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CATALOGUE 
1916 — 1917 





Purchase Street 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 



3 



CATALOGUE 



New Bedford 
Textile School 




NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 
1916-1917 



OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION FOR THE YEAR 

1916. 



WLLLIAM E. HATCH, President. 
FREDERIC TABER, Treasurer. 
JAMES O. THOMPSON, JR., Clerk. 

TRUSTEES. 

On Behalf of the Commonivealth of Massachusetts. 
WILLIAM E. HATCH. 
ABBOTT P. SMITH, 
Director Butler, N. B. Cotton, Quissett, Soule and Taber Mills. 

Ex-Officio on the part of the City of Neiv Bedford. 

Hon. EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, Mayor. 

ALLEN P. KEITH, Superintendent of Schools. 

TRUSTEES AT LARGE. 

LEWIS E. BENTLEY, former Superintendent Bennett Mills 

of the New England Cotton Yarn Co. 

GEORGE E. BRIGGS, Director Whitman Mills. 

CHARLES O. BRIGHTMAN. 

W T ILLIAM A. CONGDON, Agent Whitman Mills. 

HON. W. W. CRAPO, President Acushnet, Potomska and Wam- 

sutta Mills, and Director Gosnold and -Hathaway Mills. 

WILLIAM O. DEVOLL, Treasurer Potomska Mills. 

CHARLES O'. DEXTER, Agent Beacon Manufacturing Co. 

JOHN DUFF, President Soule Mill, and Director Bristol Mill. 

THOMAS F. GLENNON, Agent Quissett Mill. 

CHARLES M. HOLMES, Treasurer Holmes Mill. 

NATHANIEL B. KERR, Vice President Butler Mill, Director 

New Bedford Cotton Mills. 

EDWARD O. KNOWLES. 

JOHN NEILD, Agent Neild Mill. 

HON. DAVID L. PARKER, Director Pierce and Potomska Mills. 

HON. SAMUEL ROSS, Secretary Mule Spinners' Union. 

JOHN SULLIVAN, Agent of Taber Mill. 

FREDERIC TABER, President Taber Mill, New Bedford Safe 

Deposit and Trust Co., and New Bedford Cooperative Bank. 

JAMES O. THOMPSON, JR., Agent N. B. Cotton Mills. 

W T ILLIAM A. TWISS, Superintendent Kilburn Mill. 

SAMUEL F. WINSPER, Superintendent City Mill. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM E. HATCH, Chairman. 
NATHANIEL B. KERR, LEWIS E. BENTLEY, 

CHARLES M. HOLMES, ABBOTT P. SMITH, 

JAMES O. THOMPSON, JR., FREDERIC TABER. 



ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION. 



ADMINISTRATION. 

William E. Hatch, A. M., 
President of the Corporation and Managing Director 
Frederic Taber, Treasurer. 
Maud L. Clark, Chief Clerk. 
Doris F. Young. Assistant Clerk. 



INSTRUCTION. 

Henry W. Nichols, A. B. 

Chief Instructor. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

William Smith, 

Carding and Spinning. 

Thomas Yates, 

Warp Preparation and Weaving. 

Samuel Holt, 

Designing. 

Frank Payton, 

Knitting. 

Everett H. Hinckley, S. B., 

Chemistry and Dyeing. 

Sereno G. Miller, M. E., 

Engineering. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Morris H. Crompton, 

Machine Shop Practice. 

Thomas B. O'Brien, 

Carding and Spinning. 

Raymond A. Burt, John W. Baldwin, 

Chemistry and Dyeing. 



Engineer, 
John F. Judge. 



The President, Chief Instructor and Heads of Departments 

constitute the Faculty of the School. 

The Day Instructors serve both day and evening. 




MAIN STAIRWAY, MACHINERY BUILDING 



ASSISTANT EVENING INSTRUCTORS. 



Carding and Spinning: 

Bruce Cary, Charles F. Heap, 

Stephen K. Dyer, Leonard H. Mellor, 

John F. Glennon, Harold A. Perkins, 

Harry L. Ray. 



Warp Preparation and Weaving: 
Benjamin A. Bradshaw, William Mitchell, 
Albert E. Dean/ Josef Niedzwicki. 

Frederick W. Holt, Joseph Pedro, 

Peter J. Macy, John Reynolds. 

Patrick J. Ma honey, John Yanovsky, 



Mill Calculations: 
John F. Hagen. 

Arithmetic : 
Harrison D. Ricketson. 

Designing : 
Victor 0. B. Slater, Jean C. Uberti. 

Mechanical Drafting : 

Milton J. Bentley, Wallace B. Baylies, 

James L. Sherman, 2nd. 

Machine Shop Practice: 
Albert Jones, Simeon B. Livesley. 



1916 


CALENDAR 


1917 


JULY. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTEMBER. 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


W I 


h Pr 


Sa 


Su Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 





_ 


— 


_ 





1 


— 


— 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


o 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 1 


3 14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 2 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 2 


7 28 


29 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


— 


— 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


30 


31 






































OCTOBER. 


NOVEMBER. 


DECEMBER. 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


W T 


h Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


1 w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


— 


— 


- 


1 


2 


3 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


2 


8 


9 


10 


11 1 


2 13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


15 


16 


17 


18 1 


9 20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


22 


23 


24 


25 2 


6 27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


29 


30 


31 


— - 


- — 


— 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30. 


— 


— 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


MARCH. 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


W T 


h Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Fr 


Sa 


— 


1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


_ 


— 





_ 


1 


2 


3 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


1 


2 


3 


7 


8 


9 


10 1 


112 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


14 


15 


16 


17 1 


8 19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


21 


22 


23 


24 2 


5 26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


28 


29 30 


31 - 


— 


— " 


25 


26 


27 


28 


— 


— 


— 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


APRIL. 


MAY. 


JUNE. 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


W T 


h Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


Sa 


Su 


Mo 


Tu 


w 


Th 


Pr 


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1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


_ 


— 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


8 


9 


10 


11 1 


2 13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


15 


16 


17 


18 1 


9 20 


21 


,13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


22 


23 


24 


25 2 


6 27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


29 


30 






" 




1 


28 


29 


30 


31 




—™ 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 



SCHOOL CALENDAR— 1916-17. 



1916. 

Thursday, June 15, at 9 a. m. First Entrance Examina- 
tions for Day Students. 

Friday, Sept. 8, at 9 a. m. Second Entrance Examinations 
for Day Students. 

Monday, Sept. 11. Beginning of First Semester for Day 
Students. 

Thursday, Sept. 21, and Friday, Sept. 22, from 7 to 9 p. 
m. Enrollment of Evening Students at the School. 

Monday, Sept. 25, at 7.30 p. m. Beginning of First Term 
for Evening Students. 

Monday, Nov. 13 to Friday, Nov. 17, inclusive. Mid-term 
Examinations, First Semester for Day Students. 

Wednesday, Nov. 29, 12 m., to Saturday, Dec. 2, inclusive. 
Thanksgiving Recess. 

Monday, Dec. 11 to Friday, Dec. 15, inclusive. Examina- 
tions for Evening Students. 

Friday, Dec. 22. End of First Term for Evening Students. 

Saturday, Dec. 23 to Tuesday, Jan. 2. 1917, inclusive. 
Christmas Recess. 

1917. 

Monday, Jan. 1, and Tuesday, Jan. 2, from 7 to 9 p. m. 

Enrollment of Evening Students for Second Term at 

the School. 
Thursday, Jan. 4, at 7.30 p. m. Beginning of Second 

Term for Evening Students. 
Monday, Jan. 22 to Friday, Jan. 26, inclusive. Mid-year 

Examinations for Day Students. 
Friday, Jan. 26. End of First Semester for Day 

Students. 



11 



Monday, Jan. 29. Beginning of Second Semester for 
Day Students. 

Monday, March 26 to Friday, March 30, inclusive. Ex- 
aminations for Evening Students. 

Friday, March 30. End of Second Term for Evening- 
Students. 

Monday, March 26 to Friday, March 30, inclusive. Mid- 
term Examinations, Second Semester for Day Stu- 
dents. 

Saturday, March 31 to Saturday, April 7, inclusive. 
Spring Eecess. 

Tuesday, June 5 to Friday, June 8, inclusive. Final Ex- 
aminations for Day Students, Senior Class. 

Monday, June 11 to Thursday, June 14, inclusive. Final 
Examinations for Remainder of Day Classes. 

Thursday, June 14. First Entrance Examinations for 
Day Students. 

Friday, June 15. End of School Year and Graduating 
Exercises. 




o 
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DC 



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13 



THE LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL. 

The school is situated in the centre of the city of New 
Bedford, Mass., on the main car line of the city which 
connects the mill districts and is readily accessible to mill 
operatives who attend the evening sessions of the school. 
It is near the residential part of the city and is therefore 
conveniently situated for non-resident pupils who take up 
a temporary residence in the city. 

New Bedford is an especially suitable location for an 
institution of this character. It is the largest cotton 
manufacturing city of fine yarns and fancy woven fabrics 
and novelties in the country. Its spindles number 
3,014,851 and looms 53,733. Capital invested $41,814,500, 
and employees 32,120. Several large additions to mills 
are now under way that will add thousands of spindles to 
the above. 

High grade combed yarns are produced in New Bed- 
ford to a greater extent than in any other city, while the 
mills are engaged in the manufacture of fine shirtings, 
muslins, lawns, sateens, lenos, checks, piques, and other 
fancy fabrics to an extent unknown elsewhere. New Bed- 
ford's great advantage in this respect can be attributed 
principally to the fact that her mills are nearly all of 
recent construction with the most improved and up-to- 
date equipment. The environment of these mills is in 
itself a benefit to the students who select the New Bedford 
Textile School as the institution in which to learn the 
mill business, as they have opportunity to observe their 
construction and operation and to find employment in 
them during the long summer vacations and upon finish- 
ing their course in the school. 

New Bedford is within short distance of Hopedale, 
Whitinsville, Hyde Park, Providence, Pawtucket, Woon- 
socket, Taunton, and other large cotton machinery centres. 



15 



It is one of the healthiest of the manufacturing cities in 
the United States. Picturesquely situated on the extreme 
south shore of Massachusetts, it enjoys one of the mildest 
winter climates in New England and thus offers peculiar 
residential advantages for non-resident students. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

- The school is housed in two separate buildings con- 
nected by a tunnel in the basement and by covered bridges 
overhead. They are constructed of red brick with trim- 
mings of Indiana sandstone. They are classified as the 
machinery building and the recitation building. 

The first now comprises the original building, erected 
in 1898-9, and the first two additions, erected in the years 
1901-2 and 1905 respectively. This building is 164 feet in 
length, with an average depth of 77.3 feet. It is three 
stories high with basement under most of it and contains 
a floor space of 46,600 square feet. In it are situated the 
administration offices, the power house, and all the depart- 
ments comprised in a cotton yarn and cotton cloth mill 
as shown by the cuts distributed throughout this 
catalogue. In addition it has two large thoroughly 
equipped rooms for instruction in the art of knitting, both 
for hosiery and underwear, also shown in cuts. 

The recitation building was completed and occupied 
in the fall of 1911. It consists of a main building 108 feet 
by 93 feet 6 inches, three stories high, with a deep well- 
lighted basement under the whole of it and contains 40,392 
square feet of floor space. It also has an annex 68 feet 3 
inches long by 19 feet 3 inches deep, one story high, with 
basement, and contains 2,634 square feet of floor space. 
This annex is used as an experimental laboratory and as a 
store room for chemical supplies. 

The main building besides being equipped with recita- 
tion and lecture rooms of various sizes, has a thoroughly 
equipped chemical laboratory, dyeing and finishing 
rooms, engineering laboratories, a commodious machine 



17 



shop, drafting rooms, a designing room especially fitted, 
an exhibition room, and an assembly hall that will seat 
four hundred persons. 

Both structures are of the slow burning mill construc- 
tion type approved by the leading fire insurance associa- 
tions and mill engineers, while the general equipment of 
the plant is also illustrative of the best methods of light- 
ing, heating, ventilating, humidifying and fire-protecting 
mills. Great attention has been paid, in planning and ar- 
ranging these buildings for the school, to make them most 
suitable for the purposes of imparting textile instruction 
and that the machinery building should give an object 
lesson in cotton mill engineering. 

Power, heat and light are supplied the school from its 
own power plant. The fire protection was designed and 
installed by the General Fire Extinguisher Co. of Provi- 
dence, R. I., the well-known Grinnell sprinkler being 
used. The American Moistening Co. installed a complete 
humidifying apparatus. The whole equipment is ap- 
proved by the Massachusetts State Inspectors of public 
buildings. 

THE SCHOOL AND ITS PURPOSE. 

The Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, in the Act under which the Trustees of the New 
Bedford Textile School were incorporated, gives as the 
purpose of the incorporation that of establishing and 
maintaining a textile school for instruction in the theory 
and practical art of textiles and kindred branches of 
industry. 

As New Bedford is primarily a cotton-manufacturing 
city, this school confines itself principally to instruction 
in the cotton branch of the textile industry and seeks to 
perfect itself in this line. Its course of instruction is 
arranged to subserve the interests of two general classes 
of students: (1) day students, those who give their whole 
time for two or three years to acquiring the theory as well 



19 



as the practice of cotton manufacturing in all its details, 
from the raw cotton to the finished fabric, and also have 
instruction in the scientific principles which underlie the 
construction of the machinery and its operation, and the 
artistic principles which are involved in the production of 
desirable and ornamental fabrics; (2) evening students, 
those who are employed in the mills during the day and 
who, by attending the Textile School evenings, are able to 
learn other phases of the industry from that in which they 
are employed, or to perfect themselves in their special lines 
of work, and become more efficient workmen. The courses 
of instruction for these two classes of students are given 
fully on other pages of this catalogue. 

The whole of the machinery in the school is absolutely 
modern, being constructed especially for the school. It is 
all high grade, has latest improvements, and is especially 
built to afford facilities for all kinds of experimental work, 
and represents all the leading types of machines from the 
best builders in the United States, and several English 
builders. 

There is no mill in which there is so large a variety of 
machinery as in the New Bedford Textile School. This 
consequently affords the student a better opportunity to 
become acquainted with various machines and methods 
than could be found in any one manufacturing establish- 
ment. 

Each instructor in the day school is a man who is 
thoroughly conversant with the work of the department 
under his charge by thorough training and long experi- 
ence. Each one has charge of the work in his department 
at night also, assisted by experienced assistants from the 
mills, many of whom are graduates of this school. 

The school went into operation in 1899 and the first 
class was graduated in 1900. The regular courses were 
at first one year in length. This continued for several 
years, but these were afterward lengthened and now the 
regular diploma courses are three years long. Special 



21 



courses of shorter length are arranged, however, for 
students for which certificates are granted. 

Since the school was opened, over seven thousand 
students have attended the school and received instruction 
in courses of various lengths. Of these, two thousand, 
forty-nine have been awarded diplomas or certificates. 
Reports received from them show that the knowledge 
acquired in this school has proved of great benefit to 
them in securing more rapid advancement in the industry 
than would have been possible without such instruction. 
Employers and employes both unite in testimony as to the 
value of the textile schools in promoting the efficiency, 
broadening the scope of opportunity^ and securing advance- 
ment in the cotton mills and allied industries to those who 
have had the advantages offered by them. 



22 



DAY CLASSES. 

The regular day courses of the school are as follows : 
General Cotton Manufacturing. 
Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing. 
Designing. 
Textile Engineering. 
Seamless Hosiery Knitting. 
Latch Needle Underwear Knitting. 

All the above courses are diploma courses, three 
years long, and are intended to qualify students to hold 
positions of responsibility in textile manufacturing and 
allied establishments. 

The advantages of these courses to qualify men to 
hold responsible positions in cotton mills, dyeing and fin- 
ishing plants, commission houses, etc., are many. These 
industries, as conducted, are not adapted to give a young 
man a technical education. The opposite is the case where 
the primary object is to impart knowledge and to train 
in the correct method of doing things. 

It is not expected that a young man, going from this 
school, will at once secure an executive position. It is 
expected, on the contrary, that he will begin in a more 
humble fashion, and, with the knowledge acquired in the 
school and the experience gained in the mill itself, he 
will be qualified to hold higher positions and his advance- 
ment will be much more rapid and his knowledge broader 
than one who has not had the school instruction and 
training. That such is the case is shown already by 
the positions now held by the graduates of the school. 

Many of them are occupying positions of trust and 
responsibility in the textile and allied industries as manu- 
facturers, treasurers, agents, superintendents, assistant 
superintendents, designers in mills and commission houses, 
overseers, chemists and dyers, etc. Some have been called 



23 



to good positions as designers directly from the school 
and many who have attended the evening classes have 
so improved in skill and knowledge that they have ad- 
vanced in position and earning power. 

That the work of the school is recognized by textile 
manufacturers and those engaged in allied industries is 
attested by the fact that applications are constant for 
men of the school, more than can be supplied. One of 
the largest bleaching establishments in the country has 
assured us that it is ready to take all the men from the 
chemistry and dyeing department that we will recommend. 

But this school does not agree to make successful 
men out of lazy, careless, and indifferent boys, nor does it 
care for such boys as students. But for those who wish to 
learn, who are ready to work, who are willing to bide their 
time, it does offer an opportunity that will supply them 
with an honorable vocation with many opportunities for 
advancement in the world with good remuneration. 

In case a prospective student feels that no one of 
the diploma courses meets his particular needs he is re- 
quested to communicate with the president and manager, 
stating his wishes. Whenever possible, special courses 
will be given in the various departments for which certi- 
ficates will be granted stating the subjects taken and the 
time given to them. The limitations of these special 
courses will be determined in every case by the manage- 
ment. 



24 
GENERAL COTTON MANUFACTURING COURSE. 



FIRST 


YEAR. 




First Term. 


Second Term. 




Hours 


Ho 


urs 


Subject per week 


Subject per 


week 


Pickers and Cards 


Cards and Drawing 




(101), 6% 


Frames (102), 


5 


Weaving (111), 6% 


Weaving (112), 


5 


Cloth Analysis (121 & 


Warp Preparation 




151), 3% 


(122), 


3% 


Designing (131), 1% 


Designing (132), 


1% 


Hand Loom (161), 1 y 2 


Cloth Analysis (152), 


3% 


Principles of Mechanics 


Hand Loom (161), 


■1% 


(171), 1 


Mechanical Drawing 




Mechanical Drawing 


(172), 


3 


(172), 5% 


Machine Shop Practice 




Chemistry (182), 6% 


(174), 
Textile Chemistry and 


3 




Dyeing (222), 


6.y 2 



SECOND YEAR. 



First Term. 



Subject 
Roving and Spinning 

Frames (103), 
Weaving (113), 
Designing (133), 
Cloth Analysis (153), 
Machine Drawing 

(173 and 175), 
Machine Shop Practice 

(174), 
Steam Engineering 

(176), 
Dyeing (223), 



Hours 
per week 



10 



3% 

2 
5 



iy 2 



i% 

6 



Second Term. 

Hours 
Subject per week 

Doubling and Drafting 

(104), 6% 

Cotton Sampling (107), 1% 
W T eaving (114), 5% 

Designing (134), 2 

Cloth Analysis (154), 5 
Machine Shop Practice 

(174), 3 

Machine Drawing (175), 1 y> 
Steam Engineering 

(176), iy 2 

Textile Chemistry (234), 6 



THIRD YEAR. 



First Term. 




Hours 


Subject per ■< 


week 


Combers and Mules 




(105), 


10 


Weaving (115), 


ey 2 


Designing (135), 


iy 2 


Color (145), 


2 


Cloth Analysis (155), 


4y 2 


Machine Shop Practice 




(174), 


3 


Electrical Engineering 




(177), 


2 


Option of Carding and 




Spinning or Knitting 




(294), 


3 



Second Term. 



Hours 
per week 



Subject 
Carding and Spinning 

Tests (106), 10 

Weaving (116) 6*2 

Designing (13 6), 1% 

Color (146), 2 

Cloth Analysis (156), 3% 
Machine Drawing (175), 2 
Mill Engineering (178), 3 
Figuring Costs (179), 1 
Option of Carding and 
Spinning or Knitting 
(294), 3 



25 



GENERAL COTTON MANUFACTURING COURSE. 

The course in cotton manufacturing is designed to give 
the student a thorough fundamental knowledge of the 
different processes entering into the construction of a 
piece of cloth from the raw staple to the finished product. 

During the first year the student takes up the study 
of yarn preparation, weaving, designing, and cloth 
analysis. The study of mechanics, mechanical drawing 
and chemistry is also pursued the first year, the work in 
these subjects being designed especially for men who are 
to take up the cotton mill work. Practical work in the 
machine shop is entered upon the second term. Instruc- 
tion in yarn calculations, spooling, warping, and slashing 
is also offered during the first year. 

In the second and third years sufficient time is given 
to instruction in picking, carding and spinning, while the 
subjects of weaving, designing and analysis are continued. 

Dyeing is begun the first year, the work being 
such as is of especial interest to the student of cotton 
manufacturing. The student is also given instruction in 
steam engineering during the second year, while in the 
third year, work in electrical engineering and cotton mill 
construction is offered. The study of color is taken up 
during the third year. 

The work in all subjects is so arranged that the 
student is taken gradually from the simpler to the more 
difficult problems. Much of the work in the last year is 
original, and the student is thrown on his own resources. 

The work in chemistry, dyeing, mechanics and shop 
practice is all arranged with special reference to the stu- 
dent of cotton manufacturing. 

This course is very thorough, and is always recom- 
mended to the student who is to make cotton cloth manu- 
facturing his future work. 



26 



DESIGNING COURSE. 





FIRST YEAR. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 






Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per 


week 


Weaving (111), 


10 


Weaving (112), 


8% 


Cloth Analysis 




Warp Preparation 




(121 and 151), 


13 


(122), 


3% 


Designing (131), 


1% 


Designing (132), 


1% 


Hand Loom (161), 


i% 


Cloth Analysis (152), 


11 


Principles of Mechanics 


Hand Loom (161), 


1% 


(171), 


i 


Mechanical Drawing 




Mechanical Drawing 




(172), 


3 


(172), 


5% 


Machine Shop Practice 








(174), 


3% 



SECOND YEAR. 



First Term. 


{Second Term. 




Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per 


week 


Weaving (113-4), 10 


Cotton Sampling (107), 


2 


Designing (133), 2 


Weaving (115), 


10 


Color (145), 2 


Designing (13 4), 


2 


Cloth Analysis (153-4), 12% 


Color (146), 


2 


Machine Drawing 


Cloth Analysis (155), 


10% 


(173 and 175), ■ 1% 


Machine Shop Practice 




Machine Shop Practice 


(174), 


3 


(174), 3 


Machine Drawing (175) 


, 1% 


Steam Engineering 


Steam Engineering 




(176), iy 2 


(176), 


1% 



THIRD YEAR. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Weaving (116), 13 


Weaving (116), 13 


Jacquard Designing 


Jacquard Designing 


(135), 13% 


(136), 10% 


Cloth Analysis (156), 6 


Cloth Analysis (156), 3 




Commission House 




W T ork (157), 3 




Finishing (235), 3 



27 



DESIGNING COURSE. 

The course in designing is offered for those students 
who are seeking a thorough knowledge of cloth construc- 
tion and weaving, and who do not wish to pursue the sub- 
jects common to the carding and spinning branch of the 
industry. This course is very complete, and enables the 
student who does satisfactory work to perform satisfac- 
torily the w T ork of a designer in a mill or commission 
house. 

Designing, cloth analysis, and weaving are the prin- 
cipal subjects taught, and extend through the three years. 
Instruction in yarn calculations, spooling, warping, slash- 
ing, cotton sampling, free-hand drawing, mechanics and 
steam engineering are also required, the work being 
arranged to meet the special needs of the student follow- 
ing this course. For the student who wishes to perfect 
himself in the subject of designing, this course will be 
found very complete. 



28 



CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND FINISHING COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Principles of Mechanics 


Mechanical Drawing 


(171), 1 


(172), 3 


Mechanical Drawing 


Machine Shop Practice 


(172), 5% 


(174), 3 


General Chemistry 


Qualitative Analysis 


(181), 13 


(192), 3 


Inorganic Preparations 


Quantitative Analysis 


(183), 7 


(202), 10% 


Qualitative Analysis 


Organic Chemistry 


(191), 6 


(212), 7 




Textile Chemistry and 




Dyeing (222), 6 



SECOND 


YEAR. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Color (145), 2 


Color (146), 2 


Machine Drawing 


Machine Shop Practice 


(173 and 175), 1% 


(174), 3 


Machine Shop Practice 


Machine Drawing (175), 1% 


(174), 3 


Steam Engineering 


Steam Engineering 


(176), 1% 


(176), iy 2 


Dyeing (224), 13 


Quantitative Analysis 


Textile Chemistry 


(202), 9 


(234), 11% 


Organic Chemistry 




(213), 6 




Dyeing (223), 6 


» 


Textile Chemistry (23 3), 3% 





THIRD YEAR. 



First Term. 



Hours 
per week 

3 



Subject 
Machine Shop (174) 
Electrical Engineering 

(177), 2 

Dyeing (225), 10% 

Singeing (240), 3 

Scouring (241), 6 

Bleaching (242), 4 

Mercerizing (245), 4 



Second Term. 

Hours 
Subject per week 

Machine Drawing (175), 2 
Drying (250), 
Calendering (255), 
Putting up (260), 



6 
9 
3% 



Thesis (269), 



12 



29 



Chemistry, Dyeing and Finishing Course. 

The object of this course is to give to the student a 
thorough knowledge of the chemistry of the textile pro- 
cesses involved in the manufacture of cotton cloth. To 
insure a perfect foundation the first two years are devoted 
almost entirely to chemical subjects and laboratory work. 
During this period the subjects of general chemistry, in- 
organic and organic are taught, the preparation and prop- 
erties of various chemicals and dyestufrs, the properties of 
the various fibres and the coloring of them. 

The third year is devoted almost entirely to the prac- 
tical dyeing and finishing of cotton goods. The best cur- 
rent practice is followed, but the underlying principles are 
thoroughly taught in order that the student may under- 
stand the limitations and purpose of each process. 

The subjects of machine drawing, principles of 
mechanics, electricity, and shop work are taught. These 
allied subjects are arranged with special reference to the 
major subjects and are considered very important, as they 
give the student a first-hand knowledge of the construction 
of the various machines. 

The graduates of this course find employment with 
dyestuff makers and dealers, with manufacturers of chem- 
icals used in dyeing, with bleacheries, dye houses, and fin- 
ishing works. 

It is desirable that students entering this course shall 
have successfully completed a scientific course in High 
school, or its equivalent. Anyone, however, who can show, 
by examination, his ability to profit by the instruction 
given, is admitted. 



30 



SEAMLESS HOSIERY KNITTING COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Pickers and Cards 


Cards and Draw Frames 


(101), 6% 


(102), 5 


Principles of Mechanics 


Mechanical Drawing 


(171), 1 


(172), 3 


Mechanical Drawing 


Machine Shop Practice 


(172), 5V 2 


(174), 3 


Chemistry (182), 6 y 2 


Textile Chemistry and 


Knitting (271), 13 


Dyeing (222), 6 V 2 




Knitting (271,) 15 



SECOND 


YEAR. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 




H 


ours 


Ho 


urs 


Subject per 


week 


Subject per 


week 


Roving and Spinning 




Doubling and Drafting 




Frames (103), 


6y 2 


(104), 


6y 2 


Machine Drawing 




Cotton Sampling (107), 


1% 


(173 and 175), 


i% 


Machine Shop Practice 




Machine Shop Practice 




(174), 


3 


(174), 


Q 
° 


Machine Drawing (175) 


, 1% 


Steam Engineering 




Steam Engineering 




(176), 


iy 2 


(176), 


iy 2 


Dyeing (223), 


6 


Textile Chemistry (234) 


, 6 


Knitting (272), 


14 


Knitting (273), 


12% 



THIRD 


YEAR. 






First Term. 


Second Term. 




Hours 




Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject 


per 


week 


Combers and Mules 


Carding and Spinning 




(105), 6% 


Tests (106), 




6y 2 


Machine Shop Practice 


Machine Drawing 






(174), 3 


(175), 




2 


Electrical Engineering 


Mill Engineering 






(177), 2 


(178), 




3 


Dyeing (226), 3 


Dyeing (226), 




3 


Knitting 


Knitting 






(274 and 293), . 18 


(274 and 293), 




18 



31 



SEAMLESS HOSIERY KNITTING COURSE. 

The course in seamless hosiery knitting is adapted 
to the needs of those students desiring a thorough knowl- 
edge of the machines entering into the manufacture of 
hosiery. The larger part of the student's time is devoted 
to the instruction work on the knitting machinery, sixteen 
hours a week being given up to this work during the first 
year, fifteen hours a week during the first term of the 
second year, fourteen and one-half hours a week during 
the second term of the second year, eighteen hours a week 
during the first term of the third year, and eighteen 
hours a week during the last term. 

Instruction is also given in cotton yarn preparation, 
yarn calculations, cotton sampling, mechanics, steam 
engineering, chemist^ and dyeing, the work in these 
different subjects being arranged to meet the special needs 
of the student. 

This course is recommended to those students who 
intend to become connected with a hosiery mill. 



32 



LATCH NEEDLE UNDERWEAR KNITTING COURSE. 



FIRST 


YEAR. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Pickers and Cards 


Cards and Draw 


(101), Gy 2 


Frames (102), 5 


Principles of Mechanics 


Mechanical Drawing 


(171), 1 


(172), 3 


Mechanical Drawing 


Machine Shop Practice 


(172), 51/2 


(174), 3 


Chemistry (182), 6 y 2 


Textile Chemistry and 


Knitting (281), 13 


Dyeing (222), 6 V 2 




Knitting (281), 15 





SECOND 


YEAR. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 






Hours 


He 


»urs 


Subject p 


er week 


Subject per 


week 


Roving and Spinning 




Doubling and Drafting 




Frames (103), 


6 y 2 


(104), 


6 1/2 


Machine Drawing 




Cotton Sampling (107), 


iy 2 


(173 and 175), 


1% 


Machine Shop Practice 




Machine Shop Practice 


(174), 


3 


(174), 


3 


Machine Drawing (175), 


1% 


Steam Engineering 




Steam Engineering 




(176), 


iy 2 


(176), 


1% 


Dyeing (223), 


6 


Textile Chemistry (234) 


6 


Knitting (282), 


14 


Knitting (283), 


I21/2 



THIRD 


YEAR. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Combers and Mules 


Carding and Spinning 


(105), 6y 2 


Tests (106), 6 y 2 


Machine Shop Practice 


Machine Drawing (175), 2 


(174), 3 


Mill Engineering (178), 3 


Electrical Engineering 


Dyeing (226), 3 


(177), 2 


Knitting 


Dyeing (226), 3 


(284 and 293), 18 


Knitting 




(284 and 293), 18 





33 



LATCH NEEDLE UNDERWEAR KNITTING COURSE. 

The course in latch needle underwear knitting is 
adapted to those students intending to become connected 
with this branch of the textile industry. 

As in the case of the hosiery course the larger part 
of the student's time is devoted to instruction work on the 
knitting machines. Instruction is also given in cotton 
yarn preparation, yarn calculations, mechanics, steam 
engineering, cotton sampling, chemistry, and dyeing. As 
is the case with all other courses offered, instruction in 
these correlated subjects is arranged best to meet the 
needs of each individual course. 

Both of the knitting courses are very thorough, and 
give the student a good working knowledge of the dif- 
ferent processes and the machinery connected with the 
same. The knitting department of the New Bedford 
Textile School contains a larger variety of knitting ma- 
chinery than is found in any similar school in the United 
States, and the courses offered in this department cannot 
fail to be of very great benefit to any one desiring 
knowledge along these lines. 



35 



TEXTILE ENGINEERING COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Hours 


Hours 


Subject per week 


Subject per week 


Mathematics, 5 


Mathematics, 5 


Mechanical Drawing, 7 y 2 


Descriptive Geometry, 7 y 2 


Chemistry, 6 y 2 


Chemistry, 6 y 2 


Machine Shop Practice, 7 


Machine Shop Practice, 7 


Textile Machinery, 6 y 2 


Textile Machinery, 6 y 2 



This course, offered this year for the first time, is arranged 
to be completed in three years. The schedule is given for the 
first year only. In addition to the requirements for entrance 
to the general course, applicants should be well prepared in 
elementary algebra and plane geometry, and it is also desirable 
that they shall have had training in physics. Students intend- 
ing to take up this course will find it to their advantage to 
complete first a High School scientific course or its equivalent. 



36 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

101. Pickers and Cards. 

Cotton yarn mill machinery. Lists of processes in cotton 
mills for different numbers of yarn. Proper sequence of 
processes. 

Objects of blending cotton. Methods of mixing same. Bale 
breakers. 

Picker rooms. Automatic feeders. Construction of differ- 
ent varieties of feeders. Their capacity and suitability for the 
purpose intended. 

The cotton opener, its use and object. Various styles of 
openers. Setting and adjustment of openers. Connection of 
feeders to openers. The various styles of trunks. Calcula- 
tions in connection with openers. Breakers. Intermediate 
and finisher lappers. Different styles and makes of machines. 
Use and object of the lapper. Construction of aprons, beaters, 
bars, screens, fans, lap heads, evener and measuring motions, 
etc. The setting and adjustment of lappers. Calculations in 
connection with lappers. 

The revolving flat card. Its principal parts described, in- 
cluding feed, licker, cylinder, doffer, coiler, screens and flats. 
Different setting arrangements. Speeds of different parts. 
Top flat cards, roller and clearer, and other cotton cards. 
Clothing, grinding, setting and stripping cards. 

102. Cards and Drawing Frames. 
Study of the card continued. 

The railway head as used either independently or combined 
with sections of cards. Single and double railway heads. 
Eveners, draft calculations, metallic and other rolls. 

Method of arranging and constructing drawing frames. The 
use and objects of the frame. Gearing, weighting, stop- 
motions, varieties of rolls, etc. 

103. Roving Frames, Spinning Frames and Twisters. 

Slubbers. First and second intermediates. Roving or jack 
frames. The construction and use of the fly frame. Descrip- 
tion and use of the different parts. Calculations in connection 
therewith. Changing and fixing frames, etc. 

The spinning frame. Its construction and use. Its principal 
parts, such as creels, rolls, rings, travellers, speeds, builder 
motions, etc. 

The objects of twisting. Wet and dry twisting. The direc- 
tion and amount of twist in different ply and cord threads; 
different methods used in preparing yarn for twisting. Size of 



37 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

rings and travellers for different counts of yarn. Methods of 
winding, speeds and production. 

104. Doubling and Drafting. 

Figuring the number of doublings and drafts from picker 
to spinning frame or mule. 

Calculations for schedules of machinery required for differ- 
ent counts and amounts. Cost and production of yarn. 

Practice work consists of carrying work through picker to 
spinning frames. 

105. Combers and Mules. 

The sliver and ribbon lap machines. Construction of Ameri- 
can and English machines. Methods of operating same. Set- 
ting and adjusting same and calculations in connection 
therewith. 

The cotton comber. The construction of the comber, its 
use and objects. Comber setting. Comber calculations. Op- 
eration and management of combers. 

The spinning mule and its uses. The special features of 
the mule. Description of the head stock, the cam shaft, mule 
carriage and other parts. The construction and use of each 
part of the mule. Different movements in the mule and the 
timing of the same. The copping rail and the building of a 
cop. Faults in mule spinning and their correction. 

106. 

Original work in laying out processes for different counts of 
yarn and carrying the same through from raw cotton to finished 
yarn. Tests for different processes. 

107. Raw Cotton. 

Raw cotton. Its varieties. The cultivation of cotton. The 
preparation of cotton for the market. Cotton ginning. Cotton 
as an article of commerce. The selection of cotton, its suit- 
ability for different purposes. 

111. Plain Looms. 

The construction of the plain loom. The principal move- 
ments in weaving. Methods of shedding. Shedding motions. 
Shedding by cams. Auxiliary shafts. Varieties of cams. Con- 
struction of cams. Timing cams and effect on the cloth. 

Picking motions. Different methods of picking. Shuttles. 
Shuttle boxes. Shuttle guards. Tight and loose reed looms. 
Protector motions. Reeds. Let-off motions. Take-up mo- 
tions. Calculations in connection with take-up motions. 



39 

REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

Filling-stop motions. 

Temples. The various makes and their uses. 

The Draper loom. Special features of its construction. 

Automatic shuttle and bobbin changing looms. 

Special features of various makes of looms, including 
Crompton & Knowles, Kilburn & Lincoln, Whitin, Mason and 
Stafford looms. 

The management, operation and fixing of looms. Putting 
in warps. Faults and remedies in weaving and fixing. Cal- 
culations directly connected with plain looms. 

Looms adapted to weave twills and satins. 

Electrical and mechanical warp stop-motions. 

112. Fancies. 

Looms adapted to weave fancy cloth with dobbies. Dobbies 
with single and double cylinders. Chain pegging for dobbies. 

Tying in and starting up warps for which the student has 
worked out some design. 

113. Box Looms. 

Looms for the use of various colors of filling. Drop box 
motions. Box chain multipliers. Multiplier motions. Still 
box motion. 

114. 115. Special Loom Attachments. 

Dobby looms combined with other motions for special pur- 
poses, such as looms adapted to weave lenos, checks, blankets, 
handkerchiefs, towels and other goods. Electrical and me- 
chanical warp stop motions. 

116. Jacquards. 

The principle of construction of jacquards. Single and 
double lift jacquards. Jacquard machines with one and two 
cylinders. Harness lines. Lingoes. Comber boards. Tying 
up jacquards. Cross border and other jacquard machines. 

121. Yarn Calculations. 

Definitions. Calculations for finding length, weight or 
counts of single yarns, whether cotton, woolen, worsted, silk, 
etc. Ply yarns. 

122. Spoolers, Warpers and Slashers. 

Various methods of preparing cotton warps. 

The spooler, its use and construction. Production per 
spindle. Spindle speeds. Builder motions. Thread guides. 
Different makes of spoolers. 

The operation and setting of the spooler. 



41 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

Warpers. The object of the warper. Its construction and 
operations. Speeds, settings, etc. Warpers with and without 
cone drive. Warper slow motions. Faults in warping and 
their correction. 

The slasher. Its use. Construction of the different parts 
of the slasher. 

Sizing or dressing yarns. Materials used. Methods of mix- 
ing same. Suitable materials for various purposes. 

Preparing the warp for the loom. The construction of 
reeds and harnesses. 

Variations from the above system for special purposes, such 
as used in gingham and other mills. 

131. Designing. 

Definitions of the words and terms used in designing and 
analysis. Characteristics of the various classes of fabrics. 
Design paper and its application to designing and analysis. 
Cloth structure with a study of the various sources from which 
the patterns of fabrics are obtained. Twills. Wave effects. 
Diamonds. Sateens. Granites. Checkerboards. Rearranged 
Twills. Figured Twills. 

132. Designing. 

Elongated Twills. Entwining Twills. Curved Twills. 
Shaded Weaves. Stripes. Checks derived from contrasting 
weaves. Figured imitation welts. Figured rib or cord weaves. 
Spot weaves, including various systems of arrangement and 
ground weaves. Honey-combs. Imitation lenos. 

133. Designing. 

Filling backed weaves. Warp backed weaves. Double 
cloths. Figured double plain cloths. Ply fabrics. Embossed 
fabrics. Bedford cords. Box welts. Fancy piques. Figured 
Marseilles weaves. Figuring with extra filling. Figuring with 
extra warp. Reversible fabrics. 

134. Designing. 

Lenos. Methods of obtaining leno patterns. Mechanism 
and appliances necessary for the production of lenos on open 
shed dobbies. Yoke and Jumper motions. Weaving bottom 
doup patterns on top doups. Bottom and top doup lenos. 
Fancy one doup lenos. 

Pile fabrics, such as corduroys, velvets, plush and terry 
towelings. 

Description of lappet motions. Designing original lappet 



43 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

patterns. Reproducing patterns of woven lappet samples. 
Chain drafts for weaves and locking motions. 

135. Jacquard Designing. 

Calculations required in connection with jacquard designing, 
How to transfer design from cloth to design paper. How to 
weave patterns of different sleys. Casting out. Ground 
weaves and rules for ascertaining sley, pick, warp and filling 
required. Foundations upon which jacquard patterns are 
based. 

136. Jacquard Designing. 

Sketching of original designs by the different methods prin- 
cipally used. Development of jacquard designs on design 
paper. Card cutting. Card lacing. Weaving of at least one 
original design. 

Harness tying. Various systems of tying. Lay over, centre, 
and compound ties. Changing sley of fabrics. Casting out, etc. 

145. Color. 

Theory of colors. Complementary colors. Hue, value and 
chroma scales. Practical work in color scales. 

146. Color. 

Munsell system of coloring. Color harmony, color effects. 
Analyzing color effects. Practical work in making sequences 
and in producing colored designs. 

151. Analysis. 

Standard methods of representing harness and reed drafts. 
Methods of obtaining the best arrangement of yarns in harness 
drafting. Standard methods of representing chain drafts. 
Methods of obtaining chain drafts. 

The student is required to analyze twelve samples. 

152. Analysis. 

Twelve samples are given for analyzing and at least one 
original design must be worked out complete in every detail 
for the power loom. 

153. Analysis. 

Calculations necessary in finding production per loom per 
day, weavers wages, average numbers and percentages. Four- 
teen samples are required. Weaving of original designs. 

154. Analysis. 

Particular features of construction in lappets and lenos of 
all kinds. Fourteen samples are required. Weaving of 
original designs. 



45 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

155. Analysis. 

Analysis of more difficult samples and original work. Four- 
teen samples are required; also selling price of fabrics and 
weaving of original fabrics. 

156. Analysis. 

Continuation of 155. Work on jacquard patterns. Eight 
samples required in addition to jacquard sample. 

157. Commission House Work. 

Study of fabrics, known as Standard goods, such as prints, 
percales, satins, lawns, organdies, chambrays, voiles, etc. 

Figuring to obtain material for the reproduction of cloths 
of standard construction. 

Methods of ascertaining counts of warp and filling, also sley 
and pick for new fabrics. 

Determining the manufacturing cost of fabrics. 

1.61. Hand Loom. 

The hand loom, its construction and use. Harness drafts 
as affecting the weave. Building harness chains. Practice on 
the hand loom in weaving fabrics from original and other 
designs and putting into practice the designing lessons. 

171. Mechanics. 

The fundamental principles of mechanics and physics, with 
special reference to practical uses in textile machinery and to 
future application in the engineering courses, are given in a 
series of lectures. Practical problems illustrating these prin- 
ciples are worked out in the class-room. A study is also made 
of the strength and nature of the different materials used in 
machine construction. 

172. Mechanical Drawing. 

The object of this course in mechanical drawing is to give 
the student a good foundation for reading drawings and for 
making such sketches and drawings as he will be likely to be 
called on to make in practice. Thoroughness, accuracy, and 
neatness are insisted upon throughout the course. The work 
in mechanical drawing begins with instruction in the use and 
care of drawing instruments. The following is a general 
outline of the work to be covered: Plain lettering, geometri- 
cal constructions, orthographic and isometric projection, inking 
and tracing, standards, conventions and tabulation as used in 
the modern drafting room. Simple working drawings are to 
be made to scale and the final work of the year consists of 



47 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

free-hand sketching of machine details from parts of textile 
machinery. This brings into use at one time all the work 
covered during the year and serves as a test of the student's 
grasp of the subject. 

Text Book: — Blessing and Darling's ''Elements of Drawing." 

173. Mechanism. 

In view of the large number of mechanisms used in textile 
machinery this course is a very important one. The subject 
is given by means of lectures and recitations, the work in the 
drawing-room being closely related to the class-room instruc- 
tion. This course includes studies and graphical solutions 
of cams, gears, etc. 

174. Machine Shop. 

Shopwprk and drawing are organized as one department 
for the purpose of securing close correlation of the work. 
Many exercises are common to the drawing-room and the shop. 
In the machine shop an effort is made not only to train the 
student manually, but also to teach him correct shop methods 
and practice. Carefully graded exercises are arranged to teach 
him the use of measuring instruments, hand tools, and then 
machine tools. The different measuring tools and devices 
with advantages, methods of use and limits of accuracy of 
each are considered. Each cutting tool is taken up, its cutting 
angles and general adjustments are described, together with 
the "feeds" and cutting speeds suitable for each material 
worked and for each machine. The course includes instruction 
in centering, squaring, straight and taper turning and fitting, 
outside and inside screw cutting, chucking, reaming, finishing 
and polishing, drilling, tapping, grinding, boring, planing flat 
and V-surfaces, filing and gear cutting, including spur, bevel, 
rack and worm gears. 

When the student becomes proficient in handling the tools 
and machines he is given work in fitting and assembling, and 
also repair work from the other departments. 

175. Machine Drawing. 

Machine drawing is a continuation of the mechanical draw- 
ing of the first year and the work is dependent upon a 
thorough knowledge of how to apply the conventions of draw- 
ing which custom has made standard as given during the first 
year. The work consists of proportioning of machine details 
as fixed by practice, making assembly drawing from detailed 
sketches, and also detailing parts from assembled machines. 



49 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

176. Steam Engineering. 

A typical power plant, including the boiler, steam engine, 
and all necessary auxiliary apparatus such as is found in a 
modern cotton mill is studied in detail. Prepared outlines are 
discussed in lecture periods and the details supplied by the 
student after reading assignments in standard text and refer- 
ence books. Practice is given in handling engines, apparatus 
and equipment in the laboratory. Exercises consist in ad- 
justing, starting and running engines, taking and working 
out indicator cards, prony brake tests, pump and injector 
tests, etc. 

Text Book: — "Elements of Steam Engineering," Spangler, 
Greene & Marshall. 

177. Electrical Engineering. 

The elementary principles of magnetism and electricity are 
taken up in lecture and recitation and are supplemented by 
laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on the different 
wiring systems and electric drives as used in mills and fac- 
tories. A general study is made of a typical electrical power 
plant, and of the apparatus required to generate and dis- 
tribute electrical energy. 

Text Book: — "Essentials of Electricity," W. H. Timbie. 

178. Mill Engineering. 

Proficiency in this course depends on the thoroughness with 
which the work of the previous courses was carried on. The 
course consists of lectures supplemented by work in the 
drafting room. Problems in design, construction and equip- 
ment of mills and factories are taken up. The subject includes 
foundations, walls, floors, roofs, and mill construction in gen- 
eral. The choice of location and the methods of transmitting 
power are discussed. The following outline shows the scope 
of the course: Principles underlying the design and construc- 
tion of framed structures, involving the use of wood, steel, 
brick, stone, concrete and reinforced concrete, methods of 
lighting, ventilating and protecting from fire. 

179. Figuring Costs. 

One hour a week, during the last term of the General 
Course, is devoted to methods of cost finding in a cotton mill. 
A complete mill is taken for an illustration, and the reports of 
both the expense and production are used to work with. 

181. General Chemistry. 

This course comprises two lectures of forty-five minutes each 



51 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

and ten and one-quarter hours of laboratory work each week. 
The laboratory work is closely criticized by the instructor and 
individual effort encouraged. Careful manipulation, thorough- 
ness in observation, accuracy in arriving at conclusions, and 
neatness are required of each student. The fundamental 
principles of the science are taught in connection with the 
descriptive chemistry of the elements. 

No previous study of chemistry is required for admission 
to this course, but the instruction is so arranged that students 
having already spent considerable time in chemistry in other 
schools are given advanced work in which the knowledge al- 
ready acquired is utilized. 

182. General Chemistry. 

The training afforded by a course in general chemistry is 
considered of value to all the students of the school and also 
lays the foundation for the subsequent course in dyeing. 
Hence students taking courses in the cotton or knitting de- 
partments are required to take general chemistry during the 
first term of the first year. This subject covers the same 
ground as subject 181, but in a briefer manner. Five hours 
per week are spent in the laboratory, and one hour in the 
lecture and recitation room. A few of the simpler organic 
compounds are also studied. 

Text Book: — Morgan and Lyman's Chemistry. 

183. Inorganic Preparations. 

The time in this subject is devoted largely to laboratory 
work with an occasional explanatory lecture. First the student 
is taught the best methods of carrying on the usual laboratory 
operations, as forming of crystals, precipitates, filtering, 
evaporating, and drying. This is followed by the preparation 
of several salts and industrial products, substances being 
selected that are of particular interest to the textile industry. 
The work is progressive in subject matter and so arranged as 
to be coordinate with the subject of General Chemistry. 

191-192. Qualitative Analysis. 

This course comprises one lecture and one recitation period 
of three-quarters of an hour each and seven and one-quarter 
hours laboratory work a week during the first term of the first 
year. The student is taught the principle of systematic qualita- 
tive analysis and the application of the principles to detect the 
base forming elements, the acid forming elements, and the 
various classes of compounds of the bases and the acids. Espe- 



53 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

cial attention is paid to the inorganic materials ordinarily met 
with in the manufacture, dyeing, and finishing of cotton piece 
goods. The student is required to analyze correctly a sufficient 
number of unknown substances to demonstrate his ability to 
detect any of the elements ordinarily met with. 
Text Book: — Noyes' "Qualitative Analysis." 

202. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course comprises one lecture a week, the remainder of 
the time being devoted to laboratory practice. The first part 
of the term is spent in simple gravimetric determination of 
chlorine, sulphuric, carbonic, and phosphoric acids, and iron, 
aluminum, calcium and magnesium. The last part of the 
term is devoted to volumetric determinations involving the 
use of acids, alkalis, oxidizing and reducing agents, and chlo- 
rimetry. Great stress is laid on the accuracy and integrity 
necessary for quantitative work. Each student is required, 
under supervision of the instructor, to adjust his own balances 
and calibrate all burrettes, flasks, and pipettes he uses that 
he may understand the nature and amount of error in his 
work, thus giving him confidence in his results. In con- 
nection with this course, a thorough training in the solution 
of chemical problems is given. The use of reference books is 
encouraged and each student is trained to consider each orig- 
inal analysis from the various points of view possible. 

Text Book: — Talbot's "Quantitative Analysis." 

212. Organic Chemistry. 

This course is divided into two terms, the first term giving 
a general survey of the subject, a thorough training being 
given in the reactions and properties of the various com- 
pounds met with in textile industries. The two lower mem- 
bers of the paraffines and their derivatives are exhaustively 
treated. Then the study of the higher members is taken 
up, the unsaturated hydro-carbons and their derivatives, espe- 
cial attention being given to the members met with in the 
artificial dye-stuffs. 

Text Book: — Remsen's "Organic Chemistry." 

213. Organic Chemistry. 

The work of the second term is devoted exclusively to the 
study of dye-stuffs and their preparation. The constitutions of 
various typical dye-stuffs are studied to determine their in- 
fluence on coloring power, dyeing properties, and fastness to 
light, acids, alkalis, bleaching, etc. In the limited time af- 



55 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

forded, the number of dye-stuffs studied is necessarily limited 
but the training is made so thorough that the student is 
enabled to take up further investigation intelligently should 
his future work demand it. 

222. Textile Chemistry and Dyeing. 

These subjects open with a study of the chemical and 
physical technology of the fibres. Lectures are given descriptive 
of the action of heat, moisture, acids, alkalis, oxidizing agents, 
reducing agents, salts, organic ferments, and coloring matter 
upon the fibres. Parallel with these lectures laboratory experi- 
ments are carried out by the performance of which the student 
becomes familiar with the chemical and physical properties 
of the. various fibres and the actions of the several agents 
upon them. 

This is followed by a series of lectures and experiments that 
illustrate the application of the above principles to practice. 
The student is taught how to scour cotton, wool, and silk; 
how to bleach these fibres by the use of sulphur dioxide, 
chlorine compounds, and oxygen compounds. The mercerizing, 
fire, and water proofing of cotton, the chlorination of wool, and 
the water proofing of silk are also demonstrated. 

Now the application of the dyestuffs to the various fibres is 
studied. For convenience, the dyestuffs, whether of natural 
or synthetic origin, are classed as either substantive, acid, 
basic, or mordant. The best method of application of each of 
the above groups is then taught. The dyed fibres are tested 
for their fastness to light, water, acid, alkalis, milling, stoving, 
chloring, crocking, and hot finishing. Modified chloring, crock- 
ing, and hot finishing. Modified methods are then considered 
for the production of especial degrees of fastness to certain 
agents by after-treating of the dyed fibres. 

223. Dyeing. 

This course is supplementary to the course in Textile 
Chemistry and Dyeing and consists principally of the study of 
the various methods of applying dyestuffs, the properties of 
which so differ that a modified method of application is 
required. Under this head are treated the developed, sul- 
phur, vat, acid afterchromed, chromotrop, eosine, alkali blue, 
rhodamine, janus, polyhuic mordant, and pigment dyes. 
Further, the properties of the dyed fibres and the value of each 
dyestuff for a specific purpose are studied. 

At the end of the course the general principles of cotton 



56 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

matching are taken up and experimental work carried on, 
demonstrating the proper method of obtaining a given shade 
by mixing of several dyes. Obtaining the value of a dye is 
taught, and the detection of adulterants. Finally, methods for 
determining the dye either in the form of a dyestuff or on 
the dyed fabric are considered. 

The lectures during this term are mainly descriptive of the 
converting of grey cotton piece goods into the finished state. 
Machinery used in connection with the processes of singeing, 
bleaching, scouring, mercerizing, drying, mangling, dyeing, 
starching, tentering, and calendering is explained. The effect 
of each machine upon the properties of the fabric is studied. 
Some time is devoted to the consideration of the use of 
starches, filling agents, soap, and oil, and the filling, softening, 
and stiffening action they produce. The student is required to 
take notes during these lectures, and from such notes write 
for his own reference a complete text on the subject. In this 
connection he is encouraged to consult various standard works 
to amplify his knowledge of textiles. 

Samples acquired in connection with the laboratory practice 
are mounted and bound with the above notes, which they 
serve to illustrate. 

224. Dyeing. 

The laboratory work of this term is mainly devoted to the 
printing of textile fabrics, especial emphasis being laid on cot- 
ton. The theory and practice of the various styles such as 
the pigment style, the direct, printing style, the steam style or 
metallic or tannin mordants, resist and discharge dye styles, 
the developed azo style, the printing of indigo and similar dye- 
stuffs and aniline black are studied. The student makes as 
many different prints as the time will allow. The course is 
concluded by experiments illustrating the practice of mercer- 
izing cotton fabrics and a study of the various functions of the 
various stiffening and softening agents used to produce the 
various finishes required by the trade. The lecture course 
during this term covers practically the same ground as the 
laboratory work, especial emphasis being laid on the merceriz- 
ing and finishing of cotton yarns and cloth. During the entire 
course the student accumulates several thousand samples which 
he is required to mount in a specially designed sample book 
for his reference in the future. Special stress is laid on 
quality rather than quantity of work done. As often as time 
permits and circumstances demand it, lots of yarn, hosiery, 



57 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

etc., of commercial size, are dyed by the students for other 
departments. 

225. Dyeing. 

Construction and operation of jiggers. Speed of operation. 
Penetration of solutions used. Selection of dyestuff. Prepa- 
ration of dye liquor. Dyeing, washing and aftertreating. 

Construction of dye padders. Selection of materials for 
rolls. Speed of machines. Penetration of materials. Selec- 
tion of dyestuffs. Washing off. Aftertreatment. 

226. Dyeing of Knit Goods. 

The object of this course is to give the student an oppor- 
tunity to dye commercial size lots of knit goods and hosiery. 
Lectures describing the various processes are given and the 
necessary calculations are taught in connection with this course. 
Scouring and bleaching are also taught. The student is re- 
quired to make use of knowledge acquired in the previous 
courses in dyeing. 

233. Textile Chemistry — I. 

This subject comprises a study of the properties and analysis 
of water, coal, oil, soap, mordants, and other chemicals used 
in the textile industries. One lecture of forty-five minutes' 
duration is given each week and frequent conferences are held 
with the student in the laboratory. The student is required 
constantly to consult standard books of reference in connection 
with his laboratory work. While the limited time devoted 
to this course does not give enough time for the student to 
make many complete analyses, it does illustrate to him the 
application of the knowledge acquired in the previous subjects 
of qualitative, quantitative analysis, and organic chemistry. 

234. Textile Chemistry — II. 

This subject deals with starches, sizing, and softening com- 
pounds, and textile fabrics. The commercial methods of 
obtaining the above substances, their usual composition and 
application, is discussed in lectures. The laboratory work 
consists of the analysis of typical compounds, obtained from 
the consumers when possible. The detection of the various 
starches and fibres by the microscope is taught, and their 
separation and estimation by chemical methods. Sizing and 
loading of fabrics is also discussed. This course is very prac- 
tical in its application, and accurate work is required. 



58 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

235. Finishing of Cotton Fabrics. 

The object of this course is to give to the designer a knowl- 
edge of the various methods used in finishing and the effect of 
the same on the appearance and construction of the fabric. 
Simple methods of distinguishing between different fibres and 
finishes, filled and pure starched cloths, are taught. The in- 
struction is given by means of one lecture a week and two 
hours laboratory practice. 

240. Singeing. 

Construction of machine. Function of air pump. Adjust- 
ment of gas. Speed of operation. Singeing for a face finish. 
Singeing for a body finish. Determination of best conditions 
for a particular cloth. 

241. Scouring. 

Construction of kiers. Methods of circulation. Packing of 
goods. Time of boiling. Washing down. Use and operation 
of washing machines. Choice of scouring agent. 

242. Bleaching. 

Construction of chemic vats and cisterns. Application of 
bleaching solution to the goods. Squeezers. Piling down. 
Precautions to prevent tendering action of bleaching agent. 
Washing. Use of "Antichlors." Openers and scutchers. Se- 
lection of bleaching agent. 

245. Mercerizing. 

Construction of mercerizing machine. Design of tenter 
clips. Proper tension in tenter frame. Removal of caustic by 
washing. Neutralization of last traces. Selecting of mercer- 
izing agent. Variation in conditions to suit cloth treated. 

250. Drying. 

Preparation of goods for drying. Importance of proper 
mangling. Construction and operation of a mangle. Con- 
struction of the drying cylinders. Mechanical limits of speed 
of operation. Best speed in view of results obtained on goods. 
Static electricity and its grounding. 

Construction and use of tenter frames. Methods of heat- 
ing, direct and indirect. Direction of air currents in relation 
to that of the cloth. Conditions giving the most rapid drying, 
the best width. Choice of tenter clip for a specific purpose. 

255. Calendering. 

Types of calenders and various finishes obtained. Construc- 
tion of a simple calender, friction calender, chasing calender, 



59 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

Schreiner, and embossing calenders. Speeds and conditions 
governing the operation of the above machines. Use of scrimp 
bars and stretchers. Gas and steam heating. Metallic rolls, 
fibrous rolls, and finishes produced by them. Care of rolls. 
Use of water. So-called permanent calender finishes. Use of 
beetles and hot presses for preparation for calendering. Top 
finishing. 

260. Putting up. 

Inspection of goods for faults. Classing as firsts, seconds, 
thirds and remnants. Yarding by flat folding, by rolling ma- 
chines. Construction and operation of these machines. Vari- 
ous folds and put-up required by the several trades. Ticket- 
ing, banding, and papering. Assortment in cases and storage 
of goods. 

269. Thesis. 

Each student who is to graduate from the course in chem- 
istry and dyeing must devote twelve hours per week during the 
last half of his third year to original work, and at least one 
week before graduation must submit to the principal of the 
department a thesis of not less than two thousand words based 
upon the results of his own investigations. 

271. Winding and Rib Top Knitting. 

Winding and preparation of cotton, lisle, wool, worsted and 
silk yarns for running on rib top, rib leg and hosiery knitting 
machines. 

Construction of circular rib top knitting machines, principle 
of circular latch needle knitting, setting and adjusting of dif- 
ferent makes of machines. 

Rib top knitting on twelve, eighteen, twenty-four, thirty, 
thirty-six and forty-two gauge needle machines, with cotton, 
lisle, wool, worsted and silk yarn. 

272. Rib Leg Knitting. 

Rib leg machines, with knee and ankle splicer, chain and 
chainless measuring devices. 

Rib leg knitting. Different classes of ribs, lace effects, 
spliced knee and ankle, for children's, boys' and misses' 
stockings. 

Plaiting. Silk yarn on cotton and worsted yarn; also 
worsted on cotton yarn, for rib tops and rib legs. 

273. Hosiery Knitting. 

Principle of latch needle seamless hosiery knitting. Con- 






61 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

struction, setting and adjusting of three-quarter, seven-eighth 
and full automatic hosiery machines. 

Knitting on three-quarter automatic hosiery machines, cot- 
ton and wool stockings, fine split sole, hose and half hose. 

Seven-eighth automatic hosiery machine, medium and fine 
gauge hose and half hose. 

Knitting men's half hose, ladies' hose; footing children's, 
boys', and misses' rib legs. White feet and black legs ladies' 
stockings, double sole, reinforced heel and toe; plaited hose 
and half hose with white heel and toe, fancy lace effects, on 
full automatic hosiery machines. 

274. Hosiery Finishing. 

Hemming and embroidering stockings. Looping, mending 
and singeing. Boarding, drying and pressing. Inspecting, 
pairing, stamping, folding and boxing, keeping stock and han- 
dling boxed goods. 

Method of handling and keeping track of goods through 
the mill. 

Cost of manufacturing different classes of seamless hosiery 
from yarn to box. 

281. Winding and Knitting Cuffs and Sleeves. 

Winding and preparation of the different classes of yarns 
used in the knitting of underwear. 

Construction of circular latch needle rib cuff machines, two 
feed automatic tuck and plain sleevers, with slack course and 
welt attachments; the principle of plain and tuck stitch knit- 
ting. 

282. Underwear Knitting. 

Knit to shape ladies' underwear on latch needle circular rib 
body machines, different principles of this class of knitting. 
Construction and adjustment of the machines to knit cotton, 
lisle, worsted and silk yarns; different methods of plaiting on 
these machines. 

283. Underwear Knitting. 

Knitting plain 1 & 1 cloth for cut to shape union suits and 
fancy rib cloth for ladies' underwear on plain latch needle 
body machine. 

Latch needle, balbriggan, plain web knitting for plain and 
fancy stripes, in light weight underwear. 

Rib cuff and shirt borders knitting on circular latch needle 
rib border and cuff machinery. 



63 



REFERENCES FROM TABULATED COURSES. 

Spring needle circular rib knitting. A new principle of 
knitting extra fine cloth for underwear. 

284. Underwear Finishing. 

Cutting men's shirts and drawers, ladies' vests, infants' 
wrappers, children's, boys' and misses' vests and union suits. 

Looping, seaming and finishing of underwear in detail. 

Fixing and adjusting of the principal styles and makes of 
sewing machines used in the manufacture of underwear. 

Method of handling the goods in process of manufacture 
from yarn to box. 

293. Miscellaneous Knitting. 

Knitting fine French balbriggan cloth, worsted and merino 
cloth, single and double plush cloth, for fleeced lined under- 
wear, made on spring needle frame. 

Sweater knitting, with racked rib and cuffs, pineapple stitch 
and fancy colored effects on circular rib machines. 

Full fashion sweater knitting on the Lamb full fashion 
hand power machine. 

Knitting golf gloves on the Lamb hand power machine. 

Different processes of finishing balbriggan, worsted, merino 
and fleeced cloth, into underwear ready for market. 

294. Knitting (optional to third year general students). 

To those students of the General Course who desire some 
information on knitting machinery the school offers this option 
during the last year. The aim of this work is to give to the 
student an insight into the class of work for which a large part 
of the yarn in a yarn mill is made. 

The different types of knitting machines are studied, and 
in each case, the effect upon the machine and fabric of imper- 
fect yarn is gone into carefully. 



65 



TEXT BOOKS AND LECTURE SHEETS USED IN 

THE SCHOOL. 

Chemistry Department. 

Morgan and Lyman's Chemistry, No-yes' Qualitative 
Analysis, Talbot's Quantitative Analysis, Remsen's Or- 
ganic Chemistry, Blanchard's Synthetic Inorganic Chem- 
istry. 

Engineering Department. 

Blessing & Darling's Elements of Drawing, Spangler, 
Greene and Marshall's Elements of Steam Engineering, 
W. H. Timbie's Essentials of Electricity. 

Other Departments. 

No text books are used in the departments other than 
those named above. Lectures are prepared by the heads 
of the departments covering the work in detail, multi- 
graphed, and sold to the students at cost. These with 
design books, design pads, and note books constitute the 
working material to be provided by students. 



67 



EVENING CLASSES. 

Evening instruction, similar to the day, on the same 
machinery and by the heads of the day departments as- 
sisted by practical skilled men from the mills, is given for 
the benefit of workers in local mills and machine shops. 
The instruction in the evening classes is divided into 
sections so as to give the greatest possible facilities to the 
students in these classes. 

Certificates are granted to all students in the evening 
classes who have successfully completed the equivalent to 
two years' work, two evenings a week. The certificate 
states the subjects that the student has passed in and the 
length of time he has devoted to the work. 

Evening students are enrolled at the commencement 
of both the fall and spring terms. The subjects taken 
up in the different evening courses follow the detailed 
topics as specified on pages 36-65. 

Students enrolling in the regular chemistry or dyeing 
courses are required to make a deposit of $5.00 for break- 
age. In case the breakage caused by any student does not 
equal the amount of his deposit, the balance is returned 
to him at the end of the school year. 

The school is in session four evenings a week for 
twenty-six weeks, — Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and 
Friday, from 7.30 to 9.15 for all classes except those tak- 
ing the chemistry and dyeing courses. Those classes are 
held two nights a week from 7.00 to 10.30. 

For terms of admission see page 77 of this catalogue. 



69 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, EVENING CLASSES. 



Carding and Spinning Department. 

Picking and Carding— one term, two evenings a week. 

Advanced Picking and Carding — one term, one even- 
ing a week. 

Drawing and Roving Frames — one term, two evenings 
a week. 

Advanced Drawing and Roving Frames — one term, 
one evening a week. 

Ring Spinning and Twisting — one term, two evenings 
a week. 

Mule Spinning — one term, two evenings a week. 

Cotton Sampling — one term, two evenings a week. 

Advanced Calculations in Carding and Spinning — one 
term, two evenings a week. 

Weaving and Warp Preparation Departments. 

Spooling, Warping and Slashing — one term, two 
evenings a week. 

Plain Loom Fixing — one term, two evenings a week. 

Fancy Loom Fixing — one term, two evenings a week. 

French, Portuguese and Polish Classes in Loom 
Fixing. 

Advanced Calculations in Weaving — one term, two 
evenings a week. 

Designing Department. 

Elementary Designing — one term, two evenings a 
week. 

Advanced Designing — one term, two evenings a week. 
Elementary Analysis — one term, two evenings a week. 
Advanced Analysis — one term, two evenings a week. 
Jacquard Designing — one term, two evenings a week. 



71 

Knitting Department. 

Special Knitting — two evenings a week each term. 

Engineering Department. 

Mechanical Drawing — one year, two evenings a week. 

Machine Drawing — one year, two evenings a week. 

Descriptive Geometry — one term, two evenings a 
week. 

General Engineering Drawing — one term, two even- 
ings a week. 

Machine Shop Practice — one year, two evenings a 
week. 

Advanced Shop Work — one year, two evenings a 
week. 

Steam Engineering, Boilers — one term, one evening a 
week. 

Steam Engineering, Engines— one term, one evening 
a week. 

Electrical Engineering, Elementary Electricity — one 
term, two evenings a week. 

Electrical Engineering, Direct Current Machinery — 
one term, one evening a week. 

Electrical Engineering, Alternating Current Machin- 
ery — one term, one evening a week. 

Chemistry Department. 

General Chemistry — one year, two evenings a week. 
Qualitative Analysis — one year, two evenings a week. 
Quantitative Analysis — one year, two evenings a 
week. 

Organic Chemistry — one year, two evenings a week. 
Textile Chemistry I — one year, two evenings a week. 
Textile Chemistry II — one year, two evenings a week. 
Dyeing I — one year, two evenings a week. 
Dyeing II— one year, two evenings a week. 
Dyeing III — one year, two evenings a week. 



73 



Mathematics. 

Cost Finding — One term one evening a week. 

Arithmetic — one term, two evenings a week. 

Mill Calculations — one term, two evenings a week. 

Evening Diploma Courses. 

The school diploma will be granted to those students 
of the evening classes who successfully complete the work 
specified under the following courses: 

I. Carding and Spinning: 

Picking and Carding, Drawing and Roving Frames, 
Combing, Ring Spinning and Twisting, Mule Spinning, 
Cotton Sampling, Advanced Calculations in Carding and 
Spinning, Mechanical Drawing, Advanced Drawing. 

II. Weaving and Designing: 

Spooling, Warping and Slashing, Plain Weaving and 
Fixing, Fancy Weaving and Fixing, Elementary Design- 
ing and Cloth Construction, Advanced Designing and 
Cloth Construction, Jacquard Designing, Cotton Sampling, 
Mechanical Drawing, Advanced Drawing. 

III. Chemistry and Dyeing: 

General Chemistry, Qualitative Analysis, Quantita- 
tive Analysis, Organic Chemistry, Textile Chemistry I, 
Textile Chemistry II, Dyeing I, Dyeing II, Dyeing III, 
Mechanical Drawing, Advanced Drawing. 



Women. 

The designing of textile fabrics is an occupation that 
offers many inducements to women and is also one that is 
constantly widening. The designing courses offered by the 
New Bedford Textile School are open to all women and the 
same advantage extended as in the case of men. 



75 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO DAY CLASSES. 

Candidates for admission to the regular day courses 
must be at least sixteen years of age. Those who have 
been students of other technical institutions, colleges, or 
universities are required to furnish a certificate of hon- 
orable dismissal from those institutions. Candidates hav- 
ing a graduate's certificate from a high school or other 
educational institution of equal standing are admitted 
without examination. Other applicants for admission to 
courses other than the Chemistry and Dyeing Course and 
the Textile Engineering Course are required to undergo 
examinations in arithmetic, English, and commercial geog- 
raphy. Candidates for these two courses are required 
to pass examination in elementary algebra and plane 
geometry. 

All candidates, whether desiring to be enrolled on 
certificate or by passing the entrance examination must 
fill out an application blank, which should be delivered 
at the school as early as possible before the opening of 
the year. 

Applicants desiring to take up special studies in 
the school may be admitted provided their applications 
are approved by the Managing Director. Such students 
shall be known as specials and, upon satisfactory comple- 
tion of their work in the school, shall be given certificates 
stating the work they have covered and the time they have 
been in attendance. 

No applicant is admitted to the regular courses of the 
school after the first four weeks unless he has already cov- 
ered the work of the school for the time preceding the date 
of his application; nor shall any change in any student's 
course be made after the first four weeks of admission ex- 
cept by permission of the Managing Director. 



77 



Entrance Examinations for Day Students. 

The examinations for those desiring to enter the school 
at the opening of the fall term of 1916 will be held at the 
school only, on Thursday, June 15, and on Friday, Sept. 
8, at 9 a. m. 

The detailed topics dealt with in the entrance ex- 
aminations are as follows : 

ARITHMETIC. 

Definitions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
division, factors, multiples, cancellation, fractions, deci- 
mals, percentage, interest, ratio and proportion, square 
root, compound quantities, mensuration, metric system. 

ENGLISH. 

The candidate will be required to show his ability to 
spell, capitalize, and punctuate correctly ; to show a prac- 
tical knowledge of the essentials of English grammar, a 
good training in the construction of the sentence, and 
familiarity with the simple principles of paragraph 
division and structure. 

He will be required to write a business letter, and 
one or more short articles on subjects assigned from 
which he may select. Ability to express himself clearly 
and accurately will be considered of prime importance. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. 

Farm products of the United States, where raised ; 
our mines, and where located ; our manufactures, and 
where established ; our exports, and to what countries ; 
our imports, and from what countries ; our transportation 
facilities. 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO EVENING CLASSES. 

Candidates for admission to the evening classes must 
be at least fourteen years of age and must satisfy the 
head of the department which they desire to enter that 
they have sufficient knowledge to be benefited by the in- 
struction offered. 



79 



FEES. 

Day Students : No tuition fee is charged day stu- 
dents who are residents of Massachusetts. For students, 
who come from outside the State of Massachusetts, the 
fee is $150.00 a year, payable in advance in two equal in- 
stallments in September and January. No student shall 
be admitted to the classes until his tuition is paid. No 
fees are refunded except by special action of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board of Directors. 

The above fee includes admission to any of the even- 
ing classes in which there is accommodation and which 
the day students may desire to attend. 

A deposit of $10.00 is required of all day students 
taking the regular Chemistry and Dyeing Course. A de- 
posit of $5.00 is required of students taking chemistry in 
connection with any other course. This deposit covers 
cost of any breakage that may occur. Any unexpended 
balance is returned at the end of the year. To students 
coming from outside the State of Massachusetts a further 
charge of $10.00 for chemicals is made. 

Students are required to supply themselves with such 
books, tools and materials as are recommended by the 
school, and pay for any breakage or damage that they may 
cause in addition to the above named fee. 

Evening Students : No tuition fee is charged evening 
students. Students enrolled in the chemistry or dyeing 
courses are required to make a deposit of $5.00 for break- 
age. In case the breakage caused by any student does not 
equal the amount of his deposit, the balance is returned to 
him at the close of the school year. Evening students are 
required to supply themselves with such books and ma- 
terials as are recommended by the school, but this charge 
is small. 

SCHOOL HOURS. 

The school hours for the day classes are from 8.30 to 
12 each morning excepting Saturdays with afternoon ses- 
sions from 1.30 to 4.30 except Saturdays. For sessions of 
evening classes see page 67. 



81 

EXAMINATIONS, CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Examinations are held quarterly for tests of the 
student's work. 

The final examination is held at the end of the spring 
term. Results of these examinations, together with the 
student 's marks recorded from recitations, practical demon- 
strations, and student's books are taken into account in 
ranking students at the end of each year, and for gradua- 
tion. Unsatisfactory progress necessitates the student re- 
peating his studies. 

Diplomas are given on the satisfactory completion of 
a course of study extending over a period of three years 
in connection with each course, if the student's record 
is otherwise satisfactory. 

Students taking special courses, in most cases, are 
entitled to a certificate if they honorably and satisfactorily 
complete the course of instruction scheduled. 

Day students are required to spend as much time daily 
out of school hours in study, such as recording lectures and 
other notes, as may be necessary to maintain proper stand- 
ing. The students' books are examined by the instructors 
periodically, and the care and accuracy with which they 
are kept is considered in ranking students. 

CONDUCT. 

Students are required to conduct themselves in an 
orderly and gentlemanly manner while in attendance at 
the school. When the conduct of any student is consid- 
ered by the Managing Director of the school detrimental 
to its best interests, he will be suspended by him and the 
case reported to the Executive Committee for action. 

Any student who presents at any time work as his 
own which he has not performed, or tries to pass an ex- 
amination by dishonorable means, shall be regarded as 
having committed a serious offence. 

Students shall exercise due care in the use of the 
school apparatus and machinery. All breakages and 
accidents must be reported at once to the instructor in 



82 



charge and the student will be held liable for any wilful 
damage or the result of gross carelessness. 

ATTENDANCE. 

Day students taking the regular courses are required 
to attend every exercise of the school; special students, 
every exercise called for by their schedules. For every 
case of absence or tardiness, students must present an 
excuse to the Managing Director. A certain number of 
unsatisfactory excuses will render the student liable to 
suspension and further action if cause is sufficient. 

When the attendance of an evening student is un- 
satisfactory, he will render himself liable to be dropped 
from the school. 

BOARD AND ROOMS. 

New Bedford is unusually desirable as a residential 
city, and students will find numerous houses of private 
families and boarding houses, where they may obtain room 
and board. 

No requirements are made as to residence of out of 
town students, although facilities are given by having 
addresses of suitable houses on file at the school. 

No definite estimate can be made of the cost, as this 
depends entirely on the tastes of the student, but board 
and room may be obtained for from $6.00 per week up- 
wards. 

TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 

Students are required to purchase such materials, text 
books, tools and apparatus as may be required from time 
to time by the school authorities or make deposits on such 
as are loaned to them. The supplies required vary with 
the courses for which the students enter, the cost being 
from $8 to $15 per year. 

LIBRARY. 

The school maintains a library that contains all the 
best works on carding and spinning, weaving, designing, 



83 



knitting, dyeing, and mechanics, also a consulting en- 
cyclopedia and an international dictionary. Catalogues 
and pamphlets dealing with machinery or processes re- 
lated to textile work are also on file, as are all the leading 
textile journals and trade papers. The students have access 
to the library during school hours. 

ATHLETICS. 

The school has an athletic association and the 
students participate actively in various sports and 
games. There are several athletic fields open to the 
students for their out-of-door sports. The management of 
the school will give all reasonable encouragement and 
support to the furtherance of healthful recreation and 
manly sports for ils students. 



84 



THE WILLIAM FIRTH SCHOLARSHIP AT THE 
NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

The donation of William Firth, Esq., has established 
a scholarship at the New Bedford Textile School, primari- 
ly for the benefit of a son of a member or of a deceased 
member of the National Association of Cotton Manufac- 
turers, furnishing to the recipient of such scholarship $120 
a year for the course. Candidates for this scholarship 
must apply by letter only, addressed to the National Asso- 
ciation of Cotton Manufacturers, P. 0. Box 3672, Boston. 
Mass. The candidates must be at least sixteen years of 
age and furnish certificates of good moral character, and 
those who have been students of other technical institu- 
tions, colleges or other universities are required to furnish 
certificates of honorable dismissal from such institutions. 
Those applicants conforming to the above conditions are 
nominated by the Board of Government to the New Bed- 
ford Textile School, and the selection of the candidate 
for the scholarship is made as the result of an examina- 
tion held at New Bedford, Mass. Every candidate, pre- 
vious to the examination, must file an application at the 
school for admission, agreeing to observe the rules and 
regulations of the school. Candidates are eligible for any 
of the courses included in the curriculum of the school. 

Tn case the son of a member or of a deceased member 
of the National Association of Cotton Manufacturers does 
not apply for the scholarship, any person eligible for 
entrance to the school may make application. 

This scholarship will be available for the school year 
commencing the fall of 1916. 



85 



THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COTTON MANU- 
FACTURERS' MEDAL. 

The National Association of Cotton Manufacturers 
offers a medal to be awarded each year to the student in 
the graduating class who shows the greatest proficiency 
in scholarship. This is determined by an examination of 
the records of the students' progress throughout their 
studies, which are recorded and reported upon by the 
instructors and kept permanently on file. 

The competition for this medal is open to all day 
students who graduate in the Complete Cotton Manu- 
facturing Course, or to evening students who have com- 
pleted studies comprised in that course and graduated 
therein. The association offering the medal has made it a 
condition of the award that at least four members of the 
graduating class be eligible to the competition. 



86 



EQUIPMENT. 

COTTON CARDING AND SPINNING DEPARTMENT. 

This department occupies nearly the entire first floor 
of the machinery building, and has approximately 9,000 
square feet of floor surface. The equipment is large and 
diversified, enabling the students to become acquainted 
with practically all the leading makes of machines found 
in the carding or spinning departments of a cotton mill. 

A special feature of the equipment is the large num- 
ber of models of the principal parts of the different 
machines in this department. These models are so 
mounted that the different settings and adjustments can 
be made equally as well as on the machine itself, and thus 
enable the student to grasp more readily the essential 
points, since the parts are much more readily accessible. 

The department is humidified by the system of the 
American Moistening Company. 

Picker Room. 

] Carver cotton gin. 

1 Kitson roving waste machine. 

1 Kitson automatic feeder. 

1 Kitson porcupine opener with cleaning trunk. 

1 Kitson breaker lapper with condenser and gnage 

box. 

1 Atherton intermediate lapper. 

1 Howard & Bullough finisher lapper. 

1 Potter & Johnston finisher lapper. 

Carding and Spinning Room. 

1 Mason card. 

1 Howard & Bullough card. 

1 Saco & Pettee card. 



87 



1 Hetherington card. 

1 Potter & Johnston card. 

1 Whitin card. 

1 Whitin sliver lap machine. 

1 Hetherington sliver lap machine. 

2 Whitin combers. 

1 Hetherington comber. 
1 Nasmith comber. 
1 Montfort comber. 
1 Mason railway head. 
1 Saco & Pettee improved railway head. 
1 Saco & Pettee draw frame. 
1 Howard & Bullough draw frame. 
1 Woonsocket draw frame. 
1 Whitin draw frame. 
1 Woonsocket slubber. 
1 Woonsocket second intermediate. 
1 Providence first intermediate. 
1 Howard & Bullough second intermediate. 
1 Dobson & Barlow fine roving frame. 
1 Saco & Pettee fine roving frame. 
1 Whitin spinning frame. 
1 Howard & Bullough spinning frame. 
1 Saco & Pettee spinning frame. 
1 Fales & Jenks spinning frame. (Motor driven.) 
1 Fales & Jenks special spinning frame for experi- 
mental work. 
1 Mason mule. 

1 Hetherington mule. 

2 Draper twisters. 

1 Draper banding machine. 

1 Fales & Jenks twister. (Motor driven.) 

1 Dronsfield card flat grinding and testing machine. 

1 Dronsfield card clothing machine. 

1 Hetherington camless winder. 

1 Universal winder. 

1 Foster doubling winder. 



88 



TESTING MACHINES. 

1 Moscrop single thread tester. 

2 Goodbrand thread testers. 

1 Goodbrand conditioning and testing machine. 

1 Goodbrand inspecting machine. 

2 Goodbrand yarn reels. 
1 Knowles yarn balance. 

1 Brown & Sharpe yarn scale. 

1 Goodbrand roving reel. 

1 Brown & Sharpe roving reel. 

1 Percentage scale. 

1 Goodbrand picker lap scale. 

1 Baus.ch & Lomb. microphotographic machine. 

MODEIiS. 

1 case English spinning and twisting spindles. 

1 case American spinning and twisting spindles 

2 Howard differential motions. 

1 Dobson & Barlow differential motion. 

1 Woonsocket differential motion. 

1 Asa Lees differential motion. 

1 Howard & Bullough roving frame builder motion. 

1 Woonsocket roving frame builder motion. 

1 Whitin spinning frame builder motion. 

1 Draper twister builder motion. 

1 Nasmith nipper frame. 

1 Nasmith cylinder. 

1 Providence roving frame swing motion. 

WEAVING AND WARP PREPARATION DEPARTMENT. 

This department occupies all of the second floor of 
the machinery building and contains about 9,500 square 
feet of floor area. The equipment is very complete and 
includes sufficient machinery to enable each student to 
obtain all the practical experience required in connection 
with his studies. All of the latest machinery is repre- 
sented in this equipment, and as the machinery is made 
especially for use in the school it fully meets the needs of 
the students. 



89 



The list of machines is as follows: 

1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) plain cam loom. 

1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) plain and 3 har- 
ness cam loom. 

1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) plain and 4 har- 
ness cam loom. 

1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) plain and 5 har- 

ness cam loom with mechanical warp-stop motion. 

2 Kilburn & Lincoln plain cam looms. 
1 Lowell plain cam loom. 

1 Lowell plain and 5 harness cam loom. 
1 Whitin plain and 3 harness cam loom. 

1 Whitin plain and 4 harness cam loom. 

2 Whitin plain and 5 harness cam looms. 

4 Draper automatic bobbin changing looms. 
1 Mason standard print cloth loom. 

1 Mason plain and 5 harness cam loom. 

2 Whitin 25 harness dobby looms with leno and 2x1 

box motions. 

3 Whitin 25 harness dobby looms with leno motion. 

1 Whitin 20 harness dobby loom. 

2 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) 2 bar lappet 

looms. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) gingham loom 

4x1 box. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) gingham loom 

6x1 box. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) 25 harness 

dobby loom. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) 20 harness 

dobby loom with 4x1 box motion. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Worcester) 12 harness 

dobby towel loom with 3x1 box motion. 
1 Stafford (Providence) 20 harness dobby loom with 

leno motion. 
1 Stafford (Providence) 25 harness dobby loom with 

leno motion. 



90 



1 Stafford (Readville) automatic shuttle changing 

loom. 
1 Stafford 25 harness dobby loom. 
1 Stafford (Readville) automatic shuttle changing 

loom, with 20 harness dobby. 
1 Stafford (Providence) 25 harness dobby loom with 

leno motion. 
.1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) 20 harness 

dobby loom. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) 20 harness 

double cylinder dobby loom. 

1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) 20 harness 

dobby loom with multiplier. 

2 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) 25 harness 

dobby looms with leno motions. 

3 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) 25 harness 

dobby looms with leno and 2x1 box motions. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) rise and drop 

jacquard loom with 200 hooks. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) single lift 

jacquard loom with 300 hooks. 
1 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) double lift 

jacquard loom with 400 hooks. 

3 Kilburn & Lincoln 25 harness dobby looms. 
1 Stafford (Readville) 25 harness dobby loom. 
1 John Royle & Sons card cutting machine. 

4 "Whitin looms. 

4 Crompton & Knowles (Providence) looms. 

The eight last named looms were constructed 
for the school and are fitted with auxiliary 
shafts. They are supplied with extra cams for 
plain or twill and satin cam work and are to be 
used for taking down and setting up, timing and 
setting, etc. 
6 Dobbies. 

These dobbies have been especially constructed 
for the school and are mounted on benches. They 



91 



can be driven by hand and are to be used for 
taking down and setting up, timing and setting, 
etc. 

There are also models for demonstrating leno mo- 
tions, box motions, warp-stop motions, etc. 
1 Draper spooler. 
1 Easton & Burnham spooler. 

1 Entwistle warper. 

2 Draper warpers. 
1 Whitin reel. 

1 Universal bobbin winder. 
1 Howard & Bullough slasher. 

1 Goodbrand, size "B" cloth testing machine to test 
to 700 lbs. 

DESIGNING DEPARTMENT. 

The design class room is located on the third floor 
of the recitation building, and is a large well lighted 
room containing all the appliances necessary for instruc- 
tion in this important subject. Special attention has been 
given to the method of lighting this room to give the 
best results, and the desks are made with special refer- 
ence to the needs of the student of designing. 

The hand loom work is located in a large room on 
the third floor of the machinery building. This room 
contains twenty-eight hand looms adapted to the use of 
students in experimental work, and in putting into prac- 
tice the theory of designing, and also to enable them to 
produce certain of the designs that they are taught in 
the designing class. The room is well lighted by a saw- 
tooth roof. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Instruction in the Engineering Department is carried 
on in five different rooms located in various parts of the 
new building. These rooms are arranged and fitted out 
with apparatus to meet the needs of the students follow- 
ing this course. The department is subdivided into the 



92 



following sections : Mechanical Drawing, Textile En- 
gineering, and Machine Shop Work. 

Mechanical Drawing. 

The drafting room is located on the second floor of 
the new building and is well lighted by northern and 
western exposures. It is equipped with independent 
drawing tables and lockers for the drawing boards and 
materials. For the students ' use in connection with their 
drafting instruction there is a collection of models, me- 
chanical apparatus and machine parts. On the third floor 
there is a swinging blue print frame mounted on a track, 
and a large dark room fitted with modern conveniences 
for blue printing. 

Steam and Electrical Engineering. 

Instruction in steam and electrical engineering is 
given both in theory and practice. The theoretical part 
of the course is carried on in a large recitation room on 
the second floor, while the practical side is studied in the 
engineering laboratory in the basement of the new build- 
ing. The laboratory is supplied with steam direct from 
the boiler room and also has gas and water connections. 
For the study of electricity there is provided a source of 
alternating current at 110 volts and 220 volts pressure. 

The laboratory equipment consists of the following 
apparatus : 

1 Cahall 60-horse power water tubular boiler. 

1 Buffalo 40-horse power horizontal high speed steam 
engine. 

1 12x24 Wetherill horizontal Corliss steam engine. 

1 2i/o KW. compound Avound special laboratory ro- 
tary converter. 

1 Jacobs boiler feed water heater. 

1 Cockrane oil separator. 

1 Buffalo 3" x 2" x 3%" duplex feed pump. 

1 Knowles 4%" x 2%" x 4" feed pump and receiver. 

1 Four-horse power gas engine. 



93 



1 Sturtevant 5%-horse power vertical steam engine. 
1 Small model steam power plant. 

1 Crosby gauge tester. 

2 Crosby steam engine indicators. 
1 Portable wattmeter. 

1 Portable voltmeter. 

1 Portable ammeter. 

1 Tachometer. 

1 Peabody calorimeter. 

1 Amsler polar planimeter. 

1 Type N Metropolitan injector. 

1 Portable switchboard. 

3 1000-watt single phase transformers. 
1 2 KW., D. C. generator. 

1 Five-horse power induction motor. 

1 Rheostat. 

1 D. C. volt -ammeter. 

3 A. C. voltmeters. 

4 A. C. ammeters. 

1 Seller's complete exhibit of transmission devices. 
1 Current transformer. 
1 Wire resistance frame. 

1 Lamp resistance frame. 

2 Arc lights. 

1 Prony brake. 

1 Universal lecture table galvanometer. 

The equipment includes several steam gauges and a 
number of the various types of stop and check valves in 
part section to show the working mechanism. The school 
power plant is available for use in studying steam and 
electrical devices found in the modern power plant. 

Machine Shop. 

This department of the school occupies about 2800 
square feet of floor surface on the first floor of the new 
building. The department is electrically driven and the 
equipment, all of which is modern, is as follows : 



94 



1 Reed 18" x 8' engine lathe. 
3 Reed 12" x 6' engine lathes. 
6 Reed 12" x 5' engine lathes. 

2 Flathers 13" x 6' engine lathes. 
1 Hendey 14" x 6' engine lathe. 

1 Whitcomb and Blaisdell 13" x 5' engine lathe. 

1 Seneca Falls 11" x 5' star lathe. 

1 Reed H"x5' speed lathe. 

1 Prentice 20" drill. 

1 Diamond 20" x 2%" water tool grinder. 

1 Builders' Iron Foundry 12" x 2" emery grinder. 

1 Morse No. 1 plain grinder. 

1 Perkins S" x 20" mitre trimmer. 

1 Potter & Johnston 15" Universal shaping machine 

2 Cincinnati 16" shapers. 

2 Brown & Sharpe No. 2 Universal milling machines. 

1 Woodward & Powell 24" x 6' planer. 

1 W. & B. Douglas grindstone. 

1 Star power hack saw. 

1 Beach scroll saw. 

1 Gas forge. 

1 Morse cutter and twist drill grinder. 

1 Eagle anvil, 100 pounds. 

1 Peerless portable electric hand drill. 

1 Peerless portable electric tool post grinder. 

1 Machinists' work bench equipped with vises. 

1 Tool cabinet containing small tools. 

1 Jackson belt lacer. 

1 Universal milling attachment. 

1 10" circular milling and dividing attachment. 

1 Slotting attachment and set of tools. 

1 Rack cutting attachment. 

1 Indexing attachment. 

1 Toolmakers' vise. 

1 Greenard arbor press. 



95 



CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND FINISHING DEPARTMENT. 

This department occupies about 13,600 square feet, 
situated in the basement and on the first and third floors of 
the recitation building. This space is divided into six 
laboratories, "a lecture and recitation room, a reading room 
and office for the principal of the department, and two 
store rooms. The general chemistry and dyeing labora- 
tory is a large well lighted room 63' 6"x20' on the first 
floor, and is especially designed to meet the needs of the 
students in the general courses. This laboratory is equip- 
ped with forty-two double desks in rows of three desks 
each. At the end of each row is situated the sink and dye 
bath. Along the wall, on the opposite end, are the hoods. 
For the students taking the special course in chemistry, 
two special laboratories are provided. These two labora- 
tories occupy a space 40' x 17', the main part of which is 
devoted to the chemical laboratory. On the northern ex- 
posure is a small laboratory for photometric, microscopic 
and gravimetric work. In the main special laboratory 
each student has desk space 2' x 8' and his own desk, dye 
bath and draught hood. Conveniently located are a large 
drying oven, four ten-gallon dye kettles, and one twenty- 
gallon dye kettle. This laboratory is equipped at each 
desk with gas, water, steam, blast, and suction in order 
that the student's work may be carried on with the utmost 
celerity conducive to the best results. The laboratory for 
converting cotton textiles is located in the basement. It 
contains all the machines necessary to demonstrate in 
practical proportions the operations involved in singeing, 
scouring, bleaching, mercerizing, dyeing, drying and cal- 
endering of cotton piece goods. This room is lighted in 
the best possible manner and all matching of dyed goods 
is done under specially corrected electric light. 

The following pieces of special apparatus are at the 
disposal of the student as his work may require : 
,4 Gas heated dye kettles, ten gallons capacity. 
1 Gas heated dye kettle, twenty gallons capacity. 



96 



1 Wooden dye beck, twenty gallons capacity, steam 

heated. 
1 Wooden dye kettle, twelve gallons capacity, steam 

heated. 
1 Steaming chest. 
1 Experimental printing machine. 
1 Hydro extractor. 
1 Copper color kettle. 

6 Twenty-eight hole experimental dye baths. 
14 Twelve hole experimental dye baths. 
1 Autoclave. 
1 Oil viscosimeter. 

1 Orsat gas apparatus. 

2 Hempel gas apparatus (complete sets). 
1 Westphal balance. 

4 Analytical balances. 

1 Munsell photometer with special attachment for 

measuring daylight. 
1 Emerson calorimeter. 
1 Rabe turbine water tester. 
1 Flash point tester for oils. 
1 Furnace. 
1 Spectroscope. 

3 Microscopes. 

3 Drying ovens. 
1 Motor. 

1 Power air blast. 
1 Water heater. 

1 Jewell water still. 

2 Combustion furnaces. 

3 Large water baths for analytical work. 

5 Balances for general laboratory work. 

1 Single burner gas singer complete with air pump 

and spark extinguisher. 

2 40" Jigs equipped with rubber covered beam rolls 

and special squeeze roller. 
1 Six cylinder horizontal drying machine cylinder of 



97 



standard diameter and complete with folder and 
special Files exhausting device. 

1 Two roll husk combination and chilled iron steam 
heated calender, equipped with expander and 
special moistening device. 

1 Three-roll padding machine, equipped with rubber 
covered rolls and special interchangeable boxes 
for dyeing, starching, or mercerizing, complete 
with folder. 

1 Thirty-foot automatic tentering machine with But- 
terworth patent automatic clamp chain, having 
nickel plates and nippers with nickel inserts; 
machine equipped with Butterworth patent vibra- 
tory motion, and two steam coils. 

1 Set of rubber covered squeeze rolls and stand, ad- 
justable, to be used at jigs, drying cans, or at 
either end of tentering frame. 

1 Franklin dyeing machine, complete. 

1 Stocking dyeing machine. 

KNITTING DEPARTMENT. 

The knitting department occupies two large connect- 
ing rooms on the top floor of the machinery building and 
contains about 6,600 square feet of floor area. The equip- 
ment is very complete, there being a greater number 
of machines and a larger variety than can be found in 
any similar school in the world. The work that has been 
produced by the students of this department has re- 
ceived high praise from some of the leading experts in 
the knitting trade, the hosiery and underwear taking 
especially high rank. 

The list of machines in this department is as follows: 

1 Excelsior cloth dryer. 

1 Ballard electric cloth cutter. 

1 Beattie 16 point two thread looper. 

1 Beattie 22 point two thread looper. 

1 Koehler 20 point looper. 



98 



1 Brinton 4" 84 and 160 needle rib top machine. 

1 Brinton 3%" 108 and 188 needle rib leg machine. 

1 Brinton 4" % automatic hosiery machine. 

1 Brinton 16" automatic body machine. 

1 Brinton 4%" 320 needle welter and automatic knee 
and ankle splicing rib leg machine, with Wild- 
man stop-motion. 

1 Brinton 3%" 160 needle full automatic footer. 

1 Crane 36 guage spring needle machine. 

1 Crane 15" spring needle rib body machine. 

1 Crane 19" body machine. 

1 Crawford 12 end stop-motion. 

1 Hemphill Mfg. Co. 3%" 200 needle automatic 
hosiery machine. 

1 Hemphill Mfg. Co. 3%" 188 needle full automatic 
hosiery machine. 

1 Hemphill Mfg. Co. Banner automatic footer. 

2 Huse winders. 

4 Jenckes full automatic hosiery machines. 

1 Jones hosiery and underwear brusher. 

1 Kennedy automatic band folding and cutting 

machine. 
1 Lamb sweater machine. 
1 Lamb glove machine. 

1 March & Crawford two end stop-motion. 
1 March & Crawford four end stop-motion. 
1 March & Crawford sixteen end stop-motion. 
1 Mayo 3%" 200 needle full automatic footer with 

high splice and double sole attachment. 
1 Mayo full automatic hosiery machine with yarn 
changer. 

1 Mayo 3%" striper. 

2 Mayo full automatic hosiery machines. 

1 Merrow, Style 60D, two thread trimming and over- 
seaming machine. 

1 Merrow, Style 60D, three thread trimming and 
over-seaming machine. 



99 



1 Merrow, Style 60H, two thread trimming, over- 
seaming and hemming machine. 

1 Merrow, Style 60ED, three thread overedging ma- 
chine. 

1 Merrow, Style 15A, two thread plain crochet ma- 
chine. 

1 Merrow, Style 35B, shell stitch crochet machine. 

1 Metropolitan Sewing Machine Company's machine 
for sewing on lace. 

1 Metropolitan, Style 30 T. C, toggle trimmer. 

1 Payne winder. 

20 doz. Pearson hosiery boards. 

1 Hurricane stocking and underwear dryer. 

1 Scott & Williams 3%" welter 176 and 200 needle 
rib top machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 3%" striper 176 and 180 needle 
rib top machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 4" 220 needle full automatic half 
hose machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 4 1 4 // welter 180 needle rib leg 
machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 4 1 /i // welter 216 needle rib leg 
machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 4%" welter 276 needle rib leg 
machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 4%" welter 300 needle rib leg 
machine, with Crawford stop-motion. 

1 Scott & Williams 3%" two feed sleever 220 needle 
machine, with Crawford stop-motion. 

1 Scott & Williams 4*4 " two feed sleever 264 needle 
machine. 

1 Scott & Williams 10" four feed automatic body 
machine, 8 x 10 cut. 

1 Scott & Williams 13" eight feed automatic body 
machine, 10 cut. 

1 Scott & Williams 20" Swiss rib machine, cut 12 to 
inch, with Crawford stop-motion, 



100 



1 Scott & Williams 20" balbriggan machine, cut 16 

to inch. 
1 Scott & Williams 20" rib border machine, cut 14 

to inch. 
1 Scott & Williams 3%" 160 needle % automatic 

footer. 
1 Scott & Williams bar stitch machine. 
1 Scott & AVilliams chain machine. 
1 Scott & Williams 12 point looper. 
1 Singer No. 44 lock stitch finishing machine. 
1 Singer No. 24 chain stitch finishing machine. 
1 Singer twin needle taping machine. 
1 Singer No. 32-29 eyeletting machine. 
1 Singer No. 68-7 button sewer. 
1 Singer No. 79-1 drawer strapper. 
1 Stafford & Holt 14" fancy sweater machine. 
1 Standard Sewing Machine Co.'s button hole ma- 

chine. 
1 Tompkins knitting table, 22 and 36 gauge. 
1 Union Special Machine Co. flat bed twin needle 

machine. 
1 Union Special Machine Co. collarette machine. 
1 Union Special Machine Co. button facing machine. 
1 Union Special Machine Co. seaming machine with 

Dewees trimmer. 

1 Union Special Machine Co. toggle grinder. 

2 Union Special Machine Co. twin needle covering 

machines. 

1 Union Special Machine Co. drawer finishing ma- 
chine. 

1 Union Special Machine Co. hemming and seaming 
machine. 

1 United Shoe Machinery Co. eyeletting machine. 

1 Wildman 3%" two feed striper and fancy pattern 
machine. 

1 Wildman necktie machine. 

1 Wildman 3%" ribber with selvage welt and striper. 



101 



1 Wildman 3%" selvage welt machine. 

1 Wildman 13" automatic 8 and 12 cut body ma- 
chine. 

1 Wildman 4Vi" sleever. 

1 Wildman 18" Swiss rib machine. 

1 Wildman 414", 216 needle rib leg machine. 

1 Wildman 4*4", 272 needle rib leg machine with lace 
attachment. (Wildman machines equipped with 
Wildman stop-motions.) 

3 Crawford stop-motions. 

1 Skevington floating thread cutter. 

1 Foster Machine Co. cone winder, 16 ends. 



POWER, HEAT AND LIGHT PLANT. 

1 Stirling 105 horse power water tubular boiler. 

1 B. & W. 155 horse power water tubular boiler. 

1 Foster shaking grate. 

1 Dillon shaking grate. 

1 Deane 4%" x 2%" x 4" duplex double outside 
packed plunger steam pump, connected to a re- 
ceiver tank. 

1 Deane 4%"x 3"x 5" single steam pump. 

1 National 100 horse power feed water heater. 

1 Atwood and Morrill damper regulator. 

1 Sturtevant 75 horse power horizontal center crank 
engine. 

1 American Ball 160 horse power engine. 

1 Westinghouse 50 KW, 220 volt, 3 phase, alternat- 
ing current generator, direct connected. 

I Westinghouse 4 KW, 125 volt, direct current gen- 
erator. 

1 G. E. 100 KW, 220 volt, 3 phase, alternating cur- 
rent generator, direct connected. 

1 G. E. 9V2 KW, 125 volt, direct current generator. 

1 G. E. recording Wattmeter. 

1 W. S. Hill four panel switchboard equipped with 
9 Wagner indicating ammeters, 2 Wagner indi- 



102 



eating voltmeters, 1 Thomson 50 KW three phase 
integrating Wattmeter, 2 direct reading KW 
meters, 14 Wagner current transformers, 1 West- 
irfghouse combination rheostat, 1 G. E. combina- 
tion rheostat, 2 Condit Electrical Mfg. Co.'s 250 
V circuit breakers, all necessary switches, bus 
bars, etc. 
2 Turbine fans. 

1 Cockrane oil separator. 

2 Steam separators, 1 reducing valve, 1 back pressure 

valve, 1 oil filter, 1 blow-off tank. 

2 Anderson No. 3 high pressure steam traps. 
5 Nason low pressure steam traps. 

3 Sterling low pressure steam traps. 
1 Reliable electric vacuum pump. 

1 Ash elevator. 

1 Sturtevant heating and ventilating outfit. 

1 American moistening outfit. 

9 General Electric induction motors, equipped with 
oil starting switches. 

2 Westinghouse motors. 



103 



GRADUATION EXERCISES. 

The graduation exercises for the school year 1914-15 
were held in the hall of the school Thursday evening, 
June 17th. 



PROGRAMME. 



OVERTURE— Lutspiel Kela-Bela 

Tolman's Orchestra. 

OPENING ADDRESS. 

William E. Hatch. 

PRESIDENT OF THE CORPORATION. 

ADDRESS. 

Hon. Grafton D. Cushing. 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 

HUMORESKE Dvorak 

Tolman's Orchestra. 

ADDRESS. 

Rev. William B. Geoghegan. 

PASTOR UNITARIAN CHURCH, NEW BEDFORD. 

EXCERPTS from Faust Gounod 

Tolm an 's Orchestra. 

PRESENTATION of Diplomas and Certificates. 

William E. Hatch. 

PRESIDENT OF THE CORPORATION. 

PRESENTATION of the National Association of Cotton 
Manufacturers ' Medal. 

Mr. John Sullivan, 
agent taber mill. 

MARCH— Made in U. S. A. Santos 

Tolman's Orchestra. 



104 



GRADUATES— 1915. 



DIPLOMA COURSES. — DAY CLASSES. 



General Cotton Manufacturing : 

Robert E. Achorn, Jr. Niles W. Goward 

William W. Allan Raymond M. Jenks 

Alfred J. Bearcovitch C. Stanley Kinney 

Leo A. Bessette Alexander Shill 

John J. Blake Benjamin Waldstein 

Thomas G. Wong 

Designing : 

Antonio J. de la Espriella. 
Chemistry and Dyeing : 

Harold B. Sturtevant. 



DIPLOMA COURSES — EVENING CLASSES. 



Carding and Spinning: 

John P. Hagen. 



CERTIFICATE COURSES — DAY CLASSES. 



Carding and Spinning: 

Russell E. Goff Howland W T entworth 

Designing and Weaving: 

Albert Brend. 

Mechanical Drawing and Machine Shop Practice: 

Allan K. Hamer William L. O'Brien 



105 



CERTIFICATE COURSES — EVENING CLASSES. 



Edward B. Allen 
Joseph H. Allen 
Cheng Q. Amona 
Allan Barrows 
Manuel S. Botheilho 
Earle P. Bowen 
Fred Bradley 
John W. Bradley 
Arthur A. Carrier 
Esau Carter 
Jacob Chambers 
James A. Connor 
Charles Cowley 
Harold A. Dahill 
Edward W. Douglas 
Harry Fielding 
Seabrook P. Grimshaw 
William J. Hargreaves 
John Haznar 
George W. Howland 
Edward E. Judge 
Wilfrid Jukes 
Eugene Labbe 



TWO YEARS. 

Ernest N. Lee 
John M. Lowther 
Henry Luckraft 
James Metcalfe 
Joseph Mieluch 
Leonard Newett 
T. Hamilton Noland 
Arthur C'Leary 
George W. Pope 
Henry Raposo 
Earl C. Riley 
Frank Rothwell 
Allen G. Shaw 
John Slobodzian 
Manuel M. Soares 
Anthony R. Sylvia 
Antonio Sylvia 
Eugene W. Trask 
Clifford L. White 
Alfred P. Wilbor 
Francis S. Winsper 
William L. York 



Joseph Aumann 
Joseph Boothroyd 
James L. Burton 
August F. DeMello 
Edward DeMello 
Frank Driesen 
Walter Gardner 
Frederick Gee 
Harold Harrop 



THREE YEARS. 

Charles E. Metivier 
John F. O'Malley 
Norman M. Paull 
W T illiam H. Roberts 
Aaron Sharpies 
W T alter Thornley 
Harry A. Visco 
Thomas W^ard 
Albert H. W T interbottom 



106 



James Ashworth 
Abram Brooks 
Charles R. Church 
Arthur Dewhurst 
Thomas P. Eccleston 
Timothy Gorton 
William H. Harrop 



FOUR YEARS. 

Lawrence C. Maud 
Richard Molyneux 
Henry Rothwell 
William Sharpies, J i 
Richard Smith 
Leo Steiblin 
Robert E. Townseud 



W T illiam H. Gamble 
Prank Holden 
Harold Marsh 



FIVE YEARS. 

John A. Mellor 
William Southworth 
August G. Wilken 



Frederick D. Walton 



SIX YEARS. 

Walter Whitehead 



William E. Parker 



SEVEN YEARS. 

Eric G. Peterson 



107 



NEW BEDFORD 
TEXTILE SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

This is a flourishing association of the graduates of 
the Day Classes of the school. In addition to its regular 
membership, it has an honorary membership of the faculty 
of the school and trustees of the corporation. 

It holds an annual dinner and several smoke-talks 
during the year, at which speakers give addresses on 
topics relating to the textile industry. 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR. 

President — Raymond H. Chase. 
Vice President — Clifford L. White. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Lester D. Patt. 
Executive Committee — The above officers and Harold C, 
Cornell and Albert "W. Goodwin. 



108 



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