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Full text of "Catalog / Graduate School, University of Maryland"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/cataloggraduates1973univ 



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The University of Maryland in all its branches and divisions subscribes to a policy ot 
equal educational and employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, creed, 
ethnic origin or sex 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract be- 
tween the student and the University of Maryland. Changes are effected from time to time 
in the general regulations and in the academic requirements. There are established pro- 
cedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institution s integrity and the 
individual student's interests and welfare. A curriculum or graduation requirement, when 
altered, is not made retroactive unless the alteration is to the student's advantage and 
can be accommodated within the span of years normally required for graduation. When 
the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, using established procedure, 
to be detrimental to the interests of the University community, that person may be re- 
quired to withdraw from the University. 



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OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



OFFICERS FOR GRADUATE 
STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

DEAN FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND 

RESEARCH, BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS 
John P. Lambooy — BA, Kalamazoo College, 
1937; MS, 1938; MA, University of Illinois, 
1939; PhD, University of Rochester, 1942. 

COORDINATOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND 
RESEARCH, BALTIMORE COUNTY CAMPUS 
Joseph F. Mulligan — AB, Boston College, 
1945: MA, 1946; PhD, Catholic University, 
1951. 

DEAN FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND 

RESEARCH, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
David S. Sparks — AB, Grinnell College, 1944; 
MA, University of Chicago, 1945; PhD, 1951. 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 
Wilson H. Elkins — BA, University of Texas, 
1932; MA, 1932; B. Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D. Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
R. Lee Hornbake — BS, California State Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania, 1934; MA, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1936; PhD, 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GENERAL 
ADMINISTRATION 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES 
AND RESEARCH 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. — BS, University of 
Maryland, 1936; MS, 1938; PhD, State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — BS, University of Maryland, 
1942; PhD, 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr. — AB, Baldwin-Wallace 
College, 1950; MS, Boston University, 1954. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE FOR GRADUATE 
STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Ex-Officio Members 
DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President 

DR. MICHAEL J. PELCZAR, JR.. Chairman 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 

DR. R. LEE HORNBAKE 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

DR. JOHN P. LAMBOOY 

Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, 

Baltimore Campus 

DR. JOSEPH F. MULLIGAN 

Coordinator for Graduate Studies and Research, 

UMBC 

DR. GEORGE H. CALLCOTT 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, College 

Park Campus 

DR. WILLIAM A. LYNK 

Head, Department of Natural Sciences, UMES 

DR. STANLEY J. DRAZEK 
Dean, University College 

Appointed Members 

DR. EVELYN COHELAN 

Professor and Associate Dean for Graduate 

Studies, School of Nursing. Baltimore Campus 

DR. RICHARD F. NEVILLE 

Professor and Chairman of the Division of Educa- 
tion, UMBC 

DR. DAVID S. SPARKS 

Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, College 

Park Campus 

DR. JOHN 0. CORLISS 

Professor and Chairman, Department of Zoology. 

College Park Campus 

DR. JOSEPH WUTOH 

Assistant Professor of Biology and Acting Vice 

Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UMES 

DR. RALPH J. KLEIN 

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. University 

College 








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THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 2 

Locations of Campuses 3 

Libraries and Special Research Resources 3 

Special Opportunities for Creative and Performing Artists 4 

Consortia 4 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 7 

Graduate Degree Programs 8 

Admissions Standards 9 

Application for Admission 9 

Foreign Student Applications 10 

Categories of Admission 12 

Offer of Admission 12 

Graduate Work by Seniors at the University of Maryland '. 13 

Registration 13 

Records Maintenance and Disposition 13 

Continuous Registration 13 

Graduate Fees 15 

Grades 15 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Master's Degrees 15 

Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science 16 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to all Doctoral Degrees 16 

Graduate School Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 18 

Additional Information 18 

Residence Classification 18 

Financial Aid 19 

UMAB/PROGRAMS/COURSES 21 

School of Dentistry 22 

School of Medicine 24 

School of Nursing 28 

School of Pharmacy 30 

School of Social Work and Community Planning 34 

UMAB/GRADUATE FACULTY 39 

UMBC/PROGRAMS/COURSES 45 

Applied Mathematics 46 

UMBC/GRADUATE FACULTY 50 

UMCP/PROGRAMS/COURSES 51 

Aerospace Engineering 52 

Afro-American Studies 53 

Agriculture 53 

Agricultural Engineering 54 

Agricultural and Extension Education 55 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 56 

Agronomy 57 

American Studies Program 60 

Animal Science 60 

Anthropology 62 

Architecture 63 

Art 64 

Astronomy Program 69 

Botany 70 

Business Administration 72 

Chemical Engineering 78 

Chemistry 82 

Chinese and Hebrew 84 

Civil Engineering 84 

Classical Languages and Literature 88 

Comparative Literature 88 



Computer Science 89 

Dairy Science 9 1 

Dance § 1 

Economics 92 

College of Education 95 

Administration. Supervision, and Curriculum 97 

Counseling and Personnel Services 99 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 100 

Foundations of Education 102 

Industrial Education 102 

Institute for Child Study 104 

Measurement and Statistics 1 09 

Secondary Education 110 

Special Education 113 

Electrical Engineering 115 

English Language and Literature 120 

Engineering Materials 122 

Entomology 123 

Fire Protection Engineering 124 

Food Science 124 

French and Italian Languages and Literature 125 

Geography 127 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature 129 

Government and Politics 133 

History* 136 

Horticulture 141 

College of Human Ecology 142 

Food. Nutrition and Institution Administration 142 

General Human Ecology 144 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 145 

Housing and Applied Design 146 

Information Systems Management 147 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 148 

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 148 

Institute for Molecular Physics 148 

Journalism 148 

School of Library and Information Services 149 

Linguistics 151 

Mathematics 152 

Mechanical Engineering 158 

Meteorology 161 

Microbiology 163 

Music 164 

Nutritional Sciences Program 167 

Philosophy 168 

College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health 170 

Physical Education 170 

Health Education 172 

Recreation 1 73 

Physics 174 

Poultry Science 177 

Psychology 177 

Sociology 181 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literature 185 

Speech and Dramatic Art 186 

University College Study Tours 190 

Zoology 190 

UMCP/GRADUATE FACULTY 197 



"includes History of Science and Technology 





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THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The University of Maryland which had its begin- 
nings in 1 807 is today one of the largest educa- 
tional institutions in the United States. Graduate 
work has grown since 1918, when the first Grad- 
uate Dean was appointed, to the present, with 
approximately 9500 graduate students enrolled 
each term on all campuses. In the year 1971-1972 
there were more than 1 660 master's and approxi- 
mately 400 doctoral degrees conferred. Advanced 
degree programs are currently offered in most 
major fields of study. 

Since the beginning of the 1970-1971 academic 
year, each campus of the University of Maryland 
has been administered by a Chancellor who is 
responsible for all academic programs, both 
graduate and undergraduate, on his campus. The 
immediate administration of the graduate programs 
is under the supervision of a Graduate Dean (or 
Coordinator for Graduate Studies). A Graduate 
Faculty and a Graduate Council provide the or- 
ganization by which the Graduate Faculty dis- 
charges its responsibilities for the quality and 
scope of graduate studies and research. 

In the Summer of 1971 , the President created an 
Advisory Committee for Graduate Studies and 
Research, of which the Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research is the Chairman. The func- 
tion of this Advisory Committee is stated in the 
President's charge of this Committee when it was 
first organized: 

The President's Advisory Committee for Grad- 
uate Studies and Research, which shall report 
to the President, shall be concerned with those 
educational policies of The Graduate School 
which transcend campus programs of graduate 
study and which bear on the University of 
Maryland's responsibilities as a leader in 
Graduate Education. The Committee shall serve 
as an advisory body for the purpose of coordi- 
nating existing and new graduate programs 
and of developing to the highest degree of 



excellence graduate programs on the Univer- 
sity campuses to meet the needs of the State 
of Maryland and the Nation. 

The responsibility of the President's Advisory 
Committee is thus to advise the President of the 
directions which graduate education is taking 
throughout the United States and of the social 
and educational needs for graduate education 
in Maryland. It is the responsibility of the Com- 
mittee to recommend University-wide goals and 
to evaluate the achievements of the campuses in 
meeting these goals. 

The Graduate Faculty consists of members of 
the University faculty who offer graduate courses 
and supervise research leading to graduate theses 
and dissertations. This Faculty, working through 
their Councils and Committees, the Graduate 
Deans on each campus and the President's Ad- 
visory Committee for Graduate Studies and Re- 
search, chaired by the Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research, establishes the policies 
governing admission to graduate study and the 
minimum requirements to be met by all students 
seeking advanced degrees. The faculties of the 
individual academic departments or interdis- 
ciplinary programs frequently establish additional 
requirements for admission to graduate study or 
for individual degree programs above the general 
minima. 

The University, a member of the Association of 
American Universities, the Association of Grad- 
uate Schools, and the Council of Graduate Schools 
in the United States, is accredited by the Middle 
States Association and is the land-grant institution 
of the State of Maryland. Although the largest 
number of the current graduate programs are 
offered on the College Park campus (UMCP), 
graduate study is also offered at the University's 
Baltimore City campus (UMAB), and the Baltimore 
County campus (UMBC). Periodically, graduate 
courses are offered at the Eastern Shore campus 
(UMES). 



2 / the graduate school 



LOCATIONS OF CAMPUSES 

The campuses of the University of Maryland are 
located in the midst of one of the greatest con- 
centrations of research facilities and talent in the 
nation, if not in the world. (See map of Academic 
Resources and Points of Interest.) Libraries and 
laboratories serving virtually every academic dis- 
cipline are within easy commuting distance. 
There is a steady and growing interchange of 
ideas, information, technical skills, and scholars 
between the University and these centers. The 
libraries and facilities of many of the centers are 
open to qualified graduate students at the Uni- 
versity. The resources of many other centers are 
available by special arrangement. 

Interchange of graduate students and faculty among 
campuses is both permitted by the general regula- 
tions of The Graduate School, and encouraged 
to enable the students to profit from the many 
varied resources of the University. 

COLLEGE PARK (UMCP) 

The College Park campus is located in Prince 
Georges County on over 1 300 acres of land less 
than eight miles from Washington, D.C., and ap- 
proximately 32 miles from Baltimore. The campus 
is located on U.S. Route 1 and is adjacent to the 
Capital Beltway (495) and close to Interstate 95. 
There is extensive local bus service to College 
Park from both the Baltimore and Washington 
areas. Graduate study leading to advanced 
degrees is offered in 60 programs at College 
Park. 

BALTIMORE CITY (UMAB) 

The Baltimore City campus is located in the south- 
west section of the city and occupies several 
blocks centering on Lombard and Greene streets. 
The city of Baltimore is served by Friendship 
International Airport. The various departments of the 
Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing; 
and Social Work and Community Planning are 
located on the Baltimore City campus. Graduate 
study leading to advanced degrees is offered in ap- 
proximately 20 programs. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY (UMBC) 

The Baltimore County campus, opened in 1966, 
is located on a 474-acre site adjacent to exit 1 2W 
of the Baltimore Beltway at Catonsville. There is 
a planned exit off Interstate 95 leading directly 
to the campus. There is local bus service to the 
campus from downtown Baltimore. The Baltimore 
County campus presently offers graduate pro- 
grams in Applied Mathematics. Additional graduate 
programs are in various stages of planning. 

EASTERN SHORE (UMES) 

Located at Princess Anne, Maryland, the 300-acre 
Eastern Shore campus offers undergraduate pro- 
grams at the present time; selected graduate 
courses are offered periodically. 



LIBRARIES AND SPECIAL 
RESEARCH RESOURCES 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the main 
library of the College Park campus, containing 
reference works, periodicals, circulating books, 
and other materials in all fields of research and 
instruction. Other libraries include the Engineering 
and Physical Sciences Library, the Architecture 
Library, and the Chemistry Library. A new four- 
story Undergraduate Library with seating space 
for 4,000 opened in late 1972. 

The libraries on the College Park campus include 
approximately 1,100,000 volumes and 14,000 sub- 
scriptions to periodicals and newspapers, as well 
as many uncataloged government documents, 
recordings, films, and filmstrips, etc. 

Special collections include those of Richard Von 
Mises in mathematics and applied mechanics; Max 
Born in the physical sciences; Thomas I. Cook in 
political science; Romeo Mansueti in the biologi- 
cal sciences; Katherine Anne Porter; Maryland; 
U.S. government publications (for which the Uni- 
versity is a regional depository); documents of the 
United Nations, the League of Nations, and other 
international organizations; agricultural experiment 
station and extension service publications; maps 
from the U.S. Army Map Service; the files of the' 
Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding 
Workers of America; the Wallenstein collection 
of musical scores; and research collections of the 
American Bandmasters Association, the National 
Association of Wind and Percussion Instructors 
and the Music Educators National Conference. 
In addition, the collections include microfilm 
reproductions of government documents, rare 
books, early journals, and newspapers. 

The principal library for the Baltimore City campus 
is the Health Sciences Library which is housed 
in a modern, four-story library building. The 
present library contains more than 140,000 bound 
volumes and regularly receives over 2700 scientif- 
ic periodicals and annual publications. Several 
of the departments providing graduate education 
maintain small and highly specialized libraries. 

The UMBC Library opened in temporary quarters 
in 1966 with a collection of 20,000 volumes. It is 
now housed in a modern Library Building and the 
number of volumes has increased to 168,000. An 
addition to the Library Building is under construc- 
tion which will double the existing floor space. 
Students and faculty also have direct or inter- 
library loan privileges at the other University of 
Maryland libraries as well as at five state colleges — 
Coppin, Morgan, Towson, Salisbury, and Frostburg. 

Other scholarly libraries in the Baltimore area 
which make their resources available to graduate 
students of the University of Maryland are the 
Milton S. Eisenhower Library and the Welch Medical 



the graduate school / 3 



Library of The Johns Hopkins University, and the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

But it is the combined area resources, such as the 
Library of Congress, the Folger Library, Dumbarton 
Oaks, the National Archives, the Smithsonian 
Institution, the World Bank, the National Library 
of Medicine, the National Agricultural Library, and 
the libraries of the Federal Departments of 
Labor; Commerce; Interior; Health, Education and 
Welfare; Housing and Urban Development; and 
Transportation, and approximately 500 other 
specialized libraries in the area, which make the 
Universityof Maryland one of the most attractive 
in the nation for students and scholars. 

Exceptional research facilities are available to the 
advanced student in nearly all disciplines at the 
University. The proximity of the Agricultural Re- 
search Center and the Plant Industry Station of the 
United States Department of Agriculture has 
stimulated the development of both laboratories and 
opportunities for field research in the agricultural 
and animal sciences. Opportunities are also avail- 
able for collaborative graduate study programs with 
other major government laboratories, such as 
the National Bureau of Standards and the Naval 
Research Laboratory. 

The long standing interest of the State in develop- 
ing the commercial and recreational resources of 
the Chesapeake Bay has resulted in the develop- 
ment of outstanding research facilities for the study 
of marine biology at Solomons Island, Md. 

The University is now developing the Center for 
Environmental and Estuarine Studies at Horn's 
Point, Cambridge, Maryland. The Center, ex- 
pected to reach full operation by 1976, will be 
concerned with instruction and research in the 
areas of environmental and estuarine studies, and 
service to the people of the State and the nation. 

Work in the behavioral sciences, particularly in 
learning, is centered in laboratories equipped for 
fully automated research on rats, pigeons, and 
monkeys. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical 
sciences include a 160 MeV cyclotron; two small 
Van deGraaff accelerators; an assortment of com- 
puters, including an IBM 7094, two 1401 's, and 
a Univac 1108 which is complemented by remote 
access units on a time-sharing basis; a 10 KW 
training nuclear reactor; a full-scale low velocity 
wind tunnel; several small hypersonic helium 
winii tunnels; specialized facilities in both the In- 
stitute for Molecular Physics and the Center for 
Materials Research; a psychopharmacology labora- 
tory; shock tubes; a quiescent plasma device (Q 
machine) for plasma research; and rotating tanks 
for laboratory studies of meteorological phenomena. 
The University also owns and operates the world's 
longest radio telescope, located in Clark Lake, 
California. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
CREATIVE AND PERFORMING 
ARTISTS 

Advanced work in the fine arts has been stimu- 
lated by the close interaction that has developed 
between the students and faculty of the Univer- 
sity and the artists and scholars at the National 
Gallery, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Cor- 
coran Gallery, the Phillips Gallery, the Museum of 
Modern Art and the Smithsonian Institution, as 
well as the musicians of the Baltimore Symphony, 
the National Symphony Orchestra and smaller 
musical groups. The completion of the John F. 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the 
Filene Center (Wolf Trap Farm Park) have further 
enhanced the climate for creative artists attend- 
ing the University. 

Outstanding work in campus theatre, dance, 
radio, and television is enhanced by the proximity 
of the campuses to the National Theatre, the 
Arena Stage, the Morris Mechanic Theatre, and the 
numerous theatre groups in the Baltimore-Wash- 
ington area. UMBC and the College Park campus 
both sponsor Summer Fine Arts Festivals with a 
variety of theatre, musical, and art events. There 
is also a frequent and steady interchange of ideas 
and talent between students and faculty at the 
University campuses and both educational and 
commercial radio and television media in the 
Baltimore-Washington area. 



CONSORTIA 

The University of Maryland is a member of a 
number of national and local consortia concerned 
with advanced education and research. They of- 
fer a variety of opportunities for senior scholar 
and graduate student research and include the 
following: 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc. (ORAU) 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., is a non- 
profit educational and research corporation com- 
posed of 41 southern colleges and universities. 
It was established in 1946 and operated for nearly 
20 years as the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies. 

The Institute was formed to administer programs 
that would permit science faculty members from 
institutions of higher learning to visit Oak Ridge 
and to avail themselves of the outstanding nuclear 
facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to 
furthertheir research, and to enrich theirteaching 
programs on return to their home campuses. 
The Institute was the pioneer in the development 
of corporate university groups of its type in the 
United States. 



4 / the graduate school 




the graduate school / 5 



ORAL) was formed in order to broaden the op- 
portunities for member institutions collectively to 
participate in many fields of education and re- 
search in the natural sciences related to nuclear 
energy. Educational programs range from short 
term courses or institutes, conducted with ORAU 
facilities and staff or fellowship programs ad- 
ministered by ORAU for the Atomic Energy 
Commission. 



University Corporation for 
Atmospheric Research (UCAR) 

The National Center for Atmospheric Research 
(NCAR), in Boulder, Colorado, was created in 
1 960 to serve as a focal point for a vigorous and 
expanding national research effort in the atmos- 
pheric sciences. NCAR is operated under the 
sponsorship of the National Science Foundation 
by the University Corporation for Atmospheric 
Research (UCAR), made up of 27 U.S. universi- 
ties with graduate programs in the atmospheric 
sciences or related fields. The scientific staff in- 
cludes meteorologists, astronomers, chemists, 
physicists, mathematicians, and representatives 
of other disciplines. This interdisciplinary ap- 
proach is dictated by the diversity and complexity 
of the many processes involved in the behavior 
of the atmosphere. 



Universities Research Association (URA) 

Universities Research Association, a group of 50 
universities engaged in high energy research, is 
the sponsoring organization for the National Ac- 
celerator Laboratory, funded by the U.S. Atomic 
Energy Commission. The accelerator, when com- 
pleted, will become the highest energy machine in 
the world, producing protons of 400 billion elec- 
tron volt (BeV) energy. The alternating gradient 
proton synchrotron of large orbital radius is to be 
located on a 6800-acre site near Batavia, Illinois, 
about 35 miles west of Chicago. 



Interuniversity Communications 
Council (EDUCOM) 

This Council provides a forum for the appraisal of 
the current state of the art in communications 
science and technology and their relation to the 
planning and programs of colleges and universi- 
ties. The council particularly fosters inier-univer- 
sity cooperation in the area of communications 
science. 



Chesapeake Bay Center for 
Environmental Studies (CBES) 

This 900-acre waterfront research center is ded- 
icated to preserving and enhancing the quality 
of man's environment through programs of 
ecological study and education. Located on the 
western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, just south 



of Annapolis, it presents a wide selection of local 
ecosystems. Scientific programs of the Center, a 
major component of the Smithsonian Institution, 
are guided by the consortium in which the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity participate. The unique ecological environ- 
ment provided by the Center furnishes an attrac- 
tive site for graduate student research programs. 



Universities Space Research 
Association (USRA) 

The USRA was incorporated to constitute an entity 
in which universities and other research organi- 
zations may cooperate with one another, with the 
government, and with other organizations toward 
the development of knowledge associated with 
space science and technology, as well as to 
acquire, plan, construct, and operate laboratories 
and other facilities, and for research, development, 
and education associated with space science 
and technology. 



Inter-University Consortium for 
Political Science Research 

The University of Maryland is a member of the 
Inter-University Consortium for Political Science 
Research. The Consortium has a membership 
of 137 participating institutions including most of 
the graduate institutions. One purpose of the 
Consortium is to facilitate collection and dis- 
tribution of useful data for social science research. 
The data includes survey data from the University 
of Michigan Survey Research Center and from 
studies conducted by other organizations or by 
individuals, census data for the United States, 
election data, legislative roll calls, judicial de- 
cision results, and biographical data. 

Upon request any member of the Consortium can 
obtain without cost any of the data provided either 
as a complete set or in an analysis deck. Also 
available from the Consortium are computer pro- 
grams particularly useful for analyzing social 
science data. 

The Consortium each summer conducts a summer 
training program at the University of Michigan 
which is open to faculty and graduate students 
of member institutions. 



Chesapeake Research Consortium, Inc. 

The University of Maryland jointly participates in 
this wide scale environmental research program 
with The Johns Hopkins University, the Virginia 
Institute of Marine Science, and the Smithsonian 
Institution. The Consortium, originally funded by 
a 1.2 million dollar grant from the National Science 
Foundation in 1971, coordinates and integrates 
research on the Chesapeake Bay region and is 
compiling a vast amount of scientific data to 
assist in the management and control of the area. 



6 / the graduate school 



Each participating institution calls on faculty 
expertise in a diversity of disciplines including 
biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, geology, 
and the social and behavioral sciences. Through 
this interdisciplinary research program a compu- 
terized Management Resource Bank is being de- 
veloped containing a biological inventory of the 
Chesapeake Bay region, a legal survey, and socio- 
economic data of the surrounding communities. 

The Consortium provides research opportunities for 
faculty members, graduate students, and under- 
graduate students at the University. 




GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 
Programs Degrees Offered 

COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

Aerospace Engineering 1 MS, PhD 

Agricultural Engineering MS, PhD 

Agricultural and 

Extension Education 4 MS, AGS, PhD 

Agricultural and 

Resource Economics MS, PhD 

Agronomy MS, PhD 

American Studies MA, PhD 

Animal Science MS, PhD 

Art MA, PhD 

Astronomy 2 MS, PhD 

Botany MS, PhD 

Business Administration 6 MBA, DBA 

Chemical Engineering MS, PhD 

Chemistry MS, PhD 

Civil Engineering MS, PhD 

Comparative Literature MA, PhD 

Computer Science MS, PhD 

Dairy Science MS, PhD 

Economics 1 MA, PhD 

Education Programs 5 
Administration, Supervision and 
Curriculum 4 . ...MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Adult Education 4 MEd, MA, AGS 

Counseling and Personnel 

Services 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Early Childhood-Elementary 

Education 1 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Human Development 

Education 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Industrial 

Education 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Measurement and 

Statistics 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Secondary 

Education 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Social 

Foundations 4 . ..MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 
Special 

Education 4 MEd, MA, AGS, EdD, PhD 

Electrical Engineering MS, PhD 



English Language and Literature ....MA, PhD 

Entomology MS. PhD 

Food Science MS, PhD 

French and Italian Language 

and Literature 1 MA, PhD 

Geography 1 MA, PhD 

Germanic and Slavic Languages 

and Literature MA. PhD 

Government and Politics 1 MA, PhD 

History 1 MA, PhD 

Human Ecology Programs 

Food, Nutrition and 
Institutional Administration 3 MS 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 3 MS 

General Home Economics 3 MS 

Horticulture MS, PhD 

Journalism 3 MA 

Library and Information Services 3 ..MLS, PhD 

Mathematics MA, PhD 

Mechanical Engineering 1 MS, PhD 

Meteorology MS, PhD 

Microbiology 1 MS, PhD 

Music 1 MA, MM, DMA, PhD 

Nutritional Sciences MS, PhD 

Philosophy 1 MA, PhD 

Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health Programs 

Health Education MA, EdD, PhD 

Physical Education MA, EdD. PhD 

Recreation MA, EdD, PhD 

Physics and Astronomy 2 MS, PhD 

Poultry Science MS, PhD 

Psychology 1 MA, MS, PhD 

Sociology 1 MA, PhD 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages 

and Literature MA PhD 

Speech and Dramatic Art MA, PhD 

Zoology 1 MS, PhD 

BALTIMORE CITY CAMPUS 

School of Dentistry 

Anatomy MS, PhD 

Biochemistry MS, PhD 

Microbiology MS, PhD 

Oral Pathology MS, PhD 

Oral Surgery MS 

Physiology 3 MS, PhD 



Graduate Record Examinations: Write to the Graduate Record 

Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J. 

08540. 

'Both Aptitude and Advanced tests required. 

2 Advanced test only required. 

3 Aptitude test only required. 

"Millers Analogies Test required at the doctoral level. Write 

to the Counseling Center. University of Maryland, College 

Park. Md 20742; or Counseling Center. University of Maryland 

Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Md 

21228 

5 The Education Test Battery: A composite examination which 

includes the Millers Analogies is required for all individuals 

who have been admitted in the field of education. Individuals 

will be notified when they are to take this test battery. 



6 The Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business is re- 
quired Write to the Educational Testing Service. Princeton. 
N.J. 08540. 

'Either the GRE Aptitude test or the Millers Analogies test is 
required by the School of Social Work and Community 
Planning. 

Letters of Evaluation: Applicants are advised that faculty 
admissions committees normally require two or three letters 
of evaluation by individuals familiar with their qualifications 
for successful graduate study. See the application forms for 
the number of such letters required. Letters of evaluation 
should be sent directly to the program to which the ap- 
plicant seeks admission, except at UMAB and UMBC where 
they should be sent directly to The Graduate School Office 



8 / academic information 



School of Medicine 

Anatomy 3 MS, PhD 

Biological Chemistry 1 MS, PhD 

Biophysics 3 MS, PhD 

Cell Biology and Pharmacology 1 .. .MS, PhD 

Microbiology MS, PhD 

Pathology, Legal 

Medicine (Toxicology) MS, PhD 

Pathology, Medical MS, PhD 

Physiology MS, PhD 

School of Pharmacy 

Institutional Pharmacy 3 MS 

Medicinal Chemistry MS, PhD 

Pharmacognosy MS, PhD 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 . . . .MS, PhD 
Pharmacy 3 MS, PhD 

School of Nursing 

Nursing MS 

School of Social Work and 
Community Planning 7 
Social Work MSW, DSW 

BALTIMORE COUNTY CAMPUS 

Applied Mathematics 2 MS, PhD 



ADMISSIONS STANDARDS 

General: Admission to graduate study at the 
University of Maryland is the exclusive respon- 
sibility of The Graduate School and the respec- 
tive Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. In 

making decisions upon the admissibility of ap- 
plicants, the Deans and their staffs regularly seek 
the advice of the chairmen of the academic de- 
partments and graduate faculty admissions com- 
mittees. In the case of foreign student applicants, 
the University's Director of International Ed- 
ucation Services and Foreign Student Affairs 
is also consulted. 

Applications for admission to graduate study 
regularly exceed the number of students who 
can be accommodated. Every application is care- 
fully reviewed and the number of students admit- 
ted to each program is balanced against the 
number of faculty and the facilities available. As 
a consequence, standards for admission may 
vary among programs and, at times, within the 
same program. 

There are, however, minimum standards which 
apply to all applicants. They have been estab- 
lished on the basis of long experience with those 
who have succeeded in graduate study. They are 
similar to those standards governing admission 
to nearly all major graduate schools. The pur- 
pose of these standards is to improve the pros- 
pects of selecting those individuals who have a 
reasonable expectation of successfully com- 
pleting a graduate program. 



Minimum Standards: The basic minimum stand- 
ard for admission to The Graduate School is a 
"B" average, or a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, as an under- 
graduate student who has completed a program 
of study resulting in the award of a baccalaureate 
degree from a regionally accredited college or 
university. In addition, the student's under- 
graduate program must reflect successful com- 
pletion of the prerequisites for graduate study in 
the chosen field. Normally the "A" grades that 
contribute to the required "B" average will have 
been earned in the subject, or a closely allied 
one, which the student wishes to pursue in The 
Graduate School. A very few students, who fail 
to meet these minimum standards, may be admit- 
ted to graduate study as provisional students on 
the basis of outstanding performance on one or 
more of the graduate study aptitude tests, or on 
the basis of letters of evaluation from competent 
judges of their performance as students or in a 
professional capacity. Standards for admission 
to a doctoral program are invariably higher than 
for admission to a master's program. 

Evidence of Academic Potential: In the interests 
of providing those who review the qualifications 
of each applicant with the best possible infor- 
mation on which to base their recommendations, 
applicants may be required to submit, in addition 
to the required transcripts of all previous study, 
other data as indicated on the list of graduate 
programs. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Initial correspondence concerning application 
for admission to The Graduate School should be 
directed to The Graduate School Office on the 
campus to which the student seeks admission. 

1. For graduate programs offered at College 

Park: 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

2. For graduate programs offered at Baltimore 

City: 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
The University of Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

3. For graduate programs offered at Baltimore 

County: 
Coordinator of Graduate Studies and 

Research 
The University of Maryland Baltimore County 
5401 Wilkens Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

An application fee of $1 5 must accompany the 
application for admission and is not refundable 
under any circumstances. Payment must be 
made by check or money order payable to the 
University of Maryland. Do not send cash or 
stamps. 



academic information / 9 



Submission of Transcripts: Two copies of the 
application for admission and two sets of sep- 
arate official transcripts from each college or 
university attended must be received in the 
appropriate Graduate Dean's Office according 
to the following schedule: 

College Park: By May 1 for the summer ses- 
sion and the fall semester: by 
November 1 for the spring 
semester. 

Baltimore City: By May 1 5 for the summer ses- 
sion; by July 1 for the fall semes- 
ter; by December 1 for the win- 
ter session and the spring 
semester. 

UMBC: By May 1 for the summer ses- 

sion and fall semester; by No- 
vember 1 for the winter session 
and spring semester. 

In some departments the available openings are 
filled well in advance of these deadlines so that 
earlier application is often desirable. Applicants 
who require financial support and want to be 
among those first considered must submit their 
applications by February 1 for the fall semester 
and by September 1 for the spring semester. A 
foreign student applicant should apply at least 
seven months prior to the semester of expected 
entrance. 

Applicants for admission should specify to their 
institutions that the transcripts must be sent 
directly to The Graduate School Office on the 
campus to which the student seeks admission 
and not to the Registrar's Office or to the depart- 
ment in which they intend to pursue their gradu- 
ate study. Applicants who have graduated from 
the University of Maryland must also request the 
appropriate Registrar of the University of Mary- 
land to send two copies of their transcript to The 
Graduate School. All transcripts should be 
received at the appropriate Graduate School 
Office on or before the deadline specified above. 
The applicant is solely responsible for seeing 
that the above conditions are met by the deadline 
date for the filing of the application for the 
semester of expected entrance. No follow-up 
procedures are undertaken by The Graduate 
School in this respect. 

Application in the Senior Year: Students, includ- 
ing University of Maryland seniors, in their final 
semester of work toward a bachelor's degree 
may be offered provisional admission pending 
the filing of a supplementary transcript recording 
the satisfactory completion of the remaining 
coursework and the award of the degree. Ap- 
plicants engaged in graduate study at another 
institution are also subject to this policy. A stu- 
dent faces cancellation of his matriculation if a 
complete official record of all previous work is 
not received within three months following the 
completion of such study and the award of the 
degree. 



Visiting/Transfer Student Applications: A gradu- 
ate student matriculated in another graduate 
school, who wishes to enroll for a single summer 
session or a single semester in The Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland, and who 
intends thereafter to return to the graduate 
school in which he is matriculated, may be ad- 
mitted in a Non-Degree Graduate Status in a 
visiting status. 

He must have been officially admitted to another 
recognized graduate school and must be in good 
standing. Full transcripts of his credits need not 
be submitted, but he must apply for admission to 
The Graduate School of the University of Mary- 
land and pay the application fee. In lieu of tran- 
scripts, he must have his graduate dean certify, 
in writing, to the appropriate Graduate School 
Office of the University of Maryland, that he is in 
good standing and that any credits earned will 
be accepted toward his graduate degree at his 
home institution. 

Applications for National Science Foundation 
Institutes: Application for admission to an NSF 
Institute should be made directly to the director 
of the NSF Institute. If admission to The Graduate 
School is required, the director will apply the 
same criteria and standards required for admis- 
sion on a regular basis in selecting qualified par- 
ticipants and recommending their admission to 
The Graduate School. Admission to a "non- 
degree NSF Institute only" status carries with it 
no implication that the individual will automat- 
ically be considered for admission in any other 
status at a later date. The "NSF only'' status ter- 
minates upon completion of the NSF Institute in 
which the student was enrolled. A new applica- 
tion must be submitted for subsequent programs 
of a similar nature or where admission to a reg- 
ular program is desired. 

Students already admitted to a regular graduate 
program may also qualify for participation in an 
NSF Institute. 



FOREIGN STUDENT 
APPLICATIONS 

No foreign student seeking admission to the 
University of Maryland should plan to leave his 
country before obtaining an official offer of ad- 
mission from the appropriate Graduate Dean's 
office. 

Academic Credentials: The complete application 
and official academic credentials — beginning 
with secondary school records — should be re- 
ceived by the Graduate Admissions Office at 
least seven months prior to the semester in 
which he plans to begin his studies. Applications 
may be rejected prior to this deadline when for- 
eign student quotas have been exceeded. 



10 / academic information 




English Proficiency: In addition to meeting 
academic requirements, the foreign student ap- 
plicant must demonstrate proficiency in English 
by taking TOEFL (The Test of English as a For- 
eign Language). Because TOEFL is given only 
four times a year throughout various parts of the 
world, it is necessary for the applicant to make 
arrangements with the Educational Testing Ser- 
vice, Box 899, Princeton, N.J. 08450, to take the 
test as soon as he contemplates study at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. When the applicant is ready 
to begin his studies, he will be expected to read, 
speak, and write English fluently, to understand 
lectures, and to take pertinent notes. 

Financial Resources: A statement regarding the 
applicant's financial status is required by the 
respective campus' Office of International Ed- 
ucation Services and Foreign Student Affairs. 
Approximately $350 a month, or $4200 a year, is 
required for educational and living expenses of 
two academic semesters and a summer session. 

A foreign student applicant must be prepared, in 
most cases, to meet his financial obligations 
from his own resources or from those provided 
by a sponsor for at least the first year of study, 
and perhaps beyond. 



Immigration Documents: It is necessary for stu- 
dents eligible for admission to secure from the 
respective campus' Director of International 
Education Services and Foreign Student Affairs, 
the immigration form required for obtaining the 
appropriate visa. Students already studying in 
the United States who wish to transfer to the 
University of Maryland must also secure proper 
immigration documents in order to request the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant 
permission for transfer. 

Reporting Upon Arrival: Every foreign student is 
expected to report to the Office of International 
Education Services and Foreign Student Affairs 
as soon as possible after arriving at the Univer- 
sity. This office will be able to assist not only 
with various problems regarding immigration, 
housing, and fees, but also with more general 
problems of orientation to life in the University 
and the community. 

Questions concerning criteria and requirements 
for foreign applicants should be addressed to 
the Director, International Education Services 
and Foreign Student Affairs, University of Mary- 
land, on the campus to which the student seeks 
admission. 



academic information / 11 



CATEGORIES OF ADMISSION 

Applicants may be offered admission to The 
Graduate School in any of the following catego- 
ries: 

Full Graduate Status: For admission in this cat- 
egory an applicant must have received a bacca- 
laureate degree from an institution accredited by 
a regional accrediting association and be other- 
wise fully qualified in every respect. 

Provisional Graduate Status: This designation 
may be used when (1) the previous academic 
record at a regionally approved institution is 
borderline or when there is a lack of adequate 
prerequisite coursework in the chosen field; (2) 
when the applicant has majored in another area 
with a creditable record, but there is some doubt 
about his ability to pursue the program in ques- 
tion; or (3) when the student has not yet com- 
pleted his baccalaureate and so is not able to 
furnish a final transcript indicating the comple- 
tion of all requirements and the award of the 
degree. A program to correct these deficiencies 
will be outlined by the department and the stu- 
dent is expected to become fully qualified within 
a specified time limit. When all conditions have 
been met, the department may recommend "full 
status." Students who are unable to qualify for 
full admission may be considered for another 
program or dismissal. 

Non-Degree Graduate Status: Applicants who 
qualify for full graduate status, but who are not 
applicants for a degree at the University of 
Maryland, may be permitted to enroll in a non- 
degree status for a limited time. The individual 
who already has an advanced degree and who 
wants to pursue a limited course program to 
gain more background in his original area or in 
another area of specialization would be included 
in this category. Such a person is admitted on a 
"coursework only" basis. 

Other examples; (1 ) a student in Education with 
an M.A. or M.Ed. who wants to work toward the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate (AGS); 
(2) the transfer student who is in good standing 
as a graduate student at another institution (see 
also Transfer Student Application) and (3) the 
student who wishes to attend an approved Na- 
tional Science Foundation Institute but does 
not want to apply for regular admission (see also 
Applications for National Science Foundation 
Institutes). 

Non-Degree Graduate Status is not intended to 
be used as a qualifying program for full degree 
status. While consideration may be given at a 
later date to the application of credits earned 
toward a degree program while in this status, 
there is no assurance that such requests will be 
granted. If granted, however, no more than six 
semester hours of credit may be transferred to a 
degree program. Non-degree students are admit- 
ted for a period of five years only. 



Special Student Status-Undergraduate: This is 
an undergraduate classification, and it may be 
assigned by the Director, Admissions and Regis- 
trations (Undergraduate Division), to those ap- 
plicants who have received the baccalaureate or 
other advanced degrees from an accredited insti- 
tution, but who do not desire or qualify for gradu- 
ate admission. Credit earned while in a special 
student status may not be applied at a later date 
to a degree program. 

Readmission, Change of Objective, Cancellation 
of Admitted Status: Students are admitted only 
for the purpose or objective stated on the ap- 
plication for admission. A new application for 
admission must be made if the student wishes to 
change his objective. The admitted status ter- 
minates when the original objective has been 
achieved; for example, a student admitted for the 
Master's Degree must reapply for admission after 
he receives the degree. If he wishes to continue 
for the doctorate, readmission is not automatic. 
The admitted status also terminates when time 
limits have been exceeded or when other con- 
ditions required for continued admitted status 
have not been met. A student may be admitted 
to only one graduate program at any one time. 
Change of objective cancels the admission for 
the earlier objective. 

Admission Time Limits: For master's and non- 
degree students, the admitted status terminates 
five years from the entrance date unless a shorter 
period is specified in the offer of admission, i.e., 
transfer students, NSF Institute students, and 
"coursework only" students. A doctoral student 
must be admitted to candidacy within five years 
after entrance and must complete all remaining 
requirements within four years after admission 
to candidacy. 



OFFER OF ADMISSION 

A written offer of admission from the Office of 
the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 
will be made to an applicant who meets all ad- 
mission requirements. The offer will specify the 
time of entrance which will normally coincide 
with the requested starting time. The offer of 
admission must be accepted or declined by the 
date specified in the offer. If The Graduate 
School is not notified by the date specified, the 
offer of admission lapses, and the space is re- 
assigned to another applicant. An individual 
whose offer of admission has lapsed must sub- 
mit a new application and fee if he wishes to be 
considered for admission at a later date. 

The offer of admission is a permit-to-register for 
courses and must be presented by the student at 
the time of his first registration. Permanent iden- 
tification as a graduate student will be issued at 
the time of the first registration. 



12 / academic information 



GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS 
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 

A senior at the University of Maryland who is 
within seven credit hours of completing the re- 
quirements for an undergraduate degree may, 
with the approval of his undergraduate dean, the 
head of the department concerned and The 
Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may later be 
counted for graduate credit toward an advanced 
degree at the University if he has been approved 
for admission to The Graduate School. The total 
of undergraduate and graduate courses must not 
exceed 1 5 credits for the semester. Excess cred- 
its in the senior year cannot be used for graduate 
credit unless proper prearrangement is made. 
Seniors who wish to register for graduate credit 
should inquire at the Dean's office. 



REGISTRATION 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Courses are designated as follows: 

000 - 099 Non-credit courses. 

100 - 199 Primarily freshmen courses. 

200 - 299 Primarily sophomore courses. 

300 - 399 Junior and senior courses not ac- 
ceptable for credit toward graduate 
degrees. 

400 - 499 Junior and senior courses accept- 
able for credit toward some gradu- 
ate degrees. 

500 - 599 Professional school courses (Den- 
tistry, Law, Medicine) and post- 
baccalaureate courses normally not 
for graduate degree credit. 

600 - 898 Courses restricted to graduate stu- 
dents. 

799 Master's thesis credit. 

899 Doctoral dissertation credit. 

The first character of the numeric position deter- 
mines the level of the course and the last two 
digits are used for course identification. Courses 
ending with an 8 or 9 (third position) are courses 
that are repeatable for credit. All non-repeatable 
courses must end in through 7. 

Graduate credit will not be given unless the stu- 
dent has been admitted to The Graduate School. 

The student's registration should reflect his in- 
volvement in graduate studies. In the effort to 
reflect more accurately the level of effort, a sys- 
tem of graduate units has been devised. The 
number of units per credit hour varies with the 
level of difficulty of the courses in the following 
way. 

Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 units/ 

credit hour. 

Courses in the series: 500-599 (Professional 



School courses, Dentistry and Medicine), 
some of which have been approved by The 
Graduate School for graduate credit, carry 6 
units/credit hour. These courses do not carry 
graduate credit for students admitted in Col- 
lege Park programs. 

Courses in the series: 600-898 carry 6 units/ 
credit hour. 

Research courses: 799 & 899 carry 12 units/ 
credit hour. 

A full-time student should be registered for 48 or 
more units in each semester. A graduate assist- 
ant is regarded as a full-time student if he regis- 
ters for 24 or more units in each semester. 

If a student is working full time on his thesis or 
dissertation research, he must register for at 
least 4 credit hours of research (799 or 899) 
(= 48 units) in each semester. This applies even if 
he has completed the minimum requirement of 6 
hours of 799 or 12 hours of 899. 
Late Registration: Students failing to register for 
courses on the dates announced for the purpose 
can register for courses only with the consent of 
their advisors, The Graduate School, and the 
Registrar. A fee of $20 is charged for late regis- 
tration. 

Pass/Fail: Graduate students are not permitted 
to enroll for courses on a pass/fail basis. 

ADVISEMENT 

It is the responsibility of the student to seek ad- 
vice from the department or program into which 
he is admitted before registration or pre- 
registration to assure that his selection of 
courses will fulfill the department or program 
requirements. 

RECORDS MAINTENANCE AND 
DISPOSITION 

All records, including academic records from 
other institutions, become part of the official file 
and can neither be returned nor duplicated for 
any purpose. A student should obtain an addi- 
tional copy of his official credentials to keep in 
his possession for advisory purposes and for 
other personal requirements. 

Admission credentials and application data are 
retained for one year in the following cases: 1 . 
the applicant does not register for courses at 
the time for which he has been admitted; 2. the 
student's application has been disapproved; 3. 
the applicant does not respond to the depart- 
mental requests for additional information; 4. the 
application is not complete with respect to the 
receipt of all transcripts or test results. 

CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION 

Following advancement to candidacy for the 
master's degree (when applicable) and the doc- 



academic information / 13 



toral degree by the Graduate Council every 
graduate student must register each semester 
until the degree is awarded; this includes mas- 
ter's students in the non-thesis option. 

Students who may already have registered for 
the required minimum number of hours of re- 
search, but who are still consulting with their fac- 
ulty advisors, taking comprehensive examina- 
tions, using the libraries, laboratories, or other 
research or academic resources of the Univer- 
sity, must continue to register for the number of 
units which reflects their involvement in gradu- 
ate studies. A student seeking full-time status 
must register for 48 graduate units in each 
semester even though he may have completed 
the minimum registration required for the de- 
gree. Students working part-time must register 
in proportion to the time involved. In any case a 
minimum registration of one semester hour is 
required in each semester. The student must 
register in person at the time periods and with 
the conditions specified for the normal registra- 
tion for all students. 

A student who has not yet completed his min- 
imum research registration for six hours of 799 
or 12 hours of 899, and who is not using Univer- 
sity resources must register for at least one hour 
of either 799 or 899 in each semester. Students 
residing outside of the State of Maryland and 
the District of Columbia may register by mail. 
The proper form may be obtained from The 
Graduate School. The completed form along 
with the appropriate tuition and auxiliary fees 
should be received in The Graduate School be- 
fore the end of the regular registration for that 
semester. Requests received after regular regis- 
tration and prior to the end of the eighth week of 
classes may be processed but are assessed a $20 
late fee. Requests will not be processed after the 
eighth week of classes. Students residing within 
the areas specified above must register in 
person. 

The student who has been advanced to candi- 
dacy by the Graduate Council, who has com- 
pleted the minimum registration required for his 
coursework and research, and who is making no 
demands upon the resources of the University, 
including library resources, but who has not 
completed and will not during the current semes- 
ter complete all degree requirements (compre- 
hensives, orals, clearances by the Graduate Pro- 
gram Committee and The Graduate School), 
must maintain his admitted status by the pay- 
ment of a Continuous Registration fee of $1 per 
semester, exclusive of summer sessions, until 
the degree has been awarded. The payment of 
this fee must be submitted, with the appropriate 
form, either in person or by mail, directly to The 
Graduate School, before the end of the eighth 
week of classes. No other fees are assessed stu- 
dents in this category. 

14 / academic information 



Failure to comply with the requirement for main- 
taining Continuous Registration will be taken as 
evidence that the student has terminated his 
graduate program and his matriculation in The 
Graduate School will be canceled. A new appli- 
cation for admission, with the consequent re- 
evaluation of the student's record, will be re- 
quired of a student wishing to resume a graduate 
program terminated in this way. 




GRADUATE FEES* 

Application Fee 

(This fee is not refundable under any cir- 
cumstances.) $15 

Tuition Per Credit Hour: 

Resident Student 43 

Non-Resident Student 59 

Students admitted to The Graduate School must 
pay graduate tuition fees whether or not the 
credit will be used to satisfy program require- 
ments. 

Continuous Registration Fee (per 

semester) 10 

Registration Fee 5 

Late Registration Fee 20 

Graduation Fee for Master's Degree 15 

Graduation Fee for Doctor's Degree 60 

Includes a hood, microfilming and binding 

of thesis, and publication in the Dissertation 

Abstracts. 

Various campuses of the University have gradu- 
ate fees particular to that campus, including the 
following: 
College Park: 

Summer Recreation Fee $ 4 

Vehicle Registration Fee 12 

Baltimore City: 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 6 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 5 

Student Health Fee (Part-time) 2 

Change in Program Fee 5 

Baltimore County: 

Vehicle Registration Fee 10 

Change in Program Fee 5 

Summer School Recreation Fee 5 



GRADES 

The following symbols are used for grades: "A", 
"B ", "C" — Passing; "D" and "F" — Failure; 
and "I" — Incomplete. 

Since graduate students must maintain an over- 
all "B" average, every credit hour of "C" in 
coursework must be balanced by a credit hour of 
"A". A grade of "A" in thesis research will not 
balance a grade of "C" in a course, nor will an 
"A" in transfer credit balance a "C" in a course 
taken at the University of Maryland. A course in 
which a grade of less than "B" is received may 
be repeated. The grade on the repeated course, 
whether it is higher or lower than the original 
grade, replaces the original grade. Courses in 
the degree program which are completed with a 
"D" or "F" must be repeated. 



'The fee changes listed above become effective July 1 , 1 973, 
or, where applicable to the summer session, be made effec- 
tive at the beginning of the 1973 summer session. 



All incomplete grades must be removed before 
the degree is conferred. A course with an incom- 
plete grade should not be repeated; the incom- 
plete should be removed in all cases. Incom- 
pletes received for master's or doctoral research 
credits will be removed when the applicable 
research has been certified by the appropriate 
oral examination committee. 



Graduate School Require- 
ments Applicable To All 
Masters' Degrees 

In addition to the following requirements, special 
departmental or collegiate requirements may be 
imposed especially in the case of those degrees 
which are offered only in one department or col- 
lege. For these special requirements consult 
the descriptions which appear under the depart- 
mental or collegiate listing in this catalog or the 
special publications which can be obtained from 
the department or college. 

Program: The entire course of study undertaken 
for any Master's degree must constitute a unified 
coherent program which is approved by the stu- 
dent's advisor and by The Graduate School. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours in courses ac- 
ceptable for credit towards a graduate degree is 
required; in certain cases six of the 30 semester 
hours must be thesis research credits. The 
graduate program must include at least 1 2 hours 
of coursework in the major subject and at least 
1 2 hours of coursework at the 600 level or higher. 
If the student is inadequately prepared for the 
required graduate courses, additional courses 
may be required. These courses may not be con- 
sidered as part of his graduate program. 

To graduate, the student must have an overall 
average grade of "B ". 

All requirements for the Master's degree must be 
completed within a five-year period. A minimum 
residence of one year of full-time study at this 
University (or its equivalent) is required. 

Transfer of Credit: A maximum of six semester 
hours of graduate coursework taken at other 
regionally accredited institutions prior to matric- 
ulation in The Graduate School may be applied 
toward the master's degree. The courses must 
have been taken within the five-year limit for 
completing the Master's degree; the department 
or program must agree that the specific courses 
are appropriate to and acceptable in the stu- 
dent's program; a grade of "B" or better must 
have been earned in such courses. (A grade of 
"A" in transfer work will not balance a "C" in 
work taken in the program here.) The request for 



academic information / 15 



transfer of credit shall be submitted to The 
Graduate School for approval at the earliest pos- 
sible time. The candidate is subject to final exam- 
ination by this institution in all work offered for 
the degree. 

No transfer credit will be allowed for any courses 
which have been used in fulfillment of the re- 
quirements of any other degree. No credit will be 
granted for correspondence courses or for 
"credit by examination" courses. 

The requirements for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science are detailed immedi- 
ately below. The particular requirements for the 
degrees of Master of Business Administration, 
Master of Education, Master of Library Science, 
and Master of Music are given under the cor- 
responding program descriptions. 



Requirements for the 
Degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science 

THESIS OPTION 

Course Requirements: A minimum of 30 semester 
hours including six hours of thesis research credit 
(799) are required for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science. Of the 24 hours re- 
quired in graduate courses, not less than 1 2 must 
be earned in the major subject. Not less than one- 
half of the total required course credits for the 
degree, or a minimum of 1 2, must be selected 
from courses numbered 600 or above. 

Final Examination: The final oral examination on 
the thesis is conducted by a committee appointed 
by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. 
The student's advisor is the chairman of the 
committee. The other members of the committee 
are persons who are familiar with the student's 
program of studies. The chairman and the 
candidate are informed of the membership of the 
examining committee by the Dean. The chairman 
of the committee then selects the exact time and 
place for the examination and notifies the other 
members of the committee and the candidate. 
The examination may be conducted whenever the 
student has completed his thesis to the satisfac- 
tion of his advisor, providing he has 
completed all other requirements for the degree, 
and has a "B" average in all his graduate work. 
The period for the oral examination is usually 
about one hour, but the time should be long 
enough to insure an adequate examination. The 
report of the committee must be submitted to the 
Dean as soon as possible after the examination, 
in any event not later than the appropriate date 
listed in the "Important Dates for Advisors and 
Students" if the student is to graduate in that 
semester. 



The examining committee also approves the thesis, 
and it is the candidate's obligation to see that 
each member of the committee has at least seven 
days in which to examine a copy of the thesis 
priorto the date of the examination. In addition to 
the oral examination, a comprehensive written 
examination may be required at the option of the 
major department or program committee. 

NON-THESIS OPTION 

The requirements for Master of Arts and Master 
of Science degrees without theses vary slightly 
among departments and programs in which this 
option is available. Standards for admission are, 
however, identical with those for admission to 
any other Master's program. The quality of the 
work expected of the student is also identical to 
that expected in the thesis programs. 

The general requirements for those on the non- 
thesis program are: a minimum of 30 semester 
credit hours in courses approved for graduate 
credit with a minimum average grade of "B" in 
all coursework taken; a minimum of 18 semester 
credit hours in courses numbered 600 or above; 
the submission of one or more scholarly papers; 
and passing a written comprehensive final 
examination. 

A student following a non-thesis Master's program 
will be expected to meet the same deadlines for 
application for a diploma and forfinal examination 
reports established for all other degree programs. 



Graduate School Require- 
ments Applicable To 
All Doctoral Degrees 

In addition to the following requirements, special 
departmental or collegiate requirements may be 
imposed especially in the case of those degrees 
which are offered only in one department or col- 
lege. For these special requirements consult the 
descriptions which appear under the departmental 
or collegiate listing in this catalog or the special 
publications which can be obtained from the de- 
partment or college. 

Program: The number of credit hours required 
in the program varies with the degree in question. 

Residence: The equivalent of three years of full- 
time graduate study and research is the minimum 
required. Of the three years, the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent at the University 
of Maryland. On a part-time basis the time needed 
will be correspondingly increased. All work at other 
institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for any doctoral degree must be sub- 
mitted with the recommendation of the department 



16 / academic information 



or program concerned to The Graduate School 
for approval at the time of admission to candidacy. 
Official transcripts of the work must be on file in 
The Graduate School. 

Admission to Candidacy: Preliminary examinations 
or such other substantial tests as the departments 
may elect are frequently prerequisite for admis- 
sion to candidacy. A student must be admitted to 
candidacy within five years after admission to 
the doctoral program. 

A student must be admitted to candidacy for the 
doctorate at least one academic year before the 
date on which the degree will be conferred. 

Applications for admission to candidacy for the 
doctorate are made in duplicate by the student and 
submitted to his major department for further 
action and transmission to The Graduate School. 
Application forms may be obtained at the office of 
The Graduate School. 

The student must complete all of his program for 
the degree, including the thesis and final examina- 
tion, during a four-year period after admission to 
candidacy. Extensions of time are granted only 
under the most unusual circumstances. Failure to 
complete all requirements within the time allotted 
requires another application for admission to 
candidacy with the usual preliminary examination, 
or other prerequisites as determined by the de- 
partment or program committee. 

It is the responsibility of the student to submit his 
application for admission to candidacy when all 
the requirements for candidacy have been fulfilled. 



Dissertation: A dissertation is required of all 
candidates for a doctoral degree. The topic of 
the dissertation must be approved by the depart- 
ment or program committee. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all 
candidates for the doctoral degree must register 
for the prescribed number of semester hours of 
doctoral research, numbered 899, at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Final Examination: The final oral examination is 
conducted by a committee of the Graduate Faculty 
appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and 
Research. 

The Examining Committee for the final doctoral 
oral examination consists of at least five voting 
members who hold the doctoral degree or its 
equivalent, at least one of whom is external to the 
department or program in which the student is 
specializing. A minimum of three members must 
be members of the Graduate Faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

One member of the Examining Committee designated 
by the Dean is the representative of the Dean for 
Graduate Studies and Research. In addition to 
having the normal responsibility of an examiner, 
the Dean's Representative has the responsibility 
of seeing that the examination is conducted in 
proper form. Any disagreement as to the conduct 
of the examination is referred to the Dean's Repre- 
sentative for decision. 

One or more members of the Committee may be 
persons from other institutions who are distin- 
guished scholars in the field of the dissertation. 




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academic information / 17 



Nominations for membership on the Committee 
are submitted by the student's major professor 
on the form certifying that the dissertation has 
been completed and is ready for distribution to 
the Committee. To permit all members of the 
Committee adequate time to prepare for the 
examination, a period of ten days must elapse 
between the appointment of the Committee and 
the date of the examination. The time and place 
of the examination are established by the major 
professor who serves as Chairman of the 
Committee. 

All final oral examinations are open to all members 
of the Graduate Faculty. 

After the examination the committee deliberates 
and votes in private. Two or more negative votes 
constitute failure. 

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree are given 
immediately below. The requirements for the de- 
grees of Doctor of Business Administration, 
Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Musical 
Arts are given under the corresponding program 
descriptions. 



of The Graduate School to encourage the de- 
velopment of individual programs for each student 
who seeks the Ph.D. To that end the academic 
departments and interdisciplinary programs have 
been directed to determine major and minor re- 
quirements, levels or sequences of required courses 
and similar requirements for submission to the 
Graduate Council for approval. For further informa- 
tion, see the preceding section on Graduate School 
Requirements Applicable to All Doctoral Degrees. 



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Student Residency Classifications 
For Tuition Purposes 
In Maryland Public Institutions 
of Higher Education* 



Graduate School Require- 
ments for the Degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted only 
upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in 
scholarship and the ability to engage in indepen- 
dent research. It is not awarded for the comple- 
tion of course and seminar requirements no 
matter how successfully completed. 

Residence: The equivalent of three years of full- 
time graduate study and research is the minimum 
required. Of the three years the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent at the University 
of Maryland. On a part-time basis the time needed 
will be correspondingly increased. All work at 
other institutions offered in partial fulfillment of 
the requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree should be submitted to The Graduate School 
for approval, upon recommendation of the de- 
partment concerned, at the earliest possible time. 
Foreign Language Requirement: The Graduate 
School no longer has a language requirement for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. However, a 
number of departments have retained a foreign 
language requirement. The student should inquire 
in the department regarding this requirement. 
The student must satisfy the departmental or pro- 
gram requirement before he can be admitted to 
candidacy for the doctorate. 

There is no Graduate School requirement for 
either a major or a minor subject. It is the policy 



1. General 

The tuition charge at a public college or public 
university (including community colleges) in 
Maryland (hereinafter referred to as an "institu- 
tion"), is based in part on whether the student 
is considered a resident or non-resident of this 
State. The tuition for residents is less than that 
charged non-residents. To qualify as a resident 
for tuition purposes for any given semester, the 
individual must have maintained his/her domicile 1 
in Maryland for at least six months immediately 
prior to the last date available for initial registra- 
tion forthat semester in the applicable institution. 

2. Minors 

The residence of a person under the age of 
twenty-one at the time of his/her registration in 
an institution shall be considered to be that of the 
parent or legal guardian having custody of the 



'Maryland Council on Higher Education 

'The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean 
the permanent place of abode. For the purpose of residency 
for tuition purposes, only one domicile may be maintained. 
Domicile must be established in Maryland for a purpose in- 
dependent of attendance at an institution. 
2 A person stands in loco parentis to a student when he has 
put himself in the situation of a lawful parent by assuming the 
obligations incident to the parental relation without going 
through the formalities necessary to legal adoption. The de- 
termination of such status will be on a case by case basis 
by the residency appeals committee, which will consider who 
has custody or control of the student, who is financially 
supporting the student and who has assumed general re- 
sponsibility for his/her welfare. 



18 / academic information 



minor, or in extraordinary circumstances, the 
person in loco parentis 2 determined by the resi- 
dency appeals committee. 
A minorwhose parent, legal guardian, or person 
in loco parentis (if applicable) moves his her 
legal residence from Maryland to a location out- 
side the State shall be considered a non-resident 
after six months from the date of such removal 
from the State. 

3. Adults 

A person twenty-one years of age or older is a 
resident if he she has maintained continuous 
domicile in Maryland forsix months immediately 
priortothe last date available for initial registration. 

4. Emancipation 

Minors claiming emancipation from their parent, 
legal guardian, or person in loco parentis (if ap- 
plicable), must present documentary proof of such 
claims to the residency classification officer for a 
decision. Minors claiming emancipation must meet 
the domicile requirements of an adult listed 
above. 

5. Married Students 

The residence of a married minor shall be de- 
termined in the same manner as an adult. The 
husband and wife must each establish residency 
even though they live jointly. 

6. Military Personnel 

No Maryland resident shall be automatically pre- 
sumed to have gained or lost in-state residence 
in Maryland while serving in the Armed Forces. 
Members of the Armed Forces not from Maryland 
at the time of entrance into the Armed Forces and 
stationed here may be considered residents of 
this State if they establish domicile in Maryland. 

7. Foreign Nationals 

Any alien who is considered to be a permanent 
immigrant to the United States must meet the 
domicile requirements of an adult or minor as 
listed above. 

8. Change of Status 

The residence classification of a student is de- 
termined at the time of initial registration but may 
thereafter be changed for any subsequent semes- 
ter if circumstances change in relation to these 
regulations. Students may request a review of 
classification by contacting the residency classi- 
fication officer at their institution. 

9. Responsibility of Students 

Any student or prospective student in doubt con- 
cerning his, her residence status is responsible for 
receiving a ruling from the designated residence 
classification officer of his her institution. A student 
who alters his, her status from resident to non- 
resident or vice-versa, has the responsibility of 
informing the residency classification officer. The 



residency status of the student may be altered by 
the institution on the basis of its own findings. 

10. Appeals 

Any student may appeal his her classification by 
requesting a meeting before the institution's ap- 
peals committee. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Many departments are able to provide financial 
assistance in the form of teaching or research 
assistantships and fellowships to graduate stu- 
dents accepted into the department's program. 
Inquiries concerning the availability of such as- 
sistance should be directed to the department 
to which the applicant expects to be admitted or 
to the Fellowship and Grants Office of The Grad- 
uate School. 

Fellowships: The Maryland Fellowship Program, 
established by the State Legislature and admin- 
istered by The Graduate School, provides a limited 
number of fellowships to qualified applicants who 
agree to teach in a public institution of higher 
learning in the State of Maryland for a period of 
three years if a suitable position is offered after 
receiving eitherthe Doctor of Philosophy orthe 
Doctor of Education Degrees. The stipend is 
S2500 for the academic year with remission of 
tuition and fees. 

Graduate Fellowships: These fellowships are 
awarded on a competitive basis by The Graduate 
School. The stipend is S1 000 for the academic 
year, with remission of tuition and fees except 
for the graduation fee. 

Summer Dissertation Fellowships are available 
to those graduate students who have completed 
all other requirements for the doctoral degree and 
expect to complete their dissertation by August 
31 . A stipend of S660 is provided to enable the 
student to devote full-time to the completion of 
the dissertation during July and August. 

Fellowships or traineeships are also available 
under the National Defense Education Act. the 
National Science Foundation, and the National 
Institutes of Health, as well as from several 
foundations and private industry. 

All applicants for fellowships must be admitted to 
The Graduate School on a full-time basis to be 

eligible. 

Assistantships: Teaching assistantships are also 
available to qualified graduate students. In addi- 
tion to remission of tuition, these carry ten-month 
stipends ranging from $2900 to S3500. The basic 
twelve-month stipend level is $3600. In certain de- 
partments research assistantships with roughly 
comparable stipends are available. Applications for 



academic information / 19 



assistantships should be made directly to the de- 
partment in which the applicant will study. 

A substantial number of Resident Graduate As- 
sistantships in the undergraduate residence 
halls are available. The stipend is $2900 per year 
for the first year and $3200 for subsequent years, 
plus remission of tuition fees in exchange for half- 
time work as Residence Halls Staff members. 
These Resident Assistantships are open to both 
men and women. Applications for a Residence 
Graduate Assistantship should be made to the 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742. 



Offers of assistantships are made contingent upon 
acceptance as a graduate student by The Graduate 
School. 

Student Loans: National Defense Education 
Act Loan Funds are available to graduate students 
of the University of Maryland. The student may 
request up to $2500 per year. However, because 
of limited funds, loansof more than $1200 peryear 
are rarely made. Applications should be directed 
to the Director, Office of Student Aid, North Ad- 
ministration Building, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Md. 20742. 




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SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
ANATOMY (DANA) 

Professor and Chairman: Provenza 
Professors: Hahn, Piavis 
Associate Professor: Barry 
Assistant Professors: Gartner, Hobart 
Instructors: Hiatt, Meszler. Swartz 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

The Department of Anatomy offers graduate studies leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
with concentrations in developmental, macroscopic and mi- 
croscopic anatomies and cellular physiology. The primary 
objective of the graduate program is to provide its students with 
opportunities and tools to plan and execute original research 
problems. Some of the specialized techniques include elec- 
tromyography, electron microscopy, histo- and cytochemistry, 
microradiography and radioisotopes. A manual describing these 
programs is available upon request. 

DANA 514. THE ANATOMY OF THE HEAD AND NECK (3) 
Designed to provide the student with a detailed study of the 
basic anatomy of the region and to correlate this knowledge 
with the various aspects of clinical practice. 

DANA 610. INHERITANCE AND DEVELOPMENT BIOLOGY (6) 
Gametogenesis, fertilization, inheritance mechanisms, em- 
bryogeny and fetal development are described and related 
to medical genetics. 

DANA 611. HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY (8) 
A complete study of the human body with emphasis on gross 
body structures and movements. The entire cadaver is dis- 
sected. Permission of instructor required. 

DANA 612. HUMAN NEUROANATOMY (2) 
Consists of macroscopic and microscopic study of the basic 
functional organization of the nervous system including 
ultrastructure of neurons, synaptic organization of neuronal 
systems and organization of spinal cord and brain. Permis- 
sion of instructor required. 

DANA 615. COMPARATIVE ANIMAL HISTOLOGY (6) 

Morphology, structure and function of cells, tissues and 
organs of certain representative members of the animal king- 
dom are compared. 

DANA 616. EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) 

Historical and current approaches of experimental embryol- 
ogy are treated from applied and theoretical aspects. In addi- 
tion to scheduled lectures, special problems will be assigned. 

DANA 617. RADIATION BIOLOGY (4) 
To acquaint the student with the techniques of handling 
isotopes as applied to biological research. Certain phases of 
laboratory health physics are also covered. Permission of 
instructor required. 

DANA 618. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN THE ANATOMIES 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) Designed to 
provide experience in the organization and execution of small 
research projects. Consent of department chairman required. 

DANA 619. SEMINAR (1) 

DANA 620. PHYSICAL METHODS IN HISTOLOGY (4) 
Introduces the more frequently employed techniques in his- 
tochemical and cellular physiology. Exercises designed to 
utilize all available research tools and to interpret the data 
obtained. Permission of instructor required. 

DANA 621. MAMMALIAN HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY (6) 
In depth study of cells, tissues and organ-systems of the 
human body are treated. 

DANA 622. MAMMALIAN ORAL HISTOLOGY AND EMBRY- 
OLOGY (2) 
Developing and definitive oral and paraoral structures are pre- 
sented with special emphasis on recent histochemical and 
cytochemical advances. 



DANA 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
DANA 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (1-8) 



BIOCHEMISTRY (DBIC) 

Associate Professor and Head: Ganis 
Associate Professor: Leonard 
Assistant Professors: Bashirelahi, Courtade. Morris 
Research Associate: Zubairi 

DBIC 600. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (4) 

Second semester. Four lectures a week. The course includes 
the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, 
lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The topics of bioenerge- 
tics, enzymes, vitamins, hormones, and molecular biology are 
also considered. 

DBIC 609. BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR (1) 
The course will consider recent developments in biochemis- 
try. Current information derived from the literature will be pre- 
sented and discussed. 

DBIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

DBIC 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



MICROBIOLOGY (DMIC) 

Professor and Head: Shay 
Associate Professors: Krywolap. Sydiskis 
Assistant Professors: Chang, Delisle. Joseph, Nauman, 
Schneider 

The Department of Microbiology serves the School of Dentis- 
try and offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The graduate program is 
especially designed to train students for positions in research 
and teaching, with particular emphasis on research problems 
related to the dental sciences. The student may specialize in 
the areas of oral microbiology, pathogenic microbiology, 
immunology, mycology, virology, microbial genetics, cytology, 
microbial physiology and chemotherapy. 

DMIC 401 PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 200. The role of microor- 
ganisms in the diseases of man and animals with emphasis 
upon the differentiation and culture of microorganisms, type 
of disease, modes of disease transmission; prophylactic, 
therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. This course is pre- 
sented in the University College program. (Joseph, Libonati) 

DMIC 451. SEROLOGY-IMMUNOLOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, DMIC 401 or equivalent. Study of the theories 
and principles of immunological reactions to infectious and 
noninfectious agents. Demonstration of basic serologic 
phenomena and their use in laboratory diagnosis. This course 
is presented in the University College program. (Joseph) 

DMIC 452. VIROLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, DMIC 401 or equivalent. Consideration of the 
characteristics and properties of viruses and rickettsiae, with 
emphasis on concepts of pathogenicity, immunity, 
epidemiology and identification. Discussion of the principles 
of tissue cell culture. This course is presented in the Univer- 
sity College program. (Joseph) 

DMIC 453. MYCOLOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, DMIC 401 or equivalent. An introductory study 
of classification, morphology and identification of fungi, with 
special emphasis on human pathogens. This course is pre- 
sented in the University College program. (Joseph) 



22 / umab 



DMIC 454. PARASITOLOGY (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisite. DMIC 401 or equivalent. Systematic review of 
the morphology, life cycle, disease process and identification 
of human parasites, with demonstrations of representative 
forms. This course is presented in the University College pro- 
gram. (Joseph) 

DMIC 521. DENTAL MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (5) 
First semester. Consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, 
viruses, yeasts and molds. Special attention is given to those 
organisms which produce lesions of the oral cavity. 
Immunological principles are studied with emphasis on 
hypersensitivity resulting from antibiotics, antigens and vac- 
cines. Laboratory teaching includes cultural characteristics, 
disinfection, sterilization, asepsis, animal inoculation, antibi- 
otics assay and virus techniques. In all phases of the course 
emphasis is placed on dental applications. 

DMIC 600-601. CHEMOTHERAPY (1,1) 

Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites. DMIC 650 or 
equivalent: DBIC511 or equivalent. Lectures which deal with 
the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. (Shay) 

DMIC 602. THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF REAGENTS AND 
MEDIA (3) 
Offered in alternate years Consideration of media for special 
procedures, such as antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal 
fluid, exudates and other materials. Anaerobiosis. differential 
media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility testing 
are considered in detail. Emphasis placed on growth require- 
ments of specific groups of microorganisms. 

DMIC 609. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MICROBIOLOGY 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 
Laboratory course. 

DMIC 611. PUBLIC HEALTH (2) 

Prerequisite. DMIC 621 or equivalent. A demonstration of pub- 
lic health facilities in the community and their relation to the 
practices of the health sciences carried on through lectures 
and discussion groups. The application of statistical and 
epidemiological methods to health problems is illustrated 
through lectures and demonstrations. (Shay) 

DMIC 612. BACTERIAL FERMENTATIONS (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisites. DMIC 650 
and 710 or equivalent: DBIC 521 or equivalent. This course 
covers composition, nutrition and growth of microorganisms: 
influence of physical and chemical environment on 
metabolism: chemical activities of microorganisms: mecha- 
nisms of fermentative metabolism. (Krywolap) 

DMIC 621. ADVANCED DENTAL MICROBIOLOGY AND 
IMMUNOLOGY (4) 
First semester. Three lecture hours and three hours of labora- 
tory with group conferences each week. Prerequisite. DMIC 
650 or equivalent. This course, intended for graduate students 
of oral microbiology, is a continuation of DMIC 521. sup- 
plemented with library readings and advanced laboratory 
experimentation. 

DMIC 624. MICROBIOLOGY OF THE PERIODONTIUM (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. DMIC 621 or 
equivalent. Designed for advanced students in the field of 
oral microbiology. Consideration will be given to the role of 
microorganisms in periodontal tissues and the factors that 
influence the development of diseases: bacterial interactions, 
parasitism: salivary calculus: periodontitis: gingivitis: and 
herpetic gingivostomatitis. (Shay) 

DMIC 630. EXPERIMENTAL VIROLOGY (4) 

Prerequisite, a course in General Virology or equivalent and 
consent of the instructor. Offered first semester, alternate 
years. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week deal- 
ing with the molecular biology of viruses. Emphasis placed 
on experimental techniques used to study the physical, chem- 
ical and biological properties of viruses and the molecular 
basis of virus-cell interactions. Areas covered will include 
techniques used to purify and characterize viruses: fractiona- 



tion procedures: and methods used to study the in vivo and 
in vitro synthesis of viral components. (Sydiskis) 

DMIC 635. BACTERIAL GENETICS (4) 

Prerequisite. DMIC 650 and consent of the instructor. Offered 
first semester, alternate years. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods per week dealing with the genetics of bacteria 
and bacterial viruses. Areas covered include induction, 
expression and selection of mutants: molecular basis of 
mutations: transfer of genetic information by transformation, 
transduction and conjugation: complementation and recom- 
bination in phage and bacteria: genetic mapping and gene 
fine structure: and extrachromosomal genetic elements. 

(Delisle) 

DMIC 650. ADVANCED GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Three lectures, one 3-hour laboratory period 
per week. An advanced course covering various aspects of 
general microbiology: taxonomy, structure, growth, ecology, 
metabolism and genetics of microorganisms. (Taught jointly 
by faculty of Medical and Dental Schools) 

DMIC 653. TECHNIQUES IN MICROSCOPY (4) 

Prerequisites. DMIC 650 and permission of instructor. Two 
lectures and two 4-hour labs. This course provides an oppor- 
tunity to learn the many techniques used to prepare biological 
material for examination with the light and electron mi- 
croscopes. The theory of light and electron optics will be 
included and each student will be given the opportunity to 
use the techniques taught during the course to help solve 
problems that may require the microscope in their individual 
research projects. (Nauman) 

DMIC 689. SEMINAR (1) 

Presentation and discussion of current literature and 
research in the field of microbiology. 

DMIC 710. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory session per week. The 
course is a broad survey of anabolic and catabolic metabo- 
lisms of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms. 
Prerequisites. DMIC 650 and biochemistry or consent of the 
coordinator. The course is taught jointly by the faculties of 
the dental and medical schools. (Krywolap and staff) 

DMIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 
Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 
Open only to candidates for advanced degrees in mi- 
crobiology. 

DMIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



ORAL PATHOLOGY (DPAT) 

Professor and Head: Lunin 

Professor: Salley 

Assistant Professors: Beckerman. Levy. Swancar 

Programs are offered leading to a Master of Science or Doctor 
of Philosophy in oral pathology. These programs are open to 
qualified students who have the Doctor of Dental Surgery or 
equivalent degree. Students seeking admission must meet the 
Graduate School requirements and be approved by the 
Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Dentistry. 

Graduate work will be in experimental pathology but students 
will be given an opportunity to gain skills and knowledge 
required by the American Board of Oral Pathology. 

DPAT 612. 613. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ORAL PATHOLOGY 
(2.2) 
Prerequisite, a basic course in pathology. One lecture and 
one laboratory period per week. The histopathology of 
selected oral lesions with emphasis on recent advances in 
diagnostic techniques. 

DPAT 614, 615. METHODS IN HISTOPATHOLOGY (4. 4) 

Prerequisite, a basic course in pathology. Two 4-hour labora- 
tory periods each week. The laboratory methods used in pre- 
paring pathologic tissues for microscopic examination. 



umab / 23 



DPAT 616. 617. ADVANCED HISTOPATHOLOGY OF ORAL 
LESIONS (3. 3) 
Prerequisite, a basic course in pathology. One hour of lecture 
and four hours of laboratory each week. The study of uncom- 
mon and rare lesions of the head and neck. 

DPAT 618. SEMINAR (1) 

Prerequisite, a basic course in pathology One period each 
week. Recent advances in experimental oral pathology. 

DPAT 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Masters Level) (1-6) 

DPAT 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



ORAL SURGERY (DSUR) 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Hamilton 
Associate Professors: Bruni, DeVore 
Assistant Professor: Tilghman 

A three-year post-graduate or graduate program in Oral Sur- 
gery leading to American Board of Oral Surgery eligibility. The 
program is available to dentists graduated from accredited den- 
tal schools in the United States and possessions, and Canada. 
There are three positions offered each year. A Master's degree 
is offered for selected candidates, although a research project 
is mandatory for each individual in the program. 

The first year is spent as an intern in the University of Maryland 
Hospital, rotating between the anesthesia service, and inpatient 
and outpatient oral surgery clinics. The second year combines 
teaching in the undergraduate oral surgery clinic, graduate 
courses in the basic sciences and clinical oral surgery in the 
post-graduate section of the dental school. The third year, as 
senior resident, the trainee is given major responsibility for all 
oral surgery cases operated at University, City, Mercy, and Provi- 
dent Hospitals. 

DSUR 601. CLINICAL ANESTHESIOLOGY (6) 

First year oral surgery interns assigned to the Department 
of Anesthesiology for three months. Attends all conferences 
given by that department and practices clinical 
anesthesiology in the operating room of the hospital. 

DSUR 620. GENERAL DENTAL ORAL SURGERY (4) 

Clinical course for third year residents in oral surgery. Two 
conferences per week. Residents are evaluated on the way 
they manage clinical patients during their final year of 
residency. 

DSUR 621. ADVANCED ORAL SURGERY (4) 

Second Semester continuation of DSUR 620. Residents are 
required to attend all conferences. One month is spent in 
learning and teaching in Hospital Empleados in Lima, Peru. 

DSUR 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 



PHYSIOLOGY (DPHS) 

Professor and Chairman: White 
Assistant Professor: Bennett 
Instructors: Nardell, Staling 

Programs are offered leading to the Master of Science or Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degrees Admission requirements include 
adequate undergraduate preparation in both the physical and 
biological sciences. This would include an adequate back- 
ground in biology as well as courses in physics, mathematics 
and chemistry through organic Otherwise qualified students 
who lack preparation in a particular area may be admitted pro- 
viding the deficiency is corrected early in the graduate program. 
Completion of the Graduate Record Examination is required. 
Applications for admission must be approved by the Graduate 
Admissions Committee of the School of Dentistry. 



DPHS 512. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY (6) 

Introduces the student to the essentials of human physiology. 

(White, Staff) 

DPHS 611. PRINCIPLES OF MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY (6) 
Introduces the graduate student to the basic principles of 
mammalian physiology. Lectures, demonstrations and 
laboratory experiments cover the major organ systems. 

(White) 

DPHS 618. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY 

Second semester. Hours and credit by arrangement. 
Prerequisite, DPHS 512 or its equivalent. Lectures and semi- 
nars on special problems and recent advances in physiology. 

(White) 

DPHS 628. RESEARCH (1-3) 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (White) 

DPHS 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) (White) 

DPHS 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



ANATOMY (MANA) 



Professor and Acting Head: O Morchoe, C.C. 
Professors: Figge, Krahl 

Associate Professors: Donati, Rennels, Wadsworth 
Assistant Professors: Barrett. O Morchoe, P. J., Petersen, 
Ramsay 

The Department of Anatomy offers graduate programs leading 
to the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and combined 
Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Courses 




24 / umab 



are offered in most aspects of anatomy including: gross 
anatomy, embryology, histology, genetics, and neuroscience 
The program for each student is individually planned and nor- 
mally includes courses in physiology and biochemistry. Appli- 
cants for any of the graduate programs in anatomy should have 
an adequate background in biology, physics, chemistry, and 
mathematics. During the first year, the student devotes most 
of his time to scheduled course work. In the second and sub- 
sequent years the student completes his course work and com- 
mences his research program. In addition, students are 
expected to participate in the teaching programs of the depart- 
ment 

MANA 505 GENETICS (NURS-Program) (2) 

Basic principles of human and medical genetics are stressed 
with attention given to underlying mechanisms of genetic dis- 
orders of man. Other areas developed are congenital malfor- 
mations, developmental genetics, probability and genetic 
counseling. (Sigman) 

MANA 601 ANATOMY OF THE HUMAN BODY (9) 
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a 
comprehensive understanding of the morphology of the 
human body. The basic concepts of structure as they are 
related to function are described in lectures and demonstra- 
tions. Laboratory facilities are provided for the study of 
osteology and the dissection of the human body. The course 
includes instruction in embryology, roentgen anatomy, and 
clinically applied aspects of morphology. 

MANA 602. HISTOLOGY (6) 
This course provides the student with a basic knowledge and 
understanding of the microscopic structure of the human 
body. It emphasizes the interdependency between structure 
and function in the different tissues and organs of the body. 
Clinical and research applications of the course material are 
also stressed. Histological slides are provided for laboratory 
study. Each student is expected to prepare a written report 
on a specific aspect of histology. 

MANA 603. NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES (6) 
This is an integrated course in neuroanatomy and 
neurophysiology with additional contributions from 
neurology, neuropathology, neurosurgery, and electro- 
encephalography. The structure and function of the central 
nervous system is presented simultaneously. The course 
involves dissection of the human brain, examination of 
stained microscopic sections of various levels of the brain 
stem, and laboratory experience involving the study of func- 
tional aspects of the nervous system. 

MANA 605. GENETICS (2) 

Consists of a series of one-hour lectures which include a con- 
sideration of the principles of genetics, population genetics, 
biochemical genetics, radiation genetics, immunogenetics, 
and microbial genetics. Special emphasis is placed on the 
role of genetics in health and disease. (Petersen) 

MANA 606. BASIC TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY 
(2) 
Four hours per week for 12 weeks. The course is designed 
for graduate students who have had little or no training in 
electron microscopy. It consists of a series of lecture- 
demonstrations, conferences, and laboratory exercises in 
biological specimen preparation. Each student is also 
expected to prepare a written report on some assigned top'C 
in electron microscopy. (Donati. Barrett) 

MANA 607. FETAL AND INFANT ANATOMY (2) 

Fifteen periods of 3 hours each. The course is open to 
graduate students and to medical and postgraduate students 
interested in pediatrics. The course provides a theoretical and 
practical approach to the understanding of the morphology 
of the fetus and infant. The anatomy of the infant is compared 
and contrasted with that of the human adult. (Krahl) 

MANA 608. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN NEUROSCIENCE (2) 
This course deals with specific problems in the field of 
neuroanatomy, depending on the interests of the sponsor 
It will consist of lectures, seminars and specific laboratory 
assignments. (Rennels) 



MANA 609 SEMINAR (1.1) 
One session per week. Graduate students, staff and guests 
participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects 
of special interest in the field of anatomy. 

MANA 610 NORMAL AND ATYPICAL GROWTH (2) 

This course includes a study of normal human embryology 
and provides facilities for an in depth study of one or more 
aspects of atypical tissue or cellular growth. Course material 
is adapted to suit the interests of individual students. 

(Barrett, Ramsay) 

MANA 61 1 . TECHNIQUES IN TISSUE CULTURE (2) 

This course is designed for graduate students who have had 
little or no experience in tissue culture techniques. Standard 
techniques used in the tissue culture laboratory are described 
and the common problems which arise are discussed. 
Facilities are available for laboratory experience. 

(Barrett and Donati) 

MANA 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

Research work may be taken in any one of the branches of 
anatomy. 

MANA 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 
Research work may be taken in any one of the branches of 
anatomy. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY (MBIC) 

Professor and Head: Adams 

Professors: Frank, Lambooy (P.T.). Pomerantz 

Associate Professors: E Bucci. Kirtley 

Assistant Professors: Black. C Bucci. Gryder. LaBrosse 

(P.T.). Max (P.T.), Rao. Rosen, Tildon (P.T.) 
Instructor: Brown 

The Department of Biological Chemistry offers programs lead- 
ing to the Doctor of Philosophy and in special cases, the Master 
of Science in biochemistry. Students seeking admission must 
meet The Graduate School minimum requirements for entrance. 
In addition, it is expected that entering students will have passed 
courses in organic chemistry, physical chemistry and calculus 
with a grade of B or better. Any deficiencies in these areas must 
be made up before or during the first year of graduate study 

Undergraduate courses in biochemistry are desirable but not 
essential for admission to the graduate program. Students who 
have had such courses may elect to take a placement exam 
in biochemistry upon entering the program. Those students who 
pass the placement exam will be permitted to enter the 
advanced biochemistry courses. All other students must first 
take the introductory biochemistry course before entering the 
advanced courses. 

The Graduate Record Examination including the Aptitude 
Test and Advanced Test in Chemistry is recommended. 

MBIC 600. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY (5) 

First semester. A general introduction to biochemistry with 
emphasis on basic chemistry of biologically important 
molecules, enzymes, intermediary metabolism, metabolic reg- 
ulation, and molecular biology. Features of mammalian 
biochemistry are stressed but general and comparative 
aspects are considered. This is the biochemistry course 
offered to first year medical students and interested graduate 
students. 

MBIC 601 PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS 
(6) 
First semester. Same as MBIC 600 with additional lectures 
in the principles of biophysics as presented to first year medi- 
cal students. Graduate credit may be obtained for MBIC 600 
or 601 but not both 

MBIC 701 (A-G). ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (3) 
Prerequisite. MBIC 600 or 601 or equivalent. A series of lec- 
tures on special topics of current interest in biochemistry 
One course will be given each semester with primary 
emphasis as follows: A) Enzymes: B) Biochemical genetics: 



umab / 25 



C) Biochemical regulation; D) Microbial biochemistry; E) 
Physical biochemistry; F) Proteins and amino acids; G) Spe- 
cial topics. 
MBIC 708, 709. SEMINAR (1,1) 

Reports on current literature or on research in progress. 
Prerequisite, MBIC 600 or 601 or equivalent. 

MBIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Masters Level) (1-6) 

MBIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



BIOPHYSICS (MBPH) 

Professor and Chairman: Mullins 

Professor: Sjodin 

Associate Professor: Hybl 

Assistant Professors: DeWeer, Geduldig 

The Department ot Biophysics offers graduate courses of 
study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy. The study programs are flexible and depend on 
the preparation and interests of the student. Detailed require- 
ments are available from the Department of Biophysics (660 
West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Md. 21201). 

It is recommended that students studying for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in biophysics select a minor in either 
physics, chemistry or mathematics. 

Deadline for applications is March 1. 

MBPH 600. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS (3) 

Fall semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Inorganic 
Chemistry, 1 year Introductory Physics and Introductory Cal- 
culus. An introduction to the study of living systems applying 
the methods of physics and chemistry. The cell as a 
physicochemical system and experimental methods for inves- 
tigation, nerve impulse conduction and excitation, the 
interaction of radiation with living material; the structure and 
properties of muscle tissue, connective tissue, and their pro- 
teins. 

MBPH 601. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS (3) 

Continuation of MBPH 600. Given when number of students 
warrants. 

MBPH 602. BIOPHYSICS OF RADIATION (2) 
Two lectures a week. An advanced study of the interaction 
of radiation with living matter and with molecules of biologi- 
cal interest. Dosimetry problems and some biomedical appli- 
cations will be considered. (Mullins, Sjodin, Robinson) 

MBPH 603. LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN BIOPHYSICS (3) 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
MBPH 600, 601, or consent of the staff. Training in the use 
of radioactive isotopes, radioactive counting equipment, and 
bioelectric measuring instruments applied to the study of 
membranes; viscosity, optical rotation, protein titrations, 
spectroscopy, conductivity, as applied to fiber forming pro- 
teins. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

MBPH 609. SEMINAR IN BIOPHYSICS (1) 

Prerequisites, MBPH 600, 601, or consent of the staff. Semi- 
nars on various biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate 
students, and guest speakers. 

MBPH 709. ADVANCED AND THEORETICAL BIOPHYSICS (3) 
Fall semester, odd years. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, 
MBPH 600, 601, or consent of staff. An advanced and critical 
analysis of experimental findings in terms of biophysical 
theory. 

MBPH 711. MEMBRANE BIOPHYSICS (2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Inorganic and Physical 
Chemistry, Intermediate Physics, Calculus and Introductory 
Differential Equations. Diffusion in and through membranes 
developed from first principles with special reference to prob- 
lems of ion transport in biological membrances. (Sjodin) 



MBPH 713. X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (3) 

Three lectures a week. An introduction to molecular structure 
determination by the techniques of x-ray diffraction. 
Emphasis upon problems arising in structural studies of 
molecules of biological origin. (Hybl) 

MBPH 719. COLLOQUIUM IN BIOPHYSICS (1) 

Prerequisites, MBPH 609 or consent of the staff. Colloquia 
on various biophysical topics given by the staff, graduate stu- 
dents and guest speakers. 

MBPH 799. THESIS RESEARCH IN BIOPHYSICS (1-6) 

Required of students planning to take Master of Science 
degree in Biophysics. 

MBPH 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH IN BIOPHYSICS 
(Variable credit) 
Required of students planning to take the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in Biophysics. 



CELL BIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 
(MCBP) 

Professor Emeritus: Krantz 
Professor and Head: Aposhian 
Professors: Ludlum, Ryser 
Research Associate Professor: Nussbaum (P.T.) 
Assistant Professors: Brown. D.T., Brown, N.C., Burlingham, 
Qasba 

All students majoring in the Department of Cell Biology and 
Pharmacology with a view to obtaining the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy are expected to secure training in mammalian 
physiology, biochemistry and physical chemistry. 

MCBP 601. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY (5) 
Same as MCBP 501, for students majoring in pharmacology. 
Additional instruction and collateral reading are required. 
(Aposhian, Ludlum, Ryser, Brown, Brown, Burlingham) 

MCBP 602, 603. CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF PHARMA- 
CODYNAMICS (2, 2) 
MCBP 604. BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY (2) 
MCBP 605. HISTORY OF PHARMACOLOGY (2) 

MCBP 606. THE BIOLOGY OF MACROMOLECULES (4) 

Prerequisite, biochemistry. Advanced study of nucleic acids, 
proteins and their function. 

MCBP 609. PHARMACOLOGIC METHODOLOGY (4) 
Prerequisite, MCBP 601. 

MCBP 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



MICROBIOLOGY (MMIC) 



Professor and Head: Wisseman 

Professor: Traub 

Associate Professors: Eylar, Fiset, Kessel 

Assistant Professors: Myers, Ollodart, Osterman, Rosenzweig 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. While the degree of Master of Science may be 
offered in special instances, priority for research facilities will 
be given aspirants to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. This 
Department encourages students who wish to enroll in the com- 
bined Doctor of Medicine-Doctor of Philosophy degree pro- 
gram. 

Emphasis is placed upon medical aspects of microbiology. 
Research programs are available in virology, rickettsiology, 
medical bacteriology, immunology, and microbial physiology. 
Opportunities are open for experience in teaching and in diag- 
nostic bacteriology and serology. Opportunities exist for 
ecological studies on rickettsioses and arboviruses in overseas 
areas. 



26 / umab 



MMIC 601. MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours in laboratory and group 
conferences per week. Begins with an introduction to basic 
principles of microbiology and immunology and then pro- 
ceeds to consider the major groups of bacteria, spirochetes, 
fungi, rickettsiae and viruses that cause human disease. 
Emphasis is placed upon an analysis of the properties of mi- 
croorganisms thought to be important in disease production, 
pathogenesis of infection and interaction with host defense 
mechanisms, epidemiology and control measures. It is sup- 
plemented with advanced readings and laboratory work. 

MMIC 650. ADVANCED GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory session per week. Includes 

microbial taxonomy, structure and function, growth, ecology. 

physiology and genetics, immunology, and general virology. 

(Myers, Osterman. Kessel. Staff) 

MMIC 708. SEMINAR (1) 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate 
students, staff and guests participate in comprehensive and 
critical reviews of subjects of special interest or pertinent to 
the graduate training program. 

MMIC 709. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) 

Permission and credit arranged individually. Provides the 
opportunity for the graduate student to pursue under super- 
vision subjects of special interest not offered in other formal 
courses. A study program is worked out with the instructor 
prior to registration and may consist of special readings, con- 
ferences, reports and, on occasion, laboratory experience. 

MMIC 710. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory session per week. A broad 
survey of anabolic and catabolic metabolism in autotrophic 
and heterotrophic microorganisms. Prerequisites. MMIC 650 
or biochemistry, or consent of instructor. 

(Myers. Osterman. Staff) 

MMIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

MMIC 801. ADVANCED VIROLOGY AND RICKETTSIOLOGY 
LECTURE (3) 
Considers the general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. 
methods for studying them and finally concentrates on agents 
of medical importance. Special emphasis is placed on the 
host-parasite relationship, characterization of the various 
viral and rickettsial agents and on biological and ecological 
factors. Registration is by permission of instructor only. 
Prerequisite. MMIC 601 or equivalent. 

(Eylar, Fiset, Osterman, Wisseman, Staff) 

MMIC 802. VIROLOGY AND RICKETTSIOLOGY LABORATORY 
(D 
This course is the laboratory counterpart of MMIC 801. The 
laboratory consists of two formal sessions per week; and fre- 
quently requires additional participation throughout the 
week. Registration is by permission of instructor only. 

(Eylar, Fiset, Osterman. Wisseman. Staff) 

MMIC 803. ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY (3) 
Considers in detail areas of immunology that are currently 
subject to the most active investigation. Special attention will 
be paid to four areas of immunology; 1) the structures of 
antigen and antibody molecules and the nature of the interac- 
tions between them. 2) the process of antibody formation 
including the anatomy and physiology of antibody forming 
tissues, and the nature of the controls on antibody synthesis, 
3) immunopathology with special reference to the 
phenomena of autoimmunity, 4) delayed hypersensitivity 
reactions with special reference to host resistance and to 
problems of transplantation immunology. Prerequisite. MMIC 
601 and/or permission of the instructor. (Kessel. Fiset) 

MMIC 804. MICROBIOLOGY: ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY 
LABORATORY (2) 
This course is the laboratory counterpart of MMIC 803. The 
laboratory consists of formal sessions plus the additional par- 
ticipation of students throughout the week. Registration is 
by permission of the instructor only. (Fiset. Kessel) 

MMIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



PATHOLOGY, MEDICAL (PATH); LEGAL 
MEDICINE (LMED) 

Professor and Chairman: Trump 

Professors: Firminger. Fisher (P.T.). Middlebrook. Tigertt, 
Wagner, Wood 

Associate Professors: Freimuth (P.T.). Garcia, Ginn, Linden- 
berg (P.T.). Masters, S.C. Ming. Rasmussen. Reuber, Spitz 
(P.T.). Spurling. Toll 

Assistant Professors: Arstila, Dawson. Hendrickson. Knoblock. 
Lipkovic. Mergner. Mihalakis (P.T.). P.M. Ming, Schweda 
(P.T.). Shin. Springate (P.T.). Zahir 

Instructors: Calderon. McDowell 

PATHOLOGY, MEDICAL (PATH) 

The purpose of this program, leading towards the degrees 
of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy, is to prepare 
young men and women for both academic and non-academic 
careers in pathology. The academic career has both teaching 
and research aspects, both of which will be emphasized in this 
program. Non-academic careers, for which candidates will be 
prepared, include the pharmaceutical fields, and government. 
In addition, a career in diagnostic laboratory pathology is vis- 
ualized as one of the options which a student may look forward 
to during the course of training in this program. (See also CPAT 
502. 503. Clinical Pathology (2, 2)). 



PATHOLOGY, LEGAL MEDICINE (LMED) 

Toxicology is the science which deals with the effects of 
poisons on the living cell, the methods of detecting, identifying 
and assaying concentrations of such agents, the antidotes 
against their effects, and many other general aspects of their 
properties. The need for toxicologists exists in industry, teach- 
ing, pure research, and in governmental agencies (municipal, 
state and federal) which have been established to conduct inves- 
tigations of sudden deaths. 

The courses leading to degrees are presented in part at the 
University facilities at College Park, but the majority of the 
courses are given in the Baltimore Schools of the University. 
The work in toxicology is done in me Division of Forensic 
Pathology of the Medical School. This Department is closely 
connected with the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the 
State of Maryland. 

These programs are open to students who possess a 
bachelor's degree or its equivalent, with major work in chemis- 
try. This should include six to eight semester hours each in 
general chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry (both 
qualitative and quantitative), physical chemistry, physics, and 
biology and four semester hours in organic qualitative analysis. 

Fellowships carrying a stipend are available to qualified stu- 
dents. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. Russell S. Fisher. Profes- 
sor of Forensic Pathology, 111 Penn Street, Baltimore. Md. 
21201. 



PATH 501. GENERAL, SYSTEMIC AND EXPERIMENTAL 
PATHOLOGY (9) 
A study of the basic principles of pathology which progresses 
to the study of diseases of the various organ systems. 

PATH 509 SURGICAL PATHOLOGY (1-4) 
Consists of didactic and practical experiences in disease as 
expressed in tissues removed at surgery and examined in the 
surgical pathology laboratory. 

PATH 512, 513. INSTRUMENTATION. LIGHT AND ELECTRON 
MICROSCOPE (3. 3) 
Designed to teach the student the fundamentals of optical 
instrumentation including consideration of bright field light 
microscopy, phase microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 
polarization and interference microscopy, transmission and 
scanning electron microscopy and specimen preparation for 
electron microscopy. 



umab / 27 



PATH 518. RESEARCH SEMINAR (1) 

PATH 519. 520. PRINCIPLES OF GENERAL CELLULAR 
PATHOLOGY (5, 5) 
Presents lectures spanning the entire field of present day 
pathology, mainly from the aspect of concepts and 
methodology of diagnostic and experimental investigation. 

PATH 529. COLLOQUIA IN HUMAN DISEASE (1) 

PATH 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

PATH 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



LMED 601. LEGAL MEDICINE (1) 
One hour of lecture for 12 weeks. 4 hours assigned reading. 
This course embraces a summary of medical jurisprudence 
including the laws governing the practice of medicine, indus- 
trial compensation and malpractice, proceedings in criminal 
and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, 
including medicolegal toxicology. 

(Fisher. Freimuth, Spitz) 

LMED 604. 605. TOXICOLOGY (5, 5) 
Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for 1 year. 
There is also included some discussion of industrial 
toxicology relating industrial exposures to toxic substances 
to effects produced in the worker using these materials. The 
lectures include discussion of mechanism of action of 
poisons, lethal doses, antidotes and methods of detection and 
quantitation of poisons in tissues and body fluids. The 
laboratory work embraces practical application of analytical 
procedures for the detection and estimation of poisons in 
post mortem tissue samples. (Fisher. Freimuth) 

LMED 606. 607. GROSS PATHOLOGIC ANATOMY AS RELATED 
TO TOXICOLOGY (1,1) 
Two hours per week for one year. Includes elementary 
anatomy with normal histology and selected histopathology 
as it will be seen by the toxicologist. It is a correlated course 
embracing anatomy, basic physiology and the alterations in 
function as well as structure brought about by disease and 
poisoning. (Fisher, Spitz) 

LMED 799. THESIS RESEARCH IN TOXICOLOGY (Master's 
Level) (1-6) (Fisher, Freimuth) 

LMED 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH IN TOXICOLOGY (Doc- 
toral Level) (1-8) (Fisher. Freimuth) 

CPAT 502, 503. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY (2. 2) 

The course is designed to train the student in the performance 
and interpretation of the fundamental laboratory procedures 
used in clinical diagnosis. During the first semester the basic 
techniques of hematology as well as clinical aspects of blood 
diseases are taught. In the second semester the performance 
and interpretation of tests used in the diagnosis of renal, 
hepatic gastric, pancreatic, and metabolic diseases are 
considered. 



PHYSIOLOGY (MPHY) 

Professor and Chairman: Blake 
Professors: Barraclough. Pinter 
Associate Professors: Fajer, Glaser. Goldman. Karpeles. Merlis. 

Ruchkin 
Assistant Professors: Blaumanis, Fertziger. Jurf. Turgeon 

The graduate program of the Department of Physiology is 
designed to provide high quality training leading to the PhD 
degree to students interested in pursuing a career in physiology. 
The philosophy of the Department is that broad based, multiple 
disciplinary training coupled with the development of expertise 
in a specific area of physiology will result in a well educated. 



active researcher and teacher. Applicants applying for admis- 
sion to this program should have a strong background in both 
the biological and physical sciences. 

MPHY 601. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY (5) 

Second semester. Four lectures and two conferences per 
week for 16 weeks. Lectures cover major areas of organ sys- 
tem physiology except for the nervous system. 

MPHY 602. CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY (2) 

Reading assignments, seminars, conferences, two hours a 
week for 15 weeks, on current research in cardiovascular 
physiology. (Karpeles) 

MPHY 603. GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, reading assign- 
ments, and seminars on selected topics in general, cellular 
and neurophysiology. 

MPHY 605 PHYSIOLOGY OF KIDNEY AND BODY FLUIDS (2) 
Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences, for 
15 weeks. Consideration will be given to the current status 
of knowledge of renal function and body fluids in vertebrates, 
with particular reference to mammals. (Black. Pinter) 

MPHY 606. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS 
SYSTEM (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and read- 
ing assignments on current knowledge of central nervous sys- 
tem function. (Fertziger. Blaumanis) 

MPHY 607. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS 
SYSTEM (2) 
Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, seminars and read- 
ing assignments on current knowledge of autonomic nervous 
system function (Jurf) 

MPHY 608. SEMINAR (1) 

Weekly meetings are held to discuss recent literature and 

results of departmental research. 

MPHY 609. PHYSIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (1-6) 

Time and credit by arrangement. The various technical proce- 
dures currently operating in the Department will be demon- 
strated and opportunity will be given for acquiring experience 
with them. 

MPHY 610. PHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (3) 
Three or four hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures, confer- 
ences, and laboratory sessions on the theoretical principles 
of biological control systems. (Glaser) 

MPHY 612 PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION (2) 
Lectures, two hours a week for 15 weeks. A comprehensive 
survey of reproductive endocrinology. (Barraclough) 

MPHY 613. SEMINAR IN NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY (2) 

Two hours a week for 15 weeks. Lectures and seminars on 
recent advances in nervous regulation of endocrine function. 

(Barraclough) 

MPHY 614. COMPARATIVE ADRENAL PHYSIOLOGY (2) 

Lectures and conferences, two hours a week for 15 weeks. 
on current knowledge of vertebrate adrenal function. (Fajer) 

MPHY 615. ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (3) 
Topics m analysis of biological wave forms and time se- 
quences including relevant statistics of random phenomena, 
power spectrum analysis and pattern recognition. 

(Glaser. Ruchkin) 

MPHY 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Masters Level) (1-6) 
By arrangement with Head of the Department. 

MPHY 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



SCHOOL OF NURSING (NURS) 

Professor and Dean: Murphy 

Professor and Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies: Cohelan 

Professor: Neal 



28 / umab 



Associate Professors: Froebe, Hydorn, Kohl, Mitchell, Ruano, 

Schubert 
Assistant Professors: Boyd, Braun, Harvey, Kandlbinder, Lind- 

sey, Manning, Matejski, McDonagh, McGee, McManama, 

Moseley, Muhr, Robinette, Robinson, Seither, Scott, Slater, 

Waltz, Ward, Wildman, Wilkey 
Instructor: Blaha 

The Graduate Program in Nursing leading to the Master of 
Science degree is designed to prepare qualified professional 
nurses for positions of leadership in nursing. 

The graduate student is expected to deepen the knowledge 
base foundational to a clinical area as prerequisite to explora- 
tion and identification of a body of knowledge in nursing. He 
or she must develop further skill in clinical practice than would 
be expected of a baccalaureate graduate. A graduate of the mas- 
ter's program in nursing should be able to utilize appropriate 
investigative techniques in exploring nursing problems and 
demonstrate skill in working with others, developing profes- 
sional colleague relationships within and outside nursing. 

Admission to the graduate program in nursing requires that 
the applicant be a registered professional nurse who has com- 
pleted a baccalaureate degree program with academic standing 
which is recognized by The Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland. In general, the applicant should have completed 
foundational and clinical courses comparable to the require- 
ments of the undergraduate program in nursing at the University 
of Maryland. Evidence of personal and professional qualifica- 
tions are sought through references and. if possible, by an inter- 
view. 

Applications from nurses whose baccalaureate programs 
were not accredited by the National League for Nursing are sub- 
jected to special review with individualized recommendations 
resulting. 

Students who elect the thesis option register for 6 semester 
hours of research for thesis work. Students who choose the 
non-thesis option write a seminar paper, complete additional 
course work and must pass a comprehensive examination. 

Minimum residence of 3 semesters or equivalent, is required. 

NURS 601. TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND NURSING (2) 
This course enables the student to view the evolution, present 
status and probable future of nursing education against a 
backdrop of higher education in the United States. 

(Murphy) 

NURS 603. INTRADISCIPLINARY NURSING (2) 
This course is planned to provide increased ability in applica- 
tion of mental health concepts to the nursing care of patients 
in all clinical areas. 

NURS 605. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN NURSING (2) 
Two hour lecture a week. Designed to assist the student in 
understanding the foundations and methods of curriculum 
development. (Kohl) 

NURS 607. RESEARCH METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 
NURSING (3) 
One three-hour lecture a week. Includes basic understand- 
ings of the philosophy of research, the nature of scientific 
thinking, methods of research and research literature in nurs- 
ing. (Mitchell) 

NURS 618. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN NURSING (1-6) 

The major objective of this course is to develop further clinical 
and research competencies in selected students. Registration 
upon consent of advisor. 

NURS 621, 622. MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Lectures, seminars and clinical 
study. Learning experiences are planned to increase the 
student's knowledge and understanding of contemporary 
medical and surgical nursing therapies. 

(Matejski, Harvey, Manning, Moseley, Wilkey) 

NURS 623. APPLICATION OF PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES IN NURSING (2) 
Directed study in which the student demonstrates ability to 
draw generalizations and derive implications concerning the 
effectiveness of nursing care provided for selected patients. 
Successful completion of NURS 621 and 622 is prerequisite. 



NURS 631, 632. MATERNAL AND INFANT NURSING (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Extension of clinical nursing 
competencies of the graduate nurse in maternity by enriching 
knowledge of theory and providing selected activities relating 
to Maternal and Newborn Nursing and using interdisciplinary 
health agencies in the community. (Hydorn) 

NURS 633. SEMINAR IN MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH 
SERVICES (2) 
Second semester. The interrelated needs of parents and chil- 
dren are studied in the light of recent trends in family care 
and guidance. Focus is on the study of social factors influen- 
cing maternal and child nursing, the relationship of current 
problems and their significance in childbearing and child- 
rearing. (Neal, Hydorn) 

NURS 641, 642. NURSING OF CHILDREN (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Focuses on extensive knowledge 
and understanding of nursing in society's total program of 
child health services and on gaining increased practitioner 
skills in professional nursing of children. (Neal) 

NURS 643. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF MATERNAL AND CHILD 

NURSING (2) 
First semester. A study of scientific concepts which influence 
life processes. (Arranged). (Neal, Hydorn) 

NURS 651. INTERPERSONAL INTERACTION (2) 

Lectures and clinical study. The course is primarily concerned 
with the application of psychodynamic and psychoanalytic 
concepts to nurse-patient relationships. 

NURS 652, 653. PSYCHIATRIC NURSING (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Lectures and clinical study. The 
course includes dynamics of human behavior, formation of 
personality, the techniques of problem solving and the skills 
of communication in relation to therapeutic nursing care of 
psychiatric patients. 

(Schubert, Muhr, Kandlbinder, McManama) 

NURS 655. ORIENTATION TO CRITICAL CONCEPTS IN FAMILY 

(2) 

Orientation to the theories and techniques of family therapy. 

Emphasis on Family System theory. Observational experience 

with selected families in nursing settings. (Slater) 

NURS 656. INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE WITH 

FAMILIES (2) 

An orientation to the role of the nurse clinician in family 

therapy. Emphasis is on the identification of existing family 

behavior patterns. Clinical practice with at least one family. 

(Slater) 

NURS 657 ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES 
(2) 
Advanced nursing practice and refinement of clinical skills. 

(Slater, Staff) 

NURS 661, 662. ORIENTATION TO CRITICAL PROBLEMS IN 
FAMILY-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS I AND II (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Examination of theoretical con- 
cepts of normal and abnormal psychological development 
that are applicable to nursing situations. (Scott, Seither) 

NURS 663. NURSING OF PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH 
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR (2) 
Second semester. Laboratory experience with pre-school 
children. Emphasis is on using observations, participation 
and understanding of play, play materials and language as 
media utilized by children to express themselves to the nurse. 

(Seither, Scott) 

NURS 665, 666. COMPREHENSIVE CARE OF CHILDREN WITH 
PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS I AND II (4, 4) 
Assessment of child psychiatric nursing practice in primary, 
secondary and tertiary prevention of emotional disturbances 
in children. Students gain experience in practice of treatment 
modalities in in-patient and community settings. 

(McDonagh. Scott) 

NURS 671. EPIDEMIOLOGY (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. Statistics. A contemporary 
approach to epidemiological concepts and methods. General 



umab / 29 



considerations and laboratory application to data in specific 
health situations. (McGee. Apostolides) 

NURS 672, 673. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Seminars and clinical practice 
based on relevant theory from nursing and medical, public 
health, and behavioral sciences. Practicum includes intensive 
individual and interdisciplinary work with families and partici- 
pation in community organizations. 

(Boyd. Waltz, Robinette, McGee) 

NURS 674. PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (2) 

Second semester. Two hours of lecture a week. Methods and 
problems in implementing elements of administration in Com- 
munity Health within presently operating and proposed health 
systems. Relationships between health practitioners, com- 
munity agencies and participating citizen consumers are 
examined. (McGee) 

NURS 681. SEMINAR IN NURSING— CLINICAL SPECIALIST, 
TEACHING OR ADMINISTRATION (2) 
Third semester. The purpose of this course is to develop the 
knowledge, understanding and skill necessary to function as 
a teacher, administrator, or clinical specialist. 

NURS 682. PRACTICUM IN TEACHING IN NURSING (4) 
Supervised experience in teaching nurses in clinical and 
classroom settings. Placement in junior college, bac- 
calaureate program, in-service or other setting depending on 
interest and ability of student. (Ward, Robinette) 

NURS 683. PRACTICUM FOR CLINICAL SPECIALISTS IN 
NURSING (4) 
Supervised experience which will prepare the graduate stu- 
dent to function in the role of clinical specialist. Placement 
may be in community or home settings, chronic and long 
term care facilities as well as intensive care units. 

NURS 691. PROCESS OF ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Offered Fall and Spring. Study of the process of administra- 
tion and its application to nursing situations; current con- 
cepts of organizational theory and behavior; examination of 
related research. Open to graduate students in all clinical 
majors. (Froebe) 

NURS 692. ADMINISTRATION OF NURSING (3) 

Offered Fall and Spring. The independent functions of nurse 
administrators at various levels of decision making in an 
organization are identified and analyzed. Prerequisite. NURS 
691; Minimum of 3 semester hours of clinical nursing at the 
master's level. (Froebe) 

NURS 693. PRACTICUM IN ADMINISTRATION IN NURSING (4) 
The systematic investigation of a problem in administration 
of nursing. The student has the opportunity to synthesize 
learning by working through a practical problem in the field. 
Prerequisite. NURS 691 and 692. (Froebe) 

NURS 799. RESEARCH-THESIS (1-6) 



NPHY 421, 422. PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (3, 3) 
Required for students majoring in Medical-Surgical Nursing 
or Maternal and Child Nursing. (Donati, Jurf) 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (MCHM) 



Professor and Chairman: Zenker 
Associate Professors: Leslie, Krikorian 
Assistant Professors: G. Wright, J. Wright 

The Department of Medicinal Chemistry offers graduate prog- 
rams leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 



degrees. The student may specialize in analytical, biochemical, 
physicochemical, or synthetic aspects of medicinal chemistry. 
For graduate study in medicinal chemistry, the student must 
have a degree in either pharmacy or chemistry. Information 
regarding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained 
from the department. 



MCHM 420. INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF PHARMACEUTICAL 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Two lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisites, Organic 
Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis. A survey of electrometric, 
spectroscopic, and chromatographic methods of chemical 
analysis as applied especially to the analysis of materials of 
pharmaceutical interest. Basic principles and applications of 
the various techniques will be stressed so that the student 
will gain an appreciation of the scope and utility of the 
methods discussed. (Krikorian) 

MCHM 431, 432. BIOCHEMISTRY I AND II (3, 3) 

First semester, three lectures; second semester, two lectures, 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, 1 year organic chemistry. Physi- 
cal and chemical properties of the components of living sys- 
tems and of the metabolic processes in health and disease. 

(Zenker) 

MCHM 441 , 442. CHEMISTRY OF MEDICINAL PRODUCTS I AND 
II (3, 3) 
First semester, three lectures; second semester, two lectures. 
Prerequisite. 1 year organic chemistry. A survey of chemical 
properties, structure activity relationships and metabolism of 
organic medicinal products. (J. Wright) 

MCHM 451. INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures. Prerequisite, 1 year organic chemistry. Discus- 
sion of modern organic reactions and synthetic methods. 

(G. Wright) 

MCHM 452. INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY (1) 

One laboratory (can only be taken concurrently with MCHM 

451). Laboratory practice in synthetic techniques and organic 

analysis. (G. Wright) 

MCHM 453, 454. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I AND II (3, 3) 
Three lectures each semester. Prerequisite, Calculus. I. An 
Introduction to Thermodynamics. The laws of ther- 
modynamics and their application to chemical and phase 
equilibria, surface chemistry, and electrochemistry will be dis- 
cussed. II. An Introduction to Kinetics and Quantum 
Mechanics. (Leslie) 

MCHM 739. SEMINAR (1) 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in medicinal 
chemistry. Reports of progress and survey of recent develop- 
ments in chemistry. 

MCHM 741. PHYSICAL ORGANIC BASIS OF MEDICINAL 
CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures. Prerequisite, Physical Chemistry, MCHM 451. 
A discussion of atomic structure, bonding, resonance, kinet- 
ics and mechanism of organic reactions; stereochemistry 
and conformation analysis. (G. Wright) 

MCHM 769. TOPICS IN STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS 
(2) 
Two lectures. Prerequisites, MCHM 441, 442, 741. Discussions 
of drug-receptor interactions, and of the known chemical fac- 
tors which mediate drug action, including a discussion of the 
current quantitative concepts of structure activity relation- 
ships in Medicinal Chemistry. 

MCHM 773. BIOLOGICAL KINETICS (2) 

Prerequisite, MCHM 455. Kinetics of complex systems applic- 
able to drug distribution, medicinal and metabolic systems. 
Derivation of equations, mathematical models and applica- 
tion of experimental data to equations and models. (Leslie) 

MCHM 781. ENZYME AND METABOLIC INHIBITORS (2) 

Two lectures. Prerequisite. MCHM 431, 432. A discussion of 
the design, the mode of action at the enzymatic level, and 
the metabolism of biochemical analogs. (Zenker) 



30 / umab 



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umab / 31 




32 / umab 



MCHM 783. ENZYME AND METABOLIC INHIBITORS 
LABORATORY (1) 
One laboratory (can only be taken concurrently with MCHM 
781). Laboratory experiments or projects illustrating basic 
techniques in enzyme methodology, including enzyme inhibi- 
tion in vitro and in vivo. (Zenker) 

MCHM 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

MCHM 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY 
(PCOL) 



Associate Professor and Chairman: Blake 
Professors: Carr (Adjunct). Ichniowski, Kinnard 
Associate Professors: Cascorbi (Adjunct), Friemuth (Adjunct) 
Assistant Professors: Barrett (P.T.), Brown. Buterbaugh, Furth 
(Adjunct), Louis-Ferdinand 

The Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology offers 
graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees. The department emphasizes the areas 
of quantitative pharmacology, drug disposition, phar- 
macodynamics, biochemical pharmacology and toxicology. Stu- 
dents with a degree in pharmacy are preferred, however, stu- 
dents with a strong background in both chemistry and biology 
are also considered for graduate study in pharmacology. Infor- 
mation regarding specific requirements for the degree may be 
obtained from the department chairman. 

PCOL 451. CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY (2) 

First semester, two lectures. Deals with the clinical classes 
of poisoning and includes pharmacological principles in 
treatment of acute poisoning, mechanisms of toxic actions 
of drugs and household products and responsibilities of a 
poison control officer. 

PCOL 601. 602. ADVANCED TOXICOLOGY (3. 4) 

Lectures with conferences and laboratory experiments deal- 
ing with the mechanisms of toxicity. A two semester course, 
either semester may be taken separately. PCOL 601 (Fall) Clin- 
ical and Environmental Toxicology. PCOL 602 (Spring) Princi- 
ples of Investigative Toxicology. Prerequisites: Biochemistry 
(MCHM 431, 432). Physiology (PCOL 331, 332) or equivalent 
and consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 643, 644. PHARMACODYNAMICS I, II (4, 3) 

Comprises the lectures of PCOL 441, 442 (for Pharmacy Stu- 
dents) together with weekly conferences and special labora- 
tory exercises. Prerequisites, Anatomy and Physiology (PCOL 
331, 332) and Biochemistry (MCHM 431, 432) or equivalent 
and consent of the course director. 

PCOL 707. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY 
(3) 
Offered in alternate years. Two lectures, one laboratory 
weekly. A theoretical and practical approach to the study of 
the cellular and subcellular actions of drugs and the relation- 
ship of these actions to the pharmacological properties of 
medicinal agents in the intact organism. Prerequisites: PCOL 
441, 442, MCHM 431, 432 or equivalent and consent of the: 
instructor. 

PCOL 747. PHYSIOLOGICAL DISPOSITION OF DRUGS (3) 
Offered in alternate years. Two hours of lecture weekly and 
laboratory projects equivalent to one laboratory per week. A 
detailed study of the principles of drug transport, distribution, 
biotransformation, binding and excretion with emphasis on 
quantitative aspects and measurement of these processes. 
Prerequisites, Physiology (PCOL 331, 332 or equivalent), 
Pharmacology (PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent), Calculus and 
consent of the instructor. 

PCOL 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH IN 
PHARMACOLOGY 
Properly qualified students may arrange with their advisor for 
credit and hours. 



PCOL 829. ADVANCED PHARMACODYNAMICS (3) 

Two hours of lecture weekly together with conferences and 
special laboratory exercises. Neuropharmacology. Prere- 
quisite, PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent. 

PCOL 858, 859. SPECIAL STUDIES IN PHARMACODYNAMICS 
(2-4) 
Each semester. Laboratories and conferences. Credit accord- 
ing to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with 
the instructor. Prerequisite, PCOL 441, 442 or equivalent. 

PCOL 789. SEMINAR (1) 
Each semester. Reports on current literature or research in 
progress. Prerequisite, consent of the department staff 
member designated as responsible for seminar. 

PCOL 899. DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH IN 
PHARMACOLOGY (1-8) 
Properly qualified students may arrange with their advisor for 
credit and hours. 



PHARMACY— PHARMACEUTICS (PHAR) 
AND INSTITUTIONAL PHARMACY (PADM) 

Professor and Chairman: Shangraw 

Associate Professors: Allen, Lamy (Director of Institutional Pro- 
grams) 
Assistant Professors: Augsburger, Hodes 

The Department of Pharmacy offers graduate programs lead- 
ing to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
The student may specialize in the areas of industrial pharmacy, 
biopharmaceutics and institutional pharmacy. Graduate stu- 
dents working in this department must have a degree in phar- 
macy, and may be required to take some additional under- 
graduate courses to fulfill specified requirements. Information 
regarding specific requirements for the degree may be obtained 
from the department. 

The Institutional Pharmacy program aims at the education of 
pharmacists to function primarily in the clinical environment, 
interacting with other health professionals. Course work will 
utilize to a large extent those courses offered in the School 
of Medicine such as clinical pathology, statistics, computers, 
etc., in addition to the established courses in the pharmacy cur- 
riculum. Additionally, those involved in the program will partici- 
pate in a training program encompassing several hospitals in 
the Baltimore area. 

PHAR 441. BIOPHARMACEUTICS (3) 

(Shangraw) 

PHAR 453. COSMETICS AND DERMATOLOGICAL PREP- 
ARATIONS (2) 
A study of the composition and manufacture of cosmetic 
preparations. (Allen) 

PHAR 454. INSTITUTIONAL PHARMACY I (2) 

Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and 
administration with emphasis on hospital and nursing homes 

(Lamy) 

PHAR 455. INSTITUTIONAL PHARMACY II (2) 

A study of the administrative organization of health care 
institutions and interrelationship of various units with the 
pharmacy. (Lamy) 

PHAR 461. THERAPEUTICS (4) 

Introduction to the basic pathophysiology of various disease 
states and the associated drug therapy with emphasis on 
rationality. 

PHAR 462. PHARMACY AND THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS (2) 
A course designed to familiarize pharmacists with the total 
health care environment and to introduce applicable, analyti- 
cal and technical skills, such as systems analysis and compu- 
ter science. 



umab / 33 



PHAR 601, 602. SURVEY OF PHARMACEUTICAL LITERATURE 

(1.1) 
PHAR 701, 702. INDUSTRIAL PHARMACY (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Given in alternate years. A study of manufac- 
turing processes, control procedures and equipment 
employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a com- 
mercial scale, including new drug applications, patents and 
the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 

(Augsburger, Shangraw) 

PHAR 703, 704. INDUSTRIAL PHARMACY (2, 2) 

Laboratory work in the preparation of pharmaceuticals in 
large quantities with emphasis on tablets, aerosols, oint- 
ments, and parenteral products. (Shangraw, Augsburger) 

PHAR 705, 706. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHARMACEUTICAL 
TECHNOLOGY (2, 2) 
A study of technical problems in the formulation and stabiliza- 
tion of pharmaceuticals. 

PHAR 709. PHARMACEUTICAL SEMINAR (1) 

Reports of progress in research and surveys of recent 
developments in pharmacy. 

PHAR 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Masters Level) (1-6) 

PHAR 801, 802. PHYSICAL PHARMACY (2, 2) 

A study of pharmaceutical systems using the fundamentals 
of physical chemistry. 

PHAR 803, 804. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (2, 2) 
A study of the development of new pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

PHAR 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) (1-8) 



animals. Part of the course is devoted to the study of public 
health. Time is given to the study of medical parasitology, 
pathology and parasitic infections. 

PCOG 799. RESEARCH IN PHARMACOGNOSY (Masters Level) 
(1-6) 
Credit according to the amount and quality of work per- 
formed. 

PCOG 811,81 2. ADVANCED STUDY OF VEGETABLE POWDERS 
(4,4) 
Given in alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, approval of instructor. A study of powdered 
vegetable drugs from the chemotaxonomic and microchemi- 
cal standpoint. Emphasis will be placed on the screening of 
phytochemical constituents and their relationship to 
phytogeny. (Blomster) 

PCOG 841, 842. ADVANCED PHARMACOGNOSY (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, PCOG 441, 
442 or approval of instructor. A study of the major classes 
of phytochemical constituents with special attention given to 
the problems of isolation, identification and biosynthesis of 
these components. (Blomster) 

PCOG 899. RESEARCH IN PHARMACOGNOSY (Doctoral Level) 
(1-8) 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 
AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 



PHARMACOGNOSY (PCOG) 



Professor and Chairman: Blomster 
Associate Professor: Worthley (Adjunct) 
Assistant Professors: Rosier, Hurley 
Instructor: Heinrich 

The Department of Pharmacognosy offers a graduate pro- 
gram leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. The student may specialize in the areas of 
phytochemistry, chemotaxonomy, biosynthesis, fermentation, 
plant tissue culture, and plant culture. Graduate students in 
pharmacognosy must have a Bachelor of Science degree in 
pharmacy, chemistry, biology, or related areas. 

Information regarding specific requirements for the degrees 
may be obtained from the department. 

PCOG 411,412. PLANT ANATOMY (2, 2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, PCOG 441, 442. 

(Worthley, Staff) 

PCOG 413, 414. PLANT ANATOMY LABORATORY (2, 2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, PCOG 411, 412, 
441, 442. Laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy 
with special emphasis placed on the structure of roots, stems, 
and leaves of vascular plants. (Worthley) 

PCOG 421, 422. TAXONOMY OF THE HIGHER PLANTS (2, 2) 
Given in alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, PCOG 441, 442. A study of the kinds of seed 
plants and ferns, their classification, and field work on local 
flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an her- 
barium. (Worthley) 

PCOG 446. SEROLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY, PUBLIC HEALTH AND 
PARASITOLOGY (4) 
Prerequisites, PCOG 332, 343 or its equivalent. Two lectures 
and two laboratories. A study of the principles of immunity, 
including the preparation and use of biological products 
employed in the prevention and treatment of infectious dis- 
eases. Attention is given to hypersensitivity of humans and 



Professor and Dean: Thursz 

Professors: Chaiklin, Falck, Lewis. Morgan, Steiner. Young 

Associate Professors: Bechill, I. Bennett, Berman, Buttrick, 
Ephross, Goldmeier, Lucco, Nucho, Palley, Simmons, Trader 

Assistant Professors: Balgopal, Balk, Bar-llan, N. Bennett, 
Borom, Cacace, Carroll, Cierler, Citron, Codas, Cole, Dock- 
horn, Fandetti, Ford, Gavin, Gutches, Haas, Heriot, Hersey, 
Hollander, Janzen, Jones, Kahn, Kerschner, Kohles, Kraft, 
Lebowitz, Lieder, Makofsky, Maxwell, McCuan, Meyer, N. 
Miller, P. Miller. Moulton, Norris, Polston, Press, Seabury, 
Steingraph, Welch 

Instructor: Lewis 

Lecturers: Black, Bland, Harmon, Harville, Levin, Lisansky, 
Mittleman, Polsby, Rotter, Shriver, Varesi, Whitt 

A two-year program leading to the professional Master of 
Social Work degree is offered. Three concentrations of study 
are available. Clinical social work prepares students for profes- 
sional work with individuals and groups in need of therapeutic 
assistance. The concentration in social strategy prepares stu- 
dents for professional assignments in community organization, 
social planning, neighborhood work, and inter-system coor- 
dination. The social administration concentration is based upon 
four career models: middle management, staff development and 
training, supervision, and program development and program 
evaluation. Such work is being carried on in departments of 
government on all levels, citizen groups, and various voluntary 
agencies. Clinical social work is practiced in medical and 
psychiatric facilities, in public welfare, child welfare and family 
services, courts, schools, and other agencies. 

Admission requirements call for the satisfactory completion 
of an undergraduate degree at an accredited college or univer- 
sity. Undergraduate preparation should emphasize the social 
and behavioral sciences, effective written and oral expression, 
and basic knowledge of statistics. There are, however, no 
specific prerequisite courses. In exceptional cases, students 
who do not fully meet academic requirements will be considered 
for admission on a provisional basis. Either the Graduate Record 
Examination Aptitude Test or the Miller Analogies Test is 
required for admission. An autobiographic statement is also 
required. 

The program of graduate studies leading to the Doctor of 
Social Welfare degree has as its main purpose the training of 
social welfare professionals for leadership in education, social 



34 / umab 



planning, social policy and administration, and advanced levels 
of social work practice. A graduate of this program can be 
expected to contribute to the analysis and development of social 
policies affecting human resources, the growing body of 
research in social work and in community planning, and the 
communication of relevant social work knowledge. 

The doctoral program will be individualized in terms of the 
needs and interests of each student. Aiding the student in the 
design of his specialized area of study will be a faculty advisor 
and a doctoral study guidance committee comprised of the 
advisor as chairman and three members of the graduate faculty. 

Our goal is to give the student maximum freedom in propos- 
ing what he regards as a suitable program of study. Among 
the areas of interest that the student may wish to explore are 
policy analysis of social welfare problems, practice and adminis- 
tration in community mental health settings, social welfare 
planning and program analysis. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

In addition to having completed the M.S.W. degree at a 
superior level, students are required to have taken six credits 
of college mathematics, six credits of science at the college 
level, and six credits of statistics. A substantial background in 
the sciences providing a foundation of social welfare knowledge 
will be expected of all applicants. This would include course 
work in biology, psychology, sociology, political science, 
economics, anthropology, mathematics and statistics. 

Under unusual circumstances, and with the approval of the 
Schools doctoral committee, applicants with graduate educa- 
tion in a cognate field of study who do not hold a M.S.W. degree 
may be considered for admission. The doctoral committee will 
also notify a prospective student of deficiencies which must be 
remedied prior to admission. 

SOWK 600. SOCIAL SERVICES AND SOCIAL POLICY (3) 
Required first course in the social policy/social services se- 
quence. An intensive introduction to the emergence of social 
welfare programs, principally in the U.S., and the historical 
and contemporary forces — primarily social and eco- 
nomic — that have shaped their development. A major 
emphasis is given to the conceptual tools of analysis as a 
basis for evaluating social policy alternative to major national 
issues. Income maintenance, urban problems, health sys- 
tems, correctional services, and service needs of families and 
children are singled out from these issues for special atten- 
tion. (In subsequent courses in the sequence, these areas are 
dealt with in greater depth.) The value commitments of the 
social work profession, its role in the formulation of social 
policy, and its tradition of social action and social reform will 
be explicated. (Bechill, Berman, 

Buttrick, Fandetti, Lewis, McCuan, Palley) 

SOWK 601 . ISSUES AND CONSIDERATIONS IN THE PROVISION 
OF INCOME MAINTENANCE (3) 
Examines the various methods by which income can be 
assured and reviews the evolvement of the income mainte- 
nance programs in the U.S. as related to social work practice. 
The experiences of selected foreign countries as well as the 
current income maintenance programs in this country, such 
as social insurance and public assistance, are analyzed. 
Emphasis is given to current proposals in the area of income 
maintenance alternatives, welfare reform, manpower training, 
and the various in-kind programs such as public housing and 
medical care. Approaches to income maintenance are viewed 
within the context of prevailing attitudes and definitions of 
poverty and the socio-economic setting of the period. 
Prerequisite, SOWK 600. (Bechill, Berman, 

Buttrick, Fandetti, Lewis, McCuan, Palley) 

SOWK 602. ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE FOR THE 
DELIVERY OF SOCIAL SERVICES (3) 
Analyzes the current setting for social work practice. The vari- 
ous social work delivery systems are considered from the 
point of view of how their evolvement affects the nature of 
the service being rendered. The issues, problems, and 
deficiencies of the current community structure for social 



services are analyzed from the point of view of organization, 
financing and delivery of services so as to permit an under- 
standing of the policy issues the current planning raises as 
well as the issues raised by current proposals for modifica- 
tion. Prerequisite, SOWK 600. (Bechill, Berman, 
Buttrick, Fandetti, Lewis, Palley) 
SOWK 603. COMMUNITY SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES (2) 
First semester, concurrent with SOWK 600. Participant obser- 
vation of community provision for control of selected social 
problems: dependency, disordered behavior, indigent disabil- 
ity. Consideration of social work roles in alleviation and con- 
trol of selected problems. Open to qualified part-time students 
enrolled in SOWK 600. (Lewis) 

SOWK 604. SOCIAL WELFARE AND THE LAW (2) 
The law as a means of social control; special needs of the 
poor for legal services; problems of social and legal agencies 
in this professton; interdisciplinary sociolegal problems. 

(Falcon) 

SOWK 605. SOCIAL WELFARE HISTORY (2) 

The changing concept of charity from Biblical to modern 
times. Origin of English and American poor laws. Charity 
organization and the growth of voluntary efforts. Origins and 
development of welfare state concept. Open to qualified part- 
time students with consent of instructor. (Lewis) 

SOWK 606. COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH (3) 

Historical development of services for the mentally ill and the 
mentally retarded. Relationship of programs to public health, 
public medical care, social insurance, and vocational rehabili- 
tation. Legislation concerning mental health and mental ill- 
ness. Federal, State, and local responsibilities in community 
mental health. Role of voluntary agencies. Open to part-time 
students with approval of the instructor. (Palley) 

SOWK 610. LEGISLATIVE PROCESS AND SOCIAL WELFARE 
(3) 
Loci of political power in a pluralistic society with representa- 
tive government. Horizontal and vertical controls of political 
power, governmental structure and financing affecting inter- 
governmental relations in social welfare. Role of social work- 
ers in social action. (Berman) 

SOWK 61 1 . ECONOMIC ISSUES IN SOCIAL WELFARE (2) 
An examination of the formulation of social welfare policy 
with special reference to relevant economic issues. The con- 
sequences of economic growth and change, automation and 
structural change, relation of fiscal policy to financing of 
social welfare programs, are considered within the context 
of economic and social planning. Concern is with policy 
issues, implementation of rational solutions, knowledge 
required for predicting the consequences of policy. 

(Buttrick) 

SOWK 630. HUMAN BEHAVIOR I (3) 

First semester, first year. Study of normal personality develop- 
ment in the culture, birth through the oedipal period, utilizing 
behavioral and social science theories, especially ego 
psychology. The course emphasizes the maturation process 
or biological unfolding, and the developmental process 
resulting from learning through interaction of the individual 
with the environment, together with the effects of different 
learning experiences on personality development. These 
effects include interruptions in development which may set 
in motion pathological processes. Attention to the family as 
a social system and the social roles of family members in 
the patterning of relationships. (Bennett, Lebowitz, 

Lucco, Mittleman, Trader) 

SOWK 631. HUMAN BEHAVIOR II (3) 

Second semester, first year. The course continues to teach 
theories selected for relevance and usefulness for social work 
practice. Ego, social systems and role theories are utilized 
to study normal personality development, latency through old 
age, with special attention to role learning and the effects 
on adult functioning of the systems of family, school, peer 
groups, and work. Examination of dynamic relationships 
between normal development and pathology is carried for- 
ward. (Bennett, Lebowitz, 
Lucco, Mittleman. Trader) 



umab / 35 



SOWK 632. HUMAN BEHAVIOR III (1) 

Descriptive and dynamic considerations in psychosocial dis- 
orders and psychopathology likely to be encountered in social 
work practice, i.e.. indigency, marital disorder, delinquent and 
criminal behavior, personality disorders, retardations, 
illegitimate parenthood, child neglect and placement, neu- 
roses, and psychoses. (Levin, Mittleman) 

SOWK 633. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IV (2) 

Understanding of family dynamics for social workers. 
Examines the development, structure and functioning of the 
family system with emphasis on the understanding and use 
of various theoretical formulations regarding family dynamics 
associated with emotional disturbances or symptoms. 

(Novey) 

SOWK 634. NATURE AND ECOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS 

(D 
Introduction to causes, symptoms, treatment, distribution, 
prevention, and control of disease. Social and psychological 
aspects of illness, emphasizing factors influencing response 
to stress. Socio-economic problems of health care. Coordina- 
tion of health and social resources as relevant to social work 
practice. (Lisansky) 

SOWK 635. BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN GROUPS (2) 

Examination of concepts underlying social work practice as 
drawn from theory of social systems. Special reference to 
families, small groups, neighborhoods, communities, to 
social institutions and to culture. Reference also to leadership 
theory and related formulations useful in understanding inter- 
personal relationships in families, committees, clubs, social 
agencies and special interest groups. Open to qualified part- 
time students with consent of instructor. (Balgopal. Bennett. 
Chaiklin. Makofsky, Trader) 

SOWK 636. ADVANCED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (2) 
A second year elective course designed to provide the stu- 
dents with a knowledge of advanced psychopathology with 
particular emphasis on psychodynamic formulations through 
an optimal balance of clinical and didactic material. (Whitt) 

SOWK 637. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY FOR SOCIAL WORK 
(2) 
A second year elective course aimed at deepening the 
student's ability in comparing and contrasting personality 
theories, using for this purpose an evaluative frame of refer- 
ence regarding applicability for social work. The content 
emphasis will vary with the expertise of the faculty teaching 
the course and with the interest of students. (Mittelman) 

SOWK 655. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT 
FOR SOCIAL STRATEGY (3) 
Understanding the nature of growth of the healthy person. 
Major theoretical issues of motivation, process and pattern 
will be examined in the context of ego psychology. Other 
theoretical sources, such as interpersonal, role and family 
theory will be referred to when appropriate and relevant. 

(Lebovitz. Trader) 

SOWK 660. 661. SOCIAL CASEWORK I, II (3. 3) 

Basic concepts and principles of casework as a social work 
method. Nature of therapeutic relationships. Principles of 
communication. Diagnostic assessment of the person- 
problem-situation configuration. Goal-setting process. Ego- 
supportive procedures and use of community resources. 
Casework method appropriate in working with the chronically 
deprived, multi-problem families. Prognosis, termination, 
evaluation of outcomes. (Balgopal. Bennett, 

Falck, Gavin, Goldmeier, Haas. Janzen. Nucho, Rotter) 

SOWK 662. SOCIAL CASEWORK III (2) 

Social Casework with children, parent-child problems, marital 
conflict. Family therapy. Work with families having specific 
problems (mental retardation, mental illness, physical disabil- 
ity, aging, terminal illness, etc.). 

(Bennett, Goldmeier, Haas. Nucho) 

SOWK 663. SOCIAL CASEWORK IV (2) 

Comparative treatment theories for social casework practice 
Psychoanalytically oriented casework compared to and con- 



trasted with the socio-behavioral approach, existentialist 
approaches, socialization models, and others. 

(Bennett, Goldmeier, Haas, Nucho) 

SOWK 665. GROUP METHODS IN CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK (2) 
This is an advanced offering emphasizing social work in 
groups as practiced in hospitals, mental health centers, 
counseling agencies, and institutions. The approach is con- 
ceptual with reference to social work practice. 

(Citron, Falck) 

SOWK 690. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION I (3) 

Examination of community organization as a social work 
method. Practice principles, the roles and functions of the 
community organization practitioner and selected social 
practice and alternative models of practice are analyzed. 

(Borom, Cole, Lieder, Makofsky. 
Norris. Simmons, Steiner, Thursz) 

SOWK 691. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION II (3) 

The dynamics and components of planning processes as they 
relate to social problems, issues, and opportunities for 
change in urban settings. Social planning is treated as part 
of the larger urban planning movement and as having a 
number of definitions and empirical variations. Planning is 
placed firmly within the larger environment of American urban 
history and the issues of urbanization. Emphases are placed 
on the following factors: continuous process; policy and 
program development; resource allocation and the relation- 
ship of urban economics to planning; inter-organizational co- 
ordination, communications, and decision-making; the inter- 
ests of varying groups in the total populations; and the 
technologies of planning. (Lieder, Makofsky. 

Simmons. Steiner, Thursz) 

SOWK 695. INTERPERSONAL TRANSACTIONS FOR SOCIAL 
STRATEGY (3) 
To provide the social strategy student with the basic knowl- 
edge and skills in inter-personal transactions that he will need 
to achieve his professional objectives. Major emphasis will 
be placed on understanding the dynamics of interpersonal 
transactions, establishing and using a professional relation- 
ship, interviewing, communicating, and effecting behavioral 
and attitudinal changes with a wide variety of client and other 
population groups. (Falck, Janzen, Simmons) 

SOWK 696. GROUP METHODS FOR SOCIAL STRATEGY (3) 
Establish a foundation of knowledge in small group theory. 
Such theory is applied to the processes of group functioning 
and formation. These processes, and the structures of groups. 
are considered in relation to the achievement of social 
strategy goals. Particular attention is given to the role of the 
staff worker and his responsibilities as well as to issues of 
goal achievement and group maintenance. 

(Balgopal. Ephross, Kahn) 

SOWK 699. SPECIAL SOCIAL WELFARE PROBLEMS (1-3) 
Individually planned study of selected substantial area of pro- 
fessional interest as arranged to meet special needs. Exten- 
sive reading, written and oral reporting as arranged by 
instructor. (Bechill. Harmon, Lisansky, Nucho, Palley, 

Polsby, Press. Seabury, Steiner, Varesi, Young) 

SOWK 720. SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Second year. Elementary concepts of administration appli- 
cable to social welfare agencies. Staff participation in 
decision-making, policy formulation, and communication. 
Role relationships within administrative structures. Open to 
qualified part-time students with consent of instructor. 

(Bechill, Cacace, Carroll, McCuan) 

SOWK 770. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH I (3) 

Methods of research in social work. Problem formulation, 
data collection and analysis, presentation of findings and con- 
clusions. Attention to classic and recent studies. The relation- 
ship of research to social work knowledge. 

(Chaiklin, Codas. Ephross, Ford. Lewis. Miller) 

SOWK 772. EVALUATION RESEARCH (3) 

Procedures for evaluating programs and for evaluating pro- 
jects within a program are considered. Previously learned 
research techniques are used to understand how to conduct 



36 / umab 



evaluation research and ways to make evaluation findings 
useful for social work practice. The method of comparative 
analysis is given major attention Open to qualified part-time 
students with consent of instructor. Prerequisite, SOWK 770. 
(Chaiklin, Codas. Ephross, Ford, Miller) 

SOWK 780. 781 . FIELD WORK: BASIC CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK 

PRACTICE (4. 4) 

Both semesters, first year. Placement in community agencies 

for practice instruction in clinical social work methodologies. 

(Balk, Carroll, Cierler. Citron, 

Clark, Gavin, Gesben, Gutches. 

Heriot, Hollander, Jones, Kohles, Maxwell, 

McGriff, Miller, Mitchell, Moulton. Welch) 

SOWK 782. 783. FIELD WORK: ADVANCED CLINICAL SOCIAL 

WORK PRACTICE (5, 5) 

Both semesters, second year. Placement in community 

agencies for practice instruction in clinical social work 

methodologies. (Bennett, Gavin, Kraft, Maxwell, McGriff) 

SOWK 784, 786. FIELD WORK: BASIC SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 
IN SOCIAL STRATEGY (4, 4) 
Four days a week sustained placement, second semester, first 
year. Placement in community agencies for practice instruc- 
tion in social strategy methodologies. (Bar-llan, Bland, 

Cole, Lewis, Meyer) 

SOWK 785, 787. FIELD WORK: ADVANCED SOCIAL WORK 
PRACTICE IN SOCIAL STRATEGY (5, 5) 
Four days a week sustained placement, first semester, second 
year. Placement in community agencies for practice instruc- 
tion in social strategy methods. (Bar-llan, Bland, 
Cole, Lewis, Makofsky, Simmons, Wilson) 

SOWK 792, 793. FIELD WORK: ADVANCED SOCIAL WORK 
PRACTICE IN SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION (5, 5) 
Both semesters, second year. Placement in community 
agencies for practice instruction in social administration. 

(Carroll, Ford, Kerschner, McCuan) 

SOWK 797. THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION (1) 

Basic knowledge of the evolution of the profession, its history, 
purpose, organizational structure and value system. The con- 
tent emphasizes issues and dilemmas for the profession and 
the individual practitioners. (Thursz) 

SOWK 798. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) 

Student-selected topic of particular professional interest, to 
be studied with faculty member with special competence in 
subject area. Study plan must include provision for tutorial 
conferences and a formal paper or report. Approval of advisor 
and instructor required. 

SOWK 800. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY (3) 
A series of advanced seminars in which social policy issues 
of current concern are examined. Emphasis is placed upon 
methods of analysis of issues regarding problems involving 
the provision of social benefits and in the availability and 
delivery of social services. 

SOWK 801 . PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY OF SOCIAL WELFARE 
(3) 
Exploration of the ideological roots of conflicting profes- 
sional and societal value positions as these affect social pol- 
icy development and the professional practice of social work. 
The development of patterns of social provision is examined 
within the context of economic and political circumstances. 

SOWK 816. DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF SOCIAL WORK 
KNOWLEDGE I (3) 
This course is organized in two major segments. First, there 
is an examination of the issues and problems involved in the 
definition of knowledge. How knowledge is obtained will be 
given attention from the standpoint of the scientific tradition 
starting with Locke and will be considered from the point 
of view of the major schools of thought, i.e., rationalism, 
empiricism, phenomenology, etc. Second, the course deals 
with the implications of these schools of thought for social 
work knowledge as presently utilized, with attention to how 
the analysis of such knowledge produces differing insights 
depending upon the philosophical frame of reference. 



SOWK 817 DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF SOCIAL WORK 
KNOWLEDGE II (3) 
Deals primarily with the adaptation and the transformation 
of biological and behavioral (social) science knowledge to 
social work use. Particular emphasis will be given to problems 
of concept definition, logical "fit", and data interpretation in 
relation to the intellectual assumptions governing studies 
from which such data are derived. Methodologically, the 
course utilizes a series of bio-behavioral science studies 
which are to be analyzed from the standpoint of their scien- 
tific logic and applicability to social work knowledge develop- 
ment. 

SOWK 830. PRACTICE THEORIES FOR CLINICAL SOCIAL 
WORKERS I (3) 
Methods of intervention with individuals within a social con- 
text derived from psychoanalytic theory as represented by 
Sullivan, Horney, Alexander, and others compared and con- 
trasted with methods of intervention based on learning 
theory. The existentialist points of view are examined for their 
potential usefulness in social work practice. Innovative 
approaches evolving in other clinical disciplines will be consi- 
dered. 

SOWK 831. PRACTICE THEORIES FOR CLINICAL SOCIAL 
WORKERS II (3) 
Designed to study intensively methods of intervention with 
small groups, both primary and secondary. Models of small 
groups developed by social scientists and social work 
theoreticians are scrutinized for their relevance and utility, 
as well as modern psychiatric models. Theoretical perspec- 
tives drawn from field theory, classical psychoanalytic and 
neo-Freudian formulations, ego psychology, group dynamics 
and social group work will be contrasted. 

SOWK 832. DEVELOPING PRACTICE THEORIES FOR SOCIAL 
WORK (3) 
Designed to enable an integration and extension of the 
theories concerning interventive action studies in SOWK 816, 
817, 846, 847. Efforts to formulate general theoretical models, 
which encompass varied forms of intervention in personality 
and social systems, are critically examined. Particular 
emphasis will be given to the integrative functions and limita- 
tions of a systems approach. Specific experience will be pro- 
vided in theory building in the area of intervention- 
change-action in social work practice with critical analytic 
feedback in class discussion. 

SOWK 846. PRACTICE THEORY IN SOCIAL STRATEGY. SOCIAL 
CHANGE. AND SOCIAL ACTION (3) 
Focuses on theories of intervention in various social systems 
in society designed to achieve change in planned directions. 
Three models of community change practice are examined 
and the relationship among these models are studied for the 
purpose of identifying diagnostic and predictive factors and 
strategic options. These models emphasize strategies of con- 
sensus and community integration: system coordination, and 
the marshalling of necessary resources to cope with a par- 
ticular problem in society; and social action designed to alter 
or replace existing social institutions through the realignment 
of power relationships. 

SOWK 847. THEORIES OF PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING 
PROCESS (3) 
Focuses on the adaptation of planning and programming 
methods developed in diverse fields to the tasks confronting 
planners in the human and social services area. A general 
systems approach is used for model building and classifica- 
tion. Emphasis is given to planning as an organized activity, 
rooted in values and ideology and initially dependent on 
rationalism, scientism, and evolutionism. The requirements 
for effective planning are discussed, including rational 
decision-making, the relation of predictive power to control, 
time perspective, performance criteria, feedback, etc. 

SOWK 876. ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL 

WORK I (3) 

Deals with considerations of both qualitative and quantitive 

research methodologies in social work and allied disciplines. 

Problems and strategies of content analysis, conceptualiza- 



umab / 37 



tion and operationalization of definitions, historiography, 
case studies and observational techniques are stressed under 
the heading of qualitative methodologies while quantitative 
methodologies include topics such as scaling, measurement 
theory, sociometric techniques, projective techniques, and 
conceptual issues in data analysis. Development and use of 
ecologic and demographic data is introduced, and the rele- 
vance of research for policy formation and social welfare sys- 
tems explored. Prerequisite, prior or concurrent registration 
in a statistics course, or passing an exemption examination 
in statistics at a high level. 

SOWK 877. ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL 
WORK II (3) 
Includes models of data collection and analysis linked 
together as principles of research design. The linkage of 
theory, design procedures, and data collection and analysis 
are considered for all types of studies ranging from those 
concerned with an individual case to large-scale cross- 
sectional studies. Opportunities are offered for students to 
explore issues related to their emerging thesis interests. 
Further consideration of the logic of social inquiry are illus- 
trated both in seminar and laboratory settings. Prerequisite, 
successful completion of SOWK 876 and prior or concurrent 
registration in the second of the two statistics courses. 

SOWK 899. THESIS RESEARCH I, II, III. IV (1-8) 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OFFERED, 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS* 
HEALTH SCIENCE COMPUTER CENTER 

CMSC 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (1-3) 
E (Fall). Introduction to Biostatistics I 
(This course same as PREV 600). 



F (Spring). Introduction to Biostatistics II 
(This course same as PREV 601) 



PHARMACOLOGY DEPARTMENT, 
SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

DPHR 606, 607. ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY AND 
THERAPEUTICS (3, 3) 

DPHR 616. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF DRUGS (3) 

DPHR 626. MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY (3) 

DPHR 636. PHARMACOLOGY OF ANESTHETIC DRUGS (3) 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NPHY 421, 422. PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (3, 3) 



DEPARTMENT OF PREVENTIVE 
MEDICINE, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

PREV 600, 601. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS, I AND II 
(3,3) 
(This course same as CMSC 498, E and F) 

'Courses listed under these prefixes are offered for graduate 
credit but there is no graduate program in these departments. 



38 / umab 



** 





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GRADUATE FACULTY 
BALTIMORE CAMPUS 



ADAMS. Elijah, Professor and Head of Department of Biological 
Chemistry, School of Medicine 

BA, The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; MD, University of 
Rochester, 1942. 
ALLEN, Benjamin F., Associate Professor of Pharmacy, School 
of Pharmacy 

BS. University of Maryland. 1937; PhD, 1949. 
APOSHIAN. H. Vasken. Professor and Head of Cell Biology and 
Pharmacology, School of Medicine 

BS, Brown University, 1948; MS, University of Rochester, 
1950; PhD, 1953. 
AUGSBURGER, Larry L., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, 
School of Pharmacy 

BS, University of Maryland. 1962; MS. 1965; PhD, 1967. 



BURGISON, Raymond M.. Professor and Head of Department 
of Pharmacology, School of Dentistry 

BS, Loyola College, 1945; MS, University of Maryland, 1948; 
PhD. 1950. 
BURLINGHAM, Byron T., Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and 
Pharmacology, School of Medicine 

AB. University of Iowa, 1961; MS, 1965; MD, 1966; PhD, 
Rockefeller University, 1970. 
BUTTERBAUGH. Gary G., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
and Toxicology. School of Pharmacy 

BS, Iowa State University, 1965; MS, University of Iowa. 
1967; PhD. 1969. 



CHAIKLIN, Harris. Professor, School of Social Work and Com- 
munity Planning 

AB, University of Connecticut, 1950; MA, 1952; MS, Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1953; PhD, Yale University, 1961. 

COHELAN. Evelyn E., Professor, School of Nursing 

BS, University of California, 1951; MS. 1953; EdD. 1963. 



BARRACLOUGH, Charles A., Professor of Physiology, School 
of Medicine 

BS, St. Joseph's College, 1947; MS, Rutgers University, 
1952; PhD, 1953. 
BARRETT. Charles P., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Medicine 

BS. King's College, 1957; PhD, University of Maryland, 
1969. 
BARRY. Sue-ning Chu. Associate Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Dentistry 

BA. Barat College, 1955; PhD, University of Maryland, 1961. 
BECHILL, William, Associate Professor. School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

AB, Beloit College, 1949; MSW. University of Michigan. 
1952. 
BECKERMAN, Tod. Assistant Professor of Oral Pathology. 
School of Dentistry 

BA, Emory University, 1959; DDS, Columbia University, 
1963. 
BENNETT, Robert B., Assistant Professor of Physiology. School 
of Dentistry 

BA. Carleton College, 1960; MS, University of Nebraska, 
1963; PhD, 1967. 
BLAKE. David A.. Associate Professor and Head. Department 
of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy 

BS, University of Maryland, 1963; PhD. 1966. 
BLAKE. William Dewey, Professor and Head. Department of 
Physiology, School of Medicine 
AB, Dartmouth College, 1940; MD, Harvard Medical Col- 
lege. 1943. 
BLAUMANIS. Otis R.. Assistant Professor of Physiology. School 
of Medicine 

AB. The Johns Hopkins University, 1965: PhD. 1970. 
BLOMSTER. Ralph N., Professor and Head of Pharmacognosy, 
School of Pharmacy 

BS, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1953; MS. Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh. 1958; PhD. 1963. 
BROWN. Dennis T., Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and 
Pharmacology, School of Medicine 

AB, University of Pennsylvania. 1964; PhD, 1967. 
BROWN. Neal C. Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Phar- 
macology. School of Medicine 

DVM. Cornell University. 1962; PhD. Yale University, 1966. 
BUCCI, Enrico, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
School of Medicine 

MD, University of Rome. 1956; PhD, 1963; PhD, 1965. 
BULGER, Ruth E.. Associate Professor of Pathology, School of 
Medicine 

AB. Vassar College. 1958: AM. Harvard University. 1959; 
PhD, University of Washington. 1962. 



DELISLE, Allan L.. Assistant Professor of Microbiology, School 
of Dentistry 

BS, University of California, 1960; MS, 1961; PhD, University 
of Massachusetts, 1969. 
DERBYSHIRE, Robert L., Associate Professor of Sociology 
(Psychiatry). School of Medicine 

BS, University of Maryland. 1954; MA, 1959; PhD, 1964. 
DE VORE, Duane T., Associate Professor of Oral Surgery. 
School of Dentistry 

DDS, Loyola University, 1956. 
DE WEER, Paul J., Assistant Professor of Biophysics, School 
of Medicine 

BS, University of Louvain, 1959; MD, 1963; PhD, University 
of Maryland, 1969. 
DONATI. Edward Joseph, Associate Professor of Anatomy, 
School of Medicine 

AB, King's College, 1951; PhD, University of Maryland, 
1964; Certificate, Drexel Institute of Technology. 



ELKINS, Wilson H., President, University of Maryland 

BA. University of Texas, 1932; MA, 1932; LittB, Oxford 

University, 1936; DPhil, 1936. 
EPHROSS. Paul H., Associate Professor, School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

AB, Harvard College. 1955; MS, Boston University. 1957; 

PhD. University of Chicago. 1969. 
EYLAR, Ollie R.. Jr., Associate Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Medicine 

BA, University of Minnesota. 1952; MS, 1955; PhD, 1959. 



FAJER, Abram B., Associate Professor of Physiology. School 
of Medicine 

MD, University of Sao Paulo, 1951. 
FALCK, Hans S., Professor. School of Social Work and Com- 
munity Planning 

BA, Western Reserve University. 1949; MA, Syracuse 
University, 1950; MSS, University of Buffalo, 1953; DSSc, 
Syracuse University. 1960. 
FERTZIGER, Allen P.. Assistant Professor of Physiology, School 
of Medicine 

BS, City University of New York, 1963; PhD, University of 
Michigan, 1968. 
FIGGE, Frank H. J ., Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine 
AB, Colorado College, 1927: PhD. University of Maryland, 
1934. 
FIRMINGER, Harlan I., Professor of Pathology, School of 
Medicine 

AB. Washington University, 1939; MD. 1943. 



40 / umab 



FISET, Paul. Associate Professor of Microbiology, School of 
Medicine 

BA. Laval University. 1944; MD. 1949; PhD, Cambridge 
University. 1956. 
FISHER. Russell S.. Professor of Legal Medicine, School of 
Medicine 

BS. Georgia School of Technology. 1 937; MD. Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, 1942. 
FRANK. Leonard Harold, Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
School of Medicine 

AB. University of Oklahoma. 1950; PhD. The Johns Hopkins 
University. 1957. 
FREIMUTH. Henry C, Associate Professor of Legal Medicine. 
School of Medicine 

BS. City College of New York. 1932; MS. New York Univer- 
sity. 1933; PhD. 1938. 



GANIS. Frank M.. Associate Professor and Chairman, Depart- 
ment of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry 
AB. University of Rochester. 1949: PhD, 1956. 
GARCIA. Julio H.. Associate Professor of Pathology. School of 
Medicine 

BS. National College of St. Bartholomew. 1951; MD, 
National University of Colombia, 1958. 
GARTNER, Leslie P.. Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Dentistry 

AB. Rutgers University, 1965: MS, 1968; PhD, 1970. 
GEDULDIG, Donald S., Assistant Professor of Biophysics, 
School of Medicine 

BEE, Cornell University. 1955; MS, 1957; PhD, Columbia 
University, 1965. 
GINN, Fred L.. Associate Professor of Pathology, School of 
Medicine 

BS, University of North Carolina, 1 958; MD, Duke University, 
1962. 
GLASER. Edmund M.. Research Associate Professor of 
Physiology. School of Medicine 

BEE. Cooper Union. 1944; MSE, The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1954; DrEngr, 1960. 
GOLDMAN, Lawrence, Associate Professor of Physiology, 
School of Medicine 

BS. Tufts University, 1958; PhD, University of California. 
1964. 
GOLDMEIER. John. Associate Professor. School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

BSS. New York City College, 1951; MSW, Tulane University, 
1952; PhD, University of Chicago. 1966. 
GRAND. Norma K.. Assistant Professor. School of Nursing 

BS. University of Colorado, 1962; MA, Columbia University, 
1963; PhD, Case Western Reserve University, 1971. 
GREISMAN. Sheldon E.. Associate Professor of Medicine, 
School of Medicine 

MD, New York University, 1949. 
GRENELL. Robert Gordon. Professor of Psychiatry, School of 
Medicine 

AB, City College of New York. 1935; MS. New York Univer- 
sity. 1936: PhD. University of Minnesota, 1943. 
GREWE. John Mitchell, Associate Professor and Head of 
Orthodontics, School of Dentistry 

BS, University of Minnesota, 1960: DDS. 1962; MSD. 1964; 
PhD. 1966. 



HAAS, Harriet F., Assistant Professor. School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

AB. University of California, 1943; MSW. 1949; DLit, Univer- 
sity of Paris, 1951. 

HAHN. William E., Professor of Anatomy, School of Dentistry 
AB, University of Rochester, 1938: MS. 1939; DDS. Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1931. 



HAMILTON, McDonald K., Professor and Head, Department of 
Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry 

AB, Alma College, 1952; DDS, University of Michigan, 1956. 
HARVEY. Ann Elizabeth Hall, Assistant Professor, School of 
Nursing 

RN, University of Rochester, 1961; BS, University of Mary- 
land, 1964; MS, 1967. 
HASLER. John F.. Associate Professor of Oral Pathology, School 
of Dentistry 

BS. Indiana University, 1948; DDS, 1962; MSD, Indiana 
University, 1969. 
HELRICH. Martin, Professor of Anesthesiology. School of 
Medicine 

BS. Dickinson College, 1946; MD. University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1946. 
HYBL, Albert, Associate Professor of Biophysics, School of 
Medicine 

BA. Coe College, 1954; PhD, California Institute of 
Technology, 1961. 



ICHNIOWSKI. Casimir T., Professor of Pharmacology. School 
of Pharmacy 

PhG, University of Maryland, 1929; BS, 1930; MS, 1932; 
PhD, 1936. 



JOSEPH, J. Niehsen, Assistant Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Dentistry 
AB, West Virginia University, 1948; MS, 1949; BS, University 
of Toledo, 1955; PhD, University of Maryland, 1964. 
JURF, Amin N., Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of 
Medicine 
AB, Western Maryland College, 1959; PhD, University of 
Maryland, 1966. 



KARPELES, Leo M., Associate Professor of Physiology, School 
of Medicine 

BS, University of North Carolina, 1941; MD. University of 
Washington, 1955. 
KESSEL. Rosslyn W. I.. Associate Professor of Microbiology. 
School of Medicine 

BS, University of London, 1956; MS, 1956; PhD, Rutgers 
University, 1960. 
KINNARD. William J., Jr.. Professor of Pharmacology and Dean, 
School of Pharmacy 

BS, University of Pittsburgh, 1953; MS, 1955; PhD, Purdue 
University, 1957. 
KIRTLEY, Mary E., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

BA, University of Chicago, 1956; MA. Smith College. 1958; 
PhD, Western Reserve University, 1964. 
KOHL. Ruth Jean, Associate Professor. School of Nursing 

AB, Bates College. 1949; MS. Boston University, 1953; PhD, 
University of Connecticut, 1968. 
KRAHL, Vernon E.. Professor of Anatomy. School of Medicine 
BS, University of Pittsburgh. 1939; MS. 1940; PhD. Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1946. 
KRIKORIAN, S. Edward. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, School of Pharmacy 

ScB, Brown University, 1951; PhD, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, 1967. 
KRYWOLAP. George N., Associate Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Dentistry 

BS, Drexel Institute of Technology, 1 960; MS, Pennsylvania 
State University, 1962; PhD, 1964. 
KUHN, Albin O., Professor of Agronomy and Chancellor. Balti- 
more Campuses 

BS, University of Maryland, 1938; MS, 1939; PhD, 1948. 



umab / 41 



LAMBOOY, John P., Professor of Biological Chemistry, School 
of Medicine and Dean, Graduate Studies and Research, Balti- 
more Campus 

BA, Kalamazoo College, 1937; MS, 1938; MA, University of 
Illinois, 1939; PhD, University of Rochester, 1942. 
LAMY, Peter, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, School of Phar- 
macy 

BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1956; MS, 1958; 
PhD, 1964. 
LEONARD, Charles B., Jr., Associate Professor of Biochemistry, 
School of Dentistry 

BA, Rutgers College, 1955; MS, University of Maryland, 
1957; PhD, 1963. 
LESLIE, James, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemis- 
try, School of Pharmacy 

BS, Queens University, 1956; PhD, 1959. 
LEVY, Bernard A., Assistant Professor of Oral Pathology, School 
of Dentistry 
AB, Ohio University, 1963; DDS, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1966; MSD, Indiana University, 1969. 
LEWIS, Verl S., Professor, School of Social Work and Commu- 
nity Planning 
AB, Huron College, 1933; MA, University of Chicago, 1938; 
DSW, Western Reserve University, 1954. 
LIBONATI, Joseph P., Assistant Professor of Medicine, School 
of Medicine; Assistant Professor of Microbiology, School of 
Dentistry 

BS, St. Joseph's College, 1963; MS, Duquesne University, 
1965; PhD, University of Maryland, 1968. 
LINDENBERG, Richard, Lecturer in Anatomy, School of Dentis- 
try 

Graduation, University of Munich Medical School, 1934; 
MD, University of Berlin, 1944. 
LUDLUM, David Blodgett, Professor of Cell Biology and Phar- 
macology, School of Medicine 

BA, Cornell University, 1 951 ; PhD, University of Wisconsin, 
1954; MD, New York University, 1962. 
LUNIN, Martin, Professor and Head, Department of Pathology, 
School of Dentistry 

BS, Oklahoma State University, 1938; DDS, Washington 
University, 1950; MPH, Columbia University, 1952. 
LYNCH, James J., Associate Professor of Psychology 
(Psychiatry), School of Medicine 

BS, Boston College, 1962; MA. Catholic University, 1964; 
PhD, 1965. 



MASTERS, Jason M., Associate Professor of Anatomy and 
Pathology, School of Medicine 

BS, High Point College, 1 951 ; MA, Sul Ross State College, 

1956; PhD, University of Maryland, 1965. 
MATEJSKI, Myrtle S., Assistant Professor, School of Nursing 

AM, Boston University, 1958; BSN, 1953; MSNEd, 1954. 
McMANAMA, Delores, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing 

RN, St. Gabriel's, 1952; BS, University of Minnesota, 1959; 

MSN, Catholic University, 1962. 
MERGNER, Wolfgang G., Assistant Professor of Pathology, 
School of Medicine 

MD, Justus Liebig University, 1961. 
MERLIS, Jerome M., Associate Professor of Physiology, School 
of Medicine 

BS, University of Louisville, 1933; MD, 1937; MA, 1938. 
MIDDLEBROOK, Gardner, Professor of Pathology, School of 
Medicine 

AB, Harvard College, 1938; MD, 1944. 
MITCHELL, Arlene E., Associate Professor, School of Nursing 

AB, Baldwin-Wallace College, 1952; MN, University of 

Washington, 1963; PhD, 1968. 
MOXLEY, John N., Professor of Medicine and Dean, School of 
Medicine 

AB, Williams College, 1957; MD, University of Colorado, 

1961. 



MUHR, Mae Ann Wilson, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing 
BSN, University of Alabama, 1960; MS, University of Mary- 
land, 1965. 

MULLINS, L. J., Professor and Head, Department of Biophysics, 
Schoolof Medicine 

BS, University of California, 1937; PhD, 1940. 

MURPHY, Marion Isabel, Professor and Dean, School of Nursing 
BS, University of Minnesota, 1936; MPH, University of 
Michigan, 1946; PhD, 1959. 

MYERS, William F., Assistant Professor of Microbiology, School 
of Medicine 

AB, University of Kansas, 1949; MA, 1955; PhD, 1958. 



NARDELL, Birgit E., Instructor in Physiology, School of Dentistry 
BS, University of Illinois, 1961; MS, University of Maryland, 
1964; PhD, 1969. 

NAUMAN, Robert K., Assistant Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Dentistry 

BS, University of Pennsylvania, 1963; MS, University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 1965; PhD, 1968. 

NEAL, Mary Virginia, Professor, School of Nursing 

BS, University of Maryland, 1949; MLitt, University of 
Pittsburgh, 1952; PhD, New York University, 1968. 

NUCHO, Aina Ozoline, Associate Professor, School of Social 
Work and Community Planning 

BA, St. Olaf College, 1950; MSS, Bryn Mawr College, 1957; 
PhD, 1966. 



O'MORCHOE, Charles C. C, Professor of Anatomy, School of 
Medicine 

BA, Dublin University, 1953; MB, BCh, BAO, 1955; MA, 
1959; MD, 1961. 



PALLEY, Howard A., Associate Professor, School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

AB, Brooklyn College, 1957; MS, Yeshiva University, 1959; 
PhD, Syracuse University, 1963. 
PETERSON, Kyle W., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Medicine 

BS, George Washington University, 1964; MS, 1965; PhD, 
1968. 
PIAVIS, George W., Professor of Anatomy, School of Dentistry 
AB, Western Maryland College, 1948; MEd, 1952; PhD, 
Duke University, 1958. 
PINTER, Gabriel G., Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 

MD, University of Budapest Medicine School, 1951. 
POMERANTZ, Seymour H., Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

BS, The Rice Institute, 1 948; PhD, University of Texas, 1 952. 
PROVENZA, D. Vincent, Professor and Chairman, Department 
of Anatomy, School of Dentistry 

BS, University of Maryland, 1939; MS, 1941; PhD, 1952. 



RAMSAY, Frederick J., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Medicine 

BS, Washington and Lee University, 1958; MS, University 

of Illinois, 1960; PhD, 1962; EdM, 1969. 
RENNELS, Marshall L., Associate Professor of Anatomy, School 
of Medicine 

BS, Eastern Illinois University, 1961; MA, University of 

Texas, 1964; PhD, 1966. 
ROBINSON, Lisa, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing 

BS, American University, 1961; MS, University of Maryland, 

1965; PhD, 1970. 



42 / umab 



ROSENZWEIG, Edward C, Assistant Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Medicine 

AB, Centre College, 1951; MS. University of Maryland, 1956; 
PhD, 1959. 
ROSLER, Karl-Heinz, Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy, 
School of Pharmacy 

MS, University of Munich. 1956; PhD, 1960. 
RUAND, Betty J., Associate Professor. School of Nursing 

BSN, Wayne State University. 1958; MPH, University of Min- 
nesota, 1963; PhD, Case Western Reserve University, 1970. 
RUCHKIN, Daniel S., Associate Professor of Physiology, School 
of Medicine 

BE, Yale University, 1956; MEng, 1957; DEng, 1960. 
RUDO, Frieda Galindo, Professor of Pharmacology, School of 
Dentistry 
AB, Goucher College, 1944; MS, University of Maryland, 
1960; PhD, 1963. 



SALLEY, John J., Professor of Oral Pathology and Dean, School 
of Dentistry 

DDS. Medical College of Virginia, 1951 ; PhD, University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 
SCHNEIDER. Louis E., Assistant Professor of Microbiology, 
School of Dentistry 
AB, St. Joseph's College, 1951; MS, University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1957; PhD, 1961. 
SCHWEDA, Paul, Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine, School 
of Medicine 

PhD, University of Vienna, 1955. 
SEITHER, Frances G., Assistant Professor, School of Nursing 

BS, University of Maryland, 1966; MS, 1968; PhD, 1971. 
SHANGRAW, Ralph F., Professor and Chairman of Pharmacy, 
School of Pharmacy 

BS, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1952; MS, 1954; 
PhD, University of Michigan, 1958. 
SHAY, Donald E., Professor and Head, Department of Micro- 
biology 

BS, Lebanon Valley College, 1937; MS, University of Mary- 
land, 1938; PhD, 1943. 
SIMMONS, Leonard C, Associate Professor, School of Social 
Work and Community Planning 

AB, Morgan State College, 1953; MSW, Catholic University, 
1957; DSW, Case-Western Reserve University. 1968. 
SISCA, Rodger Franklin. Associate Professor of Dentistry, 
School of Dentistry 

BS, University of Pittsburgh, 1955; DDS, 1962; MS, 1963; 
PhD, University of Maryland, 1967. 
SJODIN, Raymond A.. Professor of Biophysics, School of 
Medicine 

BS, California Institute of Technology, 1951; PhD, Univer- 
sity of California, 1955. 
SNYDER, Merrill J., Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases, 
School of Medicine 

BS, University of Pittsburgh, 1940; MS, University of Wary- 
land, 1950; PhD, 1953. 
SWANCAR. James R., Assistant Professor of Oral Pathology, 
School of Dentistry 

AB, Case-Western Reserve University, 1952; DDS, 1956; 
MS, 1963. 



THUR2, Daniel, Professor and Dean, School of Social Work and 
Community Planning 

BA, Queens College, 1948; MSW, Catholic University, 1955; 
DSW, 1959. 
TILDON, J. Tyson, Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine 

BS, Morgan State College, 1954; PhD, The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1965. 
TRADER, Harriet P., Associate Professor, School of Social Work 
and Community Planning 

BS, Morgan State College. 1944; MS, Columbia University, 
1946; DSW, University of Pennsylvania, 1962. 
TRAUB, Robert, Research Professor of Microbiology, School of 
Medicine 

BS, College of City of New York, 1938; MS, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1939; PhD, University of Illinois, 1947. 
TRUMP, Benjamin, Professor and Chairman, Department of 
Pathology, School of Medicine 
AB, University of Missouri, 1953; MD, University of Kansas, 
1957. 



WADSWORTH, Gladys E., Associate Professor of Anatomy, 
School of Medicine 

BS, East Stroudsburg State College, 1936; MA, Columbia 
University, 1942; PhD, University of Maryland, 1955. 
WHITE, John I., Professor and Head, Department of Physiology, 
School of Dentistry 

BA, University of Illinois. 1939; PhD, Rutgers University. 
1950. 
WISSEMAN, Charles L., Jr., Professor and Head, Department 
of Microbiology, School of Medicine 

BA, Southern Methodist University, 1941 ; MS, Kansas State 
College, 1943; MD, Southwestern Medical College, 1946. 
WRIGHT, George Edward, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceuti- 
cal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy 

BS, University of Illinois, 1963; PhD, 1967. 
WRIGHT, Jeremy, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry. School of Pharmacy 

BS. University of Manchester, 1 961 ; PhD, University of Lon- 
don, 1965. 



YOUNG, Ruth H., Professor, School of Social Work and Com- 
munity Planning 
AB, Wellesley College, 1944; MSSW, Catholic University, 
1949; DSW, 1965. 



ZENKER, Nicholas, Professor and Chairman, Department of 
Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy 
MA, University of California, 1953; PhD, 1958. 



umab / 43 




44 / umbc 



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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE COUNTY (UMBC) 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 



Professor and Chairman: Roberts 
Professors: Aziz, Bhatia, Campolattaro, Gross, Lynn 
Associate Professors: Parr, Pittenger, Seidman 
Assistant Professors: Freiman, Horelick, Kunt, Lo, Munteanu, 
Robinson, Winston 

The Mathematics Division offers programs leading to the M.S. 
and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Mathematics. 

The principle objectives of the Ph.D. program in Applied 
Mathematics are to prepare mathematicians for teaching and 
research in colleges and universities, and to prepare research 
mathematicians for government and industrial laboratories. The 
M.S. program constitutes a preliminary step to these objectives, 
and also provides a terminal degree program for high school 
teachers and some industrial mathematicians. 

The program in Applied Mathematics at UMBC consists of 
a core of courses in basic mathematical analysis, to be taken 
by all students, followed by a wide spectrum of applied courses 
to suit the needs and desires of individual students. The pro- 
gram aims at providing a solid grounding in theoretical 
mathematics together with the development of extensive and 
sophisticated mathematical techniques for use in engineering 
and the physical, biological and social sciences. Emphasis is 
placed on the building of mathematical models and the use of 
mathematical tools to understand these models quantitatively. 
Such an approach helps develop the versatility and flexibility 
demanded of the applied mathematician in our rapidly changing 
technological world. 

Divisional regulations concerning admission to graduate 
study, requirements for the master's and doctor's degrees, qual- 
ifying and comprehensive examinations, graduate student sup- 
port and other matters, have been assembled for the guidance 
of prospective students. Copies of these regulations are avail- 
able from the Graduate Committee of the Division of Mathemat- 
ics. 



MATH 0401. INTRODUCTION TO REAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Real number system. Sequences, limits, and continuity of real 
valued functions of one variable, differentiation. Functions 
of bounded variation, Riemann-Stieltjes integration. Infinite 
series, sequences and series of functions. 

MATH 0402. FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0401. Differentiable transformations, 
implicit function theorem, manifolds, exterior algebra and dif- 
ferential forms. 

MATH 0404, 0405. INTRODUCTION TO PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Ordinary Differential Equations. Quasilinear and 
nonlinear first order equations, calculus of variations, linear 
second order equations and their classification, self-adjoint 
operators, Sturm-Liouville problems and eigenfunction 
expansions, fundamental solutions and Green's functions, 
distributions, boundary and initial value problem for potential, 
wave and heat equations, integral transforms, asymptotic 
expansions. (Aziz) 

MATH 0411. LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) 

Finite-dimensional vector spaces, subspaces, linear trans- 
formations and matrices. Further topics to be chosen from: 
convex sets and convex functionals, dual space, direct sum 
and quotient space, minimal polynomials, Jordan canonical 
form, inner product, normal, symmetric, and orthogonal 
transformations, applications. (Lynn) 



MATH 0412. LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND 
CONTROL THEORY (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 0411. Existence and uniqueness of solu- 
tions of linear differential equations, stability theory. The con- 
trol problem, algebraic controllability, attainable set. Observ- 
ability, stabi lizability, and estimation. Time optimal control 
problem. Nonlinear control problem. 

MATH 0421. INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0401. Metric spaces, topological spaces, 
derived topological spaces, separation axioms, generalized 
convergence, covering properties and compactness, connec- 
tedness, metrizability, complete metric spaces, introduction 
to homotopy theory. 

MATH 0439. INTRODUCTION TO FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 0401. Operators, review of algebraic sys- 
tems and algebras. Banach spaces and Hilbert spaces, finite- 
dimensional spectral theory. 

MATH 0441. INTRODUCTION TO MEASURE AND INTEGRATION 
(3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 0401. Daniell integral, measurable func- 
tions, measure of a set, Lebesgue-Stieltjes integral, absolute 
continuity, Radon-Nikodym theorem, signed measure, Riesz 
representation theorem. 

MATH 0490. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 
(Variable Credits) 

MATH 0611, 0612. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I, II (3, 3) 

Groups, subgroups, factor groups, homomorphism theorems, 
rings, ideals, factorization theory for Euclidean rings. 
Modules over ring of operators, normal form for matrices, 
tensor and Grassman algebras. 

MATH 0621, 0622. TOPOLOGY I, II (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0421. Fundamental group, covering 
spaces, simplicial homology, simplicial approximations, man- 
ifolds. Homology and cohomology of topological spaces, plus 
additional topics to be chosen by the instructor. 

MATH 0623. DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 0411-0421. Elementary manifold theory, 
differential forms and the DeRham theorem, first and second 
fundamental forms for surfaces, curvature and the Gauss- 
Bonnet theorem, embedded surfaces. 

MATH 0624. DIFFERENTIAL TOPOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0421. Introduction to differential 
topology. Differentiable manifolds, immersion and embed- 
ding theorems, vector bundles, characteristic classes; other 
possible topics include cobordism, piecewise-linear and dif- 
ferentiable structures, Morse theory. 

MATH 0631. 0632. REAL ANALYSIS I, II (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0401. Elements of the theory of metric 
spaces, Baire category theorem. Lebesgue integration, 
absolute continuity and differentiation of functions of 
bounded variation. Abstract measure theory, Radon-Nikodym 
and Fubini theorems, LP spaces. (Pittenger) 

MATH 0633, 0634. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I, II (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 0401. Analytic functions. Riemann sur- 
faces, Cauchy's theorem, singularities, residues, contour 
integrals, conformal mapping, Schwartz-Christoffel transfor- 
mation, series and sequences, analytic continuation, har- 
monic functions, Dirichlet problem, uniformization, quasi- 
conformal mapping, Fourier and Laplace transforms. 
Singular integral equations. (Gross) 

MATH 0635, 0636. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS I, II (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 0401-0411. General theory of bounded 
and unbounded operators in Hilbert space. Applications to 
quantum field theory, general theory of linear topological 
spaces. Locally convex spaces, duality; category theorems, 
ordered spaces. Distributions and generalized functions; ten- 
sor products and kernels; applications. (Aziz) 

MATH 0637, 0638. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3, 
3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 0401-0411. General properties of differ- 
ential equations. Two dimensional systems. Linear system 
and linearizations. Perturbations of noncritical linear systems. 



46 / umbc 



Simple ocillatory phenomena and the method of averaging. 
Behavior near a periodic orbit. Integral manifolds of equations 
with a small parameter Periodic system with a small parame- 
ter Functional equations. The direct method of Lyapunov. 

(Winston) 

MATH 0639. 0640. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3. 3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 0631 and 0632 or equivalent. Calculus of 
La derivatives, elliptic operators, local and global existence 
theory, regularity properties of solutions of strongly elliptic 
equations, eigenvalue problem for elliptic equations, com- 
pleteness of the eigenfunction. (Aziz) 

MATH 0641. 0642. HILBERT SPACE AND SPECTRAL THEORY 
(3.3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Abstract Hilbert space and 
applications. Linear operators, spectral theorem for self- 
adjoint operators, applications to ordinary, partial and 
integral equations. 

MATH 0643. 0644 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Elementary notions of 
trajectories, limit sets and prolongations. Recursive concepts, 
minimal sets. Dispersive concepts, parallelizable systems. 
Stability and attraction. Flow near compact invariant sets. 
Higher prolongations. Differential dynamical systems. Struc- 
tural stability. (Bhatia) 

MATH 0645. THEORY OF ENTIRE FUNCTIONS (3) 

Properties of maximum modules, including Hadamard s 3 cir- 
cle theorem, order and type, properties of Taylor coefficients, 
rate of growth and distribution of zeros. Phragmen-Lindelof 
theory. Wiman- Valiron theory of periodic functions, functions 
of exponential type, solutions to certain classes of differential 
equations. (Gross) 

MATH 0646. THEORY OF MEROMORPHIC FUNCTIONS (3) 
Nevanlinna characteristic function and its properties, the first 
and second fundamental theorems of Nevanlinna. order and 
type of meromorphic functions, extension of Hadamard s fac- 
torization theorem, extension of Liouvi lie's theorem, defect 
values and Picards theorem. Millouxs theorem, linear combi- 
nations of exponentials and theorem of Borel. orders of con- 
vergence. 3:6; 

MATH 0647. SELECTED TOPICS IN FUNCTIONAL EQUATIONS 
AND MEROMORPHIC FUNCTION THEORY 
Discussion of results of Ritt. Fatou. Julia. Rosenbloom. Otawa 
and others on solutions of certain functional equations, 
including the theory of fixed points and iterates. Other areas 
to be determined by student interests. (Gross) 

MATH 0651. 0652. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I. II (3. 3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 0401 . General mathematical theory of par- 
tial differential equations and method of solutions with appli- 
cation to physical problems. Topics include single equations 
of first order, characteristic surfaces and classification of 
equations of higher order and systems of equations: prop- 
erties of hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations: bound- 
ary conditions and well-posed problems: the application of 
integral transforms and other methods for their solutions. 
Asymptotic approximations. Integral equations, singular 
integral equations. Wiener-Hopf method, dual integral equa- 
tions. Riemann problem, calculus of variations. (Aziz. Lynn) 

MATH 0653. 0654. APPLIED MATHEMATICS III. IV (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Probability in function 
space, the theory of partial differential equations of evolution 
and infinite dimensional representation of continuous 
groups. Special emphasis on application to a rigorous 
development of scattering theory, constructive quantum field 
theory: representations of the Lorentz group and its exten- 
sions. 

MATH 0655. 0656. FLUID DYNAMICS I. II (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Navier-Stokes equations. 
Energy and vorticity theorems. Incompressible flow and 
potential theory. Free boundary problems. Inviscid compres- 
sible flow theory. Hodograph transformation. Characteristics 
and shocks. Similarity laws. Exact solutions for viscous flows. 
Low-Reynolds-number approximate solutions, boundary 
layer theory. Stability and turbulence. Rotating and stratified 
fluids. (Lynn. Roberts) 



MATH 0657. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL MECHANICS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A review of the concept 
of manifold, vector bundles and calculus on manifolds, the 
qualitative study of analytical mechanics for which the phase 
space of classical mechanics is generalized in a symplectic 
manifold. The symplectic algebra, its globalization. Hamilto- 
nian and Lagrangian systems. Canonical transformations. 
Groups of symmetries and integral invariants. Concept of sta- 
bility. 

MATH 0659. 0660. GENERAL RELATIVITY (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Review of concepts of 
topology. Tensor analysis and differential geometry. 
Mathematical, physical and philosophical assumptions in 
general relativity. Structure of the Einstein field equations and 
formulation of the initial value problem. The interior and 
exterior Schwartzchild solutions, introduction to relativistic 
cosmology and astrophysics. The Brans-Dicke theory of gravi- 
tation and other grayitation theories of non-Einsteinian type. 
The theory of groups of motions and the classification of Eins- 
tein spaces. Review of the unified theories of gravitation and 
electro-magnetism. (Campolattaro) 

MATH 0661. CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The fundamental problem 
of the calculus of variations, absolute and relative extrema. 
necessary conditions for extrema. the invariance of the Euler 
equation, the existence of extremals, theory of fields, the 
Weierstrass E function, the Jacobi condition. Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory, direct methods of calculus of variations. Tonelli s 
theorem. 

MATH 0662. 0663. THEORY OF PROBABILITY AND STO- 
CHASTIC PROCESSES (3. 3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Random variables and 
expectations. Law of large numbers, fluctuation theory, recur- 
rent events. Markov chains, zero-one laws of Borel-Cantelli 
and Kolmogorov. Chebyshev s and Kolmogorovs equalities. 
Distribution functions and transforms. Random walks. Pois- 
son's processes. Brownian motion and diffusion. Connection 
with differential and integral equations. (Pittenger) 

MATH 0665. 0666. GROUP THEORY WITH APPLICATIONS (3. 
3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Theory of groups and their 
representations. Discussions of point, rotation, space. 
Lorentz and Lie groups. Applications to various branches of 
physics. 

MATH 0667. 0668. ADVANCED NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3. 3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Approximation theory, 
positive matrices and their spectral properties, applications 
to iterative methods, over-relaxation. Non-linear systems of 
equations. Newton s method, global existence and conver- 
gence theorems. Solution of ordinary differential equations. 
Dalquist theory of stability. Initial value problems for partial 
differential equations. Lax-Richtmyer theorem, the Kreiss 
matrix theorem, stability considerations. Boundary value 
problems, variational methods. (Seidman) 

MATH 0669. 0670. CONTROL THEORY (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Optimal control of linear 
systems and linear processes with integral cost criteria, the 
maximum principle and necessary and sufficient conditions. 
Controllability, observability and stability. Synthesis of opti- 
mal controllers for some basic nonlinear control processes. 
Optimal processes governed by functional and partial diffe- 
rential equations. Steepest descent and other computational 
techniques. (Bhatia. Aziz) 

MATH 0671. 0672. PERTURBATION METHODS I. II (3. 3) 

Prerequisite consent of instructor. Uniformly valid approx- 
imate solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. 
Problems with multiple time scales. Poincare s method. 
Averaging methods of Krylov and Bogoliubov. Turning point 
problems. Coordinate straining techniques. Matched asymp- 
totic expansions. (Lynn) 

MATH 0673. 0674. WAVE PROPAGATION I. II (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Hyperbolic equations and 
characteristics. System of conservation laws, finite amplitude 
simple waves and shocks. Dilatational and shear waves. Grav- 



umbc / 47 



ity waves. Solitary waves. Non-linear dispersive waves. 
Geometrical optics, theory of diffraction. Waves in random 
media. Examples taken from fluid dynamics, elasticity, elec- 
tromagnetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics and plasma 
dynamics. 
MATH. 0700. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALGEBRA (Variable Credit) 
MATH 0711. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TOPOLOGY (Variable Credit) 

MATH 0721. SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ANALYSIS (Variable 
Credit) 

MATH 0731. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPLEX ANALYSIS 

(Variable Credit) 
MATH 0741. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 

(Variable Credit) 

MATH 0751. SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS 
(Variable Credit) 

MATH 0761. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 
(Variable Credit) 

MATH 0771. SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICS AND 
PROBABILITY (Variable Credit) 

MATH 0799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) (1-6) 

MATH 0801. SEMINAR (Variable Credit) 

MATH 0899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Ph.D. Level) (1-8) 



OTHER COURSES AT UMBO 



In addition to its Graduate Program in Applied Mathematics 
UMBC has a number of other graduate programs in the planning 
stages. These include programs in Biological Sciences Chem- 
istry. Psychology. Education and Policy Sciences. Details on 
these programs will be announced when they have received final 
approval. 

The following list contains graduate level courses being 
offered in some of these disciplines, and upper-level under- 
graduate courses which may be taken for graduate credit in 
other fields. Students already admitted into the University of 
Maryland Graduate School may apply a limited number of such 
credits toward a graduate degree, with the approval of their 
academic advisor. These upper-level undergraduate courses 
may also be taken by teachers who desire to use these credits 
to fulfill certification requirements. 

Further information about such courses may be obtained from 
The Graduate School Office at UMBC or from the department 
of interest at UMBC. 



AMERICAN STUDIES 0310. SEX ROLES AND INEQUALITY IN 
AMERICA 

AMERICAN STUDIES 0391. AMERICAN THOUGHT I 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 0430. BIOCHEMISTRY 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 0453. PHYSIOLOGICAL BASES OF 
INVERTEBRATE BEHAVIOR 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 0600. ADVANCED LABORATORY 
PROJECTS IN BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 0601. ADVANCED TUTORIAL PRO- 
JECTS IN BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 0620. CELL STRUCTURE AND 
FUNCTION 

CHEMISTRY 0405. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
CHEMISTRY 0430. BIOCHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 0451. MECHANISMS OF ORGANIC REACTIONS 
CHEMISTRY 0690. GRADUATE SEMINAR 



CLASSICS 0401/0101. SPECIAL AUTHOR SEMINAR 
(ARISTOPHANES) 

CLASSICS 0401/0201. SPECIAL AUTHOR SEMINAR (GREEK 
LYRIC) 



ECONOMICS 0403. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND CYCLES 
ECONOMICS 0433. URBAN ECONOMICS 
ECONOMICS 0441. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY 
ECONOMICS 0455. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 
ECONOMICS 0463. THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE 
ECONOMICS 0481. INTERNATIONAL TRADE 
ECONOMICS 0493. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 0355. SEMINAR IN THE CONTEMPORARY 
PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION 0370. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

EDUCATION 0380. SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

EDUCATION 0390. PRINCIPLES OF AUDIOVISUAL 
COMMUNICATION 

EDUCATION 0396. TELEVISION UTILIZATION 

EDUCATION 0413. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDY OF READING 
DIFFICULTIES 

EDUCATION 0430. ACTIVE TEACHING OF SCIENCE 

EDUCATION 0460. SUPERVISING PRACTICUM EXPERIENCES 
IN EDUCATION 

EDUCATION 0461. ANALYSIS AND MODIFICATION OF 
TEACHING BEHAVIOR 

EDUCATION 0462. TEACHING CLINIC 

ENGLISH 0314. ENGLISH DRAMA (TO THE RESTORATION) 

ENGLISH 0316. MODERN DRAMA 

ENGLISH 0317. DEVELOPMENT OF BRITISH I IOVEL 

ENGLISH 0341. MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE TO 1500 

ENGLISH 0344. MAJOR PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE 

ENGLISH 0361. ROMANTIC PERIOD IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 

ENGLISH 0412. STUDIES IN FICTION (DICKENS, JAMES) 

ENGLISH 0454. MILTON 

ENGLISH 0459. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS 

FRENCH 0401. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND STYLIST- 

ICS I 
FRENCH 0426. 18TH CENTURY NOVEL AND THEATRE 

GERMAN 0431 . GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE 1 9TH CENTURY 
GERMAN 0471. GERMAN CIVILIZATION I 

HISTORY 0301. HISTORY OF THE OLD SOUTH 

HISTORY 0303. THE AMERICAN COLONIES 

HISTORY 0312. HISTORY OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM 

HISTORY 0321 . THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 

HISTORY 0353. ANCIENT GREECE 

HISTORY 0361. BIRTH OF EUROPE: EARLY MIDDLE AGES 

HISTORY 0365. THE RENAISSANCE 

HISTORY 0368. THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT 

HISTORY 0372. MODERN BRITAIN, 1714 TO 1900 

HISTORY 0376, ITALY, 1860 TO THE PRESENT 

HISTORY 0377. HISTORY OF CHINA TO MID-1 7TH CENTURY 

HISTORY 0385. RUSSIA TO 1855 



48 / umbc 



HISTORY 0401. HISTORICAL RESEARCH (AMERICAN) 
HISTORY 0451. HISTORICAL RESEARCH (EUROPEAN) 
HISTORY 0496. COLLOQUIUM IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
HISTORY 0499. SPECIAL PROJECTS 

PHILOSOPHY 0340. SYMBOLIC LOGIC 
PHILOSOPHY 0370. PHILOSOPHY OF MIND 
PHILOSOPHY 0376. THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE 

PHYSICS 0401. QUANTUM THEORY I 

PHYSICS 0470. TECHNIQUES OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS 

PHYSICS 0480 TECHNIQUES OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 0318 STRATEGY AND COALITIONS- 
POLITICS 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 0332. CIVIL RIGHTS 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 0353. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND 
THE ECONOMY 

PSYCHOLOGY 0410. SEMINAR IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY 0452. SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE PSY- 
CHOLOGY—ETHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY 0460. SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY PROB- 
LEMS IN LEARNING 

SPANISH 0411. POETRY AND DRAMA— GOLDEN AGE 
SPANISH 0441. 20TH CENTURY PROSE 
SPANISH 0471. SPANISH CIVILIZATION 




umbc / 49 



GRADUATE FACULTY— UMBC 



LYNN, Yen-Mow, Professor of Mathematics 

BS, National Taiwan University, 1955: MS, California 
Institute of Technology, 1957; PhD, 1961. 



ARNOLD, Joseph L., Assistant Professor of History 

BA, Denison University, 1959; MA, Ohio State University, 
1960; PhD, 1968. 

AZIZ, A. Kadir, Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Wilson Teachers College, 1952; MS, George Washing- 
ton University, 1954; PhD, University of Maryland, 1958. 



MECKLER, Alvin, Associate Professor of Physics 

BS, College of the City of New York, 1947; PhD, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 1952. 

MULLIGAN, Joseph F., Professor of Physics and Coordinator 
of Graduate Studies and Research 
AB, Boston College, 1945; MA, 1946; PhD, Catholic Univer- 
sity of America, 1951. 



BEARE, Aleeza C, Associate Professor of Psychology 

BS, Columbia University, 1954; PhD, 1961. 
BETTRIDGE, William E., Associate Professor of English 

BA, Capital University, 1959; MA. Ohio State University, 

1960; PhD, 1966. 
BHATIA. Nam P., Professor of Mathematics 

BSc, Agra College (India). 1952; MSc. 1956; Dr. rer. nat.. 

Technische Hochschule. (Dresden) 1961. 



CAMPOLATTARO, Alfonso, Professor of Physics 

Laurea in Physics, University of Naples, 1959; Extra - 
Specialization in Theoretical Physics. University of Naples. 
1964. 

COOPER, Philip, Associate Professor of English 

BA, Tulane University, 1947; MA, Columbia University, 
1956; PhD, University of Rochester, 1967. 



GOLDBERG, Janice B., Professor of Psychology 

AB, University of Wisconsin, 1947; AM, University of 
Chicago, 1961; EdD, Harvard University, 1965. 

GORNICK, Fred. Professor of Chemistry 

BS, College of the City of New York, 1 951 ; PhD, University 
of Pennsylvania, 1959. 

GROSS, Fred, Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Brooklyn College, 1955; MA, Columbia University, 
1957; PhD, University of California at Los Angeles, 1962. 



HAMBY, Trudy M., Associate Professor of Education 

BA, Eastern Washington College of Education, 1943; MEd, 
University of Maryland, 1963; PhD, 1966. 



LEVISON, Arnold B.. Professor of Philosophy 
BA, University of Virginia, 1950; PhD, 1959. 

LEWIS, David T., Professor of Sociology 

BA, Central Michigan University, 1942; MA, Ohio State 
University, 1947; PhD, 1960. 



NEVILLE, Richard F., Professor of Education and Chairman of 
the Division of Education 

BS, Central Connecticut State College, 1 953; MA. Columbia 
University, 1957; PhD. University of Connecticut, 1963. 



PARR, Wallace E., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1950; PhD. University 
of Maryland, 1960. 

PEAKE. Charles F., Assistant Professor of Economics 

BS, East Tennessee State University, 1956; MS, University 
of Tennessee, 1957; PhD, University of Maryland, 1968. 

PLATT, Austin P., Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 
BA, Williams College, 1959; MA. University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 1963; PhD, 1965. 



ROBERTS. Richard C. Professor of Mathematics and Chairman 
of the Division of Mathematics 

AB, Kenyon College, 1945; ScM, Brown University. 1946: 
PhD, 1949. 

ROSWELL, May M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages 
BA, University of Dublin (Trinity College), 1936: MA, Cam- 
bridge University, 1937; MA, University of Maryland, 1957; 
PhD, 1961. 



SCHAMP. Homer W.. Jr.. Professor of Education 

AB, Miami University, 1944; MS, University of Michigan, 

1947; PhD, 1952. 
SCHWARTZ, Martin, Professor of Biological Sciences and 
Chairman of the Division of Science 

AB, The Johns Hopkins University, 1949; MS, University of 

Wisconsin, 1951; PhD, 1952. 
SIEGMAN, Aron W , Professor of Psychology 

BA, College of the City of New York, 1952; MS, University 

of Wisconsin, 1954; PhD, Columbia University, 1957. 
SILBER, Herbert B., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BS, Lehigh University, 1962: MS, 1964; PhD, University of 

California at Davis, 1967. 
STEINER, Robert F., Professor of Chemistry 

AB, Princeton University, 1947; PhD, Harvard University, 

1950. 



50 / umbc 



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£12 

= 1 




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AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Professor and Chairman: Rivello 

Professors: Corning. Melnik, Sherwood 

Associate Professors: Jones, Plotkin 

Assistant Professors: Barlow, Donaldson, Filotas (visiting), 

Schaeffer, Weisshaar 
Lecturers: Anderson, Billig. Fleig, Wilson 

The Aerospace Engineering Department offers a broad pro- 
gram of graduate studies leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The curricula for these 
degrees are adapted to meet the objectives and background 
of the individual student and are planned by the student and 
his advisor. Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structural 
Mechanics, and Flight Dynamics are the major areas of speciali- 
zation available to graduate students. 

Applications for admissions will be accepted from those hold- 
ing a B.S. degree in engineering, the physical sciences, and 
mathematics. However, applicants with undergraduate degrees 
in fields other than Aerospace Engineering will be required to 
correct deficiencies in prerequisite undergraduate coursework 
before enrolling in graduate courses. 

Two master's degree options are available: thesis and non- 
thesis. No special departmental requirements are imposed 
beyond The Graduate School requirements. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree beyond 
The Graduate School requirements include two semesters resi- 
dence (or equivalent); plus three years of full-time graduate 
study (or equivalent); 48 semester hours of coursework beyond 
the B. S. including (1) not less than 18 hours within one depart- 
ment area of specialization, (2) not less than 9 hours from 
among the other areas of specialization in the department. (3) 
not less than 12 hours in courses which emphasize the physical 
sciences or mathematics rather than their applications. The total 
in (2) plus that in (3) must be at least 24 hours of which no 
more than 6 are less than 600 level. Written and oral comprehen- 
sive examinations are also required. 

The research facilities of the department are available to the 
graduate student. The aerodynamic facilities include two sub- 
sonic, two supersonic, and a hypersonic wind tunnel. Facilities 
are also available for static and vibration testing of structures. 
An assortment of computers including an IBM 7094. two 1401 s, 
and a Univac 1108 complemented by remote access units on 
a time-sharing basis are available. Under special circumstances 
thesis research may be accomplished in off-campus research 
facilities. 



ENAE 411. AIRCRAFT DESIGN (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 
Prerequisities. ENAE 351, 371, 372. Theory, background, and 
methods of airplane design, subsonic, supersonic and VTOL. 

ENAE 412. DESIGN OF AEROSPACE VEHICLES (3) 
Theory, background and methods of space vehicle design for 
manned orbiting vehicle, manned lunar and Martian landing 
systems. 

ENAE 440. DYNAMICS OF AEROSPACE VEHICLES (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENAE 281 and 371. 
Stability, control and miscellaneous topics in dynamics. 

ENAE 455. AIRCRAFT VIBRATIONS (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, ENAE 351 and MATH 
246. Vibration and other dynamic problems occurring in 
structures. Specific topics of study include the free and forced 
vibrations, single degree of freedom systems, multiple 
degrees of freedom, beams and bars. 

ENAE 457. FLIGHT STRUCTURES III (3) 
Technical elective. Second semester. Three lectures each 
week. Prerequisite, ENAE 352 or equivalent. An advanced 
undergraduate course dealing with the theory and analysis 
of the structures of flight vehicles. Topics will include stresses 
due to shear, indeterminate structures, matrix methods, plate 
theory, buckling and failure of plates. 

ENAE 461. FLIGHT PROPULSION (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Operating 
principles of piston, turbojet, turboprop, ramjet, and rocket 



engines. Thermodynamic processes and engine performance, 
aero-thermochemistry of combustion, fuels and propellants. 
energy for space flight. 

ENAE 462. FLIGHT PROPULSION (3) 
See ENAE 461, above. 

ENAE 470. AERODYNAMICS III (3) 

Prerequisite, ENAE 371. Elementary theory of the flow of an 
incompressible fluid. 

ENAE 473. AERODYNAMICS OF HIGH-SPEED FLIGHT (3) 
Technical elective. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, 
ENAE 372 or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with 
aerodynamic problems of flight at supersonic and hypersonic 
velocities. Topics will include unified hypersonic and super- 
sonic small disturbance theories, real gas effects, 
aerodynamic heating and mass transfer with applications to 
hypersonic flight and re-entry. 

ENAE 475. VISCOUS FLOW AND AERODYNAMIC HEATING (3) 
Prerequisite, ENAE 371, 372, and ENME 216. Three lectures 
per week. Fundamental aspects of viscous flow, Navier Stokes 
equations, similarity, boundary layer equations; laminar, 
transitional and turbulent incompressible flows on airfoils, 
thermal boundary layers and convective heat transfer. Con- 
duction through solids. Introduction to radiative heat transfer. 

ENAE 481. ELECTIVE RESEARCH (3) 
Technical elective. Wind tunnel tests, structural tests. Written 
and oral reports on original research projects. 

ENAE 488. TOPICS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (1-4) 
Technical elective taken with the permission of the student's 
advisor and instructor. Lecture and conference courses 
designed to extend the student's understanding of aerospace 
engineering. Current topics are emphasized. 

ENAE 651. ADVANCED FLIGHT STRUCTURES (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 246 and ENAE 351, 352 or permission 
of the instructor. Advanced topics in structural theory with 
applications to flight vehicle structures. Energy and matrix 
methods, plate theory, instability and failure of columns, 
plates, and stiffened panels; introduction to shell theory. 

ENAE 652. ADVANCED FLIGHT STRUCTURES (3) 
See ENAE 651, above. 

ENAE 655. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS AND AEROELASTICITY 
(3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 246 and ENAE 352. Generalized coor- 
dinates and Lagrange's equations. Vibrations of simple sys- 
tems. Dynamics of elastically connected masses. Influence 
coefficients. Mode shapes and principal oscillations. Matrix 
methods of structural response. Transient stresses in an elas- 
tic structure. Wing divergence and aileron reversal. Theory 
of two dimensional oscillating airfoil. Flutter problems. Ran- 
dom vibrations. 

ENAE 656. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS AND AEROELASTICITY 
(3) 
See ENAE 655, above. 

ENAE 661. ADVANCED PROPULSION (3) 

Prerequisites, ENAE 461, 462. Special problems of ther- 
modynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, roc- 
ket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion 
for space vehicles. 

ENAE 662. ADVANCED PROPULSION (3) 
See ENAE 661. above. 

ENAE 671 AERODYNAMICS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 463 or permission of instructor. Funda- 
mental equations in fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. Cir- 
culation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. Lifting line theory. 
Wind tunnel corrections. Perturbation methods. 

ENAE 672. AERODYNAMICS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS (3) 
See ENAE 671, above. 

ENAE 673. AERODYNAMICS OF COMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENAE 372 or permission of instructor. One 
dimensional flow of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock 
waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible 
flow. Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact 



52 / umcp 



solutions of two dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized theory 
of three-dimensional potential flow. Exact solution of axially 
symmetrical potential flow. One-dimensional flow with fric- 
tion and heat addition. 

ENAE 674. AERODYNAMICS OF COMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS (3) 
See ENAE 673. above. 

ENAE 675. AERODYNAMICS OF VISCOUS FLUIDS (3) 

Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, some exact solutions: 
boundary layer equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, 
compressibility, transformations, analytic approximations, 
numerical methods, stability and transition of turbulent flow. 
Turbulent flow-isotropic turbulence, boundary layer flows, 
free mixing flows. 

ENAE 676. AERODYNAMICS OF VISCOUS FLUIDS (3) 
See ENAE 675. above. 

ENAE 681. WAVE PROPAGATION IN GASES AND SOLIDS (3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Methods of characteristics applied to transient phenomena 
in solids and fluids. Elastic and plastic waves under impact. 
Shock formation and strain rate effects. 

ENAE 682. WAVE PROPAGATION IN GASES AND SOLIDS (3) 
See ENAE 681. above. 

ENAE 683. AEROSPACE FACILITIES AND TECHNIQUES (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Problems in super- 
sonic and hypersonic tunnel development such as the 
aerodynamic design of nozzles, diffusers. storage systems 
and arc heaters. Shock tubes and shock tube wind tunnels. 
Development of ballistic ranges and basic considerations in 
the design of high-speed launchers. Instrumentation and data 
reduction. 

ENAE 684. AEROSPACE FACILITIES AND TECHNIQUES (3) 
See ENAE 683. above. 

ENAE 688. SEMINAR (1-16) 

ENAE 756. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I (3) 

Advanced topics in structural dynamics analysis: dynamic 
properties of materials, impact and contact phenomena, wave 
propagation, numerical methods for complex structural sys- 
tems, analysis for wind and blast loads, penetration loads, 
and earthquake, non-linear systems, random vibrations and 
structural failure from random loads. 

ENAE 757. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS II (3) 
See ENAE 756. above. 

ENAE 773. THE AERODYNAMICS OF HIGH ALTITUDE 
VEHICLES (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Aerothermodynamic 
study of several types of high altitude, hypersonic vehicles, 
including ballistic, boost-glide and satellite vehicles. 
Examination of problems in stability, control, boundary-layer 
growth, Shockwave interactions and convective and radiative 
heating. 

ENAE 774. THE AERODYNAMICS OF HIGH ALTITUDE VE- 
HICLES (3) 
See ENAE 773. above. 

ENAE 776. HEAT TRANSFER PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH 
HIGH VELOCITY FLIGHT (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Heat conduction in sol- 
ids and thermal radiation of solids and gases. Analytic solu- 
tions to simple problems and numerical methods for solving 
complicated problems. Convective heating associated with 
laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flow. Heat transfer 
equations are derived for the plate case and for selected body 
shapes such as cones and hemispheres. Real gas effects on 
convective heating are examined. 

ENAE 777. HEAT TRANSFER PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH 
HIGH VELOCITY FLIGHT (3) 
See ENAE 776. above. 

ENAE 788. SELECTED TOPICS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

(3) 
ENAE 789 SELECTED TOPICS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

(3) 



ENAE 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
ENAE 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 

AASP 400. DIRECTED READINGS IN AFRO-AMERICAN 
STUDIES (3) 
The readings will be directed by the Director of Afro-American 
studies. Topics to be covered will be chosen by the Director 
to meet the needs and interests of individual students. 

AASP 401. SEMINAR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (3) 

The theory and concepts of the social and behavioral sciences 
as they relate to Afro-American studies. Required for the cer- 
tificate in Afro-American studies. Prerequisites: at least 15 
hours of Afro-American studies, related courses or permis- 
sion of the Director. 

AASP 411. NINETEENTH CENTURY BLACK RESISTANCE 
MOVEMENTS (3) 
A comparative description of the black resistance movements 
in Africa and America during the Nineteenth Century: analysis 
of their relationship, similarities and dissimilarities as well as 
their impact on Twentieth Century black nationalism. 

AASP 428. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BLACK DEVELOPMENT (3) 
A multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary educational experi- 
ence concerned with questions relevant to the development 
of black people everywhere. Development implies political, 
economic, social, and cultural change among other things. 
Consequently, a number of topics may be examined and 
studied. 

AASP 429. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BLACK CULTURE (3) 

An interdisciplinary approach to the role of black artists 
around the world. Emphasis is placed upon contributions of 
the black man in Africa, the Caribbean and the United States 
to the literary arts, the musical arts, the performing arts, and 
the visual arts. Course content will be established in terms 
of those ideas and concepts which reflect the cultural climate 
of the era in which they were produced. Attention to individual 
compositions and works of art through lectures, concepts, 
field trips, and audio-visual devices. 



AGRICULTURE 

AGRI 401. AGRICULTURAL BIOMETRICS (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. MATH 115 or equivalent. Probability, 
measures of central tendency and dispersion, frequency dis- 
tributions, tests of statistical hypotheses, regression analyses, 
multiway analysis with emphasis on the use of statistical 
methods in agricultural research. 

AGRI 489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURE (1-3) 

Credit according to time scheduled and organization of the 
course. A lecture series organized to study in depth a selected 
phase of agriculture not normally associated with one of the 
existing programs. 

AGRI 601. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (3) 

First semester, two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. AGRI 602 or its equivalent. The application 
of the principles of experimental design including basic and 
advanced designs, confounding, fractional replication and 
relative efficiencies. 

AGRI 602. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL BIOMETRICS (3) 

Second semester, two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. AGRI 401 or equivalent. Analysis of var- 
iance to include factorials and split-plot design, analysis of 
covariance. multiple and curvilinear regression, enumeration 
data, non-parametric procedures and sample survey 
methods. 



umcp / 53 



AGRI 604. STATISTICAL METHODS IN BIOLOGICAL ASSAY (3) 
Spring semester. Prerequisite. AGRI 602 or its equivalent. The 
course is intended to provide the graduate student with a 
working knowledge of statistical methods used in biological 
assay. Topics to be considered will include direct assays, 
quantitative dose-response relationships, parallel lines 
assays, assays based on quantal response, transformations 
and designs used in bioassay. and fine particle statistics. 

AGRI 607. APPLICATION OF LEAST SQUARES METHODS (3) 
First semester, three lectures per week. Prerequisite, AGRI 
602 or equivalent. Application of the method of least squares 
to the analysis of experimental data. Principles of the least 
squares method, basic matrix algebra, and the application 
of the least squares method of one-way and multi-way 
analysis of variants, analysis of covariants, and various com- 
ponent analysis will be considered. Emphasis given to the 
use of least squares procedures for the analysis of data with 
unequal subclass numbers. 

AGRI 702. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES IN THE 
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Organi- 
zation of research projects and presentation of experimental 
results in the field of agricultural science. Topics included 
will be: sources of research financing, project outline pre- 
paration, formal progress reports, public and industrial sup- 
ported research programs, and popular presentation of 
research data. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor and Chairman: Green 

Professors: Harris, Winn 

Associate Professors: Felton. Merkel 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers graduate 
courses of study leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of specialization include power 
and machinery, soil and water engineering, structures, environ- 
mental control, food engineering, materials handling and 
aquacultural engineering. The program is designed to meet the 
demands of industry and state and federal agencies for scien- 
tists and engineers required by rapidly advancing technology. 

Only the thesis option is available for the M.S. degree. The 
department has no language requirement for either the M.S. 
or Ph.D. degree. 

In addition to well-equipped laboratories in the department, 
the facilities of the Agricultural Experiment Station, the Comput- 
er Science Center, and the College of Engineering are available. 

AGEN 401. AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT (3) 
First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, AGEN 100. Principles of operation and functions 
of power and machinery units as related to tillage; cutting, 
conveying, and separating units: and control mechanisms. 
Principles of internal combustion engines and power unit 
components. 

AGEN 402. AGRICULTURAL MATERIALS HANDLING AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, AGEN 100. Characteristics of construction 
materials and details of agricultural structures. Fundamentals 
of electricity, electrical circuits, and electrical controls. Mate- 
rials handling and environmental requirements of farm prod- 
ucts and animals. 

AGEN 421. POWER SYSTEMS (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites, ENME 216, ENEE 300 and ENME 340. 
Analysis of energy conversion devices including internal com- 
bustion engines, electrical and hydraulic motors. Fundamen- 
tals of power transmission and coordination of power sources 
with methods of power transmission. (Harris) 

AGEN 422. SOIL AND WATER ENGINEERING (3) 

Second semester Three lectures per week, prerequisite, 



ENME 340. Applications of engineering and soil sciences in 
erosion control, drainage, irrigation and watershed manage- 
ment Principles of agricultural hydrology and design of water 
control and conveyance systems. (Rebuck) 

AGEN 424 FUNCTIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN OF 
AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite. AGEN 324. An analytical approach to 
the design and planning of functional and environmental 
requirements of plants and animals in semi- or completely 
enclosed structures. (Merkel) 

AGEN 432. GENERAL HYDROLOGY (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Qualitative 
aspects of basic hydrologic principles pertaining to the prop- 
erties, distribution and circulation of water as related to public 
interest in water resources. (Rebuck) 

AGEN 433. ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. MATH 
246, ENCE 330 or ENME 340. Properties, distribution and cir- 
culation of water from the sea and in the atmosphere 
emphasizing movement overland, in channels and through 
the soil profile Qualitative and quantitative factors are consid- 
ered. (Rebuck) 

AGEN 435. AQUACULTURAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Spring semester. Prerequisite, consent of department. A 
study of the engineering aspects of development, utilization 
and conservation of aquatic systems. Emphasis will be on 
harvesting and processing aquatic animals or plants as 
related to other facets of water resources management. 

(Wheaton) 

AGEN 489. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING (1-3) 
Prerequisite, approval of department. Student will select an 
engineering problem and prepare a technical report. The 
problem may include design, experimentation, and/or data 
analysis. 

AGEN 499. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FARM MECHANICS (1-3) 
Prerequisite, approval of department. Not acceptable for 
majors in agricultural engineering. Problems assigned in 
proportion to credit. 

AGEN 601. INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. Analysis of instrumen- 
tation requirements and techniques for research and opera- 
tional agricultural or biological systems. (Winn) 

AGEN 602. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOLOGICAL 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, differential equations. A study of the signifi- 
cance and the utilization of the mechanical properties of 
biological materials under various conditions of loading. 
Emphasis on particle motion: relationships between stress 
and strain, force, velocity and acceleration; principles of work 
and energy, and theories of failure. 

AGEN 603. BIOLOGICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, differential equations. Interrela- 
tionships of physical properties as functions of moisture and 
temperature gradients in agricultural and aquacultural mate- 
rials. (Cowan) 

AGEN 605. LAND AND WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 
ENGINEERING (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite. AGEN 422 or approval of depart- 
ment. A comprehensive study of engineering aspects of 
orderly development for land and water resources. Emphasis 
will be placed on project formulation, data acquisition, project 
analysis and engineering economy. (Rebuck) 

AGEN 698. SEMINAR (1) 
First and second semesters. 

AGEN 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL AND 
AQUACULTURAL ENGINEERING (1-6) 
First and second semester and summer school. Work 
assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 

AGEN 799 MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

AGEN 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



54 / umcp 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION 
EDUCATION 

Acting Chairman: Poffenberger (Agriculture and Resource 

Economics) 
Professors: Longest, Ryden 
Associate Professors: Nelson, Smith 

As a multidisciplinary department of several educational and 
social science specialties, the Department of Agricultural and 
Extension Education services the academic and continuing 
education needs and interests of the Cooperative Extension 
Service, teachers of agriculture and professionals involved in 
community development. 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree and 
the Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate may be obtained 
in options in Agricultural Education, Extension and Continuing 
Education, and Community Development. Specialization 
options in Agricultural Education include teacher education, 
research, and administration and supervision. Specialization 
options under Extension and Continuing Education include per- 
sonnel development, program development, administration and 
supervision, and continuing education. The multidisciplinary 
community development program specialties include various 
social science disciplines with research, teaching, and exten- 
sion functions; human and organizational planning and 
development; and public affairs education as optional 
emphases. 

In the Master of Science degree programs both thesis and 
non-thesis options are available. Applicants for the Master of 
Science program must present transcripts for evaluation. 

As a continuing education option the department offers the 
A. G. S. program leading to the Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Certificate. It requires 30 credits beyond the Master's degree. 

No specific number of credits is required for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. Each student's program is planned by his 
committee according to his previous education and experience, 
special interests and needs, and professional plans. No foreign 
language requirement exists but is optional and encouraged 
for those interested in international development areas. Stu- 
dents are usually encouraged to develop additional research 
techniques through specific courses and participation in depart- 
ment research programs. Two consecutive semesters of full- 
time resident study are required. Applicants should present 
results of the Graduate Education Test Battery (Miller Analogies, 
Cooperative English, and SCAT quantitative tests) with their 
applications for admission. 

For other requirements and guidelines concerning the above 
programs, contact the Department of Agricultural and Extension 
Education. 

RLED 422. EXTENSION EDUCATION (2) 
Second semester. The agricultural extension service as an 
educational agency. The history, philosophy, objectives, pol- 
icy, organization, legislation and methods used in extension 
work. 

RLED 423. EXTENSION COMMUNICATIONS (2) 

First semester. An introduction to communications in teach- 
ing and within an organization, including barriers to com- 
munication, the diffusion process and the application of com- 
munication principles person to person, with groups and 
through mass media. 

RLED 426. DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF 
EXTENSION YOUTH PROGRAMS (3) 
Designed for present and prospective state leaders of exten- 
sion youth programs. Program development, principles of 
program management, leadership development and counsel- 
ing; science, career selection and citizenship in youth pro- 
grams, field experience in working with low income families' 
youth, urban work. 

RLED 464. RURAL LIFE IN MODERN SOCIETY (3) 

Examination of the many aspects of rural life that affect and 
are affected by changes in technical, natural and human 
resources. Emphasis is placed on the role which diverse 
organizations, agencies and institutions play in the education 
and adjustment of rural people to the demands of modern 
society. 




RLED 487. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES (3) 
Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natural 
resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, and 
minerals — natural resources problems and practices. Exten- 
sive field study. Concentration on subject matter. Taken con- 
currently with RLED 497 in summer session. 

RLED 488. CRITIQUE IN RURAL EDUCATION (1) 
Current problems and trends in rural education. 

RLED 489. CRITIQUE IN RURAL EDUCATION (1) 
Current problems and trends in rural education. 

RLED 497. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES (3) 
Designed primarily for teachers. Study of state's natural 
resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, forests, and 
minerals — natural resources problems and practices. Exten- 
sive field study. Methods of teaching conservation included. 
Taken concurrently with RLED 487 in summer session. 

RLED 499. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) 
Prerequisite, staff approval. 

RLED 606. PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (2-3) 
Second semester. Analysis of community agricultural educa- 
tion needs, selection and organization of course content, 
criteria and procedures for evaluating programs. 

RLED 626. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN EXTENSION 
EDUCATION (2) 
Prerequisite, RLED 422 or equivalent. Principles and proce- 
dures of program planning and development in extension 
education. 

RLED 642. RURAL ADULT EDUCATION (2) 
Second semester. Principles of adult education applied to 
rural groups. Understanding adult motivation, ability and 
behavior. Effective methods of planning, organizing and con- 
ducting rural adult education programs. 

RLED 661. RURAL COMMUNITY ANALYSIS (3) 

First semester. Analysis of structure and function of rural soci- 
ety and application of social understandings to educational 
processes. 



umcp / 55 



RLED 663. DEVELOPING RURAL LEADERSHIP (2-3) 

First semester. Theories of leadership are emphasized. 
Techniques of identifying formal and informal leaders and 
the development of rural lay leaders. 

RLED 689. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RURAL EDUCATION (2) 

RLED 691. RESEARCH METHODS IN RURAL EDUCATION (2-3) 
First semester. The scientific method, problem identification, 
survey of research literature, preparing research plans, 
design of studies, experimentation, analysis of data and thesis 
writing. 

RLED 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) 
Prerequisite, approval of staff. 

RLED 707. SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING (1) 

Summer session. Identification of experiences and activities 
in an effective student teaching program, responsibilities and 
duties of supervising teachers, and evaluation of student 
teaching. 

RLED 789. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RURAL EDUCATION (2) 

RLED 798. SEMINAR IN RURAL EDUCATION (1) 

Second semester. Problems in the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of rural educa- 
tion. Investigation, papers, and reports. 

RLED 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

RLED 882. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE INSTRUCTION (1) 

RLED 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE 
ECONOMICS 

Professor and Chairman: Curtis 

Professors: Beal. Foster, Ishee. Lessley, Moore. Murray. Poffen- 
berger. Smith, Stevens. Tuthill. Waugh (visiting). Wysong 

Associate Professors: Bell (visiting). Bender, Cain. Hardie, Via 

Assistant Professors: Holmes, Lawrence. Marasco, Nash (visi- 
ting) 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
offers graduate courses of study leading to the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Both thesis and non- 
thesis options are available for the Master of Science degree. 
Publications containing the detailed requirements for each 
degree are available from the department. 

Students may pursue major work in production economics, 
foreign economic development, international trade, agricultural 
marketing, resource development economics, resource man- 
agement, public policy, and fisheries economics. The various 
programs offer research and'or internship experiences 
designed to give competency in making observations from the 
real world, coursework to familiarize the student with traditional 
subject matter as well as the frontiers of knowledge, and semi- 
nar and discussion opportunities to enable the student to sharp- 
en his ability to express his thoughts. 

AREC 404. PRICES OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (3) 

Second semester. An introduction to agricultural price 
behavior. Emphasis is placed on the use of price information 
in the decision-making process, the relation of supply and 
demand in determining agricultural prices, and the relation 
of prices to grade, time, location, and stages of processing 
in the marketing system. The course includes elementary 
methods of price analysis, the concept of parity and the role 
of price support programs in agricultural decisions. 

(Marasco) 

AREC 406. FARM MANAGEMENT (3) 

Second semester. The organization and operation of the farm 
business to obtain an income consistent with family resources 
and objectives. Principles of production economics and other 
related fields are applied to the individual farm business. 
Laboratory period will be largely devoted to field trips and 
other practical exercises (Lessley) 



AREC 407. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF THE FARM BUSINESS 
First semester. Application of economic principles to develop 
criteria for a sound farm business, including credit source 
and use, preparing and filing income tax returns, methods 
of appraising farm properties, the summary and analysis of 
farm records, leading to effective control and profitable oper- 
ation of the farm business. (Wysong) 

AREC 414. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
First semester, alternate years. The different forms of 
businesses are investigated. Management functions, business 
indicators, measures of performance, and operational 
analysis are examined. Case studies are used to show applica- 
tions of management techniques. (Lessley) 

AREC 416 MARKETING MANAGEMENT OF AGRI-BUSINESS 
ENTERPRISES (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, AREC 414 or 
permission of instructor. Principles, functions, institutions 
and channels of marketing viewed from the perspective of 
a manager of an agricultural business enterprise. The mana- 
gerial framework for analyzing the entire marketing program 
of a firm is developed and utilized. (Cain) 

AREC 427. AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY MARKETS — AN 
ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Problems, institutions and 
functions within marketing systems for poultry and eggs, 
dairy, grain, horticultural, livestock, tobacco and forestry 
products. Practical applications of elementary economic 
theory in a framework for analysis of market problems. (Via) 

AREC 432. AGRICULTURAL POLICY AND PROGRAMS (3) 
First semester. A study of public policies and programs 
related to the problems of agriculture. Description analysis 
and appraisal of current policies and programs will be 
emphasized. (Beal) 

AREC 444. WORLD AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND TRADE 
(3) 
Second semester, alternate years, 1974. World production, 
consumption, and trade patterns for agricultural products. 
International trade theory applied to agricultural products. 
National influences on international agricultural trade. 

AREC 445. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIES (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Analysis of the agricultural 
economy of selected areas of the world. The interrelation- 
ships among institutions and values, such as government and 
religion, and the economics of agricultural organization and 
production. (Holmes) 

AREC 452. ECONOMICS OF RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (3) 
Second semester. Economic, political, and institutional fac- 
tors which influence the use of land resources. Application 
of elementary economic principles in understanding social 
conduct concerning the development and use of natural and 
man-made resources. (Tuthill) 

AREC 484. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS IN AGRICUL- 
TURE (3) 
First semester An introduction to the application of 
econometric techniques to agricultural problems with 
emphasis on the assumptions and computational techniques 
necessary to derive statistical estimates, test hypotheses, and 
make predictions with the use of single equation models. 
Includes linear and non-linear regression models, internal 
least squares, disciminant analysis and factor analysis. 

(Ishee) 

AREC 485. APPLICATIONS OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAM- 
MING IN AGRICULTURE. BUSINESS. AND ECONOMIC 
ANALYSIS (3) 
First semester. This course is designed to train students in 
the application of mathematical programming (especially 
linear programming) to solve a wide variety of problems in 
agriculture, business and economics. The primary emphasis 
is on setting up problems and interpreting results. The com- 
putational facilities of the computer science center are used 
extensively. (Bender) 



56 / umcp 



AREC 495. HONORS READING COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS I (3) 
First semester. Selected readings in political and economic 
theory from 1700 to 1850. This course develops a basic under- 
standing of the development of economic and political 
thought as a foundation for understanding our present soci- 
ety and its cultural heritage. Prerequisite, acceptance in the 
honors program of the department of agricultural economics. 

(Via) 

AREC 496. HONORS READING COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS II (3) 
Second semester. Selected readings in political and 
economic theory from 1850 to the present. This course con- 
tinues the development of a basic understanding of economic 
and political thought begun in AREC 495. This understanding 
on the part of the student is further developed and broadened 
in this semester by the examination of modern problems in 
agricultural economics in the light of the material read and 
discussed in AREC 495 and AREC 496. Prerequisite: success- 
ful completion of AREC 495 and registration in the honors 
program of the department of Agricultural Economics. 

(Via) 

AREC 689. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
(3) 
First and second semester. Subject matter taught will be 
varied and will depend on the persons available for teaching 
unique and specialized phases of agricultural economics. The 
course will be taught by the staff or visiting agricultural 
economists who may be secured on lectureship or visiting 
professor basis. 

AREC 698. SEMINAR (1) 

First and second semesters. Students will participate through 
study or problems in the field, reporting to seminar members 
and defending positions adopted. Outstanding leaders in the 
field will present ideas for analysis and discussion among 
class members. Students involved in original research will 
present progress reports. Class discussion will provide oppor- 
tunity for constructive criticism and guidance. (Curtis) 

AREC 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS (1-2) 
First and second semesters and summer. Intensive study and 
analysis of specific problems in the field of agricultural 
economics, which provide information in depth in areas of 
special interest to the student. 

AREC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

AREA 804. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL PRICE AND DEMAND 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Second semester. An advanced study in the theory of: (1) 
the individual consumer, (2) household behavior, and (3) ag- 
gregate demand. The concepts of price and cross elasticities 
of demand, income elasticity of demand, and elasticity of sub- 
stitution will be examined in detail. The use of demand theory 
in the analysis of welfare problems, market equilibrium (with 
special emphasis on trade) and the problem of insufficient 
and excessive aggregate demand will be discussed. 

(Marasco) 

AREC 806 ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION (3) 
First semester. Study of the more complex problems involved 
in the long-range adjustments, organization and operation of 
farm resources, including the impact of new technology and 
methods. Applications of the theory of the firm, linear pro- 
gramming, activity analysis and input-output analysis. 

(Hardie) 

AREC 814. ADVANCED AGRI-BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3) 
First semester, alternate years, 1973. Prerequisite, ECON 403, 
AREC 414, or permission of instructor. The application of 
advanced theories of management to agricultural business 
situations within the context of practical economic analysis. 
Relevant analytical techniques are utilized in a variety of prob- 
lems and case study situations. (Cain) 

AREC 822. MARKET STRUCTURE IN AGRICULTURE (3) 

Second semester. This course centers on the concept of mar- 
ket structure analysis, with application of principles 
developed to agricultural industries. (Moore) 



AREC 824. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL MARKETING (3) 
Second semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, 
institutional and legal factors governing both domestic and 
foreign agricultural trade, with particular attention given to 
policies and practices affecting cost and price. (Moore) 

AREC 832. AGRICULTURAL PRICE AND INCOME POLICY (3) 
Second semester, alternate years, 1973. The evolution of 
agricultural policy in the United States, emphasizing the 
origin and development of governmental programs, and their 
effects upon agricultural production, prices and income. 

(Beal) 

AREC 844. ADVANCED THEORY AND PRACTICE OF 
INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL TRADE (3) 
Second semester. Advanced theory, policies, and practices 
in international trade in agricultural products. Includes princi- 
pal theories of trade and finance, agricultural trade policies 
of various countries, and the mechanics of trade. (Moore) 

AREC 845. AGRICULTURE IN WORLD ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT (3) 
First semester, alternate years, 1972. Theories and concepts 
of what makes economic development happen. Approaches 
and programs for stimulating the transformation from a primi- 
tive agricultural economy to an economy of rapidly develop- 
ing commercial agriculture and industry. Analysis of selected 
agricultural development programs in Asia, Africa and Latin 
America. (Foster) 

AREC 846. INTERNATIONAL IMPACTS OF SELECTED 
AGRICULTURAL FORCES (3) 
Second semester. Selected agricultural forces (such as pres- 
sure of population on food supply) and their impacts on the 
political, social, and economic development of the world. 

AREC 852. ADVANCED RESOURCE ECONOMICS (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Assessment and evaluation 
of our natural, capital, and human resources: the use of 
economic theory and various techniques to guide the alloca- 
tion of these resources within a comprehensive framework: 
and the institutional arrangements for using these resources. 
ECON 403 or equivalent is a prerequisite. (Holmes) 

AREC 883. AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS RESEARCH 
TECHNIQUES (3) 
First semester. Emphasis is given to philosophy and basic 
objectives of research in the field of agricultural economics. 
The course is designed to help students define a research 
problem and work out logical procedures for executing 
research in the social sciences. Attention is given to the 
techniques and tools available to agricultural economists. 
Research documents in the field will be appraised from the 
standpoint of procedures and evaluation of the search. 

AREC 885. APPLICATION OF ECONOMETRICS IN 
AGRICULTURE (3) 
First semester. Tools for analyzing demand and price 
behavior of agricultural products. Theories of least squares, 
estimation of structural economic relations in simultaneous 
equation systems, identification problems, and non-linear 
estimation techniques. (Bender) 

AREC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



AGRONOMY 

Professor and Chairman: Miller 

Professors: Axley, Clark. Decker, Strickling 

Associate Professors: Aycock, Bandel, Caldwell (visiting). 

Fanning, Foss, Parochetti, Schillinger 
Assistant Professors: Bezdicek, Burt, Hall, Mulchi, Shannon 

The Department of Agronomy offers graduate courses of 
study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy. The student may pursue major work in the crops 
division or in the soils division of the department. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for the Master 
of Science degree Departmental regulations have been assem- 
bled for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. 



umcp / 57 



Copies of these regulations are available from the Department 
of Agronomy. 

Ample laboratory and greenhouse facilities for graduate work 
are available on the campus. The Plant Research Farm, the For- 
age Research Farm, and the Tobacco Experiment Farm offer 
nearby research facilities. Many projects of the department are 
conducted in cooperation with the Agricultural Research Serv- 
ice of the United States Department of Agriculture with head- 
quarters located three miles from the campus. 



AGRO 403. CROP BREEDING (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 414 or ZOOL 246. Principles and methods of breeding 
annual self and cross-pollinated plant and perennial forage 
species. (Schillinger) 

AGRO 404. TOBACCO PRODUCTION (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. BOTN 100. A study of the his- 
tory, adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement of 
various types of tobacco, with special emphasis on problems 
in Maryland tobacco production. Physical and chemical fac- 
tors associated with yield and quality of tobacco will be 
stressed. (Hoyert) 

AGRO 405. TURF MANAGEMENT (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, BOTN 100. 
A study of principles and practices of managing turf for lawns, 
golf courses, athletic fields, playgrounds, airfields and high- 
ways for commercial sod production. (Hall) 

AGRO 406. FORAGE CROP PRODUCTION (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 100, AGRO 100 or con- 
current enrollment therein. Study of the production and man- 
agement of grasses and legumes for quality hay, silage, and 
pasture. (Decker) 

AGRO 407. CEREAL CROP PRODUCTION (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 100, AGRO 100 or concurrent enrollment therein. Study 
of the principles and practices of corn, wheat, oats, barley, 
rye, and soybean production. (Shannon) 

AGRO 411. SOIL FERTILITY PRINCIPLES (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequisite, 
AGRO 202. A study of the chemical, physical, and biological 
characteristics of soils that are important in growing crops. 
Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, or biological nature 
and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, and rota- 
tions are discussed and illustrated. (Strickling) 

AGRO 412. COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 or permission of 
instructor. A study of the manufacturing of commercial fer- 
tilizers and their use in soils for efficient crop production. 

(Axley) 

AGRO 413. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. AGRO 202 
or permission of instructor. A study of the importance and 
causes of soil erosion, methods of soil erosion control, and 
the effect of conservation practices on soil-moisture supply. 
Special emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil and 
water conservation. The laboratory period will be largely 
devoted to field trips. (Foss) 

AGRO 414. SOIL CLASSIFICATION AND GEOGRAPHY (4) 
Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. 
A study of the genesis, morphology, classification and geog- 
raphic distribution of soils. The broad principles governing 
soil formation are explained. Attention is given to the influ- 
ence of geographic factors on the development and use of 
the soils in the United States and other parts of the world. 
The laboratory periods will be largely devoted to the field trips 
and to a study of soil maps of various countries. (Fanning) 

AGRO 415. SOIL SURVEY AND LAND USE (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. An introduction to soil 
survey interpretation as a tool in land use both in agricultural 



and urban situations. The implications of soil problems as 
delineated by soil surveys on land use will be considered. 

(F. Miller) 

AGRO 417. SOIL PHYSICS (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 
and a course in Physics, or permission of instructor. A study 
of physical properties of soils with special emphasis on rela- 
tionship to soil productivity. (Strickling) 

AGRO 421. SOIL CHEMISTRY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 
or permission of instructor. A study of the chemical composi- 
tion of soils; cation and anion exchange: acid, alkaline and 
saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. 
Chemical methods of soil analysis will be studied with 
emphasis on their relation to fertilizer requirements. 

(Axley) 

AGRO 422 SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. AGRO 
202, CHEM 104 or consent of instructor. A study of biochemi- 
cal processes involved in the formation and decomposition 
of organic soil constituents. Significance of soil-biochemical 
processes involved in plant nutrition will be considered. 

(Bezdicek) 

AGRO 423. SOIL-WATER POLLUTION (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, background in biology and 
CHEM 104. Reaction and fate of pesticides, agricultural fer- 
tilizers, industrial and animal wastes in soil and water will 
be discussed. Their relation to the environment will be 
emphasized. (Bezdicek) 

AGRO 451. CROPPING SYSTEMS (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, AGRO 102 or equivalent. The 
coordination of information from various courses in the 
development of balanced cropping systems, appropriate to 
different objectives in various areas of the State and Nation. 

(Clark) 

AGRO 452. SEED PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 
102 or equivalent. A study of seed production, processing, 
and distribution; Federal and State seed control programs; 
seed laboratory analysis; release of new varieties; and mainte- 
nance of foundation seed stocks. (Newcomer) 

AGRO 453. WEED CONTROL (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1971-72. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 102 
or equivalent. A study of the use of cultural practices and 
chemical herbicides in the control of weeds. (Burt) 

AGRO 499. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRONOMY (1-3) 

Prerequisites AGRO 202, 406, 407 or permission of instructor. 
A detailed study, including a written report of an important 
problem in Agronomy. 

AGRO 601. ADVANCED CROP BREEDING (2) 

Alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Prerequisite, AGRO 403 or 
equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories 
underlying methods of plant breeding. A study of quantitative 
inheritance, herterosis, heritability, interspecific and inter- 
generic hybridization, polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, 
inbreeding and outbreeding, and other topics as related to 
plant breeding. (Schillinger) 

AGRO 602. ADVANCED CROP BREEDING (2) 

Alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Prerequisite, AGRO 601 or 
equivalent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories 
underlying methods of plant breeding. A study of quantitative 
inheritance, herterosis, heritability, interspecific and inter- 
generic hybridization, polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, 
inbreeding and outbreeding, and other topics as related to 
plant breeding. (Aycock) 

AGRO 608. RESEARCH METHODS (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Develop- 
ment of research viewpoint by detailed study and report on 



58 / umcp 



crop research of the Maryland Experiment Station or review 
of literature on specific phases of a problem. 

AGRO 722. ADVANCED SOIL CHEMISTRY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, AGRO 
202 and permission of instructor. A continuation of AGRO 
421 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor elements neces- 
sary for plant growth. (Axley) 

AGRO 789. RECENT ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit four hours. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of recent 
advances in agronomy research. 

AGRO 798. AGRONOMY SEMINAR (1) 
First and second semesters. Total credit toward Master of 
Science degree, 2; toward Ph.D. degree, 6. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. 

AGRO 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
AGRO 802. BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO PLANT PESTS 
(3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequi- 
sites, ENTM 252, BOTN 221, AGRO 403, or permission of 
instructor. A study of the development of breeding techniques 
for selecting and utilizing resistance to insects and diseases 
in crop plants and the effect of resistance on the interrelation- 
ships of host and pest. (Schillinger, Shannon) 

AGRO 804. TECHNIQUE IN FIELD CROP RESEARCH (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequi- 
sites, field plot technique, application of statistical analysis to 
agronomic data, and preparation of the research project. 

AGRO 805. ADVANCED TOBACCO PRODUCTION (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-1974. Prerequi- 
site, permission of instructor. A study of the structural adapta- 
tion and chemical response of tobacco to environmental var- 
iations. Emphasis will be placed on the alkaloids and other 
unique components. (Hoyert) 

AGRO 806. HERBICIDE CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-1973. 
Prerequisite, AGRO 453 and CHEM 104 or permission of 
instructor. Two lectures a week. The importance of chemical 
structure in relation to biologically significant reactions will 
be emphasized in more than 10 different herbicide groups. 
Recent advances in herbicidal metabolism, translocation, and 
mode of action will be reviewed. Adsorption, decomposition 
and movement in the soil will also be studied. (Burt) 

AGRO 807. ADVANCED FORAGE CROPS (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-1973. Prerequi- 
site, BOTN 441 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. A 
fundamental study of physiological and ecological responses 
of grasses and legumes to environmental factors, including 
fertilizer elements, soil moisture, soil temperature, humidity, 
length of day, quality and intensity of light, wind movement, 
and defoliation practices. Relationship of these factors to life 
history, production, chemical and botanical composition, 
quality, and persistence of forages will be considered. 

(Decker) 

AGRO 821 . ADVANCED METHODS OF SOIL INVESTIGATION (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-1974. Prerequi- 
sites. AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. An advanced 
study of the theory of the chemical methods of soil investiga- 
tion with emphasis on problems involving application of phys- 
ical chemistry. (Axley) 

AGRO 831. ADVANCED SOIL MINERALOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-1973. Prerequi- 
sites, AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. A study of the 
structure, physical-chemical characteristics and identification 
methods of soil minerals, particularly clay minerals, and their 
relationship to soil genesis and productivity. (Fanning) 

AGRO 832. ADVANCED SOIL PHYSICS (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-1974. 
Prerequisites, AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. An 
advanced study of physical properties of soils. (Strickling) 

AGRO 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



GEOLOGY 

GEOL421. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, MATH 115 or consent of instructor. An introduc- 
tion to the study of crystals. Stresses the theoretical and prac- 
tical relationships between the internal and external prop- 
erties of crystalline solids. Encompasses morphological, opti- 
cal and chemical crystallography. (Siegrist) 

GEOL 422. MINERALOGY (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratories a week. 
Prerequisite, GEOL 110 and 421 or consent or instructor. 
Basic elementary mineralogy with emphasis on description, 
identification, formation, concurrence and economic signifi- 
cance of approximately 150 minerals. (Siegrist) 

GEOL 423. OPTICAL MINERALOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. One lecture 
and two laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 422 or con- 
sent of instructor. The optical behavior of crystals with 
emphasis on the theory and application of the petrographic 
microscope. (Weidner) 

GEOL 431. INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, GEOL 102 or consent or instructor. ZOOL 102 
or equivalent recommended. A systematic review of the 
morphology, classification, ecology, and geologic ranges of 
selected invertebrate groups represented in the fossil record. 

(Stifel) 

GEOL 432. STRATIGRAPHIC PALEONTOLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 431. 
Principles of biostratigraphy, paleoecology and paleogeog- 
raphy. Laboratory study emphasizes significant index fossils. 

(Stifel) 

GEOL 434. MICROPALEONTOLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 431 or 
consent of instructor. A systematic review of the morphology, 
classification, ecology and geologic ranges of important mi- 
crofossil groups, particularly ostracodes and foraminifera. 

(Stifel) 

GEOL 441. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, GEOL 110 or consent of instructor. A study of 
the cause and nature of the physical stresses and resulting 
deformational responses in the earth. Laboratory exercises 
include crustal model studies and stereographic analysis of 
deformational structures. (Segovia) 

GEOL 442. SEDIMENTATION (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 110 or 
consent of instructor. A study of the critical variables in 
sedimentation systems; origin, dispersion, accumulation, and 
properties of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Laboratories 
will include the measurement and statistical analysis of sedi- 
ment properties and study of sedimentation rates. (Stifel) 

GEOL 443. IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1973-74. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 422 
or consent of instructor. A detailed study of igneous and 
metamorphic rocks: petrogenesis; distributions; chemical 
and mineralogical relations; macroscopic descriptions and 
geologic significance. (Weidner) 

GEOL 444. PETROGRAPHY (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratories a week. 
Prerequisites, GEOL 423, 442 or consent of instructor. Micro- 
scopic thin-section studies of rocks stressing the description 
and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. 

(Weidner) 

GEOL 445. PRINCIPLES OF GEOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 103 or equiva- 
lent and senior standing. A survey of historical and modern 
theories of the origin of elements and their distributions in 



umcp / 59 



space, on extraterrestrial bodies and on earth. Discussion of 
the origin of igneous rocks, of the physical and chemical fac- 
tors governing development and distribution of sedimentary 
rocks of the oceans and of the atmosphere. Organic sedi- 
ments, the internal structures of earth and the planets, the 
role of isotopes in geothermometry and in the solution of 
other problems. (Weidner) 

GEOL 446. GEOPHYSICS (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 122 or 
consent of instructor. An introduction to the basic theories 
and principles of geophysics stressing such important appli- 
cations as rock magnetism, gravity anomolies, crustal strain 
and earthquakes, and surveying. 

GEOL 451. GROUNDWATER GEOLOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequisite, 
GEOL 100 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the 
basic geologic parameters associated with the hydrologic 
cycle. Problems in the accumulation, distribution and move- 
ment of groundwater will be analyzed. 

GEOL 452. MARINE GEOLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Prerequi- 
site. GEOL 100 or consent of instructor. An introduction to 
the essential elements of marine and estuarine geology 
including studies of currents, tides, waves, coastline develop- 
ment, shore erosion and marine and bay sedimentation. 

GEOL 453. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY I — METALLIC ORE 
DEPOSITS (2) 
First semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 422 or consent of 
instructor. A study of the geology of metallic ore deposits 
stressing ore-forming processes, configuration of important 
ore bodies, and familiarization with characteristic ore mineral 
suites. 

GEOL 454. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY II — NON-METALLIC ORE 
DEPOSITS (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite. GEOL 422 or consent of 
instructor. A study of the geology of non-metallic ore 
deposits: nitrates, phosphates, limestone, etc., and fossil 
fuels; coal oil, and natural gas. 

GEOL 456. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1971-72. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 110 or 
consent of instructor. A study of the geological problems 
associated with the location of tunnels, bridges, dams and 
nuclear reactors, slope control, and natural hazards. 

(Segovia) 

GEOL 460. EARTH SCIENCE (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An interdisciplinary 
course designed to show how geology, meteorology, physical 
geography, soil science, astronomy and oceanography are 
interrelated in the study of the earth and its environment in 
space. Recommended for science education undergraduates 
and graduate students. May riot be used for credit towards 
geology majors. (Maccini) 

GEOL 462. GEOLOGICAL REMOTE SENSING (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Offered 1972-73. One lec- 
ture and two laboratories a week. Prerequisites, GEOL 441 
and 442, or 440, or consent of the instructor. An introduction 
to geological remote sensing including applications of aerial 
photographic interpretation to problems in regional geology, 
engineering geology, structural geology, and stratigraphy. 
Films, filters, and criteria used in selecting imagery are also 
discussed. Laboratory exercises include measurements of 
geologic parameters and compilation and transference of 
data to base maps. (Segovia) 

GEOL 489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARTH SCIENCE (1-3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite. GEOL 460 or equivalent. 

(Maccini) 

GEOL 499. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY (1-3) 

Prerequisites. GEOL 102 and 110 or equivalent, and consent 
of instructor. Intensive study of a special geologic subject 



or technique selected after consultation with instructor. 
Intended to provide training or instruction not available in 
other courses which will aid the student's development in 
his field of major interest. 



AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Professor and Director: Beall 
Associate Professor: Lounsbury 
Assistant Professor: Mintz 

The Program in American Studies offers work leading to the 
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. It requires a concentration in either 
American history or literature and permits work in the support- 
ing fields of American studies, literature or history; behavioral 
and social sciences; American art; American thought; Afro- 
American studies; urban and environmental studies; popular 
culture; and comparative culture. 

Admission requirements include strong backgrounds in either 
American studies, history, literature, the humanities or social 
sciences. 

The Program in American Studies collaborates with the 
Smithsonian Institution's Department of American Studies. 

AMST 426. CULTURE AND THE ARTS IN AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American institu- 
tions, the intellectual and esthetic climate from the Colonial 
Period to the present. (Lounsbury) 

AMST 427. CULTURE AND THE ARTS IN AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American institu- 
tions, the intellectual and esthetic climate from the Colonial 
Period to the present. (Lounsbury) 

AMST 436. READINGS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. An historical survey of American 
values as presented in various key writings. (Mintz) 

AMST 437. READINGS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. An historical survey of American 
values as presented in various key writings. (Mintz) 

AMST 446. POPULAR CULTURE IN AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and permission of instructor. A 
survey of the historical development of the popular arts and 
modes of popular entertainment in America. (Mintz) 

AMST 447. POPULAR CULTURE IN AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and AMST 446. Intensive 
research in the sources and themes of contemporary Ameri- 
can popular culture. (Mintz) 

AMST 618. INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES 
(3) (Beall, Lounsbury) 

AMST 628. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (3) 

(Beall, Lounsbury, Mintz) 

AMST 629. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (3) 

(Beall, Lounsbury. Mintz) 

AMST 638. ORIENTATION SEMINAR— MATERIAL ASPECTS OF 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) 
Class meets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 639. READING COURSE IN SELECTED ASPECTS OF 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) 
Class meets at the Smithsonian. 

AMST 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

AMST 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Professor and Chairman: Young 
Professors: Green, Leffel 
Assistant Professor: DeBarthe 

The Department of Animal Science offers work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Course- 



60 / umcp 



work and thesis problems are offered in the areas of animal 
breeding, nutrition, physiology, and livestock production. 

Individual programs can be oriented toward either basic 
research or the solution of problems in the applied areas. Beef 
cattle, horses, sheep, swine and laboratory animals are available 
for graduate student problems. 

Departmental requirements have been formulated for the 
information and guidance of graduate students. Copies of these 
requirements are available from the Department of Animal Sci- 
ence. 



ANSC 401 . FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
104; ANSC 212 recommended. A study of the fundamental 
role of all nutrients in the body including their digestion, 
absorption and metabolism. Dietary requirements and nutri- 
tional deficiency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals 
and man will be considered. (Thomas) 

ANSC 402. APPLIED ANIMAL NUTRITION (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisites, MATH 110. ANSC 401 or permission of 
instructor. A critical study of those factors which influence 
the nutritional requirements of ruminants, swine and poultry. 
Practical feeding methods and procedures used in formula- 
tion of economically efficient rations will be presented. 

(Vandersall) 

ANSC 406. ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS TO THE ENVIRONMENT (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
anatomy and physiology or concurrent registration in 
physiology. The specific anatomical and physiological modifi- 
cations employed by animals adapted to certain stressful envi- 
ronments will be considered. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on the problems of temperature regulation and water 
balance. Specific areas for consideration will include: animals 
in cold (including hibernation), animals in dry heat, diving 
animals and animals in high altitudes. (Albert) 

ANSC 407. ADVANCED DAIRY PRODUCTION (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily 
designed for teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in dairy 
cattle nutrition, breeding and management. 

ANSC 411. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF SHELLFISH (4) 
First semester. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratory 
periods each week. Field trips. Identification, biology, man- 
agement, and culture of commercially important molluscs 
and Crustacea. Prerequisite, one year of biology or zoology. 
This course will examine the shellfisheries of the world, but 
will emphasize those of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and 
Chesapeake Bay. (Anderson) 

ANSC 412. INTRODUCTION TO DISEASES OF ANIMALS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, MICB200and ZOOL101.Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. This course 
gives basic instruction in the nature of disease: including cau- 
sation, immunity, methods of diagnosis, economic impor- 
tance, public health aspects and prevention and control of 
the common diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses and 
poultry. (Albert) 

ANSC 413. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT (3) 

Fall semester. A comprehensive course in care and manage- 
ment of laboratory animals. Emphasis will be placed on 
physiology, anatomy and special uses for the different 
species. Disease prevention and regulations for maintaining 
animal colonies will be covered. Field trips will be required. 

(Marquardt) 

ANSC 414. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF FISH (4) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, one year of biology or 
zoology. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratories a week. 
Fundamentals of individual and population dynamics; theory 
and practice of sampling fish populations; management 
schemes. (Anderson) 

ANSC 416. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. An 
introduction to the interrelationships of game birds and mam- 



mals with their environment, population dynamics and the 
principles of wildlife management. 

ANSC 422. MEATS (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, ANSC 221. A course designed to give the 
basic facts about meat as a food and the factors influencing 
acceptability, marketing, and quality of fresh meats. It 
includes comparisons of characteristics of live animals with 
their carcasses, grading and evaluating carcasses as well as 
wholesale cuts, and the distribution and merchandising of 
the nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods are conducted 
in packing houses, meat distribution centers, retail outlets 
and university meats laboratory. (Buric) 

ANSC 423. LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, ANSC 401. Application of various phases 
of animal science to the management and production of beef 
cattle, sheep and swine. (DeBarthe) 

ANSC 424. LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, ANSC 423. Applications of various phases 
of animal science to the management and production of beef 
cattle, sheep and swine. (Leffel) 

ANSC 426. PRINCIPLES OF BREEDING (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
ANSC 201 or equivalent, ANSC 222, ANSC 423 or 424. 
Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed with permission of 
instructor. The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, 
variation, selection, development, systems of breeding and 
pedigree study are considered. (Green) 

ANSC 442. DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisites, ANSC 242, and ANSC 201. A specialized 
course in breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis is placed on 
methods of evaluation and selection, systems of breeding and 
breeding programs. (Douglas) 

ANSC 444. ANALYSIS OF DAIRY PRODUCTION SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisites, AGEC 406 and ANSC 203 or 214, or permission 
of instructor. The business aspects of dairy farming including 
an evaluation of the costs and returns associated with each 
segment. The economic impact of pertinent management 
decisions is studied. Recent developments in animal nutrition 
and genetics, agricultural economics, agricultural engineer- 
ing, and agronomic practices are discussed as they apply to 
management of a dairy herd. (Buchman) 

ANSC 446. PHYSIOLOGY OF MAMMALIAN REPRODUCTION (3) 
First semester. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 422 or ANSC 212. Anatomy and 
physiology of reproductive processes in wild and domes- 
ticated mammals. (Williams) 

ANSC 452. AVIAN PHYSIOLOGY (2) 

Second semester. Alternate even years. One 3-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisites, a basic course in animal 
physiology. The basic physiology of the bird is discussed, 
excluding the reproductive system. Special emphasis is given 
to physiological differences between birds and other verte- 
brates. (Pollard) 

ANSC 462. PHYSIOLOGY OF HATCHABILITY (1) 

Second semester. One 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 421 or 422. The physiology of embryonic 
development as related to principles of hatchability and prob- 
lems of incubation encountered in the hatchery industry are 
discussed. (Shafner) 

ANSC 464. POULTRY HYGIENE (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisites, MICB 200 and ANSC 101. Virus, bacterial 
and protozoan diseases, parasitic diseases, prevention, con- 
trol and eradication. (Marquardt) 

ANSC 466. AVIAN ANATOMY (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite. ZOOL 102. Gross and microscopic structure, 
dissection and demonstration. (Marquardt) 



umcp / 61 



ANSC 467 POULTRY BREEDING AND FEEDING (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and extension service 
workers. The first half will be devoted to problems concerning 
breeding and the development of breeding stock. The second 
half will be devoted to nutrition. 

ANSC 477. POULTRY PRODUCTS AND MARKETING (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county agents. It deals 
with the factors affecting the quality of poultry products and 
with hatchery management problems, egg and poultry grad- 
ing, preservation problems and market outlets for Maryland 
poultry. 

ANSC 480. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FISH AND WILDLIFE 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
First semester. Three lectures. Analysis of various state and 
federal programs related to fish and wildlife management. 
This would include: fish stocking programs, Maryland deer 
management program, warm water fish management, acid 
drainage problems, water quality, water fowl management, 
wild turkey management and regulations relative to the 
administration of these programs. 

ANSC 487. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE (1) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Summer session only. 
This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and extension service personnel. One primary 
topic to be selected mutually by the instructor and students 
will be presented each session. 

ANSC 601. ADVANCED RUMINANT NUTRITION (2) 

First semester. One 1-hour lecture and one 3-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Physiologi- 
cal, microbiological and biochemical aspects of the nutrition 
of ruminants as compared to other animals. (Vandersall) 

ANSC 603. MINERAL METABOLISM (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 481 and 463. The role of minerals in metabolism of 
animals and man. Topics to be covered include the role of 
minerals in energy metabolism, bone structure, electrolyte 
balance, and as catalysts. (Soares) 

ANSC 604. VITAMINS (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites. ANSC 401 and 461. Advanced study of the fun- 
damental role of vitamins in nutrition including chemical 
properties, absorption, metabolism, storage, excretion and 
deficiency syndromes. A critical study of the biochemical 
basis of vitamin function, interrelationships of vitamins with 
other substances and of certain laboratory techniques. 

ANSC 610. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisites, permission of instructor. 
Theory of electron microscopy, electron optics, specimen 
preparation and techniques, operation of electron photog- 
raphy, interpretation of electron images, related instruments 
and techniques. (Dutta. Mohanty) 

ANSC 622. ADVANCED BREEDING (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, ANSC 426 or equivalent, and biological statis- 
tics. This course deals with the more technical phases of 
heredity and variation, selection indices, breeding systems, 
and inheritance in farm animals. (Green) 

ANSC 641. EXPERIMENTAL MAMMALIAN SURGERY I (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A 
course presenting the fundamentals of anesthesia and the 
art of experimental surgery, especially to obtain research 
preparations. 

ANSC 642. EXPERIMENTAL MAMMALIAN SURGERY II (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, ANSC 641, permission of 
instructor. A course emphasizing advanced surgical practices 
to obtain research preparations, cardiovascular surgery and 
chronic vascularly isolated organ techniques. Experience 
with pump oxygenator systems, profound hypothermia, 
hemodialysis, infusion systems, implantation and transplanta- 
tion procedures is taught. 



ANSC 643. RESEARCH METHODS (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The application 
of biochemical, physio-chemical and statistical methods to 
problems in biological research. 

ANSC 660. POULTRY LITERATURE (1-4) 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics 
are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of analysis 
and presentation of scientific material are discussed. 

(Bigbee) 

ANSC 661. PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, ANSC 212 or its equivalent. The role of 
the endocrines in reproduction is considered. Fertility, sexual 
maturity, egg formation, ovulation, and the physiology of 
oviposition are studied. Comparative processes in birds and 
mammals are discussed. (Shafner) 

ANSC 665. PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS OF DOMESTIC 
ANIMALS (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, a 
course in basic genetics and biochemistry. The underlying 
physiological basis for genetic differences in production traits 
and selected morphological traits will be discussed. Inheri- 
tance of enzymes, protein polymorphisms and physiological 
traits will be studied. (Pollard) 

ANSC 677. ADVANCED ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS TO THE EN- 
VIRONMENT (2) 
First semester. Two lectures or discussions per week. 
Prerequisites, ANSC 406, or permission of instructor. A 
detailed consideration of certain anatomical and physiologi- 
cal modifications employed by mammals adapted to cold, dry 
heat or altitude. Each student will submit for discussion a 
library paper concerning a specific adaptation to an environ- 
mental stress. 

ANSC 690. SEMINAR IN POPULATION GENETICS OF 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites. ZOOL 246 and AGRI 401 or 
their equivalents. Current literature and research dealing with 
the principles of population genetics as they apply to breed- 
ing and selection programs for the genetic improvement of 
domestic animals, population structure, estimation of genetic 
parameters, correlated characters, principles and methods of 
selection, relationship and systems of mating. 

ANSC 698. SEMINAR (1) 

First and second semesters. Students are required to prepare 
papers based upon current scientific publications relating to 
animal science, or upon their research work, for presentation 
before and discussion by the class; (1) recent advances; (2) 
nutrition; (3) physiology; (4) biochemistry. 

ANSC 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE (1-2) 
First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Problems 
will be assigned which relate specifically to the character of 
work the student is pursuing. 

ANSC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ANSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



ANTH 401. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY— PRINCIPLES AND 
PROCESSES (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 101, 102, or 221. An examination of the 
nature of human culture and its processes, both historical 
and functional. The approach will be topical and theoretical 
rather than descriptive. 

(Anderson, Dessaint, Hoffman, Williams) 



62 / umcp 



ANTH 402. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY— WORLD ETHNOG- 
RAPHY (3) 
Prerequisite, ANTH 101, 102, or 221. A descriptive survey of 
the culture areas of the world through an examination of the 
ways of selected representative societies. 

(Anderson, Dessaint, Hoffman, Williams) 

ANTH 412. PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF OCEANIA (3) 

A survey of the cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia 
and Australia. Theoretical and cultural-historical problems 
will be emphasized. (Anderson, Dessaint) 

ANTH 414. ETHNOLOGY OF AFRICA (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102. The native peoples and cul- 
tures of Africa and their historical relationships, with 
emphasis on that portion of the continent south of the Sahara. 

ANTH 417 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF THE FAR EAST (3) 
A survey of the major sociopolitical systems of China, Korea 
and Japan. Major anthropological questions will be dealt with 
in presenting this material. (Dessaint) 

ANTH 423. ETHNOLOGY OF THE SOUTHWEST 

Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102. Culture history, economic 
and social institutions, religion, and mythology of the Indians 
of the Southwest United States. (Anderson, Williams) 

ANTH 424. ETHNOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102. The native people and cul- 
tures of North America north of Mexico and their historical 
relationships, including the effects of contact with European- 
derived populations. (Anderson. Hoffman, Thurman) 

ANTH 426. ETHNOLOGY OF MIDDLE AMERICA (3) 

Prerequisites. ANTH 101 and 102. Cultural background and 
modern social, economic and religious life of Indian and 
Mestizo groups in Mexico and Central America; processes 
of acculturation and currents in cultural development. 

(Williams) 

ANTH 431. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF PRIMITIVE PEOPLES 
(3) 
Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102. A comparative survey of 
the structures of non-literate and folk societies, covering both 
general principles and special regional developments. 

ANTH 434. RELIGION OF PRIMITIVE PEOPLES (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102. A survey of the religious 
systems of primitive and folk societies, with emphasis on the 
relation of religion to other aspects of culture. (Anderson) 

ANTH 436. PRIMITIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ECONOMY (3) 
A survey of technology, food economy and general economic 
processes in non-industrial societies. (Anderson) 

ANTH 437. POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT IN PRIMITIVE 

SOCIETY (3) 

A combined survey of politics in human societies and of 

important anthropological theories concerning this aspect of 

society. (Williams) 

ANTH 441. ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE OLD WORLD (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 101 or 241. A survey of the archaeological 
materials of Europe, Asia and Africa, with emphasis on 
chronological and regional interrelationships. 

(Schacht, Thurman) 

ANTH 451. ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE NEW WORLD (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 101 or 241. A survey of the archaeological 
materials of North and South America with emphasis on 
chronological and regional interrelationships. 

(Schacht, Thurman) 

ANTH 461. ADVANCED PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 101 or 261. A technical introduction to 
the hereditary, morphological, physiological, and behavioral 
characteristics of man and his primate ancestors and rela- 
tives, with emphasis on evolutionary processes. 

(Kerley, Rosen) 

ANTH 498. FIELD METHODS IN ETHNOLOGY (1-6) 

Field training in the collection and recording of ethnological 
data. (Summer only). (Dessaint, Williams) 



ANTH 499. FIELD METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (1-6) 

Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey and 
excavation. (Summer only). (Schacht, Thurman) 

ANTH 605. THEORY OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 
History and current trends of cultural anthropological theory, 
as a basic orientation for graduate studies and research. 

(Dessaint, Hoffman, Williams) 

ANTH 621. CULTURAL ECOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An examination of the 
nature of the interrelationships between human cultures and 
the natural environment in which they exist. 

(Anderson, Thurman) 

ANTH 631. EVOLUTION IN SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (3) 

An inquiry into the origin and development of institutions of 
kinship, marriage, and group formation in differing socio- 
cultural systems. (Williams) 

ANTH 637. POLITICAL POWER AND ORGANIZATION (3) 

A seminar concerning the nature of political power, distribu- 
tion, and the way it allows different socio-cultural systems 
to solve major adaptive problems. (Williams) 

ANTH 641. METHOD AND THEORY IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. An examination of 
the principles and purposes involved in the gathering and 
interpretation of archaeological data. (Schacht, Thurman) 

ANTH 661. HUMAN MORPHOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 461 or its equivalent and permission of 
the instructor. The nature and variation of human skeletal 
and somatic characters, with emphasis on evolutionary 
developments. (Kerley, Rosen) 

ANTH 681. PROCESSES OF CULTURE CHANGE (3) 

Change in culture due to contact, diffusion, innovation, 
fusion, integration, and cultural evolution. 
ANTH 685. PEASANT COMMUNITIES IN THE MODERN WORLD 
(3) 
Comparative analysis of peasant communities in Latin 
America, Europe, Middle East, Asia and Africa. 

(Dessaint, Williams) 

ANTH 688. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) 
Detailed investigation of a current problem or research 
technique, the topic to be chosen in accordance with faculty 
interests and student needs. May be repeated, as content 
varies, for a total of not more than nine semester hours. 

ANTH 689. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (1-6) 

(Dessaint, Williams) 

ANTH 698. ADVANCED FIELD TRAINING IN ETHNOLOGY (1-6) 

Offered in the summer session only. 
ANTH 699. ADVANCED FIELD TRAINING IN ARCHAEOLOGY (1- 

6) 
Offered in the summer session only. (Schacht. Thurman) 



ARCHITECTURE 



ARCH 400. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO III (4) 

Continuation of design studio, with emphasis on comprehen- 
sive building design and introduction to urban design factors. 
Prerequisites, ARCH 301 and 311. Corequisite, ARCH 410, 
except by permission of the dean. Lecture, studio, 9 hours 
per week. 

ARCH 401. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO IV (4) 

Continuation of design studio, with emphasis on urban design 
factors. Prerequisites, ARCH 400 and 410. Corequisite, ARCH 
411, except by permission of the dean. Lecture, studio, 9 
hours per week. 



umcp / 63 



ARCH 410. BUILDING SYSTEMS III (4) 

Applications of principles in architectural structures, environ- 
mental controls and construction. Prerequisites, ARCH 301 
and 311. Corequisite, ARCH 400. Lecture, studio, 6 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 411. BUILDING SYSTEMS IV (4) 

Applications of principles and further analysis of systems and 
hardware in architectural structures, environmental controls 
and construction. Prerequisites, ARCH 400 and 410. Corequi- 
site, ARCH 401. Lecture, studio, 6 hours per week. 

ARCH 413. STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS IN ARCHITECTURE (3) 
Theory and application of selected complex structural sys- 
tems as they relate to architectural decisions. Prerequisite, 
ARCH 410 or by permission of the instructor. Seminar, 3 hours 
per week. (Shaeffer, Lazaris) 

ARCH 420. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE (3) 
Survey history of American architecture from the 17th Century 
to the present. Lecture, 3 hours per week. (Senkevitch) 

ARCH 422. LATE 18TH CENTURY PARISIAN ARCHITECTURE 
(3) 
The theoretical background, formulation, and development 
of late Eighteenth Century architecture in Paris, and its rela- 
tionship to contemporaneous British and Continental 
developments in architecture and peripheral fields. A reading 
knowledge of French will be required. Colloquium, independ- 
ent research. By permission of the instructor. (Wiebenson) 

ARCH 424. HISTORY OF RUSSIAN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

Survey history of Russian architecture from the 10th Century. 
Three hours per week. 

ARCH 426. READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE (3) 
Prerequisite, ARCH 326. Readings and analysis of recent 
architectural criticism. Seminar, three hours per week. 

(Wiebenson) 

ARCH 427. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF 
ARCHITECTURE (3) 
Permission of the instructor. Independent research in 
architectural history. Lecture 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 450. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN PLANNING (3) 

Introduction to city planning theory, methodology and 
techniques, dealing with normative, urban, structural, 
economic, social aspects of the city; urban planning as a 
process. Architectural majors or by permission of the instruc- 
tor. Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per week. (Skiadaressis) 

ARCH 472. ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF ARCHITECTURE 
(3) 
Introduction of economic aspects of present day architecture: 
government policy, land evaluation, and project financing; 
construction materials and labor costs; cost analysis and con- 
trol systems. Architecture majors, except by permission of 
instructor. Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per week. 

(Schlesinger) 

ARCH 478. DIRECTED STUDIES IN ARCHITECTURE (1-4) 
Directed study under individual faculty guidance with enroll- 
ment limited to advanced undergraduate students. Project 
proposals must receive a recommendation from the school 
curriculum committee and approval of the dean of the school 
prior to registration. Public oral presentation to the faculty 
of a final report of project will be required at final submission 
for credit. 



The Department of Art offers programs of graduate study lead- 
ing to the degrees of Master of Arts in art history and studio 
art and Doctor of Philosophy in art history. Both disciplines, 
rooted in the concept of art as a humanistic experience, share 
an essential common aim; the development of the student's 
aesthetic sensitivity, understanding and knowledge. The major 
in art history is committed to the advanced study and scholarly 
interpretation of existing works of art, from the prehistoric era 
to the present, while the studio major stresses the student's 
direct participation in the creation of works of art. 

For admission to graduate study in studio art, an under- 
graduate degree with an art major from an accredited college 
or university, or its equivalent, is required. The candidate should 
have approximately 70 credit hours of undergraduate work in 
studio courses, and 12 credit hours in art history courses. Other 
humanities area courses should be part of the candidate's 
undergraduate preparation. In addition, special departmental 
requirements must be met. A portfolio and/or slides should be 
submitted to the department along with the application for 
admission. A candidate for the Master's degree will be required 
to pass an oral comprehensive examination, present an exhibi- 
tion of his thesis work, and an oral defense of the thesis. 

For admission to graduate study in art history, in addition 
to the approved undergraduate degree, or its equivalent, special 
departmental requirements must be met. Departmental require- 
ments for the Master of Arts degree in Art History include ARTH 
692; reading knowledge of French or German (evidenced by 
an examination administered by the Art Department); a written 
comprehensive examination which tests the candidate's knowl- 
edge and comprehension of principal areas and phases of art 
history; a thesis which demonstrates competency in research 
and in original investigation by the candidate; and a final oral 
examination on the thesis and the field which it represents. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Art His- 
tory include ARTH 692; reading knowledge of French and Ger- 
man; an oral examination and an intensive research problem; 
a dissertation which demonstrates the candidate's capacity to 
perform independent research in the field of art history; and 
a final oral examination on the dissertation and the field it rep- 
resents. 

An MFA degree program proposal was submitted during the 
summer of 1972 for approval. 

For information on work leading to the degree of Master of 
Education in art education, the student is referred to the section 
devoted to the College of Education in this catalog. 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available in 
art including two Museum Training Fellowships. Interested stu- 
dents should apply to the Department of Art. 



ART EDUCATION 

ARTE 600. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ART EDUCATION (3) 
ARTE 601. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ART EDUCATION (3) 
ARTE 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



ART HISTORY 



ART 



Professor and Chairman: Levitine 

Professors: deLeiris, Jamieson, Lembach, Lynch, Maril 

Associate Professors: Bunts, Campbell, Denny, Longley, 1 Pem- 

berton, Rearick 
Assistant Professors: DeFederico, Isen, Niese 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 



ARTH 402. CLASSICAL ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the classical cultures. 
First semester will stress Greece. 

ARTH 403. CLASSICAL ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the classical cultures. 
Second semester will stress Rome. 

ARTH 404. BRONZE AGE ART (3) 

Art of the Near East, Egypt and Aegean. 

ARTH 406. ART OF THE EAST (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. First semester will stress 
India. 



64 / umcp 



ARTH 407. ART OF THE EAST (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. Second semester will 
stress China and Japan. 

ARTH 410. EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaic of early Chris- 
tian Rome, the Near East and the Byzantine Empire. 

ARTH 412. MEDIEVAL ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. First 
semester will stress Romanesque. 

ARTH 413. MEDIEVAL ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. 
Second semester will stress the Gothic Period. 

ARTH 416. NORTHERN EUROPEAN PAINTING IN THE 15TH 
CENTURY (3) 
Painting in the Netherlands, France and Germany. 

ARTH 417. NORTHERN EUROPEAN PAINTING IN THE 16TH 
CENTURY (3) 
Painting in the Netherlands, France and Germany. 

ARTH 422. EARLY RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1400 to 1430. 

ARTH 423. EARLY RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1430 to 1475. 

ARTH 424. HIGH RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1475 to 1500. 

ARTH 425. HIGH RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 1500 to 1525. 

ARTH 430. EUROPEAN BAROQUE ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major Southern 
European centers in the 17th Century. 

ARTH 431. EUROPEAN BAROQUE ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major Northern 
European centers in the 17th Century. 

ARTH 434. FRENCH PAINTING (3) 

French painting from 1400 to 1600. From Fouquet to Poussin. 

ARTH 435. FRENCH PAINTING (3) 

French painting from 1600 to 1800. From Le Brun to David. 

ARTH 440. 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe from Neo- 
Classicism to Romanticism. 

ARTH 441. 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe. From Real- 
ism, to Impressionism and Symbolism. 

ARTH 445. IMPRESSIONISM AND NEO-IMPRESSIONISM (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 260, 261 or consent of instructor. History 
of Impressionism and Neo-lmpressionism: artists, styles, art 
theories, criticism, sources and influence on 20th Century. 

ARTH 450. 20TH CENTURY ART (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture from the late 19th Cen- 
tury to 1920. 

ARTH 451. 20TH CENTURY ART (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture from 1920 to the present. 

ARTH 454. NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURY 
SCULPTURE (3) 
Trends in sculpture from Neo-Classicism to the present. 
Emphasis will be put on the redefinition of sculpture during 
the 20th Century. 

ARTH 455. 20TH CENTURY MASTERS AND MOVEMENTS (3) 
Artists and tendencies in 20th Century art. Subject will change 
and be announced each time course is offered. 

ARTH 460. HISTORY OF THE GRAPHIC ARTS (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 261, or consent 
of instructor. Graphic techniques and styles in Europe from 
1400 to 1800; contributions of major artists. 

ARTH 462. AFRICAN ART (3) 

First semester, the cultures west of the Niger River (Nigeria 
through Mali) from 400 B.C. to the present. The art is studied 
through its iconography and function in the culture and the 



intercultural influences upon the artists, including a study of 
the societies, cults and ceremonies during which the art was 
used. 

ARTH 463. AFRICAN ART (3) 

Second semester, the cultures east and south of Nigeria. The 
art is studied through its iconography and function in the 
culture and the intercultural influences upon the artists, 
including a study of the societies, cults and ceremonies dur- 
ing which the art was used. 

ARTH 464. AFRICAN ART RESEARCH (3) 

Prerequisite ARTH 462, 463 or departmental permission. 
Seminar type course with concentration on particular aspects 
of African art. The course is given at the Museum of African 
Art in Washington, D.C. 

ARTH 470. LATIN AMERICAN ART (3) 

Art of the Pre-Hispanic and the Colonial Periods. 

ARTH 471. LATIN AMERICAN ART (3) 

Art of the 19th and 20th Centuries. 
ARTH 474. SPANISH ART (3) 

Emphasis will be given to the artists of the Medieval and Early 

Renaissance Periods. 

ARTH 475. SPANISH ART (3) 

Emphasis will be given to the artists of the 16th and 17th 
Centuries such as El Greco and Velasquez. 

ARTH 476. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United States from 

the Colonial Period to about 1875. 
ARTH 477. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United States from 

about 1875 to the present. 

ARTH 480. AMERICAN COLONIAL PAINTING (3) 

Development and style of painting in Colonial America: 
sources, genres, influential studios, Anglo-American school 
of historical painting. 

ARTH 482. AMERICAN ART AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO 
EUROPE — 1800-1900 (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 476 and 477 recommended. The American 
artist in Europe; American and German Romanticism; Neo- 
Classicism in America and Europe; Dusseldorf School; 
Munich School; Pre-Raphaelites, Barbizon School and 
Impressionism. 

ARTH 489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department head or instructor. May 
be repeated to a maximum of six credits. 

ARTH 498. DIRECTED STUDIES IN ART HISTORY I (2-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of department chair- 
man. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs. 

ARTH 499. DIRECTED STUDIES IN ART HISTORY II (2-3) 

ARTH 612. ROMANESQUE ART (2-3) 

Painting and sculpture in Western Europe in the 11th and 
12th Centuries; regional styles; relationships between styles 
of painting and sculpture; religious content. 

ARTH 614. GOTHIC ART (3) 

Painting and sculpture in Western Europe in the 11th and 
12th Centuries; regional styles; relationships between styles 
of painting and sculpture; religious content. 

ARTH 630. THE ART OF MANNERISM (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 423 or permission of instructor. Mannerism 
in Europe during the 16th Century; beginnings in Italy; ramifi- 
cations in France, Germany, Flanders, Spain; painting, 
architecture, and sculpture. 

ARTH 634. FRENCH PAINTING FROM LEBRUN TO GERICAULT. 
1715-1815 (3) 
Development of iconography and style from the Baroque to 
Neo-Classicism and Romanticism. Trends and major artists. 

ARTH 656. 19TH CENTURY REALISM, 1830-1860 (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 440 or 441 or equivalent. Courbet and the 
problem of realism; precursors, David, Gericault, Landscape 
Schools; Manet; artistic and social theories; realism outside 
France. 



umcp / 65 



ARTH 662. 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 450, 451 or equivalent. A detailed examina- 
tion of the art of an individual country in the 12th Century: 
France, Germany, Italy, Spain, England. 

ARTH 672. AMERICAN COLONIAL ART (3) 

ARTH 676. 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN ART (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 450, 451 or equivalent. The "Eight," "the 
Armory Show," American Abstraction, Romantic-Realism, 
New Deal art projects, American Surrealism and Expression- 
ism. 

ARTH 692. METHODS OF ART HISTORY (3) 

Methods of research and criticism applied to typical art- 
historical problems; bibliography and other research tools. 
May be taken for credit one or two semesters. 

ARTH 694. MUSEUM TRAINING PROGRAM (3) 

ARTH 695. MUSEUM TRAINING PROGRAM (3) 

ARTH 698. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES IN ART HISTORY 
(3) 
For advanced graduate students, by permission of head of 
department. Course may be repeated for credit if content dif- 
fers. 

ARTH 699. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department head or instructor. 

ARTH 702. SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL ART (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 402, 403 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 712. SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 412, 413 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 714. SEMINAR — PROBLEMS IN MEDIEVAL 
ICONOGRAPHY (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 412 or 413 or permission of instructor. 
Studies of selected problems in the religious meaning of 
medieval iconography. Some reading knowledge of French, 
German and Latin is desirable. 

ARTH 728 SEMINAR TOPICS IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART 
(3) 
Problems selected from significant themes in the field of 
Italian Renaissance art and architecture, 1200-1600. May be 
repeated for credit if content differs. 

ARTH 736. SEMINAR IN 18TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART (3) 

ARTH 740. SEMINAR IN ROMANTICISM (3) 

Problems derived from the development of Romantic Art dur- 
ing the 18th and 19th Centuries. 

ARTH 743. SEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART (3) 
Problems derived from the period starting with David and end- 
ing with Cezanne. 

ARTH 754. SEMINAR IN POST-IMPRESSIONISM AND 
SYMBOLISM (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 440, 441 or equivalent. The period of 1880- 
1900; Cezanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin, the Nabis; symbolism 
and Art Nouveau; social and aesthetic theories; formal and 
functional approaches to architecture. 

ARTH 760. SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ART (3) 

ARTH 770. SEMINAR IN LATIN-AMERICAN ART (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of instructor. 

ARTH 772. SEMINAR IN MODERN MEXICAN ART (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of instructor. Problems 
of Mexican art of the 19th and 20th Centuries; Mexicanismo; 
the "Mural Renaissance"; architectural regionalism. 

ARTH 774. SEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN ART (3) 
Problems in architecture and painting from the end of the 
Colonial Period until 1860. 

ARTH 776. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART AND ITS LITERARY 
SOURCES (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 260 and 261 or equivalent. Art and litera- 
ture in the 19th Century; literary influences on the 19th Cen- 
tury; American painting, artistic and literary parallels; art 
theories and criticism by authors and artists. 



ARTH 777. SEMINAR IN LOCAL AND REGIONAL ART (3) 
Prerequisites, ARTH 260 and 261 or equivalent. Art in 
Washington, D.C., Baltimore and the state of Maryland. Major 
genres; prominent artists; public commissions; institutions. 

ARTH 780. SEMINAR — PROBLEMS IN ARCHITECTURAL 
HISTORY AND CRITICISM (3) 

ARTH 784. SEMINAR IN LITERARY SOURCES OF ART HISTORY 
(3) 
Art historical sources from Pliny to Malraux. 

ARTH 798. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES IN ART HISTORY 

(3) 
ARTH 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
ARTH 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ART STUDIO 



ARTS 410. DRAWING IV (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ARTS 310. Advanced draw- 
ing, with emphasis on human figure, its structure and organic 
likeness to forms in nature. Compositional problems deriving 
from this relationship are also stressed. 

ARTS 420. PAINTING IV (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ARTS 324. Creative painting 
Emphasis on personal direction and self-criticism. Group 
seminars. 

ARTS 430. SCULPTURE IV (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ARTS 335. Problems and 
techniques of newer concepts, utilizing various materials, 
such as plastics and metals. Technical aspects of welding 
stressed. 

ARTS 440. PRINTMAKING III (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ARTS 340 and 344. Contem- 
porary experimental techniques of one print medium with 
group discussions. 

ARTS 441. PRINTMAKING IV (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ARTS 440. Continuation of 
ARTS 440. 

ARTS 498. DIRECTED STUDIES IN STUDIO ART (2-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of department chair- 
man. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs. 

ARTS 610. DRAWING (3) 

Sustained treatment of a theme chosen by student. Wide vari- 
ety of media. 

ARTS 614. DRAWING (3) 

Traditional materials and methods including Oriental, Sumi 
ink drawing and techniques of classical European masters. 

ARTS 616. DRAWING (3) 

Detailed anatomical study of the human figure and prepara- 
tion of large scale mural compositions. 

ARTS 620. PAINTING (3) 

ARTS 624. PAINTING (3) 

ARTS 626. PAINTING (3) 

ARTS 627. PAINTING (3) 

ARTS 630. EXPERIMENTATION IN SCULPTURE (3) 

ARTS 634. EXPERIMENTATION IN SCULPTURE (3) 

ARTS 636. MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES IN SCULPTURE (3) 
For advanced students, methods of armature building, and 
the use of a variety of stone, wood, metal, and plastic materi- 
als. 

ARTS 637. SCULPTURE-CASTING AND FOUNDRY (3) 

The traditional methods of plaster casting and the com- 
plicated types involving metal, cire perdue, sand-casting and 
newer methods, such as cold metal process. 

ARTS 640. PRINTMAKING (3) 

Advanced problems. Relief process. 



66 / umcp 




umcp / 67 




68 / umcp 



ARTS 644. PRINTMAKING (3) 

Advanced problems. Intaglio process. 

ARTS 646. PRINTMAKING (3) 

Advanced problems. Lithographic process. 

ARTS 647. SEMINAR IN PRINTMAKING (3) 

ARTS 690. DRAWING AND PAINTING (3) 

Preparation and execution of a wall decoration. 

ARTS 698. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES IN STUDIO ART (3) 
For advanced graduate students by permission of head of 
department. Course may be repeated for credit if content dif- 
fers. 
ARTS 798. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES IN STUDIO ART (3) 
ARTS 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



take at least four 3-credit Astronomy courses at the 600 and 
700 level, exclusive of seminars and research projects. Normally 
all Ph.D. candidates take at least 12 credits of advanced physics 
courses. Especially recommended are PHYS 604, 607, and 622. 

Many other courses of direct interest to astronomy students 
are available in Physics, Mathematics, Meteorology, Electrical 
Engineering, and Chemistry. The student is urged to obtain as 
wide a background as possible outside his field of specializa- 
tion. 

For more information, especially for physics courses related 
to astronomy, see the section on Physics. A brochure, entitled 
"Graduate Study in Astronomy,'' describing the requirements, 
the courses and the research program in detail is available from 
the department. All correspondence, including that concerning 
admission to the Astronomy Program, should be addressed to: 
Astronomy Program, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland, 20742. 



ASTRONOMY PROGRAM 

Professor and Director: Westerhout 

Professors: Brandt (part-time), Erickson, Kerr. Kundu, Opik 

Associate Professors: A'Hearn, Bell, Matthews, Rose, Smith, 

Wentzel, Zipoy 
Assistant Professors: Harrington, Simonson, Zuckerman 

The Astronomy Program, administratively part of the Depart- 
ment of Physics and Astronomy, offers programs of study lead- 
ing to the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. in Astronomy. 

Students are expected to demonstrate competence in the fol- 
lowing subjects prior to admission to graduate work: general 
physics, heat, intermediate mechanics, optics, electricity and 
magnetism, modern physics, differential and integral calculus, 
and advanced calculus. A student may be admitted without one 
of these courses, but he should plan to make up the deficiency 
as soon as possible, either by including such a course as a 
part of his graduate program or by independent study. 

No formal undergraduate coursework in astronomy is 
required. However, an entering student should have a working 
knowledge of the basic facts of astronomy such as is obtainable 
from one of the many elementary textbooks. A more advanced 
knowledge of astronomy will of course enable a student to pro- 
gress more rapidly during the first year of graduate work. 

Normally, a satisfactory score on the GRE Advanced Test in 
Physics is required before an applicant's admission to The 
Graduate School will be considered. In special cases, the 
Graduate Entrance Committee may waive this requirement, and 
set other conditions as a requirement for admission, to be ful- 
filled either before admission or during the first year at Mary- 
land. 

A full schedule of courses in all fields of astronomy is offered 
including galactic astronomy, astrophysics, solar system 
astronomy, observational astronomy, celestial mechanics, solar 
physics, study of the interstellar medium and extra-galactic 
astronomy. The faculty has expertise in every major branch of 
astronomy. The research program is centered around two major 
areas of interest. The first one is the study of our Galaxy: its 
large-scale spiral structure, detailed structure and theory of 
interstellar gas clouds, the theory of the interaction between 
cosmic rays and the gas, and the distribution of different typas 
of stars. The second is the study of stellar interiors and evolu- 
tion, and of atmospheres, including the atmosphere of the sun 
and its influence on the earth and interplanetary space, includ- 
ing the study of planetary atmospheres, comets and the moon. 

Qualification for the Ph.D. program (which is decided in the 
middle or at the end of the second year) requires a written 
examination on basic astronomy at the end of the first year, 
an extensive research project during the second year, and a 
well thought-out oral presentation of a proposed thesis topic. 
Overall performance in the exam, coursework and research 
determines admission to the Ph.D. program. 

All candidates must take the courses ASTR 400, 401 and 410, 
41 1 (this requirement may be waived if the student has previous 
experience). All full-time students are expected to attend an 
average of two colloquia and/or seminars each week by register- 
ing for ASTR 498. Candidates for the Ph.D. should expect to 



ASTR 400. INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS I (3) 

Three lectures per week. Pre- or corequisite, PHYS 422 or 
consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, structure of the 
atmospheres of the sun and other stars. Observational data 
and curves of growth. Chemical composition. 

ASTR 401. INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS II (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ASTR 400. A brief sur- 
vey of stellar structure and evolution, and of the physics of 
low-density gasses, such as the interstellar medium and the 
solar atmosphere. Emphasis is placed on a good understand- 
ing of a few theoretical concepts that have wide astrophysical 
applications. 

ASTR 410. OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY (3) 

Prerequisites, working knowledge of calculus, physics 
through PHYS 284, or 263, and 3 credits of astronomy. An 
introduction to current methods of obtaining astronomical 
information including radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, and 
X-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will involve photo- 
graphic and photoelectric observations with the department's 
optical telescope and 21-cm line spectroscopy, flux measure- 
ments and interferometry with the department's radiotele- 
scopes. 

ASTR 411. OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY (3) 

Prerequisites, ASTR 410, working knowledge of calculus, 
physics through PHYS 284, or 263, and 3 credits of astronomy. 
An introduction to current methods of obtaining astronomical 
information including radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, and 
X-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will involve photo- 
graphic and photoelectric observations with the department's 
optical telescope and 21-cm line spectroscopy, flux measure- 
ments and interferometry with the department's radiotele- 
scopes. Observatory work on individual projects. Every 
semester. 

ASTR 420. INTRODUCTION TO GALACTIC RESEARCH (3) 
First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, MATH 
141 and at least 12 credits of introductory physics and 
astronomy courses. Stellar motions, methods of galactic 
research, study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters of 
stars. 

ASTR 450 CELESTIAL MECHANICS (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 410 or consent 
of instructor. Celestial mechanics, orbit theory, equations of 
motion. 

ASTR 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ASTRONOMY (1-6) 

Prerequisite, major in physics or astronomy and/or consent 
of advisor. Research or special study. Credit according to 
work done. 

ASTR 600. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ASTR 400. 401, PHYS 
422 or consent of the instructor. Observational methods, line 
formation, curve of growth, equation of transfer, stars with 
large envelopes, variable stars, novae, magnetic fields in 
stars. 

ASTR 605. STELLAR INTERIORS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, MATH 414 and PHYS 
422 or consent of instructor. A study of stellar structure and 



umcp / 69 



evolution. This course will consider the question of energy 
transfer and generation in the interior of a star, the structure 
of stars, including problems of turbulence, determination of 
chemical composition, non-homogeneous stars, evolution of 
both young and old stars, pulsating stars, novae. 

ASTR 620. GALACTIC RESEARCH (3) 

Prerequisites, ASTR 420, 410, 411, or consent of the instruc- 
tor. Current methods of research into galactic structure, 
kinematics, and dynamics. Basic dynamical theory. Optical 
and radio observational methods and current results. Review 
of presently-determined distribution and kinematics of the 
major constituents of the galaxy. Evolution of the galaxy. 

ASTR 625. DYNAMICS OF STELLAR SYSTEMS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 601 or ASTR 420. 
Study of the structure and evolution of dynamical systems 
encountered in astronomy. Stellar encounters viewed as a 
two-body problem, statistical treatment of encounters, study 
of dynamical problems in connection with star clusters, ellip- 
soidal galaxies, nuclei of galaxies, high-velocity stars. 

ASTR 630. PHYSICS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. PHYS 422. A survey 
of the problems of interplanetary space, the solar wind, com- 
ets and meteors, planetary structure and atmospheres, 
motions of particles in the Earth's magnetic field. 

ASTR 660. PHYSICS OF THE SOLAR ENVELOPE (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 422, ASTR 400 
or consent of instructor. A detailed study of the solar 
atmosphere. Physics of solar phenomena, such as solar 
flares, structure of the corona, etc. 

ASTR 670. INTERSTELLAR MATTER (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, previous or concur- 
rent enrollment in PHYS 622, ASTR 400 or 420, or consent 
of instructor. A study of the physical properties of interstellar 
gas and dust. This course will include diffuse nebulae, regions 
of ionized hydrogen, regions of neutral hydrogen, the prob- 
lems of interstellar dust and perhaps planetary nebulae, 
molecules. 

ASTR 688. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN ASTRONOMY (1-16) 
Credit according to work done each semester. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. These courses will be given by special- 
ists in various fields of modern astronomy, partly staff mem- 
bers, partly visiting professors or part-time lecturers. They will 
cover subjects such as: cosmology, discrete radio sources, 
magnetohydrodynamics in astronomy, the H.R. diagram, stel- 
lar evolution, external galaxies, galactic structure, chemistry 
of the interstellar medium, advanced celestial mechanics, 
astrometry, radio physics of the sun, etc. 

ASTR 698. SEMINAR (1) 

Seminars on various topics in advanced astronomy are held 
each semester, with the contents varied each year. One credit 
for each semester. There are weekly colloquia by staff, 
astronomers from the Washington area, and visiting 
astronomers, usually on topics related to their own work. 

ASTR 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ADVANCED ASTRONOMY 
(1-6) 

ASTR 788. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN ASTRONOMY (1-16) 

ASTR 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ASTR 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



BOTANY 



Professor and Chairman: Krauss 

Professors: Brown. Corbettn Galloway. Gauch, Kantzes. Krus- 
berg. Lockard, 1 Morgan, Sisler, Stern 

Associate Professors: Bean, Curtis, Karlander, Klarman, Pat- 
terson. Rappleye 

Assistant Professors: Barnett, Motta. Reveal. Smith 

Research Professor: Sorokin 
1 jomt appointment with Secondary Education. 



The Department of Botany offers graduate courses of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Courses and research problems are developed on 
a personal basis arranged according to the intellectual and pro- 
fessional needs of the student. Course programs are flexible 
and are designed under close supervision of the student's 
advisor. The objective of the program is to equip the student 
with a background and techniques for a career in plant science 
in academic, governmental, industrial or private laboratories. 

The areas of specialization are Anatomy and Morphology, 
Plant Biochemistry, Biophysics. Plant Ecology, Physiology of 
Fungi, Genetics and Molecular Biology, Marine Biology, 
Mycology, Plant Nematology, Plant Pathology, Phycology, Tax- 
onomy, and Plant Virology. 

There are no special admission requirements. However, a high 
degree of intellectual excellence is of greater consequence than 
completion of a particular curriculum at the undergraduate 
level. 

The degree requirements are flexible. However, they involve 
demonstration of competence in the broad field of Botany, as 
well as completion of courses in other disciplines which are 
supportive of modern competence in this field. 

The department has laboratories equipped to investigate most 
phases of botanical and molecular biological research. Field 
and greenhouse facilities are available for research requiring 
plant culture. Special laboratory rooms have been developed 
for research employing radioactive isotopes. Major pieces of 
equipment include a transmission electron microscope, 
ultracentrifuges, X-ray equipment, low-speed centrifuges, mi- 
crotomes for cutting ultrathin sections, infra-red spec- 
trophotometer, recording spectrophotometers, research ves- 
sels, and environmental controlled growth chambers. Herbaria, 
departmental reference room, enzyme preparation rooms, dark 
rooms, cold rooms, special culture apparatus for algae, fungi, 
and higher plants, spectrophotometers, and respirometers are 
among the many special pieces of equipment and facilities that 
are available for research. 



BOTN 401. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF BOTANY (1) 
First semester. Prerequisites, 20 semester credit hours in 
biological sciences including BOTN 100 or equivalent. Dis- 
cussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about 
plants, leading to a survey of contemporary work in botanical 
science. 

BOTN 405. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY (3) 
Fall semester. Two 2-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 212 or equivalent. An advanced study of 
the principles of systematic botany. Laboratory practice with 
difficult plant families including grasses, sedges, legumes, 
and composites. Field trips arranged. 

BOTN 407. TEACHING METHODS IN BOTANY (2) 

Summer session. Four 2-hour laboratory demonstration 
periods per week, for 8 weeks. Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or 
equivalent. A study of the biological principles of common 
plants, and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suitable 
for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

BOTN 41 1 . PLANT ANATOMY (3) 
Summer or University College. Lectures and labs to be 
arranged. The origin and development of the organs and the 
tissue systems in the vascular plants. 

BOTN 412. STRUCTURE OF ECONOMIC PLANTS (3) 
Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 411 or BOTN 416. A detailed mi- 
croscopic study of the anatomy of the chief fruit and vege- 
table crops. 

BOTN 413. PLANT GEOGRAPHY (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or equivalent. A study 
of plant distribution throughout the world and the factors 
generally associated with such distribution. 

BOTN 414 PLANT GENETICS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or equivalent. The 
basic principles of plant genetics are presented; the 
mechanics of transmission of the hereditary factors in relation 
to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of specialized 



70 / umcp 



organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations of 
basic and economic significance gene action, genetic maps, 
the fundamentals of polyploidy, and genetics in relation to 
methods of plant breeding are the topics considered, 

BOTN 415. PLANTS AND MANKIND (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 100orequivalent. Asurvey 
of the plants which are utilized by man, the diversity of such 
utilization, and their historic and economic significance. 

BOTN 416. PRINCIPLES OF PLANT ANATOMY (4) 
Two lectures and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 
The origin and development of cells, tissues, and tissue sys- 
tems of vascular plants with special emphasis on seed- 
bearing plants. Particular stress is given to the comparative, 
systematic, and evolutionary study of the structural compo- 
nents of the plants. Prerequisite, general botany. 

BOTN 417. FIELD BOTANY AND TAXONOMY (2) 
Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or general biology. 
Four 2-hour laboratory periods a week for 8 weeks. The iden- 
tification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native 
plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other techniques will 
be used. Numerous short field trips will be taken. Each stu- 
dent will make an individual collection. 

BOTN 422. RESEARCH METHODS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY (2) 
Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, BOTN 221 or equivalent. Advanced training in the basic 
research techniques and methods of plant pathology. 

BOTN 424. DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF PLANT DISEASES 
(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 221. Three lectures per 
week. A study of various plant diseases grouped according 
to the manner in which the host plants are affected. Emphasis 
will be placed on recognition of symptoms of the various 
types of diseases and on methods of transmission and control 
of the pathogens involved. 

BOTN 426. MYCOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two 2-hour laboratory 
periods per week. An introductory study of the morphology, 
classification, life histories, and economics of the fungi. 

BOTN 427. FIELD PLANT PATHOLOGY (1) 

Summer session: lecture and laboratory to be arranged. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 221, or equivalent. The techniques of pes- 
ticide evaluation and the identification and control of diseases 
of Maryland crops are discussed. Offered in alternate years 
or more frequently with demand. 

BOTN 441. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisites, BOTN 100 and general chemistry. 
Organic chemistry strongly recommended. A survey of the 
general physiological activities of plants. 

BOTN 462. PLANT ECOLOGY (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 100. Two lectures per 
week. The dynamics of populations as affected by environ- 
mental factors with special emphasis on the structure and 
composition of natural plant communities, both terrestrial 
and aquatic. 

BOTN 463. ECOLOGY OF MARSH AND DUNE VEGETATION (2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 100. An examination 
of the biology of higher plants in dune and marsh ecosystems. 

BOTN 464. PLANT ECOLOGY LABORATORY (1) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 462 or its equivalent or 
concurrent enrollment therein. One 3-hour laboratory period 
a week. The application of field and experimental methods 
to the qualitative and quantitative study of vegetation and 
environmental factors. 

BOTN 475. ALGAL SYSTEMATICS (3) 
One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site, BOTN 100. An intensive study of algal structures, 
morphology, classification and nomenclature including prep- 
aration, preservation and identification procedures. 

BOTN 477. MARINE PLANT BIOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 100 
or general biology plus organic chemistry or the consent of 
the instructor. Five 1-hour lectures and three, 3-hour 



laboratories each week for six weeks. An introduction to the 
taxonomic, physiological and biochemical characteristics of 
marine plants which are basic to their role in the ecology 
of the oceans and estuaries. 

BOTN 497. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARINE RESEARCH (1-3) 
Summer session. Prerequisites. BOTN 100 or general biology 
plus organic chemistry or consent of instructor. Recom- 
mended concurrent or previous enrollment in BOTN 477, 
Marine Plant Biology. An experimental approach to problems 
in marine research dealing primarily with phytoplankton, the 
larger algae, and marine spermatophytes. Emphasis will be 
placed on their physiological and biochemical activities. 

BOTN 612. PLANT MORPHOLOGY (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, BOTN 212, BOTN 411, or equivalent. A 
comparative study of the morphology of the flowering plants, 
with special reference to the phylogeny and development of 
floral organs. 

BOTN 615. PLANT CYTOGENETICS (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, Introductory Genetics. An advanced study 
of the current status of plant genetics, particularly gene muta- 
tions and their relation to chromosome changes in corn and 
other favorable materials. 

BOTN 616. NUCLEIC ACIDS AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (2) 
Fall semester, alternate years. Prerequisites, biochemistry 
(CHEM 661) and cytogenetics (BOTN 615) or equivalent, or 
consent of instructor. One session of two hours per week. 
An advanced treatment of the biochemistry of nucleic acids 
and molecular genetics for qualified graduate students. Lec- 
tures and assigned reports on recent progress in the chemis- 
try of inheritance. 

BOTN 621. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, organic chemistry and BOTN 
441 or equivalent in bacterial or animal physiology. A study 
of various aspects of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemi- 
cal transformation, fungal products, and mechanism of fun- 
gicidal action. 

BOTN 623. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI LABORATORY (1) 

First semester. One laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
BOTN 621 or concurrent registration therein. Application of 
equipment and techniques in the study of fungal physiology. 

BOTN 625. PHYSIOLOGY OF PATHOGENS AND HOST- 
PATHOGEN RELATIONSHIPS (3) 
Three lecture periods a week. A study of enzymes, toxins, 
and other factors involved in pathogenicity and the relation- 
ship of host-pathogen interaction to disease development. 

BOTN 632. PLANT VIROLOGY (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week on the biological, 
biochemical, and biophysical aspects of viruses and virus dis- 
eases of plants. Prerequisites, Bachelor's degree or equiva- 
lent in any biological science and permission of instructor. 

BOTN 634. PLANT -VIROLOGY LABORATORY (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratories per week on the applica- 
tion and techniques for studying the biological, biochemical 
and biophysical aspects of plant viruses. Prerequisites, 
Bachelor's degree or equivalent in any biological science and 
BOTN 632 or concurrent registration therein, and permission 
of the instructor. 

BOTN 636. PLANT NEMATOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 221 or permission of instructor 
The study of plant-parasitic nematodes, their morphology, 
anatomy, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecology, host- 
parasite relations and control. Recent advances in this field 
will be emphasized. 

BOTN 641. ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 441 or equivalent, and 
organic chemistry. A presentation of the metabolic processes 
occurring in plants, including the roles of the essential ele- 
ments in these processes with special emphasis on recent 
literature. 



umcp / 71 



BOTN 642. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY (2) 
Second semester, prerequisite. BOTN 641 or CHEM 461 and 
462. A treatment of those aspects of biochemistry especially 
pertinent to plants-respiration, photosynthesis, and organic 
transformations. 

BOTN 644. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (2) 
Plant biochemistry laboratory. Second semester (not offered 
1973-74.) Prerequisites, BOTN 642 or concurrent registration 
therein. Use of apparatus and application of techniques in 
the study of the chemistry of plants and plant materials. One 
scheduled 3-hour laboratory period per week, plus one 1-hour 
laboratory to be arranged. 

BOTN 645. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant sci- 
ence. A study of current developments in the mathematical 
treatment of growth and the effects of radiation, plant hor- 
mones, photoperiodism, and internal biochemical balance 
during the development of the plant. 

BOTN 652. PLANT BIOPHYSICS (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1972-73.) Prerequisites, BOTN 
641 and at least one year in physics. An advanced course 
dealing with the operation of physical phenomena in plant 
life processes. 

BOTN 654. PLANT BIOPHYSICS LABORATORY (2) 

Plant biophysics laboratory. Second semester (not offered 
(1972-73). Prerequisites BOTN 652 or concurrent registration 
therein. A quantitative and qualitative study of plant systems 
by physical and physiochemical methods and instruments. 
One scheduled 3-hour laboratory period per week, plus one 
1-hour laboratory period to be arranged. 

BOTN 661. ADVANCED PLANT ECOLOGY (3) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1973-74). Prerequisite, a working 
knowledge of elementary genetics and calculus, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Population dynamics, evolutionary 
mechanisms, and quantitative aspects of the analysis of 
natural communities. Special emphasis will be given to recent 
theoretical developments. 

BOTN 672. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1973-74). Prerequisite. BOTN 
642, the equivalent in allied fields, or permission of the 
instructor. A study of the physiology and comparative 
biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory techniques and recent 
advances in algal nutrition, photosynthesis, and growth will 
be reviewed. 

BOTN 674. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE LABORATORY (1) 
Second semester. (Not offered 1973-74). One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, previous or concurrent enroll- 
ment in BOTN 672, and permission of instructor. Special 
laboratory techniques involved in the study of algal nutrition. 

BOTN 698. SEMINAR IN BOTANY (1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. Discussion of special topics and current literature 
in all phases of botany. 

BOTN 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY (1-3) 

a. physiology, b. ecology, c. pathology, d. mycology, e. 
nematology, f. cytology, g. cytogenetics, h. morphology, i. 
anatomy, j. taxonomy. First and second semester. Credit 
according to time scheduled and organization of course. Max- 
imum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual 
student at the discretion of the Department. This course may 
be organized as a lecture series on a specialized advanced 
topic, or may consist partly, or entirely, of experimental proce- 
dures. It may be taught by visiting lecturers, or by resident 
staff members. 

BOTN 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

BOTN 899 DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor and Chairman: Taff 

Professors: H. Anderson, Carroll, Dawson, Fisher, Hermanson, 
Hi lie. Lamone. Levine, Miner, Patrick, Wright 



Associate Professors: Ashmen, Fromovitz, Gannon. Greer, Has- 
lem, Hynes. Loeb. Nash, Paine. Spivey. Widhelm 

Assistant Professors: R. Anderson. Falthzik, Hargrove, Jolson, 
Kuehl, Leete. Nickels. Olson, Poist. Zabriskie 



The Department of Business Administration offers graduate 
work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Busi- 
ness Administration, Doctor of Philosophy, and Doctor of Busi- 
ness Administration. Among the factors which are considered 
in admission of students for Master's work in business adminis- 
tration are an undergraduate record evidencing high scholastic 
attainment and performance on the required Admission Test 
for Graduate Study in Business. 

Admission to the Ph.D. program is based upon excellence 
in both undergraduate and graduate work, the Admission Test 
for Graduate Study in Business, reports of academic observers 
on the applicant's work, and other evidence of promising 
scholarship. 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed 
primarily to prepare students for positions of responsibility in 
business and government. Emphasis is placed on the develop- 
ment of analytical ability and reasoned judgment in decision 
making. Instructional methods include case analysis, seminar 
discussion and decision simulation. Computer familiarization is 
provided. 

A core of four courses embraces the areas of business deci- 
sions central to the firm's operation; relevant analytical 
methods, especially quantitative techniques: behavioral factors 
affecting the managerial task and the environment in which bus- 
iness functions, especially in its relationship with government. 

Beyond the core, further advanced work may be taken in man- 
agement and in statistics, and a concentration may be under- 
taken in a field of special interest: accounting, finance, market- 
ing, personnel and industrial relations, and transportation. 

Individuals who are qualified are accepted not only from the 
area of undergraduate business administration but from other 
areas, such as engineering, the sciences, the arts, the 
humanities, and other fields. The graduate program is offered 
only during the day and is conducted on the campus. 

Those students whose major undergraduate work has been 
in areas other than business are required to complete certain 
basic core requirements in business and economics with a "B" 
average before being granted the degree of Master of Business 
Administration. These core course requirements are: principles 
of economics (6 hours), principles of accounting (6 hours), busi- 
ness law (3 hours), statistics (3 hours), marketing (3 hours), man- 
agement and organization theory (3 hours), and business 
finance (3 hours). 

A minimum of 30 semester hours must be completed in 
courses numbered 600 or above. A thesis is not required. 

Of the 30 hours required in graduate courses, not less than 
six and not more than 12 must be taken in a major subject. 
Courses covering the remaining subjects must be taken outside 
the major and must comprise a coherent group, as approved 
by the student's advisor. 

The other requirements for the degree are the same as for 
the degree of Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

The Doctor of Business Administration degree is designed 
for those planning to teach business administration subjects 
at the university level and for those preparing for research or 
management responsibilities in industry, government and uni- 
versities. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Business Administration degree 
are required to develop competence in the following five con- 
centrations: Financial Administration. Human Behavior in Busi- 
ness, Quantitative Methods, Business Logistics, and Manage- 
ment. 

Candidates are required to pass written examinations in each 
of the five concentrations noted above Following the written 
examinations, each candidate must pass an oral examination 
given by a committee of the Graduate Faculty. 

Candidates must apply and be admitted to candidacy for the 
Doctor of Business Administration degree one academic year 
before the degree is awarded. The Ph.D. time limits apply. 

A written dissertation, exhibiting competence in the analysis, 
interpretation, and presentation of research findings is required 
of all candidates. 



72 / umcp 



Upon being admitted to candidacy, the candidate must pre- 
sent to his appointed dissertation committee a Dissertation 
Proposal, which sets forth objectives of the research plan, its 
scope, methodologies to be employed, types and sources of 
data to be sought, and time requirements for completion. When 
approved, the candidate completes the dissertation under the 
direction of his committee. Each candidate is required to regis- 
ter for 12 semester hours of dissertation research (899). 

An examination on the dissertation is conducted by a commit- 
tee of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the Dean for Graduate 
Studies and Research. The rules governing this examination are 
the same as those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree 



BSAD 401. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) 

Students enrolled in the Department of Business Administra- 
tion curricula will register for IFSM 436. For detailed informa- 
tion on prerequisites and descriptions of the course, refer 
to IFSM 436. The credits earned in IFSM 436 may be included 
in the total credits earned in the area of concentration in busi- 
ness administration. 

BSAD 420, 421 UNDERGRADUATE ACCOUNTING SEMINAR (3) 
Prerequisite, senior standing as an accounting major or con- 
sent of instructor. Enrollment limited to upper one-third of 
senior class. Seminar coverage of outstanding current non- 
text literature, current problems and case studies in account- 
ing. 

BSAD 422 AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 311. A study of the principles and prob- 
lems of auditing and application of accounting principles to 
the preparation of audit working papers and reports. 

BSAD 423. APPRENTICESHIP IN ACCOUNTING (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in accounting 
and the consent of the accounting staff. A period of appren- 
ticeship is provided with nationally known firms of certified 
public accountants from about January 15 to February 15. 

BSAD 424. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 311. Advanced accounting theory to 
specialized problems in partnerships, ventures, consign- 
ments, installment sales, insurance, statement of affairs, 
receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, and 
consolidation of parent and subsidiary accounts. 

BSAD 425. CPA PROBLEMS (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 311. or consent of instructor, a study of 
the nature, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by means 
of the preparation of solutions to, and an analysis of, a large 
sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various accounting 
fields. 

BSAD 426. ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING (2) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 321 . A continuation of basic cost account- 
ing with special emphasis on process costs, standard costs, 
joint costs, and by-product cost. 

BSAD 427 ADVANCED AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 422. Advanced auditing theory and prac- 
tice and report writing 

BSAD 430. SAMPLE SURVEYS IN BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 
(3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 230 or equivalent. A course surveying the 
uses of statistics in economic and business research. The 
emphasis of the discussion is directed toward cross-section' 
analysis as distinct from time-series' analysis (which is given 
detailed attention in BSAD 432). Topics covered include: 
research methodology, sampling techniques and design, 
data-collection methods, questionnaire preparation, inter- 
viewing procedures, the evaluation of survey results, and a 
review of selected case studies. 

BSAD 431. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 230, or equivalent. A course surveying the 
uses of statistical principles in industry. Topics considered 
include a brief review of basic statistical measures: a study 
of the hypergeometric. binomial, normal, and Poisson proba- 
bility distributions: the sampling distributions of the mean. 



the standard deviation, and the range; the construction and 
operation of the various control charts in current use; the 
diagnostic significance of different findings; acceptance 
sampling on the basis of measurement data and on the basis 
of attribute data. 

BSAD 432. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 230 or equivalent. A course exploring the 
usefulness of statistical methods in economic prediction. 
Various forecasting techniques in current use are examined. 
Major topics receiving attention are the analysis of trends, 
the identification of seasonal patterns and cycles, and the 
measurement of economic relationships. The discussion goes 
beyond the points made in BSAD 330. Particularly, the uses 
of multiple correlation analysis are examined in great detail. 
Some reference is also made to the predictive potentialities 
of so-called anticipation statistics. Throughout the course, 
due attention is given to the logical aspects of the forecasting 
problem as distinct from its statistical side. 

BSAD 434. OPERATIONS RESEARCH II (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 332 or permission of instructor. Advanced 
topics in operations research including decision theory, prob- 
ability models and inventory models. Emphasis on the 
mathematical formulation of business problems and 
implementation of model solutions. 

BSAD 435. LINEAR PROGRAMMING IN BUSINESS (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 332 or permission of instructor. Theory, 
formulation, interpretation, and application of the general 
linear transportation, assignment, and integer programming 
models. Emphasis is on the application of these models to 
large-scale business problems. 

BSAD 440. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 340. Analysis and discussion of cases and 
readings relating to financial decisions of the firm. The appli- 
cation of finance concepts to the solution of financial prob- 
lems is emphasized. 

BSAD 443. SECURITY ANALYSIS AND VALUATION (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 343. Study and application of the con- 
cepts, methods, models, and empirical findings to the 
analysis, valuation, and selection of securities, especially 
common stock. 

BSAD 445. COMMERCIAL BANK MANAGEMENT (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 340 and ECON 430. Analysis and discus- 
sion of cases and readings in commercial bank management. 
The loan function is emphasized; also the management of 
liquidity reserves, investments for income, and source of 
funds. Bank objectives, functions, policies, organization, 
structure, services, and regulation are considered. 

BSAD 450. MARKETING RESEARCH METHODS (3) 

Prerequisites. BSAD 230 and 350. Recommended that BSAD 
430 be taken prior to this course. This course is intended 
to develop skill in the use of scientific methods in the acquisi- 
tion, analysis and interpretation of marketing data. It covers 
the specialized fields of marketing research; the planning of 
survey projects, sample design, tabulation procedure and 
report preparation. 

BSAD 451. CONSUMER ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisites. BSAD 350 and 351. Recommended that PSYC 
100 and 221 betaken prior to this course. Considers the grow- 
ing importance of the American consumer in the marketing 
system and the need to understand him. Topics include the 
foundation considerations underlying consumer behavior 
such as economic, social, psychological and cultural factors. 
Analysis of the consumer in marketing situations — as a buyer 
and user of products and services — and in relation to the vari- 
ous individual social and marketing factors affecting his 
behavior. The influence of marketing communications is also 
considered. 

BSAD 452. PROMOTION MANAGEMENT (3) 

Prerequisites. BSAD 350 and 352. This course is concerned 
with the way in which business firms use advertising, personal 
selling, sales promotion, and other methods as part of their 
marketing program. The case study method is used to present 
problems taken from actual business practice. Cases studied 
illustrate problems in the use and coordination of demand 



umcp / 73 



stimulation methods as well as analysis and planning. 
Research, testing and statistical control of promotional 
activities are also considered. 

BSAD 453. INDUSTRIAL MARKETING (3) 

Prerequisites. BSAD 350 plus one other marketing course. 
The industrial and business sector of the marketing system 
is considered rather than the household or ultimate consumer 
sector. Industrial products range from raw materials and 
supplies to the major equipment in a plant, business office, 
or institution. Topics include product planning and introduc- 
tion, market analysis and forecasting, channels, pricing, field 
sales force management, advertising, marketing cost 
analysis, and government relations. Particular attention is 
given to industrial, business and institutional buying policies 
and practice and to the analysis of buyer behavior. 

BSAD 454. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 350 plus any other marketing course. A 
study of the marketing functions from the viewpoint of the 
international executive. In addition to the coverage of interna- 
tional marketing policies relating to product adaptation, data 
collection and analysis, channels of distribution, pricing, 
communications, and cost analysis, consideration is given to 
the cultural, legal, financial, and organizational aspects of 
international marketing. 

BSAD 455. SALES MANAGEMENT (3) 
The role of the sales manager, both at headquarters and in 
the field, in the management of people, resources and market- 
ing functions. An analysis of the problems involved in sales 
organization, forecasting, planning, communicating, evaluat- 
ing and controlling. Attention is given to the application of 
quantitative techniques and pertinent behavioral science con- 
cepts in the management of the sales effort and sales force. 

BSAD 460. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT — ANALYSIS AND 
PROBLEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 360. Recommended, BSAD 230. Research 
findings, special readings, case analysis, simulation, and field 
investigations are used to develop a better understanding of 
personnel problems, alternative solutions and their practical 
ramifications. 

BSAD 462. LABOR LEGISLATION (3) 
Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial rela- 
tions. Cases include the decisions of administrative agencies, 
courts and arbitration tribunals. 

BSAD 464. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 

Prerequisite. BSAD 364. An examination of research and 
theory concerning the forces which contribute to the behavior 
of organizational members. Topics covered include: work 
group behavior, supervisory behavior, intergroup relations, 
employee goals and attitudes, communication problems, 
organizational change, and organizational goals and design. 

BSAD 467. UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERSONNEL 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is open only 
to the top one-third of undergraduate majors in personnel 
and labor relations and is offered during the fall semester 
of each year. Highlights major developments. Guest lecturers 
make periodic presentations. 

BSAD 470. MOTOR TRANSPORTATION (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 370. The development and scope of the 
motor carrier industry; different types of carriers, economics 
of motor transportation, service available, federal regulation, 
highway financing, allocation of cost to highway users, high- 
way barriers. 

BSAD 471. WATER TRANSPORTATION (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 370 Water carriers of all types, develop- 
ment and types of services, trade routes, inland waterways, 
company organization, the American merchant marine as a 
factor in national activity. 

BSAD 472. COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION (3) 

Prerequisite. BSAD 370. The air transportation system of the 
United States; airways, airports, airlines. Federal regulation 
of air transportation; economics, equipment, operations, 
financing, selling of passenger and cargo services. Air mail 
development and services. 



BSAD 473. ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 370. A critical examination of current gov- 
ernment transportation policy and proposed solutions. Urban 
and intercity managerial transport problems are also consid- 
ered. 

BSAD 474. URBAN TRANSPORT AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 
(3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An analysis of the role of 
urban transportation in present and future urban develop- 
ment. The interaction of transport pricing and service, urban 
planning, institutional restraints, and public land uses is 
studied. 

BSAD 480. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (3) 
The course examines the principal ideas in law stressing 
those which are relevant for the modern business executive. 
Legal reasoning as it has evolved in this country will be one 
of the central topics of study. Several leading antitrust cases 
will be studied to illustrate vividly the reasoning process as 
well as the interplay of business, philosophy, and the various 
conceptions of the nature of law which give direction to the 
process. Examination of contemporary legal problems and 
proposed solutions, especially those most likely to affect the 
business community, are also covered. 

BSAD 481. PUBLIC UTILITIES (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. Using the regulated industries 
as specific examples, attention is focused on broad and 
general problems in such diverse fields as constitutional law, 
administrative law, public administration, government control 
of business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valua- 
tion and depreciation, taxation, finance, engineering, and 
management. 

BSAD 482. BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. A study of the role of govern- 
ment in modern economic life. Social control of business as 
a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise arising from 
the decline of competition. Criteria of limitations on govern- 
ment regulation of private enterprise. 

BSAD 485. ADVANCED PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 385. A study of typical problems encoun- 
tered by the factory manager. The objective is to develop the 
ability to analyze and solve problems in management control 
of production and in the formulation of production policies. 
Among the topics covered are plant location, production 
planning and control, methods analysis, and time study. 

BSAD 490. URBAN LAND MANAGEMENT (3) 
Covers the managerial and decision making aspects of urban 
land and property. Included are such subjects as land use 
and valuation matters. 

BSAD 493 HONORS STUDY (3) 

First semester of the senior year. Prerequisite, candidacy for 
honors in Business Administration. The course is designed 
for honors students who have elected to conduct intensive 
study (independent or group). The student will work under 
the direct guidance of a faculty advisor and the chairman 
of the honors committee. They shall determine that the area 
of study is of a scope and intensity deserving of a candidate's 
attention. Formal written and/or oral reports on the study may 
be required by the faculty advisor and/or chairman of the hon- 
ors program. Group meetings of the candidates may be called 
at the discretion of the faculty advisors and/or chairman of 
the honors committee. 

BSAD 494. HONORS STUDY (3) 
Second semester of the senior year. Prerequisite, BSAD 493, 
and continued candidacy for honors in business administra- 
tion. The student shall continue and complete the research 
initiated in BSAD 493, additional reports may be required at 
the discretion of the faculty advisor and honors program 
chairman. Group meetings may be held. 

BSAD 495. BUSINESS POLICIES (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 340, 350, 364 and senior standing. A case 
study course in which the aim is to have the student apply 
what he has learned of general management principles and 
their specialized functional applications of the overall man- 
agement function in the enterprise. 



74 / umcp 



BSAD 710. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY I (3) 
The study of the theoretical and conceptual foundations for 
generally accepted accounting principles and practices. 
Recent and current literature and ideas are studied in depth 
to provide coverage of the basic postulates, assumptions, and 
standards which underlie the measurement criteria and prac- 
tices of financial accounting. 

BSAD 720 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING I (3) 
The use of accounting data for corporate financial planning 
and control. Topics included are organization for control, 
profit planning, budgeting, relevant costing, return on invest- 
ment, and administration of the controllership function in 
smaller organizations BSAD 720 or 740 is required of MBA. 
candidates. 

BSAD 730. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND BUSINESS 
DECISIONS (3) 
This course acquaints students with the Bayesian' approach 
to decision-making. Topics include: a review of basic proba- 
bility concepts and theorems; the relationship between 
expected utility and rational action; incremental analysis; par- 
tial expectations; linear profits and costs; opportunity loss 
and the cost of uncertainty; conditional and joint probability; 
the binomial. Pascal, Poisson, Gamma, and normal probabil- 
ity distributions; the revision of probabilities in the light of 
new information; preposterior analysis and sequential deci- 
sion procedures. 

BSAD 731. THEORY OF SURVEY DESIGN (3) 
Examines the usefulness of statistical principles in survey 
design. Topics include: the nature of statistical estimation, 
the differential attributes of different estimators, the merits 
and weaknesses of available sampling methods and designs, 
the distinctive aspects of simple random samples, stratified 
random samples, and cluster samples, ratio estimates and 
the problems posed by biases and non-sampling errors. 

BSAD 732. CONCEPTS AND METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL 
STATISTICS (3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 730 (BSAD 330 highly desirable). Topical 
coverage includes the median test for 2 samples, Wilcoxon- 
Mann-Whitney test, Mood's square rank test for dispersion, 
contingency table analysis, tetrachoric and rank correlation, 
analysis of variance and covariance. discriminatory analysis 
and factor analysis. The course will use BMD class M, class 
V and class S programs or other canned' programs. 

BSAD 734. MANAGERIAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Required of MBA. and D.B.A. candidates. The processes, 
tools, and methodological problems in applying management 
science to aid managerial decision-making. Deals with the 
relationship of other quantitative aids to managerial actions 
such as economic analysis and systems analysis. 

BSAD 735. APPLICATION OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 734 or consent of the instructor. This 
course will expose the student to the successes and dif- 
ficulties experienced in applying operations research to man- 
agement decision making in all functional areas. The exami- 
nation of 'classical' and contemporary applications in the lit- 
erature and case studies will be emphasized. 

BSAD 736. PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE OF MANAGEMENT 
SCIENCE (3) 
Prerequisites, completion of any two graduate level opera- 
tions research courses and a graduate level behavioral 
course, or consent of instructor. 

BSAD 737. MANAGEMENT SIMULATION (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 734 and consent of instructor. Deals with 
the development, manipulation, and validity of an operational 
model. Production information and other decision systems 
of concern to management will be studied. Manipulation of 
parameter values, assumptions, and conditions are studied. 
This is accomplished in conjunction with the use of computer 
facilities at the Computer Science Center on campus. 

BSAD 740. FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 
The role of the financial manager in executive decision mak- 
ing. Financial planning, analysis, and control in such areas 
as the allocation of financial resources within the firm, fore- 
casting and budgeting, capital budgeting and the bases for 



investment decisions, alternative sources of short-term and 
long-term financing and financial problems of growth. BSAD 
720 or 740 is required of MB. A. candidates. 

BSAD 743. INVESTMENT ANALYSIS (3) 
Evaluation of debt and equity security alternatives available 
for the employment of the investment fund. Analysis of 
economic and financial data of the national economy, the 
industry, and the company to arrive at the fundamental value 
of a security. Study of securities markets as independent reg- 
ulators of investment values. Motives, needs, and basic 
ingredients in the selection and supervision of the portfolio. 

BSAD 750. MARKETING ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates with concentrations in mar- 
keting. Principal objectives are: to develop an understanding 
of the problems and goals of marketing executives, to develop 
competence in the analysis and solution of marketing prob- 
lems, and to evaluate specific marketing efforts as they con- 
tribute to a coordinated total marketing program. Attention 
will be focused on product, price, and service policies, market 
characteristics, channel selection, promotional policies and 
organization structure. 

BSAD 751. MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT (3) 
Required for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in marketing, 
concerned with the part that advertising, promotion, public 
relations and related efforts play in the accomplishment of 
a firm's total marketing objectives. Its purpose is to develop 
competence in the formulation of mass communications, 
objectives in budget optimization, media appraisal, theme 
selection, program implementation and management, and 
results measurement. 

BSAD 752. MARKETING RESEARCH METHODS (3) 

Required for M.B.A. candidates concentrating in marketing, 
deals with the process of acquiring, classifying and interpret- 
ing primary and secondary marketing data needed for intelli- 
gent, profitable marketing decisions. Through readings, dis- 
cussion, and case studies, efforts are made to develop skill 
in evaluating the appropriateness of alternative method- 
ologies such as the inductive, deductive, survey, observa- 
tional, and experimental. Consideration is also given to recent 
developments in the systematic recording and use of internal 
and external data needed for marketing decisions. 

BSAD 753. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3) 

Deals with environmental, organizational, and financial 
aspects of international marketing as well as problems of mar- 
keting research, pricing, channels of distribution, product 
policy, and communications which face U.S. firms trading 
with foreign firms or which face foreign firms in their opera- 
tions. 

BSAD 760. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT — MANPOWER PRO- 
CUREMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (3) 
An 'in depth' treatment of problems and techniques involved 
in obtaining and developing a competent work force, man- 
power forecasting, job analysis, time study, recruitment 
techniques, psychological tests, interviews, application 
blanks, references, programmed instruction role playing, and 
sensitivity training are typical topics included. 

BSAD 761. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT — MANPOWER 
COMPENSATION AND EVALUATION (3) 
After a work force has been assembled and developed (BSAD 
760), the manager must see to it that its potential is converted 
into efficient and continuing performance. This course pro- 
vides an in depth' analysis of the role of employee compensa- 
tion and appraisal in accomplishing this end. Typical topics 
include wage theory, incentive systems, wage decision 
criteria, job evaluation, profit sharing, wage surveys, forced 
choice rating, critical incidents, appraisal interviews, and 
fringe benefits. 

BSAD 762. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING — CURRENT 
PROBLEMS AND ISSUES (3) 
Includes such topics as methods of handling industrial dis- 
putes, legal restrictions on various collective bargaining 
activities, theory and philosophy of collective bargaining, and 
internal union problems 



umcp / 75 



BSAD 763. ADMINISTRATION OF LABOR RELATIONS (3) 
Deals with labor relations at the plant level. Emphasizes the 
negotiation and administration of labor contracts. Includes 
union policy and influence on personnel management 
activities. 

BSAD 764. BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN MANAGEMENT (3) 
Required of M.B.A. candidates. A critical analysis of the 
impact of the behavioral sciences on traditional concepts of 
management as process and as organization. Included within 
the area of analysis are such subjects as human motivation, 
human relations, morale, status, role, organization, communi- 
cation, bureaucracy, the executive role, leadership and train- 
ing. 

BSAD 765. APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE TO 
BUSINESS (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 764 or permission of professor. Stresses 
case analysis of behavioral knowledge applied to manage- 
ment problems. Typical topics include analysis of modes for 
introducing change, group versus organizational goals, 
organizational barriers to personal growth, the effect of 
authority systems on behavior, and the relationship between 
technology and social structure. 

BSAD 770. TRANSPORTATION THEORY AND ANALYSIS (3) 
Examines the transportation system and its components. Key 
topics in the development and present form of transportation 
in both the United States and other countries are considered 
together with theoretical concepts employed in the analysis 
of transport problems. 

BSAD 771. TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) 
An intensive study of the nature and consequences of rela- 
tions between governments and agencies thereof, carriers in 
the various modes, and users of transport services. Typical 
areas subjected to examination and analysis include: the con- 
trol of transport firms by regulatory bodies, taxation of car- 
riers, methods employed in the allocation of funds to the con- 
struction, operation, and maintenance of publicly-provided 
transport facilities, and the direct subsidization of services 
supplied by privately-owned entities. Additional problems 
considered include labor and safety. Comparative interna- 
tional transport policies and problems are also examined. 

BSAD 772. MANAGEMENT OF PHYSICAL DISTRIBUTION (3) 
Focuses on managerial practices required to fulfill optimally 
the physical movement needs of extractive, manufacturing, 
and merchandising firms. Attention is given to the total cost 
approach to physical distribution, interrelations among 
purchased transport services, privately-supplied transport ser- 
vices, warehousing, inventory control, materials handling, 
packaging, and plant location are considered. An understand- 
ing of the communications network to support physical dis- 
tribution is developed in conjunction with study of the prob- 
lems of coordination between the physical movement man- 
agement function and other functional areas within the busi- 
ness firm — such as accounting, finance, marketing, and pro- 
duction 

BSAD 773. TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIES (3) 
Treats organization structure, policies, and procedures 
employed in the administration of inter- and intraurban trans- 
port firms. Problems receiving attention include managerial 
development, operational and financial planning and control, 
demand analysis, pricing, promotional policies, intra- and 
intermodal competitive and complementary relationships, 
and methods for accommodating public policies designed to 
delimit the managerial discretion of carrier executives. 
Administrative problems peculiar to publicly-owned and oper- 
ated transport entities are also considered. 

BSAD 774. PRIVATE ENTERPRISE AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) 
Examines the executive's social and ethical responsibilities 
to his employees, customers and to the general public. Con- 
sideration is given to the conflicts occasioned by competitive 
relationships in the private sector of business and the effect 
of institutional restraints. The trends in public policy and their 
future effect upon management are examined. For compara- 
tive purposes, several examples of planned societies are con- 
sidered. 



BSAD 775 PRODUCT, PRODUCTION AND PRICING POLICY (3) 
Required of MBA. candidates. The application of economic 
theory to the business enterprise in respect to the determina- 
tion of policy and the handling of management problems with 
particular reference to the firm producing a complex line of 
products, nature of competition, pricing policy, interrelation- 
ship of production and marketing problems, basic types of 
cost, control systems, theories of depreciation and invest- 
ment and the impact of each upon costs. 

BSAD 777. POLICY ISSUES IN PUBLIC UTILITIES (3) 

A critical analysis of current developments in regulatory pol- 
icy and issues arising among public utilities, regulatory 
agencies, and the general public. Emphasis is placed on the 
electric, gas, water, and communications industries in both 
the public and private sectors of the economy. Changing and 
emerging problems stressed include those pertinent to cost 
analysis, depreciation, finance, taxes, rate of return, the rate 
base, differential rate-making, and labor. In addition, the 
growing importance of technological developments and their 
impact on state and federal regulatory agencies are explored. 

BSAD 781. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Examines the international business environment as it affects 
company policy and procedures. Integrates the business 
functions undertaken in international operations through 
analysis in depth and comprehensive case studies. This 
course can be credited toward the 18-hour requirement for 
a major field in the DBA program. 

BSAD 782. MANAGEMENT OF THE MULTINATIONAL FIRM (3) 
Deals with the problems and policies of international business 
enterprise at the management level. Considers management 
of a multinational enterprise as well as management within 
foreign units. The multinational firm as a socio-econometric 
institution is analyzed in detail. Cases in comparative manage- 
ment are utilized. 

BSAD 785. MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Concerned with planning and control systems for the fulfill- 
ment of organizational objectives. Identification of organiza- 
tional objectives, responsibility centers, information needs 
and information network. Case studies of integrated planning 
and control systems. 

BSAD 786. DEVELOPMENT AND TRENDS IN PRODUCTION 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
Case studies of production problems in a number of 
industries. Focuses attention on decisions concerning 
operating programs and manufacturing policies at the top 
level of manufacturing Basic concepts of process and pro- 
duct technology are covered, taking into consideration the 
scale, operating range, capital cost, method of control, and 
degree of mechanization at each successive state in the man- 
ufacturing process. 

BSAD 787. MANAGEMENT POLICY FORMULATION (3) 
An integrative course which applies students' knowledge of 
the various functional areas in business administration to the 
formulation, execution, and evaluation of managerial policies. 
The viewpoint of the chief administrative officers and board 
of directors is emphasized. 

BSAD 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

BSAD 811 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY II (3) 

Prerequisite BSAD 710. A study of the more controversial, 
not generally accepted ideas and concepts, currently pro- 
posed as suggested solutions to current problems or to 
improve the state of the art of financial accounting measure- 
ments. 

BSAD 812. ACCOUNTING IN REGULATED INDUSTRIES (3) 
A study of the unique accounting problems of industries sub- 
ject to cost and price regulations of government agencies. 
Included are government contracts and grants, rate regula- 
tions for transportation carriers and public utilities, distribu- 
tion cost analyses under the Robinson-Patman Act, and cost 
regulations of the Medicare Program. 



76 / umcp 



BSAD 813. THE IMPACT OF TAXATION ON BUSINESS 
DECISIONS (3) 
A study of the impact of tax law and regulations on alternative 
business strategies. Particular emphasis is given to the large, 
multidivisional firm. Problems of acquisitions, mergers, 
spinoffs, and other divestitures are considered from the 
viewpoint of profit planning, cash flow, and tax deferment. 

BSAD 814. CURRENT PROBLEMS OF PROFESSIONAL 
PRACTICE (3) 
Generally accepted auditing standards, auditing practices, 
legal and ethical responsibilities, and the accounting and 
reporting requirements of the securities and exchange com- 
mission. 

BSAD 821. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING II (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 720. The management of the controller- 
ship function in the large, multidivisional firm. Centralized 
and decentralized organizations; management control sys- 
tems in consolidated and conglomerate corporations; alter- 
native strategies for profit maximization; acquisitions and 
divestitures for increased investment return. 

BSAD 828. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION (1-9) 

BSAD 830. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE I — LINEAR 
PROGRAMMING (3) 
Prerequisite, mathematics, through differential calculus, and 
BSAD 734 or consent of instructor. The theory and use of 
deterministic models in management science. Models are 
based upon optimization techniques for conditions of data 
certainty. Includes linear programming models, inventory 
models, and replacement models. 

BSAD 831. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II — EXTENSION OF 
LINEAR PROGRAMMING AND NETWORK ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 830 or consent of instructor, and MATH 

240. Basic Fortran programming proficiency is assumed. 
Includes a brief review of basic linear programming, separ- 
able programming, application to game theory, the primal- 
dual and criss-cross algorithms, quadratic programming, 
basic concepts of network theory, the max-flow algorithms. 
The basic concepts and techniques of network theory will 
be developed and applied to the transportation problem. 

BSAD 832. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE III — OPTIMIZATION AND 
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) 
Prerequisites. BSAD 830 or consent of instructor, and MATH 

241. Topical coverage includes Kuhn-Tucker Theory, the lar- 
rangean, the concept of an algorithm (notation map conver- 
gence), unconstrained problems, convex simplex and method 
of centers algorithms, penalty and barrier, feasible-directions 
and cutting plane algorithms. 

BSAD 833. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE IV — INTEGER AND 
DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 831 and BSAD 832 or consent of instruc- 
tor, MATH 241 minimum, MATH 400 and 410 preferred. Cover- 
age includes fractional, all integer and mixed integer 
algorithms, the knapsack problem, decomposition, recursion 
analysis, integer optimization and sensitivity, risk and uncer- 
tainty situations and an introduction to nonserial and infinite 
stage systems. 

BSAD 834. PROBABILISTIC MODELS (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 400 highly recommended. MATH 241 or 
consent of the instructor. Theoretical foundations for the con- 
struction and optimization of probabilistic models. Following 
the review of stochastic processes, the Poisson process and 
the Markovian processes, topics may include queueing 
theory, inventory theory, Markovian decision processes and 
stochastic linear programming. 

BSAD 835. STATISTICAL MODEL BUILDING (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 432, MATH 241 , or consent of instructor. 
Emphasizes the actual construction of models encountered 
in and drawn from experience in business administration 
utilizing canned' computer programs which are in wide 
industrial use. Topical coverage includes a review of the ma- 
trix approach to linear regression, effects of bias in the general 
regression situation, weighted least squares, orthogonal 



polynomials, verification and maintenance of the mathemati- 
cal model, and the introduction to non-linear estimation. 

BSAD 840. WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT (3) 
An intensive study of short- and intermediate-term sources 
of funds and the management of cash, accounts receivable 
and inventories. Includes consideration of determinants of 
working capital needs, financial analysis as related to short- 
term financing problems, estimation of funds requirements, 
patterns of fund requirements, and major types of loan ar- 
rangements. Case studies, supplemented with outside read- 
ings. 

BSAD 841. LONG-TERM CAPITAL MANAGEMENT (3) 

An intensive study of long-term financing, return on invest- 
ment and cost of capital. Particular attention is paid to 
appraising alternative forms of long-term financing, methods 
of measuring return on investment, and problems such as 
measuring the cost of capital of cyclical companies and 
growth companies. Case studies, supplemented with outside 
readings. 

BSAD 843. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 743 or consent of instructor. The process 
of investment. Selection and supervision of securities appro- 
priate for the requirements and objectives of both the 
individual and institutional investor. Underlying considera- 
tions necessary for the continued success of the investment 
program. Critical analysis of case studies in portfolio manage- 
ment. Effects of temporary changes on investment decisions. 

BSAD 845. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (3) 

Provides an analysis of the structure of financial institutions 
in the American economy, including commercial banking and 
non-banking organizations which serve business and con- 
sumers. Topics covered include determinants of the demand 
for and supply of funds and the role of financial institutions 
in channeling financial capital among the various sectors of 
the American economy. 

BSAD 846. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Deals with the problems of financial administration of the mul- 
tinational firm. Includes the financing of investment abroad 
and management of assets in differing financial environments 
as well as the financing of exports and imports. Consideration 
of national and international financial institutions as they 
relate to the international operations of American and foreign 
business firms. 

BSAD 850. MARKETING CHANNELS ANALYSIS (3) 

Focuses on the fundamentals explaining alternate channels 
of distribution and the roles played by various intermediaries, 
the evolution of business structures in marketing, reasons 
for change, and projected marketing patterns for the future. 
M.B.A. candidates may register with permission of instructor. 

BSAD 851. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MARKETING — 
DEMAND AND COST ANALYSIS (3) 
Consideration is given to quantitative methods in the analysis 
and prediction of market demand and marketing costs. Topics 
in connection with demand include market potentials, sales 
forecasting, consumer analysis, promotional and pricing 
results, and the like. Cost analysis focuses on allocation of 
costs by marketing functions, products, territories, customers 
and marketing personnel. Statistical techniques, mathemat- 
ics, models and other methods are utilized in the solution 
of marketing problems. M.B.A. candidates may register with 
permission of instructor. 

BSAD 852. THEORY IN MARKETING (3) 
An inquiry into the problems and elements of theory develop- 
ment in general with specific reference to the field of market- 
ing. A critical analysis and evaluation of past and contempo- 
rary efforts to formulate theories of marketing and to integrate 
theories from the social sciences into a marketing framework. 
Attention is given to the development of concepts in all areas 
of marketing thought and to their potential application in the 
business firm. 

BSAD 863. THE ORGANIZATION AND ITS SOCIAL 
ENVIRONMENT (3) 
A course examining the interaction between organizations 
and aspects of their social and cultural environment. Analysis 



umcp / 77 



of the literature concerning human resource availability and 
individual differences as they influence managerial decisions, 
the impact of cultural factors on business and other types 
of organizations, and management approaches for dealing 
with the social environment. 

BSAD 864. THEORY OF THE INDUSTRIAL WORK GROUP (3) 
A study of major theories of group formation, group behavior, 
and group leadership considered in terms of their implica- 
tions for the management of business and other types of 
organizations. Will involve an in-depth analysis of the litera- 
ture concerning such topics as group cohesiveness. conform- 
ity, leadership, communication nets, problem-solving effi- 
ciency, productivity standards, and morale. 

BSAD 865. COMPARATIVE THEORIES OF ORGANIZATION (3) 
Emphasizes business and other types of complex organiza- 
tions. Theories of formal and informal organizations are 
covered. Analyzes the content, interrelationships, and 
similarities between current major schools of organization 
thought. 

BSAD 866. ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT AND CHANGE (3) 
An analysis and evaluation of the factors contributing to con- 
flict and changed patterns of behavior within organizations. 
A study of the literature on such topics as managerial decision 
making and conflict, research creativity, labor-management 
conflict, organizational maintenance and stability, resistance 
to change, and planned change. 

BSAD 872. BUSINESS LOGISTICS (3) 

Concentrates on the design and application of methods for 
the solution of advanced physical movement problems of 
business firms. Provides thorough coverage of a variety of 
analytical techniques relevant to the solution of these prob- 
lems. Where appropriate, experience will be provided in the 
utilization of computers to assist in managerial logistical 
decision-making. 

BSAD 873. TRANSPORTATION SCIENCE (3) 

Focuses on the application of quantitative and qualitative 
techniques of analysis to managerial problems drawn from 
firms in each of the various modes of transport. Included is 
the application of simulation to areas such as the control of 
equipment selection and terminal and line operations. The 
application of advanced analytical techniques to problems 
involving resource use efficiency within the transportation 
industry and between transportation and other sectors of the 
economy is an integral part of the course. 

BSAD 880. BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (3) 
Covers the nature, scope, and application of research 
methodology. The identification and formulation of research 
designs applicable to business and related fields. Required 
of D.B.A. students. 

BSAD 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor and Chairman: Marchello 

Professors: Arsenault. Beckmann, Duffey. Goldman. Gomez- 

plata. Johnson. Schroeder, Silverman, Skolnick. Smith 
Associate Professors: Almenas. Bolsaitis, Cadman. Gentry, 

Munno, Regan, Roush. 1 Sheaks, Spain 
Assistant Professor: Kugelman 
Lecturer: Belcher 

1 joint appointment with Physics 

The Chemical Engineering program has as its primary objec- 
tive the maintenance and extension of the ever increasing 
degree of engineering sophistication. The courses and research 
programs strive to create an atmosphere of originality and 
creativity that prepares the student for the engineering leader- 
ship of tomorrow. 

An individual plan of graduate study compatible with the 
student s interest and background is established between the 
student, his advisor, and the department head. General areas 
of concentration include transport phenomena, process 



dynamics and control, reaction kinetics, design and economics, 
and computer simulation. The general chemical engineering 
program is focused on three major areas: applied polymer sci- 
ence, biological and environmental health engineering, and 
chemical engineering. In addition the department administers 
programs in nuclear engineering and engineering materials. 

The programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are open 
to qualified students holding the B.S. degree. Admission may 
be granted to students with degrees in any of the engineering 
and science areas from accredited programs. In some cases 
it may be necessary to require courses to fulfill the background. 
The general regulations of The Graduate School apply in review- 
ing applications. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree has the choice of following 
a plan of study with or without thesis. The equivalent of at least 
three years of full-time study beyond the B.S. degree is required 
for the Ph.D. degree. All students seeking graduate degrees in 
Chemical Engineering must enroll in ENCH 610, 620, 630, and 
640. In addition to the general rules of The Graduate School cer- 
tain special degree requirements are set forth by the depart- 
ment in its departmental publications. 

A number of special facilities are available for graduate study 
and research and are coordinated through the Laboratory for 
Radiation and Polymer Science, the Laboratory for High Pres- 
sure Science, the Laboratory for Process Analysis and Simula- 
tion, the Laboratory for Biochemical Engineering and Environ- 
mental Studies, and the Nuclear Reactor Facility. These 
laboratories contain analog computers, a gamma radiation fa- 
cility, an electron accelerator, an electron paramagnetic reso- 
nance spectrometer, high pressure and cryogenic systems, 
crystal growth and mechanical testing equipment, X-ray diffrac- 
tion units, a neutron generator and a 200 KW pool type nuclear 
reactor. 



ENCH 425. TRANSFER AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES I (4) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 250. Theory and applications of molecular 
and turbulent transport phenomena. Principles of fluid 
mechanics, mass transfer and heat transfer. Dimensional 
analysis, analogy between heat, mass and momentum 
transfer, Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow, convective heat 
and mass transfer. 

ENCH 427. TRANSFER AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES II (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCH 425. Steady and unsteady state diffusion 
and conduction, simultaneous heat and mass transfer 
interphase transfer, boundary layer theory. Application to 
absorption, adsorption, and distillation. Principles of radiant 
heat transfer, evaporation, filtration, crystallization, drying, 
condensation, boiling humidification, ion exchange, and 
phase separations. 

ENCH 437. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 427. Application of chemical engineering 
process and unit operation principles in small scale semi- 
commercial equipment. Data from experimental observations 
are used to evaluate performance and efficiency of opera- 
tions. Emphasis is placed on correct presentation of results 
in report form. 

ENCH 440. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING KINETICS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 250. Fundamentals of chemical reaction 
kinetics and their application to the design and operation of 
chemical reactors. Reaction rate theory, homogeneous reac- 
tions in batch and flow systems, adsorption, heterogeneous 
reactions and catalysis electrochemical reactions. Catalytic 
reactor design. 

ENCH 442. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (2) 
Differential Equations or ENCH 453. Dynamic response 
applied to process systems. Goals and modes of control, La- 
place transformations, analysis and synthesis of simple con- 
trol systems, closed loop response, dynamic testing. 

ENCH 443. DYNAMICS AND CONTROL LABORATORY (1) 
Corequisite. ENCH 442. Methods of process control. Use of 
experimental analog and mathematical models of control 
systems 



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ENCH 445. PROCESS ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Utilization of chemical engineering 
principles for the design of process equipment. Typical prob- 
lems in the design of chemical plants. Comprehensive reports 
are required. 

ENCH 447. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ECONOMICS (2) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 427. Principles of engineering economics 
applied to chemical processes. Determination of investment 
and operating costs for chemical plants. 

ENCH 450. CHEMICAL PROCESS DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Chemical process industries from the 
standpoint of technology, raw materials, products and proc- 
essing equipment. Operations of major chemical processes 
and industries combined with quantitative analysis of process 
requirements and yields. 

ENCH 452. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS 
(3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Application of digital and analog 
computers to chemical engineering problems. Numerical 
methods, programming, differential equations, curve fitting, 
amplifiers and analog circuits. 

ENCH 453. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL EN- 
GINEERING (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 240. Mathematical techniques applied to 
the analysis and solution of chemical engineering problems. 
Use of differentiation, integration, differential equations, par- 
tial differential equations and integral transforms. Application 
of infinite series, numerical and statistical methods. 

ENCH 454. CHEMICAL PROCESS ANALYSIS AND OPTI- 
MIZATION (3) 
Prerequisites, ENCH 427, 440. Applications of mathematical 
models to the analysis and optimization of chemical process- 
es. Models based on transport, chemical kinetics and other 
chemical engineering principles will be employed. Emphasis 
on evaluation of process alternatives. 



ENCH 455. CHEMICAL PROCESS LABORATORY (2) 

Prerequisite. ENCH 427, and 440. Experimental study of vari- 
ous chemical processes through laboratory and small semi- 
commercial scale equipment. Reaction kinetics, fluid 
mechanics, heat and mass transfer. 

ENCH 461. CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION SOURCES (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering or consent of 
instructor. Theory and application of methods for the control 
and removal of airborne materials. Principles of design and 
performance of air quality control equipment. 

ENCH 468. RESEARCH (2-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the staff. Investigation of a 
research project under the direction of one of the staff mem- 
bers. Comprehensive reports are required. 

ENCH 475. ELECTROCHEMICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Fundamentals of electrochemistry 
with application to engineering and commercial processes. 
Equilibrium potentials, reaction mechanisms, cell kinetics, 
polarization, surface phenomena. Electrorefining, elec- 
trowinning. oxidation and reduction, solid, liquid and gas sys- 
tems. Aspects of design and performance of electroprocess 
plants. 

ENCH 480. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Engineering description and analysis of physiological sys- 
tems. Survey of bioengineering literature and an introduction 
to mathematical modeling of physiological systems. 

ENCH 482. BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in Engineering or consent of 
instructor. Introduction to biochemical and microbiological 
applications to commercial and engineering processes, 
including industrial fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, 
food and pharmaceutical processing and resulting waste 
treatment. Enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics and mass 
transfer. 




umcp / 79 



ENCH 490. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The elements of the 
chemistry, physics, processing methods, and engineering 
applications of polymers. 

ENCH 492. APPLIED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF POLYMERS 
(3) 
Prerequisite, CHEM 481. Corequisite, CHEM 482 or consent 
of instructor. Kinetics of formation of high polymers, determi- 
nation of molecular weight and structure, and applied ther- 
modynamics and phase equilibria of polymer solutions. 

ENCH 494. POLYMER TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (3) 

One lecture and two lab periods per week. Prerequisite, ENCH 
492 or consent of instructor. Measurement of mechanical, 
electrical, optical, and thermal properties of polymers. Meas- 
urement of molecular weight by viscosimetry, isometric and 
light scattering methods. Application of X-ray, NMR, ESR, 
spectroscopy molecular relaxation, microscopy and electron 
microscopy to the determination of polymer structure. Effects 
of ultraviolet light and high energy radiation. 

ENCH 609. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) 

ENCH 610 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS (3) 
First semester. Advanced application of the general ther- 
modynamic methods to chemical engineering problems. First 
and second law consequences; estimation and correlation of 
thermodynamic properties; phase and chemical reaction 
equilibria. 

ENCH 620. METHODS OF ENGINEERING ANALYSIS (3) 

First semester, application of selected mathematical 
techniques to the analysis and solution of engineering prob- 
lems; included are the applications of matrices, vectors, ten- 
sors, differential equations, integral transforms, and probabil- 
ity methods to such problems as unsteady heat transfer, tran- 
sient phenomena in mass transfer operations, stagewise 
processes, chemical reactors, process control, and nuclear 
reactor physics. 

ENCH 630. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (3) 

First semester. Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory 
from the viewpoint of the basic transport equations. Steady 
and unsteady state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary 
layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport; with specific 
application to complex chemical engineering situations. 

ENCH 640. ADVANCED CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS (3) 
Second semester. The theory and application of chemical 
reaction kinetics to reactor design. Reaction rate theory; 
homogeneous batch and flow reactors; fundamentals of 
catalysis; design of heterogeneous flow reactors. 

ENCH 648. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
(1-16) 

ENCH 655, 656. RADIATION ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An analysis of such 
radiation applications as synthesizing chemicals, preserving 
foods, control of industrial processes. Design of irradiation 
installations, e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, electronu- 
clear machine arrangement, and chemical reactors. 

ENCH 667. RADIATION EFFECTS LABORATORY (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Effect of massive doses 
of radiation on the properties of matter for purposes other 
than those pointed toward nuclear power. Radiation process- 
ing, radiation-induced chemical reactions, and conversion of 
radiation energy; isotope power sources. 

ENCH 670. RHEOLOGY OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENMA 650. Mechanical behavior with emphasis 
on the continuum point of view and its relationship to struc- 
tural types. Elasticity, viscoelasticity, anelasticity and plastic- 
ity in single phase and multiphase materials. 

ENCH 690. POLYMERIC ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENMA 650. A comprehensive summary of the 
fundamentals of particular interest in the science and applica- 
tions of polymers. Polymer single crystals, transformations 
in polymers, fabrication of polymers as to shape and internal 
structure. 



ENCH 720. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 630. Development of 
mathematical models of chemical processes based on trans- 
port phenomena, chemical kinetics, and other chemical 
engineering methods. Emphasis on principles of model build- 
ing and simulation utilizing mathematical solutions and com- 
puter methods. 

ENCH 723. PROCESS ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (3) 

First and second semesters. Coordination of chemical 
engineering and economics to advanced process engineering 
and design. Optimization of investment and operating costs, 
solution of typical problems encountered in the design of 
chemical engineering plants. 

ENCH 730. COMPLEX EQUILIBRIUM STAGE PROCESSES (3) 
Second semester. The theory and application of complex 
equilibrium stages. Binary and multicomponent absorption; 
extraction; liquefaction. 

ENCH 735. CHEMICAL PROCESS DYNAMICS (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, differential equations or con- 
sent of instructor. Analysis of open and closed control loops 
and their elements; dynamic response of processes; choice 
of variables and linkages; dynamic testing and synthesis; 
noise and drift; chemical process systems analysis; strategies 
for optimum operation. 

ENCH 737. CHEMICAL PROCESS OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Second semester. Techniques of modern optimization theory 
as applied to chemical engineering problems. Optimization 
of single and multivariate systems with and without con- 
straints. Application of partial optimization techniques to 
complex chemical engineering processes. 

ENCH 761. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF CIRCULATORY 

SYSTEM TRANSPORT (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 480 or permission of instructor. Flow, 
transport phenomena, and chemical reactions involved in 
mammalian circulatory system function. Analysis and 
interpretation of tracer studies; mathematical models for 
simulation of transport of drugs and other solutes; internal 
effects of modifying environmental factors. 

ENCH 762. BIOENGINEERING TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 480 or permission of instructor. Engineer- 
ing analysis of transport phenomena as they occur in vivo 
and in prosthetic devices. Survey and critique of current 
mathematical models for active and passive transport with 
emphasis on the renal and neural systems. 

ENCH 763 ENGINEERING OF ARTIFICIAL ORGANS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 480 or permission of instructor. Design 
concepts and engineering analysis of devices to supplement 
or replace natural functions; artificial kidney; heart assistor; 
membrane oxygenator; materials problems, physiological 
considerations. 

ENCH 784. POLYMER PHYSICS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCH 490 or consent of instructor. Application 
and correlation of mechanical and dielectric relaxation, NMR, 
electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, diffusion and electrical 
properties to the mechanical properties and structure of 
polymers in the solid state. 

ENCH 786. POLYMER PROCESSING AND APPLICATIONS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 490 or consent of instructor. Application 
of theoretical knowledge of polymers to industrial processes. 
An analysis of polymerization, stabilization, electrical, 
rheological, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and 
their influence on processing conditions and end use applica- 
tions. 

ENCH 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENCH 818. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS (1-16) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 604. 

ENCH 828. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL REACTION 
SYSTEMS (3) 
First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 
640. 



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ENCH 838. ADVANCED TOPICS IN TRANSFER THEORY (3) 
First semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 
720. 

ENCH 848. ADVANCED TOPICS IN SEPARATION PROCESSES 
(3) 
Second semester. Offered in alternate years. 

ENCH 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ENGINEERING, NUCLEAR 

ENNU 430. RADIOISOTOPE POWER SOURCES (3) 

Prerequisite. ENNU 215 or permission of instructor. Principles 
and theory of radioisotope power sources. Design and use 
of nuclear batteries and small energy conversion devices. 

ENNU 435. ACTIVATION ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENNU 215 or permission of instructor. Principles 
and techniques of activation analysis involving neutrons, 
photons and charged particles. Emphasis placed upon appli- 
cation of this analytical technique to solving environmental 
and engineering problems. 

ENNU 440. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (3) 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week Prerequisites, 
MATH 240. PHYS 263. Techniques of detecting and making 
measurements of nuclear or high energy radiation. Radiation 
safety experiments. Both a sub-critical reactor and the 
swimming pool critical reactor are sources of radiation. 

ENNU 450. NUCLEAR REACTOR ENGINEERING I (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 246 and PHYS 263 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Elementary nuclear physics, reactor theory, and reactor 
energy transfer. Steady-state and time-dependent neutron 
distributions in space and energy. Conduction and convective 
heat transfer in nuclear reactor systems. 

ENNU 455. NUCLEAR REACTOR ENGINEERING II (3) 

Prerequisite. ENNU 450. General plant design considerations 
including radiation hazards and health physics, shielding 
design, nuclear power economics, radiation effects on reac- 
tor materials, and various types of nuclear reactor systems. 

ENNU 468. RESEARCH (2-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the staff. Investigation of a 
research project under the direction of one of the staff mem- 
bers. Comprehensive reports are required. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six semester hours. 

ENNU 470. INTRODUCTION TO CONTROLLED FUSION (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The principles and the 
current status of research to achieve controlled thermo- 
nuclear power production. Properties of ionized gases relat- 
ing to confinement and heating. Concepts of practical fusion 
devices 

ENNU 480. REACTOR CORE DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENNU 450 or consent of instructor. Design of 
nuclear reactor cores based on a sequence of standard com- 
puter codes. Thermal and epithermal cross sections, multi- 
group diffusion theory in one and two dimensions and fine 
structure flux calculations using transport theory. 

ENNU 609. SEMINAR IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (1) 

ENNU 620. METHODS OF ENGINEERING ANALYSIS (3) 
Application of selected mathematical techniques to the 
analysis and solution of engineering problems; included are 
the applications of matrices, vectors, tensors, differential 
equations, integral transforms, and probability methods to 
such problems as unsteady heat transfer, transient 
phenomena in mass transfer operations, stagewise process- 
es, chemical reactors, process control, and nuclear reactor 
physics. 

ENNU 630. NUCLEAR REACTOR PHYSICS I (3) 

First semester. Introduction to neutron physics. The theory 
of neutron detection instruments including the neutron 
chopper and solid state detectors. Elements of neutron 
slowing-down theory. The Boltzmann transport equation is 
developed together with approximations such as Pn. Sn, and 
Fermi age. Nuclear systems are theoretically treated utilizing 
the diffusion approximation, the Fermi age method and the 
P-3 method. Elementary temperature and time dependence. 



ENNU 640. NUCLEAR REACTOR PHYSICS II (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCH 320. Mathematical 
treatment of nuclear reactor systems. The foundations of nu- 
clear reactor kinetics, the multigroup treatment, reflected re- 
actor theory, heterogeneous reactors, perturbation theory. 
Thermalization theory and the pulse and sine-wave 
techniques. Introduction to variational methods. 

ENNU 648. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 
(1-16) 

ENNU 649. SELECTED TOPICS IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Topics of current interest and recent advances in the nuclear 
engineering field. Because of the rapid advances in the field, 
information on special topics of much practical importance 
is continually becoming available. Since the content changes, 
re-registration may be permitted. 

ENNU 655, 656. RADIATION ENGINEERING (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An analysis of such 
radiation applications as synthesizing chemicals, preserving 
foods, control of industrial processes, design of irradiation 
installations, e.g.. cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, electro- 
nuclear machine arrangement, and chemonuclear reactors. 

ENNU 667. RADIATION EFFECTS LABORATORY (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Effect of massive doses 
of radiation on the properties of matter for purposes other 
than those pointed toward nuclear power. Radiation process- 
ing, radiation-induced chemical reactions, and conversion of 
radiation energy; isotope power sources. 

ENNU 671, 672. NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY (3. 3) 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
sites, permission of instructor. The University of Maryland 
swimming pool reactor is employed in experiments on reactor 
start-up and operation, shielding, control, neutron flux dis- 
tributions, neutron and gamma spectrum, cross section 
measurements. 

ENNU 720. NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT THEORY (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, ENNU 630 or permission of 
instructor. Transport equations for neutrons and gamma rays. 
Infinite space and Milne problems. Spherical harmonic and 
variational methods. Special methods of solving transport 
equations. 

ENNU 730. RADIATION SHIELDING AND ENERGY DEPOSITION 
(3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, ENNU 630 or permission of 
instructor. A study of the interactions of nuclear radiations 
with matter. Includes electron, gamma and neutron attenua- 
tion, dose calculations, chemical changes, heat generation 
and removal in shields. 

ENNU 740. NUCLEAR REACTOR DYNAMICS (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENNU 640. Principles of reac- 
tor control and operation. Neutron kinetics, temperature and 
coolant flow effects, transfer function, stochastic processes. 
Stability analysis. Accident calculations. Use of analog com- 
puter or simulation and problem solving. 

ENNU 761. NUCLEAR FUEL AND WASTE PROCESSING (3) 
First semester, three lectures a week. Processing of nuclear 
fuel and treatment of nuclear waste. Includes: processing of 
uranium, thorium, and other ores; chemical separation of 
Plutonium, uranium, fission products and other elements 
from materials irradiated in nuclear reactors; treatment of 
radioactive wastes; isotopic separation of U235; and isotopic 
separation of heavy water and other materials. 

ENNU 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENNU 840. NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENNU 630 or consent of instructor. The design 
features of nuclear reactor systems. The preliminary design 
of a reactor is carried out by the student. Core design includ- 
ing heat transfer, control system, safety systems and shield- 
ing. Standard computer programs are utilized throughout. 



umcp / 81 



ENNU 860. FAST REACTOR ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, ENNU 630. Engineering and physics problems 
of fast reactors. Neutron economy and breeding. Transport 
theory based on neutronic core design. Liquid metal and 
gaseous coolant heat transfer. Aspects of fast reactor plant 
design 

ENNU 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor and Chairman: Vanderslice 

Professors: Castellan, Grim, Gardner,' Henery-Logan, Holm- 

lund. Jaquith. Keeney, 2 Lippincott. Pickard, Pratt, Purdy, 

Reeve, Rollinson, Steward, Stuntz, Veitch 
Associate Professors: Bellama, Boyd, Devoe, Huheey, Jarvis. 

Kasler, Lakshmanan. Martin, Mazzocchi, O Haver, Sampugna, 

Staley, Viola, Walters 
Assistant Professors: Campagnoni, Hansen, Helz, Murphy, Olin, 

Sommer 
Research Professor: Bailey 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 

2 joint appointment with Dairy Science 



The Chemistry Department offers programs leading to the 
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees with 
specialization in the fields of analytical chemistry, biochemistry, 
chemical physics (in cooperation with the Institute for Molecular 
Physics and the Department of Physics and Astronomy), 
environmental chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, geochemistry, 
inorganic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and 
physical chemistry. The graduate program has been designed 
with maximum flexibility so that a student can achieve a strong 
background in his chosen field of specialization. 

Departmental regulations concerning qualifying (diagnostic) 
examinations, comprehensive examinations, and other matters 
pertaining to coursework have been assembled for the guidance 
of candidates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations 
are available from the Department of Chemistry. 

Special research facilities exist or are being developed in all 
the above fields, but exceptional ones already exist for chemical 
physics and nuclear chemistry. The Institute for Molecular 
Physics laboratories have been specially designed for high- 
precision experiments primarily in the area of chemical physics 
and physical chemistry. Nuclear chemistry facilities include the 
120-MeV cyclotron housed in the Physics Department. Depart- 
mental research is supported by two large computers in the 
Computer Science Building, an IBM 7094 and a Univac 1108 
(complemented by remote access units on a time-sharing basis). 
Other facilities include X-ray fluorescence instrumentation, an 
electron microprobe, mass spectrometers, NMR spectrometers, 
ultracentrifuges, and analytical optical spectrometers. Electron 
microscopes, ESCA spectrometers, and Laser laboratories are 
available through the Center of Materials Research. Individual 
research facilities are supported by three machine shops (two 
in the Institute for Molecular Physics), an excellent glass- 
blowing shop, and electronic instrumentation personnel. 



CHEM 401 . INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481. 

CHEM 403. RADIOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week Prerequisite, one year of college 
chemistry and one year of college physics. Radioactive decay; 
introduction to properties of atomic nuclei; nuclear processes 
in cosmology; chemical, biomedical and environmental appli- 
cations of radioactivity; nuclear processes as chemical tools; 
interaction of radiation with matter. 

CHEM 421. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (3) 

Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite or corequisite. CHEM 482. Volumetric, gravimet- 
ric, electrometric, and colorimetric methods. 



CHEM 423. ORGANIC QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (2) 

Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214, and consent of the instructor. The semi- 
micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen 
and certain functional groups. 

CHEM 430. CHEMICAL MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY I (3) 
One lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Corequisite, CHEM 481 . An introduction to the principles and 
applications of quantitative techniques useful in chemistry, 
with emphasis on modern instrumentation. Computer pro- 
gramming, electronic circuits, spectroscopy, chemical sepa- 
rations. 

CHEM 431. CHEMICAL MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY II (3) 
One lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite. CHEM 481 ; corequisite, CHEM 482. An introduc- 
tion to the principles and applications of quantitative 
techniques useful in chemistry, with emphasis on modern 
instrumentation. Communications techniques, vacuum sys- 
tems, thermochemistry, phase equilibria, chemical kinetics, 
electrochemistry. 

CHEM 433. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS (3) 

One lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites, CHEM 201-202 or 211-212. and 203-204 or 213- 
214. 

CHEM 441. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 203 or 213. 

CHEM 443. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS (3) 

One lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisites, CHEM 201-202 or 211-212, and 203-204 or 213- 
214. The systematic identification of organic compounds. 

CHEM 461. BIOCHEMISTRY I (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 203-204 or 213- 
214, or permission of instructor. A comprehensive introduc- 
tion to general biochemistry wherein the chemistry and 
metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and pro- 
teins are discussed. 

CHEM 462. BIOCHEMISTRY II (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 461 . A continua- 
tion of CHEM 461. 

CHEM 463. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY I (2) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 

461 or concurrent registration in CHEM 461. 

CHEM 464. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY II (2) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 

462 or concurrent registration in CHEM 462, and CHEM 430 
or CHEM 463. 

CHEM 472. PRINCIPLES OF GEOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 104 or equiva- 
lent, and senior standing. A survey of historical and modern 
theories of the origin of the universe and the solar system. 
The origin of elements and their distributions in space, on 
extra-terrestrial bodies and on earth. Discussion of the origin 
of igneous rocks, of the physical and chemical factors govern- 
ing development and distribution of sedimentary rocks, of the 
oceans, and of the atmosphere. Organic sediments, the inter- 
nal structures of earth and the planets, the role of isotopes 
in geothermometry and in the solution of other problems. 

CHEM 473. GEOCHEMISTRY OF SOLIDS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482 or GEOL 
422. Principles of crystal chemistry applied to structures, 
properties and reactions of minerals and non-metallic solids. 
Emphasis is placed on the relation of structural stability to 
bonding, ionic size, charge, order-disorder, polymorphism, 
and isomorphism. 

CHEM 474. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481, or equiva- 
lent. The sources of various elements and chemical reactions 
between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are 
treated. Causes and biological effects of air and water pollu- 
tion by certain elements are discussed. 

CHEM 475. CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 103 or equiva- 
lent, and one additional semester of physical science. An 



82 / umcp 



introduction to physical, chemical and geological processes 
that occur in the marine environment including physical and 
chemical properties of sea water, geology of the sea floor, 
general circulation of the ocean, currents, waves, and tides. 

CHEM 481. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 203-204 or 213- 
214, MATH 141, PHYS 142 or PHYS 263 (PHYS 263 may be 
taken concurrently with CHEM 481) or consent of instructor. 
A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers. 

CHEM 482. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481, or consent 
of instructor. A course primarily for chemists and chemical 
engineers. 

CHEM 485. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 482. Quantum chemistry and other 
selected topics. 

CHEM 486. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 
(2) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 
482 and consent of instructor. 

CHEM 498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures or two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite varies with the nature of the topic being 
considered. Course may be repeated for credit if the subject 
matter is substantially different, but not more than three cred- 
its may be accepted in satisfaction of major supporting area 
requirements for chemistry majors. 

CHEM 601. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 603. ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY (2) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. 

CHEM 604. ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY (2) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week . 

CHEM 605. CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 606. CHEMISTRY OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS 
(2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 607. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE RARER ELEMENTS (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 608. SELECTED TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 601 , 607 or equiva- 
lent. 

CHEM 621. CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY I (2) 

One lecture and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
Registration limited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A 
study of the use of the microscope in chemistry. 

CHEM 622. CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY II (2) 
One lecture and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 621. A study of the optical properties of 
crystals. 

CHEM 623. OPTICAL METHODS OF QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 
(3) 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites, CHEM 421 and 482. The quantitative applications of 
emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, 
ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrophotometry, fluores- 
cence, atomic fluorescence, nephelometry, and of certain 
closely related subjects like NMR and mass spectroscopy. 

CHEM 624. ELECTRICAL METHODS OF QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites, CHEM 421 and 482. The use of conductivity, potenti- 
ometry, polarography, voltammetry. amperometry, coulom- 
etry, and chronopotentiometry in quantitative analysis. 

CHEM 625. SEPARATION METHODS IN QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites, CHEM 421 and 482. The theory and practical application 



to quantitative analysis of the various forms of chromatog- 
raphy, ion exchange, solvent extraction, and distillation. 

CHEM 628. MODERN TRENDS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisites. CHEM 421 and 482. 
A study of advanced methods, including topics such as statis- 
tical treatment of analytical data, kinetic methods in analytical 
chemistry, analytical measurements based on radioactivity, 
and enzymatic techniques. 

CHEM 641. ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS (3) 
Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 642. PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 643. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS (2) 
Two lectures per week. An advanced course covering the 
synthesis of monomers, mechanisms of polymerization, and 
the correlation between structure and properties in high 
polymers. 

CHEM 644. MOLECULAR ORBITAL THEORY (2) 

Two lectures per week. A partial quantitative application of 
molecular orbital theory and symmetry to the chemical prop- 
erties and reactions of organic molecules. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 441 and 482. 

CHEM 645. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE STEROIDS (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 646. THE HETEROCYCLICS (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 648. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2) 

Two lectures per week. 
CHEM 661. PROTEINS, AMINO ACIDS, AND CARBOHYDRATES 
(2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 662. BIOLOGICAL ENERGY TRANSDUCTIONS, VITA- 
MINS, AND HORMONES (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 663. ENZYMES (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 664. THE CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 441 . The chemis- 
try and physiological action of natural products. Methods of 
isolation, determination of structure and synthesis. 

CHEM 665. BIOCHEMISTRY OF LIPIDS (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 
Classification and chemistry of lipids, lipogenesis and energy 
metabolism of lipids, structural lipids, and endocrine control 
of lipid metabolism in mammals. 

CHEM 666. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 461 and 482, or 
consent of instructor. 

CHEM 668. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2-4) 
Two to four 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 464 or equivalent. 

CHEM 669. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 681. INFRA-RED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

CHEM 682. REACTION KINETICS (3) 
Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 683. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 684 or equiva- 
lent. 

CHEM 684. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482 or equiva- 
lent. 

CHEM 685. MOLECULAR STRUCTURE (3) 
Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 686. CHEMICAL CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor 
A detailed treatment of single-crystal x-ray methods. 

CHEM 687. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 684 or equiva- 
lent. 



umcp / 83 



CHEM 688. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (2) 
Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 689. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) 
Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 690. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY I (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 485. 

CHEM 691. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY II (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 690 or PHYS 
622. 

CHEM 702. RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1-2) 

One or two 4-hour laboratory periods per week. Registration 
limited. Prerequisites, CHEM 403 (or concurrent registration 
therein), and consent of instructor. 

CHEM 703. ADVANCED RADIOCHEMISTRY (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 403 and 462. Utili- 
zation of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications 
to problems in the life sciences. 

CHEM 704. ADVANCED RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1-2) 
One or two 4-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 702 and consent of instructor. Laboratory training in 
the utilization of radioisotopes with special emphasis on 
applications to problems in the life sciences. 

CHEM 705. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482. An introduc- 
tion to nuclear chemistry. The more important nuclear decay 
phenomena: nuclear models; nuclear spin; reactions in com- 
plex nuclei; interactions of radiation with matter. Emphasis 
is placed on the behavior of heavy elements and nuclear sys- 
tematics 

CHEM 718. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (1-3) 
One to three lectures per week. A discussion of current 
research problems. Subtitles will be given at each offering. 
Repeatabie for credit to a maximum of six hours. 

CHEM 721. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 201 or equiva- 
lent. A discussion of the fate of natural organic products in 
the geological environment. The influence of diagenetic fac- 
tors, such as hydrolysis, heat, pressure, etc., on such com- 
pounds as cellulose, lignin, proteins, and lipids, detailed con- 
sideration of the origin of soil organic matter, carbonaceous 
shales, coal, and crude oil. 

CHEM 722. COSMOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 482 or equiva- 
lent. Current theories of origin and evolution of the solar sys- 
tem with emphasis on the experimental data available to 
chemists from examination of meteorites, the moon, and the 
earth. 

CHEM 723. MARINE GEOCHEMISTRY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 481 or equiva- 
lent. The geochemical evolution of the ocean; composition 
of sea water, density-chlorinity-salinity relationship and car- 
bon dioxide system. The geochemistry of sedimentation with 
emphasis on the chemical stability and inorganic and biologi- 
cal production of carbonate, silicate and phosphate contain- 
ing minerals. 

CHEM 728. SELECTED TOPICS IN ANALYTICAL 
GEOCHEMISTRY (2-3) 
One or two lectures per week and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course will be subti- 
tled each time it is offered to indicate the analytical method 
discussed. Repeatabie for credit to a maximum of nine hours. 
Enrollment will be limited. 

CHEM 729. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (1-3) 

One to three lectures per week. A discussion of current 
research problems. Subtitles will be given at each offering. 
Repeatabie for credit to a maximum of six hours. 

CHEM 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

CHEM 898. SEMINAR (1) 

CHEM 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



CHINESE AND HEBREW 



CHINESE 

CHIN 401. READINGS FROM CHINESE HISTORY (3) 

Prerequisite, CHIN 302 or equivalent. Based on anthology of 
historians from the Chou to the Ching Dynasties. 

CHIN 402. READINGS FROM CHINESE HISTORY (3) 

Prerequisite, CHIN 302 or equivalent. Based on anthology of 
historians from the Chou to the Ching Dynasties. 

CHIN 411. CHINESE CIVILIZATION (3) 

This course supplements GEOG 422; Cultural Geography of 
China and Japan. It deals with Chinese literature, art, folklore, 
history, government, and great men. The course is given in 
English. 

CHIN 412. CHINESE CIVILIZATION (3) 

Developments in China since 1911. The course is given in 
English. 

CHIN 421. CHINESE LINGUISTICS (3) 
Prerequisite, CHIN 102 or equivalent. 

CHIN 422. CHINESE LINGUISTICS (3) 
Prerequisite, CHIN 102 or equivalent. 



HEBREW 

HEBR 421. THE HEBREW BIBLE (3) 

Selected readings from the Torah and commentaries. The 
Bible in the context of the civilizations of the ancient Middle 
East. Comparison of the essential elements of Israelite reli- 
gion and contemporary paganism. Major concepts of Jewish 
thought derived by traditional commentators from analysis 
of the Biblical text. Emphasis upon the ideas of the Bible, 
the human problems which it attempts to answer, and the 
institutions which embody those ideas. (Greenberg) 

HEBR 422. THE HEBREW BIBLE (3) 

Continuation of HEBR 421. (Greenberg) 

HEBR 431. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY HEBREW 
LITERATURE (3) 
The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment) and the period 
of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Iwry) 

HEBR 432. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY HEBREW 
LITERATURE (3) 
Readings in problems facing modern man as reflected in the 
writings of Agnon, Burla, Berkowitz, Mosensohn, etc. Train- 
ing in literary criticism. Reading of periodicals dealing with 
modern literary criticism. (Iwry) 

HEBR 441. STUDIES IN CLASSICAL HEBREW (3) 

Linguistic peculiarities of classical Hebrew style from pre- 
Biblical epigraphic records to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Applies 
the method of literary form criticism to poetry and songs, 
cultic formulae, historical annals and narratives. Prerequisite, 
HEBR 301. (Iwry) 

HEBR 442. STUDIES IN CLASSICAL HEBREW (3) 

Pentateuchal source analysis, prophetic oracles. Biblical law 
in comparison with other ancient codes, wisdom literature, 
the Apocalyptic form and the Manual of Discipline of the Dead 
Sea Scrolls. Prerequisite, HEBR 301. (Iwry) 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor and Chairman: Ragan 
Professors: Carter, Lepper, Otts 
Associate Professors: Birkner, Cookson, Cournyn, Heins, 

Israel,' Piper, Sternberg, Wedding 
Assistant Professors: Colville, Haefner, Hall, Harris. McCuen, 

Reilly 

'joint appointment with Meteorology 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Courses and research opportunities are available 



84 / umcp 



in the general areas of transportation and urban systems, 
environmental and water resources, and structural engineering. 
All programs are planned on an individual basis to consider 
the student's background and his special interests. Emphasis 
is on the use of sound engineering methodology for the solution 
of the physical problems of man's environment. 

ENCE 400. ADVANCED MATERIALS OF ENGINEERING (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 300. Mecha- 
nisms of the behavior of materials under repeated, sustained 
and impact loads in relation to their environment. Influence 
of microstructure on mechanical properties. Fracture theory 
rheological aspects of the characteristics of selected materi- 
als. 

ENCE 410. ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENES 
220. Strength and deformation of deformable bodies, plane 
stress and strain Torsion theory, unsymmetrical bending, 
curved beams. Behavior of beams, columns, slabs, plates and 
composite members unload. Elastic and inelastic stability. 

ENCE 411. EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
ENES 220. Application of experimental data on materials to 
design problems. Correlation of analytical and experimental 
methods of analysis with design. Electric strain gages, photo- 
elasticity, brittle laquer methods and various analogies. 

ENCE 412. THEORY OF ELASTICITY AND PLASTICITY (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENES 220 and ENCE 
381. General formulation of the theory of mechanics of 
deformable media in terms of cartesian tensors. Plane state 
of stress, torsion of various shaped bars and thin walled sec- 
tions. Bending and buckling of bars and thin plates. Introduc- 
tion to the theory of plates and shells. 

ENCE 420. BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING PLANNING I (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisites or corequisites, ENCE 
340, 351, and 370. Lectures in the methodology used in the 
general practice of civil engineering but with special 
emphasis on planning of extensive civil engineering works. 
In addition, preparation of engineering reports, specifications 
and projects presentation, economics, functional aspects. 

ENCE 421. BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING PLANNING II (1) 
One laboratory of three hours per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 
420. Laboratory for application of the program and principles 
developed in Basic Civil Engineering Planning I. 

ENCE 430. INTERMEDIATE FLUID MECHANICS (4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
ENCE 330. The study of the properties and flow of an ideal 
fluid. (Viscosity, laminar and turbulent flow, flow nets, uniform 
flow, source, irrotational motion and circulation.) Turbulence 
and boundary layers. 

ENCE 431. SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 330 and 360 Concurrent registration in 
ENCE 460 or permission of instructor. Study of the physical 
processes of the hydrologic cycle, hydrometeorology, con- 
cepts of hydrometeorology, concepts of weather modifica- 
tion, evaporation and transpiration infiltration studies, run off 
computations, flood routing, reservoir requirements, 
emphasis on process simulation as a tool in water resource 
development. 

ENCE 432. GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY (3) 

Prerequisites. ENCE 330, 460 or permission of instructor. 
Concepts related to the development of the ground water 
resource, hydrogeology, hydrodynamics of flow through po- 
rous media, hydraulics of wells, artificial recharge, sea water 
intrusion, basin-wide ground water development. 

ENCE 433. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ENGINEERING 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory per week. The theory and 
analytical techniques used in evaluating man's environment. 
Emphasis is given to the areas of quantitative, physical, elec- 
troanalytical and organic chemistry as applied to chemical 
analysis of water. 

ENCE 434. AIR POLLUTION (3) 
Three lectures per week. Classification of atmospheric pollut- 
ants and their effects on visibility, inanimate and animate 
receptors. Evaluation of source emissions and principles of 
air pollution control; meteorological factors governing the 



distribution and removal of air pollutants; air quality measure- 
ments and air pollution control legislation. 

ENCE 435. SANITARY ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 
(4) 
Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
ENCE 221 . The application of sanitary analysis and fundamen- 
tal principles to the design and operation of water and waste 
treatment plants and the control of stream pollution 

ENCE 440. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite. 
ENCE 340. Theories of strength, compressibility, capillarity 
and permeability. Critical review of theories and methods of 
measuring essential properties. Planning, execution and 
interpretation of soil testing programs. 

ENCE 441. SOIL-FOUNDATION SYSTEMS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 340. Soil 
mechanics and foundation analysis are integrated in a sys- 
tems approach to the analysis and design of soil foundation- 
structural systems. Interaction of bearing capacity, settle- 
ments, lateral pressures, drainage, vibrations, stress distribu- 
tions, etc., are included for a variety of structural systems. 

ENCE 450. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 351. Advanced 
indeterminate structures, members of variable section, later- 
ally loaded frames, continuous trusses and secondary 
stresses. 

ENCE 451. STRUCTURAL DESIGN (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
ENCE 351. Steel and reinforced concrete design of bridges 
and buildings using appropriate controlling specifications. 
Advanced problems of modern steel and reinforced concrete. 

ENCE 460. COMPUTER ANALYSIS (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
ENCE 360 and 350. Computer methods and techniques 
applied to civil engineering problems with emphasis on struc- 
tural systems. 

ENCE 461. ANALYSIS OF CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS I (3) 
Prerequisite, senior standing or consent of instructor. Appli- 
cation of the program and principles developed in basic civil 
engineering problems. Economic comparison of alternatives 
using present worth, annual cost, rate of return and cost 
benefit analysis. Development and use of simple and multiple 
regression models, and statistical decision theory. 

ENCE 462. ANALYSIS OF CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS II (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 461 or equivalent. Application of iconic, 
analytic, numeric, and probabilistic models to the solution 
of civil engineering problems. Existing inventory, allocation 
replacement, and competitive models are examined 
Emphasis is on model construction and solution, and 
implementation of the obtained solutions. 

ENCE 470. HIGHWAY ENGINEERING (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 340. Location, 
design, construction and maintenance of roads and pave- 
ments. Introduction to traffic engineering. 

ENCE 471. TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENCE 370. A study of 
the principles of transportation engineering as applied to the 
various modes of transport. Consideration is given to cost 
analysis, economic aspects of route and site selection and 
layout. The organization and administration of engineering 
functions. 

ENCE 472. HIGHWAY AND AIRFIELD PAVEMENT DESIGN (3) 
Prerequisites, ENCE 340, 370, and 470 or equivalent. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Principles of pavement 
analysis and design. Analysis of moving loads and pavement 
response. Subgrade evaluation and beneficiation. Flexible 
and rigid pavement design; related materials specifications 
and tests. 

ENCE 489. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. A course arranged to meet the 

needs of exceptionally well prepared students for study in 

a particular field of civil engineering. 
ENCE 600 ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS 
LABORATORY (3) 

Prerequisites, ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 300 or equivalent. 

Critical examination of the methods for testing engineering 



umcp / 85 



materials and structures under static, repeated, sustained and 
impact forces. Laboratory experiments for the determination 
of strength and stiffness of structural alloys, concrete and 
other construction materials. Critical examination of the 
effects of test factors on the determination of engineering 
properties. 

ENCE 601. STRUCTURAL MATERIALS AND DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 41 and 41 1 or consent of instructor. Rela- 
tion of structural analysis, properties of materials and labora- 
tory study of the behavior of members to structural design 
methods, codes and specifications. Effects of temperature, 
loading rates and state of combined stress on behavior of 
construction materials. 

ENCE 603. 604. THEORIES OF CONCRETE AND GRANULAR 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisites, ENCE 600. or consent of instructor, critical 
reviews of analytical and experimental investigations of the 
behavior of concretes under diverse conditions of loading and 
environment. Mechanics of granular aggregates and the 
chemistry of cements. Theories of the design of Portland 
cement and field experience. 

ENCE 610, 611. ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisites, ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 300, or equivalent. 
Analysis for stress and deformation in engineering members 
by the methods of mechanics of materials and elementary 
theories of elasticity and plasticity. Problems in flexure, tor- 
sion plates and shells, stress concentrations, indeterminate 
combinations, residual stresses, stability. 

ENCE 612. STRUCTURES RESEARCH METHODS AND MODEL 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or equivalent. 
Instrumentation, data analysis; states of stress; structural 
models, structural similitude; analogies: non-destructive test- 
ing techniques; planning research projects, lab studies and 
reports. 

ENCE 620. URBAN-REGIONAL CIVIL ENGINEERING PLANNING 
(3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, degree in civil engineering or 
consent of instructor. Theory and methodology for the syn- 
thesis of general civil engineering aspects of urban and 
regional planning. Integration of land use conditions and 
capabilities, population factors and needs, engineering 
economics and engineering technologies, application to spe- 
cial problems in urban-regional development. Preparation of 
engineering reports. Presentation methods. 

ENCE 621. CIVIL ENGINEERING PLANNING (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite. ENCE 620 or equivalent. 
General to comprehensive planning of complex engineering 
facilities such as industrial plants, bridges, utilities and trans- 
portation projects. Planning based on the synthesis of all 
applicable factors. Emphasis on general civil engineering 
planning including site, structural and construction planning. 
Plan evaluation and feasibility. 

ENCE 630. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF WATER RESOURCE 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 461 or equivalent. Use of advanced 
techniques for the design and analysis of complex, multi- 
purpose water resource systems; identification of the objec- 
tives of design and translation of the objectives into design 
criteria; evaluation of alternate designs and the selection of 
the best design; special emphasis on optimization and simula- 
tion techniques which are applicable to water resource sys- 
tems. 

ENCE 631. ADVANCED HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS (3) 

Emphasis is on the analysis of hydrologic data for the 
development of information necessary for design or for the 
identification of important processes; eigenvalue and eigen- 
vector analysis of linear hydrologic systems; application of 
multivariant statistical methods; non-linear least squares. 

ENCE 632 FREE SURFACE FLOW (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 330 or equivalent. Application of funda- 
mentals of fluid mechanics to problems of free surface flow; 
computation of steady and transient water surface profiles; 
stratified flows in reservoirs and estuaries; diffusion; transi- 
tion structures; sediment transport. 

ENCE 633. THE CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL WATERS (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 433 or consent of instructor. Three lec- 



tures, one lab a week. Application of principles from chemical 
thermodynamics and kinetics to the study and interpretation 
of the chemical characteristics of natural water systems. The 
chemical composition of natural waters is rationalized by con- 
sidering metal ion soluability controls, ph, carbonate equilib- 
ria, absorption reactions, redox reactions, and the kinetics 
of oxygenation reactions which occur in natural water 
envirionments. 
ENCE 634. AIR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 434 or consent of instructor. Two lectures 
and one laboratory a week. The theory and techniques used 
in the determination and measurement of chemical, radiologi- 
cal, and biological pollutants in the atmosphere. Discussion 
of air sampling equipment, analytical methods and data 
evaluation. 

ENCE 635. DESIGN OF WATER PURIFICATION FACILITIES (3) 
Corequisite. ENCE 636 or equivalent. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Application of basic science and 
engineering science to design of water supply and purifica- 
tion processes; design and economics of unit operations as 
applied to environmental systems. 

ENCE 636. UNIT OPERATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 
ENGINEERING (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 221 or consent of instructor. Properties 
and quality criteria of drinking water as related to health are 
interpreted by a chemical and biological approach. Legal 
aspects of water use and handling are considered. Theory 
and application of aeration, sedimentation, filtration, cen- 
trifugation, desalinization, corrosion and corrosion control 
are among topics to be considered. 

ENCE 637. BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL 
HEALTH ENGINEERING (4) 
Prerequisite. MICB 440 or equivalent. Three lectures and one 
lab period a week. An exposition of biological principles 
directly affecting man and his environment; assay, control 
and treatment of biological and virological agents in water, 
sewage, and air; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic 
and anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes. 

ENCE 640. SOIL MECHANICS (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 340, 440 or equivalent. Identification 
properties tests and classification methods for earth materi- 
als. Strength and deformation characteristics, hydraulic prop- 
erties and permeability, shearing resistance, compressibility 
and consolidation, with laboratory tests for these properties. 
Study of the basic theories involved and the development of 
test procedures. 

ENCE 641. ADVANCED FOUNDATIONS (3) 

Prerequisites. ENCE 340, 450 and 451 or equivalent. Princi- 
ples of mechanics applied to engineering problems in founda- 
tion. Earth pressure theories, seepage and drainage 
phenomena, stability of footings and slopes, stresses and 
deformation in soils, consolidation theory and application to 
foundation settlements. 

ENCE 651 . MATRIX METHODS OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Review of basic structural and matrix theory. Development 
of force and displacement methods with emphasis on the lat- 
ter. Discussion of special topics such as geometric non- 
linearity, automated and optimum design non-prismatic mem- 
bers and thin-walled open sections and sub-division of large 
structures. Emphasis on applications to civil engineering 
structures. 

ENCE 652. ANALYSIS OF PLATE AND SHELL STRUCTURES (3) 
Prerequisites. ENCE 410 and ENCE 381 or equivalent. Review 
of theory of elasticity and in-plane forces; theory of ortho- 
tropic plates; approximate methods; large deflection theory, 
buckling; general theory of shells, cylindrical shells, domes. 

ENCE 655. PLASTIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURES 
(3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The study of the factors 
affecting the plastic behavior of steel structures and the 
criteria necessary for design. The design of beams, rigid 
frames and multi-story braced frames using current specifica- 
tions. A review of current research and practice. 

ENCE 656. ADVANCED STEEL DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. Interpretation 
of specifications and codes for the design of steel buildings 
and bridges. Discussion of the behavior of steel connections, 
members and structures; the relationship between behavior 
and design specifications. 



86 / umcp 



ENCE 657 THEORY OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 656 Correlation of theory, experience, 
and experiments in study of structural behavior, proportion- 
ing, and preliminary design Special design problems of 
fatigue, buckling, vibrations, and impact. 

ENCE 660 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS (3) 

ENCE 661 FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUES IN ENGINEERING 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Basic principles and fun- 
damental concepts of the finite element method. Considera- 
tion of geometric and material nonlinearities. convergence, 
mesh gradation and computational procedures in analysis 
Applications to plane stress and plane strain, plates and 
shells, eigenvalue problems, axi-symmetric stress analysis, 
and other problems in civil engineering. 

ENCE 670. HIGHWAY TRAFFIC CHARACTERISTICS AND 
MEASUREMENTS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 470 or consent of instructor. The study 
of the fundamental traits and behavior patterns of the road 
user and his vehicle in traffic. The basic characteristics of 
the pedestrian, the driver, the vehicle, traffic volume and 
speed, stream flow and intersection operation, parking, and 
accidents. 

ENCE 671. HIGHWAY TRAFFIC OPERATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 470. ENCE 670 or consent of instructor. 
A survey of traffic laws and ordinances. The design, applica- 
tion and operation of traffic control devices and aids, includ- 
ing traffic signs and signals, pavement markings, and hazard 
delineation. Capacity, accident, and parking analyses. 

ENCE 672. TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING PLANNING I (3) 
A review of the transportation problem as it relates to the 
development patterns in American cities. The theory and 
application of socio-economic factors directed toward the 
formulation of models for conducting transportation studies. 

ENCE 673. TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING PLANNING II (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 672 or consent of instructor. The theory 
and application of transportation planning models. Traffic 
distribution models including growth factor methods, gravity, 
intervening opportunity, interactance. electrostatic, and prob- 
ability models. Traffic assignment models and modal split 
analyses. 

ENCE 674. RAIL TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. A study of 
the basic engineering components of conventional railroads, 
high speed railroads, and urban rail transit. The characteris- 
tics of the vehicle, the supporting way. and the terminal 
requirements will be evaluated with respect to system per- 
formance, capacity, cost, and level of service. 

ENCE 675. AIRPORT PLANNING AND DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 471 or consent of instructor. The planning 
and design of airports including site selection, runway con- 
figuration, geometric and structural design of the landing 
area, and terminal facilities. Methods of financing airports, 
estimates of aeronautical demand, air traffic control, and air- 
port lighting are also studied. 

ENCE 676. HIGHWAY TRAFFIC FLOW THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 461. ENCE 462 or consent of the instruc- 
tor. An examination of physical and statistical laws that are 
used to represent traffic flow phenomena. Deterministic mod- 
els including heat flow, fluid flow, and energy-momentum 
analogies, car following models, and acceleration noise. 
Stochastic approaches using independent and Markov proc- 
esses, queuing models, and probability distributions. 

ENCE 688. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (1-3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Advanced topics 
selected by the faculty from the current literature of civil 
engineering to suit the needs and background of students. 
May be taken for repeated credit when identified by topic 
title. 

ENCE 689. SEMINAR (1-16) 

ENCE 731. ADVANCED GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 432 or equivalent. Theory and application 
of unsteady flow in porous media. Analysis of one and two 
dimensional unsteady flow. Solutions of non-linear equation 
of unsteady flow with a free surface. Development and use 
of approximate numerical and graphical methods in the study 
of ground water movement. 



ENCE 732. DETERMINISTIC MODELS IN SURFACE WATER 
HYDROLOGY (3) 
A detailed examination of the processes controlling the quan- 
tity and quality of watershed runoff: emphasis is on the 
development of deterministic mathematical models for proc- 
ess simulation; role of land-phase processes in flood hy- 
drology: evaporation and transpiration; models for urban 
watersheds; linkage for hydrograph synthesis. 

ENCE 733 APPLIED WATER CHEMISTRY (4) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 633 or consent of instructor Three lec- 
tures, one lab a week A study of the chemistry of both munici- 
pal and industrial water treatment processes. Among the 
topics to be considered are water softening, stabilization, 
chemical destabilization of colloidal materials, ion exchange, 
disinfection, chemical oxidation and oxygenation reactions. 

ENCE 734. AEROSOL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENCE 430 or equiva- 
lent. Physical properties of air-borne particles. Theories of: 
particle motion under the action of external forces; 
coagulation; Brownian motion and diffusion. Application of 
aerosols in atmospheric sciences and industrial processes. 

ENCE 735. DESIGN OF MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL WASTES 
TREATMENT FACILITIES (3) 
Corequisite. ENCE 736 or equivalent. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Application of basic science and 
engineering science to design of municipal and industrial 
waste treatment processes: design and economics of unit 
operations as applied to environmental systems. 

ENCE 736. THEORY OF AQUEOUS AND SOLID WASTE 
TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL (3) 
Prerequisites, ENCE 221 and fundamentals of microbiology, 
or consent of instructor. Theory and basic principles of treat- 
ing and handling waste products: hydraulics of sewers; 
biological oxidation: principles and design criteria of biologi- 
cal and physical treatment processes; disposal of waste 
sludges and solids. 

ENCE 737. INDUSTRIAL WASTES (3) 

Corequisite. ENCE 736 or equivalent. A study of the charac- 
teristics of liquid wastes from major industries, and the proc- 
esses producing the wastes. The theory and methods of 
eliminating or treating the wastes, and their effects upon 
municipal sewage-treatment plants, and receiving waters. 

ENCE 738. SELECTED TOPICS IN POROUS MEDIA FLOW (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 731. Analysis of two-liquid flows for 
immiscible fluids, simultaneous flow of two immiscible fluids 
and miscible fluids. Hydrodynamic dispersion theories, 
parameters of dispersion and solutions of some dispersion 
problems with emphasis on migration of pollutants. A max- 
imum of six hours may be earned in this course. 

ENCE 750. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or equivalent. Review 
of classical determinate and indeterminate analysis tech- 
niques; numerical technique; multistory buildings: space 
structures; suspension bridges and cables structures; arches; 
long span bridges. 

ENCE 751. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL 
BEHAVIOR (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 750 or equivalent. Elastic and inelastic 
behavior of structural members and frames: problems in tor- 
sion, stability and bending; open and closed thin-walled sec- 
tions; curved girders. 

ENCE 753. REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES (3) 

Prerequisite. ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. The behavior 
and strength of reinforced concrete members under com- 
bined loadings, including the effects of creep, shrinkage and 
temperature. Mechanisms of shear resistance and design 
procedures for bond, shear and diagonal tension. Elastic and 
ultimate strength analysis and design of slabs. Columns in 
multistory frames. Applications to reinforced concrete struc- 
tures. 

ENCE 754. PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES (3) 
Prerequisite. ENCE 450 and 451 or equivalent. Fundamental 
concepts of prestressed concrete. Analysis and design of flex- 
ural members including composite and continuous beams 
with emphasis on load balancing technique. Ultimate strength 
design for shear Design of post tensioned flat slabs. Various 
applications of prestressing including tension members, com- 



umcp / 87 



pression members, circular prestressing, frames and folded 
plates. 

ENCE 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
ENCE 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



Departments cooperating in the program are Art, Classical 
Languages, English, Germanic and Slavic Languages and Liter- 
ature, Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literature, 
French and Italian Languages and Literature, and the program 
in Hebrew, Chinese, and Linguistics. 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURE 

GREEK 

Prerequisite for 400-level courses. The status of advanced 
undergraduate or graduate and consent of the instructor. 

GREK 401. THUCYDIDES (3) 

GREK 402. GREEK PHILOSOPHERS (3) 

GREK 403. GREEK TRAGEDY (3) 

GREK 404. GREEK COMEDY (3) 

GREK 405. GREEK ORATORY (3) 

GREK 406. GREEK EPIGRAPHY (3) 

GREK 499. GREEK READINGS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. The reading of one 
or more selected Greek authors. Reports. May be repeated 
with different content. 

LATIN 

Prerequisite for 400-level courses, LATN 361. 

LATN 401. CATULLUS AND THE ROMAN ELEGIAC POETS (3) 

LATN 402. TACITUS (3) 

LATN 403. ROMAN SATIRE (3) 

LATN 404. ROMAN COMEDY (3) 

LATN 405. LUCRETIUS (3) 

LATN 411. ADVANCED LATIN GRAMMAR (3) 

Prerequisite, three years of college Latin or equivalent. An 
intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin 
language supplemented by rapid reading. 

LATN 499. LATIN READINGS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The reading of one or 
more selected Latin authors from antiquity through the 
Renaissance. Reports. May be repeated with different con- 
tent. 

LATN 610. VULGAR LATIN READINGS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An intensive review of the 
phonology, morphology, and syntax of classical Latin, fol- 
lowed by the study of the deviations of vulgar Latin from the 
classical norms, with the reading of illustrative texts. The 
reading of selections from the Peregrinatio Ad Loca Sancta 
and the study of divergences from classical usage therein, 
with special emphasis of those which anticipate subsequent 
developments in the romance languages. Reports. (Avery) 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professor and Chairman: Freedman (English) 

Professors: Levitine (Art); Russell, Whittemore (English); Jones 
(Germanic and Slavic); Goodwyn (Spanish and Portuguese). 

Associate Professors: Greenwood, Perloff, Salamanca (Eng- 
lish). 

Assistant Professors: Swigger (English); Lebreton-Savigny, 
Salchenberger (French and Italian). 

The Program in Comparative Literature offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Current language, course, examination, Master of Arts thesis, 
and Doctor of Philosophy dissertation requirements for 
graduate degrees in Comparative Literature may be obtained 
from the departmental office. 



CMLT 401 INTRODUCTORY SURVEY OF COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE (3) 
Survey of the background of European literature through 
study of Greek and Latin literature in English translations, 
discussing the debt of modern literature to the ancients. 

(Greenwood) 

CMLT 402. INTRODUCTORY SURVEY OF COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE (3) 
Study of the medieval and modern continental literature. 

(Greenwood) 

CMLT 411. THE GREEK DRAMA (3) 

The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aris- 
tophanes in English translations. Emphasis on the historic 
background, on dramatic structure, and on the effect of the 
attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. 

CMLT 415. THE OLD TESTAMENT AS LITERATURE (3) 
A study of sources, development and literary types. 

(Greenwood) 

CMLT 416. NEW TESTAMENT AS LITERATURE (3) 

A study of the books of the New Testament, with attention 
to the relevant historical background and to the transmission 
of the text. A knowledge of Greek is helpful, but not essential. 

(Greenwood) 

CMLT 421. THE CLASSICAL TRADITION AND ITS INFLUENCE 
IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE (3) 
Emphasis on major writers. Reading knowledge of Greek or 
Latin Required. (Greenwood) 

CMLT 422. THE CLASSICAL TRADITION AND ITS INFLUENCE 
IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE (3) 
Emphasis on major writers. Reading knowledge of Greek or 
Latin required. (Greenwood) 

CMLT 430. LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES (3) 

Narrative, dramatic and lyric literature of the Middle Ages 
studied in translation. (Jones) 

CMLT 433. DANTE AND THE ROMANCE TRADITION (3) 

A reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the discovery 
of reality in western literature. (Salchenberger) 

CMLT 440. LITERATURE OF THE FAR EAST (3) 

A survey of the literature of China and Japan. An examination 
of the development of Chinese and Japanese literature up 
to the Yuan and Kamakura period. 

CMLT 441. LITERATURE OF THE FAR EAST (3) 

The literature from the Fourteenth Century to the present. 

CMLT 461. ROMANTICISM — EARLY STAGES (3) 

Emphasis on England, France and Germany. Reading know- 
ledge of French or German required. (Swigger) 

CMLT 462. ROMANTICISM — FLOWERING AND INFLUENCE (3) 
Emphasis on England, France and Germany. Reading knowl- 
edge of French or German required. 

CMLT 463. THE FAUST LEGEND IN ENGLISH AND GERMAN 
LITERATURE (3) 
A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later 
treatment by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. 

CMLT 469. THE CONTINENTAL NOVEL (3) 

The novel in translation from Stendhal through the existential- 
ists, selected from literatures of France, Germany, Italy, Rus- 
sia, and Spain. (Walt) 

CMLT 470. IBSEN AND THE CONTINENTAL DRAMA (3) 

Emphasis on the major work of Ibsen, with some attention 
given to selected predecessors, contemporaries and succes- 
sors. 

CMLT 479. MAJOR CONTEMPORARY AUTHORS (3) 

CMLT 488. GENRES (3) 

A study of a recognized literary form, such as tragedy, epic, 
satire, literary criticism, comedy, tragicomedy, etc. The 
course may be repeated for cumulative credit up to six hours 
when different material is presented. (Russell) 



88 / umcp 



CMLT 489. MAJOR WRITERS (3) 

Each semester two major writers from different cultures and 
languages will be studied. Authors will be chosen on the basis 
of significant relationships of cultural and aesthetic contexts, 
analogies between their respective works, and the importance 
of each writer to his literary tradition. 

CMLT 496. CONFERENCE COURSE IN COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE (3) 
Second semester. A tutorial type discussion course, correlat- 
ing the courses in various literatures which the student has 
previously taken with the primary themes and masterpieces 
of world literature. This course is required of undergraduate 
majors in comparative literature, but must not be taken until 
the final year of the student's program. (Swigger) 

CMLT 498. SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
(3) 

CMLT 601 PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (3) 

(Swigger) 

CMLT 610. FOLKLORE IN LITERATURE (3) 

(Goodwyn) 

CMLT 631. THE MEDIEVAL EPIC (3) 

(Jones) 

CMLT 632. THE MEDIEVAL ROMANCE (3) 

(Herman, Jones) 

CMLT 639. STUDIES IN THE RENAISSANCE (3) 

Repeatable to a maximum of nine hours. (Salchenberger) 

CMLT 640. THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE AND ITS INFLUENCE 
(3) (Salchenberger) 

CMLT 642. PROBLEMS OF THE BAROQUE IN LITERATURE (3) 
CMLT 649. STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE 
(3) 

Studies in Eighteenth Century literature: as announced. 

Repeatable to a maximum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 658. STUDIES IN ROMANTICISM (3) 

Studies in romanticism: as announced. Repeatable to a max- 
imum of 9 hours. (Swigger) 

CMLT 679. SEMINAR IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY 
LITERATURE (3) 
Seminar in modern and contemporary literature: as 
announced. Repeatable to a maximum of nine hours. 

CMLT 681. LITERARY CRITICISM — ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL 
(3) (Greenwood) 

CMLT 682. LITERARY CRITICISM — RENAISSANCE AND 

MODERN (3) 
CMLT 690. SEMINAR IN LITERARY SOURCES OF ART HISTORY 

(3) 
CMLT 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
CMLT 801. SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES (3) 
CMLT 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Professor and Director: Atchison 

Professors: Chu, 1 Edmundson, 2 Glasser, 3 Heilprin, 4 Kanal, 

Minker 
Associate Professors: Austing, Vandergraft 
Assistant Professors: Agrawala, Basili, Deutsch, Feldman, 

Hagerty, Hamlet, McClellan, Noonan, Park, Zelkowitz 
Research Professors: Ortega, 5 Rheinboldt, Rosenfeld 

'joint appointment with Electrical Engineering 

2 joint appointment with Mathematics 

3 joint appointment with Physics 

"joint appointment with Library and Information Services 

s joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 



The Computer Science Center offers graduate programs lead- 
ing to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy in the following areas: applications, computer sys- 
tems, language and information processing, numerical analysis, 
and theory of computing. 



Admission and degree requirements specific to the graduate 
programs in computer science are described in a brochure avail- 
able through the Education Office of the Computer Science 
Center. There are two options for the master's degree: 24 hours 
of course work plus the completion of a thesis; or 33 hours 
of course work plus the completion of a scholarly paper. There 
is no minimum course requirement in the doctoral program. 
The number and variety of courses offered each semester 
enables a student and his advisor to plan an individualized 
degree program. 

Computers within the Computer Science Center include a 
dual processor UNIVAC 1108, and IBM 7094, and a PDP 11/45. 



CMSC 400. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER LANGUAGES AND 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 241 or equivalent. A terminal course suit- 
able for non-CMSC majors with no programming back- 
ground. Organization and characteristics of computers. 
Procedure oriented and assembly languages. Representation 
of data, characters and instructions. Introduction to logic 
design and systems organization. Macro definition and gener- 
ation. Program segmentation and linkage. Extensive use of 
the computer to complete projects illustrating programming 
techniques and machine structure. (CMSC 400 may not be 
counted for credit in the graduate program in computer sci- 
ence.) 

CMSC 410. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 210 or equivalent. This is the same course 
as ENEE 440. Introduction. Computer elements Parallel 
adders and subtracters. Micro-operations. Sequences. Com- 
puter simulation. Organization of a commercially available 
stored program computer. Microprogrammed computers. A 
large-scale batch-processing system. 

CMSC 420. DATA AND STORAGE STRUCTURES (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 210 and 340 or equivalent. A study of 
intrinsic structures of data, such as arrays, strings, trees, and 
lists, and their relation to storage media. Representation of 
data structures in storage by records, files, etc. Special stor- 
age structures such as content addressed, trie, and associa- 
tive memories. Referencing, processing, and management 
techniques based on the structuring, e.g., list processing. 
Storage and accessing efficiency, as well as dynamic flexibil- 
ity of various methods. 

CMSC 440. STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3) 
Prerequisite, CMSC 210 or equivalent. Formal definition of 
languages including specification of syntax and semantics. 
Syntactic structure and semantics of simple statements 
including precedence, infix, prefix, and postfix notation. 
Global structure and semantics of algorithmic languages 
including declarations and storage allocation, grouping of 
statements and binding time of constituents, subroutines, 
coroutines, tasks and parameters. List processing and data 
description languages. 

CMSC 450. ELEMENTARY LOGIC AND ALGORITHMS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of instructor. This is the 
same course as MATH 444. An elementary development of 
propositional logic, predicate logic, set algebra, and Boolean 
algebra, with a discussion of Markov algorithms, Turing 
machines and recursive functions. Topics include post pro- 
ductions, word problems, and formal langauages. 

CMSC 460. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 241 or 462, and CMSC 110 or equivalent. 
Study of the basic computational methods for interpolation, 
least squares, approximation, numerical quadrature, numeri- 
cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, sys- 
tems of linear equations and initial value problems for ordi- 
nary differential equations. The emphasis is placed on a dis- 
cussion of the methods and their computational properties 
rather than on their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for 
students in the physical and engineering sciences. This 
course should not be taken by students who have passed 
MATH/CMSC 470. (Listed also as MATH 460.) 

CMSC 470. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 241. Introduction to the analysis of 
numerical methods for solving linear systems of equations, 
nonlinear equations in one variable, interpolation and approx- 
imation problems and the solution of initial value problems 
for ordinary differential equations. Stress is placed on provid- 
ing the student with a good understanding of the theoretical 



umcp / 89 



foundations of the various methods. Intended primarily for 
students in mathematics, applied mathematics, and computer 
science. This course should not be taken by students who 
have passed MATH/CMSC 460. (Listed also as MATH 470.) 

CMSC 485. SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisites, CMSC 110 and MATH 246. or equivalent. 
Introduction to digital simulation; simulation by Mimic pro- 
gramming; simulation by Fortran programming; simulation 
by DSL-90 (or CSMP) programming; logic and construction 
of a simulation processor; similarity between digital simula- 
tions of continuous and discrete systems. 

CMSC 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (1-3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An individualized 
course designed to allow a student or students to pursue a 
specialized topic or project under the supervision of the 
senior staff. Credit according to work done. 

CMSC 600. PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisites. CMSC 410, 420 and 440. Review of batch- 
process programming systems, their components, operating 
characteristics, services and limitations. Concurrent process- 
ing of input-output and interrupt handling. Structure of mul- 
tiprogramming systems for large-scale multiprocessor com- 
puters. Addressing techniques, storage allocation, file man- 
agement, systems accounting, and user-related services; 
command languages and the embedding of subsystems. 
Operating characteristics of large-scale systems. 

CMSC 610. COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 410 or equivalent. Computer organiza- 
tion. Memory logic. Control logic. Numerical processors. Non- 
numerical processors. Computer architecture. On-line com- 
puter systems. Time-sharing computer systems. Computer 
networks. Analog and hybrid computer systems. 

CMSC 620. INFORMATION PROCESSING (3) 

Prerequisites. CMSC 420 and 440. Computers as devices for 
information processing. Definition, representation, and trans- 
formation of information. Complex information processing 
systems, techniques for studying information processing sys- 
tems. Models of information processing systems. Processing 
of numeric data, formula processing. Processing of natural- 
language text. Picture processing. Machine intelligence. 
Applications to cognitive processes and problem-solving. 

CMSC 630. THEORY OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3) 
Prerequisite. CMSC 440. Syntactic and semantic models of 
programming languages. Finite state processors and their 
application to lexical analysis. Context free languages, IR(k), 
precedence languages as models of programming languages. 
Extensions to context free grammars such as property gram- 
mars, inherited and synthesized attributes, van Wijngaarden 
grammars (Algol 68), abstract syntax, the Vienna definition 
language, graph models. Translator writing systems. 

CMSC 640. COMPUTABILITY AND AUTOMATA (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 450, or equivalent. Introduction to the 
theories of computability and automata. This basic course 
establishes the foundation for all courses in the area of 
metatheory. mathematical models of computers, abstract 
machines, and formal languages. Topics covered include 
finite-state automata, neural networks, computability, effec- 
tive procedures, algorithms, Turing machines, unsolvability 
results, recursive functions, post productions and canonical 
systems. 

CMSC 660. ALGORITHMIC NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH/CMSC 460 or 470, and CMSC 110. 
Detailed study of problems arising in the implementation of 
numerical algorithms on a computer. Typical problems 
include rounding errors, their estimation and control; numeri- 
cal stability considerations; stopping criteria for converging 
processes; parallel methods. Examples from linear algebra, 
differential equations, minimization. (Also listed as MATH 
684.) 

CMSC 670. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH/CMSC 460 or 470, MATH 405, and MATH 
410. Perturbation theorems for linear equations and eigen- 
value problems. Stability of solutions of ordinary differential 
equations. Discretization errors for ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Rounding error for linear equations. Convergence 
theorems for iterative methods for linear and nonlinear equa- 
tions. (Listed also as MATH 638.) 



CMSC 700. TRANSLATION OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 
(3) 
Prerequisites. CMSC 420 and 440. Application of theoretical 
concepts developed in formal language and automata theory 
to the analytic design of programming languages and their 
processors. Theory of push-down automata, precedence 
analysis, and bounded-context syntactic analysis as models 
of syntactic portion of translator design. Design criteria 
underlying compiler techniques, such as backtracking and 
lookahead. Methods for analyzing translator operation in 
terms of estimating storage space and translation time 
requirements. Current version of Backus-Naur form. 
Associated semantic notations for specifying the operation 
of programming language translators. 

CMSC 710. SIMULATION OF COMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE (3) 
Prerequisite, CMSC 410 or equivalent. Computer simulation 
language, macro and micro simulation, Boolean translation, 
software-hardware transformation, description and simula- 
tion of a microprogrammed computer, construction and 
simulation of an assembler, project for unified hardware- 
software design. 

CMSC 720. INFORMATION RETRIEVAL (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 620. Designed to introduce the student 
to computer techniques for information organization and 
retrieval of natural language data. Techniques of statistical, 
syntactic and logical analysis of natural language for retrieval, 
and the extent of their success. Methods of designing systems 
for use in operational environments. Applications to both data 
and document systems. 

CMSC 723. COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 620. Introductory course on applications 
of computational techniques to linguistics and natural- 
language processing. Research cycle of corpus selection, 
pre-editing, keypunching, processing, post-editing, and 
evaluation. General-purpose input. Processing, and output 
routines. Special-purpose programs for sentence parsing and 
generation, segmentation, idiom recognition, paraphrasing, 
and stylistic and discourse analysis. Programs for dictionary, 
thesaurus, and concordance compilation, and editing. Sys- 
tems for automatic abstracting, translation, and question- 
answering. 

CMSC 725. MATHEMATICAL LINGUISTICS (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 640 and STAT 400. Introductory course 
on applications of mathematics to linguistics. Elementary 
ideas in phonology, grammar, and semantics, automata, for- 
mal grammars and languages. Chomsky's theory of transfor- 
mational grammars, Yngve's depth hypothesis and syntactic 
complexity. Markov-chain models of word and sentence gene- 
ration, Shannon's information theory, Carnap and Bar-Hillel's 
semantic theory, lexicostatistics and stylostatistics, Zopf's law 
of frequency and Mandelbrot's rank hypothesis. Mathematical 
models as theoretical foundation for computational linguis- 
tics. 

CMSC 730. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 620 and STAT 401. Heuristic program- 
ming; tree research procedures. Programs for game playing, 
theorem finding and proving, problem solving; multiple- 
purpose programs. Conversation with computers; question- 
answering programs. Trainable pattern classifiers-linear, 
piecewise linear, quadratic. "4>", and multilayer machines. 
Statistical decision theory, decision functions, likelihood 
ratios; mathematic taxonomy, cluster detection. Neural mod- 
els, computational properties of neural nets, processing of 
sensory information, representative conceptual models of the 
brain. 

CMSC 733. COMPUTER PROCESSING OF PICTORIAL 
INFORMATION (3) 
Prerequisite, CMSC 620. Input, output, and storage of picto- 
rial information. Pictures as information sources, efficient 
encoding, sampling, quantization, approximation. Position- 
invariant operations on pictures, digital and optical 
implementations, the Pax language, applications to matched 
and spatial frequency filtering. Picture quality, "image 
enhancement" and "image restoration."' Picture properties 
and pictorial pattern recognition. Processing of complex pic- 
tures: "figure" extraction, properties of figures. Data struc- 
tures for picture description and manipulation: "picture lan- 
guages." Graphics systems for alpha-numeric and other sym- 
bols, line drawings of two- and three-dimensional objects, 
cartoons and movies. 



90 / umcp 



CMSC 737 TOPICS IN INFORMATION SCIENCE (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. This is the same 
course as LBSC 721. Definition of information science, rela- 
tion to cybernetics and other sciences, systems analysis, 
information, basic constraints on information systems, pro- 
cesses of communication, classes and their use. optimaliza- 
tion and mechanization. 

CMSC 740 AUTOMATA THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 640. This is the same course as ENEE 
652 Introduction to the theory of abstract mathematical 
machines. Structural and behavioral classification of 
automata Finite-state automata: theory of regular sets 
Pushdown automata. Linear-bounded automata. Finite trans- 
ducers. Turing machines: universal Turing machines 

CMSC 745 THEORY OF FORMAL LANGUAGES (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 640. Formal grammars: syntax and 
semantics. Post productions: Markov algorithms. Finite-state 
languages, parsing, trees, and ambiguity. Theory of regular 
sets Context-free languages: pushdown automata. Context- 
sensitive languages: linear-bounded automata. Unrestricted 
rewriting systems: Turing machines. Closure properties of 
languages under operations. Undecidability theorems. 

CMSC 750. THEORY OF COMPUTABILITY (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 640. Algorithms: Church's thesis. Primi- 
tive recursive functions: Godel numbering. General and par- 
tial recursive functions. Turing machines: Turings thesis. 
Markov algorithms. Church s Lambda calculus. Grzegorczyk 
hierarch: Peter hierarchy. Relative recursiveness. Word prob- 
lems. Post s correspondence problem. 

CMSC 755 THEORIES OF INFORMATION (3) 

Prerequisites. CMSC 620 and STAT 401. Mathematical and 
logical foundations of existing theories of information. Topics 
include Fisher s theory of statistical information. Kullback and 
Leibler s theory of statistical information. Shannon s theory 
of selective information, and Carnap and Bar-Hillel's theory 
of semantic information. The similarities and differences of 
these and other theories are treated. 

CMSC 770. ADVANCED LINEAR NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite. MATH CMSC 470. Methods for the solution of 
linear systems of equations: in particular, iterative methods 
and their convergence theory. The numerical solution of the 
algebraic eigenvalue problem. (Also listed as MATH 694.) 

CMSC 772. ADVANCED NONLINEAR NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisites. MATH CMSC 670 and MATH 441 . Iterative solu- 
tion of nonlinear operator equations: in particular, nonlinear 
systems of equations. Existence question. Minimization 
methods and applications to approximation problems. (Also 
listed as MATH 696.) 

CMSC 780. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO THE PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES (3) 
Prerequisite. CMSC 21. STAT 400. and a graduate course in 
physical science. Applications of computers to numerical cal- 
culation, data reduction, and modeling in the physical sci- 
ences. Stress will be laid on the features of the applications 
which have required techniques not usually considered in 
more general contexts. 

CMSC 782. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF PHYSICAL 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisites. CMSC 210 and STAT 401. Monte-Carlo and 
other methods of investigating models of interest to physical 
scientists. Generation and testing of random numbers. 
Probabilistic, deterministic and incomplete models. 
CMSC 798. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (1-3) 
CMSC 799. MASTER S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
CMSC 818. ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) 
CMSC 838. ADVANCED TOPICS IN INFORMATION 
PROCESSING (3) 

CMSC 840. ADVANCED AUTOMATA THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. CMSC 740. Advances and innovations in 
automata theory. Variants of elementary automata: multitape, 
multihead. and multidimensional machines. Counters and 
stack automata. Wang machines: Shepherdson-Sturgis 
machines. Recursive hierarchies. Effective computability: 
relative uncomputability. Probabilistic automata. 

CMSC 858. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THEORY AND 
METATHEORY (3) 

CMSC 878. ADVANCED TOPICS IN NUMERICAL METHODS (3) 



CMSC 898 ADVANCED TOPICS IN APPLICATIONS (3) 
CMSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



DAIRY SCIENCE 

Professor and Chairman: Davis 

Professors: Arbuckle. Cairns. Keeney 1 , King. Mattick. Vander- 

sall. Williams 
Assistant Professors: Bull. Douglas 
Lecturer: Plowman 

'joint appointment with Chemistry 

The Department of Dairy Science offers work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Can- 
didates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree have the option 
of studying in oae of two major fields: dairy production, which 
is concerned with breeding, nutrition and physiology of dairy 
animals: or dairy technology, which is concerned with chemical, 
bacteriological, and nutritional aspects of dairy products, as 
well as the industrial phases of milk processing. 

Students interested in food science may undertake graduate 
study in the dairy technology phase of Dairy Science, or in the 
food science curriculum. Courses in these programs are listed 
elsewhere under the headings Animal Science and Food Sci- 
ence, as appropriate. 



DANCE 

DANC 400. ADVANCED CHOREOGRAPHIC FORMS (3) 

Prerequisite. DANC 208 or equivalent and adequate dance 
technique. Lectures and studio work in modern sources as 
they apply to dance. Solo and group choreography. 

DANC 465. ADVANCED NOTATION (3) 

Prerequisite. DANC 365 or equivalent. Continuation of materi- 
als in DANC 365 in more intensive work. The translation, writ- 
ing, and performing of advanced scores in the various forms 
of dance. 

DANC 468. REPERTORY (3) 

The learning of dances to be chosen from notated scores, 
works of visiting artists, or selected faculty choreography to 
be performed on at least one concert. Audition required. The 
course may be repeated for credit, as different works will be 
chosen each semester. 

DANC 470. CREATIVE DANCE FOR CHILDREN (3) 

Prerequisite. DANC 208 and 305 or equivalent. Directing the 
essential elements of dance to the level of the child s experi- 
ence and facilitating the creative response. The development 
of movement into simple forms to serve as a symbol of 
individual expression. 

DANC 478. DANCE PRODUCTION (3) 

Prerequisite. DANC 388 or equivalent and an adequate under- 
standing of dance techniques. Advanced choreography. Inde- 
pendent work with periodic criticism. 

DANC 482. HISTORY OF DANCE (3) 

"? ce.e :c~e"t of dance from primitive to t h e Middle Ages 
and the relationship of dance forms to patterns of culture. 

DANC 483. HISTORY OF DANCE (3) 

The development of dance from the Renaissance Period to 
the present times and the relationship of dance forms to pat- 
terns of culture. 

DANC 484. THEORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF DANCE (3) 
The study of the theories, philosophies and aesthetics of 
dance. Investigation of form, content and structure. Interrela- 
tionships of the arts, and their role in man's world. 

DANC 489. ETHNIC STYLES (3) 

Prerequisite. DANC 104. Lecture and activity in styles expres- 
sive of various cultures. May be repeated for credit by permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DANC 492. PERCUSSION AND MUSIC SOURCES FOR DANCE 
(3) 
Prerequisite. DANC 102 or equivalent. Techniques of percus- 
sion playing, and its use as dance accompaniment. Learning 
to use the instruments in composition and improvisation. 
Study of music sources for dance 



umcp / 91 



DANC 498 DIRECTED STUDIES IN DANCE (1-6) 

Hours arranged. For advanced students who have the permis- 
sion of the chairman of the Department of Dance. 

DANC 499. ADVANCED DANCE TECHNIQUE (2) 

Prerequisite, DANC 389 or equivalent. Continuation of DANC 
389 in further advanced form. 



ECONOMICS 

Professor and Chairman: Dillard 

Professors: Almon, Bergmann, Cumberland, Gruchy, McGuire, 

O'Connell, Olson, Schultze, Ulmer, Wonnacott 
Associate Professors: Aaron, Adams, Bennett, Clague, Dodge, 

Dorsey, Harris, Knight, McLoone 1 , Meyer, Singer, Straszheim, 

Weinstein 
Assistant Professors: Atkinson, Betancourt, Boorman, Chris- 

tensen, Greer, Harrison, Layher, MacRae, Meer, Schiller, 

Whitman 
Lecturers: Hinrichs, Pierce 

'joint appointment with Education Administration, Supervi- 
sion and Curriculum 

Programs are offered leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees with majors in economic theory, com- 
parative economic systems and planning, economic develop- 
ment, economic history, history of economic thought, industrial 
organization, institutional economics, international economics, 
labor economics, mathematical economics and econometrics, 
monetary theory and policy, public finance, regional and urban 
economics, and social policy. 

Applicants should have taken (or should plan to take 
immediately) at least one undergraduate course in each of 
micro-economics, macro-economics, statistics, and calculus. 
The submission of the Graduate Record Examination scores on 
the Aptitude Test is required and on the Advanced Economics 
Test is recommended. Letters of recommendation from three 
persons competent to judge the probability of the applicant's 
success in graduate school should be sent directly to the Direc- 
tor of Graduate Studies in Economics. Preference is given to 
applicants for full-time graduate study. 

The Master of Arts degree in Economics may be taken under 
either (1) the thesis option (24 hours plus a thesis) or (2) the 
non-thesis option (30 hours, including Economics 621-622 plus 
a written examination in Economic Theory). The requirements 
for the non-thesis option for the M.A. are met automatically in 
the course of the Ph.D. program in Economics. 

The main requirements of the Ph.D. program are (1) a written 
examination in economic theory, normally taken at the begin- 
ning of the second year of full-time graduate study: (2) written 
examinations in two approved optional fields; (3) a comprehen- 
sive oral examination covering economic theory and the two 
optional fields; (4) two courses (Econ 621-622) in Quantitative 
Methods in Economics; (5) two courses (Econ 606-607) in the 
History of Economic Thought; (6) foreign language or one of 
several options; (7) a seminar paper to be available to the faculty 
at the time of the oral comprehensive examination; (8) a disser- 
tation and its successful oral defense. 

The graduate program in Economics is a comprehensive one. 
The department possesses special strength in the Economics 
of the Public Sector. Special research projects under the super- 
vision of faculty members are being carried on in the Economics 
of Discrimination (by race and sex), the Economics of Environ- 
mental Management, and Interindustry Forecasting. Research 
assistantships are available in each of these projects. Numerous 
teaching assistantships are also available. The department can 
usually help graduate students find half-time employment in 
nearby Federal agencies engaged in economic research. 

A complete description of the requirements of the degrees 
in economics and the admission process is available on request 
from: Director of Graduate Studies in Economics, Department 
of Economics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

ECON 401. NATIONAL INCOME ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203. Required for undergraduate 



economics majors. An analysis of national income accounts 
and the level of national income and employment. 

ECON 402. BUSINESS CYCLES (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 430. A study of the causes 
of depressions and unemployment, cyclical and secular insta- 
bility, theories of business cycles, and the problem of control- 
ling economic instability. (Almon) 

ECON 403. INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203. Required for undergraduate 
economics majors. An analysis of price and distribution 
theory with special attention to recent developments in the 
theory of imperfect competition. 

ECON 407. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 203 and senior standing. Graduate stu- 
dents should take ECON 705. A survey of recent trends in 
American, English and continental economic thought with 
special attention to the work of such economists as W.C. 
Mitchell, JR. Commons, T. Veblen, W. Sombart. J.A. Hobson 
and other contributors to the development of economic 
thought since 1900. (Gruchy) 

ECON 411. AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 203 or 205. Long-term trends in the 
American economy and analysis of the sources of output 
growth. Technological changes and the diffusion of new 
technologies. These subjects are discussed in the context of 
theoretical models. 

ECON 415. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF 
UNDERDEVELOPED AREAS (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An analysis of the economic 
and social characteristics of underdeveloped areas. Recent 
theories of economic development, obstacles to develop- 
ment, policies and planning for development. 

(Adams, Bennett, Betancourt) 

ECON 418. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF SELECTED AREAS 
A. Latin America, B. Asia, C. Africa. Prerequisite, ECON 415. 
Institutional characteristics of a specific area are discussed 
and alternate strategies and policies for development are 
analyzed. 

ECON 421. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ECONOMICS (3) 
Prerequisites, ECON 401, 403. Economic theory as it relates 
to quantitative methods. Theory of statistical inference. 

(Boorman, MacRae, Peterson) 

ECON 422. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ECONOMICS II (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, ECON 401, 403, 421, and 425, 
or permission of instructor. Formulation, estimation and test- 
ing of economic models; theory of identification in linear 
models, multiple regression and analysis of variance; single- 
equation problems in econometric work and econometric 
methods in estimation of multi-equation structures. Examples 
of current research employing econometric methods. 

(Boorman, MacRae, Peterson) 

ECON 425. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 401 and 403 and one year of college 
mathematics. A course designed to enable economics majors 
to understand the simpler aspects of mathematical 
economics. Those parts of the calculus and algebra required 
for economic analysis will be presented. (MacRae) 

ECON 430. MONEY AND BANKING (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203. Relation of money and credit to 
economic activity and prices; impact of public policy in finan- 
cial markets and for goods and services; policies, structure, 
and functions of the federal reserve system; organization, 
operation, and functions of the commercial banking system, 
as related particularly to questions of economic stability and 
public policy. 

ECON 431. THEORY OF MONEY, PRICES AND ECONOMIC 
ACTIVITY (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 430. A theoretical treat- 
ment of the influence of money and financial markets on 
economic activity and prices, and of the effects of monetary 
policy on the markets for goods and services; the role of 
money in the Classical and Keynesian macro-systems; topics 



92 / umcp 



of theoretical interest in monetary policy formation and 
implementation. 

ECON 440. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203. A descriptive and theoretical analysis 
of international trade, balance of payments accounts, the 
mechanism of international economic adjustment, compara- 
tive costs, economics of customs unions. 

ECON 441. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICIES (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 401, 403, and 440. Contemporary bal- 
ance of payments problems; the international liquidity con- 
troversy investment, trade and economic development; 
evaluation of arguments for protection. (Lagher) 

ECON 450 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC FINANCE (3) 

Prerequisites. ECON 201 ana 203 or 203 and 205. A study 
of the role of federal, state and local governments in mobiliz- 
ing resources to meet public wants; principles and policies 
of taxation, debt management, and government expenditures 
and their effects on resource allocation, stabilization of 
income and prices, income distribution, and economic 
growth. (Christensen, Singer) 

ECON 451. THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, ECON 450 and 401 or con- 
sent of instructor. An economic analysis of the theory and 
practice of public finance including taxation, debt manage- 
ment, expenditures, and fiscal policy. (McGuire, Singer) 

ECON 454 STATE AND LOCAL PUBLIC FINANCE (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. Principles and problems of 
governmental finance with special reference to state and local 
jurisdictions. Topics to be covered include taxation, expendi- 
tures and intergovernmental fiscal relations. 

(Ring, Whitman) 

ECON 460. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. Changing structure of the 
American economy; price policies in different industrial clas- 
sifications of monopoly and competition in relation to prob- 
lems of public policy. (O'Connell, Quails) 

ECON 461. ECONOMICS OF AMERICAN INDUSTRIES (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. A study of the technology, 
economics and geography of representative American 
industries. (Green, Measday, Mills) 

ECON 470. LABOR ECONOMICS (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. The historical development 
and chief characteristics of the American labor movement are 
first surveyed. Present-day problems are then examined in 
detail; wage theories, unemployment, social security, labor 
organization, and collective bargaining. 

(Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 471. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN LABOR ECONOMICS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 470. A detailed exami- 
nation of current problems in labor economics including: 
labor market and manpower problems, unemployment com- 
pensation and social security, wage theories, and productivity 
analysis. (Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 475. ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION 
(3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. Topics include the causes 
of the persistence of low income groups; the relation of 
poverty to technological change, to economic growth, and 
to education and training; economic motivations for dis- 
crimination; the economic results of discrimination; pro- 
posed remedies for poverty and discrimination. 

(Bergmann, Clague, McLoone, Schiller) 

ECON 480. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An investigation of the theory 
and practice of various types of economic systems. An exami- 
nation and evaluation of the capitalistic system followed by 
an analysis of alternative types of economic systems such 
as Fascism, Socialism and Communism. 

(Amuzegar, Dodge, Gruchy) 

ECON 482. ECONOMICS OF THE SOVIET UNION (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An analysis of the organiza- 
tion, operating principles and performance of the Soviet 
economy with attention to the historical and ideological back- 
ground, planning, resources, industry, agriculture, domestic 
and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the structure and 
growth of national income. (Dodge) 



ECON 484. THE ECONOMY OF CHINA (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. Policies and performances 
of the Chinese economy since 1949. Will begin with a survey 
of modern China's economic history. Emphasizes the 
strategies and institutional innovations that the Chinese have 
adopted to overcome the problems of economic develop- 
ment. Some economic controversies raised during the Cul- 
tural Revolution' review of the problems and prospects of the 
present Chinese economy. (Denny) 

ECON 486. THE ECONOMICS OF NATIONAL PLANNING (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 203 or 205. An analysis of the principles 
and practice of economic planning with special reference to 
the planning problems of West European countries and the 
United States. (Almon, Gruchy) 

ECON 490. SURVEY OF URBAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS AND 
POLICIES (3) 
Prerequisites, ECON 201, 203 or 205. An introduction to the 
study of urban economics through the examination of current 
policy issues. Topics may include suburbanization of jobs and 
residences, housing and urban renewal, urban transportation, 
development of new towns, ghetto economic development, 
problems in services such as education and police. 

(Straszheim) 

ECON 491. REGIONAL AND URBAN ECONOMICS (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 401, or consent of the 
instructor. Study of the theories, problems and policies of 
urban and regional economic development. (Harris, King) 

ECON 601 MACRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) 

First semester of a two-semester sequence, 601-602. Topics 
normally include general equilibrium theory in Classical, 
Keynesian, and Post-Keynesian treatments; the demand for 
money; theories of consumption behavior and of inflation. 
(Aaron, Atkinson, Wonnacott) 

ECON 602. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND INSTABILITY (3) 
Second semester. A continuation of ECON 601. Major topics 
include growth and technological change, investment, busi- 
ness cycles, and large empirical macroeconomic models. 
Also included is material on wages and employment and on 
international and domestic stability. (Atkinson) 

ECON 603. MICRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) 
This course and its sequel, ECON 604, analyze the usefulness 
and shortcomings of prices in solving the basic economic 
problem of allocating scarce resources among alternative 
uses. The central problem of welfare economics and general 
equilibrium provides the framework for a detailed analysis 
of consumption and production theories including linear 
programming with decisions under uncertainty. An acquaint- 
ance with calculus or concurrent enrollment in ECON 621 
is presumed. (Clague, Pierce, Ulmer) 

ECON 604. ADVANCED MICRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 603. A continuation of 
ECON 603. Theory of capital, interest and wages. Qualifica- 
tions of the basic welfare theorem caused by noncompetitive 
market structures, external economies and diseconomies and 
secondary constraints. Application of price theory to public 
expenditure decisions, investment in human capital, interna- 
tional trade, and other areas of economies. (Olson, Ulmer) 

ECON 605. WELFARE ECONOMICS (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 603. The topics covered 
include Pareto optimality, social welfare functions, 
indivisibilities, consumer surplus, output and price policy in 
public enterprise, and welfare aspects of the theory of public 
expenditures. (McGuire, Olson) 

ECON 606. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 403 or consent of the 
instructor. A study of the development of economic thought 
and theories including the Greeks, Romans, Canonists, Mer- 
cantilists, Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. Rela- 
tion of ideas to economic policy. (Di Hard) 

ECON 607. ECONOMIC THEORY IN THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 606 or consent of the 
instructor. A study of Nineteenth-Century and Twentieth- 
Century Schools of economic thought, particularly the Classi- 
cists, Neo-Classicists, Austrians, German Historical School, 
American Economic Thought, the Socialists, and Keynes. 

(Dillard) 



umcp / 93 



ECON 611. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT (3) 

ECON 613. ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT OF CAPITALISM (3) 
Second semester. Studies the transition from feudalism to 
modern capitalistic economies in Western Europe. Whenever 
possible, this economic history is analyzed with the aid of 
tools of modern economics, and in the light of comparisons 
and contrasts with the less developed areas of the present 
day. (Olson) 

ECON 615. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF 
UNDERDEVELOPED AREAS (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 401 and 403. An analysis 
of the forces contributing to and retarding economic progress 
in underdeveloped areas. Macro- and micro-economic 
aspects of development planning and strategy are 
emphasized. (Adelman, Bennett) 

ECON 616. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 615 or consent of 
instructor. A continuation of ECON 615. Special emphasis is 
on the application of economic theory in the institutional set- 
ting of a country or area of particular interest to the student. 

(Adams, Bennett) 

ECON 617. MONEY AND FINANCE IN ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT (3) 
First semester. Economic theory, strategy and tactics for 
mobilizing real and financial resources to finance and 
accelerate economic development. Monetary, fiscal, and tax 
reform policy and practice by the government sector to design 
and implement national development plans. (Bennett) 

ECON 621. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS I (3) 
First semester. An introduction to the theory and practice of 
statistical inference. Elements of computer programming and 
a review of mathematics germane to this and other graduate 
economics courses are included. (Boorman, MacRae) 

ECON 622. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS II (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 621. Techniques of 
estimating relationships among economic variables. Multiple 
regression, the analysis of variance and covariance, and 
techniques for dealing in time series. Further topics in 
mathematics. (Boorman, MacRae) 

ECON 655. CASE STUDIES IN GOVERNMENT RESOURCE 
ALLOCATION (3) 
Case studies in cost-benefit analysis of government programs 
and projects as a basis for the program budget system; an 
analysis of resource management in the public sector of the 
economy. 

ECON 656. PUBLIC SECTOR WORKSHOP (3) 

Second semester. Representative problems in analysis for 
public decision making: measurement of benefits and costs; 
incommensurabilities in benefits, and ambiguities in cost; 
criteria for program and project selection; effects of uncer- 
tainty; time horizon considerations; joint costs and multiple 
benefits; non-quantifiable factors in decision analysis. Exam- 
ples will be taken from current government programs. 

ECON 661. ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 401 and 403 or consent 
of instructor. Analysis of market structure and its relation to 
market performance. (Greer) 

ECON 662 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY 
(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 661 or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of the problems of public policy in regard 
to the structure, conduct, and performance of industry. 
Examination of anti-trust policy from the point of view of 
economic theory. (Greer) 

ECON 671. SEMINAR IN LABOR ECONOMICS (3) 

First semester. Formal models of labor demand, supply, utili- 
zation and price formation. Factors affecting labor supply; 
the determination of factor shares in an open economy; bar- 
gaining models, labor resources, trade union theories as they 
affect resource allocation. (Weinstein) 

ECON 672. SELECTED TOPICS IN LABOR ECONOMICS (3) 
Second semester. The wage-price issue; public policy with 
respect to unions, labor-management relations, and the labor 
market; institutional aspects of the American labor 
movement; manpower development and training. (Knight) 



ECON 682. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE 
SOVIET UNION (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 482 or consent of 
instructor. Measurement and evaluation of Soviet economic 
growth including interpretation and use of Soviet statistics, 
measurement of national income, fiscal policies, investment 
and technological change, planning and economic adminis- 
tration, manpower and wage policies, foreign trade and aid. 
Selected topics in bloc development and reform. (Dodge) 

ECON 686. ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MATURE ECONOMIES (3) 
First semester. Analysis of policies and problems for achiev- 
ing stable economic growth in mature economics such as 
the United States, and the major West European countries. 

(Gruchy) 

ECON 698. SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3) 

ECON 705. SEMINAR IN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMIC THEORY 

(3) 

Second semester. A study of the recent developments in the 

field of institutional economic theory in the United States and 

abroad. (Gruchy) 

ECON 706. SEMINAR IN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMIC THEORY 
(3) 

(Gruchy) 

ECON 721. ECONOMETRICS I (3) 

First semester. Special topics in mathematical statistics 
necessary for understanding econometric theory, with par- 
ticular emphasis on multivariate analysis. The estimation of 
simultaneous equation systems, problems involving errors in 
variables, distributed lags, and spectral analysis. 

(Almon, Adelman) 

ECON 722. SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 622 or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of data sources for economic research; 
critical evaluation of previous and current quantitative 
economic studies; and class discussion and criticism of stu- 
dent research projects. (Almon, Adelman) 

ECON 725. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3) 
First semester. Optimization techniques such as Lagrangian 
multipliers and linear programming. Mathematical treatment 
of general equilibrium, including interindustry analysis, the 
theory of production, consumption, and welfare. The course 
assumes a background in calculus and matrix algebra such 
as provided by ECON 621 and 622. (Almon, Madan) 

ECON 726. SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 725. 

(Almon, Madan) 

ECON 731. MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (3) 

First semester. An adequate knowledge of micro- and macro- 
economics is assumed. Theory of money, financial assets, and 
economic activity; review of classical, Neo-Classical and 
Keynesian contribution; emphasis on Post-Keynesian con- 
tributions, including those of Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley-Shaw, 
Friedman, and others. (Meyer) 

ECON 732. SEMINAR IN MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 731 or consent of 
instructor. Theory of the mechanisms through which central 
banking affects economic activity and prices; formation and 
implementation of monetary policy; theoretical topics in 
monetary policy. (Meyer) 

ECON 741. ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC 
RELATIONS (3) 
First semester. The international mechanism of adjustment; 
price, exchange rate, and income changes, comparative 
costs, factor endowments, and the gains from trade. Commer- 
cial policy and the theory of customs unions. 

(Clague, Wonnacott) 

ECON 742. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC 
RELATIONS (3) 
Second semester. (Clague, Wonnacott) 

ECON 751. ADVANCED THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE (3) 

Review of utility analysis to include the theory of individual 
consumer resource allocation and exchange and welfare 
implications, effects of alternative tax and subsidy techniques 
upon allocation, exchange, and welfare outcomes. Theories 
of public goods, their production, exchange and consump- 



94 / umcp 



tion. Principles of benefit-cost analysis for government deci- 
sions. (Schultze) 

ECON 752. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC FINANCE (3) 

Second semester. Theory of taxation and tax policy, with par- 
ticular emphasis on income taxation; empirical studies; the 
burden of the public debt Research paper by each student 
to be presented to seminar. (Aaron. McGuire) 

ECON 761 THE ECONOMICS OF TECHNICAL CHANGE (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Determinants and impact 
of inventions and innovations. Qualitative and quantitative 
aspects of technical change both at the micro- and macro- 
economic levels and under different conditions of economic 
development. 

ECON 775. SEMINAR ON THE ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND 
DISCRIMINATION (3) 
Prerequisites. ECON 621 and 622. A review of the economic 
literature in poverty and discrimination. The course will also 
function as a workshop in which research of the staff and 
students is presented. (Bergmann) 

ECON 776. SEMINAR IN THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN 
RESOURCES (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Clague. McLoone) 

ECON 791. ADVANCED REGIONAL AND URBAN ECONOMICS 
(3) 
First semester. Location theory and spatial distribution of 
economic activity: application of analytic methods, such as 
social accounting systems, economic base theory, input- 
output techniques, and industrial complex analysis to prob- 
lems of regional development, environmental quality, and 
natural resource management. (Cumberland) 

ECON 792. SEMINAR IN REGIONAL AND URBAN ECONOMICS 
(3) 
Second semester. Selected topics and techniques in regional 
and urban economic analysis, including models for economic 
projections, urban growth, and regional development. 

(Harris) 

ECON 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-16) 
ECON 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-16) 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 

All departments and one non-departmentalized area in Edu- 
cation offer the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
in accordance with Graduate School. College of Education, and 
departmental policies. For details see front of this catalog, state- 
ments of policies and procedures for master s or doctoral 
degrees in Education issued by the College of Education, and 
departmental statements. 

Master of Education 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the Master of Edu- 
cation (M.Ed.) degree with the following policies as approved 
by the Graduate Council: 

1. A minimum of 30 semester hours in coursework with a 
grade average of 8. All courses with D's and F's must be 
repeated. Grades for courses not a part of the program but taken 
in graduate status will be computed in the average and are sub- 
ject to the policy on D's and F's. 

2. A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600-800 with 
the remainder at least in the 400 series. Some departments 
require courses in departments outside of those in Education. 

3. A comprehensive written examination taken at the end of 
coursework. A part of the examination may be oral. 

4. EDMS 646 or EDMU 690 and one seminar paper: or two 
seminar papers. 

5. EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. 

6. Test battery. 

7. Transfer policy in accord with that for Master of Arts. 

For further details, see Statement of Policies and Proce- 
dures: Master's Degrees in Education, issued by the College 
of Education, and statements of departmental programs. 



Advanced Graduate Specialist Program 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist program is designed to 
promote high professional competence in an area of specializa- 
tion. The candidate must be able to show that he can operate 
as an effective counselor, administrator, teacher, or skilled per- 
son in whatever is his major field of professional endeavor. The 
program is offered through most of the departments in the Col- 
lege of Education. The applicant must be admissible to The 
Graduate School but the certificate is awarded by the College 
of Education. 

Requirements are as follows: 

1. Admission based on a master's degree or its equivalent 
in course hours earned either at the University of Maryland or 
at another recognized institution. Applicant to be in non-degree 
status in The Graduate School. 

2. Program developed with adviser and filed with Graduate 
Studies office in Education. 

3. Test battery required of all Education graduate students. 

4. Coursework totaling not more than 30 hours (grades of 
6 or A) from an institution accredited for graduate work, may 
be transferred. 

5. Minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate work with not 
less than 30 from the University of Maryland. 

6. Half of the coursework from other institutions or this Univer- 
sity to be in courses comparable to the 600-800 series. 

7. May be required to take a substantial portion of work in 
departments other than in Education. 

8. A S average with no D's or F's on the record. 

9. A written examination of not less than six hours in length. 
10. Registration in some kind of field study, field experience, 

apprenticeship or internship. 

For details see "Statement of Policies and Procedures: 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Program in Education,'' issued 
by the College of Education and departmental regulations. 

Doctor of Education Degree 

The policies and procedures for the Doctor of Education 
(Ed.D.) degree are for the most part the same as those for the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Education departments in The 
Graduate School. The only difference lies in the amount of credit 
for the Ed.D. project (6-9 hours) as opposed to the Ph.D. dis- 
sertation (12-16 hours). For details see "Statement of Policy and 
Procedures: Doctoral Degrees in Education, issued by the Col- 
lege of Education as well as policies on Ph.D. in the front of 
this catalog, and departmental regulations. 



EDUCATION 

EDUC 410. HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN WESTERN 
CIVILIZATION (3) 
Educational institutions through the ancient, medieval and 
early modern periods in Western Civilization, as seen against 
a background of socio-economic development. 
EDUC 411. HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES 
(3) 
A study of the origins and development of the chief features 
of the present system of education in the United States. 

EDUC 420. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (3) 
A study of the great educational philosophers and systems 
of thought affecting the development of modern education. 

EDUC 421. LOGIC OF TEACHING (3) 
An analysis of the structure of basic subject matters in the 
curriculum and of the standard logical moves in teaching. 

EDUC 430. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY (3) 

Deals with data of the social sciences which are germane 
to the work of teachers. Implications of democratic ideology 
for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed by 
changes in population and technological trends, the welfare 
status of pupils, the socio-economic attitudes of individuals 
who control the schools, and other elements of community 
background. 

EDUC 440. AUDIOVISUAL EDUCATION (3) 

Sensory impressions in their relation to learning projection 
apparatus, its cost and operation: slides, filmstrips and films, 
physical principles underlying projection; auditory aids to 



umcp / 95 



instruction; field trips; pictures, models and graphic 
materials; integration of sensory aids with organized instruc- 
tion. Recommended for all education students. 

EDUC 441. GRAPHIC MATERIALS FOR INSTRUCTION (3) 
Prerequisite EDUC 440 or consent of instructor. A laboratory 
course which combines graphic and photographic processes 
for education and training purposes. Techniques include let- 
tering, coloring, transparencies, illustrations, converting, 
duplicating transparent and opaque media. Emphasis is 
placed on appropriate media selection for target audiences. 
Heavy student project orientation. 

EDUC 442. INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SERVICES (3) 

Prerequisites, teaching experience and EDUC 440, or equiva- 
lent. Procedures for coordinating instructional media pro- 
grams; instructional materials acquisition, storage, schedu- 
ling, distribution, production, evaluation and other service 
responsibilities; instructional materials center staff coordina- 
tion of research, curriculum improvement and faculty devel- 
opment programs. 

EDUC 443. INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION UTILIZATION (3) 
Combining televised lessons, on-campus seminars, and 
related workbook assignments, this course focuses upon 
planning for the various uses of instructional television with 
students. State, local school unit, school, and classroom uses 
will be illustrated through film and studio production. The 
aspects of producing ITV programs developed through the 
television lessons and "Hands-On" assignments of the semi- 
nars. 

EDUC 444. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION (3) 

Analysis of programmed instruction techniques; selection, 
utilization and evaluation of existing programs and teaching 
machines; developing learning objectives; writing and val- 
idating programs. 

EDUC 489. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION (1-4) 
A. Adult Education, B. Foundations, C Higher Education. Pre- 
requisites, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience is to be 
taken. Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and whose appli- 
cation for such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area 
to both major and nonmajor students. 
Wore, the total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDUC 489. 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of 20 semes- 
ter hours. 

EDUC 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. 

EDUC 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, AND INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the College of Education (or 
developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDUC 620. ANALYSIS OF EDUCATIONAL CONCEPTS (3) 

EDUC 640. SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, 
RESEARCH AND THEORY (3) 
Prerequisite, EDUC 642. Review of the literature, including 
the mass media of communications as they relate to the 
instructional process; learning theory implications, sociologi- 
cal, and economic considerations as they relate to current 
and future mediated instructional systems. 

EDUC 642 MEDIATED INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, EDUC 440 and 444. Theoretical and pragmatic 
determinants in the selection of media systems for improving 
teaching-learning efficiency; development and evaluation of 
teaching-learning units for large-group, small-group, and self- 
instructional presentation; integration of print and non-print 



media with team teaching techniques. Review of related 
research. 

EDUC 644. PRACTICUM IN INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS (2-6) 
Prerequisite, EDUC 642. Design and application of an experi- 
mental instructional system to a problem in curriculum, learn- 
ing, or research. Each student will work with school or college 
instructors in the development, use, and evaluation of an 
instructional media system to solve a specific instructional 
problem in the field. 

EDUC 660. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (3) 
Analyzes and compares leading issues in education in various 
countries of the world, particularly as they relate to crucial 
problems in American education. 

EDUC 661. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND 
EDUCATIONAL CHANGE (3) 

EDUC 670. EDUCATION IN AFRICA (3) 
An examination of the development of modern educational 
systems in Africa south of the Sahara out of the Colonial and 
Pre-Colonial past into the independent present and future 
The focus is on research into the changing philosophies and 
persistent problems in African education. 

EDUC 671. EDUCATION IN THE NEAR EAST (3) 
A consideration of current educational problems of the Near 
East as they have emerged from the confrontation of the tradi- 
tional Muslim educational heritage with the foreign educa- 
tional activities and the forces of nationalism and moderniza- 
tion. 

EDUC 709. SEMINAR IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF 
EDUCATION (3) 

EDUC 730 SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY (3) 

EDUC 760. SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (3) 

EDUC 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. 

EDUC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of 6 hours for master's 
thesis. 
EDUC 858. ADULT EDUCATION (3) 
EDUC 859. SEMINAR IN ADULT EDUCATION (3) 

EDUC 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 

A. Adult Education, B. Foundations, C. Higher Education. Ap- 
prenticeships in the major area of study are available to se- 
lected students whose application for an apprenticeship has 
been approved by the education faculty. Each apprentice is 
assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the equiv- 
alent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or agency. 
The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the apprentice and the other persons involved. 
Prerequisites, teaching experience, a Master's degree in Edu- 
cation, and at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland. Note: The total number of credits 
which a student may earn in EDUC 489. 888 and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDUC 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 
A. Adult Education, B. Foundations, C. Higher Education. 
Internships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the education 
faculty for an internship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at 
least a semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly 
employed The intern's sponsor maintains a close working 
relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
NOTE: The total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDUC 489. 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 



96 / umcp 



EDUC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 

Registration required to the extent of 6-9 hours for an ED.D. 
project and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 



ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION AND 
CURRICULUM 

Professor and Chairman: McClure 

Professors: J. Anderson, V. Anderson, Berman, Carbone, Dud- 
ley, James, Newell, Van Zwoll. Wedberg, Wiggin 

Associate Professors: Goldman, Kelsey, McLoone, 1 Perrin 

Assistant Professors: Bennett, Hempstead 
''joint appointment with Economics 

Programs in the Department of Administration, Supervision 
and Curriculum are based on one of the three areas signified 
in the name of the department. However, within this framework, 
students have an opportunity to select such specialties as sec- 
ondary administration, curriculum-educational technology, 
administration of higher education, general curriculum, and 
others. 

Programs in any of the three areas are individually designed 
for public or private elementary and secondary school special- 
ists, personnel in higher education institutions or education 
agencies. The Master of Education, the Master of Arts, the Doc- 
tor of Education and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees are 
offered. The Advanced Graduate Specialist diploma is awarded 
for programs minimally 60 graduate hours beyond the 
bachelor's degree. 

The department prefers that candidates have preparation and 
experience in teaching. 

Admission at the doctoral level is based upon an academic 
average of 3.5 at the Master's level, performance at the 50th 
percentile or better on the Miller Analogies test battery and an 
undergraduate average of 3.0. Selective screening of qualified 
applicants at the Master's, AGS, and Doctoral levels is necessary 
in terms of limiting enrollment to the available faculty resources 
of the department. 

The department requires at least one year of residence for 
a doctoral degree. A field internship is increasingly suggested 
for most candidates. This internship is done under faculty super- 
vision in schools, colleges or agencies, in roles that are consis- 
tent with the candidate's program emphasis. 

The department has developed close working relationships 
with area schools, community colleges and education agencies 
so that they may serve as resources for the academic offerings 
on campus. Procedures have been established which facilitate 
the use of these agencies for research and field experiences. 

The Educational Technology Center in the College of Educa- 
tion is used extensively by students in the department, par- 
ticularly those in curriculum. 

EDAD 489. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION (1-4) 

A. Adult Education, B. Foundations, C. Higher Education. 
Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience is to be 
taken. Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and whose appli- 
cation for such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area 
to both major and nonmajor students. Wofe: The total number 
of credits which a student may earn in EDAD 489, 888, and 
889 is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDAD 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDAD 499 WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, INSTITUTES (1-6) 

The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the College of Education (or 




* ■'•',!*%' 




umcp / 97 



developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 
EDAD 602. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE (3) 
EDAD 603. PROBLEMS IN HIGHER EDUCATION (3) 

EDAD 605. ADMINISTRATIVE FOUNDATIONS (3) 

EDAD 605 is presented as the first of the four courses for 
students majoring in the field of educational administration, 
supervision, and curriculum development. It attempts to 
structure a theoretical and research base for the study and 
practice of administration in the field of education by 
introducing the student to selected contributors to adminis- 
tration, and by indicating the multidisciplinary nature of 
administrative study as it relates to purpose-determination, 
policy-definition, and task-accomplishment. 

EDAD 606. ADMINISTRATIVE BEHAVIOR AND 
ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3) 
A critical analysis of organizational management (informal 
and formal dimensions), an assessment of the contributions 
from other fields (traditional and emerging) to the study of 
administrative behavior and the governance of organizations, 
and an analysis and assessment of the administrator s motiva- 
tions, perceptions, and sensitivity as determinants of behavior 
constitute the major units of study for EDAD 606. The theoreti- 
cal and research bases for these areas and such related con- 
cepts as status, role, systems, interpersonal relations, and 
sensitivity training are examined. 

EDAD 607. ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES (3) 

EDAD 607 is designed to develop competence with respect 
to selected administrative process areas. It examines efforts 
to develop theories and models in these areas and analyzes 
research studies and their implications for administrative 
practice. In addition it seeks to develop skill in selected pro- 
cess areas through such techniques as simulation, role- 
playing, case analysis, and computer-assisted instruction. 

EDAD 608. ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONSHIPS (3) 

EDAD 608 is structured to provide the student of educational 
administration with an understanding of the various groups 
and subgroups to which an administrator relates and to the 
significance of these relationships for leadership behavior. 
It provides an opportunity to examine and analyze significant 
principles, concepts, and issues in the areas of personnel 
administration, public relations, community state, and federal 
agencies. The human relations skills essential to effective 
leadership in these areas constitute the other dimension of 
this course. 

EDAD 611. THE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The work of the secondary 
school principal. Includes topics such as personnel problems, 
school-community relationships, student activities, schedule 
making, and internal financial accounting. 

EDAD 612. SCHOOL FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION (3) 
An introduction to principles and practices in the administra- 
tion of the public school finance activity. Sources of tax 
revenue, the budget, and the function of finance in the educa- 
tional program are considered. 

EDAD 614. SCHOOL PLANT PLANNING (2-3) 
An orientation course in which the planning of school build- 
ings is developed as educational designing with reference 
to problems of site, building facilities, and equipment. 

EDAD 616. PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERVISION (3) 

The nature and functions of supervision; various supervisory 
techniques and procedures; human relationship factors; and 
personal qualities for supervision. 

EDAD 617 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Problems in administering elementary schools and improving 
instruction. 

EDAD 625 SCHOOL PUBLIC RELATIONS (3) 

A study of the interrelationship between the community and 
the school. Public opinion, propaganda, and the ways in 



which various specified agents and agencies within the 
school have a part in the school public relations program 
are explored. 
EDAD 634. THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM (2-3) 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole 
from early childhood through adolescence, including a review 
of historical developments, an analysis of conditions affecting 
curriculum change, an examination of issues in curriculum 
making, and a consideration of current trends in curriculum 
design. 

EDAD 635. PRINCIPLES OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3) 
Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation in the 
schools; principles for the selection and organization of the 
content and learning experiences; ways of working in class- 
room and school on curriculum improvement. 

EDAD 679. SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND 
SUPERVISION (2-4) 
Prerequisite, at least four hours in educational administration 
and supervision or consent of instructor. A student may regis- 
ter for two hours and may take the seminar a second time 
for an additional two hours. 

EDAD 718. SCHOOL SURVEYS (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Includes study of school 
surveys with emphasis on problems of school organization 
and administration, finance and school plant planning, field 
work in school surveys is required. 

EDAD 721. ADVANCED SCHOOL PLANT PLANNING (2) 

EDAD 614 is a prerequisite to this course. However, students 
with necessary background may be admitted without comple- 
tion of EDAD 614. Emphasis is given to analysis of the educa- 
tional program and planning of physical facilities to accom- 
modate that program. 

EDAD 723. PRACTICUM IN PERSONNEL RELATIONSHIPS (2-6) 
Prerequisite, Master's Degree or consent of instructor. 
Prerequisite may be waived with advisor's approval. Enroll- 
ment limited. Designed to help teachers, school adminis- 
trators, and other school staff members to learn to function 
more effectively in developing educational policy in group 
situations. Each student in the course is required to be work- 
ing concurrently in the field with a group of school staff mem- 
bers or citizens on actual school problems. 

EDAD 726. CHILD ACCOUNTING (2) 
An inquiry into the record keeping activities of the school 
system, including an examination of the marking system. 

EDAD 727. PUBLIC SCHOOL PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 
(3) 
A comparison of practices with principles governing the satis- 
faction of school personnel needs, including a study of 
tenure, salary schedules, supervision, rewards, and other 
benefits. 

EDAD 750. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
TEACHER EDUCATION (3) 
Teacher education today — current patterns and significant 
emerging changes, particularly those involving teachers and 
schools. Deals with selection, curriculum, research, accredi- 
tation, and institution-school relationships. 

EDAD 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 
See EDUC 798 for course description. 

EDAD 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDAD 802. CURRICULUM IN HIGHER EDUCATION (3) 
An analysis of research in curriculum and of conditions affect- 
ing curriculum change, with examination of issues in cur- 
riculum making based upon the history of higher education 
curriculum development. 

EDAD 803. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF HIGHER 
EDUCATION (3) 
Organization and administration of higher education at the 
local, state, and federal levels; and an analysis of administra- 
tive relationships and functions and their effects in curriculum 
and instruction. 

EDAD 805. COLLEGE TEACHING (3) 
Various methods of college instruction analyzed in relation 
to the curriculum and psychological basis. These would 
include the case study method, the demonstration method, 
the lecture method, the recitation method, teaching 
machines, teaching by television, and other teaching aids. 

EDAD 806 SEMINAR IN PROBLEMS OF HIGHER EDUCATION 
(2) 



98 / umcp 



EDAD 837 CURRICULUM THEORY AND RESEARCH (2) 

EDAD 879. SEMINAR IN TEACHER EDUCATION (3-6) 
A problem seminar In teacher education. A maximum of six 
hours may be earned in this course. 

EDAD 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 

See EDUC 888 for course description. 
EDAD 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 
EDAD 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL 
SERVICES 

Professor and Chairman: Marx 

Professors: Byrne. Hoyt. Magoon, 1 Pumroy' 

Associate Professors: Greenberg, Lawrence. Martin, Ray, 

Rhoads, Stern 
Assistant Professors: Birk 2 , Colby. Freeman. 1 Gump. Kafka. 

Kreiger. Magrab. Medvene. 2 Spielbichler. Tetrault. 

Westbrock 2 

'joint appointment with Psychology 

2 joint appointment with Counseling Center 



Historically, the programs of the Department of Counseling 
and Personnel Services have been responsive to societal needs 
in providing leadership in the training of specialized personnel 
service workers. The programs are designed for the preparation 
of professionals who serve in a variety of social settings in- 
cluding schools, colleges, rehabilitative agencies, government 
agencies and other community agencies. These professionals 
may serve one of several roles either at the practitioners level 
or at an advanced level of leadership, supervision and research. 
Programs of preparation for practitioners are offered at the Mas- 
ter's and Advanced Graduate Specialist level while the advanced 
offerings for researchers, supervisors, and personnel adminis- 
trators are conducted at the Doctoral level. The Master's and 
Advanced Graduate Specialist programs are offered among the 
following six specialty programs within the department: The 
Elementary School Counseling Specialty Program prepares the 
student as a child development consultant, individual and group 
counselor and coordinator of pupil services. The Secondary 
School Counseling Program prepares the student to serve as 
a member of a human resources team in individual and group 
counseling, information specialist regarding personnel, social, 
educational and vocational matters, and pupil personnel pro- 
gram coordination. The Psychological Services in Schools Pro- 
gram prepares the student to be certified as a school psycholo- 
gist where his principal functions are to assess psychojogical 
conditions and devise intervention strategies to enhance the 
learning of pupils. The College Student Personnel Specialty 
Program prepares specialists at the higher education level in 
two areas of concentration: college counseling and Student Per- 
sonnel Administration which includes areas such as Student 
Activities, Student Union, Housing, Admissions. Placement. 
Deans of Students and Vice Presidents of Student Affairs. The 
Community Counseling Specialty Program provides two 
emphases within the program. Career development and voca- 
tional counseling is one concentration and the other concentra- 
tion is personal-social counseling and community mental health 
consultation. The Rehabilitation Counseling Specialty Program 
prepares counselors to work with mentally, emotionally, socially 
and physically handicapped persons in public and private 
agencies. 

The doctoral programs in Counseling and Personnel Services 
are designed to prepare students to achieve exceptional compe- 
tence in the areas of research, theory, and practice related to 
personnel services. Graduates typically assume positions of 
leadership, research or supervision of personnel services in 
public units such as large school systems, universities, or state 
rehabilitation and community agencies: as professors in person- 
nel service programs: as counselors in higher education institu- 
tions. The doctoral program, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree, has as its major emphasis research in the behavioral 
sciences and applied fields. The primary thrust at the Master's 
and Advanced Graduate Specialist levels is upon excellence in 
practice: the major emphasis at the Doctoral level is upon theory 
and research. 



EDCP 410. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND PER- 
SONNEL SERVICES (3) 
Presents principles and procedures, and examines the func- 
tion of counselors, psychologists in schools, school social 
workers, and other personnel service workers. 

EDCP 411. MENTAL HYGIENE (3) 
The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene 
to classroom problems. 

EDCP 460. INTRODUCTION TO REHABILITATION COUNSELING 
(3) 
Introductory course for majors in rehabilitation counseling. 
Social Work, Psychology, or Education who desire to work 
professionally with physically or emotionally handicapped 
persons. 

EDCP 470. INTRODUCTION TO STUDENT PERSONNEL (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A systematic analysis of 
research and theoretical literature on a variety of major prob- 
lems in the organization and administration of student per- 
sonnel services in higher education. Included will be d'scus- 
sion of such topics as the student personnel philosophy in 
education, counseling services, discipline 'nousing, student 
activities, financial aid, health, remediaj Services, etc. 

EDCP 489. FIELD EXPE" ' ' c % |N COUNSELING AND 
PERSONNEL SERV.U £": ., 
Planned field experience id, Selected major students. 

EDCP 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COUNSELING AND 
PERSONNEL SERVICES (1-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to major 
students who have formal plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDCP 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours: 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the Department of Counseling and 
Personnel Services (or developed cooperatively with other 
departments, colleges and universities) and not otherwise 
covered in the present course listing; clinical experiences in 
counseling and testing centers, reading clinics, speech 
therapy laboratories, and special education centers; institutes 
developed around specific topics or problems and intended 
for designated groups. 

EDCP 611. OCCUPATIONAL CHOICE THEORY AND 
INFORMATION (3) 
Research and theory related to occupational and educational 
decisions; programs of related information and other 
activities in occupational decision. 

EDCP 614. PERSONALITY THEORIES IN COUNSELING AND 
PERSONNEL SERVICES (3) 
Examination of constructs and research relating to major per- 
sonality theories with emphasis on their significance for work- 
ing with the behaviors of individuals. 

EDCP 615. CASES IN APPRAISAL (3) 

Prerequisite, EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. Collecting and inter- 
preting non-standardized pupil appraisal data; synthesis of 
all types of data through case study procedures. 

EDCP 616. COUNSELING — THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS 
AND PRACTICE (3) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 615. Exploration of learning theories as 
applied to counseling in school, and practices which stem 
from such theories. 

EDCP 619. PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING (2-6) 

Prerequisites, EDCP 616 and permission of instructor. Se- 
quence of supervised counseling experiences of increasing 
complexity. Limited to eight applicants in advance. Two hours 
class plus laboratory. 

EDCP 645. COUNSELING IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite. EDCP 615 or consent of instructor. Counseling 
theory and practices as related to children. Emphasis will be 
placed on an awareness of the child's total behavior as well 
as on specific methods of communicating with the child 
through techniques of play interviews, observations, and the 
use of non-parametric data. 



umcp / 99 



EDCP 655. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
PERSONNEL SERVICES (2) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 619 or permission of instructor. Explora- 
tion of personnel services programs and implementing per- 
sonnel services practices. 

EDCP 656. COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 
SEMINAR (2) 
Prerequisite, advanced standing. Examination of issues that 
bear on professional issues such as ethics, interprofessional 
relationships and research. 

EDCP 661. PSYCHO-SOCIAL ASPECTS OF DISABILITY (3) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or consent of instructor. This course 
is part of the core curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. 
It is designed to develop an understanding of the nature and 
importance of the personal and psycho-social aspects of adult 
disability. 

EDCP 662. MEDICAL ASPECTS OF DISABILITY I (3) 
Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or consent of instructor. Part of the 
core curriculum for rehabilitation counselors. It is designed 
to develop a7? understanding of the prognosis and complica- 
tions of disease' process and disorders and a knowledge of 
treatment measurers t>'> ! nat realistic vocational rehabilitation 
goals may be c'evelo/is),"an asse- 

EDCP 663. MEDICAL ASPECTS^ DISABILITY II (3) 
Continuation of EDCP 662. Part of the core curriculum for 
rehabilitation counselors. It is designed to develop an under- 
standing of the prognosis and complications of disease pro- 
cess and disorders and a knowledge of treatment measures 
so that realistic vocational rehabilitation goals may be 
developed. 

EDCP 735. SEMINAR IN REHABILITATION COUNSELING (2) 
This course is part of the core curriculum for rehabilitation 
counselors. It is designed to provide the advanced rehabilita- 
tion counseling student with a formal seminar to discuss, 
evaluate and attempt to reach personal resolution regarding 
pertinent professional problems and issues in the field. 

EDCP 771. THE COLLEGE STUDENT (3) 
A demographic study of the characteristics of college stu- 
dents as well as a study of their aspirations, values, and pur- 
poses. 

EDCP 776. MODIFICATION OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR — LABORA- 
TORY AND PRACTICUM (3) 
First and second semesters. Application of methods relevant 
to behavior change in counseling and psychotherapy. 
Individual supervision and group consultation. 

EDCP 777. MODIFICATION OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR — LABORA- 
TORY AND PRACTICUM (3) 
First and second semesters. Application of methods relevant 
to behavior change in counseling and psychotherapy. 
Individual supervision and group consultation. 

EDCP 778. SEMINAR IN STUDENT PERSONNEL (2-6) 
An intensive study of the various student personnel functions. 
A means to integrate the knowledge from various fields as 
they relate to student personnel administration. 

EDCP 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COUNSELING AND 
PERSONNEL SERVICES (1-6) 
Master's, AGS, or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. 

EDCP 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDCP 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN COUNSELING AND 
PERSONNEL SERVICES (1-9) 
Prerequisite, Master's degree. Apprentice is placed in an 
appropriate agency and assumes responsibilities that are rep- 
resentative of the practitioner at the AGS level. 

EDCP 889. INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL 
SERVICES (3-16) 
Prerequisite, advanced to Doctoral standing. Intern is placed 
in an appropriate agency or agencies and assumes respon- 
sibilities that are representative of the practitioner at the Doc- 
toral level. 



EDCP 



DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-6 



EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

Professor and Chairman: Weaver 

Professors: Duffey, Goff, Leeper, O'Neill, J. Wilson, R. Wilson 

Associate Professors: Amershek, Ashlock, Brigham,' Dietz, 
Eley, Gantt, Hall, Heidelbach, Herman, Roderick, Sullivan, Wil- 
liams 

Assistant Professors: Butler, Church, Davey, 1 Hutchings, 
McCuaig, Schumacher, Seefeldt, Yawkey 
1 joint appointment with Secondary Education 



Graduate programs leading to M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in the 
Department of Early Childhood-Elementary Education are 
designed to prepare teachers, curriculum specialists, super- 
visors, administrators, and higher education instructors to func- 
tion effectively in leadership positions involving programs for 
young children. 

Students have opportunities to specialize in any of the follow- 
ing areas: early childhood education, elementary education, 
corrective-remedial reading instruction, science education, 
mathematics education, language arts-reading, social studies 
education, or nursery-kindergarten education. 

Special facilities for graduate study include the Reading 
Center, the Arithmetic Center, the Science Teaching Center, the 
Maryland Reading Resource Network of ERIC-CRIER, the 
Center for Young Children. 

Programs, particularly at the doctoral level, are individualized 
to reflect the student's background and to meet his particular 
career goals. Regular counseling with an advisor is an important 
aspect of each program. An effort is made to ascertain that 
graduate programs include both theory and practicum; profes- 
sional work and academic courses. 



EDEL 401. SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 

EDEL 402. SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 

Designed to help teachers acquire general science under- 
standings and to develop teaching materials for practical use 
in classrooms. Includes experiments, demonstrations, con- 
structions, observations, field trips and use of audio-visual 
materials. The emphasis is on content and method related 
to science units in common use in elementary schools. 

EDEL 404. LANGUAGE ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION (3) 
Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expres- 
sion, and creative expression. 
EDEL 405. LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

(3) 
EDEL 406. SOCIAL STUDIES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION (3) 

EDEL 407. SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(3) 
Consideration given to curriculum, organization and methods 
of teaching, evaluation of newer materials, and utilization of 
environmental resources. 

EDEL 410. THE CHILD AND THE CURRICULUM — EARLY 
CHILDHOOD (3) 

EDEL 411. THE CHILD AND THE CURRICULUM — 
ELEMENTARY (3) 
Relationship of the elementary school curriculum to child 
growth and development. Recent trends in curriculum 
organization; the effect of environment on learning; readiness 
to learn; adapting curriculum content and methods to matu- 
rity levels of children. 

EDEL 412. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 
Concerned with art methods and materials for elementary 
schools. Includes laboratory experiences with materials 
appropriate for elementary schools. 

EDEL 413. MATHEMATICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
(3) 

EDEL 414. MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 
Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils 
sense arithmetical meanings and relationships. Helps 
teachers gain a better understanding of the number system 
and arithmetical processes. 



100 / umcp 



EDEL 424. LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE. 
ADVANCED (3) 
Development of literary materials for children and young 
people. Timeless and ageless books, and outstanding exam- 
ples of contemporary publishing. Evaluation of the contribu- 
tions of individual authors and illustrators and children s book 
awards. 

EDEL 425. THE TEACHING OF READING — EARLY CHILDHOOD 
(3) 
Concerned with the fundamentals of developmental reading 
instruction, including readiness, use of experience records, 
procedures in using basal readers, the improvement of com- 
prehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, 
uses of children s literature, the program in word analysis. 
and procedures for determining individual needs. 

EDEL 426. THE TEACHING OF READING — ELEMENTARY (3) 
Concerned with the fundamentals of developmental reading 
instruction, including readiness, use of experience records, 
procedures in using basal readers, the improvement of com- 
prehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, 
uses of children s literature, the program in word analysis. 
and procedures for determining individual needs. 

EDEL 430. CORRECTIVE-REMEDIAL READING INSTRUCTION 
(3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 326 or equivalent. For teachers, super- 
visors, and administrators who wish to identify and assist 
pupils with reading difficulties. Concerned with diagnostic 
techniques, instructional materials and teaching procedures 
useful in the regular classroom. 

EDEL 431. LABORATORY PRACTICES IN READING (3) 

Prerequisite. EDEL 430. A laboratory course in which each 
student has one or more pupils for analysis and instruction. 
At least one class meeting per week to diagnose individual 
cases and to plan instruction. 

EDEL 489. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION (1-4) 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience is to be 
taken. Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and whose appli- 
cation for such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area 
to both major and nonmajor students. Note: The total number 
of credits which a student may earn in EDEL 489. 888. and 
889 is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDEL 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDEL 499. WORKSHOPS. CLINICS. AND INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following types of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the college of education (or 
developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDEL 600. SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (3) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. 
Prerequisite, at least 12 hours of graduate work in education. 

EDEL 601. PROBLEMS IN TEACHING SCIENCE IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 401 or approval of instructor. Provides 
opportunity for students to analyze the teaching of science 
in the elementary school through (1) the identification of 
problems of teaching. (2) the investigation and study of 
reported research related to the stated problems; and (3) the 
hypothesizing of methods for improving the effectiveness of 
elementary school science programs. Students will also have 
the opportunity to study and evaluate newer programs and 
practices in the teaching of science in the elementary school. 



EDEL 605. PROBLEMS OF TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 404 or approval of instructor. This course 
is designed to allow each student an opportunity (1) to 
analyze current issues, trends, and problems in language-arts 
instruction in terms of research in fundamental educational 
theory and the language arts, and (2) to use this analysis in 
effecting changes in methods and materials for classroom 
instruction. 

EDEL 607. PROBLEMS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 406 or approval of instructor. An examina- 
tion of current literature and research reports in the social 
sciences and in social studies curriculum design and instruc- 
tion, with an emphasis on federally-sponsored projects as well 
as programs designed for urban children. 

EDEL 614. PROBLEMS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) 
Prerequisite, EDEL 413 or approval of instructor. Critical ex- 
amination of selected theory and research in the teaching 
of mathematics in elementary schools. Evaluation of in- 
structional materials. Implications for practice. 

EDEL 615. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION OF ARITHMETIC 
DISABILITIES (3) 
Prerequisite. EDEL 313 or 314 and EDMS 446 or equivalent. 
For those who wish to increase competency in diagnosing 
and correcting arithmetic disabilities. Concerned with class- 
room and clinical techniques, instructional materials, and 
remedial procedures useful to the teacher or clinician in (1) 
diagnosing serious arithmetic difficulties and (2) planning 
programs of individual and small-group remediation. The 
work includes the writing of diagnostic and progress reports. 

EDEL 626. PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING OF READING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) 
Implications of current theory and the results of research for 
the teaching of reading in the elementary school. Attention 
is given to all areas of developmental reading instruction, with 
special emphasis on persistent problems. 

EDEL 630. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION OF READING 
DISABILITIES (3) 
Prerequisites, minimum of 15 hours including EDEL 430, 
EDEL 626. EDMS 446 and 622. For those who wish to become 
concerned with clinical diagnostic techniques, instructional 
materials, and remedial procedures useful to the reading 
specialist in (1) diagnosing serious reading difficulties, and 
(2) planning programs of individual and small group instruc- 
tion. 

EDEL 631. ADVANCED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN 
READING INSTRUCTION (3) 
Diagnostic work with children in clinic and school situations. 
Administration, scoring, interpretation, and prescription via 
of diagnostic instruments is stressed. Case report writing and 
parent conferences are also stressed. EDEL 631 is taken with 
EDEL 632. Prerequisite, EDEL 630. 

EDEL 632. ADVANCED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN 
READING INSTRUCTION (3) 
Remedial instruction with children in clinic and school situa- 
tions. Develop competency in various remedial techniques, 
diagnostic teaching, and evaluation. Development of the 
reading resource role is stressed. EDEL 632 is taken with 
EDEL 631. Prerequisite, EDEL 630. 

EDEL 640. CURRICULUM PLANNING IN NURSERY- 
KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION (3) 
An examination of significant new developments in cur- 
riculum theory and practice. 

EDEL 641. THE YOUNG CHILD IN THE COMMUNITY (3) 

Planned observation, related research, and analysis of the 
experiences of young children in such community centers 
as foster homes, orphanages, day care centers, Sunday 
schools, etc. one-half day a week observation required. 

EDEL 642. THE YOUNG CHILD IN SCHOOL (3) 

An examination of significant theory and research on the 
characteristics of young children which have special implica- 
tions for teaching children in nursery-kindergarten groups. 



umcp / 101 



EDEL 643. TEACHER-PARENT RELATIONSHIPS (3) 
A study of the methods and materials, trends, and problems 
in establishing close home-school relationships. 

EDEL 644. INTELLECTUAL AND CREATIVE EXPERIENCES OF 
THE NURSERY-KINDERGARTEN CHILD (3) 
A critical examination of materials, methods and programs 
in such areas as reading, literature, science, mathematics, 
the social studies, art, music, dance, etc. 

EDEL 650. SEMINAR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 
A problem seminar in early childhood education. Prerequi- 
sites: at least 12 hours of graduate work in early childhood 
education. 

EDEL 651. PROBLEMS OF STAFFING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION (3) 
Prerequisite — doctoral study in early childhood education 
or administration, administrative experience or consent of the 
instructor. 

EDEL 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. Course 
card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

EDEL 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDEL 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 
Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to 
selected students whose application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by the education faculty. Each apprentice 
is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or agency. 
The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the apprentice and the other persons involved. 
Prerequisites, teaching experience, a Master's Degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in education at 
the University of Maryland. Nofe: the total number of credits 
which a student may earn in EDEL 489, 888 and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDEL 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the Doctor's Degree; and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the education 
faculty for an internship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at 
least a semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close working 
relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
Note: the total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDEL 489. 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDEL 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-16) 



FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 

Professor and Chairman: Male 

Associate Professors: Agre, Huden, Lindsay, Noll 

Assistant Professors: Finkelstein, Hopkins 

The objectives of the program in Foundations of Education 
are two-fold. First, teachers and professors are prepared as 
generahsts who can teach undergraduate courses in founda- 
tions as well as high school courses in related areas; and at 
the same time, as specialists in one phase of foundations. 



Second, foundations courses may be used to enrich programs 
in other areas. 

Graduate Foundations majors, and particularly those at the 
doctoral level, are expected to have some knowledge of the 
history, sociology, and philosophy of Education, as well as com- 
parative education. Each in turn specializes in one of these 
areas with related work in history, philosophy, government and 
politics, anthropology, and/or sociology. 

A Master of Arts applicant must have a "B" average in the 
last two years of the undergraduate program from a regionally 
accredited institution. An applicant for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree must have strong undergraduate and graduate records, 
and a Miller Analogies Test score at the mid-point or better of 
the graduate Education population at the University of Mary- 
land. 

The requirements for the M.A. with and without thesis, and 
for the Ph.D. conform to those of The Graduate School. Beyond 
the stipulation that each student shall be both a generalist and 
a specialist, there are no special requirements for all students. 
Instead, programs are tailored to a student's objectives. 

The Washington area and the University are rich in resources 
for graduate study and research. The College Park campus is 
adjacent to embassies which provide access to materials for 
the study of foreign education systems. Staff members in Foun- 
dations are assigned to a Comparative Education Center which 
provides research facilities to students from both foreign and 
American backgrounds. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Professor and Chairman: Maley 
Professors: Harrison, Hornbake, Luetkemeyer 
Associate Professors: Beatty, Mietus, Stough, Tierney 
Assistant Professors: Anderson, Gelina, Gettle 

The graduate programs in the Department of Industrial Educa- 
tion are designed to prepare specialized personnel in all fields 
related to Industrial Education. These fields include programs 
both in education and in industry. Programs related to educa- 
tion prepare personnel for teaching, administration, and super- 
visory positions in local schools or in related state and federal 
agencies, as well as preparations for university teaching and 
research. Programs designed for industrial personnel are 
primarily in industrial training, supervision, and production. 

Every graduate program in the department is developed on 
an individual basis to meet the personal needs of the graduate 
student. At the same time, however, the graduate student is 
expected to have achieved certain specified objectives upon 
completion of his program. The student should exhibit: compe- 
tence in a major field of Industrial Education; ability to analyze, 
conduct, and report research findings; and a broad understand- 
ing of the relationships of education and industry as social 
institutions in our technological culture. 

At the master's degree level (M.A. and M. Ed.) programs are 
offered in four areas: Education for Industry, Industrial Arts Edu- 
cation, Vocational-Industrial Education, and Technical Educa- 
tion. The department has two separate doctoral programs (Ph.D. 
and Ed.D.) in the allied fields of Industrial Arts Education and 
Vocational Industrial Education. The department also offers an 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate in both fields. 

In addition to the extensive library and computer facilities 
available on the College Park campus, other institutions located 
within the Washington area are also available for research and 
consultation services. These institutions include the Library of 
Congress, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Office of Education, 
American Industrial Arts Association, American Vocational 
Association, and the National Medical Library. 

EDIN 409. EXPERIMENTAL ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS 

(2) 
EDIN 415. RESEARCH AND EXPERIMENTATION IN INDUSTRIAL 
ARTS (3) 
This is a laboratory-seminar course designed to develop per- 
sons capable of planning, directing and evaluating effective 



102 / umcp 



research and experimentation procedures with the materials, 
products and processes of industry. 

EDIN 421. INDUSTRIAL ARTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3) 
Four hours laboratory per week, one hour lecture. Prerequi- 
site, EDSP 470 and 471 or consent of instructor. This course 
provides experiences of a technical and theoretical nature 
in industrial processes applicable for classroom use. 
Emphasis is placed on individual research in the specific area 
of one major interest in special education. 

EDIN 425. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN INDUSTRY I (3) 
This course is designed to provide an overview of the function 
of industrial training, type of programs, organization, 
development and evaluation. 

EDIN 426. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN INDUSTRY II (3) 
This course is designed to study specific training programs 
in a variety of industries, plant program visitation, training, 
program development, and analysis of industrial training 
research. Prerequisite, EDIN 425. 

EDIN 443. INDUSTRIAL SAFETY EDUCATION I (2) 
This course deals briefly with the history and development 
of effective safety programs in modern industry and treats 
causes, effects and values of industrial safety education inclu- 
sive of fire prevention and hazard controls. 

EDIN 444. INDUSTRIAL SAFETY EDUCATION II (2) 

In this course exemplary safety practices are studied through 
conference discussions, group demonstration, and organized 
plant visits to selected industrial situations. Methods of fire 
precautions and safety practices are emphasized. Evaluative 
criteria in safety programs are formulated. 

EDIN 450. TRAINING AIDS DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and appli- 
cation. Special emphasis is placed on principles to be 
observed in making aids useful to laboratory teachers. Actual 
construction and application of such devices will be required. 

EDIN 457. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3) 
The construction of objective tests for occupational and voca- 
tional subjects. 

EDIN 460. ESSENTIALS OF DESIGN (2) 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, EDIN 101 and 
basic laboratory work. A study of the basic principles of 
design and practice in their application to the construction 
of laboratory projects. 

EDIN 461. PRINCIPLES OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE (3) 
This course identifies and applies the underlying principles 
of guidance to the problems of educational and vocational 
adjustment of students. 

EDIN 462. OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND COURSE 
CONSTRUCTION (3) 
Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job 
analysis and applies the techniques in building and reorganiz- 
ing courses of study for effective use in vocational and occu- 
pational schools. 

EDIN 464. LABORATORY ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 
(3) 
This course covers the basic elements of organizing and man- 
aging an industrial education program including the selection 
of equipment and the arrangement of the shop. 

EDIN 465. MODERN INDUSTRY (3) 

This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry 
in the American social, economic and culture pattern. Rep- 
resentative basic industries are studied from the viewpoints 
of personnel and management organization, industrial rela- 
tions, production procedures, distribution of products, and 
the like. 

EDIN 466. EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF INDUSTRIAL 
ARTS (3) 
A study of the factors which place industrial arts education 
in any well-rounded program of general education. 

EDIN 467. PROBLEMS IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION (3) 
The purpose of this course is to secure, assemble, organize, 
and interpret data relative to the scope, character and effec- 
tiveness of occupational education. 



EDIN 471. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION (3) 
An overview of the development of vocational education from 
primitive times to the present with special emphasis given 
to the vocational education movement with the American 
program of public education. 

EDIN 475. RECENT TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN 
PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (3) 
This course is designed to give the student an understanding 
of recent technological developments as they pertain to the 
products and processes of industry. The nature of the newer 
products and processes is studied as well as their effect upon 
modern industry and/or society. 

EDIN 487. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION (1-4) 

Prerequisjtes, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience is to be 
taken. Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and whose appli- 
cation for such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area 
to both major and nonmajor students. Note: The total number 
of credits which a student may earn in EDIN 487, 888, and 
889 is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDIN 488. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDIN 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, AND INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the College of Education (or 
developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDIN 607. PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION (3) 
An overview of the development of the industrial arts move- 
ment and the philosophical framework upon which it was 
founded. Special emphasis is given to the contemporary 
movements in industrial arts and their theoretical founda- 
tions. 

EDIN 614. SCHOOL SHOP PLANNING AND EQUIPMENT 
SELECTION (3) 
Deals with the principles and problems of providing the physi- 
cal facilities for industrial education programs. The selection, 
arrangement and placement of equipment are covered as well 
as the determination of laboratory space requirements, utility 
services and storage requirements for various types of indus- 
trial education programs. 

EDIN 616. SUPERVISION OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS (3) 

Deals with the nature and function of the supervisory function 
in the industrial arts field. The administrative as well as the 
supervisory responsibilities, techniques, practices and per- 
sonal qualifications of the industrial arts supervisor are 
covered. 

EDIN 620. ORGANIZATION, ADMINISTRATION AND 
SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (3) 

EDIN 640. RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION (2) 
Offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting 
research in the areas of industrial arts and vocational educa- 
tion. 

EDIN 641. CONTENT AND METHOD OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS (3) 
Various methods and procedures used in curriculum develop- 
ment are examined and those suited to the field of industrial 



umcp / 103 



arts education are applied. Methods of and devices for indus- 
trial arts instruction are studied and practiced. 

EDIN 642. COORDINATION IN WORK-EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS 
(3) 
Surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a 
teacher-coordinator in a work-experience program. Deals 
particularly with evolving patterns in city and county schools 
in Maryland, and is designed to help teacher-coordinators, 
guidance counselors, and others in the supervisory and 
administrative personnel concerned with the functioning rela- 
tionships of part-time cooperative education in a comprehen- 
sive educational program. 

EDIN 647. SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION (2) 

EDIN 650. TEACHER EDUCATION IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS (3) 
This course is intended for the industrial arts teacher 
educator at the college level. It deals with the function and 
historical development of industrial arts teacher education. 
Other areas of content include administration program and 
program development, physical facilities and requirements, 
staff organization and relationships, college-secondary 
school relationships, philosophy and evaluation. 

EDIN 798 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 
Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. Course 
card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

EDIN 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDIN 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 
Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to 
selected students whose application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by the education faculty. Each apprentice 
is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or agency. 
The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the apprentice and the other persons involved. 
Prerequisites, teaching experience, a Master's Degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in education at 
the University of Maryland. Wore: The total number of credits 
which a student may earn in EDIN 489, 888 and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDIN 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the Doctor's Degree; and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the education 
faculty for an internship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at 
least a semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close working 
relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
Wore: The total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDIN 489. 888. and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDIN 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



Associate Professors: Bolea, Dittman, Eliot, Flatter, Gardner, 
Green, Hardy, Hatfield, Huebner, Kyle, Matteson, Milhollan, 
Rogolsky 

Assistant Professors: Ansello, Bennett. Davidson, Hunt, 

McDaniels, Tyler 



The program of the Institute for Child Study attempts to col- 
lect, interpret, and synthesize the scientific findings in various 
fields that are concerned with human growth, development, 
learning, and behavior, and to communicate this synthesis to 
persons who need such understandings as a basis for their prac- 
tice and planning. 

A second purpose of the instructional program is to assist 
persons in education, and secondarily in other professions that 
deal with human beings, to work out the implications of scien- 
tific knowledge for specific situations. Student personnel in 
Institute courses and programs include teachers; principals; 
superintendents; counselors; social workers; nurses; 
psychologists; psychiatric social workers; therapists — physi- 
cal, speech, and psychological; college teachers of child 
development; college laboratory teachers; supervisors of cur- 
riculum, guidance, in-service projects, etc. 

The Institute for Child Study offers graduate programs leading 
to Master of Education, Master of Arts with thesis, Doctor of 
Philosophy, and Doctor of Education degrees and Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Certificate (a planned program of 30 
graduate hours beyond the Master's degree). The requirements 
for these degrees and certificate for those majoring in human 
development education conform to those of The Graduate 
School. Master's and Doctor's degree programs in human 
development are designed to assist the student in gaining com- 
petencies in the areas of physiological processes, cultural pro- 
cesses, personality, learning theory, and research methods in 
human development. A student's program is developed through 
consultation with an adviser to meet the unique needs of the 
student. Knowledge of foreign languages is generally not 
required unless a need for foreign language is indicated in the 
student's program. 

To be admitted to a Master's degree program in human 
development education an applicant must have a "B" average 
in the last two years of an undergraduate program from a region- 
ally accredited institution. 

Admission to a Doctor's degree program in human develop- 
ment education is based upon a profile of data using the follow- 
ing criteria: a score at the 75th percentile or above on the Mil- 
ler's Analogies Test, possession of a Master's degree in an allied 
field from a regionally accredited institution, a grade point aver- 
age of 3.5 or above in previous graduate work, favorable recom- 
mendations from professors and/or employers who are 
acquainted with the applicant's qualifications, and compatibility 
of the applicant's educational and professional goals with the 
purposes and goals of the Institute for Child Study. 

The Washington, D.C. area and the University of Maryland 
are rich in resources for graduate study in human development. 
The Institute has a special book collection available for use by 
faculty and students, an in-service program in child and youth 
study, and opportunities for participating in research. Internship 
experiences are available through cooperation with mental 
health agencies and schools in the area. Resources of the Col- 
lege of Education include a Center for Young Children, a Cur- 
riculum Materials Center, and an Educational Technology 
Center. Resources of the Washington metropolitan area include 
various schools, hospitals, the Office of Education, and the 
National Institutes of Health of the United States Department 
of Health, Education, and Welfare. 



INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 

Professor and Director: Morgan 

Professors: Bowie, Chapin, Goering, Kurtz, Mershon, Perkins 



EDHD 402. CHILD DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY I (2) 
This course involves the direct study of children throughout 
the school year. Each participant gathers a wide body of infor- 
mation about an individual, presents the accumulating data 
from time to time to the study group for criticism and group 
analysis and writes an interpretation of the dynamics underly- 
ing the child's learning behavior and development. Provides 
opportunity for teachers in service to earn credit for participa- 
tion in their own local child study group. 



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EDHD 403. CHILD DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY II (2) 
See EDHD 402 for description. 

EDHD 404. CHILD DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY III (2) 
See EDHD 402 for description. 

EDHD 411. CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) 

Growth and development of the child from conception 
through the early childhood years, with emphasis on develop- 
ment sequences in physical, psychological and social areas. 
Implications for understanding and working with young chil- 
dren in the home, school, and other settings. 

EDHD 413. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (3) 
A study of the interplay of physical, cultural and self forces 
as they influence behavior, development, learning and adjust- 
ment during adolescence. Includes observation and case 
study. This course cannot be used to meet the psychological 
foundations requirements for teacher certification. 

(Gardner) 

EDHD 416. SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
III (3) 
Guided reading and observation of pupils throughout the 
school year. Emphasis on human development concepts 
relating to impact of family, school, society, and peer group 
on the student. Collection and analysis of data affecting learn- 
ing and behavior, For in-service educators. (Not open to per- 
sons with credit in EDHD 402, 403.) 

EDHD 417. LABORATORY IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS III (3) 
Prerequisite, EDHD 416. Guided reading and observation of 
pupils throughout the school year. Emphasis on analysis of 
intrinsic aspects of learning and behavior including cognitive 
processes, motivation, self-concept, attitudes, and values. For 
in-service educators. (Not open to persons with credit in 
EDHD 402, 403.) 

EDHD 420. STUDY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 
IN SCHOOL SETTINGS I (2) 
Enables in-service teachers and administrators to carry on 
advanced study of human development and learning princi- 
ples in the continuous study and evaluation of several differ- 
ent phases of the school program over an extended period 
of time. 

EDHD 421 . STUDY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 
IN SCHOOL SETTINGS II (2) 
See EDHD 420 for description. 

EDHD 422. STUDY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING 
IN SCHOOL SETTINGS III (2) 
See EDHD 420 for description. 

EDHD 445. GUIDANCE OF YOUNG CHILDREN (3) 

Development of an appreciation and understanding of young 
children from different home and community backgrounds, 
study of individual and group problems. (Dittmann) 

EDHD 460. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisites, PSYC 100 or EDUC 300 or equivalent. Offers 
an examination of research and problems in educational 
psychology. Includes consideration of measurement and the 
significance of individual differences, learning, motivation 
and emotions, transfer of learning, intelligence, attitudes, 
problem solving, understanding, thinking, and communicat- 
ing knowledge. The course is intended to provide an overview 
of educational psychology with an emphasis on learning pro- 
cesses. It may not be substituted for EDUC 300 by regularly 
matriculated students in the teacher education program. 

(Milhollan) 

EDHD 489. FIELD EXPERIENCES IN EDUCATION (1-4) 
A. Adult education. B. Foundations. C. Higher education. 
Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the major area in which the experience is to be 
taken. Planned field experience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching experience and whose appli- 
cation for such field experience has been approved by the 
education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area 
to both major and nonmajor students. Note: The total number 
of credits which a student may earn in EDHD 489. 888. and 
889 is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 



EDHD 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDHD 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, AND INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours: 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the college of education (or 
developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDHD 600. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND 
CHILD STUDY (3) 
Offers a general overview of the scientific principles which 
describe human development and behavior and makes use 
of these principles in the study of individual children. Each 
student will observe and record the behavior of an individual 
child throughout the semester and must have one half-day 
a week for this purpose. It is basic to further work in child 
study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses 
where the student has not had field work or at least six weeks 
of workshop experience in child study. When offered during 
the summer intensive laboratory work with case records may 
be substituted for the study of an individual child. 

(Flatter, Kurtz, Kyle) 

EDHD 601. BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR (3) 

EDHD 600 or its equivalent must be taken before EDHD 601 
or concurrently. Emphasizes that understanding human life, 
growth and behavior depends on understanding the ways in 
which the body is able to capture, control and expend energy. 
Application throughout is made to human body processes 
and implications for understanding and working with people. 

(Chapin) 

EDHD 602. SOCIAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR (3) 

EDHD 600 or its equivalent must be taken before EDHD 602 
or concurrently. Analyzes the socially inherited and transmit- 
ted patterns of pressures, expectations and limitations learned 
by an individual as he grows up. These are considered in 
relation to the patterns of feeling and behaving which emerge 
as the result of growing up in one's social group. 

(Davidson. Hardy) 

EDHD 603. INTEGRATIVE BASES OF BEHAVIOR (3) 

EDHD 600 or its equivalent. Prerequisites are EDHD 601 and 
602. Analyzes the organized and integrated pattern of feeling, 
thinking and behaving which emerge from the interaction of 
basic biological drives and potentials with one's unique experi- 
ence growing up in a social group. (Green) 

EDHD 612. ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT I (3) 

EDHD 613. ADVANCED LABORATORY IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 

I (3) 

Summer session only. 

EDHD 614. ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT II (3) 
Summer session only. 

EDHD 615. ADVANCED LABORATORY IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 

II (3) 

Summer session only. 

EDHD 616. ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT III (3) 
Summer session only. 



umcp / 107 



EDHD 617. ADVANCED LABORATORY IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 
III (3) 
Summer session only. 

EDHD 659. DIRECT STUDY OF CHILDREN (1) 

May not be taken concurrently with EDHD 402. 403. or 404. 
Provides the opportunity to observe and record the behavior 
of an individual child in a nearby school. These records will 
be used in conjunction with the advanced courses in human 
development and this course will be used in conjunction with 
the advanced courses. Teachers active in their jobs while tak- 
ing advanced courses in human development may use records 
from their own classrooms for this course. A minimum of one 
year of direct observation of human behavior is required of 
all human development students at the Master's level. This 
requirement may be satisfied by this course. (Morgan) 

EDHD 710. AFFECTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND PROCESSES 
IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (3) 
EDHD 600 or its equivalent must be taken before or concur- 
rently. Describes the normal development, expression and 
influence of love in infancy, childhood, adolescence and 
adulthood. Deals with the influence of parent-child relation- 
ship involving normal acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsis- 
tency, and over-protection upon health, learning, emotional 
behavior and personality adjustment and development. 

(Hatfield) 

EDHD 711. PEER-CULTURE AND GROUP PROCESSES IN 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (3) 
EDHD 600 or its equivalent must be taken before or concur- 
rently. Analyzes the process of group formation, role-taking 
and status-winning, describes the emergence of the 'peer- 
culture during childhood and the evolution of the child society 
at different maturity levels to adulthood. Analyzes the develop- 
mental tasks and adjustment problems associated with win- 
ning, belonging, and playing roles in the peer group. 

(Hatfield) 

EDHD 721. LEARNING THEORY AND THE EDUCATIVE PROCESS 

I (3) 

Provides a systematic review of the major theories and their 
impact on education. Considers factors that influence learn- 
ing. (Ansello, Milhullan, Perkins) 
EDHD 722. LEARNING THEORY ANDTHE EDUCATIVE PROCESS 

II (3) 

Prerequisite. EDUC 300 or equivalent. Provides an exploration 
in depth of current theoretical and research developments 
in the field of human learning, especially as related to educa- 
tional processes. Considers factors that influence learning. 

(Eliot) 

EDHD 730. FIELD PROGRAM IN CHILD STUDY I (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers apprenticeship 
training preparing properly qualified persons to become staff 
members in human development workshops, consultants to 
child study field programs and coordination of municipal or 
regional child study programs for teachers or parents. Exten- 
sive field experience is provided. In general this training is 
open only to persons who have passed their preliminary exami- 
nations for the Doctorate with a major in Human Development 
or Psychology. 

EDHD 731. FIELD PROGRAM IN CHILD STUDY II (2-6) 

See EDHD 730 for description. 
EDHD 779 SEMINARS IN SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

EDHD 798 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master s, AGS, or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their advisers 
may register for credit under this number. Course card must 
have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member under whom the work will be done. 

EDHD 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDHD 810, 811. PHYSICAL PROCESSES IN HUMAN DEVELOP- 
MENT (3) 
Prerequisite. EDHD 600 or equivalent Describes in some detail 
the major organic processes of conception, biological 



inheritance: differentiation and growth of the body; capture, 
transportation and use of energy; perception of the environ- 
ment; coordination and integration of function; adaptation 
to unusual demands and to frustration; normal individual varia- 
tion in each of the above processes. (Bennett, Chapin) 

EDHD 820. SOCIALIZATION PROCESSES IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT I (3) 
Prerequisite, EDHD 600 or equivalent. Analyzes the processes 
by which human beings internalize the culture of the society 
in which they live. The major subcultures in the United States, 
their training procedures, and their characteristic human 
expressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life- 
goals, and adjustment patterns are analyzed. Other cultures 
are examined to highlight the American way of life and to 
reveal its strengths and weaknesses. 

(Hunt, Matteson, Mershon) 

EDHD 821. SOCIALIZATION PROCESSES IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT II (3) 
See EDHD 820 for description 

EDHD 830. SELF PROCESSES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I (3) 
Prerequisite, EDHD 600 or equivalent. Analyzes the effects 
of the various physical and growth processes, affectional rela- 
tionships, socialization processes, and peer group roles and 
status on the integration, development, adjustment, and reali- 
zation of the individual self. This analysis includes considera- 
tion of the nature of intelligence and of the learning process; 
the development of skills, concepts, generalizations, symboli- 
zations, reasoning and imagination, attitudes, values, goals 
and purposes; and the conditions, relationships and experi- 
ences that are essential to full human development. The more 
common adjustment problems experienced in our society at 
various maturity levels, and the adjustment mechanisms used 
to meet them are studied. 

(Bowie, Goering, Mershon, Rogolsky) 

EDHD 831. SELF PROCESSES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT II (3) 
See EDHD 830 for description. 

EDHD 860. SYNTHESIS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS 
(3) 
Prerequisites, EDHD 810, 820 and 830. A seminar wherein 
advanced students work toward a personal synthesis of their 
own concepts in human growth and development. Emphasis 
is placed on seeing the dynamic interrelations between all 
processes in the behavior and development of an individual. 

EDHD 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 
Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to 
selected students whose application for an apprenticeship has 
been approved by the education faculty. Each apprentice is 
assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the equiva- 
lent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, 
school system, or educational institution or agency. The spon- 
sor of the apprentice maintains a close working relationship 
with the apprentice and the other persons involved. Prerequi- 
sites, teaching experience, a Master's degree in education, and 
at least six semester hours in education at the University of 
Maryland. NOTE: The total number of credits which a student 
may earn in EDHD 489, 888 and 889 is limited to a maximum 
of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDHD 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following groups 
of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been advanced 
to candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (b) any student who 
receives special approval by the education faculty for an 
internship, provided that prior to taking an internship, such 
student shall have completed at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semester hours in educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland. Each intern is assigned 
to work on a full-time basis for at least a semester with an 
appropriate staff member in a cooperating school, school 
system, or educational institution or agency. The internship 
must be taken in a school situation different from the one 
where the student is regularly employed. The intern's sponsor 
maintains a close working relationship with the intern and 
the other persons involved. NOTE: The total number of credits 



108 / umcp 



which a student may earn in EDHD 489. 888 and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDHD 899 DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS 

Professor and Chairman: Giblette 
Professors: Dayton. Raths 
Associate Professors: Johnson. Stunkard 
Assistant Professors: Rogers. Schafer. Sedlacek 

In the Department of Measurement and Statistics, programs 
are available at both the master sand doctoral levels for persons 
desiring a major in research design, measurement and statistics 
in education. In addition, a doctoral minor is offered for students 
majoring in other areas. Each of these programs is designed 
to integrate the three areas of research design, measurement 
and statistics. 

The doctoral major program is primarily intended to produce 
individuals qualified to teach courses at the college level in 
educational research, measurement and statistics: conduct 
research studies in the field of education: advise in the conduct 
of research studies: and serve as measurement specialists in 
school systems, industry and government. The masters level 
program is designed to produce qualified individuals to serve 
as junior statisticians in various fields and to provide qualified 
test administration, scoring, and interpretation services. 
Courses within the program are selected from offerings of the 
College of Education and other departments of the University. 
A program for an individual student is planned to take into 
account his own background and future aims. About half the 
work within the major is elected to meet the needs and special 
interests of the individual student. 

Persons planning a college teaching career will have opportu- 
nity to engage in supervised activities appropriate for future 
faculty members whose specialization will be in these areas. 
Research experience utilizing modern electronic data process- 
ing equipment will be obtained. 



EDMS 410. PRINCIPLES OF TESTING AND EVALUATION (3) 
Basic principles including the steps in the specification of 
instructional objectives and subsequent development of 
teacher-made tests: problems in the use and interpretation 
of achievement and aptitude tests: introduction to* the 
development and use of non-testing evaluation procedures: 
basic considerations in the assignment of marks and grades: 
introduction to computer technology as applied to measure- 
ment. 

EDMS 446. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I (3) 

An introduction to research design principles and the scien- 
tific method as applied to behavioral phenomena. Instrumen- 
tation procedures including the planning and construction 
of simple data collection instruments and their analysis, and 
assessment of the reliability and validity of such instruments, 
statistical procedures appropriate to the analysis of data from 
simple research designs. Laboratory experiences in 
instrumentation and research design are emphasized. 

EDMS 451. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS {3) y 
Designed as a first course in statistics for students in educa- 
tion. Emphasis is upon educational applications of descrip- 
tive statistics, including measures of central tendency, varia- 
bility and association. Also included are inferential statistics 
through one-way anova. 

EDMS 465. ALGORITHMIC METHODS IN EDUCATIONAL 
RESEARCH (3) 
Introduction to the use of the computer as a tool in educa- 
tional research. Instruction in a basic scientific computer 
source language as well as practical experience in program 
writing for solving statistical and educational research prob- 
lems. 



EDMS 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. Course cards must have the title of the 
problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. 

EDMS 622. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF STANDARDIZED 
TESTING (3) 
Prerequisite, EDMS 410. 446 or 451. Study of group tests typi- 
cally employed in school testing programs; discussion of evi- 
dence relating to the measurement of abilities: practice in 
standardized group test administrations. 

EDMS 626. MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH (3) 
Theory, development and applications of various measure- 
ment instruments and procedures used in educational 
research. Questionnaires, interviews, rating scales, attitude 
scales, observational procedures, ecological approaches, Q- 
sort. semantic-differential, sociometry and other approaches. 
Prerequisite. EDMS 451 or 646. 

EDMS 646. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 446. Special problems arising in the 
implementation of educational research designs. Instrumen- 
tation to measure attitudes and collection of questionnaire 
data. Additional statistical procedures appropriate to the 
analysis of education research designs. Laboratory experi- 
ences in instrumentation and research design are 
emphasized. 

EDMS 651. INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS IN EDUCATION (3) 
Distributional theory; Chi-square analysis of contingency ta- 
bles: analysis of variance: introduction to multiple correlation 
and regression. 

EDMS 653. CORRELATION AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite. EDMS 651. Systematic development of simple 
regression, multiple regression, and non-linear regression as 
applied to educational research problems. Emphasis is on 
underlying theory of procedures and on analytical 
approaches which are amenable to computerization. 

EDMS 723. MEASUREMENT THEORY I (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 410. 451. or 646. Classical measurement 
theory dealing with the nature of measurement, principles and 
procedures concerning the accuracy of measurement and 
prediction, reliability, and validity theory. 

EDMS 724. MEASUREMENT THEORY II (3) 
Theoretical formulations of reliability, validity and scaling as 
related to problems in measurement theory and prediction. 
Prerequisites. EDMS 651. 723. 

EDMS 726. PRACTICUM IN INDIVIDUAL TESTING I (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 622. The administration and interpreta- 
tion of the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler scale of intelligence. 

EDMS 727. PRACTICUM IN INDIVIDUAL TESTING II (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 622 or consent of the instructor. Provides 
practicum experience in the administration of and the 
interpretation of the results of individual psychological tests. 
Designed to familiarize the student with alternate instruments 
to the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler scales of intelligence as 
well as to introduce the measurement of special abilities 
through the use of appropriate instruments. 

EDMS 738. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 
MEASUREMENT (1-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. An opportunity for stu- 
dents with special interests to fo depth on contemporary 
topics in measurement. Topics to be announced, but will typi- 
cally be related to applied and theoretical measurement. 

EDMS 769. SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED STATISTICS IN 
EDUCATION (1-4) 
Prerequisite. EDMS 771 or equivalent, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for students majoring or minoring in 
measurement and statistics in education. Topics to be 
announced, but will typically relate to the areas of advanced 
multivariate analysis and advanced design of experiments. 

EDMS 771. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (3) 

Prerequisite. EDMS 651 or equivalent. Primarily fortheeduca- 



umcp / 109 



tion student desiring more advanced work in statistical 

methodology. Survey of major types ot statistical design in 

educational research: application of multivariate statistical 
techniques to educational problems. 

EDMS 779. SEMINAR IN APPLIED STATISTICS (1-3) 

Enrollment restricted to doctoral students with a major or 
minor in measurement and statistics. Seminar topics will be 
chosen in terms of individual student interest. 

EDMS 780. RESEARCH METHODS AND MATERIALS (3) 

Research methodology for case studies, surveys, and 
experiments; measurements and statistical techniques. 
Primarily for advanced students and doctoral candidates. 

EDMS 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master s, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisors may register for credit under this number. 

EDMS 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDMS 879. DOCTORAL SEMINAR (1-3) 

Prerequisite, passing thepreliminary examinations for a Doc- 
tor's Degree in education, or recommendation of a doctoral 
advisor. Analysis of doctoral projects and theses, and of other 
on-going research projects. A doctoral candidate may partici- 
pate in the seminar during as many university sessions as 
he desires, but may earn no more than three semester hours 
of credit accumulated one hour at a time in the seminar. An 
Ed.D. candidate may earn in total no more than nine semester 
hours, and a Ph.D. candidate, no more than eighteen semes- 
ter hours, in the seminar and in EDMS 899. 

EDMS 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN MEASUREMENT AND 

STATISTICS (1-9) 
EDMS 889. INTERNSHIP IN MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS 

(3-16) 

EDMS 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Professor and Chairman: Risinger 

Professors: Anderson, Campbell. Gardner. 1 Grambs, Grentzer. 2 

Lockard, 3 Walbesser 
Associate Professors: Adkins, Blum, 2 Brigham, 4 Carr, Farrell, 5 

Fey. 6 Funaro. Henkelman, 6 Lemmon, 7 Longley, 8 Love, 9 

McWhinnie, 10 Peters, Taylor, 2 Woolf 
Assistant Professors: Cirrincione. 1 ' Croft. Davey, 4 DeLorenzo,' 2 

Flores, Green, Layman. 13 McArthur, Quigley, 14 Wrenn 9 
Lecturer: Davidson 6 

'joint appointment with Chemistry 

2 joint appointment with Music 

3 joint appointment with Botany 

4 joint appointment with Early Childhood-Elementary Educa- 
tion 

5 joint appointment with History 

6 joint appointment with Mathematics 

7 joint appointment with General Home Economics 

8 joint appointment with Art 

9 joint appointment with Physical Education 

10 joint appointment with Housing and Applied Design 

"joint appointment with Geography 

,2 joint appointment with Spanish and Portuguese 

13 joint appointment with Physics and Astronomy 

14 joint appointment with English 

The Department of Secondary Education offers programs 
leading to the Master of Arts and Master of Education, the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist, and the Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education The department offers a variety of 
programs emphasizing specialized areas of competency 
appropriate to secondary education. Among the areas of 
emphasis are: art education, business education, distributive 
education, English (language arts) education, foreign language 
education, home economics education, mathematics education, 



music education, reading education, science education, social 
studies education, and speech education. For specific informa- 
tion concerning the requirements for the various degree pro- 
grams students should contact the department. 



EDSE 402. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN TEACHING 
BOOKKEEPING AND RELATED SUBJECTS (3) 
Important problems and procedures in the mastery of book- 
keeping and related office knowledge and the skills including 
a consideration of materials and teaching procedures. 

EDSE 403. PROBLEMS IN TEACHING OFFICE SKILLS (3) 
Problems in development of occupational competency, 
achievement tests, standards of achievement, instructional 
materials, transcription, and the integration of office skills. 

EDSE 404. BASIC BUSINESS EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3) 
Includes consideration of course objectives; subject matter 
selection; and methods of organization and presenting busi- 
ness principles, knowledge and practices. 

EDSE 415. FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC EDUCATION I (3) 
Materials, resources and content of personal finance and 
economics courses in the public schools. This course deals 
with the problems of teaching, and the content used to convey 
the consumer's role in relation to his earnings and spending 
power. 

EDSE 416. FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC EDUCATION II (3) 
See EDSE 415 for description. 

EDSE 420. ORGANIZATION AND COORDINATION OF 
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS (3) 
This course deals specifically with such areas as the organiza- 
tion of a cooperative distributive education program; the 
development of an effective cooperative relationship between 
coordinator and training sponsor; the selection, orientation, 
and training of sponsors; analysis of training opportunities, 
reports and records; the evaluation and selection of students 
for part-time cooperative work assignments; and the evalua- 
tion of the program. 

EDSE 421. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN DISTRIBUTIVE 
EDUCATION (3) 
This course covers basic methods and materials needed to 
teach the preparatory classroom related instruction of a one 
or two year distributive education program. It deals specifi- 
cally with the organization of special supplementary materials 
for individual and group instruction-youth club programs, 
organization and administration. 

EDSE 423. FIELD EXPERIENCES IN VOCATIONAL AREAS (3) 
A. Home Economics Education, B. Business Education. C. 
Distributive Education. Supervised work experience in an 
occupation related to vocational education. Application of 
theory to work situations as a basis for teaching in vocational 
education programs. By individual arrangement with advisor. 

EDSE 425. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN HOME 
ECONOMICS (3) 
Bases for curriculum decisions; tools for planning and 
evaluating curriculum; methodology of conceptual teaching. 

EDSE 426. EVALUATION OF HOME ECONOMICS (3) 
The meaning and function of evaluation in education; the 
development of a plan for evaluating a homemaking program 
with emphasis upon types of evaluation devices, their con- 
struction and use. 

EDSE 430. CORRECTIVE-REMEDIAL READING INSTRUCTION 
(3) 

EDSE 431. LABORATORY PRACTICES IN READING (2-4) 

EDSE 432. THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL (2-3) 

A general overview of the junior high school. Purposes, func- 
tions and characteristics of this school unit; a study of its 
population, organization, program of studies, methods, staff, 
and other topics, together with their implications for prospec- 
tive teachers 



110 / umcp 



EDSE 434. MATERIALS AND PROCEDURES FOR THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL CORE CURRICULUM (3) 
This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to 
teachers who are in charge of core classes in junior and 
senior high schools. Materials and teaching procedures for 
specific units of work are stressed. 

EDSE 440. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3) 

EDSE 441 PRACTICUM IN ART EDUCATION (3) 

One 2-hour lecture discussion period and two. 2-hour labora- 
tory sessions per week. Instruction will be aimed at reviewing 
experiences in a chosen medium of art and assembling a 
workable procedure to present the content to secondary 
school students. The course will provide a studio setting in 
which the student will assemble materials for an in-depth 
study of the practical work involved and attempt to develop 
a total concept in a particular area of art. 

EDSE 442. TEACHING THE AUDIO-LINGUAL SKILLS IN 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES (3) 

EDSE 444. METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) 

EDSE 446. METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3) 

EDSE 447. METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS (2-3) 

EDSE 450. SPEECH METHODS AND RESOURCES IN 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) 

EDSE 453. THE TEACHING OF READING IN THE SECONDARY 
SCHOOL (3) 

EDSE 460. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (3) 

Two lecture-discussion periods and one 3-hour laboratory- 
field experience session per week. An interdisciplinary course 
covering the literature, techniques and strategies of environ- 
mental education. Emphasis is upon the study of environmen- 
tal education programs and the development of a specific 
program which is designed to implement the solution of an 
environmental problem. The laboratory-field experience is 
provided as a model for future activities of students. Open 
to any student who wishes to become actively involved in 
the process of environmental education program develop- 
ment. 

EDSE 470 TEACHING OF ART CRITICISM IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
(3) 
Introduction to various alternative theories of aesthetics as 
related to the teaching of art. 

EDSE 489. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EDUCATION (1-4) 

Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may 
be set by the secondary education department. Planned field 
experience may be provided for selected students who have 
had teaching experience and whose application for such field 
experience has been approved by the secondary education 
faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to both 
major and non-major students. NOTE: The total number of 
credits which a student may earn in EDSE 489, 888, and 889 
is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDSE 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. 

EDSE 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS. AND INSTITUTES (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the College of Education (or 
developed cooperatively with other colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present course listing; clini- 
cal experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 



intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDSE 600. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF 
BUSINESS EDUCATION (3) 
Major emphasis on departmental organization and its role in 
the school program, curriculum, equipment, budget-making, 
supervision, guidance, placement and follow-up, school- 
community relationships, qualifications and selection of 
teaching staff, visual aids, and in-service programs for teacher 
development. For administrators, supervisors, and teachers. 

EDSE 605. PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF BUSINESS 
EDUCATION (2-3) 
Principles, objectives, and practices in business education; 
occupational foundations; current attitudes of business, labor 
and school leaders; general business education relation to 
consumer business education and to education in general. 

EDSE 606. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN BUSINESS 
EDUCATION (2-3) 
This course is especially designed for graduate students 
interested in a concentrated study of curriculum planning in 
business education. Emphasis will be placed on the 
philosophy and objectives of the business education pro- 
gram, and on curriculum research and organization of appro- 
priate course content. 

EDSE 626. PROBLEMS IN TEACHING READING IN SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (3) 
Problems in the teaching of reading in the secondary school. 
Implications of current theory and the results of research for 
the teaching of reading in the secondary school. Attention 
is given to all areas of development reading instruction, with 
special emphasis on persistent problems. 

EDSE 630. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION OF READING 
DISABILITIES (3) 
Prerequisites, EDEL 325 and 430. For those who wish to 
become corrective and remedial reading specialists. Con- 
cerned with clinical techniques, instructional materials, and 
remedial procedures useful to the reading specialist in (1) 
diagnosing serious reading difficulties and (2) planning pro- 
grams of individual and small-group instruction. The work 
includes the writing of diagnostic and progress reports. 

EDSE 631 ADVANCED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN 
READING INSTRUCTION (3) 
Prerequisites, at least 21 credits applicable to the Master's 
program in corrective and remedial reading. The first semes- 
ter of the course deals with diagnostic techniques. Each par- 
ticipant will assist in diagnosing reading disabilities and in 
recommending instructional programs for individual pupils. 
The second semester deals with instruction of pupils with 
reading disabilities. Each participant will plan and execute 
a program of instruction for an individual or a small group, 
applying findings of the preliminary diagnosis. 

EDSE 632. ADVANCED LABORATORY EXPERIENCES IN 
READING INSTRUCTION (3) 
Prerequisites, at least 21 credits applicable to the Master's 
program in corrective and remedial reading. The first semes- 
ter of the course deals with diagnostic techniques. Each par- 
ticipant will assist in diagnosing reading disabilities and in 
recommending instructional programs for individual pupils. 
The second semester deals with instruction of pupils with 
reading disabilities. Each participant will plan and execute 
a program of instruction for an individual or a small group, 
applying findings of the preliminary diagnosis. 

EDSE 637. SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION (3) 

EDSE 640. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 
-GENERAL (3) 
Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum. 

EDSE 641. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- ART (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in art education. 

EDSE 642. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- BUSINESS (3) 



umcp / 111 



Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in business education. 

EDSE 643. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in distributive education. 

EDSE 644. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- ENGLISH (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in English education. 

EDSE 645. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- FOREIGN LANGUAGE (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in foreign language 
education. 

EDSE 646. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in geography. 

EDSE 647. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- MATHEMATICS (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in mathematics. 

EDSE 650. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- SCIENCE (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in science education. 

EDSE 651. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- SOCIAL STUDIES (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in social studies. 

EDSE 652. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- SPEECH (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in speech. 

EDSE 653. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- URBAN SCHOOLS (3) 

Recent developments in educational thinking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum in urban schools. 

EDSE 654. TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

- READING (3) 

Prerequisites. EDSE 453. EDMS 446. Recent developments 
in educational thinking and practice which have affected the 
curriculum in reading. 

EDSE 700. 701. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ART EDUCATION 
(3) 
Problems of teaching art in the elementary and secondary 
schools in terms of the philosophy of art education today, 
techniques and processes in the visual arts, and creative 
opportunities in the visual arts and in art education. The stu- 
dent also will have the opportunity to do special work cen- 
tered about his problems in art education. 

EDSE 705. TRENDS IN THE TEACHING AND SUPERVISION OF 
HOME ECONOMICS (3) 
Study of home economics programs and practices in light 
of current educational trends. Interpretation and analysis of 
democratic teaching procedures, outcomes of instruction, 
and supervisory practices. 

EDSE 740 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - GENERAL (1-3) 
A survey of the research literature; evaluation of research 
techniques; consideration of relevant instructional cur- 
riculum theory; evaluation of modern teaching methods and 
techniques. 

EDSE 741. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION -ART (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 742. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - BUSINESS (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 



EDSE 743. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 744. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - ENGLISH (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 745. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - FOREIGN LANGUAGE (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 746. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - HOME ECONOMICS (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 747. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - MATHEMATICS (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 750. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - MUSIC (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 751. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - READING (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 752. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - SCIENCE (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 753. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - SOCIAL STUDIES (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 754. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - SPEECH (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 755. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION - URBAN EDUCATION (1-3) 
See EDSE 740 for description. 

EDSE 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. Course 
card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

EDSE 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

EDSE 820. SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION (3) 

EDSE 821. SEMINAR IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (3) 

EDSE 822. SEMINAR IN COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION 

(3) 
EDSE 823. SEMINAR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 824. SEMINAR IN ENGLISH EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 825. SEMINAR IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 826. SEMINAR IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 827. SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (3) 

EDSE 830. SEMINAR IN READING EDUCATION (3) 

Prerequisite. EDSE 751. Exploration of major issues of theory, 
research and program development of concern to those in 
positions of advanced professional leadership. Interinstitu- 
tional and interdisciplinary factors will be considered. 

EDSE 831. SEMINAR IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 832. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 833. SEMINAR IN SPEECH EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 834. SEMINAR IN URBAN EDUCATION (3) 
EDSE 835. SEMINAR IN BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES (3) 

EDSE 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN EDUCATION (1-9) 
Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to 
selected students whose application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by the education faculty. Each apprentice 
is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or agency. 



112 / umcp 



The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the apprentice and the other persons involved. 
Prerequisites, teaching experience, a Master's Degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in education at 
the University of Maryland. Wore: The total number of credits 
which a student may earn in EDSE 489, 888 and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDSE 889. INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected 
students who have teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the Doctor's Degree; and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the education 
faculty for an internship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at 
least a semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close working 
relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
Wofe: The total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDSE 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDSE 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Professor and Chairman: Hebeler 
Professors: Ashcroft, Simms 
Associate Professor: Seidman 
Assistant Professor: Jacobs 

Graduate studies in the Department of Special Education 
include programs leading to Master of Arts and Master of Educa- 
tion degrees, Advanced Graduate Specialist certificates, and 
Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Graduate work in special education should be viewed as 
including a constellation of basic skills necessary for improving 
instruction of children with learning problems. While dealing 
specifically with children with learning problems these skills are 
seen as generally applicable to all children engaged in the learn- 
ing process. Graduate study may be used by a student to 
develop and extend competencies in related areas such as 
administration and supervision, and educational diagnosis. At 
advanced graduate study levels programs in teacher education 
are also available. 

Graduate programs are planned individually by the student 
with his advisor. Each program reflects the individual student's 
background, his goals and the level of competency being 
sought. There is no one program of study which all graduate 
students follow. Individual programming by student and advisor 
allows wide latitude of career direction within the field of special 
education upon completion of graduate study. 

Prospective graduate students are requested to consult the 
appropriate document of the following which are available in 
the College of Education graduate office: Graduate Studies in 
Education, Statement of Policies and Procedures for the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Program in Education, or State- 
ment of Policies and Procedures for Doctoral Degrees in 
Education. 

Graduate study in Special Education requires advanced com- 
petencies in the education of children with learning problems. 
Students without former graduate or undergraduate preparation 
in education and/or special education should expect more 
extensive graduate programs so that they might develop the 
necessary levels of competence. 



Students pursuing the Master's degree program in Special 
Education may earn the Master of Arts degree or the Master 
of Education degree. Specific basic course requirements in Spe- 
cial Education are the same for either program. Students should 
refer to the Statement of Policies and Procedures for the Master 
of Arts and Master of Education degrees for differentiation of 
thesis requirements. The following courses are required for 
completion of the master's level program: EDMS 446, EDMS 
646, and EDHD 721. 

The minimum number of graduate hours for this program is 
30. However, students with bachelor's degrees in fields other 
than Special Education should expect to complete a minimum 
of 45 graduate hours in order to reach a level of competence 
required at the master's level. In the master's degree program 
the student generally takes a minimum of 9 to 15 hours in Spe- 
cial Education. Specific programs will be determined with the 
student's advisor according to his background and career plans. 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist certificate in Special Edu- 
cation is available to students wishing to take increased 
graduate work beyond the Master's level. A student pursuing 
an A.G.S. certificate in Special Education is required to take 
the following courses if they have not been part of his Master's 
program: EDMS 446, EDMS 646. and EDHD 721. The minimum 
number of graduate hours for the A.G.S. is 60. The core of the 
program should be made up of Special Education courses and 
other work within the College of Education or other Colleges 
of the University as approved by the student's advisor and the 
Special Education Graduate Faculty. 

Students pursuing the doctoral program in Special Education 
may elect to work for either the Ed.D. or Ph.D. degree. A student 
in the doctoral program will generally complete a minimum of 
90 hours of graduate study of which 30-40 hours will be in his 
major field. All courses within the student's major field may not 
carry the EDSP prefix but all will be relevant in relationship 
to his background and future professional goals. A candidate 
will be expected to develop doctoral level competencies in the 
declared areas of his occupational goals. These goals may 
include instructional competencies, supervision and administra- 
tion of special programs, educational diagnosis of teacher 
education, etc. 

Further information may be obtained from the department. 



EDSP 470. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION (3) 
Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types 
of exceptional children, stressing preventive and remedial 
measures. 

EDSP 471. CHARACTERISTICS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

- MENTALLY RETARDED (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 470 or equivalent. Studies the diagnosis, 
etiology, physical, social and emotional characteristics of 
exceptional children. 

EDSP 472. EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - 
MENTALLY RETARDED (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 471 or equivalent. Offers practical and 
specific methods of teaching exceptional children. Selected 
observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 

EDSP 473. CURRICULUM FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - 
MENTALLY RETARDED (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 471 orequivalent. Examines the principles 
and objectives guiding curriculum for exceptional children: 
gives experience in developing curriculum; studies various 
curricula currently in use. 

EDSP 475. EDUCATION OF THE SLOW LEARNER (3) 

Studies the characteristics of the slow learner and those 
educational practices which are appropriate for the child who 
is functioning as a slow learner. 

EDSP 481. CHARACTERISTICS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

- GIFTED (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 470 or equivalent. Studies the diagnosis, 
etiology, physical, social, and emotional characteristics of 
exceptional children. 

EDSP 482. EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - GIFTED 
(3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 481 or equivalent. Offers practical and 



umcp / 113 



specific methods of teaching exceptional children. Selected 
observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 

EDSP 483. CURRICULUM FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - 
GIFTED (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 481 or equivalent. Examines the principles 
and objectives guiding current curriculum for exceptional 
children; gives experience in developing curriculum; studies 
various curricula currently in use. 

EDSP 489. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-4) 
Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in special education 
at the University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites 
as may be set by the special education department. Planned 
field experience may be provided for selected students who 
have had teaching experience and have been approved by 
the special education faculty. Wore; The total number of cred- 
its which a student may earn in EDSP 489, 888, and 889 
is limited to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDSP 491. CHARACTERISTICS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 
- PERCEPTUAL LEARNING PROBLEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 470 or equivalent. Studies the diagnosis, 
etiology, physical, social, and emotional characteristics of 
exceptional children. 

EDSP 492. EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - 
PERCEPTUAL LEARNING PROBLEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 491 or equivalent. Offers practical and 
specific methods of teaching exceptional children. Selected 
observation of actual teaching may be arranged. 

EDSP 493. CURRICULUM FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - 
PERCEPTUAL LEARNING PROBLEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 492 or equivalent. Examines the principles 
and objectives guiding curriculum for exceptional children; 
gives experience in developing curriculum; studies various 
curricula currently in use. 

EDSP 498. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature 
students who have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. 

EDSP 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS. AND INSTITUTES IN 
SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-6) 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; 
the symbol may be used two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following type of educational 
enterprise may be scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the Special Education Department 
(or developed cooperatively with other departments, colleges 
and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present 
course listing. Laboratories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as school superinten- 
dents, principals and supervisors. 

EDSP 600. EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3) 

Prerequisite, 9 hours in special education and consent of 
instructor. Deals primarily with research relevant to the intel- 
lectual, psychological, physical, and emotional characteris- 
tics of exceptional children. 

EDSP 601. EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND 
YOUTH (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 600 and consent of instructor. Deals with 
epidemiology, etiology, classification, diagnostic procedures, 
behavioral characteristics, treatment and prevention of child 
and adolescent disturbances. 

EDSP 605. THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD AND SOCIETY (3) 

Prerequisite, EDSP 600 or consent of instructor. Relationship 
of the role and adjustment of the child with an exceptionality 
to societal characteristics. 

EDSP 610. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF SPECIAL 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 600 and consent of instructor Considera- 
tion of the determination, establishment and function of 
educational programs to exceptional children for administra- 
tive and supervisory personnel. 



EDSP 615 EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT OF 
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3) 
Prerequisites, EDMS 446, 646, and EDSP 600. Deals with the 
understanding and interpretation of the results of psychologi- 
cal and educational tests applicable for use with exceptional 
children. 

EDSP 620. EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSIS AND PLANNING FOR 
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3) 
Prerequisite, EDSP 615. Deals with the identification of learn- 
ing characteristics of exceptional children and the planning 
of appropriate programs. 

EDSP 621. PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING WITH 

EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3) 

Prerequisite. EDSP 600, 601 and consent of instructor. Deals 

with factors pertinent to therapeutic education of disturbed 

children and adolescents in special treatment settings. 

EDSP 625. PROBLEMS IN THE EDUCATION OF THE MENTALLY 
RETARDED (3) 
Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 600 or consent 
of instructor. Consideration of the pertinent psychological, 
educational, medical, sociological and other research and 
theoretical material relevant to the determination of trends, 
practices, regarding the mentally retarded. 

EDSP 630. PROBLEMS IN THE EDUCATION OF THE GIFTED 
(3) 
Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 600 or consent 
of instructor. Consideration of the pertinent psychological, 
educational, medical, sociological and other relevant 
research and theoretical material relevant to the determina- 
tion of trends, practices, regarding the gifted. 

EDSP 635. PROBLEMS IN THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN 
WITH EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES (3) 
Prerequisite, 9 hours EDSP including EDSP 600 or consent 
of instructor. Consideration of the pertinent psychological, 
educational, medical, sociological and other research and 
theoretical material relevant to the determination of trends, 
practices, regarding the emotionally disturbed. 

EDSP 640. PROBLEMS IN THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN 
WITH PERCEPTUAL IMPAIRMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, 6 hours in education of the perceptually 
impaired, EDSP 615 and 620 or consent of instructor. Con- 
sideration of the pertinent psychological, educational, 
medical, sociological and other research and theoretical 
material relevant to the determination of trends, practices, 
regarding the perceptually impaired. 

EDSP 678. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (2) 

EDSP 798. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION (1-6) 

Master's, AGS, or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their 
advisers may register for credit under this number. Course 
card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

EDSP 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
EDSP 888. APPRENTICESHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-9) 
Apprenticeships in special education are available to selected 
students whose application for an apprenticeship has been 
approved by the special education faculty. Each apprentice 
is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff member of a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institution or agency. 
The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the apprentice and the other persons involved. 
Prerequisites, teaching experience, a Master's Degree in 
education, and at least six semester hours in special educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland. Note: The total number 
of credits which a student may earn in EDSP 489, 888 and 
889 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDSP 889. INTERNSHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3-16) 

Internships in special education are available to selected stu- 
dents who have teaching experience. The following groups 
of students are eligible: (a) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the Doctor's Degree: and (b) any 
student who receives special approval by the special educa- 



114 / umcp 



tion faculty for an internship, provided that prior to taking 
an internship, such student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at 
least a semester with an appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation 
different from the one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor maintains a close working 
relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDSP 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 
EDSP 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



media, plasma propagation); charged particle dynamics and 
accelerator design (cyclotron design); quantum electronics 
(laser technology and non-linear optics); integrated circuits and 
solid state devices (semiconductor devices and technology); 
scattering systems. 

There are seven up-to-date research laboratories and compu- 
tational facilities within the department. The Biomedical 
Laboratory is equipped with instrumentation for studying the 
motor control mechanisms of man and animals. The Laboratory 
for Charged Particle Studies contains an ion beam facility for 
source development and ion implantation. The System Simula- 
tion Laboratory contains a digital processor core and drum 
memory with analog hardware and graphics. The Gas Laser 
Laboratory is devoted to He-Ne and CO2 lasers while the Solid 
State Laser Laboratory features a mode-locked Nd glass laser 
and an injection GaAs laser. The Integrated Circuits Laboratory 
contains a full-line facility capable of producing monolithic, 
thin-film and MOS structures. The Computational Facility con- 
tains conversational and remote-batch terminals to the Univer- 
sity's IBM 7094 and UNIVAC 1108 digital computers. 

Further details and information on admission, financial aid, 
and degree requirements can be obtained from the Electrical 
Engineering Office of Graduate Studies, Area Code 301, 454- 
4173. 



Professor and Chairman: DeClaris 

Professors: Chu,' Hochuli, Newcomb, Popov, Reiser, 2 Taylor, 

Wagner, Weiss 3 
Associate Professors: Abrams, Basham, Emad, Harger, Kim, 2 

Lee, Pugsley, Rao, Simons, Torres, Tretter 
Assistant Professors: Ephremides, Friedman, D. Levine, W. 

Levine, Lieberman, O'Grady, Robinson, Zajac, Zaki 
Visiting Research Instructor: Lin 

1 joint appointment with Computer Science 

2 joint appointment with Physics 

3 joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

The Electrical Engineering Department offers graduate work 
leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees with specialization in; a) biomedical engineering, b) cir- 
cuits, c) communication, d) computers, e) control and f) elec- 
trophysics. Each graduate student pursues an individual study 
program planned in conjunction with his Graduate Advisor and 
which includes an appropriate sequence of courses and a thesis 
or scholarly paper. 

In Biomedical Engineering, areas of study include neural elec- 
trophysiology, transduction and neural coding of sensory 
events, control of effector organs, muscle contraction and 
mechanics, instrumental techniques of nerve signal processing 
and health care systems. 

Areas of study in Circuits emphasize the analysis and syn- 
thesis of passive and active, linear and non-linear networks in- 
cluding the design of digital data acquisition systems, optimized 
FM signal detectors, microwave active circuit synthesis, digital 
computer circuit design, microminiature integrated circuits and 
devices, biomedical transductors, computer aided designs and 
scattering formalisms. 

Areas of study in Computers are involved in the advancement 
of basic switching theory, and the theory and application of 
arithmetic coding and self-checking processes, stochastic 
automata theory, and the design of digital, analog, and hybrid 
systems for both general and special purposes. 

Areas of study in Communication apply the mathematics of 
random processes and statistical inference, to analysis, and 
design of communication systems, including investigations of 
theory and applications in coding theory, optical communica- 
tions, radar systems, and Walsh function applications. 

In Control, areas of study apply the mathematics of dynamical 
systems, optimization, and random processes to the synthesis 
and analysis of control systems. Topics included are state reali- 
zations, power system optimization, optimal control of large 
scale systems, control systems with time delay, non-linear sys- 
tems, fluidic and microminiature systems, systems with shot 
noise, ecological systems, and air traffic control. 

Areas of study in Electrophysics include electromagnetic 
theory and applications (microwaves and optics, stochastic 



ENEE 400. NETWORK SYNTHESIS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 306. Positive real functions, synthesis of 
driving-point impedances, network functions, approximation 
methods, Chebyshev and Butterworth filters. 

ENEE 402. ADVANCED PULSE TECHNIQUES (3) 

(See ENEE 403 for optional related laboratory course). 
Prerequisite, ENEE 312 or 410 or equivalent. Bistable, mono- 
stable, and astable circuits, sweep circuits, synchronization, 
counting, gates, comparators, magnetic core circuits, 
semiconductor and vacuum-tube circuits. 

ENEE 403. PULSE TECHNIQUES LABORATORY (1) 
Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite, 
ENEE 402 and permission of the instructor. Experiments on 
switching circuits, bistable, monostable, and astable circuits, 
sweep circuits, gates, comparators. 

ENEE 404. ADVANCED RADIO ENGINEERING (3) 

Corequisite or prerequisite, ENEE 312. (See ENEE 405 for 
optional related laboratory course.) The coupling coefficient 
concept, high-frequency effects, design and optimization of 
amplifiers, stability considerations, gain limitations, noise 
figure, design of harmonic generators, design of stable oscil- 
lators. 

ENEE 405. ADVANCED RADIO ENGINEERING LABORATORY (1 ) 
Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite, 
ENEE 404. Experiments on multiple tuned amplifiers, noise 
figure measurements, class-C amplifiers, varactors, mod- 
ulators, projects. 

ENEE 406. MATHEMATICAL FOUNDATIONS OF CIRCUIT 
THEORY (3) 
Prerequisites, ENEE 306 and MATH 241, or equivalent. Review 
of determinants, linear equations, matrix theory, eigenvalues, 
theory of complex variables, inverse Laplace transforms. 
Applications are drawn primarily from circuit analysis. 

ENEE 410. ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 300 or equivalent knowledge of circuit 
theory or consent of the instructor. This course is intended 
for students in the physical sciences, and for engineering stu- 
dents requiring additional study of electron circuits. Credit 
not normally given for this course in an electrical engineering 
major program. (ENEE 311 or 313 may optionally be taken 
as an associated laboratory, as is appropriate). P-N junctions, 
transistors, vacuum tubes, biasing and operating point' 
stability, switches, large-signal analysis, models, small-signal 
analysis, frequency response, feedback and multistage 
amplifiers, pulse and digital circuits. 

ENEE 418. PROJECTS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (1-3) 
Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites, senior standing and per- 
mission of the instructor. May be taken for repeated credit 
up to a total of 4 credits, with the permission of the student's 



umcp / 115 



advisor and the instructor. Theoretical and experimental proj- 
ects. 

ENEE 420. COMMUNICATION THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 320. Random signals: elements of random 
processes, noise, Gaussian process, correlation functions' 
and power spectra, linear operations; optimum receivers, vec- 
tor waveform channels, receiver implementation, probability 
of error performance; efficient signaling: sources, encoding, 
dimensionality, channel capacity; waveform communication: 
linear, angle, and pulse modulation. 

ENEE 421. INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION THEORY (3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 320. Definition of information and 
entropy; characterization of sources; Kraft and MacMillan 
inequalities; co.ding information sources; noiseless coding 
theorem; channels^and mutual information; Shannon's cod- 
ing theorem for noisy channels. 

ENEE 425. SIGNAL ANALYSIS, MODULATION, AND NOISE (3) 
Prerequisites, ENEE 310 and 320. Signal transmission 
through networks, transmission in the presence of noise, 
statistical methods of determining error and transmission 
effects, modulation schemes. 

ENEE 432. ELECTRONICS FOR LIFE SCIENTISTS (4) 
Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites, college algebra and a physics course, including 
basic electricity and magnetism. Not accepted for credit in 
an electrical engineering major program. The concept of an 
instrumentation system with emphasis upon requirements for 
transducers, amplifiers, and recording devices, design criteria 
and circuitry of power supplies amplifiers, and pulse equip- 
ment, specific instruments used for biological research, prob- 
lems of shielding against hum and noise pickup and other 
interference problems characteristic of biological systems. 

ENEE 433. ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION FOR PHYSICAL 
SCIENCE (3) 
Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites, ENEE 300 or 306, PHYS 271 or equivalent, or 
consent of instructor. The concept of instrumentation sys- 
tems from sensor to readout; discussions of transducers, sys- 
tem dynamics, precision and accuracy; measurement of elec- 
trical parameters; direct, differential, and potentiometric 
measurements; bridge measurements, time and frequency 
measurements, waveform generation and display. 

ENEE 434. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL PROCESSES IN 
BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE I (3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 300 or equivalent. Introduction in the 
generation and processing of bioelectric signals including 
structure and function of the neuron, neuron models, mem- 
brane theory, generation and propagation of nerve impulses, 
synaptic mechanisms, transduction and neural coding and 
sensory events. Central nervous system processing of sensory 
information and correlated electrical signals, control of 
effector organs, muscle contraction and mechanics, and 
analytical and instrumental techniques of nerve signal pro- 
cessing. 

ENEE 435. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL PROCESSES IN 
BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE II (3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 434. Continuation of ENEE 434 with 
emphasis on the experimental and analytical methods neces- 
sary to elucidate peripheral and central nervous system func- 
tion, activity and information processing, acquisition and 
analysis of electrocardiograms, electromyograms and elec- 
troencephalograms. 

ENEE 438. TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. May be taken for 
repeated credit. The content may vary from semester to 
semester. Selected topics of current interest from such areas 
as bioelectric systems, modeling instrumentation, automated 
diagnostic, health-care delivery, etc. Repeatable to a max- 
imum of 9 hours. 

ENEE 440. DIGITAL COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 201 or ENES 243 or equivalent. Same as 
CMSC 410. Introduction; computer elements; parallel adders 
and subtracters; micro-operations; sequences; computer 
simulation; organization of a commercially available stored 



program computer; microprogrammed computers; a large 
scale batch processing system. (Optional.) (Intended for those 
minoring in computers and for those majoring in computer 
science). 

ENEE 442. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYSIS 
AND DESIGN (3) 
Prerequisites, ENES 243, ENEE 310. Application of digital 
computers to solutions of lumped parameter system prob- 
lems; use of simulators; economic and reliability con- 
siderations; investigation and applications of problem 
oriented programs such as those for circuit analysis, e.g. 
CORNAP, JOBSHOP, ECAP, and NASAP. The use of the com- 
puter will be an integral part of the course. 

ENEE 443. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND COMPU- 
TATION (3) 
Prerequisite, ENES 243 or equivalent. Basic structure and 
organization of digital systems; representation of data, 
introduction to software systems; assembly language, appli- 
cation of computers in engineering and physical systems. 

ENEE 444. INTRODUCTION TO SWITCHING SYSTEM DESIGN 
(3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 443. Symbolic logic and Boolean algebra; 
switching circuits; minimization algorithms; basic sequential 
circuits; design of digital systems. 

ENEE 445. DIGITAL LOGIC LABORATORY (1) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 443 or equivalent. Design, breadboard 
construction and checkout of simple digital systems such as 
counters, shift registers, arithmetic and control units. 

ENEE 446. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 444. Digital computer organization; 
arithmetic elements; primary and secondary storage; applica- 
tions of integrated circuits; operating systems; interaction of 
hardware and software. 

ENEE 450. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE STRUCTURES (3) 
Prerequisite, ENES 243 or equivalent. This is the same course 
as CMSC 340. Review of set algebra including relations, par- 
tial ordering, and mappings. Algebraic structures including 
semigroups and groups. Graph theory including trees and 
weighted graphs. Boolean algebra and propositional logic. 
Applications of these stru'ctures to various areas of computer 
science and computer engineering. 

ENEE 451. INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMATA THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 450 or permission of the instructor. An 
introduction to finite state machines and their properties; 
properties of regular sets; elementary decomposition results; 
introduction to Turing machines and computability theory; 
undecidability propositions; introduction to finite semigroups 
with application to the decomposition of finite state 
machines. 

ENEE 456. ANALOG AND HYBRID COMPUTERS (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 310. Programming the analog computer; 
analog computing components; error analysis, repetitive 
operation; synthesis of systems using the computer; hybrid 
computer systems. 

ENEE 460. FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 310 and MATH 246. (See ENEE 461 for 
optional related laboratory course.) Feedback system opera- 
tion and design, stability criteria, basic design techniques, 
correlation of time and frequency-domain concepts, flow- 
graph algebra, system synthesis to a variety of specifications. 

ENEE 461. FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS LABORATORY (1) 
Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite, 
ENEE 460. Projects to enhance the student's understanding 
of feedback control systems and familiarize him with some 
of the devices used in the control field. 

ENEE 462. TRANSDUCERS AND ELECTRICAL MACHINERY (3) 
(See ENEE 463 for related laboratory course.) Prerequisites, 
ENEE 306, 381. Corequisite, ENEE 463. Electromechanical 
transducers, theory of electromechanical systems, power and 
wideband transformers rotating electrical machinery from the 
theoretical and performance points of view. 



116 / umcp 



ENEE 463. TRANSDUCERS AND ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 
LABORATORY (1) 
Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite. ENEE 462. 
Laboratory to be taken in association with ENEE 462. Experi- 
ments on transformers, synchronous machines, induction 
motors, synchros, loudspeakers, other transducers. 

ENEE 481. ANTENNAS AND WAVE PROPAGATION (3) 

Corequisite or prerequisite. ENEE 381. Review of Maxwell s 
Equations, radiation, antennas, radio wave propagation. 

ENEE 487. PARTICLE ACCELERATORS. PHYSICAL AND 
ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES (3) 
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 380. 
and PHYS 420, or consent of the instructor. Sources of 
charged particles: methods of acceleration and focusing of 
ion beams in electromagnetic fields; basic theory, design, and 
engineering principles of particle accelerators. 

ENEE 488. TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. May be taken for 
repeated credit up to a total of 6 credits, with the permission 
of the student's advisor and the instructor. Theoretical and 
experimental projects. 

ENEE 496. PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS OF DEVICES (3) 

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 382 and 
PHYS 420. Introduction to electron and ion optics. Principles 
of vacuum tubes, klystrons and magnetrons. Conductivity of 
metals and semiconductors, P-N junction and transistors. 

ENEE 600. MATHEMATICS OF CIRCUIT ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate circuit theory and advanced cal- 
culus. Determinants, linear equations, matrix theory, eigen- 
values, theory of complex variable inverse Laplace trans- 
forms, applications to circuit analysis. 

ENEE 601. ACTIVE NETWORK ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 406 or equivalent. The complex frequency 
plane, conventional feedback and sensitivity, theorems for 
feedback circuits, stability and physical realizability of electri- 
cal networks. Nyquist's and Routh's criteria for stability, activ- 
ity and passivity criteria. 

ENEE 602. TRANSIENTS IN LINEAR SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or mechanical 
engineering or physics. Operational circuit analysis, the 
Fourier integral, transient analysis of electrical and mechani- 
cal systems and electronic circuits by the Laplace transform 
method. 

ENEE 603. TRANSIENTS IN LINEAR SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or mechanical 
engineering or physics. Continuation of ENEE 602. 

ENEE 604. ADVANCED ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT DESIGN (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 31 2 or consent of the instructor. Compari- 
son of bipolar and field effect transistors, detailed frequency 
response of single and multistage amplifiers, design of feed- 
back amplifiers, D-C coupling techniques, design of multi- 
stage tuned amplifiers. 

ENEE 605. GRAPH THEORY AND NETWORK ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 600. Linear graph theory as applied to 
electrical networks, cut sets and tie sets, incidence matrices, 
trees, branches, and mazes, development of network equa- 
tions by matrix and index notation, network characteristic 
equations for natural circuit behavior, signal-flow-graph 
theory and Mason-S rule, stability of active two-part networks. 

ENEE 608. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Every semester regular 
seminars are held in electrical science and in the six areas 
of specialization offered by the Electrical Engineering Depart- 
ment. They may be taken, by arrangement with the student's 
advisor, for repeated credit. 

ENEE 620. RANDOM PROCESSES IN COMMUNICATION AND 
CONTROL (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 320 or equivalent. Introduction to random 
processes: characterization, classification, representation: 
Gaussian and other examples. Linear operations on random 
processes, stationary processes: covariance function and 
spectral density. Linear least-square waveform estimation: 
Wiener-Kolmogoroff filtering, Kalman-Bucy recursive filter- 



ing; function space characterization. Non-linear operations 
on random processes. 

ENEE 621. ESTIMATION AND DETECTION THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 620. Estimation of unknown parameters. 
Cramer-Rao lower bound: optimum (map) demodulation: 
filtering, amplitude and angle modulation, comparison with 
conventional systems: statistical decision theory; criteria 
(Bayes. minimac. Neyman-Pearson, and MAP), simple and 
composite hypotheses, applications to coherent and incoher- 
ent signal detection; M-ARY hypotheses, application to 
uncoded and coded digital communication systems. 

ENEE 630. ADVANCED TOPICS — RADAR SIGNALS AND 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Corequisite. ENEE 620. Review of linear systems and signals: 
Fourier transform representation time — Bandwidth product, 
resolution, complex representation; maximum signal-to-noise 
ratio criterion receiver and signal design, radar range 
equation; statistical detection theory: probability of error per- 
formance; statistical estimation theory: unknown parameters, 
range-Doppler radar, ambiguity problem, asymptotic max- 
imum likelihood estimation and Cramer-Rao lower bound: 
resolution of multiple objects. 

ENEE 632. ELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES IN MEDICINE AND 
BIOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisites, mathematics through differential equations 
and physics through electricity and magnetism, or equivalent. 
Electrical properties of biological tissues and cell suspen- 
sions, alternating current impedance, spectroscopy, trans- 
ducers and related instrumentation systems for biological 
measurements, biological control systems, interaction of 
electromagnetic fields with biological systems. Special topics 
in biomedical engineering are presented under the seminar 
course ENEE 608 and the advanced topics course ENEE 648. 

ENEE 640. ARITHMETIC AND CODING ASPECTS OF DIGITAL 
COMPUTERS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENEE 440 or 446 or permission of the instructor. 
Digital logic design aspects; sequential circuits; computer 
number systems; arithmetic codes for error correction: 
residue number theory: arithmetic unit design; fault detection 
and correction circuits 

ENEE 646. DIGITAL COMPUTER DESIGN (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 446. Introduction to design techniques for 
digital computers; digital arithmetic: logic circuits: digital 
memories; design of computer elements; arithmetic unit; and 
control unit. A simple digital computer will be designed. 

ENEE 648. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
(3) 
Every semester courses intended for high degree of speciali- 
zation are offered by visiting or regular electrical engineering 
faculty members in two or more of the areas listed in 488. 
The student should check with the electrical engineering 
office of graduate studies for a list and the description of 
the topics offered currently. 

ENEE 651. CODING THEORY AND APPLICATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 450 and some knowledge of logic of 
switching systems. Introduction to coding and brief review 
of modern algebra; theory of linear codes: decoding; Ham- 
ming, cyclic and Bose-Chaudhuri codes; error-checking 
codes for arithmetic; An f B type codes; residue checks; 
practical self checking arithmetic units: simple automatic 
fault diagnosing techniques. 

ENEE 652. AUTOMATA THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 421 or CMSC 640. This is the same course 
as CMSC 740. Introduction to the theory of abstract 
mathematical machines: structural and behavioral classifica- 
tion of automata; finite-state automata; theory of regular sets; 
pushdown automata; linear-bounded automata: finite trans- 
ducers: Turing machines; universal Turing machines. 

ENEE 654. COMBINATORIAL SWITCHING THEORY (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and ENEE 444. Application of alge- 
braic techniques to combinatorial switching networks; multi- 
valued systems; symmetries and their use; optimization 
algorithms; heuristic techniques; majority and threshold 
logic: function decomposition; cellular cascades. 



umcp / 117 




ENEE 655. STRUCTURE THEORY OF MACHINES (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and ENEE 444. Machine realizations; 
partitions and the substitution property; pair algebras and 
applications; variable dependence; decomposition; loop-free 
structures; set system decompositions; semigroup realiza- 
tions. 

ENEE 657. SIMULATION OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 443. Mechanistic methods for differential 
equation solution; application of analog or hybrid computers 
and digital differential analyzers for that purpose: design and 
structure of languages for digital-analog simulation on a 
general purpose digital computer; MIMIC language and 
examples of its use. Class will run simulation programs on 
a large-scale computer. 

ENEE 660. CONTROL SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS (3) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, undergraduate auto- 
matic control theory background. Linear control systems 
analysis and synthesis using time and frequency domain 
techniques; flow graphs, error coefficients, sensitivity, 
stability, compensation to meet specifications, introduction 
to sampled data systems. (Same as ENME 602) 

ENEE 661. NON-LINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS 
(3) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 660, ENME 602 
or equivalent. Approximate analysis of nonlinear systems 
using series, perturbation, and linearization techniques; 
introduction to state space formulation of differential 
equations; systems with Stochastic inputs: stability, introduc- 
tion to optimum switched systems; adaptive control systems. 
(Same as ENME 603). 

ENEE 662 SAMPLED-DATA CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, undergraduate or graduate preparations in 
linear feedback control theory. Z-transform and modified Z- 
transform method of analysis, root-locus and frequency- 
response methods of analysis, discrete and continuous com- 
pensation, analysis with finite pulse width, digital control sys- 
tems. 



ENEE 663. SYSTEM THEORY (3) 

Modelling of systems, abstract definition of state, linearity and 
its implications, linear differential systems, controllability and 
observability, impulse response, transfer functions, realization 
theory, nonlinear differential systems, definitions of stability, 
Lyapunov stability theory, the Lure problem and Popov con- 
dition, input/output stability. 

ENEE 664. OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 760. Calculus of variations, direct 
methods of optimization, Euler-Lagrange equations, inequal- 
ity constraint, maximum principle. Hamilton-Jacobi theory, 
dynamic programming, adaptive and Stochastic control, fil- 
tering theory. 

ENEE 680. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 381 or equivalent. Theoretical analysis 
and engineering applications of Maxwell's Equations. Bound- 
ary value problems of electrostatics and magnetostatics. 

ENEE 681. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 381 or equivalent. Continuation of ENEE 
680. Theoretical analysis and engineering applications of 
Maxwell's Equations. The homogeneous wave equation. 
Plane wave propagation. The interaction of plane waves and 
material media. Retarded potentials. The Hertz potential. Sim- 
ple radiating systems. Relativisitic covariance of Maxwell's 
Equations. 

ENEE 683. MATHEMATICS FOR ELECTROMAGNETISM (3) 
Prerequisite, undergraduate preparation in electromagnetic 
theory and advanced calculus. Tensors and curvilinear coor- 
dinates, partial differential equations of electrostatics and 
electrodynamics, functionals, integral equations, and cal- 
culus of variations as applied to electromagnetism. 

ENEE 686. CHARGED PARTICLE DYNAMICS, ELECTRON AND 
ION BEAMS (3) 
Three hours per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
General principles of single-particle dynamics; mapping of 
the electric and magnetic fields; equation of motion and 
methods of solution; production and control of charge parti- 



118 / umcp 



cle beams: electron optics; Liouville's Theorem; space charge 
effects in high current beams: design principles of special 
electron and ion beam devices. 

ENEE 696 INTEGRATED AND MICROWAVE ELECTRONICS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 310. Registration in ENEE 793 recom- 
mended. Active and passive elements used in semiconductor 
structures. Design application of linear and digital integrated 
circuits. 

ENEE 697 SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AND TECHNOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 496 or equivalent. Registration in ENEE 
793 recommended The principles, structures and charac- 
teristics of semiconductor devices. Technology and fabrica- 
tion of semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 700. NETWORK SYNTHESIS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 605 or equivalent. Design of driving-point 
and transfer impedance functions with emphasis of the 
transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase networks, flow 
diagrams, physical network characteristics, including rela- 
tions existing between the real and imaginary components 
of network functions, modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 701. NETWORK SYNTHESIS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 700 or equivalent. Design of driving-point 
and transfer impedance functions with emphasis on the 
transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase networks, flow dia- 
grams, physical network characteristics, including relations 
existing between the real and imaginary components of net- 
work functions, modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 703. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE MODELS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 605 or equivalent. Single-frequency mod- 
els for transistors; small-signal and wide-band models for 
general non-reciprocal devices. hybrid-Pi and Tee models for 
transistors; relationship of models to transistor physics: 
synthesis of wide-band models from terminal behavior, com- 
puter utilization of models for other semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 707. APPLICATIONS OF TENSOR ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 600 or 602. The mathematical background 
of tensor notation, which is applicable to electrical engineer- 
ing problems. Applications of tensor analysis to electric cir- 
cuit theory and to field theory. 

ENEE 721. INFORMATION THEORY (3) 

Corequisite. ENEE 620. Prerequisite. STAT 400 or equivalent. 
Information measure, entropy, mutual information; source 
encoding; noiseless coding theorem: noisy coding theorem; 
exponential error bounds: introduction to probabilistic error 
correcting codes, block and convolutional codes and error 
bounds; channels with memory; continuous channels; rate 
distortion function. 

ENEE 722. CODING THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 721. Algebraic burst and random error 
correcting codes, convolutional encoding and sequential 
decoding, threshold decoding, concatenated codes, P-N 
sequences, arithmetic codes. 

ENEE 728. ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION THEORY 
(3) 
Topics selected, as announced, from advanced communica- 
tion theory and its applications. 

ENEE 730. ADVANCED TOPICS — RADAR SIGNALS AND 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENEE 620 or equivalent. The theory of imaging 
radar systems. Classifications, resolution mechanisms, and 
principles. System design for additive noise: effects of 
ambiguity, multiplicative noise, motion errors, nonlinearities, 
and scattering mechanism. System design for ambiguity and 
multiplicative noise. Optical processing. Application to syn- 
thetic aperture, astronomical, and Hologram radar. 

ENEE 746. DIGITAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite. ENEE 646. Systems aspects of digital- 
computer-based systems; data flow analysis; system 
organization; control languages; consoles and displays; 
remote terminals; software-hardware tradeoff; system 
evaluation, case studies from selected applications areas 
such as data acquisition and reduction information storage, 
or the like. 



ENEE 748. TOPICS IN COMPUTER DESIGN (1-3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Such topics as 
computer arithmetic, computer reliability, and threshold logic 
will be considered. May be taken for repeated credit. 

ENEE 760. MATHEMATICS OF OPTIMIZATION (3) 

Prerequisite, course in advanced calculus or real analysis. 
Introduction to functional analysis with emphasis on applica- 
tions to system theory and optimization. Topics covered are 
linear spaces and operators. Hilbert and Banach spaces. Baire 
Category Theorem. Hahn-Banach Theorem, principle of 
uniform boundedness, duality. 

ENEE 769. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONTROL THEORY (3) 
Topics selected, as announced, from advanced control theory 
and its applications. 

ENEE 780. MICROWAVE ENGINEERING (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 681. Mathematical methods for the solu- 
tion of the wave equation, transmission lines and waveguides, 
selected topics in the theory of waveguide structures, surface 
guides and artificial dielectrics. 

ENEE 781. OPTICAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Fourier analysis in two dimensions. Diffraction Theory, optical 
imaging systems, spatial filtering, holography. 

ENEE 782. RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. ENEE 681 . General solu- 
tions of Maxwell s Equations, geometrical optics approxima- 
tions, propagation above a plane earth, effects of surface 
irregularities and stratified atmospheres, scattering by turbu- 
lence. 

ENEE 783. RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 782. Continuation 
of ENEE 782. 

ENEE 784. ANTENNA THEORY (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 681 or equivalent. 
Review of Maxwell s Equations; radiative networks; linear 
antennas; antenna arrays; aperture antennas; advanced 
topics. 

ENEE 790. QUANTUM ELECTRONICS I (3) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, a knowledge of quantum 
mechanics and electromagnetic theory. Spontaneous emis- 
sion, interaction of radiation and matter, lasers, optical 
resonators, the gas, solid and semi-conductor lasers, electro- 
optical effect, propagation in anisotropic media and light 
modulation. 

ENEE 791. QUANTUM ELECTRONICS II (3) 

Nonlinear optical effects and devices, tunable coherent light 
sources — optical parametric oscillator, frequency conversion 
and dye laser. Ultrashort pulse generation and measurement, 
stimulated Raman effect, and applications, interaction of 
acoustic and optical waves, and holography. 

ENEE 793. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS (3) 

Prerequisite, a graduate course in quantum mechanics or 
consent of instructor. Properties of crystals; energy bands; 
electron transport theory; conductivity and Hall effect; statis- 
tical distributions; Fermi level; impurities; non-equilibrium 
carrier distributions; normal modes of vibration; effects of 
high electric fields; P-N junction theory, avalanche break- 
down; tunneling phenomena; surface properties. 

ENEE 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENEE 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ENGINEERING SCIENCE 



ENES 401. TECHNOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of assessing technology in terms of goals and 
resources. Public and private constraints, changes in objec- 
tives and organization. Applications to engineering 
technology. 



umcp / 119 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Professor and Chairman: Freedman 

Professors: Bode, Bryer, Fleming, Hovey, Isaacs, Lawson, Lut- 

wack, Manning, McManaway, Mish, Murphy, Myers, Panichas, 

Russell, Whittemore 
Associate Professors: Barnes, Barry, Birdsall, Brown, Cooper, 

Fry, Gravely, Greenwood. G. Hamilton, Holton, Houppert, 

Howard, Jellema, Kenny, Kinnaird, Miller, Perloff, Peterson, 

Portz, Salamanca. Smith, Thorberg, Ward, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Cate, Kleine, Quigley, 1 Rutherford, 

Steinberg, Swigger, Weigant 

1 joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of English offers graduate work leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Master of Arts 
include: (1) ENGL 601; (2) three credits from the following: 
ENGL 482, 483, 484. 485, 486; (3) six credits in the ENGL 620 
series; and (4) six credits of seminars. Candidates have a non- 
thesis option under which they take 30 credits, submit a sub- 
stantial seminar paper for deposit, and pass a three-hour com- 
prehensive examination. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy include: (1) a foreign language requirement; (2) at 
least three hours of linguistics; (3) a comprehensive written 
examination on three fields (dissertation field and those 
immediately before and after it) which may be taken with permis- 
sion after nine hours beyond the Master of Arts and must be 
taken upon the completion of 30 hours. 



ENGL401 . ENGLISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION 
(3) 

(Birdsall, Herman, Isaacs, Rutherford) 

ENGL 402. CHAUCER (3) 

(Gallick, Isaacs, Rutherford, Steinberg) 

ENGL 403. SHAKESPEARE (3) 

Early period: histories and comedies. 

(Barry, D. Hamilton, McManaway) 

ENGL 404. SHAKESPEARE (3) 

Late periods: tragedies and romances. 

(Barry, D. Hamilton. McManaway) 

ENGL 405. THE MAJOR WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (3) 

Students who have credit for ENGL 403 or 404 cannot receive 
credit for ENGL 405. 

(Houppert, Kimble, Levinson, Schoeck, Widman) 

ENGL 407. LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE (3) 

(D. Hamilton, Houppert) 

ENGL 410. EDMUND SPENSER (3) 

ENGL 411. LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE (3) 

(G. Hamilton, Houppert) 

ENGL 412. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 
1600-1660 (3) 

(G. Hamilton. Mish, Murphy, Wilson) 

ENGL 414. MILTON (3) 

(Freedman, G. Hamilton, Murphy, Wilson) 

ENGL 415 LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 
1660-1700(3) 

(Wilson) 

ENGL 416. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (3) 
Age of Pope and Swift (Kenny. Myers, Tyson) 

ENGL 417. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (3) 
Age of Johnson and the Preromantics. 

(Howard. Kenny, Myers, Tyson) 

ENGL 418, 419. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS (3, 3) 
Two writers studied intensively each semester 

ENGL 420. LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD (3) 
First generation: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, et at. 

(Howard, Kenny, Myers, Tyson) 



ENGL 421. LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD (3) 
Second generation: Keats, Shelley, Byron, et al. 

(Howard, Kinnaird, Kolker, G. Smith) 

ENGL 422. LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD (3) 
Early years. (Brown, Cate, Kenny, Peterson) 

ENGL 423. LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD (3) 
Middle years. (Brown, Cate, Kenny, Peterson) 

ENGL 424. LATE VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN LITERATURE 
(3) 
A study of the literary movements and techniques which 
effected the transition from Victorian to modern literature. 

(Cate, Peterson) 

ENGL 425. MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE (3) 

An historical survey of the major writers and literary move- 
ments in English prose and poetry since 1900. 

(Cate, Kenny, Russell) 

ENGL 430. AMERICAN LITERATURE, BEGINNING TO 1810, THE 
COLONIAL AND FEDERAL PERIODS (3) 

(Vitzthum, Weigant) 

ENGL 431. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1810 TO 1865, THE 
AMERICAN RENAISSANCE (3) 

(Manning, Martin, Vitzthum, Weigant) 

ENGL 432. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 TO 1914, REALISM 
AND NATURALISM (3) 

(Dunn, Gravely, Thorberg) 

ENGL 433. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1914 TO THE PRESENT, 
THE MODERN PERIOD (3) 

(Holton, Lawson, Moore, Walt) 

ENGL 434. AMERICAN DRAMA (3) 

(Barry, Bryer) 

ENGL 435. AMERICAN POETRY — BEGINNING TO THE 
PRESENT (3) 

(Holton, Van Egmond) 

ENGL 436. THE LITERATURE OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY (3) 

(Barnes) 

ENGL 437. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) 
A survey of the poetry, prose, and drama written in America 
in the last decade. (Moore) 

ENGL 438, 439. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (3, 3) 
Two writers studied intensively each semester. 

ENGL 440. THE NOVEL IN AMERICA TO 1910 (3) 

(Dunn, Hovey. Thorberg) 

ENGL 441. THE NOVEL IN AMERICA SINCE 1910 (3) 

(Dunn, Hovey, Thorberg) 

ENGL 442. LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH (3) 
A historical survey, from eighteenth-century beginnings to the 
present. (Lawson, Moore) 

ENGL 443. AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) 
An examination of the literary expression of the Negro in the 
United States, from its beginning to the present. 

(Coleman, Kelly, Naughton) 

ENGL 445. MODERN POETRY (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema, Perloff, Van Egmond, Whittemore) 

ENGL 449. PLAYWRITING (3) 

(Fleming) 

ENGL 450. ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN DRAMA (3) 

Beginnings to Marlowe. (Barry. D. Hamilton) 

ENGL 451 ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN DRAMA (3) 
Jonson to Webster. (Barry, D. Hamilton) 

ENGL 452. ENGLISH DRAMA FROM 1660 TO 1800 (3) 

(Kenny) 

ENGL 453. LITERARY CRITICISM (3) 

(Lutwack. Trousdale) 

ENGL 454. MODERN DRAMA (3) 

(Barry, Bryer, Freedman, Kimble) 

ENGL 455. THE ENGLISH NOVEL (3) 

Eighteenth Century. (Kenney. Kleine. Peterson, Ward) 



120 / umcp 



ENGL 456. THE ENGLISH NOVEL (3) 

Nineteenth Century. (Kenney, Kleine, Peterson, Ward) 

ENGL 457. THE MODERN NOVEL (3) 

(Holton, Lawson, Panichas, Perloff, Rowe, Russell) 

ENGL 460. INTRODUCTION TO FOLKLORE (3) 

(Birdsall, Cothran, Fry) 

ENGL 461. FOLK NARRATIVE (3) 

Studies in legend, tale and myth. Prerequisite, ENGL 460. 

(Birdsall) 

ENGL 462. FOLKSONG AND BALLAD (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL 460. (Glazer) 

ENGL 463. AMERICAN FOLKLORE (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL 460. An examination of American folklore 
in terms of history and regional folk cultures. Exploration of 
collections of folklore from various areas to reveal the differ- 
ence in regional and ethnic groups as witnessed in their oral 
and literary traditions. (Fry) 

ENGL 464. AFRO-AMERICAN FOLKLORE AND CULTURE (3) 
An examination of the culture of the Negro in the United 
States in terms of history (antebellum to the present) and 
social changes (rural to urban). Exploration of aspects of 
Negro culture and history via oral and literary traditions and 
life histories. (Fry) 

ENGL 465. URBAN FOLKLORE (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL 460. An examination of the folklore cur- 
rently originating in white, urban, American culture. 

(Birdsall) 

ENGL 470. HONORS CONFERENCE AND READING (1) 

Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. Candidates will 
take ENGL 470 in their junior year and ENGL 471 in their 
senior year. (Manning) 

ENGL 471. HONORS CONFERENCE AND READING (1) 

Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in English. Candidates will 
take ENGL 470 in their junior year and ENGL 471 in their 
senior year. (Manning) 

ENGL 472. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ENGLISH (1-3) 
This course is designed to provide qualified majors in English 
an opportunity to pursue specific English readings under the 
supervision of a member of the department. Restricted to 
undergraduates. 

ENGL 473. SENIOR PROSEMINAR IN LITERATURE (3) 

Open only to seniors. Required of candidates for honors and 
strongly recommended to those who plan to do graduate 
work. Individual reading assignments; term paper. 

(Manning) 

ENGL 479. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN 
LITERATURE (3) 

ENGL 481. INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) 

A brief review of traditional English grammar and an introduc- 
tion to structural grammar, including phonology, morphology 
and syntax. (James, Nutku) 

ENGL 482. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) 

(Birdsall, Herman, James, Nutku) 

ENGL 483. AMERICAN ENGLISH (3) 

(Miller) 

ENGL 484. ADVANCED ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) 
Credit may not be granted in both ENGL 484 and LING 402. 

(James, Miller) 

ENGL 485. ADVANCED ENGLISH STRUCTURE (3) 

(Miller) 

ENGL 486. OLD ENGLISH (3) 

(Rutherford) 

ENGL 493. ADVANCED EXPOSITORY WRITING (3) 

(Beauchamp, Herman, Stevenson, Trousdale, Walt) 

ENGL 498. CREATIVE WRITING (3) 

(Fleming, Holton, Jellema, Salamanca, Van Egmond) 

ENGL 499. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema, Salamanca, Whittemore) 



ENGL 601. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS (3) 

(Cooper, G. Smith, Steinberg, Van Egmond, Widman) 

ENGL 602. MIDDLE ENGLISH (3) 

(Steinberg) 

ENGL 603. ENGLISH LANGUAGE — OLD ENGLISH TO EARLY 
MODERN ENGLISH (3) 

(Isaacs, Rutherford. Steinberg) 

ENGL 620. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERAT&RE — THE 
MEDIEVAL PERIOD TO 1500 (3) 

(Birdsall) 

ENGL 621. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE — 
RENAISSANCE LITERATURE (3) 

(Cooper) 

ENGL 622. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE — 
17TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) 

(G. Hamilton, Murphy) 

ENGL 623. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE — 
18TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) 

(Kenny, Myers) 

ENGL 624. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE — 
ROMANTIC LITERATURE (3) 

(Kinnaird, Smith) 

ENGL 625. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE — 
VICTORIAN LITERATURE (3) 

(Brown, Cate, Peterson) 

ENGL 626. SPECIAL STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE — 
AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1865 (3) 

(Lawson, Weigant) 

ENGL 627. SPECIAL STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE — 
AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1865 (3) 

(Lawson, Thorberg) 

ENGL 718, SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3) 

(Birdsall, Isaacs, Rutherford, Schoeck) 

ENGL 719. SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE (3) 

(Barry, Cooper, Houppert, McManaway, Schoeck) 

ENGL 728. SEMINAR IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY LITERA- 
TURE (3) 

(Freeman, G. Hamilton, Mish, Murphy) 

ENGL 729 SEMINAR IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE 
(3) 

(Kenny, Myers, Ward) 

ENGL 738. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE 
(3) 

(Howard, Kinnaird, G. Smith) 

ENGL 739. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE 
(3) 

(Brown, Cate, Kleine, Peterson) 

ENGL 748. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) 

(Barnes, Bode, Holton, Hovey, Lawson) 

ENGL 749. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY LITERATURE (3) 
(Bode, Hovey, Lutwack, Panichas, Perloff, Russell) 

ENGL 758. LITERARY CRITICISM (3) 

(Barry, Lutwack) 

ENGL 759. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE AND THE OTHER ARTS 
(3) 

(Myers) 

ENGL 768. STUDIES IN DRAMA (3) 
ENGL 769. STUDIES IN FICTION (3) 
ENGL 778. SEMINAR IN FOLKLORE (3) 



(Barry, Bryer, Freedman) 

(Mish) 

(Fry) 



ENGL 788. STUDIES IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) 
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENGL 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



umcp / 121 



ENGL 819. SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES IN ENGLISH 
LITERATURE (3) 

ENGL 828. SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES IN AMERICAN 
LITERATURE (3) 

ENGL 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ENGINEERING MATERIALS 



Studies in this area of specialization are sponsored jointly 
by the Department ot Chemical Engineering and the Department 
of Mechanical Engineering and lead to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctorof Philosophy. Qualified students holding 
bachelor degrees in engineering, the physical sciences and 
mathematics are admitted either to the Department of Chemical 
Engineering or the Department of Mechanical Engineering. (See 
their departmental program descriptions elsewhere in this 
catalog.) 



ENMA 462. DEFORMATION OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of instructor. Relation- 
ship of structure to the mechanical properties of materials. 
Elastic and plastic deformation, microscopic yield criteria, 
state of stress and ductility. Elements of dislocation theory, 
work hardening, alloy strengthening, creep, and fracture in 
terms of dislocation theory. 

ENMA 463. CHEMICAL, LIQUID AND POWDER PROCESSING 
OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of instructor. Methods 
and processes used in the production of primary metals. The 
detailed basic principles of beneficiation processes, 
pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, vapor 
phase processing and electroplating. Liquid metal processing 
including casting, welding, brazing and soldering. Powder 
processing and sintering. Shapes and structures produced 
in the above processes. 

ENMA 464. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of instructor. Introduction 
to the phenomena associated with the resistance of materials 
to damage under severe environmental conditions. Oxidation, 
corrosion, stress corrosion, corrosion fatigue and radiation 
damage are examined from the point of view of mechanism 
and influence on the properties of materials. Methods of cor- 
rosion protection and criteria for selection of materials for 
use in radiation environments. 

ENMA 470. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
A comprehensive survey of the atomic and electronic struc- 
ture of solids with emphasis on the relationship of structure 
to the physical and mechanical properties. 

ENMA 471. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Equilibrium multicomponent systems and relationship to the 
phase diagram. Thermodynamics of polycrystalline and 
polyphase materials. Diffusion in solids, kinetics of reactions 
in solids. 

ENMA 472. TECHNOLOGY OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Relationship of properties of solids to their engineering appli- 
cations. Criteria for the choice of materials for electronic, 
mechanical and chemical properties. Particular emphasis on 
the relationships between structure of the solid and its poten- 
tial engineering application. 

ENMA 473. PROCESSING OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
The effect of processing on the structure of engineering 
materials. Processes considered include refining, melting and 
solidification, purification by zone refining, vapor phase pro- 
cessing, mechanical working and heat treatments. 



ENMA 650. STRUCTURE OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENMA 470 or equivalent. The structural aspects 
of crystalline and amorphous solids and relationships to 
bonding types. Point and space groups. Summary of diffrac- 
tion theory and practice. The reciprocal lattice. Relationships 
of the microscopically measured properties to crystal sym- 
metry. Structural aspects of defects in crystalline solids. 

ENMA 651. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENMA 650. Description of electronic behavior 
in engineering solids. Behavior of conductors, semiconduc- 
tors and insulators in electrical fields. Thermal, magnetic and 
optional properties of engineering solids. 

ENMA 659. SPECIAL TOPICS IN STRUCTURE OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 660. CHEMICAL PHYSICS OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of 
engineering solids. Cohesion, thermodynamic properties. 
Theory of solid solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, 
electrical, and magnetic phenomena in solids. Chemical ther- 
modynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamic prop- 
erties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Ther- 
modynamics of defects in solids. 

ENMA 661. KINETICS OF REACTIONS IN MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite. ENMA 660. The theory of thermally activated 
processes in solids as applied to diffusion, nucleation and 
interface motion. Cooperative and diffusionless transforma- 
tions. Applications selected from processes such as allotropic 
transformations, precipitation, martensite formation, solid- 
ification, ordering, and corrosion. 

ENMA 669. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE CHEMICAL PHYSICS OF 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 670. RHEOLOGY OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 620 Mechanical behavior with emphasis 
on the continuum point of view and its relationship to struc- 
tural types. Elasticity, viscoelasticity, anelasucity and plastic- 
ity in single phase and multiphase materials. 

ENMA 671. DISLOCATIONS IN CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENMA 650. The nature and interactions of 
defects in crystalline solids, with primary emphasis on dislo- 
cations. The elastic and electric fields associated with disloca- 
tions. Effects of imperfections on mechanical and physical 
properties. 

ENMA 672. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENMA 671. The mechanical properties of single 
crystals, polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Yield 
strength, work hardening, fracture, fatigue and creep are con- 
sidered in terms of fundamental material properties. 

ENMA 679. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR 
OF MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 680. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN MATERIALS 
SCIENCE (3) 
Methods of measuring the structural aspects of materials. 
Optical and electron microscopy. Microscopic analytical 
techniques. Resonance methods. Electrical, optical and 
magnetic measurement techniques. Thermodynamic 
methods. 

ENMA 681. DIFFRACTION TECHNIQUES IN MATERIALS 
SCIENCE (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCH 620. Theory of diffraction of electrons, 
neutrons and x-rays. Strong emphasis on diffraction methods 
as applied to the study of defects in solids. Short range order, 
thermal vibrations, stacking faults, microstrain. 

ENMA 689. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES 
IN MATERIALS SCIENCE (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 



122 / umcp 



ENMA 690. POLYMERIC ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 

Prerequisite. ENMA 650 or consent of Instructor. A com- 
prehensive summary of the fundamentals of particular inter- 
est in the science and applications of polymers. Polymer 
single crystals, transformations in polymers, fabrication of 
polymers as to shape and internal structure. 

ENMA 691. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING MATERIALS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor 

ENMA 697 SEMINAR IN ENGINEERING MATERIALS (1) 

ENMA 698. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENGINEERING MATERIALS 
(1-16) 

ENMA 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENMA 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ENTOMOLOGY 



Professor and Chairman: Bickley 
Professors: Harrison. Jones, Messersmith, Steinhauer 
Associate Professors: Davidson, Menzer 
Assistant Professors: Caron, Reichelderfer 
Lecturers: Heimpel, Spangler 

The Department of Entomology offers both the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees. Graduate students may specialize in physiology, 
morphology, toxicology, biosystematics. medical entomology, 
apiculture, behavior, agricultural or economic entomology, 
ecology, pathology, biological and integrated control, and pest 
management. 

Students applying for graduate work in entomology are 
expected to have strong backgrounds in biological sciences, 
chemistry, and mathematics. Undergraduate preparation in 
entomology is not required. 

The student is given great latitude in selection of advisory 
study committees, choice of major study areas and supporting 
course work, and choice of the research problem area. Compe- 
tence in one foreign language is required for the Ph.D. 

Facilities are maintained for research in all areas of specializa- 
tion offered and, in addition, cooperative programs with other 
departments in Life Sciences and Agriculture are possible. 
Specialized facilities are frequently made available to graduate 
students by many government agencies, such as the National 
Agricultural Research Center and the U.S. National Museum. 

Departmental "Guidelines for Graduate Students'' have been 
prepared and are available from the Department of Entomology, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

ENTM 407. ENTOMOLOGY FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS (4) 
Summer. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. This course will include the elements of 
morphology, taxonomy and biology of insects using examples 
commonly available to high school teachers. It will include 
practice in collecting, preserving rearing and experimenting 
with insects insofar as time will permit. 

ENTM 412. ADVANCED APICULTURE (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two 3-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite. ENTM 111. The theory and prac- 
tice of apiary management. Designed for the student who 
wishes to keep bees or requires a practical knowledge of bee 
management. 

ENTM 421. INSECT TAXONOMY AND BIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200. Introduction to the 
principles of systematic entomology and the study of all 
orders and the important families of insects; immature forms 
considered. 

ENTM 432. INSECT MORPHOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200. A basic study of 
insect form, structure and organization in relation to function. 



ENTM 442. INSECT PHYSIOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, ENTM 200, CHEM 104 or equiv- 
alent. Lectures and laboratory exercises on the cuticle, 
growth, endocrines, muscles, circulation, nerves, digestion, 
excretion and reproduction in insects. 

ENTM 451. ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two 2-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200. The recognition, 
biology and control of insects injurious to fruit and vegetable 
crops, field crops and stored products. 

ENTM 452. INSECTICIDES (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 
The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, 
fumigants and other important chemicals, with reference to 
their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, and host injury. 
Recent research emphasized. 

ENTM 462. INSECT PATHOLOGY (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite, MICB 200, prerequisite or 
corequisite, ENTM 442 or consent of the instructor. An 
introduction to the principal insect pathogens with special 
reference to symptomology, epizootiology, and microbial 
control of insect pests. 

ENTM 472. MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY (4) 
Second semester. Three lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 200 or consent of the 
department. A study of the morphology, taxonomy, biology 
and control of the arthropod parasites and disease vectors 
of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors 
in relation to disease transmission will be emphasized. 

ENTM 498. SEMINAR (1) 

Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of original work, 
reviews and abstracts of literature. 

ENTM 612. INSECT ECOLOGY (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and one 2-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, consent of the department. A 
study of fundamental factors involved in the relationship of 
insects to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect 
as a dynamic organism adjusted to its surroundings. 

ENTM 625. EXPERIMENTAL HONEY BEE BIOLOGY (2) 

First semester. One 3-hour lab a week. Fifteen labs during 
semester will include topics such as communication, nest 
construction and organization, behavior, insect societies and 
bee and wasp biology. 

ENTM 641. ADVANCES IN INSECT PHYSIOLOGY (2) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, ENTM 442 or consent of instructor. Lectures 
on current literature with reading assignments and discus- 
sion. 

ENTM 643. ASPECTS OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. (Alternate years.) 
Prerequisite, one year of biochemistry, or equivalent, or con- 
sent of the instructor. Lectures and group discussions on the 
energy sources of insects, intermediary metabolism, utiliza- 
tion of energy sources, specialized subjects of current 
interest, such as light production, insect pigment formation, 
pheromones, venoms, and chemical defense mechanisms. 

ENTM 653. TOXICOLOGY OF INSECTICIDES (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory 
period a week. (Alternate years, not offered 1973-1974.) 
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. A study of the 
physical, chemical, and biological properties of insecticides. 
Emphasis is placed on the relationship of chemical structures 
to insecticidal activity and mode of action. Mechanisms of 
resistance are also considered. 

ENTM 654. INSECT PEST POPULATION MANAGEMENT (2) 
Second semester, alternate years (offered 1971-1972), 2 lec- 
ture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A 
study of current developments in pest management theory 
and practice, with emphasis on advances in non-pesticide 
methods of insect control. Frequent guest lecturers will 
appear. The course will explore insect pest population sup- 



umcp / 123 



pression through the management of ecological factors, such 
as parasites, predators, microbial agents, resistant hosts, and 
other agents such as hormones, attractants and repellants, 
and integrated systems. 

ENTM 672. CULICIDOLOGY (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one 3-hour laboratory 
period a week. (Alternate years.) The classification, dis- 
tribution, ecology, biology, and control of mosquitoes. 

ENTM 689. ENTOMOLOGICAL TOPICS (1-3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture or one two-hour 
laboratory period a week for each credit hour. Prerequisite, 
consent of department. Lectures, group discussions or 
laboratory sessions on selected topics such as: aquatic 
insects, biological control of insects, entomological literature, 
forest entomology, history of entomology, insect 
biochemistry, insect embryology, immature insects, insect 
behavior, principles of economic entomology, insect com- 
munication, principles of entomological research. 

ENTM 699. ADVANCED ENTOMOLOGY (1-6) 
Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the department. 
First and second semesters. Studies of minor problems in 
morphology, physiology, taxonomy and applied entomology, 
with particular reference to the preparation of the student 
for individual research. 

ENTM 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENTM 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



ENGINEERING, FIRE PROTECTION 



ENFP 411. SYSTEMS APPROACH TO FIRE PROTECTION 
DESIGN (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, senior standing. Examination of the prob- 
lem areas associated with manufacturing, process, labora- 
tory, and transportation systems. Design projects will involve 
the total application of fire protection engineering, with 
economic and cost benefit analysis. 

ENFP 414. LIFE SAFETY ANALYSIS (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, ENFP 321. Detailed examination and 
study of the physical and psychological variables related to 
the occurrence of casualties. Investigation of functional fea- 
tures of enclosures relative to egress, and smoke and gas 
fluid flow. Examination and analysis procedures. 

ENFP 415. FIRE PROTECTION FLUIDS II (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, ENFP 310, 312. The application of hy- 
draulic and fluid theory to design calculations for aqueous, 
gaseous and particle fire suppression systems. Problem cal- 
culation projects based upon design layouts developed in 
ENFP 310. 

ENFP 416. PROBLEM SYNTHESIS AND DESIGN (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, senior standing. Techniques and proce- 
dures of problem orientation and solution design utilizing log- 
ical and numerical procedures. Student development of 
research projects in selected areas. 



FOOD SCIENCE 



Professor and Chairman: Stark (Horticulture) 

Professors: Kramer, Scott, Twigg, and Wiley (Horticulture). 

Davis, Arbuckle, King and Mattick (Dairy Science). Young 

(Animal Science). 
Associate Professors: Bigbee and Thomas (Poultry Science) 



The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are 
offered in the Department of Food Science. This graduate pro- 
gram is interdepartmental, offered under the aegis of the De- 
partments of Horticulture. Dairy Science, Poultry Science and 
Animal Science. The student may pursue work in the chemical, 
physical, bacteriological and nutritional aspects of food prod- 
ucts. 

Students seeking admission should present adequate under- 
graduate preparation in the biological and physical sciences. 
Deficiencies at the lower level in these areas should be cor- 
rected by enrollment as a special undergraduate student. Stu- 
dents are admitted for the doctorate only if it is clear they can 
complete the program successfully. The Graduate Record 
Examination is not required. 

FDSC 412. PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PROCESSING I (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
A study of the basic methods by which foods are preserved 
(unit operations). Effect of raw product quality and the various 
types of processes on yield and quality of the preserved prod- 
ucts. (Wiley) 

FDSC 413. PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PROCESSING II (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A detailed study of 
food processing with emphasis on line and staff operations, 
including physical facilities, utilities, pre- and post-processing 
operations, processing line development and sanitation. 

(Mattick) 

FDSC 421. FOOD CHEMISTRY (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites, CHEM 201 and 202. The application of basic 
chemical and physical concepts to the composition and prop- 
erties of foods. Emphasis will be on the relationship of pro- 
cessing technology to the keeping quality, nutritional value 
and acceptability of foods. (King) 

FDSC 422. FOOD PRODUCT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
(3) 
Second semester. Two lectures, and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite. FDSC 413. CHEM 461, or permission of 
instructor. A study of the research and development function 
for improvement of existing products and development of 
new, economically feasible and marketable food products. 
Application of chemical-physical characteristics of ingre- 
dients to produce optimum quality products, cost reduc- 
tion, consumer evaluation, equipment and package develop- 
ment. (Mattick) 

FDSC 430. FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (4) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one formal laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, MICB 200. Additional independent 
laboratory work required. Time would be equivalent to a sec- 
ond laboratory period per week. Microorganisms of major 
importance to the food industry are studied with emphasis 
on their isolation, identification, bio-processing of foods, and 
public health significance. (Westhoff) 

FDSC 431. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) 
First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, AGRI 401. Statistical methods for acceptance, 
sampling of supplies and raw materials, in plant and finished 
product inspection, water, fuel, and waste control, produc- 
tion, transportation, inventory and budget controls. 

(Kramer) 

FDSC 432. ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites, CHEM 201. 202. Instrumental and sensory 
measurement of food quality attributes including appearance, 
Theological, flavor, and microbiological evaluations, and their 
integration into grades and standards of quality. (Kramer) 

FDSC 442. HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS PROCESSING (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Commercial methods of canning, 
freezing, dehydrating, fermenting, and chemical preservation 
of fruit and vegetable crops. (Wiley) 

FDSC 451. DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one labora- 



124 / umcp 



tory per week. Method of production of fluid milk, butter, 
cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and milk products 
and ice cream. 

FDSC 461. TECHNOLOGY OF MARKET EGGS AND POULTRY 
(3) 
First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory per week. A study of the technological factors concerned 
with the processing, storage, and marketing of eggs and poul- 
try and the factors affecting their quality. (Heath) 

FDSC 471. MEAT AND MEAT PROCESSING (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 461 or permission of 
instructor. Physical and chemical characteristics of meat and 
meat products, meat processing, methods of testing and 
product development. (Sulzbacher) 

FDSC 482. SEAFOOD PRODUCTS PROCESSING (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite. CHEM 461 or permission of 
instructor. The principal preservation methods for commer- 
cial seafood products with particular reference to the inver- 
tebrates. Chemical and microbiological aspects of processing 
are emphasized. 

FDSC 689. SEMINAR IN FOOD SCIENCE (1-3) 
A. Lipids. B. Proteins. C. Carbohydrates. D. Organoleptic 
Properties. E. Fermentation. F. Enzymes and Microorganisms. 
G. Flavor Analysis. I. Assays. Studies in depth of selected 
phases of food science are frequently best arranged by 
employment of a lecturer from outside the University to teach 
a specific phase. Flexibility in the credit offered permits 
adjustment to the nature of the course. 

FDSC 698. COLLOQUIUM IN FOOD SCIENCE (1) 
First and second semester. Oral reports on special topics or 
recently published research in food science and technology. 
Distinguished scientists are invited as guest lecturers. A max- 
imum of three credits allowed for the M.S. 

FDSC 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE (1-4) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, CHEM 461 or per- 
mission of instructor. Credit according to time scheduled and 
magnitude of problem. An experimental program on a topic 
other than the student's thesis problem will be conducted. 
Four credits shall be the maximum allowed toward an 
advanced degree. 

FDSC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

FDSC 811. ADVANCES IN FOOD TECHNOLOGY (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, CHEM 461 or per- 
mission of instructor. A systematic review of new products, 
processes and management practices in the food industry. 

(Kramer) 

FDSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND 
LITERATURE 



Professor and Chairman: MacBain 
Professors: Bingham, Guyon, Rosenfield 
Associate Professors: Demaitre, Fink 

Assistant Professors: Gilbert. Hicks, Lebreton-Savigny, 
Salchenberger, Tarica 

The department prepares students for the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees in French language and literature. Students are encour- 
aged to work in the closest contact with faculty advisors of their 
choice, in order that their programs be the most appropriate 
and most rewarding for their individual needs and interests. 

The composition of the faculty and the variety of course offer- 
ings make it possible for students to specialize in any period 



or movement of French literature, or any aspect of the French 
language with the consent of their advisers. 

Entry into the M.A. program is open to students having a solid 
grounding in French language and literature. All applicants, 
whether graduates of the University of Maryland or not, must 
take all parts of the G.R.E., including the Advanced Examination 
in French. 

Successful completion of the M.A. program, with or without 
thesis, involves passing a Comprehensive Examination in three 
parts: the Graduate Language Proficiency Examination (trans- 
lation into and from French); a six-hour examination in French 
literature from the Middle Ages to the present (a reading knowl- 
edge of Old French will be supposed); and a one hour oral 
examination in French literature from the Middle Ages to the 
present. 

Entry into the Ph.D. program is open to only the most highly 
qualified and most highly motivated candidates who can show 
that individual research is their major interest, and who give 
evidence of strong qualifications to pursue that interest. 

All applicants for the PhD program (except M.A. graduates 
of this department) must pass a similar examination not later 
than three semesters after admission. They will then be required 
to pass five Special Topic examinations within a two-year 
period. 

Complete information concerning the department's require- 
ments are set forth in Guide to Graduate Programs in French, 
available by writing to the Department of French Language and 
Literature. University of Maryland, College Park. Maryland 
20742. 



FRENCH 

FREN 400. APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3) 
The nature of applied linguistics and its contribution to the 
effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative study 
of English and French, with emphasis upon points of diver- 
gence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of related drills. 

(McArthur) 

FREN 401. INTRODUCTION TO STYLISTICS (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN 302, or course chairman's consent. Com- 
parative stylistic analysis; detailed grammatical analysis; 
translation. (Lloyd-Jones) 

FREN 405. EXPLICATION DE TEXTES (3) 

Oral and written analysis of short literary works, or of excerpts 
from longer works chosen for their historical, structural, or 
stylistic interest, with the purpose of training the major to 
understand literature in depth and to make mature esthetic 
evaluations of it. (Fink) 

FREN 411. 412. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 
(3.3) 
French literature from the Ninth through the Fifteenth Cen- 
tury. La Chanson Epique, Le Roman Courtois, Le Lai; La 
Litterature Bourgeoise. Le Theatre. La Pdesie Lyrique. 

(Hicks, Lloyd-Jones) 

FREN 421, 422. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH 
CENTURY (3, 3) 
The Renaissance in France: Humanism. Rabelais, Calvin, the 
Pleiade. Montaigne, Baroque poetry. (Lloyd-Jones. Meijer) 
FREN 431, 432. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH 
CENTURY (3. 3) 
Descartes, Pascal, Corneille. Racine; the remaining great 
classical writers, with special attention to Moliere. 

(MacBain. Rosenfield) 

FREN 441, 442. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY (3, 3) 
Development of philosophical and scientific movement; Mon- 
tesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. (Bingham, Fink) 
FREN 451, 452. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3, 3) 
Drama and poetry from Romanticism to Symbolism; the major 
prose writers of the same period. 

(Gilbert. Lebreton-Savigny) 



umcp / 125 



FREN 461. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE — 
THE EARLY YEARS (3) 
French poetry, theater and the novel during the age of Proust 
and Gide. (Demaitre, Tarlca) 

FREN 462. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE — 
MID-CENTURY WRITERS (3) 
Modern French poetry, theater and the novel, with special 
emphasis on the literature of anxiety and Existentialism. 

(Demaitre, Tarica) 

FREN 463. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE — 
THE CONTEMPORARY SCENE (3) 
French writers and literary movements since about 1950, with 
special emphasis on new forms of the novel and theater. 

(Demaitre, Tarica) 

FREN 478. THEMES AND MOVEMENTS OF FRENCH 
LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) 
Studies treatments of thematic problems or of literary or his- 
torical movements in French literature. Topic to be deter- 
mined each semester. Given in English. 

FREN 479. MASTERWORKS OF FRENCH LITERATURE IN 
TRANSLATION (3) 
Treats the works of one or more major French writers. Topic 
to be determined each semester. Given in English. 

FREN 488. PRO-SEMINAR IN A GREAT LITERARY FIGURE (3) 
Each semester a specialized study will be made of one great 
French writer chosen from some representative literary period 
or movement since the Middle Ages. Repeatable for a max- 
imum of six credits. 

FREN 489. PRO-SEMINAR IN THEMES OR MOVEMENTS OF 
FRENCH LITERATURE (3) 

Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 
FREN 498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE (3) 

Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 499. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH STUDIES (3) 
An aspect of French studies, the specific topic to be 
announced each time the course is offered. Repeatable for 
a maximum of 6 credits. 

FREN 600. PROBLEMS IN BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH 
METHODS (3) 

(Bingham) 

FREN 601. THE HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE (3) 

(MacBain) 

FREN 602. COMPARATIVE ROMANCE LINGUISTICS (3) 
Also listed as SPAN 612. (Mendeloff) 

FREN 603. STYLISTICS (3) 
Advanced composition, translation, stylistic analysis. 

(Tarica) 

FREN 609. SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FRENCH LANGUAGE (3) 

FREN 610. LA CHANSON DE ROLAND (3) 
Close reading of the text, study of epic formulae and early 
medieval literary techniques; reading knowledge of old 
French desirable. (MacBain) 

FREN 619. SPECIAL TOPIC IN MEDIEVAL FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 629. SPECIAL TOPIC IN SIXTEENTH CENTURY FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 630 CORNEILLE (3) 

FREN 631. MOLIERE (3) 

(MacBain, Rosenfield) 

FREN 632. RACINE (3) 

(MacBain) 

FREN 639. SPECIAL TOPIC IN SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 
FRENCH LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 640 VOLTAIRE (3) 

(Bingham) 

FREN 641. ROUSSEAU (3) 

(Fink) 



FREN 642. DIDEROT (3) 

(Bingham) 

FREN 649. SPECIALTOPIC IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 650. FRENCH POETRY IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 

(3) 
FREN 651. FRENCH POETRY IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 

(3) 

FREN 652. THE FRENCH NOVEL IN THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 

(Demaitre) 
FREN 653. THE FRENCH NOVEL IN THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 

(Demaitre) 

FREN 659. SPECIALTOPIC IN NINETEENTH CENTURY FRENCH 
LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 660. FRENCH POETRY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 
(3) 

(Tarica) 

FREN 662. THE FRENCH NOVEL IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 
(3) 

(Demaitre, Tarica) 

FREN 664. THE FRENCH THEATRE IN THE TWENTIETH 
CENTURY (3) 

(Demaitre) 

FREN 663. THE FRENCH NOVEL IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 
(3) 

(Demaitre. Tarica) 

FREN 665. THE FRENCH THEATRE IN THE TWENTIETH 

CENTURY (3) 

(Demaitre) 
FREN 669. SPECIAL TOPIC IN TWENTIETH CENTURY FRENCH 

LITERATURE (3) 

FREN 679. THE HISTORY OF IDEAS IN FRANCE (3) 
Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected in different periods 
and authors of French literature. 

FREN 689. SEMINAR IN A GREAT LITERARY FIGURE (3) 

FREN 699. SEMINAR (3) 
Topic to be determined each semester. 

FREN 701. COLLEGE TEACHING OF FRENCH (3) 
Instruction, demonstration and classroom practice under 
supervision of modern procedures is the presentation of 
elementary French courses to college age students. 

(McArthur) 

FREN 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

FREN 801, 802. INDEPENDENT STUDY (3, 3) 
Designed to permit doctoral candidates to work indepen- 
dently in areas of special interest to them, under the close 
supervision of a professor of their choice. 

FREN 818. FRENCH LITERARY CRITICISM (3) 
Analysis and evaluation of various trends in literary criticism 
as a manifestation of the French literary genius. Topic to be 
determined each semester. 

FREN 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



ITALIAN 

ITAL 410. THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE (3) 
A study of major trends of thought in Renaissance literature, 
philosophy, art, and science. (Salchenberger) 

ITAL 498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) 
Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. 

ITAL 499. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ITALIAN STUDIES (3) 
An aspect of Italian studies, the specific topic to be 
announced each time the course is offered. Repeatable for 
a maximum of 6 credits. 



126 / umcp 



GEOGRAPHY 

Professor and Chairman: Harper 

Professors: Ahnert. Deshler. Fonaroff, Hu 

Associate Professors: Brodsky. Chaves. Thompson 

Assistant Professors: Cirrincione. 1 Dando. Groves. Lewis. 

Mitchell 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The programs for both Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees in the Department of Geography are 
designed to provide the student with well-rounded competence 
in the field as well as opportunity for specialization. 

The department offers three major areas of specialization in 
accordance with staff interests and the unique opportunities 
afforded by the College Park location: Physical Geography, with 
emphasis on physical systems involving the inter-relationship 
between geomorphology. climatology, and other environmental 
elements: Cultural Geography is primarily concerned with the 
impact of culture (largely the technological and social aspects) 
on human spatial and resource relationships both past and pres- 
ent, with emphasis on tropical settlement, historical geography, 
health and disease, and resource use: Metropolitan Areas (their 
function, their interrelations, and their ties to surrounding 
regions) is supported by affiliation with the University s Institute 
for Urban Studies, and by the Washington Center for Metropoli- 
tan Studies with which the University is associated. 

Incoming MA. students are expected to have an under- 
graduate degree in the field or in a closely related field, with 
substantial work in geography. In the latter case, remedial work 
may be required prior to admission to the degree program. 

Because of the degree of specialization inherent in Ph.D. 
training, the department only considers applicants whose inter- 
ests coincide with departmental staff competence — in general, 
the three major areas of geography described above. Prospec- 
tive students who are unsure whether their interests match 
those of the department are encouraged to submit a proposal 
for consideration. 

For admission to the doctoral program, the department nor- 
mally requires a grade-point average higher than 3.0 and an 
M.A. degree from a recognized geography department, or 
competence in terms of fields of study and level of achievement 
comparable to the M.A. degree of the department. 

A non M.A.-direct Ph.D. program is possible by petition from 
the student and upon approval of a faculty committee appointed 
by the department chairman. 

M.A. students have the choice of either thesis or non-thesis 
programs. The non-thesis option involves the preparation of two 
substantial research papers. All M.A. students take an oral 
examination prior to work on the thesis or papers and a final 
oral examination based either on the thesis or one of the two 
research papers. 

After completion of formal coursework requirements there is 
a two-part qualifying examination. Part One is a written exami- 
nation in the student s two major fields of specialization. Part 
Two is an oral examination evaluating the dissertation proposal. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the dissertation there is a final 
oral examination. 

Departmental research facilities include a reference library 
with extensive journal collection, a map collection and a carto- 
graphic laboratory. A remote computer console in the building 
has direct connection with the University's Computer Science 
Center. There is close liaison with the Departments of 
Economics. Business Administration. Government and Politics, 
and with the Bureaus of Business and Economic Research, and 
of Government Research. The National Library of Agriculture 
is within two miles of the College Park campus. 



GEOG 400. GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA (3) 

An examination of the contemporary patterns of American 
and Canadian life from a regional viewpoint. Major topics 
include: the significance of the physical environment, 
resource use. the political framework, economic activities, 
demographic and socio-cultural characteristics, regional 
identification, and regional problems. 



GEOG 402. GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND AND ADJACENT 
AREAS (3) 
An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, 
and population in relation to agriculture, industry, transport, 
and trade in the state of Maryland and adjacent areas. 

GEOG 406. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 
BEFORE 1800(3) 
An analysis of the changing geography of the United States 
and Canada from Pre-Columbian times to the end of the 18th 
Century. Emphasis on areal variations and changes in the 
settlements and economies of Indian and Colonial popula- 
tions. Areal specialization and the changing patterns of 
agriculture, industry, trade, and transportation. Population 
growth, composition and interior expansion. Regionalization. 

GEOG 407. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 
AFTER 1800 (3) 
An analysis of the changing geography of the United States 
and Canada from 1800 to the 1920 s. Emphasis on the settle- 
ment, expansion and socioeconomic development of the 
United States, and comparisons with Canadian experience. 
Immigration, economic activities, industrialization, transpor- 
tation and urbanization. 

GEOG 410. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE (3) 

Agricultural and industrial development of Europe and 
present-day problems in relation to the physical and cultural 
setting of the continent and its natural resources. 

GEOG 411. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE (3) 
An analysis of the changing geography of Europe at selected 
periods from prehistoric times until the end of the 19th Cen- 
tury, with particular emphasis on Western Europe. Changing 
patterns of population, agriculture, industry, trade and trans- 
portation. Development of the nation-state. Impact of over- 
seas expansion. Agricultural and industrial revolutions. 

GEOG 415. ECONOMIC RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT OF 
AFRICA (3) 
The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural and 
mineral production: the various stages of economic develop- 
ment and the potentialities of the future. 

GEOG 420 GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA (3) 

Lands, climates, natural resources, and major economic 
activities in Asia (except Soviet Asia). Outstanding differences 
between major regions. 

GEOG 421. ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
EASTERN ASIA (3) 
Study of China. Korea. Japan, the Philippines: physical geo- 
graphic setting, population, economic and political geogra- 
phy. Potentialities of major regions and recent developments. 

GEOG 422. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF CHINA AND JAPAN 
(3) 
Survey of geographical distribution and interpretation of cul- 
tural patterns of China and Japan. Emphasis on basic cultural 
institutions, outlook on life, unique characteristics of various 
groups, trends of cultural change and contemporary prob- 
lems. 

GEOG 423. ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA (3) 
Study of the Indian subcontinent. Farther India. Indonesia: 
physical geographic setting, population, economic and politi- 
cal geography, potentialities of various countries and regions 
and their role in present Asia. 

GEOG 431. ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
CARIBBEAN AMERICA (3) 
An analysis of the physical framework, broad economic and 
historical trends, cultural patterns, and regional diversifica- 
tion of Mexico. Central America, the West Indies. 

GEOG 432. ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
SOUTH AMERICA (3) 
A survey of natural environment and resources, economic 
development and cultural diversity of the South American 
republics, with emphasis upon problems and prospects of 
the countries. 



umcp / 127 



GEOG 434. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE HISPANIC 
WORLD (3) 
An examination of the social, economic, political and cultural 
geography of the countries of the Iberian Peninsula and Latin 
America in the past with concentration on specific time 
periods of special significance in the development of these 
countries. 

GEOG 435. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SOVIET UNION (3) 
The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geo- 
graphical factors in the expansion of the Russian state. The 
geography of agricultural and industrial production in rela- 
tion to available resources, transportation problems, and 
diversity of population. 

GEOG 437. INTRODUCTION TO REGIONAL METHODS (3) 
Inquiry into the evolution of regional methodology with 
specific reference to geographic problems. Critical analysis 
and evaluation of past and contemporary theories and a 
thorough examination of alternate regional methodologies. 
Application of quantitative and qualitative techniques of 
regional analysis and synthesis to traditional and modern 
regional geography emphasizing principles of region- 
alization. 

GEOG 440. GEOMORPHOLOGY (3) 

Study of major morphological processes, the development 
of land forms and the relationships between various types 
of land forms and land use problems. Examination of the 
physical features of the earth's surface and their geographic 
distributions. 

GEOG 441. REGIONAL GEOMORPHOLOGY (3) 

Regional and comparative morphology with special emphasis 
upon Anglo-America. 

GEOG 445. CLIMATOLOGY (3) 
The geographic aspects of climate with emphasis on energy- 
moisture budgets, steady-state and non-steady-state 
climatology, and climatic variations at both macro- and micro- 
scales. 

GEOG 446. SYSTEMATIC AND REGIONAL CLIMATOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 445, or permission of instructor. 
Methodology and techniques of collecting and evaluating 
climatological information. A critical examination of climatic 
classifications. Distribution of world climates and their geo- 
graphical implications. 

GEOG 450. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Prerequisite. GEOG 201, 202, or consent of instructor. An 
analysis of the impact of man through his ideas and 
technology on the evolution of geographic landscapes. Major 
themes in the relationships between cultures and environ- 
ments. 

GEOG 451. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Geographical factors in national power and international 
relations; an analysis of the role of "geopolitics" and 
"geostrategy," with special reference to the current world 
scene. 

GEOG 452. POPULATION GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 201 or 203, or permission of the 
instructor. An analysis of world population distribution pat- 
terns as revealed by demographic data. Emphasis is placed 
upon a comparison of population density, growth, com- 
position, and migration with natural resources and state of 
technological advancement. Case studies from the geo- 
graphical literature will be used. 

GEOG 455 URBAN GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of elements of site and 
location with reference to cities, the patterns and functions 
of some major world cities will be analyzed. Theories of land 
use differentiation within cities will be appraised. 

GEOG 457. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF CITIES (3) 
The course is concerned with the urbanization of the United 
States and Canada prior to 1920. Both the evolution of the 
urban system across the countries and the spatial distribution 
of activities within cities will be considered. Special attention 
is given to the process of industrialization and the concurrent 
structuring of residential patterns among ethnic groups. 



GEOG 459. PROSEMINAR IN URBAN GEOGRAPHY (3) 
A problems-oriented course for students with a background 
in urban geography using a discussion/lecture format. It will 
focus on a particular sub-field within urban geography each 
'time it is taught, taking advantage of the special interests 
of the instructor. 

GEOG 460. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 
I— AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES (3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 201 or 203. The nature of agricultural 
resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in the 
world and the geographic conditions. Main problems of con- 
servation. 

GEOG 461. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY II— MINERAL 
RESOURCES (3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 201 or 203. The nature and geographic 
distribution of the principal power, metallic and other 
minerals. Economic geographic aspects of modes of 
exploitation. Consequences of geographic distribution and 
problems of conservation. 

GEOG 462. WATER RESOURCES AND WATER RESOURCE 
PLANNING (3) 
GEOG 201 or 203, or permission of instructor. Water as a 
component of the human environment. A systematic examina- 
tion of various aspects of water, including problems of 
domestic and industrial water supply, irrigation, hydroelectric 
power, fisheries, navigation, flood damage reduction and 
recreation. 

GEOG 463. GEOGRAPHIC ASPECTS OF POLLUTION (3) 
The impact of man on his environment and resultant prob- 
lems. Examination of the spatial aspects of physical and 
socio-economic factors in air, water, and land pollution. 

GEOG 465. GEOGRAPHY OF TRANSPORTATION (3) 
The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface, 
patterns of transport routes, the adjustment of transport 
routes and media to conditions of the natural environment, 
population centers and their distribution. 

GEOG 466. INDUSTRIAL LOCALIZATION (3) 

Factors and trends in the geographic distribution of the man- 
ufacturing industries of the world, analyzed with reference 
to theories of industrial location. 

GEOG 470. HISTORY AND THEORY OF CARTOGRAPHY (3) 
The development of maps throughout history. Geographical 
orientation, coordinates and map scales. Map projections, 
their nature, use and limitations. Principles of representation 
of features on physical and cultural maps. Modern uses of 
maps and relationships between characteristics of maps and 
use types. 

GEOG 471. CARTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS PRACTICUM (3) 

GEOG 472. PROBLEMS OF CARTOGRAPHIC REPRESENTA- 
TION AND PROCEDURE (3) 
Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study 
of cartographic compilation methods. Principles and prob- 
lems of symbolization, classification and representation of 
map data. Problems of representation of features at different 
scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and 
lettering, stick-up and map composition. 

GEOG 473. PROBLEMS OF MAP EVALUATION (3) 
Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Schools 
of topographic concepts and practices. Theoretical and prac- 
tical means of determining map reliability, map utility, and 
source materials. Nature, status and problems of topographic 
mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic spe- 
cial use maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned 
and of reliability. 

GEOG 490. GEOGRAPHIC CONCEPTS AND SOURCE 
MATERIALS (3) 
A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic con- 
cepts designed exclusively for teachers. Stress will be placed 
upon the philosophy of geography in relation to the social 
and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools of geog- 
raphy, source materials, and the problems of presenting 
geographic principles. 



128 / umcp 



GEOG 498. TOPICAL INVESTIGATIONS (1-3) 

Independent study under individual guidance. Restricted to 
advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 
hours in Geography and to graduate students. Any exception 
should have the approval of the head of the department. 

GEOG 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (3) 

Directed regional or systematic study involving several sub- 
fields of geography, including cartographic presentation, and 
usually requiring field work, and leading to an undergraduate 
thesis. 

GEOG 600. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN 
GEOGRAPHY (3) 
Introduces the student both to research procedures needed 
in graduate work and to current trends and developments 
in geographic research. Lectures by various staff members 
form basis for discussion. Research paper required. 

GEOG 601. FIELD COURSE (3) 

GEOG 605. QUANTITATIVE SPATIAL ANALYSIS (3) 
This course will provide students with a working knowledge 
of various tools of multivariate analysis in the context of scien- 
tific geographic methodology rather than from the statistical 
theory viewpoint. Emphasis is on the application of statistical 
tools and a working knowledge of them will be a basis for 
evaluation of professional literature in the various fields of 
geography using quantitative techniques. Students should 
gain a background suitable for using the techniques in 
research. 

GEOG 610. SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHIC METHODOLOGY (3) 
The seminar will emphasize an intensive survey of the basic 
concepts of geography, a critical evaluation of major 
approaches to the study of geography, and a detailed analysis 
of the principal methodological problems both theoretical 
and practical confronting geography today. 

GEOG 615. GEOMORPHOLOGY (3) 

GEOG 618. SEMINAR IN GEOMORPHOLOGY (3) 

Study and discussion of empirical and theoretical research 
methods applied to geomorphological problems including 
review of pertinent literature. 

GEOG 625. ADVANCED GENERAL CLIMATOLOGY (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, GEOG 260 or consent of 
instructor. Advanced study of elements and controls of the 
earth's climates. Principles of climatic classification. Special 
analysis of certain climatic types. 

GEOG 626. APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Study 
of principles, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, 
physical and regional climatology relating to such problems 
and fields as transportation, agriculture, industry, urban plan- 
ning, human comfort, and regional geographic analysis. 

GEOG 628. SEMINAR IN METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY 
(3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Selected topics in meteorology and climatology 
chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced students. 

GEOG 629. SEMINAR IN METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY 
II (3) 
See GEOG 628 for description. 

GEOG 638, 639. SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of themes 
and problems in the field of physical geography. 

GEOG 648, 649. SEMINAR IN CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 450 or consent of instructor. An examina- 
tion of themes and problems in the field of economic geog- 
raphy. 

GEOG 658. SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 
An examination of themes and problems in historical geog- 
raphy with reference to selected areas. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

GEOG 668, 669. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of themes 
and problems in the field of economic geography. 



GEOG 678. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Beginning with a review of contemporary advanced theory, 
the seminar will turn to problems such as the spatial conse- 
quences of political behavior, the political system and the 
organization of space including perceived space, the organi- 
zation of political space. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
semester hours. 

GEOG 679. SEMINAR IN URBAN GEOGRAPHY (3) 

Flexible in format to allow adaptation to particular topic being 
considered, this seminar is for advanced students in the 
department's metropolitan areas specialty. Students normally 
will have had the Seminar in Economic Geography. Possible 
topics include: metropolitan systems, the impact of migrants 
and immigrants on the internal structure of the city, the 
development of black ghettos, the use of particular 
techniques in urban geographical research. 

GEOG 698. SEMINAR IN CARTOGRAPHY (1-16) 

GEOG 718, 719. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE 
AND AFRICA (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite. GEOG 410, 415 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis of special problems concern- 
ing the resources and development of Europe and Africa. 

GEOG 738, 739. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF EAST ASIA 
(3,3) 
First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning 
the geography of East Asia with emphasis on special research 
methods and techniques applicable to the problems of this 
area. 

GEOG 748, 749. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN 
AMERICA (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, GEOG 431, 432 or 
consent of instructor. An analysis of recent changes and 
trends in industrial development, exploitation of mineral 
resources and land utilization. 

GEOG 758, 759. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE 
U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, reading knowledge 
of Russian and GEOG 435 or consent of instructor. Investiga- 
tion of special aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis on the 
use of Soviet materials. 

GEOG 768 SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE NEAR EAST 
(3) 

GEOG 788. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and discussion on 
selected topics in the field of geography. To be taken only 
with joint consent of advisor and head of the Department of 
Geography. 

GEOG 789. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY (1-3) 

GEOG 798. READINGS (1-3) 

Individual reading as arranged between a graduate faculty 
member and student. Repeatable to a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours. 

GEOG 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

GEOG 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



GERMANIC AND SLAVIC LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURE 

Professor and Chairman: Hering 
Professors: Best, Dobert, Jones 
Assistant Professors: Elder, Fleck, Irwin, Knoche 

The department offers programs in the study of Germanic lan- 
guages, culture and literature leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees. Specialization is provided in the following areas: Ger- 
manic philology, medieval literature and culture, and modern 
and continental literature. 



umcp / 129 



Admission requirements include a bachelor's degree with an 
undergraduate major in German or equivalent, and fluency in 
the written and spoken language. 

Degree requirements for the M.A. (thesis option) are 24 hours 
of coursework, a thesis, and a written comprehensive 
examination. The M.A (non-thesis) requires 30 hours of course- 
work and a written comprehensive examination. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. include proficiency in one foreign 
language (French. Latin or a language required for the can- 
didate s work), philology or applied linguistics coursework, and 
written comprehensives, dissertation, and oral defense of thesis. 

A departmental library of reference works and literary sources 
is available, and the Library of Congress and The Johns Hopkins 
University are within easy reach. 



GERMAN 

GERM 400. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS (3) 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. 

GERM 401. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) 
Translation from English into German, free composition, let- 
ter writing. 

GERM 402. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) 

Translation from English into German, free composition, let- 
ter writing. 

GERM 421. 422. GERMAN CIVILIZATION (IN GERMAN) (3, 3) 
Study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions: great 
men, customs and general culture. 

GERM 423, 424. GERMAN CIVILIZATION (IN ENGLISH) (3, 3) 
To be offered every second year, alternating with GERM 421. 
422. German civilization (in German). 

GERM 441, 442. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY (3, 3) 
The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, 
Goethe. Schiller. 

GERM 451. 452. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3. 3) 
Study of the literary movements from Romanticism to 
Naturalism. 

GERM 461. 462. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH 
CENTURY (3. 3) 
Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to the 
present. Modern literary and philosophical movements will 
be discussed. 

GERM 468. 469. PROSEMINAR— SELECTED TOPICS IN 
GERMAN LITERATURE (3, 3) 
Specialized study of one great German writer or of relevant 
topics of literary criticism. 

GERM 471. 472. INTRODUCTION TO GERMANIC PHILOLOGY 
(3.3) 
An introduction to the study of Indo-European and Germanic 
philology. Lectures, reading and independent studies. 

GERM 481 GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) 
The development of German literary thought and literary 
movements in the European context from the Enlightenment 
through Classicism and Romanticism to the end of the 19th 
Century. Emphasis on the drama and novel in English trans- 
lation. No previous German course required. May not be 
counted in fulfillment of German major requirements. 

GERM 482 GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) 

The drama and novel from the end of the 19th Century to 
the present in English translation. No previous German 
course required. May not be counted in fulfillment of German 
major requirements. 

GERM 499. DIRECTED STUDY IN GERMAN (1-3) 

For advanced students, by permission of department 
chairman. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs 
May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. 

GERM 600. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN STUDIES (3) 



GERM 601. HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (3) 

Covers the generic relationship of the Germanic languages, 
chronological periods of German, German dialects, syntax 
(e.g., periphrastic tenses, case usage, word order), influences 
on the language (e.g., early ecclesiastical, courtly style, mys- 
tical, French, official style, Nazi period), purification process, 
stylistic periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc.), special 
developments (e.g., professional terminology, slang). 

GERM 603. GOTHIC (3) 
An introduction to historical Germanic linguistics. A gram- 
matical analysis and reading of selections from the Gothic 
Bible. 

GERM 604. OLD HIGH GERMAN (3) 

A study of old high German grammar, and readings from the 
literature of the period. 

GERM 605, 606 MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN (3, 3) 

Grammar and readings in middle high German literature. 

GERM 711, 712. LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH AND 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES (3, 3) 
Study of the Reformation, Humanism and the Baroque. The 
main works of Luther, Sachs, Wickram, Fischart, Opitz, 
Gryphius, Grimmelshausen. 

GERM 745, 746. GOETHE AND HIS TIME (3,3) 
The main works of Goethe and his contemporaries as reflect- 
ing the literary development from Rococo to Biedermeier. 

GERM 747. SCHILLER (3) 

Study of Schiller's works with emphasis on his dramas. 

GERM 751. GERMAN ROMANTICISM (3) 

GERM 754. THE GERMAN DRAMA OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 
Kleist, Grabbe, Buchner, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann. 

GERM 760. THE GERMAN LYRIC (3) 
Types of lyrical poetry from "Minnesang" to symbolism with 
emphasis on post-Goethean lyricists. 

GERM 765. THE GERMAN NOVEL (3) 

GERM 766. THE GERMAN NOVEL (3) 

GERM 767. SEMINAR IN THE GERMAN NOVELLE (3) 

GERM 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

GERM 818. READING COURSE (3) 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a sur- 
vey of German literature. Extensive outside readings, with 
reports and periodic conferences. 

GERM 819. READING COURSE (3) 

Designed to give the graduate student a background of a sur- 
vey of German literature. Extensive outside readings, with 
reports and periodic conferences. 

GERM 828. SEMINAR (3) 
Topic to be determined. 

GERM 829. SEMINAR (3) 

Topic to be determined. 
GERM 838. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3) 

Topic to be determined. 

GERM 839. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3) 
Topic to be determined. 

GERM 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 

RUSSIAN 

RUSS 401. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) 
RUSS 402. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) 
RUSS 441. RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 

RUSS 451. RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 

RUSS 452. RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY (3) 



130 / umcp 




2memkti<- ■•- 



umcp / 131 




132 / umcp 



RUSS461. SOVIET RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3) 

RUSS 462. SOVIET RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3) 

RUSS 465. MODERN RUSSIAN POETRY (3) 

RUSS 466. MODERN RUSSIAN DRAMA (3) 

RUSS 467. MODERN RUSSIAN FICTION (3) 

RUSS 470. APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3) 
The nature of applied linguistics and its contributions to the 
effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative study 
of English and Russian, with emphasis upon points of diver- 
gence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of related drills. 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professor and Chairman: Piper 

Professors: Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, Harrison, Hathorn, 
Hsueh, Jacobs, McNelly, Murphy, Plischke 

Associate Professors: Claude, Conway, Devine, Glendening, 
Koury, Ranald, Reeves, Stone, Terchek, Wilkenfeld, Wolfe 

Assistant Professors: Bechtold, Butterworth, Chaples, Glass, 
Heisler, Ingles, Lanning, Levine, McCarrick, McGregor, Mel- 
nick, Oliver, Strouse, Werlin 

Lecturer: Barber 



The Department of Government and Politics offers programs 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Applicants whose goal is the doctorate will receive 
preference. 

Master's degree candidates may select a thesis (30 semester 
credit hours) or a non-thesis option (36 credit hours), both of 
which require a comprehensive examination in two fields of 
political science. 

The doctoral program is designed for completion within five 
years and includes seminars, directed research, and oppor- 
tunities to gain teaching experience. 

In consultation with an adviser each student will prepare, dur- 
ing his first semester, a plan of study to include nine hours 
of political theory and a designation of research tools, which 
require a demonstration of competence in the use of foreign 
languages, quantitative research techniques, or a combination 
of both. 

Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 54 hours of 
course work and may take a concentration in one of the follow- 
ing; American politics, international relations and comparative 
politics, historical and empirical political theory, or public 
administration and urban affairs. 

The comprehensive examination encompasses three fields 
and an oral presentation of the dissertation prospectus. An inter- 
disciplinary curriculum may be presented as one of the fields. 
The examinations are normally taken after twelve seminars, 
thereby permitting the student to specialize in terms of a disser- 
tation topic during his final semester. 



GVPT 401. PROBLEMS OF WORLD POLITICS (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 170. A study of governmental problems 
of international scope, such as causes of war, problems of 
neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to report 
on readings from current literature. 

GVPT 402. INTERNATIONAL LAW (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the basic character, 
general principles and specific rules of international law, with 
emphasis on recent and contemporary trends in the field and 
its relation to other aspects of international affairs. 

GVPT 403. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the objectives, structure, 
functions, and procedures of international organizations, 
including the United Nations and such functional and regional 
organizations as the Organization of American States. 



GVPT 410. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of public administration in 
the United States giving special attention to the principles 
of organization and management and to fiscal, personnel, 
planning, and public relations practices. 

GVPT 411. PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 410 or BSAD 360. A survey of public per- 
sonnel administration, including the development of merit 
civil service, the personnel agency, classification, recruit- 
ment, examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, 
training, discipline, employee relations, and retirement. 

GVPT 412. PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 410 or ECON 450. A survey of governmen- 
tal financial procedures, including processes of current and 
capital budgeting, the administration of public borrowing, the 
techniques of public purchasing, and the machinery of con- 
trol through pre-audit and post-audit. 

GVPT 413. GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION AND 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 410. A study of the theories of organiza- 
tion and management in American government with emphasis 
on new trends, experiments and reorganizations. 

GVPT 414. ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 170. A study of the discretion exercised 
by administrative agencies, including analysis of their func- 
tions, their powers over persons and property, their proce- 
dures, and judicial sanctions and controls. 

GVPT 417. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 410, or consent of instructor. An 
introduction to the study of governmental administrative sys- 
tems viewed from the standpoint of comparative typologies 
and theoretical schemes useful in cross-national compari- 
sons and empirical studies of the politics of the administrative 
process in several nations. Both Western and Non-Western 
countries are included. 

GVPT 422. QUANTITATIVE POLITICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 220, or consent of instructor. Introduction 
to quantitative methods of data analysis, including selected 
statistical methods, block analysis, content analysis, and 
scale construction. 

GVPT 426. PUBLIC OPINION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examination of public opinion and 
its effect on political action, with emphasis on opinion forma- 
tion and measurement, propaganda and pressure groups. 

GVPT 427. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 220, or consent of instructor. A study of 
the societal aspects of political life including selected aspects 
of the sociology of group formation and group dynamics, 
political association, community integration and political 
behavior presented in the context of the societal environ- 
ments of political systems. 

GVPT 429. PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL BEHAVIOR (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The problem approach to political 
behavior with emphasis on theoretical and empirical studies 
on selected aspects of the political process. 

GVPT 431. INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A systematic inquiry into the general 
principles of the American constitutional system, with special 
reference to the role of the judiciary in the interpretation and 
enforcement of the Federal Constitution. 

GVPT 432. CIVIL RIGHTS AND THE CONSTITUTION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 431. A study of civil rights in the American 
constitutional context, emphasizing freedom of religion, free- 
dom of expression, minority discrimination, and the rights 
of defendants. 

GVPT 433. THE JUDICIAL PROCESS (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 170. An examination of judicial organiza- 
tion in the United States at all levels of government, with some 
emphasis on legal reasoning, legal research and court proce- 
dures. 



umcp / 133 



GVPT 434. RACE RELATIONS AND PUBLIC LAW (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A political and legal examination of 
the constitutionally protected rights affecting racial minorities 
and of the constitutional power of the Federal Courts, 
Congress, and the Executive to define, protect and extend 
these rights. 

GVPT 435. JUDICIAL BEHAVIOR (3) 
A study of judicial decision making at the state and national 
levels, drawing primarily on the more recent quantitative and 
behavioral literature. 

GVPT 441. HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEORY— ANCIENT AND 
MEDIEVAL (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of the principal political 
theories set forth in the works of writers before Machiavelli. 

GVPT 442. HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEORY— MODERN AND 
RECENT (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of the principal political 
theories set forth in the works of writers from Machiavelli 
to J. S. Mill. 

GVPT 443. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 441 or 442. A survey of the principal politi- 
cal theories and ideologies from Karl Marx to the present. 

GVPT 444. AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the development and 
growth of American political concepts from the Colonial 
Period to the present. 

GVPT 445. RUSSIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey and analysis of political 
ideas in Russia and the Soviet Union from early times to the 
present. 

GVPT 448. NON-WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (3) 

Political thought originating in Asia, the Middle East, and 
Africa. This is not a survey of all non-Western political 
thought, but a course to be limited by the professor with each 
offering. When repeated by a student, consent of instructor 
is required. 

GVPT 450. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FOREIGN POLICY FOR- 
MATION (3) 
Prerequisite. GVPT 280 or 300. or consent of instructor. An 
introduction to the comparative study of foreign policy forma- 
tion structures and processes followed by a survey of the 
domestic sources of policy for major states. A conspectus 
of substantive patterns of foreign policy in analytically salient 
types of systems is presented. Domestic and global systemic 
sources of foreign policy are compared. 

GVPT 451. FOREIGN POLICY OF THE U.S.S.R. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the development of the 
foreign policy of the Soviet Union, with attention paid to the 
forces and conditions that make for continuities and changes 
from Tsarist policies. 

GVPT 452. INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An analytical and historical study of 
the Latin-American policies of the United States and of prob- 
lems in our relations with individual countries, with emphasis 
on recent developments. 

GVPT 453. RECENT EAST ASIAN POLITICS (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The background and interpretation 
of recent political events in East Asia and their influence on 
world politics. 

GVPT 454. CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN POLITICS (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of contemporary develop- 
ment in the international politics of Afiica, with special 
emphasis on the role of an emerging Africa in world affairs. 

GVPT 455. CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EASTERN POLITICS (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170 A survey of contemporary develop- 
ment in the international politics of the Middle East, with spe- 
cial emphasis on the role of emerging Middle East nations 
in world affairs. 

GVPT 457. AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 170. The principles and machinery of the 
conduct of American foreign relations, with emphasis on the 



Department of State and the Foreign Service, and an analysis 
of the major foreign policies of the United States. 

GVPT 460, STATE AND LOCAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the administrative struc- 
ture, procedures and policies of state and local governments 
with special emphasis on the state level and on intergovern- 
mental relationships, and with illustrations from Maryland 
governmental arrangements. 

GVPT 461. METROPOLITAN ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examination of administrative 
problems relating to public services, planning and coordina- 
tion in a metropolitan environment. 

GVPT 462. URBAN POLITICS (3) 

Urban political process and institutions considered in the 
light of changing social and economic conditions. 

GVPT 473. LEGISLATURES AND LEGISLATION (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comprehensive study of legislative 
organization procedure and problems. The course includes 
opportunities for student contact with Congress and with the 
Legislature of Maryland. 

GVPT 474. POLITICAL PARTIES (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A descriptive and analytical examina- 
tion of American political parties, nominations, elections, and 
political leadership. 

GVPT 475. THE PRESIDENCY AND THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
(3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examination of the executive, 
legislative and party roles of the president in the political 
process. 

GVPT 479. PROBLEMS OF AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The background and interpretation 
of various factors which affect the formation and execution 
of American public policy. 

GVPT 480. COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 280 and at least one other course in com- 
parative government. A study, along functional lines, of major 
political institutions, such as legislatures, executives, courts, 
bureaucracies, public organizations, and political parties. 

GVPT 481. GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
SOVIET UNION (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the adoption of the Com- 
munist philosophy by the Soviet Union, of its governmental 
structure and of the administration of government policy in 
the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 482. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA 
(3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the Latin Ameri- 
can countries, with special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico. 

GVPT 483. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF ASIA (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 453, or HIST 261, or 262 or HIFN 
442, or 445. A comparative study of the political systems of 
China, Japan, India and other selected Asian countries. 

GVPT 484. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF AFRICA (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the African 
countries, with special emphasis on the problems of nation- 
building in emergent countries. 

GVPT 485. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE 
EAST (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the Middle East- 
ern countries, with special emphasis on the problems of 
nation-building in emergent countries. 

GVPT 486 COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN EUROPEAN POLITICS 
(3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 280, or consent of instructor. A compara- 
tive study of political processes and governmental forms in 
selected European countries. 



134 / umcp 



GVPT 487. THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA 
(3) 
Political systems and governments of such countries as India. 
Pakistan. Bangla Desh. Ceylon, and Nepal. 

GVPT 492 THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF RACE 
RELATIONS (3) 
Impact of government and politics on race relations in various 
parts of the world. The origins, problems, and manifestations 
of such racial policies as segregation, apartheid, integration, 
assimilation, partnership, and nonracialism will be analyzed. 

GVPT 700. SCOPE AND METHOD OF POLITICAL SCIENCE (3) 
Required of all Ph.D. candidates. A seminar in the 
methodologies of political science, and their respective appli- 
cations to different research fields. Interdisciplinary 
approaches and bibliographical techniques are also 
reviewed. 

GVPT 702. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY 
(3) 
An examination of the major approaches, concepts, and 
theories in the study of world politics with special emphasis 
on contemporary literature. 

GVPT 780. SEMINAR IN THE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF 
POLITICS (3) 
An examination of the salient approaches to and conceptual 
frameworks for the comparative study of politics, followed 
by the construction of models and typologies of political sys- 
tems. 

GVPT 799. MASTER S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

GVPT 802 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL LAW (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and 
reading in substantive and procedural international law. 

GVPT 803. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL 
ORGANIZATION (3) 
A study of the forms and functions of various international 
organizations. 

GVPT 805. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (3) 
An analysis of the administrative aspects of international 
organizations with some attention given to program adminis- 
tration. 

GVPT 807. FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— COMPARATIVE SYSTEMS (3) 
A survey from Kautilya to Kaplan of the literature in IR Theory 
with an emphasis on comparative historical systems. 

GVPT 808. SELECTED TOPICS IN FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS IN 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3) 
An examination of the major substantive issues in contempo- 
rary international relations. 

GVPT 810. GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION THEORY (3) 
A study of recent developments in the area of organizational 
theory with an emphasis on empirical studies of organiza- 
tional behavior. 

GVPT 811. RESPONSIBILITY IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Reports and readings relating to the study of efficiency and 
responsiveness in public administration including the ways 
of achieving moral, legal, political and functional respon- 
sibility. 

GVPT 812. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 
(3) 
Readings and reports on topics assigned for individual or 
group study in the field of public financial administration. 

GVPT 813. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the field of public personnel administration. 

GVPT 814. DEVELOPMENTAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Reports, readings and or field surveys on topics assigned for 
individual or group study in international, national, regional 
or local environments. 



GVPT 815. GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATIVE PLANNING AND 
MANAGEMENT (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in administrative planning and management in government 

GVPT 816. STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL 
ADMINISTRATION (3) 
An examination of theoretical concepts and empirical find- 
ings in the field of comparative administration. Individual 
readings and research dealing with the civil services of West- 
ern and Non-Western nations will be assigned. 

GVPT 818. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the field of public administration. 

GVPT 822. PROBLEMS IN QUANTITATIVE POLITICAL 
ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, three hours of statistics or consent of instructor. 
Study of selected problems in quantitative political analysis. 

GVPT 826. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC OPINION (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 

in the field of public opinion. 
GVPT 828. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL BEHAVIOR 
(3) 

Individual reading and research reports on selected problems 

in the study of political behavior. 

GVPT 830. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC LAW (3) 

Reports on topics for individual study and reading in the fields 
of constitutional and administrative law. 

GVPT 840. ANALYTICAL SYSTEMS AND THEORY 
CONSTRUCTION (3) 
Prerequisite. GVPT 700. Examination of the general theoreti- 
cal tools available to political scientists and of the problems 
of theory building. Attention is given to communications 
theory, decision-making, game theory and other mathemati- 
cal concepts, personality theory, role theory, structural- 
functional analysis, and current behavioral approaches. 

GVPT 841. GREAT POLITICAL THINKERS (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 441. Intensive study of one or more men 
each semester. 

GVPT 842. MAN AND THE STATE (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 442. Individual reading and reports on 
such recurring concepts in political theory as liberty, equality, 
justice, natural law and natural rights, private property. 
sovereignty, nationalism and the organic state. 

GVPT 844. AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 444. Analytical and historical examination 
of selected topics in American political thought. 

GVPT 845. MARXIST POLITICAL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 443 or consent of instructor. Intensive 
study and analysis of the leading ideas of Marx and Engels 
and their development in the different forms of Social Democ- 
racy and of Communism. 

GVPT 846. THEORIES OF DEMOCRACY (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 442. A survey and analysis of the leading 
theories of democratic government, with attention to such 
topics as freedom, equality, representation, dissent, and crit- 
ics of democracy. 

GVPT 847. SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN POLITICAL THEORY 
(3) 
Intensive study of selected segments of political theory out- 
side of the Western European tradition. 

GVPT 848. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL THEORY (3) 
Prerequisite. GVPT 443. Intensive examination of the develop- 
ment of political theory since the Second World War. 

GVPT 851 AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— SOVIET UNION (3) 
An examination of problems in the relations of states involv- 
ing the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 852. AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— LATIN AMERICA (3) 
An examination of problems in the relations of states within 
Latin America. 



umcp / 135 



GVPT 853. AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— ASIA (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within 

Asia. 
GVPT 854. AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— AFRICA (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within 

Africa. 
GVPT 855 AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— MIDDLE EAST (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within 

the Middle East. 
GVPT 856. AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS— EUROPE (3) 

An examination of problems in the relations of states within 

Europe. 
GVPT 857. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and 

reading in American foreign policy and the conduct of Ameri- 
can foreign relations. 

GVPT 858. SELECTED TOPICS IN AREA PROBLEMS IN 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3) 
Special topics concerning regional problems in the relations 
of states. 
GVPT 862. SEMINAR ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS 
(3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the field of recent intergovernmental relations. 

GVPT 868. PROBLEMS OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
(3) 
Report of topics assigned for individual study in the field of 
state and local government throughout the United States. 

GVPT 869. SEMINAR IN URBAN ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Selected topics are examined by the team research method 
with students responsible for planning, field investigation, 
and report writing. 

GVPT 870. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 
(3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the background and development of American govern- 
ment. 

GVPT 873. SEMINAR IN LEGISLATURES AND LEGISLATION (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
about the composition and organization of legislatures and 
about the legislative process. 

GVPT 874. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL PARTIES AND POLITICS (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the fields of political organization and action. 

GVPT 876 SEMINAR IN NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY (3) 
An examination of the components of United States security 
policy. Factors, both internal and external, affecting national 
security will be considered. Individual reporting as assigned. 

GVPT 878. PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND 
POLITICS (3) 
An examination of contemporary problems in various fields 
of government and politics in the United States, with reports 
on topics assigned for individual study. 

GVPT 881. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—SOVIET UNION (3) 
An examination of government and politics in the Soviet 
Union 

GVPT 882. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—LATIN AMERICA (3) 
An examination of governments and politics within Latin 
America. 

GVPT 883. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—ASIA (3) 
An examination of governments and politics within Asia. 

GVPT 884. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—AFRICA (3) 
An examination of governments and politics within Africa. 



GVPT 885. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—MIDDLE EAST (3) 
An examination of governments and politics within the Middle 
East. 
GVPT 886. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL INSTITU- 
TIONS—EUROPE (3) 
An examination of governments and politics within Europe. 

GVPT 887. SEMINAR IN THE POLITICS OF DEVELOPING 
NATIONS (3) 
An examination of the programs of political development in 
the emerging nations with special references to the newly 
independent nations of Asia and Africa, and the less 
developed countries of Latin America. Individual reporting as 
assigned. 

GVPT 888. SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE 
GOVERNMENTAL INSTITUTIONS (3) 
An examination of special topics in comparative politics. 

GVPT 898. READINGS IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (3) 
Guided readings and discussions on selected topics in politi- 
cal science. 

GVPT 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



HISTORY 

Professor and Chairman: Rundell 

Professors: Brush, 1 Callcott, Carter, Cole, Foust, Gilbert, 

Gordon, Haber, Harlan, Jashemski, Kent, Merrill, Prange, 

Schuessler, Smith, Sparks 
Associate Professors: Belz, Berry, Breslow, Cockburn, Farrell, 2 

Folson, Giffin, Greenberg, Grimsted, Mayo, Olson, Stowasser, 

Warren, Yaney 
Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Brann, Flack, Harris, Hoffman, 

Kaufman, Matossian, McCusker, Nicklason, Perinbam, Robert- 
son, Shoufani, Van Ness, Williams, Wright 

1 joint appointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

2 joint appointment with Secondary Education 



The Master of Arts degree serves both as a firm grounding 
in a field of history for teaching purposes and as preparation 
for the expeditious pursuit of the doctorate. The student may 
specialize in one of the following fields or may petition the 
Graduate Committee to define a different one: U.S., Ancient, 
Medieval and Early Modern Europe, Modern Europe, British and 
British Empire, Russian and Soviet. East Asian, Middle Eastern, 
African, Latin American, or Science and Technology. There are 
no special admissions requirements for the History Department; 
it should be noted that an undergraduate major in history is 
not as such required for admission. Of the thirty credit hours 
required for the degree, six are in M.A. thesis research courses 
(HIST 799), fifteen are normally in the major field of history and 
nine in a minor (which may be taken within or outside of the 
department). The historiography course (HIST 600) is required 
and may be used as part of the major or minor. Fifteen credit 
hours at the level of 600 or above are required in addition to 
the thesis research courses. 

A written examination, which is based in large part on a list 
of books pertaining to the thesis and its field submitted by the 
student and approved by the advisory committee, is required 
upon completion of the coursework. There will also be a final 
oral examination which will be confined to the thesis and the 
field in which it lies. 

Admission to the doctoral program will be decided by the 
student s M.A. examining committee on the basis of the stu- 
dent's written and oral examinations, thesis, and record of 
achievement in coursework. 

The Ph.D. is the most advanced degree offered by the depart- 
ment and will be awarded only for demonstrated excellence on 
the part of the student as revealed in the written and oral exami- 
nations and in the dissertation research and writing. The depart- 



136 / umcp 



ment has approved the following fields of general study: African. 
Ancient. British. Early Modern European. East Asian. Latin 
American, Medieval. Modern Diplomatic, Modern European. 
Near Eastern. Russian. Science and Technology, and United 
States 

The M.A. degree in history is normally required for admission 
to the doctoral program, but it does not guarantee admission 
Students with M.A. degrees awarded at other institutions will 
be asked to submit substantial evidence of their written work 
and will normally be expected to have completed the equivalent 
of the work required of Maryland M.A. students. Every student 
will stand for a written examination on his major field normally 
taken within eighteen months of entry into the doctoral pro- 
gram: thisexamination will testa broad, intelligent, and informed 
handling of the major historical problems and literature of that 
field. A secondary or minor field of study, supportive of the 
major, is required of all doctoral students. It may be taken within 
or outside of the department and may be fulfilled by either a 
certain combination of courses, the regular general written 
examination in the appropriate field of study, or the major field 
of a Master's degree in a field other than the student's major 
doctoral field. 

A special field examination orally administered will examine 
the student s dissertation prospectus and a bibliography on the 
dissertation field. The dissertation is to be understood as con- 
stituting the largest single portion of the doctoral program: it 
is expected to be a distinct contribution to historical knowledge 
and or interpretation. 

All doctoral students must show a reading competence in one 
foreign language: the language examination must be fulfilled 
prior to student standing for the written examination in the 
major field. 

Fuller statements of these programs and requirements may 
be obtained from the History Department. 



FOREIGN HISTORY 

HIFN 401. THE HISTORY OF SPAIN (3) 

Political, social and economic development of Spain: the 
Spanish empire: Spain s role in Europe. Some attention will 
be paid to Portuguese history. First semester: 1469-1700. 

HIFN 402. THE HISTORY OF SPAIN (3) 

Political, social and economic development of Spain: the 
Spanish empire: Spain s role in Europe. Some attention will 
be paid to Portuguese history. Second semester: 1700 to pres- 
ent. 

HIFN 403. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA (3) 
A survey of the political, economic and cultural relations of 
the Latin American nations with emphasis on their relations 
with the United States and the development of the inter- 
American system. 

HIFN 404. HISTORY OF CANADA (3) 

Prerequisites. HIST 241. 242 or 253. 254. A history of Canada, 
with special emphasis on the Nineteenth Century and upon 
Canadian relations with Great Britain and the United States. 

HIFN 405. HISTORY OF BRAZIL (3) 
The history of Brazil with emphasis on the National Period. 

HIFN 406. THE HISTORY OF MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN 
TO 1810 (3) 
The history of Mexico. Central America and the Antilles, 
beginning with the pre-Spanish Indian cultures and continu- 
ing through the Spanish colonial period and the National 
Period to the present day. The division point between the 
two courses is the year 1810. the beginning of the Mexican 
wars for independence. 

HIFN 407. THE HISTORY OF MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN. 
1810 TO THE PRESENT (3) 
The history of Mexico. Central America and the Antilles, 
beginning with the pre-Spanish Indian cultures and continu- 
ing through the Spanish Colonial Period and the National 
Period to the present- day. The division point between the 
two courses is the year 1810. the beginning of the Mexican 
wars for independence. 



HIFN 410 HISTORY OF ROME (3) 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings 
through the Republic and down to the last centuries of the 
Empire. 

HIFN 411. HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE (3) 

A study of Medieval government, society and thought from 
the collapse of classical civilization to the Renaissance. 

HIFN 412. HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE (3) 

A study of Medieval government, society and thought from 
the collapse of classical civilization to the Renaissance. 

HIFN 413. THE OLD REGIME AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION 
1748-1815 (3) 
Europe in the era of the French Revolution. 

HIFN 414. 415. HISTORY OF EUROPEAN IDEAS (3, 3) 

Prerequisites. HIST 241. 242. or 253. 254. or the equivalent. 
Beginning with a review of the basic Western intellectual tra- 
ditions as a heritage from the ancient world, the courses will 
present selected important currents of thought from the sci- 
entific revolution of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries 
down to the Twentieth Century. First semester, through the 
Eighteenth Century. Second semester. Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth Centuries. 

HIFN 416. THE RENAISSANCE (3) 

City-states and the rise of nation-states, the culture and 
thought of the Renaissance, its impact into the Seventeenth 
Century. 

HIFN 417. THE REFORMATION (3) 

Major developments from the pre-Reformation' to the post- 
Reformation . Religion is emphasized as the fundamental 
motive force resulting in the reformations of the 16th Century. 
The interaction between religious forces and the political, 
socio-economic, intellectual, and cultural trends of the period 
are also considered. 

HIFN 420. HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (3) 

Prerequisites. HIST 241. 242 or 253, 254. First semester, the 
development of England's mercantilist empire and its fall in 
the war for American independence (1783). 

HIFN 421 . HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (3) 

Prerequisite. HIST 241. 242 or 253, 254. Second semester, 
the rise of the second British Empire and the solution of the 
problem of responsible self-government (1783-1867). the 
evolution of the British Empire into a commonwealth of 
nations, and the development and problems of the dependent 
empire. 

HIFN 422. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN (3) 
Constitutional development in England, with emphasis on the 
history of the royal prerogative, the growth of the common 
law. the development of Parliament, and the emergence of 
systematized government. First semester, to 1485. 

HIFN 423. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN (3) 
Constitutional development in England, with emphasis on the 
history of the royal prerogative, the growth of the common 
law. the development of Parliament, and the emergence of 
systematized government. Second semester, since 1485. 

HIFN 424. HISTORY OF RUSSIA (3) 

A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. 

HIFN 425. HISTORY OF RUSSIA (3) 
A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. 

HIFN 426. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, 1815-1919 

(3) 

Prerequisites. HIST 241, 242 or 253. 254. A study of the 

political, economic, social, and cultural development of 

Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the First World War. 

HIFN 427. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 1815-1919 

(3) 

Prerequisites. HIST 241. 242 or 253. 254. A study of the 

political, economic, social, and cultural development of 

Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the First World War. 

HIFN 430. EUROPE IN THE WORLD SETTING OF THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY (3) 
Prerequisites, HIST 241. 242 or 253. 254. A study of political. 



umcp / 137 



economic and cultural developments in Twentieth Century 
Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the 
two World Wars and their global impacts and significance. 

HIFN 431. EUROPE IN THE WORLD SETTING OF THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY (3) 
Prerequisites. HIST 241. 242 or 253, 254. A study of political, 
economic and cultural developments in Twentieth Century 
Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the 
two World Wars and their global impacts and significance. 

HIFN 432. THE SOVIET UNION (3) 
A history of the Bolshevik Revolution and the founding of 
the Soviet Union; the economic policy and foreign policy of 
the USSR, to the present. 

HIFN 433. MODERN FRANCE (3) 

A survey of French history from 1815 to the present. The 
emphasis is upon such topics as the population problem, the 
economic and social structure of French society, and the 
changing political and cultural values of this society in 
response to recurrent crises through the Nineteenth and 
Twentieth Centuries. 

HIFN 434. TUDOR ENGLAND (3) 
An examination of the political, religious and social forces 
in English life, 1485-1603, with special emphasis on Tudor 
Government, the English Reformation and the Elizabethan 
Era. 

HIFN 435. STUART ENGLAND (3) 

An examination of the political, religious and social forces 
in English life, 1603-1714. with special emphasis on Puritan- 
ism and the English Revolutions. 

HIFN 436. BRITAIN IN THE 18TH CENTURY (3) 

Developments in Great Britain from the Revolution of 1688 
to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. 

HIFN 437 MODERN BRITAIN (3) 

A survey of British history from the age of the French Revolu- 
tion to World War I with emphasis upon such subjects as 
Britain's role in the world, the democratization of the state, 
the problems arising from industrialism and urbanism, and 
Irish and imperial problems. 

HIFN 442. HISTORY OF CHINA (3) 

A history of China from earliest times to the present. The 
emphasis is on the development of Chinese institutions that 
have molded the life of the Nation and its people. 

HIFN 443. HISTORY OF CHINA (3) 

A history of China from earliest times to the present. The 
emphasis is on the development of Chinese institutions that 
have molded the life of the Nation and its people. 

HIFN 444. THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM. 1648-1748 (3) 

Europe in the age of Louis XIV and the Enlightened Despots. 

HIFN 445. HISTORY OF JAPAN (3) 

First semester: Japanese civilization from the age of Shinto 
mythology, introduction of continental learning, and rule of 
military overlords. 

HIFN 446. HISTORY OF JAPAN (3) 

Second semester: renewed contact with the Western world 
and Japan's emergence as a modern state. 

HIFN 448. STUDIES IN MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURE (3) 

Systematic treatment of aspects of literature and culture of 
the Middle East. May be repeated. 

HIFN 450. THE MIDDLE EAST (3) 

A survey of the political, cultural and institutional history 
covering the period up to the Tenth Century. 

HIFN 451. THE MIDDLE EAST (3) 

A survey of the political, cultural and institutional history 
covering the period up from the Tenth century to the begin- 
nings of the Nineteenth Century. 

HIFN 452. THE CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST (3) 
This course covers the break-up of the Ottoman Empire and 
the emergence of contemporary states of the area. 



HIFN 454. HISTORY OF THE JEWS AND THE STATE OF ISRAEL 
(3) 
A survey of Jewish history from the Second Century Diaspora 
to the present with special attention to an analysis of Zionism, 
the creation of a Jewish home in Palestine, the establishment 
of the state of Israel, and modern developments. 

HIFN 455. HISTORY OF ARGENTINA AND THE ANDEAN 
REPUBLICS (3) 
The history of the Nationalist Period of selected South Ameri- 
can countries. 

HIFN 456. ANCIENT NEAR EAST AND GREECE (3) 
A survey of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, the Near East 
and Greece, with particular attention to their institutions, life, 
and culture. 

HIFN 460. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF EUROPE (3) 

An exploration of social structure, life styles, rituals, symbols, 
and myths of the peoples of Europe. From earliest times to 
1800. 

HIFN 461. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF EUROPE (3) 
An exploration of social structure, life styles, rituals, symbols, 
and myths of the peoples of Europe. The modernization of 
European society. 

HIFN 462. GERMANY IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, 1815- 
1 91 4 (3) 
Prerequisites, any one of the following courses: HIST 242, 
HIFN 421, 426, 427, 433. Junior, senior, or graduate standing 
required, or consent of instructor. The course is intended to 
trace the development of modern Germany and provide a 
basis for the understanding of the rise of National Socialism 
and Germany in the 20th Century. 

HIFN 463. GERMANY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.191 4-1945 
(3) 
Prerequisites, any one of the following courses: HIST 242, 
HIFN 421, 426. 427. 433. Junior, senior or graduate standing 
required, or consent of instructor. The course is intended to 
provide an understanding of Germany's aims and policies 
during World War I, her condition and policies in the inter-war 
period, the rise of National Socialism, and Germany's part 
in World War II. 

HIFN 464. NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC 
HISTORY (3) 
Prerequisite, a course in 19th Century European history. The 
development and execution of European diplomacy from the 
Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I, concen- 
trating on Central and Western Europe. 

HIFN 465. TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC 
HISTORY (3) 
Prerequisite, a course in 20th Century European history. The 
development and execution of European diplomacy from the 
outbreak of World War I to the conclusion of World War II, 
concentrating on Central and Western Europe. 

HIFN 466. BYZANTINE EMPIRE (3) 

Institutions and culture of the Byzantine Empire dealing with 
the history of the East Fioman Empire to the Battle of Man- 
zikert, 1071. 

HIFN 467. BYZANTINE EMPIRE (3) 

History of Byzantium from 1071 to the fall of Constantinople, 
1453. 

HIFN 470. EUROPEAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (3) 

Economic development of Europe from the manorial 
economy of Medieval feudalism through the emergence of 
capitalist institutions and overseas empires to the advent of 
the industrial revolution. 

HIFN 471. EUROPEAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (3) 

Begins with 1750 and continues to the present. Emphasis is 
on causes and consequences of industrial development in 
Western and Eastern Europe. 

HIFN 473. A SURVEY OF AFRICAN HISTORY (3) 
A brief survey of the history of sub-Saharan Africa from pre- 
historic times to the end of the Colonial Era. Special focus 
on neolithic civilizations, major migrations and political and 
commercial developments in pre-colonial and Colonial Africa. 



138 / umcp 



HIFN 474. A HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA (3) 

HIFN 473 is recommended though not required. A regional 
study of the western Sudan, forest and coastal regions from 
prehistoric times to the Nineteenth Century. A discussion of 
neolithic and iron age civilizations, trans-Saharan and other 
trade, introduction of Islam, medieval Sudanese empires, for- 
est kingdoms, Nineteenth Century empires and kingdoms, 
and the impact of European penetration. 

HIFN 475. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA (3) 

The economic history of West Africa from neolithic times to 
the end of the Colonial Era. Reading knowledge of French 
desirable. 

HIFN 476. MODERN BALKAN HISTORY (3) 
A political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Yugo- 
slavia, Bulgaria, RomahJa, Greece, and Albania from the 
breakdown of Ottoman domination to the present. Emphasis 
is on movements for national liberation during the Nineteenth 
Century and on approaches to modernization in the Twentieth 
Century. 

HIFN 708. READINGS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 728. READINGS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 729. READINGS IN 17TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HISTORY 

(3) 
HIFN 738. READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN INTELLECTUAL 

HISTORY (3) 
HIFN 739. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF THE RENAISSANCE 

AND REFORMATION (3) 

HIFN 748. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 
THE BRITISH EMPIRE-COMMONWEALTH (3) 

HIFN 758. READINGS IN 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HISTORY 
(3) 
Readings in 20th Century European history, 1914 to the pres- 
ent. Requirements, reading knowledge of some European lan- 
guage is encouraged, but not required. May be repeated for 
a maximum of nine semester hours. 



HIFN 759 READINGS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE (3) 

HIFN 768. READINGS IN MODERN RUSSIAN HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 778. READINGS IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 779. READINGS IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 788. READINGS IN JAPANESE HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 789. READINGS IN CHINESE HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 798. READINGS IN GERMAN HISTORY, 1815 TO THE 
PRESENT (3) 

Reading knowledge of German is encouraged, but not 
required. May be repeated for a maximum of nine semester 
hours. 
HIFN 808. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 
HIFN 818. SEMINAR IN GREEK HISTORY (3) 
HIFN 819. SEMINAR IN ROMAN HISTORY (3) 
HIFN 828. SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3) 
HIFN 829. SEMINAR IN 17TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HISTORY 
(3) 

HIFN 838. SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN INTELLECTURAL 
HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 839. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF THE RENAISSANCE 
AND THE REFORMATION (3) 

HIFN 848. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 
THE BRITISH EMPIRE-COMMONWEALTH (3) 

HIFN 849. SEMINAR IN TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND (3) 

HIFN 850. SEMINAR IN ENGLISH LAW AND GOVERNMENT, 
1550-1760 (3) 
Prerequisites, one of the following courses: HIFN 423, 434, 
435, 436 or consent of instructor. From the accession of 
Elizabeth I to the death of George II. 

HIFN 858. SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN HISTORY (3) 




umcp / 139 



HIFN 859. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE (3) 
HIFN 868. SEMINAR IN 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HISTORY 
(3) 

Seminar in 20th Century European history, 1914 to present. 

Prerequisite: HIFN 758, or consent of instructor. 

HIFN 869. SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC 
HISTORY (3) 
Prerequisite, reading ability of either French or German; a 
course in modern European history. May be repeated for a 
maximum of nine semester hours. 

HIFN 878. SEMINAR IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 879. SEMINAR IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 888. SEMINAR IN JAPANESE HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 889. SEMINAR IN CHINESE HISTORY (3) 

HIFN 898. SEMINAR IN GERMAN HISTORY, 1815 TO THE 
PRESENT (3) 
Prerequisite, HIFN 798, or consent of instructor. Reading 
knowledge of German is required. May be repeated to a max- 
imum of six semester hours. 



HISTORY 



HIST 401. THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION — FROM 
COPERNICUS TO NEWTON (3) 
Major developments in the history of physics and astronomy 
during the 16th and 17th Centuries and critical evaluations 
of the Copernican Revolution, the 'mechanical philosophy' 
of the 17th Century scientists, and the Newtonian Synthesis 
and its impact on 18th Century thought. 

HIST 402. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN PHYSICAL 
SCIENCE — FROM LAVOISIER TO EINSTEIN (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 110 and PHYS 112 or 117. History of 
chemistry, physics and geology during the period from about 
1775 to about 1925. 

HIST 403. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY (3) 

A survey course designed for junior, senior and graduate stu- 
dents with a solid base in either engineering or history. It 
will cover the time span from Greek antiquity to the First 
World War. Technology will be studied as a cultural force 
controlled by laws of its own and operating within a distinctive 
conceptual framework. The course will concentrate on the 
changing character of technology in history and on the 
interactions between technology and other cultural forces 
such as science, philosophy, art, material culture, and the 
economy. 

HIST 404. HISTORY OF MODERN BIOLOGY (3) 

The internal development of biology from about 1750 to about 
1940 will be covered, including evolution, cell theory, ge- 
netics, enzymes, and biochemistry, and the origins of 
anthropology and experimental psychology. The social cir- 
cumstances under which biology arose and prospered, the 
philosophical aspects of some debates, the technical achieve- 
ments enabling new research, and the influences of other 
sciences on biology will also be discussed. 

HIST 405. HISTORY OF EARLY MEDICINE: FROM 
THAUMATURGY AND THEURGY TO THE 17TH CENTURY 
THEORIES (3) 
A historical survey of the development of medicine in Europe 
and Asia from earliest times to the Eighteenth Century. Topics 
discussed include: primitive diseases, Egyptian, Chinese, 
Greek and medieval medicine, epidemics, surgical develop- 
ments, and the physician and the development of public 
health administration. Enrollment limited to upper division 
and graduate students. 

HIST 406. HISTORY OF THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN 

MEDICINE (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Development of modern 

medicine from the Eighteenth Century to the present with 

emphasis on the United States, including American Indian 



medicine, growth of medical professions, hospitals and pub- 
lic health facilities, surgery, clinical medicine, psychiatry and 
modern medical specialization. 

HIST 408. SELECTED TOPICS IN WOMEN'S HISTORY (3) 
Prerequisites, HIST 226 or HIST 227 or permission of the 
instructor. In depth study of selected topics on women in 
American society including such areas as women and the law. 
women and politics, the feminine mystique', and the 'new 
feminism.' May be repeated to a maximum of six semester 
hours. 

HIST 498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3) 
May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. 

HIST 600. HISTORIOGRAPHY — TECHNIQUES OF HISTORICAL 
RESEARCH AND WRITING (3) 

HIST 685 THE TEACHING OF HISTORY IN INSTITUTIONS OF 
HIGHER LEARNING (1) 

HIST 708. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF MODERN SCIENCE 

(3) 
HIST 798. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3) 
HIST 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
HIST 808. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF MODERN SCIENCE 

(3) 
Prerequisite. HIST 708 or consent of instructor. 

HIST 818. SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL EDITING (3) 
An apprenticeship in the editing of documentary sources and 
scholarly articles for publication. Repeatable to a maximum 
of six hours. 

HIST 868. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WORLD WAR I (3) 

HIST 869. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WORLD WAR II (3) 

HIST 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



UNITED STATES HISTORY 



HIUS 401. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY (3) 
The settlement and development of colonial America to the 
middle of the Eighteenth Century. 

HIUS 402. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (3) 

The background and course of the American Revolution 
through the formation of the Constitution. 

HIUS 403. THE FORMATIVE PERIOD IN AMERICA, 1789-1824 
(3) 
The evolution of the Federal Government, the origins of politi- 
cal parties, problems of foreign relations in an era of interna- 
tional conflict, beginnings of the industrial revolution in 
America, and the birth of sectionalism. 

HIUS 404. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
The development of the American economy and its institu- 
tions. First semester, to 1865. 

HIUS 405. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
The development of the American economy and its institu- 
tions. Second semester, since 1865. 

HIUS 406. SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
Formation of regional societies; immigration and nativism; 
the Negro; urban movement; social responses to technologi- 
cal change. First semester, to 1865. 

HIUS 407. SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
Formation of regional societies; immigration and nativism; 
the Negro; urban movement; social responses to technologi- 
cal change. Second semester, from 1865. 

HIUS 410. THE MIDDLE PERIOD OF AMERICAN HISTORY, 1824- 
1860 (3) 
An examination of the political history of the United States 
from Jackson to Lincoln with particular emphasis on the fac- 
tors producing Jacksonian Democracy, manifest destiny, the 
Whig Party, the Anti-Slavery Movement, the Republican Party, 
and secession. 



140 / umcp 



HIUS411. THE CIVIL WAR (3) 
Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, 
social and economic effects of the War upon American soci- 
ety. 

HIUS 412. RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW NATION. 1865- 
1896 (3) 
Prerequisite, six credits of American history, or permission 
of instructor. Problems of reconstruction in both South and 
North. Emergence of big business and industrial combina- 
tions. Problems of the farmer and laborer 

HIUS 413. THE PROGRESSIVE PERIOD — THE UNITED STATES 
1896-1919(3) 

HIUS 414. BETWEEN THE WARS — THE UNITED STATES 1919- 
1945 (3) 

HIUS 415. THE UNITED STATES SINCE WORLD WAR II (3) 
Problems and issues of American society, foreign and domes- 
tic, of the past generation. 

HIUS 41 6. BLACKS IN AMERICAN LIFE— 1865 TO THE PRESENT 
(3) 
The role of the black in America since slavery, with emphasis 
on Twentieth Century developments; the migration from farm 
to city: the growth of the civil rights movement; the race ques- 
tion as a national problem. 

HIUS 420. 421. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 221. 222 or equivalent. The golden age of 
the Chesapeake, the institution of slavery, the antebellum 
plantation society, the experience of defeat, the impact of 
industrialization, and the modern racial adjustment. 

HIUS 422. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign 
relations of the United States. First semester, from the revolu- 
tion to 1898. Students who have taken HIST 225 are admitted 
only by permission of instructor. 

HIUS 423. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3) 
A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign 
relations of the United States. Second semester, from 1898 
to the present. Students who have taken HIST 225 are 
admitted only by permission of instructor. 

HIUS 424, 425. THE HISTORY OF IDEAS IN AMERICA (3, 3) 
A history of basic beliefs about religion, man, nature, and 
society. 

HIUS 426, 427. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES (3, 3) 
A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of 
the Constitution, and development of American con- 
stitutionalism in theory and practice thereafter. 

HIUS 430. HISTORY OF MARYLAND (3) 

Political, social and economic history of Maryland from 
Seventeenth Century to the present. 

HIUS 432. A CULTURAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE 
AMERICAN WORKER (3) 
Examines the free American working class in terms of its com- 
position; its myths and Utopias; its social conditions; and its 
impact on American institutions. 

HIUS 433, 434. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN FRONTIER (3, 3) 
Major historical interpretation of the significance to the 
period of the trans-Allegheny West. Assesses the impact of 
the frontier experience on American history. Equal attention 
is given to political, economic, social and cultural problems 
associated with the development of the West. Indian culture, 
treatment of the Indians, and Indian-white relations are inte- 
grated into the course through readings and lectures. 

HIUS 708 READINGS IN COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 709. READINGS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND 
THE FORMATIVE PERIOD (3) 

HIUS 718. READINGS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC 
HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 719. READINGS IN SOUTHERN HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 728. READINGS IN THE MIDDLE PERIOD AND CIVIL WAR 

(3) 



HIUS 729. READINGS IN RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW 
NATION (3) 

HIUS 738 READINGS IN RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 739. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN 
POLICY (3) 

HIUS 748. READINGS IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 
(3) 

HIUS 749. READINGS IN AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL 
HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 769. READINGS IN THE ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES (3) 
An examination of the major issues in the history of the 
economy of the United States from the 17th Century to the 
present, as these have been discussed by the more important 
economic historians. Repeatable to a maximum of six hours. 

HIUS 808. SEMINAR IN COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 809 SEMINAR IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE 
FORMATIVE PERIOD (3) 

HIUS 818. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC 

HISTORY (3) 
HIUS 819. SEMINAR IN SOUTHERN HISTORY (3) 
HIUS 828. SEMINAR IN THE MIDDLE PERIOD AND CIVIL WAR 

(3) 

HIUS 829. SEMINAR IN RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW 
NATION (3) 

HIUS 838. SEMINAR IN RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY (3) 

HIUS 839. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN 
POLICY (3) 

HIUS 848. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY 

(3) 
HIUS 849. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 

(3) 
HIUS 858. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY (3) 
Repeatable to a maximum of six semester hours. 

HIUS 859. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF MARYLAND (3) 

HIUS 869. SEMINAR IN THE ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES (3) 
A research-writing seminar dealing with selected topics in 
American economic development from the Colonial Period 
to the present. Repeatable to a maximum of six semester 
hours. 



HORTICULTURE 

Professor and Chairman: Stark 

Professors: Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Scott, Shanks, Thompson, 

Twigg, Wiley 
Associate Professors: Angell, Stadelbacher 
Assistant Professor: Bouwkamp 
Lecturer: Koch (Visiting) 

Programs leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees are offered by the Department of Horticul- 
ture in the fields of pomology, olericulture, floriculture, and 
ornamental horticulture. Special areas include physiology, 
genetics, and post-harvest physiology. 

Students seeking admission should present undergraduate 
preparation in horticulture, botany, chemistry, and supporting 
agricultural disciplines. Deficiencies must be corrected early in 
the graduate program. Students are admitted to the doctoral 
program only if it is evident that they can complete the program 
successfully. The Graduate Record Examination is not required. 

HORT 411. TECHNOLOGY OF FRUITS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, HORT 
112, prerequisite, or concurrent BOTN 441. A critical analysis 



umcp / 141 



of research work and application of the principles of plant 
physiology, chemistry, and botany to practical problems in 
commercial production. (Thompson) 

HORT 417. TREE AND SMALL FRUIT MANAGEMENT (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for vocational 
agriculture teachers and extension agents. Special emphasis 
will be placed upon new and improved commercial methods 
of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. Current 
problems and their solution will receive special attention. 

HORT 422. TECHNOLOGY OF VEGETABLES (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. 
HORT 222, prerequisite or concurrent, BOTN 441. A critical 
analysis of research work and application of principles of 
plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to practical problems 
in commercial vegetable production. (Reynolds) 

HORT 427. TRUCK CROP MANAGEMENT (1 ) 
Summer session only. Primarily designed for teachers of vo- 
cational agriculture and extension agents. Special emphasis 
will be placed upon new and improved methods of production 
of the leading truck crops. Current problems and their solu- 
tions will receive special attention. 

HORT 432. FUNDAMENTALS OF GREENHOUSE CROP 
PRODUCTION (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. HORT 231. This course deals with a study of 
the commercial production and marketing of ornamental 
plant crops under greenhouse, plastic houses and out- 
of-door conditions. (Shanks) 

HORT 451. TECHNOLOGY OF ORNAMENTALS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, or con- 
current BOTN 441. A study of the physiological processes 
of the plant as related to the growth, flowering and storage 
of ornamental plants. (Link) 

HORT 453. WOODY PLANT MATERIALS (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 212. A field and laboratory 
study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental plant- 
ings. (Baker) 

HORT 454. WOODY PLANT MATERIALS (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 212. Afield and labora- 
tory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental 
plantings. (Baker) 

HORT 456. PRODUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF WOODY 
PLANTS (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite or corequisite, HORT 
271, 454. A study of the production methods and operation 
of a commercial nursery and the planting and care of woody 
plants in the landscape. (Link) 

HORT 457. ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE (1) 

Summer session only. A course designed for teachers of 
agriculture and extension agents to place special emphasis 
on problems of the culture and use of ornamental plants. 

HORT 471. SYSTEMATIC HORTICULTURE (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. A study of the origin, taxonomic relationship and hor- 
ticultural classification of fruits and vegetables. 

HORT 474. PHYSIOLOGY OF MATURATION AND STORAGE OF 
HORTICULTURAL CROPS (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 441. Factors related to maturation and 
application of scientific principles to handling and storage 
of horticultural crops. (Scott) 

HORT 489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURE (1-3) 
Credit according to time scheduled and organization of 
course. A lecture and/or laboratory series organized to study 
in depth a selected phase of horticulture not covered by exist- 
ing courses. 

HORT 682. METHODS OF HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH (3) 
Second semester. One lecture and one 4-hour laboratory 
period a week. The application of biochemical and biophysi- 
cal methods to problems in biological research with emphasis 
on plant materials. (Scott) 



HORT 689 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURE (1-3) 

First and second semester. Credit according to time 
scheduled and organization of the course. Organized as a 
lecture series on a specialized advanced topic. 

HORT 699. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN HORTICULTURE (1-3) 
First and second semester. Credit according to time 
scheduled and organization of the course. Organized as an 
experimental program other than the student's thesis 
problem. Maximum credit allowed toward an advanced 
degree shall not exceed four hours of experimental work. 

HORT 781 . EDAPHIC FACTORS AND HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 
(3) 
First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, BOTN 441. A crit- 
ical study of scientific literature and current research con- 
cerning factors of the soil affecting production of horticultural 
plants. Selected papers are studied and critically discussed. 
Attention is given to experimental procedures, results 
obtained, interpretation of the data, and to evaluation of the 
contribution. (Reynolds) 

HORT 782. CHEMICAL REGULATION OF GROWTH OF 
HORTICULTURAL PLANTS (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite. BOTN 441. A 
critical review of literature and current research relating to 
the use of chemicals in controlling growth, and useful in the 
production, ripening, and handling of horticultural plants and 
products. Emphasis is placed on experimental procedures 
and the interpretation of results, current usage in the poten- 
tials for future research. (Shanks) 

HORT 783. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND HORTICULTURAL 
PLANTS (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, BOTN 441. A 
study of the literature and a discussion of current research 
concerned with the effects of environmental factors on the 
growth and fruiting of horticultural plants. Effects of tem- 
perature, light, and atmospheric conditions will be consid- 
ered. (Thompson) 

HORT 784. CURRENT ADVANCES IN PLANT BREEDING (3) 

Second semester. Alternate years. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, HORT 274 or permission of instructor. Studies 
of the genetic and cytogenetic basis of plant breeding, sys- 
tems of pollination control and their application, mutation 
breeding, methods of breeding for resistance to plant dis- 
eases and environmental pollutants. (Angell) 

HORT 798. ADVANCED SEMINAR (1) 
Three credit hours maximum allowed toward the M.S. degree 
or six credit hours maximum toward the Ph.D. degree. 

HORT 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

HORT 899 DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY 



FOOD, NUTRITION, AND INSTITUTION 
ADMINISTRATION 

Professor and Chairman: Prather 
Associate Professors: Ahrens. Butler, Hopkins (visiting) 
Assistant Professors: Berdanier (visiting), Eheart, Sanford 
(visiting), Wang 

The department offers a program leading to a Master of Sci- 
ence degree in each of the following major areas: food, nutrition 
or institution administration. The department participates in an 
interdepartmental program for Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees in nutritional science. There is also a 
coordinated program in cooperation with the U.S. Army Medical 
Department at Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, DC, 
for Dietetic Interns, leading to a Master of Science degree. 



142 / umcp 



A satisfactory score on the aptitude portion of the Graduate 
Record Examination is required for admission. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are available for the Master 
of Sciencedegree in food, nutrition or institution administration, 
but the Master of Science degree in nutritional science is avail- 
able only through a thesis option. 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available. 

Copies of department requirements are available from the 
department for the information and guidance of graduate stu- 
dents. 



FOOD 



FOOD 440. ADVANCED FOOD SCIENCE (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, FOOD 
240, 250, CHEM 461 or concurrent registration. Chemical and 
physical properties of food as related to consumer use in the 
home and institutions. 

FOOD 450. EXPERIMENTAL FOOD SCIENCE (3) 
Second semester. One lecture, two laboratories per week. 
Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. Individual and group 
laboratory experimentation as an introduction to methods of 
food research. 

FOOD 455. ADVANCED FOOD SCIENCE LABORATORY (1) 
First semester. One 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 201 and consent of instructor. Chemical determination 
of selected components in animal and plant foods. 

FOOD 480. FOOD ADDITIVES (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. Effects 
of intentional and incidental additives on food quality, nutri- 
tive value and safety. FDA approved additives, GRAS sub- 
stances, pesticide residues, mycotoxins, antibiotics, and hor- 
mones will be reviewed. 

FOOD 490. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOODS (2-3) 

Prerequisite, FOOD 440 and consent of instructor. Individual 
selected problems in the area of food science. 

FOOD 610. READINGS IN FOOD (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or consent of 
instructor. A critical survey of the literature of recent develop- 
ments in food research. 

FOOD 620. NUTRITIONAL AND QUALITY EVALUATION OF 
FOOD (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or consent of 
instructor. Effects of production, processing, marketing, 
storage, and preparation on nutritive value and quality of 
foods. 

FOOD 640. FOOD ENZYMES (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 3-hour 
laboratory. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. The classifi- 
cation and behavior of naturally occurring and added 
enzymes in food; includes the effects of temperature, pH, 
radiation, moisture, etc., on enzyme activity. 

FOOD 650. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL FOOD (3-5) 
Second semester. Two lectures and three laboratory periods 
a week. Selected readings of literature in experimental foods. 
Development of individual problem. 

FOOD 678. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOODS (1-6) 
Individual or group study in an area of foods. 

FOOD 688. SEMINAR (1-2) 
Reports and discussions of current research in foods. 

FOOD 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



NUTRITION 



NUTR 415. MATERNAL, INFANT AND CHILD NUTRITION (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 
Nutritional needs of the mother, infant and child and the rela- 
tion of nutrition to physical and mental growth. 



NUTR 425. INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 
Nutritional status of world population and local, national and 
international programs for improvement. 

NUTR 435. HISTORY OF NUTRITION (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 
A study of the development of the knowledge of nutrition and 
its interrelationship with social and economic developments. 

NUTR 450. ADVANCED HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, consent of department; NUSC 
402 or NUTR 300; CHEM 461, or concurrent registration. Two 
lectures and one 2-hour laboratory. A critical study of the 
physiological and metabolic influences on nutrient utilization, 
with particular emphasis on current problems in human nu- 
trition. 

NUTR 460. THERAPEUTIC HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, NUTR 300, 450. Modifications of the nor- 
mal adequate diet to meet human nutritional needs in 
pathological conditions. 

NUTR 470. COMMUNITY NUTRITION (3) 

Prerequisites, NUTR 300, 450, 460. A study of different types 
of community nutrition programs, problems and projects. 

NUTR 480. APPLIED DIET THERAPY (3) 

(Open only to students accepted into and participating in the 
United States Army Dietetic Internship Program at Walter 
Reed General Hospital or the Coordinated Undergraduate 
Dietetics Program.) Application of principles of normal and 
therapeutic nutrition in total medical care and instruction of 
patients. Clinical experience in hospital therapeutics, pediat- 
rics, research and a variety of clinics are included. 

NUTR 490. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN NUTRITION (2-3) 

Prerequisites, NUTR 300 and consent of instructor. Individual 
selected problems in the area of human nutrition. 

NUTR 600. RECENT PROGRESS IN HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 
First semester. Recent developments in the science of nutri- 
tion with emphasis on the interpretation of these findings for 
application in health and disease. 

NUTR 610. READINGS IN NUTRITION (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of sig- 
nificant nutritional research and investigation. 

NUTR 620. NUTRITION FOR COMMUNITY SERVICES (3) 

First semester. Application of the principles of nutrition to 
various community problems of specific groups of the public. 
Students may select specific problems for independent study. 

NUTR 670. INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM IN NUTRITION (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, CHEM 461, 462 or equivalent. 
The major routes of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism 
with particular emphasis on metabolic shifts and their detec- 
tion and significance in nutrition. 

NUTR 678. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUTRITION (1-6) 
Individual or group study in an area of nutrition. 

NUTR 680. HUMAN NUTRITIONAL STATUS (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Methods of appraisal of 
human nutritional status, to include dietary, biochemical and 
anthropometric techniques. 

NUTR 698. SEMINAR IN NUTRITION (1-3) 
A study in depth of a selected phase of nutrition. 

NUTR 699. PROBLEMS IN NUTRITION (1-4) 

Prerequisite, permission of faculty. Experience in a phase of 
nutrition of interest to the student. Use is made of experimen- 
tal animals, human studies and extensive, critical studies of 
research methods, techniques or data of specific pro|ects. 

NUTR 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 



IADM 410. SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE (3) 

Two lectures and one morning a week for field experience 



umcp / 143 



in a school food service. Prerequisite, FOOD 200, or 240 and 
250. and NUTR 300. or consent of instructor. Study of organi- 
zation and management, menu planning, food purchasing, 
preparation, service, and cost control in a school lunch pro- 
gram. 
IADM 420. QUANTITY FOOD PURCHASING (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, FOOD 240, introductory 
accounting recommended. Food selection and the develop- 
ment of integrated purchasing programs. Standards of qual- 
ity; the marketing distribution system. 

IADM 430. QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION (3) 

First semester. Two hours of lecture and one 3-hour labora- 
tory a week. Prerequisites, FOOD 240, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Scientific principles and procedures employed in food 
preparation in large quantity. Laboratory experience in man- 
agement techniques in quantity food production and service. 

IADM 440. FOOD SERVICE PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, IADM 300. Principles of per- 
sonnel administration in food services, emphasis on person- 
nel selection, supervision and training, job evaluation, wage 
and payroll structure, current labor regulations, and interper- 
sonal relationships and communications. 

IADM 450. FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT AND PLANNING (2) 
First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. Equipment design, selection, maintenance and 
efficient layout, relation of the physical facility to production 
and service. 

IADM 460. ADMINISTRATIVE DIETETICS I (3) 

(Open only to students accepted into and participating in the 
United States Army Dietetic Internship Program at Walter 
Reed General Hospital or the Coordinated Undergraduate 
Dietetics Program.) Application of management theory 
through guided experience in all aspects of hospital dietary 
department administration. 

IADM 470. ADMINISTRATIVE DIETETICS II (3) 
Continuation of IADM 460. 

IADM 490. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SERVICE (2-3) 
Prerequisites, senior standing, five hours in IADM courses and 
consent of instructor. Individual selected problems in the area 
of food service. 

IADM 600. FOOD SERVICE ADMINISTRATION (3) 

First or second semester. Principles of organization and man- 
agement related to a food system. Control of resources 
through the use of quantitative methods. Administrative 
decision-making, and personnel policies and practices. 

IADM 610. READINGS IN FOOD ADMINISTRATION (3) 

Reports and discussion of significant research and develop- 
ment in the area of food administration. 

IADM 630. COMPUTER APPLICATION IN FOOD SERVICE (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, IADM 600 or 
equivalent. The use of automatic data processing and pro- 
gramming for the procurement and issuing of food com- 
modities, processing of ingredients, menu selection, and 
labor allocations. 

IADM 640. SANITATION AND SAFETY IN FOOD SERVICE (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, MICB 200. 
Principles and practices of sanitation and safety unique to 
the production, storage and service of food in quantity; 
includes current legislation. 

IADM 650. EXPERIMENTAL QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 3-hour 
laboratory. Prerequisites, IADM 430 and FOOD 450 or equiva- 
lents. Application of experimental methods to quantity food 
production, recipe development and modification; relation- 
ship of food quality to production methods. 

IADM 678. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INSTITUTIONAL FOOD (1-6) 
Individual or group study in an area of institutional food serv- 
ice. 

IADM 688. SEMINAR (1) 

Reports and discussion of current research in institution 
administration. May be repeated to a maximum of three 
semester hours of credit. 



IADM 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



GENERAL HUMAN ECOLOGY 



Associate Professor and Chairman: Gaylin 
Professors: Bricker, Brooks 
Associate Professors: Lemmon 1 , Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Brabble, Churaman 
1 joint appointment in Secondary Education 

A Master's program in General Human Ecology is presently 
offered; however, a proposal for a degree of Master of Science 
in Family and Community Development is under active consid- 
eration as a replacement. 

The program objectives of the Department of Family and Com- 
munity Development are directed toward training professionals 
who are prepared to develop and direct a variety of programs 
and services that are both family-oriented and community 
based. The areas of specialization in coursework offered within 
the department are: family studies, community studies with par- 
ticular emphasis on programs serving families, and manage- 
ment and consumer studies. Faculty members use and encour- 
age an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human prob- 
lems related to social change and to helping students to become 
causative agents of change. 

Curriculum revisions are in progress; but until such time as 
the specific graduate programs for the department's new areas 
of specialization (already in effect in coursework) are officially 
approved — students will get their Master's degrees in General 
Human Ecology by combining coursework from the Department 
of Family and Community Development and from other areas 
of the College and/or campus. Prospective students should con- 
sult current schedules of course offerings for full details. 

The department adopts the policies of The Graduate School 
for basic criteria to the Master's program. In addition, it recom- 
mends that individuals have adequate undergraduate prepara- 
tion in one or more of the following areas: family development, 
psychology, sociology, and home economics. A course in 
elementary statistics at the undergraduate level is also desirable. 

Further information regarding either of these programs 
should be obtained by contacting the department or the College 
of Human Ecology directly. 



HUMAN ECOLOGY 



HUEC 601. METHODS OF RESEARCH IN HUMAN ECOLOGY 
(3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, statistics or tests 
and measurements. Application of scientific methods to prob- 
lems in the field of human ecology with emphasis on needed 
research of an inter-disciplinary nature. 

HUEC 602. INTEGRATIVE ASPECTS OF HUMAN ECOLOGY (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Scope 
and focus of total professional field with emphasis on purpose 
and functions as related to family and other group living. 
Impact of the changing social, economic, technological and 
educational situation upon human ecology. 

HUEC 668. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GENERAL HUMAN ECOLOGY 
(1-6) 
Individual study or arranged group study. 

HUEC 678. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (1-6) 
Individual study or arranged group study. 

HUEC 688. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FAMILY LIFE (1-6) 
Individual study or arranged group study. 

HUEC 698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNITY' SERVICES (1-6) 
Individual study or arranged group study. 

HUEC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



144 / umcp 



FAMILY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



FMCD 431. FAMILY CRISES AND DISINTEGRATION (3) 

Prerequisite. PSYC 100. A study of significant changes within 
the family setting which ultimately require major adjustments 
in inter-personal and intra-personal relations. (Olson) 

FMCD 443. CONSUMER PROBLEMS (3) 

Consumer practices of American families. Merchandising 
practices as they affect the consumer. Organizations and laws 
in the interest of the consumer. (Churaman) 

FMCD 446. LIVING EXPERIENCES WITH FAMILIES (3-6) 
A. Domestic intercultural. B. International intercultural. 
Prerequisites. FMCD 330. ANTH 101: EMCD 250: optional, lan- 
guage competence An individual experience in living with 
families of a sub-culture within the United States or with 
families of another country, participating in family and com- 
munity activities. A foreign student may participate and live 
with an American family. 

FMCD 485. INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY COUNSELING (3) 
Prerequisites. PSYC 100 and 235: FMCD 105 and 431. Basic 
principles of counseling and its effect on family action. 

(Olson) 

FMCD 487. LEGAL ASPECTS OF FAMILY PROBLEMS (3) 
Laws and legal involvement that directly affect specific 
aspects of the family: adoption, marriage, estate planning, 
property rights, wills, etc. Emphasis will be given to the 
involvement of a professional lawyer: principles and interpre- 
tation of the law. 

FMCD 499. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) 

A. Family studies. B. Community studies. C. Management and 
consumer studies. 



TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS 



Professor and Chairman: Smith 
Professor: Dardis 

Assistant Professors: Spivak. Wilbur 
Research Associate Professor: Buck 

The Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics offers 
graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree. Fields 
of specialization include consumer behavior, consumer 
economics, clothing and human behavior, historic textiles and 
costume, textile economics and marketing, and textile science. 

There are no rigid course requirements for admission to the 
graduate program in Textiles and Consumer Economics. A 
major in Home Economics. Consumer Economics. Textiles and 
Clothing. Textiles, or a relevant discipline such as chemistry, 
economics, or psychology is acceptable as background for 
study in this field. Preparation in the basic physical and social 
sciences (chemistry, mathematics, economics, psychology, and 
sociology) is highly recommended. All applicants are required 
to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude 
Test. 

Additional information about the graduate program may be 
obtained from the Department of Textiles and Consumer 
Economics. 



CONSUMER ECONOMICS 



CNEC 431 THE CONSUMER AND THE LAW (3) 

Three lectures a week. A study of legislation affecting con- 
sumer goods and services. Topics covered include product 
safety and liability, packaging and labeling, deceptive adver- 
tising, and consumer credit. The implications of such legisla- 
tion for consumer welfare with particular emphasis on the 
disadvantaged groups in our society will be examined. 



CNEC 435 ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION (3) 

Spring semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. 
ECON 201 and 203 or ECON 205 for non-majors. The applica- 
tion of economic theory to a study of consumer decision- 
making and its role in a market economy at both the individual 
and aggregate levels. Topics covered include empirical 
studies of consumer spending and saving, the consumer in 
the market and collective consumption. 

CNEC 437. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. PSYC 100 and SOCY 
100. An application of the behavioral sciences to a study of 
consumer behavior. Current theories, models and empirical 
research findings are explored. 

CNEC 498. SPECIAL STUDIES (2-4) 

Independent study by an individual student or by a group 
of students in advanced work not otherwise provided in the 
department. Students must prepare a description of the study 
they wish to undertake. The plan must be approved by the 
faculty directing the study and the department chairman. 



TEXTILES 



TEXT 452. TEXTILE SCIENCE — CHEMICAL STRUCTURES AND 
PROPERTIES OF FIBERS (3) 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
sites. CHEM 104 or consent of instructor. The chemical struc- 
ture, properties and reactions of the major classes of natural 
and man-made fibers. Emphasis is placed upon the relation- 
ship between molecular structure and physical properties of 
fibers and fabrics. Laboratory includes chemical identifica- 
tion of fibers, preparation of selected fibers and examination 
of chemical reactions and properties of fibers 

TEXT 454. TEXTILE SCIENCE — FINISHES (3) 

Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite. TEXT 452 or consent of instructor. A study of 
the chemical reactions and any mechanisms involved in im- 
parting water repellence. crease resistance and crease recov- 
ery properties, shrink-resistance. flame resistance, soil- 
release properties and moth and mildew resistance to textile 
materials. Properties of the finished material which affect its 
end-use will also be examined. Laboratory work includes the 
application of finishes, identification of finishes and a study 
of the properties of finished fabrics. 

TEXT 456. TEXTILE SCIENCE — CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS OF 
FIBERS AND POLYMERS (3) 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The theory of fiber struc- 
ture and its relationship to chemical and physical properties 
of natural and man-made fibers. Laboratory includes study 
of performance of textile materials in relation to their chemi- 
cal and physical properties. 

TEXT 463. HISTORY OF TEXTILES (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. TEXT 150 or consent 
of instructor. A study of historic and contemporary fibers and 
fabrics. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of designs 
and techniques of decorating fabrics and the relationship of 
textiles to the aesthetic and developmental cultures of 
society. 

TEXT 465. ECONOMICS OF THE TEXTILE AND APPAREL 
INDUSTRIES (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. ECON 201 and 203. 
Trends in the production and consumption of textiles and 
apparel: economic analysis of the textile and apparel indus- 
tries: factors affecting changes in output, price, location and 
market structure. 

TEXT 498. SPECIAL STUDIES (2-4) 

Independent study by an individual student or by a group 
of students in advanced work not otherwise provided in the 
department. Students must prepare a description of the study 
they wish to undertake. The plan must be approved by the 
faculty directing the study and the department chairman. 



umcp / 145 



TEXTILES AND APPAREL 



TXAP 420. APPAREL DESIGN — DRAPING (3) 

Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, APDS 
101 and TXAP 222. APDS 220 recommended but not required. 
Students explore pattern design through draping on the 
human form. Emphasis is on the interrelationship between 
material, design and form. 

TXAP 425. APPAREL DESIGN — EXPERIMENTAL PROCESSES 
(3) 
Two 3-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, APDS 
101, TEXT 250, and TXAP 222. Processes are related to fiber 
and fabric characteristics, style and end-use. Opportunities 
are provided for students to: 1. learn advanced construction 
and tailoring techniques, 2. explore, adapt and create new 
processes with modern textile materials, 3. evaluate results 
in terms of design quality. 

TXAP 441. CLOTHING AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, PSYC 100 and SOCY 
1 00. An exploration of socio-psychological approaches to the 
study of clothing in relation to human behavior. Social and 
psychological theories will be examined as possible 
framework for the study and investigation of clothing. 

TXAP 445. HISTORY OF COSTUME I (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. The wrap-style dress. 
A critical study of the various forms of dress; analyzing shape 
and form of garments and the component parts of which they 
are made, taking special note of the distinctive styles and 
unique shapes which help distinguish one period from 
another; relating the history of costume to events, to achieve- 
ments, to the social attitudes and development of the various 
times and cultures of man. 

TXAP 447. HISTORY OF COSTUME II (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. The shaped-style 
dress. A critical study of the various forms of dress; analyzing 
shape and form of garments and the component parts of 
which they are made, taking special note of the distinctive 
styles and unique shapes which help distinguish one period 
from another; relating the history of costume to events, to 
achievements, to the social attitudes and development of the 
various times and cultures of man. 

TXAP 498. SPECIAL STUDIES (2-4) 

Independent study by an individual student or by a group of 
students in advanced work not otherwise provided in the 
department. Students must prepare a description of the 
study they wish to undertake. The plan must be approved by 
the faculty directing the study and the department chairman. 



TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS 



TXCE 608. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3) 

Credit according to time scheduled and organization of the 
course. The course may be organized as a lecture series on 
a specialized advanced topic or may consist of an experimen- 
tal problem other than the student's thesis topic. Maximum 
credit allowed toward an advanced degree shall not exceed 
six hours. 

TXCE 638. SELECTED TOPICS IN CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (2-3) 
Readings and discussion on selected topics in consumer 
behavior. The focus is on the application of social sciences 
to a study of consumer decision processes. Course may be 
taken for a maximum of six credits. 

TXCE 639. SEMINAR IN THE ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION 
(3) 
A critical examination of current theories and research in the 
field. The application of research methods to current prob- 
lems in consumption economics will be discussed. Course 
may be taken for a maximum of six credits. 

TXCE 648. SEMINAR IN HISTORIC TEXTILES (1-3) 

In depth studies of selected areas of historic textiles and/or 
historic textile products, together with their relationships to 



the cultures and societies of man. Maximum credit allowed 
toward an advanced degree shall not exceed six hours. 

TXCE 649. SEMINAR IN CLOTHING AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR (3) 
An examination of theories and research concerned with the 
relation between clothing and human behavior. Special 
emphasis will be placed on research techniques. Maximum 
credit allowed toward an advanced degree shall not exceed 
six hours. 

TXCE 650. SEMINAR IN TEXTILE ECONOMICS AND 
MARKETING (3) 
A critical review of research literature in the economics of 
the textile and apparel industries and the marketing of textile 
products. The application of research methods to current 
problems of the textile and apparel industries will be dis- 
cussed. 

TXCE 658. ADVANCED TOPICS IN TEXTILE SCIENCE (2-3) 
An examination of the structure, properties and performance 
of textile materials. Topic and credit will be announced. 
Course may be taken for a maximum of six credits. 

TXCE 659. SEMINAR IN TEXTILE SCIENCE (1-3) 

A critical discussion of current research literature in the field. 

TXCE 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



HOUSING AND APPLIED DESIGN 



HSAD 440. INTERIOR DESIGN III (4) 

Eight hours studio periods. Prerequisite, HSAD 344. Prepara- 
tion of complete presentation: work specifications, floor 
plans, purchase orders, renderings, etc. Portfolio preparation. 

HSAD 441. INTERIOR DESIGN IV (4) 

Prerequisite, HSAD 440. See HSAD 440 for description. 

HSAD 442. READINGS IN HOUSING (3) 
Seminar. Prerequisites, SOCY 100, HSAD 241, senior stand- 
ing. To satisfy individual interests and needs, opportunity 
afforded for concentrated reading on one or more facets of 
housing, (Urban Renewal, public housing, etc.). Examination 
of completed research, needed future research. 

HSAD 488. SELECTED TOPICS IN HOUSING AND INTERIOR 
DESIGN (1-6) 
Offered on demand. May be repeated to a maximum of six 
hours. 

HSAD 499. INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN HOUSING AND/OR INTERIOR 
DESIGN (3-4) 
Guidance for the advanced student capable of independent 
subject matter investigation or creative work. Problem chosen 
with consent of instructor. 

HSAD 658. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HOUSING AND INTERIOR 
DESIGN (3-6) 
Individual study or arranged group study. May be repeated 
to a maximum of six hours 



APPLIED DESIGN 



APDS 430. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ADVERTISING DESIGN 
(3) 
Two studio periods. Prerequisite, APDS 331. Advanced prob- 
lems in design and layout planned for developing competency 
in one or more areas of advertising design. 

APDS 431. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ADVERTISING DESIGN 
(3) 
Two studio periods. Prerequisite, APDS 430. Advanced prob- 
lems in design and layout planned for developing competency 
in one or more areas of advertising design. 

APDS 437. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY (3) 

Three studio periods. Continuation of APDS 337. 



146 / umcp 



APDS 499. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN APPLIED DESIGN (3-4) 
A. Advertising, B. Costume. Open only to advanced students 
who, with guidance can work independently. Written consent 
of instructor. 



CRAFTS 



CRAF 420. ADVANCED CERAMICS II (3) 

Three studio periods. Prerequisite, CRAF 330. Experience in 
experimental development of body and textures, glazes and 
colors and their utilization in clay products of original design. 
Calculation of body and glaze composition. 

CRAF 428. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN CERAMICS (3) 

Prerequisites, CRAF 220, 320, 420. Open to students with 
demonstrated ability and with the potential for a high level 
of achievement in studio production or in research. Total 
undergraduate credit permitted in all individual problems 
courses in crafts is a maximum of nine hours. Consent of 
crafts faculty. No less than B average on prerequisites and 
presentation of work for evaluation. 

CRAF 430. ADVANCED METALRY II (3) 

Two studio periods. Prerequisite, CRAF 330. Advanced appli- 
cation of skills to the design and fabrication of metals; 
jewelry, stone setting, metal casting, cloisonne, hand-raised 
hollow ware. 

CRAF 438. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN METALRY (3) 

Prerequisites, CRAF 230, 330, 430. Consent of crafts faculty. 
No less than B average on prerequisites and presentation of 
work for evaluation. Open to students with demonstrated abil- 
ity and with the potential for a high level of achievement in 
studio production or in research. Total undergraduate credit 
permitted in all individual problems courses in crafts is a max- 
imum of nine hours. 

CRAF 448. INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN TEXTILE DESIGN (3) 
Prerequisites: CRAF 240, 241, 340 or 341. Consent of crafts 
faculty. No less than B average on prerequisites and presenta- 
tion of work for evaluation. Open to students with demon- 
strated ability and with the potential for a high level of 
achievement in studio production or in research. Total 
undergraduate credit permitted in all individual problems 
courses in crafts is a maximum of nine hours. 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
MANAGEMENT 



IFSM 401. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING (3) 

Prerequisites, junior standing, MATH 111 or the equivalent. 
The electronic digital computer and its use as a tool in pro- 
cessing data. The course includes the following areas: (1) 
organization of data processing systems, (2) environmental 
aspects of computer systems (3) management control prob- 
lems and potentials inherent in mechanized data processing 
systems. 

IFSM 402. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING APPLICATIONS 
(3) 
Prerequisites, IFSM 401 and BSAD 230, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Intensive study of computer applications using a problem- 
oriented language. Introduction of computer methods for the 
solution of organizational problems. Laboratory exercises in 
programming and development of computer techniques. 

IFSM 410. INFORMATION PROCESSING PROBLEMS OF 
MODELS OF ADMINISTRATIVE, ECONOMIC AND 
POLITICAL SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 141 or equivalent; IFSM 402, BSAD 230, 
and some familiarity with administrative, economic and/or 
political models. Prerequisites may be waived with the con- 
sent of instructor. Data processing requirements underlying 



the creation and maintenance of a data base to be used in 
estimating the parameters of socio-economic models. An 
analysis of the structure and development of recent socio- 
economic models as relevant to data processing considera- 
tions. Extractions and preparation of data from the data base 
to facilitate the appropriate transformation necessary for 
model construction and also to minimize the processing cost 
of data in-put. The course draws upon a knowledge of models 
of administrative, economic and political systems. Case 
studies and experience with data processing for selected 
models are included. 

IFSM 420. INFORMATION PROCESSING AND COMPUTA- 
TIONAL PROBLEMS IN OPERATIONS ANALYSIS(3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 141 or equivalent; IFSM 402, and a 
course in statistics, such as BSAD 432, dealing with multi- 
variate models. Prerequisites may be waived with the consent 
of the instructor. Implementation of applications requiring the 
integration of data processing and analytical programming 
techniques. Such applications feature the calculation of vari- 
ous statistical estimates of the parameters in a multivariate 
model within the context of a file maintenance problem (e.g., 
the writing ofa matrix inversion routine for revenue forecast- 
ing within a master updating program or sales forecasting 
and/or sales performance evaluation within a sales 
transaction-master updating program). A universal, problem- 
oriented language such as COBOL will be used with strong 
emphasis on the use of the mathematical Fortran IV library 
subroutines. Class projects include case studies and solu- 
tions of problems using real-world data. 

IFSM 434. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I (3) 
To meet this course requirement, all students enrolled in the 
information systems management curriculum will register in 
BSAD 332. Prerequisite, BSAD 230, or consent of instructor. 

IFSM 436. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisites, IFSM 102, BSAD 330, MATH 141, or the equiva- 
lent. Prerequisites may be waived with consent of instructor. 
The use of the computer in the management and operation 
of organizations. The course includes the following areas: 
(1) the principles of systems analysis, (2) recent applications 
and innovations of the systems concept, (3) design and 
implementation of computer systems, including such 
techniques as mathematical programming, simulation, busi- 
ness games and network analysis, and (4) laboratory use of 
a digital computer in the application of these techniques. 

IFSM 610. DESIGN OF LARGE-SCALE INFORMATION 
PROCESSING SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisites, IFSM 410 and 436 or consent of instructor. 
Characteristics of large-scale information processing sys- 
tems. Relationship of model-building and simulation to infor- 
mation processing system design. Design elements and 
phases. Programming techniques for large-scale information 
processing systems, including time sharing and real-time. 
Special projects include case studies and the design of a 
large-scale information processing system. 

IFSM 620. MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION PROCESSING 
SYSTEMS (3) 
Prerequisite, IFSM 436 or consent of instructor. Administra- 
tive uses and limitations of high-speed computers in an infor- 
mation processing system. Limitations as related to system 
structure and methods used to originate and process data. 
Planning and installation of a total information processing 
system including conversion problems. Measures of informa- 
tion processing effectiveness. Documentation procedures. 
Data security, legal considerations and auditing the informa- 
tion processing system. Personnel requirements for an on- 
going system. The broad statement of the system require- 
ments is taken as given. 

IFSM 630. APPLICATION OF ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTS IN 
INFORMATION PROCESSING EQUIPMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, IFSM 610 or consent of instructor. A study and 
an evaluation of the operational and hardware characteristics 
of the computer and peripheral equipment available to meet 
the specification of the broad classes of information process- 
ing systems, including coding systems, error-detecting and 
software considerations. Data communicating devices, 
including the functional characteristics of long-line, tele- 



umcp / 147 



phone channel, transceiver and communication satellites. 
Case studies and examples. 



INSTITUTE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
AND CRIMINOLOGY 

LENF 444. ADVANCED LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION 
(3) 
Prerequisite. LENF 340 or consent of instructor. The structur- 
ing of manpower, material, and systems to accomplish the 
major goals of social control. Personnel and systems manage- 
ment. Political controls and limitations on authority and juris- 
diction. 



AND 



RETAIL SECURITY 



LENF 460. INDUSTRIAL 
ADMINISTRATION (3) 
Prerequisite. LENF 100, 220 and 340 or consent of instructor. 
The origins of contemporary private security systems. Organi- 
zation and management of industrial and retail protective 
units. 



INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS 
AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Research Professor and Director: Crane 

Research Professors: Aziz 1 , Babuska, Bhatia 1 , Brush 2 . Burgers. 

DeClaris 3 , Dorfman' 1 , Elsasser, Faller, Hubbard, Jones, Kar- 

lovitz, Kellogg, Landsberg, Lashinsky, Olver, Ortega 5 , Pai, Tid- 

man, Weiss 3 . Wilkerson, Wu, Zwanzig 
Research Associate Professors: Coplan, Guernsey. Israel 6 , 

Koopman. Matthews. Rodenhuis, Yorke 
Research Assistant Professors: Gage. Thompson, Vernekar 
Visiting Lecturer: Gerrity 

'joint appointment with UMBC 

2 joint appointment with History 

3 joint appointment with Electrical Engineering 

"joint appointment with Physics 

5 joint appointment with Computer Science and Mathematics 

6 joint appointment with Civil Engineering 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics is 
a center for applied interdisciplinary research in areas requiring 
combined efforts in physical and mathematical sciences, 
environmental sciences, and engineering. It hosts a faculty of 
eminent stature to promote a variety of programs, many involv- 
ing members of other departments on campus and from other 
institutions. Its purpose is to provide graduate training for stu- 
dents interested in having an opportunity to perform research 
in a multidisciplinary environment. 

The Institute faculty conducts theoretical and experimental 
research in meteorology, atomic and molecular physics, plasma 
physics, atmospheric physics, fluid dynamics, statistical 
mechanics, history of science, theoretical biology and 
geophysics, and in all areas of applied mathematics. Applied 
mathematicians in the Institute are currently studying topics in 
numerical analysis, control theory, nonlinear processes, elastic- 
ity, asymptotic expansions, approximation theory, and in appli- 
cation of mathematics to the life sciences and environmental 
sciences. Individual research efforts are coordinated wherever 
possible to constitute broad programs in the atmospheric, 
environmental, space and life sciences. Research topics are 
determined entirely by the interests of students and faculty. 
Inter-departmental programs are strongly encouraged. 

Students interested in pursuing advanced study within the 
Institute may be admitted to the University as graduate students 
in any department of engineering, or in mathematics, physics, 
or chemistry. Those interested in meteorology may be admitted 
directly to the Graduate Program in Meteorology.' which exists 
within the Institute. Further information may be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Director of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics. 

'See the separate listing for the Meteorology Program. 



INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

Professor and Director: Munn 

Professors: Benedict, Benesch 

Associate Professors: De Rocco, Ginter, Krisher, Sengers 

Assistant Professor: Alexander 

The Institute for Molecular Physics comprises a faculty 
interested in theoretical and experimental studies in the general 
area of molecular interactions. The Institute brings together 
physicists and chemists to work on problems of mutual interest 
to the advantage of both, and the faculty is made up of members 
from each of these disciplines. Members of the Institute teach 
both undergraduate and graduate courses in both the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry and the Department of Physics and 
Astronomy and supervise thesis research of graduate students 
in these departments. 

The department also participates in the graduate degree pro- 
gram in chemical physics which is jointly administered by the 
Institute, the Department of Chemistry, and the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. This program is open to graduate stu- 
dents in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics and 
Astronomy and offers a course of study leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Entering stu- 
dents are expected to have an undergraduate degree in either 
chemistry or physics with a strong background in the other dis- 
cipline. However, a mathematics or engineering major may also 
be eligible. 

The following courses must be included in the major: PHYS 
622 (4 credits); CHEM 687 (3) or PHYS 602 (3); CHEM 684 (3) 
or PHYS 703 (3); PHYS 623 (4) or CHEM 691 (3). Major electives 
may be from the following: CHEM 682 (3); CHEM 685 (3); PHYS 
412 (3); PHYS 723 (2); PHYS 724 (2); Math 410 (4); Math 414 
(3). Courses to satisfy the minor may be chosen from chemistry, 
physics, or mathematics. Research problems in chemical 
physics may be supervised by the faculty in the Department of 
Chemistry, the Department of Physics and Astronomy or the 
Institute for Molecular Physics. The program is supervised by 
a committee from the above units. 

Detailed information on this program can be obtained by writ- 
ing the Chairman of the Chemical Physics Program, Institute 
for Molecular Physics. 



JOURNALISM 

Professor and Chairman: Hiebert 
Professor: Martin 

The Master of Arts degree in Journalism provides academic 
work both for the young person who wants a professional career 
in communication and for the student interested in mass com- 
munication theory and research methodology. The first type of 
student usually builds on a news-editorial background, adding 
in depth work in a substantive minor field, as preparation for 
a career as a reporter or editor for the news media. The second 
type of student usually builds on a social science base coupled 
with the study of journalism or mass communication while pre- 
paring for a career in teaching, scholarship, or applied research 
in advertising, public relations, opinion research, or similar 
areas concerned with mass communication. The Masters 
degree is a one-year program, with the typical student taking 
12 hours of graduate work in the fall, 12 hours in the spring, 
and 6 hours of thesis or thesis-option seminars in the summer. 
The program is best suited but not limited to students who have 
completed an undergraduate major in journalism, with a strong 
minor in the social sciences. 

Applicants seeking admission to the Masters program should 
hold a Bachelor s degree from a recognized institution of higher 
learning. Undergraduate study of journalism or professional 
experience in journalistic fields are helpful but not required. 
Completion of the general aptitude portion of the Graduate 
Record Examination is required, and three letters of recommen- 
dation must be submitted. 

The College offers a number of assistantships. varying in 
amounts from $2900 to $3500, usually including exemptions 



148 / umcp 



from tuition and fees. Students awarded such assistantships 
usually pursue full-time study while engaged in teaching or 
research assistance in journalism for 15 to 20 hours per week. 

The University of Maryland is in an advantageous location 
for the study of journalism. It is within easy reach of four of 
the nation s top newspapers: the Baltimore Sun. The Washing- 
ton Post. The Evening Star, and Wall Street Journal. It is also 
near the Washington press corps, the large Washington bureaus 
of the Associated Press. United Press International, the New 
York Times, and most other important American and foreign 
newspapers: NBC. CBS. and ABC. and other broadcasting news 
bureaus: and news magazines and major book publishing 
offices It is at the doorstep of the nation s major newsmakers 
in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the Federal 
Government. 

Special facilities include photographic, news editing, and 
advertising laboratories, as well as a reading room with daily 
and weekly newspapers, magazines, and files for miscellaneous 
clippings and bulletins. 



JOUR 630 SEMINAR IN CORPORATE COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 640. MASS CULTURE AND MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 700 SEMINAR IN MASS MEDIA LAW (3) 

JOUR 710. SEMINAR IN MASS MEDIA HISTORY (3) 

JOUR 720. SEMINAR IN GOVERNMENT AND MASS 

COMMUNICATION (3) 
JOUR 721. SEMINAR IN URBAN MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 730 SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE MASS 

COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 731. CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 799. MASTER S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

JOUR 800. SEMINAR IN CRITICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

JOUR 810. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMMUNICATION (3) 

JOUR 812. SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION THEORIES (3) 



JOUR 400. LAW OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 

Study of the legal rights and constraints of mass media: libel, 
privacy, copyright, monopoly, and contempt, and other 
aspects of the law applied to mass communication, previous 
study of the law not required. Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 
201. 

JOUR 410. HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 

Study of the development of newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, and motion pictures as media of mass communica- 
tion. Analysis of the influences of the media on the historical 
development of America. Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 201. 

JOUR 420. GOVERNMENT AND MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 
Study of the relationship between the news media and gov- 
ernment. Analysis of media coverage of government and poli- 
tics. Study of governmental and political information and per- 
suasion techniques. Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 201. 

JOUR 430. COMPARATIVE MASS COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 
(3) 
Survey of the history and status of the mass media throughout 
the world: comparative analysis of the role of the press in 
different societies. Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 201 or con- 
sent of the instructor for non-majors. 

JOUR 440. PUBLIC OPINION AND MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 
Prerequisites. JOUR 200 and 201. Study of publics and their 
interrelationships in the formation of public opinion: 
measurement of public opinion and media habits: role of the 
mass media in the formation of public opinion. 

JOUR 490 SEMINAR IN JOURNALISM (3) 

Seminar for journalism seniors in newsroom problems and 
policies, emphasizing ethics and responsibilities: in coopera- 
tion with the Baltimore Sun. Baltimore News-American, and 
other area news media. Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. 

JOUR 497. SUPERVISED INTERNSHIP (1) 

Summer session. To be taken following junior year as major 
in this department, permission of instructor. Ten weeks of 
organized, supervised study, experience, on-the-job training 
in journalism. 

JOUR 499. PROBLEMS IN JOURNALISM (1-3) 

Individual projects in journalism, including internships. May 
be repeated to a maximum of three hours. 

JOUR 600. RESEARCH METHODS IN MASS COMMUNICATION 
(3) 

JOUR 610. SEMINAR IN MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the interrelationships between the 
mass media and society, including various social and cultural 
elements of modern society: responsibilities of the mass 
media and the mass communicator. 

JOUR 612. THEORIES OF MASS COMMUNICATION (3) 
JOUR 620. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS REPORTING (3) 
JOUR 621. INTERPRETATION OF CONTEMPORARY AFFAIRS 
(3) 



SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND 
INFORMATION SERVICES 

Associate Professor and Dean: Chisholm 

Professors: Bundy. Heilprin 1 . Kidd. Olson. Reynolds. Was- 

serman 
Associate Professors: Dubester. Liesener. Soergel 
Assistant Professor: Kraft 

'joint appointment with Computer Science 

The goal of the School of Library and Information Services 
is to achieve a level of attainment appropriate to professional 
education within the university setting at the graduate level. It 
endeavors to establish a position in the forefront of instructional 
and theoretical inquiry to influence the advanced vanguard of 
practice in librarianship. 

Admission is limited to individuals who hold the bachelor s 
degree from recognized colleges, universities or professional 
schools in this country or abroad or those who can give evi- 
dence of successful completion of equivalent courses of study. 
Although no specific undergraduate courses are required for 
admission to the School, those who seek admission must have 
completed a broad arts and sciences program with strength in 
the humanities, social sciences, and physical or biological sci- 
ences. 

Faculty advisors recommend courses they think most appro- 
priate for each student. The required pro-seminar and introduc- 
tory courses in the organization of knowledge and reference 
provide a base from which the student can build a purposeful 
program fitted to his personal needs and aspirations. Reflecting 
the multi-disciplinary nature of librarianship and its continuing 
need for reliance upon insights from supportive intellectual dis- 
ciplines, students have a high degree of flexibility in the elective 
portions of their work. Their courses are not restricted only to 
those within the framework of the school but can include rele- 
vant courses in other parts of the University. 

The Master of Library Science degree will be awarded to the 
student who successfully completes a program of 36 hours with 
an average of B within three years from his first registration 
in the School. Under a full-time program a student normally 
completes 15 semester hours during the fall and spring semes- 
ters and 6 hours during the summer term. A number of qualified 
part-time students are also admitted to the program. Such stu- 
dents are expected to pursue a minimum of two courses during 
each semester. No thesis or comprehensive examination is 
required. 

The Ph.D. program requires the equivalent of three years of 
full-time work, normally divided into approximately two years 
of formal coursework (60 semester hours) and one year of 
research on the dissertation. 

LBSC 600. PROSEMINAR— THE DEVELOPMENT AND 
OPERATION OF LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION 
SERVICES (3-6) 
Background and orientation needed for advanced study in 



umcp / 149 



librananship and information science. Covers the major prob- 
lems in the development and provision of information serv- 
ices; the structure, functions, and economics of information 
service organizations; and the processes by which change 
is brought about in the quality of information services. 

LBSC 610. INTRODUCTION TO REFERENCE AND 
BIBLIOGRAPHY (3) 
A systematic approach to bibliographic control of recorded 
knowledge and the methods of securing information from 
various types of sources. 

LBSC 613. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH IN THE SCIENCES 
(3) 
Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends 
in the direction of research in the principal scientific disci- 
plines. 

LBSC 615. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH IN THE SOCIAL 
SCIENCES (3) 
Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends 
in the direction of research in the principal fields of the social 
sciences. 

LBSC 617. LITERATURE AND RESEARCH IN THE HUMANITIES 
(3) 
Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends 
in the direction of research in the principal humanistic disci- 
plines. 

LBSC 620. MEDICAL LITERATURE AND LIBRARIANSHIP (3) 
Introduction to medical literature and its reference sources, 
stressing those aspects of the field of medicine which lead 
to special characteristics in the organization and handling 
of its literature and innovations in medical librarianship and 
information services. Various kinds of health science library 
and information centers are discussed and biomedical library 
networks are studied. Students will find it necessary to spend 
considerable time at the National Library of Medicine or 
another medical library. 

LBSC 624. LEGAL LITERATURE (3) 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in law. with 
emphasis upon the bibliographic organization of the field. 

LBSC 626. LITERATURE OF THE FINE ARTS (3) 
Consideration and evaluation of the resources of the fine arts, 
emphasizing bibliography and services contained in fine arts 
libraries. 

LBSC 627. GOVERNMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3) 
Analysis of the organization of the information structure and 
the publication and dissemination programs of the U.S. 
Federal, state and municipal governments. 

LBSC 631. BUSINESS INFORMATION SERVICES (3) 
Survey and analysis of information sources in business, 
finance, and economics with emphasis upon their use in prob- 
lem solving. 

LBSC 633. ADVANCED REFERENCE SERVICES (3) 
Theoretical and administrative considerations, analysis of 
research problems, and directed activity in bibliographic 
method and search techniques in large collections. 

LBSC 635. RESOURCES OF AMERICAN LIBRARIES (3) 

Considers distribution and extent of library resources, means 
of surveying collections, mechanisms of inter-institutional 
cooperation in building collections, and means of developing 
research collections in special subject fields. 

LBSC 636. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND MATERIALS (3) 
A survey of literature and other media of communication and 
the criteria in evaluating such materials as they relate to the 
needs, interests and capability of the child. 

LBSC 637. STORYTELLING MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES (3) 
Literary sources are studied and instruction and practice in 
oral techniques are offered 

LBSC 642. ORGANIZATION OF KNOWLEDGE IN LIBRARIES I 
(3) 
Principles of the organization of library materials for physical 
and intellectual access Concepts and problems involved in 
subject cataloging, classification, and descriptive cataloging. 
Major systems and rules in use in current practice, particularly 
those systems popular in the United States. 



LBSC 644. ORGANIZATION OF KNOWLEDGE IN LIBRARIES II 
(3) 
Conceptual problems in the organization of knowledge, 
specific cataloging and classification systems, rules of entry, 
application of the systems, choice of system to suit particular 
institutional and patron characteristics. 

LBSC 647. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN THE ORGANIZATION OF 

KNOWLEDGE (3) 

Seminar course in which students may take topics of special 

interest to them in the area of organization of knowledge and 

explore them in a research project class discussion format. 

LBSC 650. FUNDAMENTALS OF DOCUMENTATION (3) 
The macro-organization of information services in the 
framework of the overall system of information transfer. The 
information transfer process is discussed, as well as the fields 
of study concerned with that process, use and user studies, 
models of communication and formal and informal communi- 
cation channels, characteristics and behavior of the literative 
(bibliometrics). innovations in the communication system. 

LBSC 653. CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF INDEX 
LANGUAGES (3) 
Treats the making of classification schedules, subject head- 
ing lists and thesauri and those considerations relating to 
the revision and extension of existing ones. 

LBSC 656. INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION STORAGE AND 
RETRIEVAL (ISAR) SYSTEMS (3) 
Micro-organization of information services and basic princi- 
ples underlying both manual and mechanized ISAR systems, 
including the conceptual structure of indexing languages and 
search strategies, file organization, typology of classifica- 
tions, abstracting, and indexing. 

LBSC 657. TESTING AND EVALUATION OF IR SYSTEMS (3) 
A survey of recent developments in the processing, arrange- 
ment, and retrieval of information, and in the procedures used 
in their evaluation. 

LBSC 665. PROBLEMS OF SPECIAL MATERIALS (3) 
Discusses advanced principles and practices for all technical 
services, in particular, cataloging applicable to maps, serials, 
music, audio-visual items, etc. 

LBSC 670. SEMINAR IN TECHNICAL SERVICES (3) 
Special issues in technical services in large libraries. Deals 
with such areas as acquisitions, cataloging, serial control, 
cooperative programs, and managerial controls. 

LBSC 674. INTRODUCTION TO REPROGRAPHY (3) 
A survey of the processes and technology through which 
materials are made available in furthering library and informa- 
tion services, ranging from photography to microforms. 

LBSC 677. SEMINAR ON MANUSCRIPT COLLECTIONS (3) 
Analysis of the methods and philosophy of handling special 
papers and documentary material in a research library. 

LBSC 700. INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING FOR 
LIBRARIES (3) 
Basic principles of data processing and the ways in which 
data processing systems have been applied to library prob- 
lems. Lectures cover the application of punched card proc- 
essing to library operations; an introduction to systems 
analysis and the methodology for establishing systems 
requirements; and the application of electronic data process- 
ing systems to library operations. In the laboratory, the funda- 
mentals of computer programming are provided for develop- 
ing and running computer programs designed to solve typical 
library problems. 

LBSC 705. ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING IN LIBRARIES (3) 
Analysis of retrieval systems and intensive study of machine 
applications in the acquisition, analysis, coding, retrieval and 
display of information. 

LBSC 711. PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS FOR INFORMATION 
HANDLING APPLICATIONS (3) 
The elements of programming system design and operation 
are studied with special emphasis on the influence of informa- 
tion handling and library requirements. 

LBSC 715. LIBRARY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) 

Introduction to the total systems approach to library and infor- 
mation problems, emphasizing administrative and managerial 



150 / umcp 



decision-making. Will give a scientific management 
framework, terms for defining a system, and its problems, 
and a set of tools, techniques, and methods to aid in analyzing 
and solving these problems. Topics to be covered include 
model building, flowcharting, motion and time study, cost 
analyses, systems design, management information, and 
cost-effectiveness and planning-programming-budget sys- 
tems. 

LBSC 721. SEMINAR IN INFORMATION SCIENCE (3) 

Introduction to the fundamentals in information science. The 
nature of messages in human and machine communication 
are approached from the viewpoint of the physical, 
psychological, and logical transformations which they 
undergo in their paths from message sender to recipient. 
Cybernetic variety, basic constraints or variety in information 
systems, and classes in their uses in search and communica- 
tions are studied, as well as models, and optimization and 
mechanization of access to messages for communication of 
data, information, knowledge. 

LBSC 726. SEMINAR IN INFORMATION TRANSFER (3) 

Prerequisite, LBSC 721, or permission of instructor. Discus- 
sion of significant problems in information science: topics 
include fundamental concepts, theory, methodology, current 
research. 

LBSC 731. LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION (3) 
An introduction to administrative theory and principles and 
their implications and applications to managerial activity in 
libraries. 

LBSC 736 ADVANCED ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SERVICES (3) 
The student's theoretical understanding of organization and 
administration will be advanced by intensive study in the vari- 
ous sub-fields of contemporary library and information 
developments. 

LBSC 740. SEMINAR IN LIBRARY AND INFORMATION 
NETWORKS (3) 
Explores the inter-library cooperative phenomenon and 
analyzes critical issues in network planning, economics, 
organization, technology, and services. 

LBSC 743. SEMINAR IN THE ACADEMIC LIBRARY (3) 
A seminar on the academic library within the framework of 
higher education, treating problems of programs, collections, 
support, planning and physical plant. 

LBSC 747. SEMINAR IN THE SPECIAL LIBRARY AND 
INFORMATION CENTER (3) 
A seminar on the development, the uses, the objectives, the 
philosophy and the particular systems employed in special 
library service. 

LBSC 754. SEMINAR IN THE SCHOOL LIBRARY (3) 

LBSC 757. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICE 
FACILITIES— OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE (3) 
The aim of this course is to describe the context of demands 
and policies within which an IR or library service facility must 
operate. 

LBSC 804. COMMUNICATION AND LIBRARIES (3) 
Theory and research in the multi-discipline domain of com- 
munication. Inquiry is directed into such diverse matters as 
coding theory, linguistic analysis, decision theory, network 
concepts, etc. Connections are pointed out between com- 
munication research and library practice. 

LBSC 807. SCIENCE INFORMATION AND THE ORGANIZATION 
OF SCIENCE (3) 

LBSC 815. LIBRARY SYSTEMS (3) 
Evolution and current patterns of regional library develop- 
ment, considering the economic, legal, service and manage- 
ment problems associated with library systems as well as the 
significance of state and Federal programs and national infor- 
mation networks. 

LBSC 817 PUBLIC LIBRARY IN THE POLITICAL PROCESS (3) 
Seminar on the principal influences which affect the patterns 
of organization, support and service patterns of public li- 
braries based upon theoretical and case studies. 



LBSC 825. LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SERVICES IN THE 
SOCIAL PROCESS (3) 
The focus is upon the policy process. Key elements in the so- 
cietal political environment which influence decision-making 
in libraries and information service facilities are identified and 
interrelated, such as legislation, citizen participation, or- 
ganized groups, mass media, professional associations, tech- 
nological changes, financial support. The significance of 
such contemporary issues as censorship, manpower, com- 
munity control, and automation are considered in this con- 
text. 

LBSC 827. HISTORY OF LIBRARIES AND THEIR MATERIALS 
(3) 
The development of publication forms and institutions set 
against the historical framework and the cultural forces within 
which such advances were made. 

LBSC 833. LIBRARY SERVICE TO THE DISADVANTAGED (3) 
Approaches, adaptations and potentials of the public library 
in relation to the problem of poverty. Includes field experience 
in the school's laboratory library. 

LBSC 837. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE 
LIBRARIANSHIP AND INFORMATION SCIENCE (3) 
Compares and contrasts bibliographical systems, institutions, 
service arrangements, and professional patterns in developed 
and developing cultures. Libraries, information organizations 
and international information systems are viewed against the 
backdrop of national cultures, and the influence of the social, 
political and economic factors upon these forms are con- 
sidered. 

LBSC 844. RESEARCH METHODS IN LIBRARY AND 
INFORMATION ACTIVITY (3) 
The techniques and strategies of research and their implica- 
tions for the definition, investigation and evaluation of library 
problems. 
LBSC 852. SEMINAR IN RESEARCH METHODS AND DATA 

ANALYSIS (3) 
LBSC 855. SEMINAR IN THE ANALYSIS OF THE LIBRARY 
SERVICE PROCESS (3) 
Teams of students, librarians, and library school faculty inves- 
tigate real problems in libraries on the basis of quantitative 
data, using analytical skills presented in the first five weeks 
of the semester. 
LBSC 858. SPECIAL TOPICS IN LIBRARY AND INFORMATION 
SERVICE (3) 
No student may earn more than 9 hours under LBSC 858, 
more than 9 hours under LBSC 859, nor more than a total 
of 12 hours in both LBSC 858 and LBSC 859. 

LBSC 859. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) 
Designed to permit intensive individual study, reading or 
research in an area of specialized interest under faculty super- 
vision, registration is limited to the advanced student who 
has the approval of his advisors and of the faculty member 
involved. No student may earn more than 9 hours under LBSC 
858, more than 9 hours under LBSC 859, nor more than a 
total of 12 hours in both LBSC 858 and 859. 

LBSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



LINGUISTICS 

LING 401. PHONETICS AND PHONEMICS (3) 
Training in the identification, description and symbolization 
of various sounds found in language. Study of scientific 
techniques for classifying sounds into units which are percep- 
tually relevant for a given language. 

LING 402. MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX (3) 
A detailed study of language structure. No student may 
receive credit for both LING 402 and ENGL 484. 

LING 403. HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (3) 

Prerequisite, LING 401 and 402, or equivalent. A study of 
change in the phonological, grammatical and semantic struc- 
tures of natural languages; language typology; reconstruc- 
tion and various allied topics will be treated. 



umcp / 151 



LING 609. SEMINAR IN LINGUISTICS (3) 
Other programs also offer courses in linguistics that may be 
of interest to the student. Some of the most relevant are: 
ANTH 102. CMSC 723, 725. ENGL 484. PHIL 360. PSYC 671. 
and SPHR 604. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor and Chairman: Kleppner 

Professors: Adams, Auslander, Brace. Chu. Cohen, Correl, 
Douglis, Ehrlich. Edmundson, 1 Goldberg. Goldhaber. Gold- 
stein. Good. Gray. L. Greenberg. Horvath. Hummel. Jackson. 
Kirwan. Kubota, G. Lehner. J. Lehner. Maltese. Mikulski. Pearl. 
Reinhart. Stellmacher, Strauss, Syski, Vesentini. Walsh. 
Zedek 

Associate Professors: Benedetto, Berg, Bernstein, Cook. 
Cooper, Dancis, Daniel, Ellis. Fey. 2 Green. Gulick. Henkel- 
man. 2 Johnson, Lay, Lipsman. Lopez-Escobar. Markley. Neri. 
Osborn. Owings, Sather, Schafer, Schneider, Warner, Wolfe 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Anderson. Currier. Fay. R 
Greenberg, Haris, Helzer. Hemperly. Mucci. Niebur. Powell. 
Schmidt, Smith, Sweet, Unsain. Yang 

Lecturer: Davidson 2 
1 joint appointment with Computer Science 
2 joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The department offers programs of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. A student 
may earn the Master's degree through thesis or non-thesis 
options. For the MA. degree, in particular, broad options may 
be arranged to satisfy different student interests. There are no 
language requirements for the MA. degree. 

Admission is granted to applicants who demonstrate marked 
ability and interest in mathematics. While not required, results 
of the Advanced Graduate Record Examination in mathematics 
would be helpful to the Admissions Committee. 

The Ph.D. degree requires 36 credit hours of coursework. In 
addition, the student must pass a written qualifying and an oral 
comprehensive examination. Translating ability in two foreign 
languages is also necessary. These requirements are minimal: 
major emphasis is placed on the preparation of a dissertation 
representing an original contribution to the existing knowledge 
of mathematics. 

Many areas of specialization are available. These include 
topics in Pure Mathematics. Applied Mathematics, and Probabil- 
ity and Statistics. 

A broadened interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program 
is in the final stages of approval. This curriculum will permit 
even more diversified programs leading to the MA. and Ph.D. 
degrees with options in fields related to economics, biology, 
physics, chemistry, engineering, and others. 

Excellent facilities are available for graduate study and 
research. These include the Engineering and Physical Sciences 
Library containing about 79.000 volumes in mathematics, 
physics, and engineering. The library, conveniently located in 
the mathematics building, receives approximately 250 journals 
in pure and applied mathematics. The Library of Congress with 
its exhaustive collections of books and technical reports is only 
30 minutes away from the campus. 

The Department of Mathematics cooperates closely with the 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. The 
facilities of the Computer Science Center are also available for 
the research needs of graduate students and faculty. 

MATHEMATICS 

MATH 400 VECTORS AND MATRICES (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 141 or 221. Algebra of vector spaces and 
matrices. Recommended for students interested in the appli- 
cations of mathematics. (Not open to students who have had 
MATH 240 or 405.) 

MATH 401 APPLIED LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 240. or 400. or consent of the instructor. 
Various applications of linear algebra: theory of finite games, 
linear programming, matrix methods as applied to finite Mar- 



kov chains, random walk, incidence matrices, graphs and 
directed graphs, networks, transportation problems. 

MATH 402. ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 240 or equivalent. The course is designed 
for students having only limited experience with rigorous 
mathematical proofs, and parallels MATH 403. Students 
planning graduate work in mathematics should take MATH 
403. Groups, rings, integral domains and fields: detailed study 
of several groups: properties of integers and polynomials. 
Emphasis is on the origin of the mathematical ideas studied 
and the logical structure of the subject. (Not open to 
mathematics graduate students.) 

MATH 403 INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 241 or equivalent. Integers: groups, rings, 
integral domains, fields. 

MATH 405. INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 403 or consent of instructor. An abstract 
treatment of finite dimensional vector spaces. Linear transfor- 
mations and their invariants. 

MATH 406. INTRODUCTION TO NUMBER THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. Rational inte- 
gers, divisibility, prime numbers, modules and linear forms, 
unique factorization theorem. Euler's function. Mobius func- 
tion, cyclotomic polynomial, congruences and quadratic 
residues. Legendre s and Jacobi's symbol, reciprocity law of 
quadratic residues, introductory explanation of the method 
of algebraic number theory. 

MATH 410. ADVANCED CALCULUS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 241. Sequences and series of numbers, 
continuity and differentiability of real valued functions of one 
variable, the Riemann integral, sequences of functions and 
power series. Functions of several variables including partial 
derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. The 
implicit function theorem. 

MATH 411. ADVANCED CALCULUS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 241. Sequences and series of numbers, 
continuity and differentiability of real valued functions of one 
variable, the Riemann integral, sequences of functions and 
power series, functions of several variables including partial 
derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. The 
implicit function theorem. 

MATH 413. INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX VARIABLES (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 410. The algebra of complex numbers, 
analytic functions, mapping properties of the elementary 
functions. Cauchy s theorem and the Cauchy integral for- 
mula. Residues. (Credit will be given for only one of the 
courses. MATH 413 and 463.) 

MATH 414. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410. A general introduction to the theory 
of differential equations. Constructive methods of solution 
leading to existence theorems and uniqueness theorems 
Other topics such as: systems of linear equations, the 
behavior of solutions in the large, the behavior of solutions 
near singularities, periodic solutions, stability, and Sturm- 
Liouville problems. 

MATH 415. INTRODUCTION TO PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS (3) 
Prerequisites. MATH 410 or 462. Topics will include one 
dimensional wave equation: linear second order equations 
in two variables, separations of variables and Fourier series: 
Sturm-Liouville theory. 

MATH 416. INTRODUCTION TO REAL VARIABLES (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410. The Lebesgue integral. Fubini's 
theorem. The L p spaces. 

MATH 417. INTRODUCTION TO FOURIER ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410. Fourier series. Fourier and Laplace 
transforms. 

MATH 430. GEOMETRIC TRANSFORMATIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 240. Recommended for students in 
mathematics education. Important groups of geometric trans- 
formations, including the isometnes and similarities of the 
plane. Geometries related to transformation groups. 



152 / umcp 



MATH 431. FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics. Recom- 
mended for students in mathematics education. The axioma- 
tic foundations of geometry. Attention will be given to one 
or more axiomatic developments of Euclidean geometry and 
to the relation of Euclidean geometry to other geometric sys- 
tems. 

MATH 432. INTRODUCTION TO POINT SET TOPOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 41 or 450, or equivalent. Connectedness, 
compactness, transformations, homomorphisms; application 
of these concepts to various spaces, with particular attention 
to the Euclidean plane. 

MATH 433. INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 403 and 432, or equivalent. Chains, 
cycles, homology groups for surfaces, the fundamental 
group. 

MATH 436. INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 241 or equivalent. The differential 
geometry of curves and surfaces, curvature and torsion, mov- 
ing frames, the fundamental differential forms, instrinsic 
geometry of a surface. 

MATH 444. ELEMENTARY LOGIC AND ALGORITHMS (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of instructor. An elemen- 
tary development of propositional logic, predicate logic, set 
algebra, and Boolean algebra, with a discussion of Markov 
algorithms, Turing machines and recursive functions. Topics 
include Post productions, word problems, and formal lan- 
guages. (Also listed as CMSC 450.) 

MATH 446. AXIOMATIC SET THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 403 or 450 or consent of instructor. 
Development of a system of axiomatic set theory, choice prin- 
ciples, induction principles, ordinal arithmetic including dis- 
cussion of cancellation laws, divisibility, canonical expan- 
sions, cardinal arithmetic including connections with the 
axiom of choice, Hartog's Theorem, Konig's theorem, prop- 
erties of regular, singular, and inaccessible cardinals. 

MATH 447. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 403 or 410 or 450. Formal propositional 
logic, completeness, independence, decidability of the sys- 
tem, formal quantificational logic, first-order axiomatic 
theories, extended Gbdel completeness theorem, 
Lowenheim-Skolem theorem, model-theoretical applications. 

MATH 450. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of instructor. Sets, rela- 
tions, mappings. Construction of the real number system 
starting with Peano postulates; algebraic structures 
associated with the construction; Archimedean order, 
sequential completeness and equivalent properties of 
ordered fields. Finite and infinite sets, denumberable and 
non-denumberable sets. 

MATH 460. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 241 or 462, and CMSC 110 or equivalent. 
Study of the basic computational methods for interpolation, 
least squares, approximation, numerical quadrature, numeri- 
cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, sys- 
tems of linear equations and initial value problems for ordi- 
nary differential equations. The emphasis is placed on a dis- 
cussion of the methods and their computational properties 
rather than on their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for 
students in the physical and engineering sciences. This 
course should not be taken by students who have passed 
MATH/CMSC 470. (Listed also as CMSC 460.) 

MATH 462. ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 240 or consent of instructor. Credit will 
be given for only one of the courses MATH 241 and 462. Cal- 
culus of functions of several real variables; limits, continuity, 
partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface 
integrals, vector-valued functions, theorems of Green, Gauss 
and Stokes, physical applications. (This course cannot be 
counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

MATH 463. ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 241 or 462 or consent of instructor. Credit 
will be given for only one of the courses MATH 413 and 463. 
The complex field. Infinite processes for real and complex 



numbers. Calculus of complex functions. Analytic functions 
and analytic continuation. Theory of residues and application 
to evaluation of integrals. Conformal mapping. 

MATH 464. ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III 
(3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 246 and 463, or consent of instructor. 
Fourier and Laplace transforms. Evaluation of the complex 
inversion integral by the theory of residues. Applications to 
systems of ordinary and partial differential equations. 

MATH 470. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 241. Introduction to the analysis of 
numerical methods for solving linear systems of equations, 
nonlinear equations in one variable, interpolation and approx- 
imation problems and the solution of initial value problems 
for ordinary differential equations. Stress is placed on provid- 
ing the student with a good understanding of the theoretical 
foundations of the various methods. Intended primarily for 
students in mathematics, applied mathematics, and computer 
science. This course should not be taken by students who 
have passed MATH/CMSC 460. (Listed also as CMSC 470.) 

MATH 478. SELECTED TOPICS FOR TEACHERS OF 
MATHEMATICS (1-3) 
Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. 

MATH 481. INTRODUCTION TO NUMBER THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs 
with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and science. 
Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is usually covered 
elsewhere in their curriculum. Axiomatic developments of the 
real numbers. Elementary number theory. 

MATH 482. INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs 
with emphasis on the teaching of mathematics and science. 
Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is usually covered 
elsewhere in their curriculum. Modern ideas in algebra and 
topics in the theory of equations. 

MATH 483. INTRODUCTION TO GEOMETRY (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs 
with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and science. 
Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is usually covered 
elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of the axioms for Eu- 
clidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

MATH 484. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs 
with emphasis on the teaching of mathematics and science. 
Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is usually covered 
elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of the limit concept 
and calculus. (Previous knowledge of calculus is not 
required.) 

MATH 488. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SUMMER 
INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF SCIENCE AND 
MATHEMATICS— SEMINAR (1-3) 
Lectures and discussion to deepen the student's appreciation 
of mathematics as logical discipline and as a medium of 
expression. Special emphasis on topics relevant to current 
mathematical curriculum studies and revisions. 

MATH 498. SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS (1-16) 
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Topics of special 
interest to advanced undergraduate students will be offered 
occasionally under the general guidance of the departmental 
committee on undergraduate studies. Honors students regis- 
ter for reading courses under this number. 

MATH 600. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 405 or equivalent. Groups with operators, 
homomorphism and isomorphism theorems, normal series, 



umcp / 153 



Sylow theorems, free groups, abelian groups, rings, integral 
domains, fields, modules. If time permits, Horn (A,B), tensor 
products, exterior algebra. 

MATH 601. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 600 or consent of instructor. Field theory, 

Galois theory, multilinear algebra. Further topics from: 

Dedekind domains, Noetherian domains, rings with minimum 

condition, homological algebra. 
MATH 602. HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 600. Projective and injective modules. 

homological dimensions, derived functors, spectral sequence 

of a composite functor. Applications. 

MATH 603. COMMUTATIVE ALGEBRA (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 600. Ideal theory of Noetherian rings, valu- 
ations, localizations, complete local rings, Dedekind domains. 

MATH 604. RING THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 601 or consent of instructor. Topics 
selected from the following: Ideal theory, structure theory of 
rings with or without minimum condition, division rings, 
algebras, non-associative rings. 

MATH 605. GROUP THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 601 or consent of instructor. Topics 
selected from the following: finite groups, abelian groups, 
free groups, solvable or nilpotent groups, groups with 
operators, groups with local properties, groups with clan con- 
ditions, extensions. 

MATH 606. ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 600-601 or consent of instructor. Prime 
and primary ideals in Noetherian rings, Hilbert Nullstellensatz 
places and valuations, prevarieties (in the sense of Serre), 
dimension, morphisms, singularities, varieties, schemes, 
rationality. 

MATH 607. ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 606. Topics in contemporary algebraic 
geometry chosen from among: theory of algebraic curves and 
surfaces, elliptic curves, abelian varieties, theory of schemes, 
theory of zeta functions, formal cohomology, algebraic 
groups, reduction theory. 

MATH 608. SELECTED TOPICS IN ALGEBRA (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

MATH 620. ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY I (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 601 or consent of instructor. Algebraic 
numbers and algebraic integers, algebraic number fields of 
finite degree, ideals and units, fundamental theorem of alge- 
braic number theory, theory of residue classes, Minkowski's 
theorem on linear forms, class numbers, Dirichlet's theorem 
on units, relative algebraic number fields, decomposition 
group, inertia group and ramification group of prime ideals 
with respect to a relatively Galois extension. 

MATH 621. ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY II (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 600, 620 or equivalent. Valuation of a 
field, algebraic function fields, completion of a valuation field, 
ramification exponent and residue class degree, ramification 
theory, elements, differents, discriminants, product formula 
and characterization of fields by the formula, Gauss sum, 
class number formula of cyclotomic fields. 

MATH 630. REAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410 or equivalent. Lebesgue measure and 
integration on the line. Differentiation, absolute continuity. 
LP spaces, Fubini's theorem. If time permits, some applica- 
tions to Fourier series and transforms. 

MATH 631. REAL ANALYSIS II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 630. Set functions and integration in 
general measure spaces, Lebesgue spaces, representation of 
bounded linear functionals on L p , spaces of measures, 
Radon-Nikodym theorem, product measure spaces (Fubini 
and Tonelli theorems), differentiation of set functions, Riesz 
representation theorem. Selected topics; e.g., harmonic 
analysis, vector-valued measure, product measure of infinitely 
many measure spaces. 

MATH 632. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 631, 660. Theory of linear spaces and 



linear operators, including spectral analysis and the concepts 
of duality and convexity. Applications to differential equations 
and distribution theory. 

MATH 633. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS II (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 631. 660. Introduction to abstract har- 
monic analysis, including Banach algebras. Fourier analysis, 
group representations and transformation groups. NOTE: 633 
and 632 are independent courses, intended to introduce stu- 
dents to two distinct but related areas of functional analysis 

MATH 634. LINEAR SPACES I (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 632. Linear topological spaces, locally 
convex spaces, inductive limits, duality theory, Baire spaces, 
barreled spaces, uniform boundedness principle, closed 
graph and open mapping theorems on Frechet spaces, 
distributions. 

MATH 635. LINEAR SPACES II (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 634. Topological tensor products, nuclear 
spaces and mappings, general closed graph theorems. 

MATH 636. BANACH ALGEBRAS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 632. The Gelfand representation; involu- 
tion algebras, commutative and non-commutative representa- 
tion theorems of Gelfand-Neumark; applications to spectral 
theory and abstract harmonic analysis. 

MATH 640. TOPOLOGICAL GROUPS I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 630 and 631 or 730, or consent of instruc- 
tor. General nature of topological groups including homo- 
morphism theorems. Haar measure, representations of 
compact groups and the Peter-Weyl theorem. Pontrjagin 
duality, Tanaka duality and the Plancherel theorem. 

MATH 641. TOPOLOGICAL GROUPS II (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 640, or equivalent. The concept of Lie 
groups, the structure of compact groups, relations between 
Lie groups and Lie algebras, the structure of compact Lie 
groups. Transformation groups. 

MATH 648. SELECTED TOPICS IN ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

MATH 654. NON-LINEAR ELASTICITY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 690. Fundamentals of non-linear elastic- 
ity. Finite deformations, rubber elasticity, small deformations 
superimposed on finite deformations. 

MATH 660. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 410 or equivalent. Linear transformations, 
analytic functions, conformal mappings, Cauchy's theorem 
and applications, power series, partial fractions and factoriza- 
tion, elementary Riemann surfaces, Riemann's mapping 
theorem. 

MATH 661. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH 630 660 topics in conformal mappings, 
normal families, Picard's theorem, classes of univalent func- 
tions, extremal properties, variational methods, elliptic func- 
tions, Riemann surfaces. 

MATH 664. INTERPOLATION AND APPROXIMATION — 
(COMPLEX DOMAIN) (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 660 or consent of instructor. Possibility 
of approximation by polynomials, lemniscates. Interpolation 
by polynomials. Maximal convergence. Uniform distribution 
of points. Interpolation and approximation by rational func- 
tions. Rational functions with some free poles. 

MATH 665. INTERPOLATION AND APPROXIMATION — (REAL 
FUNCTIONS) (3) 
Interpolation of real functions and remainder theory. Uniform 
and least square approximations. Chebychev oscillation 
theorems. Orthogonal polynomials. Degree of approximation. 
Abstract formulation of approximation theory. Constructive 
function theory. 

MATH 666. SPECIAL FUNCTIONS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 660 or consent of instructor. Gamma 
function, Riemann zeta-function, hypergeometric functions, 
confluent hypergeometric functions, Bessel functions. 

MATH 668. SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPLEX ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Material selected to suit 
interests and background of the students. Typical courses: 



154 / umcp 



Riemann surfaces, automorphic functions, several complex 
variables, symmetric spaces. 

MATH 670. ADVANCED ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 
K3) 
Prerequisites. MATH 630 and either MATH 400 or 405. 
Existence and uniqueness theorems for systems of differen- 
tial equations, linear theory, properties of solutions of differ- 
ential equations including stability, asymptotic behavior, 
oscillation and comparison theorems. Plane autonomous sys- 
tems. Non-linear systems Topics of current interest 

MATH 671. ADVANCED ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 
II (3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 670. Advanced topics in ODE. The con- 
tent of this course varies with the interests of the instructor 
and class. Some topics covered have been optional control 
theory, celestial mechanics and Hamiltonian systems. 

MATH 673. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 411 or consent of instructor. Gauss and 
Green formulas, the Cauchy problem for the wave equation, 
method of descent and Huygens principle. The Dirichlet and 
Neumann problem for the Laplace equation, single and dou- 
ble layer potentials. Green s functions, the method of integral 
equations. 

MATH 674. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 673. Introduction to modern theories in 
partial differential equations. Topics include: existence and 
uniqueness questions, concepts of weak and strong solu- 
tions, applications of functional analysis. 

MATH 676. NUMERICAL METHODS IN ORDINARY 
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 405 and 414. Discrete variable methods 
for solving initial value and boundary value problems in ordi- 
nary differential equations. Stability theory. 

MATH 677. NUMERICAL METHODS IN PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS (3) 
Prerequisites. MATH 405 and 673. Approximation methods for 
boundary value, initial value, and eigenvalue problems in par- 
tial differential equations, including finite differences and 
methods involving approximating functions. 

MATH 680. EIGENVALUE AND BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS 

I (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH 405 and 41 0. Linear analysis and applica- 
tions to modern applied mathematics. The central theme of 
the course will be the theory of compact operators on Hilbert 
space and its applications to integral equations and eigen- 
value and boundary value problems for ordinary differential 
equations. 

MATH 681. EIGENVALUE AND BOUNDARY VALUE"PROBLEMS 

II (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 680. Asymptotic behavior of eigenvalues 
and eigenfunctions for second-order ordinary and partial dif- 
ferential equations. Variational formulation of boundary value 
problems. Upper and lower bounds for eigenvalues. 
Isoperimetric inequalities. 

MATH 682. VARIATIONAL METHODS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The Euler-Lagrange equa- 
tion, minimal principles in mathematical physics, estimation 
of capacity, torsional rigidity and other physical quantities: 
symmetrization. isoperimetric inequalities, estimation of 
eigenvalues, the minimax principle. 

MATH 683. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH CMSC 460 or 470. MATH 405, and 410. 
Perturbation theorems for linear equations and eigenvalue 
problems. Stability of solutions of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Discretization errors for ordinary differential equations. 
Rounding error for linear equations. Convergence theorems 
for iterative methods for linear and nonlinear equations. (Also 
listed as CMSC 670). 

MATH 684. ALGORITHMIC NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH CMSC 460 or 470. and CMSC 110. 
Detailed study of problems arising in the implementation of 
numerical algorithms on a computer. Typical problems 
include rounding errors, their estimation and control: numeri- 
cal stability considerations: stopping criteria for converging 




i 



r 





processes: parallel methods. Examples from linear algebra, 
differential equations, minimization. (Also listed as CMSC 
770). 

MATH 690. INTRODUCTION TO CONTINUUM MECHANICS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Solid and fluid continua, 
general analysis of stress and strain, equilibrium of elastic 
bodies, equations of motion for fluid bodies, stress-strain rela- 
tions, equations of perfect fluids and formulation of viscous 
flow problems. 

MATH 692. FLUID DYNAMICS I (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A mathematical formula- 
tion and treatment of problems arising in the theory of incom- 
pressible, compressible and viscous fluids. 

MATH 693. FLUID DYNAMICS II (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A continuation of the 
topics studied in Fluid Dynamics I. 

MATH 694. ADVANCED LINEAR NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH/CMSC 470. Methods for the solution of 
linear systems of equations; in particular, iterative methods 
and their convergence theory. The numerical solution of the 
algebraic eigenvalue problem. (Also listed as CMSC 770). 

MATH 695. LINEAR ELASTICITY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 690. Linear elastic behavior of solid con- 
tinuous media. Topics covered include torsion and flexure 
of beams, plane strain and plane stress, vibration and buck- 
ling problems, variational principles. Emphasis is placed on 
formulation and technique rather than on specific examples. 

MATH 696. ADVANCED NONLINEAR NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH/CMSC 670 and MATH 441 . Iterative solu- 
tion of nonlinear operator equations; in particular, nonlinear 
systems of equations. Existence questions. Minimization 
methods and applications to approximation problems. (Also 
listed as CMSC 772). 

MATH 697. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING (3) 
Prerequisites, STAT 411 and 470 or consent of instructor. 
Non-linear programming methods. Dynamic programming 
problems as they arise in Markov chain optimizations. 
Sequential analysis, search models, and inventory theory. 
Recent concepts and methods in discrete optimization prob- 
lems. 

MATH 698. SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

MATH 699. PROSEMINAR IN RESEARCH (1) 

Prerequisite, one semester of graduate work in mathematics. 
Devoted to the foundations of mathematics, including 
mathematical logic, axiom systems, and set theory. 

MATH 700. ADVANCED CLASSICAL ANALYSIS I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 413. A basic course in those parts of 
analysis essential for applied mathematics. Topics covered: 
asymptotic analysis and special functions of mathematical 
physics. 

MATH 701. ADVANCED CLASSICAL ANALYSIS II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 413. Further study in analysis essential 
for applied mathematics. Topics covered include Fourier 
series and integrals, and integral transforms. 

MATH 710. CONSISTENCY PROOFS IN SET THEORY (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH 446 and 447. Consistency and indepen- 
dence of such fundamental principles of set theory as the 
laws of choice, of cardinal arithmetic of constructibility and 
regularity. Godel's model of constructible sets, inner models, 
Cohen s generic models. 

MATH 712. MATHEMATICAL LOGIC I (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 447. The fundamentals for the theory of 
models, completeness and incompleteness in formal theories, 
decidable theories, undecidable theories. Topics include 
model-theoretical applications of the compactness theorem 
for formal languages, definability theorems. Lowenheim- 
Skolem theorems. Godel's incompleteness theorem, 
elimination-of-quantifier methods in decidable theories, the 
undecidability theorems of Church and Tarski. 

MATH 713. MATHEMATICAL LOGIC II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 447. Recursion theory and proof theory. 
Topics include enumeration and normal form theorems, the 



classification of recursively enumerable sets, degrees of 
unsolvability, the arithmetical hierarchy, consistency proofs 
within arithmetic, Godel's theorem on the unprovability of 
the consistency of certain theories within arithmetic, a consis- 
tency proof for Peano arithmetic. 

MATH 715. MODEL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 712. Topics to be covered include the 
compactness theorem and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems for 
first-order logic. "Omega'' completeness theorem, ultra prod- 
ucts, saturated and special models, definability results, 
categoricity in power, omitting types of elements, and applica- 
tions to algebra and analysis. 

MATH 716. RECURSIVE FUNCTION THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 713. Topics to be covered are formal 
definitions of computability and recursive functions, Kleenes' 
enumeration and fixed-point theorems, Turing reducibi lity. 
the arithmetical hierarchy. Other topics are simple and hyper- 
simple sets, truth-table reducibility, creative sets, Myhill s 
theorem in one-one reducibility, deficiency sets, Friedberg's 
solution of Post's problem, maximal sets, retraceable sets, 
major subsets, the analytical hierarchy, recursive ordinals, 
hyper arithmetical sets. 

MATH 718. SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

MATH 730. TOPOLOGY I (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 410. Topological spaces, continuous 
maps, homeomorphisms. Product and quotient spaces. 
Existence of real-valued functions. Metric and metrizable 
spaces. 

MATH 731. TOPOLOGY II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 730, some familiarity with abstract 
algebra. Spaces of mappings, fundamental group, covering 
spaces. Finite simplicial complexes and simplicial mappings. 
Simplicial homology theory. Fixed point theorems. 

MATH 734. ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 731. Singular homology, uniqueness 
theorems, tensor products and homomorphisms, the functors 
ext and tor. Universal coefficient theorems, Kunneth and 
Eilenberg-Zilber theorems, products and duality. 

MATH 735. ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY II (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 734. Higher homotopy groups, CW com- 
plexes, obstruction theory, Eilenberg-MacLane spaces, the 
Serre spectral sequences. 

MATH 737. POINT SET TOPOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 730. Characterization of paths, arcs, and 
the cantor set. Polyhedral Jordan curve and Schoenfliess 
theorems. Retracts and neighborhood retracts. Fixed point 
theorems. Dimension theory. General position theorems for 
mappings of polyhedra and metric spaces, with applications. 

MATH 740. DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 746 or consent of instructor. Connec- 
tions, curvature, torsion, symplectic contact, and complex 
structures. 

MATH 742. DIFFERENTIAL TOPOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 746. Characteristic classes, cobordism. 
differential structures on cells and spheres. 

MATH 744. LIE GROUPS I (3) 

Prerequisites. MATH 403. 405, 41 1 , and 432, their equivalents, 
or consent of instructor. An introduction to the fundamentals 
of Lie groups, including some material on groups of matrices 
and Lie algebras. 

MATH 745. LIE GROUPS II (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 744, or consent of instructor. A continua- 
tion of Lie Groups I in which some of the following topics 
will be emphasized: solvable Lie groups, compact Lie groups, 
classifications of semi-simple Lie groups, representation 
theory, homogeneous spaces. 

MATH 746. DIFFERENTIABLE MANIFOLDS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Differentiable manifolds, 
embeddings in Euclidean space, vector and tensor bundles, 
vector fields, differentiable fields. Riemann metrics. 



156 / umcp 



MATH 748 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY 
(3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

MATH 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 
MATH 899 DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY 



STAT 400. APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS I (3) 
Prerequisites. MATH 141 or 221. Random variables, common 
distributions, moments, law of large numbers and central limit 
theorem. Sampling methods, estimation of parameters, test- 
ing of hypotheses, analysis of variance, regression, and corre- 
lation. 

STAT 401 APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS II (3) 
Prerequisites. STAT 400 (MATH 241 recommended). Point 
estimation, sufficient unbiased and consistent estimators. 
Minimum variance and maximum likelihood estimators. Inter- 
val estimation. Testing of hypotheses. Regression and linear 
hypotheses. Sampling distributions. Experimental designs. 
Sequential tests, elements of non-parametric methods. 

STAT 410. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY THEORY (3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 241. Probability and its properties. Ran- 
dom variables and distribution functions in one and several 
dimensions. Moments. Characteristic functions. Limit 
theorems. 

STAT 411. INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES (3) 
Prerequisite. STAT 410. or MATH 410 and one of STAT 250 
or STAT 400. Elementary stochastic processes. Renewal pro- 
cess random walks, branching process, discrete Markov 
chains, first passable times. Markov chains with a continuous 
parameter, birth and death processes. Stationary processes 
and their spectral properties. 

STAT 420. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 410 or STAT 400 and MATH 410. Short 
review of probability concepts including sampling distribu- 
tions. Interval estimation. Theory of order statistics. Tolerance 
limits. Limit distributions and stochastic convergence. Suf- 
ficient statistics. Completeness and stochastic independence. 
Rao-Blackwell theorem. 

STAT 421. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS II (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 420 or STAT 401 and MATH 410. Loss and 
risk functions Statistical decisions. Optimality criteria. 
Uniformly minimum risk procedures. Bayesian risk, minimax 
principle. Point estimation theory. Statistical hypotheses and 
optimal tests. Likelihood ratio tests. Elements of linear 
hypotheses, analysis of variance and sequential theory. 

STAT 450. REGRESSION AND VARIANCE ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 401 or 420. One. two. three and four lay- 
outs in analysis of variance, fixed effects models, linear 
regression in several variables. Gauss-Markov theorem, multi- 
ple regression analysis, experimental designs. 

STAT 464. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS (3) 

Prerequisite, one semester of calculus and junior standing. 
Probabilistic models. Sampling. Some applications of proba- 
bility in genetics. Experimental designs. Estimation of effects 
of treatment. Comparative experiments. Fisher-Irwin test. Wil- 
coxin tests for paired comparisons. (This course cannot be 
counted toward a major in mathematics ) 

STAT 470. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) 
Prerequisite. MATH 240 or 400. Duality theorem and minimax 
theorem for finite matrix games. Structure of linear and non- 
linear solutions with perturbations. Various solution 
techniques of linear, quadratic, and convex programming 
methods. Special integer programming models (transpor- 
tation and traveling salesman problems). Network theory with 
max-flow-min-cut theorem. 

STAT 600. PROBABILITY THEORY I (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 410 or MATH 400 with one semester of 
Probability. Probability space, classes of events, construction 



of probability measures. Random variables, convergence 
theorems, images of measures. Independence Expectation 
and moments. Lebesgue integration. L p spaces. Radon- 
Nikodym theorem, singular and absolutely continuous meas- 
ures. Conditional expectations, existence of regular distnbuti- 
butions; applications. Probabilities on product spaces. 
Fubini theorem. Kolmogorov extension theorem. Tulcea prod- 
uct theorem 

STAT 601 PROBABILITY THEORY II (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 600. MATH 413 recommended. Charac- 
teristic functions of distribution functions. Bochner's rep- 
resentation theorem. Hellys theorems and Levy s inversion 
formula. Application of Cauchy's residue theorem. Infinitely 
divisible distributions. Kolmogorov's three-series theorem. 
Law of the iterated logarithm. Arc sine law. Central limit 
theorems for independent and dependent random variable 
(Lindeberg-Feller theorem). Weak and strong laws of large 
numbers. Martingale convergence theorems (for sequences). 

STAT 610. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES I (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 301 . Separability, measurability. and sim- 
ple continuity of stochastic processes. Stopping times. Mar- 
tingales; fundamental inequalities, convergence theorems 
and their applications, continuity theorems, martingale times, 
sample function behavior. Processes with independent 
(orthogonal) increments, Brownian motion. Stationary pro- 
cesses, spectral analysis and ergodic theory. 

STAT 611. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES II (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 601. Definition and classification of Mar- 
kov processes. Properties of transition probabilities, forward 
and backward equations (boundary conditions), absorption 
probabilities, strong Markov-property. Markovian semi- 
groups, extended infinitesimal operator. Sample function 
behavior. Connections between semigroup approach and 
sample function approach. Diffusion theory, Ito equation. 
Potential theory. 

STAT 650. APPLIED STOCHASTIC PROCESSES (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 410 or MATH 410 with one semester of 
Probability. Basic concepts of stochastic processes. Renewal 
processes and random walks, fluctuation theory. Stationary 
processes, spectral analysis. Markov chains and processes 
(discrete and continuous parameters). Birth and death pro- 
cesses, diffusion processes. Applications from theories of 
queueing. storage, inventory, epidemics, noise, prediction 
and others. 

STAT 698. SELECTED TOPICS IN PROBABILITY (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

STAT 700. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 410 or STAT 401 and MATH 410, or equi- 
valent. Special distributions, expectations, moments, charac- 
teristic functions. Multivariate distributions, sampling dis- 
tributions, limit theorems. Transformations, order statistics, 
series representations. Estimation. Cramer-Rao inequality, 
maximum likelihood. Gauss-Markov theorem, and Bayes 
estimates. 

STAT 701. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 700 or STAT 420. Tests of hypotheses, 
Neyman-Pearson lemma, and likelihood ratio tests. Bayesian 
inference. Goodness-of-fit and contingency tables. Regres- 
sion and analysis of variance. Non-parametric tests, sequen- 
tial analysis, multivariate analysis 

STAT 710. ADVANCED STATISTICS I (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 421. Concurrent registration with STAT 
600 recommended. Statistical decision theory. Neyman- 
Pearson lemma and its extensions. Uniformly most powerful 
test. Monotone likelihood ratio. Exponential families of dis- 
tributions, concepts of similarity, and tests with Neyman 
structure. Unbiased tests and applications to normal families. 

STAT 711. ADVANCED STATISTICS II (3) 

Prerequisite. STAT 710. Invariance. almost invariance. and 
applications to rank tests. Invariant set estimation. Linear 
models with applications to analysis of variance and regres- 
sion. Elements of asymptotic theory. Minimax principle and 
Hunt-Stein theorem. 



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STAT 720. NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 710. Order statistics. Nonparametric point 
and set estimation. Stochastic approximation. Tolerance 
regions. Invariance principle and its applications. Large sam- 
ple properties and optimality criteria, efficacy, Pitmann effi- 
ciency. Rank tests and Kolmogorov-Smirnov type tests. Li- 
statistics. 

STAT 750. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 420 and MATH 400, or STAT 700. Mul- 
tivariate normal, Wishart s and Hotelling's distributions. Tests 
of hypotheses, estimation. Generalized distance, discriminant 
analysis. Regression and correlation. Multivariate analysis of 
variance; distribution of test criteria. 

STAT 760. SAMPLING THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 420 or STAT 700. Simple random samp- 
ling. Sampling for proportions. Estimation of sample size. 
Sampling with varying probabilities of sampling. Sampling: 
stratified, systematic, cluster, double, sequential, incomplete. 

STAT 798. SELECTED TOPICS IN STATISTICS (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor and Chairman: Dally 

Professors: Allen, Armstrong, Asimow, Berger, Cunniff, Hsu, 

Jackson, Marcinkowski, Sayre. Shreeve, Talaat, Yang 
Associate Professors: Anand, Buckley, Fourney, Hayleck, 

Marks, Morse, Sallet, Walston 
Assistant Professors: Forsnes, Hill, Holloway, Owens, Tsui 
Lecturers: Dawson, Seigel 

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers programs 
which lead to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Programs are offered in five different areas of 
specialization including: 1) Energy, 2) Engineering Materials, 
3) Fluid Mechanics, 4) Industrial and Systems Engineering, and 
5) Solid Mechanics. Each graduate student should select one 
of the areas of specialization at his first registration so that a 
suitable program leading to a degree can be planned. 

1) Energy. This area of specialization treats the transforma- 
tion, transportation and utilization of all types of energy. The 
area encompasses three main topics which include heat and 
mass transfer, thermodynamics, and energy conversion. 

2) Engineering Materials. This area of specialization is con- 
cerned with the relationships between the structure of materials 
and their properties. The structural considerations may be on 
an atomic, micro or macro scale depending upon the property 
of a specific material being examined. 

3) Fluid Mechanics. The programs of study in Fluid 
Mechanics are designed to provide a broad fundamental base 
structured around a background of mathematical techniques 
applicable to a wide variety of fluid flow problems. The program 
provides for an in-depth theoretical study of the inviscid and 
viscous flow of compressible and incompressible fluids. 

4) Industrial Engineering. This area of specialization com- 
bines fields of science and technology for the purposes of 
analysis, synthesis, design and management of complex sys- 
tems. In addition to traditional applications to communication, 
transportation and aerospace systems and production proces- 
ses, this area of specialization finds increased application in 
economics, biomedical engineering, and urban problems. The 
graduate program is organized to include a variety of courses 
in control systems, operations research, design, and industrial 
engineering. 

5) Solid Mechanics. This area of specialization provides an 
opportunity for preparation in advanced analytical and experi- 
mental methods in mechanics. In this area, the emphasis is usu- 
ally placed on the development of methods and procedures with 
the application following the understanding of the fundamental 
principles. Areas of study include continuum mechanics, 
dynamics, vibrations, acoustics, stress waves, elasticity, plastic- 
ity, linear and non-linear mechanics, experimental mechanics, 
and fracture mechanics. 



Although there are minor variations in the general require- 
ments for programs in the different technical areas, the require- 
ments listed below can be used as a guide for initial planning. 

The degree requirements for the Master of Science program 
include 30 semester hours distributed as follows: 12-15 semes- 
ter hours of courses within the area of interest: 3-6 semester 
hours of mathematics (normally selected from among MATH 
463, 464. 415. 460, STAT 400. 401 according to needs and pre- 
vious preparation); 6-9 semester hours in another area of inter- 
est of the Mechanical Engineering Department or from courses 
outside the department; and 6 semester hours of thesis or six 
additional course hours in the area of interest plus a paper on 
a topic selected in consultation with the student's committee. 

A Ph.D. program normally consists of 12 semester hours of 
thesis registration plus a suggested minimum of 48 semester 
hours of course work (24 semester hours beyond the M.S.), usu- 
ally 24 semester hours as a major within one of the areas of 
interest in the Mechanical Engineering Department. Groups 
require 9-18 hours of prescribed fundamental courses plus 6-15 
hours of advanced or specialized courses selected in consulta- 
tion with the advisory committee. A total of 24 semester hours 
is allowed for minors. This minor requirement is generally split 
between mathematics and one other area of specialization. 
Groups require 6-12 semester hours in mathematics (or statis- 
tics). The remaining semester hours would be devoted to a 
coherent group of courses from within or outside of the 
Mechanical Engineering Department selected by the student in 
consultation with his advisory committee. 

Each candidate for the doctoral degree must submit a disser- 
tation on a topic selected from the student's major subject. Each 
candidate must satisfactorily complete an oral and/or written 
examination. The oral examination normally consists of a "de- 
fense of thesis" and may include discussions of pertinent course 
material. 



ENME 400. MACHINE DESIGN (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
ENME 300, 360. Working stresses, stress concentration, 
stress analysis and repeated loadings. Design of machine ele- 
ments. Kinematics of mechanisms. 

ENME 401. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND 
DESIGN (4) 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequi- 
site, senior standing in Mechanical Engineering or consent 
of instructor. Engineering design practice as illustrated by 
discussions of selected case studies. Design projects involv- 
ing the application of technology to the solution of industrial 
and community problems. Legal and ethical responsibility of 
the designer. 

ENME 402. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGINEERING DESIGN (3) 
Three lecture periods per week. Prerequisite, senior standing 
in Mechanical Engineering or consent of instructor. Creativity 
and innovation in design. Generalized performance analysis, 
reliability and optimization as applied to the design of compo- 
nents and engineering systems. Use of computers in design. 
Design of multivariate systems. 

ENME 403. AUTOMATIC CONTROLS (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENEE 300, senior 
standing. Hydraulic, electrical, mechanical and pneumatic 
automatic control systems. Open and closed loops. Steady 
state and transient operation, stability criteria, linear and non- 
linear systems. Laplace transforms. 

ENME 410. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in 
Mechanical Engineering. Applications of linear programming, 
queueing model, theory of games and competitive models 
to engineering problems. 

ENME 41 1 . INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, ENME 300 and ECON 
205 or consent of instructor. This course is concerned with 
the design, improvement and installation of integrated sys- 
tems of men, materials and equipment. Areas covered include 
industrial activities, plant layout and design, value analysis, 
engineering economics, quality and production control, 
methods engineering, industrial relations, etc. 



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ENME 420. ENERGY CONVERSION (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 320. Required of 
seniors in Electrical Engineering. Chemical, heat, mechani- 
cal, nuclear and electrical energy conversion processes, 
cycles and systems. Direct conversion processes of fuel cells, 
thermionics and magnetohydromechanics. 

ENME 421. ENERGY CONVERSION I (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 321, ENME 342. 
Application of the principles of thermodynamics, fluid 
mechanics and heat transfer to chemical, thermal, mechani- 
cal, nuclear and electrical energy conversion processes, 
cycles and systems. Reciprocating, turbine and rocket power 
plants using all types of heat and reaction sources. Environ- 
mental effects of energy conversion processes. 

ENME 422. ENERGY CONVERSION II (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 421. Advanced 
topics in energy conversion. Direct conversion processes of 
fuel cells, solar cells, thermionics, thermoelectrics and mag- 
netohydrodynamics. 

ENME 423. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 321, 360, senior 
standing in Mechanical Engineering. Heating and cooling 
load computations. Thermodynamics of refrigeration sys- 
tems. Low temperature refrigeration. Problems involving ex- 
tremes of temperature pressure, acceleration and radiation. 

ENME 424. THERMODYNAMICS II (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 321, senior stand- 
ing. Applications to special systems, change of phase, low 
temperature. Statistical concepts, equilibrium, heterogene- 
ous systems. 

ENME 442. FLUID MECHANICS II (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 342, senior stand- 
ing. Hydrodynamics with engineering applications. Stream 
function and velocity potential, conformal transformations, 
pressure distributions, circulation, numerical methods and 
analogies. 

ENME 450. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS FOR THE 
OCEANIC ENVIRONMENT (3) 
Prerequisite, junior standing. Study of the characteristics of 
the marine environment which affect the design, operation 
and maintenance of mechanical equipment, effects of waves, 
currents, pressure, temperature, corrosion, and fouling. 
Study of design parameters for existing and proposed 
mechanical systems used in marine construction, on ship- 
board, in search and salvage operations. 

ENME 451. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS FOR 
UNDERWATER OPERATIONS (3) 
Prerequisite, ENME 450 or consent of instructor. Study of 
propulsion, control and environmental systems for sub- 
merged vehicles. Design of mechanical systems ifi support 
of diving and saturated living operations. 

ENME 460. ELASTICITY AND PLASTICITY I (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 400. Analysis of 
plates and shells, thick walled cylinders, columns, torsion of 
non-circular sections, and rotating disks. 

ENME 461. DYNAMICS II (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ENME 360, differential 
equations, senior standing in mechanical engineering. Linear 
and non-linear plane and three-dimensional motion, moving 
axes, Lagrange's equation, Hamilton's principle, non-linear 
vibration, gyroscope, celestial mechanics. 

ENME 462. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING ACOUSTICS (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENME 380 or equival- 
ent. Study of the physical behavior of sound waves. Introduc- 
tion to terminology and instrumentation used in acoustics. 
Criteria for noise and vibration control. Some fundamentals 
underlying noise control and applications to ventilation sys- 
tems, machine and shop quieting, office buildings, jet noise, 
transportation systems and underwater sound. 

ENME 463. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, ENME 380, or MATH 246. 
Mathematical modeling of physical situations. Solution of 
problems expressed by partial differential equations. Applica- 



tion of Fourier series and integrals, Laplace transformation, 
Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials and complex vari- 
ables to the solution of engineering problems in mechanical 
vibrations, heat transfer, fluid mechanics and automatic con- 
trol theory. 

ENME 465. INTRODUCTORY FRACTURE MECHANICS (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: senior standing in 
Engineering. An examination of the concepts of fracture in 
members with pre-existing flaws. Emphasis is primarily on 
the mechanics aspects with the development of the Griffith 
theory and the introduction of the stress intensity factor, K, 
associated with different types of cracks. Fracture 
phenomena are introduced together with critical values of 
the fracture toughness of materials. Testing procedures for 
characterizing materials together with applications of fracture 
mechanics to design are treated. 

ENME 480. ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION (3) 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. Theory of 
experimentation. Applications of the principles of measure- 
ment and instrumentation systems to laboratory experimenta- 
tion. Experiments in fluid mechanics, solid mechanics and 
energy conversion. Selected experiments or assigned pro- 
jects to emphasize planned procedure, analysis and com- 
munication of results, analogous systems and leadership. 

ENME 481. ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION (3) 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
senior standing in Mechanical Engineering. Theory of 
experimentation. Applications of the principles of measure- 
ment and instrumentation systems to laboratory experimenta- 
tion. Experiments in fluid mechanics, solid mechanics and 
energy conversion. Selected experiments or assigned pro- 
jects to emphasize planned procedure, analysis and communi- 
cation of results, analogous systems and leadership. 

ENME 488. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, senior standing in 
Mechanical Engineering. Advanced problems in Mechanical 
Engineering with special emphasis on mathematical and 
experimental methods. 

ENME 489. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
(3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. May be taken for 
repeated credit up to a total of 6 credits, with the permission 
of the student's advisor. Selected topics of current impor- 
tance in Mechanical Engineering. 

ENME 600. ADVANCED MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 
(3) 
Three lectures per week. Synthesis of stress analysis and 
properties and characteristics of materials as related to 
design. Areas covered: combined stress designs, optimiza- 
tions, composite structures, stress concentrations, design 
under various environmental conditions, metal working, limit 
analysis, etc. Review of design literature, design project. 

ENME 601. ADVANCED MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 
(3) 
Prerequisite, ENME 600. Three lectures per week. Synthesis 
of stress analysis and properties and characteristics of materi- 
als as related to design. Areas covered: combined stress 
designs, optimizations, composite structures, stress concen- 
trations, design under various environmental conditions, 
metal working, limit analysis, etc. Review of design literature, 
design project. 

ENME 602. CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS 
(3) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, undergraduate automat- 
ic control theory background. Linear control systems analysis 
and synthesis using time frequency domain techniques: flow 
graphs, error coefficients, sensitivity, stability, compensation 
to meet specifications, introduction to sampled data systems. 

ENME 603. NON-LINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS 

(3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 602, ENME 660 

or equivalent. Approximate analysis of non-linear systems 

using series, perturbation, and linearization techniques: 



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introduction to state space formulation of differential 
equations; systems with stochastic inputs; stability, introduc- 
tion to optimum switched systems: adaptive control systems. 

ENME 620. 621. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequi- 
sites, ENME 421. Advanced problems in thermodynamics on 
compression of gases and liquids, combustion and equilib- 
rium, humidification and refrigeration and availability. Statis- 
tical thermodynamics, partition functions, irreversible proces- 
ses. Transport phenomena. 

ENME 622, 623. ENERGY CONVERSION-SOLID STATE (3. 3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, ENME 421. Combustion, thermo-electric, ther- 
mionic fuel cells, reactors, magnetohydrodynamics. kinetics 
of reactors, fission and fusion. 

ENME 624, 625. ENERGY CONVERSIONS-PLASMA STATE 
(3.3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 421. Design parameters in chemical, nu- 
clear and direct conversion systems for the production of 
power, weight, efficiency and radiation. 

ENME 626. 627. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisites. ENME 321, 342, 343. Advanced problems cover- 
ing effects of radiation, conduction, convection, evaporation 
and condensation. Study of research literature on heat 
transfer. 

ENME 630. 631. JET PROPULSION (3. 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequi- 
sites, ENME 421 , 422. Types of thermal jet units. Fluid reaction 
and propulsive efficency. Performance of rockets, aerother- 
modynamics, combustion chemical kinetics, aerodynamics of 
high speed air flow. Solid and liquid propellant rockets. 
Design of turojets and aerojets. ramjets and hydroduct units, 
including combustion chambers, turbines and compressor. 

ENME 640. ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, ENME 380 or MATH 246 and ENME 340. Poten- 
tial flow theory, three-dimensional flow examples, application 
of complex variables to two-dimensional flow problems, 
Blasius theorem, circulation and Joukowski hypothesis, 
engineering applications to cavitation and calculation of pres- 
sure distribution, viscous flow and boundary layer. 

ENME 641. ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 640. Potential flow theory, three- 
dimensional flow examples, application of complex variables 
to two-dimensional flow problems. Blasius theorem, circula- 
tion and Joukowski hypothesis, engineering applications to 
cavitation and calculation of pressure distribution, viscous 
flow and boundary layer. 

ENME 642. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, ENME 341 and MATH 246, or ENME 380. One 
dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow, similarity rules, 
normal and oblique shock waves. 

ENME 643 COMPRESSIBLE FLOW (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 642. One dimensional subsonic and 
supersonic flow, similarity rules, normal and oblique shock 
waves. 

ENME 644. VISCOUS FLOW (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites. ENME 640. 641. 
Three lectures per week. Derivation of Navier Stokes equa- 
tions, some exact solutions. Boundary layer equations. Lami- 
nar flow-similar solutions, compressibility transformations, 
analytic approximations, numerical methods. Stability and 
transition to turbulent flow. Turbulent flow-isotropic turbu- 
lence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows. This course 
is equivalent to ENAE 675, 676. 

ENME 645. VISCOUS FLOW (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite. ENME 644. Three 
lectures per week. Derivation of Navier Stokes equations, 



some exact solutions. Boundary layer equations. Laminar 
flow-similar solutions, compressibility transformations, 
analytic approximations, numerical methods. Stability and 
transition to turbulent flow. Turbulent flow-isotropic turbu- 
lence, boundary layer flows, free mixing flows. This course 
is equivalent to ENAE 675, 676. 

ENME 646. SPECIAL TOPICS IN UNSTEADY HYDRODYNAMICS 
(3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, ENME 640. 641. Treatment in depth of several 
topics in unsteady hydrodynamics such as sloshing in liquid 
tanks, seismic effects in liquids in large containers and reser- 
voirs, and stationary surface wave phenomena during natural 
and forced oscillation. Examination of the effects of non- 
linearities in surface boundary conditions, low gravity and 
rotation on fluid behavior. Emphasis on the use of theoretical 
fundamentals and techniques including numerical methods 
to solve practical problems. The use of high speed computers 
will be featured in numerical solutions wherever practicable. 

ENME 647. SPECIAL TOPICS IN UNSTEADY HYDRODYNAMICS 
(3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 646. Treatment in depth of several topics 
in unsteady hydrodynamics such as sloshing in liquid tanks, 
seismic effects in liquids in large containers and reservoirs, 
and stationary surface wave phenomena during natural and 
forced oscillation. Examination of the effects of non- 
linearities in surface boundary conditions, low gravity and 
rotation on fluid behavior. Emphasis on the use of theoretical 
fundamentals and techniques including numerical methods 
to solve practical problems. The use of high speed computers 
will be featured in numerical solutions wherever practicable. 

ENME 650. DESIGN OF TURBOMACHINERY (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 422. Characteristics and design of tur- 
bines, pumps, compressors and torque converters: cavita- 
tion, stall, and surge. 

ENME 651. DESIGN OF TURBOMACHINERY (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ENME 650. Characteristics and design of tur- 
bines, pumps, compressors and torque convertors; cavita- 
tion, stall, and surge. 

ENME 660. INTERMEDIATE DYNAMICS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Fundamentals of 
Newtonian dynamics which includes kinematics of a particle, 
dynamics of a particle and a system of particles. Hamilton s 
principle. Lagrange's equations, basic concepts and kinemat- 
ics of rigid body motion, dynamics of planar rigid body 
motion. Applications to mechanical engineering problems. 

ENME 661. ADVANCED DYNAMICS (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ENME 660. Dynamics of three-dimensional rigid body motion. 
Application of Euler s angles to rigid body motion. Hamilton s 
equation. Dynamics of gyroscopic instruments. Vibration 
theory of linear lumped mass systems. Satellite orbits and 
space vehicle motion. A review of current problems under 
investigation by research workers. 

ENME 662. LINEAR VIBRATIONS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Fourier and statistical 
analysis, transient, steady-state, and random behavior of 
linear lumped mass systems. Normal mode theory; shock 
spectrum concepts: mechanical impedance and mobility 
methods. Vibrations of continuous media including rods, 
beams, and membranes. 

ENME 663. NONLINEAR VIBRATIONS (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. 
ENME 641. Geometrical and numerical analysis of non-linear 
systems. Stability, limit cycles. Theory of bifurcations. Pertur- 
bation method. Periodic solutions. Oscillations in systems 
with several degrees of freedom. Asymptotic methods. Non- 
linear resonance. Relaxation oscillations. Self-excited vibra- 
tions. 



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ENME 666, 667. STRESS WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA (3, 
3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Methods of characteristics applied to transient phenomena 
in solids and fluids. Elastic and plastic waves under impact. 
Shock formation and strain rate effects. 

ENME 670. CONTINUUM MECHANICS (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. The algebra and cal- 
culus of tensors in Riemannian space are developed with spe- 
cial emphasis on those aspects which are most relevant to 
mechanics. The geometry of curves and surfaces in E-3 is 
examined. The concepts are applied to the derivation of the 
field equations for the non-linear theory of continuous media 
and to various problems arising in classical dynamics. 

ENME 671. LINEAR THEORY OF ELASTICITY (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. The basic equa- 
tions of the linear theory are developed as a special case 
of the non-linear theory. The first and second boundary value 
problems are discussed together with the problem of unique- 
ness. Solutions are constructed to problems of technical 
interest through semi-inverse, transform and potential 
methods. Included are the study of plane problems, torsion, 
dynamic response of spherical shells and tubes, microstruc- 
ture and anisotropic materials. 

ENME 672. PLASTICITY (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. Yield 
criterion and associated flow rules as related to the behavior 
of materials in the elastic-inelastic region for both perfectly 
plastic and strain hardenable materials. Plastic behavior of 
members in the following areas including, instability, bend- 
ing, torsion, cylinders, spheres, curved members, limit 
analysis, analysis and metal working theory and applications. 

ENME 673. PLASTICITY (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, ENME 672. Yield criterion and associated flow 
rules as related to the behavior of materials in the elastic- 
inelastic region for both perfectly plastic and strain harden- 
able materials. Plastic behavior of members in the following 
areas including, instability, bending, torsion, cylinders, 
spheres, curved members, limit analysis, analysis and metal 
working theory and applications. 

ENME 674. NON-LINEAR ELASTICITY (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENME 
670. Treats those materials for which the stress at time T 
depends only on the local configuration at time T. The con- 
stitutive equations are developed for elastic and hyperelastic 
materials through the application of the various invariance 
requirements. Exact solutions for special non-linear problems 
are developed. Plane problems, infinitesimal strain super- 
imposed on a given finite strain, wave propagation and stabil- 
ity problems are considered. 

ENME 675. VISCOELASTICITY (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ENME 670. Treats the behavior of solid materials which pos- 
sess fluid characteristics. Included within this group are 
Green-Revlin and hygrosteric materials. The study of objec- 
tive tensor rates and other invariance requirements leads to 
the formulation of constitutive equation for variance visco- 
elastic materials. Steady shear flows, helical flow, visco- 
elastic torsion and problems arising from the linear visco- 
elastic theory are considered. 

ENME 676. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ELASTIC SHELLS (3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, knowledge of the equations of elasticity. Funda- 
mental results from the theory of surfaces. Theories of shells 
composed of linear and non-linear elastic materials. Discus- 
sion of both infinitesimal and finite deformation states. Strain 
displacement relationships developed to include higher order 
terms. Derivation of equilibrium equations and their use in 
static and dynamic stability studies. Constitutive equations 
for the linear theory. Solutions to special shell problems. 

ENME 677. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ELASTIC SHELLS (3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, ENME 670. Fundamental results from the theory 
of surfaces. Theories of shells composed of linear and non- 



linear elastic materials. Discussion of both infinitesimal and 
finite deformation states. Strain displacement relationships 
developed to include higher order terms. Derivation of 
equilibrium equations and their use in static and dynamic sta- 
bility studies. Constitutive equations for the linear theory. 
Solutions to special shell problems. 

ENME 678. FRACTURE MECHANICS (3) 
An advanced treatment of fracture mechanics covering in 
detail the analysis concepts for determining the stress inten- 
sity factors for various types of cracks. Advanced experimen- 
tal methods for evaluation of materials or structures for frac- 
ture toughness. Analysis of moving cracks and the statistical 
analysis of fracture strength. Finally, illustrative fracture con- 
trol plans are treated to show the engineering applications 
of fracture mechanics. 

ENME 760, 761. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I (3, 3) 
Advanced topics in structural dynamics analysis: dynamic 
properties of materials, impact and contact phenomena, wave 
propagation, modern numerical methods for complex struc- 
tural systems, analysis for wind and blast loads, penetration 
loads, and earthquake, non-linear systems, random vibrations 
and structural failure from random loads. Prerequisites, 
ENME 602. 603 or equivalent. 

ENME 788. SEMINAR (1-16) 

First or second semester. Credit in accordance with work out- 
lined by Mechanical Engineering staff. Prerequisite, graduate 
standing in Mechanical Engineering. 

ENME 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

ENME 808. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGI- 
NEERING (2-3) 

ENME 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



IETEOROLOGY 



Research Professor and Chairman: Landsberg 
Associate Professors: Israel, 1 Rodenhuis 
Assistant Professors: Gage, Thompson, Vernekar 
Research Professor: Faller 
Visiting Lecturer: Gerrity 

1 joint appointment with Civil Engineering 

The Graduate Program in Meteorology offers unusually broad 
opportunities to students pursuing an advanced course of study 
due to a close relationship between the activities of the program 
and the scientific activities of various institutes and laboratories 
on and off campus. 

The Graduate Program in Meteorology offers a course of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy, and is open to students holding the Bachelor's 
degree in chemistry, mathematics, physics, astronomy, 
engineering, or other programs with suitable emphasis in the 
sciences. Previous education in meteorology or related sciences 
will be favorably considered in a student's application for admis- 
sion to the program; however, such education or experience 
is not a prerequisite. In exceptional circumstances a student 
holding the baccalaureate degree in other fields may be 
admitted subject to satisfactory completion of prescribed back- 
ground courses. 

Courses in the major subject area may be selected from those 
courses listed under Meteorology. Courses to satisfy the minor 
requirement may be chosen in physics, astronomy, mathema- 
tics, applied mathematics, fluid dynamics, engineering or in 
other areas of special interest. The student's program will be 
supervised by a member of the Meteorology teaching faculty. 
Research problems in meteorology will be supervised by mem- 
bers of the institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathemat- 
ics, or by a faculty member of another appropriate department. 
Under special circumstances, the research may be conducted 
in an off-campus laboratory with professional supervision. 



umcp / 161 



The laboratories are well equipped and include elaborate 
apparatus for fluid dynamics experiments in rotating systems, 
a tank for studying the interaction of water waves and wind, 
continuous weather facsimile data, a complete solar radiation 
station on the roof of the building, several micro-meteorological 
field stations, and use of common shop facilities in the Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

There is, within the meteorology office grouping, a specialized 
library with several hundred text and reference books in 
meteorology and allied sciences, many specialized series of 
research reports (i.e.. contract reports, etc.) and many current 
journals in meteorology and related fields. Access to the vast 
holdings of the Atmospheric Sciences Library of NOAA at Silver 
Spring, Maryland, within about 20 minutes of the campus, has 
been arranged. 

The University of Maryland is a member of the University Cor- 
poration for Atmospheric Research and as such, enjoys the com- 
mon facilities offered by the National Center for Atmospheric 
Research at Boulder, Colorado. The University has also signed 
Memoranda of Agreements with NOAA. Naval Research Labora- 
tory and the National Bureau of Standards. 



METO 410. DESCRIPTIVE AND SYNOPTIC METEOROLOGY (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 241, PHYS 284 or equivalent. A survey 
of atmospheric phenomena, goals of research and techniques 
of study. This course would introduce the new student to the 
broad range of theoretical and applied studies in meteorology 
in order to acquaint him with the interaction of the physical 
and dynamical processes and the various scales of 
atmospheric phenomena. Some work in synoptic analysis and 
an introduction to methods of forecasting would be included. 

METO 411. DESCRIPTIVE AND SYNOPTIC METEOROLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite, METO 410. A survey of atmospheric phenomena, 
goals of research and techniques of study. This course would 
introduce the new student to the broad range of theoretical 
and applied studies in meteorology in order to acquaint him 
with the interaction of the physical and dynamical processes 
and the various scales of atmospheric phenomena. Some 
work in synoptic analysis and an introduction to methods of 
forecasting would be included. 

METO 412. PHYSICS AND THERMODYNAMICS OF THE 
ATMOSPHERE (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 241. PHYS 284 or equivalent. Optical 
phenomena, the radiation balance, introduction to cloud 
physics, atmospheric electrical phenomena, basic ther- 
modynamic processes and their application to the 
atmosphere. 

METO 420. PHYSICAL AND DYNAMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) 
Prerequisite, METO 410 or a basic course in fluid dynamics 
such as ENME 340. Historical review of oceanography; physi- 
cal, chemical, stratification and circulation properties of the 
ocean; dynamics of frictionless, frictional, wind driven and 
thermohaline circulation; air-sea interactions. 

METO 422. OCEANIC WAVES, TIDES AND TURBULENCE (3) 
Prerequisite. METO 420. Introduction to the theory of oceanic 
wave motions; tides, wind waves, swells, storm surges, 
seiches, tsunamis, internal waves, turbulence, stirring, mixing 
and diffusion; probability, statistics and time series. 

METO 434. AIR POLLUTION (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in science or engineering or con- 
sent of the instructor. Three lectures per week. Classifica- 
tion of atmospheric pollutants and their effects on visibility, 
inanimate and animate receptors. Evaluation of source emis- 
sions and principles of air pollution control; meteorological 
factors governing the distribution and removal of air pol- 
lutants; air quality measurements and air pollution control 
legislation. 

METO 610. DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY I (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 41 1 , METO 41 1 or equivalent. The equa- 
tions of fluid motion; circulation and vorticity theorems; geo- 
strophic. cyclostrophic and inertial motions; the thermal wind 
equations, boundary layer flow; potential vorticity and the 
Rossby wave speed equation; Perturbation Theory and an 
introduction to atmospheric turbulence; the momentum and 
energy balance of the general circulation. 



METO 611. DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY II (3) 

Prerequisite, METO 610 or equivalent. Barotropic and baro- 
clinic instability; theories of the general circulation of the 
atmosphere; wave motions induced by topography and ther- 
mal asymmetries; mountain waves, thermal convection and 
other selected topics. 

METO 612. ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE AND DIFFUSION (3) 
Prerequisites, METO 610 or equivalent. Statistical description 
of turbulence; the profiles of temperature and wind near the 
ground; the vertical transport of momentum, heat and water 
vapor; spectra and scales of atmospheric turbulence; recent 
theories of turbulent shear flow and convection. 

METO 614. NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION (3) 

Prerequisites, METO 611 or equivalent. Numerical techniques 
for the solution of partial differential equations; application 
to the equations of atmospheric motion; Eulerian, Lagrangian 
and Spectral methods; numerical models of the general cir- 
culation; current applications to research and forecasting. 

METO 616. PLANETARY FLUID DYNAMICS (3) 

Prerequisites, METO 412, 610 or equivalent. The structure of 
the atmospheres of the earth and other planets; analytical, 
numerical and experimental models of the circulations of 
planetary atmospheres and oceans; tidal motions. 

METO 630. STATISTICAL METHODS IN METEOROLOGY (3) 
Prerequisite. METO 411, STAT 400 or equivalent. Distribution 
of scalars and vectors; sampling methods; regression and cor- 
relation methods; tests of significance; time series analysis; 
statistical forecasting methods. 

METO 634. AIR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS (3) 

Prerequisite, METO 434 or consent of instructor. Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. The theory and techniques 
utilized in the determination of gaseous and particulate 
atmospheric pollutants. Reduction and representation of data 
and consideration in sampling site selection. 

METO 640. MICRO-METEOROLOGY (3) 

Prerequisites, METO 410, 411 or equivalent. A study of energy 
balances at the earth-atmosphere interface; statistical and 
spectral analysis of turbulence; turbulent transfer of energy 
and momentum; air motions in relation to terrain and land- 
scape; the time and spatial variations of mechanical and ther- 
modynamical quantities in the micro-layer of the atmosphere. 

METO 641. METEOROLOGY OF AIR POLLUTION (3) 

Prerequisites, METO 410, 411 or equivalent. Review of basic 
macro- and micro-meteorological considerations; the nature 
and behavior of atmospheric aerosols; the description and 
measurement of the distribution, dispersion, and other prop- 
erties of air pollution; study of the meso-meteorology of cities 
and the climatological influences of air pollution. 

METO 658. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METEOROLOGY (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Various special topics in 
meteorology are given intensive study. The topic of concentra- 
tion varies from semester to semester and depends on student 
and faculty interests. Often, specialists from other institutions 
are invited to the campus on a visiting lectureship basis to 
conduct the course. 

METO 659. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METEOROLOGY (1) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Various special topics in 
meteorology are given intensive study. The topic of concentra- 
tion varies from semester to semester and depends on student 
and faculty interests. Often, specialists from other institutions 
are invited to the campus on a visiting lectureship basis to 
conduct the course. 

METO 698, 699. SEMINAR IN METEOROLOGY (1, 1) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This seminar will cover 
selected topics of current meteorological interest. Presenta- 
tions will be by staff members, advanced graduate students 
and guest speakers. 

METO 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

METO 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



162 / umcp 



MICROBIOLOGY 



Associate Professor and Chairman: Young 
Professors: Doetsch, Hetrick, Laffer, Pelczar 
Associate Professors: Cook. MacQuillan, Roberson 
Assistant Professors: Vaituzis. Voll. Weiner 
Lecturers: Janicki, Stadtman 



The graduate studies program of the Department of Mi- 
crobiology offers to the prospective student opportunities to 
extend his knowledge and contribute to new knowledge con- 
cerning microorganisms. Satisfactory performance in course- 
work is a necessary, but not sufficient, requisite for the Master 
of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The department 
expects the student to acquire the ability to demonstrate origi- 
nality in his research and to understand and communicate the 
significance of his endeavors both orally and in writing. 

Areas of specialization in the Department of Microbiology 
include the disciplines of applied, pathogenic, and marine mi- 
crobiology, as well as bacterial cytology, physiology, metabol- 
ism, and systematics: virology, and the genetics of microorgan- 
isms. 

A student accepted for the M.S. program must have acquired, 
from an accredited college or university, a thorough foundation 
in the fundamental biological and physical sciences preliminary 
to pursuing graduate work in microbiology. In certain cases an 
applicant who has deficiencies may be admitted on a provisional 
basis. The minimum entrance requirements for graduate study 
in the Department of Microbiology are: Biology, 16 credits; 
Mathematics, 6 credits; Physics, 6 credits; Inorganic Chemistry, 
8 credits and Organic Chemistry, 6 credits. 

Requirements for the M.S. degree include a minimum of 24 
semester hours, exclusive of research credits with a minimum 
grade of "B" in approved courses. 

The candidate must also pass a final oral examination given 
by a committee of his major and minor professors. A written 
thesis is required of all degree recipients, and all candidates 
for graduate degrees are required to serve one semester as 
laboratory teaching assistants. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree, in addition to the above- 
listed requirements, must successfully complete a written pre- 
liminary examination and an oral defense of their dissertation. 

Research facilities of the Department of Microbiology include 
electron, phase, darkfield, interference, and ultraviolet micro- 
scopes; animal quarters, cell culture laboratories, photographic 
darkrooms, spectrophotometers, ultracentrifuges, gas chro- 
matographic apparatus, and radioisotope counting equipment, 
as well as standard laboratory supplies and apparatus. 



MICB 400. SYSTEMATIC BACTERIOLOGY (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite. 8 
credits in microbiology. History of bacterial classification; 
genetic relationships; international codes of nomenclature; 
bacterial variation as it affects classification. (Colwell) 

MICB 410. HISTORY OF MICROBIOLOGY (1) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a 
major or minor in microbiology or consent of instructor. His- 
tory and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the 
science. The modern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermen- 
tation, and immunity in relation to early theories. (Doetsch) 

MICB 420. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 
MICB 200. History, characteristic features, and epidemiology 
of the important communicable diseases; public health 
administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. (Faber) 

MICB 440. PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite. MICB 200. The role of bacteria 
and fungi in the diseases of man with emphasis upon the 
differentiation and culture of microorganisms, types of dis- 
ease, modes of disease transmission, prophylactic, therapeu- 
tic, and epidemiological aspects. (Vaituzis) 



MICB 450. IMMUNOLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 440. Principles of 
immunity; hypersensitiveness. Fundamental techniques of 
immunology. (Roberson) 

MICB 460. GENERAL VIROLOGY (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 440 or equivalent. Basic 
concepts regarding the nature of viruses and their properties, 
together with techniques for their characterization and iden- 
tification. (Hetrick) 

MICB 470. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, 8 credits in microbiology and 
CHEM 461, 462, or equivalent. Aspects of the growth, death, 
and energy transactions of microorganisms are considered, 
as well as the effects of the physical and chemical environ- 
ment on them. (MacQuillan) 

MICB 490. MICROBIAL FERMENTATIONS (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The appli- 
cation of quantitative techniques for measurement of enzyme 
reactions; mutations, fermentation, analyses, and other 
physiological processes of microorganisms. (Cook) 

MICB 674. BACTERIAL METABOLISM (2) 
Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 
30 credits in microbiology and allied fields, including CHEM 
461 and 462. Bacterial nutrition, enzyme formation, metabolic 
pathways and the dissimilation of carbon and nitrogen sub- 
strates. (MacQuillan) 

MICB 688. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) 

First semester. Prerequisite, twenty credits in microbiology. 
Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and 
special subjects in the field of microbiology. 

MICB 689. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, twenty credits in mi- 
crobiology. Presentation and discussion of fundamental 
problems and special subjects in the field of microbiology. 

MICB 704. MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, thirty credits in microbiology 
and allied fields. Primarily a study of fungi associated with 
disease and practice in the methods of isolation and identifi- 
cation. 

MICB 714. CYTOLOGY OF BACTERIA (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A 
consideration of morphology, differentiation, and cytochem- 
istry of the eubacterial organism. (Doetsch) 

MICB 750. ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures a week. Antigens, antibodies, 
and their interactions. Research fundamentals in immunology 
and immunochemistry. (Roberson) 

MICB 751. IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory sessions a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Techniques in experi- 
mental immunology and immunochemistry. (Roberson) 

MICB 760. VIROLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 
MICB 440 or equivalent. Physical, chemical and biological 
properties of viruses; viral replication; major virus groups. 

(Hetrick) 

MICB 761. VIROLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE LABORATORY 
(2) 
Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, MICB 440 or equivalent. Registration only upon 
consent of instructor. Laboratory methods in virology with 
emphasis on cell culture techniques. (Hetrick) 

MICB 774. ADVANCED BACTERIAL METABOLISM (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the 
field of bacterial metabolism with emphasis on metabolic 
pathways of microorganisms. 



umcp / 163 



MICB 780. GENETICS OF MICROORGANISMS (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. An introduction to genetic principles and 
methodology applicable to microorganisms. Cellular control 
mechanisms and protein biosynthesis. (Young) 

MICB 781. MICROBIAL GENETICS LABORATORY (2) 
Two three-hour laboratory meetings per week. Prerequisite, 
consent of the instructor. A laboratory course designed to 
acquaint students with the techniques employed in studying 
gene control of microbial activities. (Young) 

MICB 788. SEMINAR (1) 

First semester. (Stadtman) 

MICB 789. SEMINAR (1) 
Second semester. 

MICB 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

MICB 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 

MUSIC 

Professor and Chairman: Troth 

Professors: Berman, Bernstein, DeVermond, Gordon, Grent- 

zer, 1 Heim. Johnson. Moss, Traver, Ulrich 
Associate Professors: Blum', Garvey, Head, Hudson, Meyer, 

Montgomery, Nossaman, Pennington, Schumacher, Serwer, 

Taylor,' True, Urban 
Assistant Professors: Gould, Wakefield 
Instructors: Davis, Steinke 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of Music offers specialized musical training 
of a highly professional nature which culminates in one of 
several graduate degrees. The Master of Music degree is offered 
in five areas of specialization: music performance, music history 
and literature, theory, composition, and conducting. The Doctor 
of Philosophy degree is offered in two areas of specialization: 
musicology and theory. The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is 
offered in literature-performance and in composition. Speciali- 
zations in music education are offered in cooperation with the 
College of Education and culminate in Master of Arts, Master 
of Education, Doctor of Education, or Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Specific requirements and course offerings for those 
degrees are described under the program descriptions of that 
College. 

Admission to graduate programs in music is highly selective 
and based upon satisfactory completion of appropriate under- 
graduate preparations. Evidence of established musical pro- 
ficiencies must be demonstrated by audition, examinations in 
music literature and theory, and/or original musical scores. A 
personal interview is sometimes requested of applicants. 

Specific degree requirements in each specialization which 
supplement the general requirements of The Graduate School 
may be obtained from the department upon request. 

In addition to the superb library holdings of the campus itself, 
the adjacent city of Washington, D.C. affords graduate students 
in music an unexcelled opportunity for specialized research and 
musical exposure and development in a variety of private and 
public agencies, such as the Library of Congress, the Smithson- 
ian Institution, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Per- 
forming Arts. 



MUSIC 

MUSC 009. GRADUATE ENSEMBLE (1) 

Required of all master's and doctoral students in applied 
music. Participation in departmental ensembles according to 
the student's major instrument, and as determined by the 
student's advisor. 

MUSC 400. MUSIC PEDAGOGY (3) 

Conference course. Prerequisite or corequisite, MUSC 418. 
or a more advanced course in applied music. A study of major 
pedagogical treatises in music, and an evaluation of pedagog- 
ical techniques, materials, and procedures. 



MUSC 406, 407. APPLIED MUSIC (2, 2) 
Courses for non-majors or majors electing a secondary instru- 
ment. Half-hour lesson and six practice hours per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of department chairman or the next 
lower course on the same instrument. (See Applied Music, 
MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 408, 409. APPLIED MUSIC (2-4, 2-4) 

Courses for majors only. One-hour lesson and six practice 
hours per week if taken for two credits: or one-hour lesson 
and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four credits. 
Prerequisite, the next lower course on the same instrument. 
(See Applied Music, MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 416, 417. APPLIED MUSIC (2, 2) 
Courses for non-majors or majors electing a secondary instru- 
ment. Half-hour lesson and six practice hours per week. 
Prerequisite, permission of department chairman or the next 
lower course on the same instrument. (See Applied Music, 
MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 418, 419. APPLIED MUSIC (2-4, 2-4) 
Courses for majors only. One-hour lesson and six practice 
hours per week if taken for two credits; or one-hour lesson 
and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four credits. 
Prerequisite, the next lower course on the same instrument. 
(Seel Applied Music, MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 430. MUSIC LITERATURE SURVEY FOR THE NON- 
MAJOR (3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 130 or the equivalent. Open to all stu- 
dents except music and music education majors. Selected 
compositions are studied from the standpoint of the informed 
listener. Choral music, opera, and art song. 

MUSC 431. MUSIC LITERATURE SURVEY FOR THE NON- 
MAJOR (3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 130 or the equivalent. Open to all stu- 
dents except music and music-education majors. Selected 
compositions are studied from the standpoint of the informed 
listener. Orchestral, chamber, and keyboard music. 

MUSC 440. KEYBOARD MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 330, 331 or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of harpsichord, organ, and piano music from 
the Baroque period to the present. Suites, sonatas and 
smaller forms are studied with emphasis on changes of style 
and idiom. 

MUSC 441. CHAMBER MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 330, 331, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque 
period to the present. Music for trio sonata, string quartet 
and quintet, and combinations of piano and strings. 

MUSC 442. SYMPHONIC MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 330, 331, or the equivalent. The study of 
orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. The 
concerto, symphony, overture, and other forms are examined. 

MUSC 443. SOLO VOCAL LITERATURE (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 330, 331 or the equivalent. The study of 
solo vocal literature from the Baroque cantata to the art song 
of the present. The lied, melodie, vocal chamber music, and 
the orchestral song are examined. 

MUSC 444. CHORAL MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 330, 331, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the 
present, with discussion of related topics such as Gregorian 
chant, vocal chamber music, etc. 

MUSC 445. SURVEY OF THE OPERA (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 330, 331, or the equivalent. A study of 
the music, librettos and composers of the standard operas. 

MUSC 446. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 330, 331, or the equivalent. A study of 
music written in contemporary idioms since Debussy. 
Changes in form and performing media in the Twentieth Cen- 
tury. Electronic music and other experimental types. 

MUSC 448. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC (2-6) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six semester hours. 



164 / umcp 






MUSC 450 MUSICAL FORM (3) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 250. 251 . A study of the organizing prin- 
ciples of musical composition, their interaction in musical 
forms, and their functions in different styles 

MUSC 460. 461. COUNTERPOINT (2. 2) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 250. 251. A course in Eighteenth- 
Century contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imita- 
tion in the invention and the chorale prelude. Original writing 
in the smaller contrapuntal forms. 

MUSC 462. MODAL COUNTERPOINT (2) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 251 or the equivalent. An introduction 
to the contrapuntal techniques of the Sixteenth Century: The 
structure of the modes, composition of modal melodies, and 
contrapuntal writing for two. three and four voices. 

MUSC 465. CANON AND FUGUE (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 461 or the equivalent. Composition and 
analysis of the canon and fugue in the styles of the 
Eighteenth. Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. 

MUSC 470. HARMONICS AND CONTRAPUNTAL PRACTICES OF 
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (2) 
Prerequisites. MUSC 251 and 460 or the equivalents. A 
theoretical study of Twentieth-Century materials: scales, 
modes, intervals, chord structures, poly-harmony, and serial 
and twelve-tone organization. 

MUSC 478. COMPOSITION (2) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 250. 251 . Principles of musical composi- 
tion, and their application to the smaller forms. Original writ- 
ing in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century musical idioms for 
various media. 

MUSC 479. COMPOSITION (2) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 250. 251. Principles of musical composi- 
tion, and their application to the smaller forms. Original writ- 
ing in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century musical idioms for 
various media. 

MUSC 486. 487. ORCHESTRATION (2. 2) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 250. 251. A study of the ranges, musical 
functions, and technical characteristics of the instruments, 
and their color possibilities in various combinations. Practical 
experience in orchestrating for small and large ensembles. 

MUSC 490. 491. CONDUCTING (2. 2) 

A laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental 
groups. Baton technique, score reading, rehearsal 
techniques, tone production, style, and interpretation. Music 
of all periods will be introduced. 

MUSC 495. ACOUSTICS FOR MUSICIANS (3) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 251 or the equivalent, and senior or 
graduate standing in music. The basic physics of music, 
acoustics of musical instruments and music theory, 
physiological acoustics, and musico-architectural acoustics. 

MUSC 605. CHAMBER MUSIC REPERTOIRE (3) 

Prerequisite, graduate standing as a major in performance. 
A study, through performance, of diversified chamber music 
for standard media. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 609. INTERPRETATION AND REPERTOIRE (2) 

Prerequisite, graduate standing in performance. (See Applied 

Music. MUSC 899.) 
MUSC 610. GRADUATE PERFORMANCE (4) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 609. Recital course. (See Applied Music. 

MUSC 899.) 
MUSC 630. TEACHING THE THEORY. HISTORY. AND 
LITERATURE OF MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite, graduate standing and consent of instructor. A 

course in teaching methodology with emphasis on instruction 

at the college level. 
MUSC 635. AMERICAN MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 331 and graduate standing. A lecture 

course in the history of American art music from colonial 

times to the present. 
MUSC 638. ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF MUSIC 
(3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 330. 331 and consent of instructor. A criti- 



cal study of one style period (Renaissance. Baroque, etc.) will 
be undertaken. The course may be repeated for credit, since 
a different period will be chosen each time it is offered. 

MUSC 639. SEMINAR IN MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 330. 331 and consent of instructor. The 
work of one major composer (Bach. Beethoven, etc.) will be 
studied. The course may be repeated for credit, since a differ- 
ent composer will be chosen each time it is offered. 

MUSC 648. PRO-SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY AND LITERATURE 
OF MUSIC (3) 
Prerequisite. MUSC 331 and graduate standing. An introduc- 
tion to graduate study in the history and literature of music. 
Bibliography and methodology of systematic and historical 
musicology. 

MUSC 649. SEMINAR IN MUSICOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 331 and graduate standing. An intensive 
course in one of the areas of musicology such as performance 
practices, history of music theory, history of notation, or 
ethnomusicology. Since a cycle of subjects will be studied 
the course may be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 650. THE CONTEMPORARY IDIOM (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 461 or equivalent, and graduate standing. 
Composition and analysis in the Twentieth Century styles, 
with emphasis on techniques of melody, harmony, and coun- 
terpoint. 

MUSC 662. ADVANCED MODAL COUNTERPOINT (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 461 or the equivalent, and graduate 
standing. An intensive course in the composition of music 
in the style of the late Renaissance. Analytical studies of the 
music of Palestrina. Lasso. Byrd and others. 

MUSC 670. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES (3) 

Prerequisite, graduate standing in music and consent of 
instructor. A seminar in which composer and theorist develop 
analytical facility in advanced Nineteenth- and Twentieth- 
Century music and an inclusive technique of analysis in music 
from the Renaissance to the present. 

MUSC 671. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES (3) 

Prerequisites. MUSC 670 or consent of instructor. A seminar 
in which composer and theorist develop analytical facility in 
advanced Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century music and an 
inclusive technique of analysis in music from the Renaissance 
to the present. 

MUSC 678. SEMINAR IN MUSICAL COMPOSITION (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 479 or equivalent, and graduate standing. 
An advanced course in musical composition. May be repeated 
for credit. 

MUSC 688. ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 487 or the equivalent, and graduate 
standing. Orchestration projects in the styles of Debussy. 
Ravel. Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, and others. May be 
repeated for credit. 

MUSC 689. ADVANCED CONDUCTING (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 491 or the equivalent. A concentrated 
study of the conducting techniques involved in the repertoire 
of all historical periods. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 695. AESTHETICS OF MUSIC (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 331 or the equivalent and one course in 
aesthetics. A consideration of the principal theories of 
aesthetics as they relate to music. A study of writings in the 
field from Pythagoras to the present. 

MUSC 696. FACTORS IN MUSICAL LEARNING (3) 

Prerequisite. MUSC 331 or the equivalent and at least one 
course in psychology. The psychology of intervals, scales, 
rhythms, and harmony. Musical hearing and creativity. The 
psychology of musical ability. The theory of functional music. 

MUSC 699. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC (2-6) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six semester hours. 

MUSC 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 



umcp / 165 



MUSC 800, 801, ADVANCED SEMINAR IN MUSIC PEDAGOGY 
(3.3) 
Prerequisites, MUSC 400 or equivalent, doctoral standing and 
permission of instructor. A detailed study of historical and 
contemporary methods of pedagogy, and analysis of 
pedagogical problems. Sectioning by instrument. Required 
of all candidates for the D.M.A. Degree in performance and 
literature. 

MUSC 805. INTERPRETATION, PERFORMANCE, AND PEDA- 
GOGY (4) 
A seminar in pedagogy and the pedagogical literature for the 
doctoral performer, with advanced instruction at the instru- 
ment, covering appropriate compositions. Required of all 
candidates for the D.M.A. Degree in literature-performance. 
Prerequisite, doctoral standing in performance. Recital 
course. 

MUSC 806. INTERPRETATION, PERFORMANCE, AND 
PEDAGOGY (4) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 805. Recital course. (See Applied Music, 
MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 807. INTERPRETATION, PERFORMANCE, AND 
PEDAGOGY (4) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 806. Recital course. (See Applied Music, 
MUSC 899.) 

MUSC 830. DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN MUSIC LITERATURE (3) 
Prerequisite, at least twelve hours in music history and litera- 
ture. An analytical survey of the literature of music: keyboard 
music; vocal music; string music; wind instrument music. 
Required of all candidates for the D.M.A. Degree in literature- 
performance. 

MUSC 831. DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN MUSIC LITERATURE (3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 830 or consent of instructor. An analytical 
survey of the literature of music: keyboard music; vocal 
music; string music; wind instrument music. Required of all 
candidates for the D.M.A. Degree in literature-performance. 

MUSC 839. DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN MUSICOLOGY (3) 

Prerequisites, near completion of doctoral course work in 
musicology; or consent of instructor. Two semesters required 
of all candidates for the PH.D. in musicology; a third semester 
optional. Intensive experience with the documents of 
musicology and the musicological synthesis. 

MUSC 878. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 678 or the equivalent, and permission of 
the instructor. Conference course in composition in the larger 
forms. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 
Applied music. 

A new student or one taking applied music for the first time 
at this university should register for MUSC 099. He will receive 
the proper classification at the end of his first semester in 
the department. Special fee of $40.00 per semester for each 
applied-music course. 

Instrument designation: each student taking an applied music 
course must indicate the instrument chosen by adding a suffix 
to the proper course number as: MUSC 609a Interpretation 
and Repertoire — Piano. 



SUFFIX INSTRUMENT 



A 


Piano 


H 


Oboe 


O 


Tuba 


B 


Voice 


I 


Clarinet 


P 


Euphonium 


C 


Violin 


J 


Bassoon 


Q 


Percussion 


D 


Viola 


K 


Saxophone 


R 


Organ 


E 


Cello 


L 


Horn 


S 


Conducting 


F 


Bass 


M 


Trumpet 






G 


Flute 


N 


Trombone 







Graduate Applied Music courses: Special fee $40 per course 
per term. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 



MUED 410. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR CLASS INSTRU- 
MENTAL INSTRUCTION (2) 
Prerequisite, previous or concurrent registration in MUSC 
113-213. Two one-hour laboratories and one lecture per week. 
Teaching techniques and rehearsal techniques for beginning 
and intermediate instrumental classes — winds, strings and 
percussion. 

MUED 415. ORGANIZATION AND TECHNIQUE OF INSTRU- 
MENTAL CLASS INSTRUCTION (3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Practical instruction in the 
methods of tone production, tuning, fingering, and in the care 
of woodwind and brass instruments. A survey of the materials 
and published methods for class instruction. 

MUED 420. BAND AND ORCHESTRA TECHNIQUES AND 
ADMINISTRATION (2-3) 
Prerequisites, MUSC 113-213 and 491. Comprehensive study 
of instructional materials, rehearsal techniques, program 
planning, and band pageantry for the high school instrumen- 
tal program. Organization, scheduling, budgeting and 
purchasing are included. 

MUED 428. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC FOR SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS (2) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of the repertoires 
for high school orchestra, band, and small ensemble. Prob- 
lems of interpretation, intonation, tone quality, and rehearsal 
techniques. The course may be repeated for credit, since dif- 
ferent repertoires are covered each time the course is offered. 

MUED 430. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR CLASS PIANO 
INSTRUCTION (2) 
Objectives, techniques and materials for teaching class piano. 
Special emphasis is placed on analysis of materials, audio- 
visual aids, use of electronic pianos, and equipment. 

MUED 438. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING OF 
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (2-3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 113-213 or the equivalent. A study, 
through practice on minor instruments, of the problems 
encountered in public school teaching of orchestral instru- 
ments. Literature and teaching materials, minor repairs, and 
adjustment of instruments are included. The course may be 
taken for credit three times since one of four groups of instru- 
ments: strings, woodwind, brass or percussion will be studied 
each time the course is offered. 

MUED 450. MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 155 or equivalent. Creative experiences 
in songs and rhythms, correlation of music and everyday 
teaching with the abilities and development of each level; 
study of songs and materials, observation and teaching 
experience with each age level. 

MUED 460. CREATIVE ACTIVITIES IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (2-3) 
Prerequisite, music methods or teaching experience. A study 
of the creative approach to the development of music experi- 
ences for children in the elementary grades emphasizing con- 
temporary music and contemporary music techniques. 

MUED 462. MUSIC FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SPE- 
CIALIST (2-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Teaching techniques and 
instructional materials for the music program in the elemen- 
tary schools. For the music specialist. 

MUED 470. MUSIC IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (2-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the music pro- 
gram in the junior and senior high school with emphasis on 
objectives, organization of subject matter, teaching 
techniques and materials for general music classes. 

MUED 472. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN VOCAL MUSIC FOR 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS (2-4) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of repertoire and 
methods for teaching choral groups and voice classes. Dic- 
tion, interpretation, tone production, intonation, phrasing, 
rehearsal techniques and style characteristics. 



166 / umcp 



MUED 480. THE VOCAL MUSIC TEACHER AND SCHOOL 
ORGANIZATION (2) 
Prerequisite, student teaching, previous or concurrent. The 
role of the vocal music specialist in the implementation of 
the supervision and administration of the music programs in 
the elementary and secondary schools. Open to graduate stu- 
dents by permission of instructor. 

MUED 499. WORKSHOPS, CLINICS, INSTITUTES (2-6) 

Innovative and experimental dimensions of music education 
will be offered to meet the needs of music teachers and music 
supervisors and to allow students to individualize their pro- 
grams. The maximum number credits that may be earned 
under this course symbol toward any degree is six semester 
hours; the symbol may be used two or more times until six 
semester hours have been reached. 

MUED 635. ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION AND BAND 
ARRANGING (3) 
Prerequisite, MUSC 486 or the equivalent, or consent of 
instructor. A study of arranging and transcription procedures 
in scoring for the orchestra and band. Special attention is 
given to the arranging problems of the instrumental director 
in the public schools. 

MUED 637. ADVANCED STUDY — DEVELOPING MUSICALITY 
THROUGH INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (3) 
Analysis of new and established methods and materials for 
developing musicality. The study of the curriculum for large 
and small ensembles, and class instruction, and its adaptation 
to the diverse organizations of today's schools. 

MUED 662. ADVANCED STUDY — DEVELOPING MUSICALITY 
IN CHILDREN (3) 
Analysis of new and established methods and materials 
including Orff and Kodaly, and their adaptation to teaching 
music in the diverse organizations of today's elementary 
schools. Emphasis on general musical experiences for all 
children. 

MUED 670. THE TEACHING OF MUSIC APPRECIATION (3) 
A study of the objectives for the elementary and secondary 
levels; the techniques of directed listening, the presentation 
of theoretical and biographical materials, course planning, 
selection and use of audio-visual aids and library materials, 
and the correlation between music and other arts. 

MUED 672. ADVANCED STUDY — DEVELOPING MUSICALITY 
IN THE ADOLESCENT (3) 
Analysis of new and established methods and materials for 
developing musicality through classes in general music, 
music appreciation, music in the humanities, music theory, 
chorus, small ensembles, and class voice. 

MUED 674. CHORAL CONDUCTING AND REPERTOIRE (3) 

MUED 680. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF MUSIC 
IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS (3) 
The study of basic principles and practices of supervision 
and administration with emphasis on curriculum construc- 
tion, scheduling, budgets, directing of in-service teaching, 
personnel problems, and school-community relationships. 

MUED 690. RESEARCH METHODS IN MUSIC AND MUSIC 
EDUCATION (3) 
The application of methods of research to problems in the 
fields of music and music education. The preparation of bib- 
liographies and the written exposition of research projects 
in the area of the student's major interest. 

MUED 692. FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC EDUCATION (3) 

Educational thought and its application to instruction and 
evaluation in music education. 

MUED 698. CURRENT TRENDS IN MUSIC EDUCATION (2-4) 
A survey of current and emerging philosophies, 
methodologies and curricula in music education and their 
implementation. The influence of educational and social 
changes and the expanding musical scene upon the music 
programs for children of all ages and for teacher education. 
The maximum number of credits that may be earned under 
this course symbol (within established limits of programs) 
toward any degree is eight semester hours. The symbol may 



be used two or more times until eight semester hours have 
been completed. 
MUED 890. HISTORY OF MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE UNITED 
STATES (3) 
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. The study of histori- 
cal development of pedagogical practices in music education, 
their philosophical implications and educational values. 



NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES PROGRAM 



Professor and Chairman: Davis (Dairy Science) 

Professors: King, Mattick, Vandersall, Williams (Dairy Science); 

Leffel, Young (Animal Science); Holmlund, Keeney, Rollinson, 

Veitch (Chemistry); Prather (Food, Nutrition, and Institution 

Administration); Shaffner (Poultry Science) 
Associate Professors: Lakshmanan, Sampugna (Chemistry); 

Ahrens, Butler. Hopkins (Food, Nutrition, and Institution 

Administration); Creek, Thomas (Poultry science) 
Assistant Professors: DeBarthe (Animal Science); Bull (Dairy 

Science); Eheart, Sanford (Food, Nutrition, and Institution 

Administration) 

The Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences offers study 
leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. It is an interdepartmental program involving faculty 
in the Departments of Animal Science, Dairy Science, Chemistry, 
Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration, and Poultry Sci- 
ence. The student may undertake studies in any phase of nutri- 
tion. 

Students interested in the program should contact the Chair- 
man of the program for information on specific requirements. 

NUSC 402. FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION (3) 
Three lectures per week. A study iof the fundamental role of 
all nutrients in the body, including their digestion, absorption 
and metablosim. Dietary requirements and nutritional defi- 
ciency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals and man 
will be considered. This course will be for both graduate and 
undergraduate credit, with additional assignments given to 
the graduate students. (Thomas) 

NUSC 403. APPLIED ANIMAL NUTRITION (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequi- 
sites, MATH 110, NUSC 402 or permission of instructor. A 
critical study of those factors which influence the nutritional 
requirements of ruminants, swine and poultry. Practical feed- 
ing methods and procedures used in formulation of economi- 
cally efficient ratios will be presented. (Vandersall) 

NUSC 415. MATERNAL, INFANT AND CHILD NUTRITION (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 
Nutritional needs of the mother, infant and child and the rela- 
tion of nutrition to physical and mental growth. (Butler) 

NUSC 425. INTERNATIONAL NUTRITION (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 

Nutritional status of world population and local, national, and 

international programs for improvement. 
NUSC 435. HISTORY OF NUTRITION (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in basic nutrition. 

A study of the development of the knowledge of nutrition and 

its interrelationship with social and economic development. 

NUSC 450. ADVANCED HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
Prerequisites NUSC 402 or NUTR 300, CHEM 461 , 462 or con- 
current registration or permission of instructor. A critical 
study of the physiological and metabolic influences on nu- 
trient utilization, particular emphasis on current problems in 
human nutrition. (Ahrens) 

NUSC 460. THERAPEUTIC HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, NUSC 402 or NUTR 300. Two 
lectures and laboratory period per week. Modification of nor- 
mal adequate diet to meet human nutritional needs in 
pathological conditions. 



umcp / 167 



NUSC 600. RECENT PROGRESS IN HUMAN NUTRITION (3) 
First semester. Three lectures per week. Recent develop- 
ments in the science of nutrition with emphasis on interpreta- 
tion for application in health and disease. (Butler) 

NUSC 601. ADVANCED RUMINANT NUTRITION (2) 

First semester. Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite, permission of department. Biochemi- 
cal, physiological and bacteriological aspects of the nutrition 
of ruminants and other animals. (Vandersall) 

NUSC 603 MINERAL METABOLISM (2) 

First semester, alternate years (offered 1974). Two lectures 
per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 461 or 462. The role of miner- 
als in metabolism with special emphasis on the needs of man 
and animals. 

NUSC 604. VITAMINS (2) 

(Soares) 

NUSC 610. READINGS IN NUTRITION (1-3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, NUSC 402 or NUTR 300, 
CHEM 461 or consent of instructor. One lecture, one 2-hour 
laboratory per week. Basic concepts of animal energetics with 
quantitative descriptions of energy requirements and utiliza- 
tion. 

NUSC 612. ENERGY NUTRITION (2) 

(Leffel) 

NUSC 614. PROTEINS (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one 2-hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites, NUSC 402 or NUTR 300, and CHEM 461 
or consent of instructor. Advanced study of the roles of amino 
acids in nutrition and metabolism. Protein digestion, absorp- 
tion, anabolism. catabolism and amino acid balance. 

(Leffel) 

NUSC 620. NUTRITION FOR COMMUNITY SERVICES (3) 
First semester. Three lectures per week. Application of the 
principles of nutrition to community problems of specific 
groups. Students may select problems for independent study. 

NUSC 663. NUTRITION LABORATORY (2-3) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period per 
week. To acquaint students with basic techniques in nutrition 
research. Feeding trials with animals as well as microbiologi- 
cal and chemical assays are performed. Independent study 
of an assigned nutrition problem required for 3 credits. 

(Soares) 

NUSC 670. INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM IN NUTRITION (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
NUSC 402 or NUTR 300, CHEM 461 or 462. The major routes 
of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism with particular 
emphasis on metabolic shifts and their detection and signifi- 
cance in nutrition. (Ahrens) 

NUSC 680. HUMAN NUTRITIONAL STATUS (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Methods of appraisal of 
human nutritional status, to include dietary, biochemical and 
anthropometric techniques. 

NUSC 698. SEMINAR IN NUTRITION (1-3) 

First and second semesters. A study in depth of a selected 
phase of nutrition. (Vandersall) 

NUSC 699. PROBLEMS IN NUTRITION (1-4) 

NUSC 799. MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. Students will be required to pursue original 
research in some phase of nutrition, carrying the same to 
completion, and reporting the results in the form of a thesis. 

NUSC 898. COLLOQUIUM IN NUTRITION (1) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports on special topics 
or recently published research in nutrition. Distinguished sci- 
entists are invited as guest lecturers. A maximum of three 
credits allowed for the MS 

NUSC 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 

First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. Students will be required to pursue original 
research in some phase of nutrition, carrying the same to 
completion, and reporting the results in the form of a disser- 
tation. 



PHILOSOPHY 



Associate Professor and Chairman: Brown 

Professors: Pasch, Perkins. Schlaretzki 

Associate Professors: Brown, Celarier, Lesher, Martin, 

Svenonius 
Assistant Professors: Johnson, Kress, Odell, Varnedoe 

The Department of Philosophy offers graduate programs lead- 
ing to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, with emphasis on the 
methodology and problems of contemporary British and Ameri- 
can philosophy, especially in theory of knowledge, metaphysics, 
and ethics. Programs of study in existentialism and 
phenomenology are not available. 

The student works closely with a committee having both 
advisory and tutorial functions, in arranging and pursuing a 
program leading to qualification for Ph.D. candidacy. There is 
considerable flexibility in the programs of study available to the 
student, the primary requirement being that he qualify in two 
or three areas of philosophy. In order to qualify in a given area, 
the student must demonstrate to his committee an adequate 
breadth of knowledge in the area and the ability to write 
philosophical essays suitable for publication. 

Foreign language skills are required only insofar as demanded 
by the student's research Knowledge of the language of sym- 
bolic logic is required of all students early in their course of 
study. 

An accelerated program for exceptionally promising and well- 
prepared students permits early concentration on the disserta- 
tion subject. 

The studeTit has six semesters in which to complete his qualifi- 
cations for candidacy. A maximum of four years thereafter is 
allowed for completion of the dissertation. In the accelerated 
program the dissertation must be accepted no later than five 
years after the student enters the program. 

Students seeking admission should have completed, with a 
high grade average, at least eighteen semester hours (or the 
equivalent) of philosophy, including one course in logic, two 
courses in the history of philosophy, and two courses from the 
following areas: ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. The 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (verbal and quan- 
titative sections) is required. Applications must be supported 
by two or three letters of recommendation from previous 
instructors, at least one of whom is familiar with the applicant's 
work in philosophy. The applicant is also requested to submit 
an example of his written work on a philosophic topic. The let- 
ters and paper, as well as the test scores, should be sent directly 
to the Department of Philosophy. 

A brochure which describes the program in greater detail is 
available from the department. 



PHIL 408. TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (3) 
Prerequisite, PHIL 320. An intensive examination of contem- 
porary problems and issues. Source material will be selected 
from recent problems and issues. Source material will be 
selected from recent books and articles. May be repeated for 
credit when the topics dealt with are different. 

PHIL 412. THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLATO (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. A critical study of selected 
dialogues. (Lesher) 

PHIL 414. THE PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. A critical study of selected 
portions of Aristotle's writings. (Lesher) 

PHIL 416. MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 or 320. A history of philosophic 
thought in the West from the close of the classical period 
to the Renaissance. Based on readings of the Stoics, early 
Christian writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers, and 
Schoolmen. 

PHIL 421. THE CONTINENTAL RATIONALISTS 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. A critical study of the sys- 
tems of some of the major 17th and 18th Century rationalists, 
with special reference to Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. 



168 / umcp 




PHIL 422. THE BRITISH EMPIRICISTS (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. A critical study of selected 
writings of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. (Varnedoe) 

PHIL 423. THE PHILOSOPHY OF KANT (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. A critical study of selected 
portions of Kant's writings. 

PHIL 428. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (3) 
Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320, or consent of instructor. May 
be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. 

PHIL 440. ETHICAL THEORY (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 140. Contemporary problems having to do 
with the meaning of the principal concepts of ethics and with 
the nature of moral reasoning. (Schlaretzki) 

PHIL 444. POLITICAL AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY (3) 
A systematic treatment of the main philosophical issues 
encountered in the analysis and evaluation of social (es- 
pecially political) institutions. (Johnson, Schlaretzki) 

PHIL 447. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Examination of funda- 
mental concepts related to law, e.g., legal system, law and 
morality, justice, legal reasoning, responsibility. (Johnson) 

PHIL 455. PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3) 

Prerequisites, six hours in social science or consent of 
instructor. A discussion of several of the following topics: 
The nature of laws and explanation in the social sciences; 
the relation of the social sciences to mathematics, logic, and 
the natural sciences; the role of value judgments in the social 
sciences; the relation of social science to social policy; prob- 
lems of methodology. 

PHIL 457. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (3) 

An examination of the nature of historical knowledge and his- 
torical explanation, and of theories of the meaning of world 
history. (Martin) 

PHIL 458. TOPICS IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3) 
Prerequisite, PHIL 250 or consent of instructor. Detailed 
examination of some basic issues in the methodology and 
conceptual structure of scientific inquiry. To be investigated 



are such topics as confirmation theory, structure and function 
of scientific theories, scientific explanation, concept forma- 
tion, and theoretical reduction. (Cartwright) 

PHIL 461. THEORY OF MEANING (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 170 or 271, and 320. A study of theories 
about the meaning of linguistic expressions, including the 
verification theory and the theory of meaning as use. Among 
topics to be considered are naming, referring, synonymy, 
intension and extension, and ontological commitment. Such 
writers as Mill, Frege, Russell, Lewis, Carnap, Wittgenstein, 
Austin, and Quine will be discussed. (Kress, Odell) 

PHIL 462. THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. PHIL 271 
is recommended. The origin, nature, and validity of knowl- 
edge considered in terms of some philosophic problems 
about perceiving and thinking, knowledge and belief, thought 
and language, truth and confirmation. 

(Brown, Kress, Odell, Pasch) 

PHIL 464. METAPHYSICS (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, PHIL 310 and 320. PHIL 271 is 
recommended. A study of some central metaphysical con- 
cepts (such as substance, relation, causality, and time) and 
of the nature of metaphysical thinking. (Pasch) 

PHIL 466. PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 320. An inquiry into the nature of mind 
through the analysis of such concepts as consciousness, per- 
ception, understanding, imagination, emotion, invention, and 
action. (Perkins) 

PHIL 471. SYMBOLIC LOGIC II (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 271 or consent of instructor. Axiomatic 
development of the propositional calculus and the first-order 
functional calculus, including the deduction theorem, 
independence of axioms, consistency, and completeness. 

(Svenonius) 

PHIL 474. INDUCTION AND PROBABILITY (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of inferential 
forms, with emphasis on the logical structure underlying such 
inductive procedures as estimating and hypothesis-testing. 



umcp / 169 



Decision-theoretic rules relating to induction will be consid- 
ered, as well as classic theories of probability and induction 

PHIL 478. TOPICS IN SYMBOLIC LOGIC (3) 

Prerequisite. PHIL 471. May be repeated tor credit when the 
topics dealt with are different. (Svenonius) 

PHIL 498. TOPICAL INVESTIGATIONS (1-3) 

PHIL 499. TOPICAL INVESTIGATIONS (1-3) 

PHIL 688. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY (1-3) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

PHIL 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

PHIL 808. SEMINAR IN THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
PHIL 828. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
PHIL 838. SEMINAR IN ESTHETICS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
PHIL 848. SEMINAR IN ETHICS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

PHIL 868. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICS (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
PHIL 869. SEMINAR IN THE THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
PHIL 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION, 

RECREATION AND HEALTH 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Professor and Chairman: Husman 

Professors: Clarke, Eyler, Humphrey, Kramer 

Associate Professors: Church, Ingram. Kelley, Love. 1 Steel 

Assistant Professors: Hult, Johnson, Santa Maria, Tyler, Vander 

Velden. Wrenn 1 

1 joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The graduate student majoring in Physical Education may 
pursue the degrees of Master of Arts. Doctor of Education, or 
Doctor of Philosophy. The two major objectives of these pro- 
grams are: (1 ) to study the discipline of physical education, that 
is. to study the effects of physical education exercise as it affects 
man from a cultural, historical, biological, philosophical, social 
and psychological point of view. The program is designed, 
through study of the discipline, to improve the quality of teach- 
ing physical education. (2) to acquaint the student with the 
pedagogy of physical education, that is. to offer the student 
ways to improve the administration and supervision of Physical 
Education programs in the schools. 

A student may pursue study in exercise physiology, 
kinesiology, motor learning, sport sociology, sport history and 
philosophy, or elementary or secondary curriculum- 
supervision-administration. 

In addition to the minimum requirements of The Graduate 
School, adequate preparation in physical education from an 
accredited institution is required. This preparation should 
include, but not be limited to, such upper division requirements 
as kinesiology, exercise physiology, measurement and evalua- 
tion, history and philosophy of physical education. In addition, 
a background in mathematics, physical and/or biological sci- 
ences, and the behavioral sciences is required 

All students are required to take a preliminary examination, 
the Graduate Diagnostic Examination, during the first regular 
semester or summer session of a student's enrollment This 
examination includes six sections: tests and measurement. 



kinesiology, physiology of exercise, adaptive physical educa- 
tion, psychology of learning and history of physical education 
Competency must be attained in each of these areas by course 
work or by independent study and reexamination. 

All Master of Arts students are required to take courses in 
methods of research and in statistics and to write and success- 
fully defend a thesis. All doctoral candidates are required to 
possess competency in one language or complete a previously 
approved tool course in an ancillary discipline. 

The department maintains a modern research laboratory for 
physical education, including, but not limited to, cinemato- 
graphic analysis, cardio-vascular measurement, strength and 
other motor fitness assessment, analysis of motion, and motor 
learning research. The department also possesses several of 
the most modern computers and a direct teletype link to the 
University Computer Science Center. 



PHED 400. KINESIOLOGY (4) 
Three lectures and two laboratory hours a week. Prerequi- 
sites. ZOOL 101, 201. and 202 or the equivalent. The study 
of human movement and the physical and physiological prin- 
ciples upon which it depends. Body mechanics, posture, 
motor efficiency, sports, the performance of atypical individu- 
als, and the influence of growth and development upon motor 
performance are studied. 

PHED 420. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (3) 
Orientation of the general elementary teacher to physical 
education. Principles and practices in elementary physical 
education are discussed and a variety of appropriate activities 
are considered. 

PHED 450. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORTS (3) 

Three hours a week. An exploration of the personality factors, 
including, but not limited to motivation, aggression and emo- 
tion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill perfor- 
mance. 

PHED 455. PHYSICAL FITNESS OF THE INDIVIDUAL (3) 

A study of the major physical fitness problems confronting 
the adult in modern society. Consideration is given to the 
scientific appraisal, development, and maintenance of fitness 
at all age levels. Such problems as obesity, weight reduction, 
chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise programs are 
explored. Open to persons outside the profession of physical 
education. 

PHED 460. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE (3) 
Two lectures and two laboratory hours a week Prerequisites 
ZOOL 101. 201 and 202; PHED 400 or equivalent. A study 
of the physiology of exercise, including concepts of work, 
muscular contraction, energy transformation, metabolism, 
oxygen debt, and nutrition and athletic performance. 
Emphasis is placed on cardiovascular and respiratory func- 
tion in relation to physical activity and training. 

PHED 470. SUPERVISION IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Prerequisite. PHED 420. Principles and techniques of supervi- 
sion are studied for improving the learning situation in 
elementary school physical education. 

PHED 480. MEASUREMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite. 
MATH 105 or 110. A study of the principles and techniques 
of educational measurement as applied to teaching of physi- 
cal education: study of the functions and techniques of 
measurement in the evaluation of student progress toward 
the objectives of physical education and in the evaluation of 
the effectiveness of teaching. 

PHED 485. MOTOR LEARNING AND SKILLED PERFORMANCE 
(3) 
Prerequisites. PHED 480 and PSYC 100. A study of the 
research dealing with motor learning and motor performance. 
Major topics discussed are scientific methodology, individual 
differences, specificity, proprioceptive control of movement, 
motivation, timing, transfer, and retention. 



170 / umcp 



PHED 487. PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT IN 
CONTEMPORARY CULTURES (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, SOCY 100 or equivalent. 
A study of the cultural impact of physical education activities 
in the United States and selected countries. Individual 
research on selected topics is required. 

PHED 489. FIELD LABORATORY PROJECTS AND WORKSHOP 
(1-6) 
Summer session, too. Workshops and research projects in 
special areas of knowledge not covered by regularly struc- 
tured courses. NOTE: The maximum total number of credits 
that may be earned toward any degree in Physical Education 
is six. 

PHED 490. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
The application of the principles of administration and super- 
vision to physical education. Students are normally enrolled 
during the student teaching semester. 

PHED 491. THE CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Techniques, planning and construction are considered from 
a standpoint of valid criteria for the selection of content in 
elementary school physical education. Desirable features of 
cooperative curriculum planning in providing for learning 
experiences will be presented and discussed. 

PHED 493. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SPORT AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
History and philosophical implications of sport and physical 
education through Ancient, Medieval, and contemporary 
periods in Western civilization. 

PHED 495. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Prerequisite, PHED 420. Studies the procedures basic to satis- 
factory organization of all phases of the elementary school 
physical education program. Emphasis is placed on the 
organizational and administrative factors necessary for the 
successful operation of the program in various types of 
elementary schools. 

PHED 496. QUANTITATIVE METHODS (3) 

Statistical techniques most frequently used in research per- 
taining to physical education. Effort is made to provide the 
student with the necessary skills, and to acquaint him with 
the interpretations and applications of these techniques. 

PHED 600. SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1) 

PHED 602. STATUS AND TRENDS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Analyzes the current status and implications for future trends 
in physical education at the elementary school level. Open 
to experienced persons in all phases of education. 

PHED 604. PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF THE CHILD (3) 
Analyzes the place of physical education in meeting the 
growth and developmental needs of children of elementary 
school age. 

PHED 606. PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR DEVELOPMENT THROUGH 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
A study of the development of perceptual-motor skills through 
directed physical activities. An investigation of the growth and 
development of perceptual-motor programs. Analysis of com- 
mon factors and differences between selected programs and 
philosophies. Evaluation in perceptual-motor development. 

PHED 610. METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH (3) 
Studies methods and techniques of research used in physical 
education; an analysis of examples of their use and practice 
in their application to problems of interest to the student. 

PHED 612. RESEARCH LITERATURE (3) 

Studies the research literature of physical education, plus 
research in one specific problem. 

PHED 615. PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF EVALUATION 
(3) 
Prerequisite, an introductory course in measurement or per- 
mission of the instructor. A study of currently used means 



of evaluating the performance of students and the effective- 
ness of programs of physical education in schools and col- 
leges. Specific problems concerning evaluation, brought in 
by members of the class, will be analyzed. 

PHED 620. ANALYSIS OF CONTEMPORARY ATHLETICS (3) 
Studies current problems, practices, and national issues of 
permanent importance to the conduct of athletic competition 
in a democracy. 

PHED 630. SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT IN CONTEMPORARY 
PERSPECTIVE (3) 
Studies social organization and the role of individuals and 
groups in sport situations; the interrelationship of sport with 
traditional social institutions; sport as a sub-system and its 
structure; and sport and social problems. 

PHED 640. SUPERVISORY TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) 
Studies current concepts, principles and techniques of super- 
vision and of their application; observation of available super- 
vising programs, including visits with local supervisors; and 
practice in the use of selected techniques. 

PHED 642. ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTION OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) 
Analyzes administrative problems in the light of sound educa- 
tional practice. Students concentrate their efforts upon their 
own on-the-job administrative problems and contribute to the 
solution of other class members' problems. 

PHED 644. CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (3) 
Studies the principles underlying curriculum construction in 
physical education and the practical applications of these 
principles to the construction of a curriculum. 

PHED 650. MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL ASPECTS OF SPORTS 
AND RECREATION (3) 
Prerequisites, Psychology and/or Human Development. An 
exploration of psychological aspects of physical education, 
sports and recreation, including personality dynamics in rela- 
tion to exercise and sports. A study is made of the psychologi- 
cal factors in athletic performance and coaching. 

PHED 660. PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3) 
Studies five important philosophical disciplines and their 
impact on modern physical education and sport; and an 
exploration of the valid philosophical approaches and proc- 
esses to formulation of a personal philosophy of physical 
education. 

PHED 662. HISTORY OF SPORT IN WESTERN CULTURE (3) 
Prerequisites, PHED 493 or equivalent and 12 hours in upper 
division level courses involving Western culture. A history of 
sport of the early and Medieval periods. 

PHED 663. HISTORY OF SPORT IN WESTERN CULTURE (3) 
Prerequisites, PHED 493 or equivalent and 12 hours in upper 
division level courses involving Western culture. A history of 
sport of the Renaissance and modern periods. 

PHED 688. SEMINAR IN MOTOR LEARNING AND 
PERFORMANCE (3) 
Prerequisites, PHED 485 and 496. Discussion of research 
dealing with advanced topics in motor learning and skilled 
performance. Recent developments concerning individual 
differences, refractoriness, anticipation and timing, transfer, 
retention, and work inhibition are emphasized. May be 
repeated for a total of 6 hours. 

PHED 689. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1- 
6) 
Master's or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their advisor may 
register for 1-6 hours of credit under this number. 

PHED 690. SCIENTIFIC BASES OF EXERCISE (3) 

Prerequisites, Anatomy, Physiology, PHED 400, 460, or equiv- 
alent. A critical analysis of the role of physical exercise in 
modern society with attention given to such topics as the 
need for physical exercise, its chronic effects, the role of exer- 
cise in attaining good physical condition and fitness, factors 
determining championship performances, and physical 
fatigue. 



umcp / 171 



PHED 775- ADVANCED ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOTION (3) 
Prerequisites. PHED 400. 460. college algebra or equivalent 
of by permission of instructor. A research oriented kinesiolog- 
ical analysis of human movement as it relates to sports and 
the activities of daily living. The analysis is accomplished by 
means of various measurement procedures including 
cinematography, electronic timing devices and similar instru- 
ments. 

PHED 789. ADVANCED SEMINAR (1-3) 

Studies the current problems and trends in selected fields 
of physical education. 

PHED 799. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-6) 

PHED 899. DOCTORAL THESIS RESEARCH (1-8) 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

Professor and Chairman: Burt 

Professors: Johnson, Kenel 

Associate Professors: Jones, Leviton, Miller, Tifft 

Assistant Professor: Clearwater 

The Department of Health Education offers programs 
designed to prepare students as teachers and community health 
workers. Graduates of the departmental program have place- 
ment opportunities in public school systems, colleges and uni- 
versities, government service and community health. 

The department offers a course of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Arts, Doctor of Education and Doctor of 
Philosophy, and is open to students holding the bachelors 
degree in areas related to the social, psychological or biological 
basis of health education. 

Each student will submit a thesis and will be required to pre- 
sent his work orally in a seminar and to defend his material 
to the satisfaction of his examining committee. All students must 
take Health Education 600 and 710. 

The proximity of the National Institutes of Health and the 
National Library of Medicine render the University of Maryland 
unusually suited for graduate work in health education. 

HLTH 420. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN HEALTH EDUCATION 
(3) 
Prerequisites, HLTH 105 or 140. 310 or consent of instructor. 
The purpose of this course is to present the interrelationships 
of curriculum planning, methodology and the selection and 
use of teaching aids and materials. Special problems 
associated with health teaching are discussed. Students will 
become familiar with a variety of resources as well as plan- 
ning for and presenting demonstration lessons. 

HLTH 450. HEALTH PROBLEMS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH (3) 
This course involves a study of the health needs and problems 
of pupils from the primary grades through high school. Physi- 
cal, mental and psychosomatic aspects of health are consid- 
ered in relation to the developmental and school levels. Con- 
sideration is given to such topics as diet selection and con- 
trol; exercise, recreation and rest; emotional upset and its 
implications: and psychosexual development and problems 
The role of the teacher and parent in encouraging optimal 
health is emphasized. 

HLTH 455. PHYSICAL FITNESS OF THE INDIVIDUAL (3) 

A study of the major physical fitness problems confronting 
the adult in modern society. Consideration is given to the 
scientific appraisal, development and maintenance of fitness 
at all age levels. Such problems as obesity, weight reduction, 
chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise programs are 
explored. This course is open to persons outside the fields 
of physical education and health. 

HLTH 460. PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION IN 
ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS (2-6) 
A workshop-type course designed particularly for inservice 
teachers to acquaint them with the best methods of providing 
good health services, healthful environment and health 
instruction. 



HLTH 470. THE HEALTH PROGRAM IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL (3) 
Second semester; summer session. Prerequisites, HLTH 105 
or 140; 310. This course, designed for the elementary school 
classroom teacher, analyzes biological and sociological fac- 
tors which determine the health status and needs of the 
individual elementary school child. The various aspects of the 
school program are evaluated in terms of their role in health 
education. The total school health program is surveyed from 
the standpoint of organization and administration, and health 
appraisal. Emphasis is placed upon modern methods and cur- 
rent materials in health instruction. (The state Department of 
Education accepts this course for biological science credit.) 

HLTH 476. DEATH EDUCATION AND SUICIDE PREVENTION (3) 
The study and investigation of human dying, death, bereave- 
ment, suicidal behavior, and their relationship to human 
health utilizing a multidisciplinary approach. The course will 
consist of lectures and discussion, and field trips to 
suicidology centers and hospitals. A research project is 
required. 

HLTH 477. FUNDAMENTALS OF SEX EDUCATION (3) 
This course is concerned with basic information regarding 
the physical, psychological, social, historical, semantic and 
comparative cultural aspects of sex. The adjustment needs 
and problems of children and adults during the course of 
maturing and aging are studied; and special consideration 
is giv