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Full text of "Catalog / Graduate School, University of Maryland"

GRADUATE SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN 




The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevo- 
cable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The 
University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at 
any time within the student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



CATALOG 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1968-1970 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




Volume 25 



September 5, 1968 



No. 8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published six times in August: five 
times in September; four times in October and June; one time in November, February, 
and May; two times in December, March, and July; and three times in January, and 
April. Published 34 times. Re-entered as second class mail matter under the Act of 
Congress on August 24, 1912, and second class postage paid at College Park, Mary- 
land 20742. 



Contents 



The Graduate School 18 

General Information 19 

Location 19 

Libraries 19 

Special Research Facilities 20 

Admission — General 20 

Full Graduate Status 22 

Provisional Status 22 

Non-Degree Status 22 

Special Undergraduate 

Student Status 22 

Admission and Registration 23 

Application for Admission 23 

Transfer Student Admission 24 

Foreign Student Application 24 

Application for Institute Training 25 

Registration 26 

Continuous Registration 26 



Summer School 26 

Graduate Work in the Professional 

Schools at Baltimore 27 

University Consortia 27 

Off-Campus Offerings 27 

Graduate Work by University of 

Maryland Seniors 27 

Requirements for the Degrees of 

Master of Arts and Master 

of Science 27 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Arts in American 

Studies 30 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Education 50 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Business Education 31 



Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Music 32 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Library Science .... 32 
Requirements for the Degree of 

Master of Social Work 32 

Requirements for the Advanced 

Graduate Specialist Program . 33 
Requirements for the Degree of 

Doctor of Prilosophy 33 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Doctor of Education 34 

Requirements for the Degree of 

Doctor of Musical Arts 34 



Requirements for the Degree of 

Doctor of Business 

Administration 35 

Graduate Degree Programs 36 
Definition of Residence and 

Non-Residence Status i7 

Infirmary Services 38 

Living Accommodations 38 

Financial Aid 38 

Commencement 39 

Grades 40 

Course Numbering System 40 

Programs and Courses 41 



PROGRAMS AND COURSES 



Aerospace Engineering 41 

Agriculture 43 

Agricultural Economics 44 

Agricultural Engineering 47 

Agricultural and Extension 

Education 48 
Agronomy — Crops, Soils and 

Geology 50 

American Studies 54 

Animal Science 55 

Art 58 

Astronomy 64 

Botany 68 

Business Administration 72 

Center of Materials Research 82 

Chemical Engineering 83 

Applied Polymer Science 83 

Bioengineering 84 

Engineering Materials 84 

Nuclear Engineering 84 

Chemistry 92 

Civil Engineering 98 
Classical Languages and 

Literature 105 

Comparative Literature 106 

Computer Science 107 

Dairy Science Ill 

Economics 114 

Education 122 

Electrical Engineering 146 

English Language and Literature 155 

Entomology 158 

Food Science 160 

French Language and Literature . 162 

Geography 164 



Germanic and Slavic Languages 

and Literature 170 

Government and Politics 172 

History 176 

Home Economics 182 

Horticulture 191 

Information Systems Management 193 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics 

and Applied Mathematics 195 

Institute for Molecular Physics 196 
Librar\- and Information 

Services. School of 197 

Mathematics 200 

Mechanical Engineering 213 

Meteorology 220 

Microbiology 223 

Music . 225 

Philosophy 229 
Physical Education. Recreation 

and Health 232 

Physics and Astronomy 236 

Poultry Science 246 

Ps\chology 248 

Sociology and Anthropology 254 

Spanish and Portuguese 

Languages and Literature 259 

Speech and Dramatic Art 262 

Veterinary Science 269 

Zoology 270 

School of Dentistry 275 

School of Medicine 281 

School of Nursing 290 

School of Pharmacy 294 

School of Social Work 300 

The Graduate Council 16. 18. 304 

Graduate Faculty 305 



University Calendar, 1968-1969 



FALL SEMESTER, 1968 
SEPTEMBER 9-13 Monday-Friday Fall Registration 

16 Monday 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



27 Wednesday 

2 Monday 
20 Friday 



Instruction begins 



7969 

JANUARY 6 Monday 

14 Tuesday 
16-24 Thursday-Friday 



After last class — Thanksgiving recess 
begins 

8:00 a.m. — Thanksgiving recess ends 
After last class — Christmas recess 
begins 



8:00 a.m. Christmas recess ends 
After last class — end of instruction 
Fall Semester Examinations 



SPRING SEMESTER. 1969 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 
APRIL 



MAY 

JUNE 

JUNE 

JULY 
AUGUST 



3-7 
10 
22 

28 



27 

29-June 6 

30 



Monday-Friday 

Monday 

Saturday 

Friday 
Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Thursday-Friday 

Friday 



7 Saturday 



Spring Registration 

Instruction begins 

Washington's Birthday, holiday — 

No classes 
After last class — Spring recess begins 

8:00 a.m. — Spring recess ends 

After last class — end of instruction 
Spring Semester Examinations 
Memorial Day, holiday — 

No examinations 

Commencement 



SUMMER SCHOOL, 1969 



23-24 Monday-Tuesday 

25 Wednesday 

4 Friday 

15 Friday 



Summer Registration 
Instruction begins 

Independence Day, holiday- 
No classes 
Summer Session ends 



SHORT COURSES, 1969 
16-20 Monday-Friday College Week for Women 



JUNE 

AUGUST 4-8 Monday-Friday 

SEPTEMBER 2-5 Tuesday-Friday 



Maryland 4-H Club Week 
Fireman's Short Course 









1969-1970 






FALL 


SEMESTER, 1969 


SEPTEMBER 


8-12 


Monday-Friday 


Fall Semester Registration 




13 


Saturday 




Teacher Registration 




15 


Monday 




Instruction begins 


NOVEMBER 


26 


Wednesday 




After last class — Thanksgiving recess 
begins 


DECEMBER 


1 


Monday 




Thanksgiving recess ends 




19 


Friday 




After last class — Christmas recess 
begins 



7970 

JANUARY 5 Monday 

14 Wednesday 
15-22 Thursday-Thursday 



Christmas recess ends 
Pre-exam Study Day 
Fall Semester examinations 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1970 



FEBRUARY 


2-6 


Monday-Friday 


Spring Semester Registration 






7 


Saturday 


Teacher Registration 






9 


Monday 


Instruction begins 


MARCH 




26 


Thursday 


After last class — Spring recess begins 


APRIL 




6 


Monday 


8:00 a.m. — Spring recess ends 


MAY 




27 


Wednesday 


Pre-exam Study Day 




28-June 5 


Thursday-Friday 


Spring Semester Examinations 


JUNE 




1 


Monday 


Memorial Day 






6 


Saturday 


Commencement 



SUMMER SESSION, 1970 



JUNE 


22-23 


Monday-Tuesday Summer Registration 


JUNE 


24 


Wednesday Instruction begins 


AUGUST 


14 


Friday Summer Session ends 
SHORT COURSES, 1970 


JUNE 


15-18 


Monday-Thursday College Week for Women 


AUGUST 


3-7 


Monday-Friday Maryland 4-H Club Week 


SEPTEMBER 


8-11 


Tuesday-Friday Fireman's Short Course 



Board of Regents and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 



CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McConnick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore 21202 

VICE chairman 
George B. Newman 
The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Box 300, Cumberland 21502 

secretary 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

treasurer 
Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton 21629 

assistant secretary 
Mrs. Gerald D. Morgan 
Route 3, Gaithersburg 20760 

assistant treasurer 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, One Charles Center, 17th Floor, Baltimore 21201 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Harry Bos well Associates, 6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville 20782 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 21215 

William B. Long, M.D. 
Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

F. Grove Miller, Jr. 

R. D. 1, Box 133, North East, Maryland 21901 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 20740 



Officers of the University 



Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins— B./4.. University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kiihn— S.5., University of Maryland. 193S: M.S.. 1939; Ph.D.. 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State Uni\ersity, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— fi.5., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

J. Winston Martin— 5.5., University of Missouri, 1951; M.Ed., 1956; Ed.D., 1958. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, ]t.—A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd—B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— fi.S., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 



8 

Deans and Principal Academic Officers 

Deans 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell University, 1936: M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

John William Hill— B.^., Rice University, 1951; B. Arch.. 1952; M. Arch., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tiijts College. 1929: M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D. 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Donald W. O'Connell— B./l., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley — D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Robert B. Beckmann — B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1944. 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Marjory Brooks — B.S., Mississippi State College, 1943; M.S., University of Idaho, 
1951: Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1963. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Paul Wasserman— B.B.^., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S., (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949; M.S., (Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, I960. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL EDUCATION AND 
RESEARCH 

William S. Stone— B.5., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 
Louisville, 1929 Ph.D., {Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Marion I. Murphy — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University of Michi- 
gan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

William J. Kinnard, Jr.— B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 
Purdue University, 1957. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley—B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A.. 1937; Ph.D.. Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Daniel Thursz— B./J., Queens College, 1948; M.S.W., Catholic University. 1955; 
D.S.W., 1959. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— S./4., Wabash College. 1929: M.A., Butler University. 1930: 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY— DEAN OF FACULTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 



Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut — B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

HEAD. DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Alfred J. Hanlon, Jr. — A.B., Harvard University. 1939: M.S.. Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1966. 

DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

William F. Atchison — A.B., Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., University of 
Kentucky, 1940; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1943. 

DIRECTOR, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Robert E. Wagner— B .5., Kansas Uitiversity, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1943; Ph.D., 1950. 



10 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Melvin Bernstein — A.B., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; B.Mus., 1948; M.Mus., 

University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 

1964. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 

H. Gerthon Morgan — B.A., Fwman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 

Joseph T. Vanderslice — B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, 1952. 

DIRECTOR (ACTING), INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND APPLIED 

MATHEMATICS 

Thomas D. Wilkerson— B.5., University of Michigan, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1962. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— S./l., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR. NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR, THE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 

Eugene B. Brody — A.B., M.A., University of Missouri, 1941; M.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1944. 

DIRECTOR, SUMMER SCHOOL 

Clodus R. Smith— B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1960; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

DIRECTOR, PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL 

George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 
Maryland, 1929. 



General Administrative Officers 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Francis A. Gray, Jr. — B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

ASSISTANT FOR FACILITIES PLANNING 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 



11 

DIRECTOR OF ENDOWMENT AND GIFTS 

Richard D. Wagner — B.S., Bradley University, 1960; M.P.A., University of Pittsburgh, 
1962: Ph.D., 1967. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.5.. University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR, ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— S.^., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1931. 

DIRECTOR, ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— B.5.. University of Maryland, 19J8; M.S., 1940. 

DIRECTOR, ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobcy—A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR, FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— S./i., University of Maryland. 1932; M.A., 1934: C.P.A., 1939. 

DIRECTOR. GRADUATE RECORDS 

Carl L. Seidel — B.S.. University of Maryland 1963. 

DIRECTOR, PERSONNEL 

Bernard J. Williams — B.A., University of Chicago, 1957; M.A., 1959. 

DIRECTOR. PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY 

Clayton R. Plummer — B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1936; M.Ed., Springfield 
College, 1940. 

DIRECTOR, MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS 

Charles P. Ellington — B.S., University of Georgia, 1950; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1952; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1964. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

PLANT 

George O. Weber— B.5., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER. PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

REGISTRAR AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF REGISTRATIONS 
James P. Hill — B.S.. Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University 
of Michigan, 1963. 



12 



Directors of Bureaus and Special Services 



DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 
John W. Dorsey — B.S., University of Maryland, 1958: Certf., London School of Eco- 
nomics. 1959; M.A.. Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D. 1964. 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND FIELD 
SERVICES 

James D. Raths— B.5., Yale University, 1954; M.A.. 1955; Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH 

Franklin L. Burdette — A.B., Marshall College, 1934; M.A., University of Nebraska, 
1935; M.A., Princeton University, 1937; Ph.D., 1938; LL.D., Marshall College, 
1959. 

DIRECTOR, CENTER OF MATERIALS RESEARCH 

Ellis R. Lippincott — B.A., Earlham College, 1943; M.A., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 1944; Ph.D., 1V47 . 

DIRECTOR, FIRE SERVICE EXTENSION 

Joseph R. Bachtler — B.S., University of Southern California, 1956. 

DIRECTOR, LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

Thomas AJvin Ladson — V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

DIRECTOR, MARYLAND TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE 
Daniel R. Thompson — B.A., Queens College, 1950; LL.B., Georgetown University, 
1960. 

DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT AID 

H. Palmer Hopkins — B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1936; Ed.M., University of 
Maryland, 1948; Ed.D., George Washington University, 1962. 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT HOUSING 

Miss Margaret C. Lloyd — B.S., University of Georgia, 1932; M.Ed., University of 

Maryland, 1961. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS, BALTIMORE CAMPUS 
Miss Beth Wilson — B.A., University of Nebraska, 1930. 

DIRECTOR. WIND TUNNEL 

Donald S. Gross — B.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SERVICES 

Lester M. Dyke — B.S., M.D., University of Iowa, 1926; M.A., Oxon University, 1945 

DIRECTOR. COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B..4., Dartmouth College, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota. 
1951; Ph.D. 1954. 



13 

Standing Committees, Faculty Senate 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE, WELFARE, RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Adjunct Committees: Student Activities 

Financial Aids and Self-Help 

Student Publications and Communications 

Religious Life 

Student Health and Safety 

Student Discipline 

ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

FACULTY RESEARCH 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

LIBRARIES 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS AFFAIRS 

Adjunct Committee: Baltimore City Campus Student Affairs 

THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 




THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 1968-1969 

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

Dudley Dillard, Hugh E. Gauch, T. Faye Mitchell, Homer W. Schamp, Horace V. 
Harrison, R. Lee Hornbake, Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., David S. Sparks, Alice M. Piper, 
Donald E. Shay, Raymond M. Burgison, William E. Bickley, Ralph D. Myers. 

STANDING, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

Howard J. Laster, Joseph T. Vanderslice, V. R. Cardozier, James D. Raths, William 
F. Atchison, Charles A. Taff. 

The Graduate School staff is represented by the Vice President for Graduate Studies 
and Research, the Associate Dean for Humanities and Social Sciences and the As- 
sistant to the Dean. 



15 

GRADUATE COUNCIL 

AND THE 

GRADUATE FACULTY ASSEMBLY 

Ex-Officio Members 

WILSON H. ELKINS, D.Phil.. President of the University 

R. LEE HORNBAKE. Ph.D.. Vice-President for Academic Affairs 

MICHAEL J. PELCZAR. JR.. Ph.D.. Vice-President for Graduate Studies and 

Research 
DAVID S. SPARKS. Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Graduate School 

Appointed Members 

ATCHISON, WiUiam F., Ph.D.. Professor of Computer Science 1971 

MANNING, Charles, Ph.D.. Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 1972 

MITCHELL. T. Faye, M.A., Professor of Home Economics 1969 

SCHAMP, Homer W.. Ph.D.. Dean of the Faculty, UMBC 1970 

Elected Members 

BICKLEY, William E., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology 1970 

BURGISON, Raymond M., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology (Baltimore) 1972 
CARDOZIER, V. R., Ph.D., Professor of Agricuhural and 

Extension Education 1969 

DILLARD. Dudley, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 1971 

GAUCH, Hugh E.. Ph.D., Professor of Botany 1969 

HARRISON, Horace V., Ph.D., Professor of Government and Politics 1969 

LASTER, Howard J., Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 1969 

MYERS, Ralph D., Ph.D., Professor of Physics 1970 

RATHS, James, Ph.D., Professor of Education 1971 

SCHLARETZKI, W. E.. Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 1972 

SHAY, Donald E., Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

(Baltimore) 1970 

SILVERMAN, Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering 1971 

TAFF, Charles A., Professor of Business Administration 1972 

VANDERSLICE, Joseph T., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 1972 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OFFICERS AND STAFF 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., B.S.. University of Maryland. 1936; M.S.. 1938; Ph.D., 

State UniversitN' of Iowa, 1941. 
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING 

Gilbert W. Castellan, B.Sc, Regis College, 1945; Ph.D., The Catholic University 

of America, 1949. 
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

David S. Sparks, A.B., Grinnell College, 1944; M.A.. University of Chicago. 1945: 

Ph.D., 1951. 
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR SPONSORED RESEARCH AND FELLOWSHIPS 

George N. Trytten. B.S., Luther College. 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

1953; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 
DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE RECORDS 

Carl L. Seidel. B.S., University of Maryland. 1963. 
ASSISTANT TO THE DEAN 

Alice M. Piper, B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1941. 
ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR 

Edna M. Khalil, B.A.. University of Maryland, 1951. 
COORDINATOR FOR GRADUATE PUBLICATIONS 

Lillian W. Clark, B.A., University of Maryland, 1962. 




MICHAEL J. PELCZAR, JR. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR 

GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 



17 



EXCERPTS 

FROM THE CATALOG OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, 1968- 1970 



The Graduate School 



The Graduate School was established in its present form in 1918 under the 
jurisdiction of the Graduate Council with the Dean of The Graduate School, 
now the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, serving as Chair- 
man. It was created for the purpose of administering and developing programs 
of advanced study and research for graduate students in all branches of the 
University. Prior to the present organization some advanced degrees were 
awarded but they were under the jurisdiction of the individual departments sub- 
ject to the supervision of the general faculty. 

Despite the large expansion of graduate programs into new areas as the 
University has grown, the spirit of each program is essentially that of individual 
study under competent supervision. The Graduate School is not an extension of 
the undergraduate program, but was created rather for the preparation of 
those who, in the future, will carry on the spirit of individual inquiry. Thus it 
promotes and provides an atmosphere of research and scholarship for both 
students and the faculty; in particular, it stimulates that harmonious relation- 
ship between the two which results in advancement of learning. At the present 
time over sixty graduate programs are authorized leading to one or more of 
the advanced degrees awarded by the University. 

The Graduate School establishes minimum regulations and requirements, 
both for admission and for degree programs, that must be fulfilled by all stu- 
dents. Many departments or divisions impose additional requirements. 

The Graduate Council consists of ex-officio, elected and appointed members 
of the Graduate Faculty and is charged with the formulation of the overall 
policies of The Graduate School. It meets regularly to consider all matters re- 
lating to graduate work brought to its attention by the University Administra- 
tion, members of the Graduate Faculty, graduate students, or the Vice Presi- 
dent for Graduate Studies and Research. It may also be called for special meet- 
ings throughout the year if urgent business must be transacted. 

The following standing committees are appointed by the Vice President for 
Graduate Studies and Research: 

Committee on Academic Standards 

Committee on Elections and Procedures 

Committee on Fellowships 

Committee on Graduate Faculty 

Committee on Language Requirements 

Committee on Programs and Courses 

Committee on Publications 

Committee on Research 

Committee on Student Welfare 



18 • Graduate School 

Graduate students join Graduate Faculty members in representation on seven 
of the nine committees. They report annually to the Graduate Council and 
more frequent reports may be requested by the Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research or by the Graduate Faculty Assembly. 

The Graduate Faculty, now numbering nearly 900 members, is comprised of 
regular and associate members chosen in accordance with the Plan of Organi- 
zation of the Graduate Faculty. The direction of individual programs and 
theses is primarily assigned to the regular members of the Graduate Faculty. 

The Graduate Faculty Assembly consists of the regular and associate mem- 
bers of the Graduate Faculty and meets at least once each year. Special meet- 
ings may be called by the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 
if necessary. In accordance with the University Faculty Organization Plan, it 
has authority over the educational policy of The Graduate School, may review 
actions taken by the Graduate Council, and serves as a referendum body on 
questions referred to it by the Graduate Council. 

The Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research serves as chairman 
and executive officer of both the Graduate Council and the Graduate Faculty 
Assembly. 



University of Maryland • 19 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Nondiscrim ination 

The University of Maryland does not discriminate on the grounds of race, sex, 
color, national origin, or religious faith. 

Enrollment 

Over 8,000 graduate students were enrolled during the Fall 1968 semester. 
Over half of these were full-time students. The student body included students 
from virtually every state in the Union and fifty-eight foreign nations. During 
the 1967-68 academic year, 241 doctorates and 930 masters degrees were 
awarded. 

Location 

The Office of the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, which 
includes the Graduate School offices, is located in the new graduate school 
building on the College Park Campus. This Campus is located in Prince 
Georges County on over 1,300 acres of land less than eight miles from the 
White House and the National Capitol building in Washington, D.C., and 
approximately thirty-two miles from Baltimore. 

The Baltimore Campus of the University is located in the southwest section 
of the City and occupies a several block area centering on Lombard and 
Greene Streets. Graduate programs offered on this campus include those in 
the several departments of the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, 
Nursing, and Social Work. The University's School of Law is also located on 
the Baltimore Campus. 

The newly created Baltimore County Campus of the University of Maryland 
is located adjacent to the exit of the Baltimore Beltway at Catonsville. Oppor- 
tunities for graduate study at this location are presently being developed and 
will be expanded in the years to come. 

All three campuses of the University are located in the midst of one of the 
greatest concentrations of research facilities and talent in the nation, if not in 
the world. Libraries and laboratories serving virtually every academic disci- 
pline are within easy commuting distance. There is a steady and growing 
interchange of ideas, information, technical skills, and scholars between the 
University and these centers. The libraries and facilities of many of the 
centers are open to qualified graduate students at the University. The resources 
of many more are available by special arrangement. 

Libraries 

The University library system includes major research libraries on both the 
College Park and Baltimore Campuses, with special collections for Chemistry, 
Engineering and the Physical Sciences, and the Health Sciences located near 
the classrooms and laboratories of these disciplines. The collections are nearing 
the one million mark and growing rapidly. 

Study carrels, book lockers, and a wide variety of special services are 
available to advanced students engaged in research. 

The resources of the University library system are supplemented by the 
immense library resources of the Washington-Baltimore area. In addition to 
more than five hundred specialized libraries in the area, there are the unex- 



20 • Graduate School 

celled collections of the Library of Congress, the Folger Library, the National 
Archives, the National Library of Medicine, and the new National Agricultural 
Library, located just three miles from the College Park campus and scheduled 
to open in 1969. In Baltimore, the resources of the University libraries are 
supplemented by the Enoch Pratt Free Library and other resources. 

Special Research Resources 

Exceptional research facilities are available to the advanced student in 
nearly all disciplines at the University. The proximity of the Agricultural 
Research Center and the Plant Industry Station of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture has stimulated the development of both laboratories and 
opportunities for field research in the agricultural and animal sciences. Op- 
portunities are also available for collaborative graduate study programs with 
other major government laboratories, such as the National Bureau of Stand- 
ards and the Naval Research Laboratory. 

The long-standing interest of the State in developing the commercial and 
recreational resources of the Chesapeake Bay has resulted in the development 
of outstanding research facilities for the study of marine biology at Solomons 
Island, Maryland. 

Work in the behavioral sciences, particularly in learning, is centered in 
laboratories equipped for fully automated research on rats, pigeons, and mon- 
keys, on both the Baltimore and College Park campuses. A major shock 
trauma research facility is being developed on the Baltimore campus. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical sciences include a 160 MeV 
cyclotron; two small Van de Graaff accelerators; an assortment of computers, 
including an IBM 7094, two 140rs, and a Univac 1 108 to be complemented with 
remote access units on a time-sharing basis; a 10 KW training nuclear reactor; 
a full-scale low velocity wind tunnel; several small hypersonic helium wind 
tunnels, a 1,500 Curie cobalt 60 source, specialized facilities in both the Insti- 
tute for Molecular Physics and the new Center for Materials Research; a 
psychopharmacology laboratory; shock tubes; a quiescent plasma device (Q 
machine) for plasma research; and rotating tanks for laboratory studies of 
meteorological phenomena. The University also owns and operates the world's 
longest radio telescope, located in Clark Lake, California. 

Special collections of interest to scholars in the humanities include the newly 
acquired personal papers of Katherine Anne Porter, a rapidly growing collec- 
tion of books and documents on early Maryland, a unique collection of news- 
papers and journals published in Japan during the American occupation, and 
a very extensive collection of photographs of modern America given to the 
University by Look Magazine. 

A dmission — General 

Applications for admission to graduate study regularly exceed the number 
of students who can be accommodated. As a consequence every application 
is carefully reviewed and the number of students admitted to each program 
is balanced against the number of faculty and the facilities available. As a 
further consequence, standards for admission vary among different programs 
and, at times, in the same program. 

There are, however, minimum standards which apply to all applicants re- 
gardless of program. They have been established on the basis of long experi- 



University of Maryland • 21 

ence with those who have succeeded, as well as with those who have failed, 
in graduate study. They are very similar to those standards governing admission 
to nearly all major graduate schools. The purpose of these standards is, 
quite simply, to distinguish between those individuals who have a reasonable 
expectation of successfully completing a graduate program and those indi- 
viduals who would be better advised to devote their time and energies to other 
endeavors. 

The basic minimum standard for admission to The Gradute School is a 
"B" average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, as an undergraduate student in a regionally 
accredited college or university In addition, the student's undergraduate pro- 
gram must reflect successful completion of the prerequisites for graduate study 
in the chosen field. Normally the "A" grades that contribute to the required 
"B" average will have been earned in the subject, or a closely allied one, which 
the student wishes to pursue in The Graduate School. A very few students, 
who fail to meet these minimum standards, may be admitted to graduate study 
as provisional students on the basis of outstanding performance on one or 
more of the graduate study aptitude tests, or on the basis of letters of recom- 
mendation from competent judges of their performance as students or in a 
professional capacity. Standards for admission to a doctoral program are 
invariably higher than for admission to a master's program. 

Admission to graduate study at the University of Maryland is the exclusive 
responsibility of The Gradute School and the Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research. In making decisions upon the admissibility of many 
applicants, the Vice President and his staflf regulary seek the advice of the 
heads of the academic departments and graduate faculty admissions commit- 
tees. In the case of foreign student applicants, the University's Director of 
International Education Services and Foreign Student Affairs is also consulted. 

In the interest of providing those who review the qualifications of each ap- 
plicant with the best possible information on which to base their recommenda- 
tions, all applicants are urged to submit, in addition to the required transcripts 
of all previous study, test scores from the appropriate Graduate Record Exam- 
ination, or other advanced aptitude tests. When requested, letters of recom- 
mendation from those qualified to judge the applicant should be sent directly 
to the department to which the applicant expects to be admitted. 

In a very few programs, notably those in the College of Education, there 
is a qualifying program open to students who fall slightly below the minimum 
standards for admission to provisional status in The Graduate School. Suc- 
cessful completion of a qualifying program normally provides the basis for 
recommendation for admission to The Graduate School. 

Students are admitted only for the purpose or objective stated on the applica- 
tion for admission. A new request for admission must be submitted when the 
original objective has been attained or when the student wishes to change his 
objective. The admitted status terminates when time limits have been exceeded 
or when other conditions required for continued admitted status have not been 
met. 

The admitted status of all students, both degree and non-degree seekers, is 
continued at the discretion of the major professor, the department or program 
director, and The Graduate School. Students must maintain an average grade 
of B or better and must otherwise satisfy all additional departmental and Grad- 
uate School program requirements. 



22 • Graduate School 

Students are admitted to The Graduate School in one of the following cate- 
gories and are notified of their classification at the time they are offered ad- 
mission. 

Full Graduate Status 

This designation is assigned when the applicant is fully qualified in every 
respect and he may begin his advanced degree program immediately. 

Provisional Graduate Status 

This designation may be used when (1) the previous academic record is 
on the borderline or when there is a lack of adequate prerequisite course 
work in the chosen field; or (2) when the applicant has majored in another 
area with a creditable record, but there is some doubt about his ability to 
pursue the program in question. A program to correct these deficiencies will 
be outlined by the department and the student is expected to become fully 
qualified within a specified time limit. When all conditions have been met, the 
department may recommend "full status". Students who are unable to qualify 
for full admission may be considered for another program or dismissal. 

Non-Degree Graduate Status 

Applicants who qualify for full graduate status, but who are not applicants 
for a degree at the University of Maryland, may be permitted to take courses 
for a specified time if their work meets Graduate School standards. Included 
would be the individual who already has an advanced degree and who wants 
to pursue a partial program not leading to another degree in order to gain 
more background in his original area or in another area of specialization. 
Another example would be the student in Education with an M.A. or M.Ed, 
who wants to work toward the Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate 
instead of the doctorate. Also included under the non-degree designation is 
the transfer student who is in good standing as a graduate student at another 
institution. (See also Transfer Student Application.) 

Non-Degree Graduate Status is not intended to be used as a qualifying 
program for full degree status. While consideration may be given at a later 
date to the application of credits earned toward a degree program while in 
this status, there is no assurance that such requests will be granted. If granted, 
however, no more than six semester hours of credit may be transferred to a 
degree program. Non-degree students are admitted for a period of five years 
only. 

Non-Degree Graduate Status-Institute Only: This designation is assigned to 
applicants not qualified for regular admission, but to whom the Institute may 
wish to present an award or fellowship or to those qualified applicants who do 
not desire regular admission. 

Special Undergraduate Student Status 

This is ail undergraduate classification and it may be assigned by the 
Director, Admissions and Registration (Undergraduate Division), to those 
applicants who have received the baccalaureate degree from an accredited insti- 
tution, but who do not desire or qualify for graduate admission. 

Some academic departments and degree programs have developed qualifying 
courses of study for special students. Those students who successfully 



University of Maryland • 23 

complete one of these programs may be recommended for admission to The 
Graduate School. The student is warned, however, that no credit earned while 
a special student may be applied at a later date to a degree program. 

Special students may enroll for courses at the 100 to 199 level (courses open 
to advanced undergraduate and graduate students) for which they possess the 
necessary prerequisites. They may not, however, enroll in courses restricted 
to graduate students only, those numbered 200 and above. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 

Application for Admission 

Initial correspondence concerning application for admission to the Graduate 
School should be addressed to The Graduate School, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. An application fee of $10.00 must accompany 
the application for admission. This fee is not refundable under any circum- 
stances, but if the applicant is accepted and enrolls for courses, the fee will 
serve as a matriculation fee. Payment must be made by check or money order 
payable to the University of Maryland. Do not send cash or stamps. 

Two copies of the application for admission and two sets of separate 
official transcripts from each college or university attended must be received 
at the Graduate School by July 15 for the Fall semester, by December 15 for 
the Spring semester, and by May 15 for the Summer session. Applicants who 
require financial support and want to be among those first considered must 
submit their applications by March 1 for the Fall semester and by August 1 
for the Spring semester. A foreign student applicant should apply at least 
six months prior to the semester of expected entrance. 

Applicants for admission should specify to their institutions that the tran- 
scripts should be sent directly to The Graduate School and not to the 
Registrar's Office or the department in which they intend to pursue their 
graduate study. Applicants who have graduated from the University of 
Maryland must also request the Registrar of the University of Maryland to 
send two copies of their transcript to The Graduate School. The applicant is 
solely responsible for seeing that the above conditions are met by the deadline 
date for the filing of the application for the semester of expected entrance. 
No follow-up procedures are undertaken by The Graduate School in this 
respect. 

Students, including University of Maryland seniors in their final semester 
of work toward a bachelor's degree, may be offered provisional admission 
pending the filing of a supplementary transcript recording the satisfactory 
completion of course work and the awarding of the degree. Applicants 
engaged in graduate study at another institution are also subject to this policy. 
A student faces cancellation of his course registration if a complete record 
of all previous work is not received within three months following the 
completion of such study. 

An offer of admission will be made to an applicant who meets all admission 
requirements. The offer will specify the time of entrance which will normally 
coincide with the requested starting time. Applicants are urged to notify The 
Graduate School of their acceptance well before the time of expected entrance. 
The offer of admission lapses if the applicant does not indicate his acceptance 
of the offer of admission by registering for courses at the authorized time of 



24 • Graduate School 

entrance. An individual whose offer of admission has lapsed must submit a new 
application fee, if he wants to be reconsidered for admission. 

The offer of admission may be used as a permit to register for courses. 
Permanent identification as a graduate student will be issued at the time of first 
registration. 

All records, including academic records from other institutions, become part 
of the official file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any purpose. 
A student should obtain an additional copy of his official credentials to keep 
in his possession for advisory purposes and for other personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application data of the applicants who 
do not register for courses at the time for which they have been admitted or 
whose application has been disapproved, are retained for one year only. 

Transfer Student Application 

A graduate student matriculated in another Graduate School, who wishes 
to enroll for a single summer session or a single semester in The Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland, and who intends thereafter to return 
to the Graduate School in which he is matriculated, may be admitted in a 
Non-Degree Graduate Status-Transfer Student. 

He must have been officially admitted to another recognized Graduate 
School and must be in good standing. Full transcripts of his credits need not 
be submitted, but he must apply for admission to the Maryland Graduate 
School and pay the application fee. In lieu of transcripts, he must have his 
graduate dean certify, in writing, to The Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland, that he is in good standing and that any credits earned will b^ 
accepted toward his graduate degree at his home institution. 

Foreign Student Application 

Academic Qualifications. A foreign student wishing to be considered for 
admission to The Graduate School of the University of Maryland must keep 
in mind that his application and official academic credentials — beginning with 
secondary school records — must be received by the Graduate Admission Office 
at least six months prior to the semester for which he plans to begin his 
studies. The University of Maryland, as a State institution, limits the number 
of foreign students it accepts. The University's complement of foreign students 
is selected from the best qualified graduate applicants. Unless the applicant 
ranked high in his graduating class in his own country, and unless his grades 
ranged from very good to excellent, it is unlikely that he will be admitted 
to the University's Graduate School. 

English Proficiency. In addition to meeting academic requirements, the 
foreign student application must demonstrate his proficiency in English by 
taking TOEFL (The Test of English as a Foreign Language) where available. 
Because TOEFL is given only four times a year throughout various parts 
of the world, it is necessary for the applicant to make arrangements with the 
Educational testing Service, Box 8^9, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, to take 
the test as soon as he contemplates study at the University of Maryland., 
Where TOEFL is not available, notify the Director of International Education 
Services and Foreign Student Affairs, University of Maryland, who will send 
instructions about arranging for a standard English proficiency test to be 
administered by the nearest American Consulate or Embassy. The Embassy 



University of Maryland • 25 

or Consulate will also have information about any orientation programs that 
may be available in your country. Thus, when the applicant is ready to 
begin his studies, he will be expected to read, speak, and write English fluently 
and will be expected to understand lectures and to take pertinent notes. 

Finances. A statement regarding the applicant's financial status is required 
by the Office of International Education Services and Foreign Student Affairs. 
Approximately $250.00 a month, or $3,000.00 a year, is required for educa- 
tional and living expenses of two academic semesters and a summer session. 
A few departments and programs have assistantships available for outstanding 
graduate students; however, some of them require at least a year of study 
in the United States before considering the appointment of a foreign graduate 
student to an assistantship. Arrangements for assistantships must be made 
directly with the department or program. A foreign student applicant must 
therefore be prepared, in most cases, to meet his financial obligations from 
his own resources or from those provided by a sponsor for the first year of 
study, and perhaps beyond. 

Immigration Documents. Since the admission and stay of foreign students 
must conform to the regulations of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, it is necessary for students eligible for admission to secure from the 
University's Director of International Education Services and Foreign Student 
Affairs the immigration form required for obtaining the appropriate visa. 
Students already studying in the United States who wish to transfer to the 
University of Maryland must also secure proper immigration documents in 
order to request the Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant permis- 
sion for transfer. 

Special Services for Foreign Students. Every foreign student is expected 
to report to the Office of International Education Services and Foreign 
Student Affairs as soon as possible after arriving at the University. This office 
will be able to assist not only with various problems regarding immigration, 
housing, and fees, but also with more general problems of orientation to life 
in the University and the community. 

Questions concerning criteria and requirements for foreign applicants should 
be addressed to the Director, International Education Services and Foreign 
Student Affairs, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

No foreign student seeking admission to the University of Maryland should 
plan to leave his country before obtaining notice of admission from the Director 
of Graduate Records of The Graduate School. 

Applications for Institute Training 

During the summer session and during the regular academic year, special 
training programs are offered for the benefit of teachers and other groups with 
specialized objectives. These programs, frequently referred to as institutes, may 
be attended by admitted graduate degree-seeking students. Applicants not 
working toward a graduate degree or those who do not qualify for regular ad- 
mission may also be admitted on an Institute Only basis. Participation in these 
institutes is not limited to admitted graduate students. However, if the institute 
applicant expects to apply the credit earned in an institute toward a regular 
graduate degree program, he should apply for admission to full graduate status. 



26 • Graduate School 

Individuals classified as Special Students may also qualify for these special 
programs. 

Applications for admission should be sent directly to the Director of the 
Institute or Program, who will file with the Director of Graduate Records 
well in advance, a statement of the nature of the program, a copy of the contract, 
the criteria and methods used in selection of the students, and the assurance 
that each student recommended for admission to a graduate institute status has 
completed adequate preparation for the course. 

Admission in a Non-Degree Graduate Status-Institute Only classification 
carries with it no implication that the student will later be considered for 
admission in any other classification. 

The Non-Degree Graduate Status-Institute Only admitted classification 
terminates upon completion of the institute or program in which the student 
was enrolled. A new application must be made for subsequent programs of a 
similar nature. 

Registration 

Students admitted to The Graduate School must pay graduate tuition fees 
whether or not the credit will be used to satisfy program requirements. Graduate 
credit will not be given unless the student has been admitted to The Graduate 
School. The admission of a new student becomes valid when he registers for 
and completes at least one course during the semester for which he was admitted. 

A Schedule of Classes listing courses, hours, class locations and registration 
procedures is made available shortly before the beginning of each semester. 
Copies may be requested through the Office of the Registrar, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Late Registration. Students failing to register on the dates announced for 
the purpose can be admitted to courses only with the consent of their advisors, 
the Graduate School and the Registrar. A fee of $20.00 is charged for late 
registration. 

Auditors. A student who desires to attend a course without performing the 
work of the course must first secure the consent of the instructor. He must 
register as an auditor and pay regular fees. No credit will be granted for the 
course. 

Continuous Registration 

Following advancement to candidacy by the Graduate Council, the graduate 
student must register every semester exclusive of the summer sessions or obtain 
official leave of absence from The Graduate School until the degree is awarded. 
Failure to comply with this requirement will be considered as evidence of the 
student's termination of his graduate program. 

Summer School 

The University conducts a summer session at College Park, with a com- 
prehensive undergraduate and graduate program, as well as Institutes and 
Special Programs. A separate bulletin is published giving full information on 
the summer session. This bulletin is available upon application to the Director 



University of Maryland • 27 

of the Summer School, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Graduate Work in Professional Schools at Baltimore 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in the pro- 
fessional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in the 
professional schools must register in The Graduate School and meet the 
same requirements and proceed in the same way as do other graduate 
students in the other departments of the University. 

University Consortia 

The University is a member of several university consortia. Among these 
are: The Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Incorporated; The University 
Corporation for Atmospheric Research: The University Research Association; 
and The Inter-University Communications Council. Information concerning 
graduate student participation in the programs of these consortia is available 
from The Graduate School. 

Off-Campus Graduate Offerings 

A limited number of graduate level courses are available at off-campus 
locations. For information concerning these offerings, contact The Graduate 
School, or the Dean, University College, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

Graduate Work by Seniors at the University of Maryland 

A senior at the University of Maryland who has nearly completed the 
requirements for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his 
undergraduate dean, the head of the department concerned, and The Graduate 
School, register in the undergraduate college for graduate courses, which 
may later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at this 
University. The student must be within seven credit hours of completing 
his undergraduate work and the total of undergraduate and graduate courses 
must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester. Excess credits in the senior 
year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper pre-arrangement is made. 
Seniors who wish to register for graduate credit should apply to The Graduate 
School about procedure. 

Requirements for the Degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science 

THESIS OPTION 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclusive 
of thesis and registration for research, with a minimum average grade of "B" 
in courses approved for graduate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science. The student is also required to register for six 
semester hours for research or thesis work (399). The total number of credit 
hours required for the degree is thirty. If the student is inadequately prepared 
for the required graduate courses, either in the major or minor subjects, 
additional courses may be required to supplement the undergraduate work. 




i 



University of Maryland • 29 

Of the twenty-four hours required in graduate courses, not less than twelve 
and not more than sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major 
subject. The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must 
comprise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support 
the major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits 
for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses 
numbered 200 or above. No credit for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science may be obtained for correspondence courses or those 
taken by examination. The entire course of study must constitute a unified 
program approved by the student's major advisor and by The Graduate 
School. All requirements for the degree must be completed within the specified 
time period. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours for course work 
at other recognized institutions may be applied toward the masters degree 
only when such course work has been taken after the student has been 
admitted to the University of Maryland Graduate School. Before taking 
course work for transfer, the student must have the approval of his advisor, 
the head of the department in his major field, and The Graduate School. 
Normally, approval may be given only for courses which are not offered by 
the University of Mar}iand during the period of the student's attendance. 
The request for transfer of credit shall be submitted to the Graduate Council 
for approval when the student applies for admission to candidacy. The 
candidate is subject to final examination by this institution in all work offered 
for the degree. 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later 
than the date listed in the Graduate School Calendar for the semester in 
which the degree is sought. He must have completed at least twelve semester 
hours in graduate work at the University of Maryland. An average grade of 
"B" in all major and minor subjects is the minimum requirement. Courses 
completed with a "D" or "F'' in the major and minor must be repeated. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least two semesters, or equivalent, 
at this institution is required. 

Final E.xamination. The final oral examination is conducted by a committee 
appointed by the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research. The 
student's advisor acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members 
of the committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of 
his major and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified 
of the members of the examining committee prior to the period set for the 
oral examination. The chairman of the committee selects the exact time 
and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the 
committee and the candidate. The examination is normally conducted at the 
end of the semester, but upon recommendation of the student's advisor an 
examining committee may be appointed by the Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research at any time when all other requirements for the degree 
have been completed. A report of the committee is sent to the Vice President 
as soon as possible after the examination. Such a report is the basis upon which 
recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree 



30 • Graduate School 

sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about one hour, but the 
time should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candidate's 
obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample opportunity 
to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examination. A 
student will not be admitted to final examination until all other requirements 
for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination, a 
comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

NON-THESIS OPTION 

The requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees 
without thesis vary slightly among departments and programs in which this 
option is available. Standards for admission to these programs are, however, 
identical with those for admission to any other master's program. The quality 
of the work expected of the student is also identical to that expected in the 
thesis programs. 

While the details of the requirements vary from program to program, all 
involve a residence requirement of at least two semesters, or the equivalent, 
at this institution: a minimum of thirty semester credit hours in courses 
approved for graduate credit with a minimum average grade of "B"; a minimum 
of eighteen semester credit hours in courses numbered two hundred or above 
(those restricted to graduate students only); the submission of one or more 
scholarly papers, and the successful passing of a comprehensive final examination. 

A student following a non-thesis masters program will be expected to meet 
the deadlines for application for admission to candidacy, application for a 
diploma, and submission of final examination reports established for all other 
degree programs. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in 
American Studies 

A student seeking a Master of Arts degree in American Studies must 
complete a minimum of thirty semester hours if in the non-thesis program; 
or twenty-four semester hours plus six hours of master's level thesis research 
in the thesis program. T~he thesis is required of any student seeking information 
to the doctoral program in American Studies. Four courses are required in 
either case: American Studies 200, 201, 202. and either English 201 (Bibli- 
ography and Methods) or History 300 (Historiography). The remainder of 
the program is normally chosen from the offerings of the Departments of 
Art, English, History, and Philosophy. The student is also required to pass 
a written and oral comprehensive examination under both the thesis and the 
non-thesis programs. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degree of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science in other fields. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 

The Master of Education degree is designed to increase competence for 
various positions in Education. In those major areas where it is applicable, 
up to half of the course work may be taken in the teaching field. Course work. 



University of Maryland • 31 

seminar papers, and other requirements such as comprehensive examinations 
are substituted for thesis. For requirements for the degree see Statement of 
Policies and Procedures. Master's Degrees in Education, available from the 
Director of Graduate Studies in Education, College of Education. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business A dministration 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed primarily to 
prepare students for positions of responsibility in business and government. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical ability and reasoned 
judgment in decision making. Instructional methods include case analysis, 
seminar discussion and decision simulation. Computer familiarization is provided. 

A core of four courses embraces the areas of business decisions central to 
the firm's operation; relevant analytical methods, especially quantitative tech- 
niques; behavioral factors affecting the managerial task and the environment 
in which business functions, especially its relationship with government. 

Beyond the core, further advanced work may be taken in Management 
and in Statistics, and in concentration may be undertaken in a field of special 
interest: Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Personnel and Industrial Relations, 
and Transportation. 

Among the factors which are considered in admission of students for 
graduate work in Business Administration are an undergraduate record evi- 
dencing high scholastic attainment and performance on the required Admission 
Test for Graduate Study in Business. This test is off^ered four times a year 
through the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. The test is 
not designed to test specific knowledge in specialized academic subjects, and 
normal undergraduate training provides sufficient general knowledge to answer 
the test questions. 

Individuals who are qualified are accepted not only from the area of 
undergraduate business administration but from other areas, such as engineering, 
the sciences, the arts, the humanities, and other fields. The Graduate program 
is offered in the day school and is conducted on the campus. 

Course Requirements. Course requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business Administration are: a minimum of thirty semester hours must be 
completed in courses numbered 200 or above. A minimum average of "B" 
must be earned in these courses. If the student is inadequately prepared for 
the required graduate courses, additional courses may be required to supple- 
ment the undergraduate work. Of the thirty hours required in graduate courses, 
not less than six and not more than nine must be taken in a major subject. 
Courses covering the remaining subjects must be taken outside the major 
and must comprise a coherent group, as approved by the student's advisor. 
No credit for the degree of Master of Business Administration may be obtained 
for correspondence courses or by examination. The entire course of study 
must constitute a unified program approved by the student's advisor and by 
the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research. All requirements for 
the degree must be completed within the specified time period. 

The other requirements for the degree are the same as for the degree of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 



32 • Graduate School 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music 

Four areas of specialization are provided in the Master of Music program 
to allow the student to pursue advanced work in the area for which his 
experience and interest have best prepared him. 

1. Specialization in the history and literature of music leads to a study 
of musical styles and literatures and of the methods and materials 
of systematic musicology. Each candidate must demonstrate that he 
possesses a reading knowledge of one foreign language. A thesis is 
required in which mastery of musicological method must be shown. 

2. Specialization in theory leads to advanced work in analysis and the 
use of musical materials. A thesis of an analytical nature will 
normally be required. 

3. Specialization in composition leads to the development of creative 
ability. A thesis consisting of an original composition of major 
proportions will be required. 

4. Specialization in performance leads to advanced work in the history, 
literature, and theory of music, and will combine seminars in the 
literature of a particular instrument with advanced instruction in 
that literature. In this approach the final project will consist of a 
seminar paper of an analytical nature and a graduate-level recital 
containing the works covered in the paper. 

At least nine semester hours of the thirty required for the degree will 
normally be in a field of music outside the area of specialization (music 
theory in the case of the history-literature concentration, for example), and 
will constitute the minor area. In exceptional cases, a student may take minor 
courses (no more than nine hours) in a field outside music. History, Philosophy, 
Music Education, American or English Literature, and Foreign Languages 
are among the recommended minor fields. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Library Science 

The School of Library and Information Services offers course work leading 
to the degree of Master of Library Science designed to prepare students 
for professional practice in library and information service in each of the 
specialties of the field from children's work to information retrieval. The 
program constitutes a 36 hour course of study, normally to be completed 
in two semesters followed by a summer session, or the equivalent of part-time 
study over a more extended period. There is no thesis or comprehensive 
examination required. 

Additional details may be obtained by addressing a request to: The School 
of Library and Information Services, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Social Work 

The School of Social Work offers work leading to the degree of Master of 
Social Work with concentrations in social casework and community planning. 



University of Maryland • 33 

Concurrent field instruction is provided in cooperative arrangements with 
affiliated social agencies throughout Maryland. 

Two academic years of full-time study are required for completion of the 
School's requirements. A limited number of part-time students are permitted 
to enroll for designated courses. 

A comprehensive examination is given late in the semester in which the 
student seeks to complete requirements for the degree. 

Requirements for the Advanced Graduate 
Specialist Program 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist program is designed for those who 
wish to develop high professional competence in an area of specialization, 
but who do not seek the doctorate. Students who wish to pursue this program 
must be admitted to The Graduate School and must have the master's degree 
or its equivalent. 

Currently there are two A.G.S. certificate programs available. These are: 
( 1 ) In the College of Education through the Graduate Programs in Education, 
and (2) In the College of Agriculture through the Graduate Program in Agri- 
cultural and Extension Education. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

Foreign Language Requirement. Before admission to candidacy, the applicant 
must have demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Graduate Council that he 
possesses a working knowledge of two foreign languages or a high level of 
knowledge of one foreign language. The languages are to be chosen from a 
list approved by the student's major department and the Graduate Council. 
In some departments, an additional research method or procedure may be 
substituted for a second foreign language. Because there are differences among 
the options selected by the various departments, each student applicant for 
candidacy must determine in advance the options available to him for satisfying 
the foreign language requirements. 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy at least one academic year prior to the conferring of 
the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the doctorate are 
made in duplicate by the student and submitted to his major department for 
further action and transmission to The Graduate School. Application forms 
may be obtained at the office of The Graduate School. 

Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as the departments 
may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

The student must complete all of his program for the degree, including 
the thesis and final examination, during a four-year period after admission 
to candidacy. Extensions of time are granted only under the most unusual 
circumstances. Failure to complete all requirements within the time allotted 
requires another application for admission to candidacy with the usual pre- 
liminary examination. 

Residence. The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent at the University of Maryland. On a part-time 
basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work at other 



34 • Graduate School 

institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon 
recommendation of the department concerned, when the student applies for 
admission to candidacy for the degree. 

The doctorate is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in 
scholarship and the ability to engage in independent research. 

Major and Minor Subjects: There is no Graduate School requirement for 
either a major or a minor subject. It is the policy of The Graduate School to 
encourage the development of individual programs for each student who seeks 
the Ph.D. To that end the academic departments and interdisciplinary programs 
have been directed to determine major and minor requirements, levels or se- 
quences of required courses, and similar requirements for submission to the 
Graduate Council for approval. All candidates for the Ph.D. degree must, 
however, register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of doctoral research, 
numbered 499, at the University of Maryland. 

Dissertation. The ability to do independent research must be proved by a 
dissertation on a topic selected from the student's major subject. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a committee 
appointed by the Vice President. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the Graduate Faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the student's 
major field. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered for students who desire to 
develop high competence for various types of professional work in Education. 
The basic requirements for the degree, particularly those of residence, 
courses, a major and minor, and for a final oral examination, are similar 
to those for the Ph.D. For the specific requirements of the Doctor of Education 
degree, see the "Statement of Policies and Procedures, Doctor's Degrees in 
Education," which may be obtained from the Director of Graduate Studies 
in Education, College of Education, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Musical Arts 

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is offered for students who wish to 
undertake work on the highest level in either of two areas — composition or 
literature-performance — in order to develop excellence as composers, perform- 
ers, or teachers. A balance between scholarly (research) and professional 
(creative) work is a basic element of the program. 

Composition. The applicant must hold bachelor's and master's degrees, or 
the equivalent, in composition, and must submit an adequate number of his 
original works as evidence of his musical maturity and creative ability. 
Placement and qualifying examinations, the presentation of a lecture recital 
and a program of his own compositions, and the successful completion of 
the doctoral foreign language requirement, are prerequisites for admission to 



University of Maryland • 35 

candidacy. The thesis will be a composition of major proportions, typically a 
symphony, concerto, ballet, or chamber opera. 

Literature-Performance. The applicant must hold bachelor's and master's 
degrees, or the equivalent, in the area of specialization, and must perform an 
audition recital that includes representative repertoire from the various his- 
torical periods. Placement and qualifying examinations, the presentation of a 
lecture recital and a full-length recital, and the successful completion of the 
doctoral foreign language requirement are prerequisites for admission to 
candidacy. After admission to candidacy the student must complete his thesis 
and perform a final recital. 

Foreign Language Requirement. The department requires a reading knowl- 
edge of French, German, or Italian, and the passing of an examination 
covering the meaning of musical terms in French, German, and Italian. 

Other requirements are the same as those for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. Details of the program may be obtained from the Department of Music. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of 
Business Administration 

The Doctor of Business Administration degree is designed for those planning 
to teach business administration subjects at the university level and for those 
preparing for research or management responsibilities in industry, government, 
and universities. 

Admission to the program is based upon: ( 1 ) excellence in both undergraduate 
and graduate work, (2) the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business 
(see description under the Master of Business Administration degree), (3) 
reports of academic observers on the applicant's work, and (4) other evidences 
of promising scholarship. 

Program Requirements. Candidates for the Doctor of Business Administration 
degree are required to develop competence in the following five concentrations: 

1. Financial Administration 

2. Human Behavior in Business 

3. Quantitative Methods 

4. Business Logistics 

5. Management 

Requirements under the five basic concentrations may be fulfilled through 
approved combinations of work in the following fields: Accounting, Finance, 
Organization Theory, Personnel Administration, Mathematics, Computer Sci- 
ence, Marketing, Transportation, Production Management, and Public Policy. 

Examinations. Candidates are required to complete written examinations in 
each of the five concentrations noted above. Following the written examina- 
tions, the candidate is examined orally by a committee of the Graduate Faculty. 
Candidates must apply and be advanced to candidacy for the Doctorate in 
Business Administration degree one academic year before the degree is awarded. 

Dissertation. A written dissertation, exhibiting competence in the analysis, 
interpretation, and presentation of research findings is required of all candidates. 
Each candidate is required to register for 12 semester hours of dissertation 
research (499). 



36 • Graduate School 



Upon being advanced to candidacy, the candidate must present to his 
appointed dissertation committee a Dissertation Proposal, which sets forth 
objectives of the research plan, its scope, methodologies to be employed, types 
and sources of data to be sought, and time requirements for completion. 
When approved, the candidate completes the dissertation under direction of 
his committee. An examination on the dissertation is conducted by a committee 
of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the Vice President for Graduate Studies 
and Research. 

GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS OFFERED ON THE 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 



Degrees Offered 



Aerospace Engineering M.S. 

Agricultural Economics M.S. 

Agricultural Extension Education M.S., A.G.S, 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy M.S. 

American Studies M.A. 

Animal Science M.S. 

Art M.A. 

Astronomy (see Physics) 

Botany M.S. 

Business Administration M.B.A., 

Chemical Engineering M.S. 

Chemical Physics M.S. 

Chemistry M.S. 

Civil Engineering M.S. 

Comparative Literature M.A 

Computer Science 

Dairy Science M.S. 

Economics M.A. 

Education M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D. 

Electrical Engineering M.S. 

English Language and Literature M.A. 

Entomology M.S. 

Food Science M.S. 

French and Italian Language and Literature M.S. 

Geography M.A. 

Germanic and Slavic Language and Literature M.A. 

Government and Politics M.A. 

History M.S. 

Home Economics 

Horticulture M.S. 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics M.S. 

School of Library and Information Services 

Mathematics M.A. 

Mechanical Engineering M.S. 

Meteorology M.S. 

Microbiology M.S. 

Music M.M., D.M.A, 

Philosophy M.A. 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health M.A., Ed.D. 

Physics and Astronomy M.S. 

Poultry Science M.S. 



Ph.D. 
Ph.D. 
Ph.D. 
M.S. 
Ph.D. 
Ph.D. 
Ph.D. 
Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 
D.B.A. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 
M.S. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 
M.S. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 
M.L.S. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 



University of Maryland • 37 

Psychology M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Sociology and Anthropology M.A., Ph.D. 

Speech and Dramatic Art M.A., Ph.D. 

Spanish and Portuguese Language and Literature M.A., Ph.D. 

Zoology M.S., Ph.D. 

BALTIMORE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS— BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Degrees Offered 
Dentistry, School of 

Anatomy M.S., Ph.D. 

Biochemistry M.S., Ph.D. 

Histology and Embryology M.S., Ph.D. 

Microbiology M.S., Ph.D. 

Oral Surgery M.S. 

Pathology M.S., Ph.D. 

Physiology M.S.. Ph.D. 

Medicine, School of 

Anatomy M.S., Ph.D. 

Biological Chemistry M.S., Ph.D. 

Biophysics M.S., Ph.D. 

Legal Toxicology and Medicine M.S., Ph.D. 

Microbiology M.S., Ph.D. 

Pharmacology M.S., Ph.D. 

Physiology M.S., Ph.D. 

Pharmacy, School of 

Pharmacy M.S.. Ph.D. 

Pharmaceutical Pharmacognosy M.S., Ph.D. 

Microbiology M.S., Ph.D. 

Physiology M.S.. Ph.D. 

Chemistry M.S., Ph.D. 

Pharmacology M.S., Ph.D. 

Nursing, School of 

Nursing M.S. 

Social Work, School of 

Social Work M.S.W. 

Further inquiries about specific degree programs should be directed to: 

1. For departments located at College Park: 

Name of Department 

The University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

2. For departments located in Baltimore: 

Name of Department — School of (name) 
The University of Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence Status 

A person shall be eligible to register with the "University of Maryland 
residence status" only if he has been domiciled in the State of Maryland for 
six consecutive months preceding the last day on which registrations are 
acceptable for a given term. 



38 • Graduate School 

Tliis regulation is interpreted as follows: 

The residence status of a minor follows that of the parents or guardian. 
Minors under guardianship are required to present proof of same and of 
actual residence in Maryland at the time of and prior to being legally declared 
under guardianship as may be requested. If the parent of a Maryland resident 
student (minor) permanently leaves the state for a period of six months, the 
minor student loses his Maryland residence status. 

No person shall gain or lose his University residence status solely because 
of living in Maryland as a student. Adult students (21 years of age or older) 
are considered to be residents if, at the time of their first registration, they 
have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months and, provided further, 
that such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college 
in Maryland or elsewhere. 

TTie residence status of a wife follows that of her husband, except that no 
woman originally enrolled as a single student and continuously enrolled in the 
University shall gain or lose residence status solely by virtue of marriage. 

In the case of members of the armed services stationed in Maryland, the 
length of time stationed in Maryland is not considered in establishing residence 
at the University of Maryland if the individual entered the service as a 
bona fide resident of another state. The fact that members of the armed services 
may become registered voters in Maryland and pay income taxes while 
stationed in Maryland is not considered a basis for assignment of Maryland 
residence status at the University. 

An adult student may request that his non-residence designation be changed 
by presenting proof of ownership and occupancy of his home in the state for six 
consecutive months, or by presenting a notarized statement that he has been 
employed for a period of six consecutive months on a full-time basis and not 
enrolled full-time (9 semester hours of credit) in any school or college. 

The burden of enrolling as a student in the University in the proper residence 
status is the responsibility of the student. Misrepresentations of fact in order 
to evade payment of non-resident tuition shall be considered sufficient cause 
for suspension or permanent exclusion from the University. 

Infirmary Services 

Full-time graduate students enrolled for courses on the College Park campus 
will have available the same infirmary services as are available to full-time under- 
graduate students. 

Living Accommodations 

There is ample off-campus housing, ranging from single rooms to three- 
bedroom apartments at prices from $40 to $180 per month. University 
apartments are available, in limited quantities, to married teaching assistants. 
Food prices are similar to those in metropolitan centers throughout the nation. 

Financial Aid 

Fellowships. The Maryland Fellowship Program, established by the State 
Legislature and administered by The Graduate School, makes a number of 
fellowships available to qualified applicants who also agree to teach in a public 
institution of higher learning in the State of Maryland for a period of three 



University of Maryland • 39 

years if a suitable position is offered after receiving either the Doctor of Phi- 
losophy or the Doctor of Education degree. The stipend is $2500 for the aca- 
demic year with all fees remitted. 

Another type of financial aid in this category is the Graduate Fellowship 
awarded on a competitive basis by The Graduate School, which carries a 
stipend on a nine-month basis of $1000 and remission of all fees except the 
graduation fee. 

Summer Dissertation Fellowships are also available to those graduate students 
who have completed all other requirements for the doctoral degree and expect 
to complete their dissertation by August 31. A stipend of $660 is provided to 
enable the student to devote full time to the completion of the dissertation 
during July and August. 

Fellowships or traineeships are also available under the National Defense 
Education Act, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of 
Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, as well as from 
several foundations and private industry. 

All applicants for fellowships must be admitted to The Graduate School on 
a full-time basis in order to be eligible. 

Assistantships. There are, in addition, teaching and research assistantships 
available to qualified advanced graduate students which carry stipends of $2,700 
or $3,240 per year for a ten or twelve-month appointment. Applications for 
assistantships should be made directly to the department in which the applicant 
will study. 

A substantial number of Resident Graduate Assistantships in the under- 
graduate residence halls are available. The stipend is $2,700 per year, plus 
remission of tuition fees in exchange for half-time work as Residence Halls 
Staff members. These Resident Assistantships are open to both men and women. 
Applications for a Residence Graduate Assistantship should be made to the 
Director of Housing, University of Maryland. College Park, Mar\land 20742. 

Offers of assistantships are made contingent upon acceptance as a graduate 
student by The Graduate School. 

Student Loans. National Defense Education Act Loan Funds are available 
to graduate students of the University of Maryland up to $2,500 per year. 
Such applications should be directed to the Director, Office of Student Aid, 
North Administration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Commencement 

Attendance is required at the June commencement if the degree is conferred 
at that time. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the Office of the Registrar eight 
weeks before the date at which the candidate expects to obtain a degree except 
during the summer session. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at the June commencement. 
Those who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Student 
Supply Store. Orders must be filed eight weeks before the date of convocation 
but may be cancelled later if the student finds himself unable to complete his 
work for the degree. 



40 • Graduate School 

Grades 

The following symbols are used for grades: "A", "B", "C" and "S" — 
Passing; "D" and "F" — Failure; "I" — Incomplete. Since graduate students 
must maintain an over-all "B" average, every credit hour of "C" in course work 
must be balanced by a credit hour of "A". A grade of "A" in thesis research 
will not balance a grade of "C" in a course. All incomplete grades must be 
removed before the degree is conferred. 

Course Numbering System 

Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 100-199 

Graduate level courses which may also be taken by students not admitted 
to the Graduate School; however, credit cannot be applied toward a graduate 
degree program. 

Graduate Students Only 200-upwards 

Registration for these courses permitted only for those students who have 
been admitted to the Graduate School. 

Research 

Master's Level 399 

Doctors Level 499 

Fees 

The bulletin, An Adventure in Learning contaiins a detailed statement of fees 
and expenses and included changes in the fees as they occur. A copy may be 
obtained from the Admissions Office, North Administration Building, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 




41 



Programs and Courses 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Professors: Thomas, Corning, Rivello and Sherwood. 
Associate Professors: Melnik and Schetz. 
Assistant Professors: Donaldson and Plotkin. 
Lecturers: Billig, Brandt, Lobb, Pai, Rush and Wilson. 
Instructor: Orth. 

The Department of Aerospace Engineering offers courses and opportunities 
for research leading to the degree of Master of Science and Doctor of Philos- 
ophy in aerospace engineering. 

Facilities for graduate research include two subsonic and two supersonic wind 
tunnels, a hypersonic helium wind tunnel, a shock tube, a ballistic range and 
complete structural loading and measuring equipment for both static and dy- 
namic conditions. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENAE 101. Aerodynamics I. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites. RHYS 021 and 
MATH 021. Basic fluid mechanics and aerodynamic theory. (Melnik.) 

ENAE 102. Aerodynamics II. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. ENAE 101. Elements 
of compressible flow and application to engineering problems. (Sherwood.) 

ENAE 107. 108. Design of Aerospace Vehicles. (4, 4) 

First and second semester, two lectures and two lecture calculation periods 
a week. Prerequisites, ENAE 101, 102 and 113. (Corning.) 

ENAE 109, 110. Flight Propulsion. (3. 3) 

First semester, 3 lectures; second semester two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites. ENME 001 and ENAE 101. Operating principles 
of air breathing and rocket engines. Thermodynamic processes and engine per- 
formance, aero-thermochemistry of combustion, fuels and propellants. energy 
for space flight. (Melnik.) 

ENAE 111, 112. Elective Research. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites. ENAE 102 and 
113. Wind tunnel tests; structural tests. Written and oral reports on original 
research projects. (Staff.) 

ENAE 113. 114. Flight Structures. (4. 3) 

First semester, three lectures a week; second semester, three lectures and one 
calculation period a week. Prerequisites. ENES 020 and MATH 066. Principles 
and problems of stress analysis and structural design of tlight vehicles structures. 

(Rivello.) 

ENAE 115. Aerodynamics III. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENAE 102. Elementary theory of the flow of an incompressible 
fluid. (Sherwood.) 



42 • Graduate School 

ENAE 117. Aircraft Vibrations. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, MATH 066. Vibration and other dynamic 
problems occurring in structures. Specific topics of study include the free and 
forced vibration of single degree of freedom systems, damping, multiple degrees 
of freedom, beams and bars. (Donaldson.) 

ENAE 118. Dynamics of Aerospace Vehicles. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, ENAE 101, 102, 115. Stability, control, loads 
and miscellaneous topics in dynamics. (Corning.) 

For Graduates 

A. BASIC AERODYNAMICS 

ENAE 220, 221. Aerodynamics of Incompressible Fluids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, ENAE 101. ENAE 102. MATH 066. Fundamental equations in 
fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil 
theory. Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel corrections. Propeller theories. Linear- 
ized equations in compressible flow. Perturbation methods. (Plotkin.) 

ENAE 224, 225. Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, ENAE 115. One dimensional flow of a perfect compressible 
fluid. Shock waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible flow. 
Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two 
dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential 
flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical potential flow. One-dimensional 
viscous compressible flow. Laminar boundary layer of compressible fluids. (Pai.) 

ENAE 280, 281. Dynamics of Viscous Fluids. (3, 3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some exact solutions: Boundary layer 
equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, compressibility, transformations, 
analytic approximations, numerical methods, stability and transition to turbulent 
flow. Turbulent flow-isotropic turbulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing 
flows. (This course is equivalent to ENME 280-281). (Schetz.) 

B. APPLIED AERODYNAMICS 

ENAE 230, 231. The Aerodynamics of High Altitude Vehicles. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Aerothermodynamic study of several types 
of high altitude, hypersonic vehicles, including ballistic, boost-glide and satellite 
vehicles. Examination of problems in stability, control, boundary-layer growth, 
Shockwave interactions and convective and radiative heating. (Wilson.) 

ENAE 232, 233. Wave Propagation in Gases and Solids. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Application of method of characteristics 
to unsteady compressible flow. Study of isentropic and non-isentropic flows of 
both ideal and non-ideal gases. The Lagrange ballistic problem, detonation, the 
shock tube and spherical waves. Impact loading on elastic-plastic materials, the 
stopping shock, interactions and reflections in solids. Stress and strain produced 
in solids with varying cross-sectional area. (Seigel.) 

ENAE 234, 235. Aerospace Facilities and Techniques. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Problems in supersonic and hypersonic 
tunnel development such as the aerodynamic design of nozzles, diffusers, storage 
systems and arc heaters. Shock tubes and shock tube wind tunnels. Development 
of ballistic ranges and basic considerations in the design of high-speed launchers. 
Instrumentation and data reduction. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 43 

ENAE 236, 237. Heat Transfer Problems Associated with High 
Velocity Flight. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Heat conduction in solids and thermal 
radiation of solids and gases. Analytic solutions to simple problems and numeri- 
cal methods for solving complicated problems. Convective heating associated 
with laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flow. Heat transfer equations arc 
derived for the flat plate case and for selected body shapes such as cones and 
hemispheres. Real gas effects on convective heating are examined. (Wilson.) 

C. STRUCTURES 

ENAE 250, 251. Advanced Flight Structures. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 066 and ENAE 113, 114, or permission of the instructor. 
Advanced topics in structural theory with applications to flight vehicle struc- 
tures. Energy and matrix methods, plate theory, instability and failure of 
columns, plates, and stiffened panels; and introduction to shell theory. (Rivello.) 

D. PROPULSION . 

ENAE 260, 261. Advanced Propulsion. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, ENAE 109, 110. Special problems of thermodynamics and 
dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines: plasma, ion and 
nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. (Billig.) 

E. DYNAMICS 

ENAE 270, 271. Structural Dynamics and Aeroelasticity. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 066 and ENAE 114. Generalized coordinates and La- 
grange's equations. Vibrations of simple systems. Dynamics of elastically con- 
nected masses. Influence, coeflicients. Mode shapes and principal oscillations. 
Matrix methods of structural response. Transient stresses in an elastic struc- 
ture. Wing divergence and aileron reversal. Theory of two dimensional oscil- 
lating airfoil. Flutter problems. Random vibrations. (Donaldson.) 

F. GENERAL 

ENAE 290. Seminar. 

(Credit in accordance with woric outlined by Aerospace Enginering staff). 
First and second semesters. 

ENAE 291, 292. Selected Topics in Aerospace Engineering. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Topics of current interest and recent ad- 
vances in the field. 

ENAE 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

(Credit in accordance with work outlined by Areospace Engineering staff). First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. (Staff.) 

ENAE 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

AGRICULTURE 

Advanced degrees are not offered in General Agriculture. However, the fol- 
lowing courses may be taken by graduate students in departments offering grad- 
uate degrees with the permission of their graduate adviser. 



44 • Graduate School 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGRI 101. Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
MATH 018 or equivalent. Probability, measures of central tendency and dis- 
persion, frequency distributions, tests of statistical hypotheses, regression, 
analyses, multiway analysis of variance, and principles of experimental design 
with emphasis on the use of statistical methods in agricultural research. 

For Graduates 

AGRI 201. Advanced Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
AGRI 101 or equivalent. Analysis of variance to include factorials and split- 
plot design, analysis of covariance, multiple and curvilinear regression, enumera- 
tion, data, non-parametric procedures and sample survey methods. 

AGRI 205. Design of Experiments. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
AGRI 201 or its equivalent. The application of the principles of experimental 
design including basic and advanced designs, confounding, fractional replication 
and relative efficiencies. 

AGRI 206. Statistical Methods in Biological Assay. (3) 

Spring Semester. Prerequisite AGRI 201 or its equivalent. The course is intended 
to provide the graduate student with a working knowledge of statistical methods 
used in biological assay. Topics to be considered will include direct assays, 
quantitative dose-response relationships, parallel lines assays assays based on 
quantal response, transformations and designs used in bioassay, and fine par- 
ticle statistics. 

AGRI 207. Application of Least Square Methods. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, AGRI 201 or its equiva- 
lent. Application of the method of least squares to the analysis of experimental 
data. Principles of the least squares method, basic matrix algebra, and the 
application of the least squares method of one-way and multi-way analyses of 
variants, analysis of covariants, and variants component analysis will be 
considered. Emphasis given to the use of least squares procedures for the 
analysis of data with unequal subclass numbers. (Fairchild.) 

AGRI 210. Experimental Procedures in the Agricultural Sciences. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Organization of research 
projects and presentation of experimental results in the field of agricultural 
science. Topics included will be: sources of research financing, project outline 
preparation, formal progress reports, public and industrial supported research 
programs, and popular presentation of research data. (Haut & Scott.) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professors: Curtis, Beal, Evans {Visiting Professor), Foster, Ishee, Moore, 
PoFFENBERGER, SMITH, Waugh (Visiting Professor), Walker, and Wysong. 

Associate Professors: Bell (Visiting), Bender, Cain, Lessley, McDonald, 
Murray, Stevens, Suttor, Tuthill and Via. 

Visiting Associate Professors: Stevens, Lessley, Via and Bell. 

Assistant Professors: Beiter, Hoecker, Nash (Visiting), Noetzel (Visiting), 
AND Sokoloski (Visiting). 



University of Maryland • 45 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGEC 103. Introduction To Agricultural Business. (3) 

Second semester. (Lessley.) 

AGEC 106. Prices of Agricultural Products. (3) 

Second semester. (Sutter.) 

AGEC 107. Financial Analysis of the Farm Business. (3) 

First semester. (Wysong.) 

AGEC 108. Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. The organization and operation of the farm business in an 
economic framework. (Lessley.) 

AGEC 109. Introduction TO Econometrics IN Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. (Suttor.) 

AGEC 111. Economics OF Resource Development. (3) 

Frist semester. (Tuthill.) 

AGEC 112. Agricultural Policy and Programs. (3) 

First semester. (Beal.) 

AGEC 114. World Agricultural Production and Trade. (3) 

First semester. (Foster.) 

AGEC 117. Agricultural Commodity Markets: An Economic Analysis. (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Offered 1970-71. (Via.) 

AGEC 118. Marketing Management of Agri-Business Enterprises. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1968-69. (Cain.) 

AGEC 119. Foreign Agricultural Economics. (3) 

Second semester. (Evans.) 

AGEC 185. Applications of Mathematical Programming in Business and 
Economic Analysis. (3) 
First semester. (Bender.) 

For Graduates 

AGEC 200. Application of Econometrics in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. Tools for analyzing demand and price behavior of agricultural 
products. Theories of least squares, estimation of structural economic relations 
in simultaneous equation systems, identification problems, and non-linear estima- 
tion techniques. (Bender.) 

AGEC 201. Advanced Theory and Practice of International Agricultural 
Trade. (3) 
Second semester. Advanced theory, policies and practice in international trade 
in agricultural products. (Moore.) 

AGEC 202. Market Structure in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. This course centers on the concept of market structure analysis, 
with application of principles developed to agricultural industries. (Moore.) 



46 • Graduate School 

AGEC 204. Advanced Agri-Business Management. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1970-71. (McDonald.) 

AGEC 208. Agricultural Price and Income Policy. (3) 

Second semester. The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, em- 
phasizing the origin and development of govejnmental programs, and their 
effects upon agricultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

AGEC 210. Advanced Agricultural Price and Demand Analysis. (3) 

First semester. An advanced study in the theory of: (1) the individual con- 
sumer, (2) household behavior, and (3) aggregate demand. The concepts of 
price and cross elasticities of demand, income elasticity of demand, and elasticity 
of substitution will be examined in detail. The use of demand theory in the 
analysis of welfare problems, market equilibrium (with special emphasis on 
trade) and the problem of insufficient and excessive aggregate demand will be 
discussed. (Suttor.) 

AGEC 212. Agriculture in World Economic Development. (3) 

First semester. Theories and concepts of what makes economic development 
happen. Approaches and programs for stimulating the transformation from a 
primitive agricultural economy to an economy of rapidly developing commercial 
agriculture and industry. Analysis of selected agricultural development programs 
in Asia, Africa and Latin America. (Foster.) 

AGEC 214. Advanced Agricultural Marketing. (3) 

Second semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, institutional and 
legal factors governing both domestic and foreign agricultural trade, with par- 
ticular attention given to policies and practices affecting cost and price. 

(McDonald.) 

AGEC 216. Economics of Agricultural Production. (3) 

First semester. Study of the more complex problems involved in the long-range 
adjustments, organization and operation of farm resources, including the impact 
of new technology and methods. Applications of the theory of the firm, linear 
programming, activity analysis and input-output analysis. (Ishee.) 

AGEC 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques. (3) 

First semester. Emphasis is given to philosophy and basic objectives of research 
in the field of agricultural economics. The course is designed to help students 
define a research problem and work out logical procedures for executing re- 
search in the social sciences. Attention is given to the techniques and tools 
available to agricultural economists. Research documents in the field will be ap- 
praised from the standpoint of procedures and evaluation of the research. 

(Cain.) 

AGEC 219. Advanced Land Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Application of micro and macro economic principles to the 
analyses of special problems related to land such as public direction of land 
use, tenure arrangements, conservation, and land reform movements. (Wysong.) 

AGEC 220. International Impacts of Selected Agricultural Forces. (3) 

Second semester. Selected agricultural forces (such as pressure of population 
on food supply) and their impacts on the political, social, and economic de- 
velopment of the world. (Foster.) 

AGEC 300. Special Topics in Agricultural Economics. (3) 

First and second semester. This course is designed to offer students special sub- 
ject matter in the field of Agricultural Economics. Subject matter taught in this 
course will be varied and will depend on the persons available for teaching 
unique and specialized phases of Agricultural Economics. The course will be 



University of Maryland • 47 

taught by the staff or visiting Agricultural Economists who may be secured on 
lectureship or visiting professor basis. (Staff.) 

AGEC 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 
First and second semesters and summer. Intensive study and analysis of specific 
problems in the field of agricultural economics, which will provide information 
in depth in areas of special interest to the student. (Staff.) 

AGEC 302. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Students will participate through study of problems 
in the field, reporting to seminar members and defending positions adopted. Out- 
standing leaders in the field will present ideas for analyses and discussion among 
class members. Students involved in original research will present progress 
reports. Class discussion will provide opportunity for constructive criticism and 
guidance. (Curtis.) 

AGEC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First, second semesters and summer. Advanced research in agricultural eco- 
nomics. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

AGEC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Green and Burkhardt. 

Associate Professors: Felton, Gienger, Harris, Schwiesow, and Winn. 

Research Associate: Wheaton. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering oflfers a graduate course of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Science. The student may pursue major 
work in agricultural power and machinery, soil and water conservation engi- 
neering, agricultural structures or electric power and processing. A thesis based 
upon original research work is required. An employee of a nearby institution 
may submit a thesis based on research work at the institution under the direc- 
tion of and with prior approval by the Department. 

Laboratory facilities are available for work in each area of specialization and, 
in cooperation with other departments, ample areas for field tests and studies 
are available. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGEN 113. Mechanics of Food Processing. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory a week. Laboratory optional. 
Prerequisite, PHYS 001 or 010. (Staff.) 

AGEN 123. Agricultural Production Equipment. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite. AGEN 
001. (Staff.) 

AGEN 124. Agricultural Materials Handling and Environmental 
Control. (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
AGEN 001. (Staff.) 

AGEN 143. Agricultural Power and Machinery Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
AGEN 001, ENES 001, and ENME 001. (Harris.) 



48 • Graduate School 

AGEN 144. Design of Operational Systems for Agriculture. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
MATH 021 and PHYS 021. (Staflf.) 

AGEN 145. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENCE 090 and ENME 
102. (Schwiesow.) 

AGEN 165. General Hydrology. (3) 

Spring Semester. (Schwiesow.) 

AGEN 175. Engineering Hydrology. (3) 

Fall Semester— Prerequisites, MATH 066, ENCE 105 or ENME 102. 

(Schwiesow.) 

AGEN 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of Department. Problems as- 
signed in proportion to credit. (Gienger.) 

For Graduates 

AGEN 201. Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
Timely topics in specialized areas of agricultural engineering will be selected. 
For example. Instrumentation for Agricultural Engineering Research. (Staff.) 

AGEN 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. (1-6) 

First and second semester and summer school. Work assigned in proportion 
to amount of credit. (Staff.) 

AGEN 302. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Harris.) 

AGEN 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.; 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

Professors: Cardozier, Ryden. 
Associate Professors: Longest, Nelson. 

The Department of Agricultural and Extension Education offers programs 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The 
Master of Science with Thesis requires at least 24 semester hours of course work 
plus a six credit thesis. The Master of Science without Thesis requires at least 
30 semester hours of course work plus a two or three credit master's problem. 

The Doctor of Philosophy requires no specific number of credits; each stu- 
dent's program is planned in terms of his previous education, experience, special 
interests and future plans. Foreign language options include (a) complete fa- 
cility in one language, (b) reading knowledge of two languages, or (c) reading 
knowledge of one language and satisfactory completion of two courses that aid 
one's research competence. French, German, Russian, Spanish and Danish 
are accepted languages. In agricultural education, one may orient his prepara- 
tion toward teacher education, research, or administration and supervision. In 
agricultural education, one may orient his preparation toward teacher education, 
research, or administration and supervision. In extension education one may 



University of Maryland • 49 

orient toward personnel development, program development and administration, 
research and evaluation, or area and community development. 

The Department also offers a program leading to the Advanced Graduate 
Specialist Certificate which requires 30 semester hours of course work beyond 
the master's degree. This is a professional program designed for those who 
desire additional training beyond the master's other than a doctorate. 

Further information concerning requirements and procedures may be ob- 
tained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

RLED 114. Rural Life in Modern Society. (3) 

Second semester. (Longest.) 

RLED 150. Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. (Ryden.) 

RLED 160. Extension Communications. (2) 

First semester. (Ryden.) 

RLED 170, 17 L Conservation of Natural Resources. (3.3) 

Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natural resources — soil, water, 
fisheries, wildlife, forests and animals — natural resource problems and practices. 
Extensive field study. First course concentrates on subject matter; second includes 
methods of teaching conservation. Courses taken concurrently in summer session. 

(Staff.) 

RLED 180, 181. Critique in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Current problems and trends in rural education. (Staff.) 

RLED 185. Development and Management of Extension Youth 
Programs. (3) 



(Ryden.) 



For Graduates 



RLED 200. Research Methods in Rural Education. (2-3) 

First semester. The scientific method, problem identification, survey of research 
literature, preparing research plans, design of studies, experimentation, analysis 
of data and thesis writing. (Cardozier.) 

RLED 201. Rural Community Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Analysis of structure and function of rural society and appli- 
cation of social understandings to educational processes. (Longest.) 

RLED 204. Developing Rural Leadership. (2-3) 

First semester. Theories of leadership are emphasized. Techniques of identify- 
ing formal and informal leaders and the development of rural lay leaders. 

(Longest.) 

RLED 207, 208. Special Topics in Rural Education. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

RLED 209. Rural Adult Education. (2) 

Second semester. Principles of adult education applied to rural groups. Under- 
standing adult motivation, ability and behavior. Effective methods of planning, 
organizing and conducting rural adult education programs. (Ryden.) 

RLED 215. Supervision of Student Teaching. (1) 

Summer session. Identification of experiences and activities in an effective stu- 



50 • Graduate School 

dent teaching program, responsibilities and duties of supervising teachers, and 
evaluation of student teaching. (Cardozier.) 

RLED 217. Program Planning and Evaluation in Agricultural 
Education. (2-3) 
Second semester. Analysis of community agricultural education needs, selection 
and organization of course content, criteria and procedures for evaluating pro- 
grams. (Nelson.) 

RLED 225. Program Development in Extension Education. (2) 

Prerequisite, RLED 150 or equivalent. Principles and procedures of program 
planning and development in extensive education. (Ryden.) 

RLED 240. Agricultural College Instruction. (1) 

(Cardozier.) 
RLED 301. Special Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

RLED 302. Seminar in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Second semester. Problems in the organization, administration, and super- 
vision of the several agencies of rural education. Investigation, papers, and 
reports. (Staff.) 

RLED 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level.) (Staff.) 

RLED 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) (Staff.) 



AGRONOMY 

CROPS, SOILS, AND GEOLOGY 

Professors: Miller, Axley, Decker, Rothgeb, Street, and Strickling. 
Associate Professors: Clark, Deal, and Foss. 
Assistant Professors: Fanning, and Schillinger. 

The Department of Agronomy offers a graduate course of study leading to 
the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
The student may pursue major work in the crops division or in the soils divi- 
sion of the Department. A thesis based on original research is required for 
each degree. Ample laboratory and greenhouse facilities for graduate work are 
available on the campus. The Plant Research Farm, the Forage Research Farm, 
and the Tobacco Experiment Farm ofTer adequate nearby research facilities. 
Many projects of the Department are conducted in cooperation with the Agri- 
cultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture with 
headquarters located three miles from the campus. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candi- 
dates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are available from the 
Department of Agronomy. 

CROPS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGRO 103. Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Prerequisite, BOTN 117 or 
ZOOL 006. (Schillinger.) 



University of Maryland • 51 

AGRO 104. Tobacco Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. BOTN 001. (Street.) 

AGRO 107. Cereal Crop Production. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. (Rothgeb.) 

AGRO 108. Forage Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite 
BOTN 001. (Decker.) 

AGRO 109. Turf Management. (3) 

First semester, alternate years (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period per week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. (Deal.) 

AGRO 151. Cropping Systems. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 001 or equivalent. 

(Clark.) 

AGRO 152. Seed Production and Distribution. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) One lecture and one lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisite. AGRO 001 or equivalent. (Newcomer.) 

AGRO 154. Weed Control. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 001 or equivalent. (Parochetti.) 

For Graduates 

AGRO 201. Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Prerequisite, AGRO 103 
or equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories underlying methods 
of plant breeding. A study of quantitative inheritance, heterosis, heritability, 
interspecific and intergeneric hybridization, polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, 
inbreeding and outbreeding, and other topics as related to plant breeding. 

(Schillinger.) 

AGRO 204. Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Field plot technique, ap- 
plication of statistical analysis to agronomic data, and preparation of the re- 
search project. (LeClerg.) 

AGRO 205. Advanced Tobacco Production. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Two lectures a week. Prere- 
quisite, permission of instructor. A study of the structural adaptation and chemi- 
cal response of tobacco to environmental variations. Emphasis will be placed 
on the alkaloids and other unique components. (Street.) 

AGRO 207. Advanced Forage Crops. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, BOTN 101, CHHM 031. or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 
A fundamental study of physiological and ecological responses of grasses and 
legumes to environmental factors, including fertilizer elements, soil moisture, soil 
temperature, air temperature, humidity, length of day, quality and intensity of 
light, wind movement, and defoliation practices. Relationship of these factors 
to life history, production, chemical and botanical composition, quality, and 
persistence of forages will be considered. (Decker.) 

AGRO 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research 



52 • Graduate School 

viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland Ex- 
periment Station or review of literature on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

AGRO S210. Cropping Systems. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems 
and the latest developments in the field. (Staff.) 

SOILS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGRO SI 10. Soil Management. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents dealing with factors involved in man- 
agement of soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is 
placed on methods of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and bio- 
logical characteristics of soils. (Strickling.) 

AGRO 111. Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, AGRO 010. A study of the chemical, physical, and biological char- 
acteristics of soils that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of 
physical, chemical, or biological nature and their correction by the use of lime, 
fertilizers, and rotations are discussed and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

AGRO 112. Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 010 or permission 
of instructor. A study of the manufacturing of commercial fertilizers and their 
use in soils for efficient crop production. (Axley.) 

AGRO 113. Soil and Water Conservation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69). Two lectures and one lab- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 010 or permission of instructor. 
A study of the importance and causes of soil erosion, methods of soil-erosion 
control, and the effect of conservation practices on soil-moisture supply. Special 
emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil and water conservation. The 
laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips. (Foss.) 

AGRO 114. Soil Classification and Geography. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
AGRO 010, or permission of instructor. A study of the genesis, morphology, 
classification and geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles govern- 
ing soil formation are explained. Attention is given to the influence of geographic 
factors on the development and use of soils in the United States and other 
parts of the world. The laboratory periods will be largely devoted to field trips 
and to a study of soil maps of various countries. (Fanning.) 

AGRO 115. Soil Survey and Land Use. (3) 

First semester alternate years. (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 114 or consent of the instructor. 
An introduction to soil survey interpretation as a tool in land use both in agri- 
cultural and urban situations. The implications of soil problems as delineated 
by soil surveys on land use will be considered. (F. Miller.) 

AGRO 116. Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) One lecture and two labo- 
ratory periods a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 010, or permission of instructor. 



University of Maryland • 53 

A study of the chemical composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. Chemi- 
cal methods of soil analysis will be studied with emphasis on their relation to 
fertilizer requirements. (Axley.) 

AGRO 117. Soil Physics. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period a week. Prerequisites, AGRO 010 and a course in physics, or 
permission of instructor. A study of physical properties of soil with special 
emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

AGRO 118. Soil Biochemistry. (3) 

Second Semester, alternate years (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, AGRO 010, CHEM 033 or 037 
and 038 or consent of instructor. A study of biochemical processes involved in 
the formation and decomposition of organic soil constituents. Significance 
of soil biochemical processes involved in plant nutrition will be considered. 

(Bezdicek.) 

For Graduates 

AGRO 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, AGRO 010, and permission of instructor. A study of the structure, 
physical-chemical characteristics and identification methods of soil minerals, 
particularly clay minerals, and their relationship to soil genesis and productivity. 

(Fanning.) 

AGRO 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, AGRO 010 and permission of instructor. An advanced study of 
the theory of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis on prob- 
lems involving application of physical chemistry. (Axley.) 

AGRO 252. Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, AGRO 010 and permission of instruc- 
tor. An advanced study of physical properties of soils. (Strickling.) 

AGRO 253. Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisites, AGRO 010 and permission of instruc- 
tor. A continuation of AGRO 116 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor 
elements necessary for plant growth. (Axley.) 

CROPS AND SOILS 

For Graduates 

AGRO 260. Recent Advances in Agronomy. (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit four hours. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. A study of recent advances in agronomy research. (Staff.) 

AGRO 302. Agronomy Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Total credit toward Master of Science degree. 2; 
toward Ph.D. degree, 6. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

AGRO 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 



54 • Graduate School 

AGRO 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (1-4) 

(Staff) 
GEOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GEOL 120. Crystallography. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70) Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 003 or consent of instructor. 

(Siegrist.) 

GEOL 121. Mineralogy. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70) One lecture and two labo- 
ratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 004 and 120 or consent of instructor. 

(Siegrist.) 

GEOL 198. Special Problems in Geology. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, GEOL 002 and GEOL 004, or equiva- 
lent, and consent of instructor. Intensive study of a special geologic subject or 
technique selected after consultation with instructor. Intended to provide train- 
ing or instruction not available in other courses which will aid the student's 
development in his field of major interest. (Staff.) 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

Committee on American Studies: Manning, {Chairman) . 
Professor: Beall, {Director of the Program). 
Associate Professors: Skramstad and Washburn. 
Assistant Professor: Lounsbury. 

The American Studies Program offers work leading to both the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The Departments of English, History, 
Art and Philosophy join to offer integrated plans of study. In his class work 
the student will emphasize the offerings of any one of these departments; either 
English or History must be included within his field of emphasis. For the lists 
of courses from which his program is to be developed, he is to see principally 
the listings of the four departments just mentioned. The Director of the program 
will serve as the student's adviser in consultation with the chairman of the de- 
partment in the field of the student's special interest. The American Studies 
Program collaborates with the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Ameri- 
can Studies. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AMST 127, 128. Culture and the Arts in America. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. (Beall.) 

AMST 137, 138. Readings in American Studies. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. (Lounsbury.) 

For Graduates 

AMST 200. Introductory Seminar in American Studies. (3) 

AMST 201, 202. Seminar in American Studies. (3,3) 

AMST 251. Orientation Seminar — Material Aspects of American 
Civilization. (3) 
Class meets at the Smithsonian. 



University of Maryland • 55 



AMST 255. Supervised Study in Selected Subject Fields. (3) 
Class mets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 299. Thesis Research. (1-6) 
Class meets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

AMST 499. Dissertation Research. (Dcotral Level) 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Professors: Foster {Emeritus), Green, and Leffel. 
Associate Professors: BuRic and Young. 

The Department of Animal Science offers work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Course work and thesis problems 
are offered in the areas of animal breeding, nutrition, and livestock production. 

Departmental requirements have been formulated for the information and 
guidance of graduate students. Copies of these requirements are available from 
the Department of Animal Science. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ANSC 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

ANSC 110. Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Vandersall.) 

ANSC 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. A systematic 
comparative study of the pig, ruminants and fowl with special emphasis of those 
systems important in animal production. Prerequisite, ZOOL 001. (Albert.) 

ANSC 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prere- 
quisites, MICR 001 and ZOOL 001. (Albert.) 

ANSC 118. Wildlife Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. (Flyger.) 

ANSC 120. Advanced Livestock Judging. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, ANSC 022 
and permission of instructor. An advanced course in the selection and judging 
of purebred and commercial meat animals. The most adept students enrolled 
in the course are chosen to represent the University of Maryland in Inter- 
collegiate Livestock Judging Contests. (Buric.) 

ANSC 121. Meats. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
ANSC 020. Registration limited to 14 students. Laboratory periods are con- 
ducted in packing houses, meat distribution centers, and retail outlets. (Buric.) 

ANSC 122. Livestock Management. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
ANSC 109. (Buric.) 



56 • Graduate School 



ANSC 123. Livestock Management. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite, ANSC 122. (Leflfel.) 

ANSC 130. Principles OF Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 006 or BOT 
117. ANSC 122 or 123 or ANSC 022. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed 
with permission of instructor. (Green.) 

ANSC S131. Special Topics in Animal Science. (1) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Summer session only. This course is 
designed primarily for teachers of vocational agricultural and Extension Service 
personnel. One primary topic to be selected mutally by the instructor and 
students, will be presented each session. 

ANSC 140. Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Williams.) 

ANSC 141. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Williams.) 

ANSC 142. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Plowman.) 

ANSC S143. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Staff.) 

ANSC 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Helbacka.) 

ANSC 162. Avian Physiology. (2) 
See Poultry Science for description. 

ANSC S163. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

ANSC SI 64. Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Helbacka.) 

ANSC 165. Physioiogy of Hatchability. (1) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Shaffner.) 

ANSC 170. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Wills.) 

ANSC 171. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Wills.) 

ANSC 198. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. A course designed for advanced undergraduates 
in which specific problems relating to animal science will be assigned. (Staff.) 

ANSC 199. Seminar. (1) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Presentation and discussion 
of current literature and research work in animal science. (Staff.) 

(Attention is called to AGEC 117, Economics of Marketing Eggs and 
Poultry (3) [See Agricultural Economics]; and FDSC 125, Meat and Meat 
Processing (3) [See Food Science]. 



University of Maryland • 57 

For Graduates 

ANSC 200. Electron Microscopy. (2) 

(Mohanty.) 

ANSC 220. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, ANSC 
130 or equivalent, and Biological Statistics. This course deals with the more 
technical phases of heredity and variation, selection indices, breeding systems, 
and inheritance in farm animals. (Green.) 

ANSC 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, CHEM 031 and 033, or equivalent, ANSC 109 or 
permission of Instructor. Three lectures per week. A study of animal energetics 
and the basic descriptions of animals relative to the requirements for energy 
and protein. Literature dealing with nutrition research techniques and energy 
and protein utilization and requirements is surveyed. (Leffel and Combs.) 

ANSC 240. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

See Dairy Science for description. (Vandersall.) 

ANSC 241. Research Methods. (3) 
See Dairy Science for description. 

ANSC 242. Experimental Mammalian Surgery I. (2) 
See Dairy Science for description. 

ANSC 243. Experimental Mammalian Surgery II. (3) 
See Dairy Science for description. 

ANSC 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Shaffner.) 

ANSC 262. Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Staff.) 

ANSC 263S. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

ANSC 264. Vitamins. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

ANSC 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

ANSC 301. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Prerequisite, approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which relate spe- 
cifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

ANSC 302. Seminar. (1) (5 Cr. Max.) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers based 
upon current scientific publications relating to Animal Science, or upon their 
research work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; ( 1 ) Recent 
advances; (2) Nutrition; (3) Physiology; (4) Biochemistry. (Staff.) 

ANSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit, 
students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in the form 
of a thesis. (Staff.) 

ANSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 



58 • Graduate School 



ART 



Professors: Levitine, Lembach, Lynch, and Maril. 

Associate Professors: De Leiris, Gerdts, Gross, Jamieson, Longley, O'Con- 

NELL, ReaRICK, AND StITES. 

Assistant Professors: Bunts, Bradley, Denny, Freeny, Grossman, O'Connor, 

AND PeMBERTON. 

Lecturers: Campbell, Griffin, Landgren. 

The Department of Art offers a graduate program of study leading to the 
degree of Master of Arts in Art History and Studio Art, and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in Art History. The major in Art History is committed to the advanced 
study and scholarly interpretation of existing works of art, from the prehistoric 
era to our times, while the Studio major stresses the student's direct participa- 
tion in the creation of works of art. Both disciplines, rooted in the concept of 
art as a humanistic experience, share an essential common aim: the develop- 
ment of the student's aesthetic sensitivity, understanding and knowledge. 

A limited number of Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships are available 
in Art. Interested students should apply to the Department of Art. 

history of art major 

For admission to graduate study in Art History, in addition to the approved 
undergraduate degree, or its equivalent, special Departmental requirements 
must be met. 

I. Master of Arts in Art History 
Departmental Requirements: 

1. Art 280 is required. 

2. A reading knowledge of French or German (examination administered 
by Graduate School.) 

3. A written comprehensive examination which tests the candidate's knowl- 
edge and comprehension of principal areas and phases of Art History. 

4. A thesis which should demonstrate competency in research and in origi- 
nal investigation by the candidate. 

5. A final oral examination on the thesis and the field which it represents. 

II. Doctor of Philosophy in Art History. 

1. Arts 280 is required. 

2. A reading knowledge of two foreign languages, one of which must be 
either French or German (examination administered by Graduate 
School.) 

3. A written qualifying examination covering four fields of specialization 
including the student's own major field. The choice of fields presented 
for examination is made by the student in consultation with his adviser. 
This examination is preparatory to admission to candidacy. Course and 
language requirements must have been completed prior to taking exami- 
nation. 

4. Dissertation which should demonstrate candidate's capacity to perform 
independent research in the field of Art History. 

5. A final oral examination on dissertation and the field it represents. 



University of Maryland • 59 

studio major 

For admission to graduate study in Studio Art, an undergraduate degree with 
an art major from an accredited college or university, or its equivalent, is re- 
quired. In addition, special Departmental requirements must be met. A port- 
folio and/or slides should be submitted to the Department along with application 
for admission. Candidate for the master's degree will be required to pass a 
written comprehensive examination, and submit a thesis or an original creative 
project in painting, drawing, sculpture or print making. 

For information on work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts or Master 
of Education in Art Education, the student is referred to the section devoted to 
the Department of Education in this catalog. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ART 117. Painting II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, ART 017. 026. Original compositions based 
upon nature, figure and still life, supplemented by expressive painting. Choice 
of media. Different sections of course may be taken for credit. 
117-a. Oil painting and related media. (Maril.) 

117-b. Watercolor and casein. (Grossman.) 

117-c. Plastic media, such as encaustic and polymer tempera. (Jamieson.) 

117-d. Mural painting. The use of contemporary synthetic media. (Jamieson.) 

ART 118. Sculpture I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. (For student majoring in Art His- 
tory, by permission of Department.) (Freeny.) 

ART 119. Printmaking I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. (For student majoring in Art His- 
tory, by permission of Department.) Basic printmaking technique in relief, 
intaglio, and planographic media. (Forbes.) 

ART 126. Drawing III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. Emphasis on understanding organic 
form, as it is related to study from the human figure and to pictorial compo- 
sition. (Jamieson.) 

ART 127. Painting III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 117. Creative painting for advanced 
students. Problems require a knowledge of pictorial structure. Development 
of personal direction. Choice of media. (Gross.) 

ART 128. Sculpture II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 118. Different sections of course may be 
taken for credit. 

128-a. Nature as a point of reference with potentiality of developing ideas into 

organic and architectural forms. (Freeny.) 

128-b. May be taken after 128-a. Problems involving plastic earths and other 

material capable of being modeled or cast. Choice of individual style 

encouraged. (Freeny.) 

ART 129. Printmaking II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 119. One print media including exten- 
sive study of color processes. Individually structured problems. (O'Connell.) 

ART 136. Drawing IV. (3) 



60 • Graduate School 

ART 137. Painting IV. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 127. Creative painting. Emphasis on 
personal direction and self-criticism. Group seminars. 

(Gross, Grossman, Jamieson, Maril.) 

ART 138. Sculpture III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 128. Problems and techniques of newer 
concepts, utilizing various materials, such as: plastics and metals. Technical 
aspects of welding stressed. (Freeny.) 

ART 139. Printmaking III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequiiste, ART 129. 

139-a. Contemporary experimental techniques of one print medium with group 
discussions. (O'Connell.) 

139-b. Continuation of 139-a. May be taken for credit after 139-a. 

(O'Connell.) 
ART 150, 151. Spanish Art. (3, 3) 

Special emphasis will be given to the artists of the 16th and 17th centuries, 
such as El Greco and Velasquez. (Lynch.) 

ART 152, 153. Latin American Art. (3) (Lynch.) 

ART 155. American Colonial Painting. (3) 

(Gerdts.) 

ART 157. American Art and its Relationship to Europe: 1800-1900. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 060 and 061 recommended. The American artist in Europe; 
American and German Romanticism; Neo-Classicism in America and Europe; 
Diisseldorf School; Munich School; Pre-Raphaelism; Barbizon School and 
Impressionism. (Gerdts.) 

ART 160, 161. Classical Art. (3. 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the classical cultures. First semester 
will stress Greece; second semester, Rome. (Pemberton.) 

ART 162. 163. Art of the East. (3,3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. First semester will stress India; second 
semester, China and Japan. (Griffin.) 

ART 164. Early Christian and Byzantine Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaic of early Christian Rome, the near 
East, and the Byzantine Empire. (Staff.) 

ART 166. 167. Medieval Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. First semester will 
stress Romanesque; second semester, the Gothic period. (Denny.) 

ART 168, 169. Renaissance Art in Italy. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the High Renaissance in the 
16th century. (Rearick.) 

ART 170. Northern European Painting in the 15th and 16th Centuries. (3) 
Painting in Flanders and related northern European areas, from Van Eyck to 
Brueghel and Durer. (Denny.) 

ART 172, 173. European Baroque Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting of the major European centers in the 
17th century. (de Leiris.) 

ART 174, 175. French Painting. (3, 3) 

French painting from the 15th through the 18th century, from Fouquet to 
David. (Levitine.) 



University of Maryland • 61 

ART 176, 177. 19th Century European Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in European Art from Neo-Classicism to 
Impressionism. (de Leiris.) 

ART 178, 179. 20th Century Art. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from the late 18th century to our day. 

(O'Connor.) 

ART 180. Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 060 and 061 or consent of instructor. History of Impression- 
ism and Neo-Impressionism: artists, styles, art theories, criticism, sources and 
influence on twentieth century. (de Leiris.) 

ART 182. Twentieth Century Masters and Movements. (3) 

Artists and tendencies in twentieth century art. Subject wil change and be an- 
nounced each time course is offered. (O'Connor.) 

ART 184. History of the Graphic Arts. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 010 or ART 060, 061, or consent of instructor. Graphic 
techniques and styles in Europe from 1400 to 1800; contributions of major 
artists. (Levitine.) 

ART 192, 193. Directed Studies in Studio Art. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be re- 
peated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

ART 194, 195. Directed Studies in Art History. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Head. Course may be 
repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

ART 200. 201. P.mnting. (3, 3) 

Specific projects to be developed. Conferences arranged. 

(Grossman, Jamieson, Maril.) 
ART 202. 203. Painting. (3, 3) 

Individual projects growing in complexity. Seminars. 

(Grossman. Jamieson, Maril.) 

ART 211. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Relief process. (O'Connell.) 

ART 212. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Intaglio process. (O'Connell.) 

ART 213. Printmaking. (3) 

Advanced problems. Lithographic process. (O'Connell.) 

ART 214. Seminar in Printmaking. (3) 

(O'Connell.) 
ART 221, 222. Experimentation in Sculpture. (3. 3) 

Independent research stressed. (Freeny.) 

ART 223. Materials and Techniques in Sculpture. (3) 

For advanced students. Methods of armature building, and the use of a variety 
of stone, wood, metal, and plastic materials. (Freeny.) 

ART 224. Sculpture — Casting and Foundry. (3) 

The traditional methods of plaster casting and the more complicated types in- 
volving metal. Cire perdue, sand-casting and newer methods, such as cold metal 
process. (Freeny.) 



62 • Graduate School 

ART 226. Drawing. (3) 

Sustained treatment of a theme chosen by student. Wide variety of media. 

(Jamieson.) 

ART 227. Drawing. (3) 

Traditional materials and methods including Oriental, Sumi ink drawing and 
techniques of Classical European masters. (Jamieson.) 

ART 228. Drawing. (3) 

Detailed anatomical study of the human figure and preparation of large scale 
mural compositions. (Jamieson.) 

ART 229. Drawing and Painting. (3) 

Preparation and execution of a wall decoration. (Jamieson.) 

ART 240, 241. Advanced Problems in Art Education. (3, 3) 

An integrated series of problems determined by the student's professional needs. 

(Lembach.) 

ART 250. American Colonial Art. (3) 

The arts during the exploration period and Colonial development. (Gerdts.) 

ART 255. Seminar in 19th Century American Art. (3) 

Problems in architecture and painting from the end of the Colonial period 
until 1860. (Gerdts.) 

ART 256. Twentieth Century American Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 178, 179 or equivalent. The "Eight," the Armory Show, 
American Abstraction, Romantic-Realism, New Deal Art projects, American 
Surrealism and Expressionism. (O'Connor.) 

ART 257. Seminar in American Art and Its Literary Sources. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 060 and 061 or equivalent. Art and literature in the 19th 
century; literary influences on 19th century American painting; artistic and 
literary parallels; art theories and criticism by authors and artists. (Gerdts.) 

ART 258. Seminar in Local and Regional Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 060 and 061 or equivalent. Art in Washington, D. C, Balti- 
more and the State of Maryland. Major genres; prominent artists; public com- 
missions; institutions. (Gerdts.) 

ART 259. The Art of Mannerism. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 169 or permission of instructor. Mannerism in Europe during 
the 16th century; beginnings in Italy; ramifications in France, Germany, Flan- 
ders, Spain; painting, architecture, and sculpture. (Lynch.) 

ART 260. French Painting From Lebrun to Gericault — 1715-1815. (3) 

Development of iconography and style from the Baroque to Neo-Classicism 
and Romanticism. Trends and major artists. (Levitine.) 

ART 261. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Problems derived from the development of Romantic Art during the 18th and 
19th centuries. (Levitine.) 

ART 262. Seminar in 18th Century European Art. (3) 

(Levitine.) 

ART 263. Seminar in 19th Century European Art. (3) 

Problems derived from the period starting with David and ending with Cezanne. 

(de Leiris.) 



University of Maryland • 63 

ART 264. Nineteenth Century Realism. 1830-1860. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 176 or 177 or equivalent. Courbet and the problem of 
Realism; precursors, David, Gericault, Landscape schools; Manet; artistic and 
social theories; Realism outside France. (de Leiris.) 

ART 265. Seminar in Post-Impressionism and Symbolism. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 176 or 177 or equivalent. The period of 1880-1900; Cezanne, 
van Gogh, Gauguin, the Nabis; Symbolism and Art Nouveau; social and 
aesthetic theories; formal and functional approaches to architecture, (de Leiris.) 

ART 266. Seminar in Contemporary Art. (3) 

Problems of Western art from 1900 to the present. (O'Connor.) 

ART 267. Twentieth Century European Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 178, 179 or equivalent. A detailed examination of the art of 
an individual country in the twentieth century: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, 
England. (O'Connor.) 

ART 270. Seminar in Medieval Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 166 or 167 or permission of instructor. (Denny.) 

ART 272. Seminar — Problems in Medieval Iconogr.phy. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 166 or 167 or permission of instructor. Studies of selected 
problems in the religious meaning of Medieval iconography. Some reading 
knowlege of French, German and Latin is desirable. (Denny.) 

ART 274. Romanesque Art. (3) 

Painting and sculpture in Western Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries; 
regional styles; relationships between styles of painting and sculpture; religious 
content. (Denny.) 

ART 276. Gothic Art. (3) 

Painting and sculpture in Western Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries; 
regional styles; relationships between styles of painting and sculpture: religious 
content. (Denny.) 

ART 280. Methods of Art History. (3) 

Methods of research and criticism applied to typical art-historical problems; 

bibliography and other research tools. May be taken for credit one or two 

semesters. (Landgren.) 

ART 282, 283. Museum Training Program. (3.3) 

Year course. Open to one or two selected students. Theory and practice. Stu- 
dents will be directly involved in all phases of the Department's Gallery Ex- 
hibition program (research, planning, exhibition, catalogue). (Gerdts.) 

ART 284. Seminar — Problems in Architectural History and Criticism. (3) 

(Staff.) 

ART 286. Seminar in Latin American Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 153 or permission of instructor. (Lynch.) 

ART 288. Seminar in Modern Mexican Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 153 or permission of instructor. Problems of Mexican art of 
the 19th and 20th centuries; Mexicanismo; the "Mural Renaissance"; archi- 
tectural regionalism. (Lynch.) 

ART 292, 293. Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art. (3, 3) 

For advanced graduate students by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 



64 • Graduate School 

ART 294, 295. Directed Graduate Studies in Art History. (3,3) 

For advanced graduate students, by permission of Head of Department. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content differs. (Staff.) 

ART 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

ART 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

ASTRONOMY 

Professors: Westerhout {Director), Erickson, Kundu, Kerr, and Opik. 

Associate Professors: Matthews, v. P. Smith, and Wentzel. 

Part-Time Professors: Brandt and Musen. 

Assistant Professors: A'Hearn, Bell, Harrington, and Zuckerman. 

The Astronomy program, administratively part of the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy, is offering a program of study leading to the degrees of M.S. 
and Ph.D. in Astronomy. 

It is normally expected that the following subjects should have been studied 
previous to admission to graduate work: general physics, heat, intermediate 
mechanics, optics, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, differential and 
integral calculus, and advanced calculus. A student may be admitted without 
one of these courses, but he should plan to make up the deficiency as soon as 
possible, either by including such a course as a part of his graduate program 
or by independent study. 

No formal undergraduate course work in astronomy is required. However, 
an entering student should have a working knowledge of the basic facts of 
astronomy such as is obtainable from one of the many elementary textbooks. 
A more advanced knowledge of astronomy will of course enable a student to 
progress considerably more rapidly during the first year of graduate work. It 
is recommended that those new students who have little knowledge of astron- 
omy spend part of the summer brushing up on their elementary astronomy. 

preliminary examination. 

Astronomy students will take a preliminary examination, preferably before 
they enter the Graduate School. A satisfactory score is required before the 
student is admitted to take the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination or admitted to 
candidacy for the M.S. The preliminary examination required is the Graduate 
Record Examination, Advanced Test in Physics, given several times per year 
by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J. The student must pass the 
examination within 1 5 months after entering the Department. The examination 
tests the adequacy of the student's undergraduate training in physics, deemed 
necessary for almost all fields of astronomy. 

the PH.D. qualifying EXAMINATION. 

The Ph.D. Qualifying Examination is offered each year in September and 
has to be taken each year by all Astronomiy students working toward a Ph.D. 
who have passed the Preliminary Examination and completed one year of 
graduate study. The normal time limit for passing for full-time students is three 
years, in special cases extended to four; for part-time students it is six years. 
The time limit for obtaining the Ph.D. is 7 years for full-time and 8 years for 
part-time students. For the M.S., these time limits are 5 and 6 years, respectively. 



University of Maryland • 65 

study program. 

All candidates must obtain three credits of ASTR 100 or ASTR 102, pref- 
erably both, for an advanced degree. This requirement may be waived if the 
student has previous experience. All students should take at least two credits 
of ASTR 230, Astronomy Seminar. All full-time graduate students are expected 
to take or audit ASTR 230 each term. No other Astronomy courses are specif- 
ically required, but candidates for the Ph.D. should expect to take at least 12 
credits of Astronomy courses at the 200-level, exclusive of ASTR 230, in order 
to pass the Qualifying Examination. 

Many of the advanced Astronomy courses will be offered once every other 
year, which should be taken into account when individual study programs are 
considered. Students are urged to acquire a broad background in all fields of 
Astronomy in addition to their field of specialization. 

The Ph.D. minor may consist of one or two subjects closely related to the 
student's major field. An astronomy student may take his entire minor in 
Physics, but must always take Physics as his first minor (special rules apply to 
students of Mathematical Astronomy). For this, he has to take at least 12 
credits of Physics courses, excluding 1 -credit seminars. Especially recommended 
are: 

Physics 204, Methods of Mathematical Physics (4) 

Physics 205, Electrodynamics (3) 

Physics 212, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3) 
Many other Physics courses of direct interest to Astronomy students are avail- 
able. 

If the student elects to take two minors, his second minor must consist of at 
least nine credits chosen from the following subjects, depending on his major 
field: 

Theoretical Astronomy Computer Science 

Observational Astronomy Electrical Engineering 

Mathematics Chemistry 

Meteorology 
It is advantageous to take one or two courses in Mathematics, even if Mathe- 
matics is not specifically chosen as a minor. Departmental approval has to be 
obtained for the choice of minor fields. 

The Department also offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees based on a program in 
Astrophysics. The study program for these degrees can be carefully adjusted to 
give the optimum proportion of Physics and Astronomy courses suitable for 
some particular borderline field of study. Students majoring in Astrophysics will 
have the option of taking the qualifying examination in either Physics, Astron- 
omy, or Astrophysics. 

For more information, especially for Physics courses related to Astronomy, 
see the section on Physics. A brochure, entitled "Graduate Study in Astronomy." 
describing the requirements, the courses and the research program in detail is 
available from the Department. All correspondence, including that concerning 
admission to the Astronomy Program should be addressed to: 

Astronomy Program, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ASTR 100, 110. Observational Astronomy. (3) 

This is a 2-semester course: the two semesters have to be taken consecutively 



66 • Graduate School 

fall and spring). Two lectures per week plus laboratory work at times to be 
arranged. The laboratory work will sometimes involve all night observing ses- 
sions. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of calculus, physics through PHYS 
018, 3 credits of astronomy. An introduction to current methods of obtaining 
astronomical information including radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet and 
x-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will involve photographic and photo- 
electric observations with the department's optical telescopes and 21 -cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and interferometry with the department's 
radio telescopes. Laboratory fee, $12.00. (A'Hearn, Westerhout, Erickson.) 

ASTR 101. Introduction to Galactic Research. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. MATH 021 and at least 12 credits of 
introductory physics and astronomy courses. Stellar motions, methods of galactic 
research, study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters of stars, evolution; 
statistical parallax, distance determination, galactic rotation and structure, high 
velocity stars, stellar populations. (Kerr.) 

ASTR 102. Introduction to Astrophysics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, previous or concurrent enrollment in 
PHYS 119 or consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, structure of atmospheres of 
the sun and other stars. Observational data and curves of growth. Chemical 
composition. (Harrington, Bell.) 

ASTR 124. Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHYS 127 or consent of the instructor. Newton's Law of Gravita- 
tion; two-body problem and its integrals; Kepler's laws; elements of an orbit, 
determination of the position and velocity vectors from elements and vice versa. 
Determination of an orbit from observations: Gaussian and Laplacian methods. 
Orbit correction methods. Perturbations in co-ordinates elements. Computation 
of satellite orbits, including perturbations. (Musen.) 

ASTR 150. Special Problems in Astronomy. 
(Credit according to work done) 

Prerequisites, major in astronomy or physics and consent of one of the mem- 
bers of the astronomy staff. Research or special study. Laboratory fee, $12.00 
per credit hour when appropriate. (Staff.) 

ASTR 190. Honors Seminar. 

(Credit according to work done) 

Each semester. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Honors Pro- 
gram in astronomy. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ASTR 200. Dynamics of Stellar Systems. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 200 or ASTR 101. Study of the 
structure and evolution of dynamical systems encountered in astronomy. Stellar 
encounters viewed as a two-body problem, statistical treatment of encounters, 
Study of dynamical problems in connection with star clusters, ellipsoidal galaxies, 
nuclei of galaxies, high-velocity stars. (Staff.) 

ASTR 202. Stellar Interiors. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. MATH 114 and PHYS 119 or con- 
sent of instructor. A study of stellar structure and evolution. This course will 
consider the question of energy transfer and generation in the interior of 
a star, the structure of stars, including problems of turbulence, determination 
of chemical composition, non-homogeneous stars, evolution of both young and 
old stars, pulsating stars, novae. (Bell, Wentzel.) 



University of Maryland • 67 

ASTR 203. Stellar Atmospheres. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 212 or consent of the instructor. 
Observational methods, line formation, curve of growth, equation of transfer, 
stars with large envelopes, variable stars, novae, magnetic fields in stars. (Bell.) 

ASTR 204. Physics of the Solar System. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. PHYS 119. A survey of the problems 
of interplanetary space, the solar wind, comets and meteors, planetary structure 
and atmospheres, motions of particles in the earth's magnetic field. 

(Opik, Brandt.) 

ASTR 210. Galactic Radio Astronomy. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119, ASTR 101, 110 or consent 
of the instructor. Theory and observations of the continuum and line emission 
from the Galaxy. Galactic structure derived from radio observations, comparison 
with optical data. The rotation of the Galaxy. The galactic halo, the nucleus, 
proposed mechanisms. (Westerhout, Kerr.) 

ASTR 212. Physics of the Solar Envelope. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 119, ASTR 102 or consent 
of the instructor. A detailed study of the solar atmposhere. Physics of solar 
phenomena, such as solar flares, structure of the corona, etc. 

(Erickson, v. P. Smith.) 

ASTR 214. Interstellar Matter. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, previous or concurrent enrollment in 
PHYS 212, ASTR 101 or ASTR 102 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
physical properties of interstellar gas and dust. This course will include diff'use 
nebulae, regions of ionized hydrogen, regions of neutral hydrogen, the problems 
of interstellar dust and perhaps planetary nebulae, molecules. (Wentzel.) 

ASTR 230. Seminar. (1) 

Seminars on various topics in advanced astronomy are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 
There are weekly coUoquia by staff, astronomers from the Washington area, 
and visiting astronomers, usually on topics related to their own work. 

(Staff, Visitors.) 

ASTR 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Astronomy. 

Credit according to work done each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
These courses will be given by specialists in various fields of modern astron- 
omy, partly staff members, partly visiting professor or part-time lecturers. 
They will cover subjects such as: cosmology, discrete radio sources, magnetohy- 
drodynamics in astronomy, the H. R. diagram, stellar evolution, external galax- 
ies, galactic structure, chemistry of the interstellar medium, advanced celestial 
mechanics, astrometry, radio physics of the sun, etc. 

(Staff, Visiting Astronomers.) 

ASTR 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credit according to work done each semester. Prerequisite, an approved appli- 
cation for admission to candidacy or special permission of the Astronomy 
Program. 

ASTR 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 



68 • Graduate School 

BOTANY 

Professor and Head: Krauss. 

Professors: Corbett, Gauch, D. T. Morgan, Sisler, Stern, and Weaver. 

Research Professor: Sorokin. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Galloway, Kantzes, Klarman, Krusberg, 
LocKARD, Mans, O. D. Morgan, and Rappleye. 

Assistant Professors: Barnett, Bean, Curtis, Harrison, Karlander, Pat- 
terson, and Terborgh. 

Research Associate Professor: Norton. 

Instructors: Edwards, Owens, Pritchard. 

The Department of Botany offers a graduate course of study leading to the 
degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
student may pursue major work in plant physiology, plant pathology, plant 
ecology, plant taxonomy, nematology, cytogenetics, biochemical genetics, or 
plant anatomy. Inasmuch as a thesis based on original research is required for 
each degree, a qualified student may be allowed to pursue a problem of his own 
choosing or choose some area of research in progress since the Department is 
devoted to a study of basic biological problems as well as some projects of an 
applied nature. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BOTN 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period a week. Prere- 
quisites, BOTN 001 and General Chemistry. Organic Chemistry strongly recom- 
mended. A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. (Patterson.) 

BOTN 102. Plant Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. Two lectures per week. The dynamics 
of populations as affected by environmental factors with special emphasis on 
the structure and composition of natural plant communities, both terrestrial 
and aquatic. (Terborgh.) 

BOTN 103. Plant Ecology Laboratory. ( 1 ) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 102 or its equivalent or concurrent enrollment therein. 
One three-hour laboratory period a week. The application of field and experi- 
mental methods to the qualitative and quantitive study of vegetation and 
environmental factors. (Terborgh.) 

For Graduates 

BOTN 204. Growth and Development. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1969-70). Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant 
science. A study of current developments in the mathematical treatment of 
growth and the effects of radiation, plant hormones, photoperiodism, and in- 
ternal biochemical balance during the development of the plant. (Barnett.) 

BOTN 209. Physiology of Algae. (2) 

Second semester (Not offered 1969-70). Prerequisite, BOTN 231, the equivalent 
in allied fields, or permission of the instructor. A study of the physiology and 
comparative biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory techniques and recent ad- 
vances in algal nutrition, photosynthesis, and growth will be reviewed. 

(Krauss.) 



University of Maryland • 69 

BOTN 210. Physiology of Algae — Laboratory. (1) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1969-70). One laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, previous or concurrent enrollment in BOTN 209. and permission of 
instructor. Special laboratory techniques involved in the study of algal nutrition. 

(Krauss.) 

BOTN 219. Advanced Plant Ecology. (3) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1969-70). Prerequisites, a working knowledge of 
elementary genetics and calculus, or permission of the instructor. Population 
dynamics, evolutionary mechanisms, and quantitative aspects of the analysis of 
natural communities. Special emphasis will be given to recent theoretical develop- 
ments. (Terborgh.) 

BOTN 230. Advanced Plant Physiology. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 101 or equivalent, and Organic Chemistry. 
A presentation of the metabolic processes occurring in plants, including the roles 
of the essential elements in these processes with special emphasis on recent 
literature. (Patterson.) 

BOTN 231. Plant Biochemistry. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1968-69) Prerequisite, BOTN 230. A treatment 
of those aspects of biochemistry especially pertinent to plants — respiration, 
photosynthesis, and organic transformations. (Galloway.) 

BOTN 232. Plant Biophysics. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1968-69). Prerequisites, BOTN 230 and at least 
one year of Physics. An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical 
phenomena in plant life processes. (Karlander.) 

BOTN 233. Plant Biochemistry-Biophysics Laboratory. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1968-69). Prerequisites, BOTN 230 and one 
year of Physics. Application of physical and chemical techniques and instru- 
mentation to the study of plants. Two four-hour laboratory periods per week. 

(Karlander and Galloway.) 

PLANT MORPHOLOGY, CYTOLOGY, AND TAXONOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BOTN 110. Plant Microtechnique. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. Laboratory periods by arrangement. Pre- 
requisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Preparation 
of temporary and permanent mounts, including selection of material, killing 
and fixing, embedding, sectioning, and staining methods; photomicrography, 
film and paper processing and preparation of photographic illustrations for re- 
search publication. (Stern.) 

BOTN 111. Plant Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 110, or equivalent. (Rappleye.) 

BOTN 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. (Brown.) 

BOTN 115. Structure of Economic Plants. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1969-70). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 111. (Rappleye.) 

BOTN 116. History and Philosophy of Botany. (1) 

First semester. Prerequisites, 20 semester hours credit in biological sciences, 
including BOTN 001 or equivalent. 



70 • Graduate School 

BOTN 117. General Plant Genetics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 001 or equivalent. (Mans.^ 

BOTN 136. Plants and Mankind. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 001 or equivalent. A survey of the plants 
which are utilized by man, the diversity of such utilization, and their historic 
and economic significance. 

BOTN 151S. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Summer session. Four two-hour laboratory demonstration periods per week 
for eight weeks. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. (Lockard.) 

BOTN 153. Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

Summer session. Prerequisites, BOTN 001 or General Biology. Four two-hour 
laboratory periods a week for eight weeks. The identification of trees, shrubs, 
and herbs, emphasizing the native plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and 
other techniques will be used. Numerous short field trips will be taken. Each 
student will make an individual collection. (Brown.) 

BOTN 161. Systematic Botany. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1968-69.) Two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN Oil or equivalent. Laboratory practice with difficult 
plant families including grasses, sedges, legumes, and composites. Field trips 
arranged. (Brown.) 

BOTN 171. Marine Plant Biology. (4) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or General Biology plus Organic 
Chemistry or the consent of the instructor. Five one-hour lectures and three, 
3-hour laboratories each week for six weeks. An introduction to the taxonomic, 
physiological and biochemical characteristics of marine plants which are basic 
to their role in the ecology of the oceans and estuaries. (Krauss, Staff.) 

For Graduates 

BOTN 212. Plant Morphology. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
BOTN Oil, BOTN 111, or equivalent. A comparative study of the morphology 
of the flowering plants, with special reference to the phylogeny and develop- 
ment of floral organs. (Rappleye.) 

BOTN 215. Plant Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
introductory genetics. An advanced study of the current status of plant genetics, 
particularly gene mutations and their relation to chromosome changes in corn 
and other favorable materials. (D. T. Morgan.) 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BOTN 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, BOTN 020, or 
equivalent. Advanced training in the basic research techniques and methods of 
plant pathology. (Curtis.) 

BOTN 127. Diagnosis and Control of Plant Diseases. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. A study of various plant diseases 
grouped according to the manner in which the host plants are affected. Emphasis 
will be placed on recognition of symptoms of the various types of diseases 
and on methods of transmission and control of the pathogens involved. (Bean.) 



University of Maryland • 71 

BOTN 128. Mycology. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1969-70). (I.ockard.) 

BOTN 152S. Field Plant Pathology. (1) 

Summer session. Daily lecture for three weeks. Prerequisite. BOTN 020, or 
equivalent. Given in accordance with demand. A course for county agents and 
teachers of vocational agriculture. Discussion and demonstration of the im- 
portant diseases in Maryland crops. (Kantzes.) 

For Graduates 

BOTN 221. Plant Virology. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1969-70). Two lectures per week on the bio- 
logical, biochemical, and biophysical aspects of viruses and virus diseases of 
plants. Prerequisites, Bachelor's degree or equivalent in any biological science 
and permission of instructor. (Corbett.) 

BOTN 222. Plant Virology Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1969-70). Two laboratories per week on the 
application and techniques for studying the biological, biochemical and bio- 
physical aspects of plant viruses. Prerequisites, Bachelor's degree or equivalent 
in any biological science and BOTN 221 or concurrent registration therein, 
and permission of the instructor. (Corbett.) 

BOTN 223. Physiology of Fungi. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1969-70). Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry and 
BOTN 101 or equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study of various 
aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemical transformations, fungal 
products, and mechanism of fungicidal action. (Sisler.) 

BOTN 224. Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. ( 1 ) 

First semester. (Not offered 1969-70). One laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisites, BOTN 223 or concurrent registration therein. Application of equip- 
ment and techniques in the study of fungal physiology. (Sisler.) 

BOTN 227. Physiology of Pathogens and Host-Pathogen Relationships. (3) 
(Not offered 1968-69). Three lecture periods a week. A study of enzymes, 
toxins, and other factors involved in pathogenicity and the relationship of 
host-pathogen interaction to disease development. (Curtis, Staff.) 

BOTN 241. Plant Nematology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prere- 
quisite, BOTN 020 or permission of instructor. (Not offered 1968-69). The 
study of plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, anatomy, taxonomy, gene- 
tics, physiology, ecology, host-parasite relations and control. Recent advances 
in this field will be emphasized. (Krusberg.) 

BOTN 301. Special Problems in Botany. (1 to 3) 

First and second semester. Credit according to time scheduled and organization 
of course. Maximum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual stu- 
dent at the discretion of the Department. This course may be organized as a 
lecture series on a specialized advanced topic, or may consist partly, or entirely, 
of experimental procedures. It may be taught by visiting lecturers, or by 
resident staff members. Problems or topics may be in: 1 — Physiology; 2 — 
Ecology; 3 — Pathology; 4 — Mycology; 5 — Nematology; 6 — Cytology; 7 — Cyto- 
genetics; 8 — Morphology; 9 — Anatomy; or 10 — Taxonomy. (Staff.) 

BOTN 302. Seminar in Botany. (1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Discussion 
of special topics and current literature in all phases of botany. (Staff.) 



72 • Graduate School 

BOTN 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credit according to work done. A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for 
the M.S. degree, and an additional minimum of 12 hours is required for the 
Ph.D. degree. Students must be qualified to pursue with profit the research 
to be undertaken. (Staff.) 

BOTN 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Profesors: Taff, Fisher, Gentry, Wright, Patrick, Dawson, Anderson, 

AND Miner. 
Associate Professors: Ashmen, Spivey, Hille, Lamone, Carroll, Nash, 

Paine, Olso, Hermanson, and Hynes. 
Assistant Professors: Gannon, Lynagh, Olson, Hargrove, Keaton, Costella, 

Falthzk, Wims, McNitt, Himes, and Zabriskie. 

The degree of Master of Business Administration is conferred on those stu- 
dents who satisfactorily complete the requirements which are set forth in the 
section of this catalog entitled, "Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business Administration." 

The degree of Doctor of Business Administration is conferred on those stu- 
dents who satisfactorily complete the requirements which are set forth in the 
section of this catalog entitled, "Requirements for the Doctor of Business 
Administration." 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BSAD, 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 021. 

BSAD 118, 119. Undergraduate Accounting Seminar. (3) (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing as an accounting major or consent of instructor. 
Enrollment limited to upper one-third of senior class. Seminar coverage of 
outstanding current non-text literature, current problems and case studies in 
accounting. 

BSAD 120. Accounting Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 020. 

BSAD 121. Cost Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 021. 

BSAD 122. Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 111. 

BSAD 123. Income Tax Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 021. 

BSAD 124. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 111. Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized 
problems in partnerships, ventures, consignments, installment sales, insurance, 
statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, and 
consolidation of parent and subsidiary accounts. 

BSAD 125. C.P.A. Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 111, or consent of instructor. A study of the nature, form 
and content of C.P.A. examinations by means of the preparation of solutions 



University of Maryland • 73 

to, and an analysis of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various 
accounting fields. 

BSAD 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 122. Advanced auditing theory and practice and report 
writing. 

BSAD 128. Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 121. A continuation of basic cost accounting with special 
emphasis on process costs, standard costs, joint costs and by-product costs. 

BSAD 129. Apprenticeship in Accounting. (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in accounting and the consent of 
the accounting staff. A period of apprenticeship is provided with nationally 
known firms of certified public accountants from about January 15 to February 
15, and for a semester after graduation. 

BSAD 130. Business St.\tistics I. (3) 

BSAD 131. Business Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. A course complementing BSAD 130. 

BSAD 132. Sample Surveys in Business and Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. A course surveying the uses of statistics 
in economic and business research. The emphasis of the discussion is directed 
toward "cross-section" analysis as distinct from "time-series" analysis (which is 
given detailed attention in BSAD 135). Topics covered include: research 
methodology, sampling techniques and design, data-collection methods, ques- 
tionnaire preparation, interviewing procedures, the evaluation of survey results, 
and a review of selected case studies. 

BSAD 134. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 130, or. equivalent. 

BSAD 135. Statistical Analysis and Forecasting. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. 

BSAD 140. Business Finance. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 021. 

BSAD 141. Security Analysis. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 140. 

BSAD 143. Credit Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 140. 

BSAD 148. Advanced Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 140. An advanced course in finance. Emphasis is placed 
upon the techniques employed by executives in their application of financial 
management practice to selected problems and cases. Critical classroom analy- 
sis is brought to bear upon actual methods and techniques used by business 
enterprises. 

BSAD 149. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

BSAD 150. Marketing Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 149. 

BSAD 151. Advertising. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 149. 



74 • Graduate School 

BSAD 153. Purchasing Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 149. 

BSAD 154. Retail Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 020 and 149. 

BSAD 156. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 130 and BSAD 149. 

BSAD 157. International Marketing. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 149 and BSAD 192. Functions of various exporting agen- 
cies; documents and procedures used in exporting and importing transactions. 
Methods of procuring goods in foreign countries; financing of import ship- 
ments; clearing through the customs districts; and distribution of goods in the 
United States. 

BSAD 158. Advertising Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 149. This course is concerned with the way in which business 
firms use advertising as a part of their marketing program. The case study 
method is used to present advertising problems taken from actual business 
practice. Cases studied illustrate problems in demand stimulation, media selec- 
tion, advertising research, testing, and statistical control of advertising. 

BSAD 160. Personnel Management I. (3) 

BSAD 161. Personnel Management II. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 160. 

BSAD 163. Labor Relations. (3) 

BSAD 164. Labor Legislation. (3) 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial relations. Cases include the 
decisions of administrative agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 

BSAD 165. Advanced Production Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 169. A study of typical problems encountered by the factory 
manager. The objective is to develop the ability to analyze and solve problems 
in management control of production and in the formulation of production 
policies. Among the topics covered are plant location, production planning and 
control, methods analysis and time study. 

BSAD 166. Business Communications. (3) 

BSAD 167. Operations Research I. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or consent of instructor. (This course also listed as 
ISM 167 and may be taken for Information Systems Management credit.) 

BSAD 168. Management and Organization Theory. (3) 

BSAD 169. Production Management. (3) 

BSAD 170. Principles of Transportation. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

BSAD 171. Traffic and Physical Distribution Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, junior standing. 

BSAD 172. Motor Transportation. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 170. 

BSAD 173. Water Transportation. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 170. 



University of Maryland • 75 

BSAD 174. CoMNfERCiAL Air Transportation. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 170. 

BSAD 175. Advanced Transportation Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 170. A critical examination of current government trans- 
portation policy and proposed solutions. Urban and intercity managerial trans- 
port problems are also considered. 

BSAD 176. Urban Transport AND Urban Development. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

BSAD 180. Business Law. (3) 

BSAD 181. Business Law. (3) 

BSAD 182. Legal Environment of Business. (3) 

Designed primarily for CPA candidates. Legal aspects of wills, insurance, 
torts and bankruptcy. Offered only in Summer School. 

BSAD 184. Public Utilities. (3) 
Prerequisites, ECON 032 or 037. 

BSAD 189. Business and Government. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 032 or 037. A study of the role of government in modern 
economic life. Social control of business as a remedy for the abuses of busi- 
ness enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of limitations 
on government regulation of private enterprise. 

BSAD 190. Risk Management. (3) 

Designed to acquaint the student with the nature and significance of risk in 
business enterprise. The problems relating to both pure and speculative risk in 
business are considered; and methods of solution involving risk assumption 
transfer, reduction, and the use of insurance are analyzed as aids in manage- 
ment decision making. 

BSAD 191. Principles OF Risk AND Insurance. (3) 

Emphasizes the use of insurance in resolving problems involving personal and 
business risks. Life, accident and health, fire and casualty, automobile, and 
marine insurance are examined as means of dealing with these risks. The theory 
and legal aspects of insurance are considered, as well as the quantitative meas- 
urement of risks. 

BSAD 192. Introduction to International Business Management. (3) 

BSAD 195. Real Estate Principles. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

BSAD 196. Urban Land Management. (3) 

BSAD 198. Structure and Operations of Industries. (3) 

BSAD 199. Business Polices. (3) 

For Graduates 

BSAD 210. Advanced Accounting Theory I. (3) 

The study of the theoretical and conceptual foundations for generally accepted 
accounting principles and practices. Recent and current literature and ideas are 
studied in depth to provide coverage of the basic postulates, assumptions, and 
standards which underlie the measurement criteria and practices of financial 
accounting. 



76 • Graduate School 

BSAD 211. Advanced Accounting Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite BSAD 210. A study of the more controversial, not generally 
accepted ideas and concepts, currently proposed as suggested solutions to cur- 
rent problems or to improve the state of the art of financial accounting meas- 
urements. 

BSAD 212. Accounting in Regulated Industries. (3) 

A study of the unique accounting problems of industries subject to cost and 
price regulations of government agencies. Included are government contracts 
and grants, rate regulations for transportation carriers and public utilities, dis- 
tribution cost analyses under the Robinson-Patman Act, and cost regulations 
of the medicare program. 

BSAD 213. The Impact of Taxation on Business Decisions. (3) 

A study of the impact of tax law and regulations on alternative business 
strategies. Particular emphasis is given to the large, multidivisional firm. 
Problems of acquisitions, mergers, spinoffs, and other divestitures are con- 
sidered from the viewpoint of profit planning, cash flow, and tax deferment. 

BSAD 214. Current Problems of Professional Practice. (3) 

A study of the current problems of the C.P.A. in the practice of the professional 
accountant: Generally accepted auditing standards, auditing practices, legal 
and ethical responsibilities, and the accounting and reporting requirements of 
the Securities and Exchange Commission. 

BSAD 220. Managerial Accounting I. (3) 

The use of accounting data for corporate financial planning and control. Topics 
included are organization for control, profit planning, budgeting, relevant cost- , 
ing, return on investment, and administration of the controUership function 
in smaller organizations. 
(Note: BSAD 220 or BSAD 240 is required of M.B.A. candidates). 

BSAD 221. Managerial Accounting II. (3) 

Prerequisite BSAD 220. The management of the controUership function in the 
large, multidivisional firm. Centralized and decentralized organizations; man- 
agement control systems in consolidated and conglomerate corporations; alter- 
native strategies for profit maximization; acquisitions and divestitures for 
increased investment return. 

BSAD 230. Statistical Analysis and Business Decisions. (3) 

This course acquaints students with the "Bayesian" approach to decision- 
making. Topics dealt with include: A review of basic probability concepts and 
theorems; the relationship between expected utility and rational action; incre- 
mental analysis; partial expectations; linear profits and costs; opportunity loss 
and the cost of uncertainty; conditional and joint probability; the binomial. 
Pascal, Poisson, Gamma, and normal probability distributions; the revision of 
probabilities in the light of new information; preposterior analysis and 
sequential decision procedures. 

BSAD 231. Theory of Survey Design. (3) 

A course examining the usefulness of statistical principles in survey design. The 
discussion covers such topics as the nature of statistical estimation, the differen- 
tial attributes of different estimators, the merits and weaknesses of available 
sampling methods and designs. Detailed attention is given to the distinctive 
aspects of simple random samples, stratified random samples, and cluster 
samples. Some time is spent on a consideration of ratio estimates and the prob- 
lems posed by biases and non-sampling errors. 



University of Maryland • 77 

BSAD 234. Managerial Analysis I. (3) Required for M.B.A. candidates. 

The processes, tools, and evaluation of quantitative analysis for management. 
Emphasizes tools and methodological problems in applying management science 
to aid managerial decision-making. Deals with the relationship of other quan- 
titative aids to managerial actions such as economic analysis and systems 
analysis. Where feasible the computer's role in management analysis will be 
emphasized and demonstrated. 

BSAD 235. Management Science — Deterministic Models. (3) 

Prerequisite, Mathematics, thru differential calculus, and BSAD 234 or consent 
of instructor. The theory and use of deterministic models in management science. 
Models are based upon optimization techniques for conditions of data certainty. 
Includes linear programming models, inventory models, and replacement models. 

BSAD 236. Management Science — Probabilistic Models. (3) 

Prerequisite. Consent of instructor. The theory and use of probabilistic models 
in management science. Models are based upon conditions of data uncertainty. 
Include queuing models, network models, game theoretic models involving 
Markov processes. 

BSAD 237. Management Simulation. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 234 and consent of instructor. Deals with the development, 
manipulation, and validity of an operational model. Production information 
and other decision systems of concern to management will be studied. Mani- 
pulation of parameter values, assumptions, and conditions. This is accom- 
plished in conjunction with the use of computer facilities at the Computer 
Science Center on campus. 

BSAD 238. Optimization Methods for Managerial Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, a course dealing with the theory and application of linear pro- 
gramming such as BSAD 235. ECON 214, or permission of instructor. The 
theory and use of optimization methods for managerial analysis. Review of 
simplex algorithm. Covers transportation algorithms, dynamic programming 
and where feasible quadratic programming, parametric programming and 
other appropriate optimization techniques. 

BSAD 240. Financial Administration. (3) 

The role of the financial manager in executive decision making. Financial 
planning, analysis, and control in such areas as the allocation of financial re- 
sources within the firm, forecasting and budgeting, capital budgeting and the 
bases for investment decisions, alternative sources of short-term and long- 
term financing and financial problems of growth. 
(Note: BSAD 240 or BSAD 220 is required of M.B.A. candidates.) 

BSAD 241. Working Capital Management. (3) 

An intensive study of short — and intermediate — term sources of funds and the 
management of cash, accounts receivable and inventories. Includes consideration 
of determinants of working capital needs, financial analysis as related to 
short-term financing problems, estimation of fund requirements, patterns of 
fund requirements, and major types of loan arrangements. Case studies, supple- 
mented with outside readings. 

BSAD 242. Long-Term Capital Management. (3) 

An intensive study of long-term financing, return on investment and cost of 
capital. Particular attention is paid to appraising alternative forms of long- 
term financing, methods of measuring return on investment, and problems such 
as measuring the cost of capital of cyclical companies and growth companies. 
Case studies, supplemented with outside readings. 



78 • Graduate School 

BSAD 243. Investment Analysis. (3) 

Evaluation of debt and equity security alternatives available for the employment 
of the investment fund. Analysis of economic and financial data of the national 
economy, the industry, and the company to arrive at the fundamental value 
of a security. Study of securities markets as independent regulators of invest- 
ment values. Motives, needs, and basic ingredients in the selection and super- 
vision of the portfolio. 

BSAD 244. Portfolio Management. (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 243 or consent of instructor. The process of investment. 
Selection and supervision of securities appropriate for the requirements and 
objectives of both the individual and institutional investor. Underlying con- 
siderations necessary for the continued success of the investment program. 
Critical analysis of case studies in portfolio management. Effects of temporary 
changes on investment decisions. 

BSAD 245. Financial Institutions. (3) 

Provides an analysis of the structure of financial institutions in the American 
economy, including commercial banking and non-banking organizations which 
serve business and consumers. Topics covered include determinants of the de- 
mand for, supply of, funds and the role of financial institutions in channeling 
financial capital among the various sectors of the American economy. 

BSAD 247. International Financial Administration. (3) 

Deals with the problems of financial administration of the multinational firm. 
Includes the financing of investment abroad and management of assets in 
differing financial environments as well as the financing of exports and imports. 
Also includes consideration of national and international financial institutions 
as they relate to the international operations of American and foreign business 
firms. 

BSAD 250. Marketing Administration. (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates with concentrations in Marketing. Principal 
objectives of the course are: to develop an understanding of the problems and 
goals of marketing executives, to develop competence in the analysis and solu- 
tion of marketing problems, and to evaluate specific marketing efforts as they 
contribute to a coordinated total marketing program. Attention will be focused 
on product, price, and service policies, market characteristics, channel selection, 
promotional policies and organization structure. 

BSAD 251. Marketing Communications Management. (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in Marketing. This course is 
concerned with the part that advertising, promotion, public relations and 
related efforts play in the accomplishment of a firm's total marketing objec- 
tives. Its purpose is to develop competence in the formulation of mass com- 
munications, objectives in budget optimization, media appraisal, theme selection, 
program implementation and management, and results measurement. 

BSAD 252. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in Marketing. The course deals 
with the process of acquiring, classifying, and interpreting primary and sec- 
ondary marketing data needed for intelligent, profitable marketing decisions. 
Through readings, discussion, and case studies, efforts are made to develop 
skill in evaluating the appropriateness of alternative methodologies such as 
the inductive, deductive, survey, observational, and experimental. Consideration 
is also given to recent developments in the systematic recording and use of in- 
ternal and external data needed for marketing decisions. 



University of Maryland • 79 

BSAD 254. Marketing Channels Analysis. (3) 

A course that focuses on the fundamentals explaining alternate channels of 
distribution and the roles played by various intermediaries, the evolution of 
business structures in marketing, reasons for change, and projected marketing 
patterns for the future. M.B.A. candidates may register with permission of in- 
structor. 

BSAD 256. Quantitative Methods in Marketing: Demand and Cost 
Analysis. (3) 
Consideration is given to quantitative methods in the analysis and prediction 
of market demand and marketing costs. Topics in connection with demand 
include market potentials, sales forecasting, consumer analysis, promotional 
and pricing results, and the like. Cost analysis focuses on allocation of costs by 
marketing functions, products, territories, customers and marketing personnel. 
Statistical techniques, mathematics, models and other methods are utilized in 
the solution of marketing problems. M.B.A. candidates may register with per- 
mission of instructor. 

BSAD 257. Theory in Marketing. (3) 

An inquiry into the problems and elements of theory development in general 
with specific references to the field of Marketing. A critical analysis and evalua- 
tion of past and contemporary efforts to formulate theories of marketing and 
to integrate theories from the social sciences into a marketing framework. 
Attention is given to the development of concepts in all areas of marketing 
thought and to their potential application in the business firm. 

BSAD 258. International Marketing. (3) 

Deals with environmental, organizational, and financial aspects of international 
marketing as well as problems of marketing research, pricing, channels of 
distribution, product policy, and communications which face U.S. firms trading 
with foreign firms or which face foreign firms in their operations. 

BSAD 260. Management Planning and Control Systems. (3) 

Concerned with planning and control systems for the fulfillment of organiza- 
tional objectives. Identification of organizational objectives, responsibility cen- 
ters, information needs and information network. Case studies of integrated 
planning and control systems. 

BSAD 261. Collective Bargaining — Current Problems and Issues. (3) 

Examines contemporary problems and issues associated with collective bar- 
gaining. Includes such topics as methods of handling industrial disputes, legal 
restrictions on various collective bargaining activities, theory and philosophy of 
collective bargaining, and internal union problems. 

BSAD 262. Administration of Labor Relations. (3) 

Deals with labor relations at the plant level. Emphasizes the negotiation and 
administration of labor contracts. Includes union policy and influence on per- 
sonnel management activities. 

BSAD 263. Comparative Theories of Organization. (3) 

Emphasizes business and other types of complex organizations. Theories of for- 
mal and informal organizations are covered. Analyzes the content, interrela- 
tionships, and similarities between current major schools of organization 
thought. 

BSAD 264. Behavioral Factors in Management. (3) 
Required of M.B.A. candidates. 
A critical analysis of the impact of the behavioral sciences on traditional con- 



80 • Graduate School 

cepts of management as process and as organization. Included within the area 
of analysis are such subjects as human motivation, human relations, morale, 
status, role, organization, communication, bureaucracy, the executive role, lead- 
ership and training. 

BSAD 266. Personnel Management: Manpower Procurement and 
Development. (3) 
An "in depth" treatment of problems and techniques involved in obtaining 
and developing a competent work force. Manpower forecasting, job analysis, 
time study, recruitment techniques, psychological tests, interviews, application 
blanks, references, programmed instruction role playing, and sensitivity training 
are typical topics included. 

BSAD 267. Personnel Management: Manpower Compensation and 

Evaluation. (3) 

After a work force has been assembled and developed (BSAD 266), the 
manager must see to it that its potential is converted into efficient and con- 
tinuing performance. This course provides an "in depth" analysis of the role 
of employee compensation and appraisal in accomplishing this end. Typical 
topics include wage theory, incentive systems, wage decision criteria, job 
evaluation, profit sharing, wage surveys, forced choice rating, critical incidents, 
appraisal interviews, and fringe benefits. 

BSAD 269. Application of Behavioral Science to Business. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 264 or permission of professor. This course stresses case 
analysis of behavioral knowledge applied to management problems. Typical 
topics include analysis of modes for introducing change, group versus organi- 
zational goals, organizational barriers to personal growth, the effect of authority 
systems on behavior, and the relationship between technology and social 
structure. 

BSAD 270. Transportation Theory and Analysis. (3) 

This course examines the transportation system and its components. Key 
topics in the development and present form of transport in both the United 
States and other countries are considered together with theoretical concepts 
employed in the analysis of transport problems. 

BSAD 271. Transport and Public Policy. (3) 

An intensive study of the nature and consequences of relations between govern- 
ments and agencies thereof, carriers in the various modes, and users of 
transport services. Topical areas subjected to examination and analysis include 
the control of transport firms by regulatory bodies, taxation of carriers, methods 
employed in the allocation of funds to the construction, operation, and main- 
tenance of publicly-provided transport facilities, and the direct subsidization of 
services supplied by privately-owned entities. Additional problems considered 
include labor and safety. Comparative international transport policies and prob- 
lems are also examined. 

BSAD 272. Management of Physical Distribution. (3) 

Focuses on managerial practices required to optimally fulfill the physical 
movement needs of extractive, manufacturing, and merchandising firms. At- 
tention is given to the total cost approach to physical distribution. Interrelations 
among purchased transport services, privately-supplied transport services, ware- 
housing, inventory control, materials handling, packaging, and plant location 
are considered. An understanding of the communications network to sup- 
port physical distribution is developed in conjunction with study of the prob- 
lems of coordination between the physical movement management function 



University of Maryland • 81 

and other functional areas within the business firm — ^such as accounting, finance, 
marketing, and production. 

BSAD 273. Transportation Strategies. (3) 

Treats organization structure, policies, and procedures employed in the admin- 
istration of inter — and intraurban transport firms. Problems receiving atten- 
ion include managerial development, operational and financial planning and 
control, demand analysis, pricing, promotional policies, intra — and inter- 
modal competitive and complementary relationships, and methods for accom- 
modating public policies designed to delimit the managerial discretion of car- 
rier executives. Administrative problems peculiar to publicly-owned and operated 
transport entities are also considered.. 

BSAD 274. Business Logistics. (3) 

Concentrates on the design and application of methods for the solution of 
advanced physical movement problems of business firms. Provides thorough 
coverage of a variety of analytical techniques relevant to the solution of these 
problems. Where appropriate, experience will be provided in the utilization 
of computers to assist in managerial logistical decision-making. 

BSAD 275. Transportation Science. (3) 

Focuses on the application of quantitative and qualitative techniques of 
analysis to managerial problems drawn from firms in each of the various modes 
of transport. Included is the application of simulation to areas such as the 
control of equipment selection and terminal and line operations. The applica- 
tion of advanced analytical techniques to problems involving resource use 
efficiency within the transportation industry and between transportation and 
other sectors of he economy is an integral part of the course. 

BSAD 281. Private Enterprise and Public Policy. (3) 

Examines the executive's social and ethical responsibilities to his employees, 
customers, and to the general public. Consideration is given to the conflicts 
occasioned by competitive relationships in the private sector of business and 
the effect of institutional restraints. TTie trends in public policy and their 
future effect upon management are examined. For comparative purposes, 
several examples of planned societies are considered. 

BSAD 282. Product, Production and Pricing Policy. (3) 

Required of M.B.A. Candidates. The application of economic theory to the 
business enterprise in respect to the determination of policy and the handling 
of management problems with particular reference to the firm producing a 

complex line of products. Nature of competition. Pricing policy. Interrelationship 
of production and marketing problems. Basic types of cost. Control systems. 
Theories of depreciation and investment and the impact of each upon costs. 

BSAD 283. Management Policy Formation. (3) 

An integrative course which applies students' knowledge of the various func- 
tional areas in business administration to the formulation, execution, and 
evaluation of managerial policies. The viewpoint of the chief administrative 
officers and board of directors is emphasized. 

BSAD 284. Policy Issues in Public Utilities. (3) 

A critical analysis of current developments in regulatory policy and issues 
arising among public utilities, regulatory agencies, and the general public. 
Emphasis is placed on the electric, gas, water, and communications industries 
in both the public and private sectors of the economy. Changing and emerging 
problems stressed include those pertinent to cost analysis, depreciation, finance, 
taxes, rate of return, the rate base, differential rate-making, and labor. In 



82 • Graduate School 

addition, the growing importance of technological developments and their 
impact on state and federal regulatory agencies are explored. 

BSAD 285. Business Research Methodology. (3) 

Covers the nature, scope, and application of research methodology. The 
identification and formulation of research designs applicable to business and 
related fields. Required of D.B.A. students. 

BSAD 287. International Business Administration. (3) 

Examines the international business environment as it affects company policy 
and procedures. Integrates the business functions undertaken in international 
operations through analysis in depth and comprehensive case studies. This 
course can be credited toward the 18-hour requirement for a major field in 
the D.B.A. program. 

BSAD 288. Management of the Multinational Firm. (3) 

A course dealing with the problems and policies of international business 
enterprise at the management level. Considers management of a multinational 
enterprise as well as management within foreign units. The multinational firm 
as a socio-econometric institution is analyzed in detail. Cases in comparative 
management are utilized. 

BSAD 289. Development and Trends in Production Management. (3) 

Case studies of production problems in a number of industries. The course 
focuses attention on decisions concerning operating programs and manufactur- 
ing policies at the top level of manufacturing. Basic concepts of process and 
product technology are covered, taking into consideration the scale, operating 
range, capital cost, method of control, and degree of mechanization at each 
successive stage in the manufacturing process. 

BSAD 298 (1-9) Independent Study in Business Administration. 

BSAD 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

BSAD 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

CENTER OF MATERIALS RESEARCH 

Director: Ellis R. Lippincott. 
Associate Director: Jimmie W. Brasch. 
Assistant Director: W. K. Jenne. 

Advisory Committee: Drs. Armstrong, Bhagat, Lippincott, Miller and 
Spain. 

The Center of Materials Research comprises a faculty interested in experi- 
mental and theoretical studies in materials. The Center serves as an ideal place 
to bring together physicists, chemists, and metallurgists to work on problems of 
mutual interest to the advantage of all. The Faculty is made up of members 
from the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry, Chemical Engi- 
neering, Mechanical Engineering and the Institute of Molecular Physics. Mem- 
bers of the Center teach both undergraduate and graduate courses in the aca- 
demic departments and supervise thesis research of graduate students. 

The major function of the Center is to increase significantly the scientific 
competence and breadth of its members who will have at their command unique 
central facilities, laboratory and technical personnel for the development of a 
truly strong program in materials research. 



University of Maryland • 83 

The following list of examples of the materials program is not meant to be 
exhaustive but serves to illustrate the range of the program: studies of inter- 
action of matter with electromagnetic radiation, electronic structure and funda- 
mental interaction in solids, high pressure phenomena, intermolecular inter- 
actions, spectra and structure, mechanical properties, thermodynamics and 
kinetics reactions in materials, electronic and magnetic properties of materials, 
characterization of materials, neutron scattering and diffraction, metallurgy and 
material properties of polymers. Funds are available for qualified individuals 
for appointments as research assistant and for post-doctoral fellowships. 

The Center also participates in providing a concentration of studies in ma- 
terials science in collaboration with these departments. 

MATERIALS SCIENCE 

Courses are offered to graduate students in the Departments of Chemistry, 
Physics and Astronomy, Chemical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, 
and lead to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Enter- 
ing students are expected to have an undergraduate degree in chemistry, physics 
or engineering with a strong background in a closely related second discipline. 

Research problems in materials may be supervised by members of the faculty 
from the Departments of Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy, Chemical Engi- 
neering, Mechanical Engineering and the Institute for Molecular Physics. De- 
tailed information may be obtained by writing the heads of these departments 
concerned. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Beckmann, Bischoff, Duffey, Gomezplata, Johnson, March- 

ELLO, ScHROEDER, SILVERMAN. 

Associate Professors: Arsenault, Cadman, Munno, Skolnick, Smith. 
Assistant Professors: Bolsaitis, Gentry, Regan. 
Lecturers: Belcher, Goldman. 

The Department directs the programs of graduate students who plan to qual- 
ify for the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in the Depart- 
ment of Chemical Engineering. Courses in the subject areas of chemical, mate- 
rials and nuclear engineering, applied polymer science and bioengineering are 
listed below. 

The basic requirements for the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy are set forth on pages 27 and 33 of this catalog. Supplemental regu- 
lations for guidance of candidates for these degrees in the Department of 
Chemical Engineering are available in the department office. 

APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE 

An interdisciplinary special area in polymer science is offered by the Depart- 
ment of Chemical Engineering leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The program is open to qualified students holding bach- 
elor degrees in engineering, physics, and chemistry. Courses to satisfy the 
major requirements may be selected from those offered within the Departments 



84 • Graduate School 

of Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, and Physics. 
Courses to satisfy the minor requirements may be chosen from related courses 
in engineering, mathematics, and the pure sciences. 

BIOENGINEERING 

This special area is offered by the Department of Chemical Engineering as 
part of a joint effort with other engineering and interdisciplinary groups through- 
out the University. The program leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy is open to qualified students holding Bachelor degrees 
in Chemical Engineering. Courses to satisfy the major requirements in Bioengi- 
neering are selected from the regular Chemical Engineering offerings with at 
least 6 hours of these being courses designated as Bioengineering. Courses to 
satisfy the minor may be chosen from Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Bio- 
logical or Medical Sciences, or other engineering fields with the approval of 
the Department. 

ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

This program is given jointly by the Department of Chemical Engineering 
and the Department of Mechanical Engineering and offers courses of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The pro- 
gram is open to qualified students holding Bachelor degrees in engineering, the 
physical sciences, and mathematics. 

Courses to satisfy the major requirements in Engineering Materials must be 
selected from those designated as materials engineering by the Chemical and 
Mechanical Engineering Departments. Courses to satisfy the minor may be 
chosen from Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or other engineering courses 
including chemical and mechanical engineering. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

This program is offered by the Department of Chemical Engineering and 
represents courses of study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The program is open to qualified students holding bach- 
elor degrees in engineering, the physical sciences and mathematics. Courses to 
satisfy the major requirements in Nuclear Engineering must be selected from 
those designated as nuclear engineering by the Chemical Engineering Depart- 
ment. Courses to satisfy the minor may be chosen from Chemistry, Physics, 
Mathematics, or other engineering courses including chemical engineering. 

THERMODYNAMICS AND ANALYSIS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH 109. Chemical Process Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. ENCH 050. Estimation of thermodynamic properties 
of pure substances and mixtures. Chemical and phase equilibria in ideal and 
non-ideal systems. Thermodynamic analysis of processes, equilibrium stage 
operations, thermodynamics of chemically reacting systems. (Marchello.) 

ENCH 116. Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MATH 021 and ENCH 127. Mathematical tech- 



University of Maryland • 85 

nique applied to the analysis and solution of Chemical Engineering problems. 
Use of differentiation, integration, differential equations, partial differential 
equations and integral transforms. Application of infinite series, numerical and 
statistical methods. (Gomezplata.) 

ENCH 152 Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 109. Application of digital and analog 
computers to chemical engineering problems. Numerical methods, programming, 
differential equations, curve fitting, amplifiers and analog circuits. (Cadman.) 

ENCH 154. Numerical and Statistical Analysis. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 116. Use of probability and statistics in 
chemical engineering. Probability, normal distribution and measure of varia- 
bility. The chi square, and the t-test. Correlation and regression analysis. Intro- 
duction to analysis of variance and sequentral analysis. (Smith.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 203. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Advanced application of the general thermodynamic methods 
to chemical engineering problems. First and second law consequences: estima- 
tion and correlation of thermodynamic properties; phase and chemical reaction 
equilibria. (Smith.) 

ENCH 209. Complex Equilibrium Stage Processes. (3) 

Second semester. The theory and application of complex equilibrium stages. 
Binary and multicomponent distillation; multicomponent absorption; extraction; 
liquefaction. (Glomb.) 

ENCH 253. Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 203. (Staff.) 

TRANSPORT AND TRANSFER PHENOMENA 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH 127, 129, 131. Transfer and Transport Processes I, II. III. (4, 3, 3) 
First, second, and first semesters, respectively. Prerequisite, ENCH 050. A three 
semester sequence of courses concerning the theory and applications of molecular 
and turbulent transport phenomena. Principles of fluid mechanics, mass transfer 
and heat transfer. Dimensional analysis, analogy between heat, mass and 
momentum transfer. Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, convective heat and 
mass transfer. Steady and unsteady state diffusion and conduction, simultaneous 
heat and mass transfer, interphase transfer, boundary layer theory. The 
equilibrium stage concept and its application to absorption, extraction, and 
distillation. Analysis of multiple stage processes. Principles of radiant heat 
transfer, evaporation, filtration, crystallization, drying, condensation, boiling, 
humidification, ion exchange, and phase separations. (Smith, Marchello, Regan.) 

ENCH 137. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. (3) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 129. Application of Chemical 
Engineering process and unit operation principles in small scale semi-commer- 
cial equipment. Data from experimental observations are used to evaluate 
performance and efficiency of operations. Emphasis is placed on correct presen- 
tation of results in report form. (Cadman, Regan.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 205. Transport Phenomena. (3) 

First semester. Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint 



86 • Graduate School 

of the basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and tur- 
bulent flow; boundary layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport; with 
specific application to complex chemical engineering situations. 

(Marchello, Bischoff.) 
ENCH 207. Transfer Operations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 205. Applications of heat, mass and 
momentum transfer theory to chemical engineering problems. Transfer co- 
efficients; heat, mass and momentum analogies; two-phase flow; boiling and 
condensation; radiation heat transfer. (Marchello, Regan.) 

ENCH 257. Advanced Topics in Transfer Theory. (3) 

First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite,. ENCH 207. (Glomb.) 

ENCH 259. Advanced Topics in Separation Processes. (3) 

Second semester. Offered in alternate years. (Marchello.) 

CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH i45. Chemical Engineering Kinetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 050. Fundamentals of chemical reaction 
kinetics and their application to the design and operation of chemical reactions. 
Reaction rate theory, homogeneous reactions in batch and flow systems, adsorp- 
tion, heterogeneous reactions and catalysis, electrochemical reactions. Catalytic 
reactor design. (Bischoff'.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 211. Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Second semester. The theory and application of chemical reaction kinetics to 
reactor design. Reaction rate theory; homogeneous batch and flow reactors; 
fundamentals of catalysis; design of heterogeneous flow reactors. 

(Beckmann, Marchello.) 

ENCH 255. Advacned Topics in Chemical Reaction Systems. (3) 
First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 211. 

(Gomezplata.) 

PROCESS SYSTEMS DYNAMICS AND DESIGN 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH 147. Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

Second or first semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 129. Utilization of chemical 
engineering principles for the design of process equipment. Typical problems in 
the design of chemical plants. Comprehensive reports are required. 

(Schroeder.) 

ENCH 149. Chemical Engineering Economics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 129. Principles of engineering economy 
applied to chemical processes. Optimizing methods in the design and operation 
of industrial processes. Determination of investment and operating costs for 
chemical plants. (Schroeder.) 

ENCH 150. Chemical Process Development. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 129. Chemical process industries from the 
standpoint of technology, raw materials, products and processing equipment. 
Operations of the major chemical processes and industries combined with 
quantitative analysis of process requirements and yields. (Schroeder.) 



University of Maryland • 87 

ENCH 155. Chemical Process Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites. ENCH 129, 145, concurrently. Experimental study 
of the fundamentals of various chemical processes through laboratory and small 
semi-commercial scale equipment. Reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics, heat and 
mass transfer. (Glomb.) 

ENCH 157. Chemical Engineering Systems Analysis and Dynamics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Differential Equations or consent of instructor. 
Dynamic response applied to process systems. Goals and modes of control; 
LaPlace transformations; representation, analysis and synthesis of simple control 
systems; closed loop response; dynamic testing; role of modern computing 
machinery in process control. (Cadman, Smith.) 

ENCH 159. Dynamics and Control Laroratory. (1) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 157 concurrently. Methods of process 
control. Use of experimental and mathematical models of control systems. 

(Cadman.) 

ENCH 161. Unit Operation and Processes of Air Pollution Control. (3) 
Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor. Theory 
and application of methods for the control and removal of airborne materials. 
Principles of design and performance of air quality control equipment. 

(Marchello.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 223. Process Engineering and Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. Coordination of chemical engineering and eco- 
nomics to advanced process engineering and design. Optimization of invest- 
ment and operating costs. Solution of typical problems encountered in the 
design of chemical engineering plants. (Schroeder.) 

ENCH 235. Chemical Process Dynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Differential equations or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of open and closed control loops and their elements; dynamic re- 
sponse of processes; choice of variables and linkages; dynamic testing and 
synthesis; noise and drift; chemical process systems analysis; strategies for 
optimum operation. (Cadman, Smith.) 

ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH 170. Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials. (3) 

A comprehensive survey of the atomic and electronic structure of solids with 
emphasis on the relationship of structure to the physical and mechanical prop- 
erties. (Skolnick.) 

ENCH 171. Physical Chemistry of Engineering Materals. (3) 

Equilibrium multicomponent systems and relationship to the phase diagram. 
Thermodynamics of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Diffusion in 
solids, kinetics of reactions in solids. (Bolsaitis.) 

ENCH 172. Technology of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Relationship of properties of solids to their engineering applications. Criteria 
for the choice of materials for electronic, mechanical and chemical properties. 
Particular emphasis on the relationships between structure of the solid and 
its potential engineering application. (Staff.) 

ENCH 173. Processing of Engineering Materials. (3) 

The effect of processing on the structure of engineering materials. Processes 



88 • Graduate School 

considered include refining, melting and solidification, purification by zone 
refining, vapor phase processing, mechanical working and heat treatments. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 350. Structure of Engineering Materials. (3) 

The structural aspects of crystalline and amorphous solids and relationship to 
bonding types. Point and space groups. Summary of diffraction theory and 
practice. The Reciprocal Lattice. Relationships of the microscopically meas- 
ured properties to crystal symmetry. Structural aspects of defects in crystalline 
solids. (Skolnick.) 

ENCH 351. Electronic Structure of Engineering Solids. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Description of electronic behavior 
in engineering solids. Behavior of conductors, semiconductors and insulators 
in electrical fields. Thermal, magnetic and optional properties of engineering 
solids. (Staff.) 

ENCH 359. Special Topics in Structure of Engineering Materuls. (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENCH 360. Chemical Physics of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Thermodynamics and statistical 
mechanics of engineering solids. Cohesion, thermodynamic properties. Theory 
of solid solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, electrical, and magnetic 
phenomena in solids. Chemical thermodynamics, phase transitions and ther- 
modynamic properties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Thermo- 
dynamics of defects in solids. (Bolsaitis.) 

ENCH 361. Kinetics of Reactions in Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 360 or ENME 360. The theory of thermally activated 
processes in solids as applied to diffusion, nucleation and interface motion. 
Cooperative and diffusionless transformations. Applications selected from 
processes such as allotropic transformations, precipitation, martensite for- 
mation, solidification, ordering, and corrosion. (Staff.) 

ENCH 369. Special Topics in the Chemical Physics of Materlvls. (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENCH 370. Rheology of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Mechanical behavior with emphasis 
on the continuum point of view and its relationship to structural types. Elas- 
ticity, viscoelasticity, anelasticity and plasticity in single phase and multiphase 
materials. (Smith.) 

ENCH 371. Dislocations in Crystalline Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. The nature and interactions of de- 
fects in crystalline solids, with primary emphasis on dislocations. The elastic 
and electric fields associated with dislocations. Effects of imperfections on 
mechanical and physical properties. (Arsenault.) 

ENCH 372. Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 370 or ENME 370. The mechanical properties of single 
crystals, polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Yield strength, work harden- 
ing, fracture, fatigue and creep are considerd in terms of fundamental ma- 
terial properties. (Arsenault.) 



University of Maryland • 89 

ENCH 379. Special Topics in the Mechanical Behavior of 
Engineering. Solids. (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

ENCH 380. Experimental Methods in Materials Science. (3) 

Methods of measuring the structural aspects of materials. Optical and electron 
microscopy. Microscopic analytical techniques. Resonance methods. Electrical, 
optical and magnetic measurement techniques. Thermodynamic methods. 

(Staff.) 

ENCH 381. Diffraction Techniques in Materials Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Theory of diffraction of electrons, 
neutrons and x-rays. Strong emphasis on diffraction methods as applied to 
the study of defects in solids. Short range order, thermal vibrations, stacking 
faults, microstrain. (Skolnick.) 

ENCH 389. Special Topics in Experimental Techniques in 
Materials Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

ENCH 390. Polymeric Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350 or consent of instructor. A com- 
prehensive summary of the fundamentals of particular interest in the science 
and applications of polymers. Polymer single crystals, transformations in 
polymers, fabrication of polymers as to shape and internal structure. (Smith.) 

ENCH 391. Special Topics in Materials Technology. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCH 140. Introduction to Nuclear Technology. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites. MATH 021 and 
PHYS 021. Engineering problems of the nuclear energy complex, including basic 
theory, nuclear reactor design, and isotopic and chemical separations. Emphasis 
is on the nuclear fission reactor. (Staff.) 

ENCH 142. Environmental Considerations of Nuclear Engineering. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Protection of the public and the environment from the hazards of nuclear 
energy operations. Handling and disposal of gaseous, liquid and solid radio- 
active wastes. Meteorological, hydrological and geological phases. Typical 
problems from mining of ores through nuclear reactor operations and chemical 
separations. Legislative and economic factors, site selection, plant design and 
operation as related to the environment. (Silverman, Munno.) 

ENCH 148. Nuclear Technology Laboratory. (2 to 4) 

One or two lectures, and one or two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 003, PHYS 021, MATH 021, ENCH 140, or equivalents, and permission 
of instructor. Techniques of detecting and making measurements of nuclear or 
high energy radiation. Radiation safety experiments. Both a sub-critical reactor 
and the 10-KW swimming pool critical reactor are sources of radiation 

(Silverman, Munno.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 302, 303. Nuclear Reactor Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of 



90 • Graduate School 

instructor. Design, construction and operation of typical nuclear reactors in- 
cluding general design, nuclear reactor theory, materials of construction, heat 
transfer, and control. (Staff.) 

ENCH 308, 309. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, permission of 
instructor, ENCH 148, 302, 303, 305, or equivalent. The University of Mary- 
land 10-KW swimming pool reactor is employed in experiments on reactor 
startup and operation, shielding, control, neutron flux distributions, neutron 
and gamma spectrum, cross section measurements. (Staff.) 

ENCH 311. Nuclear Fuel and Waste Processing. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Processing of nuclear fuel and treat- 
ment of nuclear waste. Includes: (1) processing of uranium, thorium, and other 
ores; (2) chemical separation of plutonium, uranium, fission products and other 
elements from materials irradiated in nuclear reactors; (3) treatment of radio- 
active wastes; (4) isotopic separation of U235; and (5) isotopic separation of 
heavy water and other materials. (Silverman.) 

ENCH 313. Selected Topics in Nuclear Engineering. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Topics of current 
interest and recent advances in the nuclear engineering field. Because of the 
rapid advances in the field, information on special topics of much practical 
importance is continually becoming available. Since the content changes, re- 
registration may be permitted. (Staff.) 

ENCH 315, 316. Radiation Engineering. (3, 3) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
An analysis of such radiation applications as synthesizing chemicals, preserv- 
ing foods, control of industrial processes. Design of irradiation installations, 
e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, electronuclear machine arrangement, and 
chemonuclear reactors. (Silverman.) 

ENCH 317. Radiation Effects Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Effect of massive doses of radiation on 
the properties of matter for purposes other than those pointed toward nuclear 
power. Radiation processing, radiation-induced chemical reactions, and con- 
version of radiation energy; isotope power sources. (Silverman.) 

ENCH 320. Nuclear Reactor Physics L (3) 

First semester. Introduction to neutron physics. The theory of neutron detec- 
tion instruments including the neutron chopper and solid state detectors. Ele- 
ments of neutron slowing-down theory. The Boltzman transport equation will 
be developed together with approximations such as Pn, Sn, and Fermi Age. 
Nuclear systems will be theoreticaly treated utilizng the diffusion approxima- 
tion, the Fermi Age method and the P-3 method. Elementary temperature and 
time dependence. (Munno.) 

ENCH 321. Nuclear Reactor Physics IL (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite: ENCH 320. Mathematical treatment of nuclear 
reactor systems. To be presented in this course are the foundations of nuclear 
reactor kinetics, the multigroup treatment, reflected reactor theory, heterogene- 
ous reactors, perturbation theory. Thermaiization theory and the pulse and 
sine-wave techniques. Introduction to variational methods. (Munno.) 

ENCH 331. Neutral Particle Transport Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite: ENCH 320 or permission of instructor. Trans- 
port equations for neutrons and gamma rays. Infinite space and Milne prob- 



University of Maryland • 91 

lems. Spherical harmonic and variational methods. Special methods of solv- 
ing transport equations. (Munno.) 

ENCH 333. Radiation Shielding and Energy Deposition. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite: ENCH 320 or permission of instructor. A study 
of the interactions of nuclear radiations with matter. Includes electron, gamma 
and neutron attenuation, dose calculations, chemical changes, heat generation 
and removal in shields. (Goldman.) 

ENCH 337. Nuclear Reactor Dynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites; ENCH 321. Principles of reactor control 
and operation. Neutron kinetics, temperature and coolant flow effects, trans- 
fer function, stochastic processes. Stability analysis. Accident calculations. 
Use of analog computer for simulation and problem solving. (Staff.) 

APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE 

For Advanced Undergraduates and. Graduates 

ENCH 190. Introduction to Polymer Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The elements of the chemistry, physics, pro- 
cessing methods, and engineering applications of polymers. (Silverman, Smith.) 

ENCH 192. Applied Physical Chemistry of Polymers. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 187; co-requisite CHEM 189; or consent of instructor. 
Kinetics of formation of high polymers, determination of molecular weight and 
structure, and applied thermodynamics and phase equilibria of polymer solu- 
tions. (Silverman.) 

ENCH 198. Polymer Technology Laboratory. (3) 

One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, ENCH 192 or 
consent of instructor. Laboratory fee $10.00. Measurement of molecular weight 
by viscosimetry, osmometric and light scattering methods. Application of x-ray, 
NMR, ESR, spectroscopy, molecular relaxation, microscopy and electron micro- 
scopy to the determination of polymer structure. Effects of ultraviolet light 
and high energy radiation. (Smith.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 284. Polymer Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 190 or consent of instructor. Application and correlation 
of mechanical and dielectric relaxation, NMR, electron microscopy, x-ray dif- 
fraction, diffusion and electrical properties to the mechanical properties and 
structure of polymers in the solid state. (Skolnick, Silverman.) 

ENCH 286. Polymer Processing and Applications. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 190 or consent of instructor. Application of theoretical 
knowledge of polymers to industrial processes. An analysis of polymerization, 
stabilization, electrical, rheological, thermal, mechanical and optical proper- 
ties and their influence on processing conditions and end use applcations. 

(Smith.) 

SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

ENCH 133, 134. Chemical Engineering Seminar. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. Oral and written reports on recent developments 
in chemical engineering and the process industries. Fall and spring semesters. 

(Staff.) 



92 • Graduate School 

ENCH 165. Research. (2 or 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the staff. Investigation 
of a research project under the direction of one of the staff members. Com- 
prehensive reports are required. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ENCH 201. Graduate Seminar. (1) (Staff.) 

ENCH 301. Seminar in Nuclear Engineering. (1) (Staff.) 

ENCH 397. Seminar in Engineering Materials. (1) (Staff.) 

ENCH 247. Special Problems in Chemical Engineering. 

ENCH 314. Special Problems in Nuclear Engineering. 

ENCH 398. Special Problems in Engineering Materials. (Staff.) 

ENCH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

ENCH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor and Head: Vanderslice* 

Professor and Associate Head: Jaquith. 

Professors: Atkinson, Benedict*, Grim, Keeney, Lippincott, Pratt, Purdy, 

Reeve, Rollinson, Stewart, Svirbely, Veitch, and White. 
Research Professors: Bailey, Zwanzig*. 
Associate Professors: Boyd, DeRocco*, Gardner, Henery-Logan, Holm- 

lund, Huheey, Kasler, Krisher*, Lakshmanan, Munn*, Pickard, 

Sengers*, Stuntz, and Viola. 
Assistant Professors: Bellama, Carruthers, Ginter*, Jackson, Jarvis, 

Khanna, Mazzocchi, Miller, O'Haver, Spain*, Staley, and Verb eke. 

The Chemistry Department offers programs leading to the M.S. or the Ph.D. 
degrees in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic 
chemistry, physical chemistry, and chemical physics. For the latter program, 
the Chemistry Department cooperates with the Institute for Molecular Physics 
and the Department of Physics and Astronomy in both M.S. and Ph.D. 
programs. 

Departmental regulations concerning qualifying and comprehensive examina- 
tions and other matters pertaining to course work have been assembled for the 
guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are 
available from the Department of Chemistry. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 121. Intermediate Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 019 or 021, and CHEM 033 or 037. A continuation of CHEM 019 or 
021, including volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric, and colorimetric methods 
Intended for students in agricultural chemistry, general physical science, science 
education, etc. Not open to chemistry majors. (Stuntz.) 

* Member of the Institute for Molecular Physics. 



University of Maryland • 93 

CHEM 123. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 189 or concurrent registration therein. A continuation of CHEM 021, in- 
cluding volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric, and colorimetric methods. Re- 
quired of all students majoring in chemistry. (Purdy.) 

CHEM 125. Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite. CHEM 189. A study of the application of physicochemical methods 
to analytical chemistry. Techniques such as polarography, potentiometry. con- 
ductivity and spectrophotometry will be included. (Purdy.) 

CHEM 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 019 or 021, 
and consent of the instructor. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydro- 
gen, nitrogen, halogen and certain functional groups. (Kasler.) 

For Graduates 

CHEM 206, 208. Spectrographic Analysis. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration limited. Prerequi- 
sites, CHEM 184 and consent of the instructor. (White.) 

CHEM 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Registration lim- 
ited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. CHEM 221 is a prerequisite for CHEM 
223. A study of the use of the microscope in chemistry. CHEM 223 is de- 
voted to study of the optical properties of crystals. (Stuntz.) 

CHEM 227. Optical Methods OF Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 123 
and 189. The quantitative applications of emission spectroscopy, atomic ab- 
sorption spectroscopy, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrophotometry, 
fluorescence, atomic fluorescence, nephelometry, and of certain closely related 
subjects like NMR and mass spectroscopy. (Staff.) 

CHEM 229. Electrical Methods of Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 123 
and 189. The use of conductivity, potentiometry, polarography, voltammetry, 
amperometry, coulometry, and chronopotentiometry in quantitative analysis. 

(Purdy.) 

CHEM 231. Separation Methods in Quantitative Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 123 
and 189. The theory and practical application to quantitative analysis of the 
various forms of chromatography, ion exchange, solvent extraction, and dis- 
tillation. (Staff.) 

CHEM 233. Modern Trends in Analytical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 123 and 189. A study of advanced 
methods, including topics such as statistical treatment of analytical data, 
kinetic methods in analytical chemistry, analytical measurements based on 
radioactivity, and enzymatic techniques. (Staff.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 161. Chemical Background for Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 033 or CHEM 037. Organic and 



94 • Graduate School 

physical chemical properties of biologically important compounds and systems. 

(Holmlund.) 

CHEM 163. Biochemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 161. (Holmlund.) 

CHEM 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 033, CHEM 
038 or CHEM 042; CHEM 161 or CHEM 163 (or concurrent registration in 
CHEM 161, CHEM 163). (Lakshmanan.) 

For Graduates 

CHEM 261. Proteins, Amino Acids, and Carbohydrates. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 163 or equivalent. (Veitch.) 

CHEM 263. Biological Energy Transductions, Vitamins, and Hormones. (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequiste, CHEM 163 or equivalent. (Veitch.) 

CHEM 265. Enzymes. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 163 or its equivalent. (Veitch.) 

CHEM 267. The Chemistry of Natural Products. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 143. The chemistry and physio- 
logical action of natural products. Methods of isolation, determination of 
structure, and synthesis. (Henery-Logan.) 

CHEM 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry. (2-4) 

Two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 164 
or its equivalent. (Staff.) 

CHEM 269. Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 205 and CHEM 163. Utilization 
of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to problems in the life 
sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 

CHEM 270. Advanced Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 210 
and consent of instructor. Registration limited. Laboratory training in the 
utilization of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to problems 
in the life sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 

CHEM 271. Biochemistry of Lipids. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 163 or its equivalent. Classification 
and chemistry of lipids, lipogenesis and energy metabolism of lipids, structural 
lipids, and endocrine control of lipid metabolism in mammals. (Staff.) 

CHEM 273. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 163 or its equivalent. An examina- 
tion of some current topics in modern biochemistry. (Staff.) 

CHEM 275. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 161: CHEM 189. or consent of 
instructor. (Staff.) 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 101. Inorganic Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 187. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 95 

CHEM 102. Inorganic Preparations. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 123. (Boyd.) 

CHEM 110. Radiochemical Safety Procedures. (1) 

One lecture per week. A lecture and demonstration course. Radiation hazards, 
principles and practices of radiation safety, federal (AEC, ICC) codes and 
state public health laws, etc., will be discussed. Consent of the instructor must be 
obtained. (Lakshmanan.) 

CHEM 111. Chemical Principles. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 003, or equivalent. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is covered elsewhere in their curricula. A 
course in the principles of chemistry with accompanying laboratory work con- 
sisting of simple quantitative experiments. (Credit applicable only toward degree 
in College of Education.) (Jaquith.) 

CHEM 112, 113. Special Problems in Chemistry Teaching. (3,3) 

One four-hour meeting per week. An intensive study of secondary school chem- 
istry courses with particular attention to the Chemical Education Material Study 
course. Major emphasis will be placed on the chemical principles and the 
philosophy underlying the CHEM Study program. Credit applicable toward 
degrees in the College of Education only. Prerequisite, CHEM 001, 003 or its 
equivalent, and enrollment in the NSF In-Service Institute for Secondary School 
Chemistry Teachers, or consent of the instructor. (Jaquith.) 

For Graduates 

CHEM 201. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. (Staff.) 

CHEM 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. (Boyd.) 

CHEM 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. (White.) 

CHEM 205. Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (RoUinson.) 

CHEM 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Rollinson.) 

CHEM 209. Non-Aqueous Inorganic Solvents. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Jaquith.) 

CHEM 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory. (1-2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Registration limited. Pre- 
requisites, CHEM 205 (or concurrent registration therein), and consent of in- 
structor. (Lakshmanan.) 

CHEM 211. Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Grim.) 

CHEM 213. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite. CHEM 201. 203 or equivalent. An exam- 
ination of some current topics in modern inorganic chemistry. (Staff.) 

CHEM 215. Nuclear Chemistry. (2) 

Two lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 189. An introduction to 
nuclear chemistry. The more important nuclear decay phenomena; nuclear 



96 • Graduate School 

models; nuclear spin; reactions in complex nuclei; interactions of radiation 
with matter. Emphasis is placed on the behavior of heavy elements and nuclear 
systematics. (Viola.) 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 115. A Survey of Organic Chemistry. (3) 

Summer School only. Open ONLY to registrants in the National Science 
Foundation Summer Institute. Five one-hour lectures per week; five three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. A systematic survey of compounds of carbon at the 
elementary level. (Staff.) 

CHEM 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, ) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 037, 038. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. (Reeve.) 

CHEM 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2-4) 

Two or four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 037, 
038. (Pratt.) 

CHEM 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (3) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 141. The 
systematic identification of organic compounds. (Pratt.) 

For Graduates 

(One or more courses from the following group 240-254 will customarily be offered 

each semester.) 

CHEM 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. (2) 

Two lectures per week. An advanced course covering the synthesis of monomers, 
mechanisms of polymerization, and the correlation between structure and prop- 
erties in high polymers. (Bailey.) 

CHEM 241. Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Staff.) 

CHEM 243. Molecular Orbital Theory. (2) 

Two lectures per week. A partial quantitative application of molecular orbital 
theory and symmetry to the chemical properties and reactions of organic 
molecules. Prerequisites, CHEM 143 and CHEM 189. (Staley.) 

CHEM 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pratt.) 

CHEM 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Staff.) 

CHEM 251. The Heterocyclics. (2) 

Two lectures per week. (Pratt.) 

CHEM 254. Advanced Organic Preparations. (2-4) 

Two or four three-hour laboratory periods per week. (Pratt.) 

CHEM 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an 
Advanced Course. (3) 
One lecture and two to four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, CHEM 141, 143 or concurrent registration therein. (Pratt.) 



University of Maryland • 97 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 182, 184. Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry 
Majors. (1,1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 019 or 021; 

CHEM 187, 189 must be taken concurrently. (Staff.) 

CHEM 186. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 184, 
CHEM 189. (Staff.) 

CHEM 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 017, 019 or 021; PHYS 021; 
MATH 021; or consent of instructor. A course primarily for chemists and 
chemical engineers. This course must be accompanied by CHEM 182, 184 or 
CHEM 188, 190. (Staff.) 

CHEM 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. A laboratory course for chemical 
engineering students taking CHEM 187, 189. Students who have had CHEM 019, 
021, or equivalent, cannot register for this course. (Staff.) 

CHEM 195. Advanced Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189. Quantum chemistry and other selected topics. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are CHEM 187 and 189. 
One or more courses of the group, 281-323. will be offered each semester depending 
on demand. 

CHEM 281. Theory of Solutions. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 307 or equivalent. (Svirbely.) 

CHEM 285. Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

CHEM 287. Infra-Red and Raman Spectroscopy. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Lippincott.) 

CHEM 295. Heterogeneous Equilibria. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Pickard.) 

CHEM 299. Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Svirbely.) 

CHEM 303. Electrochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 307 or equivalent. Three lectures per week. (Atkinson.) 

CHEM 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Svirbely.) 

CHEM 307. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189 or equivalent. Three lectures per week. (Staff.) 

CHEM 311. Physicochemical Calculations. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189 or equivalent. Two lectures per week. (Stewart.) 

CHEM 313. Molecular Structure. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Staff.) 



98 • Graduate School 

CHEM 317. Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A detailed treat- 
ment of single-crystal X-ray methods. (Stewart.) 

CHEM 319, 321. Quantum Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite for CHEM 319 is CHEM 195. Prerequi- 
site for CHEM 321 is CHEM 319 or PHYS 212. (Staff.) 

CHEM 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 307 or equivalent. (Staff.) 

SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

CHEM 351. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. (Stall.) 

CHEM 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters, summer session. (Staff.) 

CHEM 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 



(Staff.) 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Professors: Looney, Lepper, and Otts. 

Associate Professors: CooKSON, Cournvn, Garber, Gohr, Kondner, Piper, 

Ragan, and Wedding. 
Assistant Professors: Birkner, Heins, Israel, Reilly, and Schelling. 
Instructor: Dunphy. 
Lecturers: Bloem, Byington, Desrosiers, and Rajan. 

The Civil Engineering Department offers graduate work leading to the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and research 
opportunities are available in the subject areas of civil engineering materials, 
transportation and highway engineering, hydraulic engineering, sanitary and en- 
vironmental health engineering, soils and foundations, and structural engineering. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENCE 100. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 112 or concurrent registration. 

(Garber.) 

ENCE 102. Fundamentals of Structural Analysis. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, ENES 020 and ENCE 050. 

(Reilly and Piper.) 

ENCE 103. Basic Structural Design. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 102. (Reilly and Piper.) 

ENCE 104. Computer Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisites, ENCE 100 and 
ENCE 102. (Garber.) 

ENCE 105. Basic Fluid Mechanics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENES 020, 021, PHYS 
031. Prerequisite, ENME 105, or concurrent registration (Cournyn.) 



University of Maryland • 99 

ENCE 106. Fundamentals of Sanitary Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 105. (Otts and Cookson.) 

ENCE 107. Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, ENES 020 and ENCE 050. (Kondner.) 

ENCE 108. Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 050 and ENCE 090. (Byington, Wedding.) 

ENCE 109. Basic Civil Engineering Planning I. (2) 

Two lectures each week. Prerequisites, ENCE 103. 106. 107 and 108. (Piper.) 

ENCE 110. Basic Civil Engineering Planning II. (1) 

One laboratory of three hours each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 109. (Piper.) 

ENCE 112. Applied Mathematics in Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite. MATH 022. (Schelling.) 

ENCE 125. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite. ENES 020. (Lepper.) 

ENCE 126. Experimental Stress Analysis. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. (Lepper and Wedding.) 

ENCE 127. Theory of Elasticity and Plasticity. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENES 020 and ENCE 112. 

ENCE 135. Advanced Soil Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 107. 

(Kondner.) 

ENCE 136. Soil-Foundation Systems. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites: ENCE 107, 135 or equivalent with 
permission of instructor. (Kondner.) 

ENCE 145. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 105. 

(Cournyn. Rajan.) 

ENCE 146. Hydrologic Analysis and Design. (3) 

Prerequisites ENCE 100, ENCE 105; Concurrent registration in ENCE 104 
or permission of instructor. (Ragan.) 

ENCE 147. Ground Water Hydrology. (3) 

Prerequisites ENCE 104, ENCE 105, or permission of instructor. (Ragan.) 

ENCE 155. Advanced Materials of Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite. ENCE 050. (Wedding.) 

ENCE 165. STRUCTimAL Analysis. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 103. (Garber. Heins.) 

ENCE 166. Structural Design. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite. ENCE 103. 

(Garber, Heins.) 

ENCE 175. Sanitary Engineering Analysis and Design. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory each week. (Otts, Cookson.) 

ENCE 176. Environmental Health Engineering Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory each week. (Birkner.) 



100 • Graduate School 

ENCE 185. Highway Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 107. (Wedding, Dunphy.) 

ENCE 186. Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 108. (Wedding, Dunphy.) 

ENCE 187. Engineering Analysis of Transportation Systems I. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, ENCE 186 or consent of instructor. 

(Staff.) 

ENCE 188. Engineering Analysis of Transportation Systems II. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite: ENCE 186 or consent of instructor. 

(Staff.) 

ENCE 195. Advanced Surveying. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite, ENCE 090. (Staff.) 

ENCE 199. Special Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ENCE 221, 222. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3. 3) 

Prerequisites, ENES 020, 021 and ENCE 050 or equivalent. Analyses for 
stress and deformation in engineering members by the methods of mechanics 
of materials and elementary theories of elasticity and plasticity. Problems in 
flexure, torsion plates and shells, stress concentrations, indeterminate com- 
binations, residual stresses, stability. (Lepper.) 

ENCE 223. Expermental Stress Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 221 or permission of instructor. Experimental methods of 
stress and strain analysis for static and impact forces. Use of structural models; 
brittle and plastic material methods; analogies; analogies: photoelasticity; 
optical, mechanical and electrical strain gages and instrumentation. (Wedding.) 

ENCE 224. Advanced Engineering Materials Laboratory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENES 020, 021 and ENCE 050 or equivalent. Critical examina- 
tion of the methods for testing engineering materials and structures under 
static, repeated, sustained and impact forces. Laboratory experiments for the 
determination of strength and stiffness of structural alloys, concrete and other 
construction materials. Critical examination of the effects of test factors on 
the determination of engineering properties. (Lepper, Wedding.) 

ENCE 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Materials. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 221 and 222 or consent of instructor. Modern theories 
of the structure of matter applied to the study of elastic and plastic deformation 
of materials under static, repeated, sustained and impact forces. Elements of 
solid state physics, crystal structure, slip and dislocation theory; polycrystal- 
line solids. Effects of low and high temperature, loading rates, and state of 
stress on mechanical properties and fractures. Critical study of tests and their 
application to strength of members. (Lepper.) 

ENCE 227, 228. Theories of Concrete and Granular Materials, (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 221, 222, 224 or consent of instructor. Critical reviews 
of analytical and experimental investigations of the behavior of concretes 
under diverse conditions of loading and environment. Mechanics of granular 
aggregates and the chemistry of cements. Theories of the design of portland 
cement and field experience. (Wedding.) 



University of Maryland • 101 

ENCE 241. Hydraulic Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 105 or equivalent. Water power and flood control. Analysis 
of the principal features of a water power project with special reference to reser- 
voir, waterway, dam, plant accessories, and power house equipment. Complete 
report on a water power project required, including costs and power valuation. 

(Cournyn.) 

ENCE 242. Advanced Hydrologic Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites. ENCE 146, MATH 133. or consent of instructor. Study of physi- 
cal processes controlling watershed runofl"; the use of process simulation and 
cross-correlation techniques for the analysis of streamflow records; use of 
stochastic models for the synthesis of critical patterns of low and high stream- 
flows. (Ragan.) 

ENCE 243. Free Surface Flow. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 105 or consent of instructor. Application of fundamentals 
of fluid mechanics to design problems involving steady and unsteady open 
channel flow; boundary resistance for uniform and non-uniform conditions; 
computation of water surface profiles in channels and reservoirs; hydraulic 
jump; design of flow transition structures; stratified flows. (Ragan.) 

ENCE 251. Soil Mechanics. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 107. 135 or equivalent. Identification properties tests and 
classification methods for earth materials. Strength and deformation characteris- 
tics, hydraulic properties and permeability, shearing resistance, compressibility 
and consolidation, with laboratory tests for these properties. Study of the basic 
theories involved and the development of test procedures. (Kondner.) 

ENCE 252. Advanced Foundations. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 107, 165 and 166, or equivalent. Principles of mechanics 
applied to engineering problems in foundations. Earth pressure theories, seepage 
and drainage phenomena, stability of footings and slopes, stresses and deforma- 
tion in soils, consolidation theory and application to foundation settlements. 

(Kondner.) 

ENCE 255. Dynamics of Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 112, 102, and 103 or equivalent. Analysis and design of 
structures subjected to dynamic loads. Hamilton's Principle and Lagrange's 
Equations. Rayleigh's Principle. Fourier and transform methods. Numerical and 
matrix methods used to solve continuous and lumped mass systems. Application 
to earthquake design, blast resistant structures, bridge vibration, and other 
civil engineering problems. (Schelling.) 

ENCE 256. Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 127 and ENCE 112 or equivalent. Review of basic struc- 
tural and matrix theory. Use of virtual work and complementary virtual work 
to develop in parallel the displacement and force method for determinate and 
indeterminate civil engineering structures. Stiflfness and flexiblity matrices. 
Initial and thermal strain, modification and cutout procedure. Comparison of 
flexibility and displacement methods. Introduction to the dynamic response 
of structures using mode superposition and matrix methods. (Staff.) 

ENCE 257. Analysis of Plate and Shell Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 125, ENCE 127 and ENCE 112 or equivalent. Review of 
fundamental formulas from the theory of surfaces. General theory for mem- 
brane stresses, bending stresses, deformation and stability of thin plates and 
shells. Application of the theory to civil engineering structures such as hyper- 



102 • Graduate School 

bolic paraboloids, cylindrical shells, shells of revolution, shells of arbitrary 
shape, folded plates. (Heins.) 

ENCE 258. Advanced Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 125, ENCE 127 and ENCE 112 or equivalent. Review of 
vector and tensor calculus. Invariant formulation of nonlinear theory includ- 
ing effect of large displacements, finite rotations and finite deformations. Sta- 
bility of equilibrium configurations. Special civil engineering problems solved 
by finding the system of forces which is necessary to maintain the deformed 
body in equilibrium. Theory of successive approximations. (Staff.) 

ENCE 259. Nonlinear Theory of Shell Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 257 and ENCE 258. General formulation of a nonlinear 
theory of shells of arbitrary shape occurring in civil engineering structures 
utilizing basic concepts from vector and tensor analysis. Large deflections and 
rotations are considered consistent with the existence of a strain energy func- 
tion which permits the derivation of a stress-strain relation. The shell problem 
is reduced to one of two dimensions by various procedures. After the general 
theory governing the equilibrium configuration of a shell structure is established, 
the condition of stable and unstable equilibrium is considered. (Staff.) 

ENCE 260. Plastic Analysis and Design of Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Theory of plasticity and its application 
to structural design. The behavior of steel structures beyond the elastic limit 
and up to collapse. Study of component parts of frames; methods of predicting 
strength and deformation in the plastic range. Studies of industrial type frames. 
Current research. Comparison of conventional design methods with plastic 
design techniques. (Heins.) 

ENCE 261. Urban-Regional Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite, degree in Civil Engineering or consent of instructor. Theory and 
methodology for the synthesis of general civil engineering aspects of urban and 
regional planning. Integration of land use conditions and capabilities, popula- 
tion factors and needs, engineering economics and engineering technologies. 
Application to special problems in urban-regional development. Preparation 
of engineering reports. Presentation methods. (Piper.) 

ENCE 262. Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 261 or equivalent. General to comprehensive planning of 
complex engineering facilities such as industrial plants, bridges, utilities and 
transportation projects. Planning based on the synthesis of all applicable fac- 
tors. Emphasis on general civil engineering planning including site, structural 
and construction planning. Plan evaluation and feasibility. (Piper.) 

ENCE 263. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 102, 103, 165 and 166, or equivalent. Advanced structural 
theory applied to the design of bridges and buildings. Methods of analysis for 
indeterminate structures, including movement distribution. Maxwell's method, 
virtual work, reciprocal theory, Muller Breslau's principle, and classical analytical 
methods. (Looney.) 

ENCE 264. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 263. Correlation of theory, experience, and experiments 
in study of structural behavior, proportioning, and preliminary design. Special 
design problems of fatigue, buckling, vibrations, and impact. (Looney.) 

ENCE 265, 266. Behavior of Structures. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 263, and 264. A continuation of ENCE 264. Examination 



University of Maryland • 103 

of the fundamental basis for the design of structures. Correlation of laboratory 
research, advanced structural theory and mechanics and design methods. Study 
of specifications, factor of safety and ultimate strength, in the relation between 
structural tests and design. (Looney.) 

ENCE 271. Unit Operations of Environmental Health Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 106 or consent of instructor. Properties and quality criteria 
of drinking water as related to health are interpretated by a chemical and 
biological approach. Legal aspects of water use and handling are considered. 
Theory and application of aeration, sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, 
desalinization, corrosion and corrosion control are among topics to be con- 
sidered. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 272. Theory of Aqueous and Solid Waste Treatment and Disposal. (3) 
Prerequisites, ENCE 106 and fundamentals of microbiology, or consent of 
instructor. Theory and basic principles of treating and handling waste products; 
hydraulics of sewers; biological oxidation; principles and design criteria of 
biological and physical treatment processes; disposal of waste sludges and 
solids. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 273. Design of Water Purification Facilities. (3) 

Corequisite, ENCE 271 or equivalent. One lecture and two laboratory periods 

a week. Application of basic science and engineering science to design of water 

supply and purification processes; design and economics of unit operations as 

applied to environmental systems. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 274. Design of Municipal and Industrial Wastes 
Treatment Facilities. (3) 
Corequisite, ENCE 272 or equivalent .One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Application of basic science and engineering science to design of 
municipal and industrial waste treatment processes; design and economics of 
unit operations as applied to environmental systems. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 275. Biological Principles of Environmental Health Engineering. (4) 
Prerequisite MICR 101 or equivalent. Three lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. An exposition of biological principles directly affecting man and his 
environment; assay, control and treatment of biological and virological agents 
in water, sewage, and air; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and 
anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 276. Industrial Wastes. (3) 

Corequisite, ENCE 272, or equivalent. A study of the characteristics of liquid 
wastes from major industries, and the processes producing the wastes. The theory 
and methods of eliminating or treating the wastes, and their effects upon 
municipal sewage-treatment plants, and receiving waters. (Cookson.) 

ENCE 277. The Chemistry of Natural Waters. (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 176 or consent of instructor. Three lectures, one lab a 
week. Application of principles from chemical thermodynamics and kinetics 
to the study and interpretation of the chemical characteristics of natural water 
systems. The chemical composition of natural waters is rationalized by con- 
sidering metal ion solubility controls, pH, carbonate equilbria, absorption re- 
actions, redox reactions, and the kinetics of oxygenation reactions which occur 
in natural water environments. (Birkner.) 

ENCE 278. Applied Water Chemistry. (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 277 or consent of instructor. Three lectures, one lab a week. 
A study of the chemistry of both municipal and industrial water treatment 



104 • Graduate School 

processes. Among the topics to be considered are water softening, stabilization, 
chemical destabilization of colloidal materials, ion exchange, disinfection, 
chemical oxidation and oxygenation reactions. (Birkner.) 

ENCE 279. Air Pollution. (3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. Evaluation of the capacity of the atmos- 
phere to assimilate the waste materials from an industrial society. The classi- 
fication of pollutants and identification of specific emission sources will be 
considered together with the physiological effects of specific pollutants on 
plants, animals, and humans. Consideration will also be given to techniques and 
devices which have been devised for the sampling and control of particular 
emissions. (Israel.) 

ENCE 280. Air Sampling and Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite ENCE 279 or consent of instructor. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory a week. The theory and techniques utilized in the determination and 
measurement of chemical, radiological and biological pollutants in the atmos- 
phere. Theory of particle deposition by diffusion, impaction, sedimentation and 
thermal and electrical forces, application to aerosol sampling with description 
of aerosol sampling devices and data evaluation. (Israel.) 

ENCE 281. Highway Traffic Characteristics and Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 185 or consent of instructor. The study of the fundamental 
traits and behavior patterns of the road user and his vehicle in traffic. The basic 
characteristics of the pedestrian, the driver, the vehicle, traffic volume and speed, 
stream flow and intersection operation, parking, and accidents. (Desrosiers.) 

ENCE 282. Highway Traffic Operations. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 185, ENCE 281 or consent of instructor. A survey of 
traffic laws and ordinances. The design, application and operation of traffic 
control devices and aids, including traffic signs and signals, pavement markings, 
and hazard delineation. Capacity, accident, and parking analyses. (Desrosiers.) 

ENCE 285. Rail Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 186 or consent of instructor. A study of the basic en- 
gineering components of conventional railroads, high speed railroads, and 
urban rail transit. The characteristics of the vehicle, the supporting way, and 
the terminal requirements will be evaluated with respect to system perform- 
ance, capacity, cost, and level of service. (Desrosiers.) 

ENCE 286. Airport Planning and Design. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENCE 186 or consent of instructor. The planning and design of 
airports including site selection, runway configuration, geometric and structural 
design of the landing area, and terminal facilities. Methods of financing airports, 
estimates of aeronautical demand, air traffic control, and airport lighting are 
also studied. (Desrosiers.) 

ENCE 287. Highway Traffic Flow Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 187, ENCE 188 or consent of the instructor. An examina- 
tion of physical and statistical laws that are used to represent traffic flow 
phenomena. Determmistic models including heat flow, fluid flow, and energy- 
momentum analogies, car following models, and acceleration noise. Stochastic 
approaches using independent and Markov processes, queuing models, and 
probability distributions. (Staff.) 

ENCE 296, 297. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Applications to elasticity, stability and 



University of Maryland • 105 

buckling, vibrations, thin plates and shells, or other problems in the area of 
mechanics, structures and materials. (Schelling.) 

ENCE 298. Seminar. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by the Department. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of the Department of Civil Engineering. (Staff.) 

ENCE 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credit in accordance with work done. (Staff.) 

ENCE 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor: Avery. 

The Department of Classical Languages and Literatures offers no program 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy at the present 
time. The following courses, however, are offered upon sufficient demand to 
fill the needs of graduate students in other fields, such as English, history, and 
modern foreign languages, who may wish to work in Latin in connection with 
their degree programs in such fields. Students should consult their major pro- 
fessors with respect to application of credit hours in Latin to their graduate 
programs. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Prerequisite, LATIN 061 or equivalent. 

LATIN 101. Catullus and the Roman Elegiac Poets. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Catullus as a writer of lyric an imitator of the 
Alexandrians, and as a writer of elegy, and on Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid as 
elegists. The reading of selected poems of the four authors. Reports. (Avery.) 

LATIN 102. Tacitus. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman historiography before Tacitus and 
on the author as a writer of history. The reading of selections from the Annals 
and Histories. Reports. (Avery.) 

LATIN 103. Roman Satire. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman satire. The 
reading of selections from the satires of Horace, Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis, 
and the satires of Juvenal. Reports. (Avery.) 

LATIN 104. Roman Comedy. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman comedy. The 
reading of selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Reports. (Avery.) 

LATIN 105. Lucretius. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman Epicureanism. The reading of 
selections from the De reruin natura. Reports. (Avery.) 

LATIN 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3) 

An intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language sup- 
plemented by rapid reading. (Avery.) 

LATIN 199. Latin Readings. (3) 

Special Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The reading of one or more selected 



106 • Graduate School 

Latin authors from antiquity through the Renaissance. May be repeated with 
varying content. Reports. (Avery.) 

For Graduates 

Prerequisite, LATIN 061 or equivalent. 

LATIN 210. Vulgar Latin Readings. (3) 

An intensive study of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Clasical Latin, 
followed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from the classical 
norms, with the reading of illustrative texts. The reading of selections from the 
Peregrinatio ad loca sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage 
therein, with special emphasis on those which anticipate subsequent develop- 
ments in the Romance Language. Reports. (Avery.) 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors: Cooley, Freedman, Goodwyn, G. Jones, Korg (Visiting), 
Levitine, Prahl, Salamanca, Schaumann, D. Smith, Walt, and Whitte- 

MORE. 

The Department of Comparative Literature oflfers graduate work leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Current language, course, examination, M.A. thesis, and Ph.D. dissertation 
requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Comparative Literature may 
be obtained from the Comparative Literature office. 

The program in Comparative Literature is administered by a committee made 
up of Professor Morris Freedman, English, Chairman; Dean Charles Manning, 
Arts and Sciences; Dean David Sparks, Graduate School; Professor William 
McBain, French and Italian; Professor George Jones, German; Professor Mi- 
chael McCaskey, Chinese; Professor George Panichas, English; and Professor 
Denzell Smith, English. Other departments cooperating in the program are 
Art, Classical Languages, Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, 
Spanish and Portuguese, and the program in Hebrew, Chinese and Linguistics. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CMLT 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature. (3) 

CMLT 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature. (3) 

CMLT 103. The Old Testament as Literature. (3) 

CMLT 105. Romanticism: Early Stages. (3) 

CMLT 106. Romanticism: Flowering and Influence. (3) 

CMLT 107. The Faust Legend. (3) 

CMLT 112. iBSEN AND THE CONTINENTAL DrAMA. (3) 

CMLT 114. Greek Drama. (3) 

CMLT 115. The Classical Tradition and Its Influence in the 
Middle Ages and Renaissance. (3) 

CMLT 1 16. The Classical Tradition and Its Influence in the 
Middle Ages and Renaissance. (3) 



University of Maryland • 107 

CMLT 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

CMLT 130. The Continental Novel. (3) 

CMLT 135. Dante and the Romance Tradition. (3) 

CMLT 140. Literature of the Far East. (3) 

CMLT 141. Literature of the Far East. (3) 

CMLT 145. Major Contemporary Authors. 

CMLT 150. Conference Course in Comparative Literature. (3) 

For Graduates 

CMLT 201. Problems in Comparative Literature. (3) 

CMLT 225. Medieval Epic. (3) 

CMLT 226. The Medieval Romance. (3) 

CMLT 230. Problems of the Baroque in Literature. (3) 

CMLT 235. Seminar in Italian Renaissance and Its Influence. (3) 

CMLT 240. Literary Criticism: Ancient and Medieval. (3) 

CMLT 241. Literary Criticism: Renaissance and Modern. (3) 

CMLT 258. Folklore in Literature. (3) 

CMLT 268. Seminar in Literary Sources of Art History. (3) 

CMLT 301. Seminar in Themes and Types. (3) 

CMLT 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

CMLT 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Professors: Atchison {Director of the Computer Science Center), Chu*, Ed- 

MUNDSON**, GlASSER', AND HeILPRIN'. 

Research Professors: Rheinboldt' and Rosenfeld. 
Associate Professors: Glaser' and Minker. 
Research Associate Professor: Ortega. 

Assistant Professors: Austing, Owings**, Pfaltz, Schneider, and Vander- 
graft. 

The educational program in computer science is administered by the Com- 
puter Science Center which is an academic department of the University not 
affiliated with any particular school or college. TTie Computer Science Center 
offers a Master of Science degree in computer science and also sponsors jointly 
with the Department of Electrical Engineering a Master of Science degree pro- 

* Joint appointment with Electrical Engineering 
** Joint appointment with Mathematics 

'Joint appointment with Physics and Astronomy 

^ Joint appointment with Library and Information Services 

^ Joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

* Joint appointment with Physiology 



108 • Graduate School 

gram in Computer Systems Engineering. The Center also provides computing 
service for all academic activities of the University and conducts an active 
research program in the computer and computer related sciences. 

Students applying for admission are expected to have at least a computer 
science background comparable to the contents of CMSC 100 and a mathe- 
matics background consisting of a minimum of one course beyond the basic 
calculus sequence. Additional preparation is desirable in as many of the follow- 
ing areas as possible: CMSC 140, CMSC 150, CMSC 166, linear and abstract 
algebra, combinatorial mathematics, graph theory, mathematical logic, prob- 
ability and statistics, numerical methods, digital circuit design, computer logic 
design, switching theory, mathematical or structural linguistics, and the psy- 
chology of learning. 

For additional information on admission and degree requirements on current 
developments in a Computer Science Ph.D. Program, and on financial support, 
students should write to the Admissions and Financial Awards Committee of the 
Center. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CMSC 100. Language and Structure of Computers. (3) 

Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
CMSC 012 or CMSC 020 or equivalent. Logical basis of computer structure, 
machine representation of numbers and characters, flow of control, instruction 
codes, arithmetic and logical operations, indexing and indirect addressing, 
input-output, push-down stacks, symbolic representation of programs and 
assembly systems, subroutine linkage, macros, interpretive systems, and recent 
advances in computer organization. Several computer projtcts to illustrate basic 
concepts. (Staff.) 

NOTE: CMSC 100 may not be counted for credit in the graduate program 
in computer science. 

CMSC 102. Introduction to Discrete Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 020 or equivalent. This is the same course as ENEE 102. 
Review of set algebra including relations, partial ordering and mappings. Alge- 
braic structures including semigroups and groups. Graph theory including trees 
and weighted graphs. Boolean algebra and prepositional logic. Applications of 
these structures to various areas of computer science and computer engineering. 

(Pugsley, Rheinboldt, and Vandergraft.) 

NOTE: CMSC 102 may not be counted for credit in the graduate program in 
computer science. 

CMSC 110. Special Computational Laboratory. (1 or 2) 

Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, CMSC 012 or 
equivalent. Arranged for special groups of students to give experience in 
developing algorithmic solutions of problems or using particiular computational 
systems. May be taken for cumulative credit up to a maximum of six hours 
where different material is covered. (Staff.) 

NOTE: CMSC 110 may not be counted for credit in the graduate program 
in computer science. 

CMSC 140. Structure of Programming Languages. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 or equivalent. Formal definition of languages including 
specification of syntax and semantics. Syntactic structure and semantics of 
simple statements including precedence, infix, prefix, and postfix notation. Global 



University of Maryland • 109 

structure and semantics of algorithmic languages including declarations and 
storage allocation, grouping of statements and binding time of constituents, sub- 
routines, coroutines, tasks and parameters. List processing and data description 
languages. (Schneider.) 

CMSC 144. Elementary Logic and Algorithms. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. This is the same course as 
MATH 144. An informal development of propositional logic, predicate logic, 
set algebra, and Boolean algebra. Topics include recursive functions, Turing 
machines. Post productions, Markov algorithms, and word problems. 

(Edmundson.) 

CMSC 150. Data and Storage Structures. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 and CMSC 102 or equivalent. A study of intrinsic 
structures of data, such as arrays, strings, trees, and lists, and their relation to 
storage media. Representation of data structures in storage by records, files, etc. 
Special storage structures such as content addressed, trie, and associative memo- 
ries. Referencing, processing, and management techniques based on the struc- 
turing, e.g., list processing, storage and accessing efficiency, as well as dynamic 
flexibility of various methods. (Minker.) 

CMSC 166. Functional Organization of Digital Computer Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 100 or ENEE 162 or equivalent. This is the same course 
as ENEE 166. Computer organization and configuration; interconnection of 
sub-units into a computer system; arithmetic logic; storage structure and logic; 
control and sequencing; input-output systems. A small computer and a modern 
large-scale computer system will be used to illustrate these concepts. Each stu- 
dent will be expected to complete a project. (Chu.) 

CMSC 168. Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 022 or 162, MATH 066, and CMSC 020 or equivalent. 
This course is the same as MATH 168. Interpolation, numerical differentiation 
and integration, numerical solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, 
least squares, systems of linear equations, numerical solution of ordinary dif- 
ferential equations, errors in numerical calculations. (Vandergraft.) 

CMSC 190. Special Problems in Computer Science. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An individualized course designed to 
allow a student or students to pursue a specialized topic or project under the 
supervision of the senior staff. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

CSMC 200. Computer and Programming Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 140, 150. and 166. Review of batch process programming 
systems, their components, operating characteristics, services and limitations. 
Concurrent processing of input-output and interrupt handling. Structure of 
multiprogramming systems for large-scale multi-processor computers. Address- 
ing techniques, storage allocation, file management, system accounting, and 
user-related services; command languages and the embedding of subsystems. 
Operating characteristics of large-scale systems. (Staff) 

CMSC 215. Theory of Computation. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 100 and 102 or equivalent, introduction to Turing ma- 
chines, Wang machines. Sheperdson-Sturgis and other machines. Godel num- 
bering and unsolvability results, the halting problem. Post's correspondence 
problem, and relative uncomputability. Machines with restricted memory ac- 
cess, limited memory, and limited computing time. Complexity classification 



110 • Graduate School 

and recursive function theory. Models of computation including the relation- 
ship to algorithms and programming. (Edmundson, Owings) 

CMSC 225. Computer Applications to the Physical Sciences. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 100 and a graduate course in physical science. Applications 
of computers to numerical calculation, data reduction, and modeling in the 
physical sciences. Stress will be laid on the features of the applications which 
have required techniques not usually considered in more general contexts. 

(Glasser) 

CMSC 230. Simulation of Computer Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC/ENEE 166 or equivalent. Computer design language, algo- 
rithmic and symbolic designs of stored-program computer logic, simulation of 
the designed computer, machine language programming, design and construction 
of an assembler for the simulated computer, assembly language programming. 

(Chu) 

CMSC 235. Modeling and Simulation of Physical Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 and a course in probability or mathematical statistics. 
Monte-Carlo and other methods of investigating models of interest to physical 
scientists. Generation and testing or random numbers. Probabilistic, determin- 
istic and incomplete models. (Glasser) 

CMSC 240. Compiler Construction. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 102, 140, 150. Review of assembly, loading and execution 
of programs including macros, data types and statements, block structure and 
storage allocation, procedures and functions. Organization of a compiler in- 
cluding symbol tables, lexical scan, syntax scan, object code generation, error 
diagnostics, and optimization techniques. Use of compiler writing languages 
and bootstrapping. (Staff) 

CMSC 245. Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 102, 140, 150. Definition of formal grammars: arith- 
metic expressions and precedence grammars, context-free and finite-state gram- 
mars. Algorithms for syntactic analysis: recognizers, back-tracking, operator 
precedence techniques. Semantics of grammatical constructs: reductive gram- 
mars, Floyd productions, simple syntactical compilation. Relationship between 
formal languages and automata. (Edmundson, Schneider.) 

CMSC 258. Seminar on Information Retrieval. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 or permission of instructor. This is the same course 
as LBSC 258. Discussion of basic constraints on communications, sensing and 
modulating rates, effects of constraints on structure and function of information 
storage and retrieval systems, models and analysis, aspects of automatic informa- 
tion retrieval. Term paper on subject of student's interest and instructor's ap- 
proval. (Heilprin) 

CMSC 263. Theory of Sequential Machines. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 102, and CMSC 100 or ENEE 162. This is the same course 
as ENEE 263. Definition and representation of finite automata and sequential 
machines, equivalence of states and machines, congruence and reduced machines, 
analysis and synthesis of machines, decision problems of finite automata, par- 
titions and the substitution property, generalized and incomplete machines, 
semigroups and machines, and other selected topics. (Owings, Pugsley) 

CMSC 266. Algorithmic Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 100 and MATH 170-171. A detailed study of problems 
which arise in the implementation of numerical analysis algorithms in a com- 



University of Maryland • 111 

puter. Rounding and truncation error. Automatic error estimates using interval 
arithmetic and convergence theorems. Examples from Hnear algebra, differential 
equations, systems of nonlinear algebraic equations, minimization. (Ortega) 

CMSC 280. Artificial Intelligence. (3) 

Prerequisites. CMSC 102 and MATH 100. or permission of instructor. Critical 
review of major developments in neuromimes and brain models, trainable de- 
vices, "self-organizing" systems. Representative applications to prediction, 
decision making, pattern recognition, natural language processing, theorem 
proving and game playing. Class and individual projects to illustrate basic 
concepts. (Rosenfeld) 

CMSC 285. Computer Processing of Pictorial Information. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 150 or permission of instructor. Objective and subjective 
aspects of pictorial information. Picture quality and its assessment; image en- 
hancement. Picture redundancy; quantization, encoding and approximation of 
pictures. Picture description and pictorial pattern recognition. Input and output 
of pictorial information. Computer projects illustrating typical processing tech- 
niques as applied to black-and-white images. (Rosenfeld) 

CMSC. 290. Advanced Topics in Computer Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Advanced topics selected by the faculty 
from the literature of computer science to suit the interest and background of 
students. May be taken for repeated credit. (Staff) 

CMSC 295. Graduate Seminar in Computer Science. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Seminars are held on topics such as 
language design, translator theory, data systems, organization of computer sys- 
tems, and automatic problem solving. May be taken for repeated credit. (Staff) 

CMSC 399. Thesis Research. (Arranged) (Staff) 

DAIRY SCIENCE 

Professors: Arbuckle, Cairns, Cason, Davis, Hemken, Keeney, King and 

Matrick. 
Associate Professors: Williams, Vandersall. 
Assistant Professor: Fairchild. 

The Department of Dairy Science ofTers work leading to the degree of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree have the option of studying in one of two major fields: dairy production, 
which is concerned with breeding, nutrition and physiology of dairy animals, or 
dairy technology, which is concerned with chemical, bacteriological, and nutri- 
tional aspects of dairy products, as well as the industrial phases of milk process- 
ing. Students interested in food science may undertake graduate study in the 
dairy technology phase of Dairy Science, or in the Food Science curriculum. 

DAIRY TECHNOLOGY (Food Science) 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FDSC 103. Principles of Food Processing II. (3) 

See Food Science for description. (Mattick.) 

FDSC 111. Food Chemistry. (3) 

See Food Science for description. (King.) 



112 



Graduate School 



FDSC 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 
See Food Science for description. 

FDSC 182. Dairy Products Processing. (3) 
See Food Science for description. 

Mechanics of Food Processing. 
See AGEN 113 

Experimental Food Science. 

See Home Economics. FOOD 153. 

For Graduates 

FDSC 201. Advances in Food Technology. (3) 
See Food Science for description. 

Research Methods. 

See Dairy Prod., ANSC 241. 

Methods of Horticultural Research. 
See Horticulture, HORT 207. 

FDSC 301. Special Problems in Food Science. 
See Food Science for description. 

FDSC 302. Seminar in Food Science. (3) 
See Food Science for description. 

FDSC 310. Colloquium in Food Science. (1) 
See Food Science for description. 

FDSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level ) 
See Food Science for description. 

FDSC 499. Thesis Research. (Doctoral Level) 

DAIRY PRODUCTION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
ANSC 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 



(Helbacka.) 
(Mattick.) 



(Kramer.) 



(1-4) 



(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



(Combs.) 



ANSC 110. Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
site. MATH 010. ANSC 109 or permission of instructor. (Vandersall.) 



ANSC 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

ANSC 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. 

ANSC 118. Wildlife Management. (3) 

ANSC 130. Principles of Breeding. (3) 



(Albert.) 
(Albert.) 
(Flyger.) 
(Green.) 



ANSC 140. Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction. (2) 

First Semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 102 or 104. (Williams.) 



University of Maryland • 113 

ANSC 141. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 102 or 104. (Williams.) 

ANSC 142. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites. ANSC 040, ZOOL 006, or BOTN 117. A specialized course in breeding 
dairy cattle. (Fairchild.) 

ANSC SI 43. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer 
discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ANSC 220. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

See Animal Science for description. (Green.) 

ANSC 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

See Animal Science for description. (Leffel and Combs.) 

ANSC 240. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

First semester. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of department. Biochemical, physiological and bac- 
teriological aspects of the nutrition of ruminants and other animals. 

(Vandersall.) 

ANSC 241. Research Methods. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. The application of biochemical, physio-chemical and 
statistical methods to problems in biological research. (Keeney.) 

ANSC 242. Experimental Mammalian Surgery I. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A course presenting the 
fundamentals of anesthesia and the art of experimental surgery, especially 
to obtain research preparations. 

ANSC 243. Experimental Mammalian Surgery 11. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, ANSC 242, permission of instructor. A course 
emphasizing advanced surgical practices to obtain research preparations, car- 
diovascular surgery and chronic vascularly isolated organ techniques, expe- 
rience with pump oxygenator systems, profound hypothermia, hemodialysis, 
infusion systems, implantation and transplantation procedures are taught. 

ANSC 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

See Poultry Science for description. (ShafFner.) 

ANSC 263. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

ANSC 264. Vitamins. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Combs.) 

ANSC 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

See Poultry Science for description. (Creek.) 

ANSC 266. Physiological Genetics of Domestic Animals. (2) 
See Poultry Science for description. 

ANSC 301. Special Problems IN Animal Science. (1-3) 
(4 cr. max.) 



114 • Graduate School 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 
proportion to amount of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate specifi- 
cally to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

ANSC 302. Seminar (1). (5 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers, based upon 
current scientific publications relating to Animal Science, or upon their re- 
search work, for presentation before and discussion by the class; (1) Recent 
advances; (2) Nutrition; (3) Physiology; (4) Biochemistry. (Staff.) 

ANSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in the form of 
a thesis. (Staff.) 

ANSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

ECONOMICS 

Professors: Dillard, Almon, Cumberland, Gruchy, O'Connell, Schultze, 

Ulmer, and Wonnacott. 
Associate Professors: Aaron, Bennett, Bergmann, Dodge, Dorsey, Harris, 

Knight, McGuire, Olson, and Weinstein. 
Assistant Professors: Adams, Boorman, Canterbery, Clauge, Greer, 

Havrilesky, Hexter, Mayor, Meer, Meyer, Qualls, and Singer. 
Lecturers: Amuzegar, Bell, Green, Hinrichs, Lower, Measday, Moore, 

Mueller, Pierce, Schink, Shipley, Snow, and Strober. 

The First Year of Graduate Work in Economics. Because nearly all the ad- 
vanced graduate courses require a thorough working knowledge of economic 
theory and quantitative methods, a student's first year program normally in- 
cludes, in the fall: Economics 200, Micro-economic Theory I; Economics 202, 

Macro-economic Theory; and Economics 211, Quantitative Economics L In 
the spring, these are followed by: Economics 201, Micro-economic Theory II; 
Economics 247, Economic Growth and Instability; and Economics 212, Quanti- 
tative Economics II. For students with assistantships, or internships, three 
courses constitute full-time work. Students who can devote all their time to 
courses normally take four. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. Written Theory Examination. At the beginning of his second year, the 
doctoral student should take a two-part written examination in economic theory. 
The examination may be repeated if necessary, but it must be passed before the 
student can take the comprehensive examination described below. These exam- 
inations will be given in September and April. 

2. Course and Seminar Paper Requirements. The student must pass satis- 
factorily: 

a. Economics 211 and 212, Quantitative Methods, or be exempted from 
them by examination or former work. These courses should be taken in the 
first year of study if possible. 



University of Maryland • 115 

b. Economics 230 and 231, History of Economic Thought, or be exempted 
from them on the basis of equivalent graduate work elsewhere. 

c. Two courses, other than those in (a) and (b), not in the fields which 
he presents on his comprehensive examinations. 

He must also select a major field and prepare a seminar paper in that field. 
This major paper should, if possible, lead into a Ph.D. thesis. It must be typed 
in the physical form specified by the Thesis Manual of the Graduate School 
for a thesis and it must be presented at the oral comprehensive examination. 
The student must register for six hours of thesis supervision. He will, of course, 
usually need other courses and seminars to prepare for the comprehensive 
examinations. 

3. Comprehensive Examinations. The Ph.D. candidate must pass written 
examinations in two fields selected, with the approval of his adviser, from the 
following list. His adviser will insist on balance in the choice of fields. 

Comparative Economic Systems and Planning 

Economic Development 

Economic History 

History of Economic Thought 

Industrial Ofganization 

Institutional Economics 

International Economics 

Labor Economics 

Mathematical Economics and Econometrics 

Money and Banking 

Public Finance 

Regional and Urban Economics 

Any other field approved by the faculty 

The comprehensive examinations will be given in October and May. Students 
should sign up for them in mid-September or mid-April. After passing the writ- 
ten examinations, the candidate must take an oral examination on his major 
paper, economic theory, and the two optional fields. Upon passing this examina- 
tion, he will be awarded the M.A. degree, unless he already holds one in eco- 
nomics from another institution. Upon the recommendation of the examining 
committee (when approved by the Graduate Council), he will be admitted to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. 

•4. Doctoral Dissertation. Writing a doctoral dissertation and its successful 
defense in an oral examination completes the program. The Department con- 
ducts a doctoral dissertation seminar in which the student will be asked once a 
year to discuss the progress on his thesis. 

5. Language Requirements. The Department requires either a high degree 
of competence in one language or basic proficiency in two. In the second case. 
a course numbered above 100 in Mathematics or Statistics may replace one 
language. See the general statement about foreign language requirements else- 
where in this catalog. 

6. Minor Requirements. A program satisfying the above requirements auto- 
matically satisfies the Graduate School's major and minor requirements. 



116 • Graduate School 

MASTER OF ARTS, THESIS OPTION 

Under this option for the Master's Degree, the student must pass twenty-four 
semester hours of course work, plus six hours of thesis supervision. Twelve 
semester hours, exclusive of thesis supervision, must be in courses numbered 
200 to 299. He must take one course in micro-economic theory, one in aggre- 
gate economic theory, and one in quantitative msethods, unless equivalent work 
has been done elsewhere. (In practice, because most of the advanced graduate 
courses build on those mentioned under "The First-Year" above, the Master's 
program will usually include at least twelve hours in these courses.) Finally, 
he must write an acceptable thesis and pass an oral examination on the thesis, 
economic theory, and the field in which the thesis is written. (The Master's 
Degree earned in this way does not qualify the student to be admitted to can- 
didacy for the Ph.D.) 

MASTER OF ARTS, NON-THESIS OPTION 

Under this option, the candidate must: (a) pass ECON 211 and 212 with a 
grade of "B" or better; (b) pass the written portion of the comprehensive theory 
examination which is part of the Ph.D. program; (c) prepare a seminar paper 
in a graduate-level course in economics or prepare a similar paper independent 
of a course (in the case of an independent paper, a committee will be appointed 
to evaluate it); and (d) pass with an average grade of "B" or better at least 30 
hours of courses — 24 of these must be in graduate-level courses. 

ADMISSION 

Applications for financial assistance must be received by March 1 for sup- 
port beginning in September. Applications for admission received by March 1 
will be given priority; the closing date is July 15. All applicants are urged to 
take the Graduate Record Examination; information on this examination may 
be obtained from the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Appli- 
cants should normally have taken or plan to take before enrolling at least one 
course in each of the following: price theory, macro theory, calculus, and 
statistics. Applicants intending to be part-time students should bear in mind 
that nearly all of the graduate courses are taught during the day and that the 
minimum admissable course load requires about thirty hours a week of work. 

Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department 
of Economics. 

For Graduates arid Advanced Undergraduates 

ECON 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. (Mayor. Schink. Staff.) 

ECON 103. American Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. (Shipley.) 

ECON 105. Introduction to Economic Development of Underdeveloped 
Areas. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. (Adams. Lower.) 

ECON 106. Economic Development of Selected Areas. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 105. ECON 106A— Latin America; ECON 106B— Asia; 
ECON 106C— Africa. (Bennett, Adams.) 



University of Maryland • 117 

ECON 111. Quantitative Methods in Economics. (3) 

(Boorman.) 

ECON. 120. Introduction to Regional and Urban Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 102, or consent of instructor. (Harris.) 

ECON 130. Mathematical Economics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 102 and 132 and one year of college 
mathematics. (Hexter.) 

ECON 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

(Gruchy. Lower. Amuzegar.) 

ECON 132. Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. Required for economics 
majors; an analysis of price and distribution theory with special attention 
to recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. 

(Ulmer. O'Connell, Staff.) 

ECON 134. Contemporary Economic Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 032 and senior standing. (Gruchy, Lower.) 

ECON 137. The Economics of National Planning. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 032 or 037. (Gruchy, Almon.) 

ECON 138. Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. (Dodge.) 

ECON 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. 

(Meyer, Havrilesky, Boorman.) 

ECON 141. Theory of Money, Prices and Economic Activity. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 102, 132, and 140 or consent of 
instructor. (Havrilesky, Meyer.) 

ECON 142. Introduction to Public Finance. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. (Meer, Singer.) 

ECON 143. Theory of Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 142, 102 and 132, or consent of instructor. 

(Aaron, Singer.) 

ECON 144. State and Local Public Finance. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. 

ECON 147. Business Cycles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 102. (Mayor.) 

ECON 148. International Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. 

(Wonnacott. Clague. Moore.) 

ECON 149. International Economic Policies. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 148, 102. and 132. or consent of instructor. (Canterbery.) 

ECON 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 032. (Knight, Strober.) 

ECON 161. Current Problems in Labor Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. ECON 160. (Weinstein, Knight.) 



118 • Graduate School 

ECON 170. Industrial Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. (Quails, Greer.) 

ECON 171. Economics OF American Industries. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 032 or 037. (Measday, Greer.) 

ECON 196, 197. Honors Seminar. (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Normally taken in the junior year. Prerequisite, 
candidacy for honors in Economics. Selected topics are investigated, and writ- 
ten reports are submitted. (Knight.) 

ECON 198. Independent Honors Study. (3) 

First semester. Normally taken in the senior year. Prerequisites, ECON 196, 
197 and candidacy for honors in Economics. Integrated reading under staflf 
direction, leading to the preparation of a thesis in ECON 199. (Staff.) 

ECON 199. Honors Thesis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, ECON 198 and candidacy for honors in Econo- 
mics. General supervision will be provided through assembled meetings with 
the professor in charge of the course. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ECON 200. Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. This course and its sequel, ECON 201, analyze the usefulness 
and the shortcomings of prices in solving the basic economic problem of 
allocating scarce resources among alternative uses. Competitive model and 
the theory of imperfect competition. Central problem of welfare economics 
and general equilibrium. Detailed analysis of the theory of production and 
consumption. An acquaintance with calculus or concurrent enrollment in 
ECON 211 is presumed. (Ulmer, Almon, Pierce.) 

ECON 201. Advanced Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 200. A continuation of ECON 200. 
Theory of wages, capital and interest. Qualifications of the basic welfare 
theorem caused by non-competitive market structures external economies and 
diseconomies, and secondary constraints. Application of price theory to public 
expenditure decisions, investment in human capital, international trade, and 
other areas of economics. (Ulmer, Almon, Pierce.) 

ECON 202. Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. ECON 202 and 247 form a two-semester sequence in macro- 
economic theory. Aggregate general equilibrium theory, including an analysis 
of alternative theories — classical, Keynesian, and their more recent refine- 
ments. (Bergmann, Mayor, Pierce.) 

ECON 203. Seminar in American Economic Development. (3) 

Second semester. Selected topics in the long-term movements of the American 
economy. Quantitative studies of the growth of output; applications of econo- 
metric methods and economic theory to topics in American economic history. 

ECON 204. Origins and Development of Capitalism. (3) 

First semester. Study of the transition from feudalism to capitalism and the 
subsequent development of leading capitalist institutions in industry, agricul- 
ture, commerce, banking and the social movement. (Olson.) 

ECON 205. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 102 and 132. An analysis of the forces 
contributing to and retarding economic progress in underdeveloped areas. 



University of Maryland • 119 

Macro- and micro-economic aspects of development planning and strategy are 
emphasized. (Bennett.) 

ECON 206. Seminar in Economic Development. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. ECON 205 or consent of instructor. A con- 
tinuation of ECON 205. Special emphasis is on the application of economic 
theory in the institutional setting of a country or area of particular interest to 
the student. (Bennett.) 

ECON 207. Money and Finance in Economic Development. (3) 

First semester. Economic theory, strategy and tactics for mobilizing real and 
financial resources to finance and accelerate economic development. Monetary, 
fiscal, and tax reform policy and practice by the government sector to design 
and implement national development plans. (Hinrichs, Bennett.) 

ECON 209. Welfare Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 200. The topics covered include Pareto optimality, social 
welfare functions, indivisibilities, consumer surplus, output and price policy 
in public enterprise, and the welfare aspects of the theory of public expendi- 
tures. (McGuire, Meer.) 

ECON 211. Quantitative Economics I. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the theory and practice of statistical infer- 
ence. Elements of computer programming and a review of mathematics ger- 
mane to this and other graduate economics courses are included. 

(Bergmann, Hexter, Green.) 

ECON 212. Quantitative Economics II. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. ECON 211. Techniques of estimating relationships 
among economic variables. Multiple regression, the analysis of variance and 
covariance, and techniques for dealing in time series. Further topics m mathe- 
matics. (Bergmann, Hexter, Green.) 

ECON 214. Advanced Mathematical Economics. (3) 

First semester. Optimization techniques such as Lagrangian multipliers and 
linear programming. Mathematical treatment of general equilibrium, including 
interindustry analysis, the theory of production, consumption, and welfare. 
Multisectoral growth models and questions of optimal growth. The course 
assumes a background in calculus and matrix algebra such as provided by 
ECON 211 and ECON 212. (Almon.) 

ECON 215. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 214. The topic of the seminar changes 
from year to year. (Almon.) 

ECON 217. Econometrics. (3) 

First semester. Special topics in mathematical statistics necessary for under- 
standing econometric theory, with particular emphasis on multivariate analysis. 
The estimation of simultaneous equation systems, problems involving errors in 
variables, distributed lags, and spectral analysis. (Hexter. Bell.) 

ECON 218. Seminar in Quantitative Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 212 or consent of instructor. Analysis of 
data sources for economic research; critical evaluation of previous and current 
quantitative economic studies; and class discussion and criticism of student re- 
search projects. (Bell.) 

ECON 220. Advanced Regional and Urban Economics. (3) 

First semester. Location theory and the spatial distributions of economic activity. 
The application to problems of natural resource management, environmental 



120 • Graduate School 

quality, and regional and interregional development of such analytic methods 
as input-output techniques, social accounting systems, and industrial complex 
analysis. (Cumberland.) 

ECON 221. Seminar in Regional and Urban Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Selected topics and techniques in regional and urban economic 
analysis, including models for economic projections, urban growth, and regional 
development. (Harris.) 

ECON 230. History of Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 132 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of the development of economic thought and theories including the Greeks, 
Romans, canonists, mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. 
Relation of ideas to economic policy. (Dillard.) 

ECON 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 230 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of nineteenth and twentieth-century schools of economic thought, particularly 
the classicists, neo-classists, Austrians, German historical school, American 
economic thought, the socialists, and Keynes. (Dillard) 

ECON 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory. (3, 3) 

A study of the recent developments in the field of institutional economic theory 
in the United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

ECON 234. Economic Growth in Mature Economies. (3) 

Analysis of policies and problems for achieving stable economic growth in 
mature economies such as the United States, the United Kingdom, and the 
Scandinavian countries. (Gruchy.) 

ECON 235. Advanced International Economic Relations. (3) 

First Semester. The international mechanism of adjustment: price, exchange 
rate, and income changes. Comparative costs, factor endowments, and the 
gains from trade. Commercial policy and the theory of customs unions. 

(Wonnacott, Clague.) 

ECON 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in international economics. (Wonnacott.) 

ECON 237. Selected Topics in Economics. (3) 
Arranged individually with professors. 

ECON 238. Seminar in Economic Development of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 138 or consent of instructor. Measure- 
ment and evaluation of Soviet economic growth including interpretation and 
use of Soviet statistics, measurement of national income, fiscal policies, invest- 
ment and technological change, planning and economic administration, man- 
power and wage policies, foreign trade and aid. Selected topics in Bloc 
development. (Dodge.) 

ECON 240. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

First semester. An adequate knowledge of micro- and macro-economics is 
assumed. Theory of money, financial assets, and economic activity; review of 
classical, neo-classical and Keynesian contributions; emphasis on post-Keynesian 
contributions, including those of Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, Friedman, and 
others. (Meyer.) 

ECON 241. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 240 or consent of instructor. Theory of the 
the mechanisms through which central banking affects economic activity and 



University of Maryland • 121 

prices; formation and implementation of monetary policy; theoretical topics in 
monetary policy. (Meyer.) 

ECON 242. Advanced Theory of Public Finance. (3) 

Review of utility analysis to include the theory of individual consumer resource 
allocation and exchange and welfare implications. Effects of alternative tax and 
subsidy techniques upon allocation, exchange, and welfare outcomes. Theories 
of public goods, their production, exchange and consumption. Principles of 
benefit-cost analysis for government decisions. (Schultze, McGuire.) 

ECON 243. Seminar in Public Finance. (3) 

Theory of taxation; empirical studies with reference primarily to the United 
States. The burden of the public debt. Budget concepts and their relationship to 
fiscal policy. (Aaron.) 

ECON 245. Economics of Defense. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 200. Defense systems analysis. A review of the program- 
budget system and an evaluation of resource management in the defense pro- 
gram. 

ECON 246. Public Sector Workshop. (3) 

Second semester. Representative problems in analysis for public decision mak- 
ing: measurement of benefits and costs; incommensurabilities in benefits, and 
ambiguities in cost; criteria for program and project selection; efi'ects of uncer- 
tainty; time horizon considerations; joint costs and multiple benefits; non- 
quantifiable factors in decision analysis. Examples will be taken from current 
government programs. (McGuire.) 

ECON 247. Economic Growth and Instability. (3) 

Second semester. A continuation of ECON 202 with emphasis on the theory of 
economic growth in developed economies; the basic Harrod-Domar models and 
more complex ones, both neoclassical (Solow, Tobin) and Keynesian (Kaldor, 
Champernowne). Models of embodied technological progress and various input- 
augmenting formulations. The empirical aspects of the course focus on the prob- 
lem of estimating sources of economic growth, parameters of production func- 
tions, and the rate and character of technological advance. 

(Bergmann, Mayor, Schultze.) 

ECON 248. The Economics of Technical Change. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Determinants and impact of inventions and 
innovations. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of technical change both at 
the micro- and macro-economic levels and under difi"erent conditions of economic 
development. 

ECON 260. Seminar in Labor Economics. (3) 

First semester. Formal models of labor demand, supply, utilization and price 
formation. Factors afi"ecting labor supply; the determination of factor shares 
in an open economy; bargaining models, labor resources, Trade union theories 
as they affect resource allocation. (Weinstein.) 

ECON 261. Selected Topics IN Labor Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Variation in labor market and labor organization; labor in 
stages of economic development; manpower development. Aggregate problems 
of price and employment stability. Alternative theories of public policy toward 
labor markets. (Knight.) 

ECON 266. Seminar in the Economics of Human Resources. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. (Weinstein.) 



122 • Graduate School 

ECON 270. Advanced Industrial Organization. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 102 and 132 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of market structure and its relation to market performance. 

(Mueller. Quails.) 

ECON 271. Industrial Organization and Public Policy. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 270 or consent of instructor. Analysis 
of the problems of public policy in regard to the structure, conduct, and per- 
formance of industry. Examination of anti-trust policy from the point of view 
of economic theory. (Mueller, Quails.) 

ECON 399. Thesis Research. 
Arranged. 

ECON 499. Dissertation Research. 

EDUCATION 

Professors: V. E. Anderson, Herman, Blough, Bowie, Byrne, Duffey, 
Grambs, Grentzer, Harrison, Hebeler, Hornbake, Hovet, Hymes, 
Kurtz, Leeper, Magoon, Male, Maley, Marx, McClure, Mershon, 
Morgan, Newell, O'Neill, Perkins, Raths, Risinger, Schindler, Stun- 
kard, Thompson, vanZwoll, Waetjen, Wiggin, Wilson. 
Associate Professors: Adkins, J. P. Anderson, Ashlock, Brigham, Bryan, 
E. G. Campbell, Chambliss, Chapin, Dayton, Dudley, Ehrle, M. H. 
Gardner, Giblette, Goering, Greenberg, Hall, Hatfield, Henkleman, 
Huber, James, Kelsey, Kyle, Lawrence, Lemmon, Lindsay, Lockard, 
Longley, Luetkemeyer, Matteson, Milhollan, Neville, Noll, Ray, 
Rhoads, Seidman, Simms, Tierney, Walbesser, Weaver, Wedberg, Wil- 
liams, Woody, Woolf. 

Assistant Professors: Acre, Amershek, Beatty, Bolea, D. D. Campbell, 
Carr, DiLavore, Dittman, Draeger, Duke, Eley, Farrell, Finkelstein, 
Fischer, Frank, Funaro, A. H. Gardner, Green, Grundig, Gump, 
Hamby, Herman, Huden, Hunt, Johnson, Larson, Medvene, Moyer, 
Peters, Peterson, Potterfield, Roderick, Rogolsky, Schramm, Schu- 
macher, Sedlacek, Stipek, Stough, Sullivan, vanNess, Zachary. 

MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF EDUCATION 
ADVANCED GRADUATE SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

Programs in a variety of educational specialties are offered through three 
levels of degree and diploma programs. In consultation with an adviser, a stu- 
dent may choose at the first level, to qualify for the degree of Master of Arts 
or Master of Education. A high degree of professional competence is required 
for the Advanced Graduate Specialist diploma at the second level but in a 
separate stream from the degree programs. Both the Doctor of Education and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered at the third level. The master's 
and doctoral degrees come under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School. For 
the AGS diploma, a student must be matriculated in the Graduate School but 
the program is under the control of the College of Education. 

The student is required to take a test battery, and to submit professional 
recommendations. 



University of Maryland • 123 



MAJOR AREAS 

Following is a list of major areas.* Note that some majors can be pursued 
only at the master's level, whereas others are primarily AGS or doctoral pro- 
grams. For policies and procedures respecting all degree and diploma programs, 
see bulletins issued by the Department of Education. 



Academic Education (These are em- 
phases within the areas of Elemen- 
tary or Secondary Education, with 
work in Higher Education for doc- 
toral students.) 
( 1 ) Art Education 

English (Language Arts) 

Education 
Foreign Language Education 
Mathematics Education 
Music Education 
Science Education 
Social Studies Education 
(1) Speech Education 

Administration, Supervision and 
Curriculum 

General Administration including 
(3) Curriculum Development 
Personnel Administration 
Public Relations 
School Facilities 
Supervision of Instruction 
School Finance and Business 
Management 
Administration in Higher Education 
Administration in Secondary 

Education 
Administration in Elementary 
Education 

(1) 



Secondary 

Rehabilitation 
Psychological Services in 

Schools 
Pupil Personnel Worker 
Student Personnel 

Administration 
(5) Corrective and Remedial 

Reading 
(4) Curriculum and Instruction 

(1) Education for Industry 
Elementary Education 

(2) Higher Education 

Historical, Philosophical, and So- 
ciological Foundations of Edu- 
cation; Comparative Education 
Human Development Education 
Industrial Arts Education 

( 1 ) Nursery-Kindergarten Education 
Research Design, Statistics and 

Measurement 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 

Emotionally Disturbed 
Gifted 

Mentally Retarded 
Perceptually Impaired 
(1) Technical Education 
Vocational Education 
Business Education 
Distributive Education 
Home Economics Education 
Vocational Industrial 
Education 



(1) 



Adult Education 

Counseling and Personnel Services 
Counseling 

Child and elementary 

College 

Community 

*See Director of Graduate Studies in Education for information about levels. 

(1 ) Master's only. 

(2) At AGS level as junior college education. At doctoral level, hyphenated with 
other majors for preparation of college and university personnel. 

(3) Curriculum in this major is primarily for school service personnel. 

(4) Curriculum in this major is primarily for college and university professors 
of curriculum. 

(5) Master's and AGS levels only except when part of a broader major in ele- 
mentary or secondary education. 



124 • Graduate School 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDUC 100. History of Education in Western Civilization. (3) (Lindsay.) 

EDUC 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 

(Finkelstein, Wiggin.) 

EDUC 107. Philosophy of Education. (2-3) (Agre, Noll.) 

EDUC 108. Logic of Teaching. (3) (Agre.) 

EDUC 147. Audio-Visual Education. (3) 

(Maley, Schramm, Wedberg.) 

EDUC 148. Instructional Media Services. (3) 

Prerequisites: teaching experience and EDUC 147, or equivalent. Procedures 
for coordinating instructional media programs; instructional materials acquisi- 
tion, storage, scheduling distribution, production evaluation, and other service 
responsibilities; instructional materials center staff coordination of research, 
curriculum improvement, and faculty development programs. (Staff.) 

EDUC 149. Programmed Instruction. (3) 

Analysis of programmed instruction techniques; selection, utilization, and evalu- 
ation of existing programs and teaching machines; developing learning objectives; 
writing and validating programs. (Staff.) 

EDUC 150. Educational Measurement. (3) 

First and second semesters and summer session. (Staff.) 

EDUC 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) (Staff.) 

EDUC 155. Laboratory Practices in Reading. (2 4) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 153 or EDUC 157. A laboratory course in which each 
student has one or more pupils for analysis and instruction. At least one 
class meeting per week to diagnose individual cases and to plan instruction. 

(Staff.) 

EDUC 157. Corrective-Remedial Reading Instruction. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 153 or equivalent. For teachers, supervisors, and administra- 
tors who wish to identify and assist pupils with reading difficulties. Concerned 
with diagnostic techniques, instructional materials, and teaching procedures use- 
ful in the regular classroom. (Staff.) 

EDUC 160. Educational Sociology. (3) 

Deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to the work of teach- 
ers. Implications of democratic ideology for educational endeavor, educational 
tasks imposed by changes in population and technological trends, the welfare 
status of pupils, the socio-economic attitudes of individuals who control the 
schools, and other elements of community background. (Huden.) 

EDUC 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 

A. Adult Education 

B. Foundations 

C. Higher Education 

D. Research Design, Statistics, Measurement 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may be set by the major area in 
which the experience is to be taken. Planned field experience may be pro- 
vided for selected graduate students who have had teaching experience and 
whose application for such field experience has been approved by the educa- 



University of Maryland 



125 



tion faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to both major and non- 
major students. (Staff.) 
Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in EDUC 187, 
EDUC 224, and EDUC 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester 
hours. 

EDUC 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who 
have definite plans for individual study of approved problems. Course cards 
must have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty member who 
has approved it. (Staff.) 

EDUC 189. Workshops, Clinics and Institutes. (1-6) 

The maximum number of credits that may be earned under this course symbol 
toward any degree is six semester hours, the symbol may be used two or more 
times until six semester hours have been reached. 

The following types of educational enterprises may be scheduled under this 
course heading: workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed 
cooperatively with other colleges and universities) ?nd not otherwise covered in 
the present course listing; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy, laboratories, and special education centers; institutes 
developed around specific topics or problems and intended for designated 
groups such as school superintendents, principals, and supervisors. (Staff.) 



For Graduates 

EDUC 202. The Junior College. (3) 

EDUC 203. Problems in Higher Education. (3) 

EDUC 204. Seminar in Educational Sociology. (2) 



(Kelsey.) 

(Kelsey.) 

(Staff.) 



EDUC 205. Comparative Education. (3) (Lindsay, Male.) 

EDUC. 206. Seminar in Comparative Education. (2) (Lindsay, Male.) 

EDUC 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education. (2) (Staff.) 

EDUC 208. Analysis of Educational Concepts. (3) (Agre.) 

EDUC 209. Adult Education. (3) (Staff.) 

EDUC 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

A. Adult Education 

B. Foundations 

C. Higher Education 

D. Research Design, Statistics, Measurement 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to selected students 
whose application for an apprenticeship has been approved by the Education 
faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or 
the equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, school 
system, or educational institution or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship with the apprentice and the other 
persons involved. Prerequisites, teaching experience, a master's degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland. (Staff.) 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in EDUC 187, 
EDUC 224, and EDUC 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester 
hours. 



126 • Graduate School 

EDUC 230. Mediated Instructional Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 147 and EDUC 149. Theoretical and pragmatic deter- 
minants in the selection of media systems for improving teaching-learning 
efficiency; development and evaluation of teaching-learning units for large- 
group, small-group, and self-instructional presentation; integration of print 
and non-print media with team teaching techniques. Review of related 
research. (Staff.) 

EDUC 231. Practicum in Instructional Systems. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 230. Design and application of an experimental instruc- 
tional system to a problem in curriculum, learning, or research. Each student 
will work with school or college instructors in the development, use, and 
evaluation of an instructional media system to solve a specific instructional 
problem in the field. (Staff.) 

EDUC 232. Seminar in Educational Technology Research and Theory. (2) 
Prerequisite, EDUC 230. Review of the literature, including the mass media 
of communications as they relate to the instructional process; learning theory 
implications, sociological, and economic considerations as they relate to current 
and future mediated instructional systems. (Staff.) 

EDUC 237. Curriculum Theory and Research. (2) (Hovet.) 

EDUC 241. Problems in the Teaching of Reading. (3) 

A. Elementary Schools 

B. Secondary Schools 

Prerequisite: EDUC 153 or equivalent. Implications of current theory and the 
results of research for the teaching of reading. Attention is given to all areas 
of development reading instruction, with special emphasis on persistent prob- 
lems. (Staff.) 

EDUC 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Intensive reading, analysis, and interpretation of research; applications to teach- 
ing fields; the writing of abstracts, research reports, and seminar papers. 

(Staff.) 

EDUC 251. Intermediate Statistics in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 151 or equivalent. A study of the basic statistical techniques 
used for graduate research in education, including tests of significance and sam- 
pling techniques. Necessary mathematical skills are developed as part of the 
course. (Staff.) 

EDUC 255, 256. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading 
Instruction. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, at least 21 credits applicable to the master's program in Cor- 
rective and Remedial Reading. The first semester of the course deals with diag- 
nostic techniques. Each participant will assist in diagnosing reading disabilities 
and in recommending instructional programs for individual pupils. The second 
semester deals with instruction of pupils with reading disabilities. Each par- 
ticipant will plan and execute a program of instruction for an individual or 
a small group, applying findings of the preliminary diagnosis. (Staff.) 

EDUC 257. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities. (3) 

Prerequisites, EDEL 153 and EDUC 157. For those who wish to become cor- 
rective and remedial reading specialists. Concerned with clinical techniques, 
instructional materials, and remedial procedures useful to the reading specialist 
in (1) diagnosing serious reading difficulties and (2) planning programs of 
individual and small-group instruction. The work includes the writing of 
diagnostic and progress reports. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 127 

EDUC 262. Measurement in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 150. Study of group tests typically employed in school 
testing programs; discussion of evidence relating to the measurement of abilities. 

(Staff.) 

EDUC 265. Theory of Measurement. (2) 

Prerequisites, EDUC 150 and EDUC 151. Treats such topics as theory and 
techniques used in various scaling methods, test analysis, predictive accuracy of 
scores, and equivalence of scores. For students desiring more advanced treatment 
of problems. (Giblette.) 

EDUC 266. Practicum in Individual Testing. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 262, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Intensive 
study of the theory, application, and interpretation of standard measures utilized 
in the individual assessment of abilities. Supervised practice in the administra- 
tion of Binet, Wechsler, and other tests. (Staff.) 

EDUC 271. Advanced Statistics in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 251 or equivalent. Primarily for the education student 
desiring more advanced work in statistical methodology. Survey of major types 
of statistical design in educational research; application of multivariate statistical 
techniques to educational problems. (Dayton, Stunkard.) 

EDUC 272. Special Topics in Applied Statistics in Education. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 271, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for students majoring or minoring in Research Design, Measurement, 
and Statistics in Education. Topics to be announced, but will typically relate 
to the areas of advanced multivariate analysis and advanced design of ex- 
periments. (Staff.) 

EDUC 275, 276. Advanced Prqblems in Art Education. (3, 3) 

These courses are centered about problems of teaching art in the elementary 
and secondary schools in terms of the philosophy of art education today, tech- 
niques and processes in the visual arts, and creative opportunities in the visual 
arts and in art education. The student also will have the opportunity to do 
special work centered about his problems in art education. (Staff.) 

EDUC 279. Seminar in Adult Education. (2) 

EDUC 280. Research Methods and Materials. (2) 

Research methodology for case studies, surveys, and experiments; measure- 
ments and statistical techniques; design, form and style for theses and research 
reports. Primarily for advanced students and doctoral candidates. (Stunkard.) 

EDUC 281. Source Materials in Education. (1-2) 

Bibliography development through a study of source materials in education, 
special fields in education, and for seminar papers and theses. (Wiggin.) 

EDUC 287. Internship in Education, (3-16) 

A. Adult Education 

B. Foundations 

C. Higher Education 

D. Research Design, Statistics and Measurement 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected students who 
have teaching experience. The following groups of students are eligible: (a) 
any student who has been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's degree; and 
(b) any student who receives special approval by the education faculty for 
an internship, provided that prior to taking an internship, such student shall 
have completed at least sixty semester hours of graduate work, including at 



128 • Graduate School 

least six semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. Each 
intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at least a semester with an 
appropriate staff member in a cooperating school, school system, or educational 
institution or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation differ- 
ent from the one where the student is regularly employed. The intern's sponsor 
maintains a close working relationship with the intern and the other persons 
involved. 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in EDUC 187, 
EDUC 224, and EDUC 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester 
hours. (Staff.) 

EDUC 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research 
problems under the direction of their advisers may register for credit under this 
number. Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be one. (Staff.) 

EDUC 290. Doctoral Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, passing the preliminary examinations for a doctor's degree in 
education, or recommendation of a doctoral adviser. Analysis of doctoral proj- 
ects and theses, and of other on-going research projects. A doctoral candidate 
may participate in the Seminar during as many University sessions as he desires, 
but may nearn no more than three semester hours of credit in the Seminar. An 
Ed.D. candidate may earn in total no more than nine semester hours, and a Ph.D. 
candidate, no more than eighteen semester hours, in the Seminar and in 
EDUC 399. (Dayton, Giblette, Hovet, Johnson, Stunkard.) 

EDUC 302. Curriculum in Higher Education. (3) 

An analysis of research in curriculum and of conditions affecting curriculum 
change, with examination of issues in curriculum making based upon the history 
of higher education curriculum development. (Kelsey.) 

EDUC 303. Organization and Administration of Higher Education. (3) 

Organization and administration of higher education at the local, state, and fed- 
eral levels; and an analysis of administrative relationships and functions and 
their effects on curriculum and instruction. (Wiggin.) 

EDUC 305. College Teaching. (3) 

Various methods of college instruction analyzed in relation to the curriculum 
and psychological basis. These would include the case study method, the dem- 
onstration method, the lecture method, the recitation method, teaching machines, 
teaching by television, and other teaching aids. (Kelsey and Saff.) 

EDUC 309. Seminar in Problems of Higher Education. (2) (Kelsey.) 

EDUC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Registration required to the extent of 6 hours for master's thesis; 6-9 hours 
for a doctoral project; and 12-18 hours for a doctoral dissertation. (Staff.) 

EDUC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctorate Level) (Staff.) 

ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION AND CURRICULUM 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDAD 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDAD 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 



University of Maryland • 129 

EDAD 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

For Graduates 

EDAD 210. The Organization and Administration of Publc Education. (3) 
The basic course in school administration. Deals with the organization and 
administration of school systems — at the local, state, and federal levels; and 
with the administrative relationships involved. (Dudley Newell, van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 211. The Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDAD 210 or consent of instructor. The work of the secondary 
school principal. Includes topics such as personnel problems, school-community 
relationships, student activities, schedule making, and internal financial ac- 
counting. (J. p. Anderson.) 

EDAD 212. School Finance and Business Administration. (3) 

An introduction to principles and practices in the administration of the public 
school finance activity. Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the function 
of finance in the educational program are considered. (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 214. School Plant Planning. (2-3) 

An orientation course in which the planning of school buildings is developed as 
educational designing with reference to problems of site, building facilities, and 
equipment. (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

The nature and functions of supervision; various supervisory techniques and 
procedures; human relationship factors; and personal qualities for supervision. 

(Dudley, J. P. Anderson, Neville, Herman.) 

EDAD 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Problems in administering elementary schools and improving instruction. 

(Dudley.) 

EDAD 218. School Surveys. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Includes study of school surveys with em- 
phasis on problems of school organization and administration, finance and school 
plant planning. Field work in school surveys is required. (Staff.) 

EDAD 221. Advanced School Plant Planning. (2) 

EDAD 214 is a prerequisite to this course. However, students with necessary 
background may be admitted without completion of EDAD 214. This is an ad- 
vanced course in school plant planning problems. Emphasis is given to analysis 
of the educational program and planning of physical facilities to accommodate 
that program. (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, master's degree or consent of instructor. Prerequisite may be waived 
with advisor's approval. Enrollment limited. Designed to help teachers, school 
administrators, and other school staff members to learn to function more ef- 
fectively in developing educational policy in group situations. Each student in 
the course is required to be working concurrently in the field with a group of 
school stafT members or citizens on actual school problems. (Newell.) 

EDAD 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (J -9) 
See EDUC 224 for course description. 

EDAD 225. School Public Relations. (3) 

A study of the interrelationship between the community and the school. Public 



130 • Graduate School 

opinion, propaganda, and the ways in which various specified agents and agencies 
within the school have a part in the school public relations program are ex- 
plored, (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 226. Child Accounting. (2) 

An inquiry into the record keeping activities of the school system, including an 
examination of the marking system. (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 227. Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

A comparison of practices with principles governing the satisfaction of school 
personnel needs, including a study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, re- 
wards, and other benefits. (van Zwoll.) 

EDAD 234. The School Curriculum. (2-3) 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early child- 
hood through adolescence, including a review of historical developments, an 
analysis of conditions affecting curriculum change, an examination of issues in 
curriculum making, and a consideration of current trends in curriculum design. 

(Berman. Hovet.) 

EDAD 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation in the schools; principles 
for the selection and organization of the content and learning experiences; ways 
of working in classroom and school on curriculum improvement. 

(Neville, V. Anderson, Berman.) 

EDAD 249. , Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision. (2-4) 
Prerequisite, at least four hours in educational administration and supervision or 
consent of instructor. A student may register for two hours and may take the 
seminar a second time for an additional two hours. (Staff.) 

EDAD 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for course description. 

EDAD 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for course description. 

EDAD 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 399 for course description. 

EDAD 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDCP 161. Introduction to Counseling and Personnel Services. (3) 

(Staff.) 
EDCP 165. Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. (3) 

(Formerly EDUC 182.) (Ehrle, Lawrence.) 

EDCP 172. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (3) 

(Formerly EDUC 162.) (Staff.) 

EDCP 187. Field Experience in Counseling and Personnel Services. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDCP 188. Special Problems in Counseling and Personnel Services. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDCP 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 



University of Maryland • 131 



For Graduates 



EDCP 200. Introduction to Student Personnel. (2) (Formerly EDUC 228) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Same as PSYC 224) A systematic analysis 
of research and theoretical literature on a variety of major problems in the 
organization and administration of student personnel services in higher educa- 
tion. Included will be discussion of such topics as the student personnel philos- 
ophy in education, counseling services, discipline, housing student activities, 
financial aid, health, remedial services, etc. (Marx.) 

EDCP 224. Apprenticeship in Counseling and Personnel Services. (1-9) 
See EDUC 224 for description. (Staff.) 

EDCP 240. PsYCHO-SociAL Aspects OF Disability. (3) (Formerly EDUC 283) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 165 or consent of instructor. This course is part of the core 
curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to develop an under- 
standing of the nature and importance of the personal and psycho-social aspects 
of adult disability. (Ehrle.) 

EDCP 241. Student Personnel and the College Student. (2) (Formerly 

EDUC 304) 

A demographic study of the characteristics of college students; as well as a study 
of their aspirations, values, and purposes. (Draeger.) 

EDCP 243. Occupational Choice Theory and Information. (3) (Formerly 

EDUC 253) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 161. Research and theory related to occupational and edu- 
cational decisions; school programs of related information and other activities 
in occupational decision. (Rhoads. Byrne.) 

EDCP 244, 245. Medical Aspects of Disability I. II. (3-3) (Formerly 

EDUC 284, 285) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 165 or consent of instructor. Part of the core curriculum 
for rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to develop an understanding of the 
prognosis and complications of disease processes and disorders and a knowledge 
of treatment measures so that realistic vocational rehabilitation goals may be 
developed. (Duke.) 

EDCP 249. Personality Theories in Counseling and Personnel Services. (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Examination of constructs and research re- 
lating to major personality theories with emphasis on their significance for edu- 
cators working with the behavior of individuals in school settings. (Greenberg.) 

EDCP 250. Cases in Appraisal. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 262. Collecting and interpreting non-standardized pupil ap- 
praisal data; synthesis of all types of data through case study procedures. 

(Ray. Woody.) 

EDCP 254. Organization and Administration of Personnel Services. (2) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 261 or permission of instructor. Instilling the personnel 
services point of view and implementing personnel services practices. 

(Greenberg.) 

EDPC 260. Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 250. Exploration of learning theories as applied to coun- 
seling in school, and practices which stem from such theories. 

(Grundig. Woody.) 

EDCP 261. Practicum in Counseling. (2-6) 

Prerequisites, EDCP 260 and permission of instructor. Sequence of supervised 



132 • Graduate School 

counseling experiences of increasing complexity. Limited to eight applicants in 
advance. Two hour class plus laboratory. (Staff.) 

EDCP 263, 264. Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory and 
Practicum. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Application of methods relevant to behavior change 
in counseling and psychotherapy. Individual supervision and group consultation. 

(Magoon.) 

EDCP 265. Counseling in Elementary Schools. (3) (Formerly EDUC 259) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 250 or consent of instructor. Counseling theory and prac- 
tices as related to children. Emphasis will be placed on an awareness of the 
child's total behavior as well as on specific methods of. communicating with the 
child through techniques of play interviews, observations, and the use of non- 
parametric data. (Greenberg.) 

EDCP 271. Counseling and Personnel Services 5eminar. (2) (Formerly 
EDUC 269) 
Enrollment by permission of instructor. (Stipek, Peterson.) 

EDCP 272. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2-6) (Formerly EDUC 310) 

An intensive study of the various student personnel functions. A means to inte- 
grate the knowledges from various fields as they relate to student personnel 
administration. (Staff.) 

EDCP 273. Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling. (2) (Formerly EDUC 286) 
This course is part of the core curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. It is 
designed to provide the advanced rehabilitation counseling student with a for- 
mal seminar to discuss, evaluate and attempt to reach personal resolution re- 
garding pertinent professional problems and issues in the field. (Ehrle.) 

EDCP 287. Internship in Counseling and Personnel Services. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 

EDCP 288. Special Problems in Counseling and Personnel Services. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. (Staff.) 

EDCP 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

See EDUC 399 for description. (Staff.) 

EDCP 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION' 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDEL 105. Science in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Designed to help teachers acquire general 
science understandings, and to develop teaching materials for practical use in 
classrooms. Includes experiments, demonstrations, constructions, observations, 
field trips, and use of audio-visual materials. The emphasis is on content and 
method related to science units in common use in elementary schools. 

(Blough, Eley, Williams.) 

EDEL 115. Activities and Materials in Early Childhood Education. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDUC 110 (or concurrent enrollment). Storytelling; selection of 
books; the use, preparation, and presentation of such raw materials as clay, 
paint (easel and finger), blocks, wood, and scrap materials. (Stant.) 

' For additional courses in reading see listings under Education. 



University of Maryland • 133 

EDEL 116. Music in Early Childhood Education. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, MUSC 016 or equivalent. Creative 
exneriences in songs and rhythms; correlation of music and everyday teaching 
with the abilities and developments of each level; study of songs and materials; 
observation and teaching experience with each age level. (Staff.) 

EDEL 121. Language Arts in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral 
and written expression, and creative expression. Special emphasis given to skills 
having real significance to pupils. (McCuaig Roderick, Schumacher, Zachary.) 

EDEL 122. Social Studies in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Consideration given to curriculum, organ- 
ization and methods of teaching, evaluation of newer materials, and utilization 
of environmental resources. (O'Neill, Weaver, Potterfield, Duffey, Herman.) 

EDEL 123. The Child and the Curriculum. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. Relationship of the elementary school 
curriculum to child growth and development. Recent trends in curriculum 
organization; the effect of environment on learning; readiness to learn; and 
adapting curriculum content and methods to maturity levels of children. 

(Hymes, Schumacher.) 

EDEL 125. Art in Elementary School. (2) (Lembach, Longley.) 

EDEL 126. Mathematics in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. (Schindler, Martin. Ashlock.) 

EDEL 152. Literature for Children and Young People, Advanced. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDUC 052, or approval of instructor. 

(Amershek, D. Brown, E. Anderson, Roderick, Zachary.) 

EDEL 153. The Teaching of Reading. (2-3) 

A. Early Childhood. B. Elementary. C. Secondary. 

(Hall, Herman, McCuaig, Sullivan, Wilson, Zachary ) 

EDEL 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDEL 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDEL 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

For Graduates 

EDEL 200. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. Prerequisite: at 
least 12 hours of graduate work in education. (O'Neill, Staff.) 

EDEL 205. Problems in Teaching Science in Elementary Schools. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 105 or approval of instructor. Provides opportunity for 
students to analyze the teaching of science in the elementary school through (1) 
the identification of problems of teaching, (2) the investigation and study of 
reported research related to the stated problems; and (3) the hypothesizing of 
methods for improving the effectiveness of elementary school science programs. 
Students will also have the opportunity to study and evaluate newer programs 
and practices in the teaching of science in the elementary school. 

(Blough, Eley. Williams.) 



134 • Graduate School 

EDEL 210. Curriculum Planning in Nursery-Kindergarten Education. (3) 
An examination of significant new developments in curriculum theory and prac- 
tice. (Leeper.) 

EDEL 211. The Young Child in the Community. (3) 

Planned observation, related research, and analysis of the experiences of young 
children in such community centers as foster homes, orphanages, day care cen- 
ters, Sunday schools, etc. One-half day a week observation required. (Hymes.) 

EDEL 212. The Young Child in School. (3) 

An examination of significant theory and research on the characteristics of 
young children which have special implications for teaching children in nursery- 
kindergarten groups. (Leeper.) 

EDEL 213. Teacher-Parent Relationships. (3) 

A study of the methods and materials, trends, and problems in establishing close 
home-school relationships. (Hymes.) 

EDEL 214. Intellectual Experiences of the Nursery-Kindergarten 
Child. (2) 

A critical examination of materials, methods and programs in such areas as 
reading, literature, science, mathematics, the social studies. (Moyer.") 

EDEL 215. Creative Experiences of the Nursery-Kindergarten Child. (2) 
A critical examination of materials, methods and programs in such areas as 
art, music, dance and rhythms, language, etc. (Moyer.) 

EDEL 221. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDEL 121 or approval of instructor. This course is designed to 
allow each student an opportunity ( 1 ) to analyze current issues, trends, and 
problems in language-arts instruction in terms of research in fundamental edu- 
cational theory and the language arts, and (2) to use this analysis in effecting 
changes in methods and materials for classroom instruction. 

(Roderick, Schumacher, Zachary.) 

EDEL 222. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDEL 122 or approval of instructor. An examination of current 
literature and research reports in the social sciences and in social studies curricu- 
lum design and instruction, with an emphasis on federally-sponsored projects 
as well as programs designed for urban children. 

(Duffey, Herman, O'Neil. Potterfield, Weaver.) 

EDEL 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 
See EDUC 224 for description. 

EDEL 226. Problems of Teaching Mathematics in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDEL 126 or approval of instructor. Critical examination of se- 
lected theory and research in the teaching of mathematics in elementary schools. 
Evaluation of instructional materials. Implications for practice. 

EDEL 227. Diagnosis and Remediation of Arithmetic Disabilities. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 126 and EDUC 150 or equivalent. For those who wish to 
increase competency in diagnosing and correcting arithmetic disabilities. Con- 
cerned with classroom and clinical techniques, instructional materials, and 
remedial procedures useful to the teacher or clinician in ( 1 ) diagnosing serious 
arithmetic difficulties and (2) planning programs of individual and small-group 
remediation. The work includes the writing of diagnostic and progress reports. 

(Ashlock.) 

EDEL 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 



University of Maryland • 135 

EDEL 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDEL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 399 for description. 

EDEL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDHD 102. 103. 104. Child Development Laboratory I. IT and IIT. (2. 2. 2) 
These courses involve the direct study of children throughout the school year. 
Each participant gathers a wide body of information about an individual, 
presents the accumulating data from time to time to the study group for criticism 
and group analysis and writes an interpretation of the dynamics underlying the 
child's learning, behavior and development. Provides opportunity for teachers 
in-service to earn credit for participation in their own local child study group. 

EDHD 105. Adolescent Development. (3) 

This course cannot be used to meet the psychological foundation requirements 
for teacher certification. (Felker.) 

EDHD 112. 114. Scientific Concepts in Human Development T and T1. (3. 3) 
Summer session. 

EDHD 113. 115. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I and II. (3. 3) 
Summer session. 

EDHD 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development III. (3) 

Guided reading and observation of pupils throughout the school year. Emphasis 
on human development concepts relating to the impact of family, school, society, 
and peer group on the student. Collection and analysis of data affecting learn- 
ing and behavior. For in-service educators. (Not open to persons with credit in 
EDHD 102, 103.) 

EDHD 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis III. (3) 

Prerequisite. EDHD 116. Guided reading and observation of pupils throughout 
the school year. Emphasis on analysis of intrinsic aspects of learning and be- 
havior including cognitive processes, motivation, self-concept, attitudes, and 
values. For in-service educators. (Not open to persons with credit in EDHD 
102, 103.) 

EDHD 120, 121, 122. Study of Human Development and Learning in School 
Settings I, II, III. (2 ,2, 2) 

A sequence of courses which enables in-service teachers and administrators to 
carry on advanced study of human development and learning principles in the 
continuous study and evaluation of several different phases of the school pro- 
gram over an extended period of time. (Staff.) 

EDHD 145. Guidance of Young Children. (3) (Hymes.) 

EDHD 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDHD 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDHD 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 



136 • Graduate School 

For Graduates 

EDHD 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study. (3) 

Offers a general overview of the scientific principles which describe human de- 
velopment and behavior and makes use of these principles in the study of in- 
dividual children. Each student will observe and record the behavior of an 
individual child throughout the semester and must have one half-day a week 
for this purpose. It is basic to further work in child study and serves as a 
prerequisite for advanced courses where the student has not had field work or 
at least six weeks of workshop experience in child study. When ofi"ered during 
the summer intensive laboratory work with case records may be substituted for 
the study of an individual child. (Hamby, Kurtz, Kyle, Thompson.) 

EDHD 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

EDHD 200 or its equivalent must be taken before EDHD 201 or concurrently. 
Emphasizes that understanding human life, growth and behavior depends on 
understanding the ways in which the body is able to capture, control and expend 
energy. Application throughout is made to human body processes and impli- 
cations for understanding and working with people. (Chapin.) 

EDHD 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

EDHD 200 or its equivalent must be taken before EDHD 202 or concurrently. 
Analyzes the socially inherited and transmitted patterns of pressures, expecta- 
tions and limitations learned by an individual as he grows up. These are con- 
sidered irt relation to the patterns of feeling and behaving which emerge as the 
result of growing up in one's social group. (Rogolsky.) 

EDHD 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

EDHD 200, or its equivalent. EDHD 201 and EDHD 202 are prerequisite. 
Analyzes the organized and integrated pattern of feeling, thinking and behaving 
which emerge from the interaction of basic biological drives and potentials 
with one's unique experience growing up in a social group. 

EDHD 204, 205. Physical Processes in Human Development. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, EDHD 200 or equivalent. Describes in some detail the major or- 
ganic processes of conception, biological inheritance; differentiation and growth 
of the body; capture, transportation and use of energy; perception of the en- 
vironment; coordination and integration of function; adaptation to unusual de- 
mands and to frustration; normal individual variation in each of the above 
processes. (Chapin.) 

EDHD 206, 207. Socialization Processes in Human Development I, II. (3 ,3) 
Prerequisite, EDHD 200 or equivalent. Analyzes the processes by which human 
beings internalize the culture of the society in which they live. The major sub- 
cultures in the United States, their training procedures, and their characteristic 
human expressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life-goals, and 
adjustment patterns are analyzed. Other cultures are examined to highlight the 
American way of life and to reveal its strengths and weaknesses. 

(Kyle, Kurtz, Mershon.) 

EDHD 208, 209. Self Processes in Human Development I and II. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, EDHD 200 or equivalent. Analyzes the effects of the various physi- 
cal and growth processes, afFectional relationships, socialization processes, and 
peer group roles and status on the integration, development, adjustment, and 
realization of the individual self. This analysis includes consideration of the 
nature of intelligence and of the learning process; the development of skills, 
concepts, generalizations, symbolizations. reasoning and imagination, attitudes, 
values, goals and purposes; and the conditions, relationships and experiences that 
are essential to full human development. The more common adjustment prob- 



University of Maryland • 137 

lems experienced in our society at various maturity levels, and the adjustment 
mechanisms used to meet them are studied. (Bowie, Goering, Mershon.) 

EDHD 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human Develop- 
ment. (3) 

EDHD 200 or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. Describes the 
normal development, expression and influence of love in infancy, childhood, 
adolescence and adulthood. It deals with the influence of parent-child relation- 
ship involving normal acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, and over- 
protection upon health, learning, emotional behavior and personality adjust- 
ment and development. (Hatfield.) 

EDHD 211. Peer-Culture and Group Processes in Human Development. (3) 
EDHD 200 or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. Analyzes the 
process of group formation, role-taking and status-winning. It describes the 
emergence of the "peer-culture" during childhood and the evolution of the child 
society at different maturity levels to adulthood. It analyzes the developmental 
tasks and adjustment problems associated with winning, belonging, and playing 
roles in the peer group. (Hatfield.) 

EDHD 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development 
I, II, III (3, 3. 3) 
Summer session. 

EDHD 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis 1. II. III. 
(3. 3, 3) 
Summer session. 

EDHD 221. Learning Theory and the Educative Process I. (3) 

Provides a systematic review of the major theories of learning and their im- 
pact on education. Considers factors that influence learning. 

(Larson, Milhollan, Perkins.) 

EDHD 222. Learning Theory and the Educative Process II. (3) 

Provides an exploration in depth of current theoretical and research develop- 
ments in the field of human learning, especially as related to educational pro- 
cesses. Considers factors that influence learning. (Milhollan, Perkins.) 

EDHD 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 
See EDUC 224 for description. 

EDHD 230, 231. Field Program in Child Study I and II. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers apprenticeship training preparing 
properly qualified persons to become staff members in human development 
workshops, consultants to child study field programs and coordination of 
municipal or regional child study programs for teachers or parents. Extensive 
field experience is provided. In general this training is open only to persons 
who have passed their preliminary examinations for the doctorate with a major 
in human development or psychology. (Kurtz, Thompson.) 

EDHD 250a, 250b, 25()c. Dirict Study of Children. (1, 1, 1) 

May not be taken concurrently with EDHD 102, 103, or 104. Provides the op- 
portunity to observe and record the behavior of an individual child in a nearby 
school. These records will be used in conjunction with the advanced courses in 
human development and this course will be taken concurrently with such 
courses. Teachers active in their jobs while taking advanced courses in human 
development may use records from their own classrooms for this course. A 
minimum of one year of direct observation of human behavior is required of 



138 • Graduate School 

all human development students at the master's level. This requirement may be 
satisfied by this course. 

EDHD 260. Synthesis of Human Development Concepts. (3) 

Prerequisites, EDHD 204, 206 and 208. A seminar wherein advanced students 
work toward a personal synthesis of their own concepts in human growth and 
development. Emphasis is placed on seeing the dynamic interrelations between 
all processes in the behavior and development of an individual (Morgan.) 

EDHD 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. An opportunity for advanced students to 
focus in depth on topics of special interest growing out of their basic courses 
in human development. (Morgan.) 

EDHD 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 

EDHD 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDHD 399. Research — Thesis. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 399 for description. 

EDHD 499. Research— Thesis. (Doctoral Level) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDIN 115. Research and Experimentation in Industrial Arts. (3) (Maley.) 

EDIN 121. Industrial Arts in Special Education. (3) 

Four hours laboratory per week, one hour lecture. Prerequisite, EDSP 170 and 
171 or consent of instructor. This course provides experiences of a technical 
and theoretical nature in industrial processes applicable for classroom use. 
Emphasis is placed on individual research in the specific area of one's major 
interest in special education. 

EDIN 125, 126. Industrial Training in Industry I, 11. (3, 3) 

The first course is designed to provide an overview of the function of industrial 
training, type of programs, organization, development and evaluation. The sec- 
ond course (prerequisite the first course) is designed to study specific training 
programs in a variety of industries, plan program visitation, training program 
development, and analyses of industrial training research. 

EDIN 143. Industrial Safety Education I. (2) (Crosby.) 

EDIN 144. Industrial Safety Education II. (2) 

In this course exemplary safety practices are studied through conference dis- 
cussions, group demonstrations, and organized plant visits to selected industrial 
situations. Methods of fire precautions and safety practices are emphasized. 
Evaluative criteria in safety programs are formulated. (Crosby.) 

EDIN 150. Training Aids Development. (3) (Maley.) 

EDIN 157. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 150 or consent of instructor. (Luetkemeyer.) 

EDIN 161. Principles of Vocaiional Guidance. (2) (Mietus.) 

EDIN 164. Laboratory Organization and Management. (3) 

(Mietus, Beatty.) 



University of Maryland • 139 

EDIN 165. Modern Industry. (3) (Harrison, Chambliss.) 

EDIN 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts. (2) (Beatty.) 

EDIN 167. Problems in Occupational Education. (3) (Chambliss.) 

EDIN 169. Occupational Analysis and Course Construction. (3) 

(Chambliss.) 

EDIN 171. History and Principles of Vocational Education. (3) 

(Luetkemeyer.) 

EDIN 175. Recent Technological Developments in Products and 

Processes. (3) (Crosby, Mietus.) 

EDIN 187. Field Experience IN Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDIN 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDIN 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

For Graduates 

EDIN 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) (Harrison.) 

EDIN 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. (3) (Tierney.) 

EDIN 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) (Tierney.) 

EDIN 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Vocational 
Education. (2) (Chambliss.) 

EDIN 224. Apprenticeship IN Education. (1-9) 
See EDUC 224 for description. 

EDIN 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 
This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting research 
in the areas of industrial arts and vocational education. (Staff.) 

EDIN 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts. (3) 

Various methods and procedures used in curriculum development are examined 
and those suited to the field of industrial arts education are applied. Methods 
of and devices for industrial arts instruction are studied and practiced. 

(Maley.) 

EDIN 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs. (2) 

Surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a teacher-coordinator 
in a work-experience program. Deals particularly with evolving patterns in 
city and country schools in Maryland, and is designed to help teacher-coordi- 
nators, guidance counselors, and others in the supervisory and administrative 
personnel concerned with functioning relationships of part-time cooperative 
education in a comprehensive educational program. (Chambliss.) 

EDIN 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 

(Staff.) 

EDIN 250. Teacher Education in Industrial Arts. (3) 

This course is intended for the Industrial Arts teacher educator at the college 
level. It deals with the function and historical development of Industrial Arts 
Teacher education. Other areas of content include administration program and 



140 • Graduate School 

program development, physical facilities and requirements, staff organization 
and relationships, college-secondary school relationships, philosophy and evalu- 
ation. (Harrison, Luetkemeyer. ) 

EDIN 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 

EDIN 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDIN 399. Thesis Rese.\rch. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDIN 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDSE 101. Problems in Teaching Office Skills. (3) (Peters.) 

EDSE. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 
Subjects. (3) (Peters.) 

EDSE 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools. (3) 

(Peters.) 

EDSE 114, 115. Financial and Economic Education. (3.3) 

Materials, resources and methods of teaching personal finances and economics 
in the public schools. Special attention will be directed toward the problems 
of teaching the consumer's role in relation to his earnings and spending power, 
and the need for intelligent planning and handling of personal and family 
resources. (C. R. Anderson.) 

EDSE 120. Organization .\nd Coordination of Distributive Education 

Programs. (3) (Anderson.) 

EDSE 121. Methods and Materials in Distributive Education. (3) 

(Anderson.) 

EDSE 123. FiFLD Experiences; Distribution. (3) 

First and second semester and summer session. Supervised work experiences in 
a distributive occupation to apply theory of distribution to the function of 
distribution as a basis for vocational teaching and guidance. By individual 
arrangement with the advisor. (Anderson.) 

EDSE 125. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

Prerequisites, EDSE 140. (Lemmon.) 

EDSE 126. Evaluation of Home Economics. (3) (Lemmon.) 

EDSE 130. The Junior High School. (2-3) (McClure, Grambs.) 

EDSE 134. Materials and Procedures for the Secondary School Core 
Curriculum. (3) 

This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are in 
charge of core classes in junior and senior high schools. Materials and teaching 
procedures for specific units of work are stressed. (Grambs.) 

EDSE 139. Speech Methods and Resources in Secondary Schools. (3) 

Practical suggestions for developing curricular and extra-curricular speech 
programs. Planning units and courses of study, current trends, and aims of 



University of Maryland • 141 

speech education, use of printed and audio-visual materials, evaluating of per- 
formance directed speech activities, and the teaching of listening. (Wolvin.) 

EDSE 142. Teaching the Audio-Lingual Skills in Foreign Languages. (3) 
Graduate credit allowed by special arrangement and adviser's approval. De- 
signed for high school teachers. Methods in making and using tape recordings, 
using electronic laboratories, developing oral-aural skills and direct approach to 
language teaching are emphasized. (Huguenard.) 

EDSE 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

EDSE 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDSE 189. Workshops. Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

For Graduates 

EDSE 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education. (3) 

Major emphasis on departmental organization and its role in the school pro- 
gram, curriculum, equipment, budget-making, supervision, guidance, placement 
and follow-up, school-community relationships, qualifications and selection of 
teaching staff, visual aids and in-service programs for teacher development. 
For administrators, supervisors, and teachers. (Peters.) 

EDSE 205. Seminar in Business Education. (2) 

The study and evaluation of the literature and research in Business Education. 

(Peters.) 
EDSE 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 

See EDUC 224 for description. 

EDSE 239. Seminar in Secondary Education. (2) 

(Adkins, McClure. Risinger ) 

EDSE 240. Trends in Secondary School Curriculum. (3) 

A. English B. Foreign Language C. Mathematics D. Science E. Social Studies 
F. Speech G. General H. Home Economics Education. Recent developments 
in educational thinking and practice which have affected the curriculum in 
one of the specified academic areas. (Staff.) 

EDSE 243. Theory and Research in Secondary Education. (1-3) 

A. English B. Foreign Language C. Mathematics D. Science E. Social Studies 
F. Speech G. General H. Business I. Distributive Education J. Home Eco- 
nomics K. Art L. Reading. 

A survey of the research literature in the specified area; evaluation of re- 
search techniques relative to subject area; consideration of relevant instruc- 
tional curriculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and tech- 
niques as they apply to the specific area. One to three semester hours with a 
maximum of nine. 

EDSE 247. Seminar in Special Sub.ject Areas. (2) 

A. English B. Foreign Languages C. Mathematics D. Science E. Social Studies 
F. Speech G. Business Education H. Home Economics L Art J. Reading 

An opportunity to pursue special subject area interests in curriculum con- 
struction, course of study development, or other teaching problems. Class 
members may work on problems related directly to their own school situations. 

(Staff.) 



142 • Graduate School 

EDSE 255. Principles and Problems of Business Education. (2-3) 

Principles, objectives, and practices in business education; occupational founda- 
tions; current attitudes of business, labor and school leaders; general business 
education relation to consumer business education and to education in general. 

(Peters.) 

EDSE 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education. (2-3) 

This course is especially designed for graduate students interested in devoting 
the summer session to a concentrated study of curriculum planning in business 
education. Emphasis will be placed on the philosophy and objectives of the 
business education program, and on curriculum research and organization of 
appropriate course content. (Peters.) 

EDSE 260. Seminar in Home Economics Education. (2) (Lemmon.) 

EDSE 261. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics. (2-4) 
Study of home economics programs and practices in light of current educational 
trends. Interpretation and analysis of democratic teaching procedures, outcomes 
of instruction, and supervisory practices. (Lemmon.) 

EDSE 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 

EDSE 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDSE 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 399 for description. 

EDSE 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EDMU 125. Creative Activities in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 016 or consent of instructor. A study of the creative ap- 
proach to singing, listening, playing, rhythmic activity, and composition. These 
topics are studied in correlation with other areas and creative programs. 

(Shelley.) 

EDMU 128. Music for Elementary Classroom Teacher. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 016 or consent of instructor. (Blum, Shelley.) 

EDMU 132. Music in the Secondary School. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Eisenstadt.) 

EDMU 139. Music for the Elementary School Specialist. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. A survey of instructional materials; objectives; 
organization of subject matter; lesson planning; methods and procedures in 
singing, listening, rhythms, simple instruments and creative activities for the 
music specialist in the elementary school. Twenty periods of observation will 
be required for three credits. (Blum.) 

EDMU 163. Band Techniques and Administration. (2-3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 081 and 161. Two lectures and two laboratory hours per 
week. Intensive study of a secondary wind instrument and of rehearsal tech- 
niques. A survey of instructional materials, administrative procedures, and 
band pageantry will be included. (Staff) 

EDMU 170. Methods and Materials for Class Piano Instruction. (2) 

The study of the principles and techniques of teaching class piano. The fol- 
lowing groups, beginning and advanced, will be used for demonstrations: 



University of Maryland • 143 

elementary school children, junior and senior high school students, adults. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of materials. (de Vermond.) 

EDMU 173. The Vocal Music Teacher and School Organization. (2) 

Prerequisite, practice teaching or teaching experience. Study of the function 
of the vocal music teacher in the elementary and secondary schools. Students 
will serve as resource teachers for those enrolled in EDMU 139. Open to 
graduate students by permission of instructor. (Blum.) 

EDMU 175. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High 
School. (2-4) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of suitable vocal and choral 
repertoire for the high school. Problems of diction interpretation, tone pro- 
duction, and phrasing. The course is designed primarily for choral directors and 
teachers of voice classes. (Shelley, Grentzer.) 

EDMU 176. Special Problems in the Teaching of Instrumental Music. (2-6) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 061 through 067 or equivalent. Advanced studies in the 
teaching of orchestral instruments through performance. Review of literature 
and teaching materials. The course may be taken three times since the 
subject matter dealing with the several categories of instruments (string, wood- 
wind, brass-percussion) will be offered on a rotating basis. (Staff.) 

EDMU 180. Instrumental Music for the High School. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of the repertoires for high 
school orchestra, band, and small ensemble. Problems of interpretations, 
intonation, tone quality, and rehearsal techniques. The course may be repeated 
for credit, since different repertoires are covered each time the course is offered. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

EDMU 200. Research Methods in Music and Music Education. (3) 

The application of methods of research to problems in the fields of music and 
music education. The preparation of bibliographies and the written exposition 
of research projects in the area of the student's major interest. (Grentzer.) 

EDMU 201. Administration and Supervision of Music in the Public 
Schools. (3) 
The study of basic principles and practices of supervision and administration 
with emphasis on curriculum construction, scheduling, budgets, directing of 
in-service teaching, personnel problems, and school-community relationships. 

(Grentzer.) 

EDMU 204. Current Trends in Music Education. (3) 

A survey of current philosophies and objectives of music in the schools. The 
scope and sequence of the music curricula, vocal and instrumental, on the ele- 
mentary schools. A study of the music curriculum as a part of the total school 

EDMU 205. Vocal Music in the Elementary Schools. (3) 

A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in the ele- 
mentary schools. A study of the music curriculum as a part of the total school 
program, and of the roles of the classroom teacher and the music specialist. 

(Blum, Grentzer.) 

EDMU 206. Choral Conducting and Repertoire. (3) 

The study and reading of choral literature of all periods, including the con- 
temporary, suitable for use in school and community choruses. Style, interpre- 
tation, tone quality, diction, rehearsal and conducting techniques are analyzed. 

(Traver.) 

EDMU 207. Vocal Music in the Secondary Schools. (3) 

A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in teaching 



144 • Graduate School 

junior and senior high-school classes in general music, history and appreciation, 
theory, and voice; and in directing choral groups and community singing. 

(Grentzer.) 
EDMU 208. The Teaching of Music Appreciation. (3) 

A study of the objectives for the elementary and secondary levels; the tech- 
niques of directed listening, the presentation of theoretical and biographical 
materials, course planning, selection and use of audio-visual aids and library 
materials, and the correlation between music and other arts. (Ulrich.) 

EDMU 209. Seminar in Instrumental Music. (2) 

A consideration of acoustical properties and basic techniques of the instru- 
ments. Problems of ensemble and balance, intonation, precision, and interpreta- 
tion are studied. Materials and musical literature for orchestras, bands and 
small ensembles are evaluated. (Staff.) 

EDMU 210. Advanced Orchestration and Band Arranging. (Seminar). (2) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 147 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. A 
study of arranging and transcription procedures in scoring for the orchestra 
and band. Special attention is given to the arranging problems of the instru- 
mental director in the public schools. (Trimble.) 

EDMU 250. History and Aesthetics of Music Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The study of the development of peda- 
gogical practice in music education, their aesthetic implications and educational 
values. (Grentzer.) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

EDSP 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional chil- 
dren, stressing preventive and remedial measures. 

(Seidman. Jacobs, D. D. Campbell ,Simms.) 

EDSP 171. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. (3) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. C. Perceptually impaired. Prerequisite, 
EDSP 170. (D. D. Campbell, Simms, Jacobs.) 

EDSP 172. Education of Exceptional Children. (3) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. C. Perceptually impaired. Prerequisite, 
EDSP 171 or equivalent. (D. D. Campbell, Simms, Jacobs.) 

EDSP 173. Curriculum for Exceptional Children. (3) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. Prerequisite, EDSP 171 or equivalent. 

(D. D. Campbell, Simms.) 

EDSP 175. Education of the Slow Learner. (3) (Seidman.) 

EDSP 187. Field Experience in Education. (1-4) 
See EDUC 187 for description. 

EDSP 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 
See EDUC 188 for description. 

EDSP 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. (1-6) 
See EDUC 189 for description. 

For Graduates 

EDSP 200. Exceptional Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Deals primarily with research relevant to 



University of Maryland • 145 

the intellectual, psychological, physical, and emotional characteristics of excep- 
tional children. (Seidman.) 

EDSP 201. Emotionally Handicapped Children and Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 200 and consent of instructor. Deals with epidemeology, 
etiology, classification, diagnostic procedures, behavioral characteristics, treat- 
ment and prevention of child and adolescent disturbances. (Huber.) 

EDSP 205. The Exceptional Child and Society. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 200 or consent of instructor. Relationship of the role and 
adjustment of the child with an exceptionality to societal characteristics. 

(Campbell, Seidman.) 

EDSP 210. Administration and Supervision of Special Education 
Programs. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Consideration of the determination, estab- 
lishment and function of educational programs for exceptional children for 
administrative and supervisory personnel. (Hebeler.) 

EDSP 215. Evaluation and Measurement of Exceptional Children and 
Youth. (3) 

Prerequisites, EDUC 150, EDUC 151, EDSP 200. Deals with the understand- 
ing and interpretation of the results of psychological and educational tests 
applicable for use with exceptional children. (D. D. Campbell, Simms.) 

EDSP 220. Educational Diagnosis and Planning for Exceptional Children 
AND Youth. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 215. Deals with the identification of learning characteristics 
of exceptional children and the planning of appropriate programs. 

(D. D. Campbell, Simms.) 

EDSP 221. Psycho-Educational Programming with Emotionally Handicapped 
Children and Youth. (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 200. Special Education 201 and consent of instructor. Deals 
with factors pertinent to therapeutic education of disturbed children and ado- 
lescents in special treatment settings. (Huber.) 

EDSP 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (1-9) 
See EDUC 224 for description. 

EDSP 225. Problems in the Education of the Mentally Retarded. (3) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 200. or consent of instructor. Con- 
sideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological and 
other research and theoretical material relevant to the determination of trends, 
practices, regarding the mentally retarded. (Simms.) 

EDSP 230. Problems in ihe Education of the Gifted. (3) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 200, or consent of instructor. Con- 
sideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological and 
other relevant research and theoretical material relevant to the determination of 
trends, practices, regarding the gifted. (Hebeler, Simms.) 

EDSP 235. Problems in the Education of Children v/ith Emotional Disturb- 
ances. (3) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 200, or consent of instructor. Con- 
sideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, medical, sociological and 
other research and theoretical material relevant to the determinalion of trends, 
practices, regarding the emotionally disturbed. (Huber.) 

EDSP 240. Probli.ms in the Education of Children with Perceptual Impair- 
ment. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in Education of the Perceptually Impaired, EDSP 215, 



146 • Graduate School 

and EDSP 220 or consent of instructor. Consideration of the pertinent psy- 
chological, educational, medical, sociological and other research and theoretical 
material relevant to the determination of trends, practices, regarding the per- 
ceptually impaired. (Campbell.) 

EDSP 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours in EDSP, or consent of instructor. An overview of educa- 
tion of exceptional children. (Hebeler.) 

EDSP 287. Internship in Education. (3-16) 
See EDUC 287 for description. 

EDSP 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 
See EDUC 288 for description. 

EDSP 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 
See EDUC 399 for description. 

EDSP 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: DeClaris, Chu, Price, Rutelli, Wagner, and Weiss. 

Research Professor: Jones.* 

Associate Professors: Basham, Ginnings, Harger, Hochuli, Marcovitz, 

PuGSLEY, Rao, Reiser, Taylor, and Simons. 
Research Associate: Abraham 
Assistant Professors: Abrams, Emad, Friedman, Jess, Kim, Larson, Lee, 

LeVine, Lieberman, Rumbaugh, and Tretter. 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Siahatgar. 

Lecturers: Degenford, Lin, Morakis, Schulman, Whicker. 
Instructors: Colburn, Glock, Guha, and Jones. 

Attractive research opportunities for individual investigations and thesis 
work, essential to any graduate program in Electrical Engineering are available 
in: 

1. ELECTROPHYSICS 
a. Electromagnetic Fields 



b. 


Electron and Ion Beam Dynamics 


c. 


Quantum Electronics 


d. 


Plasmas 


e. 


Semiconductors 


f. 


Atmospheric Physics 


2. ELECT ROTECHNOLOGY 


a. 


Antennae 


b. 


Ion Guns; Particle Accelerators 


c. 


Lasers 


d. 


Electronic and Solid State Circuits 


e. 


Computer-Aided Design 


f. 


Computer Technology 


g- 


Biomedical Electronics 



* Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 



University of Maryland • 147 

3. SYSTEM SCIENCE 

a. General System Theory 

b. Control Systems 

c. Communication Systems 

d. Information Processing Systems 

e. Discrete-Time Systems 

f. Simulation 

The Electrical Engineering Department offers programs leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and of Doctor of Philosophy, and it directs the studies 
of the graduate students who plan to qualify for the degrees. 

Basic requirements for the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees are set forth on pages 
27 and 33 of this catalog. Departmental regulations concerning qualifying and 
comprehensive examinations as well as course work have been assembled for 
the guidance of graduate students. Copies of the regulations, and/or further 
information, may be obtained in person from, or by writing to, the "Office of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Electrical Engineering." 

The Department offers courses at convenient times and places as to accom- 
modate the greatest number of students. However, all M.S. candidates must 
take at least six credits of course work in Electrical Engineering on the College 
Park campus. 

ELECTROMAGNETICS AND PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENEE 130,* 132.* Engineering Electromagnetics I. II. (3. 3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites. MATH 022. PHYS 021. and 
ENEE 090, with an average grade in MATH 021-022. PHYS 020-021 and ENEE 
090 of C or better. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Electric and 
magnetic fields, using vector notation; Maxwell's equations; Lorentz force law; 
capacitance, inductance, and resistance; motion of charged particles; fields in 
material media, polarization, magnetization; boundary value problems. The 
study of electromagnetism is continued in ENEE 134. (Taylor.) 

ENEE 134.* Engineering Electromagnetics III. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 132. Required of seniors 
in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 132. The wave equation and 
the impedance concept; plane waves; reflection and refraction; wave guides and 
transmission lines; Smith charts, lumped models. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE 135.* Electromagnetic Measurements Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 134. Laboratory to be 
taken in association with ENEE 134. Experiments on field mapping, transmis- 
sion line matching, impedance measurement; microwave measurements of stand- 
ing wave ratio, power, frequency, Q, and coupling. (Friedman.) 

ENEE 140.* Transducers and Electrical Machinery. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 141 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisites, ENEE 120, ENEE 132. Corequisite. ENEE 141. Required of 
seniors in electrical engineering. Electromechanical transducers; theory of elec- 
tromechanical systems; power and wide-band transformers; rotating electrical 
machinery from the theoretical and performance points of view. (Rumbaugh.) 

ENEE 141.* Transducers and Electrical Machinery Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 140. Required of seniors 

* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these courses. 



148 • Graduate School 

in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 140. 
Experiments on transformers; synchronous machines; induction motors; syn- 
chros; loudspeakers; other transducers. (Rumbaugh.) 

ENEE 170. Antennas and Wave Propagation. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite, ENEE 134. Review of Maxwell's 
equations; radiation; antennas; radio wave propagation. (Taylor.) 

ENEE 182. Introduction to Semiconductor Physical Electronics. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 132 and PHYS 153, or 
equivalent. Basic properties of semiconductors; idealized p-n junction and tran- 
sistor theory; d-c parameters; low-frequency characteristics; frequency response; 
high-frequency characteristics; transistors as amplifiers and as switches; field 
effect transistors; integrated circuit considerations; other junction devices. (Kim.) 

ENEE 184. Physical Electronics of Vacuum and Gaseous Devices. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 132 and PHYS 153, or 
equivalents. Essential principles of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics; 
electron emission; electrons in electric and magnetic fields; space charge effects; 
vacuum tubes; electron beams; gas discharges and plasmas in electronic devices. 

(Reiser.) 

ENEE 186. Particle Accelerators, Physical and Engineering Principles. (3) 
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 132 and PHYS 153, or 
consent of the instructor. Sources of charged particles; methods of acceleration 
and focusing of ion beams in electromagnetic fields; basic theory, design, and 
engineering principles of particle accelerators. (Reiser.) 

For Graduates 

ENEE 201. Electromagnetic Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 134 or 170 or 215, or equivalent. 
Theoretical analysis and engineering applications of Laplace's, Poisson's, and 
Maxwell's equations. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE 206, 207. Microwave Engineering. (3, 3) 

Two lectures, or one lecture and one laboratory, per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 
201 or ENEE 216. Basic considerations in solving field problems using differ- 
ential equations; circuit concepts and their validity at high frequency; guided 
electromagnetic waves; principles of masers and lasers; propagation and diffrac- 
tion, including the optical region. Fundamental experiments at microwave and 
optical frequencies. (Hochuli.) 

ENEE 215, 216. Radio Wave Propagation. (3, 3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate degree in electrical engi- 
neering, physics, or mathematics. Maxwell's wave equation; concept of retarded 
magnetic vector potential; propagation over plane earth; propagation over 
spherical earth; refraction; meteorological effects; complex antennas; air-to-air 
propogation; lobe modulation. (Taylor.) 

ENEE 245. Electrical Techniques in Medicine and Biology. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, mathematics through differential equations 
and physics through electricity and magnetism, or equivalent. Electrical prop- 
erties of biological tissues and cell suspensions; alternating-current impedance 
spectroscopy; transducers and related instrumentation systems for biological 
measurements; biological control systems; interaction of electromagnetic fields 
with biological systems. (Ferris.) 

ENEE 250. Mathematics for Electromagnetism. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate preparation in electromag- 
netic theory and advanced calculus. Tensors and curvilinear coordinates; partial 



University of Maryland • 149 

differential equations of electrostatics and electrodynamics; functionals, integral 
equations, and calculus of variations as applied to electromagnetism. (Rutelli.) 

ENEE 251. Antenna Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 250 or equivalent. Review of Max- 
well's equations; radiative networks; linear antennas; antenna arrays; aperture 
antennas; slot antennas; advanced topics. (Rutelli.) 

ENEE 280. Electronic Properties of Semiconductors. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 182, or MATH 066 and PHYS 053, 
or equivalents. Properties of crystals; elementary topics from quantum me- 
chanics; energy bands; electron transport theory; conductivity and Hall effect; 
statistical distributions; Fermi Level; impurities; non-equilibrium carrier distri- 
butions; normal modes of vibration; effects of high electric fields; p-n junction 
theory, avalanche breakdown; tunneling phenomena; surface properties. (Lee.) 

ENEE 282. Technology of Semiconductor Devices and Materials. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites. ENEE 182 or PHYS 053 or ENEE 290. 
Basic processes involved in the fabrication of transistors and other semicon- 
ductor devices; crystal growth and epitaxy; crystal orientation; purification and 
doping of crystals; diffusion; electrical and optical properties; photo-resist tech- 
niques; oxide passivation; contacts; device assembly and packaging. Emphasis 
is on silicon but other materials of engineering significance are considered. (Lin.) 

ENEE 290. Charged Particle Dynamics, Electron and Ion Beams. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. General principles 
of single-particle dynamics; mapping of electric and magnetic fields; equation 
of motion and methods of solution; production and control of charged particle 
beams; electron optics; Liouville's theorem; space charge effects in high cur- 
rent beams; design principles of special electron and ion beam devices. (Reiser.) 

CIRCUITS AND CONTROL SYSTEMS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENEE 120.* Circuit Analysis IL (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 121 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 090. Corequisites, ENEE 121, MATH 066. Required of 
juniors in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 090. Complex frequency 
and frequency response; application of both frequency domain and time domam 
concepts; mutual inductance and transformers; polyphase concept, Fourier and 
Laplace transform methods; driving point and transfer functions; controlled 
sources. (Basham.) 

ENEE 121.* Circuit Laboratory II. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 120. Required of juniors 
in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 120. 
Steady-state and transient circuit measurements; frequency response. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE 122.* Electronic Circuits. I. (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 123 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 120. Corequisites, ENEE 123, and ENEE 130. Required 
of juniors in electrical engineering. Transistors and electron tubes in dc, pulse, 
and small-signal situations; analysis of basic amplifiers; biasing; basic elec- 
tronic switches; tuned and wideband amplifiers, feedback. ENEE 124 continues 
where ENEE 122 ends. (Simons.) 

ENEE 123.* Electronics Laboratory I. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 122. Required of juniors 

* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these courses. 



150 • Graduate School 

in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 122. 
Transistor and vacuum-tube characteristics; basic electronic switches; amplifiers; 
design practice. To the extent possible, work will be individual or in two-man 
squads. (Simons.) 

ENEE 124.* Electronic Circuit II. (4) 

Four hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 125 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 122. Corequisites, ENEE 132. ENEE 123, and ENEE 125. 
Required of seniors in electrical engineering. Continuation of ENEE 122. 
Electron tubes and transistors in continuous-wave and pulse applications Class-C 
circuits; modulation and detection; pulse generation, delay, and storage; feed- 
back amplifiers. (Simons.) 

ENEE 125.* Electronics Laboratory II. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 124. Required of seniors 
in electrical engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 124. 
Specification and design of electronic circuits. Students work as individuals or 
as responsible members of a project team. (Simons.) 

ENEE 144. Electronic Circuits. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 060 or equivalent knowl- 
edge of circuit theory, or consent of the instructor. This course is intended for 
students in the Physical Sciences, and for engineering students requiring ad- 
ditional study of electronic circuits. Credit not normally given for this course 
in an electrical engineering major program. (ENEE 123 or 125 may optionally 
be taken as an associated laboratory, as is appropriate.) P-n junctions, tran- 
sistors; vacuum tubes; biasing and operating point stability; switches, large-signal 
analysis; models; small signal analysis; frequency response: feedback and multi- 
stage amplifiers; pulse and digital circuits. (Simons.) 

ENEE 146. Electronics for Life Scientists. (4) 

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
college algebra and a physics course including basic electricity and magnetism. 
Not accepted for credit in an electrical engineering major program. The con- 
cept of an instrumentation system with emphasis upon requirements for trans- 
ducers, amplifiers, and recording devices; design criteria and circuitry for power 
supplies, amplifiers, and pulse equipment; specific instruments used for biologi- 
cal research; problems of shielding against hum and noise pickup and other 
interference problems characteristic of biological systems. (Ferris.) 

ENEE 148. Electronic Instrumentation for Physical Science. (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 
060 or 120. PHYS 104 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. The concept 
of instrumentation systems from sensor to readout; discussion of transducers; 
system dynamics, precision, and accuracy; measurement of electrical parameters; 
direct, differential, and potentiometric measurements; bridge measurements; 
time and frequency measurements; wave-form generation and display. (Ferris.) 

ENEE 150. Network Synthesis. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 120. Positive real func- 
tions; synthesis of driving point impedances; network functions; approximation 
methods; Chebychev and Butterworth filters. (Basham.) 

ENEE 154. Feedback Control Systems. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, MATH 066 and ENEE 122. 
(See ENEE 155 for related laboratory course.) Feedback system operation and 
design; stability criteria; basic design techniques; correlation of time and fre- 

* Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these courses. 



University of Maryland • 151 

quency domain concepts; flow graph algebra; system synthesis to a variety of 
specifications. (Emad.) 

ENEE 155. Feedback Control Systems Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite. ENEE 154. Projects to enhance 
the student's understanding of feedback control systems and familiarize him 
with some of the devices used in the control field. (Emad.) 

ENEE 172. Advanced Pulse Techniques. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. (See ENEE 173 for related laboratory course.) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 124 or ENEE 146 or equivalent. Bistable, monstable, and 
astable circuits; sweep circuits; synchronization; counting; gates; comparators; 
magnetic core circuits; semiconductor and vacuum tube circuits. (Schulman.) 

ENEE 173. Pulse Techniques Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per wek. Corequisite. ENEE 172 or ENEE 164 and 
permission of the instructor. Experiments on switching circuits; bistable, mon- 
stable, and astable circuits; sweep circuits; gates; comparators. (Simons.) 

ENEE 174. Advanced Radio Engineering. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite, ENEE 124. (See ENEE 175 for 
related laboratory course.) The coupling coefficient concept; high-frequency 
effects; design and optimization of amplifiers; stability considerations; gain 
limitations; noise figure; design of harmonic generators; design of stable oscil- 
lators. (Wagner.) 

ENEE 175. Advanced Radio Engineering Laboratory. (1) 

Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite, ENEE 174. Experiments on 
multiple tuned amplifiers, noise figure measurements; class-C amplifiers; var- 
actors; oscillators; modulators, Projects. (Friedman.) 

ENEE 190. Mathematical Foundations of Circuit Theory. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 120 and MATH 022, or 
equivalent. This course is intended primarily for students preparing for graduate 
study. Review of determinants; linear equations; matrix theory; eigenvalues; 
theory of complex variables; inverse Laplace transforms. Applications are drawn 
primarily from circuit analysis. (Marcovitz.) 

For Graduates 

ENEE 202, 203. Transients in Linear Systems. (3, 3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or me- 
chanical engineering or physics. Operational circuit analysis; the Fourier in- 
tegral; transient analysis of electrical and mechanical systems and electronic 
circuits by the Laplace transform method. (Wagner.) 

ENEE 204. Advanced Electronic Circuit Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 124 or consent of the instructor. 
Comparison of bipolar and field effect transistors; detailed frequency response 
of single and multistage amplifier; design of feedback amplifiers; d-c coupling 
techniques; design of multistage tuned amplifiers. (Simons.) 

ENEE 212, 213. Servomechanism; (3, 3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 154 and ENEE 202, or equivalent. 
Linear control systems with deterministic and stochastic inputs; nonlinear con- 
trol systems; time and frequency domain techniques. (Price.) 

ENEE 230. Mathematics of Circuit Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate circuit theory and advanced 
calculus. Determinants; linear equations; matrix theory; eigenvalues; theory of 



152 • Graduate School 

complex variables; inverse Laplace transforms; applications to circuit analysis. 

(Marcovitz.) 
ENEE 232, 233. Network Synthesis. (3, 3) 

Two lectures per week. Design of driving-point and transfer impedance func- 
tions with emphasis on the transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase networks; 
flow diagrams; physical network characteristics, including relations existing 
between the real and imaginary components of network functions: modern 
methods of network synthesis. (Basham.) 

ENEE 234. Graph Theory in Network Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 230. Linear graph theory as ap- 
plied to electrical networks; cut sets and tie sets; incidence matrices; trees, 
branches, and mazes; development of network equations by matrix and index 
notation; network characteristic equations for natural circuit behavior; signal 
flow graph theory and Mason's rule; stability of active two-port networks. 

(Wagner.) 

ENEE 235. Applications of Tensor Analysis. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 202 or ENEE 230. The mathe- 
matical background of tensor notation which is applicable to electrical engi- 
neering problems. Applications of tensor analysis to electric circuit theory and 
to field theory. (Wagner.) 

ENEE 238. Sampled Data Control Systems. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate or graduate preparation in 
linear feedback control theory. Z-transform and modified Z-transform method 
of analysis; root locus and frequency response method of analysis; discrete and 
continuous compensation; analysis with finite pulse width; digital control 
systems. (Price.) 

ENEE 280. Electronic Properties of Semiconductors. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 182, or MATH 066 and PHYS 153, 
or equivalents. Properties of crystals; elementary topics from quantum me- 
chanics; energy bands; electron transport theory; conductivity and Hall effect; 
statistical distributions; Fermi Level; impurities; non-equilibrium carrier dis- 
tributions; normal modes of vibration; effects of high electric fields; p-n junction 
theory, avalanche breakdown; tunneling phenomena; surface properties. (Lee.) 

ENEE 282. Technology of Semiconductor Devices and M.\terials. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 182 of PHYS 153 or ENEE 290. 
Basic processes involved in the fabrication of transistors and other semiconductor 
devices; crystal growth and epitaxy; crystal orientation; purification and doping 
of crystals; diffusion; electrical and optical properties; photo-resist techniques; 
oxide passivation; contacts; device assembly and packaging. Emphasis is on 
silicon but other materials of engineering significance are considered. (Lin.) 

ENEE 284. Semiconductor Device Models. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 182 and ENEE 234, or equivalents. 
Single-frequency models for transistors; small-signal and wide-band models 
for general non-reciprocal devices; hybrid-pi and tee models for transistors; re- 
lationship of models to transistor physics; synthesis of wide-band models from 
terminal behavior; computer utilization of models; models for other semi- 
conductor devices. (Lin.) 

INFORMATION SCIENCES 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENEE 142.* Engineering Probability. (2) 

Two hours lecture per week. Prerequisites, MATH 022, ENEE 090. Required 

*Graduate Credit not given to E. E. Majors for these Courses. 



University of Maryland • 153 

of electrical engineering majors. Probability theory, discrete and continuous; 
statistical distribution functions and their parameters; applications to electrical 
engineering. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE 158. Signal Analysis, Modulation, and Noise. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 122. ENEE 142. Signal 
transmission through networks; transmission in the presence of noise; statisti- 
cal methods of determining error rate and transmission effects; modulation 
schemes. (Tretter.) 

ENEE 160. Analog and Hybrid Computers. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 122. Programming the 
analog computer; analog computing components; error analysis, repetitive opera- 
tion; synthesis of systems using the computer; hybrid computer systems. (Chu.) 

ENEE 162. Logic of Digital Computers. (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites. 
MATH 021, ENEE 080. or equivalent. Symbolic logic and Boolean Algebra; 
switching circuits; simplification; binary and other number representations and 
codes; storage elements defined logically; basic sequential circuits; digital 
systems. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE 164. Digital Computer Technology. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (See ENEE 173 for related laboratory.) Prerequisites, 
ENEE 122, ENEE 162. Organization of electronic digital computers; electronic 
subassemblies; integrated circuits; digital storage; digital and analog magnetic 
recording; analog-digital conversion. (Rao.) 

For Graduates 

ENEE 218, 219. Signal Analysis and Noise. (3. ) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, equivalent to ENEE 158. Mathematical 

description of noise; spectral analysis; noisy signal detection; optimum linear 
systems. (Ginnings.) 

ENEE 220. Statistical Communication Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 219. Statistical description of sig- 
nals; testing statistical hypotheses; likelihood testing; statistical estimation of 
signal parameters. (Tretter.) 

ENEE 221. Inform.\tion Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, MATH 133 or equivalent. Information 
measure; channels; source encoding; error correcting codes. (Morakis.) 

ENEE 262. Combinatorial Switching Theory. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 162 or consent of instructor. Ap- 
plications of Boolean algebra to combinational switching circuits; symmetric 
functions; majority and threshold networks; function decomposition; minimi- 
zation; prime implicants and algorithms for finding them; minimal and nearly 
minimal covers. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE 263. Theory of Sequential Machines. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 262 or consent of instructor. 
Models for sequential machines; equivalence; state minimization; incompletely 
specified machines; linear sequential machines; regular expressions, partitions, 
and state assignment. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE 270. Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 162 or equivalent. Introduction to 



154 • Graduate School 

design techniques for digital computers; review of Boolean algebra; digital 
arithmetic; logic circuits; digital memories; design of computer elements, arith- 
metic unit, and control unit. A simple digital computer will actually be designed 
during the course. (Chu.) 

ENEE 272. Advanced Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 270 or equivalent; knowledge of 
computer programming. Computer design languages; computer organization; 
computer design by language translation; integrated logic circuit design; digital 
memories including read-only and associative memories; case studies of com- 
puter designs. (Chu.) 

ENEE 274. Digital Systems Engineering. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 270. Systems aspects of digital- 
computer-based systems; data flow analysis; system organization; control lan- 
guages; consoles and displays; remote terminals; software-hardware tradeoff; 
system evaluation; case studies from selected applications areas such as data 
acquisition and reduction, information storage, or the like. (Pugsley.) 

ENEE 276. Computers for Differential Equation Solution. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 162, knowledge of elementary dif- 
ferential equations, numerical methods, and programming. Mechanistic meth- 
ods for differential equation solution; application of analog or hybrid com- 
puters for the purpose; digital differential analyzers; digital-analog simulation 
on a general-purpose digital computer. MIMIC Language and examples of 
its use. Class will run simulation program on an IBM 7094 or similar com- 
puter. (Chu.) 

RESEARCH, SEMINARS, AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENEE 180. Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. May be taken for repeated credit 
up to a total of 6 credits, with the permission of the student's advisor and 
the instructor. Selected topics from the literature of modern electrical engi- 
neering. (De Claris.) 

For Graduates 

ENEE 222. Graduate Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Seminars held on topics of current interest 
in Electrophysics, Electrotechnology and System Science. May be taken for 
repeated credit. (Basham.) 

ENEE 223. Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Selected topicsi from recent contri- 
butions in electrical engineering. May be taken for repeated credit. 

(DeClaris.) 

ENEE 399. Thesis Electrical Engineering Research. (Master's Level) 

Prerequisite, consent of thesis supervisor. Six semester hours of credit in 
ENEE 399 are required of M. S. degree candidates. A thesis covering an 
approved research problem and written in conformity with the regulations 
of the Graduate School is a partial requirement for either the degree of Master 
of Science or the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in electrical engineering. 

(DeClaris.) 

ENEE 499. Dissertation Electrical Engineering Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(DeClaris.) 



University of Maryland • 155 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors: Freedman, Bode, Cooley, Harman (Emerita), Hovey, Korg, Mc- 
Manaway (P.T.), MANNING, Mish, Murphy, Myers, Panichas, Whitte- 
more, and Zeeveld. 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Brown, Bryer, Cooper, Fleming, Gravely, 
Herman, Houppert, Jellema, Kinnaird, Lawson, Lutwack, Pitts, 
PoRTz, D. Smith, G. Smith, Thorberg, Ward, and Weber. 

Assistant Professors: Birdsall, Carey, Cate, Coulter, Holton, Howard, 
Kenney, Kleine, Lounsbury, Martin, Robb, Spurgeon, Van Egmond, 
Vitzthum, Walt, and Wilson. 

The Department of English offers graduate work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates normally take both major 
and minor work within the Department of English, but with permission stu- 
dents may take minor work in other departments. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Master of Arts include: (1) 
ENG 201; (2) three credits from the following: ENG 102, 105, 107, 108, 229; 
(3) six credits in the English 230 series. Candidates must meet a foreign 
language requirement by either ( 1 ) passing a Graduate School reading exami- 
nation in French or German; or (2) submitting a record of twelve undergradu- 
ate credits, with an average grade of C or better, in one of the following 
languages: French, German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Russian, Spanish. Students 
who wish to continue their work in this department towards the doctorate will 
be expected to elect the first alternative. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy include: 
(1) a foreign language requirement, usually satisfied by a reading knowledge of 
French and German; (2) ENGL 102 and 202; (3) a comprehensive written 
examination on three fields (dissertation field and those immediately before and 
after it) which may be taken with permission after 18 hours beyond the M.A. 
and must be taken upon the completion of 30 hours. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENGL 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

(Herman, Rutherford, Steinberg.) 

ENGL 102. Old English. (3) (Rutherford, Steinberg.) 

ENGL 104. Chaucer. (3) (Cooley, Rutherford.) 

ENGL 105. Introduction to Linguistics. (3) 

(Same as Foreign Language 101.) (Tuniks.) 

ENGL 107. American English. (3) (Robb.) 

ENGL 108. Advanced English Grammar. (3) (James.) 

ENGL 109. English Medieval Literature in Translation. (3) (Birdsall.) 

ENGL 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 3) 

(Houppert, D. Smith, Spurgeon, Zeeveld.) 

ENGL 112, 113. Literature of the Renaissance. (3, 3) 

(Cooper, Spurgeon, Zeeveld.) 



156 • Graduate School 

ENGL 115, 116. Shakespeare. (3, 3) (Beauchamp, Cooper, Houppert, 

D. Smith, Spurgeon, Zeeveld.) 

ENGL 117. Shakespeare: The Major Works. (3) (D. Smith.) 

ENGL 120. English Drama from 1660 TO 1800. (3) (D. Smith, Ward.) 

ENGL 121. Milton. (Freedman, Hamilton, Mish, Murphy, Weber.) 

ENGL 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660. (3) 

(Hamilton, Mish, Wilson.) 

ENGL 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700. (3) 

(Hamilton, Mish, Wilson.) 

ENGL 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

(Howard, Myers, Saltz.) 

ENGL 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3, 3) 

(Kinnaird, G. Smith, Weber.) 

ENGL 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Gate, Korg, Pitts.) 

ENGL 139, 140. The English Novel. (3,3) (Kenney, Korg, Ward.) 

ENGL 141. Major British Writers. (3) 

ENGL 142. Major British Writers. (3) 

ENGL 143. Modern Poetry. (3) (Fleming, Jellema.) 

ENGL 144. Modern Drama. (3) (Bryer, Freedman, Weber.) 

ENGL 145. The Modern Novel. (3) (Holton, Lawson, Panichas.) 

ENGL 146. American Drama. (3) (Bryer.) 

ENGL 148. The Literature of American Democracy. (3) (Barnes.) 

ENGL 149. American Literature to 1810. (3) (Barnes, Vitzthum.) 

ENGL 150. American Literature, 1810-1865. (3) 

(Bryer, Carey, Gravely, Hovey, Johnson, Lawson, 
Reed, Thorberg, Van Egmond, Vitzthum.) 

ENGL 151. American Literature Since 1865. (3) 

(Bryer, Carey, Hovey, Johnson, 
Lawson, Reed, Thorberg, Van Egmond.) 

ENGL 152. The Novel in America to 1910. (3) (Hovey, Lawson, Thorberg.) 

ENGL 153. The Novel in America Since 1910. (3) 

(Hovey, Lawson, Thorberg.) 

ENGL 154. Literature of the South. (3) (Lawson.) 

ENGL 155, 156. Major American Writers. (3, 3) 

(Bryer, Gravely, Lawson, 
Lutwack, Manning, Portz.) 

ENGL 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) (Birdsall, Carey.) 

ENGL 158. Folk Narrative. (3) (Birdsall, Carey.) 

ENGL 159. Folksong and Ballad. (3) (Birdsall, Carey.) 



University of Maryland • 157 

ENGL 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

(Beauchamp, Herman, Stevenson, 
Townsend. Walt.) 

ENGL 170. Creative Writing. (3) (Fleming, Jellema.) 

ENGL 171. Advanced Creative Writing. (3) (Fleming. Jellema.) 

ENGL 172. Playwriting. (3) (Fleming.) 

ENGL 190, 191. Honors Conference and Reading. (1, 1) (Weber.) 

ENGL 199. Senior Proseminar in Literature. (3) (Portz.) 

ENGL 201. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

(Bryer, Cooper, Hovey, Mish, D. Smith.) 

ENGL 202. Middle English. (3) (S. Helton.) 

ENGL 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) (Cooley.) 

ENGL 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3, 3) 

(McManaway, Mish, Zeeveld.) 

ENGL 210, 211. Seminar in Seventeenth Century Literature. (3) 

(Freedman, Mish.) 

ENGL 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Myers, Wilson.) 

ENGL 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Brown, Kinnaird, Korg, 
Pitts, G. Smith.) 

ENGL 216, 217. Literary Criticism. (3, 3) (Lutwack.) 

ENGL 218. Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts. (3) (Myers.) 

ENGL 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Bode, Hovey, Lawson, Lutwack.) 

ENGL 227, 228. Problems in American Literature. (3, 3) (Vitzthum.) 

ENGL 230. Special Studies in English Literature, to 1600. (3) 

(Cooley, Cooper.) 

ENGL 232. Special Studies in English Literature, 1600-1800. (3) (Murphy.) 

ENGL 235. Special Studies in Nineteenth Century English Literature. (3) 

(Kinnaird.) 

ENGL 237. Special Studies in American Literature. (3) (Lutwack.) 

ENGL 241. 242. Studies in Twentieth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

(Bode, Hovey, Lawson, Panichas.) 

ENGL 244. Studies in Drama. (3 (Freedman.) 

ENGL 245. Studies in Fiction. (3) (Mish.) 

ENGL 257. Seminar in Folklore. (3) (Carey.) 

ENGL 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) (Master's Level.) (Staff.) 

ENGL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) (1-6) (Staff.) 



158 • Graduate School 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors: Bickley, Cory {Emeritus), Jones, and Langford. 
Associate Professors: Harrison, and Messersmith. 
Assistant Professors: Davidson, Haviland {Emeritus), and Menzer. 
Lecturer: Heimpel. 

The Department of Entomology offers work toward the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who are 
not employed by the Department are expected to register for a minimum of 24 
semester hours credit during two semesters at College Park. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENTM 100. Advanced Apiculture. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 004. The theory and practice of apiary management. 
Designed for the student who wishes to keep bees or requires a practical knowl- 
edge of bee management. (Staff.) 

ENTM 105. Medical and Veterinary Entomology. (4) 

(Second semester.) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 015 or consent of department. A study of the morphology, 
taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropodal parasites and disease vectors 
of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in relation to disease 
transmission will be emphasized. (Messersmith.) 

ENTM 107. Insecticides. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Department. The development and 
use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and other important chemicals, 
with reference to their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, and host injury. 
Recent research emphasized. (Menzer.) 

ENTM 116. Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 001 and ZOOL 001. (Davidson.) 

ENTM 120. Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 015. Introduction to the principles of systematic entomology 
and the study of all orders and the important families of insects; immature 
forms considered. (Davidson.) 

ENTM S121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Summer session. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
This course will include the elements of morphology, taxonomy and biology of 
insects using examples commonly available to high school teachers. It will in- 
clude practice in collecting, preserving, rearing and experimenting with insects 
insofar as time will permit. (Staff.) 

ENTM 122. Insect Morphology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ENTM 015. A basic study of insect form, structure and organiza- 
tion in relation to function. (Davidson.) 

ENTM 123. Insect Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, ENTM 015, CHEM 031 or equivalent. Lectures and laboratory 



University of Maryland • 159 

exercises on the cuticle, growth, endocrines, muscles, circulation, nerves, di- 
gestion, excretion and reproduction in insects. (Jones.) 

ENTM 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

First and second semester. Credit and prerequisites, to be determined by the 
Department. Investigation of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

ENTM 199. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of 
original work, reviews and abstracts of literature. (Bickley.) 

For Graduates 

ENTM 205. Insect Ecology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of the Department. A study of fundamental factors in- 
volved in the relationship of insects to their environment. Emphasis is placed 
on the insect as a dynamic organism adjusted to its surroundings. (Harrison.) 

ENTM 206. CuLiciDOLOGY. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
(Alternate years.) The classification, distribution, ecology, biology, and control 
of mosquitoes. (Bickley.) 

ENTM 208. Toxicology of Insecticides. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
(Alternate years, not offered 1969-70). Prerequisite. CHEM 031 or permission 
of the instructor. A study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties 
of insecticides. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of chemical structures 
to insecticidal activity and mode of action. Mechanisms of resistance are also 
considered. (Menzer.) 

ENTM 209. Advances in Insect Physiology. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENTM 123 
or consent of instructor. Lectures on current literature with reading assign- 
ments and discussion. (Jones.) 

ENTM 210. Entomological Topics. (Credit arranged) 

First and second semesters. One lecture or one two-hour laboratory period a 
week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, consent of Department. Lectures, group 
discussions or laboratory sessions on selected topics such as: Aquatic Insects, 
Biological Control of Insects, Entomological Literature, Forest Entomology, 
History of Entomology, Insect Biochemistry, Insect Embryology, Immature 
Insects, Insect Behavior, Principles of Economic Entomology, Insect Com- 
munication, Principles of Entomological Research. (Staff and visiting lecturers.) 

ENTM. 211. Aspects of Insect Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Alternate years. Prerequisite, one year 
of biochemistry, or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Lectures and group 
discussions on the energy sources of insects, intermediary metabolism, utiliza- 
tion of energy, and specialized subjects of current interest such as light produc- 
tion, insect pigment formation, pheromones, venoms, and chemical defense 
mechanisms. (Menzer.) 

ENTM 301. Advanced Entomology. (1-6) 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the Department. First and second 
semesters. Studies of minor problems in morphology, physiology, ta.xonomy 
and applied entomology, with particular reference to the preparation of the 
student for individual research. (Staff) 



160 • Graduate School 

ENTM 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

ENTM 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff) 

FOOD SCIENCE 

Professors: Davis, Arbuckle, and Keeney (Dairy Science). 

Stark,* Kramer, and Scott (Horticulture). 

Shaffner (Poultry Science). 

Foster (Animal Science). 
Associate Professors: King and Mattick (Dairy Science). 

Wiley (Horticulture). 

Helbacka (Poultry Science). 

BuRic (Animal Science). 

Graduate courses of study in Food Science leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are offered under the aegis of the Depart- 
ments of Dairy Science, Horticulture, Animal Science and Poultry Science. The 
student may pursue work in the chemical, physical, bacteriological, and nutri- 
tional aspects of food products. 

Applicants for admission should contact the chairman of the program for 
information on specific requirements. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FDSC 102. Principles of Food Processing — 1. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. (Wiley) 

FDSC 103. Principles of Food Processing — II. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. (Mattick) 

FDSC 111. Food Chemistry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
033. (King) 

FDSC 112. Analytical Quality Control. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
033. Instrumental and sensory measurement of food quality attributes including 
appearance, rheological. flavor, and microbiological evaluations, and their 
integration into grades and standards of quality. (Kramer) 

FDSC 113. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, AGRI 
100. Statistical methods for acceptance sampling of supplies and raw materials, 
in-plant and finished product inspection, water, fuel, and waste control, pro- 
duction transportation, inventory and budget controls. (Kramer) 

FDSC 125. Meat and Meat Processing. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 161 or permission of instructor. 

FDSC 131. Food Product Research and Development. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, FDSC 
103, CHEM 163 or permission of instructor. (Mattick and Staff) 

* Chairman of Curriculum Committee. 



University of Maryland • 161 

FDSC 156. Horticultural Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69). Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. (Wiley) 

FDSC 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory a week. (Helbacka) 

FDSC 175. Seafood Products Processing. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70). Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 163 or permission of instructor. (Tatro) 

FDSC 182. Dairy Products Processing. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69). Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. (Mattick) 

Mechanics of Food Processing, see Agricultural Engineering, AGEN 113. 

Experimental Food Science, see Home Economics, FOOD 153. 

For Graduates 

FDSC 201. Advances in Food Technology. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69). Prerequisite, CHEM 161 
or permission of instructor. (Kramer.) 

FDSC 301. Special Problems in Food Science. (1 to 4) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 161 or permission of instructor. 
Credit according to time scheduled and magnitude of problem. An experi- 
mental program on a topic other than the student's thosis problem will be 
conducted. Four credits shall be the maximum allowed toward an advanced 
degree. (Staff) 

FDSC 302. Seminar in Food Science. (3) 

First or second semesters. Prerequisite, CHEM 163. A study in depth of a 
selected phase of food science. 

A) Lipids D) Organoleptic Properties 

B) Proteins E) Fermentation 

C) Carbohydrates F) Enzymes and Microorganisms 

in Food Synthesis 

(Staff) 
FDSC 310. Colloquium in Food Science. (1) 

First and second semester. Oral reports on' special topics or recently published 
research in food science and technology. Distinguished scientists are invited 
as guest lecturers. A maximum of three credits allowed for the M. S. (Staff) 

FDSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters; summer session. The investigation is planned 
and conducted under faculty supervision. Grades are awarded on completion 
of the thesis. 

FDSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

Methods of Horticultural Research, see Horticulture, HORT 207. 

Research Methods, see Dairy Science, ANSC 241. 

Recent Advances in Nutrition, see Home Economics, NUTR 204. 



162 • Graduate School 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors: MacBain {Head), Bingham, Falls {Emeritus), Quynn, and 

ROSENFIELD. 

Associate Professors: Demaitre, and Hall. 

Assistant Professors: Fink, Lamarque, and Zimmerman. 

Lecturers: Lloyd-Jones, and Meijer. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

In addition to specified course work, candidates must pass a written examina- 
tion based primarily on a reading list establshed by the Departmen. The ex- 
amination will test the general familiarity of the candidate with the most signifi- 
cant landmarks in French literature, together with his powers of analysis and 
criticism, and his proficiency in the French language. Both M.A. options 
(thesis and non-thesis) entail an oral examination. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Both major and minor work may be taken within the Department. In addi- 
tion to specified course work, candidates must pass a written comprehensive 
examination at least one year before the degree is awarded. The examination 
will include linguistics. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FREN 000. Intensive Elementary French. (Audit) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students should 
register as auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the French language 
designed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. (Staff.) 

FREN 101. Applied Linguistics. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contributions to the effective teaching 
of foreign languages. Comparative study of English and French, with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of related 
drills. (Staff.) 

FREN 103. Advanced Composition. (3) 

Study of word formation, specialized vocabularies, idiomatic constructions, 

review of certain points of grammar, translation from English to French, 

and free composition. (Staff.) 

FREN 104. Explication de textes. (3) 

Oral and written analysis of short literary works, or of excerpts from longer 
works chosen for their historical, structural, or stylistic interest, with the 
purpose of training the major to understand literature in depth and make 
mature esthetic evaluations of it. (Lamarque.) 

FREN 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

French History from the ninth through the fifteenth century. Selected readings 
from representative texts. (Lamarque.) 

FREN 111-112. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3, 3) 

The Renaissance in France: humanism, Rabelais, Calvin, Montaigne, the Pleiade, 
baroque poetry. (Lloyd-Jones, Meijer.) 



University of Maryland • 163 

FREN 115-116. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. First semester: Descartes, Pascal. Corneille. Racine. 
Second semester: the remaining great classical writers, with special attention 
to Moliere. (Quynn.) 

FREN 125-126. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: development of the philosophical 
and scientific movement; Montesquieu. Second semester: Voltaire. Diderot, 
Rousseau. (Bingham, Fink.) 

FREN 131-132. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Romanti- 
cism to Symbolism. Second semester: the major prose writers of the same 
period. (Zimmerman.) 

FREN 141-142. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism 
to the present time. Second semester: the contemporary novel. (Demaitre.) 

FREN 171-172. French Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. French life, customs, culture, traditions. First 
semester: the historical development. Second semester: present-day France. 

(Meijer.) 

FREN 181-182. Pro-Seminar in Great Literary Figures. (3, 3) 

Each semester a specialized study will be made of one great French writer 
chosen from some representative literary period or movement since the Middle 
Ages. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

FREN 201. The History of the French Language. (3) 

A rapid survey of the major phenomena of French linguistic history, considered 
from the internal and external points of view. Introduction to linguistic termi- 
nology. Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. (MacBain.) 

FREN 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) 

A comparative study of the principal Romance languages: phonology, morphol- 
ogy, syntax, lexicon. (Mendeloff.) 

FREN 207. Elementary Old French. (3) 

An introduction to Old French accidence and vocabulary through the reading 
of the Chanson de Roland. Readings in modern French of representative works 
of Old French literature. (MacBain.) 

FREN 208. Old French Phonology and Morphology. (3) 

Phonological changes from Vulgar Latin to Old French; the resultant Old 
French accidence and morphological changes from Vulgar Latin to Old French. 
Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. (MacBain.) 

FREN 209. Medieval French Culture. (3) 

Extensive readings in modern French translations of the masterpieces of Old 
French literature: lectures and readings on the historical and social setting of 
these works in feudalism. (MacBain.) 

FREN 210. Elementary Old Provencal. (3) 

The essentials of Old Provencal phonology and morphology necessary to 
reading; readings in Old Provencal lyric poetry and other representative 
literary works. Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin desirable. (MacBain.) 

FREN 213-214. Seminar in French Renaissance. (3,3) (Staff.) 



164 • Graduate School 

FREN 215-216. Seminar in Moliere. (3,3) (Quynn.) 

FREN 218-219. Seminar in French Classicism. (3, 3) (Quynn.) 

FREN 220-221. The Age of Enlightenment. (3, 3) 

The literature of ideas from Bayle to Condorcet. (Bingham.) 

FREN 230. Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Sources and theories of French romanticism will be studied, along with 
works of major French romantic writers. Different writers or genres will 
be stressed from year to year. (Demaitre.) 

FREN 231. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Post-Romantic Writers. (3) 

(Staff.) 

FREN 235-236. The Realistic Novel in the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 
The main works of Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, the Goncourts, Zola, Maupassant, 
and Daudet. (Demaitre.) 

FREN 243-244. The Contemporary French Theater. (3, 3) 

The most important writers and trends in French drama from the end of the 
nineteenth century to the present. (Demaitre.) 

FREN 245-246. Seminar in the Contemporary Novel. (3, 3) 

Critical study of the entire work of a major twentieth century novelist, such 
as Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Duhamel. Usually a different novelist will be 
treated in the second semester. (Demaitre.) 

FREN 251-252. The History of Ideas in France. (3, 3) 

Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected in French literature. First semester, 
17th and 18th centuries. Second semester, 19th and 20th centuries. Conducted 
in English. (Rosenfield.) 

FREN 261-262. Seminar in a Great Literary Figure. (3, 3)9 (Staff.) 

FREN 271-272. Advanced Writing and Stylistics. (3, 3) 

Composition, translation, explication de textes of both prose and poetry. 

(Staff.) 

FREN 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Designed to give graduate students a background of a survey of French 
literature. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. 

(Staff.) 

FREN 291-292. Seminar. Topic to be determined. (3, 3) (Staff.) 

FREN 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level.) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of master's 
and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

FREN 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Professors: Ahnert, Deshler, Harper, and Hu. 
Associate Professors: Chaves, and Fonaroff. 
Assistant Professors: Brodsky, Lewis, and Wiedel. 

Applicants for admission to graduate work in geography should furnish gradu- 
ate record examination scores and, in the case of Ph.D. candidates and all stu- 



University of Maryland • 165 

dents applying for financial aid, letters of reference from persons familiar with 
his previous work. 

A sufficiently broad background in geography at the undergraduate level is a 
normal prerequisite for admission to graduate study. Where such background 
is lacking, a student will be assigned additional work to make up for this 
deficiency. 

A written comprehensive examination, taken after completion of all course 
work but before the final oral examination, is required of all Master's candidates. 

Master's degree candidates are required to show competency in reading a 
foreign language approved by the department. Ph.D. candidates have the option 
of either showing competency in two languages or one language and quantitative 
techniques. For the two-language option, one language must be either French, 
German, or Russian; the other may also be selected from the preceding list or 
may be a language identified with the world area of the student's research interest. 
The quantitative techniques requirement may be met by completing prescribed 
courses in statistical methods. 

The preliminary examination for the Ph.D. is given as a comprehensive 
written and oral examination to test the student's background knowledge and 
his ability to apply this knowledge independently. 

Normally, acquisition of a Master's degree in geography is required before 
a student is admitted for a course of study leading to the Ph.D. Exceptions to 
this rule may be granted by the department depending upon the merits of the 
applicant's case. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GEOG 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo-America. (3) 

Prerequisite. GEOG 010. or GEOG 015, or permission of instructor. A study 
of the cultural and economic geography, and the geographic regions of eastern 
United States and Canada, including an analysis of the significance of the 
physical basis for present-day diversification of development, and the historical 
geographic background. (Staff.) 

GEOG 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo-America. (3) 

Prerequisite. GEOG 010. or GEOG 015. or permission of instructor. A study 
of western United States, western Canada, and Alaska along the lines men- 
tioned under GEOG 100. (Staff.) 

GEOG 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials. (3) 

A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic concepts designed ex- 
clusively for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of geography 
in relation to the social and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools 
of geography, source materials, and the problems of presenting geographic 
principles. (Kinerney) 

GEOG 104. Geogr.\phy OF Major World Regions. (3) 

A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and prospects of the world's 
principal human-geographic regions, including Europe, Anglo-America, the 
Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the causal 
factors of differentiation and the role geographic differences play in the in- 
terpretation of the current world scene. This course is designed especially 
principles (Staff.) 

GEOG 105. Geography of Maryland and Adjacent Areas. (3) (Staff.) 



166 • Graduate School 

GEOG 109. Introduction to Geographic Research. (3) 

Development of research methods in geography including the formulation of 
problem, the establishment of hypotheses, development of structures for testing 
hypotheses, and practice with forms of geographic presentation. Maps, quantita- 
tive, and field methods will be used as appropriate. 

GEOG 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Caribbean America. (3) 

(Chaves.) 

GEOG 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South America. (3) 

(Chaves.) 
GEOG 118. Geomorphology. (3) 

Study of major morphological processes, the development of land forms, and 
the relationships between various types of land forms and land use problems. 
Examination of the physical features of the earth's surface and their geographic 
distributions. 

GEOG 119. Climatology. (3) 

The geographic aspects of climate with emphasis on energy-moisture budgets, 
steady-state and non-steady state climatology, and climatic variations at both 
macro and micro-scales. 

GEOG 120. Geography OF Europe. (3) 

Second semester. (Staff.) 

GEOG 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa. (3) 

(Deshler.) 

GEOG 125. Geography of Asia. (3) (Hu.) 

GEOG 126. Cultural Geography. (3) 

An analysis of the impact of man through his ideas and technology on the 
evolution of geographic landscapes. Major themes in the relationships between 
cultures and environments. (Fonaroff, Deshler.) 

GEOG 130. Economic and Political Geography of Eastern Asia. (3) 

Study of China, Korea. Japan, the Philippines: physical geographic setting, 
population, economic and political geography. Potentialities of major regions 
and recent developments. (Hu.) 

GEOG 131. Economic and Political Geography of South and Southeast 

Asia. (3) 

Study of the Indian subcontinent. Farther India, Indonesia: physical geographic 

setting, population, economic and political geography. Potentialities of various 

countries and regions and their role in present Asia. (Hu.) 

GEOG 134. Cultural Geography of China and Japan. (3) (Hu.) 

GEOG 140. Geography of the Soviet Union. (3) (Dando.) 

GEOG 145. Systematic and Regional Climatology. (3) 

Methodology and techniques of collecting and evaluating climatological infor- 
mation. A critical examination of climatic classifications. Distribution of 
world climates and their geographical implications. (Lewis.) 

GEOG 146. Regional Geomorphology. (3) 

Regional and comparative morphology, with special emphasis upon Anglo- 
America. (Ahnert.) 

GEOG 150. History and Theory of Cartography. (3) (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 167 

GEOG 151-152. Cartography and Graphics Practicum. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design and con- 
struction of various types of maps and graphs. Relationships between map 
making and modern methods of production and reproduction. Trips to repre- 
sentative plants. Laboratory work directed toward cartographic problems 
encountered in the making of non-topographic maps. (Wiedel.) 

GEOG 153. Problems of Cartography Representation and Procedure. (31 
Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study of cartographic 
compilation methods. Principles and problems of symbolization, classification, 
and representation of map data. Problems of representation of features at 
different scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and lettering 
stickup and map composition. (Staff.) 

GEOG 154. Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) 

Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Schools of topographic 
concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical means of determining map 
reliability, map utility, and source materials. Nature, status, and problems of 
topographic mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic special 
use maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of reliability. 

(Wiedel.) 

GEOG 155. Interpretation of Topographic Maps and Aerial Photographs. (3) 
Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Interpretation of 
aerial photographs with emphasis on the recognition of landforms of different 
types and man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other data that 
may be derived from aerial photographs. Types of aerial photographs and 
limitations of photo interpretation. (Staff.) 

GEOG 156. Quantitative Methods in Geography. (3) 

The geographic applications of statistical methods. Emphasis will be placed on 
sources of quantitative data useful to geographers, measurements of location 
and association, and graphic analysis and representation of quantitative data. 

(Brodsky.) 

GEOG 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural Resources. (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. GEOG 010, or GEOG 015. The 
nature of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in 
the world, and the geographic distribution of certain major crops and animals 
in relation to the physical environment and economic geographic conditions. 
Main problems of conservation. (Staff.) 

GEOG 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral Resources. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. GEOG 010, or GEOG 015. The 
nature and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic, and other 
minerals. Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Consequences 
of geographic distribution and problems of conservation. (Holmes.) 

GEOG 163. Water Resources and Water Resource Planning. (3) 

Water as a component of the human environment. A systematic examination of 
various aspects of water, including problems of domestic and industrial water 
supply, irrigation, hydroelectric power, fisheries, navigation, flood damage re- 
duction and recreation. (Volk.) 

GEOG 171. Field Course. (1, 1, 1, 1) 
a — Field Study: Physical Geography 
b — Field Study: Rural Areas 
c — Field Study: Urban Areas 



168 • Graduate School 

d — Field Study: Field Techniques 

First semester. Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field 
observation of land use in selected rural and urban areas to eastern Maryland. 
Two lectures per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. 
Primarily for undergraduates. (Staff.) 

GEOG 180. Scientific Methodology and History of Geography. (3) 

First semester. For undergraduate and graduate majors in Geography. May be 
taken also by students with a minimum of 9 hours in systematic and 6 hours 
in regional geography. A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, 
nature, and basic principles of geography, with special reference to the major 
schools of geographic thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important 
geographical works and methods of geographic research. (Hu.) 

GEOG 190. Political Geography. (3) (Chaves.) 

GEOG 191. Population Geography. (3) 

An analysis of world population distribution patterns as revealed by demo- 
graphic data. Emphasis is placed upon a comparison of population density, 
growth, composition and migration with natural resources and state of techno- 
logical advancement. Case studies from the Geographical literature will be 
used. (Fonaroff.) 

GEOG 195. Geography of Transportation. (3) 

The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns of transport 
routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of the natural 
environment; transportation centers and their distribution. (Staff.) 

GEOG 196. Industrial Localization. (3) 

ractors and tienus m the geographic distribution of the manufacturing industries 
of the world, analyzed with reference to theories of industrial location. (Staff.) 

GEOG 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of the elements of site and location with 

reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world cities will 

be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be appraised. 

(Brodsky, Groves.) 

GEOG 198. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

First and second semester. Independent study under individual guidance. 
Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 hours 
in geography, and to graduate students. Any exception should have the approval 
of the Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

GEOG 200. Field Course. (3) 

Field work in September, conferences and reports during first semester. For 
graduate students in geography. Open to other students by special permission 
of the Head of the Department of Geography. Practical experience in con- 
ducting geographic field studies. Intensive training in field methods and tech- 
niques and in the preparation of reports. (Staff.) 

GEOG 202, 203. Seminar in Economic Geography. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An examination of themes and problems 
in the field of economic geography. (Staff.) 

GEOG 204, 205. Seminar in Cultural Geography. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 126 or consent of instructor. An examination of themes 
and problems in the field of cultural geography. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 169 

GEOG 206, 207. Seminar in Physical Geography. 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of themes and problems 
in the field of physical geography. (Staff.) 

GEOG 210, 211. Seminar in the Geooraphy of Latin America. (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, GEOG 110, 111 or consent of in- 
structor. An analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, 
exploitation of mineral resources and land utilization. (Chaves.) 

GEOG 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, GEOG 120, 122 or consent of in- 
structor. Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and develop- 
ment of Europe and Africa. (Staff.) 

GEOG 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning the geography 
of East Asia with emphasis on special research methods and techniques appli- 
cable to the problems of this area. (Hu.) 

GEOG 240. 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, reading knowledge of Russian and 
GEOG 140 or consent of instructor. Investigation of special aspects of Soviet 
geography. Emphasis on the use of Soviet materials. (Staff.) 

GEOG 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East. (3) 
First and second semesters. 

GEOG 250. Seminar in Cartography. (Credit arranged.) 

First or second semester. The historical and mathematical background of 
cartographic concepts, practices and problems, and the various philosophical 
and practical approaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by 
the presentation of specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. 

(Wiedel.) 

GEOG 260. Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. GEOG 041, or consent of instructor. Advanced 
study of elements and controls of the earth's climates. Principles of climatic 
classification. Special analysis of certain climatic types. (Staff.) 

GEOG 261. Applied Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. GEOG 041, or consent of instructor. Study of 
principles, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical and regional 
climatology relating to such problems and fields as transportation, agriculture, 
industry, urban planning, human comfort, and recional geographic analysis. 

(Staff.) 

GEOG 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected topics 
in meterology and climatology chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced 
students. (Staff.) 

GEOG 280. Geomorphology. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic 

processes and land forms; theories of land forms evolution and geomorpho- 

logical problems. (Ahnert.) 

GEOG 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and discussion on selected topics in the 
ricid of geography. To be taken only with joint consent of advisor and Head 
of the Department of Geography. (Staff.) 



170 • Graduate School 

GEOG 399. Thesis Research. (Master's level) 

First and second semesters and summer. (Staff.) 

GEOG 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) (Staff.) 

GERMANIC AND SLAVIC LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURE 

Professors: Dobert, Hering {Head), Kramer {Emeritus), Jones, Prahl, 

AND Zucker {Emeritus). 
Visiting Professor: Hansel. 
Assistant Professors: Hitchcock, Knoche, and Morris. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Candidates must pass, in addition to written examinations in the courses 
pursued, a written examination based on the reading list established by the de- 
partment in their respective field of German. The examination will test the 
general familiarity of the candidate with his respective fields and his powers 
of analysis and criticism. The oral examination will deal chiefly with the field of 
his thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least one year 
before the degree is awarded. This examination will include applied linguistics 
and each of the major literary fields. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GERM 000. Elementary German for Graduate Students. (Audit) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students should 
register as auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the German language 
designed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading 
knowledge. (Schmeissner.) 

GERM 103-104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translation from English into German, free compo- 
sition, letter writing. (Staff.) 

GERM 125-126. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, 
Herder, Goethe, Schiller. (Prahl, Knoche.) 

GERM 131-132. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Study of the literary movements from romanticism 
to naturalism. (Irwin.) 

GERM 141-142. German Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Haupt- 
mann to the present. Modern literary and philosophical movements will be 
discussed. (Dobert, Staff.) 

GERM 171-172. German Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions: 
great men, customs, and general culture. (Morris.) 



University of Maryland • 171 

GERM 191. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. (Jones.) 

Attention is called to CMLT 106, Romanticism: Flowering and Influence, and 
CMLT 107, The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

GERM 201. History of the German Language. (3) 

Lectures on the evolution of modern German. Reading and analysis of selected 
illustrative texts. (Jones.) 

GERM 203. Gothic. (3) 

An introduction to historical Germanic linguistics. A grammatical analysis and 
reading of selections from the Gothic Bible. (Morris.) 

GERM 204. Old High German. (3) 

A study of Old High German grammar, and readings from the literature of 
the period. (Jones.) 

GERM 205. Middle High German. (3) 

Grammar and readings in Middle High German literature. (Jones.) 

GERM 209. Introduction to German Studies. (Hering.) 

GERM 211-212. Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries . 
(3, 3) 
Study of the Reformation, Humanism and the Baroque. The main works of 
Luther, Sachs, Wickram, Fischart, Opitz, Gryphius, Grimmelshausen. (Hering.) 

GERM 224-225. Goethe and his Time. (3, 3) 

The main works of Goethe and his contemporaries as reflecting the literary 
development from Rococo to Biedermeier. (Hering.) 

GERM 226. Schiller. (3) 

Study of Schiller's works with emphasis on his dramas. (Prahl.) 

GERM 230. German Romanticism. (3) 

Special consideration given to the ideas and the style of romantic writers. 

(Prahl.) 
GERM 234. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 

Kleist, Grabbe, Biichner, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann. (Dobert.) 

GERM 250. The German Lyric. (3) 

Types of Lyrical poetry from "Minnesang" to Symbolism with emphasis on 
post-Goethean lyricists. (Hering.) 

GERM 255-256. The German Novel. (3, 3) (Hering.) 

GERM 258. Seminar in the German Novella. (3) (Dobert) 

GERM 281-282. Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of German 
literature. Extensive outside readings, with reports and periodic conferences. 

(Dobert.) 

GERM 291-292. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff.) 



172 • Graduate School 

GERM 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in preparation of master's 
and doctoral theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

GERM 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

RUSSIAN 

RUSSIAN 103, 104. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) (Hitchcock.) 

RUSSIAN 125. Russian Literature of the 18th Century. (3, 3) (Hitchcock.) 

RUSSIAN 131, 132. Russian Literature of the 19th Century. (3, 3) 

(Hitchcock.) 

RUSSIAN 135. Modern Russian Poetry. (3) (Hitchcock.) 

RUSSIAN 136. Modern Russian Drama. (3) (Hitchcock.) 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors: Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, Harrison, Hathorn, Hsueh, 
Jacobs, McNelly, and Plischke. 

Associate Professors: Byrd, Claude, Conway, Koury, Piper, Stone, and 
Wolfe. 

Assistant Professors: Bechtold, Chaples, Devine, Glendening, Heisler, 
Ingles, Lanning, Arthur Larson, McCarrick, McGreger, Oliver, Spen- 
cer, Stevens, Terchek, and Werlin. 

Special Lecturers: Alford, Barber, Bowen, Harold Larson, and Reeves. 

The Department of Government and Politics offers a graduate course of study 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

For the master's degree, the student may pursue a general program in govern- 
ment and politics or he may specialize in international affairs or in public ad- 
ministration. In addition to the completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours 
credit of formal course work (excluding thesis credit) in the major and minor 
fields combined, the master's candidate is required to demonstrate in a written 
comprehensive examination satisfactory competence in graduate course work in 
the major field and to write and defend in an oral examination a thesis acceptable 
to the Department. There is no language requirement for the M.A. degree. 

For the doctoral degree, the student may pursue any one of three programs; 
(1) a general program in government and politics; (2) a specialized program 
in international affairs — comparative politics; or (3) a specialized program in 
public administration — urban studies. The doctoral candidate is required to 
demonstrate in a written comprehensive examination satisfactory competence 
in five fields of government and politics, the required and elective fields in each 
case depending upon the particular program pursued. No candidate may attempt 
the comprehensive examination prior to the fulfillment of the language require- 
ment. 

This requirement may be satisfied by the candidate's demonstrating that he 
possesses either a working knowledge of two foreign languages or a high level 
of competence in one foreign language. Alternatively, a research methor or pro- 
cedure may be substituted for a second foreign language. Languages approved 
by this Department are French, Gerrnan, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, 



University of Maryland • 173 

and Arabic. The completion of a dissertation acceptable to the Department, and 
defended in oral examination, is the final Ph.D. requirement. 

Additional information on the Department's requirements and procedures is 
contained in a specially prepared "Manual of Instructions for Graduate Study 
in Government and Politics." 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GVPT 101. International Political Relations. (3) (Staff. 

GVPT 102. International Law. (3) (Harrison. Piper. 

GVTP 103. Contemporary African Politics. (3) (Werlin. 

GVPT 104. Inter-American Relations. (3) (Harrison. Barber. 

GVPT 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics. (3) (McNelly, Hsueh. 

GVPT 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) (Plischke. Barber, H. Larson. 

GVPT 107. Contemporary Middle Eastern Politics. (3) (Koury. Bechtold. 

GVPT 108. International Organization. (3) (Plischke, Wolfe. 

GVPT 109. Foreign Policy of the USSR. (3) (Jacobs, Oliver. 

GVPT 110. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

(Dillon, Ingles, A. Larson, MacGregor. 

GVPT 111. Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 110 or BSAD 160. (Stevens. 

GVPT 112. Public Financial Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 110 or ECON 142. (Ingles. 

GVPT 113. Governmental Organization and Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 110. (Dillon, McGregor. 

GVPT 120. Problems in Political Behavior. (3) 

(Chaples, Conway, Devine. Stone. 

GVPT 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) (Chaples, Conway. 

GVPT 131. Introduction to Constitutional Law. (3) (Hathorn, McCarrick. 

GVPT 132. Civil Rights and the Constitution. (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 131. (Hathorn, Claude, McCarrick. 

GVPT 133. The Judicial Process. (3) (Byrd. 

GVPT 141. History OF Political Theory. (3) 

(Anderson. Byrd. Claude. Terchek. 
GVPT 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

A study of the 19th and 20th century political thought, with special emphasis 
on recent theories of socialism, communism, and fascism. 

(Anderson, Byrd, Claude, Terchek. 

GVPT 144. American Political Theory. (3) (Anderson. 

GVPT 145. Russian Political Thought. (3) (Anderson. 

GVPT 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

A study of governmental problems of international scope, such as causes of war, 



174 • Graduate School 

problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to report on 
readings from current liteature. (Jacobs, Koury.) 

GVPT 160. State and Local Administration. (3) (Dillon, Glendening.) 

GVPT 161. Metropolitan Administration. (3) (Glendening.) 

GVPT 171. Problems of American Public Policy. (3) 

(Hathorn, A. Larson.) 

GVPT 174. Political Parties. (3) (Reeves, Conway, Devine.) 

GVPT 178. Public Opinion. (3) (Devine.) 

GVPT 181. Administrative Law. (3) (Staff.) 

GVPT 191. Government and Administration of the Soviet Union. (3) 

(Jacobs, Oliver.) 
GVPT 192. Government and Politics of Latin America. (3) 

(Barber, Lanning.) 
GVPT 193. Government and Politics of Asia. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 097 or 105, or HIST 061, 062, 187, 188. or 189. 

(McNelly, Hsueh.) 

GVPT 194. Government and Politics of Africa. (3) (Werlin.) 

GVPT 195. Government and Politics of the Middle East. (3) 

(Koury, Bechtold.) 

GVPT 197. Comparative Political Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, GVPT 097 and at least one other course in comparative govern- 
ment. (Heisler, Lanning, Wolfe.) 

For Graduates 

GVPT 200. Seminar in National Security Policy. (3) 

An examination of the components of United States security policy. Factors, 
both internal and external', affecting national security will be considered. Indi- 
vidual reporting as assigned. (Jacobs, A. Larson.) 

GVPT. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization. (3) 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. 

(Plischke, Piper.) 

GVPT 202. Seminar in International Law. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in sub- 
stantive and procedural international law. (Harrison, Piper.) 

GVPT 203. Functional Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of the major substantive issues in contemporary international 
relations, involving reports on selected topics based on individual research. 

(Staff.) 

GVPT 204. Area Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within a particular geo- 
graphic area, such as Europe, Asia and the Far East. Africa and the Middle 
East, and the Western Hemisphere. Individual reporting as assigned. (Staff.) 

GVPT 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the background 
and development of American government. (Burdette, Hathorn, Byrd.) 

GVPT 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in American 



University of Maryland • 175 

foreign policy and the conduct of American foreign relations. 

(Plischke, Barber.) 

GVPT 207. JjEMiNAR IN Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in govern- 
mental and political institutions in governments throughout the world. (Staff.) 

GVPT 208. Seminar in the Government and Politics of Emerging 
Nations. (3) 
An examination of the programs of political development in the emerging 
nations with special references to the newly independent nations of Asia and 
Africa and the less developed countries of Latin America. Individual reporting 
as assigned. (Staff.) 

GVPT 209. Seminar in International Administration. (3) 

An analysis of the administrative aspects of international organizations with 
some attention given to program administration. (Plischke.) 

GVPT 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of re- 
cent federal-state relations. (Dillon, A. Larson, Reeves.) 

GVPT 213. Problems, of Public Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of 
public administration. (Dillon, A. Larson, MacGregor. Stevens.) 

GVPT 214. Problems, of Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of 
public personnel administration. (Stevens.) 

GVPT 215. Problems of State and Local Government. (3) 

Report of topics assigned for individual study in the field of state and local 
government throughout the United States. (Reeves. Glendening.) 

GVPT 216. Government Administrative Planning and Management. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in administrative 
planning and management in government. (Dillon.) 

GVPT 218. Seminar in Urban Administration. (3) 

Selected topics are examined by the team research method with students respon- 
sible for planning, field investigation, and report writing. (Glendening, Stone.) 

GVPT 221. Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public 
opinion. (Burdette. Chaples. Devine.) 

GVPT 223. Seminar in Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading about the composi- 
tion and organization of legislatures and about the legislative process. 

(Burdette, Chaples, Conway.) 

GVPT 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of 
political organization and action. (Burdette, Reeves, Conway.) 

GVPT 225. Man and the State. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 142. Individual reading and reports on such recurring con- 
cepts in political theory as liberty, equality, justice, natural law and natural 
rights, private property, sovereignty, nationalism and the organic state. 

(Anderson, Byrd, Claude, Terchek.) 



176 • Graduate School 

GVPT 226. Scope and Method of Political Science. (3) 

Required of all Ph.D. candidates. A seminar in the methodologies of political 
science, and their respective applications to different research fields. Interdisci- 
plinary approaches and bibliographical techniques are also reviewed. 

(Conway, Devine, Terchek.) 

GVPT 227. Analytical Systems and Theory Construction. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 226. Examination of the general theoretical tools available 
to political scientists and of the problems of theory building. Attention is given 
to communications theory, decision-making, game theory and other mathemati- 
cal concepts, personality theory, role theory, structural-functional analysis, and 
current behavioral approaches. (Terchek.) 

GVPT 231. Seminar in Public Law. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of con- 
stitutional and administrative law. (Hathorn, Claude, McCarrick.) 

GVPT 261. Problems in American Government and Politics. (3) 

An examination of contemporary problems in various fields of government and 
politics in the United States, with reports on topics assigned for individual study. 

(Staff.) 

GVPT 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level.) (Staff.) 

GVPT 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

HISTORY 

Professors: Bauer, Cole, Gordon, Haber {Head), Harlan, Jashemski, Koch, 

Merrill, France, Smith, and Sparks. 
Associate Professors: Belz, Breslow, Brush, Callcott, Folsom, Giffin, 

Gilbert, Grimsted, Mayo, Rivlin, and Yaney. 
Assistant Professors: Beveridgf, Bradbury, Brann, Carter, Farrell, Flack, 

Greenberg, Harris, Matossian, Nicklason, Olson, Robertson, Sto- 

WASSER, Van Ness, Warren, Williams, and Wright. 
Lecturers: Barillari, Blassingame, Cockburn, McCusker, Perinbam, 

Vasquez. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Requirements for the M.A. include: (1) writing an acceptable thesis; (2) 
successful completion of HIST 200; (3) passing a four-hour written examina- 
tion over the major field; and (4) passing an oral examination over the thesis 
and the field in which it lies. Information about a possible non-thesis option is 
available in the departmental oflfice. At least fifteen hours of the total required 
for an M.A. must be in history, and at least nine of these shall be in the field 
of concentration. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the Ph.D. in history must pass written examinations in two 
general fields as well as a special field within one of these general fields. The 
general fields are: United States history; ancient history; history of medieval and 
early modern Europe (6th to mid-1 7th centuries); modern European history; 
British history; Latin American history; East Asian history; and history of the 



University of Maryland • 177 

Middle East and Islamic civilization. An examination in a special field follows 
successful completion of the general field examinations. A special field examina- 
tion tests the kind of knowledge and depth needed to teach upper-division or 
advanced courses in colleges and universities. Examples of the special fields 
currently offered are: American diplomatic history (within the United States 
general field); Victorian England (within the British general field); and Russia 
to 1917 (within the modern Europe general field). 

HIST 200 is required. 

The dissertation, a prospectus of which must be approved by the student's 
dissertation committee before the student can be recommended formally for 
admission to candidacy, must constitute a contribution to historical knowledge. 

The following languages are approved for the Ph.D. language requirement 
of students in history: French, German, Russian, Spanish, Italian. Portuguese, 
Greek, Latin, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Turkish, Persian, and Hebrew. 

Further information about requirements and procedures is available in the 
office of the Department. 

Note: Applicants for admission to graduate work in history should take the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AMERICAN HISTORY 

HIST 101. American Colonul History. (3) (Staff.) 

HIST 102. The American Revolution. (3) (Bradbury.) 

HIST 103. The Formative Period in America, 1789-1824. (3) (Bradbury.) 

HIST 107. 108. Economic History of the United States. (3. 3) 

The development of the American economy and its institutions. First semester, 
to 1865; second semester, since 1865. (Staff.) 

HIST 109, 110. Social History of the United States. (3. 3) 

Formation of regional societies; immigration and nativism; the Negro; urban 
movement; social responses to technological change. First semester, to 1865; 
second semester, since 1865. (Beveridge.) 

HIST 114. The Middle Period of American History. 1824-1860. (3) 

An examination of the political history of the United States from Jackson to 
Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian democ- 
racy, Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the Repub- 
lican Party, and secession. (Sparks.) 

HIST 115. History of the South. (3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 021, 022, or the equivalent. (Calcott.) 

HIST 116. The Civil War. (3) (Sparks.) 

HIST 117. The Negro in American Life. (3) 

HIST 118. The Progressive Period: The United States, 1896-1919. (3) 

HIST 119. Between the Wars: The United States, 1919-1945. (3) 

HIST 120. The United States Since World War II. (3) 



178 • Graduate School 

HIST 121. History of the American Frontier. (3) (Staff.) 

HIST 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation, 1865-1896. (3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 021, 022, or the equivalent. (Staff.) 

HIST 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3, 3) 

A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign relations of the 
United States. First semester from the Revolution to 1896. Second semester, 
from 1898 to the present. (Cole.) 

HIST 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America. (3, 3) 

A history of basic beliefs about religion, man, nature, and society. Consent 
of the instructor is required for HIST 134. (Koch.) 

HIST 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States. (3, 3) (Belz.) 

HIST 137. The Scientific Revolution: From Copernicus to Newton. (3) 

Major developments in the history of physics and astronomy during the 16th 
and 17th centuries and critical evaluations of the Copernican Revolution, the 
"mechanical philosophy" of the 17th century scientists, and the Newtonian 
synthesis and its impact on 18th century thought. (Brush.) 

HIST 138. The Development of Modern Physical Science: From Lavoisier 
TO Einstein .(3) 
History of chemistry, physics, and geology during the period from 1775 to about 
1925. Prerequisites: MATH 010 and PHYS 002 or 003. (Brush.) 

HIST 141. History of Maryland. (3) (Van Ness.) 

HIST 142, 143. History of Spain. (3, 3) 

Political, social, and economic development of Spain; the Spanish empire; 
Spain's role in Europe. Some attention will be paid to Portuguese history. 
First semester, 1469-1700; second semester, 1700-present. (Vasquez.) 

HIST 146. Diplomatic History of Latin America. (3) (Warren.) 

HIST 147. History of Mexico and the Caribbean. (3) (Warren.) 

HIST 148. History of Canada. (3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 021, 042, or HIST 053, 054. (Gordon.) 

HIST 149. History of Brazil. (3) (Giffin.) 

HIST 150. History of Argentina and the Andean Republics. (3) (Wright.) 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

HIST 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece. (3) (Jashemski.) 

HIST 153. History of Rome. (3) (Jashemski.) 

HIST 155, 156. History of Medieval Europe. (3, 3) (Robertson.) 

HIST 157. The Age of Absolutism, 1648-1748. (3) 

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV and the Enlightened Despots. (Williams.) 

HIST 158. The Old Regime and the French Revolution, 1748-1815. (3) 

(Williams.) 

HIST 159, 160. History of European Ideas. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042 or HIST 053, 054, or the equivalent. Beginning 
with a review of the basic Western intellectual traditions as a heritage from the 
Ancient World, the course will present selected important currents of thought 



University of Maryland • 179 

from the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth century down to 
the twentieth century. First semester, through the eighteenth century. Second 
semester, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Haber.) 

HIST 161, 162. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 041, 042, 053, or consent of instructor. City-states and the 
rise of nation-states, the culture and thought of the Renaissance, the Reforma- 
tions and their impact into the seventeenth century. (Brann.) 

HIST 163, 164. History OF THE British Empire. (3,3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042, or HIST 053, 054. First semester, the develop- 
ment of England's Mercantilist Empire and its fall in the war for American 
Independence (1783). Second semester, the rise of the Second British Empire and 
the solution of the problem of responsible self-government (1783-1867), the 
evolution of the British Empire into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the de- 
velopment and problems of the dependent Empire. (Gordon.) 

HIST 165, 166. Constitutional History of Great Britain. (3, 3) 

A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis on the history 
of the royal prerogative, the growth of the common law, the development of 
Parliament, and the emergence of systematized government. First semester, to 
1485; second semester, since 1485. (Cockburn) 

HIST 167, 168. History of Russia. (3, 3) (Yaney) 

HIST 169, 170. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (3. 3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042, or HIST 053. 054. A study of the political, eco- 
nomic, social and cultural development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna 
to the First World War. First semester, 1815-1870; second semester, 1870-1914. 

(Bauer) 

HIST 171, 172. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century. 
(3,3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042. or HIST 053, 054. A study of political, eco- 
nomic, and cultural developments in twentieth century Europe with special em- 
phasis on the factors involved in the two World Wars and their global impacts 
and significance. (Prange) 

HIST 173. The Soviet Union. (3) (Matossian.) 

HIST 175. Modern France. (3) 

A survey of French history from 1815 to the present. The emphasis is upon 
such topics as the population problem, the economic and social structure of 
French society, and the changing political and cultural values of this society 
in response to recurrent crises through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

(Greenberg) 

HIST 176. Tudor England. (3) (Breslow) 

HIST 177. Stuart England. (3) (Breslow) 

HIST 178. Britain in the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

Developments in Great Britain from the Revolution of 1688 to the end of the 
Napoleonic wars. (Cockburn.) 

HIST 179. Modern Britain. (3) 

A survey of British history from the age of the French Revolution to World 
War I with emphasis upon such subjects as Britain's role in the world, the 
democratization of the state, the problems arising from industrialism and ur- 
banism, and Irish and imperial problems. (Gordon.) 



180 



Graduate School 



HIST 181, 182. The Middle East. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, six hours from the following groups of courses: HIST 041, 042; 
HIST 051, 052; or HIST 053, 054. A survey of the historical and institutional 
developments of the nations of this vital area. The Islamic Empires and their 
cultures; impact of the west; breakup of the Ottoman Empire and rise of 
nationalism; present day problems. 

HIST 183. A Survey of African History. (3) 

A brief survey of the history of sub-Saharan Africa from prehistoric times to 
the end of the colonial era. Special focus on neolithic civilizations, major 
migrations, and political and commercial developments in pre-colonial and 
colonial Africa. (Perinbam.) 

HIST 184. A History of West Africa. (3) 

HIST 183 recommended though not required. A regional study of the western 
Sudan, forest and coastal regions from pre-historic times to the nineteenth 
century. A dissussion of neolithic and iron age civilizations, trans-Saharan and 
other trade, introduction of Islam, medieval Sudanese empires, forest kingdoms, 
nineteenth century empires and kingdoms, and the impact of European penetra- 
tion. (Perinbam.) 



ASIAN HISTORY 



HIST 187, li 



History of China. (3, 3) 



(Folsom.) 



HIST 189, 190. History of Japan. (3, 3) 

First semester, Japanese civilization from the age of Shinto mythology, intro- 
duction of continental learning, and rule of military overlords. Second semes- 
ter, renewed contact with the western world and Japan's emergence as a 
modern state. (Mayo.) 

HIST 191. History OF THE Arabs. (3) 

HIST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. (Rivlin.) 

HIST 192. History of the Turks. (3) 

HIST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. (Rivlin.) 

HIST 193. History of Iran. (3) 

HIST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. (Rivlin.) 

HIST 194. History of the Jews and the State of Israel. (3) (Rivlin.) 



For Graduates 

HIST 200. Historiography: Techniques of Historical Research and 

Writing. (3) (Staff.) 



HIST 201. Readings in Colonial American History. (3) 
HIST 202. Seminar in Colonial American History. (3) 



(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



HIST 203. Readings in the American Revoiution and the Formative Period. 
(3) (Bradbury.) 

HIST 204. Seminar in the American Revolution and the Formative Period. 
(3) (Bradbury.) 

HIST 205. Readings in American Social and Economic History. (3) 

(Beveridge.) 



University of Maryland • 181 

HIST 206. Seminar in American Social and Economic History. (3) 

(Beveridge. 

HIST 213. Readings in Southern History. ()3 (Callcott. 

HIST 214. Seminar in Southern History. (3) (Callcott. 

HIST 215. Readings in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) (Sparks. 

HIST 216. Seminar in the Middle Period and Civil War. (3) (Sparks. 

HIST 217. Readings in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) (Staff. 

HIST 218. Seminar in Reconstruction and the New Nation. (3) (Staff. 

HIST 223. Readings in Recent American History. (3) 

(Shannon, Merrill, Harlan. Olson. 

HIST 224. Seminar in Recent American History. (3) 

(Shannon, Merrill, Harlan, Olson. 

HIST 227. Readings in the History of American Foreign Policy. (3) 

(Cole. 

HIST 228. Seminar in the History of American Foreign Policy. (3) (Cole. 

HIST 233. Readings in American Intellectual History. (3) (Koch. 

HIST 234. Seminar in American Intellectual History. (3) (Koch. 

HIST 236. Seminar in American Constitutional and Political History. (3) 

(Belz. 

HIST 237. Seminar in the History of Modern Science. (3) (Brush. 

HIST 242. Seminar in the History of Maryland. (3) (Van Ness. 

HIST 245. Readings in Latin American History. (3) (Giffin, Wright. 

HIST 246. Seminar in Latin American History. (3) (Giffin, Wright. 

HIST 251. Seminar in Greek History. (3) (Jashemski. 

HIST 253. Seminar in Roman History. (3) (Jashemski. 

HIST 255. Readings in Medieval History. (3) (Robertson. 

HIST 256. Seminar in Medieval History. (3) (Robertson. 

HIST 259. Readings in Modern European Intellectual History. (3) 

(Haber. 

HIST 260. Seminar in Modern European Intellectual History. (3) 

(Haber. 

HIST 261. Readings in the History of the Renaissance and Reformation. (3 

(Brann. 

HIST 262. Seminar in the History of the Renaissance and Reformation. (3 

HIST 263. Readings in the History of Great Britain and the British Empire 
Commonwealth. (3) (Gordon 

HIST 264. Seminar in the History of Great Britain and the British Empire 
Commonwealth. (3) (Gordon. 

HIST 266. Seminar in Tudor and Stuart England. (3) (Breslow. 



182 • Graduate School 



HIST 268. Seminar in Russian History. (3) 

HIST 269. Readings in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 

HIST 270. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Europe. (3) 

HIST 271. Seminar in the History of World War I. (3) 

HIST 272. Seminar in the History of World War II. (3) 

HIST 274. Readings in Modern French History. (3) 

HIST 275. Seminar in Modern French History. (3) 

HIST 281. Readings in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

HIST 282. Seminar in Middle Eastern History. (3) 

HIST 285. Readings in Japanese History. (3) 

HIST 286. Seminar in Japanese History. (3) 

HIST 287. Readings in Chinese History. (3) 

HIST 288. Seminar in Chinese History. (3) 

HIST 290. The Teaching of History in Institutions of Higher 

HIST 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

HIST 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 



(Yaney.) 

(Bauer.) 

(Bauer.) 

(Prange.) 

(Prange.) 

(Greenberg.) 

(Greenberg.) 

(Rivlin.) 

(Rivlin.) 

(Mayo.) 

(Mayo.) 

(Folsom.) 

(Folsom.) 

Learning. (1) 
(FarreU.) 

(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors: Brooks, Mitchell, Prather, and Shearer. 

Associate Professors: Ahrens, Brown, Butler, Lemmon, Olson, and Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Churaman, Eheart, and Wilbur. 

The college offers a program in Home Economics leading to a Master of 
Science degree in each of the following major areas: Food, Nutrition and/or 
Institution Administration, Textiles and Clothing, and General Home Economics. 
Graduate programs in the Department of Family and Community Development 
are being initiated. Please contact College of Home Economics for information. 
Home Economics Education at the graduate level is administered by the College 
of Education. 

Students in any of the three curricula may select from a variety of courses, 
seminars, and experiences in independent study. Each student plans his program 
in consultation with his advisory committee in accordance with the general 
requirements of the Graduate School and with due consideration to his purpose 
in undertaking graduate study. 

The program in General Home Economics is oriented toward home econ- 
omists whose work is centered in home, school, and community services. It is 
designed primarily to increase competence in more than one area within the 
field of Home Economics. The minor area should be a coordinated program of 
study outside the College of Home Economics. The programs in Food, Nutrition, 
and/or Institution Administration and in Textiles and Clothing allow inter- 
departmental programs within the college. 



University of Maryland • 183 

Candidates for the master's degree are expected to have had training equiva- 
lent to that of a University of Maryland undergraduate major in the field of 
their choice. The Graduate Record Examination is required. 

FOOD 

FOOD 130. Special Problems in Foods. (2-3) 

First or second semesters. Prerequisites, FOOD 152 and consent of instructor. 
Individual selected problems in the area of food science. 

FOOD 152. Advanced Food Science. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 031, 033, FOOD 052, 
053, CHEM 161 or concurrently. Chemical and physical properties of food as 
related to consumer use in the home and institutions. 

FOOD 153. Experimental Food Science. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratories per week. Prerequisite, FOOD 
152 or equivalent. Individual and group laboratory experimentation as an intro- 
duction to methods of food research. 

FOOD 170. Economics of Food Consumption. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Economics and consent of the instruc- 
tor. Interrelations of food, population and economics progress; trends in food- 
consumption patterns; world and local food problems. 

FOOD 180. Food Additives. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, FOOD 152 or equivalent. Effects 
of intentional and incidental additives on food quality, nutritive value and 
safety. FDA approved additives, GRAS substances, pesticide residues, myco- 
toxins, antibiotics, and hormones will be reviewed. 

For Graduates 

FOOD 200. Advanced Experimental Food. (3-5) 

Second semester. Two lectures and three laboratory periods a week. Selected 
readings of literature in experimental foods. Development of individual problem. 

FOOD 204. Nutritional and Quality Evaluation of Food. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 152 or consent of instructor. Effects of pro- 
duction, processing .marketing, storage, and preparation on nutritive value and 
quality of foods. 

FOOD 210. Readings in Food. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 152 or consent of instructor. A critical 
survey of the literature of recent developments in food research. 

FOOD 220. Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of current research in 
foods. 

FOOD 240. Food Enzymes. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 
Prerequisite, FOOD 152 or equivalent. The classification and behavior of 
naturally occurring and added enzymes in food; includes the effects of tempera- 
ture, pH, radiation, moisture, etc., on enzyme activity. 

FOOD 399. Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done and results ac- 



184 • Graduate School 

complished. Investigation in some phases of food which may form the basis for 
a thesis. 



INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

lADM 130. Special Problems in Food Service. (2-3) 

First or second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of in- 
structor. Individual selected problems in the area of food service. 

lADM 140. Practicum in Institution Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, 5 credits in lADM and consent of department. In-service training 
and practical experience, totaling at least 240 hours, in an approved food service. 

lADM 150. Food Service Organization and Management. (2) 

First semester. Introduction to the food services; principles of organization, 
management, financial control, and technical operations. Records, reports, and 
organization charts included. 

I ADM 151. Food Purchasing and Cost Control. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 052, introductory accounting recommended. 
Food selection and the development of integrated purchasing programs. Stand- 
ards of quality; the marketing distribution system; managerial cost control. 

lADM 152. Quantity Food Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory a week. 
Prerequisites, FOOD 052, or consent of instructor. Scientific principles and pro- 
cedures employed in food preparation in large quantity. Laboratory experience 
in management techniques in quantity food production and service. 

lADM 153. Food Service Personnel Administration. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, lADM 150. Principles of personnal administra- 
tion in food services; emphasis on personnel selection; supervision and training; 
job evaluation, wage and payroll structure, current labor regulations, and inter- 
personal relationships and communications. 

I ADM 154. School Food Service. (3) 

Two lectures and one morning a week for field experience in a school food 
service. Prerequisite, FOOD 010, or 052, 053, and NUTR 121, or consent of 
instructor. Study of organization and management, menu planning, food pur- 
chasing, preparation, service, and cost control in a school lunch program. 

lADM 155. Food Service Equipment and Planning. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Equipment design, selection, maintenance and efficient 
layout; relation of the physical facility to production and service. Field trips. 

IDAM 181, 182. Administrative Dietetics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Open only to students accepted into and partici- 
pating in the U.S. Army Dietetic Internship program at Walter Reed General 
Hospital.) Application of management theory through guided experience in all 
aspects of hospital dietary department administration. 

lADM 183. Applied Diet Therapy. 

First semester. (Open only to students accepted into and participating in the 
U.S. Army Dietetic Internship program at Walter Reed General Hospital.) 
Application of principles of normal and therapeutic nutrition in the total medi- 
cal care and instruction of patients. 



University of Maryland • 185 



For Graduates 



lADM 200. Food Service Administration. (3) 

First or second semester. Principles of organization and management related to 
a food system. Control of resources through the use of quantitative methods. 
Administrative decision-making, and personnel policies and practices. 

lADM 210. Readings in Food Administration. (3) 

First or second semester. Reports and discussion of significant research and de- 
velopment in the area of food administration. 

lADM 235. Computer Applications in Food Service. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, lADM 200 or equivalent. The use of automatic 
data processing and programming for the procurement and issuing of food 
commodities, processing of ingredients, menu selection, and labor allocations. 

lADM 245. Sanitation and Safety in Food Service. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MICB 001. Principles and practices of sanita- 
tion and safety unique to the production, storage and service of food in quan- 
tity; includes current legislation. 

lADM 255. Experimental Quantity Food Production. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites, 
lADM 152 and FOOD 153 or equivalents. Application of experimental methods 
to quantity food production; recipe development and modification relationship 
of food quality to production methods. 

lADM 399. Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done and results ac- 
complished. Investigation in some phases of institution administration which 
may form the basis on a thesis. 

NUTRITION 

NUTR 114. Nutrition for Health Services. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. NUTR 020, CHEM 001, 003, or 
equivalent. A study of nutritional status and the effect of food habits and food 
consumption on family health. Nutritional requirements for individuals in dif- 
ferent stages of development. Techniques and procedures for the application of 
nutrition knowledge with consideration of various economic levels and social 
backgrounds. For graduate nurses, dietitians, health teachers, and social workers. 

NUTR 121. Science of Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ZOOL 001, CHEM 031, 033, or concurrently. 
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. An understanding of the chemical 
and physiological utilization of nutrients present in food as related to individual 
human nutritional status, includes digestion and absorption, requirements, de- 
ficiencies. 

NUTR 124. Advanced Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of department; ZOOL 001; CHEM 161, 
163, or concurrent. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. 

NUTR 125. Therapeutic Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
NUTR 121, 124. Modifications of the normal adequate diet to meet human 
nutritional needs in pathological conditions. 



186 • Graduate School 

NUTR 130. Special Problems in Nutrition. (2-3) 

First or second semesters. Prerequisite, NUTR 121 and consent of instructor. 
Individual selected problems in the area of human nutrition. 

NUTR 140. Maternal, Infant and Child Nutrition. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. Nutritional needs 
of the mother, infant and child and the relation of nutrition to physical and 
mental growth. 

NUTR 145. International Nutrition. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. Nutritional status 
of world population and local, national, and international, programs for im- 
provement. 

NUTR 150. History of Nutrition. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. A study of the 
development of nutrition and its interrelationship with social and economic 
developments. 

For Graduates 

NUTR 208. Recent Progress in Human Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Recent developments in the science of nutrition with emphasis 
on the interpretation of these findings for application in health and disease. 
Aids for the dietitian in creating a better understanding of nutrition among 
patients, students of graduate status and personnel, such as those in the dental 
and medical professions. 

NUTR 210. Readings in Nutrition. (3) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of significant nutritional 
research and investigation. 

NUTR 211. Problems in Nutrition. (3-5) 

Second semester. Experience in a phase of nutrition research which is of in- 
terest to the student. Use of experimental animals, human studies or a com- 
pilation and extensive and critical study of research methods, techniques or 
data of specific projects. 

NUTR 212. Nutrition for Community Services. (3) 

First semester. Application of the principles of nutrition to various community 
problems of specific groups of the public. Students may select specific problems 
for independent study. 

NUTR 220. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussion of current research in 
nutrition. 

NUTR 221. Intermediary Metabolism in Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 161, 163 or equivalent. The major routes 
of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism with particular emphasis on 
metabolic shifts and their detection and significance in nutrition. 

NUTR 285. Human Nutritional Status. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Methods of appraisal of human nutritional status, 
to include dietary, biochemical and anthropometric techniques. 

NUTR 399. Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. Credit in proportion to work done and results ac- 
complished. Investigation in some phase of nutrition which may form the basis 
of a thesis. 



University of Maryland • 187 

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

FMLF 130. Home Management and Family Life. (3) 

First semester. Prereauisites, PSYC 001: MGT 050: HOEC 005. Study of factors 
influencing establishment and maintenance of satisfying interpersonal relations 
throughout the family life cycle as affected by management in the home. 

FMLF 132. The Child in the Family. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures. Prreequisite, PSYC 001; HOEC 005 or equiva- 
lent. Study of the child from prenatal stage through adolescence, with em- 
phasis on responsibility for guidance in the home. Biological and psychological 
needs as they affect the child's relationship with his family and peers. 

FMLF 135. Directed Experiences with Children and Families. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 001 and consent of department. 
Observation and study of selected home situations placing emphasis on con- 
temporary family living. This course is designed especially for students who 
wish an understanding of children of various ages in relation to the family and 
the quality of living achieved in a variety of life situations. (Limited to majors 
in the College of Home Economics.) 

HMGT 140. Fundamentals of Housing. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, 
HMGT 050 or equivalent. 

HMGT 160. Scientific Management in the Home. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, HMGT 050 or equivalent. 

HMGT 161. Resident Experience in Home Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, HMGT 050, 160; FOOD 060, or 
equivalent. Residence from four to nine weeks in the home management center. 
Experience in planning, coordinating, and participating in the activities of a 
household, composed of a faculty member, a group of students, and possibly an 
infant on a part-time basis. 

HMGT 162. Personal and Family Finance. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, HMGT 050. Study of factors influencing use of 
money; how families attempt to achieve financial security; interrelationship of 
money and other resources; types of credit. Emphasis on management of the 
family's money. 

HMGT 165. Home Management Practicum. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, HMGT 050, 160; FOOD 060; or 
equivalent; consent of department. Home management experience under super- 
vision in a variety of situations. Designed especially for students who are man- 
aging their own homes. 

APPLIED DESIGN 

APDS 120. Fashion Illustration. (3) 

First semester. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisites, APDS 001, 002, 003, 010, 
Oil. Fabric and clothing structure as they relate to illustration. Opportunity to 
explore rendering styles and techniques appropriate to reproduction methods 
currently used in advertising. Guidance in development of individuality in pre- 
sentations. 



188 • Graduate School 

APDS 121. Fashion Design and Illustration. (3) 

Second semester. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite, APDS 120. Design 
and illustration of fashions appropriate to the custom market and to mass 
production. 

APDS 122, 123. Advanced Costume. (2, 2) 

First and/or second semesters. Prerequisite, APDS 120 or 121. Advanced prob- 
lems in fashion illustration or design. Problems chosen with consent of in- 
structor. 

APDS 130. Typography and Lettering. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: APDS 001, 
002. Experience in hand lettering techniques as a means of understanding letter- 
ing styles in design composition. Recognition of type faces used in advertise- 
ment, book, and magazine layout. Effect of printing processes on design choices. 

APDS 132. Advertising Layout. (3) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, APDS 130, INED 001. 
Design of advertising layouts from initial idea to finished layout. Typography 
and illustration as they relate to reproduction processes used in direct advertising. 

APDS 134, 135. Advanced Problems in Advertising Design. (3,3) 

Second semester. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: APDS 132. Advanced 
problems in design and layout planned for developing competency in one or 
more areas of a advertising design. 

APDS 136. Display Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: INED 001, 
APDS 130 or equivalent. Application of design principles to creative display 
appropriate to exhibits, design shows, merchandising. Display construction. 

APDS 138. Advanced Photography. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: APDS 038. 
Composition, techniques, and lighting applicable to illustration, documentation, 
advertising design and display. 

APDS 139. Advanced Photography. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods. Continuation of APDS 
138. 

APDS 180. Professional Seminar. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture-discussion periods. Prerequisite: departmental 
major with junior standing. Professional and career opportunities, ethics, 
practices. 

APDS 190. Individual Problems in Applied Design. (3-4) 
(190-a — Advertising; 190-b — Costume) 
Open only to advanced students who, with guidance, can work independently. 

HOUSING 

HSAD 140. Period Homes and Their Furnishings. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites: APDS 001, HSAD 046, or equivalent. 

HSAD 141. Contemporary Developments in Architecture, Interiors, 
Furnishings. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite: HSAD 046 and consent of instructor. 

HSAD 142. Space Development. (3) 

First semester. One lecture, 2 two-hour laboratories. Prerequisites, APDS 001. 



University of Maryland • 189 

002, 003, INED GDI, or equivalent. A study of blue prints and house con- 
struction as they relate to the interior designer. Development and drafting of 
original plans emphasizing the functional spatial relationship of furnishings to 
interiors. 

HSAD 143. Interior Design I. (3) 

First semester. One lecture-discussion, two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
APDS QIC, INED 001 or equivalent. Complete presentation of rooms: isometric 
and perspective projections rendered in color; purchase and work orders. 
Emphasis on individual and family living space. 

HSAD 144. Interior Design II. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture-discussion, two laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
HSAD 143. Continuation of HSAD 143 with emphasis on commercial and 
contract assignments. 

HSAD 145. Professional Aspects of Interior Design. (3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture plus work experience. 

HSAD 146-147. Interior Design III, IV. (4, 4) 

First and/or second semesters. 8 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: HSAD 144. 
Preparation of complete presentation: work specifications, floor plans, purchase 
orders, renderings, etc. Portfolio preparation. 

HSAD 148. Readings in Housing. (3) 

Second semester. Seminar. Prerequisite: SOCY 001, HSAD 041, Senior stand- 
ing. To satisfy individual interests and needs, opportunity afforded for concen- 
trated reading in one or more facets of housing (urban renewal, public hous- 
ing, etc.) Examination of completed research, needed future research. 

HSAD 190. Individual Study in Housing and/or Interior Design. (3-4) 

Guidance for the advanced student capable of independent subject matter investi- 
gation or creative work. Problem chosen with consent of instructor. 



CRAFTS 

CRAF 102. Creative Crafts. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite, CRAF 001 
or CRAF 002. Problems to stimulate creative experimentation as approach to 
design. Work with paper, fabric, clay, wood, metal. 

CRAF 120, 121. Advanced Ceramics I, Advanced Ceramics II. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite, CRAF 020. 

CRAF 130, 131. Advanced Metalry I, Advanced Metalry II. (2, 2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, CRAF 030. Advanced 
application of skills to design and fabrication of metals; jewelry, stone setting, 
metal casting, cloisonne; hand-raised hollow ware. 

CRAF 140, 141. Advanced Weaving, and/or Advanced Textile Design. (2, 2) 
Second semester. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, CRAF 040, 041. Exe- 
cution of original textile designs which reflect the demands both of the custom 
market and of mass production. Problems chosen with the consent of instructor. 

CRAF 190. Individual Problems in Crafts. (3-4) 

(190-a — Ceramics; 190-b — Metalry; 190-c — Textiles) Open only to advanced 
students who, with guidance, can work independently. 



190 • Graduate School 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

TXCL 101. Fashion Promotion and Coordination. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
TXCL 126; SPCH 115 or 117. Analysis of fashion media; industry publications, 
magazines, newspapers, radio, TV; merchandise displays and fashion shows. 
Role of the stylist. 

TXCL 110. Field Experience in Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

First semester or summer school. Prerequisite, senior standing in department. 
Supervised and coordinated training-work program in cooperation with agencies 
and organizations. 

TXCL 126. Fundamentals of Fashion. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, CLTH 120. Fashion history; current fashions, 
how to interpret and evaluate them; fashion show techniques; fashion promo- 
tion. The course includes oral and written reports, group projects, panel dis- 
cussions and field trips. 

TXCL 128. Fundamentals of Home Furnishings. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
TXCL 005, CLTH 010, or consent of instructor. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

TEXT 102. Textile Testing. (3) 

Second semester. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, TEXT 150. 

TEXT 150. Advanced Textiles. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
TEXT 055. 

TEXT 153. International Textiles. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, TXCL 005, or consent of 
instructor. 

CLOTHING 

CLTH 100. Family Clothing. (3) 

First semester in alternate years. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites. TXCL 005, CLTH 010, Oil, or equivalent. Clothing the 
family; analysis of needs of family members in various stages of life cycle; 
individual and family budgets; problems in selection and/or construction of 
wardrobe items. 

CLTH 120. Draping. (3) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, CLTH 010. 

CLTH 122. Tailoring. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
CLTH 021. 

CLTH 127. Apparel Design. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
CLTH 120. The art of costuming; trade and custom methods of clothing design 
and construction; advanced work in draping, pattern design and/or tailoring, 
with study of the interrelationship of these techniques. 



University of Maryland • 191 



For Graduates 



TEXT 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2-4) 

First or second semester. Summer session. Advanced inquiry into uses, care, 
types and/or performance of textile materials, either contemporary or historic 
depending on interest of students; compilation of data through testing, surveys, 
museum visits and/or field trips; writing of technical reports. 

CLTH 220. Special Studies in Clothing. (2-4) 

First or second semester. Special areas of clothing are selected according to 
interest of student; consumer, design, functional aspects, and/or evaluation and 
analysis studies are made of those areas. Reports may be written, oral, or by 
group presentation. 

TXCL 230. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. The breadth and limit of the field of textiles and 
clothing are investigated; annotated bibliography is developed; one oral report 
is presented. 

TXCL 232. Economics of Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

Second semester. Study of interrelationship of developments in production, 
distribution and consumption of textiles and clothing affecting consumers and 
the market. Analysis of consumption trends as related to patterns of family 
living and population changes. 

TXCL 233. Syntheses of Behavioral Science Concepts in Textiles and 
Clothing. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 021 and/or consent of depart- 
ment. Analysis and interpretation of interdisciplinary research methods and 
findings with reference to behavioral aspects of textiles and clothing. Considera- 
tion given to the measurement and relation of clothing interest and behavior to 
attitudes, values, roles, and social status groupings. 

TXCL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. A research problem is selected by the student; thesis 
for partial fulfillment of the Master of Science degree is written. 



HORTICULTURE 

Professors: Stark, Haut, Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Scott, Shanks, and 

Thompson. 
Associate Professor: Wiley. 

TTie Department of Horticulture oflfers programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Programs in floriculture and orna- 
mental horticulture, olericulture and pomology are concerned with theoretical 
and applied work in genetics, breeding, physiology and cultural aspects of flower 
crops, ornamental plants, vegetable crops and fruit crops. The program in 
food science (Horticultural processing) is concerned with fundamental and 
applied work in the chemical, physical, bacteriological and nutritional aspects 
of vegetable and fruit products for processing. (See Food Science.) 

Departmental requirements, supplementary to the material in the Graduate 
School Announcements, may be obtained from the Department of Horticulture. 



192 • Graduate School 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HORT 101. Technology of Fruits. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
HORT 006; prerequisite or concurrent BOTN 101. (Thompson.) 

HORT 103. Technology of Vegetables. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1969-70.) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
HORT 058; prerequisite or concurrent BOTN 101. (Reynolds.) 

HORT 105. Technology OF Ornamentals. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite or concurrent BOTN 101. 

(Link.) 
HORT 107, 108. Woody Plant Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, BOTN Oil. (Baker.) 

HORT 109. Principles of Breeding Horticultural Plants. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite BOTN 117. (Angell.) 

HORT 114. Systematic Horticulture. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. (Angell.) 

HORT 161. Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticultural 
Crops. (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite BOTN 101. Factors related to maturation and application of sci- 
entific principles to handling and storage of horticultural crops. (Scott.) 

HORT 162. Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. (Link.) 

HORT 163. Production and Maintenance of Woody Plants. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite or concurrent HORT 062; 108. 

(Link.) 

HORT 198. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according to work done. For 

major students in horticulture or botany. Four credits maximum per student. 

(Staff.) 
HORT 207. Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. 

(Scott.) 
HORT 211. Edaphic Factors AND Horticultltral Plants. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Three lectures per week. 

Prerequisite, BOTN 101. (Reynolds.) 

HORT 212. Chemical Regulation of Growth of Horticultural Plants. (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1969-70.) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 101. (Shanks.) 

HORT 213. Environmental Factors and Horticultural Plants. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 101. (Thompson.) 

HORT 214. Breeding of Horticultural Plants. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1968-69.) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, HORT 109 or permission of instructor. (Angell.) 



University of Maryland • 193 

HORT 301. Special Problems in Horticulture. (1-3) S.C. 

First and second semester. Credit according to time scheduled and organization 
of the course. The course may be organized as a lecture series on a specialized 
advanced topic or may consist of an experimental program other than the stu- 
dent's thesis problem. Maximum credit allowed toward an advanced degree 
shall not exceed 4 hours of experimental work plus any credit obtained in a 
specialized lecture series. 

A) Problems 

B) Physiology and Technology of Pectins 

C) Plants and Light 

D) Influence of Air Pollution on the Physiology of Plants 

HORT 302. Advanced Seminar. (1,1) 

First and second semesters. Three credit hours maximum allowed toward the 
M.S. degree or six credits maximum toward the Ph.D. degree. 

HORT 399. Thesis Advanced Horticultural Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HORT 499. Dissertation Advanced Horticultural Research. (Doctoral Level) 
Experimental Procedures in Agricultural Sciences, see Agriculture. AGRI 210. 
Principles of Food Processing I, see Food Science, FDSC 102. (Wiley.) 

Analytical Quality Control, see Food Science, FDSC 112. (Kramer.) 

Statistical Quality Control, see Food Science, FDSC 113. (Kramer.) 

Horticultural Products Processing, see Food Science, FDSC 156. (Wiley.) 

Advances in Food Technology, see Food Science, FDSC 201. (Kramer.) 

Seminar in Food Science, see Food Science, FDSC 302. (Staff.) 

Colloquium in Food Science, see Food Science, FDSC 310. (Staff.) 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

HORT SI 15. Truck Crop Management. (1) 
Summer session only. 

HORT S124. Tree and Small Fruit Management. (1) 

Summer session only. (Thompson.) 

HORT S125. Ornamental Horticulture. (1) 

Summer session only. (Link.) 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

Professor: Patrick. 
Assistant Professor: Sprague. 
Lecturer: Golding. 

The following courses are available as electives for students working toward 
graduate degrees in various disciplines. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ISM 101. Electronic Data Processing. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing, MATH Oil or the equivalent. The electronic 
digital computer and its use as a tool in processing data. The course includes 
the following areas: (1) Organization of data processing systems, (2) environ- 
mental aspects of computer systems. (3) fundamentals of programming using 
a common problem-oriented language, and (4) management control problems 
and potentials inherent in mechanized data processing systems. 



194 • Graduate School 

ISM 102. Electronic Data Processing Applications. (3) 

Prerequisite, ISM 101 and BSAD 130, or consent of instructor. 

ISM 103. Introduction to Systems Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ISM 102, BSAD 130, MATH 020, or the equivalent. Prerequisites 
may be waived with consent of instructor. 

ISM 110. Information Processing Problems of Models of Administrative, 
Economic and Political Systems. (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 020 or equivalent; ISM 102, BSAD 130. and some famili- 
arity with administrative, economic and/or political models. Prerequisites may 
be waived with the consent of instructor. Data processing requirements under- 
lying the creation and maintenance of a data base to be used in estimating the 
parameters of socio-economic models. An analysis of the structure and devel- 
opment of recent socio-economic models as relevant to data processing consid- 
erations. Extraction and preparation of data from the data base to facilitate 
the appropriate transformation necessary for model construction and also to mini- 
mize the processing cost of data input. The course draws upon a knowledge of 
models of administrative, economic and political systems. Case studies and 
experience with data processing for selected models are included. 

ISM 120. Information Processing and Computational Problems in 
Operations Analysis. (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 020 or equivalent; ISM 102, and a course in Statistics, 
such as BSAD 135, dealing with multivariate models. Prerequisites may be 
waived with the consent of the instructor. Implementation of applications re- 
quiring the integration of data processing and analytical programming tech- 
niques. Such applications feature the calculation of various statistical estimates 
of the parameters in a multivariate model within the context of a file mainte- 
nance problem (e.g., the writing of a matrix inversion routine for revenue fore- 
casting within a master updating program, or sales forecasting and/or sales 
performance evaluation within a sales transaction — master updating program). 
Programming tools include a universal, problem-oriented language such as 
COBOL with strong emphasis on the use of the mathematical FORTRAN IV 
library subroutines. Class projects include case studies and solutions of problems 
using real-world data. 

ISM 167. Operations Research I. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or consent of instructor. The philosophy, methods, and 
objectives of operations research. Basic methods are examined and their ap- 
plication to functional areas of business are covered. 

For Graduates 

ISM 210. Design of Large-Scale Information Processing Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, ISM 103 and 110, or consent of instructor. Characteristics of 
large-scale information processing systems. Relationship of model-building and 
simulation to information processing system design. Design elements and 
phases. Programming techniques for large-scale information processing sys- 
tems, including time sharing and real-time. Special projects include case studies 
and the design of a large-scale information processing system. 

ISM 220. Management of Information Processing Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite, ISM 103 or consent of instructor. Administrative uses and limita- 
tions of high-speed computers in an information processing system. Limitations 
as related to system structure and methods used to originate and process data. 
Planning and installation of a total information processing system including 
conversion problems. Measures of information processing effectiveness. Docu- 



University of Maryland • 195 

mentation procedures. Data security, legal considerations and auditing the 
information processing system. Personnel requirements for an on-going system. 
The broad statement of the system requirements is taken as given. 

ISM 230. Application of Advanced Developments in Information Processing 

Equipment. (3) 

Prerequisite, ISM 210 or consent of instructor. A study and an evaluation of 
the operational and hardware characteristics of the computer and peripheral 
equipment available to meet the specification of the broad classes of informa- 
tion processing systems, including coding systems, error-detecting and soft- 
ware considerations. Data communicating devices, including the functional 
characteristics of longline, telephone channel, transceiver and communication 
satellites. Case studies and examples. 

INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics is a center for 
fundamental theoretical and experimental research in the physical and mathe- 
matical sciences. It plays a vital role in the University program of higher edu- 
cation by providing facilities for predoctoral and postdoctoral study. Further, 
it provides an important link between the University and the broad scientific 
and technological community. 

Investigations in applied mathematics traditionally have centered on partial 
differential equations of mathematical physics, specifically initial value, boundary 
value and eigenvalue problems and their numerical treatment. More recently, 
attention has been drawn to current questions in ordinary differential equations 
such as hereditary dependence and control theory, and to mathematical methods 
in statistical mechanics and theoretical biology. Theoretical studies of gas dy- 
namics and plasma dynamics are carried out in conjunction with laboratory in- 
vestigations employing facilities such as shock tubes and a thermal plasma de- 
vice (Q-machine). Applications to astrophysics, e.g., the elemental abundance 
problem, to nonlinear mechanics and to space physics engage the attention of 
the staff. The meteorological program is closely associated with studies in fluid 
dynamics. Model experiments in rotating tanks have been used to simulate at- 
mospheric conditions. Interaction of atmosphere and oceans are under investi- 
gation. Research on the atmospheric boundary layer, including turbulence, 
diffusion and micro-meteorological analysis is underway. This ties in with prob- 
lems of atmospheric pollution and local climatic changes. This program offers 
a whole range of graduate courses leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. The 
Institute's research program is partially supported by outside contracts and 
grants. 

Staff members are available for thesis direction of graduate students pursuing 
advanced degrees in various departments of the University. Approximately 
145 master's and Ph.D. degrees were earned during the period 1951-68 in the 
departments of Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy. Mechanical Engineering 
and Aerospace Engineering under the direction of Institute faculty. In addition, 
staff members have taught many graduate and undergraduate courses in other 
departments of the University. Fellowships and research graduate assistantships 
are available to support the studies of qualified graduate students, and the 
Institute offers its facilities and financial support both to post-doctoral fellows 
and senior scholars on leave from other institutions. 



196 • Graduate School 

Institute staff members work closely with faculty and staff of other University 
departments on problems of mutual interest, and with scientists at many govern- 
mental and educational institutions in the Washington-Baltimore area. 

INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

Professors: Benedict, Benesch, Vanderslice, and Zwanzig.* 
Associate Professors: De Rocco, Krisher, Munn, and Sengers. 
Assistant Professors: Ginter, Spain, and Verbeke. 

The Institute for Molecular Physics comprises a faculty interested in theoreti- 
cal and experimental studies in the general area of molecular interactions. The 
Institute thus serves as an ideal place to bring together physicists and chemists 
to work on problems of mutual interest to the advantage of both, and the 
faculty is made up of members from each of these disciplines. Members of the 
Institute teach both undergraduate and graduate courses in both the Department 
of Chemistry and the Department of Physics and Astronomy and supervise 
thesis research of graduate students in these departments. The department also 
participates in the graduate degree program in chemical physics which is jointb- 
administered by the Institute, the Department of Chemistry, and the Depart- 
ment of Physics and Astronomy and is described below. 

CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

This program is open to graduate students in the Departments of Chemistry 
or Physics and Astronomy and offers a course of study leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Entering students are expected 
to have an undergraduate degree in either chemistry or physics with a strong 
background in the other discipline. However, a mathematics or engineering 
major may also be eligible. 

The following courses must be included in the major: PHYS 212 (4 credits); 
CHEM 323 (3) or PHYS 201 (3); CHEM 307 (3) or PHYS 208 (3); PITT'S 
213 (4) or CHEM 321 (3). Major electives may be from the following: CHEM 
299 (3); CHEM 313 (3); PHYS 126 (3); PHYS 216 (2); PHYS 217 (2); 
MATH 110 (4); MATH 111 (4); MATH 114 (3). Courses to satisfy the 
minor may be chosen from chemistry, physics, or mathematics. Research prob- 
lems in Chemical Physics may be supervised by the faculty in the Department 
of Chemistry, the Department of Physics and Astronomy or the Institute for 
Molecular Physics. The program is supervised by a committee from the above 
units. 

Detailed information on this program can be obtained by writing the Chair- 
man of the Chemical Physics Program, Institute for Molecular Physics. 

* Joint appointment with the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics. 



University of Maryland • 197 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Professors: Wasserman, Bundy, Heilprin, and Kidd. 

Associate Professors: Liesener, McGrath, and Olson. 

Assistant Professor: Colson, and Warner. 

Lecturers: Hodina, Mann, Moses, Reid, and Thomas. 

Visiting Lecturers: Foskett, and Levy. 

Adjunct Lecturers: Andriot, Applebaum, Bougas, Dubester, Kurt, Lahood. 

Lancaster, Lebowitz, Martin, Meadow, and Walston. 
Instructors: MacLeod, and Sloan. 

OBJECTIVES 

The curriculum deals with those areas of knowledge basic to the professional 
practice of library and information activity. The program is designed to prepare 
librarians and information specialists for beginning professional work in each of 
the specialties. This sequence of study includes a core of required courses for 
all students, numbering twenty-four semester hours, to which are added twelve 
hours of specialized and elective courses, leading to the M.L.S. degree. Courses 
in the School are open to qualified graduate students in other disciplines with 
the consent of the instructor. 

For Graduates 

Required Core Courses 

LBSC 200. Introduction to Data Processing for Libraries. (3) 
systems analysis in relation to library functions and procedures. 

(Lamkin. Walston.) 

LBSC 202. Introduction to Reference and Bibliography. (3) 

A systematic approach to bibliographic control of recorded knowledge and 
the methods of securing information from various types of sources. 

(McGrath.) 

LBSC 204. Communication and Libraries. (3) 

Communication processes are treated and the library's role as part of the larger 
social context is explored. (Kidd.) 

LBSC 206. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, I. (3) 

Introduction to basic principles of subject cataloging, alphabetical and systematic. 

(Foskett. Levy.) 

LBSC 207. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, II. (3) 

Introduction to basic principles of author/title and descriptive cataloging and 
to problems of implementation and logistics. (Kuri, Lebowitz.) 

LBSC 209. History of Libr,\ries and Their Materials. (3) 

The development of publication forms and institutions set against the historical 
framework and the cultural forces within which such advances were made. 

(Colson. Sloan.) 

LBSC 211. Library Administration. (3) 

An introduction to administrative theory and principles and their implications 
and applications to managerial activity in libraries. (Bundy, Wasserman.) 

LBSC 213. Literature and Research in the Sciences. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction of 
research in the principal scientific disciplines. (Hodina.) 

OR 



198 • Graduate School 

LBSC 215. Literature and Research in the Social Sciences. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction 
of research in the principal fields of the social sciences. (Warner.) 

OR 

LBSC 217. Literature and Research in the Humanities. (3) 

Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends in the direction 
of research in the principal humanistic disciplines. (McGrath.) 

Electives 

LBSC 220. Public Library in the Political Process. (3) 

Seminar in the principal influences which affect the patterns of organization, 
support and service patterns of public libraries based upon theoretical and 
case studies. (Bundy, Olson.) 

LBSC 222. Children's Literature and Materials. (3) 

A survey of literature and other media of communication and the criteria in 
evaluating such materials as they relate to the needs, interests and capability of 
the child. (MacLeod.) 

LBSC 224. Construction and Maintenance of Index Languages. (3) 

This course treats the making of classification schedules, subject heading lists 
and thesauri and those considerations relating to the revision and extension of 
existing ones. (Foskett.) 

LBSC 225. Advanced Data Processing in Libraries. (3) 

Analysis of retrieval systems and intensive study of machine applications in the 
acquisition, analysis, coding, retrieval and display of information. (Meadow.) 

LBSC 227. Seminar in Documentation and Information Systems and Their 
Testing and Evaluation. (3) 
A survey of recent developments in the processing, arrangement, and retrieval 
of information, and in the procedures used in their evaluation. (Lancaster.) 

LBSC 228. Analytical Bibliography and Descriptive Cataloging. (3) 

Concentrates on the techniques and theories appropriate to the study of bib- 
liographic morphology and bibliographical description. (McGrath.) 

LBSC 231. Research Methods in Library AND Information Activity. (3) 

The techniques and strategies of research and their implications for the defini- 
tion, investigation and evaluation of library problems. (Bundy.) 

LBSC 233. Governmental Information Systems. (3) 

Analysis of the organization of the information structure and the publication 
and dissemination programs of the U.S. federal, state and municipal govern- 
ments. (Andriot, Warner.) 

LBSC 235. Problems of Special Materials. (3) 

Discusses advanced principles and practices for all technical services (in par- 
ticular cataloging) applicable to maps, serials, music, audio-visual items, etc. 

(Staff.) 

LBSC 244. Medical Literature. (3) 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in medicine, with emphasis upon 
the bibliographic organization of the field. (Martin.) 

LBSC 245. Legal Literature. (3) 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in law, with emphasis upon the 
bibliographic organization of the field. (Bougas.) 



University of Maryland • 199 

LBSC 249. Seminar in Technical Services. (3) 

Treatment of special administrative problems related to acquisition, cata- 
loging and classification, circulation, and managerial controls. (Applebaum.) 

LBSC 251. Introduction to Reprography. (3) 

A survey of the processes and technology through which materials are made 
available in furthering library and information services, ranging from photog- 
raphy to microforms. (Lattood.) 

LBSC 253. Seminar in the Academic Library. (3) 

A seminar on the academic library within the framework of higher education, 
treating problems of programs, collections, support, planning and physical plant. 

(Colson, Warner.) 

LBSC 255. Seminar on Manuscript Collections. (3) 

Analysis of the methods and philosophy of handling special papers and docu- 
mentary material in a research library. (Colson.) 

LBSC 258. Seminar in Information Retrieval. (3) 

(Also offered as Computer Science 258) (Heilprin.) 

LBSC 259. Business Information Services. (3) 

Survey and analysis of information sources in business, finance, and economics 
with emphasis upon their use in problem solving. (Staff.) 

LBSC 261. Seminar in the Special Library and Information Center. (3) 

A seminar on the development, the uses, the objectives, the philosophy and 
the particular systems employed in special library service. (Thomas.) 

LBSC 263. Literature of the Fine Arts. (3) 

Consideration and evaluation of the resources of the fine arts, emphasizing 
bibliography and services contained in fine arts libraries. (Staff.) 

LBSC 264. Seminar in the School Library. (3) 

Special problems in the organization and programs unique to the library of 
the modern school. (Liesener.) 

LBSC 265. Information Systems Design. (3) 

A workshop oriented seminar designed to cover problems of implementation and 
management of various types of conventional and advanced information hand- 
ling systems. (Heilprin.) 

LBSC 269. Library Systems. (3) 

Evolution and current patterns of regional library development, considering 
the economic, legal, service and management problems associated with library 
systems as well as the signficance of state and federal programs and national 
information networks. (Kidd.) 

LBSC 270. Library Service to the Disadvantaged. (3) 

Approaches, adaptations and potentials of the public library in relation to the 
problem of poverty. Includes field experience in the School's Laboratory Li- 
brary. (Moses, Reid.) 

LBSC 271. Advanced Reference Services. (3) 

Theoretical and administrative considerations, analysis of research problems, and 
directed activity in bibliographic method and search techniques in large col- 
lections. (Dubester.) 

LBSC 273. Resources of American Libraries. (3) 

Considers distribution and extent of library resources, means of surveying col- 
lections, mechanisms of inter-institutional cooperation in building collections, 
and means of developing research collections in special subject fields. (Colson.) 



200 • Graduate School 

LBSC 275. Storytelling Materials and Techniques. (3) 

Literary sources are studied and instruction and practice in oral techniques are 
offered' (MacLeod.) 

LBSC 277. International and Comparative Librarianship. (3) 

Comparative analysis of the organization and development of libraries and 
their programs in different nations and cultures. (Staff.) 

LBSC 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to permit intensive individual 
study, reading or research in an area of specialized interest under faculty 
supervision. (Staff.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors: Auslander, Brace, Chu, Cohen, Douglis, Edmundson,** Gold- 
berg, Goldhaber, Good, Greenberg, Horvath, Hubb.\rd,* Hummel, 
Jackson, Jones,* Karp, Kleppner, Kuroda, J. Lehner, Martin,* Pearl, 
Reinhart, Rheinboldt,** Rosenfeld,** Stellmacher, Syski, Walsh, 
Zedek, and Zwanzig.* 

Associate Professors: Benedetto, Bernstein, Cook, Correl, Daniel, Ehr- 
lich, Gray, Gulick, Henkelman,*** Karlovitz,* Kellogg,* Kirwan, 
G. Lehner, Lopez-Escobar, Maltese, Mikulski, Ortega,* Sather, 
Strauss, and Trytten.* 

Assistant Professors: Austing,** Berg, Connell, Currier, Dancis, David- 
son,*** Egan, Ellis, Garstens,*** Gowen, Green, Helzer, Holzsager, 
Johnson, Lay, Markley, Neri, Osborn, Owings, Rastogi, Schneider, 
Sedgewick, Shepherd, Thaler, Timsans, Vandergraft,** Wagner, War- 
ner, Wolfe, and Yorke.* 

Persons interested in graduate study in mathematics should obtain from the 
Graduate Committee of the Department of Mathematics a booklet entitled 
"Departmental Policies Concerning Graduate Students," which contains de- 
tailed information concerning admission to graduate study, the requirements 
for the master's and doctor's degrees, the written examination, graduate student 
support, and other matters. 

A student majoring in a subject other than mathematics who intends to pre- 
sent a minor in mathematics should obtain approval of his minor program from 
the Adviser on Minors at an early stage of his work. The name of the current 
adviser may be obtained from the Graduate Committee Office. 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets frequently throughout the 
academic year for reports on current research by the resident staff, visiting lec- 
turers, and graduate students. In addition, the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics Colloquium meets at frequent intervals for reports on 
research in those fields. All colloquium meetings are open to the public. Sev- 
eral seminars meet regularly for the discussion of current developments in 
special fields. Graduate students are invited to participate. 

OFF-CAMPUS COURSES — If a graduate student in mathematics wishes 
to have a course which is offered by University College count toward a degree, 

■' Member of Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

** Member of Computer Science Center 

*** Joint Appointment — Department of Secondary Education 



University of Maryland • 201 

he must have prior approval from the Department of Mathematics' adviser on 
campus at College Park. 

COURSES 

Courses numbered 100-199 are open to graduate and properly qualified under- 
graduate students. Courses numbered 200 and above are open only to graduate 
students. 

COURSES IN ALGEBRA: 

100, 101, 103, 104, 106, 107, 200, 201, 202, 203, 206, 207, 208, 209, 227, 228, 
271. 

COURSES IN ANALYSIS: 

110. 112, 113, 114, 117, 118. 119, 165, 212, 215. 216, 218, 219, 265, 266, 272, 
278, 280, 281, 282, 283, 286, 287. 288. 289, 294. 295. 

COURSES IN GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY: 

120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 126, 128, 204, 205, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 
228, 229, 273, 290, 291, 296. 

COURSES IN APPLIED AND NUMERICAL MATHEMATICS: 

101, 114, 162, 163, 164, 165, 168, 170, 171, 215, 216, 250, 251, 252, 255. 256, 
259, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 274, 282, 283, 294, 295. 

COURSES IN PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS: 

Stat 100, 101, 110, 111, 120, 121, 150,164,170,200,201,210,212,213,220, 
221, 222, 223, 240, 241, 250. 
Math 275, 276. 

COURSES IN LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS: 

144, 146, 147, 148, 240, 244, 277. 

COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE: 

181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 189. 

SEMINARS AND RESEARCH: 

190, 191, 298, 399, 499. 

MATH 100. Vectors and Matrices. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or MATH 015. Algebra of vector spaces and matrices. 
Recommended for students interested in the applications of mathematics. Grad- 
uate students majoring in Mathematics cannot take this course for credit. 

(Good.) 

MATH 101. Applied Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 100 or consent of the instructor. Various applications of 
linear algebra: theory of finite games, linear programming, matrix methods as 
applied to finite Markov chains, random walk, incidence matrices, graphs and 
directed graphs, networks, transportation problems. (Pearl.) 

MATH 103. Introduction to Abstract Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. Integers, groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields. (Staff.) 

MATH 104. Introduction to Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 103 or consent of instructor. An abstract treatment of 
finite-dimensional vector spaces. Linear transformations and their invariants. 

(Staff.) 

MATH 106. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022. Rational integers, divisibility, prime numbers, mod- 
ules and linear forms, unique factorization theorem, Euler's function, Mobius' 



202 • Graduate School 

function, cyclotomic polynomial, congruences and quadratic residues, Legendre's 
and Jacobi's symbol, reciprocity law of quadratic residues, introductory ex- 
planation of the method of algebraic number theory. (Kuroda.) 

MATH 107. Theory of Quadratic Number Fields. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 106 and MATH 103. Quadratic number fields, integers, 
ideals, units, ideal class groups, unimodular transformations and algorithms of 
the determination of ideal class groups and fundamental units, class number 
formula. Gauss' theory of genera and Kronecker's symbol. (Kuroda.) 

MATH 110. Advanced Calculus. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022. Real number system, open sets and compact sets on 
the real line, limits and continuity of real valued functions of one real variable, 
differentiation, functions of bounded variation, Riemann-Stieltjes integration, 
sequences and series of functions. (Staff.) 

MATH 112. Infinite Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or equivalent. Construction of the real numbers from 
the rational numbers, sequences of numbers, series of positive and arbitrary 
numbers, infinite products, conditional and absolute convergence, sequences 
and series of functions, uniform convergence, integration and differentiation of 
series, power series and analytic functions, Fourier series, elements of the 
theory of divergent series, extension of the theory to complex numbers and 
functions. (Staff.) 

MATH 113. Introduction TO Complex Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 119. The algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions 
mapping properties of the elementary functions. Cauchy's theorem and the 
Cauchy integral formula. Residues. (Credit will be given for only one of 
the courses MATH 113 and MATH 163.) (Berg.) 

MATH 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110. A general introduction to the theory of differential 
equations. Constructive methods of solution leading to existence theorems and 
uniqueness theorems. Other topics such as: systems of linear equations, the 
behavior of solutions in the large, the behavior of solutions near singularities, 
periodic solutions, stability and Sturm-Liouville problems. (Staff.) 

MATH 117. Introduction to Fourier Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 113. Fourier series. Fourier and Laplace transforms. 

(Horvath.) 

MATH 118. Introduction to Real Varubles. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110. The Lebesgue integral. Fubini's theorem. Converg- 
ence theorems. The Lp spaces. (Staff.) 

MATH 119. Several Real Variables. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110. A brief review of scalar and vector-valued functions 
of several real variables (as done in MATH 022). Implicit function theorem, 
change of variables theorem for multiple integrals, a detailed study of surfaces 
and surface integrals in n-dimensional Euclidean space, including integration 
by parts. Applications to partial differential equations and potential theory. 

(Staff.) 

MATH 120. Introduction to Geometry I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or consent of instructor. Axiomatic development of 
plane geometries, Euclidean and non-Euclidean. Groups of isometries and 
similarities. (Staff.) 

MATH 121. Introduction to Geometry II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 120. Non-Euclidean transformation groups, the Erlangen 
program, projective planes, cubics and quartics. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 203 

MATH 122. Introduction to Point Set Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 or 146, or equivalent. Connectedness, compactness, 
transformations, homeomorphisms; application of these concepts to various 
spaces, with particular attention to the Euclidean plane. (Dancis, Reinhart.) 

MATH 123. Introduction to Algebraic Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 122 and 103, or equivalent. Chains, cycles, homology 
groups for surfaces, the fundamental group. (Reinhart.) 

MATH 124. Introduction to Projective Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the 
College of Education. Elementary projective geometry, combining synthetic 
algebraic approaches, projective transformations, harmonic division, cross ratio, 
projective coordinates, properties of conies. (Jackson.) 

MATH 126. Introduction to Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. The differential geometry of curves 
and surfaces, curvature and torsion, moving frames, the fundamental differ- 
ential forms, intrinsic geometry of a surface. (Correl.) 

MATH 128. Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Recommended for students 
in the College of Education. Axiomatic method, models, properties of axioms; 
proofs of some basic theorems from the axioms; modern geometry of the tri- 
angle, circle, and sphere. (Staff.) 

MATH 144. Recursive Function Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. An informal development 
of propositional and predicate logic leading to a discussion of recursive 
functions, Turing machines, and finite automata. Topics include word problems, 
the classification of recursively enumerable sets, recursive reducibility. 

(Owings.) 

MATH 146. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Sets, relations, mappings. 
Construction of the real number system starting with Peano postulates; alge- 
braic structures associated with the construction; Archimedean order, sequential 
completeness and equivalent properties of ordered fields. Finite and infinite 
sets, denumerable and non-denumerable sets. (Cohen, Ehrlich.) 

MATH 147. Axiomatic Set Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 103 or 146 or consent of instructor. Development of a 
system of axiomatic set theory, choice principles, induction principles, ordinal 
arithmetic including discussion of cancellation laws, divisibility, canonical ex- 
pansions, cardinal arithmetic including connections with the axiom of choice, 
Hartog's Theorem, Konig's Theorem, properties of regular, singular, and in- 
accessible cardinals. (Karp.) 

MATH 148. Introduction to Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 103 or 146 or 110. Formal propositional logic, complete- 
ness, independence, decidability of the system, formal quantificational logic, 
first-order axiomatic theories, extended Godel Completeness Theorem, Low- 
enheim-SkoIem Theorem, model-theoretical applications. 

(Karp, Lopez-Escobar.) 

MATH 162. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Not open to students with 
credit for MATH 022. Calculus of functions of several real variables; limits, 
continuity, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, 



204 • Graduate School 

vector-valued functions, theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes, physical ap- 
plications. (This course cannot be counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

(Martin.) 

MATH 163. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 162 or 022 or consent of instructor. Not open to students 
with credit for MATH 113. The complex field. Infinite processes for real and 
complex numbers. Calculus of complex functions. Analytic functions and 
analytic continuation. Theory of residues and application to evaluation of in- 
tegrals. Conformal mapping. (This course cannot be counted toward a major 
in mathematics.) (Sedgewick.) 

MATH. 164. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers III. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 066 and MATH 163, or consent of instructor. Fourier and 
Laplace transforms. Evaluation of the complex inversion integral by the 
theory of residues. Applications to systems of ordinary and partial differential 
equations. (This course cannot be counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

(Berg.) 

MATH 165. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 or MATH 162. Topics will include one dimensional 
wave equation; linear second order equations in two variables; separation of 
variables and Fourier series; Sturm-Liouville Theory. (Staff.) 

MATH 168. Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or 162 and MATH 066. Interpolation, numerical 
differentiation and integration, numerical solution of polynomial and Iran 
scendental equations, least squares, systems of linear equations, numerical 
solution of ordinary differential equations, errors in numerical calculations. 
(This course cannot be counted toward a major in mathematics.) (Austing.) 

MATH 170. Numerical Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 (or concurrent registration). A thorough treatment 
of solutions of equations, interpolation and approximation, numerical differ- 
entiation and integration, numerical solution of initial value problems in the 
solutions of ordinary differential equations. (Vandergraft.) 

MATH 171. Numerical Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 100 or 104 and MATH 110 (or concurrent registration). 
The solution of linear systems by direct and iterative methods, matrix inver- 
sion, the evaluation of determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. 
Application to boundary value problems in ordinary differential equations. 
Introduction to the numerical solution of partial differential equations. 

(Vandergraft.) 

MATH 181. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. Axiomatic developments of the real numbers. Elementary 
number theory. (Staff.) 

MATH 182. Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. Modern ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. 

(Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 205 

MATH 183. Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

(Staff.) 

MATH 184. Introduction to Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed 
primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the limit concept and the calculus. (Previous knowledge 
of calculus is not required). (Staff.) 

MATH 185. Selected Topics FOR Teachers OF Mathematics. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

MATH 189. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers 
OF Science and Mathematics Seminar. (1-3) 
Lectures and discussion to deepen the student's appreciation of mathematics 
as a logical discipline and as a medium of expression. Special emphasis on 
topics relevant to current mathematical curriculum studies and revisions. 

(Staff.) 
MATH 190. Honors Seminar. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of the departmental Honors Committee. Reports by 
students on mathematical literature; solution of various problems. (Staff.) 

MATH 191. Selected Topics in Mathematics. (Variable credit) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Topics of special interest to ad- 
vanced undergraduate students will be offered occasionally under the general 
guidance of the departmental Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Honors 
students register for reading courses under this number. (Staff.) 

STAT 100. Applied Probability and Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021. Basic concepts of probability. Random variables 
and distribution functions, standard distributions, moments. Conditional distri- 
butions and their moments. Sampling distributions. Laws of large numbers and 
Lindeberg-Levy's theorems. Graduate students majoring in mathematics can- 
not take this course for credit. (Connell.) 

STAT 101. Applied Probability and Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 100. Point estimation, sufficient unbiased and consistent 
estimators. Minimum variance and maximum likelihood estimators. Multi- 
variate normal distribution. Sampling distributions. Interval estimation. Test- 
ing hypotheses. Regression and linear hypotheses. Experimental designs. Se- 
quential tests, elements of nonparametric methods. Graduate students majoring 
in mathematics cannot take this course for credit. (Rastogi.) 

STAT 1 1 0. Introduction to Probability Theory. ( 3 ) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 or STAT 050, with concurrent MATH 110. Proba- 
bility space and basic properties of probability measure. Random variables 
and their distribution functions, induced probability spaces. Multi-dimensional 
distribution functions. Characteristic functions. Limit theorems. (Daniel.) 

STAT 111. Introduction to Stochastic Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110, or MATH 110 and STAT 050. Elementary stochastic 
processes. Renewal process random walks, branching process, discrete Markov 



206 • Graduate School 

chains, first passage times. Markov chains with a continuous parameter, birth 
and death processes. Stationary processes and their spectral properties. 

(Edmundson.) 
STAT 120. Introduction to Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110, or STAT 100 and MATH 110. Short review of proba- 
bility concepts including sampling distributions. Interval estimation. Theory 
of order statistics. Tolerance limits. Limit distributions and stochastic con- 
vergence. Sufficient statistics. Completeness and stochastic independence. Rao- 
Blackwell Theorem. (Mikulski.) 

STAT 121. Introduction to Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 120, or STAT 101 and MATH 110. Loss and risk func- 
tions. Statistical decisions. Optimality criteria. Uniformly minimum risk pro- 
cedures. Bayesian risk, minimax principle. Point estimation theory. Statistical 
hypotheses and optimal tests. Likelihood ratio tests. Elements of linear hypoth- 
eses, analysis of variance and sequential theory. (Mikulski.) 

STAT 150. Regression and Variance Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 101 or STAT 120. One, two, three, and four way layouts 
in analysis of variance fixed effects models, linear regression in several variables, 
Gauss-Markov Theorem, multiple regression analysis, experimental designs. 

(Rastogi.) 

STAT 164. Introduction to Biostatistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, one semester of calculus and junior standing. Probabilistic models. 
Sampling. Some applications of probability in genetics. Experimental de- 
signs. Estimation of effects of treatment. Comparative experiments. Fisher- 
Irwin test. Wilcoxon tests for paired comparisons. (This course cannot be 
counted toward a major in mathematics.) (Rastogi.) 

STAT 170. Linear and Nonlinear Programming. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or MATH 100. Duality theorem and minimax theorem 
for finite matrix games. Structure of linear and nonlinear solutions with per- 
turbations. Various solution techniques of linear, quadratic, and convex pro- 
gramming methods. Special integer programming models (transportation and 
traveling salesman problems). Network theory with max-flow-min-cut theorem. 

(Daniel.) 

MATH 200. Abstract Algebra I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 104 or equivalent. Groups with operators, homomorphism 
and isomorphism theorems, normal series, Sylow theorems, free groups, Abelian 
groups, rings, integral domains, fields, modules. If time permits, Horn (A,B), 
tensor products, exterior algebra. (Goldhaber, Pearl.) 

MATH 201. Abstract Algebra II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 200 or consent of instructor. Field theory, Galois theory, 
Multilinear algebra. Further topics from: Dedekind domains, Noetherian do- 
mains, rings with minimum condition, homological algebra. (Markley.) 

MATH 202. Homological Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 200. Projective and injective modules, homological di- 
mensions, derived functors, spectral sequence of a composite functor. Applica- 
tions. (Helzer.) 

MATH 203. Commutative Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 200. Ideal theory of Noetherian rings, valuations, locali- 
zations, complete local rings, Dedekind domains. (Wagner.) 

MATH 204, 205. Topological Groups. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286, and MATH 289 or MATH 225, or consent of in- 
structor. General nature of topological groups including homomorphism theo- 



University of Maryland • 207 

rems, Haar measure, representations of compact groups and the Peter-Weyl 
Theorem, Pontrjagin duality and the Plancherel Theorem. (Kleppner.) 

MATH 206. Algebraic Number Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286, and MATH 289 or MATH 225. or consent of in- 
braic numbers and algebraic integers, algebraic number fields of finite degree, 
ideals and units, fundamental theorem of algebraic number theory, theory of 
residue classes. Minkowski's theorem on linear forms, class numbers, Dirichlet's 
theorem on units, relative algebraic number fields, decomposition group, inertia 
group and ramification group of prime ideal with respect to a relatively Galois 
extension. (Kuroda.) 

MATH 207. Algebraic Number Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 206. MATH 200 or equivalent. Valuation of a field, alge- 
braic function fields, completion of a valuation field, ramification exponent 
and residue class degree, ramification theory, elements, differents, discriminants, 
product formula and characterization of fields by the formula. Gauss sum. class 
number formula of cyclotomic fields. (Kuroda.) 

MATH 208. Ring Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of 
the class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following: ideal theory, 
structure theory of rings with or without minimum condition, division rings, 
algebras, non-associative rings. (Wagner.) 

MATH 209. Group Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of the 
class, emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following aspects of discrete 
group theory: finite groups, abelian groups, free groups, solvable or nilpotent 
groups, groups with operators, groups with local properties, groups with clan 
conditions, extensions. (Egan.) 

MATH 212. Special Functions. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 287 or consent of instructor. Gamma-function. Riemann 
zeta-function, hypergeometric functions, confluent hypergeometric functions and 
Bessel functions. (Stellmacher.) 

MATH 215, 216. Advanced Ordinary Differential Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286 and either MATH 100 or MATH 104. Existence and 
uniqueness theorems for systems of differential equations, linear theory, prop- 
erties of solutions of differential equations including stability, asymptotic be- 
havior, oscillation and comparison theorems. Plane autonomous systems. Non- 
linear systems. Topics of current interest. (Strauss, Wolfe.) 

MATH 218, 219. Functional Analysis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286, 287. Normed linear spaces including Banach and 
Hilbert spaces, linear operators and their spectral analysis, with application to 
differential and integral equations. (Goldberg, Lay.) 

MATH 221. Differentiable Manifolds. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Differentiable manifolds, embeddings in 
Euclidean space, vector and tensor bundles, vector fields, differentiable fields. 
Riemann metrics. (Chu, Reinhart.) 

MATH 222. Differential Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 220 — Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces (previ- 
ously offered) or MATH 221. Connections, curvature, torsion: symplectic con- 
tact, and complex structures. (Chu, Reinhart.) 



208 • Graduate School 

MATH 223, 224. Algebraic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 226 or both MATH 200 and MATH 225. First semester: 
Singular homology, uniqueness theorems, tensor products and homomorphisms, 
the functors ext and tor, universal coefficient theorems, Kiinneth and Eilenberg- 
Zilber theorems, products and duality. Second semester: Higher homotopy 
groups, CW complexes, obstruction theory, Eilenberg-MacLane spaces, the 
Serre spectral sequences. (Holzsager.) 

MATH 225. Topology I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Topological spaces, continuous maps, homeomorph- 
isms. Product and quotient spaces. Existence of real-valued functions. Metric 
and metrizable spaces. (Ellis, Reinhart.) 

MATH 226. Topology II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 225, some familiarity with abstract algebra. Spaces of 
mappings, fundamental group, covering spaces. Finite simplicial complexes and 
simplicial mappings. Simplicial homology theory. Fixed point theorems. (Green.) 

MATH 227, 228. Algebraic Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Prime and primary ideals in Noetherian 
rings, Hilbert Nullstellensatz, places and valuations, fields of definitions, Chow 
points, birational correspondences, Abelian varieties, Picard varieties, algebraic 
groups. (Thaler.) 

MATH 229. Differential Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 221. Characteristic classes, cobordism, differential struc- 
tures on cells and spheres. (Reinhart.) 

MATH 240. Consistency Proofs in Set Theory. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 147 and 148. Consistency and independence of such funda- 
mental principles of set theory as the laws of choice, of cardinal arithmetic of 
constructibility and regularity. Godel's model of constructibie sets, inner models, 
Cohen's generic models. (Karp.) 

MATH 244. Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 148. Completeness of first-order predicate logic and applica- 
tions, recursive functions, Godel's incompleteness theorem. (Lopez-Escobar.) 

MATH 250. Eigenvalue and Boundary Value Problems I. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 104 and 110. Linear analysis and applications to modern 
applied mathematics. The central theme of the course will be the theory of 
compact operators on Hilbert space and its application to integral equations 
and eigenvalue and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations. 

(Kellogg, Wolfe.) 

MATH 251. Eigenvalue and Boundary Value Problems II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 250. Asymptotic behavior of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions 
for second-order ordinary and partial differential equations. Variational formu- 
lation of boundary value problems. Upper and lower bounds for eigenvalues. 
Isoperimetric inequalities. (Kellogg, Wolfe.) 

MATH 252. Variational Methods. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The Euler-Lagrange equation, minimal 
principles in mathematical physics, estimation of capacity, torsional rigidity 
and other physical quantities; symmetrization, isoperimetric inequalities, estima- 
tion of eigenvalues, the minimax principle. (Trytten.) 

MATH 255. Numerical Methods in Ordinary Differential Equations. (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 104 and 114. Discrete variable methods for solving initial 



University of Maryland • 209 

value and boundary value problems in ordinary differential equations. Stability 
Theory. (Karlovitz.) 

MATH 256. Numerical Methods in Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 104 and 265. Approximation methods for boundary value, 
initial value, and eigenvalue problems in partial differential equations, including 
finite differences and methods involving approximating functions. (Hubbard.) 

MATH 259. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Solid and fluid continua, general analysis 
of stress and strain, equilibrium of elastic bodies, equation of motion for fluid 
bodies, stress-strain relations, equations of perfect fluids and formulation of 
viscous flow problems. (Staff.) 

MATH 261, 262. Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A mathematical formulation and treatment 
of problems arising in the theory of incompressible, compressible and viscous 
fluids. (Staff.) 

MATH 263. Linear Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 259. Linear elastic behavior of solid continuous media. 
Topics covered include torsion and flexure of beams, plane strain and plane 
stress, vibration and buckling problems, variational principles. Emphasis is 
placed on formulation and technique rather than on specific examples. (Staff.) 

MATH 264. Non-Linear Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 259. Fundamentals of non-linear elasticity, finite deforma- 
tions, rubber elasticity, small deformations superimposed on finite deformations. 

(Staff.) 

MATH 265. Partial Differential Equations L (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 119 or consent of instructor. Gauss and Green formulas, 
the Cauchy problem for the wave equation, method of descent and Huygens 
principle. The Dirichlet and Neumann problem for the Laplace equation, sin- 
gle and double layer potentials, Green functions, the method of integral equa- 
tions. (Osborn.) 

MATH 266. Partial Differential Equations IL (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 265. Introduction to modern theories in partial differ- 
ential equations. Topics include: existence and uniqueness questions, concepts 
of weak and strong solutions, applications of functional analysis. (Douglis.) 

MATH 267. Advanced Linear Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 104 and 250. Numerical methods for solving linear sys- 
tems with an emphasis on error analysis, iterative methods for large systems. 
The numerical solution of the algebraic eigenvalue problem. (Rheinboldt.) 

MATH 268. Advanced Nonlinear Numerical Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286 and 250. Iterative solution of nonlinear operation 
equations, in particular, nonlinear systems. Existence questions. Minimization 
methods and applications to approximation problems. (Rheinboldt.) 

MATH 269. Advanced Mathematical Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites, STAT 111 and STAT 170 or consent of instructor. Non-linear 
programming methods. Dynamic programming problems as they arise in 
Markov Chain Optimizations, Sequential Analysis, Search Models, and Inven- 
tory Theory. Recent concepts and methods in discrete optimization problems. 

(Daniel.) 
MATH 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 



210 • Graduate School 

MATH 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 275. Selected Topics in Probability. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 276. Selected Topics in Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 277. Selected Topics in Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 278. Advanced Topics in Complex Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests and back- 
ground of the students. (Staff.) 

MATH 280, 281. Linear Spaces. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 218. Linear topological spaces, locally convex spaces, 
duality theory, distributions. (Brace, Ellis^.) 

MATH 282, 283. Interpolation and Approximation. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286, 287 or consent of instructor. First semester: Pos- 
sibility of approximation by polynomials in the complex domain. Lemniscates. 
Interpolation by polynomials. Maximal convergence. Uniform distribution of 
points. Interpolation and approximation by rational functions. Rational func- 
tions with some free poles. 

Second semester: Interpolation of real functions and remainder theory. Uni- 
form and least square approximations. Chebyshev oscillation theorems. Ortho- 
gonal polynomials. Degree of approximation. Abstract formulation of ap- 
proximation theory. Constructive function theory. (Walsh, Zedek.) 

MATH 286. Real Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 or equivalent. Lebesgue measure and integration on 
the line. Differentiation, absolute continuity, Lp spaces, Fubini's theorem. If 
time permits, some applications to Fourier series and transforms. (Cook.) 

MATH 287. Complex Analysis I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110 or equivalent. Linear transformations, analytic 
functions, conformal mappings, Cauchy's theorem and applications, power series, 
partial fractions and factorization, elementary Riemann surfaces, Riemann's 
mapping theorem. (Timsans.) 

MATH 288. Complex Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 286, 287. Topics in conformal mappings, normal families, 
Picard's theorem, classes of univalent functions, extremal properties, variational 
methods, elliptic functions, Riemann surfaces. (Kirwan.) 

MATH 289. Real Analysis II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 286. Set functions and integration in general measure 



University of Maryland • 211 

spaces, Lebesgue spaces, representation of bounded linear functional on Lp, 
spaces of measures, Radon-Nikodym theorem, product measure spaces (Fubini 
and Tonelli theorems), differentiation of set functions, Riesz representation 
theorem. Selected topics, e.g., harmonic analysis, vector-valued measure, prod- 
uct measure of infinitely many measure spaces. (Gowen.) 

MATH 290, 291. Lie Groups. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 022, 103, 104. and 122, their equivalents or consent of 
instructor. Some of the following topics will be emphasized: groups of matrices, 
solvable Lie groups, compact Lie groups, classification of semi-simple Lie groups, 
representation theory, homogeneous spaces. (Chu.) 

MATH 294, 295. Advanced Classical Analysis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 113. A basic course in those parts of analysis essential 

for applied mathematics. Topics covered: Fourier series and integrals, integral 

transforms, asymptotic series, special functions. (Wolfe.) 

MATH 296. Point Set Topology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 225. Characterization of paths, arcs, and the Cantor set. 
Polyhedral Jordan curve and Schoenfliess theorems. Retracts and neighborhood 
retracts. Fixed point theorems. Dimension theory. General position theorems 
for mappings of polyhedra and metric spaces, with applications. 

(G. Lehner.) 

MATH 298. Proseminar in Research. (1) 

Prerequisite, one semester of graduate work in mathematics. A seminar 
devoted to the foundations of mathematics, including mathematical logic, 
axiom systems, and set theory. (Staff.) 



MATH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) (Arranged) 
MATH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Arranged) 



(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 
STAT 200. Probability Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110 or MATH 1 10 with one semester of Probability. Prob- 
ability space, classes of events, construction of probability measures. Random 
variables, convergence theorems, images of measures. Independence. Expecta- 
tion and moments, Lebesgue integration, Lp spaces, Randon-Nikodym theorem, 
singular and absolutely continuous measures. Conditional expectations, existence 
of regular distributions; applications. Probabilities on product spaces, Fubini 
theorem, Kolmogorov extension theorem, Tulcea product theorem. (Staff.) 

STAT 201. Probability Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 200, MATH 113 recommended. Characteristic functions of 
distribution functions. Bochner's representation theorem. Helly's theorems and 
Levy's inversion formula. Applications of Cauchy's residue theorem. Infinitely 
divisible distributions. Kolmogorov's three-series theorem. Law of the iterated 
logarithm. Arc sine law. Central limit theorems for independent and dependent 
random variables (Lindeberg-Feller theorem). Weak and strong laws of large 
numbers. Martingale convergence theorems (for sequences.) (Staff.) 

STAT 210. Applied Stochastic Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110 or MATH 110 with one semester of Probability. Basic 
concepts of stochastic processes. Renewal processes and random walks, fluctua- 
tion theory. Stationary processes, spectral analysis. Markov chains and pro- 
cesses (discrete and continuous parameter). Birth and death processes, diffusion 
processes. Applications from theories of queueing, storage, inventory, epidemics, 
noise, prediction, and others. (Staff.) 



212 • Graduate School 

STAT 212. Stochastic Processes T. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 201. Separability, measurability, and sample continuity of 
stochastic processes. Stopping times. Martingales: fundamental inequalities, 
convergence theorems and their applications, continuity theorems, martingale 
times, sample function behavior. Processes with independent (orthogonal) in- 
crements, Brownian motion. Stationary processes, spectral analysis, and erogodic 
theory. (Staff.) 

STAT 213. Stochastic Processes II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 201. Definition and classification of Markov processes. 
Properties of transition probabilities, forward and backward equations (bound- 
ary conditions), absorption probabilities, strong Markov-property. Markovian 
semigroups, extended infinitesimal operator. Sample function behavior. Con- 
nections between semigroup approach and sample function approach. Diff"usion 
theory, Ito equation. Potential theory. (Staff.) 

STAT 220. Mathematical Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110, or STAT 101 and MATH 110, or equivalent. Special 
distributions, expectations, moments, characteristic functions. Multivariate dis- 
tributions, sampling distributions, limit theorems. Transformations, order sta- 
tistics, series representations. Estimation, Cramer-Rao inequality, maximum 
likelihood. Gauss-Markov theorem, and Bayes estimates. (Staff.) 

STAT 221. Mathematical Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 220 or STAT 120. Tests of hypotheses, Neyman-Pearson 
lemma, and likelihood ratio tests. Bayesian inference. Goodness-of-fit and 
contingency tables. Regression and analysis of variance. Non-parametric tests, 
sequential analysis, multivariate analysis. (Staff.) 

STAT 222. Advanced Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 121, concurrent registration with STAT 200 recommended. 
Statistical decision theory. Neyman-Pearson lemma and its extensions. Uni- 
formly most powerful test. Monotone likelihood ratio. Exponential families of 
distributions, concepts of similarity, and tests with Neyman structure. Unbaised 
tests and applications to normal families. (Staff.) 

STAT 223. Advanced Statistics II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 222. Invariance, almost invariance, and applications to 
rank tests. Invariant set estimation. Linear models with applications to analysis 
of variance and regression. Elements of asymptotic theory. Minimax principle 
and Hunt-Stein theorem. (Staff.) 

STAT 240. Multivariate Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 120 and MATH 100, or STAT 220. Multivariate normal, 
Wishart's and Hotelling's distributions. Tests of hypotheses, estimation. General- 
ized distance, discriminant analysis. Regression and correlation. Multivariate 
analysis of variance; distribution of test criteria. (Staff.) 

STAT 241. Sampling Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 120 or STAT 220. Simple random sampling. Sampling for 
proportions. Estimation of sample size. Sampling with varying probabilities of 
sampling. Sampling: stratified, systematic cluster, double, sequential, incom- 
plete. (Staff.) 

STAT 250. NoNPARAMETRic Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 222. Order statistics. Nonparametric point and set estima- 
tion. Stochastic approximation. Tolerence regions. Invariance principle and 



University of Maryland • 213 

its applications. Large sample properties and optimality criteria, efficacy, Pit- 
mann efficiency. Rank tests and Kolmogorov-Smirnov type tests. U-statistic. 

(Staff.) 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Allen, Armstrong, Hsu, Jackson, Marcinkowski, Sayre, 

Shreeve, Talaat, and Weske. 
Associate Professors: Anand, Asimow, Berger, Cunniff, Hayleck, John, 

Marks, Walston, Wockenfuss, and Yang. 
Assistant Professors: Buckley, Elkins, Fourney, Morse, Sallet, Todeschini, 

and Tsui. 
Lecturers: Dawson, Haberman, and Seigel. 

Instruction and research facilities are available for the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy in mechanical engineering. 

For the Master of Science degree in mechanical engineering a minimum of 
six semester hours of course work in mechanical engineering must be taken in 
classes conducted by members of the resident graduate faculty. For the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree, the minimum is eighteen semester hours. 

Registration for six credits of research (ENME 399, Research) for the M.S. 
degree and twelve credits for the Ph.D. degree are required. It is the policy 
of the Department to require that this research be conducted in the Department 
laboratories. Arrangements for the research and for faculty supervision must 
be made, and approved by the Department Chairman, well in advance of the 
registration for the research in order that the funds and equipment may be made 
available. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ENME 100. Thermodynamics. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 031, 
MATH 021, concurrently. The properties, characteristics, and fundamental 
equations of gases, and vapors. Application of the first and second laws of 
thermodynamics in the analysis of basic heat engines, air compression, and 
vapor cycles. Flow and non-flow processes for gases and vapors. 

(Allen, Kraft, Owens.) 

ENME 101. Dynamics of Machinery. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, ENES 021, 
MATH 066 or ENME 116 concurrently. (Hayleck, Cunniff.) 

ENME 102. Fluid Mechanics I. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, ENME 060. A 
rational study of fluids at rest and in motion. Principles of viscous and turbulent 
flow in pipes, nozzles, etc. Impulse and momentum. Pumps, turbines, and 
meters. Dimensional analysis and laws of similarity. (Sayre, Tsui.) 

ENME 103. Materials Engineering. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, ENES 030. Pro- 
cesses and methods to manufacture and usefully apply engineering materials; 
alloys and heat treatment of steel; strengthening processes for ferrous and 
non-ferrous alloys. Fabrication techniques for metals, polymers, and refrac- 
tories. Specification, inspection, control and automation. 

(Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 



214 • Graduate School 

ENME 104. Gas Dynamics. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, ENME 102. 
Compressible flow in ducts and nozzles; effect of area change, heat addition, 
friction, and normal shocks. Thermodynamics of chemically reacting flows, 
combustion and equilibrium. (John.) 

ENME 106. Transfer Processes. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 102. Conduction by steady state 
and variable heat flow; laminar and turbulent flow; free and forced convection; 
radiation, evaporation and condensation of vapors. Analogy between the trans- 
fer of mass, heat, and momentum. (Hsu, Sallet, Walston.) 

ENME 107. Energy Conversion. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 100. Required of seniors in electrical 
engineering. Chemical, heat, mechanical, nuclear and electrical energy conversion 
processes, cycles and systems. Direct conversion processes of fuel cells, thermi- 
onics, and magnetohydromechanics. (Kraft, Owens.) 

ENME 116. Applied Mathematics in Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021. Mathematical techniques applied to the analysis and 
solution of engineering problems. Use of differentiation, integration, differential 
equations, partial differential equations and integral transforms. Application of 
infinite series, numerical and statistical methods. (Yang, Walston.) 

ENME 120. Measurements Laboratory. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, ENES 030, ENME 
101, and ENEE 060, ENME 106 concurrently. Required of juniors in Mechan- 
ical Engineering. Measurements and measurement systems; applications of 
selected instruments with emphasis on interpretation of results. (Tsui, North.) 

ENME 140. Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, MATH 066 or ENME 116. Elements of 
operational calculus, vector analysis; numerical methods and programming for 
computers. Errors, interpolation, series, integration, iteration, and solution of 
equations. (Cunniff, Fourney.) 

ENME 150, 151. Energy Conversion. (4, 3) 

First semester. Three lectures, one laboratory a week. Second semester. Two 
lectures, one laboratory a week. Prerequisites. ENME 104, ENME 106. 
Chemical, heat, mechanical, nuclear and electrical energy conversion 
processes, cycles and systems. Reciprocating, turbo- and jet-propulsion power 
plants and components using all types of heat and reaction sources. Direct 
conversion processes of fuel cells, thermionics and magnetohydromechanics. 

(Allen, Taiaat.) 

ENME 152. Machine Design. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, ENME 101, 
103. Working stresses, stress concentration, stress analysis and repeated load- 
ings. Design of machine elements. Kinematics of machinery. 

(Hayleck, Jackson.) 

ENME 153. Elasticity and Plasticity I. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 152. Analysis of plates and shells, 
thick walled cylinders, columns, torsion of non-circular sections, and rotating 
disks. (Todeschini. Fourney.) 

ENME 154, 155. Engineering Experimentation. (2, 2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering. Theory of experimentation. Selected experiments 
emphasize planned procedure, analysis and communications of results, analogous 
systems and leadership. (Allen, Anand.) 



University of Maryland • 215 

ENME 156, 157. Mechanical Engineering Analysis and Design. (3, 4) 

First semester, two lectures, one laboratory period per week; second semester, 
two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering. Creative engineering and problem analysis. Sys- 
tems design including control, reliability and manufacturing requirements. Use 
of computers in design. Design of multi-variable systems. 

(Berger, Fisher, Say re, Walston.) 

ENME 161. Environmental Engineering. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 101, 106, senior standing in Mech- 
anical Engineering. Heating and cooling load computations. Thermodynamics 
of refrigeration systems. Low temperature refrigeration. Problems involving 
extremes of temperature, pressure, acceleration and radiation. (North.) 

ENME 162. Dynamics IT. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 101, MATH 066 or ENME 116, 
senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. Linear and non-linear plane and 
three-dimensional motion, moving axes, Lagrange's equation, Hamilton's prin- 
ciple, non-linear vibration, gyroscope, celestial mechanics. (Hayleck, Cunniff.) 

ENME 163. Fluid Mechanics II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 104, ENME 106, senior standing. 
Hydrodynamics with engineering applications. Stream function and velocity 
potential; conformal transformations; pressure distributions; circulation; numeri- 
cal methods and analogies. (Buckley, John.) 

ENME 164. Thermodynamics II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 104, ENME 106, senior standing. 
Applications to special systems, change of phase, low temperature. Statistical 
concepts, equilibrium, heterogenous systems. (Allen, Shreeve.) 

ENME 165. Automatic Controls. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 062, senior standing. Hydraulic, 
electrical, mechanical and pneumatic automatic control systems. Open and 
closed loops. Steady state and transient operation, stability criteria, linear and 
non-linear systems. Laplace transforms. (Anand, Walston.) 

ENME 166. Special Problems. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. 
Advanced problems in mechanical engineering with special emphasis on mathe- 
matical and experimental methods. (Staff.) 

ENME 167. Operations Research I. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. 
Applications of linear programming, queuing model, theory of games and com- 
petitive models to engineering problems. (Jackson.) 

ENME 170. Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials. (3) 

A comprehensive survey of the atomic and electronic structure of solids with 
emphasis on the relationship of structure to the physical and mechanical 
properties. (Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 171. Physical Chemistry OF Engineering Materl\ls. (3) 

Equilibrium multicomponent systems and relationship to the phase diagram. 
Thermodynamics of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Diffusion in solids, 
kinetics of reactions in solids. (Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 172. Technology of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Relationship of properties of solids to their engineering applications. Criteria 



216 • Graduate School 

for the choice of materials for electronic, mechanical and chemical properties. 
Particular emphasis on the relationships between structure of the solid and its 
potential engineering application. (Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 173. Processing of Engineering Materials. (3) 

The effect of processing on the structure of engineering materials. Processes 
considered include refining, melting and solidification, purification by zone 
refining, vapor phase processing, mechanical working and heat treatments. 

(Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

For Graduates 

ENME 200. Intermediate Dynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 157. Fundamentals of Newtonian dynamics which includes 
kinematics of a particle, dynamics of a particle and a system of particles, 
Hamilton's principle, Lagrange's equations, basic concepts and kinematics of 
rigid body motion, dynamics of planar rigid body motion. Application to 
mechanical engineering problems. (Cunniff) 

ENME 201. Advanced Dynamics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 200. Dynamics of three-dimensional rigid body motion; 
application of Euler's angles to rigid body motion. Hamilton's equations. Dy- 
namics of gyroscopic instruments. Vibration theory of linear lumped mass 
systems. Satellite orbits and space vehicle motion. A review of current problems 
under investigation by research workers. (Cunniff) 

ENME 202. Continuum Mechanics. (3) 

The algebra and calculus of tensors in Riemannian space are developed with 
special emphasis on those aspects which are most relevant to mechanics. The 
geometry of curves and surfaces in Ej is examined. The concepts are applied 
to the derivation of the field equations for the non-linear theory of continuous 
media and to various problems arising in classical dynamics. (Berger, Yang.)' 

ENME 203. Linear Theory of Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 202. The basic equations of the linear theory are developed 
as a special case of the non-linear theory. The first and second boundary value 
problems are discussed together with the problem of uniqueness. Solutions are 
constructed to problems of technical interest through semi-inverse, transform 
and potential methods. Included are the study of plane problems, torsion, dy- 
namic response of spherical shells and tubes, microstructure and anisotrophic 
materials. (Berger, Yang.) 

ENME 204, 205. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 104, 
ENME 106, ENME 151. Advanced problems in thermodynamics on compress- 
ion of gases and liquids, combustion and equilibrium, humidification and 
refrigeration and availability. Statistical thermodynamics, partition functions, 
irreversible processes. Transport phenomena. (Shreeve, Allen.) 

ENME 206, 207. Advanced Mechanical Engineering Design. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 200, 202. Synthesis of stress analysis and properties and 
characteristics of materials as related to design. Areas covered; combined stress 
designs, optimizations, composite structures, stress concentrations, design under 
various environmental conditions, metal working, limit analysis, etc. Review 
of design literature. Design project. (Jackson.) 

ENME 208, 209. Design Of Turbomachinery. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENME 151. Characteristics and 
design of turbines, pumps, compressors and torque convertors; cavitation, stall, 
and surge. (Shreeve.) 



University of Marvlantd • 217 

ENME 210, 211. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. ENME 102. MATH 066 or ENME 116. 
Potential flow theory; three dimensional flow examples; application of complex 
variables to two-dimensional flow problems: Blasius theorem, circulation and 
Joukowski hypothesis, engineering applications to cavitation and calculation of 
pressure distribution; viscous flow and boundary layer. (Sayre, Haberman.) 

ENME 212. Linear Vibrations. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 157. Fourier and statistical analysis. Transient, steady- 
state, and random behavior of linear lumped mass systems. Normal mode 
theory; shock spectrum concepts: mechanical impedance and mobility methods. 
Vibrations of continuous media including rods, beams, and membranes. 

(Cunnifi') 

ENME 213. Non-Linear Vibrations. (3) 

Prerequisite. ENME 212, Geometrical and numerical analyses of nonlinear 
systems. Stability, Limit cycles. Theory of bifurcations. Perturbation method. 
Periodic solutions. Oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. 
Asyptotic methods. Nonlinear resonance. Relaxation oscillations. Self-excited 
vibrations. (Cunniff) 

ENME 214. 215. Stress Waves in Continuous Media. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENME 152 and ENME 157. Methods 
of characteristics applied to transient phenomena in solids and fluids. Elastic and 
plastic waves under impact. Shock formation and strain rate eff"ects. 

(Seigel, Cunniff^.) 

ENME 216, 217, Energy Conversion-Solid State. (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENME 151. Combustion, thermo- 
electric, thermionic, fuel cells, reactors, magnetohydrodynamics. Kinetics of 
reactions, fission and fusion. (Talaat, Shreeve.) 

ENME 218, 219. Energy Conversions-Solid State. (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENME 151. Design parameters in 
chemical, nuclear and direct conversion systems for the production of power; 
weight, efficiency and radiation. (Talaat, Shreeve.) 

ENME 220. Seminar. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by mechanical engineering staff. 
Prerequisite, graduate standing in mechanical engineering. (Staff.) 

ENME 223, 224. Plasticity. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 202. Yield criterion and associated flow rules as related to 
the behavior of materials in the elastic-inelastic region for both perfectly 
plastic and strain hardenable materials. Plastic behavior of members in the 
following areas including: instability, bending, torsion, cylinders, spheres, 
curved members, limit analysis and metal working theory and applications. 

(Yang.) 

ENME 227. Non-Linear Elasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENME 202. This course treats those materials for which the stress 
at time T depends only on the local configuration at time T. The constitutive 
equations are developed for elastic and hyperelastic materials through the 
application of the various invariance requirements. Exact solutions for special 
non-linear problems are developed. Plane problems, infinitesimal strain super- 
imposed on a given finite strain, wave propogation and stability problems are 
considered. (Berger.) 

ENME 228. Viscoelasticity. (3) 

Prerequisite ENME 202. This course treats the behavior of solid materials 
which possess fluid characteristics. Included within this group are Green-Rivlin 



218 • Graduate School 

hygrostaric meterials. The study of objective tensor rates and other invariance 
requirements leads to the formulation of constitutive equations for various 
visco-elastic materials. Steady shear flows, helical flow, visco-elastic torsion 
and problems arising from the linear viscoelastic theory are considered. 

(Berger.) 
ENME 229, 230. Jet Propulsion. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 150, 
ENME 151. Types of thermal jet units. Fluid reaction and propulsive efficiency. 
Performance of rockets, aerothermodynamics, combustion chemical kinetics, 
aerodynamics of high speed air flow. Solid and liquid propellant rockets. De- 
sign of turbojets and aerojets, ramjets and hydroduct units, including combustion 
chambers, turbines and compressor. (Shreeve.) 

ENME 231, 232. Advanced Heat Transfer. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 150, 
ENME 151. Advanced problems covering effects of radiation, conduction, con- 
vection, evaporation and condensation. Study of research literature on heat 
transfer. (Shreeve, Allen.) 

ENME 233, 234. Compressible Flow. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ENME 104, MATH 066 or ENME 116, 
ENME 212. One dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow; compressible flow 
in ducts and nozzles; two and three dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow; 
similarity rules, normal and oblique shock waves. (Sayre, Haberman.) 

ENME 235, 236. Linear and Non-Linear Elastic Shells. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite ENME 202. Fundamental results from the theory of surfaces. 
Theories of shells composed of linear and non-linear elastic materials. Dis- 
cussion of both infinitesimal and finite deformation states. Strain displacement 
relationships development to include higher order terms. Derivation of equili- 
brium equations and their use in static and dynamic stability studies. Con- 
stitutive equations for the linear theory. Solutions to special shell problems. 

(Fourney, Todeschini.) 

ENME 238. Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering. (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of Instructor. Advanced topics of current interest in the 
various areas of Mechanical Engineering. May be taken for repeated credit. 

(Staff.) 

ENME 280, 281. Dynamics of Viscous Fluids. (3, 3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some exact solutions. Boundary layer 
equations. Laminar Flow-similar solutions, compressibility transformations, 
analytic approximations, numerical methods. Stability and transition to turbu- 
lent flow. Turbulent flow-isotropic turbulence, boundary layer flows, free mixing 
flows. (This course is equivalent to ENAE 280, 281.) (John.) 

ENME 282, 283. Special Topics in Unsteady Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ENME 210, 211. Treatment in depth 
of several topics in unsteady hydrodynamics such as sloshing in liquid tanks, 
seismic effects in liquids in large containers and dams, and stationary surface 
wave phenomena during natural and forced oscillation. Examination of the 
effects of non-linearities in surface boundary conditions, low gravity and rota- 
tion on fluid behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the use of theoretical funda- 
mentals and techniques to solve practical problems. The use of high speed 
computers will be featured in numerical solutions wherever practicable. 

(Haberman.) 

ENME 350. Structure of Engineering Materials. (3) 

The structural aspects of crystalline and amorphous solids and relationship to 
bonding types. Point and space groups. Summary of diffraction theory and 



University of Maryland • 219 

practice. The Reciprocal Lattice. Relationships of the macroscopically measured 
properties to crystal symmetry. Structure aspects of defects in crystalline solids. 

(Armstrong, Asimow.) 

ENME 351. Electronic Structure of Engineering Solids. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Description of electronic behavior in 
engineering solids. Behavior of conductors, semiconductors and insulators in 
electrical fields. Thermal, magnetic and optical properties of engineering solids. 

(Armstrong, Asimow.) 

ENME 359. Special Topics in Structure of Engineering Materials. (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of Instructor. (Staff.) 

ENME 360. Chemical Physics of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Thermodynamics and statistical 
mechanics of engineering solids. Cohesion, thermodynamic properties. Theory 
of solid solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, electrical, and magnetic 
phenomena in solids. Chemical thermodynamics, phase transitions and thermo- 
dynamic properties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Thermodynamics 
of defects in solids. (Skolnick.) 

ENME 361. Kinetics of Reactions in Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 360 or ENME 360. The theory of thermally activated pro- 
cesses in solids as applied to diffusion, nucleation and interface motion. Co- 
operative and diffusionless transformations. Applications selected from processes 
such as allotropic transformations, precipitation, martensite formation, solidifica- 
tion, ordering, and corrosion. (Bolsaitis.) 

ENME 369. Special Topics in the Chemical Physics of Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, Consent of Instructor. (Staff.) 

ENME 370. Rheology of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Mechanical behavior with emphasis on 
the continuum point of view and its relationship to structural types. Elasticity, 
viscoelasticity, anelasticity and plasticity in single phase and multiphase 
materials. (Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 371. Dislocations in Crystalline Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. The nature and interactions of de- 
fects in crystalline solids, with primary emphasis on dislocations. The elastic 
and electric fields associated with dislocations. Effects of imperfections on 
mechanical and physical properties. (Armstrong, Asimow.) 

ENME 372. Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 370 or ENME 370. The mechanical properties of single 
crystals, polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Yield strength, work harden- 
ing, fracture, fatigue and creep are considered in terms of fundamental material 
properties. (Armstrong, Asimow.) 

ENME 379. Special Topics in the Mechanical Behavior of Engineering 
Solids. ( 3 ) 

Prerequisite, Consent of Instructor. (Staff.) 

ENME 380. Experimental Methods in Materials Science. (3) 

Methods of measuring the structural aspects of materials. Optical and electron 
microscopy. Microscopic analytical techniques. Resonance methods. Electrical, 
optical and magnetic measurement techniques. Thermodynamic methods. 

(Staff.) 

ENME 381. Diffraction Techniques in Materials Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350. Theory of diffraction of electrons, 



220 • Graduate School 

neutrons and x-rays. Strong emphasis on diffraction methods as applied to the 
study of defects in solids. Short range order, thermal vibrations, stacking faults, 
microstrain. (Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 389. Special Topics in Experimental Techniques in Materials Science. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, Consent of Instructor. (Staff.) 

ENME 390. Polymeric Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 350 or ENME 350 or consent of Instructor. A compre- 
hensive summary of the fundamentals of particular interest in the science and 
applications of polymers. Polymer single crystals, transformation in polymers, 
fabrication of polymers as to shape and internal struqture. 

(Armstrong, Asimow, Marcinkowski.) 

ENME 391. Special Topics in Materials Technology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Consent of Instructor. (Staff.) 

ENME 397. Seminar in Engineering Materials. (1) 

Discussion of current advances and research in engineering solids. (Staff.) 

ENME 398. Special Problems in Engineering Materials. 

Special study or investigation in Materials Science under the direction of an 
assigned faculty advisor. Credit variable and since content changes, re-registra- 
tion is permissible. (Staff.) 

ENME 399. Thesis Research in Mechanical Engineering. (Master's Level) 
Credit hours to be arranged. Credit in accordance with work outlined by the 
staff of Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisites, Graduate standing in Mechanical 
Engineering. Research in any field of Mechanical Engineering such as fluid 
mechanics, solid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer, energy conver- 
sion, design, systems and controls and materials. (Staff.) 

ENME 499. Dissertation Research in Mechanical Engineering. (Doctoral 
Level) 

(Staff.) 

METEOROLOGY 

Professors: Faller, Landsberg, and Fritz. 

Assistant Professors: Gage, Rodenhuis, and Thompson. 

Visiting Lecturer: McGovERN. 

This program offers a course of study leading to the degree of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy, and is open to students holding the Bachelor's 
degree in meteorology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, astronomy, engineering, 
or other programs with suitable emphasis in the sciences. Previous training in 
Meteorology or related sciences will be favorably considered in a student's ap- 
plication for admission to the program. However, such training or experience is 
not a prerequisite nor may it be considered a substitute for a demonstrated 
capability in the mathematical and physical sciences, such capability to be 
determined either from the student's record or by examination. In exceptional 
circumstances a student may be admitted subject to satisfactory completion of 
prescribed background courses. 

Courses in the major subject may be selected from those courses listed under 
Meteorology. Courses to satisfy the minor requirement may be chosen in chem- 
istry, physics, astronomy, mathematics and engineering, or in other areas of 



University of Maryland • 221 

special interest. In all cases the student must satisfy the general requirements of 
the Graduate School. The student's program will be supervised by a member of 
the Meteorology teaching faculty. Research problems in Meteorology will be 
supervised by members of the Meteorology faculty or by a faculty member of 
another appropriate department. 

Examinations for Candidacy 

The Preliminary Examination (M.S. or Ph.D.) — The preliminary examination 
is designed to test the student's background in those areas of the mathematical 
and physical sciences which are required for successful graduate work in 
Meteorology, and together with the student's undergraduate record and experi- 
ence will serve as guidance to the faculty in the recommendation of a graduate 
program. This examination will be offered once each semester and is taken by 
all new students before or during their first year of graduate work. In general 
this examination may be taken no more than twice. 

The Comprehensive Examinations (Ph.D.) — The comprehensive examina- 
tions are intended to test the student's mastery of essential subject matter and 
the ability to apply his knowledge to new situations. Because of the diversity 
of subject matter in Meteorology, due consideration will be given to the area 
of specialization of the individual student, although the comprehensive nature 
of the examination will not be compromised. The written examinations will 
represent questions and problems from the entire faculty in Meteorology, and 
those students who satisfy the minimum required grades will be admitted to 
the oral examinations. The outcome of the examinations will be determined 
from a combination of the written and oral grades with minimum standards in 
each category. 

Thesis Presentation and Examination (M.S. and Ph.D.) — Each student will 
submit a thesis and will be required to present his work orally in seminar and 
to defend his material to the satisfaction of his examining committee. 

Requirements for the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

For the Master of Science degree a minimum of sixteen (16) semester hours 
is required in courses in Meteorology approved by the Graduate Committee. 
The minor program and research credit requirements are those of the Graduate 
School. 

The basic requirement for the Ph.D. degree is a thesis which embodies an 
original contribution to knowledge and which demonstrates an ability to present 
the subject matter in acceptable, scholarly style. 

Normally before a candidate is equipped to begin work on the thesis approxi- 
mately 30 credits of course work in Meteorology beyond the Bachelor's degree 
will be needed. The minor program, research and language requirements are 
those of the Graduate School. Languages approved for Meteorology are Ger- 
man, French, and Russian. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

METO 110, 111. Descriptive and Synoptic Meteorology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent and PHYS 021 or equivalent. A survey 
of atmospheric phenomena, goals of research and techniques of study. This 
course introduces the new student to the broad range of theoretical and applied 
studies in Meteorology in order to acquaint him with the interaction of the 



222 • Graduate School 

physical and dynamical processes and the various scales of atmospheric phe- 
nomena. Some work in synoptic analysis and an introduction to methods of 
forecasting (e.g. subjective, numerical, statistical) is included. 

METO 112. Physics and Thermodynamics of the Atmosphere. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent and PHYS 021 or equivalent. Optical 
phenomena: the radiation balance; introduction to cloud physics; atmospheric 
electrical phenomena; basic thermodynamic processes and their application to 
the atmosphere. 

For Graduates 

METO 210. Dynamic Meteorology I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent, METO 111 or equivalent. The equa- 
tions of fluid motion; circulation and vorticity theorems; goestropic, cylostrophic 
and inertial motion; the thermal wind equations; boundary-layer flow; poten- 
tial vorticity and the Rossby wave equation; perturbation theory and an intro- 
duction to atmospheric turbulence; the momentum and energy balance of the 
general circulation. 

METO 211. Dynamic Meteorology II. (3) 

Prerequisite, METO 210. Barotropic and baroclinic instability theories of the 
general circulation of the atmosphere; wave motions induced by topography and 
thermal assymetries; mountain waves, thermal convection, and other selected 
topics. 

METO 212. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. (3) 

Prerequisite, METO 210. Statistical description of turbulence, the profiles of 
temperature and wind near the ground; the vertical transport of momentum, 
heat, and water vapor; spectra and scales of atmospheric turbulence; the theory 
of homogeneous turbulence; recent theories of turbulence shear flow and 
convection. 

METO 214. Numerical Weather Prediction. (3) 

Prerequisite, METO 211. Numerical techniques for the solution of partial 
differential equations; application to the equations of atmospheric motion; 
stability criteria; Eulerian, Lagrangian, and spectral methods; filtered and primi- 
tive equation models; numerical models of the general circulation; current ap- 
plications to research and forecasting. 

METO 220. Physical and Dynamical Oceanography. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Physics of the ocean. Theories of wave 
and tidal motions. Applications of fluid dynamics to theories of the general 
circulation of the oceans. Thermal and dynamical interactions of the ocean 
and the atmosphere. 

METO 230. Statistical Methods in Meteorology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 132 or equivalent, METO 211. Distribution of scalers 
and vectors; sampling methods; regression and correlation methods; tests of 
significance; time series analysis; statistical forecasting methods. 

METO 240. Micrometeorology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 066 or equivalent. A study of energy balances at the 
earth-atmosphere interface statistical and spectral analysis of turbulence, tur- 
bulent transfer of energy and momentum, air motions in relation to terrain 
and landscape, the time and spatial cariations of mechanical and thermodynami- 
cal quantities in the micro-layer of the atmosphere. 

Prerequisites, METO 110, 111 or equivalent. Review of basic macro and micro- 
meteorological considerations; the nature and behavior of atmopsheric aerosols; 



University of Maryland • 223 

the description and measurement of the distribution, dispersion and other 
properties of air pollution; study of the meso-meteorology of cities and the 
climatological influences of air pollution. 

METO 250, 251. Special Topics in Meteorology. (3, 3) 

METO 254, 255. Seminar in Meteorology. (1, 1) 

METO 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Original research and preparation of a thesis in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for a master's degree. 

METO 499 Dissertation. Research (Doctoral Level) 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Professors: Faber, Doetsch, Hansen, Hetrick, Laffer, and Pelczar. 
Assistant Professors: Cook, MacQuillan, and Robertson. 
Instructor: Vaituzis. 
Lecturer: Stadtman. 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

TTie Department of Microbiology offers a program of advanced courses 
emphasizing the biological aspects of microorganisms. All candidates for 
advanced degrees are required to pursue a rigorous program of fundamental 
and original research in an area approved by the department chairman and the 
staff. 

Further information concerning graduate work in microbiology may be 
obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MICB lOL Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, MICB 001. (Roberson.) 

MICB 103. Immunology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, MICB 101. (Roberson.) 

MICB 104. History of Microbiology. (1) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in 
microbiology. (Doetsch.) 

MICB 108. Epidemiology and Public Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 001. 

(Faber.) 
MICB 111. General Virology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Prerequisite, MICB 101 or equivalent. (Hetrick.) 

MICB 121. Microbial Fermentations. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The application of quantitative techniques 
for the measurement of enzyme reactions, mutations, fermentation analysis and 
other physiological processes of microorganisms. (Cook.) 



224 • Graduate School 

MICB 151. Microbial Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, 8 credits in microbiology and CHEM 031, 033, or equivalent. 

(MacQuillan). 

MICB 160. Systematic Bacteriology. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 8 credits in micro- 
biology. History of bacterial classification; genetic relationships; international 
codes of nomenclature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. (Hansen.) 

MICB 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, 16 credits in micro- 
biology. Registration only upon the consent of the instructor. This course is 
arranged to provide qualified majors in microbiology and majors in allied fields 
an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological problems under the super- 
vision of a member of the Department. (Faber.) 

For Graduates 

MICB 201. Medical Mycology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, 30 credits in microbiology and allied fields. Primarily a study of the 
fungi associated with disease and practice in the methods of isolation and identi- 
fication. (Laffer.) 

MICB 202. Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. An introduction to genetic principles and methodology applicable to 
microorganisms. Spontaneous and induced mutations, interaction between clones. 

(Hansen.) 

MICB 204. Bacterial Metabolism. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 30 credits in micro- 
biology and allied fields, including CHEM 161 and 163. Bacterial nutrition, 
enzyme formation, metabolic pathways and the dissimilation of carbon and 
nitrogen substrates. (MacQuillan.) 

MICB 206, 208. Special Topics. (1-4, 1-4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 20 credits in microbiology. Presenta- 
tion and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects in the field 
of microbiology. (Staff.) 

MICB 210. Virology and Tissue Culture. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 101 or 

equivalent. Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. 

Principles of tissue culture. (Hetrick.) 

MICB 211. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 
101 or equivalent. Registration only upon consent of instructor. Laboratory 
methods in virology and tissue culture. (Hetrick.) 

MICB 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, MICB 204 or consent 
of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial metabolism 
with emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. (Stadtman.) 

MICB 271. Cytology of Bacteria. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A consideration of morphology, differentia- 
tion, and cytochemistry of the eubacterial organism. (Doetsch.) 



University of Maryland • 225 

MICB 280. Seminar — Research Methods. (1) 

First semester. (Staff.) 

MICB 282. Seminar — Microbiological Literature. (1) 

Second semester. (Staff.) 

MICB 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level.) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Credits according to work done. 
The investigation is outlined in consultation with, and pursued under, the super- 
vision of a senior staff member of the Department. (Staff.) 

MICB 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) 

(Staff.) 

MUSIC 

Professors: Ulrick, Bernstein, Gordon, Grentzer, and McCorkle. 
Associate Professors: Berman {Head), Heim, Helm, Johnson, and Pen- 
nington. 
Assistant Professors: Diemer and Montgomery. 

The Department of Music offers the Master of Music degree in five areas 
of specialization: Music history and literature, theory, composition, conduct- 
ing and performance; the Doctor of Philosophy degree in two areas: musicology 
and theory; and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in two areas: composition 
and literature-performance. A statement of Departmental requirements sup- 
plementing those of the Graduate School has been formulated for each of the 
areas of specialization. Copies may be obtained by applying to the Department. 

For information on work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master 
of Education, Doctor of Philosophy, or Doctor of Education — all in music 
education — the student is referred to the section devoted to the Department 
of Education in this catalog. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MUSC 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music (2, 2, 2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, the next lower course on the same in- 
strument. One hour lesson and six practice hours per week. The student will indi- 
cate the instrument chosen by adding the proper section number. (Staff.) 

MUSC 120, 121. History of Music (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, MUSC 001 or 020 and junior standing. 

(Bernstein and Helm.) 
MUSC 141. Musical Form. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. (Meyer.) 

MUSC 143, 144. Composition. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. (Staff.) 

MUSC 145, 146. Counterpoint. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. A course in eighteenth- 
century contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imitation in the invention 
and the choral prelude. Original writing in the smaller contrapuntal forms. 

(Diemer.) 

MUSC 147, 148. Orchestration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, MUSC 070, 071. A study of the ranges, 
musical functions and technical characteristics of the instruments, and their 



226 • Graduate School 

color possibilities in various combinations. Practical experience in orchestrating 
for small and large ensembles. (Staff.) 

MUSC 149. Modal CouNTERPorNT. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 071 or the equivalent. An introduction to 
the contrapuntal techniques of the sixteenth century: the structure of the modes, 
composition of modal melodies, and contrapuntal writing for two, three, and 
four voices. (Diemer.) 

MUSC 150. Harmonic and Contrapuntal Practices of the Twentieth 
Century. (2) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 071 and 145. (Diemer.) 

MUSC 160, 161. Conducting. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. MUSC 160 or the equivalent is prerequisite to MUSC 
161. A laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental groups. Baton 
technique, score reading, rehearsal techniques, tone production, style, and in- 
terpretation. Music of all periods will be introduced. (Traver.) 

MUSC 163. Contemporary Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. (Diemer.) 

MUSC 164. Solo Vocal Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent (Pennington.) 

MUSC 165. Keyboard Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent. (Bernstein.) 

MUSC 166. Survey of the Opera. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent. (Helm.) 

MUSC 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent (Ulrich.) 

MUSC 168. Chamber Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent. (Ulrich.) 

MUSC 169. Choral Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121 or the equivalent. (Traver.) 

MUSC 175. Canon and Fugue. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 146 or the equivalent. (Staff.) 

MUSC 180. Acoustics for Musicians. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 071 or the equivalent, and senior or 
graduate standing in music. (Staff.) 

MUSC 182. Chamber Music Repertoire. (2) 

First and second semesters. Four hours per week. Prerequisite, graduate standing 
as a major in performance. A systematic study, through performance, of diversi- 
fied chamber music for the standard media. Repertoire covered will be deter- 
mined by the personnel available in the class. May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 185. Music Pedagogy. (3) 

Second semester. Conference course. Prerequisite, completion of or current 
registration in MUSC 152 or more advanced course in applied music. A study 
of major pedagogical treatises in music, and an evaluation of pedagogical tech- 
niques, materials and procedures. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

MUSC 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, and consent of instructor. A criti- 



University of Maryland • 227 

cal study of one style period (Renaissance, Baroque, etc.) will be undertaken. 
The course may be repeated for credit, since a different period will be chosen 
each time it is offered. (Bernstein, Helm and McCorkle.) 

MUSC 201. Seminar in Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 120. 121, and consent of instructor. The 
work of one major composer (Bach, Beethoven, etc.) will be studied. The course 
may be repeated for credit, since a different composer will be chosen each time 
it is offered. (Helm, McCorkle.) 

MUSC 202. Pro-Seminar in the History and Literature of Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 121 and graduate standing. An introduction to graduate 
study in the history and literature of music. Bibliography and methodology of 
systematic and historical musicology. (Bernstein.) 

MUSC 203. Seminar in Musicology. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 121 and graduate standing. An intensive course in one of 
the areas of musicology such as performance practices, history of music theory, 
history of notation, or ethnomusicology. Since a cycle of subjects will be studied, 
the course may be repeated for credit. (Bernstein, McCorkle.) 

MUSC 204. American Music. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 121 and graduate standing. A lecture course in the history 
of American art music from Colonial times to the present. (McCorkle.) 

MUSC 206. Advanced Modal Counterpoint. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 146 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. An intensive 
course in the composition of music in the style of the late Renaissance. Analyti- 
cal studies of the music of Palestrina, Lasso, Byrd and others. (Staff.) 

MUSC 207. The Contemporary Idiom. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 146 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. Composition 
and analysis in the twentieth century styles, with emphasis on techniques of 
melody, harmony, and counterpoint. (Staff.) 

MUSC 208. Advanced Orchestration. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 148 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. Orchestration 
projects in the styles of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, and 
others. May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 209. Seminar in Musical Ccmposition. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 144 or the equivalent, and graduate standing. An advanced 
course in musical compisition. May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 210. Factors in Musical Learning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 121 or the equivalent and at least one 
course in Psychology. The psychology of intervals, scales, rhythms, and har- 
mony. Musical hearing and creativity. The psychology of musical ability. The 
theory of functional music. (Taylor.) 

MUSC 211. Special Studies in Music. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite MUSC 121 or the equivalent. Confer- 
ence course in problems in music history, literature, and theory. May be repeated 
for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 212, 213. Interpretation, Performance, and Analysis of the 
Standard Reperioire. (2-4 each course.) 
Prerequisite, consent of the graduate faculty in the Department. A seminar in 
analysis and interpretation for the graduate performer with advanced instruction 
at the instrument of the works studied. In MUSC 213 a seminar paper and a 
full-length recital are required. (Staff.) 



228 • Graduate School 

MUSC 215. Aesthetics of Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, MUSC 121 or the equivalent and one course in 
Aesthetics. A consideration of the principal theories of aesthetics as they relate 
to music. A study of writings in the field from Pythagoras to the present. 

(Staff.) 

MUSC 218. Teaching the Theory, History, and Literature of Music. (3) 
Prerequisite, graduate standing and consent of instructor. A course in teaching 
methodology, with emphasis on instruction at the college level. (Ulrich.) 

MUSC 260. Advanced Conducting. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, MUSC 161 or the equiva- 
lent. A concentrated study of the conducting techniques involved in the reper- 
toire of all historical periods. May be repeated for credit. (Traver.) 

MUSC 270, 271. Advanced Analytical Techniques. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, advanced 
standing in Music and permission of the instructor. A seminar in which com- 
poser and theorist will develop analytical facility in advanced nineteenth- and 
twentieth-century music and an inclusive technique of analysis in music from 
the Renaissance to the present. (Staff.) 

MUSC 300, 301. Doctoral Seminar in Music Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, at least twelve hours in music history 
and literature. An analytical survey of the literature of music: Section 1, key- 
board music; Section 2, vocal music; Section 3, string music; Section 4, wind 
instrument music. Required of all candidates for the D.M.A. degree in Literature- 
Performance. Normally both semesters must be taken before credit is allowed. 

(Heim and Staff.) 

MUSC 305. Doctoral Seminar in Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, at least twelve graduate hours in music history and 
a familiarity with musicological methods and bibliography. A study of topics in 
music history and theory based on original research in the subject areas. Required 
of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. May be repeated for credit. (McCorkle.) 

MUSC 306. Advanced Composition. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, MUSC 209 or the equivalent, and 
permission of the instructor. Conference course in composition in the larger 
forms. May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 312, 313, 314. Interpretation, Performance, and Pedagogy. (4, 4, 4) 
Prerequisite, consent of the Graduate music faculty. A seminar in pedagogy and 
the pedagogical literature for the doctoral performer, with advanced instruction 
at the instrument, covering appropriate compositions. Required of all candidates 
for the D.M.A. degree in Literature-Performance. (Staff.) 

MUSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Research in theory or history and literature of music, and musical composition. 
May be repeated for credit. (Staff.) 

MUSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 229 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor and Head: Schlaretzki. 

Professor: Pasch. 

Visiting Professor: Tranoy. ' 

Associate Professors: Brown, Celarier, Perkins. 

Assistant Professors: Goldstone, Kress, Odell, Roelofs, Varnedoe, and 

WiNSLADE. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Lesher. 
Lecturer: Goodwin. 

The Department of Philosophy offers the degrees of Master of Arts and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. 

A brochure containing information in detail concerning the graduate program 
in philosophy, including requirements for admission, may be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Department. 

^Spring semester, 1969 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
PHIL 101. Ancient Philosophy. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. (Celarier.) 

PHIL 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. (Winslade.) 

PHIL 103. Nineteenth Century Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. (Staff.) 

PHIL 104. Twentieth Century Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. A survey of philosophy in the 20th century 
through a consideration of representative figures in England, Europe, and 
America. Among the theories to be studied are logical atomism (Russell, 
Wittgenstein), positivism (Carnap, Ayer), existentialism and phenomenology 
(Sartre, Husserl), naturalism and realism. (Dewey, Santayana). (Brown.) 

PHIL 105. Philosophy in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. (Varnedoe.) 

PHIL 120. Oriental Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Not offered on College Park campus. 

PHIL 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization. (3) 

A critical and constructive philosophical examination of the assumptions, goals, 
and methods of contemporary democracy, facism, socialism, and communism, 
with special attention to the ideological conflict between the United States and 
the U.S.S.R. (Staff.) 

PHIL 141. Philosophy of Language. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 041 or 055. (Kress.) 

PHIL 147. Philosophy of Art. (3) (Brown.) 

PHIL 151. Ethical Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 045. (Roelofs, Schlaretzki.) 

PHIL 152. Philosophy of History. (3) (Staff.) 

PHIL 154. Political and Social Philosophy. (3) (Goldstone, Schlaretzki.) 



230 • Graduate School 

PHIL 155. Symbolic Logic IL (3) 

Prerequisite. PHIL 055 or consent of instructor. Axiomatic development of 
the propositional calculus and the first-order functional calculus, including the 
deduction theorem, independence of axioms, consistency, and completeness. 

(Staff.) 

PHIL 156. Topics in the Philosophy of Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 056 or consent of instructor. Detailed examination of some 
basic issues in the methodology and conceptual structure of scientific inquiry. 
To be investigated are such topics as confirmation theory, structure and func 
tion of scientific theories, scientific explanation, concept formation, and theo- 
retical reduction. (Staff.) 

PHIL 157. Theory of Meaning. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 041 or 055, and 102. A study of theories about the mean- 
ing of linguistic expressions, including the verification theory and the theory of 
meaning as use. Among topics to be considered are naming, referring, syn- 
onymy, intension and extension, and ontological commitment. Such writers as 
Mill, Frege, Russell, Lewis, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Austin, and Quine will be 
discussed. (Kress, Odell.) 

PHIL 158. Philosophy of Law. (3) 

Examination of fundamental concepts related to law. e.g., legal system, law 
and morality, justice, legal reasoning, responsibility. Prerequisite, one course 
in philosophy. 

PHIL 159. Philosophy of the Social Sciences. (3) 

A discussion of several of the following topics: the nature of laws and explana- 
tion in the social sciences; the relation of the social sciences to mathematics, 
logic, and the natural sciences; the role of value judgments in the social sci- 
ences; the relation of social science to social policy; problems of methodology. 
Prerequisite, six hours in social science or consent of instructor. 

PHIL 160. Philosophy of Mind. (3) 

An inquiry into the nature of mind through the analysis of such concepts as 
consciousness, perception, understanding, imagination, emotion, intention, and 
action. Prerequisite, PHIL 102. 

PHIL 168. Topics in the History of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. May be repeated 
for credit when the topics dealt with are diff'erent. (Staff.) 

PHIL 169. Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 102. An intensive examination of contemporary problems 
and issues. Source material will be selected from recent books and articles. 
May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. (Staff.) 

PHIL 170. Metaphysics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. PHIL 055 recommended. A 
study of some central metaphysical concepts (such as substance, relation, caus- 
ality, and time) and of the nature of metaphysical thinking. (Pasch, Winslade.) 

PHIL 171. Theory OF Knowledge. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. PHIL 055 recommended. 
The origin, nature, and validity of knowledge will be considered in terms of 
some philosophic problems about perceiving and thinking, knowledge and be- 
lief, thought and language, truth and confirmation. (Brown, Odell, Pasch.) 

PHIL 175. Topics in Symbolic Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 155. May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with 
are different. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 231 

PHIL 176. Induction AND Probability. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of inferential forms, with emphasis 
on the logical structure underlying such inductive procedures as estimating and 
hypothesis-testing. Decision-theoretic rules relating to induction will be con- 
sidered, as well as classic theories of probability and induction. (Staff.) 

PHIL 180. The Philosophy OF Plato. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. (Celarier.) 

PHIL 181. The Philosophy of Aristotle. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. (Celarier.) 

PHIL 182. Medieval Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite PHIL 101 or 102. A history of philosophic thought in the West 
from the close of the classical period to the Renaissance. Based on readings 
in the Stoics, early Christian writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers, and 
Schoolmen. (Celarier.) 

PHIL 184. The Continental Rationalists. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of the systems of some of 
the major 17th and 18th century rationalists, with special reference to Des- 
cartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. (Staff.) 

PHIL 185. The British Empiricists. (3) 

Prerequisite PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of selected writings of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. (Varnedoe.) 

PHIL 186. The Philosophy of Kant. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102. (Roelofs.) 

PHIL 190. Honors Seminar. (3) 

Open to honors students in philosophy and, by permission of the instructor, 
to honors students in other departments. Research in selected topics, with group 
discussion. May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. 

(Staff.) 

PHIL 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PHIL 255. Seminar in the History of Philosophy, (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHIL 256. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHIL 260. Seminar in Ethics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHIL 261. Seminar in Esthetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHIL 270. Seminar in Metaphysics. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHIL 271. Seminar in the Theory of Knowledge. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staflf.) 

PHIL 292. Selected Problems in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 



232 • Graduate School 

PHIL 399. Thesis Research in Philosophy. (Master's Level) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

PHIL 499. Dissertation Research in Philosophy. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Professors: Fraley, Harvey, Humphrey, Husman, Johnson, Eyler. 
Associate Professors: Clarke, Stull, Kramer, Steele, Kelly, Jones. 

The graduate student majoring in physical education, recreation, or health 
education may pursue the degrees of Master of Arts, Doctor of Education, and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The following undergraduate requirements or their equiv- 
alents must be met by every candidate before admission to candidacy for a 
graduate degree in physical education: basic sciences ( human anatomy and 
physiology, physiology of exercise), kinesiology, therapeutics, sport skills, meth- 
ods, human development, measurement, administration, and student teaching. 
In the event a student has had successful experience in teaching physical educa- 
tion, the prerequisites of sport skills, methods, and student teaching may be 
waived. Undergraduate prerequisites in recreation are as follows: psychology, 
sociology, principles, administration, basic sciences, recreational activities, and 
practical experience. Undergraduate prerequisites in health education: biological 
sciences, bacteriology, human anatomy and physiology, nutrition, chemistry, 
psychology, measurement, administration, principles and field work. 

Every student majoring in physical education, health education or recreation 
is required to take PHED, HLTH, RECR 210— Methods and Techniques of 
Research, and PHED 200— Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health, and PHED 399— Research— Thesis. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates * 

PHED 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures and two laboratory 
hours a week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001, 014, and 015, or the equivalent. 

(Campbell, Nelson.) 

PHED 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

PHED 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 160. Theory of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, PHED 100. (Clarke.) 

PHED 170. Supervision in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, PHED 120. 

(Humphrey.) 

PHED 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. (Kelley, Nessler.) 

*A research project must be conducted in each 100 level course taken for graduate 
credit. 



University of Maryland • 233 

PHED 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 190. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

PHED 191. The Curriculum in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, PHED 120. 

(Humphrey.) 

PHED 193. History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 195. Organization and Administration of Elementary School Physical 
Education. ( 3 ) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, PHED 120. 

(Humphrey.) 
PHED 196. Quantitative Methods. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PHED 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (1) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

PHED 202. Status and Trends in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

PHED 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Alexander.) 

PHED 204. Physical Education and the Development of the Child. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures a week. 

(Humphrey.) 

PHED 205. Analysis of Contemporary Athletics. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Husman.) 

PHED 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Clarke.) 

PHED 215. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

PHED 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Sports and Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Husman.) 

PHED 275. Advanced Analysis of Human Motion. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHED 100; first, second and summer sessions. (Kelley.) 

PHED 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 



234 • Graduate School 

PHED 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 
(1-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

PHED 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Hanson.) 

PHED 399. Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHED 499. Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HLTH 150. Health Problems of Children and Youth. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

HLTH 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HLTH 160. Problems in School Health Education in Elementary and 
Second Schools. (2-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson, Staff.) 

HLTH 170. The Health Program in the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisites, HLTH 002 and 004, 
or HLTH 040. (Humphrey.) 

HLTH 178. Fundamentals of Sex Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

HLTH 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Kelley, Nessler.) 

HLTH 188. Children's Physical Development Clinic. (1-4) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

HLTH 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HLTH 190. Organization and Administration of School Health Programs. 
(3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

For Graduates 

HLTH 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (1) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HLTH 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Clarke.) 

HLTH 220. Scientific Foundations of Health Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Jones.) 

HLTH 240. Modern Theories of Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Jones.) 



University of Maryland • 235 



HLTH 250. Health Problems in Guidance. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 260. Public Health Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 288. Special Problems in Health Education. (1-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 290. Administrative Direction of Health Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 29 L Curriculum Construction in Health Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

HLTH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

RECREATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

RECR 120. Program Planning. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, RECR 030. 

RECR 150. Camp Management. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. 



RECR 180. Leadership Techniques and Practices. 
First and second semesters. 



(3) 



RECR SI 84. Outdoor Education. 
Summer only. 



(6) 



RECR 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshops. 
First and second semesters; summer session. 



(1-6) 



RECR 190. Organization and Administration of Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters. 



(Johnson.) 

(Johnson.) 

(Staff.) 

(Staflf.) 

(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 

(Harvey.) 
(Harvey.) 
(Harvey.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 
(Harvey.) 



For Graduates 

RECR 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. ( 1 ) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

RECR 201. Foundations of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 



RECR 202. Philosophy of Recreation. (2) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 



(Harvey.) 



RECR 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Pickett.) 



RECR 204. Modern Trends in Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. 

RECR 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. 
First and second semesters; summer session. 



(3) 



(Harvey.) 
(Clarke.) 



236 • Graduate School 

RECR 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

RECR 240. Industrial Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

RECR 260. Hospital Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

RECR 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

RECR 288. Special Problems in Recreation. (1-6) 

First and second semesters: summer session. (Staff.) 

RECR 290. Administrative Direction of Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

RECR 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

RECR 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

(For Astronomy, Meteorology, and Institute for Molecular Physics (Chemical 

Physics), see Table of Contents) 

Professors: Laster, Westerhout, Banerjee, Day, Erickson, FerrelL, 
Glasser,' Glover, Greenberg, Griem, Holmgren, Hornyak, Kerr, 
Krall, Kundu, Levinson, MacDonald, Marion, Misner, Myers, Oneda, 
Prange, Snow, Sucher, Trivelpiece, Wall, Weber, and Yodh. 

Professors {part-time): Burgers,* Friedman, Hayward, Kolb, Levy, Mc- 
Donald, MusEN, Opik, Rado, Slawsky. 

Research Professor: Benedict,** Benesch,** Elsasser,* Faller,*** Lands- 
berg,*** Pat,* Tidman,* Vanderslice,** and Zwanzig.*** 

Visiting Professors {part-time) : Escobar-V., and Levy. 

Associate Professors: Alley, Bardasis, Beall, Bhagat, Brush,* ' DeSilva, 
DoRFMAN,' Dragt, Earl, Falk, Fivel, Glick, Griffin, Kacser, Y. S. Kim, 
Koch, T. A. Matthews, Pati, Pugh, Reiser,' Rodberg, E. Smith, Stein- 
berg, Wentzel, Woo, Zipoy, B. S. Zorn, and G. Zorn. 

Research Associate Professors: DeRocco,** Guernsey,* Krisher,** Lash- 
INSKY,* D. L. Matthews,* Sengers,** and Wilkerson.* 

Associate Professors {part-time): Bennett, and Dixon. 

Assistant Professors: A'Hearn, Anderson, Beaglehole, Bell, Berg, Betting- 
er, R. a. Brandt, C. Y. Chang, Currie, Davidson, DiLavore," Gloeck-i 
ler, Greene, Greig, Harrington, H. G. Kim," Korenman, Kunze, 
LaPointe, Leibowitz, Lenchek, Mead, Nolen, Pechacek, Poultney, 
Risk, Roos, Roush, Stephenson, Young, and Zapolsky. 

Research Assistant Professors: Ginter,** Goldman,* Koopman,* Munn,** 
Spain,** and Verbeke.** 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Edwards. 

Research Associates: Bandermann, Chang, Colleraine, Connors, Dove, 
Drew, Goldberg, Goldenbaum, Hemingway, Herman,* Hinds, John- 



University of Maryland • 237 

STONE, Kepple, Koehler, Mitter, Naugle, Ninio, Osmundson, Payne, 
Prinz, Richard, Sharma, S. Smith, Svetlichny, Swank, Wayland, and 

WlHL. 

Visiting Lecturers: Armstrong, Fichtel. 

Part-time Lecturers: Aitken, Eisele, Garstens, Ivory, Karle, Light, Lide, 
Maisch, and Meirs. 

PHYSICS 

It is expected that the following areas should have been studied preliminary 
to graduate work. Any deficiencies should be made up at once. A limited amount 
of graduate credit will be allowed for courses so taken. 

General Physics Electricity and Magnetism 

Thermodynamics Modern Physics 

Intermediate Mechanics Advanced Calculus 

Physical Optics Vector Analysis 

Applicants are strongly advised to take the Graduate Record Examination, 
including the Advanced Test in Physics, and to have the results sent directly to 
the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Physics and Astronomy Graduate 
Assistants receive, beyond tuition costs, a stipend of at least $2,700 for the 
academic year. Full-time summer research stipends for advanced graduate stu- 
dents are also available. Applicants for assistantships are automatically also con- 
sidered as candidates for fellowships awarded by the Department, such as Center 
for Theoretical Physics Graduate Fellowships, NSF Traineeships and NDEA 
Fellowships. Correspondence concerning admission should be directed to the 
Graduate Entrance Committee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Candidates for the master's degree are required to take four of the following 
six courses: Theoretical Dynamics ( PHYS 200). Statistical Physics (PHYS 
201), Methods of Mathematical Physics (PHYS 204), Electrodynamics (PHYS 
205), and Quantum Mechanics (PHYS 212, 213). In addition, they must take 
Graduate Laboratory (PHYS 209), unless they have a good laboratory back- 
ground or carry out an experimental thesis. Candidates for the doctor's degree 
normally must take all of these courses. Advanced Quantum Mechanics (PHYS 
254) is required for doctoral students doing dissertations in theoretical physics. 
It is recommended in the selection of further courses that the student take addi- 
tional classical courses as well as courses in a variety of fields of modern physics. 

Candidates for advanced degrees in physics may have a minor in either 
astronomy, chemistry, chemical physics, mathematics, engineering, and/or in 
fields of physics other than their field of major specialization. 

There is also a graduate program in Chemical Physics centered in the Institute 

*Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
**Tnstitute of Molecular Physics. 
***Meteorology. 

Uoint Appointment with Computer Science Center. 
'Joint Appointment with Electrical Engineering. 
'Joint Appointment with College of Education. 

*Joint Appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
'Also Commission on College Physics. 
*Joint Appointment with History. 



238 • Graduate School 

of Molecular Physics, with degrees either in Physics or the Chemistry Depart- 
ment. 

THESIS (Ph.D.) 

The student must submit an outline of his topic to the graduate faculty for 
approval. This outline must clearly set forth the nature of the problem, pro- 
posed method of procedure and the possible results that may be obtained. The 
completed thesis will also be presented to the graduate faculty for approval. 

TIME LIMITS 

There is a departmental limit on the time taken to get a graduate degree in 
physics or astronomy. For the M.S., this is five calendar years from the date of 
first enrolling in the Graduate School for full-time students and six years for 
part-time students. For the Ph.D.. the time limit is seven years from the date of 
first enrolling in the Graduate School for full-time students and eight years for 
part-time students. 

Graduate Assistants and other students whose employment is part-time and 
secondary to their studies are considered full-time students. Timing began on 
September 12, 1960 for those students who were enrolled in the Graduate School 
before that date. 

OFF-CAMPUS COURSES 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy is located within the metropolitan 
area of Washington, D. C. where it enjoys the proximity of a large number of 
outstanding institutions such as NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the 
Naval Research Laboratory, the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, the National 
Bureau of Standards, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the Atomic 
Energy Commission, The National Institutes of Health, the Library of Congress 
and other Federal institutions. TTie Department has close ties with certain 
research groups at some of these institutions. 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers courses at convenient 
times and places so as to accommodate the greatest number of students. In 
order to facilitate graduate study in the Washington area, the Department has 
part-time professors in certain government laboratories where a large number 
of students are interested in graduate study. All M.S. candidates must take at 
least 3 credits of their graduate work on the College Park campus; for the 
Ph.D. degree, students must complete on the College Park campus at least 
18 credits. For the Ph.D. in physics, these credits must include at least 2 credits 
of Physics 230 — Seminar, and the remainder can be divided among major and 
minor physics courses and thesis research. Normally, students will complete 
a much greater proportion of their graduate study on the College Park campus. 
At government agencies where there is no part-time professor, employees desir- 
ing to do graduate work in physics should contact a member of the graduate 
staff in the Department. 

Because of the large number of qualified applicants, the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy has had to restrict formal admission to the Graduate 
School to those who have shown particularly outstanding work in their under- 
graduate records or who have already done satisfactory work in key 100-level 
courses at Maryland. Those students who are initially refused formal admission 
to the Graduate School may apply for admission to University College (off- 
campus program), or to the College of Arts and Sciences as special students. 



University of Maryland • 239 

Each such student should then take at least 12 credits of 100-level courses in 
physics and astronomy including, if possible, Physics 120 and Physics 122 or 
other comparable courses suggested by his advisor. At the completion of all 
of these courses with grades of "B" or better, the student should then reapply 
for admission to the Graduate School. While the credits earned in University 
College are not directly applicable toward a graduate degree, the student will 
find that the credit requirements are normally not the principal obstacle anyway 
in earning an advanced degree and the courses taken by registration in Uni- 
versity College will form a good basis for later graduate study. The University 
of Maryland hopes in this way to offer an opportunity for advanced study in 
physics and astronomy to all qualified students. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

For more information students should write to the Department of Physics 
and Astonomy for the departmental publication entitled "Graduate Study in 
Physics." 

GENERAL PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 100. Advanced Experiments. (2 credits per semester) 

Four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite, four credits of Phys 060 
or consent of instructor. (LaPointe.) 

PHYS 102. Optics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. PHYS Oil or 021; MATH 
021. It is suggested, but not required, that PHYS 060 or PHYS 100 be taken 
concurrently with this course. (Staff.) 

PHYS 103. Applied Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 102. (Alley.) 

PHYS 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS Oil or 
021; MATH 021; (F. McDonald.) 

PHYS 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 051 or 
consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHYS 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Second semester. Three hours of lecture and two of laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, PHYS 100 and 105 or concurrent enrollment in or PHYS 128. 

(Bettinger.) 

PHYS 110. Special Laboratory Projects in Physics. (1, 2, or 3) 

Two hours laboratory work a week for each credit hour. One to three credits 
may be taken concurrently, each semester. Prerequisite, PHYS 100 and consent 
of adviser. (Staff.) 

PHYS 111. Physics Shop Techniques. (1) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 100 
or consent of instructor. (Horn.) 

PHYS 114, 115. Introduction TO Biophysics. (2,2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, intermediate 
physics and MATH 021. (DeRocco.) 

PHYS 118. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, general physics and in- 



240 • Graduate School 

tegral calculus, with some knowledge of differential equations and a degree 
of maturity as evidenced by having taken one or more of the courses PHYS 050 
through PHYS 110. (Beall.) 

PHYS 119. Modern Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 118. (Stephenson.) 

PHYS 127, 128. Elements of Mathematical Physics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PHYS 018 and MATH 021, or con- 
sent of the instructor. Classical dynamics and electrodynamic waves. A careful 
study of mathematical approaches used in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, 
and physical optics. (Dragt.) 

PHYS 129. Introduction to Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119 or consent of instructor. 
Properties of elementary particles, production and detection of particles, rela- 
tivistic kinematics, invariance principles and conservation laws. (Kim.) 

PHYS 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, junior standing. 
A primarily descriptive course intended mainly for those students in the liberal 
arts who have not had any other course in physics. This course does not satisfy 
the requirements of professional schools nor serve as a prerequisite or substi- 
tute for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the course will be on the 
concepts of physics, their evolution and their relation to other branches of 
human endeavor. (Armstrong.) 

PHYS 140, 141. Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and four hours of laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, two credits of PHYS 100 and consent of instructor. Classical 
experiments in atomic physics and more sophisticated experiments in current 
techniques in nuclear physics. Enrollment is limited to ten students. 

(Anderson.) 

PHYS 144, 145. Methods of Theoretical Physics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PHYS 128. A survey of basic ideas 
in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. An introduction to electrody- 
namics, quantum mechanics, and relativity. Primary emphasis will be placed 
upon the mathematical methods involved in our understanding of these topics. 

(Myers.) 

PHYS 152. Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, MATH 021, PHYS 018 or 051, or consent 
of the instructor. (Dorfman.) 

PHYS 153. Modern Physics for Engineers. (3) 

Each semester. TTiree lectures per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 018 or 021 and 
MATH 022. A survey of atomic and nuclear phenomena and the main trends 
in modern physics. This course is designed for students who are not physics 
majors (mathematics, chemistry, engineering). (Kunge.) 

A. GENERAL 

Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 204, 205, 212, 213, 234, 235, 252, 
253, 254, 255 and 258 are given every year; all others will be given according 
to demand. 

For Graduates 

PHYS 200. Theoretical Dynamics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 or 
equivalent. LaGrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, two-body central force 
problem, rigid body motion, small oscillations, continuous systems. 

(Zapolsky.) 



University of Maryland • 241 

PHYS 201. Statistical Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 or 
equivalent. Statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory. (Green.) 

PHYS 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. A 
detailed study of advanced classical mechanics. (Myers.) 

PHYS 204. Methods of Mathematical Physics. (4) 

Each semester. Four lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, advanced calculus, 
PHYS 127 and 128, or equivalent. Ordinary and partial differential equations 
of physics, boundary value problems, Fourier series, Green's functions, com- 
plex variables and contour integration. (Woo.) 

PHYS 205. Electrodynamics. (3) 

Each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 204 or 
equivalent. Classical electromagnetic theory: electro- and magnetostatics, Max- 
well equations, waves and radiation, special relativity. (Koch.) 

PHYS 208. Thermodynamics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. The first and second laws 
of thermodynamics are examined and applied to homogeneous and non-homo- 
geneous systems, calculations of properties of matter, the derivation of equi- 
librium conditions and phase transitions, the theory of irreversible processes. 

(Krisher.) 

PHYS 209. Graduate Laboratory. (3) 

Each semester. Six hours of laboratory work per week. Design and perform- 
ance of advanced experiments in modern and classical physics. (Anderson.) 

PHYS 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (3, 4) 

First and second semesters. Four lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201 
or an outstanding undergraduate background in physics. A study of the 
Schroedinger equation, matrix formulations of quantum mechanics, approxi- 
mation methods, scattering theory, etc., and applications to solid state, atomic, 
and nuclear physics. (Hornyak, Fivel.) 

PHYS 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical Physics. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, PHYS 205. (Falk.) 

PHYS 228. Symmetry Problems in Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. A study of general methods 
of classification of physical systems by their symmetries and invariance prop- 
erties, especially in quantum field theory applications. 

PHYS 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. A detailed study of acoustics 
and the theory of vibrations. (Staff.) 

B. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 107 and MATH 021. Dynamics of 
gas particles, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. 

(Munn.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 210. Statistical Mechanics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 119, and PHYS 201. A study of 
the determination of microscopic behavior of matter from microscopic models. 



242 • Graduate School 

Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical models. Applications of solid 
state physics and the study of gases. (Dorfman.) 

PHYS 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. A study of atomic spectra 
and structure — one and two electron spectra, fine and hyper-fine structure, 
line strengths, line widths, etc. (Brueckner.) 

PHYS 215. Theory of Molecular Spectra. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 214. The structure and properties 
of molecules as revealed by rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. 

(Vanderslice.) 

PHYS 216, 217. Molecular Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. The fundamentals of the 
interpretation of the spectra of simple molecules with particular attention to 
quantitative considerations. Emphasis on topics generally regarded as falling 
outside the domain of molecular structure, notably the measurement and analysis 
of molecular spectroscopic line intensities. (Benesch.) 

C. SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 122. Properties of Matter. (3) 

Each semester. Three lecture hours a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119 or equiva- 
lent. Introduction to solid state physics. Electro-magnetic, thermal and elastic 
properties of metals, semi-conductors and insulators. (Bhogot.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 205. A detailed study of crystal 
structure of solids and of x-rays. (Staff.) 

PHYS 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods. (2) 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in PHYS 
218. The investigation of crystal structure, using x-rays and electron diffraction. 

(Staff.) 

PHYS 242, 243. Theory of Solids. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. 
Properties of metals, lattice vibrations and specific heats; Boltzmann, Fermi- 
Dirac, and Bose-Einstein statistics, free electron gas theories, band theory of 
metals. (Falk.) 

PHYS 244. Solid State Physics. (3) 

Co-requisite, PHYS 213 or equivalent. A variety of topics such as crystal 
structure, mechanical, thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties of solids, 
band structure, the semi-surface, and superconductivity will be treated. Al- 
though the emphasis will be on the phenomena, the methods of quantum mech- 
anics are freely employed in this description. (Bardasis.) 

D. NUCLEAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 120. Nuclear Physics. (3) 

Each semester. Four lecture hours a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119. An in- 
troduction to nuclear physics at the pre-quantum mechanics level. Properties of 
nuclei; radioactivity; nuclear systematics; nuclear moments; the shell model; 
interaction of charged particles and gamma-rays with matter; nuclear detectors; 
accelerators; nuclear reactions; beta decay; high energy phenomena. 

(Holmgren.) 



University of Maryland • 243 

For Graduates 

PHYS 234. 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites. PHYS 120 and PHYS 213. Nuclear prop- 
erties and reactions, nuclear forces, two. three, and four body problems, nuclear 
spectroscopy, beta decay, and related topics. (Banerjee.) 

PHYS 252, 253. Nuclear Structure Physics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite. PHYS 
120 or equivalent; co-requisite. PHYS 212-213 or consent of instructor. Nuclear 
structure and nuclear reactions. Two-body scatterings; nucleon-nucleon forces 
and the deuteron. Neutron scattering; the optical model. Resonance reactions, 
phase-shift analysis, positions and properties of energy levels; the shell model. 
Direct reactions. Electromagnetic transitions. Photoreactions. The design of 
experiments; the extraction of parameters from experimental data and the 
comparison with nuclear models. (Pugh.) 

E. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS 
PHYS 239. Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. PHYS 237. Survey of elementary particles 
and their properties, quantum field theory, meson theory, weak interactions, 
possible extensions of elementary particle theory. (Pati.) 

PHYS 254. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Each semester. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. Relativistic wave equations, second 
quantization in many body problems and relativistic wave equations. Feynman- 
Dyson perturbation theory, applications to many body problems, applications 
to quantum electrodynamics, elements of renormalization. (Levinson.) 

PHYS 255. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, PHYS 254. Renormalizations of Lagrangian 
Field Theories. Lamb Shift. Positronium fine structure. T. C. P. invariance, 
connection between spin and statistics, broken symmetries in many body prob- 
lems, soluble models, analyticity in perturbation theory, simple applications of 
dispersion relations. (Oneda.) 

PHYS 257. Theoretical Methods in Elementary Particle Physics. (3) 

First semester. Co-requisite, PHYS 255. (Sucher.) 

PHYS 258. Quantum Field Theory. (3) 
Second semester. Co-requisite, PHYS 255. 

Introduction to Hilbert space, general postulates of relativistic quantum field 
theory, asymptotic conditions, examples of local field theory, Jost-Lehmann- 
Dyson representation and applications, generalized free field theory, general 
results of local field theory — TCP theorem, spin statistics connections, Bor- 
chers' theorems, Reeh-Schlieder theorem. (Sucher.) 

PHYS 260. High Energy Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Co-requisite, PHYS 254 or consent of instructor. Nuc- 
lear forces are studied by examining interactions at high energies. Meson 
physics, scattering processes, and detailed analysis of high energy experiments. 

(Pati.) 

F. ASTROPHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS 

For additional courses, see the section on Astronomy, below. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 123. Introduction to Atmospheric and Space Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 and PHYS 118 or consent of 
instructor. Motions of charged particles in magnetic fields, aspects of plasma 



244 • Graduate School 

physics related to cosmic rays and radiation belts, atomic phenomena in the 
atmosphere, thermodynamics and dynamics of the- atmosphere. 

(Lenchek, Bettinger.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 221. Cosmic Ray Physics. (3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Pre- or co-requisite, PHYS 200, or consent of 
the instructor. Interaction of cosmic rays with matter, geomagnetic cutoffs, 
origin and propagation of cosmic rays, the electron component and its re- 
lationship to cosmic radio noise; experimental methods. (Earl.) 

G. PLASMA PHYSICS AND FLUID DYNAMICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 116, 117. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites. PHYS 106 and MATH 021. Kinematics 
of fluid flow, properties of incompressible fluids, complex variable methods of 
analysis, wave motions. (Faller.) 

PHYS 124. Introduction to Plasma Physics. (3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 and PHYS 118, or 

consent of instructor. Orbit theory, magnetohydrodynamics, plasma heating 
and stability, waves and transport processes. (Griem.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 206. Kinetic Theory of Plasma. (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite. PHYS 204, 205. Knowledge 
of complex variable theory is also desirable. A detailed study of plasma physics. 

(Krall.) 

PHYS 207. Plasma Physics. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHYS 204, 205, orbit theory, transport processes, radiation, waves, 
stability theory. (Krall.) 

PHYS 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow. (2,2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. (Pai.) 

PHYS 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics. (3. 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. A detailed study of advanced 
fluid dynamics. (Burgers.) 

PHYS 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One meeting a week. (Staff.) 

PHYS 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor 

(Burgers.) 

PHYS 262, 263. Aerophysics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. (Pai.) 

H. GENERAL RELATIVITY 

PHYS 236. Theory of Relativity. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 201. A study of Einstein's special 
theory of relativity and some consequences, and a brief survey of the foun- 
dations of general relativity. (Weber, Misner.) 

I. APPLIED PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS 186. Particle Accelerators, Physical and Engineering Principles. (3) 
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 127, 128, or 104, 105 and 



University of Maryland • 245 

PHYS 118, or equivalents. Sources of charged particles, methods of acceleration 
and focusing of electron and ion beams in electromagnetic fields: electrostatic 
accelerators; basic theory of particle motion and orbit stability in cyclic 
accelerators; constant-gradient cyclotrons and synchronotrons; betatrons and 
microtrons; the alternating-gradient and sector-focusing principles; isochronous 
cyclotrons and alternating-gradient synchrotrons; linear accelerators. This 
course is also listed as Electrical Engineering 186. (Reiser.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 290. Charged Particle Dynamics, Electrons and Ion Beams. (3) 

Three hours per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 127, 128 or PHYS 104, 105 or 
consent of instructor. General principles of single-particle dynamics; analytical 
and practical methods of mapping electric and magnetic fields; equations of 
motion and special solutions; Liouville's Theorem; electron optics; space charge 
effects in high current beams; design principles of special electron and ion 
beam devices. This course is also listed as Electrical Engineering 290. (Reiser.) 

J. RESEARCH, SEMINARS AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
PHYS 150. Special Problems in Physics. 

Research or special study. Credit according to work done. Given each semester. 

Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of adviser. (Staff.) 

PHYS 190. Independent Studies Seminar. (Credit according to work done.) 
First and second semesters. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
Undergraduate Honors Program in physics. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PHYS 230. Semin.\r. 

Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held each semester, with 
the contents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. 

(Staff.) 

PHYS 231. Applied Physics Seminar. 

One credit for each semester. (Staff.) 

PHYS 238. Quantum Theory — Selected Topics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 213. (Staff.) 

PHYS 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. 

Two credits each semester. Two lectures a week. (Staff.) 

PHYS 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics. 

Credit according to work done. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, calculus 
and consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PHYS 250. Special Problems in Advanced Physics. 

Credit according to work done. Projects or special study in advanced physics. 

PHYS 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Prerequisite: an approved 
application for admission to candidacy or special permission of the Department. 

(Staff.) 

PHYS 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

K. SPECIAL PHYSICS COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE TEACHERS 

The courses in this section were especially designed for high school teachers and 
are not applicable to B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. degrees in physics without special permis- 



246 • Graduate School 

sion of the Department. However, these courses can be included as part of a physics 
minor or as electives. No prerequisites are required. 

PHYS 118A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to basic ideas of the constitution and 
properties of atomic and subatomic systems and of the overall structure of the 
universe. . (Hornyak.) 

PHYS 11 2A. Properties of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to the study of solid state physics and 
the properties of fluids. (Greene.) 

PHYS 160A. Physics Problems. (1, 2, 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. (Laster.) 

PHYS 170A. Applied Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Hornyak.) 

PHYS 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute 
FOR Teachers of Science and Mathematics Seminar. (1) 

Arranged during summer school. Enrollment limited to participants in the N.S.F. 

Summer Institute. (deSilva, Staff.) 

POULTRY SCIENCE 

Professors: Shaffner and Combs. 

Research Professor: Shorb. 

Associate Professors: Creek, Godfrey, and Helbacka. 

Assistant Professor: Pollard. 

Course work and research leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees are offered. The student may pursue work with the 
major emphasis either in nutrition, physiology, physiological genetics, or the 
technology of eggs and poultry. 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School, have been 
formulated for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. Copies of these 
requirements may be obtained from the Department of Poultry Science. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FDSC 160. Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. (3) 
(See FDSC curriculum for description.) 

AGEC 115. Marketing Animals and Animal Products. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. (See Agricultural Economics AGEC 
115.) (Smith.) 

Poultry Hygiene, see Animal Science, 170. (3) (Wills.) 

Avian Anatomy, see Animal Science, 171. (3) (Wills.) 

ANSC 109. Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 031 and 033. 
This course will be for both graduate and undergraduate credit with additional 
assignments given to the graduate students. (Combs.) 

ANSC 162. Avian Physiology. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
ZOOL 001 and ZOOL 102 or equivalent. (Pollard.) 

ANSC S163. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 



University of Maryland • 247 

tional agriculture and extension service woricers. The first half will be devoted 
to problems concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The 
second half will be devoted to nutrition. (Combs.) 

ANSC S164. Poultry Products and Marketing. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and county agents. (Helbacka.) 

ANSC 165. Physiology of Hatchability. (1) 

Second semester. One, three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
ZOOL 102 or 104. (Shaffner.) 

For Graduates 

ANSC 221. Energy and Protein Nutrition. (3) 

See An. Sci. for description. (Leffel, Combs.) 

ANSC 240. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (2) 

See Dairy Sci. for description. (Vandersall.) 

ANSC 261. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
ZOOL 102 or its equivalent. The role of the endocrines in reproduction is con- 
sidered. Fertility, sexual maturity, egg formation, ovulation, and the physiology 
of oviposition are studied. Comparative processes in birds and mammals are 
discussed. (Shaffner.) 

ANSC 262. Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written 
reports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are 
discussed. (Staff.) 

ANSC 263S. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. To acquaint graduate students 
with common basic nutrition research techniques useful in conducting experi- 
ments with poultry. Actual feeding trials with chicks as well as bacteriological 
and chemical assays will be performed. (Creek.) 

ANSC 264. Vitamins. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, ANSC 
109, CHEM 031, 033, and 161. Advance study of the fundamental role of vita- 
mins in nutrition including chemical properties, absorption, metabolism, storage, 
excretion and deficiency syndromes. A critical study of the biochemical basis 
of vitamin function, interrelationships of vitamins with other substances and of 
certain special laboratory techniques. (Combs.) 

ANSC 265. Mineral Metabolism. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 161 and 163. 
The role of minerals in metabolism of animals and man. Topics to be covered, 
include the role of minerals in energy metabolism, bone structure, electrolyte 
balance, and as catalysts. (Creek.) 

ANSC 266. Physiological Genetics of Domestic Animals. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 006 and a course 
in biochemistry. The underlying physiological basis for genetic differences in 
production traits and selected morphological traits will be discussed. Inheritance 
of enzymes, protein polymorphisms and physiological traits will be studied. 

(Pollard.) 

ANSC 301. Specul Problems in Animal Science. (1-2 cr. 4-cr max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in 



248 • Graduate School 

proportion to amount of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate specifi- 
cally to the character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

ANSC 302. Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare papers based upon 
current scientific publications, relating to animal science or upon their research 
work for presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

ANSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level). 

First and second semester. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying same to completion and report the results in the form of a 
thesis. (Staff.) 

ANSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) (Staff.) 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Anderson, Bartlett, McGinnies, and Waldrop. 

Associate Professors: Fisher, Fretz, Goldstein, Gollub, Hodos, Horton, 

Martin, McIntire, Pumroy, Steinman, Turnage, Vetter, Walder, and 

Ward. 
Assistant Professors: Becker, Higgs, Johnson, Larkin, Locke, Scholnick, 

Smith, Sternheim, and Teitelbaum. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

For the master's degree a minimum of 30 hours is required. The major, 
composed of 21 hours, will be identified as General Psychology and will consist 
of PSYC 211-212 (6), PSYC 252-253 (6), the master's thesis research (6), 
and will consist of PSYC 252-253(6), the master's thesis research (6) and three 
courses (9) in core areas specified by the Department. The Minor, composed of 
a minimum of 9 hours, will ordinarily be taken in a field of specialization which 
the student proposes for the major in his doctoral program. 

For the doctoral degree a minimum of 72 hours is required. The majors, 
composed of 48 hours, will consist of at least 30 hours in courses chosen from 
two specialized fields, and 18 hours of research for thesis, the last including 
6 hours for the master's thesis. The minor will be in General Psychology and 
will consist of a total of 24 hours. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the Department of 
Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

PSYC 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 001. Researches on fundamental psycho- 
logical problems encountered in education. (Staff.) 

PSYC 122. Advanced Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, PSYC 021, and PSYC 090 or consent of instruc- 
tor. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

PSYC 123. Language and Social Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 021, senior standing and consent of in- 
structor. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 



University of Maryland • 249 

PSYC 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, two courses in psychology including 
PSYC 005. (Staff.) 

PSYC 136. Applied Experimental Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 001. A study of basic human factors in- 
volved in the design and operation of machinery and equipment. Organized for 
students in engineering, industrial psychology, and the biological sciences. 

(Anderson, Goldstein.) 

PSYC 145. Experimental Psychology: Sensory Processes. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, PSYC 090. Primarily for students who major or minor 
in psychology. A systematic survey of the laboratory methods and techniques 
applied to sensory and perceptual processes. (Fisher, Steinman.) 

PSYC 146. Experimental Psychology: Learning, Motivation, and 

Problem Solving. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, PSYC 090. Primarily for students who major or minor 
in psychology. The experimental analysis of learning and motivational processes. 

(Gollub. Turnage, Mclntire.) 

PSYC 147. Experimental Psychology: Social Behavior. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites, PSYC 021 and PSYC 090 or equivalent. A laboratory 
course dealing with methods of studying behavior in the social context. Topics 
will include social perception and motivation, small groups, communication 
and persuasion. Consideration will be given to the techniques involved in labora- 
tory experimentation, field studies, attitude scale construction, and opinion 
surveys. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

PSYC 148. Psychology of Learning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite. PSYC 145 and permission or PSYC 146. Review 
and analysis of the major phenomena and theories of human and animal learn- 
ing, including an introduction to the fields of problem solving, thinking and 
reasoning behavior. (Staff.) 

PSYC 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 090. Critical survey of measuring devices used in counseling, 
educational and industrial practice with an emphasis on the theory, develop- 
ment and standardization. Laboratory work will incorporate training in 
methodology of test development together with appropriate practice in the 
use of selected tests. (Waldrop, Bartlett. Johnson.) 

PSYC 151. Psychology of Individual Differences. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 150. Problems, theories, and researches related to psycho- 
logical differences among individuals and groups. (Waldrop. Johnson.) 

PSYC 161. Industrial Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in psychology. A course designed to aid in the under- 
standing of the problems of people in a variety of work situations; serving as 
an introduction to such technical problems as personnel selection interviewing, 
morale supervision and management, and human relations in industry. Lecture, 
discussion and laboratory. (Staff.) 

PSYC 180. Physiological Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 145 or 146. An introduction to research 
on the physiological basis of human behavior, including consideration of sen- 



250 • Graduate School 

sory phenomena, motor coordination, emotion, drives, and the neurological basis 
of learning. (Staff.) 

PSYC 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of animal be- 
havior, including considerations of social interactions, learning, sensory pro- 
cesses, motivation, and experimental methods, with a major emphasis on mam- 
mals. (Mclntire.) 

PSYC 191. Senior Seminar. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of the instructor. 
The historical and theoretical roots of the science of psychology. Analysis of 
current psychological theories and their related research. (Staff.) 

PSYC 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-6) 

Prerequisites, senior standing and written consent of individual faculty super- 
visor. Integrated reading under direction leading to the preparation of an ade- 
quately documented report on a special topic. (Staff.) 

PSYC 195. Minor Problems in Psychology. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. An individual- 
ized course designed to allow the student to pursue a specialized topic or re- 
search project under supervision. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

(All the folowing courses require consent of the instructor. Not all of the graduate 
courses are offered every year. The times specified for each course are given as 
estimates.) 

PSYC 200. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological Science. (1) 
Prerequisite, consent of faculty advisor. Survey of professional problems in 
psychology, including considerations of contemporary developments, profes- 
sional ethics, literature resources, formulation of critical research problems, and 
discussion of the major institutions requiring psychological services. (Staff.) 

PSYC 201. Sensory and Perceptual Processes. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, PSYC 180 and 211. The contemporary experi- 
mental and theoretical literature on selected problems in sensation and percep- 
tion. (Fisher, Steinman.) 

PSYC 203, 204. Graduate Seminar. (3, 3) 

Surveys of contemporary American and foreign research literature in specialized 
fields of psychology. (Staff.) 

PSYC 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories 
in Psychology. (3, 3) 
Alternate years. Prerequisite, PSYC 212. A study of the philosophical and 
scientific background of modern psychology, together with a review of its 
major systematic viewpoints and issues. (Staff.) 

PSYC 207. Conditioning and Learning. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, PSYC 212. The literature on the experimental 
analysis of behavior, with examination of basic experiments and contemporary 
theories related to them. (GoUub, Mclntire, Turnage.) 

PSYC 208. Verbal Behavior. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, PSYC 123 and 212. Analysis of such topics as 
verbal learning, psycholinguistics, concept formation, and thinking. 

(Horton, Turnage.) 



University of Maryland • 251 

PSYC 211, 212. Advanced General Psychology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 145 or 146. A systematic re- 
view of the more fundamental investigations upon which modern psychology 
is based. (Staff.) 

PSYC 213. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. (1-3) 

Methodology of the automatization of research techniques and appartus; appa- 
ratus design and construction; telemetric and digital techniques; logical block 
circuitry. (Staff.) 

PSYC 214. Comparative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 181 and 212. The experimental literature on the behavior 
of infra-human organisms. Special topics. (Mclntire.) 

PSYC 215. Advanced Psychophysiology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar dealing with special selected topics in the 
area of psychophysiology. (Mclntire, Teitelbaum.) 

PSYC 216. Seminar in Psychopharmacology. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of graduate study in psychology and consent of the in- 
structor. A critical review and detailed analysis of the literature and problems 
related to the effects of drugs on animal and human behavior. Designed for ad- 
vanced graduate students in experimental psychology and clinical psychology. 

(Gollub.) 

PSYC 220. Psychological Concepts in Mental Health. (3) 

Each year. Prerequisite, advanced standing. Concepts in mental health, their 
theoretical status, experimental evidence, and current use. (Waldrop.) 

PSYC 221. Seminar in Counseling Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in counseling psychology. (Waldrop, Fretz, Johnson.) 

PSYC 222. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. (3) 

Selected problems in clinical psychology. (Staff.) 

PSYC 223. Seminar in Community Mental Health. (3) 

Selected problems in mental health psychology. (Staff.) 

PSYC 224. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The seminar is designed to acquaint the 
student with student personnel functions at the collegiate level. Attention is de- 
voted to the historical antecedents of student personnel activities, the range of 
services, their functions, responsibilities, interrelationships and projected future 
status. Resource personnel presently engaged in student personnel services will 
participate as needed. (Staff.) 

PSYC 225, 226. Behavioral Assessment and Measurement. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 150. Logic and methodology of 
individual assessment and measurement. Survey of the major testing instruments 
and techniques. (Staff.) 

PSYC 227, 228. Laboratory in Behavioral Assessment and Measurement. 
(2,2) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 150. Administration, scoring, 
interpretation, and use of current appraisal instruments and methods in evalu- 
ating a variety of age levels and types of cases, including referred cases from 
cooperating institutions. (Fretz, Smith.) 

PSYC 229. Seminar in Industrial Psychology. (3) 

An advanced seminar covering specialized topics such as: morale and motivation, 
labor relations, consumer motivations, man-machine systems, quantitative and 



252 • Graduate School 

qualitative personnel requirements inventory, job evaluation, environmental con- 
ditions and safety, occupational choice and classification, and the interview. 

(Bartlett, Goldstein, Locke.) 

PSYC 230. Seminar in Engineering Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. An advanced seminar covering the analysis of factors, variables, 
and characteristics of systems which affect human performance and efficiency. 

(Anderson, Goldstein.) 

PSYC 231. Training Procedures in Industry. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 148 or equivalent. A consideration of psychological prin- 
ciples and methods for improving job performance; skill development laboratory 
in application of methods and techniques is provided. (Goldstein.) 

PSYC 232. Personnel Selection and Job Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 161 or equivalent. Psychological measurement as applied to 
the analysis of job requirements and the development and use of performance 
criteria and predictors. (Bartlett.) 

PSYC 233. Social Organization in Industry. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Analysis of management organizations as 
social structures, and the application of concepts and methods of social psychol- 
ogy to problems of conflict, cooperation, and leader-group relations. (Staff.) 

PSYC 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques. (3) 

Psychological concepts and methods in the use of interview, questionnaire, and 
inventory procedures for the measurement, prediction and alteration of behavior. 

(Staff.) 

PSYC 241. Persuasion and Attitude Change. (3) 

Each year. Consideration of the communication process and the various media 
of mass communication. Factors related to the effectiveness of communication 
and persuasion are analyzed in the light of experimental evidence, and various 
strategies and techniques of persuasion are reviewed. 

(McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

PSYC 242. Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) 

Each year. Analysis and discussion of contemporary systematic positions in 
social psychology. Review of research methods in the area as well as theories 
and problems of current importance. (McGinnies, Higgs, Ward.) 

PSYC 243. Seminar in Small Group Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Review of current approaches to small 
group behavior, including problem-solving, communication, leadership, and con- 
formity. (Ward, Higgs.) 

PSYC 252, 253. Advanced Statistics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, PSYC 090. Detailed study of the funda- 
mentals of statistical inference, experimental design, and the analysis of regres- 
sion and correlation concepts and techniques; a basic course for research stu- 
dents in the behavioral sciences. (Staff.) 

PSYC 254. Factor Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 253. Analysis of major developments in factor theory as 
applicable to the behavioral sciences, including computational methods and re- 
search implications. (Staff.) 

PSYC 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 253. Study of psychophysical methods, scaling technique, and 
the statistical methods of pattern analysis. (Larkin.) 



University of Maryland • 253 

PSYC 256. Mental Test Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 253. Development of test theory from psychophysics and 
measurement theory. Consideration of formal and applied problems involved 
in developing and utilizing psychological tests and measurements. Special atten- 
tion is given to problems of reliability, validity, and prediction. (Bartlett.) 

PSYC 257. Seminar in Quantit.ative Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 253. An advanced seminar covering special topics in statis- 
tical and mathematical methods and models in psychology. (Staff.) 

PSYC 258. Development of Predictors. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 153. Review of statistical theory and practices in the design, 
development and analysis of techniques of prediction in the behavioral sciences, 
with special attention to the formal and practical problem of criteria for pre- 
diction. (Bartlett.) 

PSYC 260. Occupational Development and Choice. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 220. Theoretical and research literature on occupational 
behavior. (Waldrop, Fretz.) 

PSYC 261, 262. Modification of Human Behavior: Research Methods and 
Practice. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. The experimental and applied methods available 
for the induction of behavior change, with emphasis on their relationship to 
community mental health (first semester); process, outcome, and theory in their 
application to counseling and psychotherapy (second semester). 

(Fretz, Johnson, Walder.) 

PSYC 263, 264. Modification of Human Behavior: Laboratory and Practi- 
CUM. (3,3) 
First and second semesters. Application of methods relevant to behavior change 
in conseling and psychotherapy. Individual supervision and group consultation. 

(Pumroy.) 
PSYC 265. Advanced Developmental Psychology. (3) 

Empirical, experimental and theoretical literature related to developmental 
processes. (Pumroy, Schoinick.) 

PSYC 266. Theories of Motivation. (3) 

Alternate years. Current treatments of motivational concepts, and analysis of 
the causal antecedents to behavior. (Staff.) 

PSYC 267. Theories of Personality. (3) 

Scientific requirements for a personality theory. Postulates and relevant research 
literature for several current personality theories. (Walder, Vetter, Smith.) 

PSYC 269. Practicum in Community Mental Health Consultation. (3) 

Each year. Prerequisite, advanced standing. Directly supervised fieWwork in 
mental health consultation. (Staff.) 

PSYC 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Alternate years. Deviant behaviors and their etiology and taxonomy. (Vetter.) 

PSYC 271. Appraisal of Disabilities. (3) 

Human disabilities and their psychological appraisal. (Waldrop.) 

PSYC 272. Individual Clinical Diagnosis. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, PSYC 226. Case study of emotionally disturbed 
individuals with a variety of psychological techniques. (Staff.) 



254 • Graduate School 

PSYC 274. Evaluation and Change in Educational Skills. (3) 

Methods for the enhancement of reading and other educational skills. 

(Maxwell.) 

PSYC 285, 286. Research Methods in Psychology. (1-3, 1-3) 

Each year. Research is conducted on several problems each semester, in a 
variety of fields of psychology, and under the supervision of various members 
of the faculty. (Staff.) 

PSYC 288, 289. Special Research Problems. (1-4, 1-4) 

First and second semesters. Supervised research on problems selected from 
the area of experimental, industrial, social, quantitative, or mental health 
psychology. (Staff.) 

PSYC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level.) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 



PSYC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level.) 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



(Staff.) 



Associate Professor and Executive Secretary: Hirzel. 

Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Anthropology: Williams. 

Professor and Director of the Division of Criminology: Lejins. 

Professors: Hoffsommer, Janes, and Lejins. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Cussler, Henkel, Hirzel, Hoffman, Mc- 

Intyre, and Williams. 
Assistant Professors: Coates, Federico, Frantz, Harper, Hunt, Pease, And 

Wilson. 

The Department of Sociology grants the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Fields of specialization include anthropology, criminology, 
rural and urban sociology, the family, industrial and occupational sociology, 
social theory, social psychology, formal and complex organization, stratification, 
demography, and research methods. 

Prerequisites for graduate study leading to an advanced degree with a major 
in sociology consist of either ( 1 ) an undergraduate major (totalling at least 20 
semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours of sociolgy (including 6 
semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 additional hours of comparable 
work in anthropology, economics, political science, or psychology. Graduate 
Record Exam and letters of recommendation are required for admission. 

For Graduate and Advanced Undergraduates 

Sociology 001 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all courses. 

SOCY 102. Intercultural Sociology. (3) (Staff.) 

SOCY 111. Sociology of Occupations and Careers. (3) 

(Coates. Lengermann.) 

SOCY 112. Rural-Urban Relations. (3) (Hoffsommer.) 

SOCY 113. The Rural Community. (3) (Hoffsommer.) 

SOCY 114. The City. (3) (Hirzel.) 



University of Maryland • 255 



SOCY 115. Industrial Sociology. (3) 

SOCY 116. Military Sociology. (3) 

SOCY 118. Community Organization. (3) 

SOCY 121. Population. (3) 

SOCY 122. Population. (3) 

SOCY 123. Ethnic Minorities. (3) 

SOCY 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

SOCY 136. Sociology of Religion. (3) 

SOCY 141. Sociology of Personality. (3) 

SOCY 144. Collective Behavior. (3) 

SOCY 145. Social Control. (3) 

SOCY 147. Sociology of Law. (3) 

SOCY 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 



(Coates, Lengermann.) 

(Coates.) 

(Federico.) 

(Hirzel.) 

(Hirzel.) 

(Lejins.) 

(Federico.) 

(Staff.) 

(Cussler, Hunt, Simons.) 

(Cussler.) 

(Staff.) 

(Lejins.) 

(Lejins, Wilson, Staff.) 



SOCY 162. Social Stratification. (3) 

The study of the nature of stratification; indicators of social class position; 
social class correlates; social class mobility; social class and society. (Pease.) 



SOCY 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

SOCY 174. Senior Seminar in Social Work. (3) 

SOCY 180. Small Group Analysis. (3) 

SOCY 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 



(Harper.) 

(Federico.) 

(Franz.) 

(Janes, Hunt.) 



SOCY 191. Social Field Training. (1-3) 

Prerequisites: For social work field training, SOCY 131; for crime control field 
training, SOCY 052 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available placements. 
Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The student will 
select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for a 
definite program of in-service training. Group meetings, individual conferences 
and written program reports will be a required part of the course. (Staff.) 

SOCY 195. Intermediate Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisites, SOCY 095 or equivalent and a course in Sociology (other than 
SOCY 001.), Required for all candiates for the master's degree. (Henkel.) 

SOCY 196. Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology. (3) 

Nature and scope of sociological research, problem formulation, case study 
method, observational methods, survey method, experimental methods, docu- 
mentary methods, miscellaneous methods. (Bateman, Mclntyre, Staff.) 

For Graduates 

SOCY 201. Methods of Social Research. (3) 

First semester. Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and 
techniques of sociological investigation and analysis. (Hoffsommer.) 

SOCY 202. Advanced Research Methods in Sociology. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 201 or equivalent. Instruction in more advanced methodol- 
ogy in Sociological research. (Mclntyre, Simons.) 



256 • Graduate School 

SOCY 204. Practicum in Data Analysis in Field Research. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 195 and one course in methods. Field training in the con- 
duct of research in an organized research setting. Supervised instruction in the 
sequence of a total research project including preparation of research design, 
data collection, data coding, scaling, tabulation, and report writing. 

(Mclntyre, Staff.) 

SOCY 214. Survey of Urban Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 014 or 114 or equivalent. Theoretical approaches of Soci- 
ology and other Social Sciences to urbanism, urbanization, and urban phe- 
nomena. Selected approaches: Chicago School; metropolitan region; demog- 
raphy; institutions. (James, Hirzel, Staff.) 

SOCY 215. Community Studies. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of the factors affecting community development 
and growth, social structure, social stratification, social mobility and social insti- 
tutions; analysis of particular communities. (Staff,) 

SOCY 216. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. (3) 

Second semester. An analysis of the occupational and professional structure of 
American society, with special emphasis on changing roles, functions, ideologies, 
and community relationships. (Coates, Federico, Lengermann.) 

SOCY 217. Seminar in Field Work in Urban Research. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 214. Methods of Research in Sociology applied to the urban 
and metropolitan community; reviews of needed research; reviews of contempo- 
rary research; the design and execution of field studies. (Janes.) 

SOCY 221. Population and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and 
qualitative aspects; American and world problems. (Hirzel.) 

SOCY 230. Comparative Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Comparison of the social institutions, organizations, patterns 
of college behavior, and art manifestations of societal values of various countries. 

(Franz.) 

SOCY 241. Personality and Social Structure. (3) 

First semester. Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, per- 
sonality, and social traits in select social structures. (Cussler, Hunt.) 

SOCY 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda. (3) 

Second semester. Process involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies 
and techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. 

(Staff.) 

SOCY 250. Formal Organization. (3) 

The study of organizations; the nature of organizations; types of organizations; 
determinants and consequences of organizational growth; determinants and con- 
sequences of growth for administrative staff; determinants of effectiveness; and 
research in organizations. (Pease.) 

SOCY 253. Advanced Criminology. (3) 

First semester. Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological 
theory and research. (Lejins.) 

SOCY 254. Seminar: Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in criminology. (Lejins.) 

SOCY 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins.) 



University of Maryland • 257 

SOCY 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and 
juvenile delinquency in Maryland. (Lejins.) 

SOCY 257. Social Change and Social Policy. (3) 

First semester. Emergence and development of social policy as related to social 
change, policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. (Staff.) 

SOCY 262. Family Studies. (3) 

Second semester. Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family 
trends, methods of investigation and analysis. (Harper.) 

SOCY 264. The Sociology of Mental Health. (3) 

First semester. A study of the sociological factors that condition mental health 
together with an appraisal of the group dynamics of its preservation. (Staff.) 

SOCY 271. Theory of Social Interaction. (3) 

Positions of major sociologists and social psychologists as to how the individual 
interacts with various groups and the issues involved. Trends in recent inter- 
action theory. (Cussler.) 

SOCY 282. Sociological Methodology. (3) 

Second semester. Local and method of sociology in relation to the general theory 
of scientific method; principal issues and points of view. (Henkel.) 

SOCY 286. Development of European and American Sociological Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite, SOCY 186 or equivalent. Review of systematic sociological theories 
(such as Positivism, Organicism, Conflict, etc.) from the early 19th Century to 
the present. A review of the emerging self-evaluation of Sociology. 

(Janes, Staff.) 

SOCY 287. Seminar: Sociological Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 186 or equivalent. Systematic examination of contemporary 
sociological theories such as structural functionalism and social action. Special 
reference is given to the relevance of each theory to the conduct of sociological 
investigation. (Janes.) 

SOCY 291. Special Social Problems. (Credit to be determined) 

Individual research on selected problems. (Staff.) 

SOCY 295. Advanced Statistics for Sociologists. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 195 or equivalent. Advanced treatment of inferential statis- 
tics; sampling; research design; non-parametric techniques; scaling. Required of 
all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. (Henkel.) 

i 

SOCY 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) (Staff.) 

SOCY 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

The Division of Anthropology provides beginning and advanced course 
work in the principal sub-fields: General; Theory; Physical; Cultural; Culture 
Areas — primarily the Western Hemisphere; Ethnology; and Archeology. 

Courses in Anthropology may be regarded as constituting an independent 
minor in some programs leading to the B.A. degree. They may, at the discre- 
tion of the Department of Sociology, be counted toward a major in Sociology. 

Anthropology 001 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in 
Anthropology. 



258 • Graduate School 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ANTH 101. Cultural Anthropology: Principles and Processes. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 002 or 021. The approach will be topical and 
theoretical rather than descriptive. (Anderson, Hoflfman, Williams.) 

ANTH 102. Cultural Anthropology: World Ethnography. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001, 002 or 021. (Anderson, Hoffman, Williams.) 

ANTH 114. Ethnology of Africa. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. 

ANTH 123. Ethnology of the Southwest. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. 

ANTH 124. Ethnology of North America. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. 



(Staff.) 

(Anderson, Williams.) 

(Hoffman.) 



ANTH 126. Ethnology of Middle America. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. Cultural background and modern social, 
economic and religious life of Indian and mestizo groups in Mexico and 
Central America; processes of acculturation and currents in cultural develop- 
ment. (Williams.) 

ANTH 131. Social Organization of Primitive Peoples. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. 



ANTH 134. Religion of Primitive Peoples. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 and 002. 

ANTH 141. Archeology of the Old World. (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 041. 



ANTH 151. Archeology of the New World. 
Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 041. 



(3) 



(Staff.) 

(Anderson.) 

(Staff.) 

(Williams.) 



ANTH 161. Advanced Physical Anthropology. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 061. A technical introduction to the hereditary 
morphological, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of man and his 
primate ancestors and relatives, with emphasis on evolutionary processes. (Staff.) 

ANTH 171. Introduction Linguistics. (3) (Staff.) 

ANTH 191. Research Problems. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Introductory training in anthropological 
research methods. The student will prepare a paper embodying the results of 
an appropriate combination of research techniques applied to a selected problem 
in any field of anthropology. (Staff.) 



ANTH 198. Anthropological Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 



(Williams.) 



ANTH 205. Theory of Cultural Anthropology. (3) 

History and current trends of cultural anthropological theory, as a basic 
orientation for graduate studies and research. (Hoffman.) 

ANTH 281. Processes of Culture Change. (3) 

Change in culture due to contact, diffusion, innovation, fusion, integration and 
cultural evoluation. (Williams.) 

ANTH 285. Peasant Communities in the Modern World. (3) 

Comparative analysis of peasant communities in Latin America, Europe, Middle 
East, Asia and Africa. (Williams.) 



University of Maryland • 259 

ANTH 287A. Current Developments in Anthropology. (3) 

Detailed investigation of a current problem or research technique, the topic 
to be chosen in accordance with faculty interests and student needs. May be 
repeated, as content varies, for a total of not more than nine semester hours. 

(Staff.) 

ANTH 287B. Current Developments in Anthropology. (3) 

Ethnohistory of the Eastern United States — Post-contact history of the Indian 
groups of the area in relation to patterns of European penetration and 
settlement. (Hoffman.) 

ANTH 291. Special Problems in Anthropology. (1-6) 

Individual research on selected problems in any field of anthropology. 

ANTH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

ANTH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

Professors: Goodwyn, Gramberg, Hesse (Head), Mendeloff, Parsons, 

Nemes, and Rand (Emerita). 
Associate Professor: Rovner. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Candidates must pass, in addition to written examinations in the courses 
pursued, a written examination based on the reading list established by the 
department in their respective fields of Spanish. The examination will test the 
general familiarity of the candidate with his respective fields and his powers 
of analysis and criticism. The oral examination will deal chiefly with the field 
of his thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least one year 
before the degree is awarded. This examination will include applied linguistics 
and each of the major literary fields. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SPAN 101. Applied Linguistics. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to the effective teaching 
of foreign languages. Comparative study of English and Spanish with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, evaluation, and construction of related 
drills. (Mendeloff.) 

SPAN 103, 104. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3, 3) 

Free composition, literary translation, and practical study of syntactical 
structure. 

SPAN 105. Great Themes of the Hispanic Literatures. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. The evolution of the 
pervading themes of the Hispanic literatures, as reflected in representative 
manifestations across the ages. (Nemes.) 



260 • Graduate School 

SPAN 107. Introduction to Medieval Literature. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. Spanish literary history from the eleventh through the 
fifteenth century. Selected readings from representative texts. (Staff.) 

SPAN 111, 112. Prose and Poetry of the Sixteenth Century. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. Selected readings, literary analysis, and discussion of 
the outstanding prose and poetry of the period, in the light of the historical 
background. (Goodwyn, Staff.) 

SPAN 113. Drama of the Sixteenth Century. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. From the earliest autos and pasos, the development 
of Spanish drama anterior to Lope de Vega, including Cervantes. (Rovner.) 

SPAN 115, 116. Cervantes. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. An interpretive study of Don Quixote in connection 
with the other works of Cervantes and with the historical background. 

(Goodwyn.) 

SPAN 117, 118. Prose and Poetry of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. Selected readings, literary analysis, and discussion of 
the outstanding prose and poetry of the period, in the light of the historical 
background. (Goodwyn, Staff.) 

SPAN 119, 120. Drama of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. First semester devoted to Lope de Vega, dramatic 
theory, and the Spanish stage. Second semester: Drama after Lope de Vega 
to Calderon de la Barca and the decay of the Spanish theater. (Rovner.) 

SPAN 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078. Traditionalism, neo-classicism, and 
pre-Romanticism in prose, poetry, and the theater; aesthetics and poetics of the 
enlightenment. (Rovner.) 

SPAN 130. The Romantic Movement in Spain. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078. Poetry, prose and drama of the 
Romantic period. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 131. Nineteenth Century Fiction. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078. Significant novels of the nineteenth- 
century realistic movement. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 133, 134. Modernism and Post-Modernism in Spain and Spanish- 
America. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. A study of the most 
important works and authors of both movements in Spain and Spanish America. 

(Nemes.) 

SPAN 136. Modern Spanish Drama. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. Significant plays of the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 141, 142. The Generation of 1898 and Its Successors. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. Authors and works of 
all genres of the generation of 1898 and those of the immediately succeeding 
generation. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 143. The Contemporary Spanish Novel. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. The novel and the 
short story from 1940 to the present. (Gramberg.) 



University of Maryland • 261 

SPAN 144. Contemporary Spanish Poetry. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. 076. or 075, 078, or 077, 078. Spanish poetry from 
the Generation of 1927 to the present. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 159. 160. Spanish American Fiction. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. Representative novels 
and/or short stories from the Wars of Independence to the present. 

(Nemes, staff.) 

SPAN 162. Spanish-American Poetry. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. Main trends, authors 
and works from the Conquest to Ruben Dario. (Nemes.) 

SPAN 163. Spanish-American Essay. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075, 076, or 075, 078, or 077, 078. A study of the socio- 
political contents and aesthetic qualities of representative works from the 
Colonial to the Contemporary period. (Nemes.) 

SPAN 171, 172. Spanish Civilization. (3, 3) 

A survey of two thousand years of Spanish history, outlining the cultural 

heritage of the Spanish people, their great men, traditions, customs, art and 

culture, with special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and literary 

history. (Staff.) 

SPAN 173, 174. Latin-American Civilization. (3, 3) 

The cultural heritage of the Latin-American people. Pre-Columbian civilizations. 
Hispanic and other European influences. (Nemes.) 

For Graduates 

In order to be accepted in the Graduate School for specialization in Spanish, 
a student must already have a substantial panoramic knowledge of Spanish 
literature. Accordingly, the special studies courses and the open seminar are 
not surveys covering the periods indicated. They are intensive investigations 
within these periods, in which the class acts as a research team concentrating on 
a different specific theme each semester. 

SPAN 201. The History of the Spanish Language. (3) (Mendeloff.) 

SPAN 203. Comparative Romance Linguistics. (3) (Mendeloff.) 

SPAN 207, 208. Medieval Spanish Literature: Eleventh through Fifteenth 
Centuries. (3, 3) 
Specific authors, genres, and literary periods studied in depth. (Mendeloff.) 

SPAN 211, 212. Poetry of the Golden Age. (3, 3) 

Analyses and studies in depth of specific works of specific poets in the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. (Goodwyn.) 

SPAN 215, 216. Seminar: the Golden Age in Spanish Literature (3, 3) 

Specific authors, genres, literary movements and literary periods of the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries studied in depth. (Hesse.) 

SPAN 225, 226. Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

Specific authors, genres, and literary movements studied in depth. (Staff.) 

SPAN 233, 234. The Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

Specific authors, genres, and literary movements studied in depth. (Gramberg.) 



262 • Graduate School 

SPAN 237, 238. Hispanic Poetry of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Cen- 
turies. (3, 3) 
Specific authors, genres and literary movements studied in depth. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 241, 242. The Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

Specific authors, genres and literary movements studied in depth. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 245. The Drama of the Twentieth Century. (3) 

Specific authors and movements studied in depth. (Gramberg.) 

SPAN 263, 264. Colonial Spanish-American Literature. (3, 3) 

Didactic and narrative prose and epic, dramatic and lyric poetry: principal 
works and authors. (Nemes.) 

SPAN 265, 266. National Spanish-American Literature. (3, 3) 

Characteristics of the national literatures. Romantic and costumbrista literature. 
Gauchismo and indegenismo. Principal works and authors. (Nemes.) 

SPAN 281, 282. Reading Course for Minors in Peninsular Spanish Litera- 
ture. (3, 3) (Staff.) 

SPAN 283, 284. Reading Course for Minors in Spanish-American Literature. 
(3, 3) (Nemes, Staff.) 

SPAN 291, 292. Open Seminar. (3, 3) (Staff.) 

SPAN 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Credits determined by work accomplished. Guidance in the preparation of 
master's theses. Conferences. (Staff.) 

SPAN 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Professors: Strausbaugh, Aylward, Hendricks, and Pugliese. 

Associate Professors: Baker, Landfield, Linkow, Meersman and Niemeyer. 

Assistant Professors: Craven, Doudna, Kennicott, Kirkley, O'Leary, Pro- 

vensen, Scher, Vaughan, Wolvin, and Zima. 
Associate Research Professor: Causey. 
Lecturer: Spuehler. 

The Department offers a graduate course of study in the fields of dramatics, 
general speech, radio-television, or in speech and hearing science leading to the 
Master of Arts degree. The Department also offers work leading to the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy in Speech and Hearing Science. 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School require- 
ments, have been formulated in each of the fields for the guidance of students. 
Copies may be obtained from the Department. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

SPCH 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation. (3) , 

Prerequisite, SPCH 013. (Provensen.) 

SPCH 110. Advanced Group Discussion. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 010. Required in speech curriculum and elective in other 
curricula. (Linkow.) 



University of Maryland • 263 

SPCH 111. Seminar. (3) 

Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. Present-day speech 
research. (Strausbaugh, Staff.) 

SPCH 124, 125. American Public Address. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 001 or 007. The first semester covers the period from 
colonial times to the Civil War period. The second semester covers from the 
Civil War period through the contemporary period. (Kennicott.) 

SPCH 133. Communication Processes in Conferences. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. Limited to students at the off-campus 
centers. (Linkow.) 

SPCH 161. Ancient Rhetoric. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, SPCH 002 or 01 i. (Wolvin.) 

SPCH 163. Materials and Programs for the Development of Listening. (3) 
Second semester. (Wolvin.) 

SPCH 164. Persuasion in Speech. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, SPCH 002 or Oil. (Schwartz.) 

SPCH 180. Honors Seminar. (3) 

For Honors students only. Readings, symposiums, visiting lecturers, discussions. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

SPCH 260. Speech and Drama Programs in Higher Education. (3) 

A study of current theories and practices in speech education. (Wolvin.) 

SPCH 261. Introduction to Graduate Study in Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Landfield.) 

SPCH 262. Special Problems in General Speech. (3) 

First semester. (Zima.) 

SPCH 263. Rhetorical Theories of Style. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, SPCH 124, 125. or 161. Examination of selected 
theories of style drawn from the fields of rhetoric and literature, and analysis 
of model speeches. (Kennicott.) 

SPCH 264, Interpersonal Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Problems and processes of symbolic representation in speech, 
the effects of language on communication, semantic redundancy, and interaction 
between meaning and the structure of oral language. (Zima.) 

SPCH 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An individual course designed for intensive 
study or research of problems in any one of the three areas of drama, general 
speech, or radio/tv. (Staff.) 

SPCH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

(Staff.) 

SPCH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

DRAMATIC ART 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
DART 113. Play Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, DART 016 or consent of instructor. (O'Leary.) 



264 • Graduate School 

DART 114. The Film as an Art Form. (3) (Niemeyer.) 

DART 127. Children's Dramatics. (3) 

Principles and methods necessary for staging children's productions on the ele- 
mentary school level. Major emphasis on creative dramatics; the application of 
creative dramatics in the school room, and the values gained by the child in this 
activity. Students will conduct classes in formal and creative dramatics which 
will culminate in children's programs. (McKerrow.) 

DART 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, DART 008 or consent of instructor. (Landfield, O'Leary.) 

DART 131. History of the Theatre. (3) 

First semester. A survey of the dramatic production from early origin to 1800. 

(Niemeyer.) 

DART 132. History of the Theatre. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to the present. 

(Niemeyer.) 

DART 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 008 or 014. A laboratory course designed to provide the 
student with practical experience in all phases of theatre production. (Landfield.) 

DART 171. Styles and Theories of Acting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite DART 008 or consent of instructor. (Pugliese.) 

DART 175. Stage Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 014 or consent of instructor. (Vaughan.) 

DART 176. Principles and Theories of Stage Lighting. (3) 

Prerequisite: DART 175. (Vaughan.) 

DART 177. Costume Design for the Stage. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 014 or consent of instructor. (Waters.) 

For Graduates 

DART 270. Seminar: Studies in Theatre. (3) 

First semester. Research projects adapted to individual backgrounds and special 
work. (Meersman.) 

DART 271. The Theory of Pre-Modern Dramatic Production. (3) 

Second semester. An historical survey of production styles. (Pugliese.) 

DART 272. Special Problems in Drama. (3) 

Second semester. The preparation of adaptations and other projects in 
dramaturgy. (Pugliese.) 

DART 273. Theories of the Drama. (3) 

Advanced study of the identification and development of dramatic form from 
the early Greek drama to contemporary forms; the esthetics of theatre arts; 
and dramatic criticism. (Landfield.) 

DART 275. Theory of Visual Design for the Performing Arts. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 175. A historical and theoretical study of design practices 
in the performing arts. (Vaughan.) 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
RATV 102. Radio Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, RATV 022 and consent of instructor. (Kirkley.) 



University of Maryland • 265 

RATV 115. Radio and Television in Retailing. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of Home Economics. Pre- 
requisite, SPCH 001 or 007. Writing and production of promotional programs 
for the merchandising of wearing apparel and home furnishings. Collaboration 
with the Washington and Baltimore radio stations and retail stores. (Kirkley.) 

RATV 117. Radio and Television Continuity Writing. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of instructor. (Scher.) 

RATV 140. Principles of Television Production. (3) 

Prerequisite, RATV 022. A study of the theory, methods, techniques, and prob- 
lems of television production and direction. Units of study covering television 
cameras and lenses, lighting theory and practices, scenery and properties, cos- 
tumes and makeup, graphic arts and special effects are included. Observation 
of production procedures at nearby television stations. Application will be made 
through crew assignments for University-produced television programs. (Staff.) 

RATV 146. Television News and Public Affairs. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, RATV 117 or JOUR 101. (McCleary.) 

RATV 147. Analysis of Broadcasting Processes and Results. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of instructor. (Scher.) 

RATV 148. Television Direction. (3) 

Two-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites, RATV 022, 140. 

(Aylward.) 

RATV 149. Television Workshop. (3) 

Two-hour lecture, four-hour laboratory. Prerequisites, RATV 022, 140 and 
148, or consent of instructor. (Aylward.) 

RATV 150. Radio and Television Station Management. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of instructor. (Kirkley.) 

RA.TV 151. Broadcast Programming and Criticism. (3) 

Second semester. An investigation of the professional, historical, social and 
psychological criticism of American radio and television, together with a critical 
analysis of contemporary programming trends and conventions. (Kirkley.) 

RATV 155. Film Production. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the theoretical and practical 
aspects of the 16mm film productions. Through reading and practice, students 
are familarized with basic cinematography, lighting, editing, pictorial composi- 
tion and film continuity as a communication arts medium. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

RATV 240. Seminar in Broadcasting. (3) 

First semester. Studies of various aspects of broadcasting. (Aylward.) 

RATV 241. Special Problems in Broadcasting. (3) 

Second semester. An experimental laboratory course for the development of 
new ideas in broadcasting. (Scher.) 

RATV 248. Advanced Television Direction. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequiste, RATV 148 or consent of instructor. Principles of 
television direction as applied to dramatic programs, together with a considera- 
tion of the specific aesthetic values of the television medium. (Aylward.) 



266 • Graduate School 

SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

SPHR 105. Speech-Handicapped School Children. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 003 for undergraduates. The occurrence, identification and 
treatment of speech handicaps in the classrooms. An introduction to speech 
pathology. (Staff.) 

SPHR 106. Clinical Practice. (1 to 5 Credits, up to 9) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 105 and consent of instructor. May be taken for 1-5 credit 
hours per semester. May be repeated for a total of 9 semester hours credit. 
Clinical practice in various methods of corrective procedures with various types 
of speech cases in the University clinic. Veterans hospitals, and public schools. 

(Craven.) 

SPHR 108. Educational Phonetics. (3) 

This course is designed to relate phonetic science to the classroom. An exten- 
sive coverage of broad transcription of General American speech. Students hav- 
ing credit for SPHR 003 or any previous phonetics course are not eligible for 
this course. (Hendricks.) 

SPHR 109. Speech and Language Development of Children. (3) 

Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An analysis of normal 
and abnormal processes of speech and language development in children. 

(Hendricks.) 

SPHR 112. Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 003 or consent of instructor. Training in the recognition and 
production of the sounds of spoken English, with an analysis of their forma- 
tion. Practice transcription. Mastery of the international phonetic alphabet. 

(Baker.) 

SPHR 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, SPHR 105. A continuation of SPHR 105, with 
emphasie on the causes and treatment of organic speech disorders. (Staff.) 

SPHR 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. An analysis of 
speech and language habits from the standpoint of general semantics. 

(Hendricks.) 

SPHR 135. Instrumentation in Speech and Hearing Science. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, SPHR 003. The use of electronic equipment in the 
measurement of speech and hearing. (Linkow.) 

SPHR 136. Principles of Speech Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 120. Differential diagnosis of speech and language handicaps 
and the application of psychological principles of learning, motivation and ad- 
justment in the treatment of speech disorders. (Craven.) 

SPHR 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 120 or the equivalent. The design and use of methods and 
materials for diagnosis, measurement, and retraining of the speech-handicapped. 

(Craven.) 

SPHR 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, SPHR 135. Analysis of various methods and pro- 
cedures in evaluating hearing losses. Required for students whose concentration 
is in speech and hearing therapy. (Doudna.) 

SPHR 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, SPHR 135, 141. Methods of training individuals 



University of Maryland • 267 

with hearing loss to recognize, interpret and understand spoken language. Re- 
quired for students whose concentration is in speech and hearing therapy. 

(Doudna.) 

For Graduates 

The department maintains a reciprocal agreement with the Veterans Admin- 
istration whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Audiology and Speech 
Pathology Clinic. Veterans Administration Hospital, 50 Irving St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

SPHR 201. Special Problems Seminar. (A. through K.) (1, 3) 

(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech 
pathology and consent of instructor. A. Stuttering; B. Cleft Palate; C. Delayed 
Speech; D. Articulation; E. Cerebral Palsy; F. Voice; G. Special Problems of the 
Deaf; H. Foreign Dialect; I. Speech Intelligibility; J. Neurophysiology of Hear- 
ing; K. Minor Research Problems. (Hendricks, Staff.) 

SPHR 202. Techniques of Research in Speech and Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 12 hours in speech pathology and audiology. 
Analysis of research methodology including experimental techniques, statistical 
analysis and preparation of reports for scientific investigations in speech and 
hearing science. Required of candidates for Master's degree in speech and hear- 
ing therapy. (Staff.) 

SPHR 203. Experimental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 1 12. The application of experimental methods in quantitative 
analysis of the phonetic elements of speech. (Baker.) 

SPHR 204. Applied Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 112 or equivalent. Application of phonetic analysis to com- 
munication systems and clinical analysis in speech and hearing. (Baker.) 

SPHR 205. Advanced Experimental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisites, SPHR 112, SPHR 203. Application of phonetic analysis in ex- 
perimental methodology utilizing electronic equipment for making spectro- 
graphic analyses of speech phenomena. (Baker.) 

SPHR 206. Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A study of diagnostic tools and 
methods in the analysis of various types of speech disorders. 

(Hendricks, Staff.) 

SPHR 207. Advanced Principles of Speech and Hearing Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 136 or equivalent, and 6 hours of speech and hearing 
pathology. A review of learning principles as applied to the training of the 
speech and hearing handicapped. (Hendricks.) 

SPHR 208. Quantitative Methods in Speech and Hearing Science. (3) 

An analysis of current procedures used in quantifying phenomena observed m 
Speech and Hearing Science. A minimum of 12 hours credit in Speech and 
Hearing is a prerequisite for this course. (Staff.) 

SPHR 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and consent of instruc- 
tor. A study of anatomy and physiology of the auditory and speech mechanisms. 

(Staff.) 

SPHR 211. A, B, C, D. Advanced Clinical Practice. (1, 3 up to 12) 

(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisite, 12 hours in speech 



268 • Graduate School 

pathology and audiology and permission of instructor. Supervised training in 
the application of clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech 
and hearing disorders. (Craven, Doudna.) 

SPHR 212. Advanced Speech Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent of instructor. Etiology 
and therapy for organic and functional speech disorders. (Staff.) 

SPHR 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. Testing of audi- 
tory acuity with pure tones and speech. (Doudna.) 

SPHR 216. Communication Skills for the Hard-of-Hearing. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. 
Speech reading, auditory training, and speech conservation problems in the 
rehabilitation of the hard-of-hearing. (Doudna.) 

SPHR 217. Hearing Aid Selection for the Acoustically Handicapped. (3) 
Prerequisite. SPHR 214. A laboratory course in modern methods of utilizing 
electronic hearing aids. (Doudna.) 

SPHR 218. Speech and Hearing in Medical Rehabilitation and Special 
Education Programs. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Administrative problems involved in the organization and 
operation of speech and hearing theapy under the different types of programs. 

(Hendricks.) 

SPHR 219. Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and consent of instruc- 
tor. Methods of evaluation and treatment of children and adults who have 
suffered injury to brain tissue, with subsequent damage to speech and language 
processes. (Hendricks.) 

SPHR 220. Experimental Audiology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 houis in audiology. A study of experimental 
techniques in the investigation of problems in audiology and psychoacoustics. 

(Causey.) 

SPHR 221. Communication Theory and Speech Hearing Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Analysis of current theories of communication as they 
apply to research and therapy in speech and hearing. (Hendricks.) 

SPHR 222. Advanced Bio-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology. Laboratory research methods in the study 
of hearing mechanisms in animals. (Spuehler.) 

SPHR 223. Advanced Psycho-Acoustics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology. Research methodology in the study of human 
hearing. (Causey.) 

SPHR 224. The Prepar.\tion of Speech and Hearing Scientists in Institutions 

OF Higher Learning. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of audiology and 6 hours of speech pathology. A review 

of problems involved in the training of personnel who expect to take teaching 

and research positions at university and college level. (Hendricks.) 



University of Maryland • 269 

SPHR 225. Advanced Semantics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 3 hours of semantics. Advanced study of the effects of language 
in human perception. (Hendricks.) 

SPHR 226. Language Problems of the Exceptional Child. (3) 

Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A survey of special language prob- 
lems of the mentally retarded, brain-injured, hard-of-hearing and deaf children. 

(Staff.) 

SPHR 227. Experimental Design in Speech and Hearing Science. (3) 

A seminar devoted to planning and conducting experiments in speech and hear- 
ing science. Each student is required to present three pilot studies for discussion. 
Two hours classwork, two hours laboratory. Permission of instructor required. 

(Staff.) 

SPHR 229. Clinical and Socio-Economic Aspects of Hearing Loss. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 214. Social, economic, legal, medical, hearing conservation, 
and social welfare aspects of hearing loss for adults. Laboratory work will in- 
clude identification and monitoring audiometry as well as practical clinical 
audiology. (Doudna.) 

SPHR 301. Independent Study in Speech and Hearing Science. (1-6) 

Student-selected topic of investigation. A proposed topic must be approved prior 
to registration. In addition to a formal report an oral presentation of the re- 
sults will be required. May be repeated. Prerequisite, 30 hours of graduate 
study in speech and hearing science. (Staff.) 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Director and Head: Ladson. 

Associate Professors: Wills and Newman. 

Assistant Professors: Albert, Mohanty and Schultz. 

No advanced degrees are given in the Department of Veterinary Science. 
Graduate students in other departments are accepted for problems in the Depart- 
ment of Veterinary Science upon approval of the Department in which the 
graduate degree may be given. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ANSC 116. Anatomy of Domestic Animals. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite. 
ZOOL 001. (Albert.) 

ANSC 117. Introduction to Diseases of Animals. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites, MICB 001, and ZOOL 001. (Albert.) 

ANSC 119. Laboratory Animal Management. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
ZOOL 001. ' (Wills.) 

ANSC 170. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites, MICB 001, and ANSC 001. (Newman.) 

ANSC 171. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 
001. (Newman.) 



270 • Graduate School 



For Graduates 



ANSC 200. Electron Microscopy. (3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. 
Theory of the electron microscope, preparation of specimens, manipulations 
and photography. (Mohanty.) 

ANSC 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal 
science, carrying the same to completion, and reporting the results in the 
form of a thesis. (Staff.) 

ANSC 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 



ZOOLOGY 

Professor and Acting Head: Jachowski. 

Professors: Anastos, Brown, Grollman, Haley, Jachowski, Otto, and 

Schleidt. 
Professor Emeritus: Burhoe. 

Research Professors: Cronin,* Flyger,* and Koo*. 
Associate Professors: Brinkley, Clark, Gainer, Highton, Linder, and 

Ramm. 
Research Associate Professor, Part-Time: Eisenberg, and Price. 
Assistant Professors: Contrera, Goode, Hailman, Imberski, Morse, Nelson, 

AND Potter. 
Research Associate: Doss. 
Research Associate, Part-Time: Farr. 
Lecturer: McIntosh. 

Instructors: Kaufman, Moore, Nardell and Stewart. 
Junior Instructors: Albert, Croshaw, Glover, Guidmore, Piper, Resau, 

Smith, and Vieweg. 

The Department of Zoology offers programs of study leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with specialization in the fol- 
lowing fields: cellular, organ, comparative and nerve physiology; invertebrate 
and vertebrate endocrinology; biophysics; cytology; developmental zoology; 
population, biochemical, radiation and general genetics; animal behavior; 
ecology; parasitology, protozoology, helminthology, acarology; invertebrate 
zoology; systematics; ichthyology, herpetology, orinthology and mammalogy. 
The general academic requirements which must be fulfilled for the M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees are described earlier in the catalog. 

Admission to graduate study in the Department is restricted to students with 
an adequate undergraduate preparation in physical as well as biological sciences. 
This would include upper division courses in zoology, and courses in mathe- 
matics, physics and chemistry through organic. Able students who lack prepara- 
tion in a particular area may be admitted provided that the deficiency is cor- 
rected early in the graduate work. Applicants should submit the results of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

*Staff, Natural Resources Institute, University of Maryland 



University of Maryland • 271 

For further information and application forms, write to the Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland, 20742. 

All Zoolog>' courses with laboratory have a laboratory fee of $12.00 per 
course per semester. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZOOL 102. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, one 
year of zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. (Gainer.) 

ZOOL 103. Biophysics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of biology, a year of physics, at 
least one semester of calculus, or permission of the instructor. A course in 
the biophysics of excitable ceils, utilizing a fairly rigorous physical-chemical 
approach to the study of the mechanisms of action of such cells. (Goode.) 

ZOOL 104. Vertebrate Physiology. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
one year of zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. (Contrera.) 

ZOOL 105. General Endocrinology. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology and one semester 
of organic chemistry. (Brinkley.) 

ZOOL 106. Genetic Systems. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, a course in genetics, one year of organic 
chemistry and MATH Oil or equivalent. (Imberski.) 

ZOOL 108. Animal Histology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of zoology. (Haley.) 

ZOOL 109. Cell Biology. (4) 

Two lectures, one one-hour demonstration-discussion period and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, two years of zoology and organic chem- 
istry, or permission of the instructor. (Brown.) 

ZOOL 110. General Parasftology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
two years of zoology and one year of chemistry, or permission of the instructor. 

(Jachowski.) 

ZOOL 118. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of zoology. (Linder.) 

ZOOL 120. Vertebrate Embryology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of zoology. (Ramm.) 

ZOOL 121. Animal Ecology. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of zoology. (Morse.) 

"ZOOL 125S. Fishery Biology and Management. (5) 

Five 75-minute lectures and four 3-hour laboratories each week for six weeks. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology and permission of instructor. Study of fish 
identification, development, life history stages, food habits, age and growth,. 



272 • Graduate School 

spawning, migration and population dynamics. (Koo and Faculty.) 

^Offered at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Solomons, Maryland — 
summer only. 
ZOOL 127. Ichthyology. (4) 

Two lectures and one two-hour and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisites, ZOOL 001, 002 and 005 or equivalent. (Clark.) 

ZOOL 128. Zoogeography. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001, 002, and 005 or equivalent. 

(Potter.) 

ZOOL. 129. Vertebrate Zoology. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, two 
years of zoology or permission of instructor. (Clark.) 

ZOOL 130. Hydrobiology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods' a week. Prerequisite, one 
year of biology or permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

Prerequisites, major in zoology or biological sciences, a minimum of 3.0 
cumulative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. 
Research or integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several 
times and receive up to 8 semester hours of credit. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 151H. Honors Seminar. (1) 

One discussion period a week. Prerequisite, participation in honors program. 
Guided discussion of topics of current interest. Repeatable to total of 4 hours 
credit. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 152H. Honors Independent Study. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. Study of classical material by 
way of guided independent study and laboratory experiments. Repeatable to a 
total of ]2 hours credit. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 153H. Honors Research. (1-2) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. A laboratory research problem 
which is required each semester during honors participation and culminates in 
an honors thesis. Repeatable to a total of 8 hours credit. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 180. Cell Differentation. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, a course in embryology, cell biology, 
or genetic systems, or permission of the instructor. A discussion of cellular and 
subcellular differentiation, emphasizing the biochemical and ultrastructural 
bases of these developmental changes (Goode.) 

ZOOL 182. Ethology. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, two 
years of zoology, including a course in comparative anatomy, or permission of 
instructor. The function, causation, and evolution of behavior. Laboratory 
analysis of the behavior of several species. (Hailman.) 

ZOOL 190. Evolution. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in genetics or permission of instruc- 
tor. (Highton.) 

For Graduates 

ZOOL 201. Comparative Physiology. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 



University of Maryland • 273 

one year of zoology, one year of organic chemistry and one semester cf physi- 
ology. The study of the differences and similarities in the functioning of organs 
of species of the animal kingdom. (Brinkley.) 

ZOOL 203. Advanced EMBRVOLOGy. (4) 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisites, a course in 
embryology and a course in physiology. The biochemical basis of development. 

(Ramm.) 

ZOOL 204. Cellular Physiology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
a course in animal or plant ph\siology. one year of organic chemistry, one \ear 
of physics, and a course in biochemistry. Recommended. ZOOL 109 or an 
equivalent course in cytology or cell biology. A study of the structure and 
functions of cells on the molecular, subcellular and cellular levels by investi- 
gations and discussions of their physical, chemical, and microscopic properties. 

(Staff.) 

ZOOL 205. Comparative Invertebrate Endocrinology. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of organic chemistry, a course 
in endocrinology and a course in physiology, or permission of the instructor. 
A systematic approach to the structure and physiology of neuro-endocrine sys- 
tems of invertebrates. (Linder.) 

ZOOL 206. Electrophysiology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a 
course in physiology, one year of physics, and permission of the instructor. A 
course concerned with electrical phenomena occurring in living matter and with 
the effect of electrical current on cells, with special emphasis on nerves and 
muscles. (Gainer.) 

ZOOL 207. Zoology Seminar. (Arranged) 

One seminar a week for each credit hour. A. cytology; B. embryology: C. fish- 
eries: D. genetics: E. parasitology; F. physiology; G. systematics; L behavior; 
J. recent advances; K. endocrinology, and L. ecology. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 208. Special Problems in Zoology. (Arranged) 

A. cytology; B. embryology; C. fisheries; D. genetics; E. parasitology; F. 
physiology; G. systematics; I. behavior; J. general; K. endocrinology, and 
L. ecology. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 210. Systematic Zoology. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. The principles 
and methods involved in the classification of animals, with emphasis on popula- 
tion dynamics and speciation. Methods of evaluating taxonomic data, prin- 
ciples of zoological nomenclature, field and museum techniques, and the factors 
influencing the distribution of animals are also stressed. (Highton.) 

ZOOL 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology. (1-3, 1-3) 

One, two or three lectures a week. Advanced lectures by outstanding authori- 
ties in their particular field of zoology. As the subject matter is continually 
changing, a student may register several times, receiving credit for several 
semesters. (Visiting Lecturers.) 

ZOOL 215. Sociobiology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a 
course in behavior and permission of the instructor. The course will deal with 
the description and analysis of animal social organizations, the adaptive nature 



274 • Graduate School 

of animal societies, the effects of early experience, and the role of communica- 
tion in the integration of animal groups. (Eisenberg.) 

ZOOL 216. Physiological Cytology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one 
year of biochemistry and physics, a course in physiology, or permission of the 
instructor. A study of the structure and function of cells by chemical, physical 
and microscopic methods. (Brown.) 

ZOOL 220. Population Genetics. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, a 
course in genetics. The role of mutation, selection, migration, inbreeding, and 
stochastic process in evolution. (Highton.) 

ZOOL 221. Ecological Genetics. (4) 

Two lectures and six hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisites, a course in 
genetics and a course in ecology, or permission of the instructor. Analysis of 
the interactions between genotype and environment in natural and experimental 
populations of animals. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 223. Analysis of Animal Structure. (4) 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisite, a course in 
embryology. The experimental basis of developmental mechanics. (Ramm.) 

ZOOL 234. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. (4) 

Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a course in physiology 
and one year of chemistry above general chemistry. The theory, use and ap- 
plication to research of instrumentation normally found in the physiology labora- 
tory with an introduction to surgical techniques on both large and small ani- 
mals. (Grollman.) 

ZOOL 235. Comparative Behavior. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
usually a course in behavior and one in physiology, and permission of the 
instructor. Orientation and migration, communication, coding, brain and be- 
havior, biological rhythms, and hormones and behavior are the main subjects 
that will be considered. (Schleidt.) 

ZOOL 236. Mammalian Physiology. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, a course in physiology. Advanced study 
of the functioning of the organs of mammalian species. (Contrera.) 

ZOOL 237. Comparative Vertebrate Endocrinology. (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, one semester of biochemistry, physi- 
ology and endocrinology. Study of the difference and similarities in the struc- 
ture and functioning of the endocrine organs of the vertebrate species. 

(Brinkley.) 

ZOOL 240. Analysis of Animal Populations. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, a 
course in ecology or permission of instructor. An advanced course in animal 
ecology with a focus on population. Studies of growth and regulation of ani- 
mal populations are emphasized. (Morse.) 

ZOOL 245. Biology of Birds. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, a 
course in vertebrate zoology or permission of instructor. Emphasis will be 
on ecology, behavior, anatomy, systematics, and reproductive physiology, plus 
field studies of local birds. (Staff.) 



Untversity of Maryland • 275 

ZOOL 250. Experimental Parasitology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, a 
course in parasitology and permission of the instructor. Experiments will be 
performed utilizing living parasites in laboratory animals to illustrate various 
aspects of the host-parasite relationship. (Jachowski.) 

ZOOL 251. Helminthology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
two years of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study of the classifi- 
cation, structure and biology of the helminths. (Mcintosh.) 

ZOOL 252. Protozoology. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one 
year of zoology and permission of the instructor. A study of the classification, 
structure and biology of the protozoa. (Otto.) 

ZOOL 253. Physiology of Symbiosis. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, one 
year of biochemistry and permission of instructor. A consideration of the 
biology of symbiotic organisms, especially the physiological concert existing 
between host and symbiont. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 260. Quantitative Zoology. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
MATH 019 or equivalent and permission of the instructor. A consideration of 
the statistical techniques of principal importance in the analysis of biological 
data. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 300. Advanced Topics in Parasitology. (Arranged) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and permission of the instructor. 
The content of the course changes frequently and students may register for it 
several times. The course will consist of critical discussions of the published 
literature and current problems in parasitology. 1. host-parasite relationships; 
2. ecology of parasites; 3. immunity to parasites; and 4. physiology of para- 
sites. (Anastos, Haley, Jackowski, Otto.) 

ZOOL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Work on thesis project only. A. cytology; B. embryology; C. fisheries; D. genetics; 
E. parasitology; F. physiology; G. systematics; L behavior; J. invertebrate 
zoology; K. endocrinology; L. ecology. (Staff.) 

ZOOL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

ANATOMY 

Professors: Hahn and Piavis. 
Associate Professor: Sinnreich. 
Assistant Professor: Sachs. 
Lecturer: Lindenberg. 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees are offered in the Department of Anatomy. 

Applications for admission to departmental graduate programs leading to 
the MS or PhD degrees must be approved by the Graduate Admissions Com- 
mittee of the School of Dentistry. Applicants are expected to have sound aca- 



276 • Graduate School 

demic records in undergraduate study and to have achieved satisfactory scores 
on the Graduate Record Examination. Further information about requirements 
may be obtained by v^riting to the Chairman of the Graduate Admissions 
Committee or to the chairman of the department concerned. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AN AT 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First semester. Three lectures and four laboratory periods per week. This 
course, through lectures, demonstrations, and required regional dissections 
conducted over the entire human body, provides an opportunity for the stu- 
dent to become imbued with principles of body structure and functions, the 
knowledge of which is derived from a study of its development, its tissues, its 
organs, and the actions and interactions of its several systems. Frequent stu- 
dent conferences supplement the normal didactic presentations. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Sinnreich, Sachs.) 

ANAT 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Second semester. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week for 
eight weeks. Prerequisite, ANAT 111. its equivalent, or permission of the 
Department Head. The course consists of a study of the human brain and 
spinal cord through gross dissection and microscopic methods. Correlation is 
made, whenever possible, with the student's work in histology and physiology 
of the central nervous system. (Hahn, Piavis, Sinnreich, Sachs, Lindenberg.) 

For Graduates 

ANAT 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Same as ANAT 1 1 1 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Sinnreich, Sachs.) 

ANAT 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as ANAT 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Sinnreich, Sachs, Lindenberg.) 

ANAT 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. This 
course is designed to provide the student with a detailed study of the basic 
anatomy of the region and to correlate this knowledge with the various aspects 
of clinical practice. (Hahn, Piavis, Sinnreich, Sachs.) 

ANAT 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

(Credit by arrangement.) (Staff.) 

ANAT 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Associate Professor: Ganis. 

Assistant Professors: Leonard and Morris. 

Instructor: Courtade. 

BIOCHEM 111. Principles OF Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisites, inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training in 
quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week throughout the year, with one conference period per week during 
the first eight weeks of Semester 1. The chemistry of living matter forms the 
basis of the course. The detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of 
carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes 



University of Maryland • 277 

of respiration, digestion, metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. 
Laboratory instruction in qualitative blood and urine examination is included. 

(Ganis, Leonard. Morris, Courtade.) 

For Graduates 

BIOCHEM 2\\. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

This course is the same as BIOCHEM 111 except that it includes additional 
instruction, collateral reading and assigned reports of an advanced nature. 

(Ganis, Leonard, Morris, Courtade.) 

BIOCHEM 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

(Ganis, Leonard, Morris, Courtade.) 

BIOCHEM 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor: Provenza. 

Associate Professors: Barry and Fischlschweiger. 

HISTOL 111. Mammalian Histology AND Embryology. (8) 

First semester. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and 
organs of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects 
of the dental histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, 
many are included in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas 
are so intimately related when functional and clinical applications are considered. 
The instruction in embryology is correlated with that in histology. It covers the 
fundamentals of development of the human body, particular emphasis being 
given to the head and facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their 
adnexa. Specific correlations are also made with the other courses in the dental 
curriculum. (Barry, Fischlschweiger, Provenza.) 

For Graduates 

HISTOL 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (6) 

First semester. This course is the same as HISTOL 111, except that it does not 
include the dental phases of HISTOL HI, but does include additional instruction 
and collateral reading of an advanced nature. 

(Barry, Fischlschweiger, Provenza.) 

HISTOL 213. Mammalian Oral Histology aknd Embryology. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, HISTOL 11 1 or 212, or an equivalent course. This 
course covers the dental aspects of HISTOL 111, and includes additional 
instruction in the relations of histologic structure and embryologic development 
of the teeth, their adnexa, and the head and facial regions of the human body. 

(Barry. Fischlschweiger. Provenza.) 

HISTOL 216. Inheritance and Development Biology. (6) 

This course is concerned with the study of the embryogeny and fetal develop- 
ments of vertebrate animals with special emphasis on mammalian embryology. 
In addition to tracing the development pattern, lectures are devoted to the dis- 
cussion of inheritance mechanisms, gametogenesis and fertilization. (Provenza.) 

HISTOL 217. Comparative Animal Histology. (6) 

Prerequisite, HISTOL 111, 212-213, or an equivalent course. This course is 
concerned with a comparative study of the morphology, structure and function 
of the cells, tissues and organs as found in representative members of the animal 
kingdom. Special emphasis is placed on techniques and research methods. 

(Provenza.) 



278 • Graduate School 

HISTOL 218. Experimental Embryology. (4) 

Second semester of every year. Prerequisite, HISTOL 216, or an equivalent 
course. This course is concerned with the historical and recent aspects of 
experimental embryology from both the applied and theoretical standpoint. Each 
student will be assigned a special problem in addition to the scheduled lectures. 

(Provenza.) 

HISTOL 219. Radiation Biology. (4) 

Second semester of alternate years. The primary aim of this course is to 
familiarize the student with the techniques of handling radioactive isotopes as 
applied in biological research. The topics covered in the course are: the physics 
of radioactivity from the standpoint of the biological researcher; the selection 
of isotopes for specific investigations; the effects of radioactivity on cells, tissues 
and systems; the effect of radioactivity on inheritance; the role of environment 
on the effectiveness of radioactivity; and certain phases of laboratory health 
physics. The laboratory will be concerned with the use and location as well as 
recording and interpreting data of isotopes as applied to biological research. 
Permission of instructor required. (Barry.) 

HISTOL 220. Physical Methods in Histology. (4) 

Second semester of alternate years. The course introduces the graduate 
student to some of the more frequently employed techniques in cytological and 
histological research. Exercises are designed for the operation and interpretation 
of data derived from the use of available research tools. Two one-hour lectures 
and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Consent of instructor required. 

(Barry.) 

HISTOL 221. Special Problems in Histology and Embryology. 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) Prerequisite, HISTOL 111 
and HISTOL 219 or 220. This course is designed to provide experience in 
the organization and execution of small research projects in cytology and 
histology. Consent of department head required. (Staff.) 

HISTOL 320. Seminar. (1, 1) (Staff.) 

HISTOL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) (Staff.) 

HISTOL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay. 

Assistant Professors: Delisle, Joseph, Krywolap, and Schneider. 

The Department of Microbiology serves both the School of Dentistry and 
the School of Pharmacy and offers programs leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The graduate program is especially 
designed to train students for positions in research and teaching, with particular 
emphasis on research problems related to the dental sciences. The student may 
specialize in the areas of pathogenic microbiology, fermentation, antibiotics, 
antiseptics, oral microbiology, immunology and mycology. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MICE 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (5) 

First semester. Consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts 
and molds. Special attention is given to those organisms which produce lesions 



University of Maryland • 279 

of the oral cavity. Immunological principles are studied with emphasis on 
hypersensitivity resulting from antibiotics, antigens and vaccines. Laboratory 
teaching includes cultural characteristics, disinfection, sterilization, asepsis, ani- 
mal inoculation, antibiotics assay and virus techniques. In all phases of the 
course emphasis is placed on dental applications. (Shay.) 

MICB 101. Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite. MICB 001. The role of microorganisms in the diseases of man 
and animals with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of micro- 
organisms, type of disease, modes of disease transmission; prophylactic, 
therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. This course is presented in the Uni- 
versity College program. (Joseph, Libonati.) 

MICB 151. Serology-Immunology. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. TTiree lectures a week. Prerequisite, MICB BlOl 
or equivalent. Study of the theories and principles of immunological reactions 
to infectious and noninfectious agents. Demonstration of basic serologic phe- 
nomena and their use in laboratory diagnosis. This course is presented in the 
University College program. (Joseph.) 

MICB 152. Virology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. TTiree lectures a week. Prerequisite, MICB 
BlOl or equivalent. Consideration of the characteristics and properties of 
viruses and rickettsiae, with emphasis on concepts of pathogenicity, immunity, 
epidemiology and identification. Discussion of the principles of tissue cell 
culture. This course is presented in the University College program. (Joseph.) 

MICB 153. Mycology. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, MICB BlOl 
or equivalent. An introductory study of classification, morphology and identifi- 
cation of fungi, with special emphasis on human pathogens. This course is 
presented in the University College program. (Joseph.) 

MICB 154. Parasitology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, MICB 
BlOl or equivalent. Systematic review of the morphology, life cycle, disease 
process and identification of human parasites, with demonstrations of repre- 
sentative forms. This course is presented in the University College program. 

(Joseph.) 

For Graduates 

MICB 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1) 

Ofi'ered in alternate years. Prerequisites, MICB 121 or equivalent; BIOCHEM 
1 1 1 or equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharma- 
cology and therapeutic value of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

(Shay.) 

MICB 202. Theory and Principles of Reagents and Media. (3) 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media for special procedures, such 
as antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. 
Anaerobiosis, differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility 
testing are considered in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements of 
specific groups of microorganisms. (Shay.) 

MICB 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Laboratory 
course. Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. (Shay.) 



280 • Graduate School 

MICB 211. Public Health. (2) 

Prerequisite, MICB 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health 
facilities in the community and their relation to the practices of the health 
sciences carried on through lectures and discussion groups. The application of 
statistical and epidemiological methods to health problems is illustrated through 
lectures and demonstrations. (Shay.) 

MICB 212. Bacterial Fermentations. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisites, MICB 121 or equivalent; 
BIOCHEM 111 or equivalent. This course covers composition, nutrition and 
growth of microorganisms; influence of physical and chemical environment on 
metabolism; chemical activities of microorganisms; mechanisms of fermentative 
and oxidative metabolism. (Krywolap.) 

MICB 221. Advanced Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

First semester. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory v^fith group 
conferences each week. Prerequisite, MICB 121 or equivalent. This course, 
intended for graduate students of oral microbiology, is a continuation of 
MICB 121, supplemented with library readings and advanced laboratory 
experimentation. (Shay, Krywolap, Schneider.) 

MICB 224. Microbiology of the Periodontium. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisites, MICB 121; HISTOL 111; and 
PATH 121, or equivalents. This course is designed for advanced students in 
the field of oral microbiology. Consideration will be given to the role of 
microorganisms in periodontal tissues and the factors that influence the 
development of diseases; bacterial interactions; parasitism; salivary calculus; 
periodontitis; gingivitis; and herpetic gingivostomatitis. (Shay.) 

MICB 281-283. Seminar. (1) (1) 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and research in the field of 
microbiology. (Staff.) 

MICB 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Open only 
to candidates for advanced degrees in microbiology. (Staff.) 

MICB 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

PATHOLOGY 

Professors: J. J. Salley, and M. Lunin. 

Associate Professor: W. Collett. 

Assistant Professors: T. Beckerman, and B. S. Burch. 

Instructor: E. Levin. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PATH 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PATH 212, 213. Special Problems in Oral Pathology. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite. PATH 121 or equivalent. One lecture and one laboratory period 
per week. The histopathology of selected oral lesions with emphasis on recent 
advances in diagnostic techniques. (Staff.) 



University of Maryland • 281 

PATH 214, 215. Methods in Histopathology (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, PATH 121 or equivalent. Two four-hour laboratory periods each 
week. The laboratory methods used in preparing pathologic tissues for micro- 
scopic examination. (Staff.) 

PATH 216, 217. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions. (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, PATH 212 or equivalent. One hour of lecture and four hours 
of laboratory each week. The study of uncommon and rare lesions of the head 
and neck. (Staff.) 

PATH 218, 219. Seminar. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, PATH 121 or equivalent. One period each week. Recent advances 
in experimental oral pathology. (Staff.) 

PATH 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Time and credit by arrangement. (Staff.) 

PATH 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: White. 

Associate Professor: Weatherred. 

Physiology 121. F.S. Principles of Physiology. (4, 2) 

Three lectures and one laboratory period per week, first semester; two lectures 
per week, second semester. (White, Staff.) 

Physiology 211. F.S. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (4, 2) 

Prerequisite, permission from the Department. Same as PHYSIOLOGY 121 but 
with collateral reading and additional instruction. Each student is required to 
write a review paper on some special phase of physiology. (White.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Second semester. Hours and credit by arrangement. Prerequisite. PHYSIOLOGY 
121 or its equivalent. Lectures and seminars on special problems and recent 
advances in physiology during the second semester. (White.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 213. Research. 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (White.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (White.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 

Professors: FiGGE and Krahl. 

Associate Professors: O'Morchoe and Wadsworth. 

Assistant Professors: Donati, Petersen, Ramsay, and Rennels. 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the Doctor 

of Philosophy and the combined MD-Ph.D. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ANAT 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (9) 

This course gives the student an opportunity to develop a basic concept of 
the morphology of the human body. It is closely interwoven with the study 



282 • Graduate School 

of neuroanatomy, histology and embryology, and some time is devoted to 
roentgen anatomy. The entire human body is dissected. (Figge, Staff.) 

ANAT 206. Correlative Anatomy. (1, 1) 

Patients will be demonstrated and the anatomical features of the case will 
be stressed to give the student a concept of the relationship of the anatomy 
to clinical subjects. 

ANAT 207. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 

First semester, fifteen periods of three hours each, to be arranged. This course 
is open to graduate students and postgraduates interested in pediatrics. (Krahl.) 

ANAT 211. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semester. One session per week. Graduate students, staff and 
guests participate in comprehensive and critical review of subjects of special 
interest in the field of anatomy. (Figge, Staff.) 

ANAT 399. Research in Anatomy. (Master's Level) 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in any one 
of the branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff.) 

ANAT 499. Research in Anatomy. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

MICROANATOMY 

ANAT 202. Microanatomy. (6) 

This course presents an integrated study on an advanced level of the histology 
and embryology of the human body. An attempt is made to correlate this 
with gross anatomy as well as other subjects in the medical curriculum. Special 
emphasis is placed on the dynamic and functional aspects of the subject. 

(O'Morchoe, Donati.) 

ANAT 205. Genetics. (2) 

This course consists of a series of one-hour lectures which include a considera- 
tion of the principles of genetics, population genetics, biochemical genetics, 
radiation genetics, immunogenetics, and microbial genetics. Special emphasis is 
placed on the importance, understanding and application of genetics to health 
and disease. (Petersen.) 

ANAT 208. Studies on Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 

Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be arranged. 
Sixteen weeks. (Figge.) 

MICRO ANAT 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Maximum credits 12. Research work may be taken in any one of the branches 
which form the subject of microanatomy (including cancer research). 

(Figge, Staff.) 

MICROANAT 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

NEUROANATOMY 

ANAT 203. Neurological Sciences. (4) 

First and second semesters. Consists primarily of the integrated course of 
neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with additional contributions from neurol- 
ogy, neuropathology, neurosurgery and electroencephalography. The structure 
and function of the central nervous system will be presented simultaneously. 



University of Maryland • 283 

The course will involve dissection of the human brain, examination of stained 
microscopic sections of various levels of the brain stem and laboratory experi- 
ence involving the study of functional aspects of the nervous system. 

(Nelson, O'Morchoe, Rennels. Wagner, Wells.) 

ANAT 210. Special Problems in Neuroanatomy. (2) 

This course will deal with specific problems in the field of neuroanatomy, 
depending on the interests of the sponsor. It will consist of lectures, seminars, 
and specific laboratory assignments. (Figge, O'Morchoe, Rennels.) 

NEUROANAT 399. Thesis Research in Neuroanatomy. (Master's Level) 

Maximum credits, 12. Research work involving the central or peripheral 
nervous system. (Figge, Staff.) 

NEUROANAT 499. Dissertation Research in Neuroanatomy. (Doctoral Level) 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professors: Adams and Bessman (P.T.). 

Associate Professors: Frank and Pomerantz 

Assistant Professors: Bode, Gryder, Kirtley and Layne (P.T.). 

Instructor: Brown. 

Graduate degree offered by the Department of Biological Chemistry is the 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates 

BIOCHEM 201. Principles of Biochemistry. (8) 

First year, second semester. A general introduction to biochemistry with emphasis 
on basic chemistry of biologically important molecules, enzymes, intermediary 
metabolism, matabolic regulation, and molecular biology. Features of mam- 
malian biochemistry are stressed but general and comparative aspects are 
considered. This is the biochemistry portion of a combined course in Bio- 
chemistry, Biophysics and Physiology, offered to first year medical students 
and interested graduate students. Graduate students may take only the Bio- 
chemistry section (approximately 50 lectures and 30 laboratory hours) or add 
the Biophysics section (consisting of about 25 lectures and 2 laboratory 
exercises) for additional credit. 

BIOCHEM 202,203. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

A series of lectures on special topics of current interest in biochemistry. Cov- 
erage varies from year to year and is amended annually. Topics in past years 
have included nucleic acid biochemistry, chromosomal structure, oxygenases, 
collagen biochemistry, peptide hormones, comparative biochemistry, metabolic 
regulation, protein synthesis, enzyme kinetics and mechanism. Single topics 
occupying varying periods from several weeks to an entire semester. Prerequisite, 
BIOCHEM 201 or equivalent. 

BIOCHEM 204, 205. Seminar. (1, 1) 

Reports on current literature or on research in progress. Prerequisite, 
BIOCHEM 201. 

BIOCHEM 399. Thesis Research. (Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester.) 
(Master's Level) 

BIOCHEM 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 



284 • Graduate School 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professors: WissEMAN, Traub. 
Associate Professors: Eylar, Fiset, and Kessel. 
Assistant Professors: Myers, Rosenzweig, and Snyder. 
Instructors: Fabrikant, Hatgi. 

The Department of Microbiology oflFers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
While the degree of Master of Science may be offered in special instances, 
priority for research facilities will be given aspirants to the Ph.D. degree. This 
Department encourages students who wish to enroll in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. 
program. 

Emphasis is placed upon medical aspects of microbiology. Research programs 
are available in virology, rickettsiology, medical bacteriology, immunology and 
microbial physiology. Opportunities are open for experience in teaching and in 
diagnostic bacteriology and serology. Opportunities exist for ecological studies 
on rickettsioses and arboviruses in overseas areas. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MICE 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. This course begins with an introduction to basic 
principles of microbiology and immunology and then proceeds to consider 
the major groups of bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, rickettsiae and viruses that 
cause human disease. Emphasis is placed upon an analysis of the properties 
of microorganisms thought to be important in disease production, pathogenesis 
of infection and interaction with host defense mechanisms, epidemiology and 
control measures. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

For Graduates 

MICB 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. This course, intended for the serious advanced student 
of medical microbiology, is built upon the framework of MICB 101 supple- 
mented with advanced readings and laboratory work. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented with 
demonstrations. By consent of instructor. This course surveys the metabolic 
processes of bacteria, fungi, rickettsiae, viruses and parasitic protozoa. 

(Myers, Wisseman.) 

MICB 206, 207. Seminar. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, staff and 
guests participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects of special 
interest or pertinent to graduate training program. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides the oppor- 
tunity for the graduate student to pursue under supervision subjects of special 
interest not offered in other formal courses. A study program is worked out with 
the instructor prior to registration and may consist of special readings, con- 
ferences, reports and, on occasion, laboratory experience. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 210. Advanced Virology and Rickettsiology Lecture. (3) 

This course considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae, methods 
for studying them and finally concentrates on agents of medical importance. 



University of Maryland • 285 

Special emphasis is placed on the host-parasite relationship, characterization of 
the various viral and rickettsial agents and on biological and ecological factors. 
Registration is by permission of instructor only. The course will be given on 
the average in alternate years in the Spring semester. There are two weekly 
sessions of 90 minutes each. Prerequisites: MICB 201 or equivalent. 

(Eylar, Fiset, Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 211. VrROLOGY and Rickettsiologv Laboratory. (1) 

This course is the laboratory counterpart of MICB 210. It is designed to 
familiarize the student with the major techniques for the study of virus and 
rickettsial agents and to give him first hand experience with a variety of the 
more common agents. Registration is by permission of instructor only. Because 
of the limited facilities and the nature of the work, it may be necessary to 
restrict registration in this course according to the following priority: students 
majoring in medical microbiology, then students minoring in microbiology and, 
finally, others. The laboratory consists of two formal sessions per week; how- 
ever, the nature of the work frequently requires additional participation 
throughout the week. (Eylar, Fiset, Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

MICB 499 Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

BIOPHYSICS 

Professors: Mullins {Chairman of Department) , AND Sjodin. 
Assistant Professor: Hybl. 

The Department of Biophysics offers graduate courses of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The study programs 
are flexible and depend on the preparation and interests of the student. Detailed 
requirements are available from the Department of Biophysics (c/o School of 
Medicine, Baltimore). 

A number of fellowships are available for beginning graduate students; after 
the first year of graduate study, research assistantships are available. Inquiries 
should be directed to the department; deadline for applications is March 1 . 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in Biophysics select a minor in either physics, chemistry, or mathe- 
matics. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BIOPHYS 100, 101. Introduction to Biophysics. (3, 3) 

Fall semester, odd years; Spring semester, even years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites. CHEM 001, 003, PHYS 010, Oil. MATH 018. 019. An intro- 
duction to the study of living systems applying the methods of physics and 
chemistry. The cell as a physico-chemical system and experimental methods 
for investigation, nerve impulse conduction and excitation, the interaction of 
radiation with living material; the structure and properties of muscle tissue, 
connective tissue, and their proteins. (Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 102. Biophysics of Radiation. (2) 

Fall semester, even years. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, CHEM 001, 003, 
PHYS 010, Oil. An advanced study of the interaction of radiation with living 
matter and with molecules of biological interest. Dosimetry problems and some 
bio-medical applications will be considered. (Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson.) 



286 • Graduate School 

BIOPHYS 103. Laboratory Techniques in Biophysics. (3) 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, BIOPHYS 100, 
101, or consent of the staflf. Training in the use of radioactive isotopes, radio- 
active counting equipment, and bio-electric measuring instruments applied to 
the study of membranes; viscosity, optical rotation, protein titrations, spectro- 
scopy, conductivity, as applied to fiber forming proteins. (Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 104. Seminar in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, BIOPHYS 100, 101, or consent of the staff. Seminars on various 
biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students, and guest speakers. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

BIOPHYS 200. Advanced and Theoretical Biophysics. (3) 

Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, BIOPHYS 100, 
101, or consent of staff. An advanced and critical analysis of experimental 
findings in terms of biophysical theory. (Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 201. Membrane Biophysics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, CHEM 001, 003, PHYS 010, Oil, MATH 
020, 021. Diffusion in and through membranes developed from first principles 
with special reference to problems of ion transport in biological membranes. 

(Sjodin.) 

BIOPHYS 202. Biophysical Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Physical Chemistry, Differential and 
Integral Calculus. The application of physico-chemical theory to the methods 
used to study the properties or proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules 
and their component parts, and the properties of the fibers and other bio- 
logical fabrics derived from these macromolecules. The properties of interest 
will include molecular weight, size, shape and charge, intramolecular con- 
figuration, and inter-molecular interaction. The methods of interest will include 
light scattering, ultracentrifuge, viscosity and other hydrodynamic methods, 
optical rotation and rotary dispersion. (Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 203. X-RAY Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure determination 
by the techniques of X-ray differaction. Emphasis upon problems arising in 
structural studies of molecules of biological origin. (Hybl.) 

BIOPHYS 205. Colloquium in Biophysics. (1) 

Prerequisites, BIOPHYS 104 or consent of the staff. Colloquia on various 
biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate students and guest speakers. 

(Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 399. Thesis Research in Biophysics. (Master's Level) 

Required of students planning to take the Master of Science degree or the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Biophysics. (Staff.) 

BIOPHYS 499. Dissertation Research in Biophysics. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staflf.) 

CELL BIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: Aposhian and Truitt. 
Associate Professors: Dupraw and O'Neill. 
Assistant Professors: RuDO. 



University of Maryland • 287 

All students majoring in the Department of Cell Biology and Phamacology 
with a view to obtaining the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should secure 
special training in mammalian physiology, biochemistry, and physical chemistry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHARMACOL 101, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Three lectures and one laboratory. This course consists of 68 lectures and 
5 laboratory periods of three hours each, offered each year. 

(Aposhian, DuPraw, O'Neill, and Rudo.) 

For Graduates 

PHARMACOL 201, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Same as PHARMACOL 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Addi- 
tional instruction and collateral reading are required. 

(Aposhian, DuPraw, O'Neill, and Rudo.) 

PHARMACOL 206, f.s. Pharmacologic Methodology. (4) 

Prerequisite, PHARMACOL 201, f.s. (Truitt.) 

PHARMACOL 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics. (2, 2) 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACOL 209. Biochemical Pharmacology. (2) (O'Neill.) 

PHARMACOL 210. History of Pharmacology. (2) 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACOL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work accom- 
plished. (Aposhian, DuPraw, O'Neill, and Rudo.) 

PHARMACOL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

LEGAL MEDICINE 

Professor: Fisher. 

Associate Professor: Freimuth. 

Assistant Professor: Spitz. 

LEG MED 201. Legal Medicine. (1) 

One hour of lecture for twelve weeks, 4 hours assigned reading. This course 
embraces a summary of medical jurisprudence including the laws governing the 
practice of medicine, industrial compensation and malpractice, proceedings 
in criminal and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, including 
medicolegal toxicology. (12 hours) (Fisher, Freimuth, Spitz.) 

LEG MED 202. Toxicology. (10) 

Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for 1 year. There is also included 
some discussion of industrial toxicology relating industrial exposures to toxic 
substances to effects produced in the worker using these materials. The lectures 
include discussion of mechanism of action of poisons, lethal doses, antidotes 
and methods of detection and quantitation of poisons in tissues and body fluids. 
The laboratory work embraces practical application of analytical procedures for 
the detection and estimation of poisons in post mortem tissue samples. 

(Fisher, Freimuth.) 



288 • Graduate School 

LEG MED 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology. (2) 
Two hours per week for one year. This course includes elementary anatomy 
with normal histology and selected histopathology as it will be seen by the 
toxicologist. It is a correlated course embracing anatomy, basic physiology and 
the alterations in function as well as structure brought about by disease and 
poisoning. (Fisher, Spitz.) 

LEG MED 399. Thesis Research in Toxicology. (Master's Level) 

(Number of hours and credit arranged.) (Fisher, Freimuth.) 

LEG MED 499. Dissertation Research in Toxicology. (Doctoral Level) 

This Department offers schedules leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy in toxicology. Candidates are expected to have com- 
pleted undergraduate work as follows: Eight semester hours each in general 
chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry (qualitative and quantitative), 
physical chemistry, physics, biology and four semester hours in organic quali- 
tative analysis. 

Candidates for the Master's degree must complete the following or equivalent 
courses: 

LEG MED 201, 202, 203 and 399. 
PHARM 201 f. s., and PHARM CHEM 210, 211. 
Candidates for the doctorate must complete the following or equivalent 
courses: 

LEG MED 201, 202, 203, 399. 

PHARM 201 f. s., PHYSIOL 102, BACT 101, BACT 102, PHARM 

CHEM 210, 211, BIOCHEM 206, CHEM 206, 208, CHEM 221, 223, 

CHEM 150, PHARM CHEM 151, 152, PHARM CHEM 253, 254. 

Part of the above work is offered at College Park with the remainder to be 

done at the Baltimore Schools. Some of the course work in legal medicine and 

toxicology will be given at the laboratories of the Division of Forensic Pathology 

located at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 700 Fleet Street, Baltimore, 

Maryland. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors: Blake and Barraclough. 

Associate Professors: Adelman, Glaser, Karpeles, Merlis, and Pinter. 

Assistant Professors: Fajer, Goldman, Greisman, and Jure. 

There are three graduate programs available to students interested in physi- 
ology: (1) a predoctoral program leading to the Ph.D. degree; (2) a predoc- 
toral program leading to the Ph.D. degree with specialization in gerontology; 
and (3) a seven year predoctoral program leading to both M.D. and Ph.D. 
degrees. Prerequisites include differential and integral calculus, general physics, 
physical chemistry and comparative anatomy, although one of these may be 
taken concurrent with the first year of the predoctoral Ph.D. program. All 
programs include course work in anatomy, biochemistry and/or biophysics, 
instrumentation, statistics, and computers. Fellowships and assistantships are 
available for qualified applicants. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
PHYSIOL 101. Principles OF Physiology. (8) 

Second semester. Four lectures, two laboratories, and two conferences per 



University of Maryland • 289 

week for 16 weeks. Lectures cover major areas of organ-system physiology 
except for the nervous system which is embodied in NEUROANAT 101. 
Laboratory work is classical exercises for 8 weeks and a "project" experiment 
for 8 weeks. Conferences are on laboratory work. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PHYSIOL 201. Principles of Physiology. (9) 

Same as PHYSIOL 101, for graduate students majoring in physiology. Additional 
reading and attendance at departmental seminars are required. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 202. Cardiovascular Physiology. (2) 

Reading assignments, seminars, conferences, two hours a week for 15 weeks, 
on current research in cardiovascular physiology. (Karpeles.) 

PHYSIOL 203. Pulmonary Physiology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Reading assignments, lectures, seminars on 
current research in pulmonary physiology. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 204. Physiological Techniques. 

Time and credit by arrangement. The various technical procedures currently 
operating in the Department will be demonstrated and opportunity will be 
given for acquiring experience with them. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 

Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences, for 15 weeks. Considera- 
tion will be given to the current status of knowledge of renal function and body 
fluids in vertebrates, with particular reference to mammals. (Blake, Pinter.) 

PHYSIOL 206. Seminar. 

Credit according to work done. Weekly meetings are held to discuss recent 
literature and results of departmental research. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 207. Physiology of the Central Nervous System. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading assignments 
on current knowledge of central nervous system function. (Merlis.) 

PHYSIOL 208. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and reading assignments 
on current knowledge of autonomic nervous system function. (Blake.) 

PHYSIOL 209. General Physiology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, reading assignments, and seminars 
on selected topics in general, cellular and neurophysiology. (Adelman.) 

PHYSIOL 210. Physiological Systems. (3) 

Three or four hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, conferences, and labora- 
tory sessions on the theoretical principles of biological control systems. 

(Glaser.) 

PHYSIOL 211. Sensory Physiology. (3) 

Two hours lecture and conference, one laboratory period a week for 15 weeks 
on sensory systems. (Merlis.) 

PHYSIOL 212. Physiology of Reproduction. (2) 

Lectures, two hours a week for 15 weeks. A comprehensive survey of repro- 
ductive endocrinology. (Barraclough.) 

PHYSIOL 213. Seminar in Neuroendocrinology. (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures and seminars on recent advances 
in nervous regulation of endocrine function. (Barraclough.) 



290 • Graduate School 

PHYSIOL 214. Comparative Adrenal Physiology. (2) 

Lectures and conferences, two hours a week for 15 weeks, on current knowledge 
of vertebrate adrenal function. (Fajer.) 

PHYSIOL 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) 

By arrangement with Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staflf.) 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NURSING ADMINISTRATION 

GENERAL PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

NURSING OF CHILDREN WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS 

MATERNAL AND CHILD NURSING 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Professors: Murphy and Cohelan. 

Associate Professors: Borlick, Hosfeld, Hydorn, Kohl, MacVicar, Neal, 
AND Reed. 

MAJOR OBJECTIVES OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The graduate program in nursing, leading to the Master of Science degree, 
is designed to prepare qualified professional nurses for positions of leadership 
as clinical specialists, teachers, or supervisors in the following clinical areas: 
general psychiatric nursing, nursing of children with psychiatric disorders, 
medical and surgical nursing, maternal and child nursing and public health 
nursing. A program in Administration of Nursing is available for those who 
wish to prepare for leadership positions in the administration of either nursing 
service or nursing education. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. Admission to the graduate program 
in nursing requires that the applicant be a professional nurse who has completed 
a baccalaureate degree program with academic standing which is recognized 
by the Graduate School of the University of Maryland. The applicant must 
have completed basic college or university courses in the physical and natural 
sciences (i.e., Chemistry, Microbiology, Anatomy and Physiology); and in the 
behavioral sciences (i.e., Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology). In addi- 
tion, the applicant must have had clinical experience in Medical and Surgical 
Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Maternal and Child Nursing and Public Health 
Nursing comparable to the requirements in the basic undergraduate program 
in nursing at the University of Maryland. 

LEARNING EXPERIENCE. Like graduate education in general, graduate 
study in nursing should facilitate the maturing of the individual, the extension 
of professional competence, and the enhancement of ability to contribute to 
knowledge. The graduate student is given opportunity to learn to pursue, eval- 
uate, and apply results of research in nursing in order to find better ways of 
improving patient care. The graduate program assists the student to become 



University of Maryland • 291 

increasingly aware of the responsibilities of the nurse for the health of individ- 
uals in the community, the state, the nation, and the world. 

The extensive clinical facilities of the University of Maryland and associated 
instiutions provide a multi-discipline climate for learning. Seminars, workshops, 
institutes and conferences also provide opportunities for extending the scope 
of the graduate student's understanding of nursing in a dynamic society. 

Students in all clinical majors who elect preparation for the role of teacher, 
supervisor or clinical specialist receive practice in the functional area under 
faculty guidance. 

A minimum of 8 semester hours must be devoted to a minor field. By defini- 
tion these credits must comprise a group of coherent courses intended to supple- 
ment and support the major work. If the undergraduate work has not included 
a course in statistics, the student is expected to include a course in statistics in 
the first semester of the graduate program. At least Vi of the semester hours 
must be taken in courses numbered in the catalog as 200 or above. 

Students may choose either the thesis-option or the non-thesis option. 

THESIS OPTION. At thesis representing research in the major field must be 
approved by the student's advisor and presented to the Dean of the Graduate 
School as a partial requirement for the Master of Science degree. Final approval 
of the thesis is given by the examination committee appointed by the Dean of 
the Graduate School. 

NON-THESIS OPTION. Two seminar papers may be submitted instead of a 
thesis. These papers must be approved by the student's advisor and must give 
evidence of independent study and scholarly writing ability. A final compre- 
hensive examination must also be written. 

For Graduates 

NURS 201. Trends of Higher Education in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. The central objective of this course is to bring to the student 
in nursing education a knowledge and an understanding of the current status 
of nursing in institutions of higher learning and what nursing must have as a 
goal before it can become a universally accepted profession. (Murphy.) 

NURS 202. Interpersonal Interaction. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The 
course is primarily concerned with the application of psychodynamics and 
psychoanalytic understandings to the nurses' relationships with patients. (Staff.) 

NURS 203. Intradisciplinary Nursing. (2) 

Second semester. This course is planned to provide increased ability in apprecia- 
tion of mental health concepts to the nursing care of patients in all clinical areas. 

(Cohelan.) 

NURS 204, 205. Psychiatric Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. The course includes dynamics of human behavior, including formation 
of personality, the techniques of problem solving and the skills of communica- 
tion in relation to therapeutic nursing care of psychiatric patients. 

(Cohelan and Staff.) 

NURS 206. Philosophical Concepts in Health-Epidemiology. (2) 

Second semester. Two-hour lecture a week. The course is planned with a 
contemporary approach to the problem of epidemiological concepts in health. 



292 • Graduate School 

The discussions begin with general considerations and progress to the appli- 
cation of these concepts to more specific situations. (Henderson, BorHck.) 

NURS 207, 208. Nursing in Child Health Services. (2. 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. This course is concerned with extensive knowledge and understanding 
of the place of nursing in the society's total program of child health services 
and increased skill in the nursing of children. (Reed.) 

NURS 209, 210. Nursing in Maternal and Newborn Services. (2, 2) 

First and second semester, one lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a 
week. This course is concerned with extensive knowledge and understanding of 
maternal care and the opportunity to make application in varying nursing 
situations which relate to the patient, to the family and to the community. 

(Hydom.) 

NURS 211. Seminar in Maternal and Child Health Services. (2) 

Second semester. One two-hour period a week. This course is concerned with 
understanding and purposeful application of maternal and child health nursing 
as it normally exists within the family. The influence of the nurse on maternal 
and child health is traced through the many institutions and agencies where she 
contacts the mother and child, or the family as a whole. (Hydom, Reed.) 

NURS 212, 213. Medical and Surgical Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semester. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a 
week. NURS 212 is available during the Fall Semester and is prerequisite to 
NURS 213 which is available during the Spring Semester. The selected course 
activities are arranged by each student and a teacher to comprise a program of 
study which will best prepare the student for the purposive improvement of 
medical and surgical nursing practice. (Hosfeld, Staff.) 

NURS 220. 221. Public Health Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. This course is designed to extend knowledge, understanding, and com- 
petencies of the nurse at the master's level in comprehensive public health nurs- 
ing, including total planning to meet health needs of individuals and families 
in the community. Learning experiences will include selected clinical observa- 
tions and participation in public health nursing, selected activities such as com- 
munity health conferences, and interdisciplinary health consultations in a va- 
riety of community health settings. (Borlick, Staff.) 

NURS 222. Public Health Administration. (2) 

Second semester. Two-hour lecture a week. This course is designed to extend 
knowledge and understanding of the nurse at the Masters level of the principles 
of organization and administration of public health services, including budget- 
ing, program planning, coordination, interpersonal relationships, and medical 
care practices, so as to increase the competencies of practice in teaching or 
supervising public health nursing. (Borlick, Beard.) 

NURS 231. Scientific Basis of Maternal and Child Nursing. (2) 

First semester. One two-hour period a week. A core of information common 
to maternal and child nursing consisting of lectures by experts in medicine and 
in physical and social sciences. Concurrent enrollment in NURS 207 or 209 
is required. (Hydorn, Neal.) 

NURS 247. Orientation to Critical Problems in Family-Child Relation- 
ships I. (2) 
First semester. A seminar limited to those students who plan to specialize in 
child psychiatric nursing. Problems of children and their families in the cur- 



University of Maryland • 293 

rent society are examined with emphasis on normal and abnormal develop- 
mental crisis or age-level behavior. Findings of social and behavioral sciences 
are explored and related to the practice of child psychiatric nursing. Theories 
of Spitz, Bowlby, Erikson. Caplan, White and A. Freud are included. 

(McDonagh. Staff.) 

NURS 248. Orientation to Critical Problems in Family-Child Relation- 
ships II. (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite: NURS 247. One two-hour period a week. A 
continuation of seminar study of family-child relationships in a current so- 
ciety with implications for the child psychiatric nurse. Theories of Josselyn, 
Fraiberg, Ackerman, Hartmann and Rappaport are included. (Staff.) 

NURS 250. Comprehensive Nursing of Children with Psychiatric 

Disorders. (4) 

First Semester. Two two-hour lectures and four four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite. NURS 202 — Interpersonal Interaction. (2) and NURS 
204-205 — Psychiatric Nursing. (2, 2) 

This course includes planning and implementation of nursing care of children 
who are mentally ill and who are receiving intensive care in a residential treat- 
ment center. Learning experiences include seminars in psychodynamic theory of 
mental illness of children, intensive nursing — child relationships, working as 
a member of a psychiatric interdisciplinary team, establishing, maintaining, and 
providing continuity of therapeutic relationships in the home setting with 
families of the children who are receiving treatment. (Thompson, Staff.) 

NURS 251. Nursing of Pre-School Children with Deviate Behavior. (4) 
Second Semester. Two two-hour lectures and four four-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, NURS 250 — Comprehensive Nursing of Children with 
Psychiatric Disorders (4). This course includes guided observation and partici- 
pation with individual and groups of disturbed pre-school children who attend 
the Children's Guild, Inc. Learning experiences include participation in psy- 
chological consultations and staff conferences, analysis and evaluation of prob- 
lems of individual children and group therapy. Each student receives individual 
guidance throughout the course. (Thompson, Kanner.) 

NURS 285. Curriculum Development in Nursing. (2) 

First Semester. Two hour lecture a week. Prerequisite, PSYCH 110 — Educa- 
tional Psychology (3) or its equivalent. This course is designed to assist the 
student in curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation including the 
formulation of objectives and the selection and organization of content and 
learning activities in nursing education. (Marriott, Hovet.) 

NURS 286. Research Methods and Materials in Nursing. (2) 

First Semester. One two-hour lecture or conference period a week. The course 
deals with basic understandings of philosophical aspects as they relate to 
research, including the nature of scientific thinking, methods of research, and 
research literature in nursing. (Cohelan, Staff.) 

NURS 287. Seminar in Nursing — Administration, Teaching, Supervision. (2) 
Third Semester. The purpose of this course is to develop the knowledge, under- 
standing, and skill necessary to function in one of the above areas of nursing 
practice. (Staff.) 

NURS 288S. Special Problems in Nursing. (1-6) 

Prerequisites, NURS 204-205; or NURS 207-208; or NURS 209-210. The 
major objective of this course is to develop further clinical and research 
competencies in selected students who have completed a graduate core of 
clinical nursing. Registration upon consent of adviser. (Staff.) 



(Staff.) 



294 • Graduate School 

NURS 289. Process of Administration. (3) 

First semester. Study of the process of administration and its application to 
nursing situations; current concepts of organizational theory and behavior; ex- 
amination of related research. (MacVicar.) 

NURS 290. Administration of Nursing. (3, 3) 

The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for professional nurses 
to gain competence in administration of nursing through planned study and 
directed experience. This course extends over two semesters and deals with 
problems applicable to administration of services or education. 
In the second semester, students in administration of nursing service and of 
nursing education will meet in separate sections part of the time in order to 
achieve greater depth in the respective areas. (MacVicar, Staff.) 

NURS 291. Practicum in Administration. (4) 

Third semester. The systematic investigation of a problem in administration of 
nursing. Individualized. Student has the opF>ortunity to synthesize learning by 
working through a practical problem in the field. (MacVicar.) 

NURS 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

PHARMACY 

Associate Professors: Shangraw, Lamy, and Allen. 

The Department of Pharmacy offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The student may spe- 
cialize in the areas of industrial pharmacy, biopharmaceutics and hospital 
pharmacy. Graduate students working in this department must have a degree 
in pharmacy, and may be required to take some additional undergraduate 
courses to fulfill specified requirements. Information regarding specific require- 
ments for the degree may be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHARMACY 156. Cosmetics and Dermatological Preparations. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisite, PHARMACY 
153. (Allen.) 

PHARMACY 157. Hospital Pharmacy Administration I. 

First semester. Two lectures. Prerequisite, PHARMACY 044. (Lamy.) 

PHARMACY 158. Hospital Pharmacy Administration II. 

Second semester. Two lectures. Prerequisite, PHARMACY 157. (Lamy.) 

For Graduates 

PHARMACY 201, 202. Industrial Pharmacy. (3,3) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures. A study of manufacturing processes, 
control procedure and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale, including new drug applications and the Federal 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY 203, 204. Industrlu, Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, PHARMACY 201, 202, or may be taken simul- 
taneously with PHARMACY 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the prepa- 
ration of useful and imp>ortant pharmaceuticals in large quantities. 

(Shangraw.) 



University of Maryland • 295 

PHARMACY 207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor; PHYSICAL 
CHEMISTRY 187, 188, 189, 190 recommended. A study of pharmaceutical 
systems utilizing the fundamentals of physical chemistry. (Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (1, 1) 

One lecture. Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy, 
with special reference to the origin and development of the works of drug 
standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. (Allen.) 

PHARMACY 215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites. PHARMACY 201, 202, 208 or permission 
of instructor. A laboratory course in which the student is required to formulate 
a medicinal agent into a dosage form and provide all information, including 
stability data, control procedures, analytical tests, manufacturing and labeling 
specifications, trade mark and patent application necessary to meet present FDA 
requirements. (Shangraw.) 

PHARMACY 230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of pro- 
gress in research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. (Lamy.) 

PHARMACY 231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. 

(2,2) 
Two laboratories. A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preser- 
vation of pharmaceuticals and the various methods of compounding special 
prescriptions. (Allen.) 

PHARMACY 399. Thesis Research in Pharmacy. (Master's Level) 

Credit and hours to be arranged. (Staff.) 

PHARMACY 499. Dissertation Research in Pharmacy. (Doctoral Level.) 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Associate Professors: Leslie and Zenker. 
Assistant Professors: G. Wright, and J. Wright. 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry offers graduate programs 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The stu- 
dent may specialize in the areas of synthetic medicinal chemistry, natural 
product chemistry, biochemistry or biophysical chemistry. For graduate study 
in pharmaceutical chemistry, the student must have a degree in either pharmacy 
or chemistry. Information regarding specific requirements for the degree may 
be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHEM 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2,2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisites, CHEM 035, 036, 037, 038. An advanced study of 
the compounds of carbon. (G. Wright.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 149. Principles of Biochemistry. (5) 

Four lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisites, PHARM CHEM 032, 034. 
Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the composition of living organ- 
isms and the chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in 
disease. (Zenker.) 



296 • Graduate School 

PHARM. CHEM. 151, 152. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, PHARM CHEM 030, 032, 034. A survey of 
the structural relationships, synthesis and chemical properties, principally of 
organic medicinal products. (J. Wright.) 

CHEM 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisites, CHEM 019, 035, 037, PHYS 020, 021 and MATH 
020, 021. A study of laws and theories of chemistry, including the gas laws, 
kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, 
equilibrium, chemical kinetics and electro-chemistry. (Leslie.) 

CHEM 188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, CHEM 187, 189 or may be taken simultane- 
ously with CHEM 187, 189. Quantitative experiments are performed which 
demonstrate physio-chemical principles, and acquaint the student with precision 
apparatus. (Leslie.) 

For Graduates 

PHARM. CHEM. 210, 211. Techniques of Chemical Research. (3, 3) 

One lecture, two laboratories. Prerequisites, CHEM 141, 143, 187-190 or 
concurrent registration. Lectures and laboratory exercises devoted to the sys- 
tematic separation, characterization and identifification of organic structures by 
chemical and instrumental methods, to the synthesis of organic structures of 
the more difficult types including isotopically labeled compounds and to isotope 
counting techniques. (Staff.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 230. Seminar. (1) 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in chemistry. (Staff.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 235. Principles of Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, CHEM 141, 143. A study of the principles of 
stereo-chemistry of organic compounds. (G. Wright and J. Wright.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 242. Heterocyclic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, CHEM 141, 143. A study of the chemistry and 
synthesis of heterocylic compounds. (G. Wright and J. Wright.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 271. Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, PHARM. CHEM. 149, CHEM 189. The applica- 
tion of physical chemical principles to biological systems, and a discussion of 
the physical properties of biologically important macromolecules. (Leslie.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 272. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisites, CHEM 189. A discussion of selected topics of 
particular interest in the pharmaceutical sciences, including surface chemistry, 
colloids, kinetics, colligative properties and absorption spectroscopy. (Leslie.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 274. Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1) 

One laboratory. Prerequisite, CHEM 190. Selected experiments which are 
necessary for, and a part of, a larger research effort. (Leslie.) 

PHARM. CHEM. 281. Metabolic Inhibitors. (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite, PHARM. CHEM. 149. A discussion of the design, 
the mode of action of the enzymatic level, and the metabolism of biochemical 
analogs. (Zenker.) 



University of Maryland • 297 

PHARM. CHEM. 399. Thesis Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
(Master's Level) 
Credit determined by the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 

PHARM CHEM. 499. Dissertation Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
(Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professors: Kinnard, and Ichniowski. 
Assistant Professors: Blake, and Vick. 

The Department of Pharmacology offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department empha- 
sizes the areas of cellular physiology, quantitative pharmacology, pharmacody- 
namics and biochemical pharmacology. Students with a degree in pharmacy 
are preferred; however, students with a strong background in both chemistry 
and biology are also considered for graduate study in pharmacology. Informa- 
tion regarding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the 
Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHARMACOLOGY 155, 156. General Pharmacology. (4, 5) 

Three lectures, one laboratory first semester; four lectures, one laboratory sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisites. PHYSIOL 142. PHARM. CHEM .149 or consent 
of the instructor. A study of the pharmacology, toxicology, posology, untoward 
effects, precautions and therapeutic applications of medicinal substances. 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 171. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
PHARMACOLOGY 155, 156. A study of the official methods of biological 
assay of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. 

(Staff.) 

For Graduates 

PHARMACOLOGY 201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisite, PHAR- 
MACOLOGY 171. A study of the more important unofficial methods used in 
the quantitative evaluation of therapeutic substances. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 211. 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 
First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisites, PHAR- 
MACOLOGY 155, 156 and the approval of the instructor. Offered in alternate 
years. A study of the methods used in the evaluation of drug action 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods. 
(2-4, 2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. First and second semester. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequi- 
site, PHARMACOLOGY 171, 201, 202. Special problems in the development 
of biological assay methods. (Staff.) 



298 • Graduate School 

PHARMACOLOGY 230. Principles of Biochemical Pharmacology. (3) 

Two lectures. Laboratory work consists of eight six-hour periods. Second 
semester. Prerequisites. PHARM. CHEM. 149, 282 and PHARMACOLOGY 
155, 156 or equivalents and consent of the instructor. A study of the bio- 
chemical mechanisms involved in drug action with primary emphasis on drug 
metabolism. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 245. Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester, three lectures. Prerequisites. PHARM. CHEM. 149, PHYSIOL 
142, consent of instructor. The lectures will relate to the physical and chemical 
properties of protoplasm to the functional problems of the plasma membrane, 
cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, microsomes, nucleus, mitochondrial structure and 
their contributions to the integrated cellular activity. The physical and chemi- 
cal phenomena of cell division and inheritance will be discussed. (Staff.) 

PHYSIOL 246. Radioisotope Techniques. (3) 

Second semester, one lecture and two laboratories. Prerequisites, consent of 
instructor. A course concerned with the practical use of isotopes particularly 
as tracers in metabolic investigations. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 399. Thesis Research in Pharmacology. (Master's Level) 
Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Staff.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 499. Dissertation Research in Pharmacology. 

(Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

Professors: Blumster, Slama. 

The Department of Pharmacognosy offers a graduate program leading to 
the Master of Science degree. The student may specialize in the areas of 
phytochemistry, chemotaxonomy, biosynthesis fermentation, plant tissue culture 
and plant culture. Graduate students in pharmacognosy must have a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Pharmacy, Chemistry, Biology or related areas. Information 
regarding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained from the De- 
partment. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHARMACOGNOSY 101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory. Prerequisite, PHAR- 
MACOGNOSY 041, 042. A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their 
classification, and field work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the 
preparation of an herbarium. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 111, 113. Plant Anatomy. (2,2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHARMACOGNOSY 041, 042. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 112, 114. Plant Anatomy. (2,2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, PHARMACOGNOSY 041, 042; 
PHARMACOGNOSY 111, 113. Laboratory work covering advanced plant 
anatomy with special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems, and 
leaves of vascular plants. (Slama.) 

For Graduates 

PHARMACOGNOSY 201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 
Given in alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, 



University of Maryland • 299 

PHARMACOGNOSY 111, 113. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices 
from the structural and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identi- 
fication and detection of adulterants. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, PHARMACOGNOSY 111, 
113. A study of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacog- 
nosy courses. Special attention will be given to practical problems and to the 
identification and detection of adulterants. (Slama.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 399. Research in Pharmacognosy. (Master's Level) 
Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 499. Research in Pharmacognosy. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay. 

Assistant Professor: Krywolap and Schneider. 

The Department of Microbiology serves both the School of Pharmacy and 
the School of Dentistry and offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The student may specialize in the areas of 
pathogenic microbiology, fermentation microbiology, antibiotics, antiseptics, 
oral protozoa, immunology, mycology and transmission of infectious agents. 
For graduate study in microbiology, the student should have a degree in micro- 
biology or pharmacy. Information regarding specific requirements for the degree 
may be obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MICB 146. Serology, Immunology, Public Health and Parasitology. (4) 

Prerequisite, MICB 041 or its equivalent. Two lectures and two laboratories. 
A study of the principles of immunity, including the preparation and use of 
biological products employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious dis- 
eases. Attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and animals. Part of 
the course is devoted to the study of public health. Time is given to the study 
of medical parasitology, pathology and parasitic infections. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

MICB 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1, 1) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, MICB 121 or equivalent, BIOCHEM 111 or 
equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology 
and therapeutic value of drugs in the treatment of disease. (Shay.) 

MICB 202. Theory and Principle of Reagents and Media. (3) 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media or special procedures such 
as antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. 
Anaerobiosis, differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility 
testing are considered in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements of 
specific groups of micro-organisms. (Schneider.) 

MICB 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Laboratory course. Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. 
Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

MICB 211. Public Health. (2) 

ities in the community and their relation to the practices of the health sciences 
Prerequisite, MICB 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health facil- 



300 • Graduate School 

carried on through lectures and discussion groups. The application of sta- 
tistical and epidemiological methods to health problems is illustrated through 
lectures and demonstration. (Shay.) 

MICB 212. Bacterial Fermentations. (2) 

Two lectures. (Given second semester in alternate years.) Prerequisite, BIO- 
CHEM 111 or an equivalent course and MICB 121 or an equivalent course. 
This course covers composition, nutrition and growth of microorganisms; in- 
fluence of physical and chemical environment on metabolism; chemical activi- 
ties of microorganisms; mechanisms of fermentative and oxidative metabolism. 

(Krywolap.) 

MICB 221. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Open only to 
candidates for advanced degrees in microbiology. (Shay.) 

MICB 281-283. Seminar. (1, 1) 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and research in the field of 
microbiology. (Shay.) 

MICB 399. Thesis Research. (Master's Level) (Staff.) 

MICB 499. Dissertation Research. (Doctoral Level) (Staff.) 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Professors: Falck, Lansdale, Lewis, Siporin, Thursz, and Upham. 

Associate Professors: Chaiklin, Trader, and Young. 

Assistant Professors: Beschner, Brown, Buttrick, Callagy, Cole, Ephross, 

Frankel, Gavin, Gewisgold, Hersey, Hollander, Kahn, Kostick, Kraft, 

Levin, Makofsky, Moses, Moulton, Nucho, Pond, Pope, Simmons, 

Snyder, Taylor, Toia, Willis, and Wilson. 
Instructors: Miller, and Novick. 
Lecturers: Bateman, Blumberg, Cacace, Derbyshire, Granger, Hiller, 

Kaplan, Lisansky, McElhaney, McCall, Maxwell, Mittleman, Press, 

Price, and Weisgal. 

For Graduates 

THE SOCIAL SERVICES 

SOWK 200, 201. Social Services and Social Policy. (2, 2) 

Both semesters. Identification of social needs and analysis of social services 
with particular reference to political, social, and economic forces affecting their 
development. The social control and melioration functions of social welfare 
programs. Examination of the growth, organization and function of govern- 
mental and voluntary services. Open to qualified part-time students with con- 
sent of instructor. (Lansdale, Lewis, Miller, Young.) 

SOWK 202. The Social Work Profession. (2) 

Second year. The historical background and development of the profession. 
Current trends in professional piactice. Professional concerns with social 
policy. Professional values and ethical behavior. (Buttrick, Thursz, Young.) 

SOWK 203. Community Social Welfare Services. (2) 

First semester, concurrent with SOWK 200. Participant observation of com- 
munity provision for control of selected social problems: dependency, disordered 



University of Maryland • 301 

behavior, indigent disability. Consideration of social work roles in alleviation 
and control of selected problems. Open to qualified part-time students enrolled 
in SOWK 200. (Miller.) 

SOWK 204. Social Welfare and the Law. (2) 

The law as a means of social control; special needs of the poor for legal 
services; problems of social and legal agencies in this profession; interdisciplin- 
ary sociolegal problem. (McElhaney. Weisgal.) 

SOWK 205. Social Welfare History. (2) 

The changing concept of charity from Biblical to modern times. Origin of 
English and American poor laws. Charity organization and the growth of 
voluntary efforts. Origins and development of welfare state concept. Open to 
qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. (Lewis.) 

GROWTH AND BEHAVIOR 

SOWK 206. Community Mental Health. (2) 

Historical development of services for the mentally ill and the mentally re- 
tarded. Relationship of programs to public health, public medical care, social 
insurance, and vocational rehabilitation. Legislation concerning mental health 
and mental illness. Federal, State, and local responsibilities in community 
mental health. Role of voluntary agencies. Open to part-time students with 
approval of the instructor. (Lansdale.) 

SOWK 210. Human Behavior L (2) 

First semester. Concepts basic to understanding adult social functioning with 
particular reference to characteristic ways of responding to stressful situations 
arising out of economic disadvantage, sociocultural conflict, illness and dis- 
ability. Attention to the family as a social system and the social roles of family 
members in the patterning of relationships. (Mittleman, Upham, Trader.) 

SOWK 211. Human Behavior IL (2) 

Elaboration of concepts introduced in SOWK 210. Introduction of psycho- 
dynamic concepts used in assessment of psychosocial disorders. 

(Mittelman. Trader, Upham.) 

SOWK 212. Human Behavior III. (1) 

Descriptive and dynamic considerations in psychosocial disorders and psycho- 
pathology likely to be encountered in social work practice, i.e., indigency, mari- 
tal disorder, delinquent and criminal behavior, personality disorders, retarda- 
tions, illegitimate parenthood, child neglect and placement, neuroses, and psy- 
choses. (Upham.) 

SOWK 213. Human Behavior IV. (2) 

Second semester, second year. Concepts basic to an understanding of per- 
sonality development in childhood and adolescence. Application of psycho- 
dynamic formulations in differential diagnosis and planning use of casework 
and groupwork techniques appropriate to the client's needs. Analysis of 
social work, sociological and biographical case materials utilizing psychosocial 
concepts. 

SOWK 214. Nature and Ecology of Health and Illness. (1) 

Introduction to causes, symptoms, treatment, distribution, prevention and con- 
trol of disease. Social and psychological aspects of illness, emphasizing factors 
influencing response to stress. Socio-economic problems of health care. Co- 
ordination of health and social resources as relevant to social work practice. 

(Lisansky.) 



302 • Graduate School 

SOWK 215. Behavior OF Human Groups. (2) 

Examination of concepts underlying social work practice as drawn from theory 
of social systems. Special reference to families, small groups, neighborborhoods, 
communities, to social institutions and to culture. Reference also to leadership 
theory and related formulations useful in understanding interpersonal relation- 
ships in families, committees, clubs, social agencies and special interest groups. 
Open to qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Chaiklin, Derbyshire, Makofsky, Trader.) 

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 

SOWK 220, 221. Social Casework. (2, 2) 

Both semesters, first year. Fundamental concepts and principles of the case- 
work method. Emphasis on understanding person presenting the social problem, 
the environment, especially the family setting, in which it occurs, and the roles 
of the social agency and the social worker in using community resources in 
helpful ways. The relationship of study and history to psychosocial diagnosis 
and the formulation of appropriate treatment plans. 

(Gavin, Gewisgold, McCall, Nucho, Siporin, Lewis.) 

SOWK 222, 223. Social Casework. (2,2) 

Both semesters, second year. Further elaboration of basic concepts and intro- 
duction of more complex ideas. Case analysis directed toward development of 
skill in psychosocial diagnosis. Emphasis on selection of casework treatment 
techniques consistent with treatment objectives. Short-term and long-term case- 
work treatment problems. Similarities and differences in casework practices 
in such varied settings as family and children's agencies, public assistance 
agencies, school social work departments, clinical (medical and psychiatric) 
services, correctional programs, etc. (Blumberg, Nucho, Siporin.) 

SOWK 235. Group Methods in Social Work. (2) 

Elementary concepts of social groupwork practice essential for the informed 
use of social groupwork resources in the community by social workers using 
casework methods. Application of theories of group behavior to understanding 
committee and other group processes within social agencies and professional 
and related organizations. Open to qualified part-time students with consent 
of instructor. (Brown, Beschner, Ephross. Falck, Kahn, Kraft.) 

SOWK 240. Community Organization and Development. (2) 

Basic concepts useful in facilitating citizen participation in neighborhood and 
community organization for social welfare. Analysis of methods used to achieve 
social objectives in community provision of needed services and prevention 
and control of psychosocial disorders. (Beschner, Levin, Simmons.) 

SOWK 241. Community Organization in Neighborhoods. (2) 

Continuation of SOWK 240 for students in C. O. concentration. Emphasis on 
neighborhood social work. (Simmons, Cole.) 

SOWK 242, 243. Community Organization Methods. (2, 2) 

(Both semesters, second year.) Elaboration of basic concepts and methods of 
application. The role of the social worker in developing leadership and en- 
abling neighborhood groups to identify and solve problems. Emphasis upon 
community organization process in intergroup relations in urban renewal, 
housing and settlement situations. (Makofsky, Moses, Thursz.) 

SOWK 250. Social Welfare Administration. (2) 

Second year. Elementary concepts of administration applicable to social wel- 
fare agencies. Staff participation in decision-making, policy formulation, and 



University of Maryland • 303 

communication. Role relationships within administrative structures. Open to 
qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Bateman, Frankel, Hiller, Lansdale.) 

SOWK 260. Social Investigation. (2) 

Second semester. Methods of research in social work. Problem formulation, 
data collection and analysis, presentation of findings, and conclusions. Atten- 
tion to classic and recent studies. The relationships of research to social work 
knowledge. Open to qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Chaiklin, Ephross. Lewis, Miller, Sterne.) 

SOWK 261, 262. Social Work Research. (2, 2) 

Both semesters, second year. Analysis of significant social work studies and 
related social science research. A research report of substantial dimensions and 
high standards, presenting and analyzing findings of a study of some pro- 
fessional problem is required. (Chaiklin, Sterne J 

SOWK 280, 281. Field Work: Basic Social Casework. (4, 4) 

Both semesters, first year. Placement in community agencies for practice in- 
struction in social casework method. (Brown, Callagy, Gavin, Hersey, 
Hollander, Kostick, Kraft, Moulton, Pope, Snyder, Taylor, Willis and Staff.) 

SOWK 282, 283. Field Work: Advanced Social Casework. (6, 4) 

Both semesters, second year. Placement in community agencies for practice 
instruction in social casework method. (Brown, Callagy, Gavin, Hersey, 

Hollander, Kostick, Kraft, Moulton, Pope, Snyder, Tayloi, Willis and Staff.) 

SOWK 285, 286. Field Work: Community Organization and Neighborhood 
Development. (4, 4) 
Both semesters, first year. Placement in community agencies for practice 
instruction in community organization method. 

(Beschner, Cole, Frankel, Kahn, Makofsky, Moses, Simmons, Wilson.) 

SOWK 287, 288. Field Work: Community Organization. (5, 5) 

Both semesters, second year. Placement in community agencies for practice 
instruction in community organization method. 

(Beschner, Cole, Frankel, Kahn, Makofsky, Moses, Simmons, Wilson.) 

SOWK 290. Special Social Work Problems. (1-3) 

Individually planned study of selected substantial area of professional interest 
as arranged to meet special needs. Extensive reading, written and oral report- 
ing as arranged by instructor. (Falk, Granger, Lisansky, McCall, Press, 

Buttrick, Makofsky, Siporin, Beschner.) 



304 • Graduate School 

GRADUATE COUNCIL 

AND THE 

GRADUATE FACULTY ASSEMBLY 

Ex-Officio Members 

WILSON H. ELKINS, D.Phil., President of the University 

R. LEE HORNBAKE. Ph.D.. Vice-President for Academic Affairs 

MICHAEL J. PELCZAR, JR.. Ph.D.. Vice-President for Graduate Studies and 

Research 
DAVID S. SPARKS. Ph.D., Associate Dean of the Graduate School 

Appointed Members 

ATCHISON, William P., Ph.D., Professor of Computer Science 1971 

MANNING, Charles, Ph.D., Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 1972 

MITCHELL, T. Faye, M.A., Professor of Home Economics 1969 

SCHAMP, Homer W., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, UMBC 1970 

Elected Members 

BICKLEY, William E., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology 1970 

BURGISON, Raymond M., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology (Baltimore) . . 1972 
CARDOZIER, V. R., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural and 

Extension Education 1969 

DILLARD, Dudley, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 1971 

GAUCH, Hugh E., Ph.D., Professor of Botany 1969 

HARRISON, Horace V., Ph.D., Professor of Government and Politics 1969 

LASTER, Howard J., Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 1969 

MYERS, Ralph D., Ph.D., Professor of Physics 1970 

RATHS, James, Ph.D., Professor of Education 1971 

SCHLARETZKI, W. E., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 1972 

SHAY, Donald E., Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

(Baltimore) 1970 

SILVERMAN, Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering 1971 

TAFF, Charles A., Professor of Business Administration 1972 

VANDERSLICE, Joseph T., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 1972 



305 



The Faculty 



AARON. Henry J., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles. 1958: M.A.. Harvard University, 
1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

ADAMS. Elijah. Professor and Head of Department of Biological Chemistry 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; M.D., University of Rochester. 1942. 

ADAMS, John Q., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1965. 

ADELMAN, William J., Jr., Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Fordham University. 1950; M.S., University of Vermont, 1952; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1955. 

ADKINS, Arthur J., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., St. Cloud Technical College, 1942; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

A'HEARN, Michael F., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Boston College, 1961; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1966. 

AHNERT, Frank Oswald, Professor of Geography 
Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1953. 

AHRENS, Richard A., Associate Professor of Food and Nutrition 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1958; Ph.D., University of California, 1963. 

ALLEN, Benjamin F., Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

ALLEN, Redfield W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S.. 1949: Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
1959. 

ALLEY, Carroll O., Jr., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1948; M.A., Princeton University, 1951; Ph.D., 
1962. 

ALMON, Clopper, Jr., Professor of Economics 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1956; M.A., Harvard University, 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 

ANAND, Davinder K., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., The George Washington University, 1959: M.S.E.. 1961: D.Sc... 1965. 

ANASTOS, George, Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1942; M.A.. Harvard University. 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

ANDERSON, Frank Gibbs, Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

ANDERSON, Henry, Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., University of London, 1939; M.B.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D. 
1959. 



University of Maryland • 307 

ANDERSON, J. Paul, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1942; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., 1960. 

ANDERSON, James R., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S., Iowa State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1963. 

ANDERSON, Nancy S., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Colorado, 1952; M.S., Ohio State University, 1953; Ph.D., 
1956. 

ANDERSON, Thornton H., Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 
1948. 

ANDERSON, Vernon E., Professor and Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A.. 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

APOSHIAN, H. Vasken, Professor and Head of Cell Biology and Pharmacology 
B.S., Brown University, 1948; M.S., University of Rochester. 1950; Ph.D., 1953. 

ARBUCKLE, Wendell S., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S.A., Purdue University, 1933; A.M., University of Missouri, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

ARMSTRONG, Ronald W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955; M.Sc, Carnegie-Mellon, 1957; Ph.D., 
1958. 

ARSENAULT, Richard J., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Michigan Technical University, 1957; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1962. 

ASHLOCK, Robert B., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Butler University, 1957; M.S., 1959; Ed.D., Indiana University, 1965. 

ASHMEN, Roy, Associate Professor of Business Organization 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1935; M.S., Columbia University, 1936; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University, 1950. 

ASIMOW, Robert M., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1953, M.S., 1955, Ph.D., 1958. 

ATCHISON, William P., Professor and Director, Computer Science Center 

A.B., Georgetown College (Ky.), 1936; M.A., University of Kentucky, 1940; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1943. 

ATKINSON, Gordon, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1952; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1956. 

AUSLANDER, Joseph, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; M.S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1953, Ph.D., 1957. 

AVERY, William T., Professor and Head of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

AXLEY, John H., Professor of Agronomy 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1937; Ph.D., 1945. 

AZIZ, Abdul Kadir, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1952; M.S., George Washington University, 1954; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1958. 



308 • Graduate School 

BAILEY, William J.. Research Professor of Chemistry 

B. Cham., University of Minnesota, 1943; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1946, 

BAKER, Donald J., Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.S.Ed., The Ohio State University, 1954; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

BANERJEE, Manoj K., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.Sc, Patna University, 1949; M.Sc, Calcutta University, 1951; Ph.D., 1956. 

BARBER, Willard P., Lecturer in Government and Politics 

A.B., Stanford University, 1928; M.A., 1929; Diploma, The War College, 1948. 

BARDASIS, Angelo, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B., Cornell University, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

BARRACLOUGH, Charles A., Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1947; M.S.. Rutgers University, 1952; Ph.D., 1953. 

BARRY, Sue-ning Chu, Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology 
B.A., Barat College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

BARTLETT, Claude Jackson, Associate Professor and Head of Department of Psy- 
chology 
B.S,, Denison University, 1954; M.A., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

BASHAM, Ray Scott, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., U. S. Military Academy, 1945; M.S., University of Illinois, 1952; Ph.D., 1962. 

BAUER, Richard H., Professor of History 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1923; M.A., 1928; Ph.D.. 1935. 

BEAGLEHOLE, David, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.Sc, Victoria University of Wellington. 1959; M.Sc, I960; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University, England, 1964. 

BEAL, George M., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

B.S., Utah State Agricultural College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

BEALL, Edgar P., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., University of California, 1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

BEALL, Otho Thompson, Jr., Professor and Director of American Studies Program 
B.A., Williams College, 1930; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1932; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

BEAN, George A., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., Cornell University, 1958; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

BECKMANN, Robert Bader, Professor and Dean, College of Engineering 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1944. 

BELL, Roger A., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Melbourne, 1957; Ph.D., Australian National University, 1962. 

BENDER, Pilmore E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., University of California, 1961; M.S., North Carolina State University, 1965; 
Ph.D., 1966. 

BENEDETTO, John J., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Boston College, 1960; M.A., Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D., University of 
Toronto, 1964. 



University of Maryland • 309 

BENEDICT, William S., Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics 

B.A., Cornell University, 1928; M.A., 1929; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1933. 

BENESCH. William, Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics 

B.A., Lehigh University, Pa., 1942; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

BENNETT, Lawrence H.. Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1955; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University, 1958. 

BENNETT. Robert L., Associate Professor of Economics 
B. A., University of Texas, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

BERG, Richard E., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S.. Manchester College, 1960; M.S., Michigan State University, 1963; Ph.D., 
1966. 

BERGER, Bruce S.. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1954; M.S.. 1958: Ph.D.. 1962. 

BERGMANN, Barbara R.. Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Cornell University. 1948; M.A., Radcliffe Graduate School (Harvard), 1955; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

BERMAN. Louise M., Professor of Education 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1950; M.A.. Columbia University, 1953; Ed.D., 1960. 

BERNSTEIN, Melvin, Professor of Music 

A.B., Southwestern, 1947; B. Music, 1948; M. Music, University of Michigan, 1949; 
M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 1963. 

HETTINGER, Richard T., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Syracuse University, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

BHAGAT, S. M., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Jammu and Kashimir University of India, 1950; M.A., University of Delhi, 
1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

BICKLEY, William E.. Professor and Head of Department of Entomology 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

BILLIG, Frederick S., Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering, Project Supervisor, Hyper- 
sonic Propulsion 
B.E., The Johns Hopkins University. 1955; M.S., University of Maryland. 1958; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

BINGHAM, Alfred Jepson, Professor of French and Italian Language and Literature 
B.A., Yale University, 1933; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1939. 

BIRKNER, Francis B., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., Newark College of Engineering, 1961; M.S.E., University of Florida, 
1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

BISCHOFF, Kenneth B., Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S.Ch.E., Illinois Institute of Technology, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 



310 • Graduate School 

BLAKE, David A., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

BLAKE. William Dewey. Professor and Head of Department of Physiology 
A.B., Dartmouth College. 1940; M.D.. Harvard Medical College, 1943. 

BLOUGH, Glenn O., Professor of Education 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1929; A.M., 1932; LL.D., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

BODE. Carl. Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1933; M.A., Northvs^estern University, 1938; Ph.D., 
1941. 

BODE, Vernon C. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1955; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

BORLICK, Martha M., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University. 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1954; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1966. 

BOWIE, Blanche Lucile, Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., Columbia University, 1946; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1957. 

BOYD. Alfred C Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

BRACE, John W., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Swarthmore College, 1949; A.M., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

BRESLOW, Marvin A., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1957; M.A., Harvard University, 1958; Ph.D., 1963. 

BRICKER, A. June, Extension Professor and Head of Department. Extension Home 
Economics 
B.S., Battle Creek College, 1935; M.A.. New York University, 1953; Ph.D.. 1961. 

BRIGHAM, Bruce W., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., State University of New York, 1949; M.S., 1954; Ph.D.. Temple University, 
1967. 

BRINKLEY, Howard J., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1958; M.S.. University of Illinois. 1960: Ph.D., 
1963. 

BROOKS, Marjory, Professor and Dean of College of Home Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1943; M.S., University of Idaho, 1951; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1963. 

BROWN, John H., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Princeton University, 1952; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

BROWN, Joshua R. C, Associate Professor of Zoology 
A.B., Duke University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1953. 

BROWN, Russell G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., Agr., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1934. 

BROWN, Samuel E., Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Indiana University, 1934; M.A., 1946; Ph.D., Yale University, 1955. 
BHAGAT, S. M., Associate Professor of Physics 



University of Maryland • 311 

BRYER, Jackson R., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1959; M.A., Columbia University, 1960; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1965. 

BUNDY, Mary Lee, Professor, School of Library and Information Services 

B.E.. State University of New York, 1948; M.A., University of Denver, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1960. 

BURCH, Buckner S., Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.S., University of Southern California, 1955; D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1959; 
M.S., University of Oregon, 1965. 

BURDETTE, Franklin L., Professor of Government and Politics and Director of 
the Bureau of Governmental Research 
A.B., Marshall College, 1934; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1935; A.M., Prince- 
ton University, 1937; Ph.D., 1938; LL.D., Marshall College, 1959. 

BURGERS, Johannes Martanus, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
Doctor of Mathematics and Physics, University of Leiden, 1918; Doctor Honoris 
Causa, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1948; Doctor Honoris Causa, Universite de 
Poitiers, 1950; Doctor of Science in Technology, The Technion, 1955. 

BURGISON, Raymond M., Professor and Head of Department of Pharmacology 
B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 1950. 

BURKHARDT, George J.. Research Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A., University of Wisconsin, 1933; B.S.M.E., f934; M.S.A.E., 1935. 

BUTLER, Lillian C Associate Professor of Food and Nutrition 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., University of Texas, 1945; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California, 1953. 

BYRD, Elbert M., Jr., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., The American University, 1953; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

BYRNE, Richard H., Professor of Education 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1947; 
Ed.D., 1952. 

CADMAN, Theodore W., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1962; M.S.. 1964; Ph.D.. 1966. 

CAIN, Jarvis Lynn, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1955; M.S., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 1961. 

CAIRNS, Gordon M., Professor of Dairy Science and Dean of College of Agriculture 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

CALLCOTT, George H., Associate Professor of History 

A.B., University of South Carolina, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1956. 

CAMPBELL, Elwood G., Associate Professor of Secondary Education 

B.S., Northeast Missouri State College, 1949; M.A., Northwestern University, 
1952; Ph.D., 1963. 

CANTERBERY, E. Ray, Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Southern Illinois University, 1958; M.A., 1960; Ph.D., Washington Uni- 
versity, 1966. 



312 • Graduate School 

CARDOZIER, V. R., Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural and Ex- 
tension Education 
B.S., Louisiana State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 
1952. 

CARROLL, Stephen J., Jr., Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1957; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

CASON, James Lee, Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S.. Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, 1948: M.S., Michigan State University, 1950; 
Ph.D., North Carolina State College, 1956. 

CAUSEY, G. Donald, Research Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1954. 

CELARIER, James L.. Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1956; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1960. 

CHATKLIN, Harris, Associate Professor of Social Work 

A.B., University of Connecticut, 1950; M.A., 1952; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1953; Ph.D., Yale University, 1961. 

CHAMBLISS, Kinneth M., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Montana State University, 1952; M.Ed., Colorado State University, 1962; 
D.Ed., Texas A & M University, 1966. 

CHANG, Chung-Yun, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1966. 

CHAPIN, John L., Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., Denison University, 1939; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1950. 

CHAVES, Antonio P., Associate Professor of Geography 

Doctor, Law, University of Havana, 1941; Doctor of Filosofia & Letras, 1946; 
M.A., Northwestern University, 1948. 

CHU, Hsin, Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., Tulane University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

CHU, Yaohan, Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Chiao-Tung University, 1942; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1945; Sc.D., 1953. 

CLARK, Neri A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

CLARKE, David H.. Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Springfield College, 1952; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1959. 

CLAUDE, Richard Pierre, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., College of St. Thomas, 1956; M.S., Florida State University, 1960; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia, 1964. 

COATES, Charles H., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., United States Military Academy, 1924; M.A., Louisiana State University, 
1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

COHELAN, Evelyn E., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of California, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ed.D., 1963. 



University of Maryland • 313 

COHEN, Leon W., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Columbia University, 1923; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1928. 

COLE, Wayne S.. Professor of History 

B.A.. Iowa State Teachers College, 1946; M.S.. University of Wisconsin, 1948; 
Ph.D., 1951. 

COMBS, Gerald P., Professor of Poultry Nutrition 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1948. 

CONNELL, Terrence L.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Colorado State University, 1961; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

CONTRERA, Joseph P., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1966. 

CONWAY, Mary M., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1957; M.A., University of California. Berkeley, 1960; 
Ph.D., Indiana University, 1965. 

COOK, Clarence H.. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., State University of Iowa, 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1962. 

COOK, Thomas M., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1955; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1963. 

COOKSON, John T., Jr., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., Washington University, 1961; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., California Institute of 
Technology, 1965. 

COOLEY, Franklin D., Professor of English 

A.B.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

CORBETT, M. Kenneth, Professor of Botany 

B.S., Macdonald College, McGill University, 1950; Ph.D., Cornell University, 
1954. 

CORNING, Gerald, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 

B.S., New York University, 1937; M.S., Catholic University, 1954. 

CORREL, Ellen, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Douglass College, 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

COURNYN, John B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1946; M.S., 1948. 

CREEK, Richard D., Associate Professor of Poultry Nutrition 
B.S.A., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1955. 

CUMBERLAND, John H., Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1947; M.A., Harvard University, 1949; Ph.D., 1951. 

CUNNIFF, Patrick F., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Manhattan College, 1955; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

CURRIE, Douglas C, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.E.P., Cornell University, 1958; Ph.D., Rochester, 1962. 

CURTIS, Charles R., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., Colorado State University, 1961; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 



314 • Graduate School 

CURTIS, John M., Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., North Carolina State, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

CUSSLER, Margaret T., Associate Professor of Sociology 

M.A., New York State College for Teachers. 1932; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1941; 
Ph.D., 1943. 

DANCIS, Jerome, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1961; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

DANIEL, Klaus H., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Cologne, 1954; M.S., University of Gottingen, 1957; M.A., 
University of California. 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

DAVIDSON, John A., Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957; 
Ph.D., 1960. 

DAVIS, Richard P., Professor and Head of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

DAWSON, Townes L., Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; B.S., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; Ph.D., 1950; LL.B.. 1954. 

DAY, Thomas B., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

DAYTON, Chauncey M., Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DEAL, Elwyn E., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

Diploma, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, 1956; B.S.A., University of 
Georgia, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1963. 

DECKER, A. Morris, Jr., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Colorado A & M, 1949; M.S., Utah State College, 1951; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1953. 

DECLARIS, Nicholas, Professor and Head of Department of Electrical Engineering 
and Professor of Fluid Dynamics 
B.S., Texas A & M College, 1952; S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1954; Sc.D., 1959. 

DEMAITRE, Ann, Assistant Professor of French and Italian Language and 
Literature 
Baccalaureate, Notre Dame de Sion, 1942; B.A., Columbia University, 1950; 
M.A., University of California, 1951; M.S., Columbia University, 1952; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1960. 

DE ROCCO, Andrew G., Associate Professor of Molecular Physics 

B.S., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

DESHLER, Walter Williams, Professor of Geography 

B.S., Lafayette College, 1943; M.A., University of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

DE SILVA, Alan W., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1954; Ph.D., University of Cali- 
fornia, 1961. 



University of Maryland • 315 

DILLARD. Dudley. Professor and Head of Department of Economics 
B.S.. University of California. 1935; Ph.D.. 1940. 

DILLON. Conley H.. Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., Marshall College. 1928: A.M., Duke University, 1933; Ph.D.. 1936. 

DIXON, Jack, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.S., Western Reserve University. 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland. 1956. 

DOBERT. Eitel Wolf. Professor of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature 
B.A.. University of Geneva. 1932; M.A., University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 
1954. 

DODGE. Norton T., Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Cornell University, 1948; M.A., Harvard University, 1951; Ph.D.. 1960. 

DOETSCH. Raymond N.. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; A.M., Indiana University, 1943; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1948. 

DORFMAN, Jay R.. Research Associate Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; Ph.D.. 1961. 

DORSEY, John W.. Associate Professor of Economics and Director of Bureau of 
Business and Economic Research 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; Certificate, London School of Economics, 1959; 
M.A., Harvard University, 1962; Ph.D., 1963. 

DOUGLIS, Avron. Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., University of Chicago. 1938; M.A., New York University, 1949; Ph.D., 1949. 

DRAGT, Alexander J., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Calvin College, 1958; Ph.D., University of California, 1963. 

DUDLEY, James, Associate Professor of Education and Head of Department of 
Administration. Supervision and Curriculum 
B.A., Southern Illinois University, 1951; M.S. in Education, 1957; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1964. 

DUFFEY, Dick, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Purdue University, 1939; M.S., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1956. 

DUFFEY, Robert V., Professor and Head of Department of Early Childhood 
Education 
B.S., Millersville State Teachers College, 1938; Ed.M., Temple University, 1948; 
Ed.D., 1954. 

EARL, James A., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1935, Ph.D., 1958. 

EDMUNDSON, Harold P., Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics 
B.A., University of California at Los Angeles, 1946; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., 1953. 

EHEART, Mary S., Assistant Professor of Food and Nutrition 
A.B., Park College, 1933; M.S., University of Chicago, 1934. 

EHRLE, Raymond A., Lecturer in Education 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1950; M.A. George Washington University, 1956; 
Ed.D., University of Missouri, 1961. 



316 • Graduate School 

EHRLICH. Gertrude. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College of Women, 1943; M.A., University of North Carolina, 
1945; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 1953. 

EISENBERG. John F., Research Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Washington State University, 1957; M.A., University of California, 1959; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

ELKINS, Wilson H., President, University of Maryland 

B.A., University of Texas. 1932; M.A.. 1932; Litt.B.. Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil., 1936. 

ELLIS, Robert L.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Miami University, 1960; Ph.D., Duke University, 1966. 

ERICKSON, William C. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1956. 

EYUAR, OUie R., Jr., Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1959. 

EYLER, Marvin Howard, Professor and Head of Department of Physical Education 
A.B., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 1956. 

FABER, John E., Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937 

FAIRCHILD, Thomas P., Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1959; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1961; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

FAJER, Abram B.. Assistant Professor of Physiology 
M.D., University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 

FALCK, Hans S., Professor of Social Work 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1949; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950; M.S.S., 
University of Buffalo, 1953; D.S.Sc, Syracuse University, 1960. 

FALK, David W., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B. Engr. Phys., Cornell University, 1954; A.M., Harvard University, 1955; Ph.D., 
1959. 

FALLER, Alan J., Research Associate Professor of Meteorology of the Institute of 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1951; M.S., 1953; Sc.D., 1957. 

FANNING, Delvin S., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Cornell University, 1954; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

FEDERICO, Ronald C, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Yale University, 1962; M.S.W., University of Michigan, 1964; Ph.D., North- 
western University, 1968. 

FELTON, Kenneth E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; B.S., 1951; M.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1962. 

FERRELL, Richard A., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., Princeton 
University, 1952. 

FIGGE, Frank H. J., Professor and Head of Department of Anatomy 
A.B., Colorado College, 1927; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 



University of Maryland • 317 

FISCHLSCHWEIGER. Werner. Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology 
Certificate, Teachers College, Graz. Austria, 1952; Ph.D., University of Graz, 1957. 

FISET, Paul. Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., Laval University, Quebec, 1944: M.D., 1949; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 
1956. 

FISHER, Allan J., Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1928; Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh, 1936; 
Ph.D., 1937. 

FISHER, George L., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.B.A., City College. New York, 1957; A.M., Boston University, 1958; Ph.D., 
1962. 

FISHER, Russell S., Professor of Legal Medicine 

B.S.. Georgia School of Technology, 1937; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 
1942. 

FIVEL, Daniel I., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; Ph.D., 1959. 

FLEMING, Rudd, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Chicago. 1930; Ph.D.. Cornell University, 1934. 

FOLSOM, Kenneth E., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Princeton University, 1943; B.A., University of California, 1955; M.A., 
1957; Ph.D., 1964. 

FONAROFF, Leonard S.. Associate Professor of Geography 

B.A., University of Arizona, 1955; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1961. 

FOSS, John E., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., Wisconsin State University. 1957; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1959, 
Ph.D., 1965. 

FOSS, Noel E.. Professor of Pharmacy 

Ph.C B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

FOSTER, John Erwin, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science 

B.S., North Carolina State College. 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; Ph.D., 
Corneir University, 1937. 

FOSTER, Phillips W., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University. 1953; M.S., University of Illinois. 1956; Ph.D.. 1958. 

FRALEY, Lester M., Professor and Dean of College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 
A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., Peabody College, 1937; Ph.D., 1939. 

FRANZ. Jacob G.. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Southwestern University, 1935; M.A., Columbia University, 1939; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 1960. 

FREEDMAN, Morris, Professor and Head of Department of English 

B.A., City College of New York, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 
1953. 

FRETZ, Bruce R., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1961; M.A., Ohio State University, 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 



318 • Graduate School 

FRIEDMAN, Herbert, Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1936; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

FREIMUTH, Henry C. Associate Professor of Legal Medicine 

B.S., City College of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1938. 

FUNARO, George J., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., American International College, 1956; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut, 1965. 

GAINER, Harold, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., City College of New York, 1956; Ph.D., University of California, 1959. 

GALLOWAY, Raymond A., Associate Professor of Botany 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

GANIS, Frank M., Chairman and Associate Professor of Biochemistry 
A.B., University of Rochester, 1949; Ph.D., 1956. 

GAUCH, Hugh G., Professor of Botany 

B.S., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

GENTRY, Dwight L., Professor of Marketing and Associate Dean of College of 
Business and Public Administration 
A.B., Elon College, 1941; M.B.A., Northwestern University, 1947; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1952. 

GIBLETTE, John F., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., George Washington University, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

GIFFIN, Donald W., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of California, 1950; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1956; Ph.D., 
1962. 

GINNINGS, Robert M., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., 1965. 

GINTER, Marshall L., Assistant Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., Chico State College, 1958; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1961. 

GLASER, Edmund M., Research Associate Professor of Medical Physiology 
B.E.E., Cooper Union, 1944; M.S.E., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954; Dr. 
Engr., 1960. 

GLASSER, Robert Gene, Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 
A.B., University of Chicago, 1948; B.S., 1950; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., 1954. 

GLICK, Arnold J., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1959. 

GLOECKLER, George, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., University of Chicago, 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

GLOVER, Rolfe Eldridge, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B., Bowdoin, 1948; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1948; Ph.D., 
University of Gottingen, 1953. 



University of Maryland • 319 

GODFREY, Edward P.. Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S.. University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S., Ohio State University, 1950; 
Ph.D.. 1952. 

GOERING. Jacob D.. Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Bethel College. 1941: B.D.. Bethany Seminary, 1949; Ph.D.. University 
of Maryland, 1959. 

GOLDBERG. Seymour. Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Hunter College, 1950; M.A., Ohio State, 1952; Ph.D., University of 
California at Los Angeles, 1958. 

GOLDHABER, J. K., Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department of 
Mathematics 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1944; M.A., Harvard University, 1945; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1950. 

GOLDMAN, Lawrence. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Tufts University, 1958; Ph.D., University of California, 1964. 

GOLDSTEIN, Irwin L., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.B.A., City College of New York, 1959; M.A., University of Maryland, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

GOLLUB, Lewis R., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1958. 

GOMEZPLATA. Albert, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.Ch.E., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 1952; M.Ch.E.. Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

GOOD, Richard A., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Ashland College, 1939; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940; Ph.D., 1945. 

GOODWYN, Frank, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literature 
B.A.. Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1940; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University 
of Texas, 1946. 

GORDON. Donald C, Professor of History 

A.B.. College of William and Mary, 1934; M.A., Columbia University, 1937; 
Ph.D., 1947. 

GORDON, Stewart L., Professor of Music 

Certificate-Diploma. Staatliches Konservatorium des Saarlands, 1951; B.A.. Uni- 
versity of Kansas, 1953; M.A., 1954; D.M.A., University of Rochester, 1965. 

GRAMBERG, Eduard J., Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages 
and Literature 
M.A., University of California at Los Angeles, 1949; Ph.D., University of 
California, 1956. 

GRAMBS, Jean D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; M.A., Stanford University, 1941; Ed.D., 1948. 

GREEN, Robert L., Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E.. University of Georgia. 1934; M.S., Iowa State College, 1939; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. 1953. 

GREEN, Willard Wynn, Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1939. 



320 • Graduate School 

GREENBERG, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S.. Ohio State University, 1951; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

GREENBERG. Leon, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. City College of New York, 1953; M.A.. Yale University, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

GREENBERG, Louis M., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1954; M.A., Harvard University, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

GREENE. Michael P.. Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.E.P.. Cornell University, 1960: M.S., University of California, 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

GREENBERG, Oscar Wallace, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; A.M.. Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

GREIG, Joseph Robert, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Imperial College, 1959; Ph.D., 1965. 

GREISMAN, Sheldon E., Assistant Professor of Physiology 
M.D., New York University, 1949. 

GRENELL, Robert Gordon, Professor of Psychiatry 

A.B., City College of New York, 1935; M.S., New York University, 1936; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1943. 

GRENTZER. Rose Marie, Professor of Music Education 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; B.A., 1936; M.A., 1939. 

GRIEM, Hans, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
Ph.D., Universitat Kiel, 1954. 

GRIFFIN, James J., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Villanova University, 1952; M.S., Ph.D., Princeton University, 1956. 

GRIM, Samuel O., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1960. 

GROLLMAN, Sidney, Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

GRUCHY, Allan G., Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of British Columbia, 1926; M.A., McGill University, 1929; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1931. 

GUERNSEY, Ralph L., Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.A., Miami University, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1960. 

GULICK, Sidney L., Ill, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1958; M.A., Yale University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

HABER, Francis C, Professor and Head of Department of History 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1948; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1957. 

HABERMAN, William L., Visiting Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., Cooper Union, 1949; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952; Ph.D., 1956. 

HAHN, William E., Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1931. 



University of Maryland • 321 

HAILMAN, Jack P., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

A.B., Harvard University, 1959; Ph.D., Duke University, 1964. 

HALEY, A. James, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1949; M.S.. 1950; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1955. 

HAMILTON, McDonald K., Professor and Head of Department of Oral Surgery 
A.B., Alma College, 1952: D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1956. 

HANSEN, Paul Arne. Professor of Microbiology 

M.S., Royal Tech. College, 1926; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1934. 

HARLAN, Louis R., Professor of History 

B.A., Emory University, 1943; M.A.. Vanderbilt University. 1947; Ph.D.. The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 

HARPER, Glenn A.. Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., Purdue University, 1958; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1968. 

HARPER, Robert A., Professor and Head of Department of Geography 
Ph.B., University of Chicago. 1946; B.S., 1947; M.S., 1948; Ph.D.. 1950. 

HARRINGTON. J. Patrick, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1961; M.S., Ohio State University, 1964; Ph.D., 1967. 

HARRIS, Curtis C, Jr., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., University of Florida, 1956; M.A., Harvard University, 1959; Ph.D.. 1960. 

HARRIS, Wesley Lamar, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1953; M.S.. 1958; Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

HARRISON, Floyd P., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

HARRISON, Horace V., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Trinity University, 1932; M.A., University of Texas, 1941; Ph.D., 1951. 

HARRISON, Paul E., Jr., Professor of Industrial Education 

B.E.D., Northern Illinois State College, 1942; M.A., Colorado State College, 
1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

HARVEY, Ellen E., Professor and Head of Department of Recreation 

Teacher Certificate, New Paltz Normal, 1933; B.S., New College, Columbia 
University, 1935; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941; Ed.D.. Uni- 
versity of Oregon, 1951. 

HATFIELD, Agnes B.. Associate Professor. Institute for Child Study 

Certificate, Dakota Wesleyan University, 1940; B.A., University of California, 
1948; M.A., University of Denver, 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

HATHORN, Guy B., Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Mississippi, 1940; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Duke University, 1950. 

HAUT, I. C, Professor of Horticulture, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station 
B.S., University of Idaho. 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

HAVRILESKY, Thomas M., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960; M.A., 1963; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois, 1966. 



322 • Graduate School 

HAYLECK, Charles Raymond. Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1949. 

HAYWARD, Raymond W.. Jr.. Instructor in Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Iowa State College, 1943; Ph.D., University of California, 1950. 

HEBELER. Jean R., Professor and Head of Department of Special Education 
B.S., Buffalo State Teachers College, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1956; 
Ed.D., Syracuse University. 1960. 

HEILPRIN, Laurence B., Professor, School of Library and Information Services 
B.S.. University of Pennsylvania, 1928; M.A., 1931; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1941. 

HEIM, Norman M.. Associate Professor of Music 

B.M.Ed., Evansville College, 1951; M.M., Eastman School of Music, University 
of Rochester, 1952; D.M.A., University of Rochester, 1962. 

HEIMPEL, Arthur M., Lecturer in Entomology 

B.A., Queens University, 1948; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., Queens University and Uni- 
versity of California, 1954. 

HEINS, Conrad P., Jr., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 1960; M.S., Lehigh University, 1962; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1967. 

HELBACKA, Norman V. L., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

HELRICH, Martin, Professor of Anesthesiology 

B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

HELZER, Garry A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Portland State College, 1959; M.A., Northwestern University, 1962; Ph.D., 
1964. 

HEMKEN, Roger W., Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

HENDRICKS, Richard, Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

A.B., Franklin College of Indiana, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939; 
Ph.D., 1956. 

HENERY-LOGAN, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.Sc, McGill University, 1942; Ph.D., 1946. 

HENKEL, Ramon E., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 
Ph.B., University of Wisconsin, 1958; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., 1967. 

HENKELMAN, James Henry, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Miami University, 1954; M.Ed., 1955; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1965. 

HERING, Christoph A., Professor and Head of Department of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages and Literature 
Ph.D., Rhein-Frederich-Wilhelms Universitat, 1950. 

HERMAN, Wayne L., Assistant Professor, Early Childhood-Elementary Education 
B.A., Ursinus College, 1955; M.Ed., Temple University, 1960; D.Ed., 1965. 

HERMANSON, Roger H., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., Michigan State University, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 



University of Maryland • 323 

HESSE, Everett W., Professor and Head of Department of Spanish and Portuguese 
Languages and Literatures 
B.A., New York University. 1931; M.A., 1933; Ph.D.. 1941. 

HETRICK, Frank M.. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 
1962. 

HEXTER, J. Lawrence. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Minnesota. 1954; M.B.A.. Cornell University, 1958; M.A., 
University of Wisconsin, 1964; Ph.D.. 1965. 

HIEBERT, Ray Eldon, Professor and Head of Department of Journalism 

B.A., Stanford University. 1954; M.S., Columbia University. 1957; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1961; Ph.D.. 1962. 

HIGGS, William J., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1960; A.M.. University of Illinois. 1964; Ph.D.. 1965. 

HIGHTON, Richard T., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1950; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; Ph.D.. 1956. 

HILLE, Stanley J., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.B.A., University of Minnesota, 1959; M.B.A.. 1962; Ph.D., 1966. 

HINRICHS, Harley H.. A.ssistant Professor of Economics 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1953; M.S.. Purdue University, 1958; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1964. 

HIRZEL, Robert K., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1946; M.A.. 1950; Ph.D.. Louisiana State 
University, 1954. 

HOCHULL U. E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Technikum Biel, Biel. Switzerland. 1952; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1955; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1962. 

HOFFMAN, Bernard G., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 
B.A.. Montana State University. 1946; Ph.D.. University of California, 1955. 

HOFFSOMMER, Harold C, Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Northwestern University. 1921; M.A.. 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

HOLMGREN, Harry D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B. of Phys., University of Minnesota, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., 1954. 

HORNBAKE, R. Lee, Professor of Industrial Education and Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 
B.S., California State College, California. Pa.. 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 
1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

HORNYAK, William Frank. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.E.E., City College of New York, 1944; M.S., California Institute of Technology, 
1949; Ph.D., 1949. 

HORTON, David L., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B. A., University of Minnesota, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

HORVATH, John, Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Budapest, 1947. 

HOSFELD, Carol M.. Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M. S., University of Pennsylvania, 1956. 



324 • Graduate School 

HOUPPERT, Joseph W., Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Detroit. 1955; M. A., University of Michigan, 1957; Ph.D., 
1964. 

HOVET, Kenneth O., Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 1950. 

HOVEY, Richard B., Professor of English 

A.B., University of Cincinnati, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

HSU, Shao T., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Chiao Tung University, 1937; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1944; Sc.D., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, 1954. 

HSUEH, Chun-tu, Professor of Government and Politics 

Diploma, China School of Journalism. 1939; LL.B., Chaoyang College, 1946; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

HU, Charles Y., Professor of Geography 

B.S., University of Nanking, 1930: M.A., University of California, 1936; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1941. 

HUBBARD, Bert E., Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics 
B.S., Western Illinois University. 1949; M.S., State University of Iowa, 1952; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1960. 

HUBER, Franz E., Associate Professor of Special Education 
B.A., University of Michigan, 1951: M.A., 1953; Ph.D., 1964. 

HUMMEL. James A., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. California Institute of Technology, 1949; M.A., Rice Institute. 1953; Ph.D., 
1955. 

HUMPHREY, James H., Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Denison University, 1933; M.A., Western Reserve University, 1946; Ed.D., 
Boston University, 1951. 

HUNT, Larry L., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.S., Ball State University, 1961; M. A., Indiana University, 1964; Ph.D., 1968. 

HUSMAN. Burris F., Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

HYBL, Albert, Assistant Professor of Biophysics 

B.A., Coe College, 1954; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1961. 

HYDORN, Marguerite E., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Wayne State University, 1951; M. Ed., University of Maryland, 1954. 

HYMES, James L., Jr., Professor of Education 

A.B., Harvard College, 1934; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1936; Ed.D., 1946. 

ICHNIOWSKI, Casimir T., Professor and Head of Department of Pharmacology 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 

ISHEE, Sidney, Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Mississippi State College, 1950; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1957. 



University of Maryland • 325 

JACHOW^^KI, Leo A.. Jr.. Professor of Zoology 

B.S.. University of Michigan, 1941; M.S., 1942; Sc.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1953. 

JACKSON, John W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1934; M.E., 1937; M.S.M.E., California 
Institute of Technology, 1940. 

JACKSON, Stanley B., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Bates College, 1933; A.M., Harvard University, 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

JACOBS. Walter Darnell, Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.A., 1956: Ph.D., 1961. 

JANES, Robert W., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1938; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1942. 

JAQUITH, Richard H., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; Ph.D., Michigan State 
College, 1955. 

JASHEMSKI, Wilhelmina, Professor of History 

A.B., York College, 1931; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1933; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1942. 

JOHN, James E. A., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E., Princeton University, 1955; M.S.E., 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1963. 

JOHNSON, Charles E., Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1957; Ph.D., 1964. 

JOHNSON, Everett R., Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of 
the College of Engineering 
B.A., University of Iowa. 1937; M.A., Harvard University, 1940; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1949; M.S., Stevens Institute, 1960. 

JOHNSON, Roy Hamlin, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1959; M.M., 1951; D.M.A., 1961. 

JOHNSON, Warren R., Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., University of Denver, 1942; M.A., 1946; Ed.D., Boston University, 1950. 

JONES, George Fenwick. Professor of Germanic and Slavic Languages and 
Literature 
A.B., Emory University, 1938; M.A., Oxford University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1950. 

JONES, Grover S., Research Associate Professor of Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
A.B., Duke University, 1952; Navy Certificate, Naval Postgraduate School, 1955; 
M.S., University of North Carolina, 1958; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1960. 

JONES, Herbert L., Assistant Professor and Head of Department of Health Edu- 
cation 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1954; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1957; H.S.D., 
Indiana University, 1963. 

JONES, Jack Colvard, Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1939; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity, 1950. 



326 • Graduate School 

KACSER, Claude, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., Oxford University, 1955; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1959. 

KANTZES, James G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 

KARLANDER, Edward P., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Vermont, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 1962; Ph.D., 
1964. 

KARP, Carol R., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Manchester College, 1948; M.A.. Michigan State University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California, 1959. 

KARPELES, Leo M., Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., University of North Carolina, 1941; M.D., University of Washington, 1955. 

KEENEY, Mark, Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; M.S., Ohio State University, 1947; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

KEHOE, Brandt, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Cornell University, 1956; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

KELLEY, David L., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., San Diego State College, 1957; M.S., University of Southern California, 
1958; Ph.D., 1962. 

KELLOGG, R. Bruce, Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; M.S., University of Chicago, 
1953; Ph.D., 1959. 

KELSEY, Roger R., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1934; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1940; Ed.D., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1954. 

KESSEL, Rosslyn W. I., Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S. and M.S., University of London, 1956; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1960. 

KIDD, Jerry S., Professor, School of Library and Information Services 

B.S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1950; M.A., Northwestern University, 1954; 
Ph.D., 1956. 

KIM, Young Suh, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Seoul (Korea), 1956; Ph.D., University of Birmingham (Eng- 
land), 1964. 

KIM, Young Suh, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1958; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

KING, RAYMOND L., Professor of Dairy Science 
A.B., University of California, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

KINNARD, William J., Jr., Professor of Pharmacology and Dean of School of 
Pharmacy 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

KIRTLEY, Mary E., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, School of Medicine 
B.A., University of Chicago, 1956; M.A., Smith College, 1958; Ph.D., Western 
Reserve University, 1964. 



University of Maryland • 327 

KIRWAN, William E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Kentucky, 1960; M.S., Rutgers University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

KLARMAN, William L., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., Eastern Illinois State College, 1957; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; Ph.D., 
1962. 

KLEPPNER, Adam, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Yale University, 1953; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1960. 

KNIGHT, Robert E. L., Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., University of California, 1958. 

KOCH, Adrienne, Professor of History 

B.A., Washington Square College, 1933; M.A., Columbia University, 1934; Ph.D., 
1942. 

KOCH, J. Frederick, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., New York University, 1958; Ph.D., University of California, 1962. 

KOLB, Alan Charles, Professor of Physics & Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology. 1949; M.S., University of Michigan, 1950; 
Ph.D., 1957. 

KOOPMAN, David W., Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.A., Amherst College, 1957; M.S., University of Michigan, 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

KORENMAN, Victor, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Princeton University, 1958; M.A., Harvard University, 1959; Ph.D., 1966. 

KOURY, Enver M., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., George Washington University, 1953; Ph.D., American University, 1958. 

KRAHL, Vernon E., Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1939; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1946. 

KRALL, Nicholas A., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1959. 

KRAMER, Amihud, Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1942. 

KRAUSS, Robert W., Professor and Head of Department of Botany 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1947; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949; Ph.D., Unversity 
of Maryland, 1951. 

KRISHER, Lawrence C, Associate Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics and 
Applied Mathematics 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1955; A.M., Harvard University, 1957; Ph.D., 1959. 

KRUSBERG, Lorin R., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Delaware, 1954; M.S., North Carolina State College, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

KRYWOLAP, George N., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S.. Pennsylvania State University, 
1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

KUHN, Albin O., Professor of Agronomy and Chancellor, Baltimore Campuses 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 



328 • Graduate School 

KUNZE, H. J., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

Abitur, Oberrealschule Marktredwitz, 1956; Diplom-Physiker, Tech. Hochschule, 
1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

KURODA, Sigekatu, Professor of Mathematics 

Bachelor, University of Tokyo, 1928; D.Sc, 1945. 

KURTZ, John J., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1949. 

KYLE, David G., Associate Professor, Institute for Child Study 

A.B., University of Denver, 1952; M.A., 1953; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

LADSON, Thomas B., Professor and Head of Department of Veterinary Science 
and Director, Livestock Sanitary Service 
V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

LAFFER. Norman C, Professor of Microbiology and Associate Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences 
B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois, 1937. 

LAKSHMANAN, Sitarama, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc. Annamalai University, 1946; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1954. 

LAMONE, Rudolph P., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., University of North Carolina, 1960; Ph.D., 1966. 

LAMY, Peter, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 1964. 

LANDFIELD, Jerome B., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art. 

B.A., University of California, 1948; M.A., Stanford University, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Missouri, 1958. 

LANDSBERG, Helmut, Research Professor and Chairman. Graduate Committee on 
Meteorology, Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Frankfurt, 1930. 

LANGFORD, George S., Professor of Entomology 

B.S., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1929. 

LANSDALE, Robert T., Professor of Social Work 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1921; Diploma, New York School of Social Work, 1924; 
A.M., Columbia University, 1925; LL.D., St. Lawrence University, 1953. 

LA POINTE, Martin H., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S.E., University of Michigan, 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1962. 

LARKIN, Willard D., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1959; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1963; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1967. 

LARSON, Gerald L., Assistant Professor, Institute for Child Study 

B.S., in Ed., Indiana University, 1956; M.S., in Ed., 1957; Ph.D., in Ed., University 
of Illinois, 1963. 



University of Maryland • 329 

LASHINSKY, Herbert, Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., City College of New York, 1950; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1961. 

LASTER, Howard. Professor and Head of Department of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Harvard College, 1951; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

LAWRENCE, Richard E., Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1965. 

LAWSON, Lewis A., Associate Professor of English 

B.S., East Tennessee State College, 1957; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1964. 

LAY, David C, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Aurora College, 1962; M.A., University of California, 1965; Ph.D., 1966. 

LEEPER, Sarah Lou Hammond, Professor of Education 

A.B., Florida State College for Women, 1932; M.A., Florida State University, 
1947; Ed.D., 1953. 

LEFFEL, Emory C, Professor of Animal Science 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1953. 

LEHNER, Guydo R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola University, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

LEHNER, Joseph L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., New York University, 1938; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1939; Ph.D., 
1941. 

LEIBOWITZ, J. R., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., New York University, 1951; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Brown University, 1962. 

LEJINS, Peter P., Professor of Sociology 

Ph.M., University of Latvia, 1930; LL.M., 1933; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1938. 

LEMBACH, John, Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; M.A., Northwestern University, 1937; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

LEMMON, M. Louise, Associate Professor of Home Economics and Home Econom- 
ics Education 
B.S., Northern Illinois University, 1945; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1952; 
Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

LENCHEK, Allen M., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., University of Chicago, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1963. 

LEONARD, Charles B., Jr., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 

LEPPER, Henry A., Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., George Washington University, 1936; M.S., University of Illinois, 1938; 
D.Eng., Yale University, 1947. 

LESLIE, James, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S., Queens University, 1956; Ph.D., 1959. 

LESSLEY, Billy V., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

A.S., Arkansas Polytechnic College, 1955; B.S., University of Arkansas, 1957; 
M.S., 1960; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1965. 



330 • Graduate School 

LEVINE, Marvin J., Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1952; J.D., 1954; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

LEVINSON, Carl A., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1949; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1952. 

LEVITINE, George, Professor and Head of Department of Art 

Baccalaureate, University of Paris, 1936 and 1938; M.A., Boston University, 1946; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1952. 

LEVY, Maurice Marc, Visiting Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.Sc, University of Algiers, 1944; M.S., 1945; Ph.D., University of Paris, 1949. 

LEWIS, Verl S.. Professor of Social Work 

A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1938; D.S.W., Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

LIESENER, James W., Associate Professor, School of Library & Information Ser- 
vices 
B.A., Wartburg College, 1955; Tech. Cert., University of North Indiana, 1957; 
M.A., 1960; A.M.L.S., University of Michigan. 1962; Ph.D., 1967. 

LINDENBERG, Richard, Lecturer in Anatomy 

Graduation, University of Munich Medical School, 1934; M.D., University of 
Berlin, 1944. 

LINDER, Harris Joseph, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Long Island University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

LINDSAY, Rao H., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Brigham Young University, 1954; M.A., 1958; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1963; Ph.D., 1964. 

LINK, Conrad B., Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1940. 

LIPPINCOTT, Ellis R., Professor of Chemistry and Director, Center for Materials 
Research 
B.A., Earlham College. 1943; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1944; Ph.D., 
1947. 

LOCKARD, J. David, Associate Professor of Botany and Education 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1951; M.Ed., 1955; Ph.D., 1962. 

LOCKE, Edwin A., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Harvard University, 1960; M.A., Cornell University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

LONGEST, James W., Associate Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

LOONEY, Charles T. G., Professor and Head of Department of Civil Engineering 
B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1932; M.S., University of Illinois, 1934; 
Ph.D., 1940. 

LOPEZ-ESCOBAR, Edgar G. K., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Cambridge, 1958; M.A., University of California, 1961; Ph.D., 
1965. 

LOUNSBURY, Myron O., Assistant Professor of American Studies 

B.A., Duke University, 1961; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1962; Ph.D., 1966. 

LUETKEMEYER, Joseph F., Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., Stout State College, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 



University of Maryland • 331 

LUNIN, Martin, Professor and Head of Department of Pathology 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., Washington University, 1950; 
M.P.H., Columbia University, 1952. 

LUTWACK, Leonard, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

LYNN, Yen-Mow, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., National Taiwan University, 1955; M.S., California Institute of Technology, 
1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

MacBAIN, William, Professor and Head of Department of French and Italian 
Languages and Literature 
M.A., University of St. Andrews, 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

MacDONALD, William M., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 

MacQUILLAN, Anthony M., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.A., University of British Columbia, 1956; M.Sc, 1958; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1962. 

MAGOON, Thomas M., Professor of Education and Associate Dean, Director, 
Counseling Center 
B.A., Dartmouth College, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; Ph.D., 1954. 

MALE, George A., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

MALEY, Donald, Professor and Head of the Department of Industrial Education 
B.S., California State Teachers College, Pa., 1943; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

MALTESE, George J., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1953; Ph.D., Yale University, 1960. 

MANNING, Charles, Professor of English and Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences 
B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina, 1950. 

MANS, Rusty Jay, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Florida, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

MARCHELLO, Joseph M., Professor and Head of Department of Chemical Engi- 
neering 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1955; Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1959. 

MARCOVITZ, Alan B., Professor of Electrical Engineering 

S.B.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1959; S.M.E.E., 1959; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1963. 

MARIL, Herman, Professor of Art 
Maryland Institute of Fine Art, 1928 

MARION, Jerry B., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., Reed College, 1952; M.A., Rice Institute, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

MARKLEY, Nelson G., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Lafayette College, 1962; M.A., Yale University, 1964; Ph. D., 1966. 



332 • Graduate School 

MARKS, Colin H., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1956; M.S., 1957; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1965. 

MARTIN, Monroe H., Professor of Mathematics, Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

MARX, George L., Professor of Education and Head, Counseling and Personnel 
Services 
B.A., Yankton College, 1953; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1958; Ph.D., 1959. 

MATTESON, Richard L., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Knox College, 1952; M.A., University of Maryland, 1956; Ed.D., 1962. 

MATTHEWS, David L., Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., Queens University, 1949; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1959. 

MATTHEWS, Thomas A., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1950; M.S., Case Institute of Technology, 1951; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1956. 

MATTICK, Joseph F., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942; Ph.D., 1950. 

McCLURE, L. Morris, Professor and Associate Dean of Education 

A.B., Western Michigan University, 1940; M.A., University of Michigan, 1946; 
Ed.D., Michigan State University, 1953. 

McCORKLE, Donald M., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Bradley University, 1951; A.M., Indiana University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

McDonald, Frank B., Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.S., Duke University, 1948; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

McDonald, Russell F., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Ohio State University. 1950; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., 1959. 

McGINNIES, Elliott M., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1943; M.A., Brown University, 1944; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1948. 

McGRATH, Daniel F., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.A.. University of Virginia, 1959; M.A., University of Michigan, 1960; M.A.L.S., 
1961; Ph.D., 1966. 

McINTIRE, Roger Warren, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A. A.. N. Park College, 1956; B.A., Northwestern University, 1958; M.A., Louisiana 
State University. 1960; Ph.D., 1962. 

MclNTYRE, Jennie J., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.A., Howard College, 1960; M.S., Florida State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1966. 

McMANAWAY, James G., Professor of English (P.T.) 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1919; M.A., 1920; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1931. 

McNELLY, Theodore, Professor of Government and Politics 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1941: M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1952. 



University of Maryland • 33 3 

MECKLER. Alvin. Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy- 

B.S., City College of New York, 1947: Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1952. 

MEER, Melvyn L., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A.. Brooklyn College. 1960; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1966. 

MEERSMAN, Roger, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., St. Ambrose College. 1952; M.A., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

MELNIK, Walter L., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B.S., University of Minnesota. 1951: M.S.. 1953: Ph.D.. 1964. 

MENDELOFF. Henry. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages 
and Literatures 
B.S.. City College of New York. 1936: M.S.. 1939: Ph.D.. Catholic University. 
1960. 

MENZER, Robert Everett, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.S.. University of Pennsylvania. 1960; M.S.. University of Maryland. 1962: 
Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 1964. 

MERLIS. Jerome K., Professor of Neurology and Associate Professor of Phvsiologv 
B.S.. University of Louisville. 1933: M.d', 1937; M.S., 1938. 

MERRILL, Horace S.. Professor of History 

B.E., River Falls State College. 1932: Ph.M.. University of Wisconsin, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

MERSHON, Madelaine, Professor of Education 

B.S., Drake University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago. 1943; Ph.D.. 1950. 

MESSERSMITH. Donald H., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.Ed.. University of Toledo, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1962. 

MEYER, Paul A., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 1961: M.A.. Stanford University. 1963; Ph.D., 
1966. 

MIKULSKI, Piotr W., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Diploma. Main School of Planning and Statistics, Warsaw. 1951; Master's, 1952; 
Ph.D., University of California, 1962. 

MILHOLLAN. Frank. Associate Professor, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., Colorado College. 1949; M.P.S., University of Colorado, 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska, 1966. 

MILLER, James R.. Professor and Head of the Department of Agronomy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S.. 1953; Ph.D.. 1956. 

MISH. Charles C, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; M.A., 1946; Ph.D.. 1951. 

MISNER, Charles W., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 

1957. 

MITCHELL, T. Faye, Professor and Head of the Department of Textiles and 
Clothing 
B.S., Missouri State Teachers College, Springfield, 1930; M.A.. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1939. 



334 • Graduate School 

MOHANTY, Sashi B., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 

B.V.Sc, & A.H.. Bihar University. 1956; M.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 
Ph.D., 1963. 

MOORE. John R., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1955; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1959. 

MORGAN, Delbert T.. Jr.. Professor of Botany 

B.S., Kent State University, 1940; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; Ph.D., 1948. 

MORGAN, Hugh G.. Professor of Education and Assistant Director of Institute of 
Child Study 
B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

MORSE, Douglass H., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Bates College, 1960; M.S., University of Michigan, 1962; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University, 1965. 

MOSES, Tom E., Assistant Professor of Social Work 

B.A., Kent State University, 1948; M.S.S.W., University of Wisconsin, 1952. 

MULLINS, L. J., Professor and Head, Department of Biophysics 
B.S., University of California, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

MUNN, Robert J., Associate Professor and Associate Director, Institute for Molec- 
ular Physics 
B.S., University of Bristol, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

MUNNO, Frank J., Associate Professor of Chemical Enginering 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1957; M.S., University of Florida, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

MURPHY, Charles D., Professor of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

MURPHY, Marion Isabel, Professor and Dean, School of Nursing 

B.S., University of Minnesota, M.P.H., University of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

MURRAY, Ray A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1934; M.S. Cornell University, 1938; Ph.D., 1949. 

MUSEN, Peter, Visiting Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
Ph.D., University of Belgrade, 1937. 

MYERS, Ralph D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Cornell University, 1934; A.M., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

MYERS, Robert Manson, Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

MYERS, William F., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
A.B., University of Kansas, 1949; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

NASH, Allan N., Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.B.A., University of Minnesota, 1957; M.B.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1963. 

NEMES, Graciela P., Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

B.S., Trinity College, 1942; M.A., University of Maryland, 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

NERI, Umberto, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1961; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1966. 



University of Maryland • 335 

NEVILLE, Richard P., Associate Professor of Education and Assistant to the Dean 
B.S., Central Connecticut State College. 1953; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Connecticut. 1963. 

NEWELL, Clarence A., Professor of Education 

A.B., Hastings College, 1935; A.M., Teachers College, Columbia University. 1939; 
Ph.D., 1943. 

NOLL, James W., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A.. University of Wisconsin, 1954; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1965. 

O'CONNELL, Donald W.. Professor of Economics and Dean of the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A.. 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

OLSON, Keith W., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., State University of New York, 1957; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1964. 

ONEDA, Sadao, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S.C., Tohoku University, 1946; M.S.C., 1948; D.Sc, Ministry of Education, 
Nagoya University, 1953. 

O'NEILL. John J., Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., St. Francis College. 1942; M.S.. University of Maryland, 1953; Ph.D., 1955. 

O'NEILL, Leo W., Jr.. Professor of Education 

A.B., University of Chicago. 1938; M.A., University of Kansas City, 1952; Ed.D., 
University of Colorado. 1955. 

OPIK, Ernst J., Professor of Astrophysics (P.T) 

Cand. Astro., Moscow Imperial University, 1916; D. Phil. Nat.. University of 
Estonia, 1923. 

ORTEGA, James McDonough. Research Associate Professor. Computer Science 
Center and Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B.S., University of New Mexico, 1954; Ph.D.. Stanford University. 1962. 

OSBORN. John E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1958; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1965. 

OTTO, Gilbert Fred, Professor of Zoology 

A.B., Kalamazoo College, 1926: M.S.. Kansas State University. 1927; Sc.D., The 
Johns Hopkins University. 1929. 

OTTS, Louis E., Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.A., East Texas State Teachers College, 1933; B.S.. Agricultural and Mechanical 
College of Texas, 1946; M.S., 1946. 

PAI, Shih-I, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics. 
B.S., National Central University. China, 1935; M.S.. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1938; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1940. 

PAINE, Frank T.. Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; M.B.A., 1956; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1963. 

PANICHAS. George A.. Professor of English 

B.A., American International College, 1951; M.A.. Trinity College. 1952; Ph.D., 
Nottingham University, England, 1961. 



336 • Graduate School 

PARR, Wallace Eldon, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1950; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1960. 

PARSONS, Arthur C, Associate Professor of French and Italian 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

PASCH, Alan, Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., New School for Soc. Res., 1952; 
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1955. 

PATI, Jogesh Chandra, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Utkal University, 1955; M.S., Delhi University, 1957; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1960. 

PATRICK, Arthur, Professor of Information Systems Management 

B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., 
American University, 1956. 

PATTERSON, Glenn W., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., North Carolina State University, 1960; M.S., University of Maryland, 1963, 
Ph.D., 1964. 

PEARL, Martin Herbert, Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1950; M.A., University of Michigan, 1951; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1955. 

PEASE, John, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Western Michigan University, 1960; M.A., Michigan State University, 1963, 
Ph.D., 1968. 

PECHACEK, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., California Institute of Technology, 1954; M.S., University of California, 
1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

PELCZAR, Michael J., Jr., Professor of Microbiology and Vice President for Gradu- 
ate Studies and Research 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1941. 

PENNINGTON, Kenneth D., Associate Professor of Music 

A.B. & B.Mus., Friends University, 1950; M.A., New York University, 1953; 
D.Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

PERKINS, Hugh V., Professor of Education 

A.B., & Sch. Mus.B., Oberlin College, 1941; A.M., University of Chicago, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1945; Ed.D., New York University, 1956. 

PETERS, Robert M., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Mankato State College, 1955; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 
1965. 

PIAVIS, George W., Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; M.Ed., 1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 
1958. 

PICKARD, Hugh B., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Haverford College, 1933; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1938. 

PIPER, Don C, Associate Professor and Head of Department of Government and 
Politics 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., Duke University, 1961. 

PIPER, Harry W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B. Arch. E., Catholic University, 1940; M.C.E., 1961. 



University of Maryland • 337 

PITTS, Gordon M., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., McGill University, 1943; M.A., New York University, 1948; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1956. 

PLISCHKE, Elmer, Professor of Government and Politics 

Ph.B., Marquette University, 1937; M.A., American University, 1938; Ph.D., 
Clark University, 1943; Certificate, Columbia University, Naval School of Military 
Government, 1944. 

PLOTKIN, Allen, Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering 

B.S., Columbia University, 1963; M.S., 1964; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1968. 

PLOWMAN, Ronald D., Lecturer in Dairy Science 

B.S., Utah State University, 1951; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1955; Ph.D., 
1956. 

POFFENBERGER, Paul R., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Assistant 
Dean of Instruction, College of Agriculture 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., American University, 1953 

POMERANTZ, Seymour H., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 
B.S., The Rice Institute, 1948; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1952. 

PORTZ, John, Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Duke University, 1937; M.A., Harvard University. 1941; Ph.D.. 1957. 

POTTER. Jane H.. Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Chicago. 1942; M.S., 1948; Ph.D., 1949. 

POULTNEY. Sherman K.. Associate Research Professor of Phvsics and Astronomy 
B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1958; M.A., Princeton University, I960: 
Ph.D.. 1962. 

PRAHL, Augustus J., Professor of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature 
M.A., Washington University. 1928: Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

PRANGE, Gordon W., Professor of History 

A.B., University of Iowa, 1932; A.M., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

PRANGE, Richard E., Associate Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of Chicago, 1955: Ph.D., 1958. 

PRATHER, Elizabeth S., Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Auburn University, 1951; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1963. 

PRATT, Ernest F., Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., University of Redlands, 1937; M.S., Oregon State College, 1939; M.A., 
University of Michigan. 1941; Ph.D., 1942. 

PRICE, Henry Williams, Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1950. 

PROVENZA, D. Vincent, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952. 

PUGH, Howel G., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., Cambridge University, 1955; Ph.D., 1961. 

PUGLIESE, Rudolph E.. Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Miami University, 1947; M.F.A., Catholic University, 1949; Ph.D., Ohio 
State LIniversity, 1961. 



338 • Graduate School 

PUGSLEY, James H., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1956; M.S.. University of Illinois, 1958; Ph.D., 1963. 

PUMROY, Donald K., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Washington, 1954. 

PURDY, William C, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Amherst College, 1951; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. 

QUYNN, William R., Professor of French and Italian Languages and Literature 
B.A., University of Virginia, 1922; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1934. 

RADO, George T., Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1939; S.M., 1941; Ph.D., 1943. 

RAG AN, Robert M., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., Virginia Military Institute, 1955; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1959; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1965. 

RAMM, Gordon M., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., New York University, 1954. 

RAO, Thammavarapu R. N., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Government Arts College, 1952; M.S., University of Michigan, 1961; Ph.D., 
1964. 

RAPPLEYE, Robert D., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

RATHS, James, Professor of Education and Director, Bureau of Educational 
Research 
B.S., Yale University, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., New York University, 1960. 

RAY, Philip B., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Antioch College, 1950; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1962. 

REED, Frances T., Associate Professor, School of Nursing 

R.N., Griffin Hospital, 1934; B.S., Catholic University, 1940; M.Ed., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

REEVE, Wilkins, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

REEVES, Mavis M., Lecturer in Government and Politics 

B.A., West Virginia University, 1942; M.A., 1943; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1947. 

REINHART, Bruce, Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Lehigh University, 1952; M.A., Princeton University, 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

REISER, Martin P., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
M.D., Johannes Gutenberg Universitat Mainz, 1957; Ph.D., 1960. 

REISS, Howard R. (P.T.), Lecturer of Physics and Astronomy 

B.Aero.E., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1950; M.Aero.E., 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 



University of Maryland • 339 

REYNOLDS, Charles W., Professor of Horticulture 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1941; B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; 
M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

REINBOLDT, Werner C, Research Professor of Computer Science 
M.A., Heidelberg, 1952; Ph.D.. Freiburg, 1955. 

RHOADS, David J., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Temple University, 1954; M.A., 1958; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1963. 

RISINGER, Robert G., Professor of Education 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947; 
Ed.D., University of Colorado, 1955. 

RISK, Winthrop S., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1960; Ph.D., Princeton University, 
1965. 

RIVELLO, Robert M., Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Acting Head 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1948. 

RIVLIN, Helen Anne, Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1949; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1950; Ph.D., Oxford 
University, 1953. 

ROBERSON, Bob S., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.A., University of North Carolina, 1951; Ph.D., 1960. 

ROBERTS, Richard C, Professor of Mathematics and Chairman, Department of 
Mathematics, UMBC 
A.B., Kenyon College, 1945; Sc.M., Brown University, 1946; Ph.D., 1949. 

ROBERTSON. Joseph R.. Jr., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of the South, 1954; M.A., Emory University, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

RODBERG, Leonard S., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1956. 

ROGOLSKY, Saul, Assistant Professor, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., Harvard University, 1948; M.A., University of Chicago, 1953; Ed.D., 
Harvard Graduate School of Education, 1963. 

ROLLINSON, Carl L., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1933; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1939. 

ROSENFELD, Azriel, Research Associate Professor of Computer Science 

B.A., Yeshiva College, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1951; Ph.D., 1957. 

ROSENFIELD, Leonora C. Associate Professor of French and Italian Language 
and Literature 
B.A., Smith College, 1930; A.M., Columbia University, 1931; Ph.D., 1940. 

ROSENZWEIG, Edward C, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

A.B., Centre College, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1956; Ph.D.. 1959. 

ROTHGEB, Russell G., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1928. 

ROUSH, Marvin L., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Ottawa University, 1956; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1964. 



340 • Graduate School 

RUTELLI, Giovanni P., Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Ph.D. (Physics), University of Palermo, 1923; Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering), 
Polytechnic Institute of Turin, 1928. 

RYDEN, Einar R., Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education 
B.A., Augsburg College, 1929; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1947. 

SALLET, Dirse W., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., George Washington University, 1961; M.S.M.E., University of Kansas, 
1963; Dr.Ing., Technische Hochschule Stuttgart, 1966. 

SALLE Y, John J., Professor of Oral Pathology and Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

SAYRE, Clifford Leroy, Jr., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Duke University, 1947; M.S., Stevens Institute if Technology, 1950; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1961. 

SCHAMP, Homer Ward, Jr., Professor of Physics and Dean of Faculty, UMBC 
A.B., Miami University 1944; M.Sc, University of Michigan, 1947; Ph.D., 1951. 

SCHETZ, Joseph A., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering* 

B.S., Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, 1958; M.S., Princeton University, 
1960; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1962. 

SCHILLINGER, John A., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.S., 1960; Ph.D. Michigan State University, 
1965. 

SCHINDLER, Alvin W., Professor of Education 
B.A., Iowa State Teachers' College, 1927; M.A., Iowa State University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1934. 

SCHLARETZKI, Walter E., Professor and Head of the Department of Philosophy 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1941; A.M., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D. Cornell 

University, 1948. 

SCHLEIDT, Wolfgang M., Professor of Zoology 
Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1951. 

SCHNEIDER, David I., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1959; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Techonology, 1964. 

SCHNEIDER, Victor B. Assistant Professor, Computer Science Center 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962; M.S., Stanford University, 
1963; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1966. 

SCHOLNICK, Ellin K., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Vassar College, 1958; Ph.D., University of Rochester 1963. 

SCHROEDER, Wilburn C, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1930; M.S.E., 1931; Ph.D., 1933. 

SCHUCHARD, Earl A., Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

B.S., University of Washington, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1940. 

SCHULTZE, Charles Louis, Professor of Economics 

B.A., Georgetown University, 1948; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1960. 



University of Maryland • 341 

SCOTT, Leland E.. Professor of Horticultural Physiology 

B.S., University of Kentucky 1927; M.S., Michigan State College. 1929; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

SEIDMAN, Eric, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., 1948; Ph.D.. University of Connecticut, 
1964. 

SEIGEL, Arnold E., Lecturer, Department of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1944; S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1947; Ph.D., University of Amsterdam. 1952. 

SHAFFNER, Clyne S., Professor and Head of Department of Poultry Science 
B.S., Michigan State University, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1947. 

SHANGRAW, Ralph F., Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan, 1958. 

SHANKS, James B., Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1939; M.S., 1946; Ph.D.. 1949. 

SHAY, Donald E.. Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland. 1938; Ph.D., 
1943. 

SHEARER, Jane K.. Professor and Head of Department of Housing and Applied 
Design 
B.S. University of Tennessee, 1940: M.S.. 1950; Ph.D., Florida State University, 
1960. 

SHERWOOD A. Wiley, Professor of Aerospace Engineering 

M.S.. Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 1935: M.S.. University of Maryland. 1943. 

SHORE. Mary S.. Research Professor of Poultry Science 

B.S., The College of Idaho, 1928: Sc.D.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1933. 

SHREEVE, Charles A. Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 
B.E., The Johns Hopkins University. 1935: M.S.. University of Maryland. 1943. 

SILVERMAN, Joseph, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A., Brooklyn College. 1944; A.M.. Columbia^University. 1948: Ph.D.. 1951. 

SIMMS, Betty H., Associate Professor of Special Education 

B.A., Harris Teachers College 1947; M.A., University of Michigan. 1955; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland. 1962. 

SIMONS. David E.. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland. 1949: M.S.. 1951. 

SINGER. Neil M.. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Harvard University, 1960: M.A.. Stanford Universty. 1961; Ph.D.. 1965. 

SIPORIN, Max, Professor of Social Work 

B.S.S., City .College of New York. 1937; M.A.. New York University. 1940; 
M.S.S.W.. Columbia Universit\. 1948: D.S.W.. University of Pittsburgh. 1959. 

SISLER, Hugh D., Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; NLS.. 1951: Ph.D.. 1953. 



342 • Graduate School 

SJODIN, Raymond A., Associate Professor of Biophysics 

B.S., California Instiute of Technology, 1951; Ph.D., University of California, 
1955. 

SKOLNICK, Leonard P., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., University of Rochester, 1953; M.S., New York University, 1955; Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1958. 

SLAMA, Frank J., Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S., 1928; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 
1935. 

SLAWSKY, Zaka I., Professor of Physics and Astronomy (P.T.) 

B.S., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 

SMITH, Clodus R., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education, Director of 
Summer School 
B.S., Oklahoma A & M College, 1950; M.S., 1955; D.Ed., Cornell University, 1960. 

SMITH, Denzell S., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1950; M.A., 1954; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., 1965. 

SMITH, Elske van Panhuys, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., Raddiffe College, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SMITH, Gayle S., Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1946; B.S., Iowa State College, 1948; M.A., Cornell 
University, 1951; Ph.D., 1958. 

SMITH, Harold D., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.A., Bridgewater College, 1943; M.S., University of Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 
American University, 1952. 

SMITH, Theodore G., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1956; M.E.S., 1958; D.Sc, Washington 
University, 1960. 

SNOW, George A., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., City College of New York, 1945; M.A., Princeton University, 1947; Ph.D., 
1949. 

SNYDER, Merrill J., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 
1953. 

SOLOMON, Neil, Associate Professor of Physiology 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1954; M.D., 1961: M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1965. 

SOROKIN, Constantine, Research Professor of Botany 

B.A., Don Institute, 1927; M.A., Academy of Science, 1936; Ph.D., University of 
Texas, 1955. 

SPAIN, Ian L., Assistant Professor, Institute for Molecular Physics 
B.S., Imperial College, 1961, Ph.D., 1964. 

SPARKS, David S., Professor of History and Associate Dean, Humanities and Social 
Sciences, The Graduate School 
A.B., Grinnell College, 1944; A.M.. University of Chicago, 1945; Ph.D.. 1951. 

SPIVEY, Clinton, Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1946; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1957. 



University of Maryland • 343 

STADTMAN. Earl R.. Lecturer in Microbiology 
B.S.. University of California. 1942: Ph.D.. 1949. 

STALEY, Stuart W., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Williams College, 1959; M.S., Yale University. 1961; Ph.D.. 1963. 

STARK, Francis C, Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Horticulture 

B.S., Oklahoma Agriculture and Mechanical College. 1940; M.S.. University of 
Maryland. 1941; Ph.D., 1948. 

STEEL, Donald H.. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Trenton State College. 1955; M.A.. University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D.. 
Louisiana University, 1964. 

STEINBERG. Phillip H., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 1960. 

STEINMAN. Robert M., Associate Professor of Psychology 

D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1948; M.A.. Graduate Faculty, New School. 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

STELLMACHER. Karl L.. Professor of Mathematics 
D.Phil., University of Gottingen, 1936. 

STEPHENSON. Gerard J.. Jr.. Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1959: Ph.D.. 1964. 

STERN, William L., Professor of Botany 

B.S., Rutgers University. 1950; M.S., University of Illinois, 1951; Ph.D.. 1954. 

STEVENS. George A.. Extension Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1941: Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

STEWART. James M.. Professor of Chemistry 

B.A.. Western Washington College. 1953; Ph.D.. University of Washington, 1958. 

STONE. William S.. Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical Edu- 
cation and Research 
B.S.. University of Idaho. 1924; M.S.. 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 
Ph.D., (hon.) 1946. 

STRAUSS. Aaron S.. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Case Institute of Technology. 1961: M.S.. University of Wisconsin, 1962; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

STRAUSBAUGH. Warren L.. Professor and Head of Department of Speech 
B.S., Wooster College. 1932; M.A.. State University of Iowa. 1935. 

STREET, Orman E., Professor of Agronomy 

B.S.. South Dakota State College. 1924; M.S.. Michigan State College, 1927; Ph.D., 
1933. 

STRICKLING, Edward, Professor of Agronomy 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

STULL, G. Alan, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., State College at East Stroudsburg, 1955; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 
1957; Ed.D., 1961. 

STUNKARD, Clayton LeRoy, Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1948; M.A., 1951: Ph.D., 1959. 



344 • Graduate School 

STUNTZ, Calvin F., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo. 1939; Ph.D.. 1947. 

SUCHER. Joseph. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1952; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1958. 

SUTTOR, Richard E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., South Dakota State University, 1960; Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1965. 

SVIRBELY, William J., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1931; M.S.. 1932; D.Sci., 1935. 

SYSKI, Ryszard, Professor of Mathematics 

Dipl. Ing., P.U.C, London, 1950; D.I.C., Imperial College, 1951; B.Sc, University 
of London, 1954; Ph.D., Chelsea College, 1961. 

TAFF, Charles A., Professor and Head of Department of Business Administration 
B.S.C., University of Iowa, 1937; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

TALAAT, Mostafa E.. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Cairo, 1946; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 
1951. 

TAYLOR, Leonard S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

A.B., Harvard College. 1951; M.S., New Mexico State University, 1956; Ph.D., 
1960. 

TEITELBAUM. Herman. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 1957; M.S.. University of Washington, 1959; 
Ph.D., McGill University, 1962. 

TERBORGH. John. Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.A., Harvard University, 1958; M.A., 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

TERCHEK, Ronald J.. Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1958; M.A., 1960; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1965. 

THOMPSON, Arthur H.. Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 

THOMPSON, Fred R.. Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Texas, 1929; M.A., 1935; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

THURZ, Daniel. Professor of Social Work and Dean. School of Social Work 
B.A., Queens College, 1948; M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955; D.S.W., 1959. 

TIDMAN, Derek Albert. Research Associate Professor in Institute of Fluid Dynamics 
B.Sc, London University. 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

TIERNEY, William Francis, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949; 
Ed.E., University of Maryand, 1952. 

TRAUB. Robert. Research Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., College of City of New York, 1938; M.S., Cornell University, 1939; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois, 1947. 

TRETT'ER, Steven Alan, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., University of Maryland, 1962; M.A., Princeton University, 1964; Ph.D., 
1965. 



University of Maryland • 345 

TRIVELPIECE, A. W., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., California State Polytechnic Institute, 1953; M.S., California Institute of 
Technology, 1955; Ph.D., 1958. 

TRYTTEN, George N., Research Associate Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics and Associate Dean for Sponsored Research and 
Fellowships, Oflfice of the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research. 

A.B., Luther College, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; Ph.D., University 

of Maryland, 1962. 

TURNAGE, Thomas W., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.A., City College of San Francisco, 1956; A.B., University of California, 1958; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

TUTHILL, Dean F., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1949; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 

ULMER, Melville Jack, Professor of Economics 

B.S., New York University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

ULRICH, Homer, Professor and Head of the Department of Music 
A.M., University of Chicago, 1939. 

UPHAM, Frances, Professor of Social Work 
B.A., Smith College, 1922; M.S.S., 1924. 

VANDERSALL, John M., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1950; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

VANDERSLICE, Joseph T., Professor and Head of Department of Chemistry and 
Director, Institute for Molecular Physics 
B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph.D., Massachussetts Institute of Technology, 1953. 

VAN ZWOLL, James A., Professor of Education 

A.B., Calvin Coolege. 1933; M.A.. University of Michigan, 1937; Ph.D., 1942. 

VEITCH, Fletcher P., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1936. 

VETTER, Harold J., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., 1955. 

VIA, James E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., North Carolina State University, 1952; M.S., 1964; Ph.D., 1967. 

VITZTHUM, Richard C. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1957; M.A.T., Harvard University, 1958; Ph.D., Stanford 
University, 1963. 

WADSWORTH, Gladys E.. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

WAETJEN, Walter B., Professor of Education and Vice President for Administrative 
Affairs 
B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pa.. 1942; M.S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

WAGNER, T. C. Gordon, Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Harvard University, 1937; M.A., University of Maryland. 1940; Ph.D., 1943. 



346 • Graduate School 

WALBESSER, Henry H., Associate Professor of Mathematics-Education 

B.S., State University of New York, 1958; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1965. 

WALDER, Leopold O., Associate Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Boston University, 1949; M.A., University of Hawaii, 1951; Ph.D., State 
University of Iowa, 1954. 

WALDROP, Robert S., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

WALL, Nathan Sanders, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1949; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1954. 

WALSH, Joseph Leonard, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Harvard University, 1916; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1917; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1920. 

WALSTON, William H., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.M.E., University of Maryland, 1959; M.M.E., 1961; Ph.D., 1964. 

WARD, Charles D., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Pomona College, 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1962; Ph.D., 
1963. 

WARNER, Charles R., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1955; M.S., University of Rochester, 1957; Ph.D., 
1962. 

WASSERMAN, Paul, Professor and Dean of School of Library and 
Information Services 
B.B.A., City College of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), Columbia University, 
1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1960. 

WEATHERRED. Jackie G., Assistant Professor of Physiology 
D.D.S., University of Texas, 1959; Ph.D., 1965. 

WEAVER, V. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., College of William and Mary, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 
1956; D.Ed., 1962. 

WEBER, Joseph, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1940; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1951. 

WEDDING, Presley A., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; M.S., 1952. 

WEINSTEIN, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1954; M.A., Northwestern University, 1958; 
Ph.D., 1961. 

WENTZEL, Donat G., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.A., University of Chicago, 1954; B.S., 1955; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1960. 

WESKE, John R., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Dpi. Eng., Technical University, Hanover, Germany, 1924; M.S., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933; S.D., 1934. 

WESTERHOUT, Gart, Professor and Director of Astronomy 
Doct., University pf Leiden, 1954; Ph.D., 1958. 



University of Maryland • 347 

WHITE. Charles E., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

WHITE, John I., Professor and Head of Physiology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1950. 

WIGGIN, Gladys A.. Professor of Education and Director of Graduate Studies. 
College of Education 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Marvland, 
1947. 

WILBUR. June C. Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 

B.S., University of Washington, 1936; Educ, 1937; M.S., Syracuse University, 1940. 

WILEY, Robert C, Associate Professor of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1949; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Oregon State College, 1953. 

WILKERSON, Thomas D., Research Associate Professor of Institute of Fluid 
Dynamics 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 1962 . 

WILLIAMS, Aubrey W., Jr., Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 
B.A., University of North Carolina. 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D.. University of 
Arizona, 1964. 

WILLIAMS, David L., Associate Professor of Early Childhood-Elementary Education 
B.S.. Bradley University, 1953; M.Ed., University of Illinois. 1956: D.Ed.. 1964. 

WILLIAMS, Walter F., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Bradley University, 1953; M.Ed., University of Illinois. 1956: D.Ed.. 1964. 

WILLS, Franklin K., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

V.M.D., University of Pennsylvania. 1950; M.S., A & M College of Texas, 1955; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1962. 

WILSON, John M., Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.J.. University of Missouri. 1954; M.A., University of Maryland. 1958: Ph.D., 
1964. 

WILSON, Leda A., Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Lander College, 1943: M.S.. University of Tennessee. 1950: Ed.D.. 1954. 

WILSON. Robert E., Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology-, 1941; M.S., 1942: Ph.D.. University of 
Texas, 1952. 

WILSON, Robert M., Professor of Education and Director of Reading Center 
B.S.. California State Teachers College. 1950; M.S., Universitv of Pittsburgh. 1956; 
Ed.D., 1960. 

WINN, Paul N.. Jr., Research Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; M.S.A.E., 1958. 

WISSEMAN, Charles L., Jr.. Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 
B.A., Southern Methodist University, 1941; M.S.. Kansas State College, 1943; 
M.D., Southwestern Medical College, 1946. 

WOLFE, James H.. Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Harvard University, 1955; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1958; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1962. 



348 • Graduate School 

WOLFE, Peter, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., St. Lawrence University, 1959; B.E.E., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1959; 
M.S., Northwestern University, 1961; Ph.D., New York University, 1965. 

WONNACOTT, Paul, Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Western Ontario, 1955; M.A., Princeton University, 1957; 
Ph.D., 1959. 

WOO, Ching-Hung, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Louisiana Tech., 1958; M.S., University of California, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

WOODY, Robert Henley, Associate Professor of Education 

B. Music, Western Michigan University, 1958; M.A., Michigan State University, 
1960; Ed.S., Western Michigan University, 1962; Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity, 1964. 

WOOLF, Leonard, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1942; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1951; 
D.Ed., 1959. 

WRIGHT, Howard W., Professor of Business Administration 

B.S.C., Temple University, 1937; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., 1947. 

WYSONG, John Wright, Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1957. 

YANEY, George L., Associate Professor of History 

B.Mgt.E., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1952; M.A., University of Colorado, 
1956; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961. 

YANG, Jackson C. S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1963. 

YODH, Gaurang B.. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., University of Bombay, 1948; M.S., University of Chicago, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

YOUNG, Edgar Paul, Associate Professor and Head of Department of Animal 
Science 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1954; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

YOUNG, Frank C, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1962. 

YOUNG, Ruth H., Assistant Professor of Social Work 

A.B., Wellesley College, 1944; M.S.S.W., Catholic University, 1949; D.S.W., 1965. 

ZAPOLSKY, Harold S., Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
A.B., Shimer College, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1962. 

ZEDEK, Mishael. Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., Hebrew University, 1952; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1956. 

ZEEVELD, W. Gordon, Professor of English 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1924; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

ZENKER, Nicholas, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
M.A., University of California, 1953; Ph.D., 1958 

ZIPOY, David M., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1954; Ph.D., 1957. 



University of Maryland • 349 

ZORN, B. Sechi, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
Ph.D., Universita di Cagliari, 1951. 

ZORN, Gus T., Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1948; M.S., University of New Mexico, 1953; 
Ph.D., University of Padua, 1954. 

ZWANZIG, Robert, Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics 
B.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1948; M.S., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1950; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1952. 



The University of Maryland - Academic Resources and Points of Interest 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 



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APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY / 





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2. NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 

3. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

4. U S CAPITAL 

5. WHITE HOUSE 

6. NAVAL OBSERVATORY 

7. HOWARD UNIVERSITY 

8. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 




9 AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 

10 GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

11 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 
12. NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

13 LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

14 SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

15 WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CENTER 
16. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 



SC»U IN MILES 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins 
January 20, 1955 
College Park, Maryland