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1856.1917 

[The Maryland State College 

of Agriculture 

College Park, Md. 

monthly, excepting the months of Novcm- 
*>er, December, January and February 

|ered at College Park, Md., at Second-Class 
^tter, under Act of Congress, July 16, 1894 




/ 



LIBRARY -COLLEGE PARK 



Persons 
or desiring ai 
its work, may 

MARYLA 




oilege Catalog! 
the College ol 



AGRICULTURE, 
, MARYLAND 



C. & p. Telephone, Berwyn, 43. 

U. S. Express Office, College Sution, Md. 

Train Service, B. & O. R. R. 

Trolley Service from Laurel or Washington, City and Suburban R. R. 



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THE 



MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 



OF AGRICULTURE 



COLLEGE PARK. MARYLAND 



1856 




1917 



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ATALOGUE 
1917-1918 






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AGRICULTURE 
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THE 



MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 



OF AGRICULTURE 



COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



1856 




1917 



CATALOGUE 
1917-1918 



-^ ^ '^'M. 




ri L©« 



BOARD OF VTRUSTEES. 



SAMUEL SHOEMAKEK, Esq., Chairttian Term expires 1925. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

ROBERT GRAIN, Esq., Term expiree 1924. 

Charles County, Md. 

JOHN M. DENNIS, Esq., Term expires 1923. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

DR. FRANK J. GOODNOW, Term expires 1922. 

Baltimore City, Md. 

CARL R. GRAY, Esq., Term expires 1921. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

A. W. SISK, Esq., Term expires 1920. 

Caroline County, Md. 

W. W. SKINNER, Esq., Temi expires 1919. 

Montgomery County, Md. 

B. JOHN BLACK, Esq., Term expires 1918. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL, Esq., Term expirts 1917. 

Washington County, Md. 



2 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS, 



* H. J. PATTERSON. Sc. D.. 

President. 

t A. F. WOODS, M. A.. D. Agr., 
President. 

THOMAS H. SPBNCB, A. M.. 
Vice-President, Professor of Languages. 

H. B. McDonnell, m. s., m. d.. 

Dean of Division of Applied Science, Professor of Chemistry. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A. B.. Sc. D., 

Professor of Farm Management. 

HENRY T. HARRISON, A. M., 
Professor of Matliematics, Secretary of the Faculty. 

F. B. BOMBERGER, B. S., A. M., 
Dean of Division of Rural Economics and Sociology, Professor of Economics, 

Political Science and History. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, A. M., 
Professor of English and Public Speaking. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M. S., 

Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology. 

T. B. SYMONS, M. S., 

Professor of Entomology and Zoology. 

HARRY GWINNER, M. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing, Superintendent of Shops. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D., 
Dean of Division of Engineering, Professor of Civil EiUglneering. 

MYRON CREESE, B. S., B. B., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

HERMAN BECKENSTRATER, M. S., 
Professor of Pomology. 

J. B METZGER, B. S., 
Acting Dean of Division of Plant Industry, Professor of Agricultural Education. 

R. H. RUFFNER, B. S.. 
Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., 
Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., 
Professor of Zoology. 

GEORGE T. EVERETT, Captain, U. S. A., 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

R. C. REED, D. V. S., 
Dean of Division of Animal Industry. 

P. W. BESLEY, A. B., M. F., Sc, D., 

Lecturer on Forestry. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., 
Director of Physical Culture. 

B. W. ANSPON, B. S. I., (H. and F.), 
Professor of Floriculture and Landscape Gardening. 



♦Retires July 1, 1917. 

t Assumes Office July 1. 1917. 



B. F. STODDARD, B. S.. 
Professor of Vegetable Culture. 

ALLEN GRIFFITH. M. D., 
Lecturer on Hygiene, Surgeon. 

F. T. KOCHER, D. V. S.. 
Acting Professor of Veterinary Science. 

HOWARD LORENZO CRISP, M..M. E., 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Superintendent of General 

Service Department. 

♦ R. C. ROSE, B. S., 
Associate Professor of Botany. 

P. W. ZIMMERALAlN, M. S., 

Associate Professor of Botany. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M.S., 
Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

O. C. BRUCE, B. S., 

Associate Professor of Soils. 

J. B. WENTZ. M.S., 
Associate Professor of Farm Crops. 

P. I. REED, Ph.D.. 
Associate Professor of English. 

G. P. SPRINGER, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

NATHAN REED WARTHBN, B. B., 

Instructor in Mathematics and Mechanical Bnglne«rtnc. 

LOUIS ORTMAYER, B. S., 
Secretary, Young Men's Christian Associaticm. 

H. J. WHITE, B. S.. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

S. C. DENNIS, M. S.. 
Instructor in Bacteriology. 

G. J. SCHULZ, 
Instructor in English and History. 

A. C. STANTON, A. M., 
Instructor in Dairying. 

L. J. HODGINS, B. S., 
Instructor in Electrical Engineering and Physiss. 

C. J. PIERSON, M. A., 
Instructor in Zoology. 

C. F. KRAMER. M.S.. 
Instructor in Modern Languages. 

W. G. KEAT, B. S., 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

G. H. CALE, B. S., 
Instructor in Apiculture. 

L. E. CONNER, A. B.. 

Librarian. 

R. L. SHAEFFER. 
Assistant in Vegetable Culture. 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

WIRT HARRISON. 

Assistant Treasurer. 

MRS M. T. MOORE. 
Matron in Domestic Department. 

C. L. STROHM, 
Band Master, Clerk to Military Department. 

R. D. VAN HORN, 
Clerk to General Service Department. 



.'.*. ' 



* Absent on leave. 



STATE WORK. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZER, FEED AND 

AGRICULTURAL LIME CONTROL. 

(Organized 1894.) 

H. B. McDonnell, m. s., m. d.. 

state Chemist. 

T. D. JARRBLL, B. S.. 

First Assistant Chemist. 

H. J. WHITE, B. S., 
Assistant Chemist. 

C. G. REMSBIIRG, M. S., 
Assistant Chemist. 

HERBERT H. SHINNICK, 
Assistant Chemist. 

GRASON BAGGS, 

Clerk. 

J. S. WHITBY, 
Inspector. 

G. L. BOUNDS, 
Inspector. 

E. M. PRICE, 
Inspector. 

J. S. SCARBOROUGH. 
Inspector. 

W. A. WOLFE, 
Inspector. 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

(Organized 1S96.) 

RICHARD S. HILL, M. D., 
Director. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

(Organized 1898.) 



T. B. SYMONS. M. S.. 
Chief Inspector. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M. S., 

Botany, Vegetable Pathology. 

E. N. CORY. M. S., 
Entomology. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S.. 
Plant Pathology. 

G. H. CALE, B. S„ 
Apiculture. 

W. C. TRAVBRS. 

Inspector. 



EXTENSION SERVICE. 
(Organized 1914.) 

T. B. SYMONS, Director. 

W. B. KEMP, Agronomy. 

G. E. WOLCOTT, Dairy Husbandry. 
♦C. E. TEMPLE, Plant Pathology. 

S. B. SHAW, Pomology. 
•C. L. OPPERMAN, Poultry Husbandry. 

KATHARINE A. PRITCHETT, Home Economics. 

REUBEN BRIGHAM, Boys' Club Work. 

VENIE M. KELLER, Home Economics. 

SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY, Animal Industry. 
*F. B. BOMBERGER, Rural Organization. 
•C. S. RICHARDSON, Rural Organization. 
*H. T. HARRISON, Farm Accounts. 
♦T, H. TALIAFERRO, Rural Engineering. 
•HARRY GWINNER, Farm Mechanics. 
♦MYRON CREESE, Electric Light and Power. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Correspondence Courses. 

R. McHENRY, Boys' Club Work. 

ANNA E. F. McCarthy, Chief Clerk. 



COUNTY AGENTS. 



Allegany JOHN McGILL, Jr., Cumberland. 

Anne Arundel H. C. WHITEFORD, Annapolis. 

Baltimore J. F. HUDSON, Towson. 

Calvert JOHN H. DBURY, Chaney. 

Caroline A. J. NORMAN, Denton. 

Carroll GROVER KINZY, Westminster. 

CecU D. H. KAUFFMAN, Elkton. 

Charles R. L. CLUTE, La Plata. 

Dorchester G. B. PORTER, Cambridge. 

Frederick P. A. HAUVER, Frederick. 

Garrett A. G. MIDDLETON. Oakland. 

Harford T. E. McLAUGHLIN, Bel Air. 

Howard J. L. FIDLER, Ellicott City. 

Kent L- L. BURRELL, Chestertown. 

Montgomery F. J. VAN HOESEN, Rockville. 

Prince George C. H. TAYLOR, Upper Marlboro. 

Queen Anne O. C. JONES, Centerville. 

Somerset H. S. LIPPINCOTT, Princess Anne. 

St. Mary G. F. WATHEN, Jr., Loveville. 

Talbot B. P. WALLS, Baston. 

Washington THOS. L. SMITH, Hagerstown. 

Wicomico W. C. VAIL, Salisbury. 

Worcester J. F. MONROE, Snow HllL 

Allegany LEONA H. POWELL, Cumberland. 

Anna Arundel M. LUCKETT IGLEHART, Lothian. 

Charles CHARLOTTE POOLE, La Plata. 

Frederick EMILY EPNER, Frederick. 

Harford FANNIE E. SAVILLE, Bel Air. 

' Kent HELEN COMSTOCK, Chestertown. 

Prince George LILLIAN HENNAMAN, Upper Marlboro. 

St. Mary LILLIAN MATTINGLY, Bushwood. 

Talbot OLIVE K. WALLS, Easton. 

♦Part time. 

6 



LECTURERS, 1916-1917. 

In addition to the special lecturers, members of the College faculty, Experi- 
ment Station staff, and Extension Service staff lectured during the courses on Do- 
mestic Science, Soils, Crops, Farm Live Stock and Dairying, Poultry, Horticul- 
ture, Farm Mechanics, and Good Roads. 



SHORT \VINTER COURSES. 

BRAINARD, A. S., U. S. Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering. 
BRIGHAM; Dr. A. A., Commercial Poultryman, Brinklow, Md. 
BROOKS, T. ROY, Farmer, Emmorton, Md. 
CHICHESTER, PETER W., Aquasco, Md. 

CLOSE, C. P., Horticulturist, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
GAMBLE, J. A., Dairy Division, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
HOLMES, MRS. WILLIAM, Washington, D. C. 

'JACOBS, MISS EMMA S., Director of Home Economics Teaching, Washington, D. C. 
JAMES, E. W., U. S. Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering. 
LEE, A. R., Poultry Specialist. U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
LYON, Dr. MARTHA M. BREWER, Washington, D, C. 
MATTER, G. E., West Chester, Pa. 

McKINNEY, F. W., Annex Improvement Commission.. Baltimore, Md. 
MILLIN, R. B., Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
MOOREFIELD, C. H., U. S. Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering. 
OWENS, R. W., State Roads Commission, Baltimore, Md. 
RICE, C. T., Oakton, Va 
SANDO, W. J., Washington, D. C. 

SCHMITZ, NICHOLAS, Agronomist, Pennsylvania Agricultural. Experiment Station. 
SCHNEPFE, F. E., Roads Engineer, Queen Anne County, Md. 
SHIRLEY, H. G., State Roads Commission, Baltimore, Md. 
SPRINGER^ MRS. H. P., Garrett Park, Md. 

TOBIN, J. J., U. S. Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering. 
VOORHEES, W. E,, Good Roads Machinery Co.. Kennett Square, Pa. 



FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 



GOVERNOR EMERSON HARRINGTON, Annapolis, Md. 

ALFORD, G. H., U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

BLACKFORD, FRANK, Eldorado, Ohio. 

BROWN, GEORGE O., Baltimore, Md. 

COLLIER, W. OSCAR, Easton, Md. 

FRERE, WILLIAM J., Thompkinsville Md. 

HARRY, D. GARFIELD, Pylesville, Md. 

HILL, GEORGE A., Bridgeville, Del. 

HILL, DR. I. W., U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

HILL, RICHARD S., Director, College Park, Md. 

ROEFER, C. M., Chicago, 111. 

STUART, WILLIAM, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES. 

(Tke President is an Ex-officio Member of All Committees.) 

ALUMNI : Mbssrs. Cory, Byrd, Warthen, Jarrell, Dennis, and Ruffnbr. 

AMUSEMENTS, DANCES, ENTERTAINMENTS, LECTURES, STUDENT SOCIALS : 
Messrs. T. H. Taliaferro, Crisp, Broughton, Ortmayer, Bomberger, Cory, 
An s PON. 

CATALOGUE : Messrs. T. H Taliaferro, Spence, Metzger, Broughton, and 

CORT. 

COURSES OF STUDY : Messrs. McDonnell, Spence, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Bom- 
berger, T. H. Taliaferro, and Metzger. 

DISCIPLINE: Messrs. Spence, McDonnell, T. H. Taliaferro, Harrison, and 
Broughton. 

LIBRARY : Mbssrs. Bomberger, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Gwinner, and Broughton. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE AND ATHLETICS : Messrs. Byrd, Richardson, EJverett, 
Griffith, Bomberger, Broughton, and Cory. 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS : Messrs. Harrison, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Gwinner, 
Evbrhtt, Anspon, Bomberger, and Richardson. 

SANITATION : Messrs. Griffith, McDonnell, W. T. L. Taliaferro, and T. H. 
Taliaferro. 

SCHEDULE : Messrs. Creese, McDonnell, Harrison, Cory, and Gwinner. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT, RECORDS, CLASS AND QUARTER ASSIGNMENTS: 
Messrs. Spence, Harrison, Richardson, Metzger, and T. H. Taliaferro. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS, LITERARY SOCIETIES, Y. M. C. A., GLEE CLUB, 
DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION : Messrs. Richardson, Creese, Ortmayer, 
Bruce, and W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS : Messrs. Richardson, Metzger, Bomberger, and 
Cory. 

STUDENT RELATIONS : Messrs. Bomberger, Darrow, Richardson, and 

RUFFNER. 

SUMMER SCHOOL : Messrs. Metzger, Bomberger, Crisp, Beckenstrater, and 
Ortmayer. 



8 



CALENDAR. 



Monday, September 17th, Tuesday, Septeml)er 
19th. — Entrance Examinations. 



FIRST TERM. 

18th, 



and Wednesday, September 



Thursday, September 20th, 1 P. M. — College Work Begins. 

Thursday, November 29th. — ^Thanksgiving Recess. 

Friday, December 21st, 12 M. — First Term Ends. 

Friday, December 21st, 12 M., to Monday, January 7th, 8 A. M. — ^Christmas Recess. 



SECOND TERM. 

Monday, January 7th, 8 A. M. — Second Term Begins. 

Monday, January 7th. — Special Winter Courses Begin. 

Saturday, March 16th. — Second Term and Special Winter Courses End. 



THIRD TERM. 

Monday, March 18th. — ^Third Term Begins. 

Wednesday, March 27th, Noon, to Wednesday, April 3rd, 8 A. M. — Easter Recess. 

Wednesday, May 15th. — Submitting of Theses. 

Thursday, May 30th. — Founders' and Farmers' Day. 

Friday, May 31st. — Meeting of Trustees. 

Sunday, June 2nd. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday, June 3rd. — Class Day. 

Tuesday, June 4th. — Alumni Day. 

Wednesday, June 5th, 11 A. M. — Graduation Day Exercises. 

Friday, June 7th. — Examinations for Promotion Begin. 

Friday, June 14th. — Examinations for Promotion End. 















1917 


























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9 



i 



MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



HISTORY 



ii 



"An act to establish and endow an agricultural college in the 
State of Maryland" was passed by the Legislature of the State in 
1856, and is found in Chapter 97 of the Laws of Maryland for that 
year. The scope of this act of incorporation is shown by the 
preamble, which reads as follows: 

Whereas, It has been represented to the Legislature, that certain 
wise and virtuous citizens are desirous of instituting and establishing 
in some convenient locality within this State, an Agricultural College 
and Model Farm, in which the youthful student may especially be 
instructed in those arts and sciences Indispensable to successful 
agricultural pursuits; and 

Whereas, It doth appear to this Legislature, that while the wise 
and learned in the present age hath cultivated with laudable industry, 
and applied with admirable success the arts and sciences to other 
pursuits, the most necessary, useful and honorable pursuits of agricul- 
turists have so far been lamentably neglected; and 

Whereas, It is the province and duty of the Legislature to encour- 
age and aid the philanthropic citizens in their efforts to disseminate 
useful Icnowledge by establishing an Agricultural College and Model 
Farm, which shall, in addition to the usual course of scholastic 
training, particularly indoctrinate the youth of Maryland, theoretically 
and practically, in those arts and sciences, which with good manners 
and morals, shall enable them to subdue the earth and elevate the 
State to the lofty position its advantages in soil, climate, etc., and 
the moral and mental capacities of its citizens, entitle it to attain. 

This was the first effort in the Western Hemisphere to use 
scientific investigation for the advancement of the vocation of Agri- 
culture, since at that time no other institution of a similar char- 
acter existed in the United States. Under the charter thus granted 
to a party of public-spirited individuals, the original College build- 
ing was erected, and its doors were opened to students in the fall 
of 1859. 

For three years it was conducted as a private institution. In 
1862, the Congress of the United States, recognizing the valuable 
work in the cause of practical education which such colleges could 
achieve for the country passed the "Land Grant Act." This Act 
granted each State and Territory which should claim its benefit 
a proportionate amount of unclaimed Western lands, in place of 
scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under 



II 



certain conditions to the "endowment, support and maintenance of at 
least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and profes- 
giona of life." This grant having been formally accepted by the 

General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural 

College being named as the beneficiary of the grant, the College 

thus became, in part, at least, a State institution. In the Fall of 

1914, the College became, wholly, a State institution. 

During recent years the College has made a steady growth. 
This fact is evidenced by the increased number of students availing 
themselves of its facilities ; by the erection of many new buildings — 
the library and gymnasium building, the chemical laboratory, Mor- 
rill Hall, the sanitarium, the engineering building, and Calvert 
Hall; as well as by the establishment of the Departments of 
Farmers' Institutes and Extension Work, and the State Departments 
of Chemistry (Fertilizer, Feed and Agricultural Lime Control), 
Horticulture, Entomology and Vegetable Pathology. As a conse- 
quence of its development under such favorable auspices the institu- 
tion has become the most important factor in the agricultural and 
industrial development of the State. 

The State Bureau of Forestry co-operates with the College, the 
Director being, by the terms of his appointment, Lecturer on For- 
estry at the College. 

In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the 
College and changed its name from "The Maryland Agricultural 
College" to "The Maryland State College of Agriculture." 

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION. 

The College is located in Prince Georg«e's county, Maryland, on 
the line of the Washington Branch of the B. & O. R. R. eight 
miles from Washington, and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. At 
least nine trains a day from each city stop at College Station, thus 
making the place easily accessible from all parts of the State. 
Telephone connection is made withi the Chesapeake and Potomac 
lines. 



12 



The College grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington 
Boulevard. The suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the 
south, and Laurel, the largest town in the county, is ten miles 
to the north on the same road. Access to these towns and to 
Washington may be had by steam and electric railway. The site 
of the College is particularly beautiful. The buildings occupy the 
crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with forest trees, 
and overlooks the entire surrounding country. In front, extend- 
ing to the Boulevard, is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground 
and athletic field of the students. In the rear are the farm build- 
ings and barn. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the 
buildings of the Experiment Station. The College farm contains 
about three hundred acres, and is devoted to fields, gardens, orch- 
ards, vineyard, poultry yards, etc., used for experimental purposes 
and demonstration work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the College grounds is exceedingly 
attractive. They are tastefully laid oflf in lawns and terraces which 
are ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. The view from 
the grove and campus cannot be surpassed. 

The location of the College is healthful; the sanitary conditions 
are excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there 
has been practically no serious case of illness among the students 
for many years. 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The original College building completed in 1859, and the ad- 
ministration building completed in 1904, and connected with the 
former by a covered bridge, were completely destroyed by fire 
on the night of November 29, 1912. A temporary assembly hall, 
kitchen and dining hall have been erected and are now in 
use. Living rooms for a part of the students are available in 
Calvert Hall, the dormitory constructed in 1914, and in several 
houses on the College campus. 

In 1894 the building used as the library was erected. It is well- 
lighted and commodious. 

The Departments of Civil, Electncal and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing and the Departments of Physics and of Mathematics are located 
in the two-story brick building erected in 1896, the brick annex, 



13 



erected in 1904, and the brick addition constructed in 1909. This 
latter, which consists of a main building four stories in height and 
a wing three stories in height, is so arranged as to form with the 

buildings previously erected a concrete whole. In this group of 
buildings are found laboratories of various kinds, wood and machine 
shops, a forge room and foundry, drawing rooms, blue print rooms, 
instrument rooms, lecture rooms, offices, a library room, lavatories, 
lockers, etc. The equipment is modern in every respect and the 
facilities for work in the above named departments have been 
greatly increased. 

The chemical building was completed in 1897, and is now thor- 
oughly equipped. It contains several lecture rooms and labora- 
tories for practical work and the analysis of fertilizers, feeding 
materials for domestic animals, and agricultural lime. This work 
is assigned by Acts of the General Assembly to the Professor of 
Chemistry at this College, who is thereby constituted State Chemist. 

Morrill Hall, erected in 1898, provides laboratories, lecture and 
class rooms, a dark room and storage rooms for the Agricultural 
and Biological Departments. The extensive insect collections of 
past and present State Entomologists, and the State Herbarium are 
housed in this building. The Departments of Entomology and 
Botany have a small greenhouse attached to Morrill Hall for use 
as an insectary and propagating house. In addition, several class 
rooms and offices are used by the Departments of Economics, 
English, Agricultural Education, and Languages. 

The Horticultural Building, completed in 191 5, provides class 
rooms, propagating shed and offices, opening into a range of nine 
greenhouses and a conservatory abutting on the south wall of the 
building. The main building is 200 feet long, and the adjoining 
greenhouses 50 feet by 20 feet each. This equipment furnishes 
ample accommodations for laboratory work in horticulture and 
IS comparable to the best in the country. 

The College Sanitarium, completed in 1901, is being used, tem- 
porarily, as the Administration Building. 

The Agricultural Building, for which an appropriation was made 
by the General Assembly in 1916, is in course of construction and 
will be completed within the next few months. 



14 



GENERAL AIM AND PURPOSE. 

The College is the State school of science and tech- 
nology. While seeking, first of all, to perform the functions of an 
agricultural college, its sphere of work has been widened to em- 
brace all the sciences akin to agriculture, and all the arts related 
to mechanical training. To these special and prominent lines ot 
work have be>en added such branches of study as are necessary for 
a liberal education, for the development of the intelligent citizen 
and for general culture. The purpose of this college is to give 
young men anxious to prepare themselves for the active duties of 
life such training in the lecture room, laboratory and field as will 
enable them to take their places in the industrial world well pre- 
pared for the fierce competition of the day. 

Recognizing that such an education, in order to be of practical 
advantage to many, must be offered at a cost within the means of 
all, the expenses for the year to the student have been reduced to 
the point where his college dues are not in excess of his ordinary 
daily expenses. It is to be remembered that the College is a State 
institution, in part supported by the State, in part by the Federal 
Government through its several endowment Acts, and that it is in 
no sense a money-making institution, but simply a medium of dis- 
bursement by the Government to those upon whom the safety, 
progress and prosperity of the State so largely depend. 

While the College provides, as will hereafter be explained, sev- 
eral distinct courses of instruction, looking to the special training 
of the student in agriculture, engineering and science, the fact I* 
clearly kept in view that a sound foundation must be laid for each 
and every course. Successful specialization is only practicable after 
the student has prepared for it by a thorough training in the essen- 
tials. All education must be narrow and one-sided which does not 
provide for the general culture of the student, and which does not 
look first to the natural and normal development of the individual. 
That the aim of the College is to train the student in a specialty 
without sacrificing his development in general culture is shown in 
the description of the general working plan given in the next para- 
graph. 



15 



It begins with the student in the first or Freshman year with 
a systematic and carefully adjusted scheme of work, differing but 
little in the several courses, and .looking to his general development 
in mental strength, range of information and power of expression 
and thought. At the beginning of the second or Sophomore year 
the differentiation may be said to begin along those lines for which 
he shows most natural aptitude. This gradual specialization con- 
tinues during the third or Junior year, until in the last or Senior 
year, his work consists chiefly of a few closely correlated topics, in 
which he is thus able thoroughly to prepare himself. With the 
present equipment of the laboratories and work-shops a student is 
able to become iso proficient in his chosen line of work that when 
he leaves the College a successful career is open to him. 

The Maryland State College of Agriculture is, logically, the 
crowning point of the public school system of Maryland. Its aim 
in particular is to provide a higher education for the graduates of 
the county high schools. To this end its curriculum is adjusted to 
meet the preparation of such students. It is this class of young 
men that the College is specially desirous of reaching. Experience 
has shown that a large number of our most satisfactory students 
come as graduates from the county schools, and no efforts will be 
spared to make the transition from the high school to the College 
a possible one for all those actuated by an earnest desire to com- 
plete their education. 



i6 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 

Agriculture^^ 

Agricultural Education. 

Agronomy. 

Animal Husbandry. 
Botany and Vegetable Pathology. 
Chemistry and Bacteriology. 
Civil Engineering. 

Economics^ Political Science and History. 
Electrical Engineering and Physics. 
English and Public Speaking. 
Entomology and Zoology. 
Horticulture — 

Pomology. 

Vegetable Culture. 

Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. 

Forestry. 

Languages. 
Mathematics. 
Mechanical Engineering. 

ilitary Science and Tactics. 
Physical Culture. 
Sub-Collegiate Instruction. 
Veterinary Science. 

The following pages give, under the several departments, the 
general character of the courses offered by each, and the main fea- 
tures of their equipment. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 



professor metzger. 



The work of this Department is designed to meet the demand for 
men, trained in agricultural and manual arts subjects, to teach in 
the high schools of the State. 



17 



In the arrangement of the courses the needs of the agricultural 
and manual arts teacher have been kept in mind. The work how- 
ever, is open to any who desire an insight into the educational prin- 
ciples and problems of teaching vocational subjects. 

The practice teaching is arranged to give the students of this 
Department experience in conducting class work and laboratory 
and field exercises. In addition, arrangement is made whereby the 
student receives both instruction and experience in the teaching and 
gupervision of elementary industrial work in secondary schools. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

1. Psychology. Principles of psychology. Lectures and text- 
book. 

Text used: Angell's "Psychology.'' 

Junior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

2. History of Education. Outline of the historical develop- 
ment of modern education. 

Text used : Monroe's "Btief Course in the History of Education." 
Junior Year — Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

3. Principles of Education. Study of the principles and 
methods of modern education. 

Text used: Bagley's "The Educative Process." 

Junior Year — Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

4. Secondary School Agriculture and Manual Training. 
The purpose of this course is the preparation of the student for 
the teaching of agricultural or manual training subjects through a 
knowledge of the educational aims, and of the principles applying to 
the choice of subject matter. The course involves a study of the 
recitation in its parts, the methods of conducting and the function 
of laboratory, shop, and field exercises, and the correlation of these 
with other subjects. 

Senior Year — First Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

5- Organization and Materials. A course in the organiza- 
tion of courses of study, demonstration projects, and the selection 
of materials for the work in agriculture and manual training in 



i8 



secondary and elementary schools. This course is designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the materials and equipment necessary for 
the successful teaching of secondary school sciences and arts, scope 
of work, order of presentation and the sources of supplies and 
equipment for recitation and laboratory work. The function and 
the use of school land and of home demonstration work are con- 
sidered. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

6. Rural Organization. A course in which the aims, the 
functions, the methods of organization, and the relation of rural 
to city institutions are considered. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

7. Research and Thesis. The subject and lines of work to 
be arranged with the head of the Department. The purpose of 
the thesis is to study special problems in agricultural education. 

Senior* Year — Second and Third Term, 2 practical periods per 
week. 

8. Rural Organization. Methods of organization in rural 
communities and similar problems are considered in this course. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 



AGRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR TALIAFERRO. 
PROFESSOR METZGER. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BRUCE. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WENTZ. 

The Department of Agronomy takes up the agricultural work 
pertaining to the field and its crops. A. number of courses are 
offered. These treat of farm crops, their classification, soil and 
climatic adaptations, culture and improvement; soils, their phys- 
ical and chemical properties, methods of treatment for maintenance 



19 

and increase of productiveness ; soil amendments, as manures, fer- 
tilizers, cover crops and lime; farm drainage; and farm manage- 
ment. 

The College farm consists of two hundred and sixty-five acres 
of land and is operated by the Maryland Agricultural Experiment 
Station together with an adjoining leased farm. 

Students of the College are kept in close touch with the gen- 
eral and experimental work on these farms which offer an unusual 
variety of soils and crops for observation and study. 

Many of the students, who wish to do so, find work at fair 
wages on the farm and are thereby enabled to pay a part of their 
expenses as well as to gain valuable experience. 

Well-equipped soil and crop laboratories, and a greenhouse de- 
voted to the use of the Agronomy Department afford exceptional 
opportunities for the accurate study, at all seasons, of the scien- 
tific principles involved in the handling of soils and the produc- 
tion of farm crops. 

COURSES OFFERED. 



20. Farm Crops. A systematic study of the forage and cover 
crops of the United States, with special emphasis as to Maryland 
conditions, distribution, classification, economic importance, and 
cultural methods. 

Freshman and Junior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 2 
practical periods per week. 

21. Farm Crops. A detailed study of the cereal crops, includ- 
ing their history, distribution, adaptation, cultivation, harvesting, 
and marketing. Special attention is given to com production. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical per- 
iods per week. 

^2, Soils. A course dealing with the origin, classification, and 
the physical and chemical properties of soils in their relation to till- 
age and the maintenance of soil fertility. Field excursions will 
be made to study soil formation, problems of drainage, etc. 

The study of soils is conducted by means of lectures, text-books, 
and laboratory work. 



20 



I *' 



i f 



Sophomore and Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 the! 
retical and 4 practical periods per week. 

23. Fertilizers. Of vital interest to the eastern and southei 
farmer of the present day is the fertilizing question. Between 
and the profit and loss account is a very close connection, and fn 
quently a lack of knowledge of the subject entails upon the farmel 
both the loss of money paid and of the possible increase of the crop) 
In this course the subject is developed logically from the needs o( 
the plant and the efficiency of the soil to the selecting of the propci 
plant foods for each crop under varying conditions of soil andl 
climate. Special attention is given to the home-mixing of fertilizers 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical' 
periods per week. 

24. Principles of Soil Management. Prerequisite, Soils 22. 
A laboratory course dealing with special problems of soil man- 
agement and soil analysis intended for students specializing in 
agronomy. Special attention: will be given to the study of soils 
from the College farm, which have been subjected to different 
methods of cropping and treatment. 

Junior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

25. Grain Judging. This course consists of a critical compara- 
tive study of the cereals and other farm seeds from the standpoint 
of market grading and fitness for seed purposes. It is designed so 
to familiarize the student with the subject that he may not only 
handle his own crops to the best advantage, but may also be quali- 
fied to act as a judge at county fairs, grain shows, etc. Instruction 
IS given by means of laboratory practice and lectures. This course 
is given to students in the Rural Engineering Course in the Senior 
Year. 

Junior Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 2 practical periods per week. 

26. Advanced Farm Crops. A course dealing with the im- 
provement by selection and breeding of the cereal and forage 
crops. Great care is given in this course to the study of the re- 



21 



suits obtained in plant breeding at the Maryland Experiment Sta- 
tion and the United States Bureau of Plant Industry Farm at 
Arlington, Virginia. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week ; Second Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

27. Advanced Soils. Prerequisitd Soils 22. A course deal- 
ing with the study of the principal soil regions, series, and types 
of the United States, and specially of the soils of Mar3dand as to 
origin, formation, composition, and value from an agricultural point 
of view. This course is intended for students specializing in 
agronomy. 

Students will be required to survey and map a given area of the 
College farm and make a report, including description of both the 
soils and subsoils, their physical properties, and the comparative 
value of the different soil types found. 

Senior Year— First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

28. Farm Management. The course in farm management is 
designed to connect up the principles and practice which the stu- 
dent has acquired in the several technical courses and to apply 
them to the development of a successful farm business. 

Economical production and disposition of products, maintenance 
and improvement of the producing units, and business methods in 
every operation are as necessary to success in farming as in every 
other vocation and the effort is made not only to inculcate the 
necessity for these principles but to show how they may be adopted 
and practiced. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

29. Research and Thesis. To be arranged for with the head 
of the Department. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

30. Farm Crops. A detailed study of the common farm crops. 
Lectures and practical' work in field and laboratory. 

First Year — First Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
P^r week. 



22 



31. Soils. A study of the physical and chemical conditioil 
of the soils in their relation to profitable agriculture. Lecture] 
laboratory and field work. 

First Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical perio( 
per week. 

2)2. Advanced Agronomy. Students desiring to specialize i| 
agronomy may arrange with the head of the Department for 
special course during the Second year. It is not required that all 
of the time scheduled be given to agronomy subjects. If thoughi 
best, a part may be given to agronomy and a part to animal in-| 
dustry or horticulture. Elective. 

Second Year — First and Third Term, 4 theoretical and 8 prac- 
tical periods per week; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical' 
periods per week. 

33. Fertilizers. A study of the selecting of proper plant food 
for each crop under varying conditions of soil and climate. Special 
attention is given to the home-mixing of fertilizers. 

Second Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

34. Grain Judging. Instruction is given in this course to fit 
the student to handle his own crops to the best advantage and to 
qualify him to act as a judge at county fairs, grain shows, etc. 

Second Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

35. Farm Management. Lectures and practice. 

Second Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

36. Farm Forage Crops. A study of the forage crops of the 
United States, particularly those adapted to Maryland conditions. 

Second Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 



23 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

PROFESSOR REED. 

PROFESSOR RUFFNER. 

MR. STANTON. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry stands for all lines of work 
which pertain to the judging, selecting, breeding, feeding, devel- 
opment, care and management of the various breeds and classes of 
domesticated animals. Good herds of stock are being established at 
the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station which are of use 
to the student in his studies. In addition to the supply of stock 
on the farm the proximity of the College to Washington and Balti- 
more makes it possible for the student to get excellent material for 
study. 

It is quite evident that there is but one way to make a young 
man a proficient judge of live stock, and that is by training the 
eye. In all of the lecture and laboratory work outlined in the 
courses the work is demonstrated with living specimens. 

Junior and Senior students taking this course are sent to farms 
throughout the State of Maryland to supervise advanced registry 
tests for the dairy associations. These trips give the students 
the advantage of observing the most up-to-date dairy farms in the 
country, in addition to practical experience. Each year a judging 
team consisting of three students participates in the student's contest 
in judging dairy cattle at the National Dairy Show. Students in 
any of the agricultural courses are eligible to compete for a place 
on this team. The selection of students for the team is based upon 
ability and efficiency in this line of work. 

Students desiring to specialize in any line of live stock are 
allowed to do so and animals are furnished for the special purpose 
whenever possible. 

COURSES OFFERED. 



40. Breeds and Judging. This course is devoted to the detailed 
study of all breeds and classes of live stock. The practical work com- 
mences with a study of the animal form by the use of the score-card. 
Special attention is given to the relation of form to function. 



24 



i 11' 



First, the productive types are firmly fixed in the student's min( 
then more specific breed characteristics are taken up. In teachinj 
this work living specimens and lantern slides are used. 

References, text-books and lectures. 

Freshman Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 

periods per week. 

41. Elementary Live Stock Management. Lectures arel 
given on the housing, feeding, care and management of dairy cattle, 
beef cattle, horses, sheep and swine. The practical work consists] 
of the application of the principles developed in the lectures and 
takes up the drawing of barn plans and other stable conveniences. 
The last few weeks of this termi are devoted to a special study 
of the testing of milk and milk products. 

References and lectures. 

Freshman Year— Second Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical per- 
iods per week. 

42. Djleeds and Breeding. One afternoon of each week is 
devoted to the study of breeds and types of live stock. The student 
is taught the relative value of the different types, special attention 
being given to the market classes and grades of live stock. Horses 
are studied from the standpoint of those most valuable to the 
farmer on the farm and those demanded by cities and the U. S. 
Army. The term is divided so as to give the study of horses, 
beef cattle, sheep and swine an equal amount of time. This course 
includes excursions to live stock shows and noted breeding farms. 

Junior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

43. Animal Nutrition. This course embraces the principles 
and practice of animal feeding. After covering the principles of 
nutrition, it takes up the composition of feeding stuffs, their com- 
bination into properly balanced rations, and the relation between 
the sustenance of animals and their products. Many practical prob- 
lems are solved. Students entering this course should have com- 
pleted courses in organic chemistry and comparative anatomy and 
physiology. 

Text-books, lectures, and references. 



25 



Junior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week; Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods per 
week. 

44. Principles of Breeding. This course takes up the prin- 
ciples and practices involved in the improvement of domestic 
animals, including the subjects of reproduction, variation, heredity, 
selection, line breeding, inbreeding, cross-breeding, grading and a 
historical study of the results. 

Junior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

45. Animal Husbandry. Fundamental principles of animal 
husbandry and their relations to soil fertility and farm economy. 
This course is given to students in rural engineering. 

Lectures, references, laboratory work, and field excursions. 
Junior Year — Third Term, 2 practical periods per week. 

46. Stock Judging. This is an advanced course in the judging 
of live stock. The major portion of the work is done by the method 
of comparative judging, similar to county and state fair work. 

Text-books, references, and lectures. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

47. Animal Nutrition. This advanced course is given so that 
each student can^ make a special study of animal production, in- 
cluding a consideration of successful practices in feeding for mar- 
ket, fitting for show, and the management of the breeding herd 
or flock. Independent work is allowed such as rearing for mutton 
and wool ; production of winter lambs ; fitting horses for sale ; and 
methods of handling and training horses. 

Senior Year — First Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

48. Farm Dairying and Dairy Manufactures. This course 
takes up a study of the care and handling of milk and cream on the 
farm, centrifugal separation, clarification, pasteurization, the manu- 
facture of frozen products, neufchatel and cottage cheese, the 
preparation and marketing of fermented milk drinks, preparation 
and use of starters, farm butter making, determination of moisture 
and salt in butter under creamery operation, determination of spe- 



26 



cific gravity and total solids in milk by means of the lactometer,' 
and the per cent, of fat in ice-cream, evaporated milk, and con- 
densed milk with the Babcock machine. 

References and lectures. 

Senior Year — First Term, 3 theoretical and 8 practical periods 
per week. 

49. Dairy Management. This course is devoted to a study of 
the care, management and feeding of the dairy herd ; selection and 
care of the herd bull; raising calves and heifers; improvement of 
the herd through breeding and feeding operations ; pedigrees ; keep- 
ing herd records and the practical applications of methods for the 
production of clean milk. 

References and lectures. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

50. Farm Poultry. This course takes up the methods of hous- 
ing, natural and artificial incubation and brooding, feeding, breeds, 
and diseases of poultry. 

Lectures, references, and text-books. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

51. Advanced Live Stock Management. The work to be done 
in this course is arranged by the head of the Department and the 
individual student. The student is to take some class of farm 
animals, feed and care for them. Each student is to satisfy the in- 
structor that he can milk and feed dairy cows. Other animals 
besides dairy cows are used w^henever desirable. 

Senior Year— Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

52. Research and Thesis. The lines of work and subjects to 
be investigated are to be arranged with the head of the Depart- 
ment. The object of this work is to develop independence and 
originality in the student, and also to give him a taste for personal 
investigation upon lines which are of particular interest to himself. 
The results of these investigations are usually incorporated in a 
thesis. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 4 practical periods per week. 



» 



27 



53- Breeds and Judging. The student begins with the breeds 
of live stock, making a thorough study of their development and 
characteristics and also of the pedigrees and performances of 
superior individuals among horses, cattle, sheep and swine. The 
practical part of the course is devoted to the judging of horses, 
dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

First Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

54. Breeding. The main object of this course is to direct 
attention and to stimulate interest in the more tangible physical 
basis of heredity. A scientific study of the physical aspects of 
heredity leads to conclusions which fully accord with the teachings 
of the work of our master breeders. It is the aim to limit dis- 
cussion to points upon which scientific opinion is quite well agreed. 

Text-books, lectures, and references. 

First Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

55. Dairying. This course takes up a study of the care and 
handling of milk and cream on the farm, centrifugal separation, 
pasteurization and the testing of milk and milk products. 

First Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

56. Animal Industry. A study of the successful methods of 
operating farms devoted chiefly to live stock production and of the 
systems to be applied to Maryland conditions. The student may 
arrange with the head of the Department to utilize one-half of 
scheduled time in other Departments. Elective. 

Second Year — First and Third Term, 4 theoretical and 8 prac- 
tical periods per week; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

57. Animal Feeding. This course embraces the principles and 
practice of animal feeding. After covering the principles of feed- 
ing it takes up the composition of feeding stuflfs, their combina- 
tions into properly balanced rations, and the relation between the 
sustenance of animals and their products. Problems relating to 
balanced rations are solved. 



28 



Text-books, lectures, and references. 

Second Year — First Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

58. Farm Poultry. A general course dealing with poultry 
house construction, yarding, fattening, killing, dressing, marketing, 
and a brief description of the more common breeds. Demonstra- 
tions are given in the practices of handling poultry. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 



BOTANY AND VEGETABLE PATHOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR NORTON. 

^ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ROSE. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ZIMMERMAN. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR TEMPLE. 

The courses in botany are intended to give such knowledge of 
the vegetable kingdom as is a proper element in general culture ; to 
train the student mind in observation, comparison, generalization 
and other mental processes essential to true scientific methods in 
any work ; and to furnish a basis for practical studies directly con- 
nected with agriculture, since plants are the subjects dealt with in 
the field and garden. In addition to the courses in pure botany, 
others of special economic trend are given. These are specially 
for students in the Agricultural and Horticultural O^urses, and 
take up such botanical studies of cultivated plants, plant diseases, 
etc., as may be useful in practical life to the professional farmer or 
gardener. 

The equipment and means for illustration and demonstration 
consist of a reference library containing the principal botanical 
works needed by students, charts and maps, compound and dissect- 
ing microscopes, preserved specimens for illustration and a repre- 
sentative collection of Maryland plants; microtome and other in- 
struments together with reagents and apparatus for histological 
work and physiological experiments; and a culture room, steriliz- 
ers, incubators and other facilities for the study of plant diseases. 



♦Absent on Leave. 



29 

Advanced students have an opportunity to observe the work be- 
ing done in the laboratory of Vegetable Pathology and greenhouse 
of the State Horticultural Department and of the Experiment Sta- 
tion, and, if competent, to assist in the same. Special attention is 
given to students who wish practice in the treatment of plant dis- 
eases, as it is the desire of the Department to encourage young 
men to engage in this work as a business. 



COURSES OFFERED. 

60. General Botany. A course designed to give the student a 
view of the plant kingdom. Type specimens of the algae, fungi, 
liverworts, niosses, ferns and seed plants are studied in the field 
and laboratory and careful drawings made of the various struc- 
tures. In the study of each type, special attention is given to such 
points as habitat, nutrition and methods of reproduction. 

Freshman Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 6 practical per- 
iods per week. 

61. Plant Histology. The student becomes familiar with 
the cell and its parts and the different tissues of the various parts 
of the plant. Typical cells of the protective, strengthening, con- 
ducting, storage and meristematic tissues of the plant are studied 
and careful drawings made. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 6 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

62. Plant Physiology. This course gives the student an 
understanding of the life processes of the plant. A set of fifty 
experiments is performed in the laboratory and greenhouse and the 
results carefully recorded. These experiments illustrate the essen- 
tial facts of such processes as absorption and loss of water, photo- 
synthesis, relation to the inorganic and organic elements, growth, 
movement and death. 

Sophomore Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week ; Third Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

63. Comparative Morphology and Classification. This 
course is an extension of course 60 and is required of all students 
specializing in biology. 



30 



Junior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

64. Economic Plants. Lectures are given on the names, classi- 
fication, nativity and uses of the useful and detrimental plants of 
the world, and field and laboratory studies are made of the common 
cultivated plants. This is done with a view to enabling the student 
to know the scientific names and relationship of the plants with 
which he comes in contact. 

Junior Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

65. Microscopy of Foods and Drugs. The identification of 
various food and drug products and their adulterants by means of 
the microscope. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

66. Vegetable Pathology. This includes microscopic and 
macroscopic examinations of parasitic fungi in their relations to 
diseases in hio:her plants, studies of the nature of disease in plants, 
physiological diseases, etc., together with the best known means for 
the prevention and control of diseases. Lectures, reference work, 
laboratory work and experiments in infection and treatment con- 
stitute the course. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

67. Vegetable Pathology. This course is an extension of the 
above course and is required of students specializing in botany. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

68. Advanced Botany. Elective courses for students of the 
Biological Course and for post-graduate students are offered in 
methods in plant pathology, botanical microchemistry, histology of 
trees, weeds and poisonous plants, seed testing, taxonomy or ad- 
vanced work in any of the undergraduate courses before mentioned. 

Senior Year — 7 theoretical and 12 practical periods per week. 

69. Research. Students electing botany devote a portion of 
their time in the Senior year to the completion of an original 



31 

study of some botanical subject upon which they prepare the gradu- 
ation thesis. The time scheduled is a minimum. 
Senior Year — 8 practical periods per week. 

Seeds and Weeds. The student is taught to recognize the 



/ 



o. 



important weeds and the seeds produced by them. 

First Year— First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

71. Plant Diseases. A practical study of diseases of plants 
to enable the student to recognize them in the field. A course 
in sprays and spraying is given in cooperation with the Zoology 
Department in which the student is taught methods of disease 
control. 

Second Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 



CHEMISTRY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR MCDONNELL. 

PROFESSOR BROUGHTON. 

MR. DENNIS. 

MR. WHITE. 

The Chemistry Department is charged with two distinct classes 
of work, (i) The licensing, inspection and analysis of fertilizers, 
feeds and agricultural lime sold in the State, the Professor of 
Chemistry being, ex officio, the State Chemist. The results of this 
work are published in a "Quarterly'' bulletin which is sent free 
to all Maryland farmers w^ho apply for it. (2) The instruction of 
students. 

The Chemical Laboratory Building contains laboratories, office 
and balance room for the State fertilizer, feed and lime control 
work, lecture room, supply room and four other laboratories. In 
addition classrooms in Morrill Hall are used as are two bacterio- 
logical laboratories at the Experiment Station and the Experiment 
Station canning laboratory. 

The laboratories are well equipped with standard apparatus and 
chemicals, chemical and assay balances, polariscopes, refractometers, 



32 

spectroscopes, microscopes with high-power oil immersion lenses, 
etc. Each student is provided with a locker, reagents and apparatus 
and has the use of a working desk. 

The Departm,ent is provided with a library of standard reference 
books on chemistry and related subjects, to which additions are 
made from time to time. 

Instruction in chemistry is begun with the Second Term of the 
Freshman year. Laboratory work by the student is emphasized 
and special attention is given to elements and compounds of prac- 
tical and economic importance. The first year is intended to give 
the student that practical and theoretical knowledge of elementary 
chemistry which is essential in the education of every man, no 
matter what his vocation. It also serves as a foundation for ad- 
vanced work in chemistry, if the Course in Chemistry is chosen. 
The outline of Course in Canning may be found on page io6. 



CHEMISTRY. 
COURSES OFFERED. 

80. General Chemistry. Recitations, lectures and practical 
work in the laboratory, where the student performs the experiments 
under the directions of instructors. 

Text-book: McPherson and Henderson's "General Chemistry." 
Freshman Year — Second and Third Term, 4 theoretical and 2 
practical periods per week. 

81. Metals and Qualitative Analysis. A continuation of 
course 80. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, 2 lecture and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

82. Qualitative Analysis. An advanced course for students 
in the Chemical Course. 

Reference books: Treadwell and Hall's "Qualitative Analysis," 
and Brescott and Johnson's "Qualitative Analysis." 

Sophormore Year — Second Term, i lecture period and 8 practical 
periods per week. 

83. Quantitative Analysis. For students not taking the 
Chemical Course. A brief course illustrating some of the general 



33 



principles in the quantitative study of chemistry. In the latter 
part of the course the students are given samples of fertilizers, 
feeds, butter, milk, etc., for analysis. 
Text-book: Lincoln and Walton's "Quantitative Analysis." 
Sophomore Year — Second Term, i conference period and 8 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

84. Quantitative Analysis. The principal operations of quan- 
titative analysis. Standardization of the chemical balance. Stan- 
dardization of weights and apparatus used for chemical analysis. 
Typical gravimetric, volumetric, calorimetric and electrolytic meth- 
ods are taken up and discussed. 

Text-book: Olsen's "Quantitative Analysis." 
Sophomore Year — ^Third Term, 3 lecture and 10 practical periods 
per week. 

85. Mineralogy. This is a course of determinative mineralogy. 
Thq more important minerals are identified by their more char- 
acteristic physical and chemical properties, the blow-pipe being an 
important aid. 

Text-book: Brush and Penfield's "Determinative Mineralogy 
and Blow-pipe Analysis." 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, i lecture period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

86. Geology. A course in the history of dynamic, stratigraphic 
and physiographic geology. The latter part of the course is devoted 
to the geology of Maryland, specially as affecting the character of 
the soil, mineral wealth and other economic conditions of the State. 

Text-book: Chamberlin and Salisbury's "College Geology." 
Junior Year — First Term, 2 lecture and 2 practical periods per 
week; Second Term, 2 lecture periods per week. 

87. Organic Chemistry. For students taking the Agricultural, 
Biological and General Science Courses. Recitations and lectures. 

Text-book: Chamberlain's ''Organic Agricultural Chemistry." 
Junior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

88. Organic Chemistry. For students making a specialty of 
agricultural chemistry. 



34 



m 



i 



Text-books : Perkin and Kipin's "Organic Chemistry," and Gat- 
termann's "Practical Methods of Organic Chemistry," translated 
by Schober. 

Junior Year — 3 lecture and 4 practical periods per week. 

89. Quantitative Analysis. Consisting of gravimetric, vol- 
umetric, and colorimetric determinations. Samples are selected so 
as to illustrate the general principles of the work. The volumetric 
work consist of acidimetry, alkalimetry, iodometry, oxidation and 
reduction. Neatness and accuracy are insisted upon in the labora- 
tory, and in the conference periods the chemistry and mathematics 
of each determination are thoroughly discussed. 

Text-books : Olsen's "Quantitative Analysis," and Sutton's 
"Volumetric Analysis." 

Junior Year — First and Third Term, i lecture period and 12 
practical periods per week; Second Term, i lecture period and 14 
practical periods per week. 

90. Stoichiometry. Problems relating to analytical and applied 
chemistry. 

Junior Year — i theoretical period per week. 

91. Agricultural Chemistry. The chemistry of soils, fertil- 
izers, plant life, animal life, etc. 

Text-book: Stoddart's "Chemistry of Agriculture." 
Senior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

92. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. This is an advanced 
course in the analysis of fertilizers and fertilizing materials, feeding 
stuffs, butter, milk, sugar, starch, etc. 

Senior Year — First Term, 12 practical periods per week. 

93. Physiological Chemistry. Recitations and lectures. 
Text-book: Hawk's "Physiological Chemistry." 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

94. Physical Chemistry. In this course the student becomes 
familiar with the advanced theories of chemistry, and some of the 
methods employed by research chemists. The laboratory work 
consists of the determination of the boiling and melting points, 
lowering of the freezing point by substances in solution, determina- 



35 



tion of vapor densities, and combustion methods for the determina- 
tion of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. 

Text-book: Walker's "Physical Chemistry." 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 14 practical per- 
iods per week ; Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

95. Inorganic Chemistry. An advanced course covering more 
in detail the subject matter set forth in the general chemistry 
offered in the Freshman year. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per 
week. 

96. Industrial Chemistry. The study of the practical methods 
employed in the various chemical industries. Visits are made to 
ice, fermentation, and gas plants; also to fertilizer, glass, iron and 
steel works; etc. 

Text-book: Thorp's "Outlines of Industrial Chemistry." 
Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods 
per week. 

97. Advanced Agricultural Analysis. 

Text-book: "Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official 
Agricultural Chemists." 
Senior Year— Third Term, 8 practical periods per week. 

98. Thesis. Investigation along agricultural chemical lines to 
be embodied in a graduating thesis. In addition to the time sched- 
uled, a part of the work done under courses 93, 94 and 97 will be 
included. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 6 practical periods per week. 

99. Farm Chemistry. This course consists of an elementary 
study of general and agricultural chemistry, with special reference 
to the chemistry of plants, animals, fertilizers, etc. The course is 
offered to students taking the two-year Course in Agriculture. 

Text-book: Kahlenberg and Hart's "Chemistry in Its Relations 
to Daily Life." 

First Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 2P practical periods 
per week. 

Second Year — First Term, 4 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



36 



BACTERIOLOGY. 
CX)URSES OFFERED. 

IOC. Agricultural Bacteriology. Preparation and steriliza] 
tioix of routine and special media. Routine and special staininj 
methods. Studies on the biochemical action of bacteria. The morj 
phological and physiological characteristics of those organisms in^ 
volved in the economy of nature, dairying, agriculture, etc. The 
bacteriological examination of milk and its products, soils and foods.] 
Practical demonstrations of problems in immunity. 

Text and reference books: Jordan's "General Bacteriology,"] 
Swithinbank and Newman's "Dairy Bacteriology," Conn's "Agri- 
cultural Bacteriology," and Giltner's "Microbiology." 

Junior Year — Second and Third Term, 8 practical periods per 
A^eek. 

loi. General Bacteriology. Preparation of media and stains. 
The practical application of various methods of sterilization. A 
study of the various procedures for anaerobic development and isola- 
tion of bacteria in pure cultures. Standard procedures for the ex- 
amination of pure cultures supplemented by a routine determination 
of the morphological and physiological characteristics of pure cul- 
tures isolated from nature and having special functions in the 
field of agriculture, dairying and sanitation. The routine bac- 
teriological examination of drinking waters, milk and its products, 
foods, soils and disinfectants. Lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions in immunity and resistance. 

Text and reference books: Hiss and Zinnser's "General Bac- 
teriology," Conn's "Agricultural Bacteriology," Prescott and Wins- 
low's ''Bacteriology of Drinking Waters," Giltner's "Microbiology," 
and Fred's "Soil Bacteriology." 

Senior Year — i lecture period and 6 practical periods per week. 

I02. Bacteriology. Lectures and practical demonstrations of 
subjects pertaining to agricultural and dairy bacteriology, with 
emphasis on the bacteria in milk and soils. 

Reference books: Swithinbank and Newman's "Dairy Bacter- 
iology," and Lipman's "Bacteria in Relation to Country Life." 

Second Year — Second Term, 4 practical periods per week. 



37 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR TALIAFERRO. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SPRINGER. 

The subjects pertaining to civil engineering are arranged with 
the object of emphasizing the fundamental principles through lec- 
tures and recitations in the class-room, supplemented by practical 
exercises in the field, drafting room and laboratory. Self-reliance 
being an essential factor in the success of an engineer, the student 
is encouraged in every way to develop this habit. 

Equipment. In addition to minor engineering instruments, etc.. 
the Department is at present equipped with three compasses, four 
transits and four levels. 

The experimental laboratory contains a thousand pound Riehlc 
cement testing machine and a hundred thousand pound Riehle ma- 
chine for making tensile and other tests of the various kinds of ma- 
terials. A description of this latter machine will be found on page 
"jTy it having been purchased for the use of the Civil and Mechan- 
ical Engineering Departments. A description of the drafting and 
blue print rooms used by the Civil Engineering Department will 
also be found on page yj. 

Some hydraulic apparatus of a character suited to the needs of 
the Department has been installed and other apparatus will be pur- 
chased as the funds permit. 

Tours of Inspection — During the session members of the Sen- 
ior and Junior classes, accompanied by an instructor, take trips for 
the purpose of making an examination of the different types of 
modern engineering construction. 

COURSES offered. 

The subjects outlined, with a few exceptions, constitute a portion 
of the curriculum of students in the Civil Engineering Course. 

120. General Engineering Drawing. Isometric and cabinet 
projections. Perspective. Water coloring. Paper stretching. 
Blue printing. Ornamental lettering, round writing and title work. 
Floor plans, elevations and architectural details. Mapping con- 
tours and profiling. Conventional signs. 

Freshman Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 



/ 



38 



Junior Year — Second Term, 6 practical periods per week; Third 
Term, 8 practical periods per week. 

121. Surveying. This course includes the use and adjustment 
of engineering instruments, the methods of land surveying, the 
plotting and computing of areas, dividing of land, the theory of 
the stadia, true meridian lines, leveling, topographical surveying, 
railroad curves and cross sectioning. 

Texts: Raymond's "Plane Surveying," Hosmer and Breed's 
"The Principles and Practice of Surveying," and Pence & Ketch- 
urn's "Field Manual." 

Freshman Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical periods per week; 
Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week: 
Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week; Third Term, 2 theo- 
retical and 4 practical periods per week. 

Junior Year — First Term, 4 practical period per week. 

122. Mechanics. A study of statics, dealing with the compo- 
sition and resolution of forces, moments, couples, machines, and 
laws of friction ; and of dynamics, dealing with velocity, accelera- 
tion, laws of motion, work, energy, and applications to problems. 

Junior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

123. Railway Engineering. A study is made of preliminary 
and location surveys, cross sectioning, calculation of quantities, etc. 

Text: Allen's "Railroad Curves and Earthwork." 
Junior Year — Second and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per 
week. 

124. Bridge and Structural Design. This course includes 
the complete design and detailing of a steel roof truss and a plate 
girder; the detailing from standard commercial drawing sheets of 
floor beams, girders and columns; and the complete design of a 
bridge truss of either the Warren or Pratt type. The stresses are 
determined by both analytical and graphic methods. 

Texts: Merriman and Jacoby's "Stresses," Cooper's "Bridge 
Specifications," "Cambria Hand Book," Thompson's "Bridge and 
Structural Design," and Merriman and Jacoby's "Bridge Design." 

Junior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 



39 



125- Mechanics of Materials. This course treats of the elas- 
ticity and resistance of materials of construction, and the mechanics 
of beams, columns and shafts. 

Text : Merriman's **Mechanics of Materials." 

Junior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week; 
Third Term, 5 theoretical periods per week. 

126. Surveying. This course is intended, primarily, to meet the 
needs of students in agriculture, horticulture, and engineering 
education. It includes the use of the compass, transit and level, 
one or more methods of land surveying, the plotting and computing 
of areas, leveling and topographical surveying. 

Texts: Robbins' ''Surveying," and Springer's "Surveying Notes 
and Problems." 

Junior Year— Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

127. Practical Problems. The necessity for practical work 
on the part of those desiring to enter upon engineering as a profes- 
sion is obvious. To meet this condition a number of hours have 
been scheduled for field and laboratory" work in practical problems 
relating to engineering. The laboratory work includes the testing 
of cement and other materials of construction, various hydraulic 
experiments, the operation of engines, etc. The scheduled hours 
constitute a minimum, the student being encouraged to give as 
much more of his time as is possible to problems of this character. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 8 practical periods per week. 
Senior Year — First Term, 8 practical periods per week; Sec- 
ond and Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

128. Farm Drainage. Students in agriculture continue course 
126, the time being given to problems in drainage, particularly tile 
drainage. 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

129. Concrete. A study of cement, concrete, and reinforced 
concrete construction. 

Text: Hool's "Reinforced Concrete Construction." 
Senior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

130. Hydraulics. The principles of hydraulics, flow through 
pipes, water supply, etc., are discussed in this course. This course 

• 

IS continued in the Second Term as hydromechanics. 



40 



Text: Lea's "Hydraulics." 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

131. Estimates of Cost. Lectures are given on the methods 
of estimating cost and these are supplemented by problems of a 
practical nature. 

Senior Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

132. Geodesy. A study of the theory and methods of geodetic 
surveying. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

133. Highway Engineering. This course includes the loca- 
tion, construction and maintenance of roads. 

Text: Blanchard and Browne's "Highway Engineering." 
Senior Year — Third Term, 5 theoretical periods per week. 

134. Contracts and Specifications. A study of simplicity and 
legality in the preparation of contracts and specifications in engi- 
neering works. 

Text: Tucker's "Contracts in Engineering." 

Senior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

135. Farm Water Systems. An elementary course dealing 
with the water supply and the disposal of sewage on the farm. 

Second Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

136. Farm Drainage. An elementary course in the theory and 
practice of drainage. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 



ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY. 

professor bomberger. 
' mr. schulz. 

The courses in this Department are specially designed to pre- 
pare young men for the active duties of citizenship. The first 
year of the Collegiate work is devoted to the study of modern 
history, which is followed by the principles of civil government, 
constitutional history, political economy (with especial reference 
to current, social, rural and industrial problems), and, finally, the 
elements of business and international law. 



41 



ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 



COURSES OFFERED. 



140. Civil Government. Study of the history and develop- 
ment of the Constitution of the United States. 

Text used: Beard's "American Government and Politics." 
Junior Year — First and Second Term, 3 theoretical periods 
per week. 

141. Business Law. Principles of law as practically applied 
in everyday life and business. 

Text used : Huffcut's "Elements of Business Law." 
Junior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

142. Political Economy. Principles of political economy and 
industrial development of the United States ; rural economics ; social 
science; and current problems. 

Text used: Seager's "Principles of Economics." 
Senior Year — 4 theoretical periods per week. 

143. Comparative Government. Study of the governments 
of the leading nations of Europe. Elective. 

Text used: Ogg's "Governments of Europe." 

Senior Year — First Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

144. Municipal Governments. Study of typical modern mu- 
nicipal governments of the United States and Europe. Elective. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

145. International Law. Elements of international law. 
Elective. 

Text used: Davis' "Elements of International Law." 
Senior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

146. Rural Economics. Special study of rural economic prob- 
lems. Elective. 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per 
week; Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

147. Business Law. A course for the students in the two-year 
Course in Agriculture on the principles of law as practically applied 
in everyday life and business. 

Text used : Hamilton's "Practical Law." 

Second Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 



42 



HISTORY. 
COURSES OFFERED. 

1 60. Modern European History. From the treaty of West- 
phalia to the present time. 

Text used: Robinson and Beard's "Development of Moderi; 
Europe.' 

Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

161. American History. Political and economic history of the 
United States with special reference to the nineteenth century. 
Elective. 

Sophomore Year — First and Second Term, 5 theoretical periods 
per week; Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

162. History. Selected Topics. 

Junior Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

163. x\dvanced History. Elective. 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per 
week; Second Term,^ 4 theoretical periods per week. 

164. European History. Outlines from 476 A, D. to 1684 A. D. 
Prerequisite, Ancient History to 476 A. D. Elective. 

Sub-Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS. 

professor creese, 
mr. hodgins. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The work of the Electrical Engineering Course is so arranged as 
to give the student a thorough understanding of the fundamental 
principles of the various branches of electrical engineering, and at 
the same time to teach him to apply these principles to the prac- 
tical problems with which the engineer has to deal. This purpose 
is carried out by means of lectures and recitations in the class-room, 
supplemented by practical work in the laboratories and drawing 
room. 

Equipment. The Electrical Engineering Laboratories are lo- 
cated in the east wing of the engineering building. The rooms 
on the first floor are used for lectures, recitations and experimental 



43 



demonstrations by the instructor; a room on the second floor is 
equipped with apparatus for experimental work in telephone en- 
gineering; and the basement contains the dynamo room and the 
electrical engineering testing room. 

The electrical engineering testing room is fitted up with such ap- 
pliances as are used to the best advantage in engineering practice. 
Special effort has been made to purchase only the best instruments, 
as the use of poorer grades influences the student unfavorably. 
With poor instruments he cannot be taught to do satisfactory work 
and he becomes careless in the handling of them. 

Among other things the following apparatus has been purchased 
for the testing laboratory: 

A Leeds and Northrup potentiometer and Weston standard volt- 
meter and ammeter for calibrating the various measuring instru- 
ments used in the laboratory. A Sharp-Millar portable photometer 
and a Queen & Co. standard photometer for measuring the candle- 
power of lamps and for determination of illumination intensities. 
A large number of portable ammeters, voltmeters, and indicating 
wattmeters for direct and alternating current measurements ; stand- 
ard curve drawing voltmeter and ammeter; electrostatic volt- 
meter ; frequency meters ; silver and copper voltameters ; Siemen's 
type electrodynamometer ; watthourmeters, both direct and alter- 
nating current. A Leeds and Northrup standard portable testing 
set; heating devices; condensers; tachometers; multiple circuit am- 
meter and voltmeter switches. D^Arsonval galvanometers ; standard 
resistance boxes and bridges, including a very accurate decade 
resistance box and a decade resistance and Wheatstone bridge; 
double and single contact keys, condenser keys, etc. 

The lamps used for experimental purposes include direct and 
alternating current multiple carbon arc, metallic arc, mercury vapor 
and nernst lamps. 

A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt com- 
pound generator, has been installed for testing purposes. This 
may be used in connection with the College lighting plant when 
needed, and will be used for light and power service in the engi- 
neering building. 



44 



The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made readily 
with any part of the College lighting plant, with the turbo-gener- 
ator or with any of the apparatus in the dynamo room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo room includes the following: A 
lo-kilowatt rotary converter of the latest type with speed limit 
and end play devices. A 5 horse-power variable speed commutating 
pole motor. A 7.5 kilowatt, 60 cycle, 220 volt alternator designed to 
operate either as a polyphase generator, synchronous motor, fre- 
quency changer, constant speed induction motor, or variable speed in- 
duction motor ; the following parts are supplied with the set to make 
possible its operation in any of the above named ways; — a station- 
ary armature for use either as an alternating current generator or 
as an induction motor field ; a revolving field ; a squirrel cage induc- 
tion motor rotor with starting compensator having self-contained 
switches; an induction motor rotor with internal starting resist- 
ance; and an induction motor rotor with 3 phase collector rings, 
external resistance, and controller. A 2 kilowatt booster set, con- 
sisting of a series motor and shunt generator with armatures 
mounted on the same shaft. A 5 horse-power compound direct cur- 
rent motor and a 1.5 horse-power shunt motor fully enclosed. A 7.5 
kilowatt, 120 volt, 3 phase self-excited generator direct connected 
to a 115 volt compound direct current motor. A motor-generator 
set consisting of a 3.6 horse-power shunt motor direct connected 
to a 2 kilowatt compound generator. A 3 horse-power, 3 phase 
induction motor. A 0.5 kilowatt shunt generator belt connected 
to a 0.5 horse-power variable speed shunt motor. A 0.5 kilowatt 
series generator and a 0.25 horse-power, 60 cycle, single phase, in- 
duction motor. Two 2 kilowatt transformers to transform power 
from no or 220 volts to iioo or 2200 volts. Various types of start- 
ing rheostats with automatic overload and no voltage release; field 
rheostats. 

The main switchboards, consisting of two blue Vermont marble 
panels on pipe supports, are used to mount the necessary circuit 
breaker, rheostats, switches, etc., to control the generators and mo- 
tors as well as the various circuits in the dynamo room and testing 
laboratory. Wire and water rheostats are arranged for load and 
regulation. Portable lamp-boards are so arranged that they may 



45 



receive, at the proper voltage, from 0.04 to 100 amperes current. 
Portable ammeter, voltmeter and wattmeter switchboards have 
been constructed for use in machine tests. In addition to the spe- 
cial electrical engineering equipment, the College lighting plant 
will be used for illustrative and experimental purposes. This plant 
contains, together with other apparatus useful in teaching elec- 
trical engineering, two Bullock generators of 40 kilowatts total 
capacity, and a switchboard equipped with a number of Weston 
ammeters, voltmeters and circuit breakers, and various types of 
rheostats. 

An 8-inch Waltham bench lathe, with all the necessary attach- 
ments, has been installed in the dynamo room for the use of stu- 
dents in making small articles, such as binding posts, connectors, 
etc., for use in the laboratories. 

The telephone laboratory is equipped with two demonstration 
sets which were made by the Western Electric Co. 

The magneto set consists of an oak panel upon which is mounted 
the following apparatus: Two line circuits with combined jacks 
and signals; double wound supervisory drops; complete cord cir- 
cuits including ringing and listening keys, operator's telephone 
set, magneto generator, etc. On one line circuit is connected a wall 
type subscriber's set, and on the other, a desk set. 

The common battery set consists of an oak panel carrying the 
following equipment: Two line circuits with lamp signals; com- 
plete cord circuits, including ringing and listening keys, opera- 
tor's telephone set, magneto generator, split repeating coils, con- 
densers, retardation coil, supervisory lamps, etc. On one of the line 
circuits is connected a wall type subscriber's set, and on the other 
a desk set. 

Both panels have all the wiring exposed to enable the student to 
make a complete study of these two principal types of telephone 
exchanges. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

The subjects outlined constitute the work in electrical engineer- 
ing. 

180. Elementary Electricity. This subject includes static 
electricity, dealing with the phenomena of electricity in its poten- 



46 



tial form, and the conception of electric potential, quantity, capa- 
city, etc. ; kinetic electricity, including the study of the fundamen- 
la) laws and units, as Ohm's Law, Joules' Law, units of current, 
electromotive force, resistance, etc.; theory of magnetism, with its 
phenomena and forces; and electro-magnetism, which is the foun- 
dation for dynamo electric machine design and construction. 
Text: Franklin and Macnutt's "Electricity and Magnetism.'* 
Sophomore Year — Second and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods 
per week. 

181. Elementary Electricity. A laboratory course designed 
to verify the laws and principles outlined in electrical engineering 
180. 

Sophomore Year — Second and Third Term, 2 practical periods 
per week. 

182. Dynamos and Motors. This subject offers a short gen- 
eral course in direct and alternating currents. The study of various 
types of measuring instruments is followed by a general study of the 
operating characteristics of direct current generators and motors. 
The fundamental problems in single and polyphase circuits are 
taken up in detail; and finally a rather complete study is made of 
alternating current generators and motors, transformers and switch- 
board appliances. 

Text: Franklin and Esty's "Dynamos and Motors." 
Junior Year — First Term, 3 theoretical periods per week; 
Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

183. Electro-Magnetism and Construction of Dynamos. 
Beginning with the Junior year and extending throughout the 
course, the principles involved in the construction and operation 
of both direct and alternating current dynamos and motors arc 
taught. In teaching this subject, special care is exercised that 
the mathematical and graphical developments shall be concise and 
logical. The direct current machine is first examined, and this re- 
sults in a discussion of the different forms of armatures, their wind- 
ings, cores, commutators, etc.; the various fields; the methods of 
arranging the windings for different purposes; the shape and ma- 
terial of the magnetic circuits ; the bearings, shafts, and bed-plates ; 
the methods of insulation; a full description of the materials of 



47 



construction; the selection of types suited to the performance of 
specific duties; and the proper method for installing and operat- 
ing. The characteristic curves and efficiencies of the different types 
are al^o illustrated at some length. 
Text: Franklin and Esty's "Dynamo Electric Machinery." 
Junior Year — First and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods pci 
week; Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

184. Electrical Engineering Laboil\tory. This elementary 
course in testing includes the methods of measuring resistance, 
current and electromotive force; elementary photometry; and 
methods of making up connections on various types of machines. 

Junior Year — First and Second Term, 4 practical periods per 
week. 

185. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. The study of 
direct current instruments. The measurements of resistance, cur- 
rent, and electromotive force; the use of the Wheatstone Bridge 
and galvanometers; loop and capacity tests of cables; calibration 
of instruments; study of direct current machines; testing of arc 
lamps; photometry; the operation of machinery and determination 
of the characteristic curves and efficiencies of machines. 

Junior Year — First and Third Term, 8 practical periods per 
week ; Second Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

186. Primary and Secondary Batteries. The theories in- 
volved in the primary cell are developed and attention is directed 
to the various measurements and calculations pertaining to the sub- 
ject. A study is made of the construction and use of the latest types 
of commercial cells. 

Following the preliminary work on the primary cell, the study 
of the lead storage battery is taken up in detail. The work in- 
cludes the general theory, the mechanical construction and the 
commercial use of the various types of cells, together with the 
chemical and electrical actions encountered. In connection with the 
storage cell a study is made of the construction and use of the 
different forms of the auxiliary apparatus, such as end-cell switches, 
boosters, etc. 
Text: Lyndon's "Storage Battery Engineering." 
Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 



48 



187. Electric Machine Design. Practical calculation of dy- 
namos, including detail calculations of field cores, armature wind- 
ings, frames, commutator, armature core and collecting devices. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

188. Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Ma- 
chinery. A complete study is made of the fundamental pheno- 
mena and theories dealing with the effects of alternating currents, 
both single-phase and poly-phase. Included in this course there 
are a large number of problems, both analytical and graphical, 
which are specially valuable for giving a clear appreciation of the 
effects of self-inductance, mutual-inductance, and capacity in sin- 
gle-phase and poly-phase alternating current circuits. 

The theory, construction and practical applications of single- 
phase and poly-phase alternating current machinery, which in- 
cludes generators, synchronous, induction and repulsion motors, 
rotary converters, transformers, regulators, etc., are taken in detail. 

The fundamental principles of the machinery are developed in 
the class-room and applied concurrently in the laboratory and de- 
signing room with special reference to their practical utilization. 

Texts : Franklin and Esty's "Alternating Currents," McAllister's 
"Alternating Current Motors," and Karapetoff's "Electric Circuit." 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 5 theoretical periods per 
week; Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

189. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. The determina- 
tion of inductance, impedance, condensance, etc. ; measurement of 
power in alternating current circuits; regulation and efficiency 
tests of alternators and transformers; parallel operation of alter- 
nators; phase characteristics, power factor, etc. of synchronous 
motors; poly-phase transformation; mesh and star connections of 
transformers; tests of induction and synchronous motors. 

Senior Year — 8 practical periods per week. 

190. Electric Lighting. This work begins with the study of 
the different systems of distribution used in arc and incandescent 
lighting and the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages 
of each from both financial and engineering standpoints. Attention 



49 



is given to the best methods of obtaining good regulation, as upon 
this satisfactory lighting service depends. The proper arrangement 
and wiring of switchboards and the instruments which they contain, 
as well as the latest methods of protection from lightning, are treated 
in detail. 

The student is made familiar with the manufacture and charac- 
teristics of the incandescent arc and many new forms of electric 
lamps; the selection of lamps for specific commercial duties; the 
principles underlying correct interior and exterior illumination; 
the manufacture of cables for underground work; and the mate- 
rials used in overhead and conduit systems of distribution. 

The proper arrangement, the type and the size of boilers, en- 
gines and dynamos in a central station for lighting and power pur- 
poses, are obtained by the study of typical plants in this country 
and abroad. Many problems involving the calculation of the wire 
and materials needed for the various system of distribution are 
given. These problems require for their solution a know'ledge of 
the rules of the Underwriters' Association. 

Text: Franklin's **Electric Lighting." 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 theoretical periods per 
week. 

191. Electric Powder Plants and Transmission. A study of 
the principles underlying the lay-out of power-house and sub-station 
machinery and circuits for high tension transmission and distribution 
systems, including the determination of the most economical size 
of conductors for such systems. The course includes numerous 
original and practical problems illustrating the principles. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per 
week. 

192. Telephones and Telegraphs. This subject deals with the 
applications of electricity to telephony and telegraphy, with the 
details and construction of the instruments, switchboards and line 
work. In this course are included a study of telephone receivers 
and transmitters; the multiple switchboard; common battery cir- 
cuits; manual and automatic exchanges; traffic regulation; inter- 
communicating systems; line construction; the effects of self-in- 
ductance, capacity and other disturbing influences; location of 



50 



faults; simplex, duplex and quadruplex telegraphy; wireless tele- 
graphy; and simultaneous telegraphy. 

Text: Miller's "American Telephone Practice." 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per 
week. 

193. Telephone Laboratory. The course consists of experi- 
mental work with telephone receivers, transmitters, induction coils, 
the effect of inductance, capacity, and resistance on the transmission 
of voice waves, and the operation of the magneto and common bat- 
tery system of telephony. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 practical periods per 
week. 

194. Electric Machine Design. This work includes the de- 
sign of reactance coils, transformers, induction motors, alternator 
armatures, field windings and frames, and special problems in the 
transmission of power. 

Senior Year — Third Term, i theoretical period and 8 practical 
periods per week. 

195. Electric Railway Engineering. The student is made 
thoroughly familiar with the following topics relating to electric 
railway work; the power, capacity, arrangement and methods of 
installation of the engines and boilers ; the type, method of control 
and disposition of the generators in the dynamo room; the proper 
arrangement of the switchboards and the instruments to be used; 
the line work, including the various trolley and conduit construc- 
tions ; the method of laying the track, with the weight and bonding 
of the rails; the motor equipment and car wiring; the type, power 
and control of the motors and the requirements for special condi- 
tions; the applications of the storage battery; the cost of installa- 
tion and operation of the power plant ; the management of the plant ; 
and the modifications required for high speed electric traction. 

Text: Sheldon and Hausman's ''Electric Traction and Trans 
mission Engineering." 

Senior Year — ^Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 



51 



PHYSICS. 



The physical lecture room and laboratory are located in the new 
engineering building, in rooms excellently adapted to the purpose. 
The Department is well supplied with apparatus for lecture room 
demonstrations and for students' individual laboratory work, and 
new pieces of apparatus are added to the equipment each year. 



COURSES OFFERED. 

200. Mechanics and Sound. This course includes lectures, 
recitations, and demonstrations on mechanics, hydrostatics, mole- 
cular physics, and sound. A knowledge of plane trigonometry is 
required for entrance. Physics 203 must be taken at the same 
time. 

Text: Carhart's "College Physics." 

Sophomore Year — First Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

Junior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

201. Electricity and Magnetism. The elementary theory of 
electrical phenomena is carefully developed and considerable time 
is spent on the solution of problems illustrating the practical appli- 
cation of the various laws. Physics 204 must be taken at the same 
time. 

Text: Franklin and Macnutt's "Electricity and Magnetism." 
Sophomore Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 
Junior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

202. Heat and Light. The general theory of the nature of 
heat is followed by detailed discussion of expansion, change of 
state, transmission and radiation of heat and the elements of ther- 
modynamics. A careful study is made of the nature and propaga- 
tion of light, the laws of reflection and refraction, dispersion, inter- 
ference, etc. Physics 205 must be taken at the same time. 

Text: Carhart's "College Physics." 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

203. Mechanics and Sound. A laboratory course consisting of 
a series of quantitative experiments arranged to illustrate and 
verify the laws and principles considered in the class-room and to 



52 



develop in the student skill in manipulation and accuracy in making 
precise measurements. Physics 200 must be taken at the same time. 

Sophomore and Junior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per 
week. 

204. Electricity and Magnetism. A laboratory course ar- 
ranged to give the student a general knowledge of elementary elec- 
trical measurements and the practical application of the laws of 
magnetism. The course includes the study of magnetic fields and 
the measurement of current, electromotive force, resistance, 
capacity, etc. Physics 201 must be taken at the same time. 

Sophomore and Junior Year — Second Term, 4 practical periods 
per week. 

205. Heat and Light. A laboratory course including a number 
of experiments designed to illustrate and verify the laws and prin- 
ciples of heat and light. The experiments consist of the calibration 
of thermometers; measurement of specific heat, coefficient of ex- 
pansion, heat of fusion, and vaporization ; reflection with plane and 
spherical surfaces, refraction with prism and lenses, etc. Physics 
202 must be taken at the same time. 

Sophomore and Junior Year — Third Term, 4 practical periods 
per week. 

206. Elementary Physics. The course consists of lectures, 
recitations and laboratory work in mechanics, sound, heat, light, 
electricity and magnetism. The student is required to solve a num- 
ber of problems and his attention is directed to the practical appli- 
cations of the principles studied. The laboratory work consists of 
the performance of experiments by a group of students under the 
direct supervision of the Instructor. The work includes only those 
experiments which have a direct bearing on the theoretical work 
and all students in the class are required to prepare original notes 
on the experiments performed by each group. 

Text : Carhart and Chute's "Principles of Physics.'' 

Sub-Freshman Year — 4 theoretical periods and i practical period 
per week. 



53 



ENGLISH AND PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

PROFESSOR RICHARDSON. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR REED. 
MR. SCHULZ. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Courses in the English language and literature are indispensable 
to complete training. There can be no more practical branch of 
study than that which teaches the student to avoid the errors of 
the vulgar, to regard the laws of correct usage and good taste, and 
to express his thoughts in a clear, easy, and effective manner. This 
can be accomplished only by systematic instruction which stresses 
precept, practice, and example. Consequently, all composition 
courses prescribe, in addition to rhetorical theory, extensive writing 
of themes and constant attention to the methods of the masters of 
English prose. This, together with a survey of English literature 
and a study of the life and art of its great writers, permits acquaint- 
ance with and inculcates habits of sound and painstaking scholar- 
ship. 

But training is not complete without some knowledge of the 
noblest thoughts of the greatest minds. These are preserved in the 
masterpieces of literature. To study the classics is to come under 
their influence, so that the student learns to appreciate the loftier 
attitudes and ultimate end of all living. 

courses offered. 

220. Composition, Rhetoric, and Readings in English 
Prose. This course aims to train the student in clear, economic, 
forceful self-expression by familiarizing him with the leading 
requisites of literary art and by requiring him to make constant 
application of them in constructive theme writing. Theory, how- 
ever, is always kept subordinate to practice and choice example. 
E>aily exercises and at least twelve essays are written during the 
year. Instructors correct themes in detail, and after the student's 
revision place on file ; they also make appointments for conferences. 
Freshness and interest are maintained by the variety of subjects 
assigned and the careful coordination of composition with the stu- 



54 



• 



dent's other academic interests. In connection with the study of 
narratives special attention is given to the short story and letter 
writing. 

Texts: Scott and Denney's "Paragraph Writing," and Scott and 
Zeitlin's "College Readings in English Prose." 

Freshman Year — 4 theoretical periods per week. 

221. Composition and a Survey of English Literature. 
Practical work in composition done in connection with a general 
survey of the development of English literature. Historical outline 
given by lectures. Intensive study in class of six or more complete 
masterpieces. Collateral readings in classical, technical, and cur- 
rent literature. Critiques and reports on literature read and studied, 
equivalent to twelve or more regular themes. 

Texts : Long's "English Literature," and Newcomer and Andrew's 
"Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose." 

Sophomore Year — i theoretical period and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

222. Advanced Scientific Composition. The purpose of this 
course is the 'examination and analysis of such literature as pertains 
to the various technical courses of the College, with the view of 
producing work of a similar character. The preparation of at least 
a half-dozen essays on subjects within the student's major field is 
required of each member of the class. The technical departments 
cooperate with the English Department in offering this course. 

Junior Year— First and Second Term, I theoretical period and 2 
practical periods per week; Third Term, i theoretical period per 
week. 

223. The Novel and the Essay. Prerequisite, English 220 
and 221. Required in 1917-18 of General Science students; elective 
for others by permission. 

Each student will read a number of works of fiction and prepare 
written critiques. A few model novels are studied critically in 
class. Lectures on the historical development of the English novel. 

Reading of the leading nineteenth century essayists; lectures 
and reports. 

Junior Year — 2 theoretical periods per week. 



55 



224- Survey of American Literature. History of the 
English Language. Prerequisite, English 220 and 221. Required 
in 1918-19 of General Science students; elective for others by per- 
mission. 

Survey of American literature: Lectures on historical periods, 
determinative movements, and representative authors. Critical 
reading of masterpieces. Essays. 

History of the English language: The development of the lan- 
guage is traced by means of illustrative specimens. The history of 
spelling and pronunciation, the changes in the meanings of words, 
and the origin of idioms receive attention. 

Junior Year — 2 theoretical periods per week. 

225. Special Composition. Special themes illustrating the 
principles of debate, the oration and the short story. 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 practical periods per 
week; Third Term, i theoretical period per week. 

226. The Drama. Prerequisite, English 220 and 221. Required 
in 1917-18 of General Science students, and of other Seniors not 
electing English 225. 

Origin of the English drama : Early Popular Plays ; Predecessors 
of Shakespeare ; Shakespeare and his Contemporaries ; Restoration 
and Eighteenth Century drama; and Modern drama. Lectures on 
the history, and critical study of the plays, of each period. Exten- 
sive collateral reading. Essays. 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 practical periods per 
week; i theoretical period per week. 

227. Poetry. Prerequisite, English 220 and 221. Required in 
1918-19 of General Science students, and of other Seniors not elect- 
ing English 225. 

Analytic and interpretative study of Chaucer, Spenser, and Mil- 
ton; the poetry of the Eighteen Century; and Romantic and Vic- 
torian poets. Lectures on the history of English poetry, with sp>e- 
cial attention given to the rise of Romanticism. Collateral assign- 
ments. Critiques. 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 practical periods per 
Week ; Third Term, i theoretical period per week. 



i 



56 

228. Special English. Subject to be selected after consulta- 
tion with the head of the Department. Elective for students in 
General Science Course. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week ; Second 
Term, 4 theoretical periods per week; Third Term, 3 theoretical 
periods per week. 

229. English. Review of Grammar and Composition based 
upon work taken in Course. 

First Year — First and Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per 
week; Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

230. Farm Literature. A reading course in farm periodicals 
and other agricultural literature, with instruction in the taking and 
systematization of notes. 

First Year— 2 practical periods per week. 

231. Rhetoric, Composition and Literature. A study of the 
principles of rhetoric and composition, together with a study of the 
history of literature and selected works of English and American 
authors. Composition is based upon experience and literature 
studied. 

Sub-Freshman Year — 4 theoretical and 2 practical periods per 

week. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

The work in public speaking is begun with easy lessons in elocu- 
tion ; and this is continued until the student has acquired a mastery 
of vocal expression, and a pleasing and forceful delivery. The 
student is then required to deliver both extempore and prepared 
speeches and debates, covering a wide range of subjects, in this 
way not only securing practice in delivery, but also developing the 
power of logical thought. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

232. Elements of Public Speaking. Work consists of read- 
ing, declamation and original speeches. 

Freshman Year— 2 practical periods per week. 

233. Public Speaking. Lectures on ancient and modern 
orators, with readings and declamations from their orations. Ex- 



57 

tempore speeches. Original orations on subjects requiring careful 
and intelligent research work. Debates. 
Sophomore Year — 2 practical periods per week. 

234. Public Speaking. Writing and delivering original 
speeches on subjects especially adapted to the future requirements 
in the vocation of the student. Debates on current subjects. 

Junior Year — 2 practical periods per week. 

235. Public Speaking. Special course for students in the Gen- 
eral Science Course. Elective. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week ; Second 
Term, 4 theoretical periods per week; Third Term, 3 theoretical 
periods per week. 

236. Public Speaking. Instruction and practice in declamation 
and delivery of original compositions. 

First Year— 2 practical periods per week. 



ENTOMOLOGY AND ZOOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SYMONS. 

professor CORY. 

MR. PIERSON. 

MR. CALE. 

Instruction is given in this Department with a view first, to giv- 
ing the student the general knowledge of invertebrate and verte- 
brate zoology, whicn is necessary as a foundation science for an 
agricultural education ; second, to fit the student in elementary and 
advanced entomology, both economic and systematic, so that he 
may pursue this specialty after graduation. A course in economic 
entomology and zoology is also given to provide those students who 
are specializing in any of the allied agricultural sciences, with 

the infonnation which is essential to their ideal development. 

Students who intend to enter the medical profession or work in 
public health and sanitation will find in the Biological Course the 
work which will give them the best possible preparation for those 
professions. 



I? 




Hi 



58 

Students wishing to take advanced work in invertebrate zoology 
are advised to select some subject in entomology. As the State and 
Experiment Station entomological work is conducted through this 
Department, there are special advantages for students in applied 
entomology. Facilities for specializing in apiculture are now 
available. 

The reference library is unusually complete, containing in addi- 
tion to the standard works, a majority of the principal entomolo- 
gical and zoological publications. The laboratory is supplied with 
a large collection of insects for the use of students, and is well 
equipped with microscopes and other apparatus necessary for prac- 
tical work in entomology and zoology. 

A greenhouse with an aquarium for insect breeding and investi- 
gation, together with a screen insectary adjacent to the laboratories, 
adds to the opportunity for advanced work in zoology and ento- 
mology. A greenhouse 50 x 20 in the new range of houses has 
been set aside for entomological work. 

A dark room and equipment for laboratory and outdoor pho- 
tography, and for photomicrography is an important adjunct in 
carrying on the work. 

The spray laboratory is well equipped with machinery, accessories 
and insecticides. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

240. General Zoology. This course is offered to all students 
taking agriculture and allied sciences, and is introductory to all 
other work in this Department. Laboratory work consists of a 
detailed study of form and function of type species. The theoretical 
study consists of lectures and recitations based on Hegner's College 
Zoology. 

Text-book: Hegner's "College Zoology.*' 

Freshman Year — First and Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 
practical periods per week. 

241. Advanced Zoology. This course is required of students 
taking the Biological Course. The time will be divided equally be- 
tween normal histology and embryology. 

Sophomore Year — 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods per week. 




59 



242. General Entomology. This course consists of a study 
of insects, their classification, structure and relation to man. The 
practical work will consist of laboratory studies of the structures 
of typical forms, and a study in the field of the habits of insects, 
particularly those which are injurious to crops. 

As an aid to this study, the student is required to make a collec- 
tion of the more common insects which appear in the Spring. 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

243. Economic Zoology. The economic relations of animals 
to man and other animals is given careful consideration in this 
course which is required of Biological students. 

Junior Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical per- 
iods per week. 

244. Economic Entomology. This course will embrace a de- 
tailed study of the life histories of insects of economic importance 
and the most approved means of control. Practical work will be 
given in the preparation and application of insecticides and the 
operation of spraying machinery, of which the Department has 
a large assortment. 

Junior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week ; Third Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

.245. Entomology. This course is required of students special- 
izing in entomology. It consists of a study of morphology and 
classification of insects, their biology and inter-relations. 

Junior Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week ; Third Term, 2 theoretical and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

246. Advanced Entomology. Senior students specializing in 
entomology will be required to take this course which will consist 
of insect anatomy, histology, physiology, taxonomy, ecology, and 
distribution. Experimental and biologic methods, collection and 
recording of data, entomological literature and insect delineation 
will be given careful attention. 

Senior Year — 7 theoretical and 12 practical periods per week. 



6o 




mm 



if 



247. Animal Parasites. This course is designed specially for 
students specializing in animal husbandry. The course involves a 
discussion of the life history and habits of the more important in- 
ternal and external parasites of domestic animals. It also includes 
a study of the treatment employed in the control of these pests. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

248. Entomological Research. Independent research on some 
definite problem in entomology, the results of which are usually 
incorporated in the graduation thesis. 

Senior Year — 8 practical periods per week. 

249. Economic Zoology and Entomology. This course con- 
sists of lectures, recitations and laboratory and field work, de- 
signed to familiarize the student with the habits, life history, and 
essential structure from the classification standpoint, and methods of 
encouraging the beneficial and controlling the injurious forms on 
the farm. Special emphasis will be placed on insects, amphibians, 
reptiles and birds. 

First Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 2 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

250. Sprays and Spraying. A critical study will be made of 
spraying apparatus, accessories and spray materials in the Second 
Term and the knowledge thus gained will be applied in actual spray- 
ing operations in the Third Term. 

Second Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and two prac- 
tical periods per week ; Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 



6i 



HORTICULTURE. 

PROFESSOR SYMONS. 

PROFESSOR BECKENSTRATER. 

DR. BESLEY. 

PROFESSOR ANSPON. 

PROFESSOR STODDARD. 

MR. SHAEFFER. 

Recognizing the great importance of every phase of this subject 
in the State, the Department of Horticulture is offering instruction 
to students desiring to speciaHze in either pomology, vegetable cul- 
ture or landscape gardening and floriculture. The courses in this 
subject have been revised, providing for general courses in all 
phases of horticulture during the Freshman and Sophomore years 
and permitting them to specialize in any of the above subjects in 
the Junior and Senior years. 

The arrangement of the courses is, of necessity, subject to such 
adjustment as will advance the best interests of the students. The 
object in each course will be to give practical and theoretical train- 
ing in fruit growing, truck farming and commercial landscape gar- 
dening and floriculture. Under the present arrangement the spec- 
ialists in each subject will have greater opportunity to keep familiar 
with the progress of their work through the practical demonstra- 
tion and experimental work in the State. 

The equipment of the Department is being steadily increased 
and the orchards, gardens and greenhouses of College and Experi- 
ment Station afford unlimited opportunities for practical observa- 
tion. In addition, the students of each course will be expected to 
take trips to selected commercial orchards, truck farms, green- 
houses and markets. 

The Department of Horticulture offers a four-year course lead- 

• 

ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and electives in the two- 
year Course in Agriculture for proficiency in which a certificate 
is awarded. 



62 



POMOLOGY. 



COURSES OFFERED. 



m 



1 



260. Principles of Pomology. This is an introductory course 
which deals with the principles of fruit growing and covers the 
methods of propagation, planting, cultivation and pruning. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week; Third Term, 2 theoretical periods and 2 
practical periods per week. 

261. Commercial Pomology. This course considers the har- 
vesting, packing, storing and marketing of fruits. Special stress 
is given to transportation and market problems. 

Junior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

262. Fruit Judging. In this course the student is given prac- 
tical exercises in judging fruit and selecting fruits for exhibition 
purposes. The standards and principles governing the judging of 
fruits are applied. 

Junior Year — First and Second Term, 2 practical periods per 
week. 

263. Practical Pomology. A study of the orchard sites, soils, 
varieties and planting plans for the orchard and garden, cultiva- 
tion, cover crops, companion crops, fertilizers and pruning as prac- 
ticed in commercial fruit plantations. 

Junior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week; Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

264. Practical Small Fruit Culture. Practical directions 
for the production and handling of strawberries, grapes and bush 
fruits for home use and market. 

Junior Year — ^Third Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

265. Systematic Pomology. This course embraces a study of 
the evolution and relationship of the economical fruits. It includes 
exercises in describing and identifying the leading commercial 
varieties. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week ; Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



63 



266. Advanced Pomology. Special problems in adaptation, pro- 
pagation, cultivation, pruning, harvesting and marketing as they 
arise in commercial orchards will be discussed. The origin and 
development of the various fruit sections and industries will also 
be considered and a study made of the men interested and the 
methods which they use. In this course it may be necessary at 
times for the student to visit orchards in other sections of the State. 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

267. Nut Culture and Citrus and Sub-Tropical Fruits. 
This course is designed to cover these subjects in a general way. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

268. Plant Breeding. A general course in the science and art 
of plant breeding. Observed factors in organic evolution, variation 
and heredity are considered in so far as they have a bearing upon 
this subject. The discussion of the various methods of breeding 
and improvements are accompanied by practice in the orchard, 
greenhouses and gardens. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week; Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

269. Research and Thesis. This course is given to test and 
develop the student's power of observation and initiative. The 
work will be arranged with each student individually and the 
results will be written up in the form of a thesis. Upon approval, 
the student may elect other courses so far as they are available 
in place of a part or all of the thesis work. 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, 4 practical periods per 
week ; Second Term, 4 or 6 practical periods per week. 

270. Elementary Pomology. An introductory course dealing 
with the principles of the subject. It is intended for all students 
in the two-year course and it is prerequisite to the later courses. 

First Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

271. Practical Fruit Growing. This course is designed for 
those students who desire to devote all their allotted time in hor- 
ticulture to pomology. The entire field will be covered and the 



64 



II 



subjects treated in all the other courses in pomology will be in-i 
eluded herein so far as the allotted time and the capacity of the] 
student will permit. Elective. 

First and Third Term, 4 theoretical and 8 practical periods per' 
week ; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods per week. 

2,^2, Commercial Pomology. In this course the methods of 
gathering, packing and marketing of the various fruits are taken up. 
Market problems, transportation and shipping associations receive 
special attention. Advantage is taken of the materials available at 
this time to study the classification and identification of the leading 
commercial varieties of apples. The student is also given practical 
exercises in fruit judging and the selection of fruits for exhibition 
purposes. Elective. 

Second Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

273. Practical Fruit Growing. This course is a continuation 
of course 270 and deals with orchard sites, soils, varieties, com- 
panion crops, fertilizers and pruning as practiced in both commercial 
and home orchards. Elective. 

Second Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week. 

274. Small Fruits. In this course the production; of straw- 
berries, bush fruits and grapes is considered. The methods of 
propagation, selection of sites, soils, pruning, training and cultiva- 
tion are discussed. Elective. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



VEGETABLE GARDENING. 



COURSES OFFERED. 



280. Home Vegetable Gardening. This course includes the 
general principles of vegetable gardening; the production of vege- 
tables for home use; the location, planning and management of 
the garden. The laboratory work includes a study of vegetable 






65 



seeds, germination tests, growing early plants and their care in 
the greenhouses and cold frames until they are planted in the 
''Farmers Garden." Here the students assume full charge of the 
plantings and keep records of the work done on each vegetable. 

Sophomore and Senior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 
practical periods per week; Third Term, i theoretical period and 
4 practical periods per week. 

281. Vegetable Forcing. A course which treats of the prin- 
ciples and practice of forcing vegetables in greenhouses, hotbeds and 
cold-frames. All of the vegetables that are used for forcing are 
considered, and also their grading, packing and marketing. A 
definite area is allotted to each student who is then required to put 
into practice the knowledge gained in the classroom by planning, 
planting and managing the plot throughout the entire forcing season. 

Junior Year — First and Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week; Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

282. Vegetable Gardening Literature. A course relating to 
the sources of literature upon vegetable growing; a study of cur- 
rent literature on vegetable gardening and the work with vegetables 
being carried on at the various experiment stations. 

Junior Year — First Term, 2 practical periods per week; Second 
Term, i theoretical period per week. 

283. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. A study of the princi- 
ples of vegetable growing as applied in commercial production. The 
course includes the selection of a location, and the equipment, con- 
stniction and management of hotbeds and cold-frames; growing 
early vegetable plants ; field planting ; rotation of crops ; and irriga- 
tion. Cultural directions are given for all the vegetables, including 
their requirements, varieties, tillage, enemies, grading, packing and 
marketing. Each student is allotted definite areas in the field and 
greenhouses and is required to plan, plant and manage them 
throughout the year. Trips are taken to markets and vegetable 
farms. 

Senior Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week; Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 
practical periods per week. 



66 



284. Vegetable Growing for the Canning Industry. A I 
course dealing with the principal vegetables grown for commercial 
canning ; cultural directions for these crops ; and the home canning 
of surplus products. Practical work will consist in canning small 
amounts of vegetables in tin cans and glass jars. 

Senior Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week. 

285. Systematic Olericulture. This course includes a sys- 
tematic and descriptive study of the leading varieties of the most 
important vegetables, their origin and botany; adaptation of the 
various varieties to different cultural and market conditions ; judg- 
ing and exhibition work. 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, i theoretical period and 4 
practical periods per week; Second Term, 4 practical periods per 
week. 

286. Market Gardening. This course considers essentially the 
same problems in commercial vegetable growing as contained in 
course 283 but in a briefer way. Cultural directions are given for 
the most important crops. The practical work includes the grow- 
ing of early vegetable plants under glass and field planting of the 
early vegetables. The students assume full charge of the plantings. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

287. Research and Thesis. The prime object of this work is 
to test the student's power of observation and initiative. Each stu- 
dent will be required to select some special line of research in 
vegetable gardening and submit the same to the head of the Depart- 
ment for approval not later than April ist of the Junior year. The 
results must be written up in the thesis which is required for gradua- 
tion. 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week; Second 
Term, 4 or 6 practical periods per week ; Third Term, i theoretical 
period and 4 practical periods per week. 

288. Home Vegetable Gardening. The general principles of 
vegetable gardening as applied to the growing of vegetables for 
home use. The laboratory work includes a study of vegetable 



67 



seeds, seed testing, seed sowing, transplanting and the care of 
plants in the greenhouse^ and cold-frames. The students are re- 
quired to plan, plant and manage a large home garden until the 
end of the term. 

First Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week ; Third Term, 2 theoretical periods and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

289. Commercial Vegetable Growing. A study of the prin- 
ciples of vegetable gardening as applied to the growing of vege- 
tables for market and for canning. The course includes the con- 
struction and management of hotbeds and cold-frames, growing 
early vegetable plants, soil preparation, sowing and planting, cultiva- 
tion, harvesting, grading, packing, marketing, canning and storage. 
Each student is allotted a definite area and is required to plan, 
plant and manage it. Elective. 

Second Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week ; Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

290. Vegetable Forcing. A course which deals with the prin- 
ciples and practice of forcing vegetables in greenhouses, hotbeds 
and cold-frames. The most important forcing crops are considered. 
Each student is assigned a definite plot in the greenhouses and 
frames, and is required to plan, plant and manage it. Elective. 

Second Year — First and Second Term, i theoretical period and 
2 practical periods per week. 

291. Advanced Vegetable Gardening. Second year students 
who elect to spend the entire time scheduled for horticulture 
in vegetable gardening, will be given a course which includes 
the subjects considered under courses 289 and 290, but the prob- 
lems arising in the different phases of commercial vegetable grow- 
ing will be treated in a more thorough manner. It also includes a 
systematic study of some of the more important commercial varie- 
ties. Trips will be taken to markets and vegetable farms. Elective. 

Second Year — First and Third Term, 4 theoretical and 8 prac- 
tical periods per week; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 



I' 



68 



»4i 



i • I 



I 

I 

^1 



If 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING AND FLORICULTURE. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

300. Principles of Landscape Gardening. This course has 
been arranged for the purpose of giving the student a broad knowl- 
edge of the various types of landscape gardening and the prin- 
ciples which underlie them. Lectures and field trips. 

Sophomore Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 2 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

301. Ornamentation of Home Grounds. A continuation of 
course 300, giving special attention to the improvement of home 
grounds. Field trips and reports. 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

302. History of Landscape Gardening. A reference course 
dealing with the literature and the different stages in the develop- 
ment of the art. Collateral reading and reports. 

Junior Year — First Term, 2 practical periods per week. 

303. Floriculture. Preparation of soils, potting, watering, 
ventilating and fumigating as applied to greenhouse crops. Lec- 
tures, practical work in greenhouses, field trips and reports. 

Junior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

304. Commercial Floriculture. Greenhouse plants and 
flowers; culture; and methods of handling and marketing for 
wholesale and retail markets. Lectures, practical work, trips to 
leading growers in this section, and reports. 

Junior Year— Second Term, 4 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

305. Commercial Floriculture. Continuation of course 304. 
Junior Year — ^Third Term, 2 theoretical and 6 practical periods 

per week. 

306. Greenhouse Construction. Types of forcing structures, 
their location, arrangement and construction; cost; methods of 
heating and ventilating. Lectures, drawing plans, specifications, 
and practical work in construction. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



69 



307. Landscape Design. This course deals with the composi- 
tion of gardens, private estates and related problems. Simple 
problems involving the use of topographic surveys, drainage and 
grading plans. Lectures, drafting and collateral reading. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

308. Civic Art. A study of the principles of city planning 
and their application to city, town and rural improvement. Lec- 
tures and collateral reading. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

309. Landscape Design. Continuation of course 307. More 
complex problems are studied, including public parks and play- 
grounds. Planting plans and designs. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

310. Landscape Practice. Grading plans and construction 
drawings, estimates, specifications and contracts. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 4 practical periods per week; Third 
Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical periods per week. 

311. Plant Materials. Trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants. 
Their characters, soil requirements, arrangement and planting. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

312. Floral Decoration. Plants and cut flowers. Their ar- 
rangement in baskets, designs, bouquets, table and house decora- 
tions. 

Senior Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

313. Garden Flowers. Annuals, bulbous plants and herbaceous 
perennials grown in the home garden, for cut flowers and orna- 
mental planting. 

Senior Year — ^Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

314. Tree Repair. Methods of treating trees and shrubs to 
control attacks of insect and fungus enemies and to repair injury 
due to them. Technical details in pruning, bracing, treatment of 
wounds, and cavity filling. 



70 



Senior Year — ^Third Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

315. Amateur Floriculture. Plants and flowers for the win- 
dow and home garden, soils, fertilizers, containers, and the potting 
and shifting of plants. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

316. Plant Propagation. This course takes up seedage, layer- 
ing, cuttings, buds and grafts. Special attention is given to orna- 
mental plants for home decoration. 

First Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

317. Floriculture. This course takes up the various phases 
of greenhouse management, and includes preparation of soils, pot- 
ting, watering, and ventilating. Elective. 

Second Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

318. Principles of Landscape Gardening. A study of the 
various styles of landscape gardening and the principles which 
underlie them. Their application to the ornamentation of home 
grounds is also considered. Elective. 

Second Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

319. Commercial Crops. Methods of growing and marketing 
plants and cut flowers for wholesale and retail markets. Elective. 

Second Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week. 

320. Ornamentation of Home Grounds. This course takes 
up the principles of landscape gardening and their application to 
the home grounds. Elective. 

Second Year — Second Term, i theoretical period and 2 practical 
periods per week. 

321. Commercial Crops. Continuation of course 319. Elective. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



71 

322. Garden Flowers. Annuals, bulbous plants and herbaceous 
perennials suitable to planting in the home garden for cut flowers 
and ornamentation. Elective. 

Second Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 



FORESTRY. 



The instruction in forestry is planned to give to the student, who 
is fitting himself to take up the practical problems of farm manage 
ment, a sufficient knowledge of the principles of forestry to enable 
him to apply to the wood lot or timber tract, which is a part of 
practically every farm, the same degree of intelligent direction 
which he is prepared to give to the tilled lands and thus obtain 
equally satisfactory results. 

COURSE OFFERED. 

320. Farm Forestry. This course includes forest botany 
wood-management, measurement, valuation and utilization of forest 
crops, fire protection, nursery practice and tree planting. Lecture* 
and field work. 

Senior and Second Year — ^Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 



LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR SPENCE. 
MR. KRAMER. 

The Department of Languages embraces the study of three 
branches: Latin, German and French. All students are required 
to take the courses in German or French. Students may elect to 
take Latin in the Freshman year in place of history, provided that 
they have completed the work outlined for the Sub-Freshman Qass 
or its equivalent. 



72 

The course of study in Latin is given with two ends in view- 
first, to train the mind into accurate and close methods of reason- 
ing; second, to give the student a more thorough and comprehen- 
itve knowledge of his own language than he could otherwise ac- 
quire. Special attention is paid to Latin forms and terminations 
and to the derivation of English words from Latin roots. 

So large a proportion of modern scientific literature is in Ger- 
man and French that a reading knowledge of these languages has 
become almost essential to the student pursuing advanced courses 
in the various spheres of scientific research. Instruction in these 
branches is given, therefore, to enable the student to translate in- 
leiligently the works of French and German masters in the domain 
of science, for, frequently there are no English versions of theii 
works. As the student becomes more familiar with foreign scien- 
tific terms and construction, he is required to translate treatise? 
bearing upon the special line of work which he may be pursuing. 



LATIN. 



COURSES OFFERED. 



340. Syntax and Translation. Reading of Caesar and Sal- 
lust with prose composition selected from the text read. 

Text-books: Smith's "Latin Lessons," Harper and Tolman's 
"Commentaries of Caesar," and Scudder's "Sallust." 
Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

341. Mythology, Translation and Literature. Reading of 
Virgil and Horace with lectures on mythology and Latin literature. 
Elective. 

Text-books: Selected texts. 

Sophomore Year — First and Second Term, 5 theoretical periods 
per week; Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

342. Elementary Latin. Elective. 
Sub-Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 



73 



GERMAN. 

courses offered. 

360. Grammar and Conversation. 
Text-book: Bacon's "German Grammar." 
Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

361. Translation. 

Text-books selected from the following: HauflF's "Das Kaltc 
Herz," Schiller's "Der Neffe als Onkel," Wildenbruch's "Das Edle 
Blut" and "Der Letzte," Hillem's "Hoher als die Kirche," Grand- 
gent's "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves," Sybel's "Die Erhebimg 
Europas," Walther's "Algemeine Meereskunde," Brant and Day's 
"Scientific German," Wallentin's "Grundzuge der Naturlehre," Mo- 
ser's "Der Bibliothekar." 

Sophomore Year— 3 theoretical periods per week. 

362. Translation. Selected readings from various literary 
and scientific texts and periodicals. 

Junior Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 
Senior Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

363. Grammar and Conversation. 
Text-book: Bacon's "German Grammar." 

Sub-Freshman Year — 4 theoretical periods and i practical period 
per week. 



FRENCH. 



courses offered. 



380. Grammar and Composition. 

Text-book: Chardenal's "Complete French Course" (Revised), 
Aldrich & Foster's "Elementary French" and "French Reader," 
Super's "French Reader," and selected texts. 

Freshman Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

381. Translation. Selections from standard authors. 
Sophomore Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 

382. Translation. Selected texts. Readings from various 
scientific texts and periodicals. 

Junior Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 



II 



74 

Senior Year — 3 theoretical periods per week. 
383. Grammar and Composition. 

Text-book: Chardenal's "Complete French Course" (Revised). 
Sub- Freshman Year — 4 theoretical periods and i practical period 
per week. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR HARRISON. 
MR. WARTHEN. 

Mathematics is the basis upon which scientific information rests. 
A knowledge of the study is necessary, as much from the utilitarian 
point of view as from the mental training its acquisition gives. Its 
importance as a factor in our College course takes its rise from the 
former consideration. All instruction in this work is with a view 
to the equipping of students for the more practical work soon to 
follow- 

The class work in mathematics in the several courses consists of 
arithmetic, accounting, algebra, geometry (plane and solid), trig- 
onometry, analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus, and 
their application to mechanics, engineering, physics and surveying. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

400. Trigonometry. Deduction of formulas and practical ap- 
plications of same in the solution of right and oblique triangles, etc 

Text-book: Wentworth. 

Freshman Year — First Term, 5 theoretical periods per week; 
Second Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

401. Advanced Algebra. Elementary theory of equations, par- 
tial fractions, etc. 

Text-book : Taylor. 

Freshman Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

402. Analytical Geometry. Geometry of two and three di- 
mensions, loci of general equations of second order, higher plane 
curves, etc. 

Text-book : Riggs. 



75 



Freshman Year — Third Term, 5 theoretical periods per week. 
Sophomore Year — First Term, 5 theoretical periods per week. 

403. Calculus. A discussion of the methods used in differen- 
tiation and integration, and the application of these methods in de- 
termining maxima and minima, areas, volumes, moments of iner- 
tia, etc. 

Text-book : Bowser. 

Sophomore Year — Second Term, 5 theoretical periods per week; 
Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 
Junior Year — First Term, 5 theoretical periods per week. 

404. Farm Accounts. Brief course. 

First Year — First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

405. Algebra. A thorough course in elementary algebra. 
Text-book : Wentworth — Smith. 

Sub-Freshman Year — 4 theoretical periods per week. 

406. Plane Geometry. Books one to five, inclusive. 
Text-book: Wentworth. 

Sub-Freshman Year — First and Second Term, 4 theoretical per- 
iods per week. 

407. Solid Geometry. Books six to eight, inclusive, with 
selected practical problems. Elective . 

Text-book : Wentworth — Smith. 

Sub-Freshman Year — Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per 
week. 

408. Farm Arithmetic. Theory and practice. Elective. 
Sub-Freshman Year — Third Term, 4 theoretical periods per 

week. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

professor gwinner. 

associate professor crisp. 

mr. warthen. 

MR. KEAT. 

This Department offers a Course in Mechanical Engineering 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. The list of all subjects required to be completed to obtain 



76 



this degree is given on page 113. It prepares young men to design 
and construct machinery, to superintend engineering establish- 
ments, to become superintendents of construction and to teach 
mechanical engineering and manual training. For degree of 
Mechanical Engineer see page 128. 

The record of its graduates shows that the course is equipping 
them for immediate usefulness in the technical field. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures and recitations, ac- 
companied by a large amount of practice in the drafting rooms, 
shops and experimental laboratory. 

The program of the Department is arranged to embody the two- 
fold belief that a thorough training is best secured by a study of 
the practical application of the principles involved, as well as of the 
principles. 

Equipment. The Mechanical Engineering Laboratories are sit- 
uated in the engineering building, which contains the wood-work- 
ing and machine shops, drafting and lecture rooms, foundry and 
blacksmith shops as well as the College power plant. 

The wood-working shop contains accommodations for bench work 
and wood turning. The power machinery in this shop is a band 
and universal circular saw, five 12-inch turning lathes, one 16-inch 
by ID-foot pattern maker's lathe, a grindstone, wood trimmer, 26- 
inch wood planer and universal tool grinder. 

In the forge shops are sixteen power forges, two hand forges 
and a pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of 
smoke. There is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with an iron cupola, which melts 1,200 
pounds of iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core-oven and the 
necessary flasks and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one lo-inch speed lathe, 
one 22-inch engine-lathe with compound rest, one 12-inch combined 
foot and power lathe, two 14-inch engine-lathes, one 24-inch drill 
press, one No. 4 ennery tool grinder, one No. 1^4 universal milling 
machine, and an assortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and meas- 
uring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machine shops is driven by a 
9 by 14-inch automatic cut off, high speed engine, built by members 



77 



of the Junior and Senior mechanical engineering classes, after 
the standard design of the Atlas engine. An 8 by 12-inch engine 
drives the machinery of the blacksmith shop and foundry. It was 
presented to the College by the City of Baltimore, and secured 
through the efforts of Rear-Admiral John D. Ford, United States 
Navy, retired. 

The experimental laboratory contains: A hundred thousand 
pound Riehle combined hand and power testing machine for making 
tensile, compression, shearing and transverse tests on various kinds 
of materials, turbo-generator set, consisting of a Curtis steam tur- 
bine and thirty-five K. W. General Electric compound wound gen- 
erator for making steam and electric efficiency tests. This set is 
connected with the general lighting system of the College so that 
any time it may be tested to its capacity. It may also be used for 
lighting purposes if necessary, A cross compound condensing Cor- 
liss engine of fifty horse-power, equipped with brake, indicators, 
relief valves, reducing motion, steam and vacuum gauges, and speed 
indicator, gives ample opportunity for steam consumption and 
brake tests. This is connected with the shops, so that any time it 
may be switched on and drive them. The College power plant with 
its vacuum heating system, three one-hundred horse-power return 
tubular boilers, and two electric generating units offer unexcelled 
opportunities for experimental work. A six horse-power, four- 
cycle gasoline engine equipped with prony brake permits the making 
of tests in gas engineering. 

The three drafting rooms are well equipped for practical work. 
Two of these are used by the Junior and Senior classes, each stu- 
dent being provided with a separate desk. The third room is used 
jointly by the Freshman and Sophomore students and contains 
fifteen drawing tables^ accommodating about ninety students. 

Engineering students are to provide themselves with approved 
drawing outfit, materials and book; the cost of which during the 
Freshman year amounts to about $15.00. The cost to other stu- 
dents taking mechanical drawing is about $5.00. The College does 
not furnish these, but they are purchased by the student and are 
his property. 



78 






The combined blue-print and dark room with its commodious 
printing-frames affords splendid opportunities for sun-printing, 
which is so useful to engineering students. 

Tours of Inspection. The proximity of the College to Balti- 
more, Washington and Philadelphia, with their great industrial en- 
terprises, offers unexcelled opportunities to engineering students 
to acquaint themselves practically with what is being done in mod- 
em engineering construction. Upon trips of inspection an instruc- 
tor accompanies the class and explains the different processes, 
plants and machines. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

420. Freehand Dr.\wing. Elementary practice ; lettering ; exer- 
cises in sketching, both in pencil outline and pencil rendering; line 
drawing, composition, proportion, and comparative measurements; 
exercises in sketching of technical objects; and pen and ink shading. 
Plates upon completion are bound and properly titled. 

Freshman Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

421. Mechanical Drawing. Practice in plain lettering, use 
of instruments, projection and simple working drawings, the plates 
upon completion being enclosed in covers properly titled by the 
students. Instruction is given in this subject during the Junior year 
to students in the Agricultural and Horticultural Courses and is 
modified to meet their needs. 

Text-book: Tracy's "Mechanical Drawing." 
Freshman Year — 4 practical periods per week. 
Junior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

422. Technical Instruction. Explanation of the reading of 
mechanical drawings; the proper cutting angles, care and adjust- 
ment of carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, its 
shrinking and warping, and how to correct and prevent. Drill in 
problems in arithmetic, algebra and drawing by notes and lectures. 

Text-book: Goss' "Bench Work in Wood." 

Freshman Year— First Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

423. Wood Work. During the First Term is taught the use 
and care of bench tools, exercise in sawing, mortising, tenoning 
and laying out work from blue-prints. The Second Term is devoted 



79 



to projects involving construction, decoration and wood-turning. 
During the Third Term the principles and process of pattern-mak- 
ing are taught, together with enough foundry work to demonstrate 
the uses of pattern-making. Instruction in this course is given 
to the agricultural and horticultural students in the Junior year 
and covers types of wood work used on the farm. 

Freshman Year — First Term, 6 practical periods per week; Sec- 
ond and Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

Junior Year — Second Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

424. Descriptive Geometry. Detailing of machinery and draw- 
ing to scale from blue-prints. Tracing and blue-printing, and 
representation of flat and round surfaces by ink shading. Its rela- 
tion to mechanical drawing and the solution of such problems re- 
lating to magnitudes in space as bear directly upon those which 
present themselves to civil, electrical and mechanical engineers. 

Text-books: Anthony and Ashley's ^'Descriptive Geometry," and 
Notes on Empirical Design. 

Sophomore Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week; 
Second Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical periods per week ; Third 
Term, 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods per week. 

425. Blacksmithing. The making of the fire and how to keep 
it in order. The operations of drawing-out, upsetting and bending 
of iron and steel, including the calculations of stock for bent shapes. 
Welding. Construction of steel tools for use in the machine shop, 
including tool dressing and tempering. Annealing. 

Sophomore and Junior Year — First and Second Term, 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

426. Technical Mechanics. Elementary principles of ap- 
plied mechanics, calculations of gear and pulley trains, bent levers, 
calculation of belt lengths, lacing belts, the suction pump, and bolts 
and screws. 

Text-book : Jamieson's "Mechanics." 

Sophomore Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical periods per week. 

427. Foundry Work. Moulding in iron and brass. Core mak- 
ing. The cupola and its management. Lectures on the selection 
of irons by fracture, fuels, melting and mixing of metals. 

Sophomore Year— Third Term, 8 practical periods per week. 



8o 



428. Steam Engines, Boilers and Dynamos. The principles 
of steam and the steam engine. The slide valve and valve dia- 
grams. The indicator and its diagram. Steam boilers, the various 
types and their advantages. Each student taking this course is re- 
quired to spend certain hours in the power plant actually operat- 
ing the engines, boilers and dynamos. The theory of dynamos is 
given in courses 182 and 184. 

Text-book: Allen and Bursley's ''Heat Engines." 

Sophomore Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

429. Elementary Machine Design. Freehand sketching of 
the details of machinery and making working drawings of same. 
Calculations and drawings of a simple type punching press. 

Text-book: Hoffman's "Machine Design." Empirical designing. 

Junior Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week; Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week ; Third Term, 3 theoretical and 8 practical periods 
per week. 

430. Machine Work. Elementary principles of vise and ma- 
chine work, which include turning, planing, drilling, screw cut- 
ting and filing. This is preceded by study of the different machines 
used in the machine shops. 

Junior Year — First and Second Term, 4 practical periods per 
week; Third Term, 12 practical periods per week. 
Senior Year — 4 practical periods per week. 

431. Graphic Statics. The theory and practice of the method 
of determining stresses in cranes, roof trusses and bridges, and 
stresses on beams and girders due to traveling loads. Analysis of 
the stresses in roof trusses by the force polygon. Application of 
the equilibrium polygon to beams and girders. Analysis of stresses 
in bridge trusses. 

Text-book: Merriman and Jacoby's "Graphic Statics." 
Junior Year — Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

432. Experimental Engineering. Determining the amount of 
moisture in steam; the efficiency of the injector; the transit and its 
uses; indicator practice and the use of the planimeter; slide valve 
setting; the slide rule and micrometer; the analysis of boiler feed 
water; flue gases; lubricating oils; and the determination of the 



m 



8i 



heating value of coals. The efficiency test of a Curtis steam turbine 
combined with that of an electric generator. The brake test and 
steam consumption of a cross compound condensing Corliss engine 
under varying loading. The testing of iron, steel and wood to de- 
termine their commercial values. The testing of cement to deter- 
mine its tensile and compressive strength. The determination of the 
horse-power, efficiency and gas consumption of a six H. P. gasoline 
engine. Barrel and throttling calorimeter tests. Determination of 
efficiency of a screw-jack. Injector testing. All such tests must be 
written upon standard forms provided for each student. 

Junior Year — Third Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

Senior Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week; Second 
and Third Term, 8 practical periods per week. 

433. Structural Design. Analysis of stresses in structural 
steel buildings, traveling cranes and derricks. Design of crane 
girders, lattice girders and roof trusses. In addition mechanical 
engineering students have design of cranes and civil engineering 
students have design of truss bridges and retaining walls. Both 
analytical and graphical methods are used, that being used which 
is best suited to problem. Design of riveted connections. Design of 
plate girders under dead and live loads. 

Text-Books: "Cambria Steel," Ketchum's "Steel Mill Build- 
ings," Merriman's "Bridge Design," and Thompson's "Bridge and 
Structural Design." 

Senior Year — First and Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week; Third Term, 2 theoretical and 6 practical 
periods per week. 

434. Mechanics of Engineering. The mechanics of solids, 
Statics of a material point and of rigid bodies. Chains and cords. 
Centrifugal and centripetal forces. Work. Power. Energy. Slid- 
ing friction, friction of journals, friction of pivots, friction of ropes 
and belts. Analysis of stresses in thick cylinders. 

Text-book: Church's "Mechanics of Engineering." 
Senior Year — First and Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per 
Week; Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

435. Kinematics of Machinery. Centrodes. Determination oi 
the instantaneous axis and instantaneous center. Preparation of dis- 



p 




82 



placement, velocity and acceleration diagrams. Design of cams. 
Slow advance and quick return motion for machine tools. Form 
of tooth outlines in the epicycloidal and involute systems. 
Text-book: Barr and Wood's "Kinematics of Machinery." 

Senior Year — First Term, i theoretical period and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

436. Heat Engineering. Laws of fundamental equations ; per- 
fect gases; compound, hot-air and gasoline engines; theory of 
vapors; relation between pressure, volume, temperature, work and 
heat for special changes of state; calculation and drawing of Car- 
not's cycle and temperature entropy diagram. The steam turbine. 
Compressed air and refrigeration machinery. 

Text-books: Mark and Davis' "Steam Tables," Gwinner's 
"Notes on Gas, Oil and Hot-air Engines," and Moyer and Calder- 
wood's "Engineering Thermodynamics." 

Senior Year — First and Third Term, 3 theoretical periods per 
week; Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

437. Farm Machinery. A detailed study of the farm imple- 
ments. One of the objects of the course is to familiarize the 
students with the latest improvements in farm machinery. Given 
by lectures and practical work. 

Senior Year — First Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

438. Hydromechanics. A continuation of course 130. Pumps 
and pumping machinery. Water supply engineering. Practical con- 
sideration of friction of water in pipes. Cost data of machinery. 
Notes and lectures. 

Text-book: Gibson's "Hydraulics and Its Applications." 

Senior Year — Second Term, 4 theoretical periods per week. 

439. Design of Farm Structures. The design and arrange- 
ment of farm buildings and equipment. Lectures also cover the 
heating, lighting, ventilation, plumbing and costs. Elective. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 



83 



440. Design of Farm Machinery. The design and drafting of 
those portions of farm machinery common to engines, and to har- 
vesting, pumping and fertilizing machinery such as levers, shafts, 
gears and frames. Elective. 

Senior Year— Second and Third Term, -z theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

441. Farm Buildings. Design and specifications of a simple 
typical building in timber or concrete and lectures upon the details. 
The course is very practical and latitude is permitted the student to 
develop his ideas. 

Senior Year — Third Term, i theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

442. Heating and Ventilation. The principles of ventilating; 
amount of heat required for warming; radiating surfaces; steam, 
hot water and hot air systems ; vacuum and vapor systems ; pipe and 
pipe systems ; appliances ; specifications and contracts. 

Text-book : HoflFman's "Heating and Ventilation." 
Senior Year — Third Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

443. School Architecture. The planning and detailing of 
moderate priced and medium sized school buildings; including the 
heating, ventilation, lighting and plumbing. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

444. Advanced Pattern Making. Practical examples in loose- 
piece and three-part-flask patterns and in engine patterns. 

Senior Year — Third Term, 8 practical periods per week. 

445. Farm Drawing. Geometrical construction, plan and eleva- 
tion with details of farm gate and plan and elevation of simple farm 
structures. 

First Year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 

446. Farm Wood Work. Use of tools in constructing trestles, 
gates and frames. 

First Year— Second Term, 4 practical periods per wedc. 

447. Farm Machinery. A detailed study of the farm imple- 
ments and their care. Detail of costs of some of the prominent 
types. Lectures and practical work. 




■*1' 



84 

First Year — Second Term, 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

448. Farm Buildings. Study of general types of such struc- 
tures. Calculating bill of material from sketches and making esti- 
mate of cost. 

Second year — First Term, 4 practical periods per week. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE T. EVERETT. 

It is expected that on June ist, 19 17, the students will be organ- 
ized into a senior unit of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps. The 
primary object of establishing units of the Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps is to qualify, by systematic training, students at civil 
educational institutions for reserve officers. The system of instruc- 
tion presents to these students a standardized measure of that 
military training which is necessary in order to prepare them to per- 
form intelligently the duties of commissioned officers in the military 
forces of the United States, and it enables them to be thus trained 
with the least practicable interference with their civil careers. 

Under this organization all Freshman and Sophomores, except 
those excused for physical disability, will be required to attend two 
hours of practical drill and one hour of theoretical instruction a 
week; all Juniors and Seniors who sign a contract to continue in 
the Reserve Officers' Training Corps during the remainder of the 
course and to pursue a certain course in camp training, will have 
two hours of practical drill and three hours of theoretical instruc- 
tion a week. Juniors and Seniors not signing the above contract 
may be required to pursue the practical course outlined for the Re- 
serve Officers' Training Corps. 

From the view-point of the student, military training develops 
patriotism, willingness to assume responsibility, knowledge of 
human nature, and physical and moral courage. It involves the 
cultivation of thought and action, the subjection of one's self to 
the restraints of an orderly, systematic life, and to a direct and 



85 

unselfish honesty. It involves the punctilious practice of dignified 
deportment, pride in personal appearance, and looking at life from 
a simple, straightforward standpoint. It develops a youth physi- 
cally in a uniform, systematic manner, improves his health, and 
gives him that erect carriage and elastic stride, uplifted chin and 
the steady unfaltering eye which have come to be recognized the 
world over as indicating the man of military training. 

The object of military training is to teach the student to secure 
intelligent concentration of effort. The success of any man depends 
largely upon his ability to enforce his will upon those under him 
and to cause them to execute his plans with promptness and pre- 
cision. In everything involving united effort, men must be trained 
to orderly and concerted action before efficiency may be expected. 
'^System" is merely discipline under another name. 

INSPECTION. 

The annual inspection of the institution is under the direction of 
the Commanding General, Eastern Department. His report is for- 
warded to the War Department. There is also an annual inspection 
by a member of the General Staff to determine the relative efficiency 
of the institution as compared to others. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The Corps of Cadets is organized as a battalion of three com- 
panies, staff and band, the drill and administration of which con- 
form as far as possible to that of the Regular Army. 

INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instruction is prescribed by the War Department 
and is designed to develop the greatest amount of initiative on the 
part of the student, and also provides that the cadet officers and 
non-commissioned officers shall participate in the administration 
and training and share the responsibility therefor. 

As the object of all training in the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps is to bring the greatest possible number of cadets up to the 
proper standard of proficiency, permission to be absent is granted 
only for physical disability. 



86 



Close order drills and ceremonies have a disciplinary value but 
proficiency in such drills is not considered or treated as the final 
result to be accomplished in a season's training. 

The course is so arranged that a student upon graduation should 
know what is required of a platoon from the point of view of a 
company commander, and understand thoroughly the interior 
economy of a company. He must know what is demanded of the 
soldier as an individual and also in combination as part of a larger 
organization. The last knowledge includes some idea of the tech- 
nical handling of a battalion of which his company is a smaller unit. 



I 



EQUIPMENT. 

The battalion of cadets is equipped with the United States maga- 
zine rifle, caliber 30, known as the Krag-Jorgensen, with complete 
equipment of side-arms, cartridge-box, etc. Commissioned officers 
are equipped with sabres, and non-commissioned staff officers with 
the regulation cadet sword. 

The Government also has supplied the battalion with the new 
regulation subcalibre target rifle for gallery practice, and has been 
very liberal in the allowance of ammunition for gallery practice, of 
blank cartridges for field exercises, and of ball cartridges for out- 
door range practice. 

Students are held strictly accountable for all arms and equipment 
issued to them. 

PROMOTIONS. 

The officers and non-commssioned officers of the corps are se- 
lected with reference primarily to their fitness for the duties they 
will be required to perform. Their general deportment and profi- 
ciency in academic work are also given weight in making such 
selection. 

Commissioned and non-commissioned officers are selected from 
the Senior and Junior Classes. 

Cadet officers are required to serve from the beginning of the 
scholastic year up to March i, of that year. On this date readjust- 
ment of rank is made, based upon the following: Military Effi- 



87 

ciency, as evidenced by the fall drills and winter recitations in the 
Tactical Department; Military Discipline and Soldierly Bearing; 
General Deportment. 

UNIFORM. 

The uniform worn by all members of the battalion of cadets is 
the regulation West Point fatigue uniform, and is made of the best 
Charlottesville gray cloth. The uniform consists of the gray fatigue 
blouse, trousers and cap for all military formations. By special con- 
tract with one of the largest Military Equipment houses in the 
United States, the uniform is furnished at a very low price. Meas- 
ures for this uniform are taken as soon as the student arrives at 
College, and fit is guaranteed. For summer use there must also 
be provided two gray shirts, a pair of leggins, a waist belt, and 
a black tie. 

When the unit of the Reserve Officers' Trainmg Corps is estab- 
lished, the following articles of uniform will be furnished for each 
student by the United States Government: 

One ( I ) pair olive drab woolen breeches. 

One (i) olive drab cap. 

One (i) olive drab woolen coat. 

One (i) pair canvas leggins. 

One (i) set cap and collar ornaments. 

One (i) pair russet shoes. 

White gloves, collars, caps and other military accessories may be 
purchased at the stores near the College, or from the contractor who 
furnishes the uniforms. 

Information concerning the cost of uniforms, etc., may be found 

on page 136. 



1 1 



88 




PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

DIRECTOR BYRD. 

DR. GRIFFITH. 

Owing to the unusual conditions of the last four years, which 
have compelled absolute concentration on the College work, the 
required classes in the gymnasium have been temporarily dis-' 
continued. Recent appropriations by the Legislature for building 
construction will alleviate this condition and it will be only a short 
while now before the regular routine can be resumed. In the mean- 
time everything possible has been and is being done to interest the 
students of all classes in outdoor sports. The College has expended 
considerable sums of money for equipment to enable large num- 
bers of the students to take part in the several branches of outdoor 
athletics. This development is supplemented by class instruction 
in hygiene and the care of the person in relation to the physical 
and mental welfare. A complete course in corrective and general 
physical culture, to be supplemented by lectures in personal hygiene, 
is now being mapped out for use in the future. A system of exact 
measurements is to be used which will show the progress of the 
various students during each year. The course will be compulsory. 
For outline of course now given see page 117. 



P 



SUB-COLLEGIATE INSTRUCTION. 

PROFESSOR HARRISON. 
PROFESSOR RICHARDSON. 

This Department was established in 1892, and reorganized m 
191 5; and is designed to meet the requirements of those students 
who have not had the advantage of a thorough high school train- 
ing, with a view to equipping them to enter the regular collegiate 
department. 

Only such students are desired as will be able to enter the Fresh- 
man Class within a year, and who are fifteen years of age. This 
course is recommended specially to students who have not been 



t) 



89 



to school for several years; for their progress in the regular col- 
legiate course, by virtue of such a drawback, would be seriously 
impeded. It is to be remarked that as a rule the students who have 
taken this course make excellent progress in their later college 
work. Students in this Department are subject to the same mili- 
tary regulations as other students. 

This Department will be eliminated July i, 1918. 

For outline of courses see page 117. 



VETERINARY SCIENCE. 



ACTING PROFESSOR KOCIIER. 



This Department offers instruction in the elements of veterinary 
science. The course embraces the study of the external form as 
well as the internal structure and functions of the domesticated ani- 
mals. It is intended to supplement animal husbandry instruction, 
and does not have for its object the training of students for veter- 
inary practice. The preservation of health in animals is more aimed 
at than their restoration from disease. When studiously pursued 
the courses offered are of great value to the breeder, feeder or 
manager of live stock. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

The accompanying brief descriptions indicate the scope of the 
different courses. 

480. Anatomy and Physiology. This course embraces a gen- 
eral consideration of the structure and functions of the animal body, 
with especial reference to animal production and dairying. 

Senior Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical periods per week. 

481. Animal Diseases. A study is made of the diseases of the 
domesticated animals with emphasis upon sanitation, practical bac- 
teriology, nursing, administration of medicine and use of common 
medicinal substances. The aim of this course is to enable the stu- 
dent to perceive the early appearance of diseases and care for them 
intelligently under proper veterinary supervision. 



•Il . 



90 



4 



liilii 



19 ii 




Senior Year — Third Term, 3 theoretical and 4 practical periods| 
per week. 

482. Animal Diseases. A briefer course in animal diseases is 
offered to the students in the two-year Agricultural Course. 

Second Year — Second Term, 3 theoretical and 2 practical per- 
iods per week. 



THE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 



MISS CONNER. 



In 191 5 the College Library and that 0* the Experiment Station 
were consolidated and are now administered under one head. The 
first floor of the Library Building is devoted to books and periodicals 
relating to agriculture and allied sciences. The second floor is 
used as a general reading-room and also as a stack room for the 
more general classes of books. 

The combined libraries contain approximately fifteen thousand 
books and pamphlets. Most of the leading magazines and news- 
papers are subscribed for; technical periodicals, as a rule, are de- 
posited in the libraries of the various departments of the College 
and Experiment Station. Through the generosity of the county 
press of the State, most of the county papers are available for 
use by the patrons of the Library. 

The central, basic idea of the administration of the Library is 
service. It is frankly recognized that the Library should be a 
laboratory for the use of students, members of the faculty and 
members of the Experiment Station Staff; and everything possible 
is done to make the Library popular. The reading-rooms are well 
arranged and lighted, and are in all respects comfortable and con- 
venient. Every facility is offered to those desiring to make re- 
searches within the scope of the books and publications on the 
shelves of the Library. Through the courtesy of the Librarian of 
Congress and the Librarian of the Department of Agriculture, the 
resources of those institutions are made available for the use of 
patrons of the College Library. 



91 

Grateful acknowledgment is made to many State and Govern- 
ment Departments, and to other publishing offices for documents 
regularly received by the Library. Special thanks are due the 
county press for their liberality in sending their publications free 
to the Library. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

mr. ortmayer. 

Aims. 

Service, first, last and all the time is the aim of the Y. M. C. A. 
It attempts nothing through selfish motives, but through the desire 
to turn into right channels a boy's surplus energy. 

Nature. 

The Maryland State College Association is affiliated with the 
International Y. M. C. A. and membership in the local branch 
carries with it a welcome to all city and student associations, and 
during vacation periods, entitles the holder to many of the privileges 
of the city Y. M. C. A. 

Officers. 

A salaried secretary is in charge of the Y. M. C. A. organization. 
He works through and with a student cabinet, having a President, 
Vice-President, Recorder, Treasurer, and Chairman for each of 
the following committees: Employment, Membership, Social Af- 
fairs, Music, Publications and Bible Study. 

The Employment Committee assists students in finding the kind 
of work they want, acting as a clearing-house for employer and 
employee. 

The Membership Chairman's duties are as the title indicates. 
The Social Chairman plans receptions, banquets, and social affairs 
affording a pleasant evening's entertainment for all. The Music 
Chairman obtains special music for Sunday and other meetings, 
and the Publications Chairman keeps the public informed. 






92 



m 



fl 



The Bible Study Chairman organizes bible and special problei 
study classes, and endeavors to interest the student in unselfis] 
ideals. 

Regular Meetings. 

Special speakers on both popular and religious subjects, are pro-| 
vided for Sunday 3:30 meetings. The proximity to Washington 
makes it possible to obtain the best of talent, Representatives, Gov- 
ernment officials, worth-while business men, and Ministers of 
power, thus making the meetings of great value. 

Location. 

The Y. M. C. A. is located in Calvert Hall. It has beautiful 
quarters; a game room, furnished with all kinds of games, a pool 
room, a reading and writing room, and an office for the Secretary. 
A good readable line of books having a sane, helpful, moral tone 
make the reading room attractive. 




New Students. 

Receptions are given to get the new men acquainted with the 
student body and with the members of the faculty, so as to make 
them feel **at home." 

New students are given special attention, warned of dangers and 
guided to harmless but interesting methods of "letting oflf steam" 
without scorching their moral fibre. 

A handbook is published, giving the student detailed information 
about the College, its societies and activities. Upon request it will 
be mailed to you free of charge. 

The Association welcomes at all times suggestions for its better- 
ment and extension of its service. 



93 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



In order to systematize the work of the different departments of 
the College, and as far as possible arrange for specialization within 
limits consistent with the normal development of individual stu- 
dents, several distinct courses of study have been prepared, one of 
which the student is expected to choose upon entering the regular 
College work. 

These courses are Agricultural Education, Agronomy, Animal 
Husbandry, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Canning, General 
Science, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
flngineering, Rural Engineering, and Engineering Education. 

A continuous and progressive course of work, beginning in the 
Freshman year, with a nearly uniform course for all students, and 
gradually separating in the three succeeding years until the class 
work is almost wholly specialized, has been found to be most satis- 
factory. A broad and liberal foundation in English, mathematics 
and history is laid in the Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
then the particular line of study desired is emphasized more and 
more until the end of the course. 

In addition to the regular collegiate courses, a two-year Course 
is given in Agriculture. Many electives are offered in the second 
year. 

There is also a Course in Sub-Collegiate Instruction for the benefit 
of students unable to obtain elsewhere adequate preparation for 
entrance into the Freshman Class. 

Short Winter Courses in Agriculture, Horticulture and Engineer- 
ing are given for the benefit of those who find it impossible to 
afford the time necessary for an extended course in these subjects. 

The College, in co-operation with the State Department of Educa- 
tion, conducts a six-weeks' SUMMER SCHOOL, beginning this 
year on June 2Sth. 

The purpose of the SUMMER SCHOOL is to provide a course 
of vocational training for teachers and prospective teachers of rural 
and graded schools. The work offered this year includes courses 
in Elementary Agriculture, Domestic Science and Art, Industrial 
Hand Work, Theory and Practice of Teaching, History of Mary- 



94 

land, State and National Constitutions, Chemistry, Physics, Botany, 
Zoology and Entomology. 

A bulletin giving a full description of the courses is issued by 
the College. For full information address the Director of the 
Summer School. 

A SUMMER SCHOOL for MINISTERS will be held from 
July 30th to August 7th for those who wish to broaden their field 
of service in the communities in which they labor. Courses will 
be given in Rural Sociology, Rural Economics, Religious Pedagog}- 
and Agriculture. Further information concerning these courses 
may be obtained from Professor F. B. Bomberger, Dean of the 
Division of Rural Economics and Sociology. 

A CONFERENCE on COUNTRY LIFE will be held for 
MINISTERS on August 8th, 9th and loth. Leaders of national 
reputation will present matters of vital interest to the Church. 
Bulletins containing complete information concerning this Confer- 
ence may be obtained upon request from Mr. Louis Ortmayer, Sec- 
retary of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

In the tabular statements of the courses the periods per week are 
given, the numbers in parenthesis denoting practical or laboratory 
periods, the others theoretical or recitation periods. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COURSE. 

The Course in Agricultural Education is arranged to give the stu- 
dent a broad general knowledge of agriculture, languages, science 
and pedagogy. 

Students taking this course receive practically the same work 
during the first two years as those of the other agricultural courses. 
In the Junior and Senior years the agricultural work is continued, 
in addition to the special work in pedagogy and practice teaching 
which these students receive. Enough of agriculture is included in 
the course to enable the student to carry on farm operations in a 
scientific manner. The graduate is fitted not only to teach and 
supervise the teaching of agricultural subjects, but to manage school 
demonstration farms or conduct a farm of his own. 



95 



Students taking this course will be required to spend at least 
eight weeks of the summers following the Sophomore and Junior 
years in actual farm work on their home farms or on other ac- 
credited farms under the supervision of the College. All students 
will be required to keep notes and on their return to College to 
submit a written report of the summer's work and observations. 

Agricultural Education Course. 



SUBJBCT. 



Term. 



II 



Frbshman Year. 



Plane Trigonometry 400. 

English 220. 232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 360 ! 

French 380 ! 

Agronomy 20 

Animal Husbandry 40 . . 
Animal Husbandry 41 . . 

Botany 60 

Zoology 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420.. . 
Military Instruction 



5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



1(4) 



2(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



3(4) 



2(4> 
4(2) 



1(2) 



Junior Year. 



Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 

Electricty and Magne- 
tism 201. 204 

Heat and Light 202, 205. . . 

Advanced Composition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

Psychology 1 

History of Education 2 . . 

Principles of Education 3 

Grain Judging 25 

Animal Nutrition 43 

Stock Judging 46 

Fruit Judging 262 

Landscape Gardening 302 

Vegetable Pathology. 66. 

Geology 86 

Organic Chemistry 87.. . . 

Bacteriology 100 

Surveying 126 

Mechanical Drawing 421. 

Woodwork 423 

Military Instruction 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



4(2) 



(2)* 
(2)* 



2(2) 
4 



(4) 

r' 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



(4) 



(8) 



(4) 
R 



III 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 



2(6) 



4(2) 

■i(2J' 



2(4) 
1 
(2) 



2(4) 
2(4)* 



2(4)' 



(8)* 
2(4) 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year. 



Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Farm Crops 21 

Soas22 

Fertilizers 23 

Pomology 260 

Vegetable Culture 280.... 
Landscape Gardening 300. 

Home Grounds 301 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Physiology 62 

Entomology 242 

Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83. . 
Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(2) 
2(4) 



1(4) 



1(6) 



2(6) 
'i(2)' 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 



2(4) 
1(2) 



2(4) 



1(8) 
1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 — 

Political Economy 142 

Secondary Education 4 

Organization and Ma- 
terials 5 

Rural Organization 6 

Advanced Crops 26 

Advanced Soils 27 

Farm Management 28 

Dairy Management 49 

Farm Poultry 50 

Live Stock Management 51 

Animal Diseases 481 

Plant Breeding 268 

Market Gardening 286 

Amateur Floriculture 315. . 

Farm Forestry 320 

Agricultural Chemistry 91 . 
Agricultural Analysis 92. . . 

Farm Drainage 128 

Farm Machinery 437 

Farm Building* 441 

Research and Thesis 7 

Military Instruction 



(2) 
4 
3(2) 



2(4)* 
2(4)* 



4 
(4) 
(4) 

2(4) 



R 



(2) 



3(2) 



2(4) 
2(4) 
3 



3(2) 



(2) 
R 



III 



1(2) 
(2) 

3* 
3* 



2(4) 
2(2) 
1(4) 



(4) 



1(4) 
2(4) 



1(2) 



1 
4 



3(2) 



2(4)^ 



2(4)* 

3(4) 

(4)** 

2(4)* 

2(4)* 

2(4) 



(4)** 
(2) 
R 



•Alternative. 

!For present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa, 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



96 



1 I 

1! 



AGRONOMY COURSE. 

The four-year Course in Agronomy is designed to fit the graduate 
for conducting practical operations on the farm, or, should taste 
or circumstances so direct, to prosecute successfully advanced 
scientific research along the lines of agronomy, or, if occasion re- 
quires, to act as county demonstrators or advisers. With these ends 
in view, the Course has been made at once comprehensive and tech- 
nical. It is comprehensive enough to include whatever is necessary 

Agronomy Q>urse. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Freshman Year. 



Plane Trigonometry 400. . 

Engrlish 220, 232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 360 ! 

French 380! 

Agronomy 20 

Animal Husbandry 40 . . . 
Animsl Husbandry 41 ... 

Botany 60 

Zoology 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420. . . 
Military Instruction 



5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



1(4) 



2(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



4(2^ 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



3(4) 



2(4) 
4(2) 



1(2) 



Junior Year. 



Mechanics and Sound 
200.203 

Electricty and Magnetism 
201.204 

Heat and Light 202, 205. . . 

Advanced Composition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

Psychology 1 

Advanced Soils 24 

Grain Judging 25 

Animal Nutrition 43 

Stock Judging 46 

Vegetable Pathology 66, .. 

Geologry 86 

Organic Chemistry 87 

Bacteriology 100 

Surveying 126 

Mechanical Drawing 421. 

Woodwork 423 

Military Instruction 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



(4) 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



1(4) 
3(2) 



2(2) 

4 



(4) 



R 



(8) 



(4) 
R 



III 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 



2(6) 

4(2) 

'i(2) 



2(4) 
1 
(2) 



2(4) 
2(4) 



(8) 
2(4) 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year. 



Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Farm Crops 21 

Soils 22 

Fertilizers 23 

Pomology 260 

Vegetable Culture 280 

Landscape Gardening 300, 

Home Grounds 301 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Physiology 62 

Entomology 242 

Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83., 
Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(2) 
2(4) 



1(4) 



1(6) 



2(6) 

■i(2) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 



2(4) 
1(2) 



2(4) 



1(8) 
1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225... . 

Political Economy 142 

Advanced Crops 26 

Advanced Soils 27 

Farm Management 28 

Dairy Management 49 

Farm Poultry 50 

Anatomy and Physiology 

480 

Animal Diseases 481 

Plant Breeding 268 

Farm Forestry 320 

Agricultural Chemistry 91 
Agricultural Analysis 92. . . 

Farm Drainage 128 

Farm Machinery 437 

Farm Buildings 441 

Research and Thesis 29 . . 
Military Instruction 



(2) 
4 

2(4) 
2(4) 



(2) 
[ 
(4) 



2(4) 
2(4) 
3 



4 

(4) 

(4) 

2(4) 



3(2) 



R 



III 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
2(2) 
1(4) 



(4) 



1(4) 
2(4) 



1(2) 



1 
4 



2(4) 



3(4) 

(4) 

2(4) 



1(4) 
(4) 
R 



♦Alternative. 

!For present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



97 

for the complete development of the work, yet technical enough to 
make the student feel that he is a specialist and equipped for special 
work. 

Students taking this Course will be required to spend at least 
eight weeks of the summers following the Sophomore and Junior 
years in actual farm work on their home farms or on other ac- 
credited farms under the supervision of the College. All students 
will be required to keep notes and on their return to College to 
submit a written report of the summer's work and observations. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY COURSE. 

The purpose of the Course in Animal Husbandry is to fit the 
graduate to carry out successfully the operations pertaining to gen- 
eral farming, to become an expert in the raising and feeding of live 
stock, to pursue scientific investigations along lines pertaining to 
animal husbandry, or to act in the capacity of an adviser or demon- 
strator in rural communities. Therefore, the curriculum has been 
outlined to include, in addition to the subjects necessary for the 
development of a specialist in animal husbandry, those which will 
give a broid training in agriculture and other cultural branches. 

Students taking this Course will be required to spend at least 
eight weeks of the summers following the Sophomore and Junior 
years in actual farm work on their home farms or on other ac- 
credited farms under the supervision of the College. All students 
will be required to keep notes and on their return to College to 
submit a written report of the summer's work and observations. 



98 
Animal Husbandry Course. 





Term. 


Subject. 


Term. 


Subject. 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Freshman Year. 


Sophomore Year. 


Plane Trigronometry 400. . 


5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 






Composition 221 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(2) 
2(4) 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 


1(2) 


English 220.232 


4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 


4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 


Public Speaking 233 

German 361 


(2) 


History 160 


3* 


Latin 340 


French 381 


3* 


German 360 ! 


Farm Crops 21 




French 380 ! 


Soils 22 


2(4) 




Agronomy 20 


Fertilizers 23 


2(4) 


Animal Husbandry 40 


1(4) 




Pomology 260 


1(4) 


'2(4)' 
1(2) 


2(2) 


Animal Husbandry 41 


3(4) 


'2(6)* 
'4(2)" 


Vegetable Culture 280 


1(4) 


Botany 60 




Landscape Gardening 300. 
Home Grounds 301 






Zoolocfy 240.. . 


2(4) 


2(4) 
4(2) 


(4) 


Chemistry 80. . . 


Plant Histology 61 


1(6) 






Freehand Drawing 420 


(4) 
1(2) 


Plant Physiology 62 


2(4) 


1(4) 


Militarv Instruction 


1(2) 


1(2) 


Entomology 242 




2(4) 




Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83. . 
Military Instruction 


2(6) 
'i(2)* 














1(8) 
1(2) 












1(2) 


Junior Year. 


Senior Year. 






Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 


2(4) 






Special Composition 225 — 

Political Economy 142 

Advanced Crops 26 

Farm Management 28 


(2) 
4 
2(4) 


(2) 
4 


1 
4 


Electricity and Magne- 
tism 201, 204 


2(4) 


2(4)' 

1 
(2) 

'3'"' 




2(4) 

• ••••• 


2(4) 


Heat and Light 202, 205 




Animal Nutrition 47 

Dairying 48 


3(4) 
3(8) 




AdvancedComposition 222 


1(2) 
(2) 
3 


1(2) 
(2) 
3 






Public Speaking 234 


Farm Poultry 50 


3 




Civil (jrovernmfnt 140 


Live Stock Management 51 
Anatomy and Phys- 
iology 480 




2(4) 


Business Law 141 




3 




Psychology 1 


4 
(4) 






Breeds and Breeding 42.. 






Animal Diseases 481 




3(4) 


Animal Nutrition 43 


3(2) 
3 


2(4) 
'2(4)' 


Farm Forestry 320 






2(4) 


Princioles of Breedincr44 




Animal Parasites 247 




2(4) 

1(6) 




Stock Judging 46 


Bacteriology 101 






Geology 86 


2(2) 

4 


2 


Farm Machinery 437 

Farm Buildings 441 


2(4) 




Org'anic Chemistry 87. . . . 




1(4) 


Bacteriology 100 


(8) 


(8) 
2(4) 


Research and Thesis 52... . 




(4) 
R 




Surveying 126 




Military Instruction 


R 


R 


Mechanical Drawinsr 421. . 


(4) 

"r" 






Woodwork 423 


(4) 
R 


"r" 










Military Instruction 











•Alternative. 

!For present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



HORTICULTURAL COURSE. 

Through the reorganization of the Department of Horticulture 
an opportunity is presented for students in the four-year Course to 
specialize in either pomology, vegetable culture or landscape gar- 
dening and floriculture. 



99 



Horticultural Course. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Freshman Year. 



Plane Trigonometry 400. . 

English 220, 232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 360t 

French 380t 

Agronomy 20 

Animal Husbandry 40 

Animal Husbandry 41 

Botany 60 

Zoology 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420. . . 
Military Instruction 



5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



1(4) 



2(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



3(4) 



2(4) 
4(2) 



1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 



2(6) 



4(2) 
1(2) 



Junior Year. 



Mechanics and Sound 
200, 203 

Electricity and Magne- 
tism 201, 204 

Heat and Light 202, 205. . . 

AdvancedComposition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

Psychology 1 

Commercial Pomology 261 

Fruit Judging 262 

Practical Pomology 263. . . 

Small Fruit Culture 264.. . 

Vegetable Forcing 281 

Vegetable Literature 282. 

Landscape Gardening 302 

Floriculture 303 

Commercial Floriculture 
304,305 

Vegetable Pathology 66.. . 

EconomicEntomology 244 

Organic Chemistry 87. . . . 

Bacteriology 100 

Engineering Drawing 120 

Surveying 126 

Mechanical Drawing 421. 

Woodwork 423 

M ilitary Instruction 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



4 

2(4)1! 
(2)11 



2(m 
(2)t 
(2)§ 

2(4)1 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



^2)1 
2(4)1 



2(4)t 

n 



2(4) 
1 
(2) 



(4)11 

2(2) Bt 

(4)t 



4(4) § 



3(2) 



(4) 



R 



(8) lit 
(6)§ 



(4) 
R 



2(6)§ 

2(4) 

1(4) 



2(4) 

"r* 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Sophomore Year. 



Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Farm Crops 21 

Soils 22 



Fertilizers 23 

Pomologry 260 

Vegetable Culture 280 

Landscape Gardening 300, 

Home Grounds 301 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Phvsiology 62 

Entomology 242 

Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83. . 
Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(2) 
2(4) 



1(4) 



1(6) 



2(6) 
'i(2)" 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 



2(4) 
1(2) 



2(4) 



1(8) 
1(2) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
2(2) 
1(4) 

(4) 



1(4) 
2^4) 



I 



1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

Farm Management 28 

Dairy Management 49 

Farm Poultry 50 

Systematic Pomology 265. 
Advanced Pomology 266 . . 

Pomology 267 

Plant Breeding 268 

Commercial Vegetable 

(hardening 283 

Vegetable Gardening 284. . 
SystematicOlericulture 285 

Market Gardening 286 

Greenhouse Construction 

306 

Landscape Design 307, 309 

Civic Art 308 

Landscape Practice 310. . . 

Plant Materials 311 

Floral Decoration 312 

Garden Flowers 313 

Tree Repair 314 

Farm Forestry 320 

Agricultural Chemistry 91 
Agricultural Analysis 92 . . 
Farm Machinery 437 



(2) 



2(4)1! 
2(4)11 



l(4)t 
l(2)t 
l(4n 



2(4)§ 
2(4)8 
2§ 



Research and Thesis -j 237* 
Military Instruction 



(2) 
4 

2(4) 

2(4)! 

3! 

1(4)11 



31! 
3(2) 

2(4)t 



(4)t 



2(4)5 



4 

(4) 
2(4) 

(4) 

(4)t 

R 



(4) 
2(2)§ 
1(4)§ 



1 
4 
2(4) 



2(4)11 

■*(4J* 

2(4)t 



1(4)$ 
2(4)11 



(6)1 
(6)t 
R 



1(4)5 



2(4)1 
1(4)5 
2(4) 



(4)11 
1(4) t 
R 



♦Alternative. 

lAlternatlve for students In Pomology and Vegetable Gardening. If Dairy 
Management be elected Research and Thesis must be reduced to 4 practical periods. 

II For students specializing in Pomology. 

JFor students specializing in Vegetable Gardening. 

§For students specializing in Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



i 



lOO 



' 



These courses are designed to fit the student for conducting prac- 
tical operations in horticulture on the farm, or to continue scientific 
research work and teaching in his chosen field. Practical work is 
made a prominent feature of the course. In the Freshman and 
Sophomore years the work is not materially different from that of 
the Agricultural and Biological Courses, as all students are required 
to take certain fundamental subjects. In the Junior and Senior 
years the courses become specialized. 

Students taking these courses will be required to spend at least 
eight weeks of the summers following the Sophomore and Junior 
years in actual horticultural work on their home farms or on other 
accredited farms under the supervision of the College. All students 
will be required to keep notes and on their return to College submit 
a written report of the summer's work and observations. 

The College and Experiment Station farm, orchards, green- 
houses, etc., together with the close proximity of the Institution to 
the United States Department of Agriculture greenhouses and ex- 
periment farms, offer unusual opportunities to the students in horti- 
culture. 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL COURSE. 

A large number of young men seeking to better themselves in 
their chosen profession of farming are calling for instruction in 
those courses pertaining to practical agriculture. Many of them 
have neither the time nor means at hand to take the full four-year 
Course, but while away in school they wish to gain the greatest pos- 
sible amount of instruction and assistance which is particularly ap- 
plicable to the farm. They realize that the farm can no longer be 
run in the old-time haphazard way, that there is a demand for skill 
and the highest order of intelligence to make a success on the farm, 
as in any other line of human endeavor, and that brains must be 
planted with each little seed, and also put into the feeding trough 
for the animal. To meet the demand for instruction along these 



lOI 



Two- Year Agricultural Course.' 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



First Year. 



Farm Accounts 

English 

Farm Literature 

Farm Crops and Soils. . . 

Animal Husbandry 

Horticulture 

Farm Botany 

Farm Zoology and En- 
tomology 

Farm Chemistry 

Farm Drawing 

Farm Woodwork 

Farm Machinery , 

Military Instruction 



2 

4(2) 
(2) 
3(2) 
2(4) 
2(4) 
1(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



4(2) 
(2) 



3(2) 
3(6) 



2(2) 



(4) 

2(4) 
1(2) 



3(2) 
(2) 
3^.4) 
3(4) 
2(4) 



2(2) 
2(2) 



1(2) 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Second Year . 



Business Law 

Rural Organization 

Agronomy 

Fertilizers 

Farm Crops 

Farm Management 

Animal Industry 

Animal Feeding 

Farm Poultry 

Animal Diseases 

Horticulture 

Farm Forestry 

Plant Diseases 

Sprays and Spraying: 

Farm Chemistry 

Farm Bacteriology 

Farm Water Supply and 

Sewerage 

Farm Drainage 

Farm Buildings 

Military Instruction 



4(8)1 



4(8)1 
3(2) 



4(8)1 
"2(2) 



4(4) 



(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



2(4)1 

3(2) 

1(4) 

2(2) 

2(4)1 



3(2) 
2(4)1 



1(2) 
"(4) 



1(2) 



2 

4(8)11 



3(2) 

4(8) H 



4(8)11 
2(4) 



(4) 



2(2) 



1(2) 



*A description of the courses given will be found in each Department involved 
at the end of courses offered. 

II The student, after consultation with the Professor in charge of the Course, 
will elect from the courses offered in agronomy, animal industry and horticulture 
a sufficient number of subjects to make up the required number of periods. 

lines, and for a better understanding of the underlying principles of 
successful agriculture, a short course of two years has been pro- 
vided. 

It embraces much of the technical work of the four-year Courses, 
and is especially designed to lay a foundation that will secure suc- 
cess in practical farming, which, as it must be conducted today, is a 
union of many interests. To enter this Course the applicant must 
be not less than sixteen years of age and must satisfy the College 
authorities by examination or otherwise that he has preparation 
at least equal to the work of the seventh grade of the Maryland 
public schools. 

Students taking this Course are required to spend not less than 
ten weeks during the summer between the First and Second year 
in actual farm work on some accredited farm under the supervision 
of the College. 



102 



n 



iH 



I*' 

Iri 



SHORT WINTER COURSES. 

For men and women who can spare from one to ten weeks only 
from their home duties the College offers a series of short courses 
occupying from one to two weeks each, beginning after the Christ- 
mas vacation. 

For 19 18 the arrangement will be: 

First week — Soils and Fertilizers. 

Second week — Farm Crops. 

Third week — Farm Machinery and Farm Engines. 

Fourth and fifth week — Horticulture, 

Sixth week— Poultry Husbandry. 

Seventh week— Dairying. 

r Horses and Beef Cattle. 
Eighth week— J ^ .. o • 

I Domestic bcience. 

Ninth week — Swine and Sheep Husbandry. 

Tenth week — Farm Carpentry, Blacksmithing and Pipe Fitting. 

Experience has demonstrated the advantage of dividing the work 
into short periods, during which time the attention of the student 
is engrossed wholly with one subject. It enables the student to 
concentrate his efforts and affords opportunity for those who are 
interested in but one or two subjects, such as poultry husbandry or 
domestic science, for example, to take what they desire with the 
greatest economy of time. 

No charge is made to short course students for the use of labora- 
tories. Good board at moderate rates can be secured in the neigh- 
borhood. For more detailed information regarding these courses, 
write for bulletin and folders. 



i 



103 



BIOLOGICAL COURSE. 

The Biological Course, while offering a general education and 
special training in the natural sciences, is outlined in particular for 
those who wish to specialize in some branch of botany or zoology. 
It aims to fit men for practical work in the field of plant pathology 
and entomology, but will also give training for special work in the 
pure sciences. 

In addition, this Course is specially valuable in preparing stu- 
dents who wish to enter the medical profession, particularly those 
who expect to enter the higher grade medical schools, which require 
for entrance a four year collegiate course in sciences and languages. 
These students will be required to substitute organic chemistry 
for some subject given in the regular Biological Course. 

There arc many opportunities for scientific workers in connection 
with the agricultural investigations of the Federal Government and 
of the State Experiment Stations, as well as in the State inspection 
work, for which this Course gives training. In fact, it is now diffi- 
cult to secure men trained for such work. Full opportunity is given 
for the student to develop his natural resources and to learn to do 
work on his own responsibility. A large part of his time is spent 
in both practical and theoretical biological studies, without neglect- 
ing the cultural studies which are a necessary foundation for every 
specialist. 



104 



i* 



I 



I 



Biological Course. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Freshman Year. 



Plane Trifironometry 400. . 

English 220. 232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 360t 

French 380t 

Agronomy 20 

Animal Husbandry 40. . . . 
Animal Htisbandry 41 ... . 

Botany 60 

Zoology 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420. . . 
Military Instruction 



5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



1(4) 



2(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



3(4) 



2(4) 
4(2) 



1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 



2(6) 



4(2) 
'i(2) 



Junior Year. 



Mechanics and Sound 
200. 203 

Electricity and Magne- 
tism 201, 204 

Heat and Light 202. 205. . . 

AdvancedComposition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

Psychology 1 

Morphology 63 

Economic Plants 64 

Vegetable Pathology 66.. 

Botany 67 

Economic Zoology 243 

EconomicEntomology 244 

Entomology 245 

Organic Chemistry 87 

Bacteriology 100 

Military Instruction 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



4 
2(4) 



1(4) 



R 



2(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



l(4)t 



2(4) 
3(2^ 
1(4)! 



(8) 
R 



2(4) 
1 
(2) 



2(4) 
2(6)t 



1(4) 
2(6)! 



(8) 
R 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Sophomore Year. 



Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Farm Crops 21 

Pomology 260 

Vegetable Culture 280 

Landscape Gardening 300. 

Home Grounds 301 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Physiology 62 

Zoology 241 

Entomology 242 

Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83. 
Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(2) 
1(4) 



1(6) 
'2(4) 



2(6) 
'i(2)' 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
1(2) 



2(4) 
2(4) 



1(8) 
1(2) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(2) 
1(4) 



(4) 



1(4) 
2(4) 
2(4) 



1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 — 

Political Economy 142 

German 362 

French 382 

Advanced Botany 68 

Advanced Entomology 246 
Research and Thesis 69.248 
Military Instmction 



(2) 
4 
3* 
3* 

7(12)t 
7(12)! 
(8) 
R 



(2) 
4 
3* 
3* 

7(12)t 

7(12)! 

(8) 

R 



1 
4 
3* 
3* 

7(12)t 
7.12) I 
(8) 
R 



•Alternative. 

tFor students specializing in Botany. 
!For students specializing in Entomology. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



CHEMICAL COURSE. 



The Course in Chemistry differs but little from the other courses 
until the beginning of the Sophomore year and the work in the 
Freshman year of any of the four-year courses will prepare for 
it, as the amount of chemistry is the same in all courses to the be- 



105 

ginning of the Second Term of the Sophomore year and the de- 
mands on the agricultural or technical chemist are now so varied 
that a foundation with more of the essentials of the agricultural 
or the engineering courses is often desirable. 

Beginning with the Second Term of the Sophomore year the 
major part of the student's time is devoted to chemistry, the prac- 
tical work in the laboratory occupying approximately half of his 
time. The Course is essentially a course in agricultural chemistry, 
fitting the graduate for positions in agricultural colleges, experi- 
ment stations and the United States Department of Agriculture. 

Chemical Course. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Freshman Year. 



Plane Trigronometry 400. 

Algebra 401 

Analytics 402 

English 220, 232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 36Ct 

French 380t 

Botany 60 

Zoologry 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420... 
Mechanical Drawing 421. 

Woodwork 423 

Military Instruction 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



2(4) 
"(4) 



(6) 
1(2) 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



2(4) 
4(2) 



(4) 



1(2) 



Junior Year. 



AdvancedComposition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

German 362 

French 382 

Micro Botany 65 

Geology 86 

Organic Chemistry 88 

Quantitative Analysis 89. . 

Stoichiometry 90 

Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



3* 
3* 



2(2) 
3(4) 
1(12) 
1 
R 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



3* 
3* 



2 

3(4) 
1(14) 
1 
R 



III 



5 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

2(4) 



4(2) 



1(2) 



(2) 



3 
3* 
3* 
2(4) 



3(4) 
1(12) 
1 
R 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year. 



Analytics 402 

Calculus 403 

Mechanics and Sound 200, 

203 

Electricity and Magnetism 

201, 204 

Heat and Ligiit 202, 205 .... 

Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Physiology 62 

Chemistry 81 

Qualitative Analysis 82 

Chemistry 84 

Mineralogy 85 

Military Instruction 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
1(6) 



2(6) 



I 1(2) 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
1(8) 



1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 — 

Po itical Economy 142 

Agricultural Chemistry 91. 
Agricultural Analysis 92.. 
Physiological Chemistry 93 

Physical Chemistry 94 

Inorganic Chemistry 95... 
Industrial Chemistry 96... 

Chemistry 97 

Bacteriology 101 

Research and Thesis 98 

Military Instruction 



(2) 
4 
4 

(12) 
4(4) 



1(6) 1(6) 



(2) 



3(14; 

3 

3 



III 



3(4) 
1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



1(4) 



3(10) 

1(4) 

1(2) 



1 

4 



3 
3 

3 
(8) 

1(6) 
(6) 
R 



♦Alternative. 

tPor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



io6 



I' 



CANNING COURSE. 

The great importance of the canning industry in Maryland; the 
fact that it is, to a great extent, an agricultural industry, and the 
further fact that the suggestion of this Course has met with such 
hearty indorsement from prominent canners, has caused the College 
authorities to establish a Course in Canning, in order that young 
men interested may have an opportunity to become acquainted with 
the underlying sciences, and at the same time secure a liberal edu- 
cation. 

Canning Course. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Freshman Year. 



Plane Trigonometry 400. . 

Algebra 401 

English 220,232 

History 160 

Latin 340 

German 360t 

French 380t 

Agronomy 20 

Botany 60 

Zoology 240 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420. , . 
Mechanical Drawing 421. 

Woodwork 423 

Military Instruction 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



2(4) 

"(4) 

' (6) 
1(2) 



3 

4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 



2(4) 
4(2) 



(4) 
'1(2) 



Junior Year. 



AdvancedComposition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 

German 362 

French 382 

Fruit Judging 262 

Small Fruit Culture 264. . . 
Vegetable Pathology 66. . 

Organic Chemistry 88 

Quantitative Analysis 89. 

Bacteriology 100 

Canning Technology 

Electrical Laboratory 186. 
Military Instruction 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



3* 
3* 

(2) 



3(4) 
(8) 



2(4) 
(4) 
R 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



3* 
3* 



3(4) 



(8) 
5(4) 



R 



III 



4(2) 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 

3(2) 

2(6) 



4(2) 



1(2) 



(2) 



2(2) 
2(4) 
3(4) 



(8) 
2(4) 



R 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year. 



Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 

Electricity and Magnetism 
201, 204 

Heat and Light 202, 205 

Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Agronomy 21 

Soils 22 

Vegetable Culture 280 

Landscape Gardening 300. . 

Plant Histology 61 

Plant Physiology 62 

Entomology 242 

Chemistry 81 

Quantitative Analysis 83,84 

Military Instruction 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 

3* 

3* 
(2) 

2(4) 



1(6) 



2(6) 

■i(2) 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
(2) 



2(4) 



1(8) 
1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

Plant Breeding 268 

Commercial Vegetable 

Gardening 283 

Vegetable Gardening 284. . 
Agricultural Chemistry 91. 
Agricultural Analysis 92. . . 

Physical Chemistry 94 

Industrial Chemistry 96 

Chemistry 97 

Canning Technology 

Practical Problems 127 

Research and Thesis 

Military Instruction 



(2) 



1(4) 
1(2) 
4 
(8) 



3(4) 
(4) 



(2) 
4 
3(2) 

2(4) 



3(4) 
3 



2(4) 



R 



III 



3(4) 
1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



1(4) 



1(4) 
2(4) 



3(2) 
1(2) 



1 
4 



2(4) 



3 
3 

(4) 
3(6) 



(4) 
R 



♦Alternative. 

fFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 



R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



107 

During the first two years of the Course the studies will not diflFer 
much from those of the other courses. After this a large part of 
the student's time will be occupied with sciences relating directly 
to the canning industry, such as bacteriology, chemistry, agriculture, 
horticulture, and canning technology. This latter will cover a wide 
range and will include the theory and practice of canning in various 
lines, experimental work, and lectures from persons of national repu- 
tation. Assistance in these lectures has been promised by officers 
of the National Canners' Association and others. 

A canning expert is to be engaged to take charge of the technical 
instruction in canning, which will include both theoretical and lab- 
oratory work. 

Routine and factory experience are expected to be gained by 
students spending at least two summers, usually devoted to vacation, 
in a canning factory. 



GENERAL SCIENCE COURSE. 

The General Science Course is offered to those young men who 
have not chosen as their vocation in life any of the technical profes- 
sions, but who are seeking for such general culture as will fit them 
to become, after graduation, useful members of society. Young 
men desiring to study law, or medicine, or the liberal arts, or to 
become teachers, will find in the curriculum of this Course a highly 
satisfactory preparation for such work. While emphasis has been 
placed upon subjects, such as English, language, literature, history, 
mathematics, etc., the natural sciences occupy a prominent place 
m the Course and the range of electives will enable each to choose 
for himself, under certain necessary regulations, such a group of 
studies as will be best adapted to his own peculiar requirements. 

A wide range of electives is offered in order to meet as far as 
possible the needs of every student. At the opening of the session 
the student must select with the approval of the Dean of the Division 
a consistent group of courses for the year. No change may be 
made in this group later in the session except with the approval of 
the Dean. 



io8 



General Science Course. 





Term. 


Subject. 


Term. ^| 


Subject. 


I 


II 


III 


I 


n 

1 




Freshman Year. 


Sophomore Year. 






i 

Plane Trigonometry 400. . 5 






Analytics 402 


5*** 






Algebra 401 


3 


5 

4(2) 

3 

3* 

3» 

2(4) 

• «•*•• 

4(2) 


Calculus 403 


5*** 


A*^^M 


Analytics 402 




Mechanics and Sound 
200, 203 


3(4) 




English 220, 232 


4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 


4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 




Latin 340 


Electricity and Magnet- 
ism 201, 204 


3(4) 




German 360t 


^^^M 


French 380t 


Heat and Light 202. 205. . 




3(4H 


Botany 60 


Composition 221 


1(2) 
(2) 


1(2) 
(2) 


1(2H 


Zoology 240 


2(4) 


2(4) 
4(2) 


Public Speaking 233 

Library Science 


(2)H 


Chemistry 80 


1(4)H 


Freehand Drawing 420... . 


(4) 


History 161 


5*** 
5*** 
3* 
3* 
2(4)** 


5*** 

5*** 

3* 

3* 

2(4)** 

2(4)** 


A***^ 


Mechanical Drawing 421. . 


(4) 




Latin 341 

German 361 


A***^^ 


Woodwork 423 


(6) 
1(2) 

• ••••• 


3* I 


Mili'tarv Tnstmotion 


• • • 

1(2) 


1(2) 


French 381 


3* 1 




Soils 22 

Vegetable Culture 280. . , 












1(4)*' 










Plant Histology 61 

Plant Phvsiologv 62 . . . 


1(6)** 












2(4)** 
2(4)** 


1(4)** 










Zoology 241 


2(4)** 


2(4)* 










Entomology 242 


2(4)* 










Chemistry 81 


2(6) 








.... 






Quantitative Analysis 83 
Mineralogy 85 


1(8) 












i(4)**H 










Military Instruction 


1(2) 


l*i(2J' 


1(2) 1 


Junior Year. 


Senior Year. 


AdvancedComposition 222 
Literature 223, 224 


1(2) 
2 

(2) 
3 


1(2) 
2 

(2) 
3 


1 
2 
(2) 

'3***' 
3 


English 225, 226. 227 

English and Public 

Speaking 228, 235 

Political Economy 142... 
Political Science 


(2) 

2 

4 

3* 

3* 

3** 

3** 


(2) 

4 

4 

4* 

4* 

3** 

3** 


1 


Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 


3 
4 
3* 


History 162 


3 
4 


3 


Advanced History 

German 362 


3* 


Psychology 1 


3** 


History of Education 2. . . 


4 


•4*" 

3* 
3* 

2(4)** 
2(4)** 


French 382 


3** 


Principles of Education 3. 


Farm Forestrv 


2(4) 


German 362 


3* 
3* 


3* 
3* 
3 


Electivest 


12 
R 


9 
R 


7 


French 382 


Military Instruction 


R 


Principles of Breeding 44. 




Micro Botany 65 










Vegetable Pathology 66. . 


• • • • • 

2(2) 
4 












Geology 86 










Organic Chemistry 87 ... . 














Bacteriology 100 


(8) 


(8) 
2(4)** 
1 R 










Surveying 126 












Military Instruction 1 R 


"r" 











♦Alternative. 

JThe electlves may be selected from the following list : First Term, 5 periods 
in Chemistry 89 or Mathematics 403 ; 4 periods in Floriculture 303 or Mechanics 
122 ; and 3 periods in Animal Husbandry 40 or Pomology 260 ; Second Term, 4 
periods in Dairying 49 or Electricity 180 and 181 ; 3 periods in Grain Judging 25, 
Poultry 50 or Mechanics of Materials 125 ; and 2 periods in Landscape Gardening 
300. Geology 86 or Mathematics 400 ; Third Term, 4 periods in Agronomy 20, 
Market Gardening 286, Floriculture 315 or Electricity 180 and 181 ; and 3 periods 
in Pomology 260 or 264, Steam Engines 428 or Farm Buildings 441. 

fFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



109 



CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

This Course offers a young man an opportunity to obtain training 
in civil engineering which will enable him to engage in practical 
engineering work in the field or in the drafting room with the 
assurance that he has the necessary preparation to profit by the 
experience thus afforded; or which will entitle him to advanced 
standing, if he desires to pursue a more extended course at a tech- 
nical school of a higher grade. The curriculum, as outlined, includes 
not only studies having cultural value, but the sciences which form 
the basis of engineering. Students who have found themselves de- 



Civil Engineering Course. 





Term. 


Subject. 


Term. 


Subject, 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Freshman Year. 


Sophomore Year. 


Trififonometry 400 


5 


2 

3 


5 

4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 


Analytics 402 


5 






Alsrebra 401 


Calculus 403 


5 


4 


Analvtics 402 




Mechanics and Sound 200. 
203 


3(4) 




English 220 232 


4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 


4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 




History 160 


Electricity and Magnetism 
201. 204 


3^4) 




German 3601 




French J80t 


Heat and Light 202. 205 




3(4) 


Chemistry 80 


Composition 221 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(6) 


1^2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 


1(2) 


Enflrineerincr Oraivinfi 120 


(4) 


Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 


(2) 


SurvevincT 121 


2 


(4) 


3* 


Freehand Drawincr 420. . . . 


(4) 

(4) 

(6) 

1(2) 


3* 


Mechanical Drawing 421.. 


(4) 


(4)" 

• ••••• 


Chemistry 81 




Woodwork 423 


Mineralogy 85 




1(4) 


Military Instruction 


1(2) 


U2) 1 


Surveying 121 


(4) 

(4) 

1(2) 


4 

3(4) 

1(2) 


2(4) 




Descriptive Geometry 424. 
Military Instruction 


2(2) 










1(2) 


Junior Year. ! 


Senior Ye 


AR. 


Calculus 403 


5 

1(2) 
(2) 
3 




[ 


Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

Practical Problems 127 

Concrete 129 


(2) 
4 
(8) 

4 
4 


(2) 
4 
(4) 


1 


AdvancedComposition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Government 140 


1(2) 
(2) 
3 


1 
(2) 

■3***'i 

■'(8)* 


4 
(4) 


Business Law 141 


Hydraulics 130 






Geology 86 


2(2) 

"(4)* 

4 


2 
(6) 


Estimates of Cost 131 


1(4) 
3 




EnarineerinflT Draw^inur 120 


Geodesy 132 






Surve3dng: 121 


Highways 133 




5 


Mechanics 122 






Contracts and Specifica- 
tions 134 








Railway Enarineerins: 123. 


3 

2(4) 

3 


3 

2(4) 

^8) 


2 


Structural Design 124 


Structural Design 433 

Mechanics of Engineering 
434 


2(4) 

4 


2(4) 

4 

4 


2(4) 


Mechanics of Materialsl25 
Practical Problems 127 




3 


Dynamos 182 


3 

(4) 




Hydromechanics 438 




Electrical Laboratory 184. 




****** 


Heating and Ventilation 
442 






Graphics 431 


4 
R 


"r" 


2(4) 


Military Instruction 


'r* 


Military Instruction 


R 


R 


R 



•Alternative. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



no 



ficient in ability to learn mathematics are not advised to enter an en- 
gineering course. 

All engineering students in the Junior and Senior Classes are 
required to spend a portion of their time in the reading of the cur- 
rent engineering magazines. 

In 19 1 8 members of the Freshman Class taking this Course will 
be required at the close of the regular session to take 100 hours 
of field and office work in surveying. This summer work will be 
developed so as to include a specified amount of time at the close 
of the Sophomore and Junior years. Summer employment will be 
accepted as a substitute for this work if found to be equivalent. 



Ill 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

This Course was introduced because of the great demand for 
young men who are not only well trained in the practical construc- 

Electrical Engineering Course. 





Term. 


Subject. 


, 


Term. 




Subject. 


I 


n 


in 


I 


II 


III 


Freshman Year. 


Sophomore Year. 


Trigonometry 400 


5 


2 
3 


5 

4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 
4(2) 
(4) 


Analytics 402 


5 






Alffebra 401 


Calculus 403. . 


5 


4 


Analytics 402 




Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 


3(4) 




English 220. 232 


4(2) 
3 
3* 
3* 


4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 




History 160 


Electricity and Magnetism 
201, 204 


3(4) 




German 360t 




French 380t 


Heat and Light 202. 205 




3(4) 


Chemistry 80 


Composition 221 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(6) 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 


1(2) 


Survevinsr 121 




Public Speaking 233 

German 361 


(2) 


Freehand Drawing 420. . . . 


(4) 
(4) 

2 
(6) 

1(2) 




3* 


Mechanical Drawing 421.. 


(4) 


(4) 


French 381 


3* 


Technical Instruction 422 


Chemistry 81 




Woodwork 423 ; . 


(4) 
1(2) 


'i(2)' 


Electricity 180. 181 


3(2) 
3(4) 


3(2) 


Military Instruction 


Descriptive Geometry 424. 
Blacksmithing 425 


(4) 
(4) 


2(2) 










Steam Engines 428 




3 










Military Instruction 


1(2)' 


'i(2)' 


1(2) 


Junior Year. 


Senior Year, 


Calculus 403 


5 

1(2) 
(2) 
3 






Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

H vdraulics 130 


(2) 

4 
4 

(4) 
5 

(8) 
2 


(2) 

4 


1 


AdvancedComposition 222 
Public Speaking 234 . 


1(2) 
(2) 
3 


1 
(2) 

"3" 


4 


Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 


Electric Machine Design 
187, 194 


'5'**' 
(8) 
2 
2 

2(2) 


1(8) 


Mechanics 122 


4 

3***' 

(8) 




Alternators 188 


3 


Mechanics of Materialsl25 
Dynamos 183 


3 
4 
(4) 


5 
3 

(8) 
2 

2(4) 
"(4)* 

"r" 


Electrical Laboratory 189. 

Electric Lighting 190 

Electric Power Plants 191. . 


(8) 


Electrical Laboratory 185 


2 


Batteries 186 


Telephones and Tele- 
eraphs 192. 193 






Electric Machine Desicrn 






2(2) 


187 


Electric Railways 195 




3 


Machine Desifirn 429 .. 


1(4) 


2(4) 
(4) 

4 
R 


Heat Engineeringl436 

Hydromechanics 438 


3 






Machine Work 430 


4 
R 




Grraphics 431 




Military Instruction 


R 


R 


Military Instruction 


I *r" 





•Alternative. 

tFor present, students ofEering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 

tion and operation of electrical machines, but who have a thorough 
knowledge of the principles and laws controlling the phenomena 
and forces with which they have to deal. 

The general plan of the Course is to make the student thoroughly 
acquainted with the scientific laws which are the basis of the pro- 



/ 






If 



» 



i 



112 



fession, and at the same time to train him to adapt the laws to prac- 
tice, to use his own judgment, and to apply honest and accurate 
methods in all his work. 

The curriculum, as outlined, includes those studies which provide 
a broad general culture, as well as a good foundation for the engi- 
neering work which follows. From the beginning of the Second 
Term of the Sophomore year the electrical training extends con- 
tinuously throughout the Course. 

In 1918 members of the Freshman Class taking this Course will 
be required at the close of the regular session to take 100 hours 
of wood work and drawing. This summer work will be developed 
so as to include a specified amount of time at the close of the 
Sophomore and Junior years. Summer employment will be ac- 
cepted as a substitute for this work if found to be equivalent. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

The curriculum of the several years of this Course is outlined 
so as to give general culture as well as a proper foundation for the 
profession of mechanical engineering. 

Young men without a natural taste for mathematics and the 
handling of tools are advised not to pursue this Course. The prac- 
tical work of this Course is most thorough. The student is familiar- 
ized from the first with the reading of engineering drawings and 
with the use of tools and implements used in wood and iron work. 
He is given daily practice in the shops and is encouraged to develop 
whatever inventive talent he may have. Results have shown that 
students completing this Course have no difficulty in securing em- 
ployment immediately upon graduation in the field of mechanics or 
mechanical engineering. 

In 1 91 8 members of the Freshman Class taking this Course will 
be required at the close of the regular session to take 100 hours 
of shop and office work. This summer work will be developed 
so as to include a specified amount of time at the close of the 
Sophomore and Junior years. Summer employment will be ac- 
cepted as a substitute for this work if found to be equivalent. 



I 



"3 



Mechanical Engineering Course. 





Term. 


Subject. 


Term. 


Subject. 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Freshman Year. 


Sophomore Year. 


Trigronometry 400 


5 


2 

3 


"5"" 

4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 


Analytics 402 


5 






Algebra 401 


Calculus 403 


5 


4 


Analytics 402 




Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 


3(4) 




English 220. 232 


4(2) 
3 
3* 
3* 


4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 




History 160 . 


Electricity and Magnetism 
201,204 


3(4) 




German 360t 




French 380t 


Heat and Light 202. 205. .. . 




3(4) 


Chemistry 80 


Composition 221 


1(2) 
(2) 

3* 

3* 

2(6) 
(4) 
(4) 


1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 


1(2) 


Freehand Drawinir420 


(4) 
(4) 

2 
(6) 

1(2) 


Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Chemistry 81 

Descriptive Geometry 424 . 

Blacksmithing 425 

Technical Mechanics 426.. . 


(2) 


Mechanical Drawing 421.. 
Technical Instruction 422. 


(4) 


(4) 


3* 
3* 


Woodwork 423 


v4) 
\i2) 


(4) 
1(2) 




Military Instruction 


3(4) 
(4) 
2 


2(2J 




















Foundry 427 




(8) 


•• •••••••••••••••.. 








Steam Engines 428 






3 










Military Instruction 


1(2) 


i(2) 


1(2) 


Junior Year. 


Senior Year. 


Calculus 403 


5 

1(2) 
(2) 
3 






Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

Hydraulics 130 


(2) 
4 
4 

(4) 

2(4) 

4 

1(4) 

3 


(2) 
4 


1 


AdvancedComposition 222 
Public Speaking 234 


1(2) 
(2) 
3 


1 
(2) 

3**" 


4 


Civil Government 140 

Business Law 141 


Experimental Engi- 
neering 432.. 

Structural Design 433 

Mechanics of Engineering 
434 


(8) 
2(4) 

4 


(8) 


Mechanics 122 


4 

(4) 

1(4) 

(4) 




3(6) 


Mechanics of Materials 125 
Dynamos 182 


3 
4 

(A) 
2(4) 

(4) 
4 


5 

*3(8J* 
(12) 

(4) 
R 


3 


Electrical Laboratory 184. 


. ^^'^ 

Kmematics 435 




Machine Design 429 

Machine Work 430 


Heat EngiQeering 436 

Hydromechanics 438 


4 
4 


3 


Graphics 431 


Heating andVeniilation 442 
Military Instruction 




2(4) 


Experimental Engi- 
neering 432 




R 


R 


R 


Military Instruction 


R 


R 











♦Alternative. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



I 



RURAL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

This Course is offered to students who wish to become proficient 
in such branches of engineering as relate in particular to the prob- 
lems of rural communities. The broad training offered in engineer- 
ing is supplemented by instruction in those agricultural subjects 
which will give the student a greater breadth of view concerning 
rural problems requiring the services of an engineer, and, if he 
should elect to settle in the country for the practice of his profession, 



114 



i 



will enable him to conduct his farming operations with pleasure and 
profit. 

In 1918 members of the Freshman Class taking this Course will 
be required at the close of the regular session to take 100 hours 
of field and office work in surveying. This summer work will be 
developed so as to include a specified amount of time at the close 
of the Sophomore and Junior years. Summer employment will 
be accepted as a substitute for this work if found to be equivalent. 



Rural Engineering Course, 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Freshman Year. 



Trigonometry 400 

Algebra 401 

Analytics 402 

Ensrlish 220, 232 

History 160 

German 360 1 

French 380 1 

Chemistry 80 

Surveying 121 

Freehand Drawing 420 

Mechanical Drawing 421.. 
Technical Instruction 422. 

Woodwork 423 

Military Instruction 



4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 



(4) 

(4) 
2 

(6) 
1(2) 



2 

3 



4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 

2 



(4) 



1(2) 



Junior Year. 



Calculus 403 

Advanced Composition 222 

Public Speaking 234 

Civil Gov^ernment 140 

Business Law 141 

Agronomy 20 

Animal Husbandry 45 

Geology 86 

Mechanics 122 

Structural Design 124 — 
Mechanics of Materials 125 

Dynamos 182 

Electrical Laboratory 184. 

Batteries 186 

Blacksmithing 425 

Machine Work 430 

Graphics 431 

Military Instruction 



5 

1(2) 
(2) 
3 



2(2) 



(4) 



(4) 
R 



1(2) 
(2) 
3 



2(4) 
3 
4 
(4) 



R 



III 



5 

4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 
4(2) 
(4) 



(4) 



1(2) 



(2) 



3 

3(2) 
(2) 



2(4) 
5 



(8) 
R* 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year, 



Analytics 402 

Calculus 403 

Mechanics and Sound 200, 

203: 

Electricity and Magnetism 

201, 204 

Heat and Light 202. 205.... 

Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Chemistry 81 

Surveying 121 

Descriptive Geometry 424.. 

Steam Engines 428 

Military Instruction 



5 
3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 

3* 

3* 

2(6) 
(4) 
(4) 



1(2) 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



4 
3(4) 



1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225.... 

Political Economy 142 

Soil Physics 22 

Grain Judging 25 

Vegetable Culture 280 

Farm Forestry 320 

Practical Problems 127 

Concrete 129 

Hydraulics 130 

Highways 133 

Electric Lighting 190 

Telephones and Tele- 
graphs 192, 193 

Farm Machinery 437 

Hydromechanics 438 

Design of Farm Struc- 
tures 439 

Farm Machinery Design 
440 

Heating and Ventilation442 

Military Instruction 



(2) 
4 
2(4) 



4 
4 



(4) 



2 
'2(4) 



R 



(2) 
4 
2(4) 

(2) 
2(4) 



2(2) 



4 

2(4)* 

2(4)* 

"r" 



III 



3(4) 
1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 



2(4) 
2(2) 
3 
1(2) 



1 

4 



1(4) 
2(4) 



2(4)* 

2(4)* 

2(4) 
R 



♦Alternative. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French ana 
Vice versa. 

B. Required. For further information see page 84. 



I 



115 



ENGINEERING EDUCATION COURSE. 

A substantial demand for teachers of the Manual Arts who have 
had a broad training in engineering, has led to the establishment of 
this Course. In addition to the instruction in engineering, a 
thorough training in pedagogy is offered. Since the need for such 
teachers is felt in urban and in rural communities, some opportunity 
is given the student when he enters the Senior class, to select those 
subjects in engineering which will best fit him for the solution of the 
problems of the community in which he wishes to practice his pro- 
fession. 

In 19 18 members of the Freshman Class taking this Course will 
be required at the close of the regular session to take lOO hours 
of shop work and drawing. This summer work will be developed 
so as to include a specified amount of time at the close of the 
Sophomore and Junior years. Summer employment will be ac- 
cepted as a substitute for this work if found to be equivalent. 



ii6 



Engineering Education Course. 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Fii»SHMA.if Year. 



Trigonometry 400 

Algebra 401 

Analytics 402 

Engrlish 220, 232 

History 160 

German 360t 

French 3801 , 

Chemistry 80 

Freehand Drawing 420 

Mechanical Drawing 421. , 
Technical Instruction 422 

Woodwork 423 , 

Military Instruction , 



4(2) 
3 

3* 
3* 



(4) 
(4) 

2 
(6) 

1(2) 



2 
3 



4(2) 

3 

3* 

3* 

4(2) 



(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



Junior Year. 



Calculus 403 

Adranced Composition 222 

Public Speaking 134 

Ciril Government 140 

Business Law 141 

Psychology 1 

History of Education 2 — 
Principles of Education 3. 

Mechanics 122 

Mechanics of Materials 125 

Surveying 126 

Electrical Laboratory 184. 

Blacksmithing 425 

Machine Design 429 

Graphics 431 

Experimental Engi- 
neering 432 

Military Instruction 



5 

1(2) 
(2) 
3 



4(2) 



(4) 

'i(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 

3 



(4) 
2(4) 
4 



R 



III 



5 
4(2) 

3 
3* 
3* 
4(2) 



(4) 



(4) 
1(2) 



(2) 



3 
4* 



5 
2(4) 



3(4) 



(4) 
R 



Subject. 



Term. 



II 



Sophomore Year. 



Analytics 402 

Calculus 403 

Mechanics and Sound 200, 
203 

Electricity and Magnetism 
201 204 

Heat and Light 202, "205 ! *. '. '. 

Composition 221 

Public Speaking 233 

German 361 

French 381 

Chemistry tl 

Electricity 180, 181 

Descriptive Geometry 424. 

Blacksmithing 425 

Steam Engines 428 

Military Instruction 



5 
3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 
3* 
3* 
2(6) 



3(4) 



1(2) 
(2) 

3* 

3* 



(4) 
(4) 



1(2) 



3(2) 
3(4) 



1(2) 



Senior Year. 



Special Composition 225 

Political Economy 142 

Secondary Education 4 

Organization and Materials 

5 

Practical Problems 127 

Farm Drainage 128 

Concrete 129 

Hydraulics 130 

Estimates of Costs 131 

Highways 133 

Electric Lighting 190 

Telephones and 

Telegraphs If 2, 193 

Machine Work 430 

Experimental Engi- 
neering 432 

Structural Design 433 

Farm Machinery 437 

Hydromechanics 438 

Heating andVentilation442 

School Architecture 443 

Advanced Patterns 444 

Military Instruction 



(2) 

4 
3(2) 



(4) 

4* 
4 



(4) 



2(4) 
2(4)* 



(2) 



3(2) 
(4) 



1(4) 



2(2) 
(4) 



R 



R 



III 



3(4) 

1(2) 

(2) 

3* 
3* 



3(2) 
2(2) 



3 
1(2) 



2(2) 
(4) 

(4) 



2(4) 
3(4)» 

(8) 

R 



♦Alternative. 

tFor present, students offering entrance credits in German will take French and 
vice versa. 

R. Required. For further information see page 84. 



117 



SHORT WINTER COURSES IN ENGINEERING. 

These courses are offered to those who for various reasons 
cannot attend the four year courses. They are thoroughly practical 
in their nature and exceedingly helpful when full advantage is taken 
of the instruction given. Folders giving the details of these courses 
will be sent upon request. The following short courses will be 
given in 1918: 

One week's Course on Farm Machinery and Motors. 

One week's Course on Farm Carpentry, Blacksmithing, Pipe 
Fitting, and the Use of Concrete on the Farm. 

Three days' Course on the Building and Maintenance of Roads. 



SUB-COLLEGIATE COURSE. 

The work in this Course is designed to prepare students for the 
Freshman Class who have been unable to obtain elsewhere a com- 
plete preparatory course. 

Sub-Collegiate Course. 



Sub-Freshman Year. 



Subject. 



Algebra 405 

P ane Geometry 406. 
Solid Geometry 407... 
Farm Arithmetic 408 . 

Physics 206 

English 231 



Term. 



4 
4 



4(1) 
4(2) 



4 
4 



4(1) 
4(2) 



III 



4$ 
4$ 
4(1) 
4(2) 



Sub-Freshman Year 


• 




Subject. 


Term. 


I 


II 


III 



History 164 

Latin 342 

German 363 

French 383 

Physical Culture 

Military Instruction 



3** 


3** 


3** 


3** 


4(1)* 


4(1)* 


4(1)* 
(2) 


4(1)* 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 



3** 

3** 

4(1)* 

4(1)* 
(2) 
(2) 



•Alternative. 

$ Solid Geometry must be taken hy students preparing for Engineering Courses. 
Farm Arithmetic must be taken by students preparing for Agricultural and Horti- 
cultural Courses. Elective for other students. 



ii8 



1 



i 



i' 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

ADMISSION TO COLLEGE 
GENERAL STATEMENT. 

A candidate for admission to the College must present, together 
with his Scholastic Record, a certificate of good moral character; 
and if the candidate be from another school or college, the certifi- 
cate must show that he left such institution in good standing. 

METHOD OF ADMISSION. 

There are two methods of gaining admission to the Freshman 
Class : 

(i.) By Certificate. — The College will accept certificates from ap- 
proved high schools of Maryland and the District of Columbia, and 
from accredited academies and preparatory schools of this State and 
other States. The certificates presented by the candidate must be 
officially certified by the principal of the school attended and must 
state in detail the work completed by the candidate. 

Blank certificates conveniently arranged for the desired data will 
be sent upon application. 

All admissions by certificates are regarded as merely provisional. 
That is, while a student presenting a proper certificate is admitted 
to such standing as it shows him entitled to, he may be required to 
take a special examination or to do special work in, any subject 
in which his preparation proves to be unsatisfactory; or if, after 
a fair trial, he fails to maintain a standing in the class to which 
he was admitted, he may be dropped to a lower class. 

(2.) By Examination. — Candidates not admitted by certificate 
will be required to stand written examinations upon the entrance 
subjects. These examinations will be held for 191 7 from June 8th 
to 15th, inclusive, and on September 17th, i8th and 19th. 

UNITS REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION. 

A unit designates not less than four or five ''periods" of class- 
room work of eight or ten "periods" of laboratory work per week, 
continued throughout the school year, each "period" being not less 
than forty minutes. 



119 

An applicant for admission to the Freshman Class must offer 
credit for fifteen (15) units of high school or other secondary school 
work. The units covering the fundamental subjects are specifically 
designated. The others may be selected from the tabulated list of 
electives. 

A deficiency of three units will be allowed a candidate as condi- 
tions, but such conditions must be removed by the end of the Schol- 
astic Year in which the candidate is admitted. 



Distribution of the Fifteen (15) Units to be Offered in 1917 for 

Admission to the Several Courses. 



Agronomy. 

Animal Husbandry, 

Agricultural Education, 

OR 

Horticulture. 


Biology. 

Chemistry, 

Canning, 

or 

General Science. 


Civil Engineering, 

Electrical Engineering, 

Mechanical Engineering, 

Rural Engineering 

or 

Engineering Education 


Subject. 


Value 

IN 

Units. 


Subject. 


Value 

IN 

Units. 


Subject. 


Value 

IN 

Units. 


Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

English 
History 

Foreign Language ) 

or > 

Agriculture ) 

Physics 

(With Notes) 

Electives from 
Tabulated list 


1 

3 
2 

2 

1 

45^* 


Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

English 
History 

French | 

or > 

German ) 

Physics 

(With Notes) 

Electives from 
Tabulated list 


1 

3 
2 

2 

1 

45^* 


Algebra 

Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry | 
or >- 
Plane Trigonometry ) 

English 
History 

French i 

or J- 

German ) 

Physics 

(With Notes) 

Electives from 
Tabulated list 


I5i 

1 

3 
2 

2 

1 

4 



♦Students electing Latin in Freshman Class must offer two (2) units in Latin. 
**It is preferred that Solid Geometry rather than Plane Trigonometry be offered. 

The high schools of the State are primarily local institutions in 
which the curricula must be adapted to the needs of their respective 
communities. Therefore, in the correlation of their courses of study 
with the College Entrance Requirements, it has been necessary to 
permit prospective students to make a selection of a limited number 
of credits from the given list of electives. 



I 



Group. 



Mathematics 



History 



Foreign Language 



Science 



Industrial Subjectsi 



I20 



List of Elective Units. . 



Subject. 



Solid Geometry 
Plane Trigonometry 
Farm Accounts 

Ancient 

European 

General 

English 

American 

Latin 
French 
German 
Spanish 

Chemistry 

(with notes) 
Agriculture 
Botany 
Zoology 
Physiology 
Physical Geography 
Geology 

Freehand Drawing 
Mechanical Drawing 
Shop Work 



Value of 

Subject 

In Units. 



"A 
'A 

1 

1 
1** 

1 to 2 
1 to 2 
1 to 2 
1 to 2 



5^ to 

% 
A 

14 



5^ to 
5^ to 
J^to 



Maximum Number 

OF Units to be 

Selected from Any 

Group 



♦Not to be offered in addition to Ancient and European History. 
♦♦May be offered if taken in latter half of high school course. 



li' 

* 

.1 



SUGGESTIONS FOR PREPARATION IN THE REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Algebra to Quadratics. (One unit.) As treated in the alge- 
bras of Wells, Wentworth, Tanner, Fine, or an equivalent. The 
four fundamental operations; factoring; highest common factor 
and least common multiple; fractions (including their conception 
as ratios) and complex fractions; powers and roots; the solution 
of linear equations, both numerical and literal, and of problems 
depending on linear equations; radicals and the theory of expo- 
nents; and the solution of simple second degree equations in one 
unknown quantity by factoring. 

Algebra from Quadratics. (One-half unit.) As treated in 
the algebras of Wells, Wentworth, Tanner, Fine, or an equivalent. 
Equations with one or more unknown quantities, to be solved by 



121 



the methods of linear or quadratic equations ; ratio, proportion and 
variation; variables and limits; properties of series, including the 
binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, and the formu- 
las for the nth term and sum of the terms of arithmetical and geo- 
metrical progressions with applications ; logarithms. 

Plane Geometry. (One unit.) As treated by Wentworth, Mc- 
Mahon, Phillips and Fisher, or an equivalent. The usual theorems 
and constructions, including the general properties of plane recti- 
linear figures, the circle and measurement of angles, similar poly- 
gons, areas, regular polygons and the measurement of the circle; 
the solution of original exercises, including loci problems; and the 
application to the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. The 
student should be able to prove every statement made, going back 
step by step until it rests upon primary definitions or axioms. 

Solid Geometry. (One-half unit.) As treated in Wentworth's 
or an equivalent text-book. In addition to the discussion of general 
theorems, special attention should be paid to the solution of problems. 

Plane Trigonometry. (One-half unit.) This course should 
cover the field of plane trigonometry as given in Wentworth^s or an 
equivalent text-book. It should include the solution of right and 
oblique triangles and special emphasis should be placed on the solu- 
tion of practical problems, trigonometric identities, and trigono- 
metric equations. 

Farm Accounts. (One-half unit.) This course should extend 
over one-half year and treat of bookkeeping as it relates to farm life. 



ENGLISH. 

Preparation in English has two main objects: (i), command of 
correct and clear English, spoken and written; (2), power to read 
with intelligence and appreciation. 

To secure the first end, training in grammar and the simple 
principles of rhetoric and the writing of frequent compositions are 
essential. The candidate must be able to spell, capitalize and punctu- 
ate correctly. He must show a practical knowledge of the essentials 
of English grammar, including ordinary grammatical terminology, 



122 



■fc 






inflection, syntax, the use of phrases and clauses ; a thorough train- 
ing in the construction of the sentence; and familiarity with the 
simpler principles of paragraph division and structure. 

To secure the second end the candidate is required to read the 
works named below under A and B. The list is intended to give 
the candidate the opportunity of reading, under intelligent direc- 
tion, a number of important pieces of literature. 

English A. For reading and practice. (One and one-half units.) 
The candidate should read the works prescribed below with a view 
to understanding and enjoying them. He will be expected to show 
a reasonable degree of familiarity with their substance, and will be 
required to have a general knowledge of the History of English 
and American Literature. 

For students entering in 1917: Shakespeare's ''Merchant of Ven- 
ice," "As You Like It," and "Julius Caesar"; Swift's "Gulliver's 
Travels"; Scott's "Ivanhoe"; Goldsmith's "Vicar of Wakefield"; 
Stevenson's "Treasure Island" ; Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient 
Rome"; Eliot's "Silas Marner"; Longfellow's "Evangeline"; Low- 
ell's "Vision of Sir Launfal" ; Foe's Raven" ; Gray's "Elegy Writ- 
ten in a Country Churchyard"; and such other texts as are pre- 
scribed by the State Board of Education in the course of study 
for the high schools of Maryland. 

English B. For study and practice. (One and one-half units.) 
The candidate should read the books presented below with the view 
of acquiring such knowledge of their contents as will enable him 
to answer specific questions with accuracy and some detail. The 
examination is not designed, however, to require minute drill in 
difficulties of verbal expression, unimportant allusions and tech- 
nical details. 

For students entering in 1917: Shakespeare's "Macbeth"; Mil- 
ton's "L' Allegro," "II Peneroso"; Tennyson's "The Holy Grail"; 
Macaulay's Essay on Johnson or Addison, or Carlyle's Essay on 
Bums ; Washington's Farewell Address ; Webster's First Bunker 
Hill Oration or Btirke's Speech on Conciliation with America; 
Emerson's "Essay on Manners." 



123 



HISTORY. 



Ancient History to 300 A. D. (One unit.) If a single text- 
book is used, it should be West's Ancient World, Wolfson's Essen- 
tials in Ancient History, Morey's Outlines of Ancient History, or 
an equivalent. 

European History, 476 A. D. to 1648 A. D. (One unit.) Rob- 
inson's History of Western Europe or an equivalent. European His- 
tory from the Fall of Rome to the end of the Thirty Years' War. 

General History. (One unit.) Myer's, Fischer's or Colby's 
General History, or an equivalent. 

English History. (One unit.) Cheyney's A Short History of 
England, Andrew's History of England, Walker's Essentials in 
English History, Montgomery's English History, or an equivalent. 

American History. (One unit.) Channing's Student's History 
of the United States, McLaughlin's History of the American Nation, 
Hart's Essentials in American History, or an equivalent. The dis- 
covery, exploration and settlement of America; the colonial policy 
of England, culminating in the Revolution; the political, economic 
and social history of the United States since the adoption of the 
Constitution. 

The entrance examinations in History will be so framed as to 
require comparison and the use of the judgment, rather than the 
mere use of the memory. 



foreign language. 

Latin. First Year. (One unit.) First Latin Book completed. 

Second Year. (One unit.) Three Books of Caesar, or an equiv- 
alent. 

Forms and constructions needed in texts from Standard Latin 
Grammar. Prose based on texts. 

French. First Year. (One unit.) Aldrich and Foster's Foun- 
dations of French and French Reader, or their equivalents. 

Second Year. (One unit.) Reading of four to five hundred 
pages of graduated texts. 

German. First Year. (One unit.) Bacon's German Grammar, 
or an equivalent. 



1^ 



124 



11' 

11! 



Second Year. (One unit.) Reading of about 300 pages of 
graduated texts. 

Spanish. First Year. (One unit.) Elementary grammar; read- 
ing about 100 pages of easy prose ; simple composition and dictation. 

Second Year. (One unit.) Reading of about 300 pages of gradu- 
ated texts. 

SCIENCE. 



I 



Physics. (One unit.) As much as is contained in the text-books 
of Carhart and Chute, Hall and Bergen, Gage's Elements of Physics, 
Avery's Elements of Natural Philosophy, or an equivalent. Note 
books covering Laboratory work, etc., must be submitted. 

Chemistry. (One unit.) Preparation should include the study 
of at least one standard text-book, to the end that the pupil may 
gain a comprehensive and connected view of the most important 
facts of elementary chemistry. The subject should be attempted 
only in schools which possess an adequate equipment; laboratory 
work is essential and original notes must be submitted; more im- 
portance will attach to descriptive chemistry than to analytical, and 
the student should become as familiar as possible with the com- 
monest non-metals and metals, as well as their simpler compounds. 

Agriculture. (One-half to three units.) Courses in Agriculture 
should include class, laboratory, and field work in Soils and Fertil- 
izers, Farm Crops, Farm Animals, and Horticulture. A special text 
should be used in the treatment of each subject. 

Botany. (One-half unit.) As much as is contained in Gray's 
Lessons, Bailey's Elementary Botany, Bergen's Foundations, or an 
equivalent. 

Zoology. (One-half unit.) The preparation in Zoology should 
include a general knowledge of common animals of the locality with 
regard to their ecological relations ; the general study of the animal 
forms such as the Amoeba, a ciliate, an earth worm, insect, frog 
and mammal. He should have some work in the general physi- 
ology of these types and a comparison of life processes in animals 
and plants. The student should have such general knowledge of the 
animal kingdom, the characteristics of the Phyla and the principal 



125 



classes of animals as is given in Davison's Practical Zoology. The 
applicant must present an acceptable notebook covering field and 
laboratory w<M*k. 

Physiology. (One-half unit.) The preparation should include 
the general facts of the anatomy, histology and physiology of the 
human body and the essentials of hygiene. A text-book, such as 
the first part of Hough and Sedgwick's The Human Mechanism, or 
an equivalent should be used in connection with charts and models. 

Physical Geography. (One-half unit.) A study of the earth, 
atmosphere, waters and attendant phenomena; the distribution of 
both animal and vegetable life, and the various industries resulting 
from the development of the natural resources of the earth. 

Text-books on Physical Geography by Gilbert, Davis, Fairbanks, 
Tarr, or an equivalent. 

Geology. (One-half unit.) The student must show a knowledge 
of geology as treated in Scott's Introduction to Geology or an 
equivalent. Notes covering laboratory and field work must be 
submitted. 

INDUSTRIAL SUBJECTS. 

Shopwork. (One-half to one unit.) A candidate who oflFers 
shopwork as an entrance subject is asked to present a detailed 
statement from his instructor, setting forth the kind and amount 
of work done. 

Drawing. (One-half to one unit.) A candidate must present a 
detailed statement from his instructor showing the kind and amount 
of work done and submit drawings done by himself. 



ADMISSION TO OTHER CLASSES. 

Applicants for Advanced Standing in any course, in addition 
to satisfying the requirements for admission to the Freshman Qass, 
must pass an examination in the studies which have been pursued 
by the class for which they are candidates. Work done at a stand- 
ard college is accepted when properly certified and found on exam- 
ination to be equivalent in extent and quality to that required at 
this College. 



ii 



126 



Examinations for Admission to Any Higher Class will be 
held at the College in June and September at the same times as 
examinations for admission to the Freshman Qass. 

Candidates for the Two- Year Course in Agriculture must 
be at least 16 years of age. They are also required to present 
certificates or pass examinations in subjects which are at least 
equivalent to those given in the seventh grade of the Maryland 
Public Schools. 

Candidates for the Sub-Freshman Class will be required to 
present certificates or to pass examinations in subjects as follows: 
Algebra as far as quadratics; two years of high school English or 
its equivalent, and four units in other subjects taught in the Mary- 
land High Schools which are not given in the Sub-Freshman Class. 

Students from newly acquired territory or any foreign country 
must have a local guardian appointed with parental powers, with 
whom the President can deal in any case of emergency. Students 
who cannot speak English are not desired, and are advised that 
satisfactory progress at this College on their part cannot be 
achieved until they have familiarized themselves partly, at least, 
with the English language. 



ii I 



EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

In order to pass from one class to the next higher, a student is 
required to pass an examination in each study pursued, by a mark 
of at least sixty per cent., and to have a combined mark in each 
branch (daily and examination) of at least seventy per cent. 

A student will not be promoted if it is manifest that he cannot 
pursue successfully the advanced work. 



REPORTS. 

Detailed reports are sent to parents and guardians at the end of 
every term. These give the grade of the student in every branch 
of study, his attendance record and his conduct record with com- 
ment by the President upon each item. 

Special reports of deficiencies will be sent to parents and guardians 
whenever deemed necessary. 



127 



GRADUATION AND DEGREES. 

Degrees are granted by the Board of Trustees upon the recom- 
mendation of the Faculty. 

All applications for degrees must be approved by the Faculty. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

As a requisite for graduation the candidate for this degiee must 
have completed the work previously outlined. 

If a thesis is required it must be submitted to the head of the 
department in which the investigation is pursued, not later than 
May 15th. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred as follows: 

1. Upon persons who have taken the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in a recognized institution, and have pursued successfully 
at this College for one year a course of graduate study, satisfying 
the following requirements: 

The course shall consist of a major subject and two minor sub- 
jects germane to the major subject and shall be approved by the 
professor in charge of the major subject. 

At least one minor subject shall be in a different department 
from the major subject. 

The course shall occupy not less than fifteen credit periods per 
term. 

Not fewer than five credit periods per term shall be devoted to 
the minor subjects. 

A thesis satisfactory to the professor in charge of the major sub- 
ject shall be presented. 

2. Upon college graduates of not less than two years' standing, 
who are employed in any of the departments of the College, includ- 
ing the Experiment Station, and who have completed the equiva- 
lent of the above course of study. Candidates under this clause 
must have their applications approved at least eighteen months be- 
fore they contemplate receiving their degree. 



128 



3- Upon graduates of this College of not less than three years' 
standing, who having been connected with institutions of learning 
or research, where adequate facilities for advanced work are avail- 
able, have completed a course equivalent to ( i ) and have presented 
a satisfactory thesis. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

The degree of Mechanical Engineer may be conferred as follows : 

1. Upon graduates of this College of not less than three years* 
standing, who having been connected with institutions of learning 
or research, where adequate facilities for advanced work are avail- 
able, have completed a course consisting of a major and two minor 
subjects, and presented a satisfactory thesis. The course of study 
shall be outlined by the heads of the Departments of Civil, Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Engineering. 

2. Upon graduates of this College who have had three years' 
professional experience of an acceptable character. Such candi- 
dates must present a full report of such experience and such other 
information as to the qualifiations for the degree as may be found 
desirable, and in addition shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

3. All candidates must be at least Junior members of the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers. All applications for degrees 
must be approved twelve months prior to the date they contem- 
plate receiving the degree, and the thesis must be presented at least 
one month prior to such date. 



CIVIL ENGINEER. 

The degree of Civil Engineer may be conferred upon any candi- 
date who is a graduate of this College with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Civil Engineering, and has been engaged in engineer- 
ing pursuits for not less than three years since graduation, pro- 
vided : 

I. That he shall be at least a Junior member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, or that he shall have been in responsible 
charge of work for at least two years. 



129 

2. That he shall accompany his application with a synopsis of 
the work upon which he bases his request. 

3. That the Committee composed of the heads of the Civil, Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Engineering Departments, to whom his ap- 
plication shall be referred, shall consider him eligible. 

4. That previous to receiving the degree he shall comply with 
such further conditions as the aforesaid committee shall impose. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER. 

The degree of Electrical Engineer may be conferred upon any 
candidate who is a graduate of this College with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and has been en- 
gaged in engineering work for not less than three years since 
graduation, provided: 

1. That he shall be at least an Associate Member of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Electrical Engineers. 

2. That his application be approved twelve months prior to the 
date he shall receive the degree. 

3. That he shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

4. That he shall present with his application a complete report 
of his engineering experience and an outline of his thesis. 

5. That the Committee composed of the heads of the Civil, Elec- 
trical, and Mechanical Engineering Departments, to whom the ap- 
plication shall be referred, shall consider him eligible. 



SCHOLARSHIPS. 

High-School Scholarships. — To encourage worthy young men 
who desire a Collegiate Education, the Board of Trustees has estab- 
lished for each High School in Maryland and the District of Colum- 
bia, one scholarship each year^ to be awarded under the following 
conditions : 



♦This plan will be gradually put into effect as the present scholarships become 
vacant. 



I30 



I. — ^The person awarded a scholarship must be a graduate of a 
high school and qualified to enter the Freshman Class (See Entrance 
Requirements, page 119), and must be of approved moral char- 
acter and at least 15 years of age. 

2. — The appointment to a scholarship shall be made by the School 
Superintendent, upon the recommendation and certification of the 
Principal of the High School. 

The Principal of the High School may recommend one or more 
persons for appointment, with information as to the merits of each 
case. In making appointments, not only class standing, but inabil- 
ity to meet the financial expenses of an education should be given 
consideration. 

3. — ^The appointment shall be made for the term normally re- 
quired to complete the course selected. 

4.-— Each scholarship has the value of $50.00 per year. This 
amount will be credited on the holder's account. 

5.— The scholarship will be forfeited by persistent indifference to 
scholastic work or by repeated disregard of the rules of discipline 
of the College. 

6. — The scholarship will be forfeited in case the holder fails of 
promotion at the end of any scholastic year, unless there are extenu- 
ating circumstances. 

Preparatory School Scholarships. There has also been es- 
tablished one scholarship each year for graduates of each Prepara- 
tory School in Maryland and the District of Columbia in which 
the standard is of such a character as to qualify the appointee for 
entrance to the Freshman Class. The conditions governing these 
scholarships are the same as for the High Schools except that the 
appointment shall be made by the Principal of the Preparatory 
School. 

County Scholarships. — Counties which do not have a high 
school will be given one $50.00 scholarship each year, and the recipi- 
ent may enter the Sub-Freshman class (See Entrance Requirements, 
page 126). The appointment to the scholarship is made by the 
County Superintendent after a competitive examination. In other 
respects the regulations governing this scholarship are the same 
as for the high-school scholarships. 



131 



Industrial Scholarships. For the encouragement of zvorthy 
\^oung men of limited means towards getting a College education, 
a limited number of industrial scholarships have been established by 
the Board of Trustees to be awarded under the following con- 
ditions : 

I. — The number of scholarships will depend upon the amount of 
service required. 

2. — The value of the scholarship will be graduated according to 
the amount and character of the work performed, and will range 
from $40.00 per year upwards. The amount earned will be credited 
on the holder's account. 

3. — The holder of such a scholarship will be required to render to 
the College certain specified services, such as work in the dining- 
room, on the corridors, in the library, etc. 

4. — Such services will not as a rule prevent the holder from par- 
ticipating in military drill. 

5.— -Vacancies as they occur shall be filled by the President of the 
College and ratified by the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees. 

6. — The holder of an industrial scholarship: (a) — must be more 
than 15 years of age and of normal size, health and strength; (b) — 
must be of approved moral character as attested by some well- 
known resident of his locality; (c) — must be qualified to enter the 
Freshman Class of the College (See Entrance Requirements, 
page 119). 

7. — The scholarship will be forfeited by persistent indiflFerence to 
scholastic work or by repeated disregard of the rules of discipline 
of the College. 

8.— The scholarship will be forfeited in case the services re- 
quired of the holder are not satisfactory to those in charge of the 
work. 



132 



i 



FACILITIES FOR RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

The College is undenominational in character. The daily exer- 
cises of the College include religious worship in the College Chapel. 
Attendance is voluntary. 

Students are encouraged to attend the church of their choice on 
Sunday mornings. There is an Episcopal church at College Park; 
and at Berwyn, one mile north, and at Riverdale, one mile south, 
are Presbyterian churches. In Hyattsville, two miles south, may be 
found Catholic, Episcopal, Presbyterian, Baptist and Methodist 
churches. In the city of Washington are churches of all denomi- 
nations, and students may attend service in this city on Sunday 
mornings. Parents are urged to insist upon t heir s ons attending 
the church of the faith of their parents. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS. 

The attention of parents is earnestly called to the following rules 
in force at this College: The College authorities can succeed in 
conferring the maximum amount of training upon the student only 
with and by the active support and earnest co-operation of the par- 
ent. The President of the College is always ready and willing to 
discuss with parent or guardian any failures in a student's rec- 
ord, and correspondence on this subject is always appreciated. 

No student will be accepted as a matriculate until the contract 
card containing the following agreement for matriculation is signed 
by parent or guardian, and received by the President of the Col- 
lege. 

It is understood that the President of the College as the execu- 
tive of the same, and acting for the Board of Trustees, a party to 
this contract, has the right to ask the withdrawal of a student at 
any time, when in his judgment such withdrawal may be necessary 
for the interest either of the young man or of the institution which 
he attends. It is further understood that a parent or guardian can 
at any time withdraw his son or ward, subject to regulations herein 
set forth. 

A student manifesting indifference to the observance of the rules 
and regulations of the institution, or wanting in proper attention 
to the preparation of his work, will be cautioned to improve. Fail- 
ing to do so his parents, upon notice given by the President, must 
withdraw their son. 



133 



A special pledge to refrain from what is popularly knov/n as 
''having/' and taking unfair means in examinations is required of 
every applicant for entrance, before he will be allowed to matricu- 
late. Parents should impress upon their sons that failure to live 
up to this pledge is a dishonor which unfits them to be longer stu- 
dents of the College. "Hazing" is invariably punished by instant 
dismissal. 

Frequent absences from the College are invariably of great dis- 
advantage to the student, in breaking in upon the continuity of his 
work and in distracting his mind from the main purpose of his at- 
tendance at the institution. Parents are therefore earnestly asked 
io refrain from granting frequent requests to leave the College, 

Students will not be permitted to leave classes to answer telephone 
calls, unless they are urgent. 

Students will not be permitted to make contracts or to sell any 
article to their associates without the approval of the President. 

The College will not be responsible for articles left in the dormi- 
tories during vacation, nor for valuables left by students in their 
rooms at any time. They should be deposited with the College 
Treasurer, who will place them in the College safe and give a re- 
ceipt therefor. 



RULES ON COLLEGIATE ROUTINE, ENDORSED BY THE FACULTY. 

1. All students on entering the collegiate course shall select ,a course of 
study from the curricula in the catalogue, which choice of study shall be ap- 
proved by their parents or guardians. A student may not change his course of 
study except at the written request of his parents or guardians, and upon the 
approval of head of course abandoned, of the head of the course requested, and 
of the Committee on Courses of Study. 

2. No special courses are permitted save by the consent of the Committee 
on Courses of Study. A certificate awarded attesting work in a special course 
will bear neither the College Seal nor the signature of the Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees. 

3. To attain proficiency an examination grade of at least 60 per cent, and 
a term average of 70 per cent, are required. In computing averages the daily 
grade is computed at 2 and the examination grade at 1. In computing yearly 
averages a weight is given each subject according to the mean number of periods 
per week involved ; theoretical periods are given a value, 2 ; practical periods, 1. 

4. A student may be required to take an oral examination at any time within 
ten days after a written examination. 

5. An examination paper containing erasures or showing alterations may be 
rejected and a new examination ordered at the discretion of the Instructor in 
charge. 



134 



6. A student who uses unfair means in examinations shall be liable to sus- 
pension or dismissal. 

7. Any student failing in a subject on his first examination will be required 
to make arrangements with the Dean of his Division at the beginning of the 
following term for the removal of the condition during that term. He will not 
be allowed to take more than two re-examinations unless he shall have extra and 
special work approved by the Dean of the Division. He must pay a fee of 
$1.00 for each examination taken after the first. 

8. One re-€xamination only in any one subject shall be permitted to Seniors 
between the final examination and commencement. 

9. A student may not be promoted if conditioned in more than one-fifth of 
the credit periods required for a year's work. A credit period is one theoretical 
period or two practical periods per week. 

10. A student shall not be promoted if he has a condition of more than one 
year's standing. 

11. No student will be permitted more than two weeks at the beginhing of 
the scholastic year in which to remove conditions which prohibit him from entering 
the next higher class. 

12. An absence the day preceding or following a holiday will count as two. 

13. Candidates for graduation must have satisfied the requirements of the 
Ifllitary Department unless excused from military instruction. Students thus ex- 
cused must have performed work equivalent to that given in the ^Slilitary Depart- 
ment. 

Students will not be permitted to leave classes to answer telephone calls, 
unless they are urgent. 



EXPENSES. 



Summary. The details concerning the items of expense incurred 
by a student attending the College will be found in the paragraphs 
immediately following the tabulated summary. Although the cost 
of board and lodging for students living outside of the College 
Dormitories is not given, it should not vary in any marked degree 
from the amount shown. Extravagance is discouraged, but no at- 
tempt is made to stipulate the amount which should be allowed for 
incidental personal expenses. It is suggested, however, that for 
members of the lower classes in particular the weekly allowance 
for spending money at College be no greater than it is at home. 
Certain fees which do not apply to all students, such as the Diploma 
fee, have been omitted from the summary. 



135 



SUMMARY OF EXPENSES. 

(For students entering in September.) 



ITEM. 


COST. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


Total. 


Fixed Charges 


$18.00 
4.00 
5.00 


$16.00 
4.00 

• • • • 


$16.00 
4.00 

• • • • 


$50.00 


Laboratory Fee* 


12.00 


Damage Fee t 


5.00 


Uniform (Complete)^ 


27.00 
26.50 


20.00 


20.00 

• • • • • 


67.00 
26.50 






Board, Lodging and Laundry§ 


53.50 
75.00 


20.00 
60.00 


20.00 
55.00 


93.50 
190.00 


Total 


$128.50 


$80.00 


$75. eo 


$283.50 







♦Not charged to students in the Sub-Freshman Class, 
t Unexpended portion refunded at end of year, 

$As a rule students do not find it necessary- to purchase a complete new outfit 
each year. Prices subject to change from year to year. 
§ Average amount. 

Fixed Charges.— Tuition is free. There are, however, the fol- 
lowing fixed charges which must be paid by each student : 



ITEM. 



COST. 



Incidentals. — A part payment toward janitor service ; heating 
and lighting recitation and public rooms ; laboratories and 
library ; medical attention ; etc 

Physical Culture, Gymnasium and Athletics 

Book Rental t 

Total 



$30.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$50.00 



The charges are payable in advance as follows: $i8.oo on en- 
trance, $i6.oo at the beginning of the second term, and $i6.oo at 
the beginning of the third term. 

Laboratory Fee. — A charge is made against each student in the 
four year and two year Courses for outfit, material used, and ordi- 
nary wear and tear in the courses involving work in the laboratory, 
shop, or field. As this fee is small and generally covers only in 



136 



part the actual outlay, no portion of it will be returned. An extra 
charge will be made for excessive use of material or destruction of 

apparatus, etc. The total amount of this fee is $12.00 per year or 

$4.00 per term. 

This fee for each term must be paid in advance and no student 
will be allowed to take a course in the laboratory, shop, or field 
until it is paid. 

Damage or Caution Money. — A deposit of $5.00 is required of 
all students at time of entrance as a guarantee against damage to 
property. Unused damage money is returned to the student at 
the end of the year. 

Uniform. — Instruction in military tactics is prescribed in the 
"Land Grant" Act of 1862. Students are required to appear in 
uniform at all military formations. This uniform is made of the 
best quality of Charlottesville gray cloth. It is furnished, under 
a special contract, at a very low price. The cost of each article 
and the total cost is as follows : 



ITEM. 



♦COST. 



One 

Two 

Two 

One 

One 

One 

One 



(1) 

(2) 

(2) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 



gray fatigue blouse , 

pair gray fatigue trousers, 

gray shirts 

gray fatigue cap 

pair canvas leggins 

harness leather belt 

black four-in-hand tie 



$8.50 

11.00 

4.00 

1.50 

0.80 

0.50 

0.20 



Total 



$26.50 



♦Prices subject to change from year to year. 

If the uniform is given careful usage, it will not be necessary 
to purchase a complete new outfit each year. 

Measures for this uniform are taken as soon as the student ar- 
rives at the College and fit is guaranteed. 

A deposit of at least 25 per cent, for this uniform must be made 
with the Treasurer when the measure is taken, as no uniforms will 
be ordered until the money has been deposited for the same. The 
uniform must be paid for in full before it is delivered. No uniform 
is paid for until it is approved by the Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 



137 



Registration Fee. — This fee for all except graduate students, is 
included in the fixed charges. For graduate students this fee is 
$5.00, payable at the time of registering. 

Diploma. — A fee of $5.00 for the Diploma will be collected from 
each student to whom a Bachelor's degree is granted. A fee of 
$10.00 for the Diploma will be collected from each student to whom 
an advanced degree is granted. 

Certificate. — A fee of $3.00 will be collected for each Certifi- 
cate issued to students who have completed the two-year Course. 

Dormitory, Dining Hall and Laundry. Students who are 
assigned rooms in the College Dormitories and board in the College 
Dining Hall are charged as follows: 



ITEM. 



COST. 



Room and furniture rent $1.00 per week or for College year (36 

weeks) j $35.00t 

Board, $4.00 per week or for College year (36 weeks)* j 140.00 

Laundry, $0.50 per week or for College year (36 weeks) I 15.00 

, L 

Total $190.00 

t Average. 

♦If meals are served during any College recess an extra charge will be made 
for them. 

Payments on this account are to be made as follows : $75.00 on 
entrance, $60.00 at the beginning of the second term, and $5S.(X) at 
the beginning of the third term. 

Any student who has not paid for his room, board, and laundry 
within five (5) days after the date upon which payment is due will 
be required to give up his room in the dormitory and will be ex- 
cluded from the dining hall until payment is made. 

Additional Information. — A deposit of $10.00 is required of 
each student desiring to reserve a room in one of the College 
Dormitories. Room reservations will be made on and after June 
1st of each year until all the available rooms are taken. Unless 
special arrangements are made all reservations will be canceled on 
the opening day in September. The deposit of $10.00 which nor- 
mally will be credited to the account of the student, will be for- 
feited if he fails to report in September. No special room may 



1 1 



138 



be reserved, as all of them afford approximately the same comfort 
and convenience. An effort is made, however, to comply with 
the desire of the student making a reservation in so far as the 
conditions will permit. Other things being equal, old students are 
given the preference in the assignment of rooms. 

Students entering College after November ist or withdrawing 
prior to the close of the Scholastic Year will be required to pay 
for the time they are in attendance during the incomplete term as 
follows : 

The rate of fixed charges is $7.00 per month. 
The rate for room, board, and Laundry is $25.00 per 
month. 

All other charges are as previously indicated. 
Students withdrawing more than two weeks after en- 
trance will be charged for at least one month's attendance. 
Students withdrawing less than two weeks after en- 
trance will be charged at the rate of $2.00 per day. 
Students rooming outside may obtain board and laundry from 
the College at the same rates as those living in the College Dor- 
mitories. 

Day students may get lunch at noon at the lunch counter at 
nominal prices. 

Charges against students are continued until formal withdrawal 
has been made. 

No student will be promoted to another class, and no diploma 
will be conferred upon, nor any certificate issued to a student who 
is in arrears in his account with the College. 

A student's college expenses are payable in advance. Bills will 
be presented ten (10) days before the date upon which payment is 
due. If these bills are not settled within five (5) days after the 
date set for payment, they will be subject to draft. If this draft 
is not honored, the student's connection with the College will be 
terminated until all accounts are satisfied. 

In cases of illness, requiring a special nurse and medical atten- 
tion, the expenses must be borne by the student. 



139 

Students will be admitted free of cost to membership in College 
Athletic Association. 

All College property in the possession of the individual student, 
such as his room, furniture, books, apparatus and military equip- 
ment, will be charged against him, and the parent or guardian must 
assume responsibility for its return without abuse to the proper 
department at the end of each scholastic year, at which time the ac- 
count will be cancelled. If abused, the cost of replacing or repair- 
ing the abused articles must be paid by the parent or guardian. 

Damage to College property in public places in the building and 
on the grounds by the student will be charged to the whole student 
body, pro rata, unless the offender is known. In such cases, the 
whole expense of repairing or replacing the damaged property will 
be charged to the parent or guardian of the offending party. The 
matriculation of a student is evidence of the acceptance of this 
regulation. 

All students assigned to Dormitories are required to provide 
themselves with the following articles, to be brought from home 
or purchased on arrival: 

1 pair blankets (for single bed, 3 ft.x6 ft.). 

2 pairs sheets (for single bed). 
. 4 pillow cases. 

6 towels. 

8 table napkins. 

1 pillow. 

2 clothes bags. 
I broom. 

I dust pan. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

Medals. — ^The authorities of the Institution take this opportu- 
nity to express their appreciation of the courtesy of their friends in 
establishing the following, for competition : 

William Pinkney Whyte Medal, for excellence in Oratory, offered 
by Hon. Isaac Lobe Straus, of Baltimore, Md. 



I40 



James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal, to student of Prince 
George's county making the highest average in studies, offered by 
his sister, Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James, of Washington, D. C. 

A Silver Cup, to the Literary Society winning the inter-Society 
Debate, offered by Dr. H. J. Patterson, of College Park, Md, 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

Students' clubs for religious, social, literary and athletic pur- 
poses are encouraged as a means of creating class and college pride, 
and developing an esprit de corps among the students. Each class 
has its own organization, in which matters relating to the class are 
discussed and directed. Officers are elected and the unity of the 
class preserved. This has been found to be a decided aid to disci- 
pline and tends to raise the standard of student honor. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Much encouraging work has been done by this organization dur- 
ing the past year, and gratifying interest has been shown in the 
meetings. 

OFFICERS. 

President, G. M. Merrill. 
Vice-President, H. R. Shoemaker. 
Recorder, H. Remsburg. 
Treasurer, R. S. Dearstyne. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

These societies are invaluable adjuncts to college work. Through 
them a knowledge of parliamentary law is gained, as well as a readi- 
ness of expression and activity in thought, qualities particularly 
valuable to the American citizen. 

The literary society work is under the general supervision of the 
Professor of Public Speaking, who is always ready to advise with 
the members in matters of parliamentary law and train them in 
the delivery of their orations and debates. 



141 



POE SOCIETY. 



President, G. M. Merrill. 
Vice-President, J. A. Bromley. 
Secretary, W. D. Gray. 
Treasurer, F. D. Day. 
Critic, M. J. B. Ezekiel. 

NEW MERCER SOCIETY. 

President, D. J. Howard. 
Vice-President, H. R. Shoemaker. 
Secretary-Treasurer, M. D. Engle. 
Critic, L. H. Haslup. 

ENGINEERING SOCIETY. 

One of the newest and most beneficial additions to M. S. C. A. 
is the Engineering Society. Organized in September, 1912, it 
proved an immediate success, gratifying a long-felt and much- 
needed want on the part of the engineering students. The general 
object of the Society is the cultivation of a more active interest in 
engineering work, while its special aim is to give the student the 
opportunity to discuss the line of work in which he is interested and 
to become more accustomed to presenting his ideas. Inasmuch as 
the Society takes in all members of the Senior and Junior Classes 
in the Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Courses, a larger 
opportunity for acquiring technical knowledge outside of one's 
own course is offered. 

The Society meets twice a month. Papers are presented at 
alternate meetings by Engineers in practice and by the students 
themselves. 



OFFICERS. 



President, H. Smith. 
Vice-President, A. V. Williams. 
Secretary-Treasurer, M. A. Pyle. 



142 



THE LIEBIG CHEMICAL SOCIETY. 

The Liebig Chemical Society was organized to satisfy a much- 
felt need. The object of the Society is to have the various chemical 
problems of the day, discussed by men who have specialized in the 
different branches of Chemistry, or by the members themselves. 
This tends to develop a keener interest in Chemistry, and also to 
broaden the student along Chemical lines. 

Membership in this Society is open to all members of the Sopho- 
more, Junior and Senior Classes, who are specializing in Chemistry. 

OFFICERS. 

President, C. G. Donovan. 
Vice-President, L. J. Gilmour. 
Secretary, C. S. Elliot. 
Treasurer, S. S. Ternent. 

AGRICULTURAL CLUB. 

OFFICERS. 

President, W. D. Gray. 
Vice-President, C. H. Fuchs. 
Secretary, H. R. Shoemaker. 
Treasurer, W. H. Carroll. 

ROSSBOURG CLUB. 

The social man is a necessity — hence this organization is encour- 
aged and supported by the President and Faculty. The entertain- 
ments have been marked by a spirit which emphasizes the wisdom 
of its organization and justifies its encouragement. 

OFFICERS. 



President, A. V. Williams. 
Vice-President, C. H. Fuchs. 
Secretary, H. R. Shoemaker. 
Treasurer, W. D. Gray. 



143 



REVEILLE. 

The "Reveille" is the College annual, edited entirely by the 
Senior Class. Nineteen editions of the "Reveille" have appeared 
and each has been characterized by a gratifying improvement in 
the standard both of originality and expression. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Editor-in-Chief, L. R. Haslup. 

Associate Editors, H. R. Shoemaker, H. B. Derrick, W. F. Gilpin, 
D. J. Howard, R. D. Watson, A. H. Sellman, J. Donnet, C. H. Fuchs. 
Business Manager, S. W. Ruff. 
Assistant Business Manager, H. Smith. 
Treasurer, C. J. Donovan. 

MARYLAND STATE WEEKLY. 

The "Maryland State Weekly" is the College newspaper, and is 
published every week during the scholastic year. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Editor-in-Chief, H. R. Shoemaker. 

Local Editor, G. M. Merrill. 

Athletic Editor, W. Wilde. 

Assistant Local Editors, M. A. Pyle, E. B. McKinley. 

Sophomore Editor, T. V. Dowin. 

Cartoonist, A. S. Stager. 

Business ^Manager, G. F. Eppley. 

Assistant Business Managers, C. E. Johnson, W. H. Carroll. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

The Athletic Association is an organization composed of the 
student body, with membership open to the Alumni Association, 
the Faculty, and Board of Trustees. It is an incorporated body 
with a governing board of seven. The object of the Association 
is the promotion of athletics in general, the supervision of all ath- 
letic exercises and sports, and the development of athletic and Col- 



144 



I! 



I 



lege spirit. The management of the Association is vested in a 
board of seven, on which are: the Director of Athletics; two 
members of the Alimini Association (elected at the annual meeting 
of that body) ; two members of the Faculty, appointed by the 
President of the College, and two members of the student body, 
elected at an annual meeting of the Athletic Association. The offi- 
cers of the Association are students. Eligibility of students for 
membership on teams in intercollegiate competition is determined 
on a very strict basis in the By-Laws. 

OFFICERS. 

President, H. B. Derrick. 
Vice-President, L. D. Oberlin. 
Secretary, M. A. Pyle. 
Treasurer, W. F. Mornhinweg. 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL. 

The Athletic Council, in conjunction with the Student Athletic 
Association, manages all athletic affairs. It consists of seven mem- 
bers of the Faculty, appointed by the President, and five students, 
namely, the managers of the football, baseball, track and tennis 
teams, and the President of the Athletic Association. 



THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION OF MARYLAND COLLEGES. 

The Maryland State College of Agriculture is a member of this 
Association, which is composed of St. John's College, Washington 
College, Western Maryland College and Maryland State College of 
Agriculture. Contests are held annually at these colleges in rota- 
tion, and a marked improvement is to be observed as a result of its 
organization. 

BOARD OF PROCTORS. 

This Board consists of a limited number of Senior students who 
have charge of the students in dormitory and on the campus. They 
adjust all minor matters of discipline, grant temporary leaves of 
absence, inspect student quarters and are responsible for the general 
order and physical condition of the dormitories. 



145 



PROCTOR STAFF. 



Chief Proctor, H. Smith. 

Associate Proctors, W. D. Gray, H. B. Derrick, C. C. Tarbutton. 

STUDENTS' CONFERENCE COMMITTEE. 

This Committee is composed of a certain number of representa- 
tives from each class and a number of the members of the Faculty. 
The object of this Committee is to establish a definite relationship 
between the Faculty and the student body. 

COUNTY CLUBS. 

These Clubs are formed for the purpose of bringing together 
students from the same County to discuss the affairs of the County. 
From these Clubs the students acquire valuable knowledge con- 
cerning their home County. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

An Institution can largely be judged by the character of its 
Alumni. Their success in life is the Institution's pride. The work 
of the Alumni of a College is its greatest asset. M. S. C. A. is fortu- 
nate in liaving among its Alumni, men who have attained notable 
achievements in Agriculture, Engineering and Science. M. S. C. A, 
Alumni can be found holding prominent positions in all walks of 
life. 

While for many years the Alumni, through their Association, 
have taken an active interest in the growth and development of the 
Institution, it is pleasing to state that this interest has been greatly 
increased during the past two or three years and, since the recent 
great fire at the College, the Association has taken active steps to 
aid the Board of Trustees and Faculty in the rehabilitation of the 
College. 

One of the cherished hopes of the Association, that of having 
direct representation on the Board of Trustees, has been attained 
in the appointment of two members of the Alumni Association, by 



146 



i 



the Governor of the State, as Trustees of the College. The attain- 
ment of this end will naturally greatly increase the enthusiasm and 
interest of the members of the Association in co-operating more 
dosely than ever with the College authorities in increasing the 
scope and usefulness of the Institution. 

The Alumni Association continues to offer a medal to the debat- 
ing societies. 

The members have also greatly aided in the development of 
athletics and especially in conducting the joint athletic meets, which 
were held at the College during the last four years. 

The Alumni also co-operate in the publishing of the "Maryland 
State Weekly." 

The officers of the Alumni Association for the present year are: 
President, F. P. Veitch, '91; Vice-President, • R. L. Mitchell, '02; 
Secretary-Treasurer, W. M. Hillegeist, '12 ; Executive Committee, 
members at large, J. N. Mackall, '05 ; Wellstood White, '05 ; Alumni 
Athletic Board, Wellstood White, '05 ; William P. Cole, Jr., '10. 

Graduates and members of the Association are requested to keep 
the Secretary-Treasurer, W. M. Hillegeist, College Park, Md., in- 
formed of any change in address. Any information concerning the 
older graduates which will enable the officers to locate and com- 
municate with them will facilitate their, efforts and will tend to 
further the success of the Association. 



147 



DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 7th, 1916. 



Honorary. 

doctor of laws. 

his excellency, emerson c. harrington 
carl r. gray, baltimore county, md. 
robert grain, charles county, md. 

ORVILLE E. WELLER, BALTIMORE, MD. 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE. 
W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 
R. KEITH COMPTON, BALTIMORE, MD. 

In Course. 

mechanical engineer, 
harry dorsey watts, baltimore, md. 

bachelor of science, 
agricultural education. 

WILLIAM ALBURTIS BR0CK\\T:LL, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FREDERICK GRANT LODGE, MCCONNELLSBURG, PA. 

RALPH FRANK MCHENRY, FREDERICK COUNTY, MD. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

WHITNEY JENNINGS AITCHESON, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD. 

ROBERT STEINMETZ BAINS, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

STANLEY EVERETT DAY, BALTIMORE, MD. 

LEWIS WILSON ERDMAN, BALTIMORE, MD. 

BURTON ANDREWS FORD, BALTIMORE, MD. 

EDWARD GERHARDT KNATZ, JR., BALTIMORE COUNTY, MD. 

PAUL HOUSTON MORRIS, CHARLES COUNTY, MD. 

JOHN ALBERT REISINGER, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD. 

LEROY CHOWNING TOWLES, JR., PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 



148 



i 



HORTICULTURE. 

LESLIE EVERETTE BURLINGAME, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

KENNETH GRACE, TALBOT COUNTY, MD. 

KERCHEVAL EVANS SMITH, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



CHEMISTRY. 



?! 



LESLIE EDWARD BOPST, FREDERICK COUNTY, MD. 

JOHN DOMINICK BOWLING, JR., PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

JAMES BRADLEY, ALLEGANY COUNTY, MD. 

KENNETH THOMPSON KNODE, MARTINSBURG, W. VA. 

CHARLES EARL SANDO, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EDWIN ANDREW TAYLOR, WORCESTER COUNTY, MD. 

ROBERT WHITE, PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

WILLIAM MCLEAN, BALTIMORE, MD. 
LEONARD C. WILSON, NOTTINGHAM, PA. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

EDWARD RUSSELL HINDMAN, CECIL COUNTY, MD. 

FREDERICK JOSEPH MCKENNA, WOONSOCKET, R. I. 

FREDERICK JAMES STEINMETZ, BALTIMORE, MD. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

GEORGE BROOKE DORSEY GRAY, CALVERT COUNTY, MD. 

SAMUEL EARL GRIFFIN, HOWARD COUNTY, MD. 

JOHN CARMAN STERLING, SOMERSET COUNTY, MD. 



149 

CERTIFICATES IN TWO-YEAR COURSES ISSUED 

JUNE 7th, 1916. 

AGRICULTURE. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEALL, PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

JOSEPH PAUL BROWN, QUEEN ANNE COUNTY, MD. 

GEORGE CLEMENTS, KENT COUNTY, MD. 

HARRY ^YILSON MCDONALD, ALLEGANY COUNTY, MD. 

EGBERT ^^^LLIAMS THOMPSON, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

ALLEN STANFORD TRE\T:TT, RICHMOND, VA. 

HARRY BAUGHER WARD, BALTIMORE, MD. 

HORTICULTURE. 

ROBERT ADELBERT HUNGERFORD, CHARLES COUNTY, MD. 

EDWARD WILMARTH LAPHAM, CAROLINE COUNTY, MD. 

* JAMES EDWARD MILLS, PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

JOHN EARL TALIAFERRO, WARE NECK, VA. 

JOHN WILLIS VAN HORN, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Testimonials of Merit Awarded June 7th, 1916. 

For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interests of Maryland: 

W. F. ALLEN, WICOMICO COUNTY, MD. 

For his efforts in promoting Horticulture. 



HARVEY J. SPEICHER 



, GARRETT COUNTY, MD. 



HENRY M. SPEICHER 

For their efforts in promoting Animal Industry. 

ERNEST H. BRINKLEY, PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

For his efforts in promoting Agriculture. 



♦ Awarded February 28th, 1917 



I50 



I* 



Medals and Prizes Awarded June 7th, 1916. 

For excellence in the Agricultural Education Course; offered by 

the College: 

W. A. BROCKWELL, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Honorable Mention. 

R. MCHENRY, FREDERICK COUNTY, MD. 
F. G. LODGE, MCCONNELLSBURG, PA. 

For excellence in the Animal Husbandry Course; offered by the 

College : 

L. W. ERDMAN, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Honorable Mention. 

W. J. AITCHESON, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD. 

For excellence in the Horticultural Course ; offered by the College : 

K. E. SMITH, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

For excellence in the Chemical Course; offered by the College: 

ROBERT WHITE, PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

Hoiiorable Mention. 

K. T. KNODE, MARTINSBURG, W. VA. 
C. E. SANDO, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

■ 

For excellence in the Civil Engineering Course; offered by the 

College : 

L. C. WILSON, NOTTINGHAM, PA. 

For excellence in the Electrical Engineering Course; offered by 

the College: 

E. R. HINDMAN, CECIL COUNTY, MD. 

For excellence in the Mechanical Engineering Course; offered by 

the College : 

J. G. STERLING, SOMERSET COUNTY, MD. 
G. B. GRAY, CALVERT COUNTY, MD. 



151 

For excellence in the Two- Year Course in Agriculture; offered 

by the College: 

H. B. MCDONALD^ ALLEGANY COUNTY, MD. 

For excellence in the Two- Year Course in Horticulture; offered 

by the College : 

J. W. VAN HORN, CHICAGO, ILL. 

For excellence in Debate; offered by the Alumni Association: 

W\^\I^TER MEASDAY, JR., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

The Goddard Medal, for excellence in Scholarship and moral Char- 
acter; offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James: 

J. D. BOWLING, JR., PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MD. 

The William Pinkney Whyte Medal, for excellence in Oratory; 

offered by Isaac Lobe Straus, Esq.: 

R. F. MCHENRY, FREDERICK COUNTY, MD. 
WALTER MEASDAY, JR., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

^^President's Cup," for excellence in Debate; offered by Dr. H. J. 

Patterson : 

POE LITERARY SOCIETY. 



152 



» 



CADET BATTALION ORGANIZATION. 

BATTALION STAFF. 

G. M. Sturgis Major. 

H. Smith First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 

W. D. Gray Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

F. B. Rakemann Sergeant Major. 

BAND OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

H. Smith Adjutant, Commanding. 

L. Burritt First Lieutenant and Chief Musician. 

J. Donnett Second Lieutenant. 

B. Dubel Second Lieutenant. 

A. H. Sellman Second Lieutenant. 

P. V. Horn Drum Major. 

P. E. Clark Sergeant. 

R. S. Eyre Sergeant. 

J. H. Remsburg Sergeant. 

R. G. Stuntz Sergeant. 

J. I. Conover Corporal. 

COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

Company "A." Company "B." Company "C." 

CAPTAINS. 
J. A. Bromley. B. F. Senart. A. V. Williams. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 
I. Coggins. R. D. Watson. H. W. Fristoe. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 
H. B. Derrick. F. A. Korff. D. J. Howard. 

FIRST SERGEANTS. 
L. M. Childs. M. A. Thorne. C. H. Bacon. 

QUARTERMASTER SERGEANTS. 
S. S. Ternent. M. A. Pyle. M. D. Engle. 

COLOR SERGEANTS. 

F. M. Haig. E. B. McKinley. 

SERGEANTS. 

P. V. Horn. E. L. Wilde. B. Davison. 

G. F. Eppley. E. O. Simpson. C. S. Elliott. 
W. P. Williams. W. H. Carroll. W. V. Cutler. 

CORPORALS. 

F. S. Chichester. K. W. Babcock. B. L. Bumside. 
P. W. Chichester. G. S. Clark. J. H. Starr. 

G. W. Clendaniel. F. A. Dawson. R. W. Axt. 
J. Conyngton. I. W. Gutberlet. A. N. Pratt. 
E. W. Hand. J. M. Richmond. M. C. Brown. 
R. R. Lewis. E. M. Sawyer. H. L. Rocklin. 

BUGLERS. 

L. T. Prentice. A. S. Jones. F. F. Lambdin. 

W. B. Matthews. E. W. Higgins. F. Roberts. 



153 



ROSTER OF MATRICULATES. 



SESSION 1916-17. 



NAME. 



Alford, G. H., 
Allen, H. H., 
Anspon, B. W., 
Ballard, W. R., 
Drake, Harley B., 
Grace, E., 
Graham, J. J. T., 
Hayman, E. T., 
Jarrell, T. D., 
Linhardt, C. L. 

McCONNELL, J. E., 

Monroe, J. F., 
Morris, P. W., 
Pfinstag, V. R., 
Shaw, S. B., 
Snyder, W. P., 
White, Albert, 



POST OFFICE. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Hyattsville, 
Baltimore, 
College Park, 
College Park, 
Washington, 
Easton, 
Hyattsville, 
Annapolis, 
College Park, 
Baltimore, 
Anderson, 
Snow Hill, 
Faulkner, 
College Park, 
College Park, 
College Park, 
College Park, 



COUNTY. 



Prince George. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbid, 
Talbot. 

Prince George. 
Anne Arundel. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City, 
South Carolina, 
Worcester. 
Charles. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 



Bromley, J. A., 

BURRITT, L., 

Coggins, I., 
Dearstyne, R. S., 
Derrick, H. B., 
Donnet, J., 
Donovan, C. G., 
DUBEL, B., 
Fristoe, H. W., 
FucHS, C. H., 
Gemeny, W. a., 
Gn.PiN, W. F., 
Gray, W. D., 
Haslup, L. a., 
Howard, D. J., 

KiSHPAUGH, W. M., 
KORFF, F. A., 
Larsen, C. L., 
Nash, P, M., 
Oberlin, L. D., 
Ruff, S. W., 
Sellman, a. H., 
Senart, B. F., 
Shoemaker, H. R., 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Stockton, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Port Chester, 

Takoma Park, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

Baltimore, 

Port Chester, 

Bozman, 

Lanham, 

Prince Frederick, 

Annapolis Junction, 

Brooke ville, 

Harrisburg, 

Baltimore, 

Long Island, 

Washington, 

Silver Spring, 

Rosljm, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Ashton, 



Worcester. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia, 

New York, 

District of Columbia, 

Baltimore City, 

District of Columbia, 

Baltimore City, 

Baltimore City, 

New York, 

Talbot. 

Prince George. 

Calvert. 

Howard. 

Montgomery. 

Pennsylvania, 

Baltimore City, 

New York, 

District of Columbia. 

Montgomery. 

Baltimore. 

District of Columbia, 

District of Columbia. 

Montgomery. 



154 



NAME. 

Smith, H., 
Sturgis, G. M., 
Tarbutton, C. C, 
Thomsen, F. L., 
Watson, R. D., 
Williams, A. V., 

WiNANT, H. B., 



POST OFFICE. 

Arlington, 

Hyattsville, 

Crumpton, 

Hyattsville, 

Welcome, 

Nanticoke, 

Washington, 



COUNTY. 

Baltimore. 

Prince G^eorge. 

Queen Anne. 

Prince George. 

Charles. 

Wicomico. 

District of Columbia, 



Bacon, C. H., 
Boone, A. W., 
Brimer, F. C, 
Carroll, W. H., 
Childs, L. M., 
Clark, P. E., 

COPPAGE, H. S., 

Cutler, W. V., 
Davison, B., 
Day, F. D., 
Elliott, C. S., 
Engle, M. D., 
Eppley, G. F., 
Eyre, R. S., 

EZEKIEL, M. J. B., 
Fuhrmann, C. J., 

GiLMOUR, L. J., 

Grigg, W. K., 
Haig, F. M., 
Horn, P. V., 
Jones, J. P., 
Kann, R. S., 
London, 0., 
McKinley, E. B., 
Merrill, G. M., 
Posey, W. B., 
Pyle, M. A., 
Rakemann, F. B., 
Remsburg, J. H., 
Rich, M. N., 
Sando, W. J., 
Simpson, E. C, 
Stuntz, R. G., 
Ternent, S. S., 
Thorne, M. A., 
Wilde, E. L., 
Williams, W. P., 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Silver Spring, 

Philadelphia, 

Stockton, 

Baltimore, 

Highland, 

La Plata, 

Church Hill, 

Washington, 

Riverdale, 

Boyds, 

Westover, 

Forest Glen, 

Washington, 

Highland, 

Hyattsville, 

Brentwood, 

Ogdensburg, 

Port Chester, 

Riverdale, 

Mt. Airy, 

Davidsonville, 

Pittsburg, 

New York, 

Washington, 

Crisfield, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

Middletown, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Chance, 

Washing^n, 

Lonaconing, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Doncaster, 



Montgomery. 

Pennsylvania, 

Worcester. 

Baltimore City, 

Howard. 

Charles. 

Queen Anne. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Somerset. 

Montgomery. 

District of Columbia, 

Howard. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

New York, 

New York, 

Prince (Jeorge. 

Carroll. 

Anne Arundel. 

Pennsylvania, 

New York City. 

District of Columbia, 

Somerset. 

District of Columbia, 

Baltimore City, 

District of Columbia, 

Frederick. 

District of Columbia, 

District of Columbia, 

Somerset. 

District of Columbia* 

Allegany. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

Charles. 



155 



NAME. 



AlTCHESON, J. L., 

Amigo, J., 
AXT, R. W., 
Babcock, K. W., 
Berlin, H. S., 
Bletsch, C. F., 
Brooks, A. J., 
Brown, M. C, 

BUELL, A. C, 

Burnside, B. L., 
Chen, C. C, 
Chichester, F. S., 
Chichester, P. W., 
Chipman, J., 
Clark, G. S., 
Clark, J. B., 
Clendaniel, G. W., 
conover, g. i., 
Conyngton, J. 
Coster, H. 0., 
Crum, p. E., 
Dawson, F. A., 
*^iDowNiN, T. v., 
DuvALL, W. H., Jr., 
Gleason, R. W., 
gutberlet, i. w., 
Haig, R. v., 
Hand, E. W., 
Hardisty, W. R., 
Hicks, W. P., 
HiPPLE, B. G., 
Johnson, C. E., 
Lewis, R. R., 
McLean, D. L., Jr., 
Measday, W., Jr., 
Miller, E. V., 
MORNHINWEG, W. F., Jr., 
murrell, a. a., 
norris, g. w., 
Paine, C. E., 
Peck, V. S., 
Perkins, H. T., 
Posey, K. C, 
Pratt, A. N., 
Richmond, J. M., 

ROCKLIN, H. L., 

Rust, A. D., 
Sawyer, E. M., 
Sellman, R. L., 
Sewell, M. D., 
Shumate, J. 0., 
SlEGERT, L. L., Jr., 

Smith, C. R., 



POST OFFICE. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Burtonsville, 

Havana, 

Baltimore, 

Hagerstown, 

Baltimore, 

Riverdale, 

Port Chester, 

Sparrows Point, 

Washington, 

Hyattsville, 

Shanghai, 

Aquasco, 

Aquasco, 

Baltimore, 

Ellicott City, 

Ellicott City, 

Kennedyville, 

Port Chester, 

Berwyn, 

Coster, 

Harmony Grove, 

Washington, 

Williamsport, 

Croome, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

Riverdale, 

Berwyn, 

Seabrook, 

Govans, 

Marietta, 

Brooklyn, 

Frederick, 

Baltimore, 

Brooklyn, 

Hagerstown, 

Port Chester, 

Baltimore, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Springfield, 

La Plata, 

Hackensack, 

Baltimore, 

Baltimore, 

Lanham, 

Manila, 

Beltsville, 

Hyattsville, 

Washington, 

Galloways, 

Baltimore, 



COUNTY. 



Montgomery. 
Cuba, 

Baltimore City, 
Washington. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
New York, 
Baltimore. 

District of Columbia, 
Prince George. 
China, 

Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City, 
Howard. 
Howard. 
Kent. 

New York, 
Prince George. 
Calvert. 
Frederick. 

District of Columbia, 
Washington. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia, 
Baltimore City, 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City, 
Pennsylvania, 
New York, 
Frederick. 
Baltimore City. 
New York, 
Washington. 
New York, 
Baltimore City, 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia, 
District of Columbia, 
Prince George. 
Charles. 
New Jersey, 
Baltimore City, 
Baltimore City, 
Prince George. 
Philippine Islands, 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia, 
Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City, 



156 



m 



NAME. 

Smith, J. E., 
Speidel, F. C, 
Starr, J. H., 
Wallop, J. D., Jr., 



Abbott, C. W., 
Ady, E. B., 
Atkinson, W. F., 
Austin, J. A., 
Barton, J. H., 
Baurman, W., 
Benson, H. J., 
Berry, J. B., 
BissEL, T. L., 
BODLEY, H. W., 
Bradley, J. C, 
Brewer, B., 
Carroll, H. M., 
Carter, C. C, 
CoMPTON, R. K., Jr., 
Coney, W. B., Jr., 
Crone, S. D., 
Dawson, E. E., 
DiGGS, A. C, 
DiNGMAN, J. E., 

Drawbaugh, J. R., 
Dunning, E. C, 
Etienne, a. D., 
Etten, a., 
Ezekiel, W. N., 
Fellers, G. R., 
Fletcher, A. E., 
Ford, S. W., 
Gadd, a. S., 
Gonzales, J., 
Goodwin, L. M., 
Gray, J. A., 
Green, H. T., 
Hamill, F. J., 
Hartshorn, V. H., 
Hempstone, W. D., Jr., 
hockman, g. b., 
hodgins, g. b., 
Hook, Elizabeth G., 
Into, A. H., 
Jones, A. S., 
Keefauver, J. E., 
Keily, M. J., * 

KiRBY, W. W., 

Knode, J. S., 
Knode, R. T., 
Lambdin, F. F., 
Langrall, J. H., 
Lawson, E. W., 



POST OFFICE. 

Galloways, 
Washington, 
Westover, 
Princess Anne, 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Baltimore, 

Sharon, 

Washington, 

Blackshear, 

Centreville, 

Washington, 

Lanham, 

Rockville, 

Westover, 

Oak Hill, 

Somerville, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

Rock Island, 

Baltimore, 

Baltimore, 

Frederick, 

Trappe, 

Baltimore, 

Berwyn, 

Washington, 

Govans, 

Berwyn, 

Washington, 

Hyattsville, 

Brunswick, 

Erie, 

Upper Fairmount, 

Centreville, 

Bulacan, 

Brier Hill, 

Brownsville, 

New York City, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

Leesburg, 

Hagerstownp 

Union City, 

Baltimore, 

Bristol, 

Washington, 

Berwyn, 

Glens Falls, 

Washington, 

Martinsburg, 

Martinsburg, 

Annapolis, 

Baltimore, 

Crisfield, 



COUNTY. 

Anne Arundel. 
District of Columbia, 
Somerset. 
Somerset. 



Baltimore City. 
Harford. 

District of Columbia. 
Georgia. 
Queen Anne. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Montgomery. 
Somerset. 
Virginia. 
Massachusetts. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore City. 
Illinois. 

Baltimore City. 
Baltimore City, 
Frederick. 
Talbot. 

Baltimore City, 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Frederick. 
Pennsylvania. 
Somerset. 
Queen Anne. 
Philippine Islands. 
New York. 
Washington. 
New York. 
Baltimore City. 
District of Columbia. 
Virginia. 
Washington. 
Pennsylvania. 
Baltimore City. 
Rhode Island. 
District of Columbia, 
Prince George. 
New York. 
District of Columbia, 
West Virginia. 
West Virginia. 
Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City, 
Somerset. 



157 



NAME. 



POST OFFICE. 



McBrien, R. 0., 


Riverdale, 


McCall, H. F., 


Hyattsville, 


MacDonat<d, a., 


Washington, 


Matthews, W. B., 


La Plata, 


Michael, R. B., 


Hammond, 


Morgan, J. A., 


Lonaconing, 


MORNHINWEG, E. S., 


Port Chester, 


POOT.E, M. E., 


Mt. Airy, 


Reading, J. G., 


Rockville, 


RiGGS, M. T., 


Rockville, 


RUPPERT, E. C. E., 


Washington, 


Stager, A. F., 


Nutley, 


Steet-e, G. F., 


Duncannon, 


Sterling, W. F., 


Crisfield, 


Sturgis, H. L., 


Hyattsville, 


Tarbutton, E. a., 


Crumpton, 


Taylor, E. G., 


Wisharts, 


Ward, J. M., 


Jarrettsville, 


Wilson, J. M., 


Baltimore, 




SUB-FRESHMAN C 


Blumberg, M. D., 


New York City, 


Bowling, E. N., 


Upper Marlboro, 


Brundage, W. R., 


Port Chester, 


Cockey, T. B., Jr., 


Pikesville, 


Clagett, J. H., Jr., 


Roslyn, 


Davis, R. D., 


Washington, 


Frere, F. J., 


Tompkinsville, 


Grimm, W. H., 


Stanley, 


HiGGINS, E. W., 


Mardela Springs, 


HORRE, M. J., 


Elizabeth, 


Houston, T. T., 


Washington, 


Johnson, C. M., Jr., 


Baltimore, 


LooMis, F. D., 


Brentwood, 


Peddicord, H. R., 


Dickerson, 


Prentice, L. T., 


Washington, 


Reilly, W. J. R., 


Washington, 


Roberts, F., 


Hyattsville, 


Rockwell, H. P., 


Collington, 


Spangt-er, G. W., 


Chamete, 


Stephenson, P. R., 


St. Louis, 


Stonestreet, N. v., 


Rock Point, 


Wagner, J. C., 


Port Chester, 


SECOND YEAR AGRICI 


Becker, J. F., 


Washington, 


Bible, H. F., 


College Park, 


Frazee, W. L., 


Old Town, 


McCORMICK, J. M., 


Bel Air, 


Pywell, E. E., 


College Park, 


Stevens, J. W., 


Baltimore, 


Trail, 0., 


E as ton, 


Wasney, J. S., Jr., 


Washington, 


Waybright, E. J., 


Littlestown, 



COUNTY. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

Charles. 

West Virginia. 

Allegany. 

New York. 

Carroll. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

District of Columbia. 

New Jersey. 

Pennsylvania^ 

Somerset. 

Prince George. 

Queen Anne. 

Virginia. 

Harford. 

Baltimore City. 



New York. 

Prince George. 

New York. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

District of Columbia, 

Charles. 

Virginia. 

Wicomico. 

New Jersey. 

District of Columbia. 

Baltimore City. 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Kansas. 

Missouri. 

Charles. 

New York. 



Distinct of Columbia. 

Prince (xeorge. 

Allegany. 

Harford. 

Prince George. 

Baltimore City. 

Talbot. 

District of Columbia. 

Pennsylvania. 



^m 



iS8 



NAME. POST OFFICE. 

SECOND YEAR HORTICULTURAL. 



COUNTY. 



Barrett, A. J., 
Beall, O. L., 
Boyd, A. J., 
HOLLIDAY, K. B., 
SWARTZ, J. M., 



Rome, 

Beltsville, 

Washington, 

Norfolk, 

Baltimore, 



Italy, 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Virginia. 

Baltiinore City, 



FIRST YEAR AGRICULTURAL. 



BOYER, R., 
Bready, G. a., 
Cauffman, L. E., 
Crilly, J., Jr., 
Forrest, R., 

xiALL, F. B., 

Holland, J. C, 
Johnson, J. G., 
Kretschman, G. W., 
Malone, W. L., 
McCeney, R. S., 
McCeney, W. H., 

McCORKLE, A., 

Raybaud, E., Jr., 
Reiter, C. L., 
ScHULTE, H. H., Jr., 
Scribner, a. M., 
Stubbs, J. S., 
Vaux, Charlotte A., 
Weaver, H., 
WiLLisoN, H. v., 

WiLMER, H. R., 



Washington, 

Herndon, 

Merchantville, 

Washington, 

Rockville, 

Charleston, 

Derwood, 

Baltimore, 

Elmira, 

Washington, 

Silver Spring, 

Silver Spring, 

Charleston, 

Washington, 

Relay, 

Newark, 

Philadelphia, 

Charleston, 

Washington, 

Greensboro, 

Cumberland, 

Faulkner, 



District of Columbia, 

Virginia, 

New Jersey, 

District of Columbia, 

Montgomery. 

West Virginia, 

Montgomery. 

Baltimore City, 

New Yo7'k. 

District of Columbia, 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

West Virginia. 

District of Columbia, 

Baltimore. 

New Jersey. 

Peiinsylvania. 

West Virginia. 

District of Columbia, 

Caroline. 

Allegany. 

Charles. 



Arthur, R. W., 
Cole, K. C, 
Donovan, T. J., 
Nevin, D. B., 
Perrie, a. L., 
Sadtler, D. T., 
Walls, H. R., 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

Havre de Grace, 

Port Chester, 
Beverly Farms, 
Easton, 
College Park, 
Baltimore, 
Church Hill, 



Harford. 
New York, 
Massachusetts. 
Pennsylvania, 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City. 
Queen Anne. 



STUDENTS IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



Abell, Emerald, 
Baden, Ruth, 
Bast, William P., 
Beall, Grace E., 
Bennett, Ruth H., 
Blandford, Alma, 
Blundon, Marie, 
Booth, Maud L., 
Bounds, Myrtle, 



Beachville, 

Baden, 

Boonsboro, 

Silver Spring, 

Washington, 

Brandywine, 

Riverdale, 

Hancock, 

Laurel, 



St. Mary, 
Prince George. 
Washington. 
Montgomery. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Washington. 
Prince George. 



159 



NAME. 

BowDOiN, Audrey, 
Bowie, Jane Jl., 
Bran NOCK, Willie, 
Brashear, Corinne, 
Bromley, Grace M., 
Brookbank, Annie V., 
Brown, C. Howard, 
Burgess, Irma S., 
Burner, Florence H., 
Buxton, Grace M., 
Carr, Margaret J. S., 
Cator, Nadine, 
Chen, C. C., 
Chesley, Emilie, 
Chichester, Mary, 
Clark, Naomi E., 
Collins, Sue, 
CooKSEY, Amy L., 
Cooper, Mrs. Emma K., 
Creighton, Sue E., 
Croft, Mary, 
Croft, Myra C, 
Dail, Jessie, 
Dashiell, M. Mae, 
Day, Roger X., 
De Corse, Emma E., 
Dent, Louise, 
Dent, Myrtle, 
Dent, Nellie, 
Donaldson, Edna, 
Donaldson, Pearl, 
Dove, Edna F., 
Duff, Mrs. Corinne D., 
DuNNOCK, Lucille, 
Duval, Lydia Lee, 
DuvALL, Margaret, 
Elder, Helen, 
Etchison, M. Landella, 
Foxwell, Erva Ruth, 
France, R. D., 
Freeman, Mary J., 
Frere, Marie, 
Frizzell, Agnes, 
Frizzell, Laura, 
Gallahan, Julia, 
Gardner, Mrs. Genevieve, 
Garst, Catherine, 
Gonzales, Jose M., 
GoTT, Mariel v., 
Greenwell, Helen, 
Griffith, Julian, 
Griffith, Mary, 
Grove, Ethel Annie, 
GuLETTE, Mary, 



POST OFFICE. 

College Park, 

La Plata, 

Church Creek, 

Mt. Airy, 

Washington, 

Riceville, 

Bladensburg, 

Clinton, 

Baltimore, 

Gaithersburg, 

Baden, 

Taylors Island, 

College Park, 

Charlotte Hall, 

Aquasco, 

Washington, 

Germantown, 

Dentsville, 

Washington, 

East New Market, 

Cross Roads, 

Port Tobacco, 

Salem, 

Laurel, 

Tuscarora, 

Mechanicsville, 

Oakley, 

Valley Lee, 

Oakley, 

Smithsburg, 

Gamb rills, 

Forestville, 

Germantown, 

Woolford, 

Annapolis, 

Croom, 

College Park, 

Gaithersburg, 

Leonardtown, 

College Park, 

Du Bois, 

Tompkinsville, 

Gaithersburg, 

Gaithersburg, 

Brandjrwine, 

White Plains, 

Washington, 

College Park, 

Boyds, 

Hollywood, 

Gaithersburg, 

Friendship, 

Big Spring, 

Vienna, 



COUNTY. 

Prince George. 

Charles. 

Dorchester. 

Carroll. 

District of Columbia,. 

Charles. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Baltimore City, 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

St. Mary. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Montgomery. 

Charles. 

District of Colum,bi2i, 

Dorchester. 

Charles. 

Charles. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Frederick. 

St. Mary. 

St. Mary. 

St. Mary. 

St. Mary. 

Washington. 

Anne Arundel. 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

I*rince George. 

Montgomery. 

St. Mary. 

Prince George. 

Charles. 

Charles. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Charles. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Montsromery. 

St. Mary. 

Montgomery. 

Anne Arundel. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 



i6o 



j I 



NAME. 

GuYTHER, Claudia V., 
Haislip, Louise, 
Hall, Annie L., 
Hamilton, Louise, 
Hand, Ethel, 
Hardesty, Mattie v., 
Hardest Y, Nettie E., 
Hayden, Pauline, 
HiGGiNS, Daisy C, 
Hillegeist, W. M., 
Hollingsworth, Evaline, 
Holmes, Grace, 
Horseman, Delia, 
HuBSCHER, Theresa L., 
Huemmer, Mary, 
Hughes, Mrs. Helen C, 
HuTZELL, Josephine, 
Hunter, Helen, 
IsENBERG, Maude R., 
Jacobs, Iva M., 
Jameson, M. Louise, 
Jarboe, Maude E., 
Jarboe, Maude M., 
Johnson, C. M., Jr., 
Johnson, Evelin, 
Johnson, J. G., 
Jones, Edythe M., 
Jones, Isabel B., 
Jones, John Paul, 
Justice, Dorothy M., 
Justice, Norrene, 
King, Elizabeth, 
King, Mabel, 
King, Maye, 
KiRWAN, Sophie, 
Livingston, C. C., 
Lennan, B. S., 
Lewis, Lillian, 
Long, Sara, 
Love, Anna May, 
Luhn, Harriet E., 
Lyons, Grace, 
Lyons, Mary, 
McAllister, Georgia, 
McAllister, Maude, 
McAtee, Evelyn W., 
McBrien, R. 0., 
McBrien, Ruth, 
McGarry, Winifred, 
McLucas, Charles E., 
Marshall, Edna M., 
Matacotta, Mary, 
Matthaei, Dorothea, 
Mattingly, Lelia, 
Meade, Elsie, 



POST OFFICE. 

Piney Point, 

Nanjemoy, 

Glendale, 

Mitchelville, 

Berwyn, 

Chaneyville, 

Seabrook, 

Hollywood, 

Gaithersburg, 

College Park, 

Smithsburg, 

Takoma Park, 

Aireys, 

Berwyn, 

East New Market, 

Hughesville, 

Boonsboro, 

Annapolis, 

East New Market, 

Odenton, 

Popes Creek, 

Leonardtown, 

Mechanicsville, 

Baltimore, 

Cambridge, 

Baltimore, 

Davidsonville, 

Brighton, 

Davidsonville, 

College Park, 

College Park, 

Davidsonville, 

Burdette, 

Germantown, 

Lloyds, 

Manchester, 

Washington, 

Berwyn, 

Carmichaels, 

Morganza, 

Washington, 

Tippetts, 

Tippetts, 

Vienna, 

Vienna, 

Germantown, 

Riverdale, 

Riverdale, 

Washington, 

Big Pool, 

Easton, 

Baltimore, 

Cumberland, 

Leonardtown, 

Arnolds, 



COUNTY. 

St. Mary. 

Charles. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Calvert. 

Prince (Jeorge. 

St. Mary. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

District of Columbia. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Anne Arundel. 

Dorchester. 

Anne Arundel. 

Charles. 

St. Mary. 

St. Mary. 

Baltimore City. 

Dorchester. 

Baltimore City, 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Anne Arundel. 

Prince George. 

Prince Georere. 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Carroll. 

District of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Pennsylvania. 

St. Mary. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Washington. 

Talbot. 

Baltimore City. 

Allegany. 

St. Mary. 

Anne Arundel. 



i6i 



NAME. 

MiLBURN, Rosa I., 
Mills, Sadie E., 
Montgomery, Susie G., 
MuDD, Phyllis, 
MuNSON, L. Marie, 
Murphy, Della, 
Murray, Effie L., 
Murray, Mary M., 
Neild, Evelyn W., 
NoRRis, George W., 
Owens, Florence E., 
Owen, Jennie A., 
Paine, C. E., 
Patterson, W. C, 
Pendleton, Agnes L., 
Perkins, Sue, 
Powell, Mildred M., 
PiCKRON, Maude, 
Plowden, Nell M., 
Prout, Lina, 
PuMPHREY, Esther, 
Pyles, Ruth B., 
Rawlings, B. Paul, 
Raybaud, Eduardo, Jr., 
Richmond, Gladys, 
RiTz, Louise, 
RiTz, Mildred, 
Rogers, Mary, 
Rome, Hyman P., 
Sasscer, T. Evalina, 
ScAGGS, Edna K., 
ScALA, Norman, 
Sellers, Margaret, 
Shea, Katherine, 
Shea, Mabel, 
Short, Myrtle R., 
Showell, Margaret, 
Shreve, Effie H., 
Sibley, Irene, 
Slacum, Zenla, 
Sloan, Marguerite, 
Smith, Bernadette H., 
Smith, H. L., 
Smith, Ruth, 
Spedden, Nellia a., 
Spence, Charlotte C, 
Stabler, S. S., 
Stapleforte, Mary L., 
Stevenson, Philip R., 
Steynen, Dora B., 
Stoner, Eva, 
TiGHE, Eva, 
TowNSEND, Grace, 
Travers, R. Elizabeth, 
Tubman, Ethel, 



POST OFFICE. 

Maddox, 

Vienna, 

La Plata, 

Malcolm, 

Hancock, 

Vienna, 

Brandywine, 

Smithsburg, 

Woolford, 

Baltimore, 

Pindell, 

La Plata, 

Washington, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Springfield, 

Brookeville, 

Hurlock, 

Bushwood, 

Friendship, 

Germantown, 

Clinton, 

Hyattsville, 

Washington, 

Hyattsville, 

Hancock, 

Hancock, 

Hyattsville, 

Bladensburg, 

North Keys, 

B ranch ville, 
Washington, 

Vienna, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Vienna, 

Berlin, 

Dicker son, 

Germantown, 

Taylors Island, 

Lanham, 

Hancock, 

Riverdale, 

Smithsburg, 

James, 

College Park, 

Frederick, 

Madison, 

Hollands Island, 

Laurel, 

Smithsburg, 

Laurel, 

Brookeville, 

Taylors Island, 

Golden Hill, 



COUNTY. 

St. Mary. 

Dorchester. 

Charles. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Baltimore City. 

Anne Arundel. 

Charles. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

St. Mary. 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

Dorchester. 

District of Columhia. 

District of Columbia. 

Dorchester. 

Worcester. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Frederick. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 

Prince Greorge. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 



i6o 



NAME. 

GuYTHER, Claudia V., 
Haislip, Louise, 
Hall, Annie L., 
Hamilton, Louise, 
Hand, Ethel, 
Hardesty, Mattie v., 
Hardest Y, Nettie E., 
Hayden, Pauline, 
HiGGiNS, Daisy C, 
Hillegeist, W. M., 
Hollingsworth, Evaline, 
Holmes, Grace, 
Horseman, Delia, 
Hubscher, Theresa L., 
Huemmer, Mary, 
Hughes, Mrs. Helen C, 
Hutzell, Josephine, 
Hunter, Helen, 
ISENBERG, Maude R., 
Jacobs, Iva M., 
Jameson, M. Louise, 
Jarboe, Maude E., 
Jarboe, Maude M., 
Johnson, C. M., Jr., 
Johnson, Evelin, 
Johnson, J. G., 
Jones, Edythe M., 
Jones, Isabel B., 
Jones, John Paul, 
Justice, Dorothy M., 
Justice, Norrene, 
King, Elizabeth, 
King, Mabel, 
King, Maye, 
KiRWAN, Sophie, 
Livingston, C. C., 
Lennan, B. S., 
Lewis, Lillian, 
Long, Sara, 
Love, Anna May, 
LuHN, Harriet E., 
Lyons, Grace, 
Lyons, Mary, 
McAllister, Georgia, 
McAllister, Maude, 
McAtee, Evelyn W., 
McBrien, R. 0., 
McBrien, Ruth, 
McGarry, Winifred, 
McLucas, Charles E., 
Marshall, Edna M., 
Matacotta, Mary, 
Matthaei, Dorothea, 
Mattingly, Lelia, 
Meade, Elsie, 



POST OFFICE. 

Piney Point, 

Nanjemoy, 

Glendale, 

Mitchelville, 

Berwyn, 

Chaneyville, 

Seabrook, 

Hollywood, 

Gaithersburg, 

College Park, 

Smithsburg, 

Takoma Park, 

Aireys, 

Berwyn, 

East New Market, 

Hughesville, 

Boonsboro, 

Annapolis, 

East New Market, 

Odenton, 

Popes Creek, 

Leonardtown, 

Mechanicsville, 

Baltimore, 

Cambridge, 

Baltimore, 

Davidsonville, 

Brighton, 

Davidsonville, 

College Park, 

College Park, 

Davidsonville, 

Burdette, 

Germantown, 

Lloyds, 

Manchester, 

Washington, 

Berwyn, 

Carmichaels, 

Morganza, 

Washington, 

Tippetts, 

Tippetts, 

Vienna, 

Vienna, 

Germantown, 

Riverdale, 

Riverdale, 

Washington, 

Big Pool, 

Easton, 

Baltimore, 

Cumberland, 

Leonardtown, 

Arnolds, 



COUNTY. 

St. Mary. 

Charles. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Calvert. 

Prince George. 

St. Mary. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

District of Columbia. 

Dorchester. 

Prince (George. 

Dorchester. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Anne Arundel. 

Dorchester. 

Anne Arundel. 

Charles. 

St. Mary. 

St. Mary. 

Baltimore City. 

Dorchester. 

Baltimore City. 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Anne Arundel. 

Prince George. 

Prince Georgre. 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Carroll. 

IHsirict of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Pennsylvania. 

St. Mary. 

District of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Colum^bia. 

Washington. 

Talbot. " 

Baltimore City. 

Allegany. 

St. Mary. 

Anne Arundel. 



i6i 



NAME. 

MiLBURN, Rosa I., 
Mills, Sadie E., 
Montgomery, Susie G., 
MuDD, Phyllis, 
MuNSON, L. Marie, 
Murphy, Della, 
Murray, Effie L., 
Murray, Mary M., 
Neild, Evelyn W., 
NoRRis, George W., 
Owens, Florence E., 
Owen, Jennie A., 
Paine, C. E., 
Patterson, W. C, 
Pendleton, Agnes L., 
Perkins, Sue, 
Powell, Mildred M., 
PiCKRON, Maude, 
Plowden, Nell M., 
Prout, Lina, 
Pumphrey, Esther, 
Pyles, Ruth B., 
Rawlings, B. Paul, 
Raybaud, Eduardo, Jr., 
Richmond, Gladys, 
RiTZ, Louise, 
RiTZ, Mildred, 
Rogers, Mary, 
Rome, Hyman P., 
Sasscer, T. Evalina, 
Scaggs, Edna K., 
ScALA, Norman, 
Sellers, Margaret, 
Shea, Katherine, 
Shea, Mabel, 
Short, Myrtle R., 
S HOWELL, Margaret, 
Shreve, Effie H., 
Sibley, Irene, 
Slacum, Zenia, 
Sloan, Marguerite, 
Smith, Bernadette H., 
Smith, H. L., 
Smith, Ruth, 
Spedden, Nellia a., 
Spence, Charlotte C., 
Stabler, S. S., 
Stapleforte, Mary L., 
Stevenson, Philip R., 
Steynen, Dora B., 
Stoner, Eva, 
TiGHE, Eva, 
Town send, Grace, 
Travers, R. Elizabeth, 
Tubman, Ethel, 



POST OFFICE. 

Maddox, 

Vienna, 

La Plata, 

Malcolm, 

Hancock, 

Vienna, 

Brandywine, 

Smithsburg, 

Woolford, 

Baltimore, 

Pindell, 

La Plata, 

Washington, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Springfield, 

Brookeville, 

Hurlock, 

Bushwood, 

Friendship, 

Germantown, 

Clinton, 

Hyattsville, 

Washington, 

Hyattsville, 

Hancock, 

Hancock, 

Hyattsville, 

Bladensburg, 

North Keys, 

Branchville, 

Washington, 

Vienna, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Vienna, 

Berlin, 

Dickerson, 

Germantown, 

Taylors Island, 

Lanham, 

Hancock, 

Riverdale, 

Smithsburg, 

James, 

College Park, 

Frederick, 

Madison, 

Hollands Island, 

Laurel, 

Smithsburg, 

Laurel, 

Brookeville, 

Taylors Island, 

Golden Hill, 



COUNTY. 

St. Mary. 

Dorchester. 

Charles. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Baltimore City, 

Anne Arundel. 

Charles. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

St. Mary. 

Anne Arundel. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia, 

Dorchester. 

District of ColuTnbia, 

District of Columbia, 

Dorchester. 

Worcester. 

Montgomery. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Frederick. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Prince George. 

Montgomery. 

Dorchester. 

Dorchester. 



l62 



NAME. 

Tubman, Marie, 
Vann, Mrs. Annie S., 
Veitch, Caroline, 
Veitch, Isabel, 
Vincent, Florence E., 
Ward, Wilson S., 
Washington, Eleanor, 
Waters, Virginia, 
Wathen, Louise, 
Watson, Dorothy, 
Wheatley, Nellie, 
Wheeler, Maud, 
WiLLEY, Hazel, 
Wilson, Margaret, 
Zimmerman, Gladys, 



hi 



Adams, Herbert, 
Andrew, D. W., 
Arnold, Claude E., 
Arnold, Mrs. Claude E., 
Bay, John W., 
Beall, Mrs. S. W., 
Bird, Rhoda Irene, 
BowDOiN, Audrey H., 
Bowdoin, Lina M., 
Brelsford, Mrs. J. C, 
Brinkley, Ruth W., 
Broughton, Mrs. L. B., 
Byrn, Mrs. S. L., 
Castella, Mrs. C. E., 
Castella, Mrs. Wm., 
Chadwick, Mrs. W., 
Claflin, Mrs. Eloise P., 
ClarKj Bella L., 
Cresmer, J. E., 
Cresmer, Mrs. J. E., 
CoALE, Dennis S., 
CoALE, Mrs. S. P., 
CoALE, W. Chase, 
CoLTON, Mrs. T. H., 
Conrad, M. I., 
Crisp, Dorothy E., 
Day, Grace, L., 
Demaree, Mrs. L. C, 
Devilbiss, George, 
Dixon, W. T., 
Dixon, Mrs. William T., 

DURNBAUGH, MrS. W. K., 

Edwards, Mrs. Chas. S., 
Evans, Mrs. M. W., 
Ezekiel, Jacob L., 
Farley, Hanson, 
Fealy, M. S., 



POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. I 


Golden Hill, 


Dorchester. 


Alabama City, 


Alabama. \ 


College Park, 


Prince George. \ 


College Park, 


Prince George. • 


Airey, 


Dorchester. 


Rockville, 


Montgomery. 


Brookland, 


District of Columbia, 


Gaithersburg, 


Montgomery. 


Leonardtown, 


St. Mary. 


Malcolm, 


Charles. 


East New Market, 


Dorchester. 


Hurry, 


St. Mary. 


Vienna, 


Dorchester. 


Baden, 


Prince George. 


Big Pool. 


Washington. 1 


IN SHORT WINTER 


COURSES. 1 


Brighton, 


Montgomery. ' 1 


Baltimore, 


Baltimore City. 


Annapolis Junction, 


Anne Arundel. 


Annapolis Junction, 


Anne Arundel. 


Whiteford, 


Harford. 


Beltsville, 


Prince George. 


Harrisburg, 


Pennsylvania. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


Berwyn, 


Prince George. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


Cambridge, 


Dorchester. 


Riverdale, 


Prince George. 


Riverdale, 


Prince George. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


Hyattsville, 


Prince George. 


Hyattsville, 


Prince George. 


Aberdeen, 


Harford. 


Takoma Park, 


District of Columbia. 


Aberdeen, 


Harford. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


Baltimore, 


Baltimore City. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


Rocks, 


Harford. 


Glendale, 


Prince George. 


New Windsor, 


Carroll. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


College Park, 


Prince George. 


North Ridgeville, 


Ohio. 


Hyattsville, 


Prince George. 


Princess Anne, 


Somerset. 


Washington, 


District of Columbia. 



i63 



NAME. 

Friese, E., 
Galblum, Samuel, 
Galbreath, Elizabeth S., 
Galbreath, Rose E., 
Gass, S. J., 
Gillis, Myrtle, 
Grabill, L. R., 
Green, S. A., 
Groh, Edison, 
Hardell, Lelia, 
Heaney, Geo. A., Jr., 
Heintzeman, C. H., Sr., 
Heintzeman, C. H., Jr., 
holloway, j. q. a., 
Holmes, Mrs. F. S., 
Hook, W. H., 
Hubbard, Mrs. E. S., 
James, W. B., 
Janney, C. Homer, 
Jarrell, Mrs. T. D., 
Jones, C. W. 
Jones, George M., 
Jones, L. E., 
Just, Richard P., 
Justice, Norene, 
Keefauver, Mrs. J. Fred, 
Kemp, Mrs. W. B., 
KiSHPAUGH, Mrs. Wm. M., 
Knowlton, Mrs F. H., 
Knowlton, Nellie, 
KocHER, Mrs. F. T., 
Krug, Harry, 
Labores, Dr. Gregory, 
Latimer, W. J., 
Lepson, Mrs. F. P., 
Lewis, Marion M., 
Leyman, Paul M., 
longenecker, x., 
Lynham, W. B., 
McBath, Mrs. E. B., 
MacGregor, W. B., 
Mackall, J. N. 
Magruder, 0. B., 
Mallery, Ruth, 
Meany, C. Francis, 
Milstead, Edwin H., 
MiLSTEAD, Mrs. E. H., 
Montgomery, Wm. W. E., 
Moore, A. M., 
Moore, George, 
Moore, Laurence, 
Moore, Lida, 
Moore, L. M., 
Moore, Neita C, 



POST OFFICE. 

Catonsville, 

Washington, 

Street, 

Delta, 

Washington, 

Rockville, 

Washington, 

Towson, 

Hagerstown, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

Baltimore, 

Baltimore, 

College Park, 

Towson, 

Beltsville, 

Hancock, 

Lutherville, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Oxon Hill, 

Muirkirk, 

Baltimore, 

College Park, 

Berwyn, 

College Park, 

College Park, 

Laurel, 

Laurel, 

College Park, 

Lineboro, 

Baltimore, 

Anacostia, 

College Park, 

Manassas, 

Berwyn, 

Ridgely, 

Berwyn, 

Riverdale, 

Hyattsville, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

College Park, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Congress Heights, 

White Marsh, 

Fullerton, 

Washington, 

Congress Heights, 

Congress Heights, 



COUNTY. 

Baltimore. 
District of Columbia. 
Harford. 
Pennsylvania, 
District of Columbia. 
Montgomery. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore. 
Washington. 
District of Columhia. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore City. 
Baltimore City. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore. 
Prince George. 
Washington. 
Baltimore. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Carroll. 

Baltimore City. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Virginia. 
Prince George. 
Caroline. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 

District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 



164 



NAME. 

Morgan, L. A., 
Morris, Mrs. Louis, 
Morrison, P. A., 
Morse, Mrs. W. J., 
Nicholson, Ellen, 
Page, J. M., 
Patterson, Mrs. H. J., 
Paul, B. S., 
Paul, Mrs. H. K., 
Pickett, Naomi, 
Putnam, Chas. M., 
Raley, John F., 
Repetti, E. Louise, 
Sargent, Virginia W., 
Sattler, G. W1LLLA.M, 
Schaefer, Mrs. J. H., 
Seaton, Ivy, 
Shannon, Eleanor, 
Sharp, Mrs. J. M., 
Sherwood, Ethel P., 
Sherwood, Mrs. H. G., 
Skinner, P. H., 
Slady, Frank S., 
Snader, Philip B., 
Snowden, Anna McF., 
Stein, Mrs. Wm., 
Stevens, W. W., 
Stokes, E. S., 
Stubbs, Edith H., 
SucRO, W. G., 
Swartzell, M. S., 
Taylor, Wm., 
Thomas, Grace D., 
Thompson, Dora E., 
Trax, G. p., 
Turner, C. E., 
Valaer, Peter, 
Vanderwalker, M. F., 
Viets, E. L., 
Wade, Mrs. Benj. F., 
Webb, A. S., 
Wells, G. N., 
Wheeler, H. Wilson, 
Williams, D. J., 
Wilson, Charles J., 
Wilson, S. Janie, 
Wishard, Fred, 



POST OFFICE. 

Piscataway, 

Riverdale, 

Baltimore, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Baltimore, 

College Park, 

Congress Heights, 

Congress Heights, 

Ft. Myer Heights, 

Washington, 

Beauvue, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Monkton, 

Riverdale, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Takoma Park, 

Riverdale, 

Riverdale, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

New Windsor, 

Ashton, 

Riverdale, 

Brookland, 

Washington, 

Pylesville, 

Towson, 

Washington, 

Hudgins, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Easton, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

Congress Heights, 

Akron, 

Laurel, 

Vienna, 

Brentwood, 

Street, 

Washington, 

Riverview, 

Pylesville, 

Hagerstown, 



COUNTY. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

Baltimore City. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Baltimore City, 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Colum,bia. 

Virginia. 

District of Columbia. 

St. Mary. 

District of Columbia^ 

District of Columbia. 

Baltimore. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Prince George. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Carroll. 

Montgomery. 

Prince George. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Harford. 

Baltimore. 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Talbot. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

District of Columbia. 

Ohio. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Prince George. 

Harford. 

District of Columbia. 

Anne Arundel. 

Harford. 

Washington. 



i65 



SUMMARY OF STUDNTS. 

Graduate 17 

Senior 31 

Junior 37 

Sophomore 57 

Freshman 68 

Sub-Freshman 22 

Second Year Agricultural 9 

Second Year Horticultural 5 

First Year Agricultural and Horticultural 22 

Unclassified 7 

Summer School 188 

Short Winter Courses 138 

601 

Counted twice : 10 

Total 591 



LIST OF PRESIDENTS AT THE MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 

OF AGRICULTURE. 



1. Prof. Benjamin Hallowell, President 

2. Rev. J. W. Scott 

3. Prof. Colby, 

4. Prof. Henry Onderdonk, 

5. Prof. N. B. Worthington, 

6. Prof. C. L. C. Minor, 

7. Admiral Franklin Buchanan, 

8. Prof. Samuel Regester, 

9. General Samuel Jones, 

10. Captain W. H. Parker, 

11. General Augustus Smith, 

12. Allen Dodge, Esq., Pro Tem., 

13. Major Henry E. Alvord, 

14. R. W. Silvester, LL. D., 

15. Thos. H. Spence, M. A., Acting, 
*16. H. J. Patterson, Sc. D., 
tl7. A. F. Woods, M. A., D. Agr., 



Presider 


it of the Faculty. 


. 1859 1860 


« 


« 


ii 


. 1860 1860 


a 


€€ 


u 


.1860 1861 


u 


U 


u 


.1861 1864 


u 


u 


it 


.1864 1867 


President of the 


College. 


.1867 1868 


M 


u 


« 


.1868—1869 


U 


« 


u 


.1869 1873 


U 


« 


u 


.1873 1875 


u 


« 


u 


.1875 1883 


u 


« 


ii 


. 1883 1887 


M 


c< 


« 


.1887 1888 


« 


« 


ii 


.1888—1892 


u 


« 


i< 


.1892 1912 


ng, " 


u 


u 


.1912 1913 


U 


u 


it 


.1913 1917 


u 


« 


M 


.1917 



♦Retires July 1, 1917. 

t Assumes office July 1, 1917. 



h, 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Acknowledgments 139 

Agricultural Club 142 

Agricultural Education Course. 94 
Agricultural Education, De- 
partment of 16 

Agriculture, Two- Year Course. 100 

Agronomy Course 96 

Agronomy, Department of 18 

Alumni 145 

Animal Husbandry Course 97 

Animal Husbandry, Depart- 
ment of 23 

Articles to be Provided 139 

Athletic Council 144 

Athletics 88, 143 

Bacteriology, Department of . . . 36 

Band 85,152 

Biological Course 103 

Board of Proctors 144 

Board of Trustees 2 

Botanical Department 28 

Buildings 12 

Calendar 9 

Canning Course 106 

Certificates Granted 149 

Chemical Course 104 

Chemical Department 31 

Chemical Society 142 

Civil Engineering Course 109 

Civil Engineering Department. 37 

Committees 8 

County Agents 6 

County Clubs 145 

Courses of Study 93 

Degrees 127 

Degrees Granted 147 



Page. 

Departments 16 

Drawing 37, 78 

Damage Fee 136 

Economics, Department of 40 

Electrical Engineering Course. Ill 
Electrical Engineering Depart- 
ment 42 

Engineering 37, 42, 75 

Engineering Education Course. 115 

Engineering Society 141 

English, Department of 53 

Entomological Department .... 57 

Examinations 126 

Expenses of Students 134 

Extension Service 6 

Faculty 3 

Farmers' Institutes 5,7 

Forestry 71 

French 73 

General Aim and Purpose 14 

General Science Course 107 

General Information 118 

Geology 33 

German 73 

Graduation 127 

Historical Sketch 10 

History, Department of 40 

Horticulture 61 

Horticulture, Four- Year Course 98 

Laboratory Fees 135 

Languages, Department of 71 

Latin 72 

Lecturers 7 

Library 90 

Literary Societies 140 

Location and Description 11 



INDEX — Continued. 



Page. 

M. S. Weekly 143 

Mathematics, Department of . . 74 

Matriculation 113, 127 

Mechanical Engineering Course.112 
Mechanical Engineering De- 
partment 75 

Medals 139 

Medals Awarded 150 

Military Department 84 

Officers and Faculty 3 

Oratorical Association 144 

Organization, Military 152 

Organizations, Student 140 

Pathology, Vegetable 28 

Payments 135, 136, 137, 138 

Physical Culture 88 

Physics, Department of 42 

Physiology 89 

Pledges 132,133 

Political Science, Department of 40 

Pomology 62 

Presidents of College 165 

Promotions 126 

Public Speaking, Department of 53 



Page. 

Regulations 132 

Religious Opportunities 132 

Reports 126 

Requirements for Admission. . .118 

Reveille 143 

Rossbourg Club 142 

Roster of Students 153 

Rules 133 

Rural Engineering Course 113 

Sanitary Advantages 12 

Scholarships 129 

State Work 5 

Student Organizations 140 

Students, Summary of 165 

Sub-Collegiate Course 117 

Sub-Collegiate Instruction 88 

Summer School 93 

Theses 127 

Uniform 87, 136 

Veterinary Science Department 89 

Winter Courses, Short 102, 117 

Y. M. C. A 91, 140 

Zoology 57