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Full text of "Catalog of large carbon photographs, photogravures, engravings, etchings and copper-plate paintings in the educational art exhibitions of A.W. Elson & Company with a list of other pictures recommended for school, library, and home decoration"

LB 3257 
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ELSON, A. W. & CO, 
Art for schools. 



Boston 1910 



Art for 





tmam ■mwiiimmi 



A. W- ELS ON & CO MP AN 

146 OLIVER STREET 
BOSTON, MASS.' 



CATALOG 



OF 



Large Carbon Photographs 

Photogravures, Engravings, Etchings 

and Copper- Plate Paintings 



IN THE 



EDUCATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 
OF A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



With a List of Other Pictures Recommended 
FOR School, Library, and Home Decoration 



A. W. Els ON & Company 

146 Oliver Street 

Boston 



CAUTION! 



When you buy pictures for your schools you want to 
be sure of two things : 

First: That they are of the best quality. 

Second: That they will not fade. 

One of the prime requisites to pictures being of the 
first quality is that they should be original publications; 
that is, they should not be copied from other prints. 

In order that you may be assured that they will not 
fade, they must be made by some method that is scien- 
tifically accepted as giving absolutely permanent results. 
Solar prints, bromides, and all other prints made by sil- 
ver process cannot be relied upon as being fadeless. 

Pictures which are neither original publications nor 
fadeless are being offered to schools, and in time, after 
much money has been spent, these pictures will not be 
satisfactory on school walls. 

We advise that you get a guaranty, whenever you buy 
any pictures for your schools, reading as follows: 

"We guarantee that the pictures sold you this day are original pub- 
lications, not copied from other prints, and that they are not solar 
prints nor bromides, nor made by any other silver process, nor by 
any method which is not scientifically accepted as giving absolutely 
permanent prints; and we will refund your money if this statement 
is found to be in any particular incorrect." 

This guaranty should be signed by the house. We are 
always ready to give such guaranty on our publications, 
and where other publications are sold by us will state if 
desired exactly what we believe them to be, and not offer 
them under false or special names. 

A. W. Elson & Co.. 

Boston, Mass. 

Copyright, 1910, by A. W. Elson & Co. 



Educational Progress 

THE scope of the work of our public schools has certainly been 
enlarging rapidly. Where at first it was practically limited to 
the training of the mind, it has come to include manual and physical 
development, and to-day the school has begun to make its influence 
felt as a social center. 

The superintendent or principal who is abreast of the times is en- 
deavoring in every reasonable way within his power to make the 
school an elevating force in the whole community. 

There is one direction especially in which a most earnest effort is 
being made, and it is a movement that is growing in force every day. 
We refer to the work that is being done towards increasing an aes- 
thetic appreciation amongst the school-children. It is seen in the 
beautiful architecture of the best modern schoolhouses, in the careful 
tinting of the school walls, that were formerly white and bare, and in 
the placing of fine reproductions of the masterpieces of art in the cor- 
ridors and classrooms. 

It has gone further than this in many places, where at least once 
in every year, in a school-hall or in some other available place, a fine 
collection of works of art has been exhibited, not only for the benefit 
of the teachers and pupils themselves, but to bring together the 
whole community affiliated with the schools under conditions that 
have been helpful socially and educationally. 

Such exhibitions have been made possible by private enterprise, 
and entail no financial responsibility upon the superintendent or 
principal. Many collections have been offered to the schools, but 
none has acquired the high rank of 



THE ELSON ART EXHIBITIONS 

These exhibitions are not only a source of pleasure, but they pro- 
vide a means of realizing funds by which may be secured reproduc- 
tions in art for the permanent embellishment of the school. 

We have felt that an exhibition of pictures for schools should be to 
some degree educational, — that it should not be a mere conglomera- 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



tion of different periods of art, hung without any relation of one pe- 
riod to another. We have followed in our exhibitions the arrange- 
ment accepted as the best plan by museums; viz., that the pictures of 
each period of art should be hung together. By this method the pic- 
tures can be studied intelligently, and, aided by the descriptions 
which we give in our catalog, an instructive as well as pleasurable 
hour may be spent with this collection. 

A series of subjects covering Egyptian, Greek, and Italian Art, 
Dutch and Modern Painting, has been selected by such authorities 
as Dr. Van Dyke, of Rutgers College, Professor Tarbell, of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Dr. Martin, of the Hague, and Dr. Reisner, of 
the Khedivial Museum, Cairo. 

THE COLLECTIONS CONTAIN 

two hundred large subjects, reproduced in carbon photographs, 
photogravures, engravings, and etchings, which are the most artistic 
and permanent forms of reproduction, especially adapted to school 
requirements. One hundred and eighty-eight photogravures of smaller 
size than those above enumerated, known as "Elson Prints," are in- 
cluded, and also a complete set of our famous " Copper-Plate Paint- 
ings." 

DISPLAY OF THE COLLECTIONS 

The pictures in our collections are mounted in a uniform manner, 
with brown linen mats, eyeletted top and bottom. In the exhibition 
hall there should be a picture rail, or where none exists a wire can be 
stretched or a temporary frame erected. On this the top row of 
pictures should be hung by hooks which we send with the collec- 
tion. From this row the lower ones can be hung. About 1,250 feet 
of wall space is required for one of our exhibits. 

In hanging the pictures the different periods in art should be kept 
together, — those illustrating Italian Painting in one group, those 
on Greek Art in another, and so on; and they should be arranged in 
chi'onological order, — Egyptian Art first, then Greek Art, Italian 
Painting, etc. 

Pictures should not be hung too high. The center of the top row 
should not come above ten feet from the floor. 

The pictures are all numbered to correspond with the numbers in 
the catalog. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



SELECTION OF HALL 

The exhibition should be held in some hall to which the people 
are accustomed to go. The assembly-room in one of the schools, a 
public hall, the parlors of a church, — any one of these is better than 
a place unknown to the general public. 

ADVERTISING 

Tickets should be placed on sale in the various schools at least 
two weeks prior to the date set for the exhibition. Where possible 
the teachers should understand that all are equally interested, and 
that the money raised in each building should be used for the pur- 
chasing of pictures for that building. 

Let it be thoroughly known that the exhibition is to aid the schools 
in acquiring pictures. Committees should be appointed to look after 
all details connected with the exhibition. These committees should 
be made up of the school teachers or members of the various women's 
clubs in the city. The exhibition should be thoroughly advertised at 
least two weeks in advance, so that every one in your city may be 
aware of its coming. The newspapers should contain reading notices 
announcing the exhibition. Articles should be contributed on the 
use of pictures in the schools, etc. It is well to see that a week is 
selected when no other entertainment is to be held. 

ADVERTISING MATERIAL 

We furnish free all advertising material consisting of tickets, cir- 
culars, hand-bills and attractive posters. The place and date of the 
exhibit, together with any other needful information, should be 
filled in by the local printer. 

CATALOGS 

To each city or town where an exhibition is held we send a number 
of descriptive catalogs. These are charged for at the rate of ten 
cents each, and should be sold for fifteen cents each. The differ- 
ence may go to swell the proceeds of the exhibit. All unsold catalogs 
should be forwarded with the pictures and credit will be given for 
them. These catalogs should not be loaned. 

We also send a large number of lists giving the pictures in the ex- 
hibit and correspondingly numbered. For these we do not charge. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



ADDITIONAL ATTRACTIONS 

In nearly every place there are a number of persons familiar with 
art matters who would gladly give a short talk each evening on some 
interesting art topic that the pictures illustrate: Egyptian Art, Italian 
Painting, Old and Modern Masters, etc. This should be interesting 
and instructive, and give the teachers a clue, in some cases, to the way 
in which the pictures could be used when hung in the schools. Re- 
freshments should be served in the evenings, and a musical program 
or other entertainment should be arranged. The whole affair should 
be made as great a social success as possible. 

One night should be made a High-School Night or a Senior-Class 
Night, and the entire management and proceeds for that night could 
be given to the High School or to the Senior Class for placing pictures 
in the school. An earnest effort should be made, and everybody 
should be interested in the success of the undertaking. 

USE OF PROCEEDS 

The entire net proceeds of the exhibit, after deducting local ex- 
penses, unless other arrangements are made, must be used in pur- 
chasing pictures, or pictures and frames, of us, the subjects to be 
selected from our catalog. Where the funds raised exceed $50, the 
excess may be used, if desired, to purchase of us pictures framed or 
unframed published by other firms, and 10% of said excess may be 
used to purchase casts of us at manufacturers' prices to schools. 



DISCOUNTS 

The list-prices of our pictures are much lower than those of any 
other publications of equal quality and size. On an order of $80 
net, however, we allow a discount of 20% from the list-prices of the 
pictures. Prices of frames are net. The order may include both 
pictures and frames, but the discount applies only to the pictures. 
To any school or individual whose initial order amounts to $80 net 
we will allow the 20% discount on future purchases if reasonably 
frequent. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



PRIVATE SALES 

The school fund for the purchase of pictures may be increased 
considerably by adding to it commissions on private sales. In the 
smaller cities where there are no art stores there are many individuals 
who would welcome the chance to purchase fine pictures for their 
homes, and at the same time aid the schools. 

On all private sales made at an exhibition we allow a commission 
of 20%. 

TRANSPORTATION CHARGES ON EXHIBIT 

We use every endeavor to keep the transportation charges as low 
as possible, and agree when such transportation charges exceed $10 
that we will pay all of such excess. 

OTHER USES OF EXHIBITIONS 

We will also loan these pictures for the purpose of raising funds 
for other purposes than buying pictures, and will be glad to write a 
proposition for such special agreement upon hearing from you. 
State exactly what you desire to do. 

PICTURES ON APPROVAL 

In case there is a fund already available for the purchase of pic- 
tures we shall be very glad to send on approval a suitable collection 
of our publications. No obligation to purchase any picture is thereby 
incurred. We pay all transportation charges both ways on such 
approval shipments. 

AN ART LECTURE 

We have had prepared by an authority a lecture on art which 
treats especially of the pictures in the exhibit as the examples of the 
world's great masterpieces in sculpture, architecture, and painting. 
We send without charge two copies to each exhibitor to be read on 
the opening night of the exhibit. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



CARBON PHOTOGRAPHS AND 
PHOTOGRAVURES 

Carbon photographs and photogravures are almost universally 
acknowledged by authorities to be the most satisfactory pictures for 
schoolroom decoration. There are several reasons for this, the chief 
of which are the faithfulness of reproduction, carrying power, and 
permanency. Both of these forms of reproduction are absolutely 
fadeless, and should in no way be confused with fadeable prints such 
as silver prints, solar prints, or bromide enlargements (often sold 
under fanciful names). 

From the start our aim has been to produce the highest grade of 
carbon photographs and photogravures at prices more reasonable 
than equally good reproductions could be obtained elsewhere, and 
we invite comparison, picture by picture, with photogravures made 
by other houses, both foreign and domestic. As a whole the prices 
of our publications are 33|^% to 40% lower than carbon photographs 
and photogravures of equal quality made by other firms. Our col- 
lection of large carbon photographs is not equaled by any house. 

Every picture we publish is based on an original negative of the 
subject owned by us, and none of our publications are copies from 
any other reproductions. 

This is of great importance when it is considered how many of the 
pictures that are offered and sold to schools are merely copies of other 
prints, thus losing much of the feeling and detail of the originals. 

COPPER-PLATE PAINTINGS 

Especial interest attaches to our publications in color because of 
the constantly increasing demand for productions of this kind. The 
subjects are chosen from the modern school and foster an acquaint- 
ance with the works of contemporary masters, among whom are 
numbered : 

A. Mauve, the greatest landscape-painter of the modern Dutch 
school, "Autumn" and "A Misty Morning in Holland;" Wmslow 
Homer, our leading living American painter, "Fog Warning;" Lester 
G. Hornby, "Fish Wharves at Gloucester;" A. M. Gorter, "The 
Fading Light of Day;" Henri Stacquet, the late President of the Bel- 
gian Water-Color Society, "A Stormy Day on the North Sea;" 
Frank F. English, "After the Shower;" Colin Campbell Cooper, 
"Broad Street, New York," and Victor Gilsoul, "An Autumn After- 
noon on the Dyle, Malines." 



ART PUBLISHERS 



Each Is a veritable original painted upon the etched copper-plate, 
with brush and palette of color, after the manner of an artist painting 
in oil-colors, and is at one printing transferred to the sheet. The com- 
plete picture is not to be distinguished from the original itself, and to 
those schools that are buying original paintings or water-colors we 
can say with confidence that the same money invested in our Copper- 
Plate Paintings will give far greater satisfaction. The original paint- 
ings from which these are made are valued at hundreds, and in some 
cases thousands, of dollars each, and are a much higher form of art 
than any school can afford when buying originals. 

These copper-plate paintings represent works of art in full color 
of the highest merit, and the color is strictly permanent, and war- 
ranted as durable as the originals. There is nothing exceeding them 
in quality, beauty of tone, or durability. They are particularly well 
adapted for the decoration of schools, and there is a growing demand 
for them for this purpose. Their artistic quality can be appreciated 
only by being seen, and the complete set included as a part of the col- 
lection forms both a notable and a novel feature. 

SIZES OF PICTURES 

We give on page 12 the key to the symbols used in the catalogs. 
The sizes given are the average for each particular size, and are for 
the picture itself irrespective of any mat or mount. We will gladly 
give the exact size of any picture desired on application. 

FRAMING OF PICTURES 

It is important that every picture of any merit be framed artisti- 
cally, or much of its beauty may be lost. The molding should be of 
the right color to harmonize with the general tone of the picture. It 
should be of an appropriate design, and the frame put together in a 
thorough manner, so that the joints will not open. The glass must 
be clear, without waves or blows. 

We have made a careful study of the framing branch of our business 
and have one of the best-equipped plants in New England. We em- 
ploy only the very best workmen and use the finest quality of quar- 
tered white oak, stained to match the prevailing tone of the picture, 
and first-quality French glass, which is imported especially to our 
order. 

Where a picture is intended to fill a large space it is advisable to 
have it framed with margin, but we usually advise framing the larger 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



sizes close to the work. Our carbon photographs are mounted on 
board of a color that harmonizes with the prevailing tone of the pic- 
ture, so that the use of mats is unnecessary. This is often not the case 
with pictures of other publishers. 

We do not allow a discount on prices for frames, but have made 
them as low as is consistent with first-class workmanship and the 
best materials. 

On page 12 we give prices for framing pictures in nearly all the 
diflFerent sizes published. It was found impracticable here to quote 
prices for framing certain prints, as engravings, copper-plate paint- 
ings, etc., as the sizes vary considerably. We shall be glad to quote 
special prices, on application, for framing any pictures not mentioned 
in the accompanying list. 

Regarding the width of molding, we have quoted prices on the 
width considered most suitable for each size. We shall be glad to 
quote on other widths if desired. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



EXTRA LARGE CARBON PHOTOGRAPHS 

There is a large and constantly increasing demand among schools 
for pictures of extra large size and excellent quality. Until recently 
the only form of reproduction in which these pictures could be ob- 
tained were bromide enlargements. Bromides are not printed by 
contact from a large negative, but enlarged on to the paper from a 
small negative. Much of the detail and values of the original is often 
lost in the process of enlarging. 

We have made a beginning on a line of extra large carbon photo- 
graphs to meet the demand for pictures of a very large size for school 
corridors and assembly rooms where the large spaces make large pic- 
tures very desirable. They will be known as our Double Extra A 
size. Price, $40. 

These carbons vary from 45 to 56 inches in length, according to 
the shape of the subject, and are printed by contact from glass nega- 
tives and are original reproductions; not copies of other prints. With 
the exception of a few subjects published by foreign houses, which 
are very high in price, these Double Extra A carbons are the only very 
large pictures for schools on the market that are not bromide or 
solar enlargements from small negatives, not to be compared with 
contact carbons, which are absolutely fadeless, retaining the sharp- 
ness and quality of the originals from which they are made. We shall 
be very glad to send any of these large carbons on approval for in- 
spection, and will pay all transportation charges. 

The following subjects are now ready: 

Pilgrims Going to Church, Boughton. 
Cicero's Oration Against Catiline, Maccari. 
Aurora, Guido Reni. 

Washington Crossing the Delaware, Leutze. 
Stratford-on-Avon, From Nature. 



10 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

A NEW SERIES OF PUBLICATIONS 
Eison Intaglio Prints 

Copper-plate engravings of the highest quality in a size suitable 
for small wall spaces. 

Average size of work, 11 x 14 inches. Printed with plate-mark on 
heavy toned plate paper made with two deckle edges especially for 
this series. Size of paper, 18 x 24 inches. 

Price, $1.00 each. 

We have brought out this series to replace the inferior gelatine, 
bromide, and similar prints, which are either flat in shadows and 
toned over in lights, or not permanent, or uneven in the editions. 

All the ELSON INTAGLIO PRINTS Are Made from 
Original Negatives Taken Directly from the Paintings and 
Not Copied from Other Prints, as Are Many of the Inferior 
Pictures Offered. 

The Elson Intaglio Prints are a very high-grade production oflFered 
at a low price to insure a large sale. 

They are equally with the Elson Carbons and Elson Prints the 
best value now obtainable. 

List of subjects now ready (others will be announced shortly) : 

Landscape with Windmill, Ruysdael. 
Madonna of the Chair, Raphael. 
Concord Bridge (Nature). 
Holland Cattle, Van Marcke. 
Spring, Mauve. 

Moonlight in Holland, Cazin. 
Children of the Shell, Murillo. 
Knitting Lesson, Millet. 
In the Pasture, Jacques, 



ART PUBLISHERS 11 



We believe we can justly say that our pictures always give absolute 
satisfaction. Of the many hundred exhibitions we have held we do 
not recall a single instance of our failure to fully satisfy the schools in 
the quality of our pictures and in our methods of dealing. Here are 
extracts from a few recent letters, selected from a very large number 
of a similar nature. 

"We have on at least two occasions imported pictures from Em-ope, but we do not 
feel that we can secure anything superior to your own pictures." 

F. P. Whitney, Superintendent of Schools, 
Sept. 21, 1909. Collinwood, O. 

"Oiu- Board appreciated the pictures enough to vote $75 of the district's money for 
the purchase of pictiures. The excellence of your exhibit won their support." 

C. W. Vandekgkift, Principal of High School, 
June 4, 1909. Bolivar, N. Y. 

"We have several of your pictiu-es in the school and they are all standing the light 
well; not one of them has faded in the least. At least one of the pictures has been ex- 
posed to the afternoon sun for more than four years now, and it is just as bright and 
looks just as good as the one just received new from your offices." 

H. E. Clewell, Superintendent of Schools, 
Sept. 21, 1909. Florence, Kan. 

"The 78 pictures have arrived, and are very beautiful, and far surpass our expecta- 
tions. We are eagerly looking for the rest. Let me say that the unfailing courtesy and 
liberality of your firm has made my deaUngs with you delightful. It will give me great 
pleasure to recommend your Art Exhibit wherever I can." 

(Mrs.) E. L. Hetdecker, 
May 22, 1910. Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

"We are more than delighted with our pictures. They are a great addition to our 
buildings. Our teachers are very much pleased." 

A. E. Cook, Superintendent of Schools, 
May 16, 1910. Lackawanna, N. Y. 

"The pictures sent us are magnificent and are considered by all who have seen them 
the finest reproductions they have ever seen. Another exhibition of the same kind 
would be very successful here, as people would know what to expect." 

G. A. Harkleeoad, 

July 2, 1910. Reedley, Cal. 

"The eleven pictures named in the enclosed bill arrived this morning. We imme- 
diately unpacked them, and found them in good condition. I am greatly pleased with 
them, and congratulate you on doing such nice work." 

Allen F. Wood, Principal Fifth Street Grammar School, 

April 12, 1910. New Bedford, Mass. 

"The pictvues and frames go beyond our most sanguine expectations. It is a pleas- 
xu-e to deal with you, and we hope to get more pictures later." 

W. M. Henderson, Superintendent of Schools, 

April 2S, 1910. Waynesburg, Penn. 

"The exhibit was the finest we ever had. I have heard nothing but words of praise 
for the splendid display the pictures made. We have had other exhibits in the last two 
years, and they were good, too, but I can truthfully say that the Elson Exhibit was 
better." Walter Kiechel, Superintendent of Schools, 

Nov. 23, 1909. Tecumseh, Neb. 

"The pictures were very satisfactory, and the people in general were much pleased 
with the exhibit." Leon C. Staples, 

Feb. 12, 1910. Portland, Cona 



12 



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Egyptian Art 

We have chosen Egyptian Art of all of the ancient arts of the East as the 
beginning of our series because it leads directly to the most important of all 
art periods, — the Classic Greek. We have not felt it necessary to enter into 
the art history of those other eastern countries, Assyria, Babylon, China, 
Japan, that have had comparatively little effect upon our modern art. Fur- 
thermore, an art which produced the Sphinx, the Great Pyramids, the Tem- 
ples of Luxor and Karnak, the Rock-cut Tomb of Abu Simbel, is worthy of 
study, and is not without inspiration to the modern man. 

1 THE GREAT SPHINX. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 14. 

About 1800 ( ?) B.C. 

The Great Sphinx, usually said to be a statue of Harmachis, or 
Horns (God of Day) on the horizon, hes half buried in the sand on 
the edge of the mountain plateau on which the Great Pyramids 
stand. 

At present, the mere wreck of its former glory, the Sphinx is still 
one of the great monuments of Egypt. The color is gone, the nose is 
beaten off, the neck is worn thin, but there is still power in the ex- 
pression of the face. 

2 THE GREAT PYRAMIDS OF GIZEH. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 14. 

About 2600 B.C. 

The Great Pyramids of Gizeh rest on the desert plateau on the 
west side of the Nile, a few miles north of the ruins of Memphis, and 
nearly opposite the modem city of Cairo. They he with their four 
sides to the four points of the compass. 

The first pyramid was the tomb of King Cheops, of the Fourth 
Dynasty, and was named Ikkwet Khufu, "The Glory of Cheops." 
It is supposed to have been originally about four hundred and eighty- 
two feet high. 

The second pyramid was the tomb of Chephren, and was named 
Wer-Khafra, "Great is Chephren." It was about four hundred and 
fifty-two feet high (now about four hundred and forty-six feet). 

The third pjrramid was the tomb of Mykerinos, and was named 
Neter-Menkaura, "Mykerinos is divine." It was about two hundred 
and sixteen feet high (now about two hundred and three feet high). 

All three pyramids were built of limestone quarried in the Mokat- 
tam Hills across the river; but the lining of the passages and parts of 
the casing were partly built of granite. The solid rock of the moun- 
tain was not cleared away, but included in the main body of each 
pyramid. The masonry work is a marvel of exactitude. The blocks 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



14 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

of stone in the passages are joined with such exactness that it is im- 
possible to insert a hair between them. 

3 PYRAMIDS AND SPHINX (Distant View). A, B. lUustrated oppo- 

site page 14. 

See descriptions of Nos. 1 and 2. 

4 KARNAK, GREAT HALL OF COLUMNS (Entire). A, B. lUus- 

trated opposite page 14. (For detail see No. 206.) 

About 1300 B.C. 

The Temple of Amon at Karnak is called by the Egyptians "The 
Throne of the World." Completed, the temple was one of the larg- 
est buildings ever erected, being one thousand feet long and over 
three hundred feet wide. 

The most magnificent portion of the whole temple is the great 
hypostyle hall. The hall adjoins the first courtyard, and measures 
170 X 350 feet, and consists of three aisles. Here the people con- 
gregated for worship. 

5 ABU SIMBEL, FACADE OF LARGER TEMPLE. A, B. lUus- 

trated opposite page 14. 

About 1250 B.C. 

The whole temple, including the fa9ade, with its four colossal 
statues, is cut out of the soHd rock. In front is a sort of court, ap- 
proached by a stairway from the river. 

The workmanship of the statues and the reliefs is excellent. The 
curious symbolic ornamentation, the colossal scale of the figures, and 
the massiveness of the whole make it one of the most impressive 
monuments in all Egypt. 

6 TEMPLE OF EDFU (General View). A, B. lUustrated opposite 

page 14. 

The present temple at Edfu was built by Ptolemy III, but not 
finished untU 57 B.C., under Ptolemy XIII, Dionysos. 

This temple is the most perfectly preserved building in Egypt; and 
though built under the Ptolemies, it shows the same general plan as 
the older Egyptian temples. 

7 PHIL^, TEMPLE OF ISIS (General View). A,B. lUustrated oppo- 

site page 14. 

About 200 B.C. 

The Temple of Isis is on the Island of Philse, and is almost entirely 
a product of the Ptolemaic period. 

It is chiefly famous as the center of the later Isis cult, at the time 
when it seemed almost as if the worsliip of Isis might dispute the 
possession of the civilized world with Christianity. Here faith in the 
old gods of Egypt endured longest. Philse was the last temple to echo 
the worship of Isis. It was not until the Sixth Century A.D. that the 
authorities stopped all pagan practices and fiUed the island with 
churches. 

The different sizes 'published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




Great Pyramids. No. 2 




Pyramids and Sphinx (Distant View) 
No. 3 




The Great Sphinx. No. 1 





Temple at Edfu. No. 6 




Temple of Isis, Phite. No. 7 




Great Hall of Columns. No. 4 



Facade of Larger Eock Temple, Abu 
Simbel. No. 5 





Great Temple at Paestum. No. 10 



The Acropolis, Athens. No. 9 




South Porch, Erechtheum. No. 13 




The Temple of Victory. No. 1-2. 





The Parthenon (from N.W.). No. 11 



Arch of Coii.slHiiUiie. No. 15 





The Forum, Rome. No. 16 



The Colosseum. No. 14 



ART PUBLISHERS 15 



The Rise and Progress of Greek and 
Roman Art 

By F. B. Tarbell, 

Professor of Archaeology, University of Chicago. 

It is convenient to divide the history of Greek Art into periods, as follows: 

Archaic, 600-480 B.C. Fourth Century, 400-323 B.C. 

Fifth Century, 480-400 B.C. Hellenistic, 323-100 B.C. 

In the Archaic Period we may trace the artistic genius of the Greeks from 
its first timid and awkward efforts to a stage only just short of perfect mastery. 

The time from the invasion of Greece by Xerxes, in 480 B.C., to the death 
of Alexander the Great, in 323 B.C., may be called the Great Age of Greek 
Art. It is commonly subdivided into two periods of about equal length. In 
the fifth century Greek architecture attained to its highest perfection in a 
group of buildings on the Acropolis of Athens, — the Parthenon, the Propylsea, 
and the Erechtheum. In sculpture the three greatest names are those of 
Myron, Phidias, and Polyclitus, some of whose creations are known to us 
through copies executed at a much later date. Among original works of this 
period the sculptures of the Parthenon stand preeminent. They well illus- 
trate the nobly ideal tendencies of the fifth century art. 

In the fourth century sculpture tended to become more expressive of 
character and emotion and sensuous charm. The greatest names are those 
of Scopas, Praxiteles, and Lysippus. 

In the Hellenistic Period the tendency towards realism and sensationalism 
was carried further and further. The Laocoon may be taken as marking the 
culmination of this tendency. Yet if the Aphrodite of Melos really belongs to 
the Hellenistic Period, it proves that the noble traditions of the Great Age 
were not extinct. Realistic portraiture was practised during this period with 
great success, as witness the seated statue which goes under the name of 
Menander. 

We must add a Roman Period, extending from 100 B.C. to the fall of the 
ancient Roman civiKzation. The sculpture of this period is for the most part 
only Greek sculpture, going on under somewhat changed conditions. In 
architecture the Romans showed more originality. Though they borrowed 
the forms of Greek architecture, they applied them to new uses. Their best 
buildings are imposing and harmonious in proportions, and are models of 
engineering skill. 

Note. — A brief history of Greek Art, by T. W. Heermance, of Yale University, 
may be had from those in charge of the exhibition or from the publishers. Price in 
paper cover, 5 cents; a better edition in boards, 50 cents. 



The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



16 A. U'. ELSON & COMPANY 



Greek and Roman Architecture 

8 THE LION GATE AT MYCENJE. A, B. 

Latter half of Second Millenium B.C. 

The citadel of Mycenae is situated in Argolis. Our print shows the 
principal entrance to this citadel. 

The gateway is formed by two huge stone posts, surmounted by a 
colossal lintel about fifteen feet long by seven feet thick by three and 
a half feet liigh in the middle. The opening was originally provided 
with heavy gates. Above the Hntel is a comparatively thin slab of 
limestone, on whose outer face is carA'ed a rehef. Two feline crea- 
tures, apparently lionesses rather than hons, front each other in 
heraldic fashion. The precise significance of the design is not known. 

9 THE ACROPOLIS, ATHENS. Ex. A , B. Illustrated opposite page 15. 

The Athenian AcropoUs or citadel, which was nearly in the middle 
of the ancient city, rises to about five hundred feet above sea level. 
Its summit, nearly nine hundred feet long, is accessible only from the 
west end. Here stands the finest example of Doric architecture, the 
Parthenon, also the most beautiful Ionic Temple, the Erechtheum, 
as well as the small but exquisite Temple of Victory. The Propylsea, 
or gate, through which the processions passed to the Acropohs, is also 
shown. A masterpiece of Doric Art, it is still beautiful in its ruined 
state. 

The marble of which the buildings are made has yellowed with 
age, and with the setting sun shining on them the buildings to-day are 
of subhme beauty. 

10 THE GREAT TEMPLE AT P^ESTUM. A, B. Elustrated opposite 

page 15. 

Sixth Century B.C. 

Posidonia, "City of Posidon," called Psestum by the Romans, was 
a Greek colony in Southern Italy. 

Our print shows the largest of three ruined temples (the so-called 
Temple of Posidon or Neptune). This building shares with the The- 
seum in Athens the distinction of being the best-preserved columnar 
Greek edifice in existence. The material of which it is built is a coarse 
limestone, which was covered with a fine, hard stucco. The columns 
are of more massive proportions than those of a Doric temple of the 
fifth century, such as the Parthenon. Seen by moonlight, in their 
isolated location far from any town, this group of temples is only 
second to those of the Acropolis in filling the spectator with admira- 
tion and awe. 

11 THE PARTHENON (View from Northwest). A, B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 15. 
447-438 B.C. 

The different sizes ptiblished of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 17 



The Parthenon, on the Athenian Acropolis, was dedicated to 
Athena, the guardian goddess of Athens. It is, and doubtless always 
was, the most perfect example of the Doric style of temple archi- 
tecture. Its finer perfections can be appreciated only on attentive 
study of the original, and of drawings to scale, but our print conveys 
some impression of the severe and noble simplicity and harmony of 
the building. 

Phidias, the great Athenian sculptor, is said to have had a general 
superintendence of all the artistic works executed under Pericles. The 
architect of the Parthenon was Ictinus, assisted, according to one 
account, by Calhcrates. Its sculptured decoration consisted prin- 
cipally of two pediment groups, ninety-two metopes in high relief, 
and a continuous frieze in bas-relief. 

Having been converted into a Christian church, and later into a 
Mohammedan mosque, the building was blown up by an explosion 
in 1687. To this event its present ruined condition is chiefly due; but 
in spite of its ruined condition, it stands as it is to-day, the most im- 
pressive and beautiful work of architecture in the world. Its power 
is in its refinement of proportions and the beautiful material of which 
it is made. 

12 THE TEMPLE OF VICTORY. A, B. lUustrated opposite page 15. 

Second half of Fifth Century B.C. 

As one ascends the Acropolis of Athens, just before the Propylsea 
is reached, there appears on a projecting bastion at the right this 
beautiful little temple dedicated to Athena Victory. Its material is 
Pentelic marble, and it belongs to the building operations of the age 
of Pericles. The columns are of the Ionic order and form a porch 
on either end. 

In the seventeenth century the temple was still standing; then it 
was torn down and the material used by the Turks for the construc- 
tion of fortifications, and its place used for a watch-tower. In 1835-36 
the temple was rebuilt as it now stands, with but few stones missing 
from the lower part. The stones are chipped, and in some places 
new blocks have been inserted, but it reflects to-day the perfection of 
the beauty of Ionic work of the best Greek period. 

13 SOUTH PORCH OF THE ERECHTHEUM. A, B. Illustrated op- 

posite page 15. 

About 415 B.C. 

The south porch, or Porch of the Caryatids, has for its most char- 
acteristic feature six female figures, — maidens, as they are called in a 
contemporary inscription, — used in place of columns. All six are 
closely similar in general appearance, but there are numerous differ- 
ences in detail, showing that the figures were not executed mechan- 
ically from a finished model. The second figure from the nearer 
corner is a terra-cotta substitute for the original, removed by Lord 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



18 A. W. ELSON iSc COMPANY 

Elgin. The treatment of the drapery is most interesting, suggesting 
the columnar quality of a tree trunk where it envelops the leg which 
carries the weight on each Caryatid. 

14 THE COLOSSEUM. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 15. 

About 80 A.D. 

This building is situated on the low ground between the Palatine 
and Esquihne hills of Rome. Its original and proper name was 
Amphitheatrum Flavium, the "Fla-vian Amphitheatre." Begun by 
the Emperor Vespasian, it was opened for use by his son and suc- 
cessor, Titus, in 90 A.D. The name "Colosseum," or "CoUseum," 
can be traced as far back as the Eighth Century. 

The amphitheatre was a peculiarly Roman type of building, de- 
signed for gladiatorial contests, and contests of wild beasts with one 
another and with men. The Colosseum is the largest example of the 
kind ; it is said to have afforded seats for eighty-seven thousand spec- 
tators. Enormous silken curtains were drawn over the top to shield 
the spectator from the hot sun. Crowded with human beings, and 
with fierce combats in the arena, it must have been one of the most 
striking sights of ancient Rome. 

15 THE ARCH OF CONSTANTINE, ROME. A,B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 15. 

315 A.D. 

This arch stands across the Via di San Gregorio, between the 
Palatine Hill and the Colosseum. 

This is one of the best preserved and best proportioned of the 
numerous arches of triumph scattered over the Roman Empire. 

An inscription on the middle of the attica, on each front, shows 
that the monument was erected to commemorate the victory of Con- 
stantine over Maxentius in 312. Short inscriptions above the side 
passages appear to indicate 315 as the year of completion. On the 
top there was originally a statue of the emperor, standing with a ter- 
restrial globe in one hand and a lance in the other. 

16 THE FORUM, ROME. Ex.A,B. lUustrated opposite page 15. 

The narrow space of ground beneath the CapitoUne Hill, about one 
eighth of a mile in length, and varj-ing from one hundred to two hun- 
dred feet in width, is the most memorable poHtical center in the world. 
Here were the rostra on which orators addressed the people on sub- 
jects of poHtical and commercial importance; the Temple of Saturn, 
chief treasury of the republic, and the storing place of the decrees of 
the senate; and the Temple of Janus, whose doors were open only in 
times of war. 

Only a few ruins now suggest the former glory of the Forum 
Romanum. The eight columns in the middle of the picture are all 
that remain of the Temple of Saturn; on the left are the Arch of Sev- 

The different sizes publislied of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHER!? 19 



eras and the three colximns of the Temple of Vespasian. At the right 
are the columns of Phocas, partly hidden bv the columns of the Tem- 
ple of Castor and the substructures of the round Temple of Vesta and 
the Temple of Caesar. 



Greek and Roman Sculpture 

17 THEEE FATES, FROM THE EAST PEDIMENT OF THE PAR- 

THENON. A,B. 

About 43o B.C. 

London, British Museum. Pentelic marble. Taken bv the agents of Lord 
Elgin from the east pediment of the Parthenon, in 1801-03. Bought bv the 
British Government -vrith the other Elgin marbles, in 1816. No r^orations. 

The subject of the group •vrhich filled the eastern pediment of the 
Parthenon v.-as the Birth of Athena, but no details as to the treat- 
ment of the subject have come down to us from any one who saw the 
group in its c-ompleteness. The central figures, about half of the 
whole original number, disappeared centuries ago. The figures that 
remain are all mutilated, and their interpretation is beset with uncer- 
tainties. 

18 METOPE, FROM THE PARTHENON. A, B. 

British Museum No. 307. About 440 B.C. 

London, British Museum. (The head and right arm of the Centaur, and 
the head of the Lapith, are casts from the originals in Copenhagen, to which 
place they were sent in 1688.) Pentelic marble. Taken (except the parts 
just notedj from the Parthenon in 1801-12. Bought by the British Govern- 
ment, with the other Elgin marbles, in 1816. No restorations. 

The ninetv-two metopes of the exterior frieze of the Parthenon just, 
above the columns in the entablature were adorned with sculpture 
in high rehef . The British Museum possesses fifteen of these metopes, 
all from the south side of the temple, and all bearing scenes from the 
Battle of Centaurs and Lapiths, a favorite subject of Greek Art. 

19 PORTION OF SLAB OF EAST FRIEZE OF THE PARTHENON. 

A,B. 

About 440 B.C. 

Athens, Acropolis Museum. Pentehc marble. Found in 1836 in front of 
the Parthenon. No restorations. 

The continuous frieze of sculpture in low relief, to which this 
fragment belongs, extended around the cella of the Parthenon and 
its vestibules at a height of thirty-nine feet above the pavement of 
the colonnade. Its total original length was five hundred and twenty- 
two feet, ten inches: its height is nearly three feet, four inches. The 



The different sizes puhlhlied of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
Ualics. For key to symbols see -page 12. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



subject represented is a procession, probably the one which wound 
upward from the market-place of Athens to the Acropolis at the great 
Panathenaia, the principal Athenian festival. 

20 THE HERMES OF PRAXITELES (Detail). A,B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 22. 
(See also No. 238.) 
About 350 B.C. 

Olympia Museum. Parian marble. The principal part was found on May 
8, 1877, in the Temple of Hera at Olympia; some fragments came to light at 
different times subsequently. Restorations (in plaster) : the arms of Dionysus 
(not including the right hand) and some bits needed to complete his body. 

This statue, or, properly speaking, this group, was seen by the 
Greek traveler Pausanias in the second century of our era, while it 
was still standing on its pedestal in the Temple of Hera, at Olympia. 
He calls it "a marble Hermes carrying the infant Dionysus," and 
says it is the work of Praxiteles. This is the only case where we pos- 
sess an authenticated original work by a Greek sculptor of the first 
rank. 

The god Hermes is carrying the infant Dionysus to the nymphs 
to be reared by them. Pausing on his way, he rests his left arm with 
its burden on a convenient support, and with his right hand, now 
lost, holds up some object, most likely a bunch of grapes, for the en- 
tertainment of the child. There is a dreamy joyousness about the 
work that, with the exquisite variety of the modeling, makes this 
statue the finest work of sculpture now extant. 

21 THE APHRODITE OF MELOS. A,B. Illustrated opposite page 22. 

Fourth Century B.C. or later. 

Paris, Louvre. Parian marble. Found on the island of Melos (Milo), in 
1820; acquired by the Marquis de Ri^aere, Ambassador of France at Con- 
stantinople, and by him presented, in 1821, to Louis XVIII., of France. Res- 
torations (in plaster) : end of nose, end of great toe of right foot, and other 
small bits. The ancient plinth is let into a circular modern plinth. 

That tliis statue represents Aphrodite, the goddess of love, is 
highly probable, though not certain. Numerous attempts have been 
made to explain the pose of the figure and to supply the missing parts, 
but no one of these attempts commands the general assent of archae- 
ologists. All that is reasonably certain is that some object of con- 
siderable height stood at the goddess' left side. This is the noblest 
existing embodiment of Aphrodite. 

22 APOLLO OF THE BELVEDERE. A, B. Blustrated opposite 

page 22. 

Fourth Century B.C. or later. 

Rome, Vatican. Carrara (?) marble. Existent in the Belvedere of the 
Vatican since 1503. Restorations: left hand, right forearm and hand, upper 
part of tree trunk and quiver, small pieces of drapery, and legs. 

Tfie different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12 



ART PUBLISHERS 21 



This is probably a Roman copy of a lost bronze statue, which is 
generally assigned to the Hellenistic period. The god was repre- 
sented apparently as having just shot an arrow from his bow. At one 
time this statue was regarded as one of the supreme masterpieces of 
ancient sculpture. 

23 VICTORY OF SAMOTHRACE. A, B. Dlustrated opposite page 22. 

About 300 B.C. 

Paris, Louvre. Parian marble. The statue was found by M. Champoiseau 
in 1863, on the island of Samothrace, in upwards of a hundred fragments. 
These fragments were conveyed to France and pieced together in the Louvre. 
The pedestal was not removed from Samothrace till 1879. Restorations (in 
plaster) : left half of chest, right wing, small pieces of left wing. 

From certain coins of Demetrius Poliorcetes, on which a figure 
closely similar to this appears, it can safely be inferred that this statue 
was set up by Demetrius soon after 306 B.C., in commemoration of a 
naval victory won by him in that year over Ptolemy I, the ruler of 
Egypt. The goddess of victory has alighted on the prow of a galley. 
With her right hand she held a trumpet to her hps, as if blowing a 
blast of triumph; in her left hand was an object in the form of a cross, 
commonly interpreted as a trophy frame. 

24 THE LAOCOON GROUP. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 22. 

First (?) Century B.C. 

Rome, Vatican. Greek marble. Found In Rome in 1506, on the site of the 
palace of the Emperor Titus. Restorations: right arm of Laocoon with ad- 
jacent parts of the snake; right arm of the younger son with coil of the snake 
around it; right hand and wrist of the older son, and some unimportant bits 
here and there. 

Laocoon was a Trojan priest who had grievously sinned against 
the god Apollo. His punishment was long delayed, but came at last 
in terrible shape. On a certain occasion, when he was sacrificing, 
with the assistance of his two sons, they were suddenly attacked by 
two miraculous serpents. In the sculptured group the father, sunk 
upon the altar, seeks in mortal agony to free himself from the serpents' 
cods. The younger son is already helpless and dying. 

The older son, not yet bitten, but probably not destined to escape, 
strives to free himself, and at the same time looks with sympathetic 
horror upon his father's sufferings. 

25 THE DYING GAUL. A, B. 

Second half of Third Century B.C. 

Rome, Capitoline Museum. Asiatic (?") marble. Restorations: tip of nose, 
left kneepan, all the toes, the part of the plinth on which the right hand presses, 
with the objects on it, including the hand. 

By a combination of literary and monumental evidence it has been 
proved that this figure represents a Galatian, or Gaul, of Asia Minor. 

The different sizes published of each pidure are indicated hy the symbols in 
italics For key to symbols see page 12. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



The work is a product of Pergamene art, somewhat earlier in date 
than the reliefs of the great altar. 

Attains I of Pergamon (241-197 B.C.), early in his reign gained 
an important victory over the Gauls, and the event was commem- 
orated by numerous sculptures. Whether this statue of the Dying 
Gaul is an original work, as there is reason for believing, or a copy, 
as many think, at all events it owes the inspiration to the success of 
Attalus in repulsing the savage hordes which had made themselves 
the scourge of Asia Minor. 

26 AUGUSTUS FROM PRIMA PORTA. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 22. 

About 15 B.C. 

Rome, Vatican. Marble. Found in 1863 at Prima Porta, nine miles to 
the north of Rome, on the site of a villa of LiAaa. Restorations : right ear, 
thumb, first, second, and fourth fingers of right hand, first finger of left hand, 
scepter. 

This unusually well-preserved statue represents the Emperor 
Augustus in the act of delivering an address to his troops. The atti- 
tude of the figure is at once easy and dignified, and the head is a 
noble specimen of portraiture. The dolphin and cupid, by the right 
leg, are attributes of Venus, and are introduced because Venus was 
the mythical ancestress of the Juhan gens, to which Augustus by 
adoption belonged. 



Miscellaneous Architecture 

27 THE CASTLE OF SAN ANGELO. A, B. 

This building was erected by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, on 
the right bank of the Tiber, in the year 136, as a mausoleum for him- 
self and his successors, and here the emperors from Hadrian to 
Caracalla were interred. The original form of the building is greatly 
obscured, the statues which once adorned the exterior having been 
thrown down on invading Goths in 537 A.D. 

28 TAJ MAHAL. A, B. 

This beautiful mausoleum, near Agra, India, was built of white 
marble at a cost of over sixty million dollars by the Mogul Emperor 
Shah Jehan in memory of his wife. It is said to have taken the 
labor of twenty thousand men more than twenty-two years. The 
building is architecturally beautiful, the interior being richly deco- 
rated with precious metals and stones, and is one of the great monu- 
ments of the world. 

29 ST. PETER'S AND VATICAN, ROME. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 22. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 





Venus of Milo. No. 21 



Victory of Samothrace. No. 23 




Apollo of the Belvedere. 

No. 22 





Augustus. No. 26 





Hi 


^^^^1^ ^^^^^ 


Ihh 


D^^ 


Sj^l 


jr jp^^ 


L%M^^|j|^H 




I^M 




*^m 


BF'"^'~--- '^ - ^ "Jl 


^ 



Hermes, Praxiteles. No. 20 



Laocoon Group. No. 







;ffPflH|-hfSs^w 






■U- 



St. Peter's and Vatican. No. 




Milan Cathedral. No. 30 





Westminster Abbey. No. 34 



Amiens Cathedral. No. 32 





Notre Dame Cathedral. No. 31 



Cologne Cathedral. No. 33 



ART PUBLISHERS 23 



This church, the largest and most imposing, if not the most beauti- 
ful, place of worship in the world, was founded by the Emperor Con- 
stantine on what was supposed to have been the scene of St. Peter's 
martyrdom. Among the mighty architects associated with its con- 
struction was Michael Angelo, whose special work was the gigantic 
dome. 

The Vatican, the residence of the Roman Pontiffs, stands beside 
St. Peter's, and contains innumerable treasures, especially paintings 
and statues. The stanze of Raphael, containing his greatest frescoes, 
is always crowded with visitors. The Sistine Chapel, part of the 
Vatican, contains Michael Angelo 's greatest frescoes. 

30 MILAN CATHEDRAL. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 23. 

The general style of the cathedral is Gothic, and it is remarkable 
for the profusion of its sculptural decoration. 

31 NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL, PARIS. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 23. 

This building, begun in 1163 and finished a century later, is sit- 
uated in the oldest part of Paris. It is a majestic temple of the early 
Gothic style. In 1793 it was converted into a Temple of Reason by 
the revolutionists; but some ten years later it was restored by Napo- 
leon to its original use. 

32 AMIENS CATHEDRAL. A,B. Illustrated opposite page 23. 

The cathedral of Amiens is the largest ecclesiastical edifice in 
France, and is considered one of the finest Gothic churches in Europe. 
Profuse decoration characterizes the interior of the church, and a 
number of chapels gives it an air of great spaciousness. 

33 COLOGNE CATHEDRAL. Ex. A, B, P5. Illustrated opposite 

page 23. 

This cathedral is probably the most magnificent Gothic edifice in 
the world. The cornerstone was laid in 1248, but the building was 
not completed until 1880. It is in the form of a cross four hundred 
and forty-three feet long and two hundred feet wide, while the twin 
towers rise gracefully to a height of five hundred and twelve feet. 

34 WESTMINSTER ABBEY, LONDON. A, B. Elustrated opposite 

page 23. 

The present building was begun by Edward the Confessor, and 
has been added to and restored by many English rulers. It is one of 
the most imposing structures of early English architecture, and is of 
impressive dimensions. Here the coronation ceremonies of the mon- 
archs of England take place, and here they are buried. 

The Abbey is rich in associations, and interment within its walls is 
regarded by the English as the last and greatest honor which the na- 
tion can bestow. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see naae 12. 



italics. For key to symbols see page 12 



U A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

35 POETS' CORNER. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 24. 

Of all the different divisions of Westminster Abbey the South 
Transept, better known as the "Poets' Corner," is most sacred to all 
Uterary minds. It was not until the burial here of the poet Spenser, 
near the tomb of Chaucer, that this part of the Abbey was looked up- 
on as appropriated to poets. 

Our view is taken from the middle of the transept looking south. 
On the extreme left is the bust of Longfellow, placed here by his 
EngKsh admirers. Immediately behind it is the tomb of Chaucer. 
On the wall directly in the background, high up in the middle, is the 
bust of Butler, below is a tablet to Spenser, to the left of this is the 
monument to Thomas Gray, above it is the bust of John Milton, 
while that of Ben Jonson stands in the corner high up over the door. 
Under the stone pavement, marked only by a plain tombstone, lie the 
remains of Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Dr. Samuel Johnson. 
The two light-colored square blocks in the pavement in the foreground 
cover the remains of Alfred Tennyson and Robert Browning. 

36 CANTERBURY CATHEDRAE. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 24. 

This is the cathedral church of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 
Primate of all England. It is famous as being the scene of the murder 
of Thomas a Becket. Here also is the monument and tomb of Edward 
the Black Prince. 

37 YORK CATHEDRAL, WEST FRONT. A, B. 

This is wider than any other Gothic church in England and second 
only to Westminster Abbey in height, — the two towers being two 
hundi-ed and one feet high. The chief glory of the cathedral is in its 
ancient stained glass of different periods and great variety of color. 

38 DURHAM CATHEDRAL. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 24. 

The history of Dvirham Cathedral goes back to the earUest intro- 
duction of Christianity into England. Its founders, driven from their 
home by invading Danes, bearing the relics of their patron saint, 
St. Cuthbert, wandered through the wild north country until, by a 
miracle, they were shown the place to build their church. This was in 
999, and from this humble beginning arose the massive cathedral 
which now greets the eye of every traveler on his way northward from 
London to Edinburgh. 

39 THE CHOIR OF LINCOLN CATHEDRAL. A, B. Illustrated op- 

posite page 24. 

The choir is the chief glory of Lincoln Cathedral and is considered 
by many architects as the earliest piece of pure Gothic work in the 
world. It is generally known as the "Angels' Choir," on account of 
the conspicuousness of angel heads in its architectural decorations. 

40 THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT, LONDON. A, B. lUustrated 

opposite page 24. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey. 
No. 35 




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Canterbury Cathedral. No. 36 




Durham Cathedral. No. 38 



Choir, Lincoln Cathedral. No. 39 




-3i.'-^ tt.»^ i. 



Houses of Parliament. No. 40 




Kenilworth Castle. No. 42 




Tower of London. No. 41 




St. Mark's Cathedral. No. 47 




Stratford-on-Avon. No. 43 




House Where Shakespeare Was Born. 
No. 44 





Moses, Michael Angelo. No. 49 



King Arthur, Vischer. No. 51 






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Ann Hatha way's Cottage. No. 46 



Grand Canal, Venice. No. 48 



ART PUBLISHERS 25 



The present Houses of Parliament occupy the site of the former 
buildings, partially destroyed by fire in 1834. They are of the Gothic 
style of architecture, cover about eight acres of ground, and contain 
over one thousand rooms. Many scenes notable in English history 
have taken place in Westminster HaU in the Old Parliament build- 
ing directly adjoining the structure. Here King Charles I was tried 
by the High Court of Justice and condemned to death. Here Crom- 
well violently dissolved the Long Parliament with an armed force, and 
here the seven years' trial of Warren Hastings, which resulted in im- 
peachment, took place. 

41 THE TOWER OF LONDON. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 24. 

Famous as being the prison of many noted English men and 
women who were detained mostly for political crimes and who were 
admitted through what is known as the Traitors' Gate. It is one of 
the oldest English forts, and is now a government arsenal. It was 
built by William the Conqueror, in 1078, and contains the Chapel 
of St. John, considered the finest example of Norman architecture 
in England. 

42 KENILWORTH CASTLE (General View). A, B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 24. 

The history of Kenilworth Castle dates back to the time of Henry I; 
but it reached its zenith during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, who 
presented the estate to her favorite, the Earl of Leicester, and who 
visited there several times amid much magnificence. 

The downfall of Kenilworth dates from the days of Cromwell, and 
to-day it is but a vine-clad ruin. 

SHAKESPEARE 

43 STRATFORD ON AVON. A, B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 25. 

Our view of the town of Stratford is taken from the tower of the 
Shakespeare Memorial Building, and is a typical English landscape. 
Stratford is in Warwickshire, sometimes called "The Garden of 
England," and is one of the most picturesque towns in that beautiful 
country, 

44 HOUSE WHERE SHAKESPEARE WAS BORN. A,B. Rlustrated 

opposite page 25. 

Shakespeare's birthplace is a two-story cottage of timber and 
plaster, and is similar to many that are to be seen in EngUsh country 
towns. -The age of the house is uncertain, but it was known to be 
standing in 1554. 

45 ROOM IN WHICH SHAKESPEARE WAS BORN. A, B. 

The room where, according to tradition, Shakespeare was born, 
is very small. It is lighted by but one window of small, irregular 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symnhols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



26 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

panes of glass, and the ceiling is very low. The birthplace of the 
greatest genius the world has ever known could scarcely have been 
more humble. 
46 ANN HATHA WAY'S COTTAGE. A,B. Illustrated opposite page 25. 
Ann Hathaway's cottage stands in a little hamlet about a mile from 
Stratford. It is a picturesque, thatched-roof building of wood and 
plaster, standing with the front towards an old garden and the side 
towards the street. 

VENICE 

47* THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. MARK. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 24. 

This cathedral was built in the ninth century, and rebuilt in the 
tenth, after injury by fire. It is celebrated as the most impressive 
example of the Byzantine order of architecture in existence, and as 
the most splendid architectural color-scheme. The interior is full of 
rich and beautiful detail in silver, enamel, and precious stones. 
48* THE GRAND CANAL. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 25. 

Our view shows on the right the Church of Santa IMaria della 
Salute, with its domes and statues, while beyond, on another island, 
is the Church of San Georgia Maggiore. To the left is St. Mark's, 
the Campanile, the Piazza, and the Ducal Palace. 

Miscellaneous Sculpture 

49 MOSES — Michael Angelo. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 25. 

A part of the monument to Pope Julius, finished in 1545, and 
standing in the lonely Church of San Pietro, in Vincoli. The statue 
redeems all defects of other parts of the monument in its rare power 
and grandeur. 

50 DAVID — Michael Angelo. A, B. 

The original of this piece of sculpture is in Florence and symbol- 
izes the successful resistance made by Florence against an attempt oi 
a pope to overthrow her independence — a David against a Goliath, 
It is cut from a single long and narrow block of marble which waa 
owned by the city of Florence, and not only is the statue remarkable 
for its power and beauty, but for the achievement of Michael Angelo 
in contending with so unusual a shape in marble. 

51 KING ARTHUR — Vischer. Innsbruck, Austria. Ex. A, B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 25. 

King Arthur is supposed to have ruled over a part of Wales and 
to have flourished at the time of the Saxon invasion. He lived in 
splendid state, and from his court knights went out to all countries 
in search of chivalrous adventure. His death probably occurred in 
the year 542. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 

* Also published in hand-colored photographs. Size I., 26 x 34 in. Price, $10. Size II., 16f x 22} in. 
Price, $3.60. 



ART PUBLISHERS 27 



The Painting of the Itahan Renaissance 

Edited by Dr. John C. Van Dyke, 
Professor of the History of Art in Rutgers College, author of "Art for Arfs Sake," etc. 

"The word 'Renaissance' as used in Italian history means something 
more than ' new birth ' — something more than the revival of Greek literature 
and art and the study of nature. It refers to that period of history, dating 
generally from 1400 to 1600, during which the Italian people developed and 
came to maturity; and it means the intellectual, scientific, and artistic achieve- 
ments of that time. . . . We are sometimes given to understand that it be- 
gan with the year 1400, but the idea is misleading. The roots were planted 
far back in the Middle Ages. Italy came out of the gloom of the early period 
very slowly, and it was several centuries before the full light was reached. 
It would be hard to say when the dawn began. . . . 

"Perhaps the most complete, certainly the most beautiful, expression of 
the Renaissance was in the arts. In its beginnings the Italian mind had been 
led by the Church in the Christian faith; in its development it had been tem- 
pered by the philosophy of Greece and the reality of the scientific world. 
Nothing could be more natural than for art to reflect all three of these ele- 
ments. This it did. Religion, nature, and the classic inheritance are the 
principal motives of Renaissance painting. At first it was religion alone. . . . 
Painting and sculpture were the handmaidens of architecture, and all three 
of them were used by the Church to perpetuate the faith, to instruct believers 
in the word. . . . Painting was born and cradled in the Church. It ca ^e 
into existence as an adjunct of worship, a ceremonial help; and the majority 
of earlier artists were priests and monastic brothers. Bible story was in the 
beginning its only story; and though with the Gothic Age the production of 
art passed into the guilds of laymen, the religious subject and feeling were 
maintained. Even with the High Renaissance the altar-pieces for the church 
— the Madonnas, Ascents, and Crucifixions — outnumbered all the other 
subjects put together. But in this last period the religious spirit in art had 
become somewhat weakened, and the painters no longer passionately believed 
in the truth of their subject, as in the Gothic Age." 

Note. — The above is an extract from a monograph on Italian painting by Dr. 
Van Dyke, which may be had from those in charge of the exhibition. Price in paper 
cover, 5 cents. A better edition is published, illustrated with photogravures and bound 
in boards. Price, 50 cents. 



Tfie different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



Italian Painting 
GOTHIC 

GIOTTO DI BONDONE (1266P-1337) 

62 FLIGHT INTO EGYPT, Arena Chapel, Padua. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

The picture is one of a series of frescoes representing the hfe of 
Christ. According to tradition, the sons of Joseph and Salome ac- 
companied the Holy Family into Egypt. They are shown in this pic- 
ture. The landscape is more symbolic than realistic. 

Giotto was a pupil of Cimabue, and belonged to the Florentine 
School. He had great influence on the early Renaissance by casting 
aside the Byzantine traditions and studying nature. 

FRA GIOVANNI ANGELICO (1387P-1455) 

53 ANGEL WITH TAMBOUHINE, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. Ex. A, 

Ex. B. Illustrated opposite page 30. (Nos. 53 and 54 on one mount.) 

54 ANGEL WITH HARP, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. Dlus- 

trated opposite page 30. (Nos. 53 and 54 on one mount.) 

There is in the Uffizi Gallery a large tabernaxle, with doors that 
close, executed by Fra Angelico. Within the tabernacle is a picture 
of the Madonna with the Infant Jesus upon her knee. Twelve httle 
angels, playing upon different instruments, are painted about the 
edges. The Angel with the Tambourine and the Angel with the Harp 
are two of these. The work is not by any means Fra Angelico 's best, 
but the charming figures of the angels, graceful in form and attractive 
in color, have made them very popular. 

GENTILE DA FABRIANO (1360 .?-1440) 

55 ADORATION OF THE MAGI (Detail of Group of Kings), Acad- 

emy, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

The group of kings in this detail shows Gentile's ornamental style 
to advantage. The figure with the turban, standing behind the last 
king, is supposed to be a portrait of the painter himself. 

Gentile never outlived his Gothic instincts; but he was a remark- 
able man for his time, and produced a rich art, of which this altar- 
piece is the most important example that remains to us. 

EARLY RENAISSANCE 

BENOZZO GOZZOLI (1420P-1497?) 

56 ADORATION OF THE MAGI (Detail of Kneeling Angels), Riceardi 

Palace, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

Three sides of the small chapel in the Riceardi Palace are covered 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



with pictures in fresco representing the procession of the kings and 
their retainers in the Adoration of the Magi. This picture is a detail 
from this fresco. The faces of the angels show the pietistic fervor of 
the period. Benozzo was a pupil of Fra Angelico, and thus came 
honestly by his religious sentiment. 

FILIPPINO LIPPI (1457?-1504) 

67 VISION OF ST. BERNARD (Detail of Praying Angel), La Badia, 

Florence. Ex. B. Illustrated opposite page 30. 

This picture is sometimes called the "Madonna of St. Bernard." 
It was painted by Filippino when he was about twenty-two years old, 
and is one of his most charming works. It is supposed to be a por- 
trait of one of the Medici children. 

BOTTICELLI, Sandro (1446-1510) 

68 MADONNA, INFANT JESUS, AND ST. JOHN, Louvre, Paris. 

Ex. A, Ex. B, B. Illustrated opposite page 30. 

This is one of Botticelli's most acceptable Madonnas, because of 
its tenderness of feeling, its gentleness, its expression of maternal 
love. The types of the Madonna, the Child, and St. John indicate 
Botticelli's early manner when he was following his master Fra 
Filippo. He was one of the notable painters of the Florentine school. 

MELOZZO DA FORLI (1438-1494) 

69 ANGEL PLAYING VIOL, Sacristy of St. Peter's, Rome. Ex. A, 

Ex. B, B, P5. Blustrated opposite page 30. 

This is a fragment of a fresco done originally for SS. ApostoK, 
Rome. The picture is one of the most beautiful of the angels, one 
that shows Melozzo as happily in his foreshortening as in his com- 
position. The upward sweep of the wings, the downward sweep of 
the drapery, the swirl of the sleeve and arm and violin bow across the 
center, are all very effective in giving motion, — the feeling of flight. 
The serenity and loveliness of the face are features that will not be 
overlooked. There is little of Melozzo 's work left to us, but that little 
indicates that he came from the Umbrian country and was probably 
a pupil of Piero della Franceses. 

BELLINI, Giovanni (1428 .?-1516) 

60 MADONNA AND FOUR SAINTS, S. Zaccaria, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

This picture, accounted by many Bellini's masterpiece, was painted 
for the altar where it now stands. 

Belhni was the leader in Venice, during the fifteenth century, and 
the master of the great Venetians, Giorgione, Titian, and their con- 
temporaries. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



30 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

CARPACCIO, Vittore (P-1522?) 

61 ANGEL WITH LUTE, Academy, Venice. B, P3. lUustrated oppo- 

site page 30. 

The little angel, a detail from the bottom of the Presentation in the 
Temple, is very popular with picture-lovers because of the charm of 
unconsciousness. The angel is thoroughly child-like, and is making 
music, not for an applauding audience, but for the glory of the Ma- 
donna standing above. The naive quahty and the unaffected action 
are certainly attractive. They form one of the great attractions of all 
Carpaccio's -work. It is the painter's frankness that makes such frank 
characters in his art. 

Carpaccio was a contemporary of Giovanni Bellini. He was one 
of the most interesting of all the early Venetians. 

HIGH RENAISSANCE 

ANDREA DEL SARTO (1486-1531) 

62 MADONNA DEL ARPIE, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

The picture is sometimes called the "Madonna of St. Francis." 
It got the name of the "Madonna del Arpie" from the harpies sculp- 
tured on the pedestal. In loftiness of composition, in drawing, in 
handling, and in color, it is one of Andrea's best pictures. He was 
a famous colorist for Florence, and perhaps the most accomplished 
bnishman of the Florentine school. 

63 DETAIL OF ABOVE. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

This picture is a good illustration of the materialism of the High 
Renaissance. It is superb art, but lacks the religious fervor of the 
earlier Renaissance. 

MICHAEL ANGELO BUONARROTI (1474-1564) 

64 DELPHIC SIBYL (Detail), Sistine Chapel, Rome. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

Illustrated opposite page 31. 

The frescoes on the Sistine Chapel ceiling were begun in 1508, by 
order of Julius II, and finished, according to Vasari, in twenty 
months, with the painter lying upon his back on the scaffolding most 
of the time. Michael Angelo protested against doing them, and said 
he was a sculptor, not a painter; but he nevertheless proved himself 
in this ceiling the most powerful draughtsman known to art history. 
The frescoes were true fresco, and are now cracked and smoked with 
incense; but the spirit of art is stiU with them and in them. 

65 AN ATHLETE (Figure bending to loosen drapery about the feet), 

Sistine Chapel, Rome. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illustrated opposite page 31. 

This is one of the decorative figures, called Athletes or Genii, that 

are placed at the corners of the central panels of the Sistine ceiUng. 

The different sizes 'published of each 'picture are indicated by the symbols in 
"kalics. For key to symbols see page 12. 






Angel with Tambourine, 

Fra Angelico. 

No. 53 



St. Barbara, 
Palma il Vecchio. 

No. 73 



Angel with Harp, 

Fra Angelico. 

No. 54 




Angel with Lute, Carpaccio. 

No. 61 




Angel with Viol, MelozKO da ForU. 

No. 59 





Praying Angel, Filippino Lippi. 
No. 57 



Madonna, Botticelli. 
No. 58 




Figure ut an Athlete, ^Michael 
AniKelo. No. 65 




Sistine Madonna, Raphael, 

No. 67 





Delphic Sibyl, INIichael Angelo. 
No. 64 




Madonna of the Chair, Raphael. 

No. 66 




Holy Night, Correggio, 
No. 70 



Mona Lisa, Leonardo da 
Vinci. No. 69 



ART PUBLISHERS 31 



It is a muscular type, and many people have thought the secret of its 
greatness lay in its physical bulk; but the strength is mental as well 
as physical. The grasp of mind is not less patent than the bulk of 
body. 

Michael Angelo was a pupil of Ghirlandajo, influenced by Masaccio 
and Signorelli, a man of commanding personality in many fields, who 
really outlived the Renaissance, and yet was one of its most complete 
representatives in Central Italy. He had no rival, and he left no 
successor. 

RAPHAEL SANZIO (1483-1520) 

66 MADONNA OF THE CHAIR, Pitti Gallery, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B, 

B. Illustrated opposite page 31. 

This Madonna is maternal in sentiment. Perhaps that accounts 
for the great popularity of the picture. It is admired by all classes. 
The composition is in the form of a circle, and the figures fill the 
space quite perfectly. 

67 SiSTINE MADONNA, Dresden Gallery. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, PS. Illus- 

trated opposite page 31. 

This picture is accounted one of the great masterpieces of painting. 
It was originally painted for the church of the monastery of San Sisto 
at Piacenza. It hung over the high altar, and was to be seen by the 
worshipers as they entered the church. The figure of San Sisto is 
pointing towards the congregation and pleading for mercy for them as 
he looks up to the Madonna. In such a place the picture became a 
part of worship, and its reason for existence was most obvious. 

68 DETAIL OF THE ABOVE. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5. Illustrated op- 

posite page 36. 

Raphael was of the Umbro-Florentine school, an early pupil of 
Perugino, and a man who levied upon excellences in all the painters 
of the time, — Masaccio, Fra Bartolommeo, Leonardo, Michael 
Angelo. He is deservedly ranked with Leonardo and Michael Angelo 
as one of the great Florentines. 

LEONARDO DA VINCI, (1452-1519) 

69 MONA LISA, Louvre, Paris. Ex. B, B. Illustrated opposite page 31. 

The sitter was a beauty of the time, whose great charm Leonardo 
never quite succeeded in capturing with the brush, 

CORREGGIO, Antonio Allegri (1494 .?-1534) 

70 HOLY NIGHT, Dresden Gallery. Ex. A,Ex. B,P5. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 31. 

Correggio was the best colorist outside of the Venetian school, and 
also the best brushman. His works as mere form and color, aside 
from any other meaning, are superb. The "Holy Night " is on wood, 
and measures about eight feet by six feet. 

The different sizes 'published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



S2 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

TINTORETTO (Jacopo Robusti) (1518-1592) 

71 MIRACLE OF ST. MARK, Academy, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

The story told is that of a slave in the service of a nobleman of 
Provence, who disobeyed his master's orders in worshiping at the 
shrine of St. Mark. He was condemned to torture in the pubhc 
square. St. Mark appears at the critical moment, in a halo of light 
from heaven, and breaks the instruments of torture. The execu- 
tioner is holding up his broken instruments to an officer sitting upon 
a high throne at the right, and people in Oriental costume are stand- 
ing by in amazement. The portrait of the donor is in the left-hand 
corner, and that of the painter is seen next to that of the soldier in 
chain armor at the right. 

It is a very notable picture, and is usually regarded as Tinto- 
retto's masterpiece. 

VERONESE, Paolo (1528-1588) 

79 MADONNA AND SAINTS, Venice Academy. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

This is an epitome of Venetian life. Here at Venice the altar-piece 
of the church, begun as an expression of piety, finally closes its career 
as an expression of the purely sensuous beauty of life. Nothing could 
be finer as art, but nothing could be further removed from the relig- 
ious motive with v/hich Italian art was first started. 



PALMA IL VECCHIO (1480 .?-1528) 

7S ST. BARBARA, S. M. Formosa, Venice. A, B. Illustrated opposite 
page 30. (For detail see No. 293.) 

This is the central panel of a notable altar-piece. St. Barbara 
was the patron saint of the artillerists, and appears with cannon at 
her feet; the tower is seen in the background. The impersonation is 
here given with a splendid Venetian type — one of the finest in the 
whole realm of art. 

Palma was of the school of Bellini, and influenced by Giorgione. 

BORDONE, Paris (1495-1570) 

74 THE FISHERMAN AND THE RING, Academy, Venice. Ex. A, 
Ex. B. 

During a great storm in Venice, St. Mark, in the guise of a 
stranger, and two companions, induced a fisherman to row them be- 
yond the Lido, out to sea, where they met and exorcised a galley of 
demons, the cause of the storm, after which the wind ceased. Re- 
turned to Venice, the fisherman demanded fare, and was told to tell 
what he had seen to the Doge and he would be paid. He declared that 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



the Doge would not believe him, whereupon St. Mark gave him his 
ring and told him to show that. When it was presented to the Doge 
it proved to be the ring of the saint, kept in the sanctuary. The sanc- 
tuary was found locked, but the ring was gone, and the fisherman was 
believed. The picture shows the Doge with Venetian senators in 
splendid robes, and a fine perspective of architecture in the back- 
ground. 

Paris Bordone was of Titian's school, and influenced by Giorgione. 



RENI, Guido (1575-1642) 

75 AURORA, Rospigliosi Palace, Rome. Double Ex. A, A, B, P8. Fron- 
tispiece. 

Aurora strews flowers before the chariot of the god of the sun, who 
is surrounded by the dancing hours. It is the best work of Guido, 
and is too well known to call for much comment. It is agreeable in 
color and spirited in action, the movement forward of the throng 
being very well indicated. 

Dutch and Flemish Painting 

At the opening of the fifteenth century that section of Europe which to- 
day comprises Belgium and Holland was known as Flanders. It was here 
that the Van Eyck brothers, Jan and Hubert, lived and painted, and it is to 
these artists that credit is given for the first use of oil paints. Their colors 
were mixed with oil instead of white of egg or gum, according to the general 
practice of that time. 

Rich color, such as was possible with the use of oil, has ever been one of 
the characteristics of the Flemish and of the Dutch painters. The people 
delighted in having themselves painted, and whether in portraits of them, or 
religious pictures, or in interiors or landscapes, it is always the people and 
their surroundings that the artists have portrayed. The greatest painters in 
these two little countries lived during the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies. 

Rubens and Van Dyck belong to Flanders, and Hals, Rembrandt, Ver- 
meer, Hobbema, and Ruysdael to Holland. 

In 1568 Holland secured its independence from Spanish rule. Then for 
about a century and a half art seemed to decline here, the interest centering 
in England at the opening of the nineteenth century and then passing to 
France. During the last quarter of the nineteenth century, however, there 
arose in Holland a group of painters who were able to convey in their can- 
vases the moist air, the big, flat stretches of country, the gray skies, the quiet 
groups of cattle, the humble interiors with happy families, for which their 
country is noted. To this group belong such well-known painters as Israels, 
Mauve, the Maris brothers, Neuhuys, and others. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



34 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



Modern Painting 

The last quarter of the eighteenth century in England was the period of 
the great portrait painters, such as Lawrence and Reynolds; while the land- 
scape painter, Constable, who has so well portrayed the fertile EngUsh farms, 
caught some of his inspiration in Hobbema and Ruysdael, and he in turn 
influenced the group of painters in France known as the "Men of 1830," 
which included amongst others Corot, Rousseau, Millet, and Troyon. 

Miscellaneous Paintings 
DUTCH AND FLEMISH SCHOOLS 

GORTER, A. M. (1866- 

76 FADING LIGHT OF DAY. Copper-plate painting. Size of work, 

25^ X 17| in. Price, $15. Illustrated opposite page 34. 
Original owned by A. W. Elson & Co. 

HALS, Franz (1580 .?-1666) 

Hals is one of the great painters of the world. As a portrait painter 
he is ranked with the greatest masters. He was a man of the people 
and delighted in perpetuating such fleeting, happy moments as we 
see in his "Laughing Cavalier." 

77 LAUGHING CAVALIER, Wallace Collection, London. P5. Illus- 

trated opposite page 35. 

HOBBEMA, Meindert (1638 .?-1709) 

While Hobbema was probably a pupil of Ruysdael, his choice of 
subjects brings out an entirely different view of nature. Hobbema 
painted quiet, restful scenes; the effects of clouds and sunlight inter- 
ested him. He painted Dutch scenery as it was, rarely giving way to 
his imagination. 

78 AVENUE, MIDDELHARNIS, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, 

Ex. B, P5, P3. Illustrated opposite page 34. 

The Avenue, Middelliarnis, is considered Hobbema's best compo- 
sition. The coloring is excellent, and the details are painted with the 
utmost exactness. 

ISRAELS, Josef (1824- ) 
He is the leader of the modern Dutch school, is a member of the 
French Institute, and has received medals at several exhibitions. 

The dijferent sizes published of each jndure are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




Fading Light of Day, Gorter. No. 76 




Spring, Mauve. No. 80 





Avenue, Middelliamis, Hobbema. 

No. 78 



^ 


^^^mpx^ 


^'^' 


/. % fs^^ 



Autumn, Mauve. No. 81 




A Misty Morning in Holland, Mauve. 

No. 82 



Interior of a Cottage, Israels. No. 79 




Landscape with Windmill, Ruysdael. 

No. 89 



«,2S^JLa, .„ _-:^ _ -^ 



A Stormy Day on the North Sea, Staequet. 
No. 90 




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Man with Fur Cap (Detail), 
Rembrandt. No. 86 



Little Princess, Morellse. No. 83 




Rembrandt as an Officer, Rem- 
brandt. No. 85 





Laughing Cavalier, Hals. No. 77 




Children of Charles L, Van Dyck. No. 91 



The Syndics, Rembrandt. No. 87 



ART PUBLISHERS 36 



79 INTERIOR OF A COTTAGE, Corcoran Gallery, Washington. 

Ex. A, B, P3. Illustrated opposite page 34. 

MAUVE, Anton (1838-1888) 

Mauve 's dreamy, sensitive nature is embodied to a great extent in 
his paintings. A peaceful haze, a thoughtful silence, rests over his 
landscapes. Fond of animals, a flock of sheep was his favorite theme; 
and the pictures where sheep are in view form nearly all of his best 
compositions. 

80 SPRING, Metropohtan Museum, New York. Ex. A, Ex. B, P3. Illus- 

trated opposite page 34. 

This is a very characteristic bit of Dutch scenery. In the spring- 
time numberless flocks of sheep are to be seen in the fields, and the 
soft haze that lightly covers this landscape is, too, a part of the fas- 
cinating scenery of Holland. 

81 AUTUMN, Metropolitan Museum, New York. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P6, 

P3. Also in copper-plate painting. Size of work, 17f x 26^ in. 
Price, $20. Illustrated opposite page 34. 

82 A MISTY MORNING IN HOLLAND, Amsterdam. Copper-plate 

painting. Size of work, 16f x 22^ in. Price, $15. Illustrated op- 
posite page 34. 

MORELLSE, Paul (1571-1638) 

83 THE LITTLE PRINCESS, Rijks Museum, Amsterdam. P5. Illus- 

trated opposite page 35. 

POTTER, Paul (1625-1654) 

In his short life Potter produced an astonishing quantity of excel- 
lent work. Animals, single and in groups, were his favorite themes. 

84 THE YOUNG BULL, Haag Museum. P5. (For detail see No. 314.) 

REMBRANDT VAN RYN (1606-1669) 

The son of a miller of Leyden, Rembrandt persevered in his deter- 
• mination to become an artist, and succeeded in establishing a repu- 
tation as one of the world's great portrait painters. His productions 
are characterized by bold Unes and vigorous treatment. The greatest 
painter of light and shadow, the shadow that is full of color, Rem- 
brandt knew how to make his portraits seem almost hke living, 
breathing human beings. In his studies he constantly used himself 
and his family as models. 

85 PORTRAIT OF HIMSELF AS AN OFFICER, Haag Museum. P5. 

Illustrated opposite page 35. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



36 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

86 MAN WITH FUR CAP (Detail), Hermitage, St. Petersburg. P5. Illus- 

trated opposite page 35. (See also No. 323.) 

87 THE SYNDICS, Rijks Museum, Amsterdam. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5. 

Illustrated opposite page 35. (For details see Nos. 316 and 317.) 

RUBENS, Peter Paul (1577-1640) 

Rubens was a very prolific painter, several thousand of his works 
being, as it is said, in existence. At first he studied in Antwerp, then 
went to Italy and gained a great deal from the study of the works of 
TitiaUo His individuality, however, was always maintained. Rich 
color and round, fleshy bodies characterize his work. 

88 PLAYING CHILDREN, BerHn Gallery. P5. 

The models for this picture were members of Rubens' own family. 

RUYSDAEL, Jacob van (1625 .?- 1682) 

Like many another great artist, Ruysdael was not appreciated 
during his life, or in his own country. The solemn, mysterious phases 
of nature appealed to him. His touch was exceedingly spirited and 
crisp, but his color was rather cold, and limited to a few tones. 

89 LANDSCAPE WITH WINDMILL, Rijks Museum, Amsterdam. 

Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5, PS. Illustrated opposite page 34. 

This is generally considered Ruysdael's masterpiece, and portrays 
a scene that in his time was to be found all over Holland. It is per- 
haps the finest landscape painting in existence. 

STACQUET, Henri ( -1906) 

Late President of the Belgian Water Color Society 

90 A STORMY DAY ON THE NORTH SEA. Copper-plate painting. 

Size of work, 20f x 24f in. Price, $20. Illustrated opposite page 34. 
Original owned by A. W. Elson & Co. 

VAN DYCK, Anton (1599-1641) 
The most distinguished of Rubens' pupils, Van Dyck surpassed 
his master in the abiUty to paint textures and to convey the dignity of 
royalty. Born in Antwerp, Van Dyck traveled in Italy and Spain, 
and finally settled in England, where he became court painter to 
Charles I, and has left us many likenesses of the children of the king. 
In the group now in the Dresden Gallery they seem quite unconscious 
of the cares that life held in store for them, and form a delightful 
group with their two pet dogs. 

91 CHILDREN OF CHARLES I, Dresden Gallery. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 35. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated hy the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




The Holy Family, Murillo. 
No. 151 




Portrait of Himself, Rembrandt. 
No. 318 





Sistine Madonna (Detail), Raphael. 
No. 67 




William of Orange (Detail), 
Van Dyck. No. 93 




Age of Innocence, Reynolds. 
No. 144 



Baby Stuart, ^'an Dyck. 
No. 9^ 




A Scanty Meal, Herrins;. No. 133 




The Wheatfield. Volkmann. No. 127 




There's No Place Like Home, Firle. 
No. 397 



A Treaty with the Indians, Millet. 

No. 398 





Derwentwater. No. 404 



Portland Head Lii-ht. No. 405 



ART PUBLISHERS 37 



92 BABY STUART, Turin Gallery. B. (From copy by Canevari.) Illus- 

trated opposite page 36. 

93 WILLIAM OF ORANGE (Detail), The Hermitage, St. Petersburg. 

P5. Illustrated opposite page 36. 

VERMEER, Jan (Van Der Meer of Delft) (1632-1675) 

One of the great masters of the Dutch school. 

While many painters are remarkable for the number of pictures 
that they executed, just the opposite is the case with Vermeer. Only 
about a dozen authenticated works by him are known to exist, but 
each of these is a masterpiece. His "View of Delft" is especially 
noted for the exquisite handling of sky and water. 

94 VIEW OF DELFT, Haag Museum. P5. Illustrated opposite page 38. 

FRENCH SCHOOL AND THE "MEN OF 1830" 

French art, in the early years of the nineteenth century, was still 
subject to classic tradition, as exemplified in the works of David, and, 
later, of Ingres. The exhibition at the Salon of 1819, of Gericault's 
"Raft of the Medusa," may be said to mark the dawn of the Ro- 
mantic movement in French painting. This movement was a protest 
against the tyranny of Greece and Rome in art, and a vindication of 
mediaeval and modern art against the contempt with which it was 
treated. The men of 1830 were led by Delacroix, whose impetuous 
art presented as great a contrast to the conventional canvasses of the 
classicists as did, at a later day. Millet's "Man with a Hoe." The 
modem school of landscape painting in France, owing much to the 
influence of Constable, had its beginnings at this time, its chief expo- 
nents being Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny, and Diaz, who, with other 
artists of the so-called Barbizon group, are closely identified with the 
men of 1830. 

BONHEUR, Rosa (1822-1899) 

Of a family of artists, Rosa Bonheur early showed her talent for 
painting. Her love of animals and careful study of their ways led 
her to don man's garb. In that costume she haunted the stables and 
secured sketches for the "Horse Fair," her best-known work. 

Her animals are perfectly modeled, and her landscapes very faith- 
ful. For her services to art the Emperor Napoleon conferred upon her 
the Cross of the Legion of Honor, which up to that time had been 
given to women only for some striking deed of bravery or charity. 

95 THE HORSE FAIR, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 38. (For detail see No. 341.) 

These horses are of the heavy Percheron breed that come from the 
portion of France known as La Perche, and are bred from Arabian 
and Barb horses brought to France by Charles Martel, the Crusader. 

The dijferent sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



38 A. W. ELSON <& COMPANY 

96 OXEN PLOWING, Luxembourg, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illustrated 

opposite page 38. 

Cattle also interested Rosa Bonheur. Note the effort with which 
the animals draw the heav}' plow that sinks deep in the rich earth. 

97 DEER IN THE FOREST — TWILIGHT, Metropolitan Museum, 

New York. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5, P3. Illustrated opposite page 38. 

CAZIN, Jean Charles (1840-1901) 

98 MOONLIGHT IN HOLLAND, Corcoran Gallery, Washington. B. 

Illustrated opposite page 38. 

COROT, Jean Baptiste Camille (1796-1875) 

Corot early showed his fondness for art, and on his return from a 
tour in Italy at the age of thirty brought studies that established 
him as one of the pathfinders in the development of the modern 
French school of landscape painting. In his early years he was under 
the influence of the cold, classic school, and his devotion to the more 
simple things of nature did not become apparent until the last twenty 
years of his life. It was in this last period that he painted his 
greatest pictures. 

99 MATINEE (Dance of the Nymphs), Louvre, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, 

PS. Illustrated opposite page 38. 

Corot's best compositions are those he conceived from his imagina- 
tion, and the "Matinee," probably the most famous of his paintings, 
is a good example of this. He had no need of actual landscapes, he 
only needed sky at twilight or dawn and they rose before him. 

100 SUNSET, Private Collection. B. 

101 WOOD-GATHERERS, Corcoran Gallery, Wasliington. Ex. A, B. 

Illustrated opposite page 38. 

This is one of the best of Corot's works portraying real life. 

DAUBIGNY, Charles Fran9ois (1817-1878) 

One of the great painters of the "Men of 1830." 
Like Corot, Daubigny traveled in Italy, and on his return showed 
his great talent for painting. An intense lover of nature, he made 
long excursions on the Seine in a houseboat, spending his time in 
transferring to canvas his impressions of the beautiful country 
through which this river flows. 

102 A HAMLET ON THE SEINE, Corcoran Gallery, Wasliington. 

Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 38. 

DIJPRE, JuHen (1851- ) 

103 THE WHITE COW, Luxembourg, Paris. L. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated hy the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 





The Horse Fair, Bonheur. No. 95 



Oxen Plowing, Bonlienr. No. 96 





Deer in the Forest — Twilight, Bonheur. 

No. 97. 



View of Delft, Vermeer. No. 94 





A Hamlet on the Seine, Daubigny. 
No. 102 



Wood-Gatherers, Corot. No. 101 





Matinee, Corot. No. 99 



Moonlight in Holland, Cazin. No. 98 



r^', "• vy,0^",~-~- ^^c '-S^^-"^'<~T;-5 -3? 





The Balloon, Dupre. No. 104 



Girl with Apple, Greuze. No. 106 





By the River, Lerolle. No. 109 Knitting Lesson, Millet. No. 112 





Sheepfold, Jacque. No. 107 



Gleaners, Millet. No. Ill 



ART PUBLISHERS 39 



104 THE BALLOON, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Ex. A, 

Ex. B, B, P5. Illustrated opposite page 39. 

GREUZE, Jean Baptiste (1725-1805) 

105 THE BROKEN PITCHER, Louvre, Paris. P5. 

106 GIRL WITH APPLE, National Gallery, London. L. Illustrated 

opposite page 39. 

JACQUE, Charles Emile (1813-1894) 

Jacque may be characterized as a rustic artist. His farmyard 
scenes are painted with vigor, and he excels in accurate portrayal 
of sheep, which are his favorite subjects. 

107 THE SHEEPFOLD, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Ex. A , 

Ex. B, B, P5. Illustrated opposite page 39. 

LE BRUN, Vigee (1755-1842) 

Madame Le Brun soon became a great favorite of society. At the 
time of the revolution she fled to Italy, visiting important cities 
there; then went to St. Petersburg, where she remained five years. 
She was everywhere received with high honor, admitted to mem- 
bership of the principal academies, and abundantly employed. 

Madame LeBrun's figures are well posed, and although the com- 
position is sometimes conventional, there is always elegance and 
refinement in her paintings. Her technique is most careful in finish, 
her drawing is good, and her color is pleasing, reminding one of 
Greuze. 

108 PORTRAIT OF HERSELF AND DAUGHTER, Louvre, Paris. 

P8, P5. 

LEROLLE, Henri (1848- ) 

109 BY THE RIVER, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Ex. A, Ex. B, P3. 

Illustrated opposite page 39. 

MILLET, Jean Fran9ois (1814-1875) 

Millet is recognized now as being probably the greatest portrayer 
of French peasant life. While living, however, his genius did not 
receive the appreciation it deserved. It was not until after his death 
that liis true worth was appreciated. Most of his life was passed in 
Barbizon, a httle village in the forest of Fontainebleau. Here, amid 
the pastoral scenes he loved so well. Millet produced his great 
masterpieces. 

110 THE ANGELUS, Private Collection. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, PS. Illus- 

trated opposite page 37. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



40 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

111 THE GLEANERS, Louvre, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, PS. lUustrated 

opposite page 39. 

112 THE KNITTING-LESSON, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. B, PS. 

Illustrated opposite page 39. 

REGNAULT, Henri (1843-1871) 

Regnault was a genre painter of great promise who was killed 
during the Franco-Prussian war. The painting we reproduce shows 
all his vigor of drawing and color. 

113 THE HORSES OF ACHILLES, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

Ex. A, Ex. B. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

Automedon, the charioteer of Achilles, is struggling with the 
horses of Achilles while preparing to harness them to the chariot. 

RENOUF, Emile (1845-1894) 

Like Daubigny, Renouf was a lover of the Seine and its pictur- 
esque country. He lingered more near the mouth of the Seine, and 
found inspiration for his work among the fisher folk. 

114 THE HELPING HAND, Corcoran Galleiy, Washington. Ex. A, 

B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

TROYON, Constant (1810-1865) 

Beginning as a painter in the porcelain factory at Sevres, Troyon 
turned more and more to nature, and finally devoted himself entirely 
to painting landscapes. A visit to Holland, where he saw Paul 
Potter's "Bull," tempted him to paint cattle. As a colorist he had 
great technical skill and inexhaustible resources, enabling him in 
this new line of cattle and landscape painting to soon become 
illustrious. 

115 THE RETURN TO THE FARM, Louvre, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B, PS. 

Illustrated opposite page 40. 

116 HOLLAND CATTLE, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 

Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

VAN MARCKE, Emile (1827-1890) 

Troyon 's most noted pupil began his art training as his master had 
done, in the porcelain factory at Sevres. He was rather a better 
draughtsman than Troyon. 

117 VALLEY OF TILE TOUCQUES, Private Collection. B. 

118 FARM SCENE WITH CATTLE, Corcoran Gallery, Washington. 

Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

119 THE MILL, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Ex. A, Ex. B, 

B, P5. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

The different sizes publisJied of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




CopTTi.-lit. 1001, F. rUnt-taenglPlib. Co. 

The Mous*', Kaiill.afh. No. 121 




The Mill, Van Murcke. No. 119 





Horses of Achilles, Regnault. No. 113 




The Helping Hand, Renouf. No. 114 




Return to the Farm, Troyon. No. 115 




Holland Cattle, Troyon. No. 116 



Farm Scene with Cattle, Van Marcke. 

No. 118 




Arabs on the ]March, Schreyer. No. 124 




I Hear a Voice, Earl. No. IS^ 




Bismarck, Lenbach. No. 1--IS 




The Cornfield, Constable. No. 128 





Winter, Douj^lass. No. 130 



Spring, Douglass. No. 131 



ART PUBLISHERS 41 



GERMAN SCHOOL 

BRAITH, Anton 

120 THE RETURN OF THE FLOCK. Imp. Illustrated opposite 

page 40. 

KAULBACH, Hermann 

121 THE MOUSE. R. Illustrated opposite page 40. 

122 CLOISTER SOUP. R, Imp. 

LENBACH, Franz (1836-1904) 

123 BISMARCK, Corcoran Gallery, Washington. B. Illustrated opposite 

page 41. 

SCHREYER, Adolphe (1828-1899) 

124 ARABS ON THE MARCH, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 

York. Ex. A, Ex. B, B. Illustrated opposite page 41. 

PRINTS OF ORIGINAL DRAWINGS ON STONE 
BY MODERN GERMAN ARTISTS 

These pictures in color, mostly from nature, are excellent for the 
schoolroom, introducing good color studies. They have all the 
freshness of original drawings. 

Size. Price. 

125 BARNYARD IN SOUTHERN GERMANY 

(Haiteisen) 27 X 39 in. $12.00 

126 THE IRON GUARD (Jank) 22 x 30 in. 3.00 

127 THE CORNFIELD (Volkmann) 27 x 39 in. 4.00 

Illustrated opposite page 37. 

ENGLISH SCHOOL 

CONSTABLE, John (1776-1837) 

A close student of nature. Constable delighted in painting simple 
scenes of country life, especially about Hampstead, where he made 
innumerable studies of cloud-forms. Bursts of sunlight, storms, 
atmosphere, interested him, and he saw landscapes in large patches 
of form and color. When he exhibited a number of his paintings in 
Paris in 1824, it led the French artists to realize that only by going 
direct to nature could landscape be interpreted with truth and 
feeling. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols m 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



42 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

128 THE CORNFIELD, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, Ex. R 

Illustrated opposite page 41. 

DAVIS, H. W. B. 

129 SPRING PLOWING. Engraving. Size of work, 21 x 41 in. Price, 

$5. 

DOUGLAS, Edwin (1848- ) 

130 WINTER. L. Illustrated opposite page 41. 

131 SPRING. L. Illustrated opposite page 41. 

EARL, Maud 

132 I HEAR A VOICE. Engraving. Size of work, 23 x 29 in. Price, 

$7.50. Illustrated opposite page 41. 

HERRING, J. F. (1795-1865) 

133 A SCANTY MEAL, Tate Gallery, London. B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 37. 

LANDSEER, Sir Edwin (1802-1873) 

Edwin, the youngest son of John Landseer, a celebrated engraver, 
received his first lessons in drawing from his father, and before he 
was five years old showed decided talent. At fourteen, when he was 
attending the schools of the Royal Academy, he sent several pictures 
to exhibitions. His sympathy with and love for animals pervades 
all his works, dogs and deer being his favorites. His painting is 
extremely accurate, almost too detailed, but he knew how to grasp 
and express character. 

134 SHOEING THE BAY MARE, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, 

Ex. B, P3. Illustrated opposite page 42. 

135 A DISTINGUISHED MEMBER OF THE HUMANE SOCIETY, 

National Gallery, London. Ex. A, Ex. B, PS. Illustrated opposite 
page 42. 

136 DIGNITY AND IMPUDENCE, National Gallery, London. Ex. B, 

PS. Illustrated opposite page 42. 

137 KING CHARLES SPANIELS, National Gallery, London. L. 

138 RED DEER AT CHILLINGHAM. Engraving. Size of work, 

18 x 27 in. Price, $5. Illustrated opposite page 42. 

139 MONARCH OF THE GLEN. Engraving. Size of work, 24 x 24 in. 

Price, $5. Illustrated opposite page 42. 

140 THE FORESTER'S FAMILY. Engraving. Size of work, 22 x 34 in. 

Price, $5. 

141 TWINS. Engraving. Size of work, 22 x 25 in. Price, $5. 

142 ODIN. Engraving. Size of work, 18 x 24 in. Price, $5. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated hy the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 





Shoeing the Bay Mare, Landseer. 
No. 134 



Dignity and Impudence, Landseer. 
No. 136 





Red Deer at Chillingham, Landseer. 

No. 138 



The Monarch of the Glen, Landseer. 

No. 139 




A Distinguished Member of the Humane 
Society, Landseer. No. 135 




Saved, Landseer. No. 143 





Melon Eaters, Murillo. No. 150 



Sir Galahad, Watts. No. 149 





•^ 



The Strawberry Girl, Reynolds. No. 146 Age of Happiness, Walker. No. 148 




After the Shower, English. No. lot 




The Fighting Temeraire, Turner. 

No. 147 



ART PUBLISHERS 43 



143 SAVED. Engraving. Size of work, 20 x 32 in. Price, $5. Illustrated 

opposite page 42. 

REYNOLDS, Joshua (1723-1792) 
One of the greatest painters of portraits, Sir Joshua knew how to 
give grace and dignity to his figures. Particularly attractive are his 
portraits of children. 

144 AGE OF INNOCENCE, National Gallery, London. B. Illustrated 

opposite page 36. 

145 CHILD WITH LAP DOG, Wallace Collection, London. P5. 

146 THE STRAWBERRY GIRL. P5. Illustrated opposite page 43. 

This is said to have been considered by Sir Joshua one of the 
best of his portraits of children. 

TURNER, Joseph Mallord William (1775-1851) 

At the age of fourteen Turner entered the school of the Royal 
Academy. Later he was sent through England and France to make 
illustrations for books of travel, and finally went to Italy, where he 
became enamoured of the classical landscapes, and of the work of 
the French painter Claude. His own paintings vary from the pre- 
cise, map-like work of his early years to rich, glowing, imaginative 
canvases, and at the close of his life they became merely bursts of 
color with scarcely any drawing. 

147 THE FIGHTING TEMERAIRE, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, 

Ex. B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 43. 

"The Fighting Temeraire," captured from the French at the 
Battle of the Nile, was next to Nelson's ship, the Victory, in the line 
of battle at Trafalgar. In this battle she distinguished herself by 
capturing two 74-gun French ships. Turner portrays the ship 
when being towed by a puffing little tug to her last berth at Dept- 
ford, there to be broken up. 

WALKER, J. Hanson 

148 AGE OF HAPPINESS, Private Collection. P3. Illustrated opposite 

page 43. 

WATTS, George Frederick (1817-1904) 

All of Watts' paintings are imbued with the visionary spirit that 
was so strong in him. Even his landscapes do not portray so much 
as they suggest. He was a perfect technician; but even more than 
the manner of painting was his marvelous conception and ability 
to convey a lesson of the highest type of thought. 

149 SIR GALAHAD, Eton College. Ex. A, Ex. B, PS. lUustrated 

opposite page 43. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page IS. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



The artist has portrayed Sir Galahad when that knight of pure 
heart and noble life has, after long seeking, caught a glimpse of the 
Holy Grail. It is a supreme moment. That for which he has sought 
so long now appears to him clear and bright. He has dismounted 
from his white horse, and, bare-headed, gazes with fascinated eyes 
upon the glorious vision. 

SPANISH SCHOOL 

MURILLO, Bartolome Esteban (1618-1682) 

Murillo's early works were mostly of humble people. He sought 
his subjects in common places, in the streets and in the markets, 
where he found ragged but vivid life. It was in the market-place 
of Seville that he found the two urchins who are painted as "The 
Melon-Eaters." Murillo is, however, distinctly the great Spanish 
religious painter. From the time he finished the fresco on the walls 
of the small cloister of the convent of San Francisco he became 
famous, and the rank he then achieved he has continued to hold. 

160 THE MELON-EATERS, Dresden Gallery. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 43. 

161 THE HOLY FAMILY, Louvre, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illustrated 

opposite page 36. 

152 ST. ANTHONY, Berlin Gallery. P5. Illustrated opposite page 37. 

AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Other subjects by American painters will be found under "Portraits" and "Sub- 
jects Relating to American History." 

ALEXANDER, John W. (1856- ) 

158 POT OF BASIL, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Ex. A, B. Illus- 
trated opposite page 44. 

ENGLISH, Frank F. 

154 AFTER THE SHOWER. Copper-plate painting. Size of work, 
13^ X 20 in. Price, $10. Illustrated opposite page 43. 
Original owned by A. W. Elson & Co. 

HOMER, Winslow (1836- ) 

For many years Mr. Homer has lived quietly at Scarboro, on the 
Maine coast, and finds the subjects for his work in the seafaring 
life of the people about him. His paintings are characterized by 
vigorous, forceful treatment. He is one of the few commanding 
figures in American art to-day, and is regarded by many as the 
greatest living American painter. 

The diff^ent sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symboU »« 
Uaiics. For key to symbols see page 12. 





Pot of Basil, Alexander. No. 153 



Little Rose, Whistler. No. 160 



PF" 





The Fog Warning, Homer. No. 155 The Road to Concameau. No. 159 




iSf* Ate 







Hiawatha, Norris. No. 158 



"All's Well," Homer. No. 156 





Lincoln. No. 166 



Washington, Stuart. No. 161 





Emerson. No. 17.5 



Longfellow. No. 168 





Browning. No. 173 



Lowell. No. 172 



ART PUBLISHERS 45 



156 THE FOG WARNING, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Ex. A, 
Ex. B, B, P5. Also in copper-plate painting. Size of work, 
15f X 26 in. Price, $20. Illustrated opposite page 43. 

156 "ALL 'S WELL," Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 43. 

HORNBY, Lester G. (1882- ) 

157 FISH WHARVES AT GLOUCESTER. Copper-plate painting. 

Size of work, 13 x 19 in. Price, $15. 
Original owned by A. W. Elson & Co. 

NORRIS, Elizabeth 

158 HIAWATHA. Colored poster. Size of work, 14f x 22 in. Price, $2. 

Illustrated opposite page 43. 

PICKNELL, William L. (1852-1897) 

159 THE ROAD TO CONCARNEAU, Corcoran Gallery, Washington. 

Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 43. 

WHISTLER, James McNeill (1834-1903) 

160 LITTLE ROSE, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. B, PS. Illustrated 

opposite page 43. 

Portraits 

The following are India-proof photogravures, mounted on heaA^ plate 
paper 28 x 38 inches. The size of the work averages 16^ x 20 inches, except 
in the oval portraits, which average 14j x 18 inches. Price, $5 each. 

161 GEORGE WASHINGTON (oval). Gilbert Stuabt. Athenaeum 

portrait. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Illustrated opposite 
page 45. 

George Washington was born in Virginia on February 22, 1732. 
When about sixteen years old he left school and worked for three 
years as a land-surveyor. At nineteen he joined the militia, and in 
1754 he was appointed lieutenant-colonel, and the following year 
accompanied General Braddock on the disastrous expedition to 
Fort Duquesne. 

He married Mrs. Martha Custis in 1759, and, resigning his com- 
mission, led the quiet life of a country gentleman until the breaking 
out of the War of the Revolution. Elected a delegate to the First 
Continental Congress (1774), and also to the second one, he was ap- 
pointed by the latter body, in June, 1775, Commander-in-Chief of 
all the Continental forces. Taking command of the army at Cam- 
bridge, July 3, he forced the British to evacuate Boston in the 

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A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



ensuing March, after a siege of eight months. Then followed the 
battles of Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, German- 
town, and Monmouth, and finally the surrender of Cornwallis to 
Washington, at Yorktown, on October 19, 1781. 

A treaty of peace being signed at Paris in September, 1783, 
Washington resigned his commission at Annapolis, Md., on the 
twenty-tliird of the following December, and returned to his home 
at Mount Vernon. From there he was once more summoned to 
public life by his election as the first President of the United States, 
in 1789. He was reelected in 1793, and died at Mount Vernon, 
December 14, 1799. 

162 MARTHA WASHINGTON (oval). Gilbert Stuart. Athenaeum 

portrait. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

163 THOMAS JEFFERSON. Gilbert Stuart. Bowdoin College. 

Thomas JeflFerson was born at Shadwell, Va., April 2, 1743, and 
was educated at the College of William and Mary. He chose the 
law as his profession, and entered public life in 1769, when he be- 
came a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1775 he 
was elected to the Continental Congress. There he was appointed 
one of a committee to draft the Declaration of Independence, and, 
as chairman, wrote the original draft. 

Again in Congress in 1783, he was the next year sent to France as 
plenipotentiary with Franklin and Adams, later becoming sole 
minister plenipotentiary. Returning after five years, he was made 
Secretary of State under Washington, in 1790. Resigning this oflBce 
in 1794, he became Vice-President under Adams in 1796. He then 
served two terms as President, from 1801 to 1809. 

He founded the University of Virginia in 1819, and died at Monti- 
cello, Va., on July 4, 1826. 

164 ALEXANDER HAMILTON. John Trumbull. Katonah, N. Y. 

Alexander Hamilton was born in the Island of Nevis, West 
Indies, January 11, 1757. He came to the United States in 1772, 
and entered King's College (now Columbia). In 1776 he was given 
command of a company of artillery, and distinguished himself in the 
battles of Long Island and White Plains. Attracting the notice of 
Washington, the latter offered him a place on his staff, and thus 
began a long and close connection between these two great men. 

After Yorktown he left the army and practised law, accepting 
from Robert Morris the office of Continental Receiver of Taxes for 
New York. He was elected to Congress in 1782, and later to the 
New York Legislature, and took a prominent part in the Phila- 
delphia Convention of 1787. The majority of the celebrated Federal- 
ist essays were written by him, and he did much towards the adop- 
tion of the Constitution. When the Treasury Department was 
organized, in the September following Washington's election, 

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ART PUBLISHERS 47 



Hamilton was given the secretaryship; and from then until his 
resignation, in 1795, he did an immense amount of valuable work 
for his country. 

Being challenged to a duel by his old enemy, Aaron Burr, he ac- 
cepted, and fell, mortally wounded, at the first fire. This was at 
Weehawken, N. J., on July 11, 1804. 

165 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (oval). Duplessis. Museum of Fine 

Arts, Boston. 

Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston, Mass., January 17, 1706. 
He received but little education, being sent to work at an early age. 
At seventeen he went to Philadelphia, and then to London, where 
he worked as a printer. Returning to Philadelphia in 1726, he estab- 
lished himself in business, and in 1729 was both the editor and 
publisher of the Pennsylvania Gazette. In 1731 he founded the 
Philadelphia Library, and the next year began the publication of 
"Poor Richard's Almanack." In 1743 he projected what is now the 
University of Pennsylvania. His great discoveries in electricity 
were made in 1752, and the following year he was appointed Deputy 
Postmaster-general. In 1757 he was sent to England to represent 
the Assembly of Pennsylvania before the Privy Council. 

On his return, in 1775, he was elected a delegate to the Second 
Continental Congress, and there chosen one of a committee of five 
to draft the Declaration of Independence. He was appointed 
minister to France, in 1776, where he rendered invaluable aid to 
his country by his success in obtaining loans and in negotiating 
with his associates the treaties of 1778 and 1783. 

FrankUn was elected president of Pennsylvania in 1785, which 
office he retained for three years. He died in Philadelphia, April 17, 
1790. 

166 ABRAHAM LINCOLN (oval). Daguerreotype from life about 1860. 

Illustrated opposite page 45. 

Abraham Lincoln was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, Febru- 
ary 12, 1809. He was mainly self-educated, and worked for years 
on his father's farm, and as a flat boatman, clerk, storekeeper, post- 
master, and surveyor. In 1832 he was a captain of volunteers in the 
Black Hawk War. He then studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar; was several times elected to the Illinois Legislature, and served 
a short time in Congress in 1846. When, in 1858, Senator Douglas 
was a candidate for reelection to the Senate, the Illinois Republicans 
nominated Lincoln as his rival, and the campaign which followed 
was made notable by the joint debates between them. Lincoln re- 
ceived the Republican nomination for the presidency in May, 1860, 
and was elected the following November. 

The attack upon Fort Sumter, in April, 1861, was the opening 
event of the Civil War, which came to an end by the surrender of 

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48 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

Lee, at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. Five days later, 
Lincoln's second term as President having but just begun, he was 
assassinated at Ford's Theatre, at Washington. 

167 U. S. GRANT. Negative from life by Gutekunst in 1865. 

Ulysses Simpson Grant was bom at Point Pleasant, O., April 27, 
1822. He was educated at West Point Military Academy, grad- 
uating from there in 1843. He served in the Mexican War, and re- 
mained in the army for several years after its close. 

When the Civil War began he took his stand among the support- 
ers of the Union, and, drilling a company, took it to Springfield, Bl. 
He was appointed Colonel of the Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, 
June 17, 1861, and in August made a brigadier-general of volun- 
teers. He took Forts Henry and Donelson in February, 1862, these 
being the only important successes thus far gained for the national 
arms. Then followed the great conflicts of Shiloh, Vicksburg, Chat- 
tanooga, the Wildemess, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Peters- 
burg, ending in the surrender of Lee, at Appomattox Court House, 
April 9, 1864. The previous month had seen Grant's appointment 
as lieutenant-general and commander-in-chief. 

In 1868 he was elected to the presidency, and was chosen for a 
second term in 1872. After his retirement from ofiSce he made a tour 
of the world, being everywhere received vdth the greatest honors. 
He died at Mount McGregor, near Saratoga, N. Y., July 23, 1895. 

1«8 HENRY W. LONGFELLOW. Ernest Longfellow. Cambridge, 
Mass. Illustrated opposite page 45. 

Americans may fairly feel much pride in the fact that Longfellow 
is the most popular poet of the English language, even surpassing 
Tennyson; and pilgrims to the home of the poet, that stately man- 
sion endeared to us by memories of both Washington and Long- 
fellow, can hardly fail to be touched by thoughts of a hfe worthy of 
his verse. Like his great fellows, Bryant, Lowell, Whittier, and 
Holmes, and their Enghsh brothers, Tennyson and Browning, Long- 
fellow the man has won our regard no less than Longfellow the poet. 
His writings appeal to the many by their simple and direct thought 
and their exquisite feeling for rhythm. 

Born in Portland, Me., in 1807, Longfellow graduated from 
Bowdoin College in 1825, in the same class with Hawthorne, and 
after some years of travel and study in Europe came to Cambridge 
as Professor of Modern Languages at Harvard in 1835. He died in 
the quiet university city in 1882, and lies buried in Mount Auburn. 

169 OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES. From negative from life in 1893. 

The Law School of Harvard College now stands on the site of the 

ancient gambrel-roofed house wherein Oliver Wendell Holmes 

was born, in 1809. Twenty years later he graduated from Harvard, 

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ART PUBLISHERS 49 

in whose medical school, as Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, 
he taught for the greater part of his life, which ended in 1894. For- 
tunately for us, his work in his chosen profession of medicine did 
not prevent him from enriching American literature with many 
gems of poetry and prose, such as "The Last Leaf," "Old Iron- 
sides," "The Chambered Nautilus," and "The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table," in addition to a great number of admirable 
"poems of occasion." 

" If he had never perpetrated a joke he would have been one of the 
most original of essayists, and when the world forgets the sallies that 
have set tables in a roar, and even the lyrics that have set a nation's 
heart on fire, still his picture of the 'ship of pearl' will preserve his 
name forever." 

170 SIR WALTER SCOTT. Sir John Watson Gordon. National Gal- 

lery of Scotland. 

In Edinburgh, in 1771, Walter Scott was bom, and it was at 
the beautiful house of Abbotsford which he had built on the banks 
of the Tweed that the great novelist passed away, in 1832. The 
"Wizard of the North" pubhshed his first important work, "The 
Lay of the Last Minstrel," in 1805, and his last, " Castle Danger- 
ous," in 1832; and the list of romances in both prose and poetry 
(apart from other literary productions) which came from his pen 
during the years between these dates is a remarkable one both for 
quantity and quality, a legacy of inestimable worth. 

Andrew Lang says of Scott: "Since Shakespeare, whom he re- 
sembles in many ways, there has never been a genius so human and 
so creative, so rich in humor, sympathy, poetry, so fertile in the pro- 
duction of new and real characters." 

171 ROBERT BURNS (oval). Alexander Nasmtth. National Gallery 

of Scotland. 

The ploughman-poel of Ayr was born on Jan. 25, 1759, as he 
has humorously told us in one of his poems. It was not until within 
ten years of the end of his short life that a volume of his verses was 
issued at Kilmarnock in 1786, when Burns was twenty-seven years 
old, and from their publication he received about twenty pounds. 
Dying in 1796, Bums left behind him a deathless name, inevitably the 
result of such productions as "The Cotter's Saturday Night," 
"Tarn o'Shanter," "Scots wha hae," "To a Mountain Daisy," 
and "Bonnie Doon." 

Bums is the poet of passion and of patriotism, a warm lover of 
nature, and a keen observer of actual life, which he depicts with 
the utmost sympathy and humor. 

His love of popular freedom should especially endear him to 
Americans. He refused to receive money for writing his patriotic 
songs, and it is recorded that on one occasion, when Pitt's health was 

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50 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

proposed at dinner, the poet gave as an improved toast, "A better 
man — George Washington." 

172 JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL. From negative from Hfe. Illustrated 

opposite page 45. 

In 1819 Lowell first saw the light, at the historic house of Elm- 
wood, in Cambridge. There he died, in 1891, and lies buried in 
Mount Auburn, almost in sight of the homestead he loved so well. 

After publishing several volumes of verse, and a sojourn of some 
years in Europe, he succeeded Longfellow as Professor of Modern 
Languages at Harvard. Later in life Lowell was made United 
States Minister to Spain, and afterwards Ambassador to Great 
Britain. 

"The Biglow Papers," "The Cathedral," and the noble "Com- 
memoration Ode" may be mentioned among his poetry, while his 
prose writings include "Fireside Travels," "My Study Windows," 
and "Among My Books." Lowell may perhaps be considered the 
most notable figure in that famous Cambridge circle whose work 
forms so large a part of our literary heritage; one who has written 
"our best native idyl, our best and most complete work in dialectic 
verse, and the noblest heroic ode that America has produced." 

173 EGBERT BROWNING. From negative from life. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 45. 

The author of "The Ring and the Book," "Pippa Passes," and 
"The Pied Piper of Hamelin" made his entry into life in London 
in 1812, and died in Venice in 1889. His bones rest in Westminster 
Abbey, beside those of his great contemporary in English poetry, 
Alfred Tennyson. Mrs. Browning sleeps in the Protestant cemetery 
in Florence, in that Italy which both she and her husband loved so 
well, and which formed the theme of so many of their poems. An- 
other noticeable characteristic of Browning's verse is his sympathetic 
comprehension of the art of the painter; vide, "Andrea del Sarto," 
"Old Pictures in Florence," and many others. 

Browning has well been called "the most original and unequal 
of living poets." He possesses a rare dramatic gift, a wonderful 
power of reading the heart of men, and withal a powerful and subtle 
moral sentiment. 

174 ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON. M. Arnault. National Gallery, 

London. 

The quiet and reserved life of Tennyson began in 1809, his first 
book, "Poems by Two Brothers" (with his brother Charles Tenny- 
son), appearing in 1827, and ended in 1892. Unlike Browning, the 
poet -laureate shunned society in general, passing most of his time 
in the country; and the world knew him mainly by his books, even 
after his acceptance of a peerage from Queen Victoria. He received 

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ART PUBLISHERS 51 



the laureateship on the death of Wordsworth in 1850, the same 
year that saw the pubUcation of "In Memoriam." The "Ode on 
the Death of the Duke of Wellington" came in 1852, "Maud" in 
1855, "The Idylls of the King" in 1859, and "Enoch Arden" in 
1864. 

Edmund Clarence Stedman declares Tennyson to be "the most 
faultless of modern poets in technical execution, but one whos^ 
verse is more remarkable for artistic perfection than for dramatic 
action and inspired fervor. An artist so perfect in a widely extended 
range that nothing of his work can be spared." 

RALPH WALDO EMERSON. Etching by W. H. W. Bicknell from 
photograph from hfe by Southworth & Hawes. Illustrated opposite 
page 45. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson, "the sage of Concord," was born in 1803, 
and died in 1882. Much of his life was spent in that quiet New 
England town, the scene of the beginnings of our war for independ- 
ence. Its fame has greatly increased since Hawthorne, Thoreau, 
and Emerson made it their home. He was a native of Boston, 
graduating at Harvard in 1821, at eighteen years of age. After 
spending some years as a teacher and minister, he devoted himself 
to lecturing and writing. Emerson's "Nature" was published in 
1836; the "Essays" appeared in 1841-44, and were followed by 
"Poems," "Miscellanies," "The Conduct of Life," "Representa- 
tive Men," and "EngUsh Traits." His oration on "The American 
Scholar" before the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge in 
August, 1837, produced a profound efifect on thoughtful people of 
the day. It has been called "our intellectual Declaration of Inde- 
pendence." 

His long correspondence with Carlyle is not the least interesting 
among the many activities of the philosopher's life. The grave of 
the "clear-eyed Olympian," as LoweU called Emerson, is in Sleepy 
Hollow Cemetery, in Concord. He was above all a forerunner and 
inspirer. 



Subjects Relating to American History 

176 CONCORD BRIDGE. A, B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 52. 

At one end of the North Bridge, or Battle Bridge, in Concord, 
which is in part a reproduction of the original structure, the statue 
of the " Minute Man " stands on the ground occupied by the Amer- 
icans on the memorable nineteenth of April, and at the other end 
the Battle Monument (a shaft erected in 1836) denotes the British 
position. 

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52 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

Emerson's noble lines, from the hymn written for the dedicatioa 
of the Battle Monument, are well known: 

" By the rude bridge that arched the flood. 
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled. 
Here once the embattled farmers stood. 
And fired the shot heard round the world." 

Lowell, in his ode read at the centennial anniversary of the 
battle, says of Freedom: 

" But most her heart to rapture leaps 
Where stood that era-parting bridge 
On which, with footfall still as dew. 
The old time passed into the new." 

177 THE MINUTE MAN, French. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 52. 

Among our many patriotic monuments, none, perhaps, is better 
known than French's spirited figure of the "Minute Man" at Con- 
cord. The first important work of its sculptor, who completed it at 
the age of twenty-four, it was cast from ten bronze cannon given to 
the town by Congress, and unveiled April 19, 1875, the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the fight. General Grant, then President, was 
present, Emerson and George WilUam Curtis spoke, and James 
Russell Lowell read an ode written for the occasion. 

Daniel Chester French, the sculptor, had a studio in Concord for 
a number of years. Since modeling the "Minute Man" he has 
gained wide-spread fame by the production of such works as " Death 
and the Sculptor," "Alma Mater " at Columbia College, the monu- 
ments to John Boyle O'Reilly in Boston and John Harvard at Cam- 
bridge, and his sculptures at the Congressional Library and the 
Boston Public Library. 

178 INDEPENDENCE HALL, Philadelphia. A, B. 

This historic building, dear to every patriot, was erected in 1729- 
35 to serve as the seat of the Provincial Government. Within its 
venerable walls in June, 1775, Washington was chosen commander 
of the American forces. In 1776 the Second Continental Congress 
met here, and on July 4 adopted the immortal Declaration, which 
was read to the people, assembled by the ringing of the bell over- 
head, from the steps leading into Independence Square. This bell, 
long known as the Liberty Bell, though now cracked and useless, 
is sacredly preserved in Independence Hall, together with many 
portraits and relics of the signers of the Declaration and others who 
deserve their country's lasting remembrance. 

179 MOUNT VERNON. A, B, P3. Illustrated opposite page 52. 

The mansion-house of Mount Vernon stands on the bank of the 
Potomac, about fifteen miles below the city of Washington. Wash- 
ington inherited the estate on the death of his brother and lived 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page IS. 






Lincoln, St. (xaudens. No. 182 



The Minute Man, French. No. 177 




The Capitol, Washington. No. 180 




Departure of the Mayflower, Bayes. 

No. 185 





Concord Bridge. No. 176 



Mount Vernon. No. 179 




U. S. Frigate Constitution, Johnson. No. 189 




Signing the Declaration of Independence, 
Trumbull. No. 192 




Washington Crossing the Delaware. 
Leutze. No. 190 



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Embarkation of the Pilgrims, Parker, 
No. 191 




Courtship of Miles Standish, Turner. 
No. 195 



ART PUBLISHERS 53 



there from his marriage, in 1759, until his death, forty years later. 
When writing of Mount Vernon it should never be omitted that this 
sacred spot was preserved for the nation by the patriotic eflForts of 
American women, organized as the Mount Vernon Ladies' Associ- 
ation, which in 1860 completed its task of raising the money required 
for the purchase and maintenance of the home and tomb of George 
Washington. 

180 CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON. A,B. Illustrated opposite page 52, 

The corner-stone of the Capitol was laid by Washington in 1793, 
but the building was practically destroyed by the British in 1814. 
Reconstruction was soon begun and completed in 1827. An addition 
was completed in 1867, and since then the building has undergone lit- 
tle change. The style of architecture is regularly classic; the center 
building is of sandstone; the wings are of white marble. The Senate 
and House of Representatives each occupy a wing. Underneath the 
immense dome, 288 feet high, is the central rotunda, containing some 
elaborate frescoes and historical paintings. 

181 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. Facsimile. Size, 23 x 18 

in. Price, 35 cents. 

The original document of the Declaration of Independence is 
preserved in an indestructible safe in the Library of the Depart- 
ment of State at Washington, together with the original of the Con- 
stitution and of George Washington's commission as Commander- 
in-Chief. The Declaration is no longer shown to the public; for, 
having been intrusted, in 1818, to Benjamin Owen Tyler, a teacher 
of penmanship, to make a facsimile for pubhcation, it was subjected 
to some process which caused the signature to fade and almost 
destroyed the entire document. A facsimile only is displayed in the 
library, together with a copy in Jefferson's own hand of his first 
draft of the instrument, with interlineations by Franklin and John 
Adams. Here, also, may be seen the desk on which Jefferson wrote 
the immortal document. 

182 ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Augustus St. Gaudens. Lincoln Park, 

Chicago. A, B, P3. Illustrated opposite page 52. 

183 LINCOLN'S ADDRESS AT GETTYSBURG. Broad side in large 

type, with an etched border and medallion portrait. Size, 27 x 19 
in. Price, $2. 

The Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg covers seventeen 
acres of the ground whereon during the first three days of July, 1863, 
was fought the great battle of our Civil War. The cemetery was dedi- 
cated on the nineteenth of the following November, and on this oc- 
casion Edward Everett delivered the oration before a distinguished 
gathering. Lincoln's immortal words, "one of the world's master- 
pieces in rhetorical art," were spoken at the close of Everett's ad- 

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54 A. W. ELSON <& COMPANY 



dress. On the next day Everett sent a letter to the President, in 
which he said, "I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came 
as near to the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in 
two minutes." 

It is related that the ideas of the Gettysburg address were pen- 
cilled by Lincoln on a sheet of paper as he journeyed from Wash- 
ington to the battlefield. 

BAYES, A. W. 

184 FIRST SUNDAY IN NEW ENGLAND. Engraving. Size of work, 

19 X 35 in. Price, $5. 

185 DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER. Engraving. Size of work, 

19 X 35 in. Price, $5. Illustrated opposite page 52. 

After remaining for several months at anchor in Plymouth har- 
bor, the Mayflower at last sailed for England on April 15, 1621. The 
Pilgrims must have witnessed her departure with painful feelings, 
for she had been to them a ready refuge in case of disaster and the 
only connecting Unk between them and the mother country. When 
she had gone their nearest civilized neighbors were the hostile 
French in Nova Scotia, five hundred miles to the northward, or the 
unfriendly English colonists at Jamestown, an equal distance to the 
south. Left among savages in a strange land, how wistfully must 
their eyes have watched the sails of the Mayflower sink below the 
horizon. 



BOUGHTON, George H. (1834- ) 

186 PILGRIM EXILES. Engraving. Size of work, 19 x 30 in. Price, $5. 

187 RETURN OF THE MAYFLOWER. Engraving. Size of work, 

19 X 30 in. Price, $5. 

This picture was doubtless suggested to the artist by those lines in 
Longfellow's "Courtship of Miles Standish" which describe John 
Alden and Priscilla talking together on the beach at the time when 

" the Mayflower sailed from the harbor. 
Rounded the point of the Gurnet, and leaving far to the southward 
Island and cape of sand and the Field of the First Encounter, 
Took the wind on her quarter, and stood for the open Atlantic, 
Borne on the send of the sea, and the swelling hearts of the Pilgrims. 
Long in silence they watched the receding saU of the vessel 
Much endeared to them all, as something living and human. 

Casting a farewell look at the glimmering sail of the Mayflower, 
Distant, but still in sight, and sinking below the horizon." 

188 PURITANS GOING TO CHURCH. Engraving. Size of work, 

24 X 18 in. Price, $5. 

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italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 55 



JOHNSON, Marshall 

189 U. S. FRIGATE CONSTITUTION ("Old Ironsides"). From 

original painting in possession of the artist. P5. Illustrated oppo- 
site page 53. 

The Constitution was one of the first three vessels with which 
our navy enforced its claim to recognition on the sea. Built and 
launched at Boston in 1797, she took a prominent part in the hos- 
tilities with France the following year, and also in the wars with 
Tripoh and Algeria 1802-05. It was in the War of 1812, how- 
ever, that "Old Ironsides" gained her greatest distinction. Under 
Commodore Hull she met the British frigate Guerri^re and captured 
her in a brief half-hour engagement, reducing her to a helpless hulk. 
This victory was followed by the capture of the Java and later by 
the capture of the Cyane and Levant. At the close of the war the 
Constitution began a more quiet existence, and is now in the Navy 
Yard at Charlestown, Mass. 

LEUTZE, Emanuel (1816-1868) 

190 WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE, Metropolitan 

Museum, New York. A, B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 63. 

Leutze was a man of poetical temperament, with an intense ad- 
miration for heroic deeds. It can be readily understood, therefore, 
how so dramatic an incident as Washington crossing the Delaware, 
on that memorable Christmas night, took hold of his imagination 
and inspired him to one of his best efPorts. 

The crossing was begun at dusk, and was not completed until a 
few hours before daybreak the following morning. The artist has 
seized the moment where one of the boats is in mid-stream. Glover's 
Marblehead fishermen battling with the current and ice floes, while 
Washington stands near the bow. 

PARKER, Edgar 

191 EMBARKATION OF THE PILGRIMS. Pilgrim HaU, Plymouth 

Mass. A,B. Also in an engraving. Size of work, 19fx30in. 
Price, $5. Illustrated opposite page 53. 

This picture portrays the scene on the deck of the Speedwell just 
before her departure from Delfthaven, July 21, 1620. To the right is 
seen the figure of the pastor, WilUam Robinson, with face uplifted in 
prayer. Elder Brewster kneels in the center with the Holy Book, 
while between him and Robinson is Governor Carver. Between 
Carver and Brewster may be distinguished the head of WiUiam 
Bradford, and on the extreme right of the picture kneels Miles 
Standish. 

Bradford, in his "History of Plymouth Plantation," says: "But 
ye tide (which stays for no man) calling them away, y*. were thus 

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A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



loath to departe, their Reve*^. pastor falling downe on his knees 
(and they all with him) with watrie cheeks comended them with most 
fervente praiers to the Lord and his blessing." 

TRUMBULL, John 

192 SIGNING THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. A, B. 

P5. Illustrated opposite page 53. 

This picture was painted by Trumbull, by order of the National 
Government. 

The title of the picture is not as correctly descriptive of the scene 
as it might be, for it is the presentation of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence that is portrayed. 

The value of this picture lies chiefly in the fact that Trumbull was 
a contemporary of the men who appear in it, and from their Kps 
learned all the details necessary to a correct historical presentation 
of this most important event in American history. Furthermore, 
he was a miniature-painter of ability; and as the portraits are mostly 
from life, — certainly those of the chief actors are, — it must be ac- 
cepted as the best pictorial presentation that can ever be obtained 
of the birth of our nation. 

193 SURRENDER OF BURGOYNE. Photogravure. Size of work, 

18 X 26 in. Price, $7.50. 

It was at Saratoga, N. Y., on Oct. 17, 1777, that Burgoyne sur- 
rendered to General Gates his army of about 3,400 Britons and 
2,400 Germans, together with forty-two guns and a great quantity 
of mihtary stores. The prisoners remained in captivity, first in 
Massachusetts and then in Virginia, until the end of the war. 
Trumbull's painting of this event, in the Rotunda of the Capitol, 
depicts General Gates in the center, to whom Burgoyne tenders his 
sword. Next behind Burgoyne is Major-General Phillips, of the 
British army, and next to Gates we see Colonel William Prescott, of 
Massachusetts, the commander at Bunker Hill, and Colonel Daniel 
Morgan, of the Virginia riflemen, who rests his sword on the ground. 
Behind Morgan, among other American soldiers, appears General 
Schuyler, whose right hand is placed in his bosom. 

1»4 SURRENDER OF CORNWALLIS. Photogravure. Size of work, 
18 X 27 in. Price, $7.50. 

Trumbull's description of this painting is as follows: "The 
American troops were drawn up on the right of the road leading into 
York, General Washington and the American general officers on 
the right; the French troops on the opposite side of the road, facing 
them ; General Rochambeau and the principal officers of the French 
navy and army on the left. 

"The painting represents the moment when the principal officers 
of the British army, conducted by General Lincoln, are passing two 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page IS. 



ART PUBLISHERS 57 



groups of American and French generals, and entering between the 
two Unes of the victors. 

" In the center of the painting, in the distance, is seen the entrance 
to the town, with the captured troops marching out, following their 
officers; and also a distant glimpse of York River and the entrance 
of Chesapeake Bay, as seen from the spot." 

TURNER, C. Y. 

195 COURTSHIP OF MILES STANDISH. Etching. Size of work, 
21 X 31 in. Price, $7.50. Illustrated opposite page 53. 

Here the painter has depicted the visit of John Alden to Priscilla, 
when he came bearing offers of marriage from his friend Miles 
Standish, the valiant captain of Plymouth. Those who have read 
Longfellow's poetic story of the courtship, and their name is legion, 
will remember how Priscilla was found sitting at her spinning- 
wheel, and how John generously pleaded the captain's cause: 

" But as he warmed and glowed in his simple and eloquent language. 
Quite forgetful of self and full of the praise of his rival, 
Archly the maiden smiled, and, with eyes overrunning with laughter. 
Said, in a tremulous voice, * Why don't you speak for yourself, John ? ' " 



The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
Ualics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



£8 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



Additional Subjects 
EGYPTIAN ART 

196 PRINCE RA-HOTEP AND HIS WIFE NEFERT. A,B. 

197 SHEIKH-EL-BELED. A. 

198 THE SPHINX, FROM TANIS. A, B. 

199 NICHE FOR STATUE, WITH RELIEFS (From Tomb of Mery). 

A,B. 

200 DANCING WOMEN AND MUSICIANS (From Tomb of En-Heft- 

Ka). A, B. 

201 THE STEP PYRAMID OF SAQQARAH. A, B. 

202 THE GRANITE TEMPLE AT GIZEH. A, B. 

203 THE ROCK-TOMB OF AMENY, AT BENI HASAN. A, B. 

204 TEMPLE OF SETI I, AT ABYDOS, SECOND HALL. A,B. 

205 KARNAK, AVENUE OF SPHINXES. A, B. 

206 GREAT HALL OF COLUMNS, KARNAK (Detail). A, B. 

207 PERISTYLE HALL OF RAMSES II, LUXOR. A, B. 

208 RAMESSEUM (Southwest Corner). A, B. 

209 GATEWAY AT MEDINET-HABU. A, B. 

210 PERISTYLE HALL OF AMENOPHIS III, LUXOR. A. 

211 TEMPI<E OF SETI I, GURNAH. A. 

212 FACADE OF SMALL ROCK TEMPLE, ABU SIMBEL. A, B. 

213 INTERIOR OF ROCK TEMPLE, ABU SIMBEL. A, B. 

214 COURT OF TEMPLE AT EDFU. A, B. 

215 MODERN EGYPT. A, B. 

216 PHARAOH'S BED, PHIL^. A, B. 

217 CITADEL OF CAIRO. Ex. B. 

GREEK AND ROMAN ARCHITECTURE 

218 SOUTH END OF CITADEL OF TIRYNS. A, B. 

219 GALLERY IN EASTERN WALL OF CITADEL OF TIRYNS, 

A, B. 

220 THE THESEUM (View from the Southwest). A, B. 

221 THE PARTHENON (View from the Southeast). A, B. 

222 THE PROPYLJEA OF THE ATHENIAN ACROPOLIS. A, B. 

223 THE ERECHTHEUM (View from the East). A, B. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



AFtT PUBLISHERS 59 



224 THE ERECHTHEUM (View from the Northwest). A, B. 

225 THE MAISON-CARREE, NIMES, FRANCE. A, B. 

GREEK AND ROMAN SCULPTURE 

226 GRAVESTONE OF ARISTION. A, B. 

227 ARCHAIC FEMALE FIGURE. A, B. 

228 APOLLO OF TENEA. A, B. 

229 DYING WARRIOR, FROM ^GINA TEMPLE. A, B. 

230 HARMODIUS AND ARISTOGITON. A, B. 

231 APOLLO, FROM WEST PEDIMENT OF TEMPLE OF ZEUS, 

OLYMPIA. A,B. 

232 THESEUS, FROM EAST PEDIMENT OF THE PARTHENON. 

A,B. 

233 TWO SLABS OF THE NORTH FRIEZE OF THE PARTHENON 

A,B. 

234 THE VELLETRI ATHENA. A, B. 

235 COPY OF THE DORYPHORUS OF POLYCLITUS. A, B. 

236 THE WOUNDED AMAZON. A, B. 

237 CARYATID FROM SOUTH PORCH OF ERECHTHEUM. A, B, 

238 HERMES (Detail). Praxiteles. B. 

239 SLAB OF MAUSOLEUM FRIEZE. A, B. 

240 THE RONDANINI ALEXANDER. A, B. 

241 THE MARBLE FAUN (LEANING SATYR). A, B. 

242 THE BORGHESE WARRIOR. A, B. 

243 OTRICOLI ZEUS. A, B. 

244 GROUP WITH ZEUS FROM ALTAR OF PERGAMON. A,B. 

245 GROUP WITH ATHENA FROM ALTAR OF PERGAMON. 

A,B. 

246 ROMAN ORATOR (So-called Germanicus) . A, B. 

247 RELIEF FROM THE ARCH OF TITUS. A, B. 

248 HOMER. B. Illustrated opposite page 62. 

MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURE 

249 HEIDELBERG CASTLE. Ex. A, B. 

250 HOLYROOD PALACE. B. 

251 LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL, WEST FRONT. A, B. 

252 KENILWORTH CASTLE, MERWYN'S TOWER. A, B. 

253 ABBOTSFORD. A, B. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symhola in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



60 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

MISCELLANEOUS SCULPTURE 

254 SHAKESPEARE. From bust in Trinity Church, Stratford. A, B. 

255 LINCOLN. From bust by Max Bachmann. P5. Illustrated opposite 

page 62. 
856 COL. WILLIAM PRESCOTT. From statue by W. W. Story at 
Bunker Hill. B. 

257 LAFAYETTE. From replica of a bust from life by Jean Antoinb 

HOUDON. B. 

PAINTING OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 

SIMONE DI MARTINO (1283P-1344) 

258 PORTRAIT OF GUIDORICCIO, Sienna. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

FRA GIOVANNI ANGELICO (1387 P-1455) 

259 CORONATION OF THE VIRGIN, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

260 CORONATION OF THE VIRGIN (Detail). Ex. A, Ex. B. 

GENTILE DA FABRIANO (1360P-1440) 

261 ADORATION OF THE MAGI, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

BOTTICELLI, Sandro (1446-1510) 

262 ALLEGORY OF SPRING, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

263 MAGNIFICAT MADONNA, Florence. P8. 

GHIRLANDAJO, Domenico (1449-1494) 

^64 PRESENTATION IN THE TEMPLE, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

265 GINEVRA DE' BENCI (Detail of Birth of John the Baptist). Flor- 

ence. B. 

PIERO DI COSIMO (1461-1521) 

266 ANDROMEDA AND PERSEUS, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

MELOZZO DA FORLI (1438-1494) 

267 ANGEL PLAYING MANDOLIN, Sacristy of St. Peter's, Rome. 

Ex. A, Ex. B, B, P5. Illustrated opposite page 62. 

PERUGINO, Pietro (1446-1524) 

268 ST. MARY MAGDALENE, Florence. B. 

The different sizes piiblished of each ficture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 61 



FRANCIA, Francesco (1450-1518) 
«69 THE ANNUNCIATION, Maan. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

PINTURICCHIO, Bernardino (1454-1513) 
870 PORTRAIT OF A YOUTH, Dresden Gallery. B. 

MANTEGNA, Andrea (1431-1506) 

271 MADONNA OF VICTORY, Paris. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

CRIVELLI, Carlo (1430P-1493) 

272 THE ANNUNCIATION, London. Ex. A, Ex, B. 

BELLINI, Giovanni (1428 P-1516) 

273 MADONNA AND SAINTS, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

274 PORTRAIT OF THE DOGE. London. P5. 

CARPACCIO, Vittore (P-1522?) 

275 PRESENTATION IN THE TEMPLE, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

ANTONELLA DA MESSINA (1444-1493) 

276 HEAD OF UNKNOWN MAN, Paris. B. 

ANDREA DEL SARTO (1486-1531) 

277 MADONNA OF THE SACK, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

278 SAINT JOHN, Florence. P8. Illustrated opposite page 62. 

FRA BARTOLOMMEO (1475-1517) 

279 DESCENT FROM THE CROSS, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

RAPHAEL SANZIO (1483-1520) 

280 MADONNA GRAN' DUCA, Florence. P5. Illustrated opposite 

page 62. 

SEBASTIANO DEL PIOMBO (1485-1519) 

281 PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, Florence. B. 

LUINI, Bernardino (1475-1533) 

282 MADONNA AND CHILD, Milan. Ex. A, Ex. B, B. 

SODOMA (1477P-1549) 

283 ECSTASY OF ST. CATHERINE (Detail of Nuns), Sienna. Ex. B. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



CORREGGIO (1494P-1534) 

284 MADONNA OF ST. FRANCIS, Dresden Gallery. Ex. B. 

285 MADONNA OF TRIBUNE, Florence. P3. 

GIORGIONE (1477-1511) 

286 MADONNA WITH SAINTS, Castelfranco. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

287 ST. LIBERALE (Detail of Warrior in Armor). A, B. 

288 KNIGHT OF MALTA, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

289 THE CONCERT, Florence. P5. 

TITIAN (1477-1576) 

290 THREE GRACES, Rome. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

TINTORETTO (1518-1592) 

291 BACCHUS AND ARIADNE, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

LOTTO, Lorenzo (1480P-1556) 

292 PORTRAIT OF A LADY, Milan. Ex.B. 

PALMA IL VECCHIO (1480 P-1528) 

293 ST. BARBARA (Detail). B. 

MORONI, Giovanni Battista (1549-1578) 

294 PORTRAIT OF A TAILOR, London. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

GUERCINO (1591-1666) 

295 SLEEPING ENDYMION, Florence. Ex. B. 

TIEPOLO, Giovanni Battista (1696-1770) 

296 ST. JOSEPH AND INFANT JESUS, Venice. Ex. A, Ex. B. 

ALBANI, Francesco 

297 DANCE OF CUPIDS, Milan. Photogravure. Size of work, 9f x llf 

in. Price, $2. 

ROSELLI, Matteo 

298 TRIUMPH OF DAVID, Florence. Ex. A, Ex. B. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 62. 



The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 




Lincoln, Bachmann. No. 255 




Madonna Gran'duca, 
Raphael. No. 280 





Homer. No. 248 




Saint John, Andrea del Sarto. 
No. 278 




Triumph of David, Roselli. No. 298 



Angel Playing Mandolin, Melozzo 
da Forli. No. 267 




m 




^F"'-'^""" ^ 


— ^ 


m 


^^^ 




1 




4m' 







Willein van Huvtliuysen, 
Hals. No. 303 



William of Orange, Van Dyck. 
No. 330 




Detail from Syndics, Rembrandt. 
No. 31(j 




Detail from Syndics, Rembrandt. 
No. 317 





The Watermill, Hobbema. No. 307 View of Haarlem, Ruysdael. No. 327 



ART PUBLISHERS 63 



Miscellaneous Paintings 
DUTCH AND FLEMISH SCHOOLS 

CUYP, Albert (1620-1691) 

299 EVENING, London. P5. 

EYCK, Jan van (1390P-1440) 
EYCK, Hubert van (1366-1426) 

300 SINGING ANGELS, Berlin. P5. 

301 MUSICAL ANGELS, Berlin. P5. 

HACKvERT, Jan (1629-1696) 

302 THE AVENUE, Amsterdam. P5. 

HALS, Franz (1580-1666) 

303 WILLEM VAN HUYTHUYSEN, Vienna. P5. lUustrated opposite 

page 63. 

304 THE JOLLY MAN, Amsterdam. P5. 

305 THE MANDOLIN PLAYER, Amsterdam. P5. 

306 THE CAPTAIN, St. Petersburg. P5. 

HOBBEMA, Meindert (1638-1709) 

307 THE WATERMILL, Dresden. P5. Illustrated opposite page 63. 

HOLBEIN, Hans (1497 .?-1543) 

308 MADONNA OF THE MEYER FAMILY, Darmstadt. P8. 

309 PORTRAIT OF MORETTE. Dresden. P5. 

HOOCH, Pieter de (1630-1677 ?) 

310 DUTCH HOUSEHOLD, London. P5. 

311 COURTYARD OF A DUTCH HOUSE, London. P5. 

LELY, Sir Peter (1618-1680) 

312 CHARLES I, Dresden. P5. 

MAAS, Nicholas (1632-1693) 

313 "GIVE US THIS DAY," Amsterdam. P5. 

The different sizes published of each -picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12, 



64 A. W. ELSON & C 031 PAN Y 

POTTER, Paul (1625-1654) 

314 THE YOUNG BULL (Detail), The Hague. P5. 

REMBRANDT VAN RYN (1606-1669) 

315 ANATOMY LESSON, The Hague. P5. 

316 THE SYNDICS (Detail No. 91, Man with Pointed Beard), Amster- 

dam. P5. Illustrated opposite page 63. 

317 THE SYNDICS (Detail No. 90), Amsterdam. P5. Illustrated oppo- 

site page 63. 

318 PORTRAIT OF HIMSELF, National Gallery, London. B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 36. 

319 SASKIA AS A YOUNG WOMAN, Dresden. P5. 

320 REMBRANDT WITH SASKIA, Dresden. P5. 

321 SASKIA WITH A FLOWER, Dresden. P5. 

322 PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, Vienna. P5. 

323 MAN WITH FUR CAP, St. Petersburg. P5. 

324 DAN^, Boston. Ex. B, B. 

RUBENS, Peter Paul (1577-1640) 

325 HELENE FOURMENT, St. Petersburg. P5. 

326 THE SONS OF THE PAINTER, Vienna. P5. 

RUYSDAEL, Jacob van (1625 .?-1682) 

327 VIEW OF HAARLEM, The Hague. P5. Illustrated opposite 

page 63. 

328 STORMY SEA, Berlin. P5. 

VALKENBURG, Henri 

329 A DUTCH KITCHEN. Copper-plate painting. Size of work, 6f x 

8i in. Price, $10. 

Original owned by A. W. Elson & Co. 

VAN DYCK, Anton (1599-1641) 

330 WILLIAM OF ORANGE, St. Petersburg. P5. Rlustrated opposite 

page 63. 

331 MARIE VON TASSIS, Vienna. P5. 

VELDE, Willem van de (1633-1707) 

332 THE CANNON-SHOT, Amsterdam. P5. 

The different sizes publisJied of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



ART PUBLISHERS 65 



VOS, Cornelius de (1585-1651) 

333 CHILDREN OF THE PAINTER, Berlin. P5. 

FRENCH SCHOOL 

BONHEUR, Rosa (1822-1899) 

334 THE HORSE FAIR (Detail), London. PS. 

COROT, Jean Baptiste Camille (1796-1875) 

335 VILLE D'AVRAY, Private CoUection. B. 

336 PRES GISORS, Boston. B. Illustrated opposite page 66. 

DAUBIGNY, Charles Fran9ois (1817-1878) 

337 AUVERS ON THE OISE, Private CoUection. B. Illustrated opposite 

page 66. 

GREUZE, Jean Baptiste (1725-1805) 

338 THE MILK-MAIDEN, Paris. P5. 

LE BRUN, Vigee (1755-1842) 

339 PORTRAIT OF HERSELF, Florence. P5. 

LHERMITTE, Leon Augustin (1844- ) 

340 THE VINTAGE, New York. P5. 

IVIADRAZO, Raymundo de (1841- ) 

341 THE MASKED BALL, Private Collection. P5. 

TROYON, Constant (1810-1865) 

342 THE LANE, Private Collection. B. 

UNKNOWN ARTIST 

343 COUNTESS POTOCKA, BerUn. P5. Illustrated opposite page 66 

VAN MARCKE, Emile (1827-1890) 

344 A NORMANDY COW, Private Collection. B. 

GERMAN SCHOOL 

CALAME, Alexandre (1817-1864) 

345 FIRS IN THE FELSENTAL, Berlin. P5. 

346 OAKS BY MOUNTAIN STREAM, Dresden. P5. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



DURER, Albrecht (1471-1528) 

347 ADORATION OF THE HOLY TRINITY, Vienna. P8. 

348 THE APOSTLES, JOHN AND PETER, Munich. P5. 

349 THE APOSTLES, PAUL AND MARK, Munich. P5. 

350 HIERONYMUS HOLZSCHUER, Berlin. P5. 

TISCHBEIN, Johann (1750-1812) 

351 QUEEN LOUISE, Berlin, P5. Illustrated opposite page 66. 

352 PRINCESS FREDERIKA SOPHIA, Amsterdam. P5. 

ENGLISH SCHOOL 

GAINSBOROUGH, Thomas (1727-1788) 

353 PORTRAIT OF MRS. SIDDONS, London. P5. 

SPANISH SCHOOL 

FORTUNY, Mariano (1841-1874) 

354 GATE OF JUSTICE, Alhambra, Private Collection. P5. 

MURILLO, Bartolome Esteban (1618-1682) 

355 FIGURE OF CHRIST, London. Ex. B. 



Portraits 

The following, unless otherwise noted, are India-proof photogravures, 
mounted on heavy plate paper 28 x 38 inches. The size of the work averages 
16j X 20 inches. Price, $5 each. 

356 JAMES MADISON. From original in Bowdoin College, painted 

from hfe by Gilbert Stuaht. 

357 JOHN JAY. From original in Bedford House, Katonah, N. Y., 

painted from life by Gilbert Stuart. 

358 JOHN MARSHALL. From original in Philadelphia, painted by 

Henry Inman. Illustrated opposite page 66. 

359 JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY. Etching by W. H. W. Bicknell 

from a photograph from life. 

360 WILLIAM HICKLING PRESCOTT. From a crayon from Ufe by 

George Richmond, Esq., R.A. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



iSMmm0* ~."1 




Pres Gisors, Corot. No. 336 




Auvers on the Oise, Daubigny. No. 337 





Countess Potocka. No. 343 



Queen Louise, Tischbein. No. 35 1 





Audubon, Inman. No. 361 



Marshall, Inman. No. 358 



r 



,. ^1 




children Catching Minnows, Curran 
No. 371 




The Comino- Storm, Inness. No. 372 




In the Pasture, Jacque. No. 373 




Evening in May, Tryon. No. 377 




Cicero's Oration Against Catiline, 
Maccari. No. 374 




Broad Street, New York, 
Cooper. No. 375 




Autumn Afternoon on the Dyle, 
Malines, Gilsoul. No. 376 



ART PUBLISHERS 67 



361 JOHN JAMES AUDUBON. From painting from life by Henry 

Inman. Illustrated opposite page 66. 

362 JOHN RUSKIN. From negative from life by Eluott & Frye. 

363 SAMUEL ADAMS. From painting by J. S. Copley. B. 

364 JAMES OTIS. From painting by Blackburn. B. 

365 GEN. JOSEPH WARREN. From painting by J. S. Copley. B. 

366 WASHINGTON. From Lansdowne portrait by Gilbert Stuart. ^,J5. 

Also published in an etching by W. H. W. Bicknell. Size of work, 11^ x 7|in. 
Parchment proofs limited to 100 impressions, $15. Japan proofs, $10. 

Pictures Relating to American History 

367 LONGFELLOW'S HOUSE, Craigie House, Cambridge, Mass. A, B. 

368 LONGFELLOW'S STUDY, Craigie House, Cambridge, Mass. A, B. 

PAGE, Walter Gilman (1862- ) 

369 THE BOSTON MASSACRE. A, B. 



Additional Copper-plate Paintings and Carbon 

Photographs 

BENSON, Frank W. 

370 THE SISTERS, Albright Gallery, Buffalo, N. Y. B. 

CURRAN, Charles C. 

371 CHILDREN CATCHING MINNOWS, Albright Gallery, Buffalo, 

N. Y. Ex. B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 67. 

INNESS, George 

372 THE COMING STORM, Albright Gallery, Buffalo, N. Y. Ex. A, 

B. Illustrated opposite page 67. 

JACQUE, Charles Emile 

373 IN THE PASTURE, Albright Gallery, Buffalo, N. Y. Ex. A, B. 

Illustrated opposite page 67. 

MACCARI, Cesare 

374 CICERO'S ORATION AGAINST CATILINE, Rome. Double 

Ex. A, Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 67. 

The different sizes published of each picture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page 12. 



68 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

COOPER, Colin C. 

375 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK, Cincinnati Museum, Cincinnati, 

O. Copper-plate painting. Size of work, 26^ x \1\ ins. Price, $20. 
Illustrated opposite page 67. 

GILSOUL, Victor 

376 AUTUMN AFTERNOON ON THE DYLE, MALINES. Copper- 

plate painting. Size of work, 19f x 25 ins. Price, $25. Original 
owned by A. W. Elson & Co. Illustrated opposite page 67. 

TRYON, Dwight W. 

377 AN EVENING IN MAY, Albright Gallery, BuJ0Falo, N. Y. Ex. B 

Illustrated opposite page 67. 

BASTIEN-LePAGE, Jules 

378 JOAN OF ARC HEARING THE VOICES, Metropolitan Museum 

of Art, New York. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 69. 

BLASHFIELD, Edwin H. 

379 THE LAW, Federal Building, Cleveland, O. Ex. A, B. Illustrated 

opposite page 69. 

FOUR DECORATIONS SYMBOLIC OF LAW, 

Mahoning County Court House, Youngstown, O. 

380 IN REMOTE ANTIQUITY. Illustrated opposite page 68. 

381 IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY. Illustrated opposite page 68. 

382 IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Illustrated opposite page 68. 
38S IN MODERN TIMES. Illustrated opposite page 68. 

Nos. 380-383, inclusive, are made in a special size, about 18 x 10 inches. Price, 
$2.50 each. Any number of these subjects will be mounted on one moimt, and can be 
framed without using division-bars. 

BOUGHTON, George H. 

384 PILGRIMS GOING TO CHURCH. Lenox Library, New York. 

Double Ex. A, Ex. A, B, PS. Illustrated opposite page 69. 

BROZIK, Vacslav von 

385 COLUMBUS AT THE COURT OF ISABELLA, Lenox Library, 

New York. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 69. 

FRENCH, Daniel C. 

386 ALICE FREEMAN PALMER MEMORIAL, Wellesley CoUege, 

Mass. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 68. 

387 ALMA MATER, Columbia University, New York. A, B. Illustrated 

opposite page 68. 

The different sizes 'published of each ficture are indicated by the symbols in 
italics. For key to symbols see page IS. 





Law in Remote Antiquity, 

Blashfield. No. 380 



Law in Classical Antiquity, 
Blashfield. No. 381 





Law in the Middle Ages, 
Blashfield. No. 382 



Law in Modern Times, 
Blashfield. No. 383 





Ahna Mater, French. No. 387 



Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial, 
French. No. 386 




The Law, Blasbfield. No. 379 




Pilgrims Going to Church, Boughton. 

No. 384 




Milton Dictating "Paradise Lost,' 
Munkacsy. No. 389 



School of Vestals, Leroux. No. 388 





Columbus at the Court of Isabella, Brozik. 

No. 385 



Sherman Statue, St. Gaudens. No. 391 





Joan of Arc Hearing the Voices, 
Bastien-Lepage. No. 378 



Children of the Shell, Murillo. No. 390 



ART PUBLISHERS 69 



LEROUX, Hector 

388 SCHOOL OF VESTALS, Lenox Library, New York. Ex. A, B. 

Illustrated opposite page 69 

MUNKACSY, M. 

389 MILTON DICTATING "PARADISE LOST," Lenox Library, 

New York. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 69 

MURILLO, Bartolome 

390 CHILDREN OF THE SHELL, Prado Museum, Madrid. Ex. A, B, 

PS. Illustrated opposite page 69 

SAINT-GAUDENS, Augustus 

391 STATUE OF GEN. W. T. SHERMAN, New York. A, B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 69 

ANKER, Albert 

392 PESTALOZZI, Kunsthaus, Liiach. P5. Illustrated opposite page 71. 

BOUGUEREAU, W. A. 

393 HOMER AND HIS GUIDE, Layton Gallery, Milwaukee. B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 70. 

BRETON, Jules A. 

394 SONG OF THE LARK, Art Institute, Chicago. Ex. A, B. Illustrated 

opposite page 71. 

CONSTABLE, John 

395 THE HAY WAIN, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, B. Illustrated 

opposite page 70. 

DELAROCHE, Paul 

396 NAPOLEON, Stadtisches Museum, Leipzig. P5. Illustrated opposite 

page 71. 

FIRLE, Walter 

397 THERE 'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME, Layton Gallery, Milwaukee. 

Illustrated opposite page 37. 

MILLET, Frank D. 

398 A TREATY WITH THE INDIANS— TRAVERSE DES SIOUX, 

Capitol, St. Paul, Minn. Ex. A, B. Illustrated opposite page 37. 

MILLET, J. F. 

399 FEEDING HER BIRDS, Lille Museum. Ex. A, Ex. B, B, PS. 

Illustrated opposite page 70. 

REYNOLDS, Sir Joshua 

400 ANGEL HEADS, National Gallery, London. Ex. A, B. Illustrated 

opposite page 71. 



70 A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

VAN MARCKE, Emile 

401 GOLDEN AUTUMN DAY, Art Institute, Chicago. Ex. A, B. 

402 THE WATER GATE, Layton Gallery, Milwaukee. Ex. A, B. Illus- 

trated opposite page 70. 

VELASQUEZ, Diego R. 

403 PRINCE DON BALTHAZAR CARLOS, Prado Museum, Madrid. 

Illustrated opposite page 70. 

FROM NATURE 

404 DERWENTWATER, English Lakes. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 37. 

405 PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT, Maine. A, B. Illustrated opposite 

page 37, 



English Cathedrals and Abbeys 

Photogravures from negatives made direct from originals. They are about 
9x11 inches work size, printed upon specially prepared etching-paper 17 x 23 
inches. 

With each print is given a full description prepared by an authority. 

Price, 75 cents each; or $15 for the entire series in three handsome port- 
folios. 

1. DOORWAY OF MARTYRDOM, Canterbury Cathedral. 

2. THE MONUMENT OF EDWARD THE BLACK PRINCE, Can- 

terbury Cathedral. 

3. DURHAM CATHEDRAL, Exterior. 

4. DURHAM CATHEDRAL, the Nave, Looking East. 

5. THE WEST FRONT, Ely Cathedral. 

6. THE CHOIR, Exeter Cathedral. 

7. SOUTH AISLE OF CLOISTERS, Gloucester Cathedral. 

8. THE NAVE, Lichfield Cathedral. 

9. Chantrey's "SLEEPING CHILDREN," Lichfield Cathedral. 

10. THE WEST DOOR, Lichfield Cathedral. 

11. THE CHOIR, Looking West, Lincoln Cathedral. 

12. LINCOLN CATHEDRAL, from the West. 

13. SALISBURY CATHEDRAL. 

14. HENRY Vn CHAPEL, Westminster Abbey. 

15. POETS' CORNER, Westminster Abbey. 

16. THE CHOIR, Worcester Cathedral. 

17. WORCESTER CATHEDRAL, from the Northwest. 

18. THE WEST FRONT, York Cathedral. 




Prince Don Balthazar Carlos, 
Velasquez. No. 403 





Hay Wain, Constable. No. 395 



Water Gate, Van Marcke. No. iO^ 





Homer and His Guide, 
Bouiiuereau. No. 393 



Feeding Her Birds, Millet. 
No. 399 




Mrs. Siddoiis, Gainsborough. 
>«o. o5o 




Napoleon. Delaroche. No. 396 





Song of the Lark, Breton. 

No. 394 




Pestalozzi, Anker. No. 392 



' \ 


\ ' 


- --^ 1 




i 




i 



Angel Heads, Reynolds. 
No. 400 ■ 



The Iron Guard, Jank. 
No. 126 



ART PUBLISHERS 



71 



Masterpieces in Art 
ELSON PRINTS 

Elson prints are exquisite little copper-plate photogravures made from our large 
original negatives. 

They have all of the detail and modeling of our large photographs, and are rec- 
ommended for the use of Art Study Clubs, or for framing. They may be had 
singly, or in sets of ten enclosed in a strong portfolio with descriptive text. 

The work size averages 5^ x 8 inches, printed with a plate mark and engraved 
title, on special deckle-edge paper, 9 x 12 inches. 

Price, $1.25 per portfolio of 10 prints with descriptive text. Single prints 10 
cents each. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ARCHITECTURE 

Text by Prof. F. B. Tarbell, University of Chicago 



El. Lion Gate of Mycenae. 

E2. Great Temple (so-called Temple of 
Posidon) at Psestum. 

E3. Theseum, from Southwest, Athens. 

E4. Parthenon, from Southwest, Athens. 

E5. The Temple of Victory, from North- 
east, AtneuSf 



E6. Erechtheum, from Northwest, Athens. 
E7. Caryatid (South), Porch of the Erech- 
theum, Athens. 
E8. Colosseum, Rome. 
E9. Arch of Constantine, Rome. 
ElO. "Maison Carree," Nimes. 



GREEK SCULPTURE. A 



Ell. Gravestone of Aristion. (Athens Na- 
tional Museum.) 

El2. Harmodius and Aristogiton. (Naples 
Museum.) 

E13. Three Fates from East Pediment of 
the Parthenon. (British Musemn.) 

E14. Theseus from same. (British Mu- 
seum.) 

E15. Metope from Parthenon. (No. 310 in 
Catalogue of British Museum.) 



E16. 



E17. 

E18. 
E19. 



E20. 



Portion of Slab of the East Frieze of 
the Parthenon, with Seated Divin- 
ities. (Acropolis Museum.) 

Two Slabs of the North Frieze of the 
Parthenon. (British Museum.) 

Doryphorus. (Naples Museum.) 

Woimded Amazon, perhaps after 
Polyclitus. (Landsdowne House, 
London.) 

Caryatid from South Porch of Erech- 
theum. (British Museum.) 



GREEK SCULPTURE. B 



E21. Hermes of Praxiteles. (Olympia Mu- 
seum.) 

E22. Slab of Mausolemn Frieze. (British 
Museum.) 

E23. The Alexander Sarcophagus. (Con- 
stantinople.) 

E24. The Aphrodite of Melos. (Paris, 
Louvre.) 

E25. The Otricoli Zeus. (Rome, Vatican.) 



E26. 

E27. 

E28. 
E29. 



E30. 



Apollo Belvedere. (Rome. Vatican.) 
Victory of Samothrace. (Paris. 

Louvre.) 
Laocoon. (Rome, Vatican.) 
Group of Athena and Other figures 

from the Altar of Pergamon. (Ber 

lin Museum.) 
Augustus from Prima Porta. (Rome 

Vatican.) 



72 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



E31. 
E32. 

E33. 

E34. 
E35. 



RENAISSANCE PAINTING IN ITALY 

Text by Dr. John C. Van Dyke, of Rutgers College 

PORTFOLIO. A 



Giotto di Bondone, Flight into Egypt. 
Benozzo Gozzoli, Adoration of the 

Ma^ (Detail of Kneeling Angels). 
Filippmo Lippi, Vision of St. Bernard 

(Detail of Prajing Angel). 
Sandro Botticelh, Allegory of Spring. 
Fra Giovanni Angelico, Angel with 

Tambourine. 



E36. Domenico Ghirlandajo, Presentation 
in the Temple. 

E37. Melozzo da Forli, Angel Playing Viol. 

E38. Pietro Perugino, St. Mary Magdalene. 

E39. Francesco Francia, The Annuncia- 
tion. 

E40. Gentile da Fabriano, Adoration of the 
Magi (Detail of Group of Kings). 



PORITOLIO. B 



E41. 

£42. 
E43. 



E44. 
E45. 
E46. 



Andrea del Sarto, Madonna of the 

Harpies. 
Michael Angelo Buonarroti, Delphic 

Sibyl (Detail). 
Raphael Sanzio, Madonna of the 

Chair. 
Raphael Sanzio, Sistine Madonna. 
Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa. 
Bernardino Pinturicchio, Portrait of 

a Youth. 



E47. Sodoma, Ecstasy of St. Catherine (De- 
tail of Nuns). 

E48. Andrea Mantegna, Madonna of Vic- 
tory. 

EJ49. Giovanni BelliiH, Madonna and 
Saints. 

E50. Vittore Carpaccio, Angel with Lute 
(From Presentation in the Temple). 



PORTFOLIO. C 



E51. Corre^gio, Holy Night. 

E52. Giorgione, Madonna with Saints. 

E53. Titian, Three Graces. 

E54. Titian, Man with a Glove. 

E55. Tintoretto, Bacchus and Ariadne. 

E56. Paolo Veronese, Madoima and Saints. 



E57. Lorenzo Lotto, Portrait of a Lady. 

E58. Pahna il Vecchio, St. Barbara. 

E59. Paris Bordone, The Fisherman and 

the Ring. 
E60. Giovanni Battista Moroni, Portrait of 

a Tailor. 



EGYPT (ARCHITECTURE) 

Text by Dr. George A. Reisner, of Khedivial Museum, Cairo 



E61. Temple of Philse. 
E62. The Great Sphinx (Showing Pyra- 
mids in Distance). 
E63. Interior of Rock Temple, Abu Simbel. 
E64. Granite Temple at Gizeh. 
£65. Great Hall of Columns, Kamak. 



£66. Avenue of Sphinxes, Kamak. 
£67. Temple of Edfu. 
£68. Facade of Rock Temple, Abu Simbel. 
£69. Peristyle Hall of Amenophis HI, 

Luxor. 
£70. Great Pyramid. 



'HERE SHAKESPEARE LIVED 



E71. Bust of Shakespeare in Chancel of 

Trinity Church. 
£72. Shakespeare House. 
£73. Room in Which Shakespeare Was 

Born. 
£74. Ann Hathaway's Cottage. 
£75. View of Stratford from Memorial 

Theatre. 



£76. View of Memorial Theatre from Clop- 

ton Bridge. 
£77. Mary Arden's Cottage. 
£78. In the Garden of Ann Hathaway's 

Cottage. 
£79. Grammar School and Guild Chapel. 
£80. Interior of Trinity Church. 



ART PUBLISHERS 



73 



E81. 

E82. 
ESS. 
E84. 
E85. 



GENERAL WASHINGTON 



Greneral Washington, Athenaeum Por- 
trait by Gilbert Stuart. 

General Washington, Lansdowne Por- 
trait, by Gilbert Stuart. 

Martha Washington, Athenaeum Por- 
trait, by Gilbert Stuart. 

Sulgrave Manor, Northamptonshire, 
England. 

Signing the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, by John Trumbull. 



E86, Washington Crossing the Delaware, 
by Emanuel Leutze. 

E87. Washington Resigning His Conunis< 
sion, by John Trumbull. 

EBB. Surrender of Comwallis at Yorktown, 
by John Trumbull. 

E89. The Washington Family, by E. Sav- 
age. 

E90. Mount Vemon, the Home of Wash- 
ington. 



MAKERS OF OUR NATION 



E91. 
E92. 
E93. 
E94. 
E95. 



ElOl. 
E102. 
E103. 
E104. 

£105. 



Gteneral Washington. 
Thomas Jefferson. 
Alexander Hamilton. 
Benjamin Franklin. 
James Otis. 



E96. 
E97. 
E98. 
E99. 
ElOO. 



Joseph Warren. 
Samuel Adams. 
Patrick Henry. 
Abraham Lincoln. 
General Grant. 



CALIFORNIA MISSIONS 



San Diego de Alcald. 

San Antonio de Pala. 

San Luis, Rey de Francia. 

San Juan Capistrano, Old Garden 

and Cloisters. 
San Juan Capistrano, Cloister 

Arches. 



E106. San Gabriel, Arcdngel. 

E107. San Fernando, Rey de EspaiSa. 

ElOB. Santa Barbara. 

E109. San Miguel, Arcdngel. 

EllO. San Carlos Borromeo Mission. 



THE ENGLISH LAKES 

Scenes AssoaATED with the Lake Poetts 



Elll. Rydal Mount. 

E113. Crummockwater. 

E113. Wastdale Church. 

El 14. Ullswater. 

E115. Thirhnere and Helvellyn. 



E116. Blea Tarn. 

El 17. Wastwater, The Screes. 

El 18. Derwentwater. 

El 19. Buttermere. 

E120. Bowness from Orrest Head. 



TEN MASTERPIECES OF OLD AND MODERN MASTERS 



E121. Murillo, Holy Family. 
E122. M. Hobbema, Avenue Middelhamis. 
E123. Van Dyck. Children of Charles I. 
E124. J. Constable, Cornfield. 
E125. J. M. W. Turner, Fightmg Teme- 
raire. 



E126. A. Mauve, Spring. 

E127. G. F. Watts, Sir Galahad. 

E128. C. Troyon, Return to the Farm. 

E129. J. B. C. Corot, Matinee. 

E130. J. F. Millet, Gleaners. 



TEN MASTERPIECES FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF 

ART, NEW YORK 



E159. 
E160. 



E161. 
E162. 
£103. 



Schreyer, Arabs on the March. 
Cabanel, Queen Vashti Refuses to 

Come at the Command of King 

Ahasuerus. 
Jacque, The Sheepfold. 
Van Marcke, The Mill. 
Troyon, Holland Cattle. 



E164. Lhermitte, The Vintage. 

E165. Bonheur, Deer in the Forest-Twi- 

Kght. 
E166. Dupre, The Balloon. 
E126. Mauve, Spring. 
E167. Mauve, Autimm. 



74 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



TEN MASTERPIECES FROM THE CORCORAN GALLERY 
OF ART, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



E179. Daubigny, Hamlet on the Seine. 
E180. Cazin, Moonlight in Holland. 
E181. Israels, Interior of a Cottage. 
E182. Richards, on the Coast of New 

Jersey. 
E183. Lenbach, Bismarck. 



El 84. Brush, Mother and Child. 
E185. Picknell, Road to Concameau. 
E186. Van Marcke, Farm Scene with 

Cattle. 
E187. Renouf, Helping Hand. 
E188. Corot, Wood-gatherers. 



TEN MASTERPIECES FROM THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, 

BOSTON 



189. Greuze, Chapeau Blanc. 
81. Stuart, George Washington. 
83. Stuart, Martha Washington. 

190. Whistler, Little Rose. 
178. Millet, Knittmg Lesson. 



176. Homer, Fog Warning. 

140. Lerolle, By the River. 

154. Regnault, Horses of Achilles. 

191. Rembrandt, Shower of Gold. 

192. Alexander, Pot of Basil. 



MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS 



E131. 
E132. 
E133. 

E134 

E135. 

E136. 

E137. 

E138. 

E139. 
E140. 
E141. 
E142. 
E143. 

E144. 

E145. 

E146. 

E147. 
EMS. 

E149. 

E150. 

E151 



Angelas — Millet. 

Baby Stuart — Van Dyck. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson. From a 

daguerreotype from life. 
Nathaniel Hawthorne. From a 

drawing from life. 
James Russell Lowell. From a nega- 
tive from life. 
William HickUng Prescott. From a 
drawing from life by G«o. Rich- 
mond, R.A. 
Abraham Lincohi. From the Statue 
in Lincobi Park, Chicago, by 
Augustus St. Gaudens. 
U. S. Frigate Constitution (Old Iron- 
sides). From a paintmg by Mar- 
shall Johnson. 
Aurora — Guido Reni. 
By the River — Lerolle. 
Amiens Cathedral. 
Poets' Corner, Westmmster Abbey. 
Sir Walter Scott. From a pamtmg 
from Kfe by John Watson Gordon. 
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. From 

a negative from life. 
John Greenleaf Whittier. From a 

negative from life. 
Robert Bums. From a painting from 

life by Alexander Nasmyth. 
Shakespeare, Chandos portrait. 
William Cullen Bryant. From a 

portrait from life. 
Oliver Wendell Hohnes. From a 

portrait from life, 1894. 
Tennyson. From a drawing by 

M. Arnault. 
Vittore Carpaccio, Presentation m 
the Temple. 



E152. 

E153. 

E154. 
E155. 
E156. 

E157. 
E158. 
E168. 
E169. 
E170. 
E171. 
E172. 
E173. 
E174. 
E175. 
E176. 
E177. 
E178. 
193. 

194. 
195. 

196. 
197. 

198. 
199. 

200. 
201. 
202. 
203. 
204. 



Abbotsford, Home of Sir Walter 

Scott. 
Signing of the Compact in the Cabin 

of the Mayflower — White. 
H. Regnault, Horses of Achilles. 
The SjTidics — Rembrandt. 
Landscape with Windmill — Ruys- 

dael. 
Longfellow's House. 
Portland Head Light. 
The Acropolis, Athens. 
The Forum, Rome. 
Milan Cathedral. 
Cologne Cathedral. 
Grand Canal. Venice. 
St. Mark's Cathedral. 
Capitol at Washington. 
Concord Bridge. 
Fog Warning — Homer. 
Coming Storm — Millet. 
Knitting Lesson — Millet. 
Pilgrims Going to Church — 

Boughton. 
Spring — Douglass. 
Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial — 

French. 
In the Pasture — Jacque. 
Cicero's Oration Against Catiline — 

Maccari. 
Feeding Her Birds — Millet. 
Milton Dictating Paradise Lost — 

Munkacsy. 
Children of the Shell — Murillo. 
Age of Innocence — Reynolds. 
Angel Heads — Reynolds. 
At the Water Gate — Van Marcke. 
Prince Don Balthazar Carlos — 

Velasquez. 



Index of Subjects 







Number of 






Number of 






Picture 






Picture 


A-bbotsford 




253 


Baby Stuart 


Van Dyck 


92 


Acropolis 




9 


Bacchus and Ari- 






Adams, Samuel 


Copley 


363 


adne 


Tintoretto 


291 


Adoration of the 






Balloon 


Dupre 


104 


Holy Trinity 


Diirer 


347 


Barnyard in South- 






Adoration of the 






ern Germany 


Haueisen 


125 


Magi 


Fabriano 


261 


Bismarck 


Lenbach 


123 


Adoration of the 






Borghese Warrior 




242 


Magi (Detail) 


Fabriano 


55 


Boston Massacre 


Page 


369 


Adoration of the 






Broad Street, New 






Magi (Detail) 


Gozzoli 


56 


York 


Cooper 


375 


After the Shower 


English 
Walker 


154 


Broken Pitcher 


Greuze 


105 


Age of Happiness 


148 


Browning 




173 


Age of Innocence 


Reynolds 


144 


Burns 


Nasmyth 


171 


Auce Freeman Palmer 




By the River 


Lerolle 


109 


Memorial 


French 


386 








Allegory of Spring 
"All's WeU" 


Botticelli 
Homer 


262 
156 


Cannon Shot 
Canterbury Cathe- 


Van de Velde 


332 


Alma Mater 


French 


387 


dral 




36 


Amiens Cathedral 




32 


Capitol, Washing- 






Anatomy Lesson 


Rembrandt 


315 


ton 




180 


Andromeda and 






Captain, The 


Hals 


306 


Perseus 


Piero di Cosimo 266 


Caryatid 




237 


Angel Heads 


Reynolds 


400 


Castle of San An- 






Angel Playing 






gelo 




27 


Mandolin 


Da Forli 


267 


Charles I 


Van Dyck 


312 


Angel Playing Viol 


Da ForU 


59 


Child with Lap Dog 


Reynolds 


145 


Angel with Harp 


Angehco 


54 


Children Catching 






Angel with Lute 


Carpaccio 


61 


Minnows 


Curran 


371 


Angel with Tam- 






Children of Charles I 


Van Dyck 


91 


bourine 


Angelico 
MiUet 


58 


Children of the 






Angelus 


110 


Painter 


De Vos 


333 


Ann Hathaway's 






Children of the SheU 


Murillo 


390 


Cottage 




46 


Choir, Lincohi Ca- 






Annunciation 


Francia 


269 


thedral 




39 


Annunciation 


Crivelli 


272 


Cicero's Oration 






Aphrodite of Melos 




21 


against Catiline 


Maccari 


374 


Apollo of the Belve 


!- 




Citadel of Cairo 




217 


dere 




22 


Citadel of Tu-yns 






Apollo, from Tem- 






(Gallery) 




219 


ple of Zeus 




231 


Citadel of Tiryns 






Apollo of Tenea 




228 


(South End) 




218 


Apostles, John and 


1 




Cloister Soup 


Kaulbach 


122 


Peter 


Diirer 


348 


Cologne Cathedral 




33 


Apostles, Paul and 






Colosseum 




14 


Mark 


Diirer 


349 


Columbus at Court of 




Arabs on the March 


Schreyer 


124 


Isabella 


Brozik 


385 


Arch of Constantine 




15 


Coming Storm 


Inness 


372 


Archaic Female 






Concert 


Giorgione 


289 


Figure 




227 


Concord Bridge 




176 


Audubon, John J. 


Inman 


361 


Constitution 




189 


Augustus 




26 


Cornfield 


Constable 


128 


Aiu-ora 


Reni 


75 


Cornfield 


Volkman 


127 


Autumn 


Mauve 


81 


Coronation of Vir- 






Autumn Afternoon 






gin 


Angelico 


259 


on the Dyle 


Gilsoul 


376 


Coronation of Vir- 






Auvers-on-the-Oise 


Daubigny 


337 


gin (Detail) 


Angelico 


260 


Avenue 


Hackaert 


302 


Countess Potocka 




343 


Avenue of Sphinxes 




205 


Court of Temple J 


It 




Avenue, Middel- 






Edfu 




214 


harnis 


Hobbema 


78 









76 



ART PUBLISHERS 





Number of 






Number of 




Picture 






Picture 


Courtship of Miles 






Firs in the Felsental 


Calame 


345 


Standish 


Turner 


195 


First Sunday in New 






Courtyard of a 






England 


Bayes 


184 


Dutch House 


De Hooch 


311 


Fish Wharves at 












Gloucester 


Hornby 


157 


Danae 


Rembrandt 


324 


Fisherman and the 






Dance of the Cupids 


Albani 


297 


Ring 


Bordone 


74 


Dance of the 






Flight into Egypt 


Bondone 


52 


Nymphs 


Corot 


99 


Fog Warning 
Forester's Family 


Homer 


155 


Dancing Women 




200 


Landseer 


140 


David 


Michael Angelo 


50 


Forum 




16 


Declaration of Inde 


. 




Franklin 


Duplessis 


165 


pendence (Facsimile) 


181 








Decorations Symbolic 




Gate of Justice, Al- 






of Law 


Blashfield 380-383 


hambra 


Fortuny 


354 


Deer in the Forest 


Bonheur 


97 


Gateway at Medinet- 






Delphic Sibyl 


Michael Angelo 


64 


Habu 




209 


Departure of the 






Ginevra de' Benci 


Ghirlandajo 


265 


!\Iayflower 


Bayes 


185 


Girl with Apple 


Greuze 


106 


Derwentwater 




404 


" Give us this day " 


Maas 


313 


Descent from the 






Gleaners 


MiUet 


111 


Cross 


Bartolommeo 


279 


Golden Autumn Day Van Marcke 


401 


Dignity and Impu- 






Grand Canal, Venice 




48 


dence 


Landseer 


136 


Granite Temple at 






Distingxiished Mem- 






Gizeh 




202 


ber of the Hu- 






Grant, U. S. 




167 


mane Society 


Trfindseer 


135 


Gravestone of Aris- 






Doryphorus (Copy) 
Durham Cathedral 




235 


tion 




226 




38 


Great HaU of Col- 






Dutch Household 


De Hooch 


310 


umns 




4 


Dutch Kitchen 


VaJkenburg 


329 


Great Hall of Col- 






Dying Gaul 




25 


umns (Detail) 




206 


Dying Warrior 




229 


Great Pyramids at 
Gizeh 




2 


East Frieze of Par- 






Great Sphinx 




1 


thenon (Slab) 




19 


Great Temple at 






Ecstasy of St. Cath- 






Paestum 




10 


erine (Detail of 






Group of Kings 


Fabriano 


55 


Nuns) 


Sodoma 


283 


Group with Athena 




245 


Embarkation of the 






Group with Zeus 




244 


Pilgrims 


Parker 


191 


Guidoriccio 


Martino 


258 


Emerson 




175 








Erechthemn, from 






Hamilton 


Trumbull 


164 


East 




223 


Hamlet on the Seine 


Daubigny 


102 


Erechthemn, from 






Harmodius and Aris- 






Northwest 




224 


togiton 




230 


Evening 


Cuyp 


299 


Hay Wain 


Constable 


395 


Evening in May 


Tryon 


377 


Head of Unknown 












Man 


Messina 


276 


Facade of Large 






Heidelberg Castle 




249 


Rock Temple, 






Helene Fourment 


Rubens 


325 


Abu Simbel 




5 


Helping Hand 


Renouf 


114 


Fapade of Small 






Hermes 


Praxiteles 


20 


Rock Temple, 
Abu Simbel 






Hermes (Detail) 


Praxiteles 


238 




212 


Hiawatha 


Norris 


158 


Fading Light of 






Hieronymus Holz- 






Day 


Gorter 


76 


schuer 


Di'irer 


350 


Farm Scene with 






Holland Cattle 


Troyon 


116 


Cattle 


Van Marcke 


118 


Hohnes 




169 


Feeding Her Birds 


Millet 


399 


Holy Family 


Murillo 


151 


Fighting Temeraire 


Turner 


147 


Holy Family (Detail; 




355 


Figure of an Athlete 


Michael Angelo 


65 


Holy Night 


Corr^gio 


70 


F^ure of Christ 


Murillo 


355 


Holyrood Palace 




250 



ART PUBLISHERS 



77 



Homer 

Homer and His 
Guide 

Horse Fair 

Horse Fair (Detail) 

Horses of Achilles 

House where Shake- 
speare Was Born 

Houses of Parliament 

I Hear a Voice 
In the Pasture 
Independence Hall 
Interior of a Cot 

tage 
Interior of Rock 

Temple, Abu Sim- 

bel 
Iron Guard 

Jay, John 
Jefferson, Thomas 
Joan of Arc 
Jolly Man 

Kenilworth Castle 
King Arthur 
King Charles Span- 
iels 
Kneeling Angels 
Knight of Malta 
Knitting Lesson 

Lafayette 
Landscape with 

Windmill 
Lane 
Laocoon 

Laughing Cavalier 
Law 
Lichfield Cathedral 

(West Front) 
Lincoln 
Lincoln 
Lincoln 
Lincoln's Address 

at Gettysburg 
Lion Gate, Myceme 
Little Princess 
Little Rose 
Longfellow 
Longfellow's House 
Longfellow's Study 
Lowell 

Madam LeBrun 

and Daughter 
Madison, James 
Madonna del Arpie 
Madonna del Arpie 

(Detail) 
Madonna of the 
Chair 



Bouguereau 
Bonheur 
Bonheur 
Regnault 



Earl 
Jacque 

Israels 



Number of 
Picture 

248 

393 

95 

334 

113 

44 
40 

132 
S7S 

178 

79 



Luini 



Jank 


213 
126 


Stuart 
Stuart 

Bastien-Lepage 
Hals 


357 
163 
378 
304 


Vischer 


42 
51 


Landseer 
Gozzoli 
Gioreione 
MiUet 


137 
56 

288 
112 


Houdon 


257 


Ruysdael 
Troyon 

Hals 

Blashfield 


89 
342 

24 

77 

379 


Bachmann 
Saint-Gaudens 


251 
166 
255 

182 


Morellse 
Whistler 
Longfellow 


183 
8 
83 
160 
168 
367 
368 
172 


LeBrun 
Stuart 
Del Sarto 


108 

356 

62 



Bellini 
Raphael 



Botticelli 

Holbein 

Del Sarto 

Correggio 
Veronese 
Bellini 



Del Sarto 
Raphael 



66 



Madonna and Child 

Madonna and Four 
Saints 

Madonna Gran' 
duca 

Madonna, Infant 
Jesus and St. 
John 

Madonna of the 
Meyer Family 

Madonna of the 
Sack 

Madonna of St. 
Francis 

Madonna and Saints 

Madonna and Saints 

Madonna with Saints Giorgione 

Madonna of the 

Tribune Correggio 

Madonna of Victory Mantegna 

Magnificat Madonna Botticelh 

Maison Carree, Nimes 

Man with Fur Cap Rembrandt 

Man with Fur Cap 
(Detail) 

Mandolin Player 

Marble Faun 

Marie von Tassis 

Marshall, John 

Masked Ball 

Matinee 

Mausoleum Frieze 
(Slab) 

Melon Eaters 

Merwyn's Tower 
(Kenilworth) 

Metope from Par- 
thenon 

Milan Cathedral 

Milkmaiden 

MiU 

Milton Dictating "Par- 
adise Lost" Munkacsy 

Minute Man 

Miracle of St. Mark 

Misty Morning in 
Holland 

Mona Lisa 

Monarch of the 
Glen 

Modern Egypt 

Moonlight in Hol- 
land 

Moses 

Motley, John L. 

Mount Vernon 

Mouse 

Musical Angels 

Napoleon 
Niche, for Statue 

with Reliefs 
Normandy Cow 



Rembrandt 
Hals 

Van Dyck 
Inman 
Madrazo 
Corot 



Murillo 



Greuze 
Van Marcke 



French 
Tintoretto 

Mauve 
Da Vinci 

Landseer 



Cazin 
Michael Angelo 



Kaulbach 
Van Eyck 

Delaroche 
Van Marcke 



Number of 
Picture 

282 

60 

280 

58 
308 

277 

284 

72 

273 

286 

285 
271 
263 

225 



86 
305 
241 
331 
358 
341 

99 

239 
150 

252 

18 

30 

338 

119 

389 

177 

71 

82 
69 

139 
215 

98 
49 
359 
179 
121 
301 

396 

199 
344 



78 



A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 



Jfumler of 
Picture 



233 
31 



346 
142 

364 

243 

96 



North Frieze of 
Parthenon (Two 
Slabs) 

Notre Dame Cathe- 
dral 

Oaks by Mountaui 

Stream Calame 

Odin Landseer 

Otis, James Blackburn 
Otricoli Zeus 

Oxen Plowing Bonheur 



Parthenon, from 
Northwest 

Parthenon, from 
Southeast 

Peristyle Hall of 
Amenophis III 

Peristyle Hall of 
Ramses II 

Pestalozzi 

Pharaoh's Bed, 
Phite 

Pilgrim Exiles 

Pilgrims Going to 
Church 

Playing Children 

Poets' Corner, West- 
minster Abbey 

Portland Head Light 

Portrait of the Doge 

Portrait of Herself 

Portrait of Himself 

Portrait of a Lady 

Portrait of Morette 

Portrait of Mrs. 
Siddons 

Portrait of a Tailor 

Portrait of a Woman 

Portrait of a Woman 

Portrait of a Youth 

Pot of Basil 

Praying Angel • 

Pres Gisors 

Prescott, W. H. 

Prescott, Col. Will- 
iam 

Presentation in the 
Temple 

Presentation in the 
Temple 

Prince Don Balthazar 

Carlos Velasquez 403 

Prince Ra-Hotep 
and His Wife Ne- 
fert 196 

Princess Frederika 
Sophia Tischbein 352 

Propylsea of Acrop- 
olis _ 222 

Puritans Going to 

Church Boughton 188 





11 




221 




210 




. 207 


Anker 


392 




216 


Boughton 


186 


Boughton 


384 


Rubens 


88 




35 




405 


Bellini 


274 


LeBrun 


339 


Rembrandt 


318 


Lotto 


292 


Holbein 


309 


Gainsborough 


353 


Moroni 


294 


Piombo 


281 


Rembrandt 


322 


Pinturicchio 


270 


Alexander 


153 


Lippi 


57 


Corot 


336 


Richmond 


360 


Story 


256 


Carpaccio 


275 


Ghirlandajo 


264 



Tischbein 



Landseer 



Rembrandt 
Braith 

Boughton 

Troyon 

Picknell 



Pyramids and Sphinx 
(Distant View) 

Queen Louise 

Elamesseum (South- 
west Corner) 

Red Deer at Chil- 
Ungham 

ReUef from Arch of 
Titus 

Rembrandt with 
Saskia 

Return of the Flock 

Return of the May- 
flower 

Return to the Farm 

Road to Concameau 

Rock Tomb of 
Ameny 

Roman Orator 

Rondanini Alexan- 
der 

Room in which 
Shakespeare Was 
Bom 

Ruskin, John 

St. Anthony 

St. Barbara 

St. Barbara (Detail) 

St. John 

St. Joseph and In- 
fant Jesus 

St. Liberale 

St. Mark's Cathe- 
dral 

St. Mary Magda- 
lene 

St. Peter's and Vat- 
ican 

Saskia as a Young 
Woman 

Saskia with a 
Flower 

Saved 

Scanty Meal 

School of Vestals 

Scott 

Shakespeare (From 
Bust) 

Sheepfold 

Sheikh-el-Beled 

Sherman Statue 

Shoeing the Bay 
Mare 

Signing the Declara- 
tion of Independ- 
ence Trumbull 

Singing Angels Van Eyck 

Sir Galahad Watts 

Sisters Benson 

Sistine Madonna Raphael 



yuniber of 
Picture 



351 

208 
138 

247 

320 
120 

187 
115 
159 

203 
246 



Tiepolo 
Giorgione 



Perugino 



Rembrandt 

Rembrandt 

Landseer 

Herring 

Leroux 

Gordon 



Jacque 

St. Gaudens 

Landseer 



240 



45 



Murillo 152 

Palma il Vecchio 73 

Palma il Vecchio 293 

Andrea del Sarto 278 



296 

287 

47 



29 

319 

321 
143 
133 

388 
170 

254 
.107 
197 
391 

134 



192 
300 
149 
370 
67 



ART PUBLISHERS 



79 







Number of 
Picture 






Number of 
Picture 


Sistine Madonna 






Three Graces 


Titian 


290 


(Detail) 


Raphael 


68 


Tower of London 




41 


Sleeping Endynaion 


Guercino 


295 


Treaty with the 






Song of the Lark 


Breton 


394 


Indians 


Millet 


398 


Sons of the Painter 


Rubens 


326 


Triumph of David 


Roselli 


298 


South Porch of 






Twins 


Landseer 


141 


Erechtheum 




13 








Sphinx (Great) 




1 


Valley of the 






Sphinx from Tanis 




198 


Toucques 


Van Marcke 


117 


Spring 


Douglas 


131 


Velletri Athena 




234 


Spring 


Mauve 


80 


Venus of Mile 




21 


Spring Plowing 
Step Pyramid of 
Saqqarah 


Davis 


129 


Victory of Samo- 








201 


thrace 
View of Delft 


Vermeer 


23 
94 


Stormy Day on the 






View of Haarlem 


Ruysdael 


327 


North Sea 


Stacquet 


90 


Ville d'Avray 


Corot 


335 


Stormy Sea 


Ruysdael 


328 


Vintage 


Lhermitte 


340 


Stratford on Avon 




43 


Vision of Saint 






Strawberry Girl 


Re:ynolds 


146 


Bernard 


Lippi 


57 


Sunset 


Corot 


100 








Surrender of Bur- 






Warren, Joseph 


Copley 


365 


goyne 


Tnunbull 


193 


Water Gate 


Van Marcke 


402 


Surrender of Com- 






Washington, George, 






wallis 


Trumbull 


194 


Athenseum Portrait Stuart 


161 


Syndics 


Rembrandt 


87 


Washington, George, 






Syndics, Detail No. 






Lansdowne Por- 






90 


Rembrandt 


317 


trait 


Stuart 


366 


Syndics, Detail No. 






Washington, Martha 


Stuart 


162 


91 


Rembrandt 


316 


Washington Crossing 












the Delaware 


Leutze 


190 


Taj Mahal 




28 


Water Mill 


Hobbema 


807 


Temple at Edfu 




6 


Westminster Abbey 




34 


Temple of Isis, 






White Cow 


Dupre 


103 


Philse 




7 


Willem van Huy- 






Temple of Seti I, 






thuysen 


Hals 


303 


Abydos 




204 


William of Orange 


Van Dyck 


330 


Temple of Seti I, 






William of Orange 






Gurnah 




211 


(Detail) 


Van Dyck 


93 


Temple of Victory 




12 


Winter 


Douglas 


130 


Tennyson 


Arnault 


174 


Wood Gatherers ' 


Corot 


101 


There's No Place 






Wounded Amazon 




236 


Like Home 


Firle 


397 








Theseum 




220 


York Cathedral 




37 


Theseus 




232 


Young Bull 


Potter 


84 


Three Fates 




17 


Young Bull (Detail) 


Potter 


S14 



Index of Artists 



Albanl, Francesco 
Alexander, John W. 
Andrea del Sarto 
Anker, Albert 
Antonella da Messina 
Arnault, M. 

Bachmann, Max 
Bastien-Lepage, Jules 
Bayes, A. W. 
Bellini, Giovanni 
Benozzo Gozzoli 
Benson, Frank W. 
Blackbin-n 

Blashfield, Edwin H. 
Bonheur, Rosa 
Bordone, Paris 
Botticelli, Sandro 
Boughton, Greorge H. 
Bouguereau, W. A. 
Braith, Anton 
Breton, Jules 
Brozik, Vacslav von 

Calame, Alexandre 
Canevari 

Carpaccio, Vittore 
Cazin, Jean Charles 
Constable, John 
Cooper, Colin C. 
Copley, J. S. 
Corot, J. B. C. 
Correggio 
Crivelli, Carlo 
Cm"ran, Charles C. 
Cuyp, Albert 

Daubigny, Charles Franyois 
Davis, H. W. B. 
Delaroche, Paul 
Douglass, Edwin 
Duplessis 
Dupre, Julien 
Diirer, Albrecht 

Earl, Maud 
English, Frank F. 
Eyck, Hubert van 
Eyck, Jan van 

Filippino Lippi 
Firle, Walter 
Fortvmy, Mariano 
Fra Angelico 
Fra Bartolommeo 
Francia, Francesco 
French, Daniel C. 



No. of 
Page 

62 
44 
30, 61 
69 
61 
50 

60, 
68 
54 
29,61 
28 
67 
67 
68 

37, 65 
32 

29, 60 
54, 68 

69 
41 
69 
68 

m 

37 

30, 61 
38 

41,69 
68 
67 

38, 65 

31, 62 
61 
67 
63 

38,65 
42 
69 
42 
47 
38 
66 

42 
44 
63 
63 



69 

66 

28, 60 

61 

61 

52, 68 



Gainsborough, Thomas 
Gentile da Fabriano 
Ghirlandajo, Domenico 
Gilsoul, Victor 
Giotto di Bondone 
Giorgione 

Gordon, Sir John W. 
Gorter, A, M. 
Greuze, Jean B. 
Guercino 

Hackasrt, Jan 
Hals, Franz 
Haueisen 
Herring, J. F. 
Hobbema, Meindert 
Holbein, Hans 
Homer, Winslow 
Hooch, Pieter de 
Hornby, Lester G. 
Houdon, Jean A. 

Inman, Henry 
Inness, George 
Israels, Josef 

Jacque, Charles Emile 
Jank, Angelo 
Johnson, Marshall 

Kaulbach, Hermann 

Landseer, Sir Edwin 
LeBrun, Vigee 
Lely, Sir Peter 
Lenbach, Franz 
Leonardo da Vind 
Lerolle, Henri 
Leroux, Hector 
Leutze, Emanuel 
Lhermitte, Leon A 
Longfellow, Ernest 
Lotto, Lorenzo 
Luini, Bernardino 

Maas, Nicholas 

Maccari, Cesare 

Madrazo, Raymundo D. 

Mantegna, Andrea 

Mauve, Anton 

Melozzo da Forli 

Michael Angelo 

Millet, Frank D. 

MiUet, J. F. 

Morellse, Paul 

Moroni, Giovanni 

Munkacsy, M. 

Murillo, Bartolome Esteban 



No. of 


Page 




66 


28, 


, 60 




60 




68 




28 




62 




49 




34 


39: 


, 65 




62 




63 


34, 


, 63 




41 




42 


34, 


, 63 




63 




44 




63 




45 




60 


66, 


,67 




67 




34 


39, 


,67 




41 




55 




41 




42 


89, 


65 




63 




41 




31 




39 




69 




55 




65 




48 




62 




61 




63 




67 




65 




61 




35 


29, 


60 


26, 


30 




69 


89, 


69 




35 




62 




69 


44.66, 


69 



ART PUBLISHERS 



81 





No. of 




No. of 




Page 




Page 


Nasmyth, Alexander 


49 


Staquet, Henrij 


36 


Norris, Elizabeth 


45 


Story, W. W. 


60 






Stuart, Gilbert 


45. 46, 66, 67 


Page, Walter G. 
Palma il Vecchio 


67 






32, 62 


Tiepolo, Giovanni 


62 


Parker, Edgar 


55 


Tintoretto 


32,62 


Perugino, Pietro 


61 


Tischbein, Johann 


66 


Picknell, William L, 


45 


Titian 


62 


Piero di Cosimo 


60 


Troyon, Constant 


40,65 


Pinturicchio, Bernardino 


61 


Tryon, Dwight W. 


68 


Potter, Paul 


35,64 


Trumbull, John 


46,56 


Praxiteles 


20,59 


Turner, C. Y. 


57 






Turner, J. M. W. 


43 


Raphael Sanzio 


31,61 






Regnault, Henri 
Rembrandt van Ryu 
Reni, Guido 
Renouf, Emile 


40 

35,64 

33 

40 


Valkenbtirg, Henri 
Van Dyck, Anton 
Van Marcke, Emile 


64 

36,64 

40, 65, 70 


Reynolds, Joshua 
Richmond, George 
Roselli, Matteo 
Rubens, Peter Paul 
Ruysdael, Jacob van 


43,69 

66 

62 

36,64 

36,64 


Velasquez, D. R. 
Velde, Willem van de 
Vermeer, Jan 
Veronese, Paolo 
Vischer, Peter 
Volkmann 


70 
64 
37 
32 
26 
41 


St. Gaudens, Augustus 


53,69 


Vos Cornelius de 


65 


Schreyer, Adolphe 


41 






Sebastiano del Piombo 


61 


Walker, J. H. 


43 


Simone di Martino 


60 


Watts, George F. 


43 


Sodoma 


62 


Whistler, James McNdO 


45 



The Art Reader 



THERE exists in the schools an interest, which is 
constantly increasing, in the subject of art, and an 
earnest desire to become familiar with the great 
works in painting, sculpture, and architecture. 

This interest has shown itself in an effort on the part of 
the schools to acquire artistic reproductions of these mas- 
terpieces for the walls of the rooms, both for use as dec- 
orations and for study as objects of instruction. 

To aid in this study some art literature explanatory and 
historical seems necessary, and this Art Reader is pub- 
lished to supply in a measure this need. 

The Art Reader is not a text-book on the history of art, 
but is what its name implies, a reader that may be opened 
at random and read with pleasure and profit. 

"It seems to me a very good idea that the pupils of 
schools while reading for reading's sake should read about 
art and somewhat for art's sake. As the book comes to me 
now, with its handsome illustrations and good printing, and 
I am able to see it in its entirety, it seems worthy of much 
success, and I trust will have it," — Dr. John C. Van Dyke. 

The Art Reader has been prepared by Mr. P. E. Quinn, 
a member of the Parliament in Australia, who is in close 
touch with art education in the schools. 

It contains 167 pages of text, a valuable pronouncing 
vocabulary, and 53 full-page illustrations, all beautifully 
printed on good paper and bound in cloth. 

Price, $1.00 per copy. Teachers' price, 90 cents. 

School boards are requested to write for special quota- 
tions. 

The Art Reader will be sent on receipt of price to any 
one wishing to examine it, and if not desired money will 
be refunded if returned in ten days in good condition. 

A. W. ELSON & COMPANY 

146 OLIVER STREET BOSTON 

April, 1911. 






















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