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OFHCIAL PUBLICATION 



OF THE 



Maryland StateJ^llege 



1918 



CATALOGUE 

TO SHORT OOUR.-^ ^.f '^'''' """^^ 
Pa^ito -T: "^'^**^^-^-'^ DESCRIBED o4 
PAGES 133 AND POLU)WI^^G 




' -^7 




1919 



ISSUED MONTHLY BY THE 
MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Entered as Second Class Matter at the Post Office 
at College Park, Md. 



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# 



THE MARYLAND 
STATE COLLEGE 
OF AGRICULTURE 



CATALOGUE 
1918—1919 



i 



Containing general information 
concerning the College, Announce- 
ments for the Scholastic Year 1918' 
1919, and Records of 19174918. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page. 

Battalion Organization 145 

Board of Trustees 4 

Calendar 3 

Degrees Conferred in 1917 142-143 

Division of Animal Industry 65-70 

Aninaal Husbandry 66, 67, 70 

Description of Subjects Offered 67 

Introduction 65 

Outline of Courses Offered 65 

Division of Engineering 71-104 

Apparatus in Laboratories 103 

Civil Engineering 74 

Description of Subjects Offered 80 

Electrical Engineering 77 

Facilities for Instruction 100 

Instruction 72 

Introduction 71 

Mechanical Engineering 76 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 103 

Outline of Courses Offered 73 

Rural Engineering 79 

Summer Work and Inspection 73 

Division of General Science 105-112 

Chemical Course 107 

Description of Subjects Offered 109 

General Science 108 

Introduction 105 

Outline of Courses Offered 106 

Suggested Electivcs, etc 109 

Division of Home Economics 126-128 

Announcement 126 

Description of Courses 127 

Foreword 126 

Home Economics Education 126, 127 

Division of Language and Literature 129-132 

P^fiription of Courses Offered 130 

Farm Projects 140 

Introduction 129 

Modern Language 129 

Outline of Courses 137, 139 

Short Course in Agriculture Practices 137 

Two- Year Agricultural Course 136 

Two- Year Course in Engineering 133 

Two-Year Mechanics Art 135 

Division of Plant Industry 37-64 

Agronomy 46 

Agronomy and Soils 39 

Botany 43 

Economic Botany 58 

Economic Zoology 44, 60 

Equipment and Facilities for Instruction 63 

Forestry 57 

Introduction 37 

Landscape Gardening and Floriculture 42 

Outline of Courses Offered 38 

Pomology 41, 53 

Suggested Electives for Students 45 

Vegetable Gardening 40, 50 



Page. 
Division of Vocational Education 113-125 

Agricultural Education 116 

Courses 114 

Description of Courses 120 

Farm Management and Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 118, 119 

FoUow-Up Courses 114 

Home Economics Education 117 

Introduction 113 

Supervised Teaching 124 

Trade and Industrial Education 117 

Experiment Station 9 

Extension Service 9 

Faculty 6-8 

Faculty Committees 13 

Farmers Institutes 11 

General Information 15-36 

Admission Requirements of the College 30 

Agricultural Experiment Station 16 

Alumni Association 24 

Athletics 25 

Board of^rogtees 19 

Buildings 21 

Christian Associations 22 

Divisions and Courses of Instruction 26 

Examinations and Reports 30 

Expenses 32 

Extension Service 17 

Graduate Study and Advance Degrees 28 

Graduation. Degrees and Certificates 27 

Health Service 21 

History 15 

Lectures 23 

Library 21 

Location and Description 20 

Military Instruction 24 

Registration 32 

Religious Influences 22 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 35 

Short Course in Engineering 27 

Short Courses in Agriculture 27 

Student Government 26 

Student Organizations 23 

Student Publications 23 

Sub<:ollegiat€ Work 30 

Support 19 

Unclassified Students 30 

Uniform 34 

Lectures 13 

Organization, Board of Trustees 5 

Roster of Matriculates 146 

Short Course in Agricultural Practice 137 

State Fertilizer Work 11 

State Horticultural Department 12 

Testimonials and Prizes 144 

Two- Year Courses in Engineering and Agriculture . 13S 



CALENDAR 



FIRST TERM. 

Monday, September 30, and Tuesday, October 1. — ^Registration and Organization. 

Wednesday, October 2, 1 P. M. — College Work Begins. 

Thursday, November 30. — Thanksgiving Recess. 

Friday, December 20, 12 M. — First Term Ends. 

Friday, December 20, 12 M., to Monday, January 6, 8 A. M.— Christmas Recess. 



SECOND TERM. 



Monday, January 6, 8 A. M. — Second Term Begins. 
Monday, January 6. — Special Winter Courses Begin. 
Saturday, March 15. — Second Term and Special Winter Courses End. 



THIRD TERM. 



Monday, March 17. — ^Third Term Begins. 

Friday, April 18. — Good Friday Recess. 

Thursday, May 15. — Submitting of Theses. 

Sunday, May 25. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Friday, May 30. — Founders' and Farmers' Day; Graduation Day. 



n 



1918 



JULY 



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7 
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21 
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8 
15 



2 

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29 30131 



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,\ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, Esq Term expires 1925. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

ROBERT GRAIN, Esq Term expires 1924. 

Charles County, Md. 

JOHN M. DENNIS, Esq Term expires 1923. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

DR. FRANK J. GOODNOW Term expires 1922. 

Baltimore City, Md. 

CARL R. GRAY, Esq Term expires 1921. 

Baltimore Coimty, Md. 

A. W. SISK, Esq Term expires 1920. 

Caroline County, Md. 

DR. W. W. SKINNER Term expires 1919. 

Montgomery County, Md. 

B. JOHN BLACK, Esq Term expires 1927. 

Baltimore County, Md. 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL, Esq Term expires 1926. 

Washington County, Md. 



?.■! 



ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFHCERS. 

Chairman SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER. 

Treasurer JOHN M. DENNIS. 

Secretary W. W. SKINNER. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, A. W. SISK, ROBERT GRAIN and 

JOHN M. DENNIS. 

COLLEGE AND EDUCATIONAL WORK. 
DR. FRANK J. GOODNOW, CARL R. GRAY and W. W. SKINNER. 

EXPERIMENT STATION AND INVESTIGATIONAL WORK. 
COL. A. W. SISK, ROBERT GRAIN and W. W. SKINNER. 

EXTENSION AND DEMONSTRATION WORK. 
ROBERT GRAIN, CARL R. GRAY and B. JOHN BLACK. 

INSPECTION AND CONTROL WORK. 
JOHN M. DENNIS. A. W. SISK and HENRY HOLZAPFEL, Jr. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION. 

PRESIDENT WOODS, DIRECTORS PATTERSON and SYMONS, DEANS SPENCE, 
McDonnell, T. H. TALIAFERRO. reed, ZIMMERMAN and COTTERMAN. 



FACULTY 



A. F. WOODS, M. A., D. Agr., 
President. 

THOMAS H. SPENCE, M. A.. 
Dean of Division of Language and Literature, Professor of Modem Language, Acting Registrar. 

H. B. McDonnell, m. s., m. d.. 

Dean of Division of General Science, Professor of Chemistry. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D., 
Dean of Division of Engineering, Professor of Civil Engineering and Mathematics. 

R. C. REED, Ph. B., D. V. M., 
Dean of Division of Animal Husbandry. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., 
Dean of Division of and Professor of Plant Industry. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, B. S., M. A., 
Dean of Division of Vocational Education, Professor of Agricultural Education. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A. B., Sc. D., 
Professor of Farm Management. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, M. A. 
Professor of English and Public Speaking. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M. S., 

Professor of Botany. 

HARRY GWINNER, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing, Superintendent of Shops. 

MYRON CREESE, B. S., E. E, 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

HERMAN BECKENSTRATER, M. S., 
Professor of Pomology. 

R. H. RUFFNER, B. S., 
Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., 
Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., 
Professor of Zoology and State Entomologist. 

F. W. BESLEY, B. A., M. F., Sc. D.. 
Lecturer on Forestry. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., 
Director of Athletics and Chief of Division of Publications. 



B. W. ANSPON, B. S. I. CH. and F.), 
Professor of Floriculture. 




E. F. STODDARD, B. S.. 
Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

JOHN PITCHER, Lt.-Col., U. S. A. (Retired). 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

W. A. GRIFFITH. M, D., 
Physician, Lecturer on Hygiene. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S.. 
Professor of Plant Pathology and State Pathologist. 

♦O. C. BRUCE, B. S., 
Professor of Soils. 

J. B. WENTZ, M. S., 
Professor of Agronomy. 

P. I. REED, Ph. D.. 

Professor of English Literature. 

J. A. GAMBLE, M. S.. 
Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 



A* R. WARD, B. S. A., D. V. M., 
Professor of Bacteriology, Pathologist of Biological Laboratory. 

L. A. EMERSON, B. S., 
Professor of Trade and Industrial Education* 

R. C. ROSE, Ph. D., 
Associate Professor of Botany. 

♦G. P. SPRINGER, B. S., 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

C. J. PIERSON, M. A.. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

P. R. BROOKENS, B. A., 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

J. M. SMITH, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

R. C. WILEY, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

E. R. HITCHNER, M. S., 
Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Chemistry. 






L. J. HODGINS, M. A., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

J. T. SPANN, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 



*0n leave of absence — ^War Work. 



.. .«• 



!l 



G. J. SCHULZ, B. A., 
Instructor in GovernmeDt. 

C. F. KRAMER, M. A., 

AssiBtant Professor of Modem Language. 

*W. W. SMELKER, B. S. Agr., 
Instructor in Farm Machinery. 

C. T. McCURDY. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



*4> 



Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

C. G. REMSBERG, M. S., 
Assistant in Analj^ical Chemistry. 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION. 

HOWARD LORENZO CRISP, M. M. E., 
Superintendent of General Service Department. 

(Miss) L. E. CONNER, A. B., 
Librarian. 

(Miss) M. F. McKENNEY, 
Accountant. 

J. E. PALMER. 
Executive Secretary. 

(Mrs.) M. T. MOORE, 
Matron in Domestic Department. 

(Miss) RUBY CRAWFORD, 
Matron in Hospital. 

C. L. STROHM, 
Band Master and Clerk to Military Department. 






*On leave of absence — ^War Work. 
♦♦To be supplied. 



a 



EXPERIMENT STATION 

H. J. PATTERSON, D. Sc.. Director and Chemiat. 

J. B. S. MORTON, M. S., Botanist. 

CHAS. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Plant PhysiologiBt. 

E. H. BRINKLEY, Farm Superintendent. 

THOS. H. WHITE, M. S., Vegetable and Floriculture. 

ROY H. WAITE, B. S., Poultryman. 

W. R. BALLARD. B. S., Pomology. 

C. P. SMITH, M. A., Seed Inspector. 

C. L. OPPERMAN, Superintendent Ridgely Farm. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., Entomologist. 

A. G. McCALL, Ph. D., Soils Investigation. 

R. L. HILL, Ph. D.. Biochemist. 

J. E. METZGER. B. S., Agronomist. 

PAUL EMERSON, Ph. D., Soil Bacteriologist. 

A. R. WARD, B. S., D. V. M., Animal Pathologist. 

PHILIP GARMAN, Ph. D., Assistant Entomologist. 

R. S. ALLEN, Assistant in Swine Husbandry. 

(Miss) L. E. CONNER, B. S., Librarian. 

R. C. TOWLES, B. S., Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

EARL S. JOHNSTON, Ph. D., Associate Plant Physiologist. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Associate Plant Pathologist. 

L. W. ERDMAN, B. S., Assistant in Soils Laboratory. 

W. J. AITCHESON, B. S., Assistant Agronomist, 

C. C. SHIVERS, D. V. M., Assistant in Biological Laboratory. 

A. C. KEEPER, Clerk. 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



THOMAS B. SYMONS, M. S. D. Agr., Director. 

F. B. BOMBERGER, B. S. A. M., Assistant Director and Specialist. 

G. E. WOLCOTT, B. S., Dairying. R. F. McHENRY, B. S., Boys' Clubs. 

S. B. SHAW, B. S., Horticulture. W. D. GRAY, B. S., Boys' Clubs. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., Insect Control. E. F. FOX, B. S., Boys' Clubs. 

S. S. BUCKLEY, D. V. S., Animal Husbandry. D. F. HOWARD, B. S., Boys' Clubs. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Plant Diseases. STANLEY DAY, B. S., Boys' Clubs. 

W. C. TRA VERS. Orchard Work. GEO. F. JORDAN, B. S., Publications and 

B. W. ANSPON, B. Sm Home Gardens. Correspondence Courses. 

VENIA M. KELLAR, B. S., Home Economics F. W. OLDENBURG, M. S., Agronomy. 

and Giris' Clubs. H. W. RICKEY, Poultry Husbandry. 

GERTRUDE ERICKSON, Girls' Clubs. W. M. HILLEGEIST, SpeciaUst. Labor. 

C. B. NICKELS, Apiculture. F. A. WIRT, B. S. in C. E., Farm Machinery. 

ANNA E. F. McCarthy, Chief Clerk. 



COUNTY AGENTS. 

Allegany JOHN McGILL, Jr., Cumberland. 

Anne Arundel H. C. WHITEFORD, B. S., Annapolis. 

Baltimore J. F. HUDSON, Towson. 

Calvert JOHN H. DRURY, Chaney. 

Caroline E. O. ANDERSON. B. S., Denton. 

Carroll GROVER KINZY, B. S., Westminster. 

Cecil HARRY J. KNODE, B. S., Elkton. 

Charles J. P. BURDETTE, A. B., La Plata. 

Dorchester C. E. LEATHERS, B. S., Cambridge. 

Frederick P. A. HAUVER, B. S., Frederick. 

Garrett A. G. MIDDLETON, B. S., Oakland. 

Harford T. E. McLAUGHLIN, B. S., Bel Air. 

Howard J. L. FIDLER, B. S. A., Ellicott City. 

Kent L. L. BURRELL, B. S., Chestertown. 

Montgomery F. J. VAN HOESEN, Rockville. 

Prince George's C. H. TAYLOR, B. S., Upper Marlboro. 

Queen Anne's. O. C. JONES, B. S. A., Centreville. 

Somerset C. Z. KELLER, B. S. H., Princess Anne. 

St. Mary's G. F. WATHEN, Jr.. Loveville. 

Talbot E. P. WALLS, B. S., Easton. 

Washington THOS. L. SMITH, B. S., Hagerstown. 

Wicomico GEORGE R. COBB., B. S., Salisbury. 

Worcester E. I. OSWALD, B. S. H., Snow Hill. 

Prince George's J. F. ARMSTRONG (col.). Seat Pleasant. 

Somerset J. W. B. TULL (col.). Princess Anne. 

Somerset L. H. MARTIN (col.). Princess Anne. 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS. 



Allegany (Mrs.) 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert (Miss) 

Caroline (Mrs.) 

Carroll (Miss) 

Cecil 

Charles (Miss) 

Dorchester (Miss) 

Frederick (Miss) 

Garrett (Miss) 

Harford (Miss) 

Howard (Mrs.) 

Kent (Miss) 

Montgomery (Miss) 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's (Miss) 

St. Mary's (Miss) 

Somerset 

Talbot (Mrs.) 

Washington (Miss) 

Wicomico (Miss) 

Worcester (Miss) 



LEONA H. POWELL, Cumberiand. 



RUBY F. CHAMBERLAIN, Prince Frederick. 
EDITH G. NORMAN, Denton. 
RACHEL EVERETT, Westminster. 

VIOLA POOLE, La Plata. 
HELEN G. WALKER, Cambridge. 
ESTHER R. NELSON, Frederick. 
FRANCES E. GERBER, B. S., Oakland. 
MARGARET SCHMIDT, B. S., Bel Air. 
NELL C. LAWSON. Ellicott City. 
ANNIE L. COPPER, Chestertown. 
HELEN ERICKSON, Rockville. 

LUCY E. ALLEN, B. S., Centreville. 
M. LILLIAN MATTINGLY, Bushwood. 

OLIVE K. WALLS. Easton. 
ALICE S. JONES, B. S., Hagerstown. 
GOLDIE S. COOK, Salisbury. 
LUCY J. WALTER, Snow HiU. 



URBAN WORKERS. 

Allegany County (Miss) ANNA P. WARREN, Cumberland. 

Baltimore City (Miss) GLADYS J. WARD, 518 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore City (Miss) ALICE C. WALTON, 518 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore City (Mrs.) FLORENCE B. BENNETT, 2305 Whittier Ave. 

Baltimore City (Mrs.) SARAH C. FERNANDIS (col.), 953 Druid Hil! Ave. 

Washington County (Miss) SUE W. FRICK, Hagerstown. 

COLORED WORKERS. 

Charles County (Miss) LEAH D. WOODSON, La Plata. 

Eastern Shore (Miss) EDNA E. THOMAS, Princess Anne. 

Montgomery County (Miss) MARIE E. MONTGOMERY, Bowie. 

Prince George's County. . . (Miss) EULA L. WATKINS, Upper Marlboro. 



FARMERS^ INSTITUTES 

Now co-ordinated with the Extension Service. 



STATE FERTILIZER WORK 

H. B. McDonnell, 

State Chemist. 

C. G. REMSBERG. 

Assistant Chemist. 

L. H. VAN WOMER, M. St.. 
Assistant Chemist. 

E. R. HITCHNER, M. S.. 

Assistant Chemist. 



Assistant Chemist. 

GRAYSON BAGGS, 
Clerk. 

J. S. WHTBY, 
Inspecor, 

CHARLES T. DAY. 
Inspector. 

J. S. SCARBOROUGH, 
Inspector. 



To be filled. 



< I 

M 



STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

THOMAS B. SYMONS, Director. 

E. N. CORY. 
State Entomologist. 

C. E. TEMPLE, 
State Pathologist. 

C. B. NICKELS. 
Assistant in Apiculture. 

WM. C. TRAVERS. 
Inspector. 



lii 



LECTURERS, 1917-1918 

Members of the College faculty. Experiment Station staff, and Extension Service staff 
lectured during the short winter courses on Domestic Science, Soils, Crops, Farm Live Stock and 
Dairying, Poultry, Horticulture, Farm Mechanics, and Good Roads, in addition to the following 
special lecturers: 

JOHN H. DRURY, Chaney, Md. 

PROF. C. P. CLOSE, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

DR. A. A. BRIGHAM. Brinklow, Md. 

A. R. LEE, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

HARRY LAMON, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

J. A. GAMBLE, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

C. T. RICE, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

C. E. KOONTZ, Virginia. 

DR. VALLIE HAWKINS, Farm Grove, Pa. 

MRS. H. J. PATTERSON, College Park, Md. 

MISS HANNAH WESLEYING, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

MISS GLADYS WARD, Baltimore, Md. 

MR. McLAIN, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

MISS BENN, New York. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1918-1919 

ALTJMNL 
MESSRS. RUFFNER. CORY, BYRD. BROUGHTON and SCHULZ. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 
MESSRS. CRISP. OLDENBURG, STODDARD, PATTERSON, PIERSON and SMITH. 

CATALOGUE, STUDENT ENROLLMENT AND COLLEGE ENTRANCE. 
MESSRS. ZIMMERMAN, SPENCE, COTTERMAN. CREESE, GWINNER and P. I. REED. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

MESSRS. COTTERMAN, R. C. REED, McDONNELL, SPENCE, ZIMMERMAN, T. H. 

TALIAFERRO and EMERSON. 

DORMITORIES AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 
MESSRS. BYRD. BROUGHTON, SCHULZ, BOMBERGER and CLASS PRESIDENTS. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

THE PRESIDENT and MESSRS. COTTERMAN, T. H. TALIAFERRO, PATTERSON, R. C. 

REED, MCDONNELL, APPLEMAN and ROSE. 

LIBRARY. 

MESSRS. W. T. L. TALIAFERRO. GWINNER, SPENCE, BROUGHTON. SCHULZ, MISS 
CONNER, NORTON, APPLEMAN, SYMONS and WENTZ. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

MESSRS. BYRD. BOMBERGER, RICHARDSON, W. D. GROFF. '00; H. C. WHITFORD, '01; 

and two students. 



PUBLIC FUNCTIONS. 

MESSRS. T. H. TALIAFERRO, BOMBERGER, RICHARDSON, CORY, METZGER, 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO and THE COMMANDANT. 

SANITATION. 
MESSRS. GRIFFITH, R. C. REED, McDONNELL, T. H. TALIAFERRO and PIERSON. 

SCHEDULE. 

MESSRS. GWINNER, BROUGHTON, WENTZ. SPENCE, SCHULZ, ROSE. GAMBLE and 

KRAMER. 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES. 
MESSRS. CORY, RICHARDSON. CRISP, BECKENSTRATER and WENTZ. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS. 
MESSRS. P. I. REED, RICHARDSON. BYRD and JORDAN. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS. 
MESSRS. PATTERSON, BYRD, JORDAN, McDONNELL. RICHARDSON and SYMON 



i| 



li 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



History — The scientific study of agriculture was advocated 
by farseeing Maryland citizens as early as the second quarter 
of the nineteenth century. They were sensible of two facts — 
namely, that agriculture is one of the largest contributing fac- 
tors to a nation's prosperity, and that all agricultural pursuits, 
in order to be potent, must be genuinely scientific. In 1847 
the subject was first brought formally to the attention of the 
Legislature of the State. In 1856 a bill was passed which 
granted a charter for the establishment, endowment and incor- 
poration of the Maryland Agricultural College. Under the 
provisions of this charter the corner-stone of the original col- 
lege building was laid on August 24, 1858, and the institution 
was opened to the public on October 5, 1859. No funds were 
provided by the Act of 1856, but the actual establishment of 
the College was made possible by the contributions of public- 
spirited citizens of the commonwealth. The names of these 
persons, in remembrance of their generosity, are inscribed on 
the massive gateway to the College grounds. The College is 
unique in that its original charter was the first in which sys- 
tematic agricultural experimentation was recognized as an 
important part of its activities. The institution thus created 
was the first significant agricultural college on the Atlantic 
slope and the second in the Western Hemisphere. 

For three years the College was under private management. 
In 1862 the Congress of the United States, recognizing the prac- 
tical value and increasing need of such colleges, passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that 
should claim its benefits a proportionate amount of unclaimed 
Western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale 
of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach 



16 



such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States 
may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and 
practical education of the industrial classes in the several pur- 
suits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland. The Maryland Agricultural 
College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution ; in the fall 
of 1914 its control was taken over entirely by the State. In 
1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the Col- 
lege and changed its name from The Maryland Agricultural 
College to The Maryland State College of Agriculture. 

In 1847 an act had been passed making provision for a State 
laboratory in which the application of chemistry to agriculture 
was to be undertaken. In 1858, following the selection of a 
location for the College, experimentation was undertaken on 
the College farm. After two or three years this work was 
interrupted by the general financial distress of the time and by 
the Civil War. In 1888, under the provisions of the Hatch Act 
e)f the preceding year, the Agricultural Experiment Station was 
established as a department of the College. 

Other major divisions of the College, together with the dates 
of their establishment, are as follows: State Department of 
Fertilizer, Feed and Agricultural Lime Control, 1894; State 
Department of Farmers' Institutes, 1896 ; State Horticultural 
Department, 1898; Extension Service, 1914, and Vocational 
Training, 1918. The State Bureau of Forestry co-operates with 
the College, the director being, by the terms of his appoint- 
ment. Lecturer on Forestry. 

The progress of the College, though not rapid, has been 
steady and in the main satisfactory. By virtue of the broad 
scope of its activities it is the most important factor in the 
agricultural and industrial development of the State. 

Agricultural Experiment Station — This is a distinct depart- 
ment of the College and is primarily an institution of scientific 
research for the benefit of agriculture. It was called into exist- 
ence as a result of the passage of the United States Hatch Act 



17 



in 1887. This act states the object and purpose of the Experi- 
ment Station as follows : 

That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to 
conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals ; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with 
the remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at 
their different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative 
cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new 
plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the 
chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds ; the 
adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and 
digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and 
cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the 
agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the 
respective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the Experiment Stations there 
was practically no agricultural science in this country. The 
work done by these institutions during the past quarter of a 
century has given the colleges a science of agriculture to teach, 
and laid a broad foundation for the future development of the 
agriculture of the country. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension 
work on a national basis has been the direct outgrowth of the 
work of the Experiment Station. 

The students of the College are kept in close touch by their 
professors with the investigations in progress. Also they 
receive special lectures and instruction by the persons in charge 
of investigations. Some students are employed by the station 
on the farm and in the laboratories. The station offers several 
research fellowships to students who desire to study for 
advanced degrees. These fellowships are open to graduates 
of other colleges as well as of this institution. They pay from 
$40 to $60 per month, depending upon the nature of the work 
and amount of time given to station work. 

Extension Service — ^The Extension Service of the College, in 
co-operation with the United States Department of Agricul- 



18 



1 1 



ture, performs the important function of carrying to the people 
of the State, through practical demonstrations conducted by 
specialists and county agents, the results of investigations in 
the fields of Agriculture and Home Economics. The organiza- 
tion consists of the administrative forces, including the direc- 
tor, assistant director, specialists and clerical force, on the one 
hand; and the field forces, including the county agricultural 
demonstration agents and the home demonstration agents in 
each county and in the chief cities of the State, on the other. 

Each specialist is responsible for a certain project. The 
county agents and the specialists jointly carry on practical 
demonstrations under the several projects by inducing the 
farmers and home-makers to follow specific directions in the 
production of some certain crop, or in some phase of home- 
making, with the view of putting into practice on the farms of 
the State improved methods of Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics that have stood the test of investigation and experi- 
mentation. Movable schools, lasting sometimes many days, 
are held in the several counties. At such schools the specialists 
discuss phases of Agriculture and Home Economics in which 
the people of the respective counties are specially interested. 

The work of the Boys' Agricultural Clubs is of especial 
importance from an educational point of view. The specialists 
in charge of these projects, in co-operation with the county 
agricultural agents, organize the boys of the several communi- 
ties of the county into agricultural clubs for the purpose of 
teaching them by actual practice the principles underlying the 
growing of an acre of corn, an eighth acre of potatoes or the 
raising of a pig or a flock of poultry. The boys hold regular 
meetings for the discussion of problems connected with their 
several projects and for the comparison of experiences. Prizes 
are offered for the stimulation of interest in the work. 

The Home Economics specialists and agents organize the 
girls into clubs for the purpose of instructing them in the prin- 
ciples underlying canning, drying, preserving of fruits and 
vegetables, cooking, dressmaking and other forms of Home 
Economics work. In the club work the boys and girls learn 



19 



how to do by doing. One thousand two hundred and thirteen 
boys and 2,045 girls were enrolled in clubs in 1917. 

Educational value of the demonstration work, farmers* meet- 
ings, movable schools, the club work and community shows is 
incalculable. The effect is to carry the College to the farmer 
and home-maker. 

Board of Trustees — ^This board consists of nine persons who 
are citizens of the State, each appointed by the Governor, with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, for a term of nine years. 
Thus under normal conditions one new appointment is made 
to the board each year. A special act provides that the persons 
appointed as trustees shall also be appointed as the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

Support — The College is supported by Federal funds and by 
appropriations of the State Legislature. The first Morrill, or 
Land Grant, Act of 1862 allotted 210,000 acres of land to 
Maryland, the proceeds from the sale of which have been 
invested for the benefit of the College. From this endowment 
the College receives $5,979 a year. The second Morrill Act of 
1890 appropriated $25,000 a year for educational purposes, and 
the College became the beneficiary. In 1907, by the Nelson 
Act $25,000 more was appropriated. The purposes to which 
these amounts may be applied are restricted. Furthermore, 
a certain proportion of the Federal funds goes for the support 
of the Eastern Branch of the Maryland State College of 
Agriculture, which is devoted to the education of the colored 
race in agriculture and the mechanic arts. The Smith-Hughes 
Act of 1917 provides annually an increasing amount for the 
training of teachers in agriculture, the industrial arts and home 
economics, and in addition gives aid to secondary schools for 
the promotion of vocational education. The assignment of a 
portion of this work to the State College of Agriculture brings 
it into even closer co-operation with the State Board of Educa- 
tion and the schools of the State. The College thus becomes, 
as it should, the crowning point of the State educational 
system. 



20 



Under the Hatch Act of 1887 and the Adams Act of 1906 
$30,000 is appropriated annually by the Federal Government 
for the organization and support of agricultural experiment 
stations. 

The Smith-Lever Act, passed by Congress in 1914, grants 
yearly an increasing appropriation for agricultural and home- 
economics extension work in the State. 

In addition to the above Federal funds, appropriations have 
been made by the State Legislature for the erection of build- 
ings, payment of salaries, etc. 

Location and Description — ^The College is located in Prince 
George's County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington 
Branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. At least 
eight trains a day from each city stop at College Station, thus 
making the place easily accessible from all parts of the State. 
Telephone connection is made with the Chesapeake and 
Potomac lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boule- 
vard. The suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the 
south, and Laurel, the largest town in the county, is ten miles 
to the north on the same road. Access to these towns and to 
Washington may be had by steam and electric railway. The 
site of the College is particularly beautiful. The buildings 
occupy the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with 
forest trees and overlooks the entire surrounding country. In 
front, extending to the boulevard, is a broad rolling campus, 
the drill ground and athletic field. In the rear are the farm 
buildings and barn. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are 
the buildings of the Experiment Station. The College farm 
contains about 300 acres, and is devoted to fields, gardens, 
orchards, vineyard, poultry yards, etc., used for experimental 
purposes and demonstration work in agriculture and horticul- 
ture. 

The general appearance of the College grounds is exceedingly 
attractive. They are tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces 
which are ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. The 
view from the grove and campus cannot be surpassed. 



21 



The location of the College is healthful ; the sanitary condi- 
tions are excellent. No better proof of this can be given than 
that there has been practically no serious case of illness among 
the students for many years. 

Health Service — The health of the student body is of prime 
importance to the College and it is in consequence carefully 
conserved. A physician is engaged by the College especially 
for this work. A hospital is maintained in which students, 
whenever necessary, are put under the care of a trained nurse. 

Buildings — The executive and instructional divisions of the 
College have quarters in the following structures: A brick 
building, erected in 1894 as a gymnasium and now used tem- 
porarily as a library; a chemical building, completed in 1897, 
used both for instruction in chemistry and for State work in 
the analysis of fertilizers, feeds and agricultural lime ; Morrill 
Hall, built in 1898, in which the Division of Language and 
Literature is situated, as well as the Zoological classrooms 
and laboratories; an engineering building, erected in 1898, 
which provides suitable quarters for the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering and the Departments 
of Mathematics and Physics ; a horticultural building, built in 
1915, which contains offices, classrooms and propagating 
rooms ; and a large, modern fireproof building, finished in 1918,. 
which contains the executive offices and is devoted almost, 
exclusively to instruction in the agricultural sciences. 

On account of the destruction by fire in 1912 of two of the 
largest buildings, two temporary structures are in use as an 
assembly hall and a dining hall. Excellent dormitory accommo- 
dations are provided in Calvert Hall, a modem fireproof build- 
ing erected in 1914. The Armory is also located in it. Other 
buildings on the campus furnish living quarters for a number of 
students. A frame building, formerly the president's home, is 
occupied temporarily by the Department of Home Economics. 
The College Sanitarium, built in 1901, makes it possible to 
treat properly any case of illness among the students. 

Library — In 1915 the College library and that of the Experi- 
ment Station were consolidated, and are now administered 



22 



1^ 



under one head. The first floor of the Library Building is 
devoted to books and periodicals relating to agriculture and 
allied sciences. The second floor is used as a general reading 
room, and also as a stackroom for the more general classes of 
books. 

The combined libraries contain approximately 15,000 books 
and pamphlets. Most of the leading magazines and news- 
papers are subscribed for; technical periodicals, as a rule, are 
deposited in the libraries of the various departments of the 
College and Experiment Station. Through the generosity of 
the county press of the State, most of the county papers are 
available for use by the patrons of the library. 

The central, basic idea of the administration of the library 
is service. It is frankly recognized that the library should be 
a laboratory for the use of students, members of the faculty 
and members of the Experiment Station staff ; and everything 
possible is done to make the library popular. The reading 
rooms are well arranged and lighted, and are in all respects 
comfortable and convenient. Every facility is offered to those 
desiring to make researches within the scope of the books and 
publications on the shelves of the library. 

Religious Influences — Provisions in the charter of the Col- 
lege provide that it shall be non-sectarian. From time to time 
religious services are conducted at the College under the direc- 
tion of different churches. Churches of practically all denomi- 
nations are located within a radius of two miles. 

Christian Associations — "The moral and spiritual welfare of 
any community lies within the community itself," and through 
the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
the students of Maryland State College accept this responsi- 
bility. Primary purpose of these organizations is to develop 
the moral life of the College. The basis of membership is non- 
sectarian and broad enough to allow every student who stands 
for Christian ideals to affiliate himself or herself with them. 
The associations seek to create an atmosphere of democratic 
good fellowship and high standard among the student body. 
The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 



23 



are anxious to assist new students in every way possible. Their 
representative will meet them at the railroad station, direct 
them to the College, help them get located in their rooms, and 
make them acquainted with other students and the faculty. 

Lectures — Lectures of a general and a technical character 
have been an important feature of the College activities for 
several years. The lectures are often given in connection with 
motion pictures or other special entertainments during the 
assembly periods, when all students as well as visitors can 
attend. Aside from the meetings of general interest each divi- 
sion of the College calls in specialists from the various prac- 
tical fields of activity to lecture to groups of students accord- 
ing to their interests. 

Student Organizations — The athletic, social, literary and 
scientific interests of the College give occasion for various 
student organizations. These are encouraged as a means 
of creating class and college pride, and as aids toward the 
development of the student in his conduct of affairs. In science 
there are the Agricultural Club, the Engineering Society and 
the Liebig Chemical Society. To foster public speaking and 
literary interest there are two literary societies, the Poe and 
the New Mercer. These are under the direction of the pro- 
fessor of public speaking, which subject every student is re- 
quired to take. As a further means of stimulating interest in 
public speaking, there exists the Oratorical Association of 
Maryland Colleges. This organization is composed of the 
following colleges: St. John's College, Washington College, 
Western Maryland College and the Maryland State College. 
Contests are held annually in rotation at these four institu- 
tions. The Rossbourg Club, the county clubs and the fraterni- 
ties promote wholesome social relations. 

Student Publications— "The Maryland State Weekly," the 
students' newspaper, is issued each week while the College is 
in session. It is published by a staff representing each class. 
"The Reveille," a record of general student activity, is brought 
out at the close of each year by the senior class. 



24 



Alumni Association — The alumni of the College, including 
men of note in all fields of endeavor, through their organiza- 
tion exert a stimulating influence in molding public opinion 
in behalf of the College and in bettering conditions in the 
institution. They are also active individually in the develop- 
ment of the College. The association offers medals for excel- 
lence in debate and intercollegiate athletic competition, and 
through its members on the Committee on Physical Training 
endeavors to promote lofty ideals and high achievement in 
athletics. 

The present officers of the association are: R. Laurie 
Mitchell, '02, president ; George H. Calvert, Jr., '02, vice-presi- 
dent ; H. C. Byrd, '08, secretary-treasurer ; J. N. Mackall, '05, 
and F. P. Veitch, '91, members at large of the executive com- 
mittee, and W. D. Groff , '00, and H. C. Whitford, '01, members 
of the athletic committee. 

Military Instruction — An infantry unit of the senior division 
of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps has been established 
at the College under the provisions of the Act of Congress of 
June 3, 1916. All male students, if citizens of the United 
States, whether pursuing a four-year or a two-year course of 
study, are required to take for a period of two years, as a pre- 
requisite to graduation, the military training furnished by the 
War Department in accordance with the aforementioned act. 
Three periods a week of not less than one hour each are devoted 
to this work, of which one period is utilized for theoretical in- 
struction. At the end of the sophomore year a student may 
volunteer for further training. His record is examined by the 
president of the College and the professor of military science 
and tactics. If accepted, the volunteer will, after signing a 
written agreement prescribed by the Secretary of War, be 
enrolled for two or more years of training in the Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps. Such students are required to give 
fours hours a week to this advanced training, three of which 
are utilized for theoretical instruction. These students are 
required also to attend two summer camps of four weeks each. 
Any student completing this advanced training course is eligi- 



25 






ble for appointment by the President of the United States as a 
Reserve Officer of the United States Army for a period of ten 
years. They are also eligible for appointment, under certain 
prescribed conditions, as temporary second lieutenants in the 
Regular Army for a period of six months. 

The Federal Government furnishes uniforms, or commuta- 
tion therefor, to all members of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps, and also commutation of subsistence to such students 
as are selected for advanced training during the junior and 
senior years. The Government furthermore pays the expenses 
of attendance at the required summer training camps, includ- 
ing traveling expenses. 

All physically fit male students, not members of the Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps, are required by the College regulations 
to take two hours a week each year of practical drill, unless 
excused by the President for some satisfactory reason. 

College credit is given for work in the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps. Since the credits obtained for the first two 
years of this training are prerequisite to graduation, any stu- 
dent of either sex who for any reason whatever does not take 
this work must elect approved subjects in place thereof to 
obtain equivalent credits. 

Athletics — ^Upon the opening of College in the fall athletics 
will be conducted under a plan of organization tending to give 
every student an opportunity to take part in some branch of 
competitive sports. The whole Department of Physical Train- 
ing is being reorganized so that all students will receive a com- 
prehensive development along natural lines. The preliminary 
part of the work will consist of squad drills in calisthenics and 
a thorough examination by a competent physician. The squad 
drills are to be supplemented by intra-mural athletics, with 
class organizations as the units. Baseball, track and field, 
basketball, boxing and wrestling will be the main intra-mural 
sports. The teams developed for intercollegiate competition 
will be made up of men selected from the best of those taking 
part in the regular sports between classes and other units. In 
intercollegiate competition the College is represented in football, 



lii-fi: 



26 



baseball, track and field, basketball, lacrosse and tennis. Tht 
athletics of the College is conducted on principles calculatec 
to give the students development in ethics and character as wel 
as physical strength. The rules governing the eligibility o: 
students for places on teams in intercollegiate competition are 
more stringent than those of any other institution in Mary 
land. The department works in conjunction with the Depart 
ment of Military Science and Tactics. 

Student Government — The government of the student body 
is based on a spirit of pure democracy. The students are taughi 
not only the theory of self-government but the practice. All 
affairs relating to the student body are adjudicated by a com- 
mittee composed of four members of the faculty and the presi- 
dents of the classes. This committee establishes a definite and 
close relationship between the faculty and students. The whole 
idea of government of the student body is based on the honor 
system, in which each student is trusted to do the "square 
thing." 

Divisions and Courses of Instruction — ^The College performs 
its various functions through organization into divisions and 
departments. These unite in offering a number of closely 
related courses leading, after four years of general and special- 
ized study, to the bachelor's degree. All courses are practically 
alike in the freshman year, for this is largely a probationary 
period in which the student is supposed to determine definitely 
which of the several courses he wishes to pursue. After the 
Freshman year a change in course is not permitted unless war- 
ranted by exceptional circumstances. A substantial founda- 
tion is laid during the first year. The opportunity for special- 
ization and election increases with each succeeding year. Upon 
reaching the senior year the work of each student is almost 
wholly specialized. 

A student when entering will select the division in which he 
expects to work, and furthermore will elect his course after 
consultation with the dean of the division. The divisions and 
the courses offered by them are given below : 



27 



Division of Animal Industry — Courses in Animal Husbandry. 

Division of Applied Science — Courses in Chemistry and General Science. 

Division of Vocational Education — Courses in Agricultural Education, 
Home-Economics Education and Industrial Education. 

Division of Engineering— Courses in Civil Engineering, Electrical Engi- 
neering, Mechanical Engineering and Rural Engineering. 

Division of Language and Literature — Auxiliary instruction in Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Division of Plant Industry — Courses in Agronomy, Botany, Entomology, 
Landscape Gardening and Floriculture, Pomology and Vegetable Cul- 
ture. 

A detailed statement as to the subjects studied in each of 
these courses will be found under the various divisions. Here 
may be found also the amount of time given to each subject, 
its credit value and the opportunity for election. In certain 
technical courses, such as engineering, little latitude is allowed 
in selecting subjects, after the student has once settled on a 
particular course. On the other hand, in the agricultural 
courses a wide selection is permitted. The reasons for this 
difference in procedure are obvious when the development of 
the courses and the character of the subjects are considered. 

Short Courses in Agriculture — ^The short courses in the Col- 
lege are designed especially to meet the demands of young men 
on the farm who cannot find time to take a regular four-year 
course, or for those who have not had sufficient educational 
training for admission to the longer courses. Aside from the 
winter unit-courses the College offers a Two-Year Agricultural 
Course and a Three-Year Agricultural Practice Course. The 
two-year course runs for the entire college year, while the 
three-year course runs for three months (December, January 
and February) during the winter. 

Short Course in Engineering — A two-year course in Engineer- 
ing, embodying work in the mechanic arts, is offered to young 
men who are unable, for various reasons, to take any of the 
four-year courses in Engineering. It gives an opportunity for 
training in Mechanics or Electricity at the option of the 
student. 

Graduation, Degrees and Certificates — All four-year courses 
in the College lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science. The 



■«fli 



28 



ihlilil'^ 



total requirement for graduation, exclusive of military science 
is 204 term credit hours, equivalent to 68 year hours, or 13 
semester hours. A term credit hour is one lecture or recita 
tion a week for one term ; two or three hours of laboratory o 
field work are counted equivalent to one lecture or recitation 
All practical work is scheduled for three hours, but the in 
structor concerned is permitted to use two or three, depending 
upon the nature of the work. 

Candidates are recommended for graduation after they hav 
completed the prescribed course of study, including all the re 
quired work and enough electives to total 204 credit hours, no 
including military science. No degrees are given to students 
in the Two- Year or the Three- Year Agricultural Practice 
Courses, but at graduation time appropriate certificates ar( 
granted to those completing the regular work as outlined. 

Graduate Study and Advanced Degrees — The advanced de 
grees conferred by the College are Master of Science and pro- 
fessional engineering degrees as follows : Civil Engineer, Elec- 
trical Engineer and Mechanical Engineer. A candidate foi 
graduate work in science must hold a Bachelor's degree 
from an institution of recognized standing and present the 
basic prerequisites to the field in which he wishes to study 
For the degree of Master of Science one year of residence 
wholly devoted to graduate work is required. Under this 
ruling it will require a student working half time at least two 
years to qualify for the Master's degree, and one doing lesg 
than half-time work three years. While the requirement foi 
the Master's degree is not conditional to the completion of 2 
definite number of hours, the amount of work required shoulc 
usually aggregate not less than the equivalent of fifteen credil 
hours per week through the year, inclusive of the thesis. Tc 
fulfill the requirements for the Master's degree the studeni 
must complete an approved course of study, consisting of t 
major subject and two minors, one of which must be in t 
different department from the major and relate in genera 
character to that subject. The minor subjects should aggre 
gate not less than five credit hours nor more than seven pei 
week through the year. 



29 



I 



^ 



'If 



i 



I 



When special organization has been made for that purpose, 
credit may be given for research carried on in the Department 
of Agriculture of the United States Government. The Experi- 
ment Station also offers considerable opportunity for research 
of a graduate character. 

Admission to graduate work does not necessarily imply 
admission to candidacy for a degree. Those seeking admission 
to graduate work should request an application blank and 
further information from the registrar. A candidate for the 
Master's degree must present his application for admission to 
candidacy not less than six months prior to the date at which 
the degree is sought. Admission to candidacy is based upon 
ability to pursue graduate work as exemplified in the official 
reports upon the student's course. A student will not be 
admitted to candidacy until he has completed the equivalent 
of one term of graduate work. 

A satisfactory thesis is required, the subject of which, to- 
gether with the written approval of the professor in charge of 
the major, must be filed with the chairman of the Graduate 
Committee not later than the close of the first term of the 
academic year in which the degree is sought. The completed 
manuscript ready for typewriting shall be submitted to the 
professor in charge for correction and approval not later than 
two weeks prior to commencement day. 

The advanced professional degrees in engineering will be 
granted only to graduates of this College, who have obtained 
the Bachelor's degree in engineering. A candidate for the 
degree of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical 
Engineer must satisfy the following conditions : 

1. He shall have been engaged in acceptable engineering 
pursuits for not less than three years. 

2. His application for a degree must be approved twelve 
months prior to the date at which the degree is sought. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

4. He shall present with his application a complete report 
of his engineering experience and an outline of his thesis. 



" — ^ --^.-- 



30 



5. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed 
of the heads of the Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Departments, to whom his application must be referred. 

Unclassified Students — Mature persons who have had insuffi- 
cient preparation to pursue any of the four-year courses may, 
with the consent of the Committee on Courses, matriculate for 
such subjects as they are fitted to take. Such students, how- 
ever, will be ineligible for a degree until they have satisfied 
the entrance requirements and completed an approved four- 
year course of study. 

Sub-Collegiate Work — Until recently the College maintained 
a sub-collegiate department for the benefit of students regis- 
tering with deficiencies. At the present time a plan is under 
consideration which will afford students an opportunity to re- 
move such deficiencies in a nearby high school. It may be pos- 
sible for students not having the advantages of a high school 
in their community to do several years of high school work 
under this co-operative plan. 

Examinations and Reports — ^Final examinations are held at 
the close of each term. The final grades are made from these 
examinations and the daily averages. Detailed reports of the 
students' standing are sent to parents and guardians at the 
end of every term. Special reports of deficiencies, failures or 
misconduct are sent whenever deemed necessary. 

Admission Requirements of the College — In general the re- 
quirements for admission to the freshman class are the same 
as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high schools 
of Maryland. An applicant must offer for admission at least 
15 units of credit by examination, or by a certificate from 
an approved high school or its equivalent. A unit represents a 
year's study in any subject in a secondary school and consti- 
tutes approximately a quarter of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods 
of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four or five class 
exercises a week. Two laboratory periods in any science or 
vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class 
exercise. 



81 

Of the fifteen units presented, seven are specifically desig- 
nated — eight for Division of Engineering — and eight may be 
elected from any subject that the high school offers toward 
graduation. A deficiency of two units is approved under the 
condition that the student remove such conditions within 12 
months after matriculation. 

Students are admitted without examination, if they can pre- 
sent certificates showing that they have completed the neces- 
sary entrance subjects. The certificates persented by the can- 
didates must be officially certified by the principals of the 
schools attended and must state in detail the work completed. 
Blank certificates conveniently arranged for the desired data 
will be sent upon application. 

Candidates not admitted by certificates will be required to 
take written examinations on the entrance subjects. These 
examinations are offered in June and September. Exact dates 
will be sent upon request. 



REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

Prescribed Units 

English 3 

Mathematics 2 (For Engineering 3) * 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 (For Engineering 8) 

Elective Units (eight) — To be selected from the following subjects: 

Agriculture, History, 

Astronomy, Home Economics, 

Botany, Industrial subjects. 

Chemistry, Language, 

Civics, Mathematics, 

Commercial subjects, Physical Geography, 

Economics, Physics, 

English, Physiology, 

General Science Zoology. 
Geology, 

* Additional unit includes Algebra, %; Soli^ Geometry, %. 



32 



A student coming from a standard college or university may 
secure advanced standing by presenting a statement of his 
complete academic record certified by the proper officials. This 
statement must be accompanied by a set of secondary school 
credentials presented for admission to the college or university. 
Full credit is given for work done in other institutions when 
found to be equivalent in extent and quality to that required at 
this College. An applicant may request examination for ad- 
vanced credit in any subject. In case the character of a 
student's work in any subject is such as to create doubt as to 
the quality of that which preceded, the College explicitly 
reserves the right to revoke at any time any credit assigned 
on certificate. 

Registration — The College year begins October 1 and ends 
May 30. (See calendar on Page 1.) Monday, September 30, 
and Tuesday, October 1, are devoted to matriculation and regis- 
tration of students for the first term. Registration for the 
second and third terms takes place on the first day of the terms 
as indicated by the calendar. 

Candidates for the freshman class should go at once to the 
new agricultural building, where they will find a committee in 
charge of matriculation and registration. 

Upper classmen should consult their advisers or deans and 
then proceed in the regular way. Students are not admitted 
to classes for which they are not registered in due form. 

Lectures and practical work begin as scheduled on Wednes- 
day, October 2. 

Expenses — Average expenses of a student for each year 
range around $300. The College is not organized as a money- 
making institution, consequently holds expenses to a minimum. 
Board is one item which fluctuates somewhat under present 
conditions, but not sufficiently to make any material difference 
in the outlay for the year. Board and lodging are furnished 
on a wholesale cost basis. 



33 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

Fixed overhead charges, physical training, hospital fees, book 

rental, etc $50.00 

Laboratory fees 12.00 

Damage fee* 5.00 

Board, lodging and laundryf 239.00 

Total $306.00 

* Unexpended portion refunded at end of year. 
fAverage cost. 



A fee of $5 for the diploma will be charged each student to 
whom a Bachelor's degree is granted. 

Each graduate student is subject to a registration fee of $10, 
payable at time of registration; $10 per term for tuition and 
$10 for diploma, payable before degree is conferred. 

Students taking the short course in Agricultural Practice are 
subject to charges of $20 for fixed overhead charges, hospital 
fee, book rental, laboratory fee, etc., and $7.50 per week for 
board, lodging and laundry. 

A deposit fee of $5 is required of each student desiring to 
reserve a room in one of the dormitories. Such reservations 
may be made on or after June 1. This fee will be credited to 
the student's account, but if he fails to return to or enter Col- 
lege it will be forfeited. 

Students entering College after November 1, or withdrawing 
before close of scholastic year, will be charged $7 per month 
for fixed charges and $8 per week for board, room and laundry. 
Students withdrawing less than two weeks after entrance will 
be charged $2 per day, and students withdrawing more than 
two weeks, but less than one month, after entrance will be 
charged for one month's attendance. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse and special medical 
attention, the expenses must be borne by the student. 

All College expenses are payable in advance, and no diploma 
will be conferred upon, nor any certificate issued to, a student 
who is in arrears in his account. 



,11 I 



84 

When a student withdraws from College he is required to 
give formal notification in writing in separate communications 
to the Registrar and Accountant. Charges for full time will 
be continued against him unless this is done. 

Students rooming outside the College may obtain board and 
laundry from the College at same rates as those living in 
dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunchrooms. 

All College property in possession of the individual student 
is charged against him, and the parent or guardian must 
assume responsibility for its return without injury other than 
results from ordinary wear. 

Damage to College property will be charged to the whole 
student body pro rata unless the offender is known. 

All students assigned to dormitories are required to provide 
themselves with one pair blankets for single bed, two pairs 
sheets for single bed, four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow 
and two clothes bags. 

There will be no refund of laboratory fees upon withdrawal 
of a student after the middle of a term. 

There will be no refund of fixed charges or laboratory fees 
upon the withdrawal of a student after the middle of the term 
for which charge is made. 

Uniform — Members of the Student Battalion must appear in 
uniform at all military formations and at other specified times. 
The uniforms worn by the members of the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps under normal conditions are furnished by the 
War Department. It is possible, however, that with the great 
demand for uniforms for the army the Government will not be 
able to supply uniforms for the members of the Reserve 
Officers' Training Camp, but will provide commutation which 
will meet, at least in part, the cost of the uniforms provided 
by these students. Students required to drill under the pro- 
visions of the "Land Grant Act" of 1862, who are not members 
of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, must furnish their 
own uniforms. 



35 



Prices fluctuate to such an unusual degree at this time that 
it is not possible to state definitely the cost of a uniform not 
provided by the Government, but it should not exceed $30. A 
deposit covering the cost of a uniform purchased under a Col- 
lege contract must be made with the Accountant in advance. 
No uniform w^ill be paid for by the College until it is approved 
by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

The uniform consists of one pair breeches, woolen, olive 
drab; one cap, olive drab; one pair leggings, canvas; one cap 
and collar ornament, set; one pair shoes, russet; one shirt, 
flannel, olive drab, and one regulation tie. 

Scholarships and Financial Aid — Although no endowment 
or loan fund exists with which to assist needy students, there 
are many opportunities for students to earn at least a portion 
of their expenses. Means of self-help, however, are afforded 
only to such students as show ability to carry work in addition 
to their College course, and to those who are disposed to assume 
such extra duties willingly. Scholarships are offered as indi- 
cated below : 

To encourage worthy young men who desire a collegiate 
education, the Board of Trustees has established for each high 
school in Maryland and the District of Columbia one scholar- 
ship each year, to be awarded under the following conditions : 

1. The person awarded a scholarship must be a graduate of a high 
school and qualified to enter the freshman class. He must also be of 
approved moral character. 

2. The appointment to a scholarship shall be made by the school super- 
intendent, upon the recommendation and certification of the principal of 
the high school. 

The principal of the high school may recommend one or more persons 
for appointment, with information as to the merits of each case. In 
making appointments, not only class standing but inability to meet the 
financial expenses of an education should be given consideration. 

3. The appointment shall be made for the term normally required to 
complete the course selected. 

4. Each scholarship has the value of $50 per year. This amount 
will be credited to the holder's account. 

5. The scholarship will be forfeited by indifference to scholastic work 
or by disregard of rules of the College. 



!iN'-i 



36 



6. The scholarship will be forfeited in case the holder fails of promo- 
tion at the end of any scholastic year, unless there are extenuating 
circumstances. 

There has also been established one scholarship each year for 
graduates of each preparatory school in Maryland and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia in which the standard is of such a character 
as to qualify the appointee for entrance to the freshman class. 
The conditions governing these scholarships are the same as 
for the high schools, except that the appointment shall be 
made by the principal of the preparatory school. 



Ill 



of Plant Industry 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

P. W. Zimmerman. .Dean, Professor of Plant Industry. 

J. B. Wentz Professor of Agronomy. 

C. E. Temple Professor of Plant Pathology, State Pathologist. 

E. F. Stoddard Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

H. Beckenstrater. .Professor of Pomology. 

B. W. Anspon Professor of Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. 

J. B. S. Norton .... Professor of Botany and Vegetable Pathology. 

R. C. Rose Associate Professor of Botany. 

E. N. Cory Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 

C. J. PiERSON Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

0. C. Bruce Professor of Soils. 



INTRODUCTION 

The Division of Plant Industry is composed of the follow- 
ing departments : 



1. Agronomy. 

a. Forage Crops. 

b. Grain Crops. 

2. Soils and Soil Fertility. 

3. Horticulture. 

a. Vegetable Gardening. 

b. Pomology. 

c. Landscape Gardening 

Floriculture. 



and 



4. Forestry. 

5. Economic Botany. 

a. General Botany. 

b. Plant Physiology. 

c. Plant Pathology. 

6. Economic Zoology. 

a. General Zoology. 

b. Entomv^logy. 

c. Bee Culture. 



Students are permitted to specialize in any of the above- 
mentioned departments except Forestry. Prospective stu- 
dents for Agronomy, Soils or Horticulture who have not had 
satisfactory practical experience on a farm before entering 
College will be required to spend from three to six months on 
an approved farm before graduation. 

The subjects required in the freshman year are the same 
in all departments, but at the end of the year students are 
expected to make a decision in regard to their line of special- 



■a 



I 




11^ 



38 

ization. The junior and senior years are devoted largely to 
special subjects and electives. At least 25 per cent, of the 
total hours required for graduation are necessary to specialize 
in a subject. With a wide leeway for electives it is possible for 
a student to take as much work in another department as in 
his special subject. It is possible, therefore, for a student to 
get either a special or a general training in agriculture. Special- 
ists who expect to carry on investigational work after leaving 
College are urged to remain for graduate work. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 

The required and elective work of the various departments 
of the division is outlined on the following pages. The College 
reserves the right to withdraw any course at any time : 



li^ 




39 



AGRONOMY AND SOILS 



SUBJECT. 



Tekm. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis. 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or 
Mathematics, or 

Language . . 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course , 



3(1) 

(2) 
3(3) 



2(6) 

i'** 

4 

1(2) 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 

1(2) 



3(1) 

(2) 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 102 — General Geology 

Botany 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103 — Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening. 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 

Agronomy 102 — Grain Judging 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 

Elective 



3(3) 



2(3) 
3(3) 



1(2) 
6 



3(3) 



2(6) 
3(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 
4 



3(3) 



2(6) 



3(3) 

1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils 102— Continuation of 101 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics 

English 103 — Technical Composition 

Botany 1 10 — Genetics 

Bacteriology 101— General Bacteriology 

Soils 103 — Principles of Soil Management 

Agronomy 106 — Marketing and Grading of Farm Crops 

Soils 104 — Fertilizers 

Military Instruction — ^Advanced Ck)urse 

Elective 



2(3) 



3 
2 



1(6) 



R 



3 
2 
3 

1(6) 
1(3) 



R 



3(3) 



2(3) 
R 

8 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management 

Agronomy 104 — Crop Breeding 

Agronomy 105 — Methods in Crop Investigation 

Agronomy 108 — Crop Rotation 

Soils 105 — Advanced Soils 

Soils 106 — Methods in Soil Investigation 

Agronomy 109 — Seminar 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(3) 

2 

1(6) 



9 



R 



3(3) 
2(3) 



9 



R 



3(3) 
(3) 



1(6) 

• • • • 

R 



I 



40 




VEGETABLE GARDENING 






SUBJECT. 



Term. 



; 1 
' 1 



I ! 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or 

Mathematics, or , 

Language 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course , 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 
1(2) 



II 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i " 

4 

1(2) 



III 



3(1) 

(2) 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



ililill 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 102 — General Geology 

Botanv 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103— Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening . 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 

Agronomy 102 — Grain Judging 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course , 

Elective , 



3(3) 
2(3) 



3(3) 



1(2) 
6 



3(3) 



2(6) 
3(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 
5 



3(3) 



2(6) 



3(3) 

1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils 102 — Continuation of Soils 101 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics 

English 103 — Technical Composition 

Vegetable Gardening 102 — Tuber and Root Crops 

Vegetable Gardening 103 — Commercial Vegetable Gardening. 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(3) 



3 
2 
2(3) 



R 



3 
2 

2(6) 
R 

8 



3(3) 



2(6) 
R 
7 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management 

Vegetable Gardening 103 — Commercial Vegetable Gardening continued , 

Vegetable Gardening 111 — Systematic Olericulture 

Vegetable Gardening 113 — Horticulture Seminar 

M ilitary Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(6) 
1(6) 



R 



3(3) 



R 



3(3) 



10 



12 



13 



R 



1 

■^ 



41 



•14 

1 



POMOLOGY 



SUBJECT. 



Tebm. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



f 





English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 .. . ..... 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology • 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or 1 

Mathematics, or > 

Language J , 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 
3(3) 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i "* 

4 

1(2) 



2(6) 

i ** 

4 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



3(1) 

(2) 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 102— General Geology 

Botany 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103 — Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening. 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 

Agronomy 102 — Grain Judging 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 

Elective , 



3(3) 



2(3) 
3(3) 



1(2) 
6 



3(3) 
2(6) 



3(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 
5 



3(3) 



2(6) 



3(3) 

1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils 102 — Continuation of 101 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics . 

Pomology 102 — Commercial Pomology 

Pomology 103 — Fruit Judging 

Pomology 104 — Practical Pomology 

Pomology 105 — Small Fruit Culture 

English 103 — Technical Composition 

Botany 110 — Genetics 

Military Instruction 103 — ^Advanced Course . . . . 
Elective 



2(3) 



3 

1(3) 
(3) 



R 



(3) 
2(3) 



2 
3 



R 



3(3) 



(6) 
2(3) 
2 



R 



6 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management 

Pomology 107 — Systematic Pomology 

Pomology 109 — Origin, Improvement and Breeding of Fruits. 

Seminar 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



1(6) 



14 



R 



3(3) 
(6) 



11 



R 



3(3) 

2(3) 

R* 
10 



42 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING AND FLORICULTURE 



f^ 



i^ 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or 

Mathematics, or , 

Language 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course . 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 
l" 
4 

1(2) 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 
i " 
4 
1(2) 



III 



3(1) 
(2) 

2(6* 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 102 — General Geology 

Botany 102— Plant Histology 

Botany 103— Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening. 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 

Agronomy 102 — Grain Judging 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course , 

Elective , 



3(3) 
2(3) 



3(3) 



1(2) 
6 



3(3) 



2(6) 
3(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 
5 



3(3) 
2(6) 



3(3) 

1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils 102— Continuation of 101 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics . 
English 



Landscape and Floriculture 102 — Plant Materials 

Landscape and Floriculture 107 — Histology of Landscape Gardening. 

Landscape and Floriculture 108 — Floriculture 

Landscape and Floriculture 109 — Commercial Floriculture 

Landscape and Floriculture 110 — Commercial Floriculture 

Military Instruction 103 — ^Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(3) 



3 
2 



2(3) 

r' 

6 



3 
2 



(3) 
2(3) 

r' 

8 



3(3) 

• • • • 

2 
2(3) 



2(3) 
R 
5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management 

Landscape and Floriculture 103 — Landscape Design 

Landscape and Floriculture 104 — Landscape Design 

Landscape and Floriculture 105 — Landscape Practice 

Landscape and Floriculture 106 — Civic Art 

Landscape and Floriculture 111 — Greenhouse Construction 

Landscape and Floriculture 112 — Floral Decorating 

Landscape and Floriculture 113 — Garden Flowers 

Landscape and Floriculture 115 — Tree Repair 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(3) 



1(3) 
2(3) 



1(6) 
R 
5 



3(3) 



2(3) 



3(3) 
1(6) 



9 



(3) 

r' 



2(3) 

*r' 



43 



BOTANY 



SUBJECT. 



Term. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Cheimstry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis , 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures . . . 
Industrial History, or 

Mathematics, or 

Language . 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course . 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i"* 

4 
1(2) 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i"* 

4 
1(2) 



3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 102— General Geology 

Botany 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103 — Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening . 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening , 

Agronomy 102— Grain Judging , 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 

Elective 



3(3) 



2(3) 
3(3) 



1(2) 
6 



3(3) 



2(6) 
3(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 
5 



3(3) 



2(6) 



3(3) 

1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils 102 — Continuation of Soils 101 

Agronomy ) 03 — Forage Crops 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics , 

English 103 — Technical Composition 

Chemistry 108— Organic Chemistry 

Botany 1 10 — Genetics 

Botany 112 — Systematic Botany 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2(3) 



3 
2 
3(3) 



R 



3 
2 



R 



3(3) 



1(6) 
R 

8 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management . . 

Botany 111 — Plant Ecology 

Botany 113 — Plant Morphology 

Botany 115 — Seminar 

Botany 116 — Plant Micro-Chemistry 

Botany 114 — Methods in Histology 

Botany 105 — General Plant Pathology 

Chemistry 1 1 1 — Physiological Chemistry . . . 
Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course . 
Elective 



(6) 
2(3) 
3(3) 

R 
8 



3(3) 



1(6) 
1(6) 



R 



6 



3(3) 
1(6) 



10 



R 



44 



ECONOMIC ZOOLOGY 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry. - _. . . ; 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or ] 

Mathematics, or } 

Language J 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 

1(2) 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 

1(2) 



3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Botany 102— Plant Histology 

Botany 103— Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Chemistry 105 — Quantitative Anf^lysis . . . 
Zoology 102 — Histology and Embryology . 

Zoology — 103 — Entomology 

English 102 — Advanced C^omposition . . . . , 
Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course. . 
Elective 



2(3) 



1(6) 
2(6) 



2 

1(2) 
5 



2(6) 



1(6) 
2(6) 



2 

1(2) 
4 



2(6) 

2(6) 
2(3) 

1(2) 
6 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Public Speaking 

Chemistry 108 — Organic Chemistry . . . 
Zoology 108 — Systematic Entomology. 

Botany 112 — Systematic Botany 

English 103 — Technical Composition. . 

Military Instruction 103 

Elective 



1 

3(3) 
2(6) 



R 



1 

3(3) 
2(6) 



R 



2(6) 
1(6) 
2 

R 
8 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Bacteriology 101 — General Bacteriology . . . . 

Zoology 107 — Economic Entomology 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 
Elective 



1(6) 


1(6) 


3(6) 


3(6) 


R 


R 


9 


9 



1(6) 
3(6) 
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9 



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45 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS MAJORING IN THE 

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY 



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(3) 

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SUBJECT. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



Animal Husbandry 101 — General Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 102 — Live Stock Management 

Animal Husbandry 103 — Principles of Breeding 

Drawing 107 — Mechanical Drawing 

Shop 104— Wood Work 

Shop 107 — Forging and Pipe Fitting 

Physics 104 — General Physics 

Chemistry 103 — Qualitative Analysis 

Chemistry 104 — Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 105 — Quantitative Analysis 

Zoology 103 — Entomology 

Botany 111 — Plant Ecology 

Modern Language 

Advanced Composition 

Literature 

Public Speaking 

Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Agronomy 102 — Grain Judging 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Floriculture and Landscape 101 — Principles of Landscape Gardening, 
Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 



3(3) 



(3) 



2(3) 
1(3) 
1(6) 



3 
2 
2 
1 

3(3) 



2(3) 



(3) 



2(3) 



1(6) 
1(6) 



3 
2 
2 
1 



3(3) 



3(3) 



3(3) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Animal Husbandry 104 — Animal Nutrition 

Animal Husbandry 105 — Stock Judging 

Animal Husbandry 108 or 109 — Production 

Animal Husbandry 1 1 1 — Anatomy and Physics 

Animal Husbandry 113 — Dairy Management 

Animal Husbandry 114 — Farm Dairying 

Animal Husbandry 1 18 — Farm Poultry 

Animal Husbandry 119 — Poultry Practice 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Agronomy 104 — Crop Breeding 

Agronomy 106 — Marketing and Grading 

Agronomy 108 — Crop Rotation 

Soils 104 — Fertilizers 

Botany 110 — Genetics 

Botany 1 12 — Systematic Botany 

Botany 105 — Plant Pathology 

Botany 106 — Methods in Pathology 

Botany 107 — Diseases of Horticultural Plants 

Botany 108 — Diseases of Cereal and Forage Crops , . 

Pomology 102 — Commercial Pomology 

Pomology 1 04 — Practical Pomology 

Pomology 103 — Fruit Judging 

Vegetable Gardening 108 

Vegetable Gardening 102 — Tuber and Root Crops . . 
Landscape and Floriculture 102 — Plant Materials.., 

Landscape and Floriculture 115 — Tree Repair 

Landscape and Floriculture 112 — Floral Decoration. 

Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry , 

Mechanical Engineering 107 — Farm Machinery 

Surveying and Drainage , 

Chemistry 107 — Agricultural Organic Chemistry. . . , 

Chemistry 108 — Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 109 — Agricultural Chemistry 

Chemistry 110 — Agricultural Chemical Analysis. . . 

Chemistry 1 1 1 — Physiological Chemistry 

History and Government 102 — Business Law 

Modern Language 

English — A 

English — B 

Oratory . 



2(3) 



1(3) 
*(3) 
2(3) 
1(6) 
5*" 



2(3) 

3 ■' 
(6) 
3(3) 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 



3(3) 
1(3) 
2(3) 
3 " 



2(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 

(3) 

1(3) 



(3) 
3(3) 



3(3) 



III 



2(3) 



(3) 
2(3) 



1(6) 

2(3) 

1(6) 

3 

2 

2 

1 



3(3) 



1(3) 



1(3) 



(3) 
3(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 
i'(6) 



2(3) 
1(3) 



(6) 
1(3) 
2(3) 



4 

3(3) 



2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 



46 






SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS MAJORING IN THE 
DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY— Concluded 



SUBJECT. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Animal Husbandry 106 — Advanced Stock Judging 

Animal Husbandry 109 — Production 

Animal Husbandry 112 — Animal Diseases 

Agronomy 107 — Classification of Farm Crops 

Bacteriology 

Botany 116- — Plant Micro-Chemistry 

Hydraulics 110— Advanced Drainage 

Landscape and Floriculture 103 — Landscape Design 

Landscape and Floriculture 106 — Civic Art 

Landscape and Floriculture 113 — Garden Flowers 

Mechanical Engineering 108 — Advanced Farm Machinery . . . . 

Mechanical Engineering 109 — Gas Engines 

Pomology 102— Commercial Pomology 

Pomology 105 — Small Fruit Culture 

Pomology 106 — Nut Culture, Citrus and Sub. Tropical Fruits. 

Pomology 107 — Systematic Pomology 

Pomology 108 — Advanced Pomology , 

Pomologv 109 — Origin, Improvement and Breeding of Fruits . 
Soils 103 , 



Structural Designing 109 — Farm Buildings 

Vegetable Gardening 105 — Vegetable Forcing 

Vegetable Gardening 106 — Vegetable Forcing . 

Vegetable Gardening 1 10 — Vegetable Growing for Canning . 
Vegetable Gardening 112 — ^Advanced Vegetable Gardening. 

Zoology 111 — Horticultural Entomology 

Zoology 104 — Insecticides and Their Application 

Psychology 

Modern Language — A 

Modern Language — B 

Public Speaking 

English — A 

English— B 



1(3) 



3(3) 



2(3) 
1(3) 



1(3) 
2(3) 



1(6) 
1(6) 



1(6) 

2 

1(6) 



2(3) 
3(3) 



3(3) 

3 

5 

1 

2 

2 



1(3) 
3(3) 



(6)1 



3(3) 

2 " 

(6) 



1(6) 



3(3) 
1(3) 



3 
5 
1 
2 
2 



1(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



(6) 
2(3) 



(6) 



3(3) 
2(3) 



3 
5 
1 
2 
2 



DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

Following are descriptions of the courses offered by the vari- 
ous departments in the Division of Plant Industry : 

AGRONOMY 

Introduction — The course in Agronomy is designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the fundamental principles in the pro- 
duction and utilization of field crops. The first two years 
include the usual scientific and cultural subjects of a College 
course, while the last two are devoted chiefly to the technical 
subjects. Students graduating from the course in Agronomy 
should be well fitted for general farming, investigational work 
in State or Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent 
work. 



47 



Agro. 101: Cereal Crops — A study of the history, distribution, culture, 
uses and improvement of cereal crops. The laboratory work is devoted to 
studies of the plant and grain of the cereal crops with detailed descriptive 
study of the grain. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Agro. 102: Grain Judging — Practice in judging the cereal crops for 
milling, seeding and feeding purposes. Prereq. Agro. 101. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Agro. 103: Forage Crops — A study of the history, distribution, adapta- 
tion, culture and uses of forage and pasture crops. The laboratory 
periods are devoted to the identification and classification of plants and 
seeds of hay and pasture crops, purity and viability of the seeds, and 
physiological studies of the plants. Prereq. Bot. 101 and Soils 101. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Agro. 104 : Crop Breeding — In this course the principles of breeding are 
applied to field crops and detailed studies made of methods used in crop 
improvement work. Prereq. Bot. 101-102 ; Genetics 110. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours, 2d term; practice, 3 hours, 3d 
term. Credit 4. 

Agro. 105: Methods in Crop Investigations — This course deals with 
methods used by Experiment Stations in crop investigational work. The 
work of different stations on certain problems is classified with the view 
of the standardization of methods. Students are required to make reports 
on and criticize methods used by the different stations in attacking the 
problems studied. Prereq. Agro. 101-103; Soils 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Agro. 106: Marketing and Grading Farm Crops — A study of market 
classifications and grades as recommended by the United States Bureau 
of Markets. The students make a study of such documents as the 
Grain Standardization Act and Rules and Regulations pertaining thereto. 
Practice is given in the laboratory in grading of grains according to the 
latest standards and regulations. Prereq. Agro. 101-102-103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Agro. 107: Classification of Farm Crops — Botannical classification of 
crop plants. Prereq. Agro. 101-103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Agro. 108: Crop Rotation — This course is designed to give the student 
a thorough knowledge of the principles and practice of crop rotation. 
Rotations used in this State and other States and the scientific principles 
involved are studied. Prereq. Agro. 101-103. 

Lectures, 2 hours, 1st term. Credit 2. 

Agro. 109: Seminar — The seminar is devoted largely to reports by 
students on current bulletins and scientific papers dealing with the 
problems in farm crops. Prereq. Agro. 104 and Soils 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour, 2d term. Credit 1. 



48 



Agro. 110: Research and Thesis — Investigation in problems pertaining 
to farm crops. The work is carried on largely in laboratory, library and 
field, and the results written in thesis form. 

Lectures and practice to fit needs; the year. Credit 6. 

GRADUATE WORK 

Agro. 201: Biometry — A study of statistical methods as applied to 
problems in Genetics and Plant Breeding. The methods used in the 
study of variations and correlations are discussed and the biometrical 
constants worked out by the class for certain assigned data. 

First term. Credit 2. 

Agro. 202: Crop Breeding — The content of this course is similar to the 
undergraduate course in Crop Breeding, but will be adapted more to 
graduate students and more of a range will be allowed in choice of 
material to suit special cases. 

Lectures, 3 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Agro. 203: Research — With the approval of the head of the department, 
the student will be allowed to work on any problem in crops or he will 
be given a list of suggested problems from which he may make a selection. 

Hours to be arranged to suit individual cases; the year. Credit 9. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

Agro. 1: Cereal Crops — A study of the history, distribution, adapta- 
tions, uses and culture of cereal crops, a larger part of the term being 
spent on corn and wheat. 

Three lectures and 3 hours; practical work; 1st term. 

Agro. 2: Forage Crops — A study of the history, distribution, adapta- 
tions, uses and culture of forage and cover crops adapted to Maryland 
conditions. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Agro. 3: Grain Judging — A laboratory course in judging grains from 
the standpoint of the grower, the feeder and the miller. 

Practice, 2 hours, 2d term. 

Agro. 4: Advanced Agronomy — Students specializing in Agronomy are 
given special work in judging and grading grains, crop improvement and 
various other phases of crop production. Students are allowed to elect 
subjects in other departments for part of the time. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 4 hours; 1st term. Lectures, 2 hours; prac- 
tice, 3 hours; 2d term. Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 4 hours; 3d term. 

SOILS 

Introduction — The subject of soils is very closely allied to the subject 
of Agronomy, and for that reason the schedule of study is the same for 
both. Students majoring in the course should be well fitted for general 
farming or investigational work. 



w 
'^.' 



49 



•?> 



•^ 

->-. 

1 



i 



Soils 101: Introductory Study of Soils — The origin, classification, 
physical and chemical properties of soils in their relation to tillage and 
the maintenance of soils fertility. Field excursions are conducted for the 
purpose of studjdng soil formation and problems of drainage. The prac- 
tical work consists mainly of experiments and demonstrations in soil 

physics. 
Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Soils 102: Soils — A continuation of 101-b. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Soils 103: Principles of Soil Management — A laboratory course dealing 
with special problems of soil management and soil analysis intended for 
students specializing in Agronomy. A special study is made of soils from 
the College Farm which have been subjected to different methods of crop- 
ping treatment. Prereq. Agro. 110-a-b and 101 and 103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Soils 104: Fertilizers — The subject of fertilizers is developed logically 
from the needs of the plant and the condition of the soil to the selection of 
proper plant food for each crop under varying conditions of soils and 
climate. Some attention is given to the home-mixing of fertilizers. 
Prereq. Soils 101-b. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Soils 105 : Advanced Soils — A study of the principal soil regions, series 
and types of the United States and especially of the soils of Maryland as 
to origin, formation and composition and value from the agricultural point 
of view. Prereq. Soils 101-b. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Soils 106: Methods in Soil Investigation — A study of methods used by 
Experiment Stations in soil problems and technique of laboratory methods. 
Prereq. Soils 101-102; Agro. 101-103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Soils 107: Research and Thesis — Investigational work of problems per- 
taining to soils. The work is carried on largely in laboratory, library and 
field, and the results written in thesis form. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; the year. Credit 6. 

Soils 201: Advanced Soils — A survey of latest investigations in soils 
and fertilizers, conducted by means of lectures, references and practical 
work. 

First term. Credit 3. 

Soils 202: Research in Soils — Original investigation of problems in soils 
and fertilizers. 

Lectures and practice to be arranged; the year. Credit 12. 

Soils 1 : General Soils — A study of the physical and chemical conditions 
of the soils in their relation to profitable agriculture. 

Three lectures and 3 hours; practical work; 3d term. 



^aan 



50 

Soils 2: Fertilizers — The selection of proper plant food for each crop 
under varying conditions of soil and climate. Special attention is given 
to the home-mixing of fertilizers. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 



VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Introduction — The course in vegetable gardening is intended 
to prepare students for the following purposes: Commercial 
vegetable gardening on truck farms, market gardens or under 
glass ; home vegetable gardening, investigational work, teach- 
ing and allied lines of work connected with growing, marketing 
and storage of horticultural products. 

Veg. G. 101 : Principles of Vegetable Gardening — This course includes a 
study of the different types of vegetable gardening, methods of propaga- 
tion, construction and management of hotbeds and cold frames, growing 
early vegetable plants under glass and methods of planting, cultivating 
and harvesting under irrigation and in a large "Farmers' Garden." 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Veg. G. 102: Tuber and Root Crops — A study of white potatoes and 
sweet potatoes, including considerations of seed, varieties, propagation, 
soils, fertilizing, planting, cultivating, spraying, harvesting, storing and 
marketing. Prereq. Veg. G. 101. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. 103: Commercial Vegetable Gardening — The methods employed 
by truckers and market gardeners in commercial production, equipment, use 
of hotbeds and cold frames, field planting, rotation of crops and irrigation. 
Cultural directions for all vegetables are given, including their require- 
ments, varieties, tillage, control of insects and diseases, grading, packing, 
storage and marketing. Each student plans and manages intensive crop- 
ping systems on small areas and under irrigation, and extensive planting 
on larger areas in a six-year rotation. Trips are taken to markets and 
vegetable farms, and the students work during the summer on commercial 
vegetable farms. Prereq. V. G. 1. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 2d, 3d and 1st terms. Credit 12. 

Veg. G. 104: Commercial Vegetable Gardening — This course is arranged 
for students in other departments who wish to know something about the 
production of vegetables for commercial purposes. Cultural directions are 
given for the most important crops — harvesting, packing and marketing. 
The practical work includes the starting of early vegetable plants in 
frames, and practice in planning, planting and managing vegetable crops 
in the field. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 



51 



Veg. G. 105 : Vegetable Forcing — A course which treats of the principles 
and practice of forcing vegetables in greenhouses. All of the vegetables 
that are used for forcing are considered, including methods of starting the 
plants, systems of companion and successive croppings and their grading, 
packing and marketing. Each student is allotted a definite area and is 
required to plan, plant and manage it. Prereq. V. G. 101. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 9. 

Veg. G. 106: Vegetable Forcing — Students who desire to complete the 
entire forcing year in the greenhouses may elect this course. The work 
will include the planning, planting and managing the spring crops which 
are planted in the greenhouses. Prereq. V. G. 105. 

Veg. G. 107: Frame Crops — The forcing of vegetables to maturity in 
hotbeds and cold frames, soil management, composting and sterilizing, use 
of permanent frames heated with manure, hot water and steam, the use of 
temporary frames for earlier planting of vegetables that will be cultivated 
as field crops. Prereq. V. G. 101. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. 108: Home Vegetable Gardening — The production of vegetables 
for home use; the location, planning, fertilizing and management of the 
garden. The varieties to select, study of vegetable seeds, germination 
tests, growing early plants in hotbeds and cold frames and their care until 
they are planted outside in the "Farmers* Garden." Seed sowing, cultiva- 
tion, harvesting and storing. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Veg. G. 109: Vegetable Gardening for Teachers — A course designed to 
give methods in teaching vegetable gardening. Planning projects to meet 
different conditions. Equipment, study of seeds, germination tests, seed 
sowing, transplanting, potting, management of frames, use and care of 
tools in outside planting and cultivation. Selection of varieties, harvest- 
ing and storing. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. 110: Vegetable Growing for Canning — ^A course dealing with 
the principal vegetables grown for commercial canning; cultural directions 
for these crops and the home canning of surplus products. Practical work 
in canning small amounts of vegetables in tin cans and glass jars. Prereq. 
V. G. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. Ill: Systematic Olericulture — This course includes a systematic 
and descriptive study of the leading varieties of the most important vege- 
tables, their origin and botany; adaptation of the various varieties to the 
different cultural and market conditions; judging and exhibition work. 
Prereq. Veg. G. 102-103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. 112: Advanced Vegetable Gardening — Advanced students who 
are preparing for some special line of work may elect this course for the 



52 



purpose of studying the special problems concerned. This course may be 
elected any term up to four credits. Improving crop yields, seed selection, 
soil fertility problems, labor, marketing problems, business systems, 
experimental work and other subjects may be considered. All of the 
facilities of the department are available for students in this course. 
Prereq. Veg. G. 103-111. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice 6 hours; the year. Credit 12. 

Veg. G. 113: Horticultural Seminar — ^Weekly meeting of faculty and 
senior students in vegetable gardening. Each one will present a paper 
on some horticultural subject, which will be followed by a general dis- 
cussion. Attendance of juniors permitted and desired. Required, 2d 
term, 1 theoretical period per week. 

Lecture, 1 hour; 1st and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

Veg. G. 114: Research — Advanced students may elect this course for 
the purpose of studying some special subject on vegetable gardening or 
experiments with vegetables. The results are written in the form of a 
report to be filed in the department. Each student's work is arranged 
individually. All of the facilities of the department are available to such 
student. A student may elect any available subject desired in case the 
problem does not require all of the time. 

Practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 6. 

GRADUATE SUBJECTS 

Veg. G. 201: Advanced Vegetable Gardening — Lectures and practical 
work on the most important phases of gardening. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours. Credit 3. 

Veg. G. 202: Research in Vegetable Gardening — Original investigation 
of problems in vegetable gardening as soils, culture, breeding, etc. 

Practice, 12 hours; the year. Credit 12. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

Veg. G. 1: Home Vegetable Gardening — The general principles of vege- 
table gardening as applied to the growing of vegetables for home use. 
The laboratory work includes a study of vegetable seeds, seed testing, seed 
sowing, transplanting and the care of plants in the greenhouses and cold 
frames. The students are required to plan, plant and manage a large 
home garden until the end of the term. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 
3 hours; 3d term. 

Veg. G. 2: Commercial Vegetable Gardening — A study of the prin- 
ciples of vegetable gardening as applied to the growing of vegetables for 
market and for canning. The course includes the construction and man- 
agement of hotbeds and cold frames, growing early vegetable plants, soil 
preparation, sowing and planting, cultivation, harvesting, grading, pack- 
ing, marketing, canning and storage. Each student is allotted a definite 
area and is required to plan, plant and manage it. 



53 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Lectures, 2 hours; prac- 
tice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Veg. G. 3: Vegetable Forcing — A course which deals with the prin- 
ciples and practice of forcing vegetables in greenhouses, hotbeds and cold 
frames. The most important forcing crops are considered. Each student 
is assigned a definite plot in the greenhouses and frames and is required 
to plan, plant and manage it. Second year. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. 

Veg. G. 4: Vegetable Growing for the Canning Industry — A course 
dealing with the principal vegetables grown for commercial canning, cul- 
tural directions for these crops and the home canning of surplus products. 
Practical work will consist in canning small amounts of vegetables in tin 
cans and glass jars. Second year. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Veg. G. 5 : Advanced Vegetable Gardening — Students who elect to spend 
the entire time scheduled for horticulture in vegetable gardening will be 
given a course which includes the subjects considered under Courses 2 and 
3, but the problems arising in the different phases of commercial vegetable 
growing will be treated in a more thorough manner. It also includes a 
systematic study of some of the more important commercial varieties. 
Trips will be taken to markets and vegetable farms. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 6 hours; 1st and 3d terms. Lectures, 2 
hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



POMOLOGY 

Introduction — The course in Pomology is planned to meet the 
needs of students who want to take up practical Pomology or 
teach or carry on investigational work. The theoretical instruc- 
tion is supplemented by excursions to field and orchards for 
practical work. 

COURSES OFFERED 

Pom. 101: Principles of Pomology — This is an introductory course 
which deals with the principles of fruit growing and covers the methods of 
propagation, planting and pruning. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Pom. 102: Commercial Pomology — In this course the harvesting, grad- 
ing, packing, storing and marketing of fruits are taken up. The prepara- 
tion of orchard by-products, such as cider and vinegar, making dried, 
canned and preserved fruits are considered. The department is equipped 
with a cider mill and canning and drying outfits, and students will be 
given practical exercises in the preparation of these products. Prereq. 
Pom. 101. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 



54 

Pom. 103: Fruit Judging — In this course the student is given practical 
exercises in judging fruit, identifying fruits and in selecting fruits for 
exhibition purposes. The standards and principles governing the judging 
of fruits are applied. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Pom. 104: Practical Pomology — Managing commercial orchards; a 
study of orchard sites, soils, planting plans, cultivation, cover crops, com- 
panion crops, fertilizers, pruning and spraying as practical in commercial 
orchards. Prereq. Pom. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 
Credit 5. 

Pom. 105 : Small Fruit Culture — Cultural methods for the production of 
strawberries, grapes and bunch fruits for market and for the home. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Pom. 106: Nut Culture and Citrus and Sub-tropical Fruits — This course 
is designed to cover these subjects in a general way. Prereq. Pom. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Pom. 107: Systematic Pomology — This course embraces a study of the 
evolution and relation of pomological plants. It includes exercises in 
describing and identifying the leading commercial varieties. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Pom. 108: Advanced Pomology — Special problems in adaptation, propa- 
gation, cultivation, pruning, harvesting and marketing as they arise in 
commercial orchards and nurseries will be discussed. The origin and 
development of the various fruit-producing sections and industries will 
also be considered and a study made of the men interested and the 
methods which they use. In this course it may be necessary at times for 
the student to visit orchards in other sections of the State. Prereq. Pom. 
105. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Pom. 109: Origin, Improvement and Breeding of Fruits — The discussion 
of the methods in plant improvement are accompanied by practice in the 
orchard, greenhouse and garden. Prereq. Bot. 110. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Pom. 110: Research and Thesis — The work will be arranged with each 
student individually. He may select some topic or problem in which he 
may be specially interested and which will require some independent 
investigation. The results to be presented in the form of a thesis. 

Practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 6. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



Research — Special problems in Pomology. Work may be based upon 
compilation and analysis of available date or upon new data acquired by 
research or experiment. Credits and hours to be arranged. 



55 



4 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

Pom 1 : Elementary Pomology — An introductory course dealing with the 
principles of the subject. It is intended for all students in the two-year 
course and it is prerequisite to the later courses. First year. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Pom. 2: Practical Fruit Growing — This course is designed for those 
students who desire to devote all their allotted time in horticulture to 
pomology. The entire field will be covered and the subjects treated in all 
the other courses in pomology will be included herein so far as the allotted 
time and the capacity of the student will permit. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Lectures, 2 
hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Pom. 3: Commercial Pomology — In this course the methods of gather- 
ing, packing and marketing of the various fruits are taken up. Market 
problems, transportation and shipping associations receive special atten- 
tion. Advantage is taken of the materials available at this time to study 
the classification and identification of the leading commercial varieties of 
apples. The student is also given practical exercises in fruit judging and 
the selection of fruits for exhibition purposes. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Pom. 4: Practical Fruit Growing — This course is a continuation of 
course Pom. 1 and deals with orchard sites, soils, varieties, companion 
crops, fertilizers and pruning as practiced in both commercial and home 
orchards. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

Pom. 5: Small Fruits — In this course the production of strawberries, 
bush fruits and grapes is considered. The methods of propagation, selec- 
tion of sites, soils, pruning, training and cultivation are discus-sed. 
Second year. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING AND FLORICULTURE 

L. & F. 101: Principles of Landscape Gardening — A study of types, 
methods and principles underlying Landscape Gardening. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

L. & F. 102: Plant Materials — A study in field and laboratory of trees, 
shrubs and herbaceous plants. Plants are studied in respect to their 
values, characters, habits, soil requirements and arrangement and plant- 
ing design. Prereq. Bot. 112. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 103: Landscape Design — The composition of gardens, private 
estates and related problems. This study involves the topographical sur- 
vey, drainage and grading plans. Prereq. engineering, — ; drawing, — , 
and surveying, — . 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 



56 



L. & F. 104: Landscape Design — Continuation of L. & F. 103, including 
more complex problems and a study of public parks and playgrounds. 
Attention is given to planting plans and designs. Prereq. L. & F. 103-a. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 105 : Landscape Practice — Grading plans, construction, drawing, 
estimates, specifications and contracts. Prereq. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 106: Civic Art — A general study of the methods of city planning 
and their application to village and rural improvement. 
Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

L. & F. 107 : History of Landscape Gardening — A reference course deal- 
ing with the literature and different stages of the development of the art. 
Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

L. & F. 108: Floriculture: Greenhouse Management — Preparation of 
soils, potting, watering, ventilating and fumigating as applied to green- 
house crops. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 109: Commercial Floriculture — Greenhouse plants and flowers, 
their culture and methods of handling and marketing for wholesale and 
retail markets. Trips are taken to leading growers in this section of the 
country. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 110: Commercial Floriculture — Continuation of course 109. 
Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. Ill: Greenhouse Construction — A study of types of forcing 
structures, their location, arrangement and construction, cost, methods of 
heating and ventilation. The work includes drawing plans, specifications 
and practical working construction. Prereq. drawing, — . 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 112: Floral Decoration — A study of plants and cut flowers 
and their arrangement in baskets, designs, bouquets, table and house 
decoration. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

L. & F. 113: Garden Flowers — The growing of annuals, bulbous plants, 
and herbaceous perennials for home gardens and for cut flowers and 
ornamental planting. 

Lecture, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 114: Amateur Floriculture — Plants and flowers for window and 
home gardens; soils, fertilizers, containers, and potting and shifting 
of plants. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 115: Tree Repair — Methods of treating trees and shrubs to con- 
trol attacks of insects and fungous enemies and the repair of injuries 
done by these enemies. Some attention is given to the technical details. 



57 

of pruning, placing, treatment of wounds and cavity filling. Prereq. 
Plant Pathology , Entomology . 

Lectures, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

L. & F. 116: Thesis — A tyi)ewritten report upon some subject or prob- 
lem in landscape gardening. 

Practice, 3 hours; the year. Credit 3. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

L. & F. 1: Plant Propagation — A study of the propagation of the plant 
by means of seedage, layering, cuttings, buds and grafts. Special 
attention is given to ornamental planting for home decoration. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 2 hours; 2d term. 

L. & F. 2: Floriculture — A study of the various phases of greenhouse 
management, including preparation of soils, watering, potting and 
ventilating. Elective. 

Lecture, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

L. & F. 3: Principles of Landscape Gardening — A study of the various 
styles of landscape gardening and the principles which underlie them. 
Special application is made to the ornamentation of the home grounds. 
Elective. 

Lecture, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

L. & F. 4: Commercial Floral Crops — Methods of growing and market- 
ing plants and cut flowers for wholesale and retail markets. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 2 hours; 2d term. 

Lecture, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 3d term. 

FORESTRY 

Introduction — Instruction in Forestry is planned to give the 
student who is fitting himself to take up practical problems in 
farm management a sufficient knowledge of the principles of 
Forestry to enable him to apply to the wood lot or timber tract 
the same degree of intelligent direction which he has prepared 
to give to the tilled lands. At the present time Forestry is not 
offered as a major course, but is used to supplement the con- 
tent of the other courses. 

101: Farm Forestry — A study of forest botany, wood management, 
measurements, fire protection, nursery practice, tree planting, valuation 
and utilization of forest crops. The work is conducted by means of 
lectures and field work. It may be elected by any student having the 
necessary prerequisites. Prerequisites Botany, 101-2-3. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

1: Farm Forestry — The content of this course is similar to that of 101, 
but is adapted to the development and needs of students in the two- 
year agricultural course. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 



58 



ECONOMIC BOTANY 

Introduction — ^The purpose of the department is to supply 
students in Agriculture and General Science with such informa- 
tion as is thought fundamental to their special subjects, and to 
train students specializing in the department in the different 
phases of Botany. This training includes such knowledge of 
plants as would fit one for various positions ; such as teachers 
in high schools, normal schools, colleges and investigators in 
Experiment Stations and Government service. 



Bot. 101: General Botany — A general introduction to Botany. It touches 
briefly on all the phases of Botany and is prerequisite to all other sub- 
jects offered in the department. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Bot. 102: Plant Histology — An anatomical study of leaves, stems, roots, 
flowers and fruits. Where possible plants of economic value are used 
as type specimens. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3, 

Bot. 103: Plant Physiology — A summary view of the physiological 
processes and behavior of seed plants. The plant is studied in relation 
to soil, water requirements and other physical processes. Prereq. Bot. 
101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Bot. 104: Plant Physiology — Continuation of 103-b; devoted to the study 
of metabolism, growth and movement. This term is devoted to the study 
of photosynthesis, synthesis of fat and proteins, respiration, fermenta- 
tion, digestion, growth and movement. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Bot. 105: General Plant Pathology — An introductory study of the dis- 
ease of plants. Especial attention is given symptoms and to microscopic 
study of the parasites causing diseases. As far as possible choice of 
material includes representatives of the principal orders of parasitic 
fungi. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Bot. 106: Methods in Pathology — A study of methods of sterilization, 
preparation of culture media, and cultural methods as applied to different 
groups of parasitic organisms. Some work is done in killing and fixing 
material, staining and mounting, inoculation and determination of 
species. Prereq. Path. 105. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3, 

Bot. 107 : Diseases of Horticultural Plants — A detailed study of diseases 
of fruits, vegetables and other horticultural plants. Especial attention 



59 



is given to causes, symptoms, effects and methods of control. Prereq. 
Path. 105. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Bot. 108: Diseases of Cereal and Forage Crops — A detailed study of 
selected types of diseases of cereal and forage crops. The study is from 
the point of view of distribution, economic importance, symptoms, and 
effects, causes and methods of control. Prereq. Path. 105. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Bot. 110: Genetics — A study of heredity. A review is given of the phe- 
nomena of evolution and a study made of variation, hybridisation and 
experimental data. This subject of genetics is fundamental to any ad- 
vanced study of breeding. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Bot. Ill: Plant Ecology — A study of plants in relation to their environ- 
ments. Plant formations and successions in various parts of the coun- 
try are briefly treated. Much of the work, especially the practical, must 
be carried on in the field, and for this purpose type regions adjacent to 
the college are selected. It is generally necessary to take three or 
four trips at some distance from the college, in which case Saturdays 
are used for that purpose. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Bot. 112: Systematic Botany — A study of the local flora. A study is 
made of floral parts and the essential relations between the groups of 
flowering plants. Students become familiar with the systematic key 
used to identify plants. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Bot. 113: Plant Morphology — A course designed to give the student a 
comprehensive view of the Plant Kingdom. It treats of the general 
morphological evolutionary development and relationships of the vari- 
ous groups of plants, based upon the examination of selected types 
from each group. Prereq. Bot. 103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 2 J term. Credit 3. 

Bot. 114: Methods in Plant Histology — Primarily a study in technique. 
It includes methods of killing, fixing, imbedding, sectioning, staining 
and mounting on slides of plant materials. Prereq. Bot. 101. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Bot. 115: Seminar in Botany — Conferences and reports on Botanical 
literature, special problems and research. Prereq. Bot. 103. 

Lecture and special topics, 1 hour. Credit 1. 

Bot. 116: Plant Micro-Chemistry — Michro-technical methods applied to 
the identification of organic and inorganic substances found in the plant 
tissues. Prereq. Bot. 103. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Bot. 117: Research and Thesis — Original investigation of some project, 
the results of which are written up in thesis form. This subject is 



60 

offered for advanced students of Botany. Hours are arranged to fit 
individual cases. 

Practice, 9 hours; the year. Credit 9. 

GRADUATE SUBJECTS 

Bot. 201: Advanced Plant Physiology — A detailed study of physiological 
processes where special problems are discussed from all points of view. 
Lectures and laboratories to fit the individual cases. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 12. 

Bot. 202: Research in Plant Physiology — Original investigation of 
projects relative to physiology of plants. 

Practice, 12 hours; the year. Credit 4. 

Bot. 203: Plant Pathology — An advanced study of causal agents, symp- 
toms, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 4. 

Bot. 204 : Research in Plant Pathology — Original investigation of special 
problems. 

Practice, 12 hours; the year. Credit 4. 

Bot. 205: Special Morphology — A study of the four great groups of 
plants as related to their Morphological development. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 3. 

Bot. 206 : Research in Morphology — Original investigation of some prob- 
lem relating to structural development. 

Practice, 12 hours; the year. Credit 4. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

Bot. 1: General Botany — A survey of the field of Botany. Effort is 
made to give the student an understanding of how plants take up water 
and nutrients from the soil, how they manufacture foods, and the struc- 
tures necessary to carry on these processes. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 

Bot. 2: Plant Diseases — A practical study of diseases of plants to enable 
the student to recognize them in the field. A course in sprays and spray- 
ing is given in co-operation with the Zoology Department in which the 
student is taught methods of disease control. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 

ECONOMIC ZOOLOGY 

Introduction — ^The department aims to give a broad training 
in general Zoology and, at present, to prepare specialists only 
in entomology. There are special advantages for students in 
entomology, since the State and Station work is conducted 
through this department. 

The course fully meets the requirements outlined for 
entrance by the leading medical colleges. 



61 



I 



New courses have been outlined and will be offered in the 
near future ; for specialization in apiculture, parasitology and 
agriculture; and in evolution and zoological theory, social life 
of insects, ecology and animal behavior. 

Zoo. 101: General Zoology — The relationships of animals, their general 
form and structure, their responses to environing conditions and their 
development and evolution are discussed in a broad manner. One example 
of each branch of the animal kingdom is studied in the laboratories. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 8. 

Zoo. 102: Histology and Embryology — A study of the normal tissues, 
chiefly of the mammals, covers the ground usually assigned to general 
Histology. The course in Embryology is based on the chick and pig. 
Prereq. Zoo. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 12. 

Zoo. 103: Entomology — General principles of structural, systematic and 
economic Entomology. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work and field 
excursions. A collection of representative economic insects is required, 
together with a general collection properly arranged to orders. Prereq. 
Zoo. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Zoo. 104: Insecticides and Their Application — The principles of insecti- 
cides, their chemistry, preparation and application, including construction, 
care and use of spray and dusting machinery, fumigation and mechanical 
controls. 

Lectures, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Zoo. 105: Parasitology — A course offered especially far animal hus- 
bandry men to include lectures and laboratory work on the principal 
ectozoic and entozoic parasites of domestic animals. Prereq. Zoo. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Zoo. 106: Economic Entomology — Morphology of type of insects to 
acquaint the student with special structures bearing on insect control, 
insect biology, including methods. The theory and practice of insect 
control. Prereq. Zoo. 103. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 12. 

Zoo. 107: Economic Entomology — Problems in Economic Entomology, 
including life history, ecology, distribution, parasitism and control. Pre- 
req, Zoo. 106. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 15. 

Zoo. 108: Systematic Entomology — A fundamental study of the mor- 
phology of various types of insects and a consideration of the characters 
of the various orders, their division into tribes, families, etc. Prereq. 
Zoo. 103. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 12. 



62 

Zoo. 109: Advanced Systematic Entomology — The student selects some 
group in which he is particularly interested and makes a detailed study of 
it. The course requires considerable field work and is supplemented by 
laboratory periods and frequent conferences. Prereq. Zoo. 108. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Zoo. 110: Scientific Delineation and Preparations — Photography, pho- 
tomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera lucida, lantern-slides 
making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit and museum material. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Zoo. Ill: Horticultural Entomology — Lectures, laboratory and field 
work on the morphology, biology and control of insect pests of horti- 
cultural crops. Prereq. 104. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 



GRADUATE STUDIES 

Zoo. 201: Investigations in Entomology — Studies of minor problems in 
morphology, taxonomy and applied entomology under the direction of a 
member of the staff, with particular reference to preparation for individual 
research. 

Credit according to work done. 

Zoo. 202: Research in Entomology — Advanced students having sufficient 
preparation may, with the approval of the head of the department, under- 
take individual research in morphology, taxonomy or biology and control 
of insects. Frequently the student may be allowed to work on Station or 
State Horticultural Department projects. The students' work may form 
a part of the final report on the project and be published in bulletin form. 

Credit according to work done. 

Zoo. 203: Advanced Economic Entomology — Lectures discussing the 
latest theories and practices in applied Entomology. 
Lectures, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

Zoo. 1: Animal Pests — A study of crop and Animal Pests with practice 
in identification; designed to enable the farmer to recognize and intelli- 
gently combat them. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 2d term. 

Zoo. 2: Sprays and Spraying — Preparation and application of insecti- 
cides, together with a consideration of other methods of control. 
Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 3d term. 

Zoo. 3: Beekeeping — Consideration of the underlying principles of suc- 
cessful Beekeeping with practice in preparation of equipment and the 
manipulation of bees. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 



es 



EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

The nearness of the College to Washington and the United 
States Department of Agriculture and the Congressional 
Library gives it advantages that the other agricultural colleges 
lack. 

Instructors of the Division of Plant Industry frequently take 
their classes to the Government farm at Arlington and other 
places of interest in and about the United States Department. 

Graduate students are permitted, where satisfactory ar- 
rangement can be made, to do their investigational work in the 
United States Department under the supervision of the proper 
College authorities. 

The departments of Agronomy, Soils and Botany have quar- 
ters in the new Agricultural Building, which is to be equipped 
with the most modern classroom and laboratory facilities. 

The Department of Agronomy recently installed modern 
apparatus for grading and testing grains, and students wishing 
to equip themselves for this new line of work will have an 
opportunity to do so. 

The Department of Botany is prepared to give undergraduate 
and graduate instruction in all phases of the subject. Special 
emphasis is placed upon plant physiology and diseases of eco- 
nomic plants. 

The Department of Zoology has its laboratories well supplied 
with collections of insects, models, microscopes and other sup- 
plies necessary for practical work in zoology and entomology.. 
A greenhouse with an aquarium and a screen insectary adja- 
cent to the laboratories are used for class and investigational 
work. Since the State and Experiment Station entomological 
work is conducted through the College department, it has 
special advantages for students in applied entomology. 

All departments of the division have greenhouses for experi- 
mental and demonstration purposes. The Horticultural De- 
partment has at its disposal 10 greenhouses that are 50 feet by 
20 feet and of the latest model. Adjacent to these is a 10-acre 
patch of land for orchards and gardens. The laboratories are 



64 



equipped with tools necessary for practical work. With these 
facilities the department offers instruction to students desiring 
to specialize in any phase of pomology, vegetable gardening, 
landscape gardening or floriculture. 

The Experiment Station, being on the same campus with the 
College, offers a field of observation in farm practice, experi- 
mental plots, greenhouses and orchards for students interested 
in plant industry. 

An exhibit of field crops and horticultural products will be 
held every autumn. All students bringing material from their 
home farms are permitted to exhibit it for prizes. 



9 



Division of Animal Industry 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

R. C. Reed Dean of Division of Animal Industry and Pro- 

fesor of Animal Pathology. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro.. . .Professor of Farm Management and Director 

of Short Winter Courses. 

R. H. RUFPNER Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

J. A. Gamble Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

A. R. Ward Professor of Bacteriology and Pathologist of 

the Biological Laboratory. 



INTRODUCTION 



The object of the work in Animal Husbandry is to give 
instruction in all lines of work which pertain to the judging, 
breeding, selecting, development and improving the various 
breeds, types and classes of domesticated animals. The course 
in Animal Husbandry is offered to students who wish to become 
proficient in those branches of animal or dairy husbandry 
which relate to the breeding of pure-bred and high-grade stock. 
Attention is given to the production, handling, marketing and 
manufacturing of high-class dairy products. The students are 
always given such instruction as to enable them: (1) To secure 
positions in the various lines of work which demand young men 
well trained in animal husbandry and dairying ; (2) to conduct 
their own farming operations with pleasure and profit. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 



II 



The required and elective work of the various departments 
of the division is outlined on the following pages. The College 
reserves the right to withdraw any course at any time : 



p 



66 
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis , 

Freshman Lectures 

Industrial History, or 
Mathematics, or 

Language 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course . 



3(1) 

(2) 

2(6) 



3(1) 

(2) 

2(6) 



3(3) 

i"* 

4 
1(2) 



3(3) 

i " 

4 

1(2) 



3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 
3(3) 
2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Animal Husbandry 101 — General Animal Husbandry. 
Animal Husbandry 102 — Live Stock Management . . . 

Animal Husbandry 103 — Principles of Breeding 

Chemistry 102 — Qualitative Analysis 

Chemistry 103 — Quantitative Analysis 

Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory' Study 

Geology 102 — General Geology 

Botany 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103 — Elementary Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Elementary Plant Physiology 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 

Elective 



3(3) 



2(3) 



1(6) 
3(3) 



1(6) 
3(3) 



2(3) 



2(6) 



1(2) 
3 



1(2) 
3 



2(3) 
i(6) 



2(6) 
1(2) 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



1(6) 



Animal Husbandry 104 — Animal Nutrition 3(3) 

Animal Husbandry 105 — Stock Judging 

Animal Husbandry 1 1 1 — Anatomy and Phsyiology 3 

Bacteriology 101— General Bacteriology 1(6) 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics 3 

Soils 102— Continuation of 101 2(3) 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

English 13 — Technical Composition 2 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course 1 R R 

Elective I 3 



1(3) 
1(6) 



3(3) 
2 

R 
6 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Animal Husbandry 106 — Advanced Stock Judging 

Animal Husbandry 112 — Animal Diseases 

Animal Husbandry 1 18 — Farm Poultry 

Rural Economics 107 — Farm Management 

Animal Husbandry 120 — Research and Thesis. . . . 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



1(3) 



13 



(6) 
R 



3(3) 

3 

3(3) 
(6) 
R 

4 



3(3) 
(6) 
R 
11 



ELECTIVES OFFERED IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 



Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 
Animal 



Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 
Husbandry 



107 — Horse and Mule Production. 

108 — Beef Production 

109 — Hog Production , 

110 — Sheep Production 

113 — Dairy Management 

114 — Farm Dairj-ing 

115— Market Milk 

116— Milk Products 

119 — Poultry Practice , 

117 — Advanced Milk Hygiene. . . , 



1(3) 



1(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 
1(3) 



(6) 



1(3) 

1(3) 

1(3) 
(3) 



67 



DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

Following are descriptions of the courses offered by the vari- 
ous departments in the Division of Animal Industry : 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 101: General Animal Husbandry — Types and breeds of live stock. 
Judging and estimating the weight and age of farm animals. Practical 
methods of using the score card. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

A. H. 102: Liyestock Management — Feeding, housing and general man- 
agement of farm live stock. Methods of keeping records of production 
and feeding, testing milk for butter-fat and the organization of testing 
associations. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

A. H. 103: Principles of Breeding — A treatment of the principles and 
practices involved in the improvement of the domestic animals. The 
course includes the subjects of heredity, selection and development. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

A. H. 104: Animal Nutrition — Principles of nutrition, composition and 
comparative value of feeding stuffs, balance rations, study of standards 
and practical problems. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

A. H. 105: Stock Judging — The course consists of lectures and practice 
on the animal form and character, giving special attention to market 
classes of live stock. Illustrations are used to indicate quality, vigor, 
capacity for profitable production of milk, meat, wool, work and speed. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 106: Advanced Stock Judging — A continuation of A. H. 105. The 
major portion of the work is done by the method of comparative judging, 
similar to County and State fair work. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 107: Horse and Mule Production — A discussion of the successful 
practical methods of breeding, handling and training horses and mules. 
Feeding and care of work horses, fattening horses, carriage and saddle 
horses, brood mares, foals and stallions. A careful study is made of the 
cost of raising horses. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-3. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 108: Beef Production — Breeding, feeding, care and management 
of beef cattle. A study of successful practice in feeding for market and 
fitting for show. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-3. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 109: Hog Production — Types and breeds of swine, principles of 
swine breeding, results of experiments in swine feeding and management, 
marketing and curing, buildings, sanitation and the prevention of dis- 
eases. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-3. 



68 



Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 110: Sheep Production — Types and breeds of sheep, principles of 
sheep breeding, results of experiments in sheep feeding, shelter, rearing 
for mutton and wool; production of winter or hothouse lambs; care and 
management of the farm flock. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-3. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. Ill: Anatomy and Physiology — Study of the structure and func- 
tions of the animal. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

A. H. 112: Animal Diseases — Study of diseases of domestic animals 
with special reference to the recognition of disease conditions, hygiene 
and sanitation. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

A. H. 113: Dairy Management — This course is devoted to a study of the 
care, management and feeding of the dairy herd; selection and care of 
the herd bull; raising calves and heifers; improvement of the herd through 
breeding and feeding operations; pedigrees; keeping herd records and the 
practical applications of methods for the production of clean milk. Pre- 
req. A. H. 101-2-3. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

A. H. 114: Farm Dairying — Care and handling of milk and cream on 
the farm, centrifugal separation, pasteurization and testing of milk and 
milk products. / 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 115: Market Milk — Importance of clean milk to consumer and 
producer; sources of milk contamination; how to produce clean milk; 
scoring methods of production; treatment after milking; methods of 
cooling; transportation of milk; pasteurization of milk and cream; stand- 
ardization milk and cream; grading of milk and cream; care of milk in the 
home. Prereq. General Bacteriology. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 116: Milk Products — This course takes up a study of the manu- 
facture of frozen products, neuf chatel and cottage cheese, the preparation 
and marketing of fermented milk drinks; preparation and use of starters; 
butter making; determination of the total solids in milk and the per- 
centage of fat in ice-cream, evaporated milk and condensed milk by means 
of the lactometer and the Babcock machine. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-4; Gen- 
eral Bacteriology. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 117: Advanced Milk Hygiene — Methods and standards for the 
production and distribution of certified milk. Prereq. General Bacteri- 
ology. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

A. H. 118: Farm Poultry — Care of poultry on the general farm; breeds 
of poultry; selection of stock; principles of poultry-house construction; 
poultry feeds and feeding; breeding, management of laying and breeding 



69 



I 



stock; natural and artificial incubation; keeping of poultry records. Pre- 
req. A. H. 101-2-3. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

A. H. 119: Poultry Practice — Poultry-house construction; fattening, 
killing, dressing, marketing poultry; each student taking this course is 
required to operate an incubator and brooder. Keeping accurate records 
and submitting detailed reports. Prereq. A. H. 101-2-3-18, 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

A. H. 120: Research and Thesis — The lines of work and subjects to be 
investigated are to be arranged with the head of the department. The 
object of this work is to develop independence and originality in the stu- 
dent, and also to give him a taste for personal investigation upon lines 
which are of particular interest to himself. The results of these investi- 
gations are usually incorporated in a thesis. 

Practice, 6 hours; the year. Credit 6. 

A. H. 1: Breeds and Judging of Live Stock — The student begins with the 
breeds of live stock, making a thorough study of their development and 
characteristics and also of the pedigrees and performances of superior 
individuals among horses, cattle, sheep and swine. The practical part 
of the course is devoted to the judging of horses, dairy cattle, beef cattle, 
sheep and swine. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 

A. H. 2: Dairying — This course takes up a study of the care and han- 
dling of milk and cream on the farm, centrifugal separation, pasteuriza- 
tion and the testing of milk and milk products. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 3d term. 

A. H. 3: Feeds and Feeding — This course embraces the principles and 
practice of animal feeding. After covering the principles of feeding it 
takes up the composition of feeding stuffs, their combinations into 
properly balanced rations and the relation between the sustenance of 
animals and their products. Problems relating to balanced rations are 
solved. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 

A. H. 4: Breeding of Animals — The main object of this course is to 
direct attention and to stimulate interest in the more tangible physical 
basis of heredity. A scientific study of the physical aspects of heredity 
leads to conclusions which fully accord with the teachings of the work 
of our master breeders. It is the aim to limit discussion to points upon 
which scientific opinion is quite well agreed. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 2d term. 

A. H. 5: Animal Diseases — A briefer course in Animal Diseases is 
offered to the students in the Two-Year Agricultural Course. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 2d term. 

A. H. 6: Farm Poultry — A general course dealing with poultry-house 
construction, yarding, fattening, killing, dressing and marketing, and a 
brief description of the more common breeds. Demonstrations are given 
in the practices of handling poultry. 






70 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

A. H. 7 : Animal Industry — A study of the successful methods of operat- 
ing farms devoted chiefly to livestock production and of the systems to 
be applied to Maryland conditions. The student may arrange with the 
head of the department to utilize one-half of scheduled time in other 
departments. Elective. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 4 hours; 1st term. Lectures, 2 hours; prac- 
tice, 3 hours; 2d term. Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 4 hours; 3d term. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Equipment and Facilities for Instruction 

The Division of Animal Husbandry is equipped with a new 
stock- judging pavilion and modern rooms for the preparation 
of market milk, milk-testing laboratory, creamery manufac- 
tures, offices and classrooms. 

Good herds of stock are being established at the Experiment 
Station, which are of use to the student in his studies. In 
addition to the supply of stock on the farm, the proximity of 
the College to Washington and Baltimore makes it possible for 
the student to get excellent material for study. 

It is evident that there is but one way to make a young man 
a proficient judge of live-stock, and that is by training the eye. 
In all of the lecture and laboratory work outffned in the courses 
the work is demonstrated with living specimens. 

Junior and senior students taking this course are sent to 
farms throughout the State of Maryland to supervise advanced 
registry tests for the dairy associations. These trips give the 
students the advantage of observing the most up-to-date farms 
in the country, in addition to practical experience. Each year 
a judging team consisting of three students participates in the 
students' contest in judging dairy cattle at the National Dairy 
Show. Students in any of the agricultural courses are eligible 
to compete for a place on this team. The selection of students 
for the team is based upon ability and efficiency in this line of 
work. 

Students desiring to specialize in any line of live stock are 
allowed to do so, and animals are furnished for the special 
purpose whenever possible. Berkshire, Duroc-Jersey, Tam- 
worth and large Yorkshire breeds of swine are maintained. 



Division of Engineering 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

T. H. Taliaferro .... Dean, Professor of Mathematics and Civil En- 
gineering. 
H. GwiNNER Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Draw- 
ing. 

Myron Creese Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

H. C. Byrd Director of Athletics and Chief of Division of 

Publications. 

John Pitcher Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

W. A. Griffith Physician, Lecturer on Hygiene. 

*G. P. Springer Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

J. M. Smith Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

L. J. Hodgins Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Physics. 

J. T. Spann Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

*W. W. Smelker Instructor in Farm Machinery. 

C. T. McCuRDY Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



* Leave of absence for war work. 



INTRODUCTION 

For administrative purposes the engineering group includes, 
in addition to the departments of Civil, Electrical and Mechani- 
cal Engineering, the departments of Mathematics, Physics, 
Physical Training and Military Science and Tactics. 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are 
offered in Civil, Electrical and Mechanical and Rural Engineer- 
ing, respectively. An outline of each is found on the succeed- 
ing pages. The four-year courses are arranged with a view to 
preparing the student for immediate usefulness in the technical 
world. The fundamental principles are emphasized through 
lectures, recitations and practical exercises in the laboratory, 
drafting room, shop and field. The courses allow some lati- 
tude in the selection of subjects in the senior year, but in the 
main they are fixed in character, since experience indicates that 



72 

the faculty is better qualified to select the subjects to be 
studied than the average undergraduate. The curriculums 
include studies which provide a broad general culture as well 
as a good foundation for technical engineering. Emphasis is 
placed on the necessity for the development of self-reliance, 
honest and accurate methods of work, and good judgment in 
addition to mastering the scientific laws underlying the pro- 
fession of engineering and applying them. 



Instruction 

The division is organized, first, to instruct the students who 
desire to practice engineering as a profession, and, second, to 
teach students interested in agriculture and applied science, 
such branches of mechanic arts and engineering as will promote 
their individual interests. Instruction in certain subjects re- 
quired under the provision of the Smith-Hughes Act for the 
training of teachers in the industrial arts will be given. An 
opportunity is afforded each year for practicing road engineers 
to take an intensive course in road building and maintenance, 
and for persons attending the short courses in agriculture to 
obtain instruction in farm machinery, wood work, the mixing 
and placing of concrete, etc. 

The work in the departments of Mathematics and Physics is 
developed with a view both to its cultural and its utilitarian 
value. The utilitarian point of view is probably more empha- 
sized because scientific training is so largely dependent on 
these subjects, particularly mathematics. Their value, how- 
ever, in mental training and in general culture is clearly pre- 
sented to the students. 

A general statement regarding military instruction is given 
elsewhere. An outline of subjects assigned to the Department 
of Military Science and Tactics, under provisions of the act 
establishing the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, is placed 
with those given by the other departments of the division. 

At present no courses are offered in the Department of Physi- 
cal Training. A statement regarding that work will be found 
elsewhere. 



78 



SUMMER WORK AND INSPECTION 

In addition to the work given during the regular session, 
summer work covering 100 hours of field, laboratory, shop 
or office practice is required of members of the freshman class. 
This work will be developed to include also a specified amount 
of time at the close of the sophomore and junior years. Sum- 
mer employment will be accepted as a substitute for this work, 
if found to be equivalent. 

The proximity of the College to Baltimore and Washington 
and to other places where there are great industrial enter- 
prises offers an excellent opportunity for engineering students 
to observe what is being done in their chosen field. An instruc- 
tor accompanies students on all trips of inspection. 

Information and advice is given to farmers and others inter- 
ested concerning drainage, sanitation, water supply, lighting, 
farm machinery and other small engineering problems when- 
ever possible, although neither an Experiment Station nor an 
Extension Department in Engineering has as yet been estab- 
lished. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 

The normal curriculum of each four-year course is outlined 
on the following pages. Since the state of war now existing 
may give rise to conditions which will necessitate a modification 
of these courses, the right is reserved to change any outline at 
any time: 



74 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



SUBJECT. 



Term. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



Mathematics 101 — ^Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analytics 

English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Pubhc Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis , 

Surve>-ing 101 and 102 — Plane Surveying 

Drawing 101 — Freehand Drawing 

Drawing 103 — Mechanical Drawing 

Drawing 104 — Engineering Drawing 

Drawing 105 — Descriptive Geometry 

Shop 113— Wood Work 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 
(6) 



(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 
(3) 



1(2) 



5 

3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 
(3) 



2(3) 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Mathematics 103 — Advanced Algebra 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus , 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — Electricity and Magnetism , 

Physics 103 and 106 — Heat and Light 

Mineralogj' 101 — Determinative Mineralogy . . . . , 

Surveying 103 and 104 — Plane Surveying 

Survejang 105 and 106 — Advanced Surveying . . . . 

Mechanics 101— Graphic Statics 

Mechanics 102 — Analytical Mechanics 

Drawing 102 — Descriptive Geometry , 

Drawing 108 — Drafting , 

Military Instructions 102 — Basic Course 



3 
2 

4(3) 



2(3) 



2(6) 
1(2) 



4(3) 



4 
2(3) 



1(2) 



4(3) 
1(3) 

(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 104 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 104 — Technical Public Speaking 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Government 104 — Law of Contracts 

Geology 103 — Engineering Geology 

Surveying 107 — Topographic Surveying 

Railways 101 and 102 — Railway Curves and Earth Work 

Railways 103 — Railway Surveying 

Mechanics 103 and 104 — Mechanics of Engineering 

Mechanics 105 — Materials of Construction 

Hydraulics 101 

Drawing 109, 110 and 111— Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 

Structural Designing 101 — Elementary Structural Design 

Electrical Engineering 111 — Dynamos and Motors 

Electrical Laboratory 102 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory , 

Experimental Laboratory 101 — Testing 

Military Instructions 103 — Advanced Course 



(2) 
(1) 



3(3) 
(3) 



(3) 

s" 



(2) 
(1) 



2 
2 



1(3) 
2(3) 



(3) 

S 



(2) 
(1) 



(6) 



3 

(3) 
2(3) 



S 



75 



CIVIL ENGINEERING— Concluded 



SUBJECT. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Mathematics 107 — Differential Equations 

Mathematics 108 — Estimates of Cost 

English 105— Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 106 — Technical Public Speaking 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 102 

Surveying 108 and 109 — Geodesy 

Railways 104 — Railway Economics 

Railways 101 — Highways 

Highways 102 — Materials Laboratory 

Hudraulics 102 

Hydraulics 103— Hydromechanics 

Hydraulics 104 and 105 — Water Supply 

Hydraulics 106 and 107 — Sewerage 

Structural Designing 102— Structiiral Design 

Structural Designing 104 and 105— Concrete Theory and Design . 
Structural Designing 106 — Retaining Walls and Concrete Arches 

Mechanical Engineering 106 — Heating and Ventilation 

Experimental Laboratory 103 — Cement Testing 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 



(3) 
(2) 

(1) 
5* 
5* 
5* 



(3) 



2(3) 
2 



(3) 

S 



3t 



(2) 

(1) 
5* 
5* 
5* 

3t 
2 



3t 



2(3) 
2 
(3) 



S 



(2) 

5* 

5* 
(3)t 



(3)t 



(3)t 
2(3) t 
2(3) 



2(3) t 

"s " 



♦Alternative. 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the necessary credits. 
S. Students who volunteer and are selected for this course are required to take 3 hours* train- 
ing in theory in addition to the 2 hours of practical drill required of all physically 6t male students. 



76 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analytics 

En^rlish 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101— General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Drawing 101 — Freehand Drawing 

Drawing 103 — Mechanical Drawing 

Drawing 105 — Descriptive Geometry 

Mechanical Engineering 101 — Technical Instruction , . 

Shop 101— Wood Work 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(6) 



2 

(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 
(3) 



(6) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 



2(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Mathematics 103 — Advanced Algebra , 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — Electricity and Magnetism . . 

Physics 103 and 106— Heat and Light 

Mechanics 101 — Graphic Statics. 

Mechanics 102 — Analytical Mechanics 

Drawing lOfr — Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 108 — Drafting 

Mechanical Engineering 102 — Steam Engines 

Mechanical Engineering 103 — Technical Mechanics 

Shop 105 — Blacksmithing 

Shop 108 — Foundry 

Shop 109 — Machine Work 

Militarv Instruction 102 — Basic Course 



3 

2 
4(3) 



2(6) 
3*'" 



1(2) 



4(3) 



2(3) 



(6) 



1(2) 



4(3) 
3" 



(3) 



(6) 

(3) 

1(2) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 104 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 104 — Technical Public Speaking 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Government 104 — Law of Contracts 

Mechanics 103 and 104 — Mechanics of Engineering 

Mechanics 105— Materials of Construction 

Hydraulics 101 

Electrical Engineering 111 and 112 — Dynamos and Motors 

Electrical Laboratory 102 and 103 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

Machine Design 101 — Elementary Machine Design 

Machine Design 102 and 103 — Machine Design 

Machine Design 104 — Kinematics of Machinerj' 

Shop 110 — Machine Work 

Experimental J.,aboratory 101 — Testing 

Experimental Laboratory 102 — Experimental Engineering 

Militarv Instruction 103 — Advanced Course 



(2) 
(1) 



2 

(3) 
1(3) 



(9) 

s" 



(2) 
(1) 



2 
2 



(3) 



2(3) 



(6) 
(3) 



(2) 
(1) 



3 
2 



2(3) 
2(3) 



(3) 

S 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Mathematics 107 — Differential Equations 

English 105 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 106 — Technical Public Speaking 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 102 

Hydraulics 103 — Hydromechanics 

Hydraulics 104 — Water Supply 

Structural Design 103 

Mechanical Engineering 104 and 105— Heat Engineering.. 
Mechanical Engineering 106 — Heating and Ventilation . . . 

Experimental Laboratory 103 — Cement Testing 

Experimental Laboratory 104 — Experimental Engineering 
Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 



(2) 

(1) 
5* 
5* 
5* 
3 



2(6) 
2 



(3) 
(3) 

S 



3 

(2) 

(1) 
5* 

5* 

5* 



3t 

2(3) 
3 



(6) 

S 



(2) 

(1) 
5* 

5* 

5* 



2(6) 

3 

2(3) 



(3) 

S 



♦Alternative. 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the necessary credits. 
S. Students who volunteer and are selected for this course are required to take 3 hours' train- 
ing in theory in addition to the 2 houra of practical drill required of all physically fit male students 



77 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



SUBJECT. 



Term. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analjrtics 

English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Surveying 101 and 102 — Plane Surveying 

Drawing 101 — Freehand Drawing 

Drawing 103 — Mechanical Drawing 

Drawing 105 — Descriptive Geometry 

Shop 113— Wood Work 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 
(6) 



(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 
(3) 



2(3) 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Mathematics 103 — ^Advanced Algebra 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — Electricity and Magnetism 

Physics 103 and 108— Heat and Light 

Mechanics 101 — Graphic Statics 

Mechanics 102 — Analytical Mechanics 

Drawing 106 — Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 108 — Drafting 

Electrical Engineering 101 — Electricity and Magnetism 

Electrical Laboratory 101 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 

Mechanical Engineering 102 — Steam Engines 

Shop 106 — Blacksmithing 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 



3 
2 

4(3) 



2(6) 



3 

1(2) 



4(3) 
2(3) 



(3) 

' (3) 
1(2) 



4(3) 

3 " 

(3) 
2 
(3) 

1(2) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 104 — ^Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 104 — Technical Public Speaking 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Government 104 — Law of Contracts 

Mechanics 103 — Mechanics of Engineering 

Hydraulics 101 

Electrical Engineering 102 — Direct Current Theory 

Electrical Engineering 103 — Dynamos and Alternating Currents , 

Electrical Engineering 108 — Wireless Telegraphy , 

Electrical Engineering 110 — Primary and Secondary Batteries. . . 

Electrical Design 101 — Direct Current Design , 

Electrical Laboratory 104 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory. . 

Electrical Laboratory 107 — Wireless Laboratory , 

Machine Design 101 — ^Elementary Machine Design , 

Machine Design 102 , 

Shop 1 1 1 — Machine Work 

Experimental Laboratory 101 — Testing , 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced (jourse , 



(2) 
(1) 



5 
3* 



(6) 
i(3) 



(3) 

s" 



(2) 
(1) 



1 
2 



(3) 
(3) 

2(3) 
(3) 
(3) 

S 



(2) 
(1) 



3 
3 



2(9) 
(6) 



78 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING— Concluded 



SUBJECT. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Tebm. 



II 



III 



English 105 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 106— Technical Public Speaking 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 102 

Hydraulics 103 — Hydromechanics 

Electrical Engineering 104 — Alternating Currents. . . . . . 

Electrical Engineering 105 — I^ighting and Illumination . 

Electrical Engineering 106 — Electric Power Plants 

Electrical Engineering 107 — Telephones and Telegraphs 

Electrical Engineering 109 — Electric Railways 

Electrical Design 102 — Alternating Current Design .... 

Electrical Laboratory 

E lectrical Laboratory 106— Telephone Laboratory 

M echanical Engineering 104 — Heat Engineering 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 



(2) 

(1) 
. . 5* 
5* 
5* 
3 
3 



(3) 
(6) 



'•• 



(2) 
(1) 
5* 

5* 

5* 



3 
2 



(6) 
(3) 



(2) 

(1) 
5* 
5* 
5* 



3 
3 



(6) 

*S* 



♦Alternative. 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the necessary credits. 

S. Students who volunteer and are selected for this course are required to take 3 hours* train- 
ing in theory in addition to the 2 hours of practical drill required of all physically fit male students. 



79 



RURAL ENGINEERING 



SUBJECT. 



Term. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analytics 

English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Surveying 101 and 102 — Plane Surveying 

Drawing 101 — Freehand Drawing 

Drawing 103 — Mechanical Drawing 

Draw^ing 104 — Engineering Drawing 

Drawing 105 — Descriptive Geometry 

Shop 102— Wood Work 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 

(2) 

3(3) 



(3) 



(3) 
1(2) 



5 

3(1) 
(2) 

2(6) 
(3) 



2(3) 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Mathematics 103 — Advanced Algebra 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — Electricity and Magnetism 

Physics 103 and 106— Heat and Light 

Surveying 103 and 104 — Plane Surveying 

Mechanics 101 — Graphic Statics 

Mechanics 102 — Analytical Mechanics 

Drawing 106 — Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 108 — Drafting 

Electrical Engineering 101 — Electricity and Magnetism 

Electrical Laboratory 101 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory, 

Shop lOfr — Blacksmithing 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 



3 

2 
4(3) 



2(3) 
2(6) 



1(2) 



4(3) 



2(3) 



2 

(3) 

(3) 

1(2) 



4(3) 



3 
2 

(3) 

1(2) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



! 



English 104 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 104 — Technical Public Speaking 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Government 104 — Law of Contracts 

Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Soils 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Vegetable Gardening 

Mechanics 102 — Mechanics of Engineering 

Hydraulics 101 

Structural Design 101 — ^Elementary Structural Design 

Electrical Engineering 105 — I>ightin^ and Illumination 

Electrical Laboratory 102 — Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 

Machine Design 101 — Elementary Machine Design 

Mechanical Engineering 107 — Farm Machinerv 

Shop 1 11— Machine Work ' 

Experimental Laboratory 101 — Testing 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced (iJourse 



(2) 
(1) 



3(3) 



(3) 
1(3) 



(3) 
S ' 



(2) 
(1) 



3(3) 
2(3) 



3(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



(2) 
(1) 



3(3) 

3*" 

2(3) 
3 



ir 






80 



RURAL ENGINEERING— Concluded 



SUBJECT. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Tbbm. 



II 



Mathematics 108 — Estimates of Cost 

English 105 — Technical Composition 

Public Speaking 106 — Technical Public Speaking 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 102 

Soils 102 



Forestry 101 — Farm Forestry 

Animal Husbandry 101 — General Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 114 — Farm Dairjnng 

Animal Husbandry 1 18 — Poultry 

Geology 103 

Highways 101 

Hydraulics 102 

Hydraulics 103 — Hydromechanics 

Hydraulics 104 and 105 — Water Supply 

Hydraulics 106 and 107 — Sewerage 

Hydraulics 110 — Advanced Drainage 

Structural Design 103 — Concrete Theory 

Structural Design 104 — Concrete Design 

Structural Design 105 — Retaining Walls and Concrete Arches . 

Structural Design 107 — Design of Farm Structures 

Structural Design 108 — School Architecture 

Electrical Engineering 107 — Telephones and Telegraphs 

Electrical Engineering 110 — Primary and Secondary Batteries, 

Electrical Laboratory 106 — Telephone Laboratory 

Machine Design 105 — Design of Farm Machinery 

Mechanical Engineering 102 — Steam Engines 

Mechanical Engineering 106 — Heating and Ventilation 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course , 



(3) 

(2) 

(1) 
5* 

5* 
5* 
2(3) t 



3(3) 



(3) 
3t 



(2) 

(1) 
5* 
5* 
5* 



3t 



3t 



3t 



2t 

(3)t 
2(3) t 



2t 
2 

(3)t 
2(3) t 



S 



III 



(2) 
(1) 

5* 

5* 

5* 



2(3) 

1(3) t 

3(3) t 
4t 



(3)t 
2(3) t 
l(3)t 



2(3) t 
3(3) t 



2(3) t 



2(3) 

S 



♦Alternative. 

fElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the necessary credits. 

S. Students who volunteer and are selected for this course are required to take 3 hours' train- 
ing in theory in addition to the 2 hours of practical drill required of all physit^ally fit male students. 

DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

The subjects offered in the different departments of the 
division are divided into groups, each of which is given a title 
more or less indicative of the subjects included in it. An abbre- 
viation of this title is placed before each subject in the group. 
This is used with the subject title in the tabulated outline of 
the curriculum of each course. 



DRAWING AND DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

Dr. 101: Freehand Drawing — Elementary practice; lettering, exercises 
in sketching, both in pencil outline and pencil rendering; line drawing, 
composition, proportion and comparative measurements; exercises in 
sketching of technical objects, and pen and ink shading. Plates upon 



81 



completion are bound and properly titled. Required of students in engi- 
neering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st or 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 102: Mechanical Drawing — Practice in plain lettering, use of instru- 
ments, projection and simple working drawings, the plates upon com- 
pletion being enclosed in covers properly titled by the students. Required 
of students in mechanical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Dr. 103: Mechanical Drawing — A course similar to Dr. 102 for students 
in civil and electrical engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours, 1st term; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 3. 

Dr. 104: Engineering Drawing — Conventional signs used in mapping. 
Scale making, contours, hachures. Profiles and mapping. Required of 
students in civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st or 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 105: Descriptive Geometry — Detailing of machinery and drawing 
to scale from blueprints. Tracing and blueprinting, and representation 
of flat and round surfaces by ink shading. Its relation to mechanical 
drawing and the solution of such problems relating to magnitudes in 
space as bear directly upon those which present themselves to civil, elec- 
trical, mechanical and rural engineers. Prerequisites Dr. 102 and Solid 
Geometry. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Dr. 106: Descriptive Geometry — A continuation of Dr. 105. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Dr. 107: Mechanical Drawing — Practice in plain lettering, use of instru- 
ments, geometrical constructions and plans of simple buildings. Elective 
for non-engineering students. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 108: Drafting — In this course problems pertinent to the work of 
students in each branch of engineering are selected. Drawings are made 
to scale. Empirical formulas for determining dimensions are used when- 
ever possible. Prereq. Dr. 102 and 103. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 109: Shades, Shadows, Perspective — Theory of shadows and per- 
spective of objects, and of shadows in perspective. Prereq. Dr. 106. 
Must be taken with Dr. 110. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 110: Shades and Shadows — Development and application of Dr. 109 
in the drawing room. Prereq. Dr. 106. Must be taken with Dr. 109. Re- 
quired of students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. Ill: Perspective — Perspective of point, line and solid. Shadows in 
perspective. Prereq. Dr. 109 and 110. Required of students in civil 
engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 



82 



Dr. 1: Farm Drawing — A course similar to Dr. 107, for students in the 
Two- Year Course in Agriculture. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Dr. 2: Mechanical Drawing — Instruction in commercial drafting. This 
is preceded by a study of drafting instruments and freehand lettering. 
Projection applied to shop drafting of machine parts. Tracing and blue- 
printing. The making of detail and assembly drawings. Freehand 
sketching of machine tools. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

Dr. 3: Freehand Drawing — A course similar to Dr. 101. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

E. E. 101: Electricity and Magnetism — The elementary theories of elec- 
trical and magnetic phenomena are carefully developed, the course being 
correlated with the technical work taken up later. Required of students 
in electrical and rural engineering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

E. E. 102: Direct Current Theory — The study of the principles involved 
in the construction and operation of direct and alternating current 
generators and motors. Also the characteristic curves and efficiencies 
of the various t3rpes of machines, the selection of machines for specific 
duties and the proper methods of installing and operating. Required 
of students in electrical engineering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 6. 

E. E. 103: Dynamos and Alternating Currents — This is a continuation 
of E. E. 102, which covers the characteristics of direct current machin- 
ery. A number of analytical and graphical problems are required to 
give a clear conception of the effects of inductance and capacity in alter- 
nating current circuits. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 104: Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Machinery — 
The theory, construction and practical applications of single phase and 
polyphase alternating current machinery, including generators, syn- 
chronous, induction, and repulsion motors, converters, transformers, etc., 
are taken up in detail. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 105. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

E. E. 105 : Lighting and Illumination — A study of the various systems of 
distribution used in arc and incandescent lighting. Lectures on the 
manufacture and characteristics of the many forms of electric lamps; 
the selection of lamps for commercial work; and the principles of cor- 
rect interior and exterior illumination. Required of students in elec- 
trical and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 



83 



E. E. 106: Electric Power Plants and Transmission — This course in- 
cludes the principles governing the installation and operation of power- 
house and substation machinery and systems. A number of practical 
problems are given to illustrate the principles. Required of students 
in electrical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 107: Telephones and Telegraphs — The application of electricity 
to telephones and telegraphs, with a study of the construction and oper- 
ation of the apparatus required for the magneto, common battery and 
automatic exchanges. The principles of the operation of simple, duplex, 
quadruplex and simultaneous telegraph. Required of electrical and 
elective for rural engineering students. Must be taken with EL Lab. 106, 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 108: Wireless Telegraphy — ^The principles of the application of 
electric waves to wireless telephony are followed by a study of the va- 
rious systems in commercial use. Required of students in electrical engi- 
neering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 107. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; 2d term. Credit 1. 

E. E. 109: Electric Railways — The course includes the consideration of 
the design and operation of the electric railway systems, power-plants 
and substations. Many problems are given which involve the engi- 
neering features of modern railway development. Required of students 
in electrical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Cradit 3. 

E. E. 110: Primary and Secondary Batteries — A study of the various 
types of primary batteries and their application to commercial work. 
The theory, construction and application of lead storage cells and Edi- 
son storage batteries. A short outline of the auxiliary apparatus used 
in connection with storage cells. Required of students in electrical and 
rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E. E. Ill: Dynamos and Motors — A general course in direct and alter- 
nating currents, covering the principles of construction and operation 
of machines used in commercial practice. Required of civil and mechani- 
cal engineering students. Must be taken with El. Lab. 102. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 112: Dynamos and Motors — A continuation of E. E. 111. Required 
of mechanical engineering students. Must be taken with El. Lab. 103. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 1 : Elements of Direct Current Machinery — The study of the funda- 
mental principles involved in the construction and operation of direct 
current generators and motors. Characteristic curves and the selection 
of machines for specific purposes. Methods for installing and maintain- 
ing various types of generators and motors. The laboratory includes the 
installation of generators and motors with the necessary auxiliary ap- 



ki 



84 



II 



paratus, and commercial tests of the various types of direct current 
machines. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. 

£, E. 2: Elements of Direct Current Machinery — A course similar to 
E. E. 1. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

E. E. 3: Elements of Alternating Current Machinery — This course in- 
cludes the study of fundamental principles and the design and construc- 
tion of alternating machinery. The laboratory work consists of commer- 
cial tests of single phase and polyphase machinery, including generators, 
motors, converters, transformers, etc. 

Recitations, 4 hours; practice,. 3 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 4: Illumination — Lectures on the manufacture and characteristics 
of the various forms of arc and incandescent lamps; the selection of 
lamps and reflectors for commercial work; the principles for correct 
interior and exterior illumination. The laboratory work includes the 
determination of the operating characteristics, the measuring of the 
candle-power of lamps, and the measuremnet of the efficiency of actual 
lighting installations. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

E. E. 5: Electric Power Plants and Transmission — The principles gov- 
erning the installation and operation of power-house and substation ma- 
chinery, transmission and distribution systems. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 

£. E. 6: Telephones and Telegraphs — A study of the construction and 
operation of the apparatus required for magneto, common battery and 
automatic exchange. The principles of the operation of simple, duplex 
and quadruplex telegraphy. The laboratory work includes experiments 
with the various types of apparatus and the operation of exchanges. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 7: Primary and Secondary Batteries — The study and testing of 
various types of primary batteries and their application to commercial 
work. The theory and construction of lead storage cells and Edison 
storage batteries. Actual testing of batteries in operation. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

£• E. 8: Electrical Measuring Instruments — The theory governing the 
design, construction and application of all types of direct and alter- 
nating current instruments. The repairing, testing and calibration of 
the different types of instruments. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

E. E. 9 : Electrical Equipment Repairs — This course includes the rewind- 
ing of armature and field coils, testing of commutators, repairs for 
signal systems, etc. 

Recitation, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



85 

E. E. 10: Switchboards — Lectures on the design and construction of 
standard switchboards of various types. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 11: Interior Wiring — A thorough study of the Underwriters' Rules 
concerning all classes of interior wiring. Calculations for circuits and 
the design of interior light and power systems. The practice includes 
the installation of residence and commercial light and power systems. 

Recitations, 2 hours, 1st and 2d terms; practice, 6 hours, 1st term, 
3 hours, 2d term. 

E. E. 12: Outside Line Construction — The design and construction of 
short transmission and distribution systems. 

Recitation, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 

E. Des. 101: Direct Current Design — This course covers the design of 
direct current generators and motors, including the use of the different 
conducting, magnetic and insulating materials. Required of students in 
electrical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 9 hours; 3d term. Credit 5. 

E. Des. 102: Alternating Current Design — The complete design of an 
alternating current generator or a transformer. Required of students in 
electrical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

EL Lab. 101: Electrical Engineering Laboratory — A laboratory course 
designed to verify the laws and principles outlined in E. E. 101. Required- 
of students in electrical and rural engineering. Must be taken witk 
E. E. 101. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

EL Lab. 102: Electrical Engineering Laboratory — This course includes' 
the methods of measuring resistance, current and electromotive force; 
photometry; and elementary testing of generators and motors. Required 
of civil and mechanical engineering students. Must be taken with E. E. 
111. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

El. Lab. 103: Electrical Engineering Laboratory — A continuation of 
El. Lab. 102. Required of students in mechanical engineering. Must be 
taken with E. E. 112. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

EI. Lab. 104 : Electrical Engineering Laboratory — Study and calibration 
of instruments. Measurement of resistance, current and electromotive 
force; commercial tests on generators and motors; arc lamp testing and 



86 

photometry. Required of students in electrical engineering. Must be 
taken with E. E. 102 and 103. 

Practice, 6 hours, 1st and 3d terms; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 5. 

El. Lab. 105: Electrical Engineering Laboratory — Measurement of in- 
ductance, impedance, condensance, etc.; power measurements in alter- 
nating current circuits; regulation and efficiency tests of alternators and 
transformers; operating characteristics of synchronous and induction 
motors. Required of students in electrical engineering. Must be taken 
with E. E. 104. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

El. Lab. 106: Telephone Laboratory — This course covers experimental 
work with all types of telephone apparatus and the operation of the 
magneto and common battery exchanges. Required of students in elec- 
trical engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 107. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

EL Lab. 107: Wireless Laboratory — At present this course is confined 
to practice in sending and receiving signals in the Continental Code by 
means of radio instruction sets. Required of students in electrical engi- 
neering. Must be taken with E. E. 108. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 



EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY 

Exp. Lab. 101: Testing — Study of testing machines and accessories. 
Operation of steam engine. Study of planimeter and indicator. Test of 
gas engines. Tension test of wrought iron and steel. Transverse tests 
of cast iron and timber. Compression tests of long and short wood and 
concrete columns. Prereq. Mec. 103. Required of all engineering stu- 
dents. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 102: Experimental Engineering — Determining the amount of 
moisture in steam; the efficiency of the injector; the transit and its uses; 
indicator practice; slide valve setting; the slide rule and micrometer; 
the analysis of boiler feed water; flue gases; lubricating oils; and the 
determination of the heating value of fuels and moisture in steam. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 103: Cement Testing — Standard tests of cement and concrete 
mortars. Time of setting. Tension and compression tests. Required of 
students in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 104: Experimental Engineering — A continuation of Exp. Lab. 
102. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours, 1st and 3d terms; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 4. 



87 



I 



Exp. Lab. 1: Experimental Laboratory — Tests of steam, gas and oil 
engines. Determining the strength of iron and steel. The efficiency of 
pumps and injectors. Tests of heating values of fuels. 

Practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

Hwys. 101: Highways — Theory of location, construction and mainte- 
nance of country roads and city streets and pavements. Prereq. Surv. 
105. Required for civil and elective for rural engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Hwys. 102: Materials Laboratory — Tests of oils, asphalts, tars and road 
binders. Prereq. Chem. 103. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

HYDRAULIC AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Hyd. 101: Hydraulics — Principles of Hydraulics. Flow in open chan- 
nels and pipes and through orifices. Methods of measurement, stream 
gauging, etc. Prereq. Mech. 102. Required of all students in engi- 
neering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 102: Hydraulics — Determination of the co-efficients of discharge, 
velocity and contraction in pipes, orifices and weirs. Stream gauging 
methods. Flow measurements. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Required of students 
in civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 103: Hydromechanics — Pumps, pumping machinery, water wheels 
and turbines. Friction losses in plants and water systems. Study of dis- 
tribution systems. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Require of students in civil, elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering. Elective for rural engineering stu- 
dents. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 104: Water Supply — Principles of water supply engineering. 
Quantity of water required for municipal systems. Fire systems. Flow 
from drainage areas. Conduits and distribution systems. Quality of 
water and methods of purification. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Elective for stu- 
dents in civil, mechanical and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 105 : Water Supply — Design of distribution system for small town, 
small pumping station and stand pipes. Estimate of cost. Prereq. Hyd. 
104. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 106: Sewerage — Principles of sewer design. House drainage. 
Modern methods of sewage disposal. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Elective for 
students in civil and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 



88 

Hyd. 107: Sewerage — Design of small sewerage system and disposal 
plant. Elective for students in civil and rural engineering. Must be 
taken with Hyd. 106. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 108: Drainage — Study of the principles of underground flow. 
Drainage of farm lands. Planning of the systems. Elective for non- 
engineering students. Must be taken with Surv. 110. 

Lecture and recitation, 1 hour; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 109: Drainage — Field practice in study of drainage conditions. 
Planning the system from notes in field. Elective for non-engineering 
students. Must be taken with Hyd. 108. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 110: Advanced Drainage — Continuation of Hyd. 108 and 109. 
Elective for rural engineering students. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours. Credit 2. 

Hyd. 1: Drainage — Elementary course in farm drainage for students in 
two-year course in agriculture. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours. 



MACHINE DESIGN 

M. Des. 101: Elementary Machine Design — Freehand sketching of the 
details of machinery and making working drawings of same. Calcu- 
lations and drawings of a simple type punching press. Prereq. Dr. 108. 
Required of students in electrical, mechanical and rural engineering. 

Lecture and recitation, 1 hour, 1st term; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 
Credit 2. 

M. Des. 102: Machine Design — A continuation of M. Des. 101. Required 
of students in electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 3. 

M. Des. 103: Machine Design — A continuation of M. Des. 102. Required 
of students in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 3. 

M. Des. 104: Kinematics of Machinery — Centrodes. Determination of 
the instantaneous axis and instantaneous center. Preparation of dis- 
placement, velocity and acceleration diagrams. Design of cams. Slow 
advance and quick return motion for machine tools. Form of tooth 
outlines in the epicycloidal and involute systems. Prereq. M. Des. 101. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 3. 

M. Des. 105: Design of Farm Machinery — The design and drafting of 
those portions of farm machinery common to engines, and to harvesting, 
pumping and fertilizing machinery, such as levers, shafts, gears and 
frames. Prereq. M. Des. 101. Elective for students in rural engineering.. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 



89 

M. Des. 1: Machine Drafting and Design — The designing and detailing 
of a complete machine, including the determination of the stresses and 
the calculations for the various parts. Both empirical and rational 
methods are used. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 



MATHEMATICS 

Math. 101: Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Deduc- 
tion of formulas and their application to the solution of triangles; trig- 
onometric equations, etc. Required of students in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 1st term. Credit 5. 

Math. 102: Trigonometry — An abbreviated course similar to Math. 101. 
Required of chemical and elective for agricultural students. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Math. 103: Analytic Geometry — Geometry of two and three dimensions, 
loci of general equations of second degree, higher plane curves, etc. 
Prerequisite, Math. 101 or 102. Required of students of chemistry and 
engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 10. 

Math. 104: Advanced Algebra — Algebra beyond that required for admis- 
sion. Elementary theory of equations, partial fractions, permutations, 
etc. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Math. 105: Calculus — A discussion of the methods used in differentia- 
tion and integration and the application of these methods in determining 
maxima and minima, areas, volumes, moments of inertia, etc. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 103. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours, 1st term; 5 hours, 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 12. 

Math. 106: Mathematics — A general course in algebra and calculus 
suited to the needs of the students of chemistry. Prereq. Math. 103. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Math. 107: Differential Equations — The solution of the simpler differ- 
ential equations is discussed. Prereq. Math. 105. Elective for students 
in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Math. 108: Estimates and Costs — Methods of estimating costs, supple- 
mented by problems of a practical nature. Required of students in 
civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Math. 1 : Shop Mathematics — Advanced arithmetic. Preliminary review. 
Common and decimal fractions. Short methods and checks. Percentage. 
Ratio and proportion. Powers and roots. These are based on their re- 
lation to shop problems. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 



w 



90 

Math. 2: Shop Mathematics — Algebra, notation and definitions. Addi- 
tion and subtraction. Multiplication and division. Exponents. Powers 
and roots. Formulas. Equations. Sufficient drill is given to make direct 
applications to practical problems in the shop and drawing room. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. 

Math. 3: Shop Mathematics — Geometry. Plane surfaces, lines and 
angles. Triangles. Circles. Pyramids. Prisms. Cones and frustums. 
Spheres. Some elementary proofs are required of the students. Facts 
or principles are discussed in ways to show their reasonableness. De- 
vices and methods used by practical men are applied to the solution 
of problems pertaining to the various trades. 

Recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Math. 4: Shop Mathematics — Trigonometry and Logarithms. An in- 
troduction to trigonometry covering the functions of angles and the solu- 
tion of right triangles. Logarithms. Trigonometric tables and their 
uses. Emphasis is placed upon applications to practical problems. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 

Math. 5: Shop Mathematics — Engineering mathematics. The correla- 
tion of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and trigonometry is clearly shown 
in this course and such problems are involved as include a combination 
of all the student's mathematics in the solution. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. 

Math. 6: Estimates and Costs — The object of this course is to teach 
the student to analyze the probable cost of the construction of machines 
from the drawings and how to deal with such items as profits, overhead 
charges and depreciation. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 101: Technical Instruction — Explanation of the reading of me- 
chanical drawings; the proper cutting angles, care and adjustment of 
carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, its shrinking and 
warping, and how to correct and prevent. Drill in problems in arith- 
metic, algebra and drawing by notes and lectures. Required of students 
in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 102: Steam Engines, Boilers and Dynamos — The principles of 
steam and the steam engine. The slide valve and valve diagrams. The 
indicator and its diagram. Steam boiler, the various types and their 
advantages. Each student taking this course is required to spend cer- 
tain hours in the power plant actually operating the engines, boilers 
and dynamos. Required of students in electrical and mechanical engi- 
neering. Elective for rural engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 



91 



M. E. 103: Technical Mechanics — Elementary principles of applied 
mechanics, calculation of gear and pulley trans, bent levers, calcula- 
tion of belt lengths, lacing belts, the suction pump, and bolts and screws. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 104: Heat Engineering — Laws of fundamental equations; perfect 
gases; compound, hot-air and gasoline engines; theory of vapors; rela- 
tion between pressure, volume, temperature, work and heat for special 
changes of state; calculation and drawing of Carnot's cycle and tempera- 
ture entropy diagram. The steam turbine. Compressed air and refrig- 
eration machinery. Prereq. M. E. 102. Required of students in elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 105: Heat Engineering — A continuation of M. E. 104. Required 
of mechanical engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms: Credit 6. 

M. E. 106: Heating and Ventilation — The principles of ventilating; 
amount of heat required for warming; radiating surfaces; steam, hot- 
water and hot-air systems; vacuum and vapor systems; pipe and pipe 
systems; appliances; specifications and contracts. Prereq. Dr. 108. Re- 
quired of mechanical and rural and elective for civil engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 3. 

M. E. 107: Farm Machinery — A detailed study of the farm implements. 
One of the objects of the course is to familiarize the students with the 
latest improvements in farm machinery. Given by lectures and prac- 
tical work. Elective for students in agricultural courses. Required of 
students in rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

M. E. 108: Advanced Farm Machinery — A continuation of M. E. 107. 
Elective for students in agricultural courses. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 109: Gas Engines — The fundamental principles concerning the 
gas engine. Its applications to agricultural operations. Elective for 
students in agricultural courses. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 4. 

M. E. 1 : Farm Machinery — A course similar to M. E. 107, for students 
in the two-year course in agriculture. 

Lecture and recitation, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

M. E. 2: Gas Engines — A course similar to M. E. 109, for students in 
the two-year course in agriculture. Elective. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

M. E. 3: Technical Instruction — Explanation of the reading of mechani- 
cal drawings; the proper angles for wood-cutting tools, care and adjust- 
ment of carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, its 



92 



shrinking and warping, and how to prevent and correct. Sketching by 
freehand of tools and apparatus. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

M. E. 4: Heat Engines — Elementary laws of steam and gases. Prin- 
ciples of the steam, gas and oil engine. The steam turbine. Compressed 
air and refrigeration machinery. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 

M. E. 5 : Technical Mechanics — Mechanics of materials with applications 
to strength of machine parts, power transmission, belting, gears, cams, 
rope and chain drives, boilers and pumps. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

M. E. 6: Power Plant Operation — The actual operation of boilers, 
engines, pumps and electric generators. This includes heating systems. 
The work will be done on Friday nights. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

MECHANICS AND MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION 

Mech. 101: Graphic Statics — The theory and practice of the method of 
determining stresses in cranes, roof trusses and bridges, and stresses 
on beams and girders due to traveling loads. Analysis of the stresses 
in roof trusses by the force polygon. Application of the equilibrium 
I)olygon to beams and girders. Analysis of stresses in bridge trusses. 
Prereq. Phys. 101 and Dr. 102 and 103. Required of engineering stu- 
dents. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Mech. 102: Analytical Mechanics — A study of statics dealing with the 
composition and resolution of forces, moments, couples, machines and 
laws of friction; and of dynamics, dealing with velocity, acceleration, 
laws of motion, work, energy and applications to problems. Prereq. Phys. 
101 and Math. 105. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Mech. 103: Mechanics of Engineering — The mechanics of solids. Statics 
of material point and of rigid bodies. Chains and cords. Centrifugal 
and centripetal forces. Work. Power. Energy. Sliding friction, fric- 
tion of journals, friction of pivots, friction of ropes and belts. Analysis 
of stresses in thick cylinders. Prereq. Mech. 102. Required of students 
in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours ; 1st term. Credit 5. 

Mech. 104: Mechanics of Engineering — A continuation of Mech. 103. 
Required of students in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Mech. 105: Materials of Construction — A study of the manufacture, 
composition and properties of the various materials used in engineering. 
Required of students in civil and mechanical engineering. Prereq. Mech. 
103. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

(G. 0. No. 49— -War Department). 

M. I. 101: Basic Course — 

1. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Physical Train- 
ing — Koehler); Infantry drill (U. S. Infantry Regulations), to include 
the School of the Soldier, Squad and Company, close and extended order. 
Preliminary instruction sighting position and aiming drills, gallery prac- 
tice, nomenclature and care of rifle and equipment. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Theory of target practice, individual and 
collective (use of landscape targets made up by U. S. Military Disci- 
plinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth, Kan.. ; military organization (Tables 
of Organization); map reading; service of security; personal hygiene. 

2. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Physical Train- 
ing — Koehler); infantry drill (U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations), to in- 
clude school of battalion, special attention devoted to fire direction and 
control; ceremonies; manuals (Part V, Infantry Drill Regulations); 
bayonet combat; intrenchments (584-595, Infantry Drill Regulations); 
first-aid instruction; range and gallery practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, general military policy as 
shown by military history of United States and military obligations of 
citizenship; service of information; combat (to be illustrated by small 
tactical exercises); United States Infantry Drill Regulations, to include 
School of Company; camp sanitation for small commands. 

M. I. 102: Basic Course — 

3. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2 (a). Combat firing, 
ifpracticable, but collective firing should be attempted in indoor ranges by 
devices now in vogue at United States Disciplinary Barracks. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. United States Infantry Drill Regula- 
tions, to include School of Battalion and Combat (350-622); Small-Arms 
Firing Regulations; lectures as in (b) course 2; map reading; camp 
sanitation and camping expedients. 

4. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2 (a); signaling; 
semaphore and flag; first aid. Work with sand table by constructing to 
scale intrenchments, field works, obstacles, bridges, etc. Comparison of 
ground forms (constructed to scale) with terrain as represented on map; 
range practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, military history (recent) ; serv- 
ice of information and security (illustrated by small tactical problems 
in patrolling, advance guards, rear guards, flank guards, trench and mine 



94 

warfare, orders, messages and camping expedients); marches and camps 
(Field Service Regulations and Infantry Drill Regulations). 

M. I. 103: Advanced Course — 

5. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank as cadet 
officers or non-commissioned officers in connection with the practical work 
and exercises laid down for the unit or units. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Minor tactics; field orders (studies in 
minor tactics. United States School of the Line); map maneuvers. 
Weight 8. Company administration, general principles (papers and re- 
turns). Weight 1. Military history. Weight 2. 

6. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Same as (a) course 5. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Minor tactics (continued); map ma- 
neuvers. Weight 8. Elements of international law. Weight 2. Prop- 
erty accountability; method of obtaining supplies and equipment (Army 
Regulations). Weight 1. 

M. I. 104: Advanced Course — 

7. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank as cadet 
officers or non-commissioned officers in connection with the practical work 
and exercises scheduled for the unit or units. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Tactical problems, small forces, all arms 
combined; map maneuvers; court-martial proceedings (Manual for 
Courts-martial). International relations of America from discovery to 
present day; gradual growth of principles of international law embodied 
in American diplomacy, legislation and treaties. Lectures: Psychology 
of war and kindred subjects; general principles of strategy only, planned 
to show the intimate relationship between the statesman and the soldier 
(not to exceed five lectures). 

8. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Same as course 7 (a). 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Tactical problems (continued); map 
maneuvers. Rifle in war. Lectures on military history and policy. 

PHYSICS 



Phys. 101: Mechanics and Sound — Lectures, recitations and demonstra- 
tions on mechanics and sound. Prereq. Math. 103. Required of students 
in engineering, chemistry and general science. Must be taken with Phys. 
Lab. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Phys. 102: Electricity and Magnetism — The elementary theory of elec- 
tricity and magnetism and the practical application of the various laws. 



95 

Required of students in engineering, chemistry and general science. Must 
be taken with Phys. Lab. 102. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Phys. 103: Heat and Light — Nature of heat; expansion, change of 
state; transmission and radiation of heat, and the elements of thermo- 
dynamics. Theory of light; reflection, refraction; dispersion, etc.; use 
of prisms, lenses and mirrors. Required of students in engineering, 
chemistry and general science. Must be taken with Phys. Lab. 103. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Phys. 104: General Physics — A discussion of such branches of physics 
as are suited to the needs of students in the agricultural courses. Elec- 
tive. Must be taken with Phys. Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 



^i 



PHYSICS LABORATORY 

Phys. Lab. 101: Mechanics and Sound — Quantitative experiments illus- 
trating the laws and principles studied under Phys. 101. Required of 
students in engineering, chemistry and general science. Must be taken 
with Phys. 101. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 102: Electricity and Magnetism — The study of magnetic 
fields and the measurement of current, electromotive force, resistance, 
etc. Required of students in engineering, chemistry and general science.. 
Must be taken with Phys. 102. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 103: Heat and Light — Quantitative experiments in heat 
and light. Required of students in engineering, chemistry and general 
science. Must be taken with Phys. 103. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 104. General Physics — Experiments illustrating the sub- 
jects discussed in Phys. 104. Elective for students in the agricultural^ 
courses. Must be taken with Phys. 104. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

Phys. 1: General Physics — An elementary course including lectures, 
recitations and laboratory work in mechanics, heat, light, electricity and 
magnetism. Special attention is paid to practical application. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 



RAILWAY ENGINEERING 

Rwys. 101 : Railway Curves — Simple and compound curves, frogs, turn- 
outs and crossings. Spirals. Prereq. Surv. 105. Required of students 
in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 



96 

Rwys. 102: Railway Earthwork — Cross-sectioning earthwork computa- 
tions. Haul, overhaul, mass diagrams. Prereq. Rwys. 101. Required of 
students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Rwys. 103: Railway Surveying — Preliminary surveys, location surveys, 
taking of cross-sections. Computation of quantities. Estimates. Prereq- 
Rwys. 101. Must be taken with Rwys. 102. Required of students in civil 
engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Rwys. 104: Railway Economics — Ballasting, track fastenings, rails, 
buildings and structures, terminals, signaling, rolling stock. Promotion, 
operating expenses, effects of curvature and grade. Valuation, repairs 
and renewals. Prereq. Rwys. 101. Required of students in civil engi- 
neering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



SHOP PRACTICE 

Shop. 101: Woodwork — During the first term is taught the use and 
care of bench tools, exercise in sawing, mortising, tenoning and laying 
out work from blueprints. The second term is devoted to projects involv- 
ing construction, decoration and wood-turning. During the third term 
the principles and process of pattern-making are taught, together with 
enough foundry work to demonstrate the uses of patern-making. Re- 
quired of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 3d terms; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 4. 

Shop 102: Woodwork — A course similar to Shop 101, for students in 
electrical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Shop 103: Woodwork — A short course similar to the first term of 
Shop 101, for students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Shop 104: Woodwork — A course for students in agricultural courses, 
in which emphasis is laid on the types of woodwork used on the farm. 
Elective. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 105: Blacksmithing — The making of the fire and how to keep it 
in order. The operations of drawing out, upsetting and bending of iron 
and steel, including the calculations of stock for bent shapes. Welding. 
Construction of steel tools for use in the machine shop, including tool 
dressing and tempering. Annealing. Prereq. Shop 101. 

Practice, 6 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Shop 106: Blacksmithing — A course similar to Shop 105, for students 
in electrical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 



97 



Shop 107: Forging and Pipefitting — A course fitted to meet the needs 
of students in agriculture. Elective. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 108: Foundry Work — Molding in iron and brass. Core-making. 
The cupola and its management. Lectures on the selection of irons by 
fracture, fuels, melting and mixing of metals. Prereq. Shop 105. Re- 
quired of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Shop 109: Machine Work — Elementary principles of vise and machine 
work, which include turning, planing, drilling, screw-cutting and filing. 
This is preceded by study of the different machines used in machine shops. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 110: Machine Work — A continuation of Shop 109. Required of 
students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 9 hours, 1st term; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 5. 

Shop 111: Machine Work — A course suited to the needs of students 
in electrical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Shop 1: Farm Woodwork — Use of tools in constructing trestles, gates 
and frames. Required of students in the two-year course in agriculture. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

Shop 2: Forging and Pipefitting — Similar to Shop 107, for students in 
the two-year course in agriculture. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 3: Carpentry and Pattern-Making — Joinery. Pattern and core 
box construction. Wood-turning. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. 

Shop 4: Advanced Woodwork — In this course the special needs of the 
student are considered in laying out the work. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 5: Blacksmithing — The making of the fire and how to keep it 
in order. The operations of drawing out, upsetting and bending of iron 
and steel, including the calculation of stock for bent shapes. Welding. 
Making, tempering and annealing of steel tools. 

Practice, 6 hours; 2d term. 

Shop 6: Foundry — Molding in iron and brass. Core-making. The 
cupola and its management. Lectures on the selection of irons by frac- 
ture, fuels, melting and mixing of metals. 
Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 7: Machine Work — Elementary principles of vise and machine 
work, which includes chipping, filing, turning, planing, drilling, screw- 
cutting and polishing. The study of the different machines precedes the 
operations. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. 



98 

Shop 8: Advanced Machine Work — Milling, gear-cutting, tool-making, 
including taps, dies and reamers. Plain and differential indexing. Pipe 
cutting and fitting. 

Practice, 9 hours; 2d term. 

Shop 9: Shop Work — Students will be permitted to specialize in any 
of the shop courses. The work is of an advanced nature. 

Practice, 9 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 10: Machine Work — A course similar to Shop 7 for students in 
electricity. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 



STRUCTURAL DESIGN 

Sir. Des. 101: Elementary Structural Design — This course includes the 
complete design and detailing of a steel roof truss and a plate girder; 
the detailing from standard commercial drawing sheets of floor beams, 
girders and columns, and the complete design of a bridge truss of either 
the Warren or Pratt type. The stresses are determined by both analytical 
and graphic methods. Prereq. Mech. 103. Required of students in civil 
and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2 and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 

Str. Des. 102: Structural Design — Analysis of stresses in structural 
steel buildings. Design of roof trusses. Design of truss bridges and high- 
way bridges. Design of plate girders under dead and live loads. Design 
of riveted connections. Both analytical and graphical methods are used. 
Prereq. Str. Des. 101. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 9. 

Str. Des. 103: Structural Design — Analysis of stresses in traveling 
cranes and derricks. Design of crane girders and lattice girders. Design 
of cranes. Both analytical and graphical methods are used. Design of 
riveted connections. Prereq. M. Des. 102. Required of students in me- 
chanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms; practice, 6 
hours, 1st and 3 terms; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 11. 

Str. Des. 104 : Concrete Theory — Manufacture, tests and uses of cement 
and concrete. Design of slabs, beams, girders and columns, plain and 
reinforced. Prereq. Mec. 103. Required of students in civil and rural 
engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Str. Des. 105 : Concrete Design — Design of retaining walls, foundations 
and arches, plain and reinforced. Prereq. Str. Des. 104. Required for 
civil and elective for rural engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



99 



Str. Des. 106: Retaining Walls and Concrete Arches — Design of a 
typical retaining wall and complete design of an arch of reinforced con- 
crete construction, including abutments. Must be taken with Str. Des. 105. 
Required for civil and elective for rural engineering students. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Str. Des. 107: Design of Farm Structures — The design and arrange- 
ment of farm buildings and equipment. Lectures also cover the heating, 
lighting, ventilation, plumbing and costs. Prereq. Str. Des. 101. Elective 
for students in rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 

Str. Des. 108: School Architecture — The planning and detailing of 
moderate priced and medium sized school buildings, including the heating, 
ventilation, lighting and plumbing. Prereq. Str. Des. 101. Elective for 
students in rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Str. Des. 109: Farm Buildings — Design and specifications of a simple 
typical building in timber or concrete and lectures upon the details. The 
course is very practical and latitude is permitted the student to develop 
his ideas. Prereq. Dr. 107. Elective for non-engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Str. Des. 1: Farm Buildings — An elementary course similar to Str. 
Des. 109. Prereq. Dr. 1. Required of students in the two-year course in 
agriculture. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 



M 



4 



i 

i 



SURVEYING 

Surv. 101: Surveying — Elements of surveying. Measurement of hori- 
zontal and level lines. Errors, use of compass, transit and level. Prereq. 
Math. 101. Required of students in civil, electrical and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Surv. 102: Surveying — Application of the principles of elementary 
surveying to practical operations in the field. Measurement of lines, 
angles, elevations. Introductory use of the transit and level. Prereq. 
Surv. 101. Required of students in civil, electrical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 103: Surveying — Adjustment of instruments. Determination of 
direction. Measurement of angles. Land survey methods and computa- 
tions. Prereq. Surv. 102. Required of students in civil and rural engineer- 
ing. Must be taken with Surv. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Surv. 104: Surveying — Transit lines, level lines, traversing, mapping, 
computation of areas. Required of students in civil and rural engineer- 
ing. Must be taken with Surv. 103. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 



100 



ll 



Surv. 105: Advanced Surveying — Theory of stadia. General surveying 
methods. Topographic surveying. Plane table. Earthwork computations. 
City surveying. Hydrographic surveying. Prereq. Surv. 103. Required 
of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Surv. 106: Advanced Surveying — Use of plane table. Topographic 
mapping. Solar observations. Prereq. Surv. 105. Required of students 
in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 107: Topographic Surveying — Adjustment of instruments. Base 
line measurements. Elements of triangulation and adjustment of quadri- 
laterals. Prereq. Surv. 106. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 108: Geodesy — Brief outline of the method of least squares. 
Applications to precise surveying, leveling and triangulation. Astro- 
nomical observations for azimuth, latitude, time and longitude. Prereq. 
Surv. 105. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Surv. 109: Geodesy — Practice in problems developed in Surv. 109. 
Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 110: Elementary Surveying — Measurement of lines, angles and 
elevations. Elementary use of transit and level. Prereq. Math. 101. Elec- 
tive for non-engineering students. Must be taken with Hyd. 108. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. Ill: Elementary Surveying — Application of principles of plane 
surveying to practical operations in the field. Profiles, trannes, computa- 
tions of areas. Elective for non-engineering students. Must be taken 
with Surv. 110. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

The Engineering Building is equipped with lecture-rooms, 
recitation-rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for 
all of the engineering work except farm machinery, which is 
located in the Agricultural Building. The departments of 
Mathematics and Physics are also located in the Engineering 
Building. Quarters are provided for the Military Department 
in Calvert Hall. 

The three drafting-rooms are well equipped for practical 
work. Two of these are used by the junior and senior classes, 
each student being provided with a separate desk. The third 



101 



room is used jointly by the freshman and sophomore students 
and contains 15 drawing tables, accommodating about 90 
students. 

Engineering students are to provide themselves with ap- 
proved drawing outfit, materials and book, cost of which dur- 
ing the freshman year amounts to about $15. The cost to other 
students taking mechanical drawing is about $5. The College 
does not furnish these, but they are purchased by the student 
and are his property. 

The combined blueprint and dark room, with its commodious 
printing frames, affords splendid opportunities for sun-print- 
ing, which is so useful to engineering students. 

This laboratory is fitted with such appliances as may be used 
to the best advantage in engineering practice. These include 
a potentiometer and standard voltmeter and ammeter for cali- 
brating the various measuring instruments used in the labor- 
atory. A Sharp-Miller portable photometer and a standard 
photometer for measuring the candle power of lamps and for 
determination of illumination intensities. A large number of 
portable ammeters, voltmeters and indicating wattmeters for 
direct and alternating current measurements, standard curve 
drawing voltmeter and ammeter, electrostatic voltmeter, fre- 
quency meters, silver and copper voltameters, Siemen's type 
electrodynaomometer, watthour meters and an oscillograph. 
A standard portable testing set, heating devices, condensers, 
tachometers, multiple circuit ammeter and voltmeter switches. 
D'Arsonval galvanometers, standard resistance boxes and 
bridges. The lamps used for experimental purposes include 
direct and alternating current multiple carbon arc, metallic 
arc, mercury vapor and nernst lamps. 

A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt 
compound generator, has been installed for testing purposes. 
This may be used in connection with the College lighting plant 
when needed and will be used for light and power service in 
the Engineering Building. 

The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made 
readily with any part of the College lighting plant with the 



102 



turbo-generator or with any of the apparatus in the dynamo- 
room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo-room includes the following: 
A 10-kilowatt rotary converter of the latest type, with speed 
limit and end play devices; a five-horsepower variable speed, 
commutating pole motor; a 7.5 kilowatt, 60-cycle, 220-volt 
alternator designed to operate either as a polyphase generator, 
synchronous motor, frequency changer, constant speed induc- 
tion motor or variable speed induction motor. The following 
parts are supplied with the set to make possible its operation 
in any of the above-named ways; a stationary armature for 
use either as an alternating current generator or as an induc- 
tion motor field; a revolving field, a squirrel cage induction 
motor rotor with starting compensator having self-contained 
switches; an induction motor rotor with 3-phase collector 
rings, external resistance and controller; a 2-kilowatt booster 
set; a five-horsepower compound direct current motor and a 
1.5 horsepower shunt motor fully inclosed; a 7.5 kilowatt, 
120-volt, 3-phase self-excited generator direct connected to a 
115-volt compound direct current motor; a motor-generator 
set consisting of a 3.6 horsepower shunt motor direct con- 
nected to a 2-kilowatt generator ; several small D. C. and A. C. 
motors and generators ; two 2-kilowatt transformers to trans- 
form power from 110 or 220 volts to 1100 or 2200 volts ; various 
types of starting rheostats with automatic overload and no 
voltage release ; field rheostats. 

The main switchboards are used to mount the necessary 
circuit apparatus to control the generators and motors as well 
as the various circuits in the dynamo-room and testing labor- 
atory. Wire and water rheostats are arranged for load and 
regulation. Portable lampboards and portable switchboards 
have been constructed for use in machine tests. In addition 
to the special electrical engineering equipment, the College 
lighting plant will be used for illustrative and experimental 
purposes. This plant contains, together with other apparatus 
useful in teaching electrical engineering, two Bullock gener- 
ators of 40 kilowatts total capacity. 



103 

An eight-inch Waltham bench lathe, with all the necessary 
attachments, has been installed in the dynamo-room for the 
use of students in making small articles, such as binding posts, 
connecters, etc., for use in the laboratories. 

The telephone laboratory is well equipped with apparatus 
for the magneto and common battery systems. 

APPARATUS IN LABORATORIES 

In the Farm Machinery Laboratory the different imple- 
ments, machines, gasoline engines, etc., used on farms are to 
be found. Much of it is loaned by the manufacturers. 

In the Hydraulic Laboratory hydraulic apparatus of a char- 
acter suitable to the needs of the students has been installed. 

In the Materials Laboratory the apparatus for testing ma- 
terials includes a 100,000-pound Riehle combined hand and 
power testing machine for making tensile, compression, shear- 
ing and transverse tests on various kinds of materials ; a 1,000- 
pound Riehle machine for testing cement briquettes, etc. The 
testing of asphalts, tars, etc., used in roadwork is carried on 
under the direction of the Department of Chemistry. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

Among the apparatus installed in the laboratory are a cross 
compound condensing Corliss engine of 50 horsepower, 
equipped with brake, indicators, relief valves, reducing motion, 
steam and vacuum gauges and speed indicator, which gives 
ample opportunity for steam consumption and brake tests. 
This is connected with the shops, so that at any time it may 
be switched on and drive them. The College power plant, with 
its vacuum heating system, three 100-horsepower return 
tubular boilers and two electric generating units, offers unex- 
celled opportunities for experimental work. A six-horsepower, 
four-cycle gasoline engine equipped with prony brake permits 
the making of tests in gas engineering. 

The Physics Laboratory is well supplied with apparatus for 
lecture-room demonstrations and for experiments undertaken 



104 



by students. New pieces of apparatus are added to the equip- 
ment each year. 

The shops are well lighted and admirably adapted to the pur- 
pose for which they were designed. The wood-working shop 
contains accommodations for bench work and wood turning. 
The power machinery in this shop is a band and universal cir- 
cular saw, five 12-inch turning lathes, one 16-inch by 10-foot 
patternmaker's lathe, a grindstone, wood trimmer, 26-inch 
wood planer and universal tool grinder. 

In the forge shops are 16 power forges, 2 hand forges and a 
pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of smoke. 
There is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with an iron cupola, which melts 
1,200 pounds of iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core oven 
and the necessary flasks and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of 1 10-inch speed 
lathe, 1 22-inch engine lathe with compound rest, 1 12-inch 
combined foot and power lathe, 2 14-inch engine lathes, 1 24- 
inch drill press, 1 No. 4 emery tool grinder, 1 No. IV2 universal 
milling machine and an assortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe- 
tools and measuring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machine shops is driven 
by a 9 by 14 inch automatic cut-off, high-speed engine, built by 
members of the junior and senior mechanical engineering 
classes, after the standard design of the Atlas engine. An 
8 by 12 inch engine drives the machinery of the blacksmith 
shop and foundry. It was presented to the College by the city 
of Baltimore and secured through the efforts of the late Rear- 
Admiral John D. Ford. 

The surveying equipment includes a number of transits, 
levels, compasses, plane tables and minor instruments for use 
in plane, topographic, railroad and geodetic work. These are 
added to as the necessity for other equipment arises. 



Division of General Science 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

H. B. McDonnell. .Dean, Professor of Chemistry. 

L. B. Broughton . . • Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

R. C. Wiley Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

E. R. HiTCHNER. .. .Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Chemistry. 
C. G. Remsberg Assistant in Analytical Chemistry. 



INTRODUCTION 

The Division of General Science is charged with two distinct 
classes of work. (1) The licensing, inspection and analysis of 
fertilizers, feeds and agricultural lime sold in the State, the 
professor of chemistry being, ex officio, the State Chemist. 
The results of this work are published in a "quarterly" bulletin, 
which is sent free to all Maryland farmers who apply for it. 
(2) The instruction of students. 

The Chemical Laboratory Building contains laboratories, 
office and balance room for the State fertilizer, feed and lime 
control work, lecture room, supply room and four other labora- 
tories. In addition classrooms in Morrill Hall are used and two 
bacteriological laboratories in the new Agricultural Building. 

The laboratories are well equipped with standard apparatus 
and chemicals, chemical and assay balances, polariscopes, re- 
fractometers, spectroscopes, microscopes with high-power oil 
immersion lenses, etc. Each student is provided with a locker, 
reagents and apparatus and has the use of a working desk. 

The division is provided with a library of standard reference 
books on chemistry and related subjects, to which additions are 
made from time to time. 

Instruction in chemistry is begun with the first term of the 
freshman year. Laboratory work by the student is empha- 
sized and special attention is given to elements and compounds 
of practical and economic importance. The first year is in- 



q! 



106 



I'i 



tended to give the student that practical and theoretical knowl- 
edge of elementary chemistry which is essential in the educa- 
tion of every man, no matter what his vocation. It also serves 
as a foundation for advanced work in chemistry, if the course 
in chemistry is chosen. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 

The required and elective work of the various departments of 
the division is outlined on the following pages. The College 
reserves the right to withdraw any course at any time. 



107 



CHEMICAL COURSE 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Tebm. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analytics 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Drawing 103 — Mechanical Drawing , 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3 
1 

2(6) 



4 
3(3) 



3 

1(2) 



3 
1 

2(6) 



5 

3(3) 



1(2) 



3 
1 



2(6) 



2(6) 
1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Language — Modern Language 

Chemistry 113 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Chemistry 103 — Qualitative Analysis , 

Chemistry 105 — Quantitative Analj'sis 

Mathematics 103 — Advanced Algebra , 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus 

Botany 103 — Plant Physiology 

Botany 104 — Plant Physiology 

Botany 1 IG — Plant Micro-Chemistry , 

Soils 101 — Introductor>' Study of Soils 

Geology 102 — General Geology , 

Geology 101 — Determinative Mineralogy , 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course , 



3 
2 
1(6) 



3 

i(6) 



2(3) 
1(2) 



1(2) 



3 
2 


3 
2 


1(6) 


1(6) 


3 


3 


2(6) 
(6) 





3(3) 
1(3) 
1(2) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Language — Modern Language , 

Chemistry 108 — Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 106 — Quantitative Analysis 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — ^Electricity and Magnetism, 

Physics 103 and 106 — Heat and Light 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course , 



3 

3(3) 
2(9) 
4(3) 



R 



3 

3(3) 
2(9) 



4(3) 

r" 



3 

3(3) 
2(9) 



4(3) 
R 



SENIOR YEAR. 



English 104 — Lectures and Technical Composition 

Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics 

Rural Economics 103 — Problems in Rural Economics. . . . 

Chemistry 109 — Agricultural Chemistry 

Chemistry 110 and 115 — Agricultural Chemical Analysis. 

Chemistry 111 — Physiological Chemistry 

Chemistry 112 — Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 114 — Industrial Chemistrj' 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 



2 
3 



3 

(6) 
3(3) 



R 



2 
3 



(6) 



3(3) 
3 
R 



(6) 



3(3) 
3 
R 



It 



108 



GENERAL SCIENCE 



I 

ill 



:r 



1^ 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



English 101 — Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 101 

Zoology 101 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Mathematics 101 — Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102 — Analytics 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 
Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Language — Modern Language 

English 102 — English Composition 

Public Speaking 102 

Mathematics 103 — Advanced Algebra . . 

Mathematics 104 — Calculus 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course . 
Electives 



Term. 



II 



3 
1 
2(6) 



5 

3(3) 
1(2) 



3 

1 
2(6) 



5 

3(3) 



1(2) 



3 
2 
1 
3 



1(2) 
8 



3 
2 
1 



3 

1(2) 
8 



III 



3 
1 



2(6) 
5 " 



2(6) 
1(2) 



3 
2 
1 



3 

1(2) 
8 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



!e 



Rural Economics 102 — Principles of Economics . . 

Government 104 — Law of Contracts 

Language — Modern Language 

Physics 101 and 104 — Mechanics and Sound 

Physics 102 and 105 — Electricity and Magnetism , 

Physics 103 and 106 — Heat and Light 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course , 

Electives 



3 

4(3) 
4(3) 



R 



6 



3 
3' 



R 



6 



3 
3 



4(3) 
R 
6 



SENIOR YEAR. 


Government 101 


2 

R 
15 




R 
15 


2 


Militarv Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 


R 


Electives 


15 







(I, 



109 
•SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN GENERAL SCIENCE 



SUBJECT. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Tebm, 



II 



III 



Botany 102-103-104— Plant Histology and Physiology. 

Botany 116 — Plant Micro-Chemistry 

Chemistry 104 and 105— ^Quantitative Analysis 

Chemistry 113 — Inorganic Chemistry 

Zoology — Advanced Zoology 

Soils 101— A Study of Soils 

Geology 102— General Geology 

Literature — English Literature . 

Drawing 103 — Alechanical Drawing 

Zoolog>' — General Entomology , 



3 
2 
4 



2 
2 



4 
2 
3 
2 
4 
4 



2 
2 



3 
2 
4 



4 
2 
2 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 

Public Speaking 

Chemistry 108 — Organic Chemistry 

Bacteriologj' 101— General Bacteriology 

Botany 105 — General Plant Pathology 

Botany 110 — Genetics 

Chemistry 104 and 105— Quantitative Analysis 

Botany 1 12— Systematic Botany 

Education 101 — Problems in Secondary Education 

Education 102 — Educational Psychology 

Education 103 — School Obser^-ations and General Methods 

Soils 102 — Advanced Course 

Geology 101 — Determinative Mineralogy 



2 
1 
4 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
2 



2 
1 
4 
3 



3 
3 



3 
2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Chemistry 109 — Agricultural Chemistry 

Chemistry 111 — Physiological Chemistry 

Bacteriology 101 — General or Advanced Bacteriology 

Chemistry 112 — ^Physical Chemistry 

Language — Modern Language 

English 



Education 104 — Vocational Education 

Education 105 — Special Methods in Secondary Vocational Agriculture, 
Rural Economics 104 — Economics 



3 

4 
3 



3 
2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
2 



2 
3 



3 
3 
3 
2 



2 
3 



♦Subjects not indicated may be available. 

♦If any elective is not available when indicated because of conflicts or otherwise, it may be 
elected the following year. In all cases the students must consult their advisers. 

DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 



Following are descriptions of the courses offered by the 
various departments in the Division of General Science : 

Chemical Course — The course in Chemistry differs but little 
from the other courses until the beginning of the sophomore 
year and the work in the freshman year of any of the four- 
year courses will prepare for it, as the amount of chemistry is 



110 



li 



the same in all courses to the beginning of the sophomore year 
and the demands on the agricultural or technical chemist are 
now so varied that a foundation with more of the essentials of 
the agricultural or the engineering courses is often desirable. 

Beginning with the sophomore year the major part of the 
student's time is devoted to chemistry, the practical work in the 
laboratory occupying approximately half his time. The course 
is essentially a course in agricultural chemistry, fitting the 
graduate for positions in agricultural colleges, experiment 
stations and the United States Department of Agriculture. 

General Science Course — The General Science Course is 
offered to those young men who have not chosen as their voca- 
tion in life any of the technical professions, but who are seeking 
for such general culture as will fit them to become, after gradu- 
ation, useful members of society. Young men desiring to 
study law or medicine or the liberal arts, or to become teachers, 
will find in the curriculum of this course a highly satisfactory 
preparation for such work. While emphasis has been placed 
upon subjects such as English language, literature, history, 
mathematics, etc., natural science occupies a prominent place 
in the course and the range of electives will enable each to 
choose for himself, under certain necessary regulations, such a 
group of studies as will be best adapted to his own peculiar 
requirements. 

A wide range of electives is offered in order to meet, as far 
as possible, the needs of every student. At the opening of the 
session the student must select, with the approval of the Dean 
of the division, a consistent group of courses for the year. No 
change may be made in this group later in the session, except 
with the approval of the Dean. 

CHEMISTRY 

« 

Chem. 101 : General Chemistry — Recitations, lectures and practical work 
in the laboratory, where the student performs the experiments under the 
direction of instructors. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 8. 

Chem. 102: The Metals and Qualitative Analysis — A theoretical study 
of the occurrence, properties and metallurgy of the common metals, sup- 
plemented by a laboratory course in qualitative analysis. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 



I' 



Ill 

Chem. 103: Qualitative Analysis — An advanced course of qualitative 
analysis. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Chem. 104: Quantitative Analysis — A brief course illustrating some of 
the general principles of the quantitative study of chemistry. In the latter 
part of the course the students are given samples of fertilizers, feeds, 
butter, milk, etc., for analysis. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 3. 

Chem. 105: Quantitative Analysis — The principal operations of quanti- 
tative analysis. Standardization of the chemical balance. Standardiza- 
tion of weights and apparatus used in chemical analysis. Typical gravi- 
metric, volumetric, colormetric and electrolytic methods are taken up and 
discussed. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

Chem. 106: Quantitative Analysis — A continuation of course 105. An 
advanced course of quantitative analysis which consists of a study of 
methods used in the agricultural and industrial chemical world. Prereq. 
Chem. 104 or 105. 

Lectures, 2 hours; practice, 9 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 5. 

Chem. 107: Agricultural Organic Chemistry — A study of the principal 
organic compounds of agriculture. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Chem. 108: Organic Chemistry — The chemistry of the carbon com- 
pounds. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Chem. 109: Agricultural Chemistry — The chemistry of soils, fertilizers, 
plant life, animal life, etc. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Chem. 110: Agricultural Chemical Analysis — An advanced course in the 
analysis of fertilizers and fertilizing materials, feeding stuffs, butter, milk, 
sugar, starch, etc. Prereq. Chem. 104. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Chem. Ill: Physiological Chemistry — Lectures and recitations. Prereq. 
Chem. 107 or 108. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Chem. 112: Physical Chemistry — A study of the advanced theories of 
chemistry. The laboratory consists of the determination of the boiling 
and melting points, lowering of the freezing point by substances in solu- 
tion, determination of vapor densities, etc. Prereq. Chem. 104-107. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Chem. 113: Inorganic Chemistry — An advanced course covering more in 
detail the subject matter set forth in the general chemistry offered in the 
freshman year. Prereq. Chem. 101. 

Lectures, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

Chem. 114: Industrial Chemistry — The study of the practical methods 
employed in various chemical industries. Visits are made to ice, fermen- 



112 



tation and gas plants; also to fertilizer, glass, iron and steel works, etc. 
Prereq. Chem. 113. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

Chem. 115: Advanced Agricultural Analysis — Prereq. Chem. 104-105. 

Practice, 6 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

Chem. 116: Thesis — Investigation along agricultural chemical lines to 
be embodied in a graduating thesis. 

Chem. 1 : Farm Chemistry — This course consists of an elementary study 
of general and agricultural chemistry, with special reference to the chem- 
istry of plants, animals, fertilizers, etc. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. 

GEOLOGY 

Geol. 101: Determinative Mineralogy — This is a course of determinative 
mineralogy. The more important minerals are identified by their charac- 
teristic physical and chemical properties. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Geol. 102: General Geology — A course in the history of dynamic, strati- 
graphic and physiographic geology. The latter part of the course is 
devoted to the geology of Maryland, specially as affecting the character of 
the soil, mineral wealth and other economic conditions of the State. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Geol. 103 : Engineering Geology — Discussion of the principles of geology. 
Study of geological materials of importance in engineering. Practical 
field work. 

Lectures, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Bact. 101 : General Bacteriology — Preparation of media and stains. The 
practical application of various methods of sterilization. A study of the 
various procedures for anaerobic development and isolation of bacteria in 
pure cultures. Standard procedures for the examination of pure cultures, 
supplemented by a routine determination of the morphological and physio- 
logical characteristics of pure cultures isolated from nature and having 
special functions in the field of agriculture, dairying and sanitation. The 
routine bacteriological examination of drinking waters, milk and its 
products, foods, soils and disinfectants. Lectures and practical demon- 
strations in immunity and resistance. Prereq. Chem. 101-102. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL COURSE 

Bact. 1 : Bacteriology — Lectures and practical demonstrations of subjects 
pertaining to agricultural and dairy bacteriology, with emphasis on the 
bacteria in milk and soils. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



Division of Vocational Education 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Habold F. Cotterman.. . .Dean and Professor of Agricultural Education* 

L. A. Emerson. Professor of Trade and Industrial Education. 

Professor of Home Economics Education. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro Professor of Farm Management. 

P. F. Brookens Assistant Professor of Rural Economics. 

George J. Schulz Instructor in Government and History. 






INTRODUCTION 

The Division of Vocational Education offers opportunity to 
prepare for teaching in secondary vocational schools of the 
types encouraged by the Smith-Hughes Act. As a means to 
that end its vocational education curricula and courses have 
the approval of the Maryland State Board of Education. 
Graduates from its curricula are eligible for certification by the 
State Superintendent of Schools without examination. The 
work is organized in four departments — namely, Agricultural 
Education, Home Economics Education, Trade and Industrial 
Education and Supervised Teaching. 

In addition to the teacher training work, the division also 
includes the departments of Government, History and Rural 
Economics. 

The four-year curricula of the division consist of regular 
collegiate courses and lead to the Bachelor's degree given by 
the College. These curricula consist of Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Home Economics Education, Trade and Industrial Educa- 
tion and Farm Management and Agricultural Economics. The 
Home Economics Education curriculum is offered in co-opera- 
tion with the Division of Home Economics. 

One-year curricula for the training of teachers of trade and 
industrial subjects and teachers of related trade and industrial 
subjects will be offered to persons of maturity. Upon the satis- 



114 

factory completion of such curricula, prospective teachers will 
be issued certificates of proficiency. 

As the need for evening classes in Trade and Industrial and 
Home Economics Education arises, special curricula in these 
fields will be offered at centers throughout the State. The 
number and location of these centers will depend entirely upon 
the need and demand for such instruction. The courses will 
be organized on the short-unit basis and will be maintained 
only as long as the demand justifies it. Upon the satisfactory 
completion of such special curricula students will be issued 
certificates of proficiency. 



I 



Follow-Up Courses 

By a uniform system of follow-up, the division keeps a com- 
plete record of the qualifications of the prospective teacher, of 
his work while in training, and of his efficiency as a teacher 
upon entering the field. As the beginning teacher's training 
is not considered complete until he has demonstrated his ability 
to turn out workers proficient in the vocation for which he is 
offering instruction, an attempt is made to give him such help 
as he may need from time to time, particularly during his first 
year's teaching experience. 

In summer courses in vocational education are offered for 
the benefit of teachers in service and such individuals as may 
be able to qualify for the teaching of a vocation upon the com- 
pletion of the work. 

By a system of itinerant teaching, special courses in voca- 
tional education are offered in evenings and on Saturdays to 
teachers in service. 

COURSES 

Agricultural Education — In addition to the entrance require- 
ments, involving graduation from a standard four-year high 
school, students electing the Agricultural Education curriculum 
must present evidence of having acquired farm experience after 
reaching the age of 14 years. Graduation will depend upon 
the successful completion of the curriculum as laid down and 



115 

farm experience equivalent to at least two years of farm work. 
Some of the farm experience may be acquired after the student 
has entered College. 

The 48 hours of electives allowed by this curriculum may 
be selected from any of the courses offered by the College for 
which the student has the necessary prerequisites. This free- 
dom affords not only an opportunity to acquire a broad train- 
ing in agriculture of the type needed for farming and teaching 
the vocation, but permits also some specialization in a particu- 
lar field of production as agronomy, pomology, vegetable gar- 
dening, or animal husbandry. In making such elections the 
student should consult the Dean in charge of the specialty as 
well as the Dean of this division. Students should arrange 
their work so that at least 40 per cent, of their time will have 
been spent on technical agriculture, 25 per cent, on scientific 
subjects, 20 per cent, on subjects of a general educational char- 
acter and from 12 to 15 per cent, on subjects in professional 
education. 



116 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



SUBJECT. 



Term. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



II 



III 



English 

Public Speaking 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry , 

Chemistry 102 — ^The Metals and Qualitative Analysis , 

Zoology 101 and 102 — General Zoology 

Botany 101— Oeneral Botany 

Vocational Education 101 — Freshman Lectures. 
History 101-102-103— Industrial History, or 

Mathematics, or 

Language 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3 
1 
3(3) 



] 



2(6) 

i" 

4 

1(2) 



3 

1 
3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 
1(2) 



3 
1 

• • • • 
2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils 

Geology 

Pomology 101 — Principles of Pomology 

Botany 103 and 104 — ^Plant Physiology 

Animal Husbandry 

Vegetable Gardening 101 — Principles of Vegetable Gardening 

Elective 

Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course 



3(3) 



3(3) 
3(3) 



5 

1(2) 



3(3) 



2(6) 
2(3) 



6 
1(2) 



3(3) 

2(6) 

3(3) 

5 

1(2) 



% 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Soils 102 

Poultry 

Agronomy 103 — Forage Crops 

Vocational Education 102 — Principles of Teaching 

Vocational Education 103 — Educational Psychology 

Vocational Education 104 — Observation and Methods 

Vocational Education 105 — Methods in Vocational Agriculture 

Voational Education 106 — Observation and Methods , 

Elective 

Military Instruction 103 — ^Advanced Course 



2 
3 

2(3) 



3 

1(3) 



R 



2 
3 

2(3) 



3 

1(3) 



R 



2(3) 



3 

1(3) 
6 
R 




I . 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 108 — Farm Accounting , 

Rural Economics 109 — Farm Management 

Rural Economics 107 — Community Study 

Vocational Education 107 — Methods in Vocational Agriculture . . 
Vocational Education 108 — Supervised Teaching and Observation , 
Vocational Education 109 — Problems in Secondary Education. . . . 

Elective 

Military Instruction 104 — Advanced Course 



3(3) 



5 
4' 



(6) 



R 



3(3) 
2 

(6) 
1(3) 



R 



3(3) 
2 

1(3) 
2 
7 
R 



117 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Applicants for admission to the Home Economics Education 
curriculum should present, in addition to the equivalent of a 
high school education, evidence of having had practical experi- 
ence in the home. If practical experience is not presented for 
entrance, it must be acquired before graduation. 

The 40 hours of electives allowed by this curriculum may be 
selected from any of the courses offered by the College for 
which the student has the necessary prerequisites. In making 
elections students should consult the Dean of Home Economics 
as well as the Dean of this division. 

For further description of Home Economics Education cur- 
riculum see Division of Home Economics. 



TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



^1 



Several types of curricula will be offered those desiring to 
prepare for trade and industrial teaching — namely, four-year, 
one-year and special evening curricula. 

To enter a four-year curriculum for the training of teachers 
of related trade and industrial subjects, applicants must present 
evidence of having had the equivalent of a high school educa- 
tion and evidence of satisfactory contact with the trade or 
willingness to acquire such contact while in training. Appli- 
cants for admission to one-year curricula for the training of 
teachers of related industrial subjects must present evidence of 
having served two years in the trade, or two years in a tech- 
nical school and must have a general education equivalent to 
three years in high school. Applicants for admission to one- 
year curricula for the training of shop teachers must have com- 
pleted the elementary school, served an apprenticeship and at 
least one year as a journeyman. Applicants for admission to 
special evening teacher training classes must present evidence 
of having had two years' experience as a journeyman in the 
trade and evidence of having completed the equivalent of an 
elementary school education. 



f 



I 



118 

For a further description of Trade and Industrial Education 
curricula write for special circular. 

FARM MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURAL 

ECONOMICS 

The Farm Management and Agricultural Economics curricu- 
lum offers opportunity to train for farm management and for 
special investigational work along economic lines. 

The elections allowed by this curriculum may be made from 
any of the courses offered by the College for which the student 
is qualified to enroll. Students are encouraged to make elec- 
tions along some particular line of agricultural production as 
agronomy, pomology, vegetable gardening, or animal hus- 
bandry. In making such elections students should consult the 
Dean in charge of the specialty as well as the Dean of this 
division. 



i 



119 



FARM MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Tebm. 



II 



III 



English 101 — Composition, Rhetoric and Readings in English Prose 

Public Speaking 101 — Elements of Public Speaking 

Chemistry 101 — General Chemistry 

Chemistry 102 — The Metals and Qualitative Analysis 

Zoology 101 and 102 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Vocational Education 101 — Freshman Lectures 

History 101-102-103— Industrial History, or \ 

Mathematics, or ^ 

Language j 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



3 

1 

3(3) 



2(6) 

i" 

4 

1(2) 



3 
1 

3(3) 



2(6) 
l" 
4 
1(2) 



3 
1 



2(6) 

2(6) 
1 

4 

1(2) 



\. s 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



) 



Agronomy 101 — Cereal Crops 

Soils 101 — Introductory Study of Soils . 

Geology 

Botany 102 — Plant Histology 

Botany 103 and 104— Plant Physiology. 
Animal Husbandry or Horticulture .... 
Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course, 
Elective 



3(3) 



2(3) 



1(2) 
5 



3(3) 



2(6) 



1(2) 
5 



3(3) 



2(6) 



1(2) 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 

Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Ecnomics 

Rural Economics 102 — Problems in Rural Economies . 

Soils 102 

Soils 104 — Fertilizers 

Agronomy 103 — Farm Crops 

Government 101 

Military Instruction 103 — Advanced Course 

Elective 



2 
3 



2(3) 



R 



2 
3 



10 



R 



2(3) 
2(3) 
2 

R 
4 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 108 — Farm Accounting 

Rural Economics 109 — Farm Management 

Rural Economics 107 — Community Study 

Rural Economics 104 — Principles of Rural Organization 

Rural Economics 105 — Markets and the Marketing of Farm Products 

Rural Economics 106 — Co-operative Marketing 

Military Instruction — Advanced Course 

Elective 



3(3) 



2 
3 



8 



R 



3(3) 
2 



8 



R 



3(3) 
2 



R 



8 



1 



s 



120 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Agricultural Education 

Voc. Ed. 101: Freshman Lectures — A general description of vocational 
opportunities as exemplified by the various curricula of the Maryland 
State College of Agriculture. This course is intended primarily to assist 
the student in selecting his curriculum and courses for the succeeding 
years. 

Lecture, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 1. 

Voc. Ed. 102: Principles of Teaching — A survey of the aims of second- 
ary education, the nature of the high school pupil, types of learning, types 
of presentation, selection and organization of subject matter, supervised 
study, discipline and teaching ideals. Open only to juniors and seniors. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Voc. Ed. 103 : Educational Psychology — An intensive study of the nature 
of the individual, combining the important topics of both general and 
educational psychology, and stressing particularly the traits and charac- 
teristics of adolescence. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 102. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Voc. Ed. 104: Observation and Methods* — A study of methods as exem- 
plified in the classroom teaching of secondary teachers in Maryland and 
in the city of Washington. This course must parallel Voc. Ed. 102 and 

103. Open only to juniors and seniors. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Voc. Ed. 105 : Methods in Vocational Agriculture — A study of the teach- 
ing of secondary vocational agricultural subjects, stressing particularly 
the purposes of such instruction, the selection, organization and presenta- 
tion of subject matter and the organization of project activities. Prereq. 
Voc. Ed. 103. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Voc. Ed. 106: Observation and Methods — A continuation of Voc. Ed. 

104. stressing particularly methods used in the presentation of agricul- 
tural subjects in secondary schools. This course must parallel Voc. Ed. 

105. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 104. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Voc. Ed. 107: Methods in Vocational Agriculture — A continuation of 
Voc. Ed. 105, emphasizing particularly organization of subject matter, 
equipment, text-books and community relationships. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 105, 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Voc. Ed. 108: Supervised Teaching and Observation — ^Each student in 
this course is expected to spend at least one term, five periods a week or 



♦Observation work is in every case in charge of the instructor offering* 
the courses which such work parallels. 



i 



121 

its equivalent as a junior teacher of vocational agriculture and serve as an 
assistant to a supervising teacher in charge of this subject in a secondary 
school. During the term in which the student does his supervised teach- 
ing he is expected to assume a few other obligations. During the terms 
in which he is not teaching the student must continue observation work 
and attend the conferences held for the benefit of junior teachers. Open 
only to seniors. Credit depends upon the amount and character of work 
done. An average of three hours per term for the year may be allowed. 

Voc. Ed. 109: Problems in Secondary Education — A study of the prob- 
lems and responsibilities of the secondary school, stressing particularly 
the history and development of vocational education. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 107. 

Lectures, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 



1 



Graduate Work 

Voc. Ed. 201 : Problems in Agricultural Education — A study of historical 
and administrative phases of agricultural education, types of schools and 
systems of supervision. Credit depends upon amount and character of 
work done. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Voc. Ed. 110: Methods in Home Economics Education — A study of the 
teaching of secondary home economic subjects, stressing particularly the 
purposes of such instruction and the selection, organization and presenta- 
tion of subject matter. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 103. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Voc. Ed. Ill: Observation and Methods — A continuation of Voc. Ed. 104, 
stressing particularly the methods used in the presentation of home 
economic subjects. This course must parallel Voc. Ed. 110. Prereq. Voc. 
Ed. 104. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Voc. Ed. 112: Methods in Home Economics Education — A continuation of 
Voc. Ed. 110, emphasizing particularly organization of subject matter, 
equipment, text-books and community relationships. Prereq. Voc. Ed. 110. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Voc. Ed. 113: Supervised Teaching and Observation — Each student in 
this course is expected to spend at least one term, five periods a week or 
its equivalent as a junior teacher in home economics and serve as an 
assistant to a supervising teacher in charge of this subject in a secondary 
school. During the term in which the student does this teaching she is 
expected to assume a few other obligations. During the term in which she 
is not teaching she must continue observation work and attend the con- 
ferences held for the benefit of junior teachers. Open only to seniors. 
Credit depends upon the amount of work done. An average of three 
hours per term for the year may be allowed. 



122 



GOVERNMENT 

Gov. 101 : Federal, State and Municipal Government — This course deals 
with institutions and functions of the State and is adapted to the needs 
of those desiring to gain an insight into the responsibilities of citizenship. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Gov. 102: Business Law — This course deals with the common legal 
aspects of ordinary business transactions and is planned to give to the 
student a sense of the occasions when he should consult a lawyer for 
guidance to avoid making legal mistakes, rather than any feeling that he 
is competent to dispense with legal advice. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 4. 

Gov. 103 : Public Finance — This course is complimentary to the study of 
government and deals with the revenue and budgetory systems of public 
bodies — Federal, State and local. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 4. 

Gov. 104: Law of Contracts and Specifications — A course in business 
law arranged for students in engineering, dealing primarily with covenants 
and specifications. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Gov. 1: Federal, State and Municipal Government — A course parallel 
with Gov. 101, arranged for students in the two-year agricultural course. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. 

(Jov. 2: Business Law — A course parallel with Gov. 102 arranged for 
students in the two-year agricultural course. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. 

HISTORY 



Hist. 101 : European Industrial History — This course deals with a study 
of the economic and social causes underlying the "break up" of the Roman 
Empire and the succeeding industrial changes to 1776, stressing particu- 
larly the rise of England as an industrial nation. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

Hist. 102: Industrial and Economic History of the United States — A 
study of the industrial and economic development of the United States 
from the Colonial period to 1861. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Hist. 103: Comparative Industrial and Economic History — A study of 
the industrial development of the leading nations of the world from 1861 
to the present time. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Hist. 104 : Studies in Modern and Contemporary History — A course deal- 
ing with the history of modern States from 1850 to the present time. 

Lectures and recitations^ 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 



123 



i 



Hist. 105: History of Agriculture — A course dealing with the develop- 
ment of farming as an industry from the period of origin to the period of 
skill and scientific management. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

RURAL ECONOMICS 

R. Ec. 101: Principles of Economics — A basal course embracing a study 
of the economic principles underlying the phenomena of consumption, pro- 
duction, distribution, co-operation and business organization. 

Lectures, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 3. 

R. Ec. 102: Problems in Rural Economics — A study of the economic 
adaptations and adjustment necessary on the part of the agriculturist to 
meet the changing economic conditions. Population flows, land tenure, 
farm incomes, farm labor, agricultural credit and price movements will 
receive special consideration. Prereq. R. Ec. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

R. Ec. 103: Elements of Community Study — A course dealing with the 
fundamental principles of community development. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

R. Ec. 104: Principles of Rural Organization — A study of the historical 
and comparative development of farmers* co-operative organizations, 
stressing particularly present tendencies. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

R. Ec. 105: Markets and the Marketing of Farm Products — An analysis 
of the present system of transporting, storing and distributing farm 
products as a basis for intelligent direction of effort in increasing the 
efficiency of marketing methods. Prereq. R. Ec. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

R. Ec. 106: Co-operative Marketing — A study of the co-operative mar- 
keting, endeavors of farmers with a view to developing methods of dis- 
tributing perishable and specialized farm products. Prereq. R. Ec. 101 
and R. Ec. 105. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

R. Ec. 107: Community Study — A course dealing with a study of the 
history and structure of rural communities, stressing particularly rela- 
tionships and needs. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

R. Ec. 108: Farm Accounting — A study of the principles underlying 
farm accounting, emphasizing cost accounting and analysis of farm 
business. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 

R. Ec. 109: Farm Management — A study of the business of farming 
from the standpoint of the individual farmer. This course aims to con- 
nect the principles and practice which the student has acquired in the 



124 



several technical courses and to apply them to the development of a 
successful farm business. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 4. 

R. £c. 1: Farm Management — A course parallel with R. Ec. 109 
arranged for students in the two-year agricultural curriculum. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 2 hours; 1st term. 

R. Ec. 2: Farm Accounting — A course parallel with R. Ec. 108 arranged 

for students in the two-year agricultural curriculum. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. 

R. Ec. 3: Rural Organization — A survey of the functions, scope and 
present forms of organization of rural interests primarily for economic 
purposes. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. 

SUPERVISED TEACHING 

The supervised teaching required in courses numbered Voca- 
tional Education 108 and Vocational Education 111 is in charge 
of the individual at the head of this department, supervising 
teachers, professors of special methods in vocational agricul- 
ture and home economics and the principal in charge of the 
high school in which such work is conducted. 

It is the duty of the head of the department of supervised 
teaching to arrange in consultation with the supervising teach- 
ers and the principal the details involved in the administration 
of the practical work of students engaged as junior teachers, 
assume responsibility for the prompt fulfillment of duties on 
the part of a student acting in such capacity, and safeguard the 
interests of such students as individuals engaged in training 
for a State teacher's certificate. It is the duty of a supervising 
teacher to assume entire responsibility for the instruction of 
the pupils enrolled in the secondary courses for which he is 
responsible, supervise the lesson plans and classroom teaching 
of the junior teachers under him, and assist in every way 
possible in the training and development of students in such 
service. It is the duty of a professor of special methods to 
keep in close touch with the work of the supervising teachers 
in his field, study the development of students as junior teach- 
ers and assist supervising teachers in their work with such 



125 

students. It is the duty of the principal to maintain the school 
as a school, safeguard the interests of the pupils and endeavor 
to develop within the school the best that modern secondary 
education has to offer. 

The first aim of the courses in supervised teaching is to 
acquaint the student with the professional relations that ought 
to be considered in connection with the teaching of any subject 
in a high school. Plans are prepared for subsequent work in 
the classes of supervising teachers. Students failing during 
their regular period of supervised teaching to display essential 
qualifications for teaching are required to extend their periods 
of preparation under such arrangements as can be made for 
each mdividual case. 



Note — Use of terms. 

Pupil refers to one who has matriculated in a high school in which 
supervised teaching is done. 

Student refers to the college student in training for a State teacher's 
certificate. 

Teacher refers to any person regrularly teaching in a high school. 
Teachers may be of two classes — supervising and junior. A supervising 
teacher is an individual having entire charge of a secondary course in 
which students may be enrolled for supervised teaching. A junior teacher 
is a student who acts as an assistant to a supervising teacher and is 
enrolled for supervised teaching. 

Professor of Special Methods refers to a professor of special profes- 
sional courses in education, as Professor of Agricultural Education, Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics Education, etc. 

Principal refers to the principal of the high school in which supervised 
teaching is done. 



Division of Home Economics 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

A recent act of the Maryland Legislature made possible the 
establishment of the Division of Home Economics. This 
division will be able to enroll a limited number of students by 
October 1, 1918. As this catalogue goes to press but few of 
the instructors have been selected for the work. Sufficient 
basic courses, however, are outlined to enable prospective stu- 
dents and their agents to gain an idea of the character of the 
instruction which the College proposes to inaugurate. 

FOREWORD 

The Division of Home Economics offers opportunity to pre- 
pare for home making and home economics teaching. The 
courses given will include fundamental training which will 
enable the student to prepare for such professional service as 
interior decorating, dressmaking, millinery and managing or 
serving as a dietition in a private home, institutional household, 
hospital, school or college dormitory with a small amount of 
specialized training. On account of the demand for trained 
teachers of home economics and the limited dormitory space, 
students will be accepted only in the curriculum preparing for 
teaching. This curriculum is offered in co-operation with the 
Division of Vocational Education. 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The special entrance requirements of the Home Economics 
Education curriculum are stated in the description of this cur- 
riculum under the Division of Vocational Education. 



127 



!' 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



SUBJECT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Tebm. 



II 



III 



English 

Public Spaking 

Chemistry 

Zoology 101 and 102 — General Zoology 

Botany 101 — General Botany 

Vocational Education 101 — Freshman Lectures. . 
Home Economics 101 — Drawing and Design. . . . 

Home Economics 102 — Textiles 

Home Economics 103 — Elementary Dressmsiking , 
Physical Training 



3 
1 

3(3) 
2(6) 



1 
4 



3 

1 

3(3) 

2(6) 



1 

i' 
i* 



1 

2(6) 

2(6) 
1 



4 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Organic Chemistry 

Physiology 

Bacteriology and Public Health 

Elements of Community Study 

Home Economics 104 — Food Study and Cooking. 

Home Economics 105 — Dressmaking 

Home Economics 106 — Dietetics 

Physical Training 

Elective 



4 

4 



2 

4 



1 
3 



4 
2 

4 
4 



1 
3 



4 
2 



4 
1 

7 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



English 

Home Economics 107- 
Home Economics 108- 
Home Economics 109- 
Vocational Education 
Vocational Elducation 
Vocational Education 
Vocational Education 
Vocational Education 
Elective 



—Advanced Design 

—Home Care of the Sick 

—Nutrition 

102 — Principles of Teaching 

103 — Educational Psychology 

104 — Observation and Methods. . . . 
110 — Methods in Home Economics. 
Ill — Observation and Methods. . . . 



2 
2 
2 



3 
i'(3) 



6 



2 
2 



3 

1(3) 



3 

1(3) 

5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Rural Economics 101 — Principles of Economics 

Home Economics 110 — Clothing , 

Home Economics 111 — Home Equipment 

Home Economics 1 12 — Home Management 

Vocational Education 112 — Methods in Home Economics Ekiucation, 
Vocational Education 113 — Supervised Teaching and Observation. . . 

Vocational Education 109 — Problems in Secondary Education 

Elective 



3 
3' 



5 
4 



(6) 



3 
3 
3 



(6) 
1(3) 



1(3) 

2 

5 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

H. Ec. 101: Drawing and Design — A study of the principles of design 
as applied to clothing and house furnishing. 

First term. Credit 4. 

H. Ec. 102 : Textiles — A study of the structure and properties of textiles 
and fabrics and their use in clothing and household furnishings. 

Second term. Credit 4. 



128 

H. Ec. 103-c: Dressmaking — A course giving practice in the cutting and 
making of simple garments and dresses from washable materials. 
Third term. Credit 4. 

H. Ec. 104-a-b: Food Study, Cookery and Elementary Dietetics — A 

course including a study of food principles in relation to their composi- 
tion, sources, and value in the body; of dietaries; cost in relation to the 

family budget; and practice in preparation and serving of meals. 

First and second terms. Credit 4. 

H. Ec. 105: Dressmaking — This course includes a study of quality, 
suitability, and cost of materials and practice in constructing simple 
wool and silk dresses. 

Second term. Credit 4. 

H. Ec. 106: Dietetics — A study of the fundamental principles of human 
nutrition and the application of these principles to the feeding of individ- 
uals, families, and larger groups under varying physiological and eco- 
nomic conditions. 

Third term. Credit 4. 

H. Ec. 107: Advanced Design — A study of the development of art and 
ornament in relation to modern styles in articles of clothing and house 
furnishings, so treated that students may recognize what is appropriate 
and beautiful. 

First and second terms. Credit 2. 

H. Ec. 108: Home Care of the Sick — A study of the transmission and 
prevention of communicable diseases; first aid; hygiene of infancy; 
maidenhood, maturity; and home nursing. 

First term. Credit 2. 

H. Ec. 109: Nutrition — A physiological and chemical study of human 
nutrition. 

Second and third terms. Credit 5. 

H. Ec. 110: Clothing — A study of family clothing problems, stressing 
particularly needs and cost in relation to the clothing budget. Problems 
in modeling and construction. 

Second and third terms. Credit 3. 

H. Ec. Ill: Home Equipment — A study of house sites; architecture; 
floor plans, building materials; details of construction; heating plants, 
ventilation, lighting, plumbing; water supply, furniture, pictures, and 
hangings from the point of view of the home-maker with various sums 
at her command. 

First and second terms. Credit 3. 

H. Ec. 112: Home Management — A course including instruction in 
family budget making, for varying incomes and for larger groups ; house- 
hold accounts; and practice as manager and helper in a household. 

Third term. Credit 5. 

For description of home economics education courses see Division of 
Vocational Education, 




Division of Language and Literature 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

T. H. Spence Dean of Division and Professor of Modem 

Language. 

C. S. Richardson Professor of English and Public Speaking. 

P. I. Reed Professor of English Literature. 

C. F. Kramer, Jr Instructor in Modern Language. 



INTRODUCTION 

Instruction in the English language and literature is indis- 
pensable to complete training. There is no more practical 
branch of study than that which teaches the student to avoid 
the ordinary errors, to regard the laws of correct usage and 
good taste, and to express his thoughts in a clear, easy and 
effective manner. This can be accomplished only by system- 
atic instruction which stresses precept, practice and example. 
Consequently, all composition courses prescribe, in addition to 
rhetorical theory, extensive writing of themes and constant 
attention to the methods of the masters of English prose. 

Training, however, is not complete without some knowledge 
of the noblest thoughts of the greatest minds. These are pre- 
served in the masterpieces of literature. To study the classics 
is to come under their influence; hence a survey of English 
literature permits acquaintance with and inculcates habits of 
sound and painstaking scholarship. 



MODERN LANGUAGE 

This department embraces the study of three branches — 
French, German and Spanish. Instruction is open to students 
for one, two or three years. The work offered is similar to 
that of the more advanced agricultural colleges, and when cer- 
tified by this department is accepted at full credit by the larger 
universities of the country. 



130 

The instruction in French and German is intended — first, to 
enable students who expect to engage in investigation to 
translate and to understand foreign scientific contributions 
which have not been rendered into English; second, to foster 
and to train the mind for accurate and logical methods of rea- 
soning ; and third, to clarify and simplify technical and applied 
English, giving the student a more thorough and comprehen- 
sive appreciation of his own language. 

The recent political and commercial history of our country 
has caused a knowledge of the Spanish language to be wholly 
desirable. Consequently the instruction given herein is prac- 
tical, laying the foundations for the spoken and written use of 
the language. 

DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

For convenience and ease in reference, the instruction is 
arranged alphabetically. 



iir. 




ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

Eng. 101: Composition, Rhetoric and Readings in English Prose — This 
course aims to train the student in clear, economic, forceful thought- 
transmission. Constant application of the principles of good writing in 
constructive composition is required. Daily exercises and twelve essays 
are written during the year. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 10. 

Eng. 102; Advanced Composition — Research work and practical com- 
position on general and technical subjects. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Eng. 103: Technical and Advanced General Composition — Writing for 
newspapers and magazines. Commercial correspondence. Bulletin writ- 
ing. The technical departments of the College co-operate with the English 
department in offering this course. Required of all students other than 
engineers. 

Practice, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

Eng. 104: Lectures on Technical Composition — Practice in technical 
composition. Criticism and correction of compositions in the classroom* 
This course is entirely practical. Required of all engineering students. 

Practice, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

Eng« 105: Advanced Lectures on Technical Composition — Theme sub- 
jects are offered by the department in which the student's major work 



131 

is done. The larger portion of the work is done in the classroom. Re- 
quired of all engineering students. Elective for non-engineers. 

Practice, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

Eng. 1 : Rhetoric and Composition — A study of the principles of rhetoric 
and composition, especially adapted to the needs of the students in the 
practical courses. A thorough study is made of the business letter, the 
newspaper report, and the advertisement; all of which are illustrated by 
models taken from the best current literature. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours, 1st and 3d terms; 3 hours, 2d term. 

Eng. 2: Farm Literature — A comprehensive study of the farm maga- 
zine; Federal and State Experiment Station bulletins; reports of agri- 
cultural associations, granges and agricultural colleges. The object is 
to make the student familiar with the literature of his vocation. The 
student is engouraged to secure for himself a working library. Frequent 
visits to the College Library and to the Library of Congress serve to 
familiarze the student wth the practical workings of the modern library. 

Practice, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

Eng. 3: Technical Literature — This course is a continuation of Eng. 1 
and 2, with special emphasis upon the technical literature of the science 
of farming. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st and 2d terms. 

Eng. 4: English — Review of grammar and composition based upon work 
taken in the mechanic arts course. 

Recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

Eng. 5 : English and Themes— A reading course in engineering periodi- 
cals and theme writing relative to engineering subjects. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Eng. Lit. 101: A Survey of English Literature — A general survey by 
types of the development of English literature. Historical outline given 
by lectures. Intensive study in class of representative masterpieces of 
each type. Collateral readings. Elective. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Eng. Lit. 102: The Novel and the Essay — Each student will read a 
number of works of fiction and prepare written critiques. A few model 
novels are studied critically in the class. Lectures on the historical de- 
velopment of the English novel. Reading of the leading nineteenth cen- 
tury essayists; lectures and reports. Elective. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Eng. Lit. 103: The Drama — The origin of the English drama; early 
popular plays; predecessors of Shakespeare; Shakespeare and his con- 
temporaries; the Restoration and eighteenth century drama; the modern 
drama. Lectures on the history, and the critical study of the plays of 
each period. Extensive collateral reading. Elective. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 



132 

FRENCH 

Fr. 101: Elementary French — Drill in pronunciation, elements of gram- 
mar, conversation, simple composition, reading, and translation. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 12. 

Fr. 102: Second- Year French — Grammar continued. Drill on pronouns 
and irregular verbs. Composition, dictation, conversation, sight-reading 
and translation. Prereq. Fr. 101. 

Recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Fr. 103: Advanced French — Reading and translation of scientific texts 
and periodicals. Original and dictated reproductions of the texts. Prereq. 
Fr. 102. 

Recitations, 3 houi*s; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

Fr. 104: Double French— A combination of Fr. 101 and Fr. 102. Drill 
upon the essentials of grammar. Oral exercises and composition. Study 
of texts from the very beginning of the course. Practice in translation 
at sight. Much attention is given to the use of good English in the 
translation. 

Recitations, 5 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 15. 

GERMAN 

Ger. 101: Beginning German — Drill on pronunciation, elements of 
grammar, conversation, dictation, reading, and translation. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 12. 

Ger. 102: Second- Year German — Grammar continued. Drill in prose 
composition, reproduction, and conversation. Sight-reading and trans- 
lation. Pereq. Ger. 101. 

Recitation, 3 hours ; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Ger. 103: Third- Year German — Reading and translation of scientific 
texts and periodicals. Prepared and extemporary reproductions of the 
text. Prereq. Ger. 102. 

Recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Ger. 104: Double German — A combination of Ger. 101 and Ger. 102. 
Drill upon the foundations of grammar. Conversation and written com- 
position. Early reading of texts. Sight-reading. Oral and written 
reproductions. 

Recitations, 5 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 15. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

P. S. 101: Elements of Public Speaking — Reading, declamation, original 
speeches, debates. 

Practice, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

P. S. 102: Public Speaking — Realization and expression of thought. 
The art of debate. Original speeches on general and technical subjects. 

Recitation, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 



133 



P. S. 103: Advanced Public Speaking — Preparation and delivery of 
speeches on general and technical subjects. Argumentation and formal 
debate. Required of all students other than engineers. 

Recitation, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

P. S. 104: Technical Public Speaking — Preparation and delivery of 
speeches on technical subjects; the subjects being offered by the Divi- 
sion of Engineering. Required of engineering students. 

Practice, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 1. 

P. S. 105: General Advanced Public Speaking — Continuation of P. S. 
103 and P. S. 104. Elective. 

Recitation, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 

P. S. 106: Advanced Technical Public Speaking — Continuation of P. S. 
104. Required of engineering students. 

Practice, 1 hour; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 1. 

SPANISH 

Sp. 101: Elementary Spanish — Drill in the elements of Spanish gram- 
mar, pronunciation, simple composition, reading, and translation. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 12. 

Sp. 102: Second-Year Spanish — Grammar, conversation, composition 
continued. Reading and translation. Prereq. Sp. 101. 

Recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Sp. 103: Double Spanish — A combination of Sp. 101 and Sp. 102. Drill 
upon the elements of grammar. Oral exercises and written composition. 
Study of texts from the beginning of the course. Practice in reading 
and translation at sight. Conversation. Reproductions from texts read. 

Recitations, 5 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 15. 

TWO-YEAR COURSE IN ENGINEERING 

The object of the course is to prepare men for positions of 
responsibility in lines of work in which training in mechanic 
arts is necessary. There is a special need for such men at all 
times and particularly in time of war. The course affords an 
excellent opportunity for training to such persons as find it 
impossible for any reason to enter any of the four-year courses 
in Engineering. A certificate is granted to each student who 
satisfactorily completes the course. The first year of the 
course is devoted to the laying of a foundation in shop mathe- 
matics, physics and English, as well as in drawing and shop 
work. In the second year most of the time is devoted to sub- 
jects closely related to mechanical and electrical engineering, 



134 

the student selecting the branch in which he thinks he may use 
his talents to the greatest advantage. 

Throughout the course emphasis is laid on the necessity for 
turning out work in the drafting room, shop and field which 
will meet the requirements of the commercial work. The stu- 
dent is taught that a task worth doing at all is worth doing 
well and that the finished product from the hand, brains, or 
both, must not only pass inspection, but be better than the 
average if one wishes to succeed. Parallel with the practical 
work instruction is given in the fundamentals upon which prac- 
tice is based. Thus the head and hand are brought into that 
intimate and harmonious relation so necessary to the normal 
development of the individual engaged in any industrial pursuit. 

Among the positions which the course equips a man to fill 
may be noted the following: Tracers, draftsmen, linemen, 
station operators, assistants in various branches related to 
engineering, salesmen for different kinds of machinery, and 
assistant foremen. 

To enter the course a student must have completed at least 
the equivalent of the seventh grade in the Maryland public 
schools and be not less than 16 years of age. 

The tabulated curriculum of the course follows. It gives the 
outline of the work in both its mechanical and electrical 
aspects : 




135 



TWO-YEAR ENGINEERING 



SUBJECT. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



Mathematics 1, 2 and 3 — Shop Mathematics 

Physics 1 — Elementary Physics 

English 4 

Mechanical Engineering 3 — Technical Instruction . 

Drawing 2 — Mechanical Drawing 

♦Drawing 3 — Freehand Drawing 

Shop 3— -Carpentry 

Shop 4 — Advanced Wood Work 

Shop 5 — Blacksmithing 

♦Shop 6 — Foundry 

Military Instruction 101 — Basic Course 



4 

3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 



1(2) 



4 

3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 
1(2) 



III 



3 

3(3) 

3 

2 
(6) 
(6) 



(3) 



(6) 
1(2) 



SECOND YEAR. 



Mathematics 4 and 5 — Shop Mathematics. 
Military Instruction 102 — Basic Course. . . 




1(2) 



OPTION IN MECHANICS. 



Mathematics 6 — Estimates and Costs 

English 3 — English and Themes 

Mechanical Engineering 4 — Heat Engines 

Mechanical Engineering 5 — Technical Mechanics . . 

Electrical Engineering 2 — Direct Current 

Shop 7 and 8 — Machine Work 

Shop 9— Shop Work 

Machine Design 1 — Machine Drafting 

Experimental Laboratory 1 

Mechanical Engineering 6— Power Plant Operation 



4 

4 



(6) 
(6) 
(3) 



4 

3(3) 
(9) 



(6) 



4 
3 



(9) 
(6) 
3 



OPTION IN ELECTRICITY. 



Electrical Engineering 1 — ^Direct Current 

Electrical Engineering 2 — Alternating Currents 

Electrical Engineering 4 — Illuminations 

Electrical Engineering 5 — Power Plants 

Electrical Engineering 6 — Telephones and Telegraphs 

Electrical Engineering 7 — Batteries 

Electrical Engineering 8 — Measuring Instruments. . . . 

Electrical Engineering 9 — Equipment Repairs 

Electrical Engineering 10 — Switchboards 

Electrical Engineering 1 1 — Interior Wiring 

Electrical Engineering 12 — Outside Lines 

Shop 10 — Machine Work 



2(3) 



2(3) 
2(3) 



2(6) 



2(3) 



2(3) 
2 



1(3) 
2(3) 



4(3) 

2 ■* 
3(3) 



1(6) 
(3) 



♦Students electing option in mechanics take foundry; others take freehand drawing. 



136 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL COURSE 

The Two- Year Agricultural Course embraces much of the 
technical work of the four-year courses and is designed to lay 
a foundation that will secure success in practical farming. It 
is planned especially to meet the demands of young men who 
cannot find time to take the regular courses of the College, or 
for those who have not had the necessary educational require- 
ments for admission to the longer courses. 

Among the most enthusiastic students who have taken the 
course and give it their hearty endorsement are some of the 
landowners and best farmers of Maryland. The course is made 
practical in every sense of the word, and for that reason stu- 
dents having farm experience before entering will derive most 
benefit from the work. Those taking the course who do not 
live on home farms are required to spend at least ten weeks 
between the first and second years on a farm approved by the 
College. 

It is advisable for students to carry on project work where 
possible. College authorities are always available to supervise 
such projects, and when satisfactorily carried out credit may 
be given for the work. Look for a list of projects under the 
Short Course in Agricultural Practice. 

The two-year course has the advantage of being given during 
the same months that the regular College courses are given. 
The students can enter into all phases of athletics and other 
student activities. 

To enter the two-year course the applicant must have prepa- 
ration at least equal to the work given in the seventh grade of 
the Maryland public schools. 

At the conclusion of the course students having completed 
the regular work as outlined are given a certificate stating the 
studies pursued during the time spent in the College. 



1,1 

■I 



137 



OUTLINE OF COURSES 



SUBJECT. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term. 



II 



III 



Agronomy 1 — Cereal Crops 

Agronomy 2 — Forage Crops 

Soils 1 — General Soils 

Animal Husbandry 1 — Breeds and Judging Live Stock . 

Animal Husbandry 2 — Dairying 

Animal Husbandry 3 — Feeds and Feeding 

Chemistry 1 — ^Agricultural Chemistry 

Pomology 1 — Elementary Pomology 

Landscape and Floriculture 1 — Plant Propagation .... 
Vegetable Gardening 1 — Home Vegetable Gardening . . 

Botany 1 — General Botany 

Zoology 1 — Entomology 

Zoology 2 — Sprays and Spraying 

Drawing 1 — Farm Drawing 

Shop 1 — Farm Wood Work 

Shop 2 — Forging and Pipe Fitting 

English 1 — Composition 

English 2 — Farm Literature 

Military Instruction 



2(2) 



2(2) 



2(3) 
2(2) 



2(2) 
* (3) 



2 

(2) 
1(2) 



2(2) 



3(3) 



1(2) 
1(2) 



2(2) 
* (3) 



3 

(2) 
1(2) 



2(2) 
2(2) 



2(2) 



2(2) 
2(3) 



(3) 
2 

(2) 
1(2) 



SECOND YEAR. 



Agronomy 3 — Grain Judging 

Animal Husbandry 4 — Breeding of Animals. . 
Animal Husbandry 5 — Disease of Animals. . . 

Animal Husbandry 6 — Farm Poultry 

Economics 1 — Farm Management 

Economics 2 — Farm Accounts 

Economics 3 — Rural Organization 

Economics 4 — Business Law 

Soils 2 — Fertilizers 

Botany 2 — Plant Diseases 

General Science 1 — Bacteriology 

Forestry 1 — Farm Forestry 

Structural Design 1 — Farm Buildings 

Mechanical Engineering 1 — Farm Machinery. 

Hydraulics 1 — Drainage 

English 3 

Military Instruction 



Elect one or a portion of each: 

Agronomy 4 — Advanced Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 7 — Animal Industry 

Horticulture — Vegetable Gardening 5 or Pomology 2 or Floriculture 

Mechanical Engineering 2 — Gas Engines 

Zoology 3 — Beekeeping 



2 

2(2) 



2(2) 
2(2) 



1(3) 



2 

1(2) 



2(4) 

2(4) 
2(4) 



(2) 
2(2) 



2 
3 



1(3) 



1(3) 



2 

1(2) 



2(3) 
2(3) 
2(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



2(6) 

2 

1(2 



3(4) 
3(4) 
3(4) 
2(3) 
(3) 



SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL PRACTICE 

(Three Years of Three Months Each — December, January and 

February) 

There has been a long-felt need for an agricultural course for 
the rural men and women that will not take them away from 
the farm during the greater part of the growing season. There 
never has been a time when it is more necessary that the 



i 







138 

farmers of this country produce maximum crops. For these 
reasons a new course in Agriculture has been initiated which 
will take the farmer away from his home work only three 
winter months — December, January and February — when he 
is least needed on the farm. 

The short course is organized entirely from the practical 
point of view. The content embodied deals largely with farm- 
crop production, vegetable gardening, pomology, animal indus- 
try and mechanics. The methods employed show the new 
ways of handling old problems and the best ways to increase 
production with the least possible expense. 

This course should appeal to men who are actually up and 
doing and who want to render greater service to their country 
by preparing to meet new conditions on the farm. It should 
make farm life more interesting, pleasant and profitable. One 
big feature is that this course affords an opportunity to come 
shoulder to shoulder with a multitude of splendid young men 
of Maryland and other States. 

Although this course has hardly been announced as yet, 
several students have already registered for the work. The 
only requirement for admission is a common school education. 
A high school education will be very helpful, and the course is 
planned so that it is elastic enough to fit students with various 
degrees of training. 

Permission is given for students to elect largely subjects 
pertaining to their own interest. If the plan outlined is fol- 
lowed, all students will take the general work during the first 
year and then elect their special work during the second and 
third years. Each year should make a unit so that a student 
who can attend only one or two years will still have a rounded 
course. Special supervised project work is offered for all who 
want to keep in touch with the College during the summer. 

At the suggestion of students, college specialists go to the 
home farms to ascertain what the greatest difficulties are and 
then lay plans for the correction. A list of projects to select 
from is given elsewhere. 

Students who have completed the regular work as outlined 
and have carried supervised project work through two sum- 



139 

mers are given a certificate stating the studies pursued while 
registered at the College. 

Registration for this course will take place on Monday, 
December 2. The term will close on Friday, February 28. 
Those who expect to attend should request the authorities to 
send registration blanks as early in the year as possible. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 

FIRST YEAR. 



Agronomy 1 and 3 — Cereal Crop Production and Grain Judging 

Animal Husbandry 1 — Breeds and Judging of Live Stock 

Animal Husbandry 2 — Dairying 

Vegetable Gardening 1 — Home Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 1 

Shop 1 and 2 — ^Wood Work, Forging and Pipe Fitting 

Supervised Farm Project for Summer Months. 

Elective (elect one) : 

Chemistry 1 — ^Agricultural Chemistry 

English 1 and 2 — Composition and Farm Literature 



2(2) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
(3) 



2(2) 
3 



SECOND YEAR. 



;| 



Agronomy 2 — Forage Crops 

Animal Husbandry 3 — Feeds and Feeding of Live Stock 

Mechanical Engineering 1 — Farm Machinery 

Zoology 2 — Sprays and Spraying 

Soils 2 — Fertilizers 

Economics 2 — Farm Accounts 

Supervised Farm Project During Summer Months. 

Elective (elect enough to make a normal schedule) : 

Botany 2 — Plant Diseases 

Zoology 1 — Entomology 

Vegetable Gardening 2 — Commercial Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 2 — Practical Fruit Growing 

Animal Husbandry 6 — Farm Poultry 

Rural Economics 4 — Business Law 

Soils 1— <5eneral Soils 



2(2) 

2(2) 

1(3) 

1(2) 

2 

2 



1(2) 

1(2) 

2(2) 

2(2) 

2(2) 

2 

2(2) 



THIRD YEAR. 



Animal Husbandry 5 — Animal Diseases 

Rural Economics 1 — Farm Management 

Hydraulics 1 — Drainage 

Rural Economics 3 — Rural Organization 

General Science 1 — Bacteriology 

Elective (elect enough to make a normal schedule) : 

Agronomy 4 — Advanced Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 7 — Animal Industry 

Vegetable Gardening 5 — Advanced Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 2 — Practical Fruit Growing 

Mechanical Engineering 3 — Gas Engines 

Structural Design 1 — Farm Buildings 

Zoology 3 — ^Bee keeping 



2 

2(2) 
(3) 
2 
1(3) 



3(4) 
3(4) 
3(4) 
3(4) 
2(3) 
1(3) 
(3) 



•1 



f; 



140 

FARM PROJECTS 

To entirely satisfy the requirements of the Short Course in 
Agricultural Practice, students who are working for certificates 
are required to carry out farm projects between the first and 
second years and between the second and third years. 

Students are at liberty to invite College specialists to their 
home farms to point out the difficulties which may be used as 
farm projects, or they may select a project from the list. 

The work will be supervised and inspected by the department 
in which the project has been chosen. The following are 
projects submitted by the various departments: 

FIELD CROPS 



lii 




i 



1. Field selection of seed corn. 

2. Ear-to-row test of corn. 

3. Variety test of corn. 

4. Methods of cultivating corn. 

5. Rate and date of planting corn. 

6. Variety tests of wheat. 

7. Rate and date of seeding wheat. 

8. Inoculation tests for legumes. 

9. Effect of lime on legumes. 

10. Time of havesting alfalfa. 

11. Effect of legumes upon succeeding crops. 

12. Collection and identification of tame and wild grasses and weeds 

and noting their commercial value or detriment. 

13. Effect of fertilizers upon common crops. 

14. A survey of the home farm from the standpoint of soil texture, 

drainage, and productivity of the various soil types. 

15. Preparation of seed bed. 

HORTICULTURE 

1. Thinning apples. 

2. Fertilizers for apple orchards. 

3. Controlling diseases of orchards. 

4. Making old orchards productive. 

5. The pruning of fruit trees. 

6. Cultural methods and disease and insect ravages. 

7. Do strawberries pay as a commercial crop ? 

8. The cost of disease and insect control in orchards. 

9. Ideal home vegetable gardening. 



141 

10. Potato culture. 

11. Varieties of tomatoes. 

12. Spray tomatoes vs. non-sprayed. 

13. Beautifying the home grounds. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Hog feeding. 

2. District survey of pure bred stock. 

3. Cost of feeding dairy cattle. 

4. Sheep management. 

5. Rationing work horses. 

6. Cost of fattening cattle. 

7. Selling of cream vs, home butter making. 

8. Liberal feeding vs, conservation feeding of dairy cattle. 

9. Profits from improved rations. 

10. Profitable methods of feeding dairy calves. 

11. Home cheese making. 

12. The most profitable poultry flock. 

13. Feeding for e^g production. 

14. Feeding and milking records of dairy cattle. 

15. Cost of feeding horses. 

16. Lamb raising. 

FARM FORESTRY 

1. Survey of wood lots. 

2. Planting trees for farm use. 

3. Germination of seeds of forest trees. 

4. Rate of growth of trees. 

5. Diseases of wood lots. 



RURAL ECONOMICS 

1. Types of farming. 

2. Methods of operating farm lands. 

3. A system of farm accounting and records. 

4. Relation of farm equipment to the size of the farm. 

5. Survey of farm practices. 

6. Rural organization. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

1. Design and construction of farm buildings. 

2. Laying out and installing a drainage system. 

3. The draft of farm implements. 

4 Design and installation of modern farm home conveniences. 
5. The use and handling of cement and concrete. 



142 



DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 30, 1917 

HONORARY 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 

William W. Skinner Montgomery County, Md. 

H. G. Shirley Baltimore County, Md. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

James Jessie Thomas Graham Prince George's County, Md. 

Harley D. Drake Washington, D. C. 

Emma S. Jacobs Washington, D. C. 



IN COURSE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Agricultural Education 

Horace Bennett Derrick Takoma Park, D. C. 

DowELL Jennings Howard Brookeville, Md. 

William Morse Kishpaugh Harrisburg, Pa. 

Henry Reese Shoemaker Ashton, Md. 

Howard B arr Winant Washington, D. C. 

Animal Husbandry 

Roy S. Dearstyne Port Chester, N. Y. 

Bernard Dubel Baltimore, Md. 

William Andrew Gemeny Bozman, Md. 

Walter Fortunatus Gilpin Lanham, Md. 

William Dorsey Gray Prince Frederick, Md. 

Frederick L. Thomsen Hyattsville, Md. 

Roderick Dows Watson Welcome, Md. 

Horticulture 

LOREN BURRITT Washington, D. C. 

Harry Waite Fristoe Baltimore, Md. 

Charles Henry Fuchs Port Chester, Ni Y. 

Chales Louis Larsen Long Island, N. Y. 

Chemistry 

John Donnett Baltimore, Md. 

Clarence Gervase Donovan Washington, D. C. 

Ferdinand Andrew Korff Baltimore, Md. 

Preston M. Nash Washington, D. C. 



143 

Ciyil Engineering 

Irving Coggins Washington, D. C. 

Seymour William Ruff Roslyn, Md. 

Harry Smith Arlington, Md. 

Clyde Cooper Tarbutton Crumpton, Md. 

Albert Vaugh Williams Nanticoke, Md. 

Electrical Engineering 

John Albert Bromley Silver Spring, Md. 

Lyman Daniel Oberlin Washington, D. C, 

Albert Hall Sellman Stockton, Md. 

Mechanical Engineering 
Bernard Frederick Senart Washington, D. C. 

Biology 
Galen Miller Sturgis. 

General Science 

Lemuel Alden Haslup Annapolis Junction, Md. 

CERTIFICATES IN TWO-YEAR COURSES ISSUED MAY 30, 1917 

Agriculture 

Homer Franklin Bible College Park, Md. 

Clin Leech Beall Beltsville, Md. 

William Leroy Frazee Old Town, Md. 

James Monroe McCormick Bel Air, Md. 

James Wilmer Stevens Baltimore, Md. 

Oscar Trail Easton, Md. 

Joseph Stanislaus Wasney Washington, D. C. 

E ARLINGTON JACOB WayBRIGHT Littlestown, Pa. 

Horticulture 

Joseph Francis Becker Washington, D. C. 

Alfred James Barrett Rome, Italy. 

Andrew Jackson Boyd Washington, D. C. 

King Beardsley Hollyday Norfolk, Va. 

James Mano Swartz Baltimore, Md. 



144 

TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT AWARDED MAY 30, 1917 

For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interests of Maryland: 
Alexander M. Fulford, Harford County, Md. 
James R. Galbreath, Harford County, Md. 



H 



ifi> 







MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED MAY 30, 1917. 

For excellence in the Agricultural Education Course, offered by the 

College : 
H. R. Shoemaker, Montgomery County, Md. 

For excellence in the Animal Husbandry Course, offered by the College: 

R. S. Dearstyne, Port Chester, N. Y. 

Honorable Mention: 
W. F. Gilpin, Prince George's County, Md. 

For excellence in the Chemical Course, offered by the College: 

C. G. Donovan, Washington, D. C. 

For excellence in the Civil Engineering Course, offered by the College: 

C. C. Tarbutton, Queen Anne's County* Md. 

For excellence in the Electrical Engineering Course, offered by the 

College : 
A. H. Sellman, Washington, D. C. 

For excellence in the Two- Year Course in Agriculture, offered by the 

College : 
E. J. Waybright, Littlestown, Pa. 

For excellence in the Two- Year Course in Horticulture, offered by the 

College : 
J. M. SwARTZ, Baltimore, Md. 

For excellence in Debate, offered by the Alumni Association: 
M. D. Engle, Montgomery County, Md. 

The Goddard Medal for excellence in Scholarship and Moral Character, 

offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James : 
W. F. Gilpin, Prince George's County, Md. 

The William Pinkney Whyte Medal for excellence in Oratory, offered by 

Isaac Lobe Straus, Esq. 
M. D. Engle, Montgomery County, Md. 

"President's Cup" for excellence in Debate, offered by Dr. H. J. Patterson : 

New Mercer Literary Society. 



ifli 



145 

BATTALION ORGANIZATION 

The enlistment of students and the appointment of students to Officers 
Training Camps necessited the reduction of the Battalion from three to 
two companies, after January 1, 1918. 

BATTALION STAFF 

F. M. Haig Major. 

W. H. Carroll First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 

R. S. Kann Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

H. S. Berlin Sergeant Major. 

COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

COMPANY "A" COMPANY "B" 

Captains 
W. V. Cutler M. A. Pyle 

First Lieutenants 

F. C. Brimer J. P. Jones 

Second Lieutenants 

M. J. B. Ezekiel R. W. Arthur 

J. H. Remsberg E. L. Wilde 

First Sergeants 

G. W. NoRRis M. C. Brown 

Quartermaster Sergeants 

W. F. MORNHINWEG R. W. AXT 

Sergeants 

J. L. Aitcheson G. W. Clendaniel 

R. R. Lewis E. M. Sawyer 

W. P. Hicks K. W. Babcock 

Corporals 

C. E. Paine E. W. Hand 

J. W. Stevens A. N. Pratt 

K. C. Posey P. E. Clark 

C. F. Bletch J. H. Starr 

H. McDonald W. F. Sterling 

F. A. Dawson M. T. Riggs 



V. 



' II 






■ * 

i 



iiiiii 



1 



146 

ROSTER OF MATRICULATES 

Session 1917-18 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Name, Postoffice. County, 

Anspon, B. W College Park Prince George's. 

Ballard, W. R Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Fox, E. F Hagerstown Washington. 

Jarrell, T. R College Park Prince George's. 

Leathers, C. E Cambridge Dorchester. 

Jordan, S. F College Park. Prince George's. 

McCONNELL, H. S College Park Prince George's. 

Nickels, C. B Starkville Mississippi, 

Pfingstag, V. R Hudson Illinois. 

YOSHIKAWA, Masao Japan Japan, 

SENIOR CLASS 

Bacon, C. H Silver Spring Montgomery. 

Brimer, F. C Stockton Worcester. 

Carroll, W. H Ashland Baltimore. 

Clark, P. E La Plata Charles. 

Cutler, W. V Washington District of Columbia. 

Davison, B Riverdale Prince George's. 

Day, F. D Boyd's Montgomery. 

Eppley, G. F Washington District of Columbia, 

Eyre, R. S Highland Howard. 

Ezekiel, M. J. B Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Grigg, W. K Port Chester > ,New York, 

Haig, F. M Riverdale Prince George's. 

Horn, P. V Mt. Airy Carroll. 

Jones, J. P Davidsonville Anne Arundel. 

Kann, R. S Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, 

Pyle, M. a Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Remsburg, J. H Middletown Frederick. 

Wilde, E. L Washington District of Columbia, 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Aitcheson, J. L Burton ville Montgomery. 

AxT, R. W Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Babcock, K. W Hagerstown Washington. 

Berlin, H. S Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Bletsch, C. F Mt. Rainier Prince George's. 

Brown, M. C Sparrows Point Baltimore. 



I 



147 

Name, Postoffice. County, 

BuELL, A. C Washington District of Columbia, 

Chen, C. C Shanghai China. 

Chichester, F. S Aquasco Prince George's. 

Clark, G. S Ellicott City Howard. 

Coster, H. Coster Calvert. 

Crum, p. E Harmony Grove Frederick. 

DOWNIN, T. V Williamsport Washington. 

DuvALL, W. H Croome Prince George's. 

Gleason, R. W Washington .District of Columbia, 

Gutberlet, I. W Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Hand, E. W Berwyn Prince George's. 

Hicks, W. P Govans Baltimore. 

HiPPLE, B. G Marietta Pennsylvania, 

Lewis, R. R Frederick Frederick. 

McLean, D. L Baltimore Baltimore City. 

Miller, E. V Hagerstown Washington. 

Mornhinweg, W. F Port Chester New York. 

NoRRis, G. W College Park Prince George's. 

Paine, C. E Washington District of Columbia, 

Perkins, H. T Springfield Prince George's. 

Posey, K. C La Plata Charles. 

Pratt, A. N Hackensack New Jersey. 

Sawyer, E. M College Park Prince George's. 

Sellman, R. L Beltsville Prince George's. 

Sewell, M. D Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Siegert, L. L Galloway's Anne Arundel. 

Smith, J. E Galloway's Anne Arundel. 

Starr, J. H • Westcver Somerset. 

Stevens^ J. W Baltimore Baltimore City. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Ady, E. B Sharon . 

Atkinson, W. F Washington 

Austin, J. A Blackshear 

Barton, J. H Centreville 

Baurman, W. M Washington 

BissELL, T. L Westover .. 

Carroll, H. M Baltimore . 

Dawson, E. E Trappe 

Dawson, F. A Washington 

DiGGS, A. C Baltimore . 

Dingman, J. E Berwyn . . . 



Harford. 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Queen Anne's. 

District of Columbia. 

Somerset. 

Baltimore City. 

Talbot. 

District of Columbia. 

Baltimore City. 

Prince George's. 

Drawbaugh, J. R Washington District of Columbia. 

Etienne, a. D Berwyn Prince George's. 



1 



148 

Name, Postoffice, County. 

EzEKiEL, W. N Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Fletcher, A. E Erie Pennsylvania, 

Gray, J. A Brownsville Washington. 

Hamill, F. J Baltimore Baltimore City, 

HocKMAN, G. B Hagerstown Washington. 

HoDGiNS, R. J Union City Pennsylvania, 

Hook, Elizabeth G Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Jones, A. S Washington District of Columbia. 

Keefauver, J. E Berwyn Prince George's. 

Knode, J. S Martinsburg West Virginia, 

Knodb, R. T Martinsburg West Virginia. 

Lambdin, F. F Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Langrall, J. H Baltimore Baltimore City. 

Lawson, E. W Crisfield Somerset. 

MacDonald, a Washington District of Columbia. 

Morgan, J. A Lonaconing Allegany. 

MoRNHiNWEG, E. S Port Chester New York, 

RiGGS, M. T Rockville Montgomery. 

RuPPERT, E. E Washington District of Columbia, 

Sterling, W. F Crisfield Somerset. 

Sturgis, H. L Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Sullivan, J. H Newburyport Massachusetts, 

Taylor, E. G Wishart's Virginia. 



m 



liJI. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Bland, Harriett W Sparks Baltimore. 

Blumberg, M. D New York New York. 

Brundage, W. R Port Chester New York. 

Caldwell, D. R Washington District of Columbia. 

Cole, C. W Towson Baltimore. 

Donaldson, E. C Laurel Prince George's. 

EiSEMAN, J. H Washington District of Columbia. 

Ford, S. W Upper Fairmount Somerset. 

Frere, F. J Tompkinsville 

FuCHS, J Port Chester 

Gardner, W. T Clear Spring 

Graham, J. R Barclay 

Grimm, W. H Stanley 

Groten, T. C Pocomoke City 

Hamke, J. C Rockville 

Heller, R. W Annapolis 

HiGGiNS, E. W Mardela Springs 

HoLTER, C. K Jefferson 

Holter, E. F Middletown 



. Charles. 
.New York. 
Washington. 
Queen Anne's. 
, Virginia. 
Worcester. 
, Montgomery. 
Anne Arundel. 
, Wicomico. 
. Frederick. 
Frederick. 



149 

Name. Postoffice. County, 

Jester, W. C Wilmington Delaware, 

Kellam, D. C Shady Side Virginia. 

Marquis, T. E Washington District of Columbia. 

Nelson, G. V Newport News Virginia. 

Neuman, a Washington District of Columbia, 

Peddicord, H. R Dickerson Montgomery. 

Perry, D. P Clear Spring Washington. 

Powell, E. W Princess Anne Somerset. 

Rakemann, H. C Washington District of Columbia. 

Rausch, R. M Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Reinmuth, O Frederick Frederick. 

Roberts, F Berwyn Prince George's 

Rockwell, P. H Collington Prince George's. 

Salisbury, A. W Ridgely Caroline. 

Scheuch, J. D Washington District of Columbia, 

Sener, H. H Chewsville Washington. 

SiLBERMAN, H. A Washing^ton District of Columbia,. 

Slanker, F Washington District of Columbia, 

Smith, J. W Arlington Baltimore. 

Snyder, L. W Washington District of Columbia^ 

Spangler, G. W Chanute Kansas. 

Starkey, E. B Sudlersville Queen Anne's. 

Stephenson, P. R College Park Prince George's 

Stone, R., Jr Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Stonestreet, N. V Rock Point Charles. 

Stubbs, J. S Charles Town West Virginia. 

Thawley, L. H Laurel Prince George's. 

Thomas, R. B Washington District of Columbia.. 

Thomas, W. P Jefferson Frederick. 

Trachtenberg, I Brooklyn Neiv York. 

TwiLLEY, 0. S Hurlock Dorchester. 

Walker, W. P Mt. Airy Carroll. 

Westcott, C. W Atlantic City New Jersey. 

White, H. N Princess Anne Somerset. 

WiLHELM, C. P Arlington Baltimore. 



SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS 

BoYER, O. H Ferryman Harford. 

Darn ALL, C. E Hyattsville Prince GeorgeV.. 

DuvALL, W. N Baltimore Baltimore City. 

EzEKiEL, Bertha B Hyattsville Prince George's. 

HuGG, J. A Baltimore Baltimore City. 

McCeney, R. S Silver Spring Prince George's* 

Morgan, P. T Arlington Baltimore. 



150 



Name, Postoffice. 

Orban, F. J Baltimore 

OwiNGS, E. P Chesapeake Beach. 

Scott, J. G Princess Anne. . . . 

Silver, G. B Havre de Grace.. . 

SWARTZ, A. N Washington 

Woods, H. E Washington 

Wright, J. R Baltimore 



County. 

Baltimore City. 
Calvert. 
Somerset. 
, Harford. 

District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
Baltimore City. 



SECOND-YEAR AGRICULTURAL CLASS 

Bready, G. A Herndon Virginia. 

Forrest, R Rockville Montgomery. 

SCHULTE, H. H Newark New Jersey. 

SCRIBNER, A. M Philadelphia Pennsylvania. 

Vaux, Charlotte A Washington District of Columbia. 

Weaver, H Greensboro Caroline. 

WiLMER, H. R Faulkner Charles. 

FIRST- YEAR AGRICULTURAL CLASS 



, Dorchester. 

District of Columbia. 

. Somerset. 

District of Columbia. 

. Dorchester. 

. Baltimore. 

, District of Columbia. 



CoRKRAN, E. B Rhodesdale 

Donovan, C. A Washington 

Froelich, E Crisfield 

Griffin, N. E Washington 

Holder, T. D Vienna 

JOH, R Violetville 

Menzel, K. F Washington 

Nevitt, L. H Washington District of Columbia. 

Quaintance, H. W Washington District of Columbia. 

Richardson, P. S Williamsburg Dorchester. 

Saunders, H. R Washington District of Columbia. 

Shepherd, J. H Branchville Prince George's. 

Tawes, W. I Crisfield Somerset. 

Umbarger, H. L Bel Air Harford. 

White, J. N Upper Marlboro Prince George's. 

Young, C. H Aquasco Prince George's. 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Arthur, R. W Havre de Grace Harford. 

Clendaniel, G. W Kennedyville Kent. 

Coppage, H. S Church Hill Queen Anne's. 

Hall, F. B Charles Town West Virginia. 

H ardisty, W. R Seabrook Prince George's. 

Holmes, Grace Takoma Park District of Columbia. 

McDonald, H. M Barton Allegany. 



151 

Name, Postoffice. County, 

Merrill, G. M Crisfield Somerset. 

Perrie, a. L College Park Prince George's. 

Rakemann, F. B Washington District of Columbia. 

Raybaud, E. R Washington District of Columbia, 

Rich, M. N Washington District of Columbia, 

Smith, P. H Philadelphia Pennsylvania, 

Umhau, Christine Washington District of Columbia, 

Walls, H. R Church Hill Queen Anne's. 

Wiseman, K. B Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, 



STUDENTS IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Adams, A. C Bristol Tennessee, 

Albrittain, Louise La Plata Charles. 

Allee, Helen Cumberland Allegany. 

Baity, Earl Highland Harford. 

Baldwin, Elizabeth Washington District of Columbia, 

Barnes, Mary La Plata Charles. 

Benson, Hilda Brookeville Montgomery. 

Berry, Eloise Berry Charles. 

Biggs, Irma Frederick Frederick. 

Brent, Eugenia Waldorf Charles. 

Brinkman, Blanche Belle Grove Allegany. 

Brookhank, U. N Riceville Charles. 

Buxton, Elaine Govans Baltimore. 

Canter, Grace Hughesville Charles. 

Cheseldine, Carrie Palmer's St Mary's. 

Clarke, Edith California St Mary's. 

Clarke, Elizabeth Annapolis Junction.. . .Anne Arundel. 

Copley, I. C. (Mrs.) Washington District of Columbia. 

Cover, Blanche New Windsor Carroll. 

CRAMER,BLANCHE(Mrs.) Silver Spring Montgomery. 

Creek, Clara Hancock Washington. 

Croft, Lorena Port Tobacco Charles. 

Cromwell, Floyd Walkersville Frederick. 

CzARRA, SiGMUNDA Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Darner, Daisy Jefferson Frederick. 

Davis, Dorothy Chaptico St. Mary's. 

Dent, Nellie Oakley St. Mary's. 

Devilbiss, Edna Mt. Airy Frederick. 

Dietz, George Baltimore Baltimore City. 

Dubel, Omer Myersville Frederick. 

Ewell, Goldie Compton St. Mary's. 

Ezekiel, Bertha Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Fellows, Meredith Takoma Park District of Columbia. 



152 



Name. Postofflce, County, 

Fitzgerald,Marguerite Washington , District of Columbia. 

FoGLE, Ethel Walkersville Frederick. 

FoGLE, Hazel Walkersville Frederick. 

Fox, ESTON Hagerstown Washington. 

Freeman, Edna Berwyn Prince George's. 

Frere, Marie Tompkinsville Charles. 

Gallahan, Jessie Brandywine Prince George's. 

Gardiner, Clara. Indian Head Charles. 

Gardiner, Mary Indian Head Charles. 

Garner, Mary Baden Prince George's. 

Gibbons, Annette Hughesville Charles. 

Gilbert, Mary Walkersville Frederick. 

GiLLis, Viola Rockville Montgomery. 

GiTTiNGER, Blanche Frederick Frederick. 

Gottlieb, Florence Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Gottlieb, Kathryn Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Griffith, Allen Berwyn Prince George's. 

Griffith, Mary Forestville Prince George's. 

Grove, Grace Frederick Frederick. 

GuLLETTE, Lydia Vienna Dorchester. 

GuLLETTE, Marjorie Vienna Dorchester. 

GUYTHER, CLAUDL4 Piney Point St. Mary's. 

Hackett, Lavada Vienna Dorchester. 

Hall, Claudia Germantown Montgomery. 

Haring, Gladys Cambridge Dorchester. 

Harrison, Adalina. Charlotte Hall St. Mary's. 

Harrison, Dora Charlotte Hall St. Mary's. 

Hawkins, Mary Millersville Anne Arundel. 

Hayden, Pauline Hollywood St. Mary's. 

Hearne, Mary Cambridge Dorchester. 

Holland, Lois Clarksburg Montgomery. 

Holmes, Grace Washington District of Columbia^ 

Holmes, Nettie Washington District of Columbia. 

Hood, Elizabeth Mt. Airy Carroll. 

Hook, Elizabeth College Park Prince George's. 

Howard, Marian Brookeville Montgomery. 

Hunt, Lula South River Anne Arundel. 

Jackson, Franklin Washington District of Columbia^ 

Jarboe, Maude Mechanicsville St. Mary's. 

Jones, Agnes Hughesville Charles. 

Jones, Anna (Mrs.) Thurmont Frederick. 

Joyce, Adele Glen Burnie Anne Arundel. 

Keefer, a. C College Park Prince George's. 

Kelly, Lillian •, Thurmont Frederick. 



153 



Name* Postoffice. County, 

King, Mary Tippett Prince George's. 

Kloss, Augusta Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Lamson, Elizabeth Washington District of Columbia. 

Lawrence, Eulalia Abell St. Mary's. 

Leathers, C. E College Park Prince George's. 

Lerrier, Elizabeth Washington District of Columbia, 

LiNTHicuM, Nannie Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Little, Florence Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Martin, Pauline North Keys Prince George's. 

Matthaei, Dorathea Cumberland Allegany. 

Mattingly, Elizabeth. Leonardtown St. Mary's. 

Mayhew, Ruth Mitchellville Prince George's. 

McIntyre, Mary Branchville Prince George's. 

Meekins, Roxa Fishing Creek Dorchester. 

Milburn, Rosa Maddox St. Mary's. 

Miller, Nettie Mt. Airy Frederick. 

Mills, Maude Golden Hill Dorchester. 

Mills, Mildred Golden Hill Dorchester. 

Montgomery, Hattie Brookeville Montgomery. 

Morgan, Carrie Millersville Anne Arundel. 

Morris, Adelaide Faulkner Charles. 

Morris, Lillian Faulkner Charles. 

Nelson, J. M. (Mrs.) Madison Wisconsiru 

NicoLSON, Ellen Washington District of Columbia, 

Owens, Mary Pindell Anne Arundel. 

Patterson, Blanche College Park Prince George's. 

Plowden, Nell Bushwood St. Mary's. 

Porter, R. G Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Powell, Dora Denton Caroline. 

Preller, Mary Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

PuMPHREY, Esther Germantown Montgomery. 

Rausch, Robert Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Reed, Eleanora Germantown Montgomery. 

Rice, Esther Waterbury Anne Arundel. 

Robinson, M. E Brightwood District of Columbia, 

Roderick, Margaret Jefferson Frederick. 

Rogers, Annabell Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Rogers, Harris Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Shildt, Charles Taneytown Carroll. 

Shipley, Isabel Annapolis Anne Arundel. 

Sibley, Irene Germantown Montgomery. 

Slagle, Mary Jefferson Frederick. 

Sloan, Marguerite Hyattsville Prince George's. 

Smith, Naomi Waldorf Charles. 



154 

Name. Postoffice. County, 

Smyth, Caroline Chestertown Kent. 

Solly, Lawrence Washington District of Columbia, 

Steward, Mary Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Thompson, Mabel Brandywine Prince George's. 

TowNSEND, Grace Brookeville Montgomery. 

Tubman, Marie Golden Hill Dorchester. 

Umhau, Emily Washington District of Columbia, 

Veitch, Caroline College Park Prince George's. 

Veitch, Isabel College Park Prince George's. 

Warthen, Louise College Park Prince George's. 

Watson, Clara Clinton Prince George's. 

Watson, Ruth Welcome Charles. 

Westcamp, Mabel Clinton Prince George's. 

Wills, Louise Bel Alton Charles. 

Wilson, Ellen Westwood Prince George's. 

Wilson, Mahala Waterbury Anne Arundel. 

Wise, Hilda Wayside Charles. 

WooDFiELD, Maggie Galloway's Anne Arundel. 

Woodward, Mildred Washington District of Columbia. 

Wooster, Helen College Park Prince George's. 

Wright, Lillian (Mrs.) Cambridge Dorchester. 



STUDENTS IN SHORT WINTER COURSES 

Austin, C. J. (Mrs.) Elkton Cecil. 

Benson, F. H. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

BiCKFORD, LuLA (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

Brown, A. E. (Mrs.) Bedford Massachusetts, 

BuRSCH, T. R. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

Claflin, Eloise (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

Close, Margaret (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

Conner, E. R. (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

DuRNBAUGH, W. K. (Mrs.) ..College Park Prince George's. 

Emerson, E. E. (Mrs.) Branch ville Prince George's. 

EuwER, Walter C Upper Marlboro Prince George's. 

Finnell, I. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

Forrester, T. C Frederick Frederick. 

Gahan, Winifred Berwyn Prince George's. 

Gardiner, J. U. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

Garlock, Eva S. (Mrs.) Pomonkey Prince George's. 

Gilbert, Lee E Laurel Prince George's. 

GOWNLEY, H. S. (Mrs.) Branch ville Prince George's. 

Haller, Ellen (Mrs.) Hagerstown Washington. 

Haller, Frederick Hagerstown Washington. 

Hamm, B. J. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 



155 



Name, Postoffice, County, 

Hartley, Edna Federalsburg Caroline. 

HiNES, Charles H Frederick Frederick. 

KiRNES, Horace Berlin Wicomico. 

LiNTHicuM, Charles Clarksburg Howard. 

Marlow, W. J. (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

McBath, E. B. (Mrs.) Riverdale Prince George's. 

McNab, M. C Upper Marlboro Prince George's. 

Milstead, E. H. (Mrs.) Washington District of Columbia, 

Olmstead, L. B.(Mrs.) Anacostia District of Columbia, 

Ortmayer, Louis (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

Palmore, Nora G. (Mrs.).. .College Park Prince George's. 

Paul, Harry (Mrs.) Anacostia District of Columbia, 

Power, Elmore (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

Purvis, C. Taylor.. . . , Hudgins Virginia, 

Ranchenstein, E. F. (Mrs.) Washington District of Columbia, 

Reily, J. Ross (Mrs.) ., College Park Prince George's. 

RoBY, H. (Mrs.) .1 Berwyn Prince George's. 

Shearer, J. J Washington District of Columbia, 

Shepherd, J. H ., Branchville Prince George's. 

Sims, R. (Mrs.) Branchville Prince George's. 

Stein, C. H. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

SwARTZELL, F. F. (Mrs.) Washington District of Columbia, 

Taliaferro, Emily (Mrs.).. College Park Prince George's. 

Warner, F. E Keyser West Virginia, 

Weigel, Edna A. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's. 

Wilson, Samuel C Baltimore Baltimore City, 

Wooster, (Mrs.) College Park Prince George's. 

Vaux, Ellen M. (Mrs.) Washington District of Columbia, 

Vaughan, C. H. (Mrs.) . . . .Plattsburg New York. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

Graduates 10 

Seniors 18 

Juniors 35 

Sophomores 36 

Freshman 54 

Sub-Freshman 14 

Second- Year Agricultural 7 

First- Year Agricultural 16 

Unclassified 16 

Summer School 142 

Short Winter Courses 50 



Counted twice. 



398 
6 



Total 392