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Full text of "Catalogue"

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M-W BEDFORD 



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ATALQGUE 



1.899 •■ .1900 











THE LIBRARY 



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1895 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/catalogueOOnewb 




New Bedford Textile School, 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



Catalogue 1899- J 900. 




FOUNDED BY THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AND THE 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 





CATALOGUE 



or THE 



New Bedeord Textile School 



NEW BEDEORD, MASSACHUSETTS 



1599-1900 




8595 



trustees 

1899. 

President, GEORGE E. BRIGGS. Treasurer, ISAAC B. TOMPKINS, Jr. 

Clerk, ROBERT BURGESS. 

On Behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Hon. ANDREW G. PIERCE, Ex-Major, and late Treasurer Wamsutta Mills. 
JOSEPH F. KNOWLES, Treasurer of Acushnet Mills and Hathaway Mfg. Co. 

Ex- Officio on the part of the City of New Bedford. 
Hon. CHARLES S. ASHLEY, Mayor of New Bedford. 
WILLIAM E. HATCH, Superintendent of Schools, New Bedford. 



George A. Ayer, Agent Bristol Mfg. Co. and City Mfg. Corp. 

George E. Briggs, Director Whitman Mills. 

Robert Burgess, Agent Grinnell Mfg. Co. 

Charles O. Brightman, Ex-Commissioner Public Works. 

Hon. Wm. W. Crapo, Ex-M. C, President Wamsutta Mills. 

Philip Y. DeNormandie, Agent Potomska Mills. 

Hon. Lemuel LeB. Holmes, District Attorney. 

Jonathan Howland, Jr., Ex-Member School Committee. 

George W. Hillman, Ex-Member School Committee. 

Nathaniel B. Kerr, Agent Boott Mills, Lowell, Mass. 

John W. Knowles, Agent Acushnet Mills. 



Wm. M. Lovering, Supt. Whittenton Mills, Taunton, Mass. 

Hon. David L. Parker, Postmaster and Ex-Mayor. 

Samuel Ross, Member of Legislature and Secretary National 

Mule Spinners' Association. 
Hon. Rufus A. Soule, State Senator and President Dartmouth 

Mills. 
George R. Stetson, President N. B. Gas and Edison Light Co. 
Samuel J. Smith, Loom Fixer, Wamsutta Mills. 
Isaac B. Tompkins, Jr., Ex-President Board of Trade. 
Herbert E. Walmsley, Agent Wamsutta Mills. 
John Wilkinson, Weaver, Potomska Mills. 



Managing Director, CHRISTOPHER P. BROOKS. 






mil. 




Calen&ar* 

....ffall Germ, 1899..., 

Wednesday, September 13, 1899. Entrance Examination for New Bedford Day 
Students at 10 a. m. 

Friday, September 29. Entrance Examination for non- Resident Day Students 

at 10 a. m. 
Monday, October 2. Beginning of the Fall Term for Day Students. 

Wednesday, October 11. Entrance Examination for Evening Students at 
7.30 p. m. 

Monday, October 23. Beginning of Fall Term for Evening Students. 

Thursday, November 30. Thanksgiving Day. Vacation. 

Friday, December 22 to Monday, January 8, 1900, Christmas Recess. 

Friday, January 26, 1900. End of Fall Term. 

Monday, January 29. Annual Meeting of Corporation. 

Spring Germ, 1900 

Monday, January 29. Beginning of Spring Term. 

Thursday, February 22, Washington's Birthday. Vacation. 

Tuesday, April 3, End of Spring Term and Close of School Year for Evening 

Students. 
Thursday, April 19, Patriots' Day. Vacation. 
Wednesday, May 30, Memorial Day. Vacation. 
Wednesday, June 6, End of Spring Term and of Academic Year. 



Zbe ButlMna. 



The New Bedford Textile School building is a spacious brick structure, 
centrally located on Purchase street, the principal business street of New Bed- 
ford, and is the first building erected exclusively for the purpose of a textile 
technical school in the United States. 

The style of architecture employed in its construction is "Old Colonial," 
an adaptation of the work done in Maryland, Virginia, and parts of New Eng- 
land during the eighteenth century. The substitution of brick for wood in the 
general construction was the marked departure from the New England mode of 
building as found in Maryland and Virginia. The brick was usually laid with 
wide joints in Flemish bond, each course being made by alternate headers and 
stretchers, a header coming over the stretcher below. 

A fine effect was thus attained, both in color and design. 

The dignity and repose of these old buildings were primarily based on their 
symmetry of plan, and their aesthetic excellence was due to this fact, coupled 
with judicious and legitimate adaptation of classic motives to decoration. To 
the entire absence of false precedent was also, to some extent, their merit of ex- 
cellence due. The craftsmen and builders of those days were compelled to re- 
sort for their precedents to the few books on the "Orders," which were mostly 
of English origin. The rules of Pallidio and Vignola, as interpreted by Gibbs 



and Langley through Sir Christopher Wren and Inigo Jones, were faithfully ad- 
hered to in spirit. 

The facade of the New Bedford Textile School is an example of this period, 
and is an admirable addition to the architecture of the public buildings of the 
city. 

The building is of red brick, with trimmings of Indiana limestone. The 
Purchase street entrance opens on an ample vestibule, from which rises a stair- 
case leading to the second and third floors. On either side of this on the first 
floor are corridors which communicate with the machinery room. This is 
65x70 feet, occupies the entire width and about half the length of the building, 
and is well provided with windows. West of this room are the boiler and en- 
gine rooms. On either side of the front vestibule on the first floor are rooms, 
one of which is used for an office and the other as an exposition room, where 
samples of the finished work of the students can be displayed. Opening from 
the machinery room on either side are toilet rooms, and on the north side en- 
trance to the machinery room is afforded by a corridor. 

The second floor is practically a duplicate of the first. One room at the 
front of the building is utilized as a class room, and one, which is considerably 
larger, as a lecture hall. On this floor is a locker room for the students. 

The third floor is devoted to the designing and hand loom weaving depart- 
ments. The well lighted studio at the front of the building is occupied by 
the designer and his assistants and furnished with numerous appliances for the 

8 



most advantageous teaching of fabric designing, while^the large machinery room 
on the same floor is utilized for hand looms, and a portion of it on the north 
side for machine drafting. 

The main building is 64x100 feet and has an annex in the rear, 12x67 feet, 
for the engine and boiler rooms with a rear staircase reserved for use in 
case of fire. 

In designing the school attention has been paid to arranging it in 
the most suitable manner for the purposes of imparting textile instruction, but 
the rear portion will also serve to give an object lesson in cotton mill engineering. 

The structure is of the slow burning mill construction type, approved by the 
leading fire insurance associations and mill engineers, while the general equip- 
ment of the school is also illustrative of the best methods of heating, ventilat- 
ing, humidifying and fire protecting mills. 

The fire protection has been designed and installed by the General Fire Ex- 
tinguisher Co. of Providence, the well known Grinnell sprinkler being used ; the 
American Air Moistening Co. have installed a complete humidifying apparatus, 
while the heating and ventilation illustrate the ordinary methods used in mills, 
except in that portion of the building which is devoted to lectures and recita- 
tions, where the ustial methods of heating and ventilating school rooms are used ; 
the whole equipment having been approved by the Massachusetts State In- 
spectors of public buildings. 



£ffllacbfner\>. 



While some other schools exist which have more machinery for manipulat- 
ing different fibres, such as wool, silk, etc. , there is no textile technical school 
in the world which has so wide a variety of exclusively cotton machinery in its 
equipment, and the machinery of the school may be pronounced as being 
almost perfect for the purpose of a technical school which is to be devoted 
exclusively to the teaching of cotton manufacturing. Almost every maker of 
cotton machinery in the United States is represented in the school, together 
with several English builders, giving the student an admirable opportunity of 
becoming acquainted with machines varied in construction, although utilized for 
performing the same work. 

The machinery is sufficiently complete to enable the raw cotton to be dealt with 
in the school at the several processes until it becomes a woven fabric ; in fact, there 
is a sufficient surplus of machinery of the more important kinds to enable inde- 
pendent experiments to be conducted by the students, under the direction of 
their instructors. 

The student thus has the opportunity of acquainting himself with the con- 
struction and operation of machines such as he may come in contact with later 
in assuming a position in a mill, together with the setting of the same, and cal- 
culations connected therewith. 



10 



Zf±SI 




FIRST FLOOR PLAN 



THE NEW- BEDFORD TEXTILE, -SCHOOL.- 
NEW-BEDFORD r/AASS- 



The knowledge that he obtains is not confined, as in some schools, to any 
one make of machinery, and he thus becomes a more valuable officer to any firm 
securing his services after graduating, and, owing to this wider knowledge, has a 
much better opportunity of securing a position. 

(Tfifrfntt (Tarhittn ^^ department containing the largest amount of machin- 

' ery is the cotton picking, carding and spinning department. 

atlO SpUUttftQ 2/€Pt» In one large room are arranged the following machines: 

i automatic feeder made by the A. T. Atherton Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i single beater breaker lapper made by the A. T. Atherton Machine Co., 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

i single beater finisher lapper made by the Howard & Bullough American 
Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i revolving flat card, made by the Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Mass. 

i revolving flat card, made by the Howard & Bullough American Machine 
Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i revolving flat card, made by the Saco & Pettee Machine Shops, Newton 
Upper Falls, Mass., and Biddeford, Maine. 

i sliver lap machine made by John Hetherington & Sons, Manchester, Eng- 
land, William Firth, Boston, Mass. , Agent. 

i ribbon lap machine made by the Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Mass. 

12 



i comber, made by John Hetherington & Sons, Manchester, England, 
William Firth, Boston, Mass., Agent. 

i railway head, made by the Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Mass. 

i first drawing frame with electric stop motion and metallic rolls, made by 
the Howard & Bullough American Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i second drawing frame with electrical stop motion and metallic rolls, made 
by the Saco & Pettee Machine Shops, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. , and Biddef ord, 
Maine. 

i slubber, made by the Woonsocket Machine & Press Co. , Woonsocket, R. I. 

i first intermediate, made by the Providence Machine Co. , Providence, R. I. 

i second intermediate, made by the Howard & Bullough American Machine 
Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i jack roving frame, made by Dobson & Barlow, Ltd., Bolton, England, 
Stoddard, Haserick, Richards & Co., Boston, Mass., Agents. 

i warp spinning frame, made by the Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, 
Mass. 

i filling spinning frame, made by the Howard & Bullough American Machine 
Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

i spinning mule, made by the Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Mass. 

i twister arranged both for wet and dry work, made by the Draper Co. , 
Hopedale, Mass. 

i winding machine, made by the Universal Winding Co. , Boston, Mass. 

13 



These are in addition to several machines for card grinding, stripping, yarn 
testing, sizing, etc. 

There is a sufficient complement of machinery to enable some students to be 
working on coarse and others on fine work at the same time, and a sufficient 
amount of spare machinery to enable experiments to be conducted and instruc- 
tion to be given in setting and fixing some of the machinery without interfering 
with the operation of the ordinary work of the School. 

This is especially valuable to students in their graduating year. 

The power for this room is transmitted from the engine by means of a 
Lambeth rope drive and an approved system of power transmission by 
shafting and pulleys which has been installed by Jones & Laughlins, Limited, of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

The department is heated throughout by steam heat and humidified by the 
system of the American Moistening Co., Boston, Mass. 

The Weaving Department is in the main room on the 
second floor, the warp preparation machinery being also placed 
Hilt) Mea\>ttt0 2)Cpt in the same room. 

The equipment consists among other machinery, of : 
i spooler, from the Draper Co. , Hopedale, Mass. 
i warper, made by T. C. Entwistle, Lowell, Mass. 

14 



SECOND FLOOR PLAN 



THE • NEW- BEDFORD TEXTILE ' SCHO OJL- 
NEW-BEDFCBRD-i^ASS • 



i warper, made by the Draper Co., Hopedale, Mass. 

i cone winder, from the Howard & Bullongh American Machine Co. , Paw- 
tucket, R. I. 

i reel, made by the Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 

And the following very complete assortment of looms : 

i Crompton gingham loom, 4x1 box, made by the Crompton & Knowles 
Loom Works, Worcester, Mass a 

1 fancy cotton Crompton Loom, 6x1 box with 20 harness dobby, made by the 
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

1 Crompton Leno Loom, 4x1 box with 20 harness dobby, made by the 
Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

1 Knowles Turkish Towel Loom, 3x1 box, with 12 harness dobby, made by 
the Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

1 Knowles gem dress goods loom, 4x4 boxes, 20 harness. 

1 Stafford Leno Loom with 20 harness dobby made by the Crompton & 
Knowles Loom Works, Providence, R. I. 

1 Stafford fancy cotton loom with 25 harness dobby, made by the Crompton 
& Knowles Loom Works, Providence, R. I. 

1 Stafford jacquard loom with 400 hooks, made by the Crompton & Knowles 
Loom Co., Providence, R. I. 

1 Mason Gingham Loom, 4x1 box, made by the Mason Machine Works, 
Taunton, Mass. 

16 



i fancy cotton loom with 25 harness dobby, made by the Mason Machine 
Works, Taunton, Mass. 

1 Northrop magazine loom, made by the Draper Co., Hopedale, Mass. 

2 English plain looms, donated by Stoddard, Haserick, Richards & Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

1 heavy sateen loom, made by Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 

1 plain print loom, made by Kilburn & Lincoln, Fall River, Mass. 

It will be seen that the above list of machinery includes all the varieties 
that are used in cotton mill work in the United States, which affords an oppor- 
tunity of weaving a very wide range of goods. 

This department is well lighted throughout with inverted arc lamps. The 
shafting and pulleys are from Jones & Laughlins of Pittsburg, Pa. , and the 
room is humidified by the apparatus of the American Drosophore Co. 

The machinery room on the third floor of the building is devoted 
to hand loom weaving, and the necessary power machines which are 
used for the preparation of warp and filling for these looms. 
The room is equipped with a number of hand looms adapted to the use of 
the students in the experimental work, and in putting into practice the theory of 
designing that they learn in the school, and to enable them, at a small expense, 
and with little trouble to themselves, to produce the fabrics that they have de- 
signed in the course of their studies. 

17 



(Beneral Equipment 



The power for the machinery is derived from a 40 H. P. engine built by the 
Buffalo Forge Co. of Buffalo, N. Y., and the steam is generated in a 60 H. P. 
Cahall safety vertical water tube boiler. 



Donations, 
Xoans ant) 
IRintmessee 
lEiten&et)* 



Co. 



The Trustees of the school desire to acknowledge donations re- 
ceived from, and courtesies extended by, the following firms: 

The A. T. Atherton Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. L, 1 combina- 
tion feeder and breaker. 

The Atwood Morrison Co., Stonington, Conn., 1 silk quiller. 

American Moistening Co., Boston, Mass., a complete humidifying apparatus. 

American Supply Co., Providence, R. I., supplies. 

Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., looms. 

Covel & Osborn, Pall River, Mass., mill supplies. 

Dobson & Barlow, Ltd., Bolton, England, per Stoddard, Haserick, Richards & 

Boston, Mass., 1 jack frame. 

Draper Co., Hopedale, Mass., 1 spooler, 1 warper, 1 twister, and 1 loom. 

The Dixon Lubricating Saddle Co., Bristol, R. I., supplies. 

D. T. Dudley & Son Co., Wilkinson ville, Mass., hand loom shuttles. 

T. C. Entwistle, Lowell, Mass., 1 warper. 

Excelsior Loom Reed Works, Pawtucket, R. I. , reeds for all looms. 









««pw 



Pelten & Guilleaume, Carlswerk, Mulheim, Germany, 30,000 wire heddles 
and 300 shafts for same. 

Factory Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn., sets of mill plans for students. 

General Fire Extinguisher Co., Providence, R. I., complete equipment for 
fire protection. 

J. Hetherington & Son, Manchester, England, per William Firth, Boston, 
Mass., 1 comb and 1 sliver lap machine. 

Howard & Bullough American Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I., 1 finisher 
lapper, 1 card, 1 drawing frame, 1 second intermediate, 1 spinning frame, and 1 
cone winder. 

Kilburn & Lincoln, Fall River, Mass., one loom. 

Lambeth Rope Co., New Bedford, Mass., driving ropes. 

Laminar Fibre Co., North Cambridge, Mass., cash donation. 

S. C. Lowe, New Bedford, Mass., mill supplies./ 

Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Mass., 1 card, 1 railway head, 1 ribbon 
lapper, 1 mule and 2 looms. 

Metallic Drawing Roll Co., Indian Orchard, Mass., metallic rolls for drawing 
frames and comber. 

John Ormerod & Son, Castleton, Eng., roll leather. 

Providence Machine Co., Providence, R. I., 1 first intermediate. 

E. H. Pierce, New Bedford, Mass., mill supplies. 



19 



Saco & Pettee Machine Shops, Newton Upper Falls, Mass., and Biddeford, 
Maine, i card and i drawing frame „ 

Nat C. Smith, Architect, New Bedford, Mass., the building plans. 

Stoddard, Haserick, Richards & Co., Boston, Mass., 2 looms. 

Thayer & Co., Incorp., Boston, Mass., Donation. 

The Universal Winding Co., Boston, Mass., 2 winding machines. 

The Union Belting Co., Fall River, Mass., all belting required. 

Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass., 1 spinning frame, 1 reel and 1 
loom. 

Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I., 1 slubber. 

Woonsocket Reed and Shuttle Works, Woonsocket, R. I., shuttles. 

W. R. West, New Bedford, Mass., roll covering. 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Asso., Boston, Mass., a file of the 
transactions of the Association. 



g0 ^ New Bedford is an especially suitable location for an insti- 

tution of this character. With but one exception (Fall River) 
this is the largest cotton manufacturing city in the country, its 
CtCltUC SCuOOL spindles numbering 1,282,332 and looms 23,610. It has long 

been famous for the fine cotton yarns, fancy woven fabrics, novelties, and gene- 
rally high grade of goods manufactured within its limits. 

High grade combed yarns are produced in New Bedford to a greater extent 



20 



than in any other city, while the mills are engaged in the manufacture of fine 
shirtings, muslins, lawns, sateens, lenos, checks, pique, jacquard, and other fancy 
fabrics to an extent unknown elsewhere. New Bedford's great advantage in this 
respect can be attributed principally to the fact that her mills are nearly all of 
recent construction with the most improved and up-to-date equipments. With 
but two exceptions her eighteen great textile corporations, operating more than 
forty mills, have all been organized since 1881. The environment of these 
mills is in itself a benefit to those students who select the New Bedford Textile 
School as the institute in which to learn the mill business. 

New Bedford is one of the healthiest of the manufacturing cities in the 
United States, picturesquely situated on the extreme south shore of Massa- 
chusetts, it enjoys the mildest climate in New England and has no malaria, and 
thus offers great advantages to the student. 

It is within short distances of Fall River, Pawtucket, Providence, Taunton, 
Woonsocket and other large cotton machinery building centres. 

T&h£ ©blCCt Of thC ^^ e New Bedford Textile School is an institute of textile 

1Kb*>\tt Ift^hfnr^ technology with especial regard to the manufacture of cotton 

and subjects allied thereto 
SCDOOL The Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in 

the act under which the Trustees of the New Bedford Textile School were in- 
corporated, gives as the purpose of the Corporation that of "establishing and 

21 



maintaining a textile school for instruction in the theory and practical art of tex- 
tiles and kindred branches of industry. ' ' 

This act has been taken advantage of by a Corporation consisting of 
many of the leading manufacturers of New Bedford and Taunton, Mass., 
secretaries of the labor unions of New Bedford, and several of its prominent cit- 
izens, the object being to insure the establishment of a school in which the young 
men of the city who are desirous of being trained for entering the cotton manu- 
facturing industry, in which the mill workers who desire to advance and be pro- 
moted in their respective departments, as well as those men who may make New 
Bedford their temporary residence in order to obtain a thorough cotton mill edu- 
cation, may have every facility to learn the theory as well as have the practice 
of cotton manufacture in all its details from the raw cotton to the finished fabric, 
and also have instruction in the scientific principles which underlie the con- 
struction of the machinery and its operation and the artistic principles which are 
involved in the production of desirable and ornamental fabrics. 

The communities of manufacturers of the leading European nations now 
realize that the trade school is a very valuable, if not a supreme necessity to 
their business, and textile educational institutions are found in England, France, 
Germany, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland and Russia in large numbers. With one 
exception, they have only been introduced within recent years into the United 
States, and it is the determination of the Trustees that the New Bedford Textile 



22 



■ t i.j - i » mnw» j w i— imu mxwrtH wwgMwwwnwn' 



School shall be second to none in its special suitability for teaching the manufac- 
ture of cotton textiles. 

The whole of the machinery in the school is absolutely modern, being con- 
structed especially for the school. It is all high grade, has latest improve- 
ments, and is especially built to afford facilities for all kinds of experimental 
work and represents all the leading types of machines from the best machine 
builders in the United States. 

It is unusual in a textile school to have so very many varieties of machinery, 
but in this case, as will be seen from the list of machinery on pages 10 to 21, 
almost all the leading machine shops are represented, and in many cases ma- 
chinery is installed in duplicate and triplicate so as to accustom students to oper- 
ating machinery of various makes, and to show various methods of setting and 
fixing the same. 

Instruction will be given both in the day and evening. The day courses 
are intended to qualify suitable students to hold positions of responsibility in tex- 
tile manufacturing establishments. Moderate fees will be charged for these 
courses. Evening instruction, similar to the day courses, on the same machinery, 
and by the same teachers, will be given for the benefit of workers in mills and 
machine shops who cannot spare the time or money for day courses. In the 
evening classes instruction will be given in sections so as to give the greatest 
possible facilities to mill workers to obtain such instruction as they may require. 

This sectional curriculum is to some extent adopted in the day courses as a 

23 



feature of the school which will commend itself to those men who have a very 
limited period which they can devote to taking a day course of study, so that a 
man may enter for a period of several months in order to qualify himself in 
some special branch of work. This principle is adopted so that a maximum 
of information on any special subject may be obtained in a minimum of time. 

At the same time records are made for future reference regarding the pro- 
gress made while a student is taking any section of study, and it will be possible 
for him to continue studies in any future year, the section of instruction already 
completed being accepted as a portion of the work of the full course. 

The cotton mill as usually conducted is not particularly adapted for giving a 
young man a technical education. It is an enterprise for making yarns and 
goods rather than developing overseers or superintendents. In fact, for a combi- 
nation of reasons, a young man often finds difficulty in obtaining all the informa- 
tion that he desires in a mill, while the management is often inconvenienced by 
his desire to gain experience. 

The opposite is the case where the primary object of the lecturers and in- 
structors is to instill all the information possible, and there can be no doubt but 
that two years judiciously spent in the New Bedford school are equal to five 
years of aimless wandering from department to department in a mill, without any 
settled plan of procedure, or without the guiding influence of instructors. 

There is no one mill in which there is so large a variety of machinery as in 
the New Bedford Textile School. This consequently affords the student a bet- 

24 






ter opportunity of becoming acquainted with various machines and methods than 
could be found in one manufacturing establishment. 

StSff Of ^k e scno °l * s * n charge of Managing Director C. P. Brooks, M. S. A. , 

tb£ SrhOOl whose experience in the organization and management of Textile 

schools and the superintendence of cotton mills, is extensive. He has 

charge of the Cotton Picking, Carding and Spinning Department, in addition 

to undertaking the duties of Managing Director, and will be assisted in this and 

other departments of the school by fully qualified men of practical experience. 

Among the appointments already made are those of Mr. Thomas Yates, to 
be Principa' of the Weaving Department, Mr. James T. Broadbent, to be Assist- 
ant Instructor of the Cotton picking, Carding and Spinning Department, and Mr. 
Samuel Holt to be Assistant Instructor in Designing and on hand loom work. 
Mr. Thacher E. Crocker has charge of the Power Plant and Miss E. Louise 
Conniff is Registrar and Stenographer. Other appointments will be made be- 
fore the opening of the Pall Term, when the list of assistant instructors will also 
be published. 

IDW COUt0C0 ^he cotirses of instruction in the day school are arranged with a 

nf ffltiafrnrtinti v * ew to preparing men for various positions in cotton mills, and 
* students may enter for any one of the following courses : 

25 



Course No. i, General Cotton Manufacturing Course, 

Course No. 2, Weave Mill Superintendent's Course, 

Course No. 3, Designer's Course, 

Course No 4, Mill Engineer's Course, 

Arrangements will be made, if a. sufficient number of students enroll, for 
Course No. 5, suitable for men intending to hold a position in a dry goods 
commission house, and 

Course No. 6, as preparation for a superintendency of a yarn mill. 

It is not intended that any one of these courses shall occupy more than two 
years to complete, while some of them only occupy one year, thus giving facil- 
ities for those students whose time for study is limited. 

It is possible for a diligent student to complete the full course in two 
years by serious, constant application to study. 

Candidates are strongly recommended to take the regular cotton manufactur- 
ing course, which is the most comprehensive and valuable of any of the courses 
in the school, and, where a student is in doubt as to what his ultimate occupation 
will be, or what position to prepare himself for, no mistake will be made by 
electing to study the regular course of the school. 



26 






Cotton ffS^anufactuttno Course. 

H Uwo gears' Course* 

-.. , COURSE OF STUDY FIRST YEAR. 

The construction of the plain loom. The principle movements in 
UUlCavinQ* weaving. Methods of shedding. Open and close sheds. Relative ad- 
vantages. Shedding motions. Shedding by cams. Auxiliary shafts. Varieties 
of cams. Construction of cams. 

Picking motions. Different methods of picking. Shuttles. Shuttle boxes. 
Shuttle guards. Tight and loose reed looms. Protector motions. Reeds. The 
use of the reed. 

Beating up. The lay and its construction. Method of obtaining the ec- 
centricity of the lay. Long and short cranks. 

Let-off motions. Bartlett, Thompson, Morton, Shepard and other let-off 
motions. 

Take-up motions. Their use in connection with the let-off motion. 
Various makes of take-up motions. Changes of take-up. 

Filling stop motions. Their construction and operation. 

Temples. The various makes and their uses. 

The Draper loom. Special features of its construction. The operation of 
the magazine, the stop motion and other special features of this loom. 

27 



Special features of various makes of looms, including Crompton, Knowles, 
Kilburn & Lincoln, Whitin, Mason, Stafford, Colvin, English and Lowell looms. 

The management, operation and fixing of looms. Putting in warps. Faults 
and remedies in weaving and fixing. Calculations directly connected with plain 
weaving. 

ff&ttCP Looms adapted to weave twills and satins. Looms for the use of 

UTTl^flttf nrt various colors of filling. Drop box motion. Circular boxes. Multipliers. 
y * Building of chains for boxes. 

Looms adapted to weaving fancy cloth with dobbies and jacquards. Single 
acting dobbies. Double acting dobbies. Dobbies with single and double cylin- 
der. Chain pegging for dobbies. Under motions for dobbies. Dobby looms 
combined with other motions for special purposes, such as looms adapted for 
weaving leno, checks, blankets, handkerchiefs, towels and other goods. 

The principle of construction of jacquards. Single and double lift jacquards. 
Jacquard machines with one and two cylinders. Harness lines. Lingoes. Com- 
ber boards. Tieing up jacquards. Cross border and other jacquard machines. 

The various classes of fabrics. The representation of fabrics on 
paper. Design paper and its uses. The methods of obtaining pattern. 
Twills, satins, fancy and diagonal twills. Combinations and arrangement of 
twills. Harness drafts and their representations on paper. Methods of obtain- 
ing harness drafts. Chain drafts and their representation on paper. Method of 

28 

fe ll i ll " 11 J p i BM i | l ww il W I » il i ll | lll lW^^ 






obtaining chain drafts. Boup plans for lenos. The analysis of fabrics with a 
view to their reproduction. The particulars to be obtained by analysis, and 
method of obtaining same most expeditiously and advantageously. 

The dissection of ply fabrics as compared with that of single fabrics. 

Fabrics usually made by harnesses. Bedford Cords, pique, imitation leno, 
figured muslins, dimity, leno, spots, satin and other stripes. 

Cloth calculations. Yarn calculations. Calculations regarding ply yarns. 
Reedfand harness calculations. Calculations of contraction in length of warp 
and weight of material required in either warp or filling to produce given 
fabrics. Calculating particulars of a piece of cloth from the information obtained 
in dissecting small samples. 

IH&tlb XOOITI The hand loom, its construction and use. Practice on the hand 

TKHOVfo* loom in weaving fabrics from original and other designs. 

flllCCbHUi01Tl 8Ub Definition of a machine, mechanism, motion and rest. 

rff . j. Direction of motion. Continuous motion. Reciprocating motion. 

MIlHCIJIIlv Intermittent motion. Velocity. Angular and circumferential 

IDniWiflQ* velocity. Rolling contact. Friction gearing. Grooved gearing. 

Pitch surface and pitch lines. Shafting, pulleys and belting. 

Tight and loose pulleys. Length of belts. Crossed and open belts. Quarter 

turn belts. 

29 



Gears in trains. Spur, bevel and mitre gears. Pitch of gears. Shape of 
teeth. Calculations regarding shafting, pulleys, gearing and belting. 

The elements of mechanism. Levers. Wheel and axle. Pulley blocks. 
The wedge and inclined plane. The screw and its applications. 

flDHCbillC Drawing instruments. Their use and care. Drawing boards. Paper. 

T squares. Varieties of ink, etc. Different lines used in drawings. Meth- 
ods of representing different materials on drawings. Different views of an 
object. Different views of simple objects in orthographic projection. Drawing 
to scale. The use of shade lines. Drawing a gear, a lever, a valve, or some 
simple part of a machine with care and accuracy. 

IKHatP Various methods of preparing cotton warps. Long and short chain 

preparation. s y ste ^ s 

The spooler, its use and construction. Different makes of spoolers. 
The operation and setting of a machine. 

Warpers. The object of the warper. Its construction and operation. 
Speeds, settings, etc. Warpers with and without cone drive. Warper slow mo- 
tions. Faults in warpers and their correction. 

Sizing or dressing yarns. Material used. Methods of mixing same. Suit- 
able materials for various purposes. 

The slasher. Its construction and use. Construction of the different parts 
of the slasher. Faulty and good slashing. 

30 

MM 



Preparing the warp for the loom. Methods of drawing in. Explanation of 
drafts. The construction of reeds and harnesses. Drawing-in frames. 

Variations from the above system for special purposes, such as used in ging- 
ham and other mills. 

COURSE OP STUDY SECOND YEAR. 

COttOU IptCfUnCU R aw cotton. Its varieties. The cultivation of cotton. The 

(Lftt&irtCt preparation of cotton for the market. Cotton ginning. Cotton as 

{Trmihitin fltift an aT ^ c ^ e °f commerce. The selection of cotton, its suitability for 
K , , different purposes. 

;9lHIiIUIiy« Cotton yarn mill machinery. Lists of processes in cotton mills 

for different numbers of yarns. Proper sequence of processes. 

Objects of blending cotton. Methods of mixing same. Bale breakers. 
Picker rooms. Automatic feeders. Construction of different varieties of 
feeders. Their capacity and suitability for the purpose intended. 

The cotton opener. Its use and object. Various styles of openers. Set- 
ting and adjustment of openers. Connection of feeders to openers. The vari- 
ous styles of trunks. Calculations in connection with openers. Breakers. In- 
termediate and finisher lappers. Different styles and makes of machines. Use 
and object of the lapper. Description of aprons, beaters, bars, screens, fans, 
lap heads, evener and measuring motions, etc. The setting and adjustment of 
lappers. Calculations in connection with lappers. 

3i 



Carding. Different methods of carding. Revolving flat card. Its principal 
parts described, including feed, licker, cylinder, doffer, coiler, screens and flats. 
Different setting arrangements. Speeds of different parts. Other methods of 
carding. Top flat cards, roller and clearer, and other cotton cards. Clothing, 
grinding, setting and stripping cards. 

The sliver and ribbon lap machine. Construction of American and English 
machines. Methods of operating same. Setting and adjusting same and calcu- 
lations in connection therewith. 

The cotton comber. The construction of the comber, its use and objects. 
Comber setting. Comber calculations. Operation and management of combers. 

The railway head as used either independently or combined with sections of 
cards. Single and double railway heads. The use and object and disadvantages 
of railway heads. Eveners, draft calculations, etc. 

The drawing frame. Methods of arranging and constructing drawing frames. 
The use and objects of the frame. Gearing, weighting, stop motions, varieties 
of rolls, etc. 

Fly frames. The different fly frames usually used and the use of each . 
Slubbers. First and second intermediates. Roving or jack frames. The con- 
struction and use of the fly frame. Description and use of the different parts. 
Calculations in connection therewith. Changing and fixing frames, etc. 

Spinning, both on frame and mule. The spinning frame. Its construction 
and use. Its principal parts, such as creels, rolls, rings, travellers, speeders, 
builder motions, etc. 

32 



The spinning mule and its uses. The special features of the mule. Descrip- 
tion of the head stock, the cam shaft, mule carriage and other parts. The con- 
struction and use of each part of the mule. Different movements in the mule 
and the timing of the same. The copping rail and the building of a cop. Faults 
in mule spinning and their correction. 

Processes for handling the yarn subsequent to spinning. Reeling. Bund- 
ling. Gassing. Twisting. Doubling. Cabling. Spooling. Warping. Ball- 
ing and baling cotton yarns. 

Management, production, calculations and general information regarding 
each process. 



^m Cotton mill construction. Different styles of building mills. 

EnCtfnCCrittCS Strength of material. Thickness of walls. Features in the arrange- 

ment of the rooms of a mill. Proper sequence of processes and 
arrangement of machinery. Machinery for special plants. Relative positions 
of power houses, passages, elevators, dust rooms, etc. Steam and water power 
plants. Power transmission. Heating, plumbing, humidifying and ventilation of 
cotton mills, fire protection, etc. General mill management. Statistics. Costs. 
Methods and organizations. Principal varieties of goods manufactured and neces- 
sary machinery for same. Principal markets for goods. Duties of mill officials. 



H&V&ttCCb Color as applied to fabrics. Practical lessons in color effects. 

Color definitions. Contrast and harmony of colors. Fabrics de- 
pending on color for satisfactory results, such as ginghams, stripes, 
and figured fabrics. 

Fancy goods other than plain and twills. Leno, gauze or cross weaving. 
Leno weaving from i, 2 and 3 beams. Cloths made with or ornamented by 
extra warp or filling, or both. Box welts. Double cloth pile fabrics, such as 
velvets, corduroys and plush. 

Jacquard designing. Sketching for same. Making design paper. Figures 
for jacquard designs. Designing for jacquard work. 



flDCCb&niStn 8U& Advanced work in machine drawing, leading up to making 

assembly drawings of different parts of a machine and section- 
al drawings of machinery. Tracing drawings. Making blue 
prints, etc. 

Machine design. Features in general construction and design of ma- 
chines. Strength of materials and parts. 



(SCttCt^L Facilities will be given in the second year for the students to perform ex- 

perimental work, and each student graduating will be expected to write a thesis, 

34 



or perform some special work in connection with some matter of general inter- 
est to a cotton mamrfacUrrer. 

Various subjects will be added to the above courses from time to time, as 
may be found necessary to suit the requirements of the different students. 



Weaving flMU Supedntenbent's Course. 

H ®ne Jt?ear Course* 

LpGlHrp Long and short chain systems of preparing cotton warps, 

W>tVttftraHntl spoolers, warpers, slashers, sizing materials, size mixing, reeds, 

harnesses, drafts, dra wing-in, etc. 

CftVlUQ* A full course of instruction in all the different varieties of plain and 

fancy looms, their use, construction and methods of operation. This in- 
cludes plain looms, dobby looms, box looms, jacquard looms. 

S)C0iQttinQ* ^he re P r ^sentation of fabrics on paper, methods of obtaining 

chain drafts, harness drafts. The dissection and reproduction of fa- 
brics. Fabric calculations, and a full course in designing all the or- 
dinary styles of cotton goods from plain to jacquard fabrics. 
Hand-loom work in weaving original and other designs, 

35 



era 



©rawing* 



The use of drawing instruments, drawing materials, the methods of 
representing machine parts on paper, the use of scales, shade lines, dif- 
ferent methods of representing materials on paper, and such instruction 
in machine drawing as will lead up to making an assembly of different 
parts of a machine. 

Course of instruction in machines, motion, velocity, gearing, shaft- 
ing, pulleys, shapes of gear teeth, etc. 

Course fio- 3- ^Designer's Course* 

H TEwo feats' Course* 

This, in the first year, follows the lines of the general cotton manufacturing 
course. The second year of this course, however, is different, almost exclusive 
attention being given to designing and practice on hand and power looms. 

Course IRo* 4- fBMII Engineering Course* 

H Uvoo gears' Course* 

This follows the lines of the general cotton manufacturing course, except- 
ing that especial attention will be given to instruction with regard to power 



■ 



plants, mill designing and engineering and transmission of power, the nature of 
which will depend to some extent on the number of students entering for the 



course. 



Course Bo* 5* l>atn fiMIl Superintenbent's 



H ®ne lear course* 

If a sufficient number of students enroll, a course will be given with es- 
pecial regard to students wishing to qualify for the position of a cotton yarn 
mill superintendent or of overseer in a cotton yarn mill. 

This course is also suitable for the requirements of those intending to en- 
gage in the cotton yarn commission business. 



37 



Course Ulo- 6* 
H)r^ (Boobs Commission Mouse Course* 

H ©ne Kear Course* 

If a sufficient number of students enroll, a special course will be arranged 
with regard to the manufacture and sale of dry goods. 

The manufacture of the goods will not be treated of as technically as in the 
case of students who intend to take up the position of a mill superintendent, 
while other subjects, such as designs, materials, markets, costs, etc., will be dealt 
with more fully than usual. 

HEIt($UHSC0» Should any student desire to include in his course the study of 

the French, Italian, or German languages, arrangements will be 
made for these to be studied under Professor Adolph Schumacher of the Swain 
Free School of New Bedford, Mass. 

Students desiring to pursue advanced academic studies concurrently with 
those in the Textile School have an excellent opportunity of doing so in the 
Swain Free School, founded by the late Governor Swain, and of which the prin- 
cipal is Prof. Andrew Ingraham. 

38 



- — ~— — - v ~ " ■ 



CbCttttottV) &ttb ^° course i n dyeing is included in the curriculum of the New Bed- 
TOtv>itm ^ orc ^ textile School at present but arrangements will be made for any 

XUYKrl 9* student desiring the same to study Chemistry with a view to prepara- 

tion for a course in Textile Chemistry and Dyeing at the Swain Free School 
under Professor William H. Bassett, S. B. Mass. Institute of Technology. 



2)a£ Classes. 



COn&ittOft0 Of Candidates for admission to day classes must be at least 14 years 

fflhttlf aafan °^ a ^ e ' an( ^ rna y ^ e °^ e ^k er sex > or an y nationality. They must have 

certificates of good moral character, and those who have been students 
of other technical institutions, colleges or universities, will be required to fur- 
nish certificates of honorable dismissal from those institutions. Candidates 
having a graduation certificate from a high school or other educational institution 
satisfactory to the Managing Director will be excused from taking the entrance 
examination. Other students will be required to pass an entrance examination 
in Arithmetic and English. 

The examination will be held in New Bedford only. The examination for 
residents of New Bedford will be held in the lecture hall of the school on 



39 



) 
Wednesday, September 13, 1899, at 10 a. m. and for non-resident candidates on 
Friday, September 29, 1899, at 10 a. m. 

As no facilities are provided in the day school for giving academic in- 
struction, candidates are especially recommended to fully qualify themselves in 
these branches, more especially in mathematics, before taking the entrance 
examination. 

All candidates, whether desiring to be enrolled on certificate or by passing 
the entrance examination, must fill out the application blank accompanying this 
catalogue, which should be delivered at the school before September 12th, 1899. 

The certificates of those candidates who desire to be enrolled on certificate 
must be shown to the Managing Director and approved by him, in the case of 
New Bedford students before Tuesday, September 12th, 1899, and in the case of 
non-resident students before Saturday, September 30th. 

For conditions of admission to evening classes, see page 49. 

No candidate will be registered as a student until he has obtained a card of 
admission and paid his first term fees in advance. 

Blank forms of application for admission are mailed with this catalogue or 
may be obtained at the school. 

Students must state on their application blanks what course of study they 
desire to pursue, and for what position they desire to prepare. The privilege 
of changing from one course to another will be extended to all students dur- 
ing the first month of the fall term, but after November 1st, 1899, no request 

40 



for a change in any course can or will be entertained until the commencement 
of another school year. 
jfCC0* Tk e ^ ee ^ or tuition in the day classes is $50.00 per term of approxi- 

mately four months, making $100.00 for the school year, excepting for 
those students who, immediately prior to their application for enrollment, were 
non-residents of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the latter case the fee 
will be $75 per term or $150 per year, in accordance with an act of the Legisla- 
ture of Massachusetts. 

Places in the school will be reserved for day students by an advance pay- 
ment of $25, which will be appropriated towards the tuition fee. No fees will 
be refunded either to the day or evening students, excepting by special action 
of the Board of Trustees. 

The above fee includes free admission to any of the evening classes in 
which there is accommodation and which the day student may desire to attend, 
New Bedford mill workers having the preference. 

Students must provide books, stationery, tools and overalls, and pay for 
any breakage or damage that they may cause, in addition to the above named fees. 

Fees are strictly payable in advance. 
^£|3£ The fall term of '99 will begin on Monday, October 2nd, 1899 and 

Scbool lDear end on Friday ' J anuar y 2<5th > t 9°°- 

** The spring term of *oo, will begin on Monday, January 29th, 

1900, and end on Wednesday, June 6th, 1900. 

41 



Q\)C The school hours will be from 8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. each 

^fhnnl 1Rni1T<; morning, excepting Saturdays, with afternoon session from 2 to 5 

o'clock, excepting on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



\D&CStiOH0# There will be vacations on all legal holidays ; also from Friday, Dec. 

22nd, 1899, to Monday, Jan. 8th, 1900, not inclusive. There will also be 
short vacations after each term and half term examination. 



HttCttbHttCC* Each student will be scheduled for attendance at the school 

through the week at the hours previously named. These schedules 
must be strictly adhered to, and each student will be expected to attend all lec- 
tures, recitations, and demonstrations of practical work excepting when permis- 
sion to be absent has been obtained from the Managing Director. 

A register of attendance will be marked at each meeting of the class, and an 
excessive number of absences during a term will debar a student from presenting 
himself for examination, and necessitate his repeating the work of the term or 
the year. 

In cases of unavoidable absences, either from sickness or other cause, a writ- 
ten explanation must be sent. Where especially requested by parents, cases of 
absences of students will be reported to them weekly or otherwise. 

42 



The Managing Director of the school is frequently asked by those 
IPiCPaiallOru students who have some time to wait before entering upon the course 
of study as to what preparation they might advantageously be making for their 
course in the Textile School. In such cases the candidate is advised to study 
arithmetic carefully and completely, to become acquainted with elementary alge- 
bra and geometry, and to practice free hand and mechanical drawing. 



l£lH1TUn£ltiOn0 Examinations will be held as tests of the student's work at 

ITortifimtoa smh ^ e m id-fall term, end of fall term and mid-spring term. 

aeUlUCaieS auO The annual examination will be held at the end of the spring 

HHplOtTl80« term. Results of these examinations, together with the student's 

record as to satisfactory performance of other work and also as to conduct and 

regularity of attendance will be taken into account in ranking students at the end 

of each year, and for graduation. Unsatisfactory progress as shown by any of 

the term examinations may necessitate the student repeating his studies at the 

discretion of the Managing Director. 

Diplomas will be given on the satisfactory completion of a course of study 
extending over the period named in connection with each course on pages 27 to 
38, if the student's record is otherwise satisfactory. 

Certificates will be given at the close of the first year's course to students 
taking a two years' course, if they have honorably and satisfactorily completed 

43 



their course, which will be supplemented by a diploma on the completion of the 
second year's work. 

Students taking special courses, or a one year course, will be entitled to a 
certificate if they have honorably and satisfactorily completed the course of in- 
struction scheduled. 

Day students are required to spend at least two hours daily out of school 
hours in study, such as recording lectures and other notes, and in entering 
up note and design books. These will be examined by the instructors period- 
ically, and the care and accuracy with which these books are kept will be consid- 
ered in ranking students. No student will be considered qualified to pass the 
mid-term or term examination, unless such books have been kept and entered 
up satisfactorily. Deficiencies or omissions in any study must be made up by 
the student, or he will be required to repeat the work of the whole year, at the 
discretion of the Managing Director. 



3B08tb &ttt) New Bedford is unusually desirable as a residential city, 

-rt and students will find numerous houses of private families, and board- 

ing houses where they may obtain rooms and board. 
No requirements are made as to residence of out of town students, although 
facilities are given by having addresses of suitable houses on file at the 
school. 

44 



No definite estimate can be made of the cost, as this varies entirely on the 
tastes of the student, but rooms and board may be obtained for from $4.00 per 
week, upwards. 

^IOOl0 Htlt) ^k e cost °f these ordinarily does not exceed $10.00 per year, or 

fffSftfr^riflla in some cases $15.00 for day students. 

Students will be required to purchase such materials, text books, 
tools and apparatus as may be required from time to time by the principal of 
each department with the approval of the Managing Director. 

The tools and supplies required vary with the courses for which the stu- 
dent enters. All day students require a suit of overalls, preferably of blue check 
pattern, sample of which can be seen at the school, or will be mailed on re- 
quest, a set of drawing instruments, a T. square, rubber, pencils, eraser, bot- 
tle of drawing ink, thumb tacks, architect's scale, 9 in. triangle, pair of calipers, 
and several note books, lecture record books, and text books. 

COUbUCt* Students will be expected to conduct themselves in a gentlemanly 

manner in or out of the school, and to be punctual and regular in at- 
tendance, polite and orderly in their conduct, decent and respectful in their 
language. 

Rules will be made from time to time with reference to returning all tools, 
materials and apparatus to their proper places, leaving machinery and appara- 

45 



tus clean and in working order, with regard to regular and prompt attendance, 
and other matters connected with the routine work of the school which each stu- 
dent will be required to observe. 

Misconduct, irregularity or lack of observance of the rules indicated above 
will be considered good and sufficient reasons for the suspension of any student 
by the Managing Director and for dismissal from the school by the Education 
Committee and forfeiture of fees paid and of all school privileges. 

(BCUCnil The Trustees of the school will provide a library of books, 

IfnfnrmaHnn textile and other papers, for the use of the students from time to 

time, which may be consulted at such hours and in such a manner 
as may be decided by the Managing Director. 

Lockers are provided free of charge for the use of day students of sufficient 
size to contain clothing, books and tools. A deposit for the key to such locker is 
required from each student, which will be refunded when the key is returned. 

No charts, books, tools, instruments or other property of the school will be 
allowed to be removed from the premises under any circumstances, and students 
are required to obtain the permission of the Principal of the department before 
using any special apparatus for experimental or other purposes. 

No student is allowed to leave the school building between the hours of 
8.30 A. M. and 12.30 P. M., and between 2.00 P. M. and 5.00 P. M. when the 
school is in session, unless with the knowledge and permission of the Principal 

46 



of the department in which he should attend, and also with the consent of the 
Managing Director. 

Students may not claim the attention of instructors at other than the regu- 
lar hours as indicated on the schedules. 

All textile materials will be provided by the Trustees, and the products of 
the machinery remain, or become the property of the Trustees, except by spe- 
cial arrangement. 

Arrangements will be made for students to mount, tabulate and retain cer- 
tain specimens of yarn and fabrics that they have themselves produced, and they 
will be allowed to retain other specimens by making arrangements with the Man- 
aging Director. 

It is understood that the Trustees may retain in the school any specimens 
of student's work, either in books, on paper, or in manufactured material, and 
for such a period as the Managing Director may determine. 

Deposits may be required from time to time to cover possible or probable 
loss or breakage caused by students. 



47 



Evening Classes. 



The school will be in session four evenings per week for the ben- 
efit of those students who are engaged in mills and work shops 
during the day time, and who can only devote evenings to study. This 
department also offers the opportunity, and proposes to provide facilities 
for practically free education in all or any branches of cotton manufacturing 
to those who cannot be expected to defray the whole cost of their textile 
education. No difference is made between the courses of instruction of the 
evening and those of the day. The same machinery and same instructors are 
retained for the evening classes, and in order to accommodate the larger num- 
bers of students generally found in the evening technical schools, additional in- 
structors have also been engaged, for the benefit of the evening students alone. 

A special feature of the evening instruction in the New Bedford 
School which is not usually found in technical schools is in the minute sub- 
division of subjects, so that any one employed in the mill will find in the plan of 
studies something that will assist him or her, and which will apply to the depart- 
ment in which he or she is daily engaged, and yet will not necessitate their entry 
for a long course of study in order to get such instruction as is desired. This in- 
creases the expense of operating the school, and largely adds to the work of ad- 
ministration, but it has been thought desirable to try the experiment, which will 
be further extended, if the methods adopted are found popular. 

49 



The fees in the evening classes have been reduced to a minimum, and 
are barely sufficient to cover the cost of lighting the rooms. The only reason 
for charging any fee is that it is felt that the payment of a fee, however small, 
tends to cause additional interest in the work. 

What has already been stated regarding the school building, the equipment, 
the staff of instructors, etc. , need not be recapitulated in connection with the 
evening classes, but the following explanation as to how different courses are 
sub-divided is necessary. 

Cotton picking, Carbine* anb Spinning 

Department. 

EVCUinCl CD0UV6C6 This department will be in direct charge of Managing Direc- 

f *n tvwrtirm tor ^' ^' brooks, assisted by James T. Broadbent. The instruc- 

Ul AluHlUll u ♦ t « Qn w -jj -^ given by several assistants whose names will be 
announced later. 

Subject A. Cotton Yarn Preparation, including picking and card room 
machinery, and frame spinning, to be completed in a two years' course, two even- 
ings per week, Monday and Thursday. 

Raw Cotton. Its varieties. The cultivation of cotton. 

The preparation of cotton for the market. Cotton ginning. Cotton as an 

5o 



article of commerce. The selection of cotton, its suitabilities for different pur- 
poses. 

Cotton Yarn Mill Machinery. Lists of processes in cotton mills for differ- 
ent numbers of yarns. Proper sequence of processes. 

Objects of blending cotton. Methods of mixing same. Bale breakers. 

Picker rooms. Automatic feeders. Construction of different varieties of 
feeders. Their capacity and suitability for the purpose intended. 

The cotton opener. Its use and object. Various styles of openers. Set- 
ting and adjustment of openers. Connection of feeders to openers. The 
various styles of trunks. Calculations in connection with openers, breakers, 
intermediate and finisher lappers. Different styles and makes of machines. 
Use and object of the evener and measuring motions, etc. The setting and ad- 
justment of lappers. Calculations in connection with lappers. 

Carding. Different methods of carding. Revolving flat card. Its principal 
parts described, including feed, licker, cylinder, doffer, coiler, screens and flats. 
Different setting arrangements. Speeds of different parts. Other methods of 
carding. Top flat cards, roller and clearer and other cotton cards. Clothing, 
setting, grinding and stripping cards. 

The railway head as used either independently or combined with sections 
of cards. Single and double railway heads. The use and object and disadvant- 
age of railway heads. Eveners, draft calculations, etc. 

The drawing frame. Methods of arranging and constructing drawing 

5i 



frames. The use and objects of the frame. Gearing, weighting, stop motions, 
varieties of rolls, etc. 

Fly frames. The number of fly frames usually used and the use of same. 
Slubbers. First and second intermediates. Roving or jack frames. The con- 
struction and use of the fly frame. Description and use of the different parts. 
Calculations in connection therewith. Changing and fixing frames, etc. 

Management and care of machinery. 

Subject B. Cotton combing, together with ribbon and sliver lap machines, 
to be a one term course, (three months) two evenings per week, Monday and 
Thursday. 

Machines used in connection with combers. Preparation of laps for com- 
bers. Construction of the sliver lap machine. Calculations connected there- 
with. Construction of the ribbon lap machine on American and English princi- 
ples. Setting and adjusting same, and calculations connected therewith. 

Different principles of cotton combers, American and English, Single 
and double nip combers. The construction of the ordinary comber. Feed rolls, 
nippers, needles, top combs. Detaching and other mechanism. Cams. Set- 
ting of combers. Care and operation of combers. Draft in sliver and ribbon 
lappers and combers. Defects in combed work and their remedies. Operation 
and management of combers. 

Subject C. Mule spinning, a one term course, three months, two evenings 
per week, Monday and Thursday. 

52 



The mule as constructed by American and English makers. Principles of 
mule spinning. The general construction of mules. Detailed construction of 
mule. Carriages, roll beams, head stock, cam shafts. 

Winding motions. Backing off mechanism. Hastening motions. Jack and 
nosing motions. Copping motions. Faults and remedies in copping. Setting 
and fixing mules. Care and attention required in mule rooms. Calculations. 

Subject D. Frame spinning, spooling, warping and slashing, a one year 
course, two evenings per week, Monday and Thursday. 

Students to receive the early part of their instruction in this subject in the 
cotton yarn preparation and the latter part in the weaving department. 

Spinning on ring frames. The construction of frames. Driving and gear- 
ing. The construction of the various motions of the frames, including the 
builder motion. The construction and use of spindles, rings, travellers, separ- 
ators, etc. 

Warp preparation. Various methods of preparing cotton warps. Long and 
short chain systems. 

The spooler, its use and construction. Different makes of spoolers. 

Warpers. The object of the warper. Its construction and operation. 
Speeds, settings, etc. Warpers with and without cone drive. Warper slow 
motions. Faults in warps and their correction. 

Sizing or dressing yarns. Material used. Methods of mixing same. Suit- 
able materials for various purposes. 

53 



The slasher. Its construction and use. Construction of the different parts 
of the slasher. Faulty and good slashing. 

Preparing the warp for the loom. Methods of dra wing-in. Explanation of 
drafts. The construction of reeds and harnesses. Drawing-in frames. 

Variations from the above system for special purposes such as used in 
gingham and other mills. 

Cotton Weaving Department 

fffov. Ubomas lates, principal* 

TKHCHVtttCW Subject E. Weaving and loom fixing on all the different makes of 

American looms. One year course, two evenings per week, Tuesday 
and Friday. 
The construction of the plain loom. The principal movements in weaving. 
Shedding motions. Open and close sheds. Relative advantages. Methods of 
shedding. Shedding by cams. Auxiliary shafts. Varieties of cams. Con- 
struction of cams. Under and over motions. 

Picking motions. Different methods of picking. Shuttles. Shuttle boxes. 
Shuttle guards. Tight and loose reed looms. Protector motions. Brakes. 
Reeds. The use of the reed. 

54 



The beating up. The lay and its construction. Method of obtaining the 
eccentricity of the lay. Long and short cranks. 

Let-off motions. Bartlett, Thompson, Morton, Shepard and other let-off 
motions. 

Take-up motions. Their connection with the let-off motion. Various 
makes of take-up motions. Changes of pick gears. 

Filling stop motions, side and centre. Their construction and operation. 

Temples. The various makes and their uses. 

The Draper loom. Special features of its construction. The operation of 
the magazine, the stop motion and other special features of this loom. 

Special features of various makes of looms including Crompton, Knowles, 
Kilburn & Lincoln, Whitin, Mason, Stafford, Draper, Colvin and Lowell looms. 

The management, operation and fixing of looms. Putting in warps. Faults 
and remedies in weaving and fixing. Calculations directly connected with plain 
weaving. 

Subject JF. Fancy weaving, including dobbies and drop boxes, both weav- 
ing and fixing, a one year course, two evenings per week, Tuesday and Friday. 

Fancy weaving. Looms adapted to weave twills and satins. Looms for the 
use of various colors of filling. Drop box motions. Circular boxes. Multipliers. 
Building of chains for boxes. 

Looms adapted for weaving fancy cloth with dobbies and jacquards. 
Witches. Single dobbies. Double acting dobbies. Dobbies with single and 

55 



double cylinder. Chain pegging for dobbies. Under motions for dobbies. 
Dobby looms combined with other motions for special purposes, such as leno 
looms, towel looms, blanket looms and others. 

Subject G. Jacquard weaving, a one year course, two evenings per week, 
Monday and Thursday. 

The principle of construction of jacquards. Single and double lift jac- 
quards. Jacquard machines with one and two cylinders. Harness. Lingoes. 
Comber board. Tieing;up jacquards. Varnishing. Couplings. Straight, lay 
over and centre ties. Leno and pressure harness. Cross border and other 
jacquard machines. 



Besuming Department 

Subject H. The designing of all kinds of cotton fabrics, including cloth 
dissection, cloth construction and hand loom work, a two years' course, three 
evenings per week, Monday, Tuesday and Friday. 

IDC0tQntnQ» ^he var i° us classes of fabrics. The representation of fabrics on 

paper. Design paper and its uses. The methods of obtaining pat- 
tern. Twills. Satins, fancy and diagonal twills. Combinations and re-arrange- 
ment of twills. Harness drafts and their representation on paper. Methods of 

56 



obtaining harness drafts. Chain drafts and their representation on paper. 
Methods of obtaining chain drafts. The analysis of fabrics with a view to their 
reproduction. The particulars to be obtained by analysis, and method of obtain- 
ing the same most expeditiously and advantageously. 

The dissection of ply fabrics as compared with that of single fabrics. 

Fabrics usually made by harnesses. Bedford Cords, pique, imitation leno, 
figured muslins, dimity. 

Yarn calculations. Calculations regarding ply yarns. Cloth calculations. 
Reed and harness calculations. Calculations of contraction in length of warp, 
and weight of material required in either warp or filling to produce given fab- 
rics. Calculating particulars of a piece of cloth from the information obtained 
in dissecting small samples. 

Color as applied to fabrics. Practical lessons in color effects. Color defi- 
nitions. Contrast and harmony of colors. Fabrics depending on color for sat- 
isfactory results, such as ginghams, stripes, spotted and figured fabrics. 

Fancy goods other than plain and twills. Leno, gauze or cross weaving. 
Leno weaving from i, 2 and 3 beams. Cloths made with or ornamented by ex- 
tra warp or filling, or both. Box welts. Double cloth pile fabrics, such as vel- 
vets, corduroys and plush. 

Jacquard designing. Sketching for same. Transferring to design paper. 
Figures for jacquard designs. 



57 



flDecbanical anb flfeatbematical departments. 

Subject. Textile calculations, including arithmetic ; also spinning, weaving, 
shafting, and other calculations. One year course. Fall term, two evenings 
per week, Thursday and Friday. Spring term, two evenings per week, Tuesday 
and Friday. 

J First Section. Powers and roots. The extraction of square roots. Per- 
centage. Proportion. Mensuration. Measurements of squares, rectangles, 
triangles, circles, cylinders and calculations connected with finding the contents 
of such figures. Circumference and diameters of circles. Shafting calculations. 
Figuring velocities. Required sizes of gears and pulleys. Pitch and pitch cir- 
cles. Leverage. Principles of calculating leverage. 

Yarn calculations. Methods of numbering yarns for cotton, silk and other 
materials. Methods of finding the number of yarns by various methods. Reel- 
ing or sizing yarns. Double and other ply yarn calculations. Fall term, Thurs- 
day and Friday evenings. 

K Second Section. Drafts. The principle of drafting. Calculation of draft in 
drawing, slubbing, roving, spinning and other machinery. General principles of 
calculating constants for draft gears, twist gears, etc. General principles of calcu 
lating changes of gears for various purposes. Cotton mill machinery. Calcu- 
lations of ^production of machinery. Spring term, Tuesday evenings. 

58 



L Third Section. Calculations connected with warp preparation and weaving. 
Spooling, warping and slashing calculations. Calculating weights of warp 
beams. Calculations of take-up motions on looms, size of shed, size of cams, 
etc. Calculations of weight and proportions of warp and filling required to pro- 
duce certain fabrics. Calculations regarding shrinkage and contraction in warp 
or filling. Calculating costs of fabrics. Calculating extent of foreign matter 
in fabrics. Calculations for reeds and harnesses. Spring term, Friday even- 
ings. 



Arrangements will be made by which students shall have facilities for study- 
ing Geometry, Machine Drawing and Freehand Drawing. Further information 
regarding these classes will be given later. 

Subject M includes a course of instruction in Geometry and is intended to 
occupy from 20 to 30 weeks, two evenings per week. 

Subject iV includes a course of instruction in Machine Drawing somewhat 
similar to the one indicated under the head of the day course, first and second 
year. It is intended that this course shall occupy two years, two evenings per 
week and from 20 to 30 weeks per year. 

Subject O includes a course of instruction in Freehand drawing intended to 
lead up to sketching for jacquard designing and other branches of ornament as 
applied to textiles. 

59 



HSntninCC IRCCJUitC^ Students who are in possession of a graduation certifi- 

1Tt£tt1ta atlh iFtirfilT- cate ^ rom a grammar or a high school will be admitted to 

the evening classes without passing an entrance examina- 

TliCiil9« tion. Candidates presenting to the Managing Director a 

certificate showing that they have taken a course of instruction in any institu- 
tion corresponding to, or higher than a grammar school, or who can give satis- 
factory evidence of their ability to read and write English, and of a knowledge 
of elementary arithmetic will be excused from an entrance examination, at the 
discretion of the Managing Director. Students must be at least 14 years of age. 
All other candidates for evening classes will be required to pass the entrance 
examination, which will be held on Wednesday, October 11, 1899, in the lecture 
hall of the school at 7.30 P. M. The subjects of this examination will be read- 
ing and writing English, and elementary arithmetic, to include addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers and fractions. 

It is not intended to make this examination sufficiently stringent to debar 
from attendance any except those whose education is so deficient that 
they would not derive any benefit from the school, and who would tend to retard 
the progress of the other students in the same class. 

1f££0 4 The fees for the evening classes will be uniformly $2.50 per term of 

three months, in each subject, as indicated by the letters from A to O. This 
is on a basis of two evenings per week, so that students taking two subjects and 
attending four evenings per week will pay $5.00 per term. 

60 



The only subjects which will be an exception to the above rule are M, N and 
O, in which instruction will be given free to residents of New Bedford. 

Examinations of the evening students will be held at the end of 

JblaminaUOiu?* eac h term, and on the results of these examinations, considered to- 
gether with the care and attention that has been devoted to entering up the 
lecture and other record books, the working out of designs and other work re- 
quired out of school, certificates will be awarded. These certificates will specify 
definitely what section of study has been taken by each student, and the progress 
that has been made in same, and will only be awarded where the studies have 
been completed to the satisfaction of the instructor and Managing Director. 
A permanent record is kept of the work of each student. Should any one 
desire to take a sufficient number of sections of study to complete a diploma 
course, such as is indicated in connection with the programme of the day classes, 
this may be arranged and as each section is completed a certificate will be 
awarded and ultimately the diploma given when all the sections of the studies 
which make up the diploma course have been completed. 

Tl/>nnf-h nf Evening school will be in session from Monday, October 23rd, 1899^ 

** to Tuesday, April 3rd, 1900, excepting on all legal holidays and other 

5C00lOrU vacations as indicated in the school calendar and on page 42. 

The school will be open on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday even- 
ings, the classes being held from 7.15 to 9.15 p. m. On a following page a 
preliminary schedule for the evening classes is given, which is liable to alter- 

61 



ations, according to the number of students enrolling for each subject, which 
may necessitate a rearrangement of the hours allotted for the use of various 
class rooms and machinery rooms. 

7Yf\fs\a jjtth ^^ students in the evening classes will be required to purchase from 

time to time such books, tools and materials as may be required by the 

flD&t€tt&l$» Principals of the different departments with the approval of the Manag- 
ing Director. The cost of these varies according to the subject selected, but as 
a rule the cost does not exceed $3.00 for each student for the necessary 
materials to commence with, and $1.50 or $2.50 per term subsequently. 

Each candidate for admission to the evening class must fill out an appli- 
cation blank for enrollment, which may be obtained at the school, and which 
must be delivered at the school before September 29th, 1899, together with the 
notification of his intention to take the entrance examination. Candidates not 
intending to take the entrance examination, but to enter on certificate as named 
on page 60, must present to the Managing Director such evidence or certificate 
on or before October 6th, 1899. 

It is strongly recommended to those candidates whose education is not equal 
to the graduating standard of the grammar school, that they enter the evening 
grammar school, as this will enable them to make much more rapid progress 
later in the evening Textile School. 



62 



ROOM. 



TEvcniWQ 

MONDA Y. 



Classes, 

TUESDA Y. 



of Studies* 

TIIURSDA Y. 



FRIDA Y. 



Cotton 
Room. 


C. Practice (i). 


A. Practice (3). 
C. Practice (2). 


A. Practice (1). 
B Practice (1). 


A. Practice (2). 

B. Practice (2). 


Class Room. 
1st Floor. 


O. 


M. 


O. 


M. 


Weave 
Room. 


D. Practice (i). 

E. Practice (2). 


D. Practice (2). 
F. Practice (1). 


D. Practice (3). 

E. Practice (3). 
G. Practice (1). 


E. Practice (1). 

F. Practice (2). 


Lecture 
Hall. 


A. Lecture and 
Recitation. 


E. Lecture & Recit. 


D. Lecture & Recit. 


F. Lecture & Recit. 


Class Room. 
2d Floor. 


G. Lecture & Recit. 




C. Lecture & Recit. 




Hand Loom 
Room. 


N(2). 


Hand Loom 

practice (3). 

N (1). 


H. Hand Loom 
practice (2). 

N(2). 


H. Hand Loom 
practice (1). 

N(i). 


Design 

Room. 

3d Floor. 


H. Lecture & Recit. 


H. Analysis 

practice (1). 


H. Analysis 

practice (2). 


H. Analysis 

practice (3). 


Class 

Room. 

3d Floor. 


B. Lecture & Recit. 


K. Lecture & Recit. 
Spring Term. 


J. Fall Term. 
Lecture & Recit. 


J. Fall Term. 

L. Spring Term. 

Lecture and Recit. 



For references to the subject letters see pages 50 to 59. 

63 



The general arrangement is to have one evening per week devoted to a 
lecture and recitation in connection with each subject, and one evening to 
practical work in connection with the same. In several cases the lecture class is 
divided up into two or three sections for practical work. This will only be done 
in case of the classes being too large to be taken together in practical work in one 
evening. Demonstration evenings are lettered i, 2 and 3, and practical work 
will be surely taken on the evening numbered "1", but will not be taken on 
the evenings numbered "2" and "3" unless the number of students enrolling 
necessitates same. 

SClCCttOn ^^ e Managing Director will be glad to assist candidates in selecting 

Of a(L0ttr8£ a cotirse > or &i ye them any advice that they may desire, and for this pur- 
pose will be at the school each day from 11 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. ; 
also on Monday, Tuesday and Friday evenings, September 18th, 19th and 2 2d, and 
on Monday, Tuesday and Friday evenings October 9th, 10th and 13th from 
7 p. m. to 9 p. m. 

(BCUCrnL * n general, and when not otherwise stated above, the rules and regula- 

tions and general information given regarding the day classes will apply to 
the evening classes. 

IDOnBtiOtlB* Addenda to page 19. The trustees desire to acknowledge: — • 

Shafting and pulleys from Jones & Laughlins, Ltd., Pittsburg, Pa., and 
Bobbins and Spools from Fall River Bobbin & Shuttle Co., Fall River, Mass.* 

64 




THE TEACHING OF 
COTTON MANUFACTURING 
A SPECIAL FEATURE 
OF THIS SCHOOL 




STANDARD PRINT. 



SMU 

ARCHIVES 



8595 




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