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Full text of "Catalog issue of the Maryville College bulletin"

Wm 




LI B RARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

C 

M365H 
1910-11-1917-18 



ny 



Mary ville College 
= Bulletin = 



fc& 




Vol. X MAY, 1911 No. 1 

-LINOIS. 
CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Officers and Faculty 3 

The Courses of Study 8 

History and General Information . 40 

Expenses 47 

Register of Students for 1910-11 . 59 

Index 77 



Published Quarterly by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 

Entered May 24, 1904, at Maryville, Term., as second-class 
matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 




m 



Register of the Officers 
and Students of 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

TENNESSEE 



For the Year 19101911 




Published by 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CLASS OF 1911 

Rev. Nathan Bachman, D.D Sweetwater 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachm an, D.D .Knoxvi e 

REV. Henry Seymour Butler, D.D Htmtsville 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D Chattanooga 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D • ••• • \^°*™ e 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

REV. Samuel TyndalE Wilson, D.D Maryvi e 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A • .;; M 5 y £ lle 

Alexander Russeee McBath, Esq Knoxville R. D. 3 

Hon. William Anderson McTeer • • ■ ^^1 ! 

William Boaz Minnis, Esq New Market 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingston 

CLASS OF 1912 

REV Newton Wadsworth Cadwell, D.D Atlantic City, N J. 

Rev.! John Baxter CrEswell, B.A •••••• • -Bearden 

REvJ Wieeiam Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxvi e 

Rev. Caevin Alexander Duncan, D.D .Knoxvi e 

Rev.; John Samuel Eakin, B.A • • ■ '^neville 

REVJ Woodward Edmund FinlEy, D.D Marshall N. C. 

Hon. William Lkonidas Brown Philadelphia 

Jasper Edward Corning, Esq • • ; • • ' ; Rye ' N _ " 

jAMks Moses Craweord, Esq Fountain City R. D . 1 

Major Ben Cunningham ^ yv !/ 

Samuel O'Grady Houston, B.A Knoxvi e 

Colonel John Beaman Minnis Knoxville 

CLASS OF 1913 

REV. John McKnitt Alexander, B.A i^T^ 

Rev. Robert Henry Dunnaway, B.A Burnsville, N. C. 

* Rev. Wallace Bliss Lucas, D.D Chattanooga 

Rev. Thomas Judson Miles, M.A Knoxville, R D 10 

REV.: John C. Ritter, B.A • ■ • • -Washington College 

Rev. Elmer Briton Waller, M.A Maryvi e 

James Addison Anderson, Esq V? \ , 

Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, M.A Maryvi e 

John Calvin Craweord, B.A., LL.B Maryville 

John Calvin Martin, Esq 1 Broadway New York 

Governor John Powel Smith National Soldiers Home 

James Martin Trimble, Esq Chattanooga 

* Died February 22, 191 1. 



ii)% 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



Officers of the Board of Directors: Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmor^ D.D., 
Chairman; Major Ben Cunningham, Recorder and Treasurer. 

Executive Committee of the Board of Directors: Hon. William Ander- 
son McTeer, Chairman; Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, Secretary; 
and Revs. William Robert Dawson, D.D., John McKnitt Alex- 
ander, and Elmer Briton Waiter. 

Committee on Professors and Teachers: Rev. William Robert Daw- 
son, D.D., Chairman; Prof. Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; 
and Hon. William Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Nelson 
Brown, Dean Elmer Briton Waeler, and President Samuel 
Tyndale Wilson. 

Synodical Examiners for 1911 : Revs. Clarence G. Reynolds, D.D., 

John Morgan Wooten, and Samuel G. Frazier. 
Faculty Committees: 

Entrance: Professors Gillingham, Schnirel, and Mathes. 
Advanced Standing: President Wilson and Professors Barnes and 
Bassett. 

Theses and Degrees: Professors Mathes, Barnes, and Flint. 
Scholarships: Professors Gillingham and Mathes, and Miss Henry. 
Student Publications and Programs: Professors Gillingham, Mathes, 

and Schnirel, and Dean Waiter. 
The Lamar Library: Professor Barnes. 
The Loan Library: Professor Bassett. 
Athletics: Professors Schnirel and Mathes. 
The Cooperative Club: Dean Waller. 
Care of Buildings and Grounds: Professor Lyon. 
College Extension: Professors Barnes, Mathes, and Gillingham. 
Appointments and Employment: Professors Barnes, Bassett, and 

Lyon. 



FACULTY 



REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and Literature, and of 

the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER BRITON WALLER, M.A., 
Dean, Professor of Mathematics, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

CHARLES HODGE MATHES, M.A., 

Professor of Greek. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin. 

PHOEBUS WOOD LYON, M.A., Ph.D., 
Logic and History. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 

Registrar, Professor of Old Testament History and Literature, and 

'Acting Principal of the Preparatory Department. 

REV. HUBERT SAMUEL LYLE, M.A., 
Professor of New Testament History and Literature. 

HERMAN FERDINAND SCHNIREL, B.A, 

Professor of German and French. 

WILLIAM RUTHVEN FLINT, M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, B.A., 

English Language and Literature. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A., 
Biology and Geology. 

MARGARET ELIZA HENRY, B.A., 
English. 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, B.A., 
Mathematics, Physics, and Bookkeeping. 

VIRGINIA ESTELLE SNODGRASS, B.A. 

Latin, 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A./ 

Mathematics. 

MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, B.A., 

English. 

IDA EMMA SCHNIREL, B.A., 
German and French 

ALICE ISABEL CLEMENS, B.A., 
English and History. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, B.A., 
Latin, English, and Mathematics. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 

History. 

JOAN McDOUGALL, 
Piano. 

INEZ MONFORT, 

Voice, History of Music, and Theory. 

REV. EDWIN WILLIAM HALL, 

Vocal and Band Music, and Bible. 

MRS. NITA ECKLES WEST, B.A., B.O., 
Expression. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



REV. THOMAS CAMPBELL, M.A., 
Painting and Drawing. 

ARTHUR EVAN MITCHELL, B.A., 
Physical Director. 

GEORGE REED SHELTON, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM THOMAS ROBISON, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

SAMUEL WALKER, 
Assistant in Biology. 

MARK ARTHUR MAY. 
Assistant in Psychology. 

JOHN GRANVILLE SIMS, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

PHILIP LELAND ROBINSON, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

JULIA HALE DILLON, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

WALLACE HENRY MARSH, 
Assistant in Physiography. 

CLARENCE McMURRY FRANKLIN, 
Assistant in Physics. 

LUCILE CAWOOD, 

Assistant in Greek. 

GEORGE WINFIELD MIDDLETON, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 



OTHER OFFICERS 



MAJ. BEN CUNNINGHAM, 
Treasurer. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, 
Manager of the Loan Library. 

MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Matron of Baldivin Hall. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODGRASS, 
Librarian, and Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 
Proctor of the Grounds. 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, 
Proctor of Carnegie Hall. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 
Proctor of Memorial Hall. 

MRS. WILLIAM PETER BARNHILL, 
Matron of Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 

HORTENSE MARY KINGSBURY, 

Managers of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

Robert McMillan magill, 

Bookkeeper of the Cooperative Boarding Club, 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 
Secretary to the Scholarship Committee. 

CORINNE FLEMING TETEDOUX, 
Secretary to the President. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 
Secretary to the Registrar. 

WILBUR ALBERT HAMMAN, 
Assistant Librarian. 

CLYDE TERELIUS MURRAY, 

Assistant in Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER, 
Janitor. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are expected to be at 
least sixteen years of age and of good moral character. Candidates coming 
from other institutions must bring letters of honorable dismissal. Appli- 
cation for admission to the Freshman Class or to advanced standing should 
be made on the regular application blank of the College. This blank pro- 
vides for the necessary testimonial of character and certificate of honorable 
dismissal, as well as for a complete statement of all studies completed. 
This blank is to be signed by the president or principal of the institution 
from which the applicant comes. The Registrar will mail a copy of the 
application blank upon request. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is the equiv- 
alent of five recitation periods a week during a full academic year, in 
subjects above the eighth grade of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen units are 
required, as specified below : 

i. ENGLISH.— Three units. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write correctly 

and clearly; a knowledge of the principles of punctuation, 
capitalization, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature recom- 

mended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Re- 
quirements in English. For the texts recommended for 
study and practice and for reading in 191 1, see the lists 
scheduled for the Preparatory Department, page 30. 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Six units. Four 
units of Latin are required for entrance to any course leading to a degree. 
In addition, two units in one other language are required, which may be 
Greek, German, or French. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Latin. — Four units. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Caesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, ^neid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology, prosody. 

GrEEk. — Two units. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, Anabasis, 

Book i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv; Homer, Iliad, Books i-iii. 

Composition, mythology, prosody. 

German. — Two units. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and com- 

position. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, with 

reproduction and composition. 

French. — Two units. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of about 

about five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one thousand 

pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, ratio 

and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial 
and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and 
equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original demon- 

strations. 

4. HISTORY.— One or two units. 

(a) Ancient History, to 476 A. D. 

(b) Medieval and Modern History or English History. 

5. NATURAL SCIENCES.— Two units. 

(a) Physiology, with laboratory practice. 

(b) Elementary Physics. Properties of matter; mechanics; 

sound ; light and heat ; electricity and magnetism. Labo- 
ratory drill. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITIONS 

A candidate may be admitted with conditions if the number of his 
condit ; ons does not exceed three. Not more than two conditions will be 
allowed in any one subject. Only one will be allowed in mathematics or 



io MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



English. All entrance conditions must be absolved before admission to 
the Sophomore Class. 

Beginning with September, 1912, the following change regarding 
entrance with conditions will be in effect: The number of conditions 
allowed will be reduced from three to two; and no condition will be 
allowed in English. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, not 
matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Preparatory 
Department. 

Irregular CoeeEGiate Students. — Candidates offering for entrance a 
sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in the Freshman 
Class, but deficient in more than three of the specified units required by 
this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee on Entrance, be 
admitted as irregular collegiate students until they have absolved their 
conditions and attained full standing in a regular college class. Students 
of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregular or partial course and not 
seeking a degree may be allowed to select such studies as they show them- 
selves qualified to pursue. 

SpECiae Students. — Students desiring to study only music, expression, 
or art, and those seeking only the courses in the Bible Training Depart- 
ment, are classified under their respective departments. They have all the 
privileges offered to any students, such as the advantages of the libraries, 
the literary societies, the dormitories, and the boarding club. Young 
women rooming in the college dormitories and desiring chiefly music, 
expression, or art are required to take a sufficient number of literary 
courses to make up, together with their work in the departments mentioned, 
fifteen recitation hours a week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science. To attain either degree a minimum of 
thirty-six courses must be completed. A "course" is a study pursued for 
five one-hour recitation periods a week throughout one term. A term is 
one-third of the scholastic year, and three courses in any subject consti- 
tute, therefore, a year's work in that subject. All courses recite five hours 
a week. Laboratory courses in the natural sciences require two additional 
hours. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four full years 
of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the minimum amount 
required of all students. Since all courses recite five hours a week, fifteen 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE » 



hours a week is the normal amount of work expected of each student A 
student is permitted to take four courses a term (twenty hours a week) 
if his average grade in the subjects pursued during the preceding term was 
not less than ninety per cent. 

Certain studies are required of all candidates for a degree. These 
required studies include twenty-nine of the courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, and all of the courses leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Candidates for the latter degree have the opportunity to choose 
one of two groups of science courses leading to the degree. These required 
studies are shown below. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

I. In Groups Leading to the Degree of B.A. 

English, 6 courses. 
Other Languages, 9 courses. 
Mathematics, 3 courses. 
Science, 4 courses. 
Philosophy, 2 courses. 
Bible, 5 courses. 
Electives, 7 courses. 

In addition to the twenty-nine specified courses as listed above, candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required to select seven 
courses, to make up the total number of thirty-six required for graduation. 
It is recommended that these courses be selected in one of the following 
groups : 

1. Ancient Languages. 

2. Modern Languages. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. English Literature and History. 

5. Political Science. 

6. Philosophy. 

The special requirements for Groups 1 and 2 are as follows : In the 
Ancient Languages Group, the nine required courses in foreign languages 
shall be the ancient languages, and at least three of the seven electives shall 
be in an ancient or a modern language. These twelve language courses 
may be arranged in one of the following combinations: (a) Latin six 
and Greek six; (b) Latin nine and Greek (or German or French) three; 
(c) Greek nine and Latin (or German or French) three. In the Modern 
Languages Group the nine required courses in foreign languages and at 
least three of the seven elective courses shall be in modern languages. At 
least six of these twelve courses must be in German, or nine if German 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



has not been offered for entrance. In these two groups the remaining 
electives may be selected by the student. 

II. In Groups Leading to the Degree of B.S. 

English, 6 courses. 
Other Languages, 8 courses. 
Mathematics, 3 courses. 
Science, 12 courses. 
Philosophy, 2 courses. 
Bible, 5 courses. 

The twelve science courses required for the degree of B.S. may be 
selected in either of the following groups : 

1. The Chemistry Group, in which all the chemistry courses offered 
are to be taken, and the remaining science courses selected in biology, 
physics, and astronomy. 

2. The Biology Group, in which all the biology courses offered are 
to be taken, and the remaining courses selected in chemistry, physics, and 
astronomy. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

The Board of Directors have adopted the following rule as to the 
degree of Master of Arts: 

That the degree of Master of Arts in course be hereafter conferred 
upon graduates of the College after three years of academic, collegiate, 
theological seminary, or university postgraduate work ; the presentation of 
a thesis upon a topic assigned by the Faculty, the thesis to be approved by 
the Faculty ; and, finally, the payment of five dollars for the diploma. The 
thesis must be deposited with the Faculty by the first of April. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not granted by this institution. 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



13 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 



Freshman Year 



English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

History 

Biology 

Philosophy . 
Bible 



Sophomore Year 



English 
Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 
French .... 

Biology 

Physics .... 
History .... 
Philosophy . 
Education . 
Bible 



Junior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

History 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Philosophy 

Political Science. . 
Bible 



Senior Year 

English , 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Geology 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Philosophy 

Political Science. . 

Spanish 

Hebrew 

Bible 



Fall 



*2 
*3 
3 
3 
4 
1 
5 



7 
*1 
*4 
*3 



Winter 



2 

2 

1 

*1 or 3 

*1 



10 


11 


1 


— 


or 7 


5 or £ 


9 


10 


*7 


*8 


3, 9 


4 or 5 


1 


2 


1 


2 





*4 



Spring 

*2 
2 

3 
2 

*2 or 4 



*3 


*4 


4 


5 


4 


5 


4 


5 


5 


6 


2 


3 





6 


1 


2 





3 


3 


— 


1 


2 


— 


*2 


*6 


*7 


6 


7 


7 


8 


7 


8 


8 


9 


4 


5 


*2 


3 





7 or 


5 or 6 


— 


1 


2 



10 or 11 

Q 



12 

6 or 9 

*9, 10 or 11 

7 or 8 

*5 



•Required in all groups leading to a degree. 



i4 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Barnes, Dean Waeeer, and Proeessor Lyon 

i. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for students 
taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supplemented by 
lectures and typical experiments. 

2. Educational Psychology. This course is developed with special 
reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, mental growth as a 
function of sensori-motor coordination ; from this point of view, attention, 
perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. The course 
is designed to show the application of psychological laws and principles 
to educational theory and practice. 

3. Sociology. Wright's Outlines of Practical Sociology is used as a 
text-book, including the subjects of units of social organization, questions 
of population, question of the family, the labor system, social well-being, 
and the defense of society. Collateral reading and reports on assigned 
subjects are required. — Dean WaeeER. 

4. Logic. Hill's Jevons' Logic, studied in connection with printed 
questions and exercises prepared for the class. All the practical work 
given in the exercises appended in the text-book is required, and original 
work is introduced. Logic in its relations to composition and literature is 
discussed. Jevons' Studies in Deductive Logic is used by the class during 
the last month's work. — Proeessor Lyon. 

5. History of Greek and Medieval Philosophy. This course consists 
•of a study of the problems, methods, motives, and conclusions of the great 
philosophers of the Greek and Medieval periods. Rogers' History of 
Philosophy, with lectures and readings from Windelband, Zeller, Plato, 
and Aristotle. Open to students that have completed Psychology 2 (or its 
equivalent). (Not to be given in 1911-12.) 

6. History of Modern Philosophy. This course is designed to 
familiarize students with the problems of modern philosophy, to evaluate 
the methods of modern investigation, and to understand the motives and 
conclusions of a few of the great philosophers of modern times. Rogers' 
History of Philosophy, with lectures and readings from Windelband, 
Ueberweg, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 1 or 2. 

7. Psychology. The aim of this course is to give the student a 
definite idea of the elements and methods of modern psychology. The 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE *S 



ground covered is as follows: (a) The structure of the eye, ear, and 
train: five lectures illustrated by the use of the Auzoux Models, (b) 
Titchener's Outline of Psychology, supplemented by prescribed readings 
in Angell, James, Ladd, Wundt, Stout, and Porter, (c) Typical experi- 
ments. . 

8. The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief, as set forth in Dr. 
Fisher's work, is made the basis of classroom study and recitation. The 
principal theistic and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the 
main historical and philosophical arguments for belief in the Christian 
religion are considered. — Dean Waller. 

9. Ethics. The leading conceptions of moral theory are approached 
by the historical method. The student is led to see that moral problems 
are real problems, which are solved best by reflective thought that is 
guided by Christian ideals. The various types of ethical theory are 
discussed. Special emphasis is placed upon the ethics of social organiza- 
tions : the state, the economic life, and the family. The text of Dewey 
and Tufts is placed in the hands of the students, and is supplemented by 
the works of Sidgwick, Green, Martineau, and Spencer. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 1 or 2. 

10. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experiments 
in acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titchener's Ex- 
perimental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by the works of 
Kiilpe, Sanford, and Judd. 

11. Experimental Psychology. This course' is a continuation of 
Course 10. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reacti 
periment by the use of the Hipp chronoscop 



on ex- 

e. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Proeessor Barnes and Dean Waller 

1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the nation, 
and of the character and distribution of nationalities; a development of 
the idea and conception of the state, and a study of its origin, forms, and 
•ends; a history of the formations of the constitutions of the states of 
Great Britain, the United States, Germany, and France, and of the organ- 
ization of these states within their respective, constitutions, and a study of 
liberty as guaranteed in their constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' 
Political Science, Volume I, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and 
Thayer's and McClain's Cases, and the works of other authors. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the construc- 
tions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judicial depart- 
ments of the governments of Great Britain, the United States, Germany, 
and France. The text-book is Burgess' Political Science, Volume II, sup- 
plemented by the works of Story, Macy, and other authors. 



16 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



3. International Law. This course consists of the elements of inter- 
national law, with an account of its origin, sources, and historical develop- 
ment. Davis' text-book is used, and the course is supplemented by pre.- 
scribed readings in the works of Woolsey and Hall, and in Scott's and 
Snow's Cases. 

4. The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This course 
is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure and procedure, 
national, state, and municipal ; it includes also a study of the structure and 
procedure of political conventions and similar bodies, and the theory and. 
practice of parliamentary law. Open to students who have had Political 
Science 1 and 2. (Not to be given in 1911-12.) 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and 
methods of action of political parties in the United States. Growth of the 
party system ; primary and convention systems ; permanent party organiza- 
tion ; reform movements ; and the value and theory of the party system. 

6. Comparative Governments. A . comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Wilson's The State is used 
as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Governments and Parties in Con- 
tinental Europe. 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great Britain, 
and the United States. Wilson and Lowell are the texts, supplemented by 
Taswell-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and Story. 

8. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the elementary 
principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. Cooley's text, and 
McClain's and Thayer's Cases, are used. 

9. An elementary course in Political Economy. Seligman's Prin- 
ciples of Economics is used, with supplementary reading, including the 
usual divisions of production, exchange, distribution, and consumption, 
with some applications of economic principles. Members of the class are 
required to submit in writing a summary of their collateral reading on 
assigned topics. — Dean Waiter. 



EDUCATION 

i, 2. History of Education. A study of the educational systems of 
early China, Egypt, Greece, and Rome ; the history of Christian education ; 
the rise of the universities; the Renaissance; and the educators of the 
sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. A careful 
study is made of such modern educators as Rousseau, Basedow, Pestalozzi, 
Froebel, Herbart, and Horace Mann. The last part of the course is 
devoted to the comparison of the school systems of Germany, France,. 
England, and the United States. 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICS 

Dean Waller 



i. Solid Geometry begun and finished; Conic Sections as given in 
Book ix of Wentworth's Geometry. 

2. Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry, including functions of acute 
angles, the right triangle, goniometry, and the oblique triangle. 

3. Wentworth's Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. This work 
includes the application of spherical trigonometry to the problems of the 
celestial sphere in astronomy, and enough field work is given to illustrate 
the principles of compass surveying. 

4. 5. Plane Analytic Geometry. This course includes the study of 
the subject as given in Wentworth's Analytic Geometry, omitting the sup- 
plementary propositions. 

6, 7. Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus as given in Tay- 
lor's Elements of Calculus; Osborne's Treatise used in supplementary 
work. 

8. Wentworth's College Algebra, beginning with the subject of 
choice and chance, and including variables and limits, series, determinants, 
graphical representation of functions, and general solutions of equations. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 3, or equivalent. 

9. Astronomy. The subject as presented in Young's General Astron- 
omy is made the basis of study and recitation. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Flint 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A careful survey of the funda- 
mental laws and theories of chemistry is made. Lecture periods, three 
hours each week, including bi-weekly written quizzes. Laboratory practice, 
four hours each week, the credit for which will be based on neatness, 
observation, reasoning ability, and clearness of record. Gooch and 
Walker's Outlines of Inorganic Chemistry is the text-book for the course. 
Laboratory experiments are selected. Prerequisite, elementary physics. 
Course open to Freshmen and Sophomores who are sufficiently prepared. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1. Pre- 
requisite, Course 1. 

3. Analytical Chemistry; Qualitative Analysis. A laboratory course 
of seven hours each week in the methods used in the detection and sep- 
aration of the metallic elements for the various groups, and inorganic basic 
and acidic radicals. Gooch and Browning's Outline of Qualitative Chem- 
ical Analysis is the manual used. Prerequisites are Courses t and 2. 

4. Analytical Chemistry; Quantitative Analysis. A laboratory course 
2 



18 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



of six hours each week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods used 
in quantitative analysis. Instruction by personal conference and reference 
to standard works on analysis. Prerequisites, Courses i, 2, and 3. 

5. Analytical Chemistry; Quantitative Analysis. A continuation of 
Course 4. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

6. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of seven hours each week. 
Occasional lectures on crystallography and mineral deposits will be given. 
Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Brush-Penfield's Determinative Mineral- 
ogy is the manual. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and quizzes, 
three hours each week; laboratory practice, four hours. Rolleman's Text- 
book of Organic Chemistry is the guide to the recitations, and Holleman's 
manual supplemented by Gotterman and others will serve for the lab- 
oratory guide. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Course 8. 

9. Physical Chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and quizzes, three hours 
each week ; laboratory practice, four hours. Texts, reference to standard 
works, and study of topics. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

Before making a selection of courses in chemistry, a conference with 
the head of the department will be found helpful. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Flint and Assistant 

1. Sound and Light. Three recitation periods and four hours of 
laboratory exercises a week. Instruction mainly by lectures and bi-weekly 
quizzes. Goodspeed-Gage's Principles of Physics is used as the class text- 
book in this course, with Watson's Physics as a general reference text. 

2. Magnetism and Electricity. Three recitation periods and four 
hours of laboratory exercises a week. Method of instruction similar to 
that in Course 1. Goodspeed-Gage's Principles of Physics is used as the 
class text-book, with Watson's Physics as a general reference text. 

GEOLOGY 

1. General Geology: Dynamic, Structural, and Historical. Le Conte's 
Elements of Geology is the text-book used. 

2. Mineralogy. A course in determinative mineralogy, is offered. See 
Chemistry 6. 

BIOLOGY 

Miss Gresn 

1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 19 



Prerequisite, elementary physiology. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, 
three hours. 

2. General Vertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, three hours. 

3. Botany. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Emphasis 
is laid upon the chief problems involved in the physiology, ecology, and 
morphology of the seed, the developing plant, and the flower. Text-book, 
Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany. Recitations, two hours; labora- 
tory, three hours. 

4. Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey of the 
four great plant groups. Prerequisite, Course 3. Recitations, two hours; 
laboratory, three hours. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most evident life rela- 
tions of plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant physiology. 
Classroom work, accompanied by experimental work in the laboratory. 
The work is not confined to any one text-book, but references are given 
out to various standard text-books on plant physiology. Prerequisite, 
Course 3. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, five hours. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed study of 
the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts, smuts, mildews, 
and molds renders this a valuable course from an economic standpoint. 
Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, Course 4. Recitations, two 
hours; laboratory, five hours. 

7. Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Mosses, 
liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thoroughly studied. 
The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the surrounding region makes 
this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Courses 4 and 6. Recitations, 
two hours; laboratory, five hours. 

8. Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 4, 6, and 7. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, five 
hours. 

9. 10. Advanced Physiology. Classroom work and laboratory experi- 
ments, bringing out the fundamental principles of the circulatory, res- 
piratory, digestive, and nervous systems. This course is especially valuable 
to students intending to take up the study of medicine. Prerequisites, 
elementary physiology, elementary physics, Biology 2, and Chemistry 1. 
Recitations, three hours ; laboratory, four hours. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 6, 7, or 
8. By this alternation of courses, a student will be given an opportunity 
to pursue the subject farther than would otherwise be possible. Courses 
6, 7, and 8 are open to those who have completed Courses 3, 4, and 5. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



HISTORY 

Mrs. Alexander and Professor Lyle 

i. Nineteenth Century History. The object of the course is the study 
of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed from the 
French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of republican ideas 
in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment of the German Empire, 
and revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848. Special topics for indi- 
vidual study are taken up by each member and pursued throughout the 
course.— Mrs. Alexander. 

2. History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the Influ- 
ence of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, the German Reformation. 
The work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed authors, but 
students are required to submit oral reports of special library work.— Mrs. 
Alexander. 

3. Church History. A general survey of the history of the Church 
from the first century to the present time, with especial emphasis upon the 
great leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text-book and library work.— 
Professor Lyle. 

4. 5. American History. In this course, students are expected to cen- 
tralize their private work upon one line of development — constitutional, 
economic, social, ethical, or religious — and the result of the special work 
is to be handed in as a term theme.— Mrs. Alexander. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

President Wilson, Mrs. Alexander, and Professor Lyon 

1. Outlining and Argumentation. Five Weeks.— Outlining or analysis 
of topics for discussion. This practical work is done in accordance with 
a system of principles and rules collated by the instructor in charge. The 
absolute necessity of method in all composition is emphasized by this 
course. At least fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by each 
student, and criticised and returned by the professor. Nine Weeks.— 
Argumentation. This course follows the course in outlining and involves 
the application of the principles presented in that course in the production 
of finished argumentative exercises, which are delivered in class and criti- 
cised by the instructor. Special attention is given to delivery as well as 
to the thought and composition, since the aim of the course is to develop 
the power of effective public address.— President Wilson. 

2, 3. Genung's Practical Elements of Rhetoric, with illustrative ex- 
amples, is studied, and the students are familiarized with the principles of 
style and invention ; while practical exercises accompany the study of the 
text-book. — Professor Eyon. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 21 



4. Rhetorical Analysis. This course consists of the practical applica- 
tion of the principles enunciated in Courses 2 and 3. The work is alto- 
gether practical, and consists of rhetorical criticism of passages of English 
prose, and of sentences, paragraphs, and longer compositions prepared by 
the student, either in or for the recitation room. — Professor Lyon. 

5. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial liter- 
ature. The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the works of 
the leading American poets and prose writers of the nineteenth century. 
Library work and Page's Chief American Poets. — Mrs. Alexander. 

6. 7. A survey of the entire field of English Literature. As a guide 
Halleck's History of English Literature is employed, but' most of the time 
is devoted to the reading and criticism of specimens from the works of 
forty or more authors, from Chaucer's time to the present. — Professor 
Lyon. 

8. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course will be a study of rep- 
resentative nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial attention to the 
development of the essay and of prose fiction. The work will be based on 
typical essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Stevenson, and Arnold; 
and representative fiction by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, 
Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling. — Mrs. Alexander. 

9. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting the 
development of his poetic art; with introductory lectures on the evolution 
of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. — Mrs. Alex- 
ander. 

10. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tennyson, 
and Browning, with introductory lectures, classroom criticism, and papers 
on assigned subjects. — Mrs. Alexander. 

11. Theme Writing. This course aims to give instruction and prac- 
tice in the four kinds of composition: exposition, argumentation, descrip- 
tion, and narration. There are daily exercises and themes written and 
criticised in class. These are designed to illustrate the use of words and 
the structure of sentences and paragraphs, and to give general practice in 
writing on varied subjects. In addition, at least four long themes, of from 
a thousand to fifteen hundred words each, must be handed in. — Mrs. 
Alexander. 

LATIN 

Professor Bassett 

1. Livy, and Latin Composition. Livy, four hours; Latin composition, 
one hour. Livy, Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The class 
makes a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. Syn- 
tax receives close attention. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by 
the professor in charge. Translation at sight and at hearing. 



22 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



2. De Senectute and De Amicitia, and Latin Composition. De Senec- 
tute and De Amicitia, four hours ; Latin composition, one hour. A careful 
study of De Senectute, followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the author's thought and style, and to securing 
an elegant translation. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by the 
professor in charge. Translation at sight and at hearing. 

3. Cicero and Pliny, and Latin Composition. Selections from the 
letters of Cicero and Pliny. The letters read will be such as illustrate the 
life and customs of the times and the characters of the writers. Latin 
prose as in previous courses. Sight reading. Prerequisite, Course 1 or 
Course 2. 

4. Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together w r ith Course 5 
presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace. By this time 
the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatical structure of the 
language to enable him to study the poems of Horace from a literary view- 
point. Special attention is paid to the metrical structure and the class 
receives thorough drill in scansion. Prerequisites, at least two of the 
preceding courses. 

5. Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal. A continuation of the preceding course. The class makes a care- 
ful study of the origin and development of Roman satire. Prerequisite, 
Course 4. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of the Junior year 
consists of a thorough and systematic review of the whole period of Roman 
literature — its beginnings, development, and decline — with special refer- 
ence to its connection with Roman history. The three courses should be 
taken in succession. The texts used will be Fowler's History of Roman 
Literature and Smith's Latin Selections. Readings from representative 
authors. Lectures by the professor in charge. Reports will be required 
on assigned portions of the various histories of Latin literature, Sellar's 
Roman Poets, Tyrrell's Latin Poetry, and other reference works. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 4 and 5. 

The work of the fall term (Course 6) is a study of the fragments of 
early Latin, the plays of Plautus and Terence, Lucretius' De Rerum. Natura, 
Catullus, and the prose writers of the age of Cicero. 

7. Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. A 
continuation of Course 6, as explained above. Selections from Vergil's 
Eclogues and Georgics. Ovid and the Elegiac Poets, and the prose writers 
of the period. 

8. Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and Post- 
classical Latin. A continuation of Courses 6 and 7. Selections from Lucan, 
Seneca, Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius, 
Minucius Felix, and others. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 23 



9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from the 
writings of Seneca. The class makes a critical study of the historical 
setting, structure, and purpose of the Agricola. The characteristics of 
Silver Latin as illustrated in the style of Tacitus and Seneca receive close 
attention. 

GREEK 

Professor Matches 

1. Selections from Herodotus and Thucydides. A careful study of 
the dialect of Herodotus is made, and special reading is assigned on the 
rise and development of history as a type of Greek literature. In this 
term a study of the history of Greek literature is begun, based on Wright's 
and Jebb's texts, with assigned reading in Mueller and Mahaffy. 

2. Selections from Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are 
read, and the peculiarities of the late Attic style are studied. The study 
of the history of Greek literature is continued. 

3. Plato. The Protagoras, or two of the shorter dialogs. In connec- 
tion with this course a study is made of the philosophic dialog and of 
Plato's literary style. Sight translation from easy Attic prose is made a 
part of this course. 

4. Tragic Poetry. Aeschylus' Seven against Thebes and Sophocles' 
Oedipus Tyrannus are read in alternate years, with one play from Eurip- 
ides, either Alcestis or Iphigenia in Tauris. The origin and development 
of tragedy, the Greek theater, and other related topics are discussed in 
lectures and studied in assigned readings. 

5. Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. The 
development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and Greek life 
are studied. One hour a week is given to the study of Greek architecture, 
based upon a text-book, supplemented by lectures and the examination of 
drawings and stereographs. 

6. Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute the 
basis of a general study of the rise and development of political oratory 
and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written translations are 
required, to develop accuracy and elegance in rendering the polished style 
of the classical orators. One hour a week is devoted to lectures and dis- 
cussions on Greek sculpture and painting, Tarbell's History of Greek Art 
being used as a text. 

7. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course cover- 
ing the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine books is 
read in the original and the intervening portions in a translation. Merry's 
two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a classroom text. Homeric 
geography, politics, religion, home-life, and art are studied in connection 
with the reading of the text. 

8. Lyric Poetry. Selections are read from a considerable number o£ 



24 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



the elegiac, iambic, and melic poets. Tyler's Selections from the Greek 
Lyric Poets is the text-book used. Special attention is paid to metres and 
scansion. 

9. The Attica of Pausanias. This course is designed to give a de- 
tailed knowledge of Athens in the time of Pausanias. In connection with 
the author's text, a careful study of the topography of Athens, together 
with a historical survey of the growth of the ancient city, is made. Maps, 
plans, photographs, and stereographs are used, and readings are assigned 
in the most recent archaeological works. 

A course in New Testament Greek is conducted in the Bible Training 
Department (see New Testament Literature, Course 4). This course is 
accepted as an equivalent for any of the courses listed above. 

GERMAN 

Professor Schniree 

1, 2, 3. This course is intended for students well prepared .in other 
subjects to enable them to complete the entrance German in one year, 
so that they can enter earlier the study of advanced German literature. 
Grammar, Joynes and Meissner. Composition. Reading such texts as 
Marchen und Erzahlungen, Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, Freytag's 
Die Journalisten, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, or Lessing's Minna von Barn- 
helm. Memorizing some of the best poems. 

4, 5, 6. Rapid reading of modern literature and a critical study of 
one of the great works of Schiller or Goethe. 

Such works as Zwischen den Schlachten by Elster, Sudermann's Die 
Heimat. Frau Sorge, Goethe's Faust and Dichtung und Wahrheit, Fulda's 
Der Talisman, Schiller's Wallensteins Tod. 

7, 8, 9. Advanced German composition and conversation. Open only 
to students that have completed Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4, or their equiva- 
lent. This course is conducted in German and consists in the translation 
of representative English prose in the German idiom. Careful training in 
German phonetics. 

10, 11, 12. History of German literature, in the fall term. Reading 
of scientific books and journals, winter and spring terms. 

FRENCH 

Professor Schniree 

1, 2, 3. This course is designed for those who enter college without 
French and are sufficiently well prepared in other subjects to enable them 
to complete the grammar and easy prose in the fall term. The course 
consists of the reading of the most representative authors, some of which 
reading is done independently of the classroom. The classical drama as 



MARYVILLB CO HUGE 25 



represented by Racine, Corneille, Moliere ; also French prose of the seven- 
teenth century by Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, and Bossuet. 

SPANISH 

President Wilson 

1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning with 
the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of English 
into Spanish and of Spanish into English, as the sentences are read to the 
student. 

2. Zarate's Compendio de Historia General de Mejico; Galdos' Maria- 
nela ; El Si de las Ninas ; conversation and composition. 

HEBREW 

Professor Gillingham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading of easy 
portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's Inductive Hebrew 
Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion of both 
courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced standing 
in Hebrew in the theological seminary. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

1. The requirements of this course may be met by electing any course 
in English Bible offered in the Bible Training Department. — Professors 
Gillingham and Lyle. 

2. As in Course 1, any of the Bible Training courses in English Bible 
may be taken. Students prepared to do so may take New Testament Greek 
instead of English Bible. — Professors Gielingham and Lyle. 

3. This course requires that election be made from the English Bible 
courses offered in the fall term. Hebrew may be elected instead of Eng- 
lish Bible by Juniors or Seniors. — Professors Gielingham and Lyle. 

4. Theism. Required of all Seniors, and accepted as an allied subject 
in place of English Bible. — Dean Waller. 

5. Ethics. Required of all Seniors, and accepted as an allied subject 
in place of English Bible. — Professor Barnes. 



26 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A six years' course of study, designed to equip prospective teachers 
thoroughly for their profession, is offered in the Teachers' Course. The 
first four years are arranged in such a way as to correspond closely with 
the regular courses of the Preparatory Department, and these four years 
constitute sixteen units of academic work. Those completing these four 
years are admitted to the Freshman Class of the College, with two con- 
ditions in Greek or a modern language. The work of the fifth and sixth 
years is made to correspond closely with the requirements of the Freshman 
and Sophomore years of the College. Special emphasis is put upon his- 
tory, pedagogy, psychology, and the history of education, and the courses 
in these subjects are conducted in accordance with the best normal methods 
now in vogue. 

Detailed descriptions of the courses outlined in the first four years in 
the following synopsis will be found under Departments of Instruction in 
the Preparatory Department, pages 30 to 34; and descriptions of the courses 
in the fifth and sixth years under Departments of Instruction in the College 
Department, pages 14 to 25. 



First Year 

English I 
Physiology I 
Latin I 
History I 

^Mathematics I 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 

Second Year Third Year 



English II 
Mathematics II 
Latin II 
History II 

^Bookkeeping I 



English III 
Mathematics III 
Latin III 
Physiography I 



Fourth Year 

Physics I 
Mathematics IV 
Latin IV 
Pedagogy I 

^History III 



Fieth Year 

English 

Mathematics 

History 

Biology .... 
Philosophy 
Bible 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


2 

2 

2 or 3 




1 


— 



Sixth Year 

English 

Mathematics 
Philosophy 
Education . 
Bible 



Fall 


Winter 


2 
3 
2 


3 

3 
1 


~ 


— 



Spring 
4 



*May be taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of the Prepar- 
atory Department. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 27 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of the Preparatory Department is to furnish thorough 
courses of training in high-school branches leading to entrance to the 
Freshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted to make up their 
conditions in this department. Students in the Teachers' Department take 
their first four years' work in preparatory courses, and Bible Training stu- 
dents have the privilege of electing studies in this department. Oppor- 
tunities are provided also for a large and worthy class of young people, 
with limited means and time at their command, to obtain some preparation 
for their future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
are available to students in the Preparatory Department. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates from 
principals of secondary schools will be accepted and credit given for equiv- 
alent work in any of the subjects required for graduation. Credit thus 
given is conditional, and will be canceled in any subject in which the stu- 
dent is found to be deficient. Full credit for physiology or physics will 
not be given unless a reasonable amount of laboratory work has been done 
in connection with the text-book work. Diplomas must be accompanied by 
certified statements of the amount of time devoted to each subject studied, 
and the passing grade, together with the name of the text-book used and 
the ground covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for 
examinations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 
if indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
as testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases students 
coming from other secondary schools, whether asking for credits or not, 
must present letters of honorable dismissal from their former principals. 
Students that have been out of school for a number of years are admitted 
under the general rule that all candidates for admission must furnish satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character, and must have completed the 
common-school branches. Students that have not had the advantage of 
sufficient preparation and that fail to pass the entrance examinations are, 
if not too deficient, prepared for entrance in a room provided for that pur- 
pose. Applicants under fifteen years of age, unless residents of Maryville, 
will not be admitted. 



28 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers three courses of study : the Classical, the Latin- 
Scientific, and the General. The Classical and Latin- Scientific Courses pre- 
pare for college entrance. The General Course is offered for the benefit 
of those who are not preparing to enter college. In case a student after 
completing the General Course decides to enter college, opportunity will be 
given him to make up the four Latin units while pursuing college work 
in other subjects. All regular courses of study begin in the fall term and 
continue throughout the year. These courses may not be entered at the 
opening of the winter or spring term unless the student has had the work 
of the preceding term or terms. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in any course are sixteen units of 
work as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the equivalent of 
five forty-five-minute recitation periods a week in one subject throughout 
the academic year. A student may elect any one of the three courses, but 
must pursue the studies prescribed in the course elected for at least one 
year, unless change is made in accordance with the administrative rule on 
page 54 regarding changes of course. The prescribed work is four reci- 
tation periods a day. Partial work may be permitted at the discretion of 
the Faculty. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on the unit 
basis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be so indicated on 
the records, and unit credit for that subject withheld until the student 
shall have completed the year's work. A minimum of three units, seventy- 
five per cent of the year's work, will be required for advancement in 
classification to the following year. 

SPECIAL AFTER-CHRISTMAS COURSES 

Extra classes in Latin I, English II, Mathematics II, and other 
branches, as well as courses in pedagogy and other studies of special inter- 
est to those who have been teaching in the public schools cr who contem- 
plate doing so, are provided for those who are unable to enter before the 
winter term. These classes, together with these regular courses for which 
the after-Christmas students are prepared, make it certain that such stu- 
dents will find it satisfactory and to their advantage to enter for the winter 
and spring terms. Every year large numbers of the teachers of the public 
schools throughout this section avail themselves of the special opportu- 
nities afforded them by this department; and many of them bring some 
of their most advanced pupils with them. Full particulars regarding this 
special after-Christmas work are given in the smaller bulletins. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 29 



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30 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ENGLISH 

Miss Alexander 



First Year : I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by the best 
modern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. During the fall 
term the work is supplemented by oral drill in the retelling of familiar 
stories from Cooper, Hawthorne, Irving, and other American authors ; and 
in the winter and spring terms by a grammatical study of The Lady of the 
Lake, Silas Marner, and other selections from English authors. 

Second Year : II. Composition and Rhetoric, as presented in Brooks 
and Hubbard's text. Particular attention is given to the study of style, to 
the writing of original themes, and to correct expression in reading and 
speaking. Seven weeks in the fall term are given to English Bible. During 
the winter and spring terms the work is supplemented by the study of 
American literature. 

Third Year: III. Composition and Rhetoric, and English Litera- 
ture. . The subject of invention is carefully studied, and drill is given in 
theme-writing, reading, and speaking. Seven weeks in the winter term are 
devoted to English Bible. The requirements prescribed by the College 
Entrance Examination Board are followed, and all texts not already 
studied in the two preceding years are used in this year's work. 

The prescribed texts for 1911-12 are as fellows: 

For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus, L' Allegro, and 
II Penseroso; Washington's Farewell Address; Webster's First Bunker 
Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson. 

For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and As You Like 
It; Bacon's Essays; Spenser's Faerie Queen, Book i; Hawthorne's House 
of Seven Gables; George Eliot's Silas Marner: Irving's Sketch Book; 
Lamb's Essays of Elia; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner; Scott's Lady of the 
Lake; The Old Testament. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Profeitt and Mr. W'aeker 

First Year : I. Higher Arithmetic. A course in arithmetic is offered 
in the fall term and repeated in the winter and spring terms. The subjects 
considered are percentage and its various applications, exchange, equation 
of payments, progressions, involution and evolution, mensuration, ratio and 
proportion, and the metric system. 

Second Year: II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New 
Standard Algebra, to radicals. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 31 



Third Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, 
ratio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial and expo- 
nential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and equations in general. 

Fourth Year: IV. Plane Geometry. Wentworth's Revised Geom- 
etry is the text-book used. Five books of plane geometry, together with 
about three hundred original theorems and problems. 



LATIN 

Professor Bassett and Miss Snodgrass 

First Year: I. First Latin. Collar and Daniell's First Latin Book, 
supplemented by outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is com- 
pleted in the spring term, and is followed by the reading of Viri Romse 
or some book of like grade. 

Second Year : II. Csesar and Latin Composition. Caesar, four hours 
each week; Latin composition, one hour. During this year outlines are 
•given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. The first four books of 
the Gallic War are completed in this year. 

Third Year: III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In the 
fall and winter terms : Cicero, four hours each week ; Latin composition, 
one hour. These two courses include the four orations against Catiline, 
the Manilian Law, and the Archias. In the spring term: Sallust, four 
hours each week; Latin composition, one hour. Sallust's Catiline. A 
•careful comparison is made with Cicero's Catilinarian orations. During 
this year special attention is paid to drill in pronouncing the Latin, intelli- 
gent reading in the original, and translation at sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year: IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is spent in 
the study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The principles of quan- 
tity and versification are carefully studied. Thorough drill in oral and 
written scansion. Sight reading. This course covers the first six books 
of Vergil's iEneid. The last three weeks of the spring term are devoted 
to prose composition. — Professor Bassett. 



GREEK 

Professor Mathes and Assistant 

Third Year: I. Beginning Greek. Pronunciation as given in White's 
First Book and in Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Daily drill on forms. 
Review outlines on various topics are presented by the instructor or pre- 
pared by the student and preserved in his note-book for permanent refer- 
•ence. Bi-weekly reviews and frequent written tests throughout the year. 



32 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 

In the spring term the Anabasis is begun, in connection with the review 
of inflection and daily exercises in composition. 

Fourth Year: II. The fall and winter terms are devoted to the 
reading of the Anabasis, Books ii-iv. Goodwin and White's Anabasis is. 
the text-book used. The geography of Ancient Greece and Asia Minor 
is studied. Semi-weekly drill in prose composition, the exercises being: 
prepared by the instructor and based upon the lessons in the text. In the 
spring term the Iliad, Books i-iii, is read, omitting the Catalog of the Ships. 
Mythology and geography are studied as required for the full understand- 
ing of the text. Review translation and sight reading are practiced daily, 
with drill in the identification of Epic forms and the turning of selected 
passages into Attic prose. Special attention is paid to scansion and the 
laws of versification. 

GERMAN 

Miss Schniree 

Third Year: I. Grammar, Joynes-Wesselhoeft. This course consists- 
of the principles of German pronunciation, inflection, rules of syntax, the 
rewriting of easy English sentences in German, and the memorizing of 
familiar poems. 

The work of the winter and spring terms is augmented by reading 
Grimm's Marchen und Erzahlungen, and Hewitt's German Reader. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Joynes-Wesselhoeft. This course in- 
cludes advanced grammar and syntax, use of moods, derivation of words, 
force of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted to conversation and 
composition work of an intermediate character. The reading consists of 
such works of descriptive and narrative prose as will impart facility in trans- 
lation. Storm's Immensee, Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn, Zschokke's 
Der Zerbrcchene Krug, Benedix' Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's Germels- 
hausen, Heine's Die Harzreise. Memorizing of longer poems. 

FRENCH 

MlSS SCHNIREE 

Third Year: I. This course consists of a thorough foundation in the 
elements of French grammar and the conjugation of irregular verbs. Com- 
position, and reading of such authors as Laboulaye's Contes Bleus, Dumas' 
La Tulipe Noire, Merimee's Colomba. 

Fourth Year : II. This course consists of advanced grammar, com- 
position, and conversation. Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Corneille's Le Cid, 
Moliere's L'Avare, Greville's Dosia, Moliere's Les Femmes Savantes, Erck- 
mann-Chatrian's Madame Therese. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 33 



HISTORY 

Professor Lyon, Miss Ceemens, and Mr. Brittain 

First Year: I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian and 
Oriental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alexander, fol- 
lowed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 476 A. D. This 
work is carried through the whole year and is required in all the courses. 

Second Year : II. Medieval and Modern History. A general survey 
of European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 A. D., to 
the present time. This work will be centered on the history of France. 
Carried through the year. Required in all courses. 

Fourth Year : III. English History. A brief outline of the history 
of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the periods of 
the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course is intended 
to give the student a good general knowledge of the history of our mother 
country and to prepare for subsequent courses in English literature and 
higher United States history. Carried through the year. Required in the 
General Course and elective in the other courses. 

PEDAGOGY 

Fourth Year: I. (a) School Management. This part of the course 
is designed to inculcate practical views of teaching that will enable the 
young teacher to do successful work in the common schools. Among the 
subjects discussed are the teacher's part in school government; the pupil's 
part in school government; incentives; punishments; and the like. This 
course is open to Fourth Year students in the Teachers' Course. Seeley's 
School Management is used as a text-book, supplemented by extensive 
library work. 

(b) and (c) Methods of Teaching. The work of the winter and 
spring terms is devoted to a study of the best methods of teaching the 
common-school branches, as presented in such modern authors as Seeley 
and White, with special emphasis upon the teaching of reading, arithmetic, 
and geography. Each member of the class is required to teach at least two 
periods in each term in the sub-preparatory rooms, under the supervision 
of the instructor in pedagogy. 

BOOKKEEPING 

Mr. Proeeitt 

Thorough courses in bookkeeping are now conducted throughout the 
year according to the practical methods employed in business colleges. 
Students may enter in any one of the three parts of the course in any 
term. No extra charge is made for this work. 



34 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



PHYSICS 

Mr. Profit? and Assistant 

Fourth Year: I. Elementary Physics, (a) Properties of Matter 
Mechanics; Sound, (b) Light and Heat, (c) Electricity and Magnetism. 
Three recitation periods and four laboratory periods a week. Text-book, 
Carhart and Chute's High School Physics. Laboratory exercises selected. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY 

Miss Green and Assistant 

Third Year: I. Physiography. This course is a high-school course 
in physical geography, and treats of the general conditions of the lithos- 
phere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. This course includes a study of 
dynamic, structural, and historical geology, and embraces the main features 
of the geology of Tennessee. The classroom work is supplemented by field 
trips r.nd by the study of topographic maps and stereographic views. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Miss Green and Assistants 

First Year: I. Human Physiology, as presented in Ritchie's text. 
Particular attention is given to the circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and 
digestive systems. Two laboratory periods a week. 



MARY VILLI* COLLEGE 35 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Miss McDougau, and Miss Monfort, and Mr. Hau. 

In this department opportunity is given pupils for instruction in piano, 
voice, theory, harmony, and history of music. Private lessons are half an 
hour in length, and class lessons one hour. Certificates and diplomas are 
granted to such students of piano and voice as pass the requirements. 

Piano.— In the piano work the teacher's aim is to cultivate in the stu- 
dent a clear, concise production of tone and an intelligent interpretation of 
melody. The elementary studies used are those of Kohler, Matthew, Ber- 
tini, Czerny, Kuhlau, Low, Diabelli, and Clementi. More advanced works 
include those of Cramer, Haydn, Mozart, Schumann, Handel, Beethoven, 
Bach, and Chopin. Pupis are trained not only in solo work, but also in 
ensemble playing. 

To receive certificates pupils in piano are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent in this work. They are required also to 
have a repertoire of six compositions from classic composers of Grade IV, 
and to be examined in the playing of some of these compositions. They 
are also required to be able to read at sight a piano selection of Grade II. 
One of the six numbers is to be worked up by the pupil without help. 
Diplomas are given to students that meet the requirements of the cer- 
! tificate work, and pass with a grade of seventy-five per cent in advanced 
class work, and have a repertoire of six selections from Grade V, and read 
at sight from Grade III. 

Voice.— In this department great care is given to voice building. Exer- 
cises are given to produce tones that are round, full, and clear. Founda- 
tion studies are those of Sieber ; the Franz Abt Singing Tutor, and Behnke 
i and Pearce are used ; also vocalises of Sieber, Concone, Marchesi, and 
Bordogni. Ballads and songs of opera and oratorio are taught. Special 
attention is paid to sight singing. Great stress is laid on correct breathing. 
To receive certificates in voice, pupils are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent in this work. A repertoire of ten songs 
; from Grade IV is required, one from an oratorio or one from an opera, 
and one sacred. One of these ten songs is to be learned by the pupil with- 
out help. Sight reading of a song of Grade II is also required. 

Diplomas are given to students that meet the requirements of the cer- 
tificate work and advanced class work, and have a repertoire of ten songs 
ifrom Grade V, and do sight reading from Grade III. 

In addition to the private instruction given as described in the above 
1 courses, the College offers free instruction in the following branches, which 
are under the direction of Mr. Hall: 



36 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 

Chorus and CnoiR.-Excellent instruction is given free to any stu- 
dents desiring to take the work of chorus and choir singing and sight 

^^.-Instruments are furnished by the College, and the band is 
composed entirely of students in this institution. 

GLEE CEUB.-This is accessible to any young men that have a fair 
knowledge of the rudiments of vocal music. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Campbeix 

This department furnishes those desiring it with instruction in free- 
hand drawing and in painting in oil and water color The lessor -draw- 
ing are given without extra cost to the student, and are designed to lay a 
efid foundation for work on industrial and artiste hues. 1 he art room 
has a supply of casts; and, in addition, the student „ encouraged to draw 
from the objects of nature around him. 

Painting is taught by such practical methods as produce beaut ul 
results which far exceed in value their trifling cost. The mstructor m tlj 
depa mint has enjoyed exceptional advantages in the pursmt o. art study 
during th-e years hr England, France, and Italy; and has executed many; 
commissions In copying important works in some of the finest » m^n 
galleries; and has had a teaching experience of more than th.rty y 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

Mrs. West 






The aim of this department is to cultivate the voice, to free the student 
from constrained, limited, and erroneous action, and to lead him to a 
knowledge and understanding of the interpretation of literature. 

Diplomas are granted to such students as pass all the requirement 
of the course. Students must be graduates of a preparatory school of a 
standard equivalent to that of the Preparatory Department of this mstitu- 
tion before they will be granted a diploma in expression. _ 
Opportunity will be given for class and private instruction^ 
The text-books used are King's Practice of Speech and Fulton an< 
Trueblood's Practical Elocution. . 

Class work in interpretative analysis will also be required of thos 
looking forward to graduation from the department Monthly recitals wfl 
be given, affording opportunities to students to read publicly. 




Lamar Memorial Library. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 37 



THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 
UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department was established in 1907 through the 
generosity of Mr. John Calvin Martin, of New York City, whose gift of 
$20,000, together with a like amount set aside by the Board of Directors, 
made the department possible. Its four years of service have proved its 
value to the College and justified the confidence of its founder. This de- 
partment provides biblical instruction for all the students enrolled in all 
other courses of the institution, and offers exceptional advantages for 
young men and young women wishing to prepare themselves for Christian 
service as lay workers, Sabbath-school workers, pastors' assistants, mission 
teachers, or Bible readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of graduation 
will be granted those completing twenty-seven terms' work selected under 
the direction of the head of the department from the following courses 
of study : 

I. Special Bible Training courses from which at least two-thirds of 
the student's work shall be selected : Old Testament, eight courses ; New 
Testament, seven courses ; Missions, two courses ; and Practical Work, two 
courses. These courses are described in the ensuing paragraphs. Courses 
will be alternated, a sufficient number being given each year to meet 
requirements. 

II. College courses from which one-third of the student's work may 
be selected: English 1, 2, 3, and 4; Philosophy 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9; History 3; 
and Spanish 1 and 2. These courses are described under The College 
Department. 

III. Preparatory courses that may be taken as elective work if de- 
sired : Physiology I ; Pedagogy I ; and Bookkeeping I. These courses are 
described under The Preparatory Department. 

OLD TESTAMENT HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor Giujngham 

The Old Testament Courses 1 to 6 are entirely a study of the English 
Is Bible, the American Standard Version of the Bible being the required text- 
■ book. Note-books are required of the students in all courses. 

1. Pioneers of Palestine. A careful study of Genesis. Text-books : 



38 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



the Bible, Davis' Dictionary of the Bible, and the professor's outlines. 
Reference reading is assigned. 

2. Princes of Palestine. A continuation of Course i. Exodus to 
Deuteronomy. Special attention is paid to the study of the lives and char- 
acter of Israel's leaders. Text-books, same as in Course I. 

3. People of Palestine. A continuation of Course 2, beginning with 
Joshua. As in the preceding courses, character study is an important 
feature. In addition, the national development ; the conflicts of Judah and 
Israel; their civil government; their subjugation and partial restoration; 
their contribution to the arts and sciences ; their influence upon their con- 
temporaneous political, commercial, social, and religious world ; and espe- 
cially their preparation for the kingdom of Christ, are studied. Text-books, 
same as in Course 1. 

4. Poets of Palestine. A study of Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song 
of Solomon, and selected Psalms. Introductory lectures on Hebrew poetry 
and wisdom literature. The books are outlined, and their relation to other 
sacred literature and importance in Christian experience are emphasized. 
No commentaries are used as text-books, but required readings are assigned ; 
and the professor furnishes a syllabus of each book. 

5. Prophets of Palestine. The methods outlined in Course 4 are fol- 
lowed. The prophecies are studied chronologically in the light of contem- 
poraneous history. Messianic prophecy is given special attention. 

6. The Bible of Jesus. An introduction to the Old Testament based 
upon Dr. James Robertson's The Old Testament and Its Contents. This 
course gives a "bird's-eye view" of the Scriptures as they existed in the 
time of Jesus. 

7. 8. Hebrew. The same as College Department, Hebrew 1, 2. 

NEW TESTAMENT HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Processor Lyle 

1. Life of Christ. The study of the life of Christ is based on a 
harmony of the Gospels. As an introduction to this course four weeks are 
spent at the beginning of the term in studying "A History of New Testa- 
ment Times in Palestine." Special lessons in the geography of Palestine 
are given. Maps are constantly used. Special readings in standard authors 
and in current literature are assigned. Students are required to tabulate 
all work in note-books. 

2. The Message of the Books. This course consists of a critical study 
of each book in the New Testament. Each book is studied according to 
paragraphs or sections. The exact meaning of words, phrases, and clauses 
is sought. The style and illustrations of each book are studied. The whole 
book is carefully analyzed and outlined. This course is arranged so as to 
cover the entire New Testament in nine terms. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 39 



3. New Testament People. This course consists of biographical 
studies of about thirty prominent people of the New Testament. Classified 
references on each character are given so that the student is enabled to 
write out the life-story of each person studied. The traditions concerning 
the various characters are considered. A legitimate use of the imagination 
is encouraged in order that the student may understand the environment 
and character of each person. 

4. New Testament Greek. One of the gospels or the Acts is read 
in class, Westcott and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and 
Winer's and Robertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the 
assigned text, a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic 
Greek, the literature of this period, and the most important New Testament 
manuscripts and versions. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. The words of Jesus are studied four 
hours a week. The Red Letter Testament is required, to get the setting 
of the words. An approved text-book is studied one hour each week. 
Definitely assigned readings are required of each student. The results of 
all work are tabulated in note-books. 



MISSIONS 

1. Mission Methods Course. A four months' course, in which two 
weeks or more are given to each of the following subjects: (1) The 
Southern Mountaineers, President Wilson. (2) The Foreign Missionary, 
President Wieson. (3) City Missions, Proeessor Lyon. (4) The Home 
Mission Teacher, Miss CaudwELE. (5) The Foreign Mission Teacher, 
Miss Henry. (6) The Sabbath-school Missionary, Mr. Haee. 

2. History of Missions. A brief survey of the history of Christian 
missions, with special attention to the principles and methods of those of 
modern times. — Professor Gieeingham. 



PRACTICAL WORK 

Proeessor Gieeingham 

1. Bible Teaching : Principles and Practice. This course has refer- 
ence especially to personal work and the conducting of Bible classes. The 
history, organization, and management of the Sunday-school are studied. 
Lectures, and drill under the direction of the instructor. 

2. Religious Address : Principles and Practice. Preparation for re- 
ligious services, missionary programs, and the like; selection and develop- 
ment of themes ; sources and use of illustrations ; addresses on special 
occasions and to special audiences ; and drill in the reading of hymns and 
passages of Scripture. 



4 o MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



Maryville College was founded in 1819. It was born of the moral and 
spiritual needs of the earliest settlers of East Tennessee — chiefly Scotch- 
Irish Presbyterians — and was designed to educate for the ministry men 
who should be native to the soil. The grand motive of the founder may 
be stated in his own words: "Let the Directors and Managers oe this 
Sacred Institution propose the glory oe God and the advancement of 

THAT KINGDOM PURCHASED BY THE BLOOD OE HlS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON AS 

their SOLE object." Inspired by such a motive, Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., 
gathered a class of five in the fall of 1819, and in prayer and faith began 
the work of his life. In forty-two years the institution put one hundred 
and fifty men into the ministry. Its endowment, gathered by littles through 
all these years, was only sixteen thousand dollars. 

Then came the Civil War, and suspended the work of the institution 
for five years, and the College came out of the general wreck with little 
save its good name and precious history. 

After the war the Synod of Tennessee, moved by the spirit of self- 
preservation, and by a desire to promote Christian education in the Central 
South, resolved to revive Maryville College. The institution was reopened 
in 1866. New grounds and new buildings were an imperative necessity. 
To meet this need, sixty-five thousand dollars was secured, and the Col- 
lege was saved from extinction. In 1881 a few generous friends — William 
Thaw, William E. Dodge, Preserved Smith, Dr. Sylvester Willard, and 
others — contributed an endowment fund of one hundred thousand dollars. 
In 1891, Daniel Fayerweather bequeathed to the College the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars, and also made it one of twenty equal partici- 
pants in the residuary estate. The College received almost two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars by the provisions of the will. This magnificent 
donation enabled the institution to enlarge its work and to enter upon a 
new era of usefulness and influence. On January 1, 1905, Mr. Ralph Voor- 
hees, of New Jersey, made the munificent donation of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars to the general endowment fund of the College. The gift is 
subject to a five per cent annuity during the lifetime of Mrs. Voorhees. 
The reception of this superb benefaction filled the hearts of Maryville'^ 
friends with confidence, and with intense gratitude to God and to God's 
stewards. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 41 



In 1906, the rapid growth in the number of students having made nec- 
essary much further enlargement of the teaching force and of the material 
equipment of the institution, President Wilson entered upon a campaign 
for additional endowment. Mr. Andrew Carnegie generously offered the 
College twenty-five thousand dollars on condition that fifty thousand dollars 
additional be secured. In 1907 the General Education Board pledged fifty 
thousand dollars on condition that one hundred and fifty thousand dollars 
be secured from other sources. Mr. Carnegie then increased his pledge to 
fifty thousand dollars toward this larger fund. The time limit set for the 
completion of the fund was December 31, 1908, and in the face of many 
difficulties the President, with absolute reliance upon the favor of God, 
prosecuted the campaign for the "Forward Fund of two hundred thousand 
dollars." In order to meet the spirit as well as the letter of the require- 
ments of the conditional pledges, it was deemed necessary to raise twenty- 
five thousand dollars more than the designated sum. When the canvass 
closed, the subscriptions amounted to the splendid sum of two hundred and 
twenty-six thousand nine hundred and two dollars. The fact that, in spite 
of the recent panic and hard times, the uneasiness of a presidential year, 
and the ill health of the canvasser, the "Forward Fund" was secured, 
filled the Faculty, Directors, and friends of the College with a deep sense 
of gratitude to God, and to his human agents who took part with Maryville 
in its ministry to the noble youth of mountain and valley in its Southern 
Appalachian field. 

As the result of the generous contributions made through many years 
by many philanthropic donors, the College now owns property and endow- 
ment to the total amount of three-quarters of a million dollars. Of this 
amount, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars is invested in endowment 
and three hundred thousand dollars in buildings and equipment. 

One hundred and twelve of the post-bellum alumni have entered the 
ministry, while forty-one alumni and undergraduates have been or are 
missionaries in Japan, China, Siam, Korea, India, Persia, Syria, Africa, the 
Philippines, South America, Mexico, and Porto Rico. Several are labor- 
ing in missions on the Western frontier. All the alumni are engaged in 
honorable pursuits. Students who have gone from the College to the theo- 
logical, medical, and legal schools have usually attained a high rank in their 
classes. A goodly number of the alumni are now studying in theological 
seminaries. 

The necessary expenses are so phenomenally low as to give the insti- 
tution a special adaptation to the middle class and to the struggling poor 
of valley and mountain — the great mass of the surrounding population. 

The privileges of the institution are, of course, open alike to all denom- 
inations of Christians. All the leading denominations are largely repre- 
sented in the student body. 



42 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



LOCATION 



Maryville is a pleasant and thriving town of about three thousand- 
inhabitants. It is widely known as "the town of schools and churches." 
It is sixteen miles south of Knoxville. There are three trains a day each 
way on the Knoxville and Augusta Railroad, two trains each way on the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and one train each way on the Tennessee 
and Carolina Southern Railroad. 

Maryville is an ideal health resort for students from other States. The 
town lies on the hills, one thousand feet above sea level, and enjoys the 
life-giving breezes from the Chilhowees and the Smokies, a few miles away. 
Young people from the North and other sections are greatly benefited in 
health by a year at Maryville, and many take their entire course here. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college grounds consist of two hundred and fifty acres, and for 
beautiful scenery are not surpassed by any in the country. They are 
elevated and undulating, covered with a beautiful growth of evergreens 
and. with a noble forest, and command a splendid view of the Cumberland 
Mountains on the north, and of the Smoky Mountains on the south. The 
location is as remarkable for its healthfulness as it is for its beauty. The 
campus affords the choicest facilities for the development of athletics. 

On these grounds there are thirteen buildings, which, together with the 
grounds and equipment, represent an investment of three hundred thousand 
dollars. The buildings are heated with steam and lighted with electricity 
from the central power plant on the campus. Water is provided from a 
stream flowing through the college grounds, and is forced by hydraulic 
pressure into large tanks, supplying the buildings with toilet facilities and 
drainage. Drinking water is furnished from four wells driven through 
limestone rock to a depth of about one hundred and seventy-five feet, and 
furnishing an inexhaustible supply of absolutely pure water. At stated 
intervals this water is subjected to a thorough bacteriological test, and has 
invariably been pronounced exceptionally free from impurities. 

Anderson Haw,, the central building, is the oldest of the present col- 
lege halls, having been built in 1869, and named in honor of the founder 
of the institution. It contains the administrative offices and most of the 
recitation rooms for the literary departments. The large addition to the 
Hall, the Fayerweather Annex, is occupied by the Preparatory Department. 

Baldwin Hall, named in honor of the late John C. Baldwin, of New 
Jersey, is the main dormitory for young women. It contains rooms for 
one hundred and thirty students. It is provided, as are all the dormitories, 
with all modern conveniences, and is a comfortable home for young women. 

Memorial; Hall, originally built as a companion building to Baldwin 









MARYVIUM COLLllGB 43 



Hall, is a young men's dormitory, containing rooms for seventy students. 
While it is one of the oldest of the college buildings, it has been put into 
excellent repair, and is a comfortable and well equipped dormitory. It is 
under the control of a regular instructor in the College. 

Willard Memorial, the home of the President, was provided in 1890 
by a generous gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard, in memory of her husband, 
Sylvester Willard, M.D. It is one of the chief adornments of the campus, 
and is a valuable property. 

The Lamar Memorial Library Hall was erected in 1888 at a cost of 
five thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was generously provided 
by three friends of Professor Lamar and of the College. The building is 
a model in every respect. It is a noble and fitting monument. The large 
memorial window contributed by the brothers and sisters of Professor 
Lamar holds the central position. 

Bartlett Hall is one of the largest college Y. M. C. A. buildings in 
the South. Planned for by the students led by Kin Takahashi, a Japanese 
student, -it was erected by contributions made or secured by the Bartlett 
Hall Building Association, supplemented by a large gift by the college 
authorities. A liberal donation made by Mrs. Nettie F. McCormick enabled 
the committee to complete the building. The Y. M. C. A. auditorium, 
parlors, and students' apartments occupy the front part of the building, 
while the large gymnasium occupies the rest of the structure. 

Fayerweather Science Hall was erected in 1898 through the liberal 
bequest of Daniel B. Fayerweather. It is two stories in height, with ex- 
treme dimensions of one hundred and six feet by ninety-seven feet. The 
first floor contains the five spacious laboratories of chemistry and physics, 
balance and storage rooms, an office, and the John C. Branner Scientific 
Library. The second floor contains four excellent lecture rooms, two large 
and well lighted biological laboratories, the laboratory of experimental 
psychology, and the museum. The laboratories are furnished with both 
direct and alternating electric current, and also with gas. The building is 
thoroughly modern in every respect. It is provided with liberal equipment 
for the practical study of science, and will stand a useful and lasting mon- 
ument to the intelligent philanthropy of the princely giver whose name it 
bears. 

The Elizabeth R. VoorhEES Chapel. — The long-felt and urgent need 
of an adequate assembly hall was met in 1905 by the gift of the late Mr. 
Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey. The new chapel, named in honor of Mrs. 
Voorhees, graces one of the most commanding sites on the grounds, and is 
well worthy of its place of distinction. It is of an extra quality of brick, 
with buff-brick and terra-cotta trimmings. The style is Grecian, the details 
being of the Ionian order. The auditorium seats eight hundred and eighty 
persons and can be arranged to accommodate two or three hundred more. 
The basement contains fourteen well lighted rooms, occupied by the Music 



44 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Department, and a commodious auditorium occupied by the Y. W. C. A. 
To the rear of the main auditorium, also, and on the floor above, are sev- 
eral rooms used by the Department of Expression and for various other 
purposes. The entire building is in every way satisfactory, and will for 
many years be adequate for the purposes it is designed to serve. 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospitai,. — While the health of' 
the student body has always been far above the average, yet in so large a 
number of students there is necessarily more or less sickness. As the Col- 
lege has grown, the need for proper facilities for caring for such occasional 
cases of illness has become increasingly urgent. This need has now been 
provided for by the generosity of Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, a lifelong friend 
of the College. Her gift of six thousand dollars has provided a thoroughly 
modern hospital building, containing eleven wards, caretakers' rooms, 
baths, toilets, an operating room, and other appointments of a well ordered 
hospital. The building is named in honor of Mrs. Lamar's only son, who 
died in infancy. A gift of five hundred dollars from Mr. Nathaniel Tooker, 
of East Orange, N. J., secured the purchase of a valuable outfit of. the best 
hospital furnishings. To this amount about three hundred and fifty dollars 
was added from other sources and used for the purchase of additional 
furnishings and medical supplies. 

Carnegie Hale. — In connection with the "Forward Fund" secured in 
1908, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave the sum of fifty thousand dollars for a 
dormitory for young men. The building was designed by the firm of Whit- 
field and King, of New York. The building was occupied at the opening 
of the fall term of the present year, and was dedicated on January 11, 191 1. 
It contains rooms for one hundred and eight young men. Each of the 
two large wings contains a suite of rooms for the use of a professor and 
his family. Commodious parlors and reception rooms are provided, and 
the building is a comfortable and attractive home for the young men. In 
its architectural beauty and its thoroughly modern appointments this is one 
of the best college dormitories in the South, and is a most valuable addition 
to the equipment of the College. 

Pearsons Hall. — No benefaction of recent years has proven more 
immediately serviceable than the gift of twenty thousand dollars made in 
1908 by Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago. The new building named in 
his honor provides additional dormitory facilities for young women, and 
adequate quarters for the large Cooperative Boarding Club. The building 
is of brick, and is two stories in height, with an imposing Greek portico 
fronting the west and commanding an excellent view of the grounds. The 
first story contains the spacious dining hall, with a seating capacity of five 
hundred, the kitchen, offices, and waiting rooms. The second story con- 
tains parlors, halls for the young women's literary societies, and rooms for 
thirty-four occupants. For size, beauty, and serviceability, the building is 
a model in every respect, and was erected at an almost incredibly low cost. 



.fW jp 




MARYVILLE COLLEGE 45 



The Power Plant.— Heat for all the buildings and light for the build- 
ings and grounds are furnished from the central power house situated on 
the campus. The boilers in this plant have a combined capacity of three 
hundred horse-power. The Webster Vacuum System of steam heating is 
used, and the buildings are quickly and uniformly heated. A Bullock 
direct-current generator furnishes electric power ample for all purposes. 
Steam from the plant is used also for the meat and soup boilers and the 
dish-washing machine at Pearsons Hall. 

THE LAMAR MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest college libraries in the State. 
The number of books now on the shelves is about fifteen thousand. The 
library is open for the drawing of books or for the consulting of volumes 
in the reference alcoves for eight hours every day from Monday to Satur- 
day. The use of the library is entirely free to students of all departments. 
The nucleus of a much-needed endowment for the library has been secured, 
the fund now amounting to nearly $8,000. Among the gifts making up the 
endowment are the following: 

The "M. T." Fund, 1900, given by a friend $5°° 

The Helen Gould Fund, 1900, by Miss Helen Gould, New York.. .. 500 

The Willard Fund, 19CO, by the Misses Willard, Auburn, N. Y 200 

The Hollenback Fund, 1901, by J. W. Hollenback, Esq., Wilkes- 

barre, Pa 5°° 

The Solomon Bogart Fund, 1908, by Miss Martha M. Bogart, Phila- 
delphia, Tenn 2 °° 

The Nina Cunningham Fund, 1909, by the sons of Major Ben Cun- 
ningham, Treasurer of the College, in memory of their sister, 

Miss Nina Cunningham, '91 5°° 

The John M. Alexander English Literature Fund, 1909, by Rev. John 

M. Alexander, '87, and wife, Maryville 50° 

The Charles T. Cates, Jr., Fund, 1909, b ^ Hon - C - T - Cates > J r " ' 8l > 

Attorney General of the State of Tennessee 3°° 

The Rev. S. B. West Fund, 1909, by Mrs. S. B. West, Concord, Tenn. 75 

The McTeer Fund, 1909, by J. C. McTeer, '07 100 

The Brown Fund, 1910, by Hon. T. N. Brown, '77 100 

The Chilhowee Club Fund, 1910, by the Chilhowee Club, Maryville. 100 

The Class of 1891 Fund, 1910, by five members of the class 232 

The George Glenn Cooper Fund, 1910, by the parents, brother, and 

sister of George Glenn Cooper 300 

The Faculty Fund, 1910, by members of the Faculty 1,000 

The French Fund, 1910, by Mr. and Mrs. C. T. French, '06 100 

The Gamble Fund, 1910, by Hon. M. H. Gamble, '05, Hon. Andrew 

Gamble, and A. M. Gamble, M.D., Maryville 200 



46 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



The Hooke Fund, 1910, by Rev. R. H. Hooke, '74 $50 

The Lowry Fund, 1910, by Rev. G. H. Lowry, '94 I00 

The Tracy Fund, 1910, by J. E. Tracy, Esq., '01 5 o 

The following funds are now being formed : 

The Class of 1909 Fund ($700 subscribed) 440 

The Class of 1910 Fund ($560 subscribed) 330 

The Class of 191 1 Fund ($250 subscribed) 171 

The Class of 1912 Fund ($200 subscribed) 116 

The Class of 1913 Fund ($125 subscribed) 89 

The Litterer Fund ($100 subscribed), by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

LOAN LIBRARIES 

James R. Hills Library._I n 1888 Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New York, 
contributed a fund of six hundred. dollars for the establishment of a Loan 
Library, in order that students unable to purchase the necessary text-books 
might have the privilege of renting them at a nominal rate. By judicious 
management the income from this fund has grown until now the privileges 
O'f this library are open to all students, and all the regular text-books used 
in the institution may be either rented or purchased, as the student prefers. 
An additional gift of five hundred dollars from the same donor in 1908 
made it possible to provide the text-books for the students in the Bible 
Training Department. The rental charged a term is one-fifth the retail 
price of each book. The income from rentals is devoted to supplying new 
books as they are needed. The library occupies a room in Anderson Hall, 
and is open every day. 

John C. Branner Library — A few years ago John C. Branner, Ph.D., 
then the State Geologist of Arkansas, now Vice-President of the Leland 
Stanford Junior University, gave another proof of his generosity and 
friendship to the College by establishing a loan library of the text-books 
used in the natural science departments. The books in this library are 
under the same regulations as are those of the Hills Library. 

The Misses Willard Library — Through the generosity of the Misses 
Willard, of Auburn, N. Y., the text-book employed in the Bible classes of 
the Preparatory Department is also provided for rent at a nominal charge. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING CLUB 

No other agency has been of greater service in enabling the College to 
keep the expenses of its students at a minimum than the popular and suc- 
cessful Co-operative Boarding Club. The actual cost of the board is esti- 
mated at the end of each month. The price is fixed approximately at the 
beginning of each year. During the past year the price has been $1.70 a 



MARYVILLU COLLHGB 47 



week. A deposit of six dollars is required of each member of the Club, 
and settlements are thereafter made at the end of every fourth week. A 
considerable number of students are employed as waiters and assistants in 
the dining room, thus materially reducing the cost of their board. The 
privileges of the Club are extended to all male students and to all young 
women rooming in the college dormitories. The membership of the Club 
has been more than five hundred this year. Through the generosity of 
Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago, the Club is now housed in the new Pear- 
sons Hall, spoken of elsewhere. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES 

It is one of the fundamental aims of the College to provide first-class 
college advantages to the student at the lowest possible rates, and the 
endowment enables it to make its charges very moderate. College bills 
must be paid invariably in advance. Until this condition is complied with, 
no one can become a member of any of the classes. 

Tuition 

In view of the very low rates, no deduction will be made for absence 
at the beginning or at the end of any term, and no tuition will be refunded. 

In all the literary departments $6.00 a term 

Athletics fee (payable by all students) 50 a term 

Graduation fee (payable at the opening of the spring 

term of the Senior year) 5.00 a term 

Special science fees : 
Laboratory fee in Chemistry: Fall $3.00; Winter $2.50; Spring $2.50 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics. $2.00 a term 

Laboratory fee in Physiology or Preparatory Physics... 1.00 a term 
Breakage ticket in Chemistry: Fall $2.co; Winter $1.50; Spring $1.50 
Breakage ticket in Physics, Biology, or Physiology $1.00 a term 

In the Music Department (vocal or instrumental). 
Fall Term: 

One lesson a week $6.00 

Winter or Spring Term: 

One lesson a week 4.00 

Piano rental (one hour a day) : Fall Term, $4; Winter or 
Spring Term, $2.50. Two hours a day at double these. rates. 
Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History of 
Music. 

Fall Term 2.50 

Winter and Spring Terms combined 3.00 



48 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



In the Expression Department. 

Fall Term $10.00 

Winter or Spring Term 6.oo> 

In the Art Department. 

Twenty lessons of three hours each in Painting in Oil or in 

Water Color io.oo- 

Drawing lessons are free. 

Rooms 

Rooms in all the dormitories are heated with steam and lighted with 
electricity, and fully supplied with baths and toilets. Two students usually 
occupy one room. More than two students in one room will not be allowed. 

Every prospective student desiring to room in a dormitory must make 
a two-dollar deposit with the Registrar in order to secure a reservation. 
This deposit will be forfeited if the student does not enter college ; but will 
be credited on the room rent if he does enter. The room, however, will 
not be held unless the student enters the first day or notifies the Registrar 
of the cause of his delay. 

The cost of rooms in the different dormitories, with full information 
regarding furnishings, is given below. The rates given below are for each: 
occupant of a room. Students desiring to room alone in rooms equipped 
for two students may do so by paying double the rates here given. 

Memorial Hau (for Young Men) 

These rooms are furnished with iron bedsteads, tables, and wardrobes. 
Baths on first floor. According to location the rates for each student are 
as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $8.00 to $9.00 $6.00 to $7.00 $4.00 to $5.00- 

Other rooms 7.00 to 8.00 5.00 to 6.00 3.00 to 4.00 

Carnegie Hau (for Young Men) 

The rooms in this dormitory are furnished with individual iron bed- 
steads, springs, mattresses, tables, chiffoniers, chairs, and wardrobes. Baths 
and toilets on each of the three floors. There are fifty double rooms, i. e.,. 
for two students each, and eight single rooms for one student each. The 
rates for each student are as follows : 



Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Double rooms $10.00 to $14.00 $8.00 to $11.00 $5.00 to $7.00-' 

Single rooms 14.00 11.00 7.00 






MARYVILLH COLLEGE 49 



Baldwin Haix (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this hall are furnished with iron bedsteads, springs, mat- 
tresses, washstands, tables, and wardrobes. Baths on second floor; toilets 
on second and third floors. According to location the rates for each stu- 
dent are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $9.00 to $10.00 $7.00 to $8.00 $5.00 to $6.00 

Other rooms 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 4.00 to 5.00 

Pearsons Halt, (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this building are occupied by young women of the Col- 
lege Department, precedence being given to Seniors, juniors, and Sopho- 
mores. When members of these classes desiring to room in this hall have 
been assigned rooms, any remaining rooms are assigned to Freshmen in 
the order of application. The rooms are furnished with individual iron 
bedsteads, springs, mattresses, tables, dressers, chairs, and built-in ward- 
robes. All the rooms, with the baths and toilets, are on the second floor. 
The rates for each student are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

According to location $12.00 to $14.00 $9.00 to $11.00 $6.co to $7.00 

Rooms in Town 

Young men can find comfortable furnished rooms in private residences 
in convenient parts of town at the following rates by the month for each 
student : 

Rooms furnished and cared for, without fuel or light $2.oo-$3.oo 

Rooms furnished and cared for, with light and heat 3.00- 4.00 



Board 

In the Cooperative Boarding Club $1.70 a week 

In private boarding houses $2.5o-$3.so a week 



Laundry 

In the Cooperative Laundry (young women doing their own 

work ) • $0.30 a month 

In town by private laundresses, young men pay $o.35-$o.6o a week 

At Maryville steam laundry, young women pay $o.35-$o.75 a week 

4 



50 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Societies—Four literary societies are conducted by the stu- 
dents, and are of the greatest benefit to those who avail the ^selves of the 
advantages they offer. The Athenian, organized .n 1868 a d t he A pha 
Si-ma organized in 1882 are composed of young men. filler halls are on 
ff :"h rd floor of Anderson Hall. Each society is divided into a senior 
section" and a "junior section," the latter being composed of students m 
the Preparatory Department. The Bainoman, organized in 1S75, and the 
Tleta Epsifon, organized in 1894, are conducted by the young women 
T ey have neatly furnished halls in Pearsons Hall. The socet.es meet 
every Friday evening to engage in debates and other literary exercises. 
The junior lections of the young men's societies meet on Saturday even- 
ing. Each society gives annually a public midwinter entertainment. 

" The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A— The Y. M. C. A., established in 
187S has become one of the strongest organizations of its kind in the 
South W devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoon 
f„ the auditorium of Bartlett Hall. The Association conducts an annua 
ncampment on the Tennessee River for one week before the opening of 
he fall term, at which encampment plans and policies for the ensuing yea s 
•work are arranged. The officers of the Association are as follows. Pre 1- 
Zt Horace E. Orr; Vice-President, Samuel Walker Secretary Ph, ,p 
L Robinson; Treasurer, Ralph S. Carson; Executive Committee, Hor ce 
E Orr William T. Robison, Clyde T. Murray, Addison S. Moore, Ralph 
W. Owens, Samuel W. McCulloch, and Vincent T. Shipley 

The Advisory Committee of the Y. M. C. A., composed of representa- 
tives of the Faculty and the student body, directs the genen . pe hc.es o 
the Association. It consists of the following members: Cha.rn.an, Pro 
Lor Barnes; Secretary, Horace E. Orr; Class of 1913: Dean Waller, 
Cor Will A. McTeer, and Wallace H. Marsh; Class of !<,»: Philip 
L Robinson, Horace E. Orr, and William F. Buchanan; Class of i 9 :.. 
President Wilson, Professor Barnes, and Professor Bassett. 

• The Y W C A. was established in 1884, and has become one of the 
most wholesome influences in the religious life of the College The mem- 
bership for the current year has been about one hundred a „d fty Th 
devotional meetings are held in the association room in the ba ement of 
Voorhees Chapel. The Association has a small hi, valual 1c lb r«y » 
Pearsons Hall, known as the Florence McMamgal Memor.a Library. I 
was contributed by Rev. J. Oscar Boyd and wife, of Princeton N, J., as 
I memo 1 to their sister, Miss McMamgal, '08, who was an instructor 
in~ollege and who died in W9 . The officers of the Asscc.at.on are 
Is follows: President, Belle Gray; Vice-President, Frances G.bson ; Sec- 
retary, Lula Gibbs ; Treasurer, Miriam Rood. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 51 



The Athletic Association — This organization is maintained by the 

student body for the purpose of regulating athletics and caring for athletic 
equipment. The Board of Athletic Control, composed of representatives 
of the Faculty, the students, and former students, meets at stated intervals 
and exercises oversight over all the athletic events of the College. Tickets 
of membership admit to all games played in Maryville and entitle the hold- 
ers to the use of dressing rooms, lockers, and baths in the Gymnasium, and 
any available equipment used in athletic sports. The football and baseball 
fields, the tennis courts, the track, and the basketball court are open to any 
student desiring to enter these forms of sport. 

The members of the Board of Athletic Control, whose officers are also 
the officers of the Athletic Association, are as follows : President, William 
F. Buchanan; Vice-President, G. Thomas Wilson; Secretary, William T. 
Robison ; Treasurer, Wallace H. Marsh ; Editor, Paul R. Grabiel ; Official 
Buyer, Lloyd E. Dyer; Town Representatives, Dr. John A. McCulloch and 
Charles D. Chandler; Faculty Representatives, President Wilson and Pro- 
fessor Schnirel ; Student Representatives, James B. Gibbons, Clarence M. 
Franklin, and Anna Belle Callaway. 

The officers of the athletic teams are as follows : Football, William 
T. Robison, Manager; H. Noble Wright, Captain; Arthur E. Mitchell, 
Coach: Baseball, Jancer L. Tweed, Manager; A. Kyle Bolton, Captain: 
Basketball, William F. Buchanan, Manager; Ed. L. McCall, Captain: Ten- 
nis, Charles B. Tedford, Manager; Carl Hall, Captain: Track, Joseph M. 
Rankin, Manager; Frank W. Henson, Captain: Women's Basketball, Susan 
A. Green, Manager; Anna Belle Callaway, Captain. 

The Political Science Club — An inter-society club has recently been 
organized for the study and discussion of practical, present-day political 
questions. The Club numbers about thirty-five members, representing the 
four classes of the College Department. The meetings are held twice a 
month. The officers of the Club are as follows : President, Jancer L. 
Tweed ; Secretary-Treasurer, Oscar D. Moore ; Program Secretary, Wilbur 
A. Hamman. 

The Ministerial Association, organized in 1900, is composed of the 
candidates for the Christian ministry that are in attendance upon the Col- 
lege. It has for its object the enlistment of its members in various forms 
of active Christian work, and the discussion of themes relating to the work 
of the ministry. Its officers are: President, Wilbur A. Hamman; Vice- 
President, George H. Douglas; Secretary, Roy H. Hixson. 

The Student Volunteer Band — The College has from its earliest 
history been identified with foreign missions, and has sent out forty-one 
missionaries into twelve foreign countries. Since 1894 the students have 
maintained a Student Volunteer Band, composed of those who are pledged 
to enter some foreign field, if the way be open. The Band at present con- 



52 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



sists of twelve members, who meet weekly to study missionary fields and. 
conditions. The officers for the present year are as follows : Leader, Lena 
Aikin ; Secretary and Treasurer, Addison S. Moore. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This Association was formed in 1871. It holds its annual meeting 011 
Tuesday of Commencement week, when a banquet is given under the 
auspices of the Faculty of the College and the local alumni. The officers 
for the present year are as follows : President, Hon. Moses H. Gamble,. 
'05; Vice-President, Albert C. Samsel, '10; Secretary, Pres. Samuel T. 
Wilson, '78; Executive Committee, Hugh R. Crawford, '0.3; Mary V. Alex- 
ander, 'c8; Grace E. McReynolds, '04; Almira C. Bassett, '09; and Edgar 
R. Walker, '09. 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1910 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon the twenty-five 
members of the graduating class of 1910. 

The degree of Master of Arts in course was conferred upon Horace- 
Lee Ellis, '98, Dean of Carson and Newman College, Jefferson City, Tenn. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon Rev. 
William E. Graham, '91, Petoskey, Mich. 

GRADUATES IN MUSIC, 1910 

Joslyn, Harvey Langill ". . . . Voice 

Magill, Mary Tirzah Piano 

Patton, Martha AdelE Voice 

Rankin, Joseph Marshall Piano 

Rutherford, Beatrice May Piano 

Shipley, Vincent Talbott Piano 

Stivers, Winifred Voice 

Summers, Elisabeth Irwin Piano 

GRADUATES IN EXPRESSION, 1910 

Cawood, Lucile Rutherford, Beatrice May 

Profeitt, Addie Blanche West, Ethel Amanda 

CERTIFICATE PUPILS IN MUSIC, 1910 

Dean, Hazel Esther Voice 

Griffitts, Bessie Piano 

Lowe, Florance Lee Piano 

McReynolds, Fidelia Constance Piano 

Rutherford, Beatrice May .Voice 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE, 53 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Each student is required to pay a fee of fifty cents each term for the 
privilege of class work in physical culture and for providing a director 
for athletic sports. Classes are conducted by the Physical Director semi- 
weekly, and every student, except members of the Senior and Junior 
Classes, is required to avail himself of the privilege afforded, unless ex- 
empted by reason of his being a member of a regular athletic team or 
doing regular work in the college buildings or on the grounds. The men's 
classes are conducted in the Gymnasium and the young women's classes in 
Baldwin Hall. Every young woman should bring with her a regulation 
gymnasium suit, preferably blue in color, with gymnasium or tennis shoes. 



MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital, spoken of elsewhere, is 
available for all students. There is no charge for the use of the wards, 
or for nursing in cases of slight illness. In case of serious illness, in which 
the services of a trained nurse are required, such nursing must be provided 
at the expense of the student, as must also the expense of medical atten- 
tion. On Monday, Thursday, and Saturday of each week free medical 
consultation and prescription by approved physicians are provided at the 
hospital for out-of-town students. This privilege has been responded to 
with marked appreciation by the student body, and the medical attention 
thus afforded has been of great service in the prevention and checking of 
serious illness. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Two members of the graduating class, one young man and one young 
woman, are chosen upon the basis of scholarship and general merit to rep- 
resent the class as orators on Commencement Day. The representatives 
of the class of 1910 were Thomas Alexander Williams and Ruby Charles 
Patton. 

THE Y. M. C. A. LYCEUM COURSE 

For several years the Y. M. C. A. has conducted for the student body 
and the public a course of lectures and entertainments. The course usually 
consists of five or six numbers, one or two of which are popular lectures 
and the rest musical, elocutionary, or dramatic entertainments. The course 
is provided at small cost to the student, tickets for the entire series costing 
usually a dollar and a half. 



54 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSIC CONTESTS 

In 1909 a triangular debating and oratorical league was formed with 
Carson and Newman College and Washington and Tusculum College. 
Each college selects two debating teams of two members each, and two- 
orators. The contests are held simultaneously in the three colleges, each 
institution being represented at each place. A silver cup has been offered 
as a trophy by Hope Brothers, of Knoxville, to the college winning the 
largest number of points in any year. It is to become the permanent trophy 
of the college winning the largest number of points for three consecutive 
years. The first contest was held in April, 1910, each institution winning 
an equal number of points. 

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Examinations and Standing. — A uniform system of grading is em- 
ployed, upon the results of which depends the promotion from one class to 
another. 

A student absent from any examination without an approved excuse 
will be marked "zero" on that examination, and will receive no credit for 
his term's work. 

Any student failing to be present at term examinations shall be re- 
quired to take all omitted examinations before being allowed to enter 
classes on his return to the College. 

A special examination will be granted to any student that desires 
credit for any required study that he has not taken in the regular class- 
room work of this institution. A fee of fifty cents will be charged for any 
examination not taken at the regular time for the examination. 

The Faculty meets each week of the college year, and receives reports 
of the work done in all departments and of the delinquencies of individual 
students. A record is made of the standing of each student, which is sent 
to his parents or guardian at the end of each term. 

Conditions. — In order to be classified in any given year in the College 
Department a student shall not be conditioned in more than three studies. 

Changes of Course. — All changes of studies must be made within two 
weeks after matriculation. Thereafter, all changes for students in the Pre- 
paratory Department shall be made by order of the Principal of the depart- 
ment, and all changes in the College Department by order of the President 
or the Dean ; and in all cases after consultation with the instructors con- 
cerned. Every change of course made after two weeks from date of 
matriculation involves a fee of fifty cents, unless this fee is remitted by 
special vote of the Faculty. 

Delinquencies and Demerits. — All unexcused delinquencies and de- 
merits are registered, and when the number amounts to fifteen or more, 



MARY VI LIB .COLLEGE 55 



notice thereof is given to the student, and to his parents or guardian. 
When the sum of unexcused delinquencies and demerits amounts to twenty- 
five, the student ceases to be a member of the institution. A delinquency 
is a failure to perform any college duty. Excuses for such failure must 
be presented immediately upon returning to work. 

Students are dismissed, also, whenever in the opinion of the Faculty 
they are pursuing a course of conduct detrimental to themselves and to the 
College. 

Forfeiture of Aid. — Any student receiving financial aid from the Col- 
lege, in the form of scholarships, loans, or opportunities for work, will 
forfeit such aid if he becomes an object of college discipline. 

Absence from the College. — Students are not allowed to absent them- 
selves from the College without permission from the Faculty. 

The Sabbath. — Students are not allowed to patronize the Sunday trains 
or to visit the railway stations on the Sabbath. No student will be received 
on the Sabbath. Sunday visits are disapproved. 

Religious Services. — Prayers are attended in the college chapel in the 
morning, with the reading of the Scripture and with singing. Every stu- 
dent is required to attend public worship on the Sabbath, and to connect 
himself with a Sabbath-school class in some one of the churches in town. 

Rooming in Town. — Students are not permitted to room or to board 
at places disapproved by the Faculty. Young women from out of town 
are not permitted to room or board off the college grounds, except with 
relatives. 

Tobacco. — The use of tobacco on the college grounds and in the col- 
lege buildings is forbidden, and no student addicted to its use will be 
allowed to room upon the college premises. One violation of this rule will 
be deemed sufficient to exclude a student from the college dormitories. 

Entertainments. — To avoid interference with the regular work of the 
College, students are not permitted to engage in dramatic entertainments, 
and must secure special permission before engaging in any entertainment 
outside the College. 

Secret Societies. — No secret society will be allowed among the stu- 
dents, and no organization will be permitted that has not been approved 
by the Faculty. 

SELF-HELP 

The College offers opportunities of self-help to a large number of 
deserving young men and women. During the present year the number 
of those availing themselves of such opportunities has been over two hun- 
dred. The work offered includes manual labor on the grounds, janitor 
service in the various buildings, dining-room and kitchen service at the 
Cooperative Boarding Club, office work, and work as assistants in labo- 
ratories, libraries, or study rooms. These forms of employment are paid 



56 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



for at a rate varying according to the degree of skill and responsibility 
involved. Indoor work is allotted usually to students that have previously 
given proof of their ability and worth. Positions of exceptional respon- 
sibility, such as janitor service and work as assistants, are granted for a 
year in advance, the assignment being made at the close of the spring 
term. Assistants in any department are elected by the Faculty upon the 
recommendation of the head of the department. 

Application for work of any kind must be made in writing and ad- 
dressed to the Faculty. The acceptance of an opportunity of self-help 
involves especial obligation to diligence, loyalty, and the faithful discharge 
of duty. A student that fails to do satisfactory work or becomes an object 
of discipline by the Faculty will forfeit all such opportunities. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Craighead Fund, 1886, contributed by Rev. James G. Craighead, 

D.D., for candidates for the ministry $1,500 

The Carson Adams Fund, 1887, by Rev. Carson W. Adams, D.D., 

of New York, for tuition help 6,300 

The George Henry Bradley Scholarship, 1889, by Mrs. Jane Loomis 

Bradley, of Auburn, N. Y., in memory of her only son 1,000 

The Willard Scholarship, 1898, by the Misses Willard, of Auburn, 

New York 1,000 

The Students' Self-help Lean Fund, 1903 and 1908, by an Hast Ten- 

nesseean, for loans to upper classmen 1,500 

The Clement Ernest Wilson Scholarship, 1904, by Mrs. Mary A. 

Wilson in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship Fund, begun 1904, by 
the Alumni Association and former students. A bequest of $500, 
not yet available, was made to the fund by the late Mrs. M. A. 
Wilson 939 

The Angier Self-help Fund, 1907-1910, by Mr. Albert E. Angier, of 

Boston, Mass., to provide opportunities of work for young men. 3,000 

The Margaret E. Henry Scholarship, 1907, established through the 

efforts of Mr. Jasper E. Corning, of New York 1,000 

The Arta Hope Scholarship, 1907, by Miss Arta Hope, of Robin- 
son, 111 1,000 

The Silliman Scholarship, 1907, by Hon. H. B. Silliman, of Cohoes, 
N. Y., and held in trust by the College Board of the Presby- 
terian Church 1,000 

The Hugh O'Neill, Jr., Scholarship, 1908, by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill, of 

New York, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alexander Caldwell Memorial Fund, 1908, by Mr. G. A. Moody, 

of Jefferson City, Tenn., the income to be loaned 1,000 



MARYVILLB COLLBGU 57 



The D. Stuart Dodge Scholarship, 1908, by Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, 
D.D., of New York City, preferably to aid graduates of the 
Farm School of North Carolina $1,500 

The Julia M. Turner Missionary Scholarship Fund, 1908, by Mrs. 
Julia M. Turner to aid the children of foreign missionaries or 
those preparing for the foreign field 5,000 

The William J. McCahan, Sr., Fund, 1008, by Mr. William J. Mc- 

Cahan, Sr., of Philadelphia, Pa., for tuition help 5,000 

The W. A. E. Campbell Foreign Missionary Fund, 1909, by Rev. 
W. A. E. Campbell, of Nashville, Ind., to aid a young woman 
preparing for foreign missionary work 700 

The Charles Francis Darlington, Jr., Scholarship, 1909, by Mrs. 

Letitia Craig, of New York, in honor of her son 1,000 

The Hoover Self-help Fund, 1909, by Dr. W. A. Hoover, of Gibson 

City, 111., to provide opportunities of work for young men 500 

The Isaac Anderson Scholarship, 1909, by James A. and Howard 
Anderson, of Knoxville, Tenn., in memory of their great-uncle, 
Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., the founder of Maryville College.. 1,000 

The John H. Converse Scholarship, 1909, by Mr. John H. Converse, 
of Philadelphia, Pa., for candidates for the ministry and other 
Christian service 5,000 

The Chattanooga Self-help Fund, 1910, by Rev. E. A. Elmore, D.D., 
and citizens of Chattanooga, Tenn., to provide opportunities of 
work for students 500 

The G. S. W. Crawford Self-help Fund, 191 1, by friends of the late 

Prof. Crawford, to provide work for students 1,000 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official publication of the College is The; Maryville College Bul- 
letin. It is issued quarterly, and is sent free to any who apply for it. 
The May number of each year is the annual catalogue. The Southern 
Co-ed is issued several times a year by the students, the editorial staff 
consisting of representatives of the four literary societies, the Christian 
Associations, the Athletic Association, and the Alumni Association. The 
Chilhowean is issued annually by the Senior Class. It is the year-book 
of the student body, containing a summarized record of the year's work in 
' all the departments and organizations of the College, and is an attractive 
souvenir. 

THE MclLVAINE PRIZE FUND 

An annual prize fund of twenty-five dollars is given by Mr. William 
J. Mcllvaine, of New York City, and is expended for prizes awarded to 
successful contestants in oratory. The fund is proving to be a valuable 
stimulus to activity in this very practical and desirable field. 



5 8 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



SPECIAL NEEDS 

(i) The provision of a water-supply system adequate for the enlarged 
demands made by the added dormitories and other buildings. For this 
purpose there will be needed at least $5,000. (2) Another story to Pear- 
sons Hall, $10,000. The first term the new hall was in use, both young 
women's halls were filled. What shall be done next year? (3) Endow- 
ment for a domestic science department, $15,000. Too long has this impor- 
tant and most practical department been delayed. To meet this need a 
generous friend has pledged $14,000 on condition that by May, 1912, $25,000 
be secured in addition for manual training, or some other pressing neces- 
sity of the College. (4) Endowment for a manual training department, 
$25,000. The clientage of Maryville and the trend of the times both 
demand this addition. The basement of Carnegie Hall affords a good 
starting place for this work. (5) Endowment for the natural science 
departments to help provide annual supplies, $10,000. (6) Endowment to 
pay the administration expenses of the Cooperative Boarding Club so as 
to keep the cost of board from rising any further, $15,000. Thousands of 
students have been enabled to enter college because of this remarkable 
club. Board is $1.70 a week. (7) Additional endowment for the library, 
$5,000. The present endowment is less than eight thousand dollars. (8) 
A hospital endowment to provide a nurse, $10,000. The hospital is proving 
invaluable, but a nurse is sorely needed, for many students are unable to 
pay for one. (9) For streets, walks, and grounds, $5,000. Naturally beau- 
tiful, the grounds have been reluctantly left unimproved through lack of 
funds. (10) A new recitation building, $50,000. It can not long be de- 
ferred. All available space is utilized, and yet the work is sorely cramped. 

All these great needs can be met with one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. And the College has faith that this amount will be secured before 
many commencements have passed. 

BEQUESTS AND DEVISES 

Since each State has special statutory regulations in regard to wills, 
it is most important that all testamentary papers be signed, witnessed, and 
executed according to the laws of the State in which the testator resides. 
In all cases, however, the legal name of the corporation must be accurately 
given, as in the following form: 

"I give and bequeath to 'The Directors 0? Maryviw* 

Coixege/ at Maryville, Tennessee, and to their successors and assigns for- 
ever, for the uses and purposes of said College, according to the provisions 
of its charter." 



MARYVILLB COLLBGU 59 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



College Department 

POST-GRADUATE 

Mayo, Solon Anderson Loudon, R. D. 4 Bible Training 

SENIOR CLASS 

Aikin, Lena Sanborn, N. Y Ancient Languages 

\ Baker, Robert Roy Mohawk Mathematics 

I Bolton, Alva Kyle Washington College. . Mathematics 

I Buchanan, William Franklin. Atlanta, Ga Ancient Languages 

I Caldwell, Edward Humphrey. . .Burdick, Ky Ancient Languages 

i Callaway, Anna Belle Maryville English and History 

j! Crawford, Jennie Fidelia Maryville English and History 

1 Duncan, Henry Rankin Maryville Political Science 

Dyer, Lloyd Elmer Mohawk Political Science 

Fillers, Alvin Hugo Greene vill-e Mathematics 

I Franklin, Clarence McMurry. Jefferson City General 

j: Frazier, Eustis Julian Cleveland Political Science 

I Gibbs, Lula Irene Fountain City English and History 

Gibson, Frances Janvier South Charleston, O. General 

j Gray, Winnie Belle Bearden General 

Hunter, FlorinE Jonesboro, Ind General 

Jewell, Ruth Eva Maryville General 

1 Kidder, Anna Eleanor South Knoxville Ancient Languages 

McMurry, Nellie Maud .Knoxville General 

j Marsh, Wallace Henry Elizabeth, N. J Ancient Languages 

I May, Mark Arthur Telford Ancient Languages 

MiddlETOn, George Winfield Lexington, Ind Mathematics 

Pence, Adam Franklin Limestone Ancient Languages 

Proffitt, Addie Blanche Maryville General 

Rankin, Joseph Marshall Fountain City Mathematics 

! Robinson, Philip Leland Citronelle, Ala General 

Sheddan, Laura McLin De Land, Fla General 

Shelton, George Reed Columbia, Ky General 

' Wilson, George Thomas Rhea Springs General 



6o MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Bays, Willamette Maryville Modern Languages 

Carson, Leland Gates Harriman Political Science 

C a wood, LucieE Maryville Ancient Languages 

Crawford, SamuEE EareE. Maryville General 

Duggan, Morton Blaine Sevierville, R. D. 18. Mathematics 

Duggan, Orton Lorraine Sevierville, R. D. 18. Mathematics 

Dunbar, Ellen SieEna Hersman, Til General 

Duncan, NeleiE Fern Maryville General 

Goddard, Homer Andrew Maryville Ancient Languages 

Graham, Leeia Love Dandridge English and Histor 

Hamman, Wilbur Albert Cloverport, Ky Ancient Languages 

Hixson, Roy HebER Chattanooga General 

Johnston, Nellie Fayette Montgomery, O English and Histor; 

McCulloch, Samuel Wiley Maryville General 

McGinlEy, Josepli Leonard Maryville General 

Magill, Mary Tirzah Maryville . General 

Marshall, Olga Alexandra Katonah, N. Y Ancient Languages 

Murray, Clyde TerELIUS Maryville General 

Orr, Horace Eugene. Cabot, Ark Ancient Languages 

Pickens, Alice Belle Maryville General 

Rule, Clay Evans Maryville Political Science 

Shipley, Vincent Talbott Baltimore, Md Ancient Languages 

Sims, John Granville Monroe Political Science 

Smith, Elmira Grace Concord Ancient Languages 

Stanton, Ida Grace Limestone General 

Tweed, Jancer Lawrence White Rock, N. C. . . Political Science 

Walker, Samuel Jellico Creek, Ky . . . . General 

Williams, Solomon Randolph . . Sevierville, R. D. 8. .Mathematics 

Wilson, Olive More Maryville Ancient Languages 

Wright, Noble Pall Mall Political Science 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Alexander, Christine Maryville Ancient Languages 

Alexander, Loy McCord Reno, 111 General 

Callaway, Thomas Howard .... Maryville Mathematics 

Cross, Robert Carroll Gastonburg, Ala Ancient Languages 

Davis, Minnie Carter Washington, D. C. . .Ancient Languages 

Douglas, George HarlEy Leeds, Mass Ancient Languages 

Elmore, Grace Gladys New Market Ancient Languages 

Fanson, Anna Ethel Assumption, 111 Ancient Languages 

Goddard, Volta Francis Maryville Mathematics 

<}rabiel, Paul Ruskin Columbus, O Political Science 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE * 61 



Jewell, Grace Day Fredericktown, Mo. . . Ancient Languages 

Johnson, Bessie Dale Warren, O General 

Kirkpatrick, Marivine Mcoresburg English and History 

LESTER, Hattie Belle Butler, Mo Ancient Languages 

McCampbell, Ella Townsend English and History 

McConnELL, Ralph Erskine. . . . Maryville Ancient Languages 

MoorE, William Elder Maryville Ancient Languages 

Newell, Ruth Culver Eustis, Fla English and History 

Norcross, George Dillon Horner. New Egypt, N. J. .. .Ancient Languages 

Nuchols, May Cowan Maryville Ancient Languages 

Owens, Ralph Waldo Boonville, Ind Ancient Languages 

Pickens, Nellie Cowan Knoxville General 

Robison, William Thomas Murfreesboro General 

Rood, Miriam Anna Bradentown, Fla Ancient Languages 

Secor, Marcia Carrollton, 111 General 

Silsby, Helen Cassilly Shanghai, China General 

SwannER, Mae Meadow General 

Titley, Richard John Marietta, O General 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Alexander, Melancthon Herbert, Reno, 111 General 

Armstrong, Alma Mabel Bradentown, Fla General 

Benson, Charles Cheston Dayton Mathematics 

BriTTain, James Frazier, Jr Maryville Mathematics 

Garden, Jesse Daniel Marrowbone, Ky Ancient Languages 

Carson, Ralph St. Clair Hendersonville, N. C. Ancient Languages 

Clark, Margaret Emily New Market English and History 

Condry, William Macy Idol Mathematics 

Cross, Luther Laupance Gastonburg, Ala English and History 

Cuesta, Angell La Madrid Atlanta, Ga General 

Detty, Victor Charles Scranton, Pa Ancient Languages 

Dodd, Fletcher Forest Dayton Mathematics 

FerrEE, Harry Vernon Maroa, 111 Ancient Languages 

Fyke, Will Foster Springfield Chemistry 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville Mathematics 

Grisewood, Lydia Mabel Rochester, N. Y Chemistry 

Hall, Erma May Maryville Modern Languages 

Hargrave, Fred Jack Boonville, Ind Mathematics 

Harwell, William Dunlap Atlanta, Ga Ancient Languages 

Hyden, John Albert Philadelphia General 

James, Katherine Maye Gallatin English and History 

Jones, William Patton Swannanoa, N. C General 

Jordan, William Knouchels Louisville Ancient Languages 



62 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Kirkpatrick, Nell Ross Mooresbnrg General 

Lenoir, Frank Osborne Philadelphia Mathematics 

McConnell, Adolpiius Rankin. . Maryville Ancient Languages 

McCully, Jonnie Ann Maryville Modern Languages 

Maxey, Mayme Rebecca Maryville English and Histor] 

Miller, Frank Lewis East Moriches, N. Y. Chemistry 

Moore, Addison Stronc Maryville Ancient Languages 

Moore, Oscar Dent Chuckey Ancient Languages 

Newman, Reva Straw Plains General 

Ramsey, Enoch Jones Viola General 

Rutledge, Wiley Blount Maryville Ancient Languages 

Silsby, Mary Lancaster Springfield, Mo English and Histor 

Smith, Robert Harmer Oyster Bay, N. Y.„. . .Ancient Languages 

Stewart, James Kirkpatrick. . . .Wilmington, Del Ancient Languages 

Tilford, William Harmon Ludlow, Ky Ancient Languages 

IRREGULAR COLLEGIATE STUDENTS 

Atwell, William James Marion, N. C General 

Bell, Lorenzo VerE Lexington, Ind Mathematics 

Black, James Stedman, Jr Newport General 

Blanton, Wade Hampton Nettleton, Miss General 

Brewer, Alvtn Houston Walland General 

Converse, Mary Flavia Morristown General 

Dillon, Julia Hale Memphis Biology 

Gaston, David Ftnts. Gastonburg, Ala General 

Gibbons, James Booth Prattville, Ala Political Science 

Goddard, Joe Maryville General 

Goddard, Thomas Warner Maryville General 

Good, Edison B Harriman General 

Haggard, William Wade Bank General 

Hankins, Hannah Harrison . . . Well Spring General 

Harper, Fred Knott Maryville Modern Languages 

Henson, Frank W'tlliam Philadelphia, Pa Ancient Languages 

Huguley, Edward Artliur Piano, Tex General 

Jackson, Mary Elizabeth Maryville General 

McAuley, Allte Antoinette Huntersville, N. C... General 

Randolph, George William Nettleton, Miss Mathematics 

Rankin, MelvtllE Bliss Boonville, Ind General 

Reeves, Ernest Mayrout Hobart, Okla General 

Rice, Gustavus Adolphus Harlan, Ky Ancient Languages 

Samsel, Eva May Tate General 

Singleton, Lester Delozier Maryville General 

Smith, George Farrar Newport General 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 6.* 



Smith, Harry Huff Newport General 

Smith, Ida Margaret Concord General 

Smith, Mae Darthula Morristown Teachers' 

Tedford, Charles Benton Kodoli, Kolhapur, India. General 

Toney, George Lynn Erwin General 

Whitworth, Charees Beee Gleason General 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Armstrong, Emma Gertrude Rogersville Music 

Baker, Grace Mohawk Music 

Ballard, William Overton La Follette Teachers' 

Blanchard, Carl Pottsville, Pa Music 

Broady, India Patton Maryville Art 

Carson, Con well BurnsidE Boggstown, Ind Mathematics 

Carthron, Marcus . Morristown Music 

Combs, Verna Leonora. Maryville Music 

Craven, Nell Winifred Mt. Sterling, 111 Music 

Dean, Hazel Esther Bellefontaine, O Music 

DeArmond, Mamie Maryville Music 

Fulkerson, Will Fugate New Ta/.ewell General 

Henry, Zora Alice. .Rockford Bible Training 

Howard, Cora Maryville Art 

Huddleston, Albert Dubois Maryville General 

Johnston, Emma LEE Petros Teachers' 

McNutt, Frankie LEE Maryville Music 

McNutt, Jennie Irene Maryville Expression and Music 

McReynolds, Fidelia Constance. Maryville Music 

McTeer, Lucy Maryville Art 

Martin, Alta Willard Maryville Music 

Measells, Dewitt Talmage Morton, Miss Music 

Miller, Bertha Elizabeth East Moriches, N. Y. Bible Training 

Patton, Mae Maryville Art 

Patton, Martha AdelE Maryville Music 

Rankin, Mary Kate Dandridge Music 

Rowland, Minnie LEE Alexandria Bible Training 

Smith, Walter Albert Maryville General 

Taylor, Rose Lucile Kelso Music 

Thurman, Mattie Nora Sevierville Music 

Toney, Herbert Edwin Erwin General 

Wagner, Mittie Macaulay Maryville Art 



64 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Preparatory Department 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 

Barnes, Mark Hopkins Maryville Latin-Scientific 

BewlEy, Ardin Nelson . . . .' Mcsheim Latin-Scientific 

Brown, Olivia Jean Maryville Teachers' 

Carson, Ruth Rankin Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Davenport, James Marcus Acwbrth, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Dawson, Charles Edward South Knoxville Classical 

Dean, Leslie LEE Nesbitt, Miss Latin-Scientific ' 

Eaves, Beverley MoEEETT Jacksboro Latin-Scientific 

Franklin, Lucy Elgin Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

Fruh, Michael New York, N. Y Latin-Scientific 

Garrison, Nellie Jim Byingtoti Latin-Scientific 

Hueeaker, Della Straw Plains General 

Jackson, Maktha Frank Maryville Teachers' 

Kerns,. Amelia Keziah Parkville, Mo . Classical 

KoehlER, George William Maryville Latin-Scientific 

KoEhlER, Margaret Emily Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Lane, Ethel Milburn Rnssellville Latin-Scientific 

LETHERWOOD, Mae Carrie Maryville Teachers' 

Lloyd, Ralph Waldo Whiterocks, Utah. . . . Latin-Scientific 

McConnell, Paul Carson Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Painter, Winifred LEE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Peyton, Willia m Preston Salem, Va Classical 

Ramsey, John Blair McMinnville Latin-Scientific 

Reynolds, William Roscoe Algood Latin-Scientific 

Rice, Walter Lee Flag Pond Classical 

Stepp, Joseph Carl Asheville, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Susong, Charles Evert Walland Teachers' 

Tetedoux, Corinne Fleming Norwood, O Latin-Scientific 

White, Albert Joseph Oyster Bay, N. Y Classical 

Wilson, Howard Hannington:. . Maryville Classical 

Wilson, Lois Coligny Maryville Classical 

THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Alma McBryan Kelton. S. C Latin-Scientific 

Alexander, UtiE Zella Mansfield, Ark Latin-Scientific 

Bacon, D. Robert Charleston General 

Bryan, Helen Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Burian, Ludvik Martinice, Moravia . . Classical 

Burns, Edward Walland Latin-Scientific 

Caldwell, Carrie Lou New Market General 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 65 



Callaway, Henry Abbott Maryville Latin-Scientific 

CantrELL, James Carlock Etowah General 

Cantrell, Thomas Washington. Etowah General 

CARVER, Ralston Wilde Pineville, N. C Latin- Scientific 

C a wood, Mary Charles Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Clemens, Frances Elizabeth Caldwell, Idaho Latin-Scientific 

Clemens, Mary Lucinda Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Coleman, Dora Maryville Teachers' 

Condry, Eugene Idol Latin-Scientific 

Conrad, Chauncey Elbert Fredericktown, Mo. . . Classical 

Cox, Herbert Hale Whitesburg Latin-Scientific 

Crane, Mary Rebecca Waxhaw, N. C Teachers' 

Creech, Charles Bishop Whitesburg Latin-Scientific 

Dawson, Edna Elizabeth South Knoxville Latin- Scientific 

Dawson, Eva Lavinia South Knoxville Latin- Scientific 

Dean, Emma Leona. Nesbitt, Miss Latin-Scientific 

DeverEaux, George Discan Spencer, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Dykes, Bessie Louvinia South Knoxville Teachers' 

Eaves, Ruth Matilda Jacksboro Latin-Scientific 

Elmore, Linden Lucian New Market Latin-Scientific 

Fletcher, LischEr VernELLE. .... Socrum, Fla Latin-Scientific 

Ford, Mamie Jane Knoxville Teachers' 

Foster, Edna Earle Blaine Latin-Scientific 

Garrison, William Reid Derita, N, C Latin-Scientific 

Grice, George Harrison Petros General 

Hale, Frank FulkErson Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Hall, Carl Ralston Maryville General 

Hall, Frank Jackson Maryville General 

Hall, Mary Venita Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Harper, Maude Marguerite Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Hearst, Elvin Harrison Noeton Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Cora Jane Bank Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Lily Canzada Cosby Latin-Scientific 

Hicks, George Robert Coile Knoxville General 

KEELER, Pearl Farlington, Kan Latin-Scientific 

Little, Augusta L Lenoir, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Lowry, Bernice LEE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Loy, Harvey Gibson Maynardville General 

McBEE, Edgar Love Corryton Latin-Scientific 

McCallie, Nellie French. Sweetwater General 

McCurry, Coy Mosheim Latin-Scientific 

McCurry, Eula Erskine Mosheim Classical 

McGaha, William Edgar Cosby Latin- Scientific 

McGinley, Viola Blanche Maryville Latin-Scientific 

5 



66 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



McQueen, Norman Mason Loudon Latin-Scientific 

McReynolds, Jessie Mauds Maryville General 

Martin, William Ears ..Maryville Latin-Scientific 

May, AlETha ClELAND Maryville Latin-Scientific 

MorEhSad, Joseph Nathan Ridgeville, Ind Classical 

Murray, Lela AgnES Greenback Latin-Scientific 

Nicely, Burl Henry Powder Springs Latin-Scientific 

Nicely, Lillard Washburn Latin-Scientific 

Norton, Jennie Charleston General 

Ogle, Eunice Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

O'Hair, John Henry Paris, 111 Latin-Scientific 

O'Hair, Smith Paris, 111 Latin-Scientific 

PannELL, Mary Elizabeth Prendergast General 

Pleasants, William Henry Roxboro, N. C Classical 

ProffitT, David Wilson Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Rankin, Rol*S Montgomery Jet, Okla Latin-Scientific 

Rose, Joseph Hartford General 

Rowland, Eliza Annie Alexandria Latin- Scientific 

Smith, Raymond Owens Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Speck, Marie EeeiE Algood Latin-Scientific 

Stooksbury, Isaac LEE Gibson. . .Maynardville Latin-Scientific 

TallEnt, George Albert Barnesville, Ga Classical 

Taylor, MurriEL Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Tedford, Dwight Messenger Fletcher, O Latin-Scientific 

Tedford, Mary Pearl Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Thompson, Charles Earl Corryton Latin-Scientific 

TowE, Garland DaedEn Chapanoke, N. C General 

Von Tress, Percy Allen Dallas, Tex Latin- Scientific 

Walker, William Barker • . Robbinsville, N. C. . . Latin- Scientific 

Webb, Lillian Gray Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Williams, Deck Christopher. . . . Cosby General 

Williamson, Edgar Allen Webster, N. C Classical 

Work, Ruth AnnE Harriman General 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Aldridge, Adolphus Ervin Chuckey Latin-Scientific 

Alexander, Ruth Lillian Charlotte, N. C Classical 

Allen, John Elisha Oregon, Mo Classical 

Allen, Leroy Barry Leflore, Miss Latin-Scientific 

Armstrong, Cora Greenback Latin-Scientific 

Ayers, Ruth Hannah Midway General 

BadgSTT, Frances LucilE Maryville General 

Bailey, William Newton Fall Branch Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 67 



BiTTLE, Joseph Calvin Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Boring, William Wiley Rasar General 

BroylES, Cecil Clint Chuckey Latin-Scientific 

Byrd, Elmer Ellis Etowah General 

Caldwell, Alexander Bryan New Market Latin-Scientific 

Carson, Jean Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Castro, America Havana, Cuba General 

Cate, ArliE Eugene Riverdale Latin-Scientific 

Caton, Herman Luther Cosby Latin- Scientific 

Cecil, Asbury •. . Helenwood Latin-Scientific 

CoiLE, Mary Emma Jefferson City General 

Conrad, Hazel Maude Alliance, Mo Latin-Scientific 

Cooper, Fern Vivian Maryville Latin- Scientific 

CuEsta, Karl Bernardo Atlanta, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Davis, Retta Fountain City . . Teachers' 

Dawson, Izora Bybee Latin-Scientific 

Dean, Dorothy Louise Nesbitt, Miss Latin- Scientific 

Dobbins, Willard Clinton Latin-Scientific 

Duckworth, William Thomas. .Candler, N. C General 

Dunham, James Isaac Nashville Latin-Scientific 

Erwin, Cornelius Clieton Sharon Latin- Scientific 

Frow, Carrie LEE Maryville General 

Frye, Irene Virginia Maryville General 

Gaines, Mary Frances Bloomingdale Latin-Scientific 

Goeorth, Ransom DeSchEa Kings Mountain, N. C. Latin- Scientific 

Gordon, Elizabeth Arta Robinson, 111 Teachers' 

Griffith, William Eugene Oliver Springs General 

Gross, Tracy Jane Piney Flats Teachers' 

Henry, James Oscar Walland . . . .' General 

Henry, Paul William Walland General 

Hodges, George WinEred Boyds Creek Latin-Scientific 

Holmes, William Conrad . Wildwood, Ga Latin- Scientific 

Huddleston, Hiram Harold Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Huff, Wiley Harrison Brierfield, Ala Latin- Scientific 

HufestetlEr, Frank Henry Maryville General 

Hutchins, Robert Dayton Teachers' 

Jackson, Eugene Deaderick Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Jarrell, Robert Clayton Jarrolds Valley, W. Va. General 

Jenkins, Cora Mae Spencer, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Karnes, Marie ElisE Gallipolis, O Latin-Scientific 

KERLEE, Elijah Black Mountain, N. C. Classical 

Kincaid, Robert LEE Leinarts Latin-Scientific 

King, Frank Wilson Knoxville Latin- Scientific 

Kirkpatrick, Lucy Wiucins Mooresburg Latin-Scientific 



68 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Lane, Jay Hugh Russellville Latin- Scientific 

Lewis, Grace Amanda Harlan, Ky General 

Leoyd, Care Stanton Whiterocks, Utah. . . . Latin- Scientific 

McCaee, Edgar Lamar Greenback General 

McEehosE, James Bertram Elmer, Okla Latin- Scientific 

McGineEy, Newton Nathaniel. . Maryville t . General 

McKoy, Mary Louise Old Fort, N. C Teachers' 

McLain, Looney Rogers Acworth, Ga Latin- Scientific 

McMurray, Tom Roy Chilhowee Classical 

McNuTT, Ruby Gray Maryville General 

McReynoeds, CearEnce AeerEd . . Maryville Latin-Scientific 

McTEER, Eeea Greenback Teachers' 

McTeer, William Andrew Maryville Latin- Scientific 

May, Margaret Eunice Maryville Classical 

Mieeing, Lamar Orance Philadelphia, Miss . . . General 

Mitcheee, Maude Heiskaee Mascot Teachers' 

Murray, Quorinna Noeton General 

Nicely, Jueius Martin Washburn General 

Painter, John Wieeiam Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Parker, John Francis. Louisville Latin- Scientific 

Price, ChareES Parkhurst Baltimore, Md Latin-Scientific 

Quinn, ChareES Fred Patrick . .Lancing Latin- Scientific 

Quinn, David Luther Lancing Latin- Scientific 

Raueston, Guy Chester Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Richmond, GrovER Cleveland. . . .Inez, Ky General 

Robertson, Bubber Newbern Latin- Scientific 

Robinson, Gilbert Oscar Patton, Mo Classical 

Samsee, Herbert WhiTEEAW Tate Latin- Scientific 

SikES, Ruth Iantha Morristown Teachers' 

Slaughter, Mary KathErinE. . . .Cleveland Latin-Scientific 

Smith, ChareES Logan Harlan, Ky Latin- Scientific 

Smith, Mamie Reed Limestone Latin-Scientific 

Stinnett, Dora Townsend Teachers' ■ 

Tayeor, Bonnie AeicE Kelso General 

Taylor, Ceara Bush Del Rio Latin- Scientific 

Tayeor, Thomas Jackson Kelso Latin-Scientific 

TedEord, StaciE ArbEEEY Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Tweed, Chapee White Rock, N. C. . . Latin-Scientific 

WaekEr, Herbert LeseiE South Knoxville Classical 

Weathereord, Francis AeeEn Hustonville, Ky Latin-Scientific 

Wilson, Bertha Mary Maryville Latin-Scientific 

WisecarvER, Lewis CeydE Russellville General 

Worthington, George Washington, Noeton Latin- Scientific 

Wright, Aeice Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 69 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Anderson, Thomas Bruce Bloomingdale General 

Armitage, George Franklin Greeneville Latin-Scientific 

Bailey, Azaeea Webster Bailey, Miss General 

Baker, Mary LilliE Mohawk General 

Baker, Veema Alexander Marrowbone, Ky General 

Bays, Gage Maryville Latin-Scientific 

BEEEER, Ernest OrrEn Washburn Latin- Scientific 

Blanchard, Harry Randaee Pottsville, Pa Latin-Scientific 

Brakebiel, Zuea Anna Maryville General 

Brasweee, James Acaman Dyer Latin-Scientific 

Brewer, Elmer Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Bright, Leatha Fawn Chuckey Latin-Scientific 

Bryden, Raymond Starr Eldon, Ia» General 

Bryson, Alton Davis Whitwell Latin-Scientific 

Burchfield, Mary Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Callaway, Inez Nelson Charleston General 

Campbell, Lillian Mae Erwin General 

Campbell, Martin Hoyt Ducktown Latin-Scientific 

Carden, Nancy JanE Marrowbone, Ky General 

CoiLE, Merrill Doak Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

ColEy, Wayne Eward New Market Latin-Scientific 

Corp, Manuel Cienfuegos, Cuba General 

Cross, Ovia . . „ Gumfork Teachers' 

Cross, Sterling Gumfork Teachers' 

Crum, Medley Pikeville, Ky General 

Curry, Stanford Burney Dallas, Tex Latin-Scientific 

Darwin, Sidney LEE Evensville Latin- Scientific 

Dawson, Horace South Knoxville Classical 

Deaderick, Rachel Embree Edgemoor General 

Douglas, William FullErton . . . Jellico Latin- Scientific 

Dunlap, Elizabeth Caroline Bank Classical 

Edwards, Arthur Taylor Alaculsy, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Farmer, S. Ester Idol Latin- Scientific 

Fisher, Lavinia Concord, N. C Teachers' 

Gamble, Bertha Maryville General 

Gibson, Otha Abraham Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Goddard, Katherine Trula Maryville General 

Goddard, Myrtle Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Goldstone, Georgia Mae Oakdale General 

Grifeitts, Bessie Anne Greenback General 

Hale, Arthur Armstrong Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Harper, Irene Knox Louisville General 

Harper, James Wilford Louisville General 



7 o MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Harris, Charles Clarence Greenback Latin- Scientific 

Haun, Nellie Larue Knoxville Latin- Scientific 

Henderson, Earl Ceay Dixon, Miss Latin- Scientific 

Henry, NanciE Cordelia Cosby Latin- Scientific 

Hiee, Willie Kate Maryville General 

Hopkins, Cora Frances Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

HuEE, ChareES Arthur Brierfield, Ala Latin- Scientific 

HuEESTETEER, JESSE Care Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Hunt, Meredith Ceyde . > St. Elmo Classical 

Hunt, Reed Madisonville General 

HuskEy, Mack Reynolds Walland General 

Hutchison, Sam Neeey Horn Lake, Miss Latin- Scientific 

Jones, Isaac Steward Maryville General 

Justiniani, Ramiro Havana, Cuba General 

KEEBEE, Edgar • ■ Bank Classical 

King, Meeissa Esteeea Maryville General 

KingsoevER, Ernest CeydE Washburn Latin- Scientific 

Kirk, K. Russell Inez, Ky General 

KiTTRELL, Robert French Maryville General 

KittrELL, Sara Louise Maryville Latin-Scientific 

LEE, Essie ImErgenE Tellico Plains Latin- Scientific 

LEEPER, Kate Rockwood Latin-Scientific 

Lloyd, Edna Irene Coal Creek Latin- Scientific 

Lloyd, KathERINE Emma Coal Creek Latin-Scientific 

Lovingcod, George RoscoE Murphy, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Loy, George Wooten New Market General 

Loy, James Washington Maynardville Latin- Scientific 

Loy, RuEus Zack New Market General 

McCall, Newton ShaddEn Greenback General 

McCampbELL, Carroll BEECHER . .Fowler, Kan Latin- Scientific 

McConnELL, Thomas Lamar Maryville Latin-Scientific 

McCullEy, Emma Mae Maryville Latin-Scientific 

McCully, Maud Elizabeth Maryville General 

McDonald, Jacob Hickman Rogersville Latin- Scientific 

McGaha, Doctor Talmage Cosby Latin-Scientific 

McGinlEy, Carl Alexander Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Marcum, Henry LEE Helenwood General 

Martin, Herbert Russell Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Martin, Mamie Irene Maryville General 

Means, Margaret LucilE Maryville . . . . General 

Mitchell, William Rae Corliss . Whiterocks, Utah Latin- Scientific 

Moore, Charles Thomas Morrison Latin- Scientific 

Morton, Nola McTEER Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Nuchols, Margaret Elizabeth . .Townsend Teachers' 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 71 



Owen, Nora Belle Morristown Latin-Scientific 

Painter, ErskinE Grills Maryville General 

Parks, Samuel Julian Ocoee General 

Parks, William BurnEy McDonald Latin-Scientific 

Patton, SamuEL Carl . . Dayton Latin-Scientific 

Pile, Herman Owen Piano, Tex Latin-Scientific 

PoATS, Lewis LeandER, Jr Rogers ville Latin- Scientific 

PrickETT, Hubert Maysville, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Raulston, James Dukes Kodak Classical 

REESER, OeivE Mitchell New Market General 

Roberts, Wieeiam Beee Atlanta, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Robertson, Hugh EmErt Pigeon Forge Latin- Scientific 

Robeson, Wieeiam Edward Ori,a. Morristown General 

Rutherford, Edith Mary Corryton Latin-Scientific 

Seaton, Mary Stelea. ... .. . , Maryville Latin-Scientific 

ShEddan, Katie BeeeE Bank General 

SikEs, Grady Alexander Morristown Latin- Scientific 

Sikes, Hubert WinErEd Morristown General 

Skoenick, Ned Edwin New York, N. Y Classical 

Smith, John Clark Limestone General 

Susong, John Calvin Walland Latin-Scientific 

Susong, Sue Ella Walland Latin-Scientific 

Taylor, Sidney Clyde Louisville Latin-Scientific 

TeefetellER, Lula Gertrude Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Tucker, Hubert Newport Latin- Scientific 

Tye, Robert Clarence Conasauga Latin-Scientific 

Walker, Elsie Harriet Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Walker, ESTELLE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Walker, George Wayne Robbinsville, N. C. . . Latin- Scientific 

Walker, Lora True Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Walker, Rufus Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Whetsell, TrissiE Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 

White, Margaret Elizabeth Monroe, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Willis, Jackson Christopher . . .Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Wine, Elizabeth Maryville General 

Wrinkle, Mabel Faye South Knoxville General 



Sub-Preparatory 

Alexander, Gustava Irene Greenback 

Alexander, Pearl Mae Kiser 

Altom, William Reed Rogersville 



72 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Armstrong, Lanty Walker Greenback 

Badgett, Jessie Rockford 

Bailey, James Preston Bailey, Miss. 

Barlow, Wileiam Ernest Bulls Gap 

Bays, Aubrey Hiram Maryville 

Best, Eare Martin Knoxville 

Bogle, Leland Lyons Maryville 

BoclE, MonniE T Maryville 

Boring, James Marcus Rasar 

Boring, Mary KathErynE Rasar 

Brewer, Grace Lilian Maryville 

Brown, Margaret Maryville 

Brown, Theron Nelson Maryville 

BurchELL, ThEopolus Toulmin Manchester, Ky. 

Callahan, John Thomas Dyersburg 

Callaway, Lula May Maryville 

Carroll, James H Bank 

Carter, Emma Lou Mosheim 

Carter, Mabel Lenora Mosheim 

Carter, Wilbur Mosheim 

Chambers, Daniel Gareield Huntsville 

Chapman, Sarah Ross Greenback 

Chung, Han Ell Seoul, Korea 

Clark, Allen Long Knoxville 

Clark, Roy Leonard Maryville 

Clemens, Robert Broady Maryville 

Clement, Hugh Idol 

CoiLE, John Andrew Jefferson Citj 

Condry, Haley May Idol 

Coulter, Hassie Etta Maryville 

Crye, Josie Pearl Greenback 

Damiano, Charles Middleton, W. Va 

Dodson, Herbert William Rutledge 

Dumas, Jose Havana, Cubs 

Edwards, Lea HarlE Alactilsy, Ga 

Eggers, RoscoE Maryville 

Emery, Carl Herbert Harrimar 

Farnham, George Matison. Wolcott, N. Y 

Ferguson, Adlai CarlylE Jefferson Citj 

Freeman, Nan Zirconia, N. C 

Gamble, Helen Maryville 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville 

George, Winnie Mae Jacksborc 

Gibson, Etta Mae Maryville 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 73 



Goddard, Corina Irene Maryville 

Goddard, Mary Maryville 

Hale, Sue LEE Maryville 

Henry, NELLE Marie Rockford 

Henry, Samuel Joseph Rockford 

Higgins, Robert Maryville 

Hodges, Otis Boyds Creek 

Holt, Gertrude Maryville 

Horner, Myrtle Mabel Maryville 

Hughes, William Green Mountain, N. C. 

Hunter, Millie Victoria Dorothy, W. Va. 

Irwin, Paul Maryville 

James, Bessie Susan Maryville 

James, Callie Gordonsville 

James, Elijah Elihu Maryville 

James, Susan Caddie Maryville 

Jarrell, Donna KatholEnE Jarrolds Valley, W. Va. 

Jenkins, Ray Tellico Plains 

Johnston, Edith Eliza Cincinnati, O. 

Kennon, George Hermon Watkinsville, Ga. 

Kennon, Henry Carlton Watkinsville, Ga. 

Kidd, Oscar Maryville 

Kirk, Wendell Holmes Inez, Ky. 

Krexs, Charles Louis ,. ., Wartburg 

Lamon, Howard Fielding Maryville 

LequirE, Mary Ella Maryville 

Lynch, Clarence Davis Briceville 

Lynch, Edward James Briceville 

McCurry, Nancy Elizabeth Mosheim 

McFadden, Marley Louisville 

McGhee, William Edgar Louisville 

McGinniss, Carra Janet Tdol 

McMahan, Cynthia Elizabeth Chilhowee 

McMurray, Beulah Chilhowee 

McNeilly, Nora Maryville 

Marcum, Hettie Helenwood 

Marcum, Rosa Ada , Helenwood 

Marine, Elmer Herman Rasar 

Martin, Kenneth Lee Maryville 

Martinez, Manuel Havana, Cuba 

Matthews, Willie Carlton Kizer 

Moody, Caryl Guy Townsend 

Moore, Edith ;.., Maryville 

Morton, Daisy LEE Maryville 



74 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



Norton, Anna BeeeE Charleston 

Patton, Chares Henry Dayton i 

Peery, Joseph LequirE Bank ; 

PembERTON, Wieeiam Condy Briceville | 

Pendarvis, Da-niEE Eugene. Harleyville, S. C 

Pendarvis, Newton Harleyville, S. C. 

Raueston, Neie Andrew ■ .Maryville ! 

Rhodes, Oea Apalachiola, Fla.l 

Robbins, ChareES FineEy Chilhowee j 

Robbins, Maggie Mariah Mint 

Robinson, Dennis Omer - Loudon i 

Rucker, Neeson Barton , • .Washburn! 

RueE, Bessie Irene Maryyijjfe 

Shaver, ThEo. Wieson - .Dayton 

Simpson, Frank Magiee • Philadelphia 

Simpson, J. Rueus • Philadelphia 

Simpson, Samuee Jesse . Philadelphia 

Spurgeon, ChareES Haddon Sevierville; 

Spurgeon, Wieea Tiara , Hney Flats, 

Stanton, James Beaine Cawood, Ky. 

Stinnett, LieeiE '. Townsendj 

Stone, Iea Wana Coal Creek! 

Sueeivan, Aeice CaeeEy Newark, N. J. 

Summers, Paue Maecom Maryville?' 

TaeeEnT, Jessie Maryville 

Thomas, Emma BEEEE Maryville: 

Thomas, Reason Oneida- 

Trotter, Hugh Maryville; 

Tueeoch, Cecie Maryville', 

TureEy, Mary VaeeiE Cabell, W. Va,' 

Tweed, Sherman White Rock, N. C; 

Tye, John MieeEr Conesauga 

WaddELE, Feeix John... Greeneville 

WaekER, Joe KnaeeeE Maryville 

WaekER, NETTIE RoSETTA Maryville 

Webb, Dannie Esteeea ; Maryville 

West, Ceyde EckeEs Maryville 

White, Aesop Maryville 

Wiekinson, Carrie Tipton Maryville 

Wiekinson, Margaret Catharine Maryville 

Wieeoughby, James Waeeace Maryville 

Wieson, Lamar Siesby Maryville 

WrinkeE, Annie South Rockford 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



75 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



Classification by Departments 

College Department 158 

special Students 32 

Preparatory Department 334 

>ub-Preparatory 134 



Total. 



658 



Classification by States 



Alabama 7 

Arkansas 2 

)elaware 1 

Kstrict of Columbia 1 

'lorida 6 

Borgia 14 

daho 1 

Ilinois 10 

ndiana 8 

owa 1 

Kansas 2 

Kentucky 18 

laryland 2 

lassachusetts 1 

lississippi 12 

lissouri 8 

few Jersey 3 



New York 10 

North Carolina 29 

Ohio 10 

Oklahoma 3 

Pennsylvania 4 

South Carolina 3 

Tennessee 481 

Texas 3 

Utah 3 

Virginia 1 

West Virginia 5 



China . , 
Cuba ... 
India . . . 
Korea . . 
Moravia 



Total. 



.658 



76 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



CALENDAR FOR I9II-I9I2 



FALL TERM 

191 1 

Sept. 12, Fall Term begins Tuesda] 

Nov. 30, Thanksgiving Thursday 

Dec. 18, 19, 20, Examinations Monday- Wednesday 

Dec. 20, Fall Term ends Wednesda 1 



WINTER TERM 

1912 

Jan. 2, Winter Term begins Tuesda; 

Jan. 10, Meeting of the Directors, 10 a. m Wednesda; 

Mar. 19, 20, 21, Examinations Tuesday-Thursda; 

Mar. 21, Winter Term ends Thursda; 



SPRING TERM 

Mar. 25, Spring Term begins Monda 

June 2, Baccalaureate Sermon • Sabbat 

June 2, Address before the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A Sabbat 

June 3, 4, 5, Examinations Monday- Wednesda 

June 5, Class Day Exercises, 7 130 p. m Wednesda 

June 6, Meeting of Directors, 8 130 a. m Thursda 

June 6, Commencement, 10 a. m Thursda 

June 6, Annual Alumni Dinner, 12 m Thursda 

June 6, Social Reunion, 8 p. m Thursda 



INDEX 



Ulministrative Rules 

admission to College Depart' 
nient .... 

Ldmission to Preparatory De 
partment 

ilumni Association 

irt, Department of 

ithletic Association 

Requests and Devises 

Sible Study 

►ible Training Department . . . 

•iology 

loard, Rates for 

ioard of Directors 

lookkeeping 

luildings 

lalendar for 1911-1912 

:arnegie Hall 

:hapel , 

chemistry 

:ommittees and Officers 

ontests, Intercollegiate 

ooperative Club 

)egrees Offered 

)egrees Conferred in 1910. . . . 

)irectors 

Economics and Political Sci- 
ence 

Endowment 

English Language and Liter- 
ature 

Entrance Requirements 

Examinations 

Expenses 

xpression, Department of. . 

acuity 

rench 

eology 

erman 

raduation, Requirements for. 



PAGE 

54 



27 
52 
36 
5i 
58 
25 
37-39 
18 

49 
2 

33 

42-45 

76 

44 
43 
17 

3 
54 
46 
10 
52 

2 

15 

40, 41 

20, 30 

8-10 

27, 54 

47-49 

56 

4-7 

24, 32 

18 

24, 32 
10 



Greek ■ 

Grounds and Buildings 

Groups of Studies 

Hebrew 

History of the College 

History, Department of .... 

Honors, Graduation 

Hospita 

Latin 

Libraries 

Literary Societies 

Location 

Lyceum Course 

Mathematics 

Medical Attention . . ..... 

Music, Department of 

Needs 

New Testament Literature. . . 
Old Testament Literature . . . 

Organizations, Student 

Pearsons Hall 

Philosophy 

Physical Culture 

Physics 

Power Plar 

Preparatory Department 

Prize Fund 

Publications, College 

Railway Connections 

Rooms 

Rules 

Scholarship Funds 

Self-help 

Spanish 

Students, Register for 1910- 

1911 

Teachers' Department 

Tuition 

Y. M. C. A 

Y. W. C. A 



PAGE 

23. 31 

42-45 

11 

25 

40, 41 

•20, 33 

53 

44 

21, 31 

■45, 46 

50 

42 

53 

12, 30 

53 

35, 36 
58 
38 
37 
50 
44 
14 
53 

18, 34 
45 

27-34 
57 
57 
42 
48 
54 

56, 57 
55 
25 

59.66 
26 
47 
50 
50 



y 



Mary ville College 
= Bulletin = 




Vol. XI MAY, 1912 No. 1 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Officers and Faculty 3 

The Courses of Study ...... 8 

History and General Information . 44 

Expenses 51 

Register of Students for 1911-12 . 64 
Index .82 



Published four times a year by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 



Entered May 24, 1904, at Maryville, Term., as second-class 
matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Wji 



Mary mile College 
Bulletin 

ANNUAL CATALOG NUMBER 
For the Year 1 9 1 1 - 1 9 1 2 




Published by 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CLASS OF 1912 



Rev. Newton Wads worth Cadweee, D.D .. . .Atlantic City, N. J. 

Rev. John Baxter Cresweee, B.A Bearden 

Rev. Wieeiam Robert Dawson, D.D. South Knoxville 

Rev. Caevin AeExandEr Duncan, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. John Samuee Eakin, B.A Greeneville 

Rev. Woodward Edmund FineEy, D.D Marshall, N. C. 

Hon. Wieeiam Leonidas Brown Philadelphia 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. i 

Major Ben Cunningham Maryville 

Samuee O'Grady Houston, B.A Knoxville 

Humphrey Gray Hutchison, M.D Vonore 

Coeonee John Beaman Minnis Knoxville 

CLASS OF 1913 

Rev. John McKnitt AeExandEr, B.A Maryville 

REV. Thomas Judson MieES, M.A Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Washington College 

REv. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Baltimore, Md 

REV. EemER Briton WaeeEr, M.A Maryville 

Rev. David GoureEy WyeiE, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

James Addison Anderson, Esq Knoxville 

Hon. Thomas Neeson Brown, M.A Maryville 

John Caevin Crawford, B. A., LL.B Maryville 

John Caevin Martin, Esq New York, N. Y. 

Governor John PowEE Smith National Soldiers' Home 

James Martin Trimbee, Esq Chattanooga 

CLASS OF 1914 

Rev. Nathan Bachman, D.D .Sweetwater 

REv. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Rockwood 

REv. Henry Seymour ButeER, D.D ., Huntsville 

REv. Edgar Aeonzo Eemore, D.D Chattanooga 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Rev. Samuee TyndaeE Wieson, D.D. Maryville 

Hon. Moses Houston GambeE, M.A Maryville 

AeExandEr Russeee McBath, Esq Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Hon. Wieeiam Anderson McTeer Maryville 

* Wieeiam Boaz Minnis. Esq New Market 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingston 



'■''Died December 2, 1911. 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



Officers of the Board of Directors: Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D., 
Chairman; Major Ben Cunningham, Recorder and Treasurer. 

Executive Committee of the Board of Directors: Hon. William Ander- 
son McTefr, Chairman; Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, Secretary; 
and Revs. William Robert Dawson, D.D., John McKnitt Alex- 
ander, and Elmer Briton Waller. 

Committee on Professors and Teachers: R Ev . William Robert Daw- 
son, D.D., Chairman; Prof. Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; and 
Hon. William Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, 
Dean Elmer Briton Waller, and President Samuel Tyndale 
Wilson. 

Synodical Examiners for 1912: Revs. George H. Mack, William J. 

King, D.D., and Dayton A. Dobbs. 
Faculty Committees: 

Entrance: Processors Gillingham, Schnirel, and Proffitt. 
Advanced Standing: President Wilson and Professors Barnes and 
Bassett. 

Scholarships: Professor Gillingham, President Wilson, and Miss 
Henry. 

Student Publications and Programs: Professors Gillingham and 

Schnirel, and Dean Waller. 
The Lamar Library: Professor Barnes. 
The Loan Library: Professor Bassett. 
Athletics: Professors Schnirel and McClenahan. 
The Cooperative Club: Dean Waller. 
Care of Buildings and Grounds: Professor Lyon. 
College Extension: Professors Barnes, Proffitt, and Gillingham. 

Appointments and Employment: Professors Barnes, Bassett, and 
Lyon. 



FACULTY 



REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and Literature, and of 

the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D, 
Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER BRITON WALLER, M.A., 
Dean, Professor of Mathematics, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin. 

PHOEBUS WOOD LYON, M.A., Ph.D., 

Logic, History, and Pedo>gogy. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 
Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, and Head of the Bible Training 

Department. 

HERMAN FERDINAND SCHNIREL, B.A, 
Professor of German and French. 

FRANCIS MITCHELL McCLENAHAN, M.A., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, B.A., 
Principal of the Preparatory Department, and Professor of Education. 

MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, B.X 

English Language and Literature. 

SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A., 
Biology and Geology. 



MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 



ANNABEL PERSON, B.A, 
Greek. 

MARGARET EUZA HENRY, B.A., 
English. 

VIRGINIA ESTELLE SNODGRASS, B.A. 
Latin. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A., 

Mathematics. 

MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, B.A., 
English. 

ALICE ISABEL CLEMENS, B.A., 
English, 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, B.A., 

Latin and English. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 
History. 

GEORGE WINFIELD MIDDLETON, B.A. 

Physics and Mathematics. 

ANNA DeVRIES, Ph.B., 
German and French. 

ALMIRA ELIZABETH JEWELL, B.A., 

Mathematics. 

JOAN McDOUGALL, 
Piano. 

INEZ MONFORT, 
Voice, History of Music, and Theory. 

REV. EDWIN WILLIAM HALL, 
Vocal and Band Music, and Bible. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



MRS. NITA ECKLES WEST, B.A., B.O. 
Expression. 

WANDA COZINE KELLER, 
Expression. 

REV. THOMAS CAMPBELL, M.A., 
Painting and Drawing. 

VINCENT TALBOT SHIPLEY, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

SAMUEL WALKER, 

Assistant in Biology. 

JOHN GRANVILLE SIMS, 
Assistant in Psychology. 

HATTIE BELLE LESTER, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

JULIA HALE DILLON, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD, 
Assistant in Physics. 

SAMUEL ROLAND WILLIAMS, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

ZORA ALICE HENRY, 

Assistant in Bible. 

HENRY JASPER WILSON, 

Assistant in Bible. 

LESTER EVERETT BOND, 
Physical Director. 



OTHER OFFICERS 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Treasurer. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, 
Manager of the Loan Library. 

MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODGRASS, 
Librarian, and Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 
Proctor of the Grounds. 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, 
Proctor of Carnegie Hall. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 
Proctor of Memorial Hall. 

MRS. WILLIAM PETER BARNHILL, 
Matron of Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 
Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

EMMIE LAURA DARBY, 
Assistant Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

ROBERT McMILLAN MAGILL, 
Bookkeeper of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 
Secretary to the Scholarship Committee. 

CORINNE FLEMING TETEDOUX, 
Secretary to the President. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 
Secretary to the Registrar. 

GEORGE HARLEY DOUGLAS, 

WILLIAM PRESTON PEYTON, 

HENRY JASPER WILSON, 

Assistant Librarians. 

MORTON BLAINE DUGGAN, 
Assistant in Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER, 
Janitor. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are expected to be at 
least sixteen years of age and of good moral character. Candidates coming 
from other institutions must bring letters of honorable dismissal. Appli- 
cation for admission to the Freshman Class or to advanced standing should 
be made on the regular application blank of the College. This blank pro- 
vides for the necessary testimonial of character and certificate of honorable 
dismissal, as well as for a complete statement of all studies completed. 
This blank is to be signed by the president or principal of the institution 
from which the applicant comes. The Registrar will mail a copy of the 
application blank upon request. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is the equiv- 
alent of five recitation periods a week during a full academic year, in 
subjects above the eighth grade of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen units are 
required, as specified below : 

i. ENGLISH.— Three units required. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write correctly and 

clearly ; a knowledge of the principles of punctuation, cap- 
italization, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature recom- 

mended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Require- 
ments in English. For the texts recommended for study 
and practice and for reading in 1912, see the lists sched- 
uled for the. Preparatory Department, page 33. 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Four units required. 
Latin. — Four units may be offered. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Caesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, iEneid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology, prosody. 




fcl 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Greek. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, Anabasis, 

Book i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv ; Homer, Iliad, Books i-iii. 

Composition, mythology, prosody. 
German.— Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and compo- 

sition. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, with 

reproduction and composition. 
French. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of about 

five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one thousand 

pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, ratio 

and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial 
and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and 
equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original demon- 

strations. 

4. NATURAL SCIENCES.— Two units. 

5. ELECTIVE.— Three units. Any three units of standard high- 
school work that may be accepted by the Committee on Entrance. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITIONS 

A candidate may be admitted with conditions if the number of his 
conditions does not exceed two. Not more than one condition will be 
allowed in mathematics and none in English. All entrance conditions must 
be absolved before admission to the Sophomore Class. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, not 
matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Preparatory 
Department. 

Irregular CoeeEGiate Students. — Candidates offering for entrance a 
sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in the Freshman 
Class, but deficient in more than two of the specified units required by 
this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee on Entrance, be 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



admitted as irregular collegiate students until they have absolved their 
conditions and attained full standing in a regular college class. Students 
of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregular or partial course and not 
seeking a degree may be allowed to select such studies as they show them- 
selves qualified to pursue. 

Special Students.- — Students desiring to study only music, expression, 
or art, and those seeking only the courses in the Bible Training Depart- 
ment, are classified under their respective departments. They have all the 
privileges offered to any students, such as the advantages of the libraries, 
the literary societies, the dormitories, and the boarding club. Young women 
rooming in the college dormitories and desiring chiefly music, expression, 
or art, are required to take a sufficient number of literary courses to make 
up, together with their work in the departments mentioned, fifteen reci- 
tation hours a week. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. To attain the degree a minimum of thirty-six courses must be 
completed. A " course" is a study pursued for five one-hour recitation 
periods a week throughout one term. A term is one-third of the scholastic 
year, and three courses in any subject constitute, therefore, a year's work 
in that subject. All courses recite five hours a week. Laboratory courses 
in the natural sciences require additional hours. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four full years 
of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the minumum amount 
required of all students. Since all courses recite five hours a week, fifteen 
hours a week is the normal amount of work expected of each student. A 
student is permitted to take four courses a term (twenty hours a week) 
if his average grade in the subjects pursued during the preceding term was 
not less than ninety per cent. 

Twenty-eight of the thirty-six courses are required of all candidates 
for a degree. These required studies are as follows : 

English, 6 courses. 
Other Languages, 8 courses. 
Mathematics, 3 courses. 
Science, 4 courses. 
Philosophy, 1 course. 
Psychology, 1 course. 
Bible, 5 courses. 

In addition to the twenty-eight courses as listed above, candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required to select eight courses to make 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



up the total number of thirty-six required for graduation. These courses 
may be elected in one of the following groups : 

I. Classical. 

Modern Languages. 

Science. 

Mathematics. 

Education. 

English Literature and History. 

Psychology and Philosophy. 

Economics and Political Science. 

General. 

The requirements for Groups I, 2, and 3 are as follows : In the Class- 
ical Group, twelve language courses shall be taken, and may be arranged 
in one of the following combinations: (a) Latin six and Greek (or Ger- 
man) six; (b) Latin nine and Greek (or German or French) three; (c) 
Greek nine and Latin (or German or French) three. In the Modern Lan- 
guages Group, twelve courses in modern languages (or eleven, in case 
Spanish is elected) shall be taken. In the Science Group, besides the four 
required science courses, seven additional courses, either of chemistry or 
of biology, shall be taken, and at least two years of German or French. 

The requirements in the Mathematics, Education, English Literature 
and History, Psychology and Philosophy, and Economics and Political 
Science Groups are that all the courses offered in the respective groups 
shall be taken. 

Students that meet all the requirements for graduation but do not 
meet the requirements of any of the afore-mentioned groups shall be grad- 
uated in the General Group. The narrfe of the group in which a student 
graduates will be indicated on the diploma. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

The Board of Directors have adopted the following rule as to the 
degree of Master of Arts : 

That the degree of Master of Arts in course be hereafter conferred 
upon graduates of the College after three years of academic, collegiate, 
theological seminary, or university post-graduate work; the presentation of 
a thesis upon a topic assigned by the Faculty, the thesis to be approved by 
the Faculty; and, finally, the payment of five dollars for the diploma. The 
thesis must be deposited with the Faculty by the first of April. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not granted by this institution. 



MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 



SYNOPSIS OF COLLEGE COURSES 



Freshman Year 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German , 

Chemistry .... 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Sophomore 

English 

Mathematics . 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

French 

Biology 

Philosophy . . . 

History 

Education . . . 
Bible 



Year 



Junior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Physics 

Philosophy 

Political Science. ., 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Senior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

German 

Spanish 

Hebrew 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Psychology 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Education 

Bible 



Fall 

*1 

1 

1 

1 

*1 

1 
1 



6 
6 

7 

4 

t4 

*2 



n 



*4 



3 or 8, 9 



;10 or 11 



Winter 



2 
2 

*2 
1 
2 

9 



*2 
4 
4 



ta 
i 



2 

2 
2 
8 
9 

or 5, 6 



Spring 
*3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 

±3 



*3 
5 
5 

11 
6 



f3 
3 



*6 

7 



8. 9, or 10 



6, 7, or 8 
2 

2 
5 
5 

9 



i or 10 
9 

10 
10 



3 
9 

10 
6 or 7 

$4 

7 
6 and 7 



•Required in all groups leading to a degree. 

fTwo Biology courses are required : either i and 2 ; 3 and 4 ; or 1 and 3. 

{Required Bible may be taken in any term, but vSeniors take Phil. 3 and 4. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 13 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



PHILOSOPHY 

Dean Waeeer, Processor Barnes, and Professor Lyon 

i. Sociology. Wright's Outlines of Practical Sociology is used as a 
text-book, including the subjects of units of social organization, questions 
of population, question of the family, the labor system, social well-being, 
and the defense of society. Collateral reading and reports on assigned 
subjects are required. — 'Dean Waller. 

2. Logic. Hill's Jevons' Logic, studied in connection with questions 
and exercises prepared for the class. The practical work given in the 
exercises appended in the text book is required, and also much original 
work in Induction connected with every-day questions, the aim being to 
make the study of practical service in such reasoning as will be met by 
the student in his subsequent experiences in life. — Processor Lyon. 

3. The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief, as set forth in Di\ 
Fisher's work, is made the basis of class-room study and recitation. The 
principal theistic and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the 
main historical and philosophical arguments for belief in the Christian 
religion are considered.— Dean Waiter. 

4. Ethics. The leading conceptions of moral theory are approached 
by the historical method. The student is led to see that moral , problems 
are real problems, which are solved best by reflective thought that is 
guided by Christian ideals. The various types of ethical theory are dis- 
cussed. Special emphasis is placed upon the ethics of social organiza- 
tions: the state, the economic life, and the family. The text; ,<}f Dewey 
and Tufts is placed in the hands of the students, and is supplemented 
by the works of Sidgwick, Green, Martineau, and Spencer. Prerequisite,. 
Psychology 1 or 4. — Professor Barnes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Barnes 

1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for students 
taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supplemented by 
lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology is- 
used as a text-book. This course is identical with Education Course 1. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 



i4 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



problems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
relations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, apper- 
ception, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented by lectures. This 
course is identical with Education Course 2. 

3. Genetic Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view, 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Education Course 4. 

4. Psychology. The aim of this course is to give the student a 
definite idea of the elements and methods of modern psychology. The 
ground covered is as follows : (a) The structure of the eye, ear, and 
brain: five lectures illustrated by the use of the Auzoux Models, (b) 
Angell's Psychology, supplemented by prescribed readings in James, Titch- 
ener, Ladd, Wundt, Stout, and Porter, (c) Typical experiments. 

5. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades : a study of the 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
course is identical with Education Course 7. 

6. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experiments in 
acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titchener's Experi- 
mental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by the works of Kiilpe. 
Sanford, Judd, and Myer. 

7. Experimental Psychology. This course is a continuation of Course 
6. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reaction experiment 
by the use of the Hipp chronoscope. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Barnes and Dean Walter. 

1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the nation, 
and of the character and distribution of nationalities; a development of 
the idea and conception of the state, and a study of its origin, forms, and 
ends ; a history of the formations of the constitutions of the states of Great 
Britain, the United States, Germany, and France, and of the organization 
of these states within their respective constitutions, and a study of liberty 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 15 



as guaranteed in their constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' Political 
Science, Volume I, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and Thayer's 
and McClain's Cases, and the works of other authors. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the construc- 
tions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judicial depart- 
ments of the governments of Great" Britain, the United States, Germany, 
and France. • The text-book is Burgess' Political Science, Volume II, sup- 
plemented by the works of Story, Macy, and other authors. 

3. International Law. This course consists of the elements of inter- 
national law, with an account of its origin, sources, and historical develop- 
ment. Lawrence's text-book is used, and the course is supplemented by 
prescribed readings in the works of Woolsey and Hall, and in Scott's and 
Snow's Cases. (Not to be given in 1912-13.) 

4. The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This course 
is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure and procedure, 
national, state, and municipal; it includes also a study of the structure and 
procedure of political conventions and similar bodies, and the theory and 
practice of parliamentary law. Open to students who have had Political 
Science 1 and 2. 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and methods 
of action of political parties in the United States. Growth of the party 
system; primary and convention systems; permanent party organization; 
reform movements; and the value and theory of the party system. (Not 
to be given in 1912-13.) 

6. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Wilson's The State is used 
as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Governments and Parties in Conti- 
nental Europe. 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great Britain, 
and the United States. Wilson and Lowell are the texts, supplemented by 
Taswell-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and Story. 

8. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the elementary 
principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. CoOley's text and 
McClain's and Thayer's Cases are used. 

9- An elementary course in Political Economy. Seager's Principles 
of Economics is used, with supplementary reading, including the usual 
divisions of production, exchange, distribution, and consumption, with some 
applications of economic principles. Members of the class are required 
to submit in writing a summary of their collateral reading on assigned 
topics. — Dsan Waiter. 



16 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



EDUCATION 



For the courses^ in Education see the descriptive text regarding the 
Teachers' Department. 

MATHEMATICS 

Dsan Waiter 

i. Solid Geometry begun and finished; Conic Sections as given in 
Book ix of Wentworth's Geometry. 

2. Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry, including functions of acute 
angles, the right triangle, goniometry, and the oblique triangle. 

3. Wentworth's Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. This work 
includes the application of spherical trigonometry to the problems of the 
celestial sphere in astronomy, and enough field work is given to illustrate 
the principles of compass surveying. 

4. 5. Plane Analytic Geometry. This course includes the study of 
the subject as given in Wentworth's Analytic Geometry, omitting the sup- 
plementary propositions. 

6, 7. Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus as given in Tay- 
lor's Elements of Calculus ; Osborne's Treatise used in supplementary 
work. 

8. Wentworth's College Algebra, beginning with the subject of choice 
and chance, and including variables and limits, series, determinants, graph- 
ical representation of functions, and general solutions of equations. Pre- 
requisite, Mathematics 2 and 3. 

9. Astronomy. The subject as presented in Young's General Astron- 
omy is made the basis of study and recitation. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor McClknahan and Assistants 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A beginner's course in modern 
chemical theory and practice. A clear comprehension of the fundamentals 
of the science is required of all who receive credit for the course. Suitable 
text and experiments are selected, but the requirements center about the 
demonstration lectures and their accompanying oral and written quizzes. 
Laboratory practice, four hours each week. Lecture periods, two hours 
each week. Oral and written quizzes alternate one hour each week. Open 
to all students in the College. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1, during 
the first half of the winter term. Second half of the winter term, an 



p^r ? jl| 




MARYVILLB COLLEGE 17 



introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis. Laboratory practice, six 
hours each week. Lecture, one hour each week. Quizzes as in Course 1. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. 

3. Qualitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 2. Gooch 
and Browning's manual. Prerequisite, Course 2. 

4. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A laboratory course of six hours 
each week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods ordinarily employed 
in quantitative chemical analysis. The instruction is personal, and there 
is continual reference to the well-stocked reference library and to current 
literature. Independence of thought is the aim, and the most scrupulous 
care to exactness of technique is required. One hour each week in. addition 
is devoted to the broader aspects of quantitative analysis, and one hour 
each week is allowed for quizzes and informal discussions. Prerequisites, 
Courses 1, 2, and 3. 

5. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 4. . 

6. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 5. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Lectures and quizzes, two hours each 
week. Laboratory practice, six hours each week. Cohen's Theoretical 
Organic Chemistry and the accompanying manual are the guides in the 
course, but free use of other literature in both the synthetical and theoret- 
ical study of the science is encouraged. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, and 3. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 7. 

9. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 8, with some 
definite applications to biological chemistry, both analytical and theoretical. 

(See Geology for acceptable substitutes for Chemistry courses in the 
Chemistry-Science group.) 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor McCeenahan 

1. General Geology. Dynamic and Structural. LeConte's Elements 
of Geology is the text. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. 

2. General Geology. Historical. A continuation of Course 1. Much 
use is made of the United States Geological Folios and Atlas. Also occa- 
sional field trips are made to the interesting localities in the county. 

3. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of eight hours each week, accom- 
panied by one hour lecture each week. Brush-Penfield's Determinative 
Mineralogy is the manual. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. 

(Geology 1, 2, and 3 may be substituted for Chemistry 7, 8, and 9 by 
students electing the Chemistry-Science group.) 
(2) 



iS 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



PHYSICS 

Mr. Middleton 



i. Sound and Light. Three recitation periods and four hours' labo- 
ratory practice each week. Goodspeed-Gage's Principles of Physics is used 
as the text-book in the course, with Watson, Glazebrook, Carhart, and 
others as library references. Prerequisites, Chemistry i, 2, and 3. 

2. Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of Course 1. 



BIOLOGY 

Miss Green 

1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Class-room work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisites, elementary physiology and Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, 
three hours; laboratory, four hours. 

2. General Vertebrate Zoology. Class-room work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, two hours ; laboratory, five 
hours. 

3. Botany. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Emphasis 
is laid upon the chief problems involved in the physiology, ecology, and 
morphology of the seed, the developing plant, and the flower. Text-book, 
Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Recitations, two hours; laboratory, five hours. 

4. Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey of the 
four great plant groups. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, 
three hours ; laboratory, four hours. Text-book, Bergen and Davis' Prin- 
ciples of Botany. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most evident life rela- 
tions of plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant physiology. 
Class-room work, accompanied by experimental work in the laboratory. 
The work is not confined to any one text-book, but references are given 
out to various standard text-books on plant physiology. Prerequisite, 
Course 3. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, five hours. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed study of 
the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts, smuts, mildews, 
and molds renders this a valuable course from an economic standpoint. 
Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, Course 4. Recitations, twc 
hours; laboratory, five hours. 

7. Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Mosses. 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 19 



liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thoroughly studied. 
The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the surrounding region makes 
this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Courses 4 and 6. Recitations, 
two hours; laboratory, five hours. 

8. Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 4, 6, and 7. Recitations, two hours; laboratory, five 
hours. 

9, 10. Advanced Physiology. Class-room work and laboratory experi- 
ments, bringing out the fundamental principles of the circulatory, res- 
piratory, digestive, and nervous systems. This course is especially valuable 
to students intending to take up the study of medicine. Prerequisites, 
elementary physiology, elementary physics, Biology 2, and Chemistry 1 
and 2. Recitations, three hours; laboratory, four hours. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 6, 7, 
or 8. By this alternation of courses, a student will be given an opportunity 
to pursue the subject further than would otherwise be possible. 



HISTORY 

Mrs. Alexander and Professor Gillingham 

1. Nineteenth Century History. The object of this course is the study 
of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed from the 
French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of republican ideas 
in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment of the German Empire, 
and the revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848. Special topics for 
individual study are taken up by each member and pursued throughout the 
course. — Mrs. Alexander. 

2. History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the influ- 
ence of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, the German Reformation. 
The work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed authors, but 
students are required to submit oral reports of special library work.— 
Mrs. Alexander. 

3. Church History. A general survey of the history of the Church 
from the first century to the present time, with especial emphasis upon the 
great leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text-book and library work.— 
Professor Gillingham. 

4. 5. American History. In this course, students are expected to cen- 
tralize their private work upon one line of development — constitutional, 
economic, social, ethical, or religious — and the result of the special work 
is to be handed in as a term theme. — Mrs. Alexander. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE' 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

President Wilson, Mrs. Alexander,' and Professor Lyon 

i. Outlining and Argumentation. Five W^&.s— Outlining or analysis 
of topics for discussion. This practical work is done in accordance with 
a system of principles and rules collated by the instructor in charge. The 
absolute necessity of method in all composition is emphasized by this 
course. At least fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by each 
student, and criticised and returned by the professor. Nine Weeks.- 
Argumentation. This course follows the course in outlining and involves 
the application of the principles presented in that course in the production 
of finished argumentative exercises, which are delivered in class, and criti- 
cised by the instructor. Attention is given to the delivery as well as to 
the thought and composition, since the aim of the course is to develop the 
power of effective public address. — President Wilson. 

2, 3. Genung's Practical Elements of Rhetoric, with illustrative ex- 
amples, is studied, and the students are familiarized with the principles of 
style and invention; while practical exercises accompany the study of the 
text-book. This is followed by work in Rhetorical Analysis, consisting 
of practical application of the principles referred to above. This worl 
is altogether practical, and consists of rhetorical criticism of selections oi 
English prose and of original work in sentence structure, paragraphs, anc 
longer compositions prepared by the students both in and for the recitatioi 
room.— Professor Lyon. 

4. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial liter- 
ature. The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the works oi 
the leading American poets and prose writers of the nineteenth centur} 
Library work and Page's Chief American Poets.— Mrs. Alexander. 

5, 6. A survey of the entire field of English Literature from its begii 
ning to the death of Victoria. As a guide, Long's History of Englisl 
Literature is employed, but much use is made of Saintsbury, Garnett, an( 
Gosse, and other advanced works in this subject. The development of the 
literature from period to period is carefully noted, and the works and char- 
acteristics of the more prominent authors are studied and criticised. The 
study runs through the winter and spring terms. — Professor Lyon. 

7. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course will be a study of rep- 
resentative nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial attention to the 
development of the essay and of prose fiction. The work will be based on 
typical essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Stevenson, and Arnold: 
and representative fiction by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot. 
Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling.— Mrs. Alexander. 

8. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting the 
development of his poetic art; with introductory lectures on the evolution 



MARYVILLE COLLBGE 



of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. — Mrs. Alex- 
ander. 

9. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tennyson, 
and Browning, with introductory lectures, class-room criticism, and papers 
on assigned subjects. — Mrs. Alexander. 

10. Theme Writing. This course aims to give instruction and prac- 
tice in the four kinds of composition : exposition, argumentation, descrip- 
tion, and narration. There are daily exercises and themes written and 
criticised in class. These are designed to illustrate the use of words and 
the structure of sentences and paragraphs, and to give general practice in 
writing on varied subjects. In addition, at least four themes, of from 
a thousand to fifteen hundred words each, must be handed in.— Mrs. 
Alexander. 

LATIN 

Professor B as sett 

1. Livy, and Latin Composition. Livy, four hours; Latin composition, 
one hour. Livy, Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The class 
makes a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. Syn- 
tax receives close attention. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by 
the professor in charge. Sight reading. 

2. De Senectute and De Amicitia, and Latin Composition. De Senec- 
tute and De Amicitia, four hours ; Latin composition, one hour. A careful 
study of De Senectute, followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the author's thought and style, and to securing 
an elegant translation. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by the 
professor in charge. Translation at sight and at hearing. 

3. Cicero and Pliny. Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny. 
The letters read will be such as illustrate the life and customs of the times 
and the characters of the writers. Sight reading. Prerequisite, Course 1 
or Course 2. 

4. Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together with Course 5 
presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace. By this time 
the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatical structure of the 
language to enable him to study the poems of Horace from a literary view- 
point. Special attention is paid to the metrical structure, and the class 
receives thorough drill in scansion. Prerequisites, at least two of the 
preceding courses. 

5. Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal. A continuation of the preceding course. The class makes a care- 



22 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ful study of the origin and development of Roman satire. Prerequisite, 
Course 4. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of the Junior year 
consists of a thorough and systematic review of the whole period of Roman 
literature — its beginnings, development, and decline — with special refer- 
ence to its connection with Roman history. The three courses should be 
taken in succession. The texts used will be Fowler's History of Roman 
Literature and Smith's Latin Selections. Readings from representative 
authors. Lectures by the professor in charge. Reports will be required 
on assigned portions of the various histories of Latin literature. Sellar's 
Roman Poets, Tyrrell's Latin Poetry, and other reference works. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 4 and 5. 

The work of the fall term (Course 6) is a study of the fragments of 
early Latin, the plays of Plautus and Terence, Lucretius' De Rerum Natura. 
Catullus, and the prose writers of the age of Cicero. 

7. Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. A 
continuation of Course 6, as explained above. Selections from Vergil's 
Eclogues and Georgics and Books vii to xii of the iEneid. Ovid and the 
Elegiac Poets, and the prose writers of the period. 

8. Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and Post- 
classical Latin. A continuation of Courses 6 and 7. Selections from Lucan, 
Seneca, Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius. 
Minucius Felix, and others. 

9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from the 
writings of Seneca. The class makes a critical study of the historical 
setting, structure, and purpose of the Agricola. The characteristics of 
Silver Latin as illustrated in the style of Tacitus and Seneca receive close 
attention. 

10. Teachers' Course. This course is intended to assist those who 
expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the prin- 
ciples of the language, the class considers the most effective methods of 
teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. Open to students who have had at least 
one reading course. This course is identical with Education Course 6. 

GREEK 

Miss Person 

1, 2, 3. This course is designed only for students sufficiently well pre- 
pared in other subjects to enable them to complete the entrance Greek in 
one year. The work of the fall term aims to secure a mastery of the prin- 
cipal inflections, a careful study of the principles of syntax, and facility in 
reading and writing easy sentences in Greek. In the winter term the read- 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 23 



ing of the Anabasis is begun, continuing through the spring term with a 
thorough review of Greek grammar and Greek composition. Selections 
from other authors are brought in for sight translation. 

4. Selections from Herodotus and Thucydides. A careful study of 
the dialect of Herodotus is made, and special reading is assigned on the 
rise and development of history as a type of Greek literature. In this 
term a study of the history of Greek literature is begun, based on Wright's 
and Jebb's texts, with assigned reading in Mueller and Mahaffy. 

5. Selections from Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are 
read, and the peculiarities of the late Attic style are studied. The study 
of the history of Greek literature is continued. 

6. Plato. The Phsedo is read for the immortal teachings of Socrates, 
with the Apology or the Crito for his life and death. Brief outline of 
pre-Socratic philosophy. In connection with this course a study is made 
of the philosophic dialog and of Plato's literary style. Sight translation 
from easy Attic prose is made a part of this course. 

7. Tragic Poetry. ./Eschylus' Seven against Thebes or Prometheus 
Bound, and Sophocles' CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone are read in alter- 
nate years, with one play from Euripides, either Alcestis or Iphigenia in 
Tauris. The origin and development of tragedy, the Greek theater, and 
other related topics are discussed in lectures and studied in assigned 
readings. 

8. Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. The 
development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and Greek life 
are studied. One hour a week is given to the study of Greek architecture, 
based upon a text-book, supplemented by lectures and the examination of 
drawings and stereographs. 

9. Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute the 
basis of a general study of the rise and development of political oratory 
and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written translations are 
required to develop accuracy and elegance in rendering the polished style 
of the classical orators. One hour a week is devoted to lectures and dis- 
cussions on Greek sculpture and painting, Tarbell's History of Greek Art 
being used as a text. 

10. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course cover- 
ing the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine books is 
read in the original and the intervening portions in a translation. Merry's 
two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a class-room text. Homeric 
geography, politics, religion, home life, and art are studied in connection 
with the reading of the text. 

11. A course in New Testament Greek is conducted in the Bible 
Training Department (see Bible Course 14). This course is accepted as 
an equivalent for any of the courses listed above. 



24 MARY VILLI- COLLEGE 






GERMAN 

Professor Schniree 

i, 2, 3. This course is intended for students well prepared in other 
subjects to enable them to complete the entrance German in one year, 
so that they can enter earlier the study of advanced German literature. 
Grammar, Jpynes and Meissner. Composition. Reading such texts as 
Marchen und Erzahlungen, Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, Freytag's 
Die Journalisten, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, or Lessing's Minna von Barn- 
helm. Memorizing some of the best poems. 

4, 5, 6. Rapid reading of modern literature, and a critical study of 
one of the great works of Schiller or Goethe. Such works as Zwischen 
den Schlachten by Elster, Sudermann's Die Heimat, Frau Sorge, Goethe's 
Faust and Dichtung und Wahrheit Fulda's Der Talisman, Schiller's Wal- 
lenstein's Tod. 

7, 8, 9. Advanced German composition and conversation. Open only 
to students that have completed Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4, or their equiva- 
lent. This course is conducted in German and consists in the translation 
of representative English prose in the German idiom. Careful training in 
German phonetics. 

10. Teachers' Course. A general review of German grammar, his- 
torical and comparative syntax, synonyms, and characteristics of German 
style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. Open to students 
that have had at least one reading course. This course is identical with 
Education Course 6. 

FRENCH 

Professor Schniree 

1, 2, 3. This course is designed for those who enter college without 
French and are sufficiently well prepared in other subjects to enable them 
to complete the grammar and easy prose in the fall term. The course 
consists of the reading of the most representative authors, some of which 
reading is done independently of the class room. The classical drama as 
represented by Racine, Corneille, Moliere ; also French prose of the seven- 
teenth century by Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, and Bossuet. 

SPANISH 

President Wieson 

1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning with 
the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of English 
into Spanish and of Spanish into English, as the sentences are read to the 
student. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 25 



2. Galdos' Marianela; El Si de las Ninas; conversation and compo- 
sition. 

HEBREW 

Professor Giujngham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading of easy 
portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's Inductive Hebrew 
Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion of both 
courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced standing 
in Hebrew in the theological seminary. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gieungham 

1. Life of Christ. This and all following courses are described 
under The Bible Training Department. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. 

3. Princes of Palestine. 

4. People of Palestine. 

5. Teachings of Jesus. 

6. Apostolic Christianity. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. 

8. Poets of Palestine. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. 

Five courses in Bible and allied subjects are required for graduation. 
Three of these must be in English Bible, and may be taken during the 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years in any term. The required work 
for Seniors consists of the allied subjects, The Grounds of Theistic and 
Christian Belief (Philosophy 3), and Ethics (Philosophy 4). 



26 MARYV1LLH COLLEGE 



THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A large percentage of the graduates and undergraduates of Maryville 
College become teachers. They are found in all sections of the United 
States, especially in the Southern Appalachian region, and in the South- 
west and West, and are employed in elementary schools, high schools, and 
colleges. 

The instructors in the various departments of the College endeavor 
to conduct their work in such a way as to help train teachers both by the 
thoroughness of the instruction given in the various branches, and by the 
object lesson of the methods employed in the class rooms. Competent 
teachers selected from many colleges and universities bring the best 
methods of those schools to their work at Maryville. The teachers trained 
at Maryville rank high in sound scholarship and practical pedagogy. 

Besides providing model methods in college management and class- 
room work, the College maintains a special department for the vocational 
training of teachers. 

In the Teachers' Department a six years' course of study designed to 
equip prospective teachers thoroughly for their profession is offered. 

PREPARATORY 

The first four years correspond closely to the regular courses of the 
Preparatory Department, and these four years contain sixteen units of 
academic work. Those completing these four years are admitted to the 
Freshman Class of the College. 

Synopsis of Courses — The following is a synopsis of the courses in 
the four preparatory years: 

First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year 

English I English II English III Physics I 

Physiology I Mathematics II Mathematics III Mathematics IV 

Latin I Latin II Lat. Ill or Ger. I Lat. IV or Ger. II 

History I History II Physiography and Pedagogy I 

Agriculture I, or 

♦Mathematics I *Bookkeeping I U. S. History and ^History IV 

Government III 



*May be taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of the Prepar- 
atory Department. 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 



Pedagogy I — School Management. This part of the course is de- 
signed to inculcate practical views of class management that will enable 
the teacher to handle classes successfully in the common schools. Among 
the subjects discussed are the teacher's part in school government, the 
pupil's part in school government, incentives, punishments, school evils 
and how to deal with them, length of recitation, examinations, promotions, 
and the like. Seeley's School Management is used as a text-book, supple- 
mented by extensive reference to other authors. 

Methods of Teaching. The work of the winter term is devoted to the 
study of the various methods of teaching. The difference between the 
Object Method, the Direct Method, and the Development Method is shown 
by numerous illustrations ; the advantages and disadvantages of each are 
pointed out ; and the method of combining them practically in teaching the 
fundamental subjects in our schools is carefully developed. 

Methods of Teaching. In the spring term the above work is applied 
to the routine of the school room ; actual practice in teaching reading, lan- 
guage, arithmetic, geography, and other studies is given ; and the work of 
the year is reviewed and unified. White's Art of Teaching and McMurry's 
Method of the Recitation are used in both winter and spring terms. — 
Professor Lyon. 

These courses are open also to such students in the college classes as 
may desire special work in these lines. Teachers who enter College after 
the holidays may join the class. 

Special Courses — To accommodate teachers who enter College after 
the holidays, special courses in history, civics, higher arithmetic, and gram- 
mar are offered. For example, Normal English Grammar is a course 
based on an extensive study of technical English grammar. The subject 
is presented from the teacher's standpoint, methods of teaching are dis- 
cussed, and each member of the class is required, at times, to take his 
turn in conducting the recitation. Later in the year methods of teaching 
composition are discussed. 

Special Double Courses — Teachers and others who enter College 
after the holidays may take up any full-year course offered in the cur- 
riculum of the preparatory years for which they are prepared. College 
courses may also be taken by those who have had sufficient preparation. 
In addition to these regular courses, and the special courses referred to 
above, special double courses in Beginning Latin and Beginning Algebra 
are provided, by which a full year's credit in these studies may be secured 
during the winter and spring terms. The classes recite ten hours each 
a week, and prepare respectively for Ca?sar and Advanced Algebra. For 
the successful completion of the double course in either Latin or Algebra 
one unit credit will be given; for any of the other preparatory courses, 
proportional credit will be allowed. 



28 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Reading Circle — Lectures are given oil the books adopted by the Ten- 
nessee Teachers' Reading Circle. All teachers have the privilege of attend- 
ing these lectures. Prospective teachers are accorded the same privileges 
as are teachers. 

Other Courses- — Detailed descriptions of the courses outlined in the 
four preparatory years of the Teachers' Department will be found under 
Departments of Instruction in the Preparatory Department, pages 32 to. 37. 

COLLEGE 



The work of the two college years of the Teachers' Department cor- 
responds somewhat to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years of the 
College. Six of the seven courses of the college Department of Education 
are completed during these two years, thus giving the student that com- 
pletes the work of the Teachers' Department a very thorough vocational 
training. The courses in pedagogy, psychology, and the history of educa- 
tion are conducted in accordance with the best normal methods now in 
vogue. Those completing the work of this department may, after two 
years' additional work, graduate from the College in the Education Group 
of studies and receive the Bachelor's degree. 

Synopsis of Courses. — The following is a synopsis of the courses in 
the two college years : 



Fifth Year 

Education. . 
Mathematics 
Chemistry. . 
Or Latin or 
German. . . 
Bible 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring I 


1 
1 
1 


2 
2 
9 


3 
3 


1 
1 


2 
2 


3 
3 



Sixth Year 

Education . 
English .... 

Biology 

Or Latin or 

German. . . 

Bible 



Fall 

3 

1 
1 



Winter 

4 
2 



Spring 

5,6 
3 



(5 



Education 1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for 

students taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supple- 
mented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psy- 
chology is used as a text-book. This course is identical with Psychology 
Course 1. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psycholog- 
ical problems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, 
correlations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, apper- 
ception, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education supplemented by lectures. This 
course is identical with Psychology Course 2. 

3. History of Education. A study of the educational systems of early 
China, Greece, and Rome ; the history of Christian education ; the rise 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 29 



of the universities; the Renaissance; and the educators of the sixteenth, 
seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. A careful study is made 
of such modern educators as Rousseau, Basedow, Pestalozzi, Froehel, Iler- 
bart. and Horace Mann. The last part of the course is devoted to the 
comparison of the school systems of Germany, France, England, and the 
I nited States. 

4. Genetic Psychology — Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view. 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Psychology Course 3. 

5. Teachers' Course in Latin. This course is intended to assist those 
who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the 
principles of the language, the class considers the most effective methods 
of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. This course is identical with Latin Course 
10, and is open to students that have had at least one reading course. 

6. Teachers' Course in German. A general review of German gram- 
mar, historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, characteristics of Ger- 
man style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. This course is 
identical with German Course 10, and is open to students that have had 
at least one reading course. 

7. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades : a study of the 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
course is identical with Psychology Course 5, and is open to Seniors and 
to those who have completed Education Courses 1, 2, and 3. 

Other Courses. — Detailed descriptions of the other courses offered in 
the synopsis of the college years of the Teachers' Department will be found 
under Departments of Instruction in the College Department, pages 13 
to 2s. 



30 MARYVILLH COLLEGE 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of, the Preparatory Department is to furnish thorough 
courses of training in high-school branches leading to entrance to the 
Freshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted to make up their 
conditions in this department Students in the Teachers' Department take 
their first four years' work in preparatory courses, and Bible Training stu- 
dents have the privilege of electing studies in this department. Oppor- 
tunities are provided also for a large and worthy class of young people, 
with limited means and time at their command, to obtain some preparation 
for their future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
are available to students in the Preparatory Department. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates from 
principals of secondary schools will, however, be accepted and credit given 
for equivalent work in any of the subjects required for graduation. Credit 
thus given is conditional, and will be canceled in any subject in which the 
student is found to be deficient. Full credit for physiology or physics will 
not be given unless a reasonable amount of laboratory work has been done 
in connection with the text-book work. Diplomas must be accompanied by 
certified statements of the amount of time devoted to each subject studied, 
and the passing grade, together with the name of the text-book used and 
the ground covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for 
examinations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 
if indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
as testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases students 
coming from other secondary schools, whether asking for credits or not, 
must present letters of honorable dismissal from their former principals. 
Students that have been out of school for a number of years are admitted 
under the general rule that all candidates for admission must furnish satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character, and must have completed the 
common-school branches. Students that have not had the advantage of 
sufficient preparation and that fail to pass the entrance examinations are. 
if not too deficient, prepared for entrance in a room provided for that pur- 
pose. Applicants under fifteen years of age, unless residents of Maryville. 
will not be admitted. 



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32 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers three courses of study: the Classical, the Latin- 
Scientific, and the General. The Classical and Latin-Scientific Courses pre- 
pare for college entrance. The General Course is offered for the benefit 
of those who are not preparing- to enter college. In case a student after 
completing the General Course decides to enter college, opportunity will be 
given him to make up the four foreign language units while pursuing col- 
lege work in other subjects. All regular courses of study begin in the fall 
term and continue throughout the year. These courses may be entered at 
the opening of the winter or spring term, provided the student has had the 
work of the preceding term or its equivalent. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in any course are sixteen units of 
work as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the equivalent of 
five forty-five-minute recitation periods a week in one subject throughout 
the academic year. A student may elect any one of the three courses, but 
must pursue the studies prescribed in the course elected for at least one 
year, unless change is made in accordance with the administrative rule on 
page 58 regarding changes of course. The prescribed work is four reci- 
tation periods a day. Partial work may be permitted at the discretion of 
the Principal. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on the unit 
basis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be so indicated on 
the records, and unit credit for that subject withheld until the student 
shall have completed the year's work. A minimum of three units, seventy- 
five per cent, of the year's work, will be required for advancement in 
classification to the following year. The passing grade in the Preparatory 
Department is seventy. 

ENGLISH 

Miss Alexander and Miss McCampbeel 
First Year : I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by the best 
modern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. Oral drill 
is given in the retelling of familiar stories from standard American and 
English authors. Written themes are required weekly, in which drill is 
given on capitalization and punctuation, and, in an elementary way, on 
unity and coherence in the paragraph and the sentence. 

Second Year : II. Composition and Rhetoric, as presented in Brooks 
and Hubbard's text, is made the basis of this year's work, and written 
themes are required four times a week. A further study is made of unity 
and coherence in the composition and in paragraphs ; and practice is given 
in variety of sentence structure. Seven weeks in the fall term are devoted 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 33 



to > the English Bible. During the year the work is supplemented by the 
study of selections from the prescribed requirements for college entrance. 

Third Year: III. English Literature. A study is made of the texts 
prescribed by the College Entrance Examination Board. During the I year 
themes are required based on topics that arise from the study of literature. 
Special care is taken that these themes shall be an expression of the per- 
sonal opinion of the student. Seven weeks of the winter term are given 
to the study of the English Bible. 

The prescribed texts for 1912-13 are as follows : 

For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus, I/Allegro, and 
II Penseroso; Washington's Farewell Address ; Webster's First Bunker 
Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson. ; 

For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice' and As Y$u Like 
It; Bacon's Essays; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal; Longfellow's 
The Courtship of Miles Standish; Hawthorne's House of Seven Gables; 
George Eliot's Silas Marner; Irving's Sketch Book; Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner; Scott's Lady of the Lake; Selections from the Old Testament. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Walker, Mr. Middeeton, and Miss Jeweee 
. First Year: I. Higher Arithmetic. A thorough course in arith- 
metic is offered. The subjects considered are percentage and its various 
applications, exchange, equation of payments, progressions, involution and 
evolution, mensuration, ratio and proportion, and the metric system. 

Second Year : II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New 
Standard Algebra, to radicals. 

Third Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, 
ratio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial and expOr 
nential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and equations in general. 

Fourth Year: IV. Plane Geometry. Five books of plane geometry, 
together with about three hundred original theorems and problems. Went- 
worth's Revised Geometry is the text-book used. 

LATIN 

Professor Bassett, Miss Snodgrass, and Miss McCampbeel 

First Year: I. First Latin. Pearson's Essentials, supplemented by 
outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is completed in the spring 
term, and is followed by the reading of Viri Rorme or some book of like 
grade. 

Second Year : II. Caesar and Latin Composition. Csesar, four hours, 
each week; Latin composition, one hour. During this vear outlines are 
(3) 



34 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. The first four books of 
the Gallic War are completed in this year. The texts used are Allen and 
Greenough's Caesar and Allen and Phillips' Latin Composition. 

Third Yeah: III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In the 
fall and winter terms: Cicero, four hours each week; Latin composition, 
one hour. These two courses include the four orations against Catiline, 
the Manilian Law, and the Archias. In the spring term: Sallust, four 
hours each week ; Latin composition, one hour. Sallust's Catiline. A care- 
ful comparison is made with Cicero's Catilinarian orations. During this 
year special attention is paid to drill in pronouncing the Latin, intelligent 
reading in the original, and translation at sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year: IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is spent in 
the study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The principles of quan- 
tity and versification are carefully studied. Thorough drill in oral and 
written scansion. Sight reading. This course covers the first six books 
of Vergil's /Eneid. The last three weeks of the spring term are devoted 
to prose composition. — Professor Bassett. 

GREEK 

Miss Person 

Third Year: I. Beginning Greek. Pronunciation as given in White's 
First Book and in Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Daily drill on forms. 
Review. outlines on various topics are presented by the instructor or pre- 
pared by the student and preserved in his note book for permanent refer- 
ence. Bi-weekly reviews and frequent written tests throughout the year. 
In the spring term the Anabasis is begun, in connection with the review 
of inflection and daily exercises in composition. 

Fourth Year : II. The fall and winter terms are devoted to the 
reading of the Anabasis, Books ii-iv. Goodwin and White's Anabasis is 
the text-book used. The geography of Ancient Greece and Asia Minor 
is studied. Semi-weekly drill in prose composition, based upon the lessons 
in the text. In the spring term the Iliad, Books i-iii, is read, omitting the 
Catalog of the Ships. Mythology and geography are studied as required 
for the full understanding of the text. Review translation and sight read- 
ing are practiced daily, with drill in the. identification of Ep?c forms and 
the turning of selected passages into Attic prose. Special attention is paid 
to scansion and the laws of versification. 

GERMAN 

Miss De Vries 
Third Year : I. Grammar, Joynes-Wesselhoeft. This course consists 
of the principles of German pronunciation, inflection, rules of syntax, the 
rewriting of easy English sentences in German, and the memorizing of 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 35 

familiar poems. The work of the winter and spring terms is augmented 
by reading Grimm's Marchen und Erzahlungen, and Hewitt's German 
Reader. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Joynes-Wesselhoeft. This course in- 
cludes advanced grammar and syntax, use of moods, derivation of words, 
force of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted to conversation and 
composition work of an intermediate character. The reading consists of 
such works of descriptive and narrative prose as will impart facility in trans- 
lation. Storm's Immensee, Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn, Zschokke's 
Der Zerbrochene Krug, Benedix' Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's Germels- 
hausen, Heine's Die Harzreise. Memorizing of longer poems. 

FRENCH 

Miss De Vries 

Third Year : I. This course consists of a thorough foundation in the 
elements of French grammar and the conjugation of irregular verbs. Com- 
position, and reading of such authors as Guerber's Contes et Legendes, 
Dumas' La Tulipe Noire, Merimee's Colomba. 

Fourth Year : II. This course consists of advanced grammar, com- 
position, and conversation. Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Corneille's Le Cid, 
Moliere's L'Avare, Greville's Dosia, Moliere's Les Femmes Savantes, Erck- 
mann-Chatrian's Madame Therese. 

HISTORY 

Professor Lyon and Mr. Brittain 

First Year: I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian and 
Oriental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alexander, fol- 
lowed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 476 A. D. This 
work is carried through the whole year and is required in all the courses. 

Second Year : II. Medieval and Modern History. A general survey 
of European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 A. D., to 
the present time. This work will be centered on the history of France. 
Carried through the year. Required in all courses. 

Third Year : III. Advanced United States History and Government. 
A survey of the history of our country from its beginning to the close 
of the nineteenth century. This course is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of the settlement of the country by European colo- 
nists in the seventeenth century, the struggle with France for supremacy 
m America, the cause, course, and consequence of the American Revo- 
lution, the development of the Union under the Constitution, the slavery 
struggle, and the final advance of the country to the position it occupies 






3 b MAR YVILLE COLLEGE 



to-day. Combined with the above a term's work is given in Civics, based 
on Garner's text. 

Fourth Year : IV. English History. A brief outline of the history 
of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the periods of 
the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course is intended 
to give the student a good general knowledge of the history of our mother 
country and to prepare for subsequent courses in English literature and 
higher United States history. Carried through the year. Required in the 
General Course and elective in the other courses. 

BOOKKEEPING 

Principal Proffttt 
Thorough courses in bookkeeping are now conducted throughout the 
year according to the practical methods employed in business colleges. 
Students may enter any part of the course in any term. No extra charge 
is made for this work. The Twentieth Century Bookkeeping is the system 
used. 

PHYSICS 

Mr. Middleton and Assistant 

Fourth Year: I. Elementary Physics, (a) Properties of Matter; 

Mechanics; Sound, (b) Light and Heat, (c) Electricity and Magnetism. 

Three recitation periods and four laboratory periods a week. Text-book, 

Carhart and Chute's High-School Physics. Laboratory exercises selected. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY AND AGRICULTURE 

Miss GrEEn and Principal ProefttT 
Third Year : I. Physiography. This course is a high-school course 
in physical geography/and treats of the general conditions of the lithos- 
phere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. This course includes a study of 
dynamic, structural, and historical geology, and embraces the main features 
of the geology of Tennessee. The class-room work is supplemented by 
field trips and by the study of topographic maps and stereographic views. 
In the spring term a practical course in general agriculture is given. This 
course includes a study of such important subjects as plants and their 
improvement, soil in its relation to plant growth, injurious insects, seed 
testing, and the improvement of home and school yards. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Miss Green and Assistants 
First Year: I. Human Physiology, as presented in Ritchie's text. 
Particular attention is given to the circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and 



MARYVILLH COLLHGli 37 



digestive systems. This course presupposes grade physiology. Two labo- 
ratory periods a week. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Mr. Haee and Miss Alexander 

First Year: A brief outline study of the entire Bible. The number, 
names, order, and divisions of the books are studied, together with the 
principal features of each book. Seven weeks in the spring term, required 
in all courses. 

Second Year: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark, Required 
in all courses, in the fall term. 

Third Year: The Life of Christ. A text-book adapted to secondary 
students is used, and the subject is taught so as to prepare for the more 
advanced course offered in the College Department. Seven weeks in the 
winter term, required in all courses. 

Fourth Year: Studies in the First Book of Samuel. Thirty-five 
lessons given during the fall term. Required in all courses. 

The Principal will each year arrange the student's hours so that these 
courses will not conflict with other required courses nor add to the 
required number of hours a week. 

Note. — -Students are also required to pursue a weekly Bible study in 
the Bible classes of the Christian Associations of the College or the Sab- 
bath-schools of the town. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department was established in 1907 through the 
generosity of Mr. John Calvin Martin, of New York City, whose gift of 
$20,000, together with a like amount set aside by the Board of Directors, 
made the department possible. This department provides biblical instruc- 
tion for all the students enrolled in all other courses of the institution, and 
offers exceptional advantages for young men and young women wishing 
to prepare themselves for Christian service as lay workers, Sabbath-school 
workers, pastors' assistants, mission teachers, or Bible readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of graduation 
will be granted those completing twenty-seven courses selected under the 
direction of the head of the department from the following groups : 

I. Bible Training courses, all of which are required except those in 
Bible languages : English Bible, eleven courses ; Bible Languages, three 
courses; Missions, two courses; and Practical Work, two courses. These 
courses are described in the ensuing paragraphs. Courses will be alter- 

• nated, a sufficient number being given each year to meet requirements. 

II. College courses from which supplementary work may be elected : 
English 1, 2, 3, and 10; Philosophy 1, 2, 3, and 4; Psychology 1, 2, 3, 4, 
and 5; Education 3; History 3; and Spanish 1 and 2. These courses are 
described under The College Department. 

III. Preparatory courses from which supplementary work may be 
elected : Physiology I ; Pedagogy I ; and Bookkeeping I. These courses 
are described under The Preparatory Department. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gieungham, Mr. Hale, Mrs. Alexander, Miss Alexander, 

and Assistants 

1. Life of Christ. The study of the life of Christ is based on a har- 
mony of the Gospels. As an introduction to the course a rapid view of 
the period between the Testaments is taken, and the principal character- 
istics of each of the four Gospels are studied. Text-books : Stevens and 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 39 



Burton's Harmony of the Gospels and Burton and Mathews' The Life of 
Christ. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. A careful study of Genesis, the geography 
of Palestine and surrounding countries, and the general mechanics of the 
Bible. The object of the course is, in addition to the mastery of the 
subject matter, to develop systematic habits and methods of Bible study. 
Text-books: the Bible (R. V.), Davis' A Dictionary of the Bible, and the 
professor's outlines. Reference reading is assigned. 

3. Princes of Palestine. A continuation of Course 2. The work is 
more rapid, covering Exodus to Ruth. Special attention is paid to the 
lives and characters of Israel's leaders during this period. Text-books, 
same as in Course 2. 

4. People of Palestine. A continuation of Course 3, beginning with 
I Samuel. The national development, the conflicts of Judah and Israel, 
their governments, their subjugation and partial restoration, their social 
customs, the character of their leaders, and their influence upon their con- 
temporaries, are studied. An outline course, preparing for detailed treat- 
ment of the most important parts in Course 10. Text-books, same as in 
Course 2. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. An analytic and synthetic study based 
on the words of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels. Use is also made of 
his works and of the evangelists' commentaries in helping to determine 
the nature of Jesus' teaching. Dr. James Robertson's Our Lord's Teaching 
is used also as a text-book. 

6. The Apostolic Church. A historical study of the early church 
based on the Acts and Epistles. Text-books: the New Testament (R. V.) 
and Gilbert's A Short History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. This course treats very briefly 
General and Particular Introduction, and brings the entire Bible before the 
student in rapid review. Text-books : Robertson's The Old Testament 
and Its Contents and McClymonfs The New Testament and Its Writers. 

8. Poets of Palestine. An outline study of Job, Proverbs, Eccle- 
siastes, Song of Solomon, and selected Psalms. Introductory lectures on 
Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature. Portions of the books are studied 
in detail and their relation to other sacred literature and their importance 
in Christian experience are emphasized. No commentaries are used as 
text-books, but required readings are assigned ; and the professor furnishes 
a syllabus of each book. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. The methods outlined in Course 8 are fol- 
lowed. The prophecies are reviewed chronologically in the light of con- 
temporaneous history. Messianic prophecy is given special attention. 



40 MARYVILLB COLLBGE 



»■! 10. Men and: Messages, of the Qld Testament: A search study, for 
advanced students. The great leaders of Israel and their messages:. are 
carefully studied. Three or more characters are studied a term, the entire 
Old Testament being covered during a succession of years. Commentaries 
suitable to the nature of the work are used. 

ii, Men and Messages of the New Testament. A search study for 
advanced students. This alternates with Course] 10 and pursues the saree 
method of study. , - . ; .. 

Courses for Preparatory students. For First Year students: An out- 
line study of the Bible. Thirty-five lessons on the general contents of 
Holy Scripture, emphasizing only the principal characteristics of each book. 
For Second Year students: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. 
For Third Year students: The Life of Christ; thirty-five lessons. For 
fourth Year students : Studies in the First Book of Samuel; thirty-five 
lessons 1 . 

[/r.y-u-ru BIBLE LANGUAGES ; , 

12. Hebrew. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and 
reading of easy portions of the Old Testament. Text-books : Harper's 
Inductive Hebrew Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew — Pro- 
fessor Gileingham. 



13. Hebrew. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion 
of both courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced 
standing in Hebrew in the theological seminary. — Professor Gitjjngiiam. 

14. Greek. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, Westcott 
and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's and Rob- 
ertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the assigned text, 
a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek, the 
literature of this period, and the most important New Testament manu- 
scripts and versions.— Miss Person. 

MISSIONS 

15. Mission Methods. A four months' course, in which two weeks 
or more are given to each of the following subjects: (1) The Southern 
Mountaineers, President Wieson. (2) The Foreign Missionary, Presi- 
dent Wieson. (3) City Missions, Professor Lyon. (4) The Home Mis- 
sion Teacher, Miss CaedwEEL. (5) The Foreign Mission Teacher, Miss 
Henry. (6) The Sabbath-school Missionary, Mr. Hall. 

16. History of Missions. A brief survey of the history of Christian 
missions, with special attention to the principles and methods of those of 
modern times.— Professor Gieeingham. 



M4RYVLLLE CQLLUGli 4' 



PRACTICAL WORK 

Professor Gilungham 

17. Bible Teaching: Principles and Practice. This course has refer- 
ence especially to personal work and the conducting of Bible classes. The 
history, organization, and management of the Sunday school are studied. 
Lectures, quizzes/and practice under the direction of the instructor. 

18. Religious Address : Principles and Practice. Preparation for re- 
ligious services, missionary programs, and the like; selection and develop- 
ment of themes; sources and use of illustrations ; addresses on special 
occasions and to special audiences ; and drill in the reading of hymns and 
passages of Scripture. As much practical work is done by the student as 
possible. - 



42 MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Miss McDougaw, and Miss Monfortt, and Mr. Haix 

In this department opportunity is given pupils for instruction in piano, 
voice, theory, harmony, and history of music. Private lessons are half an 
hour in length, and class lessons one hour. Diplomas are granted to such - 
students of piano and voice as pass the requirements. 

Piano. — In the piano work the teacher's aim is to cultivate in the stu- 
dent a clear, concise production of tone and an intelligent interpretation of 
melody. The elementary studies used are those of Kohler, Matthew, Ber- 
tini, Czerny, Kuhlau, Low, Diabelli, and Clementi. More advanced works 
include those of Cramer, Haydn, Mozart, Schumann, Handel, Beethoven, 
Bach, and Chopin. Pupils are trained not only in solo work, but also in 
ensemble playing. 

To receive diplomas pupils in piano are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. They are required also to 
have a repertoire of six compositions from classic composers of Grade VI, 
and to be examined in the playing of some of these compositions. They 
are also required to be able to read at sight a piano selection of Grade III. 
One of the six numbers is to be worked up by the pupil without help. 

Voice. — In this department great care is given to voice building. Exer- 
cises are given to produce tones that are round, full, and clear. Founda- 
tion studies are those of Sieber ; the Franz Abt Singing Tutor, and Behnke 
and Pearce are used ; also vocalises of Sieber, Concone, Marchesi, and 
Bordogni. Ballads and songs of opera and oratorio are taught. Special 
attention is paid to sight singing. Great stress is laid on correct breathing. 

To receive diplomas in voice, pupils are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. A repertoire of ten songs 
from Grade VI is required, one from an oratorio or one from an opera, 
and one sacred. One of these ten songs is to be learned by the pupil with- 
out help. Sight reading of a song of Grade III is also required. 

Monthly recitals are given, through the medium of which the student 
gains self-control and ease of manner when appearing before the public. 

In addition to the private instruction given as described in the above 
courses, the College offers free instruction in the following branches, which 
are under the direction of Mr. Hall: 

Chorus and Choir. — Excellent instruction is given free to any stu- 
dents desiring to take the work of chorus and choir singing and sight 
reading. 



MARY VI LIE COLLEGE 43 



Band. — Instruments are furnished by the College, and the band is 
composed entirely of students in this institution. 

GLEE Club. — This is accessible to any young men that have a fair 
knowledge of the rudiments of vocal music. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Campbell 

This department furnishes those desiring it with instruction in free- 
hand drawing and in painting in oil and water color. The lessons in draw- 
ing are given without extra cost to the student, and are designed to lay a 
solid foundation for work on industrial and artistic lines. The art room 
has a supply of casts ; and, in addition, the student is encouraged to draw 
from the objects of nature around him. 

Painting is taught by such practical methods as produce beautiful 
results, which far exceed in value their trifling cost. The instructor in this 
department has enjoyed exceptional advantages in the pursuit of art study 
during three years in England, France, and Italy; and has executed many 
commissions in copying important works in some of the finest European 
galleries ; and has had a teaching experience of more than thirty years. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

Mrs. West and Miss Keller 

The aim of this department is to cultivate the voice, to free the student 
from constrained, limited, and erroneous action, and to lead him to a 
knowledge and understanding of the interpretation of literature. Oppor- 
tunity is given for class and private instruction. Class work consists of 
interpretative analysis, delsarte, and technical work. Special time and 
attention is given persons troubled with stuttering, stammering, or any 
form of defective speech. 

The text-book used is King's Practice of Speech. 

Monthly recitals will be given, affording opportunities to students to 
read publicly. 

Diplomas are granted to such students as pass all the requirements 
of the course. Students must be graduates of a preparatory school of a 
standard equivalent to that of the Preparatory Department of this insti- 
tution before they will be granted a diploma in expression. 



44 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



Maryville College was founded in 1819. It was born of the moral and 
spiritual needs of the earliest settlers of East Tennessee — chiefly Scotch- 
Irish Presbyterians — and was designed to educate for the ministry men 
who should be native to the soil. The grand motive of the founder may 
be stated in his own words: "Let the Directors and Managers of This 
Sacred Institution propose the geory oe God and the advancement of 
that kingdom purchased by the beood of hls oney begotten son as 
their sole object." Inspired by such a motive, Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., 
gathered a class of five in the fall of 1819, and in prayer and faith began 
the work of his life. In forty-two years the institution put one hundred 
and fifty men into the ministry. Its endowment, gathered by littles through 
all these years, was only sixteen thousand dollars. 

Then came the Civil War, and suspended the Work of the institution 
for five years, and the College came out of the general wreck with little 
save its good name and precious history. 

After the war the Synod of Tennessee, moved by the spirit of self- 
preservation, and by a desire to promote Christian education in the Central 
South, resolved to revive Maryville College. The institution was reopened 
in 1866. New grounds and new buildings were an imperative necessity. 
To meet this need, sixty-five thousand dollars was secured, and the Col- 
lege was saved from extinction. In 1881 a few generous friends —William 
Thaw, William E. Dodge, Preserved Smith, Dr. Sylvester Willard, and 
others — contributed an endowment fund of one hundred thousand dollars. 
In 1891, Daniel Fayerweather bequeathed to the College the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars, and also made it one of twenty equal partici- 
pants in the residuary estate. The College received almost two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars by the provisions of the will. This magnificent 
donation enabled the institution to enlarge its work and to enter upon a 
new era of usefulness and influence. On January 1, 1905, Mr. Ralph Voor- 
hees, of New Jersey, made the munificent donation of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars to the general endowment fund of the College. The gift is 
subject to a five per cent, annuity during the lifetime of Mrs. Voorhees. 
The reception of this superb benefaction filled the hearts of Maryville's 
friends with confidence, and with intense gratitude to God and to God's 
stewards. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE, 43 



In 1906, the rapid growth in the number of students having made nec- 
essary much further enlargement of the teaching force and of the material 
equipment of the institution, President Wilson entered upon a campaign 
for additional endowment. Mr. Andrew Carnegie generously offered the 
College twenty-five thousand dollars on condition that fifty thousand dol- 
lars additional be secured. In 1907, the General Education Board pledged 
fifty thousand dollars on condition that one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars be secured from other sources. Mr. Carnegie then increased his pledge 
to fifty thousand dollars toward this larger fund. The time limit set for 
the completion of the fund was December 31, 1908. In the face of many 
difficulties the President, with reliance upon the favor of God, prose- 
cuted the campaign for the "Forward Fund of two hundred thousand 
dollars." In order to meet the spirit as well as the letter of the require- 
ments of the conditional pledges, it was deemed necessary to raise twenty- 
five thousand dollars more th'an the designated sum. When the canvass 
closed, the subscriptions amounted to the splendid sum of two hundred and 
twenty-six thousand nine hundred and two dollars. The fact that, in spite 
of the recent panic and hard times, the uneasiness of a presidential year, 
and the ill health of the canvasser, the " Forward Fund " was secured, 
filled the Faculty, Directors, and friends of the College with a deep sense 
of gratitude to God, and to his human agents who took part with Maryville 
in its ministry to the noble youth of mountain and valley in its Southern 
Appalachian field. 

As the result of the generous contributions made through many years 
by many philanthropic donors, the College now owns property and endow- 
ment to the total amount of more than three-quarters of a million dollars. 
Of this amount, four hundred and fifty thousand dollars is invested in 
endowment and three hundred thousand dollars in buildings and equipment. 

One hundred and twenty-eight of the post-bellum alumni have entered 
the ministry, while forty-one alumni and undergraduates have been or are 
missionaries in Japan, China, Siam, Korea, India, Persia, Syria. Africa, the 
Philippines, Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and Porto Rico. Several are 
laboring in missions on the Western frontier. All the alumni are engaged 
in honorable pursuits. Students who have gone from the College to the 
theological, medical, and legal schools have usually attained a high rank 
in their classes. A goodly number of the alumni are now studying in 
theological seminaries. 

The necessary expenses are so phenomenally low as to give the insti- 
tution a special adaptation to the middle class and to the struggling poor 
of valley ahd mountain — the great mass of the surrounding population. 

The privileges of the institution are, of course, open alike to all denom- 
inations of Christians. All the leading denominations are largely repre- 
sented in the student body. 



46 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



LOCATION 



Maryville is a pleasant and thriving town of about three thousand 
inhabitants. It is widely known as "the town of schools and churches." 
It is sixteen miles south of Knoxville. There are three trains a day each 
way on the Knoxville and Augusta Railroad, two trains each way on the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and one train each way tri-weekly on 
the Tennessee and Carolina Southern Railroad. 

Maryville is an ideal health resort for students from other States. The 
town lies on the hills, one thousand feet above sea level, and enjoys the 
life-giving breezes from the Chilhowees and the Smokies, a few miles away. 
Young people from the North and other sections are greatly benefited in 
health by a year at Maryville, and many take their entire course here. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college grounds consist of two hundred and fifty acres, and for 
beautiful scenery are not surpassed by any in the country. They are 
elevated and undulating, covered with a beautiful growth of evergreens 
and with a noble forest, and command a splendid view of the Cumberland 
Mountains on the north, and of the Smoky Mountains on the south. The 
location is as remarkable for its healthfulness as it is for its beauty. The 
campus affords the choicest facilities for the development of athletics. 

On these grounds there are thirteen buildings, which, together, with the 
grounds and equipment, represent an investment of three hundred thousand 
dollars. The buildings are heated with steam and lighted with electricity 
from the central power plant on the campus. Water is provided from a 
stream flowing through the college grounds, and is forced by hydraulic 
pressure into large tanks, supplying the buildings with toilet facilities and 
drainage. Drinking water is furnished from four wells driven through 
limestone rock to a depth of about one hundred and seventy-five feet, and 
furnishing an inexhaustible supply of absolutely pure water. At stated 
intervals this water is subjected to a thorough bacteriological test, and has 
invariably been pronounced exceptionally free from impurities. 

Anderson Ham,, the central building, is the oldest of the present col- 
lege halls, having been built in 1869, and named in honor of the founder 
of the institution. It contains the administrative offices and most of the 
recitation rooms for the literary departments. The large addition to the 
Hall, the Fayerweather Annex, is occupied by the Preparatory Department. 

Baldwin Haw,, named in honor of the late John C. Baldwin, of New 
Jersey, is the main dormitory for young women. It contains rooms for 
one hundred and thirty students. It is provided, as are allthe dormitories, 
with all modern conveniences, and is a comfortable home for young women. 

Memorial Hall, originally built as a companion building to Baldwin 



MARYVILLli COLLEGE 47 



Hall, is a young men's dormitory, containing rooms for seventy students. 
While it is one of the oldest of the college buildings, it has been put into 
excellent repair, and is a comfortable and well-equipped dormitory. It is 
under the control of a regular instructor of the College. 

W'illard Memorial, the home of the President, was provided in 1890 
by a generous gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard, in memory of her husband, 
Sylvester Willard, M.D. It is one of the chief adornments of the campus, 
and is a valuable property. 

The Lamar Memorial Library Hale was erected in 1888 at a cost of 
five thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was generously provided 
by three friends of Professor Lamar and of the College. The building is 
a model in every respect. It is a noble and fitting monument. The large 
memorial window contributed by the brothers and sisters of Professor 
Lamar holds the central position. 

BartlETT Haee is one of the largest college Y. M. C. A. buildings in 
the South. Planned for by the students led by Kin Takahashi, a Japanese 
student, it was erected by contributions made or secured by the Bartlett 
Hall Building Association, supplemented by a large gift by the College 
authorities^ A liberal donation made by Mrs. Nettie F. McCormick in 
1901 enabled the committee to complete the building. In 191 1, Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth R. Voorhees made a generous gift providing for extensive alterations 
and improvements, including the building of a separate gymnasium for the 
use of young women. The Y. M. C. A. auditorium, parlors, and secre- 
tary's and committees' apartments occupy the front part of the building, 
while the large gymnasium occupies the rest of the structure. 

Fayerweather Science Haee was erected in 1898 through the liberal 
bequest of Daniel B. Fayerweather. It is two stories in height, with ex- 
treme dimensions of one hundred and six feet by ninety-seven feet. The 
first floor contains the five spacious laboratories of chemistry and physics, 
balance and storage rooms, an office, and the John C. Branner Scientific 
Library. The second floor contains four excellent lecture rooms, two large 
and well-lighted biological laboratories, the laboratory ' of experimental 
psychology, and the museum. The laboratories are furnished with both 
direct and alternating electric current, and also with gas. The building is 
thoroughly modern in every respect. It is provided with liberal equipment 
for the practical study of science, and will stand a useful and lasting mon- 
ument to the intelligent philanthropy of the princely giver whose name it 
bears. 

The Elizabeth R. Voorhees Chapel. — The long- felt and urgent need 
of an adequate assembly hall was met in 1905 by the gift of the late Mr. 
Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey. The new chapel, named in honor of Mrs. 
Voorhees, graces one of the most commanding sites on the grounds, and is' 
well worthy of its place of distinction. It is of an extra quality of brick. 



48 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



with buff-brick and terra-cotta trimmings. The style is Grecian, the details 
being of the Ionian order. The auditorium seats eight hundred and eighty 
persons and can be arranged to accommodate two or three hundred more. 
The basement contains fourteen well-lighted rooms, occupied by the Music 
Department, and a commodious auditorium occupied by the Y. W. C: A. 
To the rear of the main auditorium, also, and; on the floor above, are sev- 
eral rooms used by the Department of Expression and for various other 
purposes. The entire building is in every way satisfactory, and will for 
many years be adequate for the purposes it is designed to serve. 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital— While the health of 
the student body has always been far above the average, yet in so large a 
number of students there is necessarily more or less sickness. As the Col- 
lege has grown, the need for proper facilities for caring for such occasional! 
cases of illness has become increasingly urgent. This need has now been 
provided for by the generosity of Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, a life-long friend 
of the College. Her gift of six thousand dollars has provided a thoroughly 
modern hospital building, containing eleven wards, caretakers' rooms, baths,, 
toilets, an operating room, and other appointments of a well-ordered hos- 
pital. The building is named in honor of Mrs. Lamar's only son, who died 
in infancy. A gift of five hundred dollars from Mr. Nathaniel Tooker, of 
East Orange, N. J., secured the purchase of a valuable outfit of the best 
hospital furnishings. To this amount about three hundred and fifty dollars 
was added from other sources and used for the purchase of additional 
furnishings and medical supplies. 

Carnegie Hale. — In connection with the "Forward Fund" secured in 
1008, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave the sum of fifty thousand dollars for a 
dormitory for young men. The building was designed by the firm of Whit- 
field & King, of New York. The building was occupied at the opening 
of the fall term in 1910, and was dedicated on January 11, 1911. It con- 
tains rooms for one hundred and eight young men. Each of the two large 
wings contains a suite of rooms for the use of a professor and his family. 
Commodious parlors and reception rooms are provided, and the building- 
is a comfortable and attractive home for the young men. In its archi- 
tectural beauty and its thoroughly modern appointments this is one of the 
best college dormitories in the South, and is a most valuable addition to 
the equipment of the College. 

Pearsons Hall. — No benefaction of recent years has proven more 
immediately serviceable than the gift of twenty thousand dollars made in 
1908 by Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago. The new building named in 
his honor provides additional dormitory facilities for young women, and 
adequate quarters for the large Cooperative Boarding Club. The building- 
is of brick, and is two stories in height; with an imposing Greek portico 
fronting the west and commanding an excellent view of the grounds. The 



MARYVILLH COLLHGB 49 



first story contains the spacious dining hall, with a seating capacity of five 
hundred, the kitchen, offices, and waiting rooms. The second story con- 
tains parlors, halls for the young women's literary societies, and rooms for 
thirty-four occupants. A third story will be added during the vacation 
months of 1912, increasing the capacity of the dormitory so that fifty addi- 
tional young women may secure rooms. For size, beauty, and service- 
ability, the building is a model in every respect, and was erected at an 
almost incredibly low cost. 

The; Power Pi,ant.— Heat for all the buildings and light for the build- 
ings and grounds are furnished from the central power house situated on 
the campus. The boilers in this plant have a combined capacity of three 
hundred horse-power. The Webster Vacuum System of steam heating is 
used, and the buildings are quickly and uniformly heated. A Bullock 
direct-current generator furnishes electric power ample for all purposes. 
Steam from the plant is used also for the meat and soup boilers and the 
dish-washing machine at Pearsons Hall. 



THE LAMAR MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest college libraries in the State. 
The number of books now on the shelves is about fifteen thousand. The 
library is open for the drawing of books or for the consulting of volumes 
in the reference alcoves for eight hours every day from Monday to Satur- 
day. The use of the library is entirely free to students of all departments. 
The nucleus of a much-needed endowment for the library has been secured, 
the fund now amounting to nearly $8,000. Among the gifts making up the 
endowment are the following: 

The " M. T." Fund, 1900, given by a friend $500 

The Helen Gould Fund, 1000, by Miss Helen Gould, New York. ... 500 

The Willard Fund, 1000, by the Misses Willard, Auburn, N. Y 200 

The Hollenback Fund, 1901, by J. W. Hollenback, Esq., Wilkes- 

barre > Pa 500 

The Solomon Bogart Fund, 1908, by Miss Martha M. Bogart, Phila- 
delphia, Tenn _ 200 

The Nina Cunningham Fund, 1909, by the sons of Major Ben Cun- 
ningham, Treasurer of the College, in memory of their sister, 

Miss Nina Cunningham, '91 r^ 

The John M. Alexander English Literature Fund, 1909, by Rev. John 

M. Alexander, '87, and wife, Maryville 500 

The Charles T. Cates, Jr., Fund, 1909, by Hon. C. T. Cates, Jr., '81, 

Attorney-General of the State of Tennessee 300 

The Rev. S. B. West Fund, 1909, by Mrs. S. B. West, Concord, Tenn. 100 

The McTeer Fund, 1909, by J. C. McTeer, '07 I00 

( 4 ) 



5 o MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



The Brown Fund, 1910, by Hon. T. N. Brown, '77 $100 

The Chilhowee Club Fund, 1910, by the Chilhowee Club, Maryville. 100 

The Class of 1891 Fund, 1910, by five members of the class 232 

The George Glenn Cooper Fund, 1910, by the parents, brother, and 

sister of George Glenn Cooper 300 

The Faculty Fund, 1910, by members of the Faculty 1,000 

The French Fund, 1910, by Mr. and Mrs. C. T. French, '06 100 

The Gamble Fund, 1910, by Hon. M. H. Gamble, '05, Hon. Andrew 

Gamble, and A. " M. Gamble, M.D., Maryville 200 

The Hooke Fund, 1910, by Rev. R. H. Hooke, '74 7° 

The Lowry Fund, 1910, by Rev. G. H. Lowry, '94 100 

The Tracy Fund, 1910, by J. E. Tracy, Esq., '01 50 

The following funds are now being formed: 

The Class of 1909 Fund ($700 subscribed) 495 

The Class of 1910 Fund ($560 subscribed) 34Q 

The Class of 1911 Fund ($250 subscribed) 180 

The Class of 1912 Fund ($200 subscribed) 116 

The Class of 1913 Fund ($125 subscribed) 89 

The Litterer Fund ($100 subscribed), by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

LOAN LIBRARIES 

James R. Hills Library.— In 1888 Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New York, 
contributed a fund of six hundred dollars for the establishment of a Loan 
Library, in order that students unable to purchase the necessary text-books 
might have the privilege of renting them at a nominal rate. By judicious 
management the income from this fund has grown until now the privileges 
of this library are open to all students, and all the regular text-books used 
in the institution may be either rented or purchased, as the student prefers. 
An additional gift of five hundred dollars from the same donor in 1008 
made it possible to provide the text-books for the students in the Bible 
Training Department. The rental charged a term is one-fifth the retail 
price of each book. The income from rentals is devoted to supplying new- 
books as they are needed. The library occupies a room in Anderson Hall 
and is open every day. 

JohnC. Branner Library. — A few years ago John C. Branner, Ph.D., 
then the State Geologist of Arkansas, now Vice-President of the Leland 
Stanford Junior University, gave another proof of his generosity and 
friendship to the College by establishing a loan library of the text-books 
used in the natural science departments. The books in this library are 
under the same regulations as are those of the Hills Library. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 51 



The Misses Willard Library. -Through the generosity of the Misses 
Willard, of Auburn, N. Y., the text-books employed in the Bible classes 
of the Preparatory Department are also provided for rent at a nominal 
charge. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING CLUB 

No other agency has been of greater service in enabling the College to 
keep the expenses of its students at a minimum than the popular and suc- 
cessful Cooperative Boarding Club. The actual cost of the board is esti- 
mated at the end of each month. The price is fixed approximately at the 
beginning of each year. During the past year the price has been $1.70 a 
week. A deposit of seven dollars is required of each member of the Club, 
and settlements are thereafter made at the end of every fourth week A 
considerable number of students are employed as waiters and assistants 
in the dining room, thus materially reducing the cost of their board The 
privileges of the Club are extended to all male students and to all young 
women rooming in the college dormitories. The membership of the Club 
has been more than five hundred this year. Through the generosity of 
Dr. T>. K. Pearsons, of Chicago, the Club is now housed in the new Pear- 
sons Hall, spoken of elsewhere. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES 

It is a constant aim of the College to provide first-class college advan- 
tages to the student at the lowest possible rates, and the endowment enables 
it to make its charges very moderate. College bills must be paid invariably 
m advance. Until this condition is complied with, no one can become a 
member of any of the classes. 

Tuition 

In view of the very low rates, no deduction will be made for absence 
at the beginning or at the end of any term, and no tuition will be refunded. 

In all the literary departments $doo a term 

Athletic fee (payable by all students) 5 o a term 

Graduation fee (payable at the opening of the spring term of 

the Senior year) $S 00 

Graduation fee in the Preparatory Department loo 

Special Science fees : 
Laboratory fee in Chemistry: Fall, $3.00; Winter, $2.50; Spring, $2.50 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics $2.00 a term 

Laboratory fee in Physiology or Preparatory Physics .... 1.00 a term 
Breakage ticket in Chemistry: Fall, $2.00; Winter, $1.50; Spring, $1.50 
Breakage ticket in Physics, Biology, or Physiology $1.00 a term 



52 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



In the Music Department (vocal or instrumental). 

Fall Term: 

One lesson a week »7-°° 

Winter or Spring Term : . r , , 

One lesson a week 5-5 

Piano rental (one hour a day): Fall Term, $4; Winter or 
Spring Term, $3.00. Two hours a day at double these rates. 
Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History of 
Music : 

Fall Term • 2 - 5 ° 

Winter and Spring Terms combined 3-°° 

Graduation fee 2 " 5 ° 

In the Expression Department. 

Fall Term 9 °° 

Winter or Spring Term 7-°° 

Graduation fee 2-5 ° 

In the Art Department, for lessons of three hours each in Painting 
in Oil or in Water Color : 

Fall Term : 7 -°° 

Winter or Spring Term 5-5° 

Rooms 

Rooms in all the dormitories are heated with steam and lighted with 
electricity, and fully supplied with baths and toilets. Two students usually 
occupy one room. More than two students in one room will not be allowed. 

Every prospective student desiring to room in a dormitory must make 
a two-dollar deposit with the Registrar in order to secure a reservation. 
The Registrar will send the applicant a deposit receipt, which, upon pre- 
sentation by the student when he enters College, will be accepted by the 
Treasurer for credit on the room rent to the amount and for the term 
specified thereon. The room, however, will not be held beyond the open- 
ing day unless the Registrar is notified of the cause of the student's delay 
The deposit receipt is not negotiable, and the deposit will be forfeited if 
the student does not enter college. 

The cost of rooms in the different dormitories, with full information 
regarding furnishings, is given below. The rates given are for each occu- 
pant of a room. Students desiring to room alone in rooms equipped for 
two students may do so by paying double the rates here given. 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 53 



Memorial Hall (for Young Men) 

These rooms are furnished with iron bedsteads, tables, and wardrobes. 
Baths on first floor. According to location the rates for each student are 
as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $8.00 to $9.00 $6.00 to $7.00 $4.00 to $5.00 

Other rooms 7.00 to 8.00 5.00 to 6.00 3.00 to 4.00 

Carnegie Hall (eor Young Men) 

The rooms in this dormitory are furnished with individual iron bed- 
steads, springs, mattresses, tables, chiffoniers, chairs, and wardrobes. Baths 
and toilets on each of the three floors. There are fifty double rooms, i. e., 
for two students each, and eight single rooms for one student each. The 
rates for each student are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Double rooms $10.00 to $15.00 $8.00 to $12.00 $5.00 to $8.00 

■Single rooms 14.00 11.00 7.00 

Baldwin Hall (eor Young Women) 
The rooms in this hall are furnished with iron bedsteads, springs, mat- 
tresses, washstands, tables, and wardrobes. Baths on first and second 
floors ; toilets on all floors. According to location the rates for each stu- 
dent are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $9.00 to $10.00 $7.00 to $8.00 $5.00 to $6.00 

Other rooms 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 4.00 to 5.00 

Pearsons Hall (eor Young Women) 
The rooms in this building are occupied by young women of the Col- 
lege Department. The rooms are furnished with individual iron bedsteads, 
springs, mattresses, tables, dressers, chairs, and built-in wardrobes. The 
rooms, with the baths and toilets, are on the second and third floors. The 
rates for each student are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

According to location $12.00 to $14.00 $9.00 to $11.00 $6.00 to $7.00 

Rooms in Town 
Young men can find comfortable furnished rooms in private residences 
in convenient parts of town at the following rates by the month for each 
student : 

Rooms furnished and cared for, without fuel or light $2.00 to $3.00 

Rooms furnished and cared for, with light and heat 3.00 to 4.00 



54 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Board 

In the Cooperative Boarding Club $1-75 a. week 

In private boarding houses $2.50 to $3.50 a week 

Laundry 

In the Cooperative Laundry (young women doing their own 

work) $0.30 a month 

In town by private laundresses, young men pay. .. . $0.35 to $0.60 a week 
At Maryville steam laundry, young women pay... . $0.35 to $0.75 a week 

STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Societies. — Four literary societies are conducted by the stu- 
dents, and are of the greatest benefit to those who avail themselves of the 
advantages they offer. The Athenian, organized in 1868, and the Alpha 
Sigma, organized in 1882, are composed of young men. Their halls are on 
the third floor of Anderson Hall. Each society is divided into a "senior 
section" and a "junior section," the latter being composed of students in 
the Preparatory Department. The Bainonian, organized in 1875, and the 
Theta Epsilon, organized in 1804, are conducted by the young women. 
They have neatly furnished halls in Pearsons Hall. The societies meet 
every Friday evening to engage in debates and other literary exercises. 
The j unior sections of the young men's societies meet on Saturday evening. 
Each society gives annually a public midwinter entertainment 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A._ The Y. M. C. A., established in 
1878, has become one of the strongest organizations of its kind in the 
South. The weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoon 
in the auditorium of Bartlett Hall. The Association conducts an annual 
encampment on the Tennessee River for one week before the opening of 
the fall term, at which encampment plans and policies for the ensuing year's 
work are arranged. The officers of the Association are as follows : Presi- 
dent, James K. Stewart; Vice-President, William E. Moore; Secretary, 
Samuel Walker ; Treasurer, Laurance L. Cross ; Executive Committee, 
James K. Stewart, Edwin R. Hunter, A. Garland Hinkle, Howard L. Weir, 
F. Lewis Miller, and Harry O. Bush. 

The Advisory Committee of the Y. M. C. A., composed of representa- 
tives of the Faculty and the student body, directs the general policies of 
the Association. It consists of the following members : Class of 1912 : 
Professor Barnes, Chairman, President Wilson, and Professor Bassett; 
Class of 1913: Professor Gillingham, Victor C. Detty, and A. Garland 
Hinkle; Class of 1914: Dean Waller, Major Will A. McTeer, and Horace 
E. Orr. 

The Y. W. C. A. was established in 1884, and has become one of the 



MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 55 



most wholesome influences in the religious life of the College. The mem- 
bership for the current year has been about one hundred and fifty. The 
weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoons in the asso- 
ciation room, in the basement of Voorhees Chapel. The Association has 
a small but valuable library in Pearsons Hall, known as the Florence 
McManigal Memorial Library. It was contributed by Rev. J. Oscar Boyd 
and wife, of Princeton, N. J., as a memorial to their sister, Miss McMan- 
igal, '08, who w r as an instructor in the College and who died in 1909. The 
officers of the Association are as follows : President, Nellie F. Johnston ; 
Vice-President, Nellie C. Pickens ; Secretary, Eva L. Dawson ; Treasurer, 
Marcia Secor ; Cabinet, Nellie F. Johnston, Nellie C. Pickens, Eva L- 
Dawson, Marcia Secor, Mae D. Smith, Willamette Bays, Hattie B. Lester, 
May Swanner, Olga A. Marshall, L. Mabel Grisewood, and Grace D. 
Jewell. 

The Athletic Association — This organization is maintained by the 
student body for the purpose of regulating athletics and caring for athletic 
equipment. The Board of Athletic Control, composed of representatives 
of the Faculty, the students, and former students, meets at stated intervals 
and exercises oversight over all the athletic events of the College. Tickets 
are sold that admit to all games played in Maryville and entitle the holders 
to the use of any available equipment used in athletic sports. The football 
and baseball fields, the tennis courts, the track, and the basketball court 
are open to any student desiring to enter these forms of sport. 

The members of the Board of Athletic Control, whose officers are also 
the officers of the Athletic Association, are as follows : President, Ralph 
W. Owens ; Vice-President, S. Earle Crawford ; Secretary, Paul R. Gra- 
biel; Treasurer. David J. Brittain; Editor, S. Roland Williams; Official 
Buyer, Jancer L. Tweed; Town Representatives, Dr. John A. McCulloch 
and Charles D. Chandler; Faculty Representatives, President Wilson and 
Professor Schnirel ; Student Representatives, Homer L. Goddard, Charles 
P. Quinn and Eva M. Samsel. 

The officers of the athletic teams are as follows : Football, H. Noble 
Wright, Manager; S. Earle Crawford, Captain; Arthur E.Mitchell, Coach: 
Baseball, Orton L. Duggan, Manager ; Ralston W. Carver, Captain : 
Basketball, Clay E. Rule, Manager; Harry H. Smith, Captain: Tennis, 
M. Blaine Duggan, Manager: Track, Paul R. Grabiel, Manager; Harry 
O. Bush, Captain: Women's Basketball, Miriam Rood, Manager; Lois' C. 
Wilson, Captain : Women's Tennis, L. Mabel Grisewood, Manager. 

The Political Science Club.— An inter-society club was organized in 
191 1 for the study and discussion of practical, present-day political ques- 
tions. The Club numbers twenty members, representing the four classes 
of the College Department. The meetings are held twice a month. The 
officers of the Club are as follows : President, Homer L. Goddard ; Vice- 



56 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



President, R. Wood Wright; Secretary-Treasurer, H. Noble Wright; Pro- 
gram Secretary, F. Lewis Miller; Editor, Samuel Walker. 

The Ministerial Association, organized in 1900, is composed of the 
candidates for the Christian ministry that are in attendance upon the Col- 
lege. It has for its object the enlistment of its members in various forms 
of active Christian work, and the discussion of themes relating to the work 
of the ministry. Its officers are : President, William P. Peyton ; Vice- 
President, Laurance L. Cross ; Secretary and Treasurer, Victor C. Detty. 

The Student Volunteer Band — The College has from its earliest 
history been identified with foreign missions, and has sent out forty-one 
missionaries into twelve foreign countries. Since 1894 the students have 
maintained a Student Volunteer Band, composed of those who are pledged 
to enter some foreign field, if the way be open. The Band meets weekly 
to study missionary fields and conditions. The officers for the present 
year are as follows : Leader, Horace E. Orr ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Miriam Rood. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This Association was formed in 1871. It holds its annual meeting on 
Commencement Day, when a banquet is given under the auspices of the 
Faculty of the College and the local alumni. The officers for the present 
year are as follows : President, Hon. Moses H. Gamble, '05 ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Albert C. Samsel, '10; Secretary, Pres. Samuel T. Wilson, '78; Exec- 
utive Committee, Hugh R. Crawford, '03 ; Mary V. Alexander, '08 ; Grace 
E. McReynolds, '04; Almira C. Bassett, '09; and Edgar R. Walker, '09. 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1911 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon the thirty mem- 
bers of the graduating class of 1911. 

The degree of Master of Arts in course was conferred upon Eliz- 
abeth Dorothy Wuist, '05, Ann Arbor, Mich., and Leo yd Eemore Foster, 
'07, Professor of History and Latin, McLean College, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon Rev. 
Robert AeExander BarteETT, '84, Moberly, Mo. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon Rev. 
David GoureEy WyeiE, Ph.D., D.D., pastor of the Scotch Presbyterian 
Church, New York City. 

GRADUATES IN MUSIC, 1911 

In Voice: Mamie DeArmond, Maryville, and Hazee Esther Dean, 
Bellefontaine, O. 

In Piano : FidEEIa Constance McReynoeds, Maryville ; Mary Kate 
Rankin, Dandridge; and LEEia Love Graham, Dandridge. 



MARY VI LIE COLLEGE 57 



GRADUATES IN EXPRESSION, 1911 

Loy McCord Alexander, Reno, 111.; Winnie Beel,E Gray, Bearden; 
Ruth Eva Jeweee, Maryville; Anna EeEanor Kidder, South Knoxville ; 
and Jennie Irene McNutt, Maryville. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Each student is required to pay a fee of fifty cents each term for the 
privilege of class work in physical culture and for providing a director 
for athletic sports. Classes are conducted by the Physical Director daily, 
and every student, except members of the Senior and Junior Classes, is 
required to avail himself of the privilege afforded, unless excused by 
reason of his being a member of a regular athletic team or doing reg- 
ular work in the college buildings or on the grounds. The classes for 
the young men and the young women are conducted in their respective 
gymnasiums. Every young woman should bring with her a regulation 
gymnasium suit, preferably blue in color, with gymnasium or tennis shoes. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital, spoken of elsewhere, is 
available for all students. There is no charge for the use of the wards, 
or for nursing in cases of slight illness. In case of serious illness, in which 
the services of a trained nurse are required, such nursing must be provided 
at the expense of the student, as must also the expense of medical atten- 
tion. On Monday, Thursday, and Saturday of each week free medical 
consultation and prescription by approved physicians are provided at the 
hospital for out-of-town students. This privilege has been responded to 
with marked appreciation by the student body, and the medical attention 
thus afforded has been of great service in the prevention and checking of 
serious illness. Patients in the hospital pay $2.50 a week for board. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Two members of the graduating class, one young man and one young 
woman, are chosen upon the basis of scholarship and general merit to rep- 
resent the class as orators on Commencement Day. The representatives 
of the class of 191 1 were George Winfield Middleton and Lena Aikin. 

THE Y. M. C. A. LYCEUM COURSE 

For several years the Y. M. C. A. has conducted for the student body 
and the public a course of lectures and entertainments. The course usually 
consists of five or six numbers, one or two of which are popular lectures 
and the rest musical, elocutionary, or dramatic entertainments. The course 



5 8 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



is provided at small cost to the student, tickets for the entire series costing 

usually a dollar and a half. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSIC CONTESTS 

In 1909 a triangular debating and oratorical league was formed with 
Carson and Newman College and Washington and Tusculum College. 
Each college selects two debating teams of two members each, and two 
orators. The contests are held simultaneously in the three colleges, each 
institution being represented at each place. A prize of five dollars in gold 
is awarded to each of the winning contestants annually. A silver cup was 
offered as a trophy by Hope Brothers, of Knoxville, to the college win- 
ning the largest number of points in any year. The cup was also to 
become the permanent trophy of the college winning the largest number 
of points for three consecutive years. The three contests have been held, 
and the cup has been awarded to Maryville. The twenty-seven points were 
distributed as follows : Maryville, thirteen ; Carson and Newman, seven ; 
Washington and Tusculum, seven. 

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Examinations and Standing. — A uniform system of grading is em- 
ployed, upon the results of which depends the promotion from one class to 
another. 

A student absent from any examination without an approved excuse 
will be marked " zero " on that examination, and will receive no credit for 
his term's work. 

Any student failing to be present at term examinations shall be re- 
quired to take all omitted examinations before being allowed to enter 
classes on his return to the College. 

A special examination will be granted to any student that desires 
credit for any required study that he has not taken in the regular class- 
room work of this institution. A fee of fifty cents will be charged for any 
examination not taken at the regular time for the examination. 

The Faculty meets each week of the college year, and receives reports 
of the work done in all departments and of the delinquencies of individual 
students. A record is made of the standing of each student, which is sent 
co his parents or guardian at the end of each term. 

Conditions. — In order to be classified in any given year in the College 
Department a student shall not be conditioned in more than three studies. 

Changes of Course. — All changes of studies must be made within two 
weeks after matriculation. Thereafter, all changes for students in the Pre- 
paratory Department shall be made by order of the Principal of the depart- 
ment, and all changes in the College Department by order of the President 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 59 



or the Dean ; and in all cases after consultation with the instructors con- 
cerned. Every change of course made after two weeks from date of 
matriculation involves a fee of fifty cents, unless this fee is remitted by 
special vote of the Faculty. 

Delinquencies and Demerits. — All unexcused delinquencies and de- 
merits are registered. When they amount to twenty-five, the student ceases 
to be a member of the institution. A delinquency is a failure to perform 
any college duty. Excuses for such failure must be presented immediately 
upon returning to work. 

Dismissal Erom College. — Students are dismissed, also, whenever in 
the opinion of the Faculty they are pursuing a course of conduct detri- 
mental to themselves and to the College. The Faculty are the sole judges 
of the advisability of such dismissal. Maryville College is a private insti- 
tution, and reserves the right to dismiss a student whenever the authorities 
of the College may elect. An institution which is affording such extensive 
opportunities and advantages to its students in return for fees not so large 
as the incidental fees of most institutions, can not allow those to remain 
in attendance who fail to perform their college work, or who injure college 
property, disturb college order, or by acts of insubordination or immo- 
rality hurt the good name of the College and add unnecessary burdens to 
the authorities of the institution. The College desires no such students, 
and rids itself of them when they appear. 

Forfeiture oE Aid. — Any student receiving financial aid from the Col- 
lege, in the form of scholarships, loans, or opportunities for work, will 
forfeit such aid if he becomes an object of college discipline. 

Absence from the College— Students are not allowed to absent them- 
selves from the College without permission from the Faculty. 

The Sabbath. — Students are not allowed to patronize the Sunday 
trains or to visit the railway stations on the Sabbath. No student will be 
received on the Sabbath. Sunday visits are disapproved. 

Religious Services.— Prayers are attended in the college chapel in the 
morning, with the reading of the Scripture and with singing. Every stu- 
dent is required to attend public worship on the Sabbath, and to connect 
himself with a Sabbath-school class in some one of the churches in town. 

Rooming in Town. — Students are not permitted to room or to board 
at places disapproved by the Faculty. Young women from out of town 
are not permitted to room or board off the college grounds, except with 
relatives. 

Tobacco. — The use of tobacco on the college grounds and in the col- 
lege buildings is forbidden, and no student addicted to its use will be 
allowed to room upon the college premises. One violation of this rule will 
be deemed sufficient to exclude a student from the college dormitories. 



6o MARYVILLB COLLBGE 



Vaccination. — Vaccination is required of those students who have not 
recently been vaccinated. 

Entertainments. — To avoid interference with the regular work of the 
College, students are not permitted to engage in dramatic entertainments, 
and must secure special permission before engaging in any entertainment 
outside the College. 

Secret Societies. — No secret society will be allowed among the stu- 
dents, and no organization will be permitted that has not been approved 
by the Faculty. 

SELF-HELP 

The College offers opportunities of self-help to a large number of 
deserving young men and women. During the present year the number 
of those availing themselves of such opportunities has been over two hun- 
dred. The work offered includes manual labor on the grounds, janitor 
service in the various buildings, dining-room and kitchen service at the 
Cooperative Boarding Club, office work, and work as assistants in labo- 
ratories, libraries, or study rooms. These forms of employment are paid 
for at a rate varying according- to the degree of skill and responsibility 
involved. Indoor work is allotted usually to students that have previously 
given proof of their ability and worth. Positions of exceptional respon- 
sibility, such as janitor service and work as assistants, are granted for a 
year in advance, the assignment being made at the close of the spring 
term. Assistants in any department are elected by the Faculty upon the 
recommendation of the head of the department. 

Application for work of any kind must be made in writing and ad- 
dressed to the Faculty. The acceptance of an opportunity of self-help 
involves especial obligation to diligence, loyalty, and the faithful discharge 
of duty. A student that fails to do satisfactory work or becomes an object 
of discipline by the Faculty will forfeit all such opportunities., 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Craighead Fund, 1886, contributed by Rev. James G. Craighead, 

D.D., for candidates for the ministry $i,5°° 

The Carson Adams Fund, 1887, by Rev. Carson W. Adams, D.D., 

of New York, for tuition help . 6,300 

The George Henry Bradley Scholarship, 1889, by Mrs. Jane Loomis 

Bradley, of Auburn, N. Y., in memory of her only son 1,000 

The Willard Scholarship, 1898, by the Misses Willard, of Auburn, 

New York 1,000 

The Students' Self-help Loan Fund, 1903 and 1908, by an East Ten- 

nessean, for loans to upper classmen 1.500 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 61 



The Clement Ernest Wilson Scholarship, 1904, by Mrs. Mary A. 

Wilson, of Maryville, in memory of her son $1,000 

The Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship Fund, begun 1904, by 
the Alumni Association and former students. A bequest of $500 
was made to the fund by the late Mrs. M. A. Wilson, of Mary- 
ville *&7 

The Angier Self-help Work and Loan Fund, 1907- 191 1, by Mr. Albert 
E. Angier, of Boston, Mass., to provide opportunities of work 
for young men 5>°°° 

The Margaret E. Henry Scholarship, 1907, established through the 

efforts of Mr. Jasper E. Corning, of New York 1,000 

The Arta Hope Scholarship, 1907, by Miss Arta Hope, of Robin- 
son, 111 • l >°°° 

The Silliman Scholarship, 1907, by Hon. H. B. Silliman, of Cohoes. 
N. Y., and held in trust by the College Board of the Presby- 
terian Church I > 000 

The Hugh O'Neill, Jr., Scholarship, 1908, by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill, of 

New York, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alexander Caldwell Memorial Fund, 1908, by Mr. G. A. Moody, 

of Jefferson City, Tenn., the income to be loaned 1,000 

The D. Stuart Dodge Scholarship, 1908, by Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, 
D.D., of New York City, preferably to aid graduates of the Farm 
School of North Carolina 1,500 

The Julia M. Turner Missionary Scholarship Fund, 1908, by Mrs. 
Julia M. Turner, to aid the children of foreign missionaries or 
those preparing for the foreign field 5, 000 

The William J. McCahan, Sr., Fund, 1908, by Mr. William J. Mc- 

Cahan, Sr., of Philadelphia, Pa., for tuition help 5,ooo 

The W. A. E. Campbell Foreign Missionary Fund, 1909, by Rev. 
W. A. E. Campbell, of Nashville, Ind., to aid a young woman 
preparing for foreign missionary work 7°° 

The Charles Francis Darlington, Jr., Scholarship, 1009, by Mrs. 

Letitia Craig Darlington, of New York, in honor of her son. . . 1,000 

The Hoover Self-help Fund, 1909, by Dr. W. A. Hoover, of Gibson 

City, 111., to provide opportunities of work for young men 500 

The Isaac Anderson Scholarship, 1909, by James A. and Howard 
Anderson, of Knoxville, Tenn., in memory of their great-uncle, 
Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., the founder of Maryville College. . 1,000 

The John H. Converse Scholarship, 1909, by Mr. John H. Converse, 
of Philadelphia, Pa., for candidates for the ministry and other 
Christian service 5,°°° 

The Chattanooga Self-help Fund, 1910, by Rev. E. A. Elmore, D.D.. 
and citizens of Chattanooga, Tenn., to provide opportunities of 
work for students 5°° 



62 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



The Rena Sturtevant Memorial Scholarship, 1910, by Miss Anna 

St. John, of New York $1,000 

The Nathaniel Tooker Scholarship, 1910, by Nathaniel Tooker, Esq., 

East Orange, N. J IOOO 

The G. S. W. Crawford Self-help Fund, 191 1, by friends of the late 

Professor Crawford, to provide work for students 1,000 

The James R. Hills Memorial Self-help Work Fund, 191 1, by Miss 

Sarah B. Hills, of New York, to provide work for students 1,000 

The Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Mead Memorial Scholarship, 191 1, by the 

Abbott Collegiate Association of New York 1 000 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official publication of the College is The; Maryvieee Coei.Ege Bul- 
letin. It is issued four times a year, and is sent free to any who apply 
for it. The May number of each year is the annual catalogue. The Col- 
LEGE Monthly is issued several times a year by the students, the editorial 
staff consisting of representatives of the four literary societies, the Chris- 
tian Associations, the Athletic Association, and the Alumni Association. 
The Chilhowean is issued annually by the Senior Class. It is the year- 
book of the student body, containing a summarized record of the year's 
work in all the departments and organizations of the College, and is an 
attractive souvenir. The MaryvillE Hand Book is issued annually by the 
Christian Associations. It is intended to present the work of the Asso- 
ciations to new students, and also to assist them in adjusting themselves 
to their new environment. It includes a directory of the Christian Asso- 
ciations, Literary Societies, Athletic Associations, city churches, and col- 
lege offices; the college colors, yell, song, and athletic records; and 
instructions as to matriculation. 

SPECIAL NEEDS 

(1) The provision of a water-supply system adequate for the enlarged 
demands made by the added dormitories and other buildings. For this 
purpose there will be needed at least $5,000. (2) Another story to Pear- 
sons Hall, $10,000. This amount has been pledged by a generous anony- 
mous donor. The addition will be made during the vacation months of 
x 9i2. (3) Endowment for a domestic science department, $15,000. Too 
long has this important and most practical department been delayed. To 
meet this need a generous friend has pledged $14,000 on condition that by 
May, 1912, $25,000 be secured in addition for agricultural or manual train- 
ing, or some other pressing necessity of the College. (4) Endowment for 
an agricultural and manual training department, $25,000. The clientage 
of Maryville and the trend of the times both demand this addition. (5) 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 63 



Endowment for the natural science departments to help provide annual 
supplies, $10,000. (6) Endowment to pay the administration expenses of 
the Cooperative Boarding Club so as to keep the cost of board from rising 
any further, $15,000. Thousands of students have been enabled to enter 
college because of this remarkable club. Board is $1.75 a week. (7) 
Additional endowment for the library, $5,000. The present endowment is 
less than eight thousand dollars. (8) A hospital endowment to provide a 
nurse, $10,000. The hospital is proving invaluable, but a nurse is sorely 
needed, for many students are unable to pay for one. (9) For streets, 
walks, and grounds, $5,000. Naturally beautiful, the grounds have been 
reluctantly left unimproved through lack of funds. (10) A new recitation 
building, $50,000. It can not long be deferred. All available space is 
utilized, and yet the work is sorely cramped. 

All these great needs can be met with one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. And the College has faith that this amount will be secured before 
many commencements have passed. 

BEQUESTS AND DEVISES 

Since each State has special statutory regulations in regard to wills, 
it is most important that all testamentary papers be signed, witnessed, and 
executed according to the laws of the State in which the testator resides. 
In all cases, however, the legal name of the corporation must be accurately 
given, as in the following form : 

" I give and bequeath : . . . to ' The: Directors of Maryvieee 

College/ at Maryville, Tennessee, and to their successors and assigns for- 
ever, for the uses and purposes of said College, according to the provisions 
of its charter." 



<H MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



College Department 

SENIOR CLASS 

Bays, WielaWe Ventura, Cal . . .Modern languages 

Carson, Leland Gates Harriman Political Science 

Ca wood, Lucius Maryville Ancient Languages 

Crawford, Samuel Earle Maryville General 

Duggan, Morton Blaine Sevierville, R. D. 18. Mathematics 

Duggan, Orton Lorraine Sevierville, R. D. 18. Mathematics 

Duncan, Nellie Fern Maryville General 

Goddard, Homer Andrew ........ Maryville Political Science 

Graham, Lelia Love Dandridge General 

Hixson, Roy HebEr Chattanooga General 

Johnston, NeeeiE Fayette Montgomery, O General 

KiRKPATRiCK, Marivine Mooresburg English and History 

McGineEy, Joseph Leonard Maryville Ancient Languages 

Magill, Mary Tirzah Maryville General 

Marshall, Olga Aeexandra Mount Kisco, N. Y. .Ancient Languages 

Orr, Horace Eugene Cabot, Ark Ancient Languages 

Pickens, Aeice Belle Mary ville General 

Rule, Clay Evans Maryville Political Science 

Shipley, Vincent Talbott Baltimore, Md Ancient Languages 

Sims, John Granville Monroe Political Science 

Smith, Elmira Grace Concord General 

Stanton, Ida Grace Limestone General 

Tweed, Jancer Lawrence White Rock, N. C. . . Political Science 

Walker, SamuEE Jellico Creek, Ky . . . . General 

Williams, Samuel Roland Sevierville, R. D. 8. . General 

Williams, Solomon Randolph .. Sevierville, R. D. 8. . Mathematics 
Wright, Harrison Noble Pall Mall Political Science 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Alexander, Christine Maryville Ancient Languages- 

Cross, Robert Carroll Gastonburg, Ala Ancient Languages 

Davis, Minnie Carter Washington, D. C. . . Ancient Languages- 

Douglas, George Harley Leeds, Mass Philosophy 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 65 



I ) un bar, Ellen Silk n a Hersman, 111 General 

ELMORE, Grace Gladys New Market Ancient Languages 

Ooi>dard, VolTa Francis Maryville Mathematics 

Grabiel. Paul Ruskin Columbus, O Political Science 

Jewell, Grace Day Fredericktown, Mo . .Ancient Languages 

Johnson, Elizabeth Daee Warren, O General 

Lester. Hattie BeeeE Gridley, Cal General 

McCampbEll, Eeea Townsend English and History 

McConnell, Raeph ErskinE Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Ancient Languages 

Moore, Wieeiam Elder .Maryville Ancient Languages 

Newell. Ruth CuevER Eustis, Fla English and History 

Newman, Rev a. Straw Plains General 

Norcross, George Dieeon Horner. New Egypt, N. J Ancient Languages 

Nuchols, May Cowan Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Ancient Languages 

Owens, Raeph Waedo Boonville, Ind Ancient Languages 

Pickens, NeeeiE Cowan Knoxville, R. D. 3. . . General 

Rankin, MeevieeE Beiss Boonville, Ind General 

Rood, Miriam Anna Bradentown, Fla Ancient Languages 

Secor, Marcia „ Carrollton, 111 General 

SiLSBY, HEEEN Cassieey Shanghai, China ..... General 

Swanner, Beueah Mae Meadow General 

Weir, Howard Laurie Britton, Okla General 

Wieson, Oeive More Maryville Ancient Languages 

Wintsch, John George Walton, N. Y Modern Languages 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Armstrong, Aema MabEE Bradentown, Fla Chemistry 

Boggs. Mary Barnett Kingston, O General 

Brittain, James FraziER Maryville Chemistry 

Carson. Raeph St. Clair Hendersonville, N. C. Ancient Languages 

Cross, Luther Laurance Gastonburg, Ala English and History 

Detty, Victor ChareEs Scranton, Pa Ancient Languages 

Dieeon, Julia Hale Memphis Biology 

Fyke, Wile Foster Springfield Chemistry 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville. R. D. 4. . . Mathematics 

Grisewood, Lydia Mabel Rochester, N. Y Chemistry 

Hall, Erma May Maryville Modern Languages 

Henson, Frank William Philadelphia, Pa.... Ancient Languages 

Hunter, Edwin Ray Carlyle, 111 English and History 

Hyden. John Albert Philadelphia General 

Kirk Patrick, Nell Ross Mooresburg General 

Lenoir, Frank Osborne Philadelphia Mathematics 

McConnell, Adolphus Rankin. . Maryville, R. D. 6... Ancient Languages 



66 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



McCully, JonniE Ann Maryville .Modern Languages 

MillER, Frank Lewis East Moriches, N. Y. Ancient Languages 

Moore, Addison Strong Maryville Ancient Languages' 

REEVES, Ernest Mayrant Hobart, Okla General 

Rowland, Minnie LEE Alexandria General 

Rutledge, Wiley Blount Maryville Ancient Languages 

Smith, George Farrar Newport Chemistry 

Smith, Harry Huee Newport Chemistry ; 

Smith, Mae DarThula Morristown General 

Stewart, James Kirkpatrick Wilmington, Del Ancient Languages 

Tilford, William Harman Ludlow, Ky Ancient Languages 

Toney, Herbert Edwin Erwin General 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Attyeh, Anise Elias Horns, Syria General 

B alch , Hiram Smith Newport Mathematics 

Barnes, Mark Hopkins Maryville Modern Languages 

Beam an, Clarence Andrew Moscow Mills, Md. . .Ancient Languages 

Burian, Ludvik Martinice, Moravia . .Ancient Languages 

Bush, Harry Oswald Roxborough, Phila., Pa. Ancient Languages 

Card, John Wesley Coal Creek General ,, 

Carson, Ruth Rankin Maryville Ancient Languages 

Clark, FrankiE Belle Christiana '. .Ancient Languages 

Crane. Anne McPhEETErs New Decatur, Ala Modern Languages 

Cross, Annie LEE : '••''■ .Columbiana, Ala General 

Cross, George Gowans Barton, Md Ancient Languages 

Dawson, Charles Edward South Knoxville Ancient Languages 

Eaves, Beverly Moeeitt . Jacksboro General 

Eaves, Ruth Matilda Jacksboro General 

Edwards, John James Coal Creek General 

Ensign, John Evans Rossville, Ga Ancient Languages 

Franklin, Lucy Elgin Jefferson City, R. D. i. General 

Gaston, David Finis Gastonburg, Ala Ancient Languages 

Goddard, Thomas Warner Maryville General 

Heilman, Mary JanE Concord, N. C Teachers' 

HinklE, Augustus Garland Inez, Ky Ancient Languages 

Holloway, William Edward. . . .Glen Alice General 

LandES, Charlotte HauEr Florianopolis, Brazil. General 

Lloyd, Ralph Waldo Whiterocks, Utah. . . . Mathematics 

McConnELL, Paul Carson Maryville General 

McGrEaham, AlmEda Lillian. . . Shawano, Wis Teachers' ( 

Melick, Sarosa Rosamond Annandale, N. J. . . .. Modern Languages 

Murray, Albert Francis Knoxville ' Mathematics 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 67 



Painter, Winifred Lee. Maryville, R. D. 7. . . Ancient Languages 

PetrEE, Harriet Irene Harriman General 

Petty, Mote Knoxville Ancient Languages 

Peyton, William Preston Louisville, Ky Ancient Languages 

Powel, Samuee Franklin Rogersville Ancient Languages 

RasEy, Mary Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 1 . . . General 

Reagan, Madge Tipton Maryville General 

Reynolds, William Roscoe Algood General 

Smith, Micah Pearce Chickasha, Okla English and History 

Stearns, Irving Kip Bryson City, N. C. . . Modem Languages 

Tetedoux, CorinnE Fleming Norwood, O Modern Languages 

Thompson, James Edward Princeton, Ala Modern Languages 

TonEy, George Lynn Erwin : General 

West, James Morrison Morristown, R. D. 3. General 

Wilson, Howard Hannington. . . Maryville General 

Wilson, Lois Coligny Maryville Ancient Languages 

Wright, Robert Wood Maryville Political Science 

IRREGULAR COLLEGIATE STUDENTS 

Alexander, Zenas Ambrose Mansfield, Ark Political Science 

Bond, Lester EvErETT South Portland, Me. . General 

Brown, Olivia Jean Maryville, R. D. 5. . . General 

Butler, Ruth • Manila, P. I General 

Converse, Mary Flavia Morristown General 

Garrison, Nellie Jim Byington Ancient Languages 

Goddard, Joseph Maryville ! General _ 

Good, Edison B Harriman General 

KoehlER, George William .Maryville General 

Long, LorEn Essie Johnson City Ancient Languages 

Lowry, Eddie Louis Philadelphia, Miss . . . General 

McClain, Kate Evelyn Tate, Ga. General 

MaxEy, MaymE Rebecca Maryville English and History 

Montgomery, Myrtis . Maryville General 

Ogle, Nora May Knoxville Modern Languages 

Parham, Constance Maryville General 

Phillips, Mary Nice Lexington, Ind Bible Training 

Rankin, Mary Kate Dandridge General 

Samsel, Eva May Tate General 

SpEnce, James Carl Milford, O General 

Sugg, Catharine ShErbrookE Christiana General 

Wells, Jack Kelton Springfield General 

Wtllard, Pearl Maryville General 

Wilson, Henry Jasper Pryorsburg, Ky Ancient Languages 



68 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Ambrister, MadalEinE Sybilla . .Knoxville . Music 

Browning, Pearl Hall Maryville Music 

Buttram, Eolia Fay Huntsville . Music 

CaldwEEL, Carrie Lou New Market Music 

Cawood, Mary Charles . .Maryville Expression 

DeArmond, Mamie ^ Maryville Music 

GrEEn, Susan Allen Wakefield, Mass Art 

Henry, Zora Alice. Rockford Bible Training; 

KEEEER, Wanda CozinE Fort Recovery, O Music 

Kilpatrick, EmmET? Camden, Ala General 

McMurray, Beueah Chilhowee Music 

McNuTT, Frankie LEE Maryville Music 

McReynolds, Fideeia Constance. Maryville General 

McReynoeds, Jessie Margaret. . . Maryville Music 

Martin, Alta Wieeard Maryville Music 

Perry, Blanche Thompson Okisko, N. C Music 

Person, Annabel Howell, Mich Art 

Ramey, Dora Ellen LEE Oakdale Music 

Smith, Walter Albert Maryville General 

TarvER, Olden BarnvELdt Corryton Music 

TowE, Garland Darden Chapanoke General 

Weeks, Elizabeth Morgan Elizabeth City, N. C. Music 

Woeee, Greene Sneedville General 



Preparatory Department 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Alma McBryan Kelton, S. C Latin-Scientific 

Bryan, HeeEn Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Calloway, Henry Abbott Maryville Latin-Scientific 

CanTrELL, James Carlock Etowah Latin-Scientific 

Carver, Ralston Wilde Granite Falls, N. C. . General 

ChEEk, Mamie Anne Cornersville Classical 

Clemens, Frances Elizabeth Caldwell, Idaho Latin- Scientific 

Clemens, Mary Lucinda Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Conrad, Chauncey Egbert Fredericktown, Mo . . Classical 

Creech, Charles Bishop Whitesburg. . Latin-Scientific 

Dawson, Edna Elizabeth South Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Dawson, Eva Lavinia South Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Dean, Emma Leona Nesbitt, Miss Latin-Scientific 

Elmore, Linden Limon New Market Latin-Scientific 

Foster. Edna EarlE Blaine Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLH COLLUGH 69 



Graham, Ernest Robert Dandridge ' Latin-Scientific 

Hale, Frank FuekErson Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Cora Jane Walland, R. D. 2 Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Liey Canzada Cosby, R. D. 1 Latin-Scientific 

Jackson, Martha Frank Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Jenkins, Cora Mae Spencer, N. C Teachers' 

Karnes, Marie EeisE Huntington, W. Va. . Latin-Scientific 

Karr, Lula Harriman Latin- Scientific 

Xoehler, Margaret EmieiE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Lowry, Bernice LEE Maryville Latin- Scientific 

McBEE, Edgar Love Corryton Latin- Scientific 

McCeEnaghan, Wieeis CROWEEE-Jamesburg, N. J Latin- Scientific 

McCurry, Coy Mosheim Latin-Scientific 

McCurry, Euea Erskine Mosheim Classical 

McGaha, Wieliam Edgar Cosby Latin- Scientific 

Martin, Wieeiam Eare Maryville Latin-Scientific 

May, AeETha CeEEAnd Maryville Latin- Scientific 

O'Hair, Smith Paris, 111 General 

Park, Harweee Bennett Culleoka Classical 

Peeasants, Wieeiam Henry. .... Roxboro, N. C Classical 

Powee, Wieeiam Armstrong Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Proefitt, David Wieson Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Rankin, Rolee Montgomery Jet, Okla Latin-Scientific 

Ross, Jesse Barrance Cascilla, Miss Latin- Scientific 

Smith, Raymond Owens Maryville Latin-Scientific 

SueEtvan, Mamie Margaret South Knoxville. .... Latin- Scientific 

Tayeor, Murriee Maryville, R. D. 3 . . . Latin-Scientific 

Tedford, Mary Peare Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Thompson, Charees Eare Corryton Latin-Scientific 

Von Tress, Percy Aeeen Dallas, Tex General 

WaekEr, Wieeiam Barker Andrews, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Webb, Lieeian Gray Maryville Latin-Scientific 

WithERSPoon, Etta Huntsville, Ala Latin-Scientific 

Work, Ruth Anne Wooster, O General 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Aedridge, Adoephus Ervin Forest City, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Ardrey, Robert Hoet Fort Mill, S. C General 

AtwEEE, Harvey Smith Marion, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Badgett, Lon Maryville General 

Beankenship, Leon Horace Knoxville General 

Boring, Wieeiam Wieey Rasar .Latin-Scientific 

^Bradford, LucieE Geadys Byington ; . . . General 



7 o MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Caldwell, Alexander Bryan. . . .New Market Latin- Scientific 

Caldwell, Turner Anderson. . . .Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

Cantrell, Thomas Washington. Etowah General 

Carson, Dorothy Jean Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Carson, Thomas Cooke Vonore Latin-Scientific 

Caton, Herman Luther Cosby Latin-Scientific 

Cecil, Asbury Helen-wood. Latin- Scientific 

Clark, Mary Miller Maryville General 

Clemens, Bessie Dean Coeburn, Va Teachers' 

Cooper, Fern Vivian Maryville General 

CuEsta, Karl Bernardo Atlanta, Ga. Latin- Scientific 

Davis, Curtis Alexander Lenoir City Latin- Scientific 

Davis, Retta Fountain City. Teachers' 

Dobbins, Willard Clinton Latin-Scientific 

DouthiTT, Elizabeth Mae Louisville General 

EllEr, Loyd Zack Asheville, N. C Classical 

Frow, Lloyd Chandler Maryville, R. D. 2. . . General 

Gaines, Mary Frances Bloomingdale General 

GenthER, William LanTry Paterson, N. J Latin-Scientific 

Gordon, Elizabeth Arta Robinson, 111 Teachers' 

GroenEndykE, Grace Dean New Decatur, Ala. . .Latin-Scientific 

Hall, Frank Jackson Maryville General 

Hall, Mary Venita Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Henry, James Oscar Walland General 

Hodges, George WinErEd Boyds Creek Latin- Scientific 

Huee, Edith Elwood Emmett, Idaho Latin-Scientific 

HuEESTETLER, Frank Henry Maryville General 

Hutchins, Robert Dayton, R. D. 3 General 

Jackson, Eugene DeadErick Louisville Latin- Scientific 

LEGG, Pauline MEEK Straw Plains Latin- Scientific 

Lloyd, Carl Stanton Whiterocks, Utah. . . . Latin- Scientific 

McCaughan, William Aubrey . .Memphis General 

McClain, Julia Tate, Ga Latin- Scientific 

McElhose, James Bertram Elmer, Okla Latin-Scientific 

McGinlEy, Blanche Viola. Maryville . . .». Latin- Scientific 

McMahan, Lizzie Mazzilla Sevierville, R. D. 8. .Teachers' 

McReynolds, Clarence AlErEd . . Maryville Latin- Scientific 

MahER, Thomas DelanEy Roane Mountain Latin-Scientific 

May, Margaret Eunice Maryville Classical^ 

Miller, Eugene Clingman Rock Island Latin- Scientific 

Murray, Lela AgnES Greenback Teachers' 

Ogle, Eunice Knoxville ..'.".' General 

O'Hair, John Henry Paris, 111 Latin-Scientific 

Painter, John William Maryville Latin- Scientific 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 71 



Parker, John Francis Louisville, R. D. 2. . . Latiiir Scientific 

PiLEj Herman Owen Tyler, Tex r^at in-Scientific 

Pi'G,h. Harriet Darby Hyattsville, Md Latin-Scientific 

Quinn, Charles Fred Patrick. .Lancing . Latin-Scientific 

Qui nx, David Luther ". . .Lancing Latin-Scientific 

Raulstgn, Guy Chester Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Robertson, Bubber Caevin Newbern Teachers' 

RoRfNSON. GiebErT Oscar Patton, Mo Classical 

Samsel, Herbert Whiteeaw Tate Latin-Scientific 

SherrEr, Claude Ervin Rock Hill, S. C Latin-Scientific 

Shugart, Cooksey Groves Cohutta, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Siesby, ChareES Edwin Shanghai, China Classical 

Smith, ChareES Logan Harlan, Ky Classical 

Smith, Juua Chickasha, Okla Latin-Scientific 

S noddy, AddiE Carrie Morristovvn, R. D. 4. Latin-Scientific 

Stinnett, Dora Townsend Teachers' 

Stinson, Edgar Carroll Harveysburg, O Latin-Scientific 

Sugg, Margaret Sutton Christiana Latin-Scientific 

Taylor, Bonnie Aeice Kelso General 

Taylor, Thomas Jackson Kelso Latin- Scientific 

Tedford, StaciE ArbEELY Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Thomson, Charles Harrison. .Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Classical 

Tweed, Chapei White Rock, N. C. . . Latin-Scientific 

Van Keuren, Thomas FRANKLYN.Harriman Latin-Scientific 

Wallace, Hugh Alexander Maryville, R. D. 7. . . General 

Waller, Meredith Gentry Oliver Springs Classical 

Williams, Deck Christopher ... Cosby, R. D. 2 Latin-Scientific 

Wilson, Bertha Mary Maryville Classical 

WiTherspoon, Lucy Hnntsville, Ala. Latin-Scientific 

Wright, Alice Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Alexander, Lois Amy Mansfield, Ark Latin-Scientific 

Badgett, Frances LucilE Maryville General 

Baker, Mary LilliE. ., Mohawk General 

Barnett, Fielding Grady Horseshoe, N. C General 

Best, Elsie Mae Maryville General 

BicknELL, Guileord O Maryville Latin-Scientific 

BittlE, Joseph Calvin Maryville . General 

BrakEbtll, Anna Zula Maryville General ^ 

Bryden, Raymond Starr Washington, la General 

Bryson, Alton Davis Whitwell Latin-Scientific 

Campbell, Lillian Mae Erwin Latin-Scientific 



12 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Catlett, Jonnie WilliE. Maryville . . General 

Coile, Merrill Doak Jefferson City General 

Cox, James Orris Humboldt Latin- Scientific 

Cross, Ovia Gumfork General 

Cross, Sterling Gumfork General 

Dawson, Horace South Knoxville Classical 

Dunlap, Elizabeth Carolyn Bank, R. D. i Classical 

Edwards. Arthur Taylor Conasauga. .......... Latin- Scientific 

Farmer, S. Ester. Idol Latin- Scientific 

Felknor, Audley Ray White Pine General 

Fisher, Lavinia Concord, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Fox, John Howard Morristown General 

Fryar, Mary Irene Greenback Teachers' 

Fugate, Eugene French Rutledge General 

Gardner, Vera Martin Latin- Scientific 

Goddard, Kate Trula Maryville General 

Goddard, Myrtle Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin-Scientific 

Graves, Ray Aubrey Mansfield, Ark Latin-Scientific 

Hale, Arthur Armstrong Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Hale, Steven Porter Addison, Ky General 

Hamilton, Paul Carroll Hartford, Ark Latin-Scientific 

Harper, Irene Knox Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Harper, James Wileord Louisville General 

Harris, Charles Clarence Friendsville, R. D. i . Latin-Scientific 

Harris, George WillEy Memphis General 

Harrison, Helen Gainesville, Fla Latin-Scientific 

Haun, Nellie Larue Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Henry, MaymE Greenback General 

Henry, Nancy Cordelia Cosby, R. D. 7 Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Thomas Gilbert Martin Latin-Scientific 

Hill, Willie Kate Maryville General 

Hopkins, Cora Frances Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Hough, Chapman Ernest Mansfield, Ark Latin-Scientific 

HuddlESTon, Hiram Harold. . . . . Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Johnson, William Tipton Elizabethton Latin-Scientific 

Johnston, Lindsay Morris Pineville, N. C Latin-Scientific 

KiTTRELL, Robert French Maryville General 

Kittrell, Sara Louise Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Lane, Jay Hugh Russellville Latin-Scientific 

McCall, Newton ShEddan Greenback General 

McCullEy, Emma Mae Maryville, R. D. 2. . . Latin-Scientific 

McCully, Maud Elizabeth Maryville General 

McDonald, James DeVando Philadelphia, Miss. . . General 

McDonald, Jacob Hickman Rogersville Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 73 



McMurray, Tom Roy Maryville Classical 

McNuTT, MattiE Evalyn Maryville General 

McNuTT, Ruby Gray .Maryville Latin-Scientific 

McTEER, William Andrew Maryville Latin-Scientific 

MaxEy, Anna Mae .Rockford Latin-Scientific 

Means, Margaret LuctlE '■ ■ . Maryville General 

Mitchell, William RaE Corliss.. Whiterocks, Utah Latin-Scientific 

MizELL, Della Anna Greenback Teachers' 

Nicely, Julius Martin Washburn General 

Painter, ErSkinE Grills Maryville, R. D. 7. . . Latin-Scientific 

Parham, Stirling Edmond Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Parks, William BurnEy Cleveland Latin-Scientific 

Price, Charles Parkhurst Baltimore, Md Latin-Scientific 

Prichard, JEEEERSON Riley Dyersburg Latin-Scientific 

PrigmorE, Beulah Whitwell • . Teachers' 

Ramsey, Leonard Jerome Inman, S. C Latin-Scientific 

Raulston, JamES DukE Kodak Latin-Scientific 

Russell, Wade Sutton Rockford General 

SetzER, AvEry Catawba, N. C Latin-Scientific 

SHERROD, SenTER More Knoxville General 

Smith, Elbert Benjamin LaFollette. Latin-Scientific 

Stair, Paul Eugene Knoxville General 

Susong, John Calvin Walland Latin-Scientific 

Susong, SuELla Walland Latin-Scientific 

Taylor, AbbeE Louise East Nashville Latin-Scientific 

Thompson, Riley Luther Mint General 

Tucker/ Hubert Henry Knoxville General 

TyE, Robert Clarence Conasauga Latin-Scientific 

WaekER, Lora Trula Maryville Latin-Scientific 

WaekER, Rueus Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Latin-Scientific 

Waelin, Reuben Roy Harriman General 

Warwick, William Durant Pineville, N. C Latin-Scientific 

WELLS, Dorothy Carolyn Cleveland Latin-Scientific 

Williams, Ernest Ralph Wartburg Latin-Scientific 

Willis, Jackson Christopher. . . Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

WiTHERSPOON, John Knox Himtsville, Ala. Latin-Scientific 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Adams, John Ottomar New Providence, N. J.Latin-Scientific 

Allison, William Scott Hunter sville, N. C. . . Latin-Scientific 

Anderson, James Caswell Johnson City. R. D. 2. General 

Anderson, Minnie Florence Vonore General 

Ardrey, Joseph Alexander Fort Mill, S. C General 



74 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Armitage, George Frankijn Greeneville General 

Barnard, Claude Hurst Harriman General 

Beeler, Ernest Orren Washburn General 

Bennett, Charles Sumner. . .South Jacksonville, Fla. Latin-Scientific 

Bible, Willie Frank Greeneville .General 

Bogle, Leland Lyons Maryville . . General 

Bogle, MonniE T Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Boring, James Marcus Rasar General 

Brewer, Elmer Maryville . Latin-Scientific 

Briggs, David Hezekiah Marshall, N. C Latin- Scientific 

Bright, Leatha Fawn Chuckey Latin- Scientific 

Brown, ThEron Neeson Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Latin-Scientific 

Browning, Fletcher Worth Maryville . Latin-Scientific 

Browning, Susie ParmEEia Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Burchfield, Mary Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Butler, Judson Rea Manila, P. I Latin-Scientific 

Cameron, WESLEY Ennis Townsend Latin-Scientific 

CandeEr, Wieeiam Washington.. Candler, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Carmack, Wieeiam Eedridge Rogersville, R. D. 6. .Latin-Scientific 

Cassady, CeydE Inez, Ky Latin-Scientific 

Cateett, Mae Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

ChambErein, Harry Wieeiam . . . Milford, Mich Latin-Scientific 

Clark, AeeEn Long Maryville Latin-Scientific 

CeEment, Hugh Tieeman Idol Latin-Scientific 

CeEndEnen, Minnie BEEEE Walland Latin-Scientific 

CeEndenEn, Waeeace Walland Latin-Scientific 

CoiEE, Eugene Leland Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

CoieE, John Andrew JefTerson City. General 

Coleman, Frank Maryville General 

Conrad, Julius Casseee Alliance, Mo Latin-Scientific 

Coulter, HassiE Etta Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

DEES, WeseEy Philadelphia, Miss. . . Latin-Scientific 

Dumas, Jose Eeias Havana, Cuba General 

Dunn, Julia. Maryville General 

Eggers, Lura BEEEE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Eemore, Perkins Owens College Grove Latin-Scientific 

EneoE, Florence Katharine Sevierville, R. D. 4. . Latin-Scientific 

Ennes, Howard Wesley Asheville, N. C General 

Everett, Moses McClEllan Greenback General 

Eweee, John Edward Thomas. . . Baltimore, Md Classical 

Fisher, Frances Mae Concord, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Gamble, Bertha Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

George, Winnie Mae LaFollette, R. D. 3. . . Latin-Scientific 

Goddard, Mary Maryville Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 75 



GrEENE, Thelma J Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Hale. John Henry Murphy, N. C Latin-Scientific 

I j vkrell Grace Murfreesboro. Latin-Scientific 

HarrEll, Rufus Keley Murfreesboro, R. D. 8. Latin- Scientific 

Henry. Andrew Harrison Walland General 

Henry, Irene Ipe Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Ralph Edward New Market General 

Higgs, Rueus Feeix Tolar, Tex Latin-Scientific 

Mines. Minnis Cecil Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Hord Otto Leon Kings Mountain, N. C. Latin-Scientific 

Horner, Myrtle IsabELLE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Hunter, Millie Victoria . Dorothy, W. Va Latin-Scientific 

James. Susan Caddie Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin-Scientific 

James, Elijah Elihu Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin- Scientific 

Jenkins, Ray Howard Tellico Plains Latin-Scientific 

Kennon, George Herman Watkinsville, Ga General 

Kennon, Henry Carlton Watkinsville, Ga General 

King, Melissa EsTELLE • • . Maryville General 

Lamon, Howard Fielding Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Laney, Thomas Dillon Monroe, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Lawson, Enola Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 5- • • Latin-Scientific 

Lloyd. Evangeline Whiterocks, Utah. . . . Latin-Scientific 

Lloyd, Glen Alfred Whiterocks, Utah Latin- Scientific 

Love, Guy Basil Benton General 

Luntsford, Annie Amelia Rutledge General 

Luntsford, Dudley James Rutledge Latin-Scientific 

Luther. Thomas Don Candler, N. C Latin-Scientific 

McConnELL, Thomas Lamar Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Latin-Scientific 

McCurry, Luther Mosheim Latin-Scientific 

McDonald, AllirEnE Philadelphia, Miss . . . Latin-Scientific 

McDonald, LeRoy Francis Philadelphia, Miss . . . General 

McGhEE, William Edgar Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Maden, Ernie James Jonesboro General 

Marcum, Rosa Ada Helenwood Latin-Scientific 

Martin, Herbert Russell Maryville General 

Medcalf, Louis RoscoE Windridge, Pa General 

Medcalf, OrvillE Thomas Windridge, Pa. General 

Meek. Anna BELLE Straw Plains Latin-Scientific 

Moore, Ralph Blaine Russellville General 

Myers, Grover Cleveland Idol Latin-Scientific 

Neubert, Ora Ola Shooks Latin-Scientific 

NeubERT, Sadie Jane Shooks Latin-Scientific 

Parks, HarlEy Lovelace Ocoee Latin-Scientific 

PEndarvis, Daniel Eugene Harleyville, S. C General 



/6 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Phillips, Onva Kywood Norma , Latin-Scientific 

Fierce. Roy Hearld ..Tolar, Tex . n Latin-Scientific 

Quinn, Ray Lancing Latin-Scientific 

Rhodes, Ola . Apalachicola, Fla,,[>' Latin- Scientific 

Robbins. Charles Finley Chilhowee. .......... Latin-Scientific 

Roberts, George Daniel Cades Cove General 

Rowland, MiTTie Ellston Alexandria ; . Classical 

Sheddan, Blanche. . ., Jefferson City .General 

Sheddan, Hugh Jefferson City. ....... General 

Sisk, Augustus Ector, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Slater y, Pearl Gertrude Trundles Crossroads . Latin- Scientific 

Sloan, Ira Grant Vonore Latin-Scientific 

Smith, Harry Richard . Rutledge . . Latin- Scientific 

Stair, Alice Reba Knoxville . . Latin-Scientific 

Stanton, William Oswald. ... . . Limestone. General 

Strunk, Annie Elizabeth. ..... . Helenwood. , . ; . ; . , . . General 

Strunk, Emma Minerva . . : ->j . . Helenwood. . . . . .; ... General 

Summers, Paul Malcom Maryville ; -. ; ; ; . Latin-Scientific 

TallEnt, Jessie Maryville, R. D. # . . Teachers' 

Taylor, Joanna Newport Latin-Scientific 

Trent, Led Cameron Williams, W. Va. .... Latin-Scientific 

Trolinger, William Loeton Knoxville. General 

Tu'rlEy, Mary ValliE Cabell, W. Va Latin-Scientific 

Turner, Haskew Bybee Latin-Scientific 

Walker, Elsie Harriett Maryville Latin- Scientific 

Walker, George Wayne Andrews, N. C. Latin-Scientific 

Walker, John Jacob Henry, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Walker, Julia Maryville Latin-Scientific 

WALTERS, Lydia Alice Greenback, R. D. 2. . . Latin-Scientific 

Walters, Paul Edgar Greenback, R. D. 2. . . Latin-Scientific 

Warlick, William Wade Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Watts, Tom LEE Coal Creek Latin-Scientific 

Wells, Wade Samuel Maryville General 

Whetsell, TrissiE Elizabeth. . . . Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Latin-Scientific 

Wtlliams, Aubrey Willis Birmingham, Ala Classical 

Williamson, Ernest Lane Bailey, Miss Latin-Scientific 

Williamson, Margaret Esther. . Benton Latin-Scientific 

Wilson, Nellie Edith Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Young, Glenn Edward Maryville Latin-Scientific 



MAR YV1LLE COLLEGE 



SUB-PREPARATORY 

Alexander, Ellen Cullen Knoxville 

Alexander, Gustava Irene Greenback 

Alexander; Pearl Mae Kiser 

Armstrong. Lanty Walker. Greenback, R. D. 3 

Armstrong, Ruby Elizabeth • • McGhee 

Badgett, Eula May. • • • -Rockford 

Badgett, Jessie Belle Rockford 

BirchfiEL, Carl Vonore 

Bogle, Jennie Tunnell Maryville 

Bortng, Laura Marrah Rasar 

Boring, Mary Katharine. Rasar 

Bowman, AnnabellE- Jacksbor,o 

Brown, Margaret Luella Maryville 

Bryan, Edgar Sevierville, R. D. 5 

Byrd. Josephus ,. Norma 

Caldwell. Edith Fawn . . . Maryville 

Callaway, Lula May • Maryville 

Cash, John Henry McKinlEy Maryville, R. D. 7 

Clemens, Adeline TurrELL. Maryville- 

Clemens, Robert Broady Maryville 

Clement, Henly Rufus Idol- 

Cole. Harley Jay Marshall, N. C. 

Coxdra. Fred Bassel , • Whitwell 

Coulter, Addie Gillespy Walland, R. D. 1 

Coulter, Fred John Walland 

Douthitt, Lela Louisville 

Dunn, Charles Snider. Townsend 

Enloe, Walter Winton Sevierville, R. D. 4. 

Epperson, Charlie Tilm an Idol 

Everett, Walker David Maryville, R. D. 5 

Freeman, Nan Zirconia, N. C. 

Gamble, Helen Rebecca Maryville 

Gamble. James Thompson Maryville, R. D. 5 

Garland, Kara LEE Chilhowee 

Garland, Priscilla Chilhowee 

Gibson, Etta Mae Maryville 

Grant. Pearly William Chilhowee 

Grant, Roy William Caringer 

Grant, Vance Thomas Chilhowee 

IrEEne, Tyler Ido1 

Eregory, Alvin W t iij.\rd Cades Cove 

Bregory. Walter Abe Cades Cove 



/8 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Griffitts, Gladys LucieE Louisville 

Haddox, Thomas RoeeEn Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Haddox, Troy Mae Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Harmon, James Minnis Maryville, R. D. 4 

Henry, Betty Jane Cosby, R. D. 7 

Henry, Horace ChumeEy Tellico Plains 

Henry, Horace Herbert Sevierville, R. D. 16 

HEnry, NeeeE Marie Rockford 

Henry, Samuee Joseph Rockford 

Henry, ZeniE Maryville 

Higgins, Robert Maryville 

Hodges, Otis Boyds Creek 

Holt, Ouve Gertrude . Maryville, R. D. 1 

Howard, Irene Lawson Vonore 

Hurst, Peina Christopher ; Sevierville, R. D. 8 

Jackson, Euea Marian Maryville 

James, Carrie Dorcas Maryville 

James, Mary Lucinda Maryville 

Keener, John Benjamin Trundles Crossroads I 

Lambert, Annis Aegia ; Maryville 

Lambert, Waeter Rasar J 

Lawson, Wright Wieeiams Townsend 

LeQuire, Eela Mary Maryville, R. D. 6 

Leoyd, Hae LaFayette Whiterocks, Utah 

Lowe, Harle Vonore 

Lowry, Mae FeorinE Maryville, R. D. 3 

McCaeeiE, Hugh V Philadelphia' 

McCurry, Nancy Eeizabeth Mosheirrl ; 

McGinley, Wiefiam Robert Maryville ' 

McMahan, Baxter LEE Chilhowee 

McMahan, Cynthia Eeizabeth Chilhowee 

McMurray, Luke Chilhowee 

McNeieey, Nora Elizabeth Maryville, P. D. 5 

Magifl, ChareES Rankin Maryville 

Martin, Kenneth LEE , Maryville 

Montgomery, Joseph Bartey Maryville, R. D. 7 

"Neubert, Herman GambeE Shooks 

Ogee, Abraham Maryville, R. D. 5 

Parker, HeeEn CorriE .Louisville, R. D. 2 

Patton, John Edgar Adams 

PETTY, LaRue Knoxville 

Roberts, Wifeiam Eeijah Cades Cove 

Robinson, Sam Harry Knoxville 

Ross. Lanty Marion Mint 



MARYVILUi COLLEGE 7<> 



Ross, Tennie Mint 

RuETER, Kleeemann Hood • Maryville 

Russell, Cassie Lou Rockford 

feusSELL, Myrtle Maryville, R. D. 5 

RuTlEdge, Margaret Gertrude Maryville 

Simpson, Albert Bowman Philadelphia 

Simpson, Frank Magill Philadelphia 

Slatery, Floyd Alexander Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Slatery, Mary Melinda Bank 

Slatery, Patrick Henry Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Smith, Farnum BoguE • Johnson City 

Smith, John VenTis LaFollette 

Speer, Russell • Inez > K y- 

Stinnett, LilliE Townsend 

Stinnett, Mildred Townsend 

Stinnett, Sarah Townsend 

Sutton, Myra Christine : Townsend 

Swaggerty, Charles Bruce Maryville, R. D. 1 

Taylor, George Sylvester Maryville, R. D. 5 

TEEFERTELLER, Henry Stephen Maryville 

Toomey, Viola Elizabeth \ Maryville 

Tulloch, Cecil Clark Maryville 

Tweed, Sherman . . . .White Rock, N. C. 

Walker, Gertrude • Maryville. R. D. 6 

Walker, Wilburn ClESTER Louisville, R. D. 2 

Waller, Jane Knox Maryville 

Waters, Jim Martin Walland 

West, Clyde EcklES Maryville, R. D. 4 

White, Alsop Maryville, R. D. 6 

Wilkinson, Carrie Tipton Maryville, R. D. 5 

Wilkinson, Margaret Catherine Maryville, R. D. 5 

Wilson, Lamar Silsby Maryville 

Witherspoon, ManiE WalkEr Hiuitsville, Ala. 



8o 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



Classification by Departments 

College Department , 154 

Special Students 23 

Preparatory Department 353 

Sub-Preparatory 1 19 



Total. 



649 



Classification by States 



Alabama 13 

Arkansas 6 

California 2 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 5 

Georgia 7 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 6 

Indiana 

Iowa , 

Kentucky , 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 2 

Michigan 2 

Mississippi 8 

Missouri 4 

New Jersey 5 



New York 4 

North Carolina 34 

Ohio 9 

Oklahoma 6 

Pennsylvania 5 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee 476 

Texas 4 

Utah 6 

Virginia 1 

Wisconsin 1 

West Virginia 4 

Philippine Islands 2 

Porto Rico 

Brazil 

China 

Cuba 

Moravia 

Syria 



Total 649 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE «' 



CALENDAR FOR 1912-1913 



FALL TERM 
1912 

Sept. 10, Fall Term begins Tuesday 

Nov. 28, Thanksgiving Thursday 

Dec. 18, 19, 20, Examinations Wednesday-Friday 

Dec. 20, Fall Term ends Friday 



WINTER TERM 

1913 

Jan. 2, Winter Term begins Thursday 

Jan. 15, Meeting of the Directors, 10 a. m Wednesday 

Mar. 18, 19, 20, Examinations Tuesday-Thursday 

Mar. 20, Winter Term ends Thursday 



SPRING TERM 

Mar. 24, Spring Term begins Monday 

June 1, Baccalaureate Sermon Sabbath 

June i, Address before .the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A Sabbath 

June 2, 3, 4, Examinations Monday-Wednesday 

June 4, Class Day Exercises, 7 130 p. m Wednesday 

June 5, Meeting of Directors, 8:30 a. m \ . .Thursday 

June 5, Commencement, 10 a.m.. .Thursday 

June 5, Annual Alumni Dinner, 12 m Thursday 

June 5, Social Reunion, 8 p. m '. Thursday 



82 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



INDEX 



Administrative Rules 

Admission to College Depart 

ment 

Admission to Preparatory De 

partment 

Alumni Association 

Art, Department of 

Athletic Association 

Bartlett Hall 

Bequests and Devises 

Bible Study 

Bible Training Department . . 

Biology 

Board, Rates for 

Board of Directors 

Bookkeeping 

Buildings 

Calendar for 19 12-191 3 

Carnegie Hall 

Chapel 

Chemistry 

Committees and Officers 

Contests, Intercollegiate 

Cooperative Club 

Degree Offered 

Degrees Conferred in 191 1 . . 

Directors 

Education 

Endowment 

English Bible 25, 

English Language and L/ttsr- 

ature ...'.. .... 

Entrance Requirements 

Examinations 

Expenses 

Expression, Department of . 

Faculty 

French 

Geology and Mineralogy 

German . 

Graduation, Requirements for 
Greek 



PAGE 

58 



30 
. 56 

• 43 
55 
47 
63 

25, 37 

38-41 

18 

54 
2 

• 36 
46-49 

81 

. 48 

47 
16 

3, 7 

58 

5i 

10, 11 

56 

2 

16, 28 

44-45 
37-4o 

20, 32 

8-10 

30,58 

51-54 

43-57 

4-7 

24, 35 

17 

24, 34 

10, 32 

22, 34 



PAGK 

Grounds and Buildings 46-49 

Groups of Studies 11 

Hebrew . . 25 

History of the College 44, 45 

History, Department of 19, 35 

Honors, Graduation 57 

Hospital 48, 57 

Latin 21, 23 

Laundry 54 

Libraries 47, 49, 50 



54 
46 

57 
16, 33 

57 
42, 56 

62 



Literary Societies 

Location 

Lyceum Course 

Mathematics 

Medical Attention 
Music, Department of . . . 

Needs 

Organizations, Student 53 

Pearsons Hall 48 

Pedagogy 27 

Philosophy 13 

Physical Culture 57 

Physics 18, 36 

Physiography and Agriculture 36 

Political Science 14 

Power Plant 49 

Preparatory Department .... 30-37 

Psychology 13 

Publications, College 62 

Railway Connections 46 

Rooms 52 

Rules 58 

Scholarship Funds 60, 62 

Science Hall 47 

Self-help 60 

Spanish 24 

Students, Register of 64-80 

Teachers' Department 26-29 

Tuition 51 

Y. M. C. A. 54 

Y. W. C. A 54 



f~ 




OF THE 
"'Varsity OF ILLIMOtgL 



Mary ville College 
= Bulletin — 










Vol. XII MAY, 1913 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

Officers and Faculty . . 



ge/ 



PAG 

..... 4 



The Courses of Study ..... 8 

History and General Information . 47 

Expenses . . . 55 

Register of Students for 1912-13 . 68 

Index 88 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



MAR 31 

Published four times a year by 



Maryville, Tennessee 



Entered May 24, 1904. at Maryville, Teim., as seeond-elass 
matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 




u* 



14 



Maryville College 
Bulletin } 

ANNUAL CATALOG NUMBER 



For the Year 1912-1913 




Published by 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville ; Tennessee 



BOARD OFj DIRECTORS 






CLASS OF 1913 

Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, B.A Maryville 

James Addison Anderson, Esq Knoxville 

Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, M.A Maryville 

Hon. John Calvin Crawford, B.A., LL.B Maryville 

Judge Jesse Seymour L'Amoreaux New York, N. Y. 

REV. Thomas Judson Mii.es, M.A Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Washington College 

Governor John Powel Smith National Soldiers' Home 

Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Baltimore, Md. 

James Martin Trimble, Esq .Chattanooga 

* Rev. Eemer Briton Waiter, M.A Maryville 

Rev. David Goureey Wyeie, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

CLASS OF 1914 

Rev. Nathan Bachman, D.D Sweetwater 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Jonesboro 

Rev. Henry Seymour Butler, D.D Huntsville 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D Chattanooga 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A Maryville 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Alexander Russell McBath, Esq Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Hon. William Anderson McTeer Maryville 

William Edwin Minnis, Esq New Market 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingston 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D Maryville 

CLASS OF 1915 

Hon. William Leonidas Brown Philadelphia 

Rev. Newton Wads worth Cadwell, D.D Atlantic City, N. J. 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 1 

Rev. John Baxter Creswell, B.A Bearden 

Major Ben Cunningham Maryville 

Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxville 

Rev. Calvin Alexander Duncan, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. John Samuee Eakin, B.A Greeneville 

Rev. Woodward Edmund Finley, D.D Marshall, N. C 

Samuel O'Grady Houston, B.A, Knoxville 

Humphrey Gray Hutchison, M.D Vonore 

Colonel John Beaman Minnis Knoxville 



*Died March 39, 1913. 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



Officers of the Board of Directors: Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D., 
Chairman; Major Ben Cunningham, Recorder and Treasurer. 

Executive Committee of the Board of Directors: Hon. William Ander- 
son McTeer, Chairman; Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, Secretary; 
and Revs. William Robert Dawson, D.D., John McKnitt Alex- 
ander, and Elmer Briton Waeler. 

Committee on Professors and Teachers: Rev. William Robert Daw- 
son, D.D., Chairman; Prof. Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; and 
Hon. William Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, 
Dean Elmer Briton Waeler, and President Samuel Tyndaee 
Wilson. 

Jynodical Examiners for 1913: Revs. Alexander Jackson Coile, D.D., 
and Woodward Edmund Finley, D.D., and Chari.es Armstrong, Esq. 

r aculty Committees: 

Entrance: Professors Gillingham, McClEnahan, and Proffitt. 
Advanced Standing: President Wilson and Professors Barnes and 
Bassett. 

Scholarships: Professor Gillingham, President Wilson, and Miss 
Henry. 

Student Publications and Programs: Professors Bassett and Lyon, 

and Dean Waller. 
Intercollegiate Literary Contests: Professors Gillingham and Lyon. 
The Lamar Library: Professor Barnes. 
The Loan Library: Professor Bassett. 
Athletics: Professors Proffitt and McClenahan. 
The Cooperative Club: Dean Waller. 
Care of Buildings and Grounds: Professor Lyon. 
College Extension: Professors Barnes, Proffttt, and Gillingham. 
Recommendations: Professors Barnes, Bassett, and Lyon. 



FACULTY 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D, 

President, and Professor of the English Language and Literature, and of 

the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D, 
Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER BRITON WALLER, MA.,* 
Dean, Professor of Mathematics, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, MA., Ph.D., 
Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

4 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin. 

PHOEBUS WOOD LYON, M.A., Ph.D., 
Logic, History, and Pedagogy. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 
Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, and Head of the Bible Training 

Department. 

FRANCIS MITCHELL McCLENAHAN, M.A, 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

EDWARD GEORGE SEEL, B.A., 
German and French. 

MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, B.A., 
English Language and Literature. 

SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A., 
Biology. 

ANNABEL PERSON, B.A., 
Greek. 

GEORGE HARLEY DOUGLAS, 
Assistant in Psychology Laboratory. 



*Died March 29, 1913. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



EDWIN RAY HUNTER, 
Assistant in Chemistry Laboratory. 

ALMA MABEL ARMSTRONG, 
Assistant in Chemistry Laboratory. 

JULIA HALE DILLON, 

Assistant in Biology Laboratory. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, B.A., 
Principal of the Preparatory Department, and Professor of Education. 

MARGARET ELIZA HENRY, B.A., 
English. 

MRS. ESTELLE SNODGRASS PROFFITT, B.A., 
Latin. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A., 

Mathematics. 

MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, B.A., 
English and Bible. 

ALICE ISABEL CLEMENS, B.A., 
English. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 
History. 

ANNA DsVRlES, Ph.B, 
German and French. 

ALMIRA ELIZABETH JEWELL, B.A., 
Latin and English. 

MARY EMMA RENICH, M.A., 
Physics and Mathematics, 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, B.A. 
Latin. 

LLOYD HELVETIUS LANGSTON, 
Bookkeeping. 

NANNIE LEE BROADY, B.A, 
English. 

HATTIE BELLE LESTER, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

ELLA McCAMPBELL, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

IRVING KIP STEARNS, 
Assistant in Physics. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

INEZ MONFORT, 
Voice, History of Music, and Theory. 

LAURA BELLE HALE, 
Piano. 

REV. EDWIN WILLIAM HALL, 
Vocal and Band Music. 

REV. THOMAS CAMPBELL, M.A., 
Painting and Drawing. 

EDNA EDITH ZIMMERMAN, Ph.B, 
Expression. 

LESTER EVERETT BOND, 

GEORGE EDMUND WILLIAMS, 

Physical Directors. 



OTHER OFFICERS 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 
Treasurer. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, 
Manager of the Loan Library. 

MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, 
Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODGRASS, 
Librarian. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 
Proctor of the Grounds. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 
Proctor of Carnegie and Memorial Halls. 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 

Secretary to the Scholarship Committee. 

CORINNE FLEMING TETEDOUX, 
Secretary to the President. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 
Secretary to the Treasurer and the Registrar. 

MRS. WILLIAM PETER BARNHILL, 
Matron of Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 
Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

EMMIE LAURA DARBY, 
Assistant Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

robert McMillan magill, 

Bookkeeper of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

GEORGE HARLEY DOUGLAS, 

HENRY JASPER WILSON, 

Assistant Librarians. 

VICTOR CHARLES DETTY, 
Assistant in Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER, 
Janitor. 



MARY VI LIB COLLBGB 



THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are expected to be at 
least sixteen years of age and of good moral character. Candidates coming 
from other institutions must bring letters of honorable dismissal. Appli- 
cation for admission to the Freshman Class or to advanced standing should 
be made on the regular application blank of the College. This blank pro- 
vides for the necessary testimonial of character and certificate of honorable 
dismissal, as well as for a complete statement of all studies completed. 
This blank is to be signed by the president or principal of the institution 
from which the applicant comes. The Registrar will mail a copy of the! 
application blank upon request. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is the equiv- 
alent of five forty-five minutes' recitation periods a week during a full 
academic year, in subjects above the eighth grade of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen units are 
required, as specified below : 

1. ENGLISH.— Three units required. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write correctly and 

clearly; a knowledge of the principles of punctuation, cap- 
italization, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature recom- 

mended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Require- 
ments in English. For the texts recommended for study 
and practice and for reading in 1912-1913, see the lists 
scheduled for the Preparatory Department, page 35. 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Four units required. 
Latin. — Four units may be offered. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Caesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, ^Eneid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology, prosody. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Greek.— Two units may be offered. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, Anabasis, 

Book i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv ; Homer, Iliad, Books i-iii. 

Composition, mythology, prosody. 

German.— Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and compo- 

sition. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, with 

reproduction and composition. 

French.— Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of about 

five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one thousand 

pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, ratio 

and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial 
and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and 
equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original demon- 

strations. 

4. NATURAL SCIENCES.— Two units. 

5. ELECTIVE.— Three units. Any three units of standard high- 
school work that may be accepted by the Committee on Entrance. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITIONS 

A candidate may be admitted with conditions if the number of his 
conditions does not exceed two. Not more than one condition will be 
allowed in mathematics and none in English. All entrance conditions must 
be absolved before admission to the Sophomore Class. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, not 
matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Preparatory 
Department. 

IprEGUEAr ColeEGIATE Students.— Candidates offering for entrance a 
sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in^ the Freshman 
Class, but deficient in more than two of the specified units required by 
this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee on Entrance, be 



10 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



admitted as irregular collegiate students until they have absolved their 
conditions and attained full standing in a regular college class. Students 
of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregular or partial course and not 
seeking a degree may be allowed to select such studies as they show them- 
selves qualified to pursue. 

Special Students. — Students desiring to study only music, expression, 
or art, and those seeking only the courses in the Bible Training Depart- 
ment, are classified under their respective departments, They have all the 
privileges offered to any students, such as the advantages of the libraries, 
the literary societies, the dormitories, and the boarding club. Young women 
rooming in the college dormitories and desiring chiefly music, expression, 
or art, are required to take a sufficient number of literary courses to make 
up, together with their work in the departments mentioned, fifteen reci- 
tation hours a week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. To attain the degree a minimum of thirty-six courses must be 
completed. A "course" is a study pursued for five one-hour recitation 
periods a week throughout one term. A term is one-third of the scholastic 
year, and three courses in any subject constitute, therefore, a year's work 
in that subject. All courses recite five hours a week. Laboratory courses 
in the natural sciences require additional hours. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four full years 
of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the minimum amount 
required of all students. Since all courses recite five hours a week, fifteen 
hours a week is the normal amount of work expected of each student. A 
student is permitted to take four courses a term (twenty hours a week) 
if his average grade in the subjects pursued during the preceding term was 
not less than ninety per cent. 

Twenty-eight of the thirty-six courses are required ofcandidates for 
the Bachelor's degree in all groups, and are distributed as follows : 

English, 6 courses. 
Other Languages, 8 courses. 
Mathematics, 3 courses. 
Science, 4 courses. 
Philosophy, 1 course. 
Psychology, 1 course. 
Bible, 5 courses. 

In addition to these twenty-eight courses, eight courses must be elected 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 11 



from the following groups in order to make up the total number of thirty- 
six required for graduation: 

1. Classical. 

2. Modern Languages. 

3. Science. 

4. Mathematics. 

5. Education. 

6. English Literature and History. 

7. Psychology and Philosophy. 

8. Economics and Political Science. 

9. General. 

The requirements for Groups 1, 2, and 3 are as follows : In the Class- 
ical Group, twelve language courses shall be taken, and may be arranged 
in one of the following combinations: (a) Latin six and Greek (or Ger- 
man) six; (b) Latin nine and Greek (or German or French) three; (c) 
Greek nine and Latin (or German or French) three. In the Modern Lan- 
guages Group, twelve courses in modern languages (or eleven, in case 
Spanish is elected) shall be taken. In the Science Group, besides the four 
required science courses, seven additional courses, either of chemistry or 
of biology, shall be taken, and at least two years of German or French. 

The requirements in the Mathematics, Education, English Literature 
and History, Psychology and Philosophy, and Economics and Political 
Science Groups are that all the courses offered in the respective groups 
shall be taken. 

Students that meet all the requirements for graduation but do not 
meet the requirements of any of the afore-mentioned groups shall be grad- 
uated in the General Group. The name of the group in which a student 
graduates will be indicated on the diploma. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

The Board of Directors have adopted the following rule as to the 
degree of Master of Arts: 

That the degree of Master of Arts in course be conferred upon grad- 
uates of the College after three years of academic, collegiate, theological 
seminary, or university post-graduate work; the presentation of a thesis 
upon a topic assigned by the Faculty, the thesis to be approved by the 
Faculty; and, finally, the payment of five dollars for the diploma. The 
thesis must be deposited with the Faculty by the first of April. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not granted by this institution. 



SYNOPSIS OF COLLEGE COURSES 



Freshman Year 

Mathematics 

Latin , 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Psychology 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Sophomore Year 



English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

French 

Biology 

Psychology . . 
Philosophy . 

History 

Education . . 
Bible 



Junior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Physics 

Philosophy 

Political Science. . . 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Senior Year 

English 

Mathematics , 

Latin 

Spanish 

Hebrew , 

Geology and Mineralogy. 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Psychology 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Education 

Bible 



Fall 

*1 

1 

1 

1 

*1 
1 

1 
1 



*1 

4 
3 
4 
4 
1 
tl and 



6 

7 
4 

tl 
*2 

4 

J7 



1 
1 
1 

7 

*4 

3, 5, and i 

£10 or 11 



Winter 
*2 

2 
2 

*2 

2 
1 

2 
2 



*2 
5 
4 
5 
5 
2 

ta 



4 

{5 



*5 
6 

7 
7 



5 
t2 

1 

5 



2 
2 
2 
8 
9 

t3 

6 



Spring 
*3 
2 
3 
3 
3 



is 



*3 

5 

11 

6 

3 

U 



*6 

7 

8 
9, or 10 
and 10 

6 
7, or 8 



9 and 10 
9 

10 



3 

9 

10 

5 and 6, 

*4 

7 
7 and 8 



7 or 



♦Required in all groups leading to a degree. 

fTwo courses are required: either Biology i and 2; 3 and 4; or 1 and 3; or Physics 1 and 2. 

tRequired Bible may be taken in any term, but Seniors take Philosophy 3 and 4. 



MARYVILLE COLLBGB 13 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



PHILOSOPHY 

Dean Waiter, Professor Barnes, and Professor Lyon 

1. Sociology. Wright's Outlines of Practical Sociology is used as a 
text-book, including the subjects of units of social organization, questions 
of population, question of the family, the labor system, social well-being, 
and the defense of society. Collateral reading and reports on assigned 
subjects are required. Sophomore year, spring term.— Dean Waller. 

2. Logic. Hill's Jevons' Logic, studied in connection with questions 
and exercises prepared for the class. The practical work given in the 
exercises appended in the text-book is required, and also much original 
work in Induction connected with every-day questions, the aim being to 
make the study of practical service in such reasoning as will be met by 
the student in his subsequent experiences in life. Junior year, fall term,— 
Professor Lyon. 

3. The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief. Dr. Fisher's work 
is made the basis of class-room study and recitation. The principal theistic 
and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the main historical and 
philosophical arguments for belief in the Christian religion are considered. 
Senior year, winter term.— Dean Waiter. 

4. Ethics. The leading conceptions of moral theory are approached 
by the historical method. The student is led to see that moral problems 
are real problems, which are solved best by reflective thought that is guided 
by Christian ideals. The various types of ethical theory are discussed. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the ethics of social organizations: the 
state, the economic life, and the family. The text of Dewey and Tufts is 
placed in the hands of the students, and is supplemented by the works of 
Sidgwick, Green, Martineau, and Spencer. Prerequisite, Psychology 1 or 4. 
Senior year, spring term. — Professor Baknes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Barnes 
1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for students 
taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supplemented by 
lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology is 



14 MARYVILLB COLLEGH 



used as a text-book This course is identical with Education 1. Freshman 
year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
problems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
relations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, apper- 
ception, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented by lectures. This 
course is identical with Education 2. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view, 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Education 4. Sophomore year, winter term. 

4. Advanced General Psychology. A study of the psycho-physical ; 
organism by means of the Auzoux models, sensation, habit, attention, per- ) 
ception, memory, imagination, reasoning, emotions, and volition. Typical 
experiments. Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports. Senior year, \ 
fall term. 

5. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades: a study of the ' 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This ' 
course is identical with Education 8. Senior year, spring term. 

6. Social Psychology. A study of group consciousness and social | 
origins. Relation of the psychic life of the group to the group activities. 
Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. 
Comparison of the mental traits of different races and social classes. Psy- 
chology of the crowd, the mores, and folkways. Open to Seniors and to 
Juniors who have had Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. Senior year, spring term. 

7. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experiments in 
acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titchener's Experi- 
mental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by the works of Kiilpe, 
Sanford, Judd, and Myer. Senior year, spring term. 

8. Experimental Psychology. This course is a continuation of Course 
7. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reaction experiment 
by the use of the Hipp chronoscope. Senior year, spring term. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 15 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Barnes and Dean Waller 

1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the nation, 
and of the character and distribution of nationalities; a development of 
the idea and conception of the state, and a study of its origin, forms, and 
ends ; a history of the formations of the constitutions of the states of Great 
Britain, the United States, Germany, and France, and of the organization 
of these states within their respective constitutions, and a study of liberty 
as guaranteed in their constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' Political 
Science, Volume I, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and Thayer's 
and McClain's Cases, and the works of other authors. Junior year, winter 
term. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the construc- 
tions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judicial depart- 
ments of the governments of Great Britain, the United States, Germany, 
and France. The text-book is Burgess' Political Science, Volume II, sup- 
plemented by the works of Story, Macy, and other authors. Junior year, 
spring term. 

3. International Law. This course consists of the elements of inter- 
national law, with an account of its origin, sources, and historical develop- 
ment. Lawrence's text-book is used, and the course is supplemented by 
prescribed readings in the works of Woolsey and Hall, and in Scott's and 
Snow's Cases. Senior year, fall term. 

4. The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This course 
is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure and procedure, 
national, state, and municipal ; it includes also a study of the structure and 
procedure of political conventions and similar bodies, and the theory and 
practice of parliamentary law. Open to students who have had Political 
Science 1 and 2. (Not to be given in 1913-14.) 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and methods 
of action of political parties in the United States. Growth of the party 
system ; primary and convention systems ; permanent party organization ; 
reform movements ; and the value and theory of the party system. Senior 
year, fall term. 

6. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Ogg's Governments of 
Europe is used as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Governments and Par- 
ties in Continental Europe. Senior year, winter term. 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great Britain, 



16 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



and the United States. Ogg and Lowell are the texts, supplemented by 
Taswell-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and Story. Senior 
year, spring term. 

8. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the element- 
ary principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. Hall's text and 
McClain's and Thayers' Cases are used. (Not to be given in 1913-14.) 

9. An elementary course in Political Economy. Seager's Principles 
of Economics is used, with supplementary reading, including the usual 
divisions of production, exchange, distribution, and consumption, with some 
applications of economic principles. Members of the class are required 
to submit in writing a summary of their collateral reading on assigned 
topics. Senior year, fall term.— Dean Waiter. 

EDUCATION 

For the courses in Education see the descriptive text regarding the 
Teachers' Department 

MATHEMATICS 

Dean Waller 

1. Solid Geometry begun and finished ; Conic Sections as given in 
Book ix of Wentworth's Geometry. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry, including functions of acute 
angles, the right triangle, goniometry, and the oblique triangle. Freshman 
year, winter term. 

3. Wentworth's Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. This work 
includes the application of spherical trigonometry to the problems of the 
celestial sphere in astronomy, and enough field work is given to illustrate 
the principles of compass surveying. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. 5. Plane Analytic Geometry. This course includes the study of the 
subject as given in Wentworth's Analytic Geometry, omitting the supple- 
mentary propositions. Sophomore year, fall and winter terms. 

6, 7. Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus as given in Tay- 
lor's Elements of Calculus; Osborne's Treatise used in supplementary 
work. Junior year, winter and spring terms. 

8. Wentworth's College Algebra, beginning with the subject of choice 
and chance, and including variables and limits, series, determinants, graph- 
ical representation of functions, and general solutions of equations. Pre- 
requisite, Mathematics 2 and 3. Senior year, fall term. 

9. Astronomy. The subject as presented in Young's General Astron- 
omy is made the basis of study and recitation. Senior year, spring term. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE ^ 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor McCi^nahan and Laboratory Assistants 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A beginner's course in modern 
chemical theory and practice. A clear comprehension of the fundamentals 
of the science is required of all who receive credit for the course. Suitable 
text and experiments are selected, but the requirements center about the 
demonstration lectures and their accompanying oral and written quizzes. 
Laboratory practice, four hours each week. Lecture periods, two hours 
each week. Oral and written quizzes alternate one hour each week. Fresh- 
man year, fall term. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1, during 
the first half of the winter term. Second half of the winter term, an 
introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis. Laboratory practice, six 
hours each week. Lecture, one hour each week. Quizzes as in Course 1. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 1. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Qualitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 2. Gooch 
and Browning's manual. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2. Freshman year, spring 
term. 

4. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A laboratory course of eight hours 
each week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods ordinarily employed 
in quantitative chemical analysis. The instruction is individual, and there 
is continual reference to the well-stocked reference library and to current 
literature. Independence of thought is the aim, and the most scrupulous 
care to exactness of technique is required. One hour each week in addition 
is devoted to quizzes and informal discussions. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 
2, and 3. Junior year, fall term. 

5. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 4. 
Junior year, winter term. 

6. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 5. 
Junior year, spring term. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Lecture or quiz, one hour each week. 
Laboratory practice, eight hours each week. Cohen's Theoretical Organic 
Chemistry and the accompanying manual are the guides in the course, but 
free use of other literature in both the synthetical and theoretical study 
of the science is encouraged. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Senior 
year, fall term. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 7. Senior 
year, winter term. 

9. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 8, with 

? 



18 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



some definite applications to biological chemistry, both analytical and theo- 
retical. Senior year, spring term. 

For acceptable substitutes for Chemistry courses in the Science group, 
see Geology and Mineralogy. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor McClfnahan 

1. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of eight hours each week, accom- 
panied by one hour lecture each week. Brush-Penfield's Determinative 
Mineralogy is the manual. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Senior 
year, fall term. 

2. General Geology. Dynamic and Structural. Chamberlain and 
Salesbury's College Geology is the text. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, 
and 3. Senior year, winter term. 

3. General Geology. Historical. A continuation of Course 2. Much , 
use is made of the United States Geological Folios and Atlas. Also occa- \ 
sional field trips are made to interesting localities in the county. Senior ' 
year, spring term. 

Geology 1, 2, and 3 may be substituted for Chemistry 7, 8, and 9 by \ 
students electing the Science group. 

PHYSICS j 

Professor McCefnahan 
1. Heat, Light, and Sound. Lectures, selected experiments, problems, j 
and quizzes. Kimball's College Physics is used as the text-book in this j 
course. Prerequisite. Chemistry 1 and 2, and Mathematics 2. Recitations 
or lectures, two hours ; quiz, one hour ; and laboratory, four hours. Junior ! 
year, fall term. 

2 Magnetism and Electricity. A continuation of Course 1. Junior 
year, winter term. 

BIOLOGY 

Miss GrFFn and Laboratory Assistants 

1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Class-room work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisites, elementary physiology and Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, 
three hours ; laboratory, four hours. Sophomore year, fall term. 

2. General Vertebrate Zoology. Class-room work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 19 



Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, three hours; laboratory, 
four hours. Sophomore year, winter term. 

3. Botany. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Emphasis 
is laid upon the chief problems involved in the physiology, ecology, and 
morphology of the seed, the developing plant, and the flower. Text-book, 
Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Recitations, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Sophomore year, fall 
term. 

4. Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey of the 
four great plant groups. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Recitations, 
three hours ; laboratory, four hours. Text-book, Bergen and Davis' Prin- 
ciples of Botany. Sophomore year, spring term. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most evident life rela- 
tions of plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant physiology. 
Class-room work, accompanied by experimental work in the laboratory. 
The work is not confined to any one text-book, but references are given 
out to various standard text-books on plant physiology. Prerequisite, 
Biology 3. Recitations, three hours ; laboratory, four hours. Junior year, 
winter term. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed study of 
the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts, smuts, mildews, 
and molds renders this a valuable course from an economic standpoint. 
Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, Biology 4. Recitations, three 
hours; laboratory, four hours. Junior year, spring term. 

7. Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Mosses, 
liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thoroughly studied. 
The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the surrounding region makes 
this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Biology 4 and 6. Recitations, 
three hours ; laboratory, four hours. Junior year, spring term. 

8. Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 4, 6, and 7. Recitations, three hours ; laboratory, four 
hours. Junior year, spring term. 

9. 10. Advanced Physiology. Class-room work and laboratory experi- 
ments, bringing out the fundamental principles of the circulatory, res- 
piratory, digestive, and nervous systems. This course is especially valuable 
to students intending to take up the study of medicine. Prerequisites, 
elementary physiology, elementary physics, Biology 2, and Chemistry 1 
and 2. Recitations, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Senior year, 
winter and spring terms. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 6, 7, 



20 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



or 8. B-y this alternation of courses, a student will be given an opportunity 
to pursue the subject further than would otherwise be possible. 

HISTORY 

Mrs. Alexandre and Professor Gieeingham 

1. Nineteenth Century History. The object of this course is the study 
of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed from the 
French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of republican ideas 
in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment of the German Empire, 
and the revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848. Special topics for 
individual study are taken up by each member and pursued throughout the 
course. Freshman year, winter term. — Mrs. Alexander. 

2. History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the influ- 
ence of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, the German Reformation. 
The work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed authors, but 
students are required to submit oral reports of special library work. Fresh- 
man year, spring term. — Mrs. Alexander. 

3. Church History. A general survey of the history of the Church 
from the first century to the present time, with especial emphasis upon the 
great leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text-book and library work. 
Sophomore year, spring term. — ProEESSOr Gileingham. 

4. 5. American History. In this course, students are expected to cen- 
tralize their work upon one line of development — constitutional, economic, 
social, ethical, or religious — and the result of the special work is to be 
handed in as a term theme. Junior year, fall and winter terms. — Mrs. 
Alexander. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

President Wieson, Mrs. Alexander, and Professor Lyon 

1. Outlining and Argumentation. Five Weeks. — Outlining or analysis 
of topics for discussion. This practical work is done in accordance with 
a system of principles and rules collated by the instructor in charge. The 
absolute necessity of method in all composition is emphasized by this 
course. At least fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by each 
student, and criticised and returned by the professor. Nine Weeks. — 
Argumentation. This course follows the course in outlining and involves 
the application of the principles presented in that course in the production 
of finished argumentative exercises, which are delivered in class, and criti- 
cised by the instructor. Attention is given to the delivery as well as to 
the thought and composition, since the aim of the course is to develop the 



MARYV1LLB COLLUGB 21 



power of effective public address. Sophomore year, fall term.— President 

WlLSON. 

2, 3. Rhetoric. Genung's Practical Elements of Rhetoric, with illus- 
trative examples, is studied, and the students are familiarized with the prin- 
ciples of style and invention; while practical exercises accompany the study 
of the text-book. This is accompanied by work in Rhetorical Analysis, 
consisting of practical application of the principles referred to above. The 
work is altogether practical, and consists of rhetorical criticism of selec- 
tions of English prose and of original work in sentence structure, para- 
graphs, and longer compositions prepared by the students both in and for 
the recitation room. Sophomore year, winter and spring terms.— Pro- 
fessor Lyon. 

4. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial liter- 
ature. The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the works of 
the leading American poets and prose writers of the nineteenth century. 
Library work and Page's Chief American Poets. Junior year, fall term.— 
Mrs. Alexander. 

5, 6. English Literature. A survey of the entire field of English Lit- 
erature from its beginning to the death of Victoria. As a guide, Long's 
History of English Literature is employed, but much use is made of Saints- 
bury, Garnett and Gosse, and other advanced works in this subject. The 
development of the literature from period to period is carefully noted, and 
the works and characteristics of the more prominent authors are studied 
and criticised. Junior year, winter and spring terms.— Professor Lyon. 

7. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course will be a study of rep- 
resentative nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial attention to the 
development of the essay and of prose fiction. The work will be based on 
typical essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Stevenson, and Arnold ; 
and representative fiction by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, 
Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling. Senior year, fall term.— Mrs. Alex- 
ander. 

8. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting the 
development of his poetic art ; with introductory lectures on the evolution 
of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. Senior year, 
winter term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

9. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tennyson, 
and Browning, with introductory lectures, class-room criticism, and papers 
on assigned subjects. Senior year, spring term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

10. Theme Writing. This course gives instruction and practice in 
the four kinds of composition : exposition, argumentation, description, and 
narration. Daily exercises and themes are written and criticised in class. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



These are designed to illustrate the use of words and the structure of sen- 
tences and paragraphs, and to give general practice in writing on various 
subjects. In addition, at least four themes, of from a thousand to fifteen 
hundred words each, must be handed in. Senior year, spring term. — Mrs. 
Alexander. 

LATIN 

Professor Bassett 

1. Livy, and Latin Composition. Livy, four hours ; Latin composition, 
one hour. Livy, Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The class 
makes a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. Syn- 
tax receives close attention. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by 
the professor in charge. Sight reading. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. De Senectute and De Amicitia, and Latin Composition. De Senec- 
tute and De Amicitia, four hours; Latin composition, one hour. A careful 
study of De Senectute, followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the author's thought and style, and to securing 
an elegant translation. Latin prose based on the text is prepared by the 
professor in charge. Translation at sight and at hearing. Freshman year, 
spring term. 

3. Cicero and Pliny. Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny. 
The letters read will be such as illustrate the life and customs of the times 
and the characters of the writers. Sight reading. Prerequisite, Latin 1 
or 2. Sophomore year, fall term. 

4. Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together with Course 5 
presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace. By this time 
the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatical structure of the 
language to enable him to study the poems of Horace from a literary view- 
point. Special attention is paid to the metrical structure, and the class 
receives thorough drill in scansion. Prerequisites, at least two of the 
preening courses. Sophomore year, winter term. 

5. Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal. A continuation of Course 4. The class makes a careful study 
of the origin and development of "Roman satire. Prerequisite, Latin 4. 
Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of the Junior year 
consists of a thorough and systematic review of the whole period of Roman 
literature — its beginnings, development, and decline — with special refer- 
ence to its connection with Roman history. The three courses should be 
taken in succession. The texts used are Fowler's History of Roman Liter- 



MARYV1LLB COLLBGB 23 



attire and Smith's Latin Selections. Readings from representative authors. 
Lectures by the professor in charge. Reports are required on assigned 
portions of the various histories of Latin literature. Sellar's Roman Poets, 
Tyrrell's Latin Poetry, and other reference works. The work of this term 
is a study of the fragments of early Latin, the plays of Plautus and Ter- 
ence, Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Catullus, and the prose writers of the 
age of Cicero. Prerequisites, Latin -± and 5. Junior year, fall term. 

7. Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. A 
continuation of Course 6. Selections from Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics 
and Books vii to xii of the ^Eneid. Ovid and the Elegiac Poets, and the 
prose writers of the period. Junior year, winter term. 

8. Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and Post- 
classical Latin. A continuation of Course 7. Selections from Lucan, 
Seneca, Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius, 
Minucius Felix, and others. Junior year, spring term. 

9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from the 
writings of Seneca. The class makes a critical study of the historical 
setting, structure, and purpose of the Agricola. The characteristics of 
Silver Latin as illustrated in the style of Tacitus and Seneca receive close 
attention. Senior year, winter term. 

10. Teachers' Course. This course is intended to assist those who 
expect' to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the prin- 
ciples of the language, the class considers the most effective methods of 
teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. Open to students who have had at least 
one reading course. This course is identical with Education 7. Senior 
year, spring term. 

GREEK 

Miss Person 

1, 2, 3. This course is designed only for students sufficiently well pre- 
pared in other subjects to enable them to complete the entrance Greek in 
one year. The work of the fall term purposes to secure a mastery of the 
principal inflections, a careful study of the principles of syntax, and facility 
in reading and writing easy sentences in Greek. In the winter term the 
reading of the Anabasis is begun, continuing through the spring term with 
a thorough review of Greek grammar and Greek composition. Selections 
from other authors are brought in for sight translation. Freshman year, 
fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Herodotus and Thucydides. Selections from the works of Herod- 
otus and Thucydides are read. A careful study of the dialect of Herod- 



24 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



otus is made, and special reading is assigned on the rise and development, 
of history as a division of Greek literature. A study of the history of 
Greek literature is begun, based on Wright's and Jebb's texts, with assigned 
reading in Mueller and Mahaffy. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are read, and the 
peculiarities of the late Attic style are studied. The study of the history 
of Greek literature is continued. Sophomore year, winter term. 

11. Greek Testament. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, 
Westcott and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's 
and Robertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the assigned 
text, a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek, 
the literature of this period, and the most important New Testament man- 
uscripts and versions. Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Plato. The Phaedo is read for the immortal teachings of Socrates, 
with the Apology or the Crito for his life and death. Brief outline of 
pre-Socratic philosophy. A study is made of the philosophic dialog and 
of Plato's literary style. Sight translation from easy Attic prose. Junior 
year, fall term. 

7. Tragic Poetry. iEschylus' Seven against Thebes or Prometheus 
Bound, and Sophocles' CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone are read in alter- 
nate years, with one play from Euripides, either Alcestis or Iphigenia in 
Tauris. The origin and development of tragedy, the Greek theater, and 
other related topics are discussed in lectures and studied in assigned read- 
ings. Junior year, winter term. 

8. Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. The 
development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and Greek life 
are studied. One hour a week is given to the study of Greek architecture, 
based upon a text-book, supplemented by lectures and the examination of 
drawings and stereographs. Alternates with Courses 9 and 10. Junior 
year, spring term. 

9. Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute the 
basis of a general study of the rise and development of political oratory 
and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written translations are 
required to develop accuracy and elegance in rendering the polished style 
of the classical orators. One hour a week is devoted to lectures and dis- 
cussions on Greek sculpture and painting, Tarbell's History of Greek Art 
being used as a text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 10. Junior year, 
spring term. 

10. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course cov- 
ering the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine books is 
read in the original and the intervening portions in a translation. Merry's 




if 



I Mi 







MARYVILLB COLLBGH 25 



two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a class-room text. Homeric 
geography, politics, religion, home life, and art are studied in connection 
with the reading of the text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 9. Junior 
! year, spring term. 

GERMAN 

Mr. Sttu 
1, 2, 3. This course is intended for students well prepared in other 
subjects to enable them to complete the entrance German in one year, 
so that they can enter earlier the study of advanced German literature. 
Grammar, Joynes and Meissner. Composition. Reading such texts as 
Marchen und Erzahlungen, Von Hillern's Holier als die Kirche, Freytag's 
Die Journalisten, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, or Lessing's Minna von Barn- 
! helm. Memorizing some of the best poems. Freshman year, fall, winter 
and spring terms. 

4, 5, 6. Rapid reading of modern literature, and a critical study of 
one of the great works of Schiller or Goethe. Such works as Zwischen 
den Schlachten by Elster, Sudernlann's Die Heimat, Frau Sorge, Goethe's 
Faust and Dichtung und Wahrheit, Fulda's Der Talisman, Schiller's Wal- 
lenstein's Tod. Sophomore year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

7, 8, 9. Advanced German composition and conversation. This course 

j: is conducted in German and consists in the translation of representative 

English prose in the German idiom. Careful training in German phonetics. 

Prerequisites, German 1, 2, 3, and 4, or equivalents. Junior year, fall, 

| winter, and spring terms. 

10. Teachers' Course. A general review of German grammar, his- 
torical and comparative syntax, synonyms, and characteristics of German 
style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. Open to students 
that have had at least one reading course. This course is identical with 
Education 6. Junior year, spring term. 

FRENCH 

Mr. $$$u 
1, 2, 3. This course is designed for those who enter college without 
French and are sufficiently well prepared in other subjects to enable them 
to complete the grammar and easy prose in the fall term. The course 
consists of the reading of the most representative authors, some of which 
reading is done independently of the class room. The classical drama as 
represented by Racine, Corneille, Moliere ; also French prose of the seven- 
teenth century by Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, and Bossuet. Soph- 
omore year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE, 



SPANISH 

President Wilson 

1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning with 
the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of English 
into Spanish and of Spanish into English. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Galdos' Marianela; El Si de las Ninas; conversation and compo- 
sition. Senior year, winter term. 

HEBREW 

Processor Gieeingham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading of easy 
portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's Inductive Hebrew 
Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion of both 
courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced standing 
in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year, winter term. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Proeessor Gieungham 

1. Life of Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Teachings of Jesus. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. Apostolic Christianity. Sophomore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. Senior year, fall term. 
These courses are described under The Bible Training Department. 
Five courses in Bible and allied subjects are required for graduation. 

Three of these must be in English Bible, and may be taken during the 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years in any term. The required work 
for Seniors consists of the allied subjects, The Grounds of Theistic and 
Christian Belief (Philosophy 3), and Ethics (Philosophy 4). 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE ™ 



THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A large percentage of the graduates and undergraduates of Maryville 
College become teachers. They are found in all sections of the United 
States, especially in the Southern Appalachian region, and in the South- 
west and West, and are employed in elementary schools, high schools, and 

The instructors in the various departments of the College endeavor 
to conduct their work in such a way as to help train teachers both by the 
thoroughness of the instruction given in the various branches, and by the 
object lesson of the methods employed in the class rooms. Competent 
teachers selected from many colleges and universities bring the best 
methods of those schools to their work at Maryville. The teachers trained 
at Maryville rank high in sound scholarship and practical pedagogy. 

Besides providing model methods in college management and class- 
room work, the College maintains a special department for the vocational 
training of teachers. . 

In the Teachers' Department a six years' course of study designed to 
equip prospective teachers thoroughly for their profession is offered. 

PREPARATORY 

The first four years correspond closely to the regular courses of the 
Preparatory Department, and these four years contain sixteen units of 
academic work. Those completing these four years are admitted to the 
Freshman Class of the College. 

Synopsis of Courses — The following is a synopsis of the courses in 
the four preparatory years : 

First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year 

English I English II English TTT Physics I 

Physiology I Mathematics II Mathematics III Mathematics TV 

Latin I Latin II Lat. Ill or Ger. I I at IV or Ger. II 

History I History II Physiography and Pedagogy 1 

Agriculture I, or 
♦Mathematics I *Bookkeeping I U. S. History and *History IV 

Government III 

♦ Maybe taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of the Prepar- 
atory Department. 



28 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Pedagogy I — ( ) School Management. This part of the course is 
designed to inculcate practical views of class management that will enable 
the teacher to handle classes successfully in the common schools. Among 
the subjects discussed are the teacher's part in school government, the 
pupil's part in school government, incentives, punishments, school evils and 
how to deal with them, length of recitation, examinations, promotions, and 
the like. Seeley's School Management is used as a text-book, supplemented 
by extensive reference to other authors. 

(b) Methods of Teaching. The work of the winter term is devoted 
to the study of the various methods of teaching. The difference between 
the Object Method, the Direct Method, and the Development Method is 
shown by numerous illustrations ; the advantages and disadvantages of each 
are pointed out; and the method of combining them practically in teaching 
the fundamental subjects in our schools is carefully developed. 

(c) Methods of Teaching. In the spring term the methods learned/ 
are applied to the routine of the .school room ; actual practice in teaching 
reading, language, arithmetic, geography, and other studies is given; and; 
the work of the year is reviewed and unified. White's Art of Teaching' 
and McMurry's Method of the Recitation are used in both winter and ' 
spring terms. — Principal Proffitt. 

These courses are open also to such students in the college classes as ; 
may desire special work in these lines. Teachers who enter College after \ 
the Christmas holidays may join the class. 

Special Courses — To accommodate teachers who enter College after ' 
the Christmas holidays, special courses in history, civics, higher arithmetic, ! 
and grammar are offered. For example, Normal English Grammar is a j 
course based on an extensive study of technical English grammar. The ; 
subject is presented from the teacher's standpoint, methods of teaching are 
discussed, and each member of the class is required, at times, to take his 
turn in conducting the recitation. Later in the year methods of teaching \ 
composition are discussed. 

Special Double Courses — Teachers and others who enter College after 
the Christmas holidays may take up any full-year course offered in the cur- 
riculum of the preparatory years for which they are prepared. College 
courses may also be taken by those who have had sufficient preparation. 
In addition to these regular courses, and the special courses referred to 
above, special double courses in Beginning Latin and Beginning Algebra 
are provided, by which a full year's credit in these studies may be secured 
during the winter and spring terms. The classes recite ten hours each 
a week, and prepare respectively for Caesar and Advanced Algebra. For 
the successful completion of the double course in either Latin or Algebra 
one unit credit will be given; for any of the other preparatory courses, 
proportional credit will be allowed. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



29 



Reading Circle— Lectures are given on the books adopted by the Ten- 
>ssee Teachers' Reading Circle. All teachers have the privilege of attend- 
^g these lectures. Prospective teachers are accorded the same privileges 
5 are teachers. 

Other Courses.— Detailed descriptions of the courses outlined in the 
>ur preparatory years of the Teachers' Department will be found under 
apartments of Instruction in the Preparatory Department, pages 34 to 39. 

COLLEGE 

The work of the two college years of the Teachers' Department cor- 
responds somewhat to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years of the 
: olWe Seven of the eight courses of the College Department of Equ- 
ation are completed during these two years, thus giving the student that 
ompletes the work of the Teachers' Department a very thorough voca- 
ional training. The courses in pedagogy, psychology, and the history ot 
ducation are conducted in accordance with the best normal methods now 
a vogue. Those completing the work of this department may, after two 
wears' additional work, graduate from the College in the Education Group 
>f studies and receive the Bachelor's degree. 

Synopsis of Courses— The following is a synopsis of the courses in 
he two college years : 



Fall 

1 
1 
1 



Winter 

2 
2 

2 

2 
2 



Spring 

3 
3 

3 
3 



Sixth Year 

Education . 
English 

Biology 

Or Latin or 

German. . 

Bible 



Fall 

3 
1 
1 



Winter 

4 

2 



Spring 
5,6,7 



6 



?ifth Year 

Education. . 
Mathematics 
Chemistry 
Jr Latin or 

German 
Bible .... 

Education— 1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for 
students taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supple- 
mented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psy- 
chology is used as a text-book. This course is identical with Psychology 1. 
Fifth year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
problems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
relations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, appercep- 
tion, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education supplemented by lectures. This 
course is identical with Psychology 2. Fifth year, winter term. 

3. History of Education. A study of the educational systems of early 
China, Greece, and Rome; the history of Christian education; the rise 



30 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



of the universities; the Renaissance; and the educators of the sixteenth, 
seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. A careful study is made 
of such modern educators as Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, and 1 
Horace Mann. The last part of the course is devoted to the comparison 
of the school systems of Germany, France, England, and the United States. 
Monroe's History of Education is used as a text-book. Sixth year, fall 
term. 

4. Child Psychology — Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view, 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed! 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Psychology 3. Sixth year, winter term. 

5. Problems in Secondary Education. Present ideals in education. 
The moral element in education. Adolescence and education. The dis- 
ciplinary basis of courses of study. The high-school curriculum. History 
of the high-school curriculum since the Renaissance. Arts and technology 
in secondary education. The social organization of the high school. Ath- 
letics in education. Sex pedagogy in the high school. The school and the ] 
community. On sending boys and girls to college. High School Edu- 
cation, by Johnston and others, is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
Hall's Problems in Education, lectures, and reports by students. Sixth 
year, spring term. 

6. Teachers' Course in German. A general review of German gram- 
mar, historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, characteristics of Ger- 
man style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. This course is ' 
identical with German 10, and is open to students that have had at least 
one reading course. Sixth year, spring term. 

7. Teachers' Course in Latin. This course is intended to assist those 
who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the 
principles of the language, the class considers the most effective methods 
of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. This course is identical with Latin 10, and 
is open to students that have had at least one reading course. Sixth year, 
spring term. 

8. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades: a study of the 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 31 



these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
course is identical with Psychology 5, and is open to Seniors and to those 
who have completed Education 1, 2, and 3. 

Other Courses Detailed descriptions of the other courses offered in 

the synopsis of the college years of the Teachers' Department will be found 
under Departments of Instruction in the College Department, pages 13 
to 26. 



32 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of the Preparatory Department is to furnish thorough 
courses of training in high-school branches leading to entrance to the 
Freshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted to make up their 
conditions in this department. Students in the Teachers' Department take 
their first four years' work in preparatory courses, and Bible Training stu- 
dents have the privilege of electing studies in this department. Oppor- 
tunities are provided also for a large and worthy class of young people, 
with limited means and time at their command, to obtain some preparation 
for their future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
are available to students in the Preparatory Department. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates from 
principals of secondary schools will, however, be accepted and credit given 
for equivalent work in any of the subjects required for graduation. Credit 
thus given is conditional, and will be canceled in any subject in which the 
student is found to be deficient. Full credit for physiology or physics will 
not be given unless a reasonable amount of laboratory work has been done 
in connection with the text-book work. Diplomas must be accompanied by 
certified statements of the amount of time devoted to each subject studied, 
and the passing grade, together with the name of the text-book used and 
the ground covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for 
examinations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 
if indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
as testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases students 
coming from other secondary schools, whether asking for credits or not, 
must present letters of honorable dismissal from their former principals. 
Students that have been out of school for a number of years are admitted 
under the general rule that all candidates for admission must furnish satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character, and must have completed the 
common-school branches. Students that have not had the advantage of 
sufficient preparation and that fail to pass the entrance examinations are, 
if not too deficient, prepared for entrance in a room provided for that pur- 
pose. Applicants under fifteen years of age, unless residents of Maryville, 
will not be admitted. 




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34 MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers three courses of study : the Classical, the Latin- 
Scientific, and the General. The Classical and Latin-Scientific Courses pre! 
pare for college entrance. The General Course is offered for the benefit 
of those who are not preparing to enter college. In case a student afteij 
completing the General Course decides to enter college, opportunity will be 
given him to make up the four foreign language units while pursuing col- 
lege work in other subjects. All regular courses of study begin in the fal 
term and continue throughout the year. These courses may be entered a 
the opening of the winter or spring term, provided the student has had the 
work of the preceding term or its equivalent. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in any course are sixteen units o 
work as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the equivalent o 
five forty-five-minute recitation periods a week in one subject throughou 
the academic year. A student may elect any one of the three courses, bu 
must pursue the studies prescribed in the course elected for at least ori 
year, unless change is made in accordance with the administrative rule 01 
page 62 regarding changes of course. The prescribed work is four rec? 
tation periods a day. Partial work may be permitted at the discretion q 
the Principal. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on the uni 
basis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be so indicated o; 
the records, and unit credit for that subject withheld until the studeri 
shall have completed the year's work. A minimum of three units, seventy 
five per cent, of the year's work, will be required for advancement \ 
classification to the following year. The passing grade in the Preparator; 
Department is seventy. 

ENGLISH 

First Year : I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by the be? 
modern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. Oral dri 
is given in the retelling of familiar stories from standard American an 
English authors. Written themes are required weekly, in which drill : 
given on capitalization and punctuation, and, in an elementary way, o 
unity and coherence in the paragraph and the sentence. 

Second Year : II. Composition and Rhetoric. Brooks and Hubbard 
text is made the basis of this year's work, and written themes are require 
weekly. A further study is made of unity and coherence in the compositic 
and in paragraphs; and practice is given in variety of sentence structur 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 35 



During the year the work is supplemented by the study of selections from 
the prescribed requirements for college entrance. 

Third Year: III. English Literature. A study is made of the texts 
prescribed by the College Entrance Examination Board. During the year 
themes are required based on topics that arise from the study of literature. 
Special care is taken that these themes shall be an expression of the opinion 
of the student. 

The prescribed texts for 1912-13 were as follows : 

For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Comus, I/Allegro, and 
11 Penseroso; Washington's Farewell Address; Webster's First Bunker 
Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson. 

For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and As You Like 
It; Bacon's Essays; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal; Longfellow's 
The Courtship of Miles Standish; Hawthorne's House of Seven Gables; 
George Eliot's Silas Marner ; Irving's Sketch Book ; Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner; Scott's Lady of the Lake; Selections from the Old Testament. 

MATHEMATICS 

First Year : I. Higher Arithmetic. A thorough course in arith- 
metic is offered. The subjects considered are percentage and its various 
applications, exchange, equation of payments, progressions, involution and 
evolution, mensuration, ratio and proportion, and the metric system. 

Second Year: II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New 
Standard Algebra, to radicals. 

Third Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, 
ratio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial and expo- 
nential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and equations in general. 

Fourth Year : IV. Plane Geometry. Five books of plane geometry, 
together with about three hundred original theorems and problems. Went- 
worth's Revised Geometry is the text-book used. 

LATIN 

First Year: I. First Latin. Pearson's Essentials, supplemented by 
outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is completed in the spring 
term, and is followed by the reading of Viri Romae or some book of like 
grade. 

Second Year : II. Caesar and Latin Composition. Caesar, four periods 
each week ; Latin composition, one period. During the year outlines are 
given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. The first four books of 



36 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



the Gallic War are completed. The texts used are Allen and Greenough's 
Csesar and Allen and Phillips' Latin Composition. 

Third Year : III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In the; 
fall and winter terms : Cicero, four periods each week ; Latin composition, 
one period. The four orations against Catiline, the Manilian Law, and the 
Archias. In the spring term : Sallust, four periods each week ; Latin com- 
position, one period. Sallust's Catiline. A careful comparison is made 
with Cicero's Catilinarian orations. Special attention is paid to drill in 
pronouncing the Latin, intelligent reading in the original, and translation 
at sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year: IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is spent in 
the study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The principles of quan- 
tity and versification are carefully studied. Thorough drill in oral and 
written scansion. Sight reading. The course covers the first six books oi 
Vergil's ^Eneid. The last three weeks of the spring term are devoted to 
prose composition. 

GREEK 

Third Year : I. Beginning Greek. Pronunciation as given in White's 
First Book and in Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Daily drill on forms; 
Review outlines on various topics are presented by the instructor or pre- 
pared by the student and preserved in his note book for permanent refer- 
ence. Bi-weekly reviews and frequent written tests throughout the year 
In the spring term the Anabasis is begun, in connection with the review 
of inflection and daily exercises in composition. 

Fourth Year : II. Anabasis. The fall and winter terms are devotee 
to the reading of Books ii-iv. Goodwin and White's Anabasis is the text 
book used. The geography of Ancient Greece and Asia Minor is studied 
Semi-weekly drill in prose composition, based upon the lessons in the text 
In the spring term the Iliad, Books i-iii, is read, omitting the Catalog o 
the Ships. Mythology and geography are studied as required for the ful 
understanding of the text. Review translation and sight reading are prac 
ticed daily, with drill in the identification of Epic forms and the turnin; 
of selected passages into Attic prose. Special attention is paid to scansioi 
and the laws of versification. 

GERMAN 

Third Year: I. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This course con 
sists of the principles of German pronunciation, inflection, rules of synta> 
the rewriting of easy English sentences in German, and the memorizing c 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 37 



familiar poems. The work of the winter and spring terms is augmented 
w reading Bacon's Im Vaterland. 

Fourth Year : II. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This course in- 
•luilcs advanced grammar and syntax, use of modes, derivation of words, 
force of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted to conversation and 
romposition work of an intermediate character. The reading consists of 
>uch works of descriptive and narrative prose as will impart facility in 
:ranslation. Storm's Immensee, Benedix' Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's 
3ermelshausen, Heine's Die Harzreise, Mezger and Mueller's Kreuz und 
2ner. Memorizing of longer poems. 

FRENCH 

Third Year : I. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course consists 
>f a thorough foundation in the elements of French grammar and the 
:onj ligation of irregular verbs. Composition, and reading of such authors 
is Guerber's Contes et Legendes, Dumas' La Tulipe Noire, Merimee's 
Colomba. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course con- 
sists of advanced grammar, composition, and conversation ; a paper each 
erm on some book to be read outside of class ; and the reading of Buffum's 
Short Stories, Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Moliere's L/Avare, and Greville's 
Dosia. 

HISTORY 

First Year: I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian and 
Driental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alexander, fol- 
lowed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 476 A. D. This 
work is carried throughout the year and is required in all the courses. 

Second Year : II. Medieval and Modern History. A general survey 
oi European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 A. D., to 
the present time. This work will be centered on the history of France. 
Carried throughout the year. Required in all courses. 

Third Year : III. Advanced United States History and Government. 
A survey of the history of our country from its beginning to the close 
of the nineteenth century. This course is designed to give the student a 
thorough knowledge of the settlement of the country by European colo- 
nists in the seventeenth century, the struggle with France for supremacy 
in America, the cause, course, and consequence of the American 'Revo- 
lution, the development of the Union under the Constitution, the slavery 
struggle, and the final advance of the country to the position it occupies 
to-day. Combined with the above, a thorough course in Civics is given, 



38 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



with careful detail of the Constitution and its Amendments. Channing's 
text is used. 

Fourth Year : IV. English History. A brief outline of the history 
of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the periods of 
the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course is intended to 
give the student a good general knowledge of the history of our mother 
country and to prepare for subsequent courses in English literature and 
higher United States history. Carried throughout the year. 

BOOKKEEPING 

Second Year : I. Bookkeeping. Thorough courses conducted through- 
out the year according to the practical methods employed in business col- 
leges. Students may enter any part of the course in any term. No extra 
charge is made for this work. The Twentieth Century Bookkeeping is the 
system used. 

PHYSICS 

Fourth Year : I. Elementary Physics. This course purposes to give 
the student a knowledge of the fundamental principles of physics and of 
their applications in every-day life. Three recitation periods and four labo- 
ratory periods a week. Text-books, Hoadley's Elements of Physics and 
Hoadley's Physical Laboratory Handbook. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY AND AGRICULTURE 

Third Year: I. Physiography. This is an advanced high-school 
course in physical geography, and treats of the general conditions of the 
lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. This course includes a study of 
dynamic, structural, and historical geology, and embraces the main features 
of the geology of Tennessee. The class-room work is supplemented by 
field trips and by the study of topographic maps and stereographic views. 
In the spring term a practical course in general agriculture is given. This 
course includes a study of such important subjects as plants and their 
improvement, soil in its relation to plant growth, injurious insects, seed 
testing, and the improvement of home and school yards. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

First Year: I. Human Physiology. This is a high-school course, 
and presupposes the study of physiology in the common school. Much 
emphasis is placed upon laboratory work. The student examines fresh 
materials, models, and slides prepared for compound microscopes, and per- 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 39 



tonus about fifty experiments. Two recitation periods, a written quiz, and 
two laboratory periods a week. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

First Year: Studies in the First Book of Samuel. Seven weeks 
during the spring term. Required in all courses. 

Second Year : Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. Required 
in all courses, in the fall term. 

Third Year : The Life of Christ. A text-book adapted to secondary 
students is used, and the subject is taught so as to prepare for the more 
advanced course offered in the College Department. Thirty-five lessons in 
the winter term, required in all courses. 

Fourth Year: A study of Bible characters for seven weeks during 
the fall term. Required in all courses. 

The Principal will each year arrange the student's hours so that these 
courses will not conflict with other required courses nor add to the required 
number of hours a week. 

Note.— Students are also required to pursue a weekly Bible study in 
the Bible classes of the Christian Associations of the College or the Sab- 
bath-schools of the town. 



40 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department was established in 1907 through the 
generosity of the late Mr. John Calvin Martin, of New York City, whose 
gift of $20,000, together with a like amount set aside by the Board of 
Directors, made the department possible. This department provides bib- 
lical instruction for all the students enrolled in all other courses of the 
institution, and offers exceptional advantages for young men and young 
women wishing to prepare themselves for Christian service as lay work- 
ers, Sabbath-school workers, pastors' assistants, mission teachers, or Bible 
readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of graduation 
will be granted those completing twenty-seven courses selected under the 
direction of the head of the department from the following groups : 

I. Bible Training courses of college grade, all of which are required 
except those in Bible languages : English Bible, eleven courses ; Bible Lan- 
guages, three courses; Missions, two courses; and Practical Work, two 
courses. These courses are described in the ensuing paragraphs. Courses 
will be alternated, a sufficient number being given each year to meet 
requirements. 

II. Other college courses from which supplementary work may be 
elected: English 1, 2, 3, and 10; Philosophy 1, 2, 3, and 4; Psychology 1, 
2, 3, 4, and 5 ; Education 3 ; History 3 ; and Spanish 1 and 2. These courses 
are described under The College Department. 

III. Preparatory courses from which supplementary work may be 
elected : Physiology I ; Pedagogy I ; and Bookkeeping I. These courses 
are described under The Preparatory Department. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gillingham, Mr. Halt,, Mrs. Alexander, and Miss Alexander 

1. Life of Christ. The study of the life of Christ is based on a har- 
mony of the Gospels. As an introduction to the course a rapid view of 
the period between the Testaments is taken, and the principal character- 
istics of each of the four Gospels are studied. Text-books : Stevens and 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 41 



Burton's Harmony of the Gospels and Burton and Mathews' The Life of 
Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. A careful study of Genesis, the geography 
of Palestine and surrounding countries, and the general mechanics of the 
Bible. The object of the course is, in addition to the mastery of the 
subject matter, to develop systematic habits and methods of Bible study. 
Text-books: the Bible (R. V.), Davis' A Dictionary of the Bible, and 
the professor's outlines. Reference reading is assigned. Freshman year, 
winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. A continuation of Course 2. The work is 
more rapid, covering Exodus to Ruth. Special attention is paid to the lives 
and characters of Israel's leaders during this period. Text-books, same as 
in Course 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. A continuation of Course 3, beginning with 
I Samuel. The national development, the conflicts of Judah and Israel, 
their governments, their subjugation and partial restoration, their social 
customs, the character of their leaders, and their influence upon their con- 
temporaries, are studied. An outline course, preparing for detailed treat- 
ment of the most important parts in Course 10. Text-books, same as in 
Course 2. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. An analytic and synthetic study based 
on the words of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels. Use is also made of 
his works and of the evangelists' commentaries in helping to determine the 
nature of Jesus' teaching. Dr. James Robertson's Our Lord's Teaching is 
used also as a text-book. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. The Apostolic Church. A historical study of the early church 
based on the Acts and Epistles. Text-books : the New Testament (R. V.) 
and Gilbert's A Short History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age. Soph- 
omore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. This course treats very briefly 
General and Particular Introduction, and brings the entire Bible before the 
student in rapid review. Text-books: Robertson's The Old Testament 
and Its Contents and M'Clymont's The New Testament and Its Writers. 
Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. An outline study of Job, Proverbs, Eccle- 
siastes, Song of Solomon, and selected Psalms. Introductory lectures on 
Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature. Portions of the books are studied 
in detail and their relation to other sacred literature and their importance 
in Christian experience are emphasized. No commentaries are used as 
text-books, but required readings are assigned; and the professor furnishes 
a syllabus of each book. Junior year, winter term. 



42 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



9. Prophets of Palestine. The methods outlined in Course 8 are 
followed. The prophecies are reviewed chronologically in the light of 
contemporaneous history. Messianic prophecy is given special attention. 
Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. A search study for 
advanced students. The great leaders of Israel and their messages are 
carefully studied. Three or more characters are studied a term, the entire 
Old Testament being covered during a succession of years. Commentaries 
suitable to the nature of the work are used. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. A search study for 
advanced students. This alternates with Course 10 and pursues the same 
method of study. Senior year, fall term. 

Courses for Preparatory students. For First Year students : Studies 
in the First Book of Samuel; thirty-five lessons. For Second Year stu- 
dents: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. For Third Year stu- 
dents : The Life of Christ ; thirty-five lessons. For Fourth Year students : 
A study of Bible characters; thirty-five lessons. 

BIBLE LANGUAGES 

12. Hebrew. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and 
reading of easy portions of the Old Testament. Text-books: Harper's 
Inductive Hebrew Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Senior 
year, fall term. — Professor Gixungham. 

13. Hebrew. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion 
of both courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced 
standing in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year, winter 
term. — Professor Giujngham. 

14. Greek. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, Westcott 
and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's and Rob- 
ertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the assigned text, 
a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek, the 
literature of this period, and the most important New Testament manu- 
scripts and versions. Sophomore year, spring term. — Miss Person. 

MISSIONS 

15. Mission Methods. Two weeks or more are given to each of the 
following subjects: (1) The Southern Mountaineers, President Wilson. 
(2) The Foreign Missionary, President Wilson. (3) City Missions, 
Proffssor Lyon. (4) The Home Mission Teacher, Miss Cauwfix. (5) 
The Foreign Mission Teacher, Miss Hfnry. (6) The Sabbath-school 
Missionary, Mr. Haw,. Sophomore year, fall term. 



MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 43 



16. History of Missions. A brief survey of the history of Christian 
missions, with special attention to the principles and methods of thos^e of 
modern 'times. Sophomore year, spring term.— Professor Giujngham. 

PRACTICAL WORK 

Professor Giujngham 

17. Bible Teaching : Principles and Practice. This course has refer- 
ence especially to personal work and the conducting of Bible classes. The 
history, organization, and management of the Sunday school are studied. 
Lectures, quizzes, and practice under the direction of the instructor. 
Freshman year, spring term. 

18. Religious Address : Principles and Practice. Preparation for re- 
ligious services, missionary programs, and the like ; selection and develop- 
ment of themes; sources and use of illustrations; addresses on special 
occasions and to special audiences ; and drill in the reading of hymns and 
passages of Scripture. As much practical work is done by the student as 
possible. Sophomore year, spring term. 



44 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



THE DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

The liberality of an anonymous donor, who has contributed the Mary 
Esther Memorial Endowment Fund, makes it possible for the College to 
add a Domestic Science Department to the privileges already afforded its 
students. The courses scheduled in this department will be open to all 
students without extra tuition, the only additional expense being a small 
laboratory fee. The department will be inaugurated at the beginning of 
the fall term of the coming college year. A special bulletin containing the 
courses to be offered, and all other necessary information regarding the 
department, will be published during the summer vacation, and can be had 
upon application. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Miss Monfort and Miss Hai,e, and Mr. Haw, 

In this department opportunity is given pupils for instruction in piano, 
voice, theory, harmony, and history of music. Private lessons are half an 
hour in length, and class lessons one hour. Diplomas are granted to such 
students of piano and voice as pass the requirements. 

Piano. — In the piano work the teacher's aim is to cultivate in the stu- 
dent a clear, concise production of tone and an intelligent interpretation of 
melody. The elementary studies used are those of Kohler, Matthew, Ber- 
tini, Czerny, Kuhlau, Low, Diabelli, and Clementi. More advanced works 
include those of Cramer, Haydn, Mozart, Schumann, Handel, Beethoven, 
Bach, and Chopin. Pupils are trained not only in solo work, but also in 
ensemble playing. 

To receive diplomas pupils in piano are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. They are required also to 
have a repertoire of six compositions from classic composers of Grade VI, 
and to be examined in the playing of some of these compositions. They 
are also required to be able to read at sight a piano selection of Grade III. 
One of the six numbers is to be worked up by the pupil without help. 

Voice;. — In this department great care is given to voice building. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 45 



Stress is laid on correct breathing. Exercises are given to produce tones 
that are round, full, and clear. Ballads and songs of opera and oratorio 
are taught. Attention is paid to sight singing. Special training is given 
advanced students who intend to teach music. 

To receive diplomas in voice, pupils are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have an 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. A repertoire of ten songs 
from Grade VI is required, one from an oratorio or one from an opera, 
and one sacred. One of these ten songs is to be learned by the pupil with- 
out help. Sight reading of a song of Grade III is also required. 

Monthly recitals are given, through the medium of which the student 
gains self-control and ease of manner when appearing before the public. 

In addition to the private instruction given as described in the above 
courses, the College offers free instruction in the following branches, which 
are under the direction of Mr. Hall: 

Chorus and Choir.— Instruction is given free to any students desiring 
to take the work of chorus and choir singing and sight reading. 

Band.— Instruments are furnished by the College, and the band is 
composed entirely of students in this institution. 

GlLE Club.— This is accessible to any young men that have a fair 
knowledge of the rudiments of vocal music. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Campbell 

This department furnishes those desiring it with instruction in free- 
hand drawing and in painting in oil and water color. The lessons in draw- 
ing are given without extra cost to the student, and are designed to lay a 
solid foundation for work on industrial and artistic lines. The art room 
has a supply of casts ; and, in addition, the student is encouraged to draw 
from the objects of nature around him. 

Painting is taught by such practical methods as produce beautiful 
results, which far exceed in value their trifling cost. The instructor in this 
department has enjoyed exceptional advantages in the pursuit of art study 
during three years in England, France, and Italy; has executed many 
commissions in copying important works in some of the finest European 
galleries; and has had a teaching experience of more than thirty years. 



46 MARYV1LLB COLLBGB 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

Miss Zimmerman 

The aim of this department is to cultivate the voice, to free the student 
from constrained, limited, and erroneous action, and to lead him to a 
knowledge and understanding of the interpretation of literature. Oppor- 
tunity is given for class and private instruction. Class work consists of 
interpretative analysis, Delsarte system, and technical work. Special time 
and attention is given persons troubled with stuttering, stammering, or any 
form of defective speech. The text-book used is King's Practice of Speech. 

Monthly recitals will be given, affording opportunities to students to 
read publicly. 

Diplomas are granted to such students as pass all the requirements 
of the course. Students must be graduates of a preparatory school of a 
standard equivalent to that of the Preparatory Department of this insti- 
tution before they will be granted a diploma in expression. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 47 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



Maryville College, like most of the older colleges, grew out of the zeal 
that the pioneers of the American church had for the education of the 
people. The same year (1802) in which Isaac Anderson was ordained to 
the ministry by the Presbytery of Union, he founded within the bounds of 
his Grassy Valley congregation, near Knoxville, a school which he called 
"Union Academy," but which was popularly known as ''the Log College." 
He built for it a large four-roomed log house. In this, for the times, pre- 
tentious building, many men who afterwards served their country well 
were educated. Among this number was Governor Reynolds, of Illinois. 
Dr. Anderson in 1812 removed to Maryville and took charge of New Provi- 
dence Church, of which organization he remained pastor till his death, 
which took place in 1857. In Maryville he continued his academic work. 
The most famous pupil of this Maryville academy was Sam Houston, who 
afterward had so unique and picturesque a career as general, governor, 
president of Texas, congressman, and patriot. 

Dr. Anderson, however, felt that more should be done toward pro- 
viding an educated ministry for the South-west. Encouraged by others 
like-minded with himself, he founded Maryville College in 1819. The insti- 
tution was born of the moral and spiritual needs of the early settlers of 
East Tennessee — chiefly Scotch-Irish Presbyterians — and was designed 
principally to educate for the ministry men who should be native to the 
soil. The grand motive of the founder may be stated in his own words: 
"Let the directors and managers oe this sacred institution propose 
the glory oe God and the advancement oe that kingdom purchased by 
the blood of his only begotten Son as their sole object." Inspired by 
such a motive, Dr. Anderson gathered a class of five candidates for the 
ministry in the fall of 1819, and in prayer and faith began what proved 
to be the principal work of his life. In forty-two years the institution put 
one hundred and fifty men into the ministry. Its endowment, gathered by 
littles through all these years, was only sixteen thousand dollars. 

Then came the Civil War, and suspended the work of the institution 
for five years, and the College came out of the general wreck with little 
save its good name and precious history. 

After the war the Synod of Tennessee, moved by the spirit of self- 
preservation, and by a desire to promote Christian education in the Central 



48 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



South, resolved to revive Maryville College. The institution was reopened 
in 1866. New grounds and new buildings were an imperative necessity. 
To meet this need, sixty-five thousand dollars was secured, and the Col- 
lege was saved from extinction. In 1881 a few generous friends — William 
Thaw, William E. Dodge, Preserved Smith, Dr. Sylvester Willard, and 
others — contributed an endowment fund of one hundred thousand dollars. 
In 1891, Daniel Fayerweather bequeathed to the College the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars, and also made it one of twenty equal partici- 
pants in the residuary estate. The College received two hundred and 
sixteen thousand dollars by the provisions of the will. This magnificent 
donation enabled the institution to enlarge its work and to enter upon a 
new era of usefulness and influence. On January 1, 1905, Mr. Ralph Voor- 
hees, of New Jersey, made the munificent donation of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars to the general endowment fund of the College. The gift is 
subject to a five per cent, annuity during the lifetime of Mrs. Voorhees. 
The reception of this superb benefaction filled the hearts of Maryville's 
friends with confidence, and with intense gratitude to God and to God's 
stewards. 

In 1906, the rapid growth in the number of students having made nec- 
essary much further enlargement of the teaching force and of the material 
equipment of the institution, President Wilson entered upon a campaign 
for additional endowment. Mr. Andrew Carnegie generously offered the 
College twenty-five thousand dollars on condition that fifty thousand dol- 
lars additional be secured. In 1907, the General Education Board pledged 
fifty thousand dollars on condition that one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars be secured from other sources. Mr. Carnegie then increased his pledge 
to fifty thousand dollars toward this larger fund. The time limit set for 
the completion of the fund was December 31, 1908. In the face of many 
difficulties the President, with reliance upon the favor of God, prose- 
cuted the campaign for the "Forward Fund of two hundred thousand 
dollars." In order to meet the spirit as well as the letter of the require- 
ments of the conditional pledges, it was deemed necessary to raise twenty- 
five thousand dollars more than the designated sum. When the canvass 
closed, the subscriptions amounted to the splendid sum of two hundred and 
twenty-six thousand nine hundred and two dollars. The fact that, in spite 
of the recent panic and hard times, the uneasiness of a presidential year, 
and the ill health of the canvasser, the "Forward Fund" was secured, 
filled the Faculty, Directors, and friends of the College with a deep sense 
of gratitude to God, and to his human agents who took part with Maryville 
in its ministry to the noble youth of mountain and valley in its Southern 
Appalachian field. 

As the result of the generous contributions made through many years 



MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 49 



by many philanthropic donors, the College now owns property and endow- 
ment to the total amount of more than eight hundred thousand dollars. 
Of this amount, four hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars is invested 
in endowment and three hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars in build- 
ings and equipment. 

On hundred and thirty-one of the post-bellum alumni have entered 
the ministry, while forty-five alumni and undergraduates have been or are 
missionaries in Japan, China, Siam, Korea, India, Persia, Syria, Africa, the 
Philippines, Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and Porto Rico. Several are 
laboring in missions in the West. All the alumni are engaged in honor- 
able pursuits. Students who have gone from the College to the theolog- 
ical, medical, and legal schools have usually attained a high rank in their 
classes. A goodly number of the alumni are now studying in theological 
seminaries. 

The necessary expenses are so phenomenally low as to give the insti- 
tution a special adaptation to the middle class and to the struggling poor 
of valley and mountain — the great mass of the surrounding population. 

The privileges of the institution are, of course, open alike to all denom- 
inations of Christians. All the leading denominations are largely repre- 
sented in the student body. 

LOCATION 

Maryville is a pleasant and thriving town of about three thousand 
inhabitants. It is widely known as "the town of schools and churches." 
It is sixteen miles south of Knoxville. There are three trains a day each 
way on the Knoxville and Augusta "Railroad, two trains each way on the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and one train each way tri-weekly on 
the Tennessee and Carolina Southern Railroad. 

Maryville is an ideal health resort for students from other States. The 
town lies on the hills, one thousand feet above sea level, and enjoys the 
life-giving breezes from the Chilhowees and the Smokies, a few miles away. 
Young people from the North and other sections are greatly benefited in 
health by a year at Maryville, and many take their entire course here. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college grounds consist of two hundred and fifty acres, and for 
beautiful scenery are not surpassed by any in the country. They are 
elevated and undulating, covered with a beautiful growth of evergreens 
'and with a noble forest, and command a splendid view of the Cumberland 
Mountains on the north, a«d of the Smoky Mountains on the south, The 

4 



50 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



location is as remarkable for its healthfulness as it is for its beauty. The 
campus affords the choicest facilities for the development of athletics. 

On these grounds there are thirteen buildings, which, together with the 
grounds and equipment, represent an investment of three hundred and 
twenty-five thousand dollars. The buildings are heated with steam and 
lighted with electricity from the central power plant on the campus. Water 
is provided from a stream flowing through the college grounds, and is 
forced by hydraulic pressure into large tanks, supplying the buildings with 
toilet facilities and drainage. Drinking water is furnished from four wells 
driven through limestone rock to a depth of about one hundred and 
seventy-five feet, and furnishing an inexhaustible supply of absolutely pure 
water. At stated intervals this water is subjected to a thorough bacte- 
riological test, and has invariably been pronounced exceptionally free from 
impurities. 

Anderson Hai^ the central building, is the oldest of the present col- 
lege halls, having been built in 1869, and named in honor of the founder 
of the institution. It contains the administrative offices and most of the 
recitation rooms for the literary departments. The large addition to the 
Hall, the Fayerweather Annex, is occupied by the Preparatory Department. 

Baldwin Haix, named in honor of the late John C. Baldwin, of New 
Jersey, is the main dormitory for young women. It contains rooms for 
one hundred and thirty students. It is provided, as are all the dormitories, 
with all modern conveniences, and is a comfortable home for young women. 

Memorial Hal^ originally built as a companion building to Baldwin 
Hall, is a young men's dormitory, containing rooms for seventy students. 
While it is one of the oldest of the college buildings, it has been put into 
excellent repair, and is a comfortable and well-equipped dormitory. It is 
under the control of a regular instructor of the College. 

Wizard Memorial, the home of the President, was provided in 1890 
by a generous gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard, in memory of her husband, 
Sylvester Willard, M.D. It is one of the chief adornments of the campus, 
and is a valuable property. 

Th£ Lamar Memorial Library Hau, was erected in 1888 at a cost of 
five thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was generously provided 
by three friends of Professor Lamar and of the College. The building is 
a model in every respect. It is a noble and fitting monument. The large 
memorial window contributed by the brothers and sisters of Professor 
Lamar holds the central position. 

Bartustt Haw, is one of the largest college Y. M. C. A. buildings in 
the South. Planned for by the students led by Kin Takahashi, a Japanese 
Student, it was erected by contributions made or secured by the Bartlett 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 51 



[all Building Association, supplemented by a large appropriation by the 
ollege authorities. A liberal donation made by Mrs. Nettie F. McCor- 
lick in 1901 enabled the committee to complete the building. In 1911, Mrs. 
;lizabeth R. Voorhees made a generous gift providing for extensive alter- 
tions and improvements, including the building of a separate gymnasium 
Dr the use of young women. The Y. M. C. A. auditorium, parlors, and 
scretary's and committees' apartments occupy the front part of the build- 
lg, while the large gymnasiums occupy the rest of the structure. 

FayerweathEr Science Haw, was erected in 1898 through the liberal 
equest of Daniel B. Fayerweather. It is two stories in height, with ex- 
•eme dimensions of one hundred and six feet by ninety-seven feet. The 
rst floor contains the five spacious laboratories of chemistry and physics, 
alance and storage rooms, an office, and the John C. Branner Scientific 
,ibrary. The second floor contains four excellent lecture rooms, two large 
nd well-lighted biological laboratories, the laboratory of experimental 
sychology, and the museum. The laboratories are furnished with both 
irect and alternating electric current, and also with gas. The building is 
loroughly modern in every respect. It is provided with liberal equipment 
Dr the practical study of science, and will stand a. useful and lasting mon- 
ment to the intelligent philanthropy of the princely giver whose name it 
ears. 

The Elizabeth R. Voorhees Chapee. — The long-felt and urgent need 
f an adequate assembly hall was met in 1905 by gifts made by the late 
It. Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey, and by other donors. The new 
hapel, named in honor of Mrs. Voorhees, graces one of the most com- 
landing sites on the grounds, and is well worthy of its place of distinc- 
.on. It is of an extra quality of brick, with buff-brick and terra-cotta 
rimmings. The style is Grecian, the details being of the Ionian order. 
v he auditorium seats eight hundred and eighty persons and can be arranged 
3 accommodate two or three hundred more. The basement contains four- 
sen well-lighted rooms, occupied by the Music Department, and a com- 
lodious auditorium occupied by the Y. W. C. A. To the rear of the main 
uditorium, also, and on the floor above, are several rooms used by the 
)epartment of Expression and for various other purposes. The entire 
uilding is in every way satisfactory, and will for many years be adequate 
or the purposes it is designed to serve. 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memoriae Hospital.— While the health of 
he student body has always been far above the average, yet in so large a 
umber of students there is necessarily more or less sickness. With the 
;rowth of the College, the need of proper facilities for caring for such 
ccasional cases of illness became increasingly urgent. This need was sup- 
lied in 1909 by the generosity of Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, a life-long friend 



52 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



of the College. Her gift of six thousand dollars provided a thoroughly; 
modern hospital building, containing eleven wards, caretakers' rooms, baths 
toilets, an operating room, and other appointments of a well-ordered hosl 
pital. The building is named in honor of Mrs. Lamar's only son, who diecl 
in infancy. A gift of five hundred dollars from Mr. Nathaniel Tooker, o| 
East Orange, N. J., secured the purchase of a valuable outfit of the bes 
hospital furnishings. To this amount about three hundred and fifty dollars 
was added from other sources and used for the purchase of additions 
furnishings and medical supplies. 

Carnegie Haee. — In connection with the "Forward Fund" secured ir, 
1908, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave the sum of fifty thousand dollars for < 
dormitory for young men. The building was designed by the firm of Whit- 
field & King, of New York. The building was occupied at the opening 
of the fall term in 1910, and was dedicated on January 11, 1911. It con- 
tains rooms for one hundred and twenty-one young men. Each of the twqj 
large wings contains a suite of rooms for the use of a professor and hi< 
family. Commodious parlors and reception rooms are provided, and tht 
building is a comfortable and attractive home for the young men. In it\ 
architectural beauty and its thoroughly modern appointments this is one oi 
the best college dormitories in the South, and is a most valuable addition 
to the equipment of the College. 

Pearsons Haee. — No benefaction of recent years has proven movi : . 
immediately serviceable than the gift of twenty thousand dollars made irj 
1908 by the late Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago. The new building named 
in his honor provides additional dormitory facilities for young women, and 
adequate quarters for the large Cooperative Boarding Club. The building 
is of brick, and is three stories in height, with an imposing Greek portico 
fronting the west and commanding an excellent view of the grounds. Th( 
first story contains the spacious dining hall, with a seating capacity of fiV 
hundred, the kitchen, offices, and waiting rooms. The second story con; 
tains parlors, halls for the young women's literary societies, and rooms foij 
thirty- four occupants. A third story was added during the vacation months;' 
of 1912, increasing the capacity of the dormitory so that fifty additional 
young women may secure rooms. This story was a gift of "an admirer 
of Dr. Pearsons, who esteemed it a privilege to put this crowning story 
upon his building." 

The Power Peant. — Heat for all the buildings and light for the build- 
ings and grounds are furnished from the central power house situated on 
the campus. The boilers in this plant have a combined capacity of three 
hundred horse-power. The Webster Vacuum System of steam heating is] 
used, and the buildings are quickly and uniformly heated. A Bullock 
direct-current generator furnishes electric power ample for all purposes. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 53 



iani from the plant is used also for the meat and soup boilers and the 
h-washing machine at Pearsons Hall. 

THE LAMAR MlBMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest college libraries in the State. 
e number of books now on the shelves is about fifteen thousand. The 
■ary is open for the drawing of books or for the consulting of volumes 
the reference alcoves for eight hours every day from Monday to Satur- 
r. The use of the library is entirely free to students of all departments, 
e nucleus of a much-needed endowment for the library has been secured, 
fund now amounting to nearly $8,000. Among the gifts making up the 
lowment are the following: 

e " M. T." Fund, 1900, given by a friend $500 

e Helen Gould Fund, 1900, by Miss Helen Gould, New York 500 

e Willard Fund, 1900, by the Misses Willard, Auburn, N. Y 200 

e Hollenback Fund, 1901, by J. W. Hollenback, Esq., Wilkes- 

barre, Pa 500 

e Solomon Bogart Fund, 1908, by Miss Martha M. Bogart, Phila- 
delphia, Tenn 200 

e Nina Cunningham Fund, 1909, by the sons of Major Ben Cun- 
ningham, Treasurer of the College, in memory of their sister, 

Miss Nina Cunningham, '91 500 

e John M. Alexander English Literature Fund, 1909, by Rev. John 

M. Alexander, '87, and wife, Maryville 500 

e Charles T. Cates, Jr., Fund, 1909, by Hon. C. T. Cates, Jr., '81, 

Attorney-General of the State of Tennessee 300 

e Rev. S. B. West Fund, 1909-1912, by Mrs. S. B. West, Con- 
cord, Tenn 100 

e McTeer Fund, 1909, by J. C. McTeer, '07 100 

e Brown Fund, 1910, by Hon. T. N. Brown, '77 100 

e Chilhowee Club Fund, 1910, by the Chilhowee Club, Maryville. 100 

e Class of 1891 Fund, 1910, by five members of the class 232 

e George Glenn Cooper Fund, 1910, by the parents, brother, and 

sister of George Glenn Cooper 300 

e Faculty Fund, 1910, by members of the Faculty 1,000 

e French Fund, 1910, by Mr. and Mrs. C. T. French, '06 100 

e Gamble Fund, 1910, by Hon. M. H. Gamble, '05, Hon. Andrew 

Gamble, and A. M. Gamble, M.D., Maryville 200 

e Hooke Fund, 1910-1912, by Rev. R. H. Hooke, '74 70 

e Litterer Fund, 1910, by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

e Lowry Fund, 1910, by Rev. G. H. Lowry, '94 100 

e Tracy Fund, 1910, by J. E. Tracy, Esq., '01 50 



54 MARY VI LIB COLLBGB 



The following funds are now being formed : 

The Class of 1909 Fund ($700 subscribed) $505 

The Class of 1910 Fund ($560 subscribed) 365 

The Class of 1911 Fund ($250 subscribed) 195 

The Class of 1912 Fund ($200 subscribed) . . . 116 

The Class of 1913 Fund ($125 subscribed) 89 

The Litterer Fund ($100 subscribed), by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

LOAN LIBRARIES 

James R. Hills Library — In 1888 Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New York, 
contributed a fund of six hundred dollars for the establishment of a Loan 
Library, in order that students unable to purchase the necessary text-books 
might have the privilege of renting them at a nominal rate. By judicious 
management the income from this fund has grown until now the privileges 
of this library are open to all students, and all the regular text-books used 
in the institution may be either rented or purchased, as the student prefers. 
An additional gift of five hundred dollars from the same donor in 1908 
made it possible to provide the text-books for the students in the Bible 
Training Department. The rental charged a term is one-fifth the retail 
price of each book. The income from rentals is devoted to supplying new 
books as they are needed. The library occupies a room in Anderson Hall, 
and is open every day. 

John C. Branner Library — A few years ago John C. Brainier, Ph.D., 
then the State Geologist of Arkansas, now Vice-President of the Leland 
Stanford Junior University, gave another proof of his generosity and 
friendship to the College by establishing a loan library of the text-books 
used in the natural science departments. The books in this library are 
under the same regulations as are those of the Hills Library. 

The Misses Willard Library — Through the generosity of the Misses 
Willard, of Auburn, N. Y., the text-books employed in the Bible classes 
of the Preparatory Department are also provided for rent at a nominal 
charge. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING CLUB 

No other agency has been of greater service in enabling the College 
to keep the expenses of its students at a minimum than the popular and 
successful Cooperative Boarding Club. The actual cost of the board is 
estimated at the end of each month. The price is fixed approximately at 
the beginning of each year. During the past year the price has been $1.75 
a week. A deposit of seven dollars is required of each member of the Club, 
and settlements are thereafter made at the end of every fourth week. A 



MARYVILLB COLLHGU 



considerable number of students are employed as waiters and assistants 
in the dining room, thus materially reducing the cost of their board. The 
privileges of the Club are extended to all male students and to all young 
women rooming in the college dormitories. The membership of the Club 
has been more than five hundred this year. Through the generosity of 
the late Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago, the Club is now housed in the 
new Pearsons Hall, spoken of elsewhere. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES 

It is a constant aim of the College to provide first-class college advan- 
tages to the student at the lowest possible rates, and the endowment enables 
it to make its charges very moderate. College bills must be paid invariably 
in advance. Until this condition is complied with, no one can become a 
member of any of the classes. 

Tuition 

In view of the very low rates, no deduction will be made for absence 
at the beginning or at the end of any term, and no tuition will be refunded. 

In all the literary departments $6.00 a term 

Incidental fee (payable by all students) 1.00 a term 

Graduation fee (payable at the opening of the spring term of 

the Senior year) $5.00 

Graduation fee in the Preparatory Department 1.00 

Special Science fees : 
Laboratory fee in Chemistry: . Fall, $3.00; Winter, $2.50; Spring, $2.50 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics $2.00 a term 

Laboratory fee in Physiology or Preparatory Physics 1.00 a term 

Breakage ticket in Chemistry: Fall, $2.00; Winter, $1.50; Spring, $1.50 
Breakage ticket in Physics, Biology, or Physiology $1.00 a term 

In the Music Department (vocal or instrumental). 

Fall Term: 

Under the head of the department, fourteen lessons $7.00 

Under an assistant, twenty lessons 7.00 

Winter or Spring Term: 

Under the head of the department, eleven lessons 5.50 

Under an assistant, fifteen lessons 5.50 

Piano rental (one hour a day): Fall Term, $4; Winter or 
Spring Term, $3.00. Two hours a day at double these rates. 



MARY VI LLE COLLEGE 



Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History of 
Music : 

Fall Term $ 2 .50 

Winter and Spring Terms combined 3.00 

Graduation fee 2.50 

In the Expression Department. 

Fall Term 9 qq 

Winter or Spring Term 7 00 

Graduation fee 2.50 

In the Art Department, for lessons of three hours each in Painting 
in Oil or in Water Color: 

Fall Term , 7 00 

Winter or Spring Term 5.50 

Rooms 

Rooms in all the dormitories are heated with steam and lighted with' 
electricity, and fully supplied with baths and toilets. Two students usually ; 
occupy one room. More than two students in one room will not be allowed. 

Every prospective student desiring to room in a dormitory must make ' 
a two-dollar deposit with the Registrar in order to secure a reservation. ! 
The Registrar will send the applicant a deposit receipt, which, upon pre- 
sentation by the student when he enters College, will be accepted by the 
Treasurer for credit on the room rent to the amount and for the term 
specified thereon. The room, however, will not be held beyond the open- 
ing day unless the Registrar is notified of the cause of the student's delay. I 
The deposit receipt is not negotiable, and the deposit will be forfeited if; 
the student does not enter college. 

The cost of rooms in the different dormitories, with full information 
regarding furnishings, is given below. The rates given are for each occu- 
pant of a room. Students desiring to room alone in rooms equipped for 
two students may do so by paying double the rates here given. 

Memorial Hau, (for Young Men) 

These rooms are furnished with iron bedsteads, tables, and wardrobes. 
Baths on first floor. According to location the rates for each student are 
as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $8.00 to $9.00 $6.00 to $7.00 $4.00 to $5.00 

Other rooms 7.00 to 8.00 5.00 to 6.00 3.00 to 4.00 



MARYV1LLB COLLHGE r >? 



Carnegie Hale (for Young Men) 
The rooms in this dormitory are furnished with individual iron bed- 
teads springs, mattresses, tables, chiffoniers, chairs, and wardrobes. Baths 
ind toilets on each of the three floors. There are fifty-four rooms for two 
students each, two rooms for three students each, and eight rooms for one 
student each. The rates for each student are as follows : 

Pall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

I rooms for two or three...$10.00 to $15.00 $8.00 to $12.00 $5.00 to $8.00 
[n rooms for one 14.00 11.00 7.00 

Baldwin Hall (eor Young Women) 
The rooms in this hall are furnished with iron bedsteads, springs, mat- 
tresses washstands, tables, and wardrobes. Baths on first and second 
floors; toilets on all floors. According to location the rates for each stu- 
dent are as follows : 

Pall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $9.00 to $10.00 $7.00 to $8.00 $5.00 to $6.00 

Other rooms 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 4.00 to 5.00 

Pearsons Hale (for Young Women) 
The rooms in this hall are furnished with individual iron bedsteads, 
wrings, mattresses, tables, dressers, chairs, and built-in wardrobes. The 
rooms, with the baths and toilets, are on the second and third floors. The 
rates for each student are as follows : 

Pall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

According to location $12.00 to $14.00 $9.00 to $11.00 $6.00 to $7.00 

Rooms in Town 
Young men can find comfortable furnished rooms in private residences 
in convenient parts of town at the following rates by the month for each 
student : 

Rooms furnished and cared for, without fuel or light $2.00 to $3.00 

Rooms furnished and cared for, with light and heat 3.00 to 4.00 

Board 

In the Cooperative Boarding Club $!- 75 a wee ^ 

In private boarding houses $2.50 to $3.50 a week 



58 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Laundry 

In the Cooperative Laundry (young women doing their own 

work) ^ _ 

T . i V $0.30 a month 

In town by private laundresses $0>35 to $0 ?5 a week 

STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Societies.-. Four literary societies are conducted by the stu- 
dents, and are of the greatest benefit to those who avail themselves of the 
advantages they offer. The Athenian, organized in 1868, and the Alpha 
Sigma, organized in 1882, are composed of young men. Their halls are on 
the third floor of Anderson Hall. Each society is divided into a "senior 
section and a "junior section," the latter being composed of students in 
the Preparatory Department. The Bainonian, organized in 1875, and the 
Theta Epsilon, organized in 1894, are conducted by the young women 
They have neatly furnished halls in Pearsons Hall. The societies meet 
every Friday evening to engage in debates and other literary exercises 
The junior sections of the young men's societies meet on Saturday evening 
Each society gives annually a public midwinter entertainment. 

^JT V : M " °" Al and Y - W " C " A '~ The Y - M ' C ' A -> established in 
1878 has become one of the strongest organizations of its kind in the 
South. The weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoon 
in the auditorium of Bartlett Hall. The Association conducts an annual 
encampment on the Tennessee River for one week before the opening of 
the fall term, at which encampment plans and policies for the ensuing year's 
work are arranged. The officers of the Association are as follows- Presi- 
dent, Robert Wood Wright; Vice-President, Addison S. Moore- Secretary 
Edwin R. Hunter; Treasurer, Garland Hinkle; Cabinet, John V. Stephens' 
Lester E. Bond, John A. Hyden, Aubrey W. Williams, and James K 
Stewart. 

The Advisory Committee of the Y. M. C. A., composed of representa- 
tives of the Faculty and of the student body, directs the general policies 
of the Association. It consists of the following members: Class of 1913- 
Professor Gilhngham, Victor C. Detty, and Garland Hinkle; Class of 
1914: Dean Waller, Major Will A. McTeer, and Horace E. Orr • Class 
of 1915: Professor Barnes, Chairman, President Wilson, and Professor 
Bassett. 

The Y. W. C. A. was established in 1884, and has become one of the 
most wholesome influences in the religious life of the College. The weekly 
devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoons in the association 
room, in the basement of Voorhees Chapel. The Association has a small 
but valuable library, known as the Florence McManigal Memorial Library 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



59 



It was contributed by Rev. J. Oscar Boyd and wife, of Princeton N J., as 
a memorial to their sister, Miss McManigal, '08, who was an instructor in 
the College and who died in 1909. The officers of the Association are as 
follows: President, Nellie C. Pickens; Vice-President, Marcia Secor; Sec- 
retary, Mae Swanner; Treasurer, Zora A. Henry; Cabinet^ Marcia Secor, 
Cora F. Hopkins, Charlotte H. Landes, Ella McCampbell, Hattie B. Les.er, 
Helen C. Silsby, and Miriam A. Rood. 

The Athletic Association— This organization is maintained by the 
student body for the purpose of regulating athletics and caring for athletic 
eauipment The Board of Athletic Control, composed of representatives 
of the Faculty, the students, and former students, meets at stated intervals 
and exercises oversight over all the athletic events of the Co lege. Ticket 
are sold that admit to all games played in Maryville and entitle the holders 
to the use of any available equipment used in athletic sports. The football 
and baseball fields, the tennis courts, the track, and the basketball court 
are open to any student desiring to enter these forms of sport. 

The members of the Board of Athletic Control, whose officers are also 
the officers of the Athletic Association, are as follows: President Charles 
E Dawson; Secretary, Wiley B. Rutledge, Jr.; Treasurer, David J. Bri- 
tain; Official Buyer, Fred L- Proffitt; Faculty Representatives President 
Wilson and Professor Walker; Student Representatives, Ernest M. Reeves, 
Wood Wright, Miriam A. Rood, and Alma M. Armstrong; Town Repre- 
sentatives, Charles D. Chandler and John A. McCulloch. 

The officers of the athletic teams are as follows : Managers : Football, 
Tames F Brittain; Basketball, Wood Wright; Women's Basketball, Mayme 
R Maxey ; Baseball, Ralston W. Carver; Track, David W. Proffitt; Tennis, 
Laurance Cross. Captains: Football, Lon Badgett; Basketball, James 
F Brittain; Women's Basketball, Alma M. Armstrong; Baseball, Ernes 
M. Reeves. Physical Director, Lester E. Bond. Football and Basketball 
Coach, George E. Williams. 

The Ministerial Association, organized in 1900, is composed of the 
candidates for the Christian ministry that are in attendance upon the Col- 
lege It has for its object the enlistment of its members m various forms 
of active Christian work, and the discussion of themes relating to the work 
of the ministry. Its officers are : President, George H Douglas; Vice- 
President, Henry J. Wilson; Secretary and Treasurer, William E. Moore; 
Program Secretary, Garland Hinkle. 

The Student Volunteer Band—The College has from its earliest 
history been identified with foreign missions, and has sent out forty-one 
missionaries into twelve foreign countries. Since 1894 the students have 
maintained a Student Volunteer Band, composed of those who are pledged 
to enter some foreign field, if the way be open. The Band meets weekly 



so 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



to study missionary fields and conditions. The officers for the present year 
are as follows: Leader, George H. Douglas; Recording Secretary, Helen 
U bilsby; Program Secretary, Miriam A. Rood. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This Association was formed in 1871. It holds its annual meeting on 
Commencement Day, when a banquet is given under the auspices of the 
Faculty of the College and the local alumni. The officers for the presen 
year are as follows: President, James A. Goddard, '71; Vice-President 
WUham R Dawson, V 84; Secretary, Samuel T. Wilson '78; Exe u dve 

HaH "d ^fA^^ '° 5; Almira C JeWdl > '"' Vera M 
Hall, 10; David J. Bnttain, '10; Olga A. Marshall, '12. 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1912 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon the twenty-seven 
members of the graduating class of 1912. 

The degree of Master of Arts in course was conferred upon Rev 
Theron AeexandEr, '08, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Springfield' 
Tenn., and Marguerite McCeenaghan, >08, Jamesburg, N. J. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Two members of the graduating class, one young man and one young 
woman are chosen upon the basis of scholarship and general merit to rep- 
resent the class as orators on Commencement Day. The representatives 
of the class of 1912 were Homer Andrew Goddard and Oega Alexandra 
Marshaee. 

GRADUATES IN MUSIC, 1912 

tu J" V0iC T, CAERI * UU Ca ^ dw ^ ^uciee Cawood, Frances Lee 
McNutt, and Mary Kate Rankin. 

In Piano: Carrie Lou Caedweee, Ceyde Cassady, and Edna Eeiz- 
abeth Dawson. 

GRADUATES IN EXPRESSION, 1912 

Mary Charees Cawood and HeeEn Cassieey Siesby. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Classes are conducted by the Physical Director daily, and every stu- 
dent, except members of the Senior and Junior Classes, is required to avail 
himself of the privilege afforded, unless excused by reason of his being a 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 61 



member of a regular athletic team or doing regular work in the college 
buildings or on the grounds. The classes for the young men and the 
young women are conducted in their respective gymnasiums. Every young 
woman should bring with her a regulation gymnasium suit, preferably blue 
in color, with gymnasium or tennis shoes. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital, spoken of elsewhere, is 
available for all students. There is no charge for the use of the wards, 
or for nursing in cases of slight illness. In case of serious illness, in which 
the services of a trained nurse are required, such nursing must be provided 
at the expense of the student. On Monday, Thursday, and Saturday of 
each week free medical consultation and prescription by approved phy- 
sicians are provided at the hospital for out-of-town students. Any other 
medical attention, however, that may be required must be paid for by the 
student. These privileges have been responded to with marked appre- 
ciation by the student body, and the medical attention thus afforded has 
been of great service in the prevention and checking of serious illness. 
Patients in the hospital pay $2.50 a week for board. 

THE Y. M. C. A. LYCEUM COURSE 

For several years the Y. M. C. A. has conducted for the student body 
and the public a course of lectures and entertainments. The course usually 
consists of five or six numbers, one or two of which are popular lectures 
and the rest musical, elocutionary, or dramatic entertainments. The course 
is provided at small cost to the student, tickets for the entire series costing 
usually a dollar and a half. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSIC CONTESTS 

In 1909 a Triangular Debating and Oratorical League was formed with 
Carson and Newman College and Washington and Tusculum College for a 
term of three years, 1910-1912. A prize of five dollars in gold was awarded 
to each of the winning contestants annually. A silver cup, offered as a 
trophy by Hope Brothers, of Knoxville, to the college winning the largest 
number of points for the three consecutive years, was awarded to Maryville. 

In the spring of the present year a contest was held simultaneously^ at 
Jefferson City and at Maryville with Carson and Newman College, in which 
each college was represented by two debating teams and two orators. A 
prize of five dollars in gold was awarded to each winning contestant. 



63 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Absence from The College— Students are not allowed to absent them- 
selves from the College without permission from the Faculty. 

Changes of Course— All changes of studies must be made within two 
weeks after matriculation. Thereafter, all changes for students in the Pre- 
paratory Department shall be made by order of the Principal of the depart- 
ment, and all changes in the College Department by order of the President 
or the Dean; and in all cases after consultation with the instructors con- 
cerned. Every change of course made after two weeks from date of 
matriculation involves a fee of fifty cents, unless this fee is remitted by 
special vote of the Faculty. 

Delinquencies and Demerits.- All unexcused delinquencies and de- 
ments are registered. When they amount to twenty-five, the student ceases 
to be a member of the institution. A delinquency is a failure to perform 
any college duty. Excuses for such failure must be presented immediately 
upon returning to work. 

Dismissal from College.- Students are dismissed, also, whenever in 
the opinion of the Faculty they are pursuing a course of conduct detri- 
mental to themselves and to the College. The Faculty are the sole judges 
of the advisability of such dismissal. Maryville College is a private insti- 
tution, and reserves the right to dismiss a student whenever the authorities 
of the College may elect. An institution which is affording such extensive 
opportunities and advantages to its students in return for fees not so large 
as the incidental fees of most institutions, can not allow those to remain 
in attendance who fail to perform their college work, or who injure college 
property, disturb college order, or by acts of insubordination or immo- 
rality hurt the good name of the College and add unnecessary burdens to 
the authorities of the institution. The College desires no such students, 
and rids itself of them when they appear. 

Entertainments— To avoid interference with the regular work of the 
College, students are not permitted to engage in dramatic entertainments, 
and must secure special permission before engaging in any entertainment 
outside the College. 

Examinations— A student absent from any examination without an 
approved excuse will be marked "zero" on that examination, and will 
receive no credit for his term's work. Any student failing to be present 
at term examinations shall be required to take all omitted examinations 
before being allowed to enter classes on his return to the College. A fee 
of fifty cents will be charged for any examination not taken at the regular 
time for the examination. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 63 



Forfeiture of Aid.— Any student receiving financial aid from the Col- 
lege, in the form of scholarships, loans, or opportunities for work, will 
forfeit such aid if he becomes an object of college discipline. 

Hazing.— Hazing and other interference with individual liberty or 
class functions on the part of individuals or classes are prohibited. 

REUGious Services.- Prayers are attended in the college chapel in the 
morning, with the reading of the Scripture and with singing. Every stu- 
dent is required to attend public worship on the Sabbath, and to connect 
himself with a Sabbath-school class in some one of the churches in town. 
Rooming in Town.— Students are not permitted to room or to board 
at places disapproved by the Faculty. Young women from out of town 
are not permitted to room or board off the college grounds, except with 
relatives. 

Sabbath.— Students are not allowed to patronize the Sunday trains or 
to visit the railway stations on the Sabbath. No student will be received 
on the Sabbath. Sunday visits are disapproved. 

Secret Societies.— No secret society will be allowed among the stu- 
dents, and no organization will be permitted that has not been approved 
by the Faculty. 

Standing.— A uniform system of grading is employed, upon the results 
of which depends the promotion from one class to another. The Faculty 
meets each week of the college year, and receives reports of the work 
done in all departments and of the delinquencies of individual students. A 
record is made of the standing of each student, which is sent to his parents 
or guardian at the end of each term. In order to be classified in any given 
year in the College Department a student shall not be conditioned in more 
than three studies. 

Tobacco.— The use of tobacco on the college grounds and in the col- 
lege buildings is forbidden, and no student addicted to its use will be 
allowed to room upon the college premises. One violation of this rule will 
be deemed sufficient to exclude a student from the college dormitories. 

Vaccination.— Vaccination is required of those students who have not 
recently been vaccinated. 

SELF-HELP 

The College offers opportunities of self-help to a large number of 
deserving young men and women. During the present year the number 
of those availing themselves of such opportunities has been over two hun- 
dred. The work offered includes manual labor on the grounds, janitor 
service in the various buildings, dining-room and kitchen service at the 
Cooperative Boarding Club, office work, and work as assistants in labo- 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ratones, libraries, or study rooms. These forms of employment are paic 
for at a rate varying according to the degree of skill and responsibility 
involved. Indoor work is allotted usually to students that have previously 
given proof of their ability and worth. Positions of exceptional respon- 
sibility, such as janitor service and work as assistants, are granted for a 
year m advance, the assignment being made at the close of the sprflf 
term. Assistants in any department are elected by the Faculty upon the 
recommendation of the head of the department. 

Application for work of any kind must be made in writing and ad- 
dressed to the Faculty. The acceptance of an opportunity of self-help 
involves especial obligation to diligence, loyalty, and the faithful discharge 
of duty. A student that fails to do satisfactory work or becomes an object 
of discipline by the Faculty will forfeit all such opportunities 



SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Craighead Fund, 1886, contributed by Rev. James G. Craighead, 

D.D., for candidates for the ministry ' $1 500 

The Carson Adams Fund, 1887, by Rev. Carson W. Adams, D.D ' 

of New York, for tuition help . . ' 6 300 

The George Henry Bradley Scholarship, 1889, by Mrs.' Jane Loomis 

Bradley, of Auburn, N. Y., in memory of her only son i 000 

The Willard Scholarship, 1898, by the Misses Willard, of Auburn 

New York , .' lj000 

The Students' Self-help Loan Fund, 1903, 1908, and 1912, by an East 

Tennessean, for loans to upper classmen 2>000 

The Clement Ernest Wilson Scholarship, 1904, by Mrs. Mary A. 

Wilson, of Maryville, in memory of her son ' 1 00 o 

The Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship Fund, begun 1904, by 
the Alumni Association and former students. A bequest of $500 
was made to the fund by the late Mrs. M. A. Wilson, of Mary- 
ville 

The Angier Self-help Work and Loan Fund, 1907-1911, by Mr. Albert 
E. Angier, of Boston, Mass., to provide opportunities of work 
for young men g m 

The Margaret E. Henry Scholarship, 1907, established through the 

efforts of Mr. Jasper E. Corning, of New York i, 00 

The Arta Hope Scholarship, 1907, by Miss Arta Hope, of Robin- 
son, 111 

The Silliman Scholarship, 1907, by Hon. H. B.' Silliman/of Cohoes, 
N. Y., and held in trust by the College Board of the Presby- 
terian Church. 




V 



iW~ 



MARYVILLH COLLBGB «5 



The Hugh O'Neill, Jr., Scholarship, 1908, by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill, of 

New York, in memory of her son $1,000 

The Alexander Caldwell Memorial Fund, 1908, by Mr. G. A. Moody, 

of Jefferson City, Tenn., the income to be loaned 1,000 

The D. Stuart Dodge Scholarship, 1908, by Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, 

D.D., of New York City, preferably to aid graduates of the Farm 

School of North Carolina 1,500 

The Julia M. Turner Missionary Scholarship Fund, 1908, by Mrs. 

Julia M. Turner, to aid the children of foreign missionaries or 

those preparing for the foreign field 5,000 

The William J. McCahan, Sr., Fund, 1908, by Mr. William J. Mc- 

Cahan, Sr., of Philadelphia, Pa., for tuition help 5,000 

The W. A. E. Campbell Foreign Missionary Fund, 1909, by Rev. 

W. A. E. Campbell, of Nashville, Ind., to aid a young woman 

preparing for foreign missionary work 700 

The Charles Francis Darlington, Jr., Scholarship, 1909, by Mrs. 

Letitia Craig Darlington, of New York, in honor of her son... 1,000 
The Hoover Self-help. Fund, 1909, by Dr. W. A. Hoover, of Gibson 

City, 111., to provide opportunities of work for young men 500 

The Isaac Anderson Scholarship, 1909, by James A. and Howard 

Anderson, of Knoxville, Tenn., in memory of their great-uncle, 

Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., the founder of Maryville College. . 1,000 
The John H. Converse Scholarship, 1909, by Mr. John H. Converse, 

of Philadelphia, Pa., for candidates for the ministry and other 

Christian service 5,000 

The Chattanooga Self-help Fund, 1910, by Rev. E. A. Elmore, D.D., 

and citizens of Chattanooga, Tenn., to provide opportunities of 

work for students 500 

The Rena Sturtevant Memorial Scholarship, 1910, by Miss Anna 

St. John, of New York 1,000 

The Nathaniel Tooker Scholarship, 1910, by Nathaniel Tooker, Esq., 

East Orange, N. J 1,000 

The James R. Hills Memorial Self-help Work Fund, 1911, by Miss 

Sarah B. Hills, of New York, to provide work for students 1,000 

The Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Mead Memorial Scholarship, 1911, by the 

Abbott Collegiate Association of New York , 1,000 

The G. S. W. Crawford Self-help Fund, 1912, by friends of the late 

Professor Crawford, to provide work for students 1,000 

The Elizabeth Belcher Bullard Memorial Scholarship, 1912, "given 

in memory of a great friendship" by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Barney 
Buel, of East Litchfield, Conn., through the Mary Floyd Tall- 

madge Chapter of the D. A. R 1,000 

5 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



The Elizabeth Hillman Memorial Scholarship, 1912, by. Mrs. John 
Hartwell Hillman, of Pittsburgh, Pa., through the Pittsburgh 
Chapter of the D. A. 'R., "in perpetuity for mountain girls in 
Maryville College" $1,000 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official publication of the College is The MaryvieeE College Bul- 
letin. It is issued four times a year, and is sent free to any who apply 
for it. The May number of each year is the annual catalog. The Col- 
lege Monthly is issued several times a year by the students, the editorial : 
staff consisting of representatives of the four literary societies, the Chris- 1 
tian Associations, the Athletic Association, and the Alumni Association.' 
The Chilhowean is issued annually by the Senior Class. It is the year-.-: 
book of the student body, containing a summarized record of the year's 
work in all the departments and organizations of the College, and is an 
attractive souvenir. The Maryville Hand Book is issued annually by the; 
Christian Associations. It is intended to present the work of the Asso- ' 
ciations to new students, and also to assist them in adjusting themselves! 
to their new environment. It includes a directory of the Christian Asso- ; 
ciations, Literary Societies, Athletic Associations, city churches, and college 
offices ; the college colors, yell, song, and athletic records ; and instructions ; 
as to matriculation. 

SPECIAL NEEDS 

(1) The provision of a water-supply and fire-protection system j 
adequate for the enlarged demands made by the added dormitories and 
other buildings. Sanitation and safety call for it. For this purpose', 
there will be needed at least $10,000. (2) A new recitation building, ; 
$50,000. It can not be long deferred. All available space is utilized, and 
yet the work is sorely cramped. (3) Endowment for a manual training 
department, $25,000. Too long has this important and most practical 
department been delayed. The basement of Carnegie Hall was planned 
with reference to it, and will provide adequate quarters for it. (4) 
Endowment of an agricultural department, $25,000, The clientage of 
Maryville, the need that present-day public school teachers have of train- 
ing in agriculture, and the trend of the times all demand this addition. 
(5) Endowment for the natural science departments to help provide annual 
supplies, $10,000. (6) Endowment to pay the administration expenses of 
the Cooperative Boarding Club so as to keep the cost of board from rising 
any further, $15,000. Thousands of students have been enabled to enter 
college because of this remarkable club. Board is $1.75 a week. (7) 



MARYVILLB COLLHGU 67 



Additional endowment for the library, $13,000. The present endowment is 
less than eight thousand dollars. (8) A hospital endowment to provide a 
nurse, $10,000. The hospital is proving invaluable, but a nurse is sorely 
needed, for many students are unable to pay for one. (9) For streets, 
walks, and grounds, $5,000. Naturally beautiful, the grounds have been 
reluctantly left unimproved through lack of funds. (10) A third story 
for the Fayerweather Science Hall. The building is rendered inadequate 
by the rapid growth of the Science Department. The roof can be raised, 
as that of Pearsons was raised last summer, and a third story built and 
equipped, at a cost of $10,000. This is an urgent need. (11) Another 
dormitory for young men. Both dormitories for the young men are full, 
and many students are unable to secure rooms in them. A duplicate of 
Carnegie Hall can be erected for $44,000, and will make a home for one 
hundred and twenty additional students. (12) Minor but pressing needs: 
(a) $1,500 to provide furniture for Memorial Hall, and (b) $2,500 for 
furniture for Baldwin Hall, (c) A pipe organ for the Chapel, $2,000. 
(d) Additional boilers for the Power House, $1,500. (e) An additional 
dynamo, to cost with engine $1,500. (13) Endowment to enable the Col- 
lege to employ a Professor of Education to serve partly in college exten- 
sion work, $25,000. 

All these great needs can be met with two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. And the College has faith that this amount will be secured before 
many commencements have passed. 

BEQUESTS AND DEVISES 

Since each State has special statutory regulations in regard to wills, 
it is most important that all testamentary papers be signed, witnessed, and 
executed according to the laws of the State in which the testator resides. 
In all cases, however, the legal name of the corporation must be accurately 
given, as in the following form : 

" I give and bequeath to 'The Directors of Maryville 

CoeeEGE/ at Maryville, Tennessee, and to their successors and assigns for- 
ever, for the uses and purposes of said College, according to the provisions 
of its charter." 



68 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
College Department 

SENIOR CLASS 

Alexander, Christina Maryville Classical 

Cross, Robert Carroll Gastonburg, Ala General 

Douglas, George Harley Leeds, Mass Psych, and Philosopt 

Fanson, Anna Ethel Asumption, 111 Classical 

Goddard, Volta Francis Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Mathematics 

Grabiel, Paue Ruskin. . Columbus, O. . - Econ. and Pol. Scieru] 

HaynES, Albert Telford Mathematics 

Jewell, Grace Day Fredericktown, Mo. . . Classical 

Johnson, Elizabeth DaeE Warren, O General 

Langston, Leoyd Helvetius Bower Mills, Mo Mathematics 

LESTER, Hattie Belle • . . . Gridley, Cal General 

McCampbeee, Ella Townsend General 

McConnELL, "Ralph ErSkine Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Classical 

Moore, William Elder Maryville Classical 

Newell, Ruth Culver Eustis, Fla Eng. Lit. and Historj 

Newman, Reva Straw Plains . General 

Nuchols, May Cowan Maryville, R. I). 5. . .Classical 

Owens, Raeph Waldo Boonville, Ind Classical 

Pickens, Nellie Cowan Knoxville, R. D. 3. . . General 

Rood, Miriam Anna Bradentown, Fla Classical 

Secor, Marcia Carrollton, 111 General 

Silsby, Helen Cassilly Shanghai, China General 

SwannER, Beulah Mae Meadow General 

Weir, Howard Laurie Yukon, Okla General 

Wilson, Olive More Maryville General 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Armstrong, Alma Mabel Bradentown, Fla Science 

Brittain, James Frazier Maryville Science 

Calloway, Thomas Howard Maryville General 

Carson, Ralph St. Clair Hendersonville, N. C.Classical 

Cowan, James Maxwell Dickson Classical 

Cross, Luther Laurance. Gastonburg, Ala Eng. Lit. and Histor 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE «« 



Detty, Victor Charles Scranton, Pa Classical 

Dillon, Julia Hale Memphis Science 

Elmore, Grace Gladys New Market Classical 

Fyke, William Foster Springfield Science 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville, R. D. 4. . .Mathematics 

Hall, Erma May Maryvilld Modern Languages 

HinklE, Augustus Garland Inez, Ky Classical 

Hunter, Edwin Ray Bicknell, Ind Science 

HydEn, John Albert Philadelphia Mathematics 

Kirkpatrick, Nell Ross Mooresburg General 

McConnELL, Adolphus Rankin. .Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

McCully, JonniE Ann Maryville! Modern Languages 

MaxEy, MaymE Rebecca Maryville: Eng. Lit. and History 

Miller, Frank Lewis East Moriches, N. Y. Classical 

Moore, Addison Strong Maryville Classical 

Rankin, Mary Kate Dandridge General 

REEVES, Ernest Mayrant Fresno, Cal General 

Rowland, Minnie LEE Alexandria General 

RuTLEDGE, Wiley Blount Maryville Classical 

Samsel, Eva May Tate General 

Stewart, James Kirkpatrick. . . .Wilmington, Del Classical 

TilEord, William Harm an Ludlow, Ky Psych, and Philosophy 

Waggoner, Andrew Bell Lenoir City General 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Alexander, Gladys Henrietta. . . Chapanoke, N. C Modern Languages 

Alexander, Zenas Ambrose Mansfield, Ark Econ. and Pol. Science 

Atiyeh, Anise Elias Horns, Syria General 

Balch, Hiram Smith Newport Mathematics 

Barnes, Mark Hopkins Maryville General 

Biggs, Alfred DeBard Greenup, Ky Classical 

Boggs, Mary BarnETT . . Kingston, O General 

Burian, Ludvik Martinice, Moravia . . Classical 

Bush, Harry Oswald Philadelphia, Pa Classical 

BuTLER, Ruth Virginia Manila, P. I General 

Carson, Ruth Rankin Maryville Classical 

Clark, FrankiE Belle Christiana Classical 

Crane, Anne McPheETERS New Decatur, Ala. ...Modern Languages 

Cross, Annie LEE Columbiana, Ala General 

Dawson, Charles Edward South Knoxville Classical 

Eaves, Ruth Matilda Jacksbbro General 

Ensign, John Evans Rossville, Ga Classical 



70 MARYVILLE COLLBGB 



Garrison, Nellie Jim Byington General 

Gaston, David Finis Gastonhmrg, Ala General 

Landes, Charlotte HauER Florianopolis, BraziL.Modern Languages 

Lu>yd, Ralph Waldo Fort Duchesne, Utah. Mathematics 

McConnell, Paul Carson Maryville General 

Murray, Albert Francis New Decatur, Ala. . . Mathematics 

Painter, WiniErEd LEE Maryville Modern Languages 

PetreE, Harriet Irene Harriman General 

Powel, Samuel Franklin kogersville Classical 

Reagan, Madge Tipton Maryville General 

Rupert, Margaret Jane Magrew, O Science 

Smith, Micah Pearce Chickasha, Okla Eng. Lit. and Ilistoi 

Stearns, Irving Kip Bryson City, N. C. . .Modern Languages 

Stephens, John Vant Cincinnati, O General 

Tetedoux, Corinne Fleming Norwood, O Modern Languages I 

TonEy, George Lynn Erwin General 

West, James Morrison Morristown General 

Wilson, Henry Jasper Pryorsburg, Ky General 

Wilson, Howard Hannington. . .Maryville General 

Wilson, Lois Coligny Maryville General 

Wright, Robert Wood '. . . Maryville Econ. and Pol. Sciend 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Adams, Alma McBryan Union, S. C General 

Adams, George Morris Cedar Hill General 

Anthony, Emmett Nova Mansfield, Ark Science 

Blair, Edward Whittier Turlock, Cal General 

Blair, Helen Hope Turlock, Cal Education 

BoedekEr, Paul Ernest Bowie, Tex General 

Brown, Olivia Jean Maryville Education 

Brown, Vera Cedarwood, Col General 

Bussard, Esther Elizabeth Toledo, 111 Eng. Lit. and Hister 

Caldwell, Alexander Bryan New Market Mathematics 

Calloway, Henry Abbott Maryville Mathematics 

Carver, Ralston Wilde Granite Falls, N. C. .General 

Caton, Herman Luther Cosby Education 

Clemens, Frances Elizabeth. . . .Caldwell, Idaho Education 

Conrad, Chauncey Elbert Fredericktown, Mo.. .Classical 

Creech, Charles Bishop Whitesburg General 

CrESwell, Lula Baxter Bluefield, W. Va General 

Cross, Frank Moore Gastonburg, Ala Classical 

Dawson, Edna Elizabeth South Knoxville Modern Languages 



MARYVILLB COLLHGB 71 



Dawson Eva Lavinia South Knoxville Modern Languages 

EllER, Lloyd Zack Asheville, N. C Eng. Lit. and History 

Ellis,' Ellen Estelle Knoxville, R. D. 5. . . General 

Elmore, Linden Limon New Market Classical 

Fletcher, Lischer VernellE vSocrum, Fla Science 

Fletcher, Roy Alfred Bryson City, N. C. . . Mathematics 

Flinn, Frances Hazel Detroit, Mich General 

Foreman, James Aura Tionesta, Pa Science 

Foster, Edna EarlE '• -Blaine Modern Languages 

Gordon, Elizabeth Arta Robinson, 111 General 

Haggard, Bessie Janette Hillsboro, Tex Bible Training 

HalE, Arthur Armstrong Rogersville Mathematics 

Hale, Frank FulkeRSon Rogersville Mathematics 

Henry, Cora Jane '• Walland, R. D. 2. . . .Education 

Henry, Flossie Maryville General ; 

Holloway, William Edward . . . .Glen Alice Mathematics 

Hopkins, James Vincent Maryville General 

Huff, Edith Elwood Emmett, Idaho Eng. Lit. and History 

Karnes, Marie ElisE Gallipolis, O. Classical 

Kidder, Jonathan Edward South Knoxville General 

KilgorE, Annie Mildred Woodruff, S. C General 

KilgorE, JaniE Wills Woodruff, S. C General 

Liddell, GEORGE Turner McAlester, Okla General 

Lowry, BErnice LEE Maryville General 

McBEE, Edgar Love Corryton Mathematics 

McClEnaghan, Willis CROWELL...Jamesburg, N. J General 

McCurry, Coy Mosheim General 

McCurry, Eula ErskinE Mosheim Econ. and Pol. Science 

McGaha, William Edgar Newport General 

McKelvey, Ethel Gertrude Chattanooga General 

May, AlETha ClELAnd Maryville Modern Languages 

MorELOCK, GlEnna PearlE Limestone Education 

Needham, Charles Harold Batavia, O General 

Park, Harwell Bennett Culleoka Classical 

Pile, Herman Owen Edgewood, Tex General 

Pleasants, William Henry Roxboro, N. C General 

PostlEThwaite, Frank Keith Thomson. .Chattanooga . .Classical 

Powel, William Armstrong Rogersville Classical 

ProfFitt, David Wilson Maryville, R. D. 2. . .Econ. and Pol. Science 

"Rankin, Rolfe Montgomery Jett, Okla Mathematics 

Raulston, Guy Chester Maryville General 

Robinson, Gilbert Oscar Patton, Mo Classical 

Schaui, HELEN Margaret Niagara Falls, N. Y. .Modern Languages 



™ MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Siesby, Charts Edwin Shanghai, China Classical 

Smith, DeWitt Ceinton Culleoka General 

Smith, Raymond Owens Maryville General 

Sugg, Catherine Sherbrooke. . . .Christiana Modern Languages 

Thompson, Charges Eare Corryton Mathematics 

Threekeed, Horace Wai/ton. . . . .Hobart, Okla General 

Tiepord, Louise Esteeee Ludlow, Ky Classical 

Watkins, Georgie Indian Springs, Ga. . .Education 

Webb, Lilian Gray Maryville Eng. Lit. and Histoi 

Whaein, ErEd Raymond Hobart, Okla General 

Witherspoon, Etta Birmingham, Ala ... . General 

Work, Ruth Anne Wooster, O General 



IRREGULAR COLLEGIATE STUDENTS 

Bond, Lester Everett South Portland, Me. . Science 

CoeE, James Ceyde Crandull General 

Gibson, Chapman J Spring City General 

Henry, Zora Aeice Rockford General 

Kemmer, Ralph Thomas Spring City General 

Kennedy, Zeema Beaumont Straw Plains, R. D. 3. Education 

King, Frank Whson Knoxville, R. D. 10. .General 

Long, Loren Essie Johnson City General 

PritchETT, Wieeiam Henry Annemanie, Ala General 

Rupert, Frankein Amos Magrew, O General 

Smock, Care Edwin Southport, Ind General 

Tayeor, MurriEE Maryville Education 

Tipton, Raeph A Alanreed, Tex Econ. and Pol. Scienc 

TruseER, Howard ChareES Jonesboro General 

WEEES, Jack Keeton Springfield General 

Wieeiams, George Edmund Belchertown, Mass. . .General 



COLLEGE SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Green, Susan AeeEn, M.A Wakefield, Mass Art 

HiEEE, Mary E Alliance, O Music 

Langston, Aema Mae Auxvasse, Mo Education 

Marshaee, Oega Alexandra, B.A.Port Chester, N. Y. . Music 

Patton, Ruby Charees, B.A Maryville Music 

Person, AnnabEE, B.A Howell, Mich Art 

Renich, Mary Emma, M.A. . Urbana, 111 Music 

WoepE, Greene Benjamin Sneedville . General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 73 



Preparatory Department 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 

fcrwELL, Harvey Smith Marion, N. C Latin- Scientific 

Blankenship, Leon Horace; Knoxville General 

Boring, William Wiley Rasar Latin-Scientific 

Bradford, LucilE Gladys Byington General 

CaldwELL, Turner Anderson Jefferson City Latin- Scientific 

Carson, Dorothy Jean Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Carson, Thomas Cooke Vonore Latin-Scientific 

Clark, Mary Miller Maryville General 

CrESwELL, Anna Gambia Bearden General 

Curry, Ralph Neal Dallas, Tex General 

Davis, Retta Fountain City Latin-Scientific 

Hall, Frank Jackson. . . Maryville General 

Harper, Maude Marguerite Louisville Teachers 

Henry, Lily Canzada Cosby, R. D. 7 Latin-Scientific 

Hodges, George WinErEd Boyds Creek Latin-Scientific 

Jackson, Martha Frank Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Kelly, Charles Francis . . .Boyds Creek General 

Kelso, Arthur Henry Walla Walla, Wash. .Latin-Scientific 

Legg, Pauline Meek Straw Plains Latin-Scientific 

Lloyd, Carl Stanton Fort Duchesne, Utah.Latin-Scientific 

McCall, Newton Sheddan ...... Greenback General 

McGinley, Blanche Viola Maryville, R. D. 5. . .Latin-Scientific 

McKenzie, Joseph OlliE Mesquite, Tex. ... . .. Latin-Scientific 

McMahan, Elizabeth MAzziLLA..Sevierville, R. D. 8.. Teachers 

McReynoeds, Alfred Clarence. . .Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Maher, Thomas Delaney Roan Mountain Latin-Scientific 

Martin, William Earl Maryville Latin-Scientific 

May, Margaret Eunice Maryville Classical^ 

Painter, John William Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Parker, John Francis Louisville, R. D. 2. . .Latin- Scientific 

Quinn, Charles Fred Patrick . .Lancing Latin-Scientific 

Rose, Joseph Hartford Latin- Scientific 

Rowland, Eliza Annie Alexandria Classical 

RuGEL, Clyde TemplETON Mesquite, Tex Latin- Scientific 

Russeel, Franklin Fillmore Maryville Classical^ 

Samsee, HERBERT Whitelaw. . . . .Tate Latin- Scientific 

SherrER, Claude Ervin Rock Hill, S. C General 

Smith, Charles Logan Harlan, Ky Latin- Scientific 



74 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Stanberry, Charts Richard. . . .Newport Latin-Scientific 

Stinson, Edgar Carroll Harveysburg, O Latin-Scientific 

Taylor, Thomas Jackson Kelso, R. D. 1 Latin- Scientific 

Tedford, Mary Pearl Maryville Teachers 

Tedford, Stacie Arbeely Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Thomson, Charts Harrison. . . . Porte de Santa Maria, Spain. .Classical 

Titsworth, Frank Lesley Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Tweed, Chapel. White Rock, N. C. . . Latin-Scientific 

Wilson, Bertha Mary Maryville Classical 

Witherspoon, Lucy Birmingham, Ala ... . Latin- Scientific 

Wright, Aeice Eeizabeth Maryville Latin- Scientific 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Alexander, Lois Amy Mansfield, Ark Latin-Scientific 

Alexander, UtiE Zeeea Mansfield, Ark General 

Badgett, Frances Luciee Maryville General 

Badgett, Lon Maryville General 

Best, Eesie May Maryville Teachers 

Bicknele, Guilford O Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Boyce, MerTie James Woodruff, S. C Teachers 

Bryson, Alton Davis Whitwell Latin-Scientific 

Campbell, Lillian May Erwin Latin-Scientific 

Cassady, Clyde ". Inez, Ky Latin-Scientific 

Cecil, Asbury Helenwood Teachers 

Cross, Ovia Gum Fork Latin-Scientific 

Cross, Sterling Gum Fork Latin-Scientific 

Crum, Mark Blaine Greeneville, R. D. 15. Classical 

Dawson, Horace South Knoxville Classical 

DiTTES, Dorothy Leila Beardsley, Minn General 

Edwards, Arthur Taylor Alaculsy, Ga Latin-Scientific 

Ellis, Lorraine Macone Lombard, 111 General 

Fisher, Lavinia Concord, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Garrison, William Reid Derita, N. C General 

Goddard, Cecil French Maryville General 

Graves, Ray Aubrey Mansfield, Ark Latin- Scientific 

GroEnEndyke, Grace Dean New Decatur, Ala. . . Latin-Scientific 

Hall, Mary VeniTa Maryville General 

Henry, Thomas Gilbert Martin General 

Hopkins, Cora Frances Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

HuddlESTon, Hiram Harold Maryville Latin-Scientific 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE ?~> 



Jackson, Eugene DeadERick Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Johnson, Lindsay Morris Pineville, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Kjttrell, Robert French Maryville General 

Lane, Jay Hugh Russellville Latin-Scientific 

U)vE, James Preston Sevierville General 

Lyle, LucilE Eleanor Dandridge General 

Lyle, Sarah Porter Dandridge Latin-Scientific 

McCulley, Emma Mae Maryville, *R. D. 2. . .Latin-Scientific 

McDonald, Jacob Hickman Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

McTeer, William Andrew Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Maloney, John Willard Dallas, Tex Latin-Scientific 

Means, Margaret LucilE Maryville General 

Mitchell, William Rae Corliss.. Fort Duchesne, Utah.Latin-Scientific 

Nicely, Julius Martin Washburn Latin-Scientific 

Nicholson, LaurEE Bokoshe, Okla Latin-Scientific 

Painter, Erskine Grills Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Parks, William Burney Cleveland Latin-Scientific 

Porter, Jean McDonald .Campinas, Brazil Latin-Scientific 

Porter! Mary Isabel Campinas, Brazil Latin-Scientific 

Powers, Larry Carson Jacksboro Latin-Scientific 

Price, Charles Parkhurst Baltimore, Md Latin-Scientific 

Quinn, David Luther Lancing General 

Ramsey, Leonard Jerome Inman, S. C Latin- Scientific 

Rankin, Lela Maude Jefferson City General 

Rowland, Mittie Ellston Alexandria Latin-Scientific 

Russell, Barbara EiLEEN Maryville General 

Russell, Wade Sutton Rockford General 

Stinnett, Dora Townsend Latin-Scientific 

Sugg, Margaret Sutton Christiana Latin-Scientific 

Susong, John Calvin Walland Latin-Scientific 

Susong, SuELLA Walland Teachers 

Swanay, Josephine Vonore Latm-Scientific 

Tucker, Hubert Henry Knoxville General ^ 

VanKeurEn, Thomas FRANKLiN..Harriman Latin- Scientific 

Walker, J. Charles Forkvale Latin-Scientific 

Wallace, Hugh Alexander Maryville .General 

Wells, Don Battle Creek, Mich. . . General 

Williams, Aubrey Willis Birmingham, Ala Classical^ 

Williams, Deck Christopher. . . .Cosby Latin-Scientific 

Willis, Jackson Christopher . . .Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Winfrey, Edna Buena Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin-Scientific 

Witherspoon, John Knox Birmingham, Ala Latin-Scientific 



76 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Frank Thomas Springfield General 

Adams, James Ceyde Springfield General 

Adams, John Ottomar New Providence, N. J. Latin- Scientific 

Aeeison, Wieeiam Scott Huntersville, N. C. . . Latin-Scientific 

Bayeess, Richard Deakins Athens Utin-Scientific 

Bennett, Charees Sumner So. Jacksonville, Fla. Latin-Scientific 

Birdsaee, Edgar Maynard Brockport, N. Y General 

Birdsaee, Jueian Keeeogg Brockport, N. Y Latin-Scientific 

Bogee, Leeand Lyons Maryville General 

Booher, Lena Thompson Fountain City Latin-Scientific 

Brakebhe, Anna Zuea Maryville General 

Brasseee, Efeie IonE Tampa, Fla Latin-Scientific 

Brewer, EemEr Maryville General 

Briggs, David Hezekiah Marshall, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Brown, ThEron Neeson Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Burcheieed, Mary Elizabeth. . . . Maryville Latin-Scientific 

BuTEER, Judson Rea Manila, P. I Latin-Scientific 

Cameron, WeseEy Ennis Kinzel Springs General 

Candler, William Washington.. Candler, N. C Latin-Scientific 

CanTreee, Jacob Edward Etowah Latin-Scientific 

Carmack, William Eedridge Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

Carter, U. S. Grant Mosheim General 

CatlETT, JonniE WieeiE Maryville General 

Caughron, John Walland Latin-Scientific 

Chambers, George Garrett Hunts ville Latin-Scientific 

Ceark, AeeEn Long Maryville Latin-Scientific 

CoiEE, John Andrew Jefferson City General 

Collins, Bessie Mae Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Cross, Sheeby Cecie Columbiana, Ala Latin-Scientific 

Detty, George Wieeiam Scranton, Pa General 

Dunn, Jueia Maryville . . Latin-Scientific 

EGGERS, Lura BEEEE Maryville, R. D. 3 . . . Latin-Scientific 

EneoE, FeorEncE Katharine Sevierville, R. D. 4 . . Teachers 

Eneoe, Herbert Careisee Judson, N. C General 

Fisher, Frances Concord, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Francis, Josephine RideEy Ironton, Mo Latin-Scientific 

George, Winnie Mae LaFollette, R. D. 3. . . Latin-Scientific 

Goddard, Mary Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Goddard, MyrteE Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin-Scientific 

Greene, Theem a J Maryville Latin-Scientific 

GrEER, Haroed HaeE Maryville General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



GuffiTHS, Nora LEE Oliver Springs Latin- Scientific 

Hamilton, Arthur Gray Hyattsville, Md General 

Harper, Irene Knox Louisville Latin-Scientific 

Harper, James Wilford Louisville General 

Harris Charles Clarence Friendsville, R. D. 1. General 

Henry, Irene Ipe Teachers 

Henry, MaymE BELLE Greenback General 

Henry, Nancy Cordelia Cosby, R. D. 7 Latin-Scientific 

Henry, Ralph Edward New Market General 

Hickman, Clyde South Knoxville Latin- Scientific 

Holland, Charles LEE Springfield General 

Houston Salem Winston Greeneville, R. D. is.Latm-Scientific 

Hunt, Meredith Clyde St. Elmo Latin- Scientific 

Hunter Millie Victoria Dorothy, W. Va Latm-Scientific 

Hyder, Ella Grace Crossville Latin-Scientific 

James Elijah Elihu Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Latin-Scientific 

Jenkins, Ray Howard Tellico Plains Latm-Scientific 

Kennon, George Herman Watkinsville, Ga. . . .. Latin-Scientific 

Kincaid, Robert LEE Leinarts Latin-Scientific 

King, Melissa EstellE Maryville General 

Kittrell, Sara Louise Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Lamon, Howard Fielding Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Laney, Thomas Dillon Monroe, N. C General 

Lawson, Enola Gertrude Maryville. R. D. 5. . .Latin-Scientific 

Ledbetter, Ralph Overton Rutherford College, N. C. .General 

Lloyd, Evangeline Fort Duchesne, Utah.Latin-Scientific 

Lloyd, Glen AlerEd Fort Duchesne, Utah.Latin-Scientific 

Logan, OnESSus Horner Persia Latin-Scientific 

Luther, Thomas Don Candler, N. C Latin-Scientific 

McConnell, Thomas Lamar .... Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Latin-Scientific 

McCully, Maud Elizabeth Maryville General 

McCurry, Luther. .'. Mosheim Latin-Scientific 

McKoy, William Gordon Old Fort, N. C Latin-Scientific 

McNuTT, Ruby Gray Maryville General 

Maloney, Ernest Craweord Dallas, Tex Latin-Scientific 

Major, Howard Dean Tunkhannock, Pa Latin-Scientific 

Marcum, Rosa Ada Helenwood Teachers 

Mattingly, William Boyd Stroud, Okla Latm-Scientific 

Miles, Mary ...Knoxville, R. D. 10. . Latin-Scientific 

Moore, Ralph BlainE Russellville General 

NeuberT, Sadie Jane Shooks Latin-Scientific 

Nuchols, James HobarT Maryville, R. D. 5. . .General 

Parks, H arlE Lovelace Ocoee Latin-Scientific 



78 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Powers William Benjamin Jacksboro Latin- Scientific 

*T: JACKW k IGH ^ RUtl6dge Latin-Scientific 

Richardson, Frank Taylor Monroe, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Ricketts Dossm Ta^ Bearden Latin-Scientific 

Roberts, Ethyl. . Marshall, N< c Latin _ Scientific 

Robertson, David Irene Toney, Ala Latin-Scientific 

Robertson Nell Yeakey Toney, Ala Latin-Scientific 

Sheddan, Blanche Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

Sheddan, Katharine Bei.EE Trundles X Roads, R. D 4 General 

Shipe Eva Lamar Corryton, R. D. 4. ... Latin-Scientific 

Sisk, Augustus Marion, N. C Classical 

Seatery, Peare Gertrude Trundles X Roads. . . General 

Smith, Boyd Ritner Q u il ce ne, Wash Latin- Scientific 

Smith Noel Godwin Concord Latin-Scientific 

f^^LE Maryville General 

Summers, Paue Mai.com Maryville Latin-Scientific 

1 hompson, John Boston Corryton Latin-Scientific 

Turner, HaskEw Bybee Latin-Scientific 

Vandegriet, Roy Ulamont Erwin General 

Walker, Elsie Harriet Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Waeker, George Wayne Andrews, N. C General 

Waeker, Rueus Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Teachers 

Watts, Douschka Pickens Chattanooga General 

Weees, Wade SamuEe Maryville, R. D. 5. . . General 

Whetsell, Trissie Eeizabeth. . . . Maryville, R. D. 5. .. Latin-Scientific 
Williamson, Ernest Lane Bailey, Miss General 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Alexander, Eleanor CullEn . . . .Knoxville, R. D. 12. .General 

Alexander, Gustava Irene Greenback Teachers 

Alexander, John Burton Riser ! . . General 

Alexander, Lela Elba Greenback Latin-Scientific 

Alexander, Pearl Mae Kiser Teachers 

Allen, Milbert Elliott Scranton, Pa General 

Anderson, Minnie Florence Vonore General 

Armstrong, Lanty Walker Greenback Latin-Scientific 

Atchley, Luther Bryan Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Badgett, Jessie Belle Rockford Teachers 

Benson, Richard Walton Springfield Latin-Scientific 

Birchftel, Carl Vonore Latin-Scientific 

Boring. James Marcus R aS ar Latin-Scientific 

Boring, Mary Katharine Rasar Teachers 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 79 



HkEyvf.r, Sarah Belle Walland Teachers 

Bright, Hazel Anne Maryville, R. D. 4. . .Latin-Scientific 

Brown,' James Elijah Maryville General 

Brown' Willis Maryville , . . Latin- Scientific 

Browning, Fletcher Worth Maryville General 

Browning, SusiE PamELia Maryville General 

Bryson, Mava Kszziah Whitwell Latin- Scientific 

Bushong, William Decatur Morristown General 

Calloway, Lula May Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Campbell, Edward Stephen Hot Springs, N. C. .. Classical 

Campbell, Laila Blanche Apison Teachers 

Carson, Leo Oneida Latin-Scientific 

Carson, Viola Oneida General 

CatlETT, James Elmer. Maryville, R. D. 3 ... Latin- Scientific 

Catlett, Mae • • Maryville General 

Clemens, Robert Broa-dy Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Climer, Ella Marie Indianapolis, Ind General 

Coleman, Frank Maryville, R. D. 4. . .General 

Coventry, Elva Viola Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Cunningham, Leon Knoxville General 

Dean, Horace Stewart Sidney, O Latin-Scientific 

Dickey, Eunice Irene Toney, Ala General ^ 

Dickey, Waller Elbert Toney, Ala Latin-Scientific 

Disney, Edward Kyle Coal Creek Latin-Scientific 

Dittes, Merrill Glass . . .Beardsley, Minn General 

Dunlap, Martha Ann Walland General 

Estep, John Gilmer Ducktown Teachers 

Everett, Wade Herman Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

FoosheE, L. Brackin Dyersburg General 

Foster, AlEEn Huntsville Latin-Scientific 

Freels, Wade CliETon Harriman Latin-Scientific 

Freeman, Nan Zirconia, N. C General 

Gaebraith, John Mac Byinotfon General 

Gallion, Katharine Gertrude. . . Black Mountain, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Gamble,' Helen Rebecca Maryville • • • Latin-Scientific 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville General 

Garner, James Owen Mint Latin-Scientific 

Garrison, Ellie JanE Derita, N. C General 

Gibson, Etta Mae Maryville, R. D. 5 . . . Latin- Scientific 

Gillespie, George Benton Walland General 

Goddard, William Roy Townsend General 

Grayson, Gladys Irene Whitwell Latin-Scientific 

Griffith, William Frederick. . . Leslie, S. Dak Latin-Scientific 



80 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Guigou, Charees Valdese, N. C General 

Haddox, Thomas Rollen. Knoxville, R. D. .3 ... Latin-Scientific 

Harris, Maevern Kilpatrick .... Spring City Latin-Scientific 

Henry, NellE Marie Rockford General 

Hernandez, Pedro Jose Havana, Cuba General 

Holt, Olive Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 1. . . General 

Horner, Myrtle Isabel Maryville General 

Howard, John Zoleicoffer Gainesboro General 

Hunter, Guy Webster Alexander, N. C Latin-Scientific 

Hunter, Minnie AnnE Citie, W. Va Latin-Scientific 

Hurst, Peina Christopher Sevierville, R. D. 8. .Latin-Scientific 

James, Carrie Dorcas Maryville, R. D. 6. . . General 

James, Mary Lou Maryville, R. D. 6. . . General 

Kaiser, Myrtee Peare Battle Creek, Mich. . . General 

Keebee, Sarah Anne Maryville, R. D. 8. . . Latin-Scientific 

Keeso, Victor George Walla Walla, Wash. . Latin-Scientific 

LEE, George Lawrence Ben Avon, Pa Latin-Scientific 

Lequire, Mary Eeea Maryville, R. D. 6. .. Latin-Scientific 

McCaeeiE, Hugh V Sweetwater Latin-Scientific 

McCeary, Samuee Washington.. Ocoee Latin-Scientific 

McCurry, Elizabeth.. Nancy Mosheim Latin-Scientific 

McDonaed, John Raymond Rogersville Latin-Scientific 

McGiee, Paue Parker Kiser General 

McMurray, Luke Chilhowee General 

McMurry, Edward Taylor Kingston, R. D. 1. . . Latin-Scientific 

McNeieey, Nora Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 5. . . General 

Marsh aee, Alexander Port Chester, N. Y. . Latin-Scientific 

Martin, HERBERT Russell. .". Maryville General 

Martin, Kenneth LEE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Meek, Fred Aubrey Blue Springs, Miss.. .Latin-Scientific 

MEELEN, Margery MERLE . Newark, N. J Latin-Scientific 

Messer, Allen Tampa General 

Miles, Emma Knoxville, R. D. 10. . Latin- Scientific 

Miller, Jesse Hopkins . . Sevierville. R. D. 16. Latin-Scientific 

Moore, Walter William , . , , Ocoee Latin-Scientific 

Page, Myrtle Blanche. Abbott, Ark Teachers 

Parker, Helen Corrie , Louisville, R. D. 2.. . Latin-Scientific 

Peterson, Frederick Cornelius. .Asheville, N. C. .. . . .Latin-Scientific 

Quinn, Ray. . Lancing General 

Quinn, Ruth Kate Lancing Latin-Scientific 

Raulston, Neil Andrew. .......... Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Rhodes, Clifford McNeill. ,..:.. Apalachicola, Fla General 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 81 



Robbins, Margaret Mariah Mint Teachers 

Robertson, Bessie Leah Eriendsville Teachers 

Robeson, Chari.es Hamilton Morristown, R. D. 6. General 

Robinson, Ella Pearl Patton, Mo General 

Robinson, John Bollinger Patton, Mo Latin- Scientific 

Rogers, Agnes Belle Mooresburg Latin-Scientific 

Rogers, Jennie May Mooresburg Latin-Scientific 

Ross, Lanty Marion Mint General 

Russell, CassiE Lou Rockford General 

Sheddan, Hugh Jefferson City Latin-Scientific 

Shirley, Homer Harrison Greenback Latin-Scientific 

Simpson, Albert Bowman Philadelphia Latin-Scientific 

Slatery, Floyd Alexander Knoxville, R. D. 10. . General 

Seatery, Patrick Henry Knoxville, R. D. 10. .General 

Smith, Harry Richard Rutledge Latin-Scientific 

Smith, Horace Judson Apison General 

Stephens, Cora Anne Knoxville Latin-Scientific 

Stump, UGEE Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Styles, Thomas Cosby Teachers 

Sullinger, Marguerite Maryville Latin-Scientific 

Sutton, Myra Christine Townsend Teachers 

Taylor, Sidney Clyde Maryville General 

Thompson, Anna Ray Maryville, R. D. 1. . -Latin-Scientific 

Toomey, Viola Elizabeth Maryville Latin-Scientific 

TuLLOCH, Cecil Clark Maryville General 

ValdES, Sara EsTELLA Havana, Cuba Latin-Scientific 

Waggoner, Hugh Morrison Lenoir City Latin-Scientific 

Warlick, William Wade Talking Rock, Ga.. . . General 

Waters, James Martin Walland Latin-Scientific 

Waters, Mae Maryville General 

Webb, OcEy Blanche Townsend Latin-Scientific 

Wells, Lois Wilma Canton, N. C General 

Wilkinson, Carrie Tipton Maryville, £. D. 5. . -Latin-Scientific 

Wilkinson, Margaret Catherine. Maryville, K. D. 5. . . Latin-Scientific 

Williams, James CrawEord Cosby, R. D. 3 Latin-Scientific 

Williams, Jessie Emily Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

Wilson, Lamar Silsby Maryville Latin-Scientific 

WitherELL, Jack Leo Manistee, Mich General 

WolE, Mary Elizabeth Tarpon Springs, Fla. Latin-Scientific 

Young, Glen Edward Maryville General 

Young, Helen A Maryville, R. D. 2. . . General 

Yowell. Ruth LorraynE Abbott, Ark Teachers 



82 MARY VI LIB COLLBGB 



PREPARATORY SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Bogle, Monnie T Maryville Music 

Bryan, Helen Elizabeth Maryville Music 

DeArmond, Mamie Maryville Music 

Gamble, Bertha Maryville, R. D. 4. . . Music 

Haddox, Gladys Virginia Knoxville, R. D. 3. . . Music 

Hill, Willie Kat$ Maryville Expression 

Howard, Cora Ann Maryville Art 

McNuTT, Frankie LEE Maryville Music 

McReynolds, Jessie Margaret. . . Maryville Music 

Martin, Alta Willard Maryville Music 

Martin, Mamie Irene Maryville Music 

Walker, EstellE Maryville Art 

Walker, Lora Trula Maryville Music 



SUB-PREPARATORY 

Allen, Otto Hill Mansfield, Ark. 

Anderson, Mildred McElwee Rockford 

Biggs, Seaton Humpries Greenup, Ky. 

BoglE, Jennie TunnELL Maryville 

Brown, Lora Tampa 

Brown, Margaret LuELLA Maryville 

Browning, Claude Hunter Maryville 

Broyles, James Ross Telford ' 

Cabbage, Cornelius Bliss .Maynardville 

Caldwell, Edith Fawn Maryville 

Campbell, Ernest Lee Alcoa 

Carter, Harry Knoxville, R. D. 5 

Caton, Eefie Arline Cosby 

Caton, Fred Sandburg Sevierville 

Caughron, Samuel Jackson Walland 

Chandler, Floyd Kittyton 

Clark, Barbara Blount Maryville 

Clark, Lillian Marie Knoxville 

Clemens, Adeline Turrell Maryville 

Coulter, Floyd Wendell Walland 

Coulter, Fred John Walland 

Cowan, Guy Maryville 

Cox, Roy Greeneville 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 83 



- _, D „, t „„ Wellsville 

Crye, Roy Lee 

Damiano, Cam, Endeen Fairmount, W. Va. 

Dennis, Dora LEE Sevierville, R. D. 8 

Dunn, Charles Snyder Townsend 

Dyer, AeeEN Rankin Louisville 

EnloE, Luna Sevierville, R. D 4 

Everett, Tressie Maryville 

Faubion, Mary Wood Walland 

Gamble, Max Marion Maryville 

Gillespie, Helen Cowan Walland 

Goddard, HELEN Maryville 

Gregory, Walter Abe Cades Cove 

Grieeiths, SalliE Jane Mmt 

Haddox, Troy Mae Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Hale, Donnie Ella Addison, Ky. 

Hamill, Daniel Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HasslER, William Harrison Binfield, R. D. 1 

Hays, Raymond Sherwood Russellville 

Headrick, Lettie May • • Walland 

Henry, Betty Jane Cosb y> R - D - x 

Henry, ZeniE Maryville, R. D. 5 

HenslEy, Robert Floyd Kittyton 

HERSHEY, Fay Broady Maryville 

HiGGiNS, LEVI ■ • Maryville, R. D. 1 

Hitch, Luttrell McNabb Sweetwater 

Hodges, Otis • B °y ds Creek 

Holt, James Austin Binfield 

HousER, Minnie Maryville 

Howard, Lillie Ann Mmt 

Hunter, Martha Quindora • • ■ -Dorothy, W. Va. 

Jackson, Eula Marion Maryville 

Key, John Columbus Newton Greenback 

Kirkpatrick, Ralph Persia 

Law, Edgar Hubbard 

Lawson, Wright Williams Townsend 

Legg, John Wallace , Straw Plains 

LequirE, Martha May Townsend 

LEQUiRE, Mary Alice Maryville, R. D. 6 

Lloyd, Hal Lafayette Fort Duchesne, Utah 

Lowry, Mae FlorinE Maryville 

McCampbell, Earl Houston Townsend 

McCaulley, Otis Wal ^ nd 

McCulloch, Elmer Linley Mmt 



84 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



McCulloch, Thomas Leonard Maryville 

McGinley, William Robert Maryville, H. D. 5 

McKelder, Mayme Matilda Maryville 

McNeilly, Ethee Massila Maryville R D 5 

McNeill, Herman Gray Apalachicola, Fla 

McNeill, Lillian Apalachicola, Fla 

McNutt, Mary Lawson Maryville 

McTeer, Cam,...--: Walland, R. D. 2 

Magill, Charles Rankin Maryville 

Marcum, Florence Oneida 

Marcum, Frona .\. Oneida 

Marcum, William Calvin Oneida 

Milligan, Charles Lincoln Vonore 

Milligan, William Homer Vonore 

Nuchols, Perky Manaly Maryville, R. D. 5 

O'Connor, Charles Ross Maryville 

OGLE, Abraham Maryville, R. D. f 

Pemberton, William Herbert Helenwood 

Proffitt, Walter Cosby 

Ratledge, Viola Linton Chicago 111. 

Reagan, Stella Dicey Maryville 

Reeder, William Nicholas Maryville 

Rhodes, Blanche Apalachicola, Fla. 

Rhodes, Eefie Elizabeth , Apalachicola, Fla. 

Robbins, Grace Emily |^ nt 

Ross, Tennie , # .Mint 

Rueter, Kleeemann Hood Maryville 

Russell, Myrtle Maryville, R. D. 5 

Russell, Nellie Rockford 

Rutledge, Margaret Gertrude Maryville 

Ryan, Mayme Ewald Marion, Va. 

Sharp, Lassie Rosella Jacksboro 

Simpson, Frank Magill Philadelphia 

Smith, Ray Myphra Rutledge 

Stinnett, Lillie Townsend 

Stinnett, Mildred Townsend 

Stinnett, Sarah Anne Townsend 

Tallent, John Paul Maryville, R. D. 3 

Tedford, Hugh Craig Maryville 

Thomas, Hurshel Dover Maryville, R. D. 2 

Thomas, Roy Asbury Stra ^ Plains 

Thurman, Victor Sevierville 

Tipton, Clemmie Enola # Maryville, R. D. 4 



MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 85 



Tipton, Daniel Claude Maryville, R. D. 4 

?ipton, Minnie May Trundles X Roads 

:oomEy, Fred Barthell Maryville 

PwEED, Sherman White Rock, N. C. 

/an Nostran, Ceem Wartburg 

VaekER, Jessie Aeice Townsend 

ATaekER, Joe Leslie Maryville, R. D. 3 

Valker, Vertie Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 6 

.Valker, Wilburn CleSTER Louisville, R. D. 2 

,VallER, Jane Knox Maryville 

,Vebb, Georgie Ella Townsend 

A/ELLS, Astor Andrew Canton, N. C. 

.VhETSell, Houston Alexander Maryville 

•VhetsELL, Louisa Pearl Maryville, R. D. 5 

Vhite, Alsop Maryville 

iVhitehead, Claude Montgomery Rasar 

Whitehead, FrEd Fremont .... . Rasar 

fEAROUT, David Jones Maryville 

ifEAROUT, Howard Early Maryville, R. D. 2 

^EarouT, Pearl May Maryville, R. D. 2 

ftmK, Silas, Cordell 



86 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



Classification by Departments 



College Department 

Preparatory Department. 
Sub-Preparatory 



Total. 



190 

382 
130 

702 



Classification by States 



Alabama 18 

Arkansas 3 

California 4 

Colorado . 1 

Delaware 1 

Florida 12 

Georgia 5 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 7 

Indiana 4 

Kentucky 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Jersey 



North Carolina 35 

Ohio 13! 

Oklahoma 

Pennsylvania 3 

South Carolina 6 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 49£ 

Texas flj 

Utah ti 

Virginia 1 

Washington 3 

West Virginia 5 

Philippine Islands 2 

Brazil 3 

China 2 

Cuba 

Moravia 

Spain 

Syria 



New York 6 



Total 702 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 87 



CALENDAR FOR 1913-1914 



FALL TERM 

1913. 

Jept. 9, Fall Term begins Tuesday 

sov. 27, Thanksgiving Thursday 

Dec. 17, 18, 19, Examinations Wednesday-Friday 

Dec. 19, Fall Term ends Frida y 

WINTER TERM 

1914. 

"an. 1, Winter Term begins Thursday 

(an. 14, Meeting of the Directors, 10 a. m Wednesday 

Mar. 18, 19, 20, Examinations Wednesday-Friday 

Mar. 20, Winter Term ends • Friday 

SPRING TERM 

Mar. 24, Spring Term begins Tuesday 

May 31, Baccalaureate Sermon Sabbath 

May 31, Address before the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A Sabbath 

[une 1, 2, 3, Examinations Monday-Wednesday 

rune 3, Class Day Exercises, 7 :30 p. m Wednesday 

'[une 4, Meeting of Directors, 8 :30 a. m Thursday 

June 4, Commencement, 10 a. m Thursday 

'June 4, Annual Alumni Dinner, 12 m Thursday 

Tune 4, Social Reunion, 8 p. m • • .Thursday 



38 



MARYVILIB COLLEGE 



INDEX 



page: 

Administrative Rules 62 

Admission to College Depart- 
ment 8 

Admission to Preparatory De- 
partment 32 

Alumni Association 60 

Art, Department of 45 

Athletic Association 59 

Bequests and Devises ... 67 

Bible Training Department . . 40-43 

Biology l8 

Board, Rates for 57 

Board of Directors 2 

Bookkeeping 38 

Buildings 49 _ 53 

Calendar for 1913-1914 87 

Chemistry T y 

College Courses, Synopsis of . . 12 

Committees and Officers 3, 7 

Contests, Intercollegiate 61 

Cooperative Club . , 54 

Degree Offered 10, 11 

Degrees Conferred in 1912 ... 60 

Directors 2 

Domestic Science Department 44 

Dormitories 50-52,56, 57 

Education 16, 20 

Endowment 47-49 

English Bible 26, 39, 40-43 

English language and Liter- 
ature 20, 34 

Entrance Requirements 8,9 

Examinations 32, 62 

Expenses « 

Expression, Department of . . 46 
faculty 4 _ 6 

French 25,37 

Geology and Mineralogy 18 

German 25, 36 

Graduation, Requirements for 10, 34 
Greek 23, 36 



page 

Grounds and Buildings 40 

Groups of Studies n 

Hebrew 2 6 

History of the College 47 

History, Department of 20, 37 

Honors, Graduation 60 

Hospital 5! 

^ atin 22,35 

Laundry gg 

Libraries 53,54 

Literary Societies 58 

Location of the College. 49 

Lyceum Course 61 

Mathematics 16, 35 

Medical Attention 6i 

Music, Department of 44 

Needs 66 ! 

Organizations, Student 58 

Pedagogy 28 

Philosophy 13 

Physical Culture 60 

Physics 18, 38 

Physiography and Agriculture 38 

Physiology 38 

Political Science 15 ( 

Preparatory Courses, Synopsis. 33 

Preparatory Department 32-39 

Psychology 13 

Publications, College 66 

Railway Connections 49 

Rooms 56 

Rules 62 

Scholarship Eunds 64 

Self-help 63 

Spanish 26 

Special Students 9 

Students, Register of 68-85 

Teachers' Department 27-31 

Tuition 55 

Y. M. C. A 58 

Y. W. C. A 58 



UL 1914 



Mary ville College 
= Bulletin — 










Vol. XIII MAY, 1914 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Officers and Faculty 3 

The Courses of Study 9 

History and General Information . 52 

Expenses 60 

Register of Students for 1913-14 . 75 

Calendar for 1914-15 95 

Index • 96 

Published four times a year by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 

Entered May 24, 1904. at Maryville, Teun., as second-class 
matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 




Maryville College 
Bulletin 

ANNUAL CATALOG NUMBER 



For the Year 1913-1914 




Published by 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville ', Tennessee 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CLASS OF 1914 

Rev. Nathan Bachman, D.D Sweetwater 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Jonesboro 

Rev. Henry Seymour Butler, D.D ; Huntsville 

REV. Edgar Alonzo Elm ore, D.D Chattanooga 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A Maryville 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Alexander Russell McBath, Esq Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Hon. William Anderson McTeer Maryville 

William Edwin Minnis, Esq New Market 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingston 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D Maryville 

CLASS OF 1915 

Hon. William Leonidas Brown Philadelphia 

Rev. Newton Wads worth Cadwell, D.D Atlantic City, N. J. 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 1 

Rev. John Baxter CrEswell, B.A Bearden 

* Major Ben Cunningham Maryville 

Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxville 

Rev. Calvin Alexander Duncan, D.D Harriman 

Rev. John Samuel Eakin, B.A Greeneville 

Rev. Woodward Edmund FinlEy, D.D Marshall, N. C 

Samuel O'Grady Houston, B.A . Knoxville 

Humphrey Gray Hutchison, M.D Vonore'; 

Colonel John Beaman Minnis KnoxvilW 

CLASS OF 1916 

REV. John McKnitt Alexander, B.A Maryville 

James Addison Anderson, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 1 

Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, M.A Maryville 

Hon. John Calvin Crawford, B.A., LL.B Maryville 

Judge Jesse Seymour L'AmorEaux New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Thomas Judson Miles, M.A Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Fred Lowry ProFFitt, B.A Maryville 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Washington College 

Governor John Powel Smith National Soldiers' Home 

Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Baltimore, Md. 

James Martin Trimble, Esq Chattanooga 

Rev. David GourlEy WyliE, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 



*Died January 8, 1914. 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



fficers of the Board of Directors: 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D., Chairman; Fred Lowry Proffitt, 
Recorder and Treasurer. 

ommittees of the Board of Directors: 

Executive: Hon. William Anderson McTeer, Chairman; Hon. Thomas 
Nelson Brown, Secretary; and Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D., 
Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, and Hon. Moses Houston Gambee. 

Professors and Teachers: Rev. Wieeiam "Robert Dawson, D.D., Chair- 
man; Dean Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; and Hon. Wieeiam 
Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Neeson Brown, President Samuel 
TyndaeE Wieson, and Principal Fred Lowry Profpitt. 

Hospital: President Samuee TyndaeE Wieson, Hon. John Caevin 
Crawford, Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, 
and Professor Francis Mitcheee McCeenahan. 

ynodical Examiners for 1914: 

Rev. Ira Donneee Steele, D.D., Rev. Herbert Booth Smith, and 
Mr. John Fred Ferger. 

acuity Committees: 

'Entrance: Professors Gillingham, McCeenahan, and Proffitt. 

Advanced Standing: President Wilson, Dean Barnes, and Professor 
Calhoun. 

Scholarships: Professor Gillingham, President Wilson, and Miss 
Henry. 

Student Publications and Programs: Professors Bassett, Lyon, and 
Calhoun. 

Intercollegiate Literary Contests: Professors Lyon and Calhoun. 

Religious Activities: Professor Gillingham. 

The Lamar Library: Dean Barnes. 

The Loan Library: Professor Bassett. 

Athletics: Professors Proffitt and McCeenahan. 

The Cooperative Boarding Club: Professor Proffitt and President 
Wilson. 

Care of Buildings and Grounds: Professor Lyon. 

College Extension: Dean Barnes and Professors Proffitt and Gil- 
lingham. 

Recommendations : Dean Barnes and Professors Bassett and Lyon. 

The Catalog: Professor Gillingham. 



F ACU LTY 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and Literature, and 
the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D., 
Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, Ph.D., 
Dean, and Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

PHOEBUS WOOD LYON, Ph.D., 
Professor of Logic and Rhetoric. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 
Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, and Head of the Bible Traini 

Department. 

ERANCIS MITCHELL McCLENAHAN, M.A, 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

EDWARD GEORGE SEEL, B.A., 
Associate Professor of German and French. 

ARTHUR WALLACE CALHOUN, M.A., 
Professor of Social Science. 



Professor of Mathematics. 



MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, M.A., 
Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A.,. 
Professor of Biology. 

ANNABEL PERSON, B.A., 

Associate Professor of Greek. 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



WILLIAM HARMON TILFORD, 
Assistant in the Psychology Laboratory. 

EDWIN RAY HUNTER, 

ALMA MABEL ARMSTRONG, 

WILLIAM FOSTER FYKE, 

CHAUNCEY ELBERT CONRAD, 

Assistants in the Chemistry Laboratories. 

JULIA HALE DILLON, 

MARIE ELISE KARNES, 

Assistants in the Biology Laboratories. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, B.A., 

Principal and Associate Professor of Education. 
(Resigned January 14, 1914-) 

HORACE LEE ELLIS, M.A., 

Principal-elect, and Professor-elect of Education. 

MARGARET ELIZA HENRY, B.A., 
English. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A., 

Mathematics. 

MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, B.A., 
English and Bible. 

ALICE ISABEL CLEMENS, B.A., 
English. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, B.A, 
Latin. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 
History. 

ANNA DEVRIES, Ph.B., 
German and French. 

ALMIRA ELIZABETH JEWELL, B.A.. 
Latin. 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



MARY EMMA RENICH, M.A., 
Physics and Mathematics. 

MABEL BROADY, B.A., 
Bnglish. 

ANNA ETHEL FANSON, B.A., 
Bnglish and Latin. 

ESTHER MARY KELL, B.A., 
Mathematics. 

THOMAS HARVEL MITCHELL, 
Bookkeeping. 

HENRY JASPER WILSON, 
Assistant in Bible. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD, 

MAYME REBECCA MAXEY, 

Assistants in Physiology. 

ARTHUR HENRY KELSO, 

GEORGE MORRIS ADAMS, 

JOSEPH CHARLES WALKER, 

Assistants in Physics. 

ADOLPHUS RANKIN McCONNELL, 
JOHN ALBERT HYDEN, 

Assistants in Algebra. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

HELENA MABEL RYLAND, B.A, B.S., 

Head of the Plome Bconomics Department. 

NELL ROSS KIRKPATRICK, 
MARGARET McLAURIN McLUCAS, 

Assistants in Home Bconomics. 

INEZ MONFORT, 

Voice, History of Music, and Theory. 



MARYV1LLB COLLHGB 



LAURA BELLE HALE, 
Piano and Harmony. 

MARY BARNETT BOGGS, 
Piano. 

MARY KATE RANKIN, 

Piano. 

EDNA ELIZABETH DAWSON, 
Piano. 

REV. EDWIN WILLIAM HALL, 
Vocal and Band Music. 

* REV. THOMAS CAMPBELL, M.A., 
Painting and Drawing. 

EDNA EDITH ZIMMERMAN, Ph.B., 
Expression. 

ISABEL MARGARET MacLACHLAK 
Nurse. 

LESTER EVERETT BOND, 

GEORGE EDMUND WILLIAMS, 

Physical Directors. 



OTHER OFFICERS 

t MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 
Treasurer. 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, 
Treasurer. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, 
Manager of the Loan Library. 



*Died March 7, 1914. 
f Died January 8, 1914. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 

Dean of Women and Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, 
Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODG'RASS, 

Librarian. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 

Proctor of the Grounds. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 

Proctor of Carnegie and Memorial Halls. 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 

Secretary to the Scholarship Committee. 

CORINNE FLEMING TETEDOUX, 
Secretary to the President. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 
Secretary to the Treasurer and the Registrar. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 

Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

LULA GRAHAM DARBY, 
Assistant Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

ROBERT McCORKLE MAGILL, 
Bookkeeper of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

HENRY JASPER WILSON, 

FRANK KEITH POSTLETHWAITE, 

Assistant Librarians. 

VICTOR CHARLES DETTY, 
Assistant in the Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER. 
Janitor. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Admission to the Freshman Class is by written examination in the 
mbjects given under Statement of Entrance Requirements, or by officially 
:ertified statements showing in detail all work for which entrance credit 
s asked. Candidates are expected to be at least sixteen years of age and 
)f good moral character. They should send their credentials to the Com- 
nittee on Entrance at as early a date as possible. Those that delay filing 
m application for admission until the opening of the term will be given 
Dnly provisional classification, pending a meeting of the Committee on 
Entrance. The regular application blank of the College, a copy of which 
will be mailed by the Registrar upon request, provides for the neces- 
sary testimonials of character, detailed statement of subjects completed, 
and certificates of honorable dismissal. Entrance credit and classification 
granted on certificates is conditional, and will be cancelled if the student 
is found to be deficient. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is the equiv- 
alent of five forty-five-minutes recitation periods a week during a full 
academic year, in subjects above the eighth grade of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen units are 
required, as specified below : 

1. ENGLISH.— Three units required. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write correctly and 

clearly ; a knowledge of the principles of punctuation, cap- 
italization, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature recom- 

mended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Require- 
ments in English. For the texts recommended for study 
and practice and for reading in 1913-1914, see the lists 
scheduled for the Preparatory Department, page 38. 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Four units required. 
Latin. — Four units may be offered. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Csesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, /Eneid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology, prosody. 



10 MARYVILLB COLLEGB 



Greek. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, Anabas 

Book i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv; Homer, Iliad, Books i-i 

Composition, mythology, prosody. 
German. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and comp< 

sition. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, wi 

reproduction and composition. 
French.— ^Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of abo 

five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one thousar 

pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, rat, 

and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomi 
and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, ar 
equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original demoi 

strations. 

4. NATURAL SCIENCES.— Two units. 

5. ELECTIVE. — Three units. Any three units of standard hig! 
school work that may be accepted by the Committee on Entrance. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITIONS 

A candidate may be admitted with conditions if the number of h; 
conditions does not exceed two. Not more than one condition will I 
allowed in mathematics and none in English. All entrance conditions mui 
be absolved before admission to the Sophomore Class. 

ENTRANCE WITH ADVANCE CREDIT 

Admission with credit for college courses or advanced standing wi 
be granted only upon the presentation of certificates showing that tr., 
candidate, having previously had fifteen units of preparatory work, hi 
satisfactorily completed the college studies, or their equivalent, for whic 
credit is asked. Candidates will not be admitted to the graduating cla; 
for less than one full year's residence work. 






MARYVILLB COLLBGB i* 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, not 
matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Preparatory 
Department. 

Irregular Collegiate: Students.— Candidates offering for entrance a 
sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in the Freshman 
Class, but deficient in more than two of the specified units required by 
this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee on Entrance, be 
admitted as irregular collegiate students until they have absolved their 
conditions and attained full standing in a regular college class. Students 
of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregular or partial course and not 
seeking a degree may be allowed to select such studies as they show them- 
selves qualified to pursue. 

Special Students.— Students desiring to study only music, expression, 
or art, and those seeking only the courses in the Bible Training Depart- 
ment, are classified under their respective departments. They have all the 
privileges offered to any students, such as the advantages of the libraries, 
the literary societies, the dormitories, and the boarding club. Young women 
rooming in the college dormitories and desiring chiefly music, expression, 
or art, are required to take a sufficient number of literary courses to make 
up, together with their work in the departments mentioned, fifteen reci- 
tation hours a week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. To attain the degree a minimum of thirty-six courses must be 
completed. A "course" is a study pursued for five one-hour recitation 
periods a week throughout one term. A term is one-third of the scholastic 
year, and three courses in any subject constitute, therefore, a year's work 
in that subject. All courses recite five hours a week. Laboratory courses 
in the natural sciences require additional hours, as indicated in the descrip- 
tion of the courses. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four full 
years of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the minimum 
amount required of all students. Since all courses recite five hours a 
week, fifteen hours a week is the normal amount of work expected of 
each student. A student is permitted to take four courses a term (twenty 
hours a week) if his average grade in the subjects pursued during the 
preceding term was not less than ninety per cent. 



12 MARYVILLB COLLBGH 



Twenty-six of the thirty-six courses are required of candidates for 
the Bachelor's degree in all groups, and are distributed as follows : 

English, 6 courses. Philosophy, 1 course. 

Other Languages, 8 courses. Psychology, 1 course. 

Mathematics, 1 course. Bible, 5 courses. 
Science, 4 courses. 

In addition to these twenty-six courses, ten courses must be elected 
from the following groups in order to make up the total number of thirty- 
six required for graduation: 



1. 


Classical. 


6. English Literature and History. 


2. 


Modern Languages. 


7. Psychology and Philosophy. 


3. 


Science. 


8. Social Science. 


4. 


Mathematics. 


9. General. 


5. 


Education. 





The requirements for Groups 1, 2, and 3 are as follows : In the Class- 
ical Group, twelve language courses shall be taken, and may be arranged 
in one of the following combinations : (a) Latin six and Greek (or Ger- 
man) six; (b) Latin nine and Greek (or German or French) three; (c) 
Greek nine and Latin (or German or French) three. In the Modern Lan- 
guages Group, twelve courses in modern languages (or eleven, in case 
Spanish is elected) shall be taken. In the Science Group, besides the four 
required science courses, seven additional courses, either of chemistry or 
of biology, shall be taken, and at least two years of German or French. 

The requirements in the Mathematics, Education, English Literature 
and History, and Psychology and Philosophy Groups are that all the 
courses offered in the respective groups shall be taken. The requirements 
in the Social Science Group are that eight courses selected from the 
departments of Economics, Sociology, and Political Science shall be taken. 

Students that meet all the requirements for graduation but do not 
meet the requirements of any of the afore-mentioned groups shall be grad- 
uated in the General Group. The name of the group in which a student 
graduates will be indicated on the diploma. 

CERTIFICATES OF CREDIT 

Graduates and undergraduates that have left college in good standing- 
may, if they so desire, receive an official statement of their credits, upon 
application to the "Registrar. No charge is made for this certificate when 
issued in the form adopted by the College. For the filling out of special 
blanks, prepayment of one dollar for each blank is required. Duplicates 
of certificates may be had by paying for the clerical expense involved. 



Freshman Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Psychology 

History 

Education 

Bible 



SYNOPSIS OF COLLEGE COURSES 



Sophomore Year 



English 

Mathematics . . 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

French 

Biology 

Psychology . . 
Social Science 

History 

Education 
Bible 



Junior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Physics 

Philosophy 

Political Science. . 

Social Science 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Senior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

German 

Spanish 

Hebrew 

Geology and Mineralogy. 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Psychology 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Education 

Bible 



Fall 

*2 
1 
1 
1 

*1 
1 

1 



*1 

8 
3 
4 
4 
12 
1 
tl,3 



3 

±4 



6 

7 
4 

n 

*2 

6 

4 

J7 



11 
1 
1 
1 

7 



3,4,5, 8 
$10 or 11 



Winter 
*2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
*2, 10 
2 
1 
2 

9 



1 

or 9 



Spring 
*3 

9 

8 

3 

3, 11 

2 

3 



5 


6 


4 


5 


4 


5 


5 


11 


5 


6 


— 


— 


2 


3 


t2 


U 


3 


— 


2 or 4 


3 or 5 



11 




6 


7 


7 


8 


7 


8, 9, or 10 


8 


9, 10 


5 


6 


5 


6, 7, or 8 


t2 


— 


— 


~~ 



2 
8 or 10 



, 10 

9 

10 



2 


3 


8 


9 


9 


10 


6 


5, 7 or 8 


ts 


u 


6 


7 


— 


7,8 


— 


• — 



•Required in all groups leading to a degree. 

tTwo courses are required : either Biology i and 2 ; 3 and 4 ; or 1 and 3 ; or Physics 1 and 2. 

jRequired Bible may be taken in any term, but Seniors take Philosophy 3 and 4. 



14 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: The courses in each department are numbered consecutively, 
beginning with 1. The omission of a number indicates that a course has 
been discontinued. New courses receive new numbers and are inserted in 
the^ Synopsis and in the description of courses in the curriculum year to 
which they belong. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Dean Barnes and Professor Lyon 

2. Logic. Hill's Jevons' Logic, studied in connection with questions 
and exercises prepared for the class. The practical work given in the 
exercises appended in the text-book is required, and also much original 
work in Induction connected with every-day questions, the aim being to 
make the study of practical service in such reasoning as will be met by 
the student in his subsequent experiences in life. Junior year, fall term.- 
Proeessor Lyon. 

3. The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief. Dr. Fisher's work 
is made the basis of classroom study and recitation. The principal theistic 
and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the main historical and 
philosophical arguments for belief in the Christian religion are considered. 
Senior year, winter term. — Proeessor Lyon. 

4. Ethics. The leading conceptions of moral theory are approached 
by the historical method. The student is led to see that moral problems 
are real problems, which are solved best by reflective thought that is guided 
by Christian ideals. The various types of ethical theory are discussed. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the ethics of social organizations: the 
state, the economic life, and the family. The text of Dewey and Tufts is 
placed in the hands of the students, and is supplemented by the works of 
Sidgwick, Green, Martineau, and Spencer/ Prerequisite, Psychology 1 or 4. 
Senior year, spring term. — Dean Barnes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dean Barnes 

1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for students 
taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supplemented by 
lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology is 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE l6 



5 ed as a text-book. This course Is identical with Education 1. Freshman 
?ar, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
roblems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
slations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, apper- 
Iption, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
sed is' Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented by lectures. This 
ourse is identical with Education 2. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
>gical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
ial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
s a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view, 
Mention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
Che course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
Principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Education 4. Sophomore year, winter term. 

4. Advanced General Psychology. A study of the psycho-physical 
Organism by means of the Auzoux models, sensation, habit, attention, per- 
:eption, memory, imagination, reasoning, emotions, and volition. ^ Typical 
Experiments. Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports. Senior year, 

all term. 

5. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades: a study of the 
jroup consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
lex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
iiourse is identical with Education 8. Senior year, spring term. 

6. Social Psychology. A study of group consciousness and social 
brigins. Relation of the psychic life of the group to the group activities. 
Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group. 
Comparison of the mental traits of different races and social classes. Psy- 
chology of the crowd, the mores, and folkways. Open to Seniors and to 
ijuniors who have had Psychology 1, 2, 3, and 4. Senior year, winter term. 

7. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experiments in 
acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titchener's Experi- 
mental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by the works of Kiilpe, 
Sanford, Judd, and Myer. Senior year, spring term. 

8. Experimental Psychology. This course is a continuation of Course 
7. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reaction experiment 
by the use of the Hipp chronoscope. Senior year, spring term. 



16 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Dean Barnes 

1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the natic 
and of the character and distribution of nationalities; a development 
the idea and conception of the state, and a study of its origin, forms, a 
ends ; a history of the formation of the constitutions of the states of Gn 
Britain, the United States, Germany, and France, and of the organizati 
of these states within their respective constitutions, and a study of liber 
as guaranteed in their constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' Politic 
Science, Volume I, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and Thayei 
and McClain's Cases, and the works of other authors. Junior year, wint 
term. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the constru! 
tions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judicial depai 
ments of the governments of Great Britain, the United States, Germans 
and France. The text-book is Burgess' Political Science, Volume II, su 
plemented by the works of Story, Macy, and other authors. Junior yei 
spring term. 

3. International Law. This course consists of the elements of inte 
national law, with an account of its origin, sources, and historical develop 
ment. Lawrence's text-book is used, and the course is supplemented 1 
prescribed readings in the works of Woolsey and Hall, and in Scott's ar 
Snow's Cases. Senior year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1914-1915: 

4. The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This cour 
is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure and procedur 
national, state, and municipal ; it includes also a study of the structure ar| 
procedure of political conventions and similar bodies, and the theory ar 
practice of parliamentary law. Open to students who have had Politic 
Science 1 and 2. Senior year, fall term. 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and methcx 
of action of political parties in the United States. Growth of the pari 
system ; primary and convention systems ; permanent party organizatior 
reform movements ; and the value and theory of the party system. Senic 
year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1914-1915.) 

6. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the goverr 
ments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Ogg's Governments c 
Europe is used as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Governments and Pai 
ties in Continental Europe. Senior year, winter term. (Not to be give 
in 1914-1915.) 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the goverr 
ments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great Britaii 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 17 



nd the United States. Ogg and Lowell are the texts, supplemented by 
aswoll-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and Story. Senior 
ear, spring term. (Not to be given in 1914-1915.) 

s. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the element- 
ry principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. Hall's text and 
JcClain's and Thayer's Cases are used. Senior year, fall term. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Calhoun 
As preliminary or accompaniment to work in this department, courses 
iti General Psychology and Biology are advised. Courses in Ethics and 
Social Psychology are recommended to students desiring to take the Social 
Science Group. Course 1 is a desirable preliminary to all the succeeding 
ourses. Course 6 should be taken before any of the Courses 7-10. 

1. General Introduction. This course is designed as a background 
or courses in history, and in all the social sciences. It is a broad survey 
f social evolution, with special reference to its economic basis, and traces 
he path by which mankind has risen to the present social level. The 
ourse exhibits the forces at work in social life, and the factors of prog- 
ess in its several phases. The text-book is Mills' The Struggle for 
Existence, used in connection with Bogardus' syllabus, Introduction to the 
Social Sciences. Assigned readings and class conferences supplement the 
r ;xts. Sophomore year, fall term. 

2. General Sociology. The subject matter of this course is human 
chievement, as worked out in the origin and spontaneous development of 
; bciety in the past. The course is a systematic study of social forces, 
frocesses, structures, and functions. It lays the basis for a study of 
juture possibilities of social improvement. It is the first half of a cora- 
■lete system of sociology, which is concluded in the following course. The 
sxt is Ward's Pure Sociology. Sophomore year, winter term. (Not to 
,e given in 1914-1915.) 

3. Social Progress. A study of the possibility and method of con- 
Icious improvement of society by society. An estimate of the latent 
lowers of the race, and a survey of the direction of advance by means 

f the equalization of opportunity through the cooperative commonwealth. 
;'he texts are Ward's Applied Sociology, and Rauschenbusch's Christian- 
izing the Social Order. Sophomore year, spring term. (Not to be given 

1 1914-1915.) 

4. The Family. The historical evolution of the family in relation to 
:s economic basis. Most of the time is given to the American family — 
:s social history and present problems. The decay of the family under 

% 



18 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



modern capitalism is traced, and the significance of corresponding theor 
is shown. The course concludes with a discussion of the probable efifV 
of collectivist tendencies, and a forecast of the general outlook. T| 
is primarily a lecture course. Dealey's The Family, and the Americ 
Sociological Society's Publication on the Family are used as supplements 
texts, together with reference reading and class discussion. Sophomcl 
year, winter term. 

5. Modern Social Problems. The first half of the course is a gt 
eral survey based on Nearing's Social Adjustment. The second half, 
devoted to an intensive study of one problem selected by the class, such 
charities and correction, criminology, rural life, child labor, social hygie 
eugenics. Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. The Economics of Capitalism. A study of permanent econon: 
principles, especially as they operate under the present economic svste 
and also of the principles and conditions peculiar to capitalism. Capitali: 
is tested as a system of production and distribution. The concepts a| 
the workings of rent, interest, and profits are analyzed and criticised. T 
premises and logic of the defenders of capitalism are examined and d- 
cussed. The total aim is to estimate the value and the shortcomings 
the system. Text is Reeve's The Cost of Competition, supplemented, 
wide reading of concrete material selected as a basis for class discussi 
and conclusions. Junior year, fall term. 

7. Economic Reform. A study of the various proposals and attemi, 
to remove the grosser evils of capitalism. The program of governmt 
regulation is examined and criticised. Incidental attention is given I 
profit-sharing, " welfare work," and other palliatives of capitalism. T 
cooperative movement is thoroughly studied, and appraised. The a 
of the course is to estimate the possibility of satisfactorily remedy.' 
economic evils without revolutionary measures. Junior year, winter ter 

8. Economic Revolution. A review of the Economic Interpretati. 
of History, Exploitation, the Class Struggle, and the general theory 
Socialism. The socialist philosophy and movement are analyzed and cr; 
cised. The principles and activities of syndicalists and industrial unioni) 
receive due attention. Text-books are Kelley's Twentieth Century Soci 
ism, and The Case Against Socialism. Junior year, spring term. 

9. Taxation. A study of taxation as an agency of social maintenai i 
and progress. Special attention is given to the increment tax, the renl 
tax, the income and inheritance taxes. Text-book is Seligman's Ess;* 
on Taxation. Junior year, winter term. (Not to be given in 1914-191; 

10. Rural Economics. The economic aspects of country life and wo • 
The text-books are Simons' The American Farmer, and Carver's Rul 
Economics. Junior year, spring term. (Not to be given in 1914-191-' 



MAKYVILLB COLLEGE 19 



i the option of a majority of the students desiring economics during 
winter or spring term, there may be substituted for any of the Courses 
MO one oi the following: 11. Money and Banking; 12. Labor Organi- 
zations; 13. Public Finance; 14. Trusts. 

EDUCATION 

For the courses in Education see the descriptive text regarding the 
Teachers' Department. 

MATHEMATICS 

2. Plane Trigonometry. Wentworth's text, including functions of 
acute angles, the right triangle, goniometry, and the oblique triangle. 
Freshman year, fall term. 

3. Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. Wentworth's text. This 
work includes the application of spherical trigonometry to the problems of 
the celestial sphere in astronomy, and enough field work is given to illus- 
trate the principles of compass surveying. Freshman year, winter term. 

8. College Algebra. Wentworth's text is used, beginning with the 
jsubject of choice and chance, and including variables and limits, series, 
determinants, graphical representation of functions, and general solutions 
of equations. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 3. Sophomore year, fall 
[term. 

4. 5. Plane Analytic Geometry. This course includes the study of the 
subject as given in Wentworth's Analytic Geometry, omitting the supple- 

rentary propositions. Sophomore year, winter and spring terms. 

6, 7. Differential and integral Calculus. Taylor's Elements of Cal- 
:ulus ; Osborne's Treatise used in supplementary work. Junior year, waiter 
md spring terms. 

9. Astronomy. The subject as presented in Young's General Astron- 
omy is made the basis of study and recitation. Senior year, spring term. 

CHEMICTRY 

Professor McCi^nahan and Laboratory Assistants 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A beginner's course in modern 
chemical theory and practice. Suitable experiments are selected, but the 
[requirements of the course center about lectures and quizzes, both oral 
and written. Mellor's Modern Inorganic Chemistry is the text. It is 
pxpected that the Chemical Library be freely used by all members of the 
College taking this course. Special topics are assigned for library work 
; n the history of chemistry and in special phases of industrial and tech- 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



nical chemistry. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; lectures and 
quizzes, three hours. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1 durim 
the first half of the winter term. Second half of the winter term, ai 
introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis. The library and text-boow 
work of the latter half of the term has to do more particularly with thi 
metals. The order of their presentation for discussion and laborator 
study follows the analytical order as outlined in Gooch and Browning' 
Outlines of Qualitative Chemical Analysis. Continual reference is mad 
to Mellor's Modern Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory practice, six hour 
a week; lectures and quizzes, two hours. Freshman year, winter terrr 

3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. A contin 
uation of Course 2. This is more particularly a course in metallurgica 
and applied chemistry with respect to the library work, and in analytica 
chemistry with respect to the laboratory. The same text and manual i 
used as in Course 2. Laboratory practice, six hours a week; lecture am 
quiz, two hours. Freshman year, spring term. 

10. General Inorganic Chemistry. Parallel to Course 2. This cours 
is designed more particularly for students in Home Economics. The labe 
ratory exercises are distinctively qualitative and analytical. The lecture' 
are supplemented by library work. Definite topics are provided for specia 
reports. Laboratory practice, six hours a week; lectures and quizzes, tw< 
hours. Prerequisite, Chemistry 1. Freshman year, winter term. 

11. Elementary Organic and Household Chemistry. Designed prima 
rily for students in Home Economics. Laboratory practice, six hours ; 
week; lectures, two hours. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 10, or 1 and S 
Freshman year, spring term. 

12. Advanced Household Chemistry. A course dealing with element, 
ary biochemistry, chemical sanitation, food analysis, and poisons. This \ 
a laboratory course of eight laboratory hours and one lecture a weel 
Much use is made of the library. The study is topical. Prerequisites 
Chemistry 1, 2, and 11, or 1, 10, and 11. Sophomore year, fall term. 

4. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A laboratory course of eigh 
hours a week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods ordinarily em 
ployed in quantitative chemical analysis. The instruction is individua 
and there is continual reference to the well-stocked reference library an 
to current literature. Independence of thought is the aim, and the mo< 
scrupulous care to exactness -of technic is required. One hour a wee 
in addition is devoted to quizzes and informal discussions. Prerequisite; 
Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Junior year, fall term. 

5. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course - 
Junior year, winter term, 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 21 



6. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 5. 
[trior year, spring term. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Liberal use of the Chemical Library 
required. Individual reports on special topics. The course is arranged 
r topical study. No particular text-book is required, but there is re- 
ated reference to such texts as Holleman, Perkin and Kipping, and 
}hen, to such larger works as Richter, and to current literature. Labo- 
tory practice, eight hours a week; lecture or quiz, one hour. Senior 
ar, fall term. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 7. Senior 
■ar, winter term. 

9. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 8, with 
me definite applications to biological chemistry, both analytical and theo- 
tical. Senior year, spring term. 

For acceptable substitutes for Chemistry courses in the Science Group, 
e Geology and Mineralogy. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor McCeenahan 

1. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of eight hours each week, accom- 
inied by one hour lecture each week. Brush-Penfield's Determinative 
".ineralogy is the manual. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Senior 
;ar, fall term. 

2. General Geology. Dynamic and Structural. Chamberlain and 
alesbury's College Geology is the text. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, 
id 3. Senior year, winter term. 

3. General Geology. Historical. A continuation of Course 2. Much 
se is made of the United States Geological Folios and Atlas. Also occa- 
onal field trips are made to interesting localities in the county. Senior 
iar, spring term. 

Geology 1, 2, and 3 may be substituted for Chemistry 7, 8, and 9 by 
udents electing the Science Group. 

PHYSICS 

Professor McCeenahan 

1. Heat, Light, and Sound. Lectures, selected experiments, problems, 
nd quizzes. Kimball's College Physics is used as the text-book in this 
Durse. Prerequisite, Chemistry 1 and 2, and Mathematics 2. Laboratory 
ractice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, fall 
:rm. 

2. Magnetism and Electricity. A continuation of Course 1. Junior 
ear, winter term. 



22 MARYV1LLB COLLBGH 



BIOLOGY 

Miss Green and Laboratory Assistants 

1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisites, elementary physiology and Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory 
practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, 
fall term. 

2. General Vertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; 
recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, winter term. 

3. Botany. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Emphasis 
is laid upon the chief problems involved in the physiology, ecology, and 
morphology of the seed, the developing plant, and the flower. Text-book, 
Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Sopho- 
more year, fall term. 

4. Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey of the 
four great plant groups. Text-book, Bergen and Davis' Principles of 
Botany. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory practice, four hours 
a week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, spring term. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most evident life rela-: 
tions of plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant physiology. 
Classroom work, accompanied by experimental work in the laboratory. 
The work is not confined to any one text-book, but references are given ' 
out to various standard text-books on plant physiology. Prerequisite, , 
Biology 3. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three 
hours. Junior year, winter term. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed study of< 
the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts, smuts, mildews, ' 
and molds renders this a valuable course from an economic standpoint. 
Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, Biology 4. Laboratory prac- 
tice, four hours a week ; recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

7. Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Mosses, 
liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thoroughly studied. 
The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the surrounding region makes 
this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Biology 4 and 6. Laboratory prac- 
tice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

8. Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 4, 6, and 7. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; 
recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 23 



<», 10. Advanced Physiology. Classroom work and laboratory experi- 
:nts, bringing out the fundamental principles of the circulatory, res- 
■ato'ry, digestive, and nervous systems. This course is especially valuable 
students intending to take up the study of medicine. Prerequisites, 
Miientary physiology, elementary physics, Biology 2, and Chemistry 1 
d 2. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours, 
nior year, winter and spring terms. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 6, 7, 
8. By this alternation of courses, a student will be given an opportunity 
pursue the subject further than would otherwise be possible. 

HISTORY 

Mrs. Alexander and Professor Gillingham 

1. Nineteenth Century History. The object of this course is the 
udy of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed from 
e French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of republican 
eas in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment of the German 
mpire, and the revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848. Special topics 
>r individual study are taken up by each member and pursued throughout 
e course. Freshman year, winter term. 

2. History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the influ- 
lce of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, the German Reformation, 
he work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed authors, but 
udents are required to submit oral reports of special library work. Fresh- 
en year, spring term. 

3. Church History. A general survey of the history of the Church 
"om the first century to the present time, with especial emphasis upon the 
reat leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text-book and library work, 
ophomore year, spring term. 

4. 5. American History. In this course, students are expected to cen- 
■alize their work upon one line of development — constitutional, economic, 
Dcial, ethical, or religious — and the result of the special work is to be 
anded in as a term theme. Junior year, fall and winter terms. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Mrs. Alexander, and Professors Lyon and Giujngham. 
2, 3. Rhetoric. Genung's Practical Elements of Rhetoric, with illus- 
rative examples, is studied, and the students are familiarized with the 
irinciples of style and invention. Practical exercises accompany the study 
.f the text-book. This is accompanied by work in Rhetorical Analysis, 
onsisting of application of the principles referred to above. The work 



24 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



is altogether practical, and consists of rhetorical criticism of selections of 
English prose and of original work in sentence structure, paragraphs, and 
longer compositions prepared by the students both in and for the class- 
room. Freshman year, winter and spring terms. — Professor Lyon. 

1. Outlining and Argumentation. Five Weeks.— Outlining or analysis 
of topics for discussion. This practical work is done in accordance with 
a system of principles and rules collated by the instructor in charge. The 
absolute necessity of method in all composition is emphasized by this 
course. At least fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by each 
student, and criticised and returned by the professor. Nine Weeks.— 
Argumentation. This course follows the course in outlining and involves 
the application of the principles presented in that course in the production 
of finished argumentative exercises, which are delivered in class, and criti- 
cised by the instructor. Attention is given to the delivery as well as to 
the thought and composition, since the aim of the course is to develop the 
power of effective public address. Sophomore year, fall term.— Professor 

GlEUNGHAM. 

5, 6. English Literature. A survey of the entire field of English Lit- 
erature from its beginning to the death of Victoria. As a guide, Long's 
History of English Literature is employed, but much use is made of Saints- 
bury, Garnett and Gosse, and other advanced works in this subject. The 
development of the literature from period to period is carefully noted, and 
the lives, works, and characteristics of the more prominent authors are 
studied and criticised. Sophomore year, winter and spring terms.-— Pro- 
fessor Lyon. 

4. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial liter- 
ature. The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the works of 
the leading American poets and prose writers of the nineteenth century. 
Library work and Page's Chief American Poets. Junior year, fall term.— 
Mrs. Alexander. 

11. Development of English Poetry. This course is an introductory 
study of the technic of the art of verse. The forms of English poetry are 
studied, including the epic, ballad, sonnet, ode, and other lyrics. These 
forms will be traced in examples from Chaucer to Tennyson. The object 
of the course is to increase the enjoyment and appreciation of poetry by 
insight into the methods of the poets and by acquaintance with the best 
examples of their art. Junior year, winter term. — Mrs. Ai,ExandFr. 

7. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course will be a study of rep- 
resentative nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial attention to the 
development of the essay and of prose fiction. The work will be based on 
typical essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Stevenson, and Arnold; 



MARYVILLU COLLEGE 25 



and representative fiction by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, 
Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling. Senior year, fall term.— Mrs. Alex- 
ander. 

8. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting the 
development of his poetic art; with introductory lectures on the evolution 
of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. Senior year, 
winter term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

9. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tennyson, 
and Browning, with introductory lectures, classroom criticism, and papers 
on assigned subjects. Senior year, spring term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

10. Theme Writing. This course gives instruction and practice in 
the four kinds of composition : exposition, argumentation, description, and 
narration. Daily exercises and themes are written and criticised in class. 
These are designed to illustrate the use of words and the structure of sen- 
tences and paragraphs, and to give general practice in writing on various 
subjects. In addition, at least four themes, of from a thousand to fifteen 
hundred words each, must be handed in. Senior year, spring term.— Mrs. 
Alexander. 

LATIN 

Proeessor Bassett 

1. Livy, and Latin Composition. Livy, four hours; Latin compo- 
sition, one hour. Livy, Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The 
class makes a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. 
Syntax receives close attention. Latin prose based on the text is prepared 
by the professor in charge. Sight reading. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. De Senectute and De Amicitia. A careful study of De Senectute, 
followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia. Special attention is given to 
the author's thought and style, and to practice in translation. Latin prose 
based on the text is prepared by the professor in charge. Sight reading. 
Freshman year, winter term. 

9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from the 
writings of Seneca. The class makes a critical study of the historical 
setting, structure, and purpose of the Agricola. The characteristics of 
Silver Latin as illustrated in the style of Tacitus and Seneca receive close 
attention. Prerequisite, Latin 1 or 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

3. Cicero and Pliny. Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny. 
The letters read will be such as illustrate the political history, the life and 
customs of the times, and the characters of the writers. Sight reading. 
Prerequisites, two of the preceding courses. Sophomore year, fall term. 

4. Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together with Course 5 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace. By this time 
the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatical structure of the 
language to enable him to study the poems of Horace from a literary 
viewpoint. Special attention is paid to the metrical structure, and the class 
receives thorough drill in scansion. Prerequisites, three of the preceding- 
courses. Sophomore year, winter term. 

5. Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal. A continuation of Course 4. The class makes a careful study 
of the origin and development of Roman satire. Prerequisite, Latin 4. 
Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of the Junior year 
consists of a thorough and systematic review of the whole period of Roman 
literature — its beginnings, development, and decline — with special refer- 
ence to its connection with Roman history. The three courses should be 
taken in succession. They presuppose thorough familiarity with Latin 
Syntax, a good working vocabulary, and considerable practice in transla- 
tion. All the preceding courses should be taken before these are attempted. 
The texts used are Fowler's History of Roman Literature and Smith's 
Latin Selections. Readings from representative authors. Lectures by the 
professor in charge. Reports are required on assigned portions of the 
various histories of Latin literature. Se-lar's Roman Poets, Tyrrell's Latin 
Poetry, and other reference works. The work of this term is a study of 
the fragments of early Latin, the plays of Plautus and Terence, Lucretius' 
De Rerum Natura, Catullus, and the prose writers of the age of Cicero. 
Junior year, fall term. 

7. Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. A 
continuation of Course 6. Selections from Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics 
and Books vii to xii of the vEneid. Ovid and the Elegiac Poets, and the 
prose writers of the period. Junior year, winter term. 

8. Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and Post- 
classical Latin. A continuation of Course 7. Selections from Lucan, 
Seneca, Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Tacitus, Suetonius, Apuleius, 
A'linucius Felix, and others. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Teachers' Course. This course is intended to assist those who 
expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the prin- 
ciples of the language, the class considers the most effective methods of 
teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. Open to students who have had at least 
one reading course. This course is identical with Education 7. Senior 
year, spring term. 



MARYVILLE COLLHGU 



GREEK 

Miss Person 



I. 2, ;;. College Beginning Greek. This course is designed only for 
students sufficiently well prepared in other subjects to enable them to com- 
plete the entrance Greek in one year. The work of the fall term purposes 
to secure a mastery of the principal inflections, a careful study of the 
principles of syntax, and facility in reading and writing easy sentences in 
Oreek. In the winter term the reading of the Anabasis is begun, contin- 
uing through the spring term with a thorough review of Greek grammar 
and Greek composition. Selections from other authors are brought in for 
sight translation. Freshman year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Herodotus and Thucydides. Selections from the works of Herod- 
otus and Thucydides are read. A careful study of the dialect of Herod- 
otus is made, and special reading is assigned on the rise and development 
of history as a division of Greek literature. A study of the history of 
Greek literature is begun, based on Wright's and Jebb's texts, with assigned 
reading in Mueller and Mahafify. Sophomore year, fall term. 

.5. Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are read, and the 
peculiarities of the late Attic style are studied. The study of the history 
of Greek literature is continued. Sophomore year, winter term. 

II. Greek Testament. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, 
Westcott and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's 
and Robertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the assigned 
text, a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek, 
the literature of this period, and the most important New Testament man- 
uscripts and versions. Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Plato. The Phsedo is read for the immortal teachings of Socrates, 
with the Apology or the Crito for his life and death. Brief outline of 
pre-Socratic philosophy. A study is made of the philosophic dialog and 
of Plato's literary style. Sight translation from easy Attic prose. Junior 
year, fall term. 

7. Tragic Poetry. ^Eschylus' Seven against Thebes or Prometheus 
Bound, and Sophocles' CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone are read in alter- 
nate years, with one play from Euripides, either Alcestis or Iphigenia in 
Tauris. The origin and development of tragedy, the Greek theater, and 
other related topics are discussed in lectures and studied in assigned read- 
ings. Junior year, winter term. 

8. Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. The 
development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and Greek life 
are studied. One hour a week is given to the study of Greek architecture, 
based upon a text-book, supplemented by lectures and the examination of 



28 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



drawings and stereographs. Alternates with Courses 9 and 10. Junior 
year, spring term. 

9. Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute the 
basis of a general study of the rise and development of political oratory 
and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written translations are 
required to develop accuracy and elegance in rendering the polished style 
of the classical orators. One hour a week is devoted to lectures and dis- 
cussions on Greek sculpture and painting, Tarbell's History of Greek Art 
being used as a text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 10. Junior year, 
spring term. 

10. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course cov- 
ering the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine books is 
read in the original and the intervening portions in a translation. Merry's 
two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a classroom text. Homeric 
geography, politics, religion, home life, and art are studied in connection 
with the reading of the text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 9. Junior 
year, spring term. 

GERMAN 

Professor Seei* 

1, 2, 3. College Beginning German. This course is designed for stu- 
dents who enter college without German, but who are sufficiently prepared 
in language study to be able to complete entrance German in one year. 
The work of the fall term is intended to give the student a mastery of the 
grammar, easy prose translation, and simple conversation. Six or more 
popular German poems are committed to memory. Text-books, Joynes 
and Meissner's Grammar and Guerber's Marchen und Erzahlungen. Dur- 
ing the winter term such intermediate texts as von Hillern's Hoher als 
die Kirche and Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn are read and made the 
basis of conversation and composition exercises. Drill in grammar. In 
the spring term Schiller's Wilhelm Tell is read and its dramatic structure 
studied. Selected passages are committed to memory and original themes 
are written in German on subjects connected with the plot. Freshman 
year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Prose Translation and Composition. Elster's Zwischen den Schlach- 
ten and Mosher's Willkommen in Deutschland are used. With the for- 
mer, emphasis is laid principally upon translation and on extending the 
vocabulary; and with the latter upon oral work and composition, with a 
progressive review of the grammar. Prerequisites, German 1, 2, and 3, 
or their equivalents. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Schiller's Life and Works. Two of Schiller's dramatic works, 
including Wallenstein's Tod, are translated and studied in the classroom, 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



and a third (in 1913-1914, Maria Stuart) is read out of class. Outlines 
oi the plots of two of these plays are presented by the student, the first 
in English and the second in German. Schiller's life and literary career 
are made the subject of reference reading and written report. Sophomore 
year, winter term. 

6. Goethe's Life and Faust. The First Part of Faust is studied and 
discussed in the classroom. Goethe's life and career are made the subject 
of reference reading and written report. Sophomore year, spring term. 

7. Advanced Composition and Conversation. This course is conducted 
in German and consists of translation of representative English prose into 
the German idiom. Sketches from German History are made the basis of 
classroom discussion and German themes are presented on various phases 
of German life and customs. Prerequisites, German 1, 3, and 3, or their 
equivalents. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Survey of German Literature. This course consists of three parts. 

(1) A study of the History of German Literature from the text-book. 

(2) Reading, out of class, literature representative of the different periods 
of German Literary History. (3) Lectures on the political and social 
forces which determined the character and growth of German Literature. 
Junior year, winter term. 

9. Lessing's Life and Dramatic Works. A critical study is made of 
Nathan der Weise and one other of Lessing's dramas. A third drama may 
be read out of class. Lessing's life and career are made the subject of 
reference reading and written report in German. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Teachers' Course. A general review of German grammar, his- 
torical and comparative syntax, synonyms, and characteristics of German 
style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. Open to students 
that have had at least one reading course. This course is identical with 
Education 6. Junior year, spring term. 

11. Nineteenth Century Drama. A special course conducted in 1913- 
1914. Dramatic Literature of the Nineteenth Century as represented by 
the work of Hebbel and Ludwig. Classroom discussion in German. Pre- 
requisite, German 9. Senior year, fall term. 

FRENCH 

Professor St^h 
1, 2, 3. College Beginning French. This course is designed for those 
who enter college without French and are sufficiently well prepared in 
language study to be able to complete the grammar and easy prose in the 
fall term. The course consists of reading some of the most representa- 
tive authors, some of which reading is done out of class. Romanticism 



30 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



as represented by the work of Lamartine, Hugo, and De Musset. The! 
life and customs of the French people are studied. Sophomore year, fall] 
winter, and spring terms. 

SPANISH 

President Wilson 

1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning with 
the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of English 
into Spanish and of Spanish into English. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Galdos' Marianela ; El Si de las Ninas ; conversation and compo- 
sition. Senior year, winter term. 

HEBREW 

Professor Gieeingham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading of easy 
portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's Inductive Hebrew 
Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion of both 
courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced standing 
in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year, winter term. 

3. A third term was given in 1913-1914. Translation in Genesis, with 
drill in grammar and syntax. Senior year, spring term. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gilungham 

1. Life of Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Teachings of Jesus. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. Apostolic Christianity. Sophomore year, spring term.. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. Senior year, fall term. 
These courses are described under The Bible Training Department. 
Five courses in Bible and allied subjects are required for graduation. 

Three of these must be in English Bible, and may be taken during the 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years in any term. The required work 
for Seniors consists of the allied subjects, The Grounds of Theistic and 
Christian Belief (Philosophy 3), and Ethics (Philosophy 4). 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



31 



THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A large percentage of the graduates and undergraduates of Maryville 
College become teachers. They are found in all sections of the United 
States, especially in the Southern Appalachian region, and in the South- 
west and West, and are employed in elementary schools, high schools, and 

colleges. 

The instructors in the various departments of the College endeavor 
to conduct their work in such a way as to help train teachers both by 
the thoroughness of the instruction given in the various branches, and by 
the object lesson of the methods employed in the classrooms. Competent 
teachers selected from many colleges and universities bring the best 
methods of those schools to their work at Maryville. The teachers trained 
at Maryville rank high in sound scholarship and practical pedagogy. 

Besides providing model methods in college management and class- 
room work, the College maintains a special department for the vocational 
training of teachers. 

In the Teachers' Department a six years' course of study designed to 
equip prospective teachers thoroughly for their profession is offered. 



PREPARATORY 

The first four years correspond closely to the regular courses of the 
Preparatory Department, and these four years contain sixteen units of 
academic work. Those completing these four years are admitted to the 
Freshman Class of the College. 

Synopsis of Courses — The following is a synopsis of the courses in 
the four preparatory years : 



First Year 
Mathematics II 
English I 
Latin I 
History I 

^Mathematics I 



Second Year 
Mathematics III 
English II 
Latin II 
Science I 

*History II 
^Bookkeeping I 



Third Year 
Mathematics IV 
English III 
Lat. Ill or Ger. I 
History III 



Fourth Year 

Math. V (Fall) 
Eng.IV(W.&S.) 
Lat. IV or Ger. II 
Science II 
Pedagogy I 
*Historv IV 



* May be taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of the Preparatory 
Department. 



32 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Pedagogy I — ( a ) School Management. This part of the course is 
designed to inculcate practical views of class management that will enable 
the teacher to handle classes successfully in the common schools. Among 
the subjects discussed are the teacher's part in school government, the 
pupil's part in school government, incentives, punishments, school evils and 
how to deal with them, length of recitation, examinations, promotions, and 
the like. Seeley's School Management is used as a text-book, supplemented 
by extensive reference to other authors, (b) Methods of Teaching. The 
work of the winter term is devoted to the study of the various methods of 
teaching. The difference between the Object Method, the Direct Method, 
and the Development Method is shown by numerous illustrations; the 
advantages and disadvantages of each are pointed out; and the method 
of combining them practically in teaching the fundamental subjects in our 
schools is carefully developed, (c) Methods of Teaching. In the spring 
term the methods learned are applied to the routine of the school room; 
actual practice in teaching reading, language, arithmetic, geography, and 
other studies is given; and the work of the year is reviewed and unified. 
White's Art of Teaching and McMurry's Method of the Recitation are 
used in both winter and spring terms. 

This course is open also to such students in the college classes as may 
desire special work in these lines. Teachers who enter College after the 
Christmas holidays may join the class. 

Special Courses;, — To accommodate teachers and others who enter 
College after the Christmas holidays, special courses in history, civics, 
higher arithmetic, and grammar are offered. Students may also take up 
any full-year course offered in the curriculum of the preparatory years for 
which they are prepared. College courses may also be taken by those who 
have had sufficient preparation. 

Special Double Courses — In addition to the regular courses, and 
the special courses referred to above, special double courses in Beginning 
Latin and Beginning Algebra are provided, by which a full year's credit 
in these studies may be secured during the winter and spring terms. The 
classes recite ten hours each a week, and prepare respectively for Caesar 
and Advanced Algebra. For the successful completion of the double 
course in either Latin or Algebra one unit credit will be given; for any 
of the other preparatory courses, proportional credit will be allowed. 

Reading Circle — Lectures are given on the books adopted by the Ten- 
nessee Teachers' Reading Circle. All teachers have the privilege of attend- 
ing these lectures. Prospective teachers are accorded the same privileges 
as are teachers. 

Other Courses — Detailed description of the courses outlined in the 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 33 



four preparatory years of the Teachers' Department will be found under 
Departments of Instruction in the Preparatory Department, pages 35 to 41. 

COLLEGE 

The work of the two college years of the Teachers' Department cor- 
responds somewhat to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years of the 
College. Seven of the eight courses of the College Department of Edu- 
cation are completed during these two years, thus giving the student that 
completes the work of the Teachers' Department a very thorough voca- 
tional training. The courses in pedagogy, psychology, and the history of 
education are conducted in accordance with the best normal methods now 
in vogue. Those completing the work of this department may, after two 
years' additional work, graduate from the College in the Education Group 
of studies and receive the Bachelor's degree. 

Synopsis of Courses — The following is a synopsis of the courses 
offered in the two college years : 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 (Eight courses to be taken). 

English 1, 2, and 3 (Three courses to be taken). 

Mathematics 2 (To be taken). 

Chemistry 1, 2, and 3; Biology 1; Latin 1, 2, 3, and 4; German 1, 2, 
3, and 4 (Four courses to be taken). 

Bible 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (Two courses to be taken). 

Education — i. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for 
students taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supple- 
mented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psy- 
chology is used as a text-book. This course is identical with Psychology 1. 
Fifth year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
problems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
relations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, appercep- 
tion, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented by lectures. This 
course is identical with Psychology 2. Fifth year, winter term. 

3. History of Education. A study of the educational systems of early 
China, Greece, and Rome ; the history of Christian education ; the rise 
of the universities; the Renaissance; and the educators of the sixteenth, 
seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. A careful study is made 
of such modern educators as Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, and 
Horace Mann. The last part of the course is devoted to the comparison 
of the school systems of Germany, France, England, and the United States. 
Monroe's History of Education is used as a text-book. Sixth year,- fall 
term. 

3 



34 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



4. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 1 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe-i 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth! 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view,;, 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 1 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Psychology 3. Sixth year, winter term. 

5. Problems in Secondary Education. Present ideals in education. 
The moral element in education. Adolescence and education. The dis- 
ciplinary basis of courses of study. The high-school curriculum. History 
of the high-school curriculum since the Renaissance. Arts and technology 
in secondary education. The social organization of the high school. Ath- I 
letics in education. Sex pedagogy in the high school. The school and the 
community. On sending boys and girls to college. High School Edu- 
cation, by Johnston and others, is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
Hall's Problems in Education, lectures, and reports by students. Sixth, 
year, spring term. 

6. Teachers' Course in German. A general review of German gram- 
mar, historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, characteristics of Ger-, 
man style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. This course is' 
identical with German 10, and is open to students that have had at least- 
one reading course. Sixth year, spring term. 

7. Teachers' Course in Latin. This course is intended to assist those 
who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the 1 
principles of the language, the class considers the most effective methods 
of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions; 
papers, and collateral reading. This course is identical with Latin 10, and' 
is open to students that have had at least one reading course. Sixth year| 
spring term. 

8. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades : a study of the' 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
course is identical with Psychology 5, and is open to Seniors and to those 
who have completed Education 1, 2, and 3. Sixth year, spring term. 

Other Courses — Detailed descriptions of the other courses offered in 
the synopsis of the college years of the Teachers' Department will be 
found under Departments of Instruction in the College Department, pages 
14 to 30. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 35 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of the Preparatory Department is to furnish thorough 
ourses of training in high-school branches leading to entrance to the 
nreshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted to make up their 
onditions in this department. Students in the Teachers' Department take 
lieir first four years' work in preparatory courses, and Bible Training stu- 
ents have the privilege of electing studies in this department. Oppor- 
unities are provided also for a large and worthy class of young people, 
nth limited means and time at their command, to obtain some preparation 
or their future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
re available to students in the Preparatory Department. 



ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates from 
rincipals of secondary schools will, however, be accepted and credit given 
3r equivalent work in any of the subjects required for graduation. Credit 
ms given is conditional, and will be canceled in any subject in which the 
:udent is found to be deficient. Full credit for physiology or physics will 
ot be given unless a reasonable amount of laboratory work has been done 
l connection with the text-book work. Diplomas must be accompanied by 
>rtified statements of the amount of time devoted to each subject studied, 
rid the passing grade, together with the name of the text-book used and 
ie ground covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for 
laminations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 

indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
s testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases students 
)ming from other secondary schools, whether asking for credits or not, 
lust present letters of honorable dismissal from their former principals, 
tudents that have been out of school for a number of years are admitted 
rider the general rule that all candidates for admission must furnish sat- 
factory evidence of good moral character, and must have completed the 
>mmon-school branches. Students that have not had the advantage of 
ifficient preparation and that fail to pass the entrance examinations are, 

not too deficient, prepared for entrance in a room provided for that pur- 
3se. Applicants under fifteen years of age, unless residents of Maryville, 
ill not be admitted. 



36 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers two courses of study: the Classical and tt 
General. All regular courses of study begin in the fall term and contint 
throughout the year, except as noted in Mathematics V and English P 
Courses may be entered at the opening of the winter or spring term, pn 
vided the student has had the work of the preceding term or its equivaler! 

SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 

General 



Classical 

First Year 
Mathematics II 
English I 
Latin I 
History I 

* Mathematics I 

Second Year 
Mathematics III 
English II 
Latin II 
Science I 

* History II 

Third Year 
f Mathematics IV 
t English III 

Latin III 

German I 

French I 

History III 
Fourth Year 
f Mathematics V (Fall) 
t English IV (W. & S.) 

Latin IV 

German II 

French II 
f Science II 

History IV 



First Year 
Mathematics I 
Mathematics II 
English I 
History I 

Second Year 
Mathematics III 
English II 
Science I 
History II, or 
Bookkeeping I 

Third Year 
Mathematics IV 
English III 
German I, or 
French I 
History III 

Fourth Year 
Mathematics V (Fall) 
English IV (W. & S.) 
German II, or 
French II 
Science II 
History IV 



tion - t aamm tn the courses listed above, which begin in the fall term, extra cla.'S 

the smaller bulletins. . . j 

-T^Tb7taken in addition to the required, studies by ^mission of ^*™ a l 

t These studies and one language are required; the other study is elected. 



MARYVILLU COLLEGE 3* 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in either course are fifteen units of 
ork as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the equivalent of 
ve forty-five-minutes recitation periods a week in one subject throughout 
le academic year. A student may elect either course, but must pursue the 
udies prescribed in the course elected for at least one year, unless change 
made in accordance with the administrative rule on page G9 regarding 
langes of course. The prescribed work is four recitation periods a day. 
artial work may be permitted at the discretion of the Principal. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on the unit 
isis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be so indicated on 
le records, and unit credit for that subject withheld until the student 
lall have completed the year's work. A minimum of three units, seventy- 
ve per cent, of the year's work, will be required for advancement in 
assification to the following year. The passing grade in the Preparatory 
apartment is seventy. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Mathematics 

First Year: I. Higher Arithmetic. A thorough course in arith- 
letic is offered. The subjects considered are percentage and its various 
^plications, exchange, equation of payments, progressions, involution and 
solution, mensuration, ratio and proportion, and the metric system. 

II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New Standard Algebra, 
> radicals. 

Second Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, 
itio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial and expo- 
ential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and equations in general. 

Third Year: IV. Plane Geometry. Five books of plane geometry, 
)gether with about three hundred original theorems and problems. Went- 
orth's Revised Geometry is the text-book used. 

Fourth Year : V. Solid Geometry. The subject is begun and finished 
uring the fall term. Students in this course enter English IV in the 
inter term. Wentworth's text is used, including the chapter on Conic 
ections. 

English 

First Year : I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by the best 
lodern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. Oral drill 
i given in the retelling of familiar stories from standard American and 
English authors. Written themes are required weekly, in which drill is 



38 MARYVILLB COLLBGH 



given on capitalization and punctuation, and, in an elementary way, on! 
unity and coherence in the paragraph and the sentence. 

Second Year : II. Composition and Rhetoric. Brooks' text is made 
the basis of this year's work, and written themes are required weekly. A 
further study is made of unity and coherence in the composition and in 
paragraphs; and practice is given in variety of sentence structure. During 
the year the work is supplemented by the study of selections from the 
prescribed requirements for college entrance. 

Third Year: III. English Literature. A study is made of the texts 
prescribed by the College Entrance Examination Board. During the year 
themes are required based on topics that arise from the study of litera- 
ture. Special care is taken that these themes shall be an expression of the 
opinion of the student. The prescribed texts for 1913-1914 were as fol- 
lows : For Study : Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's Comus, L' Allegro, 
and II Penseroso ; Washington's Farewell Address ; Webster's First Bunker 
Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson. For Reading: Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice and Julius Caesar; Addison and Steele's, The Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers ; Blackmore's Lorna Doone ; Irving's Sketch 
Book; Gateway Series, Byron, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Browning; 
Selections from the New Testament; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Short 
stories by standard writers. 

Fourth Year : IV. English Literature. Further study of literature 
is pursued during the winter and spring terms. The method of work is 
the same as that followed during the third year. 



Latin 



First Year: I. First Latin. Pearson's Essentials, supplemented by 
outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is completed in the spring; 
term, and is followed by the reading of Viri Romae or some book of like; 
grade. 

Second Year: II. Caesar and Latin Composition. Caesar, four periods 
each week; Latin composition, one period. During the year outlines are 
given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. The first four books of 
the Gallic War are completed. The texts used are Allen and Greenough's 
Caesar and Allen and Phillips' Latin Composition. 

Third Year: III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In the 
fall and winter terms : Cicero, four periods each week ; Latin composition, 
one period. The four orations against Catiline, the Manilian Law, and the 
Archias. In the spring term: Sallust, four periods each week; Latin com- 
position, one period. Sallust's Catiline. A careful comparison is made 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 39 



with Cicero's Catilinarian orations. Special attention is paid to drill in 
pronouncing the Latin, intelligent reading in the original, and translation 
Lt sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year: IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is spent in 
he study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The principles of quan- 
tity and versification are carefully studied. Thorough drill in oral and 
written scansion. Sight reading. The course covers the first six books 
of Vergil's ^neid. The last three weeks of the spring term are devoted 
to prose composition. 

German 

Third Year : I. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This course con- 
sists of the principles of German pronunciation, inflection, rules of syntax, 
the rewriting of easy English sentences in German, and the memorizing of 
familiar poems. The work of the winter and spring terms is augmented 
by reading Bacon's Im Vaterland. 

Fourth Year : II. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This course in- 
cludes advanced grammar and syntax, use of modes, derivation of words, 
force of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted to conversation and 
composition work of an intermediate character. The reading consists of 
such works of descriptive and narrative prose as will impart facility in 
translation. Storm's Immensee, Benedix' Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's 
Germelshausen, Heine's Die Harzreise, Mezger and Mueller's Kreuz und 
Quer. Memorizing of longer poems. 

French 

Third Year : I. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course consists 
of a thorough foundation in the elements of French grammar and the 
conjugation of irregular verbs. Composition, and reading of such authors 
as Guerber's Contes et Legendes, Dumas' La Tulipe Noire, Merimee's 
Colomba. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course con- 
sists of advanced grammar, composition, and conversation; a paper each 
term on some book to be read outside of class ; and the reading of Buf- 
fum's Short Stories, Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Moliere's L'Avare, and 
Greville's Dosia. 

History 

First Year : I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian and 
Oriental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alexander, 
followed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 476 A. D. 



40 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Second Year : II. Medieval and Modern History. A general survey j 
of European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 A. D., to 
the present time. This work will be centered on the history of France, i 

Third Year : III. Advanced United States History and Government. 
A survey of the history of our country from its beginning to the close j 
of the nineteenth century. This course is designed to give the student a j 
thorough knowledge of the settlement of the country by European colo- 
nists in the seventeenth century, the struggle with France for supremacy 
in America, the cause, course, and consequence of the American Revo- 
lution, the development of the Union under the Constitution, the slavery 
struggle, and the final advance of the country to the position it occupies 
to-day. Combined with the above, a thorough course in Civics is given, 
with careful detail of the Constitution and its Amendments. Channing's 
text is used. 

Fourth Year : IV. English History. A brief outline of the history 
of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the periods of 
the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course is intended to ■ 
give the student a good general knowledge of the history of our mother 
country and to prepare for subsequent courses in English literature and;| 
higher United States history. , 

Bookkeeping 

Second Year : I. Bookkeeping. Thorough courses conducted through- 
out the year according to the practical methods employed in business col- 1 
leges. Students may enter any part of the course in any term. No extra 
charge is made for this work. The Twentieth Century Bookkeeping is' 
the system used. 

Science 

Second Year: I. General Biology. The purpose of this course is to. 
instruct the student in human physiology and hygiene. The dependence of 
human life and health on plants and animals is shown by simple demon- 
strations in plant physiology, followed by similar work in zoology. The 
principles of physiology thus learned are then applied to man. Three 
recitation periods and four laboratory periods a week. 

Fourth Year: II. Elementary Physics. This course purposes to 
give the student a knowledge of the fundamental principles of physics and 
of their applications in every-day life. Three recitation periods and four 
laboratory periods a week. Text-books, Hoadley's Elements of Physics 
and Hoadley's Physical Laboratory Handbook. 



MARYVIlLE COLLEGE 41 



English Bible 

First Year: Studies in the First Book of Samuel. Seven weeks 
during the spring term. Required in ail courses. 

Second Year: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. Required 
in all courses, in the fall term. 

Third Year : The Life of Christ. A text-book adapted to secondary 
students is used, and the subject is taught so as to prepare for the more 
advanced course offered in the College Department. Thirty-five lessons 
in the winter term, required in all courses. 

Fourth Year : A study of Bible characters for seven weeks during 
the fall term. Required in all courses. 

The Principal will each year arrange the student's hours so that these 
courses will not conflict with other required courses nor add to the required 
number of hours a week. 

Note.— Students are also required to pursue a weekly Bible study in 
the Bible classes of the Christian Associations of the College or the Sab- 
bath schools of the town. 



42 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department provides biblical instruction for all 
the students enrolled in all other courses of the institution, and offers 
exceptional advantages for young men and young women wishing to pre- 
pare themselves for Christian service as lay workers, Sabbath-school 
workers, pastors' assistants, mission teachers, or Bible readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of graduation ; 
will be granted those who, having previously completed fifteen units of 
high-school work, complete twenty-seven courses selected under the direc- 
tion of the head of the department from the following groups : 

I. Bible Training courses of college grade, all of which are required 
except those in Bible languages : English Bible, eleven courses ; Bible Lan- 
guages, three courses ; Missions, two courses ; and Practical Work, two j 
courses. To these courses, which are described in the ensuing paragraphs, 
only students prepared to do work of college grade are admitted. Courses ' 
are alternated, at least nine being given each year. 

II. Other college courses from which supplementary work may be 
elected : English 1, 2, 3, and 10 ; Philosophy 2, 3, and 4 ; Psychology, 1, 2, 3, 
4, and 5 ; Social Science 1, 2, 3, and 4 ; Education 3 ; History 3 ; and Span- 
ish 1 and 2. These courses are described under The College Department. ! 

III. Preparatory courses from which supplementary work may be ' 
elected : Physiology I ; Pedagogy I ; and Bookkeeping I. These courses ] 
are described under The Preparatory Department. 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Giixingham. 

1. Life of Christ. The study of the life of Christ is based on a har- 
mony of the Gospels. As an introduction to the course a rapid view of 
the period between the Testaments is taken, and the principal character- 
istics of each of the four Gospels are studied. Text-books, Stevens and 
Burton's Harmony of the Gospels and Burton and Mathews', The Life of 
Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. A careful study of Genesis, the geography 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 43 



of Palestine and surrounding countries, and the general mechanics of the 
Bible. The object of the course is, in addition to the mastery of the 
subject matter, to develop systematic habits and methods of Bible study. 
Text-books, the Bible (R. V.), Davis', A Dictionary of the Bible, and 
the professor's outlines. Reference reading is assigned. Freshman year, 
winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. A continuation of Course 2. The work is 
more rapid, covering Exodus to Ruth. Special attention is paid to the 
lives and characters of Israel's leaders during this period. Text-books, 
same as in Course 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. A continuation of Course 3, beginning with 
I Samuel. The national development, the conflicts of Judah and Israel, 
their governments, their subjugation and partial restoration, their ^ social 
customs, the character of their leaders, and their influence upon their con- 
temporaries, are studied. An outline course, preparing for detailed treat- 
ment of the most important parts in Course 10. Text-books, same as in 
Course 2. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. An analytic and synthetic study based 
on the words of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels. Use is also made of 
his works and of the evangelists' commentaries in helping to determine the 
nature of Jesus' teaching. Dr. James Robertson's, Our Lord's Teaching- 
is used also as a text-book. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. The Apostolic Church. A historical study of the early church 
based on the Acts and Epistles. Text-books, the New Testament (R. V.) 
and Gilbert's, A Short History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age. Soph- 
omore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. This course treats very briefly 
General and Particular Introduction, and brings the entire Bible before the 
student in rapid review. Text-books, "Robertson's, The Old Testament 
and Its Contents and M'Clymont's, The New Testament and Its Writers. 
Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. An outline study of Job, Proverbs, Eccle- 
siastes, Song of Solomon, and selected Psalms. Introductory lectures on 
Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature. Portions of the books are studied 
in detail and their relation to other sacred literature and their importance 
in Christian experience are emphasized. No commentaries are used as 
text-books, but required readings are assigned ; and the professor furnishes 
a syllabus of each book. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. The methods outlined in Course 8 are 
followed. The prophecies are reviewed chronologically in the light of 
contemporaneous history. Messianic prophecy is given special attention. 
Junior year, spring term. 



44 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. A search study for 
advanced students. The great leaders of Israel and their messages are 
carefully studied. Three or more characters are studied a term, the entire 
Old Testament being covered during a succession of years. Commentaries 
suitable to the nature of the work are used. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. A search study for 
advanced students. This alternates with Course 10 and pursues the same 
method of study. In 1913-1914 an analysis of the Gospels according to 
Matthew and John was made, together with a study of the life and char- 
acter of the writers. Senior year, fall term. 

BIBLE LANGUAGES 

12. Hebrew. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and 
reading of easy portions of the Old Testament. Text-books : Harper's 
Inductive Hebrew Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Senior 
year, fall term. — Professor Gieungham. 

13. Hebrew. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion 
of both courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced 
standing in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year, winter 
term. — Professor Gieeingham. 

In 1913-1914 a third term's work in Hebrew was given, being a con- 
tinuation of grammar, syntax, translation, and composition. This course 
is not permanently added to the curriculum. 

14. Greek. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, Westcott 
and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's and Rob- 
ertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the assigned text, 
a study is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek, the 
literature of this period, and the most important New Testament manu- 
scripts and versions. Sophomore year, spring term. — Miss Person. 

MISSIONS 

15. Mission Methods. Two weeks or more are given to each of the 
following subjects: (1) The Southern Mountaineers, President Wieso-n. 
(2) The Foreign Missionary, President Wieson. (3) City Missions, 
Professor Lyon. (4) The Home Mission Teacher, Miss Caedweee. (5) 
The Foreign Mission Teacher, Miss Henry. (6) The Sabbath-school 
Missionary, Mr. Haee. Sophomore year, fall term. 

16. History of Missions. A brief survey of the history of Christian 
missions, with special attention to the principles and methods of those of 
modern times. Sophomore year, spring term. — Professor Gieeingham. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 45 



PRACTICAL WORK 

Professor Giixingham 

17 Bible Teaching : Principles and Practice. This course has refer- 
ence especially to personal work and the conducting- of Bible classes. The 
history organization, and management of the Sabbath school are studied. 
Lectures, quizzes, and practice under the direction of the instructor. 
Freshman year, spring term. 

18 Religious Address: Principles and Practice. Preparation for 
relioious services, missionary programs, and the like; selection and devel- 
opment of themes; sources and use of illustrations; addresses on special 
occasions and to special audiences; and drill in the reading of hymns and 
passages of Scripture. As much practical work is done by the student as 
possible. Sophomore year, spring term. 

COURSES FOR PREPARATORY STUDENTS 

Mr. Ham,, Mrs. Alexander, Miss Alexander, and Miss Renich 
For First Year students : Studies in the First Book of Samuel; thirty- 
five lessons For Second Year students : Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel 
of Mark For Third Year students: The Life of Christ; thirty-five 
lessons. For Fourth Year students: A study of Bible characters; thirty- 
five lessons. 



46 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 



The liberality of an anonymous donor, who contributed the Mary 
Esther Memorial Endowment Fund, made it possible in 1913 for the 
College to add a Home Economics Department to the privileges already 
afforded its students. The principal home of the department is the new 
third story of Fayerweather Science Hall, which was added to the build- 
ing in 1913 by the generosity of the founder of the department as an 
additional memorial of her mother. The large and well lighted rooms 
have been equipped in the most recent and approved manner, through the 
kindness of the same generous lady. Spacious rooms are set aside as 
sewing room, kitchen, dining room, lecture room, and general room. The 
hospital is also employed in connection with the teaching of home nursing 
and sanitation, and rooms in the dormitories in connection with the teach- 
ing of housekeeping. The home economics courses in chemistry are given 
in the chemistry laboratories and lecture room. The courses scheduled in 
this department are offered without extra tuition. A small laboratory fee 
is charged for the use of equipment, and in the sewing classes students 
provide their own materials as specified in the description of the courses. 
Cotton dresses should be worn in the laboratories, and long white aprons 
coming to the bottom of the dress, and bibs, are required. 

Preparatory students of the second year and above may enter such 
classes of the Home Economics Department as are adapted to their degree 
of advancement, and will be allowed in this department a maximum credit 
of two units toward the fifteen units required for graduation from the 
Preparatory Department. College students pursuing college grade studies 
in this department will be allowed three credits in home economics toward 
the seven science electives required to complete the total thirty-six credits 
necessary for graduation with the B.A. degree in the Science Group. 

For students that desire to take all their studies in this department, 
two-year, and three-year courses are offered. Fifteen recitation hours a 
week for thirty-six weeks constitute a year's work. Two hours of labo- 
ratory practice count as one recitation hour. Students that do not wish 
to take the three-year course may receive a certificate for the completion 
of two years' work. Both preparatory and college students are eligible 
to these certificates. Students that wish to prepare for teaching the sub- 
ject will be required to pursue the full course of three years. Diplomas 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 47 



will be granted students of college standing that complete twenty-seven 
courses selected under the direction of the head of the department from 
the following groups: 

I. Home Economics courses, twelve of which are required for grad- 
uation, as follows : 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15. 

II. College courses as follows: Chemistry 1, 10, 11, and 12 (three 
must be taken) ; Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 (two must be taken) ; 
Social Science 4 (must be taken) ; English 2, 3, and 11; and Bible 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5, and 6 (two must be taken). These courses are described under The 
College Department. 

III. Preparatory courses as follows : Pedagogy I (three terms) ; Sci- 
ence I (three terms) ; and Bookkeeping I (at least one term). These are 
to be taken unless substituted for from among the higher courses offered 
above. These courses are described under The Preparatory Department. 

Special classes in cooking, if called for, will be organized for students 
from Maryville and vicinity who may wish to take only this work. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Miss Ryland and Assistants, and Miss MacLachlan 

1, 2, 3. Cookery and Clothing. Elementary studies intended for those 
that have had no previous training in the subjects taught. The courses 
consist of the following work: (a) Foods and Cookery. The purpose of 
this course is to give practice in fundamental cooking processes in order 
to develop skill and efficiency in handling food materials and cooking uten- 
sils. It includes the study of food materials, principles of cookery, care 
of food in the house, how to study the recipe, methods of mixing, the 
making of beverages, vegetables and vegetable cookery, cereals, proteins — 
eggs, milk, cheese, fats,— batters and doughs, salads, and simple desserts. 
Bacteria, yeasts, and molds of the household are studied two hours a week 
throughout the fall term as part of the work in Course 1. The instruction 
in bacteriology is given by Miss Green, in the biological laboratory, (b) 
Textiles and Clothing. Elementary clothing and handwork. As a prelimi- 
nary to the practical work specified below, students are taught, as needed, 
the various stitches used in garment making, machine stitching, and the 
use and care of the sewing machine and attachments. During the year the 
students make the following articles from materials which they provide, 
subject to the approval of the instructor, at the approximate cost of eight 
dollars. The garments thus made are the property of the student. Two 
pieces of underclothing are made by hand; a nightgown and a laundry 
bag are made by hand and machine ; a slip, a plain shirtwaist or middy, 
and a plain tailored cotton skirt are made by machine. The students also 



48 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



make a simple muslin dress, and embroider a towel, a table runner, and \ 
a centerpiece. In this course darning and patching are taught. Pattern 
drafting is also taught, and the students draft patterns for a kimono ! 
nightgown and a plain skirt. Text-books, Kinne and Cooley's Foods and 
Household Management, and Shelter and Clothing; and Conne's Bacteria, 
Yeasts, and Molds in the Home. These three courses are required for 
certificate or diploma. Laboratory practice in cooking, four hours a week, | 
in sewing, four hours ; recitation, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4, 5, 6. Cookery and Clothing, (a) Foods and Cookery. Home 
cookery and table service. This course consists of a review of food prin- 
ciples and the theory of cookery ; the preparation of more elaborate dishes ; 
the study of meats, soups, canning, and frozen desserts ; the planning and 
serving of simple meals ; and a study of the comparative cost and nutritive 
value of different food materials, (b) Textiles and Clothing. Draft- 
ing and elementary dressmaking. This course includes drafting, cutting, 
and fitting. Shirtwaists, plain skirts, and sleeves are cut in cambric from 
drafted patterns, and fitted. The patterns are then altered, and the articles 
to be made are cut from the altered patterns. Practice is given in test- 
ing commercial patterns. During the year the students make the follow- 
ing articles of clothing from materials which they provide, subject to the, 
approval of the instructor, at the approximate cost of fifteen dollars : a 
tailored shirtwaist and skirt, a simple muslin dress, an unlined silk dress,' 
and a wool skirt. The garments thus made are the property of the stu- : 
dent. Text-books, Parloa's Home Economics, Hill's Up-to-date Waitress, 
and references to government bulletins. These three courses are required 
for certificate or diploma. Prerequisites, Home Economics 1, 2, and 3. 
Laboratory practice in cooking, four hours a week, in sewing, four hours ; 
recitation, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

7, 8, 9. Cookery. These courses consist of all the work offered in! 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 on the subject of Cookery. They are intended' 
for students already proficient in sewing, or who, for reasons satisfactory 
to the head of the department, do not desire instruction in sewing and are I 
able to take both years of Cookery at the same time. Laboratory practice 
in cooking, eight hours a week; recitation, one hour. Fall, winter, and 
spring terms. 

10, 11, 12. Clothing. These courses consist of all the work offered in 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 on the subject of Clothing. They are intended 
for students already proficient in cooking, or who, for reasons satisfactory 
to the head of the department, do not desire instruction in cooking, and 
are able to take both years of Clothing at the same time. Laboratory 
practice in sewing and drafting, eight hours a week ; recitation, one hour. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms, 



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MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 49 



L3, 14, 15. Cookery, Housekeeping, and Home Nursing. These courses 
consist oi : (a) Cookery. The various methods of preserving and canning. 
Fancy cookery. Invalid cookery. Demonstration cookery. Lunch-room 
cookery. The preparation and serving of typical and economical luncheon 
dishes. The penny luncheon and the five- and ten-cent luncheon will be 
considered with reference to schools, (b) Housekeeping. Household man- 
agement. Discussions and readings. The text-book is Home Economics, 
by Maria Parloa. This course includes the question of the budget, the 
cost of living, problems of household labor, the care of children, and the 
social side of home life. Household furnishings. The decoration and fur- 
nishing" of the entire house, artistic and economic furnishing, cost of mate- 
rials and labor, and visits to house-furnishing establishments, (c) Home 
Nursing. General structure of the body. General instructions for care of 
sickness in the home. Bed-making. Bathing. Food. Medicine and gen- 
eral treatment. Care of infants and children. Infectious diseases. Emer- 
gencies and first aid. These three courses are required for diploma. Pre- 
requisites, Home Economics 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, or their equivalents. 
Laboratory practice in cooking, four hours a week; recitations, three 
hours. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

Courses will be added also in the subjects of practice teaching, tex- 
tiles, history of costume, laundering, and shelter, as the growth of the 
department demands. 



50 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Miss Monfort, Miss Hai^ and Assistants, and Mr. Hai,i, 

In this department opportunity is given pupils for instruction in piano, 
voice, theory, harmony, and history of music. Private lessons are half an 
hour in length, and class lessons one hour. Diplomas are granted to such 
students of piano and voice as pass the requirements. 

Piano. In the piano work the teacher's aim is to cultivate in the stu- 
dent a clear, concise production of tone and an intelligent interpretation of 
melody. The elementary studies used are those of Kohler, Matthew, Ber- 
tini, Czerny, Kuhlau, Low, Diabelli, and Clementi. More advanced works: 
include those of Cramer, Haydn, Mozart, Schumann, Handel, Beethoven,: 
Bach, and Chopin. Pupils are trained not only in solo work, but also in 
ensemble playing. 

To receive diplomas pupils in piano are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have aril 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. They are required also to' 
have a repertoire of six compositions from classic composers of Grade VI; 
and to be examined in the playing of some of these compositions. They 
are also required to be able to read at sight a piano selection of Grade III? 
One of the six numbers is to be worked up by the pupil without help. 

Voice;. In this department great care is given to voice building.; 
Stress is laid on correct breathing. Exercises are given to produce tones 
that are round, full, and clear. Ballads and songs of opera and oratorio; 
are taught. Attention is paid to sight singing. Special training is given 
advanced students who intend to teach music. 

To receive diplomas in voice, pupils are required to take the class 
work in theory of music, harmony, and history of music, and to have ar/ 
average of seventy-five per cent, in this work. A repertoire of ten songs 
from Grade VI is required, one from an oratorio or one from an opera, 
and one sacred. One of these ten songs is to be learned by the pupil 
without help. Sight reading of a song of Grade III is also required. 

Monthly recitals are given, through the medium of which the student 
gains self-control and ease of manner when appearing before the public. 

In addition to the private instruction given as described in the above 
courses, the College offers free instruction in the following branches, which 
are under the direction of Mr. Hall : 

Chorus and Choir. Instruction is given free to any students desiring 
to take the work of chorus and choir singing and sight reading. 



MARYV1LLH COLLEGE 51 



Band, Instruments are furnished by the College, and the band is 
omposed entirely of students in this institution. 

GLEE Club.- This is accessible to any young men that have a fair 
nowledge of the rudiments of vocal music. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Campbeee 

This department furnishes those desiring it with instruction in free- 
and drawing and in painting in oil and water color. The lessons in draw- 
rig are given without extra cost to the student, and are designed to lay a 
olid foundation for work on industrial and artistic lines. The art room 
as a supply of casts ; and, in addition, the student is encouraged to draw 
rom the objects of nature around him. 

Painting is taught by such practical methods as produce beautiful 
esults, which far exceed in value their trifling cost. The instructor in this 
apartment has enjoyed exceptional advantages in the pursuit of art study 
Luring three years in England, France, and Italy; has executed many 
ommissions in copying important works in some of the finest European 
alleries ; and has had a teaching experience of more than thirty years. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

Miss Zimmerman 

The aim of this department is to cultivate the voice, to free the stu- 
[ent from constrained, limited, and erroneous action, and to lead him to a 
;nowledge and understanding of the interpretation of literature. Oppor- 
unity is given for class and private instruction. Class work consists of 
nterpretative analysis, Delsarte system, and technical work. Special time 
nd attention is given persons troubled with stuttering, stammering, or 
.ny form of defective speech. The text-book used is King's Practice of 
Speech. 

Monthly recitals will be given, affording opportunities to students to 
ead publicly. 

Diplomas are granted to such students as pass all the requirements 
>f the course. Students must be graduates of a preparatory school of a 
tandard equivalent to that of the Preparatory Department of this insti- 
ution before they will be granted a diploma in expression. 



52 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



Maryville College, like most of the older colleges, grew out of the ze^ 
that the pioneers of the American church had for the education of th 
people. The same year (1802) in which Isaac Anderson was ordained t 
the ministry by the Presbytery of Union, he founded within the bounds c 
his Grassy Valley congregation, near Knoxville, a school which he calle 
"Union Academy," but which was popularly known as "the Log College 
He built for it a large four-roomed log house. In this, for the times, prd 
tentious building, many men who afterwards served their country we 
were educated. Among this number was Governor Reynolds, of Minor 
Dr. Anderson in 1812 removed to Maryville and took charge of New Prov 
dence Church, of which organization he remained pastor till his deatj: 
which took place in 1857. In Maryville he continued his academic wor! 
The most famous pupil of this Maryville academy was Sam Houston, wh 
afterward had so unique and picturesque a career as general, governo, 
president of Texas, congressman, and patriot. 

Dr. Anderson, however, felt that more should be done toward pre 
viding an educated ministry for the South-west. Encouraged by other 
like-minded with himself, he founded Maryville College in 1819. Tr! 
institution was born of the moral and spiritual needs of the early settle! 
of East Tennessee — chiefly Scotch-Irish Presbyterians — and was designe 
principally to educate for the ministry men who should be native to tl, 
soil. The grand motive of the founder may be stated in his own word; 
"Let the directors and managers oe this sacred institution pkopoj 
THE GLORY oe God and the advancement oe that kingdom purchased I 

THE BLOOD OE HIS ONEY BEGOTTEN SON AS THEIR SOEE OBJECT/' Inspired t 

such a motive, Dr. Anderson gathered a class of five candidates for tl 
ministry in the fall of 1819, and in prayer and faith began what prove 
to be the principal work of his life. In forty-two years the institution pi 
one hundred and fifty men into the ministry. Its endowment, gathered 1 
littles through all these years, was only sixteen thousand dollars. 

Then came the Civil War, and suspended the work of the institutic 
for five years, and the College came out of the general wreck with litt 
save its good name and precious history. 

After the war the Synod of Tennessee, moved by the spirit of sel 
preservation, and by a desire to promote Christian education in the Centr 



MARYViLLB COLLEGE 53 



iouth, resolved to revive Maryville College. The institution was reopened 
n L866. New grounds and new buildings were an imperative necessity. 
?0 meet this need, sixty-five thousand dollars was secured, and the Col- 
>ge was saved from extinction. In 1881 a few generous friends — William 
"'haw, William E. Dodge, Preserved Smith, Dr. Sylvester Willard, and 
, mer s — contributed an endowment fund of one hundred thousand dollars. 
n 1891, Daniel Fayer weather bequeathed to the College the sum of one 
mndred thousand dollars, and also made it one of twenty equal partici- 
,ants in the residuary estate. The College received two hundred and 
ixteen thousand dollars by the provisions of the will. This magnificent 
lonation enabled the institution to enlarge its work and to enter upon a 
lew era of usefulness and influence. On January 1, 1905, Mr. Ralph 
/oorhees, of New Jersey, made the munificent donation of one hundred 
housand dollars to the general endowment fund of the College. The gift 
s subject to a five per cent, annuity during the lifetime of Mrs. Voorhees. 
fhe reception of this superb benefaction filled the hearts of Maryville's 
iriends with confidence, and with intense gratitude to God and to God's 
stewards. 

In 1906, the rapid growth in the number of students having made nec- 
essary much further enlargement of the teaching force and of the material 
equipment of the institution, President Wilson entered upon a campaign 
for additional endowment. Mr. Andrew Carnegie generously offered the 
College twenty-five thousand dollars on condition that fifty thousand dol- 
ars additional be secured. In 1907, the General Education Board pledged 
frfty thousand dollars on condition that one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars be secured from other sources. Mr. Carnegie then increased his 
pledge to fifty thousand dollars toward this larger fund. The time limit 
set for the completion of the fund was December 31, 1908. In the face of 
many difficulties the President, with reliance upon the favor of God, pros- 
ecuted the campaign for the "Forward Fund of two hundred thousand 
dollars." In order to meet the spirit as well as the letter of the require- 
ments of the conditional pledges, it was deemed necessary to raise twenty- 
five thousand dollars more than the designated sum. When the canvass 
closed, the subscriptions amounted to the splendid sum of two hundred 
and twenty-six thousand nine hundred and two dollars. The fact that, in 
spite of the recent panic and hard times, the uneasiness of a presidential 
year, and the ill health of the canvasser, the "Forward Fund" was secured, 
filled the Faculty, Directors, and friends of the College with a deep sense 
of gratitude to God, and to his human agents who took part with Mary- 
ville in its ministry to the noble youth of mountain and valley in its 
Southern Appalachian field. 

During the past five years there have been, besides a steady increase 
of the permanent scholarship funds and numerous contributions for minor 



54 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



but pressing needs of the College, three notable advances made: (l) by 
the gift of an endowment of sixteen thousand dollars by an anonymous! 
donor, a Home Economics Department has been established; (2) by the! 
gift of thirteen thousand and five hundred dollars by the late Louis H. 
Severance, Esq., a third story has been added to Pearsons Hall, providingj 
dormitory room for fifty additional young women; and (3) by the addi- 
tional gift of ten thousand dollars by the anonymous donor of the Mary 
Esther Home Economics endowment fund, it has been possible for the 
College to add a third story to Fayerweather Science Hall in order to. 
provide quarters for the Home Economics Department. 

As the result of the generous contributions made through many years 
by many philanthropic donors, the College now owns property and endow- 
ment to the total amount of about nine hundred thousand dollars. Of 
this amount, four hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars is invested' 
in endowment and the remainder in buildings and equipment. 

One hundred and forty of the post-bellum alumni have entered the 
ministry, while forty-seven alumni and undergraduates have been or are 
missionaries in Japan, China, Siam, Korea, India, Persia, Syria, Africa, 
the Philippines, Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and Porto Rico. Several 
are laboring in missions in the West. All the alumni are engaged in hon J i 
orable pursuits. Students who have gone from the College to the theolog- 1 
ical, medical, and legal schools have usually attained a high rank in their,' 
classes. A goodly number of the alumni are now studying in theological: 
seminaries. 

The necessary expenses are so phenomenally low as to give the insti- 
tution a special adaptation to the middle class and to the struggling poor 
of valley and mountain — the great mass of the surrounding population. 

The privileges of the institution are, of course, open alike to all, 
denominations of Christians. All the leading denominations are largely, 
represented in the student body. 



LOCATION 

Maryville is a pleasant and thriving town of about four thousand 
inhabitants. It is widely known as "the town of schools and churches." 
It is sixteen miles south of Knoxville. There are three trains a day each 
way on the Knoxville and Augusta Railroad, two trains each way on the 
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and one train each way tri-weekly on 
the Tennessee and Carolina Southern Railroad. 

Maryville is an ideal health resort for students from other States. 
The town lies on the hills, one thousand feet above sea level, and enjoys 
the life-giving breezes from the Chilhowees and the Smokies, a few miles 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 55 



lNV -iv Young people from the North and other sections are greatly ben- 
>fited in health by a year at Maryville, and many take their entire course 



lere. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college grounds consist of two hundred and fifty acres, and for 
beautiful scenery are not surpassed by any in the country. They are 
elevated and undulating, covered with a beautiful growth of evergreens 
a&d with a noble forest, and command a splendid view of the Cumberland 
Mountains on the north, and of the Smoky Mountains on the south. The 
location is as remarkable for its healthfulness as it is for its beauty. The 
campus affords the choicest facilities for the development of athletics. 

On these grounds there are thirteen buildings, which, together with the 
rounds and equipment, represent an investment of nearly four hundred 
thousand dollars. The buildings are heated with steam and lighted with 
electricity from the central power plant on the campus. Generous contri- 
butions from several givers have enabled the College to begin the installa- 
tion of a new water system. The water rights to some protected springs 
situated a mile and a half from the college grounds have been obtained, 
and pipes have been laid connecting these springs with the pipes of the 
old water system, through which the water is pumped by electrical power 
to the reservoir tanks on the campus. It is thence conveyed to all the 
dormitories, the gymnasium, and the science laboratories, supplying an 
abundance of pure water for drinking as well as for toilet facilities. As 
soon as funds are provided for the purpose, a fifty thousand gallon steel 
tank will supplant the old tanks now in use, additional toilet facilities will 
be furnished in the recitation buildings, and sanitary drinking fountains 
will be installed in all the buildings and on the campus. 

Anderson Ham,, the central building, is the oldest of the present col- 
lege halls having been built in 1869, and named in honor of the founder 
of* the institution. It contains the administrative offices and most of the 
recitation rooms for the literary departments. The large addition to the 
Hall, the Fayerweather Annex, is occupied by the Preparatory Department. 
Baldwin Ham, named in honor of the late John C. Baldwin, of New 
Jersey, is a dormitory for young women. It contains rooms for one hun- 
dred and thirty students. It is provided, as are all the dormitories, with 
all modern conveniences, and is a comfortable home for young women. 
Memoriae Haee, originally built as a companion building to Baldwin 
Hall, is a young men's dormitory, containing rooms for seventy students. 
While it is one of the oldest of the college buildings, it is kept in excel- 
lent repair, and is a comfortable and well equipped dormitory. It is under 
the control of a regular instructor of the College. 



56 MARYVILLB COLIBGB 



Wizard Memoriae, the home of the President, was provided in 189« 
by a generous gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard, in memory of her husband 
Sylvester Ward, M.D. It is one of the chief adornments of the campus 
and is a valuable property. 

The Lamar Memoriae Library Haee was erected in 1888 at a cost oi 
five thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was generously providec 
by three friends of Professor Lamar and of the College. The "building i< 
a model in every respect. It is a noble and fitting monument. The largl 
memorial window contributed by the brothers and sisters of Professoi 
Lamar holds the central position. 

Barteett Haee is one of the largest college Y. M. C. A. buildings ir 
the South. Planned for by the students led by Kin Takahashi, a Japanese 
student, it was erected by contributions made or secured by the Bartletl 
Hall Building Association, supplemented by a large appropriation by the 
College authorities. A liberal donation made by Mrs. Nettie F. McCor- 
mick in 1901 enabled the committee to complete the building. In 1911, 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Voorhees made a generous gift providing for extensive 
alterations and improvements, including the building of a separate gymJ 
nasium for the use of young women. The Y. M. C. A. auditorium, parlors, 
and secretary's and committees' apartments occupy the front part of the' 
building, while the large gymnasiums occupy the rest of the structure. I 

FayErweaEher Science Haee was erected in 1898 through the liberal! 
bequest of Daniel B. Fayerweather. The building as erected was two? 
stories in height, with extreme dimensions of one hundred and six feet 
by ninety-seven feet. The first floor contains the five spacious laboratories 
of chemistry and physics, balance and storage rooms, an office, and the 
John C. Branner Scientific Library. The second floor contains four excel- 
lent lecture rooms, two large and well lighted biological laboratories, and 
the laboratory of experimental psychology. The laboratories are furnished 
with both direct and alternating electric current, and also with gas. The' 
building is thoroughly modern in every respect. It is provided with liberal 
equipment for the practical study of science, and will stand a useful and 
lasting monument to the intelligent philanthropy of the princely giver 
whose name it bears. In 1913 the anonymous donor of the Mary Esther 
Memorial Fund that provided for the establishment of the Home Eco- 
nomics Department, also contributed funds for the building of the third 
and fourth floors of this hall for the housing of the Home Economics 
Department, as an additional memorial of her mother. The third floor 
contains, besides cloak rooms, storerooms, closets, toilets, and lockers, a 
reading room, dining room, kitchen, sewing room, lecture room, and one 
small and one large laboratory. On the fourth floor are three large rooms 
for general purposes. 



MAKYV1LLH COLLUGB 57 



The Elizabeth R. VoorhEES Chapel was erected in 1905-1906 by 
gifts made by the late Mr. Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey, and by other 
donors. The chapel, named in honor of Mrs. Voorhees, graces one of the 
most commanding sites on the grounds, and is well worthy of its place of 
distinction. It is of an extra quality of brick, with buff-brick and terra- 
cotta trimmings. The style is Grecian, the details being of the Ionian 
order. The auditorium seats eight hundred and eighty persons and can be 
arranged to accommodate two or three hundred more. The basement con- 
tains fourteen well lighted rooms, occupied by the Music Department, and 
a commodious auditorium occupied by the Y. W. C. A. To the rear of 
the main auditorium, also, and on the floor above, are several rooms used 
by the Department of Expression and for various other purposes. The 
entire building is in every way satisfactory, and will for many years be 
adequate for the purposes it is designed to serve. 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memoriae Hospital. — While the health of 
the student body has always been far above the average, yet in so large a 
number of students there is necessarily more or less sickness. With the 
growth of the College, the need of proper facilities for caring for such 
occasional cases of illness became increasingly urgent. This need was sup- 
plied in 1909 by the generosity of Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, a life-long friend 
of the College. Her gift of six thousand dollars provided a thoroughly 
modern hospital building, containing eleven wards, caretakers' rooms, 
baths, toilets, an operating room, and other appointments of a well ordered 
hospital. The building is named in honor of Mrs. Lamar's only son, who 
died in infancy. A gift of five hundred dollars from Mr. Nathaniel Tooker, 
of East Orange, N. J., secured the purchase of a valuable outfit of the 
best hospital furnishings. To this amount about five hundred dollars has 
been added from other sources and used for the purchase of additional 
furnishings and medical supplies. 

Carnegie Hall. — In connection with the " Forward Fund " secured in 
1908, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave the sum of fifty thousand dollars for 
a dormitory for young men. The building was designed by the firm of 
Whitfield & King, of New York. The building was occupied at the open- 
ing of the fall term in 1910, and was dedicated on January 11, 1911. It 
contains rooms for one hundred and twenty-one young men. Each of the 
two large wings contains a suite of rooms for the use of a professor and 
his family. The building is a comfortable and attractive home for the 
young men. In its architectural beauty and its thoroughly modern appoint- 
ments this is one of the best college dormitories in the South, and is a 
most valuable addition to the equipment of the College. 

Pearsons Hall. — No benefaction of recent years has proven more 
immediately serviceable than the gift of twenty thousand dollars made in 



58 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



1908 by the late Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago. The new building named 
in his honor provides additional dormitory facilities for young women, and 
adequate quarters for the large Cooperative Boarding Club. The building 
is of brick, and is three stories in height, with an imposing Greek portico 
fronting the west and commanding an excellent view of the grounds. Th< 
first story contains the spacious dining hall, with a seating capacity of five 1 
hundred, the kitchen, offices, and waiting rooms. The second story con- 
tains parlors, halls for the young women's literary societies, and rooms 
for thirty-four occupants. The third story was added during the vacatior 
months of 1912, increasing the capacity of the dormitory so that fifty 
additional young women may secure rooms. This story was a gift of the 
late Louis H. Severance, Esq., of Cleveland, Ohio, "an admirer of Dr 
Pearsons, who esteemed it a privilege to put this crowning story upon his 
building." 

The Power Peant. — Heat for all the buildings and light for the build- 
ings and grounds are furnished from the central power house situated onj 
the campus. The boilers in this plant have a combined capacity of three!! 
hundred horse-power. The Webster Vacuum System of stear ^eating is! 
used, and the buildings are quickly and uniformly heated. 
direct-current generator furnishes e'ectric power ample for y ^uses! 

Steam from the plant is used also for the meat and soup boilers and the* 
dish-washing machine at Pearsons Hall. 



THE LAMAR MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest college libraries in the State 
The number of books now on the shelves is about fifteen thousand. The; 
library is open for the drawing of books or for the consulting of volumes 
in the reference alcoves for eight hours every day from Monday to Sat. 
urday. The use of the library is entirely free to students of all depart-* 
ments. The nucleus of a much needed endowment for the library has 
been secured, the fund now amounting to nearly $8,000. Among the gifts; 
making up the endowment are the following : 

The " M. T." Fund, 1900, given by a friend $50C 

The Helen Gould Fund, 1900, by Mrs. Helen Gould Shepard, New 

York 50( 

The Willard Fund, 1900, by the Misses Willard, Auburn, N. Y 20C 

The Hollenback Fund, 1901, by J. W. Hollenback, Esq., Wilkes- 

barre, Pa »K 

The Solomon Bogart Fund, 1908, by Miss Martha M. Bogart, Phila- 
delphia, Tenn 20C 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 59 



he Nina Cunningham Fund, 1909, by the sons of the late Major 
Ben Cunningham, Treasurer of the College, in memory of their 

sister, Miss Nina Cunningham, '91 $500 

l he John M. Alexander English Literature Fund, 1909, by Rev. John 

M. Alexander, '87, and wife, Mary ville 500 

lie Charles T. Cates, Jr., Fund, 1909, by Hon. C. T. Cates, Jr., '81, 

former Attorney-General of the State of Tennessee 300 

'he Rev. S. B. West Fund, 1909-1912, by the late Mrs. S. B. West, 

Concord, Tenn 10 ° 

'he McTeer Fund, 1909, by J. C. McTeer, '07 100 

le Brown Fund, 1910, by Hon. T. N. Brown, '77 100 

A he Chilhowee Club Fund, 1910, by the Chilhowee Club, Maryville. 100 

'he Class of 1891 Fund, 1910, by five members of the class 232 

*he George Glenn Cooper Fund, 1910, by the parents, brother, and 

sister of the late George Glenn Cooper 300 

?he Faculty Fund, 1910, by members of the Faculty 1,000 

le French Fund, 1910, by Mr. and Mrs. C. T. French, '06 100 

Che Ga^Me Fund, 1910, by Hon. M. H. Gamble, '05, Hon. Andrew 

e, and A. M. Gamble, M.D., Maryville 200 

llu o Fund, 1910-1914, by Rev. R. H. Hooke, '74 90 

Che tiuvrer Fund, 1910, by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

Phe Lowry Fund, 1910, by Rev. G. H. Lowry, '94 100 

fhe Tracy Fund, 1910, by J. K. Tracy, Esq., '01 75 

fhe Jackson Fund, 1913, by C. O. Jackson, Maryville 100 

fhe Philadelphia Fund, 1909-1914, by a Friend, Philadelphia, Pa... 225 

The following funds are now being formed: 

Hie Class of 1909 Fund ($700 subscribed) $505 

Hie Class of 1910 Fund ($560 subscribed) 370 

The Class of 1911 Fund ($250 subscribed) 195 

The Class of 1912 Fund ($200 subscribed) 126 

The Class of 1913 Fund ($125 subscribed) 89 

LOAN LIBRARIES 

James R. Hills Library — In 1888 Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New York, 
contributed a fund of six hundred dollars for the establishment of a Loan 
Library, in order that students unable to purchase the necessary text-books 
might have the privilege of renting them at a nominal rate. By judicious 
management the income from this fund has grown until now the privileges 
of this library are open to all students, and all the regular text-books used 
in the institution may be either rented or purchased, as the student pre- 
fers. An additional gift of five hundred dollars from the same donor in 



60 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



1908 made it possible to provide the text-books in use in the Bible Train- 
ing Department. The rental charged a term is one-fifth the retail price of 
each book. The income from rentals is devoted to supplying new books 
as they are needed. The library occupies a room in Anderson Hall, and 
is open every day. 

John C. Branner Library — Some years ago John C. Branner, Ph.D., 
then the State Geologist of Arkansas, now President of the Iceland Stan- 
ford Junior University, gave another proof of his generosity and friend- 
ship to the College by establishing a loan library of the text-books used 
in the natural science departments. The books in this library are under 
the same regulations as are those of the Hills Library. 

The Misses Wiliard Library — Through the generosity of the Misses 
Willard, of Auburn, N. Y., the text-books employed in the Bible classes 
of the Preparatory Department are also provided for rent at a nominal 
charge. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING CLUB 

No other agency has been of greater service in enabling the College 
to keep the expenses of its students at a minimum than the popular and 
successful Cooperative Boarding Club. The actual cost of the board is 
estimated at the end of each month. The price is fixed approximately at 
the beginning of each year. During the past year the price has been $1.75 
a week; the price has been fixed at $1.90 for next year. A deposit of 
seven dollars is required of each member of the Club, and settlements are 
thereafter made at the end of every fourth week. A considerable number 
of students are employed as waiters and assistants in the dining room, 
thus materially reducing the cost of their board. The privileges of the 
Club are extended to all male students and to all young women rooming 
in the college dormitories. The membership of the Club has been more 
than five hundred this year. The Club is housed in Pearsons Hall, spoken 
of elsewhere. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES 

It is a constant aim of the College to provide first-class college ad- 
vantages to the student at the lowest possible rates, and the endowment 
enables it to make its charges very moderate. College bills must be paid 
invariably in advance. Until this condition is complied with, no one can 
become a member of any of the classes. In view of the very low rates, 
no deduction will be made for absence at the beginning or at the end of 
any term, and no tuition will be refunded. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 61 



7.00 



Fall Term 

Tuition : All literary courses $ 6 - 00 

* Home Economics (one course, $3.00) 6.00 

Music (vocal or instrumental) : 
Under head of department, 14 lessons ) 
Under an assistant, 20 lessons ^ 

Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History of 

Music 2 - 50 

Expression 9 - 00 

Art (three-hour lessons in oil or water-color painting) 7.00 

FEES : Incidental fee (payable by all students) 1-00 

Laboratory fee in Chemistry or Home Economics (each course). 3.00 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics (each course) . . 2.00 

Laboratory fee in Preparatory Sciences (each course) 1.00 

Breakage deposit for Chemistry (each course) 2.00 

Breakage deposit for other science courses (each course) 1.00 

Piano rental (an hour a day) 400 

Text-books : Rented for about one-fifth retail price of the book, 

1 7^ 

average x " 

Room rent: (consult the detailed statement under Rooms) average 10.00 

Board : In the Cooperative Boarding Club, $1.90 a week 26.60 

In private families, $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 

USUAE EXPENSES EOR THE EAEE TERM : 

For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, or 
art ;•• 45 - 00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, expression, 
or art - 48 - 00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or art. .... . 60.00 



Winter or Spring Term 

Tuition : All literary courses $6.00 

* Home Economics (one course, $3.00) 6.00 

Music (vocal or instrumental) : 
Under head of department, 11 lessons ) 
Under an assistant, 15 lessons £ 

Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History of 

Music (winter and spring terms combined) 3.00 

Expression ' - 00 

Art (three-hour lessons in oil or water-color painting) 5.50 

* Students enrolled in literary courses are not charged any additional tuition if 
they take home economics courses. 



62 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Fees : Incidental fee (payable by all students) $1.00 

Laboratory fee in Chemistry (each course) 2.50 

Laboratory fee in Home Economics (each course) 3.00 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics (each course) . . 2.00 

Laboratory fee in Preparatory Sciences (each course) 1.00 

Breakage deposit for Chemistry (each course) 1.50 

Breakage deposit for other science courses (each course) 1.00 

Piano rental (an hour a day) 3.00 

Graduation fees (payable at the opening of the spring term of 
the graduating year) : 

College Department 5.00 

Preparatory Department 1.00 

Home Economics Department 2.50 

Music Department 2.50 

Expression Department 2.50 

Text-books : Rented for about one-fifth retail price of the book, 

average for winter and spring terms combined 1.75 

Room rent: (consult the detailed statement under Rooms) average: 

Winter term 8.50 

Spring term 6.00 

Board : In the Cooperative Boarding Club, $1.90 a week 21.90 

In private families, $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 

USUAE EXPENSES EOR THE WINTER TERM : 

For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, or 

art 40.00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, expression, 

or art 43.00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or art 50.00 

Usuae EXPENSES for The Spring TErm are about $5.00 less than for 

the winter term. 
Usual expenses for The year (three terms) : 

For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, or 

art 120.00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, expression, 

or art 130.00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or art 150.00 

Rooms 

Rooms in all the dormitories are heated with steam, and lighted with 
electricity, and fully supplied with baths and toilets. Two students usually 
occupy one room. More than two students in one room will not be allowed, 
except as noted in connection with Carnegie Hall. 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 63 



Every prospective student desiring to room in a dormitory must make 
a two-dollar deposit with the Registrar in order to secure a reservation. 
The Registrar will send the applicant a deposit receipt, which, upon pre- 
sentation by the student when he enters College, will be accepted by the 
Treasurer for credit on the room rent to the amount and for the term 
specified thereon. The room, however, will not be held beyond the open- 
ing day unless the room rent is paid for the term in advance. The deposit 
receipt is not negotiable, and the deposit will be forfeited if the student 
does not enter college. 

The cost of rooms in the different dormitories, with full information 
regarding furnishings, is given below. The rates given are for each occu- 
pant of a room. Students desiring to room alone in rooms equipped for 
two students may do so by paying double the rates here given. 

Memorial Hall (for Young Men) 

Rooms in this hall may be had either partially or fully furnished, as 
desired. The partially furnished rooms have in them only tables, ward- 
robes, and new individual iron bedsteads, with springs and mattresses. 
The fully furnished rooms have besides the wardrobes and the new indi- 
vidual iron bedsteads, with springs and mattresses, new tables, bookcases, 
chiffoniers, and chairs. The baths are on the first floor. According to 
location the rates for each student are as follows: 
Corner rooms : Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Fully furnished $11.00 to $12.00 $9.00 to $10.00 $7.00 to $8.00 

Partially furnished. .. . 9.00 to 10.00 7.00 to 8.00 5.00 to 6.00 
Other rooms : 

Fully furnished 10.00 to 11.00 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 

Partially furnished. .. . 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 4.00 to 5.00 

Carnegie Hall (eor Young Men) 

The rooms in this dormitory are furnished with individual iron bed- 
steads, springs, mattresses, tables, chiffoniers, chairs, and wardrobes. Baths 
and toilets on each of the three floors. There are fifty-four rooms for 
two students each, two rooms for three students each, and eight rooms 
for one student each. The rates for each student are as follows : 

Pall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

In rooms for two or three..$12.00 to $15.00 $10.00 to $12.00 $6.00 to $8.00 
In rooms for one 14.00 11.00 7.00 

Baldwin Hall (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this hall are furnished with iron bedsteads, springs, 
mattresses, washstands, tables, and wardrobes. In some rooms new fur- 



64 MARYVILLB COLLBGH 



niture has been placed, including individual iron bedsteads, springs, mat- 
tresses, dressers, and tables with bookcases. Baths on first and second 
floors ; toilets on all floors. According to location and furnishings the 
rates for each student are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $9.00 to $13.00 $7.00 to $10.00 $5.00 to $7.00 

Other rooms 8.00 to 12.00 6.00 to 9.00 4.00 to 7.00 

Pearsons Hau, (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this hall are furnished with individual iron bedsteads, 
springs, mattresses, tables, dressers, chairs, and built-in wardrobes. The 
rooms, with the baths and toilets, are on the second and third floors. The 
rates for each student are as follows : 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

According to location $12.00 to $15.00 $10.00 to $12.00 $6.00 to $8.00 

Rooms in Town 

Young men can find comfortable furnished rooms in private residences 
in convenient parts of town at the following rates by the month for each 1 
student : 

Rooms furnished and cared for, without fuel or light $2.00 to $3.00 - 

Rooms furnished and cared for, with light and heat 3.00 to 4.00 ' 

Laundry 

In the Cooperative Laundry (young women doing their own 

work) $0.30 a month 

In town by private laundresses $0.35 to $0.75 a week (j 

STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Societies — Four literary societies are conducted by the stu- 
dents, and are of the greatest benefit to those who avail themselves of the ' 
advantages they offer. The Athenian, organized in 1868, and the Alpha 
Sigma, organized in 1882, are composed of young men. Their halls are on 
the third floor of Anderson Hall. Each society is divided into a "senior 
section" and a "junior section," the latter being composed of students in 
the Preparatory Department. The Bainonian, organized in 1875, and the 
Theta Epsilon, organized in 1894, are conducted by the young women. 
They have neatly furnished halls in Pearsons Hall. The societies meet 
every Friday evening to engage in debates and other literary exercises. 
The junior sections of the young men's societies meet on Saturday evening. 
Kadi society gives annually a public midwinter entertainment, 








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MARYV1LLU COLLEGE 65 



The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A— The Y. M. C. A, established in 
1878, has become one of the strongest organizations of its kind in the 
South. The weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoon 
m the auditorium of Bartlett Hall. The Association conducts an annual 
encampment on the Tennessee River for one week before the opening of 
the fall term, at which encampment plans and policies for the ensuing 
year's work are arranged. The officers of the Association are as follows : 
President, Lester E. Bond; Vice-President, Oscar Robinson; Secretary, 
John V. Stephens, Jr.; Treasurer, Ralph W. Lloyd; Cabinet, Harry O. 
Bush, Herman O. Pile, "Robert A. Ramsey, Haskew Turner, Charles Walker, 
and Aubrey W. Williams. 

The Advisory Committee of the Y. M. C. A., composed of representa- 
tives of the Faculty and of the student body, directs the general policies 
of the Association. It consists of the following members : Class of 1914 : 
Professor Proffitt, Major Will A. McTeer, and John V. Stephens, Jr.; 
Class of 1915 : Dean Barnes, Chairman, President Wilson, and Professor 
Bassett ; Class of 1916 : Professor Gillingham, Victor C. Detty, and Gar- 
land Hinkle. 

The Y. W. C. A. was established in 1884, and has become one of the 
most wholesome influences in the religious life of the College. The weekly 
devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoons in the association 
room, in the basement of Voorhees Chapel. The Association has a small 
but valuable library, known as the Florence McManigal Memorial Library. 
It was contributed by Rev. J. Oscar Boyd, Ph.D., and wife, of Princeton, 
N. J., as a memorial to their sister, Miss McManigal, '08, who was an 
instructor in the College and who died in 1909. The officers of the Asso- 
ciation are as follows : President, Mary Kate Rankin ; Vice-President, 
Charlotte H. Landes ; Secretary, Anne M. Crane ; Treasurer, Nellie J. Gar- 
dison; Cabinet, Mary I. Camp, Sarosa R. Melick, Jean M. Porter, Alma M. 
Armstrong, Eva M. Samsel, Anna E. Taylor, Cora F. Hopkins, Zora A. 
Henry, and Anna J. Jones. 

The Athletic Association — This organization is maintained by the 
student body for the purpose of regulating athletics and caring for athletic 
equipment. The Board of Athletic Control, composed of representatives 
of the Faculty, the students, and former students, meets at stated intervals 
and exercises oversight over all the athletic events of the College. Tickets 
are sold that admit to all games played in Maryville and entitle the holders 
to the use of any available equipment used in athletic sports. The football 
and baseball fields, the tennis courts, the track, and the basketball court 
are open to any student desiring to enter these forms of sport. 

The members of the Board of Athletic Control, whose officers are also 
the officers of the Athletic Association, are as follows : President, James 
5 



66 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



F. Brittain, Jr.; Secretary, Edwin R. Hunter; Treasurer, David J. Brittain; 
Official Buyer, Fred L. Proffitt ; Faculty Representatives, President Wilson 
and Professor McClenahan ; Student Representatives, Alma M. Armstrong, 
Madge T. Reagan, Charles E. Dawson, and Patrick Quinn; Town Repre- 
sentatives, John A. McCulloch and Charles D. Chandler. 

The officers of the athletic teams are as follows : Managers : Foot- 
ball, Henry A. Calloway; Basketball, Ralph W. Lloyd; Women's Basket- 
ball, Alma M. Armstrong; Baseball, Ralston W. Carver; Track, Lewis 
Miller; Tennis, John A. Hyden. Captains: Football, Thomas W. God- 
dard; Basketball, Reid Garrison; Women's Basketball, Eva M. Samsel; 
Baseball, Charles E. Dawson. 

The Ministerial Association, organized in 1900, is composed of the 
candidates for the Christian ministry that are in attendance upon the Col- 
lege. It has for its object the enlistment of its members in various forms 
of active Christian work, and the discussion of themes relating to the work 
of the ministry. Its officers are: President, Victor C. Detty; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Harry O. Bush; Secretary and Treasurer, Chester F. Leonard; 
Program Secretary, Henry J. Wilson. 

The Student Volunteer Band — The College has from its earliest 
history been identified with foreign missions, and has sent out forty-seven 
missionaries into twelve foreign countries. Since 1894 the students have 
maintained a Student Volunteer Band, composed of those who are pledged 
to enter some foreign field, if the way be open. The Band meets weekly 
to study missionary fields and conditions. The officers for the present year 
are as follows : Leader, Victor C. Detty ; Secretary and Treasurer, Bessie 
J. Haggard ; Program Secretary, Addison S. Moore ; Editor, Isabel Porter. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This Association was formed in 1871. It holds its annual meeting on 
Commencement Day, when a banquet is given under the auspices of the 
Faculty of the College and the local alumni. The officers for 1913-1914 
are as follows : President, Hugh R. Crawford, '03 ; Vice-President, Robert 
C. Cross, '13 ; Secretary, Samuel T. Wilson, '78 ; Executive Committee, 
Fred L. Proffitt, '07, Anna Magill, '08, Eva Alexander, '10, Belle Pickens, 
'12, and Homer Goddard, '12. 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1913 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon the following 
twenty-four members of the graduating class of 1913 : Christina Alex- 
ander, Robert Carroll Cross, George Harley Douglas, Anna Ethel 
Fanson, Volta Francis Goddard, Albert Haynes, Grace Day Jewell, 



MARYVlLUi COUJiGH 67 



U \i.itii Dale Johnson, Lloyd Helvetius Eancston, IIattik Belle 
,imi:k, Ella McCampbkll, Ralph Erskine McConnell, William Elder 
\\oo\i\-, Ruth Culver Newell, Reva Newman, May Cowan Nuchols, 
vai.hl Waedo Owens, Nellie Cowan Pickens, Mirtam Anna Rood, 
A \kcia Secor, Helen Cassilly Siesby, Beueah Mae S wanner, Howard 
,auriK Weir, Oeive More Wilson. 

The degree of Master of Arts in course was conferred upon Ernest 
Morrison Ewers, B.A., '08. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon the 
U:\\ Hubert Samuel I/ylE, '99, pastor of New Providence Presbyterian 
Munch, Maryville, Tennessee. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Two members of the graduating class, one young man and one young 
roman, are chosen upon the basis of scholarship and general merit to rep- 
esent the class as orators on Commencement Day. The representatives 
f the class of 1913 were George Harley Douglas and Anna Ethel 



POST-GRADUATE STUDENT IN MUSIC, 1913 

Voice: Frances Tee McNutt. 

GRADUATES IN MUSIC, 1913 

Voice: Helen Elizabeth Bryan, Annie LEE Cross, Grace Dlan 
.roenendyke, AlETha Cleland May, and Hiram Harold HuddlEston. 

Piano: Mary Barnett Boggs, Mamie DeArmond, Mary Goddard, 
nd Margaret Sutton Sugg. 

GRADUATES IN EXPRESSION, 1913 

Anna Ethel Fanson, Martha Frank Jackson, May Cowan Nuch- 
as, and Nellie Cowan Pickens. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Classes are conducted by the Physical Director daily, and every stu- 
ent, except members of the Senior and Junior Classes, is required to avail 
imself of the privilege afforded, unless excused by reason of his being a 
lember of a regular athletic team or doing regular work in the college 
uildings or on the grounds. The classes for the young men and the 
oung women are conducted in their respective gymnasiums. Every young 
'oman should bring with her a regulation gymnasium suit, preferably blue 
i color, with gymnasium or tennis shoes. 



G8 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital, spoken of elsewhere, i 
available for all students. A trained nurse looks after the general healt' 
of the students, and nurses all cases that require her attention. In casei 
of slight illness no charge is made for nursing, but the patient pays $4.0i 
a week for the use of the ward, and for board and laundry. In cases o 
serious illness demanding more than ordinary time and attention, a nom 
inal charge is also made for the nursing. On Monday, Thursday, and Sat 
urday of each week free medical consultation and prescription by approve! 
physicians are provided at the hospital for out-of-town students. An 
other medical attention, however, that may be required must be paid fo 
by the student. These privileges have been responded to with marke' 
appreciation by the student body, and the medical attention thus afforde 
has been of great service in the prevention and checking of serious illnes: 

THE Y. M. C. A. LYCEUM COURSE 

For several years the Y. M. C. A. has conducted for the student bod 
and the public a course of lectures and entertainments. The course usuallij 
consists of five or six numbers, one or two of which are popular lecture 
and the rest musical, elocutionary, or dramatic entertainments. The cours 
is provided at small cost to the student, tickets for the entire series costin 
usually a dollar and a half. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSIC CONTESTS 

In 1909 a Triangular Debating and Oratorical League was forme 
with Carson and Newman College and Tusculum College for a term t 
three years, 1910-1912. A prize of five dollars in gold was awarded f 
each of the winning contestants annually. A silver cup, offered as a troph 
by Hope Brothers, of Knoxville, to the college winning the largest numkj 
of points for three consecutive years, was awarded to Maryville. 

After an interval of one year the agreement was renewed for th 
three years, 1914-1916. 

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Absence: From this Cou^GE. — Students are not allowed to absent then 
selves from the College without permission from the Faculty. 

Changes of Course. — All changes of studies must be made withi 
two weeks after matriculation. Thereafter, all changes for students i 
the Preparatory Department shall be made by order of the Principal c 



• MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



the department, and all changes in the College Department by permission 
of the Faculty, and in all cases after consultation with the instructors 
concerned. Every change of course made after two weeks from date of 
matriculation involves a fee of fifty cents, unless this fee is remitted by 
special vote of the Faculty. 

Delinquencies and Demerits. — All unexcused delinquencies and de- 
merits are registered. When they amount to twenty-five, the student ceases 
to be a member of the institution. A delinquency is a failure to perform 
any college duty. Excuses for such failure must be presented immediately 
upon returning to work. 

Dismissal from College. — Students are dismissed, also, whenever in 
the opinion of the Faculty they are pursuing a course of conduct detri- 
mental to themselves and to the College. The Faculty are the sole judges 
of the advisability of such dismissal. Maryville College is a private insti- 
tution, and reserves the right to dismiss a student whenever the authorities 
o\ the College may elect. An institution which is affording such extensive 
opportunities and advantages to its students in return for fees not so large 
as the incidental fees of most institutions, can not allow those to remain 
in attendance who fail to perform their college work, or who injure col- 
lege property, disturb college order, or by acts of insubordination or immo- 
rality hurt the good name of the College and add unnecessary burdens to 
the authorities of the institution. The College desires no such students, 
and rids itself of them when they appear. 

Entertainments. — To avoid interference with the regular work of the 
College, students are not permitted to engage in dramatic entertainments, 
and must secure special permission before engaging in any entertainment 
outside the College. 

Examinations. — A student absent from any examination without an 
approved excuse will be marked " zero " on that examination, and will 
receive no credit for his term's work. Any student failing to be present 
at term examinations shall be required to take all omitted examinations 
before being allowed to enter classes on his return to the College. A fee 
of one dollar will be charged for any examination not taken at the regular 
time for the examination. 

Forfeiture of Aid. — Any student receiving financial aid from the Col- 
lege, in the form of scholarships, loans, or opportunities for work, will 
forfeit such aid if he becomes an object of college discipline. 

Hazing.- — Hazing and other interference with individual liberty or 
class functions on the part of individuals or classes are prohibited. 

Religious Services.— Prayers are attended in the college chapel in the 



70 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



morning, with the reading of the Scripture and with singing. Every stv 
dent is required to attend public worship on the Sabbath, and to connet- 
himself with a Sabbath-school class in some one of the churches in towi 
Rooming in Town. — Students are not permitted to room or to boar 
at places disapproved by the Faculty. Young women from out of tow- 
are not permitted to room or board off the college grounds, except wit 
relatives. 

Sabbath. — Students are not allowed to patronize the Sunday trains oj 
to visit the railway stations on the Sabbath. No student will be receive 
on the Sabbath. Sunday visits are disapproved. 

Secret Societies. — No secret society will be allowed among the sti 
dents, and no organization will be permitted that has not been approve 
by the Faculty. 

Standing.— A uniform system of grading is employed, upon the result 
of which depends the promotion from one class to another. The Facult 
meets each week of the college year, and receives reports of the wor 
done in all departments and of the delinquencies of individual student: 
A record is made of the standing of each student, which is sent to hi 
parents or guardian at the end of each term. In order to be classified i. 
any given year in the College Department a student shall not be conditione 
in more than three studies. 

Tobacco. — The use of tobacco on the college grounds and in the co 1 
lege buildings is forbidden, and no student addicted to its use will b 
allowed to room upon the college premises. One violation of this rul 
will be deemed sufficient to exclude a student from the college dormitories 

Vaccination. — Vaccination is required of those students who have no 
recently been vaccinated. 

SELF-HELP 

The College offers opportunities of self-help to a large number <>: 
deserving young men and women. During the present year the numbc 
of those availing themselves of such opportunities has been over two liun 
dred. The work offered includes manual labor on the grounds, janito 
service in the various buildings, dining-room and kitchen service at th 
Cooperative Boarding Club, office work, and work as assistants in labn 
ratories, libraries, or study rooms. These forms of employment are pai> 
for at a rate varying according to the degree of skill and responsibilit 
involved. Indoor work is allotted usually to students that have previous! 
given proof of their ability and worth. Positions of exceptional respon 
sibility, such as janitor service and work as assistants, are granted for ; 
year in advance, the assignment being made at the close of the sprinj 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 71 



term. Assistants in any department are elected by the Faculty upon the 
recommendation of the head of the department. 

Application for work of any kind must be made in writing and ad- 
dressed to the Faculty. The acceptance of an opportunity of self-help 
involves especial obligation to diligence, loyalty, and the faithful discharge 
o\ duty. A student that fails to do satisfactory work or becomes an object 
of discipline by the Faculty will forfeit all such opportunities. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Craighead Fund, 1886, contributed by Rev. James G. Craighead, 

D.D., for candidates for the ministry $1,500 

The Carson Adams Fund, 1887, by Rev. Carson W. Adams, D.D., 

of New York, for tuition help 6,300 

The George Henry Bradley Scholarship, 1889, by Mrs. Jane Loomis 

Bradley, of Auburn, N. Y., in memory of her only son 1,000 

The Willard Scholarship, 1898, by the Misses Willard, of Auburn, 

New York 1,000 

The Students' Self-help Loan Fund, 1903, 1908, and 1912, by an East 

Tennessean, for loans to upper classmen 2,000 

The Clement Ernest Wilson Scholarship, 1904, by Mrs. Mary A. 

Wilson, of Maryville, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship Fund, begun 1904, by 
the Alumni Association and former students. A bequest of 
$500 was made to the fund by the late Mrs. M. A. Wilson, of 
Maryville 2,013 

The Angier Self-help Work and Loan Fund, 1907-1911, by Mr. 
Albert E. Angier, of Boston, Mass., to provide opportunities of 
work and loans for young men 5,000 

The Margaret E. Henry Scholarship, 1907, established through the 

efforts of Mr. Jasper E. Corning, of New York 1,000 

The Arta Hope Scholarship, 1907, by Miss Arta Hope, of Robin- 
son, 111 1,000 

The Silliman Scholarship, 1907, by Hon. H. B. Silliman, of Cohoes, 
N. Y., and held in trust by the College Board of the Presby- 
terian Church 1,000 

The Hugh O'Neill, Jr., Scholarship, 1908, by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill, of 

New York, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alexander Caldwell Memorial Fund, 1908, by Mr. G. A. Moody, 

of Jefferson City, Tenn., the income to be loaned 1,000 

The D. Stuart Dodge Scholarship, 1908, by Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, 
D.D., of New York City, preferably to aid graduates of the 
Farm School of North Carolina 1,500 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



The Julia M. Turner Missionary Scholarship Fund, 1908, by Mrs. 
Julia M. Turner, to aid the children of foreign missionaries or 
those preparing for the foreign field ^ $5,000 

The William J. McCahan, Sr., Fund, 1908, by Mr. William J. Mc- 

Cahan, Sr., of Philadelphia, Pa., for tuition help 5,000 

The W. A. E. Campbell Foreign Missionary Fund, 1909, by Rev. 
W. A. E. Campbell, of Nashville, Ind., to aid a young woman 
preparing for foreign missionary work 700 

The Charles Francis Darlington, Jr., Scholarship, 1909, by Mrs. 

Letitia Craig Darlington, of New York, in honor of her son. .. 1,000 

The Hoover Self-help Fund, 1909, by Dr. W. A. Hoover, of Gibson 

City, 111., to provide opportunities of work for young men 500 

The Isaac Anderson Scholarship, 1909, by James A. and Howard 
Anderson, of Knoxville, Tenn., in memory of their great-uncle, 
Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., the founder of Maryville College. . 1,000 

The John H. Converse Scholarship, 1909, by Mr. John H. Converse, 
of Philadelphia, Pa., for candidates for the ministry and other 
Christian service _ # 5000 

The Chattanooga Self-help Fund, 1910, by Rev. E. A. Elmore, D.D., 
and citizens of Chattanooga, Tenn., to provide opportunities of 
work for students 50o 

The Rena Sturtevant Memorial Scholarship, 1910, by Miss Anna 

St. John, of New York iooo 

The Nathaniel Tooker Scholarship, 1910, by Nathaniel Tooker, Esq., 

East Orange, N. J 10 oo 

The James R. Hills Memorial Self-help Work Fund, 1911, by Miss 

Sarah B. Hills, of New York, to provide work for students 1,000 

The Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Mead Memorial Scholarship, 1911, by the 

Abbott Collegiate Association of New York 1,000 

The G. S. W. Crawford Self-help Fund, 1912, by friends of the late 

Professor Crawford, to provide work for students 1.000 

The Elizabeth Belcher Bullard Memorial Scholarship, 1912, "given 
in memory of a great friendship " by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Barney 
Buel, of East Meadows, Litchfield, Conn., through the Mary 
Floyd Tallmadge Chapter of the D. A. R 1,000 

The Elizabeth Hillman Memorial Scholarship, 1912 and 1914, by Mrs. 
John Hartwell Hillman, of Pittsburgh, Pa., through the Pitts- 
burgh Chapter of the D. A. R., " in perpetuity for mountain girls 
in Maryville College " 2,000 

The Robert A. Tedford Scholarship, 1913, "given by his wife, Emma 

Patton Tedford, as a memorial to her husband" 1,000 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 73 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official publication of the College is The; MaryviujS Corj,i<;cE Bui,- 
,i;tix. It is issued four times a year, and is sent free to any who apply 
for it. The May number of each year is the annual catalog. The; Col,- 
.i;c;i: Monthly is issued several times a year by the students, the editorial 
itaff consisting of representatives of the four literary societies, the Chris- 
inn Associations, the Athletic Association, and the Alumni Association. 
fin: Cnii.now i;AN is issued annually by the Senior Class. It is the year- 
>ook of the student body, containing a summarized record of the year's 
work in all the departments and organizations of the College, and is an 
ittractive souvenir. The; Maryvil,l,e; Hand Book is issued annually by the 
Christian Associations. It is intended to present the work of the Asso- 
ciations to new students, and also to assist them in adjusting themselves 
;o their new environment. It includes a directory of the Christian Asso- 
intions, Literary Societies, Athletic Associations, city churches, and college 
offices ; the college colors, yell, song, and athletic records ; and instructions 
is to matriculation. 

SPECIAL NEEDS 

(l) The provision of a water-supply and fire-protection system ade- 
quate for the enlarged demands made by the added dormitories and other 
juildings. Sanitation and safety call for it. To complete this system there 
will be needed at least $5,000. (2) A new recitation building, $50,000. It 
:an not be long deferred. All available space is utilized, and yet the work 
is sorely cramped. (3) Endowment for a manual training department, 
j>25,000. Too long has this important and most practical department been 
delayed. The basement of Carnegie Hall was planned with reference to 
it, and will provide adequate quarters for it. (4) Endowment of an agri- 
cultural department, $25,000. The clientage of Maryville, the need that 
present-day public-school teachers have of training in agriculture, and the 
trend of the times all demand this addition. A gift of $150 has been 
received towards this endowment. (5) Equipment of manual training and 
agriculture departments, $10,000. (6) Endowment to enable the College 
to employ a Professor of Education to serve partly in college extension 
work, $25,000. (7) Endowment for the natural science departments to 
help provide annual supplies, $10,000. (8) Endowment to pay the admin- 
istration expenses of the Cooperative Boarding Club so as to keep the cost 
of board from rising any further, $15,000. Thousands of students have 
been enabled to enter college because of this remarkable club. Board is 
$1.90 a week. (9) Additional endowment for the library, $12,000. The 
present endowment is less than eight thousand dollars. (10) A hospital 



74 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



endowment to provide the salary of the nurse, $10,000. The hospital is 
proving invaluable and the nurse is necessary, and the students are unable 
to pay for one. Two gifts amounting to $600 have been paid in during 
the past year, and furnish a nucleus for the Hospital Endowment Fundj 

(11) For streets, walks, and grounds, $5,000. Naturally beautiful, the; 
grounds have been reluctantly left unimproved through lack of funds. 

(12) Another dormitory for young men. Both dormitories for the young j 
men are full, and many students are unable to secure rooms in them. A: 
duplicate of Carnegie Hall can be erected for $50,000, and will make a 
home for one hundred and twenty additional students. (13) Minor but 
pressing needs: (a) $1,000 to provide additional furniture for Memorial 
and Baldwin Halls, (b) A pipe organ for the Chapel, $4,000. (c) Addi- 
tional boilers for the Power House, $1,500. (d) An additional dynamo, 
to cost with engine, $1,500. 

All these great needs can be met with two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. And the College has faith that this amount will be secured before 
many commencements have passed. 

BEQUESTS AND DEVISES 

Since each State has special statutory regulations in regard to wills,, 
it is most important that all testamentary papers be signed, witnessed, and ; 
executed according to the laws of the State in which the testator resides. \ 
In all cases, however, the legal name of the corporation must be accurately 1 
given, as in the following form: 

"I give and bequeath to 'Th£ Directors of MaryviWvE; 

Coixsge/ at Maryville, Tennessee, and to their successors and assigns for- 
ever, for the uses and purposes of said College, according to the provisions; 
of its charter." > 



MARYV1LLB COLLEGE 75 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



College Department 

SENIOR CLASS 

Armstrong, Alma Mabel Bradentown, Fla Science 

Brittain, James Frazier Maryville, R. D. 5. . .General 

Burian, Ludvik Martinice, Moravia . . General 

Carson, Ralph St. Clair Hendersonville, N. C.Classical 

Clark, Frankie Belle Christiana General 

Cross, Luther Laurance Gastonburg, Ala General 

Detty, Victor Charles Scranton, Pa Classical 

Dillon, Julia Hale Memphis Science 

Elmore, Grace Gladys New Market Classical 

Fyke, William Foster Springfield Science 

Gamble, James Thompson Maryville, R. D. 4. . .Mathematics 

Hall, Erma May Maryville Modern Languages 

HinklE, Augustus Garland Inez, Ky Classical 

Hunter, Edwin Ray Bicknell, Ind Modern Languages 

Hyden, John Albert Philadelphia Mathematics 

KirkpaTrick, NELL Ross Mooresburg General 

Landes, Charlotte HauEr Florianopolis, BraziL.Modern Languages 

McConnELL, Adolphus Rankin. .Maryville, R. D. 6.. .Mathematics 

McCully, Jonnie Ann Maryville Modern Languages 

MaxEy, MaymE Rebecca Maryville General 

Miller, Frank Lewis East Moriches, N. Y. Classical 

Moore, Addison Strong Maryville Classical 

Rankin, Mary Kate Dandridge General 

REEVES, Ernest MayranT Sacramento, Cal General 

Rowland, Minnie LEE Alexandria General 

Samsel, Eva May Tate General 

Stewart, James KirkpaTrick Wilmington, Del General 

Tit.ford, William Harm an Ludlow, Ky Social Science 

Waggoner, Andrew Bell Irvington, Ky General 

JUNIOR GLASS 

Atiyeh, Anise Elias Horns, Syria General 

Baixh, Hiram Smith Newport, R. D. 5 Mathematics 

Barnes, Mark Hopkins Maryville Science 



76 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Biggs, AeEred DeBard Greenup, Ky Classical 

Boggs, Mary BarnETT Kingston, O General 

Bond, Lester Everett South Portland, Me. . General 

Burnett, Bertha Mae Knoxville General 

Butler, Ruth Virginia Manila, P. I General 

Carson, Ruth Rankin Mary ville Classical 

Crane, Anne McPheeters New Decatur, Ala... .Modern Languages 

Dawson, ChareES Edward South Knoxville Classical 

Ensign, John Evans Rossville, Ga Classical 

Garrison, Nellie James Byington General 

Gaston, David Finis Gastonburg, Ala General 

Goddard, Thomas Warner Mary ville General 

Henry, Zora Aeice Rockford General 

Lloyd, Raeph Waedo Fort Duchesne, Utah. Mathematics 

MiTCHEEE, Thomas Harvey Ironton, Mo Classical 

Murray, Albert Francis New Decatur, Ala... .Mathematics 

Painter, Winifred LEE Mary ville, R. D. 6. . .General 

PowEE, SamueE Franklin Rogersville Classical 

Reagan, Madge Tipton Mary ville General 

Rupert, Margaret Jane Magrew, O Science 

Stephens, John Vant Cincinnati, O General 

Tetedoux, CorinnE Fleming Norwood, O Modern Languages 

TonEy, George Lynn Erwin General 

Wieeiams, George Edmund Belchertown, Mass. . .General 

Wilson, Henry Jasper Pryorsburg, Ky General 

Wilson, Howard HanninGTon. . . Mary ville General 

Wilson, Lois Coetgny Maryville General 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Adams, Alma McBryan Union, S. C General 

Adams, George Morris Cedar Hill General 

Alter, Ruth Maude Anniston, Ala Modern Languages ' 

Bush, Harry Oswaed Philadelphia, Pa Classical 

Bussard, Esther Elizabeth Toledo, 111 Eng. Lit. and History 

Caldwell, Alexander Bryan New Market, D. D. 3. Mathematics 

Carver, Ralston Wilde Granite Falls, N. C. .General 

Conrad, Chauncey Elbert Fredericktown, Mo.. .Classical 

CreswELL, Lula Baxter Bluefield, W. Va General 

Cross, Frank Moore Gastonburg, Ala Classical 

Dawson, Edna Elizabeth South Knoxville ...... Modern Languages 

EELER, Lloyd Zack Asheville, N. C Social Science 

Elmore, Linden Ljmon New Market Classical 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 77 



Im'ivii, Mary Abigail Troy, General 

Foster, Edna EarlE Blaineville Modern Languages 

1 1 aggard, BESSIE JeanETTE Hillsboro, Tex General 

1 h:\Kv, Cora Jane Walland, R. D. 2. . . .Education 

1 Iou.oway, William Edward . . . .Glen Alice Mathematics 

RarnES, Marie Elise Huntington, W. Va. . Classical 

KiddER, Jonathan Edward South Knoxville Eng. Lit. and History 

Liddell, George Turner El Reno, Okla General 

Logan, Rosa Emma Persia General 

Cowry, Bernice LEE Maryville General 

McBEE, Edgar Love Corryton Mathematics 

McCurry, Coy Mosheim, R. D. 2. . . . General 

McKelvey, Gertrude Ethee Chattanooga General 

May, AlETha Ceeeand Maryville Modern Languages 

Moxon, Frank Harold Dubuque, la General 

Pleasants, Wieeiam Henry Roxboro, N. C General 

PosteEThwaiTE, Frank KeiTh Thomson. . Chattanooga . Classical 

PowEL, Wieeiam Armstrong Rogersville Classical 

Proffitt, David Wilson Maryville Social Science 

Rankin, RoefE Montgomery Jet, Okla Mathematics 

Robinson, Gilbert Oscar Patton, Mo Mathematics 

Ross, Jesse BarrancE Cascilla, Miss General 

Silsby, Charles Edwin Shanghai, China Classical 

Smith, DeWitt Clinton Culleoka General 

Smith, Raymond OwEns Maryville General 

Sugg, Catherine ShERbrookE . . . .Christiana Modern Languages 

Taylor, Muriel Maryville Education 

ThrelkELd, Horace Walton Hobart, Okla General 

Thford, Louise EstellE Ludlow, Ky Classical 

Webb, Lillian Gray Maryville Eng. Lit. and History 

Whalin, Fred Raymond Hobart, Okla General 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Allen, Hazel Marie Sorrento, Fla General 

Alter, Samuel NealE Tarentum, R. D. 1, Pa. Classical 

Anderson, Annie Lou Greenback, R. D. 1. . .General 

Bargfr, Carr Cornelius Salisbury, N. C General 

Berry hill, Esther Anna Waynesville, O General 

Boeing, William Wiley Rasar General 

BrocklEhurst, Zeora MO'NTEz Mercer, Pa Eng. Lit. and History 

Camp, Mary Ida Dry Run, Pa Classical 

Carson, Dorothy Jean Maryville General 



78 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Carter, William Mos^s Valdosta, Ga General 

Caton, Herman Luther Cosby General 

Clemens, Mary Lucinda Maryville General 

Dagley, Carl Franklin Evens ville General 

Day, Guthrie Ford Spring City General 

Dorris, Pauline VandELLE. Providence, Ky General 

Ensign, Charles Edward Rossville, Ga Classical 

Fisher, Commodore Bascom Lewisburg Classical 

French, Cecil Jack Tampa, Fla General 

Gamon, Robert SpeER Knoxville General 

Gaylor, Anna Maude Jellico General 

George, Margaret Irene Maryville Science 

Goff, Florence Good Hope, 111 General 

Gordon, Elizabeth ArTA Robinson, 111 General 

Henry, Lily Canzada Cosby, R. D. 1 General 

Hickey, Mary Craig Jonesboro General 

Hodges, George Winfred Boyds Creek Classical 

Hopkins, Cora Frances Knoxville General 

Huff, Edith Eewood Emmett, Idaho Eng. Eit. and Histor 

Hunter, Florence LEE Bicknell, Ind Eng. Lit. and Histor 

Jackson, Martha Frank Maryville General 

JonES, Anna Josephine Charlestown, Ind General 

Kannon, Frank Burke Culleoka General 

Kell, Robert John Oakland City, Ind Classical 

Kelly, Charles Francis Kodak General 

Kelso, Arthur Henry Walla Walla, Wash. . General 

Kennedy, Zelma Beaumont Straw Plains, R. D. 3. Education 

Lance, Elsie Mae High Bridge, N. J. . . General 

Leonard, Chester Fred Birmingham, Ala Classical 

McCord, William Hugh Lewisburg General 

McDaniel, Margaret Evelyn Union Mills, N. C... General 

McReynolds, Alfred Clarence . . Maryville Mathematics 

Mapes, Ralph Clark Rising Sun, Ind General 

Martin, William Earl Maryville General 

Matthews, Mary Elk City, Okla General 

May, Margaret Eunice Maryville General 

Meyers, TaleETa LucrETia Memphis General 

Norris, Rachel LEE New London, O General 

Painter, John William Maryville, R. D. 6 . . . Mathematics 

PEREA, Wendell SomERS Falmouth, Ky General 

Pile, Herman Owen Edgewood, Tex General 

PlFasanTs, Annie Lewis Roxboro, N. C General 

Porter, Jean McDonald Campinas, Brazil General 



MARYV1LLH COLLEGE 79 



PORTER, Mary Isabel Campinas, Brazil General 

PRATER, Oscar Earl Louisville General 

tt, Elizabeth Lois Cane Hill, Ark General 

QuiNN, Charles Fred Patrick. . .Lancing Social Science 

Ramsey, Robert Adair Newport, Pa Classical 

Rodgers, William Hunter Macomb, 111 Classical 

Rodriguez, Zacarias Ignacio, Colo General 

Ross, Miriam Chaudoin Lakeland, Fla Mathematics 

Rough, Celia Ellen Oakland City, Ind. ... General 

RuGEL, Clyde TemplETon Mesquite, Tex General 

Samsel, Herbert Whitelaw Tate General 

SchEER, LorinE Margaret New Decatur, Ala... .General 

Sharp, Reuben Thomas Trundles X Roads . . . General 

Shearer, Olive Lenore Dry Run, Pa Classical 

Skelton, Margaret LEE Elberton, Ga General 

Steelman, Florence Christine. .Cairo, N. Y Modern Languages 

Steelman, Frances Willard . . . .Cairo, N. Y Education 

Stinson, Edgar Carroll Harveysburg, O Social Science 

Striplin, Adlai Crisp Maryville General 

Striplin, Esther ApharinE Maryville Mathematics 

Sugg, Margaret Sutton Christiana General 

Taylor, Anna Elizabeth New Market General 

Tedeord, Stacie ArbeELY Maryville General 

Thomson, ChareES Harrison Puerto de Santa Maria, Spain. .Mathematics 

rrrswoRTH, Frank Leslie Knoxville General 

Vance, Roy Robert Concord Education 

Walker, Joseph Charles Forkvale General 

Webster, Alfred Harrison Oliver Springs, R. D. 2. .General "*'< 

Williams, Deck Christopher Cosby, R. D. 2 General 

Wilson, Bertha Mary Maryville General 

Wright, Alice Elizabeth Maryville Eng. Lit. and History 

IRREGULAR COLLEGIATE STUDENTS 

Braun, Loessa Marie Port Chester, N. Y. .General 

Broady, Ita Anderson Maryville, R. D. 7. . .Home Economics 

Calloway, Henry Abbott Maryville General 

Campbell, BerTha Mae Grandview Home Economics 

Dawson, Eva Lavinia South Knoxville Modern Languages 

Gibson, Chapman J Maryville General 

Hilleary, Perry Caspar Grandview General 

EIolloway, James Arthur Glen Alice General 

Iones, Margaret Mason Jellico General 



80 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



KeEblE, Pearl kock Mills, Ala General 

McCaee, Newton ShLddan Greenback, R. D. 4. .General 

McLucas, Margaret McLaurin. . McColl, S. C Home Economics 

Melick, Sarosa Rosamond Annandale, N. J General 

MiLLER,' Sula Mae Grandview Home Economics 

MorELOCK, GeEnna PeareE Limestone General 

Nicholson, Mary Julia Bokoshe, Okla General 

Park, HarwEEE Bennett Culleoka Classical 

PriTChETT, William Henry. ... . .Annemanie, Ala General 

Russell, Erma Madison Nashville General 

Smith, Mae DarThuia Morristown, R. D. 7. Home Economics; 

Toney, HERBERT Edwin Erwin General 

Trent, Naomi Elizabeth Mary ville Home Economies' 

Wallace, Charles Nathaniel. . .Fayetteville General 

Work, Ruth Anne Fort Lauderdale, Fla.Home Kconom 

Wright, Robert Wood Mary ville Geneq 

Yates, Ethel Rock Mills, Ala Gener 

COLLEGE SPECIAL STUDENTS 

BatchELdEr, Mina Ada New Rochelle, N. Y.Home 

Bright, AlETha Fawn Chuckey Home . 

Coulter, Jonnie Brown Maryville Music 

Dean, Dorothy Louise Nesbitt, Miss Music 

DeVriES, Anna, Ph.B Aplington, la Music 

Duncan, NELLIE Eern, B.A Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Art 

Fitch, Anna Dillaway Troy, O Art 

Green, Susan Allen, M.A Wakefield, Mass Music 

Henry, Ada KathERINE Maryville Home Economic* 

KELL, Esther Mary, B.A Oakland City, Ind. ...Home Economic) 

Keys, Henry Norton Hobart, Okla General 

LEGrand, Thomas Joseph. South Hadley Falls, Mass. .General 

McCampbell, Nellie Pearl, B.A. Fountain City, R.D. l.Music 

MiLLER, Charles Mack, B.A Whitesburg General 

Mitchell, Delia Johnsonville, R. D. 1. Bible Training 

PERSON, Annabel, B.A Olivet, Mich Art 

Pickens, Alice BELLE, B.A Maryville Home Economic 

REnich, Mary Emma, M.A Urbana, 111 Music 

Sutton, Marguerite Chattanooga Music 

Weaver, Bernard Glynn Hanover, O General 

Willard, Pearl Maryville Music and Art 

Willard, Ruth Maryville Music 

Wilson, Olive More, B.A Maryville Home Economic 



MARY VI LIE COLLEGE 81 



Preparatory Department 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 

Iicknell, Guilford O Maryville . Classical 

Ioyce, Mertie James Clinton, S. C Classical 

Iryson, Alton Davis Whitwell Classical 

!ate, Ralph Newport Classical 

Iooper, Finis Gaston Gastonburg, Ala Classical 

Iotton, Bessie Lind New Decatur, Ala ... . Classical 

!rLswell, Anna Gamble ........ Bearden General 

ross, Stirling Gumfork Classical 

:rowdl% Frank Gist Sparta Classical 

'rum, Mark Blaine Greeneville Classical 

iawf— Horace South Knoxville Classical 

)eArml- v John Alfred Harriman, R. D. 3. . . General 

William Reid Derita, N. C Classical 

JEcil French Maryville General 

■nk Jackson Maryville General 

on, Hiram Harold Maryville Classical 

Eugene Deaderick Louisville General 

& Lindsay Morris Pineville, N. C Classical 

y, Emma Mae Maryville, R. D. 2. . .Classical 

„4Y, Viola Blanche Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

icTeer, William Andrew Maryville Classical 

liLES, Mary Knoxville, 1R. D. 10 . . Classical 

IiTCHELL, William Rae Corliss. Penablanca, N. Mex. Classical 

ainter, ErskinE Grills Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

arks, William BurnEy Cleveland, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

ayne, Mildred Adell Elberton, Ga Classical 

ose, Joseph Hartford Classical 

owland, MiTTie EllsTon Alexandria Classical 

isk, Augustus Marion, N. C Classical 

miTh, Charles Logan Harlan, Ky Classical 

nell, Robert Leonidas Naraja, Fla Classical 

tanberry, Charles Richard Newport Classical 

riNNETT, Dora Townsend Classical 

usong, John Calvin Walland Classical 

usong, Suella Walland Teachers 

wanay, Josephine Vonore Classical 

urner, James HaskEw Bybee, R. D. 1 Classical 

Catkins, Ben Ed Indian Spring, Ga. . . . Classical 

Williams, Aubrey Willis Birmingham, Ala Classical 

6 



82 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Frank Thomas Springfield Classical 

Adams, James Clyde Springfield Classical 

Adams, John Ottomar New Providence, N. J.Classical 

Alison, William Scott Huntersville, N. C. . . Classical 

BibeE, Robert Lucian Jacksboro Classical 

Birdsall, Edgar Maynard Brockport, N. Y General 

Birdsall, Julian Kellogg Brockport, N. Y Classical 

BlauvElt, HomEr Everett Maplesville, Ala Classical 

Booher, Lena Thompson Fountain City, R. D. 1. Classical 

Bradley, Homer Blaine, Ga Classical 

Brakebill, Anna Zula Maryville General 

Brewer, ElmER Maryville Classical 

Briggs, David Hezekiah Marshall, R. D. 4, N. C. .Classical 

Brown, Frances Marie Volant, Pa Classical 

Brown, Theron Nelson Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Classical 

BurchEiELd, Mary Elizabeth. .. .Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

Candler, William Washington. Candler, N. C Classical 

Carmack, William Eldridge Rogersville, R. D. 2. .Classical 

Clark, All^n Long Maryville Classical 

Dltty, George William Scranton, Pa Classical 

Dorton, Florence Helen North Chattanooga . . Teachers 

Ellis, Edwin BreckenridgE Maryville Classical 

Ellis, Horace Knox Maryville Classical 

Franklin, Ellie May Crowley, Tex Classical 

Garner, Joseph Davis Mint Classical 

George, Winnie Mae Jacksboro Classical 

Goins, William Alvis Laf ollette, R. D. 2 . . . Classical 

Greene, Thelma J Maryville General 

GrEER, Harold Hale Maryville Classical 

Hall, Mary VeniTa Maryville Classical 

Harper, Irene Knox Louisville General 

Hart, Cowan McNuTT Concord General 

Henry, Nancy Cordelia Cosby, R. D. 1 Classical 

Henry, Ralph Edward New Market, R. D. 2.General 

Henry, Thomas Gilbert Martin General 

Hill, Willie Kate Maryville General 

Houston, Salem Winston Greeneville, R. D. 13. Classical 

Hunt, Louis Dawson Madisonville General 

Hunter, Minnie AnnE Citie, W. Va Classical 

James, Hugh Maryville, R. D. 6 . . . Classical 

KiTTrell, Sara Louise Maryville Classical 



MARYVILLH COLLBGB 83 



Laswell, Josi-i-ii Rogers Owensboro, Ky. . ..Classical 

I.i.oMt, Glen Alfred Fort Duchesne, Utah. Classical 

Logan, OnESSuS Horner Persia Classical 

|,\u:. Lucile Eleanor Dandridge Teachers 

McClELLAN, Charles Thompson. Corryton, R. D. 4. .. .Classical 

McConnELL, Thomas Lamar Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

McCurry, Luther Mosheim, R. D. 2. . . . Classical 

McKoy, William Gordon Old Fort, N. C Classical 

McLaughlin, James Edward Woonsocket, R. I General 

McLaughlin, Otis Higgins Fayetteville General 

El 1 arcum, Rosa Ada Helenwood Classical 

Means, Margaret Lucile Maryville General 

Moore, Ralph Blaine '. Russellville Classical 

A 1 vers, Rhea Connie Morristown Classical 

Nicely, Julius Martin Washburn Classical 

Nicholson, LaureE Elizabeth. . .Bokoshe, Okla Classical 

Nicholson, Moody Aston Bokoshe, Okla General 

Owen, East Miller Knoxville General 

irks, Harle Lovelace Ocoee, R. D. 1 Classical 

vTTon, Mary Lucile Winchester, Ky General 

juinn, David Luther Lancing Classical 

Raulston, James Duke Kodak Classical 

Robinson, Eugene Deadrick Newport Classical 

Ross, John Mint Classical 

SlEmonS, Lena Dosser Wooldridge General 

Smith, Noel Godwin Concord, R. D. 1. . . . Classical 

Thompson, John Boston Corryton Classical 

' Tweed, John Beulah Marshall, N. C Classical 

Tye, Robert Clarence Conasauga Classical 

Wade, Julta LEE Quinton, Okla Classical 

Wagener, Loran Scott Narka, Kan Classical 

Walker, Oscar Laeayette Walland General 

Waller, Meredith Gentry Oliver Springs Classical 

Ward, Ernest Jennings Inez, Ky Classical 

Whetsell, TrissiE Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 5. . .Teachers 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Charles Leslie Chattanooga General 

Alexander, Lela Elda Greenback Classical 

Armstrong, LanTy Walker Greenback, R. D. 2. .Teachers 

AxlEy, Porter Murphy, N. C Classical 

Bogle, LELANd Lyons Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 



84 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Brewer, Salue BELLE Walland General 

Bright, Annie Hazel Maryville, R. D. 5. . .Classical 

Broce, LeoniE GaeE Bristol General 

Browning, FeeTcher Worth. . . . .Maryville Classical 

ButlEr, Judson Rea Manila, P. I Classical 

Calloway, Luea May Maryville Classical 

Campbell, Edward Stephen Hot Springs, N. C. . . Classical 

Carpenter, Bertha Ruth Ansonville, R. D. 1, N. C. . Classical 

Carson, Leo Oneida Classical 

CatlETT, Jonnie Willie Maryville General 

Cosby, Wieeiam Marshall. .... .Birmingham, Ala Classical 

Coventry, Eeva Viola Maryville Classical 

CrEsweee, Mary Davis Bearden Classical 

DamERON, Manoea Frederica. . . . Fountain City, R. D. l.Classical 

Davis, AlErEd EzEkiee Asheville, R. D. 1, N. C. .Classical 

Duneap, Martha Ann Walland, R. D. 2 General 

Dunn, Julia Maryville Classical 

EakErs, John Vasco Corryton General 

Ellis, JESSE Lamar Friendsville General 

Eeeis, John Nick Friendsville General 

Fisher, Abbie Dayton, R. D. 1 General 

Frow, John Thomas Maryville, R. D. 2. . .General 

Gallion, Katherine Gertrude. . . Black Mountain, N. C. Classical 

Gamble, Helen Rebecca Maryville Classical 

Garrison, Eeeie Jane Derita, R. D. 14, N. C.General 

Gibson, Etta Mae Maryville, R. D. 4 . . . Classical 

Gillespy, Flora Elizabeth Walland Classical 

Goddard, Mary Maryville , . . . General 

Greene, Freeman Mooresburg Classical 

Greene, Martha Bertha Maryville Classical 

Griffith, Nora L,EE Oliver Springs General 

Haddox, Thomas Roland Knoxville, R. D. 3. . .Classical 

Hamilton, Arthur Gray Hyattsville, Md General 

Harper, William Rodgers Louisville General 

Heard, Mary Ethel Tampa, Fla General 

Henry, Irene Maryville Teachers 

Hickman, Clyde Knoxville Classical 

Holland, Charles LEE Springfield General 

Howard, John Zollicopeer Cookeville Classical 

Hunt, Meredith Clyde Chattanooga General 

Hurst, Plina Christopher.' Sevierville, R. D. 8.. Classical 

Kellam, Perry Alexander Marvel, Ala Classical 

Kennedy, Nellie Cleveland Maryville, R. D. 8. . .General 



MARYVILLH COLLHCli 85 



K iki?y . RoscoE Ellis Etowah Classical 

l,wu>N, Howard Finding Maryville General 

I.Ki.;, George Lawrence Ben Avon, Pa Classical 

MacMillan, Harriet Dougaux . .Tampa, Fla Classical 

McBEE, Ganum Gipson Corryton Classical 

\UVi\ry, Samuel Washington. ..Ocoee Classical 

McCormack, Frank Leslie Cincinnati, O Classical 

McCurry, Eeizabeth Nancy Mosheim Classical 

McGhEE, Wieeiam Edgar Maryville, R. D. 3. . .General 

MdN cjTT, Ruby Gray Maryville General 

Marshall, AeExandEr B Port Chester, N. Y. . Classical 

Martin, Kenneth LEE Maryville Classical 

Maxwell, Howard Hebbard Broad Ripple, R. D. 12, Ind. .Classical 

MiLES, Emma Knoxville, R. D. 10. .Classical 

Miller, Jesse Hopkins Sevierville, R. D. 16. Teachers 

Moore, Waiter William Ocoee Classical 

Nicely, Aeonzo Clifton Powder Springs Classical 

Orr, LucilE Franklin Tryon, N. C Classical 

Peterson, Frederic Corneeius Asheville, N. C Classical 

Prince, John Cutcher Benton Classical 

Quinn, Ruth Kate Lancing Classical 

Robinson, Eeea Pearl Patton, Mo General 

Robinson, John Bollinger Patton, Mo Classical 

Runyan, Voea Beeee Sevierville Classical 

Russeee, Cassie Louise Rockf ord Classical 

Sheddan, Hugh Jefferson City General 

Sherrod, Ceifeord Carter Louisville General 

Slatery, Feoyd Alexander Knoxville, U. D. 10. .Classical 

Slater y, Patrick Henry Knoxville, R. D. 10. .Classical 

Stephens, Cora Anne Knoxville Classical 

Stone, Voea C Greenback, R. D. 1. .Classical 

Stump, Ugee Flat Woods, W. Va... Classical 

Sugg, Jesse Grant Christiana — Classical 

Sullinger, Marguerite Maryville Classical 

Taylor, Dorothy Ray Utica, Ky Classical 

Thompson, Addie Evelyn Bearden Classical 

Thornton, DeWitt Talmage Dandridge, R. D. 7.. Classical 

Toomey, Elizabeth Viola Maryville Classical 

Towe, Durward NorflEET Chapanoke, N. C Classical 

Valdes, Sara Estela Havana, Cuba Classical 

Vandegrift, Roy Ulamont Erwin General 

Wade, Robert Thomas Quinton, Okla Classical 

Waggoner, Hugh Morrison Irvington, Ky General 



86 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Walker, Beatrice; Genevieve Maryville, R. D. 1. . .General 

Walker, Elsie Harriet Maryville General 

Walker, Joe Knaeeee Maryville General 

Webb, Ocey Beanche Townsend Classical 

WEST, Ceyde EckeES Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

Wncox, Howard Samuee. Jellico Classical 

Wilkinson, Carrie Tipton Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

Wilkinson, Margaret Catharine. .Maryville, R. D. 6. . Classical 

Williams, Jessie Emiey Maryville, R. D. 4. . .General 

Williams, Ross H Lancing, R. D. 1 Teachers 

Wilson, Lamar Silsby Maryville Classical 

Woodson, Mary Eeea Atlanta, R. D. 5, Ga. Classical 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 

AeExandeR, EeEanor CueeEn Knoxville, R. D. 12. .General 

Alexander, James Vance Morganton, N. C Classical 

Badgett, Jessie Rockf ord General 

Barnes, Theema Hunter Lafollette General 

BEEEER, Lola Frances Powder Springs General 

Beet, Robert Leroy Wellsville Classical 

Benson, Richard Walton Springfield Classical 

Biggs, SeaTon Humphries Greenup, Ky General 

BoGLE, Jennie Tunneee Maryville, R. D. 4. . . General 

Boring, James Marcus Rasar General 

Bost, Nancy LEE Claremont, N. C Classical 

Boyd, MoeeiE Louise Hampton, R. D. 1 General 

Bridges, John McKim Marvel, Ala Classical 

Brown, EemEr McIevaine Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Classical 

Brown, Margaret Lueeea ....... Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Classical 

Browning, Ceaude Hunter Maryville Classical 

Bryson, Mava Kezziah Whitwell General 

Burns, Cora Sievara Flemington, N. J General 

ButeEr, Bruce C Cosby, R. D. 2 Classical 

Caedweee, Edith Fawn Maryville Classical 

Carson, Vioea Oneida General 

Castor, Sadie BEEEE Concord, R. D. 3, N. C. .General 

Caton, EeeiE Areine Cosby Classical 

Caughron, Samuee Jackson Walland General 

Clemens, Adeline Turrell Maryville Classical 

Clemens, Robert Broady Maryville Classical 

Cochrane, Annie Corinna Concord, N. C Classical 

Collins, SETTiS Louise Montgomery, Ala General 



MARYVILLE COLLBGB 87 



Cook, Max Gordon Waddams Grove, 111. Classical 

Cooper, Cedric Bittle Maryville General 

, i;k, OlliE Maud Sevier ville, R. D. 7. .Teachers 

Coulter, HassiE Etta Maryville, R. D. 4... Teachers 

Cowan. Guy Maryville Classical 

Damiano, Carl Eugene Fairmont, W. Va. .. .General 

, Robert Taylor Springfield General 

I )hko , Arthur Wallace Sevierville Classical 

Dickey, Lena Kate Sevierville Teachers 

i taRTON, BESSIE Foster North Chattanooga . . Classical 

I )yer, Allen Rankin Louisville Classical 

Ewjs, Elizabeth Maryville Classical 

EnloE, Herbert CarlylE Judson, N. C General 

Fisher, Taylor Dayton, R. D. 1 General 

Foster, AleEn Huntsville Classical 

Foster, Cordelia Huntsville General 

Frazier, Annie LEE Centerville Classical 

Freeman Nan Zirconia, N. C Classical 

Garner, James Owen Mint Classical 

Gernt, Walter Allardt General 

[ Giles, James Irvin Cosby Classical 

GhlESpy, George Benton Walland Classical 

Grayson, Gladys Irene Whitwell General 

: Greene, Arthur Wade Walland General 

I GriEfiTTS, Sallie Jane Mint General 

Haddox, Troy Mae Knoxville, R. D. 3. . . Classical 

Hakanson, Dorothy Anna Mobile, Ala Teachers 

Hakanson, Robert AlEred Mobile, Ala Teachers 

Hale, DonniE Ella Maryville General 

Hancock, William Sterling Springfield General 

Harm an, Louis Elmore Russellville, O Classical 

' Harris, Alexander Webb Springfield General 

Harris, Emma Maud Bokhoma, Okla Classical 

Harris, Erector FrEd Corryton Classical 

Hkadrick, Ida Jane Sevierville, R. D. 7 . .Teachers 

I Ienry, Edna Lillian Maryville Classical 

| Henry, NellE Marie Rockf ord General 

Henry, ZeniE Maryville, R. D. 5. . .Classical 

Hensley, Robert Floyd Kitty ton General 

HENSLEY, William Ferris Kittyton Classical 

Hernandez, Pedro Jose Havana. Cuba Classical 

i HERSHEY, Fay Broady Maryville General 

HilEman, DELMER Paul Mooresburg Classical 



88 



MARYVILLB COLLBGli 



Hodges, Otis Boyds Creek General 

Holt, Olive Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 1 . . . Teachers 

Horner, Myrtle IsabellE Maryville, R. D. 3 . . . General 

Huffstettler, Myrtle AlliE Maryville General 

Huffstettler, Verni Princeton... Maryville, R. D. 7. . .Classical 

HuskEy, Isaac Umon Sevierville, R. D. 16. Classical 

Jackson, Eula Marion. Maryville Classical 

Jarred Donna Kathleen Jarrolds Valley, W. V a . .Classical 

Kelso, Victor George Walla Walla, Wash . . Classical 

Kesterson, John Washington. . .Clinton Classical 

King, Fred Harvey Springfield, R. D. 6. . General 

Lamon, David Hamilton Maryville Classical 

Lansing, Dorothy StratTon Grandview Classical 

Lawson, Melvin Early Sevierville, 'R. D. 7. . General 

Legg, John Wallace Straw Plains Classical 

Lent, Elizabeth Sorrento, Fla Teachers 

LEQUIRE, Mary Ella Maryville, R. D. 6. . . General 

Lowry, Mae Florine Kizer, R. D. 1 General 

McCalliE, Hugh V Sweetwater General 

McCurry, Addie Mae Mosheim, R. D. 2. . . . Classical 

McDonald, John Raymond Rogersville General 

McGinlEy, Raymond Cuthbert. .Independence, Mo... .Classical 
McMahon, Albert Ernest S a mull. .Birkenhead, England. .Classical 

McNeill y, Nora Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Classical 

McNuTT, Mary Lawson Maryville Classical 

Magill, Charles Rankin Maryville, R. D. 6. . .General 

MalonE, Robert Beal Alexandria Classical 

Martin, Melissa Gertrude Brodhead, Ky General 

Mervine, Florence Alice Canastota, N. Y Classical 

Meyers, Margaret Virginia Memphis General 

Mills, Laney Ray Medina General 

Mills, Thomas Hunter Medina General 

Mitchell, Effie Johnsonville, R. D. 1. General 

Mitchell, Ethll Johnsonville, R. D. 1. General 

Mooney, Lorna Gladys Knoxville General 

Mullineaux, KatherinE Virginia. .Gallipolis, O Classical 

Murphy, Daisy Lucile Sevierville General 

Oliver, James Riley Judson, N. C Teachers 

Panther, Ernest Murphy, N. C Classical 

Parker, Ruth Elizabeth Nashville General 

PLEry, James Harvey Maryville, R. D. 8. . . Classical 

Price, Albert Marvin Vanceburg, Ky Classical 

Purceel, Jonathan McClure. . . . Palatka, Fla Classical 



MARYV1LLU COLLLiGli so 



Quinn, Jesse; Clay Lancing General 

Raueston, Neil Andrew Maryville Classical 

RobbinS, Margaret Mariah Mint General 

Rom x son, Marvin Curtis Weaverville, N. C. ...Classical 

Robinson, William Arthur Jupiter, N. C Classical 

Rogers, Agnes Beeee Mooresburg Classical 

ROGERS, Jennie Mae Mooresburg Classical 

Rogers, Robert Hazen Washington, D. C. ... General 

Ross, Lanty Marion Mint Classical 

Rowan, Margaret Beanche Maryville Classical 

RussEEE, NEEEiE Margaret Rockford Classical 

Ryan, Mayme Ewald Marion, Va General 

Scarborough, Mary Bessie Maryville Classical 

SenTEEEE, Henry LEE Greeneville, R. D. 8. .General 

Simpson, Frank Magiee Philadelphia General 

Seack, John Dayton Bakersfield, Cal Classical 

Smith, Ada Frances . . Morristown, R. D. 7. Classical 

Smith, Horace Judson Apison Classical 

Smith, Paue Wieeiam Lafollette General 

Stephens, Noble Henderson Yamacraw, Ky General 

Stinnett, LieliE Townsend Classical 

Stinnett, Sarah Ann Townsend Classical 

Sutherland, Wieheemina Jean... Sorrento, Fla Classical 

Tedford, Hugh Craig Maryville Classical 

Tipton, Minnie Mae Trundles X Roads, R. D. 3. .Classical 

Tucker, Edgar Moses Harrisburg, R. D. 4, N. C. .Classical 

Tweed, Sherman White Rock, N. C. ...General 

Vance, Martha Clementine Memphis Classical 

Walker, Lawrence L Maryville, R. D. 6. . .Classical 

Walker, Wager fcoscoE Norma Classical 

Warlick, William Wade Talking Rock, Ga General 

Waters, James Martin Walland Classical 

Webb, Dixie LEE Sevierville, R. D. 8 . . Classical 

WeisbeckEr, Homer George Fort Wayne, Ind Classical 

Weithoee, Valford Ellsworth . .Columbus, Ind Classical 

Whetsell, Louisa Pearl Maryville, R. D. 5. . . Classical 

White, Aesop Maryville, R. D. 6. . . General 

White, Martha Irene Powder Springs Classical 

Williams, Eugene Monroe Maryville Classical 

Williams, James Craweord Cosby, R. D. 3 Classical 

Williams, Louis Gray Hopkins ville, Ky General 

York, Silas Cordell Classical 



90 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



PREPARATORY SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Bryan, HELEN Elizabeth Maryville Music 

Carson, Eiea Carter Brodhead, Ky Home Economics 

Gates, Charlotte Wiekinson Maryville Art 

Catlett, Mae Maryville Expression 

Chandler, Mary Louise East Northfield, Mass. Bible Training 

CoilE, Mary Emma Jefferson City, R. D. 1. Music 

Goddard, MyrTeE Maryville Music 

Haddox, Geadys Virginia Knoxville, R. D. 3. . . Music 

Hale, Sue LEE Maryville Music 

James, Susan Caddie Maryville, R. D. 6. . . Music 

McReynoeds, Jessie Maude Maryville Music 

Martin, Aeta Willard Maryville Music 

Scarborough, Wieeiam Leinart... Maryville Art 

Slack, Ethel Lummie Bakersfield, Cal Home Economics 

SuLLiNGER, Constance Parham . . Maryville Music 

Tedford, Lennis LuctlE Maryville Music 

Tedford, Mary Pearl Maryville Home Economics 

Tipton, Nellie Verna Maryville, R. D. 1. . . Music 



SUB-PREPARATORY CLASS 

Adams, Mell Townsend, R. D. 1 

Adams, Roy Edgar Townsend, R. D. 1 ; 

Adkins, Tivis Gumf ork 

Alexander, Carrie Lou Greenback, R. D. 1 : 

Anderson, Mary Rhea Maryville - 

Anderson, Mildred McElwEE Rockford j 

Anderson, William Harris Maryville 

Anderson, William Reagon Mint 

BadGETT, Alma Rockford 

B arr, Jennie Winona Maryville 

Bassee, Mary Elizabeth Maryville 

Beaty, Holland Conasauga 

Boring, Laura Maria Rasar 

Brown, Clay Browns 

Brown, Dora v Tampa 

Brown, Lora Tampa 

Buchanan, Grace Jane Rasar 

BurchfiELD, John Thomas Maryville, R. D. 6 

BurchfiEld, Luther Daniel Maryville, R. D. 7 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB at 



BURCHFIEED, William Maryville, R. I). 6 

Caldwell, Edward Alexander Maryvillc 

CaM)WEUo Ruth Odessa Louisville, R. D. 2 

C mi:s, Charles Merritt Maryville 

Chandler, Margaret McElwee Maryville 

CfcABOUGH, BeanchE Sevierville, R. D. 3 

Curk, Barbara Blount Maryville 

CURK, LiEUAN Marie Maryville 

Coulter, Fred John Walland 

CROEEY, Roxie Susie Williamsburg, Ky. 

Crye, Bessie Wellsville 

Curtis, FlEda Lee Meadow 

Davis, James Alfred Maryville 

Davis, James GeathEr Maryville, R. D. 5 

Duneap, Susie Hearon '. Eriendsville 

EhrhardT, Nevah Rhea Rochester, N. Y. 

Everett, TrESSie Maryville, R. D. 4 

Ezell, Fred Gayeor Judson, N. C. 

Farmer, Nathan. .. Walland 

Faubian, Mary Wood Maryville, R. D. 8 

Ferguson, Rosa Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 8 

Ford, HobarT Browns 

Ford, Lena Ethee Browns 

Franks, Vaughna Sarah Maryville 

French, Bessie Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 8 

French, Helen Margaret Louisville, R. D. 1 

French, Vaughtie McReynolds Louisville, R. D. 1 

Gamble, Ethel Gertrude Trundles X Roads 

Gamble, Max Marion Maryville, R. D. 4 

Garner, Albert Ross Mint 

Gillespie, Helen Cowan Walland 

Goddard, HELEN Maryville 

Green, John Tyler Mooresburg 

Gregory, Walter Abe Cades Cove 

Gregory, William Elmer Oneida 

Griffith, Minnie Belle Tampa 

Griffitts, Gaynell Maryville 

Griffitts, Margaret Ellen Mint 

Hamill, Daniei Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Harrison, Beatrice Martha Maryville 

Harrison, Erastus Maryville 

Harrison, Neva Maryville 

Harrison, Sarah Elizabeth ' Maryville 



92 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Harrison, Wallace Maryvillei 

Hatcher Daisy Marie: Asheville, N. C 

Hays, Raymond Sherwood Russellville 

Henry, Betty Jane Cosby, R. D. l 

Henry, George Tubman Cosby, R. D. l 

Howard, Lilian Anne Mint, R. D. l 1 

Hunt, Beuna Mae Greenback, R. D. 

Hunter, Martha Quindora Dorothy, W. Va 

Hutchins, LuciouS Eldridge Rockf ord 

Irwin, Ernest Avery Maryvillei 

Johnson, Anus Katherine Powder Springs 

Johnson, Herman Maryvillc 

Jones, Eeizabeth Jellico 

Jones, Eric Odell Apison 

Kennedy, Rena Belle Maryville, R. D. S 

Key, John Coeumbus Newton Greenback 

Kidd, Ruby Temperance Binfield, R. D. 1 

King, Bela Donald Springfield, R. D. 7 

Keuttz, Fred Wiuiam Salisbury, N. C. 

Lambdin, Hazel Kate Powder Springs \ 

Lambert, Annis Algia Maryville 1 

Lawson, Enoea Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 5 

LEQuirE, Lucy Jane ' Maryville, 'R. D. r>. 

Lewis, Horace Kittyton 

LiTTERER, Mary Evans Maryville 

Lowe, James Franklin Knoxville ' 

McCueeoch, EemEr Linly Mint , 

McCueeoch, Thomas Leonard Maryville 

McGuirE, Paue Bohanon Pryorsburg, Ky. 

McKeedEr, Mayme Matilda McKelder 

McNeieey, EthEE Maniea Maryville, R. D. 5 \ 

McNutt, Robert LylE Maryville 

Marcum, Feorence Oneida ; 

Marcum, Frona Oneida 

MaTkins, EeeEn BellE Black Mountain, N. C. 

May, Montgomery Maryville 

M'Galliard, Elizabeth Haddon Bridgeton, N. J. 

Mieeigan, Charles Lincoln Vonore 

Mitchell, Jasper Maryville, R. D. 8 

Myers, Laura Estella Cades Cove, R. D. 1 

Myers, Luther Johnson Maryville, R. D. 6 

Newcom, Homer Crockett Sevierville, R. D. 18 

O'Connor, Charts Ross Maryville 



MARYVILLB COLLliGH <J3 



I 'ate, VERA Mau 1V1 ary villc 

I DOCTOR, George Mary villc 

RSagon, Stella Dicie Binfield, R. D. 1 

Robbins, Grace Emma LEE Mint 

Ross, TenniE Mint 

Rowan, James Victor Maryville 

RUSSET Myrtle Beatrice Maryville, R. D. 5 

RUSSELL, Nancy AieEEn Rockford 

Seaton, Rebecca Alene Maryville 

Sherrod, Reva LEE Louisville 

S eatery, Mary Meeinda Trundles X Roads 

Stinnett, Miedred Townsend 

Taylor, Horace Edgar Maryville 

Taylor, Jessie Peare Mint 

Terry, Toebert Sidney Elva 

Thomas, DilliE Oneida 

Thurman, Victor Aeonzo Sevierville 

Tipton, CeEmmiE Enoea Maryville 

Tipton, DaniEE CeaudiuS Maryville 

Tipton, James Myers Trundles X Roads 

Toomey, Fred BarThell Maryville 

Turner, Allen Bybee, R. D. 1 

Turner, John Care Bybee, R. D. 1 

WaekER, Hazee Blanche Maryville 

Walker, Jessie Alice Townsend 

Walker, Joe Leslie Maryville, "R. D. 3 

Walker, VERTiE Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 6 

Wallace, Thomas Howard Maryville 

Waller, Jane Knox Maryville 

Wear, Ina Geneva Sevierville, R. D. 3 

Webb, Georgia Ella Townsend 

Webster, Will Arthur Maryville 

Williams, Richard Hobart Maryville 

Yearout, David Jones Maryville 

YearouT, Howard EarlEy Maryville, R. D. 2 

Yearout, Pearl Mae Maryville, R. D. 2 

York, Dan Cordell 



94 



MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



Classification by Departments 

College Department 235 

Preparatory Department 392 

Sub-Preparatory 142 

Total ' 769 



Classification by States 



Alabama 21 

Arkansas 1 

California 3 

Colorado 1 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 11 

Georgia 9 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 6 

Indiana 10 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 1 

Kentucky 22 

Maine 1 

Maryland ' 1 

Massachusetts 4 

Michigan ,. 1 

Mississippi 2 

Missouri 6 

New Jersey 5 

New Mexico 1 



New York 10' 

North Carolina 40 



Ohio 



13 



540 
4 ; 

9, 



Oklahoma 12} 

Pennsylvania 11 

Rhode Island 1 

South Carolina 3 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Philippine Islands 

Brazil 

China 

Cuba 

England 

Moravia 

Spain 

Syria 



Total number of students 

Total number of States and countries, 



769 



MARYVIllB COLLHCn 95 



CALENDAR FOR 1914-1915 



FALL TERM 

1914. 

Sept. 8, Fall Term begins Tuesday 

Nov. 26, Thanksgiving Thursday 

Dec. 15, 16, 17, Examinations Tuesday-Thursday 

Dec. 17, Fall Term ends Thursday 



WINTER TERM 

Dec. 29, Winter Term begins Tuesday 

1915. 

Jan. 13, Meeting of the Directors, 10 a. m Wednesday 

Mar. 17, 18, 19, Examinations .Wednesday-Friday 

Mar. 19, Winter Term ends : • • • • Friday 



SPRING TERM 

Mar. 23, Spring Term begins Tuesday 

May 30, Baccalaureate Sermon Sabbath 

May 30, Address before the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A Sabbath 

May 31, June 1, 2, Examinations Monday- Wednesday 

June 2, Class Day Exercises, 7 :30 p. m Wednesday 

June 3, Meeting of Directors, 8 :30 a. m Thursday 

June 3, Commencement, 10 a. m Thursday 

June 3, Annual Alumni Dinner, 12 m Thursday 

June 3, Social Reunion, 8 p. m Thursday 



96 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



INDEX 



Administrative Rules 

Admission to College Depart- 
ment 

Admission to Preparatory De- 
partment 

Alumni Association 

Art, Department of 

Athletic Association 

Bequests and Devises 

Bible Training Department . . 

Biology 22, 

Board, Rates for 

Bookkeeping ... . 

Buildings 

Calendar for 19T4-1915 

Certificates 9, 12, 35, 42, 46, 

Chemistry 

College Courses, Synopsis of. . 

Committees and Officers .... 

Contests, Intercollegiate . 

Cooperative Club 

Credits. ... 10, 12, 32, 35, 

Degree Offered 

Degrees Conferred in 1913 . . 

Directors, Board of 

Dormitories . 55, 57, 

Education 

Endowment 

English Bible 30, 41, 

English Language and Liter- 
ature 23-25, 

Entrance Requirements 

Examinations 9, 

Expenses 

Expression, Department of . 

Faculty 

French 

Geology and Mineralogy 

German 28, 

Graduation, Requirements for 

Greek ' . 



PAGE 

68-70 



35 
66 

5i 

65 

74 

42-45 

23,40 

60-62 

40 

55-58 

95 

50,51 

19-21 

13 
3,7,8 

68 

60 
37,46 

11 
66, 67 
2 
62-64 
19, 33 
52-54 
42-44 

37,38 
9, 10 

35, 69 
60-64 

5i 
4-6 

29, 39 
21 

29, 39 
11, 37 
27, 28 



page; 

Grounds and Buildings 55-58 

Groups of Studies ]2 

Hebrew i 

History of the College 52-54 

History, Department of. ...23, 39, 40 
Home Economics Department. 46-49 

Honors, Graduation 67 

Hospital 57, 68 

Latin 25, 26, 38, 39 

Laundry . „ 64 1 

Libraries. 58-60 

Literary Societies 64 

Location of the College 54 

.. 68 

■■19,37' 
. . 68 

50 

■73, 74;! 

. . 64-66' 

32. 

14' 

.. 6 7 ; 

. 21, 40, 

.16, 17' 



Lyceum Course 

Mathematics .... 

Medical Attention 

Music, Department of 

Needs .... 

Organizations, Student 

Pedagogy 

Philosophy 

Physical Culture . 

Physics 

Political Science 



Preparatory Courses, Synopsis . 36 
Preparatory Department . . . 35-41 ' 

Psychology 14, 15 

Publications, College ... 73' 

Railway Connections 54' 

Rooms ... . 62-64 

Rules 68-70. 

Scholarship Funds 71 , 72 

Self-help 70, 71 

Social Science 17-19 

Spanish 30 

Special Students 1 1 

Students, Register of 75-93 

Teachers' Department 31-34 

Tuition 61 

Y. M. C. A 65 

Y. W. C. A 65 



rtf. 



Vlaryville College 
=— Bulletin — - 



Vol. XIV MAY, 1915 No. 1 

TH E l i Bttt av 

INC LiDnAnt 

OF THE 

mmn it u\*m 

CONTENTS 

Officers and Faculty . . . .. . . 3 

The Courses of Study . . . . . . . 15 

History and General Information ..... 55 

Expenses ........ 63 

Register of Students for 1914-1915 79 

Calendar for 1915-1916 . .... 94 

Index ...'..'...«.'•■ 95 



Published four times a year by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 

Entered May 24, 1904, at Maryville, Term., as second-class matter, under Act of 
Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Maryville College 
Bulletin 

ANNUAL CATALOG NUMBER 

For the Year 1914-1915 




Published by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CLASS OF 1915 

Hon. William Leonidas Brown Philadelphia 

Rev. Newton Wadsworth Cadwell, D.D Atlantic City, N. J. 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 1 

Rev. John Baxter Creswell, B.A Bearden 

Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxville 

Rev. Calvin Alexander Duncan, D.D Harriman 

Rev. John Samuel Eakin, B.A Greeneville 

Rev. Woodward Edmund Finley, D.D Marshall, N. C.' 

Samuel O'Grady Houston, B.A Knoxville 

Humphrey Gray Hutchison, M.D Vonore 

John Riley Lowry, B.S Knoxville 

Colonel John Beaman Minnis Knoxville 

CLASS OF 1916 

Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, B.A '. Maryville 

James Addison Anderson, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 1 

Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, M.A Maryville 

Hon. John Calvin Crawford, B.A., LL.B Maryville 

Judge Jesse Seymour L'Amoreaux New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Thomas Judson Miles, M.A Knoxville, R. D. 10 

Fred Lowry Proffitt, B.A Maryville 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Washington College 

Governor John Powel Smith National Soldiers' Home 

Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Princeton, N. J. 

James Martin Trimble, Esq Chattanooga 

Rev. David Gourley Wylie, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

CLASS OF 1917 

*Rev. Nathan Bachman, D.D Sweetwater 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Jonesboro 

Rev. Henry Seymour Butler, D.D Huntsville 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D .... Chattanooga 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A .' Maryville 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxville 

|Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Alexander Russell McBath, Esq Knoxville, R. D. 3 

Hon. William Anderson McTeer .Maryville 

William Edwin Minnis, Esq - New Market 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingston 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D Maryville 



* Died, December 3, 1914. 
f Died, January 6, 1915. 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



Beers of the Board of Directors: 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D., Chairman; Fred Lowry Prof- 
fitt, Recorder and Treasurer. 

►mmittees of the Board of Directors: 

Executive: Hon. William Anderson McTeer, Chairman; Hon. 
Thomas Nelson Brown, Secretary; and Rev. William Robert 
Dawson, D.D., Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, and Hon. 
Moses Houston Gamble. 

Professors and Teachers: Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D., 
Chairman; Dean Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; and Hon. 
William Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, 
President Samuel Tyndale Wilson, and Treasurer Fred 
Lowry Proffitt. 

Hospital: President Samuel Tyndale Wilson, Hon. John Cal- 
vin Crawford, Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, Mrs. Martha 
A. Lamar, and Professor Francis Mitchell McClenahan. 

rnodical Examiners for 1915: 

Revs. Thomas Alfred Cosgrove and Oscar Everett Gardner, 
D. D., and Mr. C. Victor Brown. 

►mmittees of the Faculty: 

i Entrance.- Professors Gillingham and Ellis. 
Advanced Standing: President Wilson and Dean Barnes. 
^Scholarships : Miss Henry, President Wilson, and Professor 

Gillingham. 
Student Publications and Programs, and the Lyceum: Professor 

Bassett. 
Intercollegiate Literary Contests: Professors Calhoun and 

Knapp. 

Religious Activities: Professors Gillingham and Knapp. 
I The Lamar Library : Dean Barnes. 
\The Loan Library: Professor Bassett. 
! Athletics : President Wilson and Professor McClenahan. 
I The Cooperative Boarding Club ; President Wilson. 
I Care of Buildings and Grounds: Professor McClenahan. 
I College Extension: Professor Ellis and Dean Barnes. 

Recommendations: Dean Barnes. 
I; The Catalog: Professor Gillingham. 
I Rhodes Scholarship: Dean Barnes. 



FACULTY 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and Literature, 
and of the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, Ph.D., 
Dean, and Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

* PHOEBUS WOOD LYON, Ph.D., 
Professor of Logic and Rhetoric. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 

Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, and Head of the Bible 

Training Department. 

FRANCIS MITCHELL McCLENAHAN, M.A., 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

ARTHUR WALLACE CALHOUN, M.A., 
Professor of Social Science and Greek. 

GEORGE ALAN KNAPP, M.A., 
Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, M.A., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A., 
Professor of Biology. 

JOHN WESLEY PERKINS, M.A., 

Professor of German and French. 



* Died, November 13, 1914. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

MAYME REBECCA MAXEY, B.A., 

Assistant in Biology. 

HORACE WALTON THRELKELD, 

Student Assistant in the Psychology Laboratory. 

MARK HOPKINS BARNES, 
CHAUNCEY ELBERT CONRAD, 

FRANK MOORE CROSS, 
WILLIAM HENRY PLEASANTS, 

Student Assistants in the Chemistry Laboratories. 

MARIE ELISE KARNES, 
Student Assistant in the Biology Laboratories. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

HORACE LEE ELLIS, M.A., 

Principal, and Professor of Education. 

MARGARET ELIZA HENRY, B.A., 

English. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A., 
Mathematics. 

*MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, M.A., 
English and Bible. 

ALICE ISABELLA CLEMENS, B.A., 

English. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, B.A., 

Latin. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 

History. 

ALMIRA ELIZABETH JEWELL, B.A., 

Latin. 



Absent on leave. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

MME. ADELE MARIE DENNEE 

(Brevet Superieur, The Sorbonne) 

German and French. 

ANNA ETHEL FANSON, B.A., 
English and Latin. 

MABEL BROADY, B.A., 

English. 

EVA ALEXANDER, B.A., 
English and Bible. 

Z. JAY STANLEY, B.A., 

History. 

MARGARET CECELIA PEELER, Ph.B. 

History. 

THOMAS HARVEL MITCHELL, 

Bookkeeping. 

JOHN VANT STEPHENS, Jr., 
LILY ELMA MITCHELL, 

Student Assistants in History. 

JOSEPH CHARLES WALKER, 
WILLIAM ARMSTRONG POWEL, 

Student Assistants in Sciences. 

JESSIE BELLE FRANKS, 

Student Assistant in Algebra. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

HELENA MABEL RYLAND, B.A., B.S., 
Head of the Home Economics Department. 

MAE DARTHULA SMITH, 
BERTHA MAE CAMPBELL, 

Student Assistants in Home Economics. 

BLAINE IRVING LEWIS, 

Tailoring. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

LAURA BELLE HALE, 
Piano and Harmony, and Head of the Music Department. 

ZANNA STAATER, 
Voice. 

MARY BARNETT BOGGS, 

Piano. 

MARY KATE RANKIN, B.A., 
Piano. 

EDNA ELIZABETH DAWSON, 
Piano. 

ANNA BELLE SMITH, 
Painting and Drawing. 

MRS. NITA ECKLES WEST, B.A., B.O., 

Expression. 

ISABEL MARGARET MacLACHLAN, 

Nurse. 

LESTER EVERETT BOND, 

Z. JAY STANLEY, B.A., 

Physical Directors. 

NELLIE MAE WILSON, 

Women's Physical Director. 



OTHER OFFICERS 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, 

Treasurer. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 

Assistant Registrar. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, 
Manager of the Loan Library. 

MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Dean of Women and Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

SARAH JANE GAMBLE, 
Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODGRASS, 
Librarian. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 

Proctor of the Grounds. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 
Proctor of Carnegie and Memorial Halls. 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 

Secretary to the Scholarship Committee. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 
Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

LULA GRAHAM DARBY, 

LURA JANE LYLE, 

Assistant Managers of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

FRANK KEITH POSTLETHWAITE, 

Assistant Librarian. 

GILBERT OSCAR ROBINSON, 

Assistant in the Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER, 
Janitor. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 
THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Admission to the Freshman Class is by written examination in 
the subjects given under Statement of , Entrance Requirements or 
by officially certified statements showing in detail all work for which 
entrance credit is asked. Candidates are expected to be at least 
sixteen years of age and of good moral character. They should send 
their credentials to the Committee on Entrance at as early a date as 
possible. Those that delay filing an application for admission until 
the opening of the term will be given only provisional classification, 
pending a meeting of the Committee on Entrance The regular 
application blank of the College, a copy of which will be mailed by 
the Registrar upon request, provides for the necessary testimonials 
of character, detailed statement of subjects completed and certificates 
of honorable dismissal. Entrance credit and classification granted 
on certificates are conditional, and will be cancelled if the student is 
found to be deficient. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is 
the equivalent of five forty-five-minutes recitation periods a week 
during a full academic year, in subjects above the eighth grade 
of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen 
units are required, as specified below: 

1 ENGLISH.— Three units required; four may be offered. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and 

syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write cor- 

rectly and clearly; a knowledge of the principles 
of punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, 
and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature rec- 

ommended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance 
Requirements in English. For the texts recom- 
mended for study and practice and for reading, see 
the lists scheduled for the Preparatory Depart- 
ment, page 40. 



10 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Pour units re- 
quired. 

Latin. — Four units may be offered. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Caesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, ^Eneid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology,, 

prosody. 

Greek. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, 

Anabasis, Book -i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv; Homer, Iliad, Books 

i-iii. Composition, mythology, prosody. 
German. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and 

composition. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, 

with reproduction and composition. 
French. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of 

about five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one 

thousand pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units required; three and one-half 

may be offered. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infin- 

ity, ratio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, 
series, binomial and exponential theorems, indeter- 
minate coefficients, and equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original 

demonstrations. 

(d) Solid Geometry. One-half unit. may be offered. 

4. NATURAL SCIENCES.— Two units required. 

5. ELECTIVE.— Three units. Any three units of standard 
high-school work that may be accepted by the Committee on En- 
trance. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITIONS 

A candidate may be admitted with conditions if those conditions 
do not exceed two units. Not more than one condition will be al- 
lowed in mathematics and none in English. All entrance conditions 
must be absolved before admission to the Sophomore Class. 

Beginning September, 1916,; only one unit entrance condition 
will be allowed. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 11 

ENTRANCE WITH ADVANCE CREDIT 

Admission with credit for college courses or advanced standing 
will be granted only upon the presentation of certificates showing 
that the candidate, having previously had fifteen units of preparatory 
work, has satisfactorily completed the college studies, or their 
equivalent, for Which credit is asked. Candidates will not be admit- 
ted to the graduating class for less than one full year's residence 

work. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, 
not matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Pre- 
paratory Department. 

Irregular Collegiate Students.— Candidates offering for en- 
trance a sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in the 
Freshman Class, but deficient in more than two of the specified units 
required by this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee 
on Entrance, be admitted as irregular collegiate students until they 
have absolved their conditions and attained full standing in a regular 
college class. Students of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregu- 
l lar or partial course and not seeking a degree may be allowed to 
select such studies as they show themselves qualified to pursue. 

Special Students.— Students desiring to study only music, ex- 
: pression, or art, and those seeking only the courses in the Bible 
1 Training Department, are classified under their respective depart- 
' ments. They have all the privileges offered to any students, such 
\ as the advantages of the libraries, the literary societies, the dormi- 
tories, and the boarding club. Young women rooming in the college 
dormitories and desiring chiefly music, expression, or art, are re- 
quired to take a sufficient number of literary courses to make up, 
together with their work in the departments mentioned, fifteen reci- 
tation hours a week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. To attain the degree a minimum of thirty-six 
courses must be completed. A "course" is a study pursued for five 
one-hour recitation periods a week throughout one term. A term 
is one-third of the scholastic year, and three courses in any subject 
constitute, therefore, a year's work in that subject. All courses 
recite five hours a week. Laboratory courses in the natural sciences 
require additional hours, as indicated in the description of the 
courses. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four 
full years of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the 



12 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

minimum amount required of all students. Since all courses recite 
five hours a week, fifteen hours a week is the normal amount of 
work expected of each student. A student is permitted to take four 
courses a term (twenty hours a week) if his average grade in the 
subjects pursued during the preceding term was not less than ninety 
per cent. 

Twenty-six of the thirty-six courses are required of candidates 
for the Bachelor's degree in all groups, and are distributed as 
follows : 

English, 6 courses. Science, 4 courses. 

Other Languages, 8 courses. Philosophy, 1 course. 

Mathematics, 1 course. Psychology, 1 course. 

Bible, 5 courses. 

In addition to these twenty-six courses, ten courses must be 
elected from the following groups in order to make up the total 
number of thirty-six required for graduation: 

1. Classical. 6. English Literature and History. 

2. Modern Languages. 7. Psychology and Philosophy. 

3. Science. 8. Social Science. 

4. Mathematics. 9. General. 

5. Education. 



The special requirements for the respective groups are as fol- 
lows: In the Classical Group, twelve language courses shall be 
taken, and may be arranged in one of the following combinations: 
(a) Latin six and Greek (or German) six; (b) Latin nine and Greek 
(or German or French) three; (c) Greek nine and Latin (or Ger- j 
man or French) three. In the Modern Languages Group, twelve 
courses in modern languages (or eleven, in case Spanish is elected) 
shall be taken. In the Science Group, besides the four required 
science courses, seven additional courses, either of chemistry or of 
biology, shall be taken and at least two years of German or French. 
In the Mathematics Group, eight courses in mathematics shall be 
taken. In the Education, English Literature and History, and 
Psychology and Philosophy Groups, all the courses offered in the 
respective groups shall be taken. In the Social Science Group, eight 
courses selected from the departments of economics, sociology, and 
political science shall be taken. 

Students that meet all the requirements for graduation, but do 
not meet the requirements of any of the afore-mentioned groups 
shall be graduated in the General Group. The name of the group 
in Which a student graduates will be indicated on the diploma. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 13 

CERTIFICATES OF CREDIT 

Graduates and undergraduates that have lef t college in good 
standing may, if they so desire, receive an official statement of their 
redfts upon application to the Registrar. No charge is made for 
* s c 'rtmcate when issued in the form adopted by the College. For 
the filling out of special blanks, prepayment of one dollar for each 
blank in required. Duplicates of certificates may be had by paying 
for the clerical expense involved. 



SYNOPSIS OF COLLEGE COURSES 


. 


Freshman Year 
English 


Fall 

*2 

1 

1 

1 
*1 

1 

1 
Jl 


Winter 
*2 

4 

2 

2 

2 
*2, 10 

2 

1 

2 

2 


Spring 
*3 

3 

3 

3,11 

2 

3 


Mathematics 


Latin 


Greek... 


German 


Chemistry.. 


Psychology 


History 


Education 


Bible 


Sophomore Year 
English... 


*1 

8 
3, 11 

4 

4 
12 

1 
tM 

1 

3 

14 


5 
6 
4, 12 
5 
5 

2 

12 

3 

2 or 4 

7 
4 

5 


6 
7 
5 
11 
6 


Latin.. 


Greek. 


German 


Chemistry.. 


French 


3 

t4 

3 or 5 
3 
5 

6 

■ i 


Biology 


Psychology 

Social Science 


History 

Education 
Bible 


■ 


Junior Year 


4 

6 
6 

7 
4 

fl 

*2 

6 

4 

J7 


11 

9 

7 

7 
8 or 12 

5 

5 
t2 

1 

7 or 9 

5 

8 


_ i 

11 or 12 ] 
8 H 
8, 9, or 10 
9 or 13, 10 
6 
6, 7, or 8 ' 
3 

• 2 


Mathematics...... 


Latin 


Greek 


German 


Chemistry 

Biology.. 

Physics... 

Philosophy... 


Social Science 


8 or 10 


History 

Education 

Bible 


6 
6 
9 



Senior Year 

English 


7 

1 
1 
1 

7 

* 4 
3, 4, 5, 8 
J10 or 11 


8 

2 
2 
2 
8 
9 
6 
13 
6 


9 10 


Mathematics. 

Latin... _ 


13 
10 


Spanish... 




Hebrew 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Chemistry 

Biology... 

Psychology 

Philosophy 

Political Science 


3 

9 

10 

5, 7 or 8 

14 

7 


Education. 

Bible ; 


7, 8 



*Required in all groups leading to a degree. 

+Two courses are required: either Biology 1 and 2; 3 and 4; or 1 and 3; or Physics 1 and 

^Required Bible may be taken in any term, but Seniors take Philosophy 3 and 4. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 15 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: The courses in each department are numbered con- 
secutively, beginning with 1. The omission of a number indicates 
that a course has been discontinued. New courses receive new num- 
bers and are inserted in the Synopsis and in the description of 
courses in the curriculum year to which they belong. 

PHILOSOPHY 

President Wilson, Dean Barnes, and Professor Gillingham 
2 Logic. Hill's Jevons' Logic, studied in connection with ques- 
tions and exercises prepared for the class. The practical work given 
in the exercises appended in the text-book is required, and also much 
original work in Induction connected with every-day questions, the 
aim being to make the study of practical service in such reasoning 
as will be met by the student in his subsequent experiences in life. 
Junior year, fall term.— President Wilson. 

3. The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief. Dr. Fisher's 
work is made the basis of classroom study and recitation. The prin- 
cipal theistic and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the 
main historical and philosophical arguments for belief in the Chris- 
tian religion are considered. Senior year, winter term.— Professor 
Gillingham. 

4. Ethics. The leading conceptions of moral theory are ap- 
proached by the historical method. The student is led to see that 
moral problems are real problems, which are solved best by reflective 
thought that is guided by Christian ideals. The various types of 
ethical theory are discussed. Special emphasis is placed upon the 
ethics of social organizations: the state, the economic life, and the 
family. The text of Dewey and Tufts is placed in the hands of the 
students, and is supplemented by the works of Sidgwick, Green, Mar- 
tineau, and Spencer. Prerequisite, Psychology 1 or 4. Senior year, 
spring term. — Dean Barnes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dean Barnes 

1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for stu- 
dents taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supple- 
mented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials 
of Psychology is used as a text-book. This course is identical with 
Education 1. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psy- 
i chological problems which have reference to education; theory of 

recapitulation, correlations between mind and body, instinct, memory, 



16 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

imagination, apperception, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, 
and volition. The text-book used is Bolton's Principles of Educa- 
tion, supplemented by lectures. This course is identical with Edu- 
cation 2. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psy- 
chological growth of children and youth. This course is developed 
with special reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and 
mental growth as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From 
this point of view, attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, 
and will are discussed. The course is designed to show the appli- 
cation of psychological laws and principles to educational theory and 
practice. This course is identical with Education 4. Sophomore year, 
winter term. 

4. Advanced General Psychology. A study of the psycho-phys- 
ical organism by means of the Auzoux models, sensation, habit, at- 
tention, perception, memory, imagination, reasoning, emotions, and 
volition. Typical experiments. Lectures, readings, discussions, and , 
reports. Senior year, fall term. 

5. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching 
and management in the high school and upper grammar grades: a 
study of the group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, 
competition, rivalry, sex, dress, social organization, with special ref- 
erence to the meaning of these facts in their application in the or- 4 
ganization of the school. This course is identical with Education 8. 
Prerequisites, Psychology 1, 2, and 3. Senior year, spring term. 

6. Social Psychology. A study of group consciousness and 
social origins. Relation of the psychic life of the group to the J 
group activities. Instruction and discipline of children by the par- ; 
ents and by the group. Comparison of the mental traits of different / 
races and social classes. Psychology of the crowd, the mores, and 
folkways. Open to Seniors and to Juniors who have had Psychology j 
1, 2, 3, and 4. Senior year, winter term. 

7. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experi- 
ments in acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titch- 
ener's Experimental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by 
the works of Kiilpe, Sanford, Judd, and Myer. Senior year, spring 
term. 

8. Experimental Psychology. This course is a continuation of 
Course 7. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reaction 
experiment by the use of the Hipp chronoscope. Senior year, spring 
term. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Dean Barnes 
1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the 
nation, and of the character and distribution of nationalities; a 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 17 

levelopment of the idea and conception of the state, and a study of 
its origin, forms, and ends; a history of the formation of the con- 
stitutions of the states of Great Britain, the United States, Germany, 
ind France, and of the organization of these states within their 
respective constitutions, and a study of liberty as guaranteed in their 
constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' Political Science, Volume 
[, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and Thayer's and Mc- 
Clain's Cases, and the works of other authors. Junior year, winter 
term. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the con- 
structions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judi- 
cial departments of the governments of Great Britain, the United 
States, Germany, and France. The text-book is Burgess' Political 
Science, Volume II, supplemented by the wc-ks of Story, Macy, and 
other authors. Junior year, spring term. 

3 International Law. This course consists of the elements of 
international law, with an account of its origin, sources, and his- 
torical development. Lawrence's text-book is used, and the course 
is supplemented by prescribed readings in the works of Woolsey and 
Hall, and in Scott's and Snow's Cases. Senior year, fall term. 

4 The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This 
course is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure 
and procedure, national, state, and municipal; it includes also a 
study of the structure and procedure of political conventions and 
,similar bodies, and the theory and practice of parliamentary law. 
i-Open to students who have had Political Science 1 and 2. Senior 
;year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and 
Imethods of action of political parties in the United States. Growth 
(of the party system; primary and convention systems; permanent 
[party organization; reform movements; and the value and theory 

of the party system. Senior year, fall term. 

6. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the gov- 
ernments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Ogg's Govern- 
iments of Europe is used as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Gov- 
jernments and Parties in Continental Europe. Senior year, winter 

term. 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the gov- 
ernments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great 
Britain, and the United States. Ogg and Lowell are the texts, sup- 
plemented by Taswell-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and 
Story. Senior year, spring term. 

8. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the 
elementary principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. 

1 Hall's text and McClain's and Thayer's Cases are used. Senior year, 
1 fall term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 



18 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Calhoun 

1. General Introduction. This course is designed as a back- ' 
ground for courses in history, and in all the social sciences. It is a ' 
broad survey of social evolution, with special reference to its eco- 
nomic basis, and traces the path by which mankind has risen to the j 
present social level. The course exhibits the forces at work in ' 
social life, and the factors of progress in its several phases. The '! 
text-book is Mills' The Struggle for Existence, used in connection 
with Bogardus' syllabus, Introduction to the Social Sciences. As- 
signed readings and class conferences supplement the texts. Sopho-1 
more year, fall term. 

2. General Sociology. The subject matter of this course is J 
human achievement, as worked out in the origin and spontaneous j 
development of society in the past. The course is a systematic study 1 
of social forces, processes, structures, and functions. It lays the 
basis for a study of future possibilities of social improvement. Itl 
is the first half of a complete system of sociology, which is concluded 
in the following course. The text is Ward's Pure Sociology. Sopho- j 
more year, winter term. 

3. Social Progress. A study of the possibility and method of, 
conscious improvement of society by society. An estimate of thej 
latent powers of the race, and a survey of the direction of advance- 
by means of the equalization of opportunity through the cooperative' 
commonwealth. The texts are Ward's Applied Sociology, and' 
Rauschenbusch's Christianizing the Social Order. Sophomore year,j 
spring term. 

4. The Family. The historical evolution of the family in re- 
lation to its economic basis. Most of the time is given to the Ameri-j 
can family — its social history and present problems. The decay of j 
the family under modern capitalism is traced, and the significance of 
corresponding theories is shown. The course concludes with a dis-i 
cussion of the probable effect of collectivist tendencies, and a forecast 
of the general outlook. This is primarily a lecture course. Dealey's 
The Family, and the American Sociological Society's Publication on 
the Family are used as supplementary texts, together with refer- 
ence reading and class discussion. Sophomore year, winter term. 
(Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

5. Modern Social Problems. The first half of the course is a 
general survey based on Nearing's Social Adjustment. The second 
half is devoted to an intensive study of one problem selected by the 
class, such as charities and correction, criminology, rural life, child 
labor, social hygiene, eugenics. Sophomore year, spring term. (Not 
to be given in 1915-1916.) 

6. The Economics of Capitalism. A study of permanent eco-i 
nomic principles, especially as they operate under the present eco- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 19 

Dmic system, and also of the principles and conditions peculiar to 
ipitalism. Capitalism is tested as a system of production and disto- 
rtion. The concepts and the workings of rent, interest, and profits 
re analyzed and criticised. The premises and logic of the defenders 
1 capitalism are examined and discussed. The total aim is to estimate 
le value and the shortcomings of the system. Text is Reeve's The 
:ost of Competition, supplemented by wide reading of concrete ma- 
Bal selected as a basis for class discussion and conclusions. Junior 
[ear, fall term. 

7. Economic Reform. A study of the various proposals and 
ttempts to remove the grosser evils of capitalism. The program of 
overnment regulation is examined and criticised. Incidental atten- 
tion is given to profit-sharing, "welfare work," and other palliatives 
I capitalism. The cooperative movement is thoroughly studied, and 
ippraised. The aim of the course is to estimate the possibility of 
'atisfactorily remedying economic evils, without revolutionary meas- 
ures. Junior year, winter term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

8. Economic Revolution. A review of the Economic Interpreta- 
tion of History, Exploitation, the Class Struggle, and the general 
iheory of Socialism. The socialist philosophy and movement are 
Analyzed and criticised. The principles and activities of syndicalists 
and industrial unionists receive due attention. Text-books are Kel- 
ly's Twentieth Century Socialism, and The Case Against Socialism. 
Junior year, spring term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

9. Taxation. A study of taxation as an agency of social main- 
tenance and progress. Special attention is given to the increment 
tax, the rental tax, the income and inheritance taxes. Text-book is 
Seligman's Essays on Taxation. Junior year, winter term. 

10. Rural Economics. The economic aspects of country life 
'and work. Text-books are Simons' The American Farmer, and Car- 
eer's Rural Economics. Junior year, spring term. 

At the option of a majority of the students desiring economics 
during winter or spring term, there may be substituted for any of 
|the Courses 7-10 one of the following: 11. Money and Banking; 
H. Labor Organizations; 13. Public Finance; 14. Trusts. 

EDUCATION 

For the courses in Education see the descriptive text regarding 
the Teachers' Department. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Knapp 
2. Plane Trigonometry. Definitions and fundamental notions; 
systems of angular measurement; trigonometric formula^ their der- 
J ivation and transformation; solutions of equations and of numerical 
j problems. Freshman year, fall term. 



20 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



4. Plane Analytic Geometry. Rectilinear and polar systems 
of coordinates; the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, and hy- 
perbola; tangents and normals; general equation of the second de-j 
gree and certain higher plane curves. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2.J 
Freshman year, winter term. 

10. Plane Surveying. The use and adjustments of instruments,! 
and the methods employed in practical surveying. The work in- 
cludes chaining, triangulation, leveling, calculating areas and earth-i 
work, establishing grades, dividing land, railway location, laying 
out curves, mapping, and topographical work. Especial attention 
is given to field work. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. Freshman year, 
spring term. 

8. College Algebra. Logarithms; series; permutations, com- 
binations, and probability; determinants and the theory of equations.! 
Sophomore year, fall term. 

6 7 Differential and Integral Calculus. Differentiation of al- 
gebraic and transcendental functions, with elementary applications 
of the calculus, especially in maxima and minima, and in the expan- 
sion of functions, the general treatment of curve tracing, asymptotes,; 
inflection, curvature, and singular points; radius of curvature antf 
envelopes. Direct integration of elementary forms, including intei 
gration by decomposition of fractions; integration by substitution, 
by parts, and by the aid of reduction formulae. Applications partic- 
ularly in the rectification, quadrature, and cubature of curves. Pre- 
requisite, Mathematics 4. Sophomore year, winter and spring terms. 

11 Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Analytic Geometry. The 1 
development and transformation of formulae; solution of spherical 
triangles with applications in geodesy, navigation, and astronomy: 
Systems of coordinates in solid analytic geometry; loci; lines, planes., 
surfaces; general equations of the second degree; ruled surfaces; 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 4. Junior year, spring term. 

12. Differential Equations. Equations of the first and seconc 
orders; linear equations; solutions of equations by series; miscella- 
neous applications. Prerequisites, Mathematics 6 and 7. Junior 
year, spring term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

9. Astronomy. A general survey; definitions; description and 
use of instruments; earth, moon, sun, planets, aerolites and shoot- 
ing stars, comets, fixed stars; stellar and planetary evolution. Pre- 
requisite, Mathematics 2. Junior year, winter term. 

13. The History of Mathematics. Mathematical knowledge and 
methods of primitive races; Egyptians; the Greek schools; the Mid- 
dle Ages and the Renaissance; mathematics of the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries; recent times; resume by topics with a study oi 
the methods of teaching elementary mathematics. Senior year, 
spring term. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 21 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor McClenahan and Laboratory Assistants 

1 General Inorganic Chemistry. A beginner's course in mod- 
ern chemical theory and practice. Suitable experiments are selected, 
but the requirements of the course center about lectures and quizzes, 
both oral and written. Mellor's Modern Inorganic Chemistry is 
the text It is expected that the Chemical Library be freely used 
by all members of the College taking this course. Special topics are 
assigned for library work in the history of chemistry and in special 
phases of industrial and technical chemistry. Laboratory practice, 
four hours a week; lectures and quizzes, three hours. Freshman 

year, fall term. . 

2 General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1 
during the first half of the winter term. Second half of the winter 
term an introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis. The li- 
brary and text-book work of the latter half of the term has to do 
more particularly with the metals. The order of their presentation 
for discussion and laboratory study follows the analytical order as 
outlined in Gooch and Browning's Outlines of Qualitative Chemical 
Analysis. Continual reference is made to Mellor's Modern Inorganic 
Chemistry. Laboratory practice, six hours a week; lectures and 

! quizzes, two hours. Freshman year, winter term. 

3 General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. A 
: continuation of Course 2. This is more particularly a .course in 
] metallurgical and applied chemistry with respect to the hbraiy 

work, and in analytical chemistry with respect to the laboratory. The 
: same text and manual is used as in Course 2. Laboratory practice, 
| six hours a week; lecture and quiz, two hours. Freshman year, 
| spring term. 

10 General Inorganic Chemistry. Parallel to Course 2. This 
! course is designed more particularly for students in Home Economics. 

The laboratory exercises are distinctively qualitative and analytical. 
' The lectures are supplemented by library work. Definite topics are 

provided for special reports. Laboratory practice, six hours a week; 

lectures and quizzes, two hours. Prerequisite, Chemistry 1. Fresn- 
; man year, winter term. . . - 

11 Elementary Organic and Household Chemistry. Designed 
primarily for students in Home Economics. Laboratory practice, 
six hours a week; lectures, two hours. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 
and 10, or 1 and 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

12. Advanced Household Chemistry. A course dealing with ele- 
mentary biochemistry, chemical sanitation, food analysis, and poi- 
sons. This is a laboratory course of eight laboratory hours and one 
lecture a week. Much use is made of the library. The study is 
topical. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 11, or 1, 10, and 11. 
Sophomore year, fall term. 



22 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

4. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A laboratory course of 
eight hours a week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods ordi- 
narily employed in quantitative chemical analysis. The instruction 
is individual, and there is continual reference to the well-stocked 
reference library and to current literature. Independence of thought 
is the aim, and the most scrupulous care to exactness of technic is 
required. One hour a week in addition is devoted to quizzes and in- 
formal discussions. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Junior i 
year, fall term. 

5. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 

4. Junior year, winter term. 

6. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 

5. Junior year, spring term. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Liberal use of the Chemical 
Library is required. Individual reports on special topics. The course 
is arranged for topical study. No particular text-book is required,, 
but there is repeated reference to such texts as Hollenlan, Perkin 
and Kipping, and Cohen, to such larger works as Richter, and to 
current literature. Laboratory practice, eight hours a week; lecture 
or quiz, one hour. Senior year, fall term. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 7. 
Senior year, winter term. 

9. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 8, 
with some definite applications to biological chemistry, both analytical 
and theoretical. Senior year, spring term. 

For acceptable substitutes for Chemistry courses in the Science 
Group, see Geology and Mineralogy. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor McClenahan 

1. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of eight hours each week, 
accompanied by one hour lecture each week. Brush-Penfield's De- 
terminative Mineralogy is the manual. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 
2, and 3. Senior year, fall term. 

2. General Geology. Dynamic and Structural. Chamberlain 
and Salesbury's College Geology is the text. Prerequisites, Chem- 
istry 1, 2, and 3. Senior year, winter term. 

3. General Geology. Historical. A continuation of Course 2. 
Much use is made of the United States Geological Folios and Atlas. 
Also occasional field trips are made to interesting localities in the 
county. Senior year, spring term. 

Geology 1, 2, and 3 may be substituted for Chemistry 7, 8, and 
9 by students electing the Science Group. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 23 

PHYSICS 

Professor Knapp 
1 Mechanics and Heat. Lectures, recitations, and quantitative 
JX periments. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 Laboratory practice, 
four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, fall term. 

2. Sound and Light. A continuation of Course 1. Junior year, 
winter term. 

3. Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of Course I. 
Junior year, spring term. 

BIOLOGY 

Miss Green and Laboratory Assistants 
1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Classroom work accompanied 
by dissection of typical forms, and field work. J^™^ 1 ^ 
Zoology Prerequisites, elementary physiology and Chemistry 1 and 
2 Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. 
Sophomore year, fall term. . 

2 General Vertebrate Zoology. Classroom work accompamed 

Lr hours a week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, wmter 
rm 3 Botauy. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Em- 
phast I Wd upon the chief problems involved in the Physiology, 
ecoTogy and morphology of the seed, the developing : plant, and the 
flowed Text-book, Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany Pre 
requisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory practice four hours 
week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, fall term 

4 Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey 
of the four great plant groups. Text-book, Bergen and Davu , Pruv 
rinles of Botanv. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory 
prttice fir Tours a wU; recitations, three hours. Sophomore 
vear, spring term. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most eviden 
life relations li plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant 
physiology. Classroom work, accompanied by experimental work in 
the laboratory. The work is not confined to any one text-book, but 

e e ences are" given out to various standard text-books on plan phys- 
iology. Prerequisite, Biology 3. Laboratory practice four hours a 
week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, winter term. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed 
study of the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts 
smute, mildews, and molds renders this \ valuab VT^ PO ™ site 
economic standpoint. Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, 



24 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Biology 4. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three 
hours. Junior year, spring term. 

7. Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. 
Mosses, liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thor- 
oughly studied. The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the sur- 
rounding region makes this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Biol- 
ogy 4 and 6. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, 
three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

8. Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. 
Prerequisites, Biology 4, 6, and 7. Laboratory practice, four hours 
a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

9. 10. Advanced Physiology. Classroom work and laboratory 
experiments, bringing out the fundamental principles of the circula- 
tory, respiratory, digestive, and nervous systems. This course is 
especially valuable to students intending to take up the study of 
medicine. Prerequisites, elementary physiology, elementary physics, 
Biology 2, and Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory practice, four hours 
a week; recitations, three hours. Senior year, winter and spring 
terms. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 
6, 7, or 8. By this alternation of courses, a student will be given 
an opportunity to pursue the subject further than would otherwise 
be possible. 

HISTORY 

Mrs. Alexander 

1. Nineteenth Century History. The object of this course is the 
study of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed 
from the French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of 
republican ideas in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment 
of the German Empire, and the revolutionary movements of 1830 
and 1848. Special topics for individual study are taken up by each 
member and pursued throughout the course. Freshman year, winter 
term. 

2. History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the 
influence of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, the German Refor- 
mation. The work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed 
authors, but students are required to submit oral reports of special 
library work. Freshman year, spring term. 

7. Roman History and Politics. This course is given in Eng- 
lish. No language requirement. A general survey of Roman His- 
tory from the earliest period until the time of Charlemagne. During 
the latter part of the term the class makes a careful study of the 
political development of the Roman State. The texts used are Ab- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 25 

,„tt's Short History of Rome and Abbott's Roman Political Institu- 
tes This course I identical with Latin 12. Sophomore year, Win- 

er term. , 

3 Church History. A general survey of the history of the 
Church from the first century to the present t toe with especial 
*p„asis upon the great leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text- 
book and library work. Sophomore year, spring term. 

4 5 American History. In this course, students are expected 
t „ centralize their work upon one line of develo P™*^™^ **£ 
economic, social, ethical, or religious-and the result of the special 
work is to be handed in as a term theme. Junior year, fall and 

"T A™udy of Simons' Social Forces in American History This 
course was offered in 1913-1914 to meet a special demand, and was 
not added permanently to the curriculum. Junior year, spring term. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Wed to above The work is altogether practical, and consists ot 
rhetorical crSIdsm of selections of English prose and of original work 
ta sen ence tructure, paragraphs, and longer compositions prepared 
bv tie strdents both in and for the classroom. Freshman year, win- 
ter and spring terms.— President Wilson. 

1 Outlining and Argumentation. Five Jfeefcs.-Outlining or 
anal sisrf topics for discussion. Analytical study of the princrpl 
of debating. Practical work is done m accordance with a system ot 
principles and rules collated hy the instructor in charge The abso 
fate necessity of method in all composition is ; m P haslze * t ^ °™ 
fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by each ^ent^nd 
criticised and returned by the professor N»e fff^-^Tnd 
tation This part of the course follows the work in outlining ana 
lives *: application of the principles that have been .studied ui 
the production of finished argumentative exercises wh ch are de 
livered in class, and criticised by the instructor. Attention s given 
to the delivery as well as to the thought and composition since the 
L of the course is to develop the power of effective public address. 
Sophomore year, fall term.-PROFESSOR Gillingham. 

5 6 English Literature. A survey of the entire field of English 
Literature frl its beginning to the death of Victoria As a gu de 
Long's History of English Literature is employed, but much use is 



26 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

made of Saintsbury, Garnett and Gosse, and other advanced work- 
in this subject. The development of the literature from period tc 
period is carefully noted, and the lives, works, and characteristics oi 
the more prominent authors are studied and criticised. Sophomore 
year, winter and spring terms.— Mrs. Alexander. 

4. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial 
literature. The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the 
works of the leading American poets and prose writers of the nine- 
teenth century. Library work and Page's Chief American Poets 
Junior year, fall term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

11. Development of English Poetry. This course is an intro- 
ductory study of the technic of the art of verse. The forms of Eng- 
lish poetry are studied, including the epic, ballad, sonnet, ode, and 
other lyrics. These forms will be traced in examples from Chaucer 
to Tennyson. The object of the course is to increase the enjoyment 
and appreciation of poetry by insight into the methods of the poets 
and by acquaintance with the best examples of their art Junior 
year, winter term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

7. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course will be a study of 
representative nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial atten- 
tion to the development of the essay and of prose fiction. The work 
will be based on typical essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin 
Stevenson, and Arnold; and representative fiction by Jane Austen' 
Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling' 
Senior year, fall term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

8. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting 
the development of his poetic art; with introductory lectures on the 
evolution of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. 
Senior year, winter term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

9. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tenny- 
son, and Browning, with introductory lectures, classroom criticism, 
and papers on assigned subjects. Senior year, spring term.— Mrs. 
Alexander. 

10. Theme Writing. This course gives instruction and practice 
in the four kinds of composition: exposition, argumentation, descrip- 
tion, and narration. Daily exercises and themes are written and 
criticised m class. These are designed to illustrate the use of words 
and the structure of sentences and paragraphs, and to give general 
practice in writing on various subjects. In addition, at least four 
themes, of from a thousand to fifteen hundred words each, must be 
handed in. Senior year, spring term.— Mrs. Alexander. 

LATIN 

Professor Bassett 
1. Livy. Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The class 
makes a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 27 

Special emphasis is laid upon the syntax. Sight reading. Freshman 
year, fall term. 

2 De Senectute and De Amicitia. A careful study of De 
Senec'tute, followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia Special at- 
tention is given to the author's thought and style, and to practice 
in translation. Sight reading. Freshman year, winter term. 

9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from 

the writings of Seneca. The class makes a «*£^ «*£»£. 

Senia receive close attention. Freshman year, spring term. 

3 Cicero and Pliny. Selections from the letters °f Cicero and 
Pliny The letters read will be such as illustrate the life, customs, 
!!d political history of the times, and the characters of the writers. 
Shading. Prerequisite, one of the preceding courses. Sopho- 
more year, fall term. 

4 Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together with Course 
5 presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace By this 

im the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatma, ^true- 
hire of the language to enable him to study the poems of Horace 
£ m a Siterar^iewpoint. Special attention is paid to the metrica 
structure and the class receives thorough drill in scansion. Pre 
feSnes', two of the preceding courses. Sophomore year, winter 
term. . 

5 Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and 
Epist es of Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the 
SaW of Juvenal! A continuation of Course 4. The class makes a 
careful study of the origin and development of Roman satire. Pre 
requisite, Latin 4. Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of the Junior 
year consists of a thorough and systematic review of *e whole penod 
of Roman literature-its beginnings, dev elopment and^ ^line-with 
special reference to its connection with Roman history. The three 
courses should be taken in succession. They presuppose thorough 
familiarity with Latin Syntax, a good working vocabulary, and con- 
siderable practice in translation. All the preceding courses should 
be taken before these are attempted. The texts used are Fowler s 
History of Roman Literature and Smith's Latin Selections. Read- 
ings from representative authors. Lectures by the professor in 
charge. Reports are required on assigned portions of theyanous his- 
tories of Latin literature and other reference works. The work of 
this term is a study of the fragments of early Latin, the plays of 
Plautus and Terence, Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Catullus, and the 
prose writers of the age of Cicero. Junior year, fall term. 



28 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

7. Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. 
A continuation of Course 6. Selections from Vergil's Eclogues and 
Georgics and Books vii to xii of the ^neid, Horace's Epodes, Ovid, 
and the Elegiac Poets, and the prose writers of the period. Junior 
year, winter term. 

8. Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and! 
Post-classical Latin. A continuation of Course 7. Selections from 
Lucan, Seneca, Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian, Tacitus, Sue- 
tonius, Apuleius, Minucius Felix, and others. Junior year, spring 
term. 

10. Teachers' Course. This course is intended to assist those 
who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey 
of the principles of the language, the class considers the most effec- 
tive methods of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. 
Lectures, discussions, papers, and collateral reading. Open to stu- 
dents who have had at least one reading course. This course is 
identical with Education 7. Senior year, spring term. 

11. Mythology. This course is given in English, and is intended 
primarily for those that have no knowledge of Latin. It will prove 
valuable, however, to classical students that desire a more thorough 
acquaintance with the mythology of Greece and Rome. The work 
includes a general survey of Graeco-Roman Mythology, a study of 
ancient Roman religious rites and festivals, and a brief outline of! 
Norse and Egyptian mythology. Stress is laid upon the influence 
of the Myths on English Literature. Selections from Milton, Shakes- . 
peare, and Dante are read in class, and collateral reading in English - 
Literature is required. Sophomore year, fall term. 

12. Roman History and Politics. This course is given in Eng- 
lish. No language requirement. A general survey of Roman His- 
tory from the earliest period until the time of Charlemagne. During 
the latter part of the term the class makes a careful study of the 
political development of the Roman State. The texts used are 
Abbott's Short History of Rome and Abbott's Roman Political Insti- I 
tutions. This course is identical with History 7. Sophomore year, 
winter term. 

GREEK 

Professor Calhoun 
1, 2, 3. College Beginning Greek. This course is designed only 
for students sufficiently well prepared in other subjects to enable 
them to complete the entrance Greek in one year. The work of the 
fall term purposes to secure a mastery of the principal inflections, 
a careful study of the principles of syntax, and facility in reading 
and writing easy sentences in Greek. In the winter term the reading 
of the Anabasis is begun, continuing through the spring term with 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 29 

a. thorough review of Greek grammar and Greek composition. Se- 
lections from other authors are brought in for sight translation. 
Freshman year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Herodotus and Thucydides. Selections from the works of 
Herodotus and Thucydides are read. A careful study of the dialect 
of Herodotus is made, and special reading is assigned on the rise 
and development of history as a division of Greek literature. A study 
of the history of Greek literature is begun, based on Wright's and 
Jebb's texts, with assigned reading in Mueller and Mahaffy. Sopho- 
more year, fall term. 

5 Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are read, and 
the peculiarities of the late Attic style are studied. The study of the 
history of Greek literature is continued. Sophomore year, winter 
term. 

11 Greek Testament. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read 
in class, Westcott and Hort's text being used, with Thayer s lexicon 
and Winer's and Robertson's grammars. In connection with the 
reading of the assigned text, a study is made of the general ^char- 
acteristics of Hellenistic Greek, the literature of this period, and the 
most important New Testament manuscripts and versions. Sopho- 
more year, spring term. 

6 Plato The Phaedo is read for the immortal teachings of 
Socrates, with the Apology or the Crito for his life and death. Brief 
outline of pre-Socratic philosophy. A study is made of the philo- 
sophic dialog and of Plato's literary style. Sight translation from 
easy Attic prose. Junior year, fall term. 

7 Tragic Poetry, ^schylus' Seven against Thebes or Prome- 
theus Bound, and Sophocles' CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone are read 
in alternate years, with one play from Euripides, either Alcestis or 
Iphigenia in Tauris. The origin and development of tragedy, the 
Greek theater, and other related topics are discussed in lectures and 
studied in assigned readings. Junior year, winter term. 

8 Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. 
The development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and 
Greek life are studied. One hour a week is given to the study o± 
Greek architecture, based upon a text-book, supplemented by lec- 
tures and the examination of drawings and stereographs. Alternates 
with Courses 9 and 10. Junior year, spring term. 

9. Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute 
the basis of a general study of the rise and development of political 
oratory and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written 
translations are required to develop accuracy and elegance in ren- 
dering the polished style of the classical orators. One hour a week 
is devoted to lectures and discussions on Greek sculpture and paint- 



30 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

ing, Tarbell's History of Greek Art being used as a text. Alternates 
with Courses 8 and 10. Junior year, spring term. 

10. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course 
covering the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine 
books is read in the original and the intervening portions in a trans- ! 
lation. Merry's two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a class- 
room text. Homeric geography, politics, religion, home life, and art 
are studied in connection with the reading of the text. Alternates! 
with Courses 8 and 9. Junior year, spring term. 

GERMAN 

Professor Perkins 
1, 2, 3. College Beginning German. This course is designed for 
students who enter college without German, but who are sufficiently 
prepared in language study to be able to complete entrance German 
in one year. The work of the fall term is intended to give the stu- 
dent a mastery of the grammar, easy prose translation, and simple 
conversation. Six or more popular German poems are committed to 
memory. Text-books, Joynes and Meissner's Grammar and Guerber's 
Mar chen und Erzahlungen. During the winter term such intermedi- 
ate texts as von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche and Baumbach's Der 
Schwiegersohn are read and made the basis of conversation and 
composition exercises. Drill in grammar. In the spring term 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell is read and its dramatic structure studied. 
Selected passages are committed to memory and original themes are 
written in German on subjects connected with the plot. Freshman 
year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Prose Translation and Composition. A modern Reader and 
Mosher's Willkommen in Deutschland are used. With the former, 
emphasis is laid principally upon translation and on extending the 
vocabulary; and with the latter upon oral work and composition, 
with a progressive review of the grammar. Prerequisites, German 
1, 2, and 3, or their equivalents. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Schiller's Life and Works. Two of Schiller's dramatic 
works, including Wallenstein's Tod, are translated and studied in the 
classroom, and a third (in 1914-1915, Maria Stuart) is read out of 
class. Outlines of the plots of two of these plays are presented by 
the students, the first in English and the second in German. Schiller's 
life and literary career are made the subject of reference reading 
and written report. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. Goethe's Life and Faust. The First Part of Faust is studied 
and discussed in the classroom. Goethe's life and career are made 
the subject of reference reading and written report. Sophomore 
year, spring term. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 31 

7. Advanced Composition and Conversation. This course is 
conducted in German and consists of translation of representative 
English prose into the German idiom. Sketches from German His- 
tory are made the basis of classroom discussion and German themes 
are presented on various phases of German life and customs. Pre- 
requisites, German 1, 2, and 3, or their equivalents. Junior year, 
fall term. 

8. Survey of German Literature. This course consists of three 
parts. (1) A study of the History of German Literature from the 
text-book. (2) Reading, out of class, literature representative of the 
different periods of German Literary History. (3) Lectures on the 
political and social forces which determined the character and growth 
of German Literature. Junior year, winter term. (Not to be given 
in 1915-1916.) 

12. Modern Drama. Representative plays of such authors as 
Hauptmann, Sudermann, and Fulda; collateral reading and reports. 
Junior year, winter term. 

9. Lessing's Life and Dramatic Works. A critical study is 
made of Nathan der Weise and one other of Lessing's dramas. A 
third drama may be read out of class. Lessing's life and career are 
made the subject of reference reading and written report in German. 
Junior year, spring term. (Not to be given in 1915-1916.) 

13. The Novel. Scheffel's Ekkehard, Sudermann's Frau Sorge, 
and other novels are read and discussed in class. Collateral reading. 
Junior year, spring term. 

10. Teachers' Course. A general review of German grammar, 
historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, and characteristics of 
German style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. Open 
to students that have had at least one reading course. This course 
is identical with Education 6. Junior year, spring term. 

FRENCH 

Professor Perkins 
1, 2, 3. College Beginning French. This course is designed for 
those who enter college without French and are sufficiently well pre- 
pared in language study to be able to complete the grammar and 
easy prose in the fall term. The course consists of reading some of 
the most representative authors, some of which reading is done out 
of class. Romanticism as represented by the work of Lamartine, 
Hugo, and De Musset. The life and customs of the French people 
are studied. Sophomore year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

SPANISH 

President Wilson 
1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning 
with the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of 



32 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

English into Spanish and of Spanish into English. Senior year 
fall term. 

2. Galdos' Marianela; El Si de las Ninas; conversation anc 
composition. Senior year, winter term. 

HEBREW 

Professor Gillingham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading 
of easy portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's In\ 
ductive Hebrew Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew,] 
Offered every second or third year. Senior year, fall term. (Noj 
given in 1914-1915.) 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion oi 
both courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure ad-i 
vanced standing in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year,! 
winter term. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gillingham 

1. Life of Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. Teachings of Jesus. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. Apostolic Christianity. Sophomore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. Senior year, fall 
term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. Senior year, 
fall term. 

These courses are described under The Bible Training Depart- 
ment. 

Five courses in Bible and allied subjects are required for gradu- 
ation. Three of these must be in English Bible, and may be taken 
during the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years in any term. 
The required work for Seniors consists of the allied subjects, The 
Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief (Philosophy 3), and Ethics 
(Philosophy 4). 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 33 

THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A large percentage of the graduates and undergraduates of 
Maryville College become teachers. They are found in all sections 
of the United States, especially in the Southern Appalachian region, 
and in the Southwest and West, and are employed in elementary 
schools, high schools, and colleges. 

The instructors in the various departments of the College en- 
deavor to conduct their work in such a way as to help train teachers 
both by the thoroughness of the instruction given in the various 
branches, and by the object lesson of the methods employed in the 
classrooms. Competent teachers selected from many colleges and uni- 
versities bring the best methods of those schools to their work at 
Maryville. The teachers trained at Maryville rank high in sound 
scholarship and practical pedagogy. 

Besides providing model methods in college management and 
classroom work, the College maintains a special department for the 
vocational training of teachers. 

In the Teachers' Department a six years' course of study de- 
signed to equip prospective teachers thoroughly for their profession 
is offered. 

PREPARATORY 

The first four years correspond closely 1 to the regular courses of 
the Preparatory Department, and these four years contain sixteen 
units of academic work. Those completing these four years are ad- 
mitted to the Freshman Class of the College. 

Synopsis of Courses. — The following is a synopsis of the courses 
in the four preparatory years: 



First Year 


Second Year 


Third Year 


Fourth Year 


Mathematics II 


Mathematics III 


Mathematics IV 


Math. V (Fall) 


English I 


English II 


English III 


Eng. IV (W.&S.) 


Latin I 


Latin II 


Lat. Ill, Ger. I, 


Lat. IV, Ger. II, 


History I 


Science I 


or French I 


or French II 


*Mathematics I 


* History II 


History III 


Science II 




* Bookkeeping I 




Pedagogy I 
*History IV 



* May be taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of 
the Preparatory Department. 



34 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Pedagogy. — Fourth Year: I. (a) School Management and The 
Method of the Recitation. This part of the course is designed to 
prepare the teacher to control and teach a common school in ac-i 
cordance with sound pedagogical principles and methods. The prin- 
ciples underlying class management and instruction are studied, and 
the practical problems of organization, discipline, and general method 
are discussed. Seeley's School Management and McMurry's Method 
of the Recitation are used as text-books, (b) Methods of Teaching. 
The work of the winter term is devoted to the study of the various 
methods of teaching. The difference between the Object Method, the 
Direct Method, and the Development Method is shown by numerous 
illustrations; the advantages and disadvantages of each are pointed 
out; and the method of combining them practically in teaching the 
fundamental subjects in our schools is developed. Special methods 
in reading, language, arithmetic, history, geography, and other sub- 
jects are considered in detail. White's Art of Teaching and Gil- 
bert's What Children Should Study and Why, are used as text-books, 
(c) Reading Circle. In the spring term the books selected for the 
Tennessee Teachers' Reading Circle are carefully studied, and sup- 
plemental lectures are given by the professor in charge. This course 
is open also to such students in the college classes as may desire 
special work in these lines. Teachers who enter College after the 
Christmas holidays may join the class. 



Special Courses. — To accommodate teachers and others who enter - 
College after the Christmas holidays, special courses in history, 
civics, higher arithmetic, and grammar are offered. Students may, 
also take up any full-year course offered in the curriculum of the, 
preparatory years for which they are prepared. College courses may L 
also be taken by those who have had sufficient preparation. 

Special Double Courses. — In addition to the regular courses, and* 
the special courses referred to above, special double courses in Be- 
ginning Latin and Beginning Algebra are provided, by which a full 
year's credit in these studies may be secured during the winter and 
spring terms. The classes recite ten hours each a week, and prepare 
respectively for Caesar and Advanced Algebra. For the successful 
completion of the double course in either Latin or Algebra one unit 
credit will be given; for any of the other preparatory courses, pro- 
portional credit will be allowed. 



Other Courses. — Detailed descriptions of the courses out- 
lined in the four preparatory years of the Teachers' Department 
will be found under Departments of Instruction in the Preparatory 
Department pages 39 to 43. 






MARYVILLE COLLEGE 35 

COLLEGE 

The work of the two college years of the Teachers' Department 
corresponds somewhat to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years 
of the College. Seven of the eight courses of the College Department 
of Education are completed during these two years, thus giving the 
student that completes the work of the Teachers' Department a very 
thorough vocational training. The courses in pedagogy, psychology, 
and the history of education are conducted in accordance with the 
best normal methods now in vogue. Those completing the work of 
this department may, after two years' additional work, graduate from 
the College in the Education Group of studies and receive the Bache- 
lor's degree. 

Synopsis of Courses. — The following is a synopsis of the courses 
offered in the two college years: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 (Eight courses to be taken). 

English 1, 2, and 3 (Three courses to be taken). 

Mathematics 2 (To be taken). 

Chemistry 1, 2, and 3; Biology 1; Latin 1, 2, 3, and 4; German 
1, 2, 3, and 4 (Four courses to be taken). 

Bible 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (Two courses to be taken). 

Education. — 1. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed 
for students taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, 
supplemented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Es- 
sentials of Psychology is used as a text-book. This course is identical 
with Psychology 1. Fifth year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psy- 
chological problems which have reference to education: theory of re- 
capitulation, correlations between mind and body, instinct, memory, 
imagination, apperception, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and 
volition. The text-book used is Bolton's Principles of Education, sup- 
plemented by lectures. This course is identical with Psychology 2. 
Fifth year, winter term. 

3. History of Education. A study of the educational systems 
of early China, Greece, and Rome; the history of Christian educa- 
tion; the rise of the universities; the Renaissance; and the educators 
of the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 
A careful study is made of such modern educators as Rousseau, 
Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, and Horace Mann. The last part of 
the course is devoted to the comparison of the school systems of Ger- 
many, France, England, and the United States. Monroe's History 
of Education is used as a text-book. Sixth year, fall term. 

4. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psy- 
chological growth of children and youth. This course is developed 
with special reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and 



36 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

mental growth as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From! 
this point of view, attention, perception, apperception, interest, habitj 
and will are discussed. The course is designed to show the applica-l 
tion of psychological laws and principles to educational theory andf 
practice. This course is identical with Psychology 3. Sixth year,: 
winter term. 

5. Problems in Secondary Education. Present ideals in edu- 
cation. The moral element in education. Adolescence and education. 
The disciplinary 1 basis of courses of study. The high-school curric- 1 
ulum. History of the high-school curriculum since the Renaissance.; 
Arts and technology in secondary education. The social organization! 
of the high school. Athletics in education. Sex pedagogy in the high 
school. The school and the community. On sending boys and girls 
to college. High School Education, by Johnston and others, is used' 
as a text-book, supplemented by Hall's Problems in Education, lec- 
tures, and reports by students. Sixth year, spring term. 

6. Teachers' Course in German. A general review of German 
grammar, historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, characteris- ! 
tics of German style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. 
This course is identical with German 10, and is open to students that., 
have had at least one reading course. Sixth year, spring term. 

7. Teachers' Course in Latin. This course is intended to assist 
those who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic sur- 
vey of the principles of the language, the class considers the most 
effective methods of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. . 
Lectures, discussions, papers, and collateral reading. This course is J 
identical with Latin 10, and is open to students that have had at 
least one reading course. Sixth year, spring term. 



: 



8. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching 
and management in the high school and upper grammar grades; a 
study of the group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, 
competition, rivalry, sex, dress, social organization, with special 
reference to the meaning of these facts in their application in the I 
organization of the school. This course is identical with Psychology 
5, and is open to Seniors and to those who have completed Psychology 
1, 2, and 3. Sixth year, spring term. 

Other Courses. — Detailed descriptions of the other courses offered 
in the synopsis of the college years of the Teachers' Department will 
be found under Departments of Instruction in the College Depart- 
ment, pages 15 to 32. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 37 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of the Preparatory Department is to furnish 
thorough courses of training in high-school branches leading to en- 
trance to the Freshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted 
to make up their conditions in this department. Students in the 
Teachers' Department take their first four years' work in prepara- 
tory courses, and Bible Training students have the privilege of 
electing studies in this department. Opportunities are provided also 
for a large and worthy class of young people, with limited means 
and time at their command, to obtain some preparation for their 
future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
are available to students in the Preparatory Department. 



ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates 
from principals of secondary schools will, however, be accepted and 
credit given for equivalent work in any of the subjects required for 
graduation. Credit thus given is conditional, and will be canceled in 
any subject in which the student is found to be deficient. Full credit 
for physiology or physics will not be given unless a reasonable amount 
of laboratory work has been done in connection with the text-book 
work. Diplomas must be accompanied by certified statements of the 
amount of time devoted to each subject studied, and the passing 
grade, together with the name of the text-book used and the ground 
covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for exam- 
inations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 
if indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
as testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases stu- 
dents coming from other secondary schools, whether asking for 
credits or not, must present letters of honorable dismissal from their 
former principals. Students that have been out of school for a num- 
ber of years are admitted under the general rule that all candidates 
for admission must furnish satisfactory evidence of good moral char- 
acter, and must have completed the common-school branches. Stu» 
dents that have not had the advantage of sufficient preparation and 
that fail to pass the entrance examination are, if not too deficient, 
prepared for entrance in a room provided for that purpose. Appli- 
cants under fifteen years of age, unless residents of Maryville, will 
not be admitted. -^ 



38 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers two courses of study: the Classical and 
the General. All regular courses of study begin in the fall term 
and continue throughout the year, except as noted in Mathematics 
V and English IV. Courses may be entered at the opening of the 
winter or spring term, provided the student has had the work of 
the preceding term or its equivalent. 

SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 



Classical 
First Year 

Mathematics II 

English I 

Latin I 

History I 
* Mathematics I 
Second Year 

Mathematics III 

English II 

Latin II 

Science I 
♦History II 

Third Year 
fMathematics IV 
f English III 

Latin III 

German I 

French I 

History III 

Fourth Year 
fMathematics V (Fall) 
fEnglish IV (W. & S.) 

Latin IV 

German II 

French II 
fScience II 

History IV 
NOTES. — 1. English Bible is required for seven weeks each year. 



General 

First Year 
Mathematics I 
Mathematics II 
English I 
History I 

Second Year 
Mathematics III 
English II 
Science I 
History II, or 
Bookkeeping I 

Third Year 
Mathematics IV 
English III 
German I, or 
French I 
History III 

Fourth Year 
Mathematics V (Fall) 
English IV (W. & S.) 
German II, or 
French II 
Science II 
History IV 



The 



work is so arranged as not to interfere with the other prescribed studies, 
and is credited for graduation. 

2. In addition to the courses listed above, which begin in the fall term, 
extra classes in Latin I, Mathematics II, and other branches, are provided 
at the opening of the winter term. Such subjects as are completed by the 
end of the spring term may be continued regularly during the following 
year. For further information see page 34, and the smaller bulletins. 



* May be taken in addition to the required studies, by permission of 
the Principal. 

t These studies and one language are required; the other study is 
elected. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 39 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in either course are fifteen units 
of work as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the 
equivalent of five forty-five minutes recitation periods a week in one 
subject throughout the academic year. A student may elect either 
course, but must pursue the studies prescribed in the course elected 
for at least one year, unless change is made in accordance with the 
administrative rule on page 72 regarding changes of course. The 
prescribed work is four recitation periods a day 1 . Partial work may 
be permitted at the discretion of the Principal. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on 
the unit basis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be 
so indicated on the records, and unit credit for that subject with- 
held until the student shall have completed the year's work. A 
minimum of three units, seventy-five per cent, of the year's work, 
will be required for advancement in classification to the following 
year. The passing grade in the Preparatory 1 Department is seventy. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Mathematics 

First Year: I. Higher Arithmetic. A thorough course in 
arithmetic is offered. The subjects considered are percentage and its 
various applications, exchange, equation of payments, progressions, 
involution and evolution, mensuration, ratio and proportion, and the 
metric system. 

II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New Standard 
Algebra, to radicals. 

Second Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and 
infinity, ratio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, bi- 
nomial and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and 
equations in general. 

Third Year: IV. Plane Geometry. Five books of plane geom- 
etry, together with about three hundred original theorems and 
problems. Wentworth's Revised Geometry is the text-book used. 

Fourth Year: V. Solid Geometry. The subject is begun and 
finished during the fall term. Students in this course enter English 
IV in the winter term. Wentworth's text-book is used, including 
the chapter on Conic Sections. 

English 

First Year: I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by 
the best modern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. 
Oral drill is given in the retelling of familiar stories from standard 



40 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

American and English authors. Written themes are required weekly, 
in which drill is given on capitalization and punctuation, and, in an 
elementary way, on unity and coherence in the paragraph and the 
sentence. 

Second Year: II. Composition and Rhetoric. Brooks' text is 
made the basis of this year's work, and oral and written themes are 
required weekly. A further study is made of unity and coherence 
in the composition and in paragraphs ; and practice is given in variety 
of sentence structure. During the year the work is supplemented 
by the study of selections from the prescribed requirements for college 
entrance. 

Third Year: III. English Literature. In courses III and IV 
a study is made of the texts prescribed by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. During the year written and oral themes are re- 
quired based on topics that arise from the study of literature and 
from the daily life of the student. The texts used for study are as 
follows: Addison and Steele's, The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers; 
Shakespeare's Macbeth and As You Like It; Milton's Minor Poems; 
Burke's Conciliation of the American Colonies; the four Gospels; 
Dicken's Tale of Two Cities; Poe's Tales. 

Fourth Year: IV. English Literature. Further study of 
literature is pursued during the winter and spring terms. The method 
of work is the same as that followed during the third year. The 
texts used for study are as follows: Gateway Series, Byron, Shelley, 
Keats, Browning; Shakespeare's Hamlet; Lamb's Essays of Elia; 
Types of the Short Story. 

Latin 

First Year: I. First Latin. Pearson's Essentials, supple- 
mented by outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is com- 
pleted in the spring term, and is followed by the reading of easy 
prose selections. 

Second Year: II. Caesar and Latin Composition. Caesar, 
four periods each week; Latin composition, one period. During the 
year outlines are given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. 
The first four books of the Gallic War are completed. The texts 
used are Allen and Greenough's Caesar and Allen and Phillips' Latin 
Composition. 

Third Year: III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In 
the fall and winter terms: Cicero, four periods each week; Latin 
composition, one period. The four orations against Catiline, the 
Manilian Law, and the Archias. In the spring term: Sallust, four 
periods each week; Latin composition, one period. Sallust's Catiline. 
A careful comparison is made with Cicero's Catilinarian orations. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 41 

Special attention is paid to drill in pronouncing the Latin, intelligent 
reading in the original, and translation at sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year: IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is 
spent in the study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The prin- 
ciples of quantity and versification are carefully studied. Thorough 
drill in oral and written scansion. Sight reading. The course covers 
the first six books of Vergil's Mneid. The last three weeks of the 
spring term are devoted to prose composition. 

German 

Third Year: I. Grammar, Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der Deut- 
schen Sprache. This course consists of the principles of German pro- 
nunciation, inflection, rules of syntax, the rewriting of easy English 
sentences in German, and the memorizing of familiar poems. The 
work of the winter and spring terms is augmented by reading Bacon's 
Im Vaterland, and Gerstacker's Irrfahrten. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This 
course includes advanced grammar and syntax, use of modes, deriva- 
tion of words, force of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted 
to conversation and composition work of an intermediate character. 
The reading consists of such works of descriptive and narrative prose 
as will impart facility in translation. Storm's Immensee, Benedix' 
Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's Germelshausen, Mezger and Mueller's 
Kreuz und Quer, Griltparzer's Der arme Spielmann, Hoffmann's Das 
Gymnasium zu Holpenburg. Memorizing of longer poems. 

French 

Third Year: I. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course 
consists of a thorough foundation in the elements of French grammar 
and the conjugation of irregular verbs. Composition, and reading 
of such authors as Guerber's Contes et Legendes, Dumas' La Tulipe 
Noire, Dandet's Trois Contes Choisis. 

Fourth Year: II. Grammar, Fraser and Squair. This course 
consists of advanced grammar, composition, and conversation; a paper 
each term on some book to be read outside of class; and the reading 
of Buffum's Short Stories, Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Moliere's 
L'Avare, and Greville's Dosia. 

History 

First Year: I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian 
and Oriental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alex- 
ander, followed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 
476 A. D. 



42 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Second Year: II. Medieval and Modern History. A genera] 
survey of European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 
A. D., to the present time. This work will be centered on the history 
of France. 

Third Year: III. Advanced United States History and Gov- 
ernment. A survey of the history of our country from its beginning 
to the close of the nineteenth century. This course is designed to 
give the student a thorough knowledge of the settlement of the coun- 
try by European colonists in the seventeenth century, the struggle 
with France for supremacy in America, the cause, course, and conse- 
quence of the American Revolution, the development of the Union 
under the Constitution, the slavery struggle, and the final advance of 
the country to the position it occupies today. Combined with the 
above, a thorough course in Civics is given, with careful detail of 
the Constitution and its Amendments. Channing's text is used. 

Fourth Year: IV. English History. A brief outline of the 
history of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the 
periods of the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course 
is intended to give the student a good general knowledge of the his- 
tory of our mother country and to prepare for subsequent courses in 
English literature and higher United States history. 

Bookkeeping 

Second Year: I. Bookkeeping. Thorough courses conducted 
throughout the year according to the practical methods employed in 
business colleges. Students may enter any part of the course in any 
term. No extra charge is made for this work. The Twentieth Cen- 
tury Bookkeeping is the system used. 

Science 

Second Year: I. General Biology. The purpose of this course 
is to instruct the student in human physiology and hygiene. The de- 
pendence of human life and health on plants and animals' is shown 
by simple demonstrations in plant physiology, followed by similar 
work in zoology. The principles of physiology thus learned are then 
applied to man. Three recitation periods and four laboratory periods 
a week. 

Fourth Year: II. Elementary Physics. This course pur- 
poses to give the student a knowledge of the fundamental principles 
of physics and of their applications in every-day life. Three recita- 
tion periods and four laboratory periods a week. Text-books, Hoad- 
ley s Elements of Physics and Hoadley's Physical Laboratory Hand- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 43 

English Bible 

First Year: Studies in the First Book of Samuel. Thirty-five 
lessons during the spring term. Required in all courses. 

Second Year: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. Re- 
quired in all courses during the fall term. 

Third Year: The Life of Christ. A text-book adapted to sec- 
ondary students is used, and the subject is taught so as to prepare 
for the more advanced course offered in the College Department. 
Thirty-five lessons during the winter term, required in all courses. 

Fourth Year: A study of Bible characters. Thirty-five lessons 
during the spring term. Required in all courses. 

The Principal will each year arrange the student's hours so that 
these courses will not conflict with other required courses nor add 
to the required number of hours a week. 

Note. — Students are also required to pursue a weekly Bible study 
in the Bible classes of the Christian Associations of the College or the 
Sabbath schools of the town. 



44 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department provides biblical instruction for 
all the students enrolled in all other courses of the institution, and 
offers exceptional advantages for young men and young women wish- 
ing to prepare themselves for Christian service as lay workers, Sab- 
bath-school workers, pastors' assistants, mission teachers, or Bible 
readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of gradua- 
tion will be granted to those who, having previously completed 
fifteen units of high-school work, complete twenty-seven courses se- 
lected under the direction of the head of the department from the 
following groups: 

I. Bible Training courses of college grade, all of which are re- 
quired except those in Bible languages: English Bible, eleven 
courses; Bible Languages, three courses; and Practical Work, two 
courses. To these courses, which are described in the ensuing para- 
graphs, only students prepared to do work of college grade are admit- 
ted. Courses are alternated, at least nine being given each year. 

II. Other college courses from which supplementary work may 
be elected: English 1, 2, 3, and 10; Philosophy 2, 3, and 4; Psy- 
chology 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; Social Science 1, 2, 3, and 4; Education 
3; History 3; and Spanish 1 and 2. These courses are described 
under The College Department. 

III. Preparatory courses from which supplementary work may 
be elected: Science I; Pedagogy I; and Bookkeeping I. These 
courses are described under The Preparatory Department. 

ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gillingham 

1. Life of Christ. The study of the life of Christ is based on 
a harmony of the Gospels. As an introduction to the course a rapid 
view of the period between the Testaments is taken, and the prin- 
cipal characteristics of each of the four Gospels are studied. Text- 
books, Stevens and Burton's Harmony of the Gospels and Burton 
and Mathews', The Life of Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. A careful study of Genesis, the geo- 
graphy of Palestine and surrounding countries, and the general me- 
chanics of the Bible. The object of the course is, in addition to the 
mastery of the subject matter, to develop systematic habits and 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 45 

methods of Bible study. Text-books, the Bible (R. V.), Davis', A 
Dictionary of the Bible, and the professor's outlines. Reference 
reading is assigned. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. A continuation of Course 2. The 
work is more rapid, covering Exodus to Ruth. Special attention is. 
paid to the lives and characters of Israel's leaders during this period. 
Text-books, same as in Course 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. A continuation of Course 3, beginning 
with I Samuel. The national development, the conflicts of Judah 
and Israel, their governments, their subjugation and partial restora- 
tion, their social customs, the character of their leaders, and their 
influence upon their contemporaries, are studied. An outline course, 
preparing for detailed treatment of the most important parts in 
Course 10. Text-books, same as in Course 2. Sophomore year, fall 
term. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. An analytic and synthetic study 
based on the words of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels. Use 
is also made of his works and of the evangelists' commentaries in 
helping to determine the nature of Jesus' teaching. Dr. James 
Robertson's, Our Lord's Teaching is used also as a text-book. Sopho- 
more year, winter term. 

6. The Apostolic Church. A historical study of the early church 
based on the Acts and Epistles. Text-books, the New Testament. 
(R. V.) and Gilbert's, A Short History of Christianity in the Apos- 
tolic Age. Sophomore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. This course treats very 
briefly General and Particular Introduction, and brings the entire 
Bible before the student in rapid review. Text-books, Robertson's, 
The Old Testament and Its Contents and M'Clymont's, The New 
Testament and Its Writers. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. An outline study of Job, Proverbs, Ec- 
clesiastes, Song of Solomon, and selected Psalms. Introductory 
lectures on Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature. Portions of 
the books are studied in detail and their relation to other sacred 
literature and their importance in Christian experience are empha- 
sized. No commentaries are used as text-books, but required read- 
ings are assigned; and the professor furnishes a syllabus of each 
book. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. The methods outlined in Course 8 
are followed. The prophecies are reviewed chronologically in the 
light of contemporaneous history. Messianic prophecy is given special 
attention. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. A search study 
for advanced students. The great leaders of Israel and their mes- 



46 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



sages are carefully studied. Three or more characters are studied I 
a term, the entire Old Testament being covered during a succession 
of years. Commentaries suitable to the nature of the work are 
used. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. A search study 
for advanced students. This alternates with Course 10 and pursues 
the same method of study. Senior year, fall term. 

BIBLE LANGUAGES 

12. Hebrew. An elementary course, grammar and exercises, and 
reading of easy portions of the Old Testament is offered every second 
or third year. Text-books: Harper's Inductive Hebrew Method and 
Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Senior year, fall term.— Pro- 
fessor GlLLINGHAM. 

13. Hebrew. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory com- 
pletion of both courses will enable candidates for the ministry to 
secure advanced standing in Hebrew in the theological seminary. 
Senior year, winter term.— Professor Gillingham. 

14. Greek. One of the Gospels or the Acts is read in class, West- 
cott and Hort's text being used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer's 
and Robertson's grammars. In connection with the reading of the 
assigned text, a study is made of the general characteristics of Hel- 
lenistic Greek, the literature of this period, and the most important 
New Testament manuscripts and versions. Sophomore year, spring 
term. — Professor Calhoun. 

PRACTICAL WORK 

Professor Gillingham 

17. Bible Teaching: Principles and Practice. This course has 
reference especially to personal work and the conducting of Bible 
classes. The history, organization, and management of the Sabbath 
school are studied. Lectures, quizzes, and practice under the direc- 
tion of the instructor. Freshman year, spring term. 

18. Religious Address: Principles and Practice. Preparation for 
religious services, missionary programs and the like; selection and 
development of themes; sources and use of illustrations; addresses 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 47 

on special occasions and to special audiences; and drill in the read- 
ing of hymns and passages of Scripture. As much practical work 
is done by the student as possible. Sophomore year, spring term. 

COURSES FOR PREPARATORY STUDENTS 

Mrs. Alexander, Miss Alexander, and Miss Broady 

For First Year students: Studies in the First Bc?k of Samuel; 
thirty-five lessons. For Second Year students: The Gospel of 
Mark; thirty-five lessons. For Third Year students: The Life of 
Christ; thirty-five lessons. For Fourth Year students: A study of 
Bible characters; thirty-five lessons. 



48 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 



The liberality of an anonymous donor, who contributed th( 
Mary Esther Memorial Endowment Fund, made it possible in 191? 
for the College to add a Home Economics Department to the privileges 
already afforded its students. The principal home of the depart- 
ment is the new third story of Fayerweather Science Hall, which was 
added to the building in 1913 by the generosity of the founder of 
the department as an additional memorial of her mother. The large 
and well lighted rooms have been equipped in the most recent and 
approved manner, through the kindness of the same generous lady. 
Spacious rooms are set aside as sewing rooms, kitchen, dining room, 
lecture room, and general room. The hospital is also employed in 
connection with the teaching of home nursing and sanitation, and 
rooms in the dormitories in connection with the teaching of house- 
keeping. The home economics courses in chemistry are given in, 
the chemistry laboratories and lecture room. The courses scheduled, 
in this department are offered without extra tuition. A small labo- 
ratory fee is charged for the use of equipment, and in the sewing; 
classes students provide their own materials as specified in the de- 
scription of courses. Cotton dresses should be worn in the labora- 
tories, and long white aprons with bibs, and coming to the bottom of 
the dress are required. 

Preparatory students of the second year and above may enter 
such classes of the Home Economics Department as are adapted to 
their degree of advancement, and will be allowed in this depart- 
ment a maximum credit of two units toward the fifteen units re- 
quired for graduation from the Preparatory Department. College 
students pursuing college grade studies in this department viil be 
allowed three credits in home economics toward the seven science- 
electives required to complete the total of thirty-six credits neces- 
sary for graduation with the B.A. degree in the Science Group. 

For students that desire to take all their studies in this de- 
partment, two-year, and three-year courses are offered. Fifteen 
recitation hours a week for thirty-six weeks constitute a year's work. 
Two hours of laboratory practice count as one recitation hour. Stu- 
dents that do not wish to take the three-year course may receive 
a certificate for the completion of two years' work. Both preparatory 
and college students are eligible to these certificates. Students 
that wish to prepare for teaching the subject will be required to 
pursue the full course of three years. Diplomas will be granted 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 49 

students of college standing that complete twenty-seven courses se- 
lected under the direction of the head of the department from the 
following groups: 

I. Home Economics courses, twelve of which are required for 
graduation, as follows: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
and 15. 

II. College courses as follows: Chemistry 1, 10, 11, a?id 32 
(three must be taken) ; Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 (two must 
be taken) ; Social Science 4 (must be taken) ; English 2, 3, and 10; 
and Bible 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (two must be taken). These courses 
are described under The College Department. 

III. Preparatory courses as follows: Pedagogy I (three terms) ; 
Science I (three terms) ; Science II (three terms) ; and Bookkeep- 
ing I (at least one term). These are to be taken unless substituted 
for from among the higher courses offered above. These courses are 
described under The Preparatory Department. 

Special classes in cooking, if called for, will be organized for 
students from Maryville and vicinity who may wish to take only 
this work. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Miss Ryland and Assistants, and Miss MacLachlan 

1, 2, 3. Cookery and Clothing. Elementary studies intended 
for those that have had no previous training in the subjects taught. 
The courses consist of the following work: (a) Foods and Cookery. 
The purpose of this course is to give practice in fundamental cooking 
processes in order to develop skill and efficiency in handling food 
materials and cooking utensils. It includes the study of food mate- 
rials, principles of cookery, care of food in the house, how to study the 
recipe, methods of mixing, the making of beverages, vegetables and 
vegetable cookery, cereals, proteins — eggs, milk, cheese, fats, — bat- 
ters and doughs, salads, and simple desserts. Bacteria, yeasts, and 
molds of the household are studied two hours a week throughout 
the fall term as part of the work in Course 1. The instruction 
in bacteriology is given by Miss Green, in the biological laboratory, 
(b) Textiles and Clothing. Elementary cloth! ig and handwork. 
As a preliminary to the practical work specified below, students are 
taught, as needed, the various stitches used in garment making, 
machine stitching, and the use and care of the sewing machine and 
attachments. During the year the students make the following ar- 
ticles from materials which they provide, subject to the approval of 
the instructor, at the approximate cost of eight dollars. The gar- 
ments thus made are the property of the student. Two pieces of 
underclothing are made by hand ; a nightgown and a laundry bag are 



50 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

made by hand and machine; a slip, a plain shirtwaist or middy, andi 
a plain tailored cotton skirt are made by machine. The students alsd 
make a simple muslin dress, and embroider a towel, a table runnerj 
and a centerpiece. In this course darning and patching are taught' 
Pattern drafting is also taught, and the students draft patterns for' 
a kimono nightgown and a plain skirt. Text-books, Kinne and! 
Cooley's Foods and Household Management, and Shelter and Cloth- 
ing; and Conne's Bacteria, Yeasts, and Molds in the Home. Thesp 
three courses are required for certificate or diploma. Laboratory 
practice in cooking, four hours a week, in sewing, four hours; recita- 
tion, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4, 5, 6. Cookery and Clothing. (a) Foods and Cookery. 
Home cookery and table service. This course consists of a review of 
food principles and the theory of cookery; the preparation of more 
elaborate dishes; the study of meats, soups, canning, and frozen 
desserts; the planning and serving of simple meals; and a study of 
the comparative cost and nutritive value of different food mate- 
rials, (b) Textiles and Clothing. Drafting and elementary dress- 
making. This course includes drafting, cutting, ard fitting. Shirt- 
waists, plain skirts, and sleeves are cut in cambric from drafted 
patterns, and fitted. The patterns are then altered, and the articles 
to be made are cut from the altered patterns. Practice is given 
in testing commercial patterns. During the year the students make 
the following articles of clothing from materials which they pro- 
vide, subject to the approval of the instructor, at the approximate 
cost of fifteen dollars: a tailored shirtwaist and skirt, a simple 
muslin dress, an unlined silk dress, and a wool skirt. The garments 
thus made are the property of the student. Text-book, Kinne and 
Cooley's Foods and Household Management, and references to govern- - 
ment bulletins. These three courses are required for certificate or * 
diploma. Prerequisites, Home Economics 1, 2, and 3. Laboratory 
practice in cooking, four hours a week, in sewing, four hours; reci- 
tation, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms^ 

7, 8, 9. Cookery. These courses consist of all the work offered 
in Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 on the subject of Cookery. T!-ey are 
intended for students already proficient in sewing, or who, for reasons 
satisfactory to the head of the department, do not desire instruction 
in sewing and are able to take both years of Cookery at the same 
time. Laboratory practice in cooking, eight hours a week; recita- 
tion, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

10, 11, 12. Clothing. These courses consist of all the work of- 
fered in Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 on the subject of Clothing. They 
are intended for students already proficient in cooking, or who, for 
reasons satisfactory to the head of che department, do not desire 
instruction in cooking, and are able to take both years of Clothing 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 51 

at the same time. Laboratory practice in sewing and drafting, eight 
hcurs a week; recitation, one hour. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

13, 14, 15. Cookery, Housekeeping, and Home Nursing. These 
courses consist of: (a) Cookery. The various methods of preserv- 
ing and canning. Fancy cookery. Invalid cookery. Demonstration 
cookery. Lunch room cookery. The preparation and serving of 
typical and economical luncheon dishes. The five- and ten-cent lunch- 
eon will be considered with reference to schools. (b) House- 
keeping. Household management. Discussions and readings. The 
text-book is Snyder's Human Foods. This course includes the ques- 
tion of the budget, the cost of living, problems of household labor, the 
care of children, and the social side of home life. Household fur- 
nishings. The decoration and furnishing of the entire house, artistic 
and economic furnishing, cost of materials and labor, and visits to 
house-furnishing establishments. (c) Home Nursing. ^ General 
structure of the body. General instruction for care of sickness in 
the home. Bed-making. Bathing. Food. Medicine and general 
treatment. Care of infants and children. Infectious diseases. Emer- 
gencies and first aid. These three courses are required for diploma. 
Prerequisites, Home Economics 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, or their equivalents. 
Laboratory practice in cooking, four hours a week; recitations, three 
hours. Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

Courses will be added also in the subjects of practice teaching, 
textiles, history of costume, laundering, and shelter, as the growth 
of the department demands. 



52 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Miss Hale and Assistants, and Miss Staater 

It is the purpose of this department to lay a firm technical foun- 
dation that will lead to the expression of the highest musical thought 
and emotion. The works of the best masters are employed through 
all grades, m both piano and voice training, so that the pupil may 
grow continually in musical taste and may develop a sympathetic 
comprehension of all that enters into artistic performance 'The 
study of Harmony, Theory, and History of Music is urged upon the 
students of Piano and Voice. Pupils are required to read and pass; 
examinations upon reference works, provided in the Library, as 
assigned by the teachers. Lectures are given during the year by 
the head of the department on the subject of Musical Appreciation 
Compositions are played and analyzed, and an effort is made to point 
out their underlying thought and meaning. These lectures are open 
to the general public as well as to students of the College. Monthly 
recitals also are given by the students of Voice and Piano in the 
chapel auditorium. These public recitals are among the prominent 
social events of the year, and have the double advantage of encourag- 
ing the pupil to a higher mastery of his art, and of providing also 
a means of musical education to those that listen. The utmost care 
is used m the selection of compositions, with a view to acquainting 
the listener with the best musical literature. 

On account of the individual needs of the pupil, it is considered 
inadvisable to adhere too persistently to any special set of exercises 
and studies, but advisable, rather, to select those that will meet the 
particular requirements of each pupil. A general idea of the various 
courses may be had by the following outline. 

Piano. Elementary Course. Building up the hand. Correct- 
ing improper or faulty hand positions, and the reinforcing of the 
hand by means of exercises. Training in a knowledge of notes, their 
relationship to the keyboard, rhythm, and the like. Studies and 
sonatas selected from the works of Czerny, Bertini, Clementi, Handel, 
Mozart, and Beethoven, supplemented by easy pieces from modern 
composers, such as Schumann, Schytte, Reinecke, and Scharwenka. 

Intermediate Course. More difficult forms of scale, including 
major and minor scales, scales in thirds, sixths, and tenths; 
broken chords and arpeggios with their inversions; dominant and 
diminished seventh chords in their different positions. Studies of 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 53 

considerable technical difficulty from the works of Czerny, Berens, 
and Cramer. Emphasis on the study of Bach's two- and three-part 
Inventions. Classical compositions, including- sonatas, from the 
works of Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn. Study of the best modern 
compositions. By the end of the Intermediate Course pupils must 
be able to play at least five compositions from memory. 

Advanced Course. Studies of technical difficulty, including 
"Gradus ad Parnassum" Clementi, Moscheles, and Chopin; also com- 
positions by Beethoven, Schumann, Mendelssohn, and others, sup- 
plemented by those of the best modern composers. Pupils in this 
course are required to appear several times in recital, playing from 
memory whatever compositions are selected. It is also necessary to 
cover the requirements in Harmony and History of Music, and to 
take the course in Normal Training. When the pupil has done the 
work of this course successfully, he is entitled to a diploma in Piano, 
and upon graduation will be assisted in securing a position by the 
college agency, the Committee on Recommendations, if so desired. 

Voice. Correct breathing and breath control. Placing of the 
voice and development of the resonance. Training of the ear and 
mind. Enunciation and diction. Vocalises such as Vaccai, Sieber, 
Martzo (Preparatory and Advanced), and Liitgen. Song interpre- 
tation. Repertoire work, including the Classics, German Lieder, 
Opera, and Oratorio. 

All vocal students are required to take Sight-singing, Theory, 
and History of Music. The requirements in Harmony, Theory, and 
History of Music are the same for graduation in Voice as those re- 
quired in Piano. In addition, the pupil must be able to sing in at 
least one language besides his own. 

Violin. A new department will be added at the beginning of 
the coming year, when a violin department under competent instruc- 
tion will be opened. 

Chorus and Choir. Instruction is given free to any students de- 
siring to take the work of chorus and choir singing and sight reading. 

Band. Instruments are furnished by the College, and the band 
is composed entirely of students in this institution. 

Glee Club. This is accessible to any young men that have a 
fair knowledge of the rudiments of vocal music. 



54 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Miss Smith 

This department furnishes those desiring it with instruction J 
free-hand drawing and in painting in oil and water color. Class 
lessons in free-hand drawing are available to students of all the 
other departments without extra tuition charges. These lessons are 
designed to lay a foundation for work on industrial and artistic lines 
The student is taught to draw from still life objects, including casts,! 
and from nature. 

The work of the department is designed to train the hand and 
the eye, and to cultivate the aesthetic sense, thereby adding to the 
students cultural equipment and increasing his abilities along every 
line of endeavor. . 

*-n r^ ? UT f 6S lndude the Study 0f form and color ^ object and 
still life, landscape study from nature, the theory of perspective and : 
color, elements of applied design, modeling and pottery making, and : 
also a course m History of Art for those desiring to graduate in art. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

Mrs. West 

The aim of this department is to cultivate the voice, to free 
the student from constrained, limited, and erroneous action, and to 
lead him to a knowledge and understanding of the interpretation of 
literature. Students are trained for teaching Expression in the 
various forms that it takes in public schools, high schools, and col- 
leges. Opportunity is given for class and individual instruction. 
Class work consists of interpretative analysis and technical work. 
Special time and attention are given persons troubled with stuttering 
stammering, or any other form of defective speech. The text-books 
used are King's Practice of Speech and Phillips' Natural Drills in 
Expression. 

Diplomas are granted to such students as pass all the require- 
ments of the course. Students must be graduates of a preparatory 
school of a standard equivalent to that of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment of this institution before they will be granted a diploma in 
Expression. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 55 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY 



Maryville College, like most of the older colleges, grew out of 
the zeal that the pioneers of the American church had for the educa- 
tion of the people. The same year (1802) in which Isaac Anderson 
was ordained to the ministry by the Presbytery of Union, he founded 
within the bounds of his Grassy Valley congregation, near Knoxville, 
a school which he called "Union Academy," but which was popularly 
known as "the Log College." He built for it a large four-roomed 
log house. In this, for the times, pretentious building, many men 
who afterwards served their country well were educated. Among 
this number was Governor Reynolds, of Illinois. Dr. Anderson in 
1812 removed to Maryville and took charge of New Providence 
Church, of which organization he remained pastor till his death, 
which took place in 1857. In Maryville he continued his academic 
work. The most famous pupil of this Maryville academy was Sam 
Houston, who afterward had so unique and picturesque a career as 
general, governor, president of Texas, congressman, and patriot. 

Dr. Anderson, however, felt that more should be done toward 
providing an educated ministry for the South-west. Encouraged 
by others like-minded with himself, he founded Maryville College 
in 1819. The institution was born of the moral and spiritual needs 
of the early settlers of East Tennessee — chiefly Scotch-Irish Pres- 
byterians — and was designed principally to educate for the ministry 
men who should be native to the soil. The grand motive of the 
founder may be stated in his own words. "Let the directors and 

MANAGERS OF THIS SACRED INSTITUTION PROPOSE THE GLORY OF GGD 
AND THE ADVANCEMENT OF THAT KINGDOM PURCHASED BY THE BLOOD 
OF HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON AS THEIR SOLE OBJECT." Inspired by 

such a motive, Dr. Anderson gathered a class of five candidates 
for the ministry in the fall of 1819, and in prayer and faith began 
what proved to be the principal work of his life. In forty-two years 
the institution put one hundred and fifty men into the ministry. 
Its endowment, gathered by littles through all these years, was only 
sixteen thousand dollars. 

Then came the Civil War, and suspended the work of the in- 
stitution for five years, and the College came out of the general 
wreck with little save its good name and precious history. 



56 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

After the war the Synod of Tennessee, moved by the spirit < 
self-preservation, and by a desire to promote Christian edueatic 
in the Central South, resolved to revive Maryville College. Tl 
institution was reopened in 1866. New grounds and new building 
were an imperative necessity. To meet this need, sixty-five thousar 
dollars was secured, and the College was saved from extinctio: 
In 1883 a few generous friends — William Thaw, William E. Dodg 
Preserved Smith, Dr. Sylvester Willard, and others — contributed s 
endowment fund of one hundred thousand dollars. In 1891, Dani 
Fayerweather bequeathed to the College the sum of one hundre 
thousand dollars, and also made it one of twenty equal participam 
in the residuary estate. The College received two hundred an 
sixteen thousand dollars by the provisions of the will. This ma£ 
nificent donation enabled the institution to enlarge its work aij 
to enter upon a new era of usefulness and influence. On Januar 
1, 1905, Mr. Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey, made the munificer 
donation of one hundred thousand dollars to the general endowmer 
fund of the College. The gift is subject to a five per cent, annuit 
during the lifetime of Mrs. Voorhees. The reception of this super 
benefaction filled the hearts of Maryville's friends with confident 
and with intense gratitude to God and to God's stewards. 

In 1906, the rapid growth in the number of students havin 
made necessary much further enlargement of the teaching fore 
and of the material equipment of the institution, President Wilso 
entered upon a campaign for additional endowment. Mr. Andre* 
Carnegie generously offered the College twenty-five thousand dollar 
on condition that fifty thousand dollars additional be secured. I 
1907, the General Education Board pledged fifty thousand dollar 
on condition that one hundred and fifty thousand dollars be secure 
from other sources. Mr. Carnegie then increased his pledge to fift 
thousand dollars toward this larger fund. The time limit set fo 
the completion of the fund was December 31, 1908. In the face o 
many difficulties the President, with reliance upon the favor of Goc 
prosecuted the campaign for the "Forward Fund of two hundre 
thousand dollars." In order to meet the spirit as well as the lette 
of the requirements of the conditional pledges, it was deemed neces 
sary to raise twenty-five thousand dollars more than the designate- 
sum. When the canvass closed, the subscriptions amounted to th 
splendid sum of two hundred and twenty-seven thousand dollars 
The fact that, in spite of the recent panic and hard times, the un 
easiness of a presidential year, and the ill health of the canvasser 
the "Forward Fund" was secured, filled the Faculty, Directors, am 
friends of the College with a deep sense of gratitude to God, am 
to his human agents who took part with Maryville in its ministr; 
to the noble youth of mountain and valley in its Southern Appa 
lachian field. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 57 

During the past six years there have been, besides a steady in- 
crease of the permanent scholarship funds and numerous contribu- 
tions for minor but pressing needs of the College, three notable 
advances made: (1) by the gift of an endowment of sixteen 
thousand dollars by an anonymous donor, a Home Economics Depart- 
ment has been established; (2) by the gift of thirteen thousand 
md five hundred dollars by the late Louis H. Severence, Esq., a 
;hird story has been added to Pearsons Hall, providing dormitory 
*oom for fifty additional young women; and (3) by the additional 
rift of twelve thousand dollars by the anonymous donor of the Mary 
Ssther Home Economics endowment fund, it has been possible for 
;he College to add a third story to Fayerweather Science Hall in 
>rder to provide quarters for the Home Economics Department. 

As the result of the generous contributions made through many 
rears by many philanthropic donors, the College now owns property 
tnd endowment to the total amount of about nine hundred thousand 
lollars. Of this amount, four hundred and seventy-five thousand 
lollars is invested in endowment and the remainder in buildings and 
quipment. 

One hundred and fifty of the post-bellum alumni have entered 
he ministry, while forty-seven alumni and undergraduates have 
een or are missionaries in Japan, China, Siam, Korea, India, Persia, 
lyria, Africa, the Philippines, Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Cuba, and 
'orto Rico. Several are laboring in missions in the West. All 
he alumni are engaged in honorable pursuits. Students who have 
-one from the College to the theological, medical, and legal schools 
ave usually attained a high rank in their classes. A goodly number 
f the alumni are now studying in theological seminaries. 

The necessary expenses are so phenomenally low as to give the 
istitution a special adaptation to the middle class and to the strug- 
ling poor of valley and mountain — the great mass of the surround- 
lg population — and to young people of other sections of the country 
here the cost of attending college is beyond their ability to defray. 

The privileges of the institution are, of course, open alike to 
11 denominations of Christians. All the leading denominations are 
rgely represented in the student body. 

LOCATION 

Maryville is a pleasant and thriving town of about four thousand 
habitants. It is widely known as "the town of schools and 
lurches." It is sixteen miles south of Knoxville. There are three 
ains a day each way on the Knoxville and Augusta Railroad, two 
ains each way on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and one 
aiii each way tri-weekly on the Tennessee and Carolina Southern 
ailroad. 



58 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville is an ideal health resort for students from othe! 
States. The town lies on the hills, one thousand feet above se 
level, and enjoys the life-giving" breezes from the Chilhowees an 
the Smokies, a few miles away. Young people from the Nortj 
and other sections are greatly benefited in health by a year a: 
Maryville, and many take their entire course here. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college grounds consist of two hundred and fifty acres, anf 
for beautiful scenery are not surpassed by any in the country. The] 
are elevated and undulating, covered with a beautiful growth o 
evergreens and with a noble forest, and command a splendid vie^ 
of the Cumberland Mountains on the north, and of the Smoky Moun 
tains on the south. The location is as remarkable for its healthful: 
ness as it is for its beauty. The campus affords the choicest facilitie 
for the development of athletics. 

On these grounds there are thirteen buildings, which, togethe 
with the grounds and equipment, represent an investment of nearljj 
four hundred thousand dollars. The buildings are heated with steanl 
and lighted with electricity from the central power plant on thi 
campus. Generous contributions from several givers have enable*, 
the College to begin the installation of a new water system. Th« 
water rights to some protected springs situated a mile and a hal : 
from the college grounds have been obtained, and pipes have beei: 
laid connecting these springs with the pipes of the old water system 
through which the water is pumped by electrical power to the reser; 
voir tank on the campus. It is thence conveyed to all the dormitories! 
the gymnasium, and the science laboratories, supplying an abundance 
of pure water for drinking as well as for toilet facilities. A fiftj 
thousand gallon steel tank has supplanted the old tanks formerly il 
use. As soon as funds are provided for the purpose, additional toile 
facilities will be furnished in the recitation buildings, and sanitarj 
drinking fountains will be installed in all the buildings and on tilt 
campus. 

Anderson Hall, the central building, is the oldest of the present 
college halls, having been built in 1869, and named in honor of the 
founder of the institution. It contains the administrative offices and 
most of the recitation rooms for the literary departments. The 
large addition to the Hall, the Fayerweather Annex, is occupied 
by the Preparatory Department. 

Baldwin Hall, named in honor of the late John C. Baldwin, 
of New Jersey, is a dormitory for young women. It contains rooms 
for one hundred and thirty students. It is provided, as are all the 
dormitories, with all modern conveniences, and is a comfortable home 
for young women. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 59 

Memorial Hall, originally built as a companion building to 
Baldwin Hall, is a young men's dormitory, containing rooms for 
seventy students. While it is one of the oldest of the college buildings, 
it is kept in excellent repair, and is a comfortable and well equipped 
dormitory. It is under the control of a regular instructor of the 
College. 

Willard Memorial, the home of the President, was provided 
in 1890 by a generous gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard, in memory of 
her husband, Sylvester Willard, M.D. It is one of the chief adorn- 
ments of the campus, and is a valuable property. 

The Lamar Memorial Library Hall was erected in 1888 at a 
cost of five thousand five hundred dollars, which amount was gener- 
ously provided by three friends of Professor Lamar and of the 
College. The building is a model in every respect. It is a noble 
and fitting monument. The large memorial window contributed by 
the brothers and sisters of Professor Lamar holds the central position. 

Bartlett Hall is one of the largest college Y. M. C. A. build- 
ings in the South. Planned for by the students led by Kin Taka- 
hashi, a Japanese student, it was erected by contributions made or 
secured by the Bartlett Hall Building Association, supplemented by 
a large appropriation by the College authorities. A liberal donation 
made by Mrs. Nettie F. McCormick in 1901 enabled the committee 
to complete the building. In 1911, Mrs. Elizabeth R. Voorhees made 
a generous gift providing for extensive alterations and improvements, 
including the building of a separate gymnasium for the use of young 
women. The Y. M. C. A. auditorium, parlors, and secretary's and 
committees' apartments occupy the front part of the building, while 
the large gymnasiums occupy the rest of the structure. 

Fayerweather Science Hall was erected in 1898 through the 
liberal bequest of Daniel B. Fayerweather. The building as erected 
was two stories in height, with extreme dimensions of one hundred 
and six feet by ninety-seven feet. The first floor contains spacious 
laboratories for chemistry and physics, a lecture room, balance and 
storage rooms, an office, and the John C. Branner Scientific Library. 
The second floor contains four excellent lecture rooms, two large and 
well lighted physics laboratories, and the laboratory of experimental 
psychology. The laboratories are furnished with both direct and 
alternating electric current, and also with gas. The building is 
thoroughly modern in every respect. It is provided with liberal equip- 
ment for the practical study of science, and will stand a useful and 
lasting monument to the intelligent philanthropy of the princely 
giver whose name it bears. In 1913 the anonymous donor of the Mary 
Esther Memorial Fund that provided for the establishment of the 
Home Economics Department, also contributed funds for the building 
of the third and fourth floors of this hall for the housing of the 



60 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Home Economics Department, as an additional memorial of hei 
mother. The third floor contains, beside cloak rooms, storerooms 
closets, toilets, and lockers, a reading room, dining room, kitchen 
sewing room, lecture room, and one small and one large laboratory 
On the fourth floor are three large rooms for general purposes. 

The Elizabeth R. Voorhees Chapel was erected in 1905-19(K 
by gifts made by the late Mr. Ralph Voorhees, of New Jersey, anc 
by other donors. The chapel, named in honor of Mrs. Voorhees 
graces one of the most commanding sites on the grounds, and ig| 
well worthy of its place of distinction. It is of an extra quality 
of brick, with buff-brick and terra-cotta trimmings. The style i 
Grecian, the details being of the Ionian order. The auditorium 
seats eight hundred and eighty persons and can be arranged to ac- 
commodate two or three hundred more. The basement contains seven- 
teen well lighted rooms, occupied by the Music Department, and J 
commodious auditorium occupied by the Y. W. C. A. To the rear 
of the main auditorium, also, and on the floor above, are several 
rooms used by the Department of Expression and for various other 
purposes. The entire building is in every way satisfactory, and will! 
for many years be adequate for the purposes it is designed to serve. 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital.— While the health 
of the student body has always been far above the average, yet 
in so large a number of students there is necessarily more or lessi 
sickness. With the growth of the College, the need of proper facilities 
for caring for such occasional cases of illness became increasingly 
urgent. This need was supplied in 1909 by the generosity of Mrs. 
Martha A. Lamar, a life-long friend of the College. Her gift of 
six thousand dollars provided a thoroughly modern hospital building; 
containing eleven wards, caretakers' rooms, baths, toilets, an operat- 
ing room, and other appointments of a well ordered hospital. The' 
building is named in honor of Mrs. Lamar's only son, who died M 
infancy. A gift of five hundred dollars from Mr. Nathaniel Tooker,;, 
of East Orange, N. J., secured the purchase of a valuable outfit! 
of the best hospital furnishings. To this amount about five hundred 
dollars has been added from other sources and used for the purpose, 
of additional furnishings and medical supplies. 

Carnegie Hall. — In connection with the "Forward Fund" secured 
in 1908, Mr. Andrew Carnegie gave the sum of fifty thousand dollars I 
for a dormitory for young men. The building was designed by the 
firm of Whitfield & King, of New York. The building was occupied 
at the opening of the fall term in 1910, and was dedicated on January 
11, 1911. It contains rooms for one hundred and twenty-one young 
men. Each of the two large wings contains a suite of rooms for the 
use of a professor and his family. The building is a comfortable 
and attractive home for the young men. In its architectural beauty 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 61 

and its thoroughly modern appointments this is one of the best college 
dormitories in the South, and is a most valuable addition to the 
equipment of the College. 

Pearsons Hall. — No benefaction of recent years has proven 
more immediately serviceable than the gift of twenty thousand dol- 
lars made in 1908 by the late Dr. D. K. Pearsons, of Chicago. The 
new building named in his honor provides additional dormitory facil- 
ities for young women, and adequate quarters for the large Cooper- 
ative Boarding Club. The building is of brick, and is three stories 
in height, with an imposing Greek portico fronting the west and 
commanding an excellent view of the grounds. The first story con- 
tains a spacious dining hall, with a seating capacity of five hundred, 
the kitchen, offices, and waiting rooms. The second story contains 
parlors, halls for the young women's literary societies, and rooms 
for thirty-four occupants. The third story was added during the 
vacation months of 1912, increasing the capacity of the dormitory 
so that fifty additional young women may secure rooms. This story 
was a gift of the late Louis H. Severance, Esq., of Cleveland, Ohio, 
"an admirer of Dr. Pearsons, who esteemed it a privilege to put 
this crowning story upon his building." 

The Power Plant.- — Heat for all the buildings and light for the 
buildings and grounds are furnished from the central power house 
situated on the campus. The boilers in this plant have a combined 
capacity of three hundred horse-power. The Webster Vacuum Sys- 
tem of steam heating is used, and the buildings are quickly and 
uniformly heated. A Bullock direct-current generator furnishes 
electric power for lighting purposes. Steam from the plant is used 
also for the meat and soup boilers and the dish- washing machine at 
Pearsons Hall. 

THE LAMAR MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest college libraries in the 
State. The number of books now on the shelves is about fifteen 
thousand. The library is open for the drawing of books or for the 
consulting of volumes in the reference alcoves for eight hours every 
day from Monday to Saturday. The use of the library is entirely 
free to students of all departments. The nucleus of a much needed 
endowment for the library has been secured, the fund now amount- 
ing to nearly $8,000. Among the gifts making up the endowment 
are the following: 

The "M. T." Fund, 1900, given by a friend $500 

The Helen Gould Fund, 1900, by Mrs. Helen Gould Shep- 

ard, New York 500 

The Willard Fund, 1900, by the Misses Willard, Auburn, N. Y. 200 
The Hollenback Fund, 1901, by J. W. Hollenback, Esq., Wilkes- 

barre, Pa 500 



62 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

The Solomon Bogart Fund, 1908, by Miss Martha M. Bog-art, 

Philadelphia, Tenn.. 200 

The Nina Cunningham Fund, 1909, by the sons of the late 
Major Ben Cunningham, Treasurer of the College, in mem- 
ory of their sister, Miss Nina Cunningham, '91 500 

The John M. Alexander English Literature Fund, 1909, by Rev. 

John M. Alexander, '87, and wife, Maryville 500 

The Charles T. Cates, Jr., Fund, 1909, by Hon. C. T. Cates, Jr., 

'81, former Attorney-General of the State of Tennessee...'. 300 

The Rev. S. B. West Fund, 1909-1912, by the late Mrs. S. B. 

West, Concord, Tenn 10 

The McTeer Fund, 1909, by J. C. McTeer, '07 \ZZZZ"Z" 100 

The Brown Fund, 1910, by Hon. T. N. Brown, '77 ioo 

The Chilhowee Club Fund, 1910, by the Chilhowee Club, Mary- 

ml ville 100 

The Class of 1891 Fund, 1910, by five members of the class 232 

The George Glenn Cooper Fund, 1910, by the parents, brother, 

and sister of the late George Glenn Cooper 300 ; 

The Faculty Fund, 1910, by members of the Faculty 1,000 

The French Fund, 1910, by Mr. and Mrs. C. T. French, '06.. 'l00 
The Gamble Fund, 1910, by Hon. M. H. Gamble, '05, Hon. 

Andrew Gamble, and A. M. Gamble, M.D., Maryville. . 250 

The Hooke Fund, 1910-1914, by Rev. R. H. Hooke, '74 90 

The Litterer Fund, 1910, by C. C. Litterer, '99 50 

The Lowry Fund, 1910, by Rev. G. H. Lowry, '94 100 

The Tracy Fund, 1910, by J. E. Tracy, Esq., '01 75 

The Jackson Fund, 1913, by C. O. Jackson, Maryville 100 

The Philadelphia Fund, 1909-1914, by a Friend, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 225, 

The following funds are now being formed: 

The Class of 1909 Fund ($700 subscribed) , $505 

The Class of 1910 Fund ($560 subscribed) 380 

The Class of 1911 Fund ($250 subscribed) "" 195 

The Class of 1912 Fund ($200 subscribed) 126 

The Class of 1913 Fund ($125 subscribed) 89 

LOAN LIBRARIES 

James R. Hills Library.— In 1888 Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New 
York, contributed a fund of six hundred dollars for the establish- 
ment of a Loan Library, in order that students unable to purchase 
the necessary text-books might have the privilege of renting them 
at a nominal rate. By judicious management the income from this 
fund has grown until now the privileges of this library are open to 
all students, and all the regular text-books used in the institution 
may be either rented or purchased, as the student prefers. An 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 63 

additional gift of five hundred dollars from the same donor in 1908 
made it possible to provide the text-books in use in the Bible Train- 
ing Department. The rental charged a term is one-fifth the retail 
price of each book. The income from rentals is devoted to supply- 
ing new books as they are needed. The library occupies a room in 
Anderson Hall, and is open every day. 

John C. Branner Library. — Some years ago John C. Branner, 
Ph.D., then the State Geologist of Arkansas, now President of the 
Leland Stanford Junior University, gave another proof of his gen- 
erosity and friendship to the College by establishing a loan library 
of the text-books used in the natural science departments. The books 
in this library are under the same regulations as are those of the 
Hills Library. 

The Misses Willard Library. — Through the generosity of the 
Misses Willard, of Auburn, N. Y., the text-books employed in the 
Bible classes of the Preparatory Department are also provided for 
rent at a nominal charge. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE BOARDING CLUB 

No other agency has been of greater service in enabling the 
College to keep the expenses of its students at a minimum than has 
the popular and successful Cooperative Boarding Club. The actual 
cost of the board is estimated at the end of each month. The price 
is fixed approximately at the beginning of each year. During the 
past year the price has been $1.90 a week; the price has again been 
fixed at $1.90 for the ensuing year. A deposit of $7.60 is required 
of each member of the Club, and settlements are thereafter made at 
the end of every fourth week. Because of the minimum rates at 
which board is furnished, a member's account with the Club is 
reckoned from the beginning of the college month during which he 
enters. A considerable number of students are employed as waiters 
and assistants in the dining room, thus materially reducing the cost 
of their board. The privileges of the Club are extended to all male 
students and to all young women rooming in the college dormitories. 
The membership of the Club has been more than five hundred this 
year. The Club is housed in Pearsons Hall, spoken of elsewhere. 

COLLEGE EXPENSES 

It is a constant aim of the College to provide first-class college 
advantages to the student at the lowest possible rates, and the en- 
dowment enables it to make its charges very moderate. College 
bills must be paid invariably in advance. Until this condition is 
complied with, no one can become a member of any of the classes. 
In view of the very low rates, no deduction will be made for absence 
at the beginning or at the end of any term, and no tuition will be 
refunded. 



64 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Fall Term 

Tuition: All literary courses $6.00 

*Home Economics (one course, $3.00) 6.00 

Music (vocal or instrumental) : 

Under head of department, 14 lessons » 

Under an assistant, 20 lessons \ ^0 

Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History 

of Music 2.50 

Expression 9.00 

Art (three-hour lessons in oil or water-color painting) 7.00 

Fees: Incidental fee (payable by all students) 1.00 

Laboratory fee in Chemistry or Home Economics (each 

course) 3.00 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics (each course) 2.00 

Laboratory fee in Preparatory Sciences (each course) 1.00 

Breakage deposit for Chemistry (each course) 2.00 

Breakage deposit for other science courses (each course) 1.00 

Piano rental (an hour a day) 4.00 

Text-books: Rented for about one-fifth retail price of the 

book, average 1.75 

Room rent: (consult the detailed statement under Rooms) 

average 10,00 

Board: In the Cooperative Boarding Club, $1.90 a week 27.45 

In private families, $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 
Usual expenses for the fall term: 

For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, 

or art, about : 45.00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, ex- 
pression, or art, about 48.00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or 

art, about \ 60.00 

Winter or Spring Term 

Tuition : All literary courses $6.00 

*Home Economics (one course, $3.00) 6.00 

Music (vocal or instrumental) : 

Under head of department, 11 lessons ) _ ™ 

Under an assistant, 15 lessons ( 

Class lessons in Rudiments of Music, Harmony, or History 

of Music (winter and spring terms combined) 3.00 

Expression 7.00 

Art (three-hour lessons in oil or water-color painting) 5.50 



* Students enrolled in literary courses are not charged any additional 
tuition if they take home economics courses. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 65 

^ees: Incidental fee (payable by all students) $1.00 

Laboratory fee in Chemistry (each course) 2.50 

Laboratory fee in Home Economics (each course) 3.00 

Laboratory fee in Biology or Advanced Physics (each course) 2.00 

Laboratory fee in Preparatory Sciences (each course) 1.00 

Breakage deposit for Chemistry 1 (each course) 1.50 

Breakage deposit for other science courses (each course) 1.00 

Piano rental (an hour a day) 3.00 

Graduation fees (payable at the opening of the spring term 
of the graduating year) : 

College Department 5.00 

Preparatory Department 1.00 

Home Economics Department 2.50 

Music Department 2.50 

Expression Department 2.50 

rEXT-BOOKS: Rented for about one-fifth retail price of the 

book, average for winter and spring terms combined 1.75 

$oom rent: (Consult the detailed statement under Rooms) 
average : 

Winter term 8.50 

Spring term 6.00 

3oard: In the Cooperative Boarding Club, $1.90 a week: 

Winter term 22.20 

Spring term 20.70 

In private families, $3.00 to $4.00 a week. 
Usual expenses for the winter term:,: 
For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, 

or art, about 40.00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, ex- 
pression, or art, about 43.00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or 

art, about 50.00 

Usual expenses for the spring term are about $5.00 less 

than for the winter term. 
Usual expenses for the year (three terms) : 
For the student not taking science courses, music, expression, 

or art, about 120.00 

For the student taking science courses, but not music, ex- 
pression, or art, about 130.00 

For the student taking principally music, expression, or 

art, about 150.00 

Rooms 

Rooms in all the dormitories are heated with steam and lighted 
with electricity, and fully supplied with baths and toilets. Two 
students usually occupy one room. More than two students in one 



66 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

room will not be allowed, except as noted in connection with Car- 
negie Hall. 

Every prospective student desiring to room in a dormitory must 
make a two-dollar deposit with the Registrar in order to secure a 
reservation. The Registrar will send the applicant a deposit receipt, 
which, upon presentation by the student when he enters college, will 
be accepted by the Treasurer for credit on the room rent to the 
amount and for the term specified thereon. The room,' however, will 
not be held beyond the opening day unless the room rent is paid for 
the term in advance. The deposit receipt is not negotiable, and the 
deposit will be forfeited if the student does not enter college. 

The cost of rooms in the different dormitories, with full infor- 
mation regarding furnishings, is given below. The rates given are 
for each occupant of a room. Students desiring to room alone in 
rooms equipped for two students may do so by paying double the 
rates here given. 

Memorial Hall (for Young Men) 

Rooms in this hall may be had either partially or fully furnished, 
as desired. The partially furnished rooms have in them only tables, 
wardrobes, and individual iron bedsteads, with springs and mat- 
tresses. The fully furnished rooms have besides the wardrobes and 
the individual iron bedsteads, with springs and mattresses, tables, 
bookcases, chiffoniers, and chairs. The baths are on the first floor. 
According to location the rates for each student are as follows : 

Corner rooms: Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Fully furnished ....$11.00 to $12.00 $9.00 to $10.00 $7.00 to $8.00 
Partially furnished 9.00 to 10.00 7.00 to 8.00 5.00 to 6.00 

Other rooms: 

Fully furnished .... 10.00 to 11.00 8.00 to 9.00 6,00 to 7.00 
Partially furnished 8.00 to 9.00 6.00 to 7.00 4.00 to 5.00 

Carnegie Hall (for Young Men) 

The rooms in this dormitory are furnished with individual iron 
bedsteads, springs, mattresses, tables, chiffoniers, chairs, and ward- 
robes. Baths and toilets on each of the three floors. There are 
fifty-four rooms for two students each, two rooms for three students 
each, and eight rooms for one student each. The rates for each stu- 
dent are as follows: 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 
In rooms for two or 

three $12.00 to $15.00 $10.00 to $12.00 $6.00 to $8.00 

In rooms for one 14.00 11.00 7.00 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 67 

Baldwin Hall (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this hall are furnished with iron bedsteads, springs, 
mattresses, washstands, tables, and wardrobes. In some rooms new 
furniture has been placed, including individual iron bedsteads, 
springs, mattresses, dressers, and tables with bookcases. Baths on 
first and second floors; toilets on all floors. According to location and 
furnishings the rates for each student are as follows: 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

Corner rooms $9.00 to $13.00 $7.00 to $10.00 $5.00 to $7.00 

Other rooms 8.00 to 12.00 6.00 to 9.00 4.00 to 7.00 

Pearsons Hall (for Young Women) 

The rooms in this hall are furnished with individual iron bed- 
steads, springs, mattresses, tables, dressers, chairs, and built-in 
wardrobes. The rooms, with the baths and toilets, are on the sec- 
ond and third floors. The rates for each student are as follows: 

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term 

According to location..$12.00 to $15.00 $10.00 to $12.00 $6.00 to $8.00 

Rooms in Town 

Young men can find comfortable furnished rooms in private resi- 
dences in convenient parts of town at the following rates by the 
month for each student: 

Rooms furnished and cared for, without fuel or light....$2.00 to $3.00 
Rooms furnished and cared for, with light and heat 3.00 to 4.00 

Laundry 

In the Cooperative Laundry (young women doing their 

own work) $0.30 a month 

In town by private laundresses $0.35 to $0.75 a week 

STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Societies. — Four literary societies are conducted by the 
students, and are of the greatest benefit to those who avail them- 
selves of the advantages they offer. The Athenian, organized in 
1868, and the Alpha Sigma, organized in 1882, are composed of 
young men. Their halls are on the third floor of Anderson Hall. 
Each society is divided into a "senior section" and a "junior sec- 
tion," the latter being composed of students in the Preparatory 
Department. The Bainonian, organized in 1875, and the Theta Ep- 
silon, organized in 1894, are conducted by the young women. They 
have neatly furnished halls in Pearsons Hall. The societies meet 
every Friday evening to engage in debates and other literary ex- 



68 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

ercises. The junior sections of the young men's societies meet on 
Saturday evening. Each society gives annually a public midwinter! 
entertainment. 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A.— The Y. M. C. A., established in 
1878, has become one of the strongest organizations of its kind in I 
the South. The weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath 
afternoon in the auditorium of Bartlett Hall. The Association con- 
ducts an annual encampment on the Tennessee River for one week 
before the opening of the fall term, at which encampment plans and 
policies for the ensuing year's work are arranged. The officers of 
the Association are as follows: President, Oscar Robinson; Vice 
President, George M. Adams; Secretary, Thomas H. Mitchell; Treas- 
urer, Fred R. Whalin; Cabinet, Charles Walker, Deck C. Williams, 
Bernard G. Weaver, Allen E. Groeneveld, Frank M. Cross, Roy r! 
Anderson. 

The Advisory Committee of the Y. M. C. A., composed of repre- 
sentatives of the Faculty and of the student body, directs the gen- 
eral policies of the Association. It consists of the following mem- 
bers: Class of 1915: Dean Barnes, Chairman, President Wilson, and 
Professor Bassett; Class of 1916: Professor Gillingham, Ralph W. 
Lloyd, and Oscar Robinson; Class of 1917: Treasurer Proffitt Major 
Will A. McTeer, and John V. Stephens, Jr. 

The Y. W. C. A. was established in 1884, and has become one 
of the most wholesome influences in the religious life of the College. 
The weekly devotional meetings are held on Sabbath afternoons in 
the association room, in the basement of Voorhees Chapel. The As- 
sociation has a small but valuable library, known as the Florence 
McManigal Memorial Library. It was contributed by Rev. J. Oscar 
Boyd, Ph.D., and wife, of Paterson, N. J., as a memorial to their 
sister, Miss McManigal, '08, who was an instructor in the College | 
and who died in 1909. The officers of the Association are as fol- 
lows: President, Cora F. Hopkins; Vice President, Lula B. Cres- 
well; Secretary, Jessie A. Thistle; Treasurer, Bertha M. Campbell; ' 
Editor, Anna J. Jones; Cabinet, Mary Miles, Mary I. Camp, Cora 
J. Henry, Alice E. Wright, Mary C. Hickey, Anna E. Taylor, Ruth 
M. Alter, Elsie M. Lance. 

The Athletic Association. — This organization is maintained by 
the student body for the purpose of regulating athletics and caring ! 
for athletic equipment. The Board of Athletic Control, composed 
of representatives of the Faculty, the students, and former students, 
meets at stated intervals and exercises oversight over all the athletic 
events of the College. Tickets are sold that admit to all games ' 
played in Maryville and entitle the holders to the use of any avail- 
able equipment used in athletic sports. The football and baseball 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 69 

fields, the tennis courts, the track, and the basketball court are 
open to any student desiring to enter these forms of sport. 

The members of the Board of Athletic Control, whose officers 
are also the officers of the Athletic Association, are as follows: 
President, Thomas W. Goddard; Secretary, Francis Kelly; Treasurer 
and Official Buyer, Treasurer Proffitt; Faculty Representatives, 
President Wilson, Mr. Walker, and Mr. Brittain; Student Repre- 
sentatives, Reid Garrison, Harwell B. Park, and Alice E. Wright; 
Town Representatives, John A. McCulloch, M.D., and Charles D. 
Chandler. 

The officers of the athletic teams are as follows: Managers: 
Football, Horace W. Threlkeld; Basketball, David W. Proffitt; 
Women's Basketball, Mayme R. Maxey; Baseball, John V. Steph- 
ens, Jr.; Track, Harry O. Bush; Tennis, William A. Powel. Cap- 
tains: Football, Henry A. Calloway; Basketball, Ralph W. Lloyd; 
Women's Basketball, Mary B. Boggs; Baseball, Francis Kelly; 
Track, Rea Butler. 

The Ministerial Association, organized in 1900, is composed of the 
candidates for the Christian ministry that are in attendance upon the 
College. It has for its object the enlistment of its members in 
various forms of active Christian work, and the discussion of themes 
relating to the work of the ministry. Its officers are: President, 
Harry 0. Bush; Vice President, Aubrey W. Williams; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Cecil Cross ; Program Secretary, Andrew Richards. 

The Student Volunteer Band.— The College has from its earliest 
history been identified with foreign missions, and has sent out forty- 
seven missionaries into fourteen foreign countries. Since 1894 the 
students have maintained a Student Volunteer Band, composed of 
those who are pledged to enter some foreign field, if the way be 
open. The Band meets weekly to study missionary fields and condi- 
tions. The officers for the present year are as follows: Leader, 
Lester E. Bond; Secretary and Treasurer, Mary Miles; Program 
Secretary, Isabel Porter; Editor, Keith Postlethwaite. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This Association was formed in 1871. It holds its annual meet- 
ing on Commencement Day, when a banquet is given under the 
auspices of the Faculty of the College and the local alumni. The 
officers for 1914-1915 are as follows: President, Robert L. Houston, 
'05; Vice President, Lewis Miller, '14; Secretary, Samuel T. Wilson, 
'78; Executive Committee, Horace L. Ellis, '98, Edgar R. Walker, 
'09, Grace D. Robertson, '10, Jennie F. Crawford, '11, and Erma M. 
Hall, '14; Manager of the Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship 
Fund, Henry J. Bassett, '04. 



70 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1914 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon the follow- 
ing twenty-eight members of the graduating class of 1914: Alma 
Mabel Armstrong, James Frazier Brittain, Ludvik Burian, Ralph 
St. Clair Carson, Frankie Belle Clark, Luther Laurance Cross, Vic- 
tor Charles Detty, Grace Gladys Elmore, William Foster Fyke, James 
Thompson Gamble, Erma May Hall, Augustus Garland Hinkle, Ed- 
win Ray Hunter, John Albert Hyden, Nell Ross Kirkpatrick, Char- 
lotte Hauer Landes, Adolphus Rankin McConnell. Jonnie Ann Mc- 
Cully, Mayme Rebecca Maxey, Frank Lewis Miller, Addison Strong 
Moore, Mary Kate Rankin, Ernest Mayrant Reeves, Minnie Lee 
Rowland, Eva May Samsel, James Kirkpatrick Stewart, William 
Harman Tilford, and Andrew Bell Waggoner. 

The degree of Master of Arts in course was conferred upon 
Mary Victoria Alexander, B.A., '08, and Eustis Julian Frazier, B.A., 
'11; and the honorary degree of Master of Arts, upon Mrs. Jane 
Bancroft Smith Alexander. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Two members of the graduating class, one young man and one 
young woman, are chosen upon the basis of scholarship and general 
merit to represent the class as orators on Commencement Day. The 
representatives of the class of 1914 were Frank Lewis Miller and 
Grace Gladys Elmore. 

^OST-GRADUATE STUDENT IN MUSIC, 1914 

Voice: Helen Elizabeth Bryan. 

GRADUATE IN MUSIC, 1914 

Voice: Florence Christine Steelman. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Classes are conducted by the Physical Directors daily, and every 
student, except members of the Senior and Junior Classes, is re- 
quired to avail himself of the privilege afforded, unless excused by 
reason of his being a member of a regular athletic team or doing 
regular work in the college buildings or on the grounds. The 
classes for the young men and the young women are conducted in 
their respective gymnasiums. Every young woman should bring 
with her a regulation gymnasium suit, preferably blue in color, with 
gymnasium or tennis shoes. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE VI 

THE SWIMMING POOL MOVEMENT 

In the original plans of Bartlett Hall, as secured by Kin 
Takahashi, there was provision made for the building- of a swim- 
ming pool beneath the gymnasium. Lack of funds prevented the 
construction of the pool. 

In April, 1914, the Y. M. C. A. cabinet led in a movement, which 
rallied around it the entire student body, looking to the construction 
of the proposed pool. This movement was continued in "Swimming 
Pool Week," November 1 to 7, when the enthusiastic efforts of the 
students completed the raising of fifteen hundred dollars in cash 
toward the cost of the pool. The college authorities then under- 
took the building of the pool. It will be ready for use at the open- 
ing of the fall term. 

The pool occupies a separate building fifty-eight by one hun- 
dred and ten feet. The pool itself is twenty-five by seventy-five feet 
in dimensions. All the appointments of the building will be those 
approved by the best architects. The pool will be a means of health 
and of useful sport to the students of the future. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hospital, spoken of elsewhere, 
is available for all students. A trained nurse looks after the general 
health of the students, and nurses all cases that require her atten- 
tion. In cases of slight illness no charge is made for nursing, but 
the patient pays $4.00 a week for the use of the ward, and for board 
and laundry. In cases of serious illness demanding more than or- 
dinary time and attention, a nominal charge is also made for the 
nursing. On Monday, Thursday, and Saturday of each week free 
medical consultation and prescription by approved physicians are 
provided at the hospital for out-of-town students. Any other med- 
ical attention, however, that may be required must be paid for by 
the student. These privileges have been responded to with marked 
appreciation by the student body, and the medical attention thus 
afforded has been of great service in the prevention and checking 
of serious illness. 

THE Y. M. C. A. LYCEUM COURSE 

For several years the Y. M. C. A. has conducted for the student 
body and the public a course of lectures and entertainments. The 
course usually consists of five or six numbers, one or two of which 
are popular lectures and the rest musical, elocutionary, or dramatic 
entertainments. The course is provided at small cost to the stu- 
dent, tickets for the entire series costing usually a dollar and a half. 



72 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSIC CONTESTS 

In 1909 a Triangular Debating- and Oratorical League was 
formed with Carson and Newman College and Tusculum College 
for a term of three years, 1910-1912. A prize of five dollars in gold 
was awarded to each of the winning contestants annually. A silver 
cup, offered as a trophy by Hope Brothers, of Knoxville, to the col- 
lege winning the largest number of points for three consecutive years, 
was awarded to Maryville. 

After an interval of one year the agreement was renewed for 
the three years, 1914-1916. 

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES 

Absence from the College.— Students are not allowed to ab- 
sent themselves from the College without permission from the Fac- 
ulty. 

Changes of Course.— All changes of studies must be made 
within two weeks after matriculation. Thereafter, all changes for 
students in the Preparatory Department shall be made by order of 
the Principal of the department, and all changes in the College 
Department by permission of the Faculty, and in all cases after 
consultation with the instructors concerned. Every change of course 
made after two weeks from date of matriculation involves a fee of 
fifty cents, unless this fee is remitted by special vote of the Faculty. 

Delinquencies and Demerits.— All unexcused delinquencies I 
and demerits are registered. When they amount to twenty-five, the 
student ceases to be a membr of the institution. A delinquency is 
a failure to perform any college duty. Excuses for such failure ' 
must be presented immediately upon returning to work. 

Dismissal from College. — Students are dismissed, also, when- 
ever in the opinion of the Faculty they are pursuing a course of 
conduct detrimental to themselves and to the College. The Faculty 
are the sole judges of the advisability of such dismissal. Maryville 
College is a private institution, and reserves the right to dismiss a 
student whenever the authorities of the College may elect. An in- 
stitution which is affording such extensive opportunities and ad- 
vantages to its students in return for fees not so large as the inci- 
dental fees of most institutions, can not allow those to remain in 
attendance who fail to perform their college work, or who injure 
college property, disturb college order, or by acts of insubordination 
or immorality hurt the good name of the College and add unnec- 
essary burdens to the authorities of the institution. The College 
desires no such students, and rids itself of them when they appear. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 73 

Entertainments. — To avoid interference with the regular work 
of the College, students are not permitted to engage in dramatic 
entertainments, and must secure special permission before engaging 
in any entertainment outside the College. 

Examinations.— A student absent from any examination with- 
out an approved excuse will be marked "zero" on that examination, 
and will receive no credit for his term's work. Any student failing 
to be present at term examinations shall be required to take all 
omitted examinations before being allowed to enter classes on his 
return to the College. A fee of one dollar will be charged for any 
examination not taken at the regular time for the examination. 

Forfeiture of Aid. — Any student receiving financial aid from 
the College, in the form of scholarships, loans, or opportunities for 
work, will forfeit such aid if he becomes an object of college dis- 
cipline. 

Hazing. Hazing and other interference with individual liberty 

or class functions on the part of individuals or classes are pro- 
hibited. 

Religious Services. — Prayers are attended in the college chapel 
in the morning, with the reading of the Scripture and with singing. 
Every student is required to attend public worship on the Sabbath, 
and to connect himself with a Sabbath-school class in some one of 
the churches in town. 

Rooming in Town. — Students are not permitted to room or to 
board at hotels or other places disapproved by the Faculty. Young 
women from out of town are not permitted to room or board off the 
college grounds, except with relatives. 

Sabbath. — Students are not allowed to patronize the Sunday 
trains or to visit the railway stations on the Sabbath. No student 
will be received on the Sabbath. Sunday visits are disapproved. 

Secret Societies.— No secret society will be allowed among the 
students, and no organization will be permitted that has not been 
approved by the Faculty. 

Standing. — A uniform system of grading is employed, upon the 
results of which depends the promotion from one class to another. 
The Faculty meets each week of the college year, and receives re- 
ports of the work done in all departments and of the delinquencies 
of individual students. A record is made of the standing of each 
student, which is sent to his parents or guardian at the end of each 
term. In order to be classified in any given year in the College 
Department a student shall not be conditioned in more than three 
studies. 



74 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Tobacco. — The use of tobacco on the college grounds and in the 
college buildings is forbidden, and no student addicted to its use 
will be allowed to room upon the college premises. One violation 
of this rule will be deemed sufficient to exclude a student from the 
college dormitories. 

Vaccination. — Vaccination is required of those students who 
have not recently been vaccinated. 

SELF-HELP 

The College offers opportunities of self-help to a large number 
of deserving young men and women. More than two hundred an- 
nually avail themselves of such opportunities. The work offered 
includes manual labor on the grounds, janitor service in the various 
buildings, dining room and kitchen service at the Cooperative Board- 
ing Club, office work, and work as assistants in laboratories, libraries, 
or study rooms. These forms of employment are paid for at a 
rate varying according to the degree of skill and responsibility 
involved. Indoor work is allotted usually to students that have 
previously given proof of their ability and worth. Positions of 
exceptional responsibility, such as janitor service and work as 
assistants, are granted for a year in advance, the assignment being 
' made at the close of the spring term. Assistants in any department 
are elected by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the head of 
the department. 

Application for work of any kind must be made in writing and 
addressed to the Faculty. The acceptance of an opportunity of 
self-help involves especial obligation to diligence, loyalty, and the 
faithful discharge of duty. A student that fails to do satisfactory 
work or becomes an object of discipline by the Faculty will forfeit 
all such opportunities. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

The Craighead Fund, 1886, contributed by Rev. James G. 

Craighead, D.D., for candidates for the ministry $1,500 

The Carson Adams Fund, 1887, by Rev. Carson W. Adams, 

D.D., of New York, for tuition help 6,300 

The George Henry Bradley Scholarship, 1889, by Mrs. Jane 

Loomis Bradley, of Auburn, N. Y., in memory of her only 

son 1,000 

The Willard Scholarship, 1898, by the Misses Willard, of Au- 

burn > N - Y 1,000 

The Students' Self-help Loan Fund, 1903, 1908, and 1912, by 

an East Tennessean, for loans to upper classmen 2,000 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 75 

The Clement Ernest Wilson Scholarship, 1904, by Mrs. Mary 

A. Wilson, of MaryVille, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alumni and Undergraduate Scholarship Fund, begun 1904, 
by the Alumni Association and former students. A be- 
quest of $500 was made to the fund by the late Mrs. M. 

A. Wilson, of Maryville 2,097 

The Angier Self-help Work and Loan Fund, 1907-1911, by Mr. 
Albert E. Angier, of Boston, Mass., to provide opportuni- 
ties of work and loans for young men 5,000 

The Margaret E. Henry Scholarship, 1907, established through 

the efforts of Mr. Jasper E. Corning, of New York 1,000 

The Arta Hope Scholarship, 1907, by Miss Arta Hope, of Rob- 
inson, 111 1»000 

The Hugh O'Neill, Jr., Scholarship, 1908, by Mrs. Hugh O'Neill, 

of New York, in memory of her son 1,000 

The Alexander Caldwell Memorial Fund, 1908, by Mr. G. A. 

Moody, of Jefferson City, Tenn., the income to be loaned.... 1,000 
The D. Stuart Dodge Scholarship, 1908, by Rev. D. Stuart 
Dodge, D.D., of New York City, preferably to aid gradu- 
ates of the Farm School of North Carolina 1,500 

The Julia M. Turner Missionary Scholarship Fund, 1908, by 
Mrs. Julia M. Turner, to aid the children of foreign mis- 
sionaries or those preparing for the foreign field 5,000 

The William J. McCahan, Sr., Fund, 1908, by Mr. William J. 

McCahan, Sr., of Philadelphia, Pa., for tuition help 5,000 

The W. A. E. Campbell Foreign Missionary Fund, 1909, by 
Rev. W. A. E. Campbell, of Nashville, Ind., to aid a young 

woman preparing for foreign missionary work 700 

The Charles Francis Darlington, Jr., Scholarship, 1909, by 
Mrs. Letitia Craig Darlington, of New York, in honor 

of her son 1,000 

The Hoover Self-help Fund, 1909, by Dr. W. A. Hoover, of 
Gibson City, 111., to provide opportunities of work for 

young men 500 

The Isaac Anderson Scholarship, 1909, by James A. and How- 
ard Anderson, of Knoxville, Tenn., in memory of their 
great-uncle, Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., the founder of 

Maryville College 1,000 

The John H. Converse Scholarship, 1909, by Mr. John H. Con- 
verse, of Philadelphia, Pa., for candidates for the ministry 

and other Christian service 5,000 

The Chattanooga Self-help Fund, 1910, by Rev. E. A. Elmore, 
D.D., and citizens of Chattanooga, Tenn., to provide op- 
portunities of work for students..... 500 

The Rena Sturtevant Memorial Scholarship, 1910, by Miss 

Anna St. John, of New York 1,000 



76 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

The Nathaniel Tooker Scholarship, 1910, by Nathaniel Tooker, 

Esq., East Orange, N. J ' iqqq 

The James R. Hills Memorial Self-help Work Fund, 1911, by 
Miss Sarah B. Hills, of New York, to provide work' for 

students ^ qqq 

The Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Mead Memorial Scholarship, 1911, 

by the Abbot Collegiate Association of New York 1,000 

The G. S. W. Crawford Self-help Fund, 1912, by friends of the 

late Professor Crawford, to provide work for students 1,000 

The Elizabeth Belcher Bullard Memorial Scholarship, 1912, 
"given in memory of a great friendship" by Mrs. Elizabeth 
C. Barney Buel, of E. Meadows, Litchfield, Conn., through 

the Mary Floyd Tallmadge Chapter of the D. A. R 1,000 

The Elizabeth Hillman Memorial Scholarship, 1912 and 1914, 
by Mrs. John Hartwell Hillman, of Pittsburgh, Pa.^ 
through the Pittsburgh Chapter of the D. A. R., "in per- 
petuity for mountain girls in Maryville College" 2,000 

The Robert A. Tedford Scholarship, 1913, "given by his wife, 

Emma Patton Tedford, as a memorial to her husband" 1,000 

The Major Ben and Jane A. Cunningham Fund, 1914, by Ed- 
win S., Campbell S., Clay, and Ben Cunningham, to assist 
worthy and needy students, preferably from Blount Coun- 
ty, Tennessee ; 1 045 

The Mary Harwocd Memorial Scholarship, 1915, by the Stam- 
ford, Conn., Chapter of the D. A. R., "to aid worthy stu- 
dents " 1,000 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The official publication of the College is The Maryville College 
Bulletin. It is issued four times a year, and is sent free to any who 
apply for it. The May number of each year is the annual catalog. 
The College Monthly is issued several times a year by the students, 
the editorial staff consisting of representatives of the four literary 
societies, the Christian Associations, the Athletic Association, and 
the Alumni Association. The Chilhowean is issued annually by the 
Senior Class. It is the yearbook of the student body, containing 
a summarized record of the year's work in all the departments and 
organizations of the College, and is an attractive souvenir. The 
Maryville Hand Book is issued annually by the Christian Associa- 
tions. It is intended to present the work of the Associations to new 
students, and also to assist them in adjusting themselves to their new 
environment. It includes a directory of the Christian Associations, 
Literary Societies, Athletic Associations, city churches, and college 
offices; the college colors, yell, song, and athletic records; and in- 
structions as to matriculation. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE r '7 

SPECIAL NEEDS 

(1) The most pressing need is the addition of another dynamo, 
the replacing of the boilers worn out by long service, and the removal 
of the power plant to the railroad track. The cost of these improve- 
ments will be $10,000. (2) The provision of a water-supply and 
fire-protection system adequate for the enlarged demands made by 
the added dormitories and other buildings. Much work has been 
done during the past two years in providing for this need. To com- 
plete the system there will be needed $3,000. (3) A new recitation 
building, $50,000. It can not be long deferred. All available space 
is utilized, and yet the work is sorely cramped. (4) Endowment 
for a manual training department, $25,000. Too long has this 
important and most practical department been delayed. The base- 
ment of Carnegie Hall was planned with reference to it, and will 
provide adequate quarters for it. (5) Endowment of an agricul- 
tural department, $25,000. The clientage of Maryville, the need that 
present-day public-school teachers have of training in agriculture, 
and the trend of the times all demand this addition. A gift of $150 
has been received towards this endowment. (6) Equipment of man- 
ual training and agriculture departments, $10,000. (7) Endowment 
to enable the College to employ a Professor of Education to serve 
partly in college extension work, $25,000. (8) Endowment for the 
natural science departments to help provide annual supplies, $10,000. 

(9) Endowment to pay the administration expenses of the Cooper- 
ative Boarding Club so as to keep the cost of board from rising any 
further, $15,000. Thousands of students have been enabled to enter 
college because of this remarkable club. Board is $1.90 a week. 

(10) Additional endowment for the library, $12,000. The present 
endowment is less than eight thousand dollars. (11) A hospital 
endowment to provide the salary of the nurse, $10,000. The hospital 
is proving invaluable and the nurse is necessary, and the students 
are unable to pay for one. Two gifts amounting to $600 have been 
paid in, and furnish a nucleus for the Hospital Endowment Fund. 

(12) For streets, walks, and grounds, $5,.000. Naturally beautiful, the 
grounds have been reluctantly left unimproved through lack of funds. 

(13) Another dormitory for young men. Both dormitories for the 
young men are full, and many students are unable to secure rooms in 
them. A duplicate of Carnegie Hall can now be erected for $45,^00, 
and will make a home for one hundred and twenty additional stu- 
dents. (14) Immediate and pressing needs: (a) $1,000 to provide 
additional furniture for Memorial and Baldwin Halls, (b) A pipe 
organ for the Chapel,. $4 ; 000. (c) $5 ; 000 to complete the swimming- 
pool. 



78 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

All these great needs can be met with two hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars. And the College has faith that this amount will 
be secured before many commencements have passed. 

BEQUESTS AND DEVISES 

Since each State has special statutory regulations in regard to 
wills, it is most important that all testamentary papers be signed, 
witnessed, and executed according to the laws of the State in which 
the testator resides. In all cases, however, the legal name of the 
corporation must be accurately given, as in the following form: 

"I give and bequeath to 'The Directors of Maryville 

College,' at Maryville, Tennessee, and to their successors and assigns 
forever, for the uses and purposes of said College, according to the 
provisions of its charter." 






mXMwm. 






Pi-BSH 






MARYVILLE COLLEGE 79 

Register of Students 

* 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



SENIOR CLASS 

Atiyeh, Anise Elias Horns, Syria .General 

Balch, Hiram Smith Newport Mathematics 

Barnes, Mark Hopkins Maryville " Scie . nc ^ 

Biggs, Alfred DeBard Greenup, Ky Classical 

Boggs, Mary Barnett Kingston, O - general 

Bond, Lester Everett South Portland, Me General 

Burnett, Bertha Mae Knoxville _y eneral 

Bush, Harry Oswald Philadelphia, Pa. Classical 

Butler, Ruth Virginia Cuyapo, P. I Modern Languages 

Carson, Ruth Rankin Maryville Classical 

Crane, Anne McPheeters New Decatur, Ala. -- - 

Modern Languages 

Dawson, Charles Edward South Knoxville Classical 

Ensign, John Evans..... Rossville, Ga Classical 

Goddard, Thomas Warner Maryville ?wical 

Karnes, Marie Elise Gallipohs, rwS 

Kilpatrick, Emmett Camden, Ala .--.-.- ~ e _!\ 

Lloyd, Ralph Waldo Fort Duchesne, Utah general 

Melick, Sarosa Rosamond Annandale, N. J pioTc^ni 

Mitchell. Thomas Harvel Ironton, Mo ^ a ™ 

Moxon, Frank Macquarie Lowell, Mass. ^F^oW^ 

Murray, Albert Francis New Decatur, Ala Mathematics 

Painter, Winifred Lee Maryville, R. D. 6 r Ya OG 1™ 

Powel, Samuel Franklin Rogersville r*t™i 

Reagan, Madge Tipton Maryville # ... rt™™\ 

Stephens, John Vant, Jr Cincinnati, O r!™^ 

Tetedoux, Corinne Fleming Norwood, O r ™i 

Toney, George Lynn..... Erwin £ enerai 

Wilson, Howard HANNiNGTON....Maryville i*enei«u 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Adams, Alma McBryan Union, S. C.~i- ^wl 

Adams, George Morris Cedar Hill n^cfl 

Alter, Ruth ' Maude Anmston Ala ^j 3 * 1 ^ 

Caldwell, Alexander Bryan New Market --vv™ 

Carver, Ralston Wilde Davidson, K C. -Social Science 

Conrad, Chauncey Elbep.t - Fred i r J5 ld S? m ,V M °' "" rZZt\ 

Creswell, Lula Baxter Bluefiuld, W. Va £*IZ»\ 

Cross, Frank Moore Gastonburg, Ala CL assicai 

Dawson, Edna Elizabeth South Knoxville..... X?*?l*{ 

Ferguson, Arthur Aaron.. Elizabethton general 

Fitch, Mary Abigail.. Maryville rlTZl\ 

Foster, Edna McBee Blameville general 

George, Margaret Irene ...Mentor ----:- ™ i+?™ 

Henry. Cora Jane Walland, R. D. 2.... - ™ucat on 

Kennedy, Zelma Beaumont Straw Plains Education 

Kidder, Jonathan Edward... South Knoxville ..General 



80 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Knapp, Tracy Fitch Maryville Mathemat™ 

Liddell George Turner Geary, Okla. ... GenerS 

Lowry, Bernice Lee Maryville " ^ enera 

McGurry, Coy Edward Mosheim, R. "iT 2 Genera 

McKelvey, Gertrude Ethel Chattanooga . GenS 

Pleasants, William Henry Roxboro, N. C." ScS 

Pnw. L T ET ^7 AITE ' FR A ANK KEITH ^OMSON....Chattanooga7.'/. Genera 

Powel, William Armstrong Rogersville ""Genera 

Proffitt, David Wilson........ Marwille R D 9'''^nni»7*^ 

Rankin, Rolfe MoNTGOitoY.:™ Jc^oSl' _" '"^Mathemati" 

Robinson, Gilbert Oscar Pa tton, Mo MatheSat e 

Ross, Jesse Barrance Cascilla, Miss Sera 

Silsby, Charles Edwin Shanghai, China Genera 

Smith Raymond Owens Maryville . " Genera 

T^'™^*™ Sherbrooke -Christiana .^^^Mo^rnlan^al 

Taylor, Muriel Maryville Education 

Threlkeld, Horace Walton Hobart, Okla. General 

Wallin Stephen Eldridge Big Laurel, N. cZ Genera 

Webb, Lillian Gray Maryville Genera 

Whalin, Fred Raymond Sharon, Kan "So'ciaiScS 

Wilson, Lois Coligny Maryville Ge ne rai 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

j 

Boring, William Wiley R asa r General! 

Calloway, Henry Abbott Maryville Genera 

Camp, Mary Ida.... Drv Run p* ni • ! 

CARSON, DOROTHY JitiZZZZZJiZ^ .!" ^S 

Caton, Herman Luther Cosby, R. D. 4 Genera 

Clemens, Mary Lucinda_ Maryville . Genera 

Ellis, Ellen Estelle Knoxville, R.D.S Genera' 

Fisher, Commodore Bascom Lewisburg Classica ' 

Gamon, Robert Speer Knoxville GeneSr 

Gaylor, Anna Maude Jellico Genera ; 

Gibson, Chapman J Spring City :Z.; General 

Gordon, Elizabeth Arta Flat Rock, 111.... Genera 

Haggard William Wade Maryville . Genera 

Hickey, Mary Craig Jonesboro Z. Genera 

Hodges, George Winfred Boyds Creek ZZ Classka 

Hopkins. Cora Frances Knoxville Genera 

Hu FF , Edith Elwood Emmett, Idaho ZZ Genera 

Jones, Anna Josephine Charlestown, Ind. Genera 

Kelly, Charles Francis Kodak, R. D 4 Genera 

Lance, Elsie Mae High Bridge, S! J. Genera 

Lansing, Vernon Cecil Bay City, Mich. SS 

Leonard Chester Fred Chicago, 111. . Genera 

McCord, William Hugh Lewisburg ,... Genera 

McReynolds, Alfred CLARENCE....Maryville, R. D. 1 Genera 

fc\ R w PH CLA 5 K Risi ^ s ™> ind.A.":::.":::;;:::.;.Genera 

Martin, William Earl Maryville General 

Matthews, Mary De Soto, Mo Genera 

May. Margaret Eunice Maryville .... Genera 

PereI ER W^ t W c? LLIAM Maryville, R. b." IZSiSS 

Ferea, Wendell Somers Falmouth, Ky General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 81 

Pile, Herman Owen Edgewood Tex £ ener *! 

Pleasants, Annie Lewis Roxboro, N. C. Genera 

Porter, Jean McDonald Campinas, Brazil General 

3uinn, Charles Fred Patrick Lancing Genera 

Rodgers, William Hunter Macomb 111. General 

Rough, Celia Ellen Oakland City, Ind Mathematics 

Russell, Erma Madison Nashville General 

Samsel, Herbert Whitelaw Tate General 

Schaul, Helen Margaret Niagara Falls, NY General 

Scheer, Lorine Margaret New Decatur, Ala Genera 

Skelton, Margaret Lee Elberton, Ga General 

Steelman, Florence CHRiSTiNE....Flanders, N. J. Modern Languages 

Steelman, Frances Willard Flanders, N. J.. Education 

Stinson, Edgar Carroll Harveysburg, O Social Science 

Striplin, Esther Apharine Maryville Mathematics 

Taylor, Anna Elizabeth New Market General 

Tedford, Stacie Arbeely Maryville General 

Vinyard, Harry Andrew Pevely, Mo Education 

Walker, J. Charles Agee General 

Wilson, Bertha Mary Maryville General 

Wright, Alice Elizabeth Knoxville General 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Adams, James Clyde Springfield ----- General 

Adams, John Ottomar New Providence, N. J General 

Baker, Marie Elizabeth Kingston, O General 

Banks, Edna Evelyn Huntland ....General 

Bassett, Margaret Newport, Pa Mathematics 

Bicknell, Guilford O Maryville Mathematics 

Blauvelt, Homer Everett Maplesville, Ala Mathematics 

Bowles, Charles Winston Pikeville, Ky General 

Brothers, Edith Mae Galllpolis, O Genera 

Brown, Frances Marie Volant, Pa General 

Bryson, Alton Davis Whitwell Mathematics 

Cahoon, Donald Blair Scranton, Pa. General 

Campbell, Mildred Lucile Erwin Eng. Lit. and History 

Collier, Martha Myrtle Madisonville General 

Cooper, Finis Gaston Gastonburg, Ala Mathematics 

Creswell, Anne Gamble Bearden General 

Cross, Shelby Cecil Columbiana, Ala General 

Cross, Sterling gumfork ... ..Mathematics 

Crum, Mark Blaine Greeneville, R. D. 15 --general 

Dawson, Horace South Knoxville Classical 

Dealy, Jacob Valentine Houston, Tex .Science 

Eaton, Chester Manning Macomb, 111.. --- Genera 

Ferntheil, Harry Henry Mount Washington, O General 

Fisher, Mattie Mildred Lewisburg ... General 

French, Edith Elizabeth Fort Branch, Ind General 

Fulton, Prentice Grady Johnson City General 

Gallaway, Mary Priscilla Lewisburg General 

Garrison. William Reid Derita, N. C General 

Gibson, Lucy Genevieve De Soto, Mo General 

Goins, William Alvis Lafollette General 

Greer, Harold Hale Maryville General 

Guille, Elizabeth Augusta Menlo, Ga. General 

Henry, Elizabeth Amy Flanders, N. J General 



82 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Henry, Jonnie Belle Maryville .. Genpri 

Holloway, James Arthur Glen Alice .. Gener' 

Huddleston, Hiram Harold Maryville .. Gener' 

Jackson Mary Louise Asheville, N. C.. Gener* 

Jordan, Herbert Joseph Beverly, N. J. " Classic 

Karte, Sophie Anna De Soto, Mo.."..". SI 

Kelso, Arthur Henry Walla Walla, Wash":""" General 

F?rS r?^Z™$ ; Maryville Mathematical 

LaRue, Claude Smith Valentine, Ind Sciend 

Lawyer, Paul Lowrance Macomb, 111 Mathematic 

Lester, Max Milton Mesquite, Tex " SraJ 

M^ T rA RL n STANT0N m F ort Duchesne, Utah .".Scienc 

McClellan, Charles Thompson.. Corryton Genera- 

McClelland, Francis DeLoss Jenkins, Ky._ "Genera 

McCulley, Emma Mae Maryville, R. DT2 Genera' 

McKoy, William Gordon Old Fort, N. C. General 

McTeer, William Andrew Maryville .... Genera! 

Miles, Mary Knoxville, R. D. 10 .".GeneraJ 

Mitchell, Muriel Florence Osborne, Kan Modern Language 

Moore, George Ann Frankfort, Ind. Genera 

Morrison, Edyth Lillie Farm School, N. "c. Genera 

New, John Ralston Fort Branch, Ind.. General 

Nichols, Frank Oliver Etowah .. Scie™9 

Nicholson, Lauree Bokoshe, Okia". Genera 

Ogilvie, Eva Louise Sandwich, 111... GeneS 

pt^e ER W ERSKINE ^ GRILLS Maryville, R. D. G^^Ma'thematici 

Parks, William Burney McDonald Social Science 

Pleasants, Mamie Ennis Roxboro, N. C. Genera 

Powell, Katherine Lee Lyerly, Ga. General 

Richards, Andrew Leith, Scotland"".".".."."." Genera ! 

Robinette, Faith Rockport, Ind .'. Genera' 

^JS*** * Naill0n ■ Mathematiq 

Scruggs, Frank Heiskell Sweetwater . Genera-i 

Sherrill. William Minnis Johnson City " General 

biLvius, Robert Hutcheson Texarkana, Tex.... Classical 

qll K T '^ UG Vr US r Marion > N - C --Mathematic/ 

^™ 0N P Mary Leslie Elberton, Ga General 

Smith, Charles Logan Harlan, Ky General 

Sowards, John Auxier Pikeville, Ky Classical 

bTANBERRY, Charles Richard Newport, R. D. 2 Genera! 

Steelman, George Newton Flanders, N. J. Sciencd 

^L5 A q GARET SUTT0N Christiana ModernLanguage 

Susong, Suella Walland, R. D. 1 . General 

iaylor, Robert Landon New Market "General 

Tedford Mary Pearl Maryville Z Genera 

Toney, James Frank Erwin General 

iurner, James Haskew Maryville, R. D. 1 General 

Tu RNER , Marie La Plata, Mo ['[ Genera 

wfr T ™« E a EN E ° w Indian S P rin ^ s ' Ga Mathematics 

W^T A ™f' n UBREY r, WlLLIS Birmingham, Ala Classical 

Williams. Deck Christopher Cosby, R. D. 2 General! 

Young, Carey McCune Harrisville, PiZZZZZoSSl 

IRREGULAR COLLEGIATE STUDENTS 

Anderson, Roy Ritter Lenoir City... General! 

Anderson, William Shannon Fountain City. R. D. i General 

Aycock, Anne Melissa Jonesville, S.'C. . "General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 83 

Jaldwin, Clifton Thomas Paducah, Tex General 

Jroady, Ita Anderson Maryville Home Economics 

Campbell, Bertha Mae Erwin Home Economics 

)ay, Guthrie Ford Spring City General 

Joddard, Cecil French Maryville General 

Iall, Mary Venita Maryville Genera 

Ienry, Lily Canzada Cosby, R. D. 1 Genera 

Iilleary, Perry Caspar Columbus, O General 

Johnston, Lindsay Morris Pineville, N. C General 

Cing, Eliot Lester Knoxville, R. D. 10 General 

,loyd, Glen Alfred Fort Duchesne, Utah General 

jYLE, ' Carl Blackburn Dandridge General 

tfcCALL, Newton Sheddan Greenback, R. D. 4 Science 

tfEANS, Margaret Lucile Maryville Home Economics 

Miller, Sula Mae Grandview Home Economics 

Moss, Sophia Ora Sparta, R. D. 3....Home Economics 

tfEW, Ruth " Fort Branch, Ind General 

d ark, Harwell Bennett Culleoka General 

Porter, Mary Isabel Campinas, Brazil Social Science 

3 ritchett, William Henry Annemanie, Ala General 

Ramsey, Robert Adair Newport, Pa General 

Renfro, William Vinet Euchee --» -.General 

Simpson, George Ella Rowland Bible Training 

Smith, Mae Darthula Morristown Home Economics 

rRENT, Naomi Elizabeth Maryville Home Economics 

COLLEGE SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Chandler, Mary Louise Maryville General 

Clemens, Alice Isabella, B.A Maryville Expression 

Davis Pauline Jonesboro, Ark Home Economics 

Fanson, Anna Ethel, B.A Assumption 111. ..Expression 

Franks Jessie Belle Smithfield, Pa Bible Training 

Goodpasture, Eva Grace Washington, D. C Home Economics 

Henry, Lavona Azalia Maryville Home Economics 

Jack Samuel Williams North Washington, Pa ^cience 

Logan, Onessus Horner Persia ---- General 

Maxey, Mayme Rebecca, B.A Maryville Home Economics 

Patton, Ruby Charles, B.A Maryville Expression 

Peeler, Margaret Cecelia, Ph.B. Maryville Expression 

Post, Alfred Andrews Maryville Bible Training 

Rankin, Mary Kate, B.A Dandridge Music 

Stanley, Z. Jay, B.A Liberty, Ind General 

Stinecipher, Mary Elizabeth Grandview Home Economics 

Sutton, Marguerite Maryville ...... General 

Weaver, Bernard Glynn Hanover, O Social bcience 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 
FOURTH YEAR CLASS 

Birdsall, Julian Kellogg Brockport, N. Y Classical 

Bradley, Homer Talking Rock, Ga -general 

Briggs, David Hezekiah Marshall, N. C Classical 

Brown, Theron Nelson Maryville, R. D. 5 General 

Burchfield, Ethel Leona Dandridge Classical 

Burchfield, Mary Elizabeth Walland, R. D. 1 General 



84 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Butler Judson Rea Cuyapo, P. I Classical! 

Clark, Allen Long Maryville Class ca 

Ellis, Edwin Breckenridge Maryville . Classic* 

Francis, Josephine Ridley Ironton, Mo. Classical 

Gallion, Blanche Lee Jefferson City.::::;;;:::;;; Classical 

George, Winnie Mae Jacksboro ......... C ass ca 

Harper Irene Knox Louisville Classica 

Henry, Nancy Cordelia Cosby, R. D. 1 Class ca 

Hill, Willie Kate Maryville Z gS" 

Hines, Minnis Cecil Maryville Classica 

Houston, Salem Winston Greeneville, R. D. 13 Classical 

James, Hugh Maryville Classica 

^ CARL * LEE "t Springfield JZZZaa La I 

Kittrell, Sara Louise Maryville Classical 

Lichlyter, Paul Ernest Dandridge ..' Genera 

McConnell, Thomas Lamar Maryville, R. D. 6... """classical 

McCurry, Luther Mosheim, R. D. 2 " "classical 

McGinley, Viola Blanche Maryville Class ca 

McGranahan, Isabel Knoxville C ass ca 

Marcum Rosa Ada Helenwood Z". c ass ca 

Moore, Ralph Blaine Russellville Classical 

Parks, Harle Lovelace Ocoee . Classical' 

Proffitt, Sallie Kathryn : Bald Creek, N. C " Classical 

Koss, John Mint Classical 

Smith, Ralph Elisha Harlan, Ky. ..." Classical 

Tweed, John Bewley Marshall, N. C Classical 

Wagener, Loran Scott Narka, Kan Classical 

Witherspoon, John Knox Kissimmee, Fla ^""classical 

THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Adams, Frank Thomas Springfield Classical 

Alexander, Eleanor Cullen Knoxville, R. D. 12 "Classical 

Allen, Fred Brooklyn, N. Y. Classical 

Birdsall, Edgar Maynard Brockport, N. Y General 

Brattain Ralph Owen Antwerp, O '.'.^".".".^".".""ciassical 

Brewer, Elmer Maryville Classica i 

Brewer, Sallie Belle Walland Genera 

Bright, Annie Hazel Maryville, R. D. 5... Classical 

Campbell, Edward Stephen Biloxi, Miss. "classical 

Carter, Lee McKinley Jonesboro GeneS 

Carter, William Jackson Jonesboro Classical ' 

Carver Stella L ee , N. C....Z Classica 

Cook, Max Gordon Waddams Grove, 111." Class ca 

F^ WE Hn.^ ARY Tr DAVIS ?/ arden - i-cCcal 

Ellis, Horace Knox Maryville Classical 

^ogleman, Gustavus Allen Bowling Green, Kv ""Classical 

Fox, Blannie Edith Powell Station.'... ^ General 

Gallion, Katherine Gertrude Black Mountain, N. C "classical 

Gallion Philip McMillan Jefferson City Genera 

Gamble, Helen Rebecca Maryville .. Classica 

Garrison, Dwight Norton Bowling Green;"" Ky." Genera 

Goddard Mary Maryville * Genera 

Haddox Thomas Rollen Knoxville, R. D. sZ Classica 

Hart, Samuel Robert Elizabethan GenerS 

Henry, Irene Maryville, R. D. 3 Teachers 

Henry, Ralph Edward New Market General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 85 

Henry, Thomas Gilbert Martin General 

Hickman, Clyde South Knoxville Genera 

Howard, John Zollicoffer Gainesboro General 

Hurst, Plina Christopher Sevierville Classical 

James, Ernest Kelly Springer, N. C Classical 

Kellam, Perry Alexander Marvel, Ala Classical 

Kiger, John Herbert Wheeling, W. Va. Classical 

Landes, Dorothy Edna Ponta Grossa, Brazil -genera 

Landes, George Harold Ponta Grossa, Brazil Classical 

Lecks, Fred Henry Palatka, Fla Genera 

Lewis, Helen Biloxi, Miss Classica 

Lewis, Mary Kate Biloxi, Miss C assica 

McClary, Samuel Washington.... Ocoee Classical 

McDaniel, Mavis Clair ..Indianapolis, Ind Classica' 

McGhee, William Edgar Maryville, R. D. 3 General 

Marshall, Alexander B Port Chester, N. Y Classical 

Martin, Kenneth Lee Maryville Classical 

Miles, Emma Knoxville, R. D. 10 C assica 

Miller, Cedric Verdi:. Philadelphia, Pa Classical 

Moore, Walter William Ocoee Classical 

Moulton, Denzil William Fall Branch Classical 

Overby, Frank Shamburghar Asheville, N. C Classical 

Peterson, Frederic Cornelius Asheville, N. C Classical 

Porter, Kathleen Querida Campinas, Brazil Classical 

Proffitt, Lillie Marie Bald Creek, N. C Classical 

Quinn, Ruth Kate Lancing Classical 

Runyan, Vola Belle Sevierville, R. D. 3 Classical 

Russell, Cassie Louise Rockford Classical 

Sheddan, Hugh Jefferson City Classical 

Sherrod, Clifford Carter Louisville Classical 

Slatery, Floyd Alexander Knoxville, R. D. 10 Classical 

Slatery, Patrick Henry Knoxville, R. D. 10 Classical 

Stump, Ugee Maryville Classical 

Sullinger, Marguerite Maryville Classical 

Taylor, Wilson Newburg, Ind Classical 

Thurmond, Enos Cyrus Chestnut Bluff Classical 

Toomey, Viola Elizabeth Helenwood Classical 

Towe, Durward Norfleet Chapanoke, N. C. General 

Vaughn, Henry Greensburg, Ky Classica 

Waggoner, Hugh Morrison Lebanon Classical 

Walker, Elsie Harriet Maryville General 

Walker, Joe Knaffle Maryville General 

Waller, Meredith Gentry Oliver Springs Classical 

Ward, Ernest Jennings Inez, Ky Classical 

Webb, Ocey Blanche Townsend Classical 

Wilbanks, Agnes Lavonia, Ga Classical 

Wilbanks, Marion Wilder Lavonia, Ga Classical 

Wilkinson, Carrie Tipton Maryville, R. D. 6 Classical 

Wilkinson, Margaret Catherine Maryville, R. D. 6 Classical 

Wilson, Lamar Silsby Maryville Classical 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Anderson, Robert Mitchell Franklin, O. General 

Baldwin, Lloyd Jerry Paducah, Tex General 

Beeler, Lola Frances Powder Springs Classical 

Belt, Robert LeRoy Wellsville Classical 

Biggs, Seaton Humphries Greenup, Ky General 



86 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Boring, James Marcus Rasar Gfw™i 

Bowers, Powell Clayton Quinton, Okla." ClasS, 

Brown, Elmer McIlvaine Maryville, R. D. 5 "ciassS 

Brown, Margaret Luella Maryville, R. D. 5 Classic 

Browning, Claude Hunter Maryville ... Classic 

Bryson, Mava Kizziah Whitwell Genera ,1 

Buchanan, Mary Elsie Kobe, Japan _..... Classic^ 

Buchanan, Percy Wilson Kobe, Japan Class ca 

Burns, Cora Silvara Freehold, N. J. GeneS 

Butler, Bruce Chapman Cosby, R. D. 2 Classical 

Caldwell, Edith Fawn Maryville . Class™ 

^™^may MarUe ::;::;;:;::;:;^3 

, DELLA Peoples, Ky. 

tALPH Lee Maryville 

Fonnie Willie Maryville .".___ 

Caughron, Samuel Jackson Walland 'cZZ v t\ 



Carpenter, Della Peoples Kv ^jassicai 

Carson, Ralph Lee Maryville ./.I".;;;.;; C assica 

Catlett, Jonnie Willie Maryville Genera] 

Caughron Samuel Jackson Walland .... GenpS 

Clemens, Adeline Turrell Maryville . C]^Zt\ 

Clemens, Robert Broady Maryville C lass S 



cZntW CE Ruth BITTLE JM} 6 " Ge -ral 

ouvimniry, -KUTH Maryville Gpnpml 

S™ T S r LUAM HENEY Meridian, Missz::::::::::::;;^!! 



Cross, Lee M Harriman R ri ""a. Classical 

»i™>, susan ^Augusta.:::::::::::::::: JS 



Dealy, James Baker -/Houston, Tex:::::""; Classical 

Dorton Bessie Foster Knoxville ... Cass ca 

& T E Z IZA ??_ TH . ; Maryville LZ^ZZioESl 



-Classical 
Ellis, John Nick ...^^Zl^nd^lle "I ^eneSl 

FR N EE Mk N n b an t CARLYLE ^ dson > N < c.-..-..::::::::::::^^^ 

freeman, Nan Zirconia, N. C Classical 

Frow, John Thomas Maryville ... Gene™ 

Garrison, Allen Norton.. Bowling Green," Ky'.". Classical 

Georges, Joel Samuel Ourmiah, Persia C ass ca 

Gibson Etta Mae .Maryville, R. D. 3 C ass ca 

Giles, James Irvin Cosby C assica 

Gillespy, George Benton Walland .... Class ca 

Greenlee Thomas James Old Fort, N. C Gene™ 

Haddox, Troy Mae Knoxville R. dVI cS 

Hakanson, Charles Errol Mobile, Ala. Class ca 

Hakanson, Dorothy Anna Mobile, Ala. Classical 

Hakanson, Robert Alfred Mobile, Ala. Classica 

Harper, Thomas Collier Louisville Geneva 

Harper, William Rodgers Louisville . Genera 

Harris, Emma Maud Bokhoma, Okla." " Classica 

Henry, Nelle Marie Rockford GeS 

Henry, Stella Maryville, R. B.'i Genera 

Henry, Zenie Maryville General 

Hernandez Pedro Jose Havana, Cuba Classical 

Hershey, Fay Broady „ Maryville .. Genera 

Hodges, Otis „ Boyds Creek'.ZZ General 

Huffman, Bernard Leslie Normandy Classical 

Huffstetler, Verni Princeton Maryville, R. D. 7 Classical 

Huskey, Isaac Lemon . Sevierville, R. D. 16 General 

Hutsell, Miriam Marie..... Sweetwater Classical 

Jackson, Eula Marion Maryville .... Classical 

Jackson, Margaret Rebecca Asheville, N. C Classical 

Kesterson, John Washington.. .Maryville . Classical 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 87 

ing, Fred Harvey Springfield .-,--■--.■ general 

IwsoN, Melvin Early Sevierville, R. D. 7 Classica 

egg, John Wallace Straw Plains -Genem 

i NT , Elizabeth Sorrento, Fla C assica 

,ong Joel Bratcher Oliver .Springs Classica 

IcCurry, Addie Mae Mosheim, R. D. 2 Genera 

IcDonald, John Raymond Rogersville n V enera 

TcGinley, Raymond Cuthbert... Independence, Mo Classica 

IcMurray, Luke S 11111 ™? 6 genera 

IcNutt, Mary Lawson Maryville ------- Classica 

Iantooth, Herman Cawood Newport, R. D. 2 Genera 

Iills, Ray Laney Medina General 

Iullineaux, Katherine Virginia Gallipolis, Classical 

►arker, Helen Corrie Louisville, R. D. 2 "<-* ene . r a 

•rice, Albert Marvin Vanceburg Ky Classical 

>urcell, Jonathan McClure Palatka, Fla Classica 

iuiNN, Jesse Clay Lancing ~Y en ® i 

Iobinson, Marvin Curtis Weaverville, N. C Classical 

Robinson, William * Arthur Jupiter, N. C y ass i ca 

Rogers, Agnes Belle Mooresburg Classical 

loss, Lanty Marion Mint Classica 

Iussell, Nellie Margaret Rockford Classical 

Scarborough, Mary Bessie Maryville Classical 

Ientelle, Henry Lea Greeneville Classical 

5heddan, Wiley Ernest Jefferson City -^ en ? ra 

Simmons, Charles Wesley Johnsonville ' Classica 

Smith, Ada Frances Morristown Classica 

5mith, Thomas Acel Andrews, N. C .....General 

Stephens, Cora Anne Knoxville ... -£ ene . ra \ 

Stephens, Noble Henderson Yamacraw, Ky Classical 

Stinnett, Lillie Townsend Classical 

Stinnett, Sarah Anne Townsend Classica 

Sutherland, Wilhelmina Jean.. Maryville Classical 

Dedford, Hugh Craig Maryville -Geneva 

rmsTLE, Jessie Aurilla Franklm, Classical 

/andegrift, Roy Ualmont Erwm ...-. .. ^ en ^ ra \ 

Webb, Dixie Lee Sevierville, R. D 8 Classical 

Weisbecker, Homer George .Fort Wayne, Ind Classica 

Nest, Clyde Eckles Maryville, R. D. 4 -General 

White, Martha Irene Powder Springs Classica 

Williams, Eugene Monroe. Maryville General 

Wilson, Nellie Mae Flint, Mich Genera 

Yoakum, Margaret Leonore Lone Mountain General 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Adkins, Tivous Gumfork ---—---■ --General 

Emmons, Georgia Irene. Maryville, R. D. 8 Classical 

Anderson, Mary Rhea Maryville Classical 

Anderson, Mildred McElwee Rockford Classical 

Anderson, William Harris ..Maryville .....Classical 

Armstrong, Stanley Morton Detroit, Mich Classical 

Beard, Moffatt Grear Harrisburg, N. C General 

Beaty, Holland Conasauga Classical 

Black, Edith Mae Jacksonville, Fla Classical 

Bogle, Jennie Tunnell Maryville, R. D. 4 General 

Bost, Nancy Lee Elizabeth Claremont, N. C General 



88 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Brown, Stacie Tampa General 

Bryson, Tula Mae Whitwell Classical 

Caldwell, Edward Alexander.... Mary ville Classical 

Caldwell, Ruth Odessa Louisville, R. D. 2 Classical 

Cantrell, John Benjamin Pittsburg Landing General 

Carter, William Jackson Philadelphia .... Classical 

Cates, Charles Merritt Maryville Classical 

Chandler, Margaret McElwee.... Maryville Classical 

Chitwood, Oscar Beaty Harriman Classical 

Clabough, Blanche Sevierville, R. D. 3.... Classical 

Clark, Barbara Blount Maryville Classical 

Clark, Lillian Marie Maryville .... ' Classical 

Coggins, Ruby Crestmont, N. C Classical 

Coles, Bernice Mae Gainesville, Fla Classical 

Collins, Myrtle Lorine Knoxville, R. D. 7 Classical 

Conrad, Daniel Lester Fredericktown, Mo Classical 

Coulter, Hassie Etta Maryville General 

Cowan, Guy Maryville Classical 

Damiano, Carl Eugene Fairmont, W. Va General 

Davis, James Alfred Maryville, R. D. 4 General 

Dennis, James Alonzo Cosby General 

Dillon, Alice Lancing Classical 

Draughon, William Marion Springfield, R. D. 7 Classical 

Ehrhardt, Nevah Rhea Rochester, N. Y Classical 

Enloe, Luna Wesley Sevierville General 

Everett, Tressie Maryville, R. D. 4 General 

Faubion, Mary Wood Maryville Classical 

Ferguson, Rosa Elizabeth Maryville, R. D. 8 Classical 

Finfrock, Glenn Mark Houston, Tex Classical 

Ford, Bertie Elizabeth Crestmont, N. C Classical 

Ford, Lena Ethel Browns Classical 

Ford, Rufus Naillon Classical 

Ford, William Hobart Browns General 

Franklin, Lillie Katherine Sevierville, R. D. 7 Classical 

Frederick, Vera Crestmont, N. C Classical 

French, Helen Margaret Maryville Classical 

Frow, Robert Porter Maryville General 

Gamble, Max Marion Maryville General 

Garner, Albert Richard Mint Classical 

Goddard, Helen Maryville Classical 

Goreham, Wilfred John Chicago, 111 Classical 

Greenlee, Ruth McEntire Old Fort, N. C Classical 

Gregory, Walter Abe... Cades Cove General 

Gregory, William Elmer Oneida Classical 

Griffith, Minnie Belle ; Tampa Classical 

Griffitts, Margaret Ellen Mint General 

Griffitts, Sallie Jane Mint Classical 

Groeneveld, Allen E Coopersville, Mich Classical 

Hale, Donnie Ella Maryville General 

Hale, George Lafette Russellville Classical 

Harman, Florence Lucile Russellville, O Classical 

Harris, John Wesley Newport Classical 

Harrison, Wallace Maryville, R. D. 8 Classical 

Hemphill, Idella Morris, Ala Classical 

Henry, Betty Jane Cosby, R. D. 1 Classical 

Henry, Jonnie Belle Maryville Classical 

Henry, Lois Maryville Classical 

Hernandez, Manuel Palos, Cuba General 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 89 

Hileman, Delmer Paul Mooresburg General 

Hitch, Mary Tennessee Louisville Classical 

Holt, Olive Gertrude Maryville, R. D. 1 General 

Huber, Frank Xavier Newark, N. J Classica 

Huffaker, Ira Reginald Knoxville, R. D. 14 Classical 

Huffstetler, Myrtle Allie Maryville General 

Hurst, Rella Victor Sevierville, R. D. 8 Classica 

Jackson, Eugene Harris Asheville, N. C Classical 

Jackson, Martha Janet Tryon, N. C General 

James, Bessie Sue Maryville, R. D. 5 Classical 

James, Mae Maryville, R. D. 5 Classical 

James, Rosalee Maryville, R. D. 5 Classical 

Jenkins, Mertie Lucinda Louisville General 

Jenkins, Roy Scranton, Pa Classical 

Jones, Edwin Leslie Charlestown, Ind Classical 

Jones, Lena Virginia Knoxville General 

Key, John Columbus Newton.... Greenback Classical 

Kidd, Ruby Temperance Binfield Classical 

King, Earl C Louisville Classical 

King, Raymond McKinley Louisville Classical 

Lambert, Annis Algia Maryville Classical 

Lequire, Jennie Belle Walland Classical 

Lovelady, Adelbert Ashenhurst White Rock, N. C Classical 

Luther, Thomas Crowell Candler, N. C General 

Luther, Thomas Don Candler, N. C Classical 

McCall, Beryl Jean Maryville General 

McCall, Helen Caroline Maryville General 

McCall, Ruth Knoxville, R. D. 10 Classical 

McCall, Stella Love Greenback, R. D. 4 Classical 

McClary, Luke Webster Ocoee Classical 

McCulley, Mary Florence Maryville, R. D. 2 Classical 

McCulloch, Thomas Leonard Maryville, R. D. 6 General 

McMaHan, Gladys Nancy Sevierville Classical 

McNutt, Robert Lyle Maryville Classical 

McPeeters, Helen Bernice.... Bald Creek, N. C Classical 

Mackey, James Murray Old Fort, N. C... Classical 

Manley, Hobart Leslie Rutledge, R. D. 2 General 

Martin, James Mansfield, O Classical 

Matkins, Ellen Belle Altamahaw, N. C Classical 

Maxwell, Stewart William Indianapolis, Ind Classical 

Montgomery, Hettie Sue... Maryville Classical 

Moore, Mellie Lucile.. Maryville General 

Morgan, Claude Arthur Pine Knot, Ky Classical 

Morrison, Thomas Banker Farm School, N. C Classical 

Morton, Edna Susan Maryville, R. D. 4 Classical 

Moser, John Richard Jefferson City Classical 

Mullendore, Frank Hale.. Sevierville Classical 

Nicely, Lula Virginia ....Washburn Classical 

Pack, Ronald Arthur Prendergast Classical 

Pate, Vera Mae Maryville Classical 

Quinn, Ray B Lancing General 

Ramsay, Charles Francis Milstead, Ala Classical 

Ramsey, Boyd Anderson Revere, N. C General 

Robbins, Grace Lee _ Mint General 

Robinson, Beulah Ellen. Maryville Classical 

Rogers, Alma Marion Mooresburg Classical 

Ross, Tennie Mint Classical 

Royal, Raymond Richard Wollaston, Mass, Classical 



90 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Russell, Myrtle Beatrice .....Maryville, R. D. 5 Classica 

Russell, Nancy Aileen Rockford Classica 

Ryan, Mayme Ewald Marion, Va Classica 

Scott, Nora Ella Maryville General' 

Seaton, Rebecca Alene Maryville Classical 

Sentelle, Lucy Greeneville " General 

Sentelle, Macie Greeneville Classical 

Sharp, Luther Franklin Jacksboro, R. D. 3 Classical 

Sims, William Lester Apison Classical! 

Smith, Mary Matilda Maryville .... Classical 

Smith, Ray Myphra Rutledge General 

Steele, Aubrey David Rankin General; 

Stinnett, Mildred Townsend Classical 

Sutherland, Donald Paul Maryville Classical 

Terry, Tolbert Sidney Elva Classical 

Thomas, Daniel Harrison Sturgis, Miss "......General 

Threlkeld, Lacey Adolphus Davenport, Ky. General 

Tipton, James Myers Seymour, R. D. 3... Classical 

Tipton, Minnie Mae „ Seymour, R. D. 3 General 

Toole, Robert Rogers Concord General 

Toomey, Fred Barthell Helenwood .... General 

Tulloch, Cecil Clark Maryville ... General 

Turner, Allen Maryville, R. D. i Classical 

Turner, John Carl Maryville, R. D. 1 Classical 

Vaden, Roy Elmer Mint Classical' 

Vega, Ricardo Jose Oviedo, Spain .... General 

Walker, Clarence Edward Chattanooga . .. . Classical : 

Walker, Mall Maryville : ...Classical 

Walker, Vertie Gertrude..... Jefferson City, R. D. 1 ...General ; 

Walker, Wager Roscoe Norma Classical 1 

Wallace, Thomas Howard Maryville, R. D. 6. Classical'- 

Waller, George Pickle Lenoir City Classical 

Waller, Jane Knox Maryville Classical 

Waters, Mae Maryville General 

Wear, Ina Geneva Sevierville, R. D. 3... Classical 

Webb, James Elder Sevierville, R. D. 7 Classical 

Webster, William Arthur Marvville ... Classical ' 

West, Frances Eliza El Paso, Tex Classical 

Whetsell, Louisa Pearl Maryville, R. D. 5 Classical ' 

White, Alsop Maryville Classical 

White, John Lyon Knoxville Classical 

Williams, Rachel Mayme Maryville, R. D. 4 Classical 

Williams, Richard Hobart Maryville Classical 

Wimberly, William Henderson.... Ocoee Classical 

Wolfe, Martha Sneedville Classical 

Yearout, Mary Katherine Louisville General 

York, Silas Cordell Classical 

Young, Ralph Abraham Chicago, 111 Classical 

PREPARATORY SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Anderson, Jessie Mae Bearden Music 

Atkins, Lillian Irene Lone Mountain Music 

Bettis, Avo Annist Rotan, Tex Home Economics 

Bryan, Helen Elizabeth... Maryville Music 

Cates, Charlotte Wilkinson ...Maryville .... Art 

Clark, Ione Elizabeth New Decatur, Ala Music 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 91 

Clarke, Theora Bowls Knoxville, R. D. 9 Ge " er ? 1 

Coulter, John Fred Walland Music 

Deaderick, George McDowell Unaka Springs. ...Home Economics 

Enloe, Nellie Howard Wedowee, Ala Home Economics 

Forkner, Raymond Hardin Philadelphia General 

Francis, Roberta Lee Ironton, Mo General 

Frazier, Annie Lee Centerville General 

Goddard, Myrtle Maryville Music 

Goodpasture, Nellie Anna Daleville, Ind. .....Home Economics 

Goodwin, Sarah Louise Nashville Music 

Haddox, Gladys Virginia Knoxville, R. D. 3 Musis 

Hall, Amelia Lucile Knoxville, R. D. 13 Music 

Hodge, Ernest Thomas Johnson City General 

Howard, Cora Ann Maryville Art 

Hudson, Ruth Wills Maryville Music 

James, Susan Cadell Maryville General 

Landes, Jessie Porter.. ..Ponta Grossa, Brazil Home Economics 

Long, Herman Clyde Johnson City General 

Loy, Jessie Beatrice New Market General 

McKoy, Charlotte Lillian Old Fort, N. C Music 

McMahan, Samuel Timothy Chandler.. ..Boyds Creek General 

Martin, Alta Willard Maryville Music 

Nicely, Julius Martin Washburn General 

Nicholson, Moody Aston Bokoshe, Okla General 

Orr, Edna May Cabot, Ark Music 

Roberts, Cina Estelle ...Corryton, R. D. 2 Music 

Sizer, Marion Floyd Philadelphia General 

Stapleton, Helen Ruth Maryville Music 

Stapleton, Robert Leighton Maryville Music 

Taylor, Turney Allen Fayetteville General 

Tedford, Lennis Lucile Maryville Music 

Tipton, Elsie Margaretta Elizabethton Expression 

Tipton, Nellie Verna 4 Maryville, R. D. 1 Music 

Vance, Alma Marie Memphis Music 

Vance, Martha Clementine... Memphis Music 

Walker, Beatrice Genevieve Maryville, R. D. 1.... Bible Training 

Walker, Estelle Maryville, R. D. 1 Art 

Wilson, Nellie Edith Maryville Music 

Yearout, Pearl Mae Maryville, R. D. 2 Music 

SUB-PREPARATORY CLASS 

Anderson, Bryan Gladstone, Mo. 

Armstrong, Kate Relda Greenback, R. D. 2 

Atchley, Dewey Olcott Maryville 

Badgett, Alma Rockford 

Bassel, Mary Elizabeth , Maryville 

Bliss, Sidney Gladstone, Mo 

Brewer, Mildred Edna Walland 

Brown, Dora Tampa 

Brown, Lora ... Tampa 

Brumit, Lester King Elizabethton 

Burchfield, Luther Daniel Maryville, R. D. 7 

Cantrell, Malcolm Paul - TT Eto y a ^ 

Clark, Maud Virginia Hartford 

Clemens, Charles Royster Maryville 

Clemens, Lorena ..Maryville, R. D. 4 



92 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Cochran, Anna Elizabeth Maryville 

Coulter, Floyd Wendle ZZZZ Walland 

Crye, LeRoy < Wellsville 

Dunn, Bertha Dollalee Townsend 

Dunn, Charles Snyder . Townsend 

Ellis, Charles Francis Maryville 

Farmer, Nathan WaTland, R. D. 2 

French, Vaughtie McReynolds Maryville 

Gamble, Ethel Gertrude Seymour R D 3 

Gamble, Iva Mae '...Seymour', R. d". 3 

Gamble, Ruth Maryville 

Gibbons, Averell Schell Maryville 

Gossett Dewey Calvin ^"".".SouthKnoxville 

Green, Parchal Long Etowah 

Griffitts, Gaynell Maryville 

Griffitts, Robert Lee Concord 

Harris, James Jesse Ranger Ga 

Harrison, Frank Erastus . Maryville R 'd 8' 

Harrison, Martha Beatrice Maryville 

Harrison, Neva Maryville, R. D. 8 

Headrick, James Ira Seymour 

Henry, George Tillman '...""".Cosby," R. D 3 

Hitch Mildred .Louisville. 

Holt, Lelah Lossie Maryville, R. D. 1 

Hopper, Joseph Santford Ranger, Ga. 

Howard, Lillian Anne M mt 

Hutchins, Lucious Eldridge 7"/"."""".'. Rockford 

James, Carrie Dorcas Maryville R D 6 

Jenkins, Bertha Euphemia Louisville R D 1 

Johnson, Herman William Maryville 

Kays, Guido Fleetwood Gladstone, Mo. 

Lawson, Rosa Ellen Townsend 

Litterer, Mary Evans Maryvilie, R. D. 5 < 

McGaha, Milford Edgar Cosby R D 3 ] 

McMahan, Iva Crestmo'nt, *N. " C. ! 

McNeilly, Ethel Massila Maryville 

McNutt, Grace Azalia Maryville ' 

Marcum, Florence Oneida ' 

Martin, Verna Violet Maryville ' ; 

Maxey Hazel Ellen .TZZZ^Rockford 

May, Montgomery Maryville 

Miller, Esther Maryville, R. D. 5 

Mitchell, James Jasper Maryville R D 8 : 

Montgomery, John Edward Knoxville R D 10 

Morgan, Paul John Pine knot, Ky. 

Mulligan, Pauline Laura Maryville 

Newcomb^ Homer Crockett "Seviervilie, R. D. 18 

Oliver, Evelyn Maryville 

Oliver, Harold Thornley Maryville 

Owsley, Samuel Everett New Market 

Reagan, Myrtle Elnora Seymour, R. D. 3 

Rice, Kenneth Taylor Tampa, Fla. 

Rowan, James Victor Maryville 

Russell, Mary Jane Louisville, R. D. 1 

Sawyer, Edgar Harold Farm School, N. C 

Slatery, Mary Melinda Seymour 

Smith, Calvin Marcellus Rutledge 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 93 

Jmith, Eva Chloe .« T 1 ^ 11 ^ 

Sullivan, Henry Russell Townsend, R. D. 1 

Pemple, Otha Boyds Creek 

riPTON, Annie Townsend 

riPTON, Willie Myrtle Seymour, R. D. 3 

rooLE, Cassie Lucile Louisville 

Talker, Hazel Blanche Maryville 

Talker, Joe Leslie Maryville, R.D. 3 

Waters, Thomas Jefferson Walland 

^ells, Arthur Eugene Maryville 

kVHALEY, Ray Cleveland, R. D. 4 

fEAROUT, Cora Rankin Maryville, R. D. 2 

fEAROUT, David Jones Maryville 

Fearout, Howard Early Maryville, R. D. 2 

ifEAKOUT, Samuel Newton Maryville 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 



CLASSIFICATION by departments 

College Department 249 

Preparatory Department 435 

Sub-Preparatory 87 

Total 771 



CLASSIFICATION by states 

Alabama 19 Oklahoma . 7 

Arkansas 2 Pennsylvania 11 

District of Columbia 1 South Carolina 2 

Florida 7 Tennessee 517 

Georgia 11 Texas 11 

Idaho 1 Utah 3 

Illinois 10 Virginia 1 

Indiana 16 Washington 1 

Kansas 3 West Virginia 3 

Kentucky 19 Philippine Islands 2 

Maine 1 Brazil 6 

Massachusetts 2 china 1 



Michigan 4 



Cuba 2 



Mississippi 6 V 9 

Missouri 16 Ja P a . n f 

New Jersey 10 Persia 1 

New York 6 Scotland 1 

North Carolina 48 Spam 1 

Ohio 16 Syria 1 

Total number of students ™ 

Total number of States and countries 37 



Mary ville College 
= Bulletin — 




Vol. XV MAY, 1916 No. 1 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Officers and Faculty ..... 3 

The Courses of Study 9 

History and General Information . 59 

Expenses 67 

Register of Students for 1915-16 . 84 

Calendar for 1916-17 105 

Index 106 



Published four times a year by 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 

Entered May 24, 1904, at Maryville, Tenn., as second-class 
matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 




Wt 




The CoIvUmns of Pearsons Hale 



Mary mile College 
Bulletin 

ANNUAL CATALOG NUMBER 



For the Year 1915-1916 



«710 




Published by 
MARTVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Ten n essee 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CLASS OF 1916 






Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, B.A Maryvill 

James Addison Anderson, Esq. Fountain City, R. D. ! 

Hon. Thomas Neeson Brown, M.A Maryvill 

Hon. John Caevin Craweord, B.A., LL.B Maryvill 

Judge Jesse Seymour L'Amoreaux New York, N. \ 

Rev. Thomas Judson Miees, M.A. Knoxville, R. D. 1 

Fred Lowry Profeitt, B.A Maryvill 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Washington Colleg 

Governor John Powee Smith National Soldiers' Homj 

Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Princeton, N. 

James Martin Trimbee, Esq Chattanoog 

Rev. David Goureey WyeiE, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y 

GLASS OF 1917 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Jonesbor 

Rev. Henry Seymour Buteer, D.D Washington, D. C 

Rev. Joseph Painter Caehoun, D.D Knoxvill 

Rev. Edgar Aeonzo Eemore, D.D Chattanoog 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A Maryvill 1 ; 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxvill i 

Alexander Russeee McBath, Esq Knoxvill 

Hon. Wileiam Anderson McTeer Maryvill] 

William Edwin Minnis, Esq New Marke 

Joseph Augustus Muecke, Esq Kingsto 

Rev. John Grant Newman, D.D Philadelphia, P; 

Rev. Samuee Tyndaee Wieson, D.D Maryvilf 

CLASS OF 1918 

Hon. Wieeiam Leonidas Brown Philadelphs 

Rev. Newton WadsworTh CadwEEE, D.D Atlantic City, N. ] 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. 

Rev. John Baxter CrEsweee, B.A Bearde 

Rev. Wieeiam Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxvill] 

Rev. Caevin Alexander Duncan, D.D Harrima 

Rev. John SamuEe Eakin, B.A Greenevill 

Rev. Woodward Edmund FineEy, D.D White Rock, N. ( 

Samuee O'Grady Houston, B.A Knoxvill 

Humphrey Gray Hutchison, M.D Vonor 

John Rieey Lowry, B.S Knoxvill 

Coeonee John Beaman Minnis Knoxvill 



COMMITTEES AND OFFICERS 



fficers of the Board of Directors: 

Rev. Edgar Alonzo Elmore, D.D., Chairman; Fred Lowry Proffitt, 
Recorder and Treasurer. 



ommittees of the Board of Directors: 

Executive: Hon. William Anderson McTeEr, Chairman; Hon. Thomas 
Neeson Brown, Secretary; and Rev. Wieeiam Robert Dawson, D.D., 
Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, and Hon. Moses Houston Gamble. 

Professors and Teachers: Rev. Wieeiam Robert Dawson, D.D., Chair- 
man; Dean Jasper Converse Barnes, Secretary; and Hon. William 
Anderson McTeer, Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, President Samuel 
Tyndale Wilson, and Treasurer Fred Lowry Proffitt. 

Hospital: President Samuel Tyndale Wilson, Hon. John Calvin 
Crawford, Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, Mrs. Martha A. Lamar, 
and Professor Francis Mitchell McClenahan. 

'nodical Examiners for 1916: 

Revs. Oscar Everett Gardner, D.D., and Alfred Noble Penland, and 
Mr. Nathan Hood Franklin. 

♦mmittees of the Faculty: 

Entrance: Professors Gillingham and Ellis. 

Advanced Standing: President Wilson and Dean Barnes. 

Scholarships: Miss Henry, President Wilson, and Professor Gil- 
lingham. 

Student Publications and Programs, and the Lyceum: Professors- 
Johnson and Myers. 

intercollegiate Literary Contests: Professors Hoyt and Knapp. 

Religious Activities: Professors Gillingham and Davis. 

The Lamar Library: Dean Barnes. 

The Loan Library and the Proposed Cooperative Store: Professor 
Knapp. 

Athletics: President Wilson and Professor McClenahan. 

The Cooperative Boarding Club: President Wilson. 

Zare of Buildings and Grounds: Professors McClenahan and Davis. 

College Extension: Professor Ellis. 

Recommendations : Dean Barnes. 

The Catalog: Professor Gillingham. 

Rhodes Scholarship: Dean Barnes. 



FACULTY 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

REV. SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., 
President. 

REV. SAMUEL WARD BOARD-MAN, D.D., LL-D., 
Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

JASPER CONVERSE BARNES, Ph.D., 
Dean, and Professor of Psychology and Political Science. 

* HENRY JEWELL BASSETT, M.A., 
Professor of Latin, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

REV. CLINTON HANCOCK GILLINGHAM, M.A., 
Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, and Head of the Bible Training 

Department. 

FRANCIS MITCHELL McCLENAHAN, M.A., 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

GEORGE ALAN KNAPP, M.A., 
Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

EDMUND WAYNE DAVIS, M.A., 
Professor of Greek and Acting Professor of Latin. 

ALFRED STUART MYERS, M.A., 
Professor of Rhetoric and Public Speaking. 

REV. CHARLES KIMBALL HOYT, D.D., 
Professor of the English Language. 

MRS. JANE BANCROFT SMITH ALEXANDER, M.A., 
Professor of English Literature. 

SUSAN ALLEN GREEN, M.A., 
Professor of Biology. 

JOHN WESLEY PERKINS, M.A., 
Professor of German and French. 



* On leave of absence for study in Italy. 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



WILLIAM LANGEL JOHNSON, Ph.B., 
Associate Professor of Social Science and History. 

HORACE WALTON THRELKELD, 
Student Assistant in the Psychology Laboratory. 

CHAUNCEY ELBERT CO'NRAD, 

MARK BLAINE CRUM, 

CLAUDE SMITH LaRUE, 

WILLIAM HENRY PLEASANTS, 

Student Assistants in the Chemistry Laboratories. 

CHARLES HARRISON THOMSON, 
Student Assistant in the Physics Laboratory. 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG POWEL, 
Student Assistant in the Biology Laboratories. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

HORACE LEE ELLIS, M.A., 
Principal, and Professor of Education. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, B.A., 
Mathematics and Physics. 

MARY VICTORIA ALEXANDER, M.A, 
English and Bible. 

ALICE ISABELLA CLEMENS, B.A., 
English and Bible. 

NELLIE PEARL McCAMPBELL, B.A., 
Latin. 

DAVID JOSEPH BRITTAIN, B.A., 
History. 

ALMIRA ELIZABETH JEWELL, B.A., 
Mathematics. 

MME. ADELE MARIE DENNEE, 

(Brevet Superior, The; Sorbonne) 

German and French, 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ANNA ETHEL FAN SON, B.A., 
Latin and History. 

DAVID WILSON PROFFITT, 

Bookkeeping. 

FRANCES MARIE BROWN, 

GEORGE NEWTON STEELMAN, 

Student Assistants in Mathematics. 

GEORGE EDGAR MITCHELL, 
Student Assistant in English. 

MARY GRACE MYERS, 
Student Assistant in Latin and English. 

MARY CRAIG HICKEY, 

ANDREW RICHARDS, 

Student Assistants in Biology. 

ERNEST KELLY JAMES, 
GLEN ALFRED LLOYD, 

.Student Assistants in Physics. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

HELENA MABEL RYLAND, B.A., B.S., 
Head of the Home Economics Department. 

MAE DARTHULA SMITH, 
Home Economics. 

BLAINE IRVING LEWIS, 
Dressmaking and Tailoring. 

ANNIE CORINNA COCHRANE, 
Student Assistant in Home Economics. 

LAURA BELLE HALE, 
Piano and Harmony, and Head of the Department of Music. 

ZANNA STAATER, 
Voice. 



MARYVILLU COLLBGU 



MARY KATE RANKIN, B.A., 
Piano. 

EDNA ELIZABETH DAWSON, 
Piano. 

MARGARET SUTTON SUGG, 
Piano. 

LENA FRANCES PARDUE, 
Assistant in Piano. 

MARTHA ELIZABETH CALDWELL, 

Violin. 

ANNA BELLE SMITH, 
Head of the Department of Art. 

MRS. NITA ECKLES WEST, B.A., B.O.. 
Head of the Department of Expression and Public Speaking. 

MRS. EDNA ZIMMERMAN WALKER, Ph.B., 

Expression. 

HENRI FRANCES POSTLETHWAITE, R.N, 

Nurse. 

HOMER BYRON FRATER, 
HOMER GEORGE WEISBECKER, 

Men's Physical Directors. 

ARDA NITA MARTIN, 

CATHERINE SHERBROOKE SUGG, 

Women's Physical Directors. 



OTHER OFFICERS 

FRED LOWRY PROFFITT, 

Treasurer. 

OLGA ALEXANDRA MARSHALL, 
Assistant Registrar. 



MARY VI LIB COLLEGE 



MARGARET ELIZA HENRY, 
Scholarship Secretary. 

ALICE ARMITAGE GILLINGHAM, 
Assistant Scholarship Secretary. 

MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Dean of Women and Matron of Pearsons Hall. 

EMMA AGNES JACKSON, 
Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

EDGAR ROY WALKER, 
Proctor of Carnegie Hall. 

EULA ERSKINE McCURRY, 
Proctor of Memorial Hall. 

REV. ARNO MOORE, 
Proctor of the Grounds. 

MRS. LIDA PRYOR SNODGRASS, 
Librarian. 

GEORGE ALAN KNAPP, 

Manager of the Loan Library. 

SARAH FRANCES COULTER, 

Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

LULA GRAHAM DARBY, 

Assistant Manager of the Cooperative Boarding Club. 

ANNA JO'SEPHINE JONES, 
Secretary to the President. 

CELIA ELLEN ROUGH, 

Secretary to the Treasurer. 

FRANK KEITH PO'STLETHWAITE, 
Assistant Librarian. 

GILBERT OSCAR ROBINSON. 
Assistant in the Loan Library. 

ALBERT ALEXANDER BREWER, 
Janitor. 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Admission to the Freshman Class is by written examination in the 
subjects given under Statement of Entrance Requirements, or by officially 
certified statements showing in detail all work for which entrance credit 
is asked. Candidates are expected to be at least sixteen years of age and 
of good moral character. They should send their credentials to the Com- 
mittee on Entrance at as early a date as possible. Those that delay filing 
an application for admission until the opening of the term will be given 
only provisional classification, pending a meeting of the Committee on 
Entrance. The regular application blank of the College, a copy of which 
will be mailed by the Registrar upon request, provides for the neces- 
sary testimonials of character, a pledge to orderly conduct while a member 
of the institution, detailed statement of subjects completed, and certificates 
of honorable dismissal. Entrance credit and classification granted on cer- 
tificates are conditional, and will be canceled if the student is found to 
be deficient. 

STATEMENT OF ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for entrance are stated in units. A unit is the equiv- 
alent of five forty-five-minute recitation periods a week during a full 
academic year, in subjects above the eighth grade of the common school. 

For admission to full standing in the Freshman Class fifteen units are 
required, as specified below : 

1. ENGLISH. — Three units required; four may be offered. 

(a) Grammar. A knowledge of technical terminology and syntax. 

(b) Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write correctly and 

clearly ; a knowledge of the principles of punctuation, cap- 
italization, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 

(c) The College Entrance Requirements in Literature recom- 

mended by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Require- 
ments in English. For the texts recommended for study 
and practice and for reading, see the lists scheduled for 
the English classes in the Preparatory Department. 

2. LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH.— Four units required. 
Latin. — Four units may be offered. 

(a) Fundamentals of grammar, and translation. 

(b) Caesar, Gallic War, Books i-iv. Composition. 

(c) Cicero, six orations ; Sallust, Catiline. Composition. 

(d) Vergil, iEneid, Books i-vi. Composition, mythology, prosody. 



10 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Greek. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Elements of grammar, and translation. Xenophon, Anabasis 

Book i. 

(b) Xenophon, Anabasis, Books ii-iv; Homer, Iliad, Books i-iiil 

Composition, mythology, prosody. 

German. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, reading, reproduction, and compo- 

sition. 

(b) Reading of about five hundred pages from simple texts, with 

reproduction and composition. 

French. — Two units may be offered. 

(a) Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, with the reading of about 

five hundred pages from simple texts. 

(b) Grammar and composition. Reading of about one thousand 

pages from texts of intermediate grade. 

3. MATHEMATICS.— Three units required; four may be offered. 

(a) Algebra, to radicals. 

(b) Algebra, including radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, ratici 

and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial 
and exponential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and 
equations in general. 

(c) Plane Geometry. Five books, together with original demon- 

strations. 

(d) Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry. 

4. NATURAL SCIENCES-— Two units required. 

5. ELECTIVE.— Three units. Any three units of standard high : 
school work that may be accepted by the Committee on Entrance. 

ENTRANCE WITH CONDITION 

A candidate may be admitted with condition not exceeding one unit, 
which must be absolved before admission to the Sophomore Class. 

ENTRANCE WITH ADVANCE CREDIT 

Admission with credit for college courses or with advanced standing 
will be granted only upon the presentation of certificates showing that the 
candidate, having previously had fifteen units of preparatory work, has 
satisfactorily completed the college studies, or their equivalent, for which 
credit is asked. Candidates will not be admitted to the graduating class 
for less than one full year's residence work. 



MARYVILLH COLLBGB H 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The College makes provision for two classes of special students, not 
matriculated in the regular classes of the College or the Preparatory 
Department. 

Irregular Collegiate Students.— Candidates offering for entrance a 
sufficient number of units to entitle them to standing in the Freshman 
Class, but deficient in more than one of the specified units required by 
this institution, may, at the discretion of the Committee on Entrance, be 
admitted as irregular collegiate students until they have absolved their 
conditions and attained full standing in a regular college class. Students 
of collegiate rank desiring to take an irregular^ or partial course and not 
seeking a degree may be allowed to select such studies as they show them- 
selves qualified to pursue. 

Special Students. — Students desiring to study only music, expression, 
art, or home economics, or seeking only courses in Bible training, are 
classified under their respective departments. Those whose academic train- 
ing would entitle them to college classification in literary courses are 
classed as College Special Students; all others as Preparatory Special 
Students. They have all the privileges offered to any students, such as 
the advantages of the libraries, the literary societies, the dormitories, and 
the boarding club. Young women rooming in the college dormitories and 
desiring chiefly music, expression, or art, are required to take a sufficient 
number of literary courses to make up, together with their work in the 
departments mentioned, fifteen recitation hours a week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. To attain the degree a minimum of thirty-six courses must be 
completed. A "course" is a study pursued for five one-hour recitation 
periods a week throughout one term. A term is one-third of the scholastic 
year, and three courses in any subject constitute, therefore, a year's work 
in that subject. All courses recite five hours or their equivalent a week. 
Courses requiring laboratory practice or field-work take additional hours, 
as indicated in the description of the courses. 

The thirty-six courses required for graduation represent four full 
years of work, nine courses a year (or three a term) being the minimum 
amount required of all students. Since all courses recite five hours a 
week, fifteen hours a week is the normal amount of work expected of 
each student. A student is permitted to take four courses a term (twenty 
hours a week) if his average grade in the subjects pursued during the 
preceding term was not less than ninety per cent. 



12 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



1. 


Classical. 


6 


2. 


Modern Languages. 


' 1 


3. 


Science. 


8 


4. 


Mathematics. 


9 


5. 


Education. 





Twenty-seven of the thirty-six courses are required of candidates foj 
the Bachelor's degree in all groups, and are distributed as follows : 

English, 6 courses. Philosophy, 1 course. 

Other Languages, 8 courses. Psychology and Education, 2 

Mathematics, 1 course. courses. 

Science, 4 courses. Bible, 5 courses. 

In addition to these twenty-seven courses, nine courses must be elected 
from the following groups in order to make up the total number of thirty- 
six required for graduation: 

English Literature and History. 
Psychology and Philosophy. 
Social Science. 
General. 



The special requirements for the respective groups are as follows : In 
the Classical Group, twelve language courses shall be taken, and may be 
arranged in one of the following combinations: (a) Latin six and Greffl 
(or German) six; (b) Latin nine and Greek (or German or French)!) 
three; (c) Greek nine and Latin (or German or French) three. In the 
Modern Languages Group, twelve courses in modern languages (or eleven,; 
in case Spanish is elected) shall be taken. In the Science Group, besides-; 
the four required science courses, seven additional courses, either of chem- 
istry or of biology, shall be taken and at least two years of German or 
French. In the Mathematics Group, eight courses in mathematics shall be 
taken. In the Education, English Literature and History, and Psychology' 
and Philosophy Groups, all the courses offered in the respective groups'; 
shall be taken. In the Social Science Group, eight courses selected from 1 ; 
the departments of economics, sociology, and political science shall be' 
taken. Students that meet all the requirements for graduation, but do not 
meet the requirements of any of the afore-mentioned groups, shall be : 
graduated in the General Group. The name of the group in which a 
student graduates will be indicated on the diploma. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

The distinction of Summa cum Laude; is conferred upon such mem- 
bers of the graduating class as shall have had twelve terms (four years) 
of residence study in the College Department, with an average grade of 
ninety-five per cent. 

The distinction of Magna cum Lauds is conferred upon such mem- 
bers of the graduating class as shall have had at least nine terms (three 



M.lKYllUJi COLlMCJi 1:; 



years) of residence study in the College Department, with an average 
made of ninety-two and a half per cent. 

The distinction of Cum Lauds is conferred upon such members of the 
graduating class as shall have had at least six terms (two years) of resi- 
dence study in the College Department, with an average grade of ninety 

per cent. 

This distinction is indicated on the diploma, and published in the Com- 
mencement program, and in the catalog number of the BueeETin for the 
ensuing year. 

The Faculty also chooses from among the honor graduates one young 
man and one young woman to represent the class as orators on Com- 
mencement Day. 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

For the benefit of students preparing to study medicine but unable first 
to complete the full four years' college course leading to a degree, the 
College provides a special course covering those college studies demanded 
for entrance to medical schools of Class A standard, as classified by the 
American Medical Association. The course of study, which may be com- 
pleted in one year, consists of the following courses, described under 
Departments of" Instruction : Chemistry 1 and 2 ; Physics 1 and 2 ; Biology 
4 and 10 ; and French 1, 2, and 3. Fourteen standard units of high-school 
work are required for admission to this course of study. This does 
not, however, admit to the regular college course, for which the College 
requires fifteen units. A student completing the pre-medical course will 
be certified to to the medical school that he may wish to enter. 

CERTIFICATES OF CREDIT 

Graduates and undergraduates that have left college in good standing 
may, if they so desire, receive an official statement of their credits, upon 
application to the Registrar. No charge is made for this certificate when 
issued in the form adopted by the College. For the filling out of special 
blanks, prepayment of one dollar for each blank is required. Duplicates 
of certificates may be had by paying for the clerical expense involved. 



SYNOPSIS OF COLLEGE COURSES 



Freshman Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

Chemistry 

Psychology 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Sophomore Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek 

German 

French 

Chemistry . 

Biology 

Psychology 

Social Science 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Junior Year 

English 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Greek [[ 

German 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Physics 

Philosophy 

Political Science. . . 

Social Science 

History 

Education 

Bible 



Senior Year 

English 

Mathematics . 

Latin 

Spanish 

Hebrew 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Chemistry . 

Biology 

Psychology . . . . 

Philosophy 

Political Science. 

Education 

Bible 



Fall 


Winter 


— • 


*2 


*2 


4 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


tl 


f2 


1 


2 


8 


1 


1 


2 


tl 


2 



*1, 12 


5, 13 


8 


6 


3, 11 


4, 12 


4 


5 


4 


14 


1 


2 


12 





tl, 3 


ta 


— 


3 


2 


12 


3 


7 

A 



1:4 



5 or 7 
4 

tl 
*2 

14 

4 



3,4,5, 8 
J10 or 11 



11 

9 
7 
7 
6 or 15 
5 
5 

ta 
i 

15 



Spring 

*3 

10 

9 

3 

3 

3, 11 

2 



6 
7 
5 
11 
9 
3 

t4 

13 
3 



11 or 12 

8 
8, 9, or 10 
2 or 13, 10 

6 
6, 7, or 8 

3 

2 
16 

6 

9 



>, 10 

13 

10 



3 

9 
10 
7 or 

U 

7 
7, 8 



■ Required in all groups leading to a degree 

tTwo courses in each of two natural sciences are required 

.Required Bible may be taken in any term, but Seniors take Philosophy 3 and 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



L5 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



NoTiv- The courses in each department are numbered consecutively, 
Linnino- with 1. The omission of a number indicates that a course has 
EL discontinued. New courses receive new numbers and are inserted in 
the Synopsis and in the description of courses in the curriculum year to 
which they belong. 

PHILOSOPHY 
Dean Barnes and Professors Gieeingham and Myers 
o Lo-ic Hill's Jevons' Logic, in connection with questions and ex- 
ercise's prepared for the class. The practical work given in the exercises 
appended in the text-book is required, and also much original work in 
Induction connected with every-day questions, the aim being to make the 
study of practical service in such reasoning as will be met by the student 
in his subsequent experiences in life. Required in all groups. Junior year, 
fall term.— Professor Myers. 

3 The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief. Dr. Fisher's work 
is made the basis of classroom study and recitation. The principal theistic 
and anti-theistic arguments are reviewed, and then the main historical and 
philosophical arguments for belief in the Christian religion are considered. 
Required in all groups. Senior year, winter term.-PROEESSOR GileinGham. 

4 Ethics The leading conceptions of moral theory are approached 
by the historical method. The student is led to see that moral problems 

- are real problems, which are solved best by reflective thought that is guided 
by Christian ideals. The various types of ethical theory are discussed. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the ethics of social organizations, the 
state the economic life, and the family. The text of Dewey and Tufts 
is placed in the hands of the students, and is supplemented by the works 
of Sidgwick, Green, Martineau, and Spencer. Prerequisite, one course in 
psychology. Required in all groups. Senior- year, spring term.-DEAN 
Barnes. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dean Barnes 

1 Elementarv Psychology. This course is designed for students 

taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supplemented by 

lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psychology is 



16 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



used as a text-book. This course is identical with Education 1. Freshman 
year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
problems which have reference to education; theory of recapitulation cor- 
relations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, appercep- 
tion, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
used is Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented bv lectures This 
course is identical with Education 2. Freshman year, winter term. 

3 Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
logical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
cial reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
as a function of sensori-motor coordination. From this point of view 
attention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed' 
The course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
principles to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
Education 4. Sophomore year, winter term. 

4. Advanced General Psychology. A study of the psycho-physical 
organism by means of the Auzoux models, sensation, habit, attention per- 
ception, memory, imagination, reasoning, emotions, and volition. Typical 
experiments. Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports. Prerequisite 
Psychology 1 or 2. Senior year, fall term. 

5. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades; a study of the 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning of 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school This 
course is identical with Education 8. Prerequisites, Psychology 1, 2, and 3. 
Senior year, spring term. 

6. Social Psychology. A study of group consciousness and social 
origins. Relation of the psychic life of the group to the group activities 
Instruction and discipline of children by the parents and by the group 
Comparison of the mental traits of different races and social classes & Psy- 
chology of the crowd, the mores, and folkways. Open to Seniors and to 
Juniors who have had Psychology 1, 2, 3, and 4, Senior year, winter term. 

7. Experimental Psychology. This course consists of experiments in 
acoustics, haptics, optics, reactions, taste, and smell. Titchener's Experi- 
mental Psychology is used as a text, supplemented by the works of Kiilpe, 
Sanford, Judd, and Myer. Senior year, spring term. 

8. Experimental Psychology. This course is a continuation of Course 
7. Special emphasis is placed upon the study of the reaction experiment 
by the use of the Hipp chronoscope. Senior year, spring term 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 17 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Dkan Barnes 

1. Liberty. This course consists of a study of the idea of the nation, 
and of the character and distribution of nationalities ; a development of 
the idea and conception of the state, and a study of its origin, forms, and 
2nds ; a history of the formation of the constitutions of the states of Great 
Britain, the United States, Germany, and France, and of the organization 
3f these states within their respective constitutions, and a study of liberty 
as guaranteed in their constitutions. The text-book is Burgess' Political 
Science, Volume I, supplemented by Story's Commentaries, and Thayer's 
and McClain's Cases, and the works of other authors. Junior year, winter 
term. 

2. Government. A study of the forms of government, the construc- 
tions, powers, and duties of the legislative, executive, and judicial depart- 
ments of the governments of Great Britain, the United States, Germany, 
and France. The text-hook is Burgess' Political Science, Volume II, sup- 
plemented by the works of Story, Macy, and other authors. Junior year, 
(spring term. 

3. International Law. This course consists of the elements of inter- 
national law, with an account of its origin, sources, and historical develop- 
ment. Lawrence's text-book is used, and the course is supplemented by 
jprescribed readings in the works of Woolsey and Hall, and in Scott's and 
; Snow's Cases. Senior year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

4. The Process of Legislation and Parliamentary Law. This course 
Is planned to familiarize students with legislative structure and procedure, 
national, state, and municipal ; it includes also a study of the structure and 
[procedure of political conventions and similar bodies, and the theory and 
'practice of parliamentary law. Open to students who have had Political 
Science 1 and 2. Senior year, fall term. 

5. Political Parties. A study of the history, organization, and methods 
jof action of political parties in the United States. Growth of the party 
jsystem; primary and convention systems; permanent party organization; 
preform movements ; and the value and theory of the party system. Senior 
'year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

6. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Greece, Rome, France, and Germany. Ogg's Governments of 
Europe is used as a text, supplemented by Lowell's Governments and Par- 
ties in Continental Europe. Senior year, winter term. (Not to be given 
in 1916-1917.) 

7. Comparative Governments. A comparative study of the govern- 
ments of Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Sweden, Norway, Great Britain, 



18 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



and the United States. Ogg and Lowell are the texts, supplemented 
Taswell-Langmead, Ridges, Low, Goodnow, Cooley, and Story. Senio 
year, spring term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

8. Constitutional Law. This course is a brief study of the elemen 
tary principles of constitutional law exemplified by cases. Hall's text an 
McClain's and Thayer's Cases are used. Senior year, fall term. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Johnson 

2. Practical Sociology. This course deals with the units of socia 
organization, questions of population, questions of the family, the labo 
system, social well-being, and the defense of society. Sophomore year 
fall term. 

12. City Problems. The first half of this course is devoted to th< 
study of Howe's The Modern City and Its Problems. This book deals it 
general with the governments and problems of modern cities in England' 
Germany, and the United States. The second half is a study of Wilcox'] 
Great Cities in America, in which the problems of six great America^ 
cities are specifically discussed. Sophomore year, winter term. 

13. Rural Problems. This course is designed to show the scope oj 
rural sociology, to compare the advantages of country and city, to marl* 
out the nature of the rural problem, to consider such improvements a< 
are conducive to rural community welfare. The text-book is Gillette'? 
Constructive Sociology. Sophomore year, spring term. 

14. Economic Principles. This is an elementary course presenting 
the fundamental concepts and problems of economics to serve as a genera, 
survey of the subject. The text-book is Bullock's Introduction to thd 
Study of Economics. Junior year, fall term. 

15. 16. Economic Principles. These courses are designed to provide 
advanced study in the field of economics. A philosophic study of the 
economic principles that explain the industrial conditions of modern coun- 
tries, particularly of the United States. The organization of production, 
value and exchange, money, international trade, distribution of wealth, 
labor problems, problems of economic organization, and taxation are the 
chief questions considered. Taussig's Economic Principles is used as a 
text-book. Junior year, winter and spring terms. 

EDUCATION 

For the courses in Education see the descriptive text regarding the 
Teachers' Department. 



MARYVILLB COLLUCli 19 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Knapp 



2. Plane Trigonometry. Definitions and fundamental notions ; sys- 
tems of angular measurement; trigonometric formulae, their derivation 
and transformation; solutions of equations and of numerical problems. 
Required in all groups. Students that present Plane Trigonometry for 
college entrance take Course 4 or 9. Freshman year, fall term. 

4. Plane Analytic Geometry. Rectilinear and polar systems of coor- 
dinates ; the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola ; tangents 
and normals; general equation of the second degree and certain higher 
plane curves. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. Either this course or Course 9 
required of students that present Plane Trigonometry for college entrance. 
Freshman year, winter term. 

10. Plane Surveying. The use and adjustments of instruments, and 
the methods employed in practical surveying. The work includes chain- 
ing, triangulation, leveling, calculating areas and earthwork, establishing 
grades, dividing land, railway location, laying out curves, mapping, and 
topographical work. Special attention is given to field-work. Prerequi- 
site, Mathematics 2. Freshman year, spring term. 

8. College Algebra. Logarithms ; series ; permutations, combinations, 
land probability; determinants and the theory of equations. Sophomore 

year, fall term. 

6, 7. Differential and Integral Calculus. Differentiation of algebraic 
and transcendental functions, with elementary applications of the calculus, 
especially in maxima and minima, and in the expansion of functions, the 
general treatment of curve tracing, asymptotes, inflection, curvature, and 
singular points; radius of curvature and envelopes. Direct integration 
of elementary forms, including integration by decomposition of fractions ; 
integration by substitution, by parts, and by the aid of reduction formulae. 
Applications particularly in the rectification, quadrature, and cubature of 
curves. Prerequisite, Mathematics 4. Sophomore year, winter and spring- 
terms. 

9. Astronomy. A general survey; definitions; description and use 
of instruments; earth, moon, sun, planets, aerolites and shooting stars, 
comets, fixed stars ; stellar and planetary evolution. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 2. Either this course or Course 4 required of students that present 
Plane Trigonometry for college entrance. Junior year, winter term. 

11. Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Analytic Geometry. The de- 
velopment and transformation of formulae; solution of spherical triangles 
with applications in geodesy, navigation, and astronomy. Systems of coor- 
dinates in solid analytic geometry; loci; lines, planes, surfaces; general 



20 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



equations of the second degree; ruled surfaces. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 4. Junior year, spring term. 

12. Differential Equations. Equations of the first and second orders ; 
linear equations; solutions of equations by series; miscellaneous appli- 
cations. Prerequisites, Mathematics 6 and 7. Junior year, spring term.j 

13. The History of Mathematics. Mathematical knowledge and 
methods of primitive races; Egyptians; the Greek schools; the Middle 
Ages and the Renaissance; mathematics of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries ; recent times ; resume by topics with a study of the methods of 
teaching elementary mathematics. Senior year, spring term. (Not to be 
given in 1916-1917.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor McCeenahan and Laboratory Assistants. 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. A beginner's course in modern 
chemical theory and practice. Suitable experiments are selected, but the 
requirements of the course center about lectures and quizzes, both oral and 
written. Mellor's Modern Inorganic Chemistry is the text. Laboratory^ 
practice, four hours a week; lectures and quizzes, three hours. Freshman; 
year, fall term. 

2. General Inorganic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 1 during' 
the first half of the winter term. Second half of the winter term, an! 
introduction to Qualitative Chemical Analysis. The work of the latter 
half of the term has to do more particularly with the metals. The order i 
of their presentation for discussion and laboratory study follows the 
analytical order as outlined in Gooch and Browning's Outlines of Quali- ' 
tative Chemical Analysis. Continual reference is made to Mellor's Modern! 
Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory practice, six hours a week ; lectures and j 
quizzes, two hours. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. General Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. A contin- 
uation of Course 2. This is more particularly a course in metallurgical ; 
and applied chemistry with respect to the lectures, and in analytical chem- 
istry with respect to the laboratory. The same text is used as in Course 2. 
Laboratory practice, six hours a week; lectures and quizzes, two hours. 
Freshman year, spring term. 

11. Elementary Organic and Household Chemistry. Designed pri- 
marily for students in Home Economics. Laboratory practice, six hours 
a week; lectures, two hours. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Freshman 
year, spring term. 

12. Advanced Household Chemistry. A course dealing with elemen- 
tary biochemistry, chemical sanitation, food analysis, and poisons. This is 



MARYVILLli COLLBGB : 'i 



a laboratory course of eight laboratory hours aud one lecture a week. 
Much use is made of the library. The study is topical. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 1, 2, and 11. Sophomore year, fall term. 

■i. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A laboratory course of eight 
hours a week in the volumetric and gravimetric methods ordinarily em- 
ployed in quantitative chemical analysis. The instruction is individual, 
and there is continual reference to the well-stocked reference library and 
to current literature. Independence of thought is the aim, and the most 
scrupulous care to exactness of technic is required. One hour a week 
in addition is devoted to quizzes and informal discussions. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Junior year, fall term. 

5. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 4. 
Junior year, winter term. 

6. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. A continuation of Course 5. 
Junior year, spring term. 

7. General Organic Chemistry. Text-book, Perkin and Kipping's 
Organic Chemistry. Laboratory practice, eight hours a week; lecture or 
quiz, one hour. Senior year, fall term. 

8. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 7. Senior 
year, winter term. 

9. General Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 8, with 
some definite applications to biological chemistry, both analytical and theo- 
retical. Senior year, spring term. 

For acceptable substitutes for Chemistry courses in the Science Group, 
1 see Geology and Mineralogy. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor McClEnahan 

1. Mineralogy. A laboratory course of eight hours a week, accom- 
panied by one hour lecture a week. Brush-Penfield's Determinative Miner- 
alogy is the manual. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2, and 3. Senior year, 
fall term. 

2. General Geology. Dynamic and Structural. Chamberlain and 
Salesbury's College Geology is the text. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2. 
and 3. Senior year, winter term. 

3. General Geology. Historical. A continuation of Course 2. Much 
use is made of the United States Geological Folios and Atlas. Also occa- 
sional field trips are made to interesting localities in the county. Senior 
year, spring term. 

Geology 1, 2, and 3 may be substituted for Chemistry 7, 8, and 9 by 
students electing the Science Group. 



32 



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PHYSICS 

Professor Knapp 

1. Mechanics and Heat. Lectures, recitations, and quantitative ex- 
periments. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. Laboratory practice, four hours 
a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, fall term. 

2. Sound and Light. A continuation of Course 1. Junior year 
winter term. 

3. Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of Course 2. Junior 
year, spring term. 

BIOLOGY 

Miss Green and Laboratory Assistants 

1. General Invertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field-work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisite, elementary physiology. Laboratory practice, four hours a 
week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, fall term. 

2. General Vertebrate Zoology. Classroom work, accompanied by 
dissection of typical forms, and field-work. Text-book, Colton's Zoology. 
Prerequisite, elementary physiology. Laboratory practice, four hours a' 
week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, winter term. 

3. Botany. Life History of Plants from Seed to Flower. Emphasis ' 
is laid upon the chief problems involved in the physiology, ecology, and : 
morphology of the seed, the developing plant, and the flower. Text-book, ' 
Bergen and Davis' Principles of Botany. Laboratory practice, four hours 
a week; recitations, three hours. Sophomore year, fall term. 

4. Botany. Plant Morphology. A rapid morphological survey of the 
four great plant groups. Text-book, Bergen and Davis' Principles of ! 
Botany. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. ; 
Sophomore year, spring term. 

5. Botany. Plant Physiology. A study of the most evident life rela- 
tions of plants, embracing the fundamental principles of plant physiology. 
Classroom work, accompanied by experimental work in the laboratory. 
The work is not confined to any one text-book, but references are given 
out to various standard text-books on plant physiology. Prerequisite, 
Biology 3. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three 
hours. Junior year, winter term. 

6. Botany. Morphology of Thallophytes. A more detailed study of 
the algae and fungi. The knowledge obtained of rusts, smuts, mildews, 
and molds renders this a valuable course from an economic standpoint. 
Lichens abound in this vicinity. Prerequisite, Biology 4. Laboratory prac- 
tice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE :i:i 



7 Botany. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. Mosses, 
liverworts, ferns, equisetums, and lycopods are more thoroughly studied. 
The abundance of bryophytes and ferns in the surrounding region makes 
this an attractive group. Prerequisites, Biology 4 and 6. Laboratory prac- 
tice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

8 Botany. Morphology of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 4, 6, and 7. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; 
recitations, three hours. Junior year, spring term. 

9 10 Advanced Physiology. Classroom work and laboratory experi- 
ments bringing out the fundamental principles of the circulatory res- 
piratory digestive, and nervous systems. This course is especially valuable 
to students intending to take up the study of medicine. Prerequisites 

, elementary physiology, elementary physics, Biology 2, and Chemistry 1 
and 2. Laboratory practice, four hours a week; recitations, three hours. 
! Senior year, winter and spring terms. 

Courses 3, 4, and 5 will be given each year, and either Course 6, 7, 
; or 8 By this alternation of courses, a student will be given an opportunity 
| to pursue the subject further than would otherwise be possible. 

HISTORY 

Associate Professor Johnson 
8 Eighteenth Century European History. In this course special em- 
phasis is laid upon political and fundamental economic matters such a, 
the Industrial Revolution, commerce and colonies, the internal reforms of 
the European states, and the general advance of science. The text-book 
is Robinson and Beard's The Development of Modern Europe, Volume I. 
Freshman year, fall term. 

1 Nineteenth Century European History. The object of this course 
is the study of conditions in Western Europe as they have been developed 
from the French Revolution. The subjects include the growth of repub- 
lican ideas in France, the unification of Italy, the establishment of the 
German Empire, and the revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848. Spe- 
cial topics for individual study are taken up by each member and pursued 
throughout the course. Freshman year, winter term. 

2 History of Civilization. Among the subjects studied are the influ- 
ence of the Church, the Italian Renaissance, and the German Reformation. 
The work is done to some extent in text-books or prescribed authors, 
but students are required to submit oral reports of special library work. 
Freshman year, spring term. 

7 Roman History and Politics. This course is given in English. No 
language requirement. A general survey of Roman History from the 



24 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



earliest period until the time of Charlemagne. During the latter part of 
the term the class makes a careful study of the political development of 
the Roman State. The texts used are Abbott's Short History of Rome 
and Abbott's Roman Political Institutions. This course is identical with 
Latin 12. Sophomore year, winter term. 

3. Church History. A general survey of the history of the Church 
from the first century to the present time, with especial emphasis upon the 
great leaders and thinkers of the Church. Text-book and library work 
Sophomore year, spring term. 

r t 5 t't An ; er j can Histor y- In thi * course a study of the development 
of the United States from the close of the American Revolution to the 
present time is presented. The course emphasizes those things which have 
been especially instrumental in the growth of our nation. The text-book 
is Fish's The Development of American Nationality. Junior year, fall and 
winter terms. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Professors Myers and Hoyt 
2, 3. Rhetoric. Genung's Practical Elements of Rhetoric, with illus- 
trative examples, is studied, and the students are familiarized with the 
principles of style and invention. Practical exercises accompany the study 
of the text-book. This is accompanied by work in Rhetorical Analysis 
consisting of application of the principles referred to above The work 
is altogether practical, and consists of rhetorical criticism of selections of 
English prose and of original work in sentence structure, paragraphs and 
longer compositions prepared by the students both in and for the class- 
room. Required in all groups. Freshman year, winter and spring terms. 
1. Outlining and Argumentation. Five Weeks.— Outlining or analysis 
of topics for discussion. Analytical study of the principles of debating 
Practical work is done in accordance with an approved svstem of prin- 
ciples and rules. The absolute necessity of method in all composition is 
emphasized. At least fifteen outlines of assigned topics are presented by 
each student, and criticised and returned by the professor. Nine Weeks - 
Argumentation. This part of the course follows the work in outlining 
and involves the application of the principles that have been studied in 
the production of finished argumentative exercises, which are delivered in 
class, and criticised by the instructor. Attention is given to the delivery 
as well as to the thought and composition, since the aim of the course is 
to develop the power of effective public address. Required in all groups 
Sophomore year, fall term. 

12, 13. Public Speaking. The first term's work includes a study of 
the science of tone production and practice in the delivery of good ex- 



MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 



■r> 



Lples of oral discourse. It involves also some study of the science of 
effective public speaking, based on a text-book. The second terms work 
is a continuation of that of the first term. More emphasis is placed on 
the interpretative aspect of the oral work. During this term a detailed 
study of the text-book on public speaking is carried on, and the principles 
are put into practice in the form of original exercises by the students. 
Sophomore year, fall and winter tennis. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Mrs. Alexander 

5 6 English Literature. A survey of the entire field of English Lit- 
erature from its beginning to the death of Victoria. As a guide, Long's 
History of English Literature is employed, but much use is made of Saints- 
bury Garnett and Gosse, and other advanced works in this subject. The 
development of the literature from period to period is carefully noted, and 
the lives, works, and characteristics of the more prominent authors are 
studied and criticised. Sophomore year, winter and spring terms. 

4. American Literature. Two weeks are devoted to Colonial liter- 
ature The rest of the time is given to a careful study of the works of 
the leading American poets and prose writers of the nineteenth century. 
Library work and Page's Chief American Poets. Junior year, fall term. 

11 Development of English Poetry. This course is an introductory 
study of the technic of the art of verse. The forms of English poetry are 
studied, including the epic, ballad, sonnet, ode, and other lyrics. These 
forms will be traced in examples from Chaucer to Tennyson. The object 
of the course is to increase the enjoyment and appreciation of poetry by 
insight into the methods of the poets and by acquaintance with the best 
examples of their art. Junior year, winter term. 

7. Nineteenth Century Prose. This course is a study of representa- 
tive nineteenth-century prose writers, with especial attention to the devel- 
opment of the essay and of prose fiction. The work is based on typical 
essays of Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Stevenson, and Arnold; and 
representative fiction by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, 
Thackeray, Meredith, and Kipling. Senior year, fall term. 

8. Shakespeare. A chronological study of Shakespeare, noting the 
development of his poetic art; with introductory lectures on the evolution 
of the drama, and on the contemporaries of Shakespeare. Senior year, 
winter term. 

9. Nineteenth Century Poets. A study of Wordsworth, Tennyson, 
and Browning, with introductory lectures, classroom criticism, and papers 
on assigned subjects. Senior year, spring term. 



.«>«*■ 



26 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



10. Theme Writing. This course gives instruction and practice in 
the four kinds of composition: exposition, argumentation, description and 
narration. Daily exercises and themes are written and criticised in class 
These are designed to illustrate the use of words and the structure of sen- 
tences and paragraphs, and to give general practice in writing on various 
subjects In addition, at least four themes, of from a thousand to fifteen 
hundred words each, must be handed in. Senior year, spring term. 

LATIN 

Professor Davis 

1. Livy. Book xxi and selections from Book xxii. The class makes 
a thorough study of the historical setting of Livy's narrative. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the syntax. Sight reading. Freshman year fall 
term. 

2. De Senectute and De Amicitia. A careful study of De Senectute 
followed by a rapid reading of De Amicitia. Special attention is given 
to the author's thought and style, and to practice in translation. Sight 
reading. Freshman year, winter term. 

9. Tacitus and Seneca. Tacitus' Agricola and selections from the 
writings of Seneca. The class makes a critical study of the historical 
setting structure, and purpose of the Agricola. The characteristics of 
Silver Latin as illustrated in the style of Tacitus and Seneca receive close 
attention. Freshman year, spring term. 

3 Cicero and Pliny. Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny 
The letters read will be such as illustrate the life, customs, and political 
history of the times, and the characters of the writers. Sight reading- 
Prerequisite, one of the preceding courses. Sophomore year, fall term. 

4. Horace. Odes and Epodes. This course together with Course 5 
presents a general view of the works of the poet Horace. By this time 
the student has a sufficient knowledge of the grammatical structure of the 
language to enable him to study the poems of Horace from a literary 
viewpoint. Special attention is paid to the metrical structure, and the class 
receives thorough drill in scansion. Prerequisites, two of the preceding 
courses. Sophomore year, winter term. 

5. Horace and Juvenal. Selections from the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace, including the Ars Poetica, and selections from the Satires of 
Juvenal. A continuation of Course 4. The class makes a careful study 
of the origin and development of Roman satire. Prerequisite, Latin 4. 
Sophomore year, spring term. 

6. Roman Literature of the Republic. The work of this year con- 
sists or a thorough and systematic review of the whole period of Roman 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



:»r 



literature -its beginnings, development, and decline - with special refer- 
ence to its connection with Roman history. Courses 0, 7, and 8 should 
be taken in succession. They presuppose thorough familiarity with Latin 
syntax a good working vocabulary, and considerable practice in transla- 
tion Ml the preceding courses should be taken before these are attempted. 
The texts used are Fowler's History of Roman Literature and Smith s 
Latin Selections. Readings from representative authors. Lectures by the 
professor in charge. Reports are required on assigned portions of the 
various histories of Latin literature and other reference works. The work 
of this term is a study of the fragments of early Latin, the plays ot 
Plautus and Terence, Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Catullus, and the prose 
writers of the age of Cicero. Junior year, fall term. 

7 Roman Literature of the Empire (A). The Augustan Age. A 
continuation of Course 6. Selections from Vergil's Eclogues and Georges 
and Books vii to xii of the ^neid, Horace's Epodes, Ovid, and the Elegiac 
Poets, and the prose writers of the period. Junior year, winter term. 

8 Roman Literature of the Empire (B). Silver Latin, and Post- 
classical Latin. A continuation of Course 7. Selections from Lucan 
Seneca. Martial, Pliny the Elder, Quintilian. Tacitus, Suetonius, Apulems. 
Minueius Felix, and others. Junior year, spring term. 

10 Teachers' Course. This course is intended to assist those who 
expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the prin- 
ciples of the language, the class considers the most effective methods ot 
teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. Open to students who have had at least 
one reading course. This course is identical with Education 7. Senior 
year, spring term. 

11 Mythology. This course is given in English, and is intended pri- 
marily for those that have no knowledge of Latin. It will prove valuable. 
however, to classical students that desire a more thorough acquaintance 
with the mythologv of Greece and Rome. The work includes a general 
survey of Graeco-fcoman Mythology, a study of ancient Roman religious 
rites and festivals, and a brief outline of Norse and Egyptian mythology. 
Stress is laid upon the influence of the Myths on English Literature. 
Selections from Milton. Shakespeare, and Dante are read in class, and col- 
lateral reading in English Literature is required. Sophomore year, tall 
term. 

12. Roman History and Politics. This course is given in English. 
No language requirement. A general survey of Roman History from the 
earliest period until the time of Charlemagne. During the latter part ot 
the term the class makes a careful study of the political development of 
the Roman State. The texts used are Abbott's Short History of Rome 



2S 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



uLTT\fT n POlitkal InStitUti ° ns - Th - course is identical with 
History 7. bophomore year, winter term. 

GREEK 

Professor Davis 

studenttL 001 ^ 8 ' B n Sinning Greet This COUrSe is des[ «^ only for 
Til ? ^ WC " PreWred !n ° ther sub J' ects to ""able them to com- 
plete the entrance Greek in one year. The work of the fall term purposes 
to secure a mastery of the principal inflections, a careful study of th 

Gr'eT L° hI yntaX ; "f "^ * ^ ^ "*** «* «* 
,fln rt ' h \ Wmter te ™ the reading of the Anabasis is begun contin- 
umg through the spring term with a thorough review of Greek grammar 
and Greek composrtton. Selections f r0m other authors are brough ml 
sight translatton. Freshman year, fall, winter, and spring term^ 

otusl^Th^Td^ ThUCy j dideS ' Sdert! °" s f«» the works of Herod- 
otus ^ Thneyd.de, read A carefuI rf 

o us s made, and special reading is assigned on the rise and development 
of history as a division of Greek literature. A study of the history o 
Greek literature .s begun, based on Wright's and Jebb's texts with Is "ned 
reading m Mueller and Mahaffy. Sophomore year, fall ternT 

5. Lucian. Several of the more important dialogs are read and the 
pecuhant.es of the late Attic style are studied. The study of the lit ry 
of Greek hterature is continued. Sophomore year, winter term 

Wesicott^d H Te !'T en \ °" e ° f * e G ° SPelS ° r the A * is read in <*»■. 
Westcott and Horts text bemg used, with Thayer's lexicon and Winer' 

ext a stud TT, ^ C ° nneCti0n WUh th£ readi "S of the assigned 
text a study ,is made of the general characteristics of Hellenistic Greek 

u t ;r a r of this p tv nd the m ° st imp ° rtant n - *»*£,££ 

uscnpts and versions. Sophomore year, spring term. 

with 6 the P ^'1 The Ph r d °. iS re3d fOT thC imm0rta ' teachin S s ° f S ° cr ates, 
with the Apology or the Crrto for his life and death. Brief outline o 

T^Tm ° S t T , A f Udy b made ° f th£ pM * d 'i an 
yLf, fall .term ary ' ^ tra " Slati ° n fr ° m eaSy Attic ^ ^r 

7 Tragic Poetry. ^Eschylus' Seven against Thebes or Prometheus 
Bound, and Sophocles' CFdipus Tyrannus or Antigone are read in iTr- 

iti TatT' The ° nePay d f r, EUriPideS ' e!ther AkeStis ° r ™&™ 
TJ T ™ on « ,n and development of tragedy, the Greek theater 

eltr ,t„; ed topics are discussed in im ^ ^ *»<««» » »,£ 

readings. Junior year, winter term. 

8. Comic Poetry. The Frogs of Aristophanes is read in class. The 






MARYVILLU COLLEGE 



39 



development of comedy and its place in Greek literature and Greek life 
are studied. One hour a week is given to the study of Greek architecture 
based upon a text-book, supplemented by lectures and the examination of 
drawings and stereographs. Alternates with Courses 9 and 10. Junior 
year, spring term. 

9 Oratory. Selections from Lysias and Demosthenes constitute the 
basis of a general study of the rise and development of political oratory 
and of its influence on Greek literature. Frequent written translations are 
required to develop accuracy and elegance in rendering the. polished style 
of the classical orators. One hour a week is devoted to lectures and dis- 
cussions on Greek sculpture and painting, Tarbell's History of Greek Art 
being used as a text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 10. Junior year, 
spring term. 

10. The Odyssey. This is designed to be a rapid reading course cov- 
ering the entire Odyssey, of which the equivalent of about nine books is 
read in the original and the intervening portions in a translation. Merry's 
two-volume edition of the Odyssey is used as a classroom text. Homeric 
geography, politics, religion, home life, and art are studied in connection 
with the reading of the text. Alternates with Courses 8 and 9. Junior 
year, spring term. 

GERMAN 

Professor Perkins 
1, 2, 3. College Beginning German. This course is designed for stu- 
dents' who enter college without German, but who are sufficiently prepared 
in language study to be able to complete entrance German in one year. 
The work of the fall term is intended to give the student a mastery of 
the grammar, easy prose translation, and simple conversation. Text-books, 
Joynes and Meissner's Grammar and Guerber's Marchen und Erzahlungen. 
During the winter term such texts as von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche 
and Wells' Drei kleine Lustspiele are read and made the basis of conver- 
sation and composition exercises. In the spring term Baumbach's Der 
Schwiegersohn is read. Drill in grammar, together with work in compo- 
sition and conversation, based on the texts read, is continued throughout 
the year. Freshman year, fall, winter, and spring terms. 

4. Advanced Grammar, Translation, and Composition. A progressive 
review of grammar is made, using Bernhardt's Composition as a text. 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell is read and its dramatic structure studied. Se- 
lected passages are committed to memory and original themes are written 
in German on subjects connected with the plot. Prerequisites, German 1, 
2, and 3, or equivalents. Sophomore year, fall term. 



30 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



14. Advanced Grammar, Translation, and Composition. Work in 
composition and conversation continued. Text-book, Allen's First German 
Composition. Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea is read. Goethe's life and 
literary career are made the subject of reference reading and written 
report. Sophomore year, winter term. 

9. Lessing's Life and Works. His life and works are studied and 
his Minna von Barnhelm is read. Written reports and original themes are 
required. Arnold's Aprilwetter is used for practice in rapid reading and 
as the basis for conversational practice. Sophomore year, spring term. 

5. Schiller's Life and Works. Two of Schiller's dramatic works are 
translated and studied in the classroom, and a third (in 1915-1916 Maria 
Stuart) is read outside of class. Outlines of the plots of two of these plays 
are presented by the students, in German. Schiller's life and career are 
carefully studied. Junior year, fall term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

7. Advanced Composition and Conversation. This course is con- 
ducted in German and consists of translation of representative English 
prose into the" German idiom. Sketches from German history are made 
the basis of classroom discussion and German themes are presented on ' 
var.ous phases of German life and customs. Prerequisites, German 4, 5 ' 
and 6, or equivalents. Junior year, fall term. 

6. Goethe's Life and Works. Iphigenie and the First Part of Faust : 
are studied and discussed in the classroom. Goethe's life and literary ! 
activities are made the subject of reference reading and written report, i 
Junior year, winter term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

15. German Poetry. A rapid survey of the field of modern Ger- : 
man poetry, beginning with Goethe and Schiller, including selections from I 
Uhland, Wieland, Heine, Scheffel, Arndt, Korner, and others. In con- | 
nection with the texts read in this course, the literary movements of the ' 
nineteenth century in Germany are discussed. Junior year, winter term. 

12. Modern Drama. Representative plays of such authors as Slider- ; 
mann, Hauptmann, and Fulda; collateral reading and reports. Junior year 
spring term. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

13. The Novel. Scheffel's Ekkehard, Sudermann's Frau Sorge and 
other novels are read and discussed in class. Collateral reading. In' con- 
nection with the texts read in this course, the literary movements of the 
nineteenth century in Germany are discussed. Junior year, spring term. 

10 Teachers' Course. A general review of German grammar, his- 
torical and comparative syntax, synonyms, and characteristics of German 
style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. Open to students 
that have had at least one reading course. This course is identical with 
Education 6. Junior year, spring term. 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 3i 



FRENCH 

Professor Perkins and Madame Dennee 
1 2 3 College Beginning French. This course is designed for those 
vho enter college without French and are sufficiently well prepared in 
an-uao-e study to be able to complete the grammar and easy prose in the 
■ term The course consists of reading some of the most representative 
luthors some of which reading is done out of class. Romanticism as rep- 
resented by the work of Lamartine, Hugo, and De Musset. The life and 
:ustoms of the French people are studied. Sophomore year, fall, winter, 
ind spring terms. 

4, 5, 6. French Literature. A general survey of French literature 
from the Renaissance to the present day. Representative works of Racine, 
Corneille, Moliere, LeSage, Beaumarchais, Chateaubriand, Balzac, Zola, 
and Daudet read in class. A considerable amount of collateral reading 
required, as well as the presentation of several papers in French. Informal 
lectures o-iven throughout the courses, which are conducted principally in 
French °These courses were given in 1915-1916 to advanced students, but 
are not added permanently to the curriculum. Junior year, fall, winter, 
and spring terms. 

SPANISH 

Proeessor Perkins 

1. De Tornos' Combined Spanish Method is used. Beginning with 
the second lesson, the principal exercises are the translation of English 
into Spanish and of Spanish into English. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Galdos' Marianela; El Si de las Ninas ; conversation and compo- 
sition. Senior year, winter term. 

HEBREW 

Professor Gieungham 

1. An elementary course, grammar, and exercises, and reading of easy 
portions of the Old Testament. Text-books, Harper's Inductive Hebrew 
Method and Manual, and Elements of Hebrew. Offered every second or 
third year. Senior year, fall term. 

2. Harper's texts, continued. The satisfactory completion of both 
courses will enable candidates for the ministry to secure advanced standing 
in Hebrew in the theological seminary. Senior year, winter term. 



32 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gilungham 

1. Life of Christ. Freshman year, fall term. 

2. Pioneers of Palestine. Freshman year, winter term. 

3. Princes of Palestine. Freshman year, spring term. 

4. People of Palestine. Sophomore year, fall term. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus. Sophomore year, winter term. 

6. The Apostolic Church. Sophomore year, spring term. 

7. A Bird's-eye View of the Bible. Junior year, fall term. 

8. Poets of Palestine. Junior year, winter term. 

9. Prophets of Palestine. Junior year, spring term. 

10. Men and Messages of the Old Testament. Senior year, fall term. 

11. Men and Messages of the New Testament. Senior year, fall term. 
These courses are described under The Bible Training Department. 

Five courses in Bible and allied subjects are required for graduation 
Three of these must be in English Bible, and may be taken during the 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years in any term. The required work 
for Seniors consists of the allied subjects, The Grounds of Theistic and 
Christian Belief (Philosophy- 3), and Ethics (Philosophy 4) 




.- '^S 1 

.'»,"•. .*•• ■■£*' 



The Elizabeth R. Voorhees Chapel and Dodge Avenue 



MARYVUJJi CO HUGH 



:.:; 



THE TEACHERS' DEPARTMENT 



A large percentage of the graduates and undergraduates of Maryville 
College become teachers. They are found in all sections of the United 
States, especially in the Southern Appalachian region, and in the South- 
west and West, and are employed in elementary schools, high schools, and 
colleges. 

The instructors in the various departments of the College endeavor 
to conduct their work in such a way as to help train teachers both by 
the thoroughness of the instruction given in the various branches, and by 
the object lesson of the methods employed in the classrooms. Competent 
teachers selected from many colleges and universities bring the best 
methods of those schools to their work at Maryville. The teachers trained 
at Maryville rank high in sound scholarship and practical pedagogy. 

Besides providing model methods in college management and class- 
room work, the College maintains a special department for the vocational 
training of teachers. The courses offered meet the requirements of the 
State Board of Public Instruction for Tennessee. The teacher's certificate 
issued by this Board is recognized by reciprocating boards in other States 
throughout the country. The Education Group in the College Department 
leads to the Bachelor's degree. In the Teachers' Department a six years' 
course of study designed to equip prospective teachers thoroughly for their 
profession is offered. 

PREPARATORY 

Synopsis of Courses The following is a synopsis of the courses in 

the four preparatory years : 



First Year 


Second Year 


Third Year 


Fourth Year 


Mathematics II 


Mathematics III 


Mathematics IV 


Mathematics V 


English I 


English II 


English III 


English IV 


Latin I 


Latin II 


Lat. Ill, Ger. I, 


Lat. IV, Ger. II, 


History I 


Science I 


or French I 


or French II 






History III 


Science II 


*Mathematics I 


^History II 




Pedagogy I 




*Bookkeeping I 




*History IV 



*May be taken as an extra study by permission of the Principal of the Prepara- 
ory Department. 
2 



34 MARYVILLB COLLBGB 



Pedagogy — Fourth Year : I. This course is designed to prepare th 
teacher to control and teach a school in accordance with sound pedagogic* 
principles and methods. The principles underlying class management an, 
instruction are studied, and the practical problems of organization, dis, 
ciplme, and method are discussed. In the fall term Buell's Psychology 
and McMurry's Method of the Recitation are used as text-books. In M 
winter term Seeley's School Management and Gilbert's What Childrei 1 
Should Study and Why are used as text-books. In the spring term th 
books selected for the Tennessee Teachers' Reading Circle are used. Tfeii 
course is open also to such students in the college classes as may desire 
special work in these lines. 

Special Courses— To accommodate teachers and others who entei 
College after the Christmas holidays, special courses in history, civics 
higher arithmetic, and grammar are offered. Students may also take J 
any full-year course offered in the curriculum of the preparatory years foi 
which they are prepared. College courses may also be taken by those whc 
have had sufficient preparation. 



Special Double Courses—In addition to the regular courses, ano 
the special courses referred to above, special double courses in Beginning 
Latin and Beginning Algebra are provided, by which a full year's credit, 
in these studies may be secured during the winter and spring terms. The 
classes recite ten hours each a week, and prepare respectively for Caesar 
and Advanced Algebra. For the successful completion of the double 
course in either Latin or Algebra one unit credit will be given ; for any! 
of the other preparatory courses, proportional credit will be allowed. 

Other Courses— Detailed descriptions of the courses outlined in the 
four preparatory years of the Teachers' Department will be found under* 
Description of Courses in the Preparatory Department. These four years; 
correspond closely to the regular courses of the Preparatory Department;,! 
and contain sixteen units of academic work. Those completing these four'i 
years are admitted to the Freshman Class of the College. 



COLLEGE 

The work of the two college years of the Teachers' Department cor- 
responds somewhat to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years of the 
College. The eight courses of the College Department of Education may 
be completed during these two years, thus giving the student that com- 
pletes the work of the Teachers' Department a very thorough vocational 
training. The courses in pedagogy, psychology, and the history of educa- 
tion are conducted in accordance with the best normal methods now in 
vogue. Those completing the work of this department may, after two 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 35 



ears' additional work, graduate from the College in the Education Group 
t" studies and receive the Bachelor's degree. 

Synopsis of Courses — The following is a synopsis of the courses 
ffered in the two college years : 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 (Eight courses to be taken). 

English 1, 2, and 3 (Three courses to be taken). 

Mathematics 2 (To be taken). 

Chemistry 1, 2, and 3; Biology 1; Physics 1, 2, and 3; Latin 1, 2, 3, 
tid 4; German 1, 2, 3, and 4 (Four courses to be taken). 

Bible 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (Two courses to be taken). 

Education — l. Elementary Psychology. This course is designed for 
udents taking the Teachers' Course. It is a text-book course, supple- 
tented by lectures and typical experiments. Pillsbury's Essentials of Psy- 
lology is used as a text-book. This course is identical with Psychology 1. 
ifth year, fall term. 

2. Psychology Applied to Education. The discussion of psychological 
roblems which have reference to education : theory of recapitulation, cor- 
ilations between mind and body, instinct, memory, imagination, appercep- 
on, interest, work, fatigue, motor control, and volition. The text-book 
sed is Bolton's Principles of Education, supplemented by lectures. This 
)urse is identical with Psychology 2. Fifth year, winter term. 

3. History of Education. A study of the educational systems of early 
hina, Greece, and Rome ; the history of Christian education ; the rise 
f the universities ; the Renaissance ; and the educators of the sixteenth, 
:venteenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. A careful study is made 
f such modern educators as Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, and 
[orace Mann. The last part of the course is devoted to the comparison 
t the school systems of Germany, France, England, and the United States, 
lonroe's History of Education is used as a text-book. Sixth year, fall 
:rm. 

4. Child Psychology. Problems, methods, and data in the psycho- 
igical growth of children and youth. This course is developed with spe- 
al reference to the dynamic conception of the mind, and mental growth 
> a function of sensori -motor coordination. From this point of view, 
tention, perception, apperception, interest, habit, and will are discussed. 
he course is designed to show the application of psychological laws and 
rinciples to educational theory and practice. This course is identical with 
sychology 3. Sixth year, winter term. 

5. Problems in Secondary Education. Present ideals in education, 
he moral element in education. Adolescence and education. The dis- 
plinary basis of courses of study. The high-school curriculum. History 
: the high-school curriculum since the Renaissance. Arts and technology 



36 MARYVJLLE COLLEGE 






in secondary education. The social organization of the high school. Ath- 
letics in education. Sex pedagogy in the high school. The school and the 
community. On sending boys and girls to college. High School Edu- 
cation, by Johnston and others, is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
Hall's Problems in Education, lectures, and reports by students. Sixth| 
year, spring term. 

6. Teachers' Course in German. A general review of German gram- 
mar, historical and comparative syntax, synonyms, characteristics of Ger- 
man style. Theories of instruction in modern languages. This course is 
identical with German 10, and is open to students that have had at leas 
one reading course. Sixth year, spring term. 

7. Teachers' Course in Latin. This course is intended to assist those 
who expect to teach high-school Latin. After a systematic survey of the 
principles of the language, the class considers the most effective methods; 
of teaching First Latin, Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. Lectures, discussions, 
papers, and collateral reading. This course is identical with Latin 10, and ! 
is open to students that have had at least one reading course. Sixth year, 
spring term. 

8. Educational Psychology. Psychology applied to teaching and man- 
agement in the high school and upper grammar grades ; a study of the! 
group consciousness and social instincts of adolescents, competition, rivalry, 
sex, dress, social organization, with special reference to the meaning ofl 
these facts in their application in the organization of the school. This 
course is identical with Psychology 5, and is open to Seniors and to those 
who have completed Psychology 1, 2, and 3. Sixth year, spring term 

Other Courses — Detailed descriptions of the other courses offered in; 
the synopsis of the college years of the Teachers' Department wil 
fo'und under Departments of Instruction in the College Department. 



MARYV1LLE COLLEGE 37 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



The purpose of the Preparatory Department is to furnish thorough 
Durses of training in high-school branches leading to entrance to the 
reshman Class. Conditioned Freshmen are permitted to make up their 
editions in this department. Students in the Teachers' Department take 
leir first four years' work in preparatory courses, and Bible Training stu- 
ents have the privilege of electing studies in this department. Oppor- 
mities are provided also for a large and worthy class of young people, 
'ith limited means and time at their command, to obtain some preparation 
Dr their future work. All the privileges and advantages of the institution 
re available to students in the Preparatory Department. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to the department is by examination. Certificates from 
rincipals of secondary schools will, however, be accepted and credit given 
or equivalent work in any of the subjects required for graduation. Credit 
ius given is conditional, and will be canceled in any subject in which the 
tudent is found to be deficient. Full credit for physiology or physics will 
ot be given unless a reasonable amount of laboratory work has been done 
1 connection with the text-book work. Diplomas must be accompanied by 
ertified statements of the amount of time devoted to each subject studied, 
nd the passing grade, together with the name of the text-book used and 
tie ground covered. Certificates for studies of primary grade and for 
xaminations taken in county normals will not be accepted for credits, but 
i indorsed by the principal or county superintendent may be accepted 
s testimonials as to character and general ability. In all cases students 
oming from other secondary schools, whether asking for credits or not, 
lust present letters of honorable dismissal from their former principals. 
Students that have been out of school for a number of years are admitted 
mder the general rule that all candidates for admission must furnish sat- 
sfactory evidence of good moral character, and must have completed the 
:ommon-school branches. All students sign a pledge to orderly conduct 
vhile members of the institution. Applicants under fifteen years of age, 
mless residents of Maryville, will not be admitted. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The department offers two courses of study: the Classical and the 
jeneral. All regular courses of study begin in the fall term and continue 



38 



MARYl/ILLB COLLEGE 



throughout the year. Courses may be entered at the opening of the winter 
or spring term, provided the student has had the work of the preceding 
term or its equivalent. 

SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 

Classical General 

First Year First Year 

Mathematics II Mathematics I 

English I Mathematics II 

Latin I English I 

History I History I 
* Mathematics I 



Second Year 
Mathematics III 
English II 
Latin II 
Science I 
* History II 

Third Year 

f Mathematics IV 
t English III 

Latin III 

German I 

French I 

History III 

Fourth Year 
$ Mathematics V 
English IV 
Latin IV 
German II 
French II 
Science II 
History IV 



Second Year 

Mathematics III 
English II 
Science I 
History II, or 
Bookkeeping I 

Third Year 
Mathematics IV 
English III 
German I, or 
French I 
History III 

Fourth Year 

Mathematics V 
English IV 
German II, or 
French II 
Science II 
History IV 



NOTES. — i. English Bible is required for seven weeks each year. The work is so 
arranged as not to interfere with the other prescribed studies, and is credited for gradua- 
tion. 

2. _ In addition to the courses listed above, which begin in the fall term, extra classes 
in I,atin I, Mathematics II, and other branches, are provided at the opening of the winter 
term. For further information see Special Courses and Special Double Courses, in the 
Teachers' Department, and the smaller bulletins. 



* May be taken in addition to the required studies, by permission of the Principal. 
t These studies and one language are required; the other study is elected. 
% The studies to be taken in the fourth year must include Science II and one language, 
and either Mathematics V or English IV; the other study is elected. 



MARYVILLB COLLUGH 39 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation in either course are fifteen units of 
vork as prescribed in the synopsis of courses. A unit is the equivalent of 
ive forty-five-minutes recitation periods a week in one subject throughout 
he academic year. A student may elect either course, but must pursue the 
tudies prescribed in the course elected for at least one year, unless change 
s made in accordance with the administrative rule regarding changes of 
:ourse. The prescribed work is four recitation periods a day. Partial 
vork may ibe permitted at the discretion of the Principal. 

Credits for all work done in this department are recorded on the unit 
>asis. An uncompleted year's work in any subject will be so indicated on 
he records, and unit credit for that subject withheld until the student 
hall have completed the year's work. A minimum of three units, seventy- 
ive per cent of the year's work, will be required for advancement in 
lassification to the following year. The passing grade in the Preparatory 
)epartment is seventy. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Mathematics 

First Year: I. Higher Arithmetic. A thorough course in arith- 
letic is offered. The subjects considered are percentage and its various 
pplications, exchange, equation of payments, progressions, involution and 
volution, mensuration, ratio and proportion, and the metric system. 

II. Algebra. The work as given in Milne's New Standard Algebra, 
3 radicals. 

Second Year: III. Algebra. Radicals, quadratics, zero and infinity, 
atio and proportion, progressions, logarithms, series, binomial and expo- 
ential theorems, indeterminate coefficients, and equations in general. 

Third Year : IV. Plane Geometry. Five books of plane geometry, 
)getherwith about three hundred original theorems and problems. Went- 
rorth and Smith's Geometry is the text-book used. 

Fourth Year : V. Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry. Solid 
Geometry is begun and finished during the fall term. Plane Trigonom- 
try is studied throughout the winter and spring terms. Wentworth and 
mith's text-book is used. 

English 

First Year : I. Technical English Grammar, as presented by the 
est modern authors, is made the basis of the first year's work. Written 
lemes are required weekly, in which drill is given on capitalization and 



40 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



punctuation, and, in an elementary way, on unity and coherence in th< 
paragraph and the sentence. Special care also is given to the oral worl 
of the student, and oral themes are required. The selections for studj 
are as follows : Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice ; Irving' s Sketclj 
Book; The First Book of Samuel. 

Second Year: II. Composition and Rhetoric. Brooks' Compositioi 
Book II is made the basis of this year's work. Oral and written themes 
are required weekly. A further study is made of unity and coherence ir 
the composition and in paragraphs, and practice is given in variety of 
sentence structure. During the year the work is supplemented by the 
study of selections as follows: The Gospel of Mark; Shakespeare's Juliu 
Caesar; Blackmore's Lorna Doone; Scott's Lady of the Lake. In addition 
outside reading is assigned by the teacher in charge. 

Third Year : III. English Literature. During this year written anc 
oral themes are required based on topics that arise from the study of liter- 
ature and from the daily life of the student. The texts used for stud) 
are as follows: Addison and Steele's The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers 
Shakespeare's Macbeth; The Four Gospels; Dickens' Tale of Two Cities 
Macaulay's Essay on Johnson; Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Reports 
are required on outside reading assigned by the teacher. 

Fourth Year: IV. English Literature. As a basis of this year's 
work specimens of the novel, the essay, the drama, the short story, and 
of poetry are chosen from the classics for special study. The student is 
required, under the guidance of the teacher, to develop each of these lines 
of study, with special attention to contemporary literature. Both written 
and oral themes are required. The classics for study are as follows:; 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Shakespeare's As You Like It; Types of, 
the Short Story (Heydrick) ; Lamb's Essays of Elia; Selections from; 
Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Byron, and Browning (Gateway Series). 



Latin 

First Year: I. First Latin. Pearson's Essentials, supplemented by 
outlines presented to the class. The First Latin is completed in the spring 
term, and is followed 'by the reading of easy prose selections. 

Second Year: II. Caesar and Latin Composition. Caesar, four periods 3 
each week; Latin composition, one period. During the year outlines arej 
given to the class in its study of Latin grammar. The first four books of| 
the Gallic War are completed. The texts used are Allen and Greenough's' 
Caesar and Allen and Phillips' Latin Composition. 

Third Year: III. Cicero and Sallust. Latin Composition. In the? 
fall and winter terms: Cicero, four periods each week; Latin composition,! 




m mm mm m.^ 1 lawm 






MARYVILLH COLLEGE, 41 



e period. The four orations against Catiline, the Manilian Law, and the 
chias. In the spring term : Sallust, four periods each week ; Latin com- 
sition, one period. Sallust's Catiline. A careful comparison is made 
th Cicero's Catilinarian orations. Special attention is paid to drill in 
>nouncing the Latin, intelligent reading in the original, and translation 
sight and at hearing. 

Fourth Year : IV. Vergil and Mythology. One month is spent in 
: study of mythology before beginning Vergil. The principles of quan- 
i and versification are carefully studied. Thorough drill in oral and 
itten scansion. Sight reading. The course covers the first six books 
Vergil's iEneid. The last three weeks of the spring term are devoted 
prose composition. 

German 

Third Year: I. Grammar, Spanhoofd's Lehrbuch der Deutschen 
rache. This course consists of the principles of German pronunciation, 
lection, rules of syntax, the rewriting of easy English sentences in Ger- 
,n, and the memorizing of familiar poems. The work of the winter 
i spring terms is augmented by reading Bacon's Im Vaterland, and 
rstacker's Irrfahrten. 

Fourth Year : II. Grammar, Kaiser and Monteser. This course in- 
des advanced grammar and syntax, use of modes, derivation of words, 
- ce of prefixes and suffixes. Some time is devoted to conversation and 
nposition work of an intermediate character. The reading consists of 
% works of descriptive and narrative prose as will impart facility in 
nslation. Storm's Immensee, Benedix' Die Hochzeitsreise, Gerstacker's 
rmelshausen, Mezger and Mueller's Kreuz und Quer, Griltparzer's Der 
ne Spielmann, Hoffmann's Das Gymnasium zu Holpenburg. Memo- 
ing of longer poems. 

French 

Third Year : I. Elementary French. This course consists of a thor- 
?h foundation in the elements of French grammar and the conjugation 
irregular verbs. Composition, and reading of such authors as Guer- 
's Contes et Legendes, Dumas' La Tulipe Noire, Daudet's Trois Contes 
Disis. 

Fourth Year: II. Advanced French. This course consists of ad- 
iced grammar, composition, and conversation; a paper each term on 
le book to be read outside of class ; and the reading of Buffum's Short 
>ries, Loti's Le Pecheur d'Islande, Moliere's L'Avare, and Greville's 
sia. 

3 



43 MARY VI LIB COLLBGB 



History 

First Year: I. Ancient History. A brief outline of Egyptian a 
Oriental history from the earliest times to the conquest by Alexandi 
followed by a fuller course in Greek and Roman history to 476 A. D. 

Second Year : II. Medieval and Modern History. A general surv 
of European history from the fall of the Western Empire, 476 A. D., 
the present time. This work will be centered on the history of Fram 

Third Year : III. Advanced United States History and Governmei 
A survey of the history of our country from its beginning to the clol 
of the nineteenth century. This course is designed to give the student 
thorough knowledge of the settlement of the country by European col 
nists in the seventeenth century, the struggle with France for suprema 
in America, the cause, course, and consequence of the American Revj 
lution, the development of the Union under the Constitution, the slave 
struggle, and the final advance of the country to the position it occupi 
to-day. Combined with the above, a thorough course in Civics is giv<> 
with careful detail of the Constitution and its Amendments. Channinj 
text is used. 1 

Fourth Year: IV. English History. A brief outline of the histdi, 
of earlier England, followed by a more careful study of the periods J 
the Tudors, Stuarts, and House of Brunswick. This course is intended' 
give the student a good general knowledge of the history of our moth 
country and to prepare for subsequent courses in English literature a J 
higher United States history. (Not to be given in 1916-1917.) 

Bookkeeping 

Second Year: I. Bookkeeping. Thorough courses conducted throug 
out the year according to the practical methods employed in business a 
leges. Students may enter any part of the course in any term. No ext 
charge is made for this work. The Twentieth Century Bookkeeping 
the system used. 

Science 

Second Year : I. General Biology. The purpose of this course is 
instruct the student in human physiology and hygiene. The dependence 
human life and health on plants and animals is shown by simple demo 
strations in plant physiology, followed by similar work in zoology. T 
principles of physiology thus learned are then applied to man. Thr 
recitation periods and four laboratory periods a week. 

Fourth Year: II. Elementary Physics. This course purposes 
give the student a knowledge of the fundamental principles of physics a 



MARYVILLH COLLEGE 43 



f their applications in every-day life. Three recitation periods and four 
iboratory periods a week. Text-books, Hoadley's Elements of Physics 
rid Hoadley's Physical Laboratory Handbook. 



English Bible 

First Year : Studies in the First Book of Samuel. Thirty-five lessons 
uring the winter term. Required in all courses. 

Second Year: Thirty-five lessons in the Gospel of Mark. "Required 
i all courses during the fall term. 

Third Year : The Life of Christ. A text-book adapted to secondary 
udents is used, and the subject is taught so as to prepare for the more 
ivanced course offered in the College Department. Thirty-five lessons 
iring the winter term. Required in all courses. 

Fourth Year: A study of Bible characters. Thirty-five lessons 
iring the fall term. Required in all courses. 

The Principal will each year arrange the student's hours so that these 
urses will not conflict with other required courses nor add to the required 
imber of hours a week. 

Students are also required to pursue a weekly Bible study in the Bible 
isses of the Christian Associations of the College or the Sabbath schools 
the town. 



44 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



THE BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 
UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION 



The Bible Training Department provides biblical instruction for a 
the students enrolled in all other courses of the institution, and offe 
exceptional advantages for young men and young women wishing to pr; 
pare themselves for Christian service as lay workers, Sabbath-scho 
workers, pastors' assistants, mission teachers, or Bible readers. 

A three years' course of study is offered. A certificate of graduatic 
will be granted those who, having previously completed fifteen units < 
high-school work, complete twenty-seven courses selected under the dire 
tion of the head of the department from the following groups: 

I. Bible Training courses of college grade, all of which are requir< 
except those in Bible languages : English Bible, eleven courses ; Bible La; 
guages, three courses ; and Practical Work, two courses. To these course 
which are described in the ensuing paragraphs, only students prepared \ 
do work of college grade are admitted. Courses are alternated, at lea 
nine being given each year. 

II. Other college courses from which supplementary work may I 
elected: English 1, 2, 3, 10, 12, and 13; Philosophy 2, 3, and 4; Ps 
chology 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 ; Social Science 2, 12, and 13 ; Education 3 ; Hi 
tory 3; and Spanish 1 and 2; described under the College Departme;' 
and Home Economics 1 to 15; described under the Home Economj 
Department. 

III. Preparatory courses from which supplementary work may 
elected : Science I ; Pedagogy I ; and Bookkeeping I. These courses aj 
described under the Preparatory Department. 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

Professor Gilungham 

1. Li