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Full text of "Catalog / Graduate School, University of Maryland"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/cataloggraduates1966univ 




















UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 




Graduate School Announcements 




1966-1968 



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GRADUATE SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CATALOG SERIES 

1966-68 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND BULLETIN 

Volume 22 May 3, 1966 Number 23 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in September; 
three times in January, March and May; and two times in August, October, Novem- 
ber, December. February, April, June and July. Published twenty-nine times. Re- 
entered as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on August 24, 1912, 
and second class postage paid at College Park, Maryland. 



Contents 



General 



University Calendar v 

Board of Regents vii 

Officers of Administration .... viii 
Committee Chairmen, 

Faculty Senate xii 

The Graduate School 1 

Location 2 

Libraries 2 

General Information 3 

Academic Information 3 

Admission 3 

Registration 4 

Graduate Courses 5 

Program of Work 5 

Summer Session 6 

Graduate Work, 

Professional Schools .... 6 

Oak Ridge Institute 6 

Foreign Students 6 

Graduate Work by Seniors 7 
Candidacy for Advanced 

Degrees 7 

Requirements for M.A. and 

M.S. Degrees 8 

Requirements for Degrees 

in American Studies . 10 
Requirements for M.Ed. 

Degree 11 



Requirements for M.B.A. 

Degree 11 

Requirements for Ed.D. 

Degree 11 

Requirements for M.M 

Degree 13 

Requirements for M.L.S. 

Degree 13 

Requirements for M.S.W. 

Degree 14 

Requirements for Advanced 

Graduate Specialist 

Program 14 

Requirements for Ph.D. 

Degree 14 

Language Examination for 

Ph.D. Degree 14 

Requirements for D.M.A. 

Degree 16 

Graduate Fees 18 

Fellowships and 

Assistantships 19 

Graduate Prize, College 

Park Branch of AAUW 20 

Student Loan Funds 20 

Commencement 21 

Numbering Courses and 

Counting Credit Hours . . 21 
Grades 22 



Curricula and Courses 



Aerospace Engineering .... 

Agriculture 

Agricultural Economics .... 
Agricultural and Extension 

Education 

Agricultural Engineering . . . 
Agronomy — Crops, Soils and 

Geology 

American Studies 

Animal Science 

Art 

Astronomy 

Botany 

Business Administration .... 



23 Chemical Engineering 68 

26 Chemistry 75 

27 Civil Engineering 81 

Classical Languages and 

30 Literatures 85 

33 Comparative Literature 87 

Dairy Science 89 

34 Economics 93 

51 Education 100 

39 Electrical Engineering 129 

42 English Language and 

47 Literature 125 

52 Entomology 140 

57 (continued on next page) 



III 



Contents 



Curricula and Courses (Continued) 



Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics, Institute for . 

Food Science 

Foreign Languages and 
Literature 

Geography 

Government and Politics . . . 

History 

Home Economics 

Horticulture 

Library Science, School of 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Microbiology 

Molecular Physics, 

Institute for 

Music 



Philosophy 

142 Physical Education, 

143 Recreation and Health . . . 
Physics and Astronomy 

144 Poultry Science 

152 Psychology 

158 Sociology and Anthropology 
165 Speech and Dramatic Art . . 

173 Veterinary Science 

184 Zoology 

188 School of Dentistry 

192 School of Medicine 

202 Interdepartmental Courses 
208 School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 

211 School of Social Work 

212 



216 

220 

227 
238 
240 
247 
254 
263 
264 
270 
276 
278 
287 
293 
301 



The Graduate Council 
Graduate Faculty 



305 

306 



IV 



University Calendar, 1965-66 

FALL SEMESTER, 1965 
SEPTEMBER 

13-17 Monday through Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
20 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

24 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
29 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

22 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Monday, 8:00 A.M. — Christmas recess ends 
17 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 

18-24 Tuesday-Monday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1966 
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 

31-4 Monday through Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
7 Monday — Instruction begins 
22 Tuesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

25 Friday — Maryland Day, not a holiday 
APRIL 

7 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 

12 Tuesday. 8:00 A.M. — Easter recess ends 
MAY 

11 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

25 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

26-June 3 Thursday through Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

29 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Monday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

4 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1966 
JUNE 

20-21 Monday, Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

22 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

25 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Monday — Independence Day, holiday 

9 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 
AUGUST 

12 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1966 
JUNE 

13-17 Monday through Friday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

1-5 Monday through Friday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Tuesday through Friday — Fireman's Short Course 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 
SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
18 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
19-25 Thursday- Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 
JANUARY 

31 -Feb. 3 Tuesday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 
MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday — AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

28 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 
JUNE 

19-20 Monday-Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

21 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

24 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

11 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 
JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday-^l-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 

VI 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 

Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

vii 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins,— B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.PhiL, 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 
Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye — B.S., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— B.S., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 
Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schultz— B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

viii 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg— B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan — B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 
(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley — B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D. D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 

ix 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D.. 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Erna R. Chapman— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., 1936. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 
Paul Wasserman— B.B.A., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949; M.S. (Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
William S. Stone— B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 

Louisville, 1929: Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss— Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley — B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

EXECUTIVE DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke — B.S.. University of Michigan. 1943; M.A.. University of Illinois, 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 



DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton— B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut— 5.5., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR. COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 
John P. Menard— B.A., St. Michael's College, Vt., 1954. 

DIRECTOR. COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B .5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S.. University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; MS., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD. DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves— B. A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer — B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 

xi 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS. CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Xll 



The Graduate School 



The graduate school was established in its present form in 1918 
under the jurisdiction of the Graduate Council with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School serving as Chairman. It was created for the purpose of admin- 
istering and developing programs of advanced study and research for 
graduate students in all branches of the University. Prior to the present 
organization some advanced degrees were awarded but they were under 
the jurisdiction of the individual departments subject to the supervision of 
the general faculty. Despite the large expansion of graduate programs into 
new areas as the University has grown, the spirit of each program is 
essentially that of individual study under competent supervision. The 
Graduate School is not an extension of the undergraduate program but 
was created rather for the preparation of those who in the future will carry 
on the spirit of individual inquiry. Thus it promotes and provides an 
atmosphere of research and scholarship for both the students and the 
faculty; in particular, it stimulates that harmonious relationship between 
the two which results in advancement of learning. At the present time over 
fifty departments are authorized to offer graduate programs to one or more 
of the advanced degrees awarded by the University. 

The Graduate Council consists of ex-officio, elected and appointed mem- 
bers of the Graduate Faculty and is charged with the formulation of the 
overall policies of the Graduate School. It meets regularly in March, June 
and November to consider all matters relating to graduate work brought to 
its attention by the University Administration, the Graduate Faculty and the 
Dean of the Graduate School. It may also be called for special meetings 
throughout the year if urgent business must be transacted. 

The Graduate Faculty consists of regular and associate members chosen 
in accordance with the Plan of Organization of the Graduate Faculty and is 
listed in the back of this catalog. The direction of individual programs and 
theses is primarily assigned to the regular members of the Graduate Faculty. 

The Graduate Faculty Assembly consists of the regular members of the 
Graduate Faculty and meets once each year. Special meetings may be called 
by the Dean of the Graduate School if necessary. In accordance with the 
University Faculty Organization Plan, it has authority over the educational 
policy of the Graduate School, may review actions taken by the Graduate 
Council and serves as a referendum body on questions referred to it by the 
Graduate Council. 

The Dean of the Graduate School serves as chairman and executive offi- 
cer of both the Graduate Council and the Graduate Faculty Assembly. 

The following standing committees are appointed by the Dean of the 
Graduate School: The Committee on Publications, Committee on Language 
Requirements, Committee on Graduate Programs and Standards for Grad- 
uate Work, Committee on Fellowships and Student Welfare, Committee on 
Research, Committee on Procedures, Committee on the Graduate Faculty, 



General Information 

and the Committee on Elections. They report annually to the Graduate 
Council and reports may be requested by the Dean of the Graduate School 
or by the Graduate Faculty Assembly. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Location 

The office of the Graduate School is located in the Business and Public 
Administration Building, Rooms 112-115, on the College Park campus. 
This campus is located in Prince Georges County on a large tract of rolling 
wooded land less than eight miles from Washington, D. C. and approxi- 
mately thirty-two miles from Baltimore and is served by excellent trans- 
portation. 

The Baltimore campus of the University is located at the corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, and on this campus the various departments in the 
Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing offer their graduate 
programs. 

Libraries 

Libraries of the University are located on the College Park and Baltimore 
campuses. They consist of the general University Library (the McKeldin 
Library), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, and the Chemistry 
Library in College Park; and the Health Sciences Library and the Law 
Library in Baltimore. The libraries have a total book collection of almost 
700,000 cataloged volumes, and almost 10,000 periodicals and news- 
papers are received currently. 

In addition to the total of cataloged volumes cited above, the College Park 
libraries contain over 125,000 U. S. government and United Nations docu- 
ments, and thousands of phonorecords, maps, negatives, prints, and techni- 
cal reports. 

Bibliographical facilities of these libraries include, in addition to the card 
catalogs, printed catalogs of other libraries, e.g., British Museum, Biblio- 
theque Nationale, and Library of Congress, as well as trade bibliographies 
of foreign countries, special bibliographies of subject fields and similar 
research aids. 

In the McKeldin Library are many study carrels available to graduate stu- 
dents whose study and research require extensive use of library materials. 
Lockers are likewise available for assignment to graduate students. Facili- 
ties for reading microtext materials and for use of typewriters are also pro- 
vided. Interlibrary loan service from other institutions is provided for those 
engaged in research. 



General Information 

Within a thirty mile radius of College Park are located the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library of Baltimore and the unexcelled libraries of the U. S. Government, 
including the Library of Congress and the National Library of Medicine, 
and the libraries of Department of Agriculture, Department of Interior, and 
National Institutes of Health. 

For Additional Information 

Detailed information concerning the American Civilization Program, fees 
and expenses, scholarships and awards, student life, and other material 
of a general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An 
Adventure in Learning. This publication may be obtained on request from 
the Catalog Mailing Office, North Administration Building, Univer- 
sity of Maryland at College Park. A detailed explanation of the regulations 
of student and academic life may be found in the University publication 
titled, University General and Academic Regulations. This is mailed in 
September and February of each year to all new undergraduate students. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should 
be directed to the deans of these respective units addressed to : 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20740 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE! 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 21201 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Admission 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a bachelor's 
or a master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. 
The applicant shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record 
which for unconditional admission must show creditable completion of an 
adequate amount of undergraduate preparation of high quality for graduate 
work in his chosen field. Application for admission to the Graduate School 
must be made by July 15 for the fall term and by December 15 for the 
spring term on blanks obtained from the Office of the Graduate School. 



Academic Information 

Admission to the summer session is governed by the date listed in the 
Summer School Catalog, which is May 15. 

If favorable action on admission is taken before the applicant has com- 
pleted his undergraduate program, it is understood that the action is 
conditional and contingent on the receiving of the bachelor's degree 
named in the application. 

Applications for the Graduate School must be accompanied by a $10.00 
non-refundable application fee. If the student is accepted for graduate study 
and enrolls as a graduate student, he will not be assessed the $10.00 
matriculation fee. 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, 
is issued to the student. This card permits him to register in the Graduate 
School. It is his certificate of membership in the Graduate School and 
should be retained by the student to present at each succeeding registration. 
If the student admitted is not enrolled upon the passing of the third regis- 
tration, the matriculation card becomes invalid and a new application will 
have to be filed if the student wishes to pursue a graduate program. 

At the time of the first registration, an Identification Card will be issued 
to all full-time graduate students. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 

Registration 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Gradu- 
ate School at the beginning of each session. Graduate credit will not be 
given unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. 
This applies likewise to students who register through University College 
at locations away from the campus. 

The program of work for each session is arranged by the student with the 
major department and entered upon course cards which are signed first by 
the professor in charge of the student's major subject and then by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. One card is retained in the office of the Graduate 
School. The registration is completed in the Registrar's Office. Students will 
not be admitted to graduate courses until the Registrar has certified to the 
instructor that registration has been completed. 

A Schedule of Classes, supplementing this catalog, is issued shortly before 
the beginning of each semester, showing the hours and location of registra- 
tion and class meetings. This Schedule of Classes is available at the Office 
of the Registrar. 



Academic Information 

Graduate Courses 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates or For 
Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Students who are inadequately 
prepared for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack prerequisites 
for minor courses may elect a limited number of courses numbered from 1 
to 99 in the general catalog, but graduate credit will not be allowed for 
these courses. Courses that are audited are registered for in the same way as 
other courses, and the fees are the same. 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Candidates for 
the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

1. A candidate for the doctor's degree must show in a written examina- 
tion that he possesses a fair knowledge of at least two foreign languages 
from the list approved by his major department and the Graduate Council, 
one of which must be either French or German. However, the two languages 
chosen must not belong to the same language family. 

The examinations given in French, German and Russian are the standard 
doctoral language examinations provided by the Educational Testing Serv- 
ice, Princeton, New Jersey. 

Students planning to take the examinations must register in the Office of 
the Department of Foreign Languages. The times of registration and the 
place of the examinations will be announced to the departments by the 
Department of Foreign Languages. 

The examinations are held three times a year. 

The examinations of these standard doctoral language examinations taken 
at another institution are recognized by the University of Maryland. 
A $6.00 fee is charged for each language examination at the time of regis- 
tration and is not refundable. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered for students who desire to 
develop high competence for various types of professional work in Edu- 
cation. The requirements are the same as those for the Doctor of Philos- 
ophy degree except for foreign languages and certain specific departmental 
requirements. For requirements for this degree see Statement of Policy, 
Doctoral Degrees in Education, available from the Director of Graduate 
Studies, College of Education. 

Program of Work 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the stu- 
dent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable 



Academic Information 

minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To 
encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, gradu- 
ate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of fifteen credit 
hours per semester. If a student is preparing a thesis during the minimum 
residence for the master's degree, the registration in graduate courses should 
not exceed twelve hours for the semester since the registration in research is 
required. 

Summer Session 

The University conducts a summer session at College Park, with a compre- 
hensive undergraduate and graduate program. The University publishes a 
separate bulletin giving full information on this summer session. This 
bulletin is available upon application to the Director of the Summer School, 
University of Maryland, College Park. 

Graduate Work in Professional Schools at Baltimore 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in the profes- 
sional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in the pro- 
fessional schools must register in the Graduate School and meet the same 
requirements and proceed in the same way as do other graduate students in 
the other departments of the University. 

Oak Ridge Institute 

The University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak Ridge 
Institute of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. One of the 
features of this affiliation is the opportunity, in the appropriate fields, for 
graduate students to do their research problems and prepare their theses 
under a cooperative arrangement. Such opportunity is limited to those who 
have completed their course work on the campus, are working in a field 
where facilities are available, and generally are candidates for the doctoral 
degree. Successful applicants will receive Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships 
with varying stipends depending upon their marital status and dependents. 
Detailed information can be obtained from the Graduate School office or 
from Dr. Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Department of Microbiology, Councilor 
for the University. 

Foreign Students 

Graduate students from foreign countries where English is not the native 
tongue must adequately be prepared to read, write and understand this 
language. Applicants for admission must pass satisfactorily an English 
test administered in his native country or at the University of Maryland. 
The student must be prepared to participate in the course of study and 
research work as assigned on a full-time basis. A foreign student adviser 
is available to all graduate students from other countries to discuss 
matters of immigration. 



Academic Information 

Since the admission and stay of foreign students are in part dependent 
on regulations issued by the United States Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, it is advisable for all graduate students who have been admitted to 
the Graduate School to consult the foreign student adviser in regard to their 
immigration status. Students wishing to come to the United States with a 
student visa must secure an Immigration 1-20 Form from the Foreign Stu- 
dent Adviser in order to secure the proper visa from the American consul. 
Students with student visas already studying in the United States who wish 
to transfer to the University of Maryland must also secure an 1-20 Form 
from the Foreign Student Adviser in order to request the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service to grant permission for the transfer. 

Every foreign student is expected to see the foreign student adviser as 
soon as possible after arriving at the University. The adviser will be able 
to assist not only with various problems regarding immigration, housing, 
fees, etc., but also with more general problems of orientation to life in the 
University and the community. 

Graduate Work by Seniors in this University 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements for 
the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean, the head of the department concerned, and the Dean of the Graduate 
School, register in the undergraduate college for graduate courses, which 
may later be transferred for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at 
this University. The student must be within seven credit hours of com- 
pleting his undergraduate work and the total of undergraduate and graduate 
courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester. Excess credits in 
the senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper pre- 
arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to register for graduate credit 
should apply to the Dean of the Graduate School for information about 
procedure. 

Admission to Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 

Application for admission to candidacy for the master's and for the doctor's 
degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the office of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate by the stu- 
dent and submitted to his major department for further action and transmis- 
sion to the Dean of the Graduate School. All applications for admission to 
candidacy must be approved by the Graduate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered by 
his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate study 
and research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree sought. 
The candidate must show superior scholarship in graduate work already 
completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 



Academic Information 

Requirements for the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Master of Science 

advancement to candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later 
than the date listed in Important Dates for the semester in which degree 
is sought. (Copies of Important Dates can be obtained in the Office 
of the Graduate School). He must have completed at least twelve semester 
hours in graduate work at the University of Maryland. An average grade of 
"B" in all major and minor subjects is the minimum requirement. Courses 
completed with a "D" or "F" in the major and minor must be repeated. 

minimum residence. A residence of at least two semesters, or equivalent, 
at this institution, is required. 

course requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, ex- 
clusive of thesis and registration for research, with a minimum average 
grade of "B" in courses approved for graduate credit, is required for the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science. The student is also re- 
quired to register for six semester hours for research and thesis work. The 
total number of credit hours required for the degree is thirty. If the student 
is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses either in the 
major or minor subjects, additional courses may be required to supplement 
the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four hours required in graduate 
courses, not less than twelve and not more than sixteen semester hours must 
be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits must be outside the 
major subject and must comprise a group of coherent courses intended to 
supplement and support the major work. Not less than one-half of the total 
required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be 
selected from courses numbered 200 or above. No credit for the degree of 
Master of Arts or Master of Science may be obtained for correspondence 
courses or those taken by examination. The entire course of study must 
constitute a unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. All requirements for the degree must be 
completed within an eight-year period. 

transfer of credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours for course 
work at other recognized institutions may be applied towards the master's 
degree only when such course work has been taken after the student has 
been admitted to the University of Maryland Graduate School. Before 
taking course work for transfer, the student must have the approval of 
his adviser and the head of the department in his major field. Normally, 
approval may be given only for courses which are not offered by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland during the period of the student's attendance. The 
request for transfer of credit shall be submitted to the Graduate Council 
for approval when the student applies for admission to candidacy. The 
candidate is subject to final examination by this institution in all work 
offered for the degree. 



8 



Academic Information 

Graduate work in the Overseas Programs of the University of Maryland 
is limited to six hours provided that the student is admitted to graduate 
studies, that prior approval is obtained from the major professor and the 
head of the department involved and from the Graduate School. Arrange- 
ments for proper registration must be made with the Graduate School. 

If a graduate student working for an advanced degree at another institu- 
tion wishes to take courses at the University of Maryland, his application 
for admission must be accompanied by a letter from the graduate dean of his 
institution stating that credit for such courses is acceptable toward his 
degree. 

thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses, 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Master of Science. (Exceptions are made in the cases 
of professional degrees). The thesis must demonstrate the student's ability 
to do independent work and it must be acceptable in literary style and 
composition. With the approval of the student's major professor and 
the Dean of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be pre- 
pared in absentia under the direction and supervision of a member of the 
faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the Grad- 
uate School not later than the date listed in Important Dates published 
annually by the Graduate School. The date published is the deadline for 
the acceptance of theses but they may be deposited earlier. The thesis 
should not be bound as the University later binds all theses uniformly. An 
abstract of the contents of the thesis, not to exceed 250 words in length, 
must accompany it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make- 
up of the thesis should be consulted by the student before the typing of 
the manuscript is begun. Students may obtain copies of this manual from 
the Students' Supply Store at nominal cost. 

final examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's 
adviser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the 
committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of his 
major and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified 
of the members of the examining committee prior to the period set for 
oral examination. The chairman of the committee selects the exact time 
and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the com- 
mittee and the candidate. The examination is normally conducted at the 
end of the semester, but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, 
an examining committee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate 
School at any time when all other requirements for the degree have been 
completed. A report of the committee is sent to the Dean as soon as pos- 
sible after the examination. A special form for this purpose is supplied to 
the chairman of the committee and the approval must be unanimous. Such a 
report is the basis upon which recommendation is made to the faculty that 



Academic Information 

the candidate be granted the degree sought. The period for the oral exam- 
ination is usually about one hour, but the time should be long enough to 
insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candidate's 
obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample oppor- 
tunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examination. 
A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination, 
a comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

Requirements for the Degrees in American Studies 

The American Studies Program is designed to prepare the candidate for 
teaching, both on the secondary as well as college levels; for research in 
American culture; and for professional work which requires the inter- 
pretation of American culture, such as journalism, library work, and for- 
eign cultural posts. The Program provides a background in the culture 
of the United States by applying the disciplines of literature, history, 
art, and philosophy. The approach is by means of historical perspective. 
A core of four courses in American Studies forms the basis of the 
Program, which is supplemented by appropriate offerings from the de- 
partments of English, History, Art, and Philosophy. The candidate will 
stress work in two of these departments when he determines his course 
of study. Normally one of the two fields must be American history or 
American literature. 

The candidate for a degree must pass a final written examination test- 
ing his understanding of American civilization in terms of his individual 
program of studies. However, students will be expected to show pro- 
ficiency in the literary, historical, artistic, and philosophical aspects of 
American culture. 

master of arts. After the candidate has been admitted to graduate 
work, he is to be counseled by the general graduate adviser in Amer- 
ican Studies. He may then be referred by the general adviser to the 
appropriate subject matter specialist within the department. With the 
approval of his adviser, a candidate for the Master of Arts degree with 
a major in American studies may elect in lieu of the thesis six addi- 
tional hours of course work. The total number of credit hours required 
for the degree would then be thirty semester hours. However, the can- 
didate who intends to work for the doctorate must write a thesis. Each 
candidate must present credits for at least fifteen semester hours of 
work in two of the jour cooperating departments, and credits for at 
least fifteen semester hours in supporting courses (nine hours if a 
thesis is elected). The Seminar in American Studies is a required course, 
as is the course in bibliography and research methods given by the 
English or History departments. 

10 



Academic Information 

All other requirements are the same as for the degree of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science in other fields. 

doctor of philosophy. The candidate must apply in writing to the 
Director of the American Studies Program for permission to work for 
the Doctorate. Successful completion of the Master of Arts require- 
ments does not assure permission. The candidate should have written 
a Master's thesis; if he has not, he must have an outstanding record. 
The candidate is required to take a preliminary exploratory oral exami- 
nation as soon as he feels adequately prepared in one inter-disciplinary 
topic or subject, normally within his field of greatest interest. Doctoral 
candidates with the Master's degree from this university are exempted 
from this requirement. 

The general requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
American Studies are the same as those for the doctoral degree in other 
fields. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 

The Master of Education degree is designed to increase competency for 
various positions in Education. In those major areas where it is appli- 
cable, up to half of the course work may be taken in the teaching field. 
Course work, seminar papers, and other requirements such as compre- 
hensive examinations are substituted for thesis. For requirements for 
the degree see Statement of Policies and Procedures, Master's Degrees 
in Education available from the Director of Graduate Studies, College of 
Education. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business Administration 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed primarily to 
prepare students for positions of responsibility in business and government. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical ability and reasoned 
judgment in decision making. Instructional methods include case analysis, 
seminar discussion and decision simulation. Computer familiarization is 
provided. 

A core of four courses embraces the areas of business decisions central 
to the firm's operation; relevant analytical methods, especially quantitative 
techniques; behavioral factors affecting the managerial task and the 
environment in which business functions, especially its relationships with 
government. 

Beyond the core, further advanced work may be taken in Management 
and in Statistics, and a concentration may be undertaken in a field of 
special interest: Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Personnel and Indus- 
trial Relations, and Transportation. 

// 



Academic Information 

Among the factors which are considered in admission of students for 
graduate work in Business are an undergraduate record evidencing high 
scholastic attainment and performance on the required Admission Test 
for Graduate Study in Business. 

The Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business is offered four times 
a year through the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. 
The test is not designed to test specific knowledge in specialized academic 
subjects and normal undergraduate training provides sufficient general 
knowledge to answer the test questions. A bulletin of information (which 
includes an application for the test) should be obtained six weeks in 
advance of the desired test date, from Admission Test for Graduate Study 
in Business, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Appli- 
cations and fees must reach ETS at least two weeks before the desired 
test administration date. ETS establishes regular test centers throughout 
the country and abroad and the bulletin contains a list of these centers. 

Individuals who are qualified are accepted not only from the area of 
undergraduate business administration but from other areas, such as 
engineering, the sciences, the arts, the humanities, and other fields. The 
Graduate program is offered in the day school and is conducted on the 
campus. 

Those students whose major undergraduate work has been in areas other 
than business are required to complete certain basic core requirements 
in business and economics with a 'B" average before being admitted to 
candidacy for the degree of Master of Business Administration. These 
core course requirements are listed below: 

Principles of Economics 6 hours Marketing 3 hours 

Principles of Accounting 6 hours Management and 

Business Law 3 hours Organization Theory . . . . 3 hours 

Statistics 3 hours Business Finance 3 hours 

course requirements for the degree of Master of Business Administra- 
tion are: 

A minimum of thirty semester hours must be completed in courses num- 
bered 200 or above. A minimum average of "B" must be earned in these 
courses. If the student is inadequately prepared for the required grad- 
uate courses, additional courses may be required to supplement the under- 
graduate work. Of the thirty hours required in graduate courses, not less 
than six and not more than nine must be taken in a major subject. Courses 
covering the remaining credits must be taken outside the major subject 
and must comprise a coherent group, as approved by the student's advisor. 
No credit for the degree of Master of Business Administration may be 
obtained for correspondence courses or those taken by examination. The 
entire course of study must constitute a unified program approved by the 
student's advisor and by the Dean of the Graduate School. All require- 
ments for the degree must be completed within an eight-year period. 

12 



Academic Information 

The other requirements for the degree are the same as for the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music 

Four areas of specialization are provided in the Master of Music pro- 
gram to allow the student to pursue advanced work in the area for which 
his experience and interest have best prepared him. ( 1 ) Specialization 
in the history and literature of music leads to a study of musical styles 
and literatures and of the methods and materials of systematic musicology. 
Each candidate must demonstrate that he possesses a reading knowl- 
edge of one foreign language. A thesis is required in which mastery of 
musicological method must be shown. (2) Specialization in theory leads 
to advanced work in analysis and the use of musical materials. A thesis 
of an analytical nature will normally be required. (3) Specialization in 
composition leads to the development of creative ability. A thesis con- 
sisting of an original composition of major proportions will be required. 
(4) Specialization in performance leads to advanced work in the history, 
literature, and theory of music, and will combine seminars in the literature 
of a particular instrument with advanced instruction in that literature. 
In this approach the final project will consist of a seminar paper of an 
analytical nature and a graduate-level recital containing the works 
covered in the paper. 

At least nine semester hours of the thirty required for the degree will 
normally be in a field of music outside the area of specialization ("music 
theory in the case of the history-literature concentration, for example), 
and will constitute the minor area. In exceptional cases a student may 
take minor courses (no more than nine hours) in a field outside music. 
History, Philosophy, Music Education, American or English Literature, 
and Foreign Languages are among the recommended minor fields. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Library Science 

The School of Library and Information Services offers course work leading 
to the degree of Master of Library Science designed to prepare students for 
professional practice in library and information service in each of the 
specialties of the field from children's work to information retrieval. The 
program constitutes a 36-hour course of study, normally to be completed 
in two semesters followed by a summer session, or the equivalent of 
part-time study over a more extended period. There is no thesis or com- 
prehensive examination required. 

Additional details may be obtained by addressing a request to: The 
School of Library and Information Services, McKeldin Library, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740. 

13 



Academic Information 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Social Work 

The School of Social Work offers work leading to the degree of Master of 
Social Work with a concentration in social casework. Concurrent field 
instruction is provided in cooperative arrangement with affiliated social 
agencies throughout Maryland. 

Two academic years of full-time study are required for completion of the 
School's requirements, except that a limited number of part-time students 
are permitted to enroll for designated courses. 

A comprehensive examination is given late in the semester in which the 
student completes requirements for the degree. 

Additional details may be obtained by addressing a request to: The School 
of Social Work, University of Maryland, 72 1 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21201. 

Requirements for the Advanced Graduate Specialist Program 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist program is designed for those who wish 
to develop high professional competence in an area of specialization. Stu- 
dents who wish to pursue this program must be admitted to the Graduate 
School, and must have the master's degree or its equivalence. The program 
leads to a diploma which is awarded by the College of Education. For re- 
quirements for this diploma see Statement of Policies and Procedures, Ad- 
vanced Graduate Specialist Program in Education, available from the Di- 
rector of Graduate Studies, College of Education. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

advancement to candidacy. Candidates for the doctor's degree must 
be admitted to candidacy at least one academic year prior to the conferring 
of degrees. Applications for admission to candidacy for the doctor's degree 
are made in duplicate by the student and submitted to his major department 
for further action and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Blanks may be obtained at the office of the Graduate School. 

Before admission to candidacy the applicant must have demonstrated 
to the Head of the Foreign Language Department that he possesses a 
fair knowledge of at least two foreign languages from the list approved 
by his major department and the Graduate Council, one of which must 
be either French or German. However, the two languages chosen must 
not belong to the same language family. 

Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as the depart- 
ments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

The student must complete all of his program for the degree, including 
the thesis and final examination, during a four-year period after admission 
to candidacy. Failure to do so requires another application for admission 

14 



Academic Information 

to candidacy with the usual preliminary examination unless the Graduate 
Council rules otherwise. 

residence. The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of 
at least one year must be spent in residence at the University. On a part- 
time basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work 
at other institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree is submitted to the Graduate Council 
for approval, upon recommendation of the department concerned, when 
the student applies for admission to candidacy for the degree. 

The doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and 
work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in 
scholarships, and ability to carry on independent research in the special 
field in which the major work is done. 

major and minor subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four semester hours 
of course work, exclusive of research, are required for the minor. Of the 
twenty-four semester hours at least eight hours must be at the 200-level 
unless special permission is granted beforehand. If two areas are chosen 
for the minor requirement not less than nine semester hours may be pre- 
sented in either area. The remainder of the required residence is devoted 
to intensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the 
individual candidate. The candidate must register for a minimum of twelve 
semester hours of research at this institution. 

thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original 
typewritten copy and one clear, plain carbon copy of the thesis, together 
with an abstract of the contents, not to exceed 600 words in length, must 
be deposited in the Office of the Graduate School on the scheduled date. 
The date published is the deadline for the acceptance of theses but they 
may be deposited earlier. It is the responsibility of the student also to 
provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of the examin- 
ing committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound, as the University 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general University Library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may 
be obtained at the Students' Supply Store. The abstracts are published 
by University Microfilms. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
should be consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. 
Students may obtain copies of this manual at the Students' Supply Store. 

final examination. The final oral examination is held before a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 

15 



Academic Information 

sentative of the Graduate Faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and 
covers the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, 
and his attainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The 
other detailed procedures are the same as those stated for the master's 
examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Musical Arts 

The Doctor of Muscial Arts degree is offered for students who wish to 
undertake work on the highest level in either of two areas — composition or 
literature-performance — in order to develop excellence as composers, per- 
formers, or teachers. A balance between scholarly (research) and profes- 
sional (creative) work is a basic element of the program. 

composition. The applicant must hold bachelor's and master's degrees, 
or the equivalent, in composition and must submit an adequate number of 
his original works as evidence of his musical maturity and creative ability. 
Placement and qualifying examinations, the presentation of a lecture recital 
and a program of his own compositions, and the successful completion of 
the doctoral foreign-language requirement are prerequisites for admis- 
sion to candidacy. The thesis will be a composition of major proportions, 
typically a symphony, concerto, ballet, or chamber opera. 

literature-performance. The applicant must hold bachelor's and 
master's degrees, or the equivalent, in the area of specialization, and must 
perform an audition recital that includes representative repertoire from the 
various historical periods. Placement and qualifying examinations, the 
presentation of a lecture recital and a full-length recital, and the successful 
completion of the doctoral foreign-language requirement are prerequisites 
for admission to candidacy. After admission to candidacy the student must 
complete his thesis and perform a final recital. 

foreign-language requirement. The Department requires a reading 
knowledge of French, German, or Italian, and the passing of an examina- 
tion covering the meaning of musical terms in French, German, and Italian. 

Other requirements pertaining to admission, residence, etc., are the same as 
those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Details of the program may be 
obtained from the Department of Music. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Business Administration 

The Doctor of Business Administration degree is designed for those plan- 
ning to teach business administration subjects at the university level and 
for those preparing for research or management responsibilities in industry, 
government and universities. 

16 



Academic Information 

Admission to the program is based upon: (1) excellence in both under- 
graduate and graduate work, (2) the Admission Test for Graduate Study 
in Business (see description under the M.B.A. degree), (3) reports of 
academic observers on the applicant's work, and (4) other evidences of 
promising scholarship. 

program requirements. Candidates for the Doctor of Business Ad- 
ministration degree are required to develop competence in the following 
five concentrations: 

(1) Financial Administration 

(2) Human Behavior in Business 

(3) Quantitative Methods 

(4) Business Logistics 

(5) Management 

Requirements under the five basic concentrations may be fulfilled through 
approved combinations of work in the following fields: Accounting, 
Finance, Organization Theory, Personnel Administration, Labor and In- 
dustrial Relations, Statistics, Operations Research, Mathematics, Com- 
puter Science, Marketing, Transportation, Production Management, and 
Public Policy. 

course requirements. The following work beyond the bachelor's de- 
gree is required as the minimum essential preparation for the candidate's 
general qualifying examinations. Additional work may, in certain in- 
stances, be necessary or desirable. 

Semester Hours 

Major Concentration (One of the 5 above) 24 

Minor Concentrations (Not less than 6 hours in each) 24 

Quantitative Methods (Required for All Candidates)* .... 12 

Research Methodology 3 

Economics — (Economics 200, Micro-Analysis 

Economics 202, Macro-Analysis) 6 

Electives 9 

A "B" average must be maintained on courses taken for the degree. 

credit for graduate work. Graduate work taken at other universities 
may be applied as credit toward the D.B.A. requirements if of appropri- 
ate level and relevance to the candidate's program, but at least thirty hours 
of residence work beyond the bachelor's degree must be taken as terminal 
doctoral requirements at this university. 

While candidates may be awarded the Doctor of Business Administration 
degree without having first received the M.B.A. degree, they are strongly 
advised to complete requirements for the M.B.A. before seeking admission 
to the D.B.A. program. 

*Two years of undergraduate mathematics. Math. 10, 11, 14, 15, or equivalent, 
must be taken as prerequisites to the graduate quantitative requirements. 

17 



Academic Information 

Course work taken for the M.B.A. may be credited toward the doctoral 
degree, but undergraduate business "core courses" (see description under 
the M.B.A. requirements) may not be so credited. 

examinations. Candidates are required to complete written examinations 
in each of the five concentrations noted above. Following the written 
examinations, the candidate is examined orally by a committee of the 
graduate faculty. Candidates must apply and be advanced to candidacy 
for the D.B.A. degree one academic year before the degree is awarded. 

the dissertation. A written dissertation, exhibiting competence in the 
analysis, interpretation, and presentation of research findings is required 
of all candidates. Each candidate is required to register for 12 semester 
hours of thesis counseling. 

Upon being advanced to candidacy, the candidate must present to his 
appointed dissertation committee a Dissertation Proposal, which sets forth 
objectives of the research plan, its scope, methodologies to be employed, 
types and sources of data to be sought, and time requirements for com- 
pletion. When approved, the candidate completes the dissertation under 
direction of his committee. An examination on the dissertation is con- 
ducted by a committee of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Fees 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

Application fee, $10.00. (See page 4). 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid only once, upon first registra- 
tion in the Graduate School. 

Graduation fee for master's degree, $10.00. 

Graduation fee for doctor's degree including a hood, microfilming and 
binding of thesis, and publication in Dissertation Abstract, $50.00. 

Tuition fee. A fixed charge of $24.00 per semester credit hour. 

Foreign Language Examination, $6.00. 

Testing fee for education majors, $5.00. 

Laboratory fees, where charged, range from $1.00 to $20.00 per semester 
course. 

Infirmary fee. $5.00 (College Park only). All full-time students are charged 
the fee of $5.00 for the academic year. Heads of departments will designate 
status of graduate students. 

Vehicle Registration Fee, each vehicle, $2.00. (Payable each academic year 
by all students registered for courses on the College Park Campus and 
who drive on the campus.) 

18 



Academic Information 

There is a $3.00 fine for violation of the University parking regulations. 
All graduate students are expected to abide by these regulations, regardless 
of full-time or part-time attendance. The failure to register for a parking 
permit entails a $5.00 fee. 

An Adventure in Learning, the undergraduate catalog of the University, 
contains a detailed statement of fees and expenses and includes changes 
in fees as they occur. A copy may be requested from the Catalog Mail- 
ing Office, North Administration Building, University of Maryland at 
College Park. 

living expenses and self-help. The University in no way assumes re- 
sponsibility for the housing of graduate students. 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park 
and Baltimore. The cost of board and room varies from about $120.00 to 
$150.00 a month, depending upon the desires of the individual. For Col- 
lege Park only, a list of accommodations is maintained by the Housing 
Bureau in the Office of the Dean of Men. 

Application for student employment, aside from fellowships and assistant- 
ships, may be made through the Offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean 
of Women, or to department heads. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. The stipend for the University fellows is $1,000.00 for nine months 
and tne remission of all graduate fees except the graduation fee. Several 
industrial and special fellowships, with varying stipends, are also available 
in certain departments. 

University Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate program, and 
they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in the normal 
time. 

Applications for fellowships are made on blanks which may be obtained 
from the Office of the Graduate School. The application with the necessary 
credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

Applications are forwarded by the Dean to the departments for their con- 
sideration and recommendation. The awards of University fellowship are 
on a competitive basis. 

graduate assistantships. A number of teaching and research assistant- 
ships are available in several departments. The compensation is at a rate 
of $240.00 per month unless otherwise specified and varies with the nature 
and amount of service required and with the terms of appointment. The 
amount of credit allowed toward a degree is normally a maximum of ten 
credit hours in a regular semester. The research assistants usually par- 
ticipate in research that meets the requirements for a master's or a doctor's 
degree. 

19 



Academic Information 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned and appointments are made through the regular channels 
for staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships 
may be obtained from the departments concerned. 

residence counseling graduate assistantships. A limited number 
of assistantships are available to graduate men students to act as super- 
visors in undergraduate residence halls. To qualify, persons must receive 
full status in the Graduate School, must have outstanding leadership qual- 
ities and must be single. Remuneration for all residence assistantships is 
$2,400.00 per academic year, remission of Graduate School fees and room 
charges. Further information about these assistantships may be obtained 
from" the Office of the Director of Housing. 

Similar residence assistantships are available for graduate women students 
contingent upon acceptance to the Graduate School. They should offer 
evidence of leadership ability and interest in working with people. Grad- 
uate assistants live in the residence halls with students and serve as coun- 
selors and group advisors under the supervision of the director of resi- 
dence and the student personnel staff. Remuneration for the assistantship 
is $2,400.00 per academic year, remission of Graduate School fees and 
room charges. Board and room charges must be paid by the student. 

For further information about these assistantships women applicants should 
write to the Office of the Dean of Women. 



GRADUATE PRIZE OF THE COLLEGE PARK BRANCH, AAUW 

A Graduate Prize of $100.00 will be awarded annually by the College Park 
Branch of the American Association of University Women to an outstand- 
ing woman student working for an advanced degree at the University of 
Maryland. The selection will be made by the Scholarship Committee of 
the Branch from candidates recommended by departments and the Grad- 
uate School. 



STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

National Defense Education Act Loan Funds are available to graduate 
students of the University of Maryland up to $2,500.00 per year. Such appli- 
cations should be directed to Mr. H. Palmer Hopkins, Director, Office of 
Student Aid, North Administration Building, University of Maryland at 
College Park, Maryland. 

A Student Loan Fund is maintained by the College Park Branch of the 
American Association of University Women. It is administered through 
the Office of the Dean of Women, and is available to deserving women 
who are graduate students at the University of Maryland. 

20 



Academic Information 

Likewise the Sigma Chapter of Phi Delta Gamma Fraternity for Grad- 
uate Women provides loans to graduate women of the University of Mary- 
land. 

For further information contact the office of the Graduate School. 

Commencement 

Attendance is required at the June commencement if the degree is con- 
ferred at that time. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the Office of the Registrar eight 
weeks before the date at which the candidate expects to obtain a degree 
except during the summer session (see Important Dates). 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at the June commence- 
ment. Those who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the 
Students' Supply Store. Orders must be filed eight weeks before the date 
of convocation but may be cancelled later if the student finds himself 
unable to complete his work for the degree. 

Method of Numbering Courses and Counting Credit Hours 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates are numbered 100 
to 199; courses for Graduates only are numbered 200 and upward. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. 

A course with a double number extends through two semesters. 

The number of semester hour credits is shown by the arabic numerals in 
parentheses after the title of the course. Examples: 

Course 101. Title (3). 

First semester. 
If a laboratory course: 

Course 101. Title. (3) 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, first semester. 
(This is a semester course: offered once a year.) 

Course 101. Title. (3) 

First and second semester. 

(This is a semester course, repeated each semester, and except for research, 

seminar, and certain problem courses, must be taken only one semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 
If a laboratory course: 

21 



Academic Information 
Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 
(This is a course extending through two semesters and carrying three semester 
credits each semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, second and first semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters, but it begins with the second 

semester.) 

Course 105, /, s. Title (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 

(This is an alternate way of listing a two-semester course.) 

GRADES 

The following symbols are used for grades: "A," "B," "C" and "S" — 
Passing; "D" and "F" — Failure; "I" — Incomplete. Since graduate stu- 
dents must maintain an overall "B" average, every credit hour of "C" 
in course work must be balanced by a credit hour of "A." A grade of 
"A" in thesis research will not balance a grade of "C" in a course. All 
incomplete grades must be removed before the degree is conferred. 



22 



Curricula and Courses 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Professors: Sherwood, Corning, and Weske. 
Associate Professors: Melnik, Rivello, and Schetz. 
Lecturers: Billig, Lobb, Pai, and Wilson. 
Instructors: Lubard, Reddy, and Reilly. 

The Department of Aerospace Engineering offers courses and opportuni- 
ties for research leading to the degree of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy in aerospace engineering. 

Facilities for graduate research include two subsonic and two supersonic 
wind tunnels, a shock tube, a ballistic range and complete structural load- 
ing and measuring equipment for both static and dynamic conditions. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Ae. En. 101. Aerodynamics I. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 21. Basic fluid 
mechanics and aerodynamic theory. (Melnik.) 

Ae. En. 102. Aerodynamics II. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Aero E. 101. Elements 
of compressible flow and application to engineering problems. (Sherwood.) 

Ae. En. 107, 108. Design of Aerospace Vehicles. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters, two lectures and two lecture calculation periods 
a week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101. 102 and 113; first semester, theory 
background and methods of airplane design, subsonic, supersonic and VTOL; 
second semester, theory background and methods of space vehicle design, 
manned orbiting vehicles, manned Lunar and Martian landing systems. 

(Corning.) 

Ae. En. 109, 110. Flight Propulsion. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 1 and 
Ae. En. 101. Operating principles of piston, turbojet, turboprop, ramjet, 
and rocket engines. Thermodynamic processes and engine performance, 
aero-thermochemistry of combustion, fuels and propellants, energy for space 
flight. (Weske.) 

Ae. En. Ill, 112. Elective Research. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Ae. En. 102 and 
Ae. En. 113. Wind tunnel tests: structure tests. Written and oral reports on 
original research projects. (Staff.) 

23 



Aerospace Engineering 

Ae. En. 113, 114. Flight Structures. (4, 3) 

First semester, three lectures and one calculation period a week; second semester, 
three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. S. 20 and Math. 64. Principles and prob- 
lems of stress analysis and structural design of flight structures. (Rivello.) 

Ae. En. 115. Aerodynamics III. (3) 

Prerequisite. Ae. En. 102. Elementary theory of the flow of an incompressible 
fluid. (Sherwood.) 

Ae. En. 117. Aircraft Vibrations. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Math. 64. Vibration and other dynamic 
problems occurring in structures. Specific topics of study include the single de- 
gree of freedom system, damping, forced vibrations, critical frequency multiple 
degrees of freedom, and vibration isolation and absorption. (Schetz.) 

Ae. En. 118. Dynamics of Aerospace Vehicles. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites. Aero. E. 101. 102, 115. Stability, control, loads 
and miscellaneous topics in dynamics. (Corning.) 

For Graduates 

A. BASIC AERODYNAMICS 

Ae. En. 220, 221. Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites. Ae. En. 101. Ae. En. 102. Math. 66. Fundamental equations in 
fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil 
theory. Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel corrections. Propeller theories. Linear- 
ized equations in compressible flow. (Schetz.) 

Ae. En. 222, 223. Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites. Ae. En. 101, Ae. En. 102, Math. 66. Fundamental concepts. 
Navier-Stokes' equations. Simple exact solutions. Laminar boundary layer 
theory. Pohlhausen method. Turbulent boundary layer; mixing length, similar- 
ity and statistical theories and their applications. Boundary layer in compres- 
sible flow. (Weske.) 

Ae. En. 224, 225. Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites. Ae. En. 115. Math. 66. One dimensional flow of a perfect com- 
pressible fluid. Shock waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible 
flow. Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two 
dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential 
flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical potential flow. One-dimensional 
viscous compressible flow. Laminar boundary layer of compressible fluids. (Pai.) 

B. APPLIED AERODYNAMICS 

Ae. En. 230, 231. The Aerodynamics of High Altitude 
Vehicles. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Aerothermodynamic study of several types 
of high altitude, hypersonic vehicles including ballistic, boosi-glide and satellite 
vehicles. Examination of problems in stability, control, boundary-layer growth, 
shockwave interactions and convective and radiative heating. (Wilson.) 

24 



Aerospace Engineering 
Ae. En. 232, 233. Wave Propagation in Gases and Solids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Application of method of characteristics 
to unsteady compressible flow. Study of isentropic and non-isentropic flows of 
both ideal and non-ideal gases. The Lagrange ballistic problem, detonation, the 
shock tube and spherical waves. Impact loading on elastic-plastic materials, the 
stopping shock, interactions and reflections in solids. Stress and strain produced 
in solids with varying cross-sectional area. (Seigel.) 

Ae. En. 234, 235. Aerospace Facilities and Techniques. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Problems in supersonic and hypersonic 
tunnel development such as the aerodynamic design of nozzles, diffusers, storage 
systems and arc heaters. Shock tubes and shock tube wind tunnels. Development 
of ballistic ranges and basic considerations in the design of high-speed launchers. 
Instrumentation and data reduction. (Lobb.) 

Ae. En. 236, 237. Heat Transfer Problems Associated with 
High Velocity Flight. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Heat conduction in solids and thermal 
radiation of solids and gases. Analytic solutions to simple problems and numeri- 
cal methods for solving complicated problems. Convective heating associated 
with laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flow. Heat transfer equations are 
derived for the flat plate case and for selected body shapes such as cones and 
hemispheres. Real gas effects on convective heating are examined. (Wilson.) 

C. STRUCTURES 

Ae. En. 250, 251. Advanced Flight Structures. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 66 and Ae. En. 113, 114, or permission of the instructor. 
Advanced topics in structural theory with applications to flight vehicle struc- 
tures. Energy and matrix methods, plate theory, introduction to shell theory. 

(Rivello.) 

D. PROPULSION 

Ae. En. 260, 261. Advanced Propulsion. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, M. E. 1; Ae. En. 109. 110. Special problems of thermody- 
namics and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines; 
plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. (Billig.) 

E. DYNAMICS 

Ae. En. 270, 271. Flight Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 64 and Ae. En. 114. Dynamics of a rigid body and applica- 
tions to airplane dynamics. Generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations. 
Vibrations of simple systems. Dynamics of elastically connected masses. In- 
fluence, coefficients. Mode shapes and principal oscillations. Transient stresses 
in an elastic structure. Wing divergence and aileron reversal. Theory of two 
dimensional oscillating airfoil. Flutter problems. Corrections for finite span. 
Compressibility effects. 

25 



Agriculture 



F. GENERAL 



Ae. En. 290. Seminar. 

(Credit in accordance with work outlined by Aerospace Engineering staff). 
First and second semesters. 

Ae. En. 291, 292. Selected Topics in Aerospace 
Engineering. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Topics of current interest and recent ad- 
vances in the field. 

Ae. En. 399. Research. 

(Credit in accordance with work outlined by Aerospace Engineering staff). First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. (Staff.) 



AGRICULTURE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agr. 100. Introductory Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Introduction 
to fundamental concepts underlying the applications of biometrical methods to 
agricultural problems with emphasis on graphical presentation of data, descrip- 
tive statistics, chi-square and t-tests, and linear regression and correlation. 

For Graduates 
Agr. 200. Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site, Agr. 100 or equivalent. A continuation of Agr. 100 with emphasis on 
analysis of variance and co-variance, multiple and curvilinear regression, sam- 
pling, experimental design and miscellaneous statistical techniques as applied to 
agricultural problems. 

Agr. 202, 203. Advanced Biological Statistics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. An advanced 
course dealing with specialized experimental designs, sampling techniques and 
elaborations of standard statistical procedures as applied to the animal and plant 
sciences. 

Agr. 210. Experimental Procedures in Agricultural Sciences. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Organization of research 
projects and presentation of experimental results in the field of Agricultural 
science. Topics included will be: sources of research financing, project out- 
line preparation, formal progress reports, public and industrial supported re- 
search programs, and technical and popular presentation of research data. 

(Haut.) 

26 



Agricultural Economics 
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professors: Curtis, Beal, Evans (visiting professor), Poffenberger, 
Smith and Walker. 

Associate Professors: Foster, Ishee, McDonald, Moore, Murray, 

SCHERMERHORN, SMITH, STEVENS, TUTHILL, WALKER, AND WYSONG. 

Assistant Professors: Bender, Cain, Lessley, and Suttor. 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
A.E. 103. Economics of Agricultural Cooperation. (3) 

Second semester. A course in the development, expansion and consolidation 
of the cooperative method of business. Modern business organization and 
operating principles and practices related to farmer cooperatives are stressed. 

(Smith.) 

A.E. 104. Economics of Agricultural Transportation. (3) 

First semester. The course deals with the unique nature of agriculture in broad 
perspective as it relates to economics of transportation of the products in- 
volved. It includes the development of agricultural transportation, effect of 
legislation and regulation upon this development, and growth of the intercarrier 
competition. Theories of rate making and classification of carriers are dis- 
cussed from the standpoint of the effect of transportation costs and methods 
upon plant and industry location in agriculture. (Smith.) 

A.E. 106. Prices of Agricultural Products. (3) 

Second semester. An introduction to agricultural price behavior. Emphasis 
is placed on the use of price information in the decision-making process, the 
relation of supply and demand in determining agricultural prices, and the 
relation of prices to grade, time, location and stages of processing in the 
marketing system. The course includes elementary methods of price analysis, 
the concept of parity, and the role of price support programs in agricultural 
decisions. (Bender.) 

A.E. 107. Financial Analysis of the Farm Business. (3) 

First semester. Application of economic principles to develop criteria for a 
sound farm business, including credit source and use, preparing and filing in- 
come tax returns, methods of appraising farm properties, the summary and 
analysis of farm records, leading to effective control and profitable operation 
of the farm business. (Wysong.) 

A.E. 108. Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. The organization and operation of the farm business to 
obtain an income consistent with family resources and objectives. Principles 
of production economics and other related fields are applied to the individual 
farm business. Laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips and 
other practical exercises. (Ishee.) 

A.E. 109. Introduction to Econometrics in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the application of econometric techniques 
to agricultural problems with emphasis on the assumptions and computational 
techniques necessary to derive statistical estimates, test hypotheses, and make 

27 



Agricultural Economics 

predictions with the use of single equation models. Includes linear and non- 
linear regression models, internal least squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis. (Bender.) 

A.E. 111. Economics of Resource Development. (3) 

First semester. Economic, political and institutional factors which influence 
the use of land resources. Application of elementary economic principles in 
understanding social conduct concerning the development and use of natural 
and man-made resources. (Tuthill.) 

A.E. 112. Agricultural Policy and Programs. (3) 

First semester. A study of public policies and programs related to the prob- 
lems of agriculture. Description, analysis and appraisal of current politics and 
programs will be emphasized. (Beal.) 

A.E. 114. World Agricultural Production and Trade. (3) 

First semester. World production, consumption and trade patterns for agri- 
cultural products. International trade theory applied to agricultural products. 
National influences on international agricultural trade. (Foster.) 

A.E. 115. Marketing Animals and Animal Products. (3) 

First semester. Principles, functions, methods and channels of marketing ani- 
mals and animal products including livestock and livestock products, dairy 
animals and dairy products, and poultry and poultry products. Application of 
basic principles of economics and marketing in a study of the role of the 
marketing system and development of measures of performance. (Smith.) 

A.E. 116. Marketing Plant Products. (3) 

Second semester. Principles, functions, methods and channels of marketing 
plant products including fruits, vegetables, horticultural specialties, grain and 
tobacco. Analyses of supply, demand, prices, grading, regulatory activities, 
and government programs and services. (Staff.) 

A.E. 119. Foreign Agricultural Economies. (3) 

Second semester. Analysis of the agricultural economy of selected areas of 
the world. The interrelationships among institutions and values, such as gov- 
ernment and religion, and the economics of agricultural organization and pro- 
duction. (Foster.) 

A.E. 199. Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. Students will obtain experience in the selection, 
preparation and presentation of economic topics and problems which will be 
subjected to critical analysis. (Wysong.) 

For Graduates 

A.E. 200. Application of Econometrics in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. Tools for analyzing demand and price behavior of agricultural 
products. Theories of least squares, estimation of structural economic rela- 
tions in simultaneous equation systems, identification problems, and non-linear 
estimation techniques. (Ishee.) 

28 



Agricultural Economics 

A.E. 201. Advanced Theory and Practice of International Agri- 
cultural Trade. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced theory, politics and practice in international trade 
in agricultural products. Includes principal theories of trade and finance, agri- 
cultural trade policies of various countries, and the mechanics of how trade is 
conducted. (Moore.) 

A.E. 202. Market Structure in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. This course centers on the concept of market structure analy- 
sis, with application of principles developed to agricultural industries. The 
dimension of market structure is analyzed along with its impact on conduct and 
performance. Considerable time is spent on policy issues and the application 
of the antitrust laws to agricultural industries. (Moore.) 

A.E. 208. Agricultural Price and Income Policy. (3) 

Second semester. The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, 
emphasizing the origin and development of governmental programs, and their 
effects upon agricultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

A.E. 210. Rural Taxation and Public Functions. (3) 

Second semester. Theory and practical problems in rural taxation. Major 
types of taxes are considered in detail. The tax system as it affects farmers and 
rural areas will be discussed. Major functional responsibilities of the different 
levels of governments are studied, with emphasis upon public service to rural 
areas and equal tax effort for support of equal functional programs. (Walker.) 

A.E. 212. Agriculture in World Economic Development. (3) 

First semester. Theories and concepts of what makes economic development 
happen. Approaches and programs for stimulating the transformation from a 
primitive agricultural economy to an economy of rapidly developing commer- 
cial agriculture and industry. Analysis of selected agricultural development 
programs in Asia, Africa and Latin America. (Foster.) 

A.E. 214. Advanced Agricultural Marketing. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, institutional and 
legal factors governing both domestic and foreign agricultural trade, with par- 
ticlar attention given to politics and practices affecting cost and price. (Beal.) 

A.E. 216. Economics of Agricultural Production. (3) 

First semester. Study of the more complex problems involved in the long- 
range adjustments, organization and operation of farm resources, including 
the impact of new technology and methods. Applications of the theory of 
the firm, linear programming, activity analysis and input-output analysis. 

(Ishee.) 

A.E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques. (3) 

First semester. Emphasis is given to philosophy and basic objectives of re- 
search in the field of agricultural economics. The course is designed to help 
students define a research problem and work out logical procedures for ex- 
ecuting research in the social sciences. Attention is given to the techniques 
and tools available to agricultural economists. Research documents in the 
field will be appraised from the standpoint of procedures and evaluation of the 
research. (Wysong.) 

29 



Agricultural and Extension Education 
A.E. 219. Advanced Land Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Application of micro and macro economic principles to the 
analyses of special problems related to land such as public direction of land 
use, tenure arrangements, conservation and land reform movements. ( Wysong.) 

A.E. 220. International Impacts of Selected Agricultural 
Forces. (3) 

Second semester. Selected agricultural forces (such as pressure of population 
on food supply) and their impacts on the political, social and economic develop- 
ment of the world. (Foster.) 

A.E. 300. Special Topics in Agricultural Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. This course is designed to offer students special sub- 
ject matter in the field of agricultural economics. Subject matter taught in 
this course will be varied and will depend on the persons available for teaching 
unique and specialized phases of agricultural economics. The course will be 
taught by the staff or visiting agricultural economists who may be secured on 
lectureship or visiting professor basis. (Staff.) 

A.E. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. (1-2) 
(4Cr, Max.) 

First and second semesters and summer. Intensive study and analysis of specific 
problems in the field of agricultural economics, which will provide information 
in depth in areas of special interest to the student. (Staff.) 

A.E. 302. Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. Students will participate through study of prob- 
lems in the field, reporting to seminar members and defending positions 
adopted. Outstanding leaders in the field will present ideas for analyses and dis- 
cussion among class members. Students involved in original research will pre- 
sent progress reports. Class discussion will provide opportunity for constructive 
criticism and guidance. (Curtis.) 

A.E. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters and summer. Advanced research in agricultural 
economics. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION 
EDUCATION 

Professor: Cardozier. 

Associate Professor: Smith. 

Assistant Professor: Johnson. 

The Department of Agricultural and Extension Education offers work 
leading to the degree of Master of Science. Students may choose either a 
program on agricultural education or extension education. 

30 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

Students pursuing either curriculum will be expected to have completed 
at least one year of experience in the field in which they are studying. They 
will be expected to have completed at least 16 semester hours of education, 
except that one year of professional experience in their field of study may- 
be substituted for eight semester hours of the prerequisites. Deficiencies in 
prerequisites may be made up after being admitted to the Graduate School. 

The Department also offers a program leading to the Advanced Graduate 
Specialist Certificate; it requires 30 credits beyond the master's degree. One 
may specialize in agricultural education, extension education, rural adult 
education, or community development. 

Department requirements, supplemental to the Graduate School, are avail- 
able for the guidance of graduate students. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
R. Ed. 114. Rural Life in Modern Society. (3) 

Second semester. Examination of the many aspects of rural life that affect, 
and are affected by. changes in technical, natural and human resources. Em- 
phasis is placed on the role which diverse organizations, agencies, and insti- 
tutions play in the education and adjustment of rural people to the demands 
of modern society. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. The Agricultural Extension Service as an educational agency. 
The history, philosophy, objectives, policy, organization, legislation, and methods 
used in extension work. (Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 160. Extension Communications. (2) 

First semester. An introduction to communications in teaching and within an 
organization; including barriers to communication, the diffusion process, and the 
application of communications principles person to person, with groups, and 
through mass media. (Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 170, 171. Conservation of Natural Resources. (3,3) 

Laboratory fee, $35.00. Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natural 
resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, and minerals — natural resource 
problems and practices Extensive field study. First course concentrates on sub- 
ject matter; second includes methods of teaching conservation. Courses taken 
concurrently in summer session. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 180, 181. Critique in Rural Education. (1,1) 

Current problems and trends in rural education. (Staff.) 



For Graduates 
R. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Rural Education. (2-3) 

First semester. The scientific method, problem identification, survey of research 
literature, preparing research plans, design of studies, experimentation, analysis 
of data and thesis writing. (Cardozier.) 

31 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

R. Ed. 201. Rural Community Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Analysis of structure and function of rural society and appli- 
cation of social understandings to educational processes. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 204. Developing Rural Leadership. (2-3) 

First semester. Theories of leadership are emphasized. Techniques of identify- 
ing formal and informal leaders and the development of rural lay leaders. 

(Staff.) 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Special Topics in Rural Education. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 209. Rural Adult Education. (2) 

Second semester. Principles of adult education applied to rural groups. Under- 
standing adult motivation, ability and behavior. Effective methods of planning, 
organizing and conducting rural adult education programs. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching. (1) 

Summer session. Identification of experiences and activities in an effective stu- 
dent teaching program, responsibilities and duties of supervising teachers, and 
evaluation of student teaching. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 217. Program Planning and Evaluation in Agricultural 
Education. (2-3) 

Second semester. Analysis of community agricultural education needs, selection 
and organization of course content, criteria and procedures for evaluating pro- 
grams. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 225. Program Development in Extension Education. (2) 

Prerequisite, R. Ed. 150 or equivalent. Principles and procedures of program 
planning and development in extension education. (Johnson.) 

R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction. (1) 

(Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 301. Special Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 302. Seminar in Rural Education. (1,1) 

Second semester. Problems in the organization, administration, and super- 
vision of the several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and 
reports. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 399. Research. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 



32 



Agricultural Engineering 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Green and Burkhardt. 

Associate Professors: Gienger, Harris and Winn. 

Assistant Professor: Matthews. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers a graduate course of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Science. The student may pursue 
major work in agricultural power and machinery, soil and water conserva- 
tion engineering, agricultural structures or electric power and processing. 
A thesis based upon original research work is required. An employee of 
a nearby institution may submit a thesis based on research work at the 
institution under the direction of and with prior approval by the 
Department. 

Laboratory facilities are available for work in each area of specialization 
and, in cooperation with other departments, ample areas for field tests and 
studies are available. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agr. Engr. 113. Mechanics of Food Processing. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory a week. Laboratory op- 
tional. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 10. A study of problems in power transmission, 
hydraulics, electricity, thermodynamics, refrigeration, instruments and controls, 
materials handling, and analysis of time and motion as related to the processing 
of agricultural commodities. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 123. Agricultural Production Equipment. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Agr. 
Engr. 1. Principles of operation and functions of power and machinery units as 
related to tillage; metering devices; cutting, conveying and separating units; and 
control mechanisms. Principles of internal combustion engines and power unit 
components. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 124. Agricultural Materials Handling and Environ- 
mental Control. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Agr. 
Engr. 1. Characteristics of construction materials and details of agricultural 
structures. Fundamentals of electricity, electrical circuits, and electrical controls. 
Materials handling and environmental requirements of farm products and ani- 
mals. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 143. Agricultural Power and Machinery Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, Agr. 
Engr. 1, E.S. 21, and M. E. 1. Analysis of power units and equipment used for 
agricultural production with emphasis on functional design requirements. Funda- 
mentals of power transmission, principles of internal combustion engines and 
force analysis. (Harris.) 

Agr. Engr. 144. Design of Operational Systems for Agriculture. 
(3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Math. 

33 



Agronomy 

21 and Phys. 21. Principles and engineering requirements of agricultural en- 
vironmental control. Included are studies of controlling heat and moisture pro- 
duced by animals and crops, static loading of farm structures and electrical com- 
ponents as related to environments and materials handling. (Harris.) 

Agr. Engr. 145. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, C. E. 90 and M. E. 102. 
Applications of engineering and soil sciences in erosion control, drainage, irriga- 
tion and watershed management. Principles of agricultural hydrology and design 
of water control and conveyance systems. (Green.) 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of Department. Problems as- 
signed in proportion to credit. (Gienger.) 

For Graduates 
Agr. Engr. 201. Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
Timely topics in specialized areas of agricultural engineering will be selected. 
For example, Instrumentation for Agricultural Engineering Research. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering. (1-6) 

First and second semester and summer school. Work assigned in proportion 
to amount of credit. (Staff.) 

Agr. Eng. 302. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Harris.) 

Agr. Eng. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

AGRONOMY 

CROPS. SOILS, AND GEOLOGY 

Professors: Miller. Rothgeb and Street. 

Associate Professors: Axley, Clark, Decker, Kresge and Strickling. 

Assistant Professors: Beyer, Colby, Deal, Fanning and Fernow. 

The Department of Agronomy offers a graduate course of study leading 
to the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy. The student may pursue major work in the crops division or in 
the soils division of the Department. A thesis based on original research 
is required for each degree. Ample laboratory and greenhouse facilities 
for graduate work are available on the campus. The Plant Research Farm, 
the Forage Research Farm, and the Tobacco Experiment Farm offer ade- 
quate nearby research facilities. Many projects of the Department are 

34 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

conducted in cooperation with the Agricultural Research Service of the 
United States Department of Agriculture with headquarters located three 
miles from the campus. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candi- 
dates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are available 
from the Department of Agronomy. 

CROPS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agron. 103. Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Prerequisite, Bot. 117 or 
Zool. 6. Principles and methods of breeding annual self and cross-pollinated 
plants and perennial forage species. (Beyer.) 

Agron. 104. Tobacco Production. ^) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the 
history, adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement of various types of 
tobacco, with special emphasis on problems in Maryland tobacco production. 
Physical and chemical factors associated with yield and quality of tobacco will 
be stressed. (Street.) 

Agron. 107. Cereal Crop Production. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. Study of the principles and practice 
of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, and soybean production. (Rothgeb.) 

Agron. 108. Forage Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. Study of the production and management of grasses and legumes for 
quality hay, silage and pasture. (Decker.) 

Agron. 109. Turf Management. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. A study of principles and practices in management of turf 
for lawns, athletic fields, playgrounds, airfields, and highway planting. (Deal.) 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. 
The co-ordination of information from various courses in the development of 
balanced cropping systems, appropriate to different objectives in various areas 
of the state and nation. (Clark.) 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and one lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study of seed 
production, processing, and distribution; federal and state seed control pro- 
grams; seed laboratory analyses; release of new varieties and maintenance of 
foundation seed stocks. (Newcomer.) 

35 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 
Agron. 154. Weed Control. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study 
of the use of cultural practices and chemical herbicides in the control of 
weeds. (Colby.) 

For Graduates 
Agron. 201. Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Prerequisite, Agron. 103 
or equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories underlying methods 
of plant breeding. A study of quantitative inheritance, heterosis, heritability, 
interspecific and intergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, 
inbreeding and outbreeding, and other topics as related to plant breeding. 

(Beyer.) 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Field plot technique, ap- 
plication of statistical analysis to agronomic data, and preparation of the 
research project. (LeClerg.) 

Agron. 205. Advanced Tobacco Production. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of the structural adaptation 
and chemical response of tobacco to environmental variations. Emphasis will 
be placed on the alkaloids and other unique components. (Street.) 

Agron. 207. Advanced Forage Crops. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-1967.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites. Bot. 101. Chem. 31, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 
A fundamental study of physiological and ecological responses of grasses and 
legumes to environmental factors, including fertilizer elements, soil moisture, 
soil temperature, air temperature, humidity, length of day, quality and in- 
tensity of light, wind movement, and defoliation practices. Relationship of 
these factors to life history, production, chemical and botanical composition, 
quality, and persistence of forages will be considered. (Decker.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research 
\ie\\ point by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland Ex- 
periment Station or review of literature on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems 
and the latest developments in the field. (Staff.) 

SOILS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agron. SI 10. Soil Management. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents dealing with factors involved in 

36 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

management of soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis 
is placed on methods of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and 
biological characteristics of soils. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 10. A study of the chemical, physical, and biological 
characteristics of soils that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of 
physical, chemical, or biological nature and their correction by the use of 
lime, fertilizers, and rotations are discussed and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission 
of instructor. A study of the manufacturing of commercial fertilizers and their 
use in soils for efficient crop production. (Axley.) 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of instructor. A 
study of the importance and causes of soil erosion, and methods of soil erosion 
control. Special emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil conservation. 
The laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips. (Staff.) 

Agron. 114. Soil Classification and Geography. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 10, or permission of instructor. A study of the genesis, morphology, 
classification and geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles govern- 
ing soil formation are explained. Attention is given to the influence of 
geographic factors on the development and use of soils in the United States 
and other parts of the world. The laboratory periods will be largely devoted to 
field trips and to a study of soil maps of various countries. (Fanning.) 

Agron. 116. Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. Agron. 10, or permission of instructor. 
A study of the chemical composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. Chemi- 
cal methods of soil analysis will be studied with emphasis on their relation to 
fertilizer requirements. (Axley.) 

Agron. 117. Soil Physics. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisites. Agron. 10 and a course in physics, or 
permission of instructor. A study of physical properties of soil with special 
emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of 
the fundamental laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal 
structure; structure, occurrence, association and uses of minerals, determination 
of minerals by means of their morphological, chemical and physical properties. 
Particular attention is given to soil-forming minerals. Laboratory periods will 
be devoted to a systematic study of about 75 minerals. (Siegrist.) 

37 



Agronomy — Crops, Soils and Geology 

For Graduates 
Agron. 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites. Agron. 10. Agron. 119 and permission of instructor. A study of 
the structure, physical-chemical characteristics and identification methods of soil 
minerals, particularly clay minerals, and their relationship to soil genesis and 
productivity. (Fanning.) 

Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. An advanced study of 
the theory of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis on 
problems involving application of physical chemistry. (Axley.) 

Agron. 252. Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites. Agron. 10 and permission of instruc- 
tor. An advanced study of physical properties of soils. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 253. Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67.) One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instruc- 
tor. A continuation of Agron. 116 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor 
elements necessary for plant growth. (Axley.) 

For Graduates 
Agron. 260. Recent Advances in Agronomy. (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit four hours. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. A study of recent advances in agronomy research. (Staff.) 

Agron. 302. Agronomy Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Total credit toward Master of Science degree, 2; 
toward Ph.D. degree, 6. Prerequisite, premission of instructor. (Staff.) 

Agron. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

GEOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Geol. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of the 
fundamental laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal 
structure: structure, occurrence, association and uses of minerals, determina- 
tion of minerals by means of their morphological, chemical and physical 
properties. Particular attention is given to soil-forming minerals. Laboratory 
periods will be devoted to a systematic study of about 75 minerals. 

(Siegrist.) 

38 



Animal Science 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Professors: Foster and Green. 

Associate Professors: Buric, Leffel and Young. 

The Department of Animal Science offers work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Course work and thesis prob- 
lems are offered in the areas of animal breeding, nutrition, and livestock 
production. 

Departmental requirements have been formulated for the information and 
guidance of graduate students. Copies of these requirements are available 
from the Department of Animal Science. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
An. Sc. 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

An. Sc. 110. Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Vandersall.) 

An. Sc. 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. A syste- 
matic comparative study of the pig. ruminants and fowl with special emphasis 
of those systems important in animal production. Prerequisite, Zoology 1. 

(Brown.) 

An. Sc. 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. This course 
gives basic instruction in the nature of disease: including causation, immunity, 
methods of diagnosis, economic importance, public health aspects and pre- 
vention and control of the common diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses 
and poultry. Prerequisite, Micro. 1 and Zoology 1. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 118. Wildlife Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. An introduction to the 
interrelationships of game birds and animals with their environment, popula- 
tion economics and the principles of wildlife management. (Flyger.) 

An. Sc. 120. Advanced Livestock Judging. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 22 
and permission of instructor. An advanced course in the selection and judging 
of purebred and commercial meat animals. The most adept students enrolled 
in the course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in Inter- 
collegiate Livestock Judging Contests. (Buric.) 

An. Sc. 121. Meat and Meat Products. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site, An. Sc. 20. Registration limited to 14 students. A course designed to 
give the basic facts about meat as a food and the factors influencing ac- 
ceptability, marketing and quality of fresh meats. It includes comparisons 
of characteristics of live animals with their carcasses, grading and evaluating 
carcasses as weli as wholesale cuts, and the distribution and merchandising of 

39 



Animal Science 

the nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods are conducted in packing houses, 
meat distribution centers, and retail outlets. (Buric.) 

An. Sc. 122. Livestock Management. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
An. Sc. 109. Applications of various phases of animal science to the manage- 
ment and production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Foster.) 

An. Sc. 123. Livestock Management. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite. An. Sc. 122. Application of various phases of animal science to 
the management and production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Leffel.) 

An. Sc. 130. Principles of Animal Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. Zoology 6 or Bot. 
117. An. Sc. 122 or 123 or An. Sc. 22. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed 
with permission of instructor. Aspects of Animal breeding, heredity, variation, 
selection, systems of breeding and pedigree study are considered. (Green.) 

An. Sc. S131. Special Topics in Animal Science. (1) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Summer session only. This course is 
designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture and Extension Service 
personnel. One primary topic to be selected mutually by the instructor and 
students, will be presented each session. 

An. Sc. 140. Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Williams.) 

An. Sc. 141. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Williams.) 

An. Sc. 142. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

See Dairy science for description. (Plowman.) 

An. Sc. SI 43. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

See Poultry Science listing for description. (Helbacka.) 

An. Sc. 161. Poultry Genetics. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. 162. Avian Physiology. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. S163. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs, Wilcox.) 

An. Sc. SI 64. Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Helbacka.) 

An. Sc. 165. Physiology of Hatchability. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Shaffner.) 

40 



American Studies 
An. Sc. 170. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

See Veterinary Science for description. (DeVolt.) 

An. Sc. 171. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

See Veterinary Science for description. (DeVolt.) 

An. Sc. 198. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) 

(4Cr. Max.) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. A course designed for advanced undergraduates 
in which specific problems relating to animal science will be assigned. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 199. Seminar. (1) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Presentation and discussion 
of current literature and research work in animal science. (Staff.) 

(Attention is called to A.E. 117, Economics of Marketing Eggs and 
Poultry (3) [See Agricultural Economics]; and Fd. Sc. 125, Meat and 
Meat Processing (3) [See Horticulture!.) 

For Graduates 
An. Sc. 200. Electron Microscopy. (2) 

See Veterinary Science for description. (Mohanty.) 

An. Sc. 220. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, An. Sc. 
130 or equivalent, and Biological Statistics. This course deals with the more 
technical phases of heredity and variation, selection indices, breeding systems, 
and inheritance in farm animals. (Green.) 

An. Sc. 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 31 and 33, or equivalent. An. Sc. 109 
or permission of Instructor. Three lectures per week. A study of animal 
energetics and the basic descriptions of animals relative to the requirements 
for energy and protein. Literature dealing with nutrition research techniques 
and energy and protein utilization and requirements is surveyed. 

(Leffel and Combs.) 

An. Sc. 240. Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Vandersall.) 

An. Sc. 241. Research Methods. (3) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 242. Experimental Mammalian Surgery I. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 243. Experimental Mammalian Surgery II. (3) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Stewart.) 

An. Sc. 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Shaffner.) 

41 



Art 

An. Sc. 262. Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 263S. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

An. Sc. 264. Vitamins. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

An. Sc. 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

An. Sc. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) 

(4 Cr. Max.) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Prerequisite, approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which relate spe- 
cifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 302. Seminar. (1) (5 Cr. Max.) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers, based 
upon current scientific publications relating to Animal Science, or upon their 
research work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; (1) Recent 
advances; (2) Nutrition; (3) Physiology; (4) Biochemistry. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 399. Research (1-12) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in the form 
of a thesis. (Staff.) 



ART 

Professors: Levitine, Lembach and Maril. 

Associate Professor: de Leiris. 

Assistant Professors: Denny, Grossman, Grubar, Jamieson, Longley, 
O'Connell and Stites. 

The Department of Art offers a graduate program of study leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts. Two types of majors are offered: Art History 
and Studio. The major in Art History is committed to the advanced study 
and scholarly interpretation of existing works of art, from the prehistoric 
era to our times, while the Studio major stresses the student's direct par- 
ticipation in the creation of works of art. Both disciplines, rooted in the 
concept of art as a humanistic experience, share an essential common aim: 
the development of the student's aesthetic sensitivity, understanding and 
knowledge. 

42 



Art 

A limited number of Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships are avail- 
able in Art. Interested students should apply to the Department of Art. 

history of art major: For admission to graduate study in Art History, 
in addition to the approved undergraduate degree, or its equivalent, special 
Departmental requirements must be met. For the master's degree an 
adequate reading knowledge of French, German or other approved language 
will be expected. A written comprehensive examination will be admin- 
istered to each student before qualifying for the final examination. A thesis 
is required. 

studio major: For admission to graduate study in Studio Art, an under- 
graduate degree with an art major from an accredited college or university, 
or its equivalent, is required. In addition, special Departmental require- 
ments must be met. A portfolio should be submitted to the Department 
along with application for admission. Candidate for the master's degree 
will be required to pass a written comprehensive examination, and submit 
a thesis or an original creative project in painting, drawing, sculpture or 
print making. 

For information on work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts or Master 
of Education in Art Education, the student is referred to the section devoted 
to the Department of Education in this catalogue. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Art 117. Painting II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, Art 17, 26. Original compositions based 
upon nature, figure and still life, supplemented by expressive painting. Choice 
of media. Different sections of course may be taken for credit. 
117-a. Oil painting and related media. (Maril, Chieffo.) 

117-b. Watercolor and casein. (Grossman.) 

117-c. Plastic media, such as encaustic and polymer tempera. (Jamieson.) 
117-d. Mural painting. The use of contemporary synthetic media. 

(Jamieson.) 

Art 118. Sculpture I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 26. (For student majoring in Art 
History, by permission of Department.) Volumes, masses, and planes, based 
on the use of plastic earths. Simple armature construction and methods of 
casting. (Freeny.) 

Art 119. Printmaking I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 26. (For student majoring in Art His- 
tory, by permission of Department.) Basic printmaking technique in relief, 
intaglio, and planographic media. (O'Connell.) 

Art 126. Drawing III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite. Art 26. Emphasis on understanding organic 
form, as it is related to study from the human figure and to pictorial compo- 
sition. (Jamieson, Chieffo.) 

43 



Art 

Art 127. Painting III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art. 117. Creative painting for advanced 
students. Problems require a knowledge of pictorial structure. Development 
of personal direction. Choice of media. (Grossman, Maril.) 

Art 128. Sculpture II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 118. Different sections of course may 
be taken for credit. 

128-a. Nature as a point of reference with potentiality of developing ideas into 
organic and architectural forms. (Freeny.) 

128-b. May be taken after 128-a. Problems involving plastic earths and other 
material capable of being modeled or cast. Choice of individual style 
encouraged. (Freeny.) 

Art 129. Printmaktng II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 119. One print media including exten- 
sive study of color processes. Individually structured problems. 

(O'Connell.) 

Art 137. Painting IV. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 127. Creative painting. Emphasis on 
personal direction and self-criticism. Group seminars. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril.) 

Art 138. Sculpture III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, Art 128. Problems and techniques of newer 
concepts, utilizing various materials, such as: plastics and metals. Technical 
aspects of welding stressed. (Freeny.) 

Art 139. Printmaktng III. (3) 

Six hour per week. Prerequisite, Art 129. 

139-a. Contemporary experimental techniques of one print medium with group 
discussions. (O'Connell.) 

139-b. Continuation of 139-a. May be taken for credit after 139-a. 

(O'Connell.) 

Art 160, 161. Classical Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the classical cultures. First semester 
will stress Greece; second semester, Rome. (Staff.) 

Art 162, 163. Art of the East. (3,3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. First semester will stress India; second 
semester, China and Japan. (Staff.) 

Art 164. Early Christian and Byzantine Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaic of early Christian Rome, the near 
East, and the Byzantine Empire. (Staff.) 

Art 166, 167. Medieval Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. First semester will 
stress Romanesque; second semester, the Gothic period. (Denny.) 

44 



Art 
Art 168, 169. Renaissance Art in Italy. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the High Renaissance in the 
16th century. (Hayum.) 

Art 170. Northern European Painting in the 15th and 16th 
Centuries. (3) 

Painting in Flanders and related northern European areas, from Van Eyck to 
Brueghel and Durer. (Denny.) 

Art 172, 173. European Baroque Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major European centers in the 17th 
century. (de Leiris.) 

Art 174, 175. French Painting. (3, 3) 

French painting from the 15th through the 18th century, from Fouquet to 
David. (Levitine.) 

Art 176, 177. 19th Century European Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in European Art from Neo-Classicism to 
Impressionism. (de Leiris.) 

Art 178, 179. 20th Century Art. (3,3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from the late 18th century to our day. 

(O'Connor.) 

Art 192, 193. Directed Studies in Studio Art. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

Art 194, 195. Directed Studies in Art History. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

Art 200, 201. Painting. (3, 3) 

Specific projects to be developed. Conferences arranged. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril.) 

Art 202, 203. Painting. (3, 3) 

Individual projects growing in complexity. Seminars. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril.) 

Art 211. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Relief process. (O'Connell.) 

Art 212. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Intaglio process. (O'Connell.) 

Art 213. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Lithographic process. (O'Connell.) 

45 



Art 

Art 214. Seminar in Printmaking. (3) 

(O'Connell.) 

Art 221, 222. Experimentation in Sculpture. (3,3) 

Independent research stressed. (Freeny.) 

Art 223. Materials and Techniques in Sculpture. (3) 

For advanced students. Methods of armature building, casting, and the use of 
a variety of stone, wood, metal, and plastic materials. (Freeny.) 

Art 224. Sculpture — Casting and Foundry. (3) 

The traditional methods of plaster casting and the more complicated types in- 
volving metal. Cire perdue, sand-casting and newer methods, such as cold metal 
process. (Freeny.) 

Art 226. Drawing. (3) 

Sustained treatment of a theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 

(Jamieson.) 

Art 227. Drawing. (3) 

Traditional materials and methods including Oriental, Sumi ink drawing and 
techniques of Classical European masters. (Jamieson.) 

Art 228. Drawing. (3) 

Detailed anatomical study of the human figure and preparation of large scale 
mural compositions. (Jamieson.) 

Art 229. Drawing and Painting. (3) 

Preparation and execution of a wall decoration. (Jamieson.) 

Art 240, 241. Advanced Problems in Art Education. (3, 3) 

An integrated series of problems determined by the student's professional needs. 

(Lembach.) 

Art 250. American Colonial Art. (3) 

The arts during the exploration period and Colonial development. (Grubar.) 

Art 255. Seminar in 19th Century American Art. (3) 

Problems in architecture, sculpture and painting from the end of the Colonial 
period until 1860. (Grubar.) 

Art 261. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Problems derived from the development of Romantic Art during the 18th and 
19th centuries. (Levitine.) 

Art 263. Seminar in 19th Century European Art. (3) 

Problems derived from the period starting with David and ending with Cezanne. 

(de Leiris.) 

Art 266. Seminar in Contemporary Art. (3) 

Problems of Western art from 1900 to the present. (O'Connor.) 

Art 268. Seminar in Literary Sources of Art History. (3) 

Art historical sources from Pliny to Malraux. (Levitine.) 

46 



Astronomy 
Art 292, 293. Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art. (3, 3) 

For advanced graduate students by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

Art 294, 295. Directed Graduate Studies in Art History. (3, 3) 
For advanced graduate students, by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff. I 

Art 399. Research. (1-6) 

ASTRONOMY 

Professors: Laster, Westerhout (director) and Opik. 

Part-time Professor: Musen. 

Associate Professors: Erickson, v. P. Smith and Van Wijk. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Komesaroff. 

Assistant Professor: Bell. 

Visiting Part-time Lecturer: Chou. 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy is offering a program of study 
leading to the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. in Astronomy. 

It is normally expected that the following subjects should have been studied 
previous to admission to graduate work: general physics, heat, intermediate 
mechanics, optics, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, differential 
and integral calculus, and advanced calculus. A student may be admitted 
without one of these courses, but he should plan to make up the deficiency 
as soon as possible, either by including such a course as a part of his 
graduate program or by independent study. 

No formal undergraduate course work in astronomy is required. However, 
an entering student should have a working knowledge of the basic facts of 
astronomy such as is obtainable from one of the many elementary text- 
books. A more advanced knowledge of astronomy will of course enable 
a student to progress considerably more rapidly during the first year of 
graduate work. It is recommended that those new students who have little 
knowledge of astronomy spend part of the summer brushing up on their 
elementary astronomy. 

preliminary examination. Astronomy students will take a preliminary 
examination, preferably before they enter the Graduate School. A satis- 
factory score is required before the student is admitted to take the Ph.D. 
Qualifying Examination or admitted to candidacy for the M.S. The pre- 
liminary examination required is the Graduate Record Examination, Ad- 
vanced Test in Physics, given several times per year by the Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, N. J. The student must pass the examination 
within 15 months after entering the Department. 

47 



Astronomy 

The examination tests the adequacy of the student's undergraduate training 
in physics, deemed necessary for almost all fields of astronomy, 

the ph.d. qualifying examination is offered each year in September and 
has to be taken each year by all Astronomy students working toward a 
Ph.D. who have passed the Preliminary Examination and completed one 
year of graduate study. The normal time limit for passing for full-time stu- 
dents is three years, in special cases extended to four, for part-time students 
it is six years. The time limit for obtaining the Ph.D. is 7 years for full- 
time and 8 years for part-time students. For the M.S., these time limits are 
5 and 6 years, respectively. 

study program. All candidates must obtain three credits of Astr. 100 or 
Astr. 102, preferably both, for an advanced degree. This requirement may 
be waived if the student has previous experience. All students should take 
at least two credits of Astr. 230, Astronomy Seminar. All full-time gradu- 
ate students are expected to take or audit Astr. 230 each term. No other 
Astronomy courses are specifically required, but candidates for the Ph.D. 
should expect to take at least 12 credits of Astronomy courses at the 200- 
level, exclusive of Astr. 230, in order to pass the Qualifying Examination. 

Many of the advanced Astronomy courses will be offered once every othei 
year, which should be taken into account when individual study programs 
are considered. Students are urged to acquire a broad background in all 
fields of Astronomy in addition to their field of specialization. 

Astronomy majors will ordinarily take a minor in Physics, where general 
Physics courses are counted toward fulfillment of the minor requirements. 
If appropriate for the particular program of study, other areas such as 
Engineering, Mathematics and Chemistry may be chosen as partial fulfill- 
ment of the minor requirements. 

A typical list of minor courses for a M.S. candidate might consist of Phys. 
200. 201, Theoretical Dynamics (3, 3), and Mathematics 162, Vector 
Analysis (3), and/or Physics 212, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 

(4). 

A Ph.D. candidate might take the following courses towards a minor in 
Physics: 

Physics 119, Modern Physics (3), 

Physics 144, 145, Methods of Theoretical Physics (4, 4) 

Physics 200, 201, Theoretical Dynamics (3, 3) 

Physics 204, Electrodynamics (3) 

Physics 212, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (4) 

These lists of minor courses can be greatly varied depending on the stu- 
dent's preparation and interests, but Phys. 200 and 201 should always be 
included unless the student has a particularly strong undergraduate back- 
ground in theoretical dynamics. 

48 



Astronomy 

The Department also offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Astrophysics. The 
study program for these degrees can be carefully adjusted to give the 
optimum proportion of Physics and Astronomy courses suitable for some 
particular borderline field of study. Students majoring in Astrophysics will 
have the option of taking the qualifying examination in either Physics or 
Astronomy. Special departmental approval of the study program must be 
obtained unless the program meets all requirements of either the Physics 
or Astronomy degree. 

For more information, especially for Physics courses related to Astronomy, 
see the section on Physics. All correspondence should be addressed to 
Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Astronomy 100. Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two hours of laboratory work per week. 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 and at least 12 credits of introductory physics and as- 
tronomy courses. Introduction to the methods of astronomical photometry and 
spectroscopy. Laboratory work consists of measuring photoelectric records and 
spectroscopic plates and observations with the 20" telescope. This course 
or its equivalent will be required of students who wish to do optical observa- 
tional work in Astronomy 399. Laboratory fee. $10.00. (van Wijk.) 

Astronomy 101. Introduction to Galactic Research. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Math. 21 and at least 
12 credits of introductory physics and astronomy courses. Stellar motions, 
methods of galactic research, study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters of 
stars, evolution: statistical parallax, distance determination, galactic rotation 
and structure, high velocity stars. (van Wijk.) 

Astronomy 102. Introduction to Astrophysics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, previous or concur- 
rent enrollment in Physics 119 or consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, structure 
of atmospheres of the sun and other stars. Observational data and curves of 
growth. Chemical composition. (Bell.) 

Astronomy 110. Introduction to Radio Astronomy. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. Math. 21 and at least 12 credits of 
introductory physics and astronomy courses. Principles of radio telescopes and 
receivers, with demonstration. Basic observational techniques. Characteristics 
of extra-terrestrial radio noise, sources of radio emission, the 21 -cm line. 
Distribution of radio emission over the sky, and the resulting distribution in 
space, our own Galaxy and external galaxies. Radio emission from the sun. 

(Westerhout.) 

Astronomy 124. Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. (3) 

Spring semester. Prerequisite. Physics 127 or consent of the instructor. New- 
ton's Law of Gravitation; two-body problem and its integrals; Kepler's laws; 
elements of an orbit, determination of the position and velocity vectors from 
elements and vice versa. Determination of an orbit from observations: Gaussian 

49 



Astronomy 

and Laplacian methods. Orbit correction methods. Perturbations in co-or- 
dinates elements. Computation of satellite orbits, including perturbations. 

(Musen.) 

Astronomy 150. Special Problems in Astronomy. 

(Credit according to work done) 

Prerequisites, major in astronomy or physics and consent of one of the mem- 
bers of the astronomy staff. Research or special study. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
per credit hour when appropriate. (Staff.) 

Astronomy 190. Honors Seminar. 

(Credit according to work done) 

Each semester. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Honors 

Program in astronomy. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Astronomy 200. Dynamics of Stellar Systems. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 200 or As- 
tronomy 101. Study of the structure and evolution of dynamical systems en- 
countered in astronomy. Stellar encounters viewed as a two-body problem, 
statistical treatment of encounters. Study of dynamical problems in connection 
with star clusters, ellipsoidal galaxies, nuclei of galaxies, high-velocity stars. 

(van Wijk.) 

Astronomy 202. Stellar Interiors. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. Math. 114 and Physics 119 or con- 
sent of instructor. A study of stellar structure and evolution. This course will 
consider the question of energy transfer and generation in the interior of 
a star, the structure of stars, including problems of turbulence, determination 
of chemical compositin. non-homogeneous stars, evolution of both young and 
old stars, pulsating stars, novae. (Bell.) 

Astronomy 203. Stellar Atmospheres. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 212 or consent of the instructor. 
Observational methods, line formation, curve of growth, equation of transfer, 
stars with large envelopes, variable stars, novae, magnetic fields in stars. 

(Bell.) 

Astronomy 204. Physics of the Solar System. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 119. A survey of the problems 
of the interplanetary space, comets and meteors, planetary structure and at- 
mospheres, physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, motions of particles in 
the earth's magnetic field. (Opik.) 

Astronomy 210. Galactic Radio Astronomy. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. Physics 119, Astronomy 101, 110 or 
consent of the instructor. Theory and observations of the continuum and 21 -cm 
line emission from the Galaxy. Galactic structure derived from radio obser- 
vations, comparison with optical data. The rotation of the Galaxy. The galactic 
halo, the nucleus, proposed mechanisms. (Westerhout.) 

50 



American Studies 
Astronomy 212. Physics of the Solar Envelope. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Physics 119. Astronomy 102 and 110 
or consent of the instructor. A detailed study of the radio emission from the 
sun. Physics of solar phenomena, such as solar flares, structure of the Corona, 
etc. (Erickson, v. P. Smith.) 

Astronomy 214. Interstellar Matter. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, previous or concurrent enrollment in 
Physics 212, Astronomy 101 or Astronomy 102 or consent of instructor. A 
study of the physical properties of interstellar gas and dust. This course will 
include diffuse nebulae, regions of ionized hydrogen, regions of neutral hydro- 
gen, the problems of interstellar dust and perhaps planetary nebulae, molecules. 

(Staff.) 

Astronomy 230. Seminar. (1) 

Seminars on various topics in advanced astronomy are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 

(v. P. Smith.) 

Astronomy 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Astronomy 

Credit according to work done each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
These courses will be given by specialists in various fields of modern astron- 
omy, partly staff members, partly visiting professors or part-time lecturers. 
They will cover subjects such as: cosmology, discrete radio sources, magnetohy- 
drodynamics in astronomy, the H. R. diagram, stellar evolution, external galax- 
ies, galactic structure, chemistry of the interstellar medium, advanced celestial 
mechanics, astrometry, etc. (Staff.) 

Astronomy 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done each semester. Laboratory fee $10.00 per 
credit hour. Prerequisite: an approval application for admission to candidacy 
or special permission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. 
There are weekly colloquia by staff, astronomers from the Washington area, 
and visiting astronomers, usually on topics related to their own work. 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

Committee on American Studies: 

Associate Professor: Beall, director of the program. 

Professor: Schlaretski. 

Visiting Professor: Main. 

Lecturer: Lounsbury. 

The American Studies Program offers work leading to both the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The Departments of English, 
History, Art and Philosophy join to offer integrated plans of study. In his 
class work the student will emphasize the offerings of any one of these 

51 



Botany 

departments; either English or History must be included within his field 
of emphasis. For the lists of courses from which his program is to be de- 
veloped, he is to see principally the listings of the four departments just 
mentioned. The Director of the program will serve as the student's adviser 
in consultation with the chairman of the department in the field of the 
student's special interest. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Amer. Stud. 127, 128. Culture and the Arts in America. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A study of American institutions, the intellectual 
and esthetic climate from the colonial period to the present. (Beall.) 

Amer. Stud. 137, 138. Conference Course in American 
Studies (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. An examination of the nature of the American 
character in historical perspective as seen through the eyes of native and 
foreign writers from the Puritan oligarchy to the present day. (Lounsbury.) 

For Graduates 

Amer. Stud. 201, 202. Seminar in American Studies. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Beall, Lounsbury.) 

Amer. Stud. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

Professors: Krauss, Bamford, Gauch, Norton (emeritus), D. T. Mor- 
gan, Weaver and Sisler. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Rappleye, Paterson, Kantzes, O. Mor- 
gan, Galloway, Krusberg, Lockard and Mans. 

Assistant Professors: Klarman, Terborgh, Harrison, Bean and Patter- 
son. 

The Department of Botany offers a graduate course of study leading to 
the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
The student may pursue major work in plant physiology, plant pathology, 
plant ecology, plant taxonomy, nematology, cytogenetics, or plant anatomy. 
Inasmuch as a thesis based on original research is required for each degree, 
a qualified student may be allowed to pursue a problem of his own choos- 
ing, or choose some area of research in progress since the Department is 
devoted to a study of basic agricultural problems as well as projects of a 
more fundamental nature. An individual employed at a nearby institu- 
tion may submit a thesis based on his research work at the institution 
under the direction of, and subject to prior approval by, a member of the 
faculty. 

52 



Botany 

Laboratory facilities are available for research in each division, and there 
are ample greenhouses and plot space available on the campus or adja- 
cent University farm land. 

In addition to the normal requirements of the Graduate School, one must 
possess a reading knowledge of one language, either French. German, 
Latin, or Russian, before the Master of Science degree is granted; two 
foreign languages are required for the Ph.D. degree. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Bot. 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. 
Bot. 1 and general chemistry. Laboratory fee, $6.00. A survey of the general 
physiological activities of plants. (Krauss, Lockard.) 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A study of the different plant successions 
and vegetational climaxes and their correlation with the climatic, soil, and 
biotic factors of the environment. (Brown.) 

Bot. 103. Plant Ecology Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 
102 or equivalent, or concurrent registration therein. Laboratory fee, S6.00. 
The application of field and other methods to the qualitative and quantitative 
study of vegetation and environmental factors. (Brown, Terborgh.) 

For Graduates 
Bot. 200. Plant Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968). Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and elementary 
organic chemistry, or equivalent. A study of the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and the chemical changes occurring therein. 

(Galloway.) 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite. Bot. 200 or concurrent registration therein. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Application of apparatus and techniques to the study of the chemistry of 
plant materials. (Galloway, Gauch.) 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and introduc- 
tory physics, or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with the operation 
of physical phenomena in plant life processes. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Two laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory course to accompany Bot. 202. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Galloway, Gauch.) 

53 



Botany 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant 
science. A study of current developments in the mathematical treatment of 
growth and the effects of radiation, plant hormones, photoperiodism, and 
internal biochemical balance during the development of the plant. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Reports on current literature are 
presented and discussed in connection with recent advances in the mineral 
nutrition of plants. (Patterson.) 

Bot. 209. Physiology of Algae. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 201, the equivalent in allied fields or per- 
mission of instructor. Laboratory fee. SI 0.00. A study of the physiology and 
comparative biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory techniques and recent ad- 
vances in algal nutrition, photosynthesis, and growth will be reviewed. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 210. Physiology of Algae-Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, previous or con- 
current enrollment in Bot. 209, and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
Si 0.00. Special laboratory techniques involved in the study of algal nutrition. 

(Krauss.) 

Bot. 219. Advanced Plant Ecology. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisite, Bot. 102 or equivalent 
and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Discussion of current 
developments in ecology, with emphasis on quantitative and radioecological 
techniques and the energy exchanges in ecological systems. Field trips and 
problems will be arranged. (Brown, Terborgh.) 

PLANT MORPHOLOGY, CYTOLOGY, AND TAXONOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Bot. 111. Plant Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 110 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The origin and development of 
the organs and tissue systems in the vascular plants. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot 1 or equivalent. A study of plant distribution 
throughout the world and the factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown.) 

Bot. 115. Structure of Economic Plants. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A detailed microscopic study of the 
anatomy of the chief fruit and vegetable crops. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisite, 20 semester hours 

credit in Biological Sciences, including Bot. 1 or equivalent. Discussion of the 

development of ideas and knowledge about plants, leading to a survey of 

contemporary work in botanical science. (Bamford.) 

54 



Botany 
Bot. 117. General Plant Genetics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. The basic principles of 
plant genetics are presented; the mechanics of transmission of the hereditary 
factors in relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of specialized 
organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and economic 
significance, gene action, genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and 
genetics in relation to methods of plant breeding are the topics considered. 

(Mans, D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 136. Plants and Mankind. (2) 

First semester. A survey of the plants which are utilized by man, the diversity 
of such utilization, and their historic and economic significance. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 15 IS. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Summer session. Four two-hour laboratory and demonstration periods a week 
for eight weeks. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A 
study of the biological principles of the common plants, and demonstrations, 
projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary 
schools. (Paterson.) 

Bot. 153. Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or general biology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native plants of 
Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. Numerous short 
field trips will be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. 

(Brown.) 

Bot. 161. Systematic Botany. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 1 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An advanced 
study of the principles of systematic botany. Laboratory practice with difficult 
plant families including grasses, sedges, legumes, and composites. Field trips 
arranged. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 
Bot. 211. Cytology. (4) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, introductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
A detailed study of the chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and the relation 
of these to current theories of heredity and evolution. (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. Laboratory fee. 
$5.00. A comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, with 
special reference to the phylogeny and development of floral organs. 

(Rappleye.) 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
introductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. An advanced study of the cur- 
rent status of plant genetics, particularly gene mutations and their relation 
to chromosome changes in corn and other favorable genetic materials. 

(D. T. Morgan, Mans.) 

55 



Botany 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Advanced training in the basic research 
techniques and methods of plant pathology. (Klarman.) 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
Symptoms, control measures, and other pertinent information concerning the 
diseases which affect important ornamental plants grown in the eastern states. 

(Klarman.) 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
The symptoms and control of the diseases of tobacco, forage crops, and 
cereal grains. (O. D. Morgan.) 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
Symptoms and control of the diseases affecting fruit production in the eastern 
United States. (Weaver.) 

Bot. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops. (2) 

Second semester. (Not Offered 1967-1968.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
The recognition and control of diseases affecting the production of important 
vegetable crops grown in the eastern United States. (Kantzes.) 

Bot. 128. Mycology. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 2, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An 
introductory study of the morphology, classification, life histories, and economics 
of the fungi. (Paterson.) 

Bot. 152S. Field Plant Pathology. (1) 

Summer session. Daily lecture for three weeks. Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A course for county agents and teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture. Discussion and demonstration of the important diseases in 
Maryland crops. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Bot. 221. Plant Virology. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1967-1968.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 20 and Bot. 101, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Consideration of the biological, biochemical, and biophysical 
aspects of plant viruses and virus diseases. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 223. Physiology of Fungi. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry 
and Bot. 101 or the equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study of 
various aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemical transformations, 
fungal products and mechanism of fungicidal action. (Sisler.) 

56 



Business Administration 
Bot. 224. Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) One laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 223 or concurrent registration therein. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Application of equipment and techniques in the study of fungal physiology. 

(Sisler.) 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1966-1967.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 
An advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant disease 
control. (Staff.) 

Bot. 241. Plant Nematology. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1966-67.) Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or permission of instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. The study of plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, anatomy, 
taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecology, host-parasite relations and control. 
Recent advances in this field will be emphasized. (Krusberg.) 

Bot. 301. Special Problems in Botany. (1 to 3) 

First or second semester. Credit according to time scheduled and organization 
of course. Maximum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual 
student at the discretion of the Department. This course may be organized 
as a lecture series on a specialized advanced topic, or may consist partly, or 
entirely, of experimental procedures. It may be taught by visiting lectures, or 
by resident staff members. Problems or topics may be in: 1 — Physiology; 
2 — Ecology; 3 — Pathology; 4 — Mycology; 5 — Nematology; 6 — Cytology; 
7 — Cytogenetics; 8 — Morphology; 9 — Anatomy; or 10 — Taxonomy. (Staff.) 

Bot. 302. Seminar in Botany. (1) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Discussion 
of special topics and current literature in all phases of botany. (Staff.) 

Bot. 399. Research. {Credit according to work done.) 

A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for the M.S. degree, and an additional 
minimum of 12 hours is required for the Ph.D. degree. Students must be 
qualified to pursue with profit the research to be undertaken. (Staff.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors: Taff, Clemens, Cook, Fisher, Gentry, Nelson, 
Sweeney, Wright, Patrick and Calhoun. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Ashmen, Dawson and Spivey. 

Assistant Professors: Bartlett, Brunner, Carroll, Clickner, Cul- 
bertson, Daiker, Edelson, Hermanson, Hille, Himes, Nash, Olson, 
Paine, Ryans, Schellenberger, Smerk, Spychalski, Suelflow, Tosi, 
and Durant. 

The degree of Master of Business Administration is conferred on those 
students who satisfactorily complete the requirements which are set forth 
in the section of this catalog entitled, "Requirements for the Degree of 
Master of Business Administration." 

57 



Business Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
B. A. 100. Office Operations and Management. (3) 

Deals with the principles of scientific management as they apply to the ex- 
amination, improvement, installation, and operation of the most effective 
paperwork methods and systems that a given organization can use to achieve 
its objectives. Procedure flow analysis and form design for control of paper- 
work: process, work distribution, and layout charts, distribution of authority 
and responsibility for office activities are among the areas considered. 

(Patrick.) 

B. A. 101. Electronic Data Processing. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing, Math. 11 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. The electronic digital computer and its use as a tool in processing 
data. The course includes the following areas: (1) organization of data pro- 
cessing systems, (2) environmental aspects of computer systems, (3) funda- 
mentals of programming using a common problem-oriented language, and 
(4) management control problems and potentials inherent in mechanized data 
processing systems. (Patrick.) 

B. A. 102. Electronic Data Processing Applications. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 101. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Intensive study of computer 
applications using a problem-oriented language. Introduction of computer 
methods for the solution of business problems. Laboratory exercises in pro- 
gramming and development of computer techniques. (Durant.) 

B. A. 103. Introduction to Systems Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 102. Laboratory fee, $10.00 (effective September, 1964). 
Math. 15 or the equivalent. The use of the computer in manage- 
ment and the operation of business. The course includes the follow- 
ing areas: (1) The principles of system analysis, (2) recent applications and 
innovations of the systems concept, (3) design and implementation of computer 
systems, including such techniques as mathematical programming, simulation, 
business games, and network analysis, (4) laboratory use of a digital computer 
in the application of these techniques. (Staff.) 

B. A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A comprehensive study of 
the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application of funds, corporation 
accounts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

(Wright.) 

B. A. 112. Records Management. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, 
$7.50. Specific management methods and techniques that have proved valuable 
in the creation, use, maintenance, protection and disposition of records are 
studied. (Staff.) 

B. A. 118. Governmental Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. The content of this course covers the scope and func- 
tions of governmental accounting. It considers the principles generally ap- 
plicable to all forms and types of governmental bodies and a basic procedure 
adaptable to all governments. (Wright.) 

58 



Business Administration 
B. A. 119. Budgeting and Control. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. The use of financial data in controlling an enterprise. 
Budgetary formulation, execution and appraisal. The use of accounting in 
managerial decision making. (Olson.) 

B. A. 120. Accounting Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 20. A study of the factors involved in the design and installa- 
tion of accounting systems: the organization, volume and types of transactions, 
charts of accounts, accounting manuals, the reporting system. Offered only 
in Summer School. (Himes.) 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A study of the fundamental procedures of cost account- 
ing, including those for job orders, process and standard cost accounting 
systems. (Olson.) 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 111. A study of the principles and problems 
of auditing and application of accounting principles to the preparation of 
audit working papers and reports. (Hermanson.) 

B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax 
Law, using illustrative examples, selected questions and problems, and the 
preparation of returns. (Edelson.) 

B. A. 124. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Advanced Accounting theory applied to specialized 
problems in partnerships, ventures, consignments, installment sales, insurance, 
statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, and 
application of mathematics to accounting problems. Offered only in Summer 
School. (Himes.) 

B. A. 125. C.P.A. Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. Ill, or consent of instructor. A study of 
the nature, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by means of the prepara- 
tion of solutions to, and an analysis of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems 
covering the various accounting fields. (Daiker.) 

B. A. 126. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Home office and branch accounting, parent and sub- 
sidiary accounting, and foreign exchange. (Hermanson.) 

B. A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 122. Advanced auditing theory and practice and report 
writing. (Wright.) 

B. A. 128. Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 121. A continuation of basic cost accounting with special 
emphasis on process costs, standard costs, joint costs and by-product costs. 

(Olson.) 

59 



Business Administration 

B. A. 130. Business Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Required for graduation. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
(effective September, 1964). An introductory course. Emphasis is placed upon 
statistical inference. Topics covered include statistical observation, frequency 
distributions, averages, measures of variability, elementary probability, sampling 
distributions, problems of estimation, simple tests of hypothesis, index numbers, 
times series, graphical and tabular presentation. Selected applications of the 
techniques are drawn from economics, industrial management, marketing and 
accounting. (Anderson.) 

B. A. 131. Business Statistics II. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00 (effective Sep- 
tember, 1964). Review of elementary probability. Population distributions. 
Sampling distributions; binomial, Poisson, normal, "t", chi-square and F. Esti- 
mates and tests of hypotheses concerning the mean, variance and other param- 
eters. Introduction to analysis of variance, linear regression, and correlation. 

(Nelson.) 

B. A. 132. Sample Surveys in Business and Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (effective September, 1964). A 
general course in scientific sample survey techniques. Review of elementary 
probability, characteristics of good estimators, errors of observation, simple 
random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, comparison of 
various sample designs, cost functions, examples of actual survey practices. 

(Nelson.) 

B. A. 134. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (effective 
September, 1964). Statistical fundamentals; theory, construction and use of 
control charts; acceptance sampling by attributes and variables; work sampling 
and other industrial applications of statistics. (Anderson.) 

B. A. 135. Statistical Analysis and Forecasting. (3) 

Alternates with B.A. 132. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
(effective September, 1964). Classical time series analysis, trend, periodic and 
irregular components, seasonal adjustment, growth curves, recent developments 
in time series analysis, techniques of forecasting and quantities as labor force, 
capital formation, demand and sales. (Anderson.) 

B. A. 140. Business Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 21. This course deals with principles and practices involved 
in the organization, financing, and rehabilitation of business enterprises; the 
various types of securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, 
risk, and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis 
on solution of problems of financial policy faced by management. (Himes.) 

B. A. 141. Security Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the principles and methods used in the 
analysis, selection, and management of investments; investment programs, 
sources of investment information, security price movements, government, 
real estate, public utility, railroad, and industrial securities. (Fisher.) 

60 



Business Administration 
B. A. 143. Credit Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the nature of credit and the principles 
applicable to its extension and redemption for mercantile and consumer pur- 
poses; sources of credit information and analysis of credit reports; the organi- 
zation and management of a credit department for effective control. Recent 
developments and effective legal remedies available. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 148. Advanced Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. An advanced course in finance. Emphasis is placed 
upon the techniques employed by executives in their application of financial 
management practice to selected problems and cases. Critical classroom 
analysis is brought to bear upon actual methods and techniques used by 
business enterprises. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 149. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This is an introductory course in the field of 
marketing. Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of 
the forces operating, institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing 
agricultural products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

(Ryans.) 
B. A. 150. Marketing Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. A study of the work of the marketing division in a 
going organization. The work of developing organizations and procedures for 
the control of marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the 
course is placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices for 
the effective marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

(Brunner.) 

B. A. 151. Advertising. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. A study of the role of advertising in the American 
economy; the impact of advertising on our economic and social life, the 
methods and techniques currently applied by advertising practitioners, the role 
of the newspaper, magazine, and other media in the development of an adver- 
tising campaign, modern research methods to improve the effectiveness of ad 
vertising, and the organization of the advertising business. (Ashmen.) 

B. A. 153. Purchasing Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 149. Determining the proper sources, 
quality and quantity of supplies, and methods of testing quality; price policies, 
price forcasting, forward buying, bidding and negotiation; budgets and stand- 
ards of achievement. Attention is given to government purchasing and methods 
and procedures used in their procurement. (Spivey.) 

B. A. 154. Retail Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites. B.A. 20 and B.A. 149. Retail store organization, 
location, layout and store policy; pricing policies, price lines, brands, credit 
policies, records as a guide to buying; purchasing methods: supervision of sell- 
ing; training and supervision of retail sales force; and administrative problems. 

(Cook.) 

B. A. 156. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 130 and B.A. 149. This course is intended 
to develop skill in the use of scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and 
interpretation of marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of marketing 
research, the planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation procedure 
and report preparation. (Brunner.) 

61 



Business Administration 

B. A. 157. International Marketing. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 149. Functions of various exporting agencies; documents 
and procedures used in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of pro- 
curing goods in foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing 
through the customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. 

(Baker.) 

B. A. 158. Advertising Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 151. This course is concerned with the 
way in which business firms use advertising as a part of their marketing pro- 
gram. The case study methods is used to present advertising problems taken 
from actual business practice. Cases studied illustrate problems in demand 
stimulation, media selection, advertising research, etc. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management I. (3) 

This course deals with the problems of directing and supervising employees, 
under modern industrial conditions. Two phases of personnel administration 
are stressed, the application of scientific management and the importance of 
human relations in this field. (Carroll.) 

B. A. 161. Personnel Management II. (3) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite, B.A. 160. Job evaluation and merit rating and 
other personnel management techniques generally employed in business. 

(Nash.) 

B. A. 163. Labor Relations. (3) 

A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry 
with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal 
analysis of labor union and employer association activities, arbitration, media- 
tion, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, boycotts, 
lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and injunctions. 

(Carroll.) 
B. A. 164. Labor Legislation and Court Decisions. (3) 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases include 
the decisions of administrative agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 

(Carroll.) 

B. A. 165. Advanced Production Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 169. A study of typical problems encountered by the 
factory manager. The objective is to develop the ability to analyze and solve 
problems in management control of production and in the formulation of 
production policies. Among the topics covered are plant location, production 
planning and control, methods analysis and time study. (Spivey.) 

B. A. 166. Business Communications. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. A systematic study 
of the principles of effective written communications in business. The funda- 
mental aim is to develop the ability to write clear, correct, concise, and persua- 
sive business letters and reports. 

B. A. 167. Operations Research I. (3) 

The philosophy, methods, and objectives of operations research. Basic methods 
are examined and their application to functional areas of business are covered. 

(Schellenberger) 
B. A. 168. Management and Organization Theory. (3) 

The historical development of management and organization theory, nature of 

62 



Business Administration 

the management process and functions and its future development. The role 
of the manager as an organizer and director, the communication process, 
goals and responsibilities. (Tosi.) 

B. A. 169. Production Management. (3) 

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise, concentrating on the 
economies of production. Introduces a grounding in analytical method early 
so that the broad problem areas of system design, operation, and control can 
be based upon the analytical method. (Spivey.) 

B. A. 170. Principles of Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A general course covering the five fields of 
transportation, their development, service and regulation. (Hille.) 

B. A. 171. Traffic and Physical Distribution Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Examines the management aspects of the busi- 
ness firm in moving their raw materials and finished goods through traffic, 
warehousing, industrial packaging, material handling, and inventory. A sys- 
tematic examination of the trade-off possibilities and management alternatives 
to minimize cost of product flow and maximizing customer service is covered. 

(Taff.) 

B. A. 172. Motor Transportation. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The development and scope of the 
motor carrier industry, different types of carriers, economics of motor trans- 
portation, services available, federal regulation, highway users, highway 
barriers. (Hille.) 

B. A. 173. Water Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Water carriers of all types, development and types of 
services, trade routes, inland waterways, company organization, the American 
Merchant Marine as a factor in national activity. (Hille.) 

B. A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The air transportation system of the United States; 
airways, airports, airlines. Federal regulation of air transportation. Problems 
and services of commercial air transportation; economics, equipment, operations, 
financing, selling of passenger and cargo services. Air mail development and 
services. (Bartlett.) 

B. A. 175. Advanced Transportation Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. A critical examination of current government trans- 
portation policy and proposed solutions. Urban and intercity managerial trans- 
port problems are also considered. (Suelflow.) 

B. A. 176. Urban Transport and Urban Development. (3) 

An analysis of the role of urban transportation in present and future urban 
development. The interaction of transport pricing and service, urban plan- 
ning, institutional restraints, and public land uses, is studied. (Spychalski.) 

B. A. 180. Business Law. (3) 

First and second semesters. Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, 
negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal 
property, and sales. (Dawson.) 

63 



Business Administration 

B. A. 181. Business Law. (3) 

Second semesters. Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable 
instruments, agency partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and 
sales. (Dawson.) 

B. A. 182. Advanced Business Law. (3) 

Designed primarily for C.P.A. candidates. Legal aspects of wills, insurance, 
torts and bankruptcy. Offered only in Summer School. (Dawson.) 

B. A. 184. Public Utilities. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37. Using the regulated industries as specific ex- 
amples attention is focused on broad and general problems in such diverse 
fields as constitutional law, administrative law, public administration, govern- 
ment control of business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valuation and 
depreciation, taxation, finance, engineering and management. 

(Clemens, Suelflow.) 

B. A. 189. Business and Government. (3) 

Prerequisites. Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the role of government in modern 
economic life. Social control of business as a remedy for the abuses of business 
enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of and limitations 
on government regulation of private enterprise. (Culbertson.) 

B. A. 190. Risk Management. (3) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the nature and significance of risk in 
business enterprise. The problems relating to both pure and speculative risk 
in business are considered; and methods of solution involving risk assumption, 
transfer, reduction, and the use of insurance are analyzed as aids in manage- 
ment decision making. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 191. Principles of Risk and Insurance. (3) 

Emphasizes the use of insurance in resolving problems involving personal and 
business risks. Life, accident and health, fire and casualty, automobile, and 
marine insurance are examined as means of dealing with these risks. The theory 
and legal aspects of insurance are considered, as well as the quantitative meas- 
urement of risk. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 195. Real Estate Principles. (3) 

First semester. This course covers the nature and uses of real estate, real 
estate as a business, basic legal principles, construction problems and home 
ownership, city planning, and control ownership of real estate. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 196. Urban Land Management. (3) 

Covers the managerial and decision making aspects of urban land and prop- 
erty. Included are such subjects as land use and valuation matters. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 198. Structure and Operations of Industries. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. The impact of technology and production policies 
on the economic, financial, marketing, and locational policies of representative 
industries. A background course for students in industrial and financial manage- 
ment, business economics, general business, and related areas. 

(Clemens, Culbertson.) 

64 



Business Administration 
B. A. 199. Business Policies. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. A case study course in which the aim is to have 
the student apply both what he has learned of general management principles 
and their specialized functional applications to the overall management function 
in the enterprise. (Schellenberger.) 

For Graduates 

B. A. 210. Advanced Accounting Theory. (3) 

(Olson.) 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting. (3) 

M.B.A. candidates must take B.A. 220 or B.A. 240. (Hermanson.) 

B. A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting. (1-6) 



(Wright.) 
(Olson.) 



B. A. 226. Accounting Systems. (3) 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting. (1-6) 

(Hermanson.) 

B. A. 229. Management Planning and Control. (1-6) 

(Tosi.) 
B. A. 230. Advanced Business Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 130 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 (effec- 
tive September, 1964). Bayesian decision processes and other statistical methods 
applicable to the operations of the business firm and the analysis of the econ- 
omy. Methodological topics include a consideration of utility, expected values, 
estimation of probabilities, opportunity loss and cost of uncertainty, sampling 
sequential decision procedures and selected topics from classical statistics. 
Applications are made to the problems of inventory control, production, invest- 
ment, and other business functions. (Nelson.) 

B. A. 231. Theory of Survey Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 131 or B.A. 132, or consent of instructor. Lab fee, $10.00. 
Theory of sampling from finite populations developed for various types of 
survey designs. Equi-probability selection methods. Unequal probabilities of 
selection. Consideration of the characteristics of particular types of estimators 
as well as cost functions in developing optimum designs. (Nelson.) 

B. A. 234. Managerial Analysis. I. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. candidates. The utilization of the scientific method in 
decision-making. Various methodologies are utilized in order to evaluate and 
interpret findings for management action. (Schellenberger.) 

B. A. 235. Managerial Analysis. II (3) 

Designed to enable the student to go into greater depth in the use of analytical 
techniques. Where feasible, data processing is applied and simulated experi- 
ences are provided. The aim is to encourage the development of the perceptive 
approach to complex business situations. (Schellenberger.) 

B. A. 237. Management Simulation I. (3) 

Application of management principles to the solution of complex business 
problems. This is accomplished in conjunction with the use of computer 
facilities at the Computer Science Center on the campus. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
(effective September, 1964.) (Spivey.) 

65 



Business Administration 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 140. (Himes.) 

B. A. 242. Financial Administration. (3) 

The role of the financial manager in executive decision making. Financial 
planning, analysis, and control in such areas as the allocation of financial re- 
sources within the firm, forecasting and budgeting, cost and profit controls, 
capital budgeting and the bases for investment decisions, alternative sources of 
short-term and long-term financing and financial problems of growth. 

(Fisher.) 

B. A. 245. Research in Finance. (1-6) 

(Fisher.) 

B. A. 249. Problems in the Financial Administration. (1-6) 

(Fisher.) 
(Cook.) 

(Ryans.) 

(Cook.) 

(Brunner.) 

(Cook.) 
B. A. 259. Business Logistics. (3) 

Involves the optimization of human and material resources by their proper 
application at the right time and place to support the business enterprise. 
Consideration is given to analysis of material and manpower requirements, 
production planning and scheduling, acquisition, inventory control, and dis- 
tribution. The role of advanced planning and forecasting is considered in 
minimizing costs and securing the best combination of resources. Impact of 
technology upon the utilization of resources is considered. (Hille.) 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Labor Relations. (1-6) 

(Carroll.) 
B. A. 264. Behavioral Factors in Management. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. candidates. A critical analysis of the impact of the be- 
havioral sciences on traditional concepts of management as process and as 
organization. Included within the area of analysis are such subjects as human 
motivation, human relations, morale, status, role, organization, communication, 
bureaucracy, the executive role, leadership, and training. (Paine.) 

B. A. 265. Development and Trends in Production 
Management. (3) 

(Spivey.) 

B. A. 266. Personnel Research: Manpower Procurement and 
Development. (1-6) 

(Paine.) 

66 



B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management. (1-6) 
B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising. (1-6) 
B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Management. (1-6) 
B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. (3) 
B. A. 258. Research Problems in Marketing. (1-6) 



Business Administration 

B. A. 267. Personnel Research: Manpower Compensation and 
Evaluation. (1-6) 

(Nash.) 

B. A. 269. Application of Behavioral Science to Business. (1-6) 

Designed to enable the student to go into greater depth in the design and im- 
plementation of behaviorial science research in management. (Paine.) 

B. A. 270. Research in Transportation. (1-6) 

(Suelflow.) 
B. A. 271. Theory of Organization. (3) 

(Paine.) 

B. A. 272. Seminar in Management of Physical Distribution. (3) 

(Bartlett.) 
(Spychalski.) 
(Taff.) 



B. A. 275. Special Studies in Transportation. (3) 

B. A. 277. Seminar in Transportation. (3) 

B. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government 
Relationships. (3) 



(Culbertson. 



B. A. 281. Private Enterprise and Public Policy. (3) 

Examines the executive's social and ethical responsibilities to his employees, 
customers, and to the general public. Consideration is given to the conflicts 
occasioned by competitive relationships in the private sector of business and 
the effect of institutional restraints. The trends in public policy and their fu- 
ture effect upon management are examined. For comparative purposes, several 
examples of planned societies are considered. (Culbertson.) 

B. A. 282. Product, Production and Pricing Policy 
Administration. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. candidates. The application of economic theory to the 
business enterprise in respect to the determination of policy and the handling 
of management problems with particular reference to the firm producing a 
complex line of products. Nature of competition. Pricing policy. Interrelation- 
ship of production and marketing problems. Basic types of cost. Control 
systems. Theories of depreciation and investment and the impact of each upon 
costs. (Clemens.) 

B. A. 283. Management Policy Formulation. (3) 

Affords an insight into the problems confronting top management. A complex 
management game supplemented by the case method, provides a simulated 
environment required for dynamic decision-making policy formulation. (Tosi.) 

B. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities. (1-6) 

(Clemens.) 

B. A. 290. Seminar in Insurance. (3) 

(Clickner.) 

B. A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate. (3) 

(Clickner.) 
B. A. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

67 



Chemical Engineering 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Beckmann, Duffey, Schroeder and Silverman. 

Associate Professors: Gomezplata, Marchello and Skolnick. 

Assistant Professors: Cadman, Glomb, Munno and Smith. 

Lecturers: Goldman and Goldstein. 

The Department directs the programs of graduate students who plan to 
qualify for the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in the 
Department of Chemical Engineering. Courses in the subject areas of 
chemical, materials and nuclear engineering are listed below. 

The basic requirements for the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy are set forth on pages 8 and 14 of this catalog. Supple- 
mental regulations for guidance of candidates for these degrees in the De- 
partment of Chemical Engineering are available in the department office. 

THERMODYNAMICS AND ANALYSIS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 109. Chemical Process Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. Ch. E. 50. Estimation of thermodynamic properties 
of pure substances and mixtures. Chemical and phase equilibria in ideal and 
non-ideal systems. Thermodynamic analysis of processes, equilibrium stage 
operations, thermodynamics of chemically reacting systems. (Cadman.) 

Ch. E. 116. Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Math. 21 and Ch. E. 127. Mathematical tech- 
nique applied to the analysis and solution of Chemical Engineering problems. 
Use of differentiation, integration, differential equations, partial differential 
equations and integral transforms. Application of infinite series, numerical and 
statistical methods. (Gomezplata.) 

Ch. E. 152. Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Ch. E. 116. Application of digital and analog 
computers to chemical engineering problems. Numerical methods, program- 
ming, differential equations, curve fitting, amplifiers and analog circuits. 

(Cadman.) 

Ch. E. 154. Numerical and Statistical Analysis. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 116. Use of probability and statistics in 
chemical engineering. Probability, normal distribution and measure of varia- 
bility. The chi square, and the t-test. Correlation and regression analysis. 
Introduction to analysis of variance and sequentral analysis. (Smith.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 203. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Advanced application of the general thermodynamic methods 
to chemical engineering problems. First and second law consequences; estima- 

68 



Chemical Engineering 

tion and correlation of thermodynamic properties; phase and chemical reaction 
equilibria. (Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 209. Complex Equilibrium Stage Processes. (3) 

Second semester. The theory and application of complex equilibrium stages.. 
Binary and multicomponent distillation; multicomponent absorption; extraction; 
liquefaction. (Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 253. Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 203. 

(Staff.) 

TRANSPORT AND TRANSFER PHENOMENA 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ch. E. 127, 129, 131. Transfer and Transport 
Processes I, II, III. (4, 3, 3) 

First, second, and first semesters, respectively. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 50. A three 
semester sequence of courses convering the theory and applications of molecular 
and turbulent transport phenomena. Principles of fluid mechanics, mass transfer 
and heat transfer. Dimensional analysis, analogy between heat, mass and 
momentum transfer, Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, convective heat and 
mass transfer. Steady and unsteady state diffusion and conduction, simultaneous 
heat and mass transfer, interphase transfer, boundary layer theory. The 
equilibrium stage concept and its application to absorption, extraction, and 
distillation. Analysis of multiple stage processes. Principles of radiant heat 
transfer, evaporation, filtration, crystallization, drying, condensation, boiling, 
humidification, ion exchange, and phase separations. 

(Smith, Marchello, Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 137. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 129. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Application of Chemical Engineering process and unit operation principles in 
small scale semi-commercial equipment. Data from experimental observations 
are used to evaluate performance and efficiency of operations. Emphasis is 
placed on correct presentation of results in report form. (Glomb.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 205. Transport Phenomena. (3) 

First semester. Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint 
of the basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and tur- 
bulent flow; boundary layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport; with 
specific application to compler chemical engineering situations. 

(Marchello, Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 207. Transfer Operations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 205. Applications of heat, mass and 
momentum transfer theory to chemical engineering problems. Transfer co- 
efficients; heat, mass and momentum analogies; two-phase flow; boiling and 
condensation; radiation heat transfer. (Marchello, Glomb.) 

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Chemical Engineering 

Ch. E. 257. Advanced Topics in Transfer Theory. (3) 

First semester. Offered in alternate years. Offered 1965-1966. Prerequisite, Ch. 
E. 207. (Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 259. Advanced Topics in Separation Processes. (3) 

Second semester. Offered in alternate years. Offered 1965-66. (Marchello.) 

PROCESS DYNAMICS AND DESIGN 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 147. Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

Second or first semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 129. Utilization of chemical 
engineering principles for the design of process equipment. Typical problems in 
the design of chemical plants. Comprehensive reports are required. 

(Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 149. Chemical Engineering Economics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 129. Principles of engineering economy 
applied to chemical processes. Optimizing methods in the design and operation 
of industrial processes. Determination of investment and operating costs for 
chemical plants. (Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 150. Chemical Process Development. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 129. Chemical process industries from the 
standpoint of technology, raw materials, products and processing equipment. 
Operations of the major chemical processes and industries combined with 
quantitative analysis of process requirements and yields. (Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 155. Chemical Process Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 129, 145, concurrently. Laboratory fee, 
SI 0.00. Experimental study of the fundamentals of various chemical processes 
through laboratory and small semi-commercial scale equipment. Reaction 
kinetics, fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. (Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 157. Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis and 

Dynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 116. Dynamic response applied to process 
systems. Goals and modes of control; LaPlace transformations; representation, 
analysis and synthesis of simple control systems; closed loop response; dynamic 
testing; role of modern computing machinery in process control. 

(Cadman, Glomb.) 

Ch. E. 159. Dynamics and Control Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 116. 157 concurrently. Laboratory fee, 
SI 0.00. Methods of process control. Dynamics and response of process systems, 
modes of control, synthesis of simple control schemes. Use of experimental 
and mathematical models of control systems. (Cadman.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 223. Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. Coordination of chemical engineering and eco- 
nomics to advanced process engineering and design. Optimization of invest- 

70 



Chemical Engineering 

ment and operating costs. Solution of typical problems encountered in the 
design of chemical engineering plants. (Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 235. Chemical Process Dynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites: Differential equations or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of open and closed control loops and their elements; dynamic re- 
sponse of processes; choice of variables and linkages; dynamic testing and 
synthesis; noise and drift; chemical process systems analysis; strategies for 
optimum operation. (Cadman, Smith.) 

CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 145. Chemical Engineering Kinetics. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 187. Fundamentals of chemical reaction 
kinetics and their application to the design and operation of chemical reactors. 
Reaction rate theory, homogeneous reactions in batch and flow systems, adsorp- 
tion, heterogeneous reactions and catalysis, electrochemical reactions. Catalytic 
reactor design. (Beckmann, Smith.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 211. Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Second semester. The theory and application of chemical reaction kinetics to 
reactor design. Reaction rate theory; homogeneous batch and flow reactors; 
fundamentals of catalysis; design of heterogeneous flow reactors. 

(Beckmann, Marchello.) 

Ch. E. 255. Advanced Topics in Chemical Reaction Systems. (3) 

First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 211. 

(Beckmann.) 

ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 160. Applied Solid State Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 109 or equivalent. Thermodynamics, 
phase and chemical equilibria. Physical properties and behavior of solids with 
emphasis on polymeric, metallic, and ceramic materials. (Smith, Skolnick.) 

Ch. E. 162. Solid State Transport Phenomena and Reaction 
Kinetics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 127 and 145 or equivalent. Transport 
and reaction kinetic prenomena in the solid state. Mass transfer operations, 
heat and stress effects, nucleation and phase growth. Diffusion and reaction 
kinetics in polymer, metallic, and ceramic systems. (Skolnick.) 

For Graduates 

Ch. E. 261, 262. Chemical-Physical Properties of 
Materials. (3,3) 

Prerequisite, Ch. E. 160 or consent of instructor. A one year sequence dealing 
with the chemical physics of the solid state. Crystal structure and relationship 

71 



Chemical Engineering 

to physical properties of solids. Interatomic forces, lattice dynamics and ther- 
mal properties. Electrons in periodic fields. Electric and magnetic properties. 
Statistical thermodynamics and relationship to classical thermodynamics of 
solids. Theory of alloy phases. (Skolnick.) 

Ch. E. 263. Rate Processes in Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite. Ch. E. 162 or consent of instructor. Mass transport and reaction 
kinetic phenomena in materials. Theory and mechanisms of diffusion, nuclea- 
tion and growth of phases; athermal transformations. Chemical reactions in 
solids. Combined diffusion and reaction in solid solutions. (Skolnick.) 

Ch. E. 264. Rheology of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ch. E. 127 or consent of instructor. Rheological properties of solids 
and fluids. Introduction to tensor analysis. Mechanical behavior, elasticity, 
plasticity, visio-elasticity, anelasticity, and relaxation. Behavior of crystalline 
and amorphorous solids, Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. 

(Smith, Skolnick.) 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 140. Introduction to Nuclear Technology. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 21 and 
Phys. 21. Engineering problems of the nuclear energy complex, including basic 
theory, nuclear reactor design, and isotopic and chemical separations. Emphasis 
is on the nuclear fission reactor. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 142. Environmental Consideration of Nuclear 
Engineering. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Protection of the public and the environment from the hazards of nuclear 
energy operations. Handling and disposal of gaseous, liquid and solid radio- 
active wastes. Meteorological, hydrological and geological phases. Typical 
problems from mining of ores through nuclear reactor operations and chemical 
separations. Legislative and economic factors, site selection, plant design and 
operation as related to the environment. (Silverman, Munno.) 

Ch. E. 148. Nuclear Technology Laboratory. (2 to 4) 

One or two lectures, and one or two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 3. Phys. 21. Math. 21, Ch. E. 140, or equivalents, and permission of 
instructor. Laboratory fee. $8.00 per semester. Techniques of detecting and 
making measurements of nuclear or high energy radiation. Radiation safety 
experiments. Both a sub-critical reactor and the 10-KYV swimming pool critical 
reactor are sources of radiation. (Silverman, Munno.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 302, 303. Nuclear Reactor Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. Design, construction and operation of typical nuclear reactors, in- 
cluding general design, nuclear reactor theory, materials of construction, heat 
transfer, and control. (Duffey.) 

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Chemical Engineering 
Ch. E. 305. Sub-Critical Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. (3) 

One lecture, two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. Ch. E. 148, 302, 
303 or equivalents and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. Experiments, such as multiplication factors, neutron flux distribution 
and neutron activation are carried out. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 308, 309. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, permission of 
instructor, Ch. E. 148, 302, 303, 305, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per 
semester. The University of Maryland 10-KW swimming pool reactor is em- 
ployed in experiments on reactor startup and operation, shielding, control, 
neutron flux distributions, neutron and gamma spectrum, cross section measure- 
ments. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 311, 312. Nuclear Separation Engineering. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. Separations include processing of uranium, thorium, and other ores, 
chemical separation of plutonium, uranium, fission products and other elements 
from materials irradiated in nuclear reactors; treatment of radioactive wastes; 
isotopic separation of U235; and isotopic separation of heavy water and other 
desired materials. Ch. E. 3 1 1 concerns primarily chemical separations, while 
Ch. E. 312 concerns mostly isotopic separations and fuel cycles. Ch. E. 311 
is not necessarily a rerequisite for Ch. E. 312. (Silverman.) 

Ch. E. 315, 316. Radiation Engineering. (2, 2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
An engineering survey of such radiation application as synthesizing chemicals, 
preserving foods, control of industrial processes. Design of irradiation installa- 
tions, e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, electronuclear machine arrangements, 
and chemonuclear reactors. (Silverman.) 

Ch. E. 317. Radiation Effects Laboratory. (2 to 4) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Effect of massive doses of radia- 
tion on the properties of matter for purposes other than those pointed toward 
nuclear power. Radiation processing, radiation-induced chemical reactions, and 
conversion of radiation energy; isotope power sources. (Silverman.) 

Ch. E. 320, 321. Advanced Nuclear Reactor Theory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 320, 
303, year of advanced calculus, and permission of instructor. Calculation of 
critical masses, neutron flux distribution, neutron energy spectrum, kinetics of 
reactor behavior and gamma ray attenuation. Multigroup treatment of reflected 
reactors, solution of the transport equipment, perturbation theory, and other 
advanced calculation techniques. (Munno.) 

SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 
Ch. E. 133, 134. Chemical Engineering Seminar. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. Oral and written reports on recent developments 
in chemical engineering and the process industries. Fall and Spring Semesters. 

(Staff.) 

73 



Chemical Engineering 

Ch. E. 165. Research. (2 or 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Permission of the staff. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Investigation of a research project under the direction of one of 
the staff members. Comprehensive reports are required. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Ch. E. 201. Graduate Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Discussion of current advances and research in 
chemical engineering. Presented by graduate students and staff. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 247. Special Problems in Chemical Engineering. 

First and second semesters. Special study and/or investigation in chemical 
engineering under the direction of an assigned faculty advisor. Since content 
changes, re-registration is permissible. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 301. Seminar in Nuclear Engineering. (1) 

First and second semesters, one meeting a week. Survey of nuclear engineering 
literature, and oral presentation of prepared reports. Since the content of this 
course is changing, a student may receive a number of credits by re-registration. 

(Duffey, Silverman, Munno.1 

Ch. E. 313. Selected Topics in Nuclear Engineering. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Topics of current 
interest and recent advances in the nuclear engineering field. Because of the 
rapid advances in the field, information on special topics of much practical 
importance is continually becoming available. Since the content changes, re- 
registration may be permitted. (Duffey, Silverman, Munno.) 

Ch. E. 314. Special Problems in Nuclear Engineering. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Laboratory 
fee, SI 0.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 399. Research in Chemical Engineering. Research in 
Nuclear Engineering. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester (Research in 
Chemical Engineering). Laboratory fee. $10.00 per semester (Research in 
Nuclear Engineering). The investigation of special problems and the prepara- 
tion of a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements of an advanced de- 
gree. (Staff.) 

ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

This program is given jointly by the Department of Chemical Engineering 
and the Department of Mechanical Engineering and offers courses of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The 
program is open to qualified students holding Bachelor degrees in engi- 
neering, the physical sciences, and mathematics. 

Courses to satisfy the major requirements in Engineering Materials must 
be selected from those designated as materials engineering by the Chemi- 
cal and Mechanical Engineering Departments. Courses to satisfy the minor 

74 



Chemistry 

may be chosen from Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or other engineer- 
ing courses including chemical and mechanical engineering. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

This program is offered by the Department of Chemical Engineering and 
represents courses of study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The program is open to qualified students holding 
bachelor degrees in engineering, the physical sciences and mathematics. 
Courses to satisfy the major requirements in Nuclear Engineering must be 
selected from those designated as nuclear engineering by the Chemical 
Engineering Department. Courses to satisfy the minor may be chosen from 
Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or other engineering courses including 
chemical engineering. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professors: White, Jaquith, Lippincott, Pratt, Purdy, Reeve, Rollin- 
son. Svirbely, Veitch, and Woods. 

Research Professor: Bailey. 

Associate Professors: Atkinson, Gordon, Grim, Henery-Logan, Kas- 
ler, Pickard, Stewart, and Stuntz. 

Assistant Professors: Bellama, Boyd, Gardner, Huhery, Lakshmanan, 
Miller, Spivey, and Staley. 

The Chemistry Department offers programs leading to the M.S. or the 
Ph.D. degrees in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, 
organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and chemical physics. For the latter 
program, the Chemistry Department cooperates with the Institute for Mole- 
cular Physics and the Department of Physics and Astronomy in both M.S. 
and Ph.D. programs. 

Basic requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are set forth on pages 
8 and 14 of this catalog. Departmental regulations concerning qualifying 
and comprehensive examinations and other matters pertaining to course 
work have been assembled for the guidance of candidates for graduate de- 
grees. Copies of these regulations are available from the Department of 
Chemistry. 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $12.00 per laboratory course per semes- 
ter except in Chemistry 270, for which the fee is $20.00. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 123. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 187. An intensive study of the theory and techniques of inorganic 

75 



Chemistry 

quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric and colo- 
rimetric methods. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 125. Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite. Chem. 189, 184 or concurrent registration therein. A study of the 
application of physico-chemical methods to analytical chemistry. Techniques 
such as polarography, potentiometry, conductivity and spectrophotometry will 
be included. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen 
and certain functional groups. (Kasler.) 



For Graduates 
Chem. 206, 208. Spectrographs Analysis. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 182, 184 or 188, 190, 
and consent of the instructor. Registration limited. (White.) 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Registration limited. A study of the 
construction and optics of the microscope and its applications in chemistry, with 
particular emphasis on the optical properties of crystals. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 225. Advanced Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 189, 184 or concurrent registration therein. An intensive study 
of physico-chemical methods as applied to analytical chemistry. Laboratory work 
will include experiments in such fields as polarography, coulometry and am- 
perometry, potentiometry and spectrophotometry, nephlometry. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 226. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 125, 225, or consent of instructor. A study of advanced 
methods with emphasis on the modern techniques of analytical chemistry. 

(Purdy.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem 33, or 
Chem. 37. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 33, Chem. 38, or Chem. 40. (Henery-Logan.) 

76 



Chemistry 



For Graduates 



Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 143 or consent of instructor. 
Two lectures a week. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, consent of the instructor. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 265. Enzymes. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 267. The Chemistry of Natural Products. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 143. The chemistry and physiological 
action of natural products. Methods of isolation, determination of structure, 
and synthesis. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry. (2-4) 

Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 161, 
162, 163, 164, and consent of the instructor. (Veitch, Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 269. Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 205 or consent of 
instructor. Utilization of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to 
problems in the life sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 

Chem. 270. Advanced Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

Second semester. One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 210 and Chem. 269 (or concurrent registration in Chem. 269) 
and consent of instructor. Registration limited. Laboratory training in utiliza- 
tion of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to problems in 
life sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 

Chem 271. Special Topics in Biochemistry. Biochemistry of 
Lipids. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Classification and chemistry of lipids; lipogenesis, and 
energy metabolism of lipids; structural lipids and endocrine control of lipid 
metabolism in mammals. (Lakshmanan.) 

Chem. 273. Special Topics in Biochemistry. Comparative 
Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Energy sources and micronutrient requirements; gluconeo- 
genesis; osmoregulation; nitrogen metabolism; detoxication and excretion; and 
comparative endocrinology. Deals with chordates only. (Lakshmanan.) 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Chem. 101. Inorganic Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 187. (Staff.) 

77 



Chemistry 

Chem. 102. Inorganic Preparations. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Chem. 123. Two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. (Staff.) 

Chem. 111. Chemical Principles. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
1 and 3, or equivalent. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is covered elsewhere in their curricula. A 
course in the principles of chemistry with accompanying laboratory work con- 
sisting of single quantitative experiments. (Credit applicable only toward degree 
in College of Education.) (Jaquith.) 

For Graduates 
Chem. 201. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Staff.) 

Chem. 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. (White.) 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. (Boyd.) 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Rollinson, Gordon.) 

Chem. 209. Non-Aqueous Inorganic Solvents. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Jaquith.) 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1 or 2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Registration limited. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 205 (or concurrent registration therein) and consent of 
instructor. (Lakshmanan.) 

Chem. 211. Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Grim.) 

Chem. 213. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 201, or equivalent. An examination 
of some current topics in modern inorganic chemistry. (Staff.) 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37 and 
38 or 40. An advanced study of the compounds of carbon. (Reeve.) 

78 



Chemistry 
Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 37, and 38 or 40. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. The systematic 
identification of organic compounds. (Pratt.) 

For Graduates 

(One or more courses from the following group 240-254 will customarily 
be offered each semester.) 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143. An advanced course cover- 
ing the synthesis of monomers, mechanism of polymerization, and the correla- 
tion between structure and properties in high polymers. (Bailey.) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 243. Molecular Orbital Theory. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Staley.) 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 251. The Heterocyclics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two or four three-hour laboratory periods a week. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, 
an Advanced Course. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. (Pratt.) 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 182, 184. Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry 
Majors. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One three-hour laboratory period a week. (Staff.) 

79 



Chemistry 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 
21; Phys. 20, 21; Math. 20, 21, or consent of instructor. This course must be 
accompanied by Chem. 188, 190, or Chem. 182, 184, unless excused by the 
instructor. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1 or 2, 1 or 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. A labora- 
tory course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. (Staff.) 

Chem. 195. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 189. Quantum chemistry and other 
selected topics. (Staff.) 



For Graduates 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187 
and 189. 

One or more courses of the group, 281-323, will be offered each semester, 
depending on demand. 

Chem. 281. Theory of Solutions. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307, or equivalent. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 287. Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, 187, 189 and consent of 



instructor. 

Chem. 295. Heterogeneous Equilibria. (2) 
Two lectures a week. 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics. (3) 
Three lectures a week. 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. 



(Lippincott.) 



(Pickard.) 



(Svirbely.) 



(Atkinson.) 



Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Svirbely.) 

Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 311. Physiochemical Calculations. (2) 

Two lectures a week. 



Chem. 313. Molecular Structure. (3) 
Three lectures a week. 



(Stewart.) 



(Lippincott.) 



80 



Civil Engineering 
Chem. 317. Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Stewart.) 

Chem. 319, 321. Quantum Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three and two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307 and 195, or equivalent. 

(Staff.) 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. (Staff.) 

SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

Chem. 351. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

Chem. 399. Thesis Research. 

First and second semesters, summer session. (Staff.) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Looney, Allen, Lepper, and Otts. 
Associate Professors: Barber, Cournyn, Piper and Wedding. 
Assistant Professors: Cookson, Garber and Mercier. 
Lecturers: Bloem, Roberts and Walker. 

The Civil Engineering Department offers graduate work in the following 
fields: engineering materials, highway engineering, hydraulic engineering, 
sanitary engineering, soils and foundations, and structural engineering, 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ENCE. 100. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 112 or con- 
current registration. (Garber.'* 

ENCE. 102. Fundamentals of Structural Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, E. S. 20 and ENCE 
50. (Lepper and Piper.) 

ENCE. 103. Basic Structural Design. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 102. 

(Lepper and Piper.) 
ENCE. 104. Computer Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisites. 
ENCE 100 and ENCE 102. (Garber.) 

ENCE. 105. Basic Fluid Mechanics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, E. S. 20, 21, Physics 20. 
Prerequisite, M. E. 105. (Cournyn and Reilly.) 

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Civil Engineering 

ENCE. 106. Fundamentals of Sanitary Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 105. 

(Otts and Cookson.) 

ENCE. 107. Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, E. S. 20 and ENCE 50. 

(Barber.) 

ENCE. 108. Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 50 and ENCE 90. 

(Wedding and Barber.) 

ENCE. 109. Basic Civil Engineering Planning I. (2) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, ENCE 103, 106, 107 
and 108. (Piper.) 

ENCE. 110. Basic Civil Engineering Planning II. ( 1 ) 

Second semester. One laboratory of three hours each week. Prerequisite, 
ENCE 109. (Piper.) 

ENCE. 112. Applied Mathematics in Engineering. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, Math. 22. 

(Mercier.) 

ENCE. 125. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, E. S. 20. (Lepper. ) 

ENCE. 126. Experimental Stress Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. 

(Lepper and Wedding.) 

ENCE. 127. Theory of Elasticity and Plasticity. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, E. S. 20 and ENCE 112. 

(Mercier.) 

ENCE. 135. Advanced Soil Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 107. 

(Barber.) 

ENCE. 145. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 105. 

(Cournyn and Reilly.) 

ENCE. 155. Advanced Materials of Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 50. (Wedding.) 

ENCE. 165. Structural Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 103. 

(Garber and Schelling.) 

ENCE. 166. Structural Design. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, 
ENCE 103. (Garber and Schelling.) 

82 



Civil Engineering 
ENCE. 175. Sanitary Engineering Analysis and Design. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory each week. 

(Otts and Cookson.) 

ENCE. 176. Environmental Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. 

(Otts and Cookson.) 

ENCE. 185. Highway Engineering. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 107. (Barber.) 

ENCE. 186. Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 108. 

(Barber and Wedding.) 

ENCE. 195. Advanced Surveying. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 90. 

(Staff.) 

ENCE. 199. Special Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
ENCE. 221, 222. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, E. S. 20, 21 and ENCE 50 or 
equivalent. Analyses for stress and deformation in engineering members by the 
methods of mechanics of materials and elementary theories of elasticity and 
plasticity. Problems in flexure, torsion, plates and shells, stress concentrations, 
indeterminate combinations, residual stresses, stability. (Lepper.) 

ENCE. 223. Experimental Stress Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 221 or permission of instructor. Experi- 
mental methods of stress and strain analysis for static and impact forces. Use of 
structural models; brittle and plastic material methods; analogies; photoelasticity; 
optical, mechanical and electrical strain gages and instrumentation. (Wedding.) 

ENCE. 224. Advanced Engineering Materials Laboratory. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisite, E.S. 20, 21 and ENCE 50 or equivalent. 
Critical examination of the methods for testing engineering materials and 
structures under static, repeated, sustained and impact forces. Laboratory ex- 
periments for the determination of strength and stiffness of structural alloys, 
concrete and other construction materials. Critical examination of the effects of 
test factors on the determination of engineering properties. (Lepper, Wedding.) 

ENCE. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Materials. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENCE 221 and 222. Modern theories 
of the structure of matter applied to the study of elastic and plastic deforma- 
tion of materials under static, repeated, sustained and impact forces. Elements 
of solid state physics, crystal structure, slip and dislocation theory; polycrystal- 
line solids. Effects of low and high temperature, loading rates, and state of stress 
on mechanical properties and fractures. Critical study of tests and their applica- 
tion to strength of members. (Lepper.) 

83 



Civil Engineering 

ENCE. 227, 228. Theories of Concrete and Granular 
Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ENCE 221, 222, 224. Critical 
reviews of analytical and experimental investigations of the behavior of con- 
cretes under diverse conditions of loading and environment. Mechanics of 
granular aggregates and the chemistry of cements. Theories for the design of 
Portland cement and asphaltic concrete mixtures. Relations between laboratory 
testing and field experience. (Wedding.) 

ENCE. 241. Hydraulic Engineering. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 105 or equivalent. Water power 
and flood control. Analysis of the principal features of a water power project 
with special reference to reservoir, waterway, dam, plant accessories, and power 
house equipment. Complete report on a water power project required, including 
costs and power valuation. (Cournyn.) 

ENCE. 251. Soil Mechanics. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 107, or equivalent. Identification 
properties tests and classification methods for earth materials. Strength and 
deformation characteristics, hydraulic properties and permeability, shearing re- 
sistance, compressibility and consolidation, with laboratory tests for these 
properties. Study of the basic theories involved and the development of test 
procedures. (Barber.) 

ENCE. 252. Advanced Foundations. (3) 

First or second semesters. Prerequisites, ENCE 107, 165 and 166, or equivalent. 
Principles of mechanics applied to engineering problems in foundations. Earth 
pressure theories, seepage and drainage phenomena, stability of footings and 
slopes, stresses and deformation in soils, consolidation theory and application to 
foundation settlements. (Barber.) 

ENCE. 261. Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, ENCE 102, 103, 165 and 166, or equivalent. Gen- 
eral planning of large engineering projects involving industrial plants, bridges, 
highways, railroads, and port developments. Emphasis on general planning fol- 
lowed by design construction and cost estimates. (Piper.) 

ENCE. 262. Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 261. City and regional planning and 
development. Special problem of municipal development. Emphasis on pre- 
paring engineering reports, financing and cost estimates. Preparation of presenta- 
tion to public bodies. (Piper.) 

ENCE. 263. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 102, 103, 165 and 166, or equivalent. 
Advanced structural theory applied to the design of bridges and buildings. 
Methods of analysis for indeterminate structures, including movement distribu- 
tion, Maxwell's method, virtual work, reciprocal theory, Muller Breslau's 
principle, and classical analytical methods. (Looney.) 

ENCE. 264. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 263. Correlation of theory, experience, 
and experiments in study of structural behavior, proportioning, and preliminary 
design. Special design problems of fatigue, buckling, vibrations, and impact. 

(Looney.) 

84 



Classical Languages and Literatures 
ENCE. 265, 266. Concrete Structures. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ENCE 263 and 264. Examination of 
the fundamental basis for the design of reinforced concrete structures. Correla- 
tion of laboratory research, advanced structural theory and mechanics, and 
design methods. Application to the design of modern forms of concrete struc- 
tures, such as folded plates, slabs, thin shells, life slabs, prestressing, and 
precasting. ( Looney . ) 

ENCE. 267, 268. Steel Structures. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ENCE 263 and 264. Design of large 
steel structures, such as cantilever and continuous trusses and girders, steel 
arches, suspension bridges, and tall building frames. Special problems of 
secondary stresses, wind bracing, stability and bracing, and interaction and 
deformation stresses. Study of specifications, factor of safety and ultimate 
strength, and the relation between structural tests and design. (Looney.) 

ENCE. 271, 272. Sanitary Engineering Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENCE 106, 175 and 176, or equivalent. 
Practical problems in the design of sewer systems and appurtenances; sewage 
treatment plants; water collection and distribution systems; water purification 
plants. Selected design of structures related to the operation of water supply and 
sewerage systems and industrial waste treatment plants. (Otts.) 

ENCE. 281, 282. Advanced Highway Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ENCE 107, 185, and 186 or equivalent. 
Reconnaissance and location, surveys and plans, drainage, subgrade structure, 
low-cost roads, base courses, flexible and rigid pavement design. Highway 
organization planning economy, and finance. Geometric design and traffic 
engineering. (Barber.) 

ENCE. 296, 297. Engineering Analysis and Computer 
Programming. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, eonsent of 
Head of Department. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming as 
applied to elasticity, stability and buckling, vibrations, thin plates and shells, 
or other problems in the area of mechanics, structures and materials. 

(Roberts.) 

ENCE. 298. Seminar. 

First or second semester. Credit in accordance with work outlined by the 
Department. Prerequisite, consent of the Department of Civil Engineering. 

(Staff.) 

ENCE. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance with work done. (Staff.) 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor: Avery. 

The Department of Classical Languages and Literatures offers no program 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy at the 
present time. The following courses, however, are offered upon sufficient 

85 



Classical Languages and Literatures 

demand to fill the needs of graduate students in other fields, such as 
English, history, and modern foreign languages, who may wish to work 
in Latin in connection with their degree programs in such fields. Students 
should consult their major professors with respect to application of credit 
hours in Latin to their graduate programs. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Prerequisite, Latin 61 or equivalent. 
Latin 101. Catullus and the Roman Elegac Poets. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Catullus as a writer of lyric, an imitator of the 
Alexandrians, and as a writer of elegy, and on Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid as 
elegists. The reading of selected poems of the four authors. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman historiography before Tacitus and 
on the author as a writer of history. The reading of selections from the Annals 
and Histories. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 103. Roman Satire. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman satire. The 
reading of selections from the satires of Horace, Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis, 
and the satires of Juvenal. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 104. Roman Comedy. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman comedy. The 
reading of selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 105. Lucretius. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman Epicureanism. The reading of 
selections from the De rerum natura. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3) 

An intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language sup- 
plemented by rapid reading. (Avery.) 

Latin 199. Latin Readings. (3) 

Special Prerequisite, Consent of Instructor. The reading of one or more 
selected Latin authors from antiquity through the Renaissance. May be re- 
peated with varying content. Reports. (Avery.) 

For Graduates 
Prerequisite, Latin 61 or equivalent. 
Latin 210. Vulgar Latin Readings. (3) 

An intense study of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Classical Latin, 
followed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from the classical 
norms, with the reading of illustrative texts. The reading of selections from the 
Preregrination ad loca sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage 
therein, with special emphasis on those which anticipate subsequent develop- 
ment in the Romance Languages. Reports. (Avery.) 

86 



Comparative Literature 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors: Aldridge, Cooley, Goodwyn, Jones, Levitine, Montano, 

AND PRAHL. 

Assistant Professor: Evans. 

The Department of Comparative Literature offers graduate work leading 
to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Candidates for the degree must have an undergraduate major in one lan- 
guage or literature acceptable for admission to graduate work in that de- 
partment. Those who offer a major in English must have in addition a 
knowledge of at least one foreign language. Requirements for the degree 
include Comparative Literature 201 and nine other hours of courses in 
Comparative Literature as well as 12 hours of courses in English, classical 
or foreign languages. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates must have an M.A. degree in comparative literature or any 
language or literature. Departmental requirements for the degree include 
Comparative Literature 301 and 33 additional hours of courses in com- 
parative literature, English, classical or foreign languages. The student 
must designate as a special field a chronological period (such as the 
Renaissance, Enlightenment, or Age of Realism) or a literary type (such 
as epic, drama or novel) or a literary theme (such as patriotism, the 
Faust legend or primitivism). The majority of his courses must relate to 
the special field and be selected from at least three departments so as to 
satisfy the major-minor requirements of the Graduate School. The dis- 
sertation must be related to the major field. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Comp. Lit. 101, 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative 
Literature. (3, 3) 

First semester: Survey of the background of European literature through study 
of Greek and Latin literature in English translations, discussing the debt of 
modern literature to the ancients. Second semester: Study of medieval and 
modern Continental literature. (Staff.) 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the sources, development and literary types. 

(Evans.) 

Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France. (3) 

First semester. Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from 
Rousseau to Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. (Aldridge.) 

87 



Comparative Literature 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany. (3) 

Second semester. Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German literature from 
Buerger to Heine in English translations. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German 
Literature. (3) 

A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment by 
Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen. (3) 

First semester. A study of the life and chief works of Henrik Ibsen with 
special emphasis on his influence on the modern drama. (Staff.) 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama. (3) 

First semester. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and 
Aristophanes in English translations. Emphasis on the historic background, on 
dramatic structure, and on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of the 
civilized world. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic, and lyric literature of the Middle Ages; studies in trans- 
lations. (Cooley.) 

Comp. Lit. 130. The Continental Novel. (3) 

First semester. The European novel in translation from Stendhal through the 
Existentialists, selected from literatures of France, Germany, Italy, Russia and 
Spain. (Staff.) 

Comp. Lit. 135. Dante and the Romance Tradition. (3) 

A reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the discovery of reality in west- 
ern literature. (Montano.) 

Comp. Lit. 140. Literature of the Far East. (3) 

Classics of the Orient in translation. (Evans.) 

In addition, all literature courses numbered 100 or above offered in the 
Classics, English, and Foreign Languages Departments may be accepted for 
Comparative Literature credit. 

For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 201. Problems in Comparative Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A research seminar for M. A. candidates only. (Staff.) 

Comp. Lit. 225. The Medieval Epic. (3) 

A comparative interpretation of Beowulf, the Waltharius, the Chanson de 
Roland, the Nibelungenlied, and the Cid. (Jones.) 

Comp. Lit. 226. The Medieval Romance. (3) 

Second semester. An interpretation of the principal works of the genre. 

(Jones.) 

88 



Dairy Science 
Comp. Lit. 230. Problems of the Baroque in Literature. (3) 

First semester. The passage from Mannerism to the most characteristic theo- 
retical and creative manifestations of Baroque. (Montano.) 

Comp. Lit. 240. Literary Criticism: Ancient and Medieval. (3) 
First semester. From Aristotle to the fifteenth century. (Montano.) 

Comp. Lit. 241. Literary Criticism: Renaissance and Modern. (3) 
Second semester. From Petrarch to the present. (Montano.) 

Comp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature. (3) 

A study of folk heroes, motifs, and ideas as they appear in the world's master- 
pieces. (Goodwyn.) 

Comp. Lit. 268. Seminar in Literary Sources of Art History. (3) 

Second semester. Art historical sources from Pliny to Malraux. (Same as Art 
268.) (Levitine.) 

Comp. Lit. 301. Seminar in Themes and Types. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year's work in literature and the knowledge of one language 
other than English. Intensive study of fundamental motifs and trends in west- 
ern literature. (Aldridge.) 

In addition, all literature courses numbered 100 or above offered in the 
Classics, English, and Foreign Languages Departments may be accepted for 
Comparative Literature credit. 



DAIRY SCIENCE 

Professors: Davis, Arbuckle, and Keeney. 

Associate Professors: Hemken, King, Mattick, Stewart, 
Williams and Vandersall. 

The Department of Dairy Science offers work leading to the degree of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree have the option of studying in one of two major 
fields: dairy production, which is concerned with breeding, nutrition and 
physiology of dairy animals, or dairy technology, which is concerned with 
chemical, bacteriological, and nutritional aspects of dairy products, as well 
as the industrial phases of milk processing. Students interested in food 
science may undertake graduate study in the dairy technology phase of 
Dairy Science. 

FOOD SCIENCE (DAIRY TECHNOLOGY) 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Fd. Sc. 102. Principles of Food Processing I. (3) 

See Horticulture for description. (Wiley.) 

89 



Dairy Science 

Fd. Sc. 103. Principles of Food Processing II. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A detailed study of food processing 
with emphasis on line and staff operations, including physical facilities, utilities, 
pre- and post-processing operations, processing line development and sanita- 
tion. (Mattick.) 

Fd. Sc. 111. Food Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, or- 
ganic chemistry. The application of basic chemical and physical concepts to 
the composition and properties of foods. Emphasis will be on the relationship 
of processing technology on the keeping quality, nutritional value and ac- 
ceptability of foods. (King.) 

Fd. Sc. 112. Analytical Quality Control. (3) 

See Horticulture for description (Kramer.) 

Fd. Sc. 113. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

See Horticulture for description. (Kramer.) 

Fd. Sc. 125. Meat and Meat Processing. (3) 

See Animal Science for description. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 131. Food Product Research and Development. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one laboratory per week. A study of the re- 
search and development function for improvement of existing products and 
development of new. economically feasible and marketable food products. 
Application of chemical-physical characteristics of ingredients to produce opti- 
mum quality products, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, equipment and 
package development. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 156. Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

See Horticulture for description. (Wiley.) 

Fd. Sc. 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 

See Poultry Science for description. (Helbacka.) 

Fd. Sc. 182. Dairy Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Method of pro- 
duction of fluid milk, butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and milk 
products and ice cream. (Mattick.) 

Mechanics of Food Processing. 

See Agricultural Engineering, Agr. Eng. 113. 

Experimental Food Science. 

See Food and Nutrition. Food 153. 



For Graduates 



Experimental Processing. 

See Horticulture. Hort. 210. 

90 



Dairy Science 
Research Methods. 

See Dairy Science, An. Sc. 241. 

Methods of Horticultural Research. 

See Horticulture, Hort. 207. 

Special Problems in Animal Science. 

See Animal Science, Dairy Science and Poultry Science, An. Sc. 301. 

Fd. Sc. 303. Advanced Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports with illustrative material are required 
on special topics or recent research publications in food science and tech- 
nology. A maximum of three credit hours are allowed for the M. S. degree 
or six credit hours for the doctoral degree. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 399. Thesis Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters; summer session. The investigation is planned and 
conducted under faculty supervision. Grades are awarded on completion of the 
thesis. (Staff.) 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
An. Sc. 140. Physiology of Reproduction. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, Zoology 102 or 104. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive 
process and artificial insemination of cattle. (Williams.) 

An. Sc. 141. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite. Zoology 102 or 104. The anatomy and growth of the mammary 
gland and the metabolism and physiology of biosynthesis in the ruminant. 

(Williams.) 

An. Sc. 142. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites. Animal Science 40, Zoology 6. or Botany 117. A specialized course in 
breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on methods of evaluation and selec- 
tion, systems and breeding and breeding programs. 

An. Sc. SI 43. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer 
discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

An. Sc. 220. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

See Animal Science for Description. (Green.) 

An. Sc. 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

See Animal Science for description. (Leffel and Combs.) 

91 



Dairy Science 

An. Sc. 240. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

First semester. Two one-hour lectures and one. two-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of department. Biochemical, physiological and bac- 
teriological aspects of the nutrition of ruminants and other animals. 

(Vandersall.) 

An. Sc. 241. Research Methods. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week.. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. The application of biochemical, physio-chemical and 
statistical methods to problems in biological research. (Keeney.) 

An. Sc. 242. Experimental Mammalian Surgery I. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A course presenting the 
fundamentals of anesthesia and the art of experimental surgery, especially 
to obtain research preparations. (Stewart.) 

DAIRY PRODUCTION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
An. Sc. 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

An. Sc. 110. Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site. Math. 10. Animal Science 109 or permission of instructor. A critical 
study of those factors which influence the nutritional requirements of rumi- 
nants, swine and poultry. Practical feeding methods and procedures used in 
formulation of economically efficient rations will be presented. (Vandersall.) 

An. Sc. 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

See Veterinary Science for de>*cnption. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. 

See Veterinary Science for description. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 118. Wildlife Management. (3) 

See Animal Science for description. (Flyger.) 

An. Sc. 130. Principles of Animal Breeding. (3) 

See Animal Science for description. (Green.) 

For Graduates 
An. Sc. 243. Experimental Mammalian Surgery II. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites. An. Sc. 242. permission of instructor. A course 
emphasizing advanced surgical practices to obtain research preparations, car- 
diovascular surgery and chronic vascularly isolated organ techniques, expe- 
rience with pump oxygenator systems, profound hypothermia, hemodialysis, 
infusion systems, implantation and transplantation procedures are taught. 

(Stewart.) 

92 



An. Sc. 260. Advanced Poultry Nutrition. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. 

An. Sc. 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. 

An. Sc. 263. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. 

An. Sc. 264. Vitamins. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. 

An. Sc. 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. 



Economics 

(Combs.) 
(Shaffner.) 

(Creek.) 
(Combs.) 

(Creek.) 



An. Sc. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science (1-3). 

(4 cr. max. J 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate specifi- 
cally to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 302. Seminar (1). (5 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers, based upon 
current scientific publications relating to Animal Science, or upon their re- 
search work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; (1) Recent 
advances: (2) Nutrition: (3) Physiology; (4) Biochemistry. (Staff.) 

An. Sc. 399. Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in the form of 
a thesis. (Staff.) 



ECONOMICS 

Professors: Dillard, Cumberland, Gruchy, O'Connell, Schultze (on 

LEAVE), AND ULMER. 

Associate Professors: Bergmann, Dodge, Knight, Weinstein, and 

WONNACOTT. 

Assistant Professors. J. Q. Adams, R. F. Adams, Bennett, Canter- 
bery, dorsey, db'rant, green, hexter, hlnrichs, kokat, mayor, 
Meyer, and Snow. 

Lecturers: Amuzegar, Bridges, Conrad, Gramley, Measday, Mueller, 
Pierce, and Spiegel. 

master of arts. Requirements for the master's degree include (1) 
course work in economics as the Department deems appropriate in view of 
the candidates' previous training, (2) course work in a minor subject, (3) 
a thesis on a topic approved by the Department, and (4) a comprehensive 



93 



Economics 

oral examination covering the major and the minor subjects and defense 
of the thesis. 

doctor of philosophy. The Ph.D. degree in economics is under the joint 
direction of the faculties of the Department of Economics and the Depart- 
ment of Business Administration. Before being advanced to candidacy 
doctoral students must pass comprehensive written and oral examinations 
in four of the following fields: (1) Accounting, (2) Comparative Eco- 
nomic Systems and Economic Planning, (3) Econometrics and Mathe- 
matical Economics, (4) Economic Development and History, (5) Eco- 
nomic Theory (required), (6) Financial Administration, (7) History of 
Economic Thought, (8) Industrial Administration, (9) Industrial Organi- 
zation and Public Policy, (10) International Economics, (11) Labor Eco- 
nomics, (12) Marketing, (13) Money and Banking, (14) Public Finance 
and Fiscal Policy, (15) Regional Economics, (16) Statistics, (17) Trans- 
portation, (18) Any other field, including the minor, approved by the 
faculty. Students should consult with members of the faculty concerning 
the choice of fields and the choice of courses within these fields. 

Econ. 211 and 212 (Quantitative Economics I and II, mathematics and 
statistics for economists) are required. Two graduate-level courses in eco- 
nomic thought are also required. If study equivalent to these required 
courses has been done elsewhere, this may be certified by passing the exam- 
inations in the courses with grades of "B" or better. 

Further information concerning requirements and procedures may be ob- 
tained from the departments administering the program. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. An analysis of national 
income accounts and the level of national income and employment. 

(Kokat, Mayor.) 
Econ. 103. American Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of long-term trends in the American 
economy. The transplantation of economic institutions from Western Europe; 
the take-off period in United States economic growth; trends in productivity, 
prices, national income, savings and investment. The welfare state and the 
mixed economy. 

Econ. 105. Introduction to Economic Development of 

Underdeveloped Areas. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the economic and social charac- 
teristics of underdeveloped areas. Recent theories of economic development; 
obstacles to development; policies and planning for development. 

(J. Q. Adams, Bennett, Hinrichs.) 

Econ. 106. Economic Development of Selected Areas. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 105. Institutional characteristics of a specific area are dis- 
cussed and alternative strategies and policies for development are analyzed. 

(Bennett, Hinrichs.) 

94 



Economics 
Econ. 130. Mathematical Economics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites. Econ. 102 and 132 and one year of college 
mathematics. A course designed to enable economics majors to understand 
the simpler aspects of mathematical economics. Those parts of the calculus 
and algebra required for economic analysis will be presented. 

(Ulmer, Hexter.) 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An investigation 
of the theory and practice of various types of economic systems. The course 
begins with an examination and evaluation of the capitalistic system and is 
followed by an analysis of alternative types of economic systems such as fascism, 
socialism, and communism. (Gruchy, Dodge, Amuzagar.) 

Econ. 132. Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for economics 
majors; an analysis of price and distribution theory with special attention 
to recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. 

(Knight, Day.) 
Econ. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and senior standing. A survey of recent trends in 
American, English, and continental economic thought with special attention 
to the work of such economists as W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Commons, T. Veblen, 
W. Sombart, J. A. Hobson and other contributors to the development of eco- 
nomic thought since 1900. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the principles and practice of 
economic planning with special reference to the planning problems of western 
European countries and the United States. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 138. Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the organization, operating prin- 
ciples and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to the historical 
and ideological background, planning, resources, industry, agriculture, domestic 
and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth of national 
income. (Dodge.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the 
relation of money and credit to economic activity and prices; the impact of 
public policy in financial markets and in markets for goods and services; 
policies, structure, and functions of the Federal Reserve System; organization, 
operation, and functions of the commercial banking system, as related par- 
ticularly to questions of economic stability and public policy. 

(Bennett, Meyer, Staff.) 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Prices and Economic Activity. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A theoretical treatment of the 
influence of money and financial markets on economic activity and prices, 
and of the effects of monetary policy on the markets for goods and services; 
the role of money in the classical and Keynesian macro-systems topics of theo- 
retical interest in monetary policy formation and implementation. (Meyer.) 

95 



Economics 

Econ. 142. Government Finance. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the 
role of federal, state, and local governments in mobilizing resources to meet 
public wants: principles and policies of taxation, debt management, and gov- 
ernment expenditures and their effects on resource allocation, stabilization of 
income and prices, income distribution and ecoomic growth. 

(Dorsey, Durant, Hinrichs, Meyer.) 

Econ. 143. Economics of Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 142 and 102, or consent of instructor. 
An economic analysis of the theory and practice of public finance including 
taxation, debt management, expenditures, and fiscal policy. 

(Dorsey, Hinrichs.) 

Econ. 144. State and Local Public Finance. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Principles and problems of governmental finance 
with special reference to state and local jurisdiction. Topics to be covered 
include taxation, expenditures, and inter-governmental fiscal relations. 

(R. F. Adams.) 

Econ. 147. Business Cycles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. A study of the causes of depressions 
and unemployment, cyclical and secular instability, theories of business cycles, 
and the problem of controlling economic instability. (Mayor.) 

Econ. 148. International Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. Econ. 32 or 37. A descriptive and 
theoretical analysis of international trade: balance of payments accounts; the 
mechanism of international economic adjustment; comparative costs; economics 
of customs unions. (Wonnacott, Canterbery.) 

Econ. 149. International Economic Policies. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 148. Contemoprary balance of payments problems; the 
international liquidity controversy; investment, trade and economic develop- 
ment; evaluation of arguments for protection. (Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A survey of the 
structural and historical development and characteristics of labor. Theories of 
trade unions, bargaining and wages will be surveyed. Emphasis will be placed 
on the policy problems of labor in an industrial society. (Staff.) 

Econ. 161. Problems in Labor Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 160. An intensive analysis of selected 
problems dealing with labor. Theoretical, historical and quantitative study of 
labor market and manpower problems in a developing and developed economy. 

(Staff.) 

Econ. 170. Industrial Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 32 or 37. Changing structure of the American economy; 
price policies in different industrial classifications of monopoly and compe- 
tition in relation to problems of public policy. (Snow.) 

96 



Economics 
Econ. 171. Economics of American Industries. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the technology, economics and geog- 
raphy of twenty representative American industries. (Measday.) 

For Graduates 
Econ. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 132. A critical analysis of the theory of 
economic decision-making in the firm, household, and industry in perfect and 
imperfect competition; price, output, distribution and the theory of general 
equilibrium. Review of recent contributions. (Ulmer, Weinstein.) 

Econ. 201. Advanced Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 200 or consent of instructor. Continua- 
tion of Econ. 200 with particular attention to recent developments in linear 
programming, game theory, activity analysis, welfare economics, input-output 
analysis, aud micro-dynamic models. (Ulmer, Weinstein.) 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 102. National income accounting: deter- 
mination of national income and employment especially as related to the mod- 
ern theory of effective demand; consumption function: multiplier and accelera- 
tion principles; the role of money as it affects output and employment as a 
whole. (Schultze, Bergmann.) 

Econ. 203. Seminar in American Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite. Graduate standing. Selected topics in the long-term movements 
of the American economy. 

Econ. 204. Origins and Development of Capitalism. (3) 

Study of the transition from feudalism to capitalism and the subsequent de- 
velopment of leading capitalist institutions in industry, agriculture, commerce, 
banking, and the social movement. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 205. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 102 and 132. Principles and problems of 
economic developments in underdeveloped areas; policies and techniques which 
hasten economic development. (Bennett.) 

Econ. 206. Seminar in Economic Development. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 205 or consent of instructor. Problems 
and policies of economic development in specified underdeveloped areas. 

(Bennett.) 

Econ. 207. Money and Finance in Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 205 or consent of instructor. An analysis of alternative 
methods of financing investment during the process of economic development. 

«'Hinrichs, Bennett.) 

Econ. 211. Quantitative Economics I. (3) 

Required of all Ph.D. majors in economics. Elements of the theory and prac- 
tice of statistical inference. Tests of hypotheses, characteristics of estimates. 

97 



Economics 

and the measurement of relationships between variable are introduced, with 
applications to problems of empirical economic research. (Green. Hexter.) 

Econ. 212. Quantitative Economics II. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 211 or equivalent. Required of all Ph.D. majors in eco- 
nomics. Multiple regression, correlation, analysis of variance and analysis of 
covariance are among the topics discussed. Applications to empirical economic 
research will be stressed. (Bergmann, Green.) 

Econ. 214. Advanced Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, either one year of calculus or Econ. 211. Model- 
building and mathematical derivation of micro- and macro-economic theories. 
Further topics in differential and difference equations and in matrix algebra 
introduced as required. (Ulmer.) 

Econ. 217. Econometrics I. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 212. Advanced theory and applications of quantitative 
economic research, with emphasis on estimation of simultaneous equation sys- 
tems. (Green, Hexter.) 

Econ. 218. Econometrics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 212 or the equivalent. Seminar in the application of 
quantitative methods. (Green.) 

Econ. 220. Regional Analysis and Location Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite. Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Location 
theory and the spatial distribution of economic activity. The application to 
regional and interregional problems of analytic methods, such as input-out- 
put techniques, linear programming, social accounts, gravity models, indus- 
trial complex analysis, money flows, and balance of payments. (Staff.) 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 132 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of the development of economic thought and theories including the Greeks, 
Romans, canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats. Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. 
Relation of ideas to economic policy. (Dillard, Spiegel.) 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic thought, par- 
ticularly the classicists, neo-classicists. Austrians. German historical school, 
American economic thought and the socialists. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory. (3, 3) 

A study of recent developments in the field of institutional economic theory 
in the United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 234. Economic Growth in Mature Economies. (3) 

Analysis of policies and problems for achieving stable economic growth in ma- 
ture economies such as the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Scan- 
dinavian countries. (Gruchy.) 



98 



Economics 
Econ. 235. Advanced International Economics. (3) 

First semester. General equilibrium and disequilibrium in the world economy; 
international mechanism and adjustment; price, exchange rate, and income 
changes. Commercial policy and the theory of customs unions. 

(Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations. (3) 

Second semester. A study of selected problems in international economic re- 
lations. (Wonnacott.) 

Econ. 237. Selected Topics in Economics. (3) 

Econ. 238. Seminar in Economic Development of the Soviet 
Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 138 or consent of instructor. Measurement and evaluation 
of Soviet economic development including interpretation and use of Soviet 
statistics, measurement of national income and rates of growth, fiscal and 
monetary policies, investment and technological change, planning and economic 
administration, manpower and wage policies, foreign trade and aid, and selected 
topics in Bloc development. (Dodge.) 

Econ. 240. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

First semester. An adequate knowledge of micro- and macro-economics is 
assumed. Theory of money, financial assets, and economic activity; review 
of classical, neo-classical and Keynesian contributions: emphasis on post- 
Keynesian contributions, including those of Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, 
Friedman, and others. (Gramley.) 

Econ. 241. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 240 or consent of instructor. Theory of 
the mechanisms through which central banking affects economic activity and 
priees; formation and implementation of monetary policy; theoretical topics 
in monetary policy. (Gramley.) 

Econ. 242. Advanced Theory of Public Finance. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 143 or conesent of instructor. Theories of 
taxation, debt management, and fiscal policy. Students are assumed to have 
a working knowledge of micro- and macro-economic analysis. 

(Hinrichs, Dorsey.) 

Econ. 243. Seminar in Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 242. Theory of public expenditures with 
special attention to recent contributions; economic analysis of the theory and 
practice of public finance in various settings. (Schultze, Dorsey, Hinrichs.) 

Econ. 247. Economic Growth and Instability. (3) 

Second semester. An analytical study of long-term economic growth in 
relation to short-term cyclical instability. Attention is concentrated on the 
connection between accumulation of capital and the capital requirements of 
secular growth and business cycles. Earlier writings as well as recent growth 
models are considered. (Schultze, Mayor.) 



99 



Education 

Econ. 248. The Economics of Technical Change. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the determinants and impact 
of inventions and innovations. Attention is given to the qualitative and quan- 
titative aspects of technical change, both at the micro-economic and macro- 
economic levels, and under different conditions of economic development. 

Econ. 260. Seminar in Labor Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 160 or consent of instructor. A study of wage theory and 
human capital theory as the primary basis for analysis of absolute and rela- 
tive wages. An appraisal of theoretical and quantitative tools in the study of 
labor. (Knight, Weinstein.) 

Econ. 261. Selected Topics in Labor Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite. Econ. 160 or consent of instructor. An analytical investigation 
of problems and policy areas in labor economics. Inter-relations of labor 
and other markets, unemployment and manpower. Specific treatment of man- 
power problems, unemployment and labor force analysis. 

(Knight, Weinstein.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors: V. E. Anderson, Blough, Byrne, Duffey, Gerberich, 
Grentzer, Harrison, Hornbake, Hovet, Hymes, Kurtz, Leeper, 
Magoon, Maley, Mayor, McClure, Mershon, Morgan, Newell, 
O'Neill, Patrick, Perkins, Prescott, Risinger, Schindler, Thomp- 
son, vanZwoll, Waetjen, and Wiggin. 

Associate Professors: Adkins, J. P. Anderson, Bowie, Bryan, Chapin, 
Dunham. Giblette, Goering, Grambs, Hebeler, James, Kelsey, Lem- 
mon, Lockard. Luetkemeyer, Marx, Neville, Raths, Spencer, Stunk- 
ard, Tierney, Wedberg, and Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Agre, Ashlock, Bott, Crosby, Dayton, DiLavore, 
Dudley, Edgemon, Finkelstein, Fitch, Frank, Funaro, Gessner, 
Greenberg. Hall. Hamby, Hatfield, Henkelman, Herman, Huber, 
Kelly. Klevan, Kyle, Larson, Lawrence, Lawson, Lindsay, Long- 
ley. Matteson, Merrill, Milhollan, Noll, Pfau, Ray, Renz, Rhoads, 
Rfshel. Rodgers, Scarr, Seidman, Simms, Sullivan, Walbesser, Wil- 
liams, and Zachary. 



Master of Arts and Master of Education 

Advanced Graduate Specialist in Education 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 

Programs in a variety of educational specialities are offered through three 
levels of degree and diploma programs. In consultation with an adviser, a 
student may choose at the first level, to qualify for the degree of Master of 
Arts or Master of Education. A high degree of professional competence is 

100 



Education 

required for the Advanced Graduate Specialist diploma at the second level 
but in a separate stream from the degree programs. Both the Doctor of 
Education and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered at the third 
level. The master's and doctoral degrees come under the jurisdiction of 
the Graduate School. For the AGS diploma, a student must be matricu- 
lated in the Graduate School but the program is under the control of the 
College of Education. 

During the first semester of graduate work, the student is required to take 
a test battery, at a fee of $5.00, and to submit professional recommenda- 
tions. 

MAJOR AREAS 

Following is a list of major areas. Note that some majors can be pursued 
only at the master's level, whereas others are primarily AGS or doctoral 
programs. For policies and procedures respecting all degree and diploma 
programs, see bulletins issued by the Department of Education. 



Adult Education 
Business Education 
Corrective and Remedial Reading 
""Curriculum and Instruction 

* Educational Administration and 
Supervision 

General 
Elementary 
Secondary 
*Elementary Education 
**Higher Education 
*History and Philosophy of 
Education and Comparative 
Education 
*Home Economics Education 

* Human Development Education 

* Industrial Education 

* Industrial Arts 
Education for Industry 

* Vocational-Industrial 
*Music Education 

* Personnel Services 

Community Counseling 



*School Counseling 
Elementary 
Secondary 
*Student Personnel Admin- 
istration 
Visiting Teacher 
Vocational Rehabilitation 
Counseling 
*Research Design, Statistics, 

Measurement 
*Secondary Education 
Art 

*English 

Foreign Language 
*Mathematics 
*Science 
*Social Studies 
*Special Education 

Emotional Disturbance 

Gifted 

Mental Retardation 

Perceptual Disturbance 



*Starred items indicate majors in which there are doctoral programs. Note 
that there are also master's and for the most part AGS programs in most of 
these areas. Unstarred items indicate majors at the master's and/or AGS 
levels only. 

**Higher Education is a doctoral area in combination with some other area 
of Education. 



101 



Education 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Ed. 100. History of Education in Western Civilization. (3) 

Educational institutions through the ancient, mediaeval, and early modern 
periods in the western civilization, as seen against a background of socio-eco- 
nomic development. (Lindsay.) 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 

A study of the origin and development of the chief features of the present 
system of education in the United States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education. (2-3) 

A study of the great educational philosophers and systems of thought affect- 
ing the development of modern education. (Agre,Noll.) 

Ed. 108. Logic of Teaching. (3) 

An analysis of the structure of basic subject matters in the curriculum and 
of the standard logical moves in teaching. (Agre.) 

Ed. 147. Audio- Visual Education. (3) 

First semester and summer session. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Sensory impressions 
in their relation to learning: projection apparatus, its cost and operation: 
slides, film-strips, and films: physical principles underlying projection: auditory 
aids to instruction: field trips: pictures, models, and graphic materials: inte- 
gration of sensory aids with organized instruction. Recommended for all 
education students. (Herrick, Maley, Schramm.) 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (3) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Constructing and interpreting 
measures of achievement. (Staff.) 

Ed 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) 

Designed as a first course in statistics for students in education. Emphasis is 
upon educational applications of descriptive statistics, including measures of 
central tendency, variability, and association. (Staff.) 

Ed. 155. Laboratory Practices in Reading. (2-4) 

Prerequisite. Ed. 153 or Ed. 157. A laboratory course in which each student 
has one or more pupils for analysis and instruction. At least one class meeting 
per week to diagnose individual cases and to plan instruction. 

(Hall, Sullivan, Wilson.) 

Ed. 157. Corrective-Remedial Reading Instruction. (3) 

Prerequisite. Ed. 153 or equivalent. For teachers, supervisors, and administra- 
tors who wish to identify and assist pupils with reading difficulties. Concerned 
with diagnostic techniques, instructional materials, and teaching procedures use- 
ful in the regular classroom. (Hall, Sullivan, Wilson.) 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology. (3) 

Deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to the work of teach- 
ers. Implications of democratic ideology for educational endeavor, educational 
tasks imposed by changes in population and technological trends, the welfare 
status of pupils, the socio-economic attitudes of individuals who control the 
schools, and other elements of community background. (Grambs.) 

102 



Education 
Ed. 161. Introduction to Counseling and Pupil Services. (3) 

Presents guidance principles and procedures, and examines the functions of 
counselors, psychologists in schools, school social workers, and other pupil 
service workers. (Staff.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (3) 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom 
problems. (Greenberg.) 

Ed. 182. Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. (3) 

Introductory course for majors in rehabilitation counseling, social work, psy- 
chology or education who desire to work professionally with physically or 
emotionally handicapped persons. (Ehrle, Lawrence.) 

Ed. 185. Pupil Transportation. (2) 

Includes consideration of the organization and administration of state, county. 
and district pupil transportation service with emphasis on safety and economy. 
The planning of bus routes; the selection and training of bus drivers, and 
maintenance mechanics; the specification of school buses; and procurement 
procedures are included. (Staff.) 

Ed. 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 

a. Adult Education f- Industrial Arts Education 

b. Counseling g. Student Personnel Administration 

c. Curriculum and Instruction h. Supervision 

d. Educational Administration i. Vocational-Industrial Education 

e. Higher Education 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may be set by the major area in 
which the experience is to be taken. Planned field experience may be pro- 
vided for selected graduate students who have had teaching experience and 
whose application for such field experience has been approved by the educa- 
tion faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to both major and non- 
major students. (Staff.) 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in Ed. 187, Ed. 
224, and Ed. 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who 
have definite plans for individual study of approved problems. Course cards 
must have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty member who 
has approved it. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. (1-6) 

The maximum number of credits that may be earned under this course symbol 
toward any degree is six semester hours, the symbol may be used two or more 
times until six semester hours have been reached. 

The following types of educational enterprises may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed 
cooperatively with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in 

103 



Education 

the present course listing; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy, laboratories, and special education centers; institutes 
developed around specific topics or problems and intended for designated 
groups such as school superintendents, principals, and supervisors. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Ed. 202. The Junior College. (2) 

The philosophy and development of the junior college in the United States 
with emphasis on curriculum and administrative controls. Special attention is 
devoted to the importance, need, place and development of technical-terminal 
curricula. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education. (3) 

A study of present problems in higher education. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 205. Comparative Education. (3) 

A study of historical changes in ways of looking at national school systems, 
and of problems in assessing their effectiveness. (Lindsay, Wiggin.) 

Ed. 206. Seminar in Comparative Education. (2) 

(Lindsay, Wiggin.) 

Ed. 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education. (2) 

(Noll, Wiggin.) 

Ed. 208. Analysis of Educational Concepts. (3) 

Application of techniques of conceptual analysis to select concepts in educa- 
tion. Mental health, adjustment, creativity, and understanding are among the 
concepts considered. (Agre.) 

Ed. 209. Adult Education. (3) 

A study of adult education in the United States, with attention to adult abilities 
and intelligence, programs of adult education, and a rationale for adult educa- 
tion. 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public 

Education. (3) 

The basic course in school administration. Deals with the organization and 
administration of school systems — at the local, state and federal levels; and 
with the administrative relationships involved. (Dudley, Newell, van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization and Administration of Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

The work of the secondary school principal. Includes topics such as personnel 
problems, school-community relationships, student activities, schedule making, 
and internal financial accounting. (J. P. Anderson.) 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration. (3) 

An introduction to principles and practices in the administration of the public 
school finance activity. Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the function 
of finance in the educational program are considered. (van Zwoll.) 

104 



Education 
Ed. 214. School Plant Planning. (2-3) 

An orientation course in which the planning of school buildings is developed 
as educational designing with reference to problems of site, building facilities. 
and equiDment. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

The nature and functions of supervision; various supervisory techniques and 
procedures; human relationship factors; and personal qualities for supervisor. 

(J. P. Anderson, Dudley, Neville). 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary 
Schools. (3) 

Problems in administering elementary schools and improving instruction. 

(Dudley.) 

Ed. 218. School Surveys. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Includes study of school surveys with 
emphasis on problems of school organization and administration, finance and 
school plant planning. Field work in school surveys is required. (Newell.) 

Ed. 219. Seminar in Educational Administration and 
Supervision. (2-4) 

Prerequisite, at least four hours in educational administration and supervision 
or consent of instructor. A student may register for two hours and may take 
the seminar a second time for an additional two hours. (Staff.) 

Ed. 221. Advanced School Plant Planning. (2) 

Ed. 214 is a prerequisite to this course. However, students with necessary 
background may be admitted without completion of Ed. 214. This is an ad- 
vanced course in school plant planning problems. Emphasis is given to 
analysis of the educational program and planning of physical facilities to 
accommodate that program. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Enrollment limited. Designed to help 
teachers, school administrators, and other school staff members to learn to 
function more effectively in developing educational policy in group situations. 
Each student in the course is required to be working concurrently in the field 
with a group of school staff members or citizens on actual school problems. 

(Newell.) 

Ed. 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (6-9) 

a. Counseling e. Student Personnel Administration 

b. Curriculum and Instruction f. Supervision 

c. Educational Administration g. Vocational-Industrial Education 

d. Industrial Arts Education 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to selected students 
whose application for an apprenticeship has been approved by the Education 
faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or 
the equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, school 
system, or educational institution or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship with the apprentice and the other 

105 



Education 

persons involved. Prerequisites, teaching experience, a master's degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland. (Staff.) 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in Ed. 187, 
Ed. 224, and Ed. 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations. (3) 

A study of the interrelationships between the community and the school. Public 
opinion, propaganda, and the ways in which various specified agents and 
agencies within the school have a part in the school public relations program 
are explored. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting. (2) 

An inquiry into the record keeping activities of the school system, including 
an examination of the marking system. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

A comparison of practices with principles governing the satisfaction of school 
personnel needs, including a study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, 
rewards, and other benefits. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 228. Introduction to Student Personnel. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Same as Psych. 228.) A systematic analy- 
sis of research and theoretical literature on a variety of major problems in 
the organization and administration of student personnel services in higher 
education. Included will be discussion of such topics as the student personnel 
philosophy in education, counseling services, discipline, housing, student activi- 
ties, financial aid, health, remedial services, etc. (Rishel, Marx.) 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum. (2-3) 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early child- 
hood through adolesence, including a review of historical developments, an 
analysis of conditions affecting curriculum change, an examination of issues 
in curriculum making, and a consideration of current trends in curriculum 
design. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation in the schools; principles 
for the selection and organization of the content and learning experiences; 
ways of working in classroom and school on curriculum improvement. 

(V. Anderson, Neville.) 

Ed. 237. Curriculum Theory and Research. (2) 

The school curriculum considered within the totality of factors affecting pupil 
behavior patterns, an analysis of research contributing to the development 
of curriculum theory, a study of curriculum theory as basic to improved cur- 
riculum design, the function of theory in guiding research, and the construc- 
tion of theory, through the utilization of concepts from the behavioral research 
disciplines. (Hovet.) 



106 



Economics 
Ed. 241. Problems in the Teaching of Reading. (3) 

A. Elementary Schools 

B. Secondary Schools 

Prerequisite: Ed. 153 or equivalent. Implications of current theory and the 
results of research for the teaching of reading. Attention is given to all areas 
of development reading instruction, with special emphasis on persistent prob- 
lems. (Hall, Sullivan, Wilson.) 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs. (2) 

Surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a teacher-coordinator 
in a work-experience program. Deals particularly with evolving patterns in 
city and country schools in Maryland, and is designed to help teacher-coordi- 
nators, guidance counselors, and others in the supervisory and administrative 
personnel concerned with functioning relationships of part-time cooperative 
education in a comprehensive educational program. (Merrill.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Intensive reading, analysis, and interpretation of research; applications to teach- 
ing fields; the writing of abstracts, research reports, and seminar papers. 

(Staff.) 

Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational 
Education. (2) 

(See Ind. Ed. 248) (Maley.) 

Ed. 249. Personality Theories in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Examination of constructs and research 
relating to major personality theories with emphasis on their significance for 
educators working with the behavior of individuals in school settings. 

(Greenberg.) 

Ed. 250. Cases in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 262. Collecting and interpreting non-standardized pupil ap- 
praisal data; synthesis of all types of data through case study procedures. 

(Ray, Rhoads.) 

Ed. 251. Intermediate Statistics in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 151 or equivalent. A study of the basic statistical techniques 
used for graduate research in education, including tests of significance and sam- 
pling techniques. Necessary arithmetic skills are developed as part of the course. 

(Staff.) 

Ed. 253. Occupational Choice: Theory and Information. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 161. Research and theory related to occupational and edu- 
cational decisions; school programs of related information and other activities 
in occupational decisions. (Byrne, Rhoads.) 

Ed. 254. Organization and Administration of Pupil Services. (2) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 261 or permission of instructor. Instilling the guidance point 
of view and implementing guidance practices. (Greenberg.) 



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Education 

Ed. 255, 256. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading 
Instruction. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, at least 21 credits applicable to the master's program in Cor- 
rective and Remedial Reading. The first semester of the course deals with diag- 
nostic techniques. Each participant will assist in diagnosing reading disabilities 
and in recommending instructional programs for individual pupils. The second 
semester deals with instruction of pupils with reading disabilities. Each par- 
ticipant will plan and execute a program of instruction for an individual or 
a small group, applying findings of the preliminary diagnosis. 

(Hall, Sullivan, Wilson.) 

Ed. 257. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECEED 153 and Ed. 157. For those who wish to become cor- 
rective and remedial reading speialists. Concerned with clinical techniques, in- 
structional materials, and remedial procedures useful to the reading specialist in 
(1) diagnosing serious reading difficulties and (2) planning programs of 
individual and small-group instruction. The work includes the writing of 
diagnostic and progress reports. (Hall, Sullivan, Wilson.) 

Ed. 259. Counseling in the Elementary School. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 250 or consent of instructor. Counseling theory and prac- 
tices as related to children. Emphasis will be placed on an awareness of the 
child's total behavior as well as on specific methods of communicating with 
the child through techniques of play interviews, observations, and the use of 
non-parametric data. (Greenberg.) 

Ed. 260. School Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and 
Practice. (3) 

Prerequisites, Ed. 161, 250, 253. Exploration of learning theories as applied 
to counseling in schools, and practices which stem from such theories. 

(Staff.) 

Ed. 261. Practicum in Counseling. (2-6) 

Prerequisites, Ed. 260 and permission of instructor. Sequence of supervised 
counseling experiences of increasing complexity. Limited to 8 applicants in 
advance. Laboratory. (Staff.) 

Ed. 262. Measurement in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 150. Study of group tests typically employed in school 
testing programs; discussion of evidence relating to the measurement of 
abilities. (Staff.) 

Ed. 265. Theory of Measurement. (2) 

Prerequisites, Ed. 150 and Ed. 151. Treats such topics as theory and techniques 
used in various scaling methods, test analysis, predictive accuracy of scores, and 
equivalence of scores. For students desiring more advanced treatment of 
problems. (Giblette.) 

Ed. 269. Counseling and Pupil Services Seminar (2) 

Enrollment by permission of instructor. (Marx.) 



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Education 
Ed. 271. Advanced Statistics in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 251 or equivalent. Primarily for the education student de- 
siring more advanced work in statistical methodology. Survey of major types 
of statistical design in educational research: application of multivariate statisti- 
cal techniques to educational problems. (Dayton, Stunkard.) 

Ed. 275, 276. Advanced Problems in Art Education. (3, 3) 

These courses are centered about problems of teaching art in the elementary 
and secondary schools in terms of the philosophy of art education today, tech- 
niques and processes in the visual arts, and creative opportunities in the visual 
arts and in art education. The student also will have the opportunity to do 
special work centered about his problems in art education. (Staff.) 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adult Education. (2) 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials. (2) 

Research methodology for case studies, surveys, and experiments; measure- 
ments and statistical techniques; design, form and style for theses and re- 
search reports. Primarily for advanced students and doctoral candidates. 

(Stunkard.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

Bibliography development through a study of source materials in education, 
special fields in education, and for seminar papers and theses. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 283. Psycho-social Aspects of Disability. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 182 or consent of instructor. This course is part of the core 
curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to develop an under- 
standing of the nature and importance of the personal and psycho-social as- 
pects of adult disability. (Ehrle.) 

Ed. 284, 285. Medical Aspects of Disability I & II. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 182 or consent of instructor. Part of the core curriculum 
for rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to develop an understanding of 
the prognosis and complications of disease processes and disorders and a 
knowledge of treatment measures so that realistic vocational rehabilitation 
goals may be developed. (Gessner.) 

Ed. 287. Internship in Education. (12-16) 

a. Curriculum and Instruction e. Student Personnel Services 

b. Educational Administration f. Supervision 

c. Industrial Arts Education g. Vocational-Industrial Education 

d. Pupil Personnel Services 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected students who 
have teaching experience. The following groups of students are eligible: (a) 
any student who has been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's degree; and 
(b) any student who receives special approval by the education faculty for 
an internship, provided that prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least sixty semester hours of graduate work, including at 
least six semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. Each 
intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at least a semester with 
an appropriate staff member in a cooperating school, school system, or educa- 

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Education 

tional institution or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly employed. The intern's 
sponsor maintains a close working relationship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in Ed. 187, Ed. 
224, and Ed. 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

(Staff.) 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research 
problems under the direction of their advisers may register for credit under this 
number. Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. (Staff.) 

Ed. 290. Doctoral Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, passing the preliminary examinations for a doctor's degree in edu- 
cation, or recommendation of a doctoral adviser. Analysis of doctoral projects 
and theses, and of other on-going research projects. A doctoral candidate may 
participate in the Seminar during as many University sessions as he desires, but 
may earn no more than three semester hours of credit in the Seminar. An Ed.D. 
candidate may earn in total no more than nine semester hours, and a Ph.D 
candidate, no more than eighteen semester hours, in the Seminar and in 
Ed. 399. (Dayton, Hovet, Stunkard.) 

Ed. 302. Curriculum in Higher Education. (3) 

An analysis of research in curriculum and of conditions affecting curriculum 
change, with examination of issues in curriculum making based upon the history 
of higher education curriculum development. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 303. Organization and Administration of Higher 
Education. (2) 

Organization and administration of higher education at the local, state, and fed- 
eral levels; and an analysis of administrative relationships and functions and 
their effects on curriculum and instruction. (Kelsey, Wiggin.) 

Ed. 304. Student Personnel and the College Student. (2) 

A demographic study of the characteristics of college students; as well as a 
study of their aspirations, values, and purposes. (Bott.) 

Ed. 305. College Teaching. (3) 

Various methods of college instruction analyzed in relation to the curriculum 
and psychological basis. These would include the case study method, the dem- 
onstration method, the lecture method, the recitation method, teaching machines, 
teaching by television, and other teaching aids. (Kelsey and Staff.) 

Ed. 309. Seminar in Problems of Higher Education. (2) 

(Kelsey.) 

Ed. 310. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2-6) 

An intensive study of the various student personnel functions. A means to 
integrate the knowledges from various fields as they relate to student personnel 
administration. (Marx, Rishel.) 

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Education 
Ed. 399. Research. (Credit variable) 

Registration required to the extent of 6 hours for master's thesis; 6-9 hours 
for a doctoral project; and 12-18 hours for a doctoral dissertation. (Staff.) 

EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 1 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
ECEEd. 105. Science in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Designed to help 
teachers acquire general science understandings, and to develoD teaching 
materials for practical use in classrooms. Includes experiments, demonstrations, 
constructions, observations, field trips, and use of audio-visual materials. The 
emphasis is on content and method related to science units in common use in 
elementary schools. (Blough, Williams.) 

ECEEd. 115. Activities and Materials in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, H. D. Ed. 110 (or concurrent enrollment). Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Storytelling; selection of books; the use, preparation, and presentation 
of such raw materials as clay, paint (easel and finger), blocks, wood, and scrap 
materials. (Stant.) 

ECEEd. 116. Music in Early Childhood Education. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Music 16 or equivalent. Creative 
experiences in songs and rhythms; correlation of music and everyday teaching 
with the abilities and developments of each level; study of songs and ma- 
terials; observation and teaching experience with each age level. (L. Brown.) 

ECEEd. 121. Language Arts in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral 
and written expression, and creative expression. Special emphasis given to skills 
having real significance to pupils. (Edgemon, Leeper, Zachary.) 

ECEEd. 122. Social Studies in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Consideration given to curriculum, organ- 
ization and methods of teaching, evaluation of newer materials, and utilization of 
environmental resources. (O'Neill, Weaver, Duffey, Herman.) 

ECEEd. 123. The Child and the Curriculum. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Relationship of the elementary school 
curriculum to child growth and development. Recent trends in curriculum 
organization; the effect of environment on learning; readiness to learn; and 
adapting curriculum content and methods to maturity levels of children. 

(Seidman, Leeper.) 

ECEEd. 124. Mathematics in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Emphasis on materials and procedures 
which help pupils sense arithmetical meanings and relationships. Helps teachers 
gain a better understanding of the number system and arithmetical processes. 

(Schindler, Ashlock.) 



1 For additional courses in reading see listings under Education. 

HI 



Education 

ECEEd. 125. Art in Elementary Shcool. (2) 

Concerned with art methods and materials for elementary schools. Includes 
laboratory experiences with materials appropriate for elementary schools. 

(Lembach, Longley.) 

ECEEd. 152. Literature for Children and Young People, 
Advanced. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 52, or approval of instructor. Development of literary ma- 
terials for children and young people. Timeless and ageless books, and out- 
standing examples of contemporary publishing. Evaluation of the contribu- 
tions of individual authors and illustrators and children's book awards. Study 
and practice in story-telling, and reading guidance in the classroom and 
library. (D. Brown, E. Anderson, Hall, Pfau.) 

ECEEd. 153. The Teaching of Reading. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. C. Secondary. Concerned with the funda- 
mentals of developmental reading instruction, including reading readiness, use 
of experience records, procedures in using basal readers, the improvement of 
comprehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of chil- 
dren's literature, the program in word analysis, and procedures for determining 
individual needs. (Edgemon, Hall, Herman, Pfau, Zachary.) 

ECEEd. 160. Teacher-Parent Relationships. (2-3) 

A survey of child development, child guidance, and related fields; a review of 
current materials, books, periodicals, leaflets, films, skits; study of individual 
parent conferences; guided observation: discussion leading, role playing, pre- 
paring materials and programs for parent groups, and television skits with 
laboratory practice through the group itself. (Hymes.) 

For Graduates 
ECEEd. 200. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. (Staff.) 

ECEEDd. 205. Problems of Teaching Science in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

An opportunity to pursue special problems in curriculum making, course of 
study development, or other science teaching problems. Class members may 
work on problems related directly to their own school situations. 

(Blough, Williams.) 

ECEEd. 221. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

Implications of current theory and results of research for the language arts in 
the elementary schools. (Edgemon, Leeper, Zachary.) 

ECEEd. 222. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

Application to the social studies program of selected theory and research in 
the social sciences, emphasizing patterns of behavior, environmental influences, 
and critical thinking. (O'Neill, Weaver, Duffey.) 

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Education 

ECEEd. 224. Problems of Teaching Mathematics in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

Implications of theory and results of research for the teaching of arithmetic 
in the elementary schools. (Schindler, Ashlock.) 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104. Child Development Laboratory 

I, II AND III. (2, 2, 2) 

These courses involve the direct study of children throughout the school year. 
Each participant gathers a wide body of information about an individual, 
presents the accumulating data from time to time to the study group for criticism 
and group analysis and writes an interpretation of the dynamics underlying the 
child's learning, behavior and development. Provides opportunity for teachers 
in-service to earn credit for participation in their own local child study group. 

(Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 105. Adolescent Development. (3) 

A study of the interplay of physical, cultural and self forces as they influence 
behavior, development, learning, and adjustment during adolescence. Includes 
observation and case study. This course cannot be used to meet the psycholog- 
ical foundation requirements for teacher certification. 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human 
Development I, II and III. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis 
I, II and III. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 120, 121, 122. Study of Human Development and 
Learning in School Settings I, II, III. (2, 2, 2) 

A sequence of courses which enables in-service teachers and administrators 
to carry on advanced study of human development and learning principles 
in the continuous study and evaluation of several different phases of the school 
program over an extended period of time. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 145. Guidance of Young Children. (3) 

Development of an appreciation and understanding of young children from 
different home and community backgrounds; study of individual and group prob- 
lems. (Hymes.) 

For Graduates 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and 
Child Study. (3) 

Offers a general overview of the scientific principles which describe human 
development and behavior and makes use of these principles in the study of 

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Education 

individual children. Each student will observe and record the behavior of 
an individual child throughout the semester and must have one half-day a 
week for this purpose. It is basic to further work in child study and serves 
as a prerequisite for advanced courses where the student has not had field 
work or at least six weeks of workshop experience in child study. When offered 
during the summer intensive laboratory work with case records may be substi- 
tuted for the study of an individual child. (Kurtz, Kyle, Thompson.) 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be taken before H. D. 201 or concur- 
rently. Emphasizes that understanding human life, growth and behavior depends 
on understanding the ways in which the body is able to capture, control and 
expend energy. Application throughout is made to human body processes and 
implications for understanding and working with people. (Chapin.) 

H. D. Ed. Zk)1. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be taken before H. D. Ed. 202 or con- 
currently. Analyzes the socially inherited and transmitted patterns of pressures, 
expectations and limitations learned by an individual as he grows up. These are 
considered in relation to the patterns of feeling and behaving which emerge 
as the result of growing up in one's social group. (Bowie, Klevan.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200, or its equivalent, H. D. Ed. 201 and H. D. Ed. 202 are pre- 
requisite. Analyzes the organized and integrated pattern of feeling, thinking 
and Dehaving which emerge from the interaction of basic biological drives and 
potentials with one's unique experience growing up in a social group. (Bowie.) 

H, D. Ed. 204, 205. Physical Processes in Human Development. 

(3,3) 

Prerequisite. 200 or equivalent. Describes in some detail the major organic 
processes of: conception, biological inheritance; differentiation and growth of the 
body; capture, transportation and use of energy; perception of the environment; 
coordination and integration of function; adaptation to unusual demands and to 
frustration; normal individual variation in each of the above processes. 

(Chapin.) 

H. D. Ed. 206, 207. Socialization Processes in Human Develop- 
ment I, II. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, 200 or equivalent. Analyzes the processes by which human beings 
internalize the culture of the society in which they live. The major sub-cultures 
in the United States, their training procedures, and their characteristic human 
expresssions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life-goals, and adjust- 
ment patterns are analyzed. Other cultures are examined to highlight the 
American way of life and to reveal its strengths and weaknesses. 

(Kurtz, Mershon.) 

H. D. Ed. 208, 209. Self Processes in Human Development I 
and II. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite. 200 or equivalent. Analyzes the effects of the various physical and 
growth processes, affectional relationships, socialization processes, and peer 
group roles and status on the integration, development, adjustment, and realiza- 
tion of the individual self. This analysis includes consideration of the nature of 

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Education 

intelligence and of the learning process; the development of skills, concepts, 
generalizations, symbolizations, reasoning and imagination, attitudes, values, 
goals and purposes; and the conditions, relationships and experiences that are 
essential to full human development. The more common adjustment problems 
experienced in our society at various maturity levels, and the adjustment 
mechanisms used to meet them are studied. (Goering, Mershon.) 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in 
Human Development. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. De- 
scribes the normal development, expression and influence of love in infancy, 
childhood, adolescence and adulthood. It deals with the influence of parent- 
child relationship involving normal acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, 
and over-protection upon health, learning, emotional behavior and personality 
adjustment and development. (Hatfield.) 

H. D. Ed. 211. Peer-culture and Group Processes in Human 
Development. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. Analyzes 
the process of group formation, role-taking and status-winning. It describes 
the emergence of the "peer-culture" during childhood and the evolution of 
the child society at different maturity levels to adulthood. It analyzes the 
developmental tasks and adjustment problems associated with winning belonging 
and playing roles in the peer group. (Hatfield.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human 
Development I, II, III. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior 
Analysis I, II, III. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 221. Learning Theory and the Educative Process I. (3) 

Provides a systematic review of the major theories of learning and their im- 
pact on education. Considers factors that influence learning. 

(Lawson, Milhollan, Perkins.) 

H. D. Ed. 222. Learning Theory and the Educative Process II. (3) 

Provides an exploration in depth of current theoretical and research develop- 
ments in the field of human learning, especially as related to educational pro- 
cesses. Considers factors that influence learning. (Perkins.) 

H. D. Ed. 230, 231. Field Program in Child Study 1 and II. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers apprenticeship training preparing 
properly qualified persons to become staff members in human development 
workshops, consultants to child study field programs and coordination of mu- 
nicipal or regional child study programs for teachers or parents. Extensive 
field experience is provided. In general this training is open only to persons 
who have passed their preliminary examinations for the doctorate with a 
major in human development or psychology. (Kurtz, Thompson.) 

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Education 

H. D. Ed. 250a, 250b, 250c. Direct Study of Children. (1, 1, 1) 

May not be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 102, 103, or 104. Provides 
the opportunity to observe and record the behavior of an individual child in a 
nearby school. These records will be used in conjunction with the advanced 
courses in human development and this course will be taken concurrently with 
such courses. Teachers active in their jobs while taking advanced courses in 
human development may use records from their own classrooms for this 
course. A minimum of one year of direct observation of human behavior is 
required of all human development students at the master's level. This require- 
ment may be satisfied by this course. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 260. Synthesis of Human Development Concepts. (3) 

Prerequisites, H. D. Ed. 204, 206 and 208. A seminar wherein advanced 
students work toward a personal synthesis of their own concepts in human 
growth and development. Emphasis is placed on seeing the dynamic interrela- 
tions between all processes in the behavior and development of an individual. 

(Morgan.) 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Develop- 
ment. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. An opportunity for advanced students 
to focus in depth on topics of special interest growing out of their basic courses 
in human development. (Staff.) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 115. Research and Experimentation in Industrial Arts 

(3) 

This is a laboratory-seminar course designed to develop persons capable of 
planning, directing, and evaluating effective research and experimentation 
procedures with the materials, products, and processes of industry. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 121. Industrial Arts in Special Education. (3) 

Four hours laboratory per week, one hour lecture. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 170 
and 171 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee $5.00. This course provides 
experiences of a technical and theoretical nature in industrial processes ap- 
plicable for classroom use. Emphasis is placed on individual research in the 
specific area of one's major interest in special education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 125, 126. Industrial Training in Industry I, II. (3, 3) 

The first course is designed to provide an overview of the function of indus- 
trial training, type of programs, organization, development and evaluation. 
The second course (prerequisite the first course) is designed to study specific 
training programs in a variety of industries, plan program visitation, training 
program development, and analyses of industrial training research. (Merrill.) 

Ind. Ed. 143. Industrial Safety Education I. (2) 

This course deals briefly with the history and developing of effective safety 
programs in modern industry and treats causes, effects, and values of industrial 
safety education inclusive of fire prevention and hazard controls. (Staff.) 

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Education 
Ind. Ed. 144. Industrial Safety Education II. (2) 

In this course exemplary- safety practices are studied through conference dis- 
cussions, group demonstrations, and organized plant visits to selected industrial 
situations. Methods of fire precautions and safety practices are emphasized. 
Evaluative criteria in safety programs are formulated. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development. (3) 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and application. Special 
emphasis is placed on principles to be observed in making aids useful to shop 
teachers. Actual construction and application of such devices will be required. 

(Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 157. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 150 or consent of instructor. The construction of objective 
tests for occupational and vocational subjects. (Luetkemeyer.) 

Ind. Ed. 161. Principles of Vocational Guidance. (2) 

This course identifies and applies the underlying principles of guidance to the 
problems of educational and vocational adjustment of students. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 164. Laboratory Organization and Management. (3) 

This course covers the basic elements of organizing and managing an industrial 
education program including the selection of equipment and the arrangement 
of the shop. (Crosby, Schramm.) 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry. (3) 

This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry' in the American 
social, economic, and culture pattern. Representative basic industries are 
studied from the viewpoints of personnel and management organization, indus- 
trial relations, production procedures, distribution of products, and the like. 

(Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts. (2) 
A study of the factors which place industrial arts education in any well- 
rounded program of general education. (Luetkemeyer.) 

Ind. Ed. 167. Problems in Occupational Education. (3) 

The purpose of this course is to secure, assemble, organize, and interpret data 
relative to the scope, character and effectiveness of occupational education. 

(Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 169. Occupational Analysis and Course 
Construction. (3) 

Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis and applies 
the techniques in building and reorganizing courses of study for effective use 
in vocational and occupational schools. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 171. History and Principles of Vocational Education. (3) 

An overview of the development of vocational education from primitive times 
to the present with special emphasis given to the vocational education move- 
ment within the American program of public education. (Staff.) 

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Education 

Ind. Ed. 175. Recent Technological Developments in Products 
and Processes. (3) 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of recent techno- 
logical developments as they pertain to the products and processes of industry. 
The nature of the newer products and processes is studied as well as their effect 
upon modern industry and/or society. (Crosby.) 

For Graduates 
Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) 

This course is intended to assist the student in his development of a point of 
view in regard to industrial arts and its relationship with the total educational 
program. He should, thereby, have a "yardstick*' for appraising current proced- 
ures and proposals and an articulateness for his own professional area. 

(Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. (3) 

This course deals with principles involved in planning a school shop and pro- 
vides opportunities for applying these principles. Facilities required in the 
operation of a satisfactory shop program are catalogued and appraised. 

(Tierney.) 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) 

(Tierney.) 

Ind. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of 
Vocational Education. (2) 

This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, supervision, 
curricular spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational educa- 
tion. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Edu- 
cation. (2) 

This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting re- 
search in the areas of industrial arts and vocational education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts. (3) 

Various methods and procedures used in curriculum development are ex- 
amined and those suited to the field of industrial arts education are applied. 
Methods of and devices for industrial arts instruction are studied and prac- 
ticed. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Edu- 
cation. (2) 

(Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 250. Teacher Education in Industrial Arts. (3) 

This course is intended for the Industrial Arts teacher educator at the college 
level. It deals with the function and historical development of Industrial 
Arts Teacher education. Other areas of content include administration pro- 
gram and program development, physical facilities and requirements, staff 
organization and relationships, college-secondary school relationships, philos- 
ophy and evaluation. (Harrison.) 

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Education 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

GENERAL AND ACADEMIC 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Sec. Ed. 130. The Junior High School. (2-3) 

A general overview of the junior high school. Purposes, functions and charac- 
teristics of this school unit; a study of its population, organization, program 
of studies, methods, staff, and other similar topics, together with their implica- 
tions for prospective teachers. (McClure, Grambs.) 

Sec. Ed. 134. Materials and Procedures for the Secondary 
School Core Curriculum. (3) 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. This course is designed to bring practical suggestions 
to teachers who are in charge of core classes in junior and senior high schools. 
Materials and teaching procedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

(Grambs.) 

Sec. Ed. 139. Speech Methods and Resources in Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

Practical suggestions for developing curricular and extra-curricular speech 
programs. Planning units and courses of study, current trends, and aims of 
speech education, use of printed and audio-visual materials, evaluating of per- 
formance, directed speech activities, and the teaching of listening. (Frank.) 

For Graduates 
Sec. Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education. (2) 

(Adkins, McClure, Risinger.) 

Sec. Ed. 240. Trends in Secondary School Curriculum. (3) 

A. English B. Foreign Language C. Mathematics D. Science E. Social 
Studies F. Speech G. General H. Home Economics Education. Recent 
developments in educational thinking and practice which have affected the cur- 
riculum in one of the specified academic areas. (Staff.) 

Sec. Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education. (2) 

An opportunity to pursue special problems in curriculum making, course of 
study development, or other science teaching problems. Class members may 
work on problems related directly to their own school situations. (Lockard.) 

Sec. Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology. (2) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
B. Ed. 101. Problems in Teaching Office Skills. (3) 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, stand- 
ards of achievement, instructional materials, transcription, and the integration of 
office skills. For experienced teachers. (Patrick.) 

119 



(Grambs.) 



Education 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping 
and Related Subjects. (3) 

Important problems and procedures in the mastery of bookkeeping and related 
office knowledges and skills including a consideration of materials and teaching 
procedures. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

Includes consideration of course objectives; subject matter selection; and 
methods of organizing and presenting business principles, knowledges, and prac- 
tices. (Patrick.) 

For Graduates 

B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business 
Education. (3) 

Major emphasis on departmental organization and its role in the school pro- 
gram, curriculum, equipment, budget-making, supervision, guidance, place- 
ment and follow-up, school-community relationships, qualifications and selec- 
tion of teaching staff, visual aids and in-service programs for teacher develop- 
ment. For administrators, supervisors, and teachers. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 205. Seminar in Business Education. (2) 

The study and evaluation of the literature and research in Business Education. 

B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business 
Education. (2-3) 

Principles, objectives, and practices in business education: occupational founda- 
tions; current attitudes of business, labor and school leaders; general business 
education relation to consumer business education and to education in general. 

(Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 256. Curriculum Development in Business 
Education. (2-3) 

This course is especially designed for graduate students interested in devoting 
the summer session to a concentrated study of curriculum planning in business 
education. Emphasis will be placed on the philosophy and objectives of the 
business education program, and on curriculum research and organization of 
appropriate course content. (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

Prerequisites, H. E. Ed. 140. A study of the managerial aspects of teaching 
and administering a homemaking program, the physical environment, organiza- 
tion, and sequence of instructional units, resource materials, evaluation, home 
projects. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 120. Evaluation of Home Economics. (3) 

The meaning and function of evaluation in education; the development of a plan 
for evaluating a homemaking program with emphasis upon types of evaluation 
devices, their construction, and use. (Spencer.) 

120 



Education 



For Graduates 



H. E. Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education. (2) 

(Spencer. ) 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of 
Home Economics. (2-4) 

Study of home economics programs and practices in light of current educational 
trends. Interpretation and analysis of democratic teaching procedures, out- 
comes of instruction, and supervisory practices. (Spencer.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Mus. Ed. 125. Creative Activities in the Elementary School. (2) 

Prerequisite. Music 16 or consent of instructor. A study of the creative ap- 
proach to singing, listening, playing, rhythmic activity, and composition. These 
topics are studied in correlation with other areas and creative programs. 

(Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 128. Music for Elementary Classroom Teacher. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, Music 16 or consent of instructor. A study of the group activities 
and materials through which the child experiences music. The course is de- 
signed to aid both music specialists and classroom teachers. It includes an out- 
line of objectives and a survey of instructional methods. (Eisenstadt.) 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in the Secondary School. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the vocal and instrumental pro- 
grams in the secondary schools. A survey of the needs in general music and the 
relationship of music to the core curriculum. (Eisenstadt.) 

Mus. Ed. 139. Music for the Elementary School Specialist. (2) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. A survey of instructional materials; objectives; 
organization of subject matter; lesson planning; methods and procedures in 
singing, listening, rhythms, simple instruments and creative activities for the 
music specialist in the elementary school. Twenty periods of observation will 
be required for three credits. (Eisenstadt.) 

Mus. Ed. 163. Band Techniques and Administration. (2) 

Prerequisites, Music 81 and 161. Two lectures and two laboratory hours per 
week. Intensive study of a secondary wind instrument and of rehearsal tech- 
niques. A survey of instructional materials, administrative procedures, and 
band pageantry will be included. (Dunham.) 

Mus. Ed. 170. Methods and Materials for Class Piano Instruc- 
tion. (2) 

The study of the principles and techniques of teaching class piano. The fol- 
lowing groups, beginning and advanced, will be used for demonstrations: 
elementary school children, junior and senior high school students, adults. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of materials. (de Vermond.) 



121 



Education 

Mus. Ed. 171. String Teaching in the Public Schools. (2) 

A study of the problems of organizing and developing the string program in 
the public schools. Emphasis is placed on exploratory work in string instru- 
ments, on the study of teaching techniques, and on the analysis of music litera- 
ture for solo, small ensembles, and orchestra. (Berman.) 

Mus. Ed. 173. The Vocal Music Teacher and School Organiza- 
tion. (2) 

Prerequisite, practice teaching or teaching experience. Study of the function 
of the vocal music teacher in the elementary and secondary schools. Students 
will serve as resource teachers for those enrolled in Mus. Ed. 139. Open to 
graduate students by permission of instructor. (Fanos.) 

Mus. Ed. 175. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the 
High School. (2-4) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of suitable vocal and choral 
repertoire for the high school. Problems of diction interpretation, tone pro- 
duction, and phrasing. The course is designed primarily for choral directors and 
teachers of voice classes. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 180. Instrumental Music for the High School. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of the repertoires for high 
school orchestra, band, and small ensemble. Problems of interpretations, 
intonation, tone quality, and rehearsal techniques. The course may be re- 
peated for credit, since different repertoires are covered each time the course 
is offered. (Dunham.) 

For Graduates 

Mus. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Music and Music Education. 
(3) 

The application of methods of research to problems in the fields of music and 
music education. The preparation of bibliographies and the written exposition 
of research projects in the area of the student's major interest. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 201. Administration and Supervision of Music in the 
Public Schools. (3) 

The study of basic principles and practices of supervision and administration 
with emphasis on curriculum construction, scheduling, budgets, directing of 
in-service teaching, personnel problems, and school-community relationships. 

(Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 204. Current Trends in Music Education. (Seminar). (3) 

A survey of current philosophies and objectives of music in the schools. The 
scope and sequence of the music curricula, vocal and instrumental, on the ele- 
mentary and secondary levels. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 205. Vocal Music in the Elementary Schools. (3) 

A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in the ele- 
mentary schools. A study of the music curriculum as a part of the total school 
program, and of the roles of the classroom teacher and the music specialist. 

(Grentzer.) 

122 



Education 
Mus. Ed. 206. Choral Conducting and Repertoire. (3) 

The study and reading of choral literature of all periods, including the con- 
temporary, suitable for use in school and community choruses. Style, interpre- 
tation, tone quality, diction, rehearsal and conducting techniques are analyzed. 

(Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 207. Vocal Music in the Secondary Schools. (3) 

A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in teaching 
junior and senior high-school classes in general music, history and apprecia- 
tion, theory, and voice; and in directing choral groups and community sing- 
ing. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 208. The Teaching of Music Appreciation. (3) 

A study of the objectives for the elementary and secondary levels; the tech- 
niques of directed listening, the presentation of theoretical and biographical 
materials, course planning, selection and use of audio-visual aids, and library 
materials, and the correlation between music and other arts. (Dunham.) 

Mus. Ed. 209. Seminar in Instrumental Music. (2) 

A consideration of acoustical properties and basic techniques of the instru- 
ments. Problems of ensemble and balance, intonation, precision, and interpreta- 
tion are studied. Materials and musical literature for orchestras, bands and 
small ensembles are evaluated. (Dunham.) 

Mus. Ed. 210. Advanced Orchestration and Band Arranging. 
(Seminar). (2) 

Prerequisite, Music 147 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. A 
study of arranging and transcription procedures in scoring for the orchestra 
and band. Special attention is given to the arranging problems of the in- 
strumental director in the public schools. (Dunham.) 

Mus. Ed. 250. History and Aesthetics of Music Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The study of the development of peda- 
gogical practice in music education, their aesthetic implications and educational 
values. (Grentzer.) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional chil- 
dren, stressing preventive and remedial measures. 

(Campbell, Renz, Simms.) 

Sp. Ed. 171. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. (3-6) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. C. Perceptually impaired. Prerequisite, 
Sp. Ed. 170. Studies the diagnosis, etiology, physical, social, and emotional 
characteristics of exceptional children. (Renz, Simms.) 

Sp. Ed. 172. Education of Exceptional Children. (3-6). 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. C. Perceptually impaired. Prerequisite. Sp. 
Ed. 171 or equivalent. Offers practical and specific methods of teaching ex- 
ceptional children. Selected observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 

(Campbell, Simms.) 

123 



Education 

Sp. Ed. 173. Curriculum for Exceptional Children. (3-6) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 171 or equivalent. 
Examines the principles and objectives guiding curriculum for exceptional chil- 
dren; gives experience in developing curriculum for these children; studies 
various curricula currently in use. (Campbell, Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 175. Education of the Slow Learner. (3) 

Course content includes the characteristics of the slow learner and those edu- 
cational practices which are appropriate for the child who is functioning as 
a slow learner. (Hebeler.) 

For Graduates 
Sp. Ed. 200. Exceptional Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Deals primarily with research relevant to 
the intellectual, psychological, physical, and emotional characteristics of ex- 
ceptional children. (Renz.) 

Sp. Ed. 201. Emotionally Handicapped Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, Special Education 200 and consent of instructor. Deals with 
epidemeology, etiology, classification, diagnostic procedures, behavioral char- 
acteristics, treatment and prevention of child and adolescent disturbances. 

(Huber.) 

Sp. Ed. 205. The Exceptional Child and Society. (3) 

Prerequisite. Sp. Ed. 200 or consent of instructor. Relationship of the role 
and adjustment of the child with an exceptionality to societal characteristics. 

(Renz.) 

Sp. Ed. 210. Administration and Supervision of Special Educa- 
tion Programs. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Consideration of the determination, estab- 
lishment and function of educational programs for exceptional children for 
administrative and supervisory personnel. (Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 215. Evaluation and Measurement of Exceptional Chil- 
dren and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisites, Ed. 150, Ed. 151, Sp. Ed. 200. Deals with the understanding 
and interpretation of the results of psychological and educational tests appli- 
cable for use with exceptional children. (Campbell, Simms.) 

Sp. Ed. 220. Educational Diagnosis and Planning for Exceptional 
Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 215. Deals with the identification of learning characteris- 
tics of exceptional children and the planning of appropriate programs. 

(Campbell, Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 221. Psycho-Educational Programming with Emotionally 
Handicapped Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, Special Education 200. Special Education 201 and consent of 
instructor. Deals with factors pertinent to therapeutic education of disturbed 
children and adolescents in special treatment settings. (Huber.) 

124 



English Language and Literature 

Sp. Ed. 225. Problems in the Education of the Mentally Re- 
tarded. (3) 

Prerequisite. 9 hours Sp. Ed. including Sp. Ed. 200. or consent of instructor. 
Consideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological 
and other relevant research and theoretical material relevant to the determina- 
tion of trends, practices, regarding the mentally retarded. (Renz.) 

Sp. Ed. 230. Problems in the Education of the Gifted. (3) 

Prerequisite. 9 hours Sp. Ed. including Sp. Ed. 200, or consent of instructor. 
Consideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological 
and other relevant research and theoretical material relevant to the determina- 
tion of trends, practices, regarding the gifted. (Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 235. Problems in the Education of Children with Emo- 
tional Disturbances. (3) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours Sp. Ed. including Sp. Ed. 200, or consent of instructor. 
Consideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological 
and other relevant research and theoretical material relevant to the determina- 
tion of trends, practices, regarding the emotionally disturbed. (Huber.) 

Sp. Ed. 240. Problems in the Education of Children with 
Perceptual Impairment. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in Education of the Perceptually Impaired, Special Edu- 
cation 215, and Special Education 220 or consent of instructor. Consideration 
of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological and other 
relevant research and theoretical material relevant to the determination of 
trends, practices, regarding the perceptually impaired. (Campbell, Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours in Special Education, or consent of instructor. An over- 
view of education of exceptional children. (Hebeler.) 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors: Murphy, Aldridge, Bode, Cooley, Harman (emeritus), 
McManaway (p.t.), Manning, Mish, and Zeeveld. 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Beall, Brown, Fleming, Gravely, 
Hovey, Lutwack, Myers, Portz, G. Smith, Thorberg, Ward, and 
Weber. 

Assistant Professors: Birdsall, Brosnahan, Bryer, Cooper, Duffy, 
Herman, S. Holton, Houppert, Jellema, Kinnaird, Kenney, Law- 
son, Logan, McMillan, Panichas, Rodgers, D. Smith, and Wilson. 

Visiting Lecturer: Fletcher. 

The Department of English offers graduate work leading to the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates normally take 

125 



English Language and Literature 

both major and minor work within the Department of English, but with 
permission students may take minor work in other departments. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Master of Arts include: (1) 
Eng. 201; (2) 3 credits from the following: Eng. 101, 102, 105, 107; 
(3) 6 credits in the English 230 series. Candidates must meet a foreign 
language requirement by either (1) passing the Graduate School reading 
examination in French or German; or (2) submitting a record of 12 un- 
dergraduate credits in one of the following languages: French, German, 
Spanish, Italian, Latin, or Greek. Students who wish to continue their 
work in this department towards the doctorate will be expected to elect 
the first alternative. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in- 
clude: (1) a reading knowledge of French and German; (2) Eng. 102 
and 202; (3) an oral qualifying examination (normally waived for Uni- 
versity of Maryland Masters of Arts in English), to be taken in the first 
year of residence after the master's degree or its equivalent; (4) a com- 
prehensive written examination on English and American literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

(Herman, James.) 
Eng. 102. Old English. (3) 

(Brosnahan, S. Holton.) 
Eng. 104. Chaucer. (3) 

(Cooley, Brosnahan, McMillan.) 

Eng. 105. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

(Same as Foreign Language 101.) (Miller.) 

Eng. 107. American English. (3) 

(Staff.) 

Eng. 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 112, 113. Literature of the Renaissance. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld, Mish, Cooper.) 
Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld, Cooper, Houppert, Logan, D. Smith.) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1880. (3) 

(Ward.) 
Eng. 121. Milton. (3) 

(Murphy, Mish, Weber.) 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 
1600-1660. (3) 

(Mish, Murphy.) 

126 



English Language and Literature 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700. (3 

(Wilson. 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

(Myers. 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3, 3) 

(Weber, Kinnaird, G. Smith. 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Fletcher. 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel. (3, 3) 

(Ward, Kenney. 

Eng. 141. Major British Writers. (3) 

Two writers studied intensively each semester. 

(Fleming, Panichas, Fletcher. 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry. (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema. 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama. (3) 

(Weber, Bryer. 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel. (3) 

(Panichas, Lawson. 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy. (3) 

(Barnes. 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Gravely, Hovey, Thorberg, Bryer, Lawson. 

Eng. 152. The Novel in America. (3) 

(Hovey, Thorberg. 

Eng. 155, 156. Major American Writers. (3, 3) 

(Gravely, Lutwack, Portz, Manning. 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

(Birdsall, McMillan. 
Eng. 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

(Myers, Herman, Rodgers. 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing. (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema. 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. (Fleming. 

Eng. 172. Playwriting. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. (Fleming. 



127 



English Language and Literature 

Eng. 190, 191. Honors Conference and Reading. (1, 1) 

(Staff.) 
Eng. 199. Senior Proseminar in Literature. (3) 

(Portz.) 
For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

(Mish, Hovey, Bryer, Cooper, D. Smith.) 

Eng. 202. Middle English. (3) 

(Brosnahan, S. Holton.) 

Eng. 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 

(Cooley, Brosnahan.) 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3,3) 

(Zeeveld, McManaway, Mish.) 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth Century Literature. (3) 

(Mish.) 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Myers.) 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar Nineteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Kinnaird, Fletcher.) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism. (3, 3) 

(Lutwack.) 

Eng. 218. Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts. (3) 

(Myers.) 

Eng. 225,226. Seminar in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Bode, Hovey.) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Aldridge.) 

Eng. 230. Special Studies in English Literature to 1600. (3) 

(Cooley, Cooper.) 

Eng. 232. Special Studies in English Literature, 1600-1800. (3) 

(Mish, Myers.) 

Eng. 235. Special Studies in Nineteenth Century English 
Literature. (3) 

(Brown, G. Smith.) 
Eng. 237. Special Studies in American Literature. (3) 

(Lutwack, Portz.) 

Eng. 241, 242. Studies in Twentieth Century Literature. (3,3) 

(Bode, Hovey, Panichas, Lawson.) 

Eng. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 

128 



Electrical Engineering 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Tompkins, Chu, Reed, and Wagner. 

Associate Professors: Basham, Ferris, Hochuli, Price, Reiser, Rutelli, 
and Simons. 

Assistant Professors: Ginnings, Marcovitz, and Pugsley. 

Lecturers: Bullis, Degenford, H. C. Jones, Schulman, and Whicker. 

Instructors Firouzabadi, Friedman, Glock, Guha, Hahn, Larson, R. D. 
Martin, R. L. Martin, Miller, Moldavsky, Pottala, and Rumbaugh. 

Courses in electrical engineering are presently offered in three general 
areas. The areas, and topics in which opportunities for specialization and 
research are particularly favorable, are as follows: 

1. ELECTROMAGNETICS AND PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS 

a. Radio Wave Propagation and Antennas 

b. Quantum Electronics; Lasers 

c. Electron and Ion Beams; Cyclotron Design 

d. Semiconductor Device Properties and Characterization (Also part 
of Area 2) 

e. Electrical Engineering in Medicine and Biology (Also part of 
Area 2) 

2. CIRCUITS AND CONTROL SYSTEMS 

a. Electronic Circuits and Systems 

b. Network Theory 

c. Continuous and Sampled Data Control Systems 

3. INFORMATION SCIENCES 

a. Computer Systems Design and Analysis 

b. Switching Theory 

c. Communication and Information Theory 

d. Mechanized Storage and Retrieval of Scientific Information 

Departmental requirements for advanced degrees, in addition to the re- 
quirements of the Graduate School, are as follows: 



129 



Electrical Engineering 

Master of Science 

The major program must be selected from two areas of electrical engineer- 
ing. The minor program must be composed of either 

1. An 8-12 semester credit program outside the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Department, or 

2. at least 6 credits outside the Department and at least 6 credits in 
an area of electrical engineering not included in the major pro- 
gram. 

A closed book Master's Qualifying Examination is required. It is designed 
to insure that the student has a broad basic knowledge of electrical engi- 
neering and applied mathematical principles. The student should take it 
as early in his program as practicable, but before he begins his last 12 
credits of course work or his thesis research. 

At least 6 semester credits of thesis registration and an acceptable thesis 
are required. Once started, thesis registration must continue consecutively 
each fall and spring until the thesis is completed. The thesis should present 
an independent accomplishment in a research, development, or applica- 
tions area of engineering. It may, under certain circumstances, be super- 
vised off campus, but it cannot be a (security) classified document. A 
comprehensive oral final examination is required. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The major and minor programs must be arranged with the Department on 
an individual basis, and considerable flexibility is possible. While the major 
program must not be limited to one area of electrical engineering, it must 
contain a recognizable primary area in prepartion of research. If a single 
minor area is selected, it must consist of a coherent set of courses taken out- 
side the Department. If two minor areas are selected, the first must be out- 
side the Department; the second may consist of 9-12 credits in an area of 
electrical engineering not included in the major program. 

A two-part written Doctoral Qualifying Examination is required. The first 
part covers the areas of mathematics, physics, and engineering that support 
electrical engineering. The second part deals specifically with electrical 
engineering through the first year of graduate study. A substantial choice 
of problems is provided, to accommodate varying backgrounds. The exam- 
ination should be taken during the first 12 semester credits of course work 
after the Master's degree requirements have been completed. 

The student will subsequently prepare a state-of-the-art paper in the area 
in which he intends to do his thesis. This should be done during the first 
one or two semesters of research registration, and will prepare the student 
for the Research Area Oral Examination, which follows. This examination 
consists first of presentation of the state-of-the-art paper, then questions on 
it and basic areas that directly support the proposed research. The goal of 
this examination is to establish the student's potential ability to perform 
the independent research he is proposing to carry out, and completes the 

130 



Electrical Engineering 

departmental requirements for Admission to Candidacy for the degree. 
The written Qualifying Examination must be repeated if the Research Area 
Oral is not completed within five years. 

The doctoral thesis must present a significant contribution to the state-of- 
the-art and normally requires at least one year of full time work. 
The Doctoral Final Examination is prescribed by the Graduate School and 
is described elsewhere in this catalog. 

ELECTROMAGNETICS AND PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ENEE. 130,* 132.* Engineering Electromagnetics I, II. (3, 3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites. Math. 22. Physics 21. and ENEE 
90, with an average grade in Math. 21-22. Physics 20-21 and ENEE 90 of C 
or better. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Electric and magnetic 
fields, using vector notation: Maxwell's equations; Lorentz force law; capaci- 
tance, inductance, and resistance: motion of charged particles; fields in material 
media, polarization, magnetization: boundary value problems. The study of 
electromagnetism is continued in ENEE 134. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE. 134.* Engineering Electromagnetics III. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 132. Required of sen- 
iors in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 132. The wave equation 
and the impedance concept; plane waves; reflection and refraction; wave 
guides and transmission lines; Smith charts, lumped models. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE. 135.* Electromagnetic Measurements Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
134. Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 134. Experiments on 
field mapping, transmission line matching, impedance measurement; micro- 
wave measurements of standing wave ratio, power, frequency, Q, and coup- 
ling. (Ferris.) 

ENEE. 140.* Transducers and Electrical Machinery. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 141 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisites, ENEE 120, ENEE 132. Corequisite, ENEE 141. Required of 
seniors in electrical engineering. Electromechanical transducers; theory of elec- 
tromechanical systems; power and wide-band transformers; rotating electrical 
machinery from the theoretical and performance points of view. (Guha.) 

ENEE. 141.* Transducers and Electrical Machinery 
Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite. ENEE 
140. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in 
association with ENEE 140. Experiments on transformers; synchronous ma- 
chines; induction motors; synchros: loudspeakers; other transducers. (Guha.) 



Graduate Credit not givei. to E. E. Majors for these courses. 

131 



Electrical Engineering 

ENEE. 170. Antennas and Wave Propagation (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite. ENEE 134. Review of Max- 
well's equations; radiation; antennas; radio wave propagation. (Reed.) 

ENEE. 182. Introduction to Semiconductor Physical 
Electronics. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 132 and Physics 153, 
or equivalent. Basic properties of semiconductors; idealized p-n junction and 
transistor theory; d-c parameters: low-frequency characteristics; frequency re- 
sponse; high-frequency characteristics; transistors as amplifiers and as switches; 
field effect transistors; integrated circuit considerations; other junction devices. 

(Tompkins.) 

ENEE. 184. Physical Electronics of Vacuum and Gaseous 
Devices. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 132 and Physics 153, 
or equivalents. Essential principles of quantum mechanics and quantum 
statistics; electron emission; electrons in electric and magnetic fields; space 
charge effects; vacuum tubes; electron beams; gas discharges and plasmas 
in electronic devices. (Reiser.) 

ENEE, 186. Particle Accelerators, Physical and Engineering 
Principles. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 132 and Physics 153, 
or consent of the instructor. Sources of charged particles; methods of accelera- 
tion and focusing of ion beams in electromagnetic fields; basic theory, design, 
and engineering principles of particle accelerators. (Reiser.) 

For Graduates 
ENEE. 201. Electromagnetic Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 134 or 170 or 215, or equivalent. 
Theoretical analysis and engineering applications of Laplace's, Poisson's, and 
Maxwell's equations. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE. 206, 207, Microwave Engineering (3, 3) 

Two lectures, or one lecture and one laboratory, per week. Prerequisite, 
ENEE 201 or ENEE 216. Laboratory fee, ENEE 207, $5.00. Basic consid- 
erations in solving field problems using differential equations; circuit concepts 
and their validity at high frequency; guided electromagnetic waves; principles 
of masers and lasers; propagation and diffraction, including the optical region. 
Fundamental experiments at microwave and optical frequencies. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE. 215, 216. Radio Wave Propagation. (3, 3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate degree in electrical engi- 
neer ng. physics, or mathematics. Maxwell's wave equation; concept of retarded 
magnetic vector potential; propagation over plane earth; propagation over 
spherical earth: refraction: meteorological effects; complex antennas; air-to-air 
propagation; lobe modulation. (Reed.) 

ENEE. 245. Electrical Techniques in Medicine and Biology. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, mathematics through differential equa- 
tions and physics through electricity and magnetism, or equivalent. Electrical 

132 



Electrical Engineering 

properties of biological tissues and cell suspensions; alternating-current im- 
pedance spectroscopy; transducers and related instrumentation systems for 
biological measurements; biological control systems; interaction of electro- 
magnetic fields with biological systems. (Ferris.) 

ENEE. 250. Mathematics for Electromagnetism. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate preparation in electro- 
magnetic theory and advanced calculus. Tensors and curvilinear coordinates; 
partial differential equations of electrostatics and electrodynamics; functionals, 
integral equations, and calculus of variations as applied to electromagnetism. 

(Rutelli.) 

ENEE. 251. Antenna Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 250 or equivalent. Review of 
Maxwell's equations; radiative networks; linear antennas;; antenna arrays; aper- 
ture antennas; slot antennas: advanced topics. (Rutelli.) 

ENEE. 280. Electronic Properties of Semiconductors. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 182, or Math. 66 and Phys. 53, 
or equivalents. Properties of crystals; elementary topics from quantum me- 
chanics; energy bands; electron transport theory; conductivity and Hall effect; 
statistical distributions; Fermi Level; impurities; non-equilibrium carrier distri- 
butions; normal modes of vibration; effects of high electric fields; p-n junction 
theory, avalanche breakdown; tunneling phenomena; surface properties. 

(Bullis.) 

ENEE. 282. Technology of Semiconductor Devices and 
Materials. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 182 or Phys. 53 or ENEE 290. 
Basic processes involved in the fabrication of transistors and other semicon- 
ductor devices; crystal growth and epitaxy; crystal orientation; purification and 
doping of crystals; diffusion; electrical and optical properties; photo-resist 
techniques; oxide passivation; contacts; device assembly and packaging. Em- 
phasis is on silicon but other materials of engineering significance are con- 
sidered. (Bullis.) 

ENEE. 290. Charged Particle Dynamics, Electron and Ion 
Beams. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. General prin- 
ciples of single-particle dynamics; mapping of electric and magnetic fields; 
equation of motion and methods of solution; production and control of charged 
particle beams; electron optics; Liouville's theorem; space charge effects in 
high current beams; design principles of special electron and ion beam de- 
vices. (Reiser.) 

CIRCUITS AND CONTROL SYSTEMS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ENEE. 120.* Circuit Analysis II. (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 121 for related laboratory 
course.) Prerequisite, ENEE 90. Corequisites, ENEE 121, Math. 66. Required 



* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these courses. 

133 



Electrical Engineering 

of juniors in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 90. Complex 
frequency and frequency response: application of both frequency domain and 
time domain concepts: mutual inductance and transformers; polyphase concept; 
Fourier and Laplace transform methods: driving point and transfer functions; 
controlled sources. (Basham.) 

ENEE. 121.* Circuit Laboratory II. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
120. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in 
association with ENEE 120. Steady-state and transient circuit measurements; 
frequency response. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE. 122.* Electronic Circuits I. (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 123 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 120. Corequisites, ENEE 123, and ENEE 130. Required 
of juniors in electrical engineering. Transistors and electron tubes in dc, pulse, 
and small-signal situations; analysis of basic amplifiers; biasing; basic elec- 
tronic switches; tuned and wideband amplifiers, feedback. ENEE 124 con- 
tinues where ENEE 122 ends. (Simons.) 

ENEE. 123.* Electronics Laboratory I. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
122. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken 
in association with ENEE 122. Transistor and vacuum-tube characteristics; 
basic electronic switches; amplifiers; design practice. To the extent possible, 
work will be individual or in two-man squads. (Simons.) 

ENEE. 124.* Electronic Circuit II. (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 125 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 122. Corequisites, ENEE 132, ENEE 123, and ENEE 125. 
Required of seniors in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 122. 
Electron tubes and transistors in continuous-wave and pulse applications Class-C 
circuits: modulation and detection; pulse generation, delay, and storage; feed- 
back amplifiers. (Simons.) 

ENEE. 125.* Electronics Laboratory II. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
124. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken 
in association with ENEE 124. Specification and design of electronic circuits. 
Students work as individuals or as responsible members of a project team. 

(Simons.) 
ENEE. 144. Electronic Circuits. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 60 or equivalent knowledge 
of circuit theory, or consent of the instructor. This course is intended for 
students in the Physical Sciences, and for engineering students requiring ad- 
ditional study of electronic circuits. Credit not normally given for this course 
in an electrical engineering major program. (ENEE 123 or 125 may op- 
tionally be taken as an associated laboratory, as is appropriate.) P-n junctions, 
transistors: vacuum tubes; biasing and operating point stability; switches, large- 
signal analysis; models: small signal analysis; frequency response: feedback and 
multistage amplifiers: pulse and digital circuits. (Simons.) 



* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these courses. 

134 



Electrical Engineering 
ENEE. 146. Electronics for Life Scientists. (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory 
fee. $5.00. Prerequisites, college algebra and a physics course including basic 
electricity and magnetism. Not accepted for credit in an electrical engineering 
major program. The concept of an instrumentation system with emphasis upon 
requirements for transducers, amplifiers, and recording devices; design criteria 
and circuitry for power supplies, amplifiers, and pulse equipment; specific 
instruments used for biological research; problems of shielding against hum 
and noise pickup and other interference problems characteristic of biological 
systems. (Ferris.) 

ENEE. 148. Electronic Instrumentation for Physical Science (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee. 
$5.00. Prerequisites, ENEE 60 or 120. Physics 104 or equivalent, or consent 
of the instructor. The concept of instrumentation systems from sensor to 
readout; discussion of transducers; system dynamics, precision, and accuracy; 
measurement of electrical parameters; direct, differential, and potentiometric 
measurements; bridge measurements; time and frequency measurements; wave- 
form generaton and display. (Ferris.) 

ENEE. 150. Network Synthesis. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 120. Positive real 
functions; synthesis of driving point impedances; network functions; approxi- 
mation methods; Chebychev and Butterworth filters. (Chu.) 

ENEE. 154. Feedback Control Systems. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, Math. 66 and ENEE 122. (See 
ENEE 155 for related laboratory course.) Feedback system operation and 
design; stability criteria: basic design techniques; correlation of time and fre- 
quency domain concepts; flow graph algebra; system synthesis to a variety of 
specifications. (Larson.) 

ENEE. 155. Feedback Control Systems Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
154. Projects to enhance the student's understanding of feedback control sys- 
tems and familiarize him with some of the devices used in the control field. 

(Martin.) 

ENEE. 172. Advanced Pulse Techniques. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 173 for related laboratory 
course.) Prerequisite. ENEE 124 or ENEE 146 or equivalent. Bistable, 
monstable, and astable circuits; sweep circuits: synchronization; counting; gates; 
comparators; magnetic core circuits; semiconductor and vacuum tube circuits. 

(Schulman.) 

ENEE. 173. Pulse Techniques Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, 
ENEE 172 or ENEE 164 and permission of the instructor. Experiments on 
switching circuits; bistable, monstable, and astable circuits; sweep circuits; 
gates; comparators. (Simons.) 



135 



Electrical Engineering 

ENEE. 174. Advanced Radio Engineering. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite. ENEE 124. (See ENEE 175 
for related laboratory course. - ) The coupling coefficient concept: high-fre- 
quency effects: design and optimization of amplifiers: stability considerations: 
gain limitations: noise figure: design of harmonic generators; design of stable 
oscillators. (Wagner.) 

ENEE. 175. Advanced Radio Engineering Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, S5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 
174. Experiments on multiple tuned amplifiers, noise figure measurements: 
class-C amplifiers: varactors; oscillators: modulators. Projects. (Friedman.) 

ENEE. 190. Mathematical Foundations of Circuit Theory. (3) 

Three hours of. lecture per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 120 and Math. 22, or 
equivalent. This course is intended primarily for students preparing for grad- 
uate study. Review of determinants: linear equations: matrix theory; eigen- 
values: theory of complex variables; inverse Laplace transforms. Applications 
are drawn primarily from circuit analysis. (Marcovitz.) 

For Graduates 
ENEE. 202. 203. Transients in Linear Systems. (3,3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or me- 
chanical engineering or physics. Operational circuit analysis: the Fourier in- 
tegral: transient analysis of electrical and mechanical systems and electronic 
circuits by the Laplace transform method. (Wagner.) 

ENEE. 204. Advanced Electronic Circuit Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 124 or consent of the instructor. 
Comparison of bipolar and field effect transistors: detailed frequency response 
of single and multistage amplifier: design of feedback amplifiers; d-c coupling 
techniques: design of multistage tuned amplifiers. (Simons.) 

ENEE. 212. 213. Servomechanism. (3,3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 154 and ENEE 202, or equiva- 
lent. Linear control systems with deterministic and stochastic inputs; non- 
linear control systems: time and frequency domain techniques. (Price.) 

ENEE. 230. Mathematics of Circuit Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate circuit theory and ad- 
anced calculus. Determinants: linear equations: matrix theory: eigenvalues; 
theory of complex variables: inverse Laplace transforms: applications to cir- 
cuit analysis. (Marcovitz.) 

ENEE. 232. 233. Network Synthesis. (3,3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 231 or equivalent. Design of driv- 
ing-point and transfer impedance functions with emphasis on the transfer loss 
and phase ol minimum-phase networks: flow diagrams: physical network 
characteristics, including relations existing Between the real and imaginary 
components of network functions: modern methods of network synthesis. 

(Basham.) 

136 



Electrical Engineering 
ENEE. 234. Graph Theory in Network Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 230. Linear graph theory as ap- 
plied to electrical networks: cut sets and tie sets: incidence matrices: trees, 
branches, and mazes: development of network equations by matrix and index 
notation: network characteristic equations for natural circuit behavior: signal 
flow graph theory and Mason's rule: stability of active two-port networks. 

(Wagner.) 

ENEE. 235. Applications of Tensor Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 202 or ENEE 230. The mathe- 
matical background of tensor notation which is applicable to electrical engi- 
neering problems. Applications of tensor analysis to electric circuit theory and 
to field theory. (Wagner.) 

ENEE. 238. Sampled Data Control Systems. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate or graduate preparation 
in linear feedback control theory. Z-transform and modified Z-transform 
method of analysis: root locus and frequency response method of analysis; dis- 
crete and continuous compensation; analysis with finite pulse width; digital con- 
trol systems. (Price.) 

ENEE. 280. Electronic Properties of Semiconductors. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 182. or Math. 66 and Phys. 153, 
or equivalents. Properties of crystals; elementary topics from quantum me- 
chanics: energy bands: electron transport theory; conductivity and Hall effect; 
statistical distributions: Fermi Level: impurities; non-equilibrium carrier dis- 
tributions; normal modes of vibration: effects of high electric fields: p-n 
junction theory, avalanche breakdown: tunneling phenomena: surface properties. 

(Bullis.) 

ENEE. 282. Technology of Semiconductor Devices and 
Materials. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 182 or Phys. 153 or ENEE 290. 
Basic processes involved in the fabrication of transistors and other semi- 
conductor devices; crystal growth and epitaxy; crystal orientation: purification 
and doping of crystals; diffusion; electrical and optical properties; photo-resist 
techniques: oxide passivation: contacts: device assembly and packaging. Em- 
phasis is on silicon but other materials of engineering significance are con- 
sidered. (Bullis.) 

ENEE. 284. Semiconductor Device Models. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 182 and ENEE 234. or equiva- 
lents. Single-frequency models for transistors: small-signal and wide-band 
models for general non-reciprocal devices; hybrid-pi and tee models for tran- 
sistors; relationship of models to transistor physics: synthesis of wide-band 
models from terminal behavior: computer utilization of models; models for 
other semiconductor devices. (Tompkins.) 



137 



Electrical Engineering 

INFORMATION SCIENCES 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ENEE. 142.* Engineering Probability. (2) 

Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, Math. 22. ENEE 90. Required 
of electrical engineering majors. Probability theory, discrete and continuous; 
statistical distribution functions and their parameters; applications to electrical 
engineering. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE. 158. Signal Analysis, Modulation, and Noise. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 122, ENEE 142. Signal 
transmission through networks; transmission in the presence of noise; statisti- 
cal methods of determining error rate and transmission effects; modulation 
schemes. (Price.) 

ENEE. 160. Electronic Analog Computers. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 122. Programming the 
analog computer; analog computing components; error analysis, repetitive opera- 
tion; synthesis of systems using the computer; hybrid computer systems. 

(Chu.) 

ENEE. 162. Logic of Digital Computers. (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Prerequisites, Math. 21, ENEE 80, or equivalent. Symbolic logic and 
Boolean Algebra; switching circuits; simplification; binary and other number 
representations and codes; storage elements defined logically; basic sequential 
circuits; digital systems. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE. 164. Digital Computer Technology. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (See ENEE 173 for related laboratory.) Prerequisites, 
ENEE 122, ENEE 162. Organization of electronic digital computers; electronic 
subassemblies; integrated circuits; digital storage; digital and analog magnetic 
recording; analog-digital conversion. (Tompkins.) 

For Graduates 
ENEE. 218, 219. Signal Analysis and Noise. (3,3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, equivalent to ENEE 158. Mathematical 
description of noise; spectral analysis; noisy signal detection; optimum linear 
systems. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE. 220. Statistical Communication Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 219. Statistical description of sig- 
nals; testing statistical hypotheses; likelihood testing; statistical estimation of 
signal parameters. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE. 221. Information Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Math. 133 or equivalent. Information 
measure; channels; source encoding; error correcting codes. (Marcovitz.) 



* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these Courses. 

138 



Electrical Engineering 
ENEE. 262. Switching Theory I. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 162 or consent of instructor. Ap- 
plications of Boolean algebra to combinational switching circuits: symmetric 
functions; majority and threshold networks: function decomposition: minimi- 
zation: prime implicants and algorithms for finding them; minimal and nearly 
minimal covers. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE. 263. Switching Theory II. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 262 or consent of instructor. Models 
for sequential machines; equivalence; state minimization; incompletely speci- 
fied machines; linear sequential machines; regular expressions, partitions, and 
state assignment. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE. 270. Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 162 or equivalent. Introduction to 
design techniques for digital computers; review of Boolean algebra; digital 
arithmetic; logic circuits; digital memories: design of computer elements, arith- 
metic unit, and control unit. A simple digital computer will actually be designed 
during the course. (Chu.) 

ENEE. 272. Advanced Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 270 or equivalent; knowledge of 
computer programming. Computer design languages: computer organization; 
computer design by language translation; integrated logic circuit design; digital 
memories including read-only and associative memories; case studies of com- 
puter designs. (Chu.) 

ENEE. 274. Digital Systems Engineering. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 270. Systems aspects of digital- 
computer-based systems; data flow analysis; system organization; control lan- 
guages; consoles and displays; remote terminals; software-hardware tradeoff; 
system evaluation; case studies from selected applications areas such as data 
acquisition and reduction, information storage, or the like. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE. 276. Computers for Differential Equation Solution. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 162, knowledge of elementary dif- 
ferential equations, numerical methods, and programming. Mechanistic meth- 
ods for differential equation solution; application of analog or hybrid com- 
puters for the purpose; digital differential analyzers; digital-analog simulation 
on a general-purpose digital computer. MIMIC Language and examples of 
its use. Class will run simulation program on an IBM 7094 or similar com- 
puter. (Chu.) 

RESEARCH, SEMINARS, AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ENEE. 180. Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. May be taken for repeated credit 
up to a total of 6 credits, with the permission of the student's advisor and 
the instructor. Selected topics from the literature of modern electrical engi- 
neering. (Jones.) 



139 



Entomology 

For Graduates 

ENEE. 222. Graduate Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Seminars are held on topics such as micro- 
wave engineering, radiation engineering, non-linear circuit analysis, tensor 
analysis, and other topics of current interest. May be taken for repeated 
credit. (Basham.) 

ENEE. 223. Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Selected topics from the current 
literature of electrical engineering. May be taken for repeated credit. 

(Basham.) 

ENEE. 399. Electrical Engineering Research. 

Prerequisite, consent of thesis supervisor. Six semester hours of credit in 
ENEE 399 are required of M. S. degree candidates and a minimum of eighteen 
semester hours are required of Ph.D. candidates. A thesis covering an ap- 
proved research problem and written in conformity with the regulations of 
the Graduate School is a partial requirement for either the degree of Master 
of Science or the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in electrical engineering. 

(Basham.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors: Bickley, Cory (emeritus), Ditman, Jones and Langford. 

Associate Professors: Harrison, Messersmith, and Steinhauer. 

Assistant Professor: Menzer. 

The Department of Entomology offers work toward the degrees of Master 
of Science and Dc~tor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree 
who are not employed by the Department are expected to register for a 
minimum of 24 semester hours credit during two semesters at College Park. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculturf. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 4. The theory and practice of apiary management. Designed 
for the student who wishes to keep bees or requires a practical knowledge of 
bee management. $3.00 Lab fee. (Abrams.) 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the Department. A study of insects and related 
anthropods that affect the health and comfort of man directly and as vectors 
of disease. In discussions of the control of such pests the emphasis will be 
upon community sanitation. $3.00 Lab fee. (Jones.) 

Ent. 107. Insecticides. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Department. The development 
and use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and other important chem- 
icals, with reference to their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, and host 
injury. Recent research emphasized. (Menzer.) 

140 



Entomology 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and occasional demon- 
strations. Prerequisite, consent of the Department. The functioning of the 
insect body with particular reference to blood, circulation, digestion, absorption, 
excretion, respiration, reflex action and the nervous system, and metabolism. 

(Jones.) 

Ent. 116. Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse 
Plants. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 and Zool. 1. The recognition, biology, and control of in- 
sects injurious to plants grown in ornamental planting, nurseries, and other 
glass. $3.00 Lab fee. (Staff.) 

Ent. 119. Insect Pests of Domestic Animals. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the Department. The recognition, biology, and 
control of insects and related arthropods injurious to horses, cattle, hogs, sheep. 
goats, and poultry. $3.00 Lab. fee. (Staff.) 

Ent. 120. Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 1. Introduction to the principles of systematic entomology 
and the study of all orders and the important families of insects; immature 
forms considered. $3.00 Lab. fee. (Bickley.) 

Ent. S121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Summer session. Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory fee. $3.00. This course will include the elements of morphology, 
taxonomy and biology of insects using examples commonly available to high 
school teachers. It will include practice in collecting, preserving, rearing and 
experimenting with insects insofar as time will permit. (Staff.) 

Ent. 122. Insect Morphology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory fee. $3.00. Prerequisite, Ent. 1. A basic study of insect form, 
structure and organization in relation to function. (Staff.) 

Ent. 123. Insect Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. Prerequisites, Ent. 1, Chem. 31 or equivalent. Lectures 
and laboratory exercises on the cuticle, growth, endocrines, muscles, circula- 
tion, nerves, digestion, excretion and reproduction in insects. (Jones.) 

Ent. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Credit and prerequisites, to be determined by the 
Department. Investigation of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 199. Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of 
original work, reviews and abstracts of literature. (Staff.) 



141 



Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

For Graduates 
Ent. 205. Insect Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of the Department. A study of fundamental factors in- 
volved in the relationship of insects to their environment. Emphasis is placed 
on the insect as a dynamic organism adjusted to its surroundings. $3.00 Lab. 
fee. (Harrison.) 

Ent. 206. Culicidology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
(Alternate years.) The classification, distribution, ecology, biology, and control 
of mosquitoes. $3.00 Lab. fee. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 207. Advanced Insect Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1967-68.) Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of organic chemistry and 
Ent. 109 or equivalent. In this course students rear experimental insects, make 
up reagents and solutions to be used, set up equipment, calibrate it, and make 
detailed measurements and observations on the functions of selected organ sys- 
tems. $3.00 Lab. fee. (Jones.) 

Ent. 208. Toxicology of Insecticides. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. (Alternate years.) A study of the 
physical, chemical and biological properties of insecticides. Emphasis is placed 
on the relationship of chemical structure to insecticidal activity and mode of 
action. Mechanisms of resistance are also considered. (Staff.) 

Ent. 210. Entomological Topics. (Credit arranged) 

First and second semesters. One lecture or one two-hour laboratory a week 
for each credit hour. Prerequisite, consent of Department. Lectures, group 
discussions or laboratory sessions on selected topics such as: Aquatic Insects, 
Biological Control of Insect. Entomological Literature, Forest Entomology, His- 
tory of Entomology. Insect Biochemistry, Insect Embryology. Immature Insects, 
Insect Behavior, Principles of Economic Entomology. Insect Communication, 
Principles of Entomological Research. (Staff and visiting lecturers.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. (1-6) 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the Department. First and sec- 
ond semesters. Studies of minor problems in morphology, physiology, taxonomy 
and applied entomology, with particular reference to the preparation of the 
student for individual research. (Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Required of graduate students majoring in ento- 
mology. This course involves research on an approved project. A dissertation 
suitable for publication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a 
part of the requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics is a center for 
fundamental theoretical and experimental research in the physical and 

142 



Food Science 

mathematical sciences. It plays a vital role in the University program of 
higher education by providing facilities for predoctoral and postdoctoral 
study. Further, it provides an important link between the University and 
the broad scientific and technological community. 

Investigations in applied mathematics traditionally have centered on partial 
differential equations of mathematical physics, specifically initial value, 
boundary value and eigenvalue problems and their numerical treatment. 
More recently, attention has been drawn to current questions in ordinary 
differential equations such as hereditary dependence and control theory, and 
to mathematical methods in statistical mechanics and theoretical biology. 
Theoretical studies of gas dynamics and plasma dynamics are carried out 
in conjunction with laboratory investigations employing facilities such as 
shock tubes and a thermal plasma device (Q-machine). Applications to 
astrophysics, e.g., the elemental abundance problem, to nonlinear mechan- 
ics and to space physics engage the attention of the staff. Research in 
meteorology as an extension of fluid dynamics to planetary atmospheres 
encompasses both theoretical and experimental techniques. The Institute's 
research program is partially supported by outside contracts and grants. 

Staff members are available for thesis direction of graduate students pursu- 
ing advanced degrees in various departments of the University. Approxi- 
mately 100 master's and Ph.D. degrees were earned during the period 
1951-65 in the departments of Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, 
Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering under the direction of 
Institute faculty. In addition, staff members have taught many graduate and 
undergraduate courses in other departments of the University. Fellowships 
and research graduate assistantships are available to support the studies of 
qualified graduate students, and the Institute offers its facilities and financial 
support both to post-doctoral fellows and senior scholars on leave from 
other institutions. 

Institute staff members work closely with faculty and staff of other Uni- 
versity departments on problems of mutual interest, and with scientists at 
many governmental and educational institutions in the Washington-Balti- 
more area. 

FOOD SCIENCE 

Graduate courses of study in food science leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are offered under the aegis of the 
Department of Dairy Science and the Department of Horticulture. Certain 
courses are offered also by the Departments of Animal Science and Poultry 
Science. The student may pursue work in the chemical, bacteriological, and 
nutritional aspects of dairy products and the industrial phases of milk pro- 
cessing; or in the chemical physical, bacteriological and nutritional aspects 
of processed vegetables and fruits. 

Students interested in food science should consult either the Department 
of Dairy Science or the Department of Horticulture for information on 
specific departmental requirements. (See course listings under Dairy Sci- 
ence, page 89, and Horticulture, page 184.) 

143 



Foreign Languages and Literature" 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Professors: Bingham, Falls (emeritus), Goodwyn, Jones, Nemes, 
Quynn, Prahl, Rand, and Zucker (Emeritus). 

Visiting Professors: Bettex and Iwry. 

Associate Professors: Parsons (Acting Head), Alter, Dobert, Gram- 
berg. Hering, Kramer (Emeritus), Mendeloff, Rosenfield, and 
Rovner. 

Assistant Professors: Bridgers, Boyd, Chen, Demaitre, Greenberg, 
Hall, Hitchcock, Kelly, Miller, Moeller, Norton, Roswell, 
Vassylkivsky, and Zimmerman. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Candidates must pass, in addition to written examinations in the courses 
pursued, a written examination based on the reading lists in their respec- 
tive fields of French. German and Spanish, established by the Department. 
The examination will test the general familiarity of the candidate with 
his respective field and his powers of analysis and criticism. The oral 
examination will deal chiefly with the field of his thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least one 
year before the degree is awarded. This examination will include linguistics 
and each of the major literary fields. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Foreign Language. 101. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

Introduction to the basic concepts of modern descriptive linguistics. Phonology, 
morphology, syntax. Examinations of the methods of comparative linguistics, 
internal reconstruction, dialect, geography. (Miller.) 

Foreign Language. 102. Phonetics and Phonemics. (3) 

Training in identification, description, and symbolization of various sounds 
found in language. Study of scientific techniques for classifying sounds into 
units which are perpetually relevant for a given language. (Miller.) 

FRENCH 

French 0. Intensive Elementary French. (Audit) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students should 
register as auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the French language 
designed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. (Hall.) 

144 



Foreign Languages and Literature 
French 101. Applied Linguistics. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contributions to the effective teaching 
of foreign languages. Comparative study of English and French, with em- 
phasis upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction o\ 
related drills. ( Mendeloff. > 

French 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translation from English into French, free compo- 
sition, practical study of syntactical structure. (Staff.) 

French 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French literary history from the ninth through the fifteenth century, selected 
readings from representative texts. (Mendeloff.) 

French 111. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3) 

The Renaissance in France; humanism; Rabelais and Calvin; the Pleiade: 
Montaigne. (Staff.) 

French 115-116. French Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: Descartes. Pascal. Corneille. Racine. 
Second semester: the remaining great classical writers, with special attention 
to Moliere. (Quynn, Rosenfield.) 

French 125-126. French Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: development of the philosophical and 
scientific movement; Montesquieu. Second semester: Voltaire, Diderot. Rous- 
seau. (Bingham.) 

French 131-132. French Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Romanti- 
cism to Symbolism. Second semester: the major prose writers of the same 
period. (Bingham, Quynn.) 

French 141-142. French Literature of the Twentieth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism 
to the present time. Second semester; the contemporary novel. (Alter.) 

French 171-172. French Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. French life, customs, culture, traditions. First 
semester: the historical development. Second semester: present-day France. 

(Rosenfield, Bingham.) 

For Graduates 
French 201. The History of the French Language. (3) 

A rapid survey of the major phenomena of French linguistic history, con- 
sidered from the internal and external points of view. Introduction to lin- 
guistic terminology. Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. 

(Mendeloff.) 

145 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

French 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

A comparative study of the principal Romance languages: phonology, morphol- 
ogy, syntax, lexicon. (Mendelofr.) 

French 207. Elementary Old French. (3) 

An introduction to Old French accidence and vocabulary through the reading 
of the Chanson de Roland. Readings in modern French of representative works 
of Old French literature. (Staff.) 

French 208. Old French Phonology and Morphology. (3) 

Phonological changes from Vulgar Latin to Old French; the resultant Old French 
accidence and morphological changes from Vulgar Latin to Old French. 
Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. (Staff.) 

French 209. Medieval French Culture. (3) 

Extensive readings in modern French translations of the masterpieces of Old 
French literature: lectures and readings on the historical and social setting of 
these works in feudalism. (Staff.) 

French 210. Elementary Old Provencal. (3) 

The essentials of Old Provencal phonology and morphology necessary to read- 
ing: readings in Old Provencal lyric poetry and other representative literary 
works. Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. (Staff.) 

French 211-212. Seminar in French Classicism. (3, 3) 

Origin and underlying ideas of classicism will be discussed. Main classic writers 
to be studied, with shifting emphasis from year to year. (Quynn.) 

French 220-221. The Age of Enlightenment. (3. 3) 

The literature of ideas from Bayle to Condorcet. (Bingham.) 

French 230. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Sources and theories of French romanticism will be studied, along with works 
of major French romantic writers. Different writers or genres will be stressed 
from year to year. (Quynn.) 

French 235-236. The Realistic Novel in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

The main works of Balzac. Stendhal, Flaubert, the Goncourts, Zola, Maupassant, 
and Daudet. (Alter.) 

French 243-244. The Contemporary French Theater. (3, 3) 

The most important writers and trends in French drama from the end of the 
nineteenth century to the present. (Staff.) 

French 245-246. Seminar in the Contemporary Novel. (3, 3) 

Critical study of the entire work of a major twentieth century novelist, such as 
Proust. Gide, Mauriac. Duhamel. Usually a different novelist will be treated 
in the second semester. (Staff.) 

French 251-252. The History of Ideas in France. (3, 3) 

Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected in French literature. First semester, 
17th and 18th centuries. Second semester, 19th and 20th centuries. Conducted 
in English. (Rosenfield.) 

146 



Foreign Languages and Literature 
French 271-272. Advanced Writing and Stylistics. (3, 3) 

Composition, translation, explication de textes of both prose and poetry. Pre- 
requisite, French 121 or 122 or their equivalent. (Staff.) 

French 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Designed to give graduate students a background of a survey of French litera- 
ture. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. 

(Staff.) 

French 291-292. Seminar. Topic to be determined. (3, 3) 

(Staff.) 

French 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of master's 
and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

GERMAN 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
German 0. Intensive Elementary German. (Audit) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students snould 
register as auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the German language 
designed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. (Hering.) 

German 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translation from English into German, free 
composition, letter writing. (Staff.) 

German 125-126. German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing. 
Herder, Goethe, Schiller. (Hering. Staff.) 

German 131-132. German Literature of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Study of the literary movements from romanticism 
to naturalism. (Prahl, Staff.) 

German 141-142. German Literature of the Twentieth 
Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Haupt- 
mann to the present. Modern literary and philosophical movements will be 
discussed. (Dobert, Staff.) 

German 171-172. German Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions: 
great men, customs, and general culture. (Dobert. Staff.) 

German 191. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. (Staff.) 

Attention is called to Comp. Lit. 106, Romanticism in Germany, and 
Comp. Lit. 107, The Faust Leg nd in English and German Literature. 

147 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
German 201. History of the German Language. (3) 

Lectures on the evolution of modern German. Reading and analysis of 
selected illustrative texts. (Jones.) 

German 203. Gothic. (3) 

An introduction to historical Germanic linguistics. A grammatical analysis 
and reading of selections from the Gothic Bible. (Jones.) 

German 204. Old High German. (3) 

A study of Old High German grammar, and readings from the literature of the 
period. (Jones.) 

German 205. Middle High German. (3) 

Grammar and readings in Middle High German literature. (Jones.) 

German 207. Literature of Old High German and Middle 
High German. (3) 

A study of the literature of the Old High German and Middle High German 
periods. (Jones.) 

German 211-212. Literature of the Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth Centuries. (3, 3) 

Study of the Reformation, Humanism and the Baroque. The main works of 
Luther, Sachs, Wickram, Fischart, Opitz, Gryphius, Grimmelshausen. (Hering.) 

German 224-225. Goethe and his Time. (3, 3) 

The main works of Goethe and his contemporaries as reflecting the literary 
development from Rococo to Biedermeier. (Hering.) 

German 226. Schiller. (3) 

Study of Schiller's works with emphasis on his dramas. (Prahl.) 

German 230. German Romanticism. (3) 

Special consideration given to the ideas and the style of romantic writers. 

(Prahl.) 

German 234. The German Drama of the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

Kleist, Grabbe, Biichner, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann. (Dobert.) 

German 250. The German Lyric. (3) 

Types of lyrical poetry from "Minnesang" to Symbolism with emphasis on 
post-Goethean lyricists. (Hering.) 

German 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of German 
literature. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. 

(Dobert.) 

148 



Foreign Languages and Literature 
German 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff.) 

German 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of master's 
and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

SPANISH 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Spanish 101. Applied Linguistics. (3) 

Nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to the effective teaching of 
foreign languages. Comparative study of English and Spanish with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation, and construction of related 
drills. (Mendeloff.) 

Spanish 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Training in self-expression in Spanish, free composi- 
tion, writing and speaking. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

Spanish literary history from the eleventh through the fifteenth century. Selective 
readings from representative texts. (Mendeloff, Parsons.) 

Spanish 111. Poetry of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Renaissance, mystics, and baroque poetry. (Goodwyn, Rand.) 

Spanish 112. Prose of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Selected readings in the pastoral, sentimental, picturesque novel and in the Ro- 
mances of Chivalry. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 113. Drama of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Centuries. (3) 

Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, and 
others. (Parsons, Rovner.) 

Spanish 114. Lope de Vega. (3) 

Selected works of Lope de Vega. (Parsons, Rovner.) 

Spanish 115-116. Cervantes. (3, 3) 

Renaissance, mystics, and baroque poetry. (Goodwyn, Rand.) 

Spanish 125. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

Reform and neo-classicism: Feijoo and Luzan. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 131. Nineteenth Century Fiction. (3) 

Reading of some of the significant novels of the nineteenth century. 

(Parsons, Rand.) 

149 



Foreign Languages and Literature 
Spanish 135. Modern Spanish Poetry. (3) 

Significant poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Nemes, Rand.) 

Spanish 136. Modern Spanish Drama. (3) 

Significant plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Parsons, Rand.) 

Spanish 141-142. Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First semester. Modern Spanish thought in the Generation of 1898 and after. 
Second semester; the contemporary Spanish novel. (Rand.) 

Spanish 161. Spanish- American Fiction. (3) 

The novel and short story from the Wars of Independence to the present and 
their reflection of society in the Hispanic republics of the Western Hemi- 
sphere. (Nemes, Rovner.) 

Spanish 162. Spanish-American Poetry. (3) 

Representative poetry after 1800 and its relation to European trends and 
writers. (Nemes, Rovner.) 

Spanish 163. Spanish-American Essay. (3) 

Social and political thought from Bolivar to Vasconcelos and its relationship 
to social and political conditions in Spanish America. (Nemes, Rovner.) 

Spanish 171, 172. Spanish Civilization. (3,3) 

A survey of two thousand years of Spanish history, outlining the cultural 
heritage of the Spanish people, their great men, traditions, customs, art and 
literature, with special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and lit- 
erary history. (Rand.) 

Spanish 173, 174. Latin-American Civilization. (3,3) 

Introduction survey of the cultures of Latin America; the historical-political 
background and the dominating concepts in the lives of the people. 

(Nemes, Rovner.) 

For Graduates 

Spanish 201. The History of the Spanish Language. (3) 

(Mendeloff.) 

Spanish 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

(Mendeloff.) 

Spanish 207. Medieval Spanish Litterature. (3) 

(Mendeloff.) 

Spanish 215, 216. Seminar: The Golden Age in Spanish 
Literature. (3,3) 

(Goodwyn, Parsons, Rovner.) 

Spanish 233. The Novel of the 19th Century. (3) 

(Goodwyn, Parsons.) 

150 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Spanish 234. The Drama of the 19th Century. (3) 

(Goodwyn, Parsons.) 

Spanish 237-238. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry (Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Centuries). (3, 3) 

Study of a specific poetic movement such as Romanticism, Modernism, Post- 
modernism. (Nemes, Rand, Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 241-242. Spanish Prose of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

The thought and aesthetics of the work of major writers of essay and novel, 
such as the Generation of 1898 and the novel after 1940. (Rand.) 

Spanish 245. The Drama of the Twentieth Century. (3) 

Important works of Benavente, Azorin, Garcis, Lorca, Casona, Buero Vallejo 
and others. (Rand.) 

Spanish 263. Colonial Spanish-American Literature. (3) 

Colonial thought and writers and their influence in the national literatures. 

(Nemes.) 

Spanish 264. National Spanish- American Literature, Seminar. (3) 

Study of a significant work, genre, or groups of works in a certain country or 
group of countries of Spanish America in relation to other literatures with 
special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and literary history. 

(Nemes.) 

Spanish 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of Hispanic lit- 
erature. Extensive readings, with reports and periodic conferences. (Staff.) 

Spanish 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be chosen. (Staff.) 

Spanish 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credits to be determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of 
master's and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

RUSSIAN 

Russian 103, 104. Advanced Composition. (3,3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

Russian 125. Russian Literature of the 18th Century. (3,3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

Russian 131, 132. Russian Literature of the 19th Century. (3,3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

Russian 135. Modern Russian Poetry. (3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

Russian 136. Modern Russian Drama. (3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

151 



Geography 

Russian 137. Modern Russian Fiction. (3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

Russian 141, 142. Soviet Russian Literature. (3,3) 



(Hitchcock.) 



CHINESE 



Chinese 101, 102. Readings from Chinese History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Based on an anthology of historians from the 
Chou to the Ching dynasties. (Chen.) 

Chinese 171, 172. Chinese Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. This course supplements Geography 134 and 135. 
Cultural Geography of East Asia. It deals with Chinese literature, art, folklore, 
history, government, and great men. Second semester: developments in China 
since 1911. The course is given in English translation. (Chen.) 

HEBREW 

Hebrew 101. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Pentateuch. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 102. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Prophets. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 103. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment). (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 104. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Greenberg.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Professors: Hu, Van Royen. 

Associate Professors Ahnert, Chaves, Deshler (Acting Head). 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Mika, Schmeider, and Wiedel. 

The following topics should have been studied by students undertaking 
graduate work in this discipline. 

Morphology 

Meteorology and Climate 

Map and Air Photo Interpretation 

Introductory Cartography 

Agricultural or Mineral Resources 

General Economic and/or Urban Geography 

Methodology 

Regional Geography 

152 



Geography 

The course work in geography should amount to twenty-four semester 
hours. However, for students of competence, gaps in the above topics can 
be made up by reading course and examination by a member of the gradu- 
ate faculty. 

Supplemental topics which the student should have studied include: Intro- 
ductory Botany, Economic Principles, and Cultural Anthropology. 

The Department requires a student working for the master's degree to show 
competence in one foreign language approved by the Department. 

Students who do not have the above background will be accepted as grad- 
uate student in provisional status. Graduate credit will not be given for 
courses taken to make up deficiencies. 

In addition to meeting the general requirements of the Graduate School, 
candidates for the master's degree in geography are required to have taken 
successfully: one field course (Geog. 170 or 200, or equivalent), a 
course in cartography, a course in soils and one seminar. In addition 
to the final oral examination, the candidate for the master's degree in 
geography is required to pass satisfactorily a written examination covering 
the field in which he has worked, his understanding of basic principles, 
and his power of reasoning. 

A graduate student seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree in geography 
must take a comprehensive written and oral examination to determine 
whether he has sufficiently broad and profound knowledge and understand- 
ing of the entire field of geography to qualify as a candidate for the 
doctor's degree. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 

Prerequisite, Geog. 10, or Geog. 15, or permission of instructor. A study of the 
cultural and economic geography, and the geographic regions of eastern United 
States and Canada, including an analysis of the significance of the physical 
basis for present-day diversification of development, and the historical geo- 
graphic background. (Staff.) 

Geog. 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo-America. (3) 

Prerequisite, Geog. 10, or Geog. 15, or permission of instructor. A study of 
western United States, western Canada, and Alaska along the lines mentioned 
under Geog. 100. (Staff.) 

Geog. 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials. (3) 

A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic concepts designed ex- 
clusively for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of geography 
in relation to the social and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools 
of geography, source materials, and the problems of presenting geographic 
principles. (Staff.) 



153 



Geography 

Geog. 104. Geography of Major World Regions. (3) 

A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and prospects of the world's 
principal human-geographic regions, including Europe, Anglo-America, the 
Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the causal 
factors of differentiation and the role geographic differences play in the inter- 
pretation of the current world scene. This course is designed especially for 
teachers. (Staff.) 

Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland and Adjacent Areas. (3) 

An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, and population in 
relation to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade in the state of Maryland 
and adjacent areas. (Staff.) 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Caribbean 
America. (3) 

An analysis of the physical framework, broad economic and historical trends, 
cultural patterns, and regional diversification of Mexico, Central America, 
the West Indies, and parts of Colombia and Venezuela. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South America. 
(3) 

A survey of natural environment and resources, economic developments and 
cultural diversity of the South American republics, with emphasis upon prob- 
lems and prospects of the countries. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 120. Geography of Europe. (3) 

First and second semester. Agricultural and industrial development of Europe 
and present-day problems in relation to the physical and cultural setting of the 
continent and its natural resources. (Ahnert, Von Royen.) 

Geog. 122. Economic Reserves and Development of Africa. (3) 

The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural and mineral produc- 
tion; the various stages of economic development and the potentialities of the 
future. (Deshler.) 

Geog. 125. Geography of Asia. (3) 

Lands, climates, natural resources and major economic activities in Asia 
(except Soviet Asia). Outstanding differences between major regions. (Hu.) 

Geog. 130. Economic and Political Geography of Eastern Asia. 
(3) 

Study of China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines: physical geographic setting, 
population; economic and political geography. Potentialities of major regions 
and recent developments. (Hu.) 

Geog. 131. Economic and Political Geography of South and 
Southeast Asia. (3) 

Study of the Indian subcontinent, Farther India, Indonesia: physical geographic 
setting; population; economic and political geography. Potentialities of various 
countries and regions and their role in present Asia. (Hu.) 



154 



Geography 
Geog. 134. Cultural Geography of China and Japan. (3) 

Survey of geographical distribution and interpretation of cultural patterns of 
China and Japan. Emphasis on basic cultural institutions, outlook on life, unique 
characteristics of various groups. Trends of cultural change and contemporary 
problems. (Hu.) 

Geog. 140. Geography of the Soviet Union. (3) 

The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geographic factors in the 
expansion of the Russian state. The geography of agricultural and industrial 
production, in relation to available resources, transportation problems, and 
diversity of population. (Anderson.) 

Geog. 146. Regional Geomorphology. (3) 

Regional and comparative morphology, with special emphasis upon Anglo- 
America. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 150. History and Theory of Cartography. (3) 

The development of maps throughout history, geographical orientation, coordi- 
nates, and map scales. Map projections, their nature, use, and limitations. 
Principles of representation of features on physical and cultural maps. Modern 
uses of maps and relationships between characteristics of maps and use types. 

(Staff.) 

Geog. 151, 152. Cartography and Graphics Practicum. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design, and con- 
struction of various types of maps and graphs. Relationships between map 
making and modern methods of production and reproduction. Trips to repre- 
sentative plants. Laboratory work directed toward cartographic problems en- 
countered in the making of non-topographic maps. (Wiedel.) 

Geog. 153. Problems in Cartographic Representation and Pro- 
cedure. (3) 

Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study of cartographic 
compilation methods. Principles and problems of symbolization, classification, 
and representation of map data. Problems of representation of features at dif- 
ferent scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and lettering 
stickup and map composition. (Staff.) 

Geog. 154. Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) 

Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Schools of topographic 
concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical means of determining map 
reliability, map utility, and source materials. Nature, status, and problems of 
topographic mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic special 
use maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of reliability. 

(Wiedel.) 

Geog. 155. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation. (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Interpretation 
of aerial photographs with emphasis on the recognition of landforms of dif- 
ferent types and man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other data 
that may be derived from aerial photographs. Types of aerial photographs and 
limitations of photo interpretation. (Ahnert.) 

755 



Geography 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural Re- 
sources. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 10, or Geog. 15. The 
nature of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in 
the world, and the geographic distribution of certain major crops and animals 
in relation to the physical environment and economic geographic conditions. 
Main problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral Resources. 
(3) 

First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 10, or Geog. 15. The nature 
and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic, and other minerals. 
Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Consequences of geo- 
graphic distribution and problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course. (3) 

First semester. Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field 
observation of land use in selected rural and urban areas to eastern Maryland. 
One lecture per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Primarily 
for undergraduates. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 180. Methodology and History of Geography. (3) 

First semester. For undergraduate and graduate majors in Geography. May be 
taken also by students with a minimum of 9 hours in systematic and 6 hours in 
regional geography. A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, 
nature, and basic principles of geography, with special reference to the major 
schools of geographic thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important 
geographical works and methods of geographic research. (Hu.) 

Geog. 190. Political Geography. (3) 

Geographical factors in national power and international relations; an analysis 
of the role of "Geopolitics" and "Geostrategy", with special reference to the 
current world scene. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation. (3) 

The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns of transport 
routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of the natural 
environment; transportation centers and their distribution. (Staff.) 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of the elements of site and location with 
reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world cities will 
be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be ap- 
praised. (Mika.) 

Geog. 198. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

First and second semester. Independent study under individual guidance. 
Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 hours 
in geography, and to graduate students. Any exception should have the ap- 
proval of the Head of the Department. (Staff.) 



156 



Geography 



For Graduates 



Geog. 200. Field Course. (3) 

Field work in September, conferences and reports during first semester. For 
graduate students in geography. Open to other students by special permission of 
the Head of the Department of Geography. Practical experience in conduct- 
ing geographic field studies. Intensive training in field methods and techniques 
and in the preparation of reports. (Staff.) 

Geog. 210, 211. Seminar in the Geography of Latin America. 
(3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 110, 111 or consent of instruc- 
tor. An analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, ex- 
ploitation of mineral resources and land utilization. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa. 
(3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 120, 122 or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and develop- 
ment of Europe and Africa. (Van Royen, Deshler.) 

Geog. 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning the geography of 
East Asia with emphasis on special research methods and techniques applicable 
to the problems of this area. (Hu.) 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, reading knowledge of Russian and 
Geog. 140 or consent of instructor. Investigation of special aspects of Soviet 
geography. Emphasis on the use of Soviet materials. (Staff.) 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East. (3) 

Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography. (Credit arranged.) 

First or second semester. The historical and mathematical background of 
cartographic concepts, practices and problems, and the various philosophical and 
practical approaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by the 
presentation of specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. 

(Staff.) 

Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Advanced 
study of elements and controls of the earth's climates. Principles of climatic 
classification. Special analysis of certain climatic types. (Staff.) 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Study of 
principles, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical and regional 
climatology relating to such problems and fields as transportation, agriculture, 
industry, urban planning, human comfort, and regional geographic analysis. 

(Staff.) 



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Government and Politics 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected topics 
in meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced 
students. (Staff.) 

Geog. 280. Geomorphology. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic 
processes and land forms; theories of land forms evolution and geomorpho- 
logical problems. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, joint consent of adviser and Head of 
the Department of Geography. Readings and discussion on selected topics in the 
field of geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 399. Thesis Research. 

(Credit to be arranged.) First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors: Plischke, Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, and Harrison. 

Associate Professors: Byrd, Hathorn, Hsueh, Jacobs, and McNelly. 

Assistant Professors: Claude, Conway, Koury, Piper, and Wolfe. 
Lecturer: Barber. 



The Department of Government and Politics offers a graduate course of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Arts and the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

For the master's degree, the student may either pursue a general program 
in government and politics or he may specialize in international affairs 
or in public administration. In addition to the completion of a minimum 
of 24 semester hours credit of formal course work (excluding thesis credit) 
in the major and minor fields combined, the master's candidate is required 
to demonstrate in a written comprehensive examination satisfactory com- 
petence in graduate course work in the major field and to write and defend 
in an oral examination a thesis acceptable to the Department. There is 
no language requirement for the M. A. degree. 

For the doctoral degree, the student may pursue any one of three programs; 
(1) a general program in government and politics; (2) a specialized pro- 
gram in international affairs; or (3) a specialized program in public admini- 
stration. The doctoral candidate is required to demonstrate in a written 
comprehensive examination satisfactory competence in five fields of govern- 
ment and politics, the required and elective fields in each case depending 
upon the particular program pursued. No candidate may attempt the comp- 
rehensive examination prior to the fulfillment of the language requirement 

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Government and Politics 

for the doctorate, and no candidate may attempt the comprehensive exami- 
nation more than twice. The following languages are approved for the Ph.D. 
requirement: French, German, Russian, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, and 
Arabic. One of the languages must be either French or German. No two 
languages offered may be in the same language family, and no student may 
offer his native language. The completion of a dissertation acceptable to the 
Department, and defended in oral examination, is the final Ph.D. require- 
ment. 

Additional information respecting requirements and procedures may be 
obtained from the Department, described in detail in a specially prepared 
Manual of Instructions for Graduate Study in Government and Politics. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the major factors underlying international 
relations, the methods of conducting foreign relations, the foreign policies of 
the major powers, and the means of avoiding or alleviating international 
conflicts. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 102. International Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the basic character, general principles, and 
specific rules of international law, with emphasis on recent and contemporary 
trends in the field and its relation to other aspects of international affairs. 

(Harrison, Piper.) 

G. & P. 103. Contemporary African Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of contemporary developments in the inter- 
national politics of Africa, with special emphasis on the role of an emerging 
Africa in world affairs. (Onyewu.) 

G. & P. 104. Inter- American Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An analytical and historical study of the Latin- 
American policies of the United States and of problems in our relations with 
individual countries, with emphasis on recent developments. (Harrison, Barber.) 

G. & P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of recent political 
events in the Far East and their influence on world politics. 

(McNelly, Hsue.) 

G. & P. 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The principles and machinery of the conduct of 
American foreign relations, with emphasis on the Department of State and the 
Foreign Service, and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United 
States. (Plischke, Barber, Staff.) 

G. & P. 107. Contemporary Middle Eastern Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1 . A survey of contemporary developments in the interna- 
tional politics of the Middle East, with special emphasis on the role of emerging 
Middle East nations in world affairs. (Koury.) 

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Government and Politics 

G. & P. 108. International Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the objectives, structure, functions, and 
procedures of international organizations, including the United Nations and 
such functional and regional organizations as the Organization of American 
States. (Plischke, Barber.) 

G. & P. 109. Foreign Policy of the USSR. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development of the foreign policy of 
the Soviet Union, with attention paid to the forces and conditions that make 
for continuities and changes from Tsarist policies. (Jacobs.) 

G. & P. 110. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of public administration in the United States, 
giving special attention to the principles of organization and management and 
to fiscal personnel, planning, and public relations practices. (Dillon, Staff.) 

G. & P. 111. Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or B. A. 160. A survey of public personnel administra- 
tion, including the development of merit civil service, the personnel agency, 
classification, recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, 
training, discipline, employee relations, and retirement. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 112. Public Financial Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. A survey of governmental financial 
procedures, including processes of current and capital budgeting, the admin- 
istration of public borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, and the 
machinery of control through pre-audit and post-audit. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 113. Governmental Organization and Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 110. A study of the theories of organization and manage- 
ment in American government with emphasis on new trends, experiments, and 
reorganizations. ( Dillon. ) 

G. & P. 120. Problems in Political Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The problem approach to political behavior with 
emphasis on theoretical and empirical studies on selected aspects of the political 
process. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comprehensive study of legislative organization, 
procedure, and problems. The course includes opportunities for student contact 
with Congress and with the Legislature of Maryland. (Hathorn, Conway.) 

G. & P. 131. Introduction to Constitutional Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A systematic inquiry into the general principles of the 
American constitutional system, with special reference to the role of the 
judiciary in the interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitution. 

(Hathorn, Staff.) 

G. & P. 132. Civil Rights and the Constitution. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 131. A study of civil rights in the American constitutional 
context, emphasizing freedom of religion, freedom of expression, minority 
discrimination, and the rights of defendants. (Hathorn, Staff.) 

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Government and Politics 

G. &. P. 133. The Judicial Process. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of judicial organization in the United 
States at all levels of government, with some emphasis on legal reasoning, legal 
research, and court procedures. (Byrd.) 

G. & P. 141. History of Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of the principal political theories set forth 
in the works of writers from Plato to Bentham. (Anderson, Byrd, Claude.) 

G. & P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 19th and 20th century political thought, 
with special emphasis on recent theories of socialism, communism, and 
fascism. (Anderson, Byrd, Claude.) 

G. & P. 144. American Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development and growth of American 
political concepts from the colonial period to the present. (Anderson.) 

G. & P. 145. Russian Political Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey and analysis of political ideas in Russia and 
the Soviet Union from early times to the present. (Anderson.) 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of governmental problems of international 
scope, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students 
are required to report on readings from current literature. (Barber.) 

G. & P. 160. State and Local Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the administrative structure, procedures, and 
policies of state and local governments with special emphasis on the state level 
and on intergovernmental relationships, and with illustrations from Maryland 
governmental arrangements. (Dillon, Staff.) 

G. & P. 161. Metropolitan Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of administrative problems relating to 
public services, planning, and coordination in a metropolitan environment. 

(Staff.) 

G. & P. 171. Problems of American Public Policy. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of various factors 
which affect the formation and execution of American public policy. 

(Hathorn, Conway.) 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive and analytical examination of American 
political parties, nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

(Burdette, Hathorn, Conway.) 

G. & P. 178. Public Opinion. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of public opinion and its effect on 
political action, with emphasis on opinion formation and measurement, propa- 
ganda, and pressure groups. (Staff.) 

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Government and Politics 

G. & P. 181. Administrative Law. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the discretion exercised by administrative 
agencies, including analysis of their functions, their powers over persons and 
property, their procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. (Dillon.) 

G. & P. 191. Government and Administration of the Soviet 

Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the adoption of the communist philosophy by 
the Soviet Union, of its governmental structure, and of the administration of 
government policy in the Soviet Union. (Jacobs.) 

G. & P. 192. Government and Politics of Latin America. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems and 
political processes of the Latin American countries, with special emphasis on 
Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. (Harrison, Barber.) 

G. & P. 193. Government and Politics of Asia. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 97, or G. & P. 105, or Hist. 61, or Hist. 62, or Hist. 187, 
or Hist. 188, or Hist. 189. A comparative study of the political systems of 
China, Japan, India, and other selected Asian countries. (McNelly, Hsuch.) 

G. & P. 194. Government and Politics of Africa. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems and 
political processes of the African countries, with special emphasis on the prob- 
lems of nation-building in emergent countries. (Onyewu.) 

G. & P. 195. Government and Politics of the Middle East. (3) 
Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the governmental systems and 
political processes of the Middle Eastern countries, with special emphasis on the 
problems of nation-building in emergent countries. (Koury.) 

G. & P. 197. Comparative Political Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, G. & P. 97 and at least one other course in comparative govern- 
ment. A study, along functional lines, of major political institutions, such as 
legislatures, executives, courts, bureaucracies, public organizations, and political 
parties. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
G. & P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization.(3) 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

(Plischke, Piper.) 

G. & P. 202. Seminar in International Law. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in sub- 
stantive and procedural international law. (Harrison, Piper.) 

G. & P. 203. Functional Problems in International Relations. 
(3) 

An examination of the major substantive issues in contemporary international 
relations, involving reports on selected topics based on individual research. 

( Staff.) 

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Government and Politics 
G. & P. 204. Area Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within a particular 
geographic area, such as Europe, Asia and the Far East, Africa and the 
Middle East, and the Western Hemisphere. Individual reporting as assigned. 

(Staff.) 

G. & P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the background 
and development of American government. (Burdette, Hathorn, Byrd.) 

G. & P. 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in American 
foreign policy and the conduct of American foreign relations. 

(Plischke, Barber.) 

G. & P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions. 
(3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned tor individual study and reading in govern- 
mental and political institutions in governments throughout the world. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 208. Seminar in the Government and Politics of Emerg- 
ing Nations. (3) 

An examination of the programs of political development in the emerging 
nations with special reference to the newly independent nations of Asia and 
Africa and the less developed countries of Latin America. Individual reporting 
as assigned. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 209. Seminar in International Administration. (3) 

An analysis of the administrative aspects of international organizations with 
some attention given to program administration. (Plischke, Barber.) 

G. & P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of recent 
federal-state relations. (Dillon.) 

G. & P. 213. Problems of Public Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of 
public administration. (Dillon.) 

G. & P. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of 
public personnel administration. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 215. Problems of State and Local Government. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study in the field of state and local 
government throughout the United States. (Dillon, Staff.) 

G. & P. 216. Government Administrative Planning and Manage- 
ment. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in administrative 
planning and management in government. (Dillon.) 

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Government and Politics 

G. & P. 218. Seminar in Urban Administration. (3) 

Selected topics are examined by the team research method with students respon- 
sible for planning, field investigation, and report writing. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public 
opinion. (Burdette, Staff.) 

G. & P. 223. Seminar in Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading about the composi- 
tion and organization of legislatures and about the legislative process. 

(Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of 
political organization and action. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 225. Man and the State. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 142. Individual reading and reports on such recurring 
concepts in political theory as liberty, equality, justice, natural law and 
natural rights, private property, sovereignty, nationalism and the organic state. 

(Anderson, Byrd, Claude.) 

G. & P. 226. Scope and Method of Political Science. (3) 

Required of all Ph.D. candidates. A seminar in the methodologies of political 
science, and their respective applications to different research fields. Inter- 
disciplinary approaches and bibliographical techniques are also reviewed. 

(Staff.) 

G. & P. 227. Analytical Systems and Theory Construction. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 226. Examination of the general theoretical tools available 
to political scientists and of the problems of theory building. Attention is 
given to communications theory, decision-making, game theory and other 
mathematical concepts, personality theory, role theory, structural-functional 
analysis, and current behavioral approaches. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 231. Seminar in Public Law. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of 
constitutional and administrative law. (Hathorn, Byrd.) 

G. & P. 261. Problems in American Government and Politics. (3) 

An examination of contemporary problems in various fields of government and 
politics in the United States, with reports on topics assigned for individual 
study. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 399. Thesis Research. (Arranged). 

(Staff.) 



164 



History 



HISTORY 



Professors: Shannon, Bauer, Cole, Gordon, Jashemski, Koch, Mer- 
rill, Prange, and Sparks. 

Visiting Professor: Main (1965-1966). 

Associate Professors: Callcott, Conkin, and Rjvlin. 

Assistant Professors: Breslow, Farrell, Folsom, Giffin, Greenberg, 
Robertson, Williams, and Yaney. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

A. Course Requirements 

1. Course requirements are those set forth under Academic Information 
in this catalog with the exception of No. 2 and No. 3 below. 

2. The course, H. 200 — Historiography, is required. 

3. Fifteen hours of the total required for the Master of Arts degree must 
be in history, of which at least 9 hours shall be in the field of 
concentration. 

B. Thesis 

1. A thesis is required of all candidates for the Master of Arts degree 
in history. 

2. The Department of History expects that the thesis, required of all 
candidates for the master's degree, shall display a capacity for directed 
research in a variety of historical sources, the ability to interpret 
factual detail, and shall constitute a properly documented report of 
the completed research. 

C. Examinations 

1. Candidates for the Master of Arts degree must pass a 4 to 6 hour 
written examination. The primary purpose of this examination is 
to determine the student's mastery of his major field. The examina- 
tion will require factual and interpretive material as well as bibli- 
ography and historiography. 

2. The oral examination will be confined to the thesis and the field in 
which it lies. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

A. Course Requirements 

1. Course requirements are those set forth under Academic Information 
in this catalog, with the exception of 2 and 3 below. 

2. The course, H. 200 — Historiography, is required. 

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History 



3. In consultation with his adviser, a candidate must select four general 
fields to present for examination. 

4. Fields: 

Greek History Russian History 

Roman History Middle Eastern History 

Medieval History East Asian History 

European History 1500-1789 Latin American History 

European History 1789-Present U.S. History to 1865 

English History U.S. History Since 1865 

British Empire Minor Outside Department 

B. Examinations 

1. The Qualifying Examination is normally taken after the student has 
completed one year's work beyond the M.A. Separate written exam- 
inations of 4 to 6 hours each will be given on two selected fields on 
successive days. One language examination must be passed before 
the qualifying examination can be administered. 

2. The Comprehensive Examination is taken at the completion of the 
student's course work. The comprehensive examination covers the 
two remaining fields and will consist of written examinations of 4 
to 6 hours in each field and an oral examination of approximately 
two hours duration. The second language examination must be 
passed before the comprehensive examination can be administered. 
The satisfactory completion of the comprehensive examination shall 
for departmental purposes constitute admission to candidacy for 
which the student must make formal application within one month. 

3. The Final Examination is conducted by a committee appointed by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. This examination, of approxi- 
mately two hours duration, covers the research of the candidate as 
embodied in his thesis and his attainments in the fields of his major 
and minor subjects. 

C. The following languages are approved for the Ph.D. requirement: 

French, German, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Hebrew, 
Chinese, and Japanese. One of the languages must be either French or 
German. No two languages offered may be in the same language family. 

D. The Ph.D. Dissertation 

The Department of History expects that the dissertation, required of all 
candidates for the doctorate, shall display a capacity for independent 
research in primary and secondary sources. The resulting synthesis must 
constitute a contribution to historical knowledge and ought to reveal the 
qualities of insight and sound judgment in the handling of historical 
materials. 

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History 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
AMERICAN HISTORY 
H. 101. American Colonial History. (3) 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle of the 
eighteenth century. (Land.) 

H. 102. The American Revolution. (3) 

The background and course of the American Revolution through the formation 
of the Constitution. (Koch.) 

H. 103. The Formative Period in America, 1789-1824. (3) 

The evolution of the Federal government, the origins of political parties, 
problems of foreign relations in an era of international conflict, beginnings 
of the industrial revolution in America, and the birth of sectionalism. (Koch.) 

H. 105. Social and Economic Hsitory of the United States to 
1865. (3) 

A synthesis of American life from Independence through the Civil War. 

(Staff.) 

H. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States Since 
the Civil War. (3) 

The development of American life and institutions, with emphasis upon the 
period since 1876. (Staff.) 

H. 114. The Middle Period of American History, 1824-1860. (3) 

An examination of the political history of the United States from Jackson to 
Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian democ- 
racy, Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the Repub- 
lican Party, and secession. (Sparks.) 

H. 115. The Old South. (3) 

Prerequisite, H. 21, 22, or the equivalent. A study of the institutional and cul- 
tural life of the ante-bellum South with particular reference to the back- 
ground of the Civil War. (Calcott.) 

H. 116. The Civil War. (3) 

Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and economic 
effects of the war upon American society. (Sparks.) 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History. (3,3) 

Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 
1890. First semester, to 1929. Second semester, since 1929. (Merrill, Glad.) 

H. 121. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

The Trans-Allegheny West. The westward movement into the Mississippi Val- 
ley. (Staff.) 

H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation, 1865-1896. (3) 

Prerequisite, H. 21, 22, or the equivalent. Problems of construction in both 
South and North. Emergence of big business and industrial combinations. 
Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Staff.) 

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History 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3,3) 

A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations of the 
United States. First semester from the Revolution to the Civil War. Second 
semester, from the Civil War to the present. (Cole.) 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs. (3) 

A consideration of the changed position of the United States with reference 
to the rest of the world since 1917. (Cole.) 

H. 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America. (3,3) 

A history of basic beliefs about religion, man, nature, and society. Consent 
of the instructor is required for H. 134. (Conkin.) 

H. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States. (3,3) 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the Constitution, 
and development of American constitutionalism in theory and practice there- 
after. (Staff.) 

H. 141, 142. History of Maryland. (3,3) 

First semester, a survey of the political, social and economic history of colonial 
Maryland. Second semester, Maryland's historical development and role as 
a state in the American Union. (Staff.) 

H. 147. History of Mexico and the Caribbean. (3) 

The history of Mexico and the Caribbean with special emphasis upon the in- 
dependence period and upon relations between ourselves and our nearest Latin 
American neighbors. (Staff.) 

H. 148. History of Canada. (3) 

Prerequisites, H. 21, 42, or H. 53, 54. A history of Canada, with special em- 
phasis on the nineteenth century and upon Canadian relations with Great 
Britain and the United States. (Gordon.) 

H. 149. History of Brazil. (3) 

The history of Brazil with emphasis on the national period. (Griffin.) 

H. 150. History of Argentina and the Andean Republics. (3) 

The history of the nationalist period of selected South American countries. 

(Staff.) 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece. (3) 

A survey of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, the Near East, and Greece, 
with particular attention to their institutions, life, and culture. (Jashemski.) 

H. 153. History of Rome. (3) 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through the Re- 
public and down to the last centuries of the Empire. (Jashemski.) 

H. 155, 156. History of Medieval Europe. (3,3) 

A study of medieval government, society, and thought from the collapse of 
classical civilization to the Renaissance. (Robertson.) 

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History 

H. 157. The Age of Absolutism, 1648-1748. (3) 

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV and the Enlightened Despots. (Staff.) 

H. 158. The Old Regime and the French Revolution, 1748-1815. 
(3) 

Europe in the era of the French Revolution. (Staff.) 

H. 159, 160. History of European Ideas. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42 or H. 53, 54, or the equivalent. Beginning with a 
review of the basic Western intellectual traditions as a heritage from the Ancient 
World, the course will present selected important currents of thought from 
the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth century down to the 
twentieth century. First semester, through the eighteenth century. Second 
semester, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Staff.) 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 

Prerequisite, H. 41, 42, or 53, or the permission of the instructor. The culture 
of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic reaction through the 
Thirty Years' War. (Breslow.) 

H. 163, 164. History of the British Empire. (3,3) 

Presequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. First semester, the development of 
England's Mercantilist Empire and its fall in the war for American Inde- 
pendence (1783). Second semester, the rise of the Second British Empire and 
the solution of the problem of responsible self-government (1783-1867), the 
evolution of the British Empire into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the 
development and problems of the dependent Empire. (Gordon.) 

H. 165. Constitutional History of Great Britain. (3) 

A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis on the 
real property aspects of feudalism, the growth of the common law, the de- 
velopment of Parliament, and the expansion of liberties of the individual. 

(Gordon.) 
H. 166. Tudor-Stuart England. (3) 

An examination of the political, religious and social forces in English life 
from 1485-1714 with special emphasis on Tudor government, the English Ref- 
ormation, the Elizabethan era, Puritanism, and the English revolution. 

(Breslow.) 
H. 167, 168. History of Russia. (3,3) 

A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. (Yaney.) 

H. 169, 170. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A study of the political, economic, 
social and cultural development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to 
the First World War. (Bauer.) 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth 
Century. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A study of political, economic, and 
cultural developments in twentieth century Europe with special emphasis on 
the factors involved in the two World Wars and their global impacts and sig- 
nificance. (Prange.) 

169 



History 

H. 173. The Soviet Union. (3) 

A history of the Bolshevik Revolution and the founding of the Soviet Union; 
the economic policy and foreign policy of the U.S.S.R. to the present. 

(Yaney.) 

H. 175. Modern France. (3) 

A survey of French history from 1815 to the present. The emphasis is upon 
such topics as the population problem, the economic and social structure of 
French society, and the changing political and cultural values of this society 
in response to recurrent crises through the nineteenth and twentieth centu- 
ries. (Greenberg.) 

ASIAN HISTORY 

H. 181, 182. The Middle East. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, six hours from the following groups of courses: H. 41, 42; 
H. 51, 52; or H. 53, 54. A survey of the historical and institutional develop- 
ments of the nations of this vital area. The Islamic Empires and their cul- 
tures; impact of the west; breakup of the Ottoman Empire and rise of national- 
ism; present day problems. (Rivlin.) 

H. 183. The Contemporary Middle East. (3) 

H. 181 or 182 recommended though not required. The development of middle 
eastern institutions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with reference to 
the emergence of contemporary states and their place in world affairs. 

(Rivlin.) 

H. 187, 188. History of China. (3,3) 

A history of China from earliest times to the present. The emphasis on the 
development of Chinese institutions that have molded the life of the nation 
and its people. (Folsom.) 

H. 189. History of Japan. (3) 

A history of Japan from earliest to modern times. Emphasis is placed on the 
evolution of institutions and thought. (Folsom.) 

For Graduates 

H. 300. Historiography: Techniques of Historical Research and 
Writing. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 301. Readings in Colonial American History. (3) 

(Land.) 

H. 302. Seminar in Colonial American History. (3) 

(Land.) 

H. 303. Readings in the American Revolution and the Formative 
Period. (3) 

(Koch.) 

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History 

H. 304. Seminar in the American Revolution and the Formative 
Period. (3) 

(Koch.) 

H. 305. Readings in American Social and Economic History. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 306. Seminar in American Social and Economic History. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 313. Readings in Southern History. (3) 

(Callcott.) 

H. 314. Seminar in Southern History. (3) 

(Callcott.) 

H. 315. Readings in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) 

(Sparks.) 

H. 316. Seminar in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) 

(Sparks.) 

H. 317. Readings in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 318. Seminar in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 323. Readings in Recent American History. (3) 

(Shannon, Merrill.) 

H. 324. Seminar in Recent American History. (3) 

(Shannon, Merrill.) 

H. 327. Readings in the History of American Foreign Policy. (3) 

(Cole.) 

H. 328. Seminar in the History of American Foreign Policy. (3) 

(Cole.) 

H. 333. Readings in American Intellectual History. (3) 

(Conkin.) 

H. 334. Seminar in American Intellectual History. (3) 

(Conkin.) 

H. 336. Seminar in American Constitutional and Political 
History. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 342. Seminar in the History of Maryland. (3) 

(Staff.) 

171 



History 

H. 345. Readings in Latin American History. (3) 

H. 346. Seminar in Latin American History. (3) 

H. 351. Seminar in Greek History. (3) 

H. 353. Seminar in Roman History. (3) 

H. 355. Readings in Medieval History. (3) 

H. 356. Seminar in Medieval History. (3) 



(Giffin > 

(Giffin.) 

(Jashemski.) 

(Jashemski.) 
(Robertson.) 



(Robertson.) 

H. 359. Readings in Modern European Intellectual History. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 360. Seminar in Modern European Intellectual History. (3) 

(Staff.) 

H. 361. Readings in the History of the Renaissance and 
Reformation. (3) 

(Breslow.) 

H. 363. Readings in the History of Great Britain and the British 
Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

(Gordon.) 

H. 364. Seminar in the History of Great Britain and the British 
Empire-Commonwealth. (3) 

(Gordon.) 

(Breslow.) 

(Yaney.) 

(Bauer.) 

(Bauer.) 

(Prange.) 

(Prange.) 



H. 366. Seminar in Tudor and Stuart England. (3) 
H. 368. Seminar in Russian History. (3) 
H. 369. Readings in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 
H. 370. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 
H. 371. Seminar in the History of World War I. (3) 
H. 372. Seminar in the History of World War II. (3) 



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Home Economics 

H. 381. Readings in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

(Rivlin.) 

H. 382. Seminar in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

(Rivlin.) 
H. 387. Readings in Chinese History. (3) 

(Folsom.) 
H. 388. Seminar in Chinese History. (3) 

(Folsom.) 

H. 390. The Teaching of History in Institutions of Higher 
Learning. (1) 

(Staff.) 

H. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors: Chapman and Mitchell. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Reiber, Shearer, and Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Eheart and Wilbur. 

Lecturer: Britton. 

The College offers programs of study leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in the fields of food and nutrition, institution administration, gen- 
eral home economics, and textiles and clothing. 

A candidate for an advanced degree with a major or minor in home eco- 
nomics is expected to have an undergraduate major in home economics 
or in closely allied fields. The graduate study program will supplement 
the student's previous training and experience to achieve a well-rounded 
knowledge of the subject, with due consideration given to his purpose in 
undertaking graduate study. Graduate students may prepare for some 
specialized phases of home economics, including food, nutrition, textiles and 
clothing, and home economics education. (See Department of Education.) 
A student whose preparation is deficient in any area may meet prerequisites 
during a period of study as a special student or as a provisional candidate. 
Interdepartmental programs and offerings in the several areas of home 
economics to give breadth of contact with the field of home economics 
are available. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Students with a major or minor in the field of food and nutrition may 
select from a variety of courses, seminars, and experiences in independent 

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Home Economics 

study. Each student plans his program in consultation with his major 
adviser, after consideration of his background and purpose in graduate 
study. 

A master's degree candidate wishing to major in this field is expected to 
have had training equivalent to that of an undergraduate major in the 
Department of Food Nutrition and Institution Management (basic courses 
in food and nutrition, organic and biochemistry, microbiology, and 
physiology). 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

This program is oriented toward home economists whose work is centered 
in home, school and community services, and to home economists re- 
turning to employment after a period of absence. It is primarily designed 
to increase competence in more than one area within the field of home 
economics. The program utilizes many courses in the University as well 
as the College to permit a well-integrated study. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

For students who wish to major or minor in textiles and clothing a 
variety of offerings is available as to course work and opportunities for 
independent study. Candidates for a Master of Science degree in the 
field of textiles and clothing are expected to acquire a general knowl- 
edge of all phases of the field and an understanding of research methods 
in it, and to concentrate in one of the various areas of textiles and 
clothing. 

FOOD, NUTRITION AND INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
FOOD 

F. & N. 130. Special Problems in Food and/or Nutrition. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, F. & N. 5, Food 10, or consent of 
instructor. Problem may be in any one of several areas of food and nutrition 
and will carry the name of the basic area; e. g., child nutrition, adolescent 
nutrition. (Brown.) 

Food 150. Food Economics and Meal Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
a week. Consent of department. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Distribution and 
marketing of the food supply; food costs; legal measures for consumer protec- 
tion; retail selection of food commodities in relation to levels of spending; 
management of family meals through organization of equipment and appoint- 
ments; time, energy, and money management for effective family living. 

(Staff.) 

Food. 152. Advanced Food Science. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 33 and Food 
10, or equivalent. Physical and chemical properties of food as related to con- 
sumer use in the home and institution, 

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Home Economics 
Food 153. Experimental Food Science. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratories per week. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00; Prerequisite. Food 152 or equivalent, Individual and group laboratory 
experimentation as an introduction to methods of food research. 

For Graduates 
FOOD 

Food 200. Advanced Experimental Food. (3-5) 

Second semester. Two lectures and three laboratory periods a week. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. Selected readings of literature in experimental foods. De- 
velopment of individual problem. (Eheart.) 

Food 204. Recent Trends in Food. (2-3) 

First semester. Recent trends in the preparation, processing, and marketing 
of foods. (Brown.) 

Food 210. Readings in Food. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisites, Food 152, 153. A critical survey of the 
literature of recent developments in food research. (Eheart.) 

Food 220. Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of current research in 
foods. (Eheart.) 

Food 399. Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done and results 
accomplished. Investigation in some phases of food which may form the 
basis for a thesis. (Eheart.) 



INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

I. M. 150. Institution Organization and Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, F. & N. 5. Planning of functional kitchens for 
institutions and commercial food services. Equipment selection and mainte- 
nance, layout, field trips and observations in a variety of situations. (Brown.) 

I. M. 151. Institution Food Purchasing and Cost Control. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Food 10; Nutr. 20 or equivalent. 
Selection of food, methods and units of purchase in large quantities. Budgets, 
food cost accounting and control. Field trips. 

I. M. 152. Institution Foods. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Food 10; Nutr. 20 or 121; or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Application of basic principles and procedures of food preparation to quantity 
food preparation. Standardizing recipes; menu planning for various types of 
food services; determination of food costs. (Brown.) 

775 



Home Economics 

I. M. 153. Food Service Organization and Management. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Application of principles 
of scientific management to the organization of food services. Efficient per- 
sonnel management with emphasis on training and supervision of employees. 

(Brown.) 

I. M. 154. School Food Service. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one morning a week for field experience in 
a school food service. Prerequisites, Food 10 and Nutr. 20 or 121, or consent 
of instructor. Not open to Institution Administration majors. Study of organi- 
zation, management, menu planning, food purchasing and preparation and cost 
control for serving the noon meal in schools and child care centers. (Brown.) 

I. M. SI 66. Nutrition and Meal Planning. (2) 

Summer only. Special application to group food services: school lunches, 
restaurants, and hospitals. (Staff.) 

I. M. SI 68. Cost Accounting for School Food Service. (2) 

Summer Session. Food cost accounting systems for school lunch programs; 
programs and procedures of accumulating, recording, and interpreting data for 
cost control. (Staff.) 

I. M. SI 69. Food Purchasing for School Food Service. (3) 

Summer session. Purchasing procedures; grading, processing and packing of 
food: selection of food, specifications, and marketing regulations. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

1. M. 200. Food Service Administration and Supervision. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
I.M. 152 and 154 or equivalent. Supervision and administrative policies; per- 
sonnel management with emphasis on human relations, and philosophy under- 
lying management practices. 

NUTRITION 

Nutr. 121. Science of Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 11, 13 or 1, 3, or consent of department. 
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. An understanding of 
the chemical and physiological utilization of nutrients present in the various 
food as related to individual human nutritional status, with studies of applied 
nutrition. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Staff.) 

Nutr. 123. Nutrition for Health Services. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. Nutr. 20, Chem. 11, 13 or 1, 3 or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, S3. 00. A study of nutritional status and the effect 
of food habits and food consumption on family health. Nutritional require- 
ments for individuals in different stages of development. Techniques and pro- 
cedures for the application of nutrition knowledge with consideration of various 
economic levels and social backgrounds. For graduate nurses, dietitians, health 
teachers, and social workers. (Staff.) 

776 



Home Economics 
Nutr. 124. Advanced Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Consent of department; Zool. 1; Biochem. 81, 
82 or concurrent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory. The progress of nutrition as found in the results of current re- 
search, with emphasis on interpretation and application. 

Nutr. 125. Therapeutic Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites, Nutr. 121, 124. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Modifications of the normal 
adequate diet to meet human nutritional needs in pathological conditions. 

(McKinley.) 

For Graduates 
Nutr. 204. Recent Advances in Nutrition. (2-3) 

First and second semester. Factors that affect the nutritive value of food 
during production, cookery processes, holding practices, processing, packaging, 
and storage. (Staff.) 

Nutr. 208. Recent Progress in Human Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Recent developments in the science of nutrition with em- 
phasis on the interpretation of these findings for application in health and 
disease. Aids for the dietitian in creating a better understanding of nutrition 
among patients, students of graduate status and personnel, such as those in the 
dental and medical professions. (Staff.) 

Nutr. 210. Readings in Nutrition. (3). 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of significant nutritional 
research and investigation . (Staff.) 

Nutr. 211. Problems in Nutrition. (3-5) 

Second semester. Experience in a phase of nutrition research which is of in- 
terest to the student. Use of experimental animals, human studies or a com- 
pilation and extensive and critical study of research methods, techniques or 
data of specific projects. 

Nutr. 212. Nutrition for Community Services. (3) 

First semester. Application of the principles of nutrition to various community 
problems of specific groups of the public. Students may select specific problems 
for independent study. (Staff.) 

Nutr. 220. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussion of current research in 
nutrition. (Staff.) 

Nutr. 399. Research. (6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done and results 
accomplished. Investigation in some phase of nutrition which may form the 
basis of a thesis. 



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Home Economics 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 170. Communication Skills and Techniques in 
Home Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Principles and techniques 
for professional demonstration and presentation of home economics and its 
related areas with selected experiences in television, radio, creative writing, and 
photography. (Staff.) 

H. E. 180. Professional Seminar. (2) 

First and second semester. Clarification of perceptions of one's job and the 
situation in which one operates; attainment of professional breadth and depth; 
establishment of reasonable levels of aspiration — recognized to be requisites 
for a successful career in home economics and related areas. (For seniors in 
College of Home Economics.) (Lemmon.) 

H. E. 190. Special Problems in Home Economics. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00 a 
semester hour. Problem may be in any area of home economics and will carry 
the name of the subject matter of the problem, a. Applied (Art) Design; b. 
Clothing; c. General Home Economics; d. Family Life; e. Food and Institu- 
tional Food; f. Management; g. Nutrition; h. Textiles. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
H. E. 201. Methods of Research in Home Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Statistics or Tests and Measurements. 
Application of scientific methods to problems in the field of home economics 
with emphasis on needed research of an inter-disciplinary nature. (Staff.) 

H. E. 202. Integrative Aspects of Home Economics. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Scope and focus 
of total professional field with emphasis on purposes and functions as related 
to family and other group living. Impact of the changing social, economic, 
technological and educational situations upon home economics. (Staff.) 

H. E. 290. Special Topics. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Concentrated study in areas of 
home economics, such as: consumer problems; housing, interior design and 
home furnishings; institution administration and food service: a. Applied (Art) 
Design; b. Clothing; c. General Home Economics: d. Family Life; e. Food and 
Institutional Food; f. Management; g. Nutrition; h. Textiles. (Staff.) 

H. E. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Credit according to work ac- 
complished. 



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Home Economics 

FAMILY LIFE AND MANAGEMENT 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
F. L. 130. Home Management and Family Life. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 1; H. M. 50; H. E. 5. Study of factors 
influencing establishment and maintenance of satisfying interpersonal relations 
throughout the family life cycle as affected by management in the home. 

(Reiber.) 

F. L. 132. The Child in the Family. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures. Prerequisites, Psych. 1; H. E. 5 or equiva- 
lent. Study of the child from prenatal stage through adolescence, with em- 
phasis on responsibility for guidance in the home. Biological and psychological 
needs as they affect the child's relationship with his family and peers. 

(Reiber.) 

F. L. 135. Directed Experiences with Children and Families. (3) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Psych. 1 and 
consent of department. Observation and study of selected home situations plac- 
ing emphasis on contemporary family living. This course is designed especially 
for students who wish an understanding of children of various ages in relation 
to the family and the quality of living achieved in a variety of life situations. 
(Limited to majors in the College of Home Economics.) (Kincaid.) 

H. M. 140. Fundamentals of Housing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory a week. Pre- 
requisite, H. M. 50. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Sociological, psychological and 
economic aspects of housing. Relationship of the house and the family living 
within. (Staff.) 

H. M. 160. Scientific Management in the Home. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, H. M. 50 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The 
Philosophy and application of principles of scientific management in the home 
through the use of resources; management of time, energy, and money; work 
simplification. (Staff.) 

H. M. 161. Resident Experience in Home Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. M. 50, 160; Food 150; or equiva- 
lent. Residence from five to nine weeks in the home management center. Expe- 
rience in planning, coordinating, and participating in the activities of a house- 
hold, composed of a faculty member, a group of students, and possibly an infant 
on a part-time basis. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

H. M. 162. Personal and Family Finance. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, H. M. 50. Study of factors influencing use of 
money; how families attempt to achieve financial security; interrelationship of 
money and other resources; types of credit. Emphasis on management of the 
family's money. (Britton.) 



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Home Economics 

H. M. 165. Home Management Practicum. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. M. 50, 160; Food 150; or equiva- 
lent; consent of department. Laboratory fee $3.00. Home management experi- 
ence under supervision in a variety of situations. Designed especially for stu- 
dents who are managing their own homes. (Orvedal.) 



HOUSING AND APPLIED (ART) DESIGN 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
A. D. 100, 101. Mural Design. (2, 2) 

First semester, alternate years. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. 
A. D. 1, 21. Fee. $3.00. Group and individual expression serving two types of 
objectives: temporary murals for the public schools developed from classroom 
study and rendered in colored chalk on wrapping paper; murals for permanent 
architectural decoration considering propriety to setting and rendered in oil 
paint, gouache, fresco, or mosaic. Brief study of civilization's use of murals. 
Trips to nearby murals having social significance. (Curtiss.) 

H.A.D. 110. Exterior-Interior Housing Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
a week. Laboratory fee. $3.00. Prerequisite, H. A. D. 41. An analysis of the 
works of contemporary architects and an overview of the field of architecture, 
relating the elements and principles to interiors. (Stewart.) 

A. D. 120. 121. Costume Illustration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, A. D. 
1, 2. 20, 21. Fee. $3.00. Fashion rendering emphasizing clothing structure, rep- 
resentation of materials and development of individual rendering technique. De- 
velopment of techniques employing transparent water color, India ink, Craftint. 
Zipatone and Burgess process. Study of styles of contemporary fashion illus- 
trators. (Beckwith.) 

A. D. 124, 125. Individual Problems in Costume. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, A. D. 
1, 2, 20. 21. 120, 121. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in fashion illustration or 
costume design for students who are capable of independent work. Program de- 
veloped in consultation with the instructor. (Beckwith.) 

A. D. 132. Advertising Layout. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, A. D. 
1, 20, 30, 40. Fee, $3.00. Designing of rough to finished layouts for advertise- 
ments for newspapers, magazines, packaging, brochures and other forms of direct 
advertising. Included is the study of typography and illustration and their re- 
lationship to reproduction. Experience in use of the airbrush. Field trip. 

A. D. 134, 135. Individual Problems in Advertising. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, A. D. 
1, 20, 30, 40, 132. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in advertising layout. Op- 
portunity to build skills in one area or more of advertising design. Readings. 
Field trip. 



180 



Home Economics 

A. D. 136. Display. (2) 

First and second semesters. Three laooraiory penoas a week. Prerequisites. A.D. 
I. 4. 30. Fee. $3.00. Practice in effective merchandise display in cooperation 
with retail establishments. Study of other aspects of display through field trips, 
discussion and research. (Nisonger.) 

A. D. 138. Advanced Photography. (2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory penoas a week. Prerequisites. A. D. 
1, 38. 39. Fee, $3.00. Advanced experimental effects emphasizing design in 
photography. Each student must have his own camera. (Davis.) 

H.A.D. 142, 143. Advanced Interior Design. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, A. D. 
1, 2, 40, 41. Fee, $3.00. Designs of rooms drawn in perspective and isometrics 
and rendered in water color. Coordination with fabrics, floor and wall finishes. 
Study of budgets, costs, and manufacturing techniques. Field trips. 

(Odland. Stewart.) 

H.A.D. 144, 145. Individual Problems in Interior Design. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. A. D. 
1, 2, 40, 41, 142, 143. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in interior design for 
students who are capable of independent work. Students assume the role of 
interior decorator serving the needs of theoretical clients. Field trips. 

(Odland, Stewart.) 

CRAFTS 

Cr. 102. Creative Crafts. (2-4) 

Summer session. Daily laboratory periods. Prerequisites, A. D. 1 and permission 
of the instructor. Fee, $3.00. Interests of the persons enrolled will determine 
the crafts pursued. Suggested: block printing, wood burning, crayon decoration, 
paper sculpture, clay modeling, metalry, weaving. Excellent for teachers, di- 
rectors of recreation centers, and persons who desire an introduction to recrea- 
tional crafts. (Roper.) 

Cr. 120, 121. Advanced Ceramics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites. 
A. D. 1, Cr. 20, 21. Fee, $3.00. Advanced techniques in clay sculpture and 
in building pottery on the potters wheel. Study of glaze composition and cal- 
culation. Experimentation with several clay bodies. (Roper.) 

Cr. 124, 125. Individual Problems in Ceramics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
A. D. 1, Cr. 20, 21, 120, 121. Fee, $3.00. Individual problems in clay sculp- 
ture and pottery making. Use of gas kiln fired in the medium cone range and 
experimental research in glazes and original textural effects. (Roper.) 

Cr. 130, 131. Advanced Metalry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
A. D. 1, Cr. 30, 31. Fee, $3.00. Advanced applications of basic techniques 
in metal working and jewelry making. Introduction of ring making, stone 
setting, and metal casting. (Staff.) 

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Home Economics 

Cr. 134, 135. Individual Problems in Metalry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
A. D. 1, Cr. 30, 31, 130, 131. Fee. $3.00. Advanced problems in metalry and 
jewelry making. Supervised laboratory for students capable of independent 
work and research. (Staff.) 

Cr. 140, 141. Advanced Weaving. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
A. D. 1, Cr. 40, 41. Fee, $3.00. Advanced weaving on four and eight harness 
looms stressing creative weaves in relation to functional use. (Staff.) 

Cr. 144, 145. Individual Problems in Weaving. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
A. D. 1, Cr. 40, 41, 141. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in creative weaving. 
Supervised laboratory for students capable of independent work and research. 

(Staff.) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
T. & C. 101. Fashion Promotion and Coordination. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
T. & C. 126: Speech 115 or 117. Laboratory fee. $3.00. Analysis of fashion 
media; industry publications, magazines, newspapers, radio, TV; merchandise 
displays and fashion shows. Role of the stylist. (Staff.) 

T. & C. 110. Field Experience in Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

First semester or summer school. Prerequisite, senior standing in department. 
Supervised and coordinated training-work program in cooperation with agencies 
and organizations. (Mitchell.) 

T. & C. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Clo. 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fashion his- 
tory; current fashions, how to interpret and evaluate them; fashion show tech- 
niques; fashion promotion. The course includes oral and written reports, group 
projects, panel discussions and field trips. (Wilbur.) 

T. & C. 128. Fundamentals of Home Furnishings. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
T. & C. 5, Clo. 10, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Selection 
of fabrics for home and institutional furnishings: care and repair of such fur- 
nishings; custom construction of slip covers, draperies, bedspreads; refinishing 
and upholstering furniture. (Wilbur.) 

For Graduates and Advanced Under graduaies 
Tex. 102. Textile Testing. (3) 

Second semester. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 150. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. The theory of textile methods, the repeated use of phys- 
ical and chemical testing, the interpretation of the data, and the presentation of 
the findings. ( Young.) 

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Home Economics 
Tex. 150. Advanced Textiles. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
Tex. 55. Laboratory fee, $3.00. An intensive study of textiles from the fiber 
to the finished fabric, from the producer to the consumer. Analysis of fabric 
construction and serviceability features. (Staff.) 

Tex. 153. International Textiles. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Laboratory fee, S3. 00. Prerequisite. 
T. & C. 5 or consent of instructor. Study of historic and contemporary fibers 
and laces with analysis of designs and techniques of decorating fabrics: rela- 
tionship of textiles to the esthetic and developmental cultures of society. 

(Wilbur.) 

CLOTHING 

Clo. 100. Family Clothing. (3) 

First semester in alternate years. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, T. & C. 5; Clo. 10, 11; or equivalent. Laboratory fee. S3.00. 
Clothing the family; analysis of needs of family members in various stages of 
life cycle; individual and family budgets; problems in selection and/or con- 
struction of wardrobe items. (Staff.) 

Clo. 120. Draping. (3) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Clo. 10. Labora- 
tory fee, S3. 00. Demonstrations and practice in creating costumes in fabrics 
and on individual dress forms; modeling of garments for class criticism. 

(Staff.) 

Clo. 122. Tailoring. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
Clo. 21. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Construction of tailored garments requiring 
professional skill. (Mitchell.) 

Clo. 127. Apparel Design. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
Clo. 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The art of costuming; trade and custom 
methods of clothing design and construction: advanced work in draping, pat- 
tern design and /or tailoring, with study of the interrelationship of these tech- 
niques. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2-4) 

First or second semester. Summer session. Laboratory fee, S3.0U. Auvanced 
inquiry into uses, care, types and/or performance of textile materials, either 
contemporary or historic depending on interest of students; compilation of 
data through testing, surveys, museum visits and/or field trips; writing of tech- 
nical reports. (Staff.) 

Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing. (2-4) 

First or second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Special areas of clotning are 
selected according to interest of student; consumer, design, functional aspects, 
and/or evaluation and analysis studies are made of those areas. Reports may 
be written, oral, or by group presentation. (Mitchell.) 

183 



Horticulture 

T. & C. 230. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The breadth and limit of 
the field of textiles and clothing are investigated; annotated bibliography is 
developed; one oral report is presented. (Mitchell.) 

T. & C. 232. Economics of Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Study of interrelationship of develop- 
ments in production, distribution and consumption of textiles and clothing af- 
fecting consumers and the market. Analysis of consumption trends as related 
to patterns of family living and population changes. (Mitchell.) 

T. & C. 233. Syntheses of Behavioral Science Concepts in 
Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Psych. 21 and /or consent of depart- 
ment. Analysis and interpretation of interdisciplinary research methods and 
findings with reference to behavioral aspects of textiles and clothing. Considera- 
tion given to measurement and relation of clothing interest and behavior to atti- 
tudes, values, roles, and social status groupings. 

T. & C. 399. Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee. $3.00. A research problem is 
selected by the student; thesis for partial fulfillment of the Master of Science 
degree is written. 



HORTICULTURE 

Professors: Stark, Haut, Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Scott, Shanks and 
Thompson. 

Associate Professors: Snyder and Wiley. 

The Department of Horticulture offers programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Programs in floriculture and 
ornamental horticulture, olericulture and pomology are concerned with 
theoretical and applied work in genetics, breeding, physiology and cultural 
aspects of flower crops, ornamental plants, vegetable crops and fruit crops. 
The program in food science {horticultural processing) is concerned with 
fundamental and applied work in the chemical, physical, bacteriological and 
nutritional aspects of vegetable and fruit products for processing. (See Food 
Science, page 143.) 

Departmental requirements, supplementary to the material in the Graduate 
School Announcements, may be obtained from the Department of Horti- 
culture. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Hort. 101. Technology of Fruits. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1966-67) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite Hort. 
6; prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. A critical analysis of rsearch work and 
application of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to 
practical problems in commercial production. (Thompson.) 

184 



Horticulture 
Hort. 103. Technology of Vegetables. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1967-68) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
Hort. 58; prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. A critical analysis of research 
work and application of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and 
botany to practical problems of commercial vegetable production. (Reynolds.) 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite or concurrent Bot. 101. 
A study of the physiological processes as related to the growth, flowering and 
storage or ornamental plants. (Link.) 

Hort. 107, 108. Woody Plant Materials. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 11. A field and laboratory study 
of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental plantings. (Baker,) 

Hort. 114. Systematic Horticulture. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. A study of 
the origin, taxonomic relationship and horticultural classification of fruits and 
vegetables. (Angell.) 

Hort. 161. Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticul- 
tural Crops. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1966-67) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 101. Factors related to maturation and application of scientific 
principles to handling and storage of horticulture crops. (Scott.) 

Hort. 162. Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. This course deals with a study of 
the commercial production and marketing of ornamental plant crops under 
greenhouse, plastic houses and out-of-door conditions. (Link.) 

Hort. 163. Production and Maintenance of Woody Plants. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1967-68) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite or concurrent Hort. 62; 108. A study of 
the production methods and operation of a commercial nursery and the plant- 
ing and care of woody plants in the landscape. (Link.) 

Hort. 198. Special Problems. (2,2) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according to work done. For major 
students in horticulture or botany. Four credits maximum per student. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of sci- 
entific knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices 
in pomology. (Thompson.) 

Hort. 203, 204, 205. Experimental Olericulture. (2,2,2) 

First semester and in sequence. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of 
scientific knowledge and practical observation as applied to commercial prac- 
tices in olericulture. (Reynolds, Snyder.) 

185 



Horticulture 

Hort. 206. Experimental Floriculture. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific knowl- 
edge and practical observation as applied to commercial practices in floriculture. 

(Link.) 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. A 
critical study of research methods which are or may be used in horticulture. 

(Scott.) 

Hort. 210. Experimental Processing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A systematic review of 
scientific knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial prac- 
tices in processing. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 302. Advanced Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports with illustrative material are required 
on special topics or recent research publications in horticulture. Three credit 
hours maximum allowed toward the M.S. degree or six credits maximum toward 
the Ph.D. degree. (Staff.) 

Hort. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Credit granted according to work 
completed. (Staff.) 

Experimental Procedures in Agricultural Sciences, see Agriculture, 
Agr. 210. (Haut.) 

FOOD SCIENCE (Horticultural Processing) 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Fd. Sc. 102. Principles of Food Processing I. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A study of the 
basic methods by which foods are preserved (unit operations). Effect of raw 
product quality and the various types of processes on yield and quality of the 
preserved products. (Wiley.) 

Fd. Sc. 103. Principles of Food Processing II. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. (See Dairy Science, Fd. Sc. 103) 

Fd. Sc. 111. Food Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. (See Dairy Science, 
Fd. Sc. Ill) 

Fd. Sc. 112. Analytical Quality Control. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Instrumental and 
sensory measurement of food quality attributes including appearance, Theologi- 
cal, flavor, and microbiological evaluations, and their integration into grades 
and standards of quality. (Kramer.) 

186 



Food Science 
Fd. Sc. 113. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Statistical methods 
for acceptance sampling of supplies and raw materials, in-plant and finished 
product inspection, water, fuel, and waste control, production transportation, 
inventory and budget controls. (Kramer.) 

Fd. Sc. 125. Meat and Meat Processing. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. (See Animal Science, 
Fd. Sc. 125) 

Fd. Sc. 131. Food Product Research and Development. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one laboratory per week. A study of the research 
and development of new. economically feasible and marketable food products. 
Application of chemical-physical characteristics of ingredients to produce 
optimum quality products, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, equipment and 
package development. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 156. Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Laboratory fee 
$5.00. Commercial methods of canning, freezing, dehydrating, fermenting, and 
chemical preservation of fruit and vegetable crops. (Wiley.) 

Fd. Sc. 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. (See Poultry Science, 
Fd. Sc. 160) 

Fd. Sc. 182. Dairy Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. (See Dairy 
Science, Fd. Sc. 182) 

Fd. Sc. 198. Special Problems in Food Science. (2, 2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Designed for ad- 
vanced undergraduates in which specific problems in food science will be 
assigned. (Staff.) 

Mechanics of Food Processing, see Agricultural Engineering, 
Agr. Engr. 113. 

Experimental Food Science, see Home Economics, Food 153. 

For Graduates 

Experimental Processing, see Horticulture, Hort. 210. 

Research Methods, see Dairy Science, An. Sci. 241. 

Methods of Horticultural Research, see Horticulture, Hort. 207. 

Special Problems in Animal Science, see Animal Science, Dairy Science and 
Poultry Science, An. Sci. 301. 



187 



School of Library and Information Services 
Fd. Sc. 302. Advanced Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports with illustrative material are required 
on special topics or recent research publications in food science and technology. 
A maximum of three credit hours are allowed for the M.S. degree or six 
credit hours for the doctoral degree. (Staff.) 

Fd. Sc. 399. Thesis Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters; summer session. The investigation is planned and 
conducted under faculty supervision. Grades are awarded on completion of the 
thesis. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL 
AGRICULTURE 

Hort. SI 15. Truck Crop Management. (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for teachers of vocational agriculture 
and extension agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved 
methods of production of the leading truck crops. Current problems and their 
solution will receive special attention. (Hollis.) 

Hort. SI 24. Tree and Small Fruit Management. (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for vocational agriculture teachers 
and extension agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon improved commercial 
methods of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. Current 
problems and their solution will receive special attention. (Thompson.) 

Hort. S125. Ornamental Horticulture. (I) 

Summer session only. A course designed for teachers of agriculture and exten- 
sion agents to place special emphasis on problems of the culture and use of 
ornamental plants. (Link.) 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND 
INFORMATION SERVICES 

Professor: Wasserman. 

Associate Professor: Bundy. 

Assistant Professors: Bergen and Colson. 

Lecturers: Dubester, Kenner, Mills, Pellowski, Perreault, Thack- 

STON, AND WALSTON. 

OBJECTIVES 

The curriculum deals with those areas of knowledge basic to the profes- 
sional practice of library and information activity. The program is designed 
to prepare librarians and information specialists for beginning professional 
work in each of the specialties. This sequence of study includes a core of 
required courses for all students, numbering twenty-four semester hours, to 
which are added twelve hours of specialized and elective courses, leading 
to the M.L.S. degree. Courses in the School are open to qualified graduate 
students in other disciplines with the consent of the instructor. 

188 



School of Library and Information Services 

For Graduates 
Required Core Courses 
L. 200. Introduction to Data Processing for Libraries. (3) 

Survey and analysis of the potential of machines, punch cards, computers and 
systems analysis in relation to library functions and procedures. (Walston.) 

L. 202. Introduction to Reference and Bibliography. (3) 

A systematic approach to bibliographic control of recorded knowledge and the 
methods of securing information from various types of sources. (Dubester.) 

L. 204. Communication and Libraries. (3) 

Communication processes are treated and the library's role as part of the larger 
social context is explored. (Bergen.) 

L. 206. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, I. (3) 

Introduction to basic principles of subject cataloging, alphabetical and sys- 
tematic. (Mills, Perreault.) 

L. 207. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, II. (3) 

Introduction to basic principles of author/title and descriptive cataloging and 
to problems of implementation and logistics. (Mills, Perreault.) 

L. 209. History of Libraries and Their Materials. (3). 

The development of publication forms and institutions set against the historical 
framework and the cultural forces within which such advances were made. 

(Colson.) 

L. 211. Library Administration. (3) 

An introduction to administrative theory and principles and their implications 
and applications to managerial activity in libraries. (Wasserman.) 

L. 213. Literature and Research in the Sciences. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction of 
research in the principal scientific disciplines. (Bohnert.) 

OR 

L. 215. Literature and Research in the Social Sciences. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction 
of research in the principal fields of the social sciences. (Bergen.) 

OR 

L. 217. Literature and Research in the Humanities. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction of 
research in the principal humanistic disciplines. (Colson.) 

ELECTIVES 

L. 220. Public Library in the Political Process. (3) 

Seminar in the principal influences which affect the patterns of organization, 
support and service patterns of public libraries based upon theoretical and case 
studies. (Bundy.) 

189 



School of Library and Information Services 
L. 222. Children's Literature and Materials. (3) 

A survey of literature and other media of communication and the criteria in 
evaluating such materials as they relate to the needs, interests and capability of 
the child. (Pellowski.) 

L. 224. Construction and Maintenance of Index Languages. (3) 

This course treats the making of classification schedules, subject heading lists 
and thesauri and those considerations relating to the revision and extension of 
existing ones. (Mills.) 

L. 225. Advanced Data Processing in Libraries. (3) 

Analysis of retrieval systems and intensive study of machine applications in the 
acquisition, analysis, coding, retrieval and display of information. (Walston.) 

L. 227. Seminar in Documentation and Information Systems and 
Their Testing and Evaluation. (3) 

A survey of recent developments in the processing, arrangement, and retrieval 
of information, and in the procedures used in their evaluation (Mills.) 

L. 228. Analytical Bibliography and Descriptive Cataloging. (3) 

Concentrates on the techniques and theories appropriate to the study of 
bibliographic morphology and bibliographical description. (Perreault.) 

L. 231. Research Methods in Library and Information 
Activity. (3) 

The techniques and strategies of research and their implications for the defini- 
tion, investigation and evaluation of library problems. (Bundy.) 

L. 233. Governmental Information Systems. (3) 

Analysis of the organization of the information structure and the publication 
and dissemination programs of the U.S., federal, state and municipal govern- 
ments. (Staff.) 

L. 235. Problems of Special Materials. (3) 

Discusses advanced principles and practices for all technical services (in par- 
ticular cataloging) applicable to maps, serials, music, audio-visual items, etc. 

(Perreault.) 

L. 244. Medical Literature. (3) 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in medicine, with emphasis upon 
the bibliographic organization of the field. (Staff.) 

L. 245. Legal Literature. (3) 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in law, with emphasis upon the 
bibliographic organization of the field. (Staff.) 

L. 249. Seminar in Technical Services. (3) 

Treatment of special administrative problems related to acquisition, cataloging 
and classification, circulation, and managerial controls. (Staff.) 

L. 251. Introduction to Reprography. (3) 

A survey of the processes and technology through which materials are made 
available in furthering library and information services, ranging from pho- 
tography to microforms. (Staff.) 

190 



School of Library and Information Services 
L. 253. Seminar in the Academic Library. (3) 

A seminar on the academic library within the framework of higher education, 
treating problems of programs, collections, support, planning and physical plant. 

(Staff.) 

L. 255. Seminar on Manuscript Collections. (3) 

Analysis of the methods and philosophy of handling special papers and docu- 
mentary material in a research library. (Staff.) 

L. 259. Business Information Services. (3) 

Survey and analysis of information sources in business, finance, and economics 
with emphasis upon their use in problem solving. (Staff.) 

L. 261. Seminar in the Special Library and Information 
Center. (3) 

A seminar on the development, the uses, the objectives, the philosophy and 
the particular systems employed in special library service. (Staff.) 

L. 263. Literature of the Fine Arts. (3) 

Consideration and evaluation of the resources of the fine arts, emphasizing 
bibliography and services contained in fine arts libraries. (Staff.) 

L. 264. Seminar in the School Library. (3) 

Special problems in the organization and programs unique to the library of 
the modern school. (Kenner.) 

L. 265. Information Systems Design. (3) 

A workshop oriented seminar designed to cover problems of implementation 
and management of various types of conventional and advanced information 
handling systems. (Staff.) 

L. 269. Library Systems. (3) 

Evolution and current patterns of regional library development, considering 
the economic, legal, service and management problems associated with library 
systems as well as the significance of state and federal programs and national 
information networks. (Bundy.) 

L. 271. Advanced Reference Services. (3) 

Theoretical and administrative considerations, analysis of research problems, 
and directed activity in bibliographic method and search techniques in large 
collections. (Staff.) 

L. 273. Resources of American Libraries. (3) 

Considers distribution and extent of library resources, means of surveying col- 
lections, mechanisms of inter-institutional cooperation in building collections, 
and means of developing research collections in special subject fields. (Staff.) 

L. 275. Storytelling Materials and Techniques. (3) 

Literary sources are studied and instruction and practice in oral techniques are 
offered. (Staff.) 

191 



Mathematics 

L. 277. International and Comparative Librarianship. (3) 

Comparative analysis of the organization and development of libraries and their 
programs in different nations and cultures. (Staff.) 

L. 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to permit intensive individual 
study, reading or research in an area of specialized interest under faculty super- 
vision. (Staff.) 



MATHEMATICS 

Professors: Cohen, Brace, Douglis, Goldhaber, Good. Horvath, Hum- 
mel, Jackson, Kuroda, J. Lehner, Martin,* Mayor, Reinhart, Stell- 

MACHER, AND WALSH. 

Research Professors: Bramble,* Diaz,* and Rheinboldt.** 

Acting Director of Computer Science Center: Menard.** 

Associate Professors: Auslander, Chu, Correl, Ehrlich, Freeman, 
Goldberg, Greenberg, Harris, Karp, Kleppner, G. Lehner, Martens, 
Pearl, Syski, and Zedek. 

Research Associate Professors: Hubbard* and Jones.* 

Assistant Professors: Austing,** Connell, Cook, Daniel, Dyer, Egan, 
Garstens, Gulick, Helzer, Henkelman, Kirwan, Maltese, McGuin- 
ness, mlkulski, nleto, osborn, roselle, sedgewick, shepherd, 
Strauss, Warner, Whitley, and Willke. 

Research Assistant Professor: Ortega.** 

Lecturer: Schweppe.** 



Persons interested in graduate study in mathematics should obtain from 
the Graduate Committee of the Department of Mathematics a booklet en- 
titled "Departmental Policies Concerning Graduate Students," which con- 
tains detailed information concerning admission to graduate study, the re- 
quirements for the master's and doctor's degrees, the written examination, 
graduate student support, and other matters. 

A student majoring in a subject other than mathematics who intends to 
present a minor in mathematics should obtain approval of his minor pro- 
gram from the Advisor on Minors at an early stage of his work. The name 
of the current advisor may be obtained from the Graduate Committee 
Office. 



*Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
** Member of the Computer Science Center. 

192 



Mathematics 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets frequently throughout the 
academic year for reports on current research by the resident staff, visiting 
lecturers, and graduate students. In addition, the Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics Colloquium meets at frequent inter- 
vals for reports on research in those fields. All colloquium meetings are 
open to the public. Several seminars meet regularly for the discussion of 
current developments in special fields. Graduate students are invited to 
participate. 

COURSES 

Courses numbered 100-199 are open to graduate and properly qualified 
undergraduate students. Courses numbered 200 and above are open only 
to graduate students. 
Courses in Algebra: 

100, 103, 104, 106 

200, 201, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 271. 

Courses in Analysis: 

110, 112, 113, 114, 117, 118, 119, 162, 163, 164 

215, 216, 218, 219, 272, 278, 280, 281, 286, 287, 288, 289. 

Courses in Geometry and Topology: 
120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 126, 128 

204, 205, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 
273. 

Courses in Applied and Numerical Mathematics: 
158, 170, 171, 172, 173 
255, 256, 257, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 274. 

Courses in Probabality and Statistics: 
130, 131, 132, 133, 134 
230, 231, 232, 235, 236, 275, 276. 

Courses in Logic and Foundations: 
146, 147, 148 
244, 277. 

Courses for Teachers of Mathematics and Science: 

181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 189. 
Seminars and Research: 

190, 191 

399. 

Math. 100. Vectors and Matrices. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or Math. 15. Algebra of vector spaces and matrices. 
Recommended for students interested in the applications of mathematics. 

(Pearl.) 
Math. 103. Introduction to Abstract Algebra I (3) 

Prerequisite. Math 22 or equivalent. Integers; groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields. (Ehrlich.) 



Mathematics 

Math. 104. Introduction to Abstract Algebra II (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of instructor. An abstract treatment of 
finite dimensional vector spaces. Linear transformations and their invariants. 

(Ehrlich.) 

Math. 106. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22. Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, diophantine 
equations, prime numbers, congruences, reciprocity law of quadratic residues, 
quadratic fields, binary quadratic forms. (Roselle.) 

Math. 110. Advanced Calculus. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math 22. A rigorous development of many topics from classical 
analysis such as the Stieltjes integral, surface integrals, sequences and series of 
functions, introduction to the Dirichlet integral. (A special section for graduate 
students will be provided.) (Strauss.) 

Math. 112. Infinite Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Construction of the real numbers from 
the rational numbers, sequences of numbers, series of positive and arbitrary 
numbers, infinite products, conditional and absolute convergence, sequences 
and series of functions, uniform convergence, integration and differentiation of 
series, power series, and analytic functions, Fourier series, elements of the 
theory of divergent series, extension of the theory to complex numbers and 
functions. (Kirwan.) 

Math. 113. Introduction to Complex Variables. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. The algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, 
mapping properties of the elementary functions. Cauchy's theorem and the 
Cauchy integral formula. Taylor and Laurent series. Residues. (Credit will 
be given for only one of the courses Math 113 and Math 163.) (Hummel.) 

Math. 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. A general introduction to the theory of differential 
equations. Constructive methods of solution leading to existence theorems and 
uniqueness theorems. Other topics such as: systems of linear equations, the 
behavior of solutions in the large, the behavior of solutions near singularities, 
periodic solutions, stability, and Sturm-Liouville Problems. (Auslander.) 

Math. 117. Introduction to Fourier Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 113. Fourier series. Fourier and Laplace transforms. 

(Maltese.) 

Math. 118. Introduction to Real Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. The Lebesgue integral. Fubini's theorem. Convergence 
ence theorems. The L p spaces. (Freeman.) 

Math. 119. Several Real Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math 110. A brief review of scalar and vector valued functions 
of several real variables (as done in Math 22). Implicit function theorem, 
change of variable theorem for multiple integrals, a detailed study of surfaces 
and surface integrals in n-dimensional Euclidean space, including integration by 
parts. Applications to partial differential equations and potential theory. 

(Harris.) 

194 



Mathematics 
Math. 120. Introduction to Geometry I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Axiomatic development of plane geom- 
etries, Euclidean and non-Euclidean. Groups of isometries and similarities. 

(Reinhart.) 

Math. 121. Introduction to Geometry II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 120. Non-Euclidean transformation groups, the Erlangen 
program, projective planes, cubics and quartics. (Reinhart.) 

Math. 122. Introduction to Point Set Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or 146, or equivalent. Connectedness, compactness, 
transformations, homeomorphisms; application of these concepts to various 
spaces, with particular attention to the Euclidean plane. (Kleppner.) 

Math. 123. Introduction to Algebraic Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 122 and 103, or equivalent. Chains, cycles, homology groups 
for surfaces, the fundamental group. (G. Lehner.) 

Math. 124. Introduction to Projective Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the College 
of Education. Elementary projective geometry, combining synthetic and alge- 
braic approaches, projective transformations, harmonic division, cross ratio, pro- 
jective coordinates, properties of conies. (Correl.) 

Math. 126. Introduction to Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. The differential geometry of curves and 
surfaces, curvature and torsion, moving frames, the fundamental differential 
forms, intrinsic geometry of a surface. (Jackson.) 

Math. 128. Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the College 
of Education. Axiomatic method, models, properties of axioms; proofs of some 
basic theorems from the axioms; modern geometry of the triangle, circle, and 
sphere. (Correl.) 

Math. 130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110, or equivalent. Sample space, events, probability and its 
basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random variables, distribution 
functions (continuous and discrete); typical distributions, expectations, mo- 
ments, generating functions; transformations of random variables, limit theo- 
rems. (Syski.) 

Math. 131. Introduction to Probability Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 130. Elementary stochastic processes. Renewal process, 
random walk, discrete Markov chains, birth processes, birth and death processes, 
stationary processes. (Daniel.) 

Math. 132. Introduction to Statistics. (3) 

(Three lectures and 1 hour of laboratory a week.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 130. Sampling distributions, elements of point and set 
estimation, maximum likelihood principle, testing statistical hypotheses, stand- 
ard tests, Neyman-Pearson lemma and problems of optimality of tests, linear 
hypotheses, sequential methods. (Mikulski.) 

195 



Mathematics 

Math. 133. Applied Probability and Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 15 or 21. Recommended for students with major other than 
mathematics. Probability concepts in finite sample spaces, generalizations to 
continuous case (intuitive approach), random variables and distribution func- 
tions standard distributions, expectations, moments and generating functions, 
limit theorems. (Willke.) 

Math. 134. Applied Probability and Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 133. Sampling distributions, estimation methods, standard 
procedures in testing statistical hypotheses, testing location and scale parame- 
ters, tests of independence and goodness of fit, elements of variance and 
regression analysis. (Willke.) 

Math. 146. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 22 or consent of instructor. Sets, relations, mappings. Con- 
struction of the real number system starting with Peano postulates; algebraic 
structures associated with the construction: Archimedean order, sequential com- 
pleteness and equivalent properties of ordered fields. Finite and infinite sets, 
denumerable and non-denumerable sets. (Cohen.) 

Math. 147. Set Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or consent of instructor. Set Algebra, cardinal arith- 
metic, axiom of choice, Zorn's lemma, well-ordering principle, transfinite in- 
duction, ordinal arithmetic, continuum hypothesis. (Karp.) 

Math. 148. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 146 or 147 or 103. Propositional calculus, predicate logic, 
axiomatic set theory, paradoxes. (Not open to students with credit for Math. 
144). (Karp.) 

Math. 158. Games and Linear Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 22: Math. 100 recommended. Theory of games, minimax 
theorem, theory of linear programming, simplex method, systems of linear in- 
equalities and the nature of their solutions, geometrical interpretations. (Pearl.) 

Math. 162. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers I. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 21 or consent of instructor. Not open to students with 
credit for Math. 22. Calculus of functions of several real variables; limits, 
continuity, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, 
vector-valued functions, theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes. Physical appli- 
cations. (This course cannot be counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

(Sedge wick.) 

Math. 163. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers II. (3) 

Prerequisites. Math. 162 or 22 or consent of instructor. The complex field. 
Infinite processes for real and complex numbers. Calculus of complex functions. 
Analytic functions and analytic continuation. Theory of residues and applica- 
tion to evaluation of integrals. Conformal mapping. (Credit will be given for 
only one of the courses. Math. 113 and Math. 163.) (Sedgewick.) 

Math. 164. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers III. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 64 and Math. 163. or consent of instructor. Fourier and 
Laplace transforms. Evaluation of the complex inversion integral by the theory 
of residues. Applications to systems of ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions. (Stellmacher.) 

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Mathematics 
Math. 170. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. (4)* 

Prerequisite. Math. 21 or Math. 15. Introduction to numerical methods, errors, 
interpolations, differences, numerical differentiation and integration, integrative 
solution of equations, least squares, elements of numerical approximation. 

(Cook J 

Math. 171. Numerical Methods in Linear Algebra. (4)* 

Prerequisite, Math. 100 or 104. Math. 110, Math. 170. Numerical solution of 
linear equations, direction methods, iterative methods, eigenvalue problems 
and their numerical solution, errors connected with numerical work in linear 
algebra. (Cook.) 

Math. 172. Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. (4) * 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or 162 and Math. 171. The methods of Euler. Runge. 
Kutta, and other single step-methods, multistep methods, discretization errors, 
stability problems. (Rheinboldt.) 

Math. 173. Numerical Methods for Scientists and 
Engineers. (4)* 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or 162 and Math. 64. Interpolation, numerical differen- 
tiation and integration, numerical solution of polynominal and transcendental 
equations, least squares, systems of linear equations, numerical solution of 
ordinary differential equations, errors in numerical calculations. 

(Rheinboldt.) 

Math. 181. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. De- 
signed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. Axiomatic developments of the real numbers. Elementary 
number theory. 

Math. 182. Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. De- 
signed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. Modern ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. 

Math. 183. Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. De- 
signed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean 
geometry. 

Math. 184. Introduction to Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. De- 
signed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 



*Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 

797 



Mathematics 

of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. A study of the limit concept and the calculus. (Previous 
knowledge of calculus is not required.) 

Math. 185. Selected Topics for Teachers of Mathematics. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 

Math. 189. National Science Foundation Summer Institute 
for Teachers of Science and Mathematics. Seminar. (1-3) 

Lectures and discussions to deepen the student's appreciation of mathematics as 
a logical discipline and as a medium of expression. Special emphasis on topics 
relevant to current mathematics curriculum studies and revisions. 

Math. 190. Honors Seminar. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of the departmental Honors Committee. Reports by 
students on mathematical literature; solution of various problems. (Ehrlich.) 

Math. 191. Selected Topics in Mathematics. (Credit according to 

work done.) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Topics of special interest to advanced 
undergraduate students will be offered occasionally under the general guidance 
of the departmental Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Honors students 
register for reading courses under this number. (Staff.) 

Math. 200. Abstract Algebra I. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 104 or equivalent. Groups with operators, homorophism 
and isomorphism theorems, normal series. Sylow theorems, free groups, abelian 
groups. Modules, tensor products. Integral domains. Field theory, Galois 
theory. (Ehrlich.) 

Math. 201. Abstract Algebra II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 200 or consent of instructor. Dedekind domains. Noetherian 
domains, Hilbert Nullstellensatz. Rings with minimum condition. Wedderburn 
theorems. Introduction to homological algebra. (Goldhaber.) 

Math. 204, 205. Topological Groups. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 286 and Math. 289 or Math. 225, or consent of instructor. 
General nature of topological groups including homomorphism theorems, Haar 
measure, representations of compact groups and the Peter-Weyl Theorem, 
Pontrjagin duality and the Plancherel Theorem. (Kleppner.) 

Math. 206. Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Foundations, linear and higher congru- 
ences, law of reciprocity, quadratic forms, sieve methods, elements of additive 
number theory and density, distribution of prime numbers and L-functions, dis- 
cussion of unsolved problems. (Kuroda.) 

Math. 208. Ring Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of 
the class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following: ideal 
theory, structure theory of rings with or without minimum condition, division 
rings, algebras, non-associative rings. (Pearl.) 

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Mathematics 
Math. 209. Group Theory (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of 
the class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following aspects of 
discrete group theory: finite groups, abelian groups, free groups, solvable or 
nilpotent groups, groups with operators, groups with local properties, groups 
with clan conditions, extensions. (Pearl.) 

Math. 215, 216. Advanced Ordinary Differential 
Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 286 and either Math. 100 or Math. 104. Existence and 
uniqueness theorems for systems of differential equations, linear theory, prop- 
erties of solutions of differential equations including stability, asymptotic be- 
havior, oscillation and comparison theorems. Plane autonomous systems. 
Nonlinear systems. Topics of current interest. (Strauss.) 

Math. 218, 219. Functional Analysis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 286, 287. Normed linear spaces including Banach and 
Hilbert spaces, linear operators and their spectral analysis with application to 
differential and integral equations. (Whitley.) 

Math. 220. Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Classical theory of curves and surfaces, 
geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, surfaces of constant curva- 
ture. (Jackson.) 

Math. 221. Differentiable Manifolds. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Differentiable manifolds, embeddings in 
Euclidean space, vector and tensor bundles, vector fields, differentiable fields, 
Riemann metrics. (Reinhart.) 

Math. 222. Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 220 or 221. Connections, curvature, torsion; symplectic. 
contact, and complex structures. (Reinhart.) 

Math. 223, 224. Algebraic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 200 and 225, or consent of instructor. Homology, coho- 
mology, and homotopy theory of complexes and spaces. (G. Lehner.) 

Math. 225, 226. Set Theoretic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Math. 286, or equivalent. Foundations 
of mathematics based on a set of axioms, metric spaces, convergence and con- 
nectivity properties of point sets, continua, and continuous curves; the topology 
of the plane. (Correl.) 

Math. 227, 228. Algebraic Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Prime and primary ideals in Noetherian 

rings, Hilbert Nullstellensatz. places and valuations, fields of definition. Chow 

points, birational correspondences, Abelian varieties, Picard varieties, alge- 
braic groups. (Horvath.) 

Math. 229. Differential Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 221. Characteristic classes, cobordism, differential struc- 
tures on cells and spheres. (Chu.) 

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Mathematics 

Math. 230, 231. Probability Theory. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 and 130 or consent of instructor. Foundations of proba- 
bility theory. Fields of events, probability space and probability measure. Ran- 
dom variables and convergence of random variables. Induced probability 
spaces. Expectations and moments. Distribution functions and their transforms. 
Consistency theorem. Laws of large numbers and central limit problem. Con- 
ditioning. Measurability and separability of stochastic processes. Stationary 
processes, harmonic analysis, Markov process, Kolmogorov equations, dif- 
fusion theory. Martingales. (Syski.) 

Math. 232. Applied Stochastic Processes. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 110 and 130 or consent of instructor. Basic concepts of 
stochastic processes, stationary processes. Markov chains and processes (discrete 
and continuous parameter). Birth and death processes. Applications from the- 
ories of: queueing, storage, inventory, noise, epidemics and others. This course 
is recommended for graduates from Physics. Engineering, Biology and Social 
Sciences. (Connell.) 

Math. 235, 236. Testing Statistical Hypotheses. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 130 and 132. (Recommended to be concurrent with Math. 
230, 231). Statistical decision problems. Uniformly most powerful tests. Ex- 
ponential families of distributions, concepts of similarity and tests with Ney- 
man-structure. Unbiased tests. Invariance and almost invariance. Elements 
of non-parametric inference. Linear hypotheses. Large sample methods. 

(Mikulski.) 

Math. 244. Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 148. Completeness of first-order predicate logic and appli- 
cations, recursive functions, Godel's incompleteness theorem. (Karp.) 

Math. 255, 256. Advanced Numerical Methods in 

Differential Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 257 and Math. 265. Approximation methods for boundary 
value, initial value and eigenvalue problems in both ordinary and partial dif- 
ferential equations, including finite differences and methods involving approxi- 
mating functions. (Hubbard.) 

Math. 257. Operators on Normed Spaces. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110. An introduction to linear analysis, in particular to 
those concepts and methods important in modern applied mathematics. Among 
the topics to be covered are linear spaces, norms and inner products, lineai 
operators, eigenvalues, basic inequalities. (Nieto.) 

Math. 265. Partial Differential Equations I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 114 or consent of instructor. Gauss and Green formulas, 
the Cauchy problem for the wave equation, method of descent and Huygens 
principle. The Dirichlet and Neumann problem for the Laplace equation, 
single and double layer potentials, Green functions, the method of integral 
equations. (Hubbard.) 

Math. 266. Partial Differential Equations II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 265. Introduction to modern theories in partial differential 
equations. Topics include: existence and uniqueness questions, concepts of 
weak and strong solutions, applications of functional analysis. (Hubbard.) 

200 



Mathematics 

Math. 267. 268. Modern Numerical Mathematics. (3. 3) 

Prerequisites. Math. 170 and Math. 257. Review of classical numerical analysis, 
matrix computations in particular numerical evaluation of eigenvalues, intera- 
tive techniques from a viewpoint of linear analysis: introduction to numerical 
approximations; error analysis in numerical computation. The course will in- 
volve laboratory work in the Computer Science Center. (Rheinboldt.) 

Math. 269. Advanced Mathematical Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites. Math. 158 and Math. 257. Linear inequalities and related systems 
and their applications to linear programming, convex functions and generalized 
programming problems, topics in non-linear and dynamic programming. 

(Rheinboldt.) 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 

(Arranged) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Courses in the following sub- 
jects may be given: homological algebra, commutative algebra, class field theory, 
Lie groups and algebras. (Staff.) 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and 
background of the students. Typical courses: harmonic analysis, singular inte- 
gral operators, spectral theory, differential equations in Hilbert space. (Staff.) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

(Arranged) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and 
background of the students. Typical courses: special functions, variational 
methods, continuum mechanics, fluid dynamics, elasticity. (Staff.) 

Math. 275. Selected Topics in Probability. (3) 

(Arranged) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 276. Selected Topics in Statistics. (3) 

(Arranged) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 277. Selected Topics in Mathematical Logic. (3) 

(Arranged) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 278. Advanced Topics in Complex Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and 
background of the students. Typical courses: interpolation and approximation. 
Riemann surfaces, automorphic functions, several complex variables, sym- 
metric spaces. (Staff.) 

Math. 280, 281. Linear Spaces. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 218. Linear topological spaces, locally convex spaces, 
duality theory, distributions. (Goldberg.) 

Math. 286. Real Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite. Math. 110 or equivalent. Sets. Metric spaces. Lebesgue measure 
and integration. Differentiation. Introduction to Banach and Hilbert spaces. 

(Whitley.) 

201 



Mechanical Engineering 

Math. 287. Complex Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Linear transformations, analytic func- 
tions, conformal mappings, Cauchy's theorem and applications, power series, 
partial fractions and factorization, elementary Riemann surfaces, Riemann's 
mapping theorem. (Kirwan.) 

Math. 288. Complex Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287, 286. Topics in conformal mappings, normal families, 
Picard's theorem, classes of univalent functions, extremal properties, variational 
methods, elliptic functions, Riemann surfaces. (Zedek.) 

Math. 289. Real Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 286, 287. General topology. Measure theory. L p spaces. 
Fourier transforms. Locally compact spaces. (Douglis.) 

Math. 399. Research. 

(Arranged) (Staff.) 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Shreeve, Jackson, R. W. Allen, Sayre, Talaat, and Mavis. 

Associate Professors: Hayleck, Eyler, Wockenfuss, Berger, Cunniff, 
and J. Asimow. 

Assistant Professors: Elkins, Walston, Anand, Marks, and Yang. 

Lecturers: Dawson, Meyerson, Haberman, and Seigel. 

Instruction and research facilities are available for the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in mechanical engineering. 

For the Master of Science degree in mechanical engineering a minimum 
of six semester hours of course work in mechanical engineering must be 
taken in classes conducted by members of the resident graduate faculty. 
For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the minimum is eighteen semester 
hours. 

Registration for six credits of research (M.E. 399, Research) for the 
M.S. degree and twelve credits for the Ph.D. degree are required. It is 
the policy of the Department to require that this research be conducted 
in the Department laboratories. Arrangements for the research and for 
faculty supervision must be made, and approved by the Department 
Chairman, well in advance of the registration for the research in order 
that the funds and equipment may be made available. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
M.E. 100. Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 20, Math. 21, concurrently. The properties, characteristics, and funda- 

202 



Mechanical Engineering 

mental equations of gases and vapors. Application of the first and second 
laws of thermodynamics in the analysis of basic heat engines, air compres- 
sion, and vapor cycles. Flow and non-flow processes for gases and vapors. 

(Eyler, Allen, Talaat.) 

M.E. 101. Dynamics of Machinery. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
E. S. 21; Math 64 concurrently. Kinematics of mechanisms, and dynamic 
characteristics of machinery with emphasis on systems with single degree of 
freedom. (Hayleck, McAuliffe, Yang.) 

M.E. 102. Fluid Mechanics I. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites. M. E. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A rational study of fluids at 
rest and in motion. Principles of viscous and turbulent flow in pipes, nozzles, 
etc. Impulse and momentum concepts. Pumps, turbines, and meters. Dimen- 
sional analysis and laws of similarity. (Sayre, John.) 

M.E. 103. Materials Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. 
E. S. 30. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Processes and methods to manufacture and 
usefully apply engineering materials; alloys and heat treatment of steel: 
strengthening processes for ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. Fabrication tech- 
niques for metals, polymers, and refractories. Specification, inspection, control 
and automation. (Jackson, Tabler.) 

M.E. 104. Gas Dynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. 
M. E. 102. Compressible flow in ducts and nozzles: effect of area change, heat 
addition, friction, and normal shocks. Thermodynamics of chemically reacting 
flows, combustion and equilibrium. (Sayre.) 

M.E. 105. Principles of Mechanical Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 21, Math 21. 
Required of seniors in civil engineering. Elementary thermodynamics and the 
study of heat, fuel and combustion in the production and use of steam for 
generation of power. Supplemented by laboratory tests and trips to industrial 
plants. (Glass, Marks.) 

M.E. 106. Transfer Processes. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 102. 
Conduction by steady state and variable heat flow; laminar and turbulent flow; 
free and forced convection; radiation, evaporation and condensation of vapors. 
Analogy between the transfer of mass, heat, and momentum. (Allen, Eyler.) 

M.E. 107. Energy Conversion. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 
100. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required of seniors in electrical 
engineering. Chemical, heat, mechanical, nuclear and electrical energy con- 
version processes, cycles and systems. Direct conversion processes of fuel cells, 
thermionics, and magnetohydromechanics. (Allen. Talaat.) 

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Mechanical Engineering 

M.E. 116. Applied Mathematics in Engineering. 

Prerequisite: Math. 21. Mathematical techniques applied to the analysis and 
solution of engineering problems. Use of differentiation, integration, differ- 
ential equations, partial differential equations and integral transforms. Appli- 
cation of infinite series, numerical and statistical methods. 

M.E. 120. Measurements Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
E. S. 30, M. E. 101, nd E. E. 51; M. E. 106 concurrently. Lab Fee $8.00. 
Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. Measurements and measurement 
systems; applications of selected instruments with emphasis on interpretation of 
results. (McAuliffe, Glass.) 

M.E. 140. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Math. 64. Elements of 
operational calculus, vector analysis; numerical methods and programming for 
computers. Errors, interpolation, series, integration, interation and solution of 
equations. (Yang.) 

M.E. 150, 151. Energy Conversion. (4, 3) 

First semester. Three lectures, one laboratory a week. Second semester. Two 
lectures, one laboratory a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 103, M. E. 104, M. E. 
106. Chemical, heat, mechanical, nuclear and electrical energy conversion 
processes, cycles and systems. Reciprocating, turbo- and jet-propulsion power 
plants and components using all types of heat and reaction sources. Direct 
conversion processes of fuel cells, thermionics and magnetohydromechanics. 

(Shreeve, John.) 

M.E. 152. Machine Design. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
M. E. 101, 103. Working stresses, stress concentration, stress analysis and 
repeated loadings. Design of machine elements. Multidegree vibration sys- 
tems. (Hayleck, Jackson.) 

M.E. 153. Elasticity and Plasticity I. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 152. Analysis 
of plates and shells, thick walled cylinders, columns, torsion of non-circular 
sections, and rotating disks. (Hayleck, Jackson, Berger.) 

M.E. 154, 155. Engineering Experimentation. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00 
per semester. Theory of experimentation. Selected experiments emphasize 
planned procedure, analysis and communications of results, analogous systems 
and leadership. (Allen, Sayre.) 

M.E. 156, 157. Mechanical Engineering Analysis and 
Design. (3, 4) 

First semester, two lectures, one laboratory period per week; second semester, 
two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering. Creative engineering and problem analysis. Sys- 
tems design including control, reliability and manufacturing requirements. Use 
of computers in design. Design of multi-variable systems. 

(Sayre, Berger, Cunniff.) 

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Mechanical Engineering 
M.E. 161. Environmental Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 101. 106, senior 
standing in Mechanical Engineering. Heating and cooling load computations. 
Thermodynamics of refrigeration systems. Low temperature refrigeration. 
Problems involving extremes of temperature, pressure, acceleration and ra- 
diation. (Eyler.) 

M.E. 162. Dynamics II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 101, Math. 64, senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering. Linear and non-linear plane and three-dimensional 
motion, moving axes. Lagrange's equation, Hamilton's principle, non-linear 
vibration, gyroscope, celestial mechanics. (Cunniff.) 

M.E. 163. Fluid Mechanics II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 104, M. E. 106. senior standing. 
Hydrodynamics with engineering applications. Stream function and velocity 
potential; conformal transformations; pressure distributions; circulation; nu- 
merical methods and analogies. (Sayre, John.) 

M.E. 164. Thermodynamics II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites. M. E. 104, M. E. 106, senior standing. 
Applications to special systems, change of phase, low temperature. Statistical 
concepts, equilibrium, heterogenous systems. (Eyler, Allen.) 

M.E. 165. Automatic Controls. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, E. E. 52, senior standing. Hydraulic, 
electrical, mechanical and pneumatic automatic control systems. Open and 
closed loops. Steady state and transient operation, stability criteria, linear and 
non-linear systems. Laplace transforms. (Yang.) 

M.E. 166. Special Problems. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. 
Advanced problems in Mechanical Engineering with special emphasis on mathe- 
matical and experimental methods. (Staff.) 

M.E. 167. Introduction to Operations Research I. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. 
Applications of linear programming, queuing model, theory of games and com- 
petitive models to engineering problems. 

M.E. 168, 169. Solid State for Engineers. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. E. S. 30. Advanced study of the behavior 
of solid materials. Structure of matter: equilibrium and rate processes; metallic 
and molecular solids; theory of dislocation; mechanical, thermal, electrical, 
optical, and other properties. (Asimow.) 

For Graduates 
M.E. 200, 201. Advanced Dynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites. E. S. 21, Math. 64, M. E. 157. 
Mechanics of machinery. Dynamic force. Balancing of rotating parts. Vibra- 
tions and vibration damping. Critical speeds. (Cunniff.) 

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Mechanical Engineering 

M.E. 202, 203. Applied Elasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites. E. S. 20, Math. 64, M. E. 153. 
Advanced methods in structural and experimental stress analysis. Advanced 
strength of materials involving beam problems, curved bars, thin plates and 
shells, buckling of bars, plates and shells, etc. Advanced work in stress con- 
centrations, plastic deformations, etc., and problems involving instability of 
structures. (Berger.) 

M.E. 204, 205. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 104, 
M. E. 106, M. E. 151, Math. 64. Advanced problems in thermodynamics on 
compression of gases and liquids, combustion and equilibrium, and availability. 
Statistical thermodynamics transport phenomena, partition functions. 

(Shreeve, Allen.) 

M.E. 206, 207. Advanced Machine Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64, 
M. E. 153, M. E. 157. Application of advanced methods of stress analysis 
to design of stationary and moving machine parts and structures. Properties 
and characteristics of materials and their relationship to design. (Jackson.) 

M.E. 208, 209. Design of Turbomachinery. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 151. Characteristics and design 
of turbines, pumps, compressors and torque converters; cavitation, stall, and 
surge. (Shreeve.) 

M.E. 210, 211. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, M. E. 102, Math. 64 or equivalent. 
Potential flow theory; three dimensional flow examples; application of complex 
variables to two-dimensional flow problems; Blasius theorem, circulation and 
Joukowski hypothesis, engineering applications to cavitation prediction and 
calculation of pressure distribution; introduction to viscous flow and theory of 
the boundary layer. (Sayre, Haberman.) 

M.E. 212, 213. Advanced Vibrations. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 157. Review of single and 
multi-degrees of freedom. Laplace methods. Effects of pulse shape on re- 
sponse of linear and non-linear systems; friction, hysterisis and variable damp- 
ing. (Cunniff.) 

M.E. 214, 215. Stress Waves in Continuous Media. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 153 and M. E. 157. Method 
of characteristics applied to transient phenomena in solids and fluids. Elastic 
and plastic waves under impact. Shock formation and strain rate effects. 

(Seigel.) 

M.E. 216, 217. Energy Conversion Theory. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. M. E. 151. Combustion, thermo- 
electric, thermionic, fuel cells, reactors, magnetohydrodynamics. Special empha- 
sis on kinetics of reactions, fission and fusion. (Talaat, Shreeve.) 

M.E. 218, 219. Energy Conversion Systems. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 217. Design parameters in 
chemical, nuclear and direct conversion systems for the production of power; 
weight, efficiency and radiation. (Talaat, Shreeve.) 

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Mechanical Engineering 
M.E. 220. Seminar. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by mechanical engineering staff. 
Prerequisite, graduate standing in mechanical engineering. (Staff.) 

M.E. 222. Advanced Metallography. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
M. E. 103, E. S. 20. Advanced study of the structure and properties of metals 
and alloys. Study of the latest developments in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys 
including stainless steels, high temperature steels, tool steels, aluminum, mag- 
nesium and copper alloys. Study of inspection of metals by the use of x-rays, 
spectrograph, metallograph and magniflux. Review of current literature. 

(Jackson.) 

M.E. 223, 224. Theory of Plasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 153. Concepts of yield criteria 
and associated flow rules in the theory of elastic-plastic solids, including per- 
fectly plastic, elastic-plastic and strain-hardening materials. Torsion and plane 
problems of plasticity. (Jackson, Berger.) 

M.E. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Metals and 
Alloys. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. S. 20, 
M. E. 103, M. E. 152, M. E. 153. Properties of metals including tensile, im- 
pact, fatigue, damping capacity, hardenability, wear, etc. Fabrication problems 
and selection of metals and alloys. Service failures. Properties required for 
nuclear engineering applications. Properties of metals at elevated and extremely 
low temperatures. (Jackson, Meyerson.) 

M.E. 227, 228. Theory of Elasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 202, 
203. Stress and strain at a point. Relation between stresses and strains, general 
equations of elasticity, plane strain and plane stress, torsion, bending, axially 
symmetric distribution of stress, plates, thermal stresses, strain energy and ap- 
proximate methods. (Berger.) 

M.E. 229, 230. Jet Propulsion. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 150, 
M. E. 151. Types of thermal jet units. Fluid reaction and propulsive efficiency. 
Performance of rockets, aerothermodynamics, combustion chemical kinetics, 
aerodynamics of high speed air flow. Principles and design of solid and liquid 
propellant rockets. Design of turbojets and aerojets, ramjets and hydroduct 
units, including combustion chambers, tuibines and compressor. (Shreeve.) 

M.E. 231, 232. Advanced Heat Transfer. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 150, 
M. E. 151. Advanced problems covering effects of radiation, conduction, con- 
vection, evaporation and condensation. Study of research literature on heat 
transfer. (Shreeve, Allen.) 

M.E. 233, 234. Compressible Flow. (3, 3) 

First and second semester. Prerequisites, M. E. 104, M. E. 210, Math. 64 
or equivalent. One dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow; compressible 
flow in ducts and nozzles; two and three dimensional subsonic and supersonic 
flow; similarity rules, normal and oblique shock waves. (John, Sayre.) 

207 



Microbiology 

M.E. 235, 236. Materials and Their Environment. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 225, 226. Problems involving 
materials subjected to extreme temperatures, nuclear bombardment and radiation 
damage, corrosion and oxidation, impact and flutter, thermal shock, high pres- 
sure and high vacuum. (Asimow, Meyerson.) 

M.E. 237. X-Ray and Diffraction Techniques. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 222. Ad- 
vanced work in X-Ray and diffraction techniques, electron microscopes, and 
optical microscopes, in the study of the structure of materials. 

(Asimow.) 

M.E. 399. Research. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by the staff of the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite, graduate standing in mechanical engineer- 
ing. Research in any field of mechanical engineering as applied mechanics, heat 
transfer, thermodynamics, heat, power, etc. (Staff.) 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Professors: Faber, Doetsch, Hansen, Laffer, and Pelczar. 
Associate Professor: Hetrick. 

Assistant Professors: Cook, MacQuillan, and Roberson. 
Lecturer: Stadtman. 



The Department of Microbiology offers the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Department of Microbiology offers a program of advanced courses 
emphasizing the biological aspects of microorganisms. All candidates for 
advanced degrees are required to pursue a rigorous program of funda- 
mental and original research in an area approved by the department 
chairman and the staff. 

Further information concerning graduate work in microbiology may be 
obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Microb. 101. Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The role of microorganisms in 
the diseases of man and animals with emphasis upon the differentiation and 
culture of microorganisms, type of disease, modes of disease transmission; 
prophylactic, therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. (Faber.) 

208 



Microbiology 
Microb. 103. Serology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Microb. 101. Laboratory fee. $15.00. Infection and resistance: 
principles and types of immunity; hypersensitiveness. Fundamental techniques 
of major diagnostic immunilogical reactions and their application. 

(Roberson.) 

Microb. 104. History of Microbiology. (1) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in 
microbiology. History and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the 
science. The modern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and immunity 
in relation to early theories. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite. Microb. 1. History, 
characteristic features, and epidemiology of the important communicable dis- 
eases; public health administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. 

(Faber.) 

Microb. 111. General Virology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Lab fee $15.00. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 or equivalent. Basic concepts 
regarding the nature of viruses and their properties, together with techniques 
for their characterization and identification. (Hetrick.) 

Microb. 121. Advanced Methods. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The application of 
quantitative techniques for the measurement of enzyme reactions, mutations, 
fermentation analysis and other physiological processes of microorganisms. 

(Hansen, Pelczar.) 

Microb. 135. Applied Microbiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Microb. 1, Chem. 31, and Chem. 33. Laboratory fee. $15.00. 
Introduction to the chemical activities of microorganisms and their industrial 
application. (Cook.) 

Microb. 151. Microbial Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, 8 credits in microbiology and Chem. 31. 33. or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. Aspects of the growth, death, and energy transactions 
of microorganisms are considered, as well as the effects of the physical and 
chemical environment on them. (MacQuillan.) 

Microb. 160. Systematic Bacteriology. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite. 8 credits in micro- 
biology. History of bacterial classification; international codes of nomenclature: 
bacterial variation as it affects classification. (Hansen.) 



209 



Microbiology 

Microb. 171. Cytology of Bacteria. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, Microb. 1, microbiology major and consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. A consideration of morphology, differentiation, and 
cytochemistry of the eubacterial organism. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, 16 credits in micro- 
biology. Laboratory fee, $15.00. Registration only upon the consent of the 
instructor. This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in microbiology 
and majors in allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological 
programs under the supervision of a member of the Department. (Faber.) 

For Graduates 
Microb. 201. Medical Mycology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, 30 credits in microbiology and allied fields. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 
Primarily a study of the fungi associated with disease and practice in the 
methods of isolation and identification. (Laffer.) 

Microb. 202. Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. An introduction to genetic principles and methodology applicable to 
microorganisms. Spontaneous and induced mutations, interaction between clones. 

(Hansen.) 

Microb. 204. Bacterial Metabolism. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisites, 30 credits in micro- 
biology and allied fields, including Chem. 161 and 162. Bacterial nutrition. 
enzyme formation, metabolic pathways and the dissimilation of carbon and 
nitrogen substrates. (MacQuillan.) 

Microb. 206, 208. Special Topics. (1-4, 1-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 20 credits in microbiology. Presenta- 
tion and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects in the field 
of microbiology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 210. Virology and Tissue Culture. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 or 
equivalent. Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. 
Principles of tissue culture. (Hetrick.) 

Microb. 211. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 101 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Registration only upon con- 
sent of instructor. Laboratory methods in virology and tissue culture. 

(Hetrick.) 

Microb. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 204 and 
consent of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial 
metabolism with emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. 

(Pelczar.) 

210 



Chemical Physics 

Microb. 280. Seminar — Research Methods. (1) 

First semester. Discussions and reports by majors in microbiology engaged in 
current research; presentation of selected subjects dealing with recent advances 
in microbiology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 282. Seminar — Microbiological Literature. (1) 

Second semester. Presentation and discussion of current literature in micro- 
biology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters: summer session. Credit-, according to work done. 
Laboratory tee. SI 5.00. I he investigation is outlined in consultation with, and 
pursued under, the supervision ol u senior stall member of the Department. 

I Staff. I 



INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

Professors: Mason, Schamp. and Vanderslice. 

Associate Professor: Benesch. 

Assistant Professors: DeRocco. Krisher, and Munn. 

The Institute for Molecular Physics comprises a faculty interested in 
theoretical and experimental studies in the general area of molecular inter- 
actions. The Institute thus serves as an ideal place to bring together physi- 
cists and chemists to work on problems of mutual interest to the advantage 
of both, and the faculty is made up of members from each of these disci- 
plines. Members of the Institute teach both undergraduate and graduate 
courses in both the Department of Chemistry and the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy and supervise thesis research of graduate students 
in these departments. The department also participates in the graduate 
degree program in chemical physics which is jointly administered by the 
Institute, the Department of Chemistry, and the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy and is described below. 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

This program is open to graduate students in the Departments of Chemis- 
try or Physics and Astronomy and offers a course of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Entering students 
are expected to have an undergraduate degree in either chemistry or physics 
with a strong background in the other discipline- However, a mathematics 
or engineering major may also be eligible. The following courses must be 
included in the major: Phvs. 212 (4 credits): Chem. 323 (3) or Phvs. 
210 (3); Chem. 307 (3)' or Phvs. 208 (3); Phvs. 213 (4) or Chem. 
321 (3). Major electives may be from the following: Chem. 299 (3): 

21 J 



Music 

Chem. 313 (3); Phys. 126 (3); Phys. 216 (2); Phys. 217 (2); Math. 
110 (4); Math. Ill (4); Math. 114 (3). Courses to satisfy the minor 
may be chosen from chemistry, physics, or mathematics. Students with a 
concentration in chemistry must take one physics course at the 200 level in 
addition to Phys. 212 and students with a concentration in physics must 
take a chemistry course at the 200 level in addition to Chem. 187, 189. 
Research problems in Chemical Physics may be supervised by the faculty 
in the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Physics and Astronomy 
or the Institute for Molecular Physics. The program is supervised by a 
committee from the above units. 

Detailed information on this program can be obtained by writing the Chair- 
man of the Chemical Physics Program. Institute for Molecular Physics. 

MUSIC 

Professors: Ulrich. Grentzer, McCorkle, and Trimble. 
Associate Professors: Berman, Dunham, and Johnson. 

Assistant Professors: Bernstein, Diemer, Gordon, Head, Heim, and 

Pennington. 

The Department of Music offers the Master of Music degree in four areas 
of specialization: Music history and literature, theory, composition, and 
performance; the Doctor of Philosophy degree in two areas: musicology 
ano theory; and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in two areas: composi- 
tion and literature-performance. A statement of Departmental require- 
ments supplementing those of the Graduate School has been formulated for 
each of the areas of specialization. Copies may be obtained by applying to 
the Department. 

For information on work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master 
of Education, Doctor of Philosophy, or Doctor of Education — all in music 
education — the student is referred to the section devoted to the Department 
of Education in this catalogue. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Music 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music (2,2,2,2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, the next lower course on the same 
instrument. One hour lesson and six practice hours per week. The student will 
indicate the instrument chosen by adding the proper section number. Special 
fee of S40.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Music 120, 121. History of Music. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 1 or 20 and junior standing. 
A study of musical styles from their origins in western Europe to their present- 
day manifestations. The interaction of music and other cultural activities. 
Music 120, the Greek period to Bach; Music 121, Bach to the present. 

(Bernstein.) 

212 



Music 
Music 141. Musical Form. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites. Music 70. 71. A study of the organizing 
principles of musical composition, their interactions in musical forms, and 
their functions in different styles. (Meyer.) 

Music 143, 144. Composition. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. The principles of 
musical composition, and their application to the smaller forms. Original writing 
in nineteenth- and twentieth-century musical idioms for various media. 

(Trimble.) 

Music 145, 146. Counterpoint. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. A course in eighteenth- 
century contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imitation in the inven- 
tion and the choral prelude. Original writing in the smaller contrapuntal forms. 

(Trimble.) 

Music 147, 148. Orchestration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. A study of the ranges, 
musical functions and technical characteristics of the instruments, and their 
color possibilities in various combinations. Practical experience in orchestrating 
for small and large ensembles. (Trimble.) 

Music 150. Keyboard Harmony. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. One lecture and two laboratory 
hours per week. The application to the piano keyboard of the harmonic prin- 
ciples acquired in Music 70 and 71. Harmonization of melodies, improvising 
and accompanying, playing from dictation, and transposition. (Haley.) 

Music 160, 161. Conducting. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Music 160 or the equivalent is prerequisite to Music 
161. A laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental groups. Baton 
technique, score reading, rehearsal techniques, tone production, style, and in- 
terpretation. Music of all periods will be introduced. (Traver.) 

Music 164. Solo Vocal Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite. Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The study of solo vocal litera- 
ture from the Baroque cantata to the art song of the present. The Lied, melodie. 
vocal chamber music, and the orchestral song are examined. (Pennington.) 

Music 165. Keyboard Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The history and literature of 
harpsichord, organ, and piano music from the Baroque period to the present. 
Suites, sonatas, and smaller forms are studied with emphasis on the changes 
of style and idiom. (Bernstein.) 

Music 166. Survey of the Opera. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. A study of the 
music, librettos, and composers of the standard operas. (Bernstein.) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The study of 
orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. The concerto, sym- 
phony, overture, and other forms are examined. (Tatnall.) 

213 



Music 

Music 168. Chamber Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque period to the present. 
Music for trio sonata, string quartet and quintet, and combinations of piano and 
string instruments is studied. (Ulrich.) 

Music 169. Choral Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the present, with dis- 
cussion of related topics such as Gregorian chant, vocal chamber music, etc. 

(Bernstein.) 

Music 175. Canon and Fugue. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 146 or the equivalent. Composition and 
analysis of the canon and fugue in the styles of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and 
twentieth centuries. (Trimble.) 

Music 180. Acoustics for Musicians. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites. Music 71 or the equivalent, and senior or 
graduate standing in music. The basic physics of music, acoustics of musical 
instruments and music theory, physiological acoustics, and musico-architectural 
acoustics. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Music 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. A criti- 
cal study of one style period (Renaissance, Baroque, etc.) will be undertaken. 
The course may be repeated for credit, since a different period will be chosen 
each time it is offered. (McCorkle.) 

Music 201. Seminar in Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. The 
work of one major composer (Bach, Beethoven, etc.) will be studied. The 
course may be repeated for credit, since a different composer will be chosen 
each time it is offered. (McCorkle.) 

Music 202. Pro-Seminar in the History and Literature of 
Music. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 121 and graduate standing. An introduction to graduate 
study in the history and literature of music. Bibliography and methodology of 
systematic and historical musicology. (Jordan.) 

Music 203. Seminar in Musicology. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 121 and graduate standing. An intensive course in one of 
the areas of musicology such as performance practices, history of music theory, 
history of notation, or ethnomusicology. Since a cycle of subjects will be studied, 
the course may be repeated for credit. (Bernstein, McCorkle.) 

Music 204. American Music. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 121 and graduate standing. A lecture course in the history 
of American art music from Colonial times to the present. (McCorkle.) 

214 



Music 

Music 206. Advanced Modal Counterpoint. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 146 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. An intensive 
course in the composition of music in the style of the late Renaissance. Analy- 
tical studies of the music of Palestrina, Lasso, Byrd, and others. (Trimble.) 

Music 207. The Contemporary Idiom. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 146 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. Composition 
and analysis in the twentieth century styles, with emphasis on techniques of 
melody, harmony, and counterpoint. (Trimble.) 

Music 208. Advanced Orchestration. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 148 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. Orchestration 
projects in the styles of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, and 
others. (Trimble.) 

Music 209. Seminar in Musical Composition. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 144 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. An advanced 
course in musical composition. (Trimble.) 

Music 210. Factors in Musical Learning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Music 121 or the equivalent and at least one 
course in Psychology. The psychology of intervals, scales, rhythms, and har- 
mony. Musical hearing and creativity. The psychology of musical ability. The 
theory of functional music. (Staff.) 

Music 211. Special Studies in Music. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Music 121 or the equivalent. Con- 
ference course in problems in music history, literature, and theory. May be 
repeated for credit. (McCorkle.) 

Music 212, 213. Interpretation, Performance, and Analysis 
of the Standard Repertoire. (2-4 each course.) 

Prerequisite, consent of the graduate faculty in the Department. Lab Fee $40.00. 
A seminar in analysis and interpretation for the graduate performer with ad- 
vanced instruction at the instrument of the works studied. In Music 213 a 
seminar paper and a full-length recital are required. (Diemer and Staff.) 

Music 215. Aesthetics of Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 121 or the equivalent and one course in 
Aesthetics. A consideration of the principal theories of aesthetics as they relate 
to music. A study of writings in the field from Pythagoras to the present. 

(Staff.) 

Music 218. Teaching the Theory, History, and Literature of 
Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, graduate standing and consent of instructor. A course in teaching 
methodology, with emphasis on instruction at the college level. (Ulrich.) 

Music 301, 302. Doctoral Seminar in Music Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, at least twelve hours in music history 
and literature. An analytical survey of the literature of music: Section 1, key- 
board music; Section 2, vocal music; Section 3, string music; Section 4, wind 

215 



Philosophy 

instrument music. Required of all candidates for the D.M.A. degree in 
Literature-Performance. Normally both semesters must be taken before credit 
is allowed. (Heim and Staff.) 

Music 305. Doctoral Seminar in Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, at least twelve graduate hours in music history 
and a familiarity with musicological methods and bibliography. A study of 
topics in music history and theory based on original research in the subject 
areas. Required of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. May be repeated for 
credit. (McCorkle.) 

Music 306. Advanced Composition. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites. Music 209 or the equivalent, and 
permission of the instructor. Conference course in composition in the larger 
forms. May be repeated for credit. (Trimble.) 

Music 312, 313, 314. Interpretation, Performance, and 
Pedagogy. (4, 4, 4) 

Prerequisite, consent of the Graduate music faculty. A seminar in pedagogy 
and the pedagogical literature for the doctoral performer, with advanced instruc- 
tion at the instrument, covering appropriate compositions. Required of all 
candidates for the D.M.A. degree in Literature-Performance. In Music 313 
a lecture recital will be required, and in Music 314 a seminar paper and a 
full-length recital. Special fee of $40.00 for each course. (Staff.) 

Music 399. Thesis Research. (3-6) 

Research in theory or history and literature of music, and musical composition. 
May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor: Schlaretzki. 

Visiting Professor: Brodbeck. 

Associate Professor: Pasch. 

Visiting Associate Professors: Alexander and Wieman. 

Assistant Professors: Brown and Celarier. 

Lecturers: Goldstone, Kress, Roelofs, and Varnedoe. 

The Department of Philosophy offers the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

A statement of departmental requirements for these degrees, supple- 
mentary to the requirements of the Graduate School, may be obtained 
on request from the Department. 

Courses numbered below 150 will not be accepted for graduate credit 
in a philosophy major. 

216 



Philosophy 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Philosophy 1 and either one additional 
course in philosophy or senior standing. A history of Greek thought from its 
beginnings to the time of Justinian. The chief figures discussed: the Presocratic 
philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoic philosophers, and 
Plotinus. (Celarier.) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Philosophy 1 and either one additional 
course in philosophy or senior standing. A history of philosophical thought in 
the West during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The chief figures discussed: 
Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. 

(Staff.) 

Phil. 103. Nineteenth Century Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in philosophy or senior 
standing. A survey of philosophy in the nineteenth century through a con- 
sideration of such writers as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Spencer, Marx, 
Comte, Mill, Mach, and Bradley. (Staff.) 

Phil. 104. Twentieth Century Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course in philosophy or senior 
standing. A survey of philosophy in the 20th century through a consideration 
of representative figures in England, Europe, and America. Among the theories 
to be studied are logical atomism (Russell, Wittgenstein), positivism (Carnap, 
Ayer), existentialism and phenomenology (Sartre, Husserl), naturalism and 
realism. (Dewey, Santayana). (Brown.) 

Phil. 105. Philosophy in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 1. A survey of philosophical thought in America from the 
eighteenth century to the present. Special attention is given to Edwards, Jeffer- 
son, Emerson, Royce, Peirce, James, and Dewey. (Schlaretzki, Varnedoe.) 

Phil. 120. Oriental Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Not offered on College Park campus. 
An examination of the major philosophical systems of the East, attempting to 
discover the relations between these and important ideas of Western thought. 

Phil. 123, 124. Philosophies Men Live By. (3, 3) 

Not offered on College Park campus. An exploration of the fundamental beliefs 
which determine what men make of their lives and of the world they live in. 
Classic statements of these beliefs by great philosophers will be chosen for class 
discussion on the basis of their significance for the problems confronting modern 
man. 

Phil. 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization. (3) 

A critical and constructive philosophical examination of the assumptions, goals, 
and methods of contemporary democracy, fascism, socialism, and communism, 
with special attention to the ideological conflict between the United States and 
the U.S.S.R. (Staff.) 

217 



Philosophy 

Phil. 141. Philosophy of Language. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 41. An inquiry into the nature and function of language and 
other forms of symbolism. (Kress.) 

Phil. 147. Philosophy of Art. (3) 

An examination of the fundamental concepts in art and in esthetic experience 
generally. Readings from the works of artists, estheticians, critics, and 
philosophers. (Brown.) 

Phil. 151. Ethical Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 45. Contemporary problems having to do with the meanings 
of the principal concepts of ethics and with the nature of moral reasoning. 

(Roelofs, Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 152. Philosophy of History. (3) 

An examination of the nature of historical knowledge and historical explana- 
tion, and of theories of the meaning of world history. (Staff.) 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy. (3) 

A systematic treatment of the main philosophical issues encountered in the 
analysis and evaluation of social (especially political) institutions. 

(Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 155. Symbolic Logic. (3) 

Phil. 41 or Math. 3 recommended but not required. An introduction to the 
concepts and techniques of modern formal logic by means of matrix and 
axiomatic developments of the sentential calculus and an examination of the 
first-order predicate calculus in a system of natural deduction. (Pasch.) 

Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 41 and either 101 or 102; or consent of instructor. An 
inquiry into the relations of the sciences, the nature of observation, hypotheses, 
verification, experiment, measurement, scientific laws and theories, the basic 
concepts and presuppositions of science, and the relations of science to 
society. (Staff.) 

Phil. 157. Theory of Meaning. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 41 and 102. A study of theories about the meaning of lin- 
guistic expressions, including the verification theory and the theory of meaning 
as use. Among topics to be considered are naming, referring, synonymy, inten- 
sion and extension, and ontological commitment. Such writers as Mill, Frege, 
Russell, Lewis, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Austin, and Quine will be discussed. 

(Staff.) 

Phil. 169. Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 102. An intensive examination of contemporary problems 
and issues. Source material will be selected from recent books and articles. 
May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. (Staff.) 

Phil. 170. Metaphysics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. Phil. 41 recommended. A 
study of some central metaphysical concepts (such as substance, relation, caus- 
ality, and time) and of the nature of metaphysical thinking. (Pasch.) 

218 



Philosophy 
Phil. 171. Theory of Knowledge. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. Phil. 41 recommended. 
The origin, nature, and validity of knowledge will be considered in terms of 
some philosophic problems about perceiving and thinking, knowledge and be- 
lief, thought and language, truth and confirmation. (Brown, Pasch.) 

Phil. 175. Topics in Symbolic Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 155. May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with 
are different. (Staff.) 

Phil. 176. Induction and Probability. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of inferential forms, with emphasis 
on the logical structure underlying such inductive procedures as estimating and 
hypothesis-testing. Decision-theoretic rules relating to induction will be con- 
sidered, as well as classic theories of probability and induction. (Staff.) 

Phil. 180. The Philosophy of Plato. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected dialogues. 

(Celarier.) 

Phil. 181. The Philosophy of Aristotle. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected portions of 
Aristotle's writings. (Celarier.) 

Phil. 182. Medieval Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phil. 101 or 102. A history of philosophic thought in the West 
from the close of the classical period to the Renaissance. Based upon readings 
in the Stoics, early Christian writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers, and 
Schoolmen. (Celarier.) 

Phil. 184. The Continental Rationalists. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of the systems of some of 
the major 17th and 18th century rationalists, with special reference to Des- 
cartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. (Staff.) 

Phil. 185. The British Empiricists. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected writings of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. (Staff.) 

Phil. 186. The Philosophy of Kant. (3) 

Prerequisites, Phil. 101 and 102. A critical study of selected portions of Kant's 
writings. (Staff.) 

Phil. 190. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Open to honors students in philosophy and, by permission of the instructor, 
to honors students in other departments. Research in selected topics, with group 
discussion. May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are 
different. (Staff.) 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 



219 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 



For Graduates 
Phil. 255. Seminar in the History of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Clarier.) 

Phil. 256. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 260. Seminar in Ethics. (3) 



Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 261. Seminar in Esthetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 270. Seminar in Metaphysics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 271. Seminar in the Theory of Knowledge. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 292. Selected Problems in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Phil. 399. Research in Philosophy. (1-12) 
Each semester. 



(Staff.) 

(Schlaretzki.) 

(Brown.) 

(Pasch.) 

(Brown.) 

(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION 
AND HEALTH 

Professors: Fraley, Harvey, Humphrey, Husman, Johnson, Eyler, 
and Ho. 

Associate Professors: Hanson and Clarke. 

Assistant Professors: Kelley and Nessler. 

The graduate student majoring in physical education, recreation, or 
health education may pursue the degrees of Master of Arts, Doctor of 
Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. The following undergraduate re- 
quirements or their equivalents must be met by every candidate before 
admission to candidacy for a graduate degree in physical education: 
basic sciences (human anatomy and physiology, physiology of exercise), 
kinesiology, therapeutics, sport skills, methods, human development, 
measurement, administration, and student teaching. In the event a stu- 
dent has had successful experience in teaching physical education, the 
prerequisites of sport skills, methods, and student teaching may be waived. 
Undergraduate prerequisites in recreation are as follows: psychology, 
sociology, principles, administration, basic sciences, recreational activities, 
and practical experience. Undergraduate prerequisites in health educa- 



220 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

tion: biological sciences, bacteriology, human anatomy and physiology, 
nutrition, chemistry, psychology, measurement, administration, principles, 
and field work. 

Every student majoring in physical education, health education or recrea- 
tion is required to take P.E., Hea., Rec. 210 — Methods and Techniques 
of Research, and P.E. 200— Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health, and P.E. 399— Research— Thesis. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates * 

P.E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures and two laboratory 
hours a week. Prerequisites. Zool. 1, 14. and 15, or the equivalent. 

(Campbell, Nelson.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P.E. 160. Theory of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 100. (Clarke.) 

P. E. 170. Supervision in Elementary School Physical 
Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. 

(Humphrey.) 

P. E. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. (Kelley, Nessler.) 

P. E. 182. History of Dance. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 52, 54, 56, 58, or permission of instructor. 

(Madden.) 

P. E. 184. Theory and Philosophy of Dance. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Madden.) 

P. E. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 190. Administration and Supervision of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 



*A research project must be conducted in each 100 level course taken for graduate 
credit. 

221 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 191. The Curriculum in Elementary School Physical 
Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. 

(Humphrey.) 

P. E. 195. Organization and Administration of Elementary 
School Physical Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. 

(Humphrey.) 

P. E. 196. Quantitative Methods. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 

For Graduates 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (1) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 202. Status and Trends in Elementary School 
Physical Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Pickett.) 

P. E. 204. Physical Education and the Development of 
the Child. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures a week. 

(Humphrey.) 

P. E. 205. Analysis of Contemporary Athletics. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Husman.) 

P. E. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Clarke.) 

P. E. 215. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Sports and 
Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Husman.) 

222 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 275. Advanced Analysis of Human Motion. (3) 

Prerequisite, P. E. 100; first, second and summer sessions. (Kelley.) 

P. E. 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (1-6) 

First and second semester; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education 
and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 

P. E. 399. Research. (1-5) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hea. 150. Health Problems of Children and Youth. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education in 
Elementary and Secondary Schools. (2-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson, Staff.) 

Hea. 170. The Health Program in the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisites, Hea. 2 and 4, or 
Hea. 40. (Humphrey.) 

Hea. 178. Fundamentals of Sex Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Kelley, Nessler.) 

Hea. 188. Children's Remedial Fitness Clinic. (1-4) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

223 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Hea. 190. Administration and Supervision of School Health 
Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session, (Johnson.) 

For Graduates 

Hea. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (1) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Pickett.) 

Hea. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Clarke.) 

Hea. 220. Scientific Foundations of Health Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session (Jones.) 

Hea. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

Hea. 240. Modern Theories of Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Jones.) 

Hea. 250. Health Problems in Guidance. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 260. Public Health Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Rec- 
reation and Health (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

Hea. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education 
and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 

Hea. 399. Research. (1-5) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

224 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

RECREATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Rec. 120. Program Planning. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Rec. 30. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 150. Camp Management. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 180. Leadership Techniques and Practices. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Harvey.) 

Rec. SI 84. Outdoor Education. (6) 

Summer only. (Staff.) 

Rec. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshops. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Rec. 190. Organization and Administration of Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters. (Harvey.) 



For Graduates 

Rec. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (1) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Rec. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

Rec. 202. Philosophy of Recreation. (2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 203. Supervisory Techniques an Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Pickett.) 

Rec. 204. Modern Trends in Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. 



Rec. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 



(Harvey.) 



(Clarke.) 



Rec. 215. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 



Rec. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. 

Rec. 240. Industrial Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 



(Eyler.) 
(Harvey.) 



225 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Rec. 260. Hospital Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Rec. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Rec. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

Rec. 399. Research. (1-5) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 



226 



Physics 
PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

(For Astronomy and Institute for Molecular Physics [Chemical Physics], 
see Table of Contents) 

Professors: Laster, Day, Estabrook, Ferrell, Griem, Holmgren, 
Hornyak, MacDonald, Marion, Myers, Snow, Stern, Sucher, Weber, 
Westerhout, and Yodh. 

Professors (part-time): Burgers,* Friedman, Hayward, McDonald, 
Montroll,* Musen, Rado, and Slawsky. 

Research Professors: Mason,** Opik, Pai,* Tidman,* Schamp,** Vand- 

ERSLICE,** ANDWESKE.* 

Visiting Professors: Banerjee, Eden, and Horie. 

Visiting Professor (part-time): Escobar- V. 

Associate Professors: Alley, Detenbeck, Earl, Erickson, Falk, Glass- 
er, 1 Glover, Greenberg, Misner, Oneda, Prange, Pugh, Reiser, 2 
Smith, Steinberg, Van Wijk, Wall, Zipoy, and G. Zorn. 

Associate Research Professors: Benesch,** Faller* and Wilkerson.* 

Associate Professors (part-time): Bennett and J. R. Dixon. 

Visiting Associate Professors: Eberhagen and Komesaroff. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Bardasis, Beall, Bell, Bettinger, 
Bhagat, Block, Condon, DeSilva, DiLavore, 3 Dorfman, 4 Dragt, 
Fivel, Glick, Greig, Kacser, Kehoe, Kim, Koch, LaPointe, Leibo- 
witz, Lenchek, Pati, Whatley, Woo, Woods, and Zapolsky. 

Assistant Research Professors: Charatis,* DeRocco,** Guernsey,* 
Koopman,* Krisher,** Lashinsky* and B. S. Zorn. 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Guss and Young. 

Research Associates: Beres, Burn, Carmeli, Clem, Conners, W. G. 
Dixon, Hinds, Kepple, Korenmann, Kunze, Lincke, Mead, Peach, 
Poultney, Rabinovitch, Resnikoff, Ruhl, Richard, Saiedy, Sinclair, 
Skadron, Schmidt, White and Willott. 

Visiting Lecturers: Brunstein, Chou, Fichtel, Gutsche and Hagge. 

Part-time Lecturers: Aitken, Altman, Bleil, Coyne, Donnert, How- 
ard, t Ivory, Karle, Kostkowski, Lide, Maisch, Maycock, McNelis, 
Reiss, Saenz, Simons, Wada, Warner and Wolcott. 



* Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
** Institute of Molecular Physics. 
1 Joint Appointment with Computer Science Center. 
: Joint Appointment with Electrical Engineering. 

3 Joint Appointment with College of Education. 

4 Joint Appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

227 



Physics 



PHYSICS 



It is expected that the following areas should have been studied preliminary 
to graduate work. Any deficiencies should be made up at once. A limited 
amount of graduate credit will be allowed for courses so taken. 

General Physics Electricity and Magnetism 

Thermodynamics Modern Physics 

Intermediate Mechanics Advanced Calculus 

Physical Optics Vector Analysis 

Candidates for both the master's and doctor's degrees are required to 
take Theoretical Dynamics (Physics 200, 201) and Electrodynamics 
(Physics 204, 205). These courses each run for a full year and carry a 
total of 12 semester hours credit. 

Candidates for the doctor's degree, likewise should take Theoretical Dy- 
namics, (Phys. 200, 201,) Electrodynamics, (Phys. 204, 205) and Quan- 
tum Mechanics (Phys. 212, 213). No other courses are specifically re- 
quired for students doing experimental thesis research, but Advanced 
Quantum Mechanics (Phys. 254) is required for students doing disserta- 
tions in theoretical physics. It is recommended in the selection of further 
courses that the student avoid overspeciaiization in any field. In par- 
ticular, he should take a wide variety of classical courses as well as 
courses in selected fields of modern physics. A few of the advanced 
courses are given only every second or third year; the student should 
check with the Department to confirm when a given course is available. 

Candidates for advanced degrees in physics may have a minor in either 
astronomy, chemistry, chemical physics, mathematics, engineering, and/or 
in those fields of physics other than general physics and their field of major 
specialization. 

There is also a graduate program in Chemical Physics centered in the In- 
stitute of Molecular Physics, with degrees either in Physics or Chemistry 
Departments. See description on p. 211. 

Thesis (Ph.D.) 

The student must submit an outline of his topic to the graduate faculty 
for approval. This outline must clearly set forth the nature of the prob- 
lem, proposed method of procedure and the possible results that may be 
obtained. The completed thesis will also be presented to the graduate 
faculty for approval. 

Time Limits 

There is a departmental limit on the time taken to get a graduate degree in 
physics or astronomy. For the M.S., this is five calendar years from 
the date of first enrolling in the Graduate School for full-time students and 
six years for part-time students. For the Ph.D., the time limit is seven years 
from the date of first enrolling in the Graduate School for full-time stu- 
dents and eight pears for part-time students. 

228 



Physics 

Graduate Assistants and other students whose employment is part-time 
and secondary to their studies are considered full-time students. Timing 
began on September 12, 1960 for those students who were enrolled in 
the Graduate School before that date. 

Off-Campus Courses 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers courses at convenient 
times and places so as to accommodate the greatest number of students. 
In order to facilitate graduate study in the Washington area, the Depart- 
ment has part-time professors in certain government laboratories where 
a large number of students are interested in graduate study. All M.S. 
candidates beginning graduate studies after August, 1960, must take at 
least 3 credits of their graduate work on the College Park campus. All 
students who began graduate work in the University of Maryland courses 
after August, 1960, will be required to complete on the College Park 
campus at least 18 credits of their graduate work for the Ph.D. degree 
in physics: these credits must include at least 2 credits of Phys. 230 — 
Seminar, and the remainder can be divided among major and minor 
physics courses and thesis research. Normally, students will complete 
a much greater proportion of their graduate study on the College Park 
campus. At government agencies where there is no part-time professor, 
employees desiring to do graduate work in physics should contact a 
member of the graduate staff in the Department. 

Because of the large number of qualified applicants, the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy has had to restrict formal admission to the Grad- 
uate School to those who have shown particularly outstanding work in 
their undergraduate records or who have already done satisfactory work 
in key 100-level courses at Maryland. Those students who are initially 
refused formal admission to the Graduate School may apply for admis- 
sion to University College (off-campus program), or to the College of 
Arts and Sciences as special students. Each such student should then 
take at least 12 credits of 100-level courses in physics and astronomy- 
including, if possible, Physics 120 and Physics 122 or other comparable 
courses suggested by his advisor. At the completion of all of these 
courses with grades of "B" or better, the student should then reapply 
for admission to the Graduate School. While the credits earned in Uni- 
versity College are not directly applicable toward a graduate degree, the 
student will find that the credit requirements are normally not the prin- 
cipal obstacle anyway in earning an advanced degree and the courses 
taken by registration in University College wiil form a good basis for 
later graduate study. Tne University of Maryland hopes in this way to 
offer an opportunity for advanced study in physics and astronomy to all 
qualified students. 

Further Information 

For more information, students should write the Department of Physics 

229 



Physics 

and Astronomy for the departmental publication entitled "Graduate Study 
in Physics." 

GENERAL PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. (2 credits per semester) 

Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, four credits of Phys. 60 
or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. Selected funda- 
mental experiments in electricity and magnetism, elementary electronics, and 
optics. (Glover, E. Stern.) 

Phys. 102. Optics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 
21. It is suggested, but not required, that Phys. 60 or Phys. 100 be taken con- 
currently with this course. Geometrical optics, optical instruments, wave motion, 
interference and diffraction, and other phenomena in physical optics. (Zipoy.) 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 102. A detailed study of physical 
optics and its application. (Alley.) 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 
21; Math. 21; Electrostatics, direct current and alternating current circuitry, 
electromagnetic effects of steady currents, electromagnetic induction, radiation, 
development of Maxwell's equations, Poynting vector, wave equations, and 
electronics. (Steinberg.) 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 51 or 
consent of instructor. A detailed study of Newtonian mechanics. Dynamics, 
the motion of rigid bodies, oscillation problems, etc., are studied. Lagrange's 
equation of the first kind and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are introduced. 

(Guss.) 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Second semester. Three hours of lecture and two of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 100 and 105 or concurrent enrollment in or Phys. 128. Theory 
of semi-conductor and vacuum tube circuits. Application in experimental physics. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Condon.) 

Phys. 110. Special Laboratory Projects in Physics. (1, 2, or 3) 

Two hours laboratory work a week for each credit hour. One to three credits 
may be taken concurrently, each semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 and consent 
of adviser. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. Selected advanced experi- 
ments. (Staff.) 

Phys. 111. Physics Shop Techniques. (1) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 
or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Machine tools, design and con- 
struction of laboratory equipment. (Horn.) 

230 



Physics 
Phys. 114, 115. Introduction to Biophysics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, intermediate 
physics and Math. 21. A study of the physical principles involved in biological 
processes, with particular emphasis on current research in biophysics. 

(Mullins.) 

Phys. 118. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, general physics and in- 
tegral calculus, with some knowledge of differential equations and a degree of 
maturity as evidenced by having taken one or more of the courses Phys. 50 
through Phys. 110. Introductory discussion of special relativity, origin of quan- 
tum theory, Bohr atom, wave mechanics, atomic structure, and optical spectra. 

(Zorn.) 

Phys. 119. Modern Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118. A survey of 
nuclear physics, x-rays, radioactivity, wave mechanics, and cosmic radiation. 

(Woo.) 

Phys. 127, 128. Elements of Mathematical Physics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Physics 18 and Mathematics 21, or 
consent of the instructor. Classical dynamics and electrodynamic waves. A 
careful study of mathematical approaches used in mechanics, electricity and 
magnetism, and physical optics. (Marion.) 

Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Lecture demonstration fee, $2.00 per semester. A primarily descriptive course 
intended mainly for those students in the liberal arts who have not had any 
other course in physics. This course does not satisfy the requirements of pro- 
fessional schools nor serve as a prerequisite or substitute for other physics 
courses. The main emphasis in the course will be on the concepts of physics, 
their evolution and their relation to other branches of human endeavor. 

(Gutsche.) 

Phys. 140, 141. Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and four hours of laboratory a week. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. Prerequisites, two credits of Phys. 100 
and consent of instructor. Classical experiments in atomic physics and more 
sophisticated experiments in current techniques in nuclear physics. Enrollment 
is limited to ten students. (Holmgren, Earl.) 

Phys. 144, 145. Methods of Theoretical Physics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Physics 128. A survey of basic ideas 
in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. An introduction to electrody- 
namics, quantum mechanics, and relativity. Primary emphasis will be placed 
upon the mathematical methods involved in our understanding of these topics. 

(Griem.) 

Phys. 152. Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical 
Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites. Mathematics 21, Physics 18 or 51, or 
consent of the instructor. Introduction to basic concepts in thermodynamics 
and statistical mechanics. (Dorfman.) 

231 



Physics 

Phys. 153. Modern Physics for Engineers. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Physics 18 or 21 and 
Math. 22. A survey of atomic and nuclear phenomena and the main trends in 
modern physics. This course is designed for students who are not physics 
majors (Mathematics, chemistry, engineering). (Pugh, Detenbeck.) 

A. GENERAL 

Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 204, 205, 212, 213, 234, 235, 252, 
253, 254, 255 and 258 are given every year; all others will be given accord- 
ing to demand. 

For Graduates 
Phys. 200, 201. Theoretical Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Physics 127 or 
equivalent. This basic course for graduate study in physics covers advanced 
classical mechanics, hydrodynamics, elasticity, thermodynamics, and statistical 
mechanics. It is normally taken concurrently with Physics 204, 205. 

(Myers, Glick, Misner.) 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A 
detailed study of advanced classical mechanics. (Myers.) 

Phys. 204, 205. Electrodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, 
Physics 128 or equivalent. This basic course for graduate study in physics 
covers electrodynamics and relativity. It is normally taken concurrently with 
Phys. 200, 201. (Sucher, Zopoy.) 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. The first and second laws 
of thermodynamics are examined and applied to homogeneous and non-homo- 
geneous systems, calculations of properties of matter, the derivation of equi- 
librium conditions and phase transitions, the theory of irreversible processes. 

(Mason. ) 

Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Four lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201 
or an outstanding undergraduate background in physics. A study of the 
Schroedinger equation, matrix formulations of quantum mechanics, approxi- 
mation methods, scattering theory, etc., and applications to solid state, atomic, 
and nuclear physics. (Weber, Falk, Zapolsky.) 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical 
Physics. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Phys. 205. (Falk.) 

Phys. 228. Symmetry Problems in Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Physics 213. A study of general methods 
of classification of physical systems by their symmetries and invariance prop- 
erties, especially in quantum field theory applications. (Misner, Pati.) 

232 



Physics 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of acoustics 
and the theory of vibrations. 

B. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. Dynamics of 
gas particles, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. 

(Mason.) 

For Graduates 
Phys. 210. Statistical Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 119. and Phys. 201. A study of 
the determination of microscopic behavior of matter from microscopic models. 
Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical models. Applications of solid 
state physics and the study of gases. (Montroll. Dorfman.) 

Phys. 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. Phys. 213. A study of atomic spectra 
and structure — one and two electron spectra, fine and hyper-fine structure, 
line strengths, line widths, etc. (Wilkerson.) 

Phys. 215. Theory of Molecular Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. Phys. 214. The structure and properties 
of molecules as revealed by rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. 

(Vanderslice.) 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites. Phys. 213. Molecular theory of gases and 
liquids, ensemble theory, analysis of empirical models for molecular interactions, 
theory of Coulomb interactions between charge distributions. (Mason.) 

C. SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 122. Properties of Matter. (4) 

Each semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 119 or equivalent. 
Introduction to solid state physics. Electromagnetic, thermal, and elastic prop- 
erties of metals, semiconductors and insulators. (Anderson, Glover, Stern.) 

For Graduates 
Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 205. A detailed study of crystal 
structure of solids and of x-rays. (Stern.) 

233 



Physics 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction 
Methods. (2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Phys. 218. 

The investigation of crystal structure, using x-rays and electron diffraction. 

(Stern.) 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 
Properties of metals, lattice vibrations and specific heats; Boltzmann, Fermi- 
Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics, free electron gas theories, band theory of 
metals. (Prange.) 

D. NUCLEAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 120. Nuclear Physics. (4) 

Each semester. Four lecture hours a week. Prerequisite, Physics 119. An intro- 
duction to nuclear physics at the pre-quantum mechanics level. Properties of 
nuclei; radioactivity; nuclear systematics; nuclear moments; the shell model; 
interaction of charged particles and gamma-rays with matter; nuclear detectors; 
accelerators; nuclear reactions; beta decay; high energy phenomena. 

(Young, Holmgren.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 234, 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 120 and Phys. 213. Nuclear prop- 
erties and reactions, nuclear forces, two, three, and four body problems, nuclear 
spectroscopy, beta decay, and related topics. (MacDonald.) 

Phys. 252, 253. Nuclear Structure Physics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 
120 or equivalent; co-requisite, Phys. 212-213 or consent of instructor. Nuclear 
structure and nuclear reactions. Two-body scatterings; nucleon-nucleon forces 
and the deuteron. Neutron scattering; the optical model. Resonance reactions, 
phase-shift analysis, positions and properties of energy levels; the shell model. 
Direct reactions. Electromagnetic transitions. Photoreactions. The design of 
experiments; the extraction of parameters from experimental data and the com- 
parison with nuclear models. (Pugh, Holmgren.) 

E. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS 

Phys. 239. Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 237. Survey of elementary particles 
and their properties, quantum field theory, meson theory, weak interactions, 
possible extensions of elementary particle theory. (Sucher, Day, Oneda.) 

Phys. 254. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Each semester. Prerequisite, Physics 213. Relativistic wave equations, second 
quantization in many body problems and relativistic wave equations, Feynman- 
Dyson perturbation theory, applications to many body problems, applications 
to quantum electrodynamics, elements of renormalization. (Ferrell, Kim.) 

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Physics 

Phys. 255. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Physics 254. Renormalizations of Lagrangian 
Field Theories, Lamb Shift, Positronium fine structure, T. C. P. invariance, 
connection between spin and statistics, broken symmetries in many body 
problems, soluble models, analyticity in perturbation theory, simple applica- 
tions of dispersion relations. (Kim.) 

Phys. 257 Theoretical Methods in Elementaby Particle 
Physics. (3) 

First semester. Co-requisite, Physics 255. (Sucher, Oneda.) 

Phys. 258 Quantum Field Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Co-requisite, Physics 255. 

Introduction to Hilbert space, general postulates of relativistic quantum field 
theory, asymptotic conditions, examples of local field theory, Jost-Lehmann- 
Dyson representation and applications, generalized free field theory, general 
results of local field theory — TCP theorem, spin statistics connections, Bor- 
chers' theorems, Reeh-Schlieder theorem. (Greenberg, Oneda.) 

Phys. 260. High Energy Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Co-requisite, Phys. 254 or consent of instructor. Nuc- 
lear forces are studied by examining interactions at high energies. Meson 
physics, scattering processes, and detailed analysis of high energy experi- 
ments. (Oneda, Snow.) 

F. ASTROPHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS 

For additional courses, see the section on Astronomy, below. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 123. Introduction to Atmospheric and Space Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Physics 127 and Physics 118 or consent 
of instructor. Motions of charged particles in magnetic fields, aspects of 
plasma physics related to cosmic rays and radiation belts, atomic phenomena 
in the atmosphere, thermodynamics and dynamics of the atmosphere. 

(Lenchek, Bettinger.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 221. Upper Atmosphere and Cosmic Ray Physics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or consent of instructor. Struc- 
ture of the atmosphere, rocket and satellite experiments, primary and sec- 
ondary cosmic rays, origins of cosmic rays, geomagnetic theory. 

(Lenchek, Laster.) 

G. PLASMA PHYSICS AND FLUID DYNAMICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 116, 117. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 106 and Math. 21. Kinematics of 
fluid flow, properties of incompressible fluids, complex variable methods of 
analysis, wave motions. (Koopmann.) 

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Physics 

For Graduates 
Phys. 206. Kinetic Theory of Plasmas. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, Physics 204, 205. Knowledge 
of complex variable theory is also desirable. A detailed study of plasma physics. 

(Tidman.) 

Phys. 207. Plasma Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Phys. 204, 205, orbit theory, transport processes, radiation, 
waves, stability theory. (Griem.) 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible 
Flow. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Pai.) 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of advanced 
fluid dynamics. (Burgers.) 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One meeting a week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

(Burgers.) 

Phys. 262, 263. Aerophysics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. (Pai.) 

H. GENERAL RELATIVITY 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A study of Einstein's special 
theory of relativity and some consequences, and a brief survey of the foundations 
of general relativity. (Weber, Misner.) 

I. RESEARCH, SEMINARS AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. 

Research or special study. Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee. 
$10.00 per credit hour when appropriate. Given each semester. Prerequisite, 
major in physics and consent of adviser. (Staff.) 

Phys. 190. Independent Studies Seminar. (Credit according 

to work done.) 

First and second semesters. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
Undergraduate Honors Program in physics. (Staff.) 



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Physics 

For Graduates 

Phys. 230. Seminar. 

Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 

(Staff.) 

Phys. 231. Applied Physics Seminar. 

One credit for each semester. (Staff.) 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory — Selected Topics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. (Staff.) 

Phys. 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. 

Two credits each semester. Two lectures a week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, calculus and consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Phys. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit 
hour. Prerequisite: an approved application for admission to candidacy 
or special permission of the Department. (Staff.) 

J. SPECIAL PHYSICS COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE TEACHERS 

The courses in this section were especially designed for high school teachers 
and are not applicable to B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. degrees in physics without special 
permission of the Department. However, these courses can be included as part 
of a physics minor or as electives. No prerequisites are required. 

Phys. 118A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to basic ideas of the constitution and 
properties of atomic and subatomic systems and of the overall structure of 
the universe. (Hornyak.) 

Phys. 112A. Properties of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to the study of solid state physics and 
the properties of fluids. (E. Stern.) 

Phys. 160A. Physics Problems. (1, 2, 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. (Laster.) 

Phys. 170A. Applied Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Hornyak.) 

Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute 
for Teachers of Science and Mathematics Seminar. (1) 

Arranged during summer school. Enrollment limited to participants in the 
N.S.F. Summer Institute. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Detenbeck, Staff.) 



237 



Poultry Science 
POULTRY SCIENCE 

Professors: Shaffner and Combs. 

Research Professor: Shorb. 

Associate Professors: Creek, Helbacka and Wilcox. 

Course work and research leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees are offered. The student may pursue work with the 
major emphasis either in nutrition, physiology, physiological genetics, or 
the technology of eggs and poultry. 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School, have 
been formulated for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. 
Copies of these requirements may be obtained from the Department of 
Poultry Husbandry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
An. Sci. 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. A study of the 
technological factors concerned with the processing, storage, and marketing 
of eggs and poultry, also factors affecting their quality and grading. 

(Helbacka) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. (See Agricultural Economics A. E. 
117.) (Staff.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Animal Science, 170. (3) 

(DeVolt.) 

Avian Anatomy, see Animal Science, 171. (3) 

(DeVolt.) 

An. Sci. 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31 and 33. 
A study of the fundamental role of all nutrients in the body including di- 
gestion, absorption, and metabolism. Dietary requirements and nutritional 
deficiency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals and man will be con- 
sidered. This course will be for both graduate and undergraduate credit with 
additional assignments given to the graduate students. (Combs.) 

An. Sci. 161. Poultry Genetics. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, An. Sc. and 
Zool. 6. Inheritance of factors related to egg and meat production and quality 
are stressed. An experiment utilizing procedures of pedigreed matings will be 
performed in the laboratory. (Wilcox.) 



238 



Poultry Science 
An. Sci. 162. Avian Physiology. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 1 and Zool. 102 or equivalent. The basic physiology of the bird is dis- 
cussed, excluding the reproductive system. Special emphasis is given to physio- 
logical differences between birds and other vertebrates. (Wilcox.) 

An. Sci. S163. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and extension service workers. The first half will be devoted to 
problems concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The 
second half will be devoted to nutrition. (Combs, Wilcox.) 

An. Sci. SI 64. Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. It deals with the factors affecting the 
quality of poultry products and with hatchery management problems, egg and 
poultry grading, preservation problems and market outlets for Maryland poultry. 

(Helbacka.) 

For Graduates 
An. Sci. 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

See An. Sci. for description. (Leffel, Combs.) 

An. Sci. 240. Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

See Dairy Sci. for description. (Vondersoll.) 

An. Sci. 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 102 or its equivalent. The role of the endocrines in reproduction is con- 
sidered. Fertility, sexual maturity, egg formation, ovulation, and the physiology 
of oviposition are studied. Comparative processes in birds and mammals are 
discussed. (Shaffner.) 

An. Sci. 262. Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written 
reports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are 
discussed. (Staff.) 

An. Sci. 263S. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. To acquaint graduate students 
with common basic nutrition research techniques useful in conducting experi- 
ments with poultry. Actual feeding trials with chicks as well as bacteriological 
and chemical assays will be performed. (Creek.) 

An. Sci. 264. Vitamins. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, An. 
Sci. 109, Chem. 31, 33, and 161. Advance study of the fundamental role of 
vitamins in nutrition including chemical properties, absorption, metabolism, 
storage, excretion and deficiency syndromes. A critical study of the biochem- 
ical basis of vitamin function, interrelationships of vitamins with other sub- 
stances and of certain special laboratory techniques. (Combs.) 

239 



Psychology 

An. Sci. 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 161 and 163. 
The role of minerals in metabolism of animals and man. Topics to be covered 
include the role of minerals in energy metabolism, bone structure, electrolyte 
balance, and as catalysts. (Creek.) 

An. Sci. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2 cr. 4-cr. 
max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate 
specifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

An. Sci. 302. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers based upon 
current scientific publications, relating to animal science or upon their research 
work for presentation before and discussed by the class. (Staff.) 

An. Sci. 399. Research. (1-12) 

First and second semester. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying some to completion and report the results in the form of a 
thesis. (Staff.) 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Andrews, Battig, Daston, McGinnies, and Waldrop. 

Part-time Professors: Brady and Edgerton. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Bartlett, Gollub, Leventhal, Max- 
well, Pumroy, Walder, and Yarczower. 

Assistant Professors: Fisher, Fretz, Golann, Higgs, Johnson, McIn- 
tire, McKenzie, O'Brien, Pavey, Steinman, Turnage, and Ward. 

For the master's degree a minimum of 30 hours are required. The major, 
composed of 21 hours, will be identified as General Psychology and will 
consist of Psych. 211-212 (6), Psych. 252-253 (6), the master's thesis 
research (6), and one elective course (3). The minor, composed of a 
minimum of 9 hours, will ordinarily be taken in a field of specialization 
which the student proposes for the major in his doctoral program. 

For the doctoral degree a minimum of 72 hours is required. The majors, 
composed of 48 hours, will consist of at least 30 hours in courses chosen 
from two specialized fields, and 18 hours of research for thesis, the last 
including 6 hours for the master's thesis. The minor will be in General 
Psychology and will consist of a total of 24 hours including Psych. 205- 
206 (6), Psych. 211-212 (6), Psych. 252-253 (6), and two elective 
courses (6). 

240 



Psychology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the Department 
of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Researches on fundamental psychological 
problems encountered in education. Measurement and significance of individual 
differences; learning, motivation, transfer of training, and the educational 
implications of theories of intelligence. (Maxwell.) 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 21, and Psych. 90 or consent of instructor. 
A systematic review of researches and points of view in regard to major problems 
in the field of social psychology. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

Psych. 123. Language and Social Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 21, senior standing and consent of in- 
structor. The nature and significance of verbal and non-verbal communication in 
social psychological processes, including examination of relevant theoretical 
approaches to symbolic behavior. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 3 courses in psychology including 
Psych. 5. The nature, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. 

(Staff.) 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. A study of basic human factors involved 
in the design and operation of machinery and equipment. Organized for stu- 
dents in engineering, industrial psychology, and the biological sciences. 

(Anderson.) 

Psych. 145. Experimental Psychology: Sensory Processes. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Laboratory fee per semester, $4.00. Primarily 
for students who major or minor in psychology. A systematic survey of the 
laboratory methods and techniques applied to sensory and perceptual processes. 

(Fisher, Steinman.) 

Psych. 146. Experimental Psychology: Learning, Motivation, 
and Problem Solving. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Laboratory fee per semester, $4.00. Primarily 
for students who major or minor in psychology. The experimental analysis of 
learning and motivational processes. (Yarczower, Gollub, Turnage.) 

Psych. 147. Experimental Psychology: Social Behavior. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
per week. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisites, Psych. 21 and Psych. 90 or 
equivalent. A laboratory course dealing with methods of studying behavior in 
the social context. Topics will include social perception and motivation, small 
groups, communication and persuasion. Consideration will be given to the 
techniques involved in laboratory experimentation, field studies, attitude scale 
construction, and opinion surveys. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

241 



Psychology 

Psych. 148. Psychology of Learning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 146, or Psych. 145 and permission. Review 
and analysis of the major phenomena and theories of human and animal learning, 
including an introduction to the fields of problem solving, thinking and reasoning 
behavior. (Staff.) 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Criti- 
cal survey of measuring devices used in counseling, educational and industrial 
practice with an emphasis on the theory, development and standardization. 
Laboratory work will incorporate training in methodology of test development 
together with appropriate practice in the use of selected tests. 

(Waldrop, Bartlett, Fretz.) 

Psych. 151. Psychology of Individual Differences. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Psych. 5 and 90. Problems, theories, 
and researches related to psychological differences among individuals and 
groups. (Heermann, Waldrop, Johnson.) 

Psych. 161. Industrial Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in psychology. A course designed to aid 
in the understanding of the problems of people in a variety of work situations; 
serving as an introduction to such technical problems as personnel selection, 
interviewing, morale, supervision and management, and human relations in 
industry. Lecture, discussion and laboratory. (Heermann, Bartlett, O'Brien.) 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 145 or 146. An introduction to research on the physiological 
basis of human behavior, including considerations of sensory phenomena, motor 
coordination, emotion, drives, and the neurological basis of learning. 

(Brady, Mclntire, Hodos.) 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

(Same as Zool. 181.) Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A 
study of animal behavior, including considerations of social interactions, learning 
sensory processes, motivations, and experimental methods, with a major 
emphasis on mammals. (Mclntire.) 

Psych. 191. Senior Seminar. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of the instructor. The 
historical and theoretical roots of the science of psychology. Analysis of cur- 
rent psychological theories and their related research. (Staff.) 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty 
supervisor. Integrated reading under direction, leading to the preparation of an 
adequately documented report on a special topic. (Staff.) 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty 
supervisor. An individualized course designed to allow the student to pursue a 
specialized topic or research project under supervision. (Staff.) 

242 



Psychology 



For Graduates 



(All the following courses require consent of the instructor. Not all of the 
graduate courses are offered every year. The times specified for each course 
are given as estimates.) 

Psych. 200. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of 
Psychological Science. ( 1 ) 

Prerequisite, consent of faculty advisor. Survey of professional problems in 
psychology, including considerations of contemporary developments, profes- 
sional ethics, literature resources, formulation of critical research problems, and 
discussion of the major institutions requiring psychological services. (Staff.) 

Psych. 201. Sensory and Perceptual Processes. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, Psych. 180 and 211. The contemporary experi- 
mental and theoretical literature on selected problems in sensation and percep- 
tion. (Fisher, Steinman.) 

Psych. 203, 204. Graduate Seminar. (3, 3) 

Surveys of contemporary American and foreign research literature in specialized 
fields of psychology. (Staff.) 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories 
in Psychology. (3, 3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 212. A study of the philosophical and 
scientific background of modern psychology, together with a review of its 
major systematic viewpoints and issues. (Battig.) 

Psych. 207. Conditioning and Learning. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 212. The literature on the experimental 
analysis of behavior, with examination of basic experiments and contemporary 
theories related to them. (Gollub, Yarczower, Turnage.) 

Psych. 208. Verbal Behavior. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 123 and 212. Analysis of such topics as 
verbal learning, psycholinguistics, concept formation, and thinking. 

(Turnage, Battig.) 

Psych. 211, 212. Advanced General Psycholoc. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 145 or 146. A systematic review 
of the more fundamental investigations upon which modern psychology is 
based. (Staff.) 

Psych. 213. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. (1-3) 

Methodology of the automatization of research techniques and appar.. 
apparatus design and construction; telemetric and digital techniques; logical bl 
circuitry. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per credit hour. (Si 

Psych. 214. Comparative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 181 and 212. The experimental literature on the behavior of 
infra-human organisms. Special topics. (Yarczower, Mcli.: 



243 



Psychology 

Psych. 215. Advanced Psychophysiology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar dealing with special selected topics in 
the area of psychophysiology. (Brady, Mclntire, Hodos.) 

Psych. 216. Seminar in Psychopharmacology. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of graduate study in psychology and consent of the 
instructor. A critical review and detailed analysis of the literature and problems 
related to the effects of drugs on animal and human behavior. Designed for 
advanced graduate students in experimental psychology and clinical psychology. 

(Brady, Gollub.) 

Psych. 220. Psychological Concepts in Mental Health. (3) 

Each year. Prerequisite, advanced standing. Concepts in mental health, their 
theoretical status, experimental evidence, and current use. (Waldrop, Golann.) 

Psych. 221. Seminar in Counseling Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in counseling psychology. (Waldrop, Fretz.) 

Psych. 222. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in clinical psychology. (Pumroy, Daston, Walder.) 

Psych. 223. Seminar in Community Mental Health. (3) 

Selected problems in mental health psychology. (Golann.) 

Psych. 224. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The seminar is designed to acquaint the 
student with student personnel functions at the collegiate level. Attention is de- 
voted to the historical antecedents of student personnel activities, the range of 
services, their functions, responsibilities, interrelationships and projected future 
status. Resource personnel presently engaged in student personnel services will 
participate as needed. (Staff.) 

Psych. 225, 226. Measurement and Evaluation. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Theory and logic of the 
methodology of evaluation. Laboratory practice in methods of appraisal. Survey 
of available testing instruments and techniques. Laboratory fee of $6 each 
semester. (Daston, Pumroy, Walder.) 

Psych. 229. Seminar in Industrial Psychology. (3) 

An advanced seminar covering specialized topics such as: morale and motivation, 
labor relations, consumer motivations, man-machine systems, quantitative and 
qualitative personnel requirements inventory, job evaluation, environmental 
conditions and safety, occupational choice and classification, and the interview. 

(Edgerton, Bartlett, O'Brien.) 

Psych. 230. Seminar in Engineering Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar covering the analysis of factors, variables, 
and characterises of systems which affect human performance and efficiency. 

(Anderson.) 



244 



Psychology 
Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry. (3) 

Prerequisite. Psych. 148 or equivalent. A consideration of psychological prin- 
ciples and methods for improving job performance; skill development laboratory 
in application of methods and techniques is provided. (Edgerton, Bartlett) 

Psych. 232. Personnel Selection and Job Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 161 or equivalent. Psychological measurement as applied 
to the analysis of job requirements and the development and use of performance 
criteria and predictors. (Edgerton, Bartlett, O'Brien.) 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Analysis of management organizations as 
social structures, and the application of concepts and methods of social psychol- 
ogy to problems of conflict, cooperation, and leader-group relations. 

(O'Brien, Edgerton.) 

Psych. 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques. (3) 

Psychological concepts and methods in the use of interview, questionnaire, and 
inventory procedures for the measurement, prediction and alteration of behavior. 

(Edgerton, O'Brien.) 

Psych. 241. Persuasion and Attitude Change. (3) 

Each year. Consideration of the communication process and the various media 
of mass communication. Factors related to the effectiveness of communication 
and persuasion are analyzed in the light of experimental evidence, and various 
strategies and techniques of persuasion are reviewed. 

(McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

Psych. 242. Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) 

Each year. Analysis and discussion of contemporary systematic positions in 
social psychology. Review of research methods in the area as well as theories 
and problems of current importance. (McGillies, Higgs, Ward.) 

Psych. 243. Seminar in Small Group Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Review of current approaches to small 
group behavior, including problem-solving, communication, leadership, and 
conformity. (Ward, Higgs.) 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Detailed study of the funda- 
mentals of statistical inference, experimental design, and the analysis of regres- 
sion and correlation concepts and techniques; a basic course for research students 
in the behavioral sciences. (Staff.) 

Psych. 254. Factor Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Analysis of major developments in factor theory as 
applicable to the behavioral sciences, including computational methods and re- 
search implications. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Study of psychophysical methods, scaling technique, 
and the statistical methods of pattern analysis. (Staff.) 

245 



Psychology 

Psych. 256. Mental Test Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Development of test theory from psychophysics and 
measurement theory. Consideration of formal and applied problems involved 
in developing and utilizing phychological tests and measurements. Special atten- 
tion is given to problems of reliability, validity, and prediction. (Bartlett.) 

Psych. 257. Seminar in Quantitative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. An advanced seminar covering special topics in statis- 
tical and mathematical methods and models in psychology. (Staff.) 

Psych. 258. Development of Predictors. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 153. Review of statistical theory and practices in the design, 
development and analysis of techniques of prediction in the behavioral sciences, 
with special attention to the formal and practical problem of criteria for 
prediction. (Staff.) 

Psych. 260. Occupational Development and Choice. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 220. Theoretical and research literature on occupational 
behavior. (Waldrop, Fretz.) 

Psych. 261, 262. Modification of Human Behavior: Research 
Methods and Practice. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The experimental and applied methods available 
for the induction of behavior change, with emphasis on their relationship to 
community mental health (first semester); process, outcome, and theory in their 
application to counseling and psychotherapy (second semester). 

(Daston, Walder.) 

Psych. 263, 264. Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory 
and Practicum. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Application of methods relevant to behavior change 
in counseling and psychotherapy. Individual supervision and group consultation. 
Laboratory fee $6 per semester. (Staff.) 

Psych. 265. Advanced Developmental Psychology. (3) 

Empirical, experimental and theoretical literature related to developmental 
processes. (Waldrop, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 266. Theories of Motivation. (3) 

Alternate years. Current treatments of motivational concepts, and analysis of 
the causal antecedents to behavior. (Staff.) 

Psych. 267. Theories of Personality. (3) 

Scientific requirements for a personality theory. Postulates and relevant research 
literature for several current personality theories. (Daston, Walder.) 

Psych. 269. Practicum in Community Mental Health 
Consultation. (3) 

Each year. Prerequisite, advanced standing. Directly supervised fieldwork in 
mental health consultation. (Staff.) 



246 



Sociology 
Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. Deviant behaviors and their etiology and taxonomy. 

(Daston, Walder.) 

Psych. 271. Appraisal of Disabilities. (3) 

Human disabilities and their psychological appraisal. (Daston, Waldrop.) 

Psych. 272. Individual Clinical Diagnosis. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 226. Case study of emotionally disturbed 
individuals with a variety of psychological techniques. (Staff.) 

Psych. 274. Evaluation and Change in Educational Skills. (3) 
Methods for the enhancement of reading and other educational skills. 

(Maxwell.) 

Psych. 285, 286. Research Methods in Psychology. (1-3, 1-3) 

Each year. Research is conducted on several problems each semester, in a 
variety of fields of psychology, and under the supervision of various members 
of the faculty. (Staff.) 

Psych. 288, 289. Special Research Problems. (1-4, 1-4) 

First and second semesters. Supervised research on problems selected from 
the area of experimental, industrial, social, quantitative, or mental health 
psychology. (Staff.) 

Psych. 399. Research, (credit arranged.) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professors: Hoffsommer, Janes, and Lejins. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Cussler, Hirzel, Shankweiler and 
Hoffman. 

Assistant Professors: Coates, Franz, Motz, DiBella, Price, Pownall, 
Jones, Williams, and Avis. 

The Department of Sociology grants the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Fields of specialization include anthropology, 
criminology, rural and urban sociology, mental health, the family, indus- 
trial and occupational sociology, social theory, social psychology, inter- 
cultural sociology and research methods. 

Prerequisites for graduate study leading to an advanced degree with a 
major in sociology consist of either (1) an undergraduate major (total- 
ling at least 24 semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours 
of sociology (including 6 semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 
additional hours of comparable work in economic**; political science, or 

247 



Sociology 

psychology. Reasonable substitutes for these prerequisites may be ac- 
cepted in the case of students majoring in other departments who desire 
a graduate minor or several courses in sociology. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Soc. 102. Intercultural Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. On the basis of a comparative study of 
customs, individual and group behavior patterns and institutions, this course 
studies the ideologies of America and other modern societies. (Staff.) 

Soc. 111. Sociology of Occupations and Careers. (3) 

First semester. The sociology of work and occupational life in modern society. 
Changing occupational ideologies, values and choices. Occupational status 
systems and occupational mobility. The social psychology of career success. 

(Coates, Jones.) 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urban Relations. (3) 

First semester. The ecology of population and the forces making for change in 
rural and urban life; migration, decentralization and regionalism as methods of 
studying individual and national issues. Applied field problems. 

(Cussler, Jones.) 

Soc. 113. The Rural Community. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. A detailed study of 
rural life with emphasis on levels of living, the family, school, and church and 
organizational activities in the fields of health, recreation, welfare, and planning. 

(Hoffsommer, Hirzel.) 

Soc. 114. The City. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. The rise of urban civiliza- 
tion and metropolitan regions; ecological process and structure; the city as a 
center of dominance; social problems, control and planning. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. The sociology of human relations in American 
industry and business. Complex industrial and business organizations as social 
systems. Social relationship within and between industry, business, community 
and society. (Coates, Jones.) 

Soc. 116. Military Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. The sociology of military life. Social change and 
the growth of military institutions. Complex formal military organizations. Mili- 
tary organizations as social systems. Military service as an occupation or pro- 
fession. Career patterns, problems and satisfactions. Relations between military 
institutions, civilian communities and society. (Coates.) 

Soc. 118. Community Organization. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Community organization 
and its relation to social welfare; analysis of community needs and resources; 
health, housing, recreation; community centers; neighborhood projects. 

(DiBella.) 

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Sociology 
Soc. 121. Population. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Population distribution and 
growth in the United States and the world; population characteristics of the 
U. S.; resulting population problems and policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 122. Population. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Trends in fertility and 
mortality, migrations, population estimates and the resulting problems and 
policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Basic social processes in 
the relations of ethnic groups within the State; immigration groups and the 
Negro in the United States; ethnic minorities in Europe. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

First and second semesters. General survey of the field of social-welfare activ- 
ities; historical development; growth, functions, and specialization of agencies 
and services, private and public. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Varieties and sources of 
religious experience. Religious institutions and the role of religion in social 
life. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Development of human 
nature and personality in contemporary social life; processes of socialization; 
attitudes, individual differences, and social behavior. (Motz, Cussler.) 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Social interaction in 
mass behavior; communication processes; structure and functioning of crowds, 
strikes, audiences, mass movements, and the public. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 145. Social Control. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Forms, mechanisms, and 
techniques of group influence on human behavior; problems of social control 
in contemporary society. (Motz.) 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Law as a form of social 
control; interrelation between legal and other conduct norms as to their content, 
sanctions, and methods of securing conformity; law as an integral part of the 
culture of the group; factors and processes operative in the formation of legal 
norms as determinants of human behavior. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Juvenile delinquency in 
relation to the general problem of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile 
delinquency; treatment and prevention. (Lejins.) 

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Sociology 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 1 or its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or 
consent of instructor. Methods and programs in prevention of crime and delin- 
quency. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 155. Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents in the 
Community. (3) 

Prerequisites, Soc. 52, 152, or consent of instructor. Analysis of the processes 
and methods in the modification of criminal patterns of behavior in a commu- 
nity setting. (Lejins, Pownall.) 

Soc. 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and 
Delinquents. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or 
consent of instructor. History, organization and functions of penal and correc- 
tional institutions for adults and juveniles. (Lejins, Pownall.) 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War. (3) 

Second semester. The origin and development of armed forces as institutions; 
the social causes, operations and results of war as social conflict; the relations 
of peace and war and revolution in contemporary civilization. (Coates.) 

Soc. 162. Basic Principles and Current Practice in 
Public Welfare. (3) 

Summer session only. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or its equivalent. Study of 
the family as a social institution: its biological and cultural foundations, historic 
development, changing structure and function; the interaction of marriage and 
parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. 

(Shankweiler, Motz, Harper.) 

Soc. 166. Interviewing and Problem Solving in Social Work. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 131, or concurrent registration. The principles of interviewing 
and other diagnostic techniques as applied to social problems with particular 
reference to family and child behavior. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Programs of family and 
child welfare agencies; social services to families and children; child placement; 
foster families. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 173. Social Security. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. The social security pro- 
gram in the United States; public assistance; social insurance. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Development and organ- 
ization of the public welfare movement in the United States, social legislation 
interrelations of federal, state, and local agencies and institutions. (DiBella.) 

250 



Sociology 
Soc. 180. Small Group Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Analysis of small group 
structure and dynamics. Review of research on small groups in factories, military 
service, schools and communities. Presentation of techniques used in the study 
of small groups. (Franz.) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Development 
of the science of sociology; historical backgrounds; recent theories of society. 

(Janes, Motz, Hirzel, Price.) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites: For social work field training, Soc. 
131; for crinre control field training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to 
available placements. Supervised field training in public and private social agen- 
cies. The student will select his particular area of interest and be responsible to 
an agency for a definite program of in-service training. Group meetings, indi- 
vidual conferences and written program reports will be a required part of the 
course. (Staff.) 

Soc. 193. Independent Reading Course in Sociology. (3) 

This course is designed for the needs of the honors students in Sociology. 

Soc. 194. Independent Research in Sociology. (3) 

This course is designed for the needs of the honors students in Sociology. 

Soc. 195. Intermediate Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisites, Sociology 95 or equivalent and a course in Sociology (other than 
Sociology 1). Intermediate correlation techniques; analysis of variance; samp- 
ling; additional non-parametric techniques; additional topics in inferential sta- 
tistics. Required for all candidates for the master's degree. (Henkel.) 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar. (3) 

Second semester. Required of and open only to senior majors in sociology. 
Scope, fields, and research methods of sociology; practical applications of socio- 
logical knowledge. Individual study and reports. (Cussler, Hoffsommer.) 

For Graduates 
Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research. (3) 

First semester. Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and 
techniques of sociological investigation and analysis. Required of graduate 
majors in sociology. (Hoffsommer.) 

Soc. 214. Survey of Urban Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sociology 14 or 114 or equivalent. Theoretical approaches of 
Sociology and other Social Sciences to urbanism, urbanization, and urban phe- 
nomena. Selected approaches: Chicago School; metropolitan region; demog- 
raphy: institutions. (Janes, Hirzel, Staff.) 

Soc. 215. Community Studies. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of the factors affecting community development 
and growth, social structure, social stratification, social mobility and social insti- 
tutions; analysis of particular communities. (Staff.) 

251 



Sociology 

Soc. 216. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. (3) 

Second scnester. An analysis of the occupational and professional structure of 
American society, with special emphasis on changing roles, functions, ideologies, 
and community relationships. (Coates.) 

Soc. .217. Seminar in Field Work in Urban Research. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sociology 214. Methods of Research in Sociology applied to the 
urban and metropolitan community; reviews of needed research; reviews of con- 
temporary research; the design and execution of fiield studies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 221. Population and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and 
qualitative aspects; American and world problems. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 230. Comparative Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Comparison of the social institutions, organizations, patterns 
of college behavior, and art manifestations of societal values of various 
countries. (Staff.) 

Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure. (3) 

First semester. Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, per- 
sonality, and social traits in select social structures. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda. (3) 

Second semester. Process involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies 
and techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. 

(Motz.) 

Soc. 250. Formal Organization. (3) 

The study of organizations; the nature of organizations; types of organizations; 
determinants and consequences of organizational growth; determinants and 
consequences of growth for administrative staff; determinants of effectiveness; 
and research in organizations. (Price.) 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology. (3) 

First semester. Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological 
theory and research. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 254. Seminar: Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in criminology. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and 
juvenile delinquency in Maryland. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy. (3) 

First semester. Emergence and development of social policy as related to social 
change, policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. 

(Price.) 

252 



Sociology 

Soc. 262. Family Studies. (3) 

Second semester. Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family 
trends, methods of investigation and analysis. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 263. Marriage and Family Counseling. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 64 or Soc. 164 or consent of instructor. A 
sociological analysis of an emerging, family-centered profession. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 264. The Sociology of Mental Health. (3) 

First semester. A study of the sociological factors that condition mental health 
together with an appraisal of the group dynamics of its preservation. (Staff.) 

Soc. 271. Theory of Social Interaction. (3) 

Positions of major sociologists and social psychologists as to how the individual 
interacts with various groups and the issues involved. Trends in recent inter- 
action theory. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 282. Sociological Methodology. (3) 

Second semester. Logic and method of sociology in relation to the general theory 
of scientific method; principal issues and points of view. (Henkel.) 

Soc. 286. Development of European and American Sociological 
Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sociology 186 or equivalent. Review of systematic sociological 
theories (such as Positivism, Organicism, Conflict, etc.) from the early 19th 
Century to the present. A review of the emerging self-evaluation of Sociology. 

(Janes. ) 

Soc. 287. Sociological Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sociology 186 or equivalent Systematic examination of contem- 
porary sociological theories such as structural functionalism and social action. 
Special reference is given to the relevance of each theory to the conduct of 
sociological investigation. (Janes.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. (Credit to be determined) 

First and second semesters. Individual research on selected problems. (Staff.) 

Soc. 295. Advanced Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisite, Sociology 195 or equivalent. Advanced treatment of inferential 
statistics: sampling; research design; non-parametric techniques; scaling. Re- 
quired of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. (Henkel.) 

Soc. 399. Thesis Research. (Credit to be determined) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

ANTHOPOLOGY 

Anthropology 1 or its Anthropology equivalent is prerequisite to all other 
courses in Anthropology. 



253 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Anth. 105. Cultural Anthropology. (3) 

A survey of the simpler cultures of the world, with attention to historical 
processes and the application of anthropological theory to the modern situa- 
tion. (Staff.) 

Anth. 106. Archeology. (3) 

A survey of human cultural developments as revealed by archeological methods, 
with materials to be drawn from selected areas of both Old and New Worlds. 

(Staff.) 

Anth. 124. The Culture of The American Indian. (3) 

A study of type cultures; cultural processes; and the effects of acculturation 
on selected tribes of Indians in the Americas. (Anderson, Williams.) 

Anth. 125. Cultural History of The Negro. (3) 

The cultures of Africa south of the Sahara and the cultural adjustments of 
the Negro in North and South America. (Anderson.) 

For Graduates 
Anth. 224. Race and Culture. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Race and culture in contemporary 
society; mobility and the social effects of race and culture contacts and inter- 
mixture. (Anderson.) 



SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Professors: Strausbaugh, and Hendricks. 

Associate Professors: Aylward, Linkow, Niemeyer, Pugliese, and 
Weaver. 

Assistant Professors: Baker, Baratz, Craven, Doudna, Frank, 
Meersman, Provensen, Schmitt, and Schwartz. 

Associate Research Professor: Causey. 

Lecturers: Spuehler, Goldiamond, and Hedlund. 

Instructors: Carter, Kanstoroom, Kirkley, McCain, and 

SCHLESINGER. 



The Department offers a graduate course of study in the fields of dra- 
matics, general speech, radio-television, or in speech and hearing science 
leading to the Master of Arts degree. The Department also offers work 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Speech and Hearing 
Science. 

254 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School re- 
quirements, have been formulated in each of the fields for the guidance 
of students. Copies may be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Speech 102. Radio Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. Laboratory fee, $2.00. A study of the 
multiple problems facing the producer. Special emphasis is given to acoustic 
setup, casting, "miking," timing, cutting, and the coordination of personnel 
factors involved in the production of radio programs. (Kirkley.) 

Speech 105. Speech — Handicapped School Children. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 for undergraduates. The occurrence, 
identification and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An introduc- 
tion to speech pathology. (Craven, Staff.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (1 to 5 credits, up to 9) 

Each semester; summer session. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Laboratory fee, $1.00 
per hour. Clinical practice in various methods of corrective procedures with 
various types of speech cases in the University Clinic, veterans hospitals, and the 
public schools. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours per semester. May be repeated 
for a total of 9 semester hours credit. (Craven, Staff.) 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 13. Emphasis upon the longer reading. 
Program planning. (Provensen.) 

Speech 108. Educational Phonetics. (3) 

This course is designed to relate phonetic science to the classroom. An ex- 
tensive coverage of broad transcription of General American speech. Students 
having credit for Speech 3 or any previous phonetics course are not eligible 
for this course. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 109. Speech and Language Development of Children. (3) 

Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An analysis of normal and 
abnormal processes of speech and language development in children. 

(Hendricks.) 

Speech 110. Advanced Group Discussion. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 10. Required in speech cur- 
riculum and elective in other curricula. An examination of current research 
and techniques in the discussion and conference including extensive practice in 
this area. (Linkow.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instruc- 
tor. Present-day speech research. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken 
English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice in transcription. Mastery 
of the international Phonetic Alphabet. (Baker.) 

255 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 113. Play Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 16 or consent of instructor. Development 
of procedure followed by the director in preparing plays for public performance. 

(Meersman.) 

Speech 114. The Film as an Art Form. (3) 

First and second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00 (effective September, 1964). 
A study of the motion picture as a developing form of entertainment, com- 
munication, and artistic expression. A series of significant American and foreign 
films are viewed to illustrate the artistic, historical and sociological trends of 
the twentieth century. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 115. Radio and Television in Retailing. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of Home Economics. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 1 or 7. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Writing and production of pro- 
motional programs for the merchandising of wearing apparel and house furnish- 
ings. Collaboration with Washington and Baltimore radio stations and retail 
stores. (Kirkley.) 

Speech 116. Radio and Television Announcing. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 4 and 22 or consent of instructor. Labor- 
atory fee, $2.00. The theory and application of all types of announcing. (Staff.) 

Speech 117. Radio and Television Continuity Writing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. A study of 
the principles, methods and limitations of writing for radio and television. 
Application will be made in the writing of general types of continuities and 
commercials. (Kirkley.) 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A continuation 
of Speech 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment of organic speech 
disorders. (Carter.) 

Speech 124, 125. American Public Address. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 1 or 7. The first semester covers 
the period from colonial times to the Civil War period. The second semester 
covers from the Civil War period through the contemporary period. 

(Schwartz.) 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. An analysis of 
speech and language habits from the standpoint of general semantics. 

(Hendricks.) 

Speech 127. Children's Dramatics. (3) 

Principles and methods necessary for staging children's productions on the ele- 
mentary school level. Major emphasis on creative dramatics; the application of 
creative dramatics in the school room, and the values gained by the child in 
this activity. Students will conduct classes in formal and creative dramatics which 
will culminate in children's programs. (Schlesinger.) 



256 



Speech and Dramatic Art 
Speech 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Admission by consent of instructor. A lecture-laboratory course dealing with the 
fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking, and rehearsal routine 
as applied to the directing of plays. (Pugliese, Meersman.) 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre. (3) 

First semester. A survey of dramatic production from early origins to 1800. 

(Niemeyer.) 

Speech 132. History of the Theatre. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to present. 

(Niemeyer.) 

Speech 133. Communication Processes in Conferences. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 103 and 104 or the equivalent. Limited 
to students in the military studies curriculum. Group participation in confer- 
ences, methods of problem solving, semantic aspects of language and the func- 
tion of conferences in industry and government. (Linkow.) 

Speech 135. Instrumentation in Speech and Hearing Science. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Laboratory fee, $2.00. The use of elec- 
tronic equipment in the measurement of speech and hearing. (Linkow.) 

Speech 136. Principles of Speech Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Differential diagnosis of speech 
and language handicaps and the application of psychological principles of learn- 
ing, motivation and adjustment in the treatment of speech disorders. 

Craven. ) 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 
Prerequisite, Speech 120 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The design 
and use of methods and materials for diagnosis, measurement, and retaining of 
the speech-handicapped. (Craven.) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 8 or Speech 14. A laboratory 
course designed to provide the student with practical experience in all phases of 
theatre production. Consent of instructor. (Strausbaugfa.) 

Speech 140. Principles of Television Production. (3) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $5.00 (effective September, 1964). Three hour 
lecture, two hour laboratory. Prerequisite, Speech 22. A study of the theory, 
methods, techniques and problems of television production and direction. Units 
of study covering television cameras and lenses, lighting theory and practices, 
scenery and properties, costumes and makeup, graphic arts and special effects, 
are included. Observation of production procedures at nearby television stations. 
Application will be made through crew assignments for University-produced 
television programs. (Wolfe.) 

Speech 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Required for students whose concentra- 
tion is in speech and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Analysis of various 
methods and procedures in evaluating hearing losses. (Doudna.) 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Required for students whose concentra- 
tion is in speech and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Methods of train- 
ing individuals with hearing loss to recognize, interpret, and understand spoken 
language. (Doudna.) 

Speech 146. Television News and Public Affairs. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 117 or Journ. 101. Training in presenta- 
tion of television news, interviews, discussions and forums. (Schlesinger.) 

Speech 147. Analysis of Broadcasting Processes and Effects. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Survey of the 
more common analytic approaches, methods, and results in the field of radio and 
television. (Wolfe.) 

Speech 148. Television Direction. (3) 

First semester. Two hour lecture, three hour laboratory. Prerequisite, Speech 
22 or Speech 140. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Principles of television direction 
including analysis of script, casting, rehearsing, production, and video control. 

(Aylward.) 

Speech 149. Television Workshop. (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, four hour laboratory. Prerequisites, Speech 
22, 140 or 148, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Advanced 
laboratory course dealing with all phases of producing a complete television 
program. (Wolfe.) 

Speech 150. Radio and Television Station Management. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Broadcasting 
regulations, licenses, personnel functions, sales, advertising, and program and 
station promotion. (Batka.) 

Speech 161. Ancient Rhetoric. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 2 or 11. The theories of speechmak- 
ing and speech composition as propounded by the classical rhetoricians. 
Special attention is given to Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Cicero, Quintillian and 
St. Augustine. (McCain.) 

Speech 163. Materials and Programs for the Development 
of Listening. (3) 

Second semester. The study of research findings, listening tests, materials, 
equipment, and programs which can be used to develop listening skills. 

(Frank.) 

Speech 164. Persuasion in Speech. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 2 or 11. A study of the bases of per- 
suasion with emphasis on recent experimental developments in persuasion. 

(Weaver.) 

Speech 171. Styles and Theories of Acting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 8 or consent of instructor. The study and 
application of historical styles and theories of acting. (Pugliese.) 

258 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 175. Stage Design and Lighting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 14 or consent of instructor. The theory 
of stage design and lighting. Making of plans and lighting plots as coordinate 
elements of scenic art. (Schmitt.) 

Speech 180. Honors Seminar. (3 Hrs.) 

For honors students only. Readings, symposiums, visiting lecturers, discussions. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

(All the following courses require consent of instructor.) 

The Department maintains a reciprocal agreement with the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital Washington, D.C., whereby clinical practice in 
speech and hearing rehabilitation may be obtained. These are in addition 
to university facilities where such clinical practice may also be obtained. 

Speech 201. Special Problems Seminar. (A through K) (1-3) 

(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisites, 6 hours of speech path- 
ology and consent of instructor. A. stuttering; B. cleft palate; C. delayed speech; 
D. articulation; E. cerebral palsy; F. voice; G. special problems of the deaf; H. 
foreign dialect; I. speech intelligibility; J. neurophysiology of hearing; K. minor 
research problems. (Hendricks, Staff.) 

Speech 202. Techniques of Research in Speech and Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 12 hours of speech pathology and audiology. Re- 
quired of candidates for master's degree in speech and hearing therapy. Analysis 
of research methodology including experimental techniques, statistical analysis 
and preparation of reports for scientific investigations in speech and hearing 
science. (Williams.) 

Speech 203. Experimental Phonetics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The application of experimental 
methods in the quantitative analysis of the phonetic elements of speech. (Baker.) 

Speech 204. Applied Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Application of 
phonetic analysis to communication systems and clinical analysis in speech and 
hearing. (Baker.) 

Speech 205. Descriptive Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Application of 
phonetic analysis in the transcription of dialects. (Baker.) 

Speech 206. Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A study of diagnostic tools and 
methods in the analysis of various types of speech disorders. (Hendricks, Staff.) 

Speech 207. Advanced Principles of Speech and Hearing 
Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 136 or equivalent, and 6 hours of speech and hearing 
pathology. A review of learning principles as applied to the training of the 
speech and hearing handicapped. (Hendricks.) 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 208. Quantitative Methods in Speech and Hearing 

Science. (3) 

An analysis of current procedures used in quantifying phenomena observed in 
Speech and Hearing Science. A minimum of 12 hours credit in Speech and 
Hearing is a prerequisite for this course. (Staff.) 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours of speech pathology and audiology and consent of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of the anatomy and physiology of the 
auditory and speech mechanisms. (Carter.) 

Speech 211. A, B, C, D. Advanced Clinical Practice. (1-3 up to 12) 

(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisite, 12 hours of speech 
pathology and audiology. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. Supervised training 
in the application of clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech 
and hearing disorders. (Craven.) 

Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent of 
instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Etiology and therapy for organic and func- 
tional speech disorders. (Carter.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. 

(Doudna.) 

Speech 216. Communications Skills for the Hard-of-Hearing. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. 
Speech reading, auditory training, and speech conservation problems in the 
rehabilitation of the hard-of-hearing. (Doudna.) 

Speech 217. Selection of Prosthetic Appliances for the 

Acoustically Handicapped. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 214. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A laboratory 
course in modern methods of utilizing electronic hearing aids. (Staff.) 

Speech 218. Speech and Hearing in Medical Rehabilitation 

and Special Education Programs. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Administrative problems involved in the organization and 
operation of speech and hearing therapy under different types of programs. 

(Hendricks.) 

Sfeech 219. Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in pathology and audiology and consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Methods of evaluation and treatment of children and 
adults who have suffered injury to brain tissue, with subsequent damage to 
speech and language processes. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 220. Experimental Audiology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A 
study of experimental techniques in the investigation of problems in audiology 
and psycho-acoustics. (Causey, Staff.) 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 221. Communication Theory and Speech and 
Hearing Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Analysis of current theories of communication as they 
apply to research and therapy in speech and hearing. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 222. Advanced Bio-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite. 6 hours of audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory research 
methods in the study of hearing mechanisms in animals. (Staff.) 

Speech 223. Advanced Psycho-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Research methodo- 
logy in the study of human hearing. (Staff.) 

Speech 224. The Preparation of Speech and Hearing 
Scientists in Institutions of Higher Learning. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology and 6 hours of speech pathology. A review 
of problems involved in the training of personnel who expect to take teaching 
and research positions at university and college level. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 225. Advanced Semantics. (3) 

Prerequisite. 3 hours of semantics. Laoratory fee, $3.00. Advanced study of 
the effects of language in human perception. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 226. Language Problems of the Exceptional Child. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A survey of special language prob- 
lems of the mentally retarded, brain-injured, hard-of-hearing and deaf children. 

(Carter.) 

Speech 227. Experimental Design in Speech and Hearing 

Science. (3) 

A seminar devoted to planning and conducting experiments in speech and hear- 
ing science. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Each student is required to present three 
pilot studies for discussion. Two hours classwork, two hours laboratory. Per- 
mission of instructor required. (Staff.) 

Speech 240. Seminar in Broadcasting. (3) 

First semester. Studies of various aspects of broadcasting. (Aylward.) 

Speech 241. Special Problems in Broadcasting. (3) 

Second semester. An experimental laboratory course for the development of 
new ideas in broadcasting. (Staff.) 

Speech 248. Advanced Television Direction. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 148 or consent of instructor. Principles of television direc- 
tion as applied to dramatic programs, together with a consideration of the 
specific aesthetic values of the television medium. (Aylward.) 

Speech 260. Speech and Drama Programs in Higher Education. (3) 
First semester. A study of current theories and practices in speech and drama. 

(Frank, Staff.) 

Speech 261. Introduction to Graduate Study in Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Weaver.) 

261 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 262. Special Problems in General Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Weaver.) 

Speech 263. Rhetorical Theories of Style. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Examination of selected theories of style 
drawn from the fields of rhetoric and literature, and analysis of model speeches. 

(Schwartz.) 

Speech 264. Interpersonal Communication. (3) 

Problems and processes involved in the use of language in interpersonal 
communication. (Weaver.) 

Sfeech 270. Seminar: Studies in Theatre. (3) 

First semester. Research projects adapted to individual backgrounds and special 
work. (Meersman.) 

Speech 271. The Theory of Pre-Modern Dramatic 
Production. (3) 

Second semester. Examination and execution of production styles. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 272. Special Problems in Drama. (3) 

Second semester. The preparation of adaptations and other projects in 
dramaturgy. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 273. Theories of the Drama. (3) 

Advanced study of the identification and development of dramatic form from the 
early Greek drama to contemporary forms; the esthetics of theatre arts; and 
dramatic criticism. (Meersman.) 

Speech 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An individual course designed for intensive 
study or research of problems in any one of the three areas of: drama, general 
speech, or radio/TV. (Staff.) 

Speech 301. Independent Study in Speech and Hearing 
Science. (1-6) 

Student-selected topic of investigation. A proposed topic must be approved 
prior to registration. In addition to a formal report an oral presentation of 
the results will be required. May be repeated. Prerequisite, 30 hours of grad- 
uate study in speech and hearing science. (Staff.) 

Speech 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. (Staff.) 



262 



Veterinary Science 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professors: DeVolt andLadson. 

Assistant Professors: Brown and Mohanty. 

No advanced degrees are given in the Department of Veterinary Science. 
Graduate students in other departments are accepted for problems in the 
Department of Veterinary Science upon approval of the Department in 
which the graduate degree may be given. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
An. Sc. 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. A systematic, 
comparative study of the pig, ruminants and fowl, with special emphasis of 
those systems important in animal production. Prerequisite, Zool. 1. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. This course 
gives basic instruction in the nature of disease: including causation, immunity, 
methods of diagnosis, economic importance, public health aspects and prevention 
and control of the common diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses, and poultry. 
Prerequisites, Micro. 1, and Zool. 1. (Brown.) 

An. Sc. 170. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Virus, 
bacterial, and protozoan diseases; parasitic diseases, prevention, control and 
eradication. Prerequisites, Micro. 1, and An. Sc. 1. (DeVolt.) 

An. Sc. 171. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Gross and micro- 
scopic structure, dissection and demonstration. Prerequisite, Zool. 1. (DeVolt.) 

For Graduates 
An- Sc. 200. Electron Microscopy. (3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. 
Theory of the electron microscope, preparation of specimens, manipulations 
and photography. (Mohanty.) 

An. Sc. 399. Research. (1-12) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and reporting the results in the 
form of a thesis. (Staff.) 



263 



Zoology 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors: Anastos, Crenshaw, and Schoenborn. 

Research Professor: Schleidt. 

Research Professors {part-time): Glinos, Humphrey, Kuntz, and 
Sadun. 

Associate Professors: Bernstein, Brown, Grollman, Highton, Jachow- 

SKI, LlNDER, RAMM, AND STROSS. 

Research Associate Professor: Eisenberg. 

Assistant Professors: Brinkley, Ficken, Gatner, Goldman, Keller, 
Nelson, Potter, and Schmit tner. 

Research Assistant Professor: Elbl. 

The Department of Zoology offers programs of study leading to the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with specialization 
in the following fields: cellular, organ, comparative and nerve physiology; 
invertebrate and vertebrate endocrinology; biophysics; cytology; develop- 
mental zoology; population, biochemical, radiation and general genetics; 
animal behavior; ecology, hydrobiology; parasitology, protozoology, hel- 
minthology, acarology; invertebrate zoology; systematics; ichthyology, 
herpetology ornithology and mammalogy. The general academic re- 
quirements which must be fulfilled for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are 
described earlier in the catalog. 

Admission to graduate study in the Department is restricted to students 
with an adequate undergraduate preparation in physical as well as bio- 
logical sciences. This would include upper division courses in zoology, 
and courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry through organic. Able 
students who lack preparation in a particular area may be admitted pro- 
vided that the deficiency is corrected early in the graduate work. Appli- 
cants should submit the results of the Graduate Record Examination. 

For further information and application forms, write to the Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland, 20740. 

All Zoology courses with laboratory have a laboratory fee of $12.00 
per course per semester. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 102. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. An 
intensive study of nerve, muscle, sensory receptors and the central nervous 
system. (Gainer.) 

264 



Zoology 
Zool. 103. Biophysics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of biology 
and one year of either physics or physical chemistry, or permission of the 
instructor. A course designed to acquaint the student with th2 scope of bio- 
physics and to provide an introduction to the analysis of cells and tissues as 
physical-chemical systems. (Goldman.) 

Zool. 104. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semester of organic chmistry. An 
intensive study of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal and respiratory 
systems, and an introduction to endocrinology, basal metabolism and repro- 
ductive physiology. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 105. General Endocrinology. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology 
and one semester of organic chemistry. The study of the functions and the 
functioning of the endocrine organs of animals, with special reference to the 
vertebrates. ( Brink! ey.) 

Zool. 106 The Genetic System. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, a course in genetics, 
one year of organic chemistry and Math. 1 1 or equivalent. A detailed de- 
scription of the interactions of the genetic system. (Keller.) 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. A microscopic study of tissues and organs 
of venerates with special emphasis on the mammal. Practice in elementary 
histotechnique will be included. (Schmittner.) 

Zool. 109. Animal Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and organic chemistry, or permission of 
the instructor. A study of cellular structure with particular reference to the 
morphology and physiology of cell organoids and inclusions. (Brown.) 

Zool. 110. General Parasitology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and one year of chemistry, or permission of 
the instructor. A consideration of the phenomenom of parasitism through a 
study of the structure, function and host relationships of parasitic organisms. 

(Jachowski.) 

Zool. 118. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. An advanced course dealing with the phy- 
logeny morphology and embryology of the invertebrates, exclusive of insects. 

(Linder.) 



265 



Zoology 

Zool. 120. Vertebrate Embryology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. Principles of developmental dynamics 
including organization, differentiation, morphogenesis and developmental 
physiology. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 121. Animal Ecology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. The environment and its control of animal 
abundance, organization of populations, and the biology of communities will 
be studied. (Stross.) 

Zool. 127. Ichthyology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour and one three-hour labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 2 and 5 or equivalent. A course in 
anatomy, embryology, distribution, habits and taxonomy of marine and fresh 
water fish. (Nelson.) 

Zool. 128. Zoogeography. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 2, and 5 or 
equivalent. Principles governing the geographical distribution of animals with 
particular emphasis on vertebrates. (Highton.) 

Zool. 129. Vertebrate Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology or permission of instructor. The identifica- 
tion, classification, habits and behavior of vertebrates. (Ficken.) 

Zool. 130. Hydrobiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of biology or permission of instructor. Study of aquatic 
animals and conditions of existence in water. Selected examples are used to 
illustrate the influence of environment on productivity of aquatic communities. 

(Stross.) 

Zool. 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

Prerequisites, major in zoology or biological sciences, a minimum of 3.0 
cumulative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. 
Research or integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several 
times and receive up to 8 semester hours of credit. (Staff.) 

Zool. 151H. Honors Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. One discussion period a week. Prerequisite, par- 
ticipation in honors program. Guided discussion of topics of current interest. 
Repeatable to total of 4 hours credit. (Staff.) 

Zool. 152H. Honors Independent Study. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. Study of classical material by 
way of guided independent study and laboratory experiments. Repeatable to a 
total of 12 hours credit. (Staff.) 

266 



Zoology 
Zool. 153H. Honors Research. (1-2) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. A laboratory research problem 
which is required each semester during honors participation and culminates in 
an honors thesis. Repeatable to a total of 8 hours credit. (Staff.) 

Zool. 182. Ethology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology, including a course in compartive anatomy, 
or permission of instructor. The function, causation, and evolution of be- 
havior. Laboratory analysis of the behavior of several species. (Ficken.) 

Zool. 190. Evolution. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in genetics or 
permission of instructor. A consideration of current thought in regard to the 
origin and evolution of living organisms. (Crenshaw.) 

For Graduates 
Zool. 201. Comparative Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology, one year of organic chemistry and one 
semester of physiology. The study of the differences and similarities in the 
functioning of organs of species of the animal kingdom. (Brinkley.) 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisites, 
a course in embryology and a course in physiology. The biochemical basis 
of development. (Ramm.) 

Zool. 204. Cellular Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in physiology and one year of organic chemistry. The 
principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal life. 

(Schoenborn.) 

Zool. 205. Comparatave Invertebrate Endocrinology (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of organic 
chemistry, a course in endocrinology and a course in physiology, or permission 
of the instructor. A systematic approach to the structure and physiology of 
neuro-endocrine systems of invertebrates. (Linder.) 

Zool. 206. Electrophysiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in physiology, one year of physics, and permission of 
the instructor. A course concerned with electrical phenomena occurring in 
living matter and with the effect of electrical current on cells, with special em- 
phasis on nerves and muscles. (Gainer.) 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar. (Arranged) 

One seminar a week for each credit hour. 1. cytology; 2. embryology; 
3. fisheries: 4. genetics; 5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; 
9. behavior; 10. recent advances; and 11. endocrinology. (Staff.) 

267 



Zoology 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. (Arranged) 

1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 4. genetics; 5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 
7. systematics; 8. ecology; 9. behavior; 10. general; and 11. endocrinology. 

(Staff.) 

Zool. 210. Systematic Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
The principles and methods involved in the classification of animals, with 
emphasis on population dynamics and speciation. Methods of evaluating taxo- 
nomic data, principles of zoological nomenclature, field and museum techniques, 
and the factors influencing the distribution of animals are also stressed. 

(Highton.) 

Zool. 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology. (1-3, 1-3) 

First and second semesters. One, two, or three lectures a week. Advanced 
lectures by outstanding authorities in their particular field of zoology. As the 
subject matter is continually changing, a student may register several times, 
receiving credit for several semesters. (Visiting Lecturers.) 

Zool. 215. Sociobiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in behavior and permission of the instructor. The course 
will deal with the description and analysis of animal social organizations, the 
adaptive nature of animal societies, the effects of early experience, and the role 
of communication in the integration of animal groups. (Eisenberg.) 

Zool. 216. Physiological Cytology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of biochemistry and physics, a course in physiology, 
or permission of the instructor. A study of the structure and function of cells 
by chemical, physical and microscopic methods. (Brown.) 

Zool. 220. Population Genetics. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in genetics. The role of mutation, selection, migration, 
inbreeding, and stochastic process in evolution. (Highton.) 

Zool. 223. Analysis of Animal Structure. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
a course in embryology. The experimental basis of developmental mechanics. 

(Ramm.) 

Zool. 234. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a 
course in physiology and one year of chemistry above general chemistry. The 
theory, use and application to research of instrumentation normally found in 
the physiology laboratory with an introduction to surgical techniques on both 
large and small animals. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 235. Comparative Behavior. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, usually a course in behavior and one in physiology, and per- 
mission of the instructor. Orientation and migration, communication, coding, 
brain and behavior, biological rhythms, and hormones and behavior are the 
main subjects that will be considered. (Staff.) 

268 



Zoology 
Zool. 236. Mammalian Physiology. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in physiology. Advanced study 
of the functioning of the organs of mammalian species. (Staff.) 

Zool. 237. Comparative Vertebrate Endocrinology. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, one semester of bio- 
chemistry, physiology and endocrinology. Study of the difference and similari- 
ties in the structure and functioning of the endocrine organs of the vertebrate 
species. (Brinkley.) 

Zool. 240. Analysis of Animal Populations. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in ecology or permission of instructor. An advanced 
course in animal ecology with a focus on population. Studies of growth and 
regulation of animal populations are emphasized. (Stross.) 

Zool. 245. Biology of Birds. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, a course in vertebrate zoology or permission of instructor. Em- 
phasis will be on ecology, behavior, anatomy, systematics, and reproductive 
physiology, plus field studies of local birds. (Ficken.) 

Zool. 250. Experimental Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a course in parasitology and permission of the instructor. Ex- 
periments will be performed utilizing living parasites in laboratory animals to 
illustrate various aspects of the host-parasite relationship. (Jachowski.) 

Zool. 251. Helminthology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, two years of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study 
of the classification, structure and biology of the helminths. (Staff.) 

Zool. 252. Protozoology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study 
of the classification, structure and biology of the protozoa. (Staff.) 

Zool. 253. Physiology of Symbiosis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, one year of biochemistry and permission of instructor. A con- 
sideration of the biology of symbiotic organisms, especially the physiological 
concert existing between host and symbiont. (Staff.) 

Zool. 260. Quantitative Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, Math. 19 or equivalent and permission of the instructor. A con- 
sideration of the statistical techniques of principal importance in the analysis 
of biological data. (Keller.) 

269 



Dentistry 

Zool. 300. Advanced Topics in Parasitology. (Arranged) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and permission of the instructor. 
The content of the course changes frequently and students may register for it 
several times. The course will consist of critical discussions of the published 
literature and current problems in parasitology. 1. host-parasite relationships; 
2. ecology of parasites; 3. immunity to parasites; and 4. physiology of para- 
sites. (Staff.) 

Zool. 399. Research. (Arranged) 

Work on thesis project only. 1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 4. genetics; 
5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; 9. behavior; 10. inver- 
tebrate zoology; and 11. endocrinology. (Staff.) 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

ANATOMY 

Professors: Hahn and Piavis 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First semester. Two lectures and three laboratories a week. Second semester. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods for eight weeks. This course consists of 
dissections and lectures supplemented by frequent conferences and practical 
demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The subject is taught with 
the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, the knowledge of 
which is derived from a study of its development, its organs and tissues and the 
action of its parts. (Hahn, Piavis, Staff.) 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods for eight weeks. 
Prerequisite, Anat. Ill or equivalent. The work consists of a study of the 
brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and microscopic methods. Correlation 
is made, whenever possible, with the student's work in the histology and physi- 
ology of the central nervous system. (Hahn, Piavis, Lindenberg, Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Same as Anat. 1 1 1 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Staff.) 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as Anat. 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Lindenberg, Staff.) 

270 



Dentistry 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. This 
course is designed to provide the student with a detailed study of the basic 
anatomy of the region and to correlate this knowledge with the various aspects 
of clinical practice. (Hahn, Piavis.) 

Anat. 399. Research. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) (Staff.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Assistant Professors: Leonard and Morris. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisites, inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training in 
quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week throughout the year, with one conference period per week during 
the first eight weeks of Semester 1 . T he chemistry of living matter forms the 
basis of the course. The detailed subject matter includes th^ chemistry of 
carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes 
of respiration, digestion, metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. 
Laboratory instruction in qualitative blood and urine examination is included. 

(Leonard, Morris.) 

For Graduates 
Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

This course is the same as Biochem. Ill except that it includes additional in- 
struction, collateral reading and assigned reports of an advanced nature. 

(Leonard, Morris.) 

Biochem. 399. Research. 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangeemnt.) (Leonard, Morris.) 

HISTOLOGY 
Professor: Provenza. 

Assistant Professors: Barry and Fischlschweiger. 
Instructor: Seipp. 

Histol. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and 
organs of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects 
of the dental histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, 
many are included in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas 
are so intimately related when functional and clinical applications are considered. 
The instruction in embryology is correlated with that in histology. It covers the 
fundamentals of development of the human body, particular emphasis being 

271 



Dentistry 

given to the head and facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their 
adnexa. Specific correlations are also made with the other courses in the dental 
curriculum. (Provenza, Barry, Seipp.) 

For Graduates 
Histol. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (4-2) 

This course is the same as Hist. Ill, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of Histol. Ill, but does include additional instruction and collateral read- 
ing of an advanced nature. (Provenza, Barry, Seipp.) 

Histol. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 

Prerequisite, Histol. Ill or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 
dental aspects of Histol. Ill, and includes additional instruction in the relations 
of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, 
and the head and facial regions of the human body. (Provenza, Barry. Seipp.) 

Histol. 216. Inheritance and Development Biology. (6) 

This course is concerned with the study of the embryogeny and fetal develop- 
ments of vertebrate animals with special emphasis on mammalian embryology. 
In addition to tracing the development pattern, lectures are devoted to the dis- 
cussion of inheritance mechanisms, gametogenesis and fertilization. (Provenza.) 

Histol. 217. Comparative Animal Histology. (6) 

Prerequisite, Histol. Ill, 212-213, or an equivalent course. This course is con- 
cerned with a comparative study of the morphology, structure and function of the 
cells, tissues and organs as found in representative members of the animal 
kingdom. Special emphasis is placed on techniques and research methods. 

(Provenza.) 

Histol. 218. Experimental Embryology. (4) 

Second semester of every year. Prerequisite, Histol. 216, or an equivalent course. 
This course is concerned with the historical and recent aspects of experimental 
embryology from both the applied and theoretical standpoint. Each student 
will be assigned a special problem in addition to the scheduled lectures. 

(Provenza.) 

Histol. 219. Radiation Biology. (4) 

First semester of odd numbered years. The primary aim of this course is to 
familiarize the student with the techniques of handling radioactive isotopes as 
applied in biological research. The topics covered in the course are: the physics 
of radioactivity from the standpoint of the biological researcher; the selection 
of isotopes for specific investigations; the effects of radioactivity on cells, tissues 
and systems; the effect of radioactivity on inheritance; the role of environment 
on the effectiveness of radioactivity; and certain phases of laboratory health 
physics. The laboratory will be concerned with the use and location as well as 
recording and interpreting data of isotopes as applied to biological research. 

(Barry.) 

Histol. 220. Physical Methods in Histology. (4) 

Second semester of even numbered years. The course introduces the graduate 
student to some of the more frequently employed techniques in cytological and 

272 



Dentistry 

histological research. Exercises are designed for the operation and interpretation 
of data derived from the use of available research tools. Two one-hour lectures 
and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Consent of department head 
required. (Barry.) 

Histol. 320. Seminar. (1,1) 

(Staff.) 

Histol. 399. Research. 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) (Provenza, Barry.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay. 

Assistant Professor: Krywolap. 

Instructor: Becker. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Microb. 115. Serology and Immunology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Protective 
reactions of the animal body against pathogenic microorganisms and their 
products; cellular and humoral immunity; anaphylaxis and allergies. 

(Shay, Becker, Krywolap.) 

Microb. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

First semester. Consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and 
molds. Special attention is given to those organisms which produce lesions 
of the oral cavity. Immunological principles are studied with emphasis on hyper- 
sensitivity resulting from antibiotics, antigens and vaccines. Laboratory teach- 
ing includes cultural characteristics, disinfection, sterilization, asepsis, animal 
inoculation, antibiotics assay and virus techniques. In all phases of the course 
emphasis is placed on dental applications. (Shay.) 

For Graduates 
Microb. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1,1) 

Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites, Microb. 121 or equivalent, Biochem. 
Ill or equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharma- 
cology and therapeutic value of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

(Shay.) 
Microb. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media for special procedures, such 
as, antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. 
Anaerobiosis, differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility 
testing are considered in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements on 
specific groups of microorganisms. (Shay.) 

Microb. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Laboratory 
course. Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. (Shay.) 

273 



Dentistry 

Microb. 211. Public Health. (2) 

Prerequisite, Microb. 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health facil- 
ities in the community and their relation to the practices of the hea^h sciences 
carried on through lectures and discussion groups. The application of statistical 
and epidemiological methods to health problems is illustrated through lectures 
and demonstrations. (Shay.) 

Microb. 212. Bacterial Fermentations. (2) 

Prerequisite, Biochemistry III or an equivalent course and Microb. 121 or 
an equivalent course. Second semester alternate years. This course covers 
composition, nutrition and growth of microorganisms; influence of physical and 
chemical environment on metabolism; chemical activities of microorganisms; 
mechanisms of fermentative and oxidative metabolism. (Krywolap.) 

Microb. 221. Advanced Dental Microbiology and 
Immunology. (4) 

Prerequisite, Microb. 121 or equivalent. First semester. Three lecture hours 
and three hours of laboratory with group conferences each week. This course, 
intended for graduate students of oral microbiology, is a continuation of 
Microbiol. 121, supplemented with library readings and advanced laboratory 
experimentation. (Shay, Becker, Krywolap.) 

Microb. 224. Microbiology of the Periodontium. (2) 

Prerequisite, Microb. 121, Histology 111. and Pathology 121 or equiva- 
lents. Second semester alternate years. This course is designed for advanced 
students in the field of oral microbiology. Consideration will be given to the 
role of microorganisms in periodontal tissues and the factors that influence the 
development of diseases: bacterial interactions; parasitism; salivary calculus; 
periodontitis; gingivitis and herpetic gingivostomatitis. (Shay.) 

Microbiology 281-283. Seminar. (1) (1) 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and research in the field of 
microbiology. (Shay.) 

Microb. 399. Thesis Research. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Open only to 
candidates for advanced degrees in microbiology. (Shay.) 

ORAL SURGERY 

Professor: Dorsey. 

For Graduates 
Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 

Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. (Heldrich, Staff.) 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

(Dorsey, Staff.) 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

(Dorsey, Staff.) 

274 



Dentistry 
Surg. 399. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. (Staff.) 

PATHOLOGY 

Professors: J. J. Salley and M. Lunin. 
Assistant Professor: B. Burch. 
Instructor: F. Stout. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

(M. Lunin and Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Path. 212, 213. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, Pathology 121 or equivalent. One lecture and one laboratory 
period per week. The histopathology of selected oral lesions with emphasis 
on recent advances in diagnostic techniques. 

(J. J. Salley, M. Lunin, B. Burch.) 

Path. 214, 215. (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, Pathology 121 or equivalent. Two four hour laboratory periods 
each week. The laboratory methods used in preparing pathologic tissues for 
microscopic examination. (Staff.) 

Path. 216, 217. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Pathology 212 or equivalent. One hour of lecture and four hours 
of laboratory each week. The study of uncommon and rare lesions of the 
head and neck. (M. Lunin, B. Burch.) 

Path. 218, 219. Seminar. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, Pathology 121 or equivalent. One period each week. Recent ad- 
vances in experimental pathology. (M. Lunin.) 

Path. 399. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: White. 

Associate Professor: Shipley. 

Assistant Professor: Weatherred. 

Physiology 121. Principles of Physiology. (4, 2) 

Three lectures and one laboratory period per week, first semester; two lectures 
per week, second semester. The lectures cover the major areas of physiology, 

275 



Medicine 

including the central and peripheral nervous systems, muscle, heart and circu- 
lation, respiration, renal function, digestion, endocrines and reproduction. The 
laboratory includes experiments with the turtle heart and frog nerve-muscle 
preparations, mammalian operative work and observations on the human sub- 
ject. (White, Staff.) 

Physiology 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (4, 2) 

Prerequisite, permission from the Department. Same as Physiology 121 but with 
collateral reading and additional instruction. Each student is required to write 
a review paper on some special phase of physiology. (White.) 

Physiology 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Prerequisite, Physiology 121 or its equivalent. 
Lectures and seminars on special problems and recent advances in physiology 
during the second semester. (White.) 

Physiology 213. Research. 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (White.) 

Physiology 399. Thesis Research. 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (White.) 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 

Professors: Figge, Krahl, and Leveque. 

Assistant Professors: Crispens, Wells, Ramsay, Wadsworth, Ebner, 
and Aquino. 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the 
Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (9) 

Four conferences or lectures and 12 laboratory hours per week throughout the 
first semester. This course gives the student an opportunity to develop a basic 
concept of the morphology of the human body. It is closely interwoven with 
the study of neuroanatomy, histology and embryology, and some time is 
devoted to roentgen anatomy. The entire human body is dissected. Laboratory 
fee, $25.00. (Figge, Krahl, Mech, Ramsay, Wadsworth.) 

Anat. 206. Correlative Anatomy. (1) 

Patients will be demonstrated and the anatomical features of the case will 
be stressed to give the student a concept of the relationship of the anatomy 
to clinical subjects. 

276 



Medicine 
Anat. 207. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 

Second semester. Fifteen periods of three hours each, even' Thursday from 
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. for 15 weeks. This course is open to graduate students and 
post-graduates interested in pediatrics. Laboratory fee. $10.00. (Krahl.) 

Anat. 399. Research in Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in any one 
of the branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff.) 

MICROANATOMY 

Microanat. 202. Microanatomy. (6) 

Three lectures and six laboratory hours a week for 16 weeks. This course 
presents an integrated study on an advanced level of the histology and embry- 
ology of the human body. An attempt is made to correlate this with gross 
anatomy as well as other subjects in the medical curriculum. Special empha- 
sis is placed on the dynamic and functional aspects of the subject. Laboratory 
fee, $15.00. (Figge, Leveque, Staff.) 

Microanat. 205. Genetics. (2) 

This course consists of a series of one-hour lectures which include a considera- 
tion of the principles of genetics, population genetics, biochemical genetics, 
radiation genetics, immunogenetics. and microbial genetics. Special emphasis 
is placed on the importance, understanding and application of genetics to health 
and disease. (Crispens.) 

Microanat. 208. Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 

Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be arranged. 
Sixteen weeks. (Figge.) 

Microanat. 209. Morphological Micro-Techniques. (2) 

One lecture and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. The aim of 
this course is to study the theoretical and practical applications of a variety 
of microanatomical techniques and their utilization in research. Time to be 
arranged. (Leveque.) 

Microanat. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Research work may be taken in any one of the branches 
which form the subject of microanatomy (including cancer research.) 

(Figge, Leveque, Crispens.) 

NEUROANATOMY 

Neuroanat. 203. Human Neuroanatomy. (4) 

Two lectures and four laboratory hours per week for 17 weeks. The study of 
the detailed anatomy of the central nervous system is coordinated with struc- 
ture and functions of the entire nervous system. The dissection of the human 
brain and the examination of stained microscopic sections of various levels 
of the brain stem are required. Laboratory fee, SI 5.00. 

(Ebner, Figge, Wells, Staff.) 

277 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Neuroanat. 210. Special Problems in Neuroanatomy. (2) 

This course will deal with specific problems in the field of neuro-anatomy, 
depending on the interests of the sponsor. It will consist of lectures, seminars 
and specific laboratory assignments. (Figge, Wells, Ebner.) 

Neuroanat. 399. Research in Neuroanatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12. Research work involving the central or peripheral 
nervous system. (Ebner, Figge, Wells, Staff.') 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

ID. 101. Man and His Environment. (2) 

One-hour lecture and one-hour panel discussion Saturday mornings from 9 to 
11 a.m. throughout the year. Distinguished leaders in American medicine par- 
ticipate in the presentation of these weekly sessions. The course is broad in 
scope, stressing the cultural aspects of anthropology with emphasis directed 
toward the sociological, psychological, physiological, and geneological relation- 
ships of man and his surroundings. All departments of the School of Medi- 
cine participate. 

P.M. 101. BlOSTATISTICS. (1) 

(Staff.) 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professors: Adams and Bessman (P.T.). 
Associate Professors: Emery, Pomerantz, and Stevens. 
Assistant Professors: Bode, Layne (P.T.), and Ganis (P.T) 
Instructors: Brown, Gryder, and Rosso. 

Graduate degree offered by the Department of Biological Chemistry is the 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates 
Biochem. 201. Principles of Biochemistry. (8) 

First year, second semester. A general introduction to biochemistry with em- 
phasis on basic chemistry of biologically important molecules, enzymes, inter- 
mediary metabolism, matabolic regulation, and molecular biology. Features 
of mammalian biochemistry are stressed but general and comparative aspects 
are considered. 

Biochemistry 202, 203. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

A series of lectures on topics of current interests in biochemistry. Coverage 
varies from year to year. Subjects reviewed in 1964-65 included nucleic acid 
biochemistry, chromosomal structure, oxygenases, collagen structure and me- 
tabolism, peptide hormones, hemoglobin. Prerequisite, Biochemistry 201. 

278 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Biochemistry 204, 205. Seminar. (1, 1) 

Reports on current literature or on research in progress. Prerequisite, Bio- 
chemistry 201. 

Biochemistry 399. Research. (Maximum credits, 12 hours per semes- 
ter.) 

(Additional offerings are contemplated for 1965-6 and later years and will be 
announced as offered.) 

BIOPHYSICS 

Professors: Mullins and Sjodin. 
Associate Professor: Stern. 
Assistant Professor: Hybl. 

The Department of Biophysics offers graduate courses of study leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The study 
programs are flexible and depend on the preparation and interests of the 
student. Detailed requirements are available from the Department of 
Biophysics (c/o School of Medicine, Baltimore). 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in Biophysics select a minor in either physics, chemistry, or 
mathematics. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Biophys. 100, 101. Introduction to Biophysics. (3-3) 

Fall semester, odd years; Spring semester, even years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11. Math. 18, 19. An introduction to the 
study of living systems applying the methods of physics and chemistry. The 
cell as a physico-chemical system and experimental methods for investigation, 
nerve impulse conduction and excitation, the interaction of radiation with 
living material; the structure and properties of muscle tissue, connective tissue, 
and their proteins. (Staff.) 

Biophys. 102. Biophysics of Radiation. (2) 

Fall semester, even years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, 
Phys. 10, 11. An advanced study of the interaction of radiation with living 
matter and with molecules of biological interest. Dosimetry problems and some 
bio-medical applications will be considered. (Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson.) 

Biophys. 103. Laboratory Techniques in Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, 1967-68. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Biophys. 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Training in the use of 
radioactive isotopes, radio-active counting equipment, and bio-electric meas- 
uring instruments applied to the study of membranes; viscosity, optical rotation, 
protein titrations, spectroscopy, conductivity, as applied to fiber forming pro- 
teins. Laboratory fee, $20.00. (Staff.) 

279 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Biophys. 104. Seminar in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 101. or consent of the staff. Seminars on various 
biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students, and guest speakers. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Biophys. 200. Advanced and Theoretical Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a wook. Prerequisites, Biophys. 100, 
101, or consent of staff. An advanced and critical analysis of experimental 
findings in terms of biophysical theory. (Staff.) 

Biophys. 201. Membrane Biophysics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3, Phys. 10, 11, Math. 20, 21. 
Diffusion in and through membranes developed from first principles with 
special reference to problems of ion transport in biological membranes. 

(Sjodin.) 

Biophys. 202. Biophysical Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry, Differential and In- 
tegral Calculus. The application of physico-chemical theory to the methods 
used to study the properties or proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules 
and their component parts, and the properties of the fibers and other bio- 
logical fabrics derived from these macromolecules. The properties of interest 
will include molecular weight, size, shape and charge, intramolecular configura- 
tion, and inter-molecular interaction. The methods of interest will include 
light scattering, ultracentrifuge, viscosity and other hydrodynamic methods, 
optical rotation and rotary dispersion. (Stern.) 

Biophys. 203. X-ray Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure determination 
by the techniques of X-ray differaction. Emphasis upon problems arising in 
structural studies of molecules of biological origin. (Hybl.) 

Biophys. 205. Colloquium in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, Biophys. 104 or consent of the staff. Colloquia on various bio- 
physical topics given by the staff, graduate students and guest speakers. 

(Staff.) 

Biophys. 399. Research in Biophysics. (3-6) 

Required of students planning to take the Master of Science degree or the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Biophysics. (Staff.) 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSTSTANTSHIPS 

A limited number of departmental fellowships and research assistantships are 
available in the Department of Biophysics. Inquiries should be directed to the 
department; deadline for applications is March 1. 



280 



Interdepartmental Courses 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professors: Wisseman, Traub. 

Associate Professors: Eylar, Fiset, and Smith. 

Assistant Professors: Myers, Rosenzweig, and Snyder. 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. While the degree of Master of Science may be offered in special 
instances, priority for research facilities will be given aspirants to the 
Ph.D. degree. This Department encourages students who wish to enroll 
in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. program. 

Emphasis is placed upon medical aspects of microbiology. Research 
programs are available in virology, rickettsiology, medical bacteriology 
and mycology, microbial physiology. Opportunities are open for experi- 
ence in teaching and in diagnostic bacteriology and serology. Oppor- 
tunities exist for ecological studies on rickettsioses and arboviruses in 
overseas areas. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Microb. 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course begins with an intro- 
duction to basic principles of microbiology and immunology and then proceeds 
to consider the major groups of bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, rickettsiae and 
viruses that cause human disease. Emphasis is placed upon an analysis of the 
properties of microorganisms thought to be important in disease production, 
pathogenesis of infection and interaction with host defense mechanisms, 
epidemiology and control measures. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Microb. 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course, intended for the 
serious advanced student of medical microbiology, is built upon the frame- 
work of Microb. 101 supplemented with advanced readings and laboratory work. 

(Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented with 
demonstrations. By consent of instructor. This course surveys the metabolic 
processes of bacteria, fungi, rickettsiae, viruses and parasitic protozoa. 

(Myers, Wisseman.) 

Microb. 206, 207. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, staff and 
guests participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects of special 
interest or pertinent to graduate training program. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

281 



Interdepartmental Courses 
Microb. 208. Medical Mycology. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory per week. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00. Registration by consent of instructor. Consists of a 
review of the fundamentals of elementary mycology; a consideration of methods 
for the isolation, cultivation and identification of actinomycetes, yeasts and fungi; 
and a study of the etiological agents and of the immunology, epidemiology, 
prognosis and treatment of the medical mycoses. (Smith.) 

Microb. 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides the oppor- 
tunity for the graduate student to pursue under supervision subjects of special 
interest not offered in other formal courses. A study program is worked out with 
the instructor prior to registration and may consist of special readings, con- 
ferences, reports and, on occasion, laboratory experience. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 210. Advanced Virology and Rickettsiology Lecture. (3) 

This course considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae, methods 
for studying them and finally concentrates on agents of medical importance. 
Special emphasis is placed on the host-parasite relationship, characterization of 
the various viral and rickettsial agents and on biological and ecological factors. 
Registration is by permission of instructor only. The course will be given as 
the average on alternate years in the Spring semester. There are two weekly 
sessions of 90 minutes each. Prerequisites: Microb. 201 or equivalent. 

CEyler, Fiset, Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 211. Virology and Rickettsiology Laboratory. (1) 

This course is the laboratory counterpart of Microbiology 210. It is designed to 
familiarize the student with the major techniques for the study of virus and 
rickettsial agents and to give him first hand experience with a variety of the 
more common agents. Registration is by permission of instructor only. Because 
of the limited facilities and the nature of the work, it may be necessary to 
restrict registration in this course according to the following priority: students 
majoring in medical microbiology, then students minoring in microbiology and, 
finally, others. The laboratory consists of one formal session per week; however, 
the nature of the work frequently requires additional participation throughout 
the week. (Eyler, Fiset, Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

LEGAL MEDICINE 

Professor: Fisher. 

Associate Professor: Freimuth. 

Assistant Professor: Petty. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine. (1) 

One hour of lecture for twelve weeks, 4 hours assigned reading. This course 
embraces a summary of medical jurisprudence including the laws governing the 
practice of medicine, industrial compensation and malpractice, proceedings 
in criminal and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, including 
medicolegal toxicology. (12 hours) (Fisher, Freimuth, Petty.) 

282 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology. (10) 

Two hours lecture. 8 laboratory hours per week for 1 year. There is also included 
some discussion of industrial toxicology relating industrial exposures to toxic 
substances to effects produced in the worker using these materials. The lectures 
include discussion of mechanism of action of poisons, lethal doses, antidotes 
and methods of detection and quantitation of poisons in tissues and body fluids. 
The laboratory work embraces practical application of analytical procedures for 
the detection and estimation of poisons in post mortem tissue samples. 

(Fisher, Freimuth.) 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to 
Toxicology. (2) 

Two hours per week for one year. This course includes elementary anatomy with 
normal histology and selected histopathology as it will be seen by the toxicologist. 
It is a correlated course embracing anatomy, basic physiology and the alterations 
in function as well as structure brought about by disease and poisoning. 

(Fisher, Petty.) 

Leg. Med. 399. Research in Toxicology. 

(Number of hours and credit arranged.) (Fisher, Freimuth.) 

This Department offers schedules leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy in toxicology. Candidates are expected 
to have completed undergraduate work as follows: Eight semester hours 
each in general chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry (quali- 
tative and quantitative), physical chemistry, physics, biology and four 
semester hours in organic qualitative analysis. 

Candidates for the Master's degree must complete the following or 
equivalent courses: 

Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203 and 399. 
Pharm. 101 f. s., and Chem. 258. 

Candidates for the doctorate must complete the following or equivalent 
courses: 

Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203, 399. 

Pharm. 100 f. s., Physiol. 102, Bact. 101, Bact. 102, 
Biochem. 206, Chem. 206, 208, Chem. 221, 223, Chem. 258, 
Chem. 150, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113, Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. 

Part of the above work is offered at College Park with the remainder to 
be done at the Baltimore Schools. Some of the course work in legal 
medicine and toxicology will be given at the laboratories of the Division 
of Forensic Pathology located at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 
700 Fleet Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 



283 



Interdepartmental Courses 
PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: Burgison and Truitt. 

Associate Professors: O'Neill and Bryant. 

Assistant Professors: Musser, Cascorbi, Rudo, Rozman, and S. Fox. 

All students majoring in the Department of Pharmacology with a view 
to obtaining the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy 
should secure special training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic 
chemistry, and physical chemistry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pharmacol. 101, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Three lectures and one laboratory. This course consists of 105 lectures and 32 
laboratory periods of three hours each, offered each year. Laboratory fee, 
$20.00. 

(Bryant, Burgison, Cascorbi, Musser, O'Neill, Rozman, Truitt, Rudo.) 

For Graduates 
Pharmacol. 201, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Same as Pharmacol. 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Additional 
instruction and collateral reading are required. Laboratory fee. $20.00 
(Krantz, Bryant, Burgison, Cascorbi, O'Neill, Rozman, Truitt, Rudo, and Fox.) 

Pharmacol. 206, f.s. Pharmacologic Methodology. (4) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacol. 201, f.s. (Truitt.) 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmaco- 
dynamics. (2, 2) 



Pharmacol. 209. Biochemical Pharmacology. (2) 



Pharmacol. 210. History of Pharmacology. (2) 



(Burgison.) 
(O'Neill.) 

(Burgison.) 



Pharmacol. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work accom- 
plished. (Bryant, Burgison, Cascorbi, O'Neill, Rozman, Truitt, Rudo.) 



284 



Interdepartmental Courses 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors: Blake and Barraclough. 

Associate Professors: Adelman, Coleman, Glaser, Merlis, and Pinter. 

Assistant Professors: Fajer, Greisman, and Karpeles. 

There are three graduate programs available to students interested in 
physiology: (1) a predoctoral program leading to the Ph.D. degree; 
(2) a predoctoral program leading to the Ph.D. degree with specializa- 
tion in gerontology; and (3) a seven year predoctoral program leading 
to both M.D. and Ph.D. degrees. Prerequisites include differential and 
integral calculus, general physics, physical chemistry and comparative 
anatomy, although one of these may be taken concurrent with the first 
year of the predoctoral Ph.D. program. All programs include course 
work in anatomy, biochemistry and/or biophysics, instrumentation, statis- 
tics, and computers. Fellowships and assistantships are available for 
qualified applicants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Physiol. 101. Principles of Physiology. (8) 

Second semester. Four lectures, two laboratories, and two conferences per 
week for 16 weeks. Lectures cover major areas of organ-system physiology ex- 
cept for the nervous system which is embodied in Neuroanatomy 101. Labora- 
tory work is classical exercises for 8 weeks and a "project" experiment for 8 
weeks. Conferences are on laboratory work. Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 
Physiol. 201. Principles of Physiology. (9) 

Same as Physiol. 101, for graduate students majoring in physiology. Additional 
reading and attendance at departmental seminars are required. Laboratory 
fee $15.00. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 202. Cardiovascular Physiology. (2) 

Reading assignments, seminars, conferences, two hours a week for 15 weeks, 
on current research in cardiovascular physiology. (Karpeles.) 

Physiol. 203. Pulmonary Physiology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Reading assignments, lectures, seminars on 
current research in pulmonary physiology. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. 

Time and credit by arrangement. The various technical procedures currently 
operating in the Department will be demonstrated and opportunity will be 
given for acquiring experience with them. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 

Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences, for 15 weeks. Considera- 
tion will be given to the current status of knowledge of renal function and body 
fluids in vertebrates, with particular reference to mammals. (Blake, Pinter.) 

285 



Interdepartmental Courses 
Physiol. 206. Seminar. 

Credit according to work done. Weekly meetings are held to discuss recent 
literature and results of departmental research. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 207. Physiology of the Central Nervous System. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading assignments on 
current knowledge of central nervous system function. (Coleman, Merlis.) 

Physiol. 208. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading assignments on 
current knowledge of autonomic nervous system function. (Blake.) 

Physiol. 209. General Physiology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, reading assignments, and seminars on 
selected topics in general, cellular and neurophysiology. (Adelman.) 

Physiol. 210. Physiological Systems. (3) 

Three or four hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, conferences, and labora- 
tory sessions on the theoretical principles of biological control systems. 

(Glaser.) 

Physiol. 211. Sensory Physiology. (3) 

Two hours lecture and conference, one laboratory period a week for 15 weeks 
on sensory systems. (Coleman, Merlis.) 

Physiol. 212. Physiology of Reproduction. (2) 

Lectures, two hours a week for 15 weeks. A comprehensive survey of repro- 
ductive endocrinology. (Barraclough.) 

Physiol. 213. Seminar in Neuroendocrinology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures and seminars on recent advances 
in nervous regulation of endocrine function. (Barraclough.) 

Physiol. 214. Comparative Adrenal Physiology. (2) 

Lectures and conferences, two hours a week for 15 weeks, on current knowledge 
of vertebrate adrenal function. (Fajer.) 

Physiol. 399. Research. 

By arrangement with Head of the Department. (Staff.) 



286 



Nursing 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NURSING ADMINISTRATION 

GENERAL PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

NURSING OF CHILDREN WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS 

MATERNAL AND CHILD NURSING 

MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Professors: Gipe, Carl and Grenell. 

MAJOR OBJECTIVES OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Graduate Program in Nursing leading to the degree of Master of 
Science is designed primarily to prepare registered nurses in adminis- 
tration in nursing education and nursing services. This program in- 
cludes a graduate clinical core of maternal and child health, medical 
and surgical nursing, psychiatric nursing, or public health nursing. Gradu- 
ates of these programs are prepared as administrators, consultants, super- 
visors and teachers. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the graduate program in nursing requires the applicant 
to be a registered nurse who has completed an undergraduate degree 
with academic standing which is recognized by the Graduate School of 
the University of Maryland. The applicant must have completed basic 
college or university courses in physical and natural sciences (i.e., chem- 
istry, microbiology, anatomy and physiology); and in the behavioral 
sciences (i.e., psychology, sociology, anthropology). In addition, the 
applicant must have clinical experience in medical and surgical nursing, 
psychiatric nursing, maternal and child nursing, and public health nurs- 
ing which is comparable to the requirements in the basic undergraduate 
program in nursing at the University of Maryland. 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Administration in 
Nursing include the satisfactory completion of a minimum of forty semester 
hours of graduate work. The forty semester hours of study and field 
experience extend through three college semesters and include clinical 
nursing and directed field experience either in University of Maryland 
Hospital or an associated hospital in Baltimore. The forty semester hour 
program includes thirty-four semester hours of course work and six 
semester hours for the thesis. Twenty-two semester hours must be taken 

287 



Nursing 

in the major field, and a minimum of twelve semester hours in the minor 
field. It is required that at least twenty-two semester hours of course work 
be taken in courses numbered in the catalogue as 200 or above. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in General Psychiatric 
Nursing include the satisfactory completion of a minimum of thirty-eight 
semester hours of graduate work. The program extends through three 
college semesters, and includes clinical study and supervised experience in 
intensive nurse-patient interaction, and nursing care of groups of mentally 
ill patients through nurse intervention and the use of the therapeutic com- 
munity. The student is provided supervised learning experience in teaching 
of psychiatric nursing or supervising psychiatric nursing services. The pro- 
gram includes thirty-two hours of course work and six semester hours 
of thesis. Eight semester hours are required in the minor field. It is 
required that at least twenty semester hours of course work be taken 
in courses numbered in the catalogue as 200 or above. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Nursing of Chil- 
dren with Psychiatric Disorders include the satisfactory completion of a 
minimum of fifty-three semester hours of graduate work. The program ex- 
tends through four college semesters, and includes clinical study and super- 
vised experience in establishing and maintaining intensive nurse-child 
relationships; working as a member of a psychiatric inter-disciplinary 
team; establishing, maintaining, and providing a continuity of therapeutic 
relationships in the home setting with families of the children who are 
receiving intensive treatment; and guided observation and participation 
with individual, and groups of, disturbed pre-school children who attend 
the Children's Guild, Inc. The student is provided supervised learning 
experiences in administering, teaching, supervising, and consulting with 
reference to nursing of children with psychiatric disorders. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Medical and Surgical 
Nursing include the satisfactory completion of at least thirty semester 
hours of graduate work. The thirty hour program includes twenty-four 
semester hours of course work and six semester hours for the thesis. At 
least twelve semester hours must be taken in the major field, and at 
least eight semester hours must be taken in the minor field. It is required 
that at least tweleve semester hours of course work be taken in courses 
numbered in the catalogue as 200 or above. 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Maternal and Child 
Nursing include the satisfactory completion of at least thirty semester 
hours of graduate work. The thirty hour program includes twenty- 
four semester hours of course work and six semester hours for the 
thesis. At least twelve semester hours must be taken in the major field, 
and at least eight semester hours must be taken in the minor field. It is 
required that at least twelve semester hours of course work be taken 
in courses numbered in the catalogue as 200 or above. 



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Nursing 

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Public Health Nurs- 
ing include the satisfactory completion of a minimum of thirty-seven 
semester hours of graduate work. The program extends through three 
college semesters, and includes clinical study and supervised experience in 
public health nursing. The student is provided supervised learning ex- 
perience in teaching public health nursing or supervising public health 
nursing. The program includes thirty-one hours of course work and six 
semester hours of thesis. Eight semester hours are required in the minor 
field. It is required that at least twenty semester hours of course work be 
taken in courses numbered in the catalogue as 200 or above. 

THESIS 

A thesis representing research in the major field must be approved by the 
advisor of the student and presented to the Dean of the Graduate School 
as partial requirement for the Master of Science Degree. Final approval 
of the thesis is given by the examination committee appointed by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

LEARNING EXPERIENCES 

Through graduate study the student broadens and deepens understandings 
built first upon knowledge and then greater understanding of a particular 
specialty of study and work. Having the privilege of studying with 
graduate students in other disciplines, the graduate student in nursing has 
opportunities to transfer knowledge from other areas to enrich her 
understandings in her particular field of specialty. The graduate student 
is given opportunity to learn to pursue, evaluate and apply results of 
research in nursing in order to find better ways of improving patient 
care. 

The extensive clinical facilities of the University of Maryland and asso- 
ciated institutions provide an excellent climate where this dynamic learn- 
ing can occur. Seminars, workshops, institutes and conferences also 
provide opportunities for extending the scope of understanding of the 
graduate student. Depending upon the functional interest, the student 
receives practice in administration, teaching, supervision, and consul- 
tation under guidance. 

For Graduates 
Nurs. 201. Trends of Higher Education in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. The central objective of this course is to bring to the student 
in nursing education a knowledge and an understanding of the current status 
of nursing in institutions of higher learning and what nursing must have as a 
goal before it can become a universally accepted profession. 

(Kelsey, Cohelan.) 



289 



Nursing 

Nurs. 202. Interpersonal Interaction. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The 
course is primarily concerned with the application of psychodynamics and 
psychoanalytic understandings to the nurses' relationships with patients. 

(Carl, Cohelan, Eischler.) 

Nurs. 203. Nursing in Somatic Therapies. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. This 
course is planned to provide (1) increased knowledge and understanding of 
neuro-physiological aspects of behavior of the psychiatric patient and (2) in- 
creased ability in application of mental health concepts to the nursing care of 
patients in all clinical areas. (Cohelan, Miller.) 

Nurs. 204, 205. Psychiatric Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. The course includes dynamics of human behavior, including formation 
of personality, the techniques of problem solving and the skills of communica- 
tion in relation to therapeutic nursing care of psychiatric patients. 

(Carl, Cohelan.) 

Nurs. 206. Philosophical Concepts in Health. (Epidemiology). (2) 

Second semester. Two-hour lecture a week. The course is planned with a con- 
temporary approach to the problem of philosophical concepts in health. The 
discussions begin with general considerations and progress to the application 
of these concepts to more specific situations. (Staff.) 

Nurs. 207, 208. Nursing in Child Health Services. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. This course is concerned with extensive knowledge and understanding 
of the place of nursing in the society's total program of child health services 
and increased skill in the nursing of children. (Reed.) 

Nurs. 209, 210. Nursing in Maternal and Newborn 
Services. (2, 2) 

First and second semester, one lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. This course is concerned with extensive knowledge and understanding 
of maternal care and the opportunity to make application in varying nursing 
situations which relate to the patient, to the family and to the community. 

(Hydorn.) 

Nurs. 211. Seminar in Maternal and Child Health 
Services. (2) 

Second semester. One two-hour period a week. This course is concerned with 
understanding and purposeful application of maternal and child health nursing 
as it normally exists within the family. The influence of the nurse on maternal 
and child health is traced through the many institutions and agencies where she 
contacts the mother and child, or the family as a whole. 

(Borlick, Hydorn, Reed.) 

Nurs. 212, 213. Medical and Surgical Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semester. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Nurs. 212 is available during the fall semester and is prerequisite to 
Nurs. 213 which is available during the spring semester. The selected course 

290 



Nursing 

activities are arranged by each student and a teacher to comprise a program of 
study which will best prepare the student for the purposive improvement of 
medical and surgical nursing practice. (Hosfeld, De Haven.) 

Nurs. 214. Application of Principles of Physical and 
Social Sciences in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The 
course is designed to apply physical and social science principles in life situations 
in such a way that similar situations will be recognized by the learners in their 
day to day application. (Smith, Staff.) 

Nurs. 215. Nursing Care of the Emotionally Disturbed 
Pre-School Child. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Requisite-Concurrent enrollment in Nurs. 208 — Nursing in Child Health Serv- 
ices (2). This course is designed to extend the knowledge and understanding 
of the graduate nurse at the Master's level in the principles of management 
and guidance of the emotionally disturbed pre-school child. Learning experiences 
will include guided observations, staff consultations and seminars to acquaint 
nurses with the professional activities of a Therapeutic Pre-School Center. 

(Reed, Kanner, Clarke.) 

Nurs. 220, 221. Public Health Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. This course is designed to extend knowledge, understanding, and com- 
petencies of the nurse at the Master's level in comprehensive public health nurs- 
ing, including total planning to meet the health needs of individuals and families 
in the community. Learning experiences will include selected clinical observa- 
tions and participation in public health nursing, selected activities such as com- 
munity health conferences, and interdisciplinary health consultations in a variety 
of community health settings. (Borlick.) 

Nurs. 222. Public Health Administration. (2) 

First semester. Two-hour lecture a week. This course is designed to extend 
knowledge and understanding of the nurse at the Master's level of the principles 
of organization and administration of public health services, including budgeting, 
program planning, coordination, interpersonal relationships, and medical care 
practices, so as to increase the competencies of practice in teaching or super- 
vising public health nursing. (Beard, Borlick.) 

Nurs. 250. Comprehensfve Nursing of Children with 
Psychiatric Disorders. (4) 

First semester. Two two-hour lectures and four four-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, Nurs. 202 — Interpersonal Interaction (2), and Nurs. 204- 
205 — Psychiatric Nursing (2, 2). 

This course includes planning and implementation of nursing care of children 
who are mentally ill and who are receiving intensive care in a residential treat- 
ment center. Learning experiences include seminars in psychodynamic theory 
of mental illness of children, intensive nursing-child relationships, working as a 
member of a psychiatric interdisciplinary team, establishing, maintaining, and 
providing continuity of therapeutic relationships in the home setting with fam- 
ilies of the children who are receiving intensive treatment. (Charlton, Rafferty.) 

291 



Nursing 

Nurs. 251. Nursing of Pre-School Children with Deviate 
Behavior. (4) 

Second semester. Two two-hour lectures and four four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Nurs. 250 — Comprehensive Nursing of Children with 
Psychiatric Disorders (4). This course includes guided observation and partici- 
pation with individual and groups of disturbed pre-school children who attend 
the Children's Guild, Inc. Learning experiences include participation in psycho- 
logical consultations and staff conferences, analysis and evaluation of problems 
of individual children and group therapy. Each student receives individual guid- 
ance throughout the course. (Charlton, Kanner, Kraft.) 

Nurs. 252. Nursing of Children with Normal Behavior. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. This 
course provides a basis of comparison of the behavior of pre-school children 
with deviate and normal behavior. Learning experiences will be provided at 
the Children's Guild, Inc. and will include guide observation of normal child- 
hood play and learning in the nursery, kindergarten, and day care centers. 
Laboratory study of normal physical and motor development, social relation- 
ships, language skills, the meaning of play, and use of intellectual and creative 
media. (Charlton, Kanner, Clarke.) 

Nurs. 285. Curriculum Development in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. One two-hour lecture a week. Prerequisite; Psych. 110 — Educa- 
tional Psychology (3) or its equivalent. This course is designed to assist the 
student in curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation including the 
formulation of objectives and the selection and organization of content and 
learning activities in nursing education. (Hovet, Marriott.) 

Nurs. 286. Research Methods and Materials in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. One two-hour lecture or conference period a week. The course 
deals with basic understandings of philosophical aspects as they relate to re- 
search, including the nature of scientific thinking, methods of research, and re- 
search literature in nursing. (Gipe, Carl.) 

Nurs. 287. Seminar in Nursing — Teaching or Supervision. (2) 

Second semester. The purpose of this course is to develop the necessary knowl- 
edge, understanding, and skill in instruction or supervision in nursing. (Staff.) 

Nurs. 288S. Special Problems in Nursing. (1-6) 

Prerequisites, Nurs. 204-205; or Nurs. 207-208; or Nurs. 209-210. The major 
objective of this course is to develop further clinical and research competencies 
in selected students who have completed a graduate core of clinical nursing. 
Registration upon consent of adviser. (Staff.) 

Nurs. 290. Administration in Nursing. (3, 3) 

The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for professional nurses, 
with experience in teaching in schools of nursing and /or nursing services, to 
gain further competence, through planned study and experience, in the area of 
nursing administration. If previous preparation in teaching or supervision in 
some clinical area is inadequate, student will be obliged to select graduate courses 
in the area of Psychiatric Nursing, Maternal and Child Health Nursing, or 
Medical and Surgical Nursing. (Gipe, Staff.) 

Nurs. 399. Research Thesis. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 

292 



Pharmacy 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

PHARMACY 

Professor: Foss. 

Associate Professors: Allen and Shangraw. 

Assistant Professor: Lamy. 

The Department of Pharmacy offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The student may 
specialize in the areas of industrial pharmacy, biopharmaceutics and 
hospital pharmacy. Graduate students working in this department must 
have a degree in pharmacy, and may be required to take some additional 
undergraduate courses to fulfill specified requirements. Information re- 
garding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the 
Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pharmacy 153, 154. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. Professional 
laboratory practice and other specialized activities pertaining to prescriptions, 
including an evaluation of compounding aids and commercial pharmaceuticals. 

(Allen.) 

Pharmacy 156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisite, Pharmacy 153. 
A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic and dermatological 
preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

(Allen.) 

Pharmacy 157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration I. 

First semester. Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pharmacy 44. The fundamentals of 
hospital pharmacy practice and administration. Includes a study of the history 
and development of hospital pharmacy, physical facilities, minimum standards, 
purchasing, the formulary, record keeping, and dispensing practices. (Lamy.) 

Pharmacy 158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. 

Second semester. Two lectures. Prerequisite. Pharmacy 157. An orientation 
to the function of the hospital pharmacy within the hospital. A study of the 
administrative organization of a hospital and the interrelationship of the var- 
ious hospital departments with the hospital pharmacy. (Lamy.) 

For Graduates 
Pharmacy 201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 153, 154. A 
study of manufacturing processes, control procedure and equipment employed in 
the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale, including new drug 
applications and the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (Shangraw.) 

293 



Pharmacy 

Pharmacy 203, 204. Industrial Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultane- 
ously with Pharmacy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation 
of useful and important pharmaceuticals in large quantities. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor; Physical Chemistry 
187, 188, 189, 190 recommended. A study of pharmaceutical systems utilizing 
the fundamentals of physical chemistry. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1,1) 

One lecture. Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, 
with special reference to the origin and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. (Allen.) 

Pharmacy 215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, 207, 208 or permission of 
instructor. A laboratory course in which the student is required to formulate 
a medicinal agent into a dosage form and provide all information, including 
stability data, control procedures, analytical tests, manufacturing and labeling 
specifications, trade mark and patent application necessary to meet present 
FDA requirements. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures. Lectures and assignments on the de- 
velopment of pharmacy in America and the principal countries of Europe. 

(Staff.) 

Pharmacy 230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of pro- 
gress in research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. (Lamy.) 

Pharmacy 231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical 
Technology. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preser- 
vation of pharmaceuticals and the various methods of compounding special 
prescriptions. (Allen.) 

Pharmacy 399. Research in Pharmacy. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Allen, Shangraw, Lamy.) 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor: Miller. 

Associate Professor: Zenker. 

Assistant Professor: Abushanab and Leslie. 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry offers graduate programs 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The 
student may specialize in the areas of synthetic medicinal chemistry, 
natural product chemistry, biochemistry or biophysical chemistry. For 

294 



Pharmacy 

graduate study in pharmaceutical chemistry, the student must have a degree 
in either pharmacy or chemistry. Information regarding specific require- 
ments for the degree may be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisites, Chemistry 35, 36, 37, 38. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. (Miller.) 

Pharm. Chem. 149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Four lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 32, 
34. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living 
organisms and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health 
and in disease. (Zenker.) 

Pharm. Chem. 151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 30, 32, 34. A survey 
of the structural relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally 
of organic medicinal products. (Abushanab.) 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisites, Chemistry 19, 35, 37, Physics 20, 21 and Math- 
ematics 20, 21. A study of laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas 
laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. (Leslie.) 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chemistry 187, 189 or may be taken simul- 
taneously with Chemistry 187, 189. Quantitative experiments arr -rformed 
which demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and acquaint the . .dent with 
precision apparatus. (Leslie.) 

For Graduates 
Pharm. Chem. 210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3, 3) 

One lecture, two laboratories. Prerequisites, Chemistry 141, 143, 187-190 or 
concurrent registration. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the sys- 
tematic separation, characterization and identification of organic structures by 
chemical and instrumental methods, to the synthesis of organic structures of 
the more difficult types including isotopically labeled compounds and to isotope 
counting techniques. (Staff.) 

Pharm. Chem. 230. Seminar. (1). 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. (Staff.) 

Pharm. Chem. 235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite. Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles of 
stereo-chemistry of organic compounds. (Miller.) 

Pharm. Chem. 242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and 
synthesis of heterocyclic compounds. (Staff.) 

295 



Pharmacy 

Pharm. Chem. 250. Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Chemistry' 141, 143. A study of the synthesis and 
structure determination of steroids and the application of modern chemical 
concepts to the chemistry of steroids. (Staff.) 

Pharm. Chem. 252. Alkaloids. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Chemistry 141, 143. A study of the principles in- 
volved in structure determination, chemistry and synthesis of the major alka- 
loidal classes. (Miller.) 

Pharm. Chem. 253, 254. Advanced Chemistry of Medicinal 
Products. (2, 2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 151, 152 and Chemistry 
141. 143 or permission of the instructor. A study of structural relationships 
and basic principles concerned with the physical and chemical mechanisms of 
drug action, e.g., structure-activity relationships, physical properties and bio- 
logical activity, cellular transport, drug, protein binding, biological receptors, 
lipid storage and physico-chemical mechanisms of drug action. (Staff.) 

Pharm. Chem. 271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, Chemistry 189. The 
application of physical chemical principles to biological systems, and a dis- 
cussion of the physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. 

(Leslie.) 

Pharm. Chem. 272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisites, Chemistry 189. A discussion of selected topics of 
particular interest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, 
colloids, kinetics, colligative properties and absorption spectroscopy. (Leslie.) 

Pharm. Chem. 274. Advanced Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. Prerequisite, Chemistry 190. Selected experiments which are 
necessary for, and a part of, a larger research effort. (Leslie.) 

Pharm. Chem. 281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149. A discussion of 
the design, the mode of action of the enzymatic level, and the metabolism of 
biochemical analogs. (Zenker.) 

Pharm. Chem. 282. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 281 or permission 
of the instructor. Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the use of 
modern techniques and metabolic methods in the study of drug action and drug 
metabolism. (Zenker.) 

Pharm. Chem. 399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 



296 



Pharmacy 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: Ichniowski. 
Assistant Professor: Driever. 

The Department of Pharmacology offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department 
emphasizes the areas of quantitative pharmacology, pharmacodynamics 
and will extend into biochemical pharmacology (distribution, metabolism 
and excretion of drugs). Students with a degree in pharmacy are preferred; 
however, students with a strong background in both chemistry and biology 
are also considered for graduate study in pharmacology. Information re- 
garding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the 
Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pharmacology 155, 156. General Pharmacology. (4, 5) 

Three lectures, one laboratory first semester; four lectures, one laboratory sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisites, Physiology 142, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149 or 
consent of the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, 
untoward effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal sub- 
stances. (Ichinowski and Driever.) 

Pharmacology 171. Official Metheds of Biological Assay. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Pharmacology 155, 156. A study of the official methods of biological assay 
of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. (Ichniowski.) 

For Graduates 
Pharmacology 201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisite, Pharma- 
cology 171. A study of the more important unofficial methods used in the 
quantitative evaluation of therapeutic substances. (Ichniowski.) 

Pharmacology 211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. 
(4,4) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisites, Pharma- 
cology 155, 156 and the approval of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. 
A study of the methods used in the evaluation of drug action. (Ichniowski.) 

Pharmacology 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay 
Methods. (2-4, 2-4) 

Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. First and second semester. Laboratory and conferences. Prere- 
quisite, Pharmacology 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of 
biological assay methods. (Ichniowski.) 

Pharmacology 399. Research in Pharmacology 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

297 



Pharmacy 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

Professor: Slama 
Assistant Professor: Euler 

The Department of Pharmacognosy offers a graduate program leading to 
the Master of Science degree. The student may specialize in the areas 
of phytochemistry, plant chemotaxonomy and plant culture. Graduate 
students in pharmacognosy must have a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Pharmacy. Information regarding specific requirements for the degree 
may be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pharmacognosy 101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory. Prerequisite, Pharma- 
cognosy 41, 42. A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifi- 
cation, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the prepara- 
tion of an herbarium. (Slama.) 

Pharmacognosy 111, 113. Plant Anatomy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42. 

(Slama.) 

Pharmacognosy 112, 114. Plant Anatomy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 41, 42; Pharma- 
cognosy 111, 113. Laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with 
special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems, and leaves of vascular 
plants. (Slama.) 

For Graduates 

Pharmacognosy 201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable 
Powders. (4, 4) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, 
Pharmacognosy 111, 113. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from 
the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identifi- 
cation and detection of adulterants. (Slama.) 

Pharmacognosy 211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 113. A 
study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy 
courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the identi- 
fication and detection of adulterants. (Euler.) 

Pharmacognosy 399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 



298 



Pharmacy 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay 

Assistant Professor: Krywolap 

The Department of Microbiology serves both the School of Pharmacy 
and the School of Dentistry and offers programs leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The student may special- 
ize in the areas of pathogenic microbiology, fermentation microbiology, 
antibiotics, antiseptics, oral protozoa, immunology, mycology and trans- 
mission of infectious agents. For graduate study in microbiology, the 
student should have a degree in microbiology or pharmacy. Information 
regarding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the 
Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microb. 146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health and 
Parasitology. (4) 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 41 or its equivalent. Two lectures and two laboratories. 
A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious dis- 
eases. Attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and animals. Part of 
the course is devoted to the study of public health. Time is given to the study 
of medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic infections. (Shay.) 

For Graduates 
Microb. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, Microbiology 121 or equivalent, Biochemistry 
1 1 1 or equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharma- 
cology and therapeutic value of drugs in the treatment of disease. (Shay.) 

Microb. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media for special procedures such 
as antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. 
Anaerobiosis, differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility 
testing are considered in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements of 
specific groups of micro-organisms. (Shay.) 

Microb. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Laboratory course. Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. 
Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

Microb. 211. Public Health. (2) 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health 
facilities in the community and their relation to the practices of the health 
sciences carried on through lectures and discussion groups. The applications 
of statistical and epidemiological methods to health problems is illustrated 
through lectures and demonstration. (Shay.) 

299 



Pharmacy 

Microb. 212. Bacterial Fermentations. (2) 

Two lectures. (Given second semester in alternate years). Prerequisite, Bio- 
chemistry 111 or an equivalent course and Microbiology 121 or an equivalent 
course. This course covers composition, nutrition and growth of microor- 
ganisms; influence of physical and chemical environment on metabolism; chem- 
ical activities of microorganisms; mechanisms of fermentative and oxidative 
metabolism. (Krywolap.) 

Microb. 221. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Open only to 
candidates for advanced degrees in microbiology. (Shay.) 

Microb. 281-283. Seminar. (1,1) 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and research in the field of 
microbiology. (Shay.) 

Microb. 399. Thesis Research 

(Shay.) 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: Costello 

The Department of Physiology offers a graduate program leading to the 
Master of Science degree and in cooperation with the School of Medicine 
and School of Dentistry, a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. The student may specialize in cellular physiology with special 
emphasis on endocrine, environmental and developmental aspects. Pre- 
requisite for study in physiology include a degree in pharmacy or a back- 
ground in the biological sciences from a college of arts and sciences or 
a professional school. Information regarding specific requirements for 
the degree may be obtained from the Department. 

Physiol. 245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. Prerequisites, Pharmaceutical Chemistry 149, 
Physiology 142, consent of instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical 
and chemical properties of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma 
membrane, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial struc- 
ture and their contributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and 
chemical phenomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. 

(Costello.) 

Physiol. 246. Radioisotope Techniques. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. Prerequisites, consent of 
instructor. A course concerned with the practical use of isotopes particularly 
as tracers in metabolic investigations. (Costello.) 

Physiol. 399. Research in Physiology. 

Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Costello.) 

300 



Social Work 

MATHEMATICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Math. 130. Probability. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, 
total, compound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems 
of Bernoulli and Laplace, theory of errors. (Staff.) 

Math. 132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequsite. Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions 
and their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, 
analysis of variance, statistical inference. (Staff.) 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Professors: Lewis, Lansdale. 

Associate Professors: Chaiklin, Thursz. 

Assistant Professors: Arens, Borom, Boucher, Blumberg, Germain, 
Jennings, Kahn, Keith. Levi, McCall, McCune, Moses, Taylor, 
Young. 

Lecturers: Gumming, Howard. Lichtenberg, Lisansky, Maxwell, 
Reidy, Ryan. 

For Graduates 
THE SOCIAL SERVICES 

SW 200, 201. Social Services and Social Policy. (2, 2) 

Both semesters. Identification of social needs and analysis of social services 
with particular reference to political, social, and economic forces affecting their 
development. The social control and melioration functions of social welfare 
programs. Examination of the growth, organization and function of govern- 
mental and voluntary services. Open to qualified part-time students with con- 
sent of instructor. (Arens, Lansdale.) 

SW 202. The Social Work Profession. (2) 

Second year. The historical background and development of the profession. 
Current trends in professional practice. Professional concerns with social 
policy. Professional values and ethncal behavior. (Cumming, Thursz, Young.) 

SW 203. Community Social Welfare Services. (2) 

First semester, concurrent with SW 200. Participant observation of community 
provision for control of selected social problems: dependency, disordered 
behavior, indigent disability. Consideration of social work roles in alleviation 
and control of selected problems. Open to qualified part-time students enrolled 
in SW 200. (Arens, Stoll.) 

301 



Social Work 

SW 205. Social Welfare History. (2) 

The changing concept of charity from Biblical to modern times. Origin of 
English and American poor laws. Charity organization and the growth of 
voluntary efforts. Origins and development of welfare state concept. Open to 
qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. (Lewis.) 

GROWTH AND BEHAVIOR 
SW 210. Human Behavior I. (2) 

First semester. Concepts basic to understanding adult social functioning with 
particular reference to characteristic ways of responding to stressful situations 
arising out of economic disadvantage, sociocultural conflict, illness and dis- 
ability. Attention to the family as a social system and the social roles of family 
members in the patterning of relationships. (Jennings, Young.) 

SW 211. Human Behavior II. (2) 

Elaboration of concepts introduced in SW 210. Introduction of psychodynamic 
concepts used in assessment of psychosocial disorders. (Jennings, Young.) 

SW 212. Human Behavior III. (2) 

Descriptive and dynamic considerations in psychosocial disorders and psycho- 
pathology likely to be encountered in social work practice, i.e., indigency, mari- 
tal disorder, delinquent and criminal behavior, personality disorders, retarda- 
tions, illegitimate parenthood, child neglect and placement, neuroses, and phy- 
choses. (Lichtenberg. ) 

SW 213. Human Behavior IV. (2) 

Second semester, second year. Concepts basic to an understanding of per- 
sonality development in childhood and adolescence. Application of psycho- 
dynamic formulations in differential diagnosis and planning use of casework 
and groupwork techniques appropriate to the client's needs. Analysis of 
social work, sociological and biographical case materials utilizing psychosocial 
concepts. (Reidy,) 

SW 214. Nature and Ecology of Health and Illness. (1) 

Introduction to causes, symptoms, treatment, distribution, prevention and con- 
trol of disease. Social and psychological aspects of illness, emphasizing factors 
influencing response to stress. Socio-economic problems of health care. Co- 
ordination of health and social resources as relevant to social work practice. 

(Lisansky.) 

SW 215. Behavior of Human Groups. (2) 

Examination of concepts underlying social work practice as drawn from 
theory of social systems. Special reference to families, small groups, neigh- 
borhoods, communities, to social institutions and to culture. Reference also to 
leadership theory and related formulations useful in understanding interpersonal 
relationships in families, committees, clubs, social agencies and special interest 
groups. Open to qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Chaiklin, Staff.) 



302 



Social Work 



SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 



SW 220, 221. Social Casework. (2, 2) 

Both semesters, first year. Fundamental concepts and principles of the case- 
work method. Emphasis on understanding the person presenting the social 
problem, the environment, especially the family setting, in which it occurs, 
and the roles of the social agency and the social worker in using community 
resources in helpful ways. The relationship of study and history to psycho- 
social diagnosis and the formulation of appropriate treatment plans. 

(Germain, McCall.) 

SW 222, 223. Social Casework. (2, 2) 

Both semesters, second year. Further elaboration of basic concepts and intro- 
duction of more complex ideas. Case analysis directed toward development of 
skill in psychosocial diagnosis. Emphasis on selection of casework treatment 
techniques consistent with treatment objectives. Short-term and long-term case- 
work treatment problems. Similarities and differences in casework practices 
in such varied settings as family and children's agencies, public assistance 
agencies, school social work departments, clinical (medical and psychiatric) 
services, correctional programs, etc. (Jennings, Ryan.) 

SW 235. Group Methods in Social Work. (2) 

Elementary concepts of social groupwork practice essential for the informed 
use of social groupwork resources in the community by social workers using 
casework methods. Application of theories of group behavior to understanding 
committee and other group processes within social agencies and professional 
and related organizations. Open to qualified part-time students with consent 
of instructor. (Jennings, Kahn, McCune.) 

SW 240. Community Organization and Development. (2) 

Basic concepts useful in facilitating citizen participation in neighborhood and 
community organization for social welfare. Analysis of methods used to achieve 
social objectives in community provision of needed services and prevention and 
control of psychosocial disorders. (Borom. Moses, Thurz.) 

SW 241. Community Organization II. (2) 

Continuation of SW 240 for students in C. O. concentration. Emphasis on 
neighborhood social work. (Borom, Moses, Thursz.) 

SW 242, 243. Community Organization Methods. (2, 2) 

(Both semesters, second year). Elaboration of basic concepts and methods of 
application. The role of the social worker in developing leadership and en- 
abling neighborhood groups to identify and solve problems. Emphasis upon 
community organization process in intergroup relations in urban renewal, 
housing and settlement situations. (Thursz.) 

SW 250. Social Welfare Administration. (2) 

Second year. Elementary concepts of administration applicable to social wel- 
fare agencies. Staff participation in decision-making, policy formulation, and 
communication. Role relationships within administrative structures. Open to 
qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. (Lansdale.) 



303 



Social Work 

SW 260. Social Investigation. (2) 

Second semester. Methods of research in social work. Problem formulation, 
data collection and analysis, presentation of findings, and conclusions. Atten- 
tion to classic and recent studies. The relationships of research to social work 
knowledge. Open to qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Chaiklin, McCune.) 

SW 261, 262. Social Work Research. (2, 2) 

Both semesters, second year. Analysis of significant social work studies and 
related social science research. A research report of substantial dimensions and 
high standards, presenting and analyzing findings of a study of some professional 
problem is required. (Chaiklin, Staff.) 

SW 280, 281. Field Work: Basic Social Casework. (4, 4) 

Both semesters, first year. Placement in community agencies for practice in- 
struction in social casework method. 

(Blumberg, Levi, McCall, Taylor, Staff.) 

SW 282, 283. Field Work: Advanced Social Casework. (6, 4) 

Both semesters, second year. Placement in community agencies for practice 
instruction in social casework method. 

(Boucher, McCall, Maxwell and Staff.) 

SW 285, 286. Field Work: Community Organization and 
Neighborhood Development. (5, 5) 

Both semesters, second year. Placement in community agencies for practice 
instruction in community organization method. Prerequisite, successful com- 
pletion of SW 280, 281 and related first-year courses. 

(Borom, Keith, Thurz, Staff.) 

SW 290. Special Social Work Problems. (1-3) 

Individually planned study of selected substantial area of professional interest 
as arranged to meet special needs. Extensive reading, written and oral report- 
ing as arranged by instructor. (Howard. Lansdale and Staff.) 



304 



Graduate Council 

The Graduate Council 

Administrative Officers 

BAMFORD. Ronald. Ph.D.. Professor of Botany and Dean of the Graduate School 

PRAHL. Augustus J.. Ph.D.. Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean 
of the Graduate School 

LYNHAM. Lucy A.. B.A.. Assistant to the Dean 

E.x-Officio Members 

ELKINS, Wilson H.. D.Phil.. President of the University 

BYRD. Harry C. LL.D.. D.Sc. President Emeritus 

HORNBAKE. R. Lee, Ph.D.. Vice President for Academic Affairs 

BAMFORD. Ronald. Ph.D.. Dean of the Graduate School 

PRAHL. Augustus J.. Ph.D.. Associate Dean and Secretary of the Graduate 
Faculty Assembly 

Appointed Members 

^NASTOS. George. Ph.D.. Professor of Zoology 1966 

GRUCHY. Allan G.. Ph.D.. Professor of Economics 1967 

MITCHELL. T. Faye. Professor of Home Economics 1969 

PELCZAR. Michael J.. Ph.D.. Professor of Microbiology 1968 

Elected Members 

BECKMANN. Robert B.. Ph.D.. Professor of Chemical Engineering 1967 

BODE. Carl. Ph.D.. Professor of English 1967 

CARDOZIER. V. R.. Ph.D.. Professor of Agricultural and Extension 

Education 1969 

EYLAR. Ollie R.. Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Microbiology (Baltimore) . 1969 

GAUCH. Hugh. Ph.D.. Professor of Plant Physiology 1969 

HARRISON. Horace V.. Ph.D.. Professor of Government and Politics 1969 

HOVET. Kenneth O.. Ph.D.. Professor of Education 1967 

JACKSON, Stanley, Ph.D.. Professor of Mathematics 1966 

SCHAMP, Jr.. Homer W.. Ph.D., Professor of Molecular Physics 1969 

SHAFFNER. Clyne S.. Ph.D.. Professor of Poultry Science 1968 

SPARKS. David S.. Ph.D.. Professor of History 1968 

THOMPSON. Arthur. Ph.D., Professor of Pomology 1966 

WHITE. John I.. Ph.D.. Professor of Physiology (Baltimore) 1966 

305 



The Faculty 



Professors 

ADAMS, Elijah, Professor and Head of Department of Biological Chemistry 

B.A.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; M.D., University of Rochester, 1942. 

ALDRIDGE, Alfred O., Professor of English and Director of Comparative Literature 
B.S., Indiana University, 1937; M.A., University of Georgia, 1938; Ph.D., Duke 
University, 1942; Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, 1955. 

ALLEN, Redfield W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

ALLEN, Russell B., Professor of Civil Engineering and Assistant Dean of College of 
Engineering 

B.S., Yale University, 1923. 

ANASTOS, George, Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

ANDERSON, Thornton H., Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1948. 

ANDERSON, Vernon E., Professor and Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

ANDREWS, Thomas G., Professor and Head of Department of Psychology 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1937; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1939; 
Ph.D.. 1941. 

ARBUCKLE, Wendell S., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S.A., Purdue University, 1933; A.M., University of Missouri, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

AVERY, William T., Professor and Head of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937; Fellow of the 
American Academy in Rome, 1937-1939. 

BAMFORD, Ronald, Professor of Botany and Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

BATTIG, William F., Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D., 
1955. 

BAUER, Richard H., Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1923; M.A., 1928; Ph.,D., 1935. 

BEAL, George M., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

B.S., Utah State Agricultural College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

306 



Faculty 

BECKMANN. Robert Bader. Professor and Head of Department of Chemical Engi- 
neering 

B.S.. University of Illinois. 1940: Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 1944. 

BESSMAN. Samuel P.. Professor of Pediatrics and Biochemistry 
M.D.. Washington University Medical School. 1944. 

BICKLEY. William E.. Professor and Head of Department of Entomology 

B.S.. Universitv of Tennessee. 1934; M.S.. 1936: Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 
1940. 

BINGHAM. Alfred Jepson. Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A.. Yale University. 1933: Ph.D.. Columbia University. 1939. 

BLAKE. William Dewey. Professor and Head of Department of Physiology 
A.B.. Dartmouth College. 1940: M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1943. 

BLOUGH. Glenn O.. Professor of Education 

A.B.. University of Michigan. 1929; A.M.. 1932: LL.D.. Central Michigan College 

of Education. 1950. 

RODE. Carl. Professor of English 

Ph.B.. L'niversity of Chicago. 1933: M.A.. Northwestern University. 1938; Ph.D., 
1941: Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom. 

BRACE. John W.. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Swarthmore College. 1949: A.M.. Cornell University. 1951; PH.D., 1953. 

BRADY. Joseph Vincent. Professor of Psychology (P.T.) 

B.S.. Fordham University. 1943; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

BURDETTE. Franklin L.. Professor of Government and Politics and Director of 

[he Bureau of Governmental Research 

A.B.. Marshall College. 1934: A.M.. University of Nebraska, 1935; A.M.. 
Princeton University. 1937; Ph.D.. 1938: LL.D., Marshall College, 1959. 

BURGISON. Raymond M.. Professor and Acting Head of Pharmacology 

B.S.. Loyola College. 1945: M.S.. University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 1950. 

BYRNE. Richard H.. Professor of Education 

A.B.. Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; M.A.. Columbia University, 1947; 
Ed.D.. 1952. 

CAIRNS. Gordon M.. Professor of Dairy Science and Dean of College of Agriculture 
B.S.. Cornell University, 1936: M.S.. 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

CARDOZIER. V. R.. Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural and Ex- 
tension Education 

B.S.. Louisiana State Universitv. 1947; M.S.. 1950: Ph.D., Ohio State University, 
1952. 

CARI . Man K.. Professor of Nursing 

B.S.. Johns Hopkins University. 1946: Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1951. 

307 



Faculty 

CHAPMAN, Erna R., Professor and Acting Dean of College of Home Economics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., 1939. 

CHU, Yaohan, Professor in Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Chiao-Tung University, 1942: M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1945; ScD., 1953. 

CLEMENS, Eli W., Professor of Business Organization 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1930; M.S., University of Illinois, 1934: Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin. 1940. 

COHEN, Leon W., Professor and Head of Department of Mathematics 

B.A., Columbia University, 1923; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 
1928. 

COMBS, Gerald F., Professor of Poultry Nutrition 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1948. 

COOK, J. Allen, Professor of Marketing 

A.B., College of William and Mary, 1928; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1936; 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

COOLEY. Franklin D., Professor of English 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

CORNING, Gerald, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 

B.S., New York University, 1937; M.S., Catholic University, 1954. 

COSTELLO, Leslie C, Professor of Anatomy and Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

CRENSHAW, John Walden, Jr., Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Emory University, 1948; M.S., University of Georgia, 1951; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Florida, 1955. 

CUMBERLAND, John H., Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1947; M.A., Harvard University, 1949; Ph.D., 1951. 

CURTIS. John M., Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., North Carolina State, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

DASTON, Paul George, Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Northeastern University, 1948: M.A.. Michigan State University, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

DAVIS. Richard F., Professor and Head of Dairy Science 
B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University. 1952; Ph.D., 
1953. 

DAY, Thomas B., Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

308 



Faculty 

DE VOLT, Harold M., Professor of Veterinary Science 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; D.V.M., 1923; M.S., 1926. 

DILLARD, Dudley, Professor and Head of Department of Economics 
B.S., University of California, 1935; Ph.D., 1940. 

DILLON, Conley H., Professor of Government and Politics 
A.B., Marshall College, 1928; A.M., Duke University, 1933; Ph.D., 1936. 

DITMAN, Lewis P., Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1929; PH.D., 1931. 

DOETSCH. Raymond N., Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; A.M., Indiana University, 1943; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1948. 

DOORENBOS, NORMAN J., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

DORSEY, Brice M., Professor and Head of Department of Oral Surgery 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1927. 

DOUGLIS, Avron, Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., University of Chicago, 1938; M.A., New York University, 1949; Ph.D., 
1949. 

DUFFEY, Dick, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Purdue University, 1939; M.S., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1956. 

DUFFEY, Robert V., Professor and Head of Early Childhood Education 

B.S., Millersville State Teachers College, 1938; Ed.M., Temple University, 1948. 
Ed.D., 1954. 

EDGERTON, Harold A., Professor of Psychology (P.T.) 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers College, 1924; M.A., Ohio State University, 1926; 
Ph.D., 1928. 

ELKINS, Wilson H., President, University of Maryland 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; LITT.B., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

ESTABROOK, Gaylord B., Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, Purdue University, 1921; M.Sc, Ohio State University, 1922; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

EYLER, Marvin Howard, Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 1956. 

FABER, John E., Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

FERRELL, Richard A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., Princeton 
University, 1952. 

309 



Faculty 

FIGGE, Frank H. J., Professor and Head of Department of Anatomy 
A.B., Colorado College, 1927; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

FISHER, Allan J., Professor of Accounting and Finance 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1928; LITT.M., University of Pittsburgh, 1936; 
Ph.D., 1937. 

FISHER, Russell S., Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine 

B.S., Georgia School of Technology, 1937; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 
1942. 

FOSS, Noel E., Professor and Dean of School of Pharmacy 
Ph.C, B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

FOSTER, John E., Professor and Head of Department of Animal Science 
B.S., North Carolina State College, 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1937. 

FRALEY, Lester M., Professor and Dean of College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., Peabody College, 1937; Ph.D., 1939. 

FRIEDMAN, Herbert, Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1936; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

GAUCH, Hugh G., Professor of Plant Physiology of the Department of Botany 
B.S., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

GENTRY, Dwight L., Professor of Marketing 

A.B., Elon College, 1941; M.B.A., Northwestern University, 1947; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1952. 

GERBERICH, J. Raymond, Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Iowa, 1922; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1929. 

GIPE, Florence M., Professor and Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; ED.D., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

GOLDHABER, J. K., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1944; M.A., Harvard University, 1945; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1950. 

GOOD, Richard A., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Ashland College, 1939; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940; Ph.D., 1945. 

GOODWYN, Frank, Professor of Spanish and Latin American Civilization 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1940; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University 
of Texas, 1946. 

GORDON, Donald C, Professor of History 

A.B., College of William and Mary, 1934; M.A., Columbia University, 1937; 
Ph.D., 1947. 

310 



Faculty 

GREEN, Robert L., Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1934; M.S., Iowa State College; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University, 1953. 

GREEN, Willard Wynn, Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1939. 

GRENELL, Robert G., Professor of Psychiatry 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1935; M.Sc, New York University, 1936; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

GRENTZER, Rose Marie, Professor of Music 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; B.A., 1936; M.A., 1939. 

GRIEM, Hans, Professor of Physics 
Ph.D., Universitat Kiel, 1954. 

GRUCHY, Allan G., Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of British Columbia, 1926; M.A., McGill University, 1929; Ph.D., 

University of Virginia, 1931. 

HAHN, William E., Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939; D.D.S., 1931. 

HANSEN, P. Arne, Professor of Microbiology 

Ph.D., University of Copenhagen, 1922; M.S., Royal Technological College, Den- 
mark, 1926; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1934. 

HARRISON, Horace V., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Trinity University, 1932; M.A., University of Texas, 1941; Ph.D., 1951. 

HARRISON, Paul E.. Jr., Professor of Industrial Education 

B.ED., Northern Illinois State College. 1942; M.A., Colorado State College, 1947; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

HARVEY, Ellen E., Professor of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

B.S., Columbia University, 1935; M.A., 1941; Ed.D., University of Oregon, 1951. 

HAUT, I. C, Professor of Horticulture, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washirgton. 1930; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

HELRICH, Martin, Professor of Anesthesiology, School of Dentistry 
B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

HENDRICKS, Richard. Professor of Speech 

A.B., Franklin College of Indiana, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939; 
Ph.D., 1956. 

HOFFSOMMER, Harold C, Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University. 1929. 

HOLMGREN, Harry D.. Professor of Physics 

B. of Phys., University of Minnesota, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., 1954. 

311 



Faculty 

HORNBAKE, R. Lee, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Professor of Industrial 
Education 

B.S., California State College, Pa., 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 1936; 

Ph.D., 1942. 

HORNYAK, William Frank, Professor of Physics 

B.E.E., College of the City of New York, 1944; M.S., California Institute of 
Technology, 1949; Ph.D., 1949. 

HORVATH, John, Pressor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University or Budapest, 1947. 

HOVET, Kenneth O., Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

HU, Charles Y., Professor of Geography 

B.S., University of Nanking, 1930; M.A., University of California, 1936; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1941. 

HUMMEL, James A., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1949; M.A., Rice Institute, 1953; Ph.D., 
1955. 

HUMPHREY, James H., Professor of Physical Education and Health 

B.A., Denison University, 1933; M.A., Western Reserve University, 1946: Ed.D., 
Boston University, 1951. 

HUSMAN. Burris F., Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1954. 

HYMES, James L., Jr., Professor of Education 

A.B., Harvard College, 1934; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; 
Ed.D., 1946. 

ICHNIOWSKI, Casimir T., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 

JACKSON, John W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1934; M.E., 1937; M.S.M.E., California Insti- 
tute of Technology, 1940. 

JACKSON, Stanley B., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Bates College, 1933; A.M., Harvard University, 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

JANES, Robert W., Professor of Sociology 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1938; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1942. 

JAQUITH, Richard H., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

JASHEMSKI, Wilhelmina, Professor of History 

A.B., York College, 1931; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1933; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1942. 

312 



Faculty 

JOHNSON, Warren R., Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., University of Denver, 1942; M.A., 1946; Ed.D., Boston University, 1950. 

JONES, George Fenwick, Professor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., Emory University, 1938; M.A., Oxford University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1950. 

JONES, Jack Colvard, Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1942; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity, 1950. 

KEENEY, Mark, Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; M.S., Ohio State University, 1947; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

KRAHL, Vernon E., Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1939; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1946. 

KRAMER, Amihud, Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 194.. 

KRAUSS, Robert W., Professor and Head of Department of Botany 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1947; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

KUHN, Albin O., Professor of Agronomy and Vice President of the Baltimore 
Campuses 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

KURODA, Sigekatu, Professor of Mathematics 

Bachelor, University of Tokyo, 1928; Dr. of Sc, 1945. 

KURTZ, John J., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1949. 

LAFFER, Norman C, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois, 1937. 

LAND, Aubrey C, Professor of History 

B.Ed., Southern Illinois University, 1934; M.A., Iowa State University, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1948. 

LANGFORD, George S., Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1929. 

LASTER, Howard, Professor and Head of Department of Physics 
A.B., Harvard College, 1951; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

LEEPER, Sarah Lou Hammond, Professor of Education 

A.B., Florida State College for Women, 1932; M.A., Florida State University, 
1947; Ed.D., 1953. 

313 



Faculty 

LEHNER, Joseph L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., New York University, 1938; M.A., University of Pennslvania, 1939; Ph.D., 
1941. 

LEJINS, Peter P., Professor of Sociology 

Ph.M., University of Latvia, 1930; LL.M., 1933; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
1938. 

LEMBACH, John, Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; M.A., Northwestern University, 1937; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

LEPPER, Henry A., Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., George Washington University, 1936; M.S., University of Illinois, 1938; 
D.Eng., Yale University, 1947. 

LEVEQUE, Theodore F., Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., University of Denver, 1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Colorado. 
1954. 

LEVITINE, George, Professor and Head of Department of Art 

Baccalaureate, University of Paris, 1936 and 1938; M.A., Boston University, 1946; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1952. 

LEWIS, Verl S., Professor of Social Work and Dean of the School of Social Work 
A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1938; D.S.W., Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

LINK, Conrad B., Professor of Floriculture 

B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1933; M.Sc, 1934; Ph.D., 1940. 
LIPPINCOTT, Ellis R., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Earlham College, 1943; M.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1944; Ph.D., 1947. 
LOONEY, Charles T. G., Professor and Head of Department of Civil Engineering 

B.S., Carneg e Institute of Technology, 1932; M.S., in C.E., University of Illinois, 

1934; Ph.D., in Engineering, 1940. 

LUNIN, Martin, Professor and Head of Department of Pathology, School of 
Dentistry 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., Washington University, 1950; 

M.P.H., Columbia University, 1952. 

MAC DONALD, William M., Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 
MAGOON, Thomas M., Professor of Education 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; Ph.D., 1954. 
MALEY, Donald, Professor and Head of the Department of Industrial Education 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1943; M.S., University 

of Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

MANNING, Charles, Professor of English and Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

314 



Faculty 

MARIL, Herman, Professor of Art 
Maryland Institute of Fine Art, 1928. 

MARION, Jerry B., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Reed College, 1952; M.A., Rice Institute, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

MARTIN, Monroe H., Professor of Mathematics and Director of Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

MASON, Edward A., Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1950. 

MAVIS, Frederic Theodore, Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E., 1932; Ph.D., 1935. 

MAYOR, John R,, Professor of Mathematics and Education 

B.S., Knox College, 1928; M.A., University of Illinois, 1929; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1933. 

MC CLURE, L. Morris, Professor and Assistant Dean of Education 

A.B., Western Michigan University, 1940; M.A., University of Michigan, 1946; 
Ed.D., Michigan State University, 1953. 

McCORKLE, Donald M., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Bradley University, 1951; A.M.. Indiana University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

McDONALD, Frank B., Professor (P. T.) of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Duke University, 1948; M.S.. University of Minnesota. 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

MCGINNIES, Elliott M., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1943; M.A., Brown University, 1944; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1948. 

MCMANAWAY, James G., Professor of English (P.T.) 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1919; M.A., 1920; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1931. 

MERRILL, Horace S., Professor of History 

B.E., Wisconsin State Teachers' College, River Falls, 1932; Ph.M., University of 
Wisconsin, 1933; Ph.D., 1942. 

MERSHON, Madelaine, Professor of Education 

B.S., Drake University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

MILLER, Francis M., Professor of Chemistry and Head of Department of Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1949. 

MILLER, James R., Professor and Head of the Department of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

MISH, Charles C, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; MA., 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

315 



Faculty 

MITCHELL, T. Faye, Professor and Head of the Department of Textiles and 

Clothing 

B.S., Missouri State Teachers College, Springfield, 1930; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1939. 

MORGAN, Delbert T., Jr., Professor of Botany 
B.S., Kent State University, 1940; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., 1948. 

MORGAN, Hugh G., Professor of Education and Assistant Director of Institute of 
Child Study 

B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

MULLINS, L. J., Professor and Head, Department of Biophysics 
B.S., University of California, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

MURPHY, Charles D., Professor and Head of Department of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

MYERS, Ralph D., Professor of Physics 

A.B., Cornell University, 1934; A.M., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

NELSON, Boyd L., Professor of Business Organization 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

NEMES, Graciela P., Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Trinity College, 1942; M.A., University of Maryland, 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

NEWELL, Clarence A., Professor of Education 

A.B., Hastings College, 1935; A.M., Columia University, 1939; Ph.D., 1943 

O'CONNELL, Donald W., Professor of Economics and Dean of the College of 
Business and Public Administration 

B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

OPIK, Ernst J., Professor of Astrophysics 

Cand. Astro., Moscow Imperial University, 1916; D. Phil. Nat., University of 
Estonia, 1923. 

OTTS, Louis E., Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.A., East Texas State Teachers College, 1933; B.S., Agricultural and Mechanical 
College of Texas, 1946; M.S., 1946. 

PATRICK, Arthur S., Professor of Business Education 

B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., Amer- 
ican University, 1956. 

PELCZAR, Michael J., Jr., Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1941. 

PERKINS, Hugh V., Professor of Education 

A.B., & Sch. Mus.B., Oberlin College, 1941; A.M., University of Chicago, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1945; Ed.D., New York University, 1956 

316 



Faculty 

PIAVIS, George W.. Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; M.Ed.. 1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 
1958. 

PLISCHKE. Elmer, Professor and Heal of Department of Government and Politics 
PhB., Marquette University, 1937; M.A., American University, 1938; Ph.D., 
Clark University, 1943; Certificate, Columia University, Naval School of Military 
Government, 1944. 

POFFENBERGER, Paul R., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Assistant 
Dean of Instruction. College of Agriculture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., American University, 1953. 

PRAHL, Augustus J., Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School 

M.A., Washington University, 1928; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

PRANGE, Gordon W., Professor of History 

A.B., University of Iowa, 1932; A.M., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

PRATT. Ernest F., Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., University of Redlands, 1937; M.S., Oregon State College, 1939; M.A., 
University of Michigan, 1941; Ph.D., 1942. 

PRESCOTT, Daniel A., Professor of Education and Director of Institute for Child 
Study 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920; Ed.M., Harvard College, 1932; Ed.D., 1923. 

PROVENZA, D. Vincent, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952, 

PURDY, William C, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Amherst College, 1951; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. 

QUYNN, William R., Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1922; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1934; Officer D'Academie (1951). 

RADO, George T., Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1939; S.M., 1941; Ph.D., 1943. 

RAND, Marguerite C, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A.. Pomona College, 1919; M.A., Stanford University, 1921; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1951. 

REED, Henry R., Professor of Electrical Engineering, Registered Professional En- 
gineer 

B.S., University of Minnesota. 1925; M.S., 1927; E.E., South Dakota State College. 

1930; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1941. 

REEVE, Wilkins, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

REINHART, Bruce, Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

317 



Faculty 

REYNOLDS, Charles W., Professor of Vegetable Crops 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1941; B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; 
M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

REINBOLDT, Werner C, Research Professor of Computer Science and Director ol 
the Computer Science Center 

Dipl. Math. Heidelberg, 1952; Dr. rer. nat., Freiburg, 1955. 

RISINGER, Robert G., Professor of Education 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947; Ed.D., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

ROLLINSON, Carl L., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1933; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1939. 

ROTHGEB, Russell G., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 

SALLEY, John J., Professor of Oral Pathology and Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1947; Ph.D., University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

SAYRE, Clifford Leroy, Jr., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Duke University, 1947; M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology, 1950. 

SCHAMP, Homer W., Jr., Professor and Director of Institute of Molecular Physics 
A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michigan, 1947; Ph.D., 1951. 

SCHINDLER, Alvin W., Professor of Education 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers' College, 1927; M.A., Iowa State University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1934. 

SCHLARETZKI, Walter E., Professor and Head of the Department of Philosophy 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1941; A.M., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

SCHOENBORN, Henry W., Professor of Zoology 

A.B., DePauw University, 1933; Ph.D., New York University, 1939. 

SCHROEDER, Wilburn C, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1930; M.S.E., 1931; Ph.D., 1933. 

SCHULTZE, Charles Louis, Professor of Economics 

B.A., Georgetown University, 1948; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1960. 

SCOTT, Leland E., Professor of Horticultural Physiology 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1927; M.S., Michigan State College, 1929; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

SHAFFNER, Clyne S., Professor and Head of Department of Poultry Science 
B.S., Michigan State University, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1947. 

SHANKS, James B., Professor of Floriculture 

B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1939; M.Sc, 1946; Ph.D., 1949. 

318 



Faculty 

SHANNON, David A., Professor and Head of Department of History 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1941; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1951. 

SHAY, Donald E., Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology and Immu- 
nology. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College. 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 

1943. 

SHERWOOD, A. Wiley. Professor of Aerodynamics and Head of Department of 
Aeronautical Engineering. 

M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

SHREEVE, Charles A., Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Mechanical En- 
gineering 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

SILVERMAN, Joseph, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1944; A.M., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 1951. 

SISLER, Hugh D., Professor Botan., 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

SJODIN. Raymond A.. Professor of Biophysics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1951; Ph.D., University of California. 
1955. 

SLAM A, Frank J.. Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S., 1928; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 
1935. 

SLAWSKY, Zaka I., Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

B.S., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 

SMITH, Harold D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

B.A., Bridgewater College, 1943; M.S., University of Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 
American University, 1952. 

SNOW, George A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1945; M.A., Princeton University, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1949. 

SPARKS, David S., Professor of History 

A. B., Grinnell College. 1944; A.M., University of Chicago, 1945; Ph.D., 1951. 

STARK, Francis C. Jr.. Professor and Head of Department of Horticulture 
B.S.. Oklahoma Agriculture and Mechanical College, 1940; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1941; Ph.D.. 1948. 

STELLMACHER, Karl L.. Professor of Mathematics 
D.Phil., University of Gottingen, 1936. 

STERN, Edward A., Professor of Physics 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

319 



Faculty 

STONE, William S., Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical Edu- 
cation and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 

Ph.D., (hon.) 1945. 
STRAUSBAUGH, Warren L., Professor and Head of Department of Speech 

B.S., Wooster College, 1932; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1935. 

STREET, Orman E., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., South Dakota State College, 1924; M.S., Michigan State College, 1927; Ph.D., 
1933. 

SUCHER, Joseph, Professor of Physics 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1952; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1958. 

SVIRBELY, William J., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1931; M.S., 1932; D.Sci., 1935. 

SWEENEY, Charles T., Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Cornell University, 1921; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1928; C.P.A., 
Iowa, 1934; C.P.A., Ohio, 1936. 

TAFF, Charles A., Professor of Transportation and Head of Business Organization 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1937; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

THOMPSON, Arthur H., Professor of Pomology 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 

THOMPSON, Fred R., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Texas, 1929; M.A., 1935; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

TOMPKINS, Howard E., Professor and Head of Electrical Engineering 

B.A., Swarthmore, 1942; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 1957. 

TRAUB, Robert, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1938; M.S., Cornell University, 1939; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1947. 

TRIMBLE, Lester, Professor of Music 

B.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1948; M.F.A., 1949. 

TRUITT, Edward B., Jr., Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1943; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

ULMER, Melville Jack, Professor of Economics 

B.S., New York University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

ULRICH, Homer, Professor and Head of the Department of Music 
A.M., University of Chicago, 1939. 

VANDERSLICE, Joseph T., Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1953. 

VAN ROYEN, William, Professor of Geography 

M.A., Rijksuniversiteit te Utrech, 1925; Ph.D., Clark University, 1928. 

320 



Faculty 

VAN ZWOLL, James A., Professor of Education 

A.B.. Calvin College, 1933; M.A.. University of Michigan, 1937; Ph.D., 1942. 

VEITCH. Fletcher P.. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.. University of Maryland, 1931; M.S., 1934: Ph.D.. 1936. 

WAETJEN, Walter B., Professor of Education and Assistant to the President for 
Administrative Affairs 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, Millersville. 1942; M.S., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

WAGNER. T. C. Gordon, Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Harvard University, 1937; M.A., University of Maryland, 1940; Ph.D.. 1943. 

WALDROP, Robert S., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

WALKER. William P., Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1921; M.S., 1925. 

WASSERMAN, Paul, Professor and Dean of School of Library Science 

B.B.A.. College of City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), Columbia University, 
1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1960. 

WEBER, Joseph, Professor of Physics 

B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1940; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1951. 

WESKE. John R., Professor of Aeronautical Engineering and in the Institute of 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

Deipl., Ing., Technical University, Germany. 1923; M.A., Harvard University, 

1932; Sc.D., 1934. 

WESTERHOUT, Gart, Professor of Astronomy 
Doct., University of Leiden, 1954; Ph.D.. 1958. 

WHITE, Charles E., Professor and Head of Department of Chemistry 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

WHITE, John I., Professor and Head of Physiology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1950. 

WIGGIN. Gladys A., Professor of Education and Director of Graduate Studies 
B.S.. University of Minnesota. 1929; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

WISSEMAN. Charles L.. Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 
B.A., Southern Methodist University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College. 1943. 
M.D., Southwestern Medical College, 1946. 

WOODS. G. Forrest, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1935; M.S., Harvard University, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

321 



Faculty 

WRIGHT, Howard W., Professor of Accounting 

B.S.C., Temple University, 1937; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., 1947. 

YODH, Gaurang B., Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Bombay, 1948; M.S., University of Chicago, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

ZEEVELD, W. Gordon, Professor of English 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1924; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1929; Ph.D., 
1936. 

Research Professors 

BAILEY, William J., Research Professor of Chemistry 

B. Chem., University of Minnesota, 1943; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1946. 

BRAMBLE, James H., Research Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 

A.B., Brown University, 1953; M.A., University of Maryland, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

BUERGERS, Johannes Martanus, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 

and Applied Mathematics 

Doctor of Mathematics and Physics, University of Leiden, 1918; Doctor Honoris 
Causa, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1948; Doctor Honoris Causa, Universite de 
Poitiers, 1950; Doctor of Science in Technology, The Technion, 1955. 

BURKHARDT, George J., Research Professor in Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A., University of Wisconsin, 1933; B.S.M.E., 1934; M.S.A.E., 1935. 

DIAZ, Joaquin Basilio, Research Professor of Mathematics in the Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

B.A., University of Texas, 1940; Ph.D., Brown University, 1945. 

PAL Shih-I, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics 

B.Sc, National Central University, China, 1935; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1938; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1940. 

ROTERUS, Victor, Consulting Professor of Geography (P.T.) 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1930; M.S., 1931. 
SHORB, Mary S., Research Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., The College of Idaho, 1928; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

WEINSTEIN, Alexander, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1921; D.Sc, Math., University of Paris, 1937. 

Associate Professors 

ADELMAN, William J., Jr., Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Fordham University, 1950; M.S., University of Vermont, 1952; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1955. 

ADKINS, Arthur J., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., St. Cloud Technical College, 1942; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

322 



Faculty 

AHNERT, Frank Oswald, Associate Professor of Geography 
Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1953. 

ALLEN. Benjamin F.. Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

ALLEY, Carroll 0., Jr., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1948; M.A., Princeton University, 1951; Ph.D., 
1962. 

ALTER, Jean V., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Lie, University of Brussels, 1949; Doc. de l'Universite, University of Paris, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1956. 

ANDERSON. Frank Gibbs, Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

ANDERSON, Henry, Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., University of London, 1939; M.B.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 
1959. 

ANDERSON, J. Paul, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1942; M.A., 1948, Ph.D., 1960. 

ANDERSON, Nancy S., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Colorado, 1952; M.S., Ohio State University, 1953; Ph.D., 
1956. 

ASHMEN. Roy, Associate Professor of Business Organization 

B.S., Drexel Institute. 1935: M.S., Columbia University, 1936; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University, 1950. 

ASIMOW, Robert M.. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

ATKINSON, Gordon, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1952; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1956. 

AUSLANDER, Joseph. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; M.S., University of Pennsylva- 
nia, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

AXLEY, John H., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.A.. University of Wisconsin, 1937; Ph.D., 1945. 

BARBER. Edward S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1935; C.E., 1952. 

BARRACLOUGH, Charles A., Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.A., St. Joseph's College, 1947; M.S., Rutgers University, 1952; Ph.D., 1953. 

BARTLETT. Claude Jackson, Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Denison University, 1954; M.A., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

323 



Faculty 

BEALL, Otho T., Jr., Associate Professor of English and Director of American 

Studies 

A.B., Williams College, 1930; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1933; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

BENESCH, William, Associate Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1942; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950; Ph.D., 
1952. 

BERGER, Bruce S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.Sc, University of Pennsylvania, 1954; M.Sc, 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

BERGMANN, Barbara R., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1948; M.A., Radcliffe Graduate School (Harvard), 
1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

BOWIE, Blanche Lucille, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., Columbia University, 1946; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

BROWN, Helen I., Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., University of Vermont, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1960. 

BROWN, Joshua R. C, Associate Professor of Zoology 
A.B., Duke University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1953. 

BROWN, Russell G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., AGR., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1934. 

BROWN, Samuel E., Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Indiana University, 1934; M.A., 1946; Ph.D., Yale University, 1955. 

BUNDY, Mary Lee, Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.E., State University of New York at Potsdam, 1948; M.A., University of Den- 
ver, 1951; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1960. 

BYRD, Elbert M., Jr., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., The American University, 1953; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1959.. 

CALLCOTT, George H., Associate Professor of History 

A.B., University of South Carolina, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1956. 

CASON, James Lee, Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, 1948; M.S., Michigan State University, 
1950; Ph.D., North Carolina State College, 1956. 

CHAIKLIN, Harris, Associate Professor of Social Work 

A.B., University of Connecticut, 1950; M.A., 1952; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1953; Ph.D., Yale University, 1961. 

324 



Faculty 

CHAP1N. John L.. Associate Professor of Education 

A.B.. Denison University. 1939; Ph.D.. University of Rochester, 1950. 

CHAVES. Antonio F., Associate Professor of Geography 

Doctor. Law. University of Havana, 1941; Doctor of Filosofia & Letras, 1946: 
M.A.. Northwestern University, 1948. 

CLARKE, David H.. Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S.. Springfield College, 1952: M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1959. 

CLARK, Neri A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; Ph.D.. 1959. 

COHELAN. Evelyn E., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of California, 1951; M.S., 1953; D.Ed., 1963. 

COLEMAN, Paul David, Associate Professor of Physiology 

A.B., Tufts University, 1948; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1953. 

CONK1N. Paul Keith. Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Milligan College, 1951; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

CORREL, Ellen. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Douglass College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

COURNYN, John B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Alabama. 1946; M.S., 1948. 

CREEK, Richard D., Associate Professor of Poultry Nutrition 
B.S.A., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1955. 

CUNNIFF. Patrick F.. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.. Manhattan College, 1955; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1956; Ph.D., 
1962. 

CUSSLER, Margaret T., Associate Professor of Sociology 

M.A., New York State College of Teachers, 1932; M.A. Radcliffe College, 1941; 
Ph.D.. 1943. 

DAWSON, Townes L., Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A.. University of Texas, 1943; B.S., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; Ph.D., 1950; LL.B., 1954; Member Texas Bar. 

DECKER, A. Morris. Jr., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1949; M.S., Utah State Col- 
lege. 1951; Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1953. 

DESHLER, Walter W.. Associate Professor and Acting Head of Department of 
Geography 

B.S., Lafayette College, 1943; M.A., University of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

DETENBECK. Robert W., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Rochester, 1954; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962. 

325 



Faculty 

DOBERT, Eitel Wolf, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Geneva, 1932; M.A., University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 
1954. 

DODGE, Norton T., Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Cornell University, 1948; M.A., Harvard University, 1951; Ph.D., 1960. 

DUNHAM, Richard L., Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1947; M.M., The University of Michigan, 
1949;; Ph.D., 1961. 

EHRLICH, Gertrude, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College of Women, 1943; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
1945; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

EMERY, Arthur James, Jr., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 
B.S., Bucknell University, 1946; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1954. 

ERICKSON, William C, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1956. 

EYLER, Marvin Howard, Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 1956. 

EYLER, Marvin Howard, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 1956. 

FALK, David W., Associate Professor of Physics 

B. Eng. Phys., Cornell University, 1954; A.M., Harvard University, 1955; Ph.D., 
1959. 

FERRIS, Clifford D., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1957; M.S., 1958; D.Sc, George Washington 
University, 1962. 

FISET, Paul, Associate Professor of Microbiology, School of Medicine 

B.A., Laval University, Quebec, 1944; M.D., 1949; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 
1956. 

FLEMING, Rudd, Associate Professor of English 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1930; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1934. 

FOSTER, Phillips W., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S.. Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

FREEMAN, Robert S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.E., New York University, 1947; Ph.D., University of California, 1959. 

FREIMUTH, Henry C, Associate Professor of Legal Medicine 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1938. 

326 



Faculty 

GALLOWAY, Raymond A., Associate Professor of Botany 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

GIBLETTE, John F., Associate Professor of Education and Assistant Director of 
the Counseling Center 

B.A., George Washington University, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

GLASSER, Robert Gene, Associate Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1948; B.S., 1950; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., 1954. 

GLOVER, Rolfe Eldridge, Associate Professor of Physics 
A.B., Bowdoin, 1948; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1948; Ph.D., 
University of Gottingen, 1953. 

GOERING, Jacob D., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Bethel College, 1941; B.D., Bethany Seminary, 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1959. 

GOLDBERG, Seymour, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Hunter College, 1950; M.A., Ohio State University, 1952; Ph.D., University 
of California at Los Angeles, 1958. 

GOLLUB, Lewis R., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph.D., Harvard University. 1958. 

GOMEZPLATA, Albert, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.Ch.E., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1952; M.Ch.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

GORDON, Gilbert, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Bradley, 1955; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1959. 

GRAMBS, Jean D., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; M.A., Stanford University, 1941; Ed.D., 1948. 

GRAMLEY, Lyle E., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Beloit College, 1951; M.A., Indiana University, 1952; Ph.D., 1956. 

GREENBERG, Oscar Wallace, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; A.M., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

GRIM, Samuel O., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1960. 

GROLLMAN, Sidney, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

HALEY, A. James, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S., 1950; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

HANSON, Dale L., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1952; M.S., Mankato State College, 1956; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University, 1962. 

327 



Faculty 

HARRIS, Wesley Lamar, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1953; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

HARRISON, Floyd P., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1953. 

HATHORN, Guy B., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Mississippi, 1940; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Duke University, 1950. 

HAYLECK, Charles Raymond, Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1949. 

HEBELER, Jean R., Associate Professor of Special Education 

B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 
1956; Ed.D., Syracuse University, 1960. 

HELBACKA, Norman V., Associate Professor of Poultry Products Technology 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

HEMKEN, Roger W., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

HENDERSON, Hubert, Associate Professor of Music 
A.B., University of North Carolina, 1941; M.A., 1950. 

HENERY-LOGAN, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., McGill University, 1954; Ph.D., 1946. 

HERING, Christoph, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of Bonn, 1950. 

HETRICK, Frank M., Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

HIGHTON, Richard T., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1950; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

HIRZEL, Robert K., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University, 1954. 

HOCHULI, U. E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Electrotechniker, KTB, Biel, Switzerland, 1950; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1955; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1962. 

HOVEY, Richard B., Associate Professor of English 
A.B., University of Cincinnati, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

328 



Faculty 

HSUEH, Chun-tu, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

Diploma, China School of Journalism. 1939; LL.B., Chaoyang College, 1946; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

ISHEE, Sidney, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1950; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

JACHOWSKI, Leo A., Jr., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1941; M.S., 1942; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1953. 

JACOBS, Walter Dranell, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1961. 

JOHNSON, Roy Hamlin, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1959; M.M., 1951; D.M.A., 1961; Fulbright 
Award, Paris Conservatory, 1952-53. 

KANTZES, James G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

KARP, Carol R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Manchester College, 1948; M.A., Michigan State University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California, 1959. 

KELSEY, Roger B., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1934; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1940; Ed.D., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1954. 

KING, Raymond L., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

A.B., University of California, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 
KLEPPNER, Adam, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Yale University, 1953; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; Ph.D., Harvard 

University, 1960. 

KNIGHT, Robert E. L., Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., University of California, 1958. 

KRESGE, Conrad Buehler, Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1953; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

KRUSBERG, Lorin R., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1954; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

LEFFEL, Emory C, Associate Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1953. 

LEHNER, Guydo R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola University, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D., 1958 

LEMMON, M. Louise, Associate Professor of Home Economics and Home Econom- 
ics Education 

B.S.. Northern Illinois University, 1945; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1952; 

Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

329 



Faculty 

LINDER, Harris Joseph, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Long Island University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

LOCKARD, J. David, Associate Professor of Botany and Education 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1951; M.Ed., 1955; Ph.D., 1962. 

LUETKEMEYER, Joseph F., Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., Stout State College, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

LUTWACK, Leonard, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

MARCHELLO, Joseph M., Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1955; Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1959. 

MARX, George L., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Yankton College, 1953; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1958; Ph.,D., 1959. 

MATTICK, Joseph F., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Pensylvania State University, 1942; Ph.D., 1950. 

McNELLY, Theodore, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.Sc, University of Wisconsin, 1941; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1952. 

MELNIK, Walter L., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B.Sc, University of Minnesota, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 1964. 

MENDELOFF, Henry, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1936; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., Catholic Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

MERLIS, Jerome K., Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., University of Louisville, 1933; M.D., 1937; M.S., 1938. 

MESSERSMITH, Donald H., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.Ed., University of Toledo, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1962. 

MISNER, Charles W., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 
1957. 

MOORE, John R., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1959. 

MURRAY, Ray A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.Sc, University of Nebraska, 1934; M.S., Cornell University, 1938; Ph.D., 1949. 

MYERS, Robert Mason, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

330 



Faculty 

NEVILLE, Richard F., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College, 1953; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1963. 

ONEDA, Sadao, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S.C., Tohoku University, 1946; M.S.C., 1948; D.Sc, Ministry of Education, 
Nagoya University, 1953. 

O'NEILL, John J., Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., St. Francis College, 1942; M.S., University of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

PARSONS, Arthur C, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

PASCH, Alan, Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., New School for Social Research, 1952; 
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 

PATERSON, Robert A., Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.A., University of Nevada, 1949; M.A., Stanford University, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1957. 

PEARL, Martin Herbert, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1950; M.A., University of Michigan, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1955. 

P1CKARD, Hugh B., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Haverford College, 1933; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1938. 

PIPER, Harry W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B. Arch. E., Catholic University, 1940; M.C.E., 1961. 

POLLACK, Burton R., Associate Professor of Physiology 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

POMERANTZ, Seymour H., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 
B.S., The Rice Institute, 1948; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1952. 

PORTZ, John, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University, 1937; M.A., Harvard University, 1941; Ph.D., 1957. 

PRANGE, Richard E., Associate Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of Chicago, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

PRICE, Henry W., Jr., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1950. 

PUGLIESE, Rudolph E., Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Miami University, Oxford, 1947; M.F.A., Catholic University, 1949; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1961. 

PUMROY, Donald K., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1954. 

331 



Faculty 

RAMM, Gordon M., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., New York University, 1954. 

RAPPLEYE, Robert D., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

RATHS, James, Associate Professor and Director of Bureau of Educational Research 
and Field Services 

B.S., Yale College, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., New York University, 1960. 

REIBER, Stanley R., Associate Professor and Head of Family Life and Manage- 
ment 

A.B., Grove City College, 1942; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, 1945; 

M.S., Florida State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

RIVELLO, Robert M., Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1948. 

RIVLIN, Helen Anne, Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1949; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1950; Ph.D., Oxford 
University, 1953. 

ROSENFIELD, Leonora C, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Smith College, 1930; A.M., Columbia University, 1931; Ph.D., 1940. 

RUTELLI, Giovanni P., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Ph.D., (Physics), University of Palermo, 1932; Ph.D.. (Electrical Engineering), 
Polytechnic Institute of Turin, 1928. 

SCHETZ, Joseph A., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 

B.S., Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, 1958; M.S., Princeton University, 
1960; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 

SCHWEPPE, Earl J., Associate Professor of Computer Science 

B.S., Missouri Valley College, 1948; M.S., University of Illinois, 1951; Ph.D., 
1955. 

SHANGRAW, Ralph F., Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S., Massachuetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan, 1958. 

SHANKWEILER, Paul W., Associate Professor of Sociology 
Ph.B., Muhlenberg College, 1919; M.A., Columbia University, 1921, Diploma, 
Union Theological Seminary, 1922; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1934. 

SHEARER, Jane K., Associate Professor and Head of Department of Housing and 
Applied Design 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1940; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Florida State University, 

1960. 

SHIPLEY, E. Roderick, Associate Professor of Physiology 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942; 
Certificate of Pennsylvania, 1947; Diplomate, American Board of Surgery, 1948. 

332 



Faculty 

SIMONS, David Elie, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951. 

SMITH, Andrew George, Associate Professor of Medical Microbiology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1940; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1950. 

SMITH, Clodus R., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education 

B.S., Oklahoma A & M College, 1950; M.S., 1955; D.Ed., Cornell University, 
1960. 

SMITH, Elske van Panhuys, Associate Professor of Physics 
B.A., Radcliffe College, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SMITH, Gayle S., Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1946; B.S., Iowa State College, 1948; M.A., Cornell 
University, 1951; Ph.D., 1958. 

SNYDER, Robert J., Associate Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SPENCER, Mabel S., Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 

B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.S., 1946; Ed.D., American University, 
1959. 

SPIVEY, Clinton, Associate Professor of Business Organization 
B.S.. University of Illinois, 1946; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1957. 

STEINBERG. Phillip H., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1960. 

STEINHAUER, Allen L., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S.A., University of Manitoba 1953; M.S., Oregon State College, 1955; Ph.D., 
1958. 

STERN, Malvin D., Associate Professor of Biophysics, School of Med'cine 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1943; M.A., Princeton University, 1948; 
Ph.D., 1949. 

STEVENS, Audrey, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine 
B.S., Iowa State University, 1953; Ph.D., Western Reserve University, 1958. 

STEVENS, George A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

STEWART, James M., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., West Washington College, 1953; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1958. 

STEWART, Wolcott E., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1957. 

STRICKLING, Edward, Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

333 



Faculty 

STROSS, Raymond G., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1952; M.S., University of Idaho, 1955; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1958. 

STUNKARD, Clayton LeRoy, Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1948; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., 1959. 

STUNTZ, Calvin F., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 

SYSKI, Ryszard, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Dipl. Ing., P.U.C., London, 1950; D.I.C., Imperial College, 1951; B.Sc, Univer- 
sity of London, 1954; Ph.D., Chelsea College, 1961. 

TIERNEY, William Francis, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949; 
Ed.E., University of Maryland, 1952. 

TUTHILL Dean F., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1949; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

VANDERSALL, John H., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

VAN WIJK, Uco Van, Associate Professor of Astronomy 
B.S., Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

WALDER, Leopold O., Associate Professor of Psychology 
A.B., Boston University, 1949; M.A., University of Hawaii, 1951; Ph.D., State 
University of Iowa, 1954; Diploma, American Board of Examiners, 1960. 

WALL, Nathan S., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1954. 

WEAVER, Carl H., Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1936; M.A., Ohio State University, 1950; Ph.D., 195^. 

WEDDING, Presley A., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; M.S., 1952. 

WEINSTEIN, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1954; M.A., Northwestern University, 1958; 
Ph.D., 1961. 

WILCOX, Frank Herbert, Jr, Associate Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

WILEY, Robert C, Associate Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Oregon State College, 
1953. 

WILLIAMS, Walter F., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
A.B., University of Missouri, 1951; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

334 



Faculty 

WILSON, Leda Amick, Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Lander College. 1943: M.S., University of Tennessee, 1950; Ph.D.. 1954. 

WILSON. Robert M.. Associate Professor and Director of Reading Clinic, College 
of Education 

B.S., California State Teachers College, 1950; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 

1956; D.Ed., 1960. 

WINN. Howard E., Associate Professor of Zoology 

A.B., Bowdoin College, 1948; M.S., University of Michigan, 1950; Ph.D., 1955. 

WONNACOTT. Paul, Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Western Ontario. 1955; M.A., Princeton University, 1957; 
Ph.D.. 1959. 

WYSONG. John Wright, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University. 1953: M.S.. University of Illinois. 1954; Ph.D.. Cornell 
University, 1957. 

YARCZOWER. Mathew. Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.B.A.. City College of New York. 1953; M.A., University of Maryland. 1955; 
Ph.D.. 1958. 

ZEDEK, Mishael. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

M.Sc, Hebrew University, 1952; Ph.D.. Harvard University. 1956. 

ZIPOY. David M., Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954; Ph.D.. 1957. 

ZENKER, Nicholas. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
M.A.. University of California, 1953: Ph.D.. 1958. 

ZIPOY. David M.. Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S.„ University of Minnesota, 1954. Ph.D., 1957. 

ZORN, Gus T.. Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S.. Oklahoma State University, 1948; M.S.. University of New Mexico, 1953; 
Ph.D., University of Padua. 1954. 

Associate Research Professors 

CAUSEY. G. Donald. Associate Research Professor of Speech 

B.A.. University of Maryland. 1950: M.A.. 1951; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1954. 

EISENBERG. John F.. Associate Research Professor (P.T.) of Zoology 

B.S.. Washington State University. 1957; M.A.. University of California, 1959; 
Ph.D.. 1962. 

FALLER. Alan J.. Associate Research Professor of the Institute of Fluid Dynamics 
B.S.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1951; M.S.. 1953: Sc.D., 1957. 

GLASER. Edmund M., Associate Research Professor of Medical Physiology 

B.E.E.. Cooper Union, 1944; M.S.E., The Johns Hopkins University. 1954; 

335 



Faculty 

HUBBARD, Bert E., Associate Research Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

B.S., Western Illinois University, 1949; M.S., State University of Iowa, 1952; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

JONES, Grover S., Associate Research Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

A.B., Duke University, 1952; Navy Certificate, Naval Postgraduate School, 1955; 

M.S., University of North Carolina, 1958; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1960. 

ROSENFELD, Azriel, Associate Research Professor of Computer Science 

B.A., Yeshiva College, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; Ph.D., 1957. 

TIDMAN, Derek Albert, Associate Research Professor in Institute of Fluid Dynamics 
B.Sc, London University, 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

WILKERSON, Thomas D., Associate Research Professor of Institute of Fluid 
Dynamics 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1962. 

WINN, Paul N., Jr., Associate Research Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; M.S.A.E., 1958. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

ADAMS, Robert F., Assistant Professor and Research Associate of Economics and 
Bureau of Business and Economic Research 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1958; M.A., University of Michigan, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

AN AND, Davinder K., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., The George Washington University, 1959; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

ANDERSON, James R., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S., Iowa State University, 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

BAKER, Donald J., Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.S.Ed., The Ohio State University, 1954; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

BARRY, Sue-ning Chu, Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology 
B.A., Barat College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

BARTLETT, Hale C, Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1955; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1959; Ph.D., 
1965. 

BEALL, Edgar F., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.A., University of California, 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

BELL, Roger A., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Melbourne, 1957; Ph.D., Australian National University, 1962. 

BENNETT, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., University of Texas, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

336 



Faculty 

BHAGAT, Satindar M., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Jannu and Kashimir University of India, 1950; M.S., University of Delhi, 
1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

BLOCK, Barry C, Assistant Professor of Physics 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1957; Ph.D., 1962. 

BOTT, Margaret M., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., St. John's University, 1952; M.S., Hunter College, 1959; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University, 1962. 

BOYD, Alfred C, Jr., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

BRINKLEY, Howard J., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1958; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; Ph.D., 
1963. 

BROWN, John Howell, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
A.B., Princeton University, 1952; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

BRUNNER, George A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.B.A., University of Toledo, 1958; M.B.A., 1960; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 
1964. 

CARROLL, Stephen J.. Jr., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1957; M.A., University of Minne- 
sota, 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

CELARIER, James LeRoy, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B.. University of Illinois. 1956; A.M., 1958; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
1960; Corpus Christi College, 1960-61. 

COATES, Charles H., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S.. United States Military Academy, 1924; M.A., Louisiana State University, 
1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

COLBY, Sterling R., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Cornell University, 1956; M.S., Purdue University, 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

COLLETT, William K., Assistant Professor of Pathology, School of Dentistry 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 1962; M.P.H., 1964; 
Sc.D., 1965. 

CONDON, Paul E., Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Harvard College, 1955; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

CONWAY, Mary Margaret, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics. 
B.S., Purdue University, 1957; M.A., University of California, 1960; Ph.D., 
Indiana University, 1965. 

CRISPENS, Charles G., Jr., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine 
B.S.. Pennsylvania State University, 1953; M.S., Ohio State University, 1955; 
Ph.D., Washington State University, 1959. 

337 



Faculty 

DAYTON, Chauncey M., Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DEAL, Elwyn E., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Diploma, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, 1956; B.S.A., University of 
Georgia, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1963. 

DE ROCCO, Andrew G., Assistant Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

DE SILVA, Alan W., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1954; Ph.D., University of Cali- 
fornia, 1961. 

DIXON, Jack, Assistant Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

B.S., Western Reserve University, 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1956. 

DORFMAN, J. Robert, Assistant Professor of Physics 
A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

DORSEY, John W., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.A., Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DUDLEY, James, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Southern Illinois University, 1951; M.S., 1957; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 
1964. 

EHEART, Mary S., Assistant Professor of Food and Nutrition 
A.B., Park College, 1933; A.M., University of Chicago, 1935. 

FAJER, Abram B., Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 
M.D., University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 

FANNING, Delvin S., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Cornell University, 1954; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

FICKEN, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
B.S., Cornell University, 1953; Ph.D., 1960. 

FISCHLSCHWEIGER, Werner, Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology, 
School of Dentistry 

Certificate, Teachers College, Graz, Austria, 1952; Ph.D., University of Graz, 
1957. 

FISHER, George L., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.B.A., College of the City of New York, 1957; A.M., Boston University, 1958; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

FIVEL, Daniel I., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; Ph.D., 1959. 

338 



Faculty 

FRANZ, Jacob G., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B.. Southwestern University, 1935; M.A., Columbia University, 1939; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1960. 

FREDERICKS, Walter W.. Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of Pharmacy 
B.A.. La Salle College, 1957; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 1962. 

FRETZ, Bruce R., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1961; M.S., Ohio State University, 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

GAINER, Harold, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S.. College of the City of New York, 1956; Ph.D., University of California, 
1959. 

GRIFFIN, Donald W., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of California, 1950; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1956; Ph.D., 
1962. 

GLICK. Arnold J., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 

GODFREY, Edward F., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., University of New Hampshire. 1949; M.S., Ohio State University, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

GOLANN, Stuart E.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queens College, 1957: M.A.. University of North Carolina, 1959; Ph.D., 
1961. 

GORDON, Stewart L.. Assistant Professor of Music 

Certificate-Diploma. Staatliches Konservatorium des Saarlands, 1951; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Kansas. 1953: M.A.. 1954: D.M.A., University of Rochester, 1965. 

GREENBERG, Kenneth R.. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1960. 

GREISMAN. Sheldon E., Assistant Professor of Physiology 
M.D., New York University, 1949. 

GRUBAR, Francis S., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1952. 

HATFIELD, Agnes B.. Assistant Professor of Education 

Certificate. Dakota Wesleyan University, 1940; B.A., University of California, 
1948; M.A., University of Denver, 1954; Ph.D.. 1959. 

HAVILAND. Elizabeth E., Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.A.. Wilmington College, 1923; M.A., Cornell University, 1926; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1936: Ph.D., 1945. 

HEIM. Norman Michael. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.Ed.. Evansville College. 1951: M.M., Eastman School of Music, University 
of Rochester, 1952; D.M.A., University of Rochester, 1962. 

339 



Faculty 

HERMANSON, Roger H., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., Michigan State University, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

HINRICHS, Harley H., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1953; M.S., Purdue University, 1958; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1964. 

HUBER, Franz E., Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B.A., University of Michigan, 1951; M.A., 1953; Ph.D., 1964. 

HYBL, Albert, Assistant Professor of Biophysics 

B.A., Coe College, 1954; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1961. 

JOHNSON, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education 
B.S., University of Nebraska, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1956; Ph.D., 
1958. 

KACSER, Claude, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Oxford University, 1955; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1959. 

KARPELES, Leo M., Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1941; M.D., University of Washington, 1955. 

KATZ, Ira, Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1957; M.S., University of Maryland, 1959; Ph.D., 
1962. 

KEHOE, Brandt, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A. Cornell University, 1956; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

KELLER, Edward C, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

KIM, Young Suh, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1958; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

KLARMAN, William L., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State College, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; Ph.D., 
1962. 

KLEVAN, Albert, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Temple University, 1948; M.Ed., 1950: Ed.D., New York University, 1957. 

KOCH, J. Frederick, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., New York University, 1958; Ph.D., University of California, 1962. 

KOKAT, Robert G., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; M.S., 1957; D.B.A., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1962. 

KOURY, Enver M., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., George Washington University, 1953; Ph.D., American University, 1958. 

KRISHER, Lawrence C, Assistant Professor of Institute for Molecular Physics 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1955; A.M., Harvard University, 1957; Ph.D., 1957. 

340 



Faculty 

KRYWOLAP. George N., Assistant Professor of Microbiology, School of Den- 
tistry 

B.S.. Drexel Institute of Technology, 1956; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 
1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

KYLE. David G., Assistant Professor of Education 

A.D., University of Denver, 1952; M.A., 1953; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

LAKSHMANAN, Sitarama, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc, Annamalai University. 1946; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1954. 

LAMY. Peter P.. Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.Sc, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 1956; M.Sc, 1958; Ph.D., 1964. 

LAWSON. John Richard. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. Long Beach State College. 1958: M.A.. 1958; Ed.D., University of Nebraska. 
1962. 

LEIBOWITZ. L. R.. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., New York University. 1951; M.S.. 1955: Ph.D., Brown University, 1962. 

LESLIE, James. Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S., Queens University. Ireland. 1956: Ph.D., 1959. 

MacQUILLAN. Anthony M.. Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.A., University of British Columbia. 1956: M.Sc, 1958; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1962. 

MALTESE. George J.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1953: M.A.. J. W. Goethe University, 1954; Ph.D., 
Yale University. 1960. 

MARCOVITZ. Alan B.. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

S.B.E.E.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1959; S.M.E.E., 1959; Ph.D., 
Columbia University. 1963. 

MARSHALL. James Paxton, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S.. University of Kentucky. 1947; M.A.. Michigan State University, 1957; Ph.D., 
1962. 

MARTIN. James E.. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.A.. Auburn University. 1954; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1956; Ph.D., 
1962. 

MATTESON. Richard L.. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A.. Knox College. 1952: M.A., University of Maryland. 1956; Ed.D., 1962. 

MC INT1RE. Roger Warren. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.A., N. Park College. 1956; B.A.. Northwestern University. 1958; M.A., Louisiana 
State University. 1960; Ph.C. 1962. 

MIKULSKI. Piotr Witold. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Diploma. Main School of Plan. & Stat., Warsaw. Poland. 1951; Masters, 1952; 
Ph.D.. University of California, 1961. 

341 



Faculty 

MOTZ, Annabelle B., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1941; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 
1950. 

MYERS, William F., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
A.B., University of Kansas, 1949; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

NASH, Allan N., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.B.A., University of Minnesota, 1957; M.B.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1963. 

NIETO, Joseph I., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.A., National University of Columbia, 1956; Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 
1959. 

O'DONNELL, Maurice E., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State, 1948; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; Ph.D., 1954 

PAINE, Frank T., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; M.B.A., 1956; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1963. 

PANICHAS, George A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., American International College, 1951; M.A., Trinity College, 1952; Ph.D., 
Nottingham University, 1961. 

PATI, Jogesh C, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, Ravenshaw College, Utkal University, India, 1955; M.Sc, Delhi University, 
1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

PENNINGTON, Kenneth D., Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., and Bm. Mus., Friends University, 1950; M.A., New York University, 1953; 
D. Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

PETTY, Charles S., Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine 

B.S., University of Washington, 1941; M.S., 1946; M.D., Harvard Medical School, 
1950. 

PIPER, Don C, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; MA., 1958; Ph.D., Duke University, 1961; 
Hague Academy of International Law, 1962. 

PUGSLEY, James H., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1956; M.S., University of Illinois, 1958; Ph.D., 1963. 

RAY, Philip Bend, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Antioch College, 1950; M.S., University of Pensylvania, 1955; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1962. 

RENZ, Paul, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; MA., 1952; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1962. 
ROBERSON, Bob S., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1951; Ph.D., 1960. 
ROBERTSON, Joseph R., Jr., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of the South, 1954; M.A., Emory University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 
ROSENZWEIG, Edward C, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

A.B., Centre College, 1951; M.Sc, University of Maryland, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

342 



Faculty 

SCHELLENBERGER, Robert E.. Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1958; M.B.A., 1959; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1963. 

SMERK, George M., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S.. Bradley University, 1955; M.B.A.. 1957; D.B.A., Indiana University, 1963. 

SMITH. Theodore G., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.E.S.. Johns Hopkins University. 1956: M.S., 1958; D.Sc, Washington Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

SNYDER. Merrill J.. Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.. University of Pittsburgh. 1940: M.S.. University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 
1953. 

STEINMAN. Robert M.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

D.D.S.. St. Louis University. 1948: M.A.. Graduate Faculty New School, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

TOSI. Henry L.. Jr.. Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S.. Ohio State University. 1958. M.B.A., 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

TURNAGE, Thomas W.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.A., Citv College of San Francisco, 1956; A.B., University of California, 1958; 
Ph.D.. 1962. 

WALBESSER. Henry H.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Secondary Edu- 
cation 

B.S.. State University of New York at Buffalo. 1958; M.A., University of Mary- 
land. 1960: Ph.D.. 1965. 

WARD. Charles D.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Pomona College. 1958: M.A.. University of North Carolina, 1962; Ph.D.. 
1963. 

WEATHERRED. Jackie G.. Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry 
D.D.S.. University of Texas. 1959: Ph.D., 1965. 

WEAVER. V. Phillips. Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B.. College of William and Mary, 1951; M.Ed.. Pennsylvania State University, 
1956: D.Ed.. 1962. 

WELLS, Joseph. Assistant Professor of Anatomy. School of Medicine 
B.S.. University of Rhode Island. 1956: Ph.D.. Duke University, 1959. 

WHATLEY. Malcolm C. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Southwestern at Memphis. 1956; M.S.. University of Wisconsin, 1958; Ph.D., 
1962. 

WILBUR. June C. Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 

B.S.. University of Washington. 1936: Educ. 1937: M.S.. Syracuse University, 1940. 

WILLK.E. Thomas A.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B.. Xavier University, 1954; M.S.. Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1960. 

343 



Faculty 

WOLFE, James H., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Harvard University, 1955; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1958; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1962. 

WOODS, Edward J., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Queen's University, Canada, 1957; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962. 

YANEY, George L., Assistant Professor of History 

B.Mgt.E., Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute, 1952; M.A., University of Colorado, 
1956; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

YOUNG, Edgar Paul, Assistant Professor of Animal Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1954; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

YOUNG, Frank C, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1957: Ph.D. .University of Maryland, 1962. 

ZAPOLSKY, Harold S., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Shimer College, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1962. 

ZORN. B. Sechi, Assistant Professor of Physics 
Ph.D., Universita di Cagliari, 1951. 

Assistant Research Professors 

KELMAN, Robert B., Assistant Research Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

A.B., University of California, 1953; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

LASHINSKY. Herbert, Assistant Research Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
B.S., College of the City of New York, 1950; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1961. 

ORTEGA, James M., Assistant Research Professor of Computer Science and Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.S., University of New Mexico, 1954: Ph.D., Stanford University, 1962. 

Lecturers 

AITKEN, Alfred H., Lecturer in Physics (P.T.) 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1949; M.S.. Indiana University, 1950; Ph.D., 1955. 

BARBER. Willard F., Lecturer in Government and Politics 

A.B., Stanford University, 1928; M.A., 1929; Diploma, The War College, 1948. 

BRITTON, Virginia, Lecturer in Home Economics 

B.A., University of Akron, 1936; M.S., University of Chicago, 1938; Ph.D., 1950. 

LEMONS, Hoyt, Lecturer in Geography 

B.Ed., Southern Illinois University, 1936; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1941. 

LINDENBERG, Richard, Lecturer in Anatomy 
Graduation, University of Munich Medical School, 1934; M.D., University of 
Berlin, 1944. 

344 



Faculty 

LOBB. R. Kenneth. Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering 

B.S., University of Alberta; M.S.. University of Toronto. 1948; Ph.D., 1950. 

MECKLER. Alvin, Lecturer in Physics 

B.S.. City College of New York. 1947; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1952. 

MEYERSON, Melvin R., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1942; M.S.. University of Maryland, 1953; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

REISS, Howard R.. (P.T.). Lecturer of Physics 

B.Aero.E.. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 1950; M.Aero.E., 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 

SCHUCHARD. Earl A.. Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

B.S.. University of Washington. 1933: M.S.. 1934; Ph.D.. 1940. 

SEIGEL. Arnold E.. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.. University of Maryland. 1944; S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Techr.Jogy, 
1947: Ph.D.. University of Amsterdam. 1952. 

STADTMAN. Earl R.. Lecturer in Microbiology 
B.S.. University of California. 1942: Ph.D., 1949. 

TRENT. Horace NL. lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

B.A.. Berea College. 1928: M.A.. Indiana University, 1929; Ph.D., 1934. 

VANDERSLICE. John L.. Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

B.S.. University of Pennsylvania. 1928; A.M., 1930; Ph.D.. Princeton University, 
1934. 

WADA. Walter W\. (P.T.). Lecturer of Physics 

B.A.. University of Utah. 1943: M.A.. University of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

WILSON. Robert E.. Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering 

B.S.. Georgia Institute of Technology. 1941; M.S.. 1942; Ph.D., University of 
Texas. 1952. 

Instructors 

DUDA. George D., Instructor of Biological Chemistry 

B.S.. The City College of New York, 1961; Ph.D.. Duke University. 1958. 

SEIPP. Joseph H.. Jr.. Instructor in Histology 

A.B.. Loyola College: D.D.S.. University of Maryland. 1955: M.S.. University of 
Pittsburgh. 1959. 

WISE. Walter R.. Jr.. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E.. Duke University. 1952: M.S.. University of Maryland. 1955: Ph.D., 1959. 



345 






bet!,