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University of Iowa 



1896^97 



CATALOGUE 



OP THE 



State U^vcrsity of Jowa 



IOWA OTY. IOWA 



1896 X 97 



AND 



ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1897/96 



PUBUSHBD BY THE UNIYERSITY 

»97 



t 



A 



Calendar for 1897^8. 



1897. 
Jwne 4y Friday . — ^Anniversary of Literary Societies, 8 p. m. 

Examinations, Collegiate Department, end 12 m. 
June 6, Sunday. — Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. m. 
June 7, Monday, — Class Day Exercises. 

Battalion Drill and Dress Parade, 4 P. M. 
June 8t Tuesday. — Alumni Day. 

Alumni Meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alumni Dinner, 6 p. m. 
June 9, Wednesday. — Graduating Exercises, Law Department, 10 ▲. M. 
June iOy Thursday. — Graduating Exercises, Collegiate Department, 10 

A. M. 

September 14, Tuesday. — Examinations for Admission. 

September 75, Wednesday. — Fall Term begins, all Departments. 

November 2$, Thursday. — ^Thanksgiving Holiday. 

December 23 j Thursday. — Fall Term ends. 

1898. 

January 5, Wednesday. — Winter Term begins. 

March 24^ Thursday. — Winter Term ends. 

March 28 ^ Monday. — Graduating Exercises, Dental Department. 

March 2g, Tuesday. — Spring Term begins. 

March ^, Tuesday. — Graduating Exercises, Homoeopathic Medical 

Department. 

March jo, Wednesday. — Graduating Exercises, Medical and Pharmacy 

Departments. 

June J, Friday. — Anniversary of Literary Societies, 8 p. m. 

Examinations, Collegiate Department, end 12 ic. 
June 5, Sunday. — Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. m. 
June 6, Monday. — Class Day Exercises. 

Battalion Drill and Dress Parade, 4 p. m. 
June 7, Tuesday. — Alumni Day. 

Alumni Meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alimmi Dinner, 6 p. m. 
June 8t Wednesday. — Graduating Exercises, Law Department, 10 A. m. 
June 9, Thursday. — Graduating Exercises, Collegiate Department, 10 

A. M. 

3 



43469 



Board of Regents. 



His ExceUem\\ FRANCIS M. DRAKE, Governor 

of the Staff ^ 
Member and President of the Board, ex-Officio. 

C. A. STANTON, Ceniennile. 
SHIRLEY CULLIIJvAND, Glenivood. 
W. R. MONINGER. Calvin, 



Tkrms Kxpirk 1898. 



I 



ALBERT W. SWALM, Oskaloosa. 
J. D. McCLHARY, Indianola, 
J. W. GARNER, Columbus Junction, 
K. W. MAHIN, Clinton. 

ALONZO ABERNETHY, Osage. 
PARKER K. HOLBROOK. Onawa. 
HARVEY INGHAM, Algona. 
CHARLES E. PICKETT, Waterloo. j 

HENRY vSABIN. ) 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. J 



Tkrms Expire 1900. 



Tkrms Expire 1902. 



Member kx-Okficio. 



OFFICERS OF THIE^ BOARD. 

LOVELL SWISHER, Iowa City, Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. HADDOCK, loTva City\ Secretary, 

ALBERT W. SWALM, | 

C. A. STANTON, BvxEcuTivE Committee. 

F. W. MAHIN, 



Members of the Facultiesi 



And Other Officers. 



CHART.KS ASHMKAD SCHAEKFER, A. M., PH. D., hL. D., 
Presidenl. 

Amos No yes Citrrikr, A. M., LL. D., 

Profesaor of I^titi language and Literature, and Dean of the Collegiate 
Facility. 

Phii«o Judson Farnsworth, a. M., M. D., 

Emcritufi Professor of Materia Medica and Diseases of Children in the 
Medical Department. 

John Cuxton Shrader, A. M., M. D., hh, D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

 

WITJJAM DrUMMOND MlDDLKTON, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the Medical Department, 
and Dean of the Medical Faculty. 

Samuel Calvin. A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Cieology. 

WlLMOT HORTON DICKINSON, M. 1)., 

Professsor of Theory and Practice, and Clinical Medicine, and Daan of the 
Homceopathic Medical Faculty. 

Emlin McClain. a. M., hh. D., 

Profe»(or of I^w, and Chancellor of the I^w Department. 

Thomas Huston Macbride, A. M., 

Professor of Botany. 

James Grant Gilchrist, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Surgical Gynecology, and Registrar of the Hom- 
oeopathic Medical Faculty. 

KmIL LOfIS BOKRNER, PH. (i., 

Professor of Practical Pharmacy, and Dean of the Pharmacy Faculty. 

I,AUNCELOT ANDREW'S, PH. D., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Herbert Cogswell, M. I)., 

pTX)fes8or of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children in the Homceopathic 
Medical Department 

George Thomas White Patrick. Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Charles Bundy Wilson, A. M., 

Professor of German Language and Literature, and Secretary of the 
Collegiate Faculty. 

5 



6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Lawrence Wiw^iamJLittig, A. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

Professor of Theory and Practict of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the 
Medical Department. 

Andrew Anderson Vebi*en, A. M., 

Professor of Physics. 

IvAENAS GIFFORD WBLD, A. M.. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles Cleveland Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology. 

James Renwick Guthrie, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Microscopic Anatomy. 

Isaac Althaus Loos, A. M., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Samuel Hayes, M. S., LL. B., 

Professor of Law. 

Joseph Jasper McConnell, A. M., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

Elbert William Rockwood, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. 

Charles S. Chase, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Medical Department. 

George Royal, M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department 

James William Dalbey, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Medical Department. 

Frank John Newberry, M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology and Paedology in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

Walter L. Bierring, M. D., 

Professor of Histology, Bacteriology and Pathology. 

Charles Bkrard Vogdes, ist Lieutenant ist U. S. Infantry. 
Profes.Hor of Military Science and Tactics. 

James A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. B., 

Professor of Law. 

John J. Ney, LL. B., 

Professor of Law. 

William Craig Wilcox, A. M., 

Profeasor of History. 

Frank Thomas Breene, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, and Therapeutics. 

WlLLL^lM S. HOSFORD, A. B., D. D. S., 

Professor of Dental Prothesis, and Secretary of the Dental Faculty. 

Frederic C. L. van Steenderen, a. M.» 

Professor of French Language and Literature. 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTIES AND OTHER OFFICERS. 7 
Alfred Vari«ey Sims, C. E., 

Pxofeasor of Civil Engineering. 

George Armstrong Wauchope, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of English language and Literature. 

Edward P. Seeds, LL. B., 

Professor of Law. 

John Walter Harriman, m. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Martin Joseph Wade, LL. B., 

Professor of Medical Jarisprudence in the Medical Department, and 
Lecturer on Evidence in the Law Department. 

Leona Angeline Call, A. M., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Greek Language and Literature. 

Charles Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistattt Profes.sor of Civil Engineering. 

Joseph W. Rich, 

Librarian. 

BOHUB^L SHIMEK, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Curator of the Herbarium. 

Gilbert L. Houser, M. S., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Henry F. Wickman, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, and .A.<$.si8tant Curator of the Museum. 

J. Allen Gilbert, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Arthiir G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Benjamin F. Shambaugh, A. M., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

La Vega G. Kinne, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Domestic Relations and Taxation. 

Gershom Hyde Hili^ A. B., M. D., 

Lecturer on Insanity. 

Oipford Simeon Robinson, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Appellate Practice and Agency. 

Horace Emerson Deemer, lyL. B., 

Lecturer on Guaranty and Suretyship and the Conducting of Law Business 

Ernest L. Harris, A. M., Ph. D., J. U. D., 

Lecturer on Roman Law. 

CHARLES M. Robertson, a. M.. M. D., 

Lecturer on Rhinology and Laryngology. 

Jambs E. Flsbner, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Orthodontia. 



8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Wu^UAM G. Clark/ D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Porcelain Work in the Dental Department. 

Pauline Kimball Partridge, 

Instructor in Elocution. 

Franklin Hazen Potter, A. M., 

Instructor in Latin. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

George N. Bauer, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Bertha Gilchrist Ridgway, 

Assistant in the General Library. 

William R. Whiteis, B. S., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pathological Histology. 

Harry Grant Plum, A. M., 

Instructor in History. 

Royal Winthrop Baldwin, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

Charles Henry Bowman, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Pedagogy. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, 

Taxidermist. 

Adble Pauline Kimball, M. D., 

Matron in the Homoeopathic Hospital. 

Theodore L. Hazard, M. D., 

Assistant in Materia Medica in the Homoeopathic Medical Department. 

Charles B. Lewis, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department. 

George W. Eshleman, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department. 

Prank B. James, 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department 

John P. Mullin, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

LoxnsE Elizabeth Hughes, a. M., 

Instructor in Latin. 

Fred. D. Merritt, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Carl Treimer, B. Ph.,* 

iBStmctor in German. 



•Died Maith 3, iS97- 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTIES AND OTHER OFFICERS. 9 

Carl Schlbnker, A. B., 
Instructor in Gemiitn. 

Harry EroEXE Keixy, B. Ph., 

Inxtmctor in Bng^lish. 

Deua S. Hutchinson, B. Ph., 

Instructor in French. 

RUSSEI.L T. Hartman, B. S., 

Instructor in Engineering. 

Cari. Leopold Ende, B. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry'. 

Karl D. Jessen, A. B., 
Instructor in German. 

Lester T. Jackson, A. B., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Lri^ B. Jester, Ph. G., 

Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Georgia Knapp, Ph. G., 

Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Leonard C. Rinard, LL. B., 

Law Librarian. 

Fred J. Becker, M. D., 

Assistant in Surgery in the Homoepathic Medical Dcpattaeat. 

Frank Victor Brock, A. B., 

Fellow in Political Science. 

C. H. Van Law, A. B., 

Fellow in Political Science. 

Robert L. McCord, 

Assistant in Geology. 

Alburtus J. Burgs, 

Assistant in Botany. 

Arthur Bailey, 

Assistant in Physics. 

Bernard Darwin Willis, 

Assistant in Physics. 

Mary Emily Barrett, B. Ph., 

Assistant in the General Library. 

Eli Grimes, M. D., 

Assistant in the Pathological laboratory. 

Ralph W. Homan, M. D., 

Assistant in Ophthalmology in the Homoeopathic Medical Departmsnt. 

Samuel Newell Watson, a. M., M. D., 

Assistant in Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Hom«eopathic Medisa 
Department. 

ftAMVEL B. H08KINS, A. B., M. D., 

Hooac Surgeon in the HomoMpathic Hospital. 



State Umvcfsity of Iowa# 



Organization. 



In the year 1840, the Congress of the United States passed an 
act setting apart two townships for the use and support of a Univer- 
sity within the Territory of Iowa, whenever it should become a State. 
The gift was accepted, as set forth in the Constitution of the State, 
and the policy re-affirmed in the amended Constitution of 1857. In 
the latter document it is moreover specifically stated that the "General 
Assembly shall encourage by all suitable means the promotion of 
intellectual, scientific, moral, and agricultural improvement." 

The first General Assembly took action in regard to the location 
of the University, and a Board of Trustees was appointed. Very 
little, however, was accomplished until 1855, when the institution was 
first opened for the reception of pupils. The University was subse- 
quently re-organized, and under tlie new organization re-opened on 
September 19, i860, and this may fairly be regarded as the date of the 
beginning of the existing institution. 

The control of the University is entrusted to a Board of Regents, 
consisting of the Governor of the State and the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, ex-officiiSy and one member from each Con- 
gressional District, who are elected by the General Assembly. 

The University comprises the following departments: 

1. CoLi^BGiATB Department. 

2. Law Department. 

3. Medical Department. 

4. HoMcBOPATHic Medical Department. 

5. Dental Department. 

6. Pharmacy Department. 

10 



Collegiate Department 



Faculty and Instructors. 



Chari^bs Ashmkad Scharpfkr, a. M., Ph. D., hh. D.. 

Prendent. 

Amos No yes Curribr, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature, and Dean of the Faculty. 

Samuel Calvin, A. M,, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

Thomas Huston Macbridk, A. M., 

Professor of Botany. 

Launcblot Andrbws, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

Gborcb Thomas Whitb Patrick, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Charles Bundy Wilson, A, M., 

Professor of German Language and Literature, and Secretary of the 
Faculty. 

Andrew Anderson Veblbn, A. M., 

Professor of Physics. 

IvABNAS GiFFORD WBLD, A, M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Charlbs Clbvbland Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology. 

Isaac Althaus Loos, A. M., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Josbph Jasper McConnell, A. M., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

Charles Bbrard Vogdes, ist Lieut., ist U. S. Infantry., 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

William Craig Wilcox, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

Frxdbric C. L. van Stbenderbn, a. M., 

Professor of Prettch Language and Literature. 

II 



12 STATE UNIVERSITY OK IOWA. 

Ai,KRKD Varlky Sims, C. E., 

Professor of Civil KoRiueering. 

Gkorge Armstrong Wauchope, M. A., Ph. I)., 

Profetisor of Knglinh Language and I^iteraturcr. 

Leon'a Angemne Cali,, a. M., 

Assintant Professor in charge of Greek I^anguajfc and I,iterature. 

Chari,es Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

BoHrMii. Shtmek, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Curator of thr Herbarium. 

Gilbert h. Hoi^ser. M. S.. 

Assistant Professor in charge of Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Henry F. Wickham, M. S., 

A.s.Mstant Professor of Zoolog>-. 

J. Allen Gilbert, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Arthur G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Benjamin Franklin Shambaugh, A. M.. Ph. D.. 

A.ssistant Professor of Political Science. 

Ernest h. Harris, A. M., Ph. D., J. U. I) 

Lecturer on Roman Law. 

Pauline Kimball Partridge., 

Instructor in Elocution. 

Franklin Hazen Potter. A. M., 

Instructor in l^atin. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

George N. Bauer, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Harry Grant Plum, A. M., 

Instructor in History. 

Charles Henry Bowman. B. Ph., 

Instructor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Pedagogy. I 

Louise Euzabeth Hughes, A. M. I 

Instructor in Latin. 

Fred. D. Merritt. B. S., 

I 

Instrucior in Mathematics.  

Carl Treimer, B. Ph.,* j 

Instructor in German. [ 

♦Died March 3, 1S97. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 13 



Carl Schi.enkrr, A. B., 

Instractor in Germiin. 

Harry Eugene Kelly, B. Ph., 

Instructor in English. 

Delia S. Hutchinson, B. Ph., 

Instructor in French. 

Russell T. Hartman, B. S., 

Instructor in Engineering. 

Carl Leopold Ende, B. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lester T. Jackson, A. B., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Karl D. Jesskn, a. B., 

Instructor in (German. 

Frank Victor Brock, A. B., 

Fellow iu Political Science. 

C. II. Van Law, A. B.. 

Fellow in Political Science. 

KOBl£RT L. MCCORD, 

Assistant in Geology. 

ALBURTUS J. BURGE, 

Assistant in Botany. 

Arthur Bailev, 

Assistant in Physics. 

Bernard Darwin Willis, 

Assistant in Physics. 



General Plan* 



The Department embraces four general courses of study,— one^ 
Classical, two Philosopliical, and one General Scientific; and two tech- 
nical courses, — Civil Engineering and Blectrical Engineering. 

By pursuing one or another of the four general courses, and devot- 
ing the time left open for elective studies to some one line, it is 
possible for the student to aiTange a course which, besides furnishing 
the means of a broader culture, will more thoroughly fit him for teach- 
ing some particular specialty, or which may enable him to develop 
his tastes in that particular direction. Thus, for example, a student in 
the course in General Science ma>' at the same time devote himself 
especially to chemistry, or physics, or mathematics and astronomy; a 
student in the Course of Philosophy may also take a special course in 
ancient or modem language, or in history. The members of the Fac- 
ulty will always be glad to advise with students on this subject, and 
¥nll cordially assist them in endeavoring to specialize their work to 
the best advantage. 

Candidates for degrees are required to make an election of one of 
these courses, and will not be allowed, without permission, to change 
the elected course, nor to pursue less or more than three studies at a 
time, except as required by the program. 

Students not candidates for graduation, on complying witli the 
terms of admission, will be allowed to select their studies, under the 
direction of the Faculty. 

Persons over twenty-one years of age not candidates for a degree 
may be admitted to special studies, without examination, at the discre- 
tion of the Faculty. 

Resident Graduates. — Graduates of this or other institutions 
desirous of prosecuting studies not included in their undergraduate 
course may, on consultation with the President, avail themselves of 
such facilities as the department affords. 

14 



Requireflients for Admission^ 



Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class in any of the 
Collegiate courses must be at least sixteen years of age, and must, by 
examination or by presenting acceptable certificates, furnish evidence 
of having completed the preparatory requirements. 

No one will be admitted whose deficiencies exceed the equivalent of 
one study for one year. Candidates having deficiencies not exceeding 
this limit may be admitted upon condition that they compute their 

m 

preparation within the first year after admission. 

It is expected that the following work will be completed in the 
grammar school: Practical Arithmetic, Reading, Pemnanship, 
Orthography, Knglish Grammar, Geography, Book-keeping (single 
entr>'), Physiolog\' (the statutory requirements for primary and 
grammar schools), United States History (three terms' work). Civil 
Government (one term's work), Composition (three terms' work). 
Drawing (three terms' work). 

The work in Book-keeping, Composition, Drawing, and Civil Gov- 
ernment is not to be considered as absolutely required, but only work 
in excess of the amount named in this paragraph will receive credit 
as preparatory work. 

ClirABSICA]; COURSB. 

GROUP I.— ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

z. I^tiii. Grammar, Caesar, ( four books ) , Cicero ( four orations ) , 
Vergil (six books) with Prosody. 

Instead of the prescribed Csesar an equivalent amount of Viri Romae 
or Nepos will be accepted and is recommended to the preparatory 
schools. In this case the remainder of the requirements may be offered 
in Caesar or Cicero. Other eqiuvalents in kind will be accepted for 
any part of the specified requirements. An accurate and ready knowl- 

15 



i6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

§dge of grammtiHetU forms and eonxirudum and a good voeabulary are 
of essential importance. Sight reading should be taught and practiced 
from the first. 

Exercise in writing Latin, based upon the current reading, ought to 
be carried through the entire preparatory course. An amount equiva- 
lent to Collar, Part III. is required for admission. 

Four years of dailj recitation are needed for the required prepara- 
tion. 

The Roman pronunciation is used in the Unirersity. 

9. Greek. Grammar, Xenophon*s Anabasis. As few high schools 
meet this requirement the University for the present will provide means 
for fulfilling it, and an equivalent of three terms* work from Group IV. 
may be offered. 

The preparatory work in Greek should give thorough knowledge of 
grammatical forms, familiarity with the common rules of syntax and 
the ability to write simple Greek prose with correct accents. It is not 
expected that high school pupils under ordinary drcumstanoes will 
be able, in a single year, to cover thoroughly the work required for 
admission. 

GROUP II.— MATHEMATICS. 

3. Algr^bra. The Algebra of the high school should comprise a 
careful study of the following topics: signs and symbols; fundamental 
operations; factoring (including lowest common multiple and highest 
common divisor; fractions; simple and quadratic equations; theory of 
exponents (including negative and fractional exponents and radicals); 
progression. Especial attention should be given to such salient points 
as the significance of the minus sign, factoring, theory* of exponents, 
equations, and the ability to state readily algebraic problems. The 
interpretation of algebraic results with the graphical method of their 
representation should be introduced at the earliest possible stage and 
constantly insisted upon. 

4. Geometry. The "Heuristic*' method in beginning the study 
of geometry is strongly recommended (See Hopkins' Manual of Plane 
Geometry, D. C. Heath & Co., and Spencer's Inventional Geometry, 
D. Appleton & Co. ) 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 17 

Whatever method is used the pupil should be provided with adequate 
drawing instruments and should construct and verify all of his propo- 
sitions and theorems. Geometric processes and results should be 
expressed by algebraic symbols whenever possible. Original investi- 
gations should not simply be encouraged, but should be insisted upon 
as a matter of course. The eminently practical side of the study of 
geometry should not be lost sight of, but the work should be so 
arranged that it may be of the highest disciplinary value. The language 
of all geometrical exercises should be exact. 

Arithmeitc. The work in arithmetic should in general be com- 
pleted in the grammar grades. At least one term's work in arithmetic 
may be done with great profit in the high school after the completion 
of the required work in algebra and geometry. Not only will a general 
view of the subject be found beneficial in itself but the higher point 
of view now attainable may be taken advantage of in many ways which 
it is not necessary to enumerate. 

In the high school not less than one-fourtli of the time for three 
years should be devoted to the work in algebra and geometry. It is 
desirable that the high school work in mathematics be not finished 
until the end of the course, in order that there may be no break in the 
continuity of the work between the high school and the University. 

GROUP III.— ENGLISH AND HISTORY. 

5. ISttSflish Compoeition. All applicants for admisvsion whether 
from accepted schools or not will be examined to test their ability to 
write clear and correct English. The applicant will be required to 
write an essay of not less than two hundred words upon a subject 
chosen by himself from a considerable number set before him. No 
applicant will be accepted who is deficient in spelling, punctuation 
sentence and paragraph structure. 

The tea<^er is reminded that the proper preparation for this part of 
the requirement is constant practice in writing, with careful correction 
and revision of themes. A part of the time should be devoted to the 
fonnal study of rhetoric in any good text-book, such as Genung's 
Outlines of Rhetoric (Ginn), or Scott & Denney's Paragraph Writing 
(Anyn& Bacon). 



i8 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

6. HtkgUBh I/iteratore. Thxioughout the high school course 
much attention should he paid to the study of literature, hy which is 
meant not merely the study of a manual on the history of literature 
but a careful, sympathetic study of literature itself in the writings of 
representative authors. Entire masterpieces suited to the attain- 
ments of the class should form the basis of recitations and an equal 
amount of collateral reading should be assigned and written reports 
required. 

During the last year of the course a good outline history of the liter- 
ature should be used, such as Brooke's Primer of English Literature 
(Macmillan) or Pancoast*s Introduction to English Literature (Holt^. 
This should always, however, be subordinated to the study of the 
texts themselves. In the study of literature the student should be 
stimulated and trained not merely to read and enjoy but to analyze the 
style and to absorb the spirit and substance of an author. 

The applicant will be expected to be familiar with all of the works 
in the following list or with their equivalents: 

For 1897; Shak8pere*s As You Like It, Irving's Tales of a Traveler, 
De Quincey's English Mail Coach, Scott's Marmion, Hawthorne's 
Twice-Told Tales, Longfellow's Evangeline, Foe's Gold Bug, George 
Eliot's Silas Mamer, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Tennyson's Idylls 
of the King, Stevenson's Treasure Island, and Kipling's Jungle Books. 

For 1898; Shakspere's Macbeth, Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. 
and II., The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator, Cole- 
ridge's Ancient Mariner, Carlyle's Essay on Bums, Shelley's Defence 
of Poetry, Stevenson's Viiginibus Puerisque, Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation with America, Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal, Hawthorne's 
The House of the Seven Gables, Poe*s Pall of the House of Usher, De 
Quincey's The Flight of a Tartar Tribe, Thackeray's Henry Esmond, 
Arnold's Culture and Anarchy, and Tennyson's The Princess. 

7. History. At Itast four terms' work should be presented in 
history. The course of study and available text-books should be 
somewhat as follows: first and second terms, History of Greece 
(Oman, Smith, Cox or Myers) and Rome (Allen, Leighton, Smith 
or Myers); third term. History of England (Montgomery or Gardi- 
ner >; fourth term, The History of the United States (Thomas, Piske, 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 19 

Johnson, Montgomery) or Civil Government (Fiske's Civil Govern- 
ment or Andrews* Manual of the Constitution). 

Instead of the first three terms' work in history indicated above, 
whidi is preferred, the University will accept for the present three 
terms* work in general history from one of the following text-books: 
Myers, Fisher, Freeman, or Swinton. 

GROUP IV.— ELECTIVE. 

Three terms' work, and if Greek is not offered six terms' work, 
are to be selected in science or in a modem language. 

8. Science. The subjects are arranged in the order of preference : 
physics, botany, physical geography, physiology, drawing or book- 
keeping, economics, chemistry, astronomy, zoology, geology. 

Credit for entrance will not be allowed on these subjects for less 
than two terms in each, except that one, or one and one half terms, 
may be allowed in botany, physiology, physical geography, and draw- 
ing or book-keeping, and one term in astronomy, geology and eco- 
nomics. In no case should more than two sciences be taken up for 
consecittive study in a single year; and whenever possible three terms 
of consecutive work in one science are advised, especially in physics. 

9. Qeim an. A full year in German may be indicated by Joynes- 
Meissner's German Grammar, Parts I and III, about fifty pages 
selected from Joynes' German Reader, all of Storm's Immensee and 
Gerstaecker's Germelshausen. 

10. French. Van Doell's Introduction to the French Language 
or Edgren's French Grammar, and Van Doell's Introduction to French 
.\iithors or Super's French Reader will be accepted as an equivalent 
of a year's work in French. 

PHIIX>80PHICAI/ A COUR8B. 

The requirements for admission to this course are the same as for 
the classical course, except that Greek is not prescribed. 



ao STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

PHUrOBOPHICAi; B, SCIENTIFIC AND BN6INBBR- 

ING COURSBS. 

The entrance requirements for these courses are in all respects the 
same as for the classical course, except that twelve terms of work from 
Group IV. may be substituted for the prescribed work in ancient lan- 
guages. The Latin preparation, entire, or in part, is however, in all 
cases preferred. Those who desire to offer a substitution for the Latin 
preparation are advised to make the following selection of studies: 
physics, one year; botany, physical geography, physiology, and draw- 
ing or book-keeping, one-half year each. The remaining six terms 
may be selected at the option of the candidates from the other subjedls 
under Group iv; but it is urgently advised that those who do not 
present any Latin for admission should attain some proficiency in at 
least one modem language. 

The following conditions should be observed: 

1. It is strongly advised that preparatory work be confined to 
few subjedts and that they be so chosen that they form two or tliree 
groups of closely related subje<5ts. 

2. Preparatory credit will not be allowed for less than three terms' 
work in any foreign language. 

3. Substitutes of real equivalents not affedtiug the absolute require- 
ments respedHng Latin, mathematics, English, and history, will be 
allowed for the purpose of adapting the University requirements to 
the means and needs of the several preparatory schools. 

4. The shortest time in which this preparation can be accom- 
plished is three years devoted entirely to work of high school grade; 
but it is assumed that, under ordinary' circumstances, four years in the 
high school will be devoted to meet the requirements for admission 
here prescribed. 

ADMISSION BY CSRTIFICATE. 

At a meeting of the Board of Regents in Jime, 1891, the following 
scheme was adopted for the inspection of high schools and for exam- 
ination to be held thereat: 

I. Any school may be placed upon tlie accepted list upon applica- 
tion of its principal or board of directors, provided the Collegiate 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 21 

Faculty of the University is satisfied as to its (a) course of study, (^) 
methods of teaching, (c) facilities for instnuStion. 
2. The coarse of study of such schools must be adapted for fitting 

its graduates for some of the collegiate courses of the University, or it 

must be in the diredi line of such preparation. 

3. Whenever any accepted school in any of the classes requests it, 
its pu|nls may be examined by the University at a convenient time in 
any sabje<ft or subject sele^ed by the school authorities from the 
schedules of studies required for admission to the University, and each 
pupil will receive from the University a credit card for each 8ubje<ft 
passed. 

4. The University shall provide for schools desiring the same, a 
syllabus of each of the subje<^s in which examination is to be taken. 

5. All accepted schools shall be inspe<5ted at the plea.sure of the 
University, the expense of the inspe<5Hon to be borne by the Univer- 
Mty. 

6. The authorities of accepted schools shall report annually to the 
University all changes made in the course of study and submit a list 
of names of the instructors employed in the high school, with subje<^n 
taught by each. 

The work of inspecting high schools has been continued during the 
past year and the lists given below have been made. 

It is to be said in this connection that the University has not been 
able to complete a canvass of the high schools of the State, but from 
such data as it has been possible to colleCl, by correspondence with 
Superintendents, by the examination of courses of study, and by vis- 
itation, the University feels justified in accepting the schools named 
below. There are other schools which are doubtless entitled to places 
on one or other of these lists, but becatise they have not furnished the 
data necessary to enable the University authorities to come to a safe 
oondnsion in regard to their proper places in the lists, or because they 
have not signified a desire to come into accepted relations with the 
University, they are for the present omitted, without prejudice. 
Students from such schools will for the present be received as hereto- 
fore. 
Jt is the intention of the University to continue the work of high 



22 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



school iiispcdlion until the position of every school which desires to 
come into accepted relations shall be definitely determined. 

All candidates for admission to the Freshman class, who come from 
accepted schools, or partially accepted schools, must furnish to the 
University certificates containing specific staUmtnts as to the amount 
of work done in each study. Blanks will be furnished for such certifi- 
cates upon application to the President, and should be returned 
by September ist. 



Accepted Schools. 



Adel, 

Albia, 

Ames, 

Anamosa, 

Atlantic, 

Belle Plaine, 

Boone, 

Burlington, 

Carroll, 

Cedar Falls, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Centerville, 

Charles City, 

Clarinda, 

Clinton, 

Columbus Junction, 

Coming, 

Council Bluffs, 

Creston, 

Davenport, 

Decorah, 

E. Des Moines, 

N. Des Moines, 

W. Des Moines, 

Dubuque, 

Eatherville, 

Fiirfitiid, 



Greene, 

Greenfield, 

Guthrie County. 

Hampton, 

Harlan, 

Independence, 

Iowa City, 

Iowa Falls, 

Knozville, 

Keokuk, 

LeMars, 

Leon, 

Manchester, 

Maquoketa, 

Marengo, 

Marion, 

Marshall town. 

Mason City, 

McGregor, 

Missouri Valley, 

Moline, 111., 

Monteziuna, 

Mt. Ayr, 

Mt. Pleasant, 

Muscatine, 

New Hampton, 

Newton, 



Red Oak, 

Rock Rapids, 

Sanborn, 

Sheldon, 

Shenandoah, 

Sibley, 

Sigoumey, 

Sioux City, 

Spencer, 

Springdale, 

Storm I^ke, 

Stuart, 

TaylorvilleTp.. Taylor- 

ville. 111., 
Villisca, 
Vinton, 
Washington, 
E. Waterloo, 
W. Waterioo, 
Waukon, 
Waverly, 
Webster City, 
Williamsburg, [School. 
Calhoun County Normal 
Charles City College, 
Denison Normal School, 
Iowa City Academy, 



COi,l.EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



23 



Fort Dodge, 
Fort Madison, 
Geneaeo, 111., 
Glenwood, 
Glidden, 



Oelwein, 
Osceola, 
Oskaloosa, 
Ottumwa, 



Washington Academy, 
Whittier College, 
Wilton German-Eng- 
lish College, 
Woodbine Normal School 



Parkersburg, 

The following schools are accepted as making full preparation for 
all non-Latin courses: 



Cresco, 
Denison, 
Forest Citv, 



Grundy Center, 

Kcosauqua, 

Odebolt, 



Sioux Rapids, 
Victor. 



The work done in the schools named below is regarded as of sufficient 
merit to entitle them to recognition by the University. 

Properly certified work from these schools will therefore be receive«l 
so far as this work meets the preparatory requirements of the Univer- 
sity. 



Adair, 


Dysart, 


North wood, 


Algona 


Eagle Grove, 


Reinbeck, 


Allerton, 


Elkader, 


Riceville, 


Anita, 


Ezixa, 


Sabnla, 


Andnbon, 


Payette, 


Sac City, 


Avoca, 


Hamburg, 


Shelby, 


Brighton, 


Hubbard, 


Shell Rock, 


Britt, 


Jefferson, 


Springrille, 


Charter Oak, 


Kingsley, 


State Center, 


Clarence, 


Lake Mills, 


Tama City. 


Clarion, 


Mechanicsville, 


Traer, 


Clearfield, 


Milton, 


Wapello, 


aearLake, 


Morning Sun, 


West Union, 


Corydon, 


Moulton, 


Wilton Junction. 


DeWitt, 


NeoU, 





Advanced Standing. Graduates from the four years* course of 
the State Normal School will be admitted to Junior standing without 
examination, and graduates of the three years' course to the Sopho- 
more daas, but with an assignment of studies according to the discre- 
tioa of the Faculty. Students from approved colleges bringing cer- 



24 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

tificates of work and standing will be admitted without examination, 
except to determine their position in the University. 

In the case of colleges where the requirements for admission are 
substantially those of the University, students will ordinarily be ad- 
mitted to the same rank if they enter not later than the opening of 
the Senior year. In every instance, at least one full year's work must 
be completed in the Collegiate Department of the University. The 
assignment of studies shall be at the discretion of the Faculty. 



Undergraduate Courses. 



CI/ASSICAI^ COURSE. 

PresHman Year. fai«l. winter. spring < 

Greek 5 liours a week 5 5 

I^atin 4 4 4 

Bngliah 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 

Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 

Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

French or German 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Elective 8 8 8 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Jtuiior Tear. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military DriU 3 i 3 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 25 

Senior Tear. fai,i<. winter spring. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 1 3 

Condition : — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in thi« 
course. 

FHII/OSOPHICAI, COUR8B A. 



FAI.1,. winter. sprw^g. 

German or French 5 5 5 

Latin 4 4 4 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 

Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 

Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

French or German 3 3 3 

Latin, German, or French 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Elective 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Jmilor Tear. 

Philosophy 2 or 3 2 or 3 2 or 3 

Elective 12 or 13 12 or 13 12 or 13 

Military Drill 3 i 3 



Elective 15 15 15 

Militaiy Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in this 
conne. 



26 STATE TNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

PHII/080PHICAI< COURSE B. 

Freshmaii Year. kai^i,. winter. spring. 

German 5 5 5 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 
Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 
Ancient Histor>' 2 2 2 

MiUUry Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

German 3 3 3 

English 2 2 2 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

Elective 5 5 5 

MiKtary Drill 3 i 3 

Junior Tear. 

Elective 15 15 '5 

MilitaryDrill 3 i 3 

Senior Tear. 

Elective 15 15 15 

MilitaryDrill 3 i 3 

Condition: — Three terms of material science are required during 
the course. In the Junior and Senior years, a major ^ the equivalent 
of not less than three hours, extending through two years, and a kin- 
dred minor of not less than three hours, extending through one year, 
must be taken. Each student may select his own major, but in the 
selection of his minor he must seek the advice of the professor in 
charge of the major, or of a committee of the Faculty. Students enter- 
ing this course on the terms prescribed for admission to the Scientific 
Course but without tlie full Latin requirements for entrance to Course 
Philosophical A, must complete them after entrance, and the Univer- 
sity will temporarily provide for instruction in Csesar, Cicero*s Ora- 
tions and Vergil. This provision is made solely in the interest of oon- 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 27 

siderablc niiinhers of high school graduates whose course has not 
furnished the opportunity for fulfilling these requirements. 



6SNBRAI/ SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Preslunan Year. i-xhh. winter. sprinc,. 

German or French 5 5 5 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

History or Drawing 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

German or French 5 or 3 5 or 3 5 or 3 

English 2 2 2 

w»y»cs 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy, Geology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics, or Astron- 
omy 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Junior Tear. 

German or French. ... 3 or 5 3 or 5 3 or 5 

Chemistry 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy, or Geology 5 5 5 

Elective 30^5 3 or 5 3 or 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 



Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

No substitution whatever is allowed for any of the required work of 
the Scientific Conrse, except that an equivalent amount of Latin of 
collegiate grade may be offered in place of the full requirement in 
either one of the modem languages. 



28 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

SPBCIAi; COUR8S8 IN SCIBNCIS. 

Tlie student who wishes, in his undergraduate course, to specialize 
in some particular line of scientific study, should at the beginning 
of the Sophomore year choose from the group of alternate electives 
then open to him ( Botany, Morphology, Geologj-, Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy) that subject most directly connected with the 
branch to which he wishes to give special attention. He will thus be 
able to pursue his chosen study without interruption through three 
years of his course, the last year of which may, if he so choose, be 
devoted entirely to his specialty. 

Such extreme specialization is not recommended to undergraduate 
students, it being the opinion of the Collegiate Faculty that a better 
preparation for a scientific career will be afforded by a broader and 
more liberal course of study. However, those wishing to specialize in 
any branch of science are urged to confer freely with the professors 
with whom they expect to pursue such study. 

Unless excused by the Faculty, each student pursuing a special 
course in Science will be required in his Senior year to prepare a thesis 
upon some subject approved by the professor in charge of his specialty, 
such thesis to represent an amount of work entitling the writer to at 
least two credits. 

Combined Scientific and Medical Coarse. 

1 . Students who pursue the General Scientific Course and complete 
not leas than two years of biologic science, who in the third year elect 
as one elective Anatomy and Dissection in the Medical Department, 
and in the fourth year two electives in the Medical Department, of 
which Anatomy and Physiology shall be one, may receive credit for 
the first two years of the regular course in Medicine, provided also 
that such students complete at least two electives in the Collegiate 
Department in the spring terms of the fifth and sixth years. 

2. Students who at the outset declare their intention of pursuing a 
combined Collegiate and Medical Course, may in the General Scientific 
Course offer instead of German, two years' work in Latin. 

3. The degree of B. S. shall be conferred in June of the sixth year. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 29 

COIJR8B IN CIVIL 19NOINSBRING. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Jui// Tenn. — French or Gennan, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 
Drawing, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Surveying, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SOPHOMORK YKAR. 

Fall Tenn. — (^fnnan or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Sur\'eying, 
5. Physics, 5. Militar>' Drill, 3. 

Winter Tenn. — German or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geomctr)*, 2. Mapping, 3. Physics, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Tenn. — German or English, 3. Matheiaatics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geometrj*, 2. Topographical Surve}-ing, 3. Physics, 5. Mili- 
tar\- Drill. 3. 

JL'NIOR YKAR. 

Fail Tenn. — Electricity and Magnetism, 5. Analytical Mechanics, 

2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 3. Railroad Curves, 3. 
Steam Engine, 2. Military' Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Dynamo and Motor, 3. Civil Engineering, 2, 
AnaU-tical Mechanics, 2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 

3. Theorx- of Stresses, 3. Limes and Cements, 2. Military Drill, i. 
Spring Tenn. — Tlienno<lynamics, 3. Civil Engineering, 2. Hydrau- 
lics. 5. Graphical Statics, 3. Theory of Stresses, 5. Military' Drill, 3. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Chemistry, 4. Sanitar}' Engineering, 2. Structural 
Drawing and Designing, 4. Geology, 5. Civil Engineering, 4. Mili- 
tary Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Chemistry, 4. Sanitar}- Engineering, 2. Struct- 
ural Designing, 3. Resistance of Materials, 2. Geology, 4. Civil 
Engineering, 3. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — ^Watcr Supply Engineering, 3. Specifications and 
Contracts, 3. Geology, 4. Civil Engineering, 3. Structural Design- 
ingi 3- Thesis. Military- Drill, 3. 



30 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

COURSIS IN BI^BCTRICAI, BNOINBBRING. 

PRBSHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 
Drawing, 5. Military Drill. 3. 

Winter Term. — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — German or French, 5. Mathematics. 5. English, 
2. Draughting, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SOPHOMORB YKAR. 

Fall Term. — French or German. 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
English, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Tertn. — French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 
5. English, 2. Militar)^ Drill, i. 

.^j^/w^ 7>f7//.— French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
English. 2. Military Drill, 3. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Physics, lectures, i, laboratory, 4. Chemistrj-, 5 
Analytical Mechanics. 3. Applie<i Mechanics, 2. Shop- work, 2 
Militar>' Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Physics, lectures, i, laboratory, 4. Chemistry, 5 
Analytical Mechanics, 2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Shop-work, 2 
Militar>lDrill, i. 

Spring Term. — Direct Current Dynamo, 3. Physical Laboratory, 2 
Chemistry, 5. Differential Equations, 3. Heat and Tliermo-Dynamics 
2. Shop-work, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Theory of Electricity, Photometry; Electrical Labora- 
tory, 10. Draughting, 3. Steam Engine, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — Alternate Current Machinery , Electrical Laboratorj-, 
10. Draughting, 3. Strength of Materials, 2. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — Distribution and Transmission of Electricity, Tele- 
graph and Telephone Electrical Laboratory, 10. Electro-Chemistry, 
5. Military Drill, 3. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 31 

Note. — One year of German and one of French are required. 
Either may be taken during the Freshman year, to be succeeded by 
the other in the Sophomore year. Electro-chemistry, being given 
only during even-numbered years, will alternate with the Junior 
spring terra chemistry' ever>^ other year. 

BACCAI/AURBATIE BDB6RBB8. 

For each of the courses of study leading to a degree four years' 
work is required. 

On completion of the regular courses, or of tlie special courses 
approved by the Faculty, the following degrees are conferred: 

Bachbix>R of Arts upon those who complete the Classical Course. 

Bacuei,or of Phii^osophv upon those who complete the Philo- 
sophical Course. 

Bachbi«or of Science upon those who complete the General 
Scientific Course, or either of the Engineering Courses, or a special 
course in science which lias previously been approved by the Faculty. 

The degree of Bachei«or op Didactics is conferred upon gradu- 
ates in the regular courses who have completed the course in Pedagogy 
and can show proof of two years' successful teaching after graduation. 



Courses of Instruction^ 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND UTERATURE. 



Professor Currier, Mr. Potter and Miss Hughes. 

z. Csesar, Cicero and Vergil. Csesar, Cicero*s Orations and 
Vergil's Aeneid. For students in Course Philosophical B. as indicated 
on page 26. Miss Hughes. 

Throughout the year. 

a. l^ivy, Cicero and Terence. Fall: Livy, Selections from 
nooks I., XXI. and XXII. Winter: Cicero*s De Senectute and De 
Amicitia, with outline of Roman Literature. Spring: Terence*s 
Phormio and Cicero's Letters. Grammar, writing Latin and sight 
reading during the year. Those who show marked proficiency in 
writing Latin during the fall term are allowed an option of easy Latin 
to be read under the direction of the instructor during the winter and 
spring terms. Mr. PoTTER and Miss HuGHES. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Tu., Wed. and Th., at 10, 1 1 and 2:30. 

3* Cicero and Horace. Fall: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations. 
Winter and spring: Horace's Odes, Satires and Epistles. This course 
is mainly occupied with the literary side of the authors studied. 
Professor CURRIBR. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed. and Fri. at 9. 

4. Pliny and Tacitna. Selected Letters of Pliny. Tacitus' 
C^nnaniaand Agricola. This course is principally literary and histor- 
ical. As much attention is given to the Latinity of the Silver Age as 
is needful for the understanding and appreciation of the authors. Mr. 

Potter. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Th. at 9. 

32 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 33 

5. Cicero, f^ointiliatt and Tacitus. Pall: Cicero's De Oratore. 
Winter: Quintiliaii, Books X. and XII. Spring: Tacitus* De Orator- 
ibos. Particular attention will be paid to literary criticism as exemplified 
in these authors. Professor CURRIBR. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Th., at 8. 

6. Tacittia and Seneca. Fall and winter: Tacitus, selections 
from the Annals and Histories. Spring: Seneca's Morals and Letters. 
Professor CURRiBit. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Th. at 8. 
Courses 5 and 6 are given in alternate years. 

7. Plantus. Three plays. The treatment is mainly literary but 
with due attention to metres and ante-classical forms and construc- 
tions. Mr. P0TT8IL 

Pall term, three hours. 

8. Barly I^atin Inscriptions and Poetry. .The course will be 
based upon Merry's Fragments of Early Roman Poetry and the Corpus 
Inscriptionum Latinarum. One play of Terence will be read to the 
class by the instructor. Mr. Potter. 

Pall term, three hours a week. 

Courses 7 and 8 are given in alternate years. 

9. ^ncretiua and Catnllns. Mr. Pottbr. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 

10. Cicero's letters. The selections will be such as to show 
Cicero in the character of a private gentleman rather than as a poli- 
tician. Mr. Potter. 

Winter term, three hours a week. 

Courses 9 and 10 are given in alternate years. 

zx. Jnvenal and Persins. Mr. Potter. 
Spring term, two hours a week. 

za« Martial. Studied as a picture of life and manners. Mr. 

Potter. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

Courses 11 and 12 are given in alternate years. 

13. Seminary in Cflcsar, Cicero and Vergil. This is in- 
tended to meet the needs of prospe<5tive Latin teachers and others who 



54 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

wish to gain some familiarity with the methods of original research. 
The fall term is devoted to syntactical and historical studies covering 
Caesar's Gallic War (seven books). The work of the winter term is 
mainly historical, and deals with Cicero's career as an orator with the 
particular study of six orations. One-half of the term is devoted to a 
study of the conspiracy of Catiline which is based largely on Sallust. 
Vergil's Aeneid complete is studied in the spring term mainly on the 
literary side. Mr. PoTTER. 

14. a. History of Roman Xriterature. The course will be 
given by lectures with assigned readings in Teuffel, Cruttwell, Sellar, 
Simcox and the standard monographs. Pall term, two hours a week. 

b, I/atin Syntax. Introduction to the study of historical syntax. 
Winter term, two hours a week. 

c. I^atin Composition. Advanced course. This course consists 
of a study of the descriptive, narrative and oratorical styles of some of 
the leading Latin writers through attempts at imitation. Spring term, 
two hours a week. Mr. Potter. 

Courses 13 and 14 are given in alternate years. 

15. Roman Antiquities. A systematic study of private life and 
of legal and political Antiquities. Professor Currier. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week at 2:30. 

i6. Seminary in Archeeolos^. For 1897-8 the subject will be 
the Topography and Archaeology of Rome and the vicinity. 

17. Cicero, I/ivy and Ovid. Sight reading of suitable selections. 
Professor CuRRiBR. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. 

18. Teachers' Course. Methods. Professor Currier. 
Spring term, two hours a week. 

Courses 5 and 6 are open to students who have completed Courses 2 
and 3 or 4 and must precede the other courses offered. Course 16 is 
intended for graduate students, and Courses 10—18 are open to them. 



COIXBGIATB DEPARTMENT. 35 



CSEEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Assistant Profbssor Cai«i«. 

For the present a course in Goodwin's Greek Grammar, White's 
First Greek Book and Xenophon's Anabasis will be given to students 
who enter without the required preparation in Greek. 

Throughout the year, daily at ii. 

z. Xenophon, I^ysias and Homer. Fall: Xenophon's Ana- 
basis with written exercises based on the text read, and review of gram- 
mar. Winter: select orations of Lysias, social customs and political 
institutions. Spring: Homer's Iliad with study of Homeric times 
and the history and character of Greek epic poetry. 

Throughout the year, daily at lo. 

9. Herodotiuiy Plato and Demosthenes. Pall: selections 
from Herodotus. Winter: Plato's Apology with sight reading from 
Xenophon's Memorabilia. Spring: Demosthenes' Oration on the 
Crown. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 9. 

3. Greek Tragedy^ Pall: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound. 
Winter: Sophocles' Antigone. Spring: Euripides' Alcestis. With 
this course are required supplementary readings from other tragedies 
and reports on the origin, literary form, and representation of Greek 
tragedy. 

Throughout the year, Mon. Wed., Fri., at 8. 

4« Irate Oreek. Fall: New Testament. Winter: Plutarch's 
Pericles. Spring: Sudan's Dialogues. 
Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

5. Greek Poetry. A course in Greek poetry through translations 
will be given to students who have no knowledge of Greek. Fall: 
epic poetry. Winter: dramatic poetry. Spring: epic and lyric 
poetry. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 8. 

Course i is required of students in the classical course. Courses 2, 3 
^d 4 are open to students who have completed Course i. 



36 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Professor Wii^on; Mr. Sturm, Mr. Schlenkbr. 

In the instruction in the German language the first year is spent in 
laying a broad foundation for the future -work. At the beginning of 
the second year it is expected that the student yrill be able to read the 
literature with some degree of appreciation, and from tliis time on the 
ability to understand and to appreciate the great masterpieces of Ger- 
man literature is the main object in view; at the same time, however, 
the origin and history of words, and the relation that the German 
language bears to the English tongue are studied and explained. But 
the courses are, as a whole, literary rather than strictly philological or 
linguistic. Sight-translation, translating at hearing, writing from dic- 
tation, and conversation, as means to a proper Sprachgefuehl^ form a 
part of the work. 

As stated elsewhere, an equivalent of the work required in the Fresh- 
man year. Course i, will be accepted, and students coming so prepared 
will be admitted, on examination, to Course 2. Course i, represents 
from four to six terms of ordinary high school work. Courses i, 2, 3, 
and 4, are Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior respectively and 
must be taken in the order of the numerals. Courses 5, and 6. are 
advanced courses, but may be open to persons who have done at least 
I and 3, or an equivalent. Course 7 is a special course and is 
intended primarily for scientific students; it must be preceded by at 
least one full year's work. 

z. Grammar and Reading. Thomas's Practical German Gram- 
mar with constant practice in writing German, Storm's Inimensee, 
Hillem's Hoeher als die Kirche, and Heyse's L'Arrabbiata. Six sec- 
tions. Mr. Sturm and Mr. Schi«snker. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

2. Preytag, Ooethe and Schiller. Fall: FreyUg's Die Jour- 
nalisten with a review of the grammar. Winter: Goethe's Hermann 
und Dorothea, and composition. Spring: it is expected that students 
in the scientific courses will take during this term Scientific German, 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 37 

Course 7, instead of the regular literary work. The reg^ular literar>' 
course is as follows: Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans, and composi- 
tion. Four sections. Professor Wn^sON and Mr. Schi^bnk^r. 
Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

3. German Authors of the Nineteenth Century and Ger- 
man Iryrlcs. Fall: Scheffers Ekkehard ( 1896-97) and readings in 
German on the literature of the nineteenth century. Winter: Heine's 
Prose, and readings from Heine's Poetry by the instructor. Spring: 
Bnckheim's Deutsche Lyrik, and lectures on German verse with special 
reference to the lyric poets studied. The work of this term is intended 
to give a general idea of the historical development of the German 
lyric from the sixteenth century to the present. Professor Wii«son. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed. Fri., at 11. 

4. Goethe, I^esaing and History of German I^iterature. 
Fall: Goethe's Faust, Part i, with an outline of Part 11. Winter: 
Lessing's Nathan der Weise. Spring: outline course in the history 
of German literature. This course gives a general view of the develop- 
ment of German literature from the earliest times to the nineteenth 
century, special attention being paid to the two classic periods of the 
twelfth and eighteenth centuries. Egelhaaf's Deutsche Litteraturge- 
schicfate is used as a chronological guide, which is supplemented by 
reports on assigned reading. Professor Wilson. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11. 

5» German Seminary. For the study and discussion of the 
works of special periods or of special movements. The Faust Books, 
Marlowe's Faustus and Goethe's Faust were the subjects in 1896-97. 
This course is primarily for graduate and advanced students. Admis- 
sion by personal application. The course counts as a half credit each 
tenn. Professor W113ON. 

Throughout the year, Tu., at 2:30. 

6. Middle Hi^^h German* Fall: Otis's Introduction to Middle 
High German, including the selections from the Nibelungen lied, and 
Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik. Winter: selections from 
Hartmann von Aue's Der anne Heinrich. Spring: Middle High 
German lyric poetry, principally the poems of Walther von der Vogel- 



38 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

weide. This course is primarily for graduate and advanced students, 
especially those who expect to teach German. Professor Wii^SON. 
Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at lo. 

7. Scientific German. This course is designed especially for 
students who wish to acquire a scientific vocabulary and some facility 
in reading technical writings. Brandt and Day's German Scientific 
Reading is used as a text-book. Applicants must have completed 
Course i or an equivalent. Mr. Sturm. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

As a branch of the German department of the University library a 
special German library has been founded and it is hoped this collection 
may be extended. There are already several hundred volumes on the 
shelves in the alcove set aside for this purpose in the general library. 
The donors have been chiefly, though not exclusively, German- Amer- 
icans of Iowa. 



FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Propsssor Van Stbendsrkn; Miss Hutchinson. 

z. Blenientary French. Grammar, reading, composition and 
conversation; Bevier's French Grammar, Van DaelPs French Reader, 
Erckmann-Chatrian's Le Conscrit de 1813, HaUvy's I^'Abb^ Con- 
stantin, Herdler's Scientific Reader, M^thode Berlitz, Part i. Miss 
Hutchinson. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

a. French Composition. Written and spoken composition: 
Grandgent*s French Composition and Part 11. of M^thode Berlitz. 
Professor Van Stebndkren. 

Fall term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

Intermediate French. Reading and composition: Bowen's 
French Lyrics, 0'Conner*s Choiz de Contes Contemporains, M^ri- 
m^e's Lettres k une Inconnue, Victor Hugo's Hemani, Alphonae 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 39 

Daadet's Le Nabob, Grandgent's Composition continued. Professor 

Van STBBNDBRB27. 

Winter and spring terms, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 
Courses 2 and 3 are to be taken in succession. 

4. Prencli Classical Drama. Comeille's Horace, Cinna and 
Le Cid, Racine*s Athalie and Ephig^nie, Molifere's L'Avare, Le Tar- 
tufe and Les Pemmes Savantes. Professor Van Stbbnderkn. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11. 

5. Modem French Authors. Each student reads and para- 
phrases about five representative works of different authors. The 
University library provides these works. Text books: Fortier's Sept 
Grands Auteurs du XIX* SiMe and Mell^'s Contemporary French 
Writers. Professor Van Stssndbrbn. 

Fall and winter terms, Mon., Wed., at 8. 

6. Advanced French and Composition. Victor Hugo's 
Les Travailleurs de la Mer. Free composition on subje<Sls assigned. 
Professsor Van Stkvndbrbn. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., at 8. 

Courses 5 and 6 are to be taken in succession. 

7. History of French I^iterature. Lectures in the French 
language. Text-books: Duval's Litterature Prancaise, Montaigne's 
De r Institution des Bnfans. Professor Van Stskndkrbn. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 10. 

8. Seminary. Nineteenth century French literature. Professor 
Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Throughout the year. Wed., at 2:50. 

9. Spanish. Bdgren's Spanish Grammar, Matzke's First Spanish 
Readings. Professor Van Stbendbrbn. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

Courses 2, 3 and 4 or 2, 3 and 5, 6 may be taken together. Also 5, 
6 and 7 or 8, but both 7 and 8 must be preceded by 2, 3. Course 9 
must be taken with or after Course i. 



40 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Professor Wauchopb; Mr. Cook and Mr. Kbi.i«by. 

The organization of the following courses has in view the study of 
English as (i) a means of expression ^ (2) a literature^ (5) a language. 

Group ( I ) consists of courses in rhetoric and theme-writing. Here 
the chief aim is by constant practice and sharp but kindly criticism to 
enable the student to form a clear, forcible and artistic style. He is 
at the same time, by constant work in the librar>% made familiar with 
the best modem stylists, and is trained in methods of criticism and 
interpretation. 

Group (2) embraces a sympathetic and critical study of our litera- 
ture as an expression in artistic form of the mind of a great people. 
An outline sketch is given in the Sophomore year, and this is followed 
in the Junior and Senior years by the broader and deeper study of 
special periods, and an insight is gained into the currents of thought 
and feeling of a particular age. Here the literature is treated as a fine 
art including not merely an appeal to the feelings through beauty of 
form but also embod3dng a philosophy of life. In both groups the 
idea is constantly kept in view that the study of English, in addition 
to its intellectual value, is a powerful means of spiritual culture, and 
to this end the artistic and ethical teachings of our great writers are 
emphasized. 

In Group (3) the subject is considered from its philological side. 
The language is studied historically as an organic growth, its struc- 
sure, phonology and et3anology are examined, and specimens of the 
prose and the poetry of the Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods 
are read. A knowledge of French and German will be of the greatest 
value to students taking these courses. 

Candidates for all baccalaureate degrees are reqtdred to complete 
two years of English, that is six terms of two lectures a week. 
Freshmen will take Course i, and Sophomores Course 4. Those who 
are preparing to teach English should take at least the fall term of 
Course 12 in addition to some of the elective courses in literature. 
Law students wishing to take work in English will find Coune 10 
especially helpful. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 41 

(l) RHETORIC. 

• 

i« Slictoric and Compositioti. Lectures. Semi-weekly themes 
with written and oral criticism; Wendell's English Composition, 
Hill's Principles of Rhetoric, and library work. Five sections. Re- 
qnired of Freshmen. Professor Wauchope, Mr. Cook and Mr. 
KBI.LY. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

a. Advanced Compositioii. Lectures. Wendell's English Com- 
position, and suggestive works on style. Tri-weekly and fortnightly 
themes. Opon to those only who have attained Grade A in Course i, 
and who wish to refine and strengthen the prose style acquired in 
that conxBe. Mr. Cook. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

3. Versificatioii. Practice in metrical composition in the fixed 
forms of verse such as the heroic couplet, blank verse, Spenserian 
stanza, ode, rondeau, sonnet, ballad and song. Analysis of the best ex- 
amples of these forms in English poetry. Informal discussion of 
artistic questions. Open to those who have had Course 2. Mr. Cook. 
Spring term, two hours a week: 

(2) ENGI,ISH UTERATURB. 

4. Vx&fflittli Uteratnre. General survey from Chaucer to 
Tennyson. Lectures. Study of masterpieces in prose and poetry; 
recitations, essays, and reports on collateral work in the library. Four 
sectioas. Required of Sophomores. Professor Wauchope, Mr. 
Cook and Mr. e:bzj«y. 

Two honrs a week throughout the year. 

5. Chaucer's Poetry. A study in fourteenth century art. Open 
to those who have had the training of Course 4 in Chaucer's grammar 
and pronunciation. Lectures; Skeat's The Student's Chaucer. Mr. 
Cook. 

Spring term, two honrs a week. 

6. The Bn^Uah Novel. Conducted on the seminary plan with 
weekly papers, reports and discussions. Pall term: Seventeenth 
oe ntnrj romanoe, Swift, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett and 
Sterne. Winter term: The romantic revival, novels of domestic life, 



42 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Austen, Scott, Dickens, Tliackeray, George Eliot, Poe and Hawthorne. 
Spring temi: Stevenson, Du Maurier, and some of the more promi- 
nent living writers of fiction. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 
Professor Wauchope. 
Two hours on Monday afternoon throughout the year. 

7. Shakspere and Hia Pellow-Playwriflrhta. A critical study 
of dramatic art. Lectures, reading of plays, reports. Preytag*s 
Technique of the Drama, Moulton*s Shakspere as a Dramatic Artist, 
any standard edition of Shakspere, and (in the library) the Mermaid 
series. Junior and Senior elective. Mr. Cook. 

Fall and winter terms, Tu. and Th. at 11. 

8. English I/iterature of the Eighteenth Century. Semi- 
nary plan of study; lectures, reports, discussions; assigned readings of 
masterpieces and standard criticism. Junior and Senior elective. 
Alternate years; to be given in 1897-98. Mr. Kbi«i,y. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

9. EngUsh I/iterature of the Nineteenth Century. A 

critical study of the literary art of the century through its representa- 
tive poets, essayists and novelists. Lectures, recitations and reports. 
Fall term: The romantic movement; Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley, Keats, Lamb, Hazlitt and Leigh Hunt. Winter tenn: De 
Quincey, Landor, Macaulay, Carlyle, Scott, Dickens, and Thackeray; 
the relation of the novel to literature and life. Spring term: George 
Eliot, Stevenson, Ruskin, Arnold, Tennyson and Browning; recent 
phases of poetry and fiction. Junior and Senior elective. Professor 
Wauchopb. 
Throughout the year, Tu. and Th. at 10. 

zo. iSaaajdata and Orators. A study in prose. Lectures and 
recitations. Fall term: A critical study of Macaulay, Carlyle and 
De Quincey in respect to style and substance. Winter term: A 
critical study of Burke as stylist, debater, and orator, with such ref- 
erence to his political philosophy and to contemporaneous history as 
is necessary to a clear understanding of his importance in political 
literature. Spring term: A critical study of Emerson and Webster. 
Junior and Senior elective. Mr. Kki«i«y. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 43 

xz. American Xriteratnre. Lectures, recitations, reports, and 
assigned readings of masterpieces and standard criticism. General 
survey of both poetry and prose, including political literature and 
oratory. Junior and Senior elective. Alternate years; not to be given 
in 1897-8. Mr. Kbi.i«y. 

Two hours a week throughout the year. 

(3) SNGUSH I«ANGUAG£. 

za. History of the Bnglish l^angnage. Lectures with maps 
and charts, on the relation of English to the Aryan family of lan- 
guages, the Anglo-Saxon literature, the early English dialects, the lin- 
guistic effects of the various invasions of England, the native vocabu- 
lary and the loan elements, and the history of inflections. Louns- 
bnry*s History of the English Language, and Sweet's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader. The study of Anglo-Saxon is begun in this class. This 
course is especially recommended to all students wishing to become 
teachefs of English. Sophomore, Junior and Senior elective. Pro- 
fessor Wauchops. 

Throughout the year, Wed., Pri., at 2:30. 

13. An^lo-Sazon. Reading of selections from Alfred, Aelfric, 
Wulfstan, Bede, Beowulf^ Caedmon, Cynewulf, Judith^ and minor 
poems. Lectures introductory to Germanic philology. Sweet's Anglo- 
Saxon Reader, Harrison and Sharp's Beowulf. Open to those who 
have had Course 12. Primarily for graduates, 1897-98. Professor 
Wauchops. 

Throughout the 3rear, two hours a week. 

14. Oofliic and Old Saxon. Bemhardt's Die gotische Bibel 
des Vulfila, Siever's Heliand, and Heyne's Die altgermanischen Dia- 
lecte. Lectures on Germanic philology in its relations to English. 
Open to students who have taken Courses 12 and 13, and who have a 
reading knowledge of German. Graduate course 1897-98. Professor 
Wauchopb. 

Throughout the j^ear, two hours a week. 

15. Teacliers' Course. During the spring term of 1898 a course 
of lectures intended primarily for teachers of English in the secondary 
schools will be given one hour a week. Among the subjects discussed 
will be historical grammar, the periods in the development of the 



44 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

language, the principles of etymology, and methods of teaching gram- 
mar, rhetoric and literature. Professor Wauchope. 

Sawyer PriJ^e. A special gold medal, or a purse of twenty-five 
dollars, known as "The Sawyer Prize," is offered for 1898 for the best 
essay of three thousand words written by any student of the Univer- 
sity on a subject approved by the Professor of English. 

SIrOCUTION. 

Mrs. Partridge. 

1. Blementary Vocal Traininj^. Studies in phonics with refer- 
ence to articulation, and the eradication of faults of speech or voice; 
development of breath control for artistic voice production; studies 
of the factors of speech; the timbre of the voice; stress as applied to 
tones, emphasis and accent, with selections adapted for illustration 
and analysis; studies in gesture; readings from standard authors. 

This course is open to Collegiate Freshmen, and Junior Law stu- 
dents. 
Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

2. Yocal Bxpresaion. Elementary Principles of Vocal Expres- 
sion: correct mental action in reading and speaking; studies and pre- 
sentations from speeches and forms of the drama, to develop the powers 
of conception and the ability to express every phase of human exper- 
ience as a means of securing simplicity and naturalness in all kinds of 
speaking. Lectures on problems in vocal expression. Study of mono- 
logues, impersonations, and miscellaneous selections, with individual 
criticism. This course is open to Sophomores who have completed 
Course i. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. Each student receives in 
addition to class exercises a private rehearsal each week. 

3. Oratory. Application of the principles of expression to the 
•ratory of the bar: special exercises for the development of extempo- 
raneous speaking; study of orations with the methods employed by 
leading orators; selections from Shakspere's tragedies and comedies 
as one of the best means of studying human character, studies in 
gesture for developing self-control, and spontaneity of action. This 
coarse is open to Senior Law students. 

Fall and winter terms, two hoars a week. 



COLLEGIATB DEPARTMENT. 45 



HISTORY, 



Propkssor Wiixox; Mr. Pi^um. 

I. History of Greece. Text-book and lectures. This course is 
intended primarily for members of the Freshman class. Mr. Pi^xjm. 
Fall term, two hours a week. 

a. History of Rome. Text-book and lectures. Tliis work con- 
sists of two parts: the History of the Roman Republic in the winter 
term, and the History of the Roman Empire in the spring term. The 
work of both terms is designed for members of the Freshman class. 
Mr. Pi,UM. 

Winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

3. History of Mediseval 9tirope. Text-book and lectures. 
This coarse is intended primarily for members of the Sophomore class 
and presupposes acquaintance with the History of Greece and Rome. 
The course is divided into three parts to correspond with the three 
terms of the University year. The first part, constituting the work of 
the fall term, extends from the final overthrow of the western Roman 
empire in 476 A. D. to the death of Charles the Great, 814 A. D. The 
work of the winter and spring terms traces the downfall of the Caro- 
lingian system and its gradual reconstruction into Modem Europe. 
Professor Wii^cox. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

4^ Constitutional History of Bng^land, Analyses and lecture.s. 
This coarse is intended for members of the Junior and Senior classes 
only. As much previous work as possible in Ancient and Mediseval 
History should be taken before beginning this course. Professor Wii,- 
cox or Mr. Pi,UM. 

Three terms, three hours a week. 

g. Constitutional History of the United States. Lectures. 
This course is designed for Senior and Graduate students. The course 
embraces, during the fall term, the study of the origin and develop- 
ment of the constitution of the United States, from preceding political 
forms. The winter term continues the work in a study of the text of 
the constitution in the light of its historical outworking. The spring 



46 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

term finishes the work with a study of the working of the United 
States Government under the constitution from 1789 to the present. 
Professor Wilcox. 
Three terms, three hours a week. 

6. The French Revolntlon and the NaiK>leonic Bta. This 
course is designed for Senior and Graduate students. Considerable 
work in Mediaeval History is an indispensable prerequisite. Professor 
Wiixox. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

7. The Nineteenth Centnry History of Europe. This is a 
sequel to Course 6 or its equivalent, and is open to the same classes of 
advanced students. Professor Wii^cox. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

8» Seminary in iSn^^lish History. This course is intended 
primarily for Gradiiate students who are qualified to specialize in 
English History. Those Senior students who have had Course 4 and 
are capable of doing original and independent work will be admitted 
to this Seminary. Professor Wii^cox. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

9. Seminary in United States History. This course is also 
primarily designed for graduate students, but exceptions are made 
similar to those specified for Course 8. Professor Wii^cox. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

All the courses in History, including the two Seminaries, are given 
each year. There are no alternating courses. 

All courses in History are elective. Admission to the courses is con- 
ditioned only upon the qualifications of the candidate who desires to 
to take the courses. 

Students are advised to plan their historical work so that it will be 
logical in its order of sequence. Students who intend to emphasize 
historical work in college are urged to make careftd preparation in 
History in preparatory schools. 

In arranging the courses in History in the University the attempt 
has been made to present the entire field of historical study with ref- 
erence to logical and chronological sequence, so that no period shall 
be neglected and each period be treated in the light of what goes 
before and what comes after. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 47 



POLITICAL SCIENCE. 



Frofhssor Loos; Assistant Professor Shambaugh, Dr. Harris, 

Mr. Brock and Mr. Van Law. 

To mark, to some extent, the differentiation of the several branches 
of political science the courses here oifered are grouped in the main 
under the following headings: ( i) Political Economy and Finance ^ (2) 
Pitblic Law and Adtninistration, The requirement of three consecu- 
tive terms of work in order to receive credit will apply to the respective 
groaps. Courses 2 and 1 1 are the fundamental courses in economics 
and politics respectively, and undergraduates are advised to select 
these courses as an introduction to advanced work in the group under 
which each stands. 

poiriTiCAi, SCONomr and finance. 

I. Economic History. After an introductory study of primitive 
man and primitive civilization (Starr's First Steps in Human Progress) 
the coarse will occupy itself mainly with the development of trades 
and manufactures in Europe (Cunningham's Industrial History), 
and later with tlie industrial development of the United States 
(Wright's Industrial Evolution of the United States). Open to Soph- 
omores. Mr. . 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th. at 8. 

a. SconCMillca. An introduction to the study of political econ- 
omy. Text-book and lectures. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Professor 
Loos, Mr. Brock and Mr. Van Law. 

Pall term daily at 11. 

3. Pinatice, Cttrrency and Bankiiis: in the United States. 
Lectures on the financial history of the United States including a dis- 
cussion of the currency and a study of banks and banking. Open to 
Juniors. Professor Loos and Mr. Van Law. 

Winter term, Mon., Wed., Fri. at 11. 

4« Transportation. The course will deal chiefly with railways: 
nilroAd oiguiization and management, explanation of terms in com- 



48 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

mon use in railroad accounts and reports; history of railroad develop- 
ment, discussion of rates, competition, discrimination, and state man- 
agement (Hadley's Railroad Transportation); the commission system, 

state and inter-state. Open to Juniors. Mr. . 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th. at 2:30. 

5. The Industrial Revolutioti and Modem Social $^e8- 
tiona. An elemenrary course in recent economic history and theory. 
An analysis of the industrial revolution with lectures on modern 
socialism, contemporary economic schools, and recent tendencies in 
legislation. Open to those who have passed in Course 2. Professor 
Loos and Mr. Brock. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th. at 11. 

6. The Principles of Bconomics. The development of the 
classical political economy will be carefully studied. Special atten- 
tion will be given also to the mathematical work of Jevons and other 
writers; and to the recent contributions of the Austrian school. Pro- 
fessor Marshall's Principles of Economics will be used as a text. For 
Seniors and Graduate students. Professor Loos and Dr. Shambaugr. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. at 9. 

7. Public Finance. A study in state expenditure, state income, 
and state debts. The class w^ill read Bastable's Public Finance. Open 
to those who have taken Course 2 or its equivalent. Professor Loos. 

Fall term, Tu., Th. at 9. 

8. Taxation. This course is designed as a continuation of Course 
7 for those who wish to do further work in public finance, and will be 
conducted as a research course. Papers will be prepared first on the 
literature of taxation; these will be followed by a series of special 
studies in existing systems of taxation, national commonwealth and 
local. Professor Loos. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu. and Th. at 9. 

9. History of Political ISconomy. Economic history in the 
fall term with special reference to the medieval systems of industry, 
the appearance of the modem era, and the writings of the mercantil- 
ists and physiocrats. Economic theory in the winter and spring terms 
with notice of Smith, Malthus, Ricardo and contemporary schools. 
For Seniors and Graduates. Professor Loos and Dr. Shambaugh. 

Throughout the year, hours to be appointed. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 49 

zo. Debatisis: Course. May be counted also as an English 
elective. Selected topics in economics and politics. The course 
may not be given in 1897-98. Mr. Kku^y and Dr. Shambaugh. 

Fall and winter, hours to be appointed. 

FUBI/IC l^AW AND ADMINISTRATION. 

zz« Historical and Descriptive Politics. A study, historical 
and descriptive, of the governments of Greece, Rome, Prance, Ger- 
many, England and the United States. Fall term: Beginning with 
the primitive institutions of the Patriarchal Family and the Village 
Community, political evolution will be traced through Greece, Rome 
(City and Empire ), Mediaeval Europe, Prance and Germany. Winter 

 

term: The general outlines of political evolution in Switzerland, 
England and the United States. Spring term: The development of 
local g overn ment, especially in the United States, will receive detailed 
consideration. Dr. Shambaugh. 
Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

la. Principles of Goyenunent in the United States. A 

study, legal and political, of constitutional government in the United 

States, wherein the Constitution of the United States will receive 

special examination. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Dr. Shambaugh. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th. at 10, (third hour to be appointed). 

13. Principles of Government in the United States. A 
special course, supplementing Course 12, wherein the principles of 
government in the United States will be studied through primary 
sources: colonial charters, commonwealth constitutions, leading state 
papers prior to 1787, the Federalist and other contemporaneous 
essays on the Constitution, leading state papers and political documents 
from 1787 to 1870, the important speeches of Jackson, Webster, Cal- 
houn and Lincoln, ordinances of secession, etc. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. Dr. Shambaugh. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

14. International I^aw. Lectures on international law given in 
alternate years. Snow's Cases on International Law will be used 
as a text. The course was given in 1896-97. Open to Juniors. 
Chancellor McClain. 

Spring term, Tu., Th., at 11. 



50 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

15. Diplomacy and Poreis^ Relations. The consular and dip- 
lomatic service with some notice of customs tariffs. Professor Loos. 
Spring term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

i6. Political Theory and Comparative Constitutional I^aw. 

The outlines of political theory will be presented in the fall term. 
A comparative study of the leading features of the constitutions of the 
United States, England, France and Germany will be undertaken in 
the winter and spring terms." Open to those who have had Courses 1 1 
and 12. An advanced course for Seniors and Graduates. Dr. Sham- 

BAUGH. 

Two hours through the year. 

VJ* Administrative I^aw. A comparative study of administra- 
tive law in France, Germany, England and the United States. Open 
to those who have taken Courses 11, 12 and t6. Dr. Shambaugh. 

Fall term, two hours to be appointed. 

18. Government in Iowa. A study, historical and descriptive, 
of the political institutions of the commonwealth of Iowa. Dr. Sham- 
baugh. 

Spring term, two hours to be appointed. 

19. Roman I^aw. The history and institutions of the classical 
and Justinian law. lyectures with assigned readings. For Seniors and 
Graduates. Dr. Harris. 

Fall and winter terms, Th., at 1:30. 

ao. Roman Municipalities. Lectures. For Seniors and Grad- 
uates. Professor Rohbach. 
Fall or winter, two hours to be appointed. 

az. Municipal Oovemment. A study in administration. This 
course is for those who have taken Course 23. Professor Loos. 
Spring term Mon., Wed., Fri., at 10. 

aa. Political Philosophy. A study in political theory, classical 
and modem, with some notice of state forms. Lectures with critical 
reading of Aristotle *8 Politics during the fall term; and Green on Poli- 
tical Obligations and Sidgwick's Elements of Politics during the winter 
and spring terms. Primarily for Graduates. Professor Loos. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 10. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 51 

as» Sociolos^. Part i. Lectnres during the fall term on the 
primary factora and forces of social pheonomena; special attention is 
given to the earliest phases of political organization. Part 2. In the 
winter term, police, sanitation, pauperism, and crime receive special 
attention. The dose relation of the so-called practical sociology to 
the German Verwaltungslehre will be pointed out. Open to Seniors 
and Graduates. Professor Loos. 

Pall and winter terms, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 10. 

S4« Seminary in Political Science. It is the aim of the 
Seminary to encourage spedal investigations. Questions in politics, 
economics, statistics, finance, administration or law may be taken for 
special research. From time to time papera are read, and then famil- 
iarly criticised and discussed. Primarily for Graduates. Professor 
Loos and Dr. Shambaugh. 

Throughout the year, houra to be appointed. 



PMLOSOPHY. 



Propbssor Patrick; Assistant Processor G113KRT. 

z. IrOgic. An elementary course in deductive and inductive 
logic. In the fall term deductive logic will be studied with the aid of 
Jevons' Lessons in Logic as a text. In the winter term inductive logic 
will be studied by means of lectures and readings in Hibben's Induc- 
tive Logic and Jevons' Principles of Science. Either term may be 
taken alone. Professor Patrick. 

Fall and winter terms, two houra. 

a. Psychology. An elementary course in general psychology. In 
the fall term Dr. G113BRT will lecture on the nervous system, localiza- 
tion of brain function, the special senses and sensations. Practical 
study and dissection of the sheep's brain will accompany the lectures 
on the nervous system. In the winter and spring terms Professor 
Patrick will lecture on general psychology. This course will be 
accompanied by experimental exercises and by demonstrations with 
apparatus from the psychological laboratory. The texts of James, 
Kuelpe, Wundt, and Ladd will be used as references and for assigned 
leadings. Professor Patrick and Dr. G113BRT. 

Throughout the year, three houra, two sections. 



52 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

3. History of Philoaophy. A coarse in Greek, mediaeval and 
modem philosophy. Lectures, with assigned readings in the texts of 
Zeller, Weber, Palckenbeig and Erdmann. Professor Patrick. 

Throughout the year, three hours. 

4. Btlilca. Lectures, discussions, and recitations. Mackenzie*s 
Manual of Ethics will be used as a text-book. Dr. Gii^bbrt. 

Spring term, three hours. 

5. I^aboratory Course in Bxperimental Psychology. An 

introductory course whose aim is to familiarize the student with the 
use of psychophysical apparatus and methods of experimental research 
in psychology. Dr. Gli^BBRT. 

Fall and winter, two hours, or four hours laboratory work. 

6. The Psychology of the Child. The methods and results 
of child study. This course will be introduced by a short course on 
comparative psychology. Lectures and reports. Dr. Gilbert. 

Spring term, two hours. 

7. The Philosophy of Nature. The principal subjects dis- 
cussed will be final causes, the philosophy of evolution, and mate- 
rialism. This course is primarily for Graduates. Lectures, theses, 
and private readings. Professor Patrick. 

Fall term, two hours. 

8. Abnormal Psychology. The principal subjects discussed 
will be sleep, dreams, somnambulism, h3rpnoti8m, automatism, altera- 
tions of personality, telepathy, and psychical research. This course 
is primarily for Graduates. It may be taken by undergraduates who 
have proper preparation. Lectures, theses, and private readings. Dr. 
G113SRT. 

Winter term, two hours. 

9. Special Research in Psychology. Original investigations 
of special problems in normal and abnormal psychology and child 
study. Laboratory work and theses. The results of these investiga- 
tions, if of sufficient worth, will be published in the Shidus in A^- 
ckohgy. This course is primarily for Graduates. It may be taken 
by undergraduates who have had Courses 2 and 5. Dr. Gii3SaT. 

Thronghont the year, hours to be arranged. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 53 

zo* Semiiiary in Paychology. Reports and discussions up- 
on advanced problems in psychology, such as the nature of the mind, 
theory of knowledge, the relation of mind and body, and kindred 
subjects. This course is primarily for Graduates. It may be taken by 
undei]graduates who have had Courses 2 and 5. Dr. G113SRT. 

Winter term, two hours. 

n. Seminary in Philoaophy. Papers and discussions upon 
special problems in philosophy. The subjects studied the past year 
were pessimism, the philosophy of India, and mysticism. This 
course is primarily for Graduates, but may be taken by special per- 
mission by undergraduates with full preparation. Professor Patrick. 

Winter term, two hours. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy are required to 
take the equivalent of three terms' work of two or three hours each 
in this department. Courses i and 2 are recommended for this re- 
quirement. 

The Psychological Laboratory, No. 14 North Clinton street, is open 
daily from 8 to 12 a. m., and from 2 to 4 p. M. A description of the 
laboratory and apparatus will be found in this catalogue under the 
head of Material Equipment of the Collegiate Department. The 
librar}' of philosophy is supplied with all the standard works in logic, 
psychology, ethics, and philosophy, and is open daily during labora- 
tory hours. 

PEDAGOGY. 



PROPBSSOR McCONNBI«I«; MR. DORCAS. 

X. General Pedasrogy. This course is designed primarily for 
students who have had no teaching experience. This will be a text- 
book course and will consist of a general treatment of the principles 
and practice of school teaching. The text-books used in this course 
are Putnam's Manual of Pedagogics, Gregory's Seven Laws of Teach- 
ing, White's School Management, Prince's Courses and Methods. 
The course is open to all students who are permitted by the rules of 
the University to take elective courses. Professor McConnbi,i« and 
Mr. Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, five hours a week. 



54 vSTATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

a. Fhiloeophy of 1Sdticati<m and Practice of TeacHinflr* 

Lectures and redtations. It is the purpose in this course to set forth 
the aims of education, as these aims have been developed in educational 
history, also to treat somewhat fully the doctrines of the eductional 
leaders of recent times, and finally to illustrate the application of 
these doctrines in teaching. Fall term: Educational Aims and Doc- 
trines. Comenius, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart. This part of the 
course will include a special treatment of the Herbartian Pedagogy 
and a discussion of educational values. Winter term: Teaching and 
Governing. This part of the course will embrace a treatment of the 
Formal Steps of Instruction, an exposition of methods of teaching and 
lectures on sanitation. Spring term: Secondary Education. In this 
part of the course, attention will be given to the organization of 
courses of study and methods of instruction in high schools. Profes- 
sor MCCONNBI*!.. 
Throughout the year, three hours a week. 

3. History of Bdttcatioxi. This course will consist of three dis- 
tinct parts, {a) The ancient and mediaeval period, (^) the modem 
period, and {c) the history of education in the United States. The 
course will consist of lectures, recitations and essays on assigned 
topics. Mr. Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

4. School Supervision. In this course the student will be ex- 
pected to make a study of the following subjects: General school 
management, the art of classifying schools, and the art of arranging 
courses of study. Lectures and recitations. Professor McConnbi^l. 

Winter terra, two hours a week. 

5. School Systems. This course will require of the student an 
examination of the state and city systems of the United States. Lec- 
tures and reports. Professor McConnbi^i^. 

Fall term, two hours a week. 

6. Child Study. In this course the history, literature and meth- 
ods of work in child study will be treated. Professor McConnbi*!,. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

7* Seminary. The seminary will afford an opportunity for the 
special investigation of subjects selected with reference to their bear- 



COLI.EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 55 

ing on Courses 2 and 6. Pall and winter: The doctrines of the Her- 
bartian school. Spring: Child study. Professor McConnbi^i,. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

NoTB. — ^The courses in Pedagogy, expect as otherwise designated, 
are open to Juniors, Seniors, and special students. Candidates for 
the d^^xee of Bachelor of Didactics are required to take three full 
terms* work in Pedagogy. 

State Certificate. Acting under a law passed by the Twenty- 
third General Assembly, the State Board of Educational Examiners 
will grant state certificates, good for five years, to graduates of the 
Collegiate Department of the University who comply with the follow- 
ing conditions: 

(a) The applicant must take three full terms' work in Pedagogy 
at the University. 

(d) He must furnish written statements, prepared expressly for the 
Board, from one or more county superintendents, or other experienced 
educators, certifying to the professional success and good moral char- 
acter of the applicant. 

(c) He must furnish written official statements, addressed to the 
Board, from school boards, or directors, for whom the candidate has 
taught, certif3Hing to his success in teaching and government. 

(d) He must apply to the Board through the Professor of Pedagogy, 
to whom he shall send, in addition to the above described certificates, 
a formal application for a state certificate, the sum of three dollars 
and such other credentials as may be required. The application for a 
state certificate should be made by using the blank form provided for 
that purpose by the State Board of Examiners. 

(e) All the papers and credentials required from candidates for 
state certificates must be filed with the President of the University at 
least thirty days before the date fixed for the examination. 

Ifife Diploma. The State Board of Educational Examiners grants 
life diplomas, according to law, to graduates of the University who 
have complied with the state certificate conditions mentioned above, 
and who, in addition thereto, have had a successful teaching experi- 
ence of five years after graduation. Applications are to be made 
through the Professor of Pedagogy. The following are the regulations 
of the Board in reference to such applicants: 



56 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

(a) The Board itself holds the right, which it exercises at discretion , 
to investigate the character, scholarship, and professional standing of 
every applicant. 

(d) The candidate must present an original thesis in his ovm hand- 
ivriting, of not less than 3,000 nor more than 5,000 words, upon some 
professional topic selected by the President of the Board. The thesis 
will be subjected to a critical examination by at least two persons 
chosen by the Board. 

(c) The credentials required, the registration blank properly filled, 
and the thesis, accompanied by the fee of five dollars, must be filed 
with the President of the University at least thirty days before the 
date fixed for examination. 



PHYSICS, 

PROPBSSOR Vbbi,bn; Mr. Bowman, Mr. Baii«by and Mr. Wii«us. 

I. Medianice and Heat. Lectures and recitations. Professor 
Vbblkn. 
Fall term, daily at 11. 

a. Blectricity and Masfnetiem. Lectures and recitations. 
Professor Vbblbn. 
Winter term, daily at ii. 

3. Sound and lAght, Lectures three times a week, laboratory 
work twice a week. Professor Vbbi«bn, Mr. Bowman, Mr. Baii«by 
and Mr. Wii*us. 

Spring term, lectures Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

Courses i, 2 and 3 constitute the general elementary work in physics 
required of all scientific and engineering students, and must be pre- 
ceded by the mathematics of the Freshman year. 

4. Phyaical Measurementa and Obaenrationa. Laboratory 
work. Mr. Bowman and Mr. Baii«by. 

One term, daily. 

5. Meaanrementa and Determination of Conatanta. Lec- 
tures and laboratory work. Professor Vbbi«bn, Mr. Bowman and 
Mr. BaUtBY. 

One term, daily. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 57 

6. M eaatiremetits. Special investigation and research to follow 
4 and 5. Professor Vbbi«bn and Mr. Bowman. 

Couraes 4, 5 and 6 may be taken any term, but must be pursued in 
the order of their numbers. These courses are planned for students 
taking a second year in Ph3rsics. Course 4 is required of electrical 
engineering students in the fall of their Junior year. In the winter of 
the same year they take 5, but in their case this course deals more es- 
pecially with electrical measurements. 

7. Direct Ctirrent I>3mamo6 and MotorB. Three lectures a 
week, laboratory work twice a week. For electrical engineering 
Juniors. Professor Vbbi«bn and Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, daily. 

8. Theory of ISlecttidty and Photometry. Lectures five 
times a week, laboratory work ten hours. Professor Vkblbn and 
Mr. Bowman. 

Kail term. 

9. Alternate Current Machinery. Five lectures a week, ten 
hours of special laboratory work. Professor Vbbi«Bn and Mr. Bow- 
man. 

xo. Dietrlbntion of Electrical Bnergy; Telesfraph and 
Telephone* Lectures and laboratory work. Professor Vbbi«9N 
and Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, ten hours a week. 

The last three numbers form the Senior year course of the electrical 
engineers, and will in general include five lectures a week, the subjects 
treated being indicated above. The work in the laboratory consists of 
practice with the photometer, experiments and measurements on the 
various machines, transformers, and other apparatus, and tests of insu- 
lators, conductors, samples of iron, etc. The student has the choice 
in the latter part of the year of preparing a thesis or carrying out 
some research, or doing other special work. 

zi. Electricity and Mafifnetiani. For civil engineering students. 
Two lectures a week, laboratory work three times a week. Professor 
VBBI.BN and Mr. Bowman. 

Pall term, daily; 



58 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

xa. Dynamo-electric Machinery. Lectures to dvil engineer- 
ing students. Professor Vsbi«bm. 
Winter term, three times a week. 

13. Heat and Thermodynamics. Lectures to Junior electrical 
and civil engineering students. Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, twice a week, with one day each week in electrical 
laboratory for civil engineers. 

14. Shop Work. For electrical engineers. Mr. Bowman and Mr. 
WiiAiS. 

Throughout the year, twice a week. 

15. Seminary. The systematic reading of physical and elec- 
trical journals by those students who are well enough equipped, is en- 
couraged by a weekly seminary, conducted for this purpose by Pro- 
fessor Vhbi^bn. 

In addition to the above, lectures and laboratory courses in selected 
topics will be given as circumstances may require or the facilities for 
instruction may admit. Laboratory work of any grade may be taken 
any term, three or more times a week. 



CHEMISTRY. 



Professor Andrews, Mr. Endb and Mr. Jackson. 

z. General Chemistry. Lectures illustrated by experiments 
and accompanied by a weekly quiz and laboratory work. Professor 
Andrews. 

Pall term, four times a week, laboratory once a week. 

a. General Chemistry (continued). Lectures illustrated by 
experiments. Introduction to qualitative analysis. Laboratory work, 
six hours a week. Professor Andrews and Mr. Bnde. 

Winter term: Lectures Tu., Th., at 9. Laboratory at hours to be 
arranged. 

3. General Chemiatry and Qualitative Analysis. Lectures 
once a week, laboratory work eight hours. The student is instructed 
in the theory and practice of Qualitative Analysis and is expected to 
carry out about twenty-five complete analyses besides a number of 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 59 

partial ones. This oonrse except the lectures can be taken in any 
tenn. Professor Andrews, Mr. Ends and Mr. Jackson. 

Spring term, lectures at 9, laboratory eight hours, at times to be 
arranged. 

4* QtumtitatiYe Analysis* I^ectures on general principles and 
aooroes of error once a week, laboratory ten hours. Professor Andrews 
and Mr. Jackson. 

Lectures Tu., at 4:30, laboratory according to arrangement. 

5. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory practicum. The stu- 
dent extends his work from the analysis of substances of defin- 
itely known composition to commercial products of various kinds and 
makes a study of certain technological methods. Professor Andrews 
and Mr. Jackson. 

Any term, ten hours a week. 

6. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Lectures on the gen- 
eral principles of thermo-chemistry, electro-chemistry and chemical 
dynamics, accompanied by a parallel course of laboratory work cover- 
ing, for example, the determination of molecular weights, experimental 
study of the laws of Avogadro and Dulong and Petit, the phenomena 
of mass action and of dissociation. Ostwald's Outlines of Physical 
Chemistry has hitherto been used as an auxiliary text. This course 
must be preceded by at least the first three courses in chemistry and 
the first three in physics or their equivalent. It will probably only be 
given in the even numbered years. Professor Andrews. 

Spring term, lectures or laboratory work daily at hours to be arranged 
for. 

7. a. Or^^anic Chemistry. Lectures on the fatty series, 
illnstrated experimentally so far as the subject will permit. Professor 
Andrews. 

Spring term, even numbered years, twice a week. 

7. b. Org^anic Chemistry. Lectures on aromatic and hetero- 
cyclic compounds. Professor Anbrkws. 

Spring of odd numbered years, thrice a week. 

8. Blectro-chemistry. Lectures for students of electrical engi- 
neering, comprising the theory of electrolysis, chemistry of primary 



6o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

and secondary batteries, electro-metallut^ and other industrial appli- 
cations. Professor Andrbws. 
Spring term, five times a week, even numbered years only. 

9. Orfi^anic Preparations. Laboratory work comprising pre- 
paration of typical organic compoimds, methods of S3aithe8isand study 
of diagnostic reactions. This course must be preceded or accompa- 
nied by Course 7. Professor Andrbws. 

Winter term, laboratory daily, twelve hours a week. 

10. Determinative Mineralogy and Cryatallography. Lab- 
oratory practicum. Mr. Endb. 

Winter and spring, five times a week. 

Numbers 3, Qualitative Analysis, and 4, and 5, Quantitative Analy- 
sis, may be taken in either fall, winter, or spring term. 

Number 6, may be taken after 3. This order is only recommended 
to those who devote no more than four terms in all to chemistry. 



ANIMAL MORPHOLCXJY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



Assistant Profbssor Housbr, Mr. Burgb. 

z. General Morphology and Physiology. A laboratory course 
for the study of selected types representing the several great groups of 
animals. General biological phenomena, the unicellular animals, and 
representatives of the higher invertebrate groups. (Pall term). Dis- 
section of t3rpical vertebrates, the microscopic morphology of verte- 
brates, and lectures and experiments covering the elements of physi- 
ology* (Winter and spring terms. ) Assistant Professor HouSBR. 

Throughout the year; daily; two divisions, 10 to 12 and 1:30 to 3:30. 

a« Microtomy. Laboratory work. The student makes a prac- 
tical application of standard methods of fixing, hardening, staining, 
injecting, imbedding, sectioning, and mounting. Methods of drawing 
and reconstruction are also considered. Prerequisite: Course i. As- 
sistant Professor HouSBR and Mr. BuRGB. 

Fall term, daily, 8 to 10. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 6i 

3. ComparatiYe Neurology. A study of the central nervous 
system and the terminal sense organs. The laboratory work involves 
the use of the technique of Golgi, Weigert, and other special means of 
investigation peculiar to the subject. Lectures are given twice a week, 
and assigned reading is done in the standard authorities. Prerequisite : 
Courses i and 2. Assistant Professor HouSBR and Mr. BURGE. 

Winter term, daily, 8 to 10. 

4. Practical Physiology. A course of laboratory work for ad- 
vanced students. References are constantly made to the standard 
texts. Prerequisite: Course i. Assistant Professor HouSBR. 

Fall and winter terms, daily, time to be arranged. 

5. Yertelnrate Bmbryology. Laboratory work accompanied by 
a series of lectures. The lectures discuss the general problems of verte- 
brate embryology, and are supplemented by collateral reading. The 
laboratory work embraces the study of the chick at different stages of 
developtnent. Prerequisite: Courses i and 2. Assistant Professor 
HOUSER and Mr. BuRGB. 

Spring term, daily, 8 to 10. 

6. Xliesis Cotirae. A course involving the preparation of a grad- 
uating thesis. Opportunities are offered for laboratory work in some 
brancli of anatomy, histology, or embryology. Prerequisite: Courses 
I, 2 and 5. Assistant Professor HouSBR. 

Time to be arranged. 

7. Iteeearch Cotirse. Facilities for original investigation will be 
provided for those who elect work in this subject as a major in a grad- 
uate course. The specific character of such work will be determined 
by individual considerations, but, in general, a problem will be assigned 
for independent investigation through the use of refined laboratory 
methods. Candidates for this work should have completed the under- 
graduate courses i, 2 and 5, at least, or the equivalent. Assistant Pro- 
fessor HOUSER. 



6a STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



ZOOLCXJY. 



Profbssor Nutting; Assistant Fropbssor Wickham. 

z. Inyertebrated Animalft — ^more especially the sub-kingdoms, 
CoeUnterata, and EMnodermata. Fall term. Professor Nutting. 

a* Mammalia. The principles of classification are here applied 
to a more limited group. More attention is paid to generic and spe- 
cific characters and more detailed descriptions are made, daily prac- 
tice being afforded by the use of the magnificent series of mammals in 
the Homaday collection and main Musetmi. Instruction in the prep- 
aration of skulls and skeletons is given to those students desiring it. 
Winter term. Professor Nutting. 

3. Or]iltholos;7, including instructions in field work. Upon 
this course the whole work in systematic zoology is centered. Owing 
to the very large series of birds (about 11,000 specimens) in the 
Museum, there is ample material for real systematic work during the 
term. Spring term. Professor NuTTiNG. 

4. Bntomology. Fall term. Assistant Professor Wickham. 
Inse<5t Anatomy and Development. I^ectures and laboratory work. 
Three hours a week. 

5. Btttomologfy. The principles acquired in the preceding term, 
will be applied to the study of systematic entomology. Three hours 
a week. Winter term. Assistant Professor Wickham. 

6. Bntomologfy. The studies of the preceding term will be 
continued. Throughout this and the preceding course special atten- 
tion will be given to the philosophical bearings of the subject. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. Assistant Professor Wickham. 

7. ^cttirea in Speculative Zoology. This course is devoted 
to a presentation of the more prominent theories concerning the origin 
and evolution of animal forms and a historical review of the position 
held by the most prominent workers in speculative zoology. Special 
attention will also be paid to a study of the habits, instincts, and 
intelligence of animals. The course will continue through the year 
and will be open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours a week. Pro- 
fessor Nutting. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 63 

8. Thesis. Equivalent to two terms' work. Advanced work in 
any group of animals of which the Museum contains a sufficient 
series. Free access to any specimens or books on the Museum floor 
is accorded to students doing thesis work in zoology, and a con 
venient study room has been fitted up for the use of advanced 
students. 

The above courses are intended to be consecutive, except that 
courses 4, 5 and 6 may follow i, 2 and 3, in Animal Morphology, and 
7 may be taken by Juniors and Seniors, without previous work in 
natural science. A combination of Courses 4, 5, 6 and 7 is recom- 
mended for students desiring a five hour course which will include a 
critical study of a definite group of animals together with the appli- 
cation of biological principles elucidated in Course 7. This course is 
more particularly designed in the interest of students who do not 
intend to specialize in 2k)ology. 

The Museum affords an abundance of material for study, and this 
is supplemented by (a) a library of zoological works, {d) Photo- 
graphs of specimens studied, the photographs to be placed in the 
note books along with the descriptions, and {c) Lectures in which the 
salient points of the various groups of animals are defined, and habits, 
distribution, etc., described. 

Students taking special courses in biological science may receive 
instruction in field work and in ^^preparaMon of museum material. 



GEOLOGY. 



Propbssor Cai«vin. 

z. Pfinciples of Geology. Lectures, illustrated by museum 
specimens, views, maps and microscopic preparations. 
Throughout the year, twice weekly, Tu. and Th., at 9. 
This course may be supplemented with Course i in Astronomy. 

a. Oenersl and Practical Geology. During the faU term this 
course e m braces lectures and field observation on the geological 
phesoiiieiiA in the vicinity of Iowa City as an introduction to the 



64 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

fundamental facts of the science. The preliminary work also embraces 
the laboratory investigation of material collected during studies in 
the field. This is followed by the general facts of rock-making, con- 
tinent-making, and the evolution of topographic forms. During 
winter and spring terms attention is given to the chronological suc- 
cession of strata in the Mississippi Valley, with studies relating to the 
genesis, lithology, geographical distribution, economic products, and 
typical faunas of the several formations. Large series of rocks, min- 
erals, fossils, maps, lantern slides, and photographs afford the material 
for lecture illustration and laboratory study. 

Throughout the year, daily at lo. Additional hours for laboratory 
work arranged to suit the convenience of the individual students. 

3. Invertebrate Paleontology. Lectures and laboratory re- 
search. 

Throughout the year, daily. Lectures at 8. Laboratory work at 
convenient hours from 8 to 5. 

4. Bconomic Oeology of the United States. Lectures, with 
library and laboratory research. 

Throughout the year daily. 

5. Special Courses in Pleistocene Geology, local Geolog>* 
and Paleontology, Characteristics and Faunas of Special Formations, 
and similar subjects are arranged to meet the wishes of individual 
students. 

Throughout the year or through a single term, two, three, or five 
hours weekly. 



BOTANY. 

Professor Macbridb; Assistant Profbssor Shimbk. 

Z. General Botany. This course includes lectures and labora- 
tory work, and is intended to give a general view of botanical 
science. Lectures, accompanied by abundant demonstrations and 
laboratory work, present a more or less complete view of the world ol 
plants. Spedal attention is paid to all available forms of onr crypto- 
xamic flora, slimemoulds, achizophytes, diatoms, algae, fungi, mosses 



COI.LBGIATE DEPARTMENT. 65 

ferns, and their allies are successively passed in review. This course 
is open to all students who are credited with Botany in their prepara- 
tory course. While it is in some particulars a review of the prepara- 
tory courses, it is also made the basis of work in the subsequent 
oonrses. Fall term, ten hours a week. Professor Macbridb and 
Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

a. General Plant Hi8tolo8:y. General Structtiral Botany. 
This course requires ten hours a week in the laboratory. Daily 
lectures accompany the laboratory work. The student receives special 
instruction in the preparation of vegetable sections, staining, mount- 
ing, etc., and is required to prepare for himself approved slides in 
illustration of all the topics presented in so far as these are referable to 
the microecope. Winter term. Professor Macbridk and Assistant 
Professor Shimbk. 

3- General Plant Physiolos^. This course consists of lec- 
tures, laboratory work, and experiments, supplemented by collateral 
reading. The most important problems of vegetable physiology are 
discussed and illustrated by simple experiments. Detmer, Vines, 
Darwin, and all other standard authorities are available to the student 
for collateral reading. Spring term. Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

4« General Mycology. This is a course in the fung^ and con- 
sists of laboratory work, supplemented by lectures, experiment, and 
collateral reading. This is an advanced course. Students make and 
dasstfy collections for themselves. In identifying material collected, 
students are aided by extensive mycological literature, exsiccatiy etc. 
Fall term. Professor Macbridb. 

5. Vegetable Bmbryology. A special course with lectures 
and laboratory work, including collateral reading. This course is 
confined chiefly to the consideration of the embryology of phenogam- 
ous plants. Ph3rtoc3rtology is taken up incidentally, and the peculiar- 
ities of nuclear division and karyokinesis noted. Spring term. Pro- 
fessor Macbridb. 

6. Special work in Morphology. A course designed for 
advanced students either graduate or special, offering opportunity for 
more exact investigation. Throughout the year. Professor Macbridb 
and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 



66 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

7. Special Systematic work. The large collections of the 
University now afford unusual opportunity for the special study of 
particular groups and families, and students are in\dted to engage in 
original research in the revision of accumulated species. Throughout 
the year. Professor Macbride and Assistant Professor Shimek. 

8. Special Applied Botany. A course for students of Pharmacy 
and Medicine. The official Materia Medica is made the basis of the 
special study of medicinal plants, their nature, origin, and relation- 
ships. Winter and spring terms. Professor Macbridk. 

9. Thesis Course. Designed for such students, either graduate 
or others, as desire to undertake problems of original research. Sum- 
mer and winter terms. Professor Macbride and Assistant Professor 
Shimbk. 



MATHEMATICS. 



Professor Wbi<d; Assistant Professor Smith; Mr. Bauer and 

Mr. Merritt. 
Classical and Philosophical students are required to take Course i. 
Course 2 may however be substituted for this and the work otherwise 
required in Ancient History. Scientific students must take Course 2. 
The work of Course 3, though not required, is arranged with reference 
to the needs of those students who expect to do special work in Phys- 
ical Sdenoe. Civil and Electrical Engineering students are required 
to take Courses 2^ 4 and 6, <i. ^. Further explanations will be found 
in connection with the following syllabus. 

Solid and Spherical Oeometty. To be given twice during the 
year as follows: Fall term: from October 4, to November 24, daily, 
except Friday, at 4:30. Mr. Bauer. Winter term: from January 10, 
to March 2, daily, except Friday, at 3:30. Mr. MerriTT. This course 
will not be given after the Collegiate year 1897-8. 

Freshman Mathematics for Classical and Philosophical Students, 

z. a. Alfirebra« Exerdaes in the statement and solution of prob- 
lems involving simple aud quadratic equations; ratio, propoition, and 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 67 

variation; aritlimetical, harmonic, and geometrical progressions; 
pr o perties of series and the development of simple functions into 
series; the binomial theorem; logarithms. Fall term. 

b. Plane Trigonometry. Trigonometric functions and formulae; 
logarithmic functions; solution of right and oblique angled triangles; 
practical applications. Winter term. 

c. Analytical Ge o metr y* The point, right line, circle, parabola, 
ellipse, and h3^rbola in cartesian coordinates. Spring term. 

Three divisions; throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 11, 
2:30, and 3:30 Mr. Baxtbr and Mr. Mbrritt. 

Students contemplating advanced study in Mathematics should 
take Course 2, instead of the one here outlined. 

Freshman MaihemaHcs/or Scientific and Engineering Students. 

9. a. Algebra and Trigonometry. In Algebra the work is 
nearly the same as that of i a. This is to be completed by November 
12 and will be followed by Plane Trigonometry. Fall term. 

b. Trigonometry and Theory of ISqnations. Trigonometry 
is to be completed by January 28. The work in the Theory of Equa- 
tions will include the study of imaginaries, the properties of the gen- 
eral equation and their graphical representation, methods of approxi- 
mating to the roots of higher equations with numerical coefficients, 
Cardai^'s solution of cubics, and bi-quadratic equations. Winter term. 

c. Analytical Geometry. The same as Course i r, with the ad- 
dition of the discussion of the general equation of the second degree be- 
tween two variables and examples of higher plane curves. Spring 
term. 

Five divisions, daily, throughout the year at 8, 9, 10 and 2:30. As- 
sistant Professor SiOTH, Mr. Bausr and Mr. Mbrritt. 

Sophomore Maihematics for Scientific Students, 

3. a. Differential and Integral Calcnltts. Theftmdamental 
principles of the Calculus are studied and applied to the solution of 
problems in geometry and mechanics. Fall term. 

b. Integral Calcolna and Method of Ireaat Sqnarea. Win- 
ter term. 



68 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

c. Applications of the Method of I^east Squares. This is a 
continuation of the preceding, the method of least squares being ap- 
plied to the reduction of various series of physical observations. Spring 
term. Assistant Professor Smith. 

This course is open only to those who have taken Course 2. Daily 
throughout the year at 8. 

Sophomore Mathematics. 

4. a. Analytical and Modem Geometry. A review of those 
portions of Course 2 c which are supplementary to Course i r, followed 
by Analytical Geometry of three dimensions. A short course of lec- 
tures on Modem Geometry is given, upon which full notes must be 
submitted. Fall term. 

b. IHfferential Calcnlus, Winter term. 

c, Inte^rral Calculus. The work in Calculus in this course is 
nearly the same as that in Course 3. Spring term. 

This course is intended primarily for engineering students but is 
open to all who have completed the required work of the Freshman 
year. Mr. Baukr. 

Daily throughout the year at 10. 

Mathematics for JunioTy Senior and Graduate Students. 

5. Inte^^al Calctdus. a. Hyperbolic Functions and Definite 
Integrals. Fall term. b. The Eulerian and Elliptic Integrals. Win- 
ter term. c. Differential Equations. Spring term. An elementary 
course open to all students who have taken either Course 3 or 4. For 
either undergraduate or graduate students. Professor Wkld. 

Three hours a week tliroughout tlie year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11, 
supplemented by a weekly seminary. 

6. Hig^her Calculus, a. Harmonic Functions. Lectures. This 
will, as soon as possible, be made a separate course running through 
the year. Fall term. b. Theory of Functions. Winter term, c. Dif- 
ferential Equations. A more advanced course than 5 c. For graduate 
students. Professor Wei^d. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11; supple- 
mented by a weekly seminary. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 69 

7. Detenninaiits and Modem Oeotiletry. For either under- 
gTBduate or graduate students, a. Determinants and the Theory of 
Quantics. Fall term. b. Modem Geometry; the principle of Invari* 
ance. Winter term. e. Modem Geometry of three dimensions, or 
Qoatemions. Spring term. Professor Wei<d. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 2:30; supple* 
mented by a fortnightly seminary. 

8. Analjrtical MechaJiics. a. Statics. Composition and reso- 
lution of forces, the funicular polygon, centers of gravity, moment of 
inertia; friction, etc. Fall term. b. Kinetics. Rectilinear motion, 
projectiles; constrained motion of a particle, the simple and conical 
pendulums; etc. Winter term. c. Mechanics of fluids. An elemen- 
tary course. Spring term. For either undergraduate or graduate 
students. Required of Civil and Electrical Engineering students. 
Assisant Professor Smith. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11; supple- 
mented, for Civil Engineering students, by a three hours course in 
applied mechanics in charge of Professor Magowan (See Course in 
Civil Engineering) and, for special students in mathematics, by a 
weekly seminary. 

9. Advanced Analytical Mechanics, a. Problems in statics 
and dynamics; virtual velocities; the principle of least action, etc. 
Fall term. b. The dynamics of a particle, with special reference to the 
theory of orbital motion. Winter term, c. Hydromechanics. This 
must be preceded by course 6, a. Spring term. For graduate 
students. Professor Smith. 

Three hours a week throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. at 11; 
supplemented by a weekly seminary. 



ASTRONOMY, 



Propessor Weld, Mr. 



The courses in Astronomy are open to all Juniors and Seniors. The 
two here offered may be taken simultaneously or in succession. Others 
will be added as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made. 



70 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The University is provided with a small but well equipped students' 
observatory. 

z. General Astronomy. A course of popular lectures on de- 
scriptive astronomy for the general student. This course may be sup- 
plemented by Course i in Geology, which is given at the same hour. 
Professor Wei4>. 

Three lectures a week throughout the year; Mon., Wed., Pri. at 9. 

2. Practical Aatronomy. The student is taught the use of the 

sextant, transit instrument, clock, chronograph, etc., the arrangement 
of the American Ephenteris and Nautical Almanac; and the general 
principles of time, latitude, longitude, and azimuth determination. 

Professor Wsu) and Mr. . 

Two hours a week throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9; supplemented 
by work at the observatory. 



CIVn. ENGINEERINa 



Prophssor Sims; Assistant Professor Magowan; Mr. Hartman. 

All the subjects will be given at definite hours, and students will not 
be allowed to substitute other subjects for the required Civil Engineer- 
ing studies as specified, without special permission of the Faculty and 
the approval of the professor in chatge. Students of one class will not 
be allowed to take subjects in an advanced class without permission of 
the professor in charge. 

So far as possible, instruction will be given by recitations from text- 
books. But where this method is not practicable, as in limes and ce- 
ments, and in some of the subjects treated under the head of Civil 
Engineering, a text will be followed, the first part of the recitation 
period being devoted to a quiz, and the remainder to a lecture. 

Saturdays, throughout the four years of the course, are devoted in 
part to field work, photography, and blue printing — ^including the 
making of sensitized paper; also to work in the carpenter shop. The 
latter consists chiefly in making models of the structures designed in 
the Senior year, and in practical joinery. For all work requiring no 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 71 

special preparation ontside of class room, such as drawing, field work, 
laboratory exercises, some of the work in graphical statics, etc., two 
hours will be required for one hour of credit. 

French or German. See Course i, under French, page 38; and 
Courses i and 2, under German, page 36. If French be elected in 
Freshman year, English must be taken in Sophomore year; but should 
German be elected, it must be continued through the Sophomore year. 
Freshman year, five hours a week, and Sophomore year, three hours 
a week. 

McUhetnatics. See Courses 2, 3, or 4 and 7, under Mathematics, 
pages 67, 68 and 69. Freshman and Sophomore years, five hours a 
week. 

English. See Courses i and 4, under English, page 41. For 
those electing French, two hours a week through the Freshman, 
and three hours a week through the Sophomore years; and for those 
electing German, two hours a week through the Freshman year. 

Drawing*. For General Scientific, Electrical and Civil Engineer- 
ing students. Geometrical and Mechanical Drawing. Orthographic, 
oblique, isometric and cabinet projections, and lettering. Linear 
perspective, shades and shadows. The work is given principally by 
means of personal instruction. The preliminary principles are studied 
from text and reference books and their application is employed in 
making drawings from models and machinery to exact scale. The 
course includes for Civil Engineering students work in graphical 
Arithmetic. Assistant Professor Magowan and Mr. HarTman. 

Freshman year, fall and winter terms, ^-^t, hours a week. 

Blementary Machine Drawing. For Electrical Engineers. A 
study in delineation of brackets, shaft-hangers, screws, pillow blocks, 
gearing and other elementary parts of machines. Assistant Professor 
Magowan and Mr. Hartman. 

Freshman year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Blementary Snryesring, For Civil and Electrical Engineering 
students. The construction, adjustment and use of the compass, level, 
and transit. Field practice in surveying, platting of notes and com- 
putation of areas. Assistant Professor Magowan and Mr. Hartman. 

Freshman year, spring term, five hours a week for Civil, and two 
hours a week for Electrical Engineering students. 



72 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

I^and SttrveyinST* Recitations and lectures, and field work witli 
transit, level, and solar compass; making profiles, leveling and drain- 
age surveys. A section of land is surveyed and the location of all 
natural and artificial features determined and noted. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Magowan and Mr. Hartmak. 

Sophomore year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Mappinfi^ and Surveying, Pen topography, including the mak- 
ing of topographical symbols; platting of section survey from notes 
taken during the previous term, and making a finished map of the 
same. United States public land surveys, determination of true meri- 
dians, and a study of the rules and Supreme Court decisions govern- 
ing re-surveys and re-locations of lost or obliterated comers. Assist- 
ant Professor Magowan. 

Sophomore 3^ar, winter term, three hours a week. 

Toposrraphical Suryejdnsf and Mapping:. Including a study 
and the use in the field of Stadia, Gradienter, and Plane table, etc., 
and the making of finished contour maps. Assistant Professor 
Magowan. 

Sophomore year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Deactiptive Geometty. The work in this study includes prob- 
lems on the point, line, and plane. The simpler geometrical solids, 
shades, and shadows, single and double curved and warped surfaces, 
and the generation and development of the same. Mr. Hartman. 

Sophomore year, winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

Electricity and Ma^yietism. See Course ii, under Physics, 
page 57. This course is designed especially for the students in Civil 
Engineering, the object being a better general understanding of this 
important subject, both in general theory, and in the practice of mak- 
ing electrical measurements; also to give a more thorough knowledge 
of electricity, preparatory to taking up the study of the Dynamo and 
Motor, in the winter term, the importance of which to t&e Civil 
Engineer is fully appreciated, and the subject is adequately given. 

Junior year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Analytical Mechanics, See Mathematics, Course 8, page 69. 
Junior year, fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 



COLtEGlATB DEPARTMENT. 73 

Mechaiilca of MaterlalB. For students in Civil and Electrical 
Engineering. The treatment of this subject is designed to be such 
that the student shall acquire a thorough training in the elementary 
principles of the Mechanics of Materials, and he is then required to 
verify by his own investigations, the experimental laws and many of 
the derived formulae. Numerous problems taken from actual engi- 
neering practioe are given for solution frem time to time, in order that 
the student may be trained in the application of his knowledge. The 
study includes the resistanoe and elasticity of materials, resistance of 
pipes and riveted joints, bending and resisting moments, shears, elas- 
tic curve, deflection of simple, cantilever, restrained and continuous 
beams; strength of columns with concentric and excentric loading, 
torsion and shafting and combined stresses, etc. Assistant Professor 
Magowan. 

Junior year, three hours a week in fall and winter term. 

Railroad Cttrrea. The solution of simple and compound curves 
and turn-outs. Enough field work is given to familiarize the student 
with the field methods of locating and running curves. Mr. Hartman. 

Junior year, fall term, three hours a week. 

Steam Bngine and Locomotiye. The subject is treated under 
four heads, Heat, Steam, Engine, and Boiler. Under Heat is treated 
the economic combustion of fuel. Under Steam the physical proper- 
ties and the energy contained. Under Engine the modem types of 
simple and compound engines are discussed, with special reference to 
the locomotive. The students are given practical problems and are 
required to ascertain the indicated horse power from actual indicator 
carda, and to determine the efficiency of various engines from assigned 
data. The modem types of boilers are then discussed. Compressed 
air is also considered in connection with the transmission of power. 
Professor Sims. 

Junior year, fall term, two hours a week. 

Orapliical Statica. The course is so arranged that this subject 
precedes the analjrtical determination of stresses. The student is thus 
given a mental photograph of the stresses in various members of 
ilmct u res, and a ready and impressive means of comparison. The 
analysts, by this method, of roof tmsses is first taken up, followed by 
the plate girder, and simple, continuous cantilever and swing bridges 



76 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

find the weakest points of the structures and the factor of safety of 
each member, joint, and fastening. Professor Sims. 

Senior year, fall term, four hours a week. Winter term, two hours 
a week. 

Geology, See Courses i, 2, and 3, under Geology, pp. 63, 64. Senior 
year, fall term, five hours a week. Winter term, four hours a week. 

Sanitary Snffineerinsf, The work offered under this course 
includes principally, sewers and sewerage, and the cleaning of cities 
and towns. The separate and combined systems of sewers are studied 
and discussed. The details of various sewer systems as set forth in 
plans and specifications for their construction are carefully studied. 
The cost of construction as taken from current contract prices is 
especially noted, and the arrangement and action of plumbing fixtures 
are incidentally studied. The growing importance of this subject is 
fully realized, and it is the intention to keep the instruction fully 
abreast of the demands and needs of the present, and if possible, anti- 
cipate future needs and methods. Assistant Professor Magowan. 

Senior year, fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

Resistance of Materiala, For Civil and Electrical Engineers. 
This subject includes the strength and resistance of engineering 
materials, their behavior under stress and the methods of their curing 
and preservation. Professor Sims. 

Senior year, winter term, two hours a week. 

Water Supply Sngineerins:. A study of the methods of col- 
lecting, purif3dng, storing, and distributing water; also the designing 
of a water supply system from assigned data. Assistant Professor 
Magowan. 

Senior year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Specificationa and Contracts. A study of various standard 
specifications and a discussion of the effect of general clauses in con- 
tracts on same. Professor Sims* 

Senior year, spring term, four hours a week. 

Thesis. At the close of the spring term of the Senior year, an 
acceptable original thesis may be required from each student before 
graduation. 

For more detailed information and description of course send for 
special announcement of Civil Engineering. 



COLLBGIATE DEPARTMBNT. 77 



MILITARY SCIENCB AND TACTICS. 



I^IBirrBNANT VOGDBS. 

Instruction in this department is prescribed for all male students of 
the Collegiate department, except such as are especially excused. 
Students who, for any valid reason, may desire to be excused must 
appear in person before the military committee, consisting of the 
ocnmnandant and five student captains, on the Friday immediately 
succeeding the beginning of each term. Those who claim exemption 
on account of physical disability, when the same is not apparent, must 
present to the committee a certificate from the battalion surgeon. All 
students not specially excused will report to the Professor on the 
Monday immediately following the beginning of the term. 

OROANia^ATION. 

The students are organized for instruction into a battery of artillery 
consisting of two gun detachments and an infantry battalion consist- 
ing of four companies, a band and the necessary staff officers. The 
commissioned officers are selected from the Senior, the sergeants from 
the Juniors, the corporals from the Sophomore class. The officers 
and non-commissioned officers are selected, for character, military 
record, knowledge of the drill regulations and general aptitude. 

UNIFORM. 

But one style of uniform is worn, known as the undress or fatigue 
uniform. It consists of a dark blue suit and is to be worn on all occa- 
sions of military duty; it can be procured either before or immediately 
after being admitted. A detailed description will be furnished on 
application to the President. 

Uniforms can be obtained in the vicinity at a cost of from $i3 to 
|i8. 



7« 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



0RGANI2;ATI0N of BATTAI/ION, 

1896 - 97* 

STAFF AND NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

1st Lieutenant and Adjutant R. O. Brown. 

I St Lieutenant and Quartermaster J. Petersberger. 

Sergeant Major L. A. Swisher. 

Quartermaster Sergeant H. E. Taylor. 



COMPANY **A." 



Captain G. S. Schae£fer. 

ist Lieutenant H. H. Hutchinson. 

ist Lieutenant G. S. Gibbs. 

2nd Lieutenant I. K. Hull, 

ist Sergeant F. A. Soleman. 

E. A. Bond. 



Sergeants 



Corporals. 



Lloyd Howell. 
J. E. Rederick. 
G. M. Rea. 
H. Carr. 
F. G. White. 
F. H. Williams. 



COMPANY "B." 

Captain F. Larrabee. 

ist Lieutenant Geo. M. Johnson. 

2nd Lieutenant C. S. Smith. 

ist Sergeant Geo. H. Carter. 

E. W. Heck. 



Sergeants 



Corporals. 



O. Veblen. 
F. Hollingsworth. 
J. E. Balle. 
Roy A. M. Collins. 
H. C. Horack. 
I4* r^. Lee. 
I B. D. Middleton. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



79 



COMPANY "C." 



Captain B. F. Thomas. 

ist Lieutenaut Frank La Force. 

2nd Lieutenant S. J. Sayers. 

i»t Sergeant W. N. StuU. 

Ralph Otto. 
Sergeants -j E. E. Hobby. 

John Beardsley. 

W. B. Chase. 

C. C. Bradley. 

C. J. Meier. 

C. W. Startsman. 



Corporals. 



»> 



COMPANY "D. 

Captain » C. W. Sears. 

1st Lieutenant E. Simmons. 

2nd Lieutenant A. A. Paisley. 

1st Sergeant. J. R. Frailey. 

' H. S. Colony. 

Sergeants - Maro Johnson. 

, F. C. Blume. 
R. D. Blackmore. 
A. J. Burt. 
F. C. Neal. 
I E. H. Yale. 



Corporals, 



BATTBRY. 

Captain B.D.Willis. 

ist Lieutenant J. D. Kiser. 

2nd Lieutenant C. S. Poster. 

ist Sergeant F. S. Holsteen. 

LeRoy D. Weld. 



Gunners. 



W. H. Eaton. 



So STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instniction is both practical and theoretical. 

Firsi Year, Practical instruction: three hours a week, spring and 
fall terms, 1:15 to 2:15; one hour a week, winter term, 4:30 to 5:50. 
Practical instruction in Infantry, school of the soldier, company and 
battalion; extended order and ceremonies; Rifle firing at 100, 200, 300, 
500 and 600 yards. Theoretical: one hour a week, winter term, 4:50 
to 5:30. Recitations, infantry, drill regulations and manual of guard 
duty. 

Second Year. Practical instruction: Infantry, same as first year; 
practical instruction: artillery in service of field guns (foot battery) 
with mechanical movements and saber exercise; rifie firing, same as 
first year. Theoretical: winter term, one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. 
Recitations, service of security and information. 

Third Year, Practical: same as second year. Theoretical: win- 
ter term; one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. Recitations, tactics and or- 
ganization. 

Fourth Year, Practical: same as above. Theoretical: winter term 
one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. Lectures on tlie organization of the 
army of the United States, United States army regulations, preparation 
of the usual reports and returns pertaining to a company and post. 
Lectures on military topography and reconnaissance and elementary 
field engineering. 

The following students, members of the graduating class of '96, were 
reported to the Adjutant General of the Army in compliance with G. 
O. 15, A. G. O. 1890, as having shown special aptitude for military ser- 
vice: L. T. Jackson, S. C. Smith, C. E. Dakin. The following were 
reported to the Adjutant General of the State: L. T. Jackson, S. C. 
Smith, C. E. Dakin, H. E. Radasch, W. H. Clark, R. L. Emr>', W. 
M. Graves, R. M. Arey, 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 8i 



COURSES OF STUDY FOR GRADUATES. 



It is the aim of the University to furnish facilities for advanced 
study oommensunite with the demand for such work. As the number 
of graduate students has increased, especially of candidates for 
advanced degrees, the courses of study have been extended to meet 
their needs. No set courses of study leading to the degree of Master 
ol Science are provided, each candidate for one of these degrees pur- 
suing an independent line of study, in which regular University 
ooofses are usually combined with special research work, often 
Ofigutal in character, laid out with the advice of the professors and 
carried oot under their charge. 

The elastic nature of the elective system as here adopted renders 
the more advanced courses in many branches as valuable to the 
graduate as to the advanced undergraduate. The Seminaries, for 
instance, hold out encouragement and opportunities for a great deal 
of original study and research. The same thing may be said of a 
number of the higher courses in the different departments. In the 
following pages will be found grouped together those courses which 
are of special interest to graduates. In every case courses intended 
for graduates only (B) are distinguished from those open also to 
undergraduates (A). To the former, undergraduates are only admit- 
ted under exceptional circumstances and subject to the discretion 
of the professor in charge of the work. 

I^ATm XrANOUAGB AND UTSRATURB. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 
Courses 5, 6, 15, 17, 18, (See pp. 33 and 34). Professor Curribr. 
Courses 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, (loc. dt.) Mr. PoTT«R. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

Seminary in Ardueology. For 1897-8 the subject will be the 
Topography and Archseology of Rome and the vicinity. Professor 
Currier. 



82 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ORBBK I/ANGUAG9 AND IrlTBRATUItS. 

A. Course open both to graduates and undet^graduates. 
Plato's Gorgias, Thesetetus and selections from the Republic. 

B. Course open to graduates only. 
Aristophanes: Special attention will be given to the purpose aud 
influence of Greek comedy, and to its value as a picture of Athenian 
life. 

GBRMAN IrANGUAOB AND I^ITBRATURB. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

1. German Seminary. This course is devoted to the study of special 
periods of German literature, of individual authors or of particular 
literary movements. Professor WiwoN. 

2. Middle High German. Middle High German Grammar, with a 
comparison of New High German Syntax and Middle High German 
Syntax. Selections from the Nibelungenlied, Gudrun and the poems 
of Walther von der Vogelweide. Professor WiwoN. 

FRENCH I^ANGUAGB AND I^ITBRATURB. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undeigraduates. 

1. History of French I^iterature. I/ectures in the French Lan- 
guage. Text-books: Duval's Litt^rature francaise; Montaigne's De 
rinstitution des Bnfans. Professor Van Stbbndbrsn. 

2. Seminary in 13th Century French Literature. Professor Van 
STBBNDBRBN. 

SNGI^ISH IrANGUAGB AND IrlTBRATURS. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 
During the year 1897-8 candidates for the master's degree may take 
work in the following Senior courses: 

1. Seminary in the Bnglish Novel. See Course 6, under Bnglish, 
p. 41. Professor Wauchopb. 

2. The Bnglish Drama. See Course 7, p. 42. Mr. Cook. 

3. The Bngliah Baeayists and Orators. Sec Course 10, p. 42. Mr. 
Kbi#i#y. 



COLI/EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 83 

4. English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. See Course 9, 
p. 42. Professor Wauchops. 

B. Course open to graduates only. 

5. Anglo-Saxon. For detailed information see Course 13, p. 43. 
Professor Wauchopb. 

6. Gothic and Old Saxon. See Course 14, p. 43. Professor Wau- 



The instructors in English will hold themselves ready to assist 
competent graduate students in planning for other lines of special 
study. In special cases where there are no classes organized, resident 
graduates may, at the discretion of the Professor, pursue various inde- 
pendent lines of work under his direction. . 

HI8TORY. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

1. The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era. Lectures. Fall 
and winter terms. Two hours a week. Professor Wuxoz. 

2. The Nineteenth Century History of Europe. Lectures. Spring 
teixn. Two hours a week. Professor Wixcoz. 

3. Constitutional History of the United States. Lectures. Three 
hours a week. Professor Wii/X)x. 

4. Seminary in Early English History. Three terms. Two hours 
a week. Professor Wn^oz. 

5. Seminary in United States History. Three terms. Two hours a 
week. Professor Wnxoz. 

Spedal research work is also provided for those who intend to take 
the Biaster's degree in History as the major study. This work is con- 
ducted personally by the Professor of History and, in each case, is 
along the lines of the candidate's dissertation for the degree. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

6. Seminary in the French Revolution. Two hours a week. Pro- 
fessor Wixxox. 

This consists, so far as possible, in a critical and comparative study 
of original sources. Controverted points receive special attention. 

7. Seminary in the Period of Napoleon. Three terms. Two hours 
a week. Professor WnAX>z. 



84 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

8. Seminary in the Protestant Reformation. Three terms. Two 
hours a week. Professor Wiw:ox. 

POIrlTICAI/ 8CIBNCB. 

A. For graduates and undergraduates. 

1. Economics, advanced course. A study in economic theorj', his- 
torical and critical, as described under Courses 6 and 9, on page 48. 
Throughout the year. Professor I^oos and Dr. Shambaugh. 

2. Economic Policy. The courses in public finance, currency and 

banking, transportation, diplomacy and foreign relations, described 

in the undergraduate statement, on pp. 47-51, as Courses 7, 3, 4 and 

15, with such additional work as may be prescribed. Open only to 
those who have a fair knowledge of economic theory. Throughout 

the year. Professor Loos. 

3. Principles of Government in the United States. The principles 
of government in the United States will be studied through primary 
sources: colonial charters, commonwealth constitutions, leading state 
papers prior to 1787, the Federalist and other contemporaneous essays 
on the Constitution, leading state papers and political documents 
from 1787 to 1870, the important speeches of Jackson, Webster, (Sal- 
houn and Lincoln, ordinances of secession, etc. Throughout the year. 
Dr. Shambaugh. 

4. Political Theory and Comparative Constitutional Law. The 
outlines of political theory will be presented in the fall term. A com- 
parative study of the leading features of the constitutions of the 
United States, England, France and Germany will be undertaken in 
the winter and spring terms. Throughout the year. Dr. Shambaugh. 

5. Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence. Lectures with 
assigned readings. Throughout the year, hours to be appointed. Dr, 
Har&is. 

6. Sociology. Part i. Lectures during the fall term on the primary 
factors and forces of social phenomonia; special attention is given to 
the earliest phases of political organization. Part 2. In the winter 
term, police, sanitation, pauperism, and crime receive special attention; 
this will be followed in the spring term by a study of municipal gov- 
ernment, with special attention to social problems. Throughout the 
year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 10. Professor Loos. 



COLi:<EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 85 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

7. Political Philosophy. A study in political theory, classical and 
modem, with some notice of state forms. Lectures with critical read- 
ing of Aristotle's Politics during the fall term; and Green on Political 
Obligations and Sidgwick's Elements of Politics during the winter and 
spring terms, Tu., Th., at 10. Professor Loos. 

8. Seminary in Political Science. It is the aim of the Seminary to 
encourage special investigations. Questions in politics, economics, 
statistics, finance, anministration or law may be taken for special 
research. Prom time to time papers are read, and then familiarly 
criticised and discussed. Throughout the year, hours to be appointed. 
Professor LOGS and Dr. Shambaugh. 

PHU^OSOPHY. 

A. Courses open to graduates and to undergraduates. 

1. Philosophy of Nature. The principal subjects discussed will be 
final causes, the philosophy of evolution, and materialism. Lectures, 
theses, and private reading. Professor Patrick. 

2. Abnormal Psychology. The principal subjects discussed will be 
sleep, dreams, somnambulism, hypnotism, automatism, alterations of 
personality, telepathy, and psychical research. lectures, theses, and 
private reading. Assistant Professor Gii^BSRT. 

In addition to these courses, undergraduate Courses in philosophy 
4 and 6 may be taken by graduate students. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

3. Special Researches in Psychology. Original investigations of 
special problems in normal and abnormal psychology and child study. 
Laboratory work and theses. The results of these investigations, if of 
sufficient worth, will be published in the Studies in Psychology. 
Assistant Professor Gii«bkrt. 

4. Seminary in Philosophy. Papers and discussions upon special 
problems in philosophy. The subjects studied the past year were 
pessimism, the philosophy of India, and mysticism. Professor Patrick. 

5. Seminary in Psychology. Reports and discussions upon ad- 
vanced problems in psychology, such as the nature of the mind, theory 
of knowledge, the relation of mind and body, and kindred subjects. 
Assistant Professor Gii«bert. 



86 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

PEDAGOGY. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 

1. Philosophy of Education and Practice of Teaching. Lectures 
and recitations. It is the purpose in this course to set forth the aims 
of education, as these aims have been developed in educational history; 
also to treat somewhat fully the doctrines of the educational leaders of 
recent times, and finally to illustrate the application of these doctrines 
in teaching. Pall term: Educational Aims and Doctrines. Comenius, 
Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart. This part of the course will include a 
special treatment of the Herbartian pedagogy and a discussion of ed- 
ucational values. Winter term: Teaching and Governing. This part 
of the course will embrace a treatment of the formal steps of instruc- 
tion, an exposition of methods of teaching and lectures on sanitation. 
Spring term: Secondary Education. In this part of the course, at- 
tention will be given to the organization of courses of study and 
methods of instruction in high schools. Professor McConnkItI*. 

2. School Systems. This course will require of the students an 
examination of the state and city systems of the United States. Lec- 
tures and reports. Professor McConnsi^i,. 

3. Child Study. In this course the history, literature and methods 
of work in child study will be treated. Professor McCONNKi/ir. 

Graduate students in these courses, in addition to the work expected 
of undergraduate students will be required to make a special study of 
one or more of the subjects included in the course selected. 

B. Courses open to graduate students only. 

4. Public School Conditions. This course will consist of concrete 
studies of public school conditions, and will be statistical and descrip- 
tive. It will be taken as individual work and will be under the direc- 
tion of Professor McConnbi^i.. 

5. Elementary Education in Germany. Iti this course the student 
will be required to make a special study of the application of the Her- 
bartian principles in the elementary schools of Germany. The student 
must be able to read German. Professor McCoknbItI*. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 87 

MATHI$MATIC8. 

The courses outlined below are offered to graduate students. 

1. Integral Calculus. Hyperbolic functions, definite integrals, 
including the beia and gofntna functions and elliptic integrals; the 
elements of differential equations. Lectures throughout the year; sup- 
plemented by a weekly seminary. Professor Wbi«d. 

2. Higher Calculus. Harmonic functions; theory of functions; 
differential equations. Lectures throughout the year; supplemented 
by a weekly seminary. Professor Wbi^d. 

3. Determinants and Modern Geometry. This course is supple- 
mented by a fortnightly seminary. Professor Wbi«d. 

4. Anal3rtical Mechanics. Statics; dynamics; the mechanics of 
fluids. This course is supplemented by a weekly seminary. Assistant 
Professor Suith. 

5. Advanced Mechanics. Virtual velocities, the principle of least 
action; dynamics of a particle with reference to the theory of orbital 
motion; hydromechanics. Lectures throughout the year; supplemented 
by a weekly seminary. Assistant Professor Smith. 

Further details regarding the above courses will be found on pages 
67-69. 

It is to be noted that in each of these courses a knowledge of the 
elements of the differential and integral calculus is implied. Graduate 
students in other lines of work may, however, take as a minor either 
of the two elementary courses in calculus offered to undergraduates. 
Sec Courses 3 and 4. 

The courses in mathematics cannot, in general, be taken in absentia. 

The following schedule is recommended to those wishing two years 
graduate work: 

First year: Review elementary calculus; integral calculus; analyti- 
cal mechanics; minor, subject to the approval of the Faculty. See pp. 

67-69. 
Second year: Higher calculus; determinants and modem geometry; 

advanced mechanics; minor, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 
See pp. 68, 69. 

Each candidate for a degree will be required to submit a thesis rep- 
resenting original investigation in either pure or applied mathematics. 



88 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



A. Courses open to both graduates and undeigradnates. 

1. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. This conrse consists of 
lectures and laboratory work, and comprises an experimental study of 
cryoscopic, ebulioscopic and vapour density methods for the determin- 
ation of molecular weights, of the speed of chemical reaction, of co- 
efficient chemical affinity, and of other problems of like character. 
Only in even numbered years. Professor Andrews. 

2. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Professor And&kws. 

3. l/ccture and Laboratory course in Crystallography and Crystal 
Measurements. Mr. Wai^kbr. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

4. Research work in Organic Chemistry. Professor Andrsws. 

5. Research work in Physical and Inorganic Chemistry. Professor 
Andrkws and Mr. Endk. 

PHYSICS. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

1. Special Investigation or Research, to follow 4 and 5, page 56. 
Professor VSBi«EN and Mr. Bowman. 

2. Theory of Direct Current Dynamos and Motors. Professor 
Vbbi^sn. 

3. Theory of Electricity. Direct currents twice a week. Professor 
VSBi^KN. Alternate currents three times a week. Mr. Bowman. 

4. Alternate Current Machinery. Pol3rphase current machines 
twice a week. Professor Vbbi^kn. The transformer, three times a 
week. Mr. Bowman. 

5. Heat and Thermodynamics. Mr. Bowman. 

6. Seminary. Systematic and critical reading of ph3rsical joui^ 
nals. Meetings every week through the year. Professor Vbbun. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

The physical laboratory affords opportunity for such special work 
and research as may be desired for additional minor and major courses. 
Work may be laid out for those who wish, in any special line, and 
will include both experimental and theoretical treatment of the 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 89 

bfanclies choaen. For those who prefer it a general major course in 
physics will be arranged by a suitable selection from the different 
courses offered. 

6BOLOGV. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

1. Invertebrate Paleontology, or Course 3, described on page 64, is 
offered to graduate and undergraduate students who have previously 
taken Course 2, This course can only be taken as a minor by candi- 
dates for the Master* s degree. Professor Calvin. 

2. Economic Geology of the United States may be taken on the 
nme terms as i. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

3. Graduate students who elect geology as a major will be assigned 
work involving original research in some branch of geology or 
paleontology. This work may embrace such subjects as describing 
and mapping the geologplcal formation of some selected area. Pleisto- 
cene geology of some country or group of coimtries, the stratigraphic 
distribution of the fauna of a given geological formation, the critical 
study of certain selected geological faunas, the geological and geo- 
graphical range of certain zoological groups of organisms, or the evi- 
dence of evolution in successive geological fauna. Throughout the 
year, daily. Professor Cai^vin. 

BOTANT. 

A. Courses open to both undergraduates and graduates. 
Courses 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9, as described on pp. 65, 66, are open to grad- 
uates who may select botany as a minor. The completion of Courses 
1, 2 and 3, as described on pp. 64, 65, or the equivalent is presupposed 
in all cases. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

I. Histology. The preparation and critical study of material illus- 
trative of the structure of some special group of either sporophytes or 
spennaph3rtes; or the critical study of some special organ or tissue as 
developed in different plant grou]>s. Professor Macbridb and Assist- 
ant Professor Shuock. 



90 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

2. Physiology. Practical experimentation in laboratory and field, 
with the object of solving, so far as may be practicable, some physio- 
logical problem as presented in the case of a selected plant or group 
of plants; or the critical study of the function of some special organ, 
or gproup of tissues. Other topics may be found in research relative to 
the effect of environment, cross and self-fertilization, etc., in the mat- 
ter of the distribution and differentiation of species, law of heredity, 
and kindred problems. Professor Macbrids and Assistant Professor 
Shimkk. 

3. Systematic Botany. Comparative study of the species of plants 
found in special geographic areas in connection with an investigation 
of the laws governing geographic distribution; studies of special 
natural orders of plants, cryptogamic or phenogamic, with reference 
to their taxonomy, relationships, distribution, etc. ; comparative stud- 
ies of plants of economic importance, their relationships and history; 
studies in problems of local forestry, especially as related to condi- 
tions found in the Mississippi Valley. Professor Macbride and 
Assistant Professor Shimkk. 

AKIlCAXr MORPHOIrOOY AND PHYSIOI^OOY. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergradutes. 

1. Microtomy. laboratory work. Methods employed in the pre- 
paration of animal tissues for microscopical study, methods of draw- 
ing, and methods of reconstruction from sections. Assistant Professor 
HOUS9R and Mr. BuRGB. 

2. Comparative Neurology. Laboratory study of the central ner- 
vous system and the terminal sense organs by means of the technique 
of Golgi, Weigert, Nissl, and Bhrlich. Lectures twice a week. Assist- 
ant Professor HouSBR and Mr. Burgb. 

3. Vertebrate Embryology. Laboratory work, accompanied by a 
aeries of lectures. The lectures discuss the general problems of ver- 
tebrate embryology, and are supplemented by collateral reading. The 
laboratory work embraces the study of the chick at different stages of 
development. Assistant Professor HousBR and Mr. Burgb. 

B. Open to graduates only. 

4. Research Course. Facilities for original investigation will be 



COIylyEGIATB DEPARTMENT. 91 

provided for those who select work in this subject as a major. The 
specific character of such work will he determined by individual con- 
sidetations, bat, in general, a problem will be assigned for independent 
investigation through tne use of refined laboratory methods. Candi- 
dates for this work are supposed to have a biolog^ical training at least 
equivalent to that provided by undergraduate Courses i, 2/ and 5. 
Assistant Professor HouSBR. 



A. Courses open both to g^raduates and undergraduates. 

1. Lectures in Speculative Zoology. Two hours a week. This 
course is devoted to a presentation of the more prominent theories 
concerning the origin and evolution of animal forms and a historical 
review of the position held by the most prominent workers in specu- 
lative zoology. Special attention will also be paid to a study of the 
habits, instincts, and intelligence of animals. The course will con- 
tinue through the year. Professor NtJTTiNG. 

2. Thesis. Equivalent to two terms' work. Advanced work in 
any group of animals of which the museum contains a sufficient 
ieries. Free access to any specimens or books on the musetmi floor 
is accorded to students doing thesis work in zoology. Professor Nut- 
ting. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

3. An exhaustive systematic discussion of any limited group of 
animals of which the museum affords sufficient material and the 
library sufficient literature. 

In several groups such as birds, echinoderms, molluscs, Crus- 
tacea, coleoptera and coelenterata, the museum can now offer facili- 
ties for the most advanced systematic work, both the material and 
literature being adequate. 

4. Special investigation along the line of Speculative TMiogj, 
t. g., coloration of animals, geographical distribution, variation, 
nattual selection, etc. 



92 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



ABYANCBD DBGRSBS. 

The degrees of Master of Arts, or Master of Science, will be con- 
ferred upon resident graduates on the following conditions: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of this University, or of an 
accredited University or College. 

2. He must have pursued, during one or more years, a course of 
graduate study at this University, covering one major and one minor 
subject. In a two years* course, one major, and two minors, may be 
allowed. His studies during this time are to be under the immediate 
supervision and control of the professors immediately concerned, and 
be subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

3. In all cases, the minor, (or minors), must be closely allied to 
the major subject. 

4. He must submit a thesis of at least 5,000 words, showing 
marked attainment in some branch of learning. The subject of this 
thesis must be announced to the Faculty for approval, not later than 
the second Friday in December, and the thesis itself must be pre- 
sented to the Examining Committee at a date to be set by the professor 
in charge of the thesis work, not later, in any case, than May 20th, of 
the year in which the degree is to be granted. 

5. He must at the close of his course, pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion, both oral and written, conducted by a committee which shall 
consist of three professors, selected by the Faculty for this purpose. 

6. The degree of Master of Arts may be granted only after the 
completion of a course mainly literary in character; Master of Science, 
after one mainly scientific. 

Non-resident graduates may receive the Master of Arts or Master of 
Science degree on complying with the following conditions in addi- 
tion to or modifying those enumerated for residents: 

1. The candidate will be required to outline a course of study, 
comprising a major and one allied minor subject, which must be 
approved by a committee of two or more professors named by the 
Faculty to pass upon it. 

2. He shall at the close of each academic year present to the 
Faculty a report, which should constitute a complete synopsis of the 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 93 

year's work, naming topics studied and authors read. These annual 
reports are expected to be specific and comprehensive. 

3. His ^^raduate studies must extend over three years; although in 
exceptional cases, where the candidate devotes a large part of his time 
to study, a shorter course, but in no case less than two years, may be 
accepted. 

The de^pree of Civil Engineer is not conferred upon completion of 
an underg^raduate course in Engineering, but instead thereof, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. The degree C. E. 
will be conferred on graduates who have practiced the profession at 
least three years, and who have submitted an approved thesis, and 
passed a satisfactory examination. 



THE UNIVERSITY, 



IrABORATORIlBS. 



Chemical Iraboratory. 

The chemical laboratory occupies two stories in the new laboratory 
building. This space is divided into twenty-five rooms, designed in 
such a way to aJBford facilities for the prosecution of a wide range of 
chemical work. 

The general laboratory is a room loo feet long by 27 feet in mini- 
mum breadth, lighted from one side only by ten large windows. In 
this and all other rooms of the new building provision has been made 
for perfect ventilation by the construction of numerous air flues. The 
building is heated by steam, which will also be freely used for chemi- 
cal purposes, as for dr3ang-ovens, distillation, etc. 

The lecture hall is built in amphitheater form with raised seats. It 
will accommodate nearly two hundred students, every one of whom 
can clearly see the lecture table and any experiment that may be per- 
formed there, even from the most distant parts of the room. 

The size of the building on the ground is 150 x 105 feet. In all the 
rooms, cross lights have been avoided, and in every respect, the de- 
signer and the architect, respectively the Professor of Chemistry and 
the Professor of Civil Engineering at the University, have spared no 
pains to meet every reasonable demand in the construction of a thor- 
oughly modem and substantial structure, adapted as perfectly as 
means would permit to its spedal uses. 

A storage battery and dynamo in connection with a gas engine fur- 
nish the electricity to the various laboratories for electrolysis and other 
uses. Espedal facilities in the way of apparatus are provided for the 
study of physical chemistry. 

94 



COI/I/EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 95 

Physical Iraboratory. . 

The physical laboratory occupies the first floor and the basement of 
the North bnilding, with an available floor space of more than 8,000 
square feet. 

In the basement is the large engine and dynamo, containing a gas 
engine which drives a shaft twenty feet long. To this shaft are belted 
the d3mamos, of which there are five of from one to ten horse-power 
capadty, and representing several types. Here also is a cable switch- 
board, meters, lamps, and other apparatus. In this room, and driven 
by the same engine, are a large lathe, benches, and the usual tools for 
wovking metal. In the battery room are some 45 accumulators of dif- 
ferent varieties. A large and commodious photometer room is sup- 
plied with a complete Kruess photometer. One basement room has 
been equipped as an electrical laboratory. Another room is supplied 
with a carpenter's bench and a few wood-working tools. 

On the floor above are eight rooms. The lecture room, with seats 
for some 70 students, is supplied with water and gas and with wires 
from the dynamos and the accumulators. The windows can be easily 
darkened, and there are conveniences for making projections by sun- 
Hght or by electric or other artifical light. A large and well lighted 
room is devoted to the uses of a general laboratory, especially in the 
line of mechanics, and contains a number of balances, air-pumps, a 
calhetometer, and a number of other measuring instruments. Another 
large room contains much of the apparatus for electrical testing. Here 
also is the special physical library with the journals taken by the lab- 
oratory. Three smaller rooms are given respectively to heat, light, 
and magnetism, and are well equipped with apparatus. There are also 
two offices, for the professor in charge and the assistant professor. 

The laboratory is fairly well supplied with lecture apparatus; and 
among the instruments of precision are many of the best and finest to 
be had. The equipment is especially full in mechanics, optics, and 
electricity. Most of the apparatus has been purchased in recent yeara, 
and has been selected with great care; and some has been constructed 
for particular uses in this laboratory. 



96 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

I/aboratoties for Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

The laboratories occupy the west half of the first floor of the Natural 
Science building, together with a portion of the basement, The main 
laboratory for the work of the first year is a large, well lighted room, 
and is supplied with heavy oak, slate-topped tables, furnished with 
drawers and cases for receiving the microscopes and other instruments 
employed in the work. The tables will accommodate twenty-four 
students at one time. The laboratory is furnished with twenty-four 
first-class students* microscopes, and the necessary accessory apparatus 
used in biological investigation. There is also a large series of micro- 
scopical and anatomical preparations here. The laboratoiy for advanced 
work is equipped with special microscopes, sliding microtomes of ap- 
proved pattern, a Minot automatic microtome, imbedding apparatus, 
a thermostat, a large incubator, turn tables, a complete stock of glass- 
ware and reagents, and various pieces of physiological apparatus. 
Opening from the main laboratory are private laboratories for students 
pursuing special lines of investigation. The basement laboratory is 
utilized for the storing of living material, and for special experimental 
work. 

Geology and Paleontology. 

The material for illustrating the work in geology and paleontology* 
embraces: 

1. The museum collections of rocks, clays, building stones, miner- 
als, and fossils. 

2. A large series of maps, charts, lantern slides, photographs, and 
geological models. 

3. A lithological lathe for making rock sections, or sections to illus- 
trate the structure of ancient forms of animals and plants. 

4. Petrographical microscopes. 

5. Photographic apparatus, including a large photomicrographic 
camera. 

6. A large series of negatives from which the students make prints 
to illustrate their permanent note books. 

7. Geological phenomena illustrated within easy reach of Iowa 
City. 



COI<LKGIATE DEPARTMENT. 97 

The sanouiiding neighborhood affords many instructive examples 
of phenomena of interest to the student of geology, At the same 
time it offers nnezcelled opportunies for field work in mapping, mak- 
ing geological sections, tracing strata from one exposure to another 
and making paleontological collections. The Pleistocene deposits aie 
of especial interest. The available material is not only sufficient to 
iUnatxate the ordinary undergraduate courses in geology, but advanced 
students will find enough to occupy their time with profit for two or 
more years. 

Botanical laboratory. 

This laboratory is located on the second floor of the Natural Science 
building, and is in direct communication with the Herbarium. It is 
supplied with heavy oak, slate-topped tables, furnished with drawers 
and cases for the instruments used in microscopic work, and is ar- 
ranged to accommodate twenty-five students at one time. 

Twenty-five compound microscopes, wish necessary accessories, 
section-cutters, etc., are at the disposal of the students. 

Connected with main laboratory are private laboratories for students 
pursuing special lines of investigation. Two of these are furnished 
with special microscopes and apparatus for investigation in Vegetable. 
Physiology. 

These laboratories are well lighted, and in every way adapted to 
satisfactory work. 

Psychological I/aboratory. 

The psychological laboratory occupies the lower floor of the brick 
building. No. 14 North Clinton street, facing the campus. It includes 
a conmiodious lecture room, library and reading room, in addition to 
three quiet, well-lighted rooms for laboratory work, and a dark room. 

The thorough equipment of the laboratory with apparatus and 
needed accessories offers every opportunity for the study of the differ- 
ent senses, memory, illusions, time relations of mental phenomena, 
and the nervous system. 

A partial list of apparatus is as follows: A complete set of instru- ' 
laents for studying the time relations of mental phenomena by the 
graphic method, recording time to the thousandth part of a second; 



9S STATE UNIVBRSrry OP IOWA. 

this set, excluding the smaller necessary accessories, comprises the 
following more important pieces: a recording drum, two induction 
coils, hatteries, multiple key, reaction key, five finger reaction key, 
graphic chronometer, rheocord, too v. d. electro-magnetic tuning fork, 
time markers, automatic contact, galvanometer, touch key, switches, 
commutator, telephone-receivers, Geissler stimulator for sight reac- 
tion, pendulum circuit interrupter, instantaneous exposure apparatus, 
slide inductorium, foil apparatus and speed counter. For the study 
of taste and smell: several varieties of olfactometers and gustatory ap- 
paratus. For touch, muscle sense, temperature and kindred phenom- 
ena: three sets of muscle sense weights, loaded boxes for the study of 
the psycho-physic law and weight illusions, steadiness guage, aesthesio- 
meters, hot and cold spot apparatus, balance scale, four dynamo- 
meters, algometer, Marey tambours, thought-action apparatus, foil, 
muscle-memory apparatus, voluntary motor recorder, spirometer, and 
set of touch weights. For hearing: sound pendulum (by Krille), 
series of 22 Koenig cylinders for highest audible tone, Galton whistle 
with manometer and blower, Appunn's reed, set of tuning forks with 
resonance boxes for illustrating hannony, beats and sympathetic vi- 
bration; set of forks for discrimination of pitch, metronome, two audi- 
ometers, sonometer. For sight: rotation apparatus with Maxwell 
color disks for illustrating mixing of colors, color contrast, etc, con- 
trast apparatus, two tachistosoopes, apparatus for testing color blind- 
ness, Rothe's color-wheel disks, two photometers, binocular and 
monocular apparatus, ejre-musde apparatus, dark box, apparatus for 
outlining the blind spot, zoetrope and perimeter. The addition, 
also, of the latest model of the Zimmerman k3rmograph and Zeitainn 
apparatus during the past year gives increased facilities in dealing 
with all problems requiring the graphic method and investigation of 
the time sense. 

In addition to the apparatus enumerated above might be mentioned 
other numerous pieces for demonstration purposes. The study of the 
nervous system is illustrated by about one hundred charts in addition 
to various models, including Auzoux*8 dissectible model of the brain, 
ear models, eye models, ophthalmotrope, etc. 

The workshop, fitted out with lathe, work bench and necessary 
tools^ forms an indispensable adjunct to the laboratory. 



COI/LB6UTB DBPARTMBNT. 99 



MU8SI7M8. 



Mtuetun of Nattural Hiatory. 

The tmiaetmi of natural history is rapidly growing, and becomes 
daily more valuable through donations of material by friends of the 
UniYeisity. 

By the generosity of the collector, the famous Homaday collection 
of mammals and birds has become the property of the University. 
This coUection contains many rare forms of mammals and birds, and 
is paxticnlarly rich in t3rpical exotic forms from India and Australia. 

Ifr. D. H. Talbot, of Sioux City, has recently donated to the Uni- 
versity his extensive collection of natural history specimens and min- 
erals. This collection contains many thousand specimens, being 
especially rich in mammals, birds, and anatomical preparations. 

Daring the last six years, expeditions for zoological explorations in 
the interest of the University have visited the following regions: 
luimtwtt Islands, Bay of Pundy, Rocky Mountain region. Pacific coast, 
Alaska, mountains of Tennessee, the Winnepeg country. Lake Atha- 
basca, Gt. Slave Lake, the Arctic coast, Siberia, Cuba, Florida Keys, 
British West Indies, and the Bay of Naples. 

An entire rearrangement of the museum has been tmdertaken, and 
a new system of labeling, cataloguing, and exhibiting has been 
adopted, with the intention of making the material embraced of the 
utmost practical use to students of natural historv. 

A rapidly growing library of reference for the use of students of 
loology is placed on the museum floor» and a free use of all the mate- 
rial in the various collections is encouraged, for which purpose a 
cheerful and convenient study room has been provided for the use of 
students and specialists. 

The material embraces: 

X. Oeologicfll CoUectioiui. 

I. A large series of minerals, building stones, fossils, earths, etc., 
collected chiefly in the prosecution of the State geological surveys 
between the years 1856 and 1870. These collections are annually 
incfcasiiig by contributions from various sources. 



loo STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

2. The Calvin collection of American and European fossils. 

3. A superb collection of cretaceous cycads from the Dakota sand- 
stone of the Black Hills. 

4. Recent extensive collections illustrating the cretaceous faunas 
and economic geology of the Black Hills. 

A rapidly growing collection illustrating general economic geology. 

a. Tloological Collection8. 

1. Mammals. A large series of mounted specimens is now on 
exhibition, the great majority being rare and valuable foreign species, 
including a series of marsupials, which surpasses anything of the kind 
west of the Alleghanies. 

Besides the Homaday collection, the museum contains a large num*. 
ber of native mammals, about forty specimens being from the Pacific 
coast. A complete series of the larger mammals of North America is 
rapidly being secured through the kindness of Mr. D. H. Talbot, and 
the efforts of Mr. Prank Russell, who returned from the far North 
with an exceptionally fine series of the large mammals of that r^on. 

2. Birds. The ornithological material in the museum now em- 
braces about 11,000 specimens, about 1,000 of which are exhibited in 
the mounted series, the remainder being included in the study series 
for the use of students and specialists. 

Besides the large collection of native birds, containing nearly all 
the species found in Iowa, the following collections are noteworthy: 

The Homaday collection of birds, containing one hundred and 
twenty-five specimens, nearly all of which are exotics, and many, 
such as the ostrich and emu, of great value. 

The Bond collection of birds of Wyoming, donated together with a 
large collection of Iowa birds, by Mr. Prank Bond, of Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. 

The Harrison collection of British gdme birds and birds of prey, a 
large and valuable series, donated by John Harrison, Esq., of England. 

The Talbot collection of American birds, embracing about 10,000 
specimens. 

A collection of 500 birds from the N. W. Provinces of British Amer-* 
ica, made by the Curator, Mr. Prank Ru9scll and Mr, A. G, Smith,' 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. loi 

A collection of about 600 specimens of birds from the Winnipeg 
country. Great Slave Lake, Athabasca Lake, the Mackenzie River and 
the Arctic coast, made by Mr. Frank Russell. 

The Curator has donated his study series of over eight hundred bird 
skins from North and Central America, and the Bahama Islands. This 
series is of special value to students interested in ornithology. 

3. Reptiles. The alcoholic collection of reptiles has received many 
important additions, among which may be mentioned a number of 
specimens from India, donated by Rev. A. Loughridge, and many 
native specimens presented by students. Regent B. P. Osbom has 
donated his large collection of alcoholic specimens, especially reptiles, 
thus nearly doubling the series of these forms. 

4. Fishes. Professdr B. Shimek has presented the musetmi with 
bis entire collection of fresh-water fishes, of which we now have sev- 
eral hundred specimens, besides a number of marine forms. 

Dnrini^ the past winter a collection of 135 species of the fresh- water 
fishes of Central and Western North America, was donated to the 
UniTeimity by the United States Fish Commission. 

5. Inflects. Assistant Professor Wickham is now engaged in as- 
sorting a large series of the coleoptera of North America, which he 
bas generously donated. All of the foreign coleoptera in this mag- 
Dtfioent collection are now the property of the museum. 

6. Marine Invertebrates. A collection consisting of several thous- 
and specimens of crustaceans, moUusks, star fishes, corals, sponges, 
etc., has been supplemented by a valuable series consisting of several 
hundred alcoholic specimens, many of which are the gift of the United 
States Fish Commission. 

The alcoholic collection has been enlarged by material collected 
during two expeditions to the Bahamas, Cuba and the Florida Keys, 
and thousands of specimens have been added by collections made in 
the Bay of Fundy by Professors Cai«vin and Nutting, 

A car load of marine specimens was secured by the Bahama expedi- 
tion, 1893. This collection contains a large number of deep-water 
forms, placing this University far ahead of all other western institu- 
tions in the matter of marine material for exhibition and study. 

A valuable series of marine forms of the more fragile and delicate 
kinds, such as medusie, sea-anemones, etc., has been secured from the 



102 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Stazione Zoologica at Naples, where the most superb preparations of 
these wonderfully beautiful forms are made. 

7. Terrestrial and Fresh-Water MoUusca. The Shimek collection 
of land and fresh-water shells, embracing nearly all the species known 
to occur in Iowa, together with many exotic species. 

8. Osteological Preparations. A series of mounted skulls and skel- 
etons, illustrating the osteology of typical series of vertebrates, is ex- 
hibited, and is of tlie greatest value to students of comparative anatomy 
and zoology. 

9. Ethnological Material, illustrating tlie handiwork of the Mound 
Builders, Pueblo Indians, Zunis, Moquis, Acomas, Mojaves, Crees, 
Dog Ribs, Metis, KosmoUiks, Piegans, Tchukchees, and Navajos, to- 
gether with skulls and other remains of the ancient and modem in- 
habitants of America. 

Mr. D. H. Talbot, ot Sioux City, has recently added very largely to 
this department of the museum. Mr. Russell has been active in 
securing ethnological specimens illustrating the life and manufactures 
of the Crees and other northern tribes of Indians, and of the Esqui- 
maux. 

During the last year the Museum has received specimens or material 
aid from the following persons: Mr. Edward Abbott, Prof. Alexander 
Agassiz, Mr. N. B. Barber, Mr. John Barnes, Mr. Ventura Barrera, 
Mr. Paul Bartsch, Mr. Arthur J. Cox, Dr. W. H. Dall, Mr. M. W. 
Davis, Mr. Charles Davis, Mr. Vinal Edwards, Prof. Samuel Carman, 
Mrs. Virginia Barrett Gibbs, Mr. G. M. Gray, Mr. William Hoenick, 
Dr. A. O. Hunt, Major Lovelace, Capt. E. C. Murray, Mr. J. H. Ridg- 
way. Dr. E. W. Rockwood, Prof. B. Shimek, Hon. A. W. Swalm, Mr. 
D. H. Talbot, and Prof. A. E. Verrill. 

South American Bzpeditloii. 

Mr. Charles L. Smith was in Nicaragua from August, 1894, to May, 
1896, as botanist for the University. He made handsome collections, 
reports of which will appear in succeeding numbers of the Bulletin 
0/the Laboratariss 0/ Natural History, 



COLI.H6UTE DEPARTMENT. 103 

Scientific PtiblicatioiMi. 

The laboratories of natural history inaugurated in 1888 the publica- 
tion of bnlletins for the porpose of preserving a record of the work 
prosecuted along the lines of botany, geology, and zoology. Three 
volumes have thus far appeared in twelve numbers, and one number 
of the fourth volume is nearly ready. The numbers are sent gratis to 
all correspondents from whom the University receives an equivalent, 
either in publications or material. To others the price is 50 cents a 
number. Address the Secretary of the University. 

The Herbarinm. 

The herbarium is crowded into a single room on the second floor of 
the Natural Science building. It contains: 

1. A very large and constantly increasing collection of fungi, 
chiefly saproph3rtic, from all parts of North and Central America. To 
be classed here is also a large collection of the myxomycetes from all 
parts of the world. 

2. A large collection of ferns and mosses from both hemispheres. 

3. A collection of lichens, representing most of the species east of 
the Rocky Mountains. 

4. A collection of many thousand flowering plants, representing 
very fully the local flora, and specially rich in Central American and 
European forms. The number of plants in the herbarium exceeds 
40,000. 

5. A collection of seeds and fruits (dry) including cones, repre- 
•enting the flora of North America chiefly, but containing also much 
material from the Tropics. 

6. A collection of the principal woods of the United States. 

The herbarium collections, thanks to friends and collectors in 
various parts of the world, are rapidly increasing in extent and value. 
It is hoped that private collectors will hereafter as heretofore find the 
University a proper place for the deposit and care of collections of 
plants. 

Special thanks in this connection are due to B. D. W. Hoi way, A. 
P. Morgan, C. I^. Smith, George Payne, Euclid Sanders, James E. 
Gow, T. J. Pitzpatrick, F. Reppert, J. H. Mills, D. H. Talbot, L. F. 



I04 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Pammel, C. h. Shear, J. B. Ellis, H. F. Wickham, Frank Russell, 
Paul Bartsch, B. Fink, R. I. Cratty, J. E. Cameron, C. W. Weidner, 
C. C. Stover, W. C. Sturgis, Fannie I/angdop, L. M. Cavanaugh, Jno. 
Floerschinger, H. Wieneke, E. A. Spraker, A. O. Hunt, G. B. Rigg, 

T. E. Savage, P. C. Myers, C. W. Irish, Herbert Goddard, and C. W. 
Sears. 

Astronotnical Observatory. 

The students' astronomical observatory is conveniently located on 
the University campus. It is furnished with a five-inch equatorial 
telescope by Grubb, of Dublin, having circles, driving dock, position 
micrometer, helioscope, and solar and stellar spectroscopes, a transit 
instrument by William Wuerdeman, of Washington, a prismatic sex- 
tant and artificial horizon by I'ister and Martins, of Berlin, dock 
dironometer, chronograph, etc. 

The mathematical and astronomical library comprises over one 
thousand volumes, induding many rare and valuable works. The 
periodical literature devoted to these branches of sdence is also well 
represented. 

Sngineerinfi: Iraboratories and DraughUng Rooma. 

The hydraulic laboratory is a room having a floor space of 575 square 
feet. The equipment for 1897-8 will indude the necessary tanks with 
standard orifices, tubes and weirs for free and submerged flow, hook 
gauge, water meters of various kinds, pressure gauges and other 
necessary appliances for illustrating hydraulic prindples; also a Price's 
pneumatic current meter for field gaugings. 

The cement laboratory contains a Riehle 1,000 pound cement tester, 
both an '*S. U. I." and a ''Sims" briquette making madiine, and all 
necessary tanks, mixing sinks, molds, etc., for making complete tests 
of cements. 

The iron, sted, and wood laboratory contains an autographic test- 
ing machine and a 100,000 pound Riehle machine. 

The machine shop contains a metal lathe, planer, and drill-press; a 
35 horae-power automatic cut-off Lansing engine, injector, speed indi- 
cator, all necessary bendi tools, etc. 



I 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 105 

The dnughtiiig rooms are well lighted and equipped with everything 



The department is provided with a field equipment ample to permit 
fall and complete practice in the different kinds of surveying; this 
equipment consists of a vernier compass, a railroad compass, a solar 
compass, levels, and transits with stadia, gradienter and SaegmuUar 
solar attachment, also a plane table of the latest approved form with best 
telescopic alidade and all necessary attachments, together with all the 
rods, flags, chains, tapes, etc., that are necessary to fully equip the 
various classes and divisions in surveying without interferring with 
each other in their work. 

The engineering library consists of 510 volumes of the standard 
works on the various engineering subjects; these books are selected 
from and are a part of the general library of over 37,000 volumes, but 
are arranged in a convenient room adjacent to the drawing rooms, and 
are freely used by the engineering student. All the best engineering 
joumals and periodicals are received, bound, and kept on file. 

In the Tallant memorial library are numerous books on engineering 
subjects which the students are allowed to use subject to the rules 
off the general library. 

Bach engineering student is eligible for membership in the Engi- 
neering Society. This society meets each week, and papera upon 
engineering subjects are prepared and read by the students. 

An engineering journal, The Transit^ is published semi-annually 
by the Univenity. It is edited by the engineering students, and con- 
tuns the resolts of original research in engineering problems, by 
undergraduate students and alumni. 



GBN^RAIr INFORMATION. 



The l^ibrary of the University. 

The libiaries of the University contain in the aggregate 42,000 vol- 
vmcs. The general library is open to students of all departments 
daring eight hours of every week day. Books may also be drawn for 
outside 



io6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The gift of Mr. D. H. Talbot, of Sioux City, Iowa, is a large and 
valuable collection, of about 4500 volumes, — a collection somewhat 
miscellaneous, but chiefly pertaining to natural history, and to 
explorations, voyages, and travels. It comprises some very scarce 
and valuable sets, as well as single volumes. There are a few very old 
volumes, dating from the beginning of the sixteenth century, — valu- 
able not only on account of the subject matter, but also as specimens 
illustrating the history of book-making. 

About seventy American and European periodicals are taken, and 
are kept on the tables of the reading room throughout the year. Many 
of the dailies and weeklies of the State are donated by their publish- 
ers and kept on file. 

The general reading room is a large, well-lighted apartment, sup- 
plied with works of reference and the current periodical literature, 
open from 8 a. m. to 12 m., and from 1:30 to 5 P. M., and is free to all 
students. 

Societies. 

Several literary and scientific societies are maintained by the Faculty 
and the students of the University. They a£ford an important means 
of general culture and scientific research, and thus form a valuable 
element as well as an attractive feature in University life. 

Among those purely literary are the Tabard, Poi^ygon and Ivy 
Lane. The Baconian has for its object discussion of scientific ques- 
tions, and the Poi,iTiCAi« Science Ci«ub discusses questions in history, 
politics, economics, law, education, and ethics. 

The Irving Institute, the Zetagathian Society, the Phii^ma- 
THiAN Society, for young men, and the Hesperian Society and 
Erodei^phian Society, for young women, hold weekly meetings 
for improvement in debate, oratory, writing, and declamation. 

There are also in the institution societies connected with the Engi- 
neering, Chemical, I^w, and Medical departments. 

There is connected with the Irving and Zetagathian Societies a Lec- 
ture Bureau, which furnishes at a small cost during the year a series 
of literary, and musical entertainments of a high order. From time 
to time, also, entertainments, musical, literary and dramatic are given 
by the University Glee Club, the Band, and other student organizations. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 107 

Student PabHcatioas. 

Two periodicals are published by the students: The Quill ^ a weekly 
liteiary magazine; and The Vidette-Reporter, a tri-weekly newspaper; 
both of which a£Ford an excellent opportunity for journalistic work. 
The Junior class publishes a University annual in book form called, 
The Hawkeye, 

Uniyervity Bxtension. 

The University recognizes in the University Extension movement 
an agency of great value in education. It invites correspondence from 
communities which may desire to organize lecture courses on literary 
and scientific subjects, and will to the extent of its ability meet the 
desires of these communities. 

Lecture couraes covering a wide range of subjects are offered by 
members of the University Faculties. 

An arrangement has been made between the University and the 
University Association of Chicago by which, University professors, so 
far as their regular duties will allow, will lecture before the centers 
working under the care of the Association. 

Printed matter explaining the work offered by the University, in- 
cluding syllabi of lecture courses, is published by the Univeraity, and 
can be secured by addressing the Director of University Extension. 



This prize is open to students of all departments of the University. 

Maysr Prizb. — ^Mr. Max Ma3rer, of Iowa City, has established a 
prize of the annual value of $25 for excellence in athletics. The details 
aa to the spedal matters of competition and the method of awarding 
the prize will be publicly announced at the beginning of the year 
1897-8. 

PiCKARD P&I2K. — ^A prize in the form of a rare set of books of the 
value of twenty-five dollars, was offered last year by Dr. J. L. Pickard, 
for the encouragement of extempore speaking, to the student in Poli- 
tical Science who was awarded first rank in competitive extempore 
debate. A aamilar prize of the value of twenty dollars is again offered 
for this year. The competitive debate will take place early in June. 



lo8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Peck Prizes. — Mr. F. W. Peck, of Chicago, has established for the 
Northern Oratorical League prizes of |ioo and I50 to be given to the 
first and second honor men in the annual contests. 

8tadeiit6 and Civil. Authotities. 

The relation of students to all laws and to city ordinances is pre- 
cisely the same as that of other residents of the city. The University 
grounds are as completely under the jurisdiction of the civil authori- 
ties as any other part of the city. 

Means of Moral and RelisnLoua Culture. 

Close Hall has been erected through the exertions of the Young 
Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations; mainly from funds 
contributed by the faculty, students, and alumni of the University 
and the citizens of Iowa City. It is a spacious and convenient build- 
ing, containing a large assembly hall, gymnasium, reading rooms, 
reception room, and bath rooms. It is extensively used for the meet- 
ings of the large and vigorous Christian Associations, as well as for 
the social and literary gathering of the students. 

The churches of the city take a deep interest in the students of the 
University and heartily welcome them to their public services and to 
a share in their religious activities and aodal life. The churches of 
the city are the Baptist, Christian, Congregational, German and Eng- 
lish Lutheran, Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, Protestant Episco- 
pal, Roman Catholic, Unitarian, and Church of God. 

Physical Training: and Athletica, 

The University authorities enooorage physical training as acquired 
in a gymnasium, in military drill, and in the exercises and sports in 
the Athletic Park, but only in such amount and of such character as 
is compatible with, and promotive of the higher objects of the Uni- 
versity. Intercollegiate contests are allowed, but under conditions 
as to membership and organization of teams, and leaves of absence 
determined by the athletic committee of the Faculty. 

Atllletle Park. This field contsins about ten acrea in the im- 
mediate vicinity of the University grounds on which have been oon- 



CX)I/lrEGIATE DEPARTMENT. lo^ 

structed a track, for running and bicycling, tennis courts/ baseball, 
and football fields, and a grand stand. 

Gyauiasitilii. In connection with Close Hall is an excellent 
gymnasinni, equipped with suitable apparatus, lockers, baths, etc. 
This is nnder the direction of a competent instructor, who organizes 
classes for both young men and young women. 

New Collegiate Btdlding. 

The 26th General Assembly passed an act levying a special tax for a 
period of five years of one-tenth mill on the total assessment of the 
State, the proceeds to be devoted exclusively to the erection of build- 
ings for the University. This tax will yield $275,000, and it is the 
intention of the Board of Regents to begin as early as possible the 
construction of a large and well-equipped building for the use of the 
Collegiate Department. 

Bxpenses. 

There are no dormitories and no commons connected with the Uni- 
versity. 

Boarding and lodging in private houses can be obtained for from I3 
tolls a week. 

Onbs are also formed, in which the cost of living is from 1 1.50 to 
fa. 50 a week. 

Room rent varies from 50 cents to I1.50 for each student a week. 

The expense for tuition is as {9II0WS: 

Coll^;iate Department, I^TP^ annum, payable, |io at the begin- 
ning of the first term, f 10 at the beginning of the second term, and 
the balance at the beginning of third term. For one or two terms the 
fee will be $10 each. 

It has been determined, however, by the Board of Regents, that no 
student need be excluded from the University by reason of his inabil- 
ity to pay tuition. Application for reduction of tuition, or for exemp- 
tion therefrom, may be made to the President, and will be considered 
by the Executive Committee, or by the Board of Regents. 

Each candidate for graduation will be required to pay a fee of $$. 



no STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

A fee of $io is required of all candidates for the Master's degree, or 
for the degree of Civil Engineer. 



Ample facilities are afforded in the city for instruction in Book- 
keeping, Stenography and Type-writing, in studies preparatory to the 
University, and in Music, by the High School, the Iowa City Com- 
mercial College and Academy, the Iowa City Conservatory of Music, 
and by private instructors. 



Law Department 



Faculty and Lecturers. 



Chajluss Ashmead Schabppbr, a. M., Ph. D., LL. D.» 

President and Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 

Emun McCi«ain, a. M., LL. D., 

Chancellor, and Resident Prof'essor of I«aw. 

Samuei* Haybs, M. S., Ll. B., 
Resident Professor of Law. 

Jambs A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. B., 

Secretary, and Resident Professor of Law. 

JOHK J. NBY, LL. B., 

Resident Professor of Law. 

Bdward p. Sbbds, LL. B., 

Resident Professor of Law. 

L. G. KllKNB, LL. D., 
Lec tur er on Law. 

GiPFORD S. Robinson, LL. B., 

Lecturer on Law. 

Martin }. Wadb, LL. B., 

Lecturer on Law. 

HORACB B. DBBMBR, LL. B., 
Lecturer oa Law. 

Lbonaro C. Rinaro, LL. B., 
Librarian. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



Preparatory Study; J^ength of Cottrae. 

The profession of law is properly regarded as a learned profession, 
requiring a considerable degree of general education as a preparation 
for its proper study and practice. Those who can take a college course, 
either in whole or in part, before entering upon the prescribed period 
of law study should do so, and it is recommended that in preparatory 
study, special attention be given to American and English History, 
Political Science and International Law. But whether one who desires 
to enter upon the study of law shall have collegiate preparation may 
perhaps be left to his own judgment, with the suggestion that such 
preparation is important to ulthnate professional success, but in order 
that the student may successfully prosecute his studies in the law school 
he should have at least a high school education or its equivalent, and 
this will be insisted upon as a condition for admission to this Depart- 
ment. 

The Statutes of Iowa regulating admission to the bar require two 
years' study of law, and the same term of study is required for gradu- 
ation from the Law Department. The course of study is arranged on 
this basis, extending through two school years of thirty-six weeks 
each, exclusive of vacations, and the students are classified accordingly 
as Juniors and Seniors. The State Bar Association has twice recom- 
mended to the Legislature the extension of the required term of study 
for admission to the Bar to three years and whenever such extension 
is made the Law Department will without doubt, extend its course of 
study to three years, and in this respect as in others strive to keep 
abreast of the best law schools of the country, but so long as a two 
years' term of study is sufficient to secure admission to the bar it is not 
deemed expedient to require a longer term for graduation from the 
Department. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 113 

Methods of InBtmctlon. 

The aim of any coorae of instruction in law may properly be con- 
sidered as twofold: First, to impart a knowledge of the recognized 
principles of the law, and, secondly, to discipline the mind in methods 
of l^;al study. Varioois methods of instruction, each having its 
special merits, are pursued in different schools. They may be roughly 
arranged in three classes, namely, lectures, text-book instruction, and 
study of cases. The peculiar merit of the first is that it may be made 
the means of giving the most vivid and striking picture of legal 
principles; the second furnishes the most convenient means of indi- 
vidual study; and the third, the best discipline in legal thinking. 

In this school the effort is made so to present the subjects as to com- 
bine in the highest practical degree the excellences of these various 



In connection with several of the lecture courses, the students are 
furnished with printed sjmopses, which give in a concise form, and 
more accurately than a student would usually write them in his note- 
book, the principal doctrines of the subject, arranged according to 
some anal3rtical method. On some of the most extensive and impor- 
tant subjects, the students are required to provide themselves with, 
and use text-books in which lessons are to be regularly prepared and 
recited, the recitations either following, or being accompanied with, 
oral explanations more or less formal, calling attention to the impor- 
tant doctrines, and explaining those which may be obscure. The 
study of leading cases is carried on extensively in connection with the 
courses of lectures, references for that purpose being given by tlie 
lecturer, or printed in the synopsis, and the students being frequently 
required to state briefly in the class the points decided in cases assigned 
for that purpose. In some subjects the students are required to pro- 
vide themselves with volumes of selected cases, and the exercise in 
the class consists of a discussion of such cases by members of the 
class, and deduction therefrom of the rules of law on the topic to 
which the cases relate. This exercise in developing the rules of law 
frcun actual cases selected for the purpose, and studied by each stu- 
dent before their discussion in the class, familiarizes the student with 
the methods of investigation pursued by the lawyer and the judge, 



114 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

and gives not only a knowledge of the law on the subject, but a 
discipline in research and in legal thinking not to be attained, it is 
believed, in any other way. As a preparation for this method of study, 
the course in the study of cases is especially valuable. 

The fact that the greater part of the instruction is by resident pro- 
fessors, giving their entire time to the school, makes it possible to 
pursue each subject consecutively, one hour a day, until it is con- 
cluded. The attention of each student being thus directed to but few 
topics at once, he is able to obtain a clearer and more complete con- 
ception of each than would be possible if the instruction were irregu- 
lar and disconnected. 

As an aid and stimulus in study, and also for the purpose of furn- 
ishing satisfactory evidence of progress, written examinations are 
required from time to time on each topic studied in the course, and 
until a reasonable proficiency in each topic has thus been shown, the 
candidate for graduation will not be presented to the committee for 
final examination. 

Schedule of Studies. 

The course of study is so arranged that the Junior and Senior classes 
have separate and distinct courses of instruction throughout, and the 
subjects are divided between the two courses and arranged in each 
course so as to be presented in natural order. 

In the Junior year are placed subjects which are elementary and at 
the same time fundamental. The work of this year is therefore of 
more importance to the student than that of the Senior year, and 
requires careful study, at the same time imparting thorough discipline 
and familiarity with the methods of legal reasoning. It is believed 
that the Junior studies are such as to make of the greatest value to 
the student the services of regular and experienced instructors and the 
advantages of a law school. Unless the principles of law as a system, 
the nature of its important divisions, and the fundamental doctrines 
ef such subjects as Elementary Law, Contract, Torts, Criminal Law, 
Pleading, and Evidence, are thorougly mastered, the whole legal edu- 
cation will be defective and unsatisfactory. 

The conxaes of study are so arranged that the students in each year 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 115 

shall have iaatnu^ioii in studies peculiar to that year for at least two 
hoars a day, that time beinj^ divided between two instructors on sep- 
arate subjects, which are thus carried along together. lu each class a 
third hour of class work will be required during a part of the year. 

The following schedule of study has several features to some extent 
peculiar. At the beginning of the Junior year a course ot lectures, oc- 
cupying one hour a day, is given on Elementary Law, in which course 
the attentioii of the student is called to the nature of law, its sources 
and development, the difference between the unwritten and the writ- 
ten law, the method of determining what the law is by the use of re- 
ports, statutes, treatises, digests, etc., and finally to the different 
branches into which the whole body of the law is usually divided, and 
their relations to each other. This course covers remedial as well as 
substantive law, and thus furnishes instruction in the general princi- 
ples of pleading, serving in this respect as a basis for the study of 
Code Pleading. 

To the various branches of pleading and practice, special attention 
is given. Although it has been generally considered that the logic of 
pleading is to be found in the common law system, while the code 
^tem is looked upon as unscientific, yet a comparative study of the 
two will show that the latter is broader in its principles and more lib- 
eral in its application than the former. The principal branches of 
practice are fully treated during the Junior year in order that the stu- 
dent may apply them in the moot courts; but an advanced course in 
pleading with special reference to the principle of common law plead- 
ing is given in the Senior year. 

The school attempts to teach how to ascertain the authoritative value 
of oases. There is one course in which this is the only purpose. In 
this course the facts, pleadings, and result of each case are briefly 
stated by the student. Attention is then directed to the manner in 
which the case reached the court whose opinion is reported. The stu- 
dent is required to discover ezactiy what proposition of law was es- 
sential to the decision and to eliminate dida. To this end he is finally 
required to prepare a brief but accurate note of the doctrine for which 
the case is authority. This work is intended to fit students for pre- 
paring briefs, text-books« and digests. Obviously this method is 
identical with that adopted by all careful lawyers in collecting author- 



Ii6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ities. The student who has mastered the system is prepared to make 
good use of other case courses in which the ultimate purpose is the 
mastery of the subject to which the cases pertain, and, indeed, is pre- 
pared to use intelligently all cases to which he may be referred in any 
part of the his study or future practice. 

The general instruction in the Law Department does not give prom- 
inence to the statutes and decisions of any one state, but is intended 
to fit students to practice in any state or country where the Anglo- 
American system of law prevails. For the benefit of the student who 
has determined where he will practice, and who wishes to familiarize 
himself in advance with the statutes and decisions of his chosen state, 
the Law Department furnishes optional courses of study, supplementing 
the prescribed courses. An optional course will be given on the 
law of any state or territory, in which three or more students ask 
instruction. Each course will cover the constitution, statutes, and de- 
cisions, will call special attention to the points in which the law of 
the state in question differs from the law usually found throughout 
the United States, and will also require the student to become well 
acquainted with leading cases. A student intending to pursue a course 
in state law must provide himself with the revised statutes of the state 
in question, and a digest of its decisions. 

The following schedule presents the course substantially as it was 
given during the year 1896-97, and the order in which the subjects 
may be expected during the year 1897-98. 



JUNIOR TBAR. 



PAIX TERM. 

Blementary I^aw. A course of lectures presenting the element- 
ary principles of law in general, and of its important branches. This 
course covers also the principles of pleading. Eight and one-half 
weeks. Professor Rohbach. 

Contracts. Bishop on Contracts is the text-book used. Ten 
weeks. Professor Nby. ^ 

Code PleadiitSf. A course of instruction, mainly by lecture, on 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 117 

pleading under the codes, with practical exercises. Five weeks. Pro- 



Study of Cases. Recitations in Wambaugh*s Cases for Analysis. 
Three and one-half weeks. Chancellor McCu^iN. 

WINTBR TERM. 

Sales, Bailments and Pleds^es. A course of instruction by the 
use of Adam's Cases on Law of Sales and printed synopses, sales, bail- 
ments, and pledges. Nine weeks. Chancellor McCi«ain. 

Torts. Recitations in Cooley on Torts, with oral explanations, 
and citation and examination of leading cases. Eleven weeks. Pro- 
fessor Hayes. 

Domestic Relations. A course of lectures on the subject of mar- 
riage and divorce, the property rights of married women, parent and 
child, guardian and ward, the rights and liabilities of infants, and 
kindred topics. Two weeks. Judge Kinnb. 

Onaranty and Suretyship. A course of lectures. One week. 

Judge DSBMBR. 

SPRING TBRM. 

Probate I^aw and Procedure. A course of lectures on the exe- 
cution and probate of wills, and the law of executors and adminis- 
trators, including the settlement and distribution of decedents' estates, 
with references to statutory provisions and examination of cases. 
Five weeks. Professor Sbbds. 

Criminal I^aw. A course of lectures accompanied with recita- 
tions in McClain's Outlines of Criminal Law and Procedure, with 
references also to statutory provisions. Five weeks. Professor Roh- 



S^idence. Redtations in the first volume of Greenleaf on Evi- 
dence. Five weeks. Judge Wads. 

Negotiable Instmments. Recitations in Norton on Bills and 
Notes. Five weeks. Professor Rohbach. 

Trial and Judgment. Lectures and procedtu^ at law in Courts 
of Record from the beginning of the trial until the entering of judg- 
ment, with reference to statutory provisions. Five weeks. Professor 
NSY. 



ii8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



SBNIOR YBAJL 



FAI4« TKRM. 

Real Property. Recitations in Tiedeman on Real Property, 
accompanied with oral explanations and references to leading cases, 
and lectures on actions to recover real property. Ten weeks. Pro- 
fessor Haybs. 

Inatirance. A course of lectures on Fire, Life, and Accident 
Insurance. Pour weeks. Chancellor McCi^ain. 

Carriers. Study of cases, McClain*s Cases on Carriers, (covering 
both carriers of goods and carriers of passengers), being used as a 
text-book. Six weeks. Chancellor McCl^iN. 

Criminal Procedure. Lectures, with recitations in McCUdn's 
Outlines of Criminal Law and Procedure. Three and one-half weeks. 
Professor Rohbach. 

Chattel Mortc^a^ee. A course of instruction by lectures with a 
printed synopsis. Three and one-half weeks. Professor Sbbbs. 

WINTSB. TBRM. 

Bquity, and Sqtiity Pleading:. Recitations in Bispham on 
Equity. Lectures on Equity Pleading. Eleven weeks. Professor 
Nby. 

Corporations. Lectures upon the general doctrines of the Law 
of Corporations, both private and municipal. Seven weeks. Professor 
Rohbach. 

A]>pellate Proceedings. Lectures upon the practice and pro- 
cedure in Appellate Courts. One week. Judge Robinson. 

Agency. A course of lectures. One week. Judge Robinson. 

Taxation. A course of lectures. Two weeks. Judge Kinnb. 

Trial Practice. A course of lectures. One week. Judge Dbbbckr. 

Damages. Recitations in Beale*s Cases on Damages. Optional. 
Pour weeks. Chancellor McCi«ain. 

8FRING TSRM . 

Partnership, Study of Cases. Paige's Cases on Partnership be- 
ing used as a text-book. Four weeks. Professor Haybs. 



LAW DfiPARtMBNt. 119 

CotiAtltatioiial l^w and Federal Jurispnidence. Lectures. 
Coc^ey's Principles of Constitutional Law and Black's Constitutional 
Law being naed as text-books, and also study of selected cases. Ten 
weeks. Chancellor McCiain. 

Attadii&eitty Oaraislimetit, and Bxecution. Lectures, with 
references to statutory provisions and leading cases. Three weeks. 
Professor Hayes. 

Justice Practice. Lectures on Practice in Justices* Courts. One 
week. Optional. Professor Haybs. 

Pleadinfir« ^.n advanced course, including common law and code 
pleading. Lectures. Three weeks. Professor Haybs. 

Itttematiotial I^aw. Lectures with recitations in Snow's Cases 
on International Law as a text book. Optional. Pour weeks. Chan- 
cellor McCi^AiN. 

Optional Stttdies. 

Instruction is given in the Department in the following subjects, 
which are additional to the required work and are optional. Admis- 
sion to these courses can only be secured by consent of the Faculty. 

Romam l^aw* A course for one hour a week throughout the fall 
tenn, open to students of the Law Department, or of the Collegiate 
Department. The study of Justinian's Institutes, with special refer- 
ence to the analogies, dissimilarities, and historical relations between 
Roman and English law. Essays and discussions. Professor Rohbach. 

State l^aw. In the spring term a course of instruction wUl be 
given upon the constitution, statutes, and decisions of any state or 
territory as to which three or more members of the Senior class ask 
instmction. Open to Seniors only. Chancellor McCm.in. 

Studies in Collegiate Department. 

For the purpose of giving the law students all the advantages of the 
Umversity which it will be practicable for them to make use of, it has 
been arranged that so many of them as can do so without interfer- 
ence with the regular studies required of them in the Law Depart- 
ment, may attend any classes in the Collegiate Department. 

Special attention is called to the opportunity thus a£forded for the 
study of elocution (in which separate classes are organized for law 



I20 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

students), and for ptmning any of the courses of study laid down in 
political science, in history, in logic, or in English. No extra chaige 
will be made for such studies, but law students will be admitted to 
such classes only on the approval of the Law Faculty, and with the 
consent of the professor whose class they desire to enter. 

I/aw Blectives for Collegiate Stodeiits. 

The Collegiate Faculty permits Seniors in that Department to take as 
elective studies in their Collegiate Course, and to receive credit therefor, 
any of the Junior law studies to the extent of thirty-six weeks' work 
of one hour a day, but this provision does not apply to students enter- 
ing the Senior year from other colleges. 

It is believed that, whether looked at as a means of mental disci- 
pline, or as a preparation for the duties of citizenship, or for the pros- 
ecution of business, a full course in the Law Department will be found 
for those who are properly prepared for it, and can pursue it as a part 
of a liberal education, fully equal to any course of study that can be 
pursued for the same length of time. If. however, a student deems it 
not practicable for him to pursue such a course of study after gradua- 
tion from the Collegiate Department, he may derive some of the ad- 
vantages of such study, and some insight into the principles and 
methods of the system of law under which he lives, by electing as part 
of his regular course some of the groups of studies above suggested. 

Credit will be given to students in the Collegiate Department taking 
studies in this Department for work done, but no credit can be given to 
those students in respect to time, the statute requiring, for admission 
to the bar of the State, tliat the applicant shall have spent at least two 
years of nine months each in a law school, or two years of twelve 
months each, in the office of some practicing attorney. Therefore, 
while this Department gives credit for work done in any study taken 
with its classes, yet it will not give credit for time unless the student 
taking such study or studies shall have been duly enrolled as a stu- 
dent of this Department. 

Moot Cotirta* 

For the purpose of affording exercise in the application of legal 
principles to statements of facts, and in connection with instruction in 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 121 

plcflding and practice, moot courts have become a well recognized and 
important feature of the Law School. Two such courts are conducted 
in connection with the Department, holding their sessions on one or 
more afternoons of each week, each presided over by a member of the 
Faculty. It is deemed best to keep the members of the two classes 
separate in this, as in other work of the school, and it is thus possible 
to select the cases assigned so that they may relate to subjects ou 
which the students have already had instruction. The Senior moot 
court will be organized at the beginning of tlie fall term, whilst that 
of the Juniors will not commence its work until the winter term, prac- 
tical exercises in pleading being given the members of that class during 
the fall term, in connection with instruction in pleading and practice. 

The method of conducting these courts is to give to two or more 
students, representing the attorneys in the case, a written statement 
ahow^ing tlie facts on which the action and defense are to be based. 
Pleadings are then prepared as they would be in an actual case. These 
pleadings are subjected to attack by motion or demurrer, and the 
issues of law or fact raised, are tried to the court, the statement of 
facts being regarded as the evidence offered on issues of fact. 

Another method of trial has been introduced with success, which in- 
volves the proof by competent evidence of the facts shown by the 
statement. This gives practice in the examination of witnesses and in 
applying the rules determining the admissibility of evidence. During 
one term, trials are conducted with all the formalities usual in nisi 
prius courts, jurors being summoned and impaneled, witnesses sub- 
pcenaed, and instructions prepared and given. It is also recommended 
that the students form dub courts for further exercise. Professors 
will give such assistance as is needed. 

lAttraxj Societies. 

Three literary societies composed exclusively of students of this 
Department hold regular weekly meetings, furnishing to tlieir members 
▼aluable training in debating and other exercises usually provided for 
by such oi^ganizations. 



122 STATE UNIVERSITY OF lOWA. 

Ifibrary Facilities. 

In commodious quarters on the same fioor with the lecture-room is 
the Law library of eight thousand seven hundred volumes, to which 
the students have personal access. This library contains a full series 
of the reports of the Supreme Court of the United States and of the 
courts of last resort of thirty-three states, including all those whow 
reports are most frequently referred to; also the American Decisions, 
American Reports, and American State Reports, a collection of Eng- 
lish Reports, which, with additions lately made, is almost complete, 
full series of the Reporter System and a large collection of the latest 
and best law text-books. 

The Library is in charge of a regular librarian who renders valuable 
assistance to the students in the prosecution of their work. 

The Library rooms are open for the use of students from 8 o'clock 
A. M. to 12 M., and from 1:30 to 5:30, and 7 to 9 o'clock p. m. of each 
school day, and during the forenoon of Saturday. 

The University library, containing 52,000 volumes, is open to the 
students of this Department, as well as those of the other departments 
of the University, and books may be drawn from it under reasonable 
regulations. No extra charge is made for the privileges of either of 
these libraries. 

Hatmnond Hiatotical l^aw CoUection, 

A valuable collection of twelve hundred volumes relating prin- 
cipally to the Civil Law and the History of the Common Law has 
been given to the University by the widow of William G. Hammond, 
LL. D., the first Chancellor of the Law Department, to be kept in the 
Law library as a separate collection for the use of the students of the 
Department and others interested in such subjects. These books are 
in special cases, under the charge of the Law Librarian and accessible 
on request. 

Irecttire Hall. 

The Law Department has the exclusive occupancy of the second 
floor of the central, or stone building, on the campus, which was 
erected for and used as the Capital Building before the removal of the 
capital of the State to Des Moines. The rooms on this floor are those 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 123 

fonnerly occapied as legislative chambers. The lecture hall is fur- 
ntthed with arm-chairs provided with broad arm-rests for use in tak- 
ing notes. 

Fees and Sxpetises. 

The rate of tuition established by the Board of Regents is |20 per 
teraiy of about twelve weeks, payable in advance, to the Secretary of 
the University. Each student upon passing his final examination, is 
teqnired to pay the sum of f 7 as a graduation fee, to cover the charge 
for diploma and for certificates of admission to the State and Federal 
Cooxts. There are no other fees or charges. 

Other expenses may be made very reasonable. Good board and 
lodging can be had at from I3.50 to $4.50 per week, and this may be 
reduced to ^2.50 or $3.00 per week by taking meals in clubs. 

Coet of Books. 

The books required for use in recitations, and with which the 
student must provide himself, are the following: 

Bishop on Contracts; McClain*s Synopses; Annotated Code of Iowa; 
Wambaugh's Cases for Analysis; Adams's Cases on Sales; Cooley on 
Tofts; Volnme i, of Greenleaf on Evidence; McClain's Outlines of 
Criminal Law and Procedure; Norton on Bills and Notes; Tiedeman 
on Real Property; McClain's Cases on Carriers; Bispham's Principles 
of Equity; Cooley's Principles of Constitutional I<aw or Black's Con- 
tlitiitional Law; Paige's Cases on Partnership and the Law Bulletin. 

The cost of required books will not exceed $45.00 for the Junior 
jrear, or I70.00 for both years. 

The student will find it greatly to his advantage to provide himself 
with a good law dictionary, and if practicable, a copy of Blackstone's 
Commentaiies in any edition. It is desirable, also, that the student 
bring with him or purchase, in addition to the above list of required 
books, as many as practicable of the following which are recommend- 
ed as the leading and best books on the subjects which are taught by 
lectures; Walker's American Law, or Pomeroy's Municipal Law; 
Sdionler's Domestic Relations; Stephen on Pleading; Pomeroy's 
Remedies and Remedial Rights, or Bliss on Code Pleading; Drake on 
Attachment; Benjamin, or Tiedeman, on Sales; Schouler on Bail- 



124 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ments and Carriers; Story » or Mechem, on Agency; Bates on Partner- 
ship; May on Insurance; Beach, or Morawetz, on Corporations; Cur- 
tis on Jurisdiction of Federal Courts; Cooley*s Constitutional Limita- 
tions. 

Any of the books mentioned may be procured through the Law 
Librarian from time to time, as needed, at a considerable reduction 
from list prices; they are not kept for sale by the book stores in Iowa 
City. 

The Department owns about twenty-five sets of the text-books above 
mentioned as required in the course, which it will rent in sets to stu- 
dents, furnishing them all the books required for either year for 
1 1 2. 50 for the year. The rent sets do not include a law dictionary, 
nor the Law Bulletin. As there are sometimes more calls for rent 
sets than can be met, those who desire to rent books should make 
application in advance. 

j^urollmeiit and Preliminary Bxaminations. 

Students may enroll at any time. It is better, however, to enter at 
the beginning of the term, and best to enter at the commencement of 
the school year. 

Those who enter the Department are expected to have an English 
education at least equivalent to that generally given in the high 
schools of the State. A diploma, or certificate, showing the comple- 
tion of a college or high school course, or a course of study in an 
academy, equivalent to a high school course, will be accepted in lieu 
of any examination. Students who have not such diploma, or certifi- 
cate, must take a preliminary examination in the usual branches of a 
high school course, or present such evidence of proficiency therein, as 
the Faculty may require. 

At the preliminary examination of September, 1896, each candidate 
was required to write a short essay, correct in expression, spelling, 
capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphing, on any one of the fol- 
lowing subjects, the essay not containing less than three hundred nor 
more than six hundred words. The subjects were: 

The causes leading to the Civil War; The settlement of Jamestown; 
The causes leading to the War with Mexico; Clay and contempor- 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 125 

aneous history; The Monroe Doctrine; The settlement of New York 
by the Dutch; The resnlts of the War of 1812. 

Fatnie examinations will be similar to the examination just now 
described, the subjects for essays varying from year to year. 

Students wishing to study special subjects without graduation will 
be admitted without preliminary examination upon showing them- 
selves qualified to pursue the studies desired. 

Preliminary examinations will be held on Wednesday, September 
15th, 1897, commencing at 9 a. m. 

Admisaion to Senior Standins:. 

A student may be admitted to the Senior class who has studied law 
for one school year of at least thirty-six weeks in this or some other 
law school^ or who has studied law in this or some other law school 
for at least ten weeks, and in, addition has read law under the direc- 
tion of an attorney for such length of time as to make eight months* 
study. Time of practice as a licensed attorney in any state will be 
considered equivalent to a like period of reading under the direction 
of an attorney. If the claim for advanced standing is based upon 
other grounds than attendance in this school, certificates of the neces- 
sary facts must be presented when Senior standing is claimed. 

In addition to the requirements as to time, it will be necessary that 
tbe applicant shall pass an examination, before admission to the 
Senior class, upon at least five of the principal subjects of the Junior 
year, and if he is a candidate for graduation it will be necessary, in 
addition to the five subjects before mentioned, that he shall pass upon 
all tbe subjects of the Junior year as well as those of the Senior year, 
at some time previous to his graduation. This rule applies to those 
who have been admitted to practice as well as to students of law. 

The examinations for admission to the Senior class for those who 
have not previously completed the Junior course in the Department 
win commence on the first day of the University year, Wednesday, 
September 15, 1897. 

While provision is thus made by which credit may be given for 
e%ht months' reading under the direction of an attorney, in lieu of 
corie sp ouding time of attendance in this Department, not to exceed 



126 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

two terms, yet the Faculty desires to say frankly that the student will 
find it difficult in this way to become sufficiently proficient in any of 
the Junior studies to pass the required examinations. The Faculty is 
not willing to impair the value of the Senior instruction to those who 
have prepared themselves for it in the Department, by admitting to 
the class those who are not qualified to carry on effectively the work 
of the year; nor is it to the interest of either the student or the school 
to admit to the Senior class any who, in order to be prepared for final 
examination and graduation, must fit themselves in so great a range of 
subjects that they cannot thoroughly master them. It must be borne in 
mind that it is not the number of pages read, nor the number of answers 
learned, which determines the student's attainments in law, but that 
discipline and development of the mind, and the habit of correct legal 
thinking, are essential elements of a legal education, and that for the 
acquirements of these, two years in a law school are not too long a 
time even for those who have the best preparation for entering. Ex- 
perience has shown how imperfect, as a rule, is the preparation of those 
who study in offices, and how necessary S3rstematic instruction is at the 
beginning of the student's course, and the Faculty strongly recom- 
mends that all the studies of the Junior year be pursued in law school, 
and that if but one year can be spent in school, the student shall com- 
mence his studies there and read in an office afterward. Even those 
who have had previous reading in an office will, it is believed, usually 
find the instruction in the Junior year to be of greater importance to 
them than that of Senior year, in obtaining a thorough and accurate 
knowledge of the law. The practical advantages of experience in a 
law office are not to be underrated, but such experience will prove of 
greater benefit after the principles of law have been acquired than at 
the beginning of the study. 

Even in courses in which text-books are used students of the law 
school have a great deal of instruction regarding matters not fully de- 
veloped in the books. Anyone who wishes to pass with credit the ex- 
aminations for Senior standing, and to profit fully by the instruction 
in the Senior subjects, should not confine his attention to the Junior 
text-books, but should attempt to get an equivalent for the instruction 
supplementing those books. Candidates for advanced standing on of- 
fice reading are therefore nrged to master, in addition to the prescribed 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 127 

tert-books, the following books or parts of books: Pomeroy's Reme- 
dies and Remedial Rights; Alison on Contracts; Pollock, or Bigelow, 
on Torts; Bishop's Criminal Law; Tiedeman on Sales; Schouler on 
Bsilments; the American notes in Chamberlayne's edition of Best on 
Bvidencc; Stephen's Digest of Evidence; Daniel on Negotiable Instru- 
ments. 

Oradiiation. 

Two years* study is essential to graduation, one year of which must 
have been spent in this school. 

Students will be given credit for time of study in another school to 
the extent of one year, or under the direction of a practicing attorney 
to the extent of two-thirds of a year. For time of actual practice as a 
doly licensed attorney, the same credit will be given as for study under 
the direction of an attorney. 

Before being recommended for graduation, the candidate who has 
pnrsoed a portion of his studies elsewhere, must satisfy the Faculty of 
his proficiency in those studies by passing examinations therein. 

Candidates for graduation must be of good character and must, upon 
bei^g recommended by the Faculty, pass a final examination con- 
ducted at Iowa City by a committee of examiners appointed by the 
Supreme Court of Iowa, in accordance with the rules of that court, regu- 
lating admission to the bar. Upon passing such examination, the 
candidates receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and are admitted 
to practice in all the courts of the State of Iowa, and in the federal 
courts of the Northern District of Iowa, oaths of admission being ad- 
ministered in connection with their graduation: and they receive the 
usual diplomas, and certificates of admission. Those who are not 
twenty-one years of age may pass the examination and receive their 
diplomas, but cannot be admitted to practice until attaining that age. 

Pinal examinations will be held only at the end of the University 



Theses. 

Bach candidate for graduation in June, 1897, must present to the 
Faculty, on or before the third Wednesday in May, a theses upon 
some legal topic approved by the Faculty. Such thesis must be legibly 
written, or printed by tjrpewriter, on paper 8x10^ inches in size of page, 



128 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

leaving a blank maigin of at least one inch at sides and at top and 
bottom. The theses shall not be less than 1,500 nor more than 2,500 
words in length, exclusive of citations of authorities. In citing cases 
the names of the parties, as well as the volume and page of the report 
must be given. The character of the theses will be taken into account 
in determining whether the candidate is qualified to be recommended 
to the Examining Committee for final examination. 

Beginning with the class of 1898 the same requirements with res- 
pect to theses will be recognized, except that all theses must be pre- 
sented to the Faculty on or before the first Monday in April. 

All theses become the property of the Department. 

The subjects approved by the Faculty for the year 1896-97 are as 
follows. Others will be submitted for following years: 

1. Dicuss the right of the State to regulate railroad charges and the 
extent to which such regulations may be carried, either by direct leg- 
islative action or by railroad commissions. 

2. Suppose the drawee of a bill pays the amount to one claiming in 
good faith but under forged endorsement, can he recover from such 
l^erson the amount so paid. 

3. There is a stipulation in a promissory note that security is held 
therefore; can the indorsee of such note taken before maturity and for 
valuable consideration recover on the note without returning the se- 
curity, supposing that such security has never been received by him, 
but has been wrongfully converted by the original payee. 

4. Can there be a recovery under a contract to pay money in satis- 
faction of a tort which was already barred at the time the contract was 
made? 

5. Is a mortgage to secure a pre-existing debt without a new con- 
sideration enforcible? 

6. Is there a tort committed when one maliciously induces the ser- 
vant of another to quit his service? 

7. Is it possible to make one the owner of a legal estate in fee sim- 
ple in lands in such a way that the estate shall not be liable to invol- 
untary sale for his debts during his life? 

8. Which is the better rule, that of the majority of the Court in 
Mathews & Co. vs. Mattress Co., 87 Iowa, 246, or that of the minority? 

9. Discuss the liability for acts done in the name of a corporation, 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 129 

when there had been an attempt to incorporate but a faihire to com- 
ply with the mandatory requirements for incorporation. 

ro. Discuss the rights of a withdrawing member of a building and 
loan association, when he has complied with all conditions for the 
surrender of his stock, but upon surrender, he finds that there are no 
moneys on hand to pay for the stock surrendered. 

11. The writ of replevin. Its hi.<¥tory, origin, development, former 
nse and use under code. 

12. Discuss the protection afforded a bona fide purchaser of a nego- 
tiable instrument for value before maturity, where the note is stolen 
and where it is obtained by the payee by fraud. 

13. Is Chapter 96, Laws of the 26th General Assembly of Iowa, for- 
bidding the sale of cigarettees in the original package as imported 
constitutional ? Draw any distinction you may see between the regu- 
lation of the sale of cigarettes and oleomargarine in the case of Plum- 
ley vs. Mass., 155 U. S., 461. 

14. Discuss Section 2002 McClain*s Code, making the railroad 
company liable for the negligence of an employe to one engaged in 
the operation of a railroad, as to what acts or employment bring an 
employe within the protection of this Section, in the light of Deppe 
▼s. C. R. I. & P. Ry. Co., 36 Iowa, 52, and subsequent decisions. 

Prices. 

Prom the theses prepared and presented as above described by the 
candidates for graduation in the class of 1897, a committee chosen by 
the Faculty of the Department from the Examining Committee will 
select the five which show the highest merit as legal essays. To the 
writer of the one of these five which has the highest literary merit, 
from the standpoint of clearness, conciseness and accuracy of expres- 
non, will be awarded a prize of twenty-five dollars, offered by the 
Chancellor of the Department. 

To each of the writers of the other four theses selected as above in- 
dicated, a prize of twenty dollars, given by the University, will be 
awarded by the same committee. 

The Kinsman-McOoud Law Book Company, of Omaha, Nebraska, 
offered as a special prize for the year 1895--6, a set of Lawson's Rights 



130 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

and Remedies (7 vols., and index) to the best thesis on the subject 
proposed by the Faculty, the award being made in the same manner 
as the other prizes, the theses written for this prize were not consid- 
ered, however, as competing for any other prize. The subject for this 
special prize was as follows: 

What do you think of the position that there is not a national com- 
mon law ? Is it reasonable and sound, or otherwise ? 

Beginning with the class of 1898, all theses prepared and presented 
as above described, will be examined by the Faculty of the Depart- 
ment for the purpose of determining whether the writer is qualified 
for graduation. 

No prizes for theses vdll be offered after June 1897. 

The prizes for 1895-6 were awarded as follows: 

The Chancellor's prize to Rollo S. Granger. 

The University prizes, all of these being equal in rank and value, 
were awarded to the following students, named in order of merit de> 
termined by the committee: Stevens A. Coldren, William H. Hughes, 
Alfred B, Walsh, Henry M. Troy, with special mention of thesis writ- 
ten by James M. Wilson. 

The Kinsman-McCloud prize was awarded to John B. Ryan, with 
special mention of thesis written by Harry L. Keefe. 

Any further information desired may be obtained by addressing the 
President of the University, or James A. Rohbach, Secretary of the 
Law Faculty, at Iowa City, Iowa. 



Medical Department 



Faculty and Other Instructors, 



Charlbs Ashmbad Schabpfbr, a. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 
Pbiu> Judson Parnsworth, a. M., M. D., 

Bmeritos ProfeMor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

John Cunton Shrader, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 

Profenor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, Clinical Gynecology, and Diseases 
of Children. 

William Drummond Middlbton, A. M., M. D., 

Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

Lawrbncb William Littig, A. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

ProfeMor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, and Clinical Medicine, and 
Aaaistant to the Chair of Surgery. 

Jambs Rbnwick Gutbrib, A. M., M. D., 

ProfeMor of Physiology and Aasociate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology 
and Diacaaes of Children. 

EUBRT William Rockwood, B. S., M. D., 

Proffcasor of Chemistry and Toxicology, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

Jambs William Dalbby, B. S., m. d., 

Pfofeasorof Oyhthalmology. 

riiA»i,iffi SUMIVBR Chasb, a. M., M. D., 

ProfcMor of Blateria Medica and Therapeutics 

Walter Lawrbncb Bibrrimg, M. d., 

Professor of Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, and Curator of the 
Medical Museum. 

John Walter Harriman, m. d., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Hartik J. Wade, hh. B., 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

Charles Moore Robertson, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

WILLL4M Robert Whitbis, M. S., M. D., 

Asaistant Professor of Histology. 

131 



13a STATE UNIVBRSTTY OF IOWA. 

Gbrsrom h. hili«, a. m., m. d., 

I«cctar«r on Insanity. 

Frank Thobcas Brkbnb, D. D. S., M. D., 

Lecturer on Dentistry. 

Kmii,Xouis Bobrner, Phar. D., 

Instmctor in Pharmacy. 

WII.I4AM Edward Bari^ow, B. A., 

Demonatrator of Chemistry. 

WiLBBR John Tbbtbrs, B. S., Ph. C 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. * 

John Patrick Mui.un, M. D.,» 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Eu Grimbs, M. D.. 

Demonstimtor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Lbb Waixacb DBAN, M. S., M. D.4 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 



WlLUAM GrBBN» 
Janitor. 



*Until June, 1197. 
tAfter June, 1897. 



1141 



ICAL DEPAFTMENT, 



A thoroiigh elementary preparation is required before entering on 
the oonrse of medical lectures. The University affords a preliminary 
scientific course preparatory to the professional, and it is expected 
that many will avail themselves of this opportunity. In the branches 
of medicine there should be a thorough training in the principles 
before the practical portion is begun. For this purpose a careful pre- 
sentation of the subjects is made by lectures, and the knowledge fixed 
by recitations and frequent reviews. Ample means of illustration are 
nsed, and the materials for demonstration are abundant. In the prac- 
tical branches enough clinical material is found to illustrate the sub- 
jects taught. 

The twenty-eighth annual course of lectures will begin on Septem- 
ber 15, 1897, and will dose on March 30, 1898. There will be a holi- 
day vacation commencing Thursday evening, December 23, and end- 
ing Wednesday morning, January 5, 1898. 

The course is divided into four years of twenty-six weeks each. It 
ia the intention of the Board of Regents and the Faculty to increase 
the length of the annual course of lectures as soon as possible, and 
notice of such increase may appear in the next annual announcement. 

Medical, Surgical, G3meoological, Eye and Ear and I^aryngological 
Clinics, are held each week during the term. Attendance upon these 
is required of all students, excepting those engaged in laboratory 
work during clinic hours. 

133 



134 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Outline of the Plan of lostnsction* 

Anatomy, 

The lectures in anatomy will be illustrated by means of specimens, 
charts, models, dissections, and black-board figures. Special effort 
will be made to associate anatomical arrangement with clinical facts 
and methods of diagnosis. 

During the first year the lectures will cover the subjects of osteol- 
ogy, syndesmology, the alimentary canal and associated structures, 
the vascular and respiratory systems, and the genito-urinary organs. 
These will be presented in full detail from their anatomical, mechani- 
cal, and ftmctional aspects, attention being paid to practical develop- 
mental laws and relations of viscera to surface markings and neigh- 
boring structures. 

In the second year the subjects covered during the first year will be 
careftdly reviewed with additional reference to the medical and surgi- 
cal anatomy. The nervous system and the anatomy of the special 
senses will be presented in detail not only by lectures but also by 
practical demonstrations to the class divided into small sections. 

The third year will be devoted entirely to regional anatomy. The 
lectures during this year will at all times be illustrated by special dis- 
sections or surface marking upon the living subject. 

Practical Anatomy. 

The tliorough study of this branch, for at least two courses, is made 
a condition of graduation. Facilities for obtaining material are such, 
under improved legislation in the State, that an abundance will always 
be provided for all who may apply. The demonstrators will always 
be ready to aid and direct the prosecution of these studies. 

Upon the completion of each course of dissection, the student will 
be examined on the anatomy of the part dissected, and if the examin- 
ination be satisfactory, a certificate to that effect will be given. No 
fee is required for dissecting material. 

Physiology. 

In this department the inductive method is very laigely employed 
in imparting instruction. The lectures are profusely illustrated by 



MEDICAL DBPARTMBNT. 135 

meuis of charts, diagnuns, and blackboard figures, and the student is 
rendered practically familiar with the phenomena of the moot impor- 
tant bodily foncdons of normal operation by the employment of ex- 
periments upon living animals as a means of demonstration. Twelve 
lectures will be given in the Junior year upon applied physiology of 
the nervous system. 

Chemistry and Toxicology. 

The course in chemistiy extends through two years. In the first 
year the lectures are on general chemistry. The laboratory work con- 
sists, first, of analjTtical chemistry, including methods of testing for 
the metallic poisons, then the common medicinal substances are 
studied. The student learns methods of chemical manipulation, and 
the use of apparatus, and also becomes acquainted with the action of 
reagents, and of chemicals upon each other. The course includes the 
exsmination of drinking water from a sanitary standpoint, each stu- 
dent making a number of analyses of various wholesome and polluted 
waters. It concludes with the methods of quantitative analysis, which 
sre of the most use to the medical practitioner. 

In the seoond year, physiological chemistry is taken up. The lec- 
tures are in explanation and amplification of the laboratory work. The 
latter indndes the study of the pr ox im ate principles of the body and 
their chemical changes. Artificial digestive experiments are made, 
their products being isolated and tested. The constituents of the blood 
are tested and the methods for the identification of stains are learned. 
The qnalitative tests for the abnormal constituents of the urine follow, 
sod the quantitative determination of such as are of importance. The 
course is completed by the identification of urinary sediments and 
calcnlly and the anal3r8is of various pathological specimens of urine. 
The lectures on toxicology treat of the physiological and chemical 
actiOD of the principal poisons, as well as their antidotes. The meth- 
ods of identifying these in food, excreta, etc., are explained and illus- 
trated by cxpenments. 

The work in practical chemistry is conducted in the new chemical 
laboratories of the Univereity, in which the Medical department oc- 
atpics rooms on the ground floor. These consist of rooms for the in- 
stnclors, store rooms, and two large laboratories. They are well 



156 STATE UNIVBRSITY <»? IOWA. 

lighted, and htated by ateam. Hoods, comiected with ventilatixig 
riiftfts, earry «ff Offensive and injurious gases. The outfit is ample for 
deoMmrtmtiQg the general principles of Chemistry, as well as its ap- 
plication to medicine. Bach student is supplied with a set of the 
nccesaary'appamtus. 

Histoloflry. 

The course in histology extends through the Freshman year and 
consists of a series of two didactic lectures and four hours laboratory 
work each week. 

The histological laboratory is situated on the first floor, southeast 
comer of the Medical building, is well lighted and thoroughly 
equipped with microscopes and all necessary apparatus for carrying 
on the work. The laboratory work comprises the preparation and 
study of microscopic slides showing the minute structure of the differ- 
ent tissues and oixans of the body. 

The slides prepared by each student become his personal property. 

Instruction is given in all forms of histological technique, harden- 
ing, embedding, section-cutting, staining and prepcu^tion of material 
for examination. 

In the Freshman year the regular work in histology yrUl be pre- 
ceded by a number of lectures and laboratory hours devoted to the 
- study of general biology. 

During the Sophomore year opportunities will be offered to those 
who wish to work in embryology and special histology. 

Pharmacy. 

An outline course in pharmacy is specially provided whereby the 
student at the outset may familiarize himself with pharmaceutical pro- 
cesses, and the methods of preparing ofiidal preparations by actual 
laboratory practice. 

Materia Medica. 

Tins subject is presented during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years in progressive form. The introductory topics, such as defini- 
tions, dosage, modes and routes of administration of medicines, pre- 
soriftion-writing, wtfeh special reference to the detection and avoidance 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 137 

of incomp a tibilities^ will be presented at the beginning of each session 
before the classes jointly. The further consideration of the subject 
will be progressive, organic drugs being presented one session, inor- 
ganic the next. At the close of each session a test will be given cov- 
ering the ground traversed during the session. Toward the close of 
the Sophomore year the entire subject will be reviewed and a final ex- 
amination given. During the didactic lectures crude drugs will be 
pieaented from time to time illustrative of the subject. All official 
preparetions from the same will be presented and briefly discussed 
during the course. 

Tlierapeutic«. 

This branch of pharmacology, recognized as the distinctively scien- 
tific division of the subject, will be presented during the Junior and 
Senior years. Both general and special therapeutics will be outlined 
and discussed witli special views to stimulate in the student a 
desire to prosecute methods of original research in the direction of 
studying the physiological action of drugs. To this end experiments 
will be made from time to time illustrative of such action upon the 
lower animals. 

Applied Therapeutics. 

In addition to the general course in therapeutics the Senior class 
will be given a special course upon applied or practical therapeutics, 
to be illnstrated by bedside discussion of cases in the wards of the 
UniTersity Hospital. 

Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The course in pathology and bacteriology extends through the 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior years, and is presented by means of 
didactic lectures and laboratory work. The lectures are devoted to 
bacteriology and general and special pathology, and are illustrated 
by means of drawings, preparations from the Medical museum and 
specimens derived from post-mortem examinations. 

The pathological and bacteriological laboratory is situated in the 
west hall on the second floor of the Medical building. It is thoroughly 
equ ipp ed with new microscopes of the most modem t3rpe, and all 



138 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

apparatus necessary for carrying on every form of bacteriological 
research. 

Each student is provided with a table, which includes a microscope 
and all necessary staining reagents with which to carry on the work 
required. 

In the Sophomore year the lectures are confined to general pathol- 
ogy and the elementary principles of bacteriology. The laboratory 
work consists of two hours each week throughout the 3^ear, and is 
illustrative of the didactic lectures, comprising the preparation and 
study of slides showing the general pathological changes that occur 
in human tissues. An examination will be held at the dose of the 
year. 

In the Junior year the lectures are devoted to the pathology of 
tumors, and the special pathology of the different organs of the 
human hotly. 

The laboratory work, consisting of two hours a week throughout 
the year, bears a direct relation to the lectures and comprises the 
preparation and study of slides showing the disease changes that oc- 
cur in special tissues and organs, including a complete collection of 
tumors; furthermore embodying the study of the general character- 
istics of micro-organisms, the preparation of artificial media, and the 
mounting of slides of the different organisms, with special reference 
to the pathogenic bacteria that are of greatest interest to medical men. 

Instruction is also given in the technique of making a post-mortem 
examination. 

A final examination in pathology will be held at the close of the 
Junior year. 

During the Senior year two hours each week are devoted to clinical 
microscopy, and advanced work in pathological histology and bac- 
teriology. 

Beginning the Thursday after Commencement, at i :30 p. m*, there 
is given a course in Practical Bacteriology, which continues for one 
month. The laboratory is open daily from 9 a. M. to 6 p. M., and the 
students become familiar with all the details of bacteriological tech- 
nique. The number of pcuticipants is limited to twenty. Places at the 
tables are secured in the order of application and payment of fee. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 139 

Practice of Medidne. 

The Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine combines didactic and 
dinical instmction. l^Iany of the subjects treated in the didactic 
course find illustration in the hospital amphitheatre, and pathological 
study is facilitated by post-mortem examinations, as well as by wet 
and dry preparations from the museum. 

Medical THagnotds. 

Recitations for the Senior class will be held each week on this sub- 
ject, the department of medical diagnosis receiving practical treatment 
here as well as at the clinic. The Junior class will receive practical 
instruction in physical diagnosis, including the use and application of 
all the instruments and methods of precision. 

dursrery. 

Surgery is taught — didactically — ^in lectures reviewed by daily class 
quiz, and in recitations by advanced students on prior work, prac- 
tically — ^by actual surgical diagnosis and treatment of patients at the 
clinic by the members of tlie Senior class; also by a course of operative 
snxgery for the same class in which all surgical operations are per- 
formed npon the cadaver. One hour each week is devoted to minor 
surgery and bandaging. 

Ohatettica and Gynecology. 

The instruction in these important departments is complete. All 
modem means for illustration are employed, and advanced students 
are carefully trained in the principal obstetric operations. 

Ophthalmology. 

The instruction in this branch combines didactic and clinical 
teaching. Two lectures a week are given in the anatomy, physiology, 
and pathology of the regions involved, and the Wednesday clinic is 
devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases. Large num- 
bers of cases appear at these clinics, and a great many operations of 
all kinds are performed. 



lAO STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Otology. I^aryngology and Rliiiiology. 

The instruction in this branch is given by didactic and clinical 
teaching, one lecture and one clinic being given each week. Much 
attention is directed to the methods of examination and treatment of 
cases. The throat and nose clinic being lai^, enables all students 
to become familiar with the use of instruments, all being allowed to 
treat patients under the supervision of the instructor. It is the aim of 
the course to familiarize each student with the normal as well as the 
pathological conditions of the throat and nasal passages. The clinic 
room has been especially fitted up for the work and is in itself com- 
plete. 

Medical Jnrlapmdetice. 

The essentials, to the practitioner, of this important department of 
medicine will be fully treated. 

Insanity. 

This subject is discussed as concisely as possible, with the special 
needs of the general practitioner constantly in view, and material ap- 
pearing at the clinics from to time, during the term, is utilized in its 
illustration. A course of lectures on this subject will be delivered 
during the latter part of January. 

Sanitary Science and Pnblic Hygiene. 

One lecture a week will be delivered on matters pertaining to sani- 
tary science and public hygiene. 

Clinics. 

The clinics have been well and abundantly supplied with material. 
The patronage of the hospital is such that a variety of cases is pre- 
sented for operation and treatment. The hospital is open for the re- 
ception of patients during the entire year. 

Every case is fully utilized as a means of instruction by a system 
of examination in which advanced students are required to diagnosti- 
cate disease and suggest treatment, before the class, subject to the 
correction of the clinical teacher. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 141 

Clinical Patients. 

Medical cases should be referred to Professor L. W. Littig; surgical 
cases to Professor W. D. Middleton; gynecological cases to Professor 
J. C. Shrader; eye and ear cases to Professor J. W. Dalbey; throat 
and Dose cases to Prof. C. M. Robertson. 

Museum. 

The Museum contains a large and interesting collection of morbid 
and other specimens, furnishing valuable aid to instruction in its 
large amount of material illustrative of pathological and normal con- 
ditions. This is constantly drawn upon as a means of demonstration. 

Physicians are earnestly requested to send to the curator any speci- 
mens of healthy, morbid, or comparative anatomy, for all of which 
favors due credit will be given by labeling the specimens with the 
name of the donor before placing them in the museum. 

Medical Uhtaty. 

The Ranney Memorial Medical Library, consisting of a large num- 
ber of works especially devoted to insanity and mental diseases, is 
open for consultation, together with a well selected list of books on 
gmeiml medical subjects to which are added each year the latest 
works and the latest editions. The library is supplied with the cur- 
rent medical journals, and will be open every day of the session. 

Medical students have also the privilege of drawing books from the 
general library of the University which contains over 40,000 volumes. 

Tk€ doss wMicM graduates in 189S is the last one to complete the 
course in three years. The following is an outline of the work for 
this doss. 

8BNIOR YBAR. 



I^UCTURBS, RBCITATIONS, AND CUNICS, KACH W9EK. 

Pathology and Pathological Anatomy — ^Two lectures and one reci- 
tation. 



142 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — ^Three lectures; one recitation; 
one and one-half hours of clinic. 

Medical Diagnosis — One hour. 

Snidery — ^Three lectures; one recitation; two hours clinic. 

Surgical Dressing — One hour. 

Toxicology — One lecture. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology — Pour lectures; one recitation; two 
hours clinic. 

Therapeutics — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Ophthalmology — ^Two lectures; one and one-half hours clinic. 

Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology — One hour lecture, and 
clinic. 

Medical Jurisprudence — One hour, after the holidays. 

Sanitary Science and Hygiene — One hour. 

The folloTving is an outline of the work of the four year c&urse. 



FIU3SHMAN TBAR. 



I«ECTURBS AND RECITATIONS, EACH WEEK. 

Anatomy — Four lectures; one recitation. 

Physiology — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 

General Chemistry — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 

Materia Medica — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Histology — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Pharmacy — ^Ten lectures during the session. 

Laboratory work for the session as follows: 

Chemistry — One hundred and sixty hours. 

Biology and Histology — One hundred hours. 

Pharmacy — ^Thirty hours. 

Bandaging — ^Twenty-six hours. 

Dissecting — One course. 

Final examination in General Chemistry, Histology, and PhannAcy, 
also, examination (not final) in Physiology, Anatomy and Materia 
Medica. 



MBDICAL DEPARTMENT. 143 



SOPHOMORB TBAR. 



LECTURES AND RECITATIONS) EACH WEEK. 

Analomj — Pour lectures; one recitation before holidays, two after 
holidays. 

Physiology — ^Three lectures; one recitation before holidays, two 
after holidays. 

Physiological Chemistry — ^Two lectures. 

General Pathology — ^Twc lectures. 

Materia Medica — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Obstetrics — ^Two lectures. 

Bacteriology — Twelve lectures during the session. 

PhjTsical Diagnosis — One hour. 

Hygiene — One hour. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Oiemistxy — Sixty hours. 

General Pathology — Fifty-two hours. 

DisBectiiig — One course. 

Bmfaryologj — Optional. 

General University clinics, when not otherwise engaged. 

Fbial examination in Anatomy, Physiological Chemistry, Physiol- 
ogy, and Materia Medica. 



JUNIOR TSAR. 



LECTURES, RECITATIONS, AND CLINICS, EACH WEEK. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — Pour lectures; one recitation. 

Snigery — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 

Pttthology — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Therapeutica — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Obstetrics — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Gynecology — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Tosioology — One lecture. 

Applied Anatomy: Medical, Surgical, and Nervous — ^Two lectures. 



144 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Applied Physiology of tlie Nervous System — Twelve lectures during 
the session. 

(^neral Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, and Ophthahnological 
Clinics — Seven hours. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Patholog}' — Fifty-two hours. 

Bacteriology — Fifty-two hours. 

Final Examination in Obstetrics and Therapeutics. 



8BNIOR TBAR. 



I,BCTURES, RECITATIONS, AND CI«INICS, KACH WBSK. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — Pour lectures; two recitations. 

Surgery — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 

Special Pathology — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Practical Therapeutics — One hour until the holidays. 

Gynecology — Two lectures; one recitation. 

Ophthalmology and Otology — One lecture. 

Laryngology and Rhinology — One lecture. 

Dermatology — One lecture after holidays. 

Paediatrics — One lecture after holidays. 

Operative Surgery — ^Twelve hours during the session. 

Operative Obstetrics — ^Twelve hours during the session. 

Medical Jurisprudence — Twelve lectures during the session. 

Dentistry — Six lectures during the session. 

Insanity — ^Twelve lectures during the session. 

General Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, Ophthalmological, and 
Laryngological Clinics — Seven hours. 

Laboratory work: 

Special Pathology — Two hours a week. 

Final Examination in Practice of Medicine, Surgery, Gynecology, 
Pathology and Ophthalmology. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 145 

T1SXT-BOOKS. AND BOOKS OP RBPBRBNCB. 

The following are recommended by the Faculty: 

Medical IMctionary — Gonld, Duane, Dunglison. 

Anatomy — Gray, Quain, Morris, Treve*s Surgical Applied Anatomy. 

Dissectors — ^Holden» Heath, Ellis. 

Comparative Anatomy — ^Wiedersheim, Jeffery Bell, Howell. 

Physiology — Landois and Stirling, Poster, Flint, Eirk. 

General Chemistry — Simon, Witthaus, Roscoe, and Schorlemmer. 

Physiological Chemistry — Pellew, Vaughn and Novy. 

Urine Analysis — Purdy, Neubauer and Vogel. 

Toxicology — ^Reese, Wormley, Woodman and Tidy. 

Surgery — ^Park, American Text-Book of Surgery, Roberts, Wyeth, 
Gerster, Stimson on Fractures and Dislocations, Wharton's Minor 
Smgery and Bandaging. 

Pathology — Green, Ziegler, Delafield and Prudden. 

Bacteriology — ^Abbott, McParland, Crookshank, Sternberg. 

Practice of Medicine — Osier, Strumpel, American Text-Book of 
Theory and Practice of Medicine, Roberts, Flint, Bartholow, I/x>mis. 

Medical Diagnosis — Vierordt, Musser, DaCosta, Flint. 

Obstetrics — American Text-Book of Obstetrics, Lusk, Davis, 
Parvin, Irishman, Playfair, King. 

Obstetric Surgery — Grandin and Jarmin. 

Embryology — ^Minot, Manton. 

Gynecology — Skene, Thomas and Munde, Garrigues, American 
Text-Book, Pozzi, Davenport, May's Manual, Clinical Gynecology, 
Keating and Coe. 

Materia Medica — White and Wilcox, Potter, Bartholow. 

Therapeutics — ^H. C. Wood, Hare, Potter, Farquharson. 

Diseases of Children — ^J. I^. Smith, Goodhart, Starr. 

Medical Jurisprudence — McClellan's Civil Malpractice, Wharton 
and Stille, Beck, Elwell. 

Histology — Stoehr, Piersol, Schafer, Stirling. 

Ophthalmology — Fuchs, Juler, Noyes, Nettleship on the Eye. 

Otology — ^MacBride, Roosa, Buck, Politzer. 

Laryngology and Rhinology — Bosworth, Burnett, Soujous, Ingals, 
Browne. 



146 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Insanity — Lewis* Text-Book of Mental Diseases, Steams, Clouston^s 
Mental Disease. 

Dermatology — ^Jamison, Hyde, Duhring, Crocker. 

Hygiene and Sanitary Science — Wilson, Rohe, Buck. 

The first book mentioned in the foregoing list is recommended for 
preliminary reading, with the exception of Chemistry. In this, 
" Remsen's Introduction to the Study of Chemistry*' is recommended. 

Text-books and books of reference can be obtained at an average 
cost per volume of from fo.oo to $5.00. 

It is of far greater advantage to the student, during the College 
course, to study and review a single text-book in each department 
than to read several cursorily. It is, therefore, advised that a single 
work, in each department recommended above, be chosen and care- 
fully studied, while any other may be used for reference and subse- 
quent perusal. 

Tuition. 

The fee for tuition is J65.00 for each year, of which I40.00 is payable 
on or before October i, and the balance on or before January 10. All 
fees must be paid when due to the Secretary of the University, William 
J. Haddock, and students who do not pay these when due will be sus- 
pended from the department until payment has been made. 

There are no extra fees whatever, but for each laboratory course in 
chemistry, also for that in practical pharmacy, there is required a de- 
posit of I3.00 to cover breakage and to insure the return of all keys at 
the close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any deducted,) is 
returned to the student on presentation of the certificate of the pro- 
fessor in charge of the laboratory in question. 

The above statement is now in effect, and will be understood to 
apply to all students in the department, entirely irrespective of the 
date of matriculation. 

Alumni of this department will be admitted to lectures and clinics 
free of charge, but will pay the usual laboratory fees. 

Graduates of other colleges which are recognised by this depart- 
ment will be admitted to full lecture privileges upon pajdng the 
matriculation fee and a fee of ten dollars and the usual laboratory fees. 



MEDICAL DBPARTMBNT. 147 

A certificate of attendance will be issued to each stndent during the 
last week of the aeasion. 

Students upon arrival will apply for all needed information to the 
Secretary, Dr. E. W. Rockwood. 

Reqtdrements for Admission. 

1. Credible certificate of good moral character signed by two phy- 
sicians of good standing in the state from which the applicant comes. 

2. Graduates or matriculants of reputable colleges, or graduates 
of high schools of the first grade, or of normal schools established by 
state authority, may be admitted without examination upon presenta- 
tion of satisfactory credentials, provided, that in each case, at least 
one year of Latin has been included in the course. All candidates for 
adndflsion must present their credentials, or apply for a permit for ex- 
amination at the office of the President of the University not later 
than noon of Tuesday, September 14th, 1897. 

Bxamination for admission will embrace the subjects usually taught 
in the high schools of Iowa, incuding one year's Latin, which subject 
may, how e ver, be made up before entering upon the second year's 
course. In September, 1897, those who have no diploma will be ex- 
amined in Latin (one year), Physics (one year), English, U. S. His- 
tory, Arithmetic, Algebra through Quadratics, plane and solid Geom- 
etry, and Botany or some other science. 

3. Students from other medical schools must present credentials or 
be exanxiiied as stated above. 

This school is a member of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges, and adheres to the requirements of that Association. 

Combined Scientific and Medical Coarse. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Con^iate Department by which it will be possible for a student to 
complete the course in Science and the course in the Medical Depart- 
ment in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees B. S. and M. D. 
This oomtmied course is especially recommended to all students who 
to enter the profession of medicine. 



148 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

COHBIimD COURSS IrBADINO TO THB DBGRBB8 

OF B. 8. AND M. B. 
FimtYear. 

German, 5, or Latin, 4 or 5/ 

Mathematics, 5, and Drawing, 2; or Mathematics, 3, History, 2, and 
Drawing, 2; or Mathematics, 5, and History, 2. 
English, 3. 
Military Drill, 3. 

Second Year. 

German, 3, and English, 2; or German, 3, and Economics, 2; or 
Latin, 5; or Greek, 5. 
Physics, 5. 

Animal Morphology and Physiology, with Histology, 5. 
MiUtaiy Drill, 3. 

Tlilrd Year. 

French, 5; or Greek, 5; or Latin, 5. (At least one year of Latin re- 
quired). 
Chemistry, 5. 

Botany (fall and winter) and Histology (spring), 5. 
Anatomy (fall and winter) and Dissection (spring), 4. 
MiUtary Drill, 3. 

Fonrth Year. 

Anatomy, 5. 

Physiology (Medical), 4. 

Physiological Chemistry, 2, with laboratory work. 

General Pathology, 2. 

Materia Medica, 3, 

Obstetrics, 2. 

Physical Diagnosis, i. 

Bandaging, i. 

Pharmacy. 40 hours. 

Dissecting when possible. 

Embryology and Bacteriology (spring). 



*Thc fiffiiret refer to the number of exercise<per week. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 149 

FiiUiYear. 

Junior Medical, with electives is the spring term. 

Sixth Yeax. 

Senior Medical, with electives in the spring term. 

Admission to Adyanced Standing:, Three Tears' Course. 

Those who have attended two courses will be admitted to the 
Senior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first and second years, and showing that they done as much 
prehminary work as is required for entrance to this department. 

Advanced Standing, Fonr Years' Conrse. 

No student is admitted to advanced standing in this department 
without such an examination as shall show that he has done work 
elsewhere equivalent to that required of students in this department. 

Students from other accredited colleges who have attended one 
conrse of lectures, will be admitted to the Sophomore class upon pass- 
ing an examination in the branches taught during the first year. 

Those who have attended two courses will be admitted to the 
Junior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first and second years. 

Those who have attended three courses will be admitted to the 
Senior dass upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first, second, and third years. 

Graduates in Pharmacy, upon examination as above, may enter the 
Sophomore class. 

Graduates of Dental schools in good standing, will be admitted to 
the Sophomore dass upon passing the entrance examination only. 

Graduates from Veterinary colleges in good standing, will be 
admitted to the Sophomore class upon passing the entrance examina- 
tion. 

In all cases those who enter from other schools with advanced 
standing must comply with the requirements for admission, page 32. 

Requirements for Oradnation. 

1. The candidate must be twenty-one years of age. 

2. He must be known to be of unexceptionable moral character. 



I50 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

3. He must have been engaged in the study of medicine for lour 
years. This includes the time spent with a preceptor, who taxut be a 
practitioner in good standing, and attendance upon lectures as stated 
in the next paragraph. 

*4. The time of study must include attendance upon at least four 
full courses of lectures, the last of which must be taken in this insti- 
tution. The time occupied by each of the four coures of lectures shall 
not be less than six months of twenty-four weeks, and not more than 
one of the four courses shall be within the same year. 

5. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed at least two 
courses in Practical Anatomy. 

6. The deportment during the term must have been unexception- 
able. 

7. Attendance upon all lectures, clinics and other instruction in 
the course must have been in accordance with the requirements of the 
department. 

8. All members of the Freshman class will be examined in General 
Chemistry, Histology, Physiology. Anatomy, Materia Medica, and 
Pharmacy, at the end of that year. The examination in General 
Chemistry, Histology, Pharmacy, and Materia Medica will be final 
should the student show the required proficiency. 

9. Members of the Sophomore class at the end of that year must 
pass satisfactory examinations in Anatomy, Physiology, Physiolc^gical 
Chemistry, and General Pathology. 

In case of failure to pass any of these examinations, the student may 
be re-examined during the first ten days of October, or of January, or 
at the end of the next session. 

Students of the Senior class must notify the Secretary of the Faculty 
in writing, during the second week in February, of their intention of 
becoming applicants for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, at the same 
time presenting a certificate of legal age, and of good moral character, 
also the receipts from the Secretary of the University, showing that 
all fees have been paid. 

During the last week of the term, having complied with the other 



^tttdenta completing three full courses not later than March, iflA a>ay pie- 
■en t themselves for graauation under the old plan of three courses ol it«4j, and 
one year with a prece p tor. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 151 

leqnizcnieiits, they mast pose a satisfactory ezaxninatioii in Practioe 
ci Medloaie, Surgery, ObstetricSi and Gjmecology, Tberapentics, 
Ophthalmology, and in any other subjects tanght, if so directed by 
the Facnlty at the beginning of the term. 

Chm standing, recitation marks, together with Demonstrators' 
reports and final examinations, will be taken into consideration when 
the candidate's fitness to receive the medical degree. 



The Medical Building: 

Is located on the south end of the campus, in a line with the other 
Umversity buildings. It is one of the best and most commodions med- 
ical ooUege buildings in the west. It comprises a basement for gen- 
eral purposes, the first floor containing the Secretary's office, the pro- 
fessors* rooms, the histological laboratory, the medical library and 
reading rtxnn, a lecture room, and the janitor's room. 

On the second floor is a spacious and well-lighted pathological and 
bacteriological laboratory supplied with a sufficient ntmiber of micro- 
icopes for dasa-work, and with other appliances; prosector's room, 
and ge n e r al Faculty room, and a large am p h iUAeater provided with 
opera chairs for two hundred and sixty-six students. 

The whole of the third floor (80x36 feet) is used as a dissecting 
room, is supplied with sinks and water, and each table is lighted with 



The whole building is heated with steam and is well ventilated* 

Uniyeraity Hoapital. 

The Twenty-sixth General Assembly levied a tax for the erection of 
buildings for the University, and by the action of the Board of 
Regents the first year's tax, estimated at somewhat more than fifty 
thousand dollars, will be devoted to the building and equipment of a 
Hoapital. Its capacity when completed will be about 120 beds and it 
is cKpected to be ready for the reception of patients by the opening of 
the senioB of 1897-98. This will add to the equipment of the Medical 
Pi yai I II Milt what it has so loag needed. The University Hospital 
will ha IB all rejects modem and without a superior in the west. 



152 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

With an administration building thoroughly furnished; with large 
and commodious wards as well as private rooms, with a clinical am- 
phitheatre that will comfortably seat two hundred or more, and with 
separate surgical, gynecological, medical, ophthalmological and laryn- 
gological operating rooms together with a well supplied Free Dispen- 
sary open throughout the year but little is left to be desired. 

It is confidently believed that the students who make the Medical 
Department of the University the school of their choice will find in 
all its departments complete and perfect equipment, both for didactic 
and illustrative instruction. 

The Uniyersity Hosfiital Training School for Nurses. 

Connected with the Medical Department of the University, the 
School for Nurses offers a two years* course of training to women who 
desire to enter the profession of nursing. The course of instruction 
comprises practical work in wards, theoretical work in class and lec- 
ture rooms and a complete course in invalid cookery. 

The work is divided into Junior and Senior years, as follows: 

Junior ITear* Class work. Anatomy, Physiology, Materia Medica, 
Practical Nursing. 

lectures on Hygiene, Anatomy, Physiology and on Nursing, — Medi- 
cal, Surgical and G3mecological. 

Senior Tear. Class work, Obstetric Nursing, Care of Infants, 
After care of operative cases. 

Lectures on Bacteriology, Obstetrics, Diseases of Children, Surgical 
Technique, Special Nursing. 

Application for admission must be made to the Superintendent of 
Training School, University Hospital. 

Internes. 

A number of appointments as Internes in State institutions are 
made each year from the graduates of the Medical Department. 
These are awarded to such of the applicants as the Faculty judges 
best prepared for the position, the successful candidates being allowed 
to select, in the order of their rank, from those which are available. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 153 

In March, 1897, the following named gxaduates were appointed: 

Dr. C. S. Cilley, Mercy Hospital, Davenport. 

Dr. P. O. Bsbjoem, University Hospital. 

Dr. P. O. Neraal, Hospital for the Insane, Independence. 

Dr. Conrad De Jong, Hospital for the Insane, Clarinda. 

Board in Iowa City can be obtained for from ^2.00 to $3.00 a week; 
rooms from |2.oo to |8.oo a month. Many students procure rooms 
and board in clubs, which materially reduces the cost. 

Graduates of this school are requested to immediately acquaint the 
Secretary of the Faculty with their postoffice addresses, and to inform 
him promptly of any change of residence. 

For any further information, or for full announcements, address 
Dr. E. W. Rockwood, Secretary of the Medical Faculty, Iowa City, 
Iowa. 



Homoeopathic Medical Department 



Faculty and Assistants, 



CHA&I4CS A. SCHAKPPRR, A. M., Ph. D., hh. D., 
President. 

WiuioT H. Dickinson, M. D., 

Professsor of Theory and Practice, and Clinical Medicine, and De«n of the 
Faculty. 

Jambs G. Gii,christ, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Surgical Gynecology, and Registrar of the 
Faculty. 

Chari^bs H. COGSWBI*!., M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

Prank J. Nbwbbrry, M. S., M. D., O. et A. Chir., 
Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, and Paedology. 

GVORGB ROYAI., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Thbodorb L. Hazard, M. D., 

A ssistant to the Chair of Materia Medica. 

PRBD J. BBCKBR, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Surgery. 

Rai«ph W. HOMAN, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology, ate. 

Samuki. N. Watson, A. M., M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice. 

adbuc p. KimbaU., M. D., 
Matron. 

Raymond E. Pbck, M. D., 

House Surgeon. 

Lbora Johnson, M. D., 

Clinical AssisUnt to the Chair of Surgeiy. 



HOMCBOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMBNT. 155 

Additional Iiistrtictors from tlie Medical Department. 

John W. Harbtman, M. D., 

PrafcMor of Anatomy. 

jAlOtS R. GUTBRIS, A. M., M. D., 
Prof CMor of Pliytiology. 

EI3BET W. ROCKWOOD, A. M., M. D., 
Profcaior of Chemistry and Toxicology. 

Wai«TBR L. BIBRRING, M. D., 

ftofeaaor of Nonnal and RMImIokic*! Histology. 

UKH Wmxacb DBAH, B. S., M. D., 
Demonstiator of Amitomy. 

WaxiAM R. WHITBI8, B. S., M. D., 
DcmoBBtxmtor of Normal Histology. 

W. E. Rarix>w, a. B., 

P— iOinUatoi' of Chemistry. 

Gimmnif H. Hzlx«, A. M., M. D., 

(SttperiBtendent of the Hospital for the Insane at Independence}. I«ec» 
iuTer on Insanity. 

Extnt McCx^AiM, A. M., IX. D., 

IfCctnver on Medical Jarispnidence. 



W. Bamcropt, M. D., Keokuk, 
p. B. Tlaxii, M. D., Mancheater, 
A. 8. Hakskn, M. D., Cedar FalU. 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The twenty-first annual course of instruction will open on Wednes- 
day, September 15, 1897, and dose on Tuesday, March 29, 1898. The 
opening lecture will be given by Prof. Royal at 4 p. m. in the amphi- 
theater. The course of study extends over ^ye years, one year being 
pre-martriculate, under a preceptor, and four years undei^graduate. 
Men and women are admitted on absolutely equal terms, no distinction 
whatever being made between them. The large and well equipped 
laboratories in the University, the hospital facilities affordied by the 
union of the college and hospital under one roof, and the opportunity 
for collateral study in any department of literature or science, furnishes 
facility for securing an education in medicine not to be surpassed. The 
fact that our undergraduates are frequently called upon to occupy po- 
sitions as demonstrators in other schools, is a sufficient proof of the 
superior advantages accruing from connection with a large University. 
A course has been authorized continuing over six years, which will 
enable the student to attain the degree of B. S., in addition to the 
medical degree. 

Admisaion. 

The requirements for admission are the same in all departments of 
the University, viz: the possession of a diploma from a high school 
approved by the University, or some equivalent, as the completion of 
the Freshman year in a college of letters, of approved standing, with a 
sufficient knowledge of Latin. Failing in these requirements, the ap- 
plicant for admission to the Freshman class must pass an examination 
in English scholarship, and I^atin sufficient to admit to the Freshman 
class in the Collegiate Department. Applicants for admission to ad- 
vanced standing must present evidence that they have attended one 

156 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 157 

or more sessions in a reputable medical college, and will be admitted 
to such class as they may prove themselves qualified to enter. All 
applicants for admission will apply to the examining committee in the 
President's office, on Tuesday, or Wednesday, September, 14 or 15, 
1897. If admitted they will then report for enrollment and assign- 
ment of seats at the Registrar's office, department building on Dubuque 
street. All fees must be paid to the Secretary of the University, and 
to Asm only. 

Advancement to higher classes is secured only by examination, oral 
and written, combined with the quiz record and class standing. An 
average of 65 per cent, must be secured in any one study to pass that 
chair; an average of 75 per cent, in all the examinations is necessary 
to pass to a higher class, and to secure a degree. A failure to pass in 
two or more studies will stop advancement untU the conditions are 
satisfied. A failure in one study will not stop advancement, but the 
student must pass a satisfactory examination in that study before the 
dose of the year to which he is promoted. The Faculty reserve the 
right to determine the class, which any student shall enter, in the case 
of applicants who have had one or more years in other medical schools. 

GraduaUs of non-homasopathic medical colleges may be admitted as 
graduate students, as follows: If an ad eundem degree is sought they 
must matriculate in the University, and pay a lecture fee and an ex- 
amination fee, passing an examination in the therapeutics of the 
branches taught in this Department. If a degree is not sought a 
mstricnlation fee is to be paid, and such laboratory expenses as may 
be necessary, together with a lecture fee, if a full course is taken. 

Alm$nni of this school will be admitted to all lectures and clinics 
free of charge. 

By order of the Board of Regents no student will be enrolled until 
all neoesaary fees have been paid. 

In case any student is unable to pay the feas at the proper time, 
snch stodent may, on application to the Dean of the Department, be 
granted an extension. 

Students who do not pay the proper fees or avail themselves of the 
provision above mentioned, will be suspended from the Department 
until sncbfees are paid. 



i5« STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Tiiitioii Feea. 

The fee for tuition is sixty-fiTC dollars (I65) for each year, of which 
forty dollars ($40) is payable on or before October ist, and the remain- 
der on or before January loth. There are no extra fees wliatever, but 
for each laboratory course in chemistr}% there is required a deposit 
of I3, to cover breakage, and to ensure the return of all ke3rs at the 
close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is re- 
turned to the student. 

The above statement of fees is now in effect, and wiU apply to all 
students in the Department, irrespective of the date of matriculation. 

Anatomy, 

Anatomy is studied during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
The course is a very thorough one, utilizing all the modem aids to 
teaching. Whenever possible the student will have the opportunity, 
by actual inspection of material, to become familiar with the appear- 
ance, texture, and physical characters of all structures. Practical 
anatomy, or dissection, is absolutely essential to promotion to higher 
classes, and is most thoroughly taught, the supply of material being 
abundant. Bach student is required to make two dissections, one 
each year. On the completion of a dissection, a rigid examination will 
be held, which will entitle to a certificate to that effect. Without snch 
evidence of having made two dissections, in a manner satisfactory to 
the Demonstrator, a student cannot be examined for graduation. Text- 
book: Gray, Nancredes' Essentials. 

Physiolosry. 

Physiology is studied in the Freshman and Sophonoie years. In 
this subject the inductive method is very largely caiployed in impart- 
ing instmctioa. The lectures are proftwely illnstraled by means of 
charts, diagrams, and black-board figures; and the etadeat is rendere<l 

piacttcally familiar with the phenomena of the moat imyertaiit bodily 
functions in normal operation by the emplojoneat (if m pniiwsn>i upon 
living animals as a means of demonstration. T i i boak ; Ftlat, Dal* 
ton, or Foster. 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL, DEPARTMENT. 159 

Histolos^'^ 

The work in this department runs through the Freshman year. One 
lecture a week will be given, many of them being illustrated by means 
of the stereoptican. Two hours each week are devoted to laboratory 
work, in the new histological laboratory, which is commodious, well- 
lighted, and supplied with thirty-six new compound microscopes, with 
all necessary accessories, dissecting microscopes, microtomes of various 
kinds, injecting apparatus, tnrn-tables, etc. 

Bach student is furnished a microscope, reagents and apparatus, is 
taught the use of the microscope, and does, or has demonstrated t>efore 
him, the general technique of the subject of histology, hardening, em- 
bedding, sectioning, staining, mounting, etc. 

Histological injections are made before the class. During the term 
the student prepares for himself a series of slides, illustrating the 
ultimate distribution of the blood, and cellular structure of normal 
tissues and organs. Klein's Manual of Histology is the text-book 
used. 

Chemistry. 

The work in chemistry is carried on during three years. In the 
Freshman year the course consists of lectures and laboratory work. 
The lectures treat first of the general principles of the science; then 
the subjects of interest to the student of medicine are discussed. 
Especial attention is paid to the compounds found in the body, with 
their functions and chemical changes. Medicinal and poisonous sub- 
stances, and such as are used in practical work are also considered. 

In the laboratory the student begins with tests for the metals, par- 
ticularly the poisonous ones, and passes to the analysis of complex 
sabstances. He learns methods of manipulation, and becomes ac- 
quainted with the properties and actions of reagents. In the latter 
part of the course urine is studied; quantitative and qualitative tests 
are made for its pathological constituents, and such normal ones as 
are of importance to the physician. 

The course includes the methods for the sanitary examination of 
water, and tboae emplo3red in quantitative analysis. 

In the Sophomore year physiologtcal chemistry is taken up on the 
same general plan. The lectures are in explanation and amplification 



i6o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

of the laboratory work. The latter includes the study of the proxi- 
mate principles of the body, and of their chemical changes. Artificial 
digestive experiments are made, their products being isolated and 
tested. The constituents of the blood are tested, together with the 
methods for identification of stains. The qualitative tests for the 
abnormal constituents of the urine follow, and the quantitative deter- 
mination of such as are of importance. The course is completed by 
the identification of urinary sediments and calculi; and the analysis 
of various pathological specimens of urine. 

In the Junior year toxicology is taken up. Instruction in this 
branch is given by means of weekly lectures, supplemented by quizzes. 
The general principles are first considered, then the most important of 
the poisons are treated separately. Text-books: Simon, or Roscoe 
and Schorlemmer, Andrews' Anal3rtical. 

Theory and Practice. 

Regular attendance on this branch of medical study will be required 
only of the Junior and Senior classes; but it is desirable that the 
Sophomore class attend the lectures as often as their other duties will 
permit. The teaching will be didactic and clinical. 

General and special pathology will be taught according to the latest 
investigations into the etiology and nature of disease. 

It will be the aim of the occupant of this chair to teach only that * 
which has secured the sanction of competent observers, and which 
has been confirmed by abundant clinical experience. 

In teaching the relation of drug pathogenesis to semieology tlie 
well established principles of homoeopathic therapeuties will be closely 
and consistently followed. 

Attendance upon clinics will be obligatory upon Seniors, Juniors and 
Sophomores, but optional with the Freshman class. 

The lecture room being under the same roof with the hospital 
furnishes admirable opportuities for bed-side instruction . The lectures 
will be illustrated by diagrams, wax and papier-mach^ models, and 
pathological specimens from the museum of the department in order 
to enhance their usefulness. No efforts will be spared to prepare the 
student to become a successful practitioner. 



*/ 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMBNT. i6i 



The books reooniinended are as follows: Dickinson's Theory and 
Practioe, Amdt's S3r8tem of Medicine, Raue's Special Pathology, 
Goodno*s Practice. For reference: Pepper's Text-book of Theory 
and Pracdoe of Medicine; Stevens' Manual of Pathology. 

Ophthalmoloi^r and Otology- 

During the Junior and Senior years instruction in diseases of the eye 
and ear will be both didactic and clinical. Special stress is laid upon 
the diagnosis and treatment of those diseases which will most often 
present tfaemselves in the work of the general practitioner. The 
didactic teaching is illustrated by models and drawings. The clinics 
are laxge and varied, opportunity being thus given to examine and 
treat the cases presented. Text-books: Norton, Buffum, Angell. 

Iraryns^oloflfy and Rhinology. 

Instruction is given in rhinology and laryngology to the Junior and 
Senior classes by weekly lectures and clinics. Students are assigned 
cases for treatment, and given ample opportunity to become expert in 
the nae of the laryngoscope, rhinoscope and other instruments em- 
pl03red in the diagnosis and treatment of the various diseases. Text- 
books: Ivins or^Brown. 

Pttdoios^y. 

Weekly lectures and recitations are given on diseases of children to 
the Junior and Senior classes. The subjects taken up are the diseases 
of infancy, as well as early childhood, and while largely treated by the 
didactic method, clinical demonstrations are used whenever possible. 
Text-books: Tooker, Fisher. 

Materia Medica. 

Students will receive instruction from this chair during the entire 
oouiae. The Freshmen will be given two lectures each week during 
the first half of the year. Ten lectures will be given on the organon, 
and ten on institntes and pharmacology. 

The Sophomores and Juniors will be instructed together. Four 
boors each week will be devoted to lectures, recitations, and quizzes. 






i62 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The minerals will be considered during the term 1897-98. A brief re- 
view of the tozicological and physiological effects of the drug will be 
given, then the most prominent and characteristic symptoms. These 
symptoms will be grouped as they have been found useful for thera- 
peutic purposes. The Seniors will be allowed to attend and review 
the lectures given the Juniors, and in addition will be given two hours 
each week. These two hours will be devoted entirely to practical work. 
Clinical cases will be presented for which each student will be required 
to prescribe. The remedies thus presented will be thoroughly studied 
and compared with others which are applicable to the various mani- 
festations of the disease under consideration. 

Text-books: Organon; Dewey's Essentials of Materia Medica; Far- 
rington's Clinical Materia Medica; Dunham's Homoeopathy and 
Science of Therapeutics; Malcolm and Moss' Regional and Compara- 
tive Materia Medica, and Allen's Hand-book of Materia Medica. 

Surirery. 

This study extends through the entire course. Minor surgery is 
taught during the Freshman year, including bandaging. In the 
Sophomore and Junior year surgical emetgencies is taught, including 
such topics as anesthesia, shock, hemorrhage, wounds, fractures, and 
dislocations. In the Senior year surgical pathology, general and 
special, is thoroughly gone over. The method of instruction is a com- 
bination of the didactic and practical. The principal operations are 
made on the cadaver, and experimental work, in the seminary, will 
receive careful attention in the Senior year. Examinations are held 
in each class at the close of the year.* 

The books recommended are: In the Freshman year, Sargent's or 
Martin's Minor Surger}\ In the Sophomore and Junior years, Gil- 
christ's Syllabus, and Hamilton on Fractures and Dislocations. In 
the Senior year, Fisher and Macdonald's Text-book of Surgeiy, and 
Gilchrist's Surgical Pathology, White and Martin's Genito-urinary 
Diseases, Adams' Text-Book. 



* Sophomores, luniors, and Seniors are required to attend the clinics; Seniors 
are admitted to suo-clinics as detailed in sections. 



HOMCBOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 163 

Oynecolo^^. 

This branch is divided between the chairs of obstetrics and surgery. 
The study is pursued in the Senior year. 

Medical diseases of women are considered by the chair of obstetrics 
during the last half of the term. The surgical diseases are treated dur- 
ing the year by the chair of surgery, by lectures, clinics, and demon- 
strations. The books recommended are Wood's Gynecology, South- 
wick's Practical G3mecology. 

Obstetrics. 

This branch is taught in the Junior and Senior years. The plan of 
instruction in this branch will be the usual didactic method supple- 
mented by demonstrations with wet and dry preparations, models and 
diagrams, together with clinical practice whenever possible. Two 
lectures a week are given, with occasional quizzes and recitations. 
The scheme is designed to carry the student forward, after thorough 
inatmction in the anatomy of the pelvis and generative apparatus, 
through ovulation, menstruation, gestation, and normal labor. Use 
of the various instruments is taught on the manikin, and every care 
taken to thoroughly prepare the students for dealing with complica- 
tions. Dystochia, and all forms of abnormal gc:station and labor are 
given in the closing portion of the course. Tlie central idea is to give 
the practical preference over the merely theoretical. The text-books 
recommended are: Guernsey, Leavitt, and Lusk; Grandin and Jarmen, 
Obstetric Surgery. 

Fathologfy. 

The west hall on the second floor of the Medical building is now the 
pathological and bacteriological laboratory. Here are all the instru- 
ments necessary for the study and demonstration of pathological anat- 
omy and patholgical histology, also the apparatus usually found in a 
well equipped bacteriological laboratory, ample for the cultivation and 
demonstration of the germs of interest to medical men. Students not 
only see this work done, but make all the ordinary cultivations and 
pare cultures themselves, and prepare slides of all the ordinary non- 
pathogenic and pathogenic microbes. 



id4 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Three hours a week are devoted to the practical study of morbid 
anatomy. The work consists of laboratory exercises, the aim being to 
make this study as practical as possible, and to familiarize the student 
with the use of the microscope in diagnosis. Part of the time in the 
laboratory is devoted to the study of prepared specimens under the 
guidance of the instructor, and the remainder to the mounting of path- 
ological specimens by the student himself. An abundance of material 
is furnished by the laboratory, and each student is allowed to keep as 
his own property all the sections prepared by him during the tenn. 
Special attention is paid to the diagnosis of tumors, trichinse, etc., 
microscopically, and the student learns easy and rapid methods of 
making preparations for such diagnosis. Two hours a week are used 
for lectures, supplementary as well as introductory to the laboratory 
work. 

The course in this chair is pursued in the Junior and Senior years, 
the Senior year being laboratory work. 

The text-books recommended are: Green, Dellafield and Pruden, 
or Ziegler. In bacteriology, Abbott, Crookshank, or Sternberg. 



Medical Jurispnideiice, Insanity and Dentistry 

will be treated in short courses of lectures, given by appointment. 



Classes in materia medica, practice, minor surgery, pharmacology, 
obstetrics, surgical emergencies, surgery, g3mecology, eye and ear, and 
peedology are in the lecture room or amphitheater of the Homoeopathic 
Hospital, in which rooms also, all the clinics are held. Ph3r8iology, 
anatomy, and insanity are taught in the amphitheater of the Medical 
Department. Pathology, histolog>', chemistry, and toxicology are 
taught in the appropriate laboratories. Medical jurisprudence is taught 
in the lecture-room of the Law Department. 

Clinics. 

The clinics of this Department are open to students of all the classes, 
but the attendance is not obligatory in the Freshman year. All the 
clinics are full, in some of them the capacity of the hospital has been 



ttOMCEOPATHIC MEWCAt DEPARTMENT. 165 

severely taxed. The general arrangements and clinical system are as 
follows : The House Stugeon at the commencement of the term details 
three students from the Senior class as clinical assistants. One of these 
retires after one week^s service, one after two weeks, and the remain- 
ing one after three weeks. One student a week is detailed thereafter 
so that each Senior student has three consecutive weeks of clinical 
work. The duties are to assist at all clinics, and attend to all dressings 
in the Hospital, under the supervision of the House Surgeon. This 
gives unusual facilities for practical instruction. In the medical and 
eye and ear clinics each member of the Senior class will be given re- 
peated opportunities for examination of patients, and will be required 
to diagnose the disease and suggest method of treatment. The clinics 
are largely patronized, the number of cases and the variety being fully 
equal to the college clinics elsewhere. The clinics are held as follows: 

Medical Clinic. Thursday afternoon, service of Professor Dick- 

IN90M. 

Sorgical Clinic. Saturday morning, service of Professor Gii<- 



9ye and Sar Clinic. Tuesday afternoon, service of Professor 
Oynecologfical Clinic. Friday afternoon, service of Professor 



Obatetrical Clinic. By appointment, service of Professor CoGS- 



8lib*C]illica« The sub-clinics are held two or more times a week, 
to which sections of the Senior class are admitted, where opportunity 
is afforded all to make examinations in gjmeoological cases, and the 
tise of various instruments of precision for purposes of diagnosis. 

Medical and surgical treatment, and nursing are free for patients 
entering the general clinics. Board in the Hospital is furnished for 
I7.00 a week. 

Correspondence with reference to admission to the clinics or Hospi- 
tal should be had with the professor having charge of the particular 
dinic, or the Registrar of the Faculty. Arrangements can be made 
for the reception of a limited number of obstetrical cases, only between 
the 15th of September and the 15th of February. 



m s*rA*rE uNtvERSHrv oi^ io\va» 

Dispeiuiary. In connedtion with the clinics a dispensary had 
recently been opened, where the clinical assistants, under the direc- 
tion of the Faculty, prescribe for and visit out-patients, as well as 
attend such cases of obstetrics as apply. The dispensary is growing 
in patronage and influence, and has become a highly important and 
profitable portion of the work, affording at once material for the 
clinics, and giving practical instruction to the attendant. 

TRAINING SCHOOIr FOR NURBS8. 

A training school for nurses has been authorized by the Board of 
Regents, the complete course covering three years. The first year is 
devoted to preliminary studies fitting the pupil for the active work, 
that is, as nurses in the hospital. Candidates for admission to the 
Training School must be not under twenty nor over thirty-five years 
of age, must have a common school education, and must present two 
letters of recommendation as to their capability, qualifications, and 
moral character. No other examination for admission will be required . 

Tht first year covering the preliminary work begins and closes with 
the medical term of the University. A fee of five dollars will.be charged , 
payable at the beginning of the term to the Registrar of the Faculty. 
The work of this year is entirely theoretical, consisting of lectures 
upon anatomy, physiology, special nursing in diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose, and throat, and on practical nursing. For cases of emergency 
and home nursing, this course is especially desirable. Aside from 
their practical work, during the second year^ the nurses will have one 
recitation each week, and during the IhirdyearsptdAl topics for essays 
will be assigned. Those who have completed the preliminary work at 
the beginning of the second year will be entered upon one month's 
probation in the Hospital, during which time they will receive board, 
lodging, and laundry, but no compensation. If they are found satis- 
factory, they shall at the end of the first month and during the re- 
mainder of the second year in addition to their living as above, receive 
|8 a month for personal expenses, with a slight increase during the 
third year. This sum is not to be regarded as wages, the instruction 
given being in itself full compensation for all services rendered . Those 
who complete the three years' course shall receive a suitable diploma, 



nOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 167 

signed by the President and the Secretary of the University and at- 
tested by the seal of the University. The graduating exercises occur 
in connection with those of the Department. For further information 
address the Matron, ADELE P. KIMBALL, M. D. 



Board and Accomodatioiia. 

Good board can be obtained at from I3 to $5 a week. By associat- 
ing in clubs, students may supply themselves with good accommoda- 
tions at a material reduction from the customary prices. 

Students will be furnished with all necessary information concern- 
ing rooms and boarding by applying to the Y. M. C. A. Information 
Bureau. 

Reqtdrements for Graduation. 

To be admitted to the degree of Doctor of Medicine (M. D. ) in this 
Department, the student must exhibit to the Dean evidence of having 
pursued the study of medicine for four years; must have attended four 
courses of lectures, of at least six months each, the last of which 
shall have been in this institution; and must be not less than twenty- 
one years of age. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Collegiate Department by which it will be possible for a student to 
complete the course in Science and the course in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees of B. 
S. and M. D. This combined course is especially recommended to all 
ftndents who intend to enter the profession of medicine. 

Altmini Association. 

The Alumni Association held its tenth annaul meeting at the College 
boilding, March 14, 1897, at which time the following officers were 
elected: 

President— Da. R. W. Homan. 

First Vicc-President—DR. Ci^aka M. Hazard. 

Second Vice-President — Dr. Adklr P. Kimbai.];, 

Secretary— Dr. R. E. P«ck. 

Treasurer— Dr. Lvora Johnson. 



i68 STAtE UNIVBRSTTY OP IOWA. 

Bzecutive Committee— Prbsidbnt, Sbc&kta&y and Tkhasurbr. 

Alimini are urged to send their names to the Secretary, to be en- 
rolled as members. A small admission fee is required, the fnnds so 
procnred to be donoted to the Hospital agreeably to a TOte taken at 
the last meeting. Alumni are requested to keep the Secretary informed 
of change of address. 

Johnson Coimty Homoeopathic Medical Society. 

The meetings of this Society are held weekly in the lecture-room of 
the Department, and have been very useful adjuncts to the instruction 
given. Senior students are associate members, and enjoy all the privi- 
leges of membership, except that of voting and the right to hold office. 
Officers for 1897-98: 

President— Jambs G. Gii«christ, A. M., M. D. 

Vice-President— R. W. Homan, M. D. 

Secretary — Adbi«B P. Kof baix, M. D. 



Any further information may be obtained by addressing the Presi- 
dent of the University, the Dean or Registrar of the Faculty, at lowm 
City, Iowa. 



Dental Department 



Faculty, 



Cbakubs Ashmkap Schabfpsk, a. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

President and Dean of the Dental Department. 

F. T. Brxsnb, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative Dentist: y and Therapeutics, and Superintendent 
of OperatiTe Clinic. 

Wif. S. H08FOKD, A. B., D. D. S., 



Profesaor of Proothetic Dentistry and Crown and Bridge Woric, Superin- 
tendent of Prosthetic Clinics, and Secretary of the Faculty. 



Other Instructors^ 



W. H. DbFord, a. M., M. D., D. D. S.» 
Professor of Oral Pathology and Hygiene. 

SI3SBT WHAIAM ROCKWOOD, A. M., M. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

WaI^TKR l^WSBNCB BlBRRINO, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology. Bacteriology, and Histolc^ry. 

Caxmuts SDMNE& Cbasb, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics 

]amms Rsnwick Guthrib, M. D., 

Profesaor of Physiology. 

John Wai«tbk Habrtmaw, M. D., 
Professor of Anatomy. 

WlIXXAM ROBBRT WHinuS, M. S., M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Histology. 

J. E. PtXBinCR, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Orthodontia. 

Cha&UCS ClXVnULKD NUTTIMG, A. M., 
I«ectnrer on Comparative Odontography. 

169 



tyo STATE UNIVERSITY OF tOWA. 

R. W. Bajudwin, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Regional Anatomy. 

A. E. ROGBRS, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy. 

W. G. Clark, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Porcelain Work. 

J. P. MULLIN, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

R. W. Baldwin, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technologv. 

A. E. Rogers, d. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

G. W. ESHLKMAN, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technologj'. 

C. B. LKWIS, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

F. B. JamKS, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of DenUl Technology. 

E. A. Sprakbr, 

Custodian. 

Hblbn Baschnagkl, 

Clerk. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



Instruction in this school is given throughout the academic yeaf 
by lectures, recitations, clinical teaching, and practical exercises, uni- 

fonnal distributed. The course of instruction is progressive and ex- 
tends over three years. 

Some of the studies of the first and second years are pursued in con- 
nection with the classes in the Medical Department, the student re- 
ceiving instruction by the same professors,at the same time and place 
with the medical students, and at the end of the year passing with them 
the examinations. 

It is the object of the Faculty to present a complete course of instruc- 
UOD in theory and practice of Dentistry; and for this purpose well- 
appointed laboratories and infirmaries are provided, and such arrange- 
ments made as insure an ample supply of patients. Clinical instruc- 
tion is given by the professors and other instructors, and under the 
direction of demonstrators patients are assigned to the students, insur- 
ing to all opportunity of operating at the chair, and becoming by actual 
practice familiar with all the operations demanded of the dentist. 

The infirmaries remain open and clinical instructors and demon- 
itntors are in attendance daily throughout the school year, offering to 
students unsurpassed facilities for acquiring practical knowledge and 
manipulative dexterity. 

Course of Ittettnctioti. 

The course of instruction extends over three years of nine months 
each. This, however, does not apply to those students who entered 
before the year 1896-97. 

171 



17^ STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Requiremente for Adnittsioii. 

The applicant must present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of 
good moral character, and must pass a preliminary examination or 
present a diploma or a certificate of graduation from a college, acade- 
my or high school, or a first class teachers' certificate covering the 
branches enumerated below under Preliminary Examination . Students 
of both sexes are admitted on equal tenns and are afforded the same fa- 
cilities for acquiring a thorough dental education. 

Preliminary Bzaminatioiis. All students who intend to matric- 
ulate in the College are expected to be present at the time appointed 
for examination. The preliminary examination will begin on Tues- 
day, the day preceding the opening of the session, at 8 a. m., and will 
embrace the following branches: Algebra, through quadratics, three 
terms; rhetoric and composition, three terms; natural philosophy, 
three terms; United States history, three terms; English literature, 
three terms; Latin, three terms. 

The student may, at the option of the Faculty, substitute any one of 
the following electives in lieu of one of the preceding studies. No sub- 
stitute, however, will be allowed for Latin: Three terms of algebra, 
through quadratics; three terms of geometry, plane and solid; two terms 
of physiology ; two terms of physical geography; one term of botany, 
with analysis of forty plants; three terms of general history; three terms 
physics; three terms of English literature; two terms of civil govern- 
ment; two terms of history of England; three terms of American litera- 
ture; three terms of chemistry; one term of commercial arithmetic; 
two terms of astronomy; two terms of geology; two terms of natural 
history; one term of political science; two terms of drawing; three 
terms of German; three terms of Greek; three terms of Latin reading, 
Caesar; three terms of Cicero, four orations; three terms of Vergil, ax 
books; one term of book-keeping; three terms of French; three tferms 
of manual training. 

Schedule of Stndiea. 

First or Preshmaii Tear. Completed the first year: Chemis- 
try, including Laboratory, Materia Medica, Histology, including 
Laboratory work. Comparative Anatomy, with Dissection, Dental 
Anatomy with Technic, and Operative Technic. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 173 

Subjects taken first year and continued through the second year: 
Anatomy, Physiology, Dental Technology, lectures and laboratory 
work, and Operative Technic. 

Second or Junior Tear. Subjects completed the second year: 
Anatomy ¥rith Dissection, Physiology, Organic Chemistry, and Met- 
allurgy, including laboratory. Therapeutics, Dental Technology, and 
laboratory work. 

Subjects taken the second and continued through the third year: 
Surgery, Pathology, Therapeutics, Orthodontia Technic, Operative 
Technic, Operative Dentistry, and Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Third or Senior ITear. Subjects completed the third year: 
Oral Surgery, Pathology, Regional Anatomy, Special Histology, 
Clinical Dentistry, Therapeutics, Metallurgy and laboratory work, 
Dental Art, Special Therapeutics, Practical Bacteriology, Operative 
Dentistry, Prosthetic Dentistry, Dental Pathology, and Hygiene. 

All students of the first and second years will be reqtdred to pass an 
examination on the studies pursued in their respective courses before 
leaving the University at the dose of each term. No student who has 
failed in two of the studies of his course will pass to advanced stand- 
ing unless they are made up before the holiday vacation. No certifi- 
cates ate given to any who fail in more than two branches, except a 
time certificate stating the actual time of attendance. 



COmitSB OF I^9CTURES AND I^ABORATORT WORK. 



0]>erative Dentistry and Therapentics. 

To arrest decay and prevent the destruction of human teeth is the 
ideal work of operative dentistry. To know how to fill teeth well and 
lastingly is the ambitious desire of every intelligent student of dentis- 
try. In the lectures delivered on this subject he will be made 
acquainted with all the useful materials and methods of filling teeth, 
the use of instruments, and the various manipulations required in a 
fnll practice at the operating chair. The same will be fully illustrated 
and demonstrated by numerous clinics, which will constitute an 



174 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

important feature of the dental instruction. The student is expected 
to supply himself vdth such instruments as will enable htm to perform 
all the usual operations of dentistry, under the supervision of the 
demonstrators. Students who own a dental engine should bring it 
with them. The application of remedies to diseased conditions is 
taught practically every day upon the patients in the operative clinics. 

Clinical Dentistry. 

In clinical dentistry thorough practical instruction will be given in 
the details of operations, use of materials, instruments, appliances and 
the application of remedial agents for the restoration of diseased con- 
ditions. The students are required to take charge of patients and 
perform operations under the supervision of demonstrators. The 
large number of clinical patients presenting themselves furnishes 
ample opportunity for a variety of practical work, 

Prosthetic Dentistry. 

The instruction in this department is both didactic and practical. 
It is the aim to teach not only the mere mechanical processes of Dent- 
istry, but that combination of art with mechanism which enables the 
practitioner to effect so much in restoring the symmetry of the face 
and usefulness of the teeth where they have been lost or impaired by 
accident or disease. Thorough instruction is also given in methods 
of restoring the dental organs with crowns of metal, or porcelain, by 
bridges, and by the making of artificial dentures with bases of metal, 
rubber, celluloid, aluminum, gold and porcelain, either alone or in 
combination. 

General Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Pathology and bacteriology will be taught during the Junior and 
Senior yeara by means of lectures and laboratory work. The work in 
the Junior 3rear will be devoted to general pathology, comprising a 
study of the general pathological changes, such as diculatory disturb- 
ances, degenerations, and inflammations, that occur in himian tissues. 
During the Senior year the work will consist of special pathology and 
bacteriology. It will include the study of all forms of new growths 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 175 

and the disease changes occurring in spedal structures, especially the 
oral tissues and such changes as come within the sphere of dental 
soigery. 

The bacteriological laboratory is equipped with the most improved 
apparatus for bacteriological investigation. The work will comprise 
the study of the characteristics of micro-organisms f nd their cultiva- 
tion; special consideration being given to the micro-organisms of the 
buccal cayity and their relation to dental caries and other disease 
processes. The slides prepared become the property of the student. 

Histology. 

Histology vrill be taught during the Freshman and Junior years by 
means of lectures and laboratory work. The laboratory work will 
comprise the preparing and study of microscopical slides, showing 
the minute structure of the different tissues and organs of the human 
body, with special reference to the digestive apparatus. Instruction 
will be given in the various methods of preparing and staining tissues 
for microscopical examination, the slides prepared becoming the per- 
sonal property of the student. During the Junior year the work will 
be continued in the form of special dental histology, which will be 
presented by means of didactic lectures and laboratory work. In the 
laboratory, each student will prepare and study a collection of slides 
pertaining to the histology of all the dental tissues and softer struc- 
tures of the buccal cavity, including a complete series showing the de- 
velopment of the teeth, the slides becoming the property of the 
student. 

Oral Pathology. 

A brief consideration of inflammation and its terminations, patho- 
logical conditions incident to first dentition, pathological conditions 
incident to second dentition, dental caries — various theories and ex- 
periments by which conclusions are reached, individual diseases of 
the teeth, — sensative dentine, hypersemia, congestion and inflamma- 
tion of the teeth, pulp nodules, putrescent pulps, alveolar abscess, 
acute and chronic, diseases of the peridental membrane, perecemen- 
titia, gingivitia, pyorrhcea alveolaris, the tongue and the mouth in dis- 
eases of remote parts, of tumors, methods of diagnosis. The epulic 



176 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

tumors, osteoma, simple cystic tumors, dentigerous cysts, diseases of 
the antrum, ranula, mouth breathing, alveolar necrosis, maxillary 
necrosis, phosphor-necrosis, epitheleoma, syphilis, mouth manifesta- 
tions, especially neuralgia and many other practical subjects that can 
not be mentioned here. 

Hyfi^iene. 

The importance of this subject cannot be overestimated when it is 
understood th|it decay of the teeth, suppuration of the pulp, alveolar 
dental abscess, pyorrhoea alveolaris, and perhaps other diseases with 
which dentists have to contend are the direct result of unhygienic con- 
ditions in the oral cavities. The processes of fermentation, suppura- 
tion, and infection in general, will be considered, and full instruction 
given in oral, personal, and office hygiene, and in the best methods of 
disinfection and antisepsis, including the care of the instruments in 
daily use. 

Chemistry. 

The work in chemistry is carried on during two years. In the Fresh- 
man year the lectures treat first of the general principles of the science, 
then their application to the needs and operations of dentistry are ex- 
plained. The laboratory work of this year is chiefly in qualitative 
analysis with a view to familiarizing the student with the action of 
reagents, with chemical manipulation and with the most important 
properties of the metals and their compounds. In the Junior year the 
lectures will be upon organic chemistry and metallurgy, and the labor- 
atory work npou the properties of the metals, and also some of tlie more 
important methods of quantitative analysis. 



Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

The course in these branches will cover the following points: 
I . The Freshman class will be given during two-thirds of the session 
two hours a week upon both organic and inorganic drugs, special 
stress being laid upon those appertaining chiefly to dentistr>*. Among 
such drugs may be mentioned aneesthetics, general and local; coagu- 
lants, mineral and vegetable; pain obtunders, sedatives, narcotics, etc. 
Also such drugs as are comprised in the list of antiseptics, disinfect- 
ants, germicides, deodorants, epispastics, eschorotics, etc. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 177 

2. The Junior class will be given a course in general therapeutics 
with the same thought constantly in mind of emphasizing those drugs 
that appertain chiefly to the practice of dentistry. 

Throughout the session both classes will l>e quizzed frequently to 
test their knowledge of the subjects presented, and the Freshmen will 
be given a complete course in prescription writing, inclusive of the sub- 
ject of incompatability. 

Anatomy. 

This is taught in the first and second years by lectures and recita- 
tions, one course in dissection being taken each year. 

Physiolos^. 

In this department the inductive method is very largely employed 
in imparting instruction. The lectures are illustrated by means of 
charts, diagrams, and blackboard figures, and the student is rendered 
practically familiar with the phenomena of the most important bodily 
functions of normal operation by the employment of experiments upon 
li\'ing animals as a means of demonstration. 

Orthodontia. 

Instruction in this branch will be by the use of large charts demon- 
strating appliances of practical cases together with special care as to 
pivventive measures for the care of deciduous teeth, and corrective 
treatment during the eruption of the permanent teeth. The course 
will also consist of the treatment of practical cases in the infirmary, 
the care of which will be given to individual students, under the 
direction of demonstrators in charge, and will also be used for class 
instructions. 

Regrional Anatomy. 

The instruction on this subject will be supplementary to the lectures 
on general anatomy, and will include a careful description of the 
bones, muscles, blood vessels, and nerves of the head and face, espe- 
cially such as are intimately associated with the physiology and patho- 
logy of the dental organs. The lectures w^ill be illustrated by maps, 
charts, and models, and by several well prepared natural specimens of 
the head, jaws, teeth, and nerves in situ. 



178 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ComparatiTe Odontogrraphy. 

This course will be one of unusual practical value. The dental 
organs and their practical use, comprised in the various orders or 
families of the animal kingdom, will be illustrated bj natural speci- 
mens, lantern exhibitions, and dessection of the lower mammals. 

Diaaection. 

Students will, early in the term, make application to the demon- 
strator of anatomy for places at the dissecting table. Bach student 
will be required to dissect at least one part. No chaige is made for 
material. 

Dental Anatomy. 

This course is supplementary to the subject of general anatomy and 
in addition to the lectures given, each student will prepare a series of 
sections of the natural teeth, making the prints of same in a book for 
that purpose. The books are the property of the students. 

Porcelain Work. 

The use of porcelain in the various applications to the practice of 
dentistry including crowns, bridges, artificial dentures, inlays, etc. 
Also the use of the various furnaces will be demonstrated. 

Operative and Prosthetic Tedinic. 

This course consists of the tempering and making of instruments 
both for operative and prosthetic work, also the preparation of cavi- 
ties in the natural teeth out of the mouth and filling of the same with 
the different filling materials. The coiuse is thoroughly practical and 
constitutes a very important feature of the student's work preparatory 
to the clinical experience. 

It is the dedre of the Faculty that the dental profession will assist 
in the above course by forwarding to the department all the extracted 
teeth possible, express charges paid by the department. 

Mnaeom and l^ibraxy. 

Mtmbers of the dental profession, dental students, and all persons 
interested, are invited to contribute to the museum such specimens of 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 179 

malfomiation, normal or diseased conditions, as will serve for illus- 
tration of dental teaching; also to the library any books, pamphlets, 
journals, or other reading matter pertaining to dental subjects. Such 
oontribtttions will be duly labeled with the donor's name, and care- 
foUy preserved. 

Iraboratories and Clinic Rooms. 

The didactic work is supplemented by practical teaching in the 
laboratory and clinic rooms; with an abundance of patients (5,226 last 
session). The clinic rooms are equipped fully and completely, with 
Wilkeson and Columbian chairs, cabinets, and all necessary apparatus 
for the purpose, such as lathes, furnaces for porcelain work, rolling 
mills, vulcanizers, tables, microscopes, etc. Students are required to 
supply only the lighter and more portable instruments, the list of 
which will be furnished on application. 

Reqidrements for Gradnation for Sesaion of i897-98« 

The candidate for graduation must be of legal age, and of good 
moral character; must present to the Faculty and Board of Examiners 
a satisfactory case of artificial dentistry; also a good clinical record of 
pnuitical operations on the natural teeth; must sustain a satisfactory 
examination in the branches taught, and must prove his fitness for 
the practice of dentistry. 

The time of study must include attendance on three courses of lec- 
tures, the last of which must be at this institution. 

The deportment during the term must have been unexceptionable; 
and attendance upon all lectures, clinics and other instruction in the 
coarse must have been in accord with the requirements of the depart- 
ment. 

Members of the Junior class must be examined finally in anatomy, 
phjrsiology, organic chemistry, metallurgy and therapeutics. 

Members of the Senior class must notify the Dean of the Faculty in 
writing during the second week of February of their intention of be- 
coming applicants for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, at the 
same time presenting a certificate from the Secretary of having paid 
all fees, with a certificate of legal age and good moral character. 



i8o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Attendance on any course of lectures in other reputable dental col- 
leges having similar requirements will be accepted as equivalent to a 
corresponding course in this department. Graduates of medical col- 
leges will be required to attend two full years of instruction in prac- 
tical dentistry in this institution, including the courses of lectures, 
before applying for graduation. 

Having complied with the requirements of this department, the 
Faculty and Board of Examiners will recommend the candidate to the 
Board of Regents as entitled to receive the degree of Doctor of Dental 
Surgery. 

Tuition. 

The fee for tuition is $ys for each year, payable ^50 on or before 
October i, and (25 on or before January 10. There are no extra fees 
whatever, but a deposit of $3 must be made to cover breakage and 
loss before beginning work in the chemical laboratory. 

The above statement of the fees is now in effect, and will be under- 
stood to apply to all students in the departments, entirely i r re sp ec ti ve 
of the date of matriculation. All students who do not pay the proper 
fees or avail themselves of the provision above mentioned will be sus- 
pended from the department until such fees are paid. 

It is of greater advantage to the student, during his collegiate 
course to study and review a single text-book in each department 
than to read several cursorily. It is, therefore, advised that a single 
work in each department recommended below be chosen and care- 
fully studied, while any others may be used for reference and stibse- 
quent perusal. 



PRACTITIONER'S COUR8B. 

This course is planned for the convenience and benefit of practi- 
tioners. It will be optional with those entering the course as to 
what studies they will pursue, and what methods in practical work 
they may take up. ^ 

The curriculum will be arranged more especially to give a thorough 
course in pulp and abscess^ treatment, and other pathological condi- 
tions of the oral cavity. , In addition to this, detailed instruction will 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. i8i 

be given in bridge and crown work, continuous giun dentures, porce- 
lain fillings, and in the methods of working metals by all the different 
opemtions which the practitioner is called upon to perform. 

Reqtiiremetits for Admissioti. 

Anyone in reputable practice may enter this course. Those attend- 
ing the full course of two months will be given a Practitioner's Certi- 
6cate at the end of the course. Graduates of this department will be 
admitted on the payment of the matriculation fee only. 

Graduates of other reputable dental schools will be admitted on 
payment of the matriculation fee and $io. 

A full corps of demonstrators in all departments have been appointed 
to attend to the duties pertaining thereto. The service of several ad- 
ditional clinical instructors will be obtained during the session, each 
one a specialist. 

Pee8 for Practitiofier's Course. 

Matriculation fee $ 5 00 

Tickets, including certificates 35 00 

I^aboratory fee 6 00 

fc6oo 

All fees must be paid at the beginning of the session to the Secre- 
tary of the University, William J. Haddock. 

Board, per week I3 00 to |5 00 

Board in dubs, per week i50to 300 

Unfurnished rooms, per month 2 00 lo 4 00 

Students should make their arrangements to be in attendance on 
the first day of the session, as the Faculty cannot adjust their plans 
to the tardy arrival of students by wasting time on unimportant lec- 
tures at the beginning. Promptness at the beginning of the term is 
very essential. 



i»2 STAtfi UKlVEkSlTY OF IOWA. 

TSXT-BOOKS, AND BOOKS OF RSFBRBNC1$. 

These can be obtained at the book stores in Iowa City. Dealers 
give a discount of from ten to twenty per cent. The following are 
recommended by the Faculty: 

Operative Dentistry: American Text-book of Operative Dentis- 
try, Ottellungui, Flagg*s Plastics. 

i^oatll^itic Dentistry: Essig's Prosthetic Dentistry, Richard- 
son's Mechaiiical Dentistry, Evan's Artificial Crown and Bridge 
Work; collateral reading of Harris's Principle and Practice, American 
(System of Dentistry. 

General Pathology: Green, Zeigler, Delafield, Pnidden. 

Bacteriology: Abbott, Crookshank, Frenkel. 

Histology: Piersol, Schcefer, Sterling, Klein. 

Oral Pathology and Hygiene: Greene, Garretson's Oral Sur- 
gery, Wilson on Hygiene. 

Chemistry: General Chemistry — ^Wurtz, Blozam, Witthous; Quali- 
tative Analysis — ^Thorpe, Crafts. 

Materia Medica: White and Wilcox, Potter. 

Therapeutics: H. C. Wood, Potter, Gorgas. 

Anatomy: Gray (13th edition), Holden's Ifandmarks, Quain (loth 
edition), Holden's Oeteology, McClellan's Regional Anatomy, Treve's 
Applied Anatomy. 

Physiology: Poster, Landois, and Sterling, Flint, Kirk. 

Orthodontia: Angles, Guilford. 

Dental Anatomy: Tomes, Black. 

Comparative Anatomy: Howell. 

Dictionaries: Harris, Dunglison, Thomas. 

Notice. 

The National Association of Dental Faculties, of which this depart- 
ment is a member, passed at their last meeting a rule whereby all stu- 
dents not regularly matriculated within ten days from the opening of 
any school will not receive credit for a full course. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 183 

The Dental department of the State University of Iowa not only 
complies with the rules and conditions of the National Association of 
Dental Faculties but also those of the National Association of Dental 
Bxaminers. 

Members of the profession who receive the announcement are 
requested to notify the Secretary of any change in their address. 
They will also confer a favor by sending the names of other dentists 
practicing in the towns in which they reside. For further informa- 
tion apply to Wm. S. Hosford, D. D. S., Secretary, Iowa City, Iowa. 



Department of Pharmacy. 



Faculty, 



Chari,es a. Schakfker, a. M., Ph. D., hh. D., 

President. 

Emii« L. Bobrnkr, Ph. G., Phar. D., 

Professor of Pharmacy, Director of the Pharmaceutical I^ltoratorv, and 
Dean of the Faculty. 

LAUNCEI.OT Andrews, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Director of the Chemical I^aboratory. 

Thomas H. Macbridb, A. M., 

Professor of Pharmacofniosy, and Director of Microscopical Laboratory. 

Charles S. Chase, A. M., M. D., 
Professor of Materia Medica. 

BoHUMiL Shimbk, C. E., 
Professor of Botany. 

E. W. ROCKWOOD, A. M., M. D., 
Lecturer on Toxicology. 

Carl L. Endb, M. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lester T. Jackson, B. S., 

Assistant in Chemical 7^borator>\ 

LuLA Beall Jester, Ph. G., 

Assistant in Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 

Georgia Knapp, Ph. G.. 

Assistant in Pharmaceutical laboratory. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 



The Department of Pharmacy of the State University of Iowa is de- 
signed to furnish pharmacists, and those desiring^ to engage in phar- 
macy, au opportunity to acquire a thorough practical education in the 
departments of science most intimately connected with the practice of 
that profession. A technical education, such as that offered by the 
schools of pharmacy, and seldom if ever acquired in drug stores, is as 
necessary to the accomplished pharmacist as is the special training of 
a medical course to the physician. The day is not far distant when 
the pharmacist who is not provided with the evidence of skill which 
the college diploma furnishes, will labor under equal disadvantages 
with the non-graduated physician of to-day. 

The e xp erience of the past twelve years has thoroughly demonstrated 
the practicability of the courses in this Department. This is shown by 
the readiness with which students of even one session find and hold 
employment in drug stores, at salaries much higher than they could pos- 
sibly command without the college training, and by the fact that the 
State Board of Pharmacy admit to their examinations, as candidates for 
registration, students who have completed one year's work in this 
school. A much lai^r percentage of students pass these examinations 
than of candidates who go before the Board from drug stores, even 
after several years' experience. 

Incidentally, therefore, the courses are well calculated to aid those 
who desire specially to qualify for the examinations of the State Board 
of Pharmacy. 

The thirteenth annual course of lectures will begin on Wednesday, 
September ]6th, 1897, and close on Wednesday, March 30th, 1898. 
There will be a vacation commencing December I9ftli, 1897, and end- 
ing January 3rd, 1898. 

185 



i86 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Btdlding. 

This school is now comfortably located in a new three-story build- 
ing, especially erected at a cost of about fifty thousand dollars, and 
furnishing about twenty-five thousand square feet of fioor space, per- 
haps the largest accommodations in the way of room enjoyed by any 
school of pharmacy in this country. The equipment of this building 
is of the most modem, and in keeping with the advancing stage of the 
science. Through liberal appropriations periodically made by the 
Legislature and the Board of Regents, the accumulated equipment of 
some years is being rapidly enlarged, and affords excellent facUities 
for instruction. The leeture-rooms are provided with all desirable con- 
veniences for class demonstration, and with laige tablet chairs. The 
laboratories are especially roomy, the chemical and pharmaceutical 
laboratories occupying each a floor space of 54x140 feet, divided into 
two laige general and a number of smaller special laboratories. Two 
forty-horse power boilers supply the steam for all purposes, and a seven- 
horse power gas engine fumishesf the power for drug mill, dynamo, 
etc. 

PreHtnlnary Vxamlnatioii. 

Every applicant for admission to the Junior class will be required to 
pass a preliminary examination in English, penmanship, geography, 
and arithmetic, or give satisfactory evidence of having completed such 
studies in a grammar school. 

Admission to the Senior class will be by examination in the branches 
of study taught during the Junior year. Students presenting evidence 
of having passed the Junior examination in another recognized college 
of pharmacy will be admitted without further examination. 



The Courses of Instructioa 

embrace lectures on pharmacy, materia medica, pharmacognosy, bot- 
any, chemistry, and toxicology, with practical work in pharmaceutical, 
microscopical, and chemical laboratories, and almost daily recitations 
during the term. 
About two hundred and twenty-five lectures are delivered annually 



DEPARTMENT OF PHAkMACY. 187 

to the Junior class, and more than four hundred hours are devoted to 
practical work in the several laboratories, and to recitations. 

Following the wise precedent established a few years ago by some of 
the leading colleges of pharmacy, the graded course has been adopted. 
The full course will extend over two vears, and the students will be di- 
vided into Junior and Senior classes, composed of first and second 
course students, respectively. This arrangement, while adding greatly 
to the labors of the Faculty, will prove of great benefit to students, by 
enabling the Professors not only to introduce new and profitable sub- 
jects in their departments, but by extending their lectures over two 
sessions, to take up the elementary work during the first, and the more 
advanced during the second year. 



PHARMACY. 



Profbssor Bosrnkr. 

The introductory lectures to the Junior class will embrace a short 
review of the pharmacopoeias of the United States, England, France, 
and Germany; the various systems and appliances of weights and 
measures in use by the leading nations; the apparatus and methods 
necessary for the determination of the specific gravity of solids and 
liquids, and the sources and management of heat for pharmaceutical 
purposes. These will be followed by descriptions and illustrations of 
apparatus necessary to properly conduct the processes of percolation, 
filtration, comminution, sifting, solution, precipitation, neutraliza- 
tion, evaporation, distillation, sublimation, etc. 

The official drugs will be considered by groups, the classification 
being based upon the more prominent proximate constituents con- 
tained in the drugs under consideration, beginning with those sub- 
stances containing prominently lignin, and passing in order to those 
containing starches, sugars, gums, resins, oleo-resins, fixed oils, vola- 
tile oils, alkaloids, glucosides, neutral principles, etc. 

All the preparations of a drug will be considered together. To aid 
the student in memorizing the strength of official preparations, these 
will be considered by pharmacopseial classifications. 



iS« STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The lectures to the Senior class will begin with a short review of 
the. subjects embraced in the Junior course, followed by a critical 
study of the preparations of the United States Pharmacopcda, classi- 
fied according to the character of their active or medicinal constitu- 
ents. The relation they sustain to different menstrua, and to each 
other will be considered, and whenever practicable, the method of 
their preparation will be demonstrated, the aim being to apply the 
theories and general principles taught in the Junior course. 

The concluding lectures of the course will be devoted to extem- 
poraneous pharmacy — such as the preparation of emulsions, pills, sup- 
positories, solutions, ointments, etc., and the dispensing of phys- 
icians' prescriptions. 

The adulteration and sophistication to which official preparations 
are subject, and the methods for their detection will be noticed to the 
extent which their importance may demand. 



CHSMI8TRT. 



Professor Andrews. 

The laboratory work will be divided into two distinct courses, both 
of which are requisite for graduation, but only one of which can be 
taken by the student during either of the two college years. 

The Jtuiior Year 

comprises instruction in the general principles of chemistry, and in 
qualitative analysis, arranged with special reference to pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

The lectures elucidate the fundamental laws of the science, demon- 
strating them, whenever possible, by munerous experiments performed 
before the class. The chief metallic and non-metallic elements, with 
their more important compounds and reactions are considered. The 
practical application of the principles of chemical calculation, by 
which the composition of compounds may be deduced from their 
formulas, in consequence of its great importance to the pharmacist, is 
carefully inculcated. Instruction in details of the work, and in mat- 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 189 

• 

ters of manipuUition is conveyed in the laboratory coarse, which occu- 
pies, on an average, seven hours a week. Here the student is taught 
by a systematically arranged series of experiments the properties of 
the commonest chemical agents, and how to handle chemical appara- 
tus properly. When some manipulative skill is attained, qualitative 
analysis is taken up. The characteristic reactions of bodies as applied 
to their detection in mixtures are made familiar in a series of exam- 
ples, beginning with the simplest substances, and passing gradually 
to the more complex, such as are met with in the practice of Phar- 
macy. The student is expected at the conclusion of this course to be 
able to test the purity of official preparations and to detect the nature 
of any adulteration which may be present. He is required to pass a 
practical examination covering this ground. 

The Senior Tear. 

Quantitative analysis is taken up, particular emphasis being laid 
upon volumetric processes, as these, by virtue of the ease and rapidity 
with which they are executed, are of the greatest general usefulness. 

Practice is given in the valuation of numerous inorganic and 
organic pharmaceutical preparations, and in the methods of control- 
ling or determining their exact strength. A practical examination 
concludes the course. 



BOTANT AND PHARMAC06N0ST. 



Propbssors Macbridb and Shimkk. 

In these subjects three courses are offered, two in botany and two 
in pharmacognosy: 

Course i. General Botany. The first part of tlie course is devoted 
to a careful study of the elements of the science. The various organs 
of the plant are reviewed and the local autumnal flora is made to 
afford abundant material to illustrate, in the hands of the student, the 
morphology of roots, stems, and leaves, as well as the ordinary prin- 
ciples of floral analysis, and the means of specific identification. 

Pall. Two hours a day for the first six weeks. Professor Shimbk. 



I90 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Course 2. The second coarse is devoted to an inquiry into the life 
and growth of the plant; the cell, its morphology and products; the 
morphology of the entire plant structure as a means of identification. 
These and similar topics are made the basis of a course of lectures 
illustrated by means of the microscope and stereopticon. 
Fall. One hour a week, latter half. Professor Shimbk. 

Course 3. Pharmacognosy. This course is intended to present the 
organic Materia Medica from the standpoint of the biologist, with 
a view to enabling the student to handle his material intelligently, 
and to identify them in accordance with the recognized principles of 
biologic science. The various drugs of organic origin are taken up in 
the order of their natural classification, the principal facts as to their 
nature, origin and preparation are set forth in a series of lectures illus- 
trated by abundant material in original packages, as well as by her- 
barium spedmens (in the case of plants), charts, drawings, microscopic 
preparations, etc. 

Winter. One hour a week, commencing about November ist. 
Professor Macbridb. 

Course 4. Microscopic Technology. This course is intended for 
Seniors only. It includes instruction in the use of the compound 
microscope, and its employment in the investigation of vegetable 
structures. The student is supplied with an instrument and all neces- 
sary reagents and apparatus, and is taught the various modes of cut- 
ting, staining, and mounting histological preparations. Practical 
instruction is given in the use of the microscope in the identification 
of crude drugs as well as in the detection of adulteration. Each stu- 
dent taking this course prepares at the laboratory for his own use, a 
cabinet of microscopic slides, illustrative of many of the more impor- 
tant official drugs. 

Winter. Two hours a week. Professors Macbridb and Shimbk. 

In carrying forward the work in botany and pharmacognosy, free 
use is constantly made of the magnificent collections now found in 
the Herbarium of the State University. Ample cabinets of Materia 
Medica are also at hand. 

Text-books: 

Wood's Class Book of Botany. 

Gray's Manual of Botany. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 191 

Flneckiger's Principles of Pharmacognosy. 

Maisch's Materia Medica. 

Bentlej and Trimen's Medicinal plants. 

Milspangh's American Medicinal Plants. 

The United States Dispensatory. 

The National Dispensatory. 



MATBRIA MEDICA. 



Professor Chasb. 

Both the inorganic and organic Materia Medica will be presented to 
the stndents of the Junior class by lectures sunplemented by careful 
drill in recitation once each week during the entire session. The pro- 
fessor in charge will also specially present to students in the Depart- 
ment, a carefid synthetic and analytic course in prescription writing 
and interpretation as well. Both the common and metric systems 
will be employed, in order that the student may be made familiar 
with the various methods. 

The official preparations will be considered in detail, with all neces- 
sary allusions to the physiological actions and medicinal uses of the 
more common and important drugs of the Pharmacopceia. 

A special effort will be made to teach the student to familiarize him- 
self with all forms of incompatibility, with a view to detection at sight 
of improperly written prescriptions. This knowledge, it is believed, 
is of vital importance to the pharmacist. 

The student will also be carefully drilled in dosage, alkaloidal sub- 
stances, toxicology, antidotes, etc., etc. Tests of proficiency are made 
from time to time. In a word it is the aim«of this chair to make the 
sabject of Materia Medica eminently practical in all its bearings upon 
the practice of the profession of pharmacy. 



19a STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



TOXICOIrOOY. 



Professor Rockwood. 

The course consists of one lecture a week during the entire session. 
Tlie general action of poisons is first considered, then the most impor- 
tant ones are treated separately. Their physical properties and chem- 
ical action are noticed, together with their uses, and most common 
sources as toxicological agents. The symptoms of the different classes 
are given, and the treatment for each. Especial attention is paid to 
antidotes. Methods of testing suspicious substances, as well as the 
examination of secretions and excretions, are explained and illus- 
trated by experiments. 



PHARMACBUTICiUr I^ABORATORY. 



The pharmaceutical laboratory, provided with the necessary con- 
veniences, apparatus, and material for thorough practical instruction, 
will be open daily during the greater part of the school year. The 
instruction will embrace practice in the use of thermometers, hydrom- 
eters, specific gravity bottles, and balances; the preparation of tinc- 
ures, syrups, oleo-resins, solid and fluid extracts, pill masses, com- 
pound powders, solutions, hypodermic and compressed tablets, and 
many chemicals, such as the official iron solutions, scale salts of iron, 
mercury and lead compounds, which the apothecary should and can 
prepare for himself, both with advantage and profit; extemporaneous 
pharmacy, including the preparation of emulsions, pills, plasters, sup- 
positories, prescriptions, the application of pharmacopceial tests, the 
manufacture of handkerchief extracts, colognes, sachet powders, etc. : 
in short, practice in all the varied duties of a first-class pharmacy. The 
greatly improved facilities of the new laboratory building will permit 
of the introduction of work found impracticable for preceeding classes. 

Instruction in this branch is now looked upon as one of the utmost 
importance in pharmaceutical education, especially as much of the 
work formerly conducted entirely by the apothecar>' is now in the hands 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 193 

of large manufacturing establishments, and the student in pharmacy 
is thereby deprived of many valuable opportunities for gaining the 
necessary experience and self-confidence in drug stores, which a per- 
sonal acquaintance with the various manipulations is sure to bring 
about. The instruction in this laboratory will be individual; the 
progress made will therefore depend upon the student's knowledge 
and exertions. 

All students desiring to graduate in this school are required to pur- 
sue this course during the Junior and Senior years. 

Students will be furnished with all necessary apparatus and 
material, but will be required to pay for all breakage or damage to 
apparatus while in their possession. 

Tttition. 

The fee for tuition is $js ^or each year, of which I50 is payable on or 
before October i, and the remainder on or before January 10. There 
are no extra fees whatever, but for each laboratory course in chem- 
istry or practical pharmacy there is required a deposit of I3.00 
to cover breakage and to insure the return of all keys at the close of 
the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is returned to the 
student on presentation of the certificate of the professor in charge of 
the laboratory in question. 

The above statement of fees is now in effect, and will be understood 
to apply to all students in the Department, entirely irrespective of the 
date of matriculation. 

All fees must be paid to the Secretary of the University, William J. 
Haddock. 

All students who are delinquent in the payment of tuition will be 
snqxnded from the Department until the tuition is paid. 

Qaalifications for Graduatioii. 

Every person upon whom the diploma of this Department is con- 
ferred must be of good moral character, have arrived at the age of 
twenty-one years; have attended two full courses of lectures, the last 
one of which shall have been in this school, including two full courses 



194 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

of phannaceutical, microscopical, and chemical laboratory practice; 
and shall pasa satisfactory written examinations in all the branches 
taught in this school, when he shall be entitied to the degree of Grad> 
uate in Pharmacy (Ph. G.). 

Final Sxamiiiatloas. 

The examinations of candidates for graduation will take place during 
the week preceding the close of the lecture season. 

Weekly Bxaminatiosis. 

As auxiliary to the lectures, the professors will hold frequent quizzes 
in their respective departments, to serve as reviews of the subjects dis- 
cussed in the lectures. 

Text-Book0. 

Pharmacy — For Juniors — U. S. Pharmacopoeia, Remington's Prac- 
tice of Pharmacy, National Formulary. For Seniors^All the above, 
Caspari's Treatise on Pharmacy, Coblentz* Handbook of Pharmacy, 
Scoville's Art of Compounding. 

Chemistry — Andrews* Qualitative Analysis, Wulling*s Inorganic 
Chemistry; Schimpf*s Volumetrice Analysis (for Seniors). 

Pharmacognosy — Maisch's Organic Materia Medica. 

Materia Medica — White & Wilcox's Materia Medica and Therapeu- 
tics, Sayre*s Organic Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy, Culbreth's 
Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Botany — Gray's or Wood's Manual, Bastin's College Botany. 

Heference Books. 

U. S. Dispensatory, National Dispensatory, Fresenius' Analytical 
Chemistry, Hoffman and Power's Examination of Medicinal Chem- 
icals, Gray's Botanical Text-Book, Vol. II. 

Boaid. 

The cost of board in clubs is from |i .50 to I2.S0 per week; in private 
houses from I2.50 to I4.00 per week. Rooms can be obtained at from 
50 cents to I1.50 per week for each student. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 195 

l^ibraries. 

The libraries of the Universitj number in the aggregate abont 4o,ocx) 
Tolnmes. The general library contains 32,000 volumes, and is access- 
ible to students of all depcutments during eight hours of every week 
day. Books may also be drawn for outside use. 

Nearly seventy American and European periodicals are taken, and 
are kept upon the tables of the reading room throughout the year. 



For further particulars address the Dean, Emil L. Boemer, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 



DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 1696. 



COI/i;SGIATB DBPARTMSNT. 



Hollister, Horace A. 
Houser, Eva 
Kaye, Percy L. 



Master of Arte. 

Rockwood, Laura Clarke 
Stover, Charles C. 
Slotterbec, Clara Agathe 
Plum, Harry Grant 



Master of Science. 
Dean, Lee W. 



Brock, Frank Victor 
Graves, William Allen 
Henry, May Virginia 
Jackson, Lester T. 
Magruire, Marie Blla 



Bachelor of Arte. 

Maine, Bmest K. 
McCoy, John N. 
Van Law, C. H. 
Whiting, Samuel Danforth 
Zimmerman, M. Amy 



Bachelor 

Barrett, Mary Emily 
Barton, David Henry 
Burling, Charles Glenn 
Butler, Maud Bernadetta 
Charlton, Ethel 
CoUaon, Mary E. 
Currier, Helen Noyes 



of Philosophy. 

Davies, Marion 
Dewel, William Cornelius 
Emry, Roy Logan 
Evans, William Thomas 
Gardner, Herbert H. 
Glass, Eva J. 
Harvat, Clara R, 

196 



GRADUATES. 



197 



Holson, Lain Claire 
Holt, Harriette Grace 
Jones, Ella Jane 
KaJlcnberg, Henry F. 
McAlvin, James Gregg 
McCanren, James 
Otto, Clementine C. 



Palmeter, Roy Armstrong 
Seerley, Prank N. 
Smith, Samuel Craig 
Stempel, Carl Hugo 
Treimer, Carl 
Willis, Eloise 
Wilson, Edwin Brown 



Bachelor of Science. 
Arey, Rodney Melvin Dakin, Channing E. 



Bartsch, Paul 

BowersQz, Eugene Clarence 

Oavanagh, Lucy 

Clark, Whit H. 



^igg> George Burton 
Stewart, Helen White 
Stover, Roy Walter 
Tompkins, Erie Duncan 



Bachelor of Science in Ciyil Sn^rineeringr. 

Gabehnan, Fred Newell, George W. 

Hartman, Russell T. Sears, Joseph H. 

Hubbard, Prank Richard 

Bachelor of Science in Blectrical Sngineeringf. 

Koza, Frank Joseph 



I;AW DISPARTMSNT. 



Bachelor of I/aws. 

Aldrich, Charles S., Ph. B. Brown, Charles D. 

Allison, WUliam B. Jr., A. B. 
Andenon, Oscar C, Ph. B. 



Andrews, Walter G. 
Arp, Henry A. 
Bailey, John P. 
Buky, Ralph P. 
Barrett, John W. 
Bstes, William E. 
Bevan, Sargent 



Brown, Clarence J. 
Brunn, William H. 
Burgess, Albert W. 
Busby, Homer E. 
Butterfield, Mark J. 
Butterfield, William H. 
Campbell, William H. 
Carpenter, Roy D. 
Cohen, M. Harry 



198 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



Coldren, Clymer A. 

Coldren, Stevens A. 

Corbett, ^ward M., A. B. 

Cunningham, Matthew C, A. B. 

Curtiss, Fred M. 

Cutting, Ehner W. 

Dyke, Harry N. 

Ehret, Edward E. 

Eversmeyer, Fred M. 

Fairchild, Timotliy M. 

FarwcU, Frank E. 

Feenan, Fred K. 

Fitzpatrick, Thomas J. 

France, James C. 

Gaines, Richard }. 

Gallagher, William S., C. E. 

Geiser, Mathias E. 

Gilmore, Merritt C. 

Goodspeed, Bert A. 

Granger, RoUo S. 

Grant, John 

Hagemann, Fred P., Ph. B. 

Halpenny, William H. 

Hayes, Gordon 

Hendershot, Charles L. 

Hughes, William H. 

Hull, John A., Ph. B. 

Hurley, William H. 

Ingham, Edward P. 

Irving, Samuel C, A. M. 

Jones, Clyde R. 

Keefe, Harry L., Ph. B. 

Kepler, Malvern H., A. B. 

Kepler, Richard P., B. S. 

Knittle, George B. 

Krause, Bernard C. 

Larrabec, William, Jr., Ph. B. 



Lawrence, Albert L., Ph. B. 
Lawrence, George C. 
Lawrence, Graham W., Ph. B. 
Leighton, Kalita E. 
Livingston, Lloyd L. 
Lusch, Edward F. 
Lyons, James P. 
McCall, Edward M. 
McCleary, Francis 
McCormack, Harford T. 
McDermott, Thomas G., Ph. B. 
McVay, James T. 
Maloney, Daniel A. 
Melchert, Milton M. 
Miller. Clarence J., B. S. 
Morris, Jay E. 
Morton, Joe 
Noth, Albert J. 
O'Brien, Frank J. 
O'Connell, Daniel J. 
Orton, Eldon C. 
Rank, Fred W. 
Rinard, Leonard C. 
Roberts, Luis M. 
Robinson, Bertram L. 
Rowell, Louis J., Ph. B. 
Rudolph, Charles J. 
Ryan, John B. 
Ryan, William L., B. S. 
Seaman, James W., Ph. B. 
Shutts, Hervey J., A. B. 
Sparks, Charles J. 
Spensley, Harker B. 
Stilwill, Charles M. 
Thomas, David P. 
Thompson, Frank E. 
Tourtellot, Park W., Ph. B. 



GRADUATES. 



199 



Troy, Henry M., Ph. B. 
Vollmer, Frederick 
Wallace, Geoi^e E. 
Walsh, Alfred E. 
Wesche, Wilmer E. 



Wilkin, Rufus F. 
Wilkinson, William }. 
Wilmarth, Myron E. 
Wilson, James M. 
Wyckoff, Fred 



Whittemore, Hugh A., A. B. 



DEGREES CONFERRED MARCH, 1897. 



MBBICAI^ DBPARTMSNT. 



Doctor 

Adams, Charles Blackstone.D.V 
Allen, Lowell Edward 
Anderson, Charles Alfred 
Bell, Walter Scott, B. S. 
Birkofer, William Joseph 
Bntterhangh, Walter Scott 
Byrnes, Victor Warren 
Cilley, Charles Sidney 
Oanser, George Alvin, B. S. 
Cnnningham, John Wesley 
Day, Henry E. 

Decker, George Edward, B. S. 
De Jong, Conrad, Jr., A. B. 
Denison, Joseph Pence 
Downs, Joshna A. 
Edgington, Avington A. 
Bsbjoem, Paul Oscar, A. B. 
Fobes, Henry Lawrence 
Grant, Charles Schaeffer 
Grimes, Eli 

Hart, Raymond Lochary 
Harrington, Burton 



of Medicine. 

. S.Hearst, Will L., Ph. B. 

Henderson, Edward Brenton 

Hewitt, Henry F. 

Hewitt, Etta E. 

Howe, James McPherson 

Johnson, Elton Mayrant 

Kenney, William Le Roy 

Keehl, Fred Wilburt 

King, John E»ra, D. V. S. 

Klein, John Leonard 

Knittle, Edward Henry 

Lyon, William Edwin 

McAlvin, James Gregg, Ph. B. 

May, George William 

Mettlen, James Harvey, D. V. S. 

MiUigan, William Wright 

Molison, Robert Crichton, D. V. S. 

Neraal, Paul O. 

Packard, Chester Walter 

Pattison, Dilly Nelson 

Pray, Gilbert Leroy 

Robinson, James William 



200 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



Scripture, James Levi 
Smittle, Jacob Michael 
Spencer, Harry D. 
Starr, Orris Ferry 
Swensson, John Gustaf 
Townsend, William Harold 
Van Epps, Clarence, B. S. 
Vorwerk, Anthony H. 



Whitacre, John Charles 
Whitehead, Herman Joseph 
Williams, Dell E. 
Williams, George Edgar 
Wilson, EUsworth, D. V. S. 
Wilson, Maurice Edward, D. V. S. 
Wright, Walter Nelson 
Wyckoff, George Lewis 



HOMOSOPATHIC MBBICAI, DBPARTMRNT. 



Doctor 

Battin, Jas. F. 
Bywater, Wm. L. 
Dun Van, Edgar K. 
Ebersole, Sarah Freeburger 
Fry, Arminda C. 
Hansen, Jorgen W. 
Hazard, Clara M. 
Kauffman, Frank E. 



of Medicine. 

Lillie, Bertha S. 
Marvin, Harvey W. 
Peck, Raymond E. 
Semones, Wm. M. 
Speaker, Everett E. 
Struble, Linton W. 
Taylor, Morrison A. 
Westonbeiger, J. C. 



Jenson, Cecelia A. 



Nurses. 

Raff, Mary A. 



DBNTAI, DBPARTMl^NT. 



Doctor of Dental Sutgety. 



Anderson, Arthur Lewis 
Baughman, George P. 
Blanchard, Frederick Channing 
Boos, Casper Milton Baltis 
Bums, Erwin Lester 
Clark, George Edward 
Conn, Frank 



Dodge, Clarence Augustus 
Donlon, Joseph Patrick 
Fox, Charles Sumner 
Griffin, Festus M. 
Hasek, Voclav O. 
Hough, Norman H. 
James, Frank Boynton 



GRADUATES. 



201 



Jones, John M. 
Jones, Harry Carson 
Keams, Chas. Rndolphos 
Kennedy, Elmer Francis 
Leonard, George R. 
Ma3rtnm, Burlington J. 
Morrow, Henry, Jr. 
Mueller, A. J. 
Renshaw, Carroll W. 



Rizer, Gustavus Earnest 
Scroggs, Richard Erskine 
Secor, Alson 
Silvia, John C. 
Smith, Roy F. 
Smith, F. Potter 
Toney, Samuel Breese 
Wilcox, Charles Shuler 



PHABMACT DBPARTMBNT. 



OraduateB 
Cooper, Zada Mary 
Codne, Irvin Vernon 
Harvey, Robert Walsh 
Highley, Larry Edward 
Koch, August Frank 
Magee, Edward Washington 



in Pharmacy. 

McCray, Walter Robert 
McMahon, Thomas 
Mead, Nehemiah Paul 
Reynolds, Lillie Ethel 
Watter8,^William Leslie 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



GRADUATB STUDENTS. 



Reeident Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

Bauer, George N., B. S., Differential Equations, Modem 

Geometric Theories. 
Bowman, Charles H., B. Ph., Physics, Mathematics. 

Brock, Prank Victor, A. B. Economics, English. 

Butler, Maud Bemadetta, B. Ph., History, French. 



Clark, Charles W., B. Ph., 
CoUsou, Mary E., B. Ph., 
Currier, Helen Noyes, B. Ph., 
Davis, Walter M., B. Ph. 
Dorcas, Herbert C, B. Ph., 
Fracker, George Cutler, B. Ph., 
Gibbs, George Sabin, Jr., B. S., 

Gilbert, Lydia L., B. Ph., 
Harney, Helen M., B. Ph., 
Hartman, Russell T., B. S., 
Hearst, W. L., B. Ph., 
Hensel, Blanche Alice, 
Hilsinger, George E., A. B., 
Jackson, Lester T., B. S., 
Jones, Elizabeth D., 
Kelly, Harry E., B. Ph., 
Lumbar, M. E., B. Ph., 



English, Political Science. 
Economics, Speculative Zoology. 
English, History. 
Political Science, History, 
Pedagogy, Psychology. 
Pedagogy, Psychology 
Heat Relations of Resistance, 
Alternate Current Theory. 
English, History. 
English, French. 
Geology f Chemistry. 

f 

Sociology, History. 
Latin, English. 
Political Science, English. 
Chemistry, Mathematics. 
Pedagogy, Morphology. 
English, Political Science. 
Pedagogy, Philosophy. 



McAlvin, James Gregg, B. Ph., M.D. Sociology, History. 
Merritt, Fred D., B. S., Political Science, History. 



202 



BNROLIvMBNT. 



ao3 



Miller, L. A., 
Radasch, Henry K., B. S., 
Rose, Horace W., B. Ph., 
Savage, Thomas Edmund, 
Schlenker, Carl, 

Sherwood, Elizabeth L., A. B., 
Shimek, Bohnmil, C. E., 
*Treimer, Carl, B. Ph., 

Van Law, C. H., A. B., 
Watt, Walter G. , 



Sociology, Public Law. 
Chemistry, Physics. 
Economics, Sociology. 
Geology, Botany. 
German Classic Drama, Rise of 

Prussia to 1830. 
German, French. 
Botany, History. 
German Language, German 

Literature. 
Political Science. 
Political Science, German. 



Non-Resident Candidates for the Master's Degree, 



Amlie, Thomas R., A. B., 
Bartsch, Paul, B. S., 
Bloom, Mant, B. Ph., 
Brown, Florence E., B. Ph., 

Burdick, Anna Lalor, B. S., 
Cameron, John E., B. S., 
Copeland, Helen L., B. Ph., 
Church, Frances, B. Ph., 
Craiy, HUsha S., B. Ph., 
Crofisley, J. J., A. B., 
O'Donoghue, J. H., A. B., 
Ebon, S. R., B. A., 
FitEpatrick, Mary Linder, B. S., 
Fitspatrick, Thomas J., B. S., 
Gilchrist, Redelia, B. Ph., 
Graves, W. A., A. B., 
Henry, Kay Virginia, A. B., 
Holaon, Lulu, B. Ph., 
Hornby, John A., B. Ph., 
Kelso, Inez F., B. Ph. 



Latin, English. 
Ornithology, Conchology. 
Mathematics, Physics. 
Abnormal Psychology, Animal 

Morphology. 
Latin and English Literature. 
Botany, Zoology. 
English, History. 
English, Botany. 
Political Science, History. 
Political Science, History. 
Chemistry, Geology, German. 
History, English Literature. 
Botany, French. 
Botany, Geology. 
Latin, Anglo-Saxon. 
Pedagogy. 

Latin of Lucretius, Philosophy. 
German, French. 
English Novel, German. 
History, Political Science. 



204 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



Kimball, Carolyn, B. Ph., 
Leach, Robert E., A. B., B. Ph., 
Lovell, Jessie R., B. Ph., 

Meissner, John, B. Ph., 

Myers, F. W., B. Ph., 

Miller, Nellie B., B. S., 

North, Howard M., A. B., 

Parsons, Louis A., A. B., 

Rigg> George Burton, B. S., 

Seerley, Frank N., B. Ph., 

Seevers, Zoe Williams, A. B., 
Smith, Charles L., A. B., 



Stanley, Clarence J., 
Sueppel, J. W., A. B., 
Thompson, Marie D., B. Ph., 
Thompson, George F., A. B., 
Williams, Hermon P., A. B., 
Weidner, C. W., B. S., 
Whiting, Samuel Danforth, A. B., 



English Literature, Psychology. 
Latin, Philosophy of Lucretius. 
United States History, Political 

Science. 
Pedagogy, Political Science. 
Political Science, History. 
Geology, Sociology. 
English History, Political Science. 
Mathematics, Physics. 
Ciyptogsmic Botany, Entomology. 
Psycholog}\ 

Classification of a Collection of 
Central American Plants, His- 
tory of Botany. 

Chemistry, Physics. 

History of Philosophy. 

Pedagogy, English. 

Geology. 

Ethics, Economics. 

History, Political Science. 

Latin. 



Resident Graduates not Candidates for a De^rree. 

Barber, Katherine Brainerd, B. Ph., 

Brown, Charles Sumner, A. B., (Rochester University.) 

Bailey, Charles H., B. S., 

Dey, Myra Thompson, B. Ph., 

Ditzen, Henry Edward Carl, B. Ph., 

Fickes, Clark R., B. S., 

Furbish, Frederick, B. S., 

Hammond, Juliet, A. B., (Smith College.) 

Hosford, Richard Waller, A. B., (Obcrlin.) 

Howell, Gertrude, B, Ph., 

Hughes, Louise E., B. Ph., 

Leighton, Kalita Elton, B. Ph., (Western), LL. B. 



ENROLLMENT. 



205 



McCleary, Lucy Josephine, B. Ph., (Simpson College.) 

Mordoff, Carrie £., B. Ph., 

Moote, Sophia, B. Ph., 

Pahneter, Roy Armstrong, B. Ph., 

Paine, Katharine* B. Ph.. 

Rice, Jennie G., B. Ph., 

Rinard, Leonard Cook, LL. B., 

Smith, William Avery, B. S., (Western College.) 

Stahl, W. S., B. Ph., (Simpson College.) 

Warner, Thomas Farnsworth, B. Ph., (Upper Iowa University.) 

Watkins, Charles Grant, M. S., (Iowa Wesleyan.) 

Watson, J. O., A. M., (Simpson College.) 

Welty, Beit B., B. D., (State Normal.) 



8BNIOR CI^ASS. 



NAME. 


COURSB. 


RKSIDBNCE. 


Allin, Norra 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Bailey, Arthur 


El. Eng. 


Charles City. 


Baker, Irving Wesley 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Barker, Arthur J. 


Ph. 


. Iowa City. 


Beckman, F. W. 


Ph. 


Manilla. 


Bettenga, Everett P. 


Ph. 


Fern. 


Bloom, Charles 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Boals, Abby 


Ph. 


Clear Lake. 


Boesche, Louise A. 


Ph. 


Council Bluffs. 


Briggs, George N. 


CI. 


Carson. 


Brown, Ralph Othniel 


Ph. 


Albia. 


Budrow, Lester R. 


Ph. 


Ogden. 


Barge, Albertus J. 


Sc. 


River Junction. 


Bursma, Jacob 


CI. 


Grand Rapids, Mich 


Churchill. D. B. 


Ph. 


Dysart. 


CUrk, Whit H. 


oc. 


Ogden. 


Corlett, Jessie M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Crane, Ezra £. 


Sc. 


Woodbine. 


Crone, Reuben Bertram 


Ph. 


Dysart. 



ao6 



STATB UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NABC9. 

Daly, William Joseph 
Donohoe, Anthony P. 
Dorcas, Cora 
Ende, August 
Ensign, Forest C. 
Finch, Grace Ellen 
Foster, Charles Scott 
Freeman, Mae Agnes 
Gibbs, Geoige Sabin, Jr. 
Gray, Maud 
Grimes, Frank P. 
Hamann, Albert W. 
Hanks, John 
Hanson, Harry Webster 
Hardman, James Elias 
Heck, Ernest William 
Hetzel, Roy Boyd 
Hewitt, Charles Edgar 
Hobbs, Sam Warren 
Horack, Frank Edward 
Huebner, Charles F., Jr. 
Hull, John Kress 
Hulsebus, Lillian 
Hutchinson, Harry H. 
Irish, Frederic Mortimer 
Iverson, Iver, Jr. 
Johnson, George Monroe 
Keeler, Wilfred Cecil 
Kiser, Joseph Donald 
LaForce, Frank E. 
Larrabee, Frederick 
I/>renz, Charles F. 
Lynch, Charles Jeremiah 
McCord, Robert Leigh, Jr. 
MacParland, Beulah 
MacFarland, Elena 



comtSE. 
Ph. 
Sc. 
Ph. 
oc. 
Ph. 
Sc. 
Ph. 
Ph. 

El. Eng. 
Ph. 
Ph. 
CI. 
CI. 
Ph. 

a. 

Sc. 

Sc. 

Civ. Eng. 

Ph. 

Ph. 

Ph. 

Ph. 

Ph. 

Sc. 

wC* 

Sc. 
Sc. 
Ph. 
Ph. 
Ph. 
Ph. 
Sc. 
Ph. 

a. 

Ph. 
Ph. 



RB8IDBNCB. 
Cresco. 
Iowa City. 
Tipton. 
Burlington. 
Iowa City. 
Ackley. 
Agency. 
Iowa City. 
Harlan. 
Springdale. 
Pamell. 
Davenport. 
Iowa City. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Sigoumey. 
Nauvoo, 111. 
Avoca. 

Morning Sim. 
Storm Lake. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Moline, 111. 
Burlington. 
Muscatine. 
Dubuque. 
Emmons, Minn. 
Maquoketa. 
Des Moines. 
Ottumwa. 
Ottumwa. 
Clermont. 
Burlington. 
Blairstown. 
Lake City. 
Columbus Junc*n. 
Columbna Junc*n. 



ENROLLMENT. 


3 


MAMB. 


COURSB. 


• 
RBSIDBNCB. 


Mdssner, John 


Ph. 




Solon. 


Miller, Justus A. 


Ph. 




Washta. 


Moon, Edwin Griswold 


Ph. 




Montroae. 


Otto, Mary Laura, 


Ph. 


• 


Iowa City. 


Paisley, Albert A. 


CI. 




Burlington. 


Peteisbexger, Isaac 


Ph. 




Davenport. 


Pile, Mittie Mansfield 


a. 




Council Bluffs. 


Fopham, R. G. 


CI. 




Williamsburg. 


Price, Geoxge M. 


Ph. 




Iowa City. 


Reever, William Henry 


Ph. 




CarroUton. 


Resser, Burt C. 


a. 




Perry. 


Reynolds, John 


Ph. 




Boone. 


Sayers, Samuel Jefferson 


Ph. 




Iowa City, 


Schaeffer, George Schuyler, 


a. 




Iowa City, 


Schulze, J. Otto 


Civ. 


Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Sears, Charles Wilber 


Ph. 




Onawa. 


Seymour, Libbie 


CI. 




Iowa City. 


Shellenberger, Enmia W. 


Ph. 




Humboldt. 


Shepard, Hugh H. 


Ph. 




Mason City. 


Sunmons, Edmimd 


CI. 




Ottumwa. 


Smith, Charles Samuel 


a. 




Albia. 


Taylor, Katheryn May 


Ph. 




Clinton. 


Thomas, Benjamin Franklin 


Ph. 




Traer. 


Van Metre, Margaret 


Ph. 




Waterloo. 


Wilkin, Prank Stephenson 


Civ. 


Eng. 


Albia. 


Willis, Bernard Darwin 


El.; 


Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Yost, Charles Gitchell 


Sc. 




Center Point. 


Zerwekh, Florence A. 


a. 




Valley Junction. 



Anderson, Theodore, 
Balle, JuUus E. 
Barker, William Lloyd 
Baith, George D. 



JUNIOR CI/AS8. 

COUBSB. 
Ph. 

Ph. 
Ph. 
Ph. 



RBSIDBNCB. 
Iowa City. 
Denison. 



Humboldt 



2o8 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMS. 


COURSB. 


RKSIDBNCB. 


Beardflley, John 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Bishop, Jene D. 


Ph. 


Marengo. 


Blum, Bertha Marie 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Blume, Fred M. 


CI. 


Audubon. 


Bond, Edward Harris 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Brown, Samuel Joe 


CI. 


Ottumwa. 


Carroll, Nan Grace 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Carter, George H. 


Ph. 


Le Mars. 


Chamberlain, Park K. 


Ph. 


Wyoming. 


Clayton, Joseph E. 


Ph. 


Rowley. 


Clements, Melville Fisk 


Civ. Eng. 


Agency. 


eobb, Clyde Beryl 


Ph. 


Harlan. 


Coldren, May Belle 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Copeland, Edwin Grant 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Denny, Alden Ray 


CI. 


Mt. Union. 


Dey, Ann Hull 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Eaton, William Hammond 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Emry, Martha Elva 


Ph. 


Brighton. 


Ensign, Lucie M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Eustis, Carl 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


Frailey, Joseph Robinson 


Ph. 


Fort Madison. 


Gabriel, Jennie May 


a. 


Des Moines. 


Gonwick, Clara 


Ph. 


North wood. 


Harriman, Tim G. 


Ph. 


Hampton. 


Hatch, Daisy Eleanor 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Hobby, Edwin E. 


av. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hollingsworth, Prank 


CI. 


Perry. 


Holsteen, Fred S. 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Horine, Ora Huntington 


Ph. 


Coon Rapids. 


Hoskins, John Bennett 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Howell, Lloyd 


El. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Huber, Anna Centennial 


Ph. 


Oskaloosa. 


Hubbell, Rena 


Ph. 


Mortelle. 


Johnson, Maro 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Kearwille, Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Red Oak. 


Kelly, Mary Celestia 


Ph. 


Iowa City 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



209 



NAMK. 


COUKSB. 


RBSIDENCB. 


Kriechbaum, Ida Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Lasheck, Adelaide Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Lenocker, Francis E. 


Ph. 


Dexter. 


Lindeman, Frank 


Sc. 


Griswold. 


Lodwick, Libbie 


Ph. 


Eldon. 


Loring, Mabel Howe 


CI. 


Waterloo. 


Lowman, Minerva M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


LnkenbeU, Ella 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Lytle, Mary 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Marquis, Frank L. 


CI. 


Waterloo. 


McCordy, Lena 


a. 


Oskaloosa. 


Mortland, James Austin 


El. Eng. 


Montezuma. 


Mnllin, Justin C. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Myers, Milfxed 


Ph. 


Rockford, Til. 


Nelson, Josephine Deane 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Northey, Delia Prances 


CI. 


Dubuque. 


Osbom, Charlotte Winston 


Ph. 


Rippey. 


Otto, Joe M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Otto, Ralph 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Paxson, Ruthanna 


Ph. 


Manchester. 


Pfeiffer, W. F. 


oc. 


Cedar Falls. 


Place, Olney 


Sc. 


Georgetown, Tex. 


Prall, John Cornelius 


Ph. 


Humboldt. 


Preston, Gertrude Elaine 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Robinson, Jessie 


Ph. 


Sioux City. 


Saylor, Earl Clarence 


El. Eng, 


Ogden. 


Schlenker, Jessie Peters 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Sharpe, James Joseph 


CI. 


Iowa Falls. 


Shorett, J. B. 


Ph. 


Earling. 


Smith, Ralph J. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Smith, Edward Shepard 


Civ. Eng. 


Harlan. 


Soleman, Fred Armstrong 


Ph. 


Tama. 


Stover, George Elmer 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Shill, WUfred N. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Swalm, looe 


Ph. 


Oskaloosa. 


Swisher, I^eonard A, 


?h. 


Iowa Citjr, 



2IO 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 


COX7RSS. 


RKSIDBIfCS. 


Taylor, Herbert Edward 


Ph. 




Poatvillc. 


Veblen, Oswald 


CI. 




Iowa City. 


Weed, Predmund Carson 


CI. 




Coming. 


Weinrich, Herman P. 


Ph. 


a 


Burlington. 


Whitacre, Grace 


Sc. 




Iowa City. 


Young, I^Roy Erwin 


av. 


Eng. 


Iowa City. 



80PH0M0R]$ CI^ASS. 



NAMB. 

Adams, Georgia 
Ady, Florence Rae 
Alford, Delia Gates 
Ankeney, Walter S. 
Bailey, Will J. 
Baker, J. Clark, Jr. 
Barber, Nathan Brainerd 
Barclay, Wade C. 
Baughman, Ruby 
Blackmore, Ralph Davis 
Bowman, Ernest Charles 
Bradley, Charles C. 
Brink, Frank N. 
Brown, James Archibald 
Brown, Joseph Wesley 
Brush, William Burritt 
Brusie, Ida M. 
Burt, Alfred James 
Cantwell, John D. 
Carr, Hubert 
Cash, W. H. 
Chase, WUl B. 
Clayton, Mrs. J. E. 
Coad, Harry Elmer 
Codner, Frances T. 



COURSB. 


RBSip^NCB. 


Ph. 


.Solpn. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Sc. 


Des Moines. 


Ph. 


Iowa City, 


Ph. 


Lucas. 


Civ. Eug. 


Iowa City. 


CI. 


Tiffin. 


CI. 


Jefferson. 


Sc. 


ApUngton, 


El. Eng. 


Solon 


CI. 


Council Bluffs. 


Sc. 


Atlantic. 


Sc. 


Keosauqua. 


Sc. 


Atlantic. 


CI. 


Ottumwa. 


Ph. 


Peoria, lU. 


Ph. 


Emmetsburg. 


Sc. 


Davenport. 


Ph. 


Manchester. 


Ph. 


Decatur. 


Sc. 


Des Moines. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Mt. Union. 


Sc. 


New London. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



an 



NAMB. 


COURSB. 


RKSIDENCB. 


Collins, Roy A. Miles 


Ph. 


Eldora. 


Colony, H. Lee 


Ph. 


Tiffin. 


Curtis, Maurice Leonard 


CI. 


Knoxville. 


Dameron, James Lewis 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Dean, Ray H. 


oC. 


Muscatine. 


Dean, William T. 


• El. Eng. 


Springville. 


Denton, Harvey Struble 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Dunham, Mattie A. 


Ph. 


Mason City. 


Ehret, Anna Lillian 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Poster, Mabel Marcella 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Preligh, Clarence Neil 


Sc. 


New Sharon. 


Garrett, Charles Reese 


CI. 


Troy. 


Giese, Charles Oscar 


Ph. 


Pleasant Grove. 


Gilchrist, Helen Cox 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Golden, Ethel Rose 


Ph. 


Vinton. 


Graff, Lulu A. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Greeley, Lennie Mabyn 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ham, John Webb 


El. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hanson, Roy Marsh 


Ph. 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Hastings, Jessie Pearle 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Heriny^, James C. 


Sc. 


Center View, Mo 


Hoag, Liudley Murray 


Ph. 


Iowa Falls. 


Hobby, Ruth Annis 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Holbrook, Prank Kinney 


Sc. 


Tipton. 


Holt, John Wesley 


Ph. 


Swedesburg. 


Honirk, H. Claude 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Howard, Libbie 


Ph. 


Jefferson. 


HnU, Elmer C. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hnmphrey, Charles William 


Ph. 


Winterest. 


Hntchiion, Eugene 


Ph. 


Lake City. 


Ink, Raymond P. 


Civ. Eng. 


Mt. Vernon. 


Jacobs, Marda A. 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Jarvis, Calvin 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Jayne, Eben Hay 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Jones, Lillian 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Joy, Florence Livingston 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Keboe, John Joseph 


Ph. 


Hopkinton. 



2T2 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 


COURSE. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Kellogg, Charles Francis 


Ph. 


Burt. 


Kemmerer, T. Wilbert 


Sc. 


Eldridge. 


Kimball, Alfred Xyce 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Koehler, Sophia Margaret 


CI. 


Le Mars. 


Lancaster, Henry Hay 


Ph. 


Allerton. 


Lee, Leslie Parvin 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Loomis, William W. 


Ph. 


Clermont. 


Louis, John J. 


Ph. 


Harlan. 


McCormick, John B. 


CI. 


Churdon. 


McCutchen, Lydia May 


CI. 


Rock Rapids. 


McDonnell, Amelia I. 


Ph. 


Solon. 


MacFarland, Winifred 


Ph. 


Columbus Junction. 


McGee, John U. B. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Meier, Charles George 


Civ. Eng. 


Farmington. 


Middleton, Edward D. 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Miller, Martin J. 


Ph. 


Montrose. 


Moon, Roy 


CI. 


Montrose. 


Moore, Alice Edith 


CI. 


Le Mars. 


Moore, Sybil Jane 


CI. 


Le Mars. 


Morrison, Sam J. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Mosnat, H. Roy 


Ph. 


Belle Plaine. 


Myers, Perry C. 


Sc. 


Williamsburg. 


Neal, Frank Carlton 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


Ogden, John Francis 


Ph. 


Pleasanton. 


Owen, Ezra Lois 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Page, Clarence Vernon 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Parsons, Ethel Baker 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Parsons, Percy Leigh 


Ph. 


Traer. 


Peet, Delbert C. 


Ph. 


Anamosa. 


Popham, Jessie 


CI. 


Williamsburg. 


Pritchett, Edward 


Ph. 


Fort Madison. 


Randall, Emma J. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Rea, George Morris 


Ph. 


Grundy Center. 


Rea, Ralph Randolph 


Sc. 


Grundy Center. 


Rederick, John Edward 


Civ. Eng. 


Sioux City. 


Remley, Bertha 


Ph. 


Anamosa, 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



ii3 



NAMB. 


COURSE. 


Riggs, Hattie 


Ph. 




Roach, Lonis J. 


Ph. 




Roberts, Anna E. 


Ph. 




Rogers, David Montford 


Sc. 




Safley, Agnes Isabel 


Sc. 




Schoonover, George L. 


Sc. 




Seymour, Edith Maria 


Sc. 




Shaffer, Nina R. 


Ph. 




Sheuennan, Jacob L. 


Ph. 




Smith, Tillman 


Ph. 




Startsman, Charles Wentworth El. 


Eng. 


Stevens, Frederick Leroy 


Ph. 




Stover, Jacob Edwin 


Ph. 




Stromsten, Frank Albert 


Sc. 




Sammy, Roy Ernest 


CI. 




Swisher, Ben 


Ph. 




Tompkins, Harry D. 


Civ. 


Eng. 


Townsend, Egbert R. 


Ph. 




Vaoghn, Michael Walter 


Ph. 




Vanghn, Philip T. 


Ph. 




Watkins, Joseph Cook 


Civ. 


Eng. 


Way, Kathryn W. 


Ph. 




Weeks, Gaylord 


El.: 


Eng. 


Weld, LeRoy Dougherty 


Sc. 




Werthmueller, Ferdinand R. 


Sc. 




White, Frank G. 


Civ. 


Eng. 


Wickersham, Dorothy T. 


Ph. 




Willett, William S. 


CI. 




Williams, Charles Allyn 


CI. 




Williams, Fred Almon 


Ph. 




Williams, Mabel Clare 


Ph. 




Williams, Mark Wayne 


CI. 




Yule, Edgar Hamson 


Sc. 





RBSIDKNCK. 
Iowa City. 
Rock Rapids. 
Iowa City. 
Radcliffe. 
Tipton. 
Anamosa. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Des Moines. 
Leon. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Cory don. 
Dysart. 
Iowa City. 
Sioux City. 
Iowa City. 
Fort Dodge. 
Fort Dodge. 
Iowa City. 
Britt. 
Denison. 
Nevada. 
Burlington. 
Winterset. 
Capron. 
Tama. 
Iowa City. 
Neola. 
Iowa City, 
Des Moines. 
Tipton. 



214 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



FRBSHMAN CI^ASS. 



NAMS. 


COURAB. 


RKSIDSNCK. 


Abersol, Edward joe 


Ph. 


Metamora, 111. 


Albert, Henry 


gc. 


Reinbeck. 


Angus, Haney Adelbert 


Sc. 


Burt. 


Appelman, Roger 


Sc. 


Clermont. 


Armstrong, William John 


Ph. 


Canton, Minn. 


Arnold, Henry Stephen 


Ph. 


Davis City. 


Ashby, Eleanor Priscilla 


Ph. 


Pilotburg. 


Baker, Prank Milton 


Ph. 


Emmetsbuig. 


Balle, Minnie 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Barrett, Anna M. 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Barrett, Grace Adah 


Ph. 


Iowa City, 


Basaett, Bertha A. 


Ph. 


Creston. 


Beach, Carl Hoff 


Sc. 


Cedar Falls. 


Beard, William Finis 


Civ. Eng. 


Mt. Union. 


Beck, William Edmund 


Sc. 


Sioux City. 


Blackmore, Auzman Hodgen 


Sc. 


Aplington. 


Bloom, Blanche 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Bloom, Myra 


Ph. 


Iowa City. , 


Blythe, Edward Ellsworth 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Bossert, Fred Everett 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Bostedo, Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Oak Park, 111. 


Bowlus, George Fletcher 


Civ. Eng. 


Cedar Rapids. 


Brock, Mrs. Lesta M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Brown, Martha Mead 


Ph. 


Solon. 


Burge, Jennie 


Ph. 


River Junction. 


Burich, Amelia 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Carroll, Elizabeth F. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Cass, Austin 


El. Eng. 


Harlan. 


Chamberlain, Will W. 


Ph. 


Wyoming. 


Childs, Hal Augustin 


Sc. 


Lenox. 


Choate, Earl Robbins 


El. Eng. 


Hailey, Idaho. 


Clapp, Helen Leila, 


Ph. 


Shelby. 


Clark, Mearl 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Clearman, Hattie M. 


Ph. 


Oxford. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



215 



KAMS^ 


COURAS. 


RBSIB^NCB. 


Close, S. R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Cobb, Dennis J. 


Ph. 


Irwin. 


Cogswell, Charles Herbert, Jr. 


. Sc. 


Cedar Rapids. 


Coidxen, Morton Leigh 


Ph. . 


Iowa City. 


Cole, Arthur Casbnm 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Consigny, Bagene Prank 


El. Eng. 


Avoca. 


Cook, Wallace Lewelling 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Cozine, Arthur A. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Danow, John Donald 


Ph. 


Columbus Junct'n. 


Deems, Oren Manferd 


Sc. 


Ottumwa. 


DeVoU, Eola CarlotU 


Ph. 


Glens Palls, N. Y. 


Duval, Harvey M. 


Sc. 


Atlantic. 


Edwards, Anne 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


^^an, Geoige William 


CI. 


California. 


Eickelbeig, William Chester 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


EIHs, Ard Hoyt 


Sc. 


Vinton. 


Bostis, Carrie Luella 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


Pairall, Henrietta 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Paixall, Herbert Snowden, Jr. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Paixall, Mattie Iglehart 


Ph. 


West Branch. 


Farrington, Minnie 


Sc. 


Iowa Palls. 




Ph. 


Centerville. 


Person, Merton Leroy 


Ph. 


Prendale. 


Fitzpatrick, Dennis Pntnds 


Ph. 


Greeley. 


Fletcher, GeoigeH. 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Pxacker, Nora R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Geeaaman, Charles E. 


Ph. 


Greenfield. 


Gillette, Guy M. 


Ph. 


Cherokee. 


Goodale, Aurora 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Gfeen, Ellen Cecilia 


CI. 


Sioux Ciiy. 


Groendycke, Clark L. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Hanson, Mabel A. 


Ph. 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Harkness, Gordon Pollett 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 




Ph. 


Griswold. 


Haxtmann, Carl Gottfried 


CI. 


Brenham, Texas. 


Hawk. In T. 


CI. 


Winterset. 



2l6 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMK. 


COUK.SK. 


RBSIDENCR. 


Heath, Maggie May 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hecht, Ralph Henry 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Heinly, Vera Alberta 


Ph. 


Durant. 


Hensen, Louie 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Hetzel, Clarence Charles 


Sc. 


Avoca. 


Hinchon, WilHam D. 


Ph. 


Algona. 


Hoffman, William Louis 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Hoffman, Frank Phillip 


Sc. 


Ottumwa. 


Howard, Libbie 


Ph. 


Jefferson. 


Hubbard, Arthur B. 


Ph. 


Maquoketa. 


Hummer, William James 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Humphrey, Almon Eugene 


Ph. 


Unity. 


Humphrey, Wallace George 


Ph. 


Hamilton, 111. 


Hunter, Lemuel Amos 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hurst, Margaret Lillian 


CI. 


Leon. 


Johnson, Jessie Florence 


CI. 


Farlin. 


Johnson, Robert J. 


Ph. 


Holstein. 


Jones, Clyde Ray 


Sc. 


Charles City. 


Kain, WUl E. 


Ph. 


Algona. 


Kelly, Marjorie Aline 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Kierulff , Anna Edwards 


Ph. 


Montezuma. 


Kierulff, George Browning 


Sc. 


Montezuma. 


Kindall, Joseph W. 


CI. 


Onawa. 


Kingland, Thomas 


Ph. 


Mt. Valley. 


Klinker, John 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Klopp, Laura Emily 


Ph. 


EstherviUe. 


Knapp, Leo 


Ph. 


Lenox. 


Koontz, George Wilson 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Lane, Everett Elmer 


Sc. 


Red Oak. 


Larrabee, Helen 


Ph. 


Clermont. 


Leitz, Nellie Mabel 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Lingo, Walter M. 


Ph. 


Norwich. 


Littig, Edward Clarence 


CI. 


Davenport. 


Lorenz, Max O. 


CI. 


Burlington. 


Losey, Florence 


Ph. 


Parkersburg. 


Louis, Edmund J. 


Ph. 


Atlantic. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



217 



NAME. 


COURSK. 


RKSIDBNCB. 


Lovell, G. E. 


Ph. 


Garner. 


McCanliff, Guy T. 


Sc. 


Aredale. 


McCotd, Clyde W. 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


McComack, CaUie D. 


CI. 


Traer. 


McCutchen, T. C. 


Ph. 


Holstein. 


McDoweU, William Orrin 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


McElroy. G. A. 


Sc. 


Tabor. 


McGee, Alice Florence 


Ph- 


Iowa City. 


McMillan, Edwin C. 


Sc. 


Marshalltown. 


McNeill. Norah 


Ph. 


Garden Grove. 


Mauthe, Katherine 


Sc. 


Gracehill. 


Meggers, Frank Henry 


Civ. Eng. 


Dysart. 


Miller, James Franklin 


Sc, 


Strawberry Point 


Miller, John William, Jr. 


Ph. 


Manning 


Mitchell, Ernest Roy 


Sc. 


Bloomfield. 


Moody, Lona Lotus 


Ph. 


Bedford. 


Moore, Rolland B. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Morrison, William F. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Monlton, Mark Mills 


CI. 


Nashville. 


Myers, Edgar C. 


Ph. 


Hampton. 


Newbold, BeUe 


Sc. 


Hillsboro. 


Newcomer, Carl S. 


Ph. 


Eldora. 


Nicholas, Edwin Herbert 


Ph. 


Emmetsburg. 


O'Connor, James Lawrence 


Sc. 


Montreal. 


Ogden, Raymond Davis 


Ph, 


Williamsburg. 


Page, Edna E. 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Paris, Nanna 


CI. 


Leon. 


Patrick, Alex Gerrish 


El. Eng. 


Lyons. 


Pearson, Abbie B. 


CI. 


Dysart. 


PenneU, I?a 


CI. 


Atlantic. 


Penrose, Thomas Emlen 


Sc. 


West Branch. 


Petersen, Walter Herman 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Peterson, Nina Margaret 


Ph. 


Evanston, Wyo. 


Phillips, Albin Blackmore 


Sc. 


Creamery. 


^nkham, Leda' 


Ph. 


Miller, S. Dak. 


Polk, Mamie 


CI. 


Winterset. 



2l8 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NABCK. 


COURSK. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Pond, Alma B. 


Ph. 


Fredericksburg. 


Porter, Mary Monta 


CI. 


Albta. 


Purdy, Winifred 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Rehkopf , Ned B. 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Reid, Frank Beatty 


CI. 


Oakaloosa. 


Remley, james Edward 


Ph. 


Anamosa. 


Reno, Mai^ret 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Reynolds, Hal Reade 


Civ. Eng. 


Des Moines. 


Rice, Stephen Edward 


av. Eng. 


Green Mountain. 


Rich, Francis Earle 


Sc. 


West Branch. 


Richardson, I^ida Winifred 


Sc. 


Sioux City. 


Richard, Sidney M. 


Ph. 


Tipton. » 


Robinson, Alta Aileen 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Robish, Albert Arrand 


Civ. Eng. 


Sumner. 


Rosenberg, Moses 


Ph. 


Traer. 


Rue, Lars O. 


Sc. 


Ridgeway. 


Russell, Erie W. 


CI. 


Adel. 


Safley, Margaret James 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Sargent, Fred Wesley 


Ph. 


Akron. 


Sailor, Edwin Allen 


Ph. 


Lisbon. 


Sanders, Susan Margarite 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Saunders, Herbert C. 


Ph. 


Manilla. 


Saunderson, William Graham 


CI. 


Burlington. 


Scales, Richard Elmo 


a. 


Ackley. 


Schenk, Erwin 


Sc. 


Waterloo. 


Schmidt, Bernard Edward 


Sc. 


Pannington. 


Secrest, Walter S. 


Sc. 


Downey. 


Shaver, Bird Alexander 


Ph. 


Red Oak. 


Sheldon, Benj. L. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Shuck, May 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Simonton, T. M. 


Ph. 


Sharon Center. 


Slater, Marie W. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Smith, Robert L. 


Ph. 


Leon. 


Sortor, Stella Luveme, 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Speers, Albert Percy 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Spurgeon, Floris J. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



219 



NAMB. 


coini.<iit. 


RKRIDBNCK. 


Starr, Charles Freeman 


Ph. 


Emmetsburg. 


Steiner, Elizabeth Margaratt Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Sterling, Editha Hortenae 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Storer, Bessie B. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Switzer, Lester Edison 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Thomas, M. Ellen 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Thomas, Will H. 


Ph. 


Traer. 


Thompson, John Morrow 


Civ. Eng. 


Bedford. 


Vincent, George Hall 


Sc. 


Davenport. 


Vorhees, Edna Marion 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


VosB, Hertha Louise 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Wambach, Albert 


Ph. 


Webster City. 


Warfield, Lyford Wilson 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Warner, Loren Ashley 


Ph. 


Luana. 


Warren, Kate S. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Watland, Maynard Franklin EL Eng, 


New Sharon. 


Webb, Florence R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Weinrich, Oscar L. A. 


Sc. 


Burlington. 


Wells, Prank 


Ph. 


Miles. 


Whaley, Holsa Hiram 


Sc. 


Aplington. 


Whitaker, Ellis J. 


CI. 


Davenport. 


Whitoomb, Bonner 


El. Eng. 


Des Moines. 


Wienke, Lanra Anna 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Willis, Bertha B. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Wright, John Henry. Jr. 


Sc. 


Marshalltown. 


Yates. Edward Gilbert 


Ph. 


Williamsbnnzr. 


Yonng, Philip G. 


Ph. 


Winterset. 


SPBCIAL 8TUDBNT8. 




NA3CK. 


COURaB. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Ashe, T. G. 


Economics. 


La Porte City. 


Barrett, Will L. 


English. 


Waterloo. 


Bli^en, George 


History. 


Sioiiz City. 


Brown, Jennie R. 


Botany. 


Iowa City. 


Bnssard, M. K. 


Political Economy. 


Iowa City. 


Crookham, J. A. 


Economics. 


Oskaloosa. 



220 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. COURSB. 

Davisson, I. E. English Literature. 

Dwelle, Elmer H. Psychology, German. 

Erickson, Alexander Political Economy, History, 



German, French. 

Logic. 

English, History. 

Political Economy. 

History. 

History, Economics. 

Chemistry. 

English, French. 

English. 

American Literature. 

Logic, History. 

History. 

German, History. 

German. 



Everett, F. D. 

Ewing, Peter Ballantyne 

Femstrom, Helen M. 

Gossman, Andrew T. 

Hall, J. Clark 

Henderson, Robert 

Hill, Mrs. Alice L. 

Holbert, Mrs. Anne C. 

Humphrey, Minnie 

Joseph, John F. 

Keeler, Burr Curtis 

Kelly, William Francis 

Lenz, John G. 

Liffring, J. D. 

Littig, Marguerite Josephine French, German. 

McConnell, William John Logic. 

McGuire, Augustine J. Elocution. 

Main, Frank H. Politics, Psychology. 

Marsh, William Franklin Pedagogy. 

O'Connor, Frank A. Economics, History. 

Plank, Nicholas English. 

Plum, W. M. History. 

Probasco, Emery M. Logic. 

Rudolph, Samuel Howard Logic. 

Searcy, William A. Psychology. 

Sharp, E. Floyd Economics. 

Sheldon, Nellie Logic, History. 

Stapleton, Martin William Logic. 

Trogdon, James Edmund Elocution. 

Underwood, A. B. French. 

Whiteis, Alice Femstrom German. 

Williams, William D. Logic. 



RBSIDBNCB. 
Iowa City. 
North wood. 
Sioux City. 
Bloomfield. 
Sheldon. 
Lone Tree. 
Iowa City. 
Davenport. 
Creston. 
Iowa Citv. 
Iowa City. 
Io¥ra City. 
Crawford. 
Mason City. 
Waterloo. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Cherokee. 
Davenport. 
Northfield. 
Des Moines. 
Iowa City. 
Eldora. 
Independence. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Moulton. 
EUiott. 
Iowa City. 
Dexter. 
Iowa City. 
Nira. 

Paris, Ills. 
Eldora. 
Iowa City. 
Newell. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



8BNIOR CI;A8S. 

NAME. DEGREE. RESIDENCE. 

Aldennan, Ulysses Sherman Nevada. 

Alien, Everet Munson Colfax. 

B. S., Northern Indiana Normal. 

Ashcraft, Adolphus Mosseau Sigouniey. 

Ashcraft, Ida Jessup Sigoumey. 

Bates, Franklin Freeman Afton. 

Beach, Arthur Earl Carroll. 

Bouma, Milton S. Killduff. 

Brady, Thomas Edward Dunlap. 

Briggs, Arthur Holmes Clinton. 

Brockway, Earl Bailey Gamer. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Brown, John J. Hanoverton, O. 

Bruce, Robert Rolfe. 

Burling, Charles Glenn Postville. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Burrell, Walter C. Greenfield. 

Camp, Curtis Bjrron Keokuk. 

Carroll, Edward John Clinton. 

Colbnrn, Henry Broadly Dexter. 

Cooper, Paul Penimore Iowa City. 

Corrigan, John I/>uis Lawler. 

Daniger, Henry Matthew Omaha, Nebr. 

Davis, John Walter Monroe. 

Devitt, James Arthur Eldora. 

Ditzen, Henry Edward Carl Davenport. 

Ph. B., State University of loyfA, 

391 



232 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

NAMB. DBGRSX. RBSIDKNCE. 

Dorland, Henry Howard Whittier, Cal. 

Bdelstdn, John Prands Iowa City. 

Evans, William Thomas Waterloo. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Everett, Pred De Muth Bloomfield. 

Ewing, Peter Ballantyne Sheldon. 

Goeldner, Hngo Priedrich Sigoumey. 

Graham, TuUy Emerson Union Mills. 

Graham, William Alexander Cedar Palls. 

Griggs, Edgar James Bloomfield. 

Groves, Mack John Greenfield. 

Haines, Robert Miller, Jr., Grinnell. 

A. B., Iowa College. 
Halvorson, Gay Crookston, Minn. 

Hammill, John Britt. 

Hkrriman, Pred Albion Hampton. 

Holbrook, Carleton William Manchester. 

A. B., Upper Iowa University. 

Hoxie. Wirt Pierce Waterloo. 

Keeler, Bnrr Curtis Mason City. 

Kehoe, John Joseph Hopkinton. 

Kingsbury, Charles Stone Yankton, S. D. 

Kintadnger, John Webster La Crosse, Wis. 

Kirkland, Louis J. Urbana. 

I/attner, Samuel Benjamin Worthingtou. 

Lewis, Edward Orin Sioux City.- 

Lovrien, Pred Clinton Bradgate. 

Lumm, Alfred W. Iowa City. 

McCoy, John Nicholson Oskaloosa. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

McGarvey, William Albert Davenport. 

Mack, Mansfield Edward New York, N. Y. 

Maine, Ernest King Des Moines. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Mayer, Stephen George Hebron. 

A. B., Iowa Wesleyan University. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 223 

NAMB. DBGRBB. RKSIDBNCB. 

Mercer, Andrew Wilbert Iowa City. 

MiUer, Justus A. Washta. 

B. S., Western Nebraska Normal. 

Mueller, Alfred Christian Davenport. 

Mugan, Thomas Agninas Jefferson. 

Newman, James Barber Cedar Falls. 

Palmeter, Roy Armstrong Clear Lake. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Pendleton, Edmund Sioux City. 

B. L., University of Wisconsin. 

Petersberger, Isaac Davenport. 

Plorn, Jerrie L. Iowa City. 

Power, Howard Wilson Pulaski. 

B. S., Iowa Wesleyan University. 

Probasoo, Emery Melville Moulton. 

Qninn, James Lewis Springfield, S. D. 

Rndolph, Samuel Han7 Elliott. 

StUman, Euarl Elof Corydon. 

Seaman, Ernest Wright Davenport. 

Slaymaker, Ora Melvin Camforth. 

Smith, Samuel Craig Winterset. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Snyder, Charles William Edward Belle Plaine. 

A. B., Cornell College. 

Spensley, Robert Waller Dubuque. 

Stahl, William Sherman Indianola. 

Ph. B., Simpson College. 
Stapleton, Martin William Nira. 

Stempel, Carl Hugo Port Madison. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Thomas, Charles Mortimer Maquoketa. 

Van Nice, lasac Webster Vinton. 

Wakefield, Albert Orin Sioux City. 

A. B., Lombard University. 



224 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. DBGREB. RESIDBNCB. 

Walling, Herman Bernard Oto. 

Washburn, Charles Henry Buffalo, N. Y. 

Watkins, Charles Grant I^ibertyville. 

M. S., Iowa Wesleyan University. 

Watson, Joseph Otis Indianola. 

A. M., Simpson College. 

Wliite, William Allen Washington. 

Williams, William David * Newell. 

Wilson, Edwin Brown Iowa City. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Winters, Samuel I/)uis Mt. Pleasant. 

A. M., Iowa Wesleyan University. 

Wood, Benjamin Upham Atlantic 



-^7 



JUNIOR CIrASS. 



NAME. DBCRKE. 


RESIDENCE 


Allen, George Kirkland 


Estherville. 


Anderson, Theodore 


Iowa City. 


Ashe, Thomas Gregory 


La Porte City. 


Baker, Jesse Clark, Jr., 


Lucas. 


Barrett, Will lyouis 


Waterloo. 


Bassett, Bertha Alfaretta 


Creston. 


Bawden, Stephen Phelps 


Davenport. 


Berry, Ernest James 


AlU. 


Bliven, George Horace 


Sioux City. 


Blood, William Graffen 


Keokuk. 


A. M., Parsons College. 




Brewster, George Farquhar 


Sheldon. 


Briggs, George Nathaniel 


Carson. 


Bronner, George Alois 


Coming. 


Bruce, James 


Rolfe. 


Bushyager, Henry B. 


Sheffield, 



*PM February ai, 1897. 



LAW DBPARTMBNT. 



225 



NAlfB. 

Buseard, Melville K. 
Camp, Robert Finley 
Chick, Charles Alvin 
Clark, Charles Warner 

Gements, Prank H. 



DAGBJKB. 



Ph. B., Iowa College. 
Ph. B., Iowa College. 



RBSIDSNCS. 

Iowa City. 
La Porte City. 
Oskaloosa. 
Montezuma. 

Newton. 



Mt. Pleasant. 

Irwin. 

Iowa City. 

Dysart. 

Oskaloosa. 

Bloomfield. 

Iowa City. 



Coad, James Coit 
Cobb, Dennis Justus 
Coldren. Paul Allied 
Crone, Reuben Bertram 
Crookham, John Addison 
Dabney, Isaac Taylor 
Davis, Walter Morton 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

DeBelle, Blizabeth Heartt AtlanU, Ga. 

A. M., Capitol Female College. 

Dqran, James Arthur Pulaski. 

Draper, William Horace Conrad. 

Dunham, Henry Clarence Hawarden. 

Dnrbin, Fred Emerson. 

Dntcher, Lonis William Iowa City. 

Dykins, Charles W. Hawkeye. 

%Bn, George William California. 

Brickson, Alexander Sioux City. 

Bversmeyer, Louise Muscatine. 

Paust, Paul Blbert Creston. 

Fuller, Homer Austin Mt. A3rr. 

Gamble, Harry Lee Perry. 

Grattan, Paul Hersey Blkton, S. D. 
B. S., South Dakota Agricultural College. 

Green, George Alfred Cherokee. 

Grimes, Prank Patrick Pamell. 

Hall, James Clark Davenport. 

Hall, Samnel McClain Cedar Rapida 

B. S., Coe College. 



226 



STATE UNTVBRSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. DEGREE. 

Hamann, Albert William 
Hanley, Peter Joseph 
Hanson, Harry Webster 
Hardy, Rufns Lee 
Harrington, Timothy P. 
Harrison, Albert Dixon 
Head, Roscoe Conkling 
Hendrick, Berte 
Hering, James Clinton 
Hilley, William Patrick Joseph 
Hilsinger, George Earl 

Ph. B., Iowa College. 

Hoagland, Frederick Judson 
Hoffman, Arthur 
Holton, Oliver Branson 
Horton, Frank Jodon 
Hosford, Richard Waller 

A. B., Oberlin College. 

Hughes, Samuel Judson 
Hull, John Kress 
Hyndman, John Alexander 
Ink, Raymond Peter 
Joseph, John Franklin 
Keenan, Edward Patrick 
Kellogg, Charles Francis 
Kelly, William Francis 
Kitchen, George Pusey 
Klingenberg, Theodore William 
Komarek, Edward Wenceslaus 
Elrause, Oscar 
Larrabee, Frederic 
Lm, Thomas Francis 

A. B., Creighton University. 

Lewis, Burton Kellogg 
Liffring, John Dominick 



RESIDENCE. 

Davenport. 

Nira. 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Bloomfield. 

Rowan. 

Iowa City. 

Jefferson. 

Waukon. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Ogden. 

Sabula. 

Council Bluffs. 
Muscatine. 
Braddyville. 
Iowa City. 
Dubuque. 

• 

Corydon. 

Moline, 111. 

Chicago, ni. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Crawford. 

Le Mars. 

Iowa City. 

Waterloo. 

Iowa City. 

Dubuque. 

New Prague, Minn. 

Garwin. 

Clermont. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Sioux City, 
Cherokee. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. aay 

NAlfB. DBGR9B. RBSIDENCB. 

lavick, Ernest Northwood. 

I/mg, Frank Kelso Whitten. 

B. D., Western College. 

Lynch, Charles Jeremiah Blairstowu. 

McConneU, William John Northfield. 

McGuire, Augustine Joseph Des Moines. 

McNeil, Harry Hallam Indianola. 

A. B.. Simpson College. 

Marqois, Prank L. Waterloo. 

Mather, Charles E. Springdale. 

Maxwell, Ezra Austin Greene. 

B, S., Upper Iowa University. 

Meister, Melvin George La Porte City. 

Meyers, Joseph Henry Templeton. 

B. Agri., Iowa Agricultural College. 

Moon, Edwin Gould Montrose. 

Morgan, Vestcr Kellogg. 

Morrison, Samuel Turner Iowa City. 

Murphy, Charles William Dubuque. 

Newbold, Willis Boyd Hillsboro. 

OTallaghan, Robert Emmett Des Moines. 

O'Connor. Krank Aloysius Lawler. 

O'Connor, Maurice Missouri Valley. 

B. D., Western Normal College. 

Penroee, Harry Shellsburg. 

Phelpe, William Piatt Atlantic. 

Plum, William Milton Shelby. 

Popham, R. G. Williamsburg. 

B. S., Northern Indiana Normal. 

Price, George Milnes Iowa City. 

Pritchett, Edward Port Madison. 

Rsdnich, Emric Davis City. 

Reaser, Burt C. Perry. 

Rollins, Richard Russell Des Moines. 

B. S., Amherst College. 



228 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



RBSIBBNCB. 

Bloomfield. 

Ouawa. 

Dexter. 

Earling. 

Page, N. D. 

Inwood. 

Toledo. 



NAME. DBGRKB. 

Rominger, Joseph Ambrose 
Sears, Charles Wilber 
Sharp, Edward Floyd 
Shorett, John Burton 
Shure, William Henry 
Skewis, Edward John 
Smith, William Avery 

B. S., Western College. 
Spensley, Montford 
Sullivan, Daniel Francis 
Swords, George William 
Trogdon, James Edmund 
Tyer, Henry Wilbert 

B. S., Iowa College. 

Underwood, Asa Boyden 
Wagner, Henry Franklin 
Warner, Thomas Famsworth 

Ph. B., Upper Iowa University. 

Watkins, Samuel R. Iowa City. 

Ph. B. State University of Iowa. 



Mineral Point, Wis. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Paris, ni. 
Perry. 

Eldora. 
Sigoumey. 
Iowa City. 



Watt, Walter Gilmore 


Cedar Rapids. 


A. B., Coe College. 




Wewl, Howard Tobey 


West Union. 


Welty, Bert B. 


Colo. 


B. D., Iowa State Normal. 




Williams, Joe 


Williamsburg. 


Worthen, Jesse Montgomery 


Warsaw, HI. 


Wyckoff , Clarenoe Stanton 


Cincinnati. 


B'. S., Amity College. 




Youker, DeWitt Talmage 


RockweU. 

—128 



— ai5 



MEDICAL 



^ARTMENT, 



SBNIOR CLAS8. 



NABCB. R^IDBNCV. 

Adams, Chas. Blackstone, D. V. M., Iowa. 

Alton, Lowell Edward Minnesota. 

Anderson, Charles Alfred Nebraska. 

Bell, Walter Soott, B. S., Ohio. 

Birkofer, Wm. Joseph Iowa. 

Bo96mghaiii,Ottmer N.,D. V.M. 

Butterbau^b, Walter Scott 

Byrnes, Victor Warren 

Cilley, Charley Sidney 

Clauaer, Geoi]ge Alvin, B. S., 

Cnnninghain, John Wesley 

Day, Henry B. 

Decker, Geoqce Edward, B. S., 

De Jong, Conrad, Jr., A. B., 

Denison, Joseph Pence 

Detchon, Hngh Smith 

Downs, Joflhna A. 

Edgington, Ayington A. 

Esbjoem, Panl Oscar, A. B., 

Pobes, Henry Lawrence 

Grant, Charles Schaelfer 

Grimes, Bli 

Hart, Raymond I^ochary 

Harrington, Burton 

Hearst, Will E.» B. Ph., 

Henderson, Edgar Brenton 



It 



(< 



(I 



It 



It 



II 



II 



II 



It 



It 



It 



It 



II 



Illinois. 
Iowa. 



II 



II 



Nebraska. 
Iowa. 



II 



It 



PRECEPTOR. 

C. J. Allen. 
M. L. Allen. 
L. M. Shaw. 
S. W. Clark. 
Walter Prazer. 
A. Beane. 
Faculty. 
Thomas Byrnes. 
J. C. Williams. 
J. L. Augustine. 
A. J. Hobson. 
G. W. Appleby. 
W. D. Middleton. 

F. J. Smith. 
J. H. Sams. 
A. R. Leath. 

J. W. Kirkpatrick. 

C. W. Hardman. 
A. W. Cantwell. 
R. W. Cavett. 
Faculty. 

Perry Engle. 

G. M. Prentice. 
A. C. Moon. 

D. W. Ciouse. 
J. D. McCleary. 



239 



230 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 


RHSIDBNCE. 


PRBCBPTOR. 


Hewett, Henry F. 


Iowa. 


C. S. Chase. 


Hewitt, Mrs. EtU E. 


1 ( 


C. S. Chase. 


Howe, James McPherson 




Eli Browning. 


Johnson, Elton May rant 




J. B. Carder. 


Keehl, Fred Wilbert 




L. W. Littig. 


Kenney, William Le Roy 


" J. A. RawlsandF. E. Sampson 


King, John Ezra, D. V. M., 




E. W. Gawley. 


Klein, John Leonard 




James Murphy. 


Knittle, Edward Henry 




A. B. Bowen. 


Lyon, William Edwin 




W. S. Parks. 


McAlyin, James Gregg, Ph. 


B., '• 


D. M. Wick. 


Marug, Andrew, A. B., 




J. G. Thomas. 


May, George 




John Heffermen. 


Mettlen, Jas. Harvey, D. V. 


M. Nebraska. 


J. B. Hawk. 


Milligan, WUUam Wright 


Iowa. 


J. C. Shrader. 


Molison, RoVt Crichton, D.V.M. '* 


Faculty. 


Neely, Abner Dale, B. A., 


Pennsylvania. 


John Clark. 


Neraal, Paul 


North DakoU. 


Faculty. 


Packard, Chester Walter 


Iowa. 


W. M. Morton. 


Pattison, Dilly Nelson 




I. Pattison. 


Pray, Gilbert Leroy 




Faculty. 


Robinson, James Wm. 




H. C. Eschbach. 


Scripture, James Levi 




J. R. Guthrie. 


Smittle, Jacob Michael 




J. L. Lyons. 


Spencer, Harry D. 




W. W. Beam. 


Starr, Orris Ferry 




F. W. Cram. 


Stull, William Hawkins 


• i 


J. C. Shrader. 


Swensson, John Gustaf 


Illinois. 


W. D. Middleton. 


Townsend, William Harold 


Iowa. 


C. H. Churchill. 


Van Epps, Clarence, B. S. 


Iowa. 


L. W. Littig. 


Vorwerk, Anthony H. 




E. E. Kirkendal. 


Whitacre, John Charles 




Faculty. 


Whitehead, Herman Joseph 




T. C. Brady. 


WUliamR, Dell E. 




M. 6. Voldeng. 


Williams, George Edgar 




H. A. Oilman. 


Wilson, Maurice Edward, D 


. V. M., Iowa. 


E. B. Myrick. 



MEDICAL DBPARTMENT. 



231 



NAME. 


RBSIDSNCK. 


PRKCBPTOR. 


Wilson, Blsworth, D. V. M. 


Iowa. 


J. S. and R. S. Watts 


Wright, Walter Nelson 


(( 


Faculty. 


Wyckoff, GeoT^ Lewis 


(1 


R. T. Jewell. 



JUNIOR CI/A88. 



NAME. 

Abegg, Henry Hervy 
Allen, Prank Hervy 
Anderson, Carl Ali 
Anderson, Frederick Eugene 
Arent, Asaph 
Baird, Jay 

Bauer, WilUam John 
Besore, Walter McKay 
Besser, Bmil, D. V. S., 
Bean, Oley G. 
Blake, Charles Wesley 
Bowen, Jesse William 
Briggs, Walter Homer, B. D., 
Brownell, William Flockton 
Bnrsma, Jacob 
Campbell, Charles Harvey 
Davies, James Eugene 
Dwelle, Elmer Hinman 
Edmonds, Charles Walton 
Ely, Francis Argyle 
Engle, Harry Perry 
Farrell, Albert Martin 
Perry, Addison Moody 
Pitz, George G. 
Prank, George 
Gardner, John Raphal 
Gilkes, William 
Graeser, Henry Bernard 
Habenicht, Robert H. 



RESIDENCE. 

Iowa. 



Michigan. 
Nebraska. 
Iowa. 



PRECEPTOR. 

A. K. Berry. 
G. H. Cassidy. 
Faculty. 

W. D. Middleton. 
Francis E. Seymour. 
O. C. Baird. 

E. N. Brown. 
J. E. Conn. 

C. E. Thomas and J. Payne. 
S. J. Nelson. 
W. M. Young. 
L. W. Littig. 
Faculty. 
Faculty. 
Faculty. 
S. O. Whaley. 
W. H. Davis. 
C. A. Mund. 
G. H. Mammeu. 
D. D. and R. R. Davisson. 
Perry Engle. 

F. E. Seymour. 
Faculty. 
Faculty. 

Charles Burwald. 
Faculty. 
Faculty. 

B. N. Graeser. 
Faculty. 



2S« 



STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



NAMS. 


RKSZDSNCB. 


PRKCBPTOA. 


Homer, Herman Corwin 


Iowa. 


L. E. Eslick. 


Hovenden, John Henry 


f i 


L. H. Jones. 


Hoxie, WUl E 


" D. G. 


Hoxie and J.W. Harritnatt. 


Hull, Henry Clay, A. B., 


i( 


J. H. Hull. 


Hull, John Franklin 


i< 


J. C. Shrader. 


Jorgenaon, Palle Peder Maurius " 


James Murphy. 


Kearny, Charles Atwell 


tf 


A. H. Blocklinger. 


Kelling, Louis Prands 


i( 


Faculty. 


Kirkland, Benjamin Franklin 


(1 


R. T. Jewell. 


Knudson, Becker Christian 


It 


R. J. Nestor. 


Lambert, Fred Ernest 


44 


A. J. Hobson. 


Lewis, Charles Ball 


44 


C. G. Lewis. 


McClintock, John T., B. A., 


44 


R. E. Connii!. 


Mcintosh, Dmsie 


44 


A. D. King. 


Mecum, John Warren 


Wisconsin. 


Faculty. 


Morgans, Samuel Lewis 


Iowa. 


M. H. Waplis. 


Moulton, Milo Willie 


44 


A. M. Avery. 


Nass, Hildus Augustinus 


44 


E. H. Williams. 


Noe, Charles Fred 


44 


C. J. Winzenried. 


Parker, William Oilman 


Oregon. 


A. W. and C. S. Bowman. 


Pence, Lawrence Waldo, B. D., 


Iowa. 


N. W. PhilUps. 


Peters, James Alphonsus 


44 


James Murphy. 


Petersmeyer, William 


44 


F. S. Johnson. 


Purcell, Bert 


C. S. Chase and H. P. Duffield. 


Proudfoot, Charles Paris 


«4 


J. D. McCleary. 


Replogle, John Alan 


44 


Faculty. 


Richards, James Weldin 


44 


J. W. Morgan. 


Rogers, Henry Courtland 


44 


Geo. Inglis. 


Rogers, Claude Bernard 


44 


R. A. Rogers. 


Sackett, Claude Conwell 


44 


A. K. Berry. 


Simpson, Charles E. 


44 


M. W. Hill. 


Snyder, John Franklin 


44 


S. R. Cook. 


SoUenbarger, Oeorge Hartly 


44 


D. D. Drennan. 


Spiller,Oscar Calvin Henry, Ph.B., Texas. 


— Watson. 


Stanford, Walter 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Stanton, James 


44 


L. B. Oliver. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



233 



KAKB. 


RKSTDBNCB. 


PRBCBPTOR. 


Thielen, Michael H., M. D. 


I., Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Thornton, Albert 


t( 


W. W. Beam. 


Walker, James 


i( 


Faculty. 


Walker, Frederick Earl 


ti 


J. L. Augustine. 


West, Hugh Hamilton 


(i 


J. D. Uorton. 


Willaey, Frank Brown 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Wright, Charles Edward 


Iowa 


C. C. Smead« 


Wyland, George Van 


(C 


Faculty. 



SOPHOMORIS CLASS. 



NAMB. 


RBSIDKNCB. 


PRECBPtOR. 


Macy, Otto E. 


Iowa. 


J. P. Mullin. 


Sigworth, Harry W. 


(t 


H. W. Sigworth 



PRJ^SHMAN CI/A8S. 



NAICB. 

Adams, Ortus Fuller 
Augustine, Grant 
Bachman, Morris Piper 
Barker, Archie 
Binford, William Sherwood 
Bowes, John Joseph 
Bright, Henry P. 
Brown, Hadley Cyprian 
Clarke, Orson Whitney 
Cook, Jesse Lee 
Copeland, John Albert 
Coraant, James 
Creel, James Cleon 
Deters, Willie August 
Dorsey, Michael Francis 
Dotson, EliE. 
Felt, Roland A. 
Freeman, John Peter 
George, Abel Benson 



RBSEDENCB. 


PRBCKPTOR. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


(t 


J. L. Augustine. 


(1 


J. L. Heries. 


(( 


C. C. Heady. 


IC 


G. W. Padgham 


(« 


T. J. 0*Toole. 


(1 


C. E. Leithead. 


n 


Faculty. 


<( 


0. Clarke. 


f ( 


F. E. Cook. 


«i 


Faculty. 


It 


W. S. Burrows. 


(i 


J. W. Lander. 


Minnesota. 


Faculty. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


t< 


J. K. Milboume. 


II 


Faculty. 


II 


C. A. Hnrd. 


II 


A. Carson. 



^34 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAUB. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


PRBCBPTOR. 


Gillam, William Newton 


Iowa. 


C. C. Griffin. 


Gray, Howard D. 


ti 


P. Engle. 


Greenlee, Clyde Vemie 


tt 


E. J. Howard. 


Harold, Arthur William 


It 


O. P. Hanson. 


Hawthorne, Robert Acheson 


ti 


Faculty. 


Henderson, Archibald G. 


^t 


Faculty. 


Hildreth, Herman Lee 


1 1 


J. £. and E. L. Gilmore. 


Hohenschuh, Frank Adam 


it 


Faculty. 


Hoyt, Benjamin Franklin 


Wisconsin. 


J. Simonson. 


Ickes, Lawrence James 


Iowa. 


A. W. Bo¥anan. 


Lamerton, William Edward 


ft 


F. Horton. 


Luehrsmann, Barney 


ft 


Faculty. 


Magana, Tobias 


Mexico. 


Faculty. 


McCloskey, Thomas John 


Iowa. 


J. R. Guthrie. 


McFall, Edward Augustus 


tt 


Faculty. 


Meis, Edward William 


tt 


N. J. A. Mueller. 


Meyhaus, John Henry 


tt 


A. L. Hageboeck. 


Morris, Thomas Boyd 


ft 


Faculty. 


Neff, Mary Lawson, A. B., 


tt 


Faculty. 


Newell, William Carl 


tt 


W. Abegg. 


Osborn, Claude Fenton 


tt 


Faculty. 


Ostrom, Louis, Jr., 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Parsons, Stephen Tyler 


Iowa. 


A. Folsom. 


Patterson, William Edward 


ti 


Faculty. 


Payne, Rollo O. 


tt 


Faculty. 


PhilUps, Isaac Hildreth 


tt 


C. A. Abbott. 


Reiter, Alfred E. 


«( 


H. P. Steinle. 


Rice, Perry Flint 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Roberts, Ernest Eugene 


Iowa. 


J. W. Lander. 


Rowe, Prank Noyes 


tt 


Faculty. 


Sargent, Prank Loring 


ft 


G. E. PuUerton. 


Schell, Ida Leonora 


ti 


Faculty. 


Schroeder, Henry A. 


tt 


A. L. Hageboeck. 


Sears, George L. 


tt 


Faculty. 


Sigworth, Fred Byers 


tt 


H. W. Sigworth. 


Smith, Cecil Ephraim 


England. 


Faculty. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



235 



NAMB. 

Smith, Ralph Thaddeus 
Speirs, George Omar 
Stuart, Percy Ernest 
Thompson, James Raymond 
Tilden, Charles Geoige 
Tomey, Samuel James 
Tourtellot, Lewis Jamison 
Van Gorden, Deland 
Von Gnndlach, Erich 
Wagner, George Alexander 
Warner, Herbert W. 
Weir, Edward C. 
Williams, Edward B. 
York, Nathan Albert 



RESIDBNCB. 


PRBCBPTOR. 


Iowa. 


M. N. McNanghton. 


niinois. 


Faculty. 


Iowa. 


A. W. Adair. 


CI 


A. J. Lahrd. 


(i 


A. Richmond. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


if 


G. W. Kirkpatrick. 


t< 


J. C. Davies. 


Wisconsin. 


E. J. Tiedemann. 


Iowa. 


M. M. Meiedith. 


<i 


J. L. and F. W. Powers. 


4( 


A. Weaver. 


t( 


Faculty. 


it 


Faculty. 



GRABUATB 8TUDBNT. 

Kenefick, Michael J., M. D., 



Iowa. 



SPBCIAI, 8TUDBNT8. 

Bulge, Albertus Joseph, 

Dow, Thomas Jefferson, B. D., A. B., 

Habenicht, Ida Adella, 

Teeters, William John, B. S., 



Iowa. 



II 

14 
II 



HOMOEOPATHIC 



\V$ 



ICAL DEPARTMENT, 



GRADUATIS BTUDBNT8. 

Samuel B. Hoskins, A. B., M. D Sioux City 

Samuel N. Watson, A. M., M. D Iowa City 



NAME. 

Anderson, C. L., M. D. 
Battin, James F. 
Bjrwater, Wm. L. 
Dun Van, Edgar K. 
Ebersole, Sarah M. 
Fry, Arminda C. 
Hansen, Jorgen W. 
Hazard, Clara M. 
Kaufhnan, Frank E. 
Lillie, Bertha S. 
Marvin, Harvey W. 
Peck, Raymond E. 
Seems, Gaillard F. 
Semones, Wm. M. 
Speaker, Everett E. 
Struble, I^inton W. 
Taylor, Morrison A. 
Westonberger, J. C. 



NAME. 

Bailey, Ida H. 
Famtmi, Earl P. 
Elauffman, Wm. A. 
I/ambert, Elmer J 



SBNIOR CIrASS. 

PRBCBFTOR. 

Faculty, 

E. D. Whitacre, 

C. M. Morford, 

W. C. Cooke, 

R. Barton, 

I. H. Fry, 

A. Shantz-Hansen, 

T. L. Hazard, 

J. H. Crippen, 

Geo. Royal, 

H. W. Marvin, 

J. W. Watzek, 

T. Seems, 

J. G. Gilchrist, 

C. M. Morford, 

T. h' Hazard, 

C. H. Barette, 

S. Johnson, 

JUNIOR CI/AS8. 

PRECEPTOR. 

J. G. Gilchrist, 
A. T. Huxley, 
C. M. Morford, 
J. C. Bonham, 

336 



RESIDENCE. 

Lees Summit, Mo. 

Iowa City 

Toledo 

Moravia, N. Y. 

Manson 

Marshalltown 

Cedar Falls 

Iowa City 

Waterloo 

Marion 

Sioux City 

Davenport 

Mitchelville 

Iowa City 

Toledo 

Iowa City 

Clarksville 

Grafton 



RESIDENCE. 

Iowa City 
Mason City 
Whitton 
Ottumwa 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



237 



NAMB. 

Miller, Lucas A. 
Sarchett, Lloyd H. 
Skinner, Fred C. 
Todd, Victor C. 
Wood, G. B. 



NAME. 

Abbott, Bd. C. 
Blackstone, B. P. 
OdkinB, Fred K. 
Carver, H. E. 
Davis, Metta B. 
Day, Henry L. 
Marble, Pearl L. 
McCabe, Pordyce 
liletzing[er, John J. 
Monlton, Horace 
Mnlckey, Carl 
Pittinger, Fred A. 
Rnggles, C. P. 
Unkrich, C. Rudy, 
Young, Glyndon A. 



PRECEPTOR. 
J. G. Gilchrist, 
F. L. Tribon, 
F. D. Paul, 
S. N. McLean, 
F. A. Seeman, 

80PH0M0RI$ CI^ASS. 

PRECEPTOR. 

J. G. Gilchrist, 

A. L. Pollard, 

R. W. Calkins, 

Faculty, 

C. B. Adams, 

P. E. Triem, 

Thos. Phillips, 

A. C. McAllister, 

Faculty, 

C. W. Smith, 

A. E. HoUoway, 

H. P. Ustick, 

Faculty, 

W. H. Connor, 

J. Hermann, 



RESIDENCE. 
Iowa City 
Algona 

Rock Island, 111. 
Washington 
Dubuque. 



RESIDENCE. 
Iowa City 
Anamosa 
Clarks, Neb. 
Oskaloosa 
Sac City 
Manchester 
Raymond 
Muscatine 
Iowa City 
Maquoketa 
Knoxville 
Boise City, Idaho 
Milton, Mass. 
Fairfield 
Sioux City 



Alexander, J. L. 
Bickley, W. H. 
Bowen, C. A. 
Barton, E. G. 
Carmicfaael, E. 
Coddington, J. K. 
BilerB,P. 

Bckman, G. A. 

(Partial coanc.) 

Hill, Alice L. 



PRj^HMAN CI^ASS. 

PRECEPTOR. RESIDENCE. 

Drs. Morhead Muirhead, Marion 



Drs. Bickley, 

A. Zolner, 

Faculty, 

J. G. Gilchrist, 

Faculty, 

W. A. Mirrick, 

Faculty, 



Waterloo 
West Union 
Mt. Pleasant 
Richland 
Princton, Ills. 
Monticello 
Cambridgeport, Mass. 



}. G. Gilchrist, Epworth 



23fi 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 

Hoekins, J. B. 

Johnstone, J. U, 

Kemp, E. H. 

Laird, J. W. 

Lenz, J. G. 

Unn, W. N. 

McGarvey, Anna M. 

Melton, E. A. 

Mitchell, P. 

Palmer, Pannie A. 
(Partial course.) 

Rorabangh, W. E. 

Schenck, E. 

Seeman, C. A. 

Tucker, P. A. 

Waterbnry, C. A. 

Winters, Rose De L. 



PRBCBPTOR. 
S. B. Hoskins, 
F. A. Strawbridge, 
C. M. Morford, 
Faculty, 
J. G. Gilchrist, 
A. M. Linn, 
J. L. Vandervere, 

A. T. Cockrun, 

B. A. WUder, 
G. W. Palmer, 

Geo. Royal, 

F . C. Sage, 

G. V. ElHs, 
I. H. Fry, 
Drs. Bickley, 
J. G. Gilchrist, 



RBSmBNCB. 

Sioux City 
Sigoomey 
Toledo 
Mt. Pleasant 
Cedar Rapids 
JeweU, N. Dak. 
Blue Grass 
Afton 
Sibley 
West Branch 

Des Moines 

Waterloo 

Akron 

Marshalltown 

Waterloo 

Epwoxth 



NURSES. 



8BNIOR. 

Gertrude A. Turner, Head Nurse, 

Jensen, CeUa, A. 
Raff, Mary A. 



Graves, Sara L. 
Hawkins, Alice 

Parrington, Minnie M. 
Gardner, Roxana G. 
Lewis, Lizzie J. 
Melton, Mrs. E. A. 
Smith, Carrie E. 
Williamson, Elizabeth 



JUNIOR. 



PUPIIr. 



Emmettsbuxg 

Osage 
Maqnoketa 

Dubuque 
Des Moines 

Iowa City 
Iowa City 
Iowa City 
Afton 
Iowa City 
Iowa Ctty 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



SBNIOR ChASa. 

NAMK. 

Anderson, Arthur Lewis 
Bangfaman, George P. 
Blanchard, Frederick Channing 
Boos, Caspar Milton Baltis 
Bums, B. It. 
Clark, George Bdward 
Conn, Prank 
Dodge, Clarence A. 
Doolon, Joseph Patrick 
Poz, Charles Stunner 
Griffin, Pestns Manfred 
Hasek, Wesley Ondrey 
Holland, Prank Elmer 
Hoiton, Fred Willis 
Hough, l^orman Hamlin 
James, Pnnk Boynton 
Jones, Harry Carson 
Jones, John Milton 
Keams, Charles Randolph 
Kennedy, Elmer Prands 
hcggett, William B. 
Leonard, Geoige Rowe 
Lotts, l^ncst Geoige 
Maytnm, Bnrlington J. 
Morrow, Henry, Jr. 
Mneller, Adam Joseph 
Renshaw, Carroll Wheaton 
Riser, Gnstaviis E. 



R^IDBNCB. 

Estherville. 
Griswold. 
Nashua. 
Manning. 
Kensett. 
Galesburg, 111. 
Cedar Rapids, 
Bnrlington. 
Elkader. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Missoula, Mon. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Afton. 
Iowa City. 
Muscatine. 
Iowa City. 
Des Moines. 
Iowa City. 
Lincoln, Nebr. 
Cherokee. 
Marcus. 
Mandan, S. D. 
Independence. 
Warsaw. 
Iowa City, 
Iowa City. 
Rock Valley. 
Pt.Madison« 



240 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 

Scroggs, Richard Enkine 

Secor, Alson 

Silvis, John Chaunoey 

Smith, F. Potter 

Smith, Ray 

Toney, Samuel Breese 

Wilcox, Charles S. 



RltSIDBNCB. 

Indianola. 
Forest City. 
Rock Island. 
York, Nebr. 
Mitchell, S. D. 
Chicago, 111. 
Elgin, m. 



JUNIOR OCfASS. 



NAME. 

Barrera, Isaac 
Barry, Joseph Edward 
Beam, Frank N. 
Bingham, Frederick Nathaniel 
Bradley, William Oscar 
Brock, Herbert Brace 
Brooks, George 
Brown, Sim Chauncey 
Brown, Cnxtis Henry 
Calhonn, Joseph Farrar 
Crandall, Walter G. 
Crowley, Thomas Edward 
Countryman, Charles Clarence 
Davis, John M. 
Davis, Walter A. 
Darnell, George Washington 
Daugherty, James Bertis 
Decker, Herbert M. 
Deetkin, Julius Charles 
Dillinger, Hanna 
Eaton, Carroll Reawick 
Eickelberg, George C. 
Eicher, Cora 
Fawkes, Charles James 
Fickes, Joeiah Barton 



RXSXDENOt. 

Mondova, Mezioo. 

Dyersville. 

Malvern. 

Des Moines. 

Dubuque. 

Iowa City. 

Greenfield. 

EddyviUe. 

Belle Plaine. 

Birmingham. 

Spencer. 

Grundy Center. 

Birmingham. 

Aledo, m. 

Aledo, ni. 

RandaHa. 

La Moine, 111. 

Davenport. 

Council Bluffs. 

GUdden. 

Strawberry Point. 

Iowa City. 

Ainsworth, Nebr. 

Dubuque. 

loHra City. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



241 



NAICB. 

Powle, I^eo G. 
Prear, Charles Ruf as 
PreyniAii, Prank 
Pnrry, James Harry 
Gary, Arthur Geoi^e 
Gay, John Charles 
Grafton, Charles W. 
Godlove, George W. 
Hackett, John Vincent 
Hall, Robert W. 
Hayes, Clinton LeGrande 
Hammons, Robert Walter 
Haley, Prank Richardson 
Henle, Mathias Prands 
Hibbard, Clark D. 
Hinus, Jennie 
Hizon, Charles L. 
Hollenbeck, Charles Dighton 
Hood, Gueme Tuttle 
Hope, Bird Norris 
Hogan, Bdwsrd Michael 
Jobnaon, Prank Alexander 
Joslin, Walter Nich. 
Keeler, Howard Denton 
Kinsley, Jason Daniel 
Knlp, Dayid Evans 
Lanning, George Richard 
Lambert, Nella 
Lawton, Ernest John 
Lawrence, William Henry 
Leech, Charles Sloan 
Leigh, Charles Lloyd 
LiUibridge, William Otis; 
Lindsay, Clayton Bums 
XcKee, J. W. 
Mcdelland, Pay 



RBSIDBNCB. 

Iowa City. 
Sloan. 
Dyersville. 
Mt. Auburn. 
Rush, Penn. 
Conesville. 
Rock wood. 
Riverside. 
Creston. 
Cherokee. 
La Porte. 
Parsons, Kas. 
Rock Island, 111. 
Clinton. 
Yankton, S. D. 
Princeton, Mo. 
Holton, Kas. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Glidden. 
Birmingham. 
Adair. 
Holsteen. 
Moline, lU. 
Des Moines. 
McGregor. 
Grundy Center. 
Washington. 
Sheridan, Wy. 
North Preedom. 
Union. 
Winterset. 
Dubuque. 
Akron. 
Waucoma. 
Davenport. 
Cedar Rapids. 



242 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAlffS. 

McClanahan» William B. 
MeiB, Herman J. 
Miller, Thomas Jefferson 
Miller, William C. 
Morrow, Burton Allen 
Ogg, Mahlon D. 
Oldaker, Leroy 
Patton, Jefferson HoUister 
Penney, Clarence Lee 
Quinn, Guy Richard 
Re3nuu'd, May 
Reupke, Alvin Carter 
Rice, James Kuelon 
Rundorff , Arthur Henry 
Sensibaugh, William Chandler 
Siverly, Edward 
Smith, Arthur T. 
Specht, Engene Henry 
Starbuck, Adelbert W. 
Sutton, Harry Burse 
Teter, Joseph Henry 
Torrance, Charles Anderson 
Truaz, Fred Elmer 
Watland, Albert 
Webb, John Everett 
Weckert, William Henry 
Westcott, Harry 
Welk, Frank Paine 
Weymouth, Ida 
White, Leonard Alwyn 
Wood, Geoige L. 



RBSIDBNCE. 

Corydon. 
Dyersville. 
Hull. 
Amish. 
Larrabee. 
Greenleafton, Minn. 
Frendale. 
Des Moines. 
Stacyyille. 
Vinton. 
Burlington. 
Davenport. 
Cherokee. 
Burlington. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Lone Tree. 
Believue. 

Hebron. 
Corydon. 
Belington, W. Va. 
Maryville, Mo. 
Maquoketa. 
New Sharon. 
McGregor. 
Fairfield. 
Iowa City. 
Fairfield. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Geneaeo, IlL 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



243 



FRESHMAN CI^ASS 


 


NAME. 


R9SIDENC^. 


Alderson, Thomas E. 


Dubuque. 


Albright, Leroy Clark 


Primghar. 


Bacon, Alexander Porter 


Iowa City. 


Baker, Harry Clark 


Everly. 


Barnard, Leslie Orvil 


Luther. 


Baumer, John 


Iowa City. 


Beaumont, Francis Hugh 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Benson, Piny Fay 


Columbus Junct*n. 


Booth, John Jacob 


Marion. 


Bradshaw, Wayland C. 


Jefferson. 


Browning, Ernest Welcomb 


Solon. 


Brock, Miles Warren 


Iowa City. 


Bnice, Guy Rolfe 


Dubuque. 


Dabney, Harry Benton 


Oakland. 


Davis, John Clarence 


Mt. Vernon. 


DeweU, Wells 


Magnolia. 


Dudley, Dud R. 


Lamoni. 


Gardner, H. H. 


Iowa City. 


Gilman, Don Cameron 


Colfax. 


Gray, I,ewis Ballon 


Bancroft. 


Grigsby, Fred Redman 


Blandinsville, 111. 


Henak, Edwin A. 


Oxford. 


Hora, Josie 


Oxford Junction. 


Johnson, Oliver 


Cedar Falls. 


Keeler, Clark C. 


Des Moines. 


KeUy, William Allan 


Afton. 


Kcm, F. J. 


Burlington. 


Lockhart, Will T. 


Mediapolis. 


Long, John Edwin 


Mt. Pleasant. 


Lowry, William David 


Davenport. 


McCarrille, Maurice Francis 


Madison, Wis. 


McGarvey, Lovelace Edwin 


Davenport. 


Mentxer, Charles 


Marion. 


Morris, Robert C. 


Union. 



244 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 

Osbom, John Culbertson 

Oyler, William Seward 

Page, Robert Roy 

Pray, Charles H. 

Ridenour, Judson, Beeghly 

Rienfried, Charles Joseph 

Roberts, Claire Willie 

Seydel, Samuel Jordon Kirk wood 

Stute, Fred Nicholas, 

Stull, Claude 

Swain, Ada M. 

Swisher, Arthur R. 

Tullis, Freeman 

Tanner, Samuel H. 

Warner, Raymond Theodore 

Williams, Ray 

Willet, Raymond C. 

Willey, Harry Duane 

Wilson, Wm. Howard 

Welsh, James Donnell 



RBSIDBNCB. 
Denison. 
Downey. 
Iowa City. 
Vinton. 
Garrison. 
Dubuque. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Iowa City. 
Lyle, Minn. 
Algona. 
Marengo. 
Iowa City. 
Ottnmwa. 
Iowa City. 
Parkersburg. 
Oakland. 
Iowa City. 
Onawa. 

Pottsdam, N. Y. 
New Albin. 



SPRING C0UR8B. 



Barry, Joseph Edward 
Brown, Curtis Henry 
Deetken, Julius Charles 
Dillinger, Hannah 
Freyman, Frank 
Godlove, George W. 
Goodenough, George 
Haley, Frank R. 
Henle, Mathias Francis 
Holland, Frank Elmer 
Leigh, Charles Lloyd 
Lillibridge, William Otis 
McClelland, Fay 



Dyersville. 

Belle Plaine. 

Council Bluffs. 

GUdden. 

Dyersville. 

Riverside. 

Gowrie. 

Rock Island, 111. 

Clinton. 

Afton. 

Dubuque. 

Akron. 

Cedar Rapids. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



245 



NAMB. 

Moore, Rolland B. 
Mueller, Adam 
Oldaker, Leary 
Penney, Clarence Lee 
Reupke, Alvin C. 
Rnndorff, Arthur H. 
Westcolt, Harry 



RSSIDSNCE. 

Iowa City. 

Iowa City. 

Prendale. 

Stacyville. 

Davenport. 

Burlington. 

Iowa City. 



PRACTITIONER'S COURSE. 



Fox, Charles Sumner, D. D. S. 
Maytnm, Burlington, D. D. S. 



Meriden, Conn. 
Warsaw. 



PHARMACY DEPARTMENT. 



SBNIOR CI4AS&. 

NAMB. 

Cooper, ZadA Mary 
Cozine, Irvin Vernon 
Foderberg, Benjamin Henry 
Harvey, Robert Walsh 
Highley, I^arry Edward 
Koch, August Frank 
Lafrcnz, Henry Theodore 
Magee, Edward Washington 
Marks, Charles Rollin 
McCray, Walter Robert 
McGlone, Agnes 
McMahon, Thomas 
Mead, Nehemiah Paul 
Novak, Joe H. 
Packwood, Flemion Bert 
Reynolds, LilHe Ethel 
Sprecher, George 
Van den Berg, Albert * 
Watters, William Leslie 



KBSroSNCB. 

Quasqneton. 

Iowa City. 

Denison. 

Logan. 

Whitewood, S. D. 

Amana. 

Davenport. 

Dnnkerton. 

Davenport. 

Marble Rock. 

Independence. 

Victor. 

Akron. 

Iowa City. 

Oskaloosa. 

Brayton. 

Denison. 

Alton. 

Atalissa. 



JUNIOR CI^ASS. 



NAME. 

Beard, Abner Ruasell 
Bemhart, J. C. 
Brinton, Gilbert Edward 
Cobbs, Milton Henry 
Conry, William Le Roy 
Corr, Edward 



RBSIDSNCB. 

DeWitt. 

Des Moines. 

Brighton. 

Plover. 

Waterloo. 

Sloan. 



* Deceased. 



246 



PHARMACY DEPARTMENT. 



247 



NAMB. 

Clark, James Albert 
Elliott, Henry Roseell 
Parrand, Bert Blvin 
Fans, Albert Samuel 
Gearhart, John Carson 
Gearhart, Newton A. 
Gofisman, Andrew P. 
Greiner, Lawrence Franklin 
Hinchman, Carl Boyer 
Jones, David Ambrose 
Landsberg, Will Edward 
McFerriny Marion Rose 
McLaughlin, Clell J. 
McGrew, L. Warner 
Mercer, Kline Miller 
Mnnson, Charles Hoyle 
Nizon, Robert Bums 
Owens, David Austin 
Park, Charles Grant 
Pfeifier, William Fred 
Philipp, August Charles 
Pohle, Edwin Brainard 
Prader, Dolph C. 
Roberts, Arthur Addison 
Royer, John Delbert 
Schen, Louis Charles 
Sigworth, M, Perry 
Southward, Harry A. 
Spear, Benjamin Irving 
Steffen, Ruthford Burchard 
Strayer, Lucile Irene 
Tagne, Marion Samuel 
Tisdale, William Henry 
Ward, Joseph John 
White, Louis Mortimore 
Wiese, Rudolph 



RBSIDBNCK. 

Woodbine. 

West Liberty. 

Sumner. 

Morning Sun. 

Monticello 

Hopkinton. 

Iowa City. 

Blairsburg. 

Red Oak. 

Williamsburg. 

Iowa City. 

College Springs. 

Monticello. 

EmeiBon. 

Burlington. 

Carroll. 

Shambaugh. 

Cresco. 

Wilton Junction. 

Cedar Falls. 

Earlville. 

Dexter. 

Monticello. 

Canton, Mo. 

Hampton. 

Stacyville. 

Anamosa. 

New Boston, 111. 

Stanwood. 

Storm Lake. 

Waterloo. 

Likens. 

State Center. 

Iowa City. 

Ma3mard. 

Manning. 



SUMMARY. 



Coi«tKGiATB Department: 

Graduate Students 98 

Seniors 83 

Juniors 82 

Sophomores 133 

Freshmen 206 

Special 42—^ 

Law DEPARTMENT: 

Seniors 87 

Juniors 128 — 215 

Medicai* Department: 

Graduate Students i 

Seniors 65 

Juniors 73 

Sophomores 2 

Freshmen 69 

Special 4 — 214 

HOM<EOPATHIC MEDICAI« DEPARTMENT: 

Graduate Students 2 

Seniors 18 

Juniors 9 

Sophomores 15 

Freshmen 25 — 69 

Dentax Department: 

Seniors. 35 

Juniors 92 

Freshmen 57 — 184 

Pharmacy Department: 

Seniors 19 

Juniors 43 — 62 

1388 
Deduct for*names counted twice 57 

1331 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



B. L. Wick, Cedar Rapids 

President. 

Lucy Hvans, Moline 

M. L. Sears, Omaha 

Stkujl Prick, Iowa City 

Vice-Preaidents. 

O. A. BYDfCTON, Iowa City 

Secretary. 

Charuss S. Magowan, Iowa City 

Treasurer. 

S. K. STSYBMSON, Iowa City 

W. M. Davis, Iowa City 

Lbona Cazx, • • • • Iowa Cit> 

Execntive Committee. 



INDEX, 

PAGE. 

Admission, Requirements for 

Collegiate Department, - . 15 

Dental Department, 172 

Homoeopathic Medical Department, 156 

I/aw Department, 124 

Medical Department, 147 

Pharmacy Department, 186 

Accepted Schools, 22 

Advanced Standing. 

Collegiate, 23 

I^w, 125 

Alumni Associations, 167 

Animal Morphology, 60 

Astronomy, 69 

Athletics, -..-.-- ----108 

Biological Sciences, Special Courses in 27 

Botany, - - 64 

Calendar, 3 

Chemistry, 58 

Chemistry, Special Courses in 26 

Civil Engineering, 29, 70 

Classical Course, 24 

Clinics, 

Dental Department, 173 

Homoeopathic Medical Department, - - - - 164 

Medical Department, 140 

Collegiate Department, n 

Debating, 4^ 

Degrees, Advanced, 82 

Degrees, Baccalaureate, ^i 



INDEX. 351 

PAGB. 

Degrees Conferred, June, 1896, i^ 

Collegiate Department, 202 

Law Department, 221 

Degrees Conferred, March, 1897, 199 

Dental Department, 239 

Homceopathic Medical Department, - - . . . 236 

Medical Depcurtment, 229 

Pharmacy Department, - - 247 

Degrees, Master's, 92 

Dental Department, 169 

Spring Course, 180 

Draughting Rooms, 104 

Electrical Engineering, 30 

Elocution, 44 

English, 40 

Expenses, - 109 

Faculty, General, 5 

Collegiate, n 

Dental, 169 

Homceopathic Medical, 154 

Law, Ill 

Medical, 131 

Pharmacy, 184 

French, 38 

Geology and Paleontology, 63 

German, ------_.___ ^5 

Graduate Courses of Study, 81 

Graduates, June 1896, 162 

March, 1897, 164 

Graduation, Requirements for 

Collegiate Department, 31, 82, 92 

Dental Department, - 179 

Homceopathic Medical Department, - - - - 167 

Law Department, 127 

Medical Department, 149 

Pharmacy Department, 160 



252 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

PAGE. 

Greek, 35 

Gymnasium, -- 109 

Herbarium, - 103 

History, 45 

Homceopathic Medical Department, 154 

Hospital, 151 

Hours in Collegiate Course, 24 

Information, General, 105 

Laboratories, - 94 

Botanical, 97 

Chemical, 94 

Dental, .-. .-..-. ij^ 

Geological, 96 

Engineering, 104 

Pharmacy, 122 

Physical, 95 

Psychological, 97 

Physiological, 56 

Latin, 32 

Law Department, 11 1 

Law Electives, 120 

Library of the University, 105 

Law Library, 122 

Medical Library, -147 

Material Equipment, -- 94 

Mathematics, -66 

Medical Department, --131 

Military Science and Tactics, -77 

Moot Courts, 120 

Morphology, -60 

Museums, 99»i4i 

Nurses, Training Schools for Homceopathic Medical, - - - 166 

Medical, 152 

Observatory, ---104 

Organization, 10 

Pedagogy, 53 



INDEX. 253 

PAGE. 

Pharmacy Department, 184 

Philosophical Courses, 23 

Philosophy, 51 

Physics, 56 

Physiology, 60 

Political Science, 47 

Practitioner's Course, Dental Department, - - - - 180 

Prizes, 107 

Publications, 103, 105, 107 

Psychological Laboratory, 97 

Psychology, 51 

Regents, Board of, 4 

Religions Exerdaes, 108 

Resident Graduates, 71 

Science, Course in, 27, 28 

Scientific Expeditions, 102 

Schedule of Studies. 

Collegiate 24 

Dental, 172 

Homoeopathic Medical, 158 

Law, 116 

Medical, 142 

Pharmacy 186 

Schools, Certificates Accepted, 22 

Societies, 106 

Students, Enrollment of. 

Collegiate Department, 166 

Dental Department, 200 

Homoeopathic Medical Department, .... 198 

Law Department, 181 

Medical Department, 189 

Pharmacy Department, 208 

Summary, -------..-. 248 

Text and Reference Books, 

Dental Department, 147 

Homoeopathic Medical Department, 158 



254 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

PAGE. 

Law Department, 123 

Medical Department, - - - i45 

Pharmacy Department, 161, 160 

Theses, Law, '^7 

Tuition and Expenses, 

Collegiate Department, J09 

Dental Department, H7 

Homoeopathic Medical Department, - - - - 158 

Law Department, 1*3 

Medical Department, 146 

Pharmacy Department, ^93 

University Extension, io7 

Zoology, ^2 






DEC S 1903 



University of Iowa 



1897^98 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



S^te University of Iowa 



IOWA CITY. IOWA 



1897/ 98 



AND 



ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1898/99 



PUBUSHBD BY THE U^aVEFSITY 



Calendar for 1898^9. 



1898. 

Jtmejt Friday, ---Axmiytxwry of I^iterary Societies, 8 p. M. 
Jwnes% Sunday, — ^Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. m. 
June 6y Monday, — Class Day Bxerdses. 

Battalion Drill and Dress Parade, 4 p. m. 
Jwie 7, Tuesday, — ^Alnmni Day. 

Alnmni Meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alnmni Dinner, 6 p. M. 
Jwm 8t Wednesday, — Graduating Exercises, Law Department, 10 A. m. 
June 9, Thursday, — Graduating Exercises, Collegiate Department, 10 

September /j, TUesday. — Examinations for Admission. 

September 14^ Wednesday, — Pall Term begins, all Departments. 

November 24^ Tittfr^^/o^.—Thank^ving Holiday. 

December 22^ Thursday, ^V^Xi Term ends. 

1899. 

January 4, Wednesday, — Winter Term begins. 

Mardt 23^ Thursday,— VJiatsx Term ends. 

March ^/, Monday, — Graduating Exercises, Dental Department. 

March 2S, Tuesday, — Spring Term begins. 

March 28, Tuesday, — Graduating Exercises, Homoeopathic Medical 
Department. 

March ^, Wednesday, — Graduating Exercises, Medical and Pharmacy 
Departments. 

June 2, /W^j^.— Anniversary of Literary Societies, 8 p. M. 

June 4t Sunday, — ^Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. m. 

June St Monday, — Class Day Exercises. 

Battalion Drill and Dress Parade, 4 p. m. 
June 6, 7\iesday,—Alasnm Day. 

Alumni Meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alumni Dinner, 6 p. m. 
June 7, )^^i/«i^5^>^.— Graduating Exercises, Law Department, to a. U. 
June 8y 7}fcffrsi/^>.— Graduating Exercises, Collegiate Department, 10 

A. M. 



Board of Regents^ 



His ExceUency, LESI^IE M. SHAW, Governor 

of the StaU, 
Member and President of the Boards ex-Officio, 



SHIRLEY GILLILLAND, Glenwood, 
W. R. MONINGER, Calvin, 
HIRAM K. EVANS, Corydofi. 

J. D. McCLEARY, Indianola. 

J. W. GARNER, Columbus Junction, 

WILLIAM D. TISDALE, Ottumzva. 

ALONZO ABERNETHY, Osage. 
PARKER K. HOLBROOK, OnarxHi. 
HARVEY INGHAM. Algona, 
CHARLES E. PICKETT, Waterloo, 

RICHARD C. BARRETT, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 



Tbrms Expirk 1898. 



Terms Expirb 1900. 



Terms Expire 1902. 



ion, J 



Member ex-Officio. 



OFFICERS OF THIS BOARD. 

LOVELL SWISHER, Iowa City, Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. HADDOCK, /^zm a/y Secretary. 

PARKER K. HOLBROOK, 
ALONZO ABERNETHY, 
CHARLES E. PICKETT, 



- Executive Committee. 



Meml>ejrs of the PacultieSi 



And Other Officers. 



Cbarlbs Ashmkad Schabfpbr, a. M., Ph. D., hh- D., 
Presidciit. 

Amos Noyks Cttrribr, A. M., LL. D., 

Profemor of Latin Language and Literature, and Dean of tbe Collegiate 
Faculty. 

Philo Judson Farnsworth, a. M., M. D., 

Bmeritua Profeaaor of Materia Medica and Diseases of Children in the 
Medical Department. 

John Cuiv^roN Shradbr, A. M., M. D., hL. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

WILLL4M Drummond Middlkton, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the Medical Department, 
and Dean of ue Medical Faculty. 

X^XSAMvnh Calvin, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

WiLMOT HORTON DICKINSON, M. D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice and Clinical Medicine, and Dean of the 
Homoeopathic Sledical Faculty. 

)f Bmun McClain, a. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Law, and Chancellor of the Law Department. 

w Thomas Huston Macbridb, A. M., Ph. D., 

Pr of e s sor of Botany. 

Jambs Grant Gilchrist, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Surzical Gynecology, and Registrar of the 
Homoeopathic Medical Faculty. 

BMIL LOVJa BOBRNBR, Pharm. D., 

Professor of Practical Pharmacy, and Dean of the Pharmacy Faculty. 

^ ]f^i(l4A.mcMXjfyt Winchbstbr Andrbws, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistiy. 

Charlbs Hsrbbrt Cogswbll, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

t^ )f Gborgb Thomas Whitb Patrick, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Charlbs Bundy Wilson, A. M., 

Professor of German Language and Literature, and Secretary of the 
Collegiate Faculty. 



6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

I/AWRBNCK WHfUAM LiTTiG, A. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

Profesior of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in 
the Medical Department. 

Andrbw Andbrson Vkbi^bn, a. M., 

Professor of Physics. 

y^y^I^ABNAS GiPPORD WBItD, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

^y Chari«bs Ci«bvbx.and Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology. 

Jambs Rbnwick Guthrib, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Microscopic Anatomy. 

Isaac AXtThaus Loos, A. M., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Samubi* Haybs, M. S., LL. B., 
Professor of I«aw. 

JOSBPH JASPBR McCONNBI^I., A. M., 
Professor of Pedagogy. 

Ei;bbrT Wii^liam Rockwood, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistxy and Toxicology, and Director of Hospital, 
Medical Department. 

Chari«bs S. Chasb, a. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Medical Department 

Gborgb Royai^, M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapentics in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

Jambs Wii^ijam Daxbby, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Medical Depa rtm ent 

Frank John Nbwbbrry, M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology and Paedology in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

Wai«tbr L. Bibrring, M. D., 

Professor of Histology, Bacteriology and Pathology. 

Jambs A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. B., 
Professor of I«aw. 

John J. Nby, LL. B., 

Professor of T<aw. 

Wiifi^iAM Craig Wii^cox, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

Frank Thomas Brbbnb, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry and Therapeutics. 

Wli,i«iAM S. HosPORD, A. B., D. D. S., 

Professor of Dental Prothesis, and Dean of the Dental Faculty. 

Frbdbric C. L. van Stbbndbrbn, a. M., 

Professor of French I<anguage and I,iterature. 

X>^/ Ai;prbd Vari^by Sims, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 



MEMBERS OF THE FACUIyTIES AND OTHER OFFICERS. 7 
Edward P. Sbbds, LL. B., 

Professor of I«aw. 

John Wai,tbr Harriman, M. D., 

Prof enor of Anatomy. 

Martin Josbph Wade, LL. B., 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence in the Medical Department and I^ec- 
turer on Evidence in the I^aw Dei>artment. 

W114JAM Harfbr DbFord, a. M., M. D., D. D. S., 
Professor of Oral Pathology and Hygiene. 

Hanson E. EI/Y, 2iid Lieutenant 17th Infantry, U. S. A., 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

GlI,BXRT L. HOUSBR, M. S., 

Professor of Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Brnjamin Frankun Shambaugh, a. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Government and Administration. 

Wii,ijam Prtbrs Rkbvks, Ph. D., 

Professor of English language and I,iterature. 

Charijbs Moore Robertson, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Otology, Rhinology and laryngology. 

Joseph W. Rich, 

Librarian. 

Lbona Angeune Cai«z«, a. M., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Greek language and I«iterature. 

Chari^s Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Bohumii. Shimek, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Curator of the Herbarium. 

Henry P. Wickham, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, and Assistant Curator of the Museum. 

Arthur G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

WnxiAM Robert Whiteis, M. S., M. D., 

Assistant Professor of Histology. 

Frankun Hazen Potter, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of I^tin. 

Cari; E. Seashore, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

La Vega 6. Kinne, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Domestic Relations and Taxation. 

Oershom Hyde Hill, A. B., M. D., 

Lecturer on Insanity. 

GiFPORD Simeon Robinson, LL. D., 

Lecturer on Api)e]late Practice and Agency. 



8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Horace Embrson Dbkmbr, LL. B., 

I«ecturer on GuatBnty and Suretyship, and the Conducting of I«aw 
BusinetB. 

JAMKS E. PlSSNER* D. D. Sm 
I,ectttrer on Orthodontia. 

Wi];i,iAM G. Ci,ARK, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Porcelain Work in the Dental Department. 

w. J. mcGbb, a. M., 

I«ectttrer on Anthropology. 

H. Foster Bain, M. S., Ph. D., 

I«ecturer on Economic Geology. 

Paui^ine Kimbai«i« Partridge, 

Instructor in Elocution. 

Frederic Bernard Sturm, A. B., 

Instructor in German. 

Percy Hargreaves Walker, m. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

George n. Bauer, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Bertha Gilchrist Ridgway, 

Assistant in the General Library. 

Harry Grant Plum, A. M., 

Instructor in History. 

Royal Winthrop Baldwin, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

A. E. Rogers, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

Charles Henry Bowman, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Pedagogy. 

Charles B. Lewis, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department. 

Frank B. James, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department. 

William Edward Barlow, A. B., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

WiLBER John Teeters, B. S., Ph. C, 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

Louise Elizabeth Hughes, A. M,, 

Instructor in Latin. 

Fred d. Merritt, b. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTIES AND OTHER OFFICERS, g 
Cau, Schi^knkkr, a. B., 

iBStmctor in German. 

Hauiy EuGsim e:kij«y, a. m., 

iBstractor in English. 

Saxah Dbua HirrcHiNsoN, A. M., 

Instructor in French. 

RussHU. T. Hartman, B. S., 

IttBtmctor in Bngineering. 

Lbstsr T. Jackson, A. B., 

Instmctor in Chemistry. 

C. H. Van Law, A. M., 

Instractor in Political Science. 

I<BB WauaCB DBAN, M. S., M. D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, 

Taxidermist. 

AOEUC Pauuns Kimbaij,, M. D., 

Matroa in the Homoeopathic Hospital. 

Thiodorb L. Hazard, M. D., 

Assistant in Materia Medica in the Homoeopathic Medical Department. 

Lkokard C. Rinard, hh. B., 

Law Ifibmrian. 

I«ui,A Bbaix Jbsxbr, Ph. G., 

Assistant in the Pharmacy Laboratory. 

Giorgia Knapp, Ph. G., 

Assistant in the Pharmacy Laboratory. 

FRBD. J. BSCKKR, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, Homoeopathic Medical Department. 

tALPtt W. HOMAN, M. D., 

Aarittant to the Chair of Ophthalmology, etc, Homoeopathic Medical 
Department. 

Lw>RA Johnson, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, Homoeopathic Medical 
Department. 

ALXKRTDS J. BURGB, B. S., 

Fellow li^Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

CHAtLHfl Frbdbrick Lorbnz, B. S., 

Fellow in Physics. 

Tboiias Edmund Savagb, B. S., 

Fellow in Geology. 

M. IU>BBRTA HOI^BS, A. M., 
Fellow in Latin. 

ISKMIB S. COTTLB, 

Saperintendent of HosplUl, Medical Department. 



lo STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

AlfPHBUS L. POLUiRD, M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology, Homoeopathic Medical 
Department. 

Raymond E. Pbck» M. D., 

Houae Surgeon, Homceopathic Hospital. 

Mary I/Aura Otto, B. Ph., 

Assistant in Botany. 

MSTTA LOOMIS, 

Assistant in the General I^ibraiy. 

G90RGE Lyman Grimes, B. S., 

Mechanician, and Assistant in the Physical I«aboratory. 

John T. McCuntock, A. B., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology, Medical Department. 



State University of Iowa# 



Organizatioa 



In the year 1840, the Congress of the United States passed an 
act setting apart two townships for the use and support of a Univer- 
sity within the Territory of Iowa, whenever it should become a State. 
The gift was accepted, as set forth in the Constitution of the State, 
and the policy re-a£Brmed in the amended Constitution of 1857. In 
the latter document it is moreover specifically stated that the "General 
Assembly shall encourage by all suitable means the promotion of 
intellectual, scientific, moral, and agricultural improvement." 

The first General Assembly took action in regard to the location 
of the University, and a Board of Trustees was appointed. Very 
little, however, was accomplished until 1855, when the institution was 
first opened for the reception of students. The University was subse- 
quently re-organized, and under the new oxganization re-opened on 
September 19, i860, and this may fairly be regarded as the date of the 
beginning of the existing institution. 

The control of the University is entrusted to a Board of Regents, 
consisting of the Governor of the State and the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, ex-officiiSy and one member from each Congres- 
sional District, who are elected by the General Assembly. 

The University comprises the following departments: 

I. COI.UGIATK DBPARTBCENT. 

3. Law Dhpa&tmsnt. 

3. Mbdicai, Dbpa&ticbnt. 

4. Homoeopathic Mkdicai. Dspartmsnt. 

5. DvirTAI, DSPA&TICSNT. 

6. Pharmacy Dhpartmsnt. 

zi 



Collegiate Department 



Faculty and Instructors* 



Chari^ks Ashmkad Schabffer, a. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

President. 

Amos Noyes Currier, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of I^atin Language and Literatare, and Dean of the Faculty. 

Samuel Calvin, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

Thomas Huston Macbride, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

Launcelot Winchester Andrews, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

George Thomas White Patrick, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Charles Bundy Wilson, A. M., 

Professor of German Language and Literature, and Secretary of the 
Faculty. 

Andrew Anderson Veblen, A. M., 

Professor of Physics. 

Laenas Gifford Weld, a. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles Cleveland Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology. 

Isaac Althaus Loos, A. M., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Joseph Jasper McConnell, A. M.» 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

William Craig Wilcox, A. M., 

Professor of History.' 

Frederic C. L. van Steenderen, A. M., 

Professor of French Language and Literature. 

Alfred Varley Sims, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

12 



COLI^EGIATB DEPARTMENT. 13 

Hanson E. Ei.y, 2nd Lieutenant 17th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

G11.BKKT L. HOUSBR, M. S., 

Professor of Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Bbnjamik Frankun Shambaugh, a. M.» Ph. D., 

Professor of Government and Administration. 

WiLUAM Peters Reeves, Ph, D., 

Professor of English Language and I,iterature. 

Lbona Angeune Cau,, a. M., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Greek I«anguage and I,iterature. 

CaARi«Es Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

BoHUMn, Shimbk, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Curator of the Herbarium. 

Henry F. Wicrham, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, and Assistant Curator of the Museum. 

Arthur G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Franki,ik Hazen Potter, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of I«atiu. 

Carx, E. Seashore, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

W. J. McGee, a. M., 

Lecturer on AnthropOiOgy. 

H. Poster Bain, M. S., Ph. D., 

Lecturer on Economic Geology. 

Pauline Kimball Partridge, 

Instructor in Elocution. 

Frederic Bernard Sturm, A. B., 

Instructor in German. 

Percy Hargreaves Walker, M. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

George N. Bauer, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Harry Grant Plum, A. M., 

Instructor in History. 

Charles Henry Bowman, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Pedagogy. 

Louise Elizabeth Hughes, A. M., 

Instructor in Latin. 



14 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

PUCD D. MERUTT, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Cari. Schiamkbxl, a. B., 

Instructor in German. 

EUk&y Eugbnb Kki«i.y, a. M., 
Instructor in Knglish. 

Sarah Deua Hutchinson, A. M., 

Instructor in French. 

RUSSBI.Z. T. Hartman, B. S., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

LssTBR T. Jackson, A. B., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

C. H. Van Law, A. M., 

Instructor in Political Science. 

AI.BERTUS J. BURGB, B. S., 

Fellow in Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Charles Frederick Lorenz, B. S., 

Fellow in Physics. 

Thomas Edmund Savage. B. S., 

Fellow in Geology. 

M. Roberta Holmes, A. M., 

Fellow in Latin. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, 

Taxidermist. 

George Lyman Grimes, B. S., 

Mechanician and Assistant in the Physical Laboratory. 

Mary Laura Otto, B. Ph., 

Assistant in Botany. 



General Plan« 



The CoUeg^te Department embraces four general courses of study, 
—one Classical, two Philosophical, and one General Scientific; and two 
t#rii«inai courses, — Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. 

By pursuing one of the four general courses, and devoting the 
time left open for elective studies to some one line, it is possible 
for the student to arrange a course which, besides furnishing the 
means of a broader culture, will more thoroughly fit him for 
*^«^^<^g some particular specialty, or which will enable him to 
develop his tastes in that particular direction. Thus, for example, 
a student in the course in General Science may at the same time 
devote himself especially to chemistry, or physics, or mathematics 
and astronomy; a student in the Philosophical Course may also take 
a special course in ancient or modern languages, or in history. The 
members of the Faculty will always be glad to advise with students 
on this subject, and will cordially assist them in endeavoring to 
specialize their work to the best advantage. 

Candidates for degrees are required to make an election of one of 
these courses, and will not be allowed, without permission, to change 
the elected course, nor to pursue less or more than three studies at a 
time, except as required by the program. 

Students not candidates for graduation, on complying with the 
terms of admission, will be allowed to select their studies under the 
direction of the Faculty. 

Penons over twenty-one years of age not candidates for a degree 
may be admitted to special studies, without examination, at the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty. 

Resident Oraduatetf.'-Graduates of this or other institutions 
denroas of prosecuting studies not included in their undergraduate 
couxse may, on consultation with the President, avail themselves of 
sQcfa facilities as the department affords. 

15 



Requirements for Admission* 



Candidates for admission to the Freshmen Class in any of the 
Collegiate courses must be at least sixteen years of age, and must, by 
examination or by presenting acceptable certificates, fnmish evidence 
of haying completed the preparatory requirements. 

No one will be admitted whose deficiencies exceed the equivalent of 
one study for one year; a preparatory credit is the equivalent of one 
study dail}' for a term of twelve weeks, on the basis of three studies a 
day in the preparatory schools. Candidates having defidendes not 
exceeding this limit may be admitted upon condition thai they complete 
their preparation ttnthin thefirstyear after admission. 

It is expected that the following work will be completed in the 
grammar school: Practical Arithmetic, Reading, Penmanship, Ortho- 
graphy, English Grammar, Geography, Book-keeping (single entry). 
Physiology, ( the statutory requirements for primary and giammar 
schools), United States History (three terms* work), Civil Government 
(one term's work). Composition, (three terms' work). Drawing (three 
terms' work). 

The work in Book-keeping, Composition, Drawing, and Civil Gov- 
ernment is not to be considered as absolutely required, but only work 
in excess of the amount named in this paragraph will receive credit 
as preparatory work. 

ci;a88icai; course- 
group I.— ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

z. Iratin. Grammar, Ceesar, (four books), Cicero (four orations), 
Vergil (six books) with Prosody. 

Instead of the prescribed Caesar an equivalent amount of Viri Eomse 
or Nepos will be accepted and is recommended to the preparatory 
schools. In this case the remainder of the requirements may be <^ered 

i6 



COI,I,EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 17 

in Caesar or Cicero. It is expected that three or four of the six required 
orMioiis of dceio (the Catiline orations being taken as the standard 
of length) will be read thoroughly and the remainder rapidly with a 
▼lew to securing facility in translation. Equivalents in kind will be 
accepted for any part of the specified requirements. An accurate and 
ready knowledge of grafnmaiical forms and constmction and a good 
voadmiary are of essential importance. Sight reading should be 
taught and practiced from the first. 

Bzerdae in writing Latin, based upon the current reading, ought to 
vIk carried through the entire preparatory course. An amount equiva- 
lent to Collar, Part III, is required for admission. 

Poor years of daily recitation are needed for the required prepara- 
tioo. 

The Roman pronounciation is used in the University. 

S* Greek. Grammar, Xenophon*s Anabasis. As few high schools 
meet this requirement, the University for the present will provide 
■eaas for fulfilling it, and an equivalent of three tenns' work from 
Group IV may be offered. 

The preparatory work in Greek should give thorough knowledge of 
gnmmatical forms, familiarity with the common rules of S3mtax and 
the ability to write simple Greek prose with correct accents. It is not 
expected that high school pupils under ordinary circumstances will 
be able, in a single year, to cover thoroughly the work required for 
admission. 

GROUP IL—MATHEMATICS. 

3* Algebra. The Algebra of the high school should comprise a 
careful study of the following topics: signs and symbols; fundamental 
operations; factoring (including lowest common multiple and highest 
oommon divisor); fractions; simple and quadratic equations; theory of 
exponents (including negative and fractional exponents and radicals); 
progression. Especial attention should be given to such salient points 
as the significance of the minus sign, factoring, theory of exponents, 
equations, and the ability to state readily algebraic problems. The 
interpretation of algebraic results with the graphical method of their 
Kpresentation should be introd\i^ ^t the earliest |)068ible sti^ ati4 
miUflU^ ioiift^ spoilt 



i8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

4. Geometry. Botk plane and solid geometry are teqoired. The 
*' Henristic " method in beginning the study of geometry is strongly 
recommended (See Hopkins* Manual of Plane Geometry, D. C. Heath 
& Co., and Spencer's Inventional Geometry, D. Appleton & Co.) 

Whatever method is used the pupil should be provided with adequate 
drawing instruments and should construct and verify all of his propo- 
sitions and theorems. Geometric processes and results should be 
expressed by algebraic symbols whenever possible. Original investi- 
gations should not simply be encouraged, but should be insisted upon 
as a matter of course. The eminently practical side of the study of 
geometiy should not be lost sight of, but the work should be so arranged 
that it may be of the highest disciplinary value. The language of all 
geometrical exercises should be exact. 

ArithmeHc, The work in arithmetic should in general be completed 
in the grammar grades. At least one term's work in arithmetic may 
be done with great profit in the high school after the completion of 
the required work in algebra and geometry. Not only will a general 
view of the subject be found beneficial in itself, but the higher point 
of view now attainable may be taken advantage of in many ways which 
it is not necessary to enumerate. 

In the high school not less than one-fourth of the time for three 
years should be devoted to the work in algebra and geometry. It is 
desirable that the high school work in mathematics be not finished 
until the end of the course, in order that there may be no break in the 
continuity of the work between the high school and the University. 

GROUP III.— ENGLISH AND HISTORY. 

5. Sngflisli Composition. All applicants for admission whether 
from accepted schools or not will be examined to test their ability to 
write clear and correct English. The applicant will be required to 
write an essay of not less than two hundred words upon a subject 
chosen by himself from a considerable number set before him. No 
applicant will be accepted who is deficient in spelling, punctuation, 
sentence and paragraph structure. 

The teacher is reminded that the proper preparation for this part of 
the requirement is constant practice in writing, with careful correction 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 19 

and revision of themes. A part of the time should be devoted to the 
formal stndy of rhetoric in any good text-book, such as Genmig's 
Outlines of Rhetoric (Ginn & Co.), or Scott & Denney's Paragraph 
Writing (Allyn & Bacon). 

6. SnffUali Uteratttre« Throughont the high school conrse 
much attention should be paid to the study of literature, by which is 
meant not merely the study of a manual on the history of literature 
but a careful, sympathetic study of literature itself in the writings of 
lepreaen t ative authors. Entire masterpieces suited to the attainments 
of the class should form the basis of recitations and an equal amount 
of collateral reading should be assigned and written reports required. 

Daring the last year of the course a good outline history of the liter- 
ature ahould be used, such as Brooke's Primer of English Literature 
(The Marmillan Co.) or Pancoast's Introduction to English Literature 
(Holt & Co.) This should always, however, be subordinated to the 
study of the texts themselves. In the study of literature the student 
should be stimulated and trained not merely to read and enjoy but to 
analyze the style and to absorb the spirit and substance of an author. 

The applicant will be expected to be familiar with all of the works 
in the following list or with their equivalents: 

For 1898; Shakespere's Macbeth, Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I 
and II, the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator^ Cole- 
ridge's Ancient Mariner, Carlyle's Essay on Bums, Shelley's Defence 
of Poetry, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, Lowell's 
Vision of Sir Launfal. 

For 1899; Shakespere's As You Like It, Irving's Sketch Book, De 
Qoincey's English Mail Coach, Scott's Marmion, Longfellow's Evan- 
geline, George Eliot's Silas Mamer, Tennyson's Idylls of the King. 

7* History. At least four terms' work should be presented in 
history. The course of study and available text-books should be 
somewhat as follows: first and second terms, History of Greece 
(Oman, Smith, Cox or Myers) and Rome (Allen, Leighton, Smith or 
Myecs); third term. History of England (Montgomery or Gardiner); 
fourth term, The History of the United States (Channing, Thomas, 
Fiske, Johnson, Montgomery or MacMaster) or Civil Government 
(Flake's Civil Government or Andrews' Manual of the Constitution). 



20 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

Instead of the first three terms* work in history indicated above, 
which is preferred, the University will accept for the present three 
terms* work in general history from one of the following text-books: 
Myers, Fisher, Freeman or Swinton. 

GROUP IV.—ELECTIVE. 

Three terms' work, and if Greek is not offered six terms* work, are 
to be selected in science or in a modem language. 

8. Science. The subjects are arranged in the order of prefer- 
ence: physics, botany, physical geography, physiology, drawing or 
book-keeping, economics, chemistry, astronomy, zoology, geology. 

Credit for entrance will not be allowed on these subjects for less 
than two terms in each, except that one, or one and one half terms, 
may be allowed in botany, physiology, physical geography, and 
drawing or book-keeping, and one term in astronomy, geology and 
economics. In no case should more than two sciences be taken np 
for consecutive study in a single year; and whenever possible three 
terms of consecutive work in one science are advised, especially in 
physics. 

9* Oerman. A full year in German may be indicated by Jo3me9- 
Meissner*8 German Grammar, Parts I and III, about fifty pages 
selected from Joynes* German Reader (D. C. Heath and Co.), all of 
Storm's Immensee (Henry Holt and Co.) and Riehl*s Buig Neideck 
(Ginnand Co.) 

ID* French. Van Daeirs Introduction to the French Language 
or Edgren's French Grammar, and Van Daell's Introduction to 
French Authors or Super's French Reader will be accepted as an 
equivalent of a year's work in French. 

PHIIirOSOPHICAi; A COU&SB. 

The requirements for admission to this course are the same as for 
the classical course, except that one year of German or French, or 
one year of additional science may be substituted for Greek lui pn>i 
vidcd for in Group IV. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. ii 

PHII^OSOFHICA]; B, SCIl^NTIPIC AND BNGIimBR- 

mO COURSES. 

Preparation in all respects the same as that offered for the Classical 
or Philosophical A courses will be accepted for the Philosophical B, 
Scientific and Engineering conrses. 

Twelve terms of work from Group IV will, however, be accepted in 
September, 1898, as a substitute for the prescribed work in ancient 
languages. The Latin preparation, entire, or in part, is in all cases 
preferred, but those who desire to offer substitutes for Latin are advised 
to make the following selection of studies: physics, one year; botany, 
physical geography, physiology, and drawing or book-keeping, one- 
hilf year each« The remaining six terms may be selected at the option 
of the candidates from the other subjects under Group IV; but it is 
ugently advised that those who do not present any Latin for admis- 
sion should attain some proficiency in at least one modem language. 

After 1898 two years' work in foreign language will be added to the 
absolute xeqoirements for admission to either of the above courses 
and the elective group will be correspondingly diminished. 

GBNBRAXr OBSBRVATIONS. 

1. It is strongly advised that preparatory work be confined to few 
sabjects and that they be so chosen that they form two or three groups 
of doeely related subjects. 

2. Preparatory credit wUl not be allowed for less than three terms' 
work in any foreign language. 

5. Substitutes of real equivalents not affecting the absolute require- 
ments respecting Latin, mathematics, English, and history, will be 
allowed for the purpose of adapting the University requirements to the 
means and needs of the several preparatory schools. 

4. It is assumed that, under ordinary circumstances, four years in 
the high school will be devoted to meet the requirements for admission 



5. Stndents who are admitted with conditions can make them up 
in the lofwa City Academy or under the direction of a private tutor 
wippnvtQ. fay the FiMiilty« 



23 STATE UWIVERSITy OF IOWA. 

ABKI88ION BY CSRTIFICATB* 

The Board of Regents has adopted the following plan for the exam* 
ination of high school pnpils and for general high school inspection: 

1. Any school may be placed upon the accredited list upon appli- 
cation of its principal or board of directors, provided the Collegiate 
Faculty of the University is satisfied as to its (a) course of study, (^) 
methods of teaching, {c) facilities for instruction^ 

2. The course of study of such schools must be adapted for fitting 
its graduates for one or more of the collegiate courses of the Univer- 
sity, or it must be in the direct line of such preparation. 

3. Whenever any accredited or other school requests it, its pupils 
may be examined by the University at a convenient time in any subject 
or subjects selected by the school authorities from the schedules of 
studies required for admission to the TJmversity, and each pupil will 
receive from the University a credit card for each subject passed. 

4. The University shall provide for schools desiring the same, a 
syllabus of each of the subjects in which examination Is to be taken. 

5. All accredited schools shall be inspected at the pleasure of the 
University, the expense of the inspection to be borne by the Univer- 
sity, 

6. The authorities of accredited schools shall report annually to the 
University all changes made in the course of study and submit a list 
of names of the instructors employed in the high school, with subjects 
taught by each. 

The following revised rules governing the accrediting of schools 
have been adopted by the Collegiate Faculty. These rules will be in 
force after 1898, and the attention of the authorities of accredited 
schools is called to the revised rules in order that they may have time 
to make such changes in their courses of study and in their plans of 
work as will enable them fully to conform to the rules. 

RUIrBS OOYBRNINO THS ACCRHBITINO OP HIGH 

SCHOOl^. 

High schools meeting the following conditions may, at the optkn 
of the Collegiate Faculty, be accredited as making full prepuatioa 
for one or more of the University courses: 



COLLB6IATK DEPARTMENT. 23 

i« The oonne of stndy must be not less than four years of thirty- 
siz weeks each in length, following an elementary oonrse not less 
than eight years in length. 

3. The oonrse of study must require of each pupil not more than 
four recitations daily. 

3. The entire time of at least two teachers must be given to 
iastmctlon in high school branches. 

4. The quality of the instruction given and the character of the 
test-books used must be approved by the Faculty. 

5. Schools seeking considerable credit in science must demon- 
strate their ability to do successful laboratory work. 

6. Schools seeking considerable credit in history and English 
must give evidence of a special library equipment for these branches. 

Private academies, seminaries, normal schools or other secondary 
schools meeting the conditions-mentioned above, or their equivalent, 
nay be accepted on the same basis as high schools. 

Accredited Schools* 

All candidates for admission to the Freshman class, who come from 
socredited schools, must furnish to the University certificates con- 
taining specific statements as to the amount of work done in each study. 
Blanks will be furnished for such certificates upon application to the 
Preaideiit, and should be returned by September ist. 

After 1898 such revision of the list of schools herewith given will 
be made, as the rules for the accrediting of schools may require. 

There are doobtless other schools which are entitled to places on 
one or other of these lists, but because they have not furnished the 
data necessary to enable the University authorities to come to a safe 
eonclnsion in regard to their proper places in the lists, or because 
they have not signified a desire to come into accredited relations with 
the University, they are for the present omitted, without prejudice. 

The foUowing schools have been accredited by the Collegiate 
Faculty of the University as making full preparation for one or more 
of the Coorses of the Collegiate Department. 

HIGH SCHOOL. PRINCIPAI.. SUPBRINTBNDBNT. 

Atlantic, C. M. Cole, William Wilcox. 

Boone, Sara P. Rice, Geo. I. 



M 



STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 



HIGH SCHOOZr. 


PRINCIPAIm 


SDP9UliTJCM11BKr. 


Burlington, 


E. Poppe, 


Chas. R. Shelton. 


Cedar Falls, 


Grace J. Norton, 


O. J. Laylander. 


Cedar Rapids, 


Abbie S. Abbott, 


J. T. Merrill. 


Clinton, 


E. L. Mason, 


O. P. Bostwick. 


Conndl Bluffs, 


U. B. Hayden, 


J. C. Hiaey. 


Creston, 


T. R. Atnlie, 


0. E. Frendi. 


Davenport, 


H. H. Roberts, 


J. B. Young. 


E. Des Moines, 


E. H. White, 


Amos Hiatt. 


N. Des Moines, 


W. N. CliflFoid, 


F. A. Lacey. 


W. Des Moines, 


W. O. Riddell, 


F. B. Cooper. 


Dubuque, 


F. L. Smart, 


F. T. Oldt. 


Fort Dodge, 


Mary L. Huffman 


, F. C. Wildes. 


Fort Madison, 


B. J. Barr, 


C. W. Cruikshank. 


Iowa City, 


F. C. Ensign, 


S. K. Stevenson. 


Keokuk, 


G. E. Marshall, 


O. W. Weyer. 


Marion, 


Lizzie R. Marshall, J. J. Dofflemeyer. 


Marshalltown, 


C. C. Carstens, 


F. E. Willard. 


Missouri Valley, 


Emma C. DeGrafi! 


', A. B. Warner. 


Muscatine, 


E. F. Schall, 


F. M. Witter. 


Oskaloosa, 


O. E. Dixon, 


O. C. Scott. 


Red Oak, 


Ira S. Condit, 


W. F. Chevalier. 


Sioux City, 


W. H. Tumbull, 


H. E. Kratz. 


E. Waterloo, 


Lydia Hinman, 


F. J. Sessions. 


W. Waterloo, 


Amy Boggs, 


S. H. Sheakley. 


Webster City, 


Laura Seals, 


C. W. Ma*^ndale. 


Ackley, 




O. W. MaxwelL 


Adel, 




C. R. Aumer. 


Albia, 




H. C. HoUingsworth. 


Algona, 




N. Spencer. 


Ames, 




E. D. Y. Cnlbertsoa. 


Anamosa, 




A. Palmer. 


Brooklyn, 




Fred S. Robinson. 


Carroll, 




C. C. Magee. 


Centerville, 




F. B. King. 


Charles City, 




G. S. Dick. 



COIXSOUTB OfiPAKtlf SNT. 



as 



Ooliimbiis Jiiiictioii« 
Ooraing, 



DcsnsoDy 

BigleGiove, 

EldocBy 



Bsfherville, 
Paljfield, 
ForeatCity, 
Geneaeo* HI., 
Glenwood, 



Ofeenfield, 
Guthrie Center, 
Guthrie Cooiity, 
Himlwig, 
Hampton, 



Independence, 
loivm Falls, 



j» 



Knozrille, 
Laon, 



ICaqiooketa, 
Haicngo, 
City, 



Mcdine,IlL. 



ML Ayr, 



SUPBMIMTJtM 1>SMT. 
W. BeU. 
D. M. KeUy. 
D. R. Michener. 
C. M. Thompson. 
L. E. A. Ling. 
B. A. Parks. 
H. V. Failor. 
J. G. Gmndy. 
W* A. Dofon. 
R. B. Blackmar. 
C C. Stover. 
J. Bk Williamson. 
J. D. Stont. 
M. F. Miller. 
J. L. Uird. 
J. Perdval Hnggett. 
P. B. Palmer. 
Adam Pickett. 
L. M. Swindler. 
J. C. King. 
G. A. Bateman. 

A. W. Merrill. 
J. L. Bnechele. 
L. Hezzelwood. 
L. B. Carlisle. 
S. J. Finley. 

B. N. Coleman. 
S. I4. Darrah. 
R. W. Wood. 

C. C. Dudley. 
C. H. Carson. 
A. R. Sale. 

P. M. Williams. 
H. M. Slanson. 
BmoeFnads* 
C* O.Catt8r« 



26 



STATB UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



HIGH SCHOOI,. 

Mt. Pleasant, 

New Hampton, 

Newton, 

Oelwein, 

Osage, 

Osceola, 

Ottnmwa, 

Parkersburg, 

Perry, 

Reinbeck, 

Rockford, 

Rock Rapids, 

Sanborn, 

Sheldon, 

Shenandoah, 

Sibley, 

Sigonmey, 

Spencer, 

Springdale, 

Storm I,ake, 

Stnart, 

Taylorville Tp., Tayloryille, 111., 

Tipton, 

Traer, 

Villisca, 

Vinton, 

Washington, 

Waukon, 

Waverly, . 

West Liberty, 



SUPSRXNTSNDBNT 

J. F. Riggs. 

D. A. Thombai^ 
B. J. H. Beard. 
L. B. Mo£Fett 
George Chandler. 
I. N. Beaxd. 

A. W. Stuart. 
W. F. Barr. 

A. It. Lyon. 
J. L. Mishler. 
J. C. Wilson. 
W. S. Wilson. 
R. B. Daniel. 
W. I. Simpson. 
O. E. Smith. 

B. T. Green. 

E. H. Griffin. 
Carrie B. Parker. 
S. B. Stonerook, Jr. 
A. V. Storm. 

G. W. Bryan. 
W. E. Andrews. 
W. h. Etter. 
O. M. ElUott. 

D. A. Knapp. 
H. C. Waddle. 
G. H. Mullin. 

E. L. Coffeen. 
E. E. Blanchard. 
L. T. Hill. 



OTHSR SCHOOZ^. . 

Calhoun County Normal School, 
Charles City College,. 
Denison Normal School, 
Dexter Normal College, 



PRINCIPAI, OR PRBSIDBNT. 

P. C. Holdoegel. 
F. J. Hirsch. 
W. C. Van Ness. 
A. G. Smith. 



COLLKGIATE DEPARTMBNT. 



n 



OTHJUt SCHOOLS. 

Epworth Seminarj, 

Iowa City Academy, 
Washington Academy, 
Whitder College, 
Wilton German-English College, 

Woodbine Normal School, 



PRINCIPAI. OR PRBSIDKNT. 

Frank G. Barnes. 
W. A. Willis. 



{ 



W. C. Pidgeon. 
B. Mannholdt. 
M. A. Reed. 
H. A. Kinney. 



The work done in the schools named below is regarded as of suffi- 
cient merit to entitle them to recognition by the University. 

Properly certified work from these schools will therefore be received 
so far as this work meets the preparatory requirements of the Uni- 
versity. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Adair, 

Allerton, 

Anita, 

Andnbon, 

Avoca, 

Bloomfield, 

Brighton, 

Britt, 

Charter Oak, 

Clarence, 

Clarion, 

Clearfield, 

Clear Lake, 

Corydon, 

DeWitt, 

Dysait, 

KIdon, 

BIkader, 



Fayette, 
Pontanelle, 



PRINCIPAI,. 

L. J. Neff. 
J. F. Holliday. 
F. B. La¥n:ence. 
F. P. Hocker. 
J. Peasley. 
Wm Fortune. 
S. T. Walker. 

A. M. Deyoe. 

C. F. Garrett. 
J. H. Morgan. 
S. T. May. 

H. S. Ash. 

D. H. Campbell. 
Charles Carter. 
Margaret Buchanan. 
H. O. Bateman. 

B. C. Mills. 
J. B. Webb. 

C. W. Johnson. 
F. B. Finch. 
C. C. Smith. 

J. F. Doderer. 



28 



STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



HIGH SCHOOZr. 

Glidden, 

Gnindy Center, 

Hubbard, 

Keofiauqua, 

Kingsley, 

I^e Mills, 

Lyons, 

Manning, 

Mechanicsville, 

Milton, 

Morning Sun, 

Moulton, 

Nashua, 

Neola, 

North English, 

Northwood, 

Odebolt, 

OxBugeCity, 

Riceville, 

Richland, 

Rolfe, 

Sacaty, 

Shelby, 

Shell Rock, 

Sioux Rapids, 

SpringvUle, 

State Center, 

Tama City, 

Victor, 

Wapello, 

West Union, 

WUton, 

Hawarden Normal School, 

Nora Springs Seminary, 

St Anogar Seminary, 



PRINCIPAI,. 

J. H. Beveridge. 
J. E. Stout. 
W. O. Reed. 
P. E. Buck. 
Ernest Richards. 
O. O. V<^nitz. 
J. A. Breese. 
W. H. Reever. 
Clarence McCracken. 
R. A. Elwood. 
A. M. M. Domon. 
E. B. Rossiter. 
C. J. Trumbauer. 
O. J. McManus. 
C. E. Fleming. 
E. W. G. VogeniU. 
Charles Henry. 
O. W. Herr. 
P. M. Ray. 
S. M. Rowley. 
A. T. Rutledge. 
J. N. Hamilton. 
C. S. Cobb. 
C. E. Buckley. 
T. B. Morris. 
S. S. MilUgan. 
Lucy Curtis. 
C. E. Locke. 
W. H. WWtford. 
J. W. Cradler. 
G. E. Pinch. 
P. A. McMillen. 
J. H. Orcutt. 
H. A. Dwelle. 
J. O. Sethre. 



COLIiBGIATB DBPARTMBNT. 29 

ABYANCSD 8TANDINO. 

Stndents from approved colleges bringing certificates of work and 
standing will be admitted without examination. In determining 
their position in the University, however, the valne of the work done 
will be measured by the University standards. 

Students coming from colleges whose requirements for admission 
are substantially those of the University will be admitted ordinarily 
to equal rank, provided they enter not later than the beginning of 
the Senior year. In every instance at least one yearns work in resi- 
dence must be completed in the Collegiate Department of the Univer- 
sity. The assignment of studies shall be at the discretion of the 
Faculty. 

Graduates of the four years' course of the Iowa State Normal 
School will be admitted to Juxdor standing without examination, and 
will be required to spend two years at the University before receiving 
a degree. Graduates ef the three jrears' course will be admitted to 
Sophomore standing and will be required to spend three years in 



Undergraduate Courses^ 



CJ^ASSICAi; COURSE. 

FAi;i,. WINTBK. SPRING. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

5 5 5 

Latin 4 4 4 

Bngliah a 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 
^fathematlcs 3 3 3 

and 

Andent History 2 2 2 

KUUMjr lJf|Ut«»» tf f ft * »f tr j rfrr>*frr**r I •r»»i»»rfirf J 



30 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

Sophomore Tear. faix. wintbr. spring. 

Hoars a week. Hours a week. Hours a week 

French or German 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Elective 8 8 8 

Military Drill 3 i 

Jnnior Year. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Year. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in 
this course. 

PHII^OSOPHICAi; COURSB A. 

Freshman Year. faix. winter. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

German or Fn»ncli 5 5 5 

Latin 4 •••• 4 4 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 
Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 
Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Year. 

French or German 3 3 3 

Latin, German or French. .. 5 5 5 

Eoglish 2 2 2 

Elective 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Jnnior Year. 

Philosophy 2 or 3 2 or 3 2 or 3 

Elective 12 or 13 12 or 13 i2ori3 

Military Drill 3 i 3 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 31 

Senior TPear. fai«i,. wintsr. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 1 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in 
this course. 

PHUrOSOPHICAi; COX7K8B B. 

Ffeahmaii Tear. pau,. wintbr. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

German 5 5 5 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 
Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 
Ancient History. 2 2 2 

MiUtaryDrill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

German 3 3 3 

English 2 3 2 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

Elective 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Jiudor Tear. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Tear. 

Elective 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must t>e taken in 
this course. In the Junior and Senior jrears a major ^ the equivalent 
of not less than three hours extending through two years, and a kin- 
dred mifwr of not less tlian three hours extending through one year, 
most be taken. Bach student may select his own major, but in the 



3a STATE UNIVBRSITy OP IOWA. 

selection of his minor he most seek the advice of the professor in 
chaige of the major, or of a committee of the Pacnlty. Students 
entering this course on the terms prescribed for admission to the Scien- 
tific Cdurse^ but nnthout the fuU Latin retirements for entrance to 
Course Fhilosophical A, must complete them after entrance^ and the 
University will temporarily provide for instruction in Gesar, Cicero* s 
Orations and Vergil. This provision is made solely in the interest of 
considerable numbers of high school graduates whose coarse has not 
famished the opportunity for fulfilling these requirements. 

OSNSRAIr 8CISHTIFIC COUS8B. 

Frefllmiaii Tear. fall. wintbr. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

German or French 5 5 5 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

History or Drawing 3 2 2 

HiUtaryDrill 3 1 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

German or French 5 or 3 5 or 3 5 or 3 

English 2 2 2 

Physics 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy, Geology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics, or Astron- 
omy 5 5 5 

MiUtary Drill 3 i 3 

Jimior Tear. 

German or French 3 or 5 3 or 5 - 3 or 5 

Chemistry 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy, or Geology 5 5 5 

Elective 3 or 5 3 or 5 3 or 5 

MiUteryDrill 3 x 3 

Settlor Tear. 

Elective 15 15 15 

llilitiii7DriU.t»«.»t».f.*f } ,.•• i .«,,* Mf» 9 



COLLBGIATB DEPARTMENT. 33 

No substitution whatever is allowed for any of the required work of 
the Scientific Course, except that an equivalent amount of I^tin of 
collegiate grade may be offered in place of the ftdl requirement in 
either one of the modern languages. 

SPlSCIAi; COURSES IN SCIBNCB. 

The student who wishes, in his undergraduate course, to specialize 
in some particular line of scientific study, should at the beginning of 
the Sophomore 3rear choose from the group of alternate electives then 
open to him (Botany, Zoology, Morphology, Geology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics and Astronomy) that subject most directly connected 
with the branch to which he wishes to give special attention. He will 
thus be able to pursue his chosen study without interruption through 
three years of his course, the last year of which may, if he so choose, 
be devoted entirely to his specialty. 

Such ex tr eme specialization is not recommended to undergraduate 
students, it being the opinion of the Collegiate Faculty that a better 
preparation for a scientific career will be afforded by a broader and 
more liberal course of study. However, those wishing to specialize in 
aoy branch of science are urged to confer freely with the professors 
with whom they expect to pursue such study. 

Unless excused by the Faculty, each student pursuing a special 
course in Science will be required in his Senior year to prepare a thesis 
upon some subject approved by the professor in charge of his specialty, 
soch thesis to represent an amount of work entitling the writer to at 
least two credits. 

COKBnmD SCIBNTIFIC AND MSBICAIr C0UR8S. 

I. Students who pursue the General Scientific Course and complete 
not less than two years of biologic science, and in the third year 
choose as one elective Anatomy and Dissection in the Medical Depart- 
ment, and in the fourth year two electives in the Medical Department, 
of which Anatomy and Ph3rsiology shall be one, may receive credit for 
the first two years of the regular course in Medicine, provided also 
that such students complete at least two electives in the Collegiate 
Department in the spring terms of the fifth and sixth yearsi 



34 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

2. Students who at the outset declare their intention of pursuing a 
combined Collegiate and Medical Course, may in the General Scientific 
Course offer instead of German, two years* work in Latin. 

3. The degree of B. S. shall be conferred in June of the sixth year. 

COURSB IN ClVUr SNGINSSRINO. 

FRBSHMAN YSAR. 

Fall Tirrwi.— French or German,* 5.t Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 
Drawing, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Survejring, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SOPHOMORE YBAR. 

Fall Term, — German or English,* 3. Mathematics, 5. Surveying, 
5. Physics, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — German or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geometry, 2. Mapping, 3. Physics, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — German or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geometry, 2. Topographical Surveying, 3. Physics, 5. Mili- 
tary Drill, 3. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Tertn, — Electricity and Magnetism, 5. Analytical Mechanics, 

2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 3. Railroad Curves, 3. 
Steam Engine, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — Dynamo and Motor, 3. Resistance of Materials, 2. 
Analytical Mechanics, 2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 

3. Theory of Stresses, 3. Limes and Cements, 2. Military Drill, i. 
spring Term, — ^Thermodynamics, 3. Hydraulics, 5. Graphical 

Statics, 4. Theory of Stresses, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term, — Chemistry, 5. Sanitary Engineering, 2. Structural 



* Note.— See Courses of Instruction in Civil Engineering for requirement ta 
language. 

t Note.—The numerals mean hours a week. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 35 

Drawing and Designing, 4. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 4. Mil- 
itary Drill, 5. 

WinUr Term, — Chemistry, 5. Sanitary Engineering, 2. Design- 
ing, 3. Laboratory, 2. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 3. Military 
Drill, I. 

Spring Term, — Water Supply Engineering, 3. Specifications and 
Contracts, 3. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 3. Laboratory, 2. 
Designing, 3. Thesis. Military Drill, 3. 

COUR8R IN BlrBCTRICAi; IBNGIimBRING. 

FRBSHMAN YBAR. 

Fall Term, — German or French, 5.t Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 
Drawing, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
3. Drawing, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Dranghting, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term, — French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
Bngliah, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 
5. English, 2. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
Hogliah, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

JUNIOR YSAR. 

FaU Term. — ^Physics: lectures, i, laboratory, 4. Chemistry, 5. 
Analytical Mechanics, 3. Applied Mechanics, 2. Shop-work, 2. 
Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Physics: lectures, i, laboratory, 4. Chemistry, 5. 
Analytical Mechanics, 2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Shop-work, 2. 
Militaty Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — Direct Current Dynamo, 3. Physical Laboratory, 2. 
Chemistry, 5. Differential Equations, 3. Heat and Thermo- Dyna« 
suics, 2. Shop-work, 2. Military Drill, 3. 



t Note— The nnmerAU mean hours a week. 



36 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Theory of Electricity, Photometry; Electrical Labora- 
tory, lo. Draughting, 3. Steam Engine, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — Alternate Current Machinery, Electrical Laboratory, 
10. Draughting, 3. Strength of Materials, 2. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — Distribution and Transmission of Electricity, Tele- 
graph and Telephone Electrical Laboratory, 10. Electro- Chemistry, 
5. Military Drill, 3. 

Note. — One year of German and one of French are required. 
Either may be taken during the Freshman year, to be succeeded by 
the other in the Sophomore year. Electro-chemistry, being given 
only during even-numbered years, will alternate with the Junior 
spring term chemistry. 

baccai;aurbatb dbgrbbs. 

For each of the courses of study leading to a bachelor's degree four 
years* work is required. 

On completion of the regular courses, or of the special courses 
approved by the Faculty, the following degrees are conferred: 

Bachelor op Arts upon those who complete the Classical Course. 

Bachei«or of Phii,osophy upon those who complete the Philo- 
sophical Course. 

Bachelor op Science upon those who complete the General 
Scientific Course, or either of the Engineering Courses, or a special 
course in science which has previously been approved by the Faculty. 

See Combined Scientidc and Medical Course. 

The degree of Bachelor op Didactics is conferred vLpon graduates 
in the regular courses who have completed the course in Pedagogy and 
can show proof of two years* successful teaching after graduation. 

SPBCIAi; TBACHBR8' CISRTIFICATBS. 

Special Teachers' Certificates as to scholarship in German or in 
French will be granted under the authority of the Collegiate Faculty 
on the following conditions: 

I. They shall be issued to students of this University on or after 
graduation only. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 37 

2. Tbej shall be in the nature of an authorized guaranty as to 
acholaiahip in German or in French. 

3. They shall be issued only after at least three years of full work 
(to represent Jive hours of lectures and recitations a week or an 
eqnivalent) ia one of these subjects. 

4. Caudidatea must pass a final examination in the subject in 
which the certificate is desired. 

5. The examination must be conducted by the professor in charge 
of the subject, assisted by such other instructors as may be agreed 
upon by him and the President of the University. 

6. These certificates will be signed by the President and by the 
professor immediately concerned. 



Courses of Instruction* 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND UTERATUFE 



P&OPBSSOR Currier; Assistant Profbssor Potter, Miss Hughes, 

Miss Hoi.mes. 

X. Csesar, Cicero and Vergil. Caesar, Cicero's Orations and 
Vergil's Aeneid. For students in Course Philosophical B as indicated 
on page 32. Miss Hughes and Miss Hoi«mbs. 

Throughout the year. 

a. I^iTjy Cicero, Vergil and Terence. Fall: I^ivy, Selections 
from Books I., XXI. and XXII. Winter: Cicero's De Senectate or 
De Amidtia, Somnium Sdpionis and Vergil's Geoigics H, with out- 
line of Roman Literature. Spring: Terence's Phormio and Cicero's 
I<etters. Grammar, writing Latin and sight reading during the year. 
Those who show marked proficiency in writing Latin during the fall 
term are allowed an option of easy Latin to be read under the direction 
of the instructor during the winter and spring terms. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Potter and Miss Hughes. 

Throughout the year. Mon . , Tu. , Wed. and Thu. , at 10, 1 1 and 2 :30. 

3, Cicero and Horace. Fall: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations. 
Winter and spring: Horace's Odes, Satires and Epistles. This oonne 
is mainly occupied with the literary side of the authors studied. 
Professor Currier. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed. and Fri. at 9. 

4* Pliny and Tacitus. Selected Letters of PUnj. Tadtns' 
Germania and Agricola. This course is principally literary and his- 
torical. As much attention is given to the Latinity of the Silver Age 
as is needful for the understanding and appreciation of the authon. 
Assistant Professor Potter. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Thn. at 9. 

33 



COI.LEGIATE DEPARTMENT; 39 

5. Cicero, Qniutilian and Tacitus. [ Fall :]]Cicero'8 De Oratore. 
Winter: Quintilian, Books X and XII. Spring: Tacitus' De Ora- 
toribus. Particular attention will be paid to literary criticisms as 
exemplified in these authors. Professor Cxjrribr. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Thu. at 8. 

6. Tacitos and Seneca. Fall and winter: Tadtus, selections 
fxxnn the Annals and Histories. Spring: Seneca's Morals and Letters. 
Professor Citrribr. 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Th. at 8. 
Courses 5 and 6 are given in alternate years. 

7. Piantna. Three plays. The treatment is mainly literary with 
due attention to metres and ante^lassical forms and constructions. 
Assistant Professor Potter. 

Fall term, three hours a week. 

8. Sarly I^tin Inact iptions and Poetry. Assistant Professor 

POTTBR. 

Fall term, three hours a week. 

Courses 7 and 8 are given in alternate years. 

9. I^ncretiua and Catnllns. Assistant Professor Pottbr. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 

zo. Cicero'8 letters. The selections will be such as to show 
Cicero in the character of a private gentleman rather than as a poli- 
tician. Assistant Professor Potter. 

Winter term, three hours a week. 

Courses 9 and 10 are given in alternate years, 

zz« Jnvenal and Martial. Assistant Professor Potter. 
Spring ttnxL, two hours a week. 

za. Tilmllna and Propertine. Assistant Professor Potter. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

Courses 11 and 12 are given in alternate years. 

13. Seminary in Cflesar, Cicero and Vergril. This is intended 
to meet the needs of prospective I^tin teachers and others who wish 
to gain some familiarity with the methods of original research. The 
fall term ia devoted to syntactical and historical studies covering 
Caesar's Gallic War (seven books). The work of the winter term is 
siainly historical, and deals with Cicero's career as an orator. One- 



40 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

half of the term is devoted to a study of the consiMiacy of Catiline 
which is based largely on Sallust. Vergil's Aeneid complete is studied 
in the spring term mainly on the literary side. Assistant Professor 

POTTBR. 

14. a. History of Roman Iriteratnre. The course will be 
given by informal lectures with assigned readings in Teuffel, Crutt- 
well, Sellar, Simcox and the standard monographs. 

Fall term, two hours a week. 

b, c. l^atin Syntax* Introduction to the study of historical 
syntax. Assitant Professor PoTTBR. 
Winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 
Courses 13 and 14 are given in alternate years. 

15. Roman Antlqnities. A systematic study of private life and 
of legal and political Antiquities. Professor CuRRlBR. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week at 2:30. 

i6. Seminary in Archseology. For 1898-9 the subject will be 
the Topography and Archaeology of Rome and the vicinity. Profes- 
sor CURRIBR. 

17* Cicero, Uvy and Ovid* Sight reading of stdtable selections. 
Professor Currikr. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. 

Courses 5 and 6 are open to students who have completed Courses 
2 and 3 or 4 and must precede the other courses offered. Course 16 is 
intended for graduate students, and Courses 5 — 17 are open to them. 



GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Assistant Professor Cau,. 

For the present a course in Goodwin's Greek Grammar, White's 
First Greek Book and Xenophon's Anabasis will be given to students 
who enter without the required preparation in Greek. 

Throughout the year, daily at 11. 

z. Xenophon» Iryaiaa and Homer. Fall: Xenophon*« Ana* 
basis with written exercises based on the text read, and review of 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 41 

grammar. Winter: select orations of Ljsias, social customs and 
political institutions. Spring: Homer's Iliad with study of Homeric 
times and the history and character of Greek epic poetry. 
Throughout the year, daily at 10. 

2. Herodottt8» Plato and Demostlienee. Fall: selections 
from Herodotus. Winter: Plato's Apology with sight reading from 
Xenophon's Memorabilia. Spring: Demosthenes' Oration on the 
Crown. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9 

3. Oreek Trag^edy* Fall: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound. 
Winter: Sophocles' Antigone. Spring: Euripides' Alcestis. With 
this course are required supplementary readings from other tragedies 
and reports on the origin, literary form, and representation of Greek 
tragedy. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

4« I^ate Greek. Fall: New Testament. Winter: Plutarch's 
Pericles. Spring: Ludan's Dialogues. 
Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

5* Greek Poetry. A course in Greek poetry through transla- 
tions will be given to students who have no knowledge of Greek. 
Fall: epic poetry. Winter: dramatic poetry. Spring: lyric poetry. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 8. 

Course i is required of students in the classical course. Courses 2, 
3 and 4 are open to students who have completed Course i. 



GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Propkssor W1130N; Mr. Sturm, Mr. Schi.bnkkr. 

In the instruction in the German language the first year is spent in 
laying a broad foundation for the future work. At the beginning of 
the second year it is expected that the student will be able to read the 
litenture with some degree of appreciation, and from this time on 
the ability to understand and to appreciate the great masterpieces of 
Gennan literature is the main object in view; at the same time, how- 



42 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ever, the origin and history of words, and the relation that the 
German language bears to the English tongne are studied and 
explained. But the courses are, as a whole, literary rather than 
strictly philological or linguistic. Sight-translation, translating at 
hearing, writing from dictation, and conversation, as means to a 
proper Sprachgefuehl^ form a part of the work. 

As stated elsewhere, an equivalent of the work required in the 
Freshman year. Course i, will be accepted, and students coming so 
prepared will be admitted, on examination, to Course 2. Course i 
represents from four to six terms of ordinary high school work. 
Courses i, 2, 3 and 4, are Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
respectively, and must be taken in the order of the ntmierals. Courses 
5 and 6 are advanced courses, but may be open to persons who have 
done at least i, 2 and 3, or an equivalent. All the courses in German 
run through the entire collegiate year and are offered every year. 

X. Orammax and Reading^. Thomas's Practical German 
Grammar with constant practice in writing German, Storm's Immen- 
see, Baumbach's Die Nonna, and Heyse's L'Arrabbiata. Six sections. 
Mr. Sturm and Mr. Schi«enki$r. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

a. FreytaflT, Goethe, and Schiller. Fall: Freytag's Die Jour- 
nalistcn with a review of the grammar. Winter: Goethe's Hermann 
und Dorothea, and composition. Spring: Schiller's Jungfrau von 
Orleans, and composition. Four sections. Professor W1130N, Mr. 
Sturm and Mr. SCRi,BNKaR. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

3. German Anthora of the Nineteenth Century, and Ger- 
man I^yrica* Fall: Scheffel's Ekkehard and readings in German on 
the literature of the nineteenth century. Winter: Heine's Prose, and 
readings from Heine's Poetry by the instructor. Spring: Bncfaheim's 
Deutsche Lyrik, and lectures on German verse with special reference 
to the lyric poets studied. The work of this term is intended to give 
a general idea of the historical development of the German lyric from 
the sixteenth century to the present. Professor W1130N. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at xx. 



COLI<EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 43 

4. Qoethey J^eesingf and History of Qertnan Uteratnre. 
Fall: Goethe's Faust, Part i, with an outline of Part 11. Winter: 
Lessing^s Nathan der Weise. Spring: Outline course in the history of 
Gennan literature. This term's work gives a general view of the 
development of German literature from the earliest times to the nine- 
teenth century, special attention being paid to the two classic periods 
of the twelfth and eighteenth centuries. Egcihaaf's Deutsche Lit- 
tenitnrgeschichte is used as a chronological guide, which is supple- 
mented by reports on assigned reading. Professor Wii«SON. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11. 

5* Germaii Seminary. For the study and discussion of the 
works of special periods or of special movements. The Faust Books, 
Xarlowe's Paustus, Goethe's Faust, and the Romantic School are 
some of the subjects that have been studied. This course is primarily 
for gnduate and advanced students. Admission by personal applica- 
tion. The course counts as a half credit each term. When the 
majority of applicants so elect, this work may be made a course in 
Advanced German Composition. Professor Wii«soN. 

Throughout the year, Tu., at 2:30. 

6. Hiddle Higli German. Fall: Otis's Introduction to Middle 
High German, including the selections from the Nibelungenlied, and 
Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik. Winter: selections from 
Hartmann von Aue's Der arme Heinrich. Spring: Middle High 
German lyric poetry, principally the poems of Walther von der Vogel- 
weide. This course is primarily for graduate and advanced students, 
enpfctally those who expect to teach German. Professor Wii«son. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th,, at 10. 

Special Teachers' Certificates as to scholarship in German are 
granted on or after graduation on conditions stated elsewhere in 
thia Catalogue. The minimum amount of work required for such 
certificates is represented by Courses i, 2, 3, and two chosen from 
4, 5 and 6, but it is recommended that candidates make preparation 
in all these Courses. 



44 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Propkssor Van Stsbndkrsn; Miss Hutchinson. 

z. IQlemeiitary Freudi. Grammar, reading, composition and 
conversation: Bevier's French Grammar, Joynes* Fairy Tales, Lewis's 
Michel Strogoff, Fontaine's Lectures Courantes, Herdler's Scientific 
Reader. Four sections. Miss Hutchinson and Professor Van Stsbn- 

DBRBN. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

a. French Compositioii. Written and spoken composition. 
Grandgent's French Composition and M^thode Berlitz, Part n. Two 
sections. Professor Van Stbendbrbn. 

Fall term, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

3. Intermediate French, Reading and composition. Dnmas' 
Les Trois Mousquetaires, Victor Hugo's Hemani and Les Mis^iables. 
Grandgent's Composition continued. Two sections. Professor Van 

STBBNDBRBN. 

Winter and spring terms, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

4. Hiatory of French J^iteratnre. A reading course with 
lectures, recommended to be taken with courses 2 and 3. Aubert's 
Litt^rature Fran9ai8e, Montaigne's De 1' Institution des Bnfans. Pro- 
fessor Van Stbbndbrkn. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th. 

5. Modem French Authors, Each student reads and para- 
phrases about six representative works by different authors. The 
University library provides these works. Fortier's Sept Grands 
Auteurs du XIX* Si^de and Metis's Contemporary French Writers. 
Professor Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Fall and winter terms, Mon., Wed. 

6. Advanced French Compoaition and Syntax. Leune's 
Difficult Modem French. Free composition on subjects assigned. 
Professor Van STbbndbrBN. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed. 



COLLBGIATB DEPARTMENT. 45 

7* French Claaalcal Drama and Fablee. Corneille*8 1^ Cid 
and Horace; Racme's Athalie, Molifere's LeaPemmes Savantes and Le 
Tartnffe, La Fontaine's Fables. Professor Van Stbbnderbn. 

Thronghont the year, Tu., Th. 

8. Seminary. Nineteenth centnry French literature. Professor 
Van Stbbndbrbn. 
Thronghont the year, Wed. 

9* Seminary* Seventeenth century French literature. Professor 

Van SnCBNDBRBN. 

Only one of these Seminaries will be given in 1898-99. 

xo. Spanish* Edgren*s Spanish Grammar. Ramsey's Element- 
ary Spanish Reader. 

Sprin^^tenn, Tu., Fri. 

Courses 2 and 3, 5 and 6 are to be taken together. Course 10 can be 
taken only with or after course i. 

Special Teachers' Certificates as to scholarship in French are 
granted on or after graduation on conditions explained elsewhere 
in this Catalogue. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Propbssor Rbbvbs; Mr. Cook, Mr. Kbi.i<y. 

The organization of the following courses has in view the study of 
Bnglish as a means of expression, as a literature, and as a language. 

The first and most important of these courses, the rhetorical, under- 
takes to enlarge and strengthen the student's own power of expres- 
sion. Constant writing is required in the Freshman year, and the 
criticism, both oral and written, is directed to the individual needs of 
the student. Informal personal conferences are added to the work of 
the dass, and every effort b made to enable the student to form a 
dear, forcible and sensible style. 

In the study of English as literature a general survey from Old 
Bnglish times to the present is first required of all Sophomores. 
After this oourse has been completed the student may elect more 



46 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

spedal work. In the Jtmior and Senior jears the study is about 
equally divided between the matter involved in the text, and the 
manner or style in which the text is written. Sound principles of 
criticism, analytic and constructive, are insisted upon, while outside 
reading of other masterpieces, with written reports, is designed for 
the cultivation of the student's own taste and judgment. 

The study of the language itself is closely connected with both the 
rhetorical and the literary study of English. The characteristic 
changes in phonology, grammar, spelling, syntax and vocabulary, are 
studied historically, and representative texts in Anglo-Saxon, Middle 
English and Early Modem English are read in class. This course is 
required for entrance into the more literary study of Anglo-Saxon and 
Middle English of the Senior year. 

The graduate work in English, while presupposing a knowledge of 
the principal courses in the Collegiate Department, may be arranged 
to the needs of the student and thus permit him to offer one or more 
electives in studying for an advanced degree. The Seminary subject 
for 1898-99 will be Nineteenth Century Poetry. 

Candidates for aU baccalaureate degrees are required to complete 

two years of English, or six terms of two hours a week. Freshmen 

will take Course i, and Sophomores Course 4. Those who are pre^ 

paring to teach English will be expected to take Course 12 in addition 
to some of the elective courses in literature. Law students wishing 

to take work in English will find Course 10 especially helpful, and 

also the rhetorical practice in Exposition and Aigumentation. 

( I ) COMPOSITION AND RHBTORIC. 

X. ConstmctiTe Rhetoric. Recitations and semi-weekly 
themes. Five sections. Required of Freshmen. Professor Rbbvbs, 
Mr. Cook and Mr. Kbi«i«y. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

a. Advanced Composition. Lectures. WendelPs English 
Composition, and suggestive works of style. Tri-weekly and fort- 
nightly themes. Open to those only who have attained Grade A in 
Course i, and who wish to add to the training of that course. Mr. 
Cook. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 



COI/LEGIATB DEPARTMENT. 47 

3. Vetsificatiaii. Practice in metrical composition in the fixed 
forms of verse such as the heroic conplet^ blank verse, Spenserian 
stanza, ode, rondeau, sonnet, ballad and song. Analysis of the best 
examples of these forms in English poetry. Informal discussion of 
artistic questions. Open to those who have had Course 2, Mr. Cook. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

(2) SNGI.ISH UTBRATURB. 

4. IRngUBh Uteratture. General survey from earliest times to 
the present. Recitation and reports. Four sections. Required of 
Sophomores. Professor Rbevbs, Mr. Cook and Mr. Kbi«i.y. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

5« Cliaucer's Poetry. A study in fourteenth century art. Open 
to those who have had the training of Course 4 in Chaucer's grammar 
and pronunciation. Lectures; Skeat's The Student Chaucer. Mr. 
Cook. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

6. Kineteenth Century Poetry. Seminary. Outside reading 
and reports, with lectures. Fall term: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley 
and Keats. Winter term: Tennyson and Browning. Spring term: 
Matthew Arnold and minor poets. Open to Seniors. Professor 
Rbbvbs. 

Throughout the year, two hours on Monday afternoon. 

7. Sbakspere and Hia Pellow-Plajrwrifi^hte. A critical 
study of dramatic art. Lectures, reading of plays, reports. Freytag*s 
Technique of the Drama, Moulton's Shakspere as a Dramatic Artist, 
any standard edition of Shakspere, and, in the library, the Mermaid 
series. Junior and Senior elective. Mr. Cook. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

8. ItnglMi I^iterature of tlie BiRhteenth Century, Lec- 
tures and reports on assigned readings of masterpieces and standard 
criticism. Junior and Senior elective. Alternate years; not to be 
given in 1898-99. Mr. Kbi^LY. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

9. Nineteenth Century Prose. Fall term: Carlyle and Emer- 
son. Winter term: Ruskin and Newman. Spring term: Matthew 



48 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Arnold, Pater and minor prose writers. Junior and Senior elective. 
Professor Kbbvbs. 
Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

10. Baaayists and Oratora. Lectures and recitations. Fall 
term: A critical study of De Quincey and Macaulay in respect to 
style and substance. Winter term: Burke as a stylist, debater and 
orator, with such reference to his political philosophy and to con- 
temporaneous history as is necessary to a clear understanding of his 
importance in political literature. Spring term: Webster, and other 
American orators and essayists. Junior and Senior elective. Mr. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

11. American Uteratnre* Lectures, recitations and reports on 
assigned readings. General survey of both poetry and prose, includ- 
ing political literature and oratory. Alternate years; to be given in 
1898-99. Mr. Kki.i:.y. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

(3) BNGI<ISH I,ANGUAGB. 

12. Hiatory of the BngliaH I/anguage. Lectures and recita- 
tions. Bmerson*s History of the English Language and Bright*s 
Anglo-Saxon Reader. Junior and Senior elective. Professor Rbbvbs. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

13. Anglo-Saxon and Middle Snglialu Open to those who 
have had Course 12. Senior Elective. Professor Rbbvbs. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

14. Gothic and Old Saxon* Braune's Gothic Grammar with 
Selections, and Heyne*s Heliand. Lectures on relation of English 
to other Germanic languages. Graduate course 1898-99. Professor 
Rbbvbs. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

15. Teachera' Courae. In the spring term a course of lectures 
for teachers of English in secondary schools will be given, one hour 
a week. The Course will include historical grammar, syntax, phon- 
ology, and methods of studying literature and constructive rhetoric. 
Professor Rbevks. 

For prizes in English see general subject of prizes* 



COI.LEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 49 

BI/OCUTION. 

Mrs. Partridgs. 

z. Slementary Yocal Training:. Studies in phonics with 
reference to articulation, and the eradication of faults of speech or 
▼oioe; development of breath control for artistic voice production; 
studies of the factors of speech; the timbre of the voice; stress as 
applied to tones, emphasis and accent, with selections adapted for 
illustration and analysis; studies in gestiure; readings from standard 
authors. 

Thisoomse is open to Collegiate Freshmen, and Junior I^w students. 

Thxonghout the year, two hours a week. 

a. Vocal ISzpreaaion. Elementary Principles of Vocal Expres* 
sion: correct mental action in reading and speaking; studies and 
presentations from speeches and forms of the drama, to develop the 
powers of conception and the ability to express every phase of human 
experience as a means of securing simplicity and naturalness in all 
kinds of speaking. Lectures on problems in vocal expression. Study 
of monologues, impersonations, and miscellaneous selections, with 
individual criticism. This course is open to Sophomores who have 
completed Course i. 

Thronghout the year, one hour a week. Each student receives in 
addition to class exercises a private rehearsal each week. 

3. Oratory. Application of the principles of expression to the 
oratory of the bar: special exercises for the development of extempo- 
raneous speaking; study of orations with the methods employed by 
leading orators; selections from Shakspere's tragedies and comedies 
as one of the best means of studying human character, studies in 
gesture for developing self-control and spontaneity of action. This 
course is open to Senior Law students. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 



so STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

HISTORY. 



Professor Wilcox; Mr. Plum. 

I. History of Greece. Text-book and lectures. This coarse is 
intended primarily for members of the Freshman class. Mr. Plum. 

Pall term, two hoars a week. 

a. History of Rome. Text-book and lectures. This work con- 
sists of two parts: the History of the Roman Republic in the winter 
term, and the History of the Roman Bmpire in the spring term. The 
work of both terms is designed for members of the Freshman daaa. 
Mr. Plitm. 

Winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

3. History of Medifleval Burope. Text-book and lectures. 
This course is intended primarily for members of the Sophomore clsss 
and presupposes acquaintance with the History of Greece and Rome. 
The course is divided into three parts to correspond with the three 
terms of the University year. The first part, constituting the work of 
the fall term, extends from the final overthrow of the western Roman 
empire in 476 A. D. to the death of Charles the Great, 814 A. D. The 
work of the winter and spring terms traces the downfall of the Caro- 
lingian system and its gradual reconstruction into Modem Burope. 
Mr. Plum. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

4* History of the Jews. Lectures and special assignments. A 
History of the Hebrew people from Abraham down to the destruction 
of Jerusalem by the Romans. This course is designed to give the 
student some knowledge of Oriental life and political institutions, 
and as well to trace the development and significance of one of the 
great Semitic Religions. Not open to Freshmen. Mr. Plum. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

5* Constitutional History of Bngrland. Analyses and lectures. 
This course is intended for members of the Jimior and Senior classes 
only. As much previous work as possible in Ancient and Mediaeval 
History should be taken before beginning this course. Professor 
Wilcox. 

Three terms, three hours a week. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 51 

6. Conatitatlonal Hiatory of the Utiited States. Lectures. 
This course is designed for Senior and graduate students. The course 
embraces, during the fall term, the study of the origin and develop- 
ment of the constitution of the United States, from preceding political 
forms. The winter term continues the work in a study of the text of 
the constitution in the light of its historical outworking. The spring 
term finiahes the work with a study of the working of the United States 
Government under the constitution from 1789 to the present. Profes- 
sor Wii^cox. 

Three terms, three hours a week. 

7. The French Revolution and the Na]>oleonic Sra. This 
course is designed for Senior and graduate students. Considerable 
woik in Mediaeval History is an indispensable prerequisite. Profes- 
sor WiiiCOX. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

8. The Nineteenth Century History of Bnrope. This is a 
sequel to Course 7 or its equivalent, and is open to the same classes of 
advanced students. Professor Wilcox. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

9. Seminary in BngHsh History. This course is intended 
primarily for graduate students who are qualified to specialize in 
English History. Those Senior students who have had Course 4 and 
are capable of doing original and independent work will be admitted 
to this Seminary. Professor Wiixox. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

ID. Seminary in United States History. This course is also 
primarily designed for graduate students, but exceptions are made 
similar to those specified for Course 9. Professor Wii«cox. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

All the courses in History, including the two Seminaries, are given 
each year. There are no alternating courses. 

All courses in History are elective. Admission to the courses is 
conditioned only upon the qualifications of the candidate who desires 
to take the courses. 

Students are advised to plan their historical work ao that it will be 
lo^^cal in its order of sequence. Students who intend to emphasize 



52 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

historical work in college are urged to make careful preparation in 
History in preparatory schools. 

In arranging the courses in History in the University, the attempt 
has been made to present the entire field of historical study with ref- 
erence to logical and chronological sequence, so that no period shall 
be neglected and each period be treated in the light of what goes 
before and what comes after. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Professor Loos; Mr. Van Law. 

The several subjects in charge of the professor of political science 
are here grouped under the following headings: (r) Ibliiicai Earn- 
amy and Finance^ (a) Sociology and Ibltiical PhiloscpAy. The courses 
of the first group are, in the main, Junior and Senior electives, while 
those of the second are open only to Seniors and graduate students. 
Exceptions to these rules may be made in individual cases by the 
special permission of the professor in charge. 

All the courses under the first group, except i and 2, presuppose 
some knowledge of the general principles of political economy as laid 
down in the manuals by Walker or Mill. Students who are not thus 
prepared are required to take Course 2 (not Course i) ss a prepara- 
tion for the other courses in economics; Course 5 may, however, be 
taken at the same time with Course 2. Candidates for admission to 
advanced courses should in all cases consult the professor in charge 
before scheduling. 

POI/ITICAXr BCONGMir AND PIKAKCB. 

z. Economic History. After an introductory study of primitive 
man and primitive civilization (Starr's First Steps in Human Progresa) 
the course will occupy itself mainly with the development of tndes 
and manufactures in Europe (Gibbins*s Industry in England), and 
later with the industrial development of the United States (Wri|(ht*s 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 53 

ladnitxial Bvolntkm of the United States). Open to Sophomoxea. 
Mr. Van Law. 

Throughout the year, Tn., Th., at 8. 

a. Scottomics. An introduction to the study of political econ 
omy. Text-book and lectures. Open to Juniors and to special 
students. Professor Loos and Mr. Van Law. 

Fall term, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 11. 

This course will be repeated during the second half of the year 
when it will be in charge of Mr. Van Law. Two hours, with an 
occasional third hour for hearing reports on assigned topics. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu. and Th., at 9. 

3* FlaaJicey Cttrrency and Banking. Currency and Bank- 
ing. Lectures on money and credit ¥dth text-book study of Dunbar's 
History and Theory of Banking, followed by a sketch of the fitiA^piftl 
hifltoxy of the United States with particular reference to the develop- 
ment of banking and the history of the currencies. Jhtdltc Finance. 
Lc cim es on the Science of Public Finance followed by a study of the 
Tariff History of the United States with some notice of the consular 
and diplomatic service. The second part of this course is given only 
evoy other year. It alternates with International Law (Government 
10) which wUl be given in 1899. Professor Loos and Mr. Van Law. 

Winter and spring terms, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

4« Transportation. The course will deal chiefly with railways; 
railroad organization and management, explanation of terms in com- 
moa use in railroad accounts and reports, history of railroad develop- 
ment, discussion of rates, competition, discrimination, and state man- 
agement (Hadley's Railroad Transportation), the commission system 
— state and inter-state. Mr. Van Law. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at 2:30. 

5* Hiatoty of Political Sconomy. The history of political 
eoonomy before, and including, Adam Smith. Beginning with a 
brief reference to ancient and mediseval systems of industry and 
economic ideas, the course will occupy itself with a closer study of the 
modem era, the writings of the mercantilists, of the physiocrats, and 
of Adam Smith and his precursors. 

6. The Ittdnatriai Hevolntlon 9^16. Modem Social itnea- 
An dementary course in recent economic history and theory. 



54 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

An analysis of the industrial revolution with lectures on the rise of 
the classical school of political economy » modem socialism, contem- 
porary economic schools, and recent tendencies in legislation. Pro- 
fessor Loos. 
Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at lo. 

7* Pablic Finance. A study in state expenditure, state income, 
and state debts. The class will read Bastable*s Public Finance. Open 
to those who have taken Course 2 or its equivalent. Professor Loos 
or Mr. Van Law. 

Fall term, Tu., Th., at 9. 

8* Taxation. This course is designed as a continuation of Course 
7 for those who wish to do further work in public finance, and will be 
conducted as a research course. Papers will be prepared first on the 
literature of taxation; these will be followed by a series of spedal 
studies in existing systems of taxation — national, commonwealth and 
local. Professor Loos or Mr. Van Law. 

Winter and spring terms, hours to be appointed. 

9. The Principles of Sconomice. The development of the 
classical political economy will be carefully studied. Special atten- 
tion will be given also to the mathematical work of Jevons and other 
writers; and to the recent contributions of the Austrian school. Pro> 
fessor Marshall's Principles of Economics will be used as a text. For 
Seniors and graduate students. Professor Loos. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Th., at 2:30. 

zo. Debating: Conrse. May be counted also as an English 
elective. Selected topics in economics and politics. The course was 
not given in 1897--98. Mr. Ksxx,y and Professor Shambaugb. 

Fall and winter, hours to be appointed. 

B0CI0i;06T AND POIrlTICAXr PHIIirOSOPHT. 

z. 8ociologr7« Part i. Lectures during the fall term on the 
primary factors and forces of social phenomena. Special attention is 
given to the earliest phases of political oiganization. Part 2. In the 
winter term, pauperism, crime, police, and sanitation receive special 
attention. The close relation of the so-called practical sociology to 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 55 

the German Verwaltungslehre will be pointed out. Open to Seniors 
and giadnates. Professor Loos. 
Pall and winter terms, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 10. 

a* Mttnicipal Govenimeiit* A study of municipal government 
with particular reference to the economic and social problems of 
modem cities. The course is designed especially for those who have 
taken the oourse in sociology but it is open to any student who has 
taken Economics 2. Professor Loos. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 10. 

3* Roman Mttniclpalities. Lectures. Por Seniors and grad- 
uates. Professor Rohbach. 

Pall or winter, two hours, to be appointed. 

4« Political Philoaophy. A study in political theory, classical 
and modem, with some notice of state forms. Lectures with critical 
reading of Aristotle's Politics during the fall term; and Green on 
Political Obligations and Part i of Sidgmck's Elemento of Politics 
during the winter and spring terms. Primarily for graduates. Pro- 
fessor Loos. 

Thronghont the year, Tu., Th., at 11. 

5. Seminary in Political Science. It is the aim of the 
Seminary to encourage special investigations. Questions in econo- 
mics, statistics, finance, political philosophy, administration or law 
may be taken for special research. From time to time papers are 
read, and then informally discussed and criticised. Primarily for 
graduates. Professor Loos and Professor Shambaugh. 

Thronghont the year, alternate Mondays, 7:30. 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION. 



P&OFBssoK Shambaugh. 

To indicate clearly the order in which the several subjects in 
Government and Administration are presented for purposes of uni- 
▼cnity instmction, the principal subjects are first grouped into three 
geaertl courses, namely; Politics I., Politics II. and Politics III. 



56 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Then, to indicate more clearly the scope and treatment of the aefenl 
sabjects, a specific statement is made of each subject viewed as aa 
independent coarse. 

Politics I. Historical and DesciiptiTe Politics* A stody, 
historical and descriptive, of the leading governments of ancient and 
modem times. This is a comparative study of political institutions, 
wherein the more general and obvious phases of political phenomena 
will be presented. Historical and Descriptive Politics is here regarded 
as the fundamental course in Government and Administration. Open 
to all students except Freshmen. 

Throughout the year, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

Politics H. Principles of Goyemment in the United 
States. A study of the principles of American government — 
national, commonwealth and local. Fall term: History of Constitu- 
tional Government in the United States, including a detailed analysis 
of leading state papers, e. g., colonial charters, plans for union, com- 
monwealth constitutions, etc. Winter term: American Constitutional 
Law, wherein the principles of Government in the United States will 
be discussed from the standpoint of judicial interpretation. Spring 
term: Local Government in the United States. The course in Local 
Government will alternate with a course in Political Parties in the 
United States. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Throughout the year, three hours. Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

Politics III. Political Theory and ComparatiTe Consti- 
tutional l^aw. A study of the general and theoretical aspects of 
political phenomena. Fall term: Outlines of a 83rBtem of political 
theory. Winter term: Comparative Constitutional Law, wherein the 
theoretical aspects of the constitutions of England, France, Germany 
and the United States will be considered. Spring term: Papers on 
selected topics in Political Theory and Comparative Constitutioaal 
Law will be prepared and read by the students. This is an advanced 
course for Seniors and graduates. 

Throughout the year, two hours, Tuesday evening. 



z. Historical and Desctiptiye Politics. A study, historical 
and descriptive, of the leading governments of ancient and modem 



COLI/BGIATH DEPARTMENT. 57 

times. Tills is a comparative study of political institutions, wheicin 
the more general and obvions phases of political phenomena will be 
pres en ted. Pall term: The theory of evolution as a working basis 
in the study of Historical Politics; some general considerations in 
Anthropolpgy; primitive institutions of the Indo-Europeans; the ori- 
g;in of government; the political institutions of the ancient Greeks; 
the political institutions of the Romans. Winter term: Roman I^iw 
— ^four weeks; Feudalism; the government of Prance; the govern- 
ments of Germany—the Empire and Prussia. Spring term: the gov- 
ernment of Switzerland — federal and cantonal; the government of 
Kngland. Open to all students except Preshmen. 

Throughout the year, three hours, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 8. 

3. History of Coastitutioiial Ooyeniinent in the United 
8tate8. A study of the sources and early development of the prin- 
ciples of government in the United States. Herein the development 
of colonial governments, the growth of federalism and the establish- 
ment of the first commonwealth governments will receive special 
consideration. The following documents will receive detailed analy- 
sis: colonial charters, plans for union, Articles of Confederation, 
Dedaiation of Independence, the first commonwealth constitutions 
and the Constitution of the United States. Open to Juniors and 



Pall term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 9. 

3« Constitntional l^aw. A study wherein the principles of 
jpovemment in the United States will be discussed from the stand- 
point of judicial interpretation. The students will read and report 
npon selected cases in Constitutional Law. Open to Juniors and 



Winter term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 9. 

4« l^ocal Goremment* A study of Local Government in the 
United States, wherein the development of the several forms of town- 
ship, county and township-oonnty government will receive special 
consideration. This course will sltemate with the course in Political 
Parties. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Spring term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 9. 

Political Paxtiea. A study in the practical workings of Ameri- 
can government, wherein the history, organization, operation and 



58 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

influence of political parties will be discnssed. This course will alter- 
nate with the course in Local Government. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. 
Spring term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

6. American Political Theory. An advanced course in which 
the writings of Hamilton, Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Clay, 
Webster, Calhoun and Lincoln will be read and discussed. A special 
course for advanced students. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours, Tu., Th., at 9. 

7. Goyemjnent in Iowa. A study, historical and descriptive, 
of the political institutions of the commonwealth of Iowa. 

Spring term, two hours. 

8. Political Theory* In this course an attempt will be made to 
present an outline of a S3r8tem of pure political theory. An advanced 
course for Seniors and graduates. 

Fall term, two hours, Tuesday evening. 

9. Comparative Constitutional ]^aw« A comparative study 

of the constitutions of England, France, Germany and the United 

States, wherein the general and theoretical aspects of government 
will be considered. An advanced course for Seniors and graduates. 

Winter term, two hours, Tuesday evening. 

zo. International l^aw. Lectures on International Law accom- 
panied by recitations from Snow's Cases on International Law as a 
text book. This course is given in alternate years. It was given in 
1896-97. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Chancblx.or McClaxn. 

Spring term, two hours, Tu., Th., at 11. 

zz. AdminiatratiTe l^aw* A comparative study of Administra- 
tive Law in France, Germany, England and the United States. An 
advanced course for graduates. 

One term, two hours. 

za« Roman l^aw. A course of about twelve lectures on the his- 
tory and principles of the Roman Law. These lectures are given in 
connection with and as a part of the general course, Politics I. See 
above. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. S9 



PHILOSOPHY. 



Paopbssor Patrick; Assistant Propessor Skashork. 

z. Bleineiit8 of Dednctlve lA>gic. An elementary course. 
Text-book: Minto's Logic. Professor Patrick. 
Pall term, Tn., Th., two sections, at lo and 3:30. 

a. Bleinents of Indnctive I^gic. An introductory course on 
scientific method. Lectures, with supplementary reading in Minto's 
Logic and Jevons' Principles of Sdence. Professor Patrick. 

Winter term, Tu., Th., at 10. 

3. Psycholosy. An elementary course in general psychology. 
In the fall term Dr. Seashors will lecture on the nervous system, 
localization of brain function, the special senses, and sensations. 
Practical study and dissection of the sheep's brain will accompany the 
lectures on the nervous system. In the winter and spring terms Pro- 
fessor Patrick will lecture on general psychology. This course will 
be accompanied by experimental exercises and by demonstrations 
with apparatus from the psychological laboratory. The texts of 
James, Kuelpe, Wundt, and Ladd will be used as references and for 
assigned readings. Professor Patrick and Dr. Seashorb. 

Throughout the year, two sections, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 8 and 9. 

4. History of Philosophy. A course in Greek, mediaeval and 
modem philosophy. Lectures, with assigned readings in the texts of. 
Zdler, Weber, Palckenberg and Erdmann. Professor Patrick. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 11. 

5« l^thics* An elementary course. The reading of Mackenzie's 
Mamial of Ethics will be accompanied by lectures. Dr. Sbashorb. 
Spring tefm, two sections, Tu., Th., at 9 and 10. 

6. laboratory Course in Bxperimental Psychology. A 

theoretical and practical course in psychological experiment. The 
exercises are so arranged as to familiarize the student with the 
methods and the apparatus of typical experiments in each of the 
appfoved lines of psychological research. The students perfonn 
the experiments and report and discuss the results and literature on 



6o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

each subject. Laboratory work and reports. Prerequisite, Course 3. 
Dr. Sbashork. 
Pall and winter terms, Tu., 2:30 to 3:30. Th., 2:30 to 4:30. 

7. Introdiictioii to Philooophy. The purpose of this course is 
to supplement the course in the history of philosophy by a more criti- 
cal study of philosophical problems and S3rstems. Lectures, with 
readings from Paulsen's Introduction to Philosophy. Professor Pat- 
rick. 

Pall term, Tu., Th., at 11. 

8. Abnomial Paycholofi^r. Hypnosis, sleep, alterations of per- 
sonality, automatism, hallucination8«and illusions, and the psycfaolc^j^ 
of the abnormal and defectiye classes, will be discussed. Lectures 
with required reading. Prerequisite, Course 3. Dr. Ssashorb. 

Winter term, Tu., Th., at 11. 

9« The Paychology of the Child* The methods and results of 
psychological experiments on children. During the past year the 
class made a series of measurements upon children in the public 
schools of the city. Dr. Sbashork. 

Spring term, Tu., Th., at 11. 

zo« Special Research in Psychology. Original investiga- 
tion of special problems in psychology. Laboratory work and theses. 
The results of these investigations, if of sufficient worth, will be pub- 
lished in the Studies in Psychology. This course is primarily for 
graduates, but may be taken by undergraduates who have had Courses 
3 and 6. Dr. Sbashors. 

Throughout the year, hours to be arranged with instructor. 

zz. History of Modem Psychology. An historical treatment 
of the development of the methods of psychology. This course is a 
continuation of Course 6, but may be taken together with, or in 
sequence to. Course 3. Lectures, and reports on reading. Dr. Ssa- 

SHORB. *• 

Spring term, Tu., Th., at 2:30. 

za. Seminary in Psychology. Reports and discussions upon 

a few selected problems in the psychology and philosophy of mind. 

Special emphasis will be laid upon the nature of oonsdoosness and 

the theory of knowledge. This course is primarily for gnduates bat 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 6i 

may be taken by undeigradtiates who have had Courses 3 and 6. Dr. 
Sbashorb. 

Whiter term, two hours, Tn., at 7 p. m. 

13. Seminary in Philosophy. Papers and discuasions upon 
spedal prohlema in philoeophy. Theism was the subject taken up the 
past year. Thia course ia primarily for graduates but may be taken 
by undergraduates by special permission. Professor Patrick. 

Spring term, two hours, Tu., at 7 p. m. 

For the convenience of students wishing to make each year's work 
m this department continuous throughout the year, the following 
oombinations of courses are suggested: 

CouTBes I, 2 and 5, two hours, through three terms. 

Conrae 3, three hours, through three terms. 

Cooxsea 6 and 11, two hours, through three terms. 

Coozae 4, three hours, thnmgh three terms. 

Courses 7 (fall), 8 or 12 (winter), and 9, 11 or 13 (spring), two hours, 
through three terma. 

Course 10, two hours, through three terms. 

Candidatea for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy are required to 
take the equivalent of three terms' work of two or three hours each 
in thia department. Course 3, or Courses i, 2 and 5, are recommended 
for thia requirement. 

The Psychological Laboratory, No. 14 North Clinton street, is open 
daily from 8 to 12 a. m., and from 2 to 4 p. m. A description of the 
laboratory and apparatua will be found in thia catalogue under the 
bead of Material Equipment of the Collegiate Department. The 
library of philosophy is supplied with the standard works in logic, 
pesrchology, ethics, and philosophy, and is open daily during labora- 
tory hours. 

PEDAGOGY. 



Professor McComnbu.; Mr. Dorcas. 

X, Oenend Pedagogy. Thia course ia designed primarily for 
ctndenta who have had no teaching experience. Thia will be a text- 
book course and will consist of a general treatment of the principled 



62 STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWa. 

and practice of school teaching. The text-books used in this course 
are Putnam's Manual of Pedagogics, Gregory's Seven Laws of Teach- 
ing, White's School Management, Prince's Courses and Methods. 
The course is open to all students who are permitted by the rules of 
the University to take elective courses. Professor McConnki.1. and 
Mr. Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, five hours a week. 

a* Philosophy of Bducation and Practice of Teaching. 
Lectures and recitations. It is the purpose in this course to set fortli 
the aims of education, as these aims have been developed in educa- 
tional history, also to treat somewhat fully the doctrines of the educa- 
tional leaders of recent times, and finally to illustrate the application 
of these doctrines in teaching. Fall term: Educational Aims and 
Doctrines. This part of the course will include a special treatment of 
the Herbartian Pedagogy and a discussion of educational values. 
Winter term: Teaching and Governing. This part of the course will 
embrace a treatment of the Formal Steps of Instruction, an exposi- 
tion of methods of teaching and lectures on sanitation. Spring term: 
Secondary Education. In this part of the course, attention will be 
given to the organization of courses of study and methods of instruc- 
tion in high schools. Professor McConnki«i«. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week. 

3* History of Bdncation. This course will consist of three dis- 
tinct parts, (a) The ancient and mediaeval period, {d) the modem 
period, and {c) the history of education in the United States. The 
course will consist of lectures, recitations and essays on assigned 
topics. Mr. Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

4« School Snpervision, In this course the student will be 
expected to make a study of the following subjects: General school 
management, the art of classifying schools, and the art of arranging 
courses of study. Lectures and recitations. Professor McConnbi.1,. 

Winter term, two hours a week. 

5. School Systems. This course will require of the student an 
examination of the state and city systems of the United States. Lec> 
tures and reports. Professor McCoknbi.L. 

Fall term, two hours a week. 



COI.LBGIATE DEPARTMENT. 63 

6. Child Study. In this course the history, literBture and meth- 
ods of work in child study will be treated. Professor McConnbi*!.. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

7. Seminary. The Seminary will afford an opportunity for the 
special investigation of subjects selected with reference to their bear- 
ing on Courses 2 and 6. Fall and winter: The doctrines of the Her- 
bartian school. Spring: Child study. Professor McConnbij*. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

NoTB. — The courses in Pedagogy, except as otherwise designated, 
are open to Juniors, Seniors, and special students. Candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Didactics are required to take three full 
terms* work in Pedagogy. 

State Certificate. Acting under a law passed by the Twenty- 
third General Assembly, the State Board of Educational Examiners 
will grant state certificates, good for five j^ears, to graduates of the 
Collegiate Department of the University who comply with the follow- 
ing conditions: 

(a) The applicant must take three full terms' work in Pedagogy at 
the University. 

{d) He must furnish written statements, prepared expressly for the 
Board, from one or more county superintendents, or other experienced 
educators, certifying to the professional success and good moral char- 
acter of the applicant. 

{c) He must furnish written official statements, addressed to the 
Board, from school boards, or directors, for whom the candidate has 
taught, certifpng to his success in teaching and government. 

{d) He must apply to the Board through the Professor of Pedagogy, 
to whom he shall send, in addition to the above described certificates, 
a formal application for a state certificate, the sum of three dollars 
and such other credentials as may be required. The application for a 
state certificate should be made by using the blank form provided for 
that purpose by the State Board of Educational Examiners. 

(e) All the papers and credentials required from candidates for 
state certificates must be filed with the President of the University at 
least thirty days before the date fixed for the examination. 

l^ife IMploma. The State Board of Educational Examiners grants 



64 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

life diplomaa, acocMrding to law, to graduates of the Univenity who 
have oompUed with the state certificate oondittons mentioned above, 
and who, in addition thereto, have had a snooessf nl teaching experi- 
ence of five years after graduation. Applications are to be made 
throogh the Professor of Pedagogy. The following are the regula- 
tions of the Board in reference to applicants for life diplomas. 

(a) The Board itself holds the right, which it exercises at discre- 
tion, to investigate the character, scholarship, and professional stand- 
ing of every applicant. 

{d) The candidate must present an original thesis in his oum hand- 
writing, of not less than 3,000 nor more than 5,000 words, upon 
some professional topic selected by the President of the Board. The 
thesis will be subjected to a critical examination by at least two 
persons chosen by the Board. 

(c) The credentials required, the registration blank properly filled, 
and the thesis, accompanied by the fee of five dollars, must be filed 
with the President of the University at least thirty days before the 
date fixed for examination. 



PHYSICS. 

Propbssor Vkbi^sn; Mr. Bowman, Mr. Lorbnz, Mr. Grimes. 

z. Mediaiiica and Heat. Lectures and recitations. Professor 
Vbbi^bn. 
Pall term, daily at 11. 

a. Electricity and Masrnetiaiii. Lectures and recitations. 
Professor Vkblbn. 
Winter term, daily at 11. 

3. Bottnd and Ufl^ht. Lectures three times a week, laboratory 
work twice a week. Professor Vbbian, Mr. Bowman, and Mr. 

LORENZ. 

Spring term, lectures Mon., Wed., Pri., at xi. 

Courses z, 2 and 3 constitute the general elementary work in 
physics required of all scientific and engineering students, and most 
be preceded by the mathematics of the Freshman year. 



COI^I^BGIATE DEPARTMENT. 65 

4. Physical Measurements and Observations. I^aboiatory 
work. Mr. Bowman and Mr. I^rsnz. 

One term, daily. 

5. Measttrements and Determination of Constants* Lec- 
tures and laboratory work. Professor Ysbun, Mr. Bowman and 
Mr. LoutNZ. 

One tenn, daily. 

6« Measurements. Special investigation and research to follow 
4 and 5. Professor Vkblbn and Mr. Bowman. 

CottTBes 4, 5 and 6 may be taken any term, bnt mnst be pnrsned in 
the order of their numbers. These courses are planned for students 
taking a second year in Physics. Course 4 is required of electrical 
engineering students in the fall of their Junior year. In the winter of 
the same year they take 5, but in their case this course deals more 
enpecially with electrical measurements. 

7* Direct Current Dynamos and Motors. Three lectures a 
week, laboratory work twice a week. For electrical engineering 
Juniors. Professor V8bij(n and Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, daily. 

8. Theory of Blectricity and Photometry. Lectures five 
times a week, laboratory work ten hours. Professor V9BUN and 
Mr. Bowman. 

Pall term. 

9* Alternate Current Machinery. Five lectures a week, ten 
hooTB of special laboratory work. Professor Vbbun, Mr. Bowman, 
and Mr. Lorbnz. 

10. Distribution of Electrical Bnergy; Telegraph and 
Telephone. Lectures and laboratory work. Professor V9bz,9N and 
Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, ten hours a week. 

The last three numbers form the Senior year course of the electrical 
engineers, and will in general include five lectures a week, the sub- 
jects treated being indicated above. The work in the laboratory con- 
iists of practice with the photometer, experiments and measurements 
on the various machines, transformers, and other apparatus, and tests 
of iasntators, conductors, samples of iron, etc. The student has the 



66 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

choice in the latter part of the year of preparing a thesis or canning 
out some research, or doing other special work. 

xz. Electricity and MafifnetiAm. For civil engineering stu- 
dents. Two lectures a week, laboratory work three times a week. 
Professor Vbblsn and Mr. I/>rbnz. 

Pall term, daily. 

za. Dynamo-electric Machiiiery. Lectures to ciyil engineer- 
ing students. Professor VBBI.9N. 
Winter term, three times a week. 

13. Heat and Thertnodynajnica. Lectures to Junior electrical 
and dvil engineering students. Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, twice a week, with one day each week in electrical 
laboratory for dvil engineers. 

Z4. Shop Work. For electrical engineers. Mr. Grimbs. 
Throughout the year, twice a week. 

15. Seminary. The systematic reading of physical and electrical 
journals by those students who are well enough equipped, is encour- 
aged by a weekly Seminary, conducted for this purpose by Professor 
VBbun. 

In addition to the above, lectures and laboratory courses in selected 
topics will be given as circumstances may require or the fadlities for 
instruction may admit. Laboratory work of any grade may be taken 
any term, three or more times a week. 



CHEMISTRY, 



Propbssor Andrews; Mr. Wai^kbr, Mr. Jackson. 

z. General t^hemiatry. Lectures illustrated by experiments 
and accompanied by a weekly quiz and laboratory work. Professor 
Andrews. 

Pall term, four times a week, laboratory once a week. 

a. General Chemiatry {Continued). Lectures illustrated by 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 67 

ezperiments. Intnxlaction to qualitative analysis. Laboratory work, 
«x hours a week. Professor Andrews and Mr. Walkbr. 

Winter term: Lectures Tu., Th., at 9. Laboratory at hours to be 
arranged. 

3^ General Chemistry and QualitatiTe Analysis. Lectures 
once a week, laboratory work eight hours. The student is instructed 
in the theory and practice of qualitative analysis and is expected to 
cany ont about twenty-five complete analyses besides a number of 
partial ones. This course except the lectures can be taken in any 
torn. Professor Andrews, Mr. Wai^ker and Mr. Jackson. 

term, lectures at 9, laboratory eight hours, at times to be 



4« QoantitatiTe Analysis. Lectures on general principles and 
aouioes of error, once a week, laboratory ten hours. Professor 
Andrews and Mr. Jackson. 

Lectures Tn., at 4:30, laboratory according to arrangement. 

5« QttantitatiTe Analysis. Laboratory practicum. The student 
extends his work from the anal3rsis of substances of definitely known 
composition to commercial products of various kinds and makes a 
study of certain technological methods. Professor Andrews and 
Mr. Jackson. 

Any term, ten hours a week. 

6. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Lectures on the 
general principles of thermo-chemistry, electro-chemistry and chem- 
ical dynamics, accompanied by a parallel course of laboratory work 
covering, for example, the determination of molecular weights, 
experimental study of the laws of Avogadro and Dulong and Petit, 
the phenomena of mass action and of dissociation. Ostwald's Out- 
lines of Physical Chemistry has hitherto been used as an auxiliary 
text This course must be preceded by at least the first three courses 
in chemistry and the first three in physics or their equivalent. It 
will probably only be given in the even numbered years. Professor 
Andrews. 

Spring term, lectures or laboratory work daily at hours to be 
anaagedfor. 

7« a. Organic Chemistry. Lectures on the fatty series, illus- 



68 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

trated ezperimentally so far as the subject will permit. Professor 
Andrews. 
Winter term, even numbered years, twice a week. 

7* b, Orsfanic Chemistry. Lectures on aromatic and hetero- 
cyclic compounds. Professor Andrews. 
Spring of odd numbered years, three times a week. 

8. Blectro-chemlstry. Lectures for students of electrical engi- 
neering, comprising the theory of electrolysis, chemistry of primary 
and secondary batteries, electro-metallurgy and other industrial appli- 
cations. Professor Andrews. 

Spring term, five times a week, even numbered years only. 

9* Orsrauic Preparations. Laboratory work comprising pre- 
paration of typical organic compounds, methods of synthesis and 
study of diagnostic reactions. This course must be preceded or accom- 
panied by Course 7. Professor Andrews. 

Winter term, laboratory daily, twelve hours a week. This course 
may also be taken as a minor, six hours a week in winter and spring 
terms, acoompan3dng Courses 7 a and 7 b, 

zo. Determinatiye Mineralogy and Crystallography. 

Laboratory practicum. Mr. Wa];ker. 
Winter and spring, five times a week. 

Numbers 3, Qualitative Analysis, and 4, and 5, Quantitative Analy 
sis, may by taken in either fall, winter, or spring term. 

Number 6, may be taken after 3. This order is only recommended 
to those who devote no more than four terms in all to chemistry. 



ANIMAL MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY 



Professor Houser; Mr. Burge. 

z. General Horphologry and Physiology. A laboratory 
course for the study of selected types representing the several great 
groups of animals. General biological phenomena, the unicellular 
animals, and representatives of the higher invertebrate groups. Fall 



COLI.BGIATB DEPARTMENT. 69 

temi.— Dissection of typical vertebrates, the microscopic morphology 
of vertebrates, and lectures and experiments covering the elements of 
physiology. Winter and spring terms. Professor HouSBR and Mr. 

BUKGS. 

Throughout the year, daily; two divisions, 10 to 12 and 1:30 to 3:50. 

9. Comparative Histology. This is a course in the com- 
parative histology of animal tissues and systems of organs. Emphasis 
is here given to the laboratory technique of histology. To this end 
the student is expected to become proficient in the standard methods 
of fixing, staining, imbedding, sectioning, mounting, and the other 
processes incident to the making of microscopical preparations. Pre- 
requisite: Course i. Professor HousSR and Mr. Burgb. 

Fall term. I^borat^ry four days a week, 1:30 to 3:30. Lectures 
Fri., at 8. 

3. Comparatiye Neurology. A course for the detailed study 
of the nervous system. The laboratory work involves the use of the 
special technique of Golgi, Nissl, Weigert, and Ehrlich. The archi- 
tecture of the nervous system is presented in a series of lectures and 
demonstrations. The texts of all the stardard authorities are used for 
reference and for assigned reading. Prerequisite: Courses i and 2. 
Professor HousSR and Mr. BxT&OB. 

Winter term. Lectures Mon., Pri., at 8. Laboratory Tu., Wed., 
Th., 1:30 to 3:30. 

4* Vertebrate Embryology. Laboratory work, accompanied 
by a aeries of lectures. The lectures discuss the general problem of 
vertebrate embryology, and are supplemented by collateral reading. 
The laboratory work embraces an examination of the frog's egg 
during its early cleavage, and a study of the chick at successive stages 
of development during the first four days of incubation. Prerequisite: 
Courses i and 2. Professor Hgxtsbb. and Mr. Burgb. 

Spring term, daily, ten hours a week. 

5* Advanced Morphology. Special courses of laboratory work 
will be arranged to meet the needs of those who desire to pursue 
morphological studies farther than the outlined Courses i, 2, 3 and 4. 
Opportnnitiea are offered for investigation in some branch of anatomy, 
histology, or embryology. Professor HouSBR. 

Throughout the year, ten hours a week. 



TO STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

6. Advanced Fh78iolofi;y. A course for advanced students 
who desire to continue the investigation of physiological processes in 
greater detail. Laboratory work and library research. Prerequisite: 
Course i. Professor HouSKR. 

Throughout the year, three times a week. 



ZCX5LCXJY, 



Professor Nutting; Assistant Professor Wickham. 

X. Invertebrated Ajtimals— more especially the sub-kingdoms, 
CcsUnUrata, and Echinodermaia. Professor Nutting. 
Pall term, daily. 

a. Mammalia. The principles of classification are here applied 
to a more limited group. More attention is paid to generic and spe- 
cific characters and more detailed descriptions are made, daily prac- 
tice being afforded by the use of the magnificent series of mammals in 
the Homaday collection and main Museum. Instruction in the 
preparation of skulls and skeletons is given to those students desiring 
it. Professor NuTTiNG. 

Winter term, daily. 

3* Omithologyy including instruction in field work. Upon this 
course the whole work in systematic zoology is centered. Owing to 
the very large series of birds (about ii,ooo specimens) in the Musemn, 
there is ample material for real systematic work during the term. 
Professor Nutting. 

Spring term, daily. 

4« Sntomology. Insect Anatomy and development. Lectures 
and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Wickham. 
Fall term, three houra a week. 

5* Entomology. The principles acquired in the preceding term, 
will be applied to the study of systematic entomology. Assistant 
Professor Wickham. 

Winter term, three houra a week. 



COLLBGIATB D^PARTMBNT. 71 

6« Sntomoll^gy. The studies of the preceding term will be oon- 
tiniied. Throughont this and the preceding course special attention 
will be given to the philosophical bearings of the subject. Assistant 
Professor Wickham. 

Spring term, three hours a week. 

7. I^ectarea in SpecttlatiTe ICoology. This course is devoted 
to a jnesentation of the more prominent theories concerning the 
origin and evolution of animal forms and a historical review of the 
position held by the most prominent workers in speculative zoology. 
Special attention will also be paid to a study of the habits, instincts 
and intelligence of animals. The course will will be open to Juniors 
and Seniors. Professor Nuthng. 

Throogfaout the year, two hours a week. 

8* Thesis. Equivalent to two terms* work. Advanced work in 
any group of animals of which the Museum contains a sufficient 
series. Free access to any specimens or books on the museum floor 
is accorded to students doing thesis work in zoology, and a convenient 
study room has been fitted up for the use of advanced students. 

The above courses are intended to be consecutive, except that 
Courses 4, 5 and 6 may follow i, 2 and 3, in Animal Morphology, and 
7 may be taken by Juniors and Seniors, without previous work in 
natural science. A combination of Courses 4, 5, 6 and 7 is recom- 
mended for students desiring a five hours' course which will include a 
critical study of a definite group of animals together with the applica- 
tion of biological principles elucidated in Course 7. This course is 
more particularly designed in the interest of students who do not 
intend to specialize in zoology. 

The Museum affords an abundance of material for study, and this 
is supplemented by (a) library of zoological works; {b) photographs 
of specimens studied, the photographs to be placed in the note books 
along with the descriptions; and {c) lectures in which the salient 
points of the various groups of animals are defined, and habits, distri* 
botion, etc, described. 

Students taking special courses in biological science may receive 
instruction in field work and in the preparation of museum material. 



73 STATE UNIVBRSrrV OF IOWA. 

GBOLCXJY. 



Professor Calvin. 

X* Principlea of Oeology. Lectures, illastrated by mnaeiiiii 
spedmens, views, maps and microsoopic pcepoxations. 
Thronghont the year, twice weekly, Tn. and Th., at 9. 
This oonrae may be supplemented with ConxBe i in Astronomy. 

a. Oeneral and Practical GeoU^gy. Daring the fall term this 
conrae embiaces lectures and field observation on the geological 
phenomena in the vicinity of Iowa City as an intzodnction to the fun- 
damental facts of the science. The preliminary work also embraces 
the laboratory investigation of material collected during studies in 
the field. This is followed by the general facts of rock-making, con- 
tinent-making, and the evolution of topographic forms. During the 
winter and spring terms attention is given to the chronological suo- 
oesston of strata in the MissLssippi Valley, with studies relating to the 
genesis, lithol<^, geographical distribution, economic products, and 
typical faunas of the several formations. Large series of rocks, min- 
erals, fossils, maps, lantern slides, and photographs afiford the 
material for lecture illustration and laboratory study. 

Throughout the year, daily at 10. Additional hours for laboratory 
work arranged to suit the convenience of the individual students. 

3* Inyertebrate Paleontology. Lectures and laboratory 



Throughout the year, daily. Lectures at 8. Laboratory work at 
convenient hours from 8 to 5. 

4. Economic Geology of the United States. Lectures, with 
library and laboratory research. 

Throughout the year daily. 

5. Special Cottraes in Pleistocene Geology, local Geology 
and Paleontology, Characteristics and Faunas of Special Formations, 
and similar subjects are arranged to meet the wishes of individusl 
students. 

Thronghont the year or through a single term, two, three, or five 
hours weekly. 



COLLBGIATB DBPARTMBNT 73 



BOTANY. 



Profbssok Macb&idb; Assistant Fropbssor Shimkk. 

z« General Botany. A course of popular lectnres and special 
studies intended to illustrate the purpose, method and scope of present 
botanical research, the progress of botanical science in recent years 
and the general economic importance of the subject. The lectures 
are illustrated by material from the Herbarium and the field and no 
effcnrt is spared to giye the course the highest practical value. This 
coarse, though intended primarily for those intending to teach, is 
open to all students; it is complete in itself, but will be accepted as 
one of the three required terms in the case of those who elect Botany 
as material science. Professor Macbridb. 

Spring term, five hours a week. 

9. Morphological Botany. This course consists of lectures 
and laboratory work and is intended to illustrate the structure and 
life-history of the several types presented by the vegetable king- 
dom. Goebel's Outlines of Classification is used as text. Special 
attention is paid to all available forms of our cryptogamic flora; slime 
moulds, schizophytes, diatoms, algae, fungi, mosses, ferns and their 
allies are successively passed in review. This course is open to all 
students who axe credited with Botany in their preparatory course. 
While it is in some particulars a review of the preparatory courses, it 
is also made the basis of work in the subsequent courses. Prof essoi 
HACBKibB and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Pall term, ten hours a week. 

3. General Plant Histology. General Stmctural Botany. 
This course requires ten hours a week in the laboratory. Daily lec- 
tures accompany the laboratory work. The student receives special 
instruction in the preparation of vegetable sections, staining, mount- 
ing, etc, and is required to prepare for himself approved slides in 
illustration of all the topics presented in so far as these are referable 
to the microscope. Professor Macb&idb and Assistant Professor 



Winter term, dsily. 



74 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

4« General Plant "PhytAologj* This oottrae oonsbts of lec- 
tures, laboratory work and experiments, supplemented by collateral 
reading. The most important problems of v^;etable physiology are 
discnssed and illustrated by simple experiments. Detmer, Vine, Dar- 
win, and all other standard authorities are available to the student for 
coUateral reading. Assistant Professor Shqikk. 

Spring term, daily. 

5« General Mycology. This is a course in the fungi and con- 
sists of laboratory work, supplemented by lectures, experiment and 
collateral reading. This is an advanced course. Students make and 
classify collections for themselves. In identifying material collected, 
students are aided by extensive mycolpgical literature, exsiaaH, etc 
Professor Macbrids. 

Pall term, daily. 

6. Yegretable Sntbryology. A special course with lectures 
and laboratory work, including collateral reading. This course is 
confined chiefly to the consideration of the embryology of phenogam- 
ous plants. Phytocjrtology is taken up incidentally, and the peculiar- 
ities of nuclear division and karyokinesis noted. Professor Mac- 

BRIDK. 

Spring term, daily. 

7. Special work in Morphology. A course designed for 
advanced students either graduate or special, offering opportunity for 
more exact investigation. Professor Macb&ide and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year. 

8. Special Systematic work. The large collections of the 
University now afford unusual opportunity for the special study of 
particular groups and families, and students are invited to engage in 
original research in the revision of accumulated spedes. Professor 
Macbridk and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year. 

9* Special Applied Botany. A course for students of Pharmacy 
and Medicine. The officinal Materia Medica is made the basis of the 
special study of medicinal plants, their nature, origin and relation- 
ships. Professor Macbridb. 

Winter and spring terms. 



COLL^BGIATE DEPARTMENT. 75 

lO. Theeia Coturse. Designed for such students, either graduate 
or others, as desire to undertake problems of original research. Pro- 
fessor Macbridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year. 

n. Seminary. A special course in reading and study of current 
literature is arranged for such students as have completed at least 
three courses in Botany. Students are expected to present written 
renews and criticisms of the literature presented, to engage in dis- 
cussion of topics specially assigned, and to carry forward at appro- 
priate seasons special investigations in the field as directed. Professor 
Macbridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. 



MATHEMATICS. 



PM0FBS90R WBU>; ASSISTANT PHOPBSSOR SmiTH, MR. BAUBR, MR. 

Mbrritt. 

Classical and philosophical students are required to take Course i. 
Course 2 may, however, be substituted for this and the work otherwise 
required in Ancient History. Scientific students must take Course 2. 
The work of Course 3, though not required, is arranged with refer- 
ence to the needs of those students who expect to do special work in 
physical science. Civil and electrical engineering students are 
required to take Courses 2, 3 or 4, and 9. Further explanations will 
be found in connection with the following syllabus. 

FfTsAman MaihemaUcs/ar GassiceU and Philosophical Students. 

z, a. Ali^tira. Exercises in the statement and solution of prob- 
lems involving simple and quadratic equations; ratio, proportion, and 
variation; arithmetical, harmonic, and geometrical progressions; 
properties of series and the development of simple functions into 
series; the binominal theorem; logarithms. Fall term. 

X. d. Plane Ttigwiomttry* Trigonometric functions and 
formnlse; logarithmic functions; solution of right and oblique angled 
triangles; practical applications. Winter term. — 



76 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

z. c. Analytical Qeometry. The point, right line, circle, par- 
abola ellipee and hyperbola in cartesian coordinates. Spring term. 

Three divisions; throughout the year, Mon., Wed., PrL, at ii, 2:30, 
and 3:30. Mr. Baubr and Mr. MBRRITT. 

Students contemplating advanced study in Mathematics should 
take Course 2, instead of the one here outlined. 

Freshman Mathematics for Scientific and Engineering Students, 

a. a, Alfi^ebra and Trigfonometry. In algebra the work is 
nearly the same as that of i a. This is to be completed by November 
nth and will be followed by Plane Trigonometry. Fall term. 

a* b. Trigonometry and Theory of Sqnationa. Trigonome- 
try is to be completed by January 27th. The work in the Theory of 
Equations will include the study of imaginaries, the properties of the 
general equation and their graphical representation, methods of 
approximating to the roots of higher equations with numerical coeffi- 
cients. Cardan's solution of cubics, and bi-quadratic equations. Win- 
ter term. 

a. c. Analytical Geometry. The same as Course i^, with the 
addition of the discussion of the general equation of the second degree 
between two variables and examples of higher plane curves. Spring 
term. 

Five divisions, daily, throughout the year at 8, 9, 10 and 2:30. As- 
sistant Professor Smith, Mr. Bau9R and Mr. Mbrritt. 

Sophomore Mathematics for Scientific Students, 

3* a. Differential and Integral Calcttlna. The fundamental 
principles of the Calculus are studied and applied to the solution of 
problems in geometry and mechanics. Fall term. 

3. b. Integral Calcttlna and Method of l^ast Squares. 

Winter term. 

3. c. Applications of tlie Method of i;east Squares. This is 
a continuation of the preceding, the method of least squares being 
applied to the reduction of various series of ph3rsical observations. 
Spring tenn. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 77 

This ooorse is open only to those who have taken Course 2. Assist- 
ant Professor Smith. 
Daily, tlirooghoat the year at 8. 

Sophomore MathenuUics, 

4. a. Analytical and Modem Geometry. A review of those 
portions of Course 2^ which are supplementary to Course i c^ followed 
by Analytical Geometry of three dimensions. A short course of lec- 
tures on Modern Geometry is given, upon which full notes must be 
sabodtfeed. Pall term. 

4. b. Differential Calctilns. Winter term. 

4* c. Integral Calcnlua. The work in Calculus in this course 
is nearly the same as that in Course 3. Spring term. 

This course is intended primarily for engineering students but is 
open to all who have completed the required work of the Preshman 
year. Professor Wsi^D. 

Daily, throughout the year, at 10. 

MaihefmUics for Junior^ Senior and Graduate Students, 

5* Intesrral Calculus* a. Hyperbolic Functions and Definite 
Integrals. Pall term. b. The Eulerian and Elliptic Integrals. Win- 
ter term. c. Differential Equations. Spring term. An elementary 
coarse open to all students who have taken either Course 3 or 4. Por 
either undeigraduate or graduate students. Professor Wsi«D. 

Three hours a week throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 11. 

6. Differential Bqnationa. Lectures. The subject is to be 
treated from the standpoint of Sophus Lie. Por graduate students. 
This course will not be given in 1898-99. Professor Wei#d. 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., and Th., at 8 or 11; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. 

7. Harmonic Fnnctiona* Lectures. Por graduate students. 
Frofeaaor WkU). 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., and Th., at 8 or 11; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. 

8. Determinants and Modern Geometry, Por either under- 
gEadnate or graduate students, a. Determinants and the Theory of 



78 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Qnantics. Pall term. b. Modem Geometry; the principle of Invaru 
ance. Winter term, c. Modem Geometry of three dimensions, or 
Quaternions. Spring term. Mr. Baukr. 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 2:30; supple- 
mented by a fortnightly Seminary. 

9* Analj^tical Meohntiica. a. Statics. Composition and reso- 
lution of forces; the funicular polygon; centers of gravity; moment of 
inertia; friction; etc. Pall term. b. Kinetics. Rectilinear motion; 
projectiles; constrained motion of a particle; the simple and conical 
pendulums; etc. Winter term, c. Mechanics of fluids. An elemen- 
tary course. Spring term. Por either undergraduate or graduate 
students. Required of civil and electrical engineering students. 
Assistant Professor Smith. 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11; supple- 
mented, for civil engineering students, by a three hours* course in 
applied mechanics in charge of Assistant Professor Magowan (See 
Course in Civil Engineering) and, for special students in mathematics, 
by a weekly Seminary. 

zo. Adyanced Analytical Mediatiics. a. Problems in statics 
and dynamics; virtual velocities; the principle of least action, etc. 
Pall term, b. The dynamics of a particle, with special reference to the 
theory of orbital motion. Winter term, c. Hydromechanics. Spring 
term. Por graduate students. Assistant Professor Smith. 

Three hours a week throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 11; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. 



ASTRONOMY. 



Propbssor Wsu>; Mr. 



The courses in Astronomy are open to all Juniors and Seniors. The 
two here offered may be taken simultaneously or in succession. 
Others will be added as soon as necessary arrangements can be made. 
The University is provided with a small but well equipped students* 
observatory. See Material Equipment. 

z. General Aatronoiiiy. A course of lectures on descriptive 
astronomy for the general student. This course may be supplemented 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 79 

by Omree i in Geology, which is given at the same honr. Professor 



Three lectures a week, thronghont the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

4. Practical Astronomy, The student is taught the use of the 
sextant, transit instrument, clock, chronograph, etc.; the arrange- 
meot of the AmericaH Ephemeris and Nautical AlmatuLc; and the 
general principles of time, latitude, longitude, and azimuth determin- 
ation. Professor Wbu) and Mr. . 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9; supplemented 
by work at the observatory. 



aVIL ENGINEERINa 



PaoFBsaoR Siiis; Assistant Professor Magowan, Mr. Hart- 
man. 

All the subjects will be given at definite hours, and students will 
not be allowed to substitute other subjects for the required civil 
engineering studies without the approval of the professor in charge 
and special permission of the Faculty. Students in one class will not 
be allowed to take subjects in an advanced class without permission 
of the professor in charge. 

So far as possible, instruction will be given by recitation from text- 
books. But where this method is not practicable, as in limes and 
cements, and in some of the subjects treated under the head of Civil 
Bagineering, a text will be followed, the first part of the recitation 
period being devoted to quiz, and the remainder to a lecture. 

Saturdays, throughout the four years of the course, are devoted in 
part to field work, photography and blue printing — including the 
aenaitizing of paper; also to work in the carpenter shop. The latter 
consists chiefly in making models of the structures designed in the 
Senior year, and in practical joinery. For all work requiring no 
special preparation outside of the class room, such as drawing, field 
<**«rk, laboratory exercises, some of the work in graphical statics, etc* 
not less than two hoars will be required for one hour of credit. 



8o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

French or German. See Conrse i, nnder French, page 44; and 
Courses i and 2, nnder German, page 42. If French be elected in 
the Freshman year, English mnst be taken in the Sophomore year; but 
should German be elected, it must be continued through the Sopho- 
more year. Freshman year, fi^e hours a week, and Sophomore year, 
three hours a week. 

MaihemaHcs. See Courses 2, 3, or 4 and 9, under Mathematics, 
pages 76, 77 and 78. Freshman and Sophomore years, five hours a 



English, See Courses i and 4, under English, pages 46-47. For those 
electing French, two hours a week through the Freshman, and three 
hours a week through the Sophomore year; and for those electing 
German, two hours a week through the Freshmen year. 

Drawiiifl^. For general scientific, electrical and dyil engineer- 
ing students. Geometrical and mechanical drawing. Orthographic, 
oblique, isometric and cabinet projections, and lettering. Linear 
perspective, shades and shadows. The work is given principally by 
means of personal instruction. The preliminary principles are studied 
from text and reference books and their application is employed in 
making drawings from models and machinery to exact scale. Assist- 
ant Professor Magowan and Mr. Ha&Tman. 

Freshman year, fall and winter terms, five hours a week. 

Blementary Machine I>rawi]ifif. For electrical engineers. A 
study in delineation of brackets, shaft-hangers, screws, pillow-blocks, 
gearing and other elementary parts of machines. Assistant Professor 
Magowan and Bfr. Hartmam. 

Freshman year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Blementary Sturyeyiiifl^* For dvil and electrical engineering 
students. The construction, adjustment and use of the compass, level 
and transit. Field practice in surveying, platting of notes and com- 
putation of areas. Assistant Professor Magowan and Mr. Hajltman. 

Freshman year, spring term, five hours a week for dvil, and two 
hours a week for electrical engineering students. 

l^and 8tirYeyi]isr* Redtations and lectures, and field work with 
transit, level and solar compass; making profiles, leveling and drain- 
age surveys. A section of land is surveyed and the location of all 



COLtBGIATE DEPARTMENT. Si 

natuial and artificial features determined and noted. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Magowan and Mr. Hartman. 
Sophomore year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Happbig and Qwryeying, Pen topography, including the mak- 
ing of topographical symbols; platting of section survey from notes 
taken during the previous term, and making a finished map of the 
same. United States public land surveys, determination of true meri- 
dians, and a study of the rules and Supreme Court decisions govern- 
ing re-surveys and re-locations of lost or obliterated comers. Assist- 
ant Professor Magowan. 

Sophomore year, winter term, three hours a week. 

Topoffrapliical Snnreying and Mappinsf. A study of the 
adjustments and methods of use of the stadia, gradienter and plane 
table, etc., and the making of finished contour maps from notes of 
flurvejrs made by the students, with the above mentioned instruments. 
Assistant Professor Magowan. 

Sophomore year, spring term, three hours a week. 

D— criptive Geometry. The work in this study includes prob- 
lems on the point, line, and plane; also the simpler geometrical 
solids, shades and shadows, single and double curved and warped sur- 
faces, and the generation and development of the same, and the solu- 
tion of various practical problems. 

Sophomore year, winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

EUdricity and Magnetism, See Course 2, under Physics, page 
64. This course is designed especially for the students in Civil 
Engineering, the object being a better general imderstanding of this 
important subject, both in general theory, and in the practice of mak- 
ing electrical measurements; also to give a more thorough knowledge 
of electricity preparatory to taking up the study of the dynamo and 
motor, in the winter term, the importance of which to the Civil 
Engineer is fully appreciated, and the subject is adequately given. 

Junior year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Analytical Mechanics, See Mathematics, Course 9, page 78. 
Junior year, fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

Mechanica of Materials. For students in civil and electrical 
engineering. The treatment of this subject is designed to be such 



82 STATE UNIVBRSiry OF IOWA. 

that the student shall acquire a thorough training in the elementary 
principles of the Mechanics of MaterialSi and he is then required to 
verify by his own investigations, the experimental laws and many of 
the derived fonnulse. Numerous problems taken from actual engi- 
neering practice are given for solution from time to time, in order that 
the student may be trained in the application of his knowledge. The 
study includes the resistance and elasticity of materials, resistance of 
pipes and riveted joints, bending and resisting moments, shears, elas- 
tic curve, deflection of simple, cantilever, restrained and continuous 
beams; strength of columns with concentric and eccentric loading, 
torsion and shafting and combined stresses, etc. Assistant Professor 
Magowan. 
Junior year, three hours a week, fall and winter terms. 

Railroad Cunrea. The study of simple and compound curves 
and turn-outs. Enough field work is given to familiarize the student 
with the field methods of locating and running curves. Mr. Hart- 

MAN. 

Junior year, fall term, three hours a week. 

Steam Sngine and I^ocomotive. The subject is treated under 
four heads, Heat, Steam, Engine, and Boiler. Under Heat is treated 
the economic combustion of fuel. Under Steam the physical proper- 
ties and the energy contained. Under Engine, the modem types of 
simple and compound engines are discussed, with special reference to 
the locomotive. The students are given practical problems and are 
required to ascertain the indicated horse power from actual indicator 
cards, and to determine the efiidency of various engines from assigned 
data. The modem types of boilers are then discussed. Compresaed 
air is also considered in connection with the transmission of power. 
Professor Sims. 

Junior year, fall term, two hours a week. 

Oraphical Statics. The course is so arranged that the study of 
the graphical method of determining stresses precedes that of the 
analytical method, it being the intention to assist the student to secure 
a mental photograph of the amount and kind of stress in the various 
members of structures, and thus provide him with a ready and impres- 
sive means of their comparison. The analysis, by this method, of 



COI/I<HGIATB DBPARTMBNT. 83 

roof tniases is fixst taken ap» followed by that of the plate girder, and 
nnple, oantilever and swing bridges, with parallel and inclined chords, 
nnder yarions conditions of loading as required in the standard speci- 
fications, both for actual wheel concentrations and equivalent uniform 
loads; after which a course is given in metal and masonry arches. Pro- 
fessor Sues and Assistent Professor Magowan. 
Junior year, fall, winter and spring terms, three hours a week. 

Dynamo-Electric Machinery. See Physics, Course 12, page 66. The 
importance of an elementary knowledge of this subject to the dvil 
engineer in general practice is fully appreciated, and the course is 
designed to give the students a comprehensive knowledge of the laws 
governing the construction and operation of the dynamo and motor. 

Junior year, winter term, three hours a week. 

Theory of Streases. Including the analytical determination 
of ■tres s es and strains in all the structures analyzed by the graphical 
method. (See Graphical Statics.) Much time and study is devoted 
to this important subject. Professor Sims. 

Junior year, winter term, three hours a week; and spring term, five 
hours a week. 

Umt^ and Cetnents. The instruction in this subject consists in 
sssigncd references, and a course of lectures on the principal proper- 
tics of Ihnes, hydraulic limes, and natural and artificial cements, with 
a general discussion of the nature and uses of concrete, followed by 
laboratory work. Bach student is required to make and test briquettes 
of varioos cements, which ¥rill be furnished him for the purpose, and 
to calculate their relative values per unit of strength. Professor S1M6. 

Junior year, winter term, two hours a week. 

CiTil Snsineerinir* '^^^^ subject is given by recitations and lec- 
tures, and is designed for the purpose of instruction in the practical 
application of the theoretical principles of Civil Bngineering. The 
rq^nlar recitations and lectures frequently will be interrupted by de- 
signs and estimates of the cost of the work under discussion. The 
subjects treated, with thoroughness commensurate with their relative 
importance, are: railway reoonnaisance and location; theory of maxi- 
mum economy in grades and curves; location of highways and resist- 
ance to traction thereon; hydrography; building materials; natural and 



84 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

artificial stones; quarrying and blasting; reaching deep foundation 
beds in earth, quick sand, water and silt, with pneumatic tubes, cais- 
sions and coffer dams, and by the Poetsch-Sooysmith freezing process; 
ordinary earth work and methods of computation; masonry, classifi- 
cation of, and specifications for; theory and practice of retaining 
walls; earth, loose rock and light masonry dams and wein; the con- 
struction of brick, masonry, and concrete arches; tunneling and the 
use of explosives; highway and street construction; railroad con- 
struction and maintenance of way; improvement of rivers and harbors 
and canal transportation; street railways and comparison of street 
motors. In all, i8o recitations, lectures, and exercises. Professor 
Sims. 

Senior year, fall term, four hours a week; winter and spring terms, 
three hours a week. 

Hydraulics. Instruction in this \rork is given by means of lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory work. The course includes the 
weight and pressure of water; head and center of pressure; computa- 
tion and measurement of velocity and discharge through orifices, 
weirs, pipes, conduits, canals, and rivers, the investigation of meters 
and motors and the determination of water power. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Magowan. 

Junior year, spring term, five hours a week. 

Heat and Thermodynamics, See Course 13, under Physics, page 
66. Junior year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Chemistry, See Courses i and 3, under Chemistry, page 66. It 
will be noticed that this course requires five hours a week in lectures 
and laboratory work. The students in civil engineering will take 
only four hours. The hour omitted, however, must be but one of the 
hours of laboratory work. Senior year, fall and winter terms, four 
hours a iveek. 

Structtiral Drawing and Desisrning. Prior to the work of 
designing proper, the students are required to make tracings or draw- 
ings of existing structures and compare the sections and connections 
of the various members with standard specifications. This work is 
followed by the design of trestles, highway and railway bridges, dams, 
foundations, etc., of which 'complete working drawings are made. 
Professor SlM3. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 8$ 

Senior year, fall term, four hours a week. Winter and spring 
terms, three times a week. 

Geology, See Course i, under Geology, page 72. Senior year, fall, 
winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

Sanitary Bngineering^. The work offered under this course 
includes principally, sewers and sewerage, and the cleaning of cities 
and towns. The separate and combined systems of sewers are studied 
and discussed. The details of various sewer systems as set forth in 
plans and specifications for their construction are carefully studied. 
The cost of construction as taken from current contract prices is 
especially noted, and the arrangement and action of plumbing fixtures 
are incidentally studied. The growing importance of this subject is 
fully realized, and it is the intention to keep the instruction fully 
abreast of the demands and needs of the present, and if possible, an- 
ticipate future needs and methods. Assistant Professor Magowan. 

Senior year, fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

Reaiatatice of Materials. For dvil and electrical engineers. 
This subject includes the strength and resistance of engineering 
materials, their behavior under stress, and the demonstration of the 
experimental laws, ultimate strength, elastic limit, etc., by tests in the 
laboratory. Professor Sims. 

Junior year, winter term, two hours a week. 

Water Sujpply Sngineerisiil^. A study of the methods of col- 
lecting, purif3dng, storing, and distributing water. Assistant Professor 
Magowan. 

Senior year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Specificatioiui and Contracts. A study of various standard 
specifications and a discussion of the effect of general causes in con- 
tracts on same. Professor Sims. 

Senior year, spring term, four hours a week. 

Tlieala. At the dose of the spring term of the senior year, an 
aoeeptable original thesis may be required from each student before 
graduation. 

For more detailed information and description of course send for 
special announcement of Civil Engineering. 



86 STATE- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



MIUTARY SOENCB AND TACTICa 



Instruction in this department is prescribed for all male students of 
the Collegiate Department, except such as are especially excused. 
Students who, for any valid reason, may desire to be excused must 
appear in person before the military committee consisting of the 
commandant and five student captains, on the Monday immediately 
succeeding the beginning of each term, at the Armory at ii a. m. 
Those who claim exemption on account of physical disability, when 
the same is not apparent, must present to the committee a certificate 
from the battalion surgeon. All students not specially excused will 
report to the Professor on the Monday immediately following the 
beginning of the term, at the Armory, at i xx> p. m. 

OROANI^ATION. 

The students are organized for instruction into a battery of artillery 
consisting of two gun detachments and an infantry battalion consist- 
ing of four companies, a band and the necessary staff officers. The 
commissioned officers are selected from the Senior, the sergeants from 
the Junior, the corporals from the Sophomore class. The officers 
and non-commissioned officers are selected for character, military 
record, knowledge of the drill regulations and general aptitude. 

UNIFORM. 

But one style of uniform is worn, known as the undress or fatigue 
uniform. It consists of a dark blue suit and is to be worn on all occa- 
sions of military duty; it can be procured either before or immediately 
after being admitted. A detailed description will be furnished on 
application to the President. 

Uniforms can be obtained in the vicinity at a cost of from $IQ to 
|i8. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



87 



ORGANIiCATIOK OP BATTAIrlON. 

Z897-98. 

STAPP AND NON-COMMISSONBD STAPP. 

I8t Lientenant and Adjutant G. M. Rea. 

irt Lieutenant and Quartermaster H. E. Taylor. 

Sergeant Major C. W. Startsman. 

Acting Qnartermaster Sergeant W. B. Chase. 

Color Sergeant P. C. Neal. 



(C . It 



COMPANY "A. 

Captain F. A. Soleman. 

1st Lieutenant L. A. Swisher. 

2nd Lieutenant L. J. Plynn. 

Tst Seixeant H. Carr. 

r p. G. White. 

Sergeants • P. A. Williams. 

^ E. E. Hull. 

G. W. Egan. 

P. H. Meggers. 

T. Kingland. 



Corporals 



t«v »l 



COMPANY **B 

Captain C. H. Carter. 

ist Lieutenant John Beardsley. 

2Ba Lieutenant M. G* Hilpert. 

ist Sergeant A. J. Burt. 

C. Horack. 

L* P* Lee* 

W. B. Chase. 

G. L. Schoonover. 

C. R. Jones. 
P. B. Reid. 
B. Whitoomb. 
E. R. MitcheU. 



Corporals, 



88 STATB UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

COMPANY **C.** 

Cmptain A. R. Denny. 

ist Lieutenant R. Otto. 

2nd Lieutenant E. E. Hobby. 

1st Seigeant W. W. LoonuB. 

' C. W. Jarvis. 
Sergeants • J. W. T. Holt. 

, T. W. Kemmerer. 

COMPANY **D." 

Captain }. R. Prailey. 

ist Lieutenant Maro Johnson. 

2nd Lieutenant Oswald Vebleo. 

1st Sergeant E. H. Yule. 

' R. D. Blackmose. 

Sergeants ^ L. J. Roach. 

. N. B. Barber. 

G. P. HarknesB. 

L« Knapp. 

A. B. Phillips. 

J. C. Bowman. 



Corporals 



BATTBRY. 

Captain P. S. Holsteen. 

1st Lieutenant W. L. Barker. 

2nd Lieutenant W. S. Willett. 

ist Sergeant LeRoy Weld. 

B. Swisher. 



Gunners 



W. S. Ankeney. 



COUR8B OP INSTRUCTION IN MUrlTART 8CIBKCB 

AND TACTICS. 

The course of instruction is both practical and theoretical. 

First Year, Practical instruction; three hours a week, spring sod 
fall terms, 1:15 to 2:15; one hour a week, winter term, 4:30 to 5:30. 
Practical instruction in infantry, school of the soldier, company and 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. 89 

bftttalion; extended order and ceremonies; rifle firing at icx), 200, 300, 
500 and 600 yaxdfl. 

Second Year, Practical instruction: Infantry, same as first year; 
practical instruction: artillery in service of field guns (foot battery), 
with mechanical movements and saber exercise; rifle firing, same as 
fint year. Theoretical: winter term, one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. 
Recitations, drill regulations and manual of guard duty. 

Third Year. Practical: same as second year. Theoretical: winter 
term, one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. Recitations, service of security 
and information. 

Fourth Year. Practical: same as above. Theoretical: winter term, 
one hour a week, 4:30 to 5:30. Lectures on the organization of the 
anny of the United States, United States army regulations, preparation 
of the usual reports and returns pertaining to a company and post. 
Lectures on military topography and reconnaissance and elementary 
field engineering. 



COURSES OF STUDY FOR GRADUATES. 



It is the aim of the University to furnish facilities for advanced 
studv commensurate with the demand for such work. As the number 
of graduate students has increased, especially of candidates for 
advanced degrees, the courses of study have been extended to meet 
their needs. No set courses of study leading to any of the advanced 
degrees are provided; each candidate for one of these degrees pur- 
sues an independent line of study, in which regular University 
courses are usually combined with special research work, often 
original in character, Jaid out with the advice of the professors and 
carried out under their charge. 

The elastic nature of the elective system as here adopted, renders 
the more advanced courses in many branches as valuable to the 
graduate as to the advanced undergraduate. The Seminaries, for 
instance, hold out encouragement and opportunities for a great deal 
«yf original study and research. The same thing may be said of a 



90 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

number of the higher courses in the different departmentB. In the 
following pages will be fonnd gxonped tc^ther those oo m se s which 
are of special interest to graduates. In every case oourses intended 
for gxadnates only (B) are distinguished from those open also to 
undeigraduates (A). To the former, undetgraduates are admitted 
only under exceptional circumstances and subject to the discretion of 
the professor in chaige of the work. 

i;atin I/Anguaob and utbratuhs. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

Courses 5, 6, 15, 17. See pp. 39 and 40. Professor Currisk. 
Courses 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. Loc. cit Assistant Professor 

POTTBR. 

Courses i to 4 or an equivalent are the minimum prerequisite for 
work leading to an advanced degree. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

Seminary in Archseology. For 1898-99 the subject wiU be the 
Topography and Archseology of Rome and the vicinity. Professor 
Currier. 

ORBBK I^ANGUAGB AKB I^ITBBATUIUS. 

A. Course open to both graduates and undergraduates. 
Plato'6 OorgiaSy Thesetettis, and selections from the Republic 

B. Course open to graduates only. 

Aristophanes. Special attention will be given to the purpose and 
influence of Greek comedy, and to its value as a picture of Athenisn 
life. 

GB&MAN I;ANGUAGB AND UTSRAl^UKB. 

A. Courses open to advanced students and graduates only. 

5. German Seminary. This course is devoted to the study of 
spedal periods of German literature, of individual anthoca or of par- 
ticular literary movements. See page 43. Professor Wix30N. 

6. Middle MUgh German. Middle High German Grsmmar, with 
a comparison of New High German Ssmtaz and Middle High GemMS 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. 91 

Syntax. Selections from the Nibelungenlied, Gndmn and the poems 
of Walther Ton der Vogelweide. See page 43. Professor Wzi^SON. 

PRSNCH IrANOUAOB AND I^ITBRATURIE. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 

4« Hlatory of French I/iterattire. Lectures in the French Lan- 
guage. Text-books; Duval's Litt^rature fran^aise; Montaigne's De 
rinstitution des Enfans. Professor Van Stkkndbrkn. 

zz« Seminary in X3th Centtiry French I^iteratore. Pro- 
fessor Van STSKNDSRBn. 

SNOU8H I^ANOUAOB AND I/ITBRATURIS. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 
Daring the year 189S-9 candidates for the master's degree may take 
work in the following Senior courses: 

6. Seminary in Nineteenth Century Poetry. See Course 6, 
under English, p. 47. Professor Rkbvbs. 

7. The Buffliah Drama. See Course 7, p. 47. Mr. Cook. 

zo. The Sngliah Bsaajriats and Orators. See Course 10, p. 
48. Mr. KSI.X«Y. 

9* Nineteenth Century Prose. See Course 9, p. 47. Professor 



B. Courses open to graduates only. 

13. Ansrlo-Sazon. For detailed information see Course 13, p. 
48. Professor Rbkws. 

14* Gothic and Old Saxon. See Course 14, p. 48. Professor 



HISTORY. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 

7. The French Revolution and Napoleonic ISra. Lectures. 
Fall and winter terms. Two hours a week. Professor Wiix:ox. 

8. The Nineteenth Century History of Europe. Lectures. 
Spring term. Two hours a week. Professor Wii,cox. 



92 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

6. Coastittttioiial History of the United States. Lectnrea. 
Three hoars a week. Professor Wilcox. 

9. Seminary in Sarly Bnglish History. Three terms. Two 
hours a week. Professor Wilcox. 

10. Seminary in United States History. Three terms. Two 
hours a week. Professor Wilcox. 

Special research work is also provided for those who intend to take 
the Master's degree in History as the major study. This work is con- 
ducted personally by the Professor of History and, in each case, is 
along the lines of the candidate's dissertation for the degree. 
B. Courses open to graduates only. 

zz. Seminary in the French Revolution. Two hours a week. 
Professor WiLCOX. 

This consists, so far as possible, in a critical and comparative study 
of original sources. Controverted points receive special attention. 

la. Seminary in the Period of Napoleon. Three terms. Two 
hours a week. Professor Wilcox. 

POI^ITICAi; SCISNCS. 

A. For graduates and under graduates. 
9* Economics, advanced course. A study in economic theory, his- 
torical and critical, as described under Course 9,on page 54. Through- 
out the year, Mon., and Th., at 2:30, Professor Loos. 

7* Economic Policy. The courses in public finance, currency and 
banking, transportation, diplomacy and foreign relations, described 
in the undergraduate statement, on pp. 53-54, as Courses 7, 3, 5 and 
6, with such additional work as may be prescribed. Open only to 
those who have a fair knowledge of economic theory. Throughout 
the year. Professor hooa. 

I. Sociology. Part i. I^ectures during the fall term on the 
primary factors and forces of social phenomena; special attention is 
given to the earliest phases of political organization. Part 2. In the 
winter term, pauperism, crime, police and sanitation receive spedal 
attention; this will be followed in the spring term by a study of muni- 
cipal government, with special attention to social problems. Thiongh- 
ont the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 10. P r of essor Loos. 



COI^LEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. 93 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

4« Political Philosophy. A study in political theory, classical 
and modem, with some notice of state forms. I^ectures with critical 
reading of Aristotle's Politics during the fall term; and Green on 
Political Obligations and Part i of Sidgwick's Elements of Politics 
during the winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at 11. Professor 
Loos. 

5. Seminary in Political Science. It is the aim of the Sem- 
inary to encourage special investigations. Questions in economics, 
statiatics, finance, political philosophy, administration or law may be 
taken for special research. From time to time papers are read, and 
then familiarly criticized and discussed. Professors L008 and Sham- 

BAUOB. 

Throughout the year alternate Mondays at 7:30. 



OOYBRNMBNT AND ADMINISTRATION. 

A. Courses open to graduates and undergraduates. 

8 and 9* Political Theory and Comparatiye Constitational 
l^mw. A study of the more general and theoretical aspects of politi- 
cal phenomena. Pall term: Political Theory. Winter term: Com- 
parative Constitutional I^w. Spring term: Papers on special topics 
in political theory and comparative constitutional law. See above, 
Potitics III., page 56. Professor Shambaugh. 

6. American Political Theory. In this course the writings 
of Hamilton, Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Clay, Webster, Cal- 
houn and Lincoln will be read and discussed. Pall and winter terms, 
two hours. Professor SHABiBAUGH. 

n. Adndniatratiye l^aw. A comparative study of Administra- 
tive I^aw in Prance, Germany, England and the United States. One 
term, two hours. Professor Shambaugq. 



94 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



A. Courses open to graduates and undex^graduates. 

4. History of Philosophy. A course in Greek, medueval and 
modem philosophy. Lectures, with assigned readings in the texts of 
Zeller, Weber, Palckenberg and Erdmann. Professor Patrick. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at ii. 

6. Iraboratory Course in Sxperimental Psycholosry- A 

theoretical and practical course in psychological experiment. The 
exercises are so arranged as to familiarize the student with the 
methods and the apparatus of typical experiments in each of the 
approved lines of psychological research. The students perform 
the experiments and report and discuss the results and lite r at ur e on 
each subject. Laboratory work and reports. Prerequisite, Course 3. 
Dr. Seashorb. 

7* Introdtictioti to Philosophy. The purpose of tnis oonrse 
is to supplement the course in the history of philosophy by a more 
critical study of philosophical problems and S3rstems. Lectures, with 
readings from Paulsen's Introduction to Philosophy. Professor Pat- 
rick. 

8. Abnormal Psychology. Hjrpnosis, sleep, alterations of per- 
sonality, automatism, hallucinations, and the psychology of the 
abnormal and defective classes, will be discussed. Lectnres with 
required reading. Prerequisite, Course 3. Dr. Seashore. 

B. Graduate Courses. 

lo. Special Research in Psychology. Original investigations 
of special problems in psychology. Laboratory work and theses. 
The results of these investigations, if of sufficient worth, will be pub- 
lished in the Studies in Psychology. Dr. Sbashors. 

xa. Seminary in Psychology. Reports and diacnssions upon a 
few selected problems in the psychology and philosophy of mind. 
Special emphasis will be laid upon the nature of consciousness and 
the theory of knowledge. Dr. Ssashork. 

13. Seminary in Philosophy. Papers and discussions upon 
special problems in philosophy. Theism was the subject taken up 
the past year. Professor Patrick. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. 95 

PSBA006Y. 

A. Courses open to both graduates or undergraduates. 

a. Philosophy of ISdttcatioii and Practice of Teaching:. 
Lectures and recitations. It is the purpose in this course to set forth 
the aims of education, as these aims have been developed in the 
history of education; also to treat somewhat fully the doctrines of the 
educational leaders of recent times, and finally to illustrate the appli- 
cation of these doctrines in teaching. Pall term: Educational Aims 
and Doctrines. This part of the course will include a special treatment 
of the Herbartian pedagogy and a discussion of educational values. 
Winter term: Teaching and governing. This part of the course will 
embrace a treatment of the formal steps of instruction, an exposition 
of methods of teaching and lectures on sanitation. Spring term: 
Secondary Education. In this part of the course, attention will be 
given to the ocganization of courses of study and methods of instruc- 
tion in high schools. Professor McConnbi«i«. 

5. School Syatems. This course will require of the students an 
examination of the state and the city systems of the United States. 
Lectures and reports. Professor McConnei*!.. 

6* Child Study. In this course the history, literature and meth- 
ods of work in child study will be treated. Professor McConnbi^i,. 

Graduate students in these courses, in addition to the work expected 
of undeigradnate students will be required to make a special study of 
one or more of the subjects included in the course selected. 

B. Courses open to graduate students only. 

8* Public School Conditions. This course will consist of con- 
crete studies af public school conditions, and will be statistical and 
descriptive. It will be taken as individual work and will be under 
the direction of Professor McConnsi<i«. 

9* Vlementary !Bdncation in Germany. In this course the 
student will be required to make a special study of the application of 
the Herbartian principles in the elementary schools of Germany. 
The student must be able to read German. Professor McCoNNKi«ir« 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



A. Courses open both to gradoates and undergraduates. 

6. Special Inyestiffatioii or Reaearch, to follow 4 and 5, page 
65. Professor Vbbi^bn and Mr. Bowman. 

7. Theory of Direct Current Dynamos and Motors. Pro- 
fessor Vbbi,sn. 

8. Theory of Electricity. Direct currents twice a week. Pro- 
fessor Vbbi^en. Alternate currents three times a week. Mr. Bow- 
man. 

9. Alternate Current Machinery. Polyphase current ma- 
chines twice a week. Professor Vbbi^bn. The transformer, three 
times a week. Bir. Bowman. 

13. Heat and Thermodynamics. Mr. Bowman. 

15. Seminary. Sjrstematic and critical reading of physical jour- 
nals. Meetings every week through the year. Professor Vbbz,bn. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

The physical laboratory affords opportunity for such special work 
and research as may be desired for additional minor and major courses. 
Work may be laid out for those who wish^ in any special line, and 
will include both experimental and theoretical treatment of the 
branches chosen. For those who prefer it a general major course in 
phyftics will be arranged by a suitable selection from the different 
courses offered. 

CHBMI8TRY. 

A. Courses open to both graduates and undergraduates. 

6. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. This course con- 
sists of lectures and laboratory ;vork, and comprises an experimental 
study of cryosoopic, ebulioscopic and vapor density methods for the 
determination of molecular weights, of the speed of chemical reaction, 
of the coefficients of chemical affinity, and of other problems of like 
character. Only in even numbered years. Professor Andrbws. 

5. Advanced Quantitatiye Analysis. Professor Andrbws. 

zo. Crystallogfraphy. Lecture and laboratory course in Crystal- 
lography and Crystal Measurements. Mr. Wai,kbr. 



COU#BGIATE DEPARTMENT. GRADUATE COURSES. 97 

B. Omraes open to graduates only. 

n. Research Work. Organic Chemistry. Professor And&sws. 

19. Research Work. Physical and Inorganic Chemistry. Pro- 
fessor Andrews and Mr. Wai.ker. 



ANIMAL MORPHOi;OOY Ain> PHYSIOXrOGT. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

The following courses are offered to graduate students who elect 
work in morphology as a minor. The completion of undergraduate 
Conzse i, or its equivalent, is prerequisite. 

a. ComparatiTe Histology. A general course of laboratory 
work on the histology of animal tissues and systems of organs. Pro- 
fessor HOXJSBR and Mr. BxTRGE. 

3. Comparatiye Netirologry. This is a specialized course for 
the detailed study of the nervous system. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Professor HousBR and Mr. Surge. 

4. Vertebrate ^Embryology. A laboratory course, accompanied 
by a series of lectures, for the study of the frog's e^ and the devel- 
opment of the chick. Professor HouSBR and Mr. Burgb. 

B. Open to graduates only. 

7. Research Course. Facilities for original investigation will 
be provided for those who elect work in this subject as a major. The 
specific character of such work will be determined by individual needs 
and preferences, but, in general, a biological problem will be assigned 
for independent investigation through the use of refined laboratory 
methods. Candidates for this work are supposed to have a biological 
training at least equivalent to that provided by undergraduate Courses 
I, 3, 3, and 4. Professor HousER. 

a^OOI/OGT. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

7* l/ccttires in Speculatiye Ideology. Two hours a week. 
This course is devoted to a presentation of the more prominent theories 
ocmceraing the origin and evolution of animal forms and a historical 



96 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

review of the position held by the most prominent workers in specu- 
lative zoology. Special attention will also be paid to a study of the 
habits, instincts and intelligence of animals. The course will con- 
tinue through the year. Professor NuTTing. 

8. Thesis. Equivalent to two terms' work. Advanced work in 
any group of ittiitnala of which the museum contains a sufficient series. 
Free access to any specimens or books on the museum floor is 
accorded to students doing thesis work in zoology. Professor Nxrr- 

TING. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

9. An exhaustive systematic discussion of any limited group of 
animals of which the museum affords sufficient material and the 
library sufficient literature. 

In several groups such as birds, echinoderms, mollusca, cmstaoea, 
coleoptera and coelenterata, the museum can now offer facilities for 
the most advanced systematic work, both the material and literature 
being adequate. 

10. Spedal investigation along the line of speculative zoology , e. g. , 
ccftoration of animals, geographical distribution, variation, natural 
selection, etc. 

GBOI/OGY. 

A. Courses open both to graduates and undergraduates. 

3, InYertebrate Paleontology. Course 3, described on page 
72, is offered to graduate and undergraduate students who have pre- 
viously taken Course 2. This course can only be taken as a minor by 
candidates for the Master's degree. Professor Cai,vin. 

4* 9cotiomic Geology of the United States may be taken on the 
same terms as i. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

6. Graduate students who elect geology as a major will be assigned 
work involving original research in some branch of geology or paleon- 
tology. This work may embrace such subjects as describing and 
mapping the geological formation of some selected area. Pleistocene 
geology of some country or group of countries, the stratigraphic dis- 
tribution of the fauna of a given geological formation, the critical 



COIXBGIATE DBPARTMBNT, GRADUATE COURSBS. 99 

fltndy of certain selected geological faunas, the geological and geo- 
gTBphical nuige of certain zoological groups of ofganiams, or the evi- 
dence of evolution in sucoessiYe geological fauna. Throughout the 
year, daily. Professor Cai,vin. 

BOTANT. 

A. Courses open to both undeigraduates and graduates. 

Courses 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10, as described on pp. 74, 75, are open to 
graduates who may select botany as a mioor. The completion of 
Courses i, 3 and 4, as described on pp. 73, 74, or the equivalent is 
pres u pposed in all cases. 

B. Courses open to graduates only. 

xa* Histology. The preparation and critical study of material 
illustrative of the structure of some special group of either sporophytes 
or i^>ermaphyte8; or the critical study of some special oigan or tissue 
as developed in different plant groups. Professor Macbridb and 
Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

13. Physiolosy* Practical experimentation in laboratory and 
field, with the object of solving, so far as may be practicable, some 
phjrsiological problem as presented in the case of a selected plant or 
group of plants; or the critical study of the function of some special 
ocgan, or group of tissues. Other topics may be found in research 
relative to the effect of environment, cross and self-fertilization, etc., 
in the matter of the distribution and differentiation of species, law of 
heredity, and kindred problems. Professor Macbridb and Assistant 
Professor Shimbk. 

Z4« Sjrstematic Botany. Comparative study of the species of 
plants found in special geographic areas in connection with an inves- 
tigation of the laws governing geographic distribution; studies of 
special natural orders of plants, cryptogamic or phenogamic, with 
r e fer e n ce to their taxonomy, relationships, distribution, etc.; com- 
parative studies of plants of economic importance, their relationships 
and history; studies in problems of local forestry, especially as related 
to conditions found in the Miitsissippi Valley. Professor Macbridb 
and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 



100 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

MATHBMATICB. 

The courses outlined below are offered to graduate students. 

5* Integral Calcttlua. Hyperbolic functions, definite in* 
tegrals, including the beta and gamma functions and elliptic inte- 
grals; the elements of differential equations. Lectures throughont 
the year; supplemented by a weekly Seminary. Professor WSI^D. 

6. Differential Bqtiations. Lectures throughout the year; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. Professor WSU). 

7. Harmonic Flinctiona. Lectures throughout the year; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. Professor Wxld. 

8. Determinants and Modem Geometry. This course is 
supplemented by a fortnightly Seminary. Mr. Baus&. 

9* Analytical Mechanics. Statics; dynamics; the mechanics 
of fluids. This course is supplemented by a weekly Seminary. 
Assistant Professor Smith. 

zo. Advanced Mechanics. Virtual velocities, the principle of 
least action; dynamics of a particle with reference to the theory of 
orbital motion; hydromechanics. Lectures throughout the year; 
supplemented by a weekly Seminary. Assistant Professor Smith. 

Further details regarding the above courses will be found on pages 

77-78. 

It is to be noted that in each of the courses a knowledge of the 
elements of the differential and integral calculus is implied. Graduate 
students in other lines of work may, however, take as a minor either 
of the two elementary courses in calculus offered to undergraduates. 
See Courses 3 and 4, pp. 76-77. 

The courses in mathematics cannot, in general, be taken in absentia 

The following schedule is recommended to those wishing two years 
of graduate work: 

Pirst year: Review elementary calculus; integral calculus; analyti- 
cal mechanics; minor, subject to the approval of the Faculty. See pp. 

76-78. 

Second year: Differential equations or harmonic functions; detei^ 
minants and modem geometry; advanced mechanics; minor, subject 
to the approval of the Faculty. See pp. 76-78. 

Bach candidate for a degree will be required to submit a thesis rep- 
resenting original investigation]in either pure or applied mathematics. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. loi 

ADYAKCSB D1SORJSS8. 

ICaster of Arts and Master of Science. The degxee of Mas- 
ter of Arts, or Master of Science, will be conferred upon resident 
graduates on the following conditions: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of this University, or of an 
accredited University or College. 

2. He must have pursued, during one or more years, a course of 
graduate study at this University, covering one major and one minor 
subject. In a two years' course, one major, and two minors, may be 
allowed. His studies during this time are to be under the immediate 
supervision and control of the professors immediately concerned, and 
to be subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

5. In aU cases, the minor, or minors, must be closely allied to the 
major subject 

4. He must submit a thesis of at least 5,000 words, showing 
marked attainment in some branch of learning. The subject of this 
thesis must be announced to the Faculty for approval, not later than 
the second Friday in December, and the thesis itself must be pre- 
sented to the Examining Committee at a date to be set by the professor 
in charge of the thesis work, not later, in any case, than May aoth of 
the year in which the degree is expected. 

5. He must, at the dose of his course, pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion, both oral and written, conducted by a committee which shall 
consist of three professors, selected by the Faculty for this purpose. 

6. The degree of Master of Arts may be granted only after the 
completion of a course mainly literary in character; Master of Science, 
after one mainly scientific. 

Non-resident graduates may receive the Master of Arts or Master of 
Sdence degree on complying with the following conditions iif addi- 
tion to or modifying those enumerated for residents: 

1. The candidate will be required to outline a course of study, 
comprising a major and one allied minor subject, which must be 
approved by a committee of two or more professors named by the 
Faculty to pass upon it. 

2. He shall at the dose of each academic year present to the 
Faculty a report, whidi should constitute a complete synopsb of the 



I02 STATB UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

year's work, naming topics studied and authors read. These annnal 
r ep OAta ate expected to be specific and comprehensive. 

3. His graduate studies must extend over three years; although in 
exceptional cases, where the candidate devotes a large part of his time 
to study, a shorter course, but in no case less than two years, may be 
accepted. 

Civil Bngineer. The degree of Civil Engineer is not conferred 
upon completion of an undergraduate course in engineering, but 
instead thereof, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Bngrineer- 
ing. The degree C. E. will be conferred on graduates who have 
practiced the profession at least three years, and who have submitted 
an approved thesis, and passed a satisfactory examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
will be granted under the following conditions: 

I. Prerequisites. 

1. The candidate must have received the Bachelor's d^^ree either 
fiom this institution or from some other of equal rank. 

2. He must present evidence of having completed a satisfactory 
amount of undergraduate work in the subjects proposed for investi- 
gation for this degree. 

3. He must possess a knowledge of French and German at least 
sufficient for purposes of research. 

II. Conditions of Candidacy. 

1. At least three years of graduate study will ordinarily be re- 
quired. Of these two must be in residence and the last year prior to 
receiving this degree must be spent at this University. 

2. In making formal application for this degree the candidate shall 
select one major study and one or two minors; the minor study or 
studies shall be closely applied to the major and shall be such as with 
it to constitute but one single field of research. 

3. The application of the candidate setting forth the line of re- 
search proposed shall be approved and endorsed by the professor or 
professors under whose direction it is proposed to prosecute the wofk. 

III. Dissertotion. 

I. On completion of his work the candidate shall submit to the 
Faculty a formal dissertation which shall not only exhibit evidence of 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT, GRADUATE COURSES. 103 

original research but shall in itself be a oontribntion to the snm ol 
Iranian knowledge. 

2. The dissertation mnst be in acceptable literary form; although 
for acceptance it will depend chiefly npon its sabject matter. 

3. The subject of the proposed dissertation mnst be submitted to 
the Faculty not later than the last Friday in September of the year 
preceding that in which the degree is expected; and a copy of the 
disMttation printed or type-written, must be in the hands of the secre- 
tary of the Faculty not later than the 20th day of May of the year in 
which the degree is expected. In case the dissertation offered is 
accepted by the Faculty and the candidate passes satisfactorily the 
examinations, provided for in the next section following, he shall 
prior to receiving his degree deposit with the librarian of the Univer- 
Kty twenty-five printed copies of the dissertation so accepted. 

IV. BaEaminations. 

I. At such time as may be agreed upon by the candidate and the 
professors in charge of his work he shall pass an examination in form 
both oral and written; the examination to be conducted by the pro- 
fessors immediately concerned, the written privately, the oral in pre- 
sence of the Faculty. For purposes of this examination five members 
of the Collegiate Faculty shall constitute a quorum. 



MATERIAL EQUIPMENT. 



i;aboratori98. 



Chemical l^aboratory. 

The chemical laboratory occupies two stories in the laboratory 
building. This space is divided into twenty-five rooms, designed in 
such a way as to afford facilities for the prosecution of a wide range 
of chemical work. 

The general laboratory is a room loo feet long by 27 feet in mini- 
mum breadth, lighted from one side only by ten large windows. In 
this and all other rooms of the building provision has been made 
for perfect ventilation by the construction of numerous air flues. The 
building is heated by steam, which will also be freely used for chemi- 
cal purposes, as for drying-ovens, distillation, etc. 

The lecture hall is bmlt in amphitheater form with raised seats. It 
will accommodate nearly two himdred students, every one of whom 
can clearly see the lecture table and any experiment that may be per- 
formed there, even from the most distant part of the room. 

The size of the building on the ground is 150 x 105 feet. In all the 
rooms, cross lights have been avoided, and in every respect, the de- 
signer and the architect have spared no pains to meet every reason- 
able demand in the construction of a thoroughly modem and sub- 
stantial structure adapted as perfectly as means would admit to its 
special uses. 

A storage battery and dynamo in connection with a gas engine fur- 
nish the electricity to the various laboratories for electrolysis and other 
uses. Especial facilities in the way of apparatus are provided for the 
study of physical chemistry. 

104 



COLI«BGIATE DEPARTMENT. 105 

Pkyiical labofatocy. 

The phjticBl laboxatoxy occnpies the first floor and the basement of 
the North Building, with an available floor space of more than 8,000 
square feet. 

In the basement is the large engine and dynamo room containing a 
gas engine which drives a shaft twenty feet long. To this shaft are 
belted the dynamos, of which there are six of from one to ten horse- 
power capacity, and representing several types. Here also is a cable 
switch-board, meters, lamps, and other apparatus. In this room, and 
driven by the same engine, are three lathes, a planer, drill-press, forge 
and the usual tools for working metal. In the battery room are some 
45 accumulators of different varieties. A large and commodious 
photometer room is supplied with a complete Kruess photometer. 
One basement room has been equipped as an electrical laboratory. 
Another room is supplied with a cabinet-maker's bench and a few 
wood-working tools. 

On the floor above are eight rooms. The lecture room, with seats 
for some 70 students, is supplied with water and gas and with wires 
horn the dynamos and the accumulators. The windows can be easily 
darkened, and there are conveniences for making projections by sun- 
light or by electric or other artificial light. A large and well lighted 
room is devoted to the uses of a general laboratory, especially in the 
line of mechanics, and contains a number of balances, air-pumps, a 
cathetometer, and a number of other measuring instruments. Another 
large room contains much of the apparatus for electrical testing. 
Here also is the special physical library with the journals taken by the 
laboratory. Three smaller rooms are given respectively to heat, light, 
and magnetism, and are weU equipped with apparatus. There are 
also two offices, for the professor in charge and the assistant professor. 

The laboratory is fairly well supplied with lecture apparatus; and 
among the instruments of precision are many of the best and finest to 
be had. The equipment is especially full in mechanics, optics and 
electricity. Most of the apparatus has been purchased in recent years, 
a nd has been selected with great care; and some has been constructed 
for particular uses in this laboratory. 



io6 STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

l^abaratories for Ajiimal Morphology and Physiology. 

The laboratories for animal morphology and physiologj oocnpy 
the west half of the first floor of the Natural Science building together 
with a portion of the basement. They are supplied with water and 
gas throughout, and are lighted by twenty windows. 

The laboratory for the course in general morphology receives light 
from the north. It is furnished with heavy oak, slate-topped tables, 
particularly adapted to the anatomical and microscopical requirements 
of the work. The tables will accomodate thirty students at one time. 
The equipment of this laboratory includes thirty compound micro- 
scopes, the requisite accessory optical apparatus, a series of over 
seven thousand microscopical slides, a large number of anatomical 
preparations, charts and models, and the numerous pieces of minor 
apparatus, glassware, etc., incident to general biological work. 

The laboratory for the several advanced courses is lighted from the 
west and south. It is furnished with tables and reagent racks de- 
signed to meet the special requirements of the work pursued here. A 
smaller room opening from the main one supplies the conditions de- 
sired for apparatus of constant temperature. The equipment of this 
laboratory embraces special microscopes, sliding microtomes of 
approved pattern, a Minot automatic microtome for serial sectioning, a 
large I#illie water bath for paraffin imbedding, a laboratory incubator 
for work in embryology, a thermostat of ample size, a complete stock 
of biological reagents, sets of reagent bottles for each student, a large 
assortment of glassware, and various pieces of phjrsiological appar- 
atus. 

Opening from the main laboratories are smaller rooms available for 
those pursuing special lines of investigation. The basement labora- 
tory is utilised for aquaria, anatomical tanks, animal cages and appli- 
ances for various kinds of work. 

Iraboratories for Geology and Paleontology. 

The material for illustrating the work in geology and paleontology 
embraces: 

I. The museum collection of rocks, dajrs, building stones, miner- 
als and fossils. 



COIXBGIATB DEPARTMBNT. 107 

2. A large smes of maps, charts, lantern slides, photographs and 
geological models. 

3. A lithological lathe for making rock sections, or sections to iUn- 
strate the stmctnre of ancient forms of animals and plants. 

4. Fetrographical microscopes. 

5. Photographic apparatus, including a large photomicrographic 



6. A large series of negatives from which the students make prints 
to tUnstrate their permanent note books. 

7. Geological phenomena illustrated within easy reach of Iowa 
City. 

The snrronnding neighborhood affords many instructive examples 
of phenomena of interest to the student of geology. At the same 
time it offers unexcelled opportunities for field work in majyping, mak- 
ing geological sections, tracing strata from one exposure to another 
and making paleontological collections. The Pleistocene deposits are 
of especial interest The available material is not only sufficient to 
illustrate the ordinary undergraduate courses in geology, but advanced 
students will find enough to occupy their time with profit for two or 
more years. 

Botanical laboratory. 

This laboratory is located on the second floor of the Natural Science 
Building, and is in direct communication with the Herbarium. It is 
supplied with heavy oak, slate-topped tables, furnished with drawers 
and cases for the instruments used in microscopic work, and is ar- 
ranged to accommodate twenty-five students at one time. 

Twenty-five compound microscopes, with necessary accessories, 
section-cutters, etc., are at the disposal of the students. 

Connected with the main laboratory are private laboratories for stu- 
dents pursuing spedal lines of investigation. Two of these are fur- 
nished with special microscopes and apparatus for investigation in 
vegetable physiology. 

These laboratories are well lighted, and in every way adapted to 
satLsfactory work. 



io8 STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

Psycholofifical l^aboratory. 

The psychological laboratory occupies the lower floor of the brick 
building, No. 14 North Clinton street, facing the campus. It includes 
a commodious lecture room, library and reading room, in addition to 
three quiet, well-lighted rooms for laboratory work, and a dark room. 

The thorough equipment of the laboratory with appcuratus and 
needed accessories offers every opportunity for the study of the differ 
ent senses, memory, illusions, time relations of mental phenomena, 
and the nervous system. 

A partial list of apparatus is as follows: A complete set of instru- 
ments for studying the time relations of mental phenomena by the 
graphic method, recording time to the thousandth part of a second; 
this set, excluding the smaller necessary accessories, comprises the 
following pieces: a recording dnmi, two induction coils, batteries, 
storage battery, multiple key, reaction keys, five finger reaction key, 
graphic chronometer with electro-magnetic attachment, rheocord, 100 
V. d. electro-magnetic tuning-fork, double contact electro-magnetic 
timing-fork, time markers, automatic contact, galvanometer, con- 
denser, touch key, switches, commutator, telephone-receivers, Geissler 
stimulator for sight reaction, pendulum circuit interrupter, instan- 
taneous exposure apparatus, slide inductorium, foil apparatus and 
speed counter. For the study of taste and smell: several varieties of 
olfactometers and gustatory apparatus. For touch, muscle sense, tem- 
perature and kindred phenomena: three sets of muscle sense weights, 
loaded boxes for the study of the psycho-physic law and weight illu- 
sions, two sets illusion blocks, steadiness gauge, eethesiometers, hot 
and cold spot apparatus, balance scale, five dynamometers, ergograph, 
algometer, Marey tambours, thought-action apparatus, foil, musde- 
memory apparatus, voluntary motor recorder, spirometer and set of 
touch weights. For hearing : siren , sound pendulum ( by Krille) , series 
of 22 Koenig cylinders for highest audible tone, Galton whistle with 
manometer and blower, Appunn*s reed, set of tuning-forks with reso- 
nance boxes for illustrating harmony, beats and sympathetic vibration, 
two sets of forks for discriminations of pitch, metronome, two audi- 
ometers, two pitch pipes, sonometer, stroboscope for study of pitch 
differences. For sight: rotation apparatus with Maxwell color disks 



COhltnGlATn DBPAKTMENT. 109 

for illustrating mixing of colors, color contrast, etc., contrast appa- 
ratns, two tachistoscopes, apparatus for testing color blindness, Rothe's 
oolor-wheel with disks, Bradley's pseudoptics, two photometers, bino- 
cular and monocular apparatus, eye-muscle apparatus, dark box, 
apparatus for outlining the blind spot, zoetrope and perimeter. The 
latest model of the Zimmerman kymograph and Zeitsinn apparatus 
giyes facilities in dealing with all problems requiring the graphic 
method and investigation of the time sense. 

In addition to the apparatus enumerated aboye might be mentioned 
other numerous pieces for demonstration purposes. The study of the 
neryous system is illustrated by about one hundred charts in addition 
to various models, including Auzoux's dissectible model of the brain, 
ear models, eye models, ophthahnotrope, nerve-muscle machine, etc. 

The workshop, fitted out with lathe, work bench and necessary 
tools, mimeograph, dissecting apparatus, etc., forms an indispensable 
adjunct to the laboratory. 

Astrottomical Obserratory. 

The students' astronomical observatory is convenientiy located on 
the Univerrity campus. It is furnished with a five-inch equatorial 
telescope by Gmpp of Dublin, having circles, driving clock, position 
micrometer, helioscope and a solar and stellar spectroscope, a transit 
instrument by William Wuerdeman of Washington, a prismatic sex- 
tant and artificial horizon by Pistor and Martins of Berlin, clock 
dmmometer, chronograph, etc. 

The mathematical and astronomical library comprises over one 
thousand volumes, including many rare and valuable works. The 
periodical literature devoted to these branches of science is also well 
represented. 

CItII Bngineerinif I^aboratorles and l>tBXkg1Mng Rooms. 

The hydraulic laboratory is a room having a floor space of 575 square 
feet. The equipment for 1898-99 will include the necessary tanks with 
standard orifices, tubes and weirs for free and submerged flow, hook 
gauge, water meters of various kinds, pressure gauges and other 
necessary appliances for illustrating hydraulic principles; also a Price's 
pneumatic current meter for field gaugings. 



no STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The cement laboratory contains a Riehle i,ooo pound cement tester, 
a Fairbanks automatic shot-stop cement tester of same capacity, 
briquette making machine of the Sims and S. U. I. type and all 
necessary tanks, mixing sinks, molds, etc., for making complete tests 
of cement. 

The ir6u, steel, and wood laboratory contains an autographic test- 
ing machine and a 100,000 pound Riehle machine. 

The draughting rooms are well lighted and equipped with all neces- 
sary appliances. 

The department is provided with a field equipment ample to permit 
full and complete practice in the different kinds of surveying; this 
equipment consists of a vernier compass, a railroad compass, a solar 
compass, levels and transits with stadia, gradienter and Saegmullar 
solar attachment, also a plane table of the latest approved form with 
best telescopic alidade and all necessary attachments, together with 
all the rods, flags, chains, tapes, etc., that are necessary to equip fully 
the various classes and divisions in surveying without interfering 
with each other in their work. 

The engineering library consists of over 500 volumes of the standard 
works on the various engineering subjects; these books are selected 
from and are a part of the general library, but are arranged in a con- 
venient room adjacent to the drawing rooms, and are freely used by 
the engineering student. All the best engineering journals and 
periodicals are received, bound and kept on file. 

Each engineering student is eligible for member^p in the Engi- 
neering Society. This society meets each week, and papers upon 
engineering subjects are prepared and read by the students. 

An engineering journal, Tke TransU^ is published annually by the 
University. It is edited by the members of the Engineering Society, 
and contains the results of original research in engineering problems 
by undergraduate students and alumni. 



COI#LBGIATE DBPARTMENT. in 



MU8BUM. 



Mimettm of Natural History. 

The mnsetun of natural history is rapidly growing, and becomes 
daily more valuable through donations of material by friends of the 
Univenity. 

By the g en er osity of the collector, the famous Homaday collection 
of tiiiiwiTiiaia and birds has become the property of the Uniyersity. 
This collection contains many rare forms of mammals and birds, and 
is particularly rich in tjrpical exotic forms from India and Australia. 

Mr. D. H. Talbot of Sioux City has donated to the University his 
extensive collection of natural history specimens and minerals. This 
Qollection contains many thousand specimens, being especially rich in 
fif«tiwaia^ birds and anatomical preparations. 

During the last seven years, expeditions for zoological explorations 
in the interest of the University have visited the following regions: 
Bahama Islands, Bay of Fundy, Rocky Mountain region, Pacific coast, 
Alaska, mountains of Tennessee, the Winnipeg country, Lake Atha- 
basca, Great Slave Lake, the Arctic coast, Siberia, Cuba, Florida Keys, 
British West Indies and the Bay of Naples. 

An entire rearrangement of the museum has been undertaken, 
and a new S3rBtem of labeling, cataloguing, and exhibiting has been 
adopted, with the intention of making the material embraced of the 
utmost practical use to students of natural history. 

A rapidly growing library of reference for the use of students of 
zoology is placed on the museum floor, and a free use of all the mate- 
rial in the various collections is encouraged, for which purpose a 
dieetful and convenient study room has been provided for the use of 
students and specialists. 

The material includes: 

1. Geological Coilectiona. 

I. A laige series of minerals, building stones, fossils, earths, etc., 
collected chiefly in the p r os e cution of the State geological surveys, 
between the years 1856 and 1870. These collections are annually in- 
creasing by contributions from various sources. 



112 STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

2. The Calvin collection of American and European fossils. 

3. A snperb collection of cretaceous cycads from tiie Dakota sand- 
stone of the Black Hills. 

4. Recent extensive collections illustrating the cretaceous faunas 
and economic geology of the Black Hills. 

A rapidly growing collection illustrating general economic geology. 

2. Zoological Ck>Ueotlons. 

1. Mammals. A laige series of mounted specimens is now on 
exhibition* the great majority being rare and valuable foreign species, 
including a series of marsupials, which suxpasses anything of the kind 
west of the All^hanies. 

Besides the Homaday collection, the museum contains a large num- 
ber of native mammals, about forty specimens being from the Pacific 
coast. A complete series of the larger mammals of North America is 
rapidly being secured through the kindness of Mr. D. H. Talbot, and 
the efforts of Mr. Prank Russell, who returned from the far North 
Mrith an exceptionally fine series of the large mammals of that region. 

2. Birds. The ornithological material in the museum now em- 
braces about 11,000 specimens, about 1,000 of which are exhibited in 
the mounted series, the remainder being included in the study series 
for the use of students and specialists. 

Besides the large collection of native birds, containing nearly all 
the species found in Iowa, the following collections are noteworthy: 

The Homaday collection of birds, containing one hundred and 
twenty-five specimens, nearly all of which are exotics, and many, 
such as the ostrich and emu of great value. 

The Bond collection of birds of Wyoming, donated together with a 
large collection of Iowa birds, by Mr. Prank Bond of Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. 

The Harrison collection of British game birds and birds of prey, s 
large and valuable series, donated by John Harrison, Esq. of England. 

The Talbot collection of American birds, embracing thousands of 
specimens, mostiy from the Mississippi Valley. 

A collection of 500 birds from the N. W. Provinces of British Amer- 
ica, made by the Curator, Mr. Prank Russell and Mr. A. O. Smith. 

A collection of about 600 specimens of birds from the Winnip^ 



CX)LLBG1ATE DEPARTMENT. 113 

ooimtry. Great Slave Lake, Athabasca Lake, the Mackenzie River and 
the Arctic coast, made by Mr. Prank Russell. 

The dtTBtor has donated his stndy series of over 800 bird skins from 
North and Central America and the Bahama Islands. This series is 
of special value to students interested in ornithology. 

3. Reptiles. The alcoholic collection of reptiles has received many 
important additions, among which may be mentioned a number of 
specimens from India, donated by Rev. A. Loughridge, and many 
native specimens presented by students. Ex-Regent B. P. Osbom has 
donated his laige collection of alcoholic specimens, especially reptiles, 
thus nearly doubling the series of these forms. 

4. Fishes. Assistant Professor B. Shimek has presented the mu- 
seum with his entire collection of fresh-water fishes, of which we now 
have several hundred specimens, besides a number of marine forms. 

A collection of 135 species of the fresh-water fishes of Central and 
Western North America, has been donated to the University by the 
United States Pbh Commission. 

5. Insects. Assistant Professor Wickham is now engaged in as- 
sorting a large series of the coleoptera of North America, which he 
has gener o usly donated. All of the foreign coleoptera in this mag- 
nificent collection are now the property of the museum. 

6. Bfarine Invertebrates. A collection consisting of several thou- 
sand specimens of crustaceans, moUusks, star fishes, corals, sponges, 
etc, has been supplemented by a valuable series consisting of several 
hundred alcoholic specimens, many of which are the gift of the United 
States Fish Commission. 

The alcoholic collection has been enlarged by material collected 
during two expeditions to the Bahamas, Cuba and the Florida Keys, 
and thousands of specimens have been added by collections made in 
the Bay of Fundy by Professors Calvin and Nutting. 

A car load of marine specimens was secured by the Bahama expedi- 
tion in 1893. This collection contains a large number of deep-water 
forms, placing this University far ahead of all other western institu- 
tions in the matter of marine materials for exhibition and study. 

A valuable series of marine forms of the more fragile and delicate 
kinds, such as medusse, sea-anemones, etc., has been secured from the 



114 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Stizione Zoologica at Naples, where the most superb preparations of 
these wonderfully beautiful forms are made. 

7. Terrestial and Fresh Water MoUusca. The Shimek collection 
of land and fresh-water shells, embracing nearly all the species known 
to occur in Iowa, together with many exotic species. 

8. Osteological Preparations. A series of mounted skulls and skel- 
etons, illustrating the osteol<^gy of typical series of vertebrates, is 
exhibited, and is of the greatest value to students of comparative 
anatomy and zoology. 

9. Ethnological Material, illustrating the handiwork of the Mound 
Builders, Pueblo Indians, Zunis, Moquis, Acomas, Mojaves, Crees, 
Dog Ribs, Metis, Kosmolliks, Piegans, Tchukchees and Navajos, to- 
gether with skulls and other remains of the ancient and modem in- 
habitants of America. 

Mr. D. H. Talbot of Sioux City has added very largely to this 
department of the museum. Mr. Russell has been active in securing 
ethnological specimens Illustrating the life and manufactures of the 
Crees, other northern tribes of Indians and of the Esquimaux. 

8. Botanical Ck>llections. 

The herbarium is crowded into a single room on the second floor of 
the Natural Science Building. It contains: 

I. A very large and constantly increasing collection of fungi, 
chiefly saprophytic, from all parts of North and Central America. To 
be classed here is also a large collection of the myxomyoetes from all 
parts of the world. 

3. A large collection of ferns and mosses from both hemispheres. 

3. A collection of lichens, representing most of the species east of 
the Rocky Moimtains. 

4. A collection of many thousand flowering plants, representing 
very fully the local flora, and especially rich in Central American and 
European forms. The number of plants in the herbarium exceeds 
aoo,ooo. 

5. A collection of seeds and dry fruits including cones, repre- 
senting the flora of North America chiefly, but containing also much 
material from the Tropics. 

6. A collection of the principal woods of the United States. 



CX)I.LBGIATE DEPARTMENT. 115 

The herbarium coUecticms, thanks to friends and collectors in 
▼ariooa parts of the world, are rapidly increasing in extent and value. 
It IS hoped that private collectors will hereafter as heretofore find the 
University a proper place for the deposit and care of collections of 
plants. 

Botanical Expeditions. Mr. Charles h. Smith was in Nicaragua 
from August 1894 to May 1896, as botanist for the University. He 
made handsome collections, reports of which will appear in succeeding 
numbers of the BuUetin of the Laboratories of Natural History . In 
• 1897 botanical expeditions were sent to various sections of the United 
States. The principal one of these was in charge of Mr. T. E. Savage 
and waa employed in Southeastern Missouri. 

Special thanks in this connection are also due to E. D. W. Holway, 
A. P. Moigan, C. L. Smith, George Payne, Euclid Sanders, James E. 
Gow, T. J. Pitzpatrick, P. Reppert, J. H. Mills, ly. P. Pammel, J. B. 
Ellis, H. P. Wickham, Paul Bartsch, B. Pink, R. I. Cratty, J. E. 
Cameron, C. C. Stover, L. M. Cavanagh, G. B. Rigg, T. E. Savage, 
P. C. Myers, C. W. Irish, C. W. Sears, E. Bethel, Katharine Vale, 
Fkofeasor Van Steenderen, Columbian Museum, H. I/. Jones, S. Cal- 
vin, Minnie L.Howe, Wilfred Stull. 

OBNSRAi; INFORMATION. 



The I^ibrary. 

Notwithstanding the loss of some 25,000 volumes by fire June 19, 
1897, the University has been able to supply the immediate wants of 
students in the past year by making fresh purchases, and the facili- 
ties for library work are now good. A large number of new books and 
new editions will be added in the ensuing year to the present collec- 
tion, which now numbers about 16,700 volumes. The 27th General 
Assembly has passed an act levying a special tax for the rehabilitation 
of the library. This tax will make about |55iOOO available for this 

purpose. 

Nearly 130 periodicals, foreign suid domestic, are regularly taken. 
These are kept in the general reading-room and are accessible to all 
students during Ubrary hours. 



Ii6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

The main room of the library is large and well lighted and ia open 
to students of all departments of the University from 8 a. m. to 12 ic. 
and from 1:30 to 5 p. m. 

Societies. 

Several literary and scientific societies are maintained by the Faculty 
and the students of the University. They afford an important means 
of general culture and scientific research, and thus form a valuable 
element as well as an attractive feature in University life. 

The Baconian has for its object discussion of scientific queationst 
and the Pouticai, Scibnck Ci^ub discusses questions in history, 
politics, economics, law, education and ethics. The Whitnky 
Society is devoted to the field of language and literature and the 
methods of instruction in these subjects. 

The Phi Bbta Kappa Socibty elects to membership on the basis 
of high scholarship a certain number from the graduating class who 
have completed the Classical or Philosophical Course. 

Among the purely literary societies are the Tabard, Polygon 
and lYv Lanb. The Irving Institute, the Zbtagathian SocntTY, 
the PHii«oiif ATHiAN Society for young men, and the Hisspbrian 
Society and the Erodei*phian Society for young women, hold 
weekly meetings for improvement in debate, oratory, writing and 
declamation. 

There are also in the institution societies connected with the Engi- 
neering, Chemical, Law and Medical departments. 

There is connected with the Irving and Zetagathian Societies a Lec- 
ture Bureau, which furnishes at a small cost during the year a series 
of literary and musical entertainments of a high order. Prom time to 
time, also, entertainments, musical, literary and dramatic arc given 
by the University Glee Club, the Band, and other student organiza- 
tions. 

University Pablications. 

NatunU History Bulletin, The laboratories of natural history 
inaugurated in 1888 the publication of bulletins for the purpose of 
preserving a record of the work prosecuted along the lines of botany, 
geology and zoology. Three volumes have thus far appeared in 



COLI.BGIATE DBPARTMENT. 117 

twdve numben, and two numbers of the fourth volume have been 
published. Material for three numbers more is at hand and these 
may be expected during the next eighteen months. The numbers are 
xnXgnUis to all correspondents from whom the University receives 
an equivalent, either in publications or material. To others the price 
is 50 cents a number. Address the Secretary of the University. 

The Transit, An engineering journal, 77te Tensity is published 
annually by the University. It is edited by the members of the Engi- 
neering Society, and contains the results of original research in 
engineering problems by undergraduate students and alumni. 

Siudies in P^chology. This is an annual publication devoted to 
experimental psychology, begun in 1897. It contains the results of 
original research by the students and instructors in the psycholog- 
ical laboratory. 

Documentary Material Relating to the History of Iowa, These 
publications contain documentary material illustrative of the history 
and politics of the commonwealth of Iowa. The series is edited by 
the professor of government and administration. 

Student Pnblications. 

The Vidette-Reporter. A tri-weekly newspaper. 

The Quill. A weekly literary publication. 

The Hawfceye, A University annual published by the Junior class. 

University BzteiiBion. 

The University recognizes in the University Extension movement 
an agency of great value in education. It invites correspondence from 
commnnities which may desire to organize lecture courses on literary 
aad scientific subjects, and will to the extent of its ability meet the 
desires of these communities. 

I^ectnre courses covering a wide range of subjects are offered by 
members of the University Faculties. 

An arrangment has been made between the University and the 
University Association of Chicago by which University professors, so 
to as their regular duties will allow, will lecture before the centers 
working under the care of the Assodation. 



n8 STATE UNTVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Printed matter explaining the work offered by the Universtty, 
indnding syllabi of lecture couraea, ia pnbliahed by the Univeratty, 
and can be secured by addreaaing the Director of Univeraity Bztenaion. 

Prices. 

Peck Prizss.— Mr. F. W. Peck of Chicago has eatabliahed for the 
Northern Oratorical League prizes of $ioo and (50 to be given to the 
first and second honor men in the annual contests. 

PiCKARD PRIZ9.— A prize of $20 waa offered last year by Dr. J. L. 
Pickard for the encouragement of extempore speaking to the student 
in political acienoe who waa awarded first rank in competitive extem- 
pore debate. A prize of the same value is again offered for thia year. 
The competitive debate will take place early in June. 

Sawyer Prize. A special gold medal, or a purse of $25, known 
as The Sawyer Prize, is offered for 1899 for the best essay of three 
thousand words written by any student of the Univeraity on a 
subject approved by the professor of English. 

Robert Tii^unghast French Prize.— A gold medal, in memory 
of the late Captain Robert French of Davenport, is offered for the best 
short story written by any student of the Univeraity. If work of suffi- 
cient merit is offered in competition, the medal will be awarded in 
1898. If no such work is offered in that year, the medal will be 
awarded the first year sufficiently good work appears. 

LowDEN Prizes.— Frank O. Lowden, Esq. of the daaa. of 1885 
offers two prizes of the value of $2$ each for excellence in classical 
scholarship,— one for work in Latin and the other for work in Greek. 
The conditions of the competition will be announced at the opening 
of the collegiate year 1898-99. 

Mayer Prize.— Mr. Max Mayer of Iowa City haa establiahed a 
prize of the annual value of $2$ for excellence in athletics. The de^ 
taila as to the special matters of competition and the methods of 
awarding the prizea will be publicly announced at the beginning of 
the year 1898-99. This prize is open to students of all departments of 
the University. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 119 

Stttdents and CiYil Attthoiitiea. 

The relations of students to all laws and to city ordinances is pre- 
cisely the same as that of other residents of the dty. The University 
gionnds are as completely under the jurisdiction of the civil authori- 
ties as any other part of the dty. 



Heana of Moral and Relisicma Cttltnre. 

Oose Hall has been erected through the exertions of the Young 
Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations; mainly fxom funds 
oontribated by the Faculty, students and alumni of the University 
and the dtizens of Iowa City. It is a spacious and convenient build- 
ing, containing a laige assembly hall, gymnasium, reading rooms, 
reception room and bath rooms. It is extensively used for the meet- 
ings of the large and vigorous Christian Assodations, as well as for 
the social and literary gathering of the students. 

The dinrches of the dty take a deep interest in the students of the 
University and heartily welcome them to their public services and to 
a share in their religious activities and social life. The churches of 
the dty are the Baptist, Christian, Congregational, German and Eng- 
lish Lutheran, Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, Protestant Episco- 
pal, Roman Catholic, Unitarian and Church of God. 

Phjrsical Training: and Athletice. 

The University authorities encourage physical training as acquired 
in a gymnasium, in military drill and in the exercises and sports in 
the Athletic Park, but only in such amount and of such character as 
is compatible with, and promotive of the higher objects of the Uni- 
versity. Intercollegiate contests axe allowed, but under conditions 
as to membership and oxganization of teams, and leaves of absence 
determined by the athletic committee of the Faculty. 

Athletic Park. , This field contains about ten acres in the immediate 
vidnity of the University grounds on which have been constructed a 
track for running and bicyding, tennis courts, baseball and football 
fidds and a gruid stand. 



lao STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Qy tntiAJMnm . In coimection with Close Hall is an excellent gym- 
nasinm, equipped with suitable apparatus, lockers, baths, etc This 
is under the direction of a competent instructor, who oi^nizes classes 
for both young men and young women. 

New Collegiate Bttildins:. 

The 26th General Assembly passed an act levying a special tax for a 
period of five years of one-tenth mill on the total assessment of the 
State, the proceeds to be devoted exclusively to the erection of build- 
ings for the University. This tax will yield $275,000 and it is the 
intention of the Board of Regents to begin during the current year 
the construction of a laige and well equipped building for the use of 
the Collegiate Department. 



There arc no dormitories and no commons connected with the Uni- 
versity. 

Boarding and lodging in private houses can be obtained for from I3 
to $5 a week. 

Clubs are also formed, in which the cost of living is from I1.50 to 
{2.50 a week. 

Room rent varies from 50 cents to |i.5ofor each student a we^. 

The expense for tuition is as follows: 

Collegiate Department, $25 per annum, payable, |io at the begin- 
ning of the first term, |io at the beginning of the second term, and 
the balance at the beginning of the third term. For one or two terms 
the fee will be $10 each. 

It has been determined, however, by the Board of Regents, that no 
student need be excluded from the University by reason of his inabil- 
ity to pay tuition. Application for reduction of tuition, or for exemp- 
tion therefrom, may be made to the President, and will be considered 
by the Executive Committee, or by the Board of Regents. 

Each candidate for graduation will be required to pay a fee of (5. 

A fee of |io is required of all candidates for the Master's d^;ree, for 
the degree of Civil Engineer, or the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 



COLI/EGIATE DEPARTMENT. wi 

Ample facilities are afforded in the dty for instruction in Book- 
keqxing, Stenography and Type-writing, in studies preparatory to the 
Umversity and in Music, by the High School, the Iowa City Com- 
mercial CoU^ie, the Academy, the Iowa City Conservatory of Music, 
and by private instructors. 



Stunmer Seoeion. 

Beginning with the summer of 1899 the University will hold a Sum- 
mer Session in the interest of teachers in the public and preparatory 
schools as well as of undergraduates who wish to carry on regular 
work during that period. Special announcements will be made in 
doe time. 



Law Department 



Faculty and Lecturers. 



Chari^BS Ashmsad Schabppsr, a. M., Ph. D., LL- D., 

President and I^ecturer on Medical Jariaprudence. 

Emi«in McCZrAiN, A. M., hit, D., 

Chancellor and Resident Professor of I«aw. 

SamUKI* HaybS, M. S., LL. B., 
Resident Professor of I^w. 

Jambs a. Rohbach, A. M., LL. B., 

Secretary and Resident Professor of I^w. 

John J. Nby, LL. B., 

Resident Professor of I^w. 

Edward P. Sbbds, LI<. B., 

Resident Professor of I^w. 

L. G. KiNNB, LL. D., 
I«ecturer on I«aw. 

GiPFORD S. Robinson, LL. D., 

I^ectnrer on I^w. 

Martin J. Wads, LL. B., 

I^ecturer on I^w. 

Horace E. Dbbmsr, LL. B., 

Lecturer on I^w. 

lyBONARD 0. RiNARD, t,lt» B. 
Librarian. 



LAV DEPAKTMBNT, 



Preparatory Study; J^ength of Course. 

The profession of law is properly regarded as a learned profession, 
requiring a considerable degree of general education as a preparation 
for its proper study and practice. Those who can take a college course, 
either in whole or in part, before entering upon the prescribed period 
of law study should do so, and it is recommended that in preparatory 
study special attention be given to American and English history, 
political science and international law. But whether one who desires 
to enter upon the study of law shall have collegiate preparation may 
perhaps be left to his own judgment, with the suggestion that such 
preparation is important to tiltimate professional success. But in order 
that the student may successfully prosecute his studies in the law 
school be should have at least a high school education or its equiva- 
lent, and this will be insisted upon as a condition for admission to 
this Department. 

The Statutes of Iowa regulating admission to the bar require two 
yeaxB* study of law, and the same term of study is required for gradu- 
ation from the Law Department. The course of study is arranged on 
this basis, extending through two school years of thirty-six weeks 
each, exclusive of vacations, and tbe students are classified accordingly 
as Juniors and Seniors. The State Bar Association has recommended 
to tbe Legislature the extension of the required term of study for 
admission to the Bar to three years and whenever such extension is 
made the Law Department will, without doubt, extend its course of 
study to three years, and in this respect as in others strive to keep 
abreast of the best law schools of the country, but so long as a two 
yeaxB' term of study is sufficient to secure admission to the bar it is not 
deemed expedient to require a longer term for graduation from the 

Department* 

123 



124 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Methods of Inetntctioti. 

The aim of any course of instruction in law may properly be con- 
sidered as twofold: First, to impart a knowledge of the recognized 
principles of the law, and, secondly, to discipline the mind in methods 
of legal study. Various methods of instruction, each having its 
special merits, are pursued in different schools. They may be roughly 
arranged in three classes, namely, lectures, text-book instruction and 
study of cases. The peculiar merit of the first is that it may be made 
the means of giving the most vivid and striking picture of legal 
principles; the second furnishes the most convenient means of indi- 
vidual study, and the third the best discipline in legal thinking. In 
this school the effort is made so to present the subjects as to combine 
in the highest practicable degree the excellences of these various 
methods. 

In connection with several of the lecture courses, the students are 
furnished with printed S3mopses, which give in a concise form, and 
more accurately than a student would usually write them in his note- 
book, the principal doctrines of the subject, arranged according to 
some analytical method. On some of the most extensive and impor- 
tant subjects, the students are required to provide themselves with 
and use text-books in which lessons are to be regularly prepared and 
recited, the recitations either following, or being accompanied with, 
oral explanations more or less formal, calling attention to the impor- 
tant doctrines, and explaining those which may be obscure. The 
study of leading cases is carried on extensively in connection with the 
courses of lectures, references for that purpose being given by the 
lecturer, or printed in the synopsis, and the student is frequently 
required to state briefly in the class the points decided in cases assigned 
for that purpose. In some subjects the students are required to pro- 
vide themselves with volumes of selected cases, and the exercise in 
the class consists of a discussion of such cases by members of the 
class, and deduction therefrom of the rules of law on the topic to 
which the cases relate. This exerdse in developing the rules of law 
from actual cases selected for the purpose, and studied by each stu- 
dent before their discussion in the class, familiarizes the student with 
the methods of investigation pursued by the lawyer and the judge, 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 125 

and gives not only a knowledge of the law on the subject, but a 
discipline in research and in legal thinking not to be attained, it is 
believed, in any other way. As a preparation for this method of study, 
the course in the study of cases is especially valuable. 

The fact that the greater part of the instruction is by resident pro- 
fessors, giving their entire time to the school, makes it possible to 
pursue each subject consecutively, one hour a day, until it is con- 
cluded. The attention of each student being thus directed to but few 
topics at once, he is able to obtain a clearer and more complete con- 
ception of each than would be possible if the instruction were irregu- 
lar and disconnected. 

As an aid and stimulus in study, and also for the purpose of fur- 
nishing satisfactory evidence of progress, written examinations are 
required from time to time on the various topics of the course, and 
until a reasonable proficiency in each topic has thus been shown, the 
candidate for graduation will not be presented to the committee for 
final examination. 

Schedule of Stndies. 

The course of study is so arranged that the Junior and Senior classes 
have separate and distinct courses of instruction throughout, and the 
subjects are divided between the two courses and arranged in each 
course so as to be presented in natural order. 

In the Junior year are placed subjects which are elementary and at 
the same time fundamental. The work of this year is therefore of 
more importance to the student than that of the Senior year, and 
requires careful study, at the same time imparting thorough dicipline 
and familiarity with the methods of legal reasoning. It is believed 
that the Junior studies are such as to make of the greatest value to 
the student the services of regular and experienced instructors and the 
advantages of a law school. Unless the principles of law as a system, 
the nature of its important divisions, and the fundamental doctrines 
of such subjects as Elementary Law, Contract, Torts, Criminal Law, 
Pleading, and Evidence, are thoroughly mastered, the whole legal 
education wUl be defective and tmsatisfactory. 

The courses of study are so arranged that the students in each year 



126 STATE UNIVBRSITY OP IOWA. 

shall have instraction in studies peculiar to that year for at least two 
honrs a day, that time being divided between two instmctors on sep- 
curate subjects, which are thus carried along together. In each class a 
third hour of class work will be required during a part of the year. 

The following schedule of study has several features to some extent 
peculiar. At the beginning of the Junior year a course of lectures, 
occupying one hour a day, is given on Elementary Law, in which 
course the attention of the student is called to the nature of law, its 
sources and development, the difference between the unwritten and 
the written law, the method of determining what the law is by use of 
reports, statutes, treatises, digests, etc., and finally to the different 
branches into which the whole body of the law is usually divided, and 
their relations to each other. This course covers remedial as well as 
substantive law, and thus furnishes instruction in the general princi- 
ples of pleading, serving in this respect as a basis for the study of 
Code Pleading. 

To the various branches of pleading and practice, special attention 
is given. Although it has been generally considered that the logic of 
pleading is to be found in the common law system, while the code 
system is looked upon as unscientific, yet a comparative study of the 
two will show that the latter is broader in its principles and more lib- 
eral in its application than the former. The principal branches of 
practice are fully treated during the Junior 3rear in order that the stu- 
dent may apply them in the moot courts; but an advanced course in 
pleading with special reference to principles of common law pleading 
is given in the Senior 3rear. 

The school attempts to teach how to ascertain the authoritative 
value of cases. There is one course in which this is the only purpose. 
In this course the facts, pleadings, and result of each case are briefly 
stated by the student. Attention is then directed to the manner in 
which the case reached the court whose opinion is reported. The stu- 
dent is required to discover exactly what proposition of law was es- 
sential to the decision and to eliminate dida. To this end he is finally 
required to prepare a brief but accurate note of the doctrine for which 
the case is authority. This work is Intended to fit students for pre- 
paring briefs, text-books, and digests. Obviously this method is 
identical with that adopted by all careful lawyers in collecting author- 



LAW DBPARTMBNT. 127 

ities. The student who has mastered the system is prepared to make 
good use of other case courses in which the ultimate purpose is the 
mastery of the subject to which the cases pertain, and, indeed, is pre- 
pared to use intelligently all cases to which he may be referred in any 
part of his study or future practice. 

The general instruction in the Law Department does not give prom- 
inence to the statutes and decisions of any one state, but is intended 
to fit students to practice in any state or country where the Anglo- 
American system of law prevails. For the benefit of the student who 
has determined where he will practice, and who wishes to familiarize 
himself in advance with the statutes and decisions of his chosen state, 
the Law Department furnishes optional courses of study supplementing 
the prescribed courses. An optional course will be given on the 
law of any state or territory, in which three or more students ask 
instruction. Bach course will cover the constitution, statutes, and 
decisions, will call special attention to the points in which the law of 
the state in question differs from the law usually found throughout 
the United States, and will also require the student to become well 
acquainted with leading cases. A student intending to pursue a course 
in state law must provide himself with the revised statutes of the state 
in question, and a digest of its decisions. 

The following schedule presents the course substantially as it was 
given during the year 1897-98 and the order in which the subjects 
may be expected during the year 1898-99. 



JUNIOR TBAR. 



PAI,L TERM. 

Tiltmentaxy J^aw. A course of lectures presenting the element- 
ary principles of law in general, and of its important branches. This 
course covers also the principles of pleading. Bight and one-half 
wedLS. Professor Rohbach. 

Contracto* Bishop on Contracts is the text-book used. Ten 
weeks. Professor Nby. 

Code Pieadlliff. A course of instruction, mainly by lecture, on 



128 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

pleading nnder the codes, with practical exercises. Fiye weeks. Pro- 
fessor Haybs. 

Study of Cases. Recitations in Wambangh's Cases for Analysis. 
Three and one-half weeks. Chancellor McCi«ain. 

WINTER TBRM. 

SaleSt Bailments and Pleds^es. A coarse of instruction by the 
use of Burdick*8 Cases on Sales and printed synopsis of bailments 
and pledges. Nine weeks. Chancellor McCEiAIN. 

Torts. Recitations in Cooley on Torts, with oral explanations, 
and citation and examination of leading cases. Eleven weeks. Pro- 
fessor Hayes. 

Asrency. A course of lectures. One week. Judge Robinson. 

Domestic Relations. A course of lectures on the subject of mar- 
riage and divorce, the property rights of married women, parent and 
child, guardian and ward, the rights and liabilities of infants, and 
kindred topics. Two weeks. Judge Kinnb. 

Guaranty and Stiretyship. A course of lectures. One week. 
Judge DbBMER. 

SPRING TERM. 

Nes^otiable Instruments. Recitations in Norton on Bills and 
Notes. Five weeks. Professor Rohbach. 

Trial and Judgment. Lectures and procedure at law in Courts 
of Record from the beginning of the trial until the entering of judg- 
ment, with references to statutory provisions. Five weeks. Professor 

Ney. 

Evidence. Recitations in Jones on Evidence. Five weeks. Judge 
Wade. 

Criminal l^aw. A course of lectures accompanied with recitations 
in McClain's Outlines of Criminal Law and Procedure, with re fe rences 
also to statutory provisions. Five weeks. Professor Rohbach.. 

Probate I^aw and Procedure. A course of lectures on the 
execution and probate of wills, and the law of executors and adminis- 
trators, including the settlement and distribution of decedents* estates, 
with references to statutory provisions and examination of 
Five weeks. Professor Sheds. 



LAW DBPARTMEMT. 139 

SBNIOR YSAR. 



Real Property. Recitatioiis in Tiedeman on Real Property, 
accompanied with oral ezplanationa and ref erencea to leading caaes 
and lectures on actiona to recover real property. Ten weeks. Pro- 



Inattraiice. A coorae of lectures on Fire, Life, and Accident 
Insurance. Pour weeks. Chancellor McCi,ain. 

Carriers. Study of cases, McClain*s Caaes on Carriers (covering 
both carriers of goods and carriers of passengers) being used as a 
test-book. Six weeks. Chancellor McCi^ain. 

Criminal Procedure. Lectures with recitations in McClain'a 
Outlines of Criminal Law and Procedure. Three and one-half weeks. 



Chattel Kortsragfea. A course of instruction by lectures with a 
printed aynopais. Three and one-half weeks. Professor Nky. 

WINTBR TS&M. 

Bquity, and Bqnity Pleading. Recitations in Bispham on 
Bquity. Lectures on Equity Pleading. Eleven weeks. Professor 

SBBD6. 

CorporatioiUl* Lectures upon the general doctrinea of the Law 
of Corporations, both private and municipal. Seven weeka. Professor 



A]»pellate Proceedings. Lectures upon the practice and pro- 
cedure in Appellate Courts. One week. Judge Robinson. 

Taxation. A course of lectures. Two weeks. Judge Kinnb. 

Trial Practice. A course of lectures. One week. Judge 

DSEICBR. 

Damagea. Recitations in Beale's Cases on Damages. Optional. 
Pour weeks. Chancellor McCi^ain. 

SPRING TBMU. 

Partttenthip* Study of Cases, Paige's Caaes on Partnership being 
nssd as a tczt-book. Pour weeks. Professor Hayvs. 



I30 STATE UOTVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

Cotiatitational l^aw and Federal Jtiriapradeiice* I^ecttms, 
Black's Constitntioiial Law being used as a text-book, and also stady 
of selected cases. Ten weeks. Chancellor McCIiAIn. 

Attachment, Oamlalmieiit and Szecntion. X^ectnres, with 
references to statutory provisions and leading cases. Three weeks. 
Professor Hayes. 

Justice Practice. Lectures on Practice in Justices* Courts. Two 
weeks. Optional. Professor SEEDS. 

Pleadins^. An advanced course, Perry on Pleading being used as 
a text-book. Lectures. Three weeks. Professor Hayes. 

International !l^aw* Lectures, with recitations in Snow*s Cases 
on International Law as a text book. Optional. Pour weeks. Chan- 
cellor McClfAIN. 

Studied in Collegiate Department. 

For the purpose of giving the law students all the advantages of the 
University which it will be practicable for them to make use of, it has 
been arranged that so many of them as can do so without interference 
with the regular studies required of them in the Law Department, 
may attend any classes in the Collegiate Department. 

Special attention is called ip the opportunity thus afforded for the 
study of elocution (in which separate classes are organized for law 
students) and for pursuing any of the courses of study laid down in 
political science, in history, in logic, or in English. No extra charge 
will be made for such studies, but law students will be admitted to 
such classes only on the approval of the Law Faculty, and with the 
consent of the professor whose class they desire to enter. 

l4B,w mectiyea for Collegiate Students. 

The Collegiate Faculty permits Seniors in that Department to take 
as elective studies in their collegiate course, and to receive credit 
therefor, any of the Junior law studies to the extent of thirty-siz 
weeks' work of one hour a day, but this provision does not apply to 
students entering the Senior year from other colleges. 

It is believed that, whether looked upon as a means of mental disci- 
pline, or as a preparation for the duties of citizenship or the prosecn* 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 131 

tion of busitiess, a full course in the I<aw Department will be found, 
for those who are properly prepared for it and can pursue it as a part 
of a liberal education, fully equal to any course of study that can be 
pursued for the same length of time. If, however, a student deems it 
not practicable for him to pursue such a course of study after gradua- 
tion from the Collegiate Department, he may derive some of the 
advantages of such study, and some insight into the principles and 
methods of the system of law under which he lives, by electing as part 
of his regular course some of the groups of studies above given. 

Credit will be given to students in the Collegiate Department taking 
studies in this Department for work done, but no credit can be given 
to those students in respect to time, the statute requiring, for admission 
to the bar of the State, that the applicant shall have spent at least two 
years of nine months each in a law school, or two years of twelve 
months each, in the office of some practicing attorney. Therefore, 
while this Department gives credit for work done in any study taken 
with its classes, 3ret it will not give credit for time unless the student 
taking such study or studies shall have been duly enrolled as a student 
of this Department. 

Moot Cottrts. 

For the purpose of affording ezerdse in the application of legal 
principles to statements of facts, and in connection with instruction in 
pleading and practice, moot courts have become a well recognized 
and important feature of the Jaw School. Two such courts are con- 
ducted in connection with the Department, holding their sessions on 
one or more afternoons of each week, each presided over by a mem- 
ber of the Faculty. It is deemed best to keep the members of the two 
classes separate in this, as in other work of the school, and it is thus 
possible to select the cases assigned so that they may relate to subjects 
on which the students have already had instruction. The Senior moot 
court will be organized at the beginning of the fall term, whilst that 
of the Juniors will not commence its work until the winter term, prac- 
tical exercises in pleading being given the members of that class dur- 
ing the iaU term, in connection with instruction in pleading and 



T32 STATB UNIV^StSITY OF IOWA. 

The method of oondnctiog these courts is to give to two or more 
students, representing the attorneys in the case, a written statement 
showing the facts on which the action and defense are to he hased* 
Pleadingsare then prepared as they would be in an actual case. These 
pleadings are subjected to attack by motion or demurrer, and the 
issues of law or fact raised are tried to the court, the statement of 
facts being regarded as the evidence offered on issue of fact. 

Another method of trial has been introduced with success, which in- 
volves the proof by competent evidence of the facts shown by the 
statement. This gives practice in the examination of witnesses and in 
appljdng the rules determining the admissibility of evidence. During 
one term, trials are conducted with all the formalities usual in nisi 
prius courts, jurors being summoned and impaneled,* witnesses sub- 
poenaed, and instructions prepared and given. 

It is also recommended that the students form dub courts for f ur^ 
ther exercise in pleading and practice. Professors will give such 
assistance in forming and conducting club courts as is needed. 

Iriterary Societiea. 

Two literary societies, the Hammond Law Senate and The 
Porum, composed exclusively of students of this Department hold re- 
gular weekly meetings, furnishing to their members valuable training 
in debating and other exercises usually provided for by such organiza- 
tions. 

Iribrary Facilities. 

In commodious quarters on the same floor with the lecture-room is 
the Law library of nine thousand two hundred volumes, to which 
the students have personal access. This library contains a full series 
of the reports of the Supreme Court of the United States and of the 
courts of last resort of thirty-three states, including all the aeries of 
reports most frequently referred to; also the American. Decisions, 
American Reports, American State Reports, a collection of Bng- 
lish Reports, which, with additions lately made, is almost complete, 
full series of the Reporter System and a laige collection of the latest 
andibest law text-books. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 133 

The Hbrary is in charge of a regular librarian who renders valuable 
MMHtawce to the students in the prosecution of their work. 

The library rooms are open for the use of students from 8 a. ic. to 
12 M. and from 1:30 to 5:30, and 7 to 9 p. m. of each school day, and 
during the forenoon of Saturday. 

The UniTersity library is open to the students of this Department, 
as well as those of the other Departments of the University, and books 
may be drawn from it under reasonable regulations. No extra charge 
is made for the privileges of either of the libraries. 

Hammond Historical I^aw Collectioii. 

A valuable collection of twelve hundred volumes relating principally 
to the Civil Law and the History of the Common Law, presented to 
the University by the widow of William G. Hammond, LL. D., the 
first Chancellor of the Law Department, is kept in the Law library as 
a separate collection for the use of the students of the Department 
and others interested in such subjects. These books are in special 
cases, under the charge of the Law librarian and accessible on 
request. 

l^ctttre Hall. 

The Law Department has the exclusive occupancy of the second 
floor of the central, or stone building, on the campus, which was 
erected for and used as the Capitol Building before the removal of the 
capital of the State to Des Moines. The rooms on this floor are those 
fonnerly occupied as legislative chambers. The lecture hall is fur- 
nished with arm-chairs provided with broad arm-rests for use in tak- 
ing notes. 

Fees *and Szpeaaea. 

The rate of tuition established by the Board of Regents is $20 per 
tenn, of about twelve weeks, payable in advance, to the Secretary of 
the Univerrity. Each student upon passing his finsl examination, is 
required to pay the sum of (7 as a graduation fee, to cover the charge 
for diploma and for oertliicates of admiasion to the State and Federal 
OoMts. There are no other fees or chaiges. 



134 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Other expenses may be made very reasonable. Good board and 
lodging can be had at from $3.50 to $4.50 per week, and this may be 
reduced to $2.50 or I3.00 per week by taking meals in dnbs. 

Coet of Books. 

The books required for use in recitations, and with which the stu- 
dent must provide himself, are the following: 

Bishop on Contracts; McClain's Synopses; Annotated Code of Iowa; 
Wambaugh's Cases for Analysis; Burdick's Cases on Sales; Cooley on 
Torts; Jones on Evidence; McClain's Outlines of Criminal Law and 
Procedure; Norton on Bills and Notes; Tiedeman on Real Property; 
McClain's Cases on Carriers; Bispham's Principles of Equity; Black's 
Constitutional Law; Perry on Pleading; Paige's Cases on Partnership, 
and the Law Bulletin. 

The cost of the required books will not exceed ^.00 for the Junior 
year, or $70.00 for both years. 

The student will find it greatly to his advantage to provide himself 
with a good law dictionary, and if practicable, a copy of Blackstone's 
Commentaries in any edition. It is desirable, also, that the student 
bring with him or purchase, in addition to the above list of required 
books, as many as practicable of the following which are recommended 
as the leading and best books on the subjects which are taught by 
lectures; Walker's American Law, of Pomeroy's Municipal Law; 
Schouler's Domestic Relations; Pomeroy's Remedies and Remedial 
Rights, or Bliss on Code Pleading; Drake on Attachment; Benjamin, 
or Tiedeman, on Sales; Schouler on Bailments and Carriers; Story, 
or Mechem, on Agency; Bates on Partnership; May on Insurance; 
Beach, or Morawetz, on Corporations; Curtis on Jurisdiction of Federal 
Courts; Cooley's Constitutional Limitations. 

Any of the books mentioned may be procured through the Law 
librarian from time to time, as needed, at a considerable reduction 
from list price; they are not kept for sale by the book-stores in Iowa 
City. 

The Department owns about twelve sets of the text-books above 
mentioned as required in the course, which it will rent in sets to stu- 
dents, furnishing them all the books required for either year for 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 135 

I12.50 for the year. The rent sets do not include a law dictionary, 
nor the I^aw Bnlletln. As there are sometimes more calls for rent 
sets than can be met, those who desire to rent books should make 
i^plicatiott in advance. 

Btttollmettt and Preliminary Bxaininationa. 

Students may enroll at any time. It is better, however, to enter at 
the beginning of the term, and best to enter at the commencement of 
the school year. 

Those who enter the Department are expected to have an English 
education at least equivalent to that generally given in the high 
schools of the State. A diploma, or certificate, showing the comple- 
tion of a college or high school course, or a course of study in an 
acsdemy, equivalent to a high school course, will be accepted in lieu 
of an examination. Students who have not such diploma or certifi- 
cate, must take a preliminary examination in the usual branches of a 
high school course, or present such evidence of proficiency therein as 
the Faculty may require. 

At the preliminary examination of September, 1897, each candidate 
was required to write a short essay, correct in expression, spelling, 
capitalization, punctuation and paragraphing, on any one of the fol- 
lowing subjects, the essay not containing less than three hundred nor 
more than six hundred words. The subjects were: 

Daniel Webster and contemporaneous history; The Monroe Doctrine; 
Causes leading to the War with England in 1812; The Missouri Com- 
promise; Kansas, the struggle as to whether it should be free or slave; 
Fenn and the Settlement of Pennsylvania; The Settlement of James- 
town. 

Future examinations will be simDar to the examination here de- 
scribed, the subjects for essays varying from year to year. 

Students wishing to study special subjects without graduation will 
be admitted without preliminary examination upon showing them- 
selves Qualified to pursue the studies desired. 

Preliminary examinations will be held on Wednesday, September 
14th, 1898, commencing at 9 a. m. 



136 STATE UOTVERSmr OF IOWA. 

Admission to Senior Standinsr. 

A student may be admitted to the Senior class who has studied law 
for one school year of at least thirty-six weeks in this or some other 
law school, or who has studied law in this or some other law school 
for at least ten weeks, and, in addition, has read law tmder the direc- 
tion of an attorney for snch length of time as to make eight months* 
stndy. Time of practice as a licensed attorney in any state will be 
considered equivalent to a like period of reading under the direction 
of an attorney. If the claim for advanced standing is bssed upon 
other grounds than attendance in this school, certificates of the neces- 
sary facts must be presented when Senior standing is claimed. 

In addition to the requirements as to time, it will be necessary that 
the applicant shall pass an examination, before admission to the 
Senior class, upon at least five of the principal subjects of the Junior 
year, and if he is a candidate for graduation it will be necessary, in 
addition to the five subjects before mentioned, that he shall pass upon 
all the subjects of the Junior year as well as those of the Senior year, 
at some time previous to his graduation. This rule applies to those 
who have been admitted to practice as well as to students of la .v. 

The examinations for admission to the Senior class for those who 
have not previously completed the Junior course in the De p artment 
will commence on the first day of the University year, Wednesday, 
September 14, 1898. 

While provision is thus made by which credit may be given for 
eight months' reading under the direction of an attorney, in Heu of 
corresponding time of attendance in this Department, not to exceed 
two terms, yet the Faculty desires to say frankly that the stodent will 
find it is difficult in this way to become sufficiently proficient in any of 
the Jimior studies to pass the required examinations. The Faculty is 
not willing to impair the value of the Senior instruction to those who 
have prepared themselves for it in the Department, by admitting to 
the class those who are not qualified to carry on effectively the work 
of the year; nor is it to the interest of either the student or the school 
to admit to the Senior class any who, in order to be prepared for final 
examination and graduation, must fit themselves in so great a range of 
subjects that they cannot thoroughly master them. It must be borne 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 137 

in mind that it is not the number of pages read, nor the number of 
answers learned, which determines the student's attainments in law, 
but that discipline and development of the mind, and the habit of 
coll e c t legal thinking, are essential elements of a legal education, and 
that for the acquisition of these, two years in a law school are not too 
long a time even for those who have the best preparation for entering. 
Experience has shown how imperfect, as a rule, is the preparation of 
those who study in offices, and how necessary systematic instruction is 
at the beginning of the student's course, and the Faculty strongly re- 
oommends that all the studies of the Junior year be pursued in the law 
school and that if but one year can be spent in school, the student shall 
commence his studies there and read in an office afterwards. Even 
those who have had previous reading in an office will, it is believed, 
usually find the instmction in the Junior year to be of greater impor- 
tance to them than that of the Senior year in obtaining a thorough and 
aocnxate knowledge of the law. The practical advantages of ex- 
perience in a law office are not to be imderrated, but such experience 
will prove of greater benefit after the principles of law have been 
acquired than at the b^;inning of the study. 

Even in co ur s es in which text-books are used students of the law 
scfa(M>l have a great deal of instruction regarding matters not fuUy de- 
veloped in the books. Anyone who wishes to pass with credit the 
examinations for Senior standing, and to profit fully by the instruction 
in the Senior subjects, should not confine his attention to the Junior 
text^books, but should attempt to get an equivalent for the instmction 
supplementing those books. Candidates for advanced standing on of- 
fice reading are therefore urged to master in addition to the prescribed 
text-books, the following books or parts of books: Pomeroy's Reme- 
dies and Remedial Rights; Anson on Contracts; Pollock, or Bigelow, 
on Torts; Bishop's, or McClain's, Criminal Law; Tiedeman on Sales; 
Schonler on Bailments; Stephen's Digest of Evidence; Daniel on 
N<^potiable Instruments. 

Oraduation* 

Two years' study is essential to graduation, one year of which must 
have been ^lent in this school. 
Students wUl be given credit for time of study in another school to 



138 STATE UNIVBRSiry OF IOWA. 

the extent of one year, or under the direction of a practicing attorney 
to the extent of two-thirds of a year. For time of actual practice as a 
duly licensed attorney, the same credit will be given as for study under 
the direction of an attorney. 

Before being recommended for graduation, the candidate who has 
pursued a portion of his studies elsewhere, must satisfy the Faculty of 
his proficiency in those studies by passing examinations therein. 

Candidates for graduation must be of good character and must, upon 
being recommended by the Faculty, pass a final examination con- 
ducted at Iowa City by a committee of examiners appointed by the 
Supreme Court of Iowa, in accordance with the rules of that court 
regulating admission to the bar. Upon passing such examination, the 
candidates receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and are admitted 
to practice in all the courts of the State of Iowa, and in the federal 
courts of the Northern District of Iowa, oaths of admission being ad- 
ministered in connection with their graduation; and they receive the 
usual diplomas, and certificates of admission. Those who are not 
twenty-one years of age may pass the examination and receive their 
diplomas, but cannot be admitted to practice until attaining that age. 

Final examinations will be held only at the end of the University 
year. 

Theses. 

Each candidate for graduation in June, 1898, must present to the 
Faculty, on or before the first Monday in April, a thesis upon some 
legal topic approved by the Faculty. Such thesis must be legibly 
written, or printed by typewriter, on paper 8 x 10^ inches in size of 
page, leaving a blank margin of at least one inch at sides and at top 
and bottom. The thesis shall not be less than 1,500 nor mote than 
2,500 words in length, exclusive of citations of authorities. In citing 
cases the names of the parties, as well as the volume and page of the 
report, must be given. The character of the thesis will be taken into 
account in determining whether the candidate is qualified to be recom- 
mended to the Examining Committee for final examination. 

All theses become the property of the Department. 

The subjects approved by the Faculty for the year 1897-98 are as 
follows: 



I^W DBPARTlfBNT. 139 

r. Diflcnss the right of recovery and extent of xeoovery under a fire 
insmaaoe policy for loss of property in which the insured has but a 
limited interest. 

2. Diacnss the right of recovery against a telegraph company for 
negligence in transmitting a message which is in cipher or is other- 
wise obscure as to its meaning. 

3. Discnas the right to recover damages for fright or other mental 
distnrbanoe and the consequences thereof. 

4. Discuss the basis and extent of the doctrine of freedom of con- 



5* Discuss the various applications of the rule as to measure of 
damages announced in HadUy v, BascendaU, 9 ^. 341. 

6. What is the limit of legislative power in respect to passing 
statotes providing that relatives of a pauper shall be liable for his 
support? 

7. In the absence of proof on the subject is there any presumption 
that the statutes of another State are the same as those of the State 
where the action is brought' 

8. Discuss the competency of subscribing witnesses to a will as 
experts on the question of the mental condition of the testator. 

9. Does the fact that a person otherwise occupies the relation of 
heir to one whom he has murdered, prevent his inheriting from his 
murdered ancestor? 

la Are there any acts which are torts or not, according to whether 
they are done maliciously or not? 

zi . Discuss the liability for loss occasioned to holder of promissory 
note by negligence of banker to whom it had been sent by the holder 
for collection, by reason of the fact that the banker had failed to take 
those steps which would have made the note collectible against maker 
orindorser. 

12. Has the Federal Government authority to pass laws with 
reference to extradition of fugitives from justice from jurisdiction of 
State and provide machinery for enforcement of demands of the State 
from which offender is fugitive? 

13. Discuss the authority of the courts to restrain persons from 
carrying oat snch threatened acts as would, if consummated, result in 
disturbances of the peace. 



140 STATE UNIVBRSITY OP IOWA. 

14. Would trial in civil cases before three persons learned in the 
Urw, who should be judges of both the law and the facts, a majority 
opinion being sufficient to determine the rights of the parties to the 
action, be preferable to present trial bj jury? 

15. Discuss the constitutionaUty of Summaty Jurisdiction and the 
reasons upon which the utility of such procedure is based. 

16. Would the exercise by incorporated towns or cities of the 
power of eminent domain so as to condemn private water works for 
public use be constitutional? 

17. Does the Statute of Frauds render a contract void or voidable 

18. Is a special assessment rendering the owner of abutting prop- 
erty liable for street improvements, in excess of the value of the 
property, constitutional? 

19. Can a court take notice of the provisions of the Carlisle Tables 
if they have not been introduced in evidence? 

20. Discuss the right of action on a contract in favor of a person 
not a party thereto. 

21. Discuss the effect of Rylands v. FUidter, L. R. 3 H. L. 530, as 
shown by subsequent decisions. 



From the theses prepared and presented upon some one of the sub- 
jects selected for the year 1896-97, it was provided that a committee 
chosen by the Faculty of the Department from the Examining Com- 
mittee would select the five which had the highest merit as l^gal 
e8sa3rs. To the writer of the one of these five which had the highest 
literary merit, from the standpoint of deamess, conciseness, and 
accuracy of expression, was to be awarded the first prize. 

Beginning with the class of 1898, all theses prepared and presented 
as above described, will be examined by the Faculty of the Department 
for the purpose of determining whether the writer is qualified for 
graduation. 

No prizes for theses will be offered after June, 1897. 

The prises for 1896-97 were awarded as follows: 

The first prize to Mack J. Oroves. The other prizes, all being 
equal in rank and value, were divided among the following stn- 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 141 

dents, named in order of merit determined by the committee: 
Sumnfl C. Smith, Ph. B., Paul F. Cooper, Andrew W. Mercer, John 
I#. Corrigan, Barl B. Brockway, A. B., Edmund Pendleton, B. L., 
Bdwin B. Wilson, Ph. B., Charles W. E. Snyder, A. B., with special 
mention of the theses written by the following: Samuel B. Lattner, 
Albert O. Wakefield, A. B., Walter C. Burrell, and Wirt P. Hoxie. 

Any further information desired may be obtained by addressing the 
Preoident of the University, or James A. Rohbach, Secretary of the 
Law Pacmlty, at Iowa City, Iowa. 



Medical Department 



Faculty and Other Instructors. 

Chari«bs Ashmkad Schakffsr, a. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

President. • 

Phii«o Judson Farnsworth, a. M., M. D., 

Bmeritus Profeaaor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

John Cunton Shrader, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, Clinical Gynecology and Diseases of 
Children. 

WlIfUAM DRUMMOND MIDDI3TON, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery and Dean of the Facnlty. 

I^AWRENCB WlI,I,IAM LlTTlG, ^. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine sad 
Assistant to the Chair of Snri^ry. 

Jambs Rbnwick Guthrie, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecotogj 
and Diseases of Children. 

EI3ERT WlI«I<IAM ROCKWOOD, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, Director of the Hospital, aad 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

James Wii^i^iam Dai«bey, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Chari^ES S. Chase, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Wai«ter L. Bierring, M. D., 

Professor of Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, and Curator of the 
Medical Museum. 

John Wai^ter Harriman, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Martin J. Wadb, LL. B., 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

Chari«es Moore Robertson, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

WiLUAM Robert Whiteis, M. S., M. D., 

Assistant Professor of Histology. 

142 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 143 



GSRSHOM Hydb Hii,!,, A. B., M. D., 
I«ecttirer on Insanity. 

Frank Thomas B&kbns, D. D. S., M. D., 

I«ecturer on Dentistry. 

Emu, Loins Boernhr, Pharm. D., 

Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Wiujam Edward Bari^w, A. B., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

WII3BR John Tektsrs, B. S., Ph. C, 

Demonstrator of Chemlstiy. 

LBB Wai,I«ACB DBAN, M. S., M. D., 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

John Thomas McCuntock, A. B., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology. 



WlUJAM GRKBN, 
Janitor. 



MEDICAL DEPAFTMENT. 



A thorough elementary preparation is required before entering on 
the course of medical lectures. The University affords a preliminary 
scientific course preparatory to the professional, and it is expected 
that many will avail themselves of this opportunity. In the branches 
of medicine there should be a thorough training in principles be- 
fore the practical portion is begun. For this purpose a careful pre- 
sentation of the subjects is made by lectures, and the knowledge fixed 
by recitations and frequent reviews. Ample means of illustration axe 
used, and the materials for demonstration are abundant. In the prac- 
tical branches abundant clinical material is found to illustrate the 
subjects taught. 

The twenty-ninth annual course of lectures will begin on September 
14, 1898, and will close on March 29, 1899. There will be a holiday 
vacation commencing Thursday evening, December 22, and ending 
Wednesday morning, January 4, 1899. 

The course is divided into four years of twenty-six weeks each. It 
is the intention of the Board of Regents and the Faculty to increase 
the leng^ of the annual course of lectures as soon as possible, and 
notice of such increase may appear in the next annual announcement 

Medical, Surgical, G3mecological, Ophthalmological, Aural, Lazyn- 
gological and Rhinological Clinics, are held each week during the 
term. Attendance upon these is required of all students, excepting 
those engaged in laboratory work during clinic hours. 

Outline of the Plan of Instruction^ 

Anatomy. 

The lectures in anatomy will be illustrated by means oi specimens, 

charts, models, dissections and black-board figures. Special effort 

will be made to associate anatomical arrangement with clinical facts 

and methods of diagnosis. 

144 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 145 

Onring the first year the lecttues will oover the subjects of osteol- 
ogy, sjmdesmology, the alimentary canal and associated stmctores, 
the vascular and respiratory systems, and the genito-urinary organs. 
These will be presented in full detail from their anatomical, mechani- 
cal and functional aspects, attention being paid to practical develop- 
mental laws and relations of viscera to surface markings and neigh- 
boring structures. 

In the second year the subjects covered during the first year will be 
carefully r eviewed with additional reference to the medical and surgi- 
cal anatomy. The nervous system and the anatomy of the special 
senses will be presented in detail not only by lectures but also by 
practical demonstrations to the class divided into small sections. 

The third year will be devoted entirely to regional anatomy. The 
lectures during this year will at all times be illustrated by special dis- 
sections or surface marking upon the living subject. 

Practical Anatomy. 

The thorough study of this branch, for at least four courses, is made 
a condition of graduation. Facilities for obtaining material are such, 
under improved legislation in the State, that an abundance will 
be provided for all who may apply. The demonstrators will always 
be ready to aid and direct the prosecution of these studies. 

Upon the completion of each course of dissection, the student will 
be examined on the anatomy of the part dissected, and if the examin- 
ation be satisfactory, a certificate to that effect will be given. No 
fee is required for dissecting material. 

Physiology. 

In this subject the inductive method is very largely employed 
in imparting instruction. The lectures are profusely illustrated by 
means of charts, diagrams and blackboard figures, and the student is 
rendered practically familiar with the phenomena of the most impor- 
tant normal functions of the body by the employment of experiments 
upon living animals as a means of demonstration. Twelve lectures will 
be given in the Junior year upon applied physiology of the nervous 
system. 



146 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Chemistry aad Toxicology. 

The course in chemistry extends through two years. In the first 
year the lectures are on general chemistry. The laboratory work con- 
sists, first, of analytical chemistry, including methods of testing for 
the metallic poisons, then the common medicinal substances are 
studied. The student learns methods of chemical manipulation, and 
the use of apparatus, and also becomes acquainted with the action of 
reagents and of chemicals upon each other. The course includes the 
examination of drinking water from a sanitary standpoint, each stu- 
dent making a number of analyses of various wholesome and polluted 
waters. It concludes with the methods of quantitative anal3rsis, which 
are of the most use to the medical practitioner. 

In the second year, physiological chemistry is taken up. The lec- 
tures are in explanation and amplification of the laboratory work. The 
latter includes the study of the proximate principles of the body and 
their chemical changes. Artificial digestive experiments are made, 
their products being isolated and tested. The constituents of the 
blood are tested and the methods for the identification of stains are 
learned. The qualitative tests for the abnormal oonsdtnents of the 
urine follow, and the quantitative determination of such as are of 
importance. The course is completed by the identification of urinary 
sediments and calculi, and the analysis of various pathological q;>eci- 
mens of urine. The lectures on toxicology treat of the physiological 
and chemical action of the principal poisons, as well as their anti- 
dotes. The methods of identifying these in food, excreta, etc, are 
explained and illustrated by experiments. 

The work in practical chemistry is conducted in the chemical labor- 
atories of the University, in which the Medical Department occupies 
rooms on the ground floor. These consist of rooms for the instructors, 
store rooms, and two large laboratories. They are well lighted and 
heated by steam. Hoods, connected with ventilating shafts, carry 
off offensive and injurious gases. The outfit is ample for demonstrat- 
ing the general principles of chemistry, as well as its application to 
medicine. Each student is supplied with a set of the necessary 
apparatus. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. i47 

Hittolosy. 

The connBe in hbtology extends through the Freshman year and 
consists of a series of two didactic lectures and four hours laboratory 
work each week. 

The histological laboratory, situated on the first floor, southeast 
comer of the Medical Building, is well lighted and thoroughly 
equipped with microscopes and all necessary apparatus for carrying 
on the work. The laboratory work comprises the preparation and 
stndy of microscopic slides showing the minute structure of the differ- 
ent tiasnes and organs of the body. 

The slides prepared by each student become his personal property. 

Instruction is given in all forms of histological technique, harden- 
ing, embedding, section-cutting, staining and preparation of material 
for examination. 

In the Freshman year the regular work in histology is preceded 
by a number of lectures and laboratory hours devoted to the study 
of general biology. 

During the Sophomore year opportunities are offered to those who 
wish to work in embryology and special histology. 

Phannacy. 

An outline course in pharmacy is specially provided whereby the 
•tndent at the outset may familiarize himself with pharmaceutical 
pr oce sses and the methods of preparing official preparations by ac- 
tual laboratory practice. 

Materia Medica. 

This subject is presented during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years in p rog r essive form. The introductory topics, such as defini- 
tions, dosage, modes and routes of administration of medicines, pre- 
scription writing, with special reference to the detection and avoidance 
of incompatibilities, will be presented at the beginning of each session 
before the classes jointly. The further consideration of the subject 
will be progressive, oiganic drugs being presented one session, inor- 
ganic the next. At the close of each session a test will be given cov- 



148 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ering the ground trayeiBed during the session. Toward the dose of 
the Sophomore year the entire subject will be reviewed and a final ex- 
amination given. During the didactic lectures crude drugs will be 
presented from time to time illustrative of the subject. All offidal 
preparations from the same will be presented and briefly discussed 
during the course. 

Therapeutics. 

This branch of pharmacology > recognized as' the distinctively scien- 
tific division of the subject, will be presented during the Sophomore 
and Junior years. Both general and spedal therapeutics will be outlined 
and discussed with special view to stimulate in the student a desire 
to prosecute methods of original research in the direction of studjdng 
the physiological action of drugs. To this end experiments will be 
made from time to time illustrative of such action upon the lower 
animals. 

Applied Therapeutics. 

In addition to the general course in therapeutics the Senior class 
is given a special course upon applied or practical therapeutics, 
to be illustrated by bedside discussion of cases in the wards of the 
University Hospital. 

Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The course in pathology and bacteriology extends through the 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior years, and is presented by means of 
didactic lectures and laboratory work. The lectures are devoted to 
bacteriology and general and special pathology, and are illustrated by 
means of drawings, preparations from the Medical museum and speci- 
mens derived from post-mortem examinations. 

The pathological and bacteriological laboratory is situated in the 
west hall on the second floor of the Medical Building. It is thoroughly 
equipped with new microscopes of the most modem type, and all 
apparatus necessary for carrpng on every form of bacteriological re- 
search. Bach student is provided with a table, which indndes a' 
microscope and all necessary staining reagents. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMBNT. 149 

In the Sophomore year the lectures are confined to general pathol- 
ogy and the elementary principles of bacteriology. The laboratory 
work consists of two hours each week thronghout the year, and is 
illustratiye of the didactic lectures, comprising the preparation and 
study of slides showing the general pathological changes that occur 
in human tissues. An examination will be held at the close of the 



In the Junior year the lectures are devoted to the pathology of 
tumors, and the special pathology of the different organs of the 
human body. 

The laboratory work, consisting of two hours a week throughout 
the year, bears a direct relation to the lectures and comprises the 
preparation and study of slides showing the disease changes that oc- 
cnr in spedal tissues and organs, including a complete collection of 
tomon; furthermore embod3ring the study of the general character- 
istics of micro-oiganisms, the preparation of artificial media, and the 
mounting of slides of the different organisms, with special reference 
to the pathogenic bacteria that are of great interest to medlca men. 

Instruction is also given in the technique of making a post-mortem 
examination. 

A final examination in pathology will be held at the close of the 
Junior y^Bi. 

During the Senior year two hours each week are devoted to clinical 
microscopy, and advanced work in pathological histology and bac- 
teriology. 

B^;inmng the Thursday after Commencement, at 1:30 p. m., there 
is given a private course in practical bacteriology, which continues for 
one month. The laboratory is open daily from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m., and 
the students become familiar with all the details of bacteriological tech- 
nique. The number of participants is limited to twenty. To secure 
a place at a table I5 must be paid March i. The rest of the fee is 
payable at the opening of the course. 

Practice of Medicine. 

The Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine combines didactic 
and clinical instruction. Many of the subjects treated in the didactic 
find illustration in the hospital amphitheatre, and pathol 



I50 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

study is facilitated by post-mortem examinations, as well as by wet 
and dry preparations from the mnsenm. 

Medical Dlaarnosis. 

Recitations for the Senior class will be held each week on this sub- 
ject, the department of medical diagnosis receiving practical treatment 
here as well as at the clinic. The Sophomore class will receive prac- 
tical instruction in physical diagnosis, including the use and applica- 
tion of all the instruments and methods of precision. 



Surgery is taught didactically in lectures reviewed by daily class 
quiz mth recitation by advanced students on prior work, and prac* 
tically by actual surgical diagnosis and treatment of patients at the 
clinic by the members of the Senior class ; also by a course of operative 
surgery for the Senior class in which all surgical operations axe per- 
formed upon the cadaver. One hour each week is devoted to minor 
surgery and bandaging. 

Obstetxics and Ojmecology. 

The instruction in these important subjects is complete. All modem 
means for illustration are employed, and advanced students are 
carefully trained in the principal obstetric operations. 

Ophthalmology. 

The instruction in this branch combines didactic and clinical 
teaching. One lecture a week is given in the anatomy, physiology 
and pathology of the region involved, and the Wednesday clinic is 
devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of its diseases. A large num- 
ber of cases appear at these clinics, and a great many operations of 
all kinds are performed. 

Otology, Bhiaology and Iraryngology. 

The instruction in these branches is given by didactic and clinical 
teaching, one lecture and one clinic being given each week. Much 
attention is directed to the methods of examination and treatment of 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 151 

The ear, uose and throat clinic being large it enables students 
to become familiar with the use of instruments, all being allowed to 
treat patients under the supervision of the instructor. It is the aim 
of the course to familiarize each student with the normal as well as the 
pathological conditions of the several organs. The clinic room has 
been especially fitted up for the work and is in itself complete. 

Medical Jurisprndence. 

The essentials, to the practitioner, of this important department of 
medicine will be fully treated. 

Insanity. 

This subject is discussed as concisely as possible, with the special 
needs of the general practitioner constantly in view, and material ap- 
pearing at the clinics from time to time, during the term, is utilized 
in illustration. A course of lectures on this subject will be de- 
livered during the latter part of January. 

Sanitary Science and Public Hysfiene. 

One lecture a week will be delivered on matters pertaining to sani- 
taty sdenoe and public hygiene. 

Clinica. 

The clinics have been well and abundantly supplied with material. 
The patzxmage of the hospital is such that a variety of cases is pre- 
sented for operation and treatment. The hospital is open for the re- 
ception of patients during the entire year. 

Every case is fully utilized as a means of instruction by a system of 
examination in which advanced students are required to diagnosticate 
disease and suggest treatment, before the class, subject to the correc- 
tion of the clinical teacher. 

Clinical Patienta. 

Medical cases should be referred to Professor L. W. I/ittig; surgical 
cases to Professor W. D. Middleton; gynecological cases to Professor 
J. C. Shnder; eye cases to Professor J. W. Dalbey ; ear, nose and throat 
I to Professor C. M. Robertson. 



15a STATE XJNIVKItSITY OF IOWA. 

Medical M iisetim. 

The museum contains a large and interesting collection of morbid 
and other specimens, furnishing valuable aid to instruction in its 
large amount of material illustratiTe of pathological and normal con- 
ditions. This is constantly drawn upon as a means of demonstration. 

Phj^cians are earnestly requested to send to the curator any speci- 
mens of healthy, morbid, or comparative anatomy; for all such 
favors due credit will be given by labeling the specimens with the 
name of the donor before placing them in the museum. 

Medical l^ilirary. 

The Kanney Memorial Medical Library, consisting of a large num- 
ber of works especially devoted to insanity and mental diseases, is 
open for consultation, together with a well selected list of books on 
general medical subjects to which are added each year the latest 
works and the latest editions. The library is supplied with the cur* 
rent medical journals, and will be open every day of the session. 
Medical students have also the privil^;e of drawing books from the 
general library of the University. 



OUTIrlNB OP THS COUR8S. 



Fresbman Year. 



I^BCTURBS AND RECITATIONS, BACH WKBK. 

Anatomy — Four lectures; one recitation. 
Physiology — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 
General Chemistry — ^Three lectures; one recitation, 
laboratory work for the session as follows: 
Materia Medica— -organic— Two lectures; one recitation. 
Histology — Two lectures; one recitation. 
Chemistry — One hundred and sixty hours. 
Biology and Histology — One hundred hours. 
Bandaging — Twenty hours. 



MBDICAL DEPARTMENT. 153 

DiaBecting — ^Two courses. 

Final examination in General Cfaemistry, Histology and Pharmacy, 
also, examination (not final) in Physiology, Anatomy and Materia 
Medica. 

Sophomore Year. 



I^^CTORKS AND RKCITATIONS, SACH WKKK. 

Anatomy — Four lectures; one recitation before holidays, two after 
holidays. 

Physiology — ^Three lectures; one recitation before holidays, two 
after holidays. 

Physiological Chemistry — ^Two lectures. 

General Pathology and Bacteriology — ^Two lectures. 

Materia Medica—Organic: two lectures; one recitation. Inorganic: 
one lecture until holidays. 

Therapeutics — One lecture after holidays. 

Obstetricft— Two lectures. 

Physical Diagnosis — One hour. 

Hygiene — One hour. 

Pharmacy — ^Ten lecturea during the session. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Chemistry — Sixty hours. 

General Pathology — Fifty hours. 

Dissecting — ^Two courses. 

Pharmacy — ^Thirty hours. 

Embryology — Optional. 

General University clinics, when not otherwise engaged. 

Pinal examination in Anatomy, Physiological Chemistry, Physiol- 
ogy, Materia Medica and General Pathology. 

Junior Year. 



LSCTURSS, &KCITATIONS AND CLINICS, HACH WKBK. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — Five lectures; one recitation. 
Suigery^Three lectures; one recitation. 
Pathology — Two lectures; one recitation. 



154 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA« 

Therapeutics — Two lectures. 

Obstetrics — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Gynecology — ^Two lectures; one recitation. 

Toxicology — One lecture. 

Applied Anatomy: Medical, Surgical and Nervous — One lecture. 

Applied Physiology of the Nervous System — Twelve lectures during 
the session. 

General Medical, Surgical, G3mecological and Ophthalmological 
Clinics — Seven hours. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Pathology—Fifty-two hours. 

Bacteriology — ^Twenty-six hours. 

Pinal examinations in Obstetrics, Therapeutics and Special Pathol- 
ogy. 

Senior Year. 



I;KCTURBS, R^ITATIONS and CI^INICS, 9ACH W99K. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — ^Pive lectures; one recitation. 

Surgery — ^Three lectures; one recitation. 

Practical Therapeutics — One hour until the holidays. 

Gynecology — Two lectures; one recitation. 

Ophthalmology — One lecture. 

Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology — One lecture. 

Dermatology — One lecture after holidays. 

Psediatrics — One lecture after holidays. 

Operative Surgery — ^Twelve hours during the session. 

Operative Obstetrics — ^Twelve hours during the session. 

Medical Jurisprudence — ^Twelve lectures during the session. 

Dentistry — Five lectures during the session. 

Insanity — ^Twelve lectures during the session. 

General Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, Ophthalmol<^cal, Anial, 
Rhinological and Laryngological Clinics — Seven hours. 

Laboratory work : 

Clinical Microscopy— Two hours a week. 

Final examination in Practice of Medicine, Snzgeiy, Gyneoolocy, 
Ophthalmology, Ear, Nose and Throat. 



MEDICAL DBPARTMBNT. 155 

Text-Books and Books of Reference. 

Tlie following axe recommended by the Faculty: 

Medical Dictionary — Gould, Duane, Dungliaon. 

Anatomy — Gray, Qnain, Morris, Treve's Surgical Applied Anatomy. 

DiaaectorB — ^Holden, Heath, Ellis. 

CompaiatiTe Anatomy — ^Wiedersheim, Jeffery Bell, Howell. 

Physiology — Landois and Stirling, Poster, Flint, Kirk. 

General Chemistry — Simon, Witthaus, Rosooe, Schorlemmer. 

Urine Analysis— Purdy, Neubauer, Vogel, Black. 

Toricology — ^Wormley, Taylor, Woodman and Tidy. 

Snigery— Park, American Text-Book of Surgery, Roberts, Wyeth, 
Geister, Stimson on Fractures and Dislocations, Wharton's Minor 
Surgery and Bandaging, MacDonald. 

Pathology — ^Ziegler, Thoma, Delafield and Prudden, Green. 

Bacteriology— Abbot, McFarland, Crookshank, Sternberg. 

Practice of Medicine— Tyson, Wood and Fitz, Osier, Strumpel, 
American Text- Book of Theory and Practice of Medicine, Roberts, 
Flint, Bartholow, l/oomis. 

Medical Diagnosis— Vierordt, Musser, DaCosta, Flint. 

Obstetrics— American Text-Book of Obstetrics, Lusk, Davis, Par- 
▼in, Leishman, Playfair, King, Dorland. 

Obstetric Surgery— Grandin and Jarmin. 

Embryology— Minot, Manton. 

Gynecology — Skene, Thomas and Munde, Garrigues, American 
Text-Book, Pozzi, Davenport, May's Manual, Clinical Gjmecology, 
Keating and Coe. 

Materia Medica— White and Wilcox, Potter, Bartholow. 

TherapeuticB — Hare, H. C. Wood, Potter, Farquharson. 

Diseases of Children— Starr's American Text-Book, J. L. Smith, 
Goodhart. 

Medical Juxispmdence— McClellan's Civil Malpractice, Wharton 
andStille, Beck, Elwell. 

Histology— Stoehr, Piersol, Schafer, Stirling. 

Ophthalmology— Fuchs, Juler, Noyes, Nettleship on the Eye. 

Otcdogy, Laryngology and Rhinology— Bnmette, MacBride, Bos- 
worth, Roosa, Buck, Politzer, Sajons, Browne. 



156 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Insanity— Lewis* Text-Book of Mental Diseases, Steam, Clouston's 
Mental Disease. 

Dennatology— Jamison, Hyde, Dnhring, Crocker. 

Hygiene and Sanitary Science— Wilson, Ri>he, Buck. 

The first book mentioned in the foregoing list is recommended for 
preliminary reading, with the exception of chemistry. In this, 
Remsen's Introduction to the Stndy of Chemistry is recommended. 

Text-books and books of reference can be obtained at an avenge 
cost per volume of from $3.00 to (5-00, or $15.00 to $20.00 per year. 

It is of far greater advantage to the student, during the college 
course, to study and review a single text-book in each department 
than to read several cursorily. It is, therefore, advised that a single 
work, in each department recommended above, be chosen and care- 
fully studied, while any other may be used for reference and subse- 
quent perusal. The first one of each of the above lists is preferred. 

Tuition. 

The fee for tuition is $65.00 for each year, of which $40.00 is payable 
at the opening of the term, and the balance on or before January 10. 
All fees must be paid when due to the Secretary of the University, 
William J. Haddock, and students who do not pay these when due 
will be suspended from the Department until payment has been made. 

In the combined course the fees are $25.00 for each of the first two 
years and $75.00 for each of the last four years of the course. Stu- 
dents entering the Medical Department from schools of pharmacy, 
dentistry, or veterinary medicine with advanced standing will pay 
$10.00 for dissecting material used in making up deficiencies in this 
branch. For students taking a partial course the fees are $10.00 per 
year for each branch except dissecting where the fee is $15.00. 

There are no extra fees whatever, but for each laboratory course ia 
chemistry, also for that in practical pharmacy, there is required a de- 
posit of $3.00 to cover breakage and to insure the return of all keys at 
the close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is 
returned to the student on presentation of the certificate of the pro- 
fessor in diaige of the laboratory in question. 

The above statement is now in effect, and will be understood to 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 157 

apply to all students in the Department, entirely irrespective of the 
date of matriculation. 

Alumni of this Department will be admitted to lectures and clinics 
free of charge, but will pay the usual laboratory fees. Graduates of 
other colleges which are recognized by this Department will be ad- 
mitted to full lecture privileges upon paying the matriculation fee and 
a fee of $10.00 and the usual laboratory fees. The laboratory fee is 
S5.00 for eadi practical course. 

A certificate of attendance will be issued to each student at the close 
of the session. 

Students upon arrival will apply for all needed information to the 
Secretary, Dr. K. W. Rockwood. 

Reqttireineiits for Admission. 

z. Credible certificate of good moral character signed by two phy- 
sicians of good standing in the state from which the applicant comes. 

3. Graduates or matriculates of respectable colleges or graduates 
of high schools of the first grade, or of normal schools established by 
state authority, may be admitted without examination upon presenta- 
tion of satisfactory credentials, provided, that in each case, at least 
one year of Latin has been included in the course. All candidates 
for admission must present their credentials or apply for a permit for 
examination at the office of the President of the University not later 
than noon of Tuesday, September 13, 1898. 

Examination for admission will embrace the subjects usually taught 
in the high schools of Iowa, including one year's Latin, which subject 
may, however, be made up before entering upon the seoood year's 
course. In September, 1898, those who have no diploma will be ex- 
amined in Latin (one year). Physics (one year), English, U. S. His* 
tory, Arithmetic, Algebra through Quadratics, plane and solid Geom- 
etry and Botany or some other science. 

3. Students entering from othpr medical schools with advanced 
standing must be examined as stated above. 

This school is a member of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges, and adheres to the requirements of that Association. 



158 8TATB UMIVERSITy OP IOWA. 

Combliied Scientific and Medical Cotttae. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Collegiate Department by which it will be possible for a student to 
complete the course in Science and the course in the Medical Depart- 
ment in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees B. S. and M. D. 
This combined course is especially recommended to all students who 
intend to enter the profession of medicine. See pages 33 and 34 of 
Catalogue. 



COMBINED COURSB i;BADING TO THB DBORBBS 

OP B. 8. AND M. D. 

(Subjects printed in italics are to be taken in the Collegiate Depart- 
ment. ) 

Firat Year. 

German^ 5, or Laiin^ 4 or 5.* 
MathemaHcs^ 5. 
Drawing or History ^ 2. 
English, 3. 
Military Drills 3. 

Second Year. 

German^ 3, and English, 2\ or German , 3, and Economics, 3; or 
Latin, 5; or Greek, 5. 
Physics, 5. 

Animal Morphology and Physiology y 5; or Systematic Zoology, 5. 
Military Drill, 3. 

Third Year. 

French, 5; or Greek, 5; or Latin, 5. (At least one 3rear of Latin re- 
quired. 
Animal Morphology and Physiology, 5. 
Chemistry, 5. 

Botany (fall and winter) and Histology (spring), 5. 
Anatomy (fall and winter) and Dissection (spring), 4. 
Military Drill, 3. 



^The figures refer to the number of exercises a week. 



MBDICAL DEPARTMENT. 159 

Foorth Tear. 

Anatomy, 5. 

Physiology (Medical), 4. 

Ph3r8iological Chemistry, 2, with laboratory work. 

General Pathology, 2. 

Materia Medica, 3. 

Obstetrics, 2. 

PhjTsical Diagnosis, i. 

Bandaging, i. 

Pharmacy, 40 hours. 

Dissecting when possible. 

Embryology and Bacteriology (spring). 

Clinics when not otherwise engaged. 

PlIlhTear. 

Jnnior Medical, with electives in the spring term. 

SbcthTear. 

Senior Medical, with electives in the spring term. 

Advanced Standing. 

Students from other accredited medical colleges who have attended 
one oonrse of lectures, will be admitted to the Sophomore class upon 
passing an examination in the branches taught during the first year. 

Those who have attended two courses will be admitted to the 
Junior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first and second years. 

Those who have attended three courses will be admitted to the 
Senior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first, second, and third years. 

Graduates in Pharmacy, upon examination as above, may enter the 
Sophomore class. 

Graduates of Dental schools in good standing, will be admitted to 
the Sophomore class upon passing the entrance examination only. 

Giadnates from Veterinary colleges in good standing, will be 
admitted to the Sophomore class upon passing the entrance examina- 
tion. 

Those entering the Sophomore year from Pharmacy, Dental, or 






i6o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Veterinary schools must at the dose of the year pass examinations in 
all branches of the Freshman year not previously pursued by them, 
and must have completed the work required of the Sophomore class 
in the dissection of the human subject. 

In all cases those who enter from other schools with advanced 
standing must comply with the requirements for admission, page 157. 

Reqairemeiits for Gradtiatioii. 

1. The candidate must be twenty-one years of age. 

2. He must be known to be of unexceptionable moral character. 

3. The time of study must include attendance upon at least four 
full courses of lectures, the last of which must be taken in this insti- 
tution. The time occupied by each of the four courses of lectures shall 
not be less than six months of twenty-six weeks, and not more than 
one of the four courses shall be within the same year. 

4. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed at least four 
courses in Practical Anatomy. 

5. The deportment during the term must have been unexception- 
able. 

6. Attendance upon all lectures, clinics and other instruction in 
the course must have been in accordance with the requirements of the 
department. 

7. All members of the Freshman class will be examined in General 
Chemistry, Histology, Physiology, Anatomy and Materia Medica at 
the end of that year. The examination in General Chemistry and 
Histology will be final should the student show the required profic- 
iency. 

8. Members of the Sophomore class at the end of that year must 
pass satisfactory examinations in Anatomy, Physiology, Ph3rsiological 
Chemistry, General Pathology, Materia Medica and Pharmacy. 

9. Members of the Junior class will be given a final examination 
at the end of the year in Obstetrics, Therapeutics and Special Patho- 
logy. 

In case of failure to pass any of these examinations, the stu- 
dent may be re-examined at the opening of the next session. If he 
fail in this second examination, he will be allowed to present him- 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. z6z 

self for re-ezamination only after attendance npon another ooorse of 
lectuies. 

Stndenta of the Senior dasa mnat notify the Secretary of the Faculty 
in writing, during the second week in Februaxy, of their intention of 
becoming applicants for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, at the same 
time presenting a certificate of legal age and of good moral character, 
also the receipts from the Secretary of the UniTersity, showing that 
all fees have been paid. 

During the last week of the term, having complied with the other 
requirements, they must pass a satisfactory examination in Practice 
ofMedidne, Surgery, Ophthalmology, Obstetrics and G3meoology, 
Bar, Nose and Throat and in any other subjects taught, if so directed 
by the Faculty at the beginning of the term. 

Class standing, recitation marks, together with demonstrators* 
xeports and final examinations, will be taken into oonsideration when 
determining the candidate's fitness to receive the medical degree. 

Medical Btdlding. 

The Medical Building is located on the south end of the campus, 
in a line with the other University buildings. It is one of the best 
and most commodious medical college buildings in the west. It com- 
prises a basement for general purposes, the first floor containing the 
Secretary's office, the professors' rooms, the histological laboratory, 
the medical library and reading room, a lecture room and the janitor's 
room. 

On the second floor is a spacious and well-lighted pathological and 
bacteriological laboratory supplied with a sufficient number of micro- 
scopes for class-work and with other appliances, prosector's room, 
and general Faculty room, and a large amphitheatre provided with 
opera chairs for two hundred and sixty-ebc students. 

The whole of the third floor (80x36 feet) used as a dissecting 
room, is supplied with sinks and water, and each table is lighted with 

The whole building ta heated with steim aiid is W«U yei|ti)#t^ 



i62 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Uniyersity Hoepital. 

The Twentyndxth General Assembly levied a tax for the erection of 
new buildings for the University, and by the action of the Board of 
Regents the first year's tax, somewhat more than fifty thousand 
dollars has been devoted to the bnilding and equipment of a 
Hospital which was opened for the reception of patients in January, 
1898. The University Hospital is in all respects modem and without 
a superior in the west. With an administration building thoroughly 
furnished, with large and commodious wards as well as private rooms, 
with a clinical amphitheatre that will comfortably seat two hundred 
or more, and with separate sutgical, gynecological, medical, ophthal- 
mological and laryngological operating rooms together with a well 
supplied Free Dispensary open throughout the year, but little is left 
to be desired. 

It is confidently believed that the students who make the Medical 
Department of the University the school of their choice will find in 
all its departments complete and perfect equipment, both for didactic 
and illustrative instruction. 

University Training School for Nnrees. 

Connected with the Medical Department of the University, the 
School for Nurses offers a three years* course to women who desire to 
enter the profession of nursing. The course comprises theoretical 
work in class, practical work in wards, and a complete course in 
invalid cookery. Lectures will be given by members of the Medical 
Faculty, and the Superintendent upon Anatomy, Physiology, Materia 
Medica, Chemistry of Foods and Nutrition, Bacteriology, Obstetrics, 
Gynecology, Diseases of Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat, Diseases of 
Children, Bandaging, Medical, Surgical, and Obstetrical Nursing. 

Candidates may be admitted when vacancies occur. For further 
information application should be made to the Superintendent, Iftiss 
Jennie S. Cottle, University Hospital. 

Resident Physicians. 

Appointments as Resident Physicians and others in State and other 
institutions are made each year from the graduates of the Medical 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 163 

Deportment. These are awarded to sach of the applicants as the 
Faculty judges best prepared for the position, the successful candidates 
being allowed to select, in the order of their rank, from those posi- 
tions which are available. 

In March, 1898, the following named graduates were appointed: 
Dr. Charles E. Wright, Mercy Hospital, Davenport. 
Dr. Brands A. Ely, University Hospital. 



Board in Iowa City can be obtained for from $2.00 to $3.00 a week; 
rocmia from ^.00 to fS.oo a month. Many students procure rooms 
and board in dubs, which materially reduces the cost. 

NeceMary Yearly Bzpenses. 

Tuition fee, which indudes all chaiges except lab- 
oratory breakage $6$ $ 65 

Breakage ito 2 

Room rent, 6 months 12 to 48 

Board, 26 weeks 52 to 78 

Fuel and light 6 to 15 

Books 12 to 20 

Total |i48to<228 



Graduates of this school are requested to acquaint the Secretary of 
the Faculty immediately with their postoffice addresses, and to inform 
him promptly of any change of residence. 

For any further information address Dr. E. W. Rockwood, Secretary 
of the Medical Faculty, Iowa City, Iowa. 



Homoeopathic Medical Department 



Faculty and Assktants. 



Chari«es a. Schabppbr, a. M. Ph. D., lilt. D., 

PresideMt 

yfuMort H. Dickinson, M. D., 

Piofeaaor of Theory and Pnctlee and Clinical ICedidne, and Dean of the 
Faculty. 

jABOtS G. GnjCHMiaftf A. M., M. D., 

Profewor of Surgery and Surgical Gynecology, and Registrar of the 
Faculty. 

CKARJJfS H. C00SWBI.I„ M. D., 

Profeaaor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

Frank J. Nbwbbrry, M. S., M. D., O. et A. Chir., 

Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology and Psdology. 

QD(Ui;99 ROYAI,, M. D., 

Frfkfenor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 



TmtODORS L. Hazard, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica. 

PRBD. J. BBCKBR, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Surgery. 

Rau»h W. Homan, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology, etc 

AiiPHSUs L. Poulard, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics. 



ADBI*S p. Kimbai,!,, M. D., 
Matron. 

BliMRR J. LaMBBRT, M. D., 
House Surgeon. 

LaoRA Johnson, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Surgeiy. 

i«4 



ROMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DBPARTMENT. 165 

ArtdWonal Iiiatractofs from the Medical Departmetit. 
John W. Harbtmaw, M. D., 

PtDfcMor of Anatomy. 

Jambs IL Guthrib, A. M., M. D., 

T ro ttm o r of Fhyaiology. 

Bi,BBRT W. RocxwooD, B. S., M. D., 

Piofeator of Chemittiy and ToKicology. 

Wai/TBR h. BiBUUNG, M. D., 

ProfcMor of Normal and Pathological Histology. 

LBB WaXpI^GB Dban, M. S., M. D., 
D«monatimtor of Anatomy. 

WIUIAM R. WhiTBIS, M. S., M. D., 
Demonatimtor of Normal Histology. 

W. E. Bakix>w, B. a., 

Demonstimtor of Chemistiy. 

WiuSK John Tbstbbs, B. S., Ph. C, 

D em onstimtor of Chemistry. 

gbrshom h. hiia, a. B., M. D., 

(Superintendent of the HosplUl for the Insane at Independence). I«ec- 
tuteron Insanity. 

Emuk McCz^ain, a. M., LL. D., 

I/ecturer on Medical Jurispmdence. 



P. E. TuBM, M. D., Manchester. 
A. S. Hansbn, M. D., Cedar Palls. 
P. A. Rbminoton, M. D., Sionz City. 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The twenty-second annual oonrse of instruction will open on 
Wednesday, September 14, 1898 and close on Tuesday, March 28, 1899. 
The opening lecture will be given by Professor Newberry, at 4 p. m., 
in the amphitheatre. The course of study extends over five years, 
one year being pre-matriculate, imder a preceptor, and four years 
undeigraduate. Men and women are admitted on equal terms, no 
distinction whatever being made between them. The latge and well 
equipped laboratories in the University, the hospital facilities afforded 
by the union of the college and hospital under one roof, and the 
opportunity for collateral study in any department of literature or 
science, furnish facilities for securing an education in medicine not to 
be surpassed. A course has been authorized continuing over six years, 
which will enable the student to obtain the degree of B. S., in addi- 
tion to the medical degree. See pages 33 and 34 of Catalogue. 

Admiasion. 

The requirements for admission are the same as in all the professional 
departments of the University, viz: the possession of a diploma from 
a high school approved by the University, or some equivalent, as the 
completion of the Freshman year in a college of letters of approved 
standing, with a sufficient knowledge of Latin. Failing in these re- 
quirements, the applicant for admission to the Freshman class must 
pass an examination iu English scholarship, and Latin sufficient to 
admit to the Freshman class in the Collegiate Department. Appli- 
cants for admission to advanced standing must present evidence that 
they have attended one or more sessions in a reputable medical col- 
lege and will be admitted to such class as they may prove themselves 
qualified to enter. All applicants for admission will apply to the 

166 



HOMCBOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 167 

^>^wittij«g committee in the President's office, on Tuesday or 
Wednesday, September 13 or 14, 1898. If admitted, they will then 
tcport for enrollment and assignment of seats at the Registrar's office, 
Homoeopathic Medical Bnilding on Dubuque street. All fees must 
be paid to the Secretary of the University, and to him only. 

Advancement to higher classes is secured only by examination, oral 
and written, combined with the quiz record and class standing. An 
average of 65 per cent must be secured in any one study to pass that 
chair; an average of 75 per cent in all the examinations is necessary 
to pass to a higher class, and to secure a degree. A failure to pass in 
two or more studies will stop advancement until the conditions are 
satisfied. A failure in one study will not stop advancement, but the 
student must pass a satisfactory examination in that study before the 
close of the year to which he is promoted. The Faculty reserves the 
right to determine the class which any student shall enter, in the case 
of applicants who have had one or more years in other medical schools. 

GraduaUs of non-homceopathic medical colleges may be admitted as 
gnulnate students, as follows: liBXLod eundem degree is sought they 
must matriculate in the University, pay a lecture fee and an examin- 
ation fee and pass an examination in the therapeutics of the branches 
taught in this Department. If a degree is not sought, a matriculation 
fee is to be paid, and such laboratory expenses as may be necessary, 
together with a lecture fee, if a full course is taken. 

Alumni of this school will be admitted to all lectures and clinics 
free of charge. 

By order of the Board of Regents no student will be enrolled until 
all necessary fees have been paid. 

In case any student is unable to pay the fees at the proper time, 
such student may, on application to the Dean of the Department, be 
granted an extension for a short time. 

Students who do not pay the proper fees or avail themselves of the 
provision above mentioned, will be suspended from the Department 
until such fees are paid. 

Tuition Fees. 

The fee for tuition is sixty-five dollars (I65) for each yftar, of which 
forty dollars ((40) is payable on or before October ist, and the remain- 



i68 STATE UNrVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

der on or before Janvaiy lodi. There are no extra fees whatever, hot 
for each Uibonitoiy ooniae in chemiatry, there is required a depoait 
of $3, to cover breakage, and to insure the retom of all ke}^ at the 
close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) ia re- 
turned to the student. 

The above statement of fees is now in effect, and will apply to all 
students in the Department, irrespective of the date of matriculation. 

Anatomy. 

Anatomy is studied during the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
years. Regional anatomy will be taught in a short course of lectures 
in the Junior year. The course is a very thorough one, utilizing all 
the modem aids to teaching. Whenever possible the student will 
have the opportunity, by actual inspection of material, to become 
familiar with the appearance, texture and physical characters of all 
structures. Practical anatomy, or dissection, is absolutely easentisl 
to promotion to higher classes, and is most thoroughly taught, the 
supply of material being abundant. Each student is required to make 
two dissections, each year. On the completion of a dissection, a 
rigid examination will be held, which will entitle to a certificate to 
that effect. Without such evidence of having made two dissections, 
in a manner satisfactory to the Demonstrator, a student cannot be 
examined for graduation. Text-book: Gray, Nancredes' Essentials. 

Physiology. 

Physiology is studied in the Freshman and Sophomore years. In 
this subject the inductive method is very largely employed in impart- 
ing instruction. The lectures are profusely illustrated by means of 
charts, diagrams, and black-board figures; and the student is rendered 
practically familiar with the phenomena of the most important bodily 
functions in normal operation by the employment of experiments 
upon living animals as a means of demonstration. Text-books: Flint, 
Dalton, or Foster. 

Bistology. 

The work in this department runs through the Freshman year. One 
lecture a week will be given, many of them being illustrated by i 



HOMCeOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 169 

of the stereoptioon. Two hours each week are devoted to laboratory 
wQik in the new histological laboratory, which is commodious, well- 
lighted and supplied with thirty-siz new compound microscopes, with 
all necessary accessories, dissecting microscopes, microtomes of various 
kinda, injecting apparatus, turn-tables, etc. 

Bach student is furnished a microscope, reagents and apparatus, is 
taught the use of the microscope, and does, or has demonstrated before 
him, the general technique of the subject of histology, hardening, 
embedding, sectioning, staining, mounting, etc. 

Histological injections are made before the dass. During the term 
the student prepares for himself a series of slides, illustrating the 
ultimate distribution of the blood, and cellular structure of normal 
tissues and organs. Klein's Manual of Histology is the text-book 



Chemiatry. 

The work in chemistry is carried on during three years. In the 
Preahman year the course consists of lectures in general chemistry 
and laboratory work. The lectures treat first of the general principles 
of the sctenoe; then the subjects of interest to the student of medi- 
cine are discussed. Especial attention is paid to the compounds 
found in the body, with their functions and chemical changes. Medic- 
inal and poisonous substances and such as are used in practical work 
are also considered. 

In the laboratory the student begins with tests for the metals, par- 
ticularly the poisonous ones, and passes to the anal3r8is of complex 
substances. He learns methods of manipulation, and becomes ac- 
qnainted with the properties and actions of reagents. In the latter 
part of the course urine is studied; quantitative and qualitative tests 
are made for its pathological constituents, and such normal ones as 
are of importance to the physician. 

The course includes the methods for the sanitary examination of 
water, and those employed in quantitative analysis. 

In the Sophomore year physiological chemistry is taken up on the 
same geneial plan. The lectures are in explanation and amplification 
of the laboratory work. The latter includes the study of the proxi- 
mate principles of the body, and of their chemical changes. Artificial 



I70 STATE UNTVBRSiry OF IOWA. 

digestive experiments are made, their products being isolated and 
tested. The constitnents of the blood are tested, together with the 
methods for identification of stains. The qimlitative tests for the 
abnormal constituents of the urine follow, and the quantitative deter- 
mination of such as are of importance. The course is completed by 
the identification of urinary sediments and calculi, and the analysis 
of various pathological specimens of urine. 

In the Jimior year toxicology is taken up. Instmction in this 
branch is given by means of weekly lectures, supplemented by quizzes. 
The general principles are first considered, then the most imiportant 
of the poisons are treated separately. Text-books: Simon, or Rosooe 
and Schorlemmer, Andrews' Analytical Chemistry. 

Theory and Practice. 

R^;ular attendance on this branch of medical study will be required 
only of the Junior and Senior classes; but it is desirable that the 
Sophomore class attend the lectures as often as their other duties will 
permit. The teaching will be didactic and clinical. 

General and special pathology will be taught according to the latest 
investigations into the etiology and nature of disease. 

It will be the aim of the occupant of this chair to teach only that 
which has secured the sanction of competent observers, and which 
has been confirmed by abundant clinical experience. 

In teaching the relation of drug pathogenesis to semieolqgy the 
well established principles of homceopathic therapeutics will be closely 
and consistently followed. 

Attendance upon clinics will be obligatory upon Seniors, Juniors and 
Sophomores, but optional with the Freshman class. 

The lecture room being under the same roof with the hospital 
furnishes admirable opportunities for bed-side instruction. 

The books recommended are: Dickinson's Theory and Prmctioe, 
Amdt's System of Medicine, Raue's Special Pathology, Goodno's 
Practice; for reference, Pepper's Text-book of Theory and Practioe 
of Medicine, Stevens's Manual of Pathology. 



HOMCEOPATHIC MBDICAL DEPARTMENT. 171 

Ophihaliiiolocy and Otology« 

During the Jimior and Senior yean instruction in diseases of the 
eye and ear are both didactic and clinical. Special stress is laid upon 
the diagnosis and treatment of those diseases which will most often 
present themselves in the work of the general practitioner. The 
didactic teaching is illustrated by models and drawings. The clinics 
are large and varied, opportunity being thus given to examine and 
treat the cases presented. Text-books: Norton, Buffum, Angell. 

I/aiyiisology and Rhinology. 

Instruction is given in laryngology and rhinology to the Junior and 
Senior rlnniww by weekly lectures and clinics. Students are assigned 
cases for treatment, and given ample opportunity to become expert in 
the nae of the laryngoscope, rhinosoope and other instruments em- 
ployed in the diagnosis and treatment of the various diseases. Text- 
books: Ivin or Brown. 

Psedology. 

Weekly lectures and recitations are given on diseases of children to 
the Junior and Senior classes. The subjects taken up are the diseases 
of infancy, as well as early childhood, and while largely treated by the 
didactic method, clinical demonstrations are used whenever possible 
Text-books: Tooker, Fisher, 

Materia Medica. 

Students receive instruction from this chair during the entire 
course. The Freshmen are given two lectures each week during the 
first half of the year. Ten lectures are given on the organon, and ten 
on institutes and pharmacology. 

The Sophomores and Juniors are instructed together. Four hours 
each week are devoted to lectures, recitations, and quizzes. The 
v^etable remedies will be considered during the term 189&-99, ^^ 
weekly quizzes on the minerals. A brief review of the toxicological 
and physiological effects of the drug will be given, then the most 
prominent and characteristic symptoms. These s ympto ms will be 
grouped as they have been found useful for therapeutic purposes. The 



172 STATB UNIVBRSrrV OF IOWA. 

Seniors will be allowed to attend and review the lectures given the 
Juniors, and in addition will be given two hours each week. These 
two hours will be devoted entirely to practical work. Clinical cases 
will be presented for which each student will be required to prescribe. 
The remedies thus presented will be thoroughly studied and compared 
with others which are applicable to the various manifestations of the 
disease under consideration. 

Text-books: Organon, Dewey's Essentials of Materia Medica, Har- 
rington's Clinical Materia Medica, Dunham's Homoeopathy and 
Science of Therapeutics and Allen's Hand-book of Materia Medica. 

Stirsrery. 

This study extends through the entire course. Minor snigery is 
taught during the Freshman year, including bandaging. In the 
Sophomore and Junior years surgical emergencies are taught, including 
such topics as anaesthesia, shock, hemorrhage, wounds, fractures and 
dislocations. In the Senior year surgical pathology, general and 
special, is thoroughly gone over. The method of instruction is a com- 
bination of the didactic and practical. The principal operations are 
made on the cadaver, and experimental work in the seminary wiU 
receive careful attention in the Senior year. Examinations are hdd 
in each class at the dose of the year.* 

The books recommended are: In the Freshman year, Sargent's or 
Martin's Minor Surgery; in the Sophomore and Junior yean, Ham- 
ilton on Fractures and Dislocations; in the Senior year, Fiiher and 
Maodonald's Text-book of Surgery, Gilchrist's Surgical Pathol- 
ogy, White and Martin's Genito-urinary Diseases, Adams' Text-book. 

Oynecolog^y. 

This branch is divided between the chair of obstetrics and surgery. 
The study is pursued in the Senior year. 

Medical diseases of women are considered by the chair of obstetrics 
during the last half of the term. The surgical diseases are treated dur- 
ing the year by the chair of surgery, by lectures, clinics, and demon- 
strations. The books recommended are Wood's Gynecology, South- 
wick's Practical Gynecology. 



are 



*S<»phomore8, Juniors, and Seniors are required to attend the clinics; Bcalon 
admitted to sub-clinicB aa detailed in aectiona. 



HOMCBOPATHIC MEDICAL DBPARTMBNT. 173 

OlMitetrica. 

Thia branch ib taught in the Junior and Senior years. The plan of 
instruction in this subject will be the usual didactic method supple- 
mented by demonstrations with wet and dry preparations, models and 
diagxams, together with clinical practice whenever possible. Two 
lectures a week are given, with occasional quizzes and recitations. 
The scheme is designed to carry the student forward, after thorough 
instruction in the anatomy of the pelvis and generative apparatus, 
through ovulation, menstruation, gestation, and normal labor. Use 
of the various instruments is taught on the manikin, and every care 
taken to thoroughly prepare the students for dealing with complica- 
tions, pystochia, and all forms of abnormal gestation and labor are 
given in the closing portion of the course. The central idea is to give 
the practical preference over the merely theoretical. The text-books 
recommended are: Guernsey, Leavitt, and Lusk; Grandin and Jar- 
men, Obstetric Surgery. 

Pathologyf. 

The west hall on the second floor of the Medical Building is now the 
pathological and bacteriological laboratory. Here are all the instru- 
ments necessary for the study and demonstration of pathological anat- 
omy and pathological histology, also the apparatus usually found in a 
well equipped bacteriological laboratory, ample for the cultivation 
and demonstration of the germs of interest to medical men. Students 
not only see this work done, but make all ordinary cultivations and 
pure cnltares themselves, and prepare slides of all the ordinary non- 
pathogenic and pathogenic microbes. 

Three honrs a week are devoted to the practical study of morbid 
anatomy. The work consists of laboratory exercises, the aim being to 
make this study as practical as possible, and to familiarize the student 
with the use of the microscope in diagnosis. Part of the time in the 
labora t ory is devoted to the study of prepared specimens under the 
guidance of the instructor, and the remainder to the mounting of 
pathological specimens by the student himself. An abundance of 
material is fnmJahed by the laboratory, and each student is allowed 
to keq> as his own prop er ty all the sections pnpBied by him during 



174 STATE UNIVBRSTTY OF IOWA. 

the tenn. Special attention ia paid to the diagnosis of tumors, tii- 
chins, etc., microscopically, and the student learns easy and lapid 
methods of making preparations for such diagnosis. Two hours a 
week are used for lectures, supplementary as well as introductory 
to the laboratory work. 

The course in this chair is pursued in the Sophomore and Junior 
years, the Junior year being devoted to laboratory work and bacter- 
iology. 

The text-books recommended are: Green, Dellafield and Pmden, 
or Ziegler. In bacteriology: Abbott, Macfarland, Crookshank. 

Medical Jnrispnidence, Insanity and Dentistry. 

These subjects will be treated in short courses of lectures, given by 
appointment. 



Classes in materia medica, practice, minor surgery, pharmacology, 
obstetrics, surgical emergencies, surgery, g3meoology, eye and ear, and 
paedology meet in the lecture-room or amphitheatre of the Homceo- 
pathic Hospital, in which rooms also, all the clinics are held. Physio- 
logy, anatomy and insanity are taught in the amphitheatre of the 
Medical Department. Pathology, histology, chemistry and toxicology 
are taught in the appropriate laboratories. Medical jurisprudence is 
taught in the lecture-room of the Law Department. 

Clinica. 

The clinics of this department are open to students of all the classes, 
but the attendance is not obligatory in the Freshman year. All the 
clinics are full; in some of them the capacity of the Hospital has been 
severely taxed. The general arrangement and clinical system are as 
follows: The House Surgeon at the commencement of the term details 
three students from the Senior class as clinical assistants. One of 
these retires after one week's service, one after two weeks, and the 
remaining one after three weeks. One student a week is detailed 
thereafter, so that each Senj or student has three consecutive weeks of 
clinical work. The duties are to assist at all clinics, and to attend to 
all dressings in the Hospital, under the supervision of the Honse Sor- 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 175 

goon. This gives imiisual facilities for practical instruction. In the 
medical and eye and ear clinics each member of the Senior class will 
be given repeated opportunities for examination of patients, and will 
be required to diagnose the disease and suggest method of treatment. 
The clinics are largely patronized, the number of cases and the variety 
being fully equal to the college clinics elsewhere. The dinics are 
held as follows: 

Medical Clinic. Thursday afternoon, service of Professor Dick- 
inson. 

Sufgical Clinic. Saturday morning, service of Professor Gix^hrist. 

Eye and Ear Clinic. Tuesday afternoon, service of Professor Nbw- 

BB&RY. 

Gynecological Clinic. Friday morning, service of Professor Gilr 



Obstetrical Clinics. By appointment, service of Professor C0G8- 



Snb-Clinics. The sub-clinics are held two or more times a week, to 
which sections of the Senior class are admitted, where opportunity is 
affoided aU to make examinations in gynecological cases, and the use 
of varions instruments of precision for purposes of disgnosis. 

Medical and sui^cal treatment, and nursing are free for patients 
entering the general clinics. Board in the Hospital is furnished for 
{7.00 a week. 

Correspondence with reference to admission to the clinics or Hospi- 
tal should be had with the professor having charge of the particular 
clinic, or the Registrar of the Faculty. Arrangements can be made 
for the reception of a limited number of obstetrical cases, only between 
the 15th of September and the 15th of February. 

DfSPSNSA&Y. In connection with the clinics a dispensary has 
recently been opened, where the clinical assistants, under the direc- 
tion of the Faculty, prescribe for and visit out-patients, as well as 
attend snch cases of obstetrics as apply. The dispensary is growing 
in patronage And influence, and has become a highly important and 
pcofitable portion of the work, affording at once material for the 
dinics, and giving practical instruction to the attendant. 



176 STATB UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

TRAININO SCHOOi; FOR NURSBS. 

A trainitig school for nuraes has been authorized by the Board of 
Regents, the complete oonrse covering three years. The first year is 
devoted to preliminary studies fitting the pupil for the active work, 
that is, as nurses in the Hospital. Candidates for admission to the 
Training School must be not under twenty nor over thirty-five years 
of age, must have a common school education, and must present two 
letters of recommendation as to their capability, qualifications, and 
moral character. No other examination for admission will be required. 

The first year, covering the preliminary work, begins and closes with 
the medical term of the University. A fee of five dollars will be 
charged, payable at the beginning of the term to the Registrar of the 
Faculty. The work of this year is entirely theoretical, consisting of 
lectures upon anatomy, physiology, special nursing in diseases of the 
eye, ear, p'^se, and throat, and on practical nursing. For cases of 
emergency and home-nursing, this course is especially desirable. 
Aside from their practical work, during the second j^ear, the nursea 
will have one recitation each week, and during the third year special 
topics for essays will be arranged. Those who have completed the 
preliminary work at the beginning of the second jrear may be entered 
upon one months* probation in the Hospital, during which time they 
will receive board, lodging, and laundry, but no compensation. If 
they are found satisfactory, they shall at the end of the first month 
and during the remainder of the second year in addition to their livings 
as above, receive fS a month for personal expenses, with a slight in- 
crease during the third year. Thissumisnot to beregarded as wages, 
the instruction given being in itself full compensation for all se i v ices 
rendered. Those who complete the three years* course shall receive a 
suitable certificate signed by the President and the Secretary of the 
University. The graduating exercises occur in connection with those 
of the Department. For further information address the Matron, 

ADELE P. KlMBAlth, M. D. 



HOMCEOPATHIC MBDICAL DEPARTMRNT. 177 

Board and Accomtnodatioiis. 

Good boaid can be obtained at from I3 to $5 a week. By assodat* 
ing in clnbs, atodents may supply themselves with good accommoda- 
tionaat a material reduction from the customary prices. 

Students will be furnished with all necessary information concern- 
ing rooms and boarding by applying to the Y. M. C. A. Information 
Bureau. 

Requirements for Graduation. 

To be admitted to the degree of Doctor of Medicine (M. D. ) in this 
De partm ent, the student must exhibit to the Dean evidence of having 
pursued the study of medicine for four years; must have attended four 
courses of lectures, of at least six months each, the last of which 
shall have been in this institution; and must be not less than twenty- 
one jreare of age. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Collegiate Department by which it will be possible for a jjtudent to 
complete the course in Science and the course in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees of B. 
S. and M. D. This combined course is especially recommended to all 
students who intend to enter the profession of medicine. 

Homceopathic Medical Alntnni Association. 

The Alumni Association held its eleventh annual meeting at the 
College Building, March 28, 1898, at which time the following officers 
were elected: 

President—- A. G. Hanssn, Cedar Palls. 

Pirst Vice-President— P. C. Skinnbr, Port Byron, lU. 

Second Vice-President— A. L. Poi«i,ard, Iowa City. 

Secretary— B. J. Lambbrt, Ottumwa. 

Treasurer— Lbo&a Johnson, Iowa City. 

Executive Committee— Prssibsnt, Sscrbtary and Trkasttrsr. 

Alumni are urged to send their names to the Secretary, to be en- 
rolled as members. A small admission fee is required, the funds so 
procured to be donated to the Hospital according to a vote taken at 
the last meeting. Alumni are requested to keep the Secretary informed 
of change of address. 



178 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Johnson Connty Honioeopatliic Medical Society. 

The meetings of this society are held weekly in the lectnre-room of 
the Department, and have been very useful adjuncts to the instruction 
given. Senior students are associate members, and enjoy all the 
privileges of membership, except that of voting and the right to hold 
office. Officers for 1898-99: 

President— jAiocs G. Giu:hrist, A. M., M. D. 
Vice-President— R. W. Homan, M. D. 
Secretary— AI.PHEUS L. Poi^i^ard, M. D. 



Any further information may be obtained by addressing the Presi- 
dent of the University, the Dean or Registn&r of the Homceopathic 
Medical Faculty, at Iowa City, Iowa. 



Dental Departinent« 



Faculty. 



CHABT^KS ABHMSAD SCHA9PFER, A. M., Ph. D., I^L. D., 
Presideiit. 

Frank Thomas Brbknb, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative Dentistry and Therapeutics, and Superintendent 
of Operative Clinics. 

WlLUAM S. HoSPORD, A. B., D. D. S., 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and Crown and Bridge Work, Superin- 
tendent of Prosthetic Clinics and Dean of the Paculfy. 

WiLi^iAM Harpbr DsPord, a. M., M. D., D. D. S., 
Professor of Oral Pathology and Hygiene. 



Other Instructors and Officers. 



BLBBRT WII.IJAM ROCKWOOD, B. S., M. D., 
Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

Waltrr Lawrencs Bibrring, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology, Bacteriology and Histology. 

Chari^bs Sumnkr{Chasb, a. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Jambs Rbnwick Gttthrib, M. D., 

Professor of Ph3rsiology. 

John Wai«tbr Harriman, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Wn^UAM ROBBRT WHITBIS, M. S., M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Histology. 

Jambs B. Pi^bbnbr, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Orthodontia. 

CHARI.BS Clbvbi^nd Nutting, A. M., 

Lecturer on Comparative Odontography. 

179 



i8o STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ROYAI, WiNTHROP BAI4>WIN, D. D. S., 

I^ecturer on Regional Anatomy and Clinical Demonstiator. 

A. E. ROGBKS, D. D. S., 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy and Clinical Demonstrator. 

W. G. Clark, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Porcelain Work. 

CHARIfES B. LKWIS, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

Prank B. Jabcbs» D. D. S. 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology. 

William Edward Barlow, B. A., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

WiLBSR John Tbstbrs, B. S.. Ph. C, 
Demonstrator of Chemistry. 



E. A. Sprakbr, 

Custodian. 

Helen Baschnagel, 

Clerk. 



Visitiiifi: Clinical Inetrttctora. 

T. L. Jabces, D. D. S., Fairfield. 
C. J. Peterson, D. D. S., Dubuque. 
A. R. Begun, D. D. S., Des Moines. 
C. A. Cope, D. D. S., Onawa. 
K. M. FuLLERTON, D. D. S., Cedar Falls. 
S. C. Hatch, D. D. S., Sioux City. 
Guy Huntley, D. D. S., Hiason City. 
C. A. Palmer, D. D. S., Grinnell. 
C. R. Baker, D. D. S., Davenport. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



Iiutructioti in this school is given throughout the academic year 
by lectures, recitations; clinical teaching, and practical exercises, uni- 
formly distributed. The course of instruction is progressive and ex- 
tends over three years. 

Some of the studies of the first and second years are pursued in con- 
nection with the classes in the Medical Department, the student re- 
ceiving instruction by the same professors, at the same time and place 
with the medical students, and at the end of the year passing with 
them the examinations. 

It is the object of the Faculty to present a complete course of in- 
struction in theory and practice of Dentistry; and for this purpose 
well-appointed laboratories and infirmaries are provided, and such 
arrangements made as insure an ample supply of patients. Clinical 
instmction is given by the professors and other instructors, and under 
the direction of demonstrators patients are assigned to the students, 
insuring to all opportunity of operating at the chair, and becoming by 
actnal practice familiar with all the operations demanded of the 
dentist. 

The infirmaries remain open and clinical instructors and demon- 
stiEton are in attendance daily throughout the school year, offering 
to students unsuxpassed facilities for acqtdring practical knowledge 
and manipulative dexterity. 

Cotirae of Instractioii. 

The course of instruction extends over three years of nine months 
each. This, however, does not apply to those students who entered 
bcfoie the jrear 1896-97. 

181 



i82 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Reqidretneiits for Admlseioii. 

The applicant must present to the Pacolty satiaEactory evidence of 
good moral character, and mnat pass a preliminary examination or 
present a diploma or a certificate of graduation from a college, academy 
or high school, or a first class teachers* certificate covering the 
branches enumerated below under preliminary examinations. Stu- 
dents of both sexes are admitted on equal terms and are afforded the 
same facilities for acquiring a thorough dental education. 

I^liminafy Examinations. All students who intend to matric- 
ulate in the Department are expected to be present at the time ap- 
pointed for examination. The preliminary examination will b^:in on 
Tuesday, the day preceding the opening of the session, at 8 a. ic., and 
will embrace the following branches: Algebra, through quadratics, 
three terms; rhetoric and composition, three terms; English Literature, 
three terms; United States History, three terms. 

The student may, at the option of the Faculty, substitute any one of 
the following electives in lieu of one of the preceding studies: Three 
terms of algebra, through quadratics; three terms of geometry, plane 
and solid; two terms of physiology; two terms of physical geography; 
one term of botany, with analysis of forty plants; three terms of gen- 
eral history; three terms of physics; three terms of English liteimtnxe; 
two terms of civil government; two terms of history of England; three 
terms of American literature; three terms of chemistry; one term of 
commercial arithmetic; two terms of astronomy; two terms of geology; 
two terms of natural history; one term of political science; two terms 
of drawing; three terms of German; three terms of Greek; three terms 
of Latin reading, Csesar; three terms of Cicero, four orations; three 
terms of Vergil, six books; one term of book-keeping; three terms of 
French; three terms of manual training. 

• 

Schedule of Stadiee. 

First or Freshman Year, Completed the first year: Chemistiy, 
including laboratory, Organic Materia Medica, Histology, indudiag 
laboratory work. Comparative Anatomy, with Dissection, Dental 
Anatomy with Technic, and Operative Technic. 



DBNTAL DEPARTMENT. 183 

Subjects taken the first year and oontinned through the second year: 
Anatomy, Physiology, Dental Technology, lectures and laboratory 
work, and Operative Technic. 

Second orjunwr Year, Subjects completed the second year: Anat- 
omy with Dissection, Physiology, Organic Chemistry, and Metallurgy, 
including laboratory, Inorganic Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
Dental Technology, and laboratory work . 

Subjects taken the second and continued through the third year: 
Surgery, Pathology, Therapeutics, Orthodontia Technic, Operative 
Technic, Operative Dentistry, and Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Third or Senior Year, Subjects completed the third year: Oral 
Surgery, Pathology, Regional Anatomy, Special Histology, Clinical 
Dentistry, Therapeutics, Metallurgy and laboratory work. Dental Art, 
Special Therapeutics, Practical Bacteriology, Operative Dentistry, 
Prosthetic Dentistry, Dental Pathology, and Hygiene. 

All students of the first and second years will be required to pass an 
examination on the studies pursued in their respective courses before 
leaving the University at the dose of each term. No student who has 
failed in two of the studies of his course will pass to advanced stand- 
ing unless they are made up before the holiday vacation. No certifi- 
cates are given to any who fail in more than two branches, except a 
time certificate stating the actual time of attendance. 



COUK8S OF I^BCTURSS AND XrABORATORT WOSX. 



OperatiTe I>e]itiatr7 and Therapeutics. 

To arrest decay and prevent the destruction of human teeth is the 
ideal work of operative dentistry. To know how to fill teeth well and 
lastingly is the ambitious desire of every intelligent student of dentis- 
try. In the lectures delivered on this subject he will be made 
acquainted with all the useful materials and methods of filling teeth, 
the use of instruments, and the various manipulations required in a 
full practice at the operating chair. The same will be fully illustrated 
and demoostnted by numerous clinics, which will constitute an 



ia4 STATE UNIVHRSITY OF IOWA. 

important f eatnre of the dental instmction. The student is expected 
to supply himself with such instruments as will enable him to pecf ocm 
all the usual operations of dentistry, under the supervision of the 
demonstrators. Students who own a dental engine should bring it 
with then. The application of remedies to diseased conditions is 
taught practically eveiy day upon the patients in the operative clinic. 

CHtiical Bentlstty. 

In clinical dentistry thorough practical instruction is given in the 
details of operation, use of materials, instruments, appliances and the 
application of remedial agents for the restoration of diseased con- 
ditions. The students are required to take charge of patients and 
perform operations under the supervision of demonstrators. The 
laxge number of clinical patients presenting themselves furnishes 
ample opportunity for a variety of practical work. 

Prosthetic Dentistry. 

The instruction in this subject is both didactic and practical. It is 
the aim to teach not only the mere mechanical processes of Dentistry, 
but that combination of art with mechanism which enables the prac- 
titioner to effect so much in restoring the symmetry of the face and 
usefulness of the teeth where they have been lost or impaired by acci- 
dent or disease. Thorough instruction is also given in methods of 
restoring the dental organs with crowns of metal, or porcelain, by 
bridges, and by the making of artificial dentures with bases of metal, 
rubber, celluloid, aluminum, gold and porcelain, either alone or in 
combination. 

General Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Pathology and bacteriology are taught during the Junior and Senior 
years by means of lectures and laboratory work. The work in the 
Junior year is devoted to general pathology, comprising a study ol 
the general pathological changes, such as circulatory disturbances, 
degenerations, and inflammations, that occur in human tissues. Dur- 
ing the Senior year the work consists of special pathdogy and bac- 
teriology. It includes the study of forms ol new growths and the 



DBNTAI^ DBPARTMBNT. 185 

diflease changes oocarriiig in special stmctiues, especially the oral 
tisBoesand such changes as ocnne within the sphere of dental snrgeiy. 
The bacteriological laboratory is equipped with the most improved 
apparatus for bacteriological investigation. The work comprises the 
study of the characteristics of micro-organisms of the buccal cavity 
and their relation to dental caries and other disease processes. The 
slides prepared become the property of the student. 

Hiatology. 

Histology is taught during the Freshman and Junior years by means 
of lectures and laboratory work. The laboratory work comprises the 
preparing and study of microsco p ical slides, showing the minute 
structure of the different tissues and organs of the human body, with 
special reference to the digestive apparatus. Instruction is given in 
the various methods of preparing and staining tissues for microscop- 
ical examination, the slides prepared becoming the personal property 
of the student. During the Junior year the work ia continued in the 
foon of special dental histology, which is presented by means of 
didactic lectures and laboratory work. In the laboratory, each stu- 
dent prepares and studies a collection of slides pertaining to the 
histology of all the dental tissues and softer structures of the buccal 
cavity, including a complete series showing the development of the 
teeth, the slides becoming the property of the student. 

Oral Pathology. 

A brief consideration of inflammation and its terminations, patho- 
ological conditions incident to first dentition, pathological conditions 
incident to second dentition, dental caries— various theories and ex- 
periments by which conclusions are reached, individual diseases of 
the teeth,— sensitive dentine, hypersemia, congestion and inflamma- 
tion of the pulp, pulp nodules, putrescent pulps, alveolar abscess, 
acute and chronic, diseases of the peridental membrane, pereoemen- 

tis, gingivitis, pyorrhoea alveolaris, the tongue and the mouth in dis- 
of remote parts, of tumors, methods of diagnosis. The epulic 
tumors, osteoma, simple cystic tumors, dentigerous cysts, diseases of 



i86 v^ATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

the antmm, ranula, mouth breathing, alveolar necrosis, majdllsij 
necrosis, phosphor-necrosis, epitheleoma, syphilis, month manifesta- 
tions, especially neuralgia and many other practical subjects that can 
not be mentioned here. 

Hygiene. 

The importance of this subject cannot be overestimated when it is 
understood that decay of the teeth, suppuration of the pulp, alveolar 
dental abscess, pyorrhcea alveolaris, and perhaps other diseaaes with 
which dentists have to contend are the direct result of unhygienic 
conditions in the oral cavities. The processes of fermentation, sup- 
puration, and infection in general, are considered, and full instruction 
given in oral, personal, and office hygiene, and in the best methods of 
disinfection and antisepsis, including the care of the instruments in 
daily use. 

Chemistry. 

The work in chemistry is carried on during two years. In the Fresh- 
man year the lectures treat first of the general principles of the scienoe, 
then their application to the needs and operations of dentistry are ex- 
plained. The laboratory work of this year is chiefly in qualitative 
analysis with a view to familiarizing the student with the action of 
reagents, with chemical manipulation and with the most important 
properties of the metals and their compounds. In the Junior year the 
lectures will be upon organic chemistry and metallurgy, and the labor- 
atory work upon the properties of the metals, and also some of the 
more important methods of quantitative analysis. 

Materia Medica. 

Freshman Year, The Freshman class receives two lectures each 
week upon the preliminary matter leading to the detailed oonsidefB- 
tion of drugs proper and organic drugs in particular, indnsive of those 
of both vegetable and animal origin. The preliminary topics include 
definitions, classification, dosage, routes and modes of administration 
of remedies, prescription writing including incompatibilities, metric 
and common systems of weights and measures, etc. The second 



DBNTAL DBFARTMBNT. 187 

dmaioii of the subject, viz., that of organic drugs, takes up their dis- 
cnasioii in detail following a natural and helpful classification of same 
based upon the dominent action of a leading drug in each group or 
class to which such drugs may be assigned. Also the antagonistic and 
S7nei]gistic action of the dings are considered in their appropriate places 
and order. Quizzes, recitations, and written tests are given frequently 
to aid the student's memory. At the close of the session a review and 
session-test will be given. 

Junior Year. The Junior class completes Inorganic Materia Medica 
prior to the holiday vacation and reviews the entire subject preparatory 
to passing the same before the close of the sessional year. After the 
holidays the class begins general therapeutics, special stress being laid 
upon those topics that appertain chiefly to dentistiy, such as anaes- 
thetics, general and local; coagulants, mineral and vegetable; pain 
obtnnders, sedatives, narcotics, etc. Also such drugs as are comprised 
in the list of antiseptics, disinfectants, germicides, deodorants, epis- 
posdcs, escharotics, etc., are specially considered. The consideration 
of a few of the more prominent and common dental affections, such as 
abscess of the antrum, alveolar abscesses, pyorrhoea alveolaris, etc., 
will be briefly discussed from their therapeutic standpoint chiefly. 
At the dose of the year an examination will be given upon this sub- 
ject as well as that of Materia Medica. 

Antttotiiy* 

This is taught in the first and second years by lectures and recita 
tions, one course in dissection being taken each year. 

Phy«i6logy* 

In this sut^ect the inductive method is very largely employed in 
imparting instruction. The lectures are illustrated by means of charts 
diagrams, and blackboard figures, and the student is rendered prac 
tically familiar with the phenomena of the most important bodily 
functions of nonnal operation by the employment of experiments upon 
living animals as a means of demonstration. 



i88 STATE UNIVBRSrry OF IOWA. 

Orthodoiitia. 

Instruction in this branch is given by the use of large charts demon- 
strating appliances of practical cases together with special care as to 
preventiTe measures for the care of deciduous teeth, and coiTec ti ve 
treatment during the eruption of the permanent teeth. The course 
consists also of the treatment of practical cases in the infirmary, the 
care of which is given to individual students, under the direction of 
demonstratoni in charge, and is also used for class instructions. 

R^onal Anatomy. 

The instruction in this subject is supplementary to the lectures on 
general anatomy, and includes a careful description of the bones, 
muscles, blood vessels, and nerves of the head and face, especially 
such as are intimately associated with the physiology and pathology 
of the dental organs. The lectures are illustrated by maps, charts, 
and models, and by several well prepared natural specimens of the 
head, jaws, teeth, and nerves in situ, 

Com]>aratiYe Odo]itog:raphy. 

This course is of unusual practical value. The dental organs and 
their practical use, comprised in the various orders or families of the 
animal kingdom, are illustrated by natural specimens, lantern exhibi- 
tions, and dissection of the lower animals. 

Diaaectioii. 

Early in the term students make application to the demonstrator of 
anatomy for places at the dissecting table. Each student is required 
to dissect at least one part. No charge is made for material. 

Dental Anatomy. 

This course is supplementary to the subject of general anat o my and 
in addition to the lectures given, each student prepares a series of 
sections of the natural teeth, making the prints of them in a book for 
that purpose. The books are the property of the student. 



DENTAI, DEPARTMENT. 189 

Porcelain Work. 

The use of porcelain in the various applications to the practice of 
dentistry is tanght, including crowns, bridges, artificial dentures, in- 
lays, etc Also the use of the various furnaces is demonstrated. 

OperatiTe and Prosthetic Tedinic. 

This course oonsbts of the tempering and making of instruments 
both for operative and prosthetic work, also the preparation of cavi- 
ties in the natural teeth out of the mouth and filling of the same with 
the different filling materials. The course is thoroughly practical and 
constitutes a very important feature of the student's work preparatory 
to the clinical experience. 

It is the desire of the Faculty that the dental profession will assist 
in the above course by forwarding to the department all the extracted 
teeth possible, express charges paid by the department. 

Dental Mnaenm and I^ibrary. 

Members of the dental profession, dental students, and all persons 
interested, are invited to contribute to the museum such specimens of 
malformation, normal or diseased conditions, as will serve for illus- 
tration of dental teaching; also to the library any books, pamphlets, 
journals, or other reading matter pertaining to dental subjects. Such 
contributions will be duly labeled with the donor's name, and care- 
fully preserved. 

Iraboratoriea and Clinic Rooms. 

The didactic work is supplemented by practical teaching in the 
laboratory and clinic rooms, with an abundance of patients (6,928 last 
session. ) The clinic rooms are equipped fully and completely, with 
WUkerson and Columbia chairs, cabinets, and all necessary apparatus 
for the purpose, such as lathes, furnaces for porcelain work, rolling 
mills, vnlcanizers, tables, microscopes, etc. Students are required to 
supply only the lighter and more portable instruments, the list of 
which will be furnished on application. 



190 STATB UNIVERSITY OP IOWA 

Reqtiiremeiits for Oradttation for Sessioii of z898-99* 

The candidate for gxadnation must be of legal age, and of good 
moral character; mnst present to the Faculty and Board of Examiners 
a satisfactory case of artificial dentistry; also the reqaired clinical re- 
cord of practical operations on the natural teeth; mnst sustain a satis- 
factory examination in the branches taught, and must prove his fitness 
for the practice of dentistry. 

The tune of study must include attendance on three courses of lec- 
tures, the last of which must be at this institution. 

The deportment during the term must have been unexceptionable; 
and attendance upon all lectures, clinics and other instruction in the 
course must have been in accord with the requirements of the depart- 
ment. 

Members of the Junior class must be examined finally in anatomy, 
physiology, organic chemistry, metallurgy and therapeutics. 

Members of the Senior class must notify the Dean of the Pacnlty iu 
writing during the second week of February of their intention of be- 
coming applicants for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, at the 
same time presenting a certificate from the Secretary of having paid 
all fees, with a certificate of legal age and good moral character. 

Attendance on any course of lectures in other reputable dental col- 
leges having similar requirements will be accepted as equivalent to a 
corresponding course in this department. Graduates of medical col- 
leges will be required to attend two full years of instruction in prac- 
tical dentistry in this institution, including the courses of lectures, 
before applying for graduation. 

Having complied with the requirements of this department, the 
Faculty and Board of Examiners will recommend the candidate to the 
Board of Regents as entitled to receive the degree of Doctor of Dental 
Surgery. 

Ttiitioii. 

The fee for tuition is I75 for each year, payable $so on or before 
October i, and $25 on or before January 10. There are no extra fees 
whatever, but a deposit of $3 must be made to cover breakage and 
loss before beginning work In the chemical laboratory. 

The above statement of the fees is now in effect, and will be nnder- 



DENTAL DBPARTMENT. 191 

stood to apply to all students in the department, entirely irrespective 
of the date of matriculation. All students who do not pay the proper 
fees or avail themselves of the provision above mentioned will be sus- 
pended from the department until such fees are paid. 

It is of greater advantage to the student, during his dental course 
to study and review a single text-book in each department than to 
read several cursorily. It is, therefore, advised that a single work in 
each department recommended below be chosen and carefully studied 
while any others may be used for reference and subsequent perusal. 



PRACTITIONERS' COXJR8B. 

This course is planned for the convenience and benefit of practi- 
tioners. It will be optional with those entering the course as to what 
studies they will pursue, and what methods in practical work they 
may take up. 

The curriculum will be arranged more especially to give a thorough 
course in pulp and abscess treatment, and other pathological condi- 
tions of the oral cavity. In addition to this, detailed instruction will 
be given in bridge and crown work, continuous gum dentures, porce- 
lain fillings, and in the methods of working metals by all the different 
operations which the practitioner is called upon to perform. 

Requirements for Admission. 

Anyone in reputable practice may enter this course. Those attend-, 
ing the full course of two months will be given a Practitioner's Certi- 
ficate at the end of the course. Graduates of this department will be 
admitted on the payment of the matriculation fee only. 

Graduates of other reputable dental schools will be admitted on 
payment of the matriculation fee and |io. 

A full corps of demonstrators in all departments has been appointed 
to attend to the duties pertaining thereto. The service of several ad- 
ditional clinical instructors will be obtained during the session, each 
a specialist. 



192 STATE UNIVBRSITY OP IOWA. 

Pees for Practitioiiers' Cotuse. 

Matriculation fee $ 5 00 

Tickets, including certificates 25 cx) 

Laboratory fee 6 00 

$3600 

BBNTAIir ASSISTANTS' COURSB. 

A training school for dental assistants has been authorized 
by the Board of Regents. The course will extend through one year 
of nine months, beginning and ending with the regular dental tenn. 
The fee for tuition is $ys for the course, of which I50 is payable on or 
before October i, and the balance on or before January 10. Candi- 
dates for admission to this course must possess a common school edu- 
cation, and must present two letters of recommendation as to their 
capabilities, qualifications and moral character. No other examina- 
tion for admission will be required. Those completing the course wiU 
receive a suitable certificate properly signed, and attested by the seal 
of the University. This course virill be both didactic and practical, 
thorough instruction being given in Operative and Prosthetic Technics, 
Therapeutics, Pathology and Dental Anatomy; there are also special 
lectures and work relative to the duties of an assistant both at the 
operating chair and in the laboratory. 

Credits obtained in this course will be allowed to those desiring to 
attend and complete the regular dental course, providing the require- 
ments are fulfilled as provided for the regular dental course. 

Pajrment of Feea. 

All fees must be paid promptly, when due, to the Secretary of the 
University, William J. Haddock. Students who do not pay the fees 
when due will be suspended from the department until payment has 
been made. 

Board and Accommodatioiia. 

Board in Iowa City can be obtained for from $3.00 to $3.00 a week; 
rooms from |2.oo to |8.oo a month. Many students procure rooms, 
and board in clubs, which materially reduces the cost 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 193 

Text-Books and Books of Reference. 

These can be obtained at the book-fltores in Iowa City. Dealers 
give a disconnt of from ten to twenty per cent. The following are 
recommended by the Faculty: 

OperatiTe Dentistry: American Text-book of Operative Dentistry, 
Ottellnngni, Flagg's Plastics. 

Prosthetic Dentistry: Essig's Prosthetic Dentistry » Richardson's 
Mechanical Dentistry, Evan's Artificial Crown and Bridge Work; col- 
lateral reading of Harris's PrincQ>le and Practice, American System 
of Dentistry. 

General Pathology: Green, Zeigler, Delafield, Prudden. 

Bacteriology: Abbott, Crookshank, Prsenkel. 

Histology: Piersol, Schsefer, Stirling, Klein. 

Oral Pathology and Hygiene: Greene, Garretson's Oral Surgery, 
Wilson on Hygiene. 

Chemistry: General Chemistry — Wurtz, Bloxam, Witthans; Quali- 
tative Analysis— Thorpe, Crafts. 

Materia Medica: White and Wilcox, Potter. 

Therapeutics: H. C. Wood, Potter, Goxgas. 

Anatmny: Gray (13th edition), Holden's Landmarks, Quain (loth 
edition), Holden's Osteology, McClellan's Regional Anatomy, Treve's 
Applied Anatomy. 

Physiology: Poster, Landois and Stirling, Flint, Kirk. 

Orthodontia: Angles, Guilford. 

Dental Anatomy: Tomes, Black. 

Comparative Anatomy: Howell. 

Dictionaries: Harris, Dunglison, Thomas. 

Notice. 

The National Association of Dental Faculties, of which this depart- 
ment is a member, passed at their last meeting a rule whereby all stu- 
dents not regularly matriculated within ten days from the opening of 
any school will not receive credit for a full course. 

The Dental Department of the State University of Iowa complies 
not only with the rules and conditions of the National Association of 



194 STATE UNIVBRSlTy OP IOWA. 

Dental Faculties bat also with those of the National Association of 
Dental Bzaminers. 

Students shonld make their arrangements to be in attendance on 
the first day of the session, as the Pacnlty cannot adjust their plans 
to the tardy arrival of students by wasting time on unimportant lec^ 
tures at the beginning. Promptness at the b^^inning of the term is 
▼ety essential. 



Members of the profession who receive the announcement are re- 
quested to notify the Secretary of any change in their address. They 
will also confer a favor by sending the names of other dentists practic- 
ing in the towns in which they reside. Por further information apply 
to Wm. S. Hosford, Dean of the Dental Department, lovraCity, Iowa. 



Department of Pharmacy^ 



Faculty. 



Chabt^KS a. Schaspfss, a. M., Fh. D., lili. D., 
President. 



Em];. Louis Bo8Rinc&» Ph. G.» Phak. D., 

»f eflflor of Pbamiac 
Desn of the Pacu 



Profeflflor of Pbamuicv, Director of the Fhannaceutical Laboratory and 
^ *ity. 



Launcbi«ot W. Andrews, Ph. D., 

Profeaaor of Chemistiy and Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 

Thomas H. Macbridb, A. M., Ph. D., 

Profeasor of Pharmacognoqr and Director of the Microacopical Labora- 
toty.. 

Cha&I^S S. ChasR, a. M., M. D., 
Professor of Materia Medica. 

BOHUMIL ShiMKK, C. B., 
Professor of Botany. 

E. W. RocKWOOD, B. S., M. D., 
Lect ur er on Toedoology. 

Percy H. Walksr, M. 8., 

Instmctor in Chemistry. 

L9STSR T. JACKSON, B. S., 

Assistant in Chemical Laboratory. 

G90RGIA Knapp, Ph. G., 

Assistant in Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 

Zada M. Cooper, Ph. G., 

Assistant in Pkarmacentlcal Laboratory. 



DEPARTMENT OP PHARMACY. 



The Department of Pharmacy of the State Univernty of Iowa is de- 
signed to famish pharmacists, and those desiring to engage in phar- 
macy, an opportunity to acqtiire a thorough practical education in the 
departments of science most intimately connected with the practice <tf 
that profession. A technical education, such as that offered by the 
schools of pharmacy, and seldom if ever acquired in drug stores, is as 
necessary to the accomplished pharmacist as is the special training of 
a medical course to the physidan. The day is not far distant when 
the pharmacist who is not provided with the evidence of skill which 
the college diploma furnishes, will labor under equal disadvantages 
with the non-graduated physician of to-day. 

The experience of the past thirteen years has thoroughly demon- 
strated the practicability of the courses in this Department. This is 
shown by the readiness with which students of even one session find 
and hold employment in drug stores, at salaries much higher than 
they could possibly command without the college training, and by the 
fact that a much larger percentage of students who have completed 
one year's work in this school pass the examinations before the State 
Board of Pharmacy, than of candidates who go before the Board from 
drug stores, even after several years' experience. 

Incidentally, therefore, the courses are well calculated to aid those 
who desire specially to qualify for the examinations of the State Board 
of Pharmacy. 

It is the aim of the Faculty to make the courses so practical that 
students will find it not only professionally but also pecuniarily profit- 
able to spend a season or two in the Department. 

Sec. 2589 of the Code, relating to the registration of pharmacists, 
was amended by the I^egislature on March 26th, 1898, to read as fol- 
lows: 

196 



DBPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. i^ 

Sec. 2589. Krmnitiatioiw-registration. The cominiflsion, atsnch 
times and places as it may select, and in sncb manner as it maj deter- 
mine upon, shall examine all persons desiring to engage in and con- 
duct business as registered pharmacists, as contemplated in the 
preceding section, and, if found competent, the applicant's name 
shall be entered in the registry book of certificate holders. Graduates 
of pharmacy holding a diploma from the State University, or from 
any school or college of pharmacy requiring a course of study and 
laboratofy work equivalent to that prescribed by the said University 
in its catalogue for the school year 1897-98, shall be entitled to regis- 
tration as pharmacists without examination. Pharmacists thus r^;is- 
tered have the sole right to keep and sell all medicines and poisons 
except intoxicating liquors. 

The fourteenth annual course of lectures will begin on Wednesday, 
September 14, 1898, and close on Wednesday, March 39, 1899. There 
wUl be a vacation commencing December 22, 1898, and ending Jan- 
uary 4, 1899. 

Bttitditig. 

This school is comfortably located in a three-story building, erected 
at a cost of about fifty thousand dollars, and furnishing about twenty- 
five thousand square feet of floor space, perhaps the largest accommo- 
dations in the way of room enjoyed by any school of pharmacy in this 
country. The equipment of this building is of the most modem, and 
in keeping with the advancing stage of the science. Through liberal 
appropriations periodically made by the I^egialature and the Board of 
R^ents, the accumulated equipment of some years is being constantly 
enlaiged, and affords excellent facilities for instruction. The lecture- 
rooms axe provided with all desirable conveniences for class demon- 
stration, and with large tablet chairs. The laboratories are especially 
roomy, the chemical and pharmaceutical laboratories occupsdng each 
a floor space of 54x140 feet, divided into two large general and a num- 
ber of smaller special laboratories. Two forty-horse power boilers 
supply the steam for all purposes, and a seven-horse power gas engine 
furnishes the power for drug mill, dynamo, etc. 



198 STATB UNTVBRSITy OF IOWA. 

PreUttinary gTamiiiation. 

Every applicant for admission to the Junior daas will be reqniied to 
pass a preliminary examination in English, penmanship, geography, 
and arithmetic, or give satisfactory evidence of having completed snch 
studies in a grammar school. 

Admission to the Senior class vtIII be by examination in the branches 
of study taught during the Junior year. Students presenting evidence 
of having passed the Junior examination in another recognized coll^;e 
or school of pharmacy will be admitted without further examination. 

Courses of InstrtictiofL 

The courses of instruction embrace lectures on pharmacy, materia 
medica, pharmacognosy, botany, chemistry, and toxicology, with 
practical work in pharmaceutical, microscopical, and chemical labor- 
atories, and almost daily recitations during the term. 

About two hundred and twenty-five lectures are delivered annually 
to each of the Junior and Senior classes and more than four hundred 
hours are devoted by each student to practical work in the severs] 
laboratories, and to recitations. 

Following the precedent established some years ago by some of the 
older colleges of pharmacy, the graded course is adopted. The full 
course extends over two years, and the students are divided into 
Junior and Senior classes, composed of first and second course stu- 
dents, respectively. This arrangement, while adding greatly to the 
labors of the Faculty, proves of great benefit to students, by enabling 
the professors not only to introduce new and profitable subjects in 
their departments, but by extending their lectures over two sessions, 
to take up the elementary work during the first, and the more ad- 
vanced during the second year. 

Pharmacy. 



PILOFSSSO& BOSKNER. 

The introductory lectures to the Junior class will embrace a short 
review of the pharmacopoeias of the United States, England, Fnnce, 



DBPARTM^rr OP PHARMACY. 199 

and Gcarmany; the various sjrstems and appliances of weights and 
measnres in use by the leading nations; the apparatus and methods 
neoessaiy for the determination of the specific grayity of solids and 
liquids, and the sonrces and management of heat for pharmaceutical 
purposes. These will be followed by descriptions and illustrations of 
apparatus necessary to conduct properly the processes of percolation, 
filtration, comminution, sifting, solution, precipitation, neutralization, 
ev ap oration, distillation, sublimation, etc. 

The official drugs will be considered by groups, the classification 
being based upon the more prominent proximate constituents con- 
tained in the drugs under consideration, beginning with those sub- 
stances containing prominentiy lignin, and passing in order to those 
containing starches, sugars, gums, resins, oleo-resins, fixed oils, vola- 
tile oils, alkaloids, glucosides, neutral principles, etc. 

All the preparations of a drug will be considered together. To aid 
the student in memorizing the strength of official preparations, these 
will be considered by pharmacopeeial classifications. 

The lectures to the Senior class will begin with a short review of 
the subjects embraced in the Junior course, followed by a critical 
study of the preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia, classi- 
fied according to the character of their active or medicinal constitu- 
ents. The relation they sustain to each other will be considered, and 
whenever practicable, the methods of their preparation will be dem- 
onstrated, the aim being to apply the theories and general principles 
tau^t in the Junior course. 

The concluding lectures of the course will be devoted to extem- 
poraneous pharmacy — such as the preparation of emulsions, piUs, sui>- 
pontories, solutions, ointments, etc., and the dispensing of physicians' 
prescriptions, the preparation of toilet articles and perfumefy, etc. 

The adulteration and sophistication to which official preparations 
are subject, and the methods for their detection will be noticed to the 
extent which their importance may demand. 



400 STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA. 



Clieiiii0tt7* 



Propbssor Andrkws. 

The laboratory work will be divided into two distiiict courses, both 
of which are reqtiisite for graduation, but only one of which can be 
taken by the student during either of the two ooll^;e years. 

Junior Year, The Junior year comprises instruction in the general 
principles of chemistry, and in qualitative anal3r8is, arranged with 
special reference to pharmaceutical preparations. 

The lectures elucidate the fundamental laws of the science, demon- 
strating them, whenever possible, by numerous experiments performed 
before the dass. The chief metallic and non-metallic elements, with 
their more important compounds and reaction^ are considered. The 
practical application of the principles of chemical calculation, by 
which the compositions of compounds may be deduced from their 
formulas, in consequence of its great importance to the pharmacist, is 
carefully inculcated. Instruction in details of the work, and in mat- 
ters of manipulation is conveyed in the laboratory course, which occu- 
pies, on an average, seven hours a week. Here the student is taught 
by a systematically arranged series of experiments the properties of 
the commonest chemical agents, and how to handle chemical appara- 
tus properly. When some manipulative skill is attained, qualitative 
analysis is tsken up. The characteristic reactions of bodies as applied 
to their detection in mixtures are made familiar in a series of exam- 
ples, beginning with the simplest substances, and pasBing gimdually 
to the more complex, such as are met with in the practioe of Phar- 
macy. The student is expected at the conclusion of this course to be 
able to test the purity of official preparations and to detect the natu« 
of any adulteration which may be present. He is required to pass a 
practical examination covering this ground. 

Senior Year, Quantitative analysis is taken up, particular rmphwniff 
being laid upon volumetric processes, as these, by virtue of the esse 
and rapidity with which they are executed, are of the greatest general 
usefulness. 

The chemical reactions used for detecting morphine, stiycluiiiieand 
other ackaloidal and coal tar products of pharmaceutical importaaoe 



DBPARTMBNT OP PHARKACY. ^i 

afe atadied in the laboratory and the class is exercised in the practical 
analysis of mixtuxes of such snbstanoes. 

Practice is given in the valuation of numerous inorganic and organic 
pharmaoentical preparationSi and in the methods of controlling or 
detennining their exact strength. A laboratory examination concludes 
the course. 

Phamtacogfiiofiy. 



Professor Macbrids. 

This course is intended to present the organic Materia Medica from 
the standpoint of the biologist, with a view to enabling the student to 
handle his materials intelligently, and to identify them in accordance 
with the recognized principles of biologic science. The various drugs 
of organic origin are tahen up in the order of their natural classifica- 
tion, the principal facts as to their nature, origin and preparation are 
set forth in a series of lectures illustrated by abundant material in 
original packages, as well as by herbarium specimens (in the case of 
plants), charts, drawings, microscopic preparations, etc. 

Winter. One hour a week, commencing about November i. 

Ample cabinets of Materia Medica are at hand, and free use is con- 
stantly made of the magnificent collections now found in the Her- 
barium of the State University. 

Text-books: 

Flueckiger's Principles of Pharmacognosy. 

Maisch's Materia Medica. 
Bentley and Trimen's Medicinal Plants. 

Millspangh's American Medicinal Plants. 

The United States Dispensatory. 

The National Dispensatory. 

Botany. 



Three co u rse s are offered in Botany: 

Course i. General Botany. This course is devoted to a careful 
study of the elements of the science. The various organs of the plant 



202 STATB UNIVBRSITY OP IOWA. 

Bxe reviewed and the local antimmal flora is made to afford abandaiit 
material to illustrate, in the hands of the stndent, the morphology of 
toots, stems, and leaves, as weU as the ordinary principles of floral 
analysis, and the means of specific identification. Types of the prin- 
ciple orders of greatest economic valne are studied in detail. 

Junior Year, Fall term. Two hours a day for the first six weeks. 

Course 2. The second course is devoted to an inquiry into the life 
and growth of the plant; the cell, its morphology and products; the 
morphology of the entire plant structure as a means of identification. 
It includes laboratory work with the microscope and evening lectures 
illustrated by numerous stereopdcon views. 

Junior Year. One hour a week during fall and winter terms, 
following Course i. 

Course 3. Microscopic Technology. This course includes instruc- 
tion in the use of the compound microscope, and its employment in 
the investigation of vegetable structures. The student is supplied 
with an instrument and aU necessary reagents and apparatus, and is 
taught the various modes of cutting, staining, and mounting histolog- 
ical preparations. Practical instruction is given in the use of the 
microscope in the identification of crude drugs as well as in the detec- 
tion of adulteration. Each student taking this course prepares at the 
laboratory for his own use, a cabinet of microscopic slides, illustrative 
of many of the more important official drugs. 

Senior Year, Winter term. Two hours a week. 

Students in all these courses are afforded ample laboratory facili- 
ties, and the splendid botanical collections in the University Her- 
barium are always available for illustrations and comparative study. 

The following list includes the principal text-books: 

Macbride's Lessons in Elementary Botany. 

Wood's Class Book of Botany. 

Gray*s Manual of Botany. 

Ooodale's Physiological Botany. 



DEPARTMENT OP PHARMACY. 203 

Kateria Medlca. 



Profbssor Chask. 

This branch will be presented to the students of the Pharmacy Depart- 
ment fnmi a two>fold standpoint, namely, that of extemporaneous 
phannacy and the prescribing physidan. To this end a brief outline 
coarse in physiology illustrative of the functions of the more promi- 
nent organs of the body will precede the discussion in detail of the sub- 
ject matter that more properly belongs to this chair. However, the 
professor in chaige feels that the pharmacist can best serve those 
who seek his aid by having a general apprehension of a few of the 
salient points at least that belong chiefly to the physiologist. 

Junior Year. The members of the Junior class will be given pre- 
liminaiy definitions of the subject; also various terms such as alka- 
loids, glucosides, leucomaines, ptomaines, gums, resins, etc., etc. 
Also the various official preparations will be defined and discussed. 
The routes and modes of administration of remedies, their physiologi- 
cal and toxicological action will likewise be considered. The origin, 
source, composition, chemical characteristics and physical properties, 
the modes of preparations, etc., of each drug will be noted briefly, 
their more elaborate consideration being referred to the chair of 
Pharmacognosy. 

The subject of prescription writing including incompatibles and 
their classifications, their instantaneous detection and means of avoid- 
ance will be subjects for careful consideration and drill. Cumulative 
action of drugs in the system — how it may occur and how avoided — 
will also be discussed. The common and metric systems of weights and 
measures will receive due attention. Finally with subject of dosage 
considered at length, the student will be assumed to be ready to be 
introduced formally to the chief dmgs made use of in his profession. 
To this end organic dmgs of both vegetable and animal origin will be 
first considered. The student will be required to make full and 
ezhanstive notes on each lecture at the time of its delivery, and also 
present a carefully prepared transcription of the teztnal matter found 
in the text-book used. Avery excellent and natural grouping of 
drugs considered will be f oUowed, based upon the dominant action of 



1Q4 STATE UNTVBRSITY OF IOWA. 

the leading drug of the group or cUss to which soch drugs may be 
assigned. In this manner systematic study is p re s er ved and the subject 
matter much more easily retained. Frequent quizzing, recitations and 
written tests supplement the student's part of the work, thereby facili- 
tating the retention of the facts presented. 

Senior Year. This course is an amplification of the preceding. 
The Senior class is given a rapid review of the subject-matter of the 
Junior course and then completes the unfinished portion of this part 
of his work. A brief course in Inorganic Materia Medica is like- 
wise presented to the members of this class, comprising the more 
important drugs made use of in pharmacy. With frequent reviews, 
tests, drills, etc., this class will, before the termination of the 
session, complete the subject, review and pass it. Prescription writing 
will be dwelt upon in this course as in the preceding year so as to 
make sight reading and detection of errors possible. The physiolog- 
ical action of drugs is also specially presented, antagonistic and 
syneigistic remedies being noted. Thus with a review of the entire 
subject, this class is led to a general comprehension of the fundamental 
principles and knowledge of the leading drugs used in this important 
branch of their course. 



PR0FBS90R ROCKWOOD. 

The course consists of one lecture a week during the entire aessioo. 
The general action of poisons is first considered, then the most impor- 
tant ones are treated separately. Their physical p roperties and chem- 
ical action are noticed, together with their uses, and most common 
sources as tozicological agents. The symptoms of the different clnsscn 
are given, and the treatment for each. Especial attention is paid to 
antidotes. Methods of testing suspidons substances, as well as the 
examination of secretions and excretions, are explained and illns- 
trated by experiments. 

Fhannacetttical Mbotatoty. 

The pharmaceutical laboratory, provided with the ne c es s ar y con- 
veniences, apparatus, and material for thorough practical in sli Bc Uo B 



DEPARTMENT OP PHARMACY. 105 

will be open daily dnring the greater part of the school year. The 
instraction will embrace practice in the nae of thermometers, hydrom- 
eteiB, specific gravity bottles, and balances; the preparation of tinc- 
tures, symps, oleo-resins, solid and fluid extracts, pill masses, com- 
poond powders, solutions, hypodermic and compressed tablets, and 
many chemicals, snch as the official iron solutions, scale salts of iron, 
mercury and lead compounds, which the apothecary should and can 
prepare for himself, both with advantage and profit; extemporaneous 
pharmacy, including the preparation of emulsions, pills, plasters, sup- 
positories, prescriptions, the application of pharmacopceial tests, the 
manufacture of handkerchief extracts, colognes, sachet powders, etc.; 
in short, practice in all the varied duties of a first-class pharmacy. The 
greatly improved facilities of the laboratory building will permit 
of the introduction of work found impracticable for preceding classes. 

Instruction in this branch is now looked upon as one of the utmost 
unportanoe in pharmaceutical education, especially as much of the 
work formerly conducted entirely by the apothecary is now in the 
hands of laige manufacturing establishments, and the student in phar- 
macy is thereby deprived of many valuable opportunities for gaining 
the necessary experience aad self-confidence in drug stores, which a 
personal acquaintance with the various manipulations is sure to bring 
about. The instruction in this laboratory will be individual; the 
progress made will therefore depend upon the student's knowledge 
and exertions. 

All students desiring to graduate from this school are xequired to pur- 
sue this course during the Junior and Senior years. 

Students wUl be furnished with all necessary apparatus and 
material, but will be required to pay for all breakage or damage to 
apparatus while in their possession. 

Tttitioii. 

The fee for tuition is $75 for each year, of which $$0 is payable on or 
before October i, and the remainder on or before January 10. There 
are no extra fees whatever, but for each laboratory course in chem- 
istry or practical pharmacy there is required a deposit of I3 to 
cover breakage and to insure the return of all keys at the dose of the 
session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is returned to the 



2o6 STATB UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

stadent on presentatioii of the certificate of the professor in charge of 
the laboratory in question. 

The above statement of fees is now in effect, and will be understood 
to apply to all students in the Department, entirely irrespective of the 
date of matricnlation. 

All fees must be paid to the Secretary of the University, William J. 
Haddock. 

All students who are delinquent in the payment of tnition will be 
suspended from the Department until the tuition is paid. 

Qnalificatioiui for Qraduatioit. 

Every person upon whom the diploma of this Department is con- 
ferred must be of good moral character, have arrived at the age of 
twenty-one years, have attended two full courses of lectures, the last 
one of which shall have been in this school, including two full courses 
of pharmaceutical, microscopical, and chemical laboratozy practice, 
and shall pass satisfactory written examinations in all the branches 
taught in this school, when he shall be entitled to the d^;ree of Grad- 
uate in Pharmacy (Ph. G.)* 

Final Bxaminationa. 

The examinations of candidates for graduation will take place during 
the week preceding the dose of the lecture season. 

Weekly lExatniiiatioiui. 

As auxiliary to the lectures, the professors will hold frequent quizzes 
in their respective departments, to serve as revi e w s of the subjects dis- 
cussed in the lectures. 

Text-Books. 

Pharmacy— Por Juniors— U. S. Pharmacopoeia, Remington's Prac- 
tioe of Pharmacy, National Pormulary. Por Seniors —All the above, 
Caspari's Treatise on Pharmacy, Coblentz' Handbook of Pharmacy, 
Sooville's Art of Compounding. 

Chemistry— Andrews' Qualitative Analysis, Long's Kzperimentid 
and Analytical Chemistry. 



DHPARTMBNT OF PHARMACY. 207 



Phannaoognoey — ^Maisch's Organic Materia Medica. 

Materia Medica— White & Wilcox's Materia Medica and Therapen- 
ticB, Sayxe'a Organic Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy, Culbreth*8 
Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Botany — ^Macbride's Lessons in Blementry Botany, Gray's or Wood's 
Mannal, Bastin's College Botany. 

Reference Books. 

U. S. Dispensatory, National Dispensatory, Presenilis' Analytical 
Chemistry, Hoffman and Power's Examination of Medicinal Chem- 
cals, day's Botanical Text-Book, Vol. II. 

Board. 

The cost of board in dubs is from |i.so to $2,50 per week; in private 
houses from $2,50 to I4.00 per week. Rooms can be obtained at from 
50 cents to ^1.50 per week for each student. 

I^lbrarles* 

The general librszy of the University is accessible to students of all 
departments during eight hours of every week-day. Books may also 
be drawn for outside use. 

One hundred and thirty American and European periodicals are 
taken, and are kept upon the tables of the reading-room throughout 
the year. 



For further particulars address BmilL. Boemer, Deanof the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy, Iowa City, Iowa. 



DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 1897. 



COi;i/BGIAT8 DSPA&TMSNT. 



Master of Arts. 

Brock, Prank V., A. B. Harney, Helen M., Ph. B. 

Currier, Helen Noyes, Ph. B. Kelly, Harry B., Ph. B. 

Crossley, J. J., A. B. Van Law, C. H., A. B. 

Master of Science. 

Radasch, Henry E., B. S. O'Donoghue, J. H., A. B. 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Briggs, George N. Pile, Mittie Mansfield 

Bursma, Jacob Popham, R. G. 

Hamann, Albert W. Resser, Burt C. 

Hanks, John Schaeffer, George Schuyler 

Hardman, James Elias Seymour, Libbie 

McCord, Robert Leigh, Jr. Simmons, Edmund 

Paisley, Albert A. Smith, Charles Samuel 

Zerwekh, Florence A. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Allin, Norra Bloom, Charles 

Baker, Irving Wesley Boals, Abby 

Barker, Arthur J. Boesche, Louise A. 

Beckman, P. W. Brown, Ralph Othniel 

Bettenga, Everett P. Bndrow, Lester R. 

208 



GRADUATES. 



209 



Chnrchill, D. B. 
Crone, Reuben Bertram 
Dorcas, Cora 
Ensign, Forest C. 
Foster, Charles Scott 
Freeman, Mae Agnes 
Gray, Maud 
Grimes, Frank P. 
Hanson, Harry Webster 
Hobbs, Sam Warren 
Horack, Frank Edward 
Huebner, Charles P., Jr. 
Hnll, John Kress 
Keeler, Wilfred Cecil 
Kiser, Joseph Donald 
LaForce, Frank E. 



Van 



Larrabee, Frederic 
Lynch, Charles Jeremiah 
MacFarland, Beulah 
MacFarland, Elena 
Meissner, John 
Moon, Edwin Griswold 
Otto, Mary Laara 
Petersberger, Isaac 
Price, George M. 
Reever, William Henry 
Reynolds, John 
Sayers, Samuel Je£Ferson 
Sears, Charles William 
Shephard, Hugh H. 
Taylor, Kathryn May 
Thomas, Benjamin Franklin 
Metre, Margaret 



Bachelor of Science. 



Bulge, Albertus J. 
Clark, Whit H. 
Crane, Eaua E. 
Daly, William Joseph 
Donohoe, Anthony P. 
Ende, August 
Finch, Grace Ellen 



Gibbs, George Sabin, Jr. 
Heck, Ernest William 
Hetzel, Roy Boyd 
Iverson, Iver, Jr. 
I^renz, Charles F. 
Savage, Thomas Edmund 
Yost, Charles Gitchell 



Bachelor of Science in Civil Bngineerins:. 



Hewitt, Charles Edgar 
Johnson, George Monroe 



Schultze, J. Otto 

Wilkin, Frank Stephenson 



Bachelor of Science in Blectxical Bngineerin^ . 



Bailey, Arthur 



Willis, Bernard Darwin 



3IO 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



I^AW DBPARTMBNT. 



Bachelor of l^ws. 



Alderman, Ul3r88eB S. 
Allen, Bveret M., B. S. 
Ashcraft, Adolphus M. 
Ashciaft, Ida }. 
Bates, Franklin P. 
Beach, Arthur E. 
Booma, Milton S. 
Brady, Thomas E. 
Brockway, Earl B., A. B. 
Brown, John }. 
Bruce, Robert 
Burling, Charles G., Ph. B. 
Burrell, Walter C. 
Camp, Curtis B. 
Campbell, Joseph 
Carroll, Edward J. 
Colbum, Henry B. 
Cooper, Paul F. 
Conigan, John L. 
Crary, Elisha A., Jr., Ph. B. 
Daniger, Henxy M. 
Devitt, James A. 
Ditzen, Henry E. C, Ph. B. 
Dorland, Henry H. 
Edelstein, John F. 
Evans, William T., Ph. B. 
Everett, Fred D. 
Ewmg, Peter B. 
Goeldner, Hugo F. 
Graham, TuUy E. 
Graham, William A. 
Groves, Mack J. 



Haines, Robert M., Jr., A. B. 
Halvorson, Gay 
Hammill, John 
Harriman, Fred A. 
Holbrook, Carleton W., A. B. 
Hozie, Wirt P. 
Keeler, Burr C. 
Kehoe, John J. 
Kingsbury, Charles S. 
Kintzinger, John W. 
Kirkland, I/mis J. 
I^attner, Samuel B. 
Lewis, Edward O. 
I/>vrien, Fred C. 
Lumm, Alfred W. 
McCoy, John N., A. B. 
McGarvey, William A. 
Mack, Mansfield E. 
Maine, Ernest K., A. B. 
Mayer, Stephen G., A. B. 
Mercer, Andrew W. 
Miller, Justus A., B. S. 
Mueller, Alfred C. 
Mugan, Thomas A. 
Newman, James B. 
Palmeter, Roy A., Ph. B. 
Pendleton, Edmund, B. L. 
Petersberger, Isaac 
Plum, Jerrie h. 
Probasoo, Emery M. 
Quinn, James L. 
Ross, Homer L. 



GRADUATBS. 



9X1 



Rudolph, Samuel H. 
Sallman, Karl E. 
Seaman, Ernest W. 
Sla3anaker, Ora M. 
Smith, Samuel C, Ph. B. 
Snyder, Charles W. E., A. B. 
Stahl, William S., Ph. B. 
Stapleton, Martin W. 
Thomas, Charles M. 
Van Nice, Isaac W. 



Wakefield, Albert O., A. B. 
Walling, Herman B. 
Washburn, Charles H. 
Watkins, Charles G., M. S. 
Watson, Joseph O., A. M. 
White, William A. 
Wilson, Edwin B., Ph. B. 
Winters, Samuel L., A. M. 
Wood, Benjamin U. 



DEG1 



UZJ^K 



CO 



u^uuzJir 



MARCH 1696, 



MBBICAI, DBPAB.TMBNT. 



Doctor of Medicine. 



Abegg, Henry Hervy 
Adams, Fred L., B. S. 
Allen, Frank Hervey 
Anderson, Frederick Eugene 
Arent, Asaph 
Beaore. Walter McKay 
Bean, Oley G. 
Blake, Charles Wesley 
Bossingham, Ottmer N., D. V. 
Bowen, Jesse William 
Briggs, Walter Homer, B. Di. 
Campbell, Charles Harvey 
Detchon, Hugh Smith 
Ely, Francis Argyle 



Engle, Harry Perry 
Farrell, Albert Martin 
Fitz, Geoige G. 
Frank, George W. 
Fuchs, Adele M. 
Habenibht, Robert H. 
Hozie, Will E. 
Hull, John Franklin 
^* Joigensen, Palle Peder Marias 
Kearney, Charles Atwell 
Knudson, Becker Christian 
Lambert, Fred Earnest 
Lester, Harry Sumner 
McClintock, John Thomas, A. B. 



212 



STATB UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



Mcintosh, J. Drnsie 
Meciiin» John Warren 
Mereness, Herbert Dayton 
Morgans, Samnel Lewis 
Monlton, Milo WiUie 
Nass, Hildus Augostinns O. 
Noe, Charles Fred 
Parker, Ralph H., M. Di. 
Parker, William Oilman 
Pence, Laurence Waldo, B. Di. 
Pnroell, Bert E. 



Replogle, Jerry A., D. V. S. 
Rogers, Claude Bernard 
Sackett, Claude Conwell 
Snyder, John Franklin 
Stover, Emery Ellsworth 
Thielen, Michael H., M. Dl. 
Thornton, Albert Herrick 
Walker, Frederick Earl 
Walker, James C. 
WiUsey, Frank Brown 
Wright, Charles Edward 



HOMCSOPATHIC MBDICAI/ DSPARTMBNT. 



Bailey, Ida Holson 
Coleman, Jennie 
Famum, Earl P. 
Kauffman, Wm. A. 



Oraves, Sara L. 



Doctor of Medicine. 

Lambert, Elmer J. 
Sarchet, Lloyd H. 
Skinner, Fred C. 
Todd, Victor C. 

Ntttaes. 

Hawkins, Alice 



DBNTAI^ DBPARTMBNT. 



Doctor of Dental Surgery. 



Barrera, Isaac 
Beam, Frank N. 
Bingham, Frederick Nathan 
Bradley, William Oscar 
Brock, Herbert Bruce 
Brooks, George 
Brown, Curtis Henry 



Brown, Sim Chaney 
Calhoun, Joseph Fanar 
Crandall, Walter Gove 
Davis, Walter Arthur 
Daugherty, James Bertis 
Deetkin, Julius Charles 
Dillinger, Hanna 



GRADUATES. 



213 



Bickelbei^g, George Charles 
Bichar, Cora Leone 
Pawkes, Charles James 
Fickes, Josiah Barton 
Gable, John Carlton 
lindsay, Clayton Bums 
McClelland, Freeman 
McClanahan, William B. 
McEee, John Wesley 
Meis, Herman James 
Killer, Wm. C. 
Morrow, Barton Allen 
Ogg, fiiahlon D. 
Fatton, Jefferson HoUister 
Read, William M. 
Reynard, May 
Gary, Arthur George 
Grafton, Charl Warwick 
Godlove, George Wesley 
Hall, Robert W. 
Hayes, Clinton LeGrande 
Henle, Mathias Francis 
Hirons, Jennie 

Wood, 



Hollenbeck, Chas. Dighton 
Hood, Gneme Tnttle 
Hope, Bird Norris 
Johnson, Francis Alexander 
Joslin, Walter Trich 
Keeler, Howard Denton 
Kinsley, Jason Daniel 
Lambert, Nella Maxwell 
Lawton, Earnest John 
Leech, Charles Sloan 
Leigh, Lloyd Charles 
LiUibridge, William Otis 
Rice, James Kinlon 
Rundorff, Arlhnr H. 
Sensibangh, William Chandler 
Starbnck, Adelbert W. 
Sutton, Harry Burse 
Tinker, B. Fay 
Torrance, Charles Anderson 
Truax, Frederick Blmer 
Webb, John Everett 
Weikert, William Henry 
Wells, Frederick Paine 
George Leroy 



DBPARTMBNT OF PHARMACT. 



Of aduates in Pharmacy. 



Brinton, Gilbert Edward 
Buss, Fiederic John 
Gearhart, Newton Arthur 
Nixon, Robert Bums 



Park, Charles Grant 
Prader, Dolph Christian 
Tague, Marion Samuel 
White, Louis Mortimore 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



ORADUATS STUBSNTS. 



Resident Candidates for the Master's D^r^ee. 



Baker, Irying W., 6. Ph., 

Bauer, George N., B. S., 

Bowman, Charles H., B. Ph., 
Btirge, Albertus J., B. S., 
Butler, Maud B., B. Ph., 
Cameron, John E., B. S., 
Dorcas, Herbert C, B. Ph., 
Bly, Mary Barber, B.Ph., 
Fracker, George C, B. Ph., 
Fteeman, Mae A., B. Ph., 
Gilbert, Lydia L., B. Ph., 
Hartman, Russell T., B. S., 
Hilsinger, George E., A. B., 
Horack, Prank E., B. Ph., 
Jackson, Lester T., B. S., 
Jones, Elizabeth D., B. Ph., 
Lorenz, Charles P.,B. S., 
Meissner, John, B. Ph., 
Merritt, Fred D., B. S., 
Savage, Thomas E., B. S., 
Schlenker, Carl, A. B., 

Seymour, I^ibbie, A B., 



Political Philosophy, United Stotes 
History. 

Differential Equations, Modem Ge- 
ometric Theories. 

Physics, Mathematics. 

Morphology, Zoology. 

History, French. 

Botany, Zoology. 

Pedagogy, Psychology. 

French, History. 

Pedagogy, Psychology. 

English, Pedagogy. 

English, History. 

Geology, Chemistry. 

Political Science, English. 

Comp. Const. I^w, Philosophy. 

Chemistry, Mathematics. 

Pedagogy, Morphology. 

Physics, Mathematics. 

Pedagogy, Political Economy. 

Political Science, History. 

Geology, Botany. 

German Classic Drama, History of 
Prussia. 

Pedagogy. 
214 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



3x5 



SRierwoodf Elizftbeth L*} A. B., 
Shimek, Bohumil, C. E., 
Smith, Charles L, A. B., 

Stanley, Clafence J., B. S., 
Taylor, Kathryn M., B. Ph., 
Thompeon, George P., B. Ph., 
Thotnpoon, L. L*) B. S., 

Thorn, Clifford J., A. B., 

Watt, Walter Gilmore, A. B., 
Zimmerman, Mary A., A. B., 



German, French. 

Botany, History. 

Central American Plants, History 
of Botany. 

Chemistry, Physics. 

Latin, German. 

Paleontology, Botany. 

History, Principles of U. S. Gov- 
ernment. 

Comp. Const. Law, Political Econ- 
omy. 

Econoxnics, History. 

English Literature, Latin. 



Non-Resident Candidates for the Master's Degree. 



Bartsch, Panl, B. S., 
Bettenga, Everett P., B. Ph., 
Briggs, George N., A. B., 
Brown, Plorenoe E.y B. Ph., 

Bnrdick, Anna L.. B. S., 
Crary, Elisha S., B. Ph., 
Crone, R* B., B. Ph., 
Ensign, Forest C, B. Ph., 
Fitzpatrick, Mary L., B. S., 
Fitzpatrick, Thomas J., B. S., 
Francis, Bmoe, B. Ph., 
Gilchrist, Redelia, B. Ph., 
Gilflllan, Dora, B. Ph., 
Graves, W. A., A. B., 
Hamilton, Arthur S., B. S., 

Hearst, W. L., B. Ph., 
Hornby, John A., B. Ph., 
Keeler, W. C, B. Ph., 
Kelso, Inez F., B. Ph., 



Ornithology, Conchology. 
German, Pedagogy. 
Pedagogy, Principles of U. S. Gov't. 
Abnormal Psychology, Animal 

Morphology. 
Latin, English Literature. ' 
Political Science, History. 
Mediseval History, Economics. 
Sociology, Pedagogy. 
Botany, French. 
Botany, Geology. 
Pedagogy, History. 
Latin, Anglo-Saxon. 
German, French. 
Pedagogy. 
Abnormal Psychology, Speculative 

Zoology. 
Sociology, History. 
English Novel, German. 
U. S. History, Comp. Const. Law. 
History, Political Science. 



2i6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Leftch, Robert B., B. Ph., Latin, Philosophy of Lucretins. 

Lovell, Jessie R., B. Ph., History, Political Science. 

Lynch, Charles J., B. Ph., History, U. S. Government. 
McAlvin, James G., B. Ph., M. D., Sociology, History. 

Parsons, Louis A., A. B., Physics, Mathematics. 

Pazson, Susan, B. Ph., Pedagogy, Latin. 

Reever, W. H., B. Ph., History, Political Economy. 

Rigg, G. B., B. S., Cryptogamic Botany, Entomology. 

Sayers, S. Jefferson, B. Ph., U. S. History, Administration. 

Seevers, Zoe Williams, A. B., English Literature, French Litera- 
ture. 

Shepard, H. H., B. Ph., Economics, U. S. History. 

Thompson, Marie D., B. Ph., Pedagogy, English. 

Watson, Joseph O., A. M., Economics, History. 

♦Weidner, C. W., B. S., History, Political Science. 

Williams, H. P., A. B., Ethics, Economics. 

Resident Oradtiatea not Candidates for a Degree. 

Allin, Norra, B. Ph. 

Barber, Elatherine Brainerd, B. Ph. 

Brock, Prank Victor, A. M. 

Brown, Charles Sumner, A. B., (Rochester University.) 

Cavanagh, Lucy, B. Ph. 

Donohoe, Anthony P., B. S. 

Eaton, Emma, LL. B., (University of Michigan.) 

Hammond, Juliet, A. B., (Smith College.) 

Holmes, M. Roberta, A. M. 

Holson, Lulu C, B. Ph. 

Huebner, Charles Frederick, Jr., B. Ph. 

Hughes, Louise, A. M. 

McGuire, Mary, B. S. 

Neff, Mary Lawson, B. Ph. 

Otto, Mary Laura, B. Ph. 

Paine, Katharine, B. Ph. 

Parker, Bessie G., B. Ph. 



*Died in October 1897. 



COLI/BGIATB BNROI^LMENT. 



217 



Plnm, Hany Grant, A. M. 

I^gby, Elsie M., M. S., (Cornell College.) 

Van Law, C. H., A. M. 

Wickham, Pannie Thompeon, A. M. 

Williams, Bertha, B. Ph. 



8SKIOR OCrASS. 



Anderson, Robinson Gregg 
Anderson, Theodore 
Barker, William Lloyd 
Beardaley, John 
Blnme, Fred M. 
Brown, Samuel Joe 
Bmsie, Ida M. 
Carroll, Nan Grace 
Carter, George H. 
Clayton, Joseph B. 
Clements, Melville Fisk 
Cobb, Clyde Beryl 
Coldren, May Belle 
Copeland, Edwin Grant 
Corlett, Jessie M. 
Dalbey, Irvin 
Denny, Alden Ray 
Dey, Ann Hull 
I>anham, Martha Aurilla 
Baton, William Hammond 
Emry, Martha Elva 
Eostis, Carl 

Prailey, Joseph Robinson 
Gabriel, Jennie May 
Golden, Ethel Rose 
Gonwick, Clara 
Hastings, Jessie Pearl 



COURSB. 


RESIDBNCB. 


Sc 


West Union. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Cresco. 


Ph. 


BnrUngton. 


CI. 


Audubon. 


CI. 


Ottumwa. 


Ph. 


Peoria, 111. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Le Mars. 


Ph. 


Rowley. 


Civ. Eng. 


Agency. 


Ph. 


Harlan. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Sc. 


Olin. 


Ph. 


Mt. Union. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Mason City. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Ph. 


Brighton. 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


Ph. 


Port Madison. 


CI. 


Des Moines. 


Ph. 


Vinton. 


Ph. 


Northwood. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 



nS 



STATE UNIVBRSITY OF IOWA, 



NAME. 


GOURSB. 


RKSZDBIVCB. 


Hatch, Daisy Eleanor 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Havner, Horace Moore 


Sc. 


New York. 


Hilpert, Meier George 


Sc. 


Parmington. 


Hilmnger, Margaret I^. 


CI. 


Sabula. 


Hobby, Edwin E. 


Sc. 


Iowa aty. 


Hollingsworth, Frank 


CI. 


Perry. 


Holsteen, Fred S. 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Horine, Ora Huntington 


Ph. 


Coon Rapids. 


Homibrook, Mary 


CI. 


Cherokee. 


Hoskins, John Bennett 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Hulsebus, Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Humphrey, Maude 


Ph. 


Eagle Centre. 


Irish, Fred M. 


Sc. 


Tempe. Arizona. 


Jacobs, Marda A. 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Johnson, Maro 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Kearwille, Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Red Oak. 


Kelly, Mary Celestia 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Kriechbaum, Ida Elizabeth 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


I^nocker, Francis E. 


Ph. 


Dexter. 


Lindeman, Frank 


Ph. 


Griswcdd. 


Lodwick, Libbie 


Ph. 


Eldon. 


Lowman, Minerva M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


I/ytle, Mary 


Ph. 


Iowa aty. 


McCurdy, Lena 


a. 


Oskalooaa. 


Morton, Mary Gertrude 


CI. 


Iowa Falls. 


Northey, Delia Frances 


CI. 


Dubuque. 


Oleson, Ole N. 


CI. 


Flugatad. 


Otto, Joe M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Otto, Balph 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Patterson, James Grant 


Ph. 


Ldghton. 


Pazson, Ruthanna 


Ph. 


Manchester. 


Prall, John Cornelius 


Ph. 


Vllliaca. 


Preston, Gertrude Elaine 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Rea, George M. 


Ph. 


Grundy Centre. 


St. John, Maud 


Ph. 




Saylor, Earl Clarence 


El. Eng. 


Ogden. 



COI.LEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



319 



KAMB. 


COURSE. 


RB9IDBNCB. 


Sharpe, James Joseph 


a. 


Iowa Falls. 


Smith, Carsten C. 


CI. 


Deoorah. 


Smith, Ralph J. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Smith, William Avery 


Ph. 


Toledo. 


Soleman, Fred Armstrong 


Ph. 


Tama. 


Stover, Geoi]g;e Elmer 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


StnU, Wilfred N. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Swisher, I/eonard A. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Taylor, Herbert Edward 


Ph. 


PostviUe. 


Veblen, Oswald 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


Weed, Fredmund Carson 


CI. 


Coming. 


Weinrich, Herman P. 


Ph. 


Burlington. 


Welty, Ira Colton 


Ph. 


Colo. 


Werthmueller, Ferdinand R. 


Sc. 


Burlington. 


Whitacre, Grace 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Williams, Mark Wayne 


CI. 


Ues Moines. 


Williams, Fred Paul 


a. 


Des Moines. 


Yonng, LeRoy Erwin 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 



JUNIOR CIrASS. 



NAMB. 


COURSK. 


RBSTOBNCB. 


Adams, Georgia 


Ph. 


Solon. 


Ady, Florence Rae 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Alford, Delia Gates 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Anderson, Fannie E. 


Ph. 


West Union. 


Ankeney, Walter S. 


Sc. 


Des Moines. 


Balle, JnUus E. 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Barber, Nathan Brainerd 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Barclay, Wade C. 


CI. 


Tiffin. 


Blackmore, Ralph Davis 


Sc. 


Aplington. 


Bowman, Ernest Charles 


Civ. Eng. 


Solon. 


Bradley, Charles C. 


CI. 


Conndl Bluffs. 


Brink, Prank N. 


Ph. 


Atlantic 


Brush, William Bnnitt 


a. 


Ottnmwa. 



320 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


COURSE. 


RXiSIDBNCB. 


Bnrt, Alfred James 


Ph. 


Emmetsbuig. 


Chase, Will B. 


Sc. 


Des Moines. 


Clapp, Helen Leila 


Ph. 


Shelby. 


Coad, Harry Elmer 


Ph. 


Mt. Union. 


Codner, Prances T. 


Sc 


C^ew London. 


Cords, Maurice Leonard 


CI. 


Knozville. 


Dean, Ray H. 


Sc. 


Muscatine. 


Eby, Moray L. 


Sc. 


Adair. 


Ehret, Anna Lillian 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ensign, Lnde M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Enstis, Carrie Lnella 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


FeUingham, John H. 


a. 


West Side. 


Foster, Mabel Marcella 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


FreUgh, Clarence Neil 


Sc. 


New Sharon. 


Garrett, Charles Reese 


CI. 


Troy. 


Giese, Charles Oscar 


Ph. 


Pleasant Grov 


Oilohrist, Helen Cox 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Graff, Lulu A. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Green, Ellen Cecelia 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Greeley, Lennie Mabyn 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Ham, John Webb 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Hawk, Ira Tapper 


a. 


Winterset 


Hearst, Mamie Frances 


Ph. 


Cedar Falls. 


Hoag, Lindley Murray 


Ph. 


Iowa Falls. 


Holt, John Wesley 


Ph. 


Swedesbuig. 


Horack, H. Claude 


Ph. 


Iowa aty. 


Howard, Libbie 


Ph. 


Jefferson. 


Howell, Lloyd 


El. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hull, Elmer C. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Humphrey, Charles William 


Ph. 


Winterset 


Hutchison, Eugene 


Ph. 


Lake City. 


Jarvis, Calvin 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Jayne, Eben Hay 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Jones, Lillian 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Kellogg, Charles Francis 


Ph. 


Burt. 


Kemmerer» T. Wilbert 


Sc. 


Eldridge. 



COLIyEGIATE ENROLI/MENT. 



221 



NAME. 


COURSR. 


RESID9NCR. 


KimbaU, Alfi«d Lee 


El. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Lambert, J. J. 


Ph. 


Cedar Palls. 


Lancaster, Henry Hay 


Ph. 


Allerton. 


Latta, Fnmk Blwyn 


a. 


Washington. 


Lee, Leslie Paryin 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Lewis, Charles Levi 


Ph. 


Cambridge. 


Lootnis, William W. 


Ph. 


Clermont, 


Lorenz, Max O. 


CI. 


Burlington. 


Lonis, John J. 


Ph. 


Harlan. 


Lnkenbell, Ella 


CI. 


Sioux City. 


Lynch, Geoige A. 


a. 


Blairstown. 


McCormick, John B. 


a. 


Churdan. 


McCnrdy, Ralph Bruce 


Ph. 


Oskaloosa. 


McCntchen, Lydia May 


CI. 


Rock Rapids. 


McParland, Winifred 


Ph. 


Columbus Junction. 


Marqnis, Prank L. 


a. 


Waterloo. 


Miller, James P. 


Civ. Eng. 


Strawberry Point. 


Mosnat, H. Roy 


Ph. 


Belle Plaine. 


Mueller, Herman August 


Ph. 


McBride. 


Myers, Milfred 


Ph. 


Rockford, 111. 


Myers, Perry C. 


Sc. 


Williamsburg. 


Neal, Prank Carlton 


Ph. 


Stuart. 


Nelson, John S. 


Ph. 


Madrid. 


Ogden, John Prands 


Ph. 


Pleasanton. 


Owen, ErzaLois 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Peet, Delbert C. 


Ph. 


Anamosa. 


Rea, Ralph Randolph 


Sc. 


Grundy Center. 


Rigg8,Hattie 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Roach, LorinJ. 


Ph. 


Rock Rapids. 


Roberts, Anna E. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Robinson, Jessie 


Ph. 


Sioux City. 


Safley, Agnes Isabel 


Sc. 


Tipton. 


Sdmiidt, Bernard Edward 


Sc. 


Parmington. 


Schoonover, George L» 


Ph. 


Anamosa. 


Seymonr, Edith Maria 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Sha£Fer, Nina R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 



222 



STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



NAMB. COURSB. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Smith, Effie Winifred 


Ph. 


Iowa Palls. 


Smith, Tilhnan 


Ph. 


Leon. 


Startsman, Charles Wentworth 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Stein, Harry S. 


Ph. 


Denmark. 


Stevens, Frederick Leroy, 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Stober, Antonie J. 


Ph. 


Brooklyn. 


Swisher, Ben 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Terry, M. C. 


CI. 


Ft. Shaw, Arizona. 


Thorbum, Andrew Logan 


Ph. 


Webster. 


Townaend, Egbert R. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Vaughan, Michael Walter 


Ph. 


Fort Dodge. 


Vanghan, Philip T. 


Ph. 


Fort Dodge. 


Watkins, Joseph Cook 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City, 


Weeks, Gaylord 


Civ. Eng. 


Denison. 


Weld, LeRoy Dougherty 


Sc. 


Cedar Rapids. 


Weldy, Morton E. 


CI. 


New Sharon. 


White, Eva May 


Ph. 


Maynard. 


White, Frank G. 


Civ. Eng. 


Winteraet. 


White, Lewis Rush 


Ph. 


Sionz Rapids. 


Wickersham, Dorothy T. 


Ph. 


Capron. 


Willett, William S. 


CI. 


Tama. 


Williams, Charles Alljrn 


a. 


Iowa City. 


Williams, Fred Almon 


Ph. 


Neola. 


Williams, Mabel Clare 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Yule, Edgar Harrison 


Sc. 


Tipton. 



SOPHOMORB CI/A8S. 



NAMB. 


COURSB. 


RBSIBBNCB. 


Albert, Henry 


Sc. 


Reinbeck. 


Angus, Haney Adelbert 


Sc. 


Burt. 


Baker, Frank Milton 


Ph. 


Emmetsbuzg. 


Baker, J. Clark, Jr. 


Ph. 


Lucas. 


Balle, Minnie 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Beach,:Carl Hoff 


Sc. 


Cedar Falls. 



COIXBGIATH BNROLLMBNT. 



233 



NAMB. 

Bcaxd, William Finis 


COUKSB. 

dv. £ng. 


RKSmBNCB. 

Mt. Union. 


Beck, Williain Edmund 


Sc. 


Sioux City. 


Black, Uva, B. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 




Sc. 


Aplington. 


Bloom, M3fTa, 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Blythe, Bdward KUaworth 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Bowman, John G. 


CI. 


Davenport. 


Bimnigar, Pxank Waldo 


CI. 


Burlington. 


Brockway, Alice R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Brown, J. A. 


Sc. 


Keosauqua. 


Brown, liarthaMead 


Ph. 


Solon. 


Cantwell, John D. 


Sc. 


Daveni>ort. 


Carr, Hubert 


Ph. 


Manchester. 


CanoU, Bliiabeth P. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


OHa, Anadn 


Ph. 


Harlan. 


Chamberlain, Will W. 


Ph. 


Wyoming. 


Cfailda, Hal Angustin 


Sc. 


Lenox. 


Church, Mae 


Sc. 


Belmond. 


Clark, Mearl 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Clayton, Mrs. J. £. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Cogswell, Charles Herbert, Jr. 


Sc. 


Cedar Rapids. 


Cole, Arthur Casbum 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Conaigny, Bngene Frank 


Sc. 


Avoca. 


Cook, Wallace Lewelling 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Dameron, James Lewis 


a. 


Iowa City. 


Deems, Oren Manfred 


Sc 


Ottumwa. 


Bdwarda, Anne 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Bgan, Geoige William 


a. 


California. 


Fairall, Henrietta 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Pairall, Herbert Snowden, Jr. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Flunngton, Minnie 


Sc. 


Iowa Falls. 


Pee, Thomas G. 


Ph. 


Centerville. 


Fenon, Merton Leroy 


Ph. 


Frendale. 


Fletcher, George H. 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Gray, Harry B. 


Ph. 


Springdale. 


Griffith, Harry M. 


Ph. 


Mt. Ayr. 



224 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. 


COURSB. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Hagler, Elisha M. 


Civ. Eng. 


MUton. 


Harkneas, Gordon PoUett 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Hartley, May M. 


So. 


Colton, California. 


Hartman, Amelia 


Ph. 


Griswold. 


Heath, Maggie May 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hecht, Ralph Henry 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Hensen, Louie 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Hetzel, Clarence Charles 


Sc. 


Avoca. 


Hobby, Ruth Annis 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Hoffman, Prank Phillip 


Sc. 


Ottumwa. 


Hoffman, William Louis 


Ph. 


Waterloo. 


Humphry, Wallace Geotge 


Ph. 


Hamilton, IlL 


Hunter, Lemuel Amos 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hurst, Margaret Lillian 


Ph. 


ItfCon. 


Johnson, Jessie Florence 


CL 


Farlin. 


Jones, Clyde Ray 


Sc. 


Charles aty. 


Kain, Will E. 


Ph. 


Algona. 


Kierulff, Anna Edwards 


Ph. 


Montezuma. 


Kindall, Joseph W. 


a. 


Onawa. 


Kingland, Thomas 


Ph. 


Mt. Valley. 


Klincker, P. John 


Ph. 


Denison. 


Klopp, Laura Emilie 


Ph. 


Estherville. 


Knapp, Leo 


Civ. Eng. 


Lenox. 


Larrabee, Helen 


Ph. 


Clermont. 


Linder, Emma G. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Lingo, Walter M. 


Ph. 


Norwu^. 


Louis, Edmund J. 


Ph. 


Atlantic. 


Lovell, G. E. 


Ph. 


Gamer. 


McCord, ayde W. 


a. 


Iowa City. 


McCutchen, Fred C. 


Ph. 


Holstein. 


McElroy, G. A. 


Sc. 


Thurman. 


McGee, Alice Florence 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


McKinney, Henderson H. 


Sc. 




McNeill, Norah 


Ph. 


Garden Grove. 


Macomber, Edith Katharine 


Ph. 


CanoU. 


Mason, Ralph Taylor 


Ph. 


Albia. 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



325 



NAMB. 


COT7KSB. 


KBSIDSZTCB. 


Mantfae, Katherine 


Sc. 


Grsoehill. 


MeggeiB, Pnmk Henry 


Civ. Eng. 


Dysart. 


Miller, John William, Jr. 


Ph. 


Manning. 


Mitchell, Ernest Roy 


Ph. 


Ottnmwa. 


Morrison, William P. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Moolton, Mark Mills 


CI. 


Nashville. 


Newbold, Belle Edna 


Sc. 


Hillsboro. 


Nicholas, Edwin Herbert 


Ph. 




O'Connor, James Lawrence 


Ph. 


Montrose. 


Ogden, Raymond Davis 


Ph. 


Williamsburg. 


Padmore, Jnlia Rachel 


a. 


Le Mars. 


Page, Edna Elizabeth 


a. 


Iowa City. 




Ph. 


Leon. 


Penrose, Thomas Emlen 


Sc. 


West Branch. 


Pttrkins, C^tlia Ethel 


Ph. 


Keosauqua. 


Peterson, Nina Mar^garet 


Ph. 


Evanston, Wyo. 


Phillips, Albin Blackmore 


Sc. 


Creamery. 


Pinkham, Leda 


Ph. 


Sioux Pslls, S. Dak. 


Polk. Mamie 


a. 


Winterset. 


Porter, Mary Monta 


a. 


Albia. 


Pordy, Winifred 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Read, Erwin C. 


Sc. 


Ogden. 


Rehkopf, Ned B. 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Reid, Prank Beatty 


CI. 


Oskaloosa. 


Remley, James Edward 


Ph. 


Anamosa. 


Reno, Margaret 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Reynolds, Hal Reade 


Civ. Eng. 


Des Moines. 


Rice, Stephen Edward 


Civ. Eng. 


Green Mountain. 


Robins, Elvene 


Ph. 


Emmetsburg. 


Robinson, Alta Aileen 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Robish, Albert Arrand 


Civ. Eng. 


Sumner. 


Rne, Lars O. 


Sc. 


Ridgeway. 


Safford, Abbie M. 


Sc. 


Hamilton, 111. 


Safley, Margaret James 


Ph. 


Tipton. 


Sannders, Herbert C. 


Ph. 


Manilla. 


Savage, Samuel M. 


Sc. 


Salem. 



226 



STATE UNIVERSrry OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


COt7RS9. 


RSSm^NCB. 


Sawyer, I^izzie M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Schenk, Brwin 


Sc 


Waterloo. 


Secrest, Walter S. 


Ph. 


Downey. 


Sheldon, Benj. I/. 


Sc. 


Iowa City, 


Sheaerman, Jacob L. 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Shuck, May 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Simonton, T. M. 


Ph. 


Sharon Cente 


Smith, Robert L. 


Ph. 


Leon. 


Sogard, John 


Ph. 


EUsworth. 


Speera, Albert Percy 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Springer, John Elbert 


a. 


Washington. 


Springer, William Jamea 


a. 


Leon. 


Spnigeon, Floria J. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Switzer, I^ester Edison 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Thomas, Will H. 


Sc 


Traer. 


Thompson, John Morrow 


Ph. 


Bedford. 


Voss, Hertha Lonise 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Waite, Lillian Ethel 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Wambach, Albert 


Ph. 


Webster City. 


Warfield, Lyford Wilson 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Warner, Loren Ashley 


Ph. 


Leon. 


Way, Kathxyn W. 


Ph. 


Britt. 


Weinrich, Oscar L. A. 


Sc. 


Burlington. 


Wells, Frank 


Ph. 


Miles. 


Werts, Charles M. 


Sc 


Russell. 


Whaley, Holsa Hiram 


Sc. 


Aplington. 


Whitaker, EUis J. 


a. 




Whitcomb, Bonner 


El. Eng. 


Des Moines. 


Wieneke, Laura Anna 


Sc 


Iowa City. 


Willis, Bertha Belle 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Wright, John Henry Jr. 


Sc. 


Marahalltown. 


Wyman, Anna Wilson 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Yates, Edward Gilbert 


Ph. 


Williamsbuzg. 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



227 



FRB8HMAN CI^ASS. 



NAME. 


COURSK. 


RBSIDSNCS. 


Aldeiiy Henry P. 


Sc. 


Davenport. 


Allen, Charles P. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Allin, George R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Anderson, Lanra 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Anderson, Rudolph Martin 


Ph. 


Forest City. 


Anthony, Charles Henry 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Bailey, Frank Sidney 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Bailey, Frederick W. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Ball, George Washington 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Banister, Nettie 


Ph. 


Cherokee. 


Bannister, Robert J. 


Ph. 


Ottumwa. 


Barrett, Anna Moore 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Becker, Gertrude Adah 


Ph. 


Newton, Elan 


BePiUon, Abraham Addison 


Sc. 


Oskaloosa. 


Bell, Everett Garfield 


a. 


Milton. 


Benham, Bessie 


Ph. 


Shelby. 


Berry, Edmund C. 


Sc. 


Livermore. 


Berry, Ethel Maxwell 


Ph. 


Chillioothe. 


Berry, J. K. M. 


CI. 


Cedar Rapids 


Birk, Levi Albert 


Civ. Eng. 


Anamosa. 


Boddy, Marshall V. 


Ph. 


Ayrshire. 


Boler, John 


Ph. 


Atlantic. 


Bond, Perry Avery 


Sc. 


Sioux City. 


Booth, CharloUe Esther 


a. 


Harlan. 


Bondxeau, Franklin M. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Brackett, Otto T. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Bradbury, Roy R. 


Sc. 


Marahalltown 


Bny, William SherriU 


Civ. Eng. 


Oskaloosa. 


Briggs, Fletcher 


Sc. 


Nevada. 


Brockway, James Madison 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Brown, Clarence A. 


Sc. 


Sioux City. 


Burrier, Emmett F. 


Sc. 


Farmington. 


Burma, James H. 


CI. 


Maple Grove. 


Burton, Harry Edward 


Ph. 


Onawa. 



238 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


COUKSB. 


RBSIDBMCB. 


Boflh, Kenneth Roy 


Sc. 


LeMars. 


Byrnes, Ralph ^. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Carder, Helen I«. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Carris, Clara M. 


Ph. 


Wira. 


Carroll, Mary Emma 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Clapp, Mortimer Edw^ 


Sc. 


Shelby. 


Clearman, Hattie M. 


Ph. 


Oxford. 


Close, Katherine S. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Conley, Agnes Jane Mercedes 


Ph. 


New Hampton. 


Converse, Charles Crosat 


Ph. 


Cresoo. 


Cook, Roy Arthur 


a. 


Independence. 


Coz, Clifford Vemard 


Sc. 


Newton. 


Cashing, Kdith WyUe 


CI. 


Davenport. 


Dsrrow, J. Don 


Ph. 


Columbus Junction 


Danm, Selma 


Ph. 


WestUberty. 


Davies, Edward Edwin 


Sc. 


Dixon. 


Dennis, Bartie Ann 


Ph. 


Villisca. 


Dickinson, Jerry Wells 


Ph. 


Larchwood. 


Downing, Harold B. 


Ph. 


Wellman. 


Downing, Ralph V. 


Ph. 


Wellman. 


Drake, Pred Collins 


a. 


Adel. 


Dye, Charles Westley 


Sc. 


Macedonia. 


Eaton, John Alvin 


Civ. Eng. 


Creston. 


Eberhart, l^Uiam Vaughan 


Sc 


Newton. 


Eddy, Helen M. 


Ph. 




Felkner, Ida 


Ph. 


Downey. 


Fenton, Jennie Inez 


Ph. 


Eldora. 


Pesenbeck, J. Alwin 


Ph. 


Danbury. 


Fracker, Nora R. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Freeman, Walter J. 


Ph. 


lowaaty. 


Gardner, Lucy Florence 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


jQilchrist, Janet Marjorie 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Goettsch, Henry Max 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Gow, Annie Louise 


Ph. 


Greenfield. 


Gow, James Ellis 


Ph. 


Greenfield. 


Griffith, John George 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



229 



NAME. COURAK. 


RBSIDBNCS. 


Haas, Lam N. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


HaUer, Julius T. 


Sc. 


Davenport. 


Ham, Geoi^ge Norval 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hanson, Prank P. 


Sc. 


Monmouth. 


Harvey. James P. 


Ph. 


Leon. 


Hathwmy, Ethel Calista 


CI. 


Webster City. 


Heishixe, Mildred 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hickenlooper, Thomas Wallace 


Civ. Eng. 


Albia. 


Hinchon, William D. 


Ph. 


Algona. 


Hobhy, William Richard 


Civ. Eng. 


Iowa City. 


Hoffman, Panl M. 


Sc. 


Muscatine. 


Holbrook, C. E. 


Ph. 


Onawa. 


Holbrook, P. K. 


Sc. 


Tipton. 


Howard, Alice 


Sc. 


Marshalltown. 


Hmska, Victoria 


Ph. 


Spillville. 


Hnghes, Homer 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Hnlbert, Adda Beatrice 


Ph. 


Pontanelle. 


Hnll, Pearl 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Hunt, John Prands 


Sc. 


Leon. 


ngenfritz, Bnrr D. 


Ph. 


Clarksville. 


Ingersoll, Helen Prances 


Ph. 


Cherokee. 


Jensen, Prank T. 


Civ. Eng. 


Dysart. 




Ph. 


Parlin. 


Johnson, Eva Nancy 


Sc. 


Holstein. 


Johnson, John Peter 


El. Eng. 


Hampton. 


Johnson, Robert Joseph 


Ph. 


Holstein. 


Jorgensen, Jsmes Edwin 


a. 


West Side. 


Kelley, Rita Amanda 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Kephart, Milton Lawrence 


Ph. 


Shuesrville. 


•Kingsbory, Maud Cleaveland 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Kitterman, P. Gad 


Sc. 


Ottumwa. 


Koontz, G. Wilson 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Knck, Orlando A. 


Sc. 


Charles City. 


Lawrence, Carl Austin Bickf ord 


Ph. 


Sibley. 


Lewis, Arthur C. 


Sc. 


Macedonia. 


Lewis, LMum 


Sc 


Macedonia. 



230 



STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



NAMB. 


COtTRSS. 


RBSIDENCB. 


Lodwick, Ruth 


Ph. 


Eldon. 


McCaffree, Howard A. 


CI. 


Waverly Junction 


McCarthy, M. J. 


Ph. 


Struble. 


McClain, Donald 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


McCord, Charles Joseph 


CI. 


Iowa City. 


McCulla, Walter PhUo 


Ph. 


Sutherland. 


McCntchen, Ezra H., Jr. 


Ph. 


Holstein. 


MacDonald, Charles S. 


CI. 


Council Bluffs. 


Mclaughlin, Harold M. 


Sc. 


Mason City. 


MAi*M«Uti, ai**tifi V. 


Ph. 


Rock Rapids. 


Mahin, Harold Joseph 


Ph. 


Muscatine. 


Mann, Loolu Mina 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Mantz, Frank J. 


Ph. 


Audubon. 


Merriau, Fred S. 


a. 


Marble Rock. 


Miller, Daniel Fry, Jr. 


CI. 


Keokuk. 


Miller, Era 


Sc. 


Hamilton, 111. 


Moore, William Franklin 


CI. 


Dale. 


Mortland, Inez 


Ph. 


Montezuma. 


Murphy, William H. 


Ph. 


Onawa. 


Nelson, Prank D. 


CI. 


Harlan. 


Noland, Hany B. 


Ph. 


Cedar FaUs. 


Otto, Luda C. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Paarmann, J. H. 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Paine, George W, 


Sc. 


Burt. 


Peterson, Walter H. 


Ph. 


Davenport. 


Plum, Hattie 


Ph. 


Shelby. 


Ragan, Ella 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Rahn, Jerry Frederick 


Sc. 


La Porte City. 


Randall, Van Quincy 


El. Eng. 


Kansas City. 


Rankin, Warren L. 


Ph. 


Carson. 


Rate, Robert Gower 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Reed, Luther Oliver 


Sc. 


Burr Oak. 


Remley, Arthur 


Sc. 


Anamosa. 


Remley, George E. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Riggs, Obie N. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Robinson, Claude Lyle 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 



COI^LBGIATB BNROLI^MBNT. 



231 



NAMB. 


OOURS9. 




RoflscTi B. P. 


Sc 


Troy. 


Sowe, FtankN. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


RiuaeU, Brie WiUaid 


a. 


Adel. 


Sanders, George B. 


Sc 


Palm Beach, Pla. 


Scales, Richard 


a. 


Ackley. 


Schlesinger, Leo R. 


Sc. 


Hampton. 


Schnltz, Dorothy Matilda 


a. 


Burlington. 


SeyiiKrar, William T. 


Civ. Bng. 


Iowa City. 


Sieg, I^eeP. 


Sc. 


Marshalltown. 


Sieg, Stanley B. 


Sc. 


Marshalltown. 


Slater, Marie W. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Slavata, Jennie 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Smith, C Horton 


Civ. Bng. 


Iowa City. 


Soeabe, Clarenoe William 


a. 


Greene. 


Spurrier, Mary Madge 


Ph. 


Des Moines. 


Staehle, Henry D. 


Ph. 


Barlville. 


Sterling, Bditha Hortense 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Storey, I^ealie 


Ph. 


Dysart. 


Stnart, Clara 


Ph. 


West Branch. 


Sweney, Gail 


Ph. 


Osage. 


Swisher, Bsther McDoweU' 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Taylor, Mary Bthel 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Thomas, M. Bllen 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Tnlloss, Carolyn M. 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Umberger, T. D. Terrill 


Sc. 


Burlington. 


Waite, ]>>vell Bdith 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Walker, Lucy Mabel 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Warner, Loren Ashley 


Ph. 


Luana. 


Warren, Clyde Madison 


Ph. 


Glenwood. 


WatUns, Dai^ A. 


Sc. 


Neola. 


Westoott, Hortense Bmmer 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Whedon, Arthur D. 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Wiedow, Henry 


Sc 


Victor. 


Williams, Samuel Clyde 


Sc. 


Iowa City. 


Willis, Psith Gertrude 


Ph. 


Iowa City. 


Wright, Hiram Newton 


Ph. 


Mt. Pleasant. 



23i 



STATE UNIVERSITV OF tOWA. 



NAMB. 


COUKSE. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Yonng, Blanche 


Sc. 


North Liberty. 


Yonng, John Wray 


Sc 


Bloomfield. 


SPHCIAI/ STUDENTS. 




NAMK. 


SUBJECT. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Abel, Eva Vesta 


English, Physics. 


Hnmeston. 


Ashe, T. G. 


Psychology. 


La Porte City. 


Benham, I^wis A. 


Chemistry. 


Shelby. 


Barrett, William L. 


English. 


Waterloo. 


Bawden, Stephen P. 




Davenport. 


Belsheim, GnlUk H. 


Politics. 


Leland. 


Bickley, William H. 


Psychology. 


Sioux City. 


Bliven, George H. 


Psychology. 


Sioux City. 


Bower, Charles A. 


Psychology. 


West Union. 


Breene, Harry D. 


English. 


Iowa City. 


Brown, Mrs. Jennie R. 


Geology. 


Iowa dty. 


Bnss, I«nona Adele 


English. 


Hammond, N. Y. 


Carmichael, Eugene 


Psychology. 


Iowa City. 


Carpenter, Arthur E. 


PoUtics. 


Columbus Junction. 


Crary, Charles Judson 


History. 


Lafayette, Ind. 


Dayton, Jennie L. 


French. 


Iowa City. 


Dickinson, Lester J. 


Logic, Politics. 


Danbuiy. 


Dilley, Wesley, B. Ph. 


Economics. 


Hawarden. 


Durbin, Pred 


PoUtics. 


^nerson. 


Edson, J. T. 


PoUtics. 


Blaine. 


Eilers, Paul 


Psychology. 


Montic^o. 


Frank, Walter 0. 


English, Economics. 


Red Oak. 


French, R. Fred 


Politics. 


Independence. 


Goodenongh, Walter R. 


Zoology, Latin. 


Council Bluffs. 


Gothard, Stanton B. 


German. 


Atlantic 


Hagander, Oscar W. 


Logic. 


Keokuk. 


Hall, James Prank 


History, English. 


EddyviUe. 


Hays, Charles R. 


PoUtics. 


Norfolk, Neb. 


Hill, Alice h. 


Psychology. 


Iowa City. 


Holly, William R. 


Logic. 


Meriden. 


Honuel, Eckeit, Jr. 


Chemistry. 


lowaaty. 



COLLEGIATE ENROLLMENT. 



233 



ITAMS. 

Horton, Prank J. 
Johannsen, Palmrich E. 
Kelly, Arthur Roland 
Kramer, Anna y. B. 
Knntze, Otto 
Lenz, John G. 
Lynch, Thomaa P. 
McBeth, Robert 
McCarty, Thomas Prancis 
McKee, John William 
licReynolda, Soott 
Mattiaon, George E. 
Meiater, M. G. 
Meyers, Joseph Henry 
Mitchell, Pied L. 
Patterson, George E. 
Peck, Paul, A. B., 
Peek, L. S. 
Popham, Amelia A. 
Righy, Elsie M., A. M. 
Robezg, Richard 
Sager, Irene M. 
Sargent, Amos H., B. Ph. 
Sharp, E. Ployd 
Sims, Rath Hairston 
Smith, Edward A. 
Spfingmire, Pannie 
Tanner, John P. 
Tonrtellot, Lonis J. 
Treimer, Anna 
Tnmer, E. J., B. DL 
Vandermast, Joseph W. 
Wd>ber, John Prancis 
Welty, Bert B. 
Willonghby, Hugh A. 
Wiae, Henry 



SX7BJKCT. 

History. 

English. 

Mathematics. 

English, German. 

Geology, Chemistry. 

Psychology. 

Politics. 

Logic, Politics. 

Mathematics, Latin. 

Politics, Economics. 

Economics, History. 

Politics. 

Psychology. 

Gennan. 

Psychology. 

Logic. 

History. 

English. 

English, History. 

Politics. 

Politics. 

German. 

History. 

Psychology. 

Prench. 

English. 

Politics, Botany. 



Biology, Botany. 

German, Prench. 

Politics. 

History, Economics. 

Economics. 

PoUtics. 

Economics. 

Gennan, Prench. 



R9SIBBNCB. 

Iowa City. 
Walnut. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Bamum. 

Keosauqua. 

Walnut. 

Conesville. 

Valdosta, Ga. 

Clinton. 

La Porte City. 

Templeton. 

Sibley. 

Algona. 

Council Bluffs. 

Normal, HI. 

Williamsbnxg. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Deoorah. 

Iowa City. 

Grundy Centre. 



Iowa City. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Wyoming. 
Dizon. 
Manaon. 
Monroe. 
Perris, 111. 
Colo. 

Grundy Centre. 
Thompson, Ark. 



LAW DEPAFTMENT. 



8BNIOR CI,A88. 



NAMB. 


DB6RBB. 


RBSIDKNCB. 


Allen, George Kirkland 






Estherville. 


Anderson, Theodore 






Iowa City. 


Ashe, Thomas Gregory 






La Porte City. 


Baker, Irving Wesley 






Iowa City. 


Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 


Baker, Jesse Clark, Jr. 






Lucas. 


Barrett, Will Lonis 






Waterloo. 


Bawden, Stephen Phelps 






Davenport. 


Beard, Henry Clay 






Mt. Ayr. 


Berry, Ernest James 






Alta. 


Bliven, George Horace 






Sioux City. 


Brewster, George Parqohar 






Sheldon. 


Bronner, George Alois 






Coming. 


Bmoe, James 






Rolfe. 


Bushyager, Henry B. 






Sheffield. 


Bnssard, Melville K. 






Iowa City. 


Clark, Charles Warner 






MontesEuma. 


Ph. 


B., Iowa 


College. 




Clements, Prank H. 






Newton. 


Ph. 


B., Iowa 


College. 




Coad, James Coit 






Mt. Pleasant 


Cobb, Dennis Justus 






Irwin. 


Cosson, George W. 






Manning. 


Crookham, John Addison 






Oskaloosa. 


Davis, Walter Morton 






Iowa City. 



Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Draper, William Horace Iowa City. 

Dunham, Henry Clarence Hawarden. 

234 



LAW ENROLLMENT. 



235 



DBGRBS. 



Dnnlap, Ralph Luther 
DnrtMiiy Fred 
Dntcher, Louis William 
Dykins, Charles W. 
Kversmeyer, Louise 
Fry, Joseph Henry 
Pnller, Homer Austin 
*Gamble, Harry Lee 
Grattan, Paul Hersey 



RSSIDSNC9. 
Iowa City. 
Emerson. 
Iowa City. 
Hawkeye. 
Muscatine. 
Iowa City. 
Mt. Ayr. 
Perry. 
Elkton, S. D. 



B. S., South Dakota Agricultural College. 

Green, George Alfred Cherokee. 

Hall, James Clark Davenport. 

Hamann, Albert WiUiam Davenport. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Hanley, Peter Joseph Nira. 

Hanson, Harry Webster Mt. Pleasant. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 



Hardy, Rufns Lee 

Harrison, Albert Dixon 

Head, Roscoe Conkling 

Hendrick, Berte 

Hering, James Clinton 

Hilsinger, George Earl 

Ph. B., Iowa College. 
Hoffman, Arthur 

Horton, Frank Jodon 

Hosford, Richard Waller 

A. B., Oberlin College. 

Hughes, Samuel Judson 
Hull, John Elress 
Hyndman, John Alexander 
Johannsen, Palmrich E. 
Keenan, Edward Patrick 
Kellogg, Charles Francis 



Bloomfield. 
Iowa City. 
Jefferson. 
Wankon. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Sabula. 

Muscatine. 
Iowa City. 
Dubuque. 

Corydon. 
Moline, 111. 
Chicago, ni. 
Walnut. 
Le Mars. 
Burt. 



*I>icd March 16, 1896. 



236 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMB. DBORBE. 

Kelly, William Francis 
^Kitchen, George Pusey 
Klingenbezg, Theodore William 
Komarek, Edward Wenoeslaua 
KratiBe, Oscar 
I^rrabee, Frederic 



RKSlDBlfCV. 
Waterloo. 
Warrentott, Va. 
Dabuqne. 

New Prague, Minn. 
Garwin. 
Clermont. 



Fh. B., State Univenity of Iowa. 

I^ee, Thomas Francis Omaha, Neb. 

A. B., Creighton University. 



I^ewis, Burton Kellogg 

LifFring, John Dominick 

Livick, Ernest 

Long, Frank Kelso, 

B. D., Western College. 



Sioux City. 
Cherokee. 
Northwood. 
Whitten. 



Iowa City. 
Indianola. 



Waterloo. 

Springdale. 

Greene. 



McGuire, Augustine Joseph 
McNeil, Harry Hallam 

A. B., Simpson College. 

Marquis, Frank L. 
Mather, Charles E. 
Maxwell, Enea Austin 

B. S., Upper Iowa University. 

Meister, Melvin George La Porte City. 

Meyers, Joseph Henry Templeton. 

B. Agri., Iowa Agricultural College. 

Morgan, Vester Kellogg. 

Murphy, Charles William Dubuque. 

Naughton, John P. Pamell. 

B. S., Northern Indiana Normal. 

Newbold, WUlis Boyd Hillsboro. 

O'Callaghan, Robert Emmett Des Moines. 
O'Connor, Frank Aloysius Lawler. 
O'Connor, Maurice Missouri Valley. 
B. Di., Western Normal College. 

*IHed Nov. II, 1897. 



I,AW ENROLLMENT. 237 

NAMB. DBGRBB. RBSIDBNCB. 

Pe nn we, Harry Shellsbnrg. 

Plum, William Milton Shelby. 

Popham, R. G. Williamsburg. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Price, Geoige Milnes Iowa City. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Reaser, Bnrt C. Perry. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Rollins, Richard Rnssell Des Moines. 

B. S., Amherst College. 

Rominger, Joseph Ambrose Bloomfield. 

Sharp, Edward Floyd Dexter. 

Shnre, William Henry Page, N. D. 

Skewis, Edward John Inwood. 

Smith, William Avery Toledo. 

B, S., Western College. 

Spensley, Robert Waller Dubuqne. 

Swords, George William Iowa City. 

Tyer, Henry Wilbert Perry. 

B. S., Iowa College. 

Wagner, Henry Franklin Sigonmey. 

Warner, Thomas Farnsworth Iowa City. 

Ph. B., Upper Iowa University. 

Watkins, Samuel R. Iowa City. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Watt, Walter Gilmore Cedar Rapids. 

A. B., Coe Coll^;e. 

Weed, Howard Tobey West Union. 

Welty, Bert B. Colo. 

B. Di., Iowa State Normal. 

Williams, Joe Williamsbui^. 

Wyckoff, Clarence Stanton Cincinnati. 

B. S., Amity College. 

Yonker, DeWitt Talmage Rockwell. 



238 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



J17NIOR CI;A88. 



NAME. 

Adams, Dayis Rankin 
Ainsworth, Fanny I/>uise 
Allen, Charles Herbert 
Amnions, Charles Ross 
Anderson, Fannie Parker 
Anderson, Joseph Robert 
Anderson, Robinson Gregg 



DK6RKB. 



B. L., Upper Iowa University. 

Anundaen, Arthur Fernando 
Baker, George B., 
Balle, Jnlins Edinger 
Barker, WOliam Lloyd 
Bamer, Fred Irvin 

B. Di., Iowa State Normal. 

Belsheim, Gnllik Henry 
Blackburn, Arthur 
Brown, Lieutellas 
Brown, Samuel Joe 
Buggy, James Bernard 
Bulman, Walter Washington 
Burrows, James Sidney 
Carpenter, Arthur Edward 
Coldren, Paul Alfred 
Condon, Maurioe Francis 
Cooper, Francis Augustine 
Crans, Norman Wallace 
Crary, Archie West 

B. S., Cornell College. 

Crary, Charles Judson 
Crary, Samuel Delos 
Davidson, Thomas Jefferson 
Dennis, Edward Swain 
Diamond, John Daniel 



RKSIDSNCS. 

Nora Springs. 
West Union. 
Scranton. 
Se3rmour. 
West Union. 
Keokuk. 
West Union. 

Deoorah. 
Iowa City. 
Denison. 



Cedar Falls. 



Inland. 



Monmouth. 

Ottumwa, 

Waukon. 

Waukon. 

Keokuk. 

Columbus Junction. 

Iowa City. 

New Hampton. 

Davenport. 

Davenport. 

Boone. 

Lafayette, Ind. 
Mapleton. 
Marengo. 
Red Oak. 
Cedar Palls. 



LAW ENROLLMENT. 



239 



NAME. 

Dickinaon, Lester Jesse 
Dilley, Wesley Yonng 



DEGREE. 



Ph. B., Cornell College. 



Donglas, Charles Lew 
Bdflon, John Tntman 
Ely, Hanson Edward 



RESIDENCE. 
Danbnry. 
Hawarden. 

West Branch. 
Blaine. 
Iowa City. 



United States Military Academy. 



Etickson, Christian 
Eostis, Carl 
FairalL Harry W. 
Parber, Edwin U. 
Pee, Thomas Grant 
Pehr, Elmer Lincoln 
Plynn, Leo James 
Prailey, Joseph Robinson 
Prench, Remington Fred 
Gould, William Edwin 
Gnlliver, Charles Thomas 
Hackler, Charles Wesley 

A. B., Iowa College. 

Haddock, Paul Stewart 
Hagander, Oscar William 
Hall, James Prank 
Hampson, Prank Christopher 
Hanley, Joseph Rhodes 
Harrington, Timothy P. 
Havner, Horace Moore 
Hays, Charles Rolvin 
Hoag, Lindley Murray 
Holbert, Anna Catharine 
HoUingsworth, Prank 
Holly, William Richard 
Hnebner, Charles Frederick 

Ph. B., State University of 



Inwood. 

Stuart. 

Iowa City. 

Davenport. 

Centerville. 

Oakland. 

Dubuque. 

Port Madison. 

Independence. 

Quasqueton. 

Charles City. 

Grinnell. 

Bedford. 
Keokuk. 
Eddyville. 
Osage. 
Muscatine. 
Rowan. 
New York. 
Norfolk, Neb. 
Iowa Palls. 
Iowa City. 
Perry. 
Meriden. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa. 



240 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

NAMB. DBGRBB. RBSIDBNCS. 

Johnson, Elmer Angustus Chester. 

Keeler, Wilfred Cecil Des Moines. 

Ph. B., State University of Iowa. 

Kennedy, George Washington Montrose. 

Korf , Henry Christopher Newton. 

Lehr, Andrew G. Tyndall, S. D. 

B. h.i University of South Dakota. 

Long, Will Ira Newton. 

I/Uken, Fernando Oskaloosa. 

B. L. Oskaloosa College. 

Lynch, Thomas Finn Bamnm. 

McBeth, Robert Keosanqna. 

McCarty, Thomss Francis Walnut. 

McCord, Robert Leigh Lake City. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

McKee, John William ConesviUe. 

Macomber, Charles Coombs Carroll. 

Ph. B., The University of Chicago. 

Mattison, George Eaton Clinton. 

Metcalf, Oren Jay Vinton. 

Millen, Emmor Henry EarlviUe. 

Miskimins, Sidney Irwin Baxter. 

Mitchell, Oliver Holmes Vinton. 

Moothart, John Solomon Primghar. 

Morrison, Samuel Turner Iowa City. 

Muekell, Francis Lewis Dubuque. 

Munger, Robert Howe Sioux City. 

Noel, Fred William Iowa aty. 

Oliver, Daniel C. Onawa. 

0*Neil, Bernard Thomas Big Rock. 

Paisley, Albert Alexander Iowa City. 

A. B., State University of Iowa. 

Patterson, George E. Algona. 

Peck, Paul Council Bluffs. 

A. B., Iowa College. 



LAW ENROLLMENT. 



341 



NAM9. DKGREB. 

Phillips, Leon Paul 
Pienol, Geoige Jndson 

Ph. B., Iowa College. 

Reiley, Robert Le Roy 

A. B., Knox College. 

Rigby, Elsie lilies 

A. M., Cornell College. 

Roberg, Richard 
Rohde, Carl Adolph 
Sargent, Amor Hartley 

Ph. B., Iowa College. 

Shaver, Bird Alexander 
Shenerman, Jake L. 
Showalter, Daniel Lynn 
Smith, Edward A. 
Smith, Ralph J. 
Sperry, Edward Smith 
Swisher, Leonard Alonzo 
Talbott, Mina G. 
Taylor, James Arthur 

B. S., Southern Iowa Normal. 



RESIDENOt. 

Volga City. 
Rockwell. 

Wapello. 

Mt Vernon. 

Deoorah. 
Davenport. 
Grundy Center. 

Red Oak. 
Des Moines. 
Brainard, Neb. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Iowa City. 
Hamburg. 
Iowa City. 
Carroll. 
Bloomfield. 



Temple, William Nathaniel Osceola. 

A. B., Iowa College. 

Thompson, Leon Lewis Waverly. 

B. S., Upper Iowa University. 

Thorn, Clifford J. Washington. 

A. B., Boston University. 

Threlkeld, Delman Chariton. 

Tzmcy, Hayden Kenney Cedar Rapids. 

Turner, Earl James Manson. 

B. D., Iowa State Normal. 
Underwood, Mount Vernon Jesup. 

Van Wagenen, Frank Alexandria, S. D. 

Walker, Gerald Griffin Waverly. 



242 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

NAMS. DBGRBB. RBSID9KCB. 

Weaver, Abnm Cnthbert Colfax. 

Webber, John Prands Ferria, 111. 

Weed, Fredinand Casson Coming. 

Weatrope, Norman Scott Harlan. 

Wheelock, Thurlow Morris Moline, HI. 

White, Arthnr Wellealey Vinton. 

B. D., Northern Indiana Normal. 

White, Lawrence James BCarengo. 

Williams, Augnstus Bumside Ottumwa. 

Williams, Keota W. Ottamwa. 

Willing, William Arthur Northwood. 

Willoaghby, Hugh A. Grundy Center. 

Witt, Fred Henry Ottawa, 111. 

Work, Emmet Alexander Ottumwa. 

A. B., Iowa Wesleyan University. 



1:^1 



ICAL DEPARTMENT. 



8SNIOR CIrAdS. 




NAMS. 


RSSID9NCS. 


PRKCBPTOR. 


Ab^^, Henry Henry 


Iowa. 


A. K. Berry. 


Adams, Fred L. 


<i 


A. J. Morgan. 


Allen, Fnmk Henry 


i« 


G. H. Cassidy. 


Andenon, Frederick Engene 


it 


W. D. Middleton. 


Arent, Asaph 


ti 


Francis E. Seymonr. 


Besore, Walter McKay 


t( 


J. E. Conn. 


Bean, Oley G. 


It 


S. J. Nelson. 


Blake, Charles Wesley 


i( 


W. M. Young. 


Bosainghain ,?pttmer N., D. V. 


M. 


A. Beane. 


Bowen, Jesse William 


II 


L. W. Uttig. 


Briggs, Walter Homer, B. Did. 


ii 


Faculty. 


Campbell, Charles Harvey 


Nebraska. 


S. O. Whaley. 


Detchon, Hugh Smith 


Iowa. 


A. R. Leath. 


Bly, Ptanda Aigyle 


D. 


D. and R. R. Davisson. 


Engle,'.Harry Perry 


IC 


Perry Engle. 


ParxeU, Albert Martin 


(i 


F. E. Sejrmour. 


Pitz, George G. 


11 


Faculty. 


Frank, George W. 


II 


Charles Burwald. 


Pnchs, Adele Matilda 


II 


Agnes Eichelberger. 


Gardner, John Raphal 


II 


Faculty. 


Gilkes, William 


II 


Faculty. 


Habenicht,;Robert H. 


II 


Faculty. 


Hozie, Will E. 


** D. G. Hoade & J. W. Harriman. 


Hnll, John Franklin 


II 


J. C. Shrader. 


Jorgensen, Palle Peder Marius 


Ii 


James Murphy. 


Kearney, Charles Atwell 


it 


A. H. Blocklinger. 


Knndson, Becker Christian 


II 


R. J. Nestor. 



243 



244 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAM8. 



RBSIDBNCB. 



Lambert, Fred Ernest 
Lester, Harry Sumner 
McClistock, John Thomas, B. A. 
Mcintosh, J. Drusie 
Mecum, John Warren. 
Mereness, Herbert Dayton 
Moi^n, Samuel Lewis 
Moulton, Milo WUUe 
Nass, Hildus Augnstinas O. 
Neely, Abner Dale 
Noe, Charles Fred 
Parker, Ralph H. 
Parker, William Oilman 
Pence, Lawrence Waldo, B. Did. 
Pnrcell, Bert 
Replogle, Jerry Allan 
Richards, James Weldin 
Rogers, Claude Bernard 
Sackett, Claude Conwell 
Snyder, John Franklin 
Stover, Emery Ellsworth 
Stull, Will H. 

Thielen, Michael H., M. Did. 
Thornton, Albert H. 
Walker, James C. 
Walker, Frederick Earl 
Willsey, Frank Brown 
Wright, Charles Edward 



CI 



If 



<l 



(( 



IC 



li 



«l 



(I 



<c 



II 



A. J. Hobson. 

Faculty. 

R. E. Conniff . 

A. D. King. 
Wisconsin. Faculty. 
Iowa. C. Brown. 

M. H. Waplia. 

A. M. Avery. 

E. H. Williams. 

Faculty. 

C. J. Winzenried. 

P. J. Barry. 
Orsgon. A. W. and C. S. Bowman. 
Iowa. N. W. Phillips. 

'* C. S. Chase and H. P. Dnffield. 

Faculty. 

J. W. Morgan. 

R. A. Rogers. 

A. K. Berry. 

S. R. Cook. 

A. Folsom. 

Faculty. 

Faculty. 

W. W. Beam. 

Faculty. 

J. L. Augustine. 
Illinois. Faculty. 

Iowa. C. C. Smead. 



CI 



II 



II 



II 



li 



II 



II 



II 



II 



II 



II 



JUNIOR ClfASa. 



NAMB. 


RKSIDBNCK. 


PRBCBPTOR. 


Macy, Otto E. 


Iowa. 


J. P. Mullin. 


Sig worth, Harry S. 


II 


H . W. Sigworth. 



MEDICAL ENROLLMENT. 



245 



SOPHOMORE CIrASS. 



NAME. 


RBSmSNCB. 


FRSCBPTOR. 


Adams, Ortiis Poller 


Iowa. 


Paculty. 


Alford, Edward True, Ph. G. 


<( 


C. S. Chase. 


Anderson, Mannie Florine, D. 


D.S. •* 


Paculty. 


Angnsdne, Grant 


i< 


J. L. Augustine. 


Bachman, Morris Piper 


i( 


J. L. Heries. 


Barker, James Archie, B. Di. 


(f 


C. C. Heady. 


Binford, William Sherwood 


II 


G. W. Padgham. 


Bowes, John Joseph 


(4 


P. J. WUl. 


Bright, Henry P. 


II 


C. E. Leithead. 


Brown, Hadley Cyprian 


<l 


I. C. Brown. 


Clark, Orson Whitney 


It 


0. Clarke. 


Cook, Jesse Lee 


11 


P. E.Cook. 


Cooper, Dean Gordon, D. V. 


S. Iowa. 


P. H. Parrington. 


Copeland, John Albert 


*i 


J. B. Kessler. 


Corsant, James Colvan 


II 


W. S. Burrows. 


Creel, James Cleon 


• II 


J. W. Lander. 


Deters, Willie August 


Minnesota. 


Paculty. 


Dotson, Eli E. 


Iowa. 


J. K. Milboume. 


Preeman, John Peter 


II 


C. A. Hurd. 


Geofge, Abel Benson 


II 


A. Carson. 


Gray, Howard D. 


IC 


P. Engle. 


Greenlee, Clyde Vemie 


II 


D. D. Drennan. 


Henderson, Archibald G. 


«l 


Paculty. 


HOdreth, Herman Lee 


J. 


E. and E. L. Gilmore 


Hohenschuh, Prank Adam 


<1 


Paculty. 


HoUenbeck, Hubert Lewis 


l< 


L. J. Adair. 


Ickes, Lawrence James 


If 


A. W. Bowman. 


Johnson, George Monroe, Pb 


I. B. 


G. 0. Johnson. 


Lamerton, William Edward 


<i 


P. Horton. 


I^nz, Joseph Alyin, Ph. G. 


i( 


Paculty. 


Lnehramann, Barney 


II 


Paculty. 


McPall, Edward Augustus 


(( 


Paculty. 


Martin, Ernest Edwin 


i< 


Paculty. 


Mela, Edward William 


11 


N. J. A. Mueller. 



246 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF lOt^^A. 



NAMB. 

Meyhaus, John Henry 
Morris, Thomas Boyd» Ph. B. 
Neff, Mary I^awson, A. B. 
Newell, William Carl 
Osbom, Claude Fenton 
Ostrom, Louis, Jr., A. B. 
Patterson, William Edward 
Payne, RolloO. 
Reiter, Alfred E. 
Rice, Perry Flint 
Roberts, Ernest Eugene 
Sargent, Frank Loring, Ph. G. 
Sears, George L. 
Sigworth, Fred Byers 
Sloan, Arthur Neely 
Smith, Ralph Thaddeus 
Stuart, Percy Ernest 
Thompson, James Raymond 
Tilden, Charles George 
Tomey, Samuel James, M. Did. 
Van Gorden, Jesse Leland 
Wagner, George Alexander 
Weir, Edward C. 
Wells, Seth M. 
Williams, Edward B. 
Wright, Charles Alfred 
York, Nathan Albert 



RKSIDBNCB. 


PRBCKPTOit. 


Io¥rai. 


A. D. Hageboeck. 


(f 


Faculty. 


f 1 


Faculty. 


II 


W. Abegg. 


(I 


Faculty. 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Iowa. 


Jas. Murphy. 


II 


Faculty. 


II 


H. F. Steinle. 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Iowa. 


J. W. Lander. 


(1 


G. E. Fulierton. 


II 


Faculty. 


II 


H. W. Sigworth. 


II 


R. E. Conniff. 


II 


M. N. McNanghton 


II 


A. W. Adair. 


• It 


C. B. Allen. 


II 


W. E. Harriman. 


II 


Faculty. 


II 


J. C. Dayiea. 


II 


M. M. Meredith. 


« 


A. Weaver. 


II 


Faculty. 


CI 


Faculty. 


II 


J. R. Stfton. 


tl 


Faculty. 



FR1S8HMAN CIrASS. 



NAMB. 


RBSIDBNCB. 




Ainsworth, Willard Charles 


Iowa. 


E. W. Haradon. 


Beach, Lena Alice 


II 


Faculty. 


Beach, Melville Augustus 


II 


Faculty. 


Belsheim, Andrew Gilbert 


II 


G. G. Bekheim. 


Bennett, Henry Sumner 


Illinob. 


Faculty. 



MEDICAL ENROLLMENT. 



247 



NAM8. 


RKSmSNCB. 


PRSCBPTOR. 


Blackmore, Ralph Davis 


Iowa. 


E. L. Blackmore. 


Bmndage, Myron 


<( 


Faculty. 


Bollock, William Elmer 


i< 


G. H. Cassidy. 


Cantonwine, Entellua Augnstufl 


Sonth Dakota. 


Faculty. 


Cantwell, John Dalzell 


Iowa. 


A. W. Cantwell. 


Cook, James Orlando 


Illinois. 


W. 0. Beam. 


Chapman, Henry S. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Cretzmeyer, Charles H. 


«i 


W. A. Rohlf. 


Daly, Mand 


(< 


Faculty. 


DeLespinasse, Adolph Frederick H. ' ' 


J. F. DeLespinasse. 


Dennert, F!rank 


tt 


J. R. Guthrie. 


Denney, Alden Ray 


tt 


Faculty. 


Donohoe, Anthony P. 


{( 


Jas. Murphy. 


Ekblad, William, A. B. 


Kansas. 


Faculty. 


Pairchild, Renben Joel 


Illinois. 


J. S. Whitmire. 


Fitzpatrick, Dennis Francis 


Iowa. 


Jas. Murphy. 


Frank, Carl Schnrtz 


»c 


J. C. Wilson. 


Gifford, Andrew James 


South Dakota. 


W. H. Lane. 


Gaines, Daniel 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Gorham, Amy Margaret 


Minnesota. 


Faculty. 


Hall, Elmo Allen 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Harlan, Charles D. 


M 


J. C. Williams. 


Heilman, Ernest Samnel 


(1 


E. C. Heilman. 


Hender, Alfred Baker 


(i 


W. D. Middleton. 


Hess, William Clarence 


ii 


Faculty. 


Hews, Lewis DeWitt 


(f 


R. H. Hews. 


Hibbs, Fred Valentine 


(1 


W. W. Chatterton. 


Hobbs, Samnel Warren, Ph. B. 


it 


Faculty. 


Hobby, Edwin Elmer 


fC 


C. M. Hobby. 


Jarvis, Fred Jackson 


(f 


Faculty. 


Johnson, Frank George 


<i 


M. B. Coltrane. 


Eemmerer, Theodore Wilbert 


u 


C. T. Kemmerer. 


Kenner, Joseph J. 


Missouri. 


S. M. Green. 


Kiejsa, Oldrich 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Langhead, John Samnel 


<( 


W. W. Syp. 


Lofgren, Emil 


Illinois. B. < 


C. and S. L. Anderson. 



248 



STATE UNIVBRSTTY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


RKSTDBNCB. 


FRKCWPTOK. 


Logan, Fred Wallace 


Iowa. 


E. E. Munger. 


Logan, Jay Angustus 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Long, Henry Shively 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Long, Ulysses Preston 


(« 


Faculty. 


Lovewell, John Hubert 


Missouri. 


Faculty. 


Lowry, James David 


Iowa. 


R. Evans. 


Luckey, George Miller, B. A. 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


McCall, Harry Kenyon 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Meadows, Lawrence Harland 


«i 


Faculty. 


Meigs, Benjamin Lyle 


**W.A. 


Chapman and C. V. Arte. 


Middleton, Edward Duncan 


it 


W. D. Middleton. 


Middleton, George McOeUan 


i( 


W. D. Middleton. 


Morgan, Charles Henry 


<t 


A. W. Adair. 


Morton, Lewis Burrows 


(C 


W. M. Morton. 


Overholser, John D. 


l( 


Faculty. 


Peterson, August John 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Pence, Roy William 


li 


Faculty. 


Plumer, Lee Elmer 


f< 


Faculty. 


Pringle, Jesse 


« 


L* A. Rogers. 


Puleston, Fred 


i( 


A. G. Hejinian. 


Ramsey, Guy 


li 


Jas. Murphy. 


Rentz, Charles Bernard 


(1 


E. A. Doty. 


Ridenour, Joseph Elmer 


it 


Faculty. 


Sailor, Edwin Allen 


ti 


Faculty. 


Schultze, Frederick Pitte 


Iowa. W. C. Schultie and E. F. Clapp. 


Schroeder, William 


(t 


J. F. McCarthy. 


Sears, Edwin 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Shaw, Robert H. 


(1 


Chas. Lanning. 


Sheldon, Benjamin L. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Smith, Lizzie 


«< 


Faculty. 


Starr, Charles Freeman 


(4 


Faculty. 


Stober, Alvin Martin 


<( 


Faculty. 


Speers, Will Frederick 


f ( 


C. C. GrifHn. 


Stanley, Clarence J., B. S. 


(C 


J. S. Love. 


Wesoott, Leroy Anderson, M. : 


Did. " 


A. F. Walters. 



MEDICAL BNROLLMENT. 249 



RKSn>KNCB. 

Wheat, Fted Calwell Iowa. Faculty. 

Wright, Howard Jeiee " Faculty. 



8PBCIAI; STUDENTS. 



Hahenicht, Ida Adella 
Masom Walter Milton 
Teeters, Wilber John, B. S., Fh. C. 
Tourtellot, Lewis Jamison 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPASTMENT. 



NAMB. 

Bailey, Ida H. 
Coleman, Jennie 
Pamum, Earl P. 
Kauffman, Wm. A. 
Lambert, Elmer J. 
Sarchett, Llyod H. 
Skinner, Fred C. 
Todd, Victor C. 



SBNIOR CIrA88. 

PRBCBPTOR. 
J. G. Gilchrist, 
George Royal, 
A. T. Huxley, 
C. M. Morford, 
J. C. Bonham, 
F. L. Tribon, 
F. D. Paul, 
S. N. Mcl^ean, 



RBSIDKNOI. 

Iowa City. 

Dee Moines. 

Mason City. 

Whitton. 

Ottumwa. 

Algnna. 

Rock Island, ni. 

Washington. 



NAME. 

Abbott, Ed. C. 
Blackstone, B. P. 
Calkins, Fred E. 
Carver, H. E. 
Davis, Metta E. 
Marble. Pearl L. 
McCabe, Fordyce 
Metiinger, John J. 
Unkrich, C. Rudy 
Young, Glyndon A. 



JUNIOR Cl^ASS. 

PRBCBPTOR. 

J. G. Gilchrist, 

A. L. Pollard, 

R. W. Calkins, 

Faculty, 

C. B. Adams, 

Thos. Phillips, 

A. C. McAllister, 

Faculty, 

W. H. Connor, 

J. Hermann, 



RBSIDRNCB. 

Iowa City. 
Anamosa. 
Clarks, Neb. 
Oskalooaa. 
Sac City. 
Raymond. 
Muscatine 
Iowa City. 
Fairfield. 
Sioux City. 



NAMK. 

Alexander, J. L. 
Barton, E. G. 



SOPHOMORS CI^ASS. 

PRBCSPTOR. 

Drs. Morhead and Muirhead, Marion. 

Faculty, Mt. Pleasant, 

aso 



fiOMd^OPATfilC JH^DlCAt El9ROtI/MBKT. 



a^t 



Bickley, W. H. 
Bower, C. A. 
Carmichae], B. 
Coddington, J. K. 
Bilers, P. 
Bvenson, Geo. A. 
mil, Alice L. 
Howe, Marion A. 
Johxutone, J. U. 
Kemp, H> H. 
Laiid, J. W. 
Lenz, J. G. 
linn, W. N. 
McGanrey, Anna M. 
MitcheU, P. 
Rotabangh, W. E. 
Schenck, B. 
Tucker, F. A. 
Waterbnry, C. A. 
WinterB, Rose De L. 



P&BCBPTOR. 
Dtb. Bickley. 
A. Zolner, 
J. G. Gilchrist, 
Faculty. 
W. A. Mirrick, 
C. F. Bennett, 
J. G. Gilchrist, 
Faculty, 

F. A. Strawbridge, 
C. M. Morford, 
Faculty, 
J. G. Gilchrist, 

A. Bf • X^iwn, 

J. L. Vandervere, 

B. A. Wilder, 
Geo. Royal, 
F. C. Sage, 

I. H. Fry, 
Dtb. Bickley, 
J. G. GUchrist, 



RB8IDSNCB. 

Waterloo. 

West Union. 

Richland. 

Princton, His. 

Monticello. 

Finchford. 

Bpworth. 

Des Moines. 

Sigoumey. 

Toledo. 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Des Moines. 

Blue Grass. 

Sibley. 

Des Moines. 

Waterloo. 

Marshalltown. 

Waterloo. 

Bpworth. 



PAS8HMAN CI^A88. 



NAMB. 

Anderson, George W. 
Baboock, BLmer 
Blessin, Otto 
Cross, George B. 
Dameron, James L. 
Hubbard, Chester 
Kauffman, Edward C. 
Kauftnan, Ira D. 
Launder, Prank T. 
litUe, Lowell 
Martin, Hobart E. 



RBSIDBNCB. 

Dysart. 

Bldora. 

Bldorado. 

Nashua* 

Iowa City. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Estherville. 

Whitten. 

Orient 

Stromsbnrg, Nebr. 

Boone. 



252 



STATB UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



NAMB. 

Maxwell, Adeldert B. 
Musgrove, GeoigeJ. 
Parsons, Percy L. 
Pond Issi Otto 
Richards, Frank O. 
Sarchett, Geo. A. 
Snitkay, Chas. J. 
Swallnm, James A. 
Wenzelick, George J. 
Wilkinson, I«andy A. 
Winters, Louis E. 



&BSIDSNCB. 

Ames. 

Parmington. 

Traer. 

Gladbrook. 

Iowa City. 

Algona. 

Tipton. 

Carroll. 

Iowa City. 

Hedrick. 

Hampton. 



NURSES. 



WSAD NUR898. 



NAMK. 

Jensen, Cecilia A. 
Raff, Mary A. 



Graves, Sara L. 
Hawkins, Alice 



Smith, Carrie E. 
Waite, Carrie I. 
Williamson, Elizabeth 



Blanck, Mae Ellen 
Moore, Mary P. 

Anderson, Ida Sophia 
Blowers, Hannah M. 



8BNI0R8. 



JUNIORS. 



PUPUr NURSBS. 



RBSIDBNCB. 
Osage. 
Maquoketa. 



Dnbnqne. 
Des Moines. 



Iowa City. 
Wellman. 
Ladora. 



Walker. 
Mt. Vernon. 

Iowa City. 
Iowa City, 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL ENROLLMENT. 



253 



NAMB. 

Camiichael, Mrs. E. 
Ernst, Alice B. 
Gibeon, Mary L. 
Hofeditz, Mary 
Hnlaebns, Elizabeth 
Lenz, Ada 
Linn, Retta 
Myera, Milfred 
Needer, Emma 
Phelps, Jennie L. 
Safley, Agnes J. 
Walker, Lucy Mabel 
Walker, Minnie M. 



RESIDENCE. 

Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Burlington. 
Iowa City. 
Des Moines. 
Rockford, 111. 
Iowa City. 
Martinsbuzg. 
Tipton. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 



SSNIOR CSrASB. 



NAMB. 

Barrera, Isaac 
Beam, Prank N. 
Bingham, Frederick Nathaniel 
Bradley, William Oscar 
Brock, Herbert Bruce 
Brooks, George 
Brown, Sim Chauncey 
Brown, Curtis Henry 
Calhoun, Joseph Parrar 
Crandall, Walter G. 
Countryman, Charles Clarence 
Davis, Walter A. 
Daugherty, James Bertis 
Decker, Herbert M. 
Deetkin, Julius Charles 
Dillinger, Hanna 
Eickelberg, George C. 
Eicher, Cora h. 
Pawkes, Charles James 
Pickes, Josiah Barton 
Gable, John Carleton 
Gary, Arthur George 
*Gay, John Charles 
Grafton, Charles W. 
Godlove, Geoxge W. 
Hall, Robert W. 

* Not inattendance. 



RBSIDBNCB. 

Porfirio, Mexico. 

Moorland. 

Des Moines. 

Dubuque. 

Lone Tree. 

Greenfield. 

HddyviUe. 

Iowa City. 

Birmingham. 

Spenoer. 

Birmingham. 

Aledo, ni. 

La MoUle, 111. 

Davenport. 

Council Bluffs. 

Glidden. 

Waterloo. 

Ainsworth, Nebr. 

Dubuque. 

Iowa City. 

Anamosa. 

Walker. 

Conesville. 

Pack wood. 

Riverside. 

Cherokee. 



254 



DENTAL ENROLLMENT. 



355 



HAMS. 

Hayes Clinton LeGrande 
Haley, Prank Richardaon 
Henle, Mathias Francis 
Hirons, Jennie 

HoUenbeck, Charles Dighton 
Hood, Gueme Tuttle 
Hope, Bird Norris 
Johnson, Prank Alexander 
Joelin, Walter Trich 
Keeler, Howard Denton 
Kinsley, Jason Daniel 
Lambert, Neiia M. 
Lawton, Ernest John 
Leechi Charles Sloan 
Leigh, Charles Lloyd 
UUihridge, William Otis 
Undalay, Clayton Bums 
McKee, J. W. 
McClelland, Freeman 
McClanahan, William B. 
Meis, Herman J. 
MiUer, William C. 
Morrow, Burton Allen 
Ogg, Mahlon D. 
Patton, Jefferson HoUister 
Read, William M. 
Reynard, May 
Rice, James Kinlon 
Rundorff. Arthur Henry 
Sensibaugh, William Chandler 
SUrbnck, Albert W. 
Sutton, Harry Burse 
Tinker, E. Pay 
Torrance, Charles Anderson 
Tmax, Fred Elmer 
Webb, John Everett 



RBSIDSNCB. 

La Porte City. 
New York, N. Y. 
N. Clinton. 
Princeton, Mo. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Dunlap. 
Birmingham. 
Holsteen. 
Moline, 111. 
Des Moines. 
McGregor. 
Springgeld, 111. 
North Freedom, Wis. 
Winterset. 
Dyersville. 
Akron. 
Waucoma. 
Davenport. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Cincinnati. 
Dyersville. 
Kalona. 
Larrabee. 
Greenleafton, Minn. 
Des Moines. 
Allerton. 
Burlington. 
Amelia. 
Burlington. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Springdale. 
Corydon. 
Wheatland. 
Maryvllle, Mo. 
Maquoketa. 
McGregor. 



256 



STATB UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



MAMS. 

Weickert, William Henry 
Wells, Frederick 
Weymouth, Ida 
Wood, Geoige L. 



RBSmSNCR. 

Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Iowa City. 
Geneaeo, 111. 



JUNIOR ci;ass. 



NAME. 

AlderBon, Thomas E. 
Albright, Leroy Clark 
Baker, Harry Clark 
Bawner, John 
Booth, John Jacob 
Biadshaw, Wayland C. 
Browning, Ernest Welcomb 
Bruce, Guy Rolfe 
Burtchby, F. T. 
Davis, John Clarence 
Gardner, H. H. 
Goodenough, G. H. 
Gray, Lewis Ballon 
Grigsby, Fred Redman 
Hallett, J. A. 
Hannofin, T. L. 
Johnson, Oliver 
Keeler, Clark C. 
Kelley, Orange R. 
Kern, F. J. 
Lockhart, Will T. 
Long, John Edwin 
Lowry, William David 
McGarvey, Lovelace Edwin 
Mentzer, Charles 
Morris, Robert C. 
*Moore, Rolland B. 



USSIDBNCB. 

Dubuque. 

Frimghar. 

Everly. 

Iowa City. 

Marion. 

Jefferson. 

Solon. 

Dubuque.' 

Montezuma. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Iowa City. 

Gowrie. 

Bancroft. 

Blandinsville, lU. 

Dea Moines. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Cedar Falls, 

Des Moines. 

Iowa City. 

Burlington. 

Mediapolis. 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Davenport. 

Davenport. 

Robbins. 

La Platte, Mo. 

Iowa City. 



*Irregu]Ar. 



DBNTAI^ ENROI^LMBNT. 



257 



NAliS. 

Oyler, WilUam Sewaxd 

Page, Robert Roy 

Pzmy. Charles H. 

Peek, h. S. 

*Ridenoiir, Judaon, Beeghly 

Roberta. Claire Willie 

Seydel, Saxnnel Jordon Kirkwood 

State, Fred Nicholaa 

Stall, Claade 

Swain, Ada M. 

tSwiaher, Arthur R. 

Tollia, Preeman 

Warner, Raymond Theodore 

Williama, Ray 

WUley, Harry Dnane 

Wilson, Wm. Howard 

Welsh, James Donnell 

tWoolverton, Blla 



RBSI09NC9. 

Downey. 
Iowa City. 
Vinton. 
Normal, 111. 
Garrison. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
Iowa City. 
Lyle, Minn. 
Algona. 
Marengo. 
Iowa City. 
Ottnmwa. 
Parkersburg. 
Coandl Blnffs. 
Onawa. 

Potsdam, N. Y. 
New Albin. 
Iowa City. 



PBS8HMAM CIrASS. 



KAMB. 

tBoostell, F. 
Brockway, F. L. 
Brown, Bsther 
Cheesbro, M. D. 
Clarke, A. O. 
Dessaint, I4. R. 
Devamey, W. 
Dexter, C. J. 
EUer, C. A. 
FaiiBU, J. A. 
Gibfofd, H. 
Gote, F. A. 



&BSZDBNCB. 

Anamosa. 
Jefferson. 
Staceyrille. 
Shell Rock. 
Charles City. 
Davenport. 
Lake Mills. 
Rockwell. 
Pekin. 
Des Moines. 
Newton. 
Riyerton. 



t IrrefulAT. 

X Not ui attcadsnce. 



258 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAMK. 

Gothard, S. B. 
Griffis, T. R. 
tGoodenough, G. D. 
Hall, B. A. 
Haaek, A. 
Holson, Alliene 
Holson, B. R. 
Kenderdine, W. H. 
Knowles, A. C. 
Kuster, S. W. 
McCartney, O. B. 
Mentzer, J. A. 
Meves, O. C. 
fMoore, R. B. 
Oyerholt, T. B. 
PaxBona, D. C. 
Rathbone, R. R. 
Reppert, I^. 
Robeson, Mary 
Safford, Margaret L. 
Seller, Agnes 
Shannon, R. B. 
tStewart, J. F. 
tSwisher, A. R. 
Taylor, M. H. 
Thompson, D. I^. 
Vorwald, T. 
Will, R. T. 



Atlantic. 

CaxBon. 

Gowrie. 

Reinbeck. 

Oedar Rapids. 

Iowa City. 

Iowa City. 

Spencer. 

Winthrop. 

Caledonia, Minn. 

Thniman. 

Robbins. 

Wheatland. 

Iowa City. 

Iowa City. 

Traer. 

Red Oak. 

Mnacatine. 

MoUne, 111. 

Hamilton, 111. 

Mnscatine. 

Miliedgeville, HI. 

Kellogg. 

Iowa City. 

Geneaeo, HI. 

Coming. 

Dnbnque. 

Glenwood. 



FRACTITI0NSR8' C0UR8S. 



McClelland, Freeman, D.D.S. 



Cedar Rapids. 



flxregular. 

tNot in Attendance. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY, 



8SNI0R CI;A88. 



NAHB. 

Brinton, Gilbert Edward 
Boas, F)«deric John 
Gearhart, Newton Arthur 
Nixon, Robert Boms 
Owena, David Austin (Special) 
Park, Charles Grant 
Piader, Dolph C 
Tagoe, Marion Samuel 
White, I/mia Mortimore 



RBSID9NC9. 

Brighton. 
Hammond, N. Y. 
Hopkinton. 
Shambaugh. 



Wilton. 
Monticello. 
Vinton, 
liaynard. 



JUNIOR ClirASS. 



HAMS. 

Adam, William Charles 
Ashford, George Washington 
Barr, Henry James 
Benham, Lewis Albert 
Carney, Bdward Holland 
Conry, William LeRoy 
Dabney, Maurice John 
Delaney, Jerry C. 
Doran, John William 
Boigeloh, Henry 
Dyhr, William 



Junger, William Fred 



R9SID9NCE. 

Volga. 

Homer, Neb. 

Vinton. 

Shelby. 

Cedar Palls. 

Waterloo. 

Oakland, 

MilUgan, Neb. 

Dnrant. 

Anamosa. 

West Branch. 

«mXBll8Ba« 

Cedar Palls. 
Reinbeck.] 



259 



26o 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAICS. 

LeFevre, I^ouis Kaantz 
McGnan, Charles 
McPheeters, Ben Brown 
Mittvalsky, Edward Charles 
Nebei::gall, George N. 
Nichols, Fred Claudius 
Phillips, Amy Drake 
Rebnm, William Warren 
Schanmloe£Pel, Marie Berenice 
Schnier, John Valentine 
Stra3rer, Lncile I. 
Swan, Wallace Cantwell 
Updegraff , Simon L. 



Montrose. 
Iowa City. 
Jefferson. 
Cedar Rapids. 
Davenport. 
Green Mountain. 
Fertile. 
New Albin. 
Ravenwood, Mo. 
Worthington. 
Waterloo. 
Morning Sun. 
Hedrick. 



SUMMARY. 



COUrBGIATB DSPARTMBMT: 

Graduate Stndents 88 

Seniora 8i 

I Jntiiora no 

Sophomores 147 

Preahmen 180 

Special 67—673 

JjLW D^PA&TMSirr: 

Senion loi 

Juniors 116 — 227 

MEDiCAi, Dbpa&tmbnt: 

Seniors 55 

Juniors 2 

I Sophomores 61 

Freshmen 78 

Special 4 — 200 

HOM<EOPATHIC MJtDICAI, D9PA&TM8NT: 

Seniors • 8 

Juniors 10 

Sophomores 22 

Freshmen 22 

Nurses 24 — 86 

Dbntai, Dspartbcbmt: 

Seniors 66 

Juniors 45 

Freshmen 40 

Practitioner i — 152 

Phakicacy Dbpartmbmt: 

Senion 9 

Juniora 27— 36 

1374 
Deduct for names counted twice 61 

1313 



UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSCX3ATI0N. 



President: 

John CAMPsm.!,, C. '77, L. '79 Colorado Springs, Col. 

Vice-Presidents: 

H. E. D99MB&, I^. '79 Red Oak 

I4OX71S9B. HUOHBS, C. *78 Iowa City 

W. A. GiBBKNS, C. '77 Oasis 

Secretary: 

O. A. Byikgton, C. '80, L. '8t Iowa City 

Treasnrer: 

Chakt,K3 S. Maoowak, C. '84 Iowa City 

Ezecntive Committee: 

Hah&yE. KKlfZ^Y, C. '93 Iowa City 

BUZAB9TH h. Sherwood, C. '81 Iowa City 

Arthur G. Sboth, C. '91 Iowa City 

Advisory Committee to the Athletic Association: 

Arthur G. Smith, C. '91 Iowa City 

W. T. CHAirri^AND, C. '92 Fort Dodge 

J. J. Crossiay, C. '91 Winterset 

Railroad Secretary: 

S. E. STEVENSON, C. *93 Iowa City 



INDEX, 



Admusion, Requirements for. 
Collegiate Department, i6 
Dental Department, 183, 191 
Horn. Med. Department, 166 
Law Department, 123 
Medical Department, 157 
Pharmacy Depaitment, 198 

Accredited Schoou, 22 

Advanced Degrees, xoi 

Advanced Standing, 
Collegiate, 39 

Medical, xw 
Altunni Associations, 

University, a6a 

Hom. Med., 177 
Animal Morphology, 68, 97 
Assistants* Coarse, Dental 193 
Astronomy, 78, 109 
Athletics, 1x9 
BattaUon. 87 

Biological Sciences, Special Courses 
^^^^^ in* 3a. 33 

Botanical cSbcctiotts, 1x4 

Calendar, 3 

Certificate, Admission by, aa 

Certificates, Special Teachers*, 36 

Chemistry, 66, 96 

Chemistij, Special Courses in, 33 

Civil Authorities, Students and, 1x9 

ClassicafCourse, 29 
Clinics, 

Dental Department, X89 

Hom. Med. Department, 174 

Medical Department, 15X 
Collegiate Building, New, xaa 
Collegiate Department, X2 
Courses of Instruction, 38 
CourKS of Study, 

Collegiate, 39 

Dental, x8x. x8a 

Graduate, 89 

Hom. Med., x68. 

Law, X27 

MedicaOsa 

Pharmacy, 198 
Degrees, Advanced, xot 
Degrees, Baccalaureate, 36 
Degrees Conferred, June X897, 

Collegiate Department, ao8 

Law Department, 2x0 
Degrees Conferred, March, x8q8, 

Dental Department, 212 

Hom. Med. Department, 2x2 

Medical Department, 2xx 

•X ^""<^ Department, 2x3 
Dental Department, x8x 
Draughting Rooms, X09 



Education, 61, 95 
IClectrical Bng^eering, 35 
Blectridty, 64 
Elocution. 49 
Engineering, 

Electr&i; 35 
English, 45, 91 
Enrollment, 

Collegiate, 2x4 

Dental, 354 

Hom. Med., 250 

Medical, 243 

Pharmacy, aS9 

Summary, 26X 
Bthica 59 

Examinations, Law Preliminary, 13s 
Expeditions, Botanical, 1x5 



Collegiate, xao 

Dental, X90, X92 

Hom. Med., X67, X77 

Law. xm 

Medical, 136. 163 

Pharmacy, 205, 207 
Facultv, 

Collegiate, xa 

Dental, X79 

General, 5 

Hom. Med., X64 

Law, X22 

Medical, X42 

Pharmacy, 195 
Finance, 52 

Geological ODllections, ixx 

Geology, 72, 98 

German, 4X, 90 

Government and Administration, 

Graduate cSurses of Study, 89 

Graduates, Resident, 15, 89 

Graduates, see Degrees Conferred. 

Graduation, Requirements for. 
Collegiate Department, 36, xox 
Dental Department, 190 
Hom. Med. Department, X77 
Law Department, 137 
Medical Department, x6o 
Pharmacy Department, 206 

Greek, 40, 90 

Gymnasium, x20 

Hammond Library, X33 

Herbarium, xx4 

High Schools, Accredited, 22 

Histology, 69 

Historv, Sf>,9i 

Hom. Medical Department, x66 

Hospitals, 

University Hospital, x62 
Horn. Med. HospiUl, 176 



264 



STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 



Information, Gcnenl, 1x5 
Instructors, Collegiate, la 
Laboratories 

Botanical, X07 

ChemicaL 104 

Dental, xw 

Bnidneering, X09 

Geological, 106 

Pharmaceutical, ao^ 

Physical, 105 ^ , 

Physiological and Morphological, 
X06 

Psychological, 61, xo6 

I«atin,38,90 
Law Department, X23 
Law Electives, 130 
Lecture Bureau, xi6 
Library of the University, xis 
Law Library, 132 

Dental Lil>iax7i 189 
Medical Library, 153 
LiteraxT Societies, 
Collegiate, xx6 
I#aw. X3a 

Material Equipment, X04 

Mathematics. 75, xoo 

Medical BuildiAg, x6i 

Medical Department, lu 

Medical and Scientific Course,^ 158 

Military Science and Tactics, 86 

Moot Courts, X3X 

Morphology, 68, 97 

Museums, 

Natural History Museum, iii 

Medical Museum, xs2 

Dental Museum, X89 
Normal School, Iowa SUte, 29 
Nurses, Trsining School for, 

Hom. Medical, 176 

Medical, x6a 
Observatoxy, X09 



Orsanisation, xi 

Officers, 4, s 

Paleontology, 7a, 9B 

Pedagogy, 61, 95^ 

Pharmacy Department, 196 

Philosophical Courses, 30, 31 

PhlloBophY, 5ft 94 

Physical Training, 1x9 

Physics, 64, 96 

Physiology. 68, 97 

poUtical Soenoe, 5s, 9a 

Praetitionerg* Course, Den. Dcpt, X9X 



(^leglate Department, xi8 

Law Department, 140 
Publications, 

University, xx6 

Student, xx7 
Psychological Laboratoxy, 6x 
Piychoiogar, 59.^94, 
Resents, Board of, 4 
Religious Exercises, X19 
Resident Graduates, 3x4, 216 
Resident Phjrsicians, 163 
Science, General Course in, 32 
Science, Special Courses, 33 
Scientific Expeditions, 1x5 
Schedule of Studies, 

Collegiate, 39 

Dental, 181, X82 

Hom. Med., x68 

I.aw.x27 

Medical, X52 

Pharmacy, xo8 
Schools, Accredited, 22 
Societies, 1x6 

Sociology, 54 

Students, see Enrollment 

Summary, 261 

Summer Session, xsx 

Teachers* Certificates and Diplomas, 
63 

Teachers' Certificates. Special, 36 

Text and Reference Books, 
Dental Department, 193 
Hom. Med. Department, x68 
Law Department, X34 
Medical Department, 155 
Pharmacy Department, 206 

Theses, Law, x^ 

Txaining School for Nurses, 
University, x62 
Hom. Med., 176 

Tuition and Expenses, 

Collegiate Department, 120 
Dental Department, X90 
Hom. Med. Department, 167 
Law Department, X33 
Medical Department, 156 
Pharmanr Department, 20s 207 

University ^tension, X17 

Young Men's Christian Associatlim, 

Young Women's Christian Assoda- 



Zoological Co; 
Zoology, 7«i 97 



ti<»»t_ 1x9 , 

llections, 



XIS 



^ / O . /J 



Il^'f//'-*^'^ /ff^ 



HEW SBBIES Toi. I. Bo. 3. 



BULLETIN 



University of Iowa 



May 16, 1899 



IOWA CITY, IOWA 

AppUcstiaii made foi Bally at UK FoM Ofloe u Second Clu* Hatter. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



State University of Iowa 



IOWA CITY, IOWA 



1898-99 



AND 



Announcement for 1899-1900 



PUBIvISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1899 



CALENDAR FOR 1899 -1900. 



1899. 

June 2, Frtday.—Axmiv&mary of I^iterary Societies, 8 p. M. 
June 4^ Sunday. — Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. m. 
June 5, Monday, ~-^3asa Day Exercises. 

Commencement, Dental Department. 

Battalion Drill and Dress Parade, 4 p. m. 
June 6, Tuesday. — ^Alumni Day. 

Alumni Meeting, 2 p. m. 

Alumni Dinner, 6 p. m. 
June 7, Wednesday, — Commencement, Law Department, 10 a. m. 
June 8, Thursday, — Commencement, Collegiate Department, 10 a. m. 
September 12^ Tuesday, — Examinations for Admission. 
September /j, Wednesday, ^^9!i\ Term begins, all Departments. 
November i*j, Thursday, — ^Thanksgiving Holiday. 
December 21^ Thursday, — Fall Term ends. 

1900. 
January 3^ Wednesday, ^Winter Term begins. 
March 22, Thursday, — Winter Term ends. 
March ^7, Tuesday, — Spring Term begins. 
March ^7, Tuesday, — Commencement, Homoeopathic Medical Depart- 



I ment. 



March 28^ Wednesday. — Commencement, Medical and Pharmacy De- 
partments. 

June /, Friday, — ^Anniversary of Literary Societies, 8 p. M. 

June s* Sunday. — Baccalaureate Address, 4 p. M. 

June 4, Monday. — Class Day Exercises. 

Commencement, Dental Department. 

June 5, Tuesday. — Alumni Day. 

Alumni Meeting, 2 p. M. 
Alumni Dinner, 6 P. M. 

June 6, Wednesday. — Commencement, Law Department, 10 a. m. 

June 7, Thursday. — Commencement, Collegiate Department, 10 a. m. 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 



Tbrms Ezpirb 1900. 



His Excellency, LESLIE M. SHAW, Governor 

of the State y 
Member and President of the Board, ex-Offido. 

J. D. McCLEARY, Indianola. 
WILLIAM D. TISDALE, Otiumwa. 
W. I. BABB, Mt, Pleasant. 
GEORGE W. CABLE, Davenport. 
ALONZO ABERNETHY, Osage. 
PARKER K. HOLBROOK, Onawa. 
HARVEY INGHAM, Algona, 
CHARLES E. PICKETT, Waterloo, 
SHIRLEY GILLILLAND, GUnwood. 
HIRAM K. EVANS, Corydon, 
M. A. HIGLEY, Cedar Rapids. 
RICHARD C. BARRETT, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 



Terms Expire 1902. 



• Terms Expire 1904* 



Member ex-Opficio. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

LOVELL SWISHER. lotva City Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. HADDOCK, loiva City, Secretary. 

EMMA HADDOCK, Iowa City, Assistant Secretary. 

PARKER K. HOLBROOK, 

ALONZO ABERNETHY, !• Executive Committee. 

M. A. HIGLEY, 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTIES 

AND OTHER OFFICERS. 



Charles Ashmbad Schaeffbr/ A. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

President 

Amos Noyks Currier, A. M., LL. D.» * 

Adting President. 

Professor of I«atin I^anguage and I«iterature, and Dean of the Collegiate 
Faculty. 

Phii/> Judson Farnsworth, a. M., M. D.,* 

Bmeritufl Professor of Materia Medica and Diseases of Children in the 
Medical Department 

John Cunton Shrader, A. M., M. D., LL. D., 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

Wii^UAM Drummond Middi«etok, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Sarvery and Clinical Surgery in the Medical Department, and 
Dean of the Medical Faculty. 

Samubi* Cai^vin, a. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

WiwioT HoRTON Dickinson, t M. D., 

Professor of Theory and Pra(5Uce, and Clinical Medicine, and Dean of the 
Homoeopathic Medical Faculty. 

Emlin McCi^ain, a, M., LL. D., 

Professor of I«aw, and Chancellor of the I«aw Department. 

Thomas Huston Macbride, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

James Grant Gii^hrist, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery, and Surgical Gynecology, and Registrar of the 
Homoeopathic Medical Faculty. 

Bmii« Louis Boerner, Pharm. D., 

Professor of Pni<5tical Pharmacy, and Dean of the Pharmacy Faculty. 

Launcbi^ot Winchester Andrews, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

Chari«es Herbert Cogswei,i<, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

George Thomas White Patrick, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 



^ Died September 33, 1898. 
t Died October a6, 189B. 



6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Charles Bundy W1150N, A. M., 

Professor of German I«anguage and Mterature, and Secretary of the 
Collegiate Faculty. 

Lawrbncb Wii«uam Littig, a. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

Professor of Theory and PradHce of Medicine, and Clinical Medicine in the 
Medical Department. 

Andrew Anderson Vebi^n, A. M., 

Professor of Physics. 

Laenas Gifford Wei,d, a. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Chari^es Ci,evei,and Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology, and Curator of the Museum of Natural History. 

jABfES Renwick Guthrie, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Medical Department. 

Isaac Ai«thaus Loos, A. M., D. C. I/., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Samuei. Hayes, M. S., LL. B., 

Professor of l«aw. 

Joseph Jasper McConneix, A. M., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 
E13ERT WlI,WAM ROCKWOOD, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, and Director of Hospital, 
Medical Department. 

George Royai^, M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

James Wiijjam Dai^bey, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Opthalmology in the Medical Department. 

Ch arises S. Chase, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Medical DepartmenL 

Frank John Newberry, M. S., M. D., O. et A. Chin, 

Professor of Opthamology, Otology, and Paedology in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department. 

Wai^ter L. Bierring, M. D., 

Professor of Badteriology and Pathology. 

James A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. B., 

Professor of I«aw. 

Wii^WAM Craig Wii/:ox, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

Frank Thomas Breene, M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, and Therapeutics. 

WlI^UAM S. HOSFORD, A. B., D. D. S., 

Professor of Dental Prothesis, and Dean of the Dental Faculty. 

Frederic C. L. van Steenderbn, A. M., 

Professor of French l«anguage and Mterature. 

Ai^prkd Vari^ey Sims, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 



MEMBERS OF THE FACUWIES AND OTHER OFFICERS. 7 
John Wai^ter Harriman, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Martin Joseph Wade, LL. B., 

Professor of Medical J[urisprudence in the Medical Department, and I«ec- 
turer on Evidence in the I^aw Department. 

WiijjAM Harper DeFord, A. M., M. D., D. D. S., 

Professor of Oral Pathology and Hygiene in the Dental Department. 

G113ERT Logan Houser, M. S., 

Professor of Animal Morphology and Ph3rsioIogy. 

Benjamin Frankwn Shambaugh, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Government and Administration. 

WiLijAM Peters Reeves, Ph. D., 

Professor of English I«anguage and I«iterature. 

Chari<es Moore Robertson, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Otology, Rhinology, and I«aryngology in the Medical Depart- 
ment. 

William Robert Whiteis, M. S., M. D., 

Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

Harry S. Richards, Ph. B., LL. B., 

Professor of Law. 

Lee Wallace Dean, M. S., M. D., 

AAing Professor of Physiology. 

Philip E. Triem, A. M., M. D., 

Adting Professor of Theory and Pradtice in the Homoeopathic Medical 
Department. 

Leona Angeline Call, A. M., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Greek Language and Literature. 

Charles Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

BoHUMiL Shimek, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany, and Curator of the Herbarium. 

Henry F. Wickham, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, and Assistant Curator of the Museum of 
Natural History. 

Arthur G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Franklin Hazen Potter, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin. 

Carl E. Seashore, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Gershom Hyde Hill, a. B., m. D., 

Ledturer on Insanity. 

GiPPORD Simeon Robinson, LL. D., 

Ledturer on Appellate Pradtice and Agency. 

Horace Emerson Deemer, LL. B., 

Ledturer on Guaranty and Suretyship, and the Condudting of Law Business. 



8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Jambs E. Fi^bbner, D. D. S., 

I^edturer on Orthodontia. 

w. J. mcGeb, a. M., 

IfCdturer on Anthropology. 

Paui«inb Kimbai^i* Partridge, 

Instnidlor in Elocution. 

Frederic Bernard Sturm, A. B., 

Instrudtor in German. 

Percy Hargreaves Wai«ker, M. S., 

Instrudtor in Chemistry. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instrudtor in English. 

George N. Bauer/ M. S., 

Instrudtor in Mathematics. 

Bertha Gii«christ Ridgway, 

Ifibrarian. 

Harry Grant Pi,um,» A. M., 

Instrudtor in History. 

ROYAI, WiNTHROP BaI^DWIN, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technol(^;y, and l^e&nrer on Regional Anatomy. 

A. E. Rogers, D. d. S., 

Demonstrator of Dental Technology, and I«edturer on Dental Anatomy. 

Chari^ES Henry Bowman, Ph. B., 

Instrudtor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, Ph. B., 

Instrudtor in Pedagogy. 

Chari.es B. Lewis, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Deparment. 

WlUJAM G. Cl^RK, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator of Porcelain Work in the Dental Department. 

Frank B. James, D. D. S., 

Demonstrator in the Dental Department. 

W11.WAM Edward Bari,ow, M. A., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

Wn^BER John Teeters, M. S., Ph. C, 

Demonstrator of Chemlstiy. 

Louise Ewzabeth HuGEms, A. M., 

Instrudtor in I«atin. 

Fred D Merritt, A. M., 

Instrudtor in Mathematics. 

Harry Eugene Kbixy,! A. M., 

Instrudtor in English. 



* Absent on leave. 

t Absent on leave, winter and spring terms. 



MEMBERS OP THE FACULTIES AND OTHER OFFICERS. 9 * 
Burton S. Easton, B. S., 

Instmdkor in Mathematica. 

Pkrcy Lewis Kayk, A. M., Ph. D., 

Instrudtor in History. 

Wii«i,iAM O. Farnsworth, a. M., 
Instrudlor in French. 

Wn^ijAM Roi^i^ Patterson, Ph. D., 

Instrudtor in Statistics and Economics. 

Ci^RBNCE Wii^us Eastman, Ph. D., 

Instrudtor in German. 

George Schuyi^r Schaeffer, A. B., 

Instrudtor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Fred Ai^i^ison Howe, A. B., LL. B., 

Instrudtor in English. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, 

Taxidermist. 

Theodore L. Hazard, M. D., 

Assistant in Materia Medica in the Homceopathic Medical Department 

Chari«es G. Park, Ph. G., 

Assistant in the Pharmacy I«aboratory. 

Zada M. Cooper, Ph. G., 

Assistant in the Pharmacy I^aboratory. 

Fred J. Becker, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, Homoeopathic Medical Department. 

Rai«ph W. HOMAN, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology, etc., Homceopathic Medical 
Department 

Leora Johnson, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, Homoeopathic Medical Depart- 
ment 

Thomas E. Savage, M. S. 

Assistant in Botany. 

OSWAU) Vebi,en, a. B., 
Fellow in Physics. 

John J. Lambert, 

Assistant in Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Herman A. Muei^i^er, 

Assistant in Geology. 

Frank N. Brink, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Jennie S. Cotti^e, 

Superintendent of Hospital, Medical Department 

AlrPHEDS L. POIXARD, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics in the Homoeopathic Medical Depart- 
ment 



10 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

John T. McCXintock, A. B., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, Pathology, and Ba<ftcriology in the Medical 
Department. 

BESsm G. Parker, Ph. B., 

Assistant in the I«ibrary. 

Ethei, Chari^ton, Ph. B., 

Assistant in the Mhrary. 

I/>UISB MOULTON, A. B., 

Assistant in the Ifibiary. 

Mary A. Raff, 

Matron of the Homceopathic Hospital. 



THE UNIVERSITY AND THE STATE. 



The University of Iowa is an integral part of the public school 
system of the State. As required by law, it begins, as far as pradti- 
cable, where the high schools end, and seeks to complete the work 
carried through the various grades below it. A sense of this vital 
connection with the system of public schools determines, in large 
measure, its requirements of admission, its spirit and the trend of its 
work. 

In the year 1840, the Cong^ress of the United States passed an act 
setting apart two townships for the use and support of a University 
within the Territory of Iowa, whenever it should become a State. The 
gift was accepted, as set forth in the Constitution of the State, and the 
policy reaffirmed in the amended Constitution of 1857. 

The first General Assembly took adlion in regard to the location 
of the University, and a Board of Trustees was appointed. Very little, 
however, was accomplished until 1855, when the institution was first 
opened for the reception of students. The University was subsequently 
reorganized, and under the new organization reopened on September 
19, i860, and this may fairly be regarded as the date of the beginning 
of the existing institution. 

The control of the University is entrusted to a Board of Regents, 
consisting of the Governor of tlie State and the Superintendent of 
Public Instrudtion, ex-officiis^ and one member from each Congres- 
sional District, who are ele<5led by the General Assembly. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The University comprises the following departments: 

I. COI^I^BGIATB DBPARTMBNT. 

2. Law Department. 

3. Medicaid Department. 

4. HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAI, DEPARTMENT. 

5. Dentai« Department. 

6. Pharmacy Department. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Amos Noybs Currier, A. M., LL. D., 

Adting President. 

Professor of I^tiu I«angiiage and X^iteniture, and Dean of the Faculty. 

Samubi, Cai^vin, a. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

Thomas Huston Macbridb, A. M., Ph. D.» 

Professor of Botany. 

I/AUNCKLOT Winchester Andrews, Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

George Thomas White Patrick, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy. 

Chari^es Bundy Wilson, A. M., 

Professor of German l«anguage and I«iterature, and Secretary of the 
Faculty. 

Andrew Anderson Vebi«en, A. M., 

Professor of Phjrsics. 

I/AENAS GiPFORD WEI^D, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Chari^es Ci,evei*and Nutting, A. M., 

Professor of Zoology. 

Isaac Ai^thaus I/k>s, A. M., D. C. L., 

Professor of Political Science. 

Joseph Jasper McConnei«i«, A. M., 

Professor of Pedagogy. 

Wii^ifiAM Craig Wii^ox, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

Frederic C. L. van Steenderen, A. M., 

Professor of French I«anguage and l«iterature. 

Ai^FRED Vari^ey Sims, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

GlI<BERT IvOGAN HOUSER, M. S., 

Professor of Animal Morphology and Physiology. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 18 

Benjamin Franklin Shambauoh, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Government and AdministTBtion. 

William Petbrs Rbsvbs, Ph. D., 

Professor of English Language and Literature. 

Leona Angblinb Call, A. M., 

Assistant Professor in charge of Greek Language and Literature. 

Charles Scott Magowan, A. M., C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

BOHUMIL Shimek, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Botany, and Curator of the Herbarium. 

Henry F. Wickham, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Arthur G. Smith, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Franklin Hazen Potter, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin. 

Carl E. Seashore, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Pauline Kimball Partridge, 

Instru^or in Elocution. 

Frederic Bernard Sturm, A. B., 

Instrudtor in German. 

Percy Hargreavbs Walker, M. S., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

George Cram Cook, A. B., 

Instrudlor in English. 

George N. Bauer,* M. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Harry Grant Plum.* A. M., 

Instructor in History. 

Charles Henry Bowman, Ph. B., 

Instructor in Physics. 

Herbert C. Dorcas, Ph. B., 

Instructor in Pedagogy. 

Louise Elizabeth Hughes, A. M., 

Instructor in Latin. 

Fred D Merritt, A. M., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Harry Eugene Kelly,* A. M., 

Instructor in English. 

Burton S. Easton, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Percy Lewis Kaye, A. M., Ph. D., 

Instructor in History. 



* Absent on leave. 



14 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

WnxiAM O. Pakmsworth, a. M., 

InstmAorin French. 

WUXIAM ROhUL PaTTKKSON, PH. D., 
InstmAor in StatistiGB and Koonomics. 

CXAJtHNCH Wnxis Eastman, Ph. D., 

InstmAorin German. 

Gborgb Schuyi^br Schabfpbr, a. B., 

InstmAor in Military Science and TaAics. 

Frbd Aujson Howb, a. B., LIr. B., 
Instnȣkor in BnKlish. 

Thomas Edmund Savagb, M. S., 

Assistant in Botany. 

OSWAI4> Vbbi^bn, a. B., 
Fellow in Physics. 

Joseph H. Ridgway, 

Taxidermist. 

John J. Lambert, 

Assistant in Animal Morphology and Physiology. 

Herman A. Mueixer, 

Assistant in Geology. 

Prank N. Brink, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COLLEGIATE 

FACULTY. 



Szecatiye: The A<5ling President, and Professors Weld, and Patrick. 

Admission and Classification: Professors Weld, Wilson, McConnell, 
and Patrick. 

Preparatory Schools: Professors McConnell, Loos, Calvin, and Houser. 

Graduate Students: Professors Wilcox, Loos, Macbride, and Nutting. 

Catalogue: Professors Wilson, Reeves, and Skambaugh. 

Military: Professors Andrews, Weld, and McConnell. 

Athletics: Professors Sims, Shambaugh, and Reeves. 

Library: The Adling President, and Professors Wilson, Calvin, Nut- 
ting, and Patrick. 

finles: Professors Veblen, Calvin, and Van Steenderen. 



GENERAL PLAN. 



The Collegiate Department offers four general courses of study, — 
one Classical, two Philosophical, and one General Scientific; and two 
technical courses, — Civil Engineering and Eledbical Engineering, 
whose requirements and lines of work offered are set forth under 
Courses of Study. 

Candidates for degrees are required to make an ele<5tion of one of 
these courses, and will not be allowed, without permission, to change 
the ele<5led course, nor to take less or more than fifteen hours of ledl- 
ures or recitations per week, except as required by the program. 

The President, Dean, and members of the Faculty are glad to advise 
with students as to courses and the choice and grouping of eledlive 
studies. 

Students not candidates for graduation, on complying with the terms 
of admission, will be allowed to seledl their studies under the diredUon 
of the Faculty. 

Persons over twenty-one years of age, not candidates for a degree, 
may be admitted to special studies, without examination, at the discre- 
tion of the Faculty. 

Resident Gradnates. — Graduates of this University and of other Col- 
1^^ and Universities in good standing, are admitted without exam- 
ination, whether candidates for advanced degrees or not, on application 
to the President or Dean. Graduate courses are set forth under the 
proper heading. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class in any of the Col- 
legiate courses must be at least sixteen years of age, and must, by 
examination or by presenting acceptable certificates, furnish evidence 
of having completed the preparatory requirements. 

No one will be admitted whose deficiencies exceed the equivalent of 
four credits; a preparatory credit is the equivalent of one study daily 
for a term of twelve weeks, on the basis of three studies a day in the 
preparatory schools. Candidates having deficiencies not exceeding 
this limit may be admitted upon condition that they complete their 
preparation within the first year after admission. 

It is expedled that the following work will be completed in the 
grammar school: Practical Arithmetic, Reading, Penmanship, Orthog- 
raphy, English Grammar, Geography, Book-keeping (single entr>'), 
Physiology, (the statutory requirements for primary and grammar 
schools). United States History (three terms* work). Civil Government 
(one term's work). Composition (three terms* work), Drawing (three 
terms* work). 

The work in Book-keeping, Composition, Drawing, and Civil Gov- 
ernment is not to be considered as absolutely required, but only work 
in excess of the amount named in this paragraph will receive credit as 
preparatory work. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

GROUP I.— ANCIENT I^ANGUAGES. 

z. Latin. Grammar, Csesar (four books), Cicero (six orations), 
Veigil (six books) with Prosody. 

Instead of the prescribed Csesar an equivalent amotmt of Viri Ronue 
or Nepos will be accepted and is recommended to the preparatory 
schools. In this case the remainder of the requirements may be offered 
in Csesar or Cicero. It is expe<£led that three or four of the six required 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 17 

orations of Cicero (the Catiline orations being taken as the standard 
of length) will be read thoroughly and the remainder rapidly with a 
view to securing facility in translation. Equivalents in kind will be 
accepted for any part of the specified requirements. An accurate and 
ready knowledge of grammatical /or9ns and constru£lion and a good 
vocabulary are of essential importance. Sight reading should be 
taught and pra<^iced from the first. 

Exercise in writing Latin, based upon the current reading, ought to 
be carried through the entire preparatory course. An amount equiva- 
lent to Collar, Part m, is required for admission. 

Pour years of daily recitation are needed for the required prepara- 
tion. 

The Roman prontmciation is used in the University. 

a. Greek. Grammar, Xenophon's Anabasis. As few high schools 
meet this requirement, the University for the present will provide 
means for fulfilling it, and an equivalent of three terms* work from 
Group rV may be offered. 

The preparatory work in Greek should give thorough knowledge of 
grammatical forms, familiarity with the common rules of S3mtax and 
the ability to write simple Greek prose with correal accents. It is not 
expe<^ed that high school pupils under ordinary circumstances will be 
able, in a single year, to cover thoroughly the work required for admis- 
sion. 

GROUP n.— MATHEMATICS. 

3. Algebra. The Algebra of the high school should comprise a 
careful study of the following topics: signs and symbols; fundamental 
operations; factoring (including lowest common multiple and highest 
common divisor) ; fra<5Uons; simple and quadratic equations; theory of 
exponents (including negative and fradlional exponents and radicals) ; 
progressions. Especial attention should be given to such salient points 
as the significance of the minus sign, fa<5loring, theory of exponents, 
equations, and the ability to state readily algebraic problems. The 
interpretation of algebraic results with their graphical representation 
should be introduced at the earliest possible stage and constantly 
insisted upon. 

4. Geoniftryp Both plane and solid geometry are required. The 



18 STATE UOTVERSrrY OF IOWA. 

'* Heuristic *' method in beginning the study of geometry is strongly 
recommended (See Hopkins' Manual of Plane Geometry, D. C. Heath 
& Co., and Spencer's Inventional Geometry, D. Appleton & Co). 

Whatever method is used the pupil should be provided with adequate 
drawing instruments and should construct and verify all of his propo- 
sitions and theorems. Geometric processes and results should be 
expressed by algebraic 83rmbols whenever possible. Original investi- 
gations should not simply be encouraged, but should be insisted upon 
as a matter of course. The eminently pra<Stical side of the study of 
geometry shotdd not be lost sight of, but the work should be so arranged 
that it may be of the highest disciplinary value. The language of all 
geometrical exercises should be exadl. 

Arithtnetic, The work in arithmetic should in general be completed 
in the grammar grades. At least one term's work in arithmetic may 
be done with great profit in the high school after the completion of 
the required work in algebra and geometry. Not only will a general 
review of the subjedi be found beneficial in itself, but the higher point 
of view now attainable may be taken advantage of in many ways which 
it is not necessary to enumerate. 

In the high school not less than one-fourth of the time for three 
years should be devoted to the work in algebra and geometry. It is 
desirable that the high school work in mathematics be not finished 
until the end of the course, in order that there may be no break in the 
continuity of the work between the high school and the University. 

GROUP in.— ENGLISH AND HISTORY. 

5 . English Composition. All applicants for admission whether from 
accepted schools or not will be examined to test their ability to write 
clear and corred^ English. The applicant will be required to write an 
essay of not less than two hundred words upon a subject chosen by 
himself from a considerable number set before him. No applicant will 
be accepted who is deficient in spelling, pim^uation, sentence, and 
paragpraph stmdture. 

The teacher is reminded that the proper preparation for this part of 
the requirement is constant pra<5lice in writing, with careful corredtion 
and revision of themes. A pcut of the time should be devoted to the 
study of composition in any good text-book, such as Lewis's First Book 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 19 

in Writing (Macmillan) or Scott & Denney's Paragraph Writing 
(Allyn & Bacon). 

6. Snglish Literature. Throughout the high school course much 
attention should be paid to the study of literature, by which is meant 
not merely the study of a manual on the history of literature but a 
careful, sympathetic study of literature itself in the writings of repre- 
sentative authors. Entire masterpieces suited to the attainments of the 
class should form the basis of recitations and an equal amount of col- 
lateral reading should be assigned and written reports required. 

During the last year of the course a good outline history of the liter- 
ature should be used, such as Brooke's Primer of English Literature 
(The Macmillan Co. ) or Pancoast's Introdudtion to English Literature 
(Holt & Co.) This should always, however, be subordinated to the 
study of the texts themselves. In the study of literatmre the student 
should be stimulated and trained not merely to read and enjoy but to 
anal3rze the style and to absorb the spirit and substance of an author. 

The applicant will be expected to be familiar with all the works 
in the following list or with their equivalents: 

For 1899; Shakespere's As You Like It, Irving's Sketch Book, De 
Quincey*8 English Mail Coach, Scott's Marmion, LongfeUow's Evan- 
geline, George Eliot's Silas Mamer, Tenn3rson's Idylls of the King. 

For 1900; Shakespere's Macbeth, Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I 
and II, the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the SpeBaiar^ Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner, Carlyle's Essay on Bums, Shelley's Defence of 
Poetry, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, Lowell's Vision 
of Sir Launfal. 

7. History. At least four terms' work shotdd be presented in his- 
toty. The course of study and available text-books should be some- 
what as follows: first and second terms. History of Greece (Oman, 
Smith, Cox or Myers) and Rome (Allen, Leighton, Smith or Myers) ; 
third term, History of England (Montgomery or Gardiner); fourth 
term. The History of the United States (Channing, Thomas, Fiske, 
Johnson, Montgomery or McMaster) or Civil Government (Piske's 
Civil Government or Andrews's Manual of the Constitution). 

' Instead of the first three terms' work in history indicated above, 
which is preferred, the University will accept for the present three 
terms' work in general history from one of the following text-books: 
Myers, Fisher, Breeman or Swinton. 



20 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

GROUP IV.— ELECTIVE. 

Three terms' work, and if Greek is not offered six terms* work, are 
to be seledled in science or in a modem language. 

8. Science. The subjects are arranged in the order of preference: 
physics, botany, physical geography, physiology, drawing or book- 
keeping, economics, chemistry, astronomy, zoology, geology. 

Credit for entrance will not be allowed on these subje<5ls for less 
than two terms in each, except that one, or one and one-half terms, 
may be allowed in botany, phjrsiolpgy, physical geography and draw- 
ing or book-keeping, and one term in astronomy, geology and 
economics. In no case should more than two sciences be taken up for 
consecutive study in a single year; and whenever possible three terms 
of consecutive work in one science are advised, especially in ph3rsics. 

9. German. A full year in German may be indicated by Joynes- 
Meissner*s German Grammar, Parts I and III, about fifty pages 
selected from Joynes's German Reader (D. C. Heath & Co.), all of 
Storm's Immensee (Henry Holt & Co.) and Riehl's Bui^ Neideck 
(Ginn & Co). 

xo. French. Van Daell's Introdu^on to the French Language or 
Edgren's French Grammar, and Van Daell's Introdudlion to French 
Authors or Super's French Reader will be accepted as an equivalent of 
a year's work in French. 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE A. 

The requirements for admission to this course are the same as for 
the Classical Course, except that one year of German or French, or one 
year of additional science may be substituted for Greek as provided 
for in Group IV. 

PHILOSOPHICAL B, SCIENTIFIC, AND ENGINEER- 
ING COURSES. 

Preparation in all respedls the same as that offered for the Cla«tcal 
Course will be accepted for the Philosophical B, Scientific, and Engi- 
neering Courses. 

In place, however, of the twelve terms' work in ancient languages 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 21 

required for admission to the Classical Course, candidates for admission 
to the courses above named may offer as substitutes six terms' work in 
foreign language and six terms* work in science. The requirements 
in foreign language may be satisfied by (i) two years in Latin; (2) two 
years in German; or (3) two years in French; but not by a single year 
in each of two languages, nor by f radHons of years in different lan- 
guages, though the time spent in foreign language study may amount 
to two years in the aggregate. 

Two years in foreign language is a minimum language requirement 
for admission to these courses; but nine terms of foreign language and 
three terms of science, or twelve terms of foreign language alone, will 
be acceptable substitutes for the twelve terms of ancient languages 
required for admission to the Classical Course; provided that not less 
than two years have been given to some one language, and not less 
than one year to each additional language that may be offered. 

Work in science may be selecEled from the subjedU named in Group 
rV, sedtion 8. When the maximum amount of six terms is to be offered 
candidates are advised, if it be practicable, to spend one year on 
physics, and one half year on each of two subjedls seledled from the 
following list: botany, physical geography (Davis), physiology, draw- 
ing, and book-keeping. 

Excepting the ancient languages, as above noted, all other require- 
ments for admission to the Classical Course must be fully met by can- 
didates for admission to the Philosophical B, Scientific, and Engineering 
Courses. 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 

1. It is strongly advised that preparatory work be confined to few 
subjedls and that they be so chosen that they form two or three groups 
of closely related subjects. 

2. Subtitutes of real equivalents not affecting the absolute require- 
ments respecting foreign languages, mathematics, English, and his- 
tory, will be allowed for the purpose of adapting the University re- 
quirements to the means and needs of the several preparatory schools. 

3. It is assumed that, under ordinary circumstances, four years in 
the high school will be devoted to meet the requirements for admission 
here prescribed. 



22 STATEIUNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

4. Students who are admitted with conditions can make them np 
in the Iowa City Academy or under the direction of a private tutor 
approved by the Faculty. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE- 

The Board of Regents has adopted the following plan for the exam- 
ination of high school pupils and for general high school inspection: 

1. Any school may be placed upon the accredited list upon appli- 
cation of its principal or board of directors, provided the Collegiate 
Faculty of the University is satisfied as to its (a) course of study, (d) 
methods of teaching, {c) facilities for instruction. 

2. The course of study of such schools must be adapted for fitting 
its graduates for one or more of the collegiate courses of the Univer- 
sity, or it must be in the diredl line of such preparation. 

3. Whenever any accredited or other school requests it, its pupils 
may be examined by the University at a convenient time in any subject 
or subjects selected by the school authorities from the schedules of 
studies required for admission to the University, and each pupil will 
receive from the University a credit card for each subjeCl passed. 

4. The University shall provide for schools desiring the same, a 
syllabus of each of the subje<5ts in which examination is to be taken. 

5. All accredited schools shall be inspedled at the pleasure of the 
University, the expense of the inspection to be borne by the Univer- 
sity. 

6. The authorities of accredited schools should report annually to 
the University all changes made in the course of study and submit a 
list of names of the instructors employed in the high school with sub- 
jects taught by each. 

The following revised rules governing the accrediting of schools 
have been adopted by the Collegiate Faculty, and are now in force. 
The attention of the authorities of accredited schools is called to the 
revised rules in order that they may make such changes in their 
courses of study and in their plans of work as will enable them fully 
to conform to the rules. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 28 

RULES GOVERNING THE ACCREDITING OF 

HIGH SCHOOLS. 

High schools meetmg the following conditions may, at the option 
of the Collegiate Faculty, be accredited as making full preparation for 
one or more of the University courses: 

1. The course of study should be not less than four years of thirty- 
six weeks each in length, following an elementary course not less than 
eight years in length. 

2. The course of study should require of each pupil not more than 
four recitations daily. 

3. The entire time of at least two teachers should be given to 
instrudbion in high school branches. 

4. The quality of the instrudlion given and the chara<Sler of the 
text-books used should be approved by the Faculty. 

5. Schools seeking considerable credit in science shotdd demonstrate 
their ability to do successful laboratory work. 

6. Schools seeking considerable credit in history and English should 
give evidence of a special library equipment for these branches. 

Private academies, seminaries, normal schools or other secondary 
scliools meeting the conditions mentioned above, or their equivalent, 
may be accepted on the same basis as high schools. 

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS. 

All candidates for admission to the Freshman class, who come from 
accredited schools, must furnish to the University certificates con- 
taining specific statements as to the amount of work done in e<uh study. 
Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the President, 
and should be returned by September ist. 

There are doubtless other schools which are entitled to places on 
one or other of these lists, but because they have not furnished the 
data necessary to enable the University authorities to come to a safe 
conclusion in regard to their proper places in the lists, or because they 
have not signified a desire to come into accredited relations with the 
University, they are for the present omitted, without prejudice. Stu- 
dents presenting themselves from secondary schools, not included in 
the list of accredited schools, will be admitted only upon examination. 



24 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



The following schools have been accredited by the Collegiate Faculty 
of the University as making full preparation for one or more of the 
courses of the Collegiate Department. 



HIGH SCHOOI^ 

Ackley, 

Adel, 

Albia, 

Algona, 

Ames, 

Anamosa, 

Atlantic, 

Bedford, 

Boone, 

Brooklyn, 

Burlington, 

Carroll, 

Cedar Falls, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Centerville, 

Charles City, 

Cherokee, 

Oarinda, 

Clinton, 

Columbus Jun(5lion, 

Council Bltiffs, 

Coming, 

Creston, 

Cresco, 

Davenport, 

Decorah, 

Denison, 

Des Moines, B., 

Des Moines, N., 

Des Moines, W., 

Dubuque, 

Eagle Grove, 

Eldora, 



PRINCIPAI,. 

Supt. a&a, 
Supt. a(Sts, 
Maicy Schreiner, 
Minnie Coale, 
Supt. adb, 
Maude Humphrey, 
C. M. Cole, 
Eveljm Miller, 
Alice Bradrick, 
Supt. adls, 
E. Poppe, 
Chas. E. Blodgett, 
Supt. adls, 
Abbie S. Abbott, 
Janet Wilson, 
^ovinia Marsh, 
Rodney M. Arey, 
Supt. adb, 
E. L. Mason, 
Supt. adls, 
W. N. Clifford, 
Supt. a<5ls, 
T. R. Amlie, 
Supt. adls, 
W. D. WeUs, 
Supt. a<Sis, 
G. W. Lee, 

E. H. White, 
Arthur W. Brett, 
W. O. Ridden, 

F. L. Smart, 
Supt. adb, 
Henrietta Holmes, 



SUPBRINTBNDBMT. 

O. W. Maxwell. 

C. R. Aumer. 

H. C. HoUingsworth. 

N. Spencer. 

E. D. Y. Culbertson. 

A. Palmer. 

William Wilcox. 

E. H. Griffin. 
Geo. I. Miller. 
Fred S. Robinson. 
Chas. R. Shelton. 

C. C. Magee. 

O. J. Laylander. 
J. T. Merrill. 

F. E. King. 

G. S. Dick. 
A. V. Stover. 
G. W. Fisher. 
O. P. Bostwick. 

D. R. Michener. 
H. B. Hayden. 

D. M. Kelly. 
O. E. French. 
L. E. A. Ling. 
J. B. Young. 

E. A. Parks. 
H. V. Failor. 
Amos Hiatt. 

F. A. Lacey 
F. B. Cooper. 
F. T. Oldt. 

J. G. Grundy. 
W. A. Doron. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



26 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Emmetsbiirg, 

Estherville, 

Paixfield, 

Forest City, 

Fort Dodge, 

Port Madison, 

Geneseo, 111., 

Glenwood, 

Greene, 

Greenfield, 

Guthrie Center, 

Guthrie County, 

Hambui;g, 

Hampton, 

Harlan, 

Ida Grove, 

Independence, 

Iowa City, 

Iowa Falls, 

Jefferson, 

Keokuk, 

Knoxville, 

LeMars, 

Leon, 

Lyons, 

Manchester, 

Maquoketa, 

Marengo, 

Marion, 

Marshalltown, 

Mason City, 

McGregor, 

Missouri Valley, 

Moline, 111., 

Monteacuma, 

Mt. Ayr, 



FRINCIPAI,. 

H. C. Richardson, 
Inez Myers, 
A. B. Goss, 
Supt. a<^, 
W. H. WUcox, 
J. W. McCulloch, 

Supt. a<5ls, 
Supt. a<5ls, 
Supt. a6b, 
Supt. adb, 

Supt. adb, 
Lenna Prater, 
Alice Sudlow, 
E. T. Sheppard, 
Clara M. Travis, 
P. C. Ensign, 
Mrs. A. L. Burdick, 
Mrs. E. B. Wilson, 
G. E. Marshall, 
H. E. Simpson, 
Jennette Carpenter, 
Supt. a<Sis, 
Supt. adb. 
A. E. Rigby, 
Supt. adis, 
Supt. a<Sb, 
L. H. Marshall, 
C. C. Carstens, 
WUliam Ege, 
Supt. adls, 
Emma C. DeGroff, 

Ida McKee, 
Supt. adis, 



SUPBRINTSNDBNT. 

H. E. Blackmar. 
C. C. Stover. 
J. E. Williamson. 
J. D. Stout. 
P. C. Wildes. 
C. W. Cruikshank. 
M. P. Miller. 
Jessie G. Nutting. 
J. R. Jamison. 
P. E. Palmer. 
Adam Pickett. 
P. E. Lenocker. 
J. C. King. 
G. A. Bateman. 
E. S. White. 
T. B. Hutton. 
J. L. Buechele. 
S. K. Stevenson. 
L. Hezzelwood. 
L. B. Carlisle. 
O. W. Weyer. 
Harlan Updegraff. 
E. N. Coleman. 
S. L. Darrah. 
O. H. Brainerd. 
R. W. Wood. 
C. C. Dudley. 
C. H. Carson. 
J. J. Dofflemeyer. 
P. E. Willard. 
A. R. Sale. 
P. N. WUlard. 
A. B. Warner. 
H. M. Slauson. 
Bruce Francis. 
L. H. Maus. 



2B 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



HIGH SCHOOI,. 

Muscatine, 

Nevada, 

New Hampton, 

Newton, 

Osage, 

Osceola, 

Oskaloosa, 

Ottumwa, 

Parkersbuig, 

Peny, 

Red Oak, 

Reinbeck, 

Rockford, 

Rock Rapids, 

Sanborn, 

Sheldon, 

Shenandoah, 

Sibley, 

Sigoumey, 

Sioux City, 

Spencer, 

Storm Lake, 

Stuart, 

Taylorville Tp., 

Tipton, 

Traer, 

Villisca, 

Vinton, 

Washington, 

Waterloo, E., 

Waterloo, W., 

Waukon, 

Waverly, 

Webster City, 

West Liberty, 

Williamsburg, 



PRINCIPAX,. 

E. P. Schall, 
Supt. adts, 
Blanche K. Perry, 
Supt. a6ls, 
Sadie M. Bold, 
Viola M. Waid, 
O. E. Dixon, 
Owen Griffiths, 
Supt. adts, 
Florence Zerwekh, 

E. U. GraflF, 
Supt. a<^, 

J. C. Sanders, 
Ida Fesenbeck, 
May Kennedy, 
Nellie Jones, 
Lizzie Marley, 
Supt. a6U, 
A. M. Bean, 
W. A. TumbuU, 

F. E. Trigg, 
Clara R. Bamber, 
C. F. Wright, 

Taylorville, 111., 
Supt. adls, 
Supt. a<5ls, 
Stella Westcott, 
Katherine Cunningham, 
Mattie E. Emry, 
Lydia Hinman, 
Amy Boggs, 
Supt. adts, 
Supt. a(^, 
Wilber Sparks, 
Supt. acts, 
Supt. a<5ls, 



SUPERINTSNDBNT. 

F. M. Witter. 
H. G. Lamson. 

D. A. Thomburg. 

E. J. H. Beard. 
George Chandler. 
I. N. Beard. 

S. J. Finley. 
A. W. Stuart. 
W. F. Barr. 
L. A. Blezek. 
W. F. Chevalier. 
J. L. Mishler. 
J. C. Wilson. 
W. S. Wilson. 
J. J. Billingsly. 
W. I. Simpson. 
O. E. Smith. 
W. P. Johnson. 
J. M. Davis. 
H. E. Kratz. 
Carrie B. Parker. 
J. H. 0*Donoghue. 

G. W. Bryan. 
W. E. Andrews. 
W. L. Etter. 

O. M. Elliott. 
C. C. Williamson. 
H. C. Waddle. 
G. H. MuUin. 

F. J. Sessions. 
S. H. Sheakley. 
E. L. CofFeen. 
A. W. Merrill. 

C. W. Martindale. 
L. T. Hill. 
A. T. Hukill. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



27 



OTHER 6CHOOI3. 

Cedar Valley Seminary, Osage, 
Charles City College, 
Decorah Institute, 
Denison Normal School, 

Dexter Normal College, 

Epworth Seminary, 

Howe's Academy, Mt. Pleasant, 

Iowa City Academy, 

Michigan Military Academy, Orchard 

Sac City Institnte, 

Urbana-Shrader Academy, Urbana, 

Washington Academy, 

Whittier College, 

Wilton German-English College, 

Woodbine Normal School, 



{ 



PRINCIPAI, OR PRBSIDBNT. 

Alonzo Abemethy. 
J. F. Hirsch. 
J. Breckenridge. 
W. C. Van Ness. 

A. G. Smith. 

D. P. Repass. 
Frank G. Barnes. 
S. C. Howe. 
W. A. Willis. 
Lake, Mich., J. Sumner Rogers. 
Walter Guthridge. 
Mrs. J. S. Wilson. 
C. M. Grumbling. 
W. N. Halsey. 
J. F. Grove. 

M. A. Reed. 
H. A. Kinney. 



{ 



The work done in the schools named below is regarded as of suffi- 
cient merit to entitle them to recognition by the University. 

Properly certified work from these schools will therefore be received 
so far as this work meets the preparatory requirements of the Univer- 
sity. 

HIGH SCHOOlr. PRINCIPAL. 

Adair, E. R. Neptune. 

AUerton, J. F. Holliday. 

Anita, F. B. Lawrence. 

Audubon, F. P. Hocker. 

Avoca, J. Peasley. 

Bloomfield, Will Fortune. 

Brighton, J. E. Vance. 

Britt, A. M. Deyoe. 

Chariton, S. M. Cart. 

Charter Oak, C. F. Garrett. 

Clarence, J. H. Morgan. 

Clarion, S. T. May. 



28 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



HIGH SCHOOI3. 

Clearfield, 

Clear I^e, 

Colfax, 

Corredlionville, 

Corydon, 

DeWitt, 

Dysart, 

Eldon, 

Elkader, 

Exira, 

Fayette, 

Fonda, 

Fontanelle, 

Gamer, 

Glidden, 

Grundy Center, 

Holstein, 

Hubbard, 

Keosauqua, 

Kingsley, 

I^ke Mills, 

Manning, 

Mechanicsville, 

Milton, 

Monticello, 

Morning Sun, 

Moulton, 

Mt. Pleasant, 

Nashua, 

Neola, 

North English, 

Northwood, 

Oak Park, Des Moines, 

Odebolt, 

Oelwein, 

Orange City, 



PRIKCIPAI,. 

H. S. Ash. 

D. H. Campbell. 
S. A. Power. 

T. B. Morris. 
Charles Carter. 
Mai^aret Buchanan. 
H. O. Bateman. 

E. C. Mills. 
J. E. Webb. 
W. H. Fort. 

F. E. Finch. 
R. B. Crone. 
C. C. Smith. 
J. F. Doderer. 
J. H. Beveridge. 
J. E. Stout. 

E. P. Bettenga. 
W. O. Reed. 
David Williams. 
Frank Jarvis. 
O. O. Vogenitz. 
W. H. Reever. 
Clarence McCracken. 

F. E. Buck. 

C. R. Scroggie. 
A. M. M. Domon. 
E. B. Rossiter. 
S. T. Walker. 
C. J. Trumbauer. 
O. J. McManus. 
E. H. McMillan. 
E. M. MitcheU. 

G. W. Hanna. 

C. H. Kamphoefner. 
L. B. Moffett. 
O. W. Herr. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 



29 



HIGH SCHOOI«. 

Riceville, 

Richland, 

Rolfe, 

Sac City, 

Shelby, 

Shell Rock, 

Sioux Rapids, 

Springdale, 

Springville, 

State Center, 

Tama City, 

Victor, 

Wapello, 

West Union, 

Wilton, 

Hawarden Normal School, 

Nora Springs Seminary, 

St. Ansgar Seminary, 



PRINCIPAI,. 
P. M. Ray. 
W. C. Pidgeon. 
A. T. Rutledge. 
J. N. Hamilton. 
C. S. Cobb. 
C. E. Buckley. 
P. L. Dorland. 
S. B. Stonerook, Jr. 
S. S. Milligan. 
J. E. Clayton. 
C. E. Locke. 
W. H. Whitford. 
J. W. Cradler. 
G. E. Finch. 
P. A. McMillen. 
C. H. Brake. 
H. A. Dwelle. 
J. O. Sethre. 



ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from approved colleges bringing certificates of work and 
standing will be admitted without examination. In determining 
their position in the University, however, the value of the work done 
will be measured by the University standards. 

Students coming from colleges whose requirements for admission 
are substantially those of the University will be admitted ordinarily 
to equal rank, provided they enter not later than the beginning of 
the Senior year. In every instance at least one year's work in resi- 
dence must be completed in the Collegiate Department of the Univer- 
sity. The assignment of studies shall be at the discretion of the 
Faculty. 

Graduates of the four years* course of the Iowa State Normal School 
will be admitted to Junior standing without examination, and will be 
required to spend two years at the University before receiving a de- 
gree. Graduates of the three years' course will be admitted to Sopho- 
more standing and will be required to spend three years in residence . 



UNDERGRADUATE COURSES. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 
Freshman Tmt. fai^i,. winter. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

Greek 5 5 5 

Latin 4 4 4 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 
Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 
Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 1 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

French or German 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Eledlive 8 8 8 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Junior Year. 

Ele<ftive ... 15 ^5 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Tear. 

EleAive 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in 
this course. 

PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE A. 
Freshman Tear. fai^i,. winter. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

German or French 5 5 5 

Latin 4 4 4 

English 2 2 2 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 81 

FAIX. WINTSR. SPRING. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 

Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 

Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 1 3 

Sophomore Tear. 

French or German .... 3 3 3 

Latin, German or French . 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

EloStive 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Junior Year. 

Philosophy 2 or 3 2 or 3 2 or 3 

EleAive 12 or 13 .... 12 or 13 .... 12 or 13 

MUitary Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Year. 

ElcAive 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in 
this course. 

PHILrOSOPHICAL COURSE B. 
Freshman Year. pai^i,. wintsr. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

Gcnnan 5 5 5 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

or 

Mathematics 3 3 3 

and 

Ancient History 2 2 2 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Year. 

German 3 3 3 

English 2 2 2 



32 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

FAI,!,. WINTER. SPRING. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

Latin or French 5 5 5 

Elective 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Junior Tear. 

Ele<5live 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Year. 

EleAive 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Condition: — ^Three terms of material science must be taken in 
this course. In the Junior and Senior years a tnajor, the equivalent 
of not less than three hours extending through two years, and a kin- 
dred minor of not less than three hours extending through one year, 
must be taken. Each student may sele<5l his own major, but in the 
sele<Slion of his minor he must seek the advice of the professor in 
charge of the major, or of a committee of the Faculty. Students 
enttrinz this course on the terms prescribed for admission to the Scien- 
tific Course^ but without the full Latin requirements for entrance to 
Philosophical Course A, must complete them after entrance j and the 
University will temporarily provide for instru^ion in Cicero* 5 Ora- 
tionSf and Ver^iL This provision is made solely in the interest of 
considerable numbers of high school graduates whose course has not 
furnished the opportunity for fulfilling these requirements. 

GENERAI, SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 
Freshman Year. pai«i,. wintbr. spring. 

Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 

German or French 5 5 5 

Mathematics 5 5 5 

English 2 2 2 

Drawing 3 3 3 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Sophomore Year. 

German or French .... 5 or 3 5 or 3 5 or 3 



COLI/EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 88 

FAI,!,. WINTER. SPRING. 
Hours a week. Hours a week. Hours a week. 
English 2 2 2 

Physics 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy, Geology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics, or Astron- 
omy 5 5 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Jimior Tear. 

German or French .... 3 or 5 3 or 5 3 or 5 

Chemistry 5 5 5 

Botany, Zoology, Morphol- 
ogy or Geology 5 5 5 

Eledlivc 3 or 5 3 or 5 3 or 5 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

Senior Tear. 

EleAive 15 15 15 

Military Drill 3 i 3 

No substitution whatever is allowed for any of the required work of 
the Scientific Course, except that, in place of the full requirement in 
either one of the modem languages, there may be offered an equiva- 
lent amount of Latin of collegiate grade, 

SPECIAL COURSES IN SCIENCE. 

The student who wishes, in his undergraduate course, to specialize 
in some particular line of scientific study, should at the beginning of 
the Sophomore year choose from the group of alternate eledtives then 
open to him (Botany, Zoology, Morphology, Geology* Chemistry, 
Mathematics and Astronomy) that subject most dire^y connedled 
with the branch to which he wishes to give special attention. He will 
thus be able to pursue his chosen study without interruption through 
three years of his course, the last year of which may, if he so choose, 
be devoted entirely to his specialty. 

Such extreme specialization is not recommended to undergraduate 
students, it being the opinion of the Collegiate Faculty that a better 
preparation for a scientific career will be afforded by a broader and 



34 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

more liberal course of study. However, those yrishing to specialize in 
any branch of science are urged to confer freely with the professors 
with whom they expe<5l to pursue such study. 

Unless excused by the Faculty, each student pursuing a special 
course in science will be required in his Senior year to prepare a thesis 
upon some subjedl approved by the professor in charge of his specialty, 
such thesis to represent an amount of work entitling the writer to at 
least two credits. 

COMBINED SCIENTIFIC AND MEDICAI, COURSE. 

1. Students who pursue the General Scientific Course and complete 
not less than two years of biologic science, and in the third year 
choose as one eledlive anatomy and dissecSlion in the Medical Depart- 
ment, and in the fourth year two eledlives in the Medical Department, 
of which anatomy and physiology shall be one, may receive credit for 
the first two years of the regular course in Medicine, provided also 
that such students complete at least two ele6lives in the Collegiate 
Department in the spring terms of the fifth and sixth years. 

2. Students who at the outset declare their intention of pursuing a 
combined Collegiate and Medical Course, may in the General Scien- 
tific Course offer instead of German, two years* work in Latin. 

3. The degree of B. S. shall be conferred in June of the sixth year. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING- 

PRKSHMAN YBAR. 

Fall Term, — French or German,* s.f Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 
Drawing, 3. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 3. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — French or German, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 3. Military Drill, 3. 

SOPHOMORB YEAR. 

Fall 7>rw.— German or English,* 3. Mathematics, 5. Surveying, 
5. Physics, 5. Military Drill, 3. 



* Note.— Sec Courses of Instni<5iion in Civil EnffineerinflT for Kquirement in 
language. 

t Note. —The numerals mean hours a week. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 86 

Winter Term, — German or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geometry, 2. Mapping, 3. Physics, 5. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — German or English, 3. Mathematics, 5. Descrip- 
tive Geometry, 2. Topographical Surveying, 3. Physics, 5. Mili- 
tary Drill, 3. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term, — Eledlricity and Magnetism, 5. Analytical Mechanics, 

2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 3. Railroad Curves, 3. 
Steam Engine, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Dynamo and Motor, 3. Resistance of Materials, 2. 
Analytical Mechanics, 2. Applied Mechanics, 3. Graphical Statics, 

3. Theory of Stresses, 3. Limes and Cements, 2. Military Drill, i. 
Spring Term, — ^Thermodynamics, 3. Hydraulics, 5. Graphical 

Statics, 4. Theory of Stresses, 5. Military Drill, 3. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Chemistry, 5. Sanitary Engineering, 2. Structural 
Designing, 4. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 4. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — Chemistry, 5. Sanitary Engineering, 2. Stru^ural 
Designing, 3. Laboratory, 2. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 3. 
Military Drill, i. 

gyring Term, — Water Supply Engineering, 3. Specifications and 
Contrails, 3. Geology, 2. Civil Engineering, 3. Laboratory, 2. 
Strudlural Designing, 3. Thesis. Military Drill, 3. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term, — German or French, 5.t Mathematics, 5. English, 2. 

Drawing, 3. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term, — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 
2. Drawing, 3. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — German or French, 5. Mathematics, 5. English, 

2. Drawing, 3. Military Drill, 3, 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term, — French or German, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
English, 2. Military Drill, 3. 



t Note.— The oumcrahi mean hours a week. 



36 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Winter 7>rw.— Ft«ich or Gemun, 5. Physics, 5. Mathematics, 
5. English, 2. Military Drill, i. 

Spring 7>rwi.— French or German, 5. Ph3rsic8, 5. Mathematics, 5. 
English, 2. MUitary Drill, 3. 

JUNIOR YBAR. 

Fall 7>rw.— Physics: ledbires, i, laboratory, 4. Chemistry, 5. 
Analytical Mechanics, 3. Applied Mechanics, 2. Shop-work, 2. 
Military Drill, 3, 

Winter 7<Pf7ii.— Physics: ledhires, i, laboratory, 4, Chemistry, 5. 
Anal3rtical Mechanics, 2, Applied Mechanics, 3. Shop-work, 2. 
Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term, — ^Diredl Current D3mamo, 3. Physical Laboratory, 2. 
Chemistry, 5. Differential Equations, 3. Heat and Thermodynam- 
ics, 2. Shop-work, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

SENIOR YBAR. 

Fall Term.— Theory of Ele&icity, Photometry; Ele<5bical Labora- 
tory, 10. Draughting, 3. Steam Engine, 2. Military Drill, 3. 

Winter Term. — Alternate Current Machinery, Ele^lrical Laboratory, 
10. Draughting, 3. Strength of Materials, 2. Military Drill, i. 

Spring Term. — Distribution and Transmission of EleAricity, Tele- 
graph and Telephone, Ele<5lrical Laboratory, 10. Eledbochemistry, 
5. Military Drill, 3. 

Note. — One year of German and one of French are required. 
Either may be taken during the Freshman year, to be succeeded by 
the other in the Sophomore year. Ele<Strochemistry, being given only 
during even-numbered years, will alternate with the Junior spring 
term chemistry. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES. 

For each of the courses of study leading to a bachelor's degree four 
years' work is required. 

On completion of the regular courses, or of the special couiscs 
approved by the Faculty, the following degrees are conferred: 

Bachsi^or of Arts upon those who complete the Classical Course. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 87 

Bachei^R op Phii^osophy upon those who complete the Philo- 
sophical Cottise. 

Bachbi,or op Scibncb upon those who complete the General 
Scientific Course, or either of the Engineering Courses, or a special 
course in science which has previously been approved by the Faculty. 

See Combined Scientific and Medical Course. 

The degree of Bachsi^r op Didactics is conferred upon graduates 
in the r^ular courses who have completed the required work in 
pedagogy and can show proof of two years* successful teaching after 
graduation. 

SPECIAL CERTIFICATES IN GERMAN AND 

FRENCH. 

Special Certificates as to scholarship in German or in French will be 
granted under the authority of the Collegiate Faculty on the following 
conditions: 

1. They shall be issued to students of this University on or after 
graduation only. 

2. They shall be in the nature of an authorized guaranty as to 
scholarship in German or in French. 

3. They shall be issued only after at least three years of full work 
(to represent ^i'^ hours of ledtures and recitations a week or an equiv- 
alent) in one of these subjects. 

4. Candidates must pass a final examination in the subjedt in 
which the certificate is desired. 

5. The examination must be conduced by the professor in chaige 
of the subje^, assisted by such other instrudlors as may be agreed 
upon by him and the President of the University. 

6. These certificates will be signed by the President and by the 
professor immediately concerned. 



COyRSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Professor Curribr; Assistant Professor Pottbr, Miss Hughes. 

z. Cicero and Vergil. Cicero's Orations and Veigil*sAeneid. With 
the Aeneid is given a course in mythology. For students in Course 
Philosophical B as indicated on page 32. Miss Hughes. 

Throughout the year. 

a. LiYj, CicerOy Vergil and Terence. Fall: Livy, Seledtions from 
Books I, XXI and XXII. Winter: Cicero's De Sene<ftute or De 
Amicitia and Seledled Letters, with outline of Roman Literature. 
Spring: Terence's Phormio and Vergil's Georgics II or IV. Gram- 
mar, writing Latin and sight reading during the year. Those who 
show marked proficiency in writing Latin during the fall term are 
allowed an option of easy Latin to be read under the dire<5Hon of the 
instrudlor during the winter and spring terms. Assistant Professor 
Potter and Miss Hughes. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Tu., Wed., Th., at 10, 11 and 1:30. 

3. Cicero and Horace. Fall: Cicero's Tusculan Disputations. 
Winter and spring: Horace's Odes, Satires and Epistles. This course 
is mainly occupied with the literary side of the authors studied. Pro- 
fessor Currier. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

4. Pliny and Tacitiis. Selected Letters of Pliny. Tacitus' Germania 
and Agricola. This course is principally literary and historical. As 
much attention is given to the Latinity of the Silver Age as is needful 
for the imderstanding and appreciation of the authors. Assistant 
Professor POTTER. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

5. Cicero, Quintilian and Tacitns. Fall: Cicero's De Oratore. 
Winter: Quintilian, Books X and XII. Spring: Tacitus' De Ora- 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 39 

toribus. Particular attention will be paid to literary criticisms as 
exemplified in these authors. Professor CuRRiHR. 
Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 8. 

6. Tacitus and Seneca. Pall and winter: Tacitus, selections from 
the Annals and Histories. Spring: Seneca's Morals and Letters. 
Professor Currier. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 8. 
Courses 5 and 6 are given in alternate years. 

7. Plantns. Three plays. The treatment is mainly literary with 
due attention to metres and ante-classical forms and construdtions. 
Assistant Professor PoT^SR. 

Pall term, three hours a week. 

8. Early Latin Inscriptions and Poetry. Assistant Professor Potter. 
Pall term, three hoiurs a week. 

Courses 7 and 8 are given in alternate years. 

9. Lttcretiiia and Catullus. Assistant Professor PoTTKR. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 

ID. Cicero's Letters. Advanced course. Assistant Professor Pot- 
ter. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 
Courses 9 and 10 are given in alternate years. 

XX. Juvenal and Martial. Assistant Professor Potter. 
Spring term, two hours a week. 

X3. TibnlluB and Propertius. Assistant Professor Potter. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

Courses 11 and 12 are given in alternate years. 

X3. Seminary in Caesar, Cicero and Vergil. This is intended to 
meet the needs of prospe<^ve Latin teachers and others who wish to 
gain some familiarity with the methods of original research. The 
fall term is devoted to syntactical and historical studies covering 
Caesar's Gallic War (seven books). The work of the winter term is 
mainly historical, and deals with Cicero's career as an orator. One 
half of the term is devoted to a study of the conspiracy of Catiline 
which is based laxgely on Sallust. Vergil's Aeneid complete is studied 
in the spring term mainly on the literary side. Assistant Professor 
Potter. 



40 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

14. a. d. History of Roman Literature. The reading by the class 
of seledtions from all the principal Latin writers will be supple- 
mented by informal lectures on the history of the literature. Assist- 
ant Professor Potter. 

Fall and winter terms two hours a week. 

14. c, Latin Syntax. Introdu^ion to the study of historical 
syntax. Assistant Professor PoTTBR. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

Courses 13 and 14 are given in alternate years. 

15. Roman Antiquities. A systematic study of private life and of 
legal and political Antiquities. Professor CURRIBR. 

Throughout the year, two hour a week at 2:30. 

16. Seminary in Archaeology. For 1899-1900 the subje6k will be 
the Topography and Archseology of Rome and the vicinity. Professor 
Currier. 

17. Cicero, Livy and Ovid. Sight reading of suitable selections. 
Professor CURRIBR. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. 

Courses 5 and 6 are open to students who have completed Courses 
2 and 3 or 4, and must precede the other courses offered. Course 16 is 
intended for graduate students, and Courses 5 — 17 are open to them. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND I^ITERATURE. 



ASSISTANT Professor Cali,. 

For the present a course in Goodwin's Greek Grammar, White's 
First Greek Book and Xenophon's Anabasis will be given to students 
who enter without the required preparation in Greek. 

Throughout the year, daily at 11. 

z. Zenophon, Lysias and Homer. Fall: Xenophon's Anabasis 
with written exercises based on the text read, and review of grammar. 
Winter: aeleA orations of Lysias, social customs and political insti- 
tutions. Spring: Homer's Iliad with study of Homeric times and the 
history and charadler of Greek epic poetry. 

Throughout the year, daily at 10. 



COLI/EGIATB DEPARTMENT. 41 

a. Herodotns, Plato and Demosthenes. Fall: selections from 
Herodotus. Winter: Plato's Apology with sight reading from Xeno- 
phon's Memorabilia. Spring: Demosthenes' Oration on the Crown. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

3. Greek Tragedy. Fall: Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound. Winter: 
Sophocles' Antigone. Spring: Euripides' Alcestis. With this course 
are required supplementary readings from other tragedies and reports 
on the origin, literary form, and representation of Greek tragedy. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

4. Late Greek. Fall: New Testament. Winter: Plutarch's Peri- 
des. Spring: Sudan's Dialogues. Homer's Odyssey may be substi- 
tuted for Plutarch. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

5. Greek Poetry. A course in Greek poetry through translations 
will be given to students who have no knowledge of Greek. Fall: 
epic poetry. Winter: dramatic poetry. Spring: lyric poetry. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 8. 

Course i is required of students in the Classical Course. Courses 2, 
3 and 4 are open to students who have completed Course i. 



GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Propkssor Wh^on; Mr. Sturm, Dr. EiiSTMAN. 

In the instruction in the German language the first year is spent in 
laying a broad foundation for the future work. At the beginning of 
the second year it is expedted that the student will be able to read the 
literature with some degree of appreciation, and from this time on the 
ability to understand and to appreciate the great masterpieces of Ger- 
man literature is the main objedt in view; at the same time, however, 
the origin and history of words, and the relation that the German 
language bears to the English tongue are studied and explained. But 
the courses are, as a whole, literary rather than strictiy philological or 
linguifltic. Sight-translation, translating at hearing, writing from 
didiation, and conversation, as means to a proper SprachgefueM^ form 
a part of the work. 



42 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

As stated elsewhere, an equivalent of the work required in the 
Freshman year, Course i, will be accepted, and students coming so 
prepared will be admitted, on examination, to Course 2. Course i 
represents from four to six terms of ordinary high school work. 
Courses i, 2, 3, and 4, are Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
respedtively, and must be taken in the order of the numerals. Courses 
5 and 6 are advanced courses, but are open to persons who have done 
at least i, 2, and 3, or an equivalent, and have made a high record 
during the three years. These six courses run through the entire 
collegiate year and are offered every year. 

X. Grammar and Reading. Thomas's Pra^cal German Grammar 
with constant pradlice in writing German, Storm's Immensee, Baiun- 
bach's Nicotiana, and Heyse's L*Arrabbiata. Six sediions. Mr. 
Sturm, and Dr. Eastman. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

a. Freytag, Goethe, and Schiller. Fall: Freytag's Die Joumalisten 
with a review of the grammar. Winter: Goethe's Hermann und 
Dorothea, or Egmont, and composition. Spring: Schiller's Jungfrau 
von Orleans, and composition. Four sediions. Professor Wilson, 
Mr. Sturm, and Dr. Eastman. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

3. German Authors of the Nineteenth Century, and German Lyrics. 
Fall: Scheffel's Ekkehard, and readings in German on the literature 
of the nineteenth centiu*y. Winter: Heine's Prose, and readings from 
Heine's Poetry by the instrudlor. Spring: Buchheim's Deutsche 
Lyrik, and ledlures on German verse with special reference to the 
l3^c poets studied. The work of this term is intended to give a 
general idea of the historical development of the German lyric from 
the sixteenth century to the present. Professor Wilson. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

4. Goethe, Leasing, and Hiatory of German Literature. Fall: 
Goethe's Faust, Part I, with an outline of Part II. Winter: Lessing's 
Nathan der Weise. Spring: The History of German Literature. 
This term's work gives a general view of the development of German 
literature from the earliest times to the nineteenth century, special 
attention being paid to the two classic periods of the twelfth and 



COLIvEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 48 

eighteentli centuries. Francke's Social Forces in German Literature 
is used as a text-book, which is supplemented by reports on assigned 
reading. Professor Wilson. 
Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at ii. 

5. German Semiiuiiy. For the study and discussion of the works 
of special periods or of special movements. The Faust Books, Mar- 
lowe's Faustus, Goethe's Faust, and the Romantic School are some of 
the subjedls that have been studied. This course is primarily for 
graduate and advanced students. Admission by personal application. 
The course counts as a half credit each term. When the majority of 
applicants so ele(5l, this work may be made a course in Advanced 
German Composition. Professor W1130N. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

6. Middle High German. Fall: Otis's Introdu(5tion to Middle High 
German, including the seledlions from the Nibelimgenlied, and Paul's 
Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik. Winter: seledlions from Hartmann 
von Aue's Der arme Heinrich. Spring: Middle High German lyric 
poetry, principally the poems of Walther von der Vogelweide. This 
course is primarily for graduate and advanced students, especially 
those who expedl to teach German. Professor WII^SON. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 10. 

Special Certificates as to scholarship in German are granted on or 
after graduation on conditions stated elsewhere in this Catalogue. 
The minimum amount of work reqiured for such certificates is repre- 
sented by Courses i, 2, 3, and two chosen from 4, 5, and 6, but it is 
recommended that candidates make preparation in all these Courses. 

For additional courses in German see under the head of Courses of 
Study for Graduates. 



FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Profbssor Van Stbendb&Bn; Mr. Parnsworth. 

I. Elementary French. Grammar, reading, composition and con- 
versation: French Grammar, Joynes's Fairy Tales, I^ewis's Michel 



44 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

Strogoff, Fontaine's Led^ures Conrantes, Herdler's Scientific Reader. 
Pour se<5tions. Mr. Parnsworth, and Professor Van Stskmdb&BN. 
Throughout the year, daily. 

a. French Composition. Written and spoken composition. Grand- 
gent's Prench Composition and M6thode Berlitz, Part 11. Two 
se<5lions. Professor Van ST9BN09RSN, and Mr. Parnsworth. 

Pall term, Mon., Wed., Pri. 

3. Intermediate French. Reading and composition. Dumas' Les 
Trois Mousquetaires, Vidior Hugo's Hemani and Les Misdrables. 
Grandgent's Composition continued. Two sedUons. Professor Van 
Stbbndsrbn, and Mr. Parnsworth. 

Winter and spring terms, Mon., Wed., Pri. 

4. History of French Literature. A reading course with ledtures, 
recommended to be taken with courses 2 and 3. Aubert's Litt^rature 
Pran^aise, Montaigne's De 1' Institution des Enfans. Professor Vak 
Stbbndrrbn. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th. 

5. Modem French Authors. Each student reads and paraphrases 
about six representative works by different authors. The University 
library provides these works. Portier's Sept Grands Auteurs du 
XlXcSi^cle and Mell6's Contemporary Prench Writers. Professor 
Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Pall and winter terms, Mon., Wed. 

6. Advanced French Composition and Syntax. Leune's Difficult 
Modem Prench. Pree composition on subjedbs assigned. Professor 
Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed. 

7. French Classical Drama and Fables. Comeille's Le Cid and 
Horace; Racine's Athalie, Moli^re's Les Pemmes Savantes and Le 
Tartuffe, La Pontaine's Pables. Professor Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th. 

8. Seminary. Nineteenth century Prench literature. Professor 
Van Stbbndbrbn. 

Throughout the year, Tu. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 45 

9. Seminary. Seventeenth century French literature. Professor 
Van Stbbndsrbn. Tu. 
Only one of these Seminaries will be given in 1899-1900. 

ID. Spanish. Ramsey's Text-book of Modem Spanish. Ramsey's 
Elementary Spcuiish Reader. Dona Perfecta, Don Quijote. 
Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Courses 2 and 3, 5, and 6 are to be taken together. Course 10 can 
be taken only with or after course i. 

Special Certificates as to scholarship in French are granted on or 
after graduation on conditions explained elsewhere in this Catalogue. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



Phopbssor Rbsvrs; Mr. Cook, Mr. Kbi«i«y. 

The organization of the following courses has in view the study of 
English as a means of expression, as a literature, and as a language. 

The first and most important of these courses, the rhetorical, under- 
takes to enlarge and strengthen the student's own power of expres- 
sion. Constant writing is required in the Freshman year, and the 
criticism, both oral and written, is dire<5led to the individual needs of 
the student. Informal personal conferences are added to the work of 
the class, and every effort is made to enable the student to form a 
clear, forcible and sensible style. 

In the study of English as literature a general survey from Old 
English times to the present is first required of all Sophomores. 
After this course has been completed the student may ele&, more 
special work. In the Junior and Senior years the study is about 
equally divided between the matter involved in the text, and the 
manner or style in which the text is written. Soynd principles of 
criticism, analytic and constru<5live, are insisted upon, while outside 
reading of other masterpieces, with written reports, is designed for 
cultivation of the student's taste and judgment. 

The study of the language itself is closely connedled with both the 
rhetorical and the literary study of English. The characteristic 
changes in phonology, grammar, spelling, syntax and vocabulary, are 



46 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

studied historically, and representatiye texts in Anglo-Saxon, Middle 
English and Early Modem English are read in class. 

The graduate work in English, while presupposing a knowledge of 
the principal courses in the CoUegiate Department, may be arranged 
to the needs of the student and thus permit him to offer one or more 
ele<itives in studying for an advanced degree. The Seminary subje<ft 
for 1899-1900 will be Shakespere and Elizabethan Drama. 

Candidates for all baccalaureate degrees are required to complete 
two years of English, or six terms of two hours a week. Freshmen 
will take Course i, and Sophomores, Course 4. Those who are pre- 
paring to teach English will be expe<5led to take Course 12 in addition 
to some of the ele<5iive courses in literature. Law students wishing to 
take work in English will find Course 9 especially helpful, and also 
the rhetorical practice in Exposition and Argumentation. 

( I ) COMPOSITION AND KHHTO&IC. 

1. Constmctiye Rhetoric. Recitations and semi-weekly themes. 
Five se<5lions. Required of Freshmen. Mr. Cook and Mr. Kbi.i«y. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

2. Ad Yanced Composition. Leisures. Wendeirs English Composi- 
tion, and suggestive works of style. Tri-weekly and fortnightly 
themes. Open to those only who have attained grade A in Course i, 
and who wish to add to the training of that course. Mr. Cook. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

3. Versification. Practice in metrical composition in the fixed 
forms of verse such as the heroic couplet, blank verse, Spenserian 
stanza, ode, rondeau, sonnet, ballad and song. Analysis of the best 
examples of these forms in English poetry. Informal discussion of 
artistic questions. Open to those who have had Course 2. Mr. Cook. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

(2) BNGUSH I.ITERATURB. 

4. English Literature. General survey from earliest times to the 
present. Recitation and reports. Four se<5lions. Required of Soph- 
omores. Professor Rbeves, Mr. Cook and Mr. Kbucy. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

5. Chaucer's Poetry. A study in fourteenth century art. Open to 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 47 

those who have had the training of Course 4 in Chaucer grammar 
and pronunciation. Lectures; Skeat's The Student's Chaucer. Mr. 
Cook. 
Spring term, two hours a week. 

6. English Minor. Five hours a week. Professor Rbbves. Old 
English, Monday and Tuesday . Middle English , Tuesday and Thurs- 
day. English Language, Friday. 

7. English Major. Five hours a week. Professor Rbbv^. 
Nineteenth Century Prose. Monday and Wednesday. 
Nineteenth Century Poetry. Tuesday and Thursday. 
Milton. Friday. 

8. English Seminary. Shakespere and Elizabethan Drama. Pro- 
fessor Rkevbs. 

9. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Ledlures and 
reports on assigned readings of masterpieces and standard criticism. 
Junior and Senior eledlive. Mr. Kbi«i«y. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

ID. American Literature. Le<5lures, recitations and reports on 
assigned readings. General survey of both poetry and prose, includ- 
ing political literature and oratory. Mr. Kbixy. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

11. Gothic and Old Saxon. Graduate Course. Professor Rbbvbs. 

12. Teacher's Course. In the spring term a course of ledlures for 
teachers of English in secondary schools will be given, one hour a 
week. The course will include historical grammar, syntax, pho- 
nology, and methods of studying literature and constru<flive rhetoric. 
Professor Rbbvbs. 

For prizes in English see general subjedi of prizes. 

ELOCUTION. 

Mrs. Partridgb. 

I. Elementary Vocal Training. Studies in phonics with reference 
to articulation, and the eradication of faults of speech or voice; de- 
velopment of breath control for artistic voice produdiion; studies of 
the fadiors of speech, the timbre of the voice; stress as applied to 



48 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

tones, emphasis and accent, with sele<5tions adapted for illustration 
and analysis; studies in gesture; readings from standard authors. 

This course is open to Collegiate Freshmen, and Junior Law stu- 
dents. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

a. Vocal Expression. Elementary Principles of Vocal Expression; 
correal mental adlion in reading and speaking; studies and presenta- 
tions from speeches and forms of the drama, to develop the powers 
of conception and the ability to express every phase of human expe- 
rience as a means of securing simplicity and naturalness in all kinds of 
speaking. Le<5lures on problems in vocal expression. Study of mono- 
logues, impersonations, and miscellaneous sele^ions, with individual 
criticism. This course is open to Sophomores who have completed 
Course i. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. Each student receives in 
addition to class exercises a private rehearsal each week. 

3. Oratory. Application of the principles of expression to the 
oratory of the bar; special exercises for the development of extempo- 
raneous speaking; study of orations with the methods employed by 
leading orators; sele<Slions from Shakespere's tragedies and comedies as 
one of the best means of studying human charadler, studies in gesture 
for developing self-control and spontaneity of adlion. This course is 
open to Senior Law students. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 



HISTORY. 

Professor WiZrCox; Dr. Kaye. 

I. History of Oreeci. Text-book and lectures. This cowik is 
intended primarily for members of the Preshman class. Dr. Katb. 
Pall term, two hours a week. . 

a. History of Rome. Text-book and ledlures. This work consists 
of two parts: The History of the Roman Republic in the winter term, 
and the History of the Roman Empire in the spring term. The work 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 49 

of both terms is designed for members of the Freshman class. Dr. 
Kayb. 
Winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

3. History of Uedisval Bnrope. Text-book and lectures. This 
course is intended primarily for members of the Sophomore class and 
presupposes acquaintance with the History of Greece and Rome. The 
course is divided into three parts to correspond with the three terms 
of the University year. The first part, constituting the work of the 
fall term, extends from the final overthrow of the western Roman 
empire in 476 A. D. to the death of Charles the Great, 814 A. D. The 
work of the winter and spring terms traces the downfall of the Caro- 
ling^an system and its gradual reconstru<5lion into Modem Europe. 
Dr. Kayb. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

4. History of the Jews. Ledlures and special assignments. A 
history of the Hebrew people from the earliest times to the destrudlion 
of Jerusalem by the Romans. This course is designed to give a 
general view of the progress of Oriental civilization and to trace the 
development and significance of the great Semitic Religions. Atten- 
tion will be dire<5led to other eastern nations with a view to illustrat- 
ing their political and institutional relation to the Jews. This course 
is open only to those who have taken Courses i and 2, or their 
equivalents. Dr. Kayb. 

Fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

5. Constitiitioiud History of England. Analyses and le<Slures. This 
course is intended for members of the Junior and Senior classes only. 
As much previous work as possible in Ancient and Mediseval History 
should be taken before beginning it. Professor Wii<cox. 

Three terms, three hours a week. 

6. Constitutional History of the United States. Le^ures. This 
course is designed for Senior and graduate students. The course 
embraces, during the fall term, the study of the origin and develop- 
ment of the constitution of the United States from preceding political 
forms. The winter and spring terms finish the work with a study of 
the working of the United States Government under the constitution 
from 1789 to the present. Professor Wii^ox. 

Three terms, three hours a week. 



60 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

7. The French Rerolntioii, and the Napoleonic En, This oouise is 
designed for Senior and graduate students. Considerable work in 
Mediaeval History is an indispensable prerequisite. Professor Wiixx>x. 

Pall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

8. The Nineteenth Centory History of Sorope. This is a sequel to 
Course 7 or its equivalent, and is open to the same classes of advanced 
students. Professor Wilcox. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

9. Seminary in English History. This course is intended primarily 
for graduate students who are qualified to specialize in English His- 
tory. Those Senior students who have had Course 4 and are capable 
of doing original and independent work will be admitted to this Sem- 
inary. Professor Wii^oz. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

ID. Seminary in United States History. This course is also primarily 
designed for graduate students, but exceptions are made similar to 
those specified for Course 9. Professor W11.COX. 

Three terms, two hours a week. 

All the courses in History, including the two Seminaries, are given 
each year. There are no alternating courses. 

All courses in History are eledlive. Admission to the courses is con- 
ditioned only upon the qualifications of the candidate who desires to 
take them. 

Students are advised to plan their historical work so that it will be 
logical in its order of sequence. Students who intend to emphasize 
historical work in college are uiged to make careful preparation in 
History in preparatory schools. 

In arranging the courses in History in the University, the attempt 
has been made to present the entire field of historical study with ref- 
erence to logical and chronological sequence, so that no period shall 
be n^le<Sled and each period be treated in the light of what goes 
before and what comes after. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 61 



POLITICAI. SCIENCE. 



Propbssor Loos; Dr. Patterson. 

The several subjects in charge of the professor of political science 
are here grouped under the following headings: (i) Political Econ- 
omy, (2) Sociology and Fblitical Philosophy. The courses of the first 
group are, in the main, Junior and Senior ele<Stives, while those of the 
second are open only to Seniors and graduate students. Exceptions 
to these rules may be made in individual cases by the special permis- 
sion of the professor in charge. 

All the courses under the first group, except i and 2, presuppose 
some knowledge of the general principles of political economy as laid 
down in the manuals by Walker or Mill. Students who are not thus 
prepared are required to take Course 2 (not Course i ) as a preparation 
for the other courses in economics; Course 4, 5 or 7, may, however, be 
taken at the same time with Course 2, during the fall term, and 5, 6, 
or 8 during the winter and spring terms. Candidates for admission to 
advanced courses should in all cases consult the professor in charge 
before scheduling. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

I. Economic History. After an introdudlory study of primitive 
man and primitive civilization (Starr's First Steps in Human Progress) 
the course will occupy itself mainly with the development of trades 
and manufadlures in Europe (Gibbins's Industry in England), and 
later with the industrial development of the United States (Wright's 
Industrial Evolution of the United States). Open to Sophomores. 
Dr. Patterson. 

Fall term, Tu., Th., at 8. 

a. Economics. An introdudtion to the study of political economy. 
Order of topics: The nature and scope of economic science, funda- 
mental economic concepts; the organization of industry; the theory of 
value, and the distribution of wealth; the functions of government. 
Text-book and ledlures. Open to Juniors and to special students. 
Professor Loos and Dr. Patterson. 

Fall term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 



52 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

This course will be repeated daring the second half of the year when 
it will be in charge of Dr. Patterson. Two hours, with an occasional 
third hour for hearing reports on assigned topics. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at 8. 

3. Finance, Currency, and Banking in the United States. Le^ures 
on the financial history of the United States including a discussion of 
the currencies and a study of banks and banking. Professor Loos. 

Winter term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

Note. — Courses 2 and 3, given each year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11 
during the fall and winter terms respedlively, are followed in the 
spring term at the same hour, by a course in International Law. See 
below. Course 15. 

4. Statistics. Le<5lures and investigation. A study of population 
in Europe and America, grouped under the heads: stru<5lure of the 
population, numbers, density, races and nationalities, sex, age, conju- 
gal condition, and occupation. Growth of population: natural in- 
crease; births, intensity; sexes, nationality; marriages, intensity, age, 
productivity; deaths, intensity, sex, age, causes, epidemics and sui- 
cides. Immigration and emigration. Population in its economic 
aspe<^, agriculture, mining, manufadluring, commerce, railroads, 
banks, money, prices, wages, consumption. Population in its social 
aspedls, education, pauperism and crime. 

Readings in the literature of the subjedl will be assigned, and 
special care taken to acquaint the student with the pra<^ical use of 
the principal governmental publications bearing on the subjedts dis- 
cussed. Dr. Patterson. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 11. 

5. History of Political Economy. The history of political economy 
before, and including, Adam Smith, with introductory leClures on 
culture history. Beginning with a brief reference to primitive, ancient, 
and mediaeval systems of industry and economic ideas, the course will 
occupy itself with a closer study of the modem era, the writings of 
the mercantilists, of the physiocrats, and of Adam Smith and his 
precursors. Throughout this course, and in the one which follows, 
careful attention will be given to the relations of political economy to 
political philosophy. Professor Loos. 

Fall term, Tu., Th.. at 10. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 68 

6. The Industrial Reyolntion, and Modem Social Questions. An 
elementary course in recent economic history and theory. An analysis 
of the industrial revolution with le<5lure8 on the rise of the classical 
school of political economy, modem socialism, contemporary eco- 
nomic schools, and recent tendencies in legislation. Professor Loos. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at lo. 

7. Pnblic Finance. A study in state expenditure, state income, 
and state debts. The class will read Bastable's Public Finance. Open 
to those who have taken Course 2 or its equivalent. Professor Loos 
or Dr. Patterson. 

Fall term, Tu., Th., at 9. 

8. Transportation. The course will deal chiefly with railways; 
railroad oxganization and management, explanation of terms in com- 
mon use in railroad accounts and reports, history of railroad develop- 
ment, discussion of rates, competition, discrimination, and state man- 
agement (Hadley*s Railroad Transportation), the commission system 
— «tate and inter-state. Dr. PaTTB&SON. 

Winter and spring terms, Tu., Th., at 9. 

9. The Principles of Economics. The development of the classical 
political economy will be carefully studied. Special attention will be 
given also to the mathematical work of Jevons and other writers, and 
to the recent contributions of the Austrian school. Professor Mar- 
shall's Principles of Economics will be used as a text. For Seniors 
and graduate students. Dr. PaTTBRSOn. 

ThxY>ughout the year, hours to be appointed. 

10. Debating Course. May be counted also as an English eledlive. 
Seledled topics in economics and politics. Mr. Kbixy and Dr. Pat- 
terson. 

Fall and winter, hours to be appointed. 

SOCIOLOGY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 

IX. Sociology. Part I: Ledlures during the fall term on the 
primary favors and forces of social phenomena. Special attention is 
given to the earliest phases of political organization. Part II: In the 
winter term, police, pauperism, crime, and sanitation receive special 
attention. The close relation of the so-called pradltcal sociology to 



64 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

the Gennaii Verwaltungslehre will be pointed out. Open to Seniors 
and graduates. Professor Loos. 
Fall and winter terms, Mon., Wed., Fri., at lo. 

12. Municipal Goyemment. A study of municipal government with 
particular reference to the economic and social problems of modem 
cities. The course is designed especially for those who have taken the 
course in Sociology, but it is open to any student who has taken 
Economics 2, or Politics I. Professor Loos. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 10.. 

13. Roman Municipalities. Le<Siures. For Seniors and graduates. 
Professor Rohbach. 

Fall or winter term, two hours to be appointed. 

14. Political Philosophy. A study of political philosophy with 
special reference to modem conditions and problems. Ledlures with 
assigned readings in Herbert Spencer, Leroy-Beaulieu, and other 
modem writers during the fall term, followed by a brief sketch of tlie 
history of the theory of the state — classical, mediaeval, and modem, 
with some notice of state forms and the elements of legal history, 
during the winter term, and a more special examination of the current 
dogmas of individualism and socialism during the spring term. Pro- 
fessor Loos. 

Throughout the year, hours to be appointed. 

15. International Law. A text-book course on International Law 
(Lawrence, The Principles of International Law) with le<^ures on 
diplomacy and foreign relations. This course is offered for 1900, and 
alternates with Chancellor McClain's course in International Law, 
namely, a course of le<5lures with recitations in Snow's Cases in Inter- 
national Law (See Courses of Study for Seniors in Law Department); 
the latter course was given in 1899. Professor Loos. 

Spring term, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 



and AduiiiiistiBtion, I'sycliohff 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 55 



GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION. 



Profbssor Shambaugh. 

To indicate clearly the order in which the several subjedls in 
Government and Administration are presented for purposes of uni- 
versity instrudtion. the principal subjedis are first grouped into four 
general courses, namely: Politics I, Politics II, Politics III, and Politics 
IV. Then, to indicate more clearly the scope and treatment of the 
several subje<5ls, a specific statement is made of each subjedl viewed 
as an independent course. 

Politics I. Historical and Descriptive Politics. A study, historical 
and descriptive, of the leading governments of ancient and modem 
times. This is a comparative study of political institutions, wherein 
the more general and obvious phases of political phenomena will be 
presented. Historical and Descriptive Politics is here regarded as the 
ftmdamental course in Government and Administration. Open to all 
students except Freshmen. 

Throughout the year, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

Politics n. Principles of Government in the United States! A 
study of the principles of American government — national, common- 
wealth, and local. Fall term: History of Constitutional Government 
in the United States, including a detailed analysis of leading state 
papers, e. g., colonial charters, plans for union, commonwealth con- 
stitutions, etc. Winter term: American Constitutional Law, wherein 
the principles of Government in the United States will be discussed 
from the standpoint of judicial interpretation. Spring term: Local 
Government in the United States. The course in Local Government 
will alternate with a course in Political Parties in the United States. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Throughout the year, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

Politics HI. Political Theory, and Comparatiye Constitutional Law. 
A study of the general and theoretical aspecSls of political phenomena. 
Fall term: Outlines of a system of political theory. Winter term: 
Comparative Constitutional Law, wherein the theoretical aspe<^ of the 
constitutions of England, France, Germany, and the United States 



66 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 

will be considered. Spring term: Papers on seledled topiqs in Polit- 
ical Theory and Comparative Constitutional Law will be prepared and 
read by the students. This is an advanced course for Seniors and 
graduates. 
Throughout the year, two hours, Tuesday evening. 

Politics IV. American Political Theory. A study in the history of 
political theory in the United States, wherein the writings of Hamil- 
ton, Madison, Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, Clay, Webster, 
Calhoun, and Lincoln will be read and discussed. This is an advanced 
course. Only a limited number of students are admitted. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 



z. Historical and Descriptive Politics. A study, historical and 
descriptive, of the leading governments of ancient and modem times. 
This is a comparative study of political institutions, wherein the more 
general and obvious phases of political phenomena will be presented. 
Fall term: The theory of evolution as a working basis in the study of 
Historical Politics; some general considerations in Anthropology; 
primitive institutions of the Indo-Europeans; the origin of govern- 
ment; the political institutions of the ancient Greeks; the political 
institutions of the Romans. Winter term: Roman Law — ^four weeks; 
Feudalism; the government of France; the governments of Germany — 
the Empire and Prussia. Spring term: the government of Switzer- 
land — federal and cantonal; the government of England. Open to all 
students except Freshmen. 

Throughout the year, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 8. 

a. History of Constitutional Government in the United States. 
A study of the sources and early development of the principles of 
government in the United States. Herein the development of 
colonial governments, the growth of federalism, and the establishment 
of the first commonwealth governments will receive special considera- 
tion. The following documents will receive detailed analysis: colonial 
charters, plans for union. Articles of Confederation, Declaration of 
Independence, the first commonwealth constitutions and the Constitu- 
tion of the United States. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Fall term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 57 

3. American Constitational Law. A study wherein the principles 
of government in the United States will be discussed from the stand- 
point of judicial interpretation. The students will read and report 
upon seledled cases in Constitutional Law. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

Winter term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

4. Local Goyermnent. A study of Ix>cal Government in the United 
States, wherein the development of the several forms of township, 
coimty , and township-county government will receive special consider- 
ation. This course will alternate with the course in Political Parties. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Spring term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

5. Political Pariiaa. A study in the practical workings of American 
government, wherein the history, organization, operation,and influence 
of political parties will be discussed. This course will alternate with 
the course in Local Government. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Spring term, three hours, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

6. American Political Theory. A study in the history of political 
theory in the United States, wherein the writings of Hamilton, Mad- 
ison, Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, Clay, Webster, Calhoun,and 
Lincoln will be read and discussed. This is an advanced course, and 
is offered for those students who desire to make a more exhaustive 
study of American Government than is possible in the general course, 
Politics II. Only a limited number of students are admitted. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9. 

7. Goremment in Iowa. A study, historical and descriptive, of the 
political institutions of the commonwealth of Iowa. 

Spring term, two hours. 

8. Political Theory. In this course an attempt will be made to 
pi^esent an outline of a system of pure political theory. An advanced 
course for Seniors and graduates. Seminary plan. 

Fall term, two hours, Tuesday evening. 

9. ComparatiTe Constitntional Law. A comparative study of the 
constitutions of England, France, Germany, and the United States, 
wherein the general and theoretical aspects of government will be con- 
sidered. An advanced course for Seniors and graduates. 

Winter term, two hours, Tuesday evening. 



58 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

10. AdminitftratiTe Law. A oomparative study of Administrative 
Law in France, Germany, England, and the United States. An 
advanced course for graduates. 

One term, two hours. 

XX. Soman Law. A course of about twelve le<5bires on the history 
and principles of the Roman Law. These leisures are given in con- 
nedtion with and as a part of the general course. Politics I. See above. 



PHILOSOPHY. 



Propbssor Patrick: Assistant Professor Seashorb. 

I. Deductive Logic. An elementary course. Text-book: Jevons*s 
Elementary Lessons in Log^c, with reading in Welton*s Logic and 
Miirs Logic. Professor Patrick. 

Fall term, two sediions, Tu., Th. 

a. Inductive Logic. An intxt)du(5lory course on scientific method. 
Ledlures, with supplementary reading in Mill's Logic, Jevons*s Prin- 
ciples of Science and Welton's Logic. Professor Patrick. 

Winter term, Tu., Th. 

3. Ethics. An elementary course. The reading of Mackenzie's 
Manual of Ethics will be accompanied by lectures. Dr. Sbashors. 

Spring term, two sections, Tu., Th. 

4. General Psychology. This course will be introduced by a series 
of twenty leisures upon the nervous system, the localization of brain 
f un<Slion, and the structure of the organs of the special senses. Tlie 
le^ures on general psychology will be accompanied throughout the 
year by demonstrations with apparatus from the psychological labora- 
tory. Professor Patrick and Dr. Sbashorb. 

Students wishing to take five hours a week in psychology may sup- 
plement this course by Course 5 and Course 6. 
Throughout the year, two se<5lions, Mon., Wed., Fri. 

5. Laboratory Course in Bzperimental Psychology. A theoretical 
and pra<5tical course in psycholog^ical experiment. The exercises aie 
so arranged as to familiarize the student with the methods and the 



COLI.EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 59 

apparatus of typical experiments in each of the approved lines of 
psychological research. The students perform the experiments, and 
report and discuss the results and literature on each subjedl. Labora- 
tory work and reports. Dr. Sbashorb. 

This course may be taken with or in sequence to Course 4, and may 
be followed in the spring term by Course 6. 

Fall and winter terms, Tu., 2:30 to 3:30, Th., 2:30 to 4:30. 

6. Abnormal Psychology. Hypnosis, sleep, alterations of per- 
sonality, automatism, hallucinations and illusions, and the psychology 
of the abnormal and defective classes will be discussed. Ledlures, 
with required reading. Prerequisite, Course 4. Dr. Sbashorb. 

Spring term, Tu., Th. 

7. History of Philosophy. A course in Greek, mediaeval, and 
modem philosophy. The fall term will be devoted to pre-Socratic 
Greek philosophy and to Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Plato's Re- 
public will be read and carefully studied. Each member of the class 
will read and report upon one other of the Platonic dialogues. In the 
winter term the work will include medieval philosophy and modem 
philosophy as far as Hume. The spring term will be devoted to Kant 
and German Philosophy of the nineteenth century. Professor Pat- 
rick. 

This course may be supplemented by Course 8. 
Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri. 

8. Seminary in Philosophy. Papers and discussion upon special 
problems in philosophy. The following plan is proposed for the year 
1899-1900: Fall term, special study of materialistic theories of reality. 
Winter term, mysticism. Spring term, theism and anti-theistic 
theories. This course is primarily for graduates. It may be taken by 
undergraduates by special permission. Professor Patrick. 

Throughout the year, two hours. 

9. Special Research in Psychology. Original investigation of special 
problems in psychology. Laboratory work and theses. The results 
of these investigations, if of sufficient worth, will be published in the 
University of loTva Studies in Psychology, This course is primarily 
for graduates, but may be taken by undergraduates who have had 
Courses 4 and 5. Dr. Sbashorb and Professor Patrick. 

Throughout the year, hours to be arranged with instruAors. — 



60 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

zo. Deyelopment of Mind. This will be a course in genetic psy- 
chology. It will include an introdudlion on comparative psychology, 
the methods and results of psychological experiments upon children, 
and the laws of mental development in general so far as such laws 
have been gained. This course is primarily for graduates. Dr. Sba- 

SHORB. 

Spring term, Tu., Th. 

For the convenience of students wishing to make each year's work 
in this department continuous throughout the year, the following 
combinations of courses are suggested: 

Courses i, 2 and 3, two hours, through three terms. 

Course 4, three hours, through three terms. 

Course 5, and 6 or 10, two hours, through three terms. 

Course 7, three hours, through three terms. 

Course 8, two hours, through three terms. 

Course 9, two hours, through three terms. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy are required to 
take the equivalent of three terms* work of two or three hours each in 
this department. Course 4, or Courses i, 2 and 3, are recommended 
for this requirement. 

The Psychological Laboratory, No. 14 North Clinton street, is open 
daily from 8 to 12 A. M., and from 2 to 4 P. M. A description of the 
laboratory and apparatus will be found in this Catalogue under the 
head of Material Equipment of the Collegiate Department. The 
library of philosophy is supplied with the standard works in logic, 
psychology, ethics, and philosophy, and is open daily during labora- 
tory hours. 

PEDAGOGY. 

Propbssor McConkbi,!,; Mr. Dorcas. 

I. General Pedagogy. This course is designed primarily for stu 
dents who have had no teaching experience; it is a text-book course 
and consists of a general treatment of the principles and pradlice of 
school teaching. The text-books used are Putnam's Manual of Peda- 
gogics, Gregory's Seven Laws of Teaching, Prince's Courses and 



COLIvEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 61 

Methods, and White's School Management. The course is open to all 
students who are permitted by the rules of the University to take 
ele<Elive courses. Mr. Dorcas. 
Throughout the year, five hours a week. 

a. Philosophy of Bdacation. It is the purpose in this course to set 
forth the aims of education, and the laws upon which mental develop- 
ment depends; to treat in some detail the educational doiSbines and 
theories that have become effective or promise to become efife^ve in 
determining the trend of school pradlice; and to devote some time to 
the application of the laws of mental development, and to the seledlion 
and arrangement of the materials of instruction. 

The cotirse is open to Juniors, Seniors, and special students. 

This course should be preceded by a course in general psychology 
or an extended experience in teaching. Professor McConnbi.i«. 

Fall and winter terms, Mon., Wed., Fri., at lo. 

3. Teaching and Gorerning. This course will embrace a careful 
study of De Garmo's Essentials of Method and other related literature. 
The methods of teaching the various subje^ of the public school cur- 
riculum will be discussed and illustrated. Through the kindness of 
the school authorities of Iowa City, students taking this course will be 
allowed the privilege of visiting the schools freely, for the purpose 
of familiarizing themselves with the methods of work employed. 
Ledlures on school government and school sanitation will conclude 
the course. Professor McConnkix. 

Throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 10. 

4. History of Education. This course will consist of three distindl 
parts: (a) The ancient and mediaeval period, {d) the modem period, 
and (c) the history of education in the United States. The work will 
consist of ledlures, recitations, and essays on assigned topics. Mr. 
Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

5. School Sapenrision. In this course the student will be expedled 
to make a study of the following subjedls: General school manage- 
ment, the art of classifying schools, and the art of arranging courses 
of study. Le^res and recitations. Professor McConnki,!,. 

Pall term, two hours a week. 



62 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

6. School Systema. This course will reqtiire of the student an 
examination of the state and city systems of the United States. Lect- 
ures and reports. Professor McCoNNBi«lr. 

Winter term, two hours a week. 

7. Child Study. In this course the history, literature, and methods 
of work in child study will be treated. Professor MCCONNBI.L. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

8. Secondary Education. This course will include a study of the 
report of the Committee on Secondary School Studies and other related 
literature. The organization of courses of study and the methods of 
instrudlion in high schools will receive specific treatment in ledtures, 
discussions, and reports. Professor McConnbix. 

Spring term, two hours a week. 

9. Seminary in the Theory and Practice of Teaching. This Semi- 
nary will aiford an opportunity for the special investigation of educa- 
tional problems. The work is designed to be germane to Courses 2, 3 
and 7. Membership in tliis Seminary is contingent upon special 
arrangement with the professor in charge. Professor McConnhi.L. 

Throughout the year, Tuesday, 7:30—9:30 p. M. 

10. Seminary in Secondary Education. This Seminary will afford 
its members an opportunity to make a pradHcal study of high school 
work. The work will include a careful examination of the text-books 
used in secondary schools, the preparation of examination lists for 
use in secondary schools, and the judging of examination papers pre- 
pared by high school pupils. Mr. Dorcas. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

zi. Teachers' Seminary. Open to public school teachers. The 
subje<5ls chosen for this Seminary will be such as are suggested by the 
requirements of its members. Professor McConneix, and Mr. 

Dorcas. 
Throughout the year, Friday, 7 — 9 p. M. 

Note. — ^The courses in Pedagogy, except as otherwise designated, 
are open to Juniors, Seniors, and special students. Candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Didactics are required to take three full 
terms* work in Pedagogy. 

Students who are intending to fit themselves for teaching in the 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 63 

public schools are advised to seledt their undergraduate work with 
special reference to the staple branches of instrudlion in the public 
high schools. 

State Certificate. The Stote Board of Educational Examiners, as 
authorized by law, will grant state certificates, good for five years, to 
graduates of the Collegiate Department of the University who comply 
with the following conditions: 

{a) The applicant must take three full terms' work in Pedagogy at 
the University. 

{d) He must furnish written statements, prepared expressly for the 
Board, from one or more county superintendents, or other experienced 
educators, certifying to the professional success and good moral char- 
a^r of the applicant. 

(c) He must furnish written official statements, addressed to the 
Board, from school boards, or diredlors, for whom the candidate has 
taught, certifying to his success in teaching and government. 

(d) He must apply to the Board through the Professor of Pedagogy, 
to whom he shall send, in addition to the above described certificates, 
a formal application for a state certificate, such other credentials as 
may be required, and the sum of three dollars. The application for a 
state certificate should be made by using the blank form provided for 
that purpose by the State Board of Educational Examiners. 

(e) All the papers and credentials required from candidates for 
state certificates must be filed with the President of the University at 
least thirty days before the date fixed for the examination. 

Life Diploma. The State Board of Educational Examiners grants 
life diplomas, according to law, to graduates of the University who 
have complied with the state certificate conditions mentioned above, 
and who, in addition thereto, have had a successful teaching experi- 
ence of five years after graduation. Applications are to be made 
through the Professor of Pedagogy. The following are the regula- 
tions of the Board in reference to applicants for life diplomas. 

(a) The Board itself holds the right, which it exercises at discretion, 
to investigate the character, scholarship, and professional standing of 
every applicant. 

(d) The candidate must present an original thesis, in his oum hand- 
lifritingy of not less than 3,000 nor more than 5,000 words, upon some 



64 STATE UNIVERSmr OF IOWA. 

professional topic sele<5led by the President of the Board. The thesis 
will be subje^ed to a critical examination by at least two persons 
chosen by the Board. 

(c) The credentials required, the registration blank properly filled, 
and the thesis, accompanied by the fee of five dollars, must be filed 
with the President of the University at least thirty days before the 
date fixed for examination. 



PHYSICS. 

Propbssor Vbbi,kn; Mr. Bowman, Mr. Vebi^bn. 

I. Mechanics and Heat. Ledlures and recitations. Professor Vbb- 
i,BN and Mr. Vbbi^BN. 
Fall term, daily at ii. 

a. Electricity and Magnetism. Ledlures and recitations. Professor 
VCBI,BN and Mr. VrblBN. 
Winter term, daily at ii. 

3. Sonnd and Light. Le<Shires three times a week, laboratory work 
twice a week. Professor Vbblbn, Mr. Bowman, and Mr. Vbbi.bn. 

Spring term, le<5lures, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. 

Courses i, 2 and 3 constitute the general elementary work in physics 
required of all scientific and engineering students, and must be pre- 
ceded by the mathematics of the Freshman year. 

4. Physical Measurements and Obserrations. Laboratory work. 
Mr. Bowman. 

One term, daily. 

5. Measurements and Determination of Constants. Ledlures and 
laboratory work. Professor Vbbi«bn and Mr. Bowman. 

One term, daily. 

6. Measurements. Special investigation and research to follow 
Courses 4 and 5. Professor Vbbijsn and Mr. Bowman. 

Courses 4, 5 and 6 may be taken any term, but must be pursued in 
the order of their numbers. These courses are planned for students 
taking a second year in physics. Cour^ 4 is required of eledbical 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 65 

engineering students in the fall of their Junior year. In the winter of 
the same year they take 5, but in their case this course deals more 
especially with ele<Sbical measurements. 

7. Direct Current Dynamos and Motors. Three ledlures a week, 
laboratory work twice a week. For eledirical engineering Juniors. 
Professor Vbbi,bn and Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, daily. 

8. Theory of Electricity and Photometry. Lectures five times a 
week, laboratory work ten hours. Professor Vkblbn and Mr. Bow- 
man. 

Pall term. 

9. Alternate Current lIKachinery. Pive ledlures a week, ten hours 
of special laboratory work. Professor VBBtSN and Mr. Bowman. 

10. Distribution of Electrical Energy; Telegraph and Telephone. 
Le<5lures and laboratory work. Professor Vbbi«bn and Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, ten hours a week. 

The last three numbers form the Senior year course of the eledbical 
engineers, and will in general include five ledlures a week, the subjedls 
treated being indicated above. The work in the laboratory consists of 
pradlice with the photometer, experiments, and measurements on the 
various machines, transformers, and other apparatus, and tests of 
insulators, conductors, samples of iron, etc. The student has the 
choice in the latter part of the year of preparing a thesis or carrying 
out some research, or doing other special work. 

IX. Electricity and Magnetism. For civil engineering students. 
Two le<5lures a week, laboratory work three times a week. Professor 
VBBI.8N. 

Pall term, daily. 

la. Dynamo-electric Machinery. Lediures to civil engineering 
students. Professor VBBI.BN. 
Winter term, three times a week. 

13. Heat and Thermodynamics. Le<5);ures to Junior ele<5trical and 
civil engineering students. Mr. Bowman. 

Spring term, twice a week, with one day each week in ele<flrical 
laboratory for civil engineers. 



66 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

14. Shop Work. For eledbical engineers. Mr. Bowman. 
Throughout the year, tvrice a week. 

15. Seminary. The systematic reading of physical and ele^bical 
journals by those students who are well enough equipped, is encour- 
aged by a weekly Seminary, condu<5led for this purpose by Professor 
Vbbi«bn. 

In addition to the above, ledlures and laboratory courses in sele^led 
topics will be given as circumstances may require or the facilities for 
instru<5tion may admit. Laboratory work of any grade may be taken 
any term, three or more times a week. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Andrews; Mr. Waiter, Mr. Brink. 

X. General Chemistry. Ledhires illustrated by experiments and 
accompanied by a weekly quiz and laboratory work. Professor 
Andrews. 

Fall term, four times a week, laboratory once a week. 

3. General Chemistry. (Continued.) Le<ftures illustrated by ex- 
periments Introdu^on to qualitative analysis. Laboratory work, 
six hours a week. Professor Andrews and Mr. Waiter. 

Winter term: I/cdlures Tu., Th., at 9. Laboratory at hours to be 
arranged. 

3. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysia. Lectures once a 
week, laboratory work eight hours. The student is instrudled in the 
theory and practice of qualitative analysis and is expedled to carry out 
about twenty-five complete analyses besides a number of partial ones. 
This course, except the ledlures, can be taken in any term. Professor 
Andrews and Mr. Wai,ker. 

Spring term, le<5tures at 9, laboratory eight hours, at times to be 
arranged. 

4. Quantitative Analysis. Le<5lures on general principles and 
sources of error, once a week, laboratory ten hours. Professor An- 
drews. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 67 

Winter term, in odd numbered years. Fall term, even numbered 
years. 
Ledbares Tuesday at 4:30, laboratory according to arrangement. 

6. Qnantitatiye Analysis. Laboratory pradlicum. The student ex- 
tends his work from the analysis of substances of definitely known 
composition to commercial produ<5b3 of various kinds and makes a 
study of certain technological methods. Professor Andrews. 

Any term, ten hours a week. 

6. Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Ledlures on the general 
principles of thermochemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical dynam- 
ics, accompanied by a parallel course of laboratory work covering, 
for example, the determination of molecular weights, experimental 
study of the laws of Avogadro and Dulong and Petit, the phenomena 
of mass adlion and of dissociation. Ostwald's Outlines of Physical 
Chemistry has hitherto been used as an auxiliary text. This course 
must be preceded by at least the first three courses in chemistry and 
the first three in physics or their equivalent. It will probably only be 
given in the even numbered years. Professor Andrews. 

Spring term, ledtures or laboratory work daily at hours to be 
arrang[ed. 

7. a. Organic Chemistry. Ledlures on the fatty series, illustrated 
experimentally, so far as the subjedl will permit. Professor Andrews. 

Winter term, odd numbered years, twice a week. 

7. d. Organic Chemistry. Le<Shires on aromatic and heterocyclic 
compounds. Professor Andrews. 

Spring term, odd numbered years, three times a week. 

8. Electrochemistry. Le6bires for students of eletSlrical engi- 
neering, comprising the theory of eie<5lrolysis, chemistry of primary 
and secondary batteries, ele<flrometallurgy and other industrial appli- 
cations. Professor Andrews. 

Spring term, even numbered years only, five times a week, 

9. Organic Preparations. Laboratory work comprising preparation 
of typical organic compounds, methods of synthesis and study of 
reactions. This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 
7. Professor Andrews. 

Winter term, laboratory daily, twelve hours a week. This course 



68 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

may also be taken as a minor, six hours a week in winter and spring 
terms, accompanying Courses 7 a and 7 d, 

ID. Determinatiye Mineralogy and CrystaUography. Laboratory 
pradlicum. Mr. WAI.KBR. 
Winter and spring, five times a week. 

Course 3, Qualitative Analysis, and 4, and 5, Quantitative Analy- 
sis, except as noted, may be taken in either fall, winter, or spring term. 

Course 6, may be taken after 3. This order is only recommended 
to those who devote no more than four terms in all to chemistry. 



ANIMAL MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 



Professor Housbr; Mr. Lambert. 

z . General Morphology and Physiology. A laboratory course for the 
study of selected types representing the several great groups of ani- 
mals. General biological phenomena, the unicellular animals, and 
representatives of the higher invertebrate groups. Fall term. — Dis- 
sedtion of typical vetebrates,the microscopic morphology of vertebrates, 
and ledlures and experiments covering the elements of physiology. 
Winter and spring terms. Professor HouSBR and Mr. Lambbrt. 

Throughout the year, daily, ten hours a week. 

a. Comparative Histology. This is a course in the comparative his- 
tology of animal tissues and systems of organs. Emphasis is here 
given to the laboratory technique of histology. To this end the student 
is expe^ed to become proficient in the standard methods of fixing, 
staining, imbedding, sectioning, moimting, and the other processes 
incident to the making of microscopical preparations. Prerequisite: 
Course i. Professor HousBR and Mr. LambbrT. 

Pall term. Laboratory, four days a week, eight hours. Ledbires 
Friday. 

3y Comparative Neurology. A course for the detailed study of the 
nervous system. The laboratory work involves the use of the special 
technique of Golgi, Nissl, Weigert, and Ehrlich. The archite<5ture of 
the nervous system is presented in a series of leCbires and demonstra- 



COttEGlATE DEPARTMENT. 6d 

dons. The texts of all the standard authorities are used for reference 
and for assigned reading. Prerequisite: Courses i and 2. Professor 
HousSR and Mr. Lambert. 

Winter term. Laboratory, Mon., Wed., Fri., six hours. LecStures 
Tu., Th. 

4. Vertebrate Embryology. Laboratory work, accompanied by a 
series of le<Slures. The le<5lures discuss the general problems of verte- 
brate embryology, and are supplemented by collateral reading. The 
laboratory work embraces an examination of the frog's egg during its 
early cleavage, and a study of the chick at successive stages of develop- 
ment during the first four days of incubation. Prerequisite: Courses 
I and 2. Professor HouSBR and Mr. Lambbrt. 

Spring term, daily, ten hours a week. 

5. Advanced Morphology. Special courses of laboratory work will 
be arranged to meet the needs of those who desire to pursue morpho- 
logical studies farther than the outlined Courses i, 2, 3, and 4. Oppor- 
tunities are offered for investigation in some branch of anatomy, 
histology, or embryology. Professor HousBR. 

Throughout the year, ten hours a week. 

6. Advanced Ph3rsiology. A coiuse for advanced students who 
desire to continue the investigation of physiological processes in greater 
detail. Laboratory work and library research. Prerequisite: Course 
I. Professor HouSBR. 

Throughout the year, three times a week. 



ZOOLOGY. 

Professor Nutting; Assistant Professor Wickham. 

X. Invertebrated Animals — ^more especially the subkingdoms, Cct/- 
enierata, and Echinodermata. Propbssor Nutting. 
Fall term, daily. 

a. MammaliA. The principles of classification are here applied to 
a more limited group. More attention is paid to generic and specific 
chara<Sters and more detailed descriptions are made, daily practice 
being afforded by the use of the large series of mammals in the 



70 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 

Homaday coUedtion and main museum. InstnuStion in the prepara- 
tion of skulls and skeletons is given to students desiring it. Pro- 
fessor Nutting. 
Winter term, daily. 

3. Ornithology, including instrudlion in field work. Upon this 
course the whole work in systematic zoology is centered. Owing to 
the very large series of birds (about 11,000 specimens) in the museum, 
there is ample material for systematic work during the term. Pro- 
fessor Nutting. 

Spring term, daily. 

4. Sntomology. Inse<Et Anatomy and development. Le^res and 
laboratory work. Assistant Professor Wickham. 

Fall term, three hours a week. 

5. Entomology. The principles acquired in the preceding term 
will be applied to the study of systematic entomology. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Wickham. 

Winter term, three hours a week. 

6. Sntomology. The studies of the preceding term will be con- 
tinued. Throughout this and the preceding course special attention 
will be given to the philosophical bearings of the subje^. Assistant 
Professor Wickham. 

Spring term, three hours a week. 

7. Lectures in Speculative Zoology. This course is devoted to a 
presentation of the more prominent theories concerning the origin 
and evolution of animal forms and a historical review of the position 
held by the most prominent workers in speculative zoology. Special 
attention will also be paid to a study of the habits, instindls, and in- 
telligence of animals. The course will be open to Juniors and Seniors. 
Professor NuTTiNG. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 

8. Thesis. Equivalent to two terms* work. Advanced work in 
any group of animals of which the museum contains a sufficient series. 
Free access to any specimens or books on the museum floor is accorded 
to students doing thesis work in zoology, and a convenient study room 
has been fitted up for the use of advanced students. 



COLtEGIATE DEPARTMENT. n 

The above courses are intended to be consecutive, except that 
Courses 4, 5 and 6 may follow i, 2 and 3, in animal morphology, and 
7 may be taken by Juniors and Seniors, without previous work in 
natural science. A combination of Courses 4, 5, 6, and 7 is recom- 
mended for students desiring a five hours* course which will include a 
critical study of a definite g^up of animals together with the applica- 
tion of biological principles elucidated in Course 7. This course is 
more particularly designed in the interest of students who do not 
intend to specialize in zoology. 

The museum affords an abundance of material for study, and this 
is supplemented by (a) library of zoological works; (d) photographs 
of specimens studied, the photographs to be placed in the note books 
along with the descriptions; and (c) ledlures in which the salient 
points of the various groups of animals are defined, and habits, distri- 
bution, etc., described. 

Students taking special courses in biological science may receive 
instru(5lion in field work and in the preparation of museum material. 



GEOLOGY. 

Professor Cai^vin. 

X. Principles of Geology. I/e<5hires, illustrated by museum speci- 
mens, views, maps, and microscopic preparations. 
Throughout the year, tvdce a week, Tu., Th., at 9. 
This course may be supplemented with Course i in astronomy. 

3. General and Practical Geology. During the fall term this course 
embraces lecflures and field observations on the geological phenomena 
in the vicinity of Iowa City as an introduAion to the fundamental 
fadls of the science. The preliminary work also embraces the labora- 
tory investigation of material coUeAed during studies in the field. 
This is followed by the general fadls of rock-making, continent-mak- 
ing, and the evolution of topographic forms. During the winter and 
spring terms attention is given to the chronological succession of strata 
in the Mississippi Valley, with studies relating to the genesis, lithology, 
geographical distribution, economic produdls, and typical faunas of 



72 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

the several foimations. Laige series of rocks, minerals, fossils, m^is, 
lantern slides, and photographs afford the material for ledture illustiB- 
tion and laboratory study. 

Throughout the year, daily at lo. Additional hours for laboratory 
work arranged to suit the convenience of the individual students. 

3. Invertebrate Paleontology. Ledhires and laboratory research. 
Throughout the year, daily. Le<5iures at 8. Laboratory work at 

convenient hours from 8 to 5. 

4. Economic Geology of the United States. Ledbires, with library 
and laboratory research. 

Throughout the year, daily. 

5. Special Courses in Pleistocene Geology, local geology and paleon- 
tology, charadieristics and faunas of special formations, and similar 
subje^ are arranged to meet the wishes of individual students. 

Throughout the year, or through a single term, two, three, or five 
hours a week. 

BOTANY. 



Propbssor Macbride; Assistant Propsssor Shimsk. 

I . General Botany. A course of popular le6lures and special studies 
intended to illustrate the purpose, method and scope of present botan- 
ical research, the progress of botanical science in recent years and 
the general economic importance of the subjedt. The le<Slures are 
illustrated by material from the Herbarium and the field, and no effort 
is spared to give the course the highest pradtical value. This course, 
though intended primarily for those intending to teach, is open to all 
students; it is complete in itself, but will be accepted as one of the 
three required terms in the case of those who eledt Botany as material 
science. Professor Macbride. 

Spring term, five hours a week. 

a. Morphological Botany. This course consists of le<Slures and lab- 
oratory work and is intended to illustrate the strudture and life-history 
of the several types presented by the vegetable kingdom. Goebers Out- 
lines of Classification is used as basis. Special attention is paid to all 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 73 

available forms of our OTptogamic flora; slime moulds, 8chizopli3rtes, 
diatoms, algae, fungi, mosses, ferns and their allies are successively 
passed in review. This couse is open to all students who are credited 
with botany in their preparatory course. While it is in some partic- 
ulars a review of the preparatory courses, it is also made the basis of 
work in the subsequent courses. Professor Macbridb and Assistant 
Professor Shimek. 
Pall term, ten hours a week. 

3. General Plant Histology. General Stmctoral Botany. This course 
requires ten hours a week in the laboratory. Daily ledlures accom- 
pany the laboratory work. The student receives special instru6lion 
in the preparation of vegetable sections, staining, mounting, etc., and 
is required to prepare for himself approved slides in illustration of all 
the topics presented in so far as these are referable to the microscope. 
Professor Macbridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Winter term, ten hours a week. 

4. General Plant Physiology. This course consists of ledlures, 
laboratory work ai\d experiments, supplemented by collateral read- 
ing. The most important problems of vegetable physiology are dis- 
cussed and illustrated by simple experiments. Detmer, Vines, Dar- 
win, and all other standard authorities are available to the student for 
collateral reading. Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Spring term, ten hours a week. 

5. General Mycology. This is a course in the fungi and con- 
sists of laboratory work, supplemented by le^ures, experiment and 
collateral reading. It is an advanced course. Students make and 
classify collections for themselves. In identifying material collected, 
students are aided by extensive mycological literature, exsiccatty etc. 
Professor Macbridb. 

Pall term, daily as arranged. 

6. Vegetable Embryology. A special course with ledbires and 
laboratory work, including collateral reading. This course is confined 
chiefly to the consideration of the embryology of phenogamous plants. 
Ph3rtoc3rtology is taken up incidentally, and the peculiarities of nuclear 
division and karyokinesis noted. Professor Macbridb. 

Spring term, daily as arranged. 



74 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

7. Special Work in Morphology. A course designed for advanced 
students either graduate or special, offering opportunity for moreexai^t 
investigation. Professor Macbridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year. 

8. Special Systematic Work. The large colledlions of the Univer- 
sity now afford unusual opportunity for the special study of particular 
groups and families, and students are invited to engage in original re- 
search in the revision of accumulated species. Professor Macbridb 
and Assistant Professor Shimkk. 

Throughout the year. 

9. Special Applied Botany. A course for students of Pharmacy and 
Medicine. The officinal Materia Medica is made the basis of the special 
study of medicinal plants, their nature, origin and relationships. Pro- 
fessor Macbridb. 

Winter and spring terms. 

ID. Thesis Coarse. Designed for such students, either graduate or 
others, as desire to undertake problems of original research. Professor 
Macbridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year. 

zz. Seminary. A special course in reading and study of current 
literature is arranged for such students as have completed at least 
three courses in Botany. Students are expe<Sied to prepare written 
reviews and criticisms of the literature presented, to engage in discus- 
sion of topics specially assigned, and to carry forward at appropriate 
seasons special investigations in tlie field as dire<5ted. Professor Mac- 
bridb and Assistant Professor Shimbk. 

Throughout the year, one hour a week. 



MATHEMATICS. 



Propbssor Wbld; Assistant Propbssor Smith, Mr. Kaston, Mr. 

Mbrritt. 

Classical and philosophical students are required to take Course i. 
Course 2 may, however, be substituted for this and the work otherwise 
required in ancient history. Scientific students must take Course 2. 



COIvLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 75 

Civil and eledtrical engineering students are required to take Courses 
2, 3, and 9. Further explanations will be found in connedtion with 
the foUomng syllabus. 

Freshman Mathematics for Classical and Philosophical Students. 

I. ay b. Algebra. Exercises in the statement and solution of 
problems involving simple and quadratic equations; ratio, proportion, 
and variation; arithmetical, harmonic, and geometrical progressions; 
properties of series and the development of simple functions into 
series; the binominal theorem; permutations and combinations; con- 
tinued fradlions; logarithms with applications. Fall term and first 
half of winter term. 

I. by c. Trigonometry. Trigonometric fun^ions and formulae;, 
logarithmic fun<5tions; solution of right and oblique angled triangles, 
both plane and spherical; pra<5lical applications to problems in survey- 
ing, navigation, geography, astronomy, and mensuration. Second 
half of winter term and spring term. 

Two divisions; throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11:00 and 
2:30. Mr. Easton and Mr. MbrriTT. 

Freshman Mathematics for Scientific and Engineering Students, 

a. a. Algebra and Trigonometry. In algebra the work is nearly 
the same as that of i a. This is to be completed by November 22nd 
and will be followed by plane trigonometry. Fall term. 

a. b. Trigonometry. The same as Course i b^ c, witli the addition 
of a discussion of Euler*s, and Demoivre's formulae and the develop- 
ment of the trigonometric fun<Slions into series. Winter term. 

a. c. Theory of Equations. The work in the Theory of Equations 
will include the study of imaginaries, the properties of the general 
equation and their graphical representation, methods of approximat- 
ing to the roots of higher equations with numerical coefficients. Car- 
dan's solution of cubics, and biquadratic equations. The rudiments 
of the theory of determinants are also presented. Spring term. 

Five divisions, daily, throughout the year at 8, 9, 10, and i :30 As- 
sistant Professor Smith, Mr. Easton, and Mr. Mbrritt. 



76 STATE UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. 

Sophomore Mathematics^ 

3. a. Analytical Geometry. The point, right line, parabola, cirde, 
ellipse, and h3^rbola in cartesian coordinates; discussion of the gen- 
eral equation of the second degree; analytical geometry of three 
dimensions; higher plane curves; etc. Pall term. 

3. ^, c. Differential and Integral Calculna. The fundamental prin- 
ciples of the calculus are studied and applied to the solution of prob- 
lems in geometry, mechanics, etc. Winter and spring terms. 

Two divisions; daily, throughout the year, at 8xx) and loxo. Pro 
fessor Wei«d and Assistant Professor Smith. 

Mathematics for Junior^ Senior^ and Graduate Students. 

4. a, h. Advanced Calcnlns. A continuation of the work of the 
sophomore year; devoted particularly to topics in the differential cal- 
culus, such as the extension of Taylor's theorem, the theorems of 
lyagrange and Leibnitz, maxima and minima of fundUons of two or 
more variables, the theory of curved surfaces, transformations of dif- 
ferential equations, etc. Pall and winter terms. 

4. c. Differential Equations. An elementary course devoted to the 
methods of solution of ordinary differential equations. Open to all 
students who have completed Course 3. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Pri., at 9XX). Assistant Professor 
Smith. 

5. a. Theory of Functions. Ledtures, the work of Durdge being 
used by the student for collateral reading. Pall term. 

5. b. Definite Integrals, including a discussion of the Beta and 
Gamma fundlions. Le^ures. Winter term. 

5. c. Elliptic Integrals and Functions. Lectures and problems. 

Spring term. 
Throughout the year. Wed., and Pri., at 8xx). Professor Wbld. 

6. Harmonic Functions, a. Laplace's equation of continuity in 
re<5Ungular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; Pourier's series and 
integral. Pall term, b. Applications of Pourier's series to problems 
in acoustics, heat, eledlridty, etc. Winter term. r. Cylindrical, 
zonal, and spherical harmonics with numerous applications to physical 
problems. Spring term. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 77 

Lectures. Throughout the year, Tu., and Th., at ii:oo. Professor 

Weu). 

7. DiiferentiAl S^uatioiia. I^dlures. The subjedl is to be treated 
from the standpoint of Sophus Lie. 

Throughout the year, two or three hours per week, the time to be 
arranged. 

8. Determinants and Modem Geometry, a. Determinants and the 
theory of quantics. Fall term. d. Modem geometry; the principle 
of invariance. Winter term, c. Modem geometry of three dimen- 
sions. Spring term. 

Lediures. Throughout the year, Wed. and Fri., at 11:00. Profes- 
sor Wbld. 

9. Anal3rtical Mechanics, a. Statics. Composition and resolution 
of forces; the funicular polygon; centers of gravity; moment of inertia; 
fridHon, etc. Pall term, b^ c. Kinetics. Re<Slilinear motion; pro- 
jedliles; constrained motion of a particle; the pendulum, etc. Winter 
and spring terms. 

A course for civil and electrical engineering students, supplemented 
by a three hours' course in applied mechanics in charge of Assistant 
Professor Magowan. (See course in civil engineering. ) 

Throughout the year, Tu. and Th., at 11:00. Assistant Professor 
Sbhth. 

10. Advanced Axalyficil Mechanics, a. Problems in statics and 
dynamics; virtual velocities; the principle of least a<5lion; etc. Pall 
term, b. The dynamics of a particle, with special reference to the 
theory of orbital motion. Winter term, c. The potential theory, 
with special reference to attractions. Spring term. 

Throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 11. Assistant Professor 



XI. a. ThsMstliod of Losst Sqwuros^ with numerous applications 
to the reduction of series of physical observations. 
Pall term only; Mon., Wed., Fri., at 2:30. 

xa. b. Calculus of Variations. LeCtiires and problems. 
Winter term only; Mon., Wed., Fri., at 1:30. Assistant Professor 
Smith. 
13. c. Quaternions. LeClures. 
Spring term only; Mon., Wed., Fri., at 2:30. 



78 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ASTRONOMY. 

Professor Whi«d, or Mr. Easton. 

The courses in Astronomy are open to all Sophomores, Juniors, and 
Seniors. The two here offered may be taken simultaneously or in suc- 
cession. Others will be added as soon as necessary arrangements can 
be made. The University is provided with a small but well equipped 
students' observatory. (See Material Equipment.) 

X. General Astronomy. A course of le<5tures on descriptive astron- 
omy for the general student. This course may be supplemented by 
Course i in Geology, which is given at the same hour. 

Three leAures a week, throughout the year, Mon., Wed., Fri., at 9. 

a. Practical Astronomy. The student is taught the use of the sex- 
tant, transit instrument, clock, chronograph, etc. ; the arrangement of 
the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac; and the general 
principles of time, latitude, longitude, and azimuth determination. 

Two hours a week, throughout the year, Tu., Th., at 9; supplemented 
by work at the observatory. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Professor Sims; Assistant Professor Magowan. 

The Civil Engineering, Eledlrical Engineering, and General Scien- 
tific Courses are identical throughout the Freshman year, and change 
may be made from anyone of these courses to another at the beginning 
of the Sophomore year; but after this year no subjedis can be substi- 
tuted for the required civil engineering studies without the approval 
of the professor in charge and special permission of the Faculty. 
Students in one class \nll not be allowed to take subje^ in an ad- 
vanced class without permission of the professor in charge. 

So far as possible, instrudlion will be given by recitation from text- 
books. But where this method is not pra^icable, as in limes and 
cements and in some of the subjedls treated under the head of Civil 
Engineering, the first part of the recitation period will be devoted to 
quizzes, and the remainder to a le^ure. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 79 

Saturdays, throughout the last three years of the course, are devoted 
to work in the field, shop, and laboratories, in making surveys, testing 
materials, construdting models, photography, blue-printing and ele- 
mentary carpentry. 

For all work requiring no special preparation outside of the class 
room, such as drawing, field work, laboratory exercises, some of the 
work in graphical statics, not less than two hours will be required for 
one hour of credit. 

Only the subje<5ls that appear in bold-faced type are given under 
the direction of the chair of Civil Engineering. 

French or German. See Course i, under French, page 43; and 
Courses i and 2, under German, page 42. If French be ele<5led in 
the Freshman year, English must be taken in the Sophomore year; 
but should German be eledled, it must be continued through the 
Sophomore year. Freshman year, five hours a week, and Sophomore 
year, three hours a week. 

Mathematics, See Cotuses 2, 3, or 4, and 9, under Mathematics, 
pages 75, 76, and 77. Freshman and Sophomore years, five hours a 
week. 

English. See Courses i and 4, tmder English, pages 45, 46. For 
those electing French, two hours a week through the Freshman, and 
three hours a week through the Sophomore year; and for those elect- 
ing German, two hours a week through the Freshman year. 

Drawing. For general scientific, eledhical and civil engineering 
students. The course comprises geometrical and mechanical draw- 
ing, orthographic, oblique, isometric and cabinet projedlions, and 
lettering. Linear perspedtive, shades and shadows. The work is given 
principally by means of personal instrudUon. The preliminary princi- 
ples are studied from text and reference books, and their application 
is employed in making drawings from models and machinery to exadl 
scale. Assistant Professor Magowan. 
Freshman year, fall, winter, and spring terms, three hours a week. 

Land Surveying. For civil engineering students. The construdlion, 
adjustment and use of the compass, level and transit. Recitations 
and ledlures, and field work with transit, level and solar compass; 
making profiles, leveling, and drainage surveys. A sediion of land is 



80 STATE UNTVBRSITY OP IOWA. 

surveyed and the location of all natural and artificial features deter- 
mined and noted. Assistant Professor Magowan. 
Sophomore year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Mapping and Surveying. Pen topography, including the making of 
topographical S3rmbols; platting of section survey from notes taken 
during the previous term, and making a finished map of the same. 
United States public land surveys, determination of true meridians, 
and a study of the rules and Supreme Court decisions governing 
resurveys and relocations of lost or obliterated comers. Assistant 
Professor Magowan. 

Sophomore year, winter term, three hours a week. 

Topographical Sorveylng and Mapping. A study of the adjustments 
and methods of use of the stadia, gradienter and plane table, etc., and 
the making of finished contour maps from notes of surveys made by 
the students, with the above mentioned instruments. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Magowan. 

Sophomore year, spring term, three hours a week. 

Descriptive Geometry. The work in this study includes problems on 
the point, line, and plane; also the simple geometrical solids, shades 
and shadows, single and double curved and warped surfaces, and the 
generation and development of the same, and the solution of various 
pradHcal problems. 

Sophomore year, winter and spring terms, two hours a week. 

Ele5lridty and Magnetism, See Course 2, under Physics, page 6^4. 
This course is designed especially for the students in civil engineering, 
the objedi being a better general understanding of this important sub- 
ject, both in general theory, and in the practice of making ele^bical 
measurements; also to g^ve a more thorough knowledge of ele^bicity 
preparatory to taking up the study of the dynamo and motor, in the 
winter term, the importance of which to the civil engineer ia fully 
appreciated. 

Junior year, fall term, five hours a week. 

Analytical Mechanics, See Mathematics, Course 9, page 77. 
Junior year, fall and winter terms, two hours a week. 

Mechanics and Materials. For students in civil and ele<5^rical engi- 
neering. The treatment of this subject is designed to be such that the 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 81 

student shall acquire a thorough training in the elementary principles 
of the mechanics of materials, and he is then required to verify, by his 
own investigations, the experimental laws and many of the derived 
formulae. Numerous problems taken from adhial engineering practice 
are given for solution from time to time, in order that the student may 
be trained in the application of his knowledge. The study includes 
the resistance and elasticity of materials, resistance of pipes and riveted 
joints, bending and resisting moments, shears, elastic curve, defledlion 
of simple, cantilever, restrained, and continuous beams, strength of 
columns with concentric and eccentric loading, torsion and shafting 
and combined stresses, etc. Assistant Professor Magowan. 
Junior year, three hours a week, fall and winter terms. 

Railroad Curves. The study of simple and compound curves and 
turn-outs. Enough field work is given to familiarize the student with 
the field methods of locating and running curves. 

Junior year, fall term, three hours a week. 

Steam Engine and Locomotive. The subjedi is treated under four 
heads, Heat, Steam, Engine, and Boiler. Under Heat is treated the 
economic combustion of fuel; under Steam the physical properties 
and the energy contained; under Engine, the modem types of simple 
and compound engines are discussed, with special reference to the 
locomotive. The students are given practical problems and are re- 
quired to ascertain the indicated horse power from a<ftual indicator 
cards, and to determine the efficiency of various engines from assigned 
data. The modem types of boilers are then discussed. Compressed 
air is also considered in connedtion with the transmission of power. 
Professor Sims. 

Junior 3rear, fall term, two hours a week. 

Graphical Statics. The course is so arranged that the study of the 
graphical method of determining stresses precedes that of the analyt- 
ical method, it being the intention to assist the student to secure a 
mental photograph of the amount and kind of stress in the various 
members of strudlures, and thus provide him with a ready and impres- 
sive means of their comparison. The analysis, by this method, of roof 
trusses is first taken up, followed by that of the plate girder, and 
simple, cantilever, and swing bridges, with parallel and inclined 
chords, under various conditions of loading as required in the stand- 



82 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ard specifications, both for adVual wheel concentrations and equivalent 
uniform loads, after which a course in metal and masonry arches is 
given. Professor Sims. 
Junior year, fall, winter, and spring terms, three hours a week. 

Pynamo-eleHric Machinery^ See Physics, Course 12, page 65. The 
importance of an elementary knowledge of this subjedl to the civil 
engineer in general practice is fully appreciated, and the course is 
designed to give the students a comprehensive knowledge of the laws 
governing the construdHon and operation of the dynamo and motor. 

Junior year, winter term, three hours a week. 

Theory of Stresses. Including the analytical determination of 
stresses and strains in all the strudtures analyzed by the graphical 
method. See Graphical Statics. Much time and study are devoted to 
this important subje<ft. Professor Sims. 

Junior year, winter term, three hours a week; and spring term, five 
hours a week. 

Limes and Cements. The instrudlion in this subject consists in as- 
signed references, and a course of ledlures on the principal properties 
of limes, hydraulic limes, and natural and artificial cements, with a 
general discussion of the nature and uses of concrete, followed by 
laboratory work. Each student is required to make and test briquettes 
of various cements, which will be furnished him for the purpose, and 
to calculate their relative values per unit of strength. Professor Sims. 

Junior year, winter term, two hours a week. 

Civil Engineering. This subjedl is given by recitations and led^ures, 
and is designed for the purpose of instruction in the pradtical applica- 
tion of the theoretical principles of civil engineering. The r^^ar 
recitations and ledlures are frequently interrupted by designs and 
estimates of the cost of the work under discussion. The subjedts are 
treated with thoroughness commensurate mth their relative impor- 
tance and are, railway reconnaissance and location ; theory of mayinmm 
economy in grades and curves; location of highways and^resistance to 
tradlion thereon; hydrography; building materials; natural and arti- 
ficial stones; quarrying and blasting; reaching deep foundation beds 
in earth, quick sand, water and silt, with pnuematic tubes, caissons 
and coffer dams, and by the Poetsch-Sooysmith freezing process; ordi- 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 88 

nary earth work and methods of computation; masonry, classification 
of, and specification for; theory and pradtice of retaining walls; earth, 
loose rock, and light masonry dams and weirs; t