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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

OF THE 

Maryland State College 



n 



Vol 16 



MAY 26, 1919 



>..A 



CATALOGUE 



1919—1920 



No. I 



BSSiI 



I 




I 




ISSUED MONTHLY BY THE 
MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICUl^TUItB 



Bseerea at Collffe Park, Md.. Pent Office 
4» Sccoa4 Q«fl0 Matter 



THE MARYLAND 
STATE COLLEGE 



I 



CATALOGUE 
1919—1920 



Containing general inrormation concerning the 
College, A^nnouncements tor the Sckolastic 
Year 1919-1920, anj Records oi 1918-1919 



CONTENTS 



Page 
College Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 7 

Officers of Administration and In- 
struction: 

Administrative Officers 9 

The Schools, Deans and Secre- 
taries of 10 

Officers of Instruction 11 

Agricultural Experiment Station 



Staff 



13 



Agricultural Extension Service 

Staff 14 

State Horticultural Department 

Staff 16 

State Fertilizer Work Staff.... 16 

Live Stock Sanitation Staff 16 

Faculty Committees 17 

General Information 19 

Location 21 

History 21 

Extension and Research 23 

Administration 25 

Admission 27 

Buildings 30 

College Organizations 33 

Awards and Competitions 35 

Fees and Expenses 36 

Scholarships and Self -aid 38 



Page 
Schools and Departments: 

School of Agriculture 40 

School of Chemistry 88 

School of Education 96 

School of Engineering and Me- 
chanic Arts 115 

Graduate School 149 

School of Home Economics 151 

School of Liberal Arts 157 

Department of Military Science 
and Tactics 179 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation 182 

List of Degrees, Students, etc.: 

Degrees Conferred, 1918 182 

Certificates Issued 183 

Testimonials of Merit Awarded. 183 

Medals and Prizes Awarded. 183 

Battalion Organization 184 

Members of Students' Army 
Training Corps 185 

Register of Students, 1918-1919.194 

Su'nmary of Regular Students. .199 



General Index, 



200 



CALENDAR 1919, 1920, 1921 




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COLLEGE CALENDAR 1919-1920 



Sept. 18-19, Thursday-Friday. 



Sept. 22, Monday, 8.15 a. m. 



Sept. 25, Thursday. 



Sept. 26, Friday. 

Oct. 25, Saturday. 

First Friday in November, 
Nov. 7. 

Nov. 26, "Wednesday, 12 m. 

Dec. 1, Monday, 8 a. m. 

Second Friday after Thanks- 
giving, Dec. 5. 

Dec 11-18. 

Dec. 19, Friday, 4 p. m. 

Last Friday of Fall term, 
Dec 19. 



Entrance and condition examinations. 
Registration days for old and new students. 

Assembly of student body; President's Ad- 
dress; all classes begin. 

Last day for change of registration without 
fee; last day to register without payment 
of late registration fee. 

President's reception for new students and 
presentation of Freshman Code. 

Home Coming Day. Sophomore-Freshman 
tug-of-war. 

Freshman entertainment night. 



Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Thanksgiving recess ends. 
Football Dance. 

Registration for second term. 

First term ends. Christmas vacation begins. 

Christmas Dance. 



8XCOH3> TS 



Jan. 5, Monday, 8 a. m. 



Christmas vacation ends. Instruction for 
second term begins. 



Jan. 10, Saturday, 9 a. m. to Condition examinations. 
4 p. m. 



Jan. 12, Monday. 



Third Friday in January, 
Jan. 16. 

First Friday in February, 
Feb. 6. 

Friday preceding Washington's 
Birthday, Feb. 20. 



Last day to change registration without fee 
and last day to register without late regis- 
tration fee. 

Intersociety debate. 



Intercollegiate debate. 



Battalion Ball. 



Second Friday in March, 
Mar. 12. 

Mar. 16-28. 

Mar. 23, Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Friday preceding: Caster 

vacation, Mar. 26. 



Presentation by Dramatic Club. 

Re^stration for third term. 
Second term ends. 
Sophomore-Freshman crosscountry run. 



Mar. 24, Wednesday, 8 a. m. 

Mar. 31, Wednesday, 12 m. 

Apr. 6, Tuesday, 8 a. m. 

First Friday after Easter, 
Apr. 9. 

First Saturday in May, May 1. 

May 15, Saturday. 

Third Friday in May, May 21, 

Decoration Day, May 30. 

June 1-8. 

Friday preceding Commence- 
ment, June 11. 

June 13, Sunday. 

June 14, Monday. 

June 15, Tuesday. 

June 16, Wednesday. 

June 17, Thursday. 



Third term begins. All classes meet at 
scheduled time. 

Easter recess begins. 

Easter recess ends. 

Junior Prom. 

Annual Intercollegiate and Interscholastic 
Track Meet. Reveille Dance. 

All required theses must be presented. 

May Ball. 

Farmers* Day. 

Registration for first term 1920-1921. 

Junior-Senior German. 

Beginning Commencement Exercises. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Fraternity Day. 

Class Day. 

Alumni Day. 

Commencement Day. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, Esq Term expires 1925 

Baltimore County, Md. 

ROBERT GRAIN, Esq Term expires 1924 

Charles County, Md. 

JOHN M. DENNIS, Esq Term expires 1923 

Baltimore County, Md. 

DR. FRANK J. GOODNOW Term expires 1922 

Baltimore City, Md. 

CARL R. GRAY, Esq Term e^ipires 1921 

Baltimore County, Md. 

A. W. SISK, Esq Term expires 1920 

Caroline County, Md. 

DR. W. W. SKINNER Term expires 1919 

Montgomery County, Md. 

B. JOHN BLACK, Esq Term expires 1927 

Baltimore County, Md. 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL, Esq Term expires 1926 

Washington County, Md. 



■■ ]\ 



ORGANIZATION OP BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFPZCSXS. 

Chairman SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER. 

Treasurer JOHN M. DENNIS. 

Secretary DR. W. W. SKINNER. 

SAMUEL. M. SHOEMIAKER, A. W. SISK, ROBERT GRAIN and 

JOHN M. DENNIS. 

COULBGS AVD SBTTOATXOVAXi WOBX. 

DR. PRANK J. GOODNOW, CARL R. GRAY and DR. W. W. SKINNER. 

azFsmzxBVT statzov ahd zvTzsTzaATZOHAZi womx. 

COL. A. W. SISK, ROBERT GRAIN and DR. W. W. SKINNER. 

SXTBHSZOV AVD DBMOVSTBATZOV WOBK. 

ROBERT GRAIN, CARL R. GRAY and B. JOHN BLACK. 

ZVBPaCTZOV ABB OOBTBOIa WOBX. 

JOHN M. DENNIS, A. W. SISK and HENRY HOLZAPFEL, Jr. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



ALBERT P. WOODS, M. A., D. Agr., President. 
H. C. BYRD, B. S., Assistant to the President 

COUHCSb or ABIOHZSTBATZON. 

PRESIDENT WOODS, MR. BYRD. 

DIRECTORS PATTERSON and SYMONS. 

DEANS SPENCE, McDONNELL, TALIAFERRO, APPLEMAN. REED. 

ZIMMERMAN and COTTERMAN. 



H. L. CRISP, M. M. E., Supt. General Service Department. 
MISS M. P. McKENNEY, Accountant. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Recorder. 

J. E. PALMER, Executive Secretary. 

MISS M. ROWB, Librarian. 

MISS MARIE M. MOUNT, Matron in Domestic Department 

MISS RUBY CRAWFORD, Matron in Hospital. 



THE SCHOOLS 



TSE SCSOOZ^ OF AaBXCUIiTTrBE. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., Dean. 
J. B. WENTZ, M. S., Secretary. 

THE SCHOOI^ or CHSKXSTBT. 

H. B. McDonnell, M. S., M. D., Dean. 
L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., Secretary. 

THE SCHOOIk OF EDUCATIOK. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, M. S., Dean. 
■ , Secretary. 

SCHOOZi OF EHGINEEBZZrG AND MECHANIC 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D., Dean. 
M. A. PYLE, B. S., Secretary. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOI^. 

C. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Dean. 

THE SCHOOI^ OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

AGNES SAUNDERS, M. A., Acting Dean. 
MISS M. MARIE MOUNT, A. B., Secretary 

THE SCHOOI^ OF IklBEBAI^ ABTS. 

T. H. SPENCE, M. A., Dean. 

P. I. REED, M. A., Ph. D., Secretary. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



A, F. WOODS, M. A., D. Agr., President. 

The order of the following names is that of seniority 

H. B. McDonnell, M. S., M. D., Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist, D«an 

of School of Chemistry. 

T. H. SPENCE, M. A., Professor of Modern Languages, Dean of School of 

Liberal Arts. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A. B., Sc. D., Professor of Farm Management. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M. S., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, M. A., Professor of Public Speaking and Exten- 
sion Education. 

HARRY GWINNER, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing, 

Superintendent of Shops. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, Ph. D., C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering and Mathe- 
matics, Dean of School of Engineering. 

MYRON CREESE, B. S., E. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., Professor of Zoology, State Entomologist. 
L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., Professor of General Chemistry. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., Professor of Physical Education and Journalism. 

O. C. BRUCE, B. S., Professor of Soils. 

HERMAN BECKENSTRATER, M. S., Professor of Pomology. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., Professor of Plant Physiology, Dean of School 

of Agriculture. 

J. B. WENTZ, M. S., Professor of Agronomy. 

P. I. REED, M. A., Ph. D., Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

A. G. McCALL, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

R. C. REED, Ph. B., D. V. M., Professor of Animal Pathology. Dean of Divi- 
sion of Animal Industry. 

COL. JOHN PITCHER, U. S. A., Professor Emeritus of Military Science and 

Tactics. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, B. S., M. A., Professor of Agricultural Education, Dean 

of School of Education. 

L. A. EMERSON, B. S., Professor of Trade and Industrial Education. 

J. A. GAMBLE, M. S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

F. A. WIRT, B. S. in C. B., Professor of Farm Machinery. 



E. M. PICKENS, D. V. S., M, S., Professor of Bacteriology and Animal 
Pathologrist of the Biologrical and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. 

DeVOE MEADE. Ph. D.. Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. C. AUCHTER, M. S., Professor of Horticulture. 

AGNES SAUNDERS, M. A., Professor of Home Economics, Acting: Dean of 

School of Home Economics. 

MAJ. GEORGE A. MATILE, U. S. A., Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

R. WELLINGTON, M. S., Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

G. J. SCHULZ, B. A., Assistant Professor of History. 

L. J. HODGINS, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

.^ Physics. 

C. J. PIERSON, M. A., Professor of Vertebrate Morphology. 

C. F. KRAMER, M. A., Assistant Professor of Modern Language. 

P. P. BROOICENS, B. A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

J. T. SPANN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

R. C. WILEY, B. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

H. W. STINSON, B. S., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

S. S. STEINBERG, B. E.. C. E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

L. H, VANWORMER, M. S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

H. B. HOSHALL, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

A. S. THURSTON, M. S., Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening and 

Floriculture. 

FRIEDA M. WIEGAND, B. A., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

T. B. LEITH, B. A., Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

HARRY ROSE, B. A., Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

C. L. STROHM, Assistant Professor of Music. 

M. A. PYLE, B. S., Instructor in Engineering. 

MARY E. WALTON, Instructor in Home Economics. 

P. C. BRIMER, B. S., Assistant in Analytical Chemistry. 

R. V. TRUITT, B. S., Assistant in Entomology. 

.SGT. M. McMANUS, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



H. J. PATTERSON, D. Sc, Director and Chemist. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M, S., Botanist. 

CHAS. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Plant Physiologist. 

T. H, WHITE, M. S., Vegetable and Floriculture. 

ROY H. WAITE, B. S.. Poultryman. 

W. R. BALLARD, B. S., Small Fruits. 

C. P. SMITH, M, A., Seed Inspector. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., Entomologist. 

A. G. McCALL, Ph. D., Soil Investigations. 
J. E. METZGER, B. S., Agronomist. 

E. M. PICKENS, D. V. M.. Animal Pathologist. 

B. C. AUCHTER, M. S., Pomologist. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Associate Plant Pathologist. 

EARL S. JOHNSTON, Ph. D., Associate Plant Physiologist. 

PHILIP GARMAN, Ph. D., Assistant Entomologist. 

R. S. ALLEN, Assistant Swine Husbandry. 

R. C. TOWLES, B. S., Assistant Animal Husbandry. 

L. W. ERDMAN, B. S., Assistant Soil Laboratory. 

W. J. AITCHESON, B. S., Assistant Agronomist. 

C. C. SHIVERS, D. V. M., Assistant Biological Laboratory. 

S. V. EATON, M. S., Assistant Plant Physiologist. 

A. M. SMITH, M. S., Assistant Soil Laboratory. 

ALBERT WHITE, B. S., Superintendent Ridgley Farm. 

P. E. RICHARDS, M. S., Assistant Soil Investigations. 

JOHN P. JONES, B. S., Assistant Plant Physiologist. 

R. WELLINGTON, M. S., Vegetable Breeder. 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



•THOMiAS B. SYMONS. M. S.. D. Agr.. Director. 

*F. B. BOMBERGER, B. S. A. M., Assistant Director and Specialist in Rural 

Organization and Marketing. 
•G. K WOLCOTT, B. S.. Specialist in Dairying. 

S. B. SHAW, B. S., Specialist in Horticulture. 

K N. CORY. M. S.. Specialist in Entomology. 
•S. S. BUCKLEY, D. V. S., Specialist in Animal Husbandry. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Specialist in Pathology. 
*W. R. BAX.LARD, B. S., Specialist in Gardening. 
•VENIA M. KELLAR, B. S., State Home Demonstration Agent. 
•MARGARET SCHMIDT. M. L. STEPHENSON. OLA DAY (District Agents 

in Home Demonstration Work.) 
•R. P. McHENRY. B. S., State Boys' Club Agent. 

•B. P. FOX. B. S.. D. J. HOWARD. B. S.. STANLEY E. DAY. B. S. and 
•H. W. FRISTOE, B. S. (Emergency Boys* Club Agents.) 

C. L, OPPERMAN. Agricultural Editor. 

F. W. OLDENBURG, M. S.. Specialist in Agronomy. 

H. W. RICKEY, Specialist in Poultry Husbandry. 

F. A. WIRT. B. S. in C. E.. Specialist in Farm Machinery. 
•E. H. BRINKLEY. Farm Help Specialist. 
•G. W. POST, Poultry Club Specialist. 
•T. E. Mclaughlin, B. S., District Agent and Specialist in Animal Industry. 

E. C. AUCHTER, Specialist in Horticulture. 



covmnr deicovstbatzon agsnts. 

•E. O. ANDERSON Denton 

•L. L. BURRELL Chestertown 

•J. P. BURDETTE La Plata 

•G. R. COBB Salisbury 

•JOHN H. DRURY Chaney 

•J. F. DAVIS Cambridge 

•B. B. DERRICK Bel Air 

♦J. L. PIDLER Ellicott City 

•P. W. FULLER Westminster 

•P. A. HAUVER Frederick 

•J. F. HUDSON Towson 

•O. C. JONES Centreville 

•J. H. KNODE Elkton 

•C. Z. KELLER Princess Anne 

•JOHN McGILL, Jr Cumberland 

•JAMES A. TOWLER Oakland 

•G. W. NORRIS Annapolis 

•E. I. OSWALD Snow Hill 

•T. L. SMITH Hagerstown 

•C. H. TAYLOR Upper Marlboro 

•F. J. VAN HOESEN Rockville 



County 
CJaroline 
Kent 
Charles 
Wicomico 
Calvert 
Dorchester 
Harford 
Howard 
Carroll 
Frederick 
Baltimore 
Queen Anne's 
Cecil 
Somerset 
Allegany 
Garrett 
Anne Arundel 
Worcester 
Washington 
Prince George 
Montgomery 



•In co-operation with the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



•E. P. WALLS Easton 

•G. F. WATHBN, Jr Loveville 

•IRA V. McKENZtE (Assistant) Cumberland 

•W. C. THOMAS (Assistant) Towson 

•L. H. MARTIN (colored Princess Anne 

•J. F. ARMSTRONG (colored) Seat Pleasant 

•J. W. B. TULL (colored) Chestertown 



Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Allegrany 

Baltimore 

Somerset 

Prince (j^eorge 

Kent 



COXrVTT KO! 



DBliOVSTmATZOV AO: 

County 
(Miss) KATHERINB E. BRAITH- 

WAITB, B. S Baltimore 

Miss) MARY L. BYRN. B. S Queen Anne's 

Miss) ANNIE L, COPPER. Pratt In- 
stitute Kent 

Miss) CATHERINE COWSILL Montgomery 

Miss) ELLEN DAVIS, Pratt Institute .. Prince George 

Miss) ELLA DAY, B. S Cecil 

Miss) RACHEL EVERETT Carroll 

Miss) SUE FRICB:. Pratt Institute. . .Washington 
Miss) FRANCES E. GERBER, B. S. . .Garrett 
Miss) BLANCHE W. GITTINGER, B. S . .Harford 
Mrs. ) ESTHER NELSON HAUVER. .Frederick 
Mrs. )GBORGIANA LINTHICUM, 

Drexel Institute Anne Arundel 

2£lss) EMMA LOVSTE Calvert 

Mrs. ) NELL C. LAWSON Howard 

Miss) LOUISE MILLS Somerset 

Mrs.) EDITH G. NORMAN, B. S Caroline 

Miss) RUTH POVSTELL Wicomico 

Miss) HELEN REECE, Drexel Insti- 
tute Allegany 

Miss) HELEN G. WALKIER, B. S Dorchester 

Mrs. ) OLIVE K. WALLS Talbot 

Miss) LUCY WALTER Worcester 



Towson 
Centreville 

Chestertown 

Rockville 

Upper Marlboro 

Elkton 

Westminster 

Hagerstown 

Oakland 

Bel Air 

Frederick 

Annapolis 
Prince Frederick 
Bllicott City 
Princess Anne 
Denton 
Salisbury 

Cumberland 
C!ambridge 
Easton 
Snow Hill 



•< 



•(Miss) ALICE C. WALTON, B. S Baltimore City 

•(Mrs. ) FLORENCE BENNETT, Drexel 

Institute 

•(Mrs. ) ADELAIDE DERRINGER 

•(Miss) GWYNNETH GMINDER, Drexel 

Institute 

•(Miss) Gladys J. WARD. B. S 

•(Miss) MARIE MONTGOMERY (col.). 



M 



M 



M 



U 



COAOBED WOBSB&8. 

• (Miss) EDNA E. THOMAS Somerset 

•(Miss) LEAH D. WOODSON Charles 

• (Miss) EULA WATKINS Prince George 

•In co-operation with the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



Princess Anne 
La Plata 
Upper Marlboro 



STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 



•THOMAS B. SYMONS, Director. 

B, N. CORY, State Entomologrist. 

C. E. TEMPLE, State Pathologist. 
W. C. TRAVERS, Inspector. 



•In co-operation with the U. S. Dept of Agriculture. 



STATE FERTILIZER WORK 



H. B. MCDONNELL, 

State Chemist. 

L. B. BROUGHTON, 

Assistant Chemist. 

R. C. WILEY, 

Assistant Chemist. 

L. H. VANWORMER. 

Assistant Chemist. 

T. B. LEITH. 

Assistant Chemist. 

HARRY ROSE, 

Assistant Chemist. 

F. C. BRIMER, 

Assistant Chemist. 

J. S. "WHITBY, 

Inspector. 

CHARLES T. DAY, 
Inspector. 

J. S. SCARBOROUGH, 
Inspector. 



LIVE STOCK SANITATION 

R. C. REED Chief, Animal Industry. 

J. B. GEORGE Secretary. 

B. M. PICKENS Pathologist, Live Stock Sanitary and 

Biological Laboratory. 

C. C. SHIVERS Assistant. 

D. R. HOFFMAN Veterinarian in charge of field work. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1919-1920 



MESSRS. CORY, BROUGHTON, BYRD, HOSHALL, STINSON. HILLEGEIST. 

BUIZ.BINGS. 
MESSRS. CRISP, GWINNER, CREESE and PIERSON. 

GBOUNDS AND SOADS. 

MESSRS. AUCHTER, THURSTON, WENTZ, PATTERSON, STEINBERG and 

AITCHESON. 

CATAIaOGlTE, STUDENT XSNBOIkXJffENT AND COZiXiEGE ENT&ANCE. 

l^iESSRS. ZIMMERMAN, BYRD, SPENCE, COTTERMAN, CREESE, P. I. 

REED, BROUGHTON and HILLEGEIST. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

MESSRS. COTTERMAN, R. C. REED, McDONNELL, SPENCE, ZIMMERMAN. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO and MISS SAUNDERS. 

STUDENT AFFAZ&S. 

MESSRS. BYRD, CORY, BROUGHTON, SCHULZ, BOMBERGER and CLASS 

PRESIDENTS. 

PUBIkXC FUNCTIONS. 

MESSRS. T. H. TALIAFERRO, RICHARDSON, CORY, METZGER and 

MA J. MATILE. 

SANITATION. 

MESSRS. PICKENS, GRIFFITH, McDONNELL, W. T. L. TALIAFERRO and 

CORY. 



MESSRS. GWINNER, BROUGHTON, W^NTZ, SCHULZ, GAMBLE, MAJ. 

MATILE and WELLINGTON. 

STUDENT FUBIklCATIONS. 

MESSRS. P. I. REED, BYRD and OPPERMAN. 

COIiUBGE PUBI.ICATIONS. 

.MESSRS. PATTERSON, BYRD, OPPERMAN, McDONNELL, RICHARDSON 

and SYMONS. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



t 



THE MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 



Location 



The Maryland State CJollege is located in Prince George's County, 
Maryland, on the line of the Washington branch of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad, eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from 
Baltimore. At least eight trains a day from each city stop at College 
station, thus making the place easily accessible from all parts of the 
State. Telephone connection is made with the Chesapeake and Potomac 
lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. 
The suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the south, and Laurel, 
the largest town in the county, is ten miles to the north on the same 
road. Access to these towns and to Washington may be had by steam 
and electric railway. The site of the College is particularly beautiful. 
The buildings occupy the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered 
with forest trees and overlooks the entire surrounding country. In 
front, extending to the boulevard, is a broad rolling campus, the drill 
ground and athletic field. In the rear are the farm buildings and barn. 
A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the buildings of the Experiment 
Station. The College farm contains about 300 acres, and is devoted to 
fields, gardens, orchards, vineyard, poultry yards, etc., used for experi- 
mental purposes and demonstration work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the grounds is exceedingly attractive. 
They are tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces which are ornamented 
with shrubbery and flower beds. The view from the grove and campus 
cannot be surpassed. 

The location of the College is healthful; the sanitary conditions are 
excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there has 
been practically no serious case of illness among the students for 
many years. 

History 

The scientific study of agriculture was advocated by far-seeing Mary- 
land citizens as early as the second quarter of the nineteenth century. 
They were sensible of two facts — namely, that agriculture is one of the 
largest contributing factors to a nation's prosperity, and that all agri- 
cultural pursuits, in order to be potent, must be genuinely scientific. 
In 1847 the subject was first brought formally to the attention of the 
Legislature of the State. In 185G a bill was passed which granted a 
charter for the establishment, endowment and incorporation of the 
Maryland Agricultural College. Under the provisions of this charter 
the corner-stone of the original college building was laid on August 24, 



22 



1858, and the institution was opened to the public on October 5, 1859. 
No funds were provided by the Act of 1856, but the actual establish- 
ment of the College was made possible by the contributions of public- 
spirited citizens of the commonwealth. The names of these persons, in 
remembrance of their generosity, are inscribed on the massive gateway 
to the College grounds. The College is unique in that its original 
charter was the first in which systematic agricultural experimentation 
was recognized as an important part of its activities. The institution 
thus created was the first significant agricultural college on the Atlantic 
slope and the second in the Western Hemisphere. 

For three years the College was under private management. In 1862 
the Congress of the United States, recognizing the practical value and 
increasing need of such colleges, passed the Land Grant Act. This act 
granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits a pro- 
portionate amount of unclaimed Western lands, in place of scrip, the 
proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college 
where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and 
classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches 
of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such 
manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in 
order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial 
classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was 
accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland. The Maryland Agri- 
cultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 
its control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College and gave the College its 
present name. 

Under the new charter the institution is co-educational. Every power 
is granted necessary to develop an institution of higher learning and 
research, comparable to the great state universities of the West, in which 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts hold the dominant place without ex- 
cluding the Liberal Arts. This is in full accord with the Morrill Act 
of the National Congress and the subsequent acts above referred to. 
This institution, therefore, becomes the representative of the State and 
the Nation in higher education and research. The charter provides that 
it shall receive and administer all existing grants from the national gov- 
ernment and all future grants which may come to the State for this 
purpose. 



23 



EXTENSION AND RESEARCH 



Agriculture and Home Economics 

The agricultural and home economics extension service of the College, 
in co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture, car- 
ries to the people of the State through practical demonstrations con- 
ducted by specialists of the College and county agents, the results of 
investigations in the fields of Agriculture and Home Economics. The 
organization consists of the administrative forces, including the director, 
assistant director, specialists and clerical force, the county agricultural 
demonstration agents, and the home demonstration agents in each county 
and in the chief cities of the State. The county agents and the spe- 
cialists jointly carry on practical demonstrations under the several 
projects in the production of crops or in home-making, with the view 
of putting into practice on the farms of the State improved methods of 
Agriculture and Home Economics that have stood the test of investiga- 
tion, experimentation, and experience. Movable schools are held in the 
several counties. At such schools the specialists discuss phases of Agri- 
culture and Home Economics in which the people of the respective 
counties are specially interested. 

The work of the Boys' Agricultural Clubs is of especial importance 
from an educational point of view. The specialists in charge of these 
projects, in co-operation with the county agricultural agents and the 
county school officers and teachers, organize the boys of the several 
communities of the county into agricultural clubs for the purpose of 
teaching them by actual practice the principles underlying agriculture. 
The boys hold regular meetings for the discussion of problems con- 
nected with their several projects and for the comparison of experiences. 
Prizes are offered for the stimulation of interest in the work. 

The Home Economics specialists and agents organize the girls into 
clubs for the purpose of instructing them in the principles underlying 
canning, drying, preserving of fruits and vegetables, cooking, dress- 
making and other forms of Home Economics work. 

Educational value of the demonstrations, farmers' meetings, movable 
schools, clubs, and community shows is incalculable. They serve to 
carry the College to the fanner and to the home-maker. 

General Extension 

This phase of the extension service of the College is conducted in co- 
operation with th« United States Bureau of Education, and is intended 
to make the Liberal Arts and other branches of educational curriculum 
of the College of greater service to the people of the State. 



24 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Vitally associated with the extension service is the experimental 
work in agriculture. 

In 1847 an act was passed making provision for a State laboratory 
in which the application of chemistry to agriculture was to be under- 
taken. In 1858 experimentation was undertaken on the College farm. 
After two or three years this work was interrupted by the general 
financial distress of the time and by the Civil War. In 1888, under 
the provisions of the Hatch Act of the preceding year, the Agricultural 
Experiment Station was established. 

This act states the object and purpose of the experiment station as 
follows : 



That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to 
conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals ; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with 
the remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at 
their different stages of growth ; the comparative advantages of rotative 
cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of 
new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the 
chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the 
adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and 
digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and 
cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the 
agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of 
the respective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the experiment stations there was prac- 
tically no agricultural science in this country. The work done by these 
institutions during the past quarter of a century has given the colleges 
a science of agriculture to teach, and laid a broad foundation for devel- 
opment. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension work on a 
national basis has been the direct outgrowth of the work of the ex- 
periment station. 

The students of the College, taking courses in the School of Agri- 
culture, are kept in close touch with the investigations in progress. 

The Eastern Branch 

The Eastern Branch of the Maryland State College is located at 
Princess Anne, Somerset County. It is maintained for the education of 
negroes in agriculture and mechanic arts. 



25 



ADMINISTRATION 



The government of the College is vested by law primarily in a board 
of trustees, consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor for 
terms of nine years. The administration of the College is vested in the 
President. The Council of Administration, composed of the President, 
the Assistant to the President, the Director of Agricultural Experiment 
Station, and Director of the Agricultural and Home Economics Exten- 
sion Service, and the Deans of the several schools, acts as an advisory 
board to the President on all phases of College work. The faculty of 
each school constitutes a faculty council which passes on all questions 
that have exclusive relationship to the school represented. 

For purposes of administration the College is divided into the follow- 
ing units; 

— ^ ■ ■ -* School of Agriculture. 

School of Chemistry. 

School of Education. 

School of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 

The Graduate School. \/ 

School of Home Economics. 

School of Liberal Arts. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Summer School. 

The School of Agriculture offers curricula in: (1) General Agricul- 
ture; (2) Agronomy; (3) Botany; (4) Farm Management; (5) Geology 
and Soils; (6) Pomology; (7) Vegetable Gardening; (8) Floriculture; 
(9) Landscape Gardening; (10) Economic Zoology; (11) Pre-Medical; 
(12) Two-Year Agriculture; (13) Animal Husbandry. 

The School of Chemistry offers curricula in: (1) Greneral Chemistry; 
(2) Chemical Engineering; (3) Agricultural Chemistry; (4) Biological 
Chemistry. 

The School of Education offers curricula in: (1) Agricultural Educa- 
tion; (2) Home Economics Education; (3) Industrial Education; (4) 
General Education. 

The School of Engineering and Mechanic Arts offers curricula in: 
(1) Civil Engineering; (2) Mechanical Engineering; (3) Electrical 
Engineering; (4) Highway Engineering; (5) Two-Year Courses in 
Mechanic Arts. 
^ The Graduate School offers courses in any of the subjects in which 
a graduate may desire to obtain advanced degrees. The Graduate School 
consists of all students taking graduate work in the various depart- 
ments. Those qualified to supervise graduate work in the various de- 




26 



partments will constitute the faculty of the Graduate School, presided 
over by a research specialist designated as Dean. 

The School of Home Economics offers a curriculum in which may be 
obtained the general principles of home economics, a knowledge of home 
economics for teaching purposes, or a specialized knowledge of particular 
phases which deal with the work of the dietitian or institutional manager. 

The School of Liberal Arts offers curricula with majors in : (1) An- 
cient Languages and Philosophy; (2) Economics; (3) English Language 
and Literature; (4) General Science; (5) History and Political Science; 
(6) Journalism; (7) French, German, or Spanish; (8) Public Speaking 
with reference to Special Professions; studies also are offered in Music 
and Library Science. 

The Department of Military Science and Tactics supervises the two 
years of military drill required for two years of students in Land 
Grant colleges and directs the work of the Reserve Officers* Training 
Corps unit established by the War Department. 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation works in close 
co-operation with the military department and supervises all physical 
training, general recreation, and intercollegiate athletics. 

The Summer School of six weeks offers courses in subjects given in 
any of the schools during the regular session of the College and in spe- 
cial subjects, such as school administration, classroom management and 
principles of secondary education for high school and elementary school 
teachers. Courses given in the Summer School are of collegiate grade 
and may be counted toward the bachelor's degree. Advanced courses 
may count toward the master's degree. 



27 



ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission to the College must be at least sixteen 
years of age. Women are admitted to all courses and under the same 
conditions as men. Students may be admitted at any time, but should 
enter at the beginning of one of the three terms. 

Students may be admitted by examination, or by certificate from an 
accredited high school or preparatory school, or by transfer from another 
college. 

In general the requirements for admission to the freshman class are 
the same as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high 
schools of Maryland. An applicant must offer for admission at least 
15 units of credit by examination, or by a certificate from an approved 
high school or its equivalent. A unit represents a year's study in any 
subject in a secondary school and constitutes approximately a quarter 
of a full year's work. It presupposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, 
recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four 
or five class exercises a week. Two laboratory periods in any science or 
vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class exercise. 

Of the fifteen units presented, seven are specifically designated — eight 
for the School of Engineering — and eight may be elected from any sub- 
ject that the high school offers toward gp'aduation. A deficiency of one 
unit is approved, but the student cannot become a candidate for a de- 
gree until all entrance requirements are satisfied. 

Students are admitted without examination, if they can present cer- 
tificates showing that they have completed the necessary entrance sub- 
jects. The certificates presented by the candidates must be officially 
certified by the principals of the schools attended and must state in 
detail the work completed. Blank certificates conveniently arranged for 
the desired data will be sent upon application. 

Candidates not admitted by certificates will be required to take written 
examinations on the entrance subjects. These examinations are offered 
in June and September. Exact dates will be sent upon request. 



Required and Elective Subjects 
Prescribed Units 

English 8 

Mathematics 2 (For Engineering 3) * 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 (For Engineering 8) 



28 
Elective Units (eight) — To be selected from the following subjects: 



Agriculture, 

Astronomy, 

Botany, 

Chemistry, 

Civics, 

Commercial subjects, 

Economics, 

English, 

General Science, 

Geology, 



History, 

Home Economics, 

Industrial subjects, 

Language, 

Mathematics, 

Physical Geography, 

Physics, 

Physiology, 

Zoology, 



♦Additional unit includes Algebra, %; Solid Geometry, %. 



Advanced Standing 

A student coming from a standard college or university may secure 
advanced standing by presenting a statement of his complete academic 
record certified by the proper officials. This statement must be accom- 
I>anied by a set of secondary school credentials presented for admission 
to the college or university. Full credit is given for work done in other 
institutions when found to be equivalent in extent and quality to that 
required at this College. An applicant may request examination for 
advanced credit in any subject. In case the character of a student's 
work in any subject is such as to create doubt as to the quality of that 
which preceded, the College reserves the right to revoke at any time 
any credit assigned on certificate. 

Registration 

The College year begins September 18 and ends June 17. (See 
calendar on page 1.) Thursday, September 18, and Friday, September 
19, are devoted to matriculation and registration of students for the 
first term. Registration for the second and third terms takes place be- 
fore the close of the preceding terms. 

Candidates for the freshman class should go at once to the new agri- 
cultural building, where they will find a committee in charge of matric- 
ulation and registration. 

Upper classmen should consult their advisers or deans and then pro- 
ceed in the regular way. Students are not admitted to classes for which 
they are not registered in due form. 

Lectures and practical work begin on Monday, September 22, 

Unclassified Students 

Mature persons who have had insufficient preparation to pursue any 
of the four-year courses may, with the consent of the Committee on 
Courses, matriculate for such subjects as they are fitted to take. Such 
students, however, will be ineligible for a degree until they have satisfied 
the entrance requirements and completed an approved four-year course 
of study. 



29 



Graduation and Degrees 

All under^aduate four-year courses lead to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science or Bachelor of Arts. The total requirement for graduation, 
exclusive of military science, is 204 term credit hours, equivalent to 68 
year hours, or 136 semester hours. A term credit hour is one lecture or 
recitation a week for one term; two or three hours of laboratory or field 
work are counted equivalent to one lecture or recitation. All practical 
work is scheduled for three hours, but the instructor concerned is per- 
mitted to use two or three, depending upon the nature of the work. 

Candidates are recommended for graduation after they have completed 
the prescribed course of study, including all the required work and 
enough electives to total 204 credit hours, not including military science. 

The Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of 
Science, Doctor of Philosophy in Arts, Doctor of Philosophy in Science, 
Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, and Electrical Engineer are de- 
grees conferred by the College. No degrees are given to students who 
finish either of the two-year curricula, but at graduation time appro- 
priate certificates are awarded. 



30 



BUILDINGS 



Some eighteen buildings have been erected on the college campus 
for research, extension, and residence educational purposes. The build- 
ings comprised in the group are the Agricultural Building, Calvert Hall, 
the Library, Engineering Buildings, Chemical Building, Morrill Hall, 
Horticultural Building, the Hospital, Stock Judging Pavilion, Poultry 
Building, temporary dining-hall, temporary auditorium. Girls' Home 
Economics Practice House, and the Agricultural Experiment Station 
group. 

As^cultural Building 

The Executive Offices, the Schools of Agriculture and Education and 
the Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service are housed in 
the Agricultural Building. This structure was completed and occupied 
in April, 1918. The building also contains biological, soils and bac- 
teriological laboratories. 

Calvert Hall 

Excellent dormitory accommodations are provided in Calvert Hall, a 
modem fireproof structure erected and occupied in 1914. It took the 
place of the two dormitories destroyed by fire in 1912. 

Morrill Hall 

The School of Liberal Arts and the Department of Zoology are 
housed in Morrill Hall, which is a three-story building erected in 1898. 
This building formerly was occupied by the work in agriculture and 
engineering. 

Chemical Building 

The Chemical Building provides a home for the School of Chemistry 
and for the state work in analysis of feeds, feritlizers and agricultural 
lime. It has classrooms, laboratories, and offices for all undergraduate 
and graduate work in chemistry. 

Engineering Buildings 

The Mechanical Building was the first of the Engineering group con- 
structed, having been completed and occupied by the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering in 1898. The Civil Engineering and Electrical 
Engineering additions, with accompanying shops, were built in 1910. 
The three buildings are connected by closed passageways. 

The Hospital 

The Hospital, or Sanitarium, was erected in 1901 and makes possible 
excellent treatment for students in cases of sickness. It has a private 
ward for segregation of contagious diseases, quarters for trained nurse, 
operating room, doctor's office, special culinary equipment, and accom- 
modations for twenty patients. 



31 



The Horticultural Building 

Classrooms, propagation rooms, and offices are contained in the Horti- 
cultural Building, completed in 1915. In connection with this, ten mod- 
ern greenhouses are so constructed as to have entry into each direct 
from building. 

The Stock Judging Pavilion 

This building is used for stock judging competitions, for stock shows, 
and to house a part of the equipment of the dairy husbandry and farm 
machinery departments of the School of Agriculture. Connecting this 
building with the Agricultural Building is an auditorium capable of 
seating 600 i)ersons. 

The Poultry Buildings 

Research in poultry projects and laboratory practice is carried on in 
the Poultry Building. The main building contains classrooms, labora- 
tories, offices and incubating rooms. 

Experiment Station Group 

The main building of the experiment station group is a large brick 
structure of the colonial period. It contains the office of the Director 
of the Station, the chemical and physiological laboratories, and a labora- 
tory for research in soils. Other buildings of this group contain seed 
and milk testing laboratories, classrooms, and others are greenhouses, 
Agronomy Building, a secondary horticultural building, bams, farm 
machinery buildings, silos, etc. 

Temporary Dining-Hall 

A temporary wooden structure has been erected to serve as a dining- 
hall until the Legislature appropriates money to put up a permanent 
building. This wooden structure is well built and contains kitchen 
equipment and other facilities for comfortably taking care of about 600 
persons. 

Other Buildings 

Another wooden structure has been used for the last few years as 
an auditorium. It is capable of seating about 400 persons. The College 
also maintains a laundry building in which it handles the students* 
laundry at cost. It also has two frame dwelling-houses in which it 
houses part of its labor. A brick power-house contains apparatus for 
pumping all water for College use. Another small frame house contains 
machinery for canning and drying of fruits and vegetables. A small 
brick gas-house has apparatus for manufacturing gas for use in the 
laboratories. 

The Filtration Plant 

Now nearing completion is a modern filtration plant for furnishing an 
ample supply of water for use in the dormitories and general college 
buildings. This plant is to consists of a reservoir with a reserve supply 
of 1,500,000 gallons, sediment tanks, filter beds, pumps, etc. 



32 




The Library 

The two-story brick building housing the Library was built in 1894. 
On the first floor is collected material relating to the various phases 
of the subject of agriculture — ^books, bound periodicals, Experiment Sta- 
tion Records, all Experiment Station Bulletins of the United States, 
United States Department of Agriculture and Farmers' Bulletins. The 
special catalog cards issued by the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture make accessible the large amount of state and national bulletin 
literature on agricultural subjects. 

The second floor of the Library is used as a general reading and ref- 
erence room as well as a stack room for all books except the agricultural. 

The entire Library contains approximately 5,000 bound books and 5,000 
United States Government documents and unbound reports and pamph- 
lets. All material is on open shelves where students can easily locate it. 
The Library is open from 8.30 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., six days of the week; 
all evenings, with the exception of Saturday, from 6.30 to 10; and on 
Sunday afternoon, from 2.30 to 5.30. The librarian or an assistant is 
always in charge. 

It is planned to increase the material on Maryland, making of it a 
well-rounded collection of Maryland literature. 



33 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 



The Alumni Association is an org^anization composed of alumni of 
the College. This association has an office at the College and has sev- 
eral branch associations. It publishes a monthly paper, The State 
College AlumniLS, and a Bi-Annuul Record, The association is active 
in legislative and other measures for the support of the College and is 
represented on the Board of Trustees and on the committee which con- 
trols athletics by four members, two on each. 

Tke Student Assembly 

The Student Assembly is composed of all the students for carrying out 
a system of student self-government. The Student Executive Council 
is the executive committee of the Student Assembly and acts in coopera- 
tion with the faculty in the management of student affairs. 

The Dramatic Club 

The Dramatic Club is organized for the purpose of presenting at least 
one play each year. It is made up of men who have had experience 
either in this work since coming to College or in high school. 

Fraternities 

There are three national fraternities and one local fraternity at the 
College. The national fraternities are Kappa Alpha, Sigma Nu, and 
Sigma Phi Sigma. The local fraternity is Nu Sigma Omicron. 

Interfratemity Council 

The Interfratemity Council is made up of representatives of the 
four fraternities and is organized to hold weekly meetings to promote 
cooperation between these organizations. 

Societies 

Two literary societies are maintained by the students, the Poe and 
New Mercer. These hold weekly meetings at which regular programs 
are presented. 

The Liebig Chemical Society is made up of students specializing in 
chemistry. Special lectures by students and specialists in certain 
branches of chemistry and open discussions of various chemical questions 
are featured. 

The Engineering Society is composed of students in the School of 
Engineering. 

The Agricultural Society is made up of students in the School of 
Agriculture. 

Programs are offered in the Engineering and Agricultural societies 
similar to that of the Liebig Chemical Society, except that the subjects 
pertain to engineering or agriculture. 



t 




34 



Clubs 

The Rifle Club is affiliated with the National Rifle Association and 
engages in matches with other colleges and rifle organizations. 

The Chess and Checker Club is organized for the promotion of these 
games among those that engage in them. Annual tournaments are con- 
ducted for which gold medals are awarded. 

The County Clubs are organizations of students from the same coun- 
ties. The Baltimore City Club and District of Columbia Club are organ^ 
izations of the same nature. 

The Rossbourg Club is the student organization which has charge of 
most of the social events of the students. Almost all students are 
members. 

The Christian Associations 

The Young Men*s and Young Women's Christian Associations are 
organized to be of general service to the students. They perform im- 
portant functions in matters of obtaining employment for worthy stu- 
dents, in receiving new students, and in helping to m.aintain generally 
a high morale and state of good fellowship in the studant body. A read- 
ing-room, chess and checkers, and other games are maintained by the 
association for use of all the students. 

Student Publications 

A weekly five-column newspaper, The Maryland State Review, is pub- 
lished by the students. Besides this the members of the junior class 
publish each year an annual book The Reveille, Both publications re- 
flect the news and atmosphere of general college life. 



35 



AWARDS AND COMPETITIONS 



The College offers each year gold medals to those men of the grad- 
uating class who have attained the best records in their respective de- 
partments of study. 

Debating and Oratory 

An annual debate is held each year in January between the Poe and 
New Mercer literary societies for the "President's Cup," given by Dr. 
H. J. Patterson. 

A gold medal is awarded by the Alumni Association each year to the 
best debater in the College, the test being a debate between picked teams 
from the two literary societies. 

The College gives gold medals to members of winning teams in inter- 
collegiate debates. 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges, consisting of Wash- 
ington College, Western Maryland College, St. John's College, and 
Maryland State College offers each year gold medals for first and second 
places in an oratorical contest that is held between representatives of 
the four institutions. 

Athletics 

The class of 1908 offers annually to "the man who best typifies the 
college athlete" a gold medal. The medal is given in honor of former 
President R. W. Silvester and is known as "The Silvester Medal for 
Excellence in Athletics." 

The Military Medal 

The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal to the member of the 
battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. The medal is 
awarded after an individual drill by each of the contestants. 

The Citizenship Prize 

A gold medal is presented annually by H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the 
College of the class of 1908, to the member of the senior class who dur- 
ing his collegiate career has nearest typified the model citizen and who 
has done most for the general advancement of the interests of the 
Collige. 



36 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



•HBl 



All fees and expenses must be paid at the be^nning of each term. 
Students are not admitted to classes until after payment of their dues, 
or until after arrangements for deferring payment have been made. 
The College makes no charge for tuition. 

The fixed fee for all students, which is a part payment of overhead 
charges, such as janitor service, hospital and doctor's fee, general labo- 
ratory fees, library, physical training, etc $60 

Bacteriology laboratory additional fee, per term 2 

Athletic association fee, payable beginning of first term 10 

Damage fee, to cover breakage, loss of library and reference books, 
and injuries to property which cannot be charged directly against 
any individual 5 

Any unused part of this fee is returned to the student if he withdraws 
from College or at the end of each year. 

Fee for special condition examination 1 

Fee for change in registration after September 25 1 

Fee for failure to register on or before September 25 2 

Diploma fee, payable at graduation 5 

Fees for Music: For musical instruction taken on a term basis, stu- 
dents are required to pay to the Treasurer of the College five dollars a 
term. In addition to this a fee of two dollars a term is charged for 
the use of pianos furnished by the institution for practice. 

The tuition for musical instruction by the lesson is fifty cents, payable 
at the time the instruction is given. Since the hour engaged for instruc- 
tion by the student is always held open for him, each student will be 
required to make regular pajonents for all engaged periods, whether he 
presents himself for instruction or not. 

Graduate Fees 

Each graduate student is subject to a registration fee of $15, a fixed 
charge of $15 per term, and $10 for diploma. 

Short Course in Agricultural Practice 

Fixed charges, to which all are subject $20.00 

Board and lodging for reg^ular four or two-year students, per day. 1.00 
Pnar^ txnd lodgfing for special students, per Week 7.50 

Average Annual Expenses 

The following are estimated average annual expenses of under- 
graduate students: 



37 



Fixed overhead charges $60.00 

Board and lodging 257.00 

Damage fee 5.00 

Laundry 20.00 

Athletic association fee 10.00 

Total $352.00 

The above does not take into consideration the cost of books, supplies, 
and personal needs. This depends largely on the tastes and habits of 
the individual. Books and supplies average about thirty dollars. 

Board and lodging may be obtained at boarding-houses or in private 
families in the vicinity of the CJollege at a slightly higher rate than is 
offered by the College. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse and special medical atten- 
tion, the expenses must be borne by the student. 

All College expenses are payable in advance, and no diploma will be 
conferred upon, nor any certificate issued to, a student who is in arrears 
in his account. 

When a student desires to withdraw from College he it required to 
give formal notification in writing to the Recorder approved by his 
Dean and the Accountant. Charges for full time will be continued 
against him unless this is done. 

Students rooming outside the College may obtain board and laundry 
from the College at same rates as those living in dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunchrooms. 

All College property in possession of the individual student is charged 
against him, and the parent or guardian must assume responsibility for 
its return without injury other than results from ordinary wear. 

Damage to College property will be charged to the whole student body 
pro rata unless the offender is known. 

All students assigned to dormitories are required to provide them- 
selves with one pair blankets for single bed, two pairs sheets for single 
bed, four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow, two clothes bags, one 
broom, and one waste-basket. 

There will be no refund of laboratory fees upon withdrawal of a 
student after the middle of a term. 

Students withdrawing before end of any term will be charged $8 per 
week for board and lodging for the time during the term preceding their 
withdrawal. There will be no refund of fixed charges. 



■v% 



I 



I 



jffli" 



Mi 



38 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND SELF AID 




While the College has no endowment nor loan funds with which to 
assist students, it has established for each high and preparatory school 
in Maryland and the District of Columbia one scholarship each year. 
For the three counties of Maryland which do not have high schools, 
Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's, one scholarship each year is given. 
These scholarships have a value of fifty dollars and are credited to the 
holder's account. 

These scholarships are offered under the following conditions: 

1. The holder must be a graduate of a high school and qualified to 
enter the freshman class. 

2. The appointment to the scholarships must be made by the county 
school superintendent upon recommendation of the principal of the 
high school. In making recommendations high school principals should 
not only take into consideration class standing but also inability to 
meet the expenses of a college education. 

3. The appointment shall be made for the term normally required 
to complete the curriculum selected. 

4. The scholarship will be forfeited by indifference to scholastic work 
or by disregard of rules of the College. 

5. Scholarships awarded to preparatory schools and to high schools 
of Baltimore and Washington shall be given on recommendation of the 
principals direct to the College. Recipients of preparatory school schol- 
arships must be qualified to enter the freshman class. 

6. Applicants from Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert counties may 
take one of the non-collegiate curriculums or, if entering from another 
college, may take one of four-year curriculums leading to a degree. 

Fellowships 

The College also offers a number of fellowships. These may be given 
either to its own graduates or the graduates of other colleges who desire 
to pursue courses in the Graduate School leading to advanced degrees. 
Fellowships are available in the School of Agriculture, School of £ngi« 
neering and Mechanic Arts, School of Chemistry, and School of Liberal 
Arts. These fellowships are worth from $500 to $720 per year. 

Industrial Scholarships 

There are available each year, as they become vacant, a number of 
industrial scholarships, in which students receive compensation for at- 
tending to certain prescribed duties, such as waiting on the tables in the 
dining hall, janitor service in the dormitory, and postmaster. Students 
may frequently earn enough in this way to cover board and lodging. 



39 



Student Labor 

Students may earn a considerable portion of their expenses in College 
by doing work for the several departments on an hour basis. Services 
of those who have a good knowledge of stenography, typewriting, elec- 
trical, or mechanical work are in demand. Considerable work is avail- 
able around the buildings and grounds and on the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station farm. 




44 

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY 

Closely related subjects dealing with plants are grouped in the Divi- 
sion of Plant Industry in order to bring about the necessary cooperation 
between the departments concerned. 

HORTICULTURE 



There are several reasons why the State of Maiyland should be pre- 
eminent in the different lines of horticulture and offer such excellent 
opportunities for horticultural enterprises. A few of the more evident 
ones are the wide variation in soil and climate from the Eastern Shore 
to the mountainous counties of Allegany and Garrett in the west, the 
nearness to all of the large eastern markets, the large number of rail- 
roads, interurban lines and waterways, all of which combine to make 
marketing easy and comparatively cheap. 

The Department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work, 
namely: Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. Students wishing to specialize in Horticulture can arrange 
to take either a general course during the four years or enough work is 
offered in each division to allow students to specialize during the last 
two years in any of the four divisions. The courses have been so 
planned and cover such subject matter that upon their completion stu- 
dents should be fitted either to engage in commercial work, county agent 
work, or teaching and investigational work in state and federal in- 
stitutions. 

CURRICULA IN HORTICULTURE 

Students who intend to specialize in any of the four divisions of 
Horticulture are required to take the same subjects during the first 
two years. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



101) 



General Geology (Geol. 

Soils 101-102 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) . . 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 121) .... 

Frame Crops (Hort. 118) 

Elementary Landscape Gardening (Hort. 

Forage Crops ( Agron. 103) 

Entomology (Zoo. 103) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-124) 

Elective 



131) 



3 

4 



4 
4 




3 
4 



3 
3 



4 




4 
3 



45 
P01K0ZM>CI>T. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102)... 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) . . . 
General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101)... 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

Genetics (Pit. Phy. 108) 

Elective 



3 
2 
3 
3 



2 
3 



3 




3 
2 
3 



3 

V 
9 



SENIOR TEAR. 



107) 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102)... 
Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Hlective 



1 
1 



2 
1 
9 



a 

3 



2 
1 

8 



1 

2 

1 

13 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term; 



II 



III 



Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

Genetics (Pit. Phy. 108) 

Elective 



3 
2 
3 
3 



S 
3 



3 
2 
3 



2 
3 

V 

V 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 116) 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 117) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



3 
3 



2 
1 

8 



2 
2 
1 
9 



1 
1 

"2 
1 

12 



rw 



46 



JUNIOR YEAR. Term: 


I 


II 


in 


Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 


3 
2 
3 
3 


3 
2 
3 




Technical Composition (Eng*. 104-106) 


2 


Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 122-123) 




Greenhouse Management (Hort. 124) 




Garden Flowers (Hort. 126) 




3 


General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 


3 






Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 




3 


Genetics 


3 







Elective 


9 


9 







SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125) 

Floral Decoration (Hort. 127) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132) 

Civic Art (Hort. 186) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



2 
1 
9 



3 
2 
1 



2 

1 
8 



1 

2 

1 

10 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term; 



II 



III 



Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132) 

History of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 137) 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 124) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 122-123) 

Systematic Botany (Bot. 103) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101)... 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Surveying 

Elective 



3 
2 



3 
3 



3 
1 



3 
2 



1 
3 



8 



2 
3 



3 
3 



2 
4 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Landscape Design (Hort. 133-134) 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 135) 

Civic Art (Hort. 136) 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 126) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125).... 
Tree Surgery and Repair (Hort. 138).... 
Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 
Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148)... 
Elective 



143-145) 



3 
2 



2 
2 
1 

7 



9 



2 
1 
9 



3 
V 



2 
1 
8 



47 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



POMOLOGY 

Hort. 101. Elementary Pomology. Four credit hours; three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term, sophomore year. 

In this course a study is made of the general practices in Pomology. 
The proper location and site for an orchard are discussed. Also 
varieties, planting plans, inter-crops, spraying, cultural methods, fer- 
tilizing methods, thinning, picking, packing and marketing are given 
consideration. In this course these subjects are discussed for apples, 
peaches, pears, plums, cherries and quinces. The principles of plant 
propagation as applied to pomology are discussed. 

Hort. 102 103. Commercial Fruit Growing. Three credit hours: twO 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year, 
prerequisite, Hort. 101. 

In this course a study is made of the proper management of com- 
mercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced work is taken up on the sub- 
jects of orchard culture, orchard fertilization^ picking, packing, market- 
ing and storing of fruits, orchard by-products and orchard heating. 

Hort. 104. Systematic Pomology. Three credit houra: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term, junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 
101. 

The history, botany and classification of fruits and their adaptation 
to Maryland conditions are discussed in this course. Exercises are given 
in describing and identifying the leading commercial varieties of fruits. 
Students in this course are required to help set up the College fruit 
show each year, 

Hort. 105. Advanced Practical Pomology. One credit hour. First 
term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principal 
fruit regions of Eastern West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. 
A visit to the fruit markets of several large cities will be made. The 
cost of this trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each 
student will be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. 
The time for taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

Hort. 106. Small Fruit Culture. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term, junior year. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations are discussed in 
this course. Varieties and their adaptation to Maryland soils and 
climate, packing, marketing, and a study of the experimental plots and 
varieties on the station grounds are made. The following fruits are 
discussed in the course: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, black cap 
raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry and loganberry. 



«I 



\fl 



in^i'i 



111 



iW* 



\i 

i 



m 



48 

Hort. 107. Economic FruiU of the World. Three credit hours: 
three lectures. Second term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102- 

103 and 104. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecolo^cal and physiologfical char- 
acteristics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, 
such as the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut bearing trees, citrus 
fruits, newly introduced fruits and the like, with special reference to 
their cultural requirements in certain parts of the United States and the 
insular possessions. All fruits are discussed in this course which have 
not been discussed in a previous course. 

Hort. 108. Fruit and Vegetable Judging. Two credit hours: two 
laboratory periods. First term, junior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 101, 

104 and 111. 

This is a course designed to train men for fruit judging teams and 
practical judging. Students are required to know at least one hundred 
varieties of fruit, and are given practice in judging single plates, largest 
and best collections, boxes, barrels and commercial exhibits of fruits 
and vegetables. Students in this course are required to help set up the 
College fruit show each year. 

Hort. 109. Advanced Fruit Judging. One credit hour: one labora- 
tory period. First term, senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 108. 



VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Hort. 111. Elementary Vegetable Gardening. Four credit hours: 
three lectures and one laboratory period. Third term, freshman year. 

This course includes a study of the different types of vegetable gar- 
dening, methods of propagation, construction and management of hot- 
beds and cold-frames. Growing early vegetable plants under glass and 
the planting, cultivating and harvesting under irrigation and in a large 
farmer's garden are discussed. 

Hort. 112. Tuber, Root Crops and Vegetable Forcing. Three 
credit hours: two lectures and one laboratory period. First term, junior 
year. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 

In this course a study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes is made, 
which includes considerations of seed, varieties, propagation, soils, fer- 
tilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, storing and market- 
ing. The principles and practices of forcing vegetables in greenhouses 
are also discussed. All the vegetables used for forcing are considered, 
including methods of starting the plants, systems of companion and suc- 
cession crops and their grading, packing and marketing. Each student 
is allotted a definite area and is required to plant and manage it. 

Hort. 113-115. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. Three credit 
hours each term. Junior year. Two lectures and one laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 



49 

The methods employed by truckers and market gardeners in commer- 
cial production, equipment, use of hotbeds and cold-frames, field plant- 
ing, rotation of crops and irrigation. Cultural directions for all veg- 
etables are given, including their varieties, requirements, tillage, control 
of insects and diseases, grading, storing, packing and marketing. Each 
student plans and manages intensive cropping systems on small areas 
and under irrigation, and extensive planting on larger areas in a six- 
year rotation. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture. Three credit hours: one lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods. First term, senior year. Prerequisites, 
Hort. 112 and 113-115. 

This course includes a systematic and descriptive study of the leading 
varieties of the most important vegetables, their origin and botany, 
adaptation of the various varieties to the different cultural and market 
conditions, judging and exhibition work. 

Hort. 117. Advanced Vegetable Gardening. One credit hour; 
Third term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 112, 113-115 and 116. 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking sections of 
Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A study of the 
markets in several large cities is included in this trip. Students are re- 
quired to hand in a detailed report of the trip. Such a trip should not 
exceed thirty dollars per student. The time will be arranged each year 
with each class. 

Hort. 118. Frame Crops. Two credit hours: One lecture and one 
laboratory period. Third term, sophomore year. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 

The forcing of vegetables to maturity in hotbeds and cold-frames, 
soil management, composting and sterilizing, use of permanent frames 
heated with manure, hot water and steam, the use of temporary frames 
for earlier planting of vegetables that will be cultivated as field crops. 



FLORICULTURE 

Hort. 121. Elementary Floriculture. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term, sophomore year. 

An elementary course in the cultivation of greenhouse and home 
plants, and of the common annuals and perennials used in outdoor work. 

Hort. 122-123. Commercial Floriculture. Three credit hours; two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 
Prerequisites, Hort. 121. 

Greenhouse plants and flowers, their cultivation and methods of hand- 
ling and marketing for wholesale and retail markets are discussed in 
this course. The growing of flowers under field conditions for purposes 
of seed production is also discussed. Trips to the leading growers in this 
section are taken. 



50 



Hort. 124. Greenhouse Management. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term, junior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 121. 

The preparation of soils, potting, watering, ventilating and fumigating 
as applied to greenhouse crops is considered in this course. 

Hort. 125. Greenhouse Construction. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Second term, senior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 121. 

A study of types of forcing structures, their location, arrangement and 
construction. Costs, methods of heating, and ventilation are discussed. 
The work includes drawing plans, specifications and practical working 
construction. 

Hort. 126. Garden Flowers. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term, junior or senior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 121. 

The growing of annuals, bulbous plants and herbaceous perennials for 
home gardens and for cut flowers and for ornamental plantings. 

Hort. 127. Floral Decoration. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Second term, senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 122-123. 

A study of plants and cut flowers and their arrangement in baskets, 
designs, bouquets, table and house decoration. Also th* arrangement of 
flowers and plants for all types of interior decoration. 

Hort. 128. Amateur Floriculture. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term, junior year. 

Plants and flowers for windows and home gardens. Soils, fertilizers, 
containers and potting and shifting of plants. The course should be of 
especial interest to students in Home Economics, but is open to anyone 
desiring information regarding simple methods of plant culture. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

Hort. 131. Elementary Landscape Gardening. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term, sophomore year. 

A study of types, methods and principles underlying landscape gar- 
dening. The work is given with special application to farmsteads, cot- 
tage grounds and small suburban properties. Students who desire an 
intelligent point of view in landscape work but who do not intend to 
take the more technical courses should take this course. 

Hort. 132. Plant Materials. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term, junior year. Prerequisite, Bot. 103. 

A study in laboratory and field, of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants. 
Plants are studied in respect to their values, characters, habits, soil re- 
quirements and arrangement and planting design. 



61 

Hort. 133-134. Landscape Desiffn. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. Pre- 
requisites, Drawing and Surveying. 

The composition of gardens, private estates and related problems. This 
study involves the topographical survey, drainage and grading plans. 

Hort. 135. Landscape Practice. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Third term, senior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 133-134. 

Grading plans, construction, drawing, estimates, specifications and 
contracts. 

Hort. 136. Civic Art. Two credit hours: one lecture and one lab- 
oratory period. First term, senior year. 

A general study of the methods of city planning and their application 
to village and rural improvement. 

Hort. 137. History of Landscape Gardening. One credit hour: 
one laboratory period. Second term, junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 
131. 

A reference course dealing with the literature and different stages of 
the development of the art. 

Hort. 138. Tree Repair and Surgery. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. First term, senior year. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 113 and Plant Path. 101. 

Methods of treating trees and shrubs to control attacks of insects and 
fungous enemies and the repair of injuries done by these enemies. Some 
attention is given to the technical details of pruning, placing, treatment 
of wounds and cavity filling. 

GENERAL COURSES 

Hort. 142. Horticultural Breeding Practice. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. Third term, senior year. Prerequisite, Genetics, 
Plant Phys. 104. 

Practice in plant breeding, including pollination, hybridization, selec- 
tion, note taking, and the general application of the theories of heredity 
and selection to practice are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 143-145. Horticultural Research and Thesis. Two, three or 
four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of seniors. Advanced students in any of the 
four divisions of horticulture may select some special problem for indi- 
vidual investigation. This may be either the summarizing of all the 
available knowledge on a particular problem or the investigation of some 
new problem. Where original investigation is carried on, students 



I- 



52 

should in most cases start the work during the junior year. The results 
of the research work are to be presented in the form of a thesis and 
filed in the horticultural library. 

Hort. 146-148. Horticultural Seminar. One credit hour each 
term. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of seniors; juniors are permitted to attend. 
In this course papers are read by members of the class upon subjects 
pertaining to their research or thesis work, or ui)on special problems 
assigned them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to 
time by members of the departmental staff. 

COURSES INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATES. 

Hort. 201. Experimental Pomology. Three credit hours. Second 
term. Lectures, three hours. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in Pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in 
Pomology and results of experiments that have been or are being con- 
ducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. A limited 
number of seniors will be allowed to take this course with the approval 
of the head of the department. 

Hort. 202. Experimental Vegetable Gardening. Two credit hours. 
Lectures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to 
practices in Vegetable Gardening; methods and difficulties in experi- 
mental work in Vegetable Gardening and results of experiments that 
have been or are being conducted in all experiment stations in this and 
other countries. A limited number of seniors will be permitted to take 
this course with the approval of the head of the department. 

Hort. 203. Experimental Floriculture. Two credit hours. Lec- 
tures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinions as to 
practices in Floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of all 
experimental work in Floriculture which have been or are being con- 
ducted will be thoroughly discussed. A limited number of seniors will 
be permitted to take this course with the approval of the head of the 
department. 

Hort. 204. Methods of Research. Two credit hours. Lecture, one 
hour, one laboratory period. Second term. 

In this course special drill will be given in the making of briefs and 
outlines of research problems, in methods of procedure in conducting in- 
vestigational work and in the preparation of bulletins and reports. A 
study of the origin, development and growth of horticultural research is 
taken up. A study of the research problems being conducted by the de- 



53 

partment of horticulture will be made, and students will be required to 
take notes on some of the experimental work in the field and become 
familiar with the manner of filing and cataloging all experimental work. 

Hort. 205-207. Adranced Horticultural Research and Thesis. Two, 

three or four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. First, 
second and third terms. 

Students will be required to select problems for original research in 
either Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture or Landscape Gar- 
dening. This work is to continue throughout the full year, and final re- 
sults will be published in the form of a thesis. 

Hort. 20S-219. Advanced Horticultural Seminar. 

This course will be required of all graduate students. Students will 
be required to give reports either on special topics assigned them or on 
the progress of their own investigational work being done in course 205. 
Members of the departmental staff will report special research work 
from time to time. 



:ll 



llr 



REQUIREMENTS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS IN HORTICULTURE 

Pomology — Graduate students specializing in Pomology who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 102-103, 104, 107, 
201, 204, 205-207 and 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 103-5; and 
Organic Chemistry. 

Vegetable Gardening — Graduate students specializing in Vegetable 
Gardening who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required 
either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 
113-115, 116, 202, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 
103-5; Organic Chemistry. 

Floriculture — Graduate students specializing in Floriculture who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 122-123, 127, 132, 
203, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 103-5; Organic 
Chemistry. 

Landscape Gardening — Graduate students si>ecializing in Landscape 
Gardening, who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be re- 
quired either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: 
Hort. 132, 133, 134, 135, 137, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant 
Physiology 103-5. 

In addition to the above required courses, all graduate students in 
Horticulture are advised to take Physical Chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in Horticulture have had some course work 
in Entomology, Plant Pathology and Genetics, certain of these courses 
will be required. 



54 



For Short-Course Students 

Hort. 1. Practical Pomology. Three lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term, first year. 

This is a general course covering the propagation of our common 
fruits. Such subjects as orchard site, location, varieties, planting plans, 
cultural methods, fertilizer requirements, and picking, packing and mar- 
keting are discussed. All of the tree fruits are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 2-3. Commercial Fruit Growing. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Three lectures and one laboratory per- 
iod, second term. Second year. Prerequisite, Hort. 1. 

This is an advanced course dealing with the proper management of 
commercial orchards in Maryland. Special attention is given to the 
subjects of pruning, picking, packing, marketing and storing of the 
various fruits. Market problems, transportation and shipping associa- 
tions receive special attention. Students are required to become familiar 
with all of the leading commercial varieties of all fruits grown in Mary- 
land. Practice is given in fruit judging and the arrangement of fruits 
for exhibition purposes. Horticultural by-products are given attention in 
this course. 

Hort. 4. Small Fruits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Third term, second year. 

In this course the production of strawberries, bush fruits and grapes 
is considered. Methods of propagation, selection of sites, soils, pruning, 
cultivation, picking, packing and marketing are discussed. 

Hort. 5. Home Vegetable Gardening. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term, first year. 

The general principles of vegetable gardening as applied to the grow- 
ing of vegetables for home use. The laboratory work includes a study 
of vegetable seeds, seed testing, seed sowing, transplanting and the care 
of plants in the greenhouses and cold-frames. The students are re- 
quired to plan, plant and manage a large home garden until the end 
of the term. 

Hort. 6 8. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First, second and third terms, second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 5. 

This course is planned to run the entire school year. A study of the 
principles of vegetable gardening, as applied to the growing of vegetables 
for market and for canning. The course includes the construction and 
management of hotbeds and cold-frames, sowing and planting, cultiva- 
tion, growing early vegetable planls, soil preparation, harvesting, grad- 
ing, packing, marketing, canning and storage. Each student is allotted a 
definite area and is required to plan, plant and manage it. 



55 

Hort. 9. Amateur Floriculture. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Second term, first year. 

The propagation and culture in the home of potted plants suitable for 
window gardening and for outdoor home gardening. The course includes 
a study of containers, soils, fertilizers and insecticides. The growing of 
flowers under glass is considered, also the preparation and planting of 
flower beds. 

Hort. 10-12. Commercial Floriculture. Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. First, second and third terms. Second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 9. 

This course is planned to run the full school year. Studies in the pro- 
pagation and culture of commercial florist crops are taken up in this 
course. Methods of packing, shipping and marketing will be considered. 
The course is so organized as to fit students for commercial work. 

Hort. 13. Principles of Landscape Gardening. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term, first year. 

A study of the various styles of landscape gardening and the prin- 
ciples which underlie them. Special application is made to the orna- 
mentation of the home grounds. 

Hort. 14-15. Landscape Design and Practice. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods. First and second terms, second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 13. 

The composition of gardens, private estates and related problems. 
Grading plans, construction, drawing, estimates and laying out of 
grounds are considered. Plant materials are thoroughly studied in this 
course also. 

AGRONOMY 



u| 



The course in agronomy aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the 
course to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field 
crop culture aad improvement on the farm. At the same time enough 
freedom is given the student in the way of electives so that he can 
register for subjects which might go along with the growing of crops 
on his particular farm. A student graduating from the course in agro- 
nomy should be well fitted for general farming, investigational work in 
the State or Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The Agronomy Department has a large, well equipped laboratory in 
the new agricultural building and a greenhouse for student use, besides 
free access to the experiment station fields and equipment. 



56 
AGBOvoinr. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term 



11 



III 



Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) . . . . 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101).. 

Entomology (Zoo. 103) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-124) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Electives 



3 
3 



4 
3 
1 



1 
3 



4 
5 



3 
V 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



107) 



Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Genetics (Pit. Phys, 104) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (Rural Econ. 101) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



106) 



Crop Breeding (Agron. 104-105). . . 
Methods of Investigation (Agron. 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 109) 

Agronomy Seminar (Agron. 110) 

Advanced Soils (Soils 105) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Farm Machinery (Farm Equipment 101) 

Tractors (Farm Equipment 103) 

Electives 



4 
2 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



2 
1 



8 



4 
V 



2 



4 
4 



3 
13 



Description of Courses 

Agron. 101. Cereal Crops. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Freshman year. 

A study of the history, distribution, culture, and improvement of the 
cereal crops. 

Agron. 102. Grain Judging. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Second term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Agron. 101. 

Practice in judging the cereal crops for milling, seeding, and feeding 
purposes. 

Agron. 103. Forage Crops. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptation, culture, and uses 
of forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. The laboratory per- 



57 



iods are largely devoted to the identification and classification of forage 
plants and seeds, and purity and viability tests of the seeds. 

Agron. 104-105. Crop Breeding. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Agron. 101 
and 103, Bot. 101 and Pit. Phy. 104. 

In this course the principles of breeding are applied to field crops and 
detailed studies made of methods used in crop improvement work. 

Agron 106. Methods in Crop Investigations. Three credit hours; 
two lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Pre- 
requisites, Agron. 101-103. 

This course deals with methods used by experiment stations in crop 
investigational work. The work of different stations on certain prob- 
lems is classified with the view of the standardization of methods. Stu- 
dents are required to make reports on and criticise methods used by the 
different stations in attacking the problems studied. 

Agron. 107. Grading Farm Crops. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Pre- 
requisites, Agron. 101, 102, 103. 

A study of market classifications and grades as recommended by the 
United States Bureau of Markets and practice in determining the grades. 

Agron. 108. Classification of Farm Crops. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Agron. 
101-103, and Morph. and Myc. 104. 

Botanical classification of crops. The course is for students who ex- 
pect to take up investigational or teaching work in Agronomy. 

Agron. 109. Crop Rotation. Two credit hours: two lectures. Sec- 
ond term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Agron. 101-103. 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of 
the principles and practice of crop rotation. Rotations used in this and 
other states and the scientific principles involved are studied. 

Agron. 110. Seminar. One credit hour: one lecture. Second 
term. Senior year. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by the students on current 
bulletins and scientific papers dealing with problems in agronomy. 

Agron. 111. Research and Thesis. Six credit hours. To be ar- 
ranged. Senior year. 

Here the students are given a chance to do some investigational work 
either in the way of collecting information on some phase of agronomic 
work or working some problem in the laboratory, field, or greenhouse. 



68 

For Graduate Students 

Agron. 201. Biometry. Two credit hours: one lecture and one 
laboratory period. First term. 

A study of statistical methods as applied to problems in Genetics 
and Plant Breeding. The methods used in the study of variations and 
correlations are discussed and the biometrical constants worked out by 
the class for certain assigned or selected data. 

Agron. 202. Crop Breeding. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. 

The content of this course is similar to the undergraduate course in 
Crop Breeding, but will be adapted more to graduate students and more 
of a range will be allowed in choice of material to suit special cases. 

Agron. 203. Research. Nine credit hours: to be arranged. 

With the approval of the head of the department the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy or he will be given a list 
of suggested problems from which he may make a selection. 

For Short-Course Students 

Agron. 1. Cereal Crops. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. First year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptations, uses, and culture of 
cereal crops, a larger part of the term being spent on corn and wheat. 

Agron. 2. Forage Crops. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptations, uses, and culture 
of forage and cover crops adapted to Maryland conditions. 

Agron. 3. Grain Judging. — One credit hours: one laboratory per- 
iod. Second term. Second year. 

A laboratory course in judging grains from the standpoint of the 
grower, the feeder and the miller. 

Agron. 4. Advanced Agronomy. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period each term. Second year. 

Students specializing in agronomy are given special work in judging 
and grading grains, crop improvement and various other phases of crop 
production. Students are allowed to elect subjects in other departments 
for part of the time. 

BOTANICAL GROUP 



The purpose of the group is to supply students in Agriculture and 
General Science with such information as is thought fundamental to 
their special work and to train specialists in the different phases of the 
subject. This training includes such knowledge of plants as would fit 
one for various positions, such as teachers in high schools, normal 



59 



schools, colleges, and investigators in experiment stations and govern- 
ment service. 

BOTAST. 



SUBJECT, Term: 


I 


II 


lU 


SOPHOMORE YKA.R. 









Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Quantitative Chemistry (Chem. 106-107).. 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

Introductory Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 102) 
Elective 



3 

4 



4 
3 
4 



3 
3 



3 
3 

4 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Genetics (Pit. Phy. 108) , 

Methods in Plant Histology (Morph. and Myc. 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phy. 106) 

Mycology (Morph. and Myc. 106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Geenral Physics (Phys. 104) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Elective , 



107) 



3 
3 



3 
3 
2 
3 



3 
3 

2 
6 



3 

a 

3 
3 
2 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Students specializing in Morphology and Mycology will take Group A; those 
in Physiology, Group B; and those in Plant Pathology, Group C. 



Group A: 

Plant Morphology (Morph. and Myc. 103-105) 
Advanced Taxonomy (Morph. and Myc. 109). . 

Cytology (Morph. and Myc. 108) 

Elective 



Group B: 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 103-105) 

Plant Micro-Chemistry (Pit. Phy. 108)... 
Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 132-133) 
Elective 



Group C: 

Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 104-106) 

Methods in Pathology (Pit. Path. 102) 

Seminar in Pathology (Pit. Path. 107) 

Elective 



4 
3 



10 



13 



4 



13 



3 

10 



4 
3 
4 
6 



4 
3 
1 
9 



13 
4 



9 
4 

13 



Description of Courses 

Bot. 101. General Botany. Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Freshman year. 

A general introduction to botany touching briefly on all phases of 
the subjects and planned to give the fundamental prerequisites for study 
in the special departmenti. 



60 



It 



,1 ri 



MORPHOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY 

Morp. & Myc. 101. Plant Anatomy. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 101. 

An anatomical study of leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Where 
possible plants of economic value are used as type specimens. 

Morph. & Myc. 102. Systematic Botany. Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of the local flora. A study is made of floral parts and the 
essential relations between the groups of flowering plants. Students be- 
come familiar with the systematic key used to identify plants. 

Morph. & Myc. 103-105. Plant Morphology. Four credit hourS 
each term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A course designed to give the student a comprehensive view of the 
plant kingdom. It treats of the general morphological evolutionary de- 
velopment and relationships of the various groups of plants, based upon 
the examinations of selected types from each group. 

Morph. & Myc. 106. Mycology. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Introductory comparative study of the morphology, life history, and 
classification of economic fungi. 

Morph. & Myc. 107. Methods in Plant Histology. Three credit 
hours: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prere- 
quisites, Morph. and Myc. 101. 

Primarily a study in technique. It includes methods of killing, fixing, 
imbedding, sectioning, staining, and mounting on slides of plant 
materials. 

Morph. & Myc. 108. Cytology. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Morph. and 
Myc. 107. 

The structure and life history of the plant cell. 

Morph. & Myc. 109. Advanced Taxonomy. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. First term. 

This course is offered for students who want more proficiency in sys- 
tematic botany than the elementary course affords. A student who com- 
pletes the course should be able to classify the grasses and other com- 
mon plants of the state. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 
Pit. Phy. 101-102. Plant Physiology. Four credit hours: two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods. Second term. Three credit hours: 



61 



two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A summary view of the phenomena occurring: in plants; complex life 
of processes are interpreted in terms of simpler ones and reduced finally 
to the principles of physics and chemistry. The first term is devoted to 
a study of the constituents of plants, the synthesis of carbohydrates, 
fats, proteins, respiration, fermentation, and digestion. The second 
term deals with water requirements, elements essential to plant growth, 
transpiration, growth and movement. 

Pit. Phy. 103-105: Advancecl Plant Physiology. Four credit hours 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Pit. 
Phy. 101. 

A detailed study of all life processes of plants. The laboratory work 
generally consists of special work on one or more problems that may con- 
tinue through the year. Students who write theses for their under- 
graduate degrees, get the data from special problems assigned for the 
laboratory work. 

Pit. Phy. 106. Plant Ecology. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the College are selected. It is 
generally necessary to take three or four trips at some distance from the 
College, in which case Saturdays are used for that purpose. 

Pit. Phy. 107. Plant Micro-Chemistry. Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Pit. 
Phy. 101, 102. 

Micro-technical methods applied to the identification of organic and in- 
organic substances found in the plant tissues. These methods are of 
especial value in the localization of plant substances and in the study of 
metabolism of plants. 

Pit. Phy. 108. Genetics. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Morph. 
and Myc. 101. 

A study of heredity. A review is given of the phenomena of evolution 
and a study made of variation, hybridisation and experimental data. 
This subject of genetics is fundamental to any advanced study of 
breeding. 

For Graduate Students 

Pit. Phy. 201-3. Plant Physiology. Four credit hours each teiim. 

Special problems in physiology and a summary of the most important 
literature on the subject up to date. 



62 



ill 






Pit. Phy. 204. Research in Physiology. Credit hours according to 
work done. 

The course requires special training in physiology and the funda- 
mentals of physics and chemistry. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Pit. Path. 101. General Plant Pathology. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and onelaboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

An introductory study of the disease of plants. Especial attention is 
given symptoms, control measures, and microscopic study of the parasites 
causing diseases. As far as possible choice of material includes repre- 
sentatives of the principal orders of parasitic fungi. 

Pit. Path. 102. Methods In Pathology. Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Junior year. Pre- 
requisites, Pit. Path. 101. 

A study of methods of sterilization, preparation of culture media, and 
cultural methods as applied to different groups of parasitic organisms. 
Some work is done in killing and fixing material, staining, mounting, 
inoculation, and determination of species. 

Pit. Path. 103-105. Advanced Plant Pathology. Four credit hours 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Senior year. 

A detailed study of diseases of economic plants. Much of the labora- 
tory work is of experimental nature and students who take pathology 
as a major can easily find a special problem for thesis material. 

Pit. Path. 106. Seminar in Pathology. One credit hour Second 
term. 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological research, special prob- 
lems and literature. 

For Graduate Students 

Pit. Path. 201. Special Problems In Pathology. Four credit hours 
each term. 

An advanced study of causal agents, symptoms, diagnosis, and treat- 
ment of diseases. Offered for students who have had a thorough training 
in undergraduate pathology and physiology. 

Pit. Path. 202. Research In Plant Pathology. Credit arranged ac- 
cording to work done. 

Original investigation of special problems. 

For Short-Course Students 

Bot. 1. General Botany. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. First year. 

A survey of the field of botany. Effort is made to give the student an 
understanding of how plants take up water and nutrients from the soil, 



63 



how they manufacture foods, and the structures necessary to carry on 
these processes. 

Pit. Path. 1. Plant Diseases. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

A practical study of diseases of plants to enable the student to recog- 
nize them in the field. A course in sprays and spraying is given in co- 
operation with Zoologry Department in which the student is taught meth- 
ods of disease control. 

DIVISION OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



The work of this division consists in giving instruction along the lines 
of general animal husbandry, dairy husbandry and animal pathology; 
also of the live stock disease control of the State and the general better- 
ment of live stock conditions in Maryland. The curriculum offered in 
this division is prepared with the idea of giving the student an oppor- 
tunity to specialize along animal industry lines and at the same time 
give him the broad foundations in general agriculture. He is given 
such instruction as should enable him (1) to conduct his own farming 
operations successfully; (2) to secure positions in the various lines of 
work which demand men trained along animal industry lines. 

Equipment and Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities offered by the new building are now being made use of 
and, as rapidly as machinery and apparatus can be provided and in- 
stalled, the laboratory instruction in market milk and dairy manufac- 
turing will be emphasized in proportion to the demand for this kind 
of work. 

Herds of cattle and swine are maintained at the College and are 
available for instructional purposes. In addition to these animals, be- 
cause of the location of the College, it is jwssible to make use of the 
excellent herds maintained by Maryland breeders and by the Federal 
Bureau of Animal Industry, thus giving the student a wide range of 
material for study. The students are urged, so far as possible, to take 
advantage of every opportunity to apply in a practical way the instruc- 
tion given in the classroom. Advanced students are sent throughout 
the State to supervise advanced registry tests as well as to study gen- 
eral conditions as they exist on some of the leading stock farms of 
Maryland. These trips give the students an opportunity of observing 
the most up-to-date farms and farm practices and at the same time 
bring them into actual contact with the live stock breeders and feeders 
who are accomplishing the results in this State. Each year a judging 
team participates in the students' contest in judging dairy cattle at the 
National Dairy Show. Students in any of the agricultural courses are 
eligible to compete for a place on this team. 



I': 



64 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term; 



II 



III 



Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101) 

General Geology (Geol. 102) 

Principles of Dairying- (D. H. 101) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Herd Management (A. H. 103) 

History and Development of Dairy Cattle (D. H. 102) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-124) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Electives 



4 
3 



4 
5 



4 
5 



4 
4 



4 
5 



i 



!ill 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Principles of Economics (R. E. 101). 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Technical Composition Eng. 103) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 
General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103). 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 103) 

Swine Production (A. H. 106) 

Farm Poultry (A. H. 105) 

Elective 



2 
3 
3 



3 
3 



3 

2 



3 

4 



4 
o 



4 
4 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (R. E. 109) 
Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) . . 

Research and Thesis 

Elective 



3 


3 




4 

2 


2 


12 


8 



2 
15 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



A. H. 101. Animal Husbandry. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Freshman year. 

Live stock in relation to successful farm practices; types and breeds 
of farm animals; principles underlying successful live stock husbandry. 

A. H. 102. Feeds and Feeding. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

A study of the composition and digestibility of foodstuffs, the source, 
characteristics and adaptability of the various food stuffs, feeding stan- 
dards and the calculation of rations. 

A. H. 103. Herd Management. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

Breeds of dairy cattle; the care, feeding, breeding and management 
of dairy cattle. Keeping of herd records and feeding for advanced reg- 
istry; judging dairy cattle and barn practice from the standpoint of 
general herd management.. 



65 



A. H. 104. Principles of Breeding. Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. 

This course will cover the practical aspects of animal breeding, in- 
cluding heredity, variation, selection, systems of breeding and pedigree 
study. 

A. H. 105. Farm Poultry. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Care of poultry on the general farm; breeds of poultry; breeding, 
feeding, and selection of stock; incubation, brooding, fattening, killing, 
marketing and construction. 

A. H. 106. Swine Production. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

Types and breeds of swine. Care, feeding, breeding, management, 
economics of swine husbandry and judging. 

A. H. 107. Meat and Meat Products. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

The slaughtering of farm live stock, curing and care of meats. 
Classes, grades and cuts of wholesale and retail markets. 

A. H. 103. Beef Production. Three credit hours; two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior and senior years. 

Beef and dual purpose breeds. The care, feeding, breeding and man- 
agement of the beef herds; fattening, fitting for show and economics of 
the beef industry. 

A. H. 109. Sheep Production. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior and senior years. 

Breeds of sheep, their history and adaptability. Care, feeding, breed- 
ing an management. Grades of wool. Judging and scoring. 

A. H. 110. Horse and Mule Production. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Junior and senior years. 

Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding, 
breeding, breaking and training, judging and fitting for show. 

A. H. 111-112. Advanced Judgingr. Two credit hours each term: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Junior 
or senior years. Prerequisite, A. H. 101 and A. H. 103. 

Competitive judging of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and swine. 
During the course various trips to stock farms throughout the State will 
be made. Such teams as may be chosen to represent the College will be 
selected from among those taking this course. 

A. H. 113. Advanced Breed Study. Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisite, 
A. H. 103, 106, 108, 110. 



66 

Special consideration of the history, development, and distribution of 
the more important breeds of live stock; important families and indi- 
viduals, assigned reading and pedigree work. 

A. H. 114. Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods. Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, A. H. 104. 

A study of theories regarding the heredity and transmission of char- 
acters, pure lines, Mendelism, etc. Correlation and methods of studying 
hereditary problems. 

A. H. 115. Markets and Marketing. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. Pre- 
requisites, A. H. 106, 108, 109. 

History, development, organization and status of the meat, wool, and 
horse industries. The packing industry and its by-products. Market 
classes and grades of live stock, markets and study of market reports. 

A. H. 116. Nutrition. Two credit hours: two lectures. Third 
term. Seniors or graduates. Prerequisite, A. H. 102. 

Composition of the animal body, digestion, assimilation, metabolism, 
protein and energy requirements. Methods of investigation and studies 
in the utilization of food nutrients. 

For Short-Course Students 

A. H. 1. Breeds and Judging. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. 

The student begins with the breeds of live stock, making a thorough 
study of their development and characteristics and also of the pedigrees 
and performances of superior individuals among horses, cattle, sheep and 
swine. The practical part of the course is devoted to the judging of 
horses, dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

A. H. 2. Feeds and Feeding. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. 

This course embraces the principles and practice of animal feeding. 
After covering the principles of feeding it takes up the composition of 
feeding stuffs, their combinations into properly balanced rations and the 
relation between the sustenance of animals and their products. Problems 
relating to balanced rations are solved. 

A. H. 3. Breeding of Animals. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. 

The main object of this course is to direct attention and to stimulate 
interest in the more tangible, physical basis of heredity. A scientific 
study of the physical aspects of heredity leads to conclusions which fully 
accord with the teachings of the work of our master breeders. It is the 
«im to limit discussion to x>oint3 upon which scientific opinion is quite 
well agreed. 



67 



A. H. 4-6. Animal Industry. Three credit hours each term: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. The year. 

A study of the successful methods of operating farms devoted chiefly 
to live stock production and of the systems to be applied to Maryland 
conditions. The student may arrange with the head of the department 
to utilize one-half of scheduled time in other departments. 

A. H. 7. Herd Management — Breeds of Dairy Cattle. Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. 

The care, feeding, breeding and itianagement of dairy cattle. The 
keeping of herd records, advanced registry requirements and judging of 
dairy cattle. 

A. H. 8. Farm Poultry. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory i)eriod. Third term. Second year. 

A general course dealing with the care of poultry on the farm; feed- 
ing and selection of stock; poultry house construction; fattening, killing, 
marketing, incubation and breeding. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D. H. 101. Principles of Dairying. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

The relationship of dairying to general agriculture; the extent of the 
dairy business and value of dairy products; milk, its secretion, char- 
acter and composition, methods of testing for butterfat and for total 
solids. 

D. H. 102. History and Development of Dairy Cattle. Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sopho- 
more year. 

A study of the origin, history, development and characteristics of the 
dairy breeds; requirements for advanced registry; the value of official 
records; bull associations, cow testing associations. 

D. H. 103. Farm Dairying. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

Composition of milk, butter and cheese; equipping the stable and milk 
house; how bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; 
surface coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and steriliza- 
tion of utensils. 

D. H. 104. Bam Practice or Dairy Production. Four credit hours: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. Third term. Junior or senior 
year. 

Feeding and handling cows ioi maximum and ecoiiomic production; 
the keeping of feed records and production records; cost of niilk produc- 
tion; the work of the herdsman from the standpoint of production; 



68 



!i*! 



standard rations for dairy cows from the standpoint of feeding practice; 
bam practices which influence quality and quantity in milk; economic ar- 
rangement of dairy plant and construction of the different dairy farm 
buildings. 

D. H. 105. Market Milk. Five credit hours: three lectures and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Senior year. 

A study of market milk conditions; city milk and cream regulations; 
requirements of city milk trade; improvement of milk supplies from the 
community standpoint; the production of milk for special trade, as 
baby's milk, pasteurized, inspected and certified milk; milk and its rela- 
tion to the public health; the food value of milk; methods of handling 
market milk and market cream for direct consumption; the transporta- 
tion of milk; Babcock testing of milk and milk products; testing for 
acidity, preservatives and adulterations. In this course visits will be 
made to dairies and to milk plants. 

D. H. 106. Advanced Course in Milk Testing. Four credit hours: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second term. Senior year. 

This course includes the determination of moisture and dry matter in 
milk and dairy products; various tests for fat and casein; testing of 
butter and oleomargarine; adulterations and preservatives; the scoring 
of milk and cream. 

D. H. 107. Commercial Dairying. Four credit hours: one lecture 
and three laboratory periods. Second term. Junior or senior year. 
Given in 1919-1920 if equipment has arrived. 

Power separators; pasteurizers; chums and butter workers; the ripen- 
ing of cream; churning, washing, salting, working, packing, scoring and 
selling butter. 

D. H. 108. Judging Dairy Products. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, 
D. H. 104, 105. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. Various outside lec- 
turers on these subjects will address the class and trips will be taken 
to butter, cheese and milk markets for the purpose of familiarizing the 
students with the commercial quality of milk, butter and cheese. Such 
teams as may be chosen to represent the College will be selected from 
those electing this course. 

FOR SHORT-COURSE STUDENTS 

D. H. 1. Principles of Dairying. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. First year. 

Relationship of dairying to general agriculture ; the extent of the dairy 
business and value of dairy products; milk, its secretion; character and 
composition; methods of testing for butterfat and for total solids. 



69 

D. HL 2. Farm Dairyinflr. Four credit hours: two lectures and two 
laboratory i)eriods. First term. Second year. 

Care and handling of milk and cream on the farm; centrifugal separa- 
tion; practice in farm butter making. 

D. H. 3. Bam Practice or Dairy Production. Four credit hours: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second term. Second year. 

Feeding and handling cows for maximum and economic production; 
the keeping of feed and production records; advanced registry testing; 
cow testing associations; bull associations; the cost of milk production; 
the work of the herdsman; barn practices which influence quality and 
quantity of milk; economic arrangement of dairy plant and construction 
of the different dairy farm buildings. 

Seminar. A forum for the discussion of subjects relating to animal 
industry. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students only. 



BACTERIOLOGY 

Bact. 101-103. General Bacteriology. Three credit hours each 
term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Junior year. 

This subject includes the following topics: A brief history of bac- 
teriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to nature; morphol- 
ogy, classification, identification of species and the different methods of 
sterilization and disinfection; preparation of culture media, isolation and 
cultivation of aerobes and anaerobes; examination of cultures; micro- 
scopic examination of bacteria; stains with their composition, classifica- 
tion and use ; vital activities of bacteria ; their relation to disease ; use of 
experimental animals; bacteria in water, milk and soil; cultural charac- 
ters of representative organisms from the following genera : micrococcus, 
streptococcus, bacterium, bacillus, pseudomnas and streptothrix, pro- 
tozoa, filterable viruses and immunity. 

Bact. 104-106. Dairy Bacteriology. Three credit hours each term: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 101-103. 

This course deals with the following topics: historical sketch; relation 
of bacteria to dairy products; prepartion of media; plating by the 
dilution method; sources of contamination, including stable atmosphere 
udder, exterior of cows and attendants; kinds of utensile and their ster^ 
ilization; kinds of bacteria in milk and their development; direct micro- 
scopic examination, sedimentation test and centrif ugalization ; fresh and 
old milk, market milk, graded milk; baby and special milks; certified 
milk, sour milk, whey, cream, butter, cheese, condensed milk, powdered 
milk and milk starters; pasteurization by flash and slow method; changes 
in milk due to bacteria and milk as a carrier of disease. 



' 



70 

Bact. 107-109. Advanced Bacteriology. Two to three credit hours 
each term: two to three laboratory periods. Senior yea,r. Preqidsite, 
Bact. 101-103. 

This course is intended primarily to give the student a chance to de- 
velop his own initiative. He will be allowed to decide upon his project 
and work it out as much as possible in his own way under proper super- 
vision. In this manner he will be able to apply his knowledge of bac- 
teriology to a given problem. He will also get to know something of the 
methods of research and will receive a valuable training in obtaining 
careful and accurate data. 

For Short-Course Students 

Bact. 1. Agricultural Bacteriology. Two credit hours: two lec- 
tures. Second term. Second year. 

An elementary course touching ui)on the following topics: The gen- 
eral characters of micro-organisms; fermentation; putrefaction and 
decay; nature's food supply; the carbon cycle; decomposition of nitrog- 
enous compounds ; nitrification and denitrification ; the manure heap and 
sewage; reclamation of lost nitrogen; bacteria and soil minerals; bacteria 
in water and milk; control of milk supply; bacteria in butter and cheese 
making; alcohol, vinegar, sour kraut, tobacco, silage and flax; preserva- 
tion of food products; resistance against parasitic bacteria; tuberculosis 
and other germ diseases and parasitic diseases of plants. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE 

V. M. 101. Anatomy and Physiology. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. First term. Junior year. 

A brief study of the structure of the animal body with a view to rec- 
ognizing the abnormal as contrasted with the normal and to the gaining 
of a knowledge of the inter-relationships between the various organs 
and parts, both as to structure and function. 

V. M. 102. Animal Diseases. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. 

A brief study of diseases of domestic animals, both infectious and non- 
infectious. Early recognition of disease; hygiene, sanitation, and pre- 
vention; first aid. 

For Short-Course Students 

V. M. 1. Animal Diseases. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Second year. 

Briefer course on the diseases of domestic animals; methods of recog- 
nizing disease in its early stages; relation of care and sanitation to 
disease. 



TX 

GENERAL ANIMAL INDUSTRY COURSES 

Seminar. A forum for the discussion of subjects relating to animal 
industry. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students only. 

Research and Thesis. The work will be arranged with each student 
individually. He may select some topic or problem in which he is es- 
pecially interested and which will require independent investigation. 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Farm Equipment was organized this year from an 
outgrowth of the increased demands for farm machinery and other 
farm equipment as labor-saving devices. 

The department will have charge of farm machinery, farm auto- 
mobiles, trucks and tractors, farm motors and gas engines, farm me- 
chanics, farm buildings, conveniences of the home, and other courses as 
the needs demand. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 



In this department are grouped courses in farm management, agri- 
cultural economics, and markets, together with the kindred subject of 
rural organization. 

Farm management has been defined as the business of the individual 
farmer to so organize his business as to produce the greatest continuous 
profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is in ac- 
cordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It re- 
quires not only knowledge of the many factors involved in the produc- 
tion of crops and animals, but also administrative ability to properly 
coordinate them into the most eflficient farm organization. 

The aim of the farm management course is to assist the student to 
perceive the just relationship of the several factors of production and 
disposition as applicable to local conditions and to develop in him execu- 
tive and administrative capacity. Students well trained in farm man- 
agement are in demand for county agent work, experiment station or 
United States Government investigation, and colleg»e or secondary 
school teaching. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles under- 
lying production, distribution, and consumption, more especially as they 
bear upon agricultural conditions. Labor, land and capital are con- 
sidered in their relationship to agriculture. The need for more exact 
business records on the farm is forcing itself imperatively on the mindfi 
of all studentB of agricultural economics. To meet this demand a 
course is offered in farm accounting. This course is not elaborate but 
is designed to meet the demand for a simple yet accurate system of 
farm business records. 



72 



The comparative isolation of country life tends naturally to individual 
rather than cooperative effort. The course in rural organization aims to 
show the student the advantages of combined effort in country com- 
munities, to sketch the history of rural organization with a discussion of 
its failures and successes, and to point out practical methods of organ- 
izing rural communities for mutual and individual benefit. 



1 : 

I I 



ill 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101).... 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Meats (A. H. 107) 

Poultry (A. H. 105) 

Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Electives 



3 
4 



4 
3 



II 



3 
4 



4 
3 



1 

2 



III 



4 
'3 



4 
'3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



11 



Technical English (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (A. E. 101-102). 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 103) 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 106) 

Farm Machinery (M. E. 107) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Surveying and Drainage ( • ) 

English, Public Speaking 



Grading Grain Crops (Agron. 107) 
Electives 



2 
3 



3 
4 



2 
3 



1 
3 
5 



3 
4 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Markets and Marketing (A. E. 104) 

Co-operative Marketing (A. E. 105) 

Community Study (R. O. 101-103) 

Principles of Rural Organization (R. O. 104) 

History, Comparative and Industrial 

Electives 



2 
3 



3 
3 



2 
9 



3 
2 



4 
8 



Description of Courses 

F. M. 101-102. Farm Management. Three credit hours each 
term: three lectures. First and second term. 

A study of the business of fanning from the standpoint of the indi- 
vidual farmer. This course aims to connect the principles and practice 
which the student has acquired in the several technical courses and to 
apply them to the development of a successful farm business. 



73 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

A. E. 103. Studies in Agricultural Economics. Three credit hours. 
Third term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

A study of the economic adaptations and adjustments necessary on the 
part of the agriculturist to meet the changing economic conditions. 
Population flows, land tenure, farm incomes, farm labor, agricultural 
•credit, and price movements will receive special consideration. 

A. E. 104. Markets and the Marketing of Farm ProducU. Three 
credit hours. Second term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

An analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and dis- 
tributing farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort 
in increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. 

A. E. 105. Cooperative Marketing. Three credit hours. Third 
term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

A study of the cooperative marketing, endeavors of farmers with a 
view to developing methods of distributing perishable and specialized 
farm products. 

A. E. 106. Farm Accounting. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. 

A study of the principles underlying farm accounting, emphasizing 
cost accounting and analysis of farm business. 

RURAL ORGANIZATION 

R. O. 101-103. Elements of Community Study. Three credit 
hours each term. The year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of community de- 
velopment. 

R. O. 104. Principles of Rural Organization. Three credit hours. 
First term. 

A study of the historical and comparative development of farmers' co- 
operative organizations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

For Short-Course Students 

F. M. 1. Farm Management. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. 

A course parallel with F. M. 101-102 arranged for the students of 
the short agricultural courses. 

A. E. 1. Farm Accounting. Two lectures. Second Term. 
A course parallel with A. E. 106. For students of the short agri- 
cultural courses. 

R. O. 1. Rural Organization. Two lectures. Third term. 
A survey of the functions, scope, and present forms of organization of 
rural interests primarily for economic purposes. 



'H'l 



74 



r 



ii^ 



!^!!ll 



II . 



FORESTRY 

Instruction in Forestry is planned to give the student who is pre- 
paring to take up practical problems in farm management a sufficient 
knowledge of the principles of Forestry to enable him to apply to the 
wood lot or timber tract the same degree of intelligent direction which 
he would give to the tilled lands. At the present time Forestry is not 
offered as a major course, but is used to supplement the content of the 
other courses. 

Description of Courses 

For. 101. Farm Forestry. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of forest botany, wood management, measurements, fire pro- 
tection, nursery practice, tree planting, valuation and utilization of 
forest crops. The work is conducted by means of lectures and field 
work. It may be elected by any student having the necessary pre- 
requisite. 

For Short-Course Students 

For. 1. Farm Forestry. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. 

The content of this course is similar to that of For. 101, but is adapted 
to the development and needs of students in the short-course work. 



G£OLX)GY AND SOILS 



The courses in Geology and Soils are designed to equip the future 
farmer with a complete knowledge of the soil which is the basis of all 
farming, and also to give advanced training to students who desire to 
specialize in soils. The unusual opportunities offered along these lines 
fit the graduate to conduct research in soils, to teach soils in agricultural 
colleges, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Soils, United States 
Department of Agriculture. If research or teaching is elected, it is ad- 
visable that the student take graduate work in addition to the re^^ar 
courses offered. 



75 



OBOIJOOT AKJ> BOXLB. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem, 123-124) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

General Physics (Phys. 104) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Elective 



3 

4 



3 

4 



4 
4 
3 



3 
3 

4 




JUNIOR TEAR. 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (Ru. Ec. 101) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 

Principles of Soils Management (Soils 103) 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) 

Surveying and Drainage 

Soils Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Elective 



2 
3 
3 



2 
3 
3 
3 



4 
3 
3 
5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (T. M, 101-102) 

Methods Crop Investigations (Agron. 106) 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 109) 

Advanced Soils (Soils 105) 

Soil Chemistry (Soils 106) 

Research and Thesis (Soils 108-110) 

Elective 



3 
2 
3 



2 

7 



2 

12 



3 
2 
8 



Description of Courses 

Soils 101-102. Introductory Study of Soils. Three credit houiv 
each term; two lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third 
terms. Prerequisite, (Jeol. 101. 

The physical and chemical properties of soils in their relation to til- 
lage operations, preparation of seed beds, and the maintenance of soil 
fertility. Field excursions are made to study soil formation and their 
physical properties. The practical work consists chiefly of experiments 
and demonstrations in soil physics. 

Soils 103. Principles <^ Soil Mmn^gement. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, 
Soils, 101-102. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the details 
of soil management. It includes the practical application of principles 
brought out in soil physics, studies of methods of tillage and cropping. 
The practical work consists of special studies of soils from the College- 
Farm, which have been subjected to various methods of treatment. 



M 



I 



I!, 



:i:il 



« 



!' 



76 

Soils 104. Fertilizer*. Four credit hours : three lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Soils 101. 

The subject of fertilizers is developed logically from the needs of the 
plant and the condition of the soil to the selection of proper plant food 
for each crop under varying conditions of soils and climate. Some at- 
tention is given to the home mixing of fertilizers. 

Soils 105. Advanced Soils. Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite, Soils 101-102. 

A study of the principal soil regions, series and types of the United 
States and especially of the soils of Maryland as to formation, composi- 
tion, and value agriculturally. The practical work consists chiefly in 
identification of the several soils and in map making. 

Soils 106. Soil Chemistry. Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Prequisites, Soils 101-102, Chem. 
101-102-103. 

A study of methods used by experiment stations in soil problems and 
technique of laboratory problems. The laboratory work deals with the 
analysis of soils from problems assigned in soils brought in by the 
student, along the lines in which he is interested. 

Soils 107. Soil Bacteriology. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It 
includes the study of nitrogen transformers, etc., and the injurious soil 
organisms. The work is carried on in the laboratory, lectures, and 
library. 

Soils 108-109-110. Research and Thesis. Two credit hours each 
term. Senior year. 

Investigational work of problems pertaining to soils. The work is 
carried on largely in the laboratory, library, and field, and the results 
written in thesis form. 

For Graduate Students 

Soils 201. Advanced Soils. Three credit hours. First term. 

A survey of latest investigations in soils and fertilizers, conducted by 
means of lectures, references, and practical work. 

Soils 202. Research in Soils. Four credit hours each term: lec- 
tures and practice to be arranged. The year. 

Original investigations of problems in soils and fertilizers. 

For Short-Course Students 

Soils 1. General Soils. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. 

A study of the physical and chemical conditions of soils in their rela- 
tion to profitable agriculture. 



77 



Soils 2. Fertilizers. Three credit hours: two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. First term. 

The selection of proper plant food for each crop under varying condi- 
tions of soil and climate. Special attention is given to the home mixing 
of fertilizers. 

GEOLOGY 

Geo!. 101. General Geology. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. 

A text book, lecture, and laboratory course dealing with the principles 
of geology. It is designed principally for agricultural students in pre- 
paring for technical courses, but may be taken as a part of a liberal 
education. 

Geol. 102. Engineering Geology. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. 

A course dealing with the study of geological materials of importance 
in engineering. The practical work is carried on partially by field 
excursions. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 



The Department of Zoology is prepared to train specialists in ento- 
mology, supplement the work of other departments, and to offer a pre- 
medical course. 

In the preparation of entomologists, the aim is to give a broad train- 
ing in zoology and allied sciences, with specialization in the senior year. 
All the work of the State and Station Entomologist is done through this, 
department, thus offering better opportunities for students desiring ta 
specialize in entomology. 

The pre-medical curriculum includes the scheduled subjects as pre- 
scribed by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association for the two-year pre-medical course. It is considered highly 
desirable, however, that prospective students take the four-year course 
since some leading medical schools require the baccalaureate degree for 
admission. 

In the courses on "Maryland Water Resources" and "Introduction to 
Aquiculture" a beginning is made looking to the development of trained 
men who can cope adequately with the intricate scientific problems of 
development and conservation of the food resources of the waters of the 
State. This is designed to supplement in a co-operative way the work 
of the Conservation Commission. 



1^ 



!; iiji 






li! 



Mi 



IP 



\ 



J 



78 



ECONOMZG BOOZiOOY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



General Zoologry (Zool. 101-102) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

General Chem. and Qualitative Chem. (Chem. 101-103). 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

ISlectives 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Histology and Embryology (Zool. 103-105) 

General Entomology (Zool. 106) 

Quant. Chemistry fChem. 106-107) 

•General Physics (Phys. 104) 

General Physics Lab. (Phys. 104) 

Exposition and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 
Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Insect Morphology (Zool. 107) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 108-109) 

Insecticides and Their Application (Zool. 117) 

Seminar (Zool. 124-126) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Economic Entomology (Zool. 110-112) 

Thesis (Zool. 114-116) 

Seminar (Zool. 124-126) 

Electives 



4 
3 

4 



1 
4 

3 

7 



II 



4 
8 
4 



4 4 

"'3 3" 

2 2 

1 1 

2 2 

5 5 



4 

2 
1 
4 
3 

3 



5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 


9 


» 



III 



3 

4 
4 
6 



4 
3 



2 
1 
2 
5 



1 

4 
3 
5 



5 
2 
1 
9 



The student must secure the approval of the head of the division in 
Ills elections. 



79 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

General Chem. and Qualitative Chem. (Chem. 101-103).. 

Language (French or German) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Electives 



4 


4 


8 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 



3 

4 
Z 
4 
2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Embryology and Histology (Zool. 102) 

General Entomology (Zool. 103) 

Exposition and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 

Quant. Chemistry (Chem. 106-107) 

Physics 101, 102, 103. (Subdivided according to pages 

94 and 95 in catalog) 

Language (French or German) 

Electives 



2 
3 

5 
3 




2 
3 

5 
3 




4 

3 
2 



5 
3 




JUNIOR YEAR. 



•Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (Zool. 114).. 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Language (French or German) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 
Electives 



4 
3 
3 



4 
3 
3 
2 
5 



4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Medical Entomology (Zool. Ill) 

Seminar (ZooL 116) 

Thesis (Zool. 109) 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Xanguage 

Electives 



3 

1 1 

2 2 

2 2 

3 3 
6 9 



1 
2 
2 
3 

9 



Description of Courses 

Zool. 101-102. General Zoology. Four credit hours: two lectures 

and two laboratory periods. First and second terms. 

The relationships of animals, their general form and structure, their 
responses to environing conditions and their development and evolution 
^re discussed in a broad manner. 

Zool. 103-105. Histology and Embryology. Four credit hours each 
term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisite, 
2ool. 101-102. 

A study of the normal tissues, chiefly of the mammals; covers the 
■gl'ound usually assigned to general histology. The course in embryc^ogy 
Hs based on the chick and pig. 



Ill 



2! 



t 



I 



f 



I 



IS 



l!H| 



80 

^^ / 

Zool. 106. Entomology. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work and field excursions. A collection of insects 
is required, properly arranged to orders. 

Zool. 107. Insect Morphology. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. Prerequisite, Zool. 106. 

A course in morphology designed to prepare students for work in eco- 
nomic entomology. 

Zool. 10&-109. Economic Entomology. Four credit hours each 
term : two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 106. 

Morphology of type insects to acquaint the student with special struc- 
tures bearing on insect control; insect biology, including methods of 
study. The theory and practice of insect control. 

Zool. 110-112. Economic Entomology. Five credit hours each term: 
three lecture hours and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 108-109. 

Problems in applied entomology, including life history, ecology, dis- 
tribution, parasitism and control. 

Zool 113. Systematic Entomology. Two credit hours: two labora- 
tory periods. First term. Prerequisite, Zool. 107. 

The student selects some group in which he is particularly interested 
and makes a detailed study of it. The course requires considerable field 
work and is supplemented by laboratory periods and frequent confer- 
ences. 

Zool. 114-116. Thesis. Two credit hours each term: laboratory peri- 
ods to be arranged. The year. 

The intensive investigation of some zoological subject, the results of 
which are incorporated in a paper which is submitted as part require- 
ment for graduation. 

Zool. 117. Insecticides And Their Application. Two credit hours: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation and appli- 
cation; construction, care and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumi- 
gation and mechanical controls. 

Zool. 118. Medical Entomology. Three credit hours: three lec- 
tures. First term. Prerequisite, Zool. 106. 

"The relation of insects to disease, directly and as vectors of pathogenic 
organisms; the control of pests of man. 



81 



Zool. 119-120. Scientific Delineation And Preparations. One credit 
hour each term: one laboratory period. First and second terms. 

Photography, photomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera 
lucida, lantern-slide making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit 
and museum material. 

Zool. 121. Horticultural Entomolosry. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 106. 

Lectures, laboratory and field work on the morphology, biology and 
control of insect pests of horticultural crops. 

Zool. 122. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. Two to four 
credit hours: laboratory periods to be arranged. Third term. Prere- 
quisite, Zool. 101-102. 

Lectures and laboratory work on one or more of the following systems 
of organs: skeletal, nervous, and circulatory. 

Zool. 123. Maryland Water Resources. One credit hour: one lec- 
ture. Second term. 

A lecture course designed to acquaint students with the immense pos- 
sibilities of the fish, oyster and crab industries of the State and the 
measures that are being taken to protect, increase and perpetuate these 
valuable assets of the State. 

Zool. 124-126. Seminar. One credit hour each term: one lecture. 
The year. The staff. 

Meetings to discuss zoological topics; to review the literature of the 
subject and in general to acquaint the student with his chosen field. 

Zool. 127. Introduction to Aquiculture. — Credit hours and labora- 
tory periods to be arranged. Offered in 1920-21. Prerequisite, Zool. 
101-102 and Botany 101. 

The biology of the fresh and tidal waters of Maryland. A qualitative 
study of the aquatic organisms with special reference to their possibili- 
ties in sustaining aquatic Kf e. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 

Zool. 201. Investigations in Entomology. Credit according tO 
work done. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 
mology under the direction of a member of the staff, with particular ref- 
erence to preparation for individual research. 

Zool. 202. Research in Entomology. Credit according to work 
done. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation may, with the ap- 
proval of the head of the division, undertake supervised research in mor- 
phology, taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently the 



III ^11 



Hi , !l 



fr' III 



I 



82 

student may be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Depart- 
ment projects. The students' work may form a part of the final report 
on the project and be published in bulletin form. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Economic Entomology. One credit hour: one 
lecture. Second term. 

Lectures discussing the latest theories and practices in applied ento- 
mology. 

For Short-Course Students 

Zool. 1. Animal Pests. Two lectures and two hours laboratory 
Second term. 

A study of crop and animal pests with practice in identification; de- 
signed to enable the farm^er to recognize and intelligently combat them. 

Zool. 2. Sprays And Spraying. Two lectures and two hours lab- 
oratory. Third term. 

Preparation and application of insecticides, together with a considera- 
tion of other methods of control. 

Zool. 3. Beekeeping. One laboratory period. Third term. 
Consideration of the underlying principles of successful beekeeping 
with practice in preparation of equipment and the manipulation of bees. 



SHORT COURSES 



urn 



I 



Two- Year Agricultural Course 

The Two- Year Agricultural Course embraces much of the technical 
work of the four-year courses and is designed to lay a foundation that 
will secure success in practical farming. It is planned especially to meet 
the demands of young men who cannot find time to take the regular 
courses of the College, or for those who have not had the necessary edu- 
cational requirements for admission to the longer courses. 

Among the most enthusiastic students who have taken the course and 
give it their hearty endorsement are some of the landowners and best 
farmers of Maryland. The course is made practical in every sense of 
the word, and for that reason students having farm experience before 
entering will derive most benefit from the work. Those taking the course 
who do not live on home farms are required to spend at least ten weeks 
between the first and second years on a farm approved by the College. 

It is advisable for students to carry on project work where possible. 
College authorities are always available to supervise such projects, and 
when satisfactorily carried oiit credit may be given for the work. Look 
for a list of projects under the Short Course in Agricultural Practice. 

The two-year course has the advantage of being given during the same 
months that the regular College courses are g:iven. The students can 
enter into all phases of athletics and other student activities. 



83 

To enter the two-year course the applicant must have preparation at 
least equal to the work g^iven in the seventh ^ade of the Maryland pub- 
lic schools. 

At the conclusion of the course students having completed the regular 
work as outlined are given a certificate stating the studies pursued dur- 
ing the time spent in the College. 

TWO-TXSAB AGRZCXrikTtTBE. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term; 



II 



III 



Cereal Crops (Agron. 1) 

Forage Crops (Agrron. 2) 

General Soils (Soils 1) 

Breeds and Judging Live Stock (A, H. 1) 

Dairying (D. H. 1) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 3) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. 1) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 1) 

Horticulture 

Home Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 5).... 

General Botany (Bot. 1) 

Entomology (Zool. 1) 

Sprays and Spraying (Zool. 2) 

Drawing 1 — Farm Drawing 

Shop 1 — ^Farm Wood Work 

Shop 2 — 'Forging and Pipe Fitting 

Composition (Eng. 1-2) 

Vocational Publications (Eng. 3) 



2(2) 



2(2) 



2(3) 
2(2) 



2(2) 



(3) 



S 



2(2) 
3(3) 



2(4) 



2(2) 



(3) 



2(2) 
2(2) 



2(2) 



2(2) 



2(3) 



(3) 



SECOND YRAR. 



Grain Judging (Agron. 3) 

Breeding of Animals (A. H. 3) 

Disease of Animals (U. M. 1) 

Farm Poultry (A. H. 6) 

Farm Management (F. M. 1) 

Farm Accounts 

Rural Organization 

Business Law 

Fertilizers (Soils 2) 

Plant Diseases (Pit. Patt. 1) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 1) 

Forestry 1 — Farm Forestry 

Structural Design 1 — Farm Buildings 

Mechanical Engineering 1 — Farm Machinery. 
Hydraulics 1 — Drainage 



Elect one or a portion of each: 

Advanced Agronomy 

Animal Industry Advanced 

Horticulture — Vegetable Gardening, or Pomology, 

or Floriculture 

Gas Engines 

Beekeeping 



3 



2(2) 
2(2) 



1(3) 



2(4) 
2(4) 

2(4) 



(3) 
2(3) 



3 
3 



1(3) 
i(3) 



2(8) 
2(3) 

2(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



2(6) 



3(4) 
3(4) 

3(4) 

2(3) 

(3) 



Il 



ill' 



fi 4 



)''! 



84 

SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES 

(Three Years of Three months Each — ^December, January and 

February) 

There has been a long-felt need for an agricultural course for the 
rural men and women that will not take them away from the farm dur- 
ing the greater part of the growing season. There never has been a 
time when it is more necessary that the farmers of this country produce 
maximum crops. For these reasons a new course in Agriculture has 
been initiated which will take the farmer away from his home work only 
three winter months — ^December, January and February — ^when he is 
least needed on the farm. 

The short course is organized entirely from the practical point of 
view. The content embodied deals largely with farm-crop production, 
vegetable gardening, pomology, animal industry and mechanics. The 
methods employed show the new ways of handling old problems and the 
best ways to increase production with the least possible expense. 

This course should appeal to men who are actually up and doing and 
should make farm life more interesting, pleasant and profitable. One 
big feature is that this course affords an opportunity to come shoulder 
to shoulder with a multitude of splendid young men of Maryland and 
other States. 

The only requirement for admission is a common school education. A 
high school education will be very helpful, and the course is planned so 
that it is elastic enough to fit students with various degrees of training. 

Permission is given for students to elect largely subjects pertaining to 
their oWn interest. If the plan outlined is followed, all students will take 
the general work during the first year and then elect their special work 
during the second and third years. Eiach year should make a unit so 
that a student who can attend only one or two years will still have a 
rounded course. Special supervised project work is offered for all who 
want to keep in touch with the College during the summer. 

At the suggestion of students, college specialists go to the home farms 
to ascertain what the greatest difficulties are and then lay plans for the 
correction. A list of projects to select from is given elsewhere. 

Students who have completed the regular work as outlined and have 
carried supervised project work through two sununers are given a cer- 
tificate stating the studies pursued while registered at the College. 

Registration for this course will take place on Tuesday, December 3. 
The term will close on Friday, March 1. Those who expect to attend 
should request the authorities to send registration blanks as early in the 
year as possible. 



85 



Outline of Course 

FIRST YEAR, 



Agronomy 1 and 3 — Cereal Crop Production and Grain Judging 

Animal Husbandry 1 — Breeds and Judging of Live Stock 

Animal Husbandry 2 — Dairying 

Vegetable Gardening 1 — ^Home Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 1 

Shop 1 and 2 — ^Wood Work, Forging and Pipe Fitting 

Supervised Farm Project for Summer M.Onths. 

Elective (elect one): 

Chemistry 1 — Agricultural Chemistry 

English 1 and 2 — Composition and Farm Literature 



2(2) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
2(2> 
2(2) 
(3) 



2(2) 
3 



SECOND YEAR. 



Agronomy 2 — Forage Crops 

Animal Husbandry 3 — -Feeds and Feeding of Live Stock 

Mechanical Engineering 1 — Farm Machinery 

Zoology 2 — Sprays and Spraying 

Soils 2 — ^Fertilizers 

Economics 2 — Farm Accounts 

Supervised Farm Project During Summer Months. 

Elective (elect enough to make a normal schedule): 

Botany 2 — Plant Diseases 

Zoology 1 — Entomology 

Vegetable Gardening 2 — Commercial Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 2 — ^Practical Fruit Growing 

Animal Husbandry 6 — ^Farm Poultry 

Rural Economics 4 — Business Law 

Soilsl — General Soils 



THIRD YEAR. 



2(2) 

2(2) 

1(3) 

1(2) 

2 

2 



1(2) 

1(2) 

2(2) 

2(2) 

2(2) 

2 

2(2) 



Animal Husbandry 5 — Animal Diseases 

Rural Economics 1 — Farm Management 

Hydraulics 1 — Drainage 

Rural Economics 3 — 'Rural Organization 

General Science 1 — Bacteriology 

Elective (elect enough to make a normal schedule): 

Agronomy 4 — Advanced Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 7 — Animal Industry 

Vegetable Gardening 5 — Advanced Vegetable Gardening 

Pomology 2 — Practical Fruit Growing 

Mechanical Engineering 3 — Gas Engines 

Structural Design 1 — ^Farm Buildings 

Zoology 3 — ^Beekeeping 



2 

2(2) 
(3) 
2 
1C3) 



3(4) 
3(4) 
3(4) 
3(4) 
2(3) 
1(3) 
(3) 



FARM PRACTICE 

To entirely satisfy the requirements of the Short Course in Agricul- 
tural Practice, students who are working for certificates are required to 
carry out farm projects during the summer between the first and second 
years and between the second and third years. 

Students are at liberty to invite College specialists to their home farms 
to point out the difficulties which may be used as farm projects, or they 
may select a project for the list. 



86 

The work will be fiui>ervised and inspected by the department in which 
the project has been chosen. 

Projects may be selected from the following departments: 

Farm Crops, 
Horticulture, 
Animal Industry, 
Farm Forestry, 
Rural Bconomics, 
Farm Equipment, 
Agricultural Engineering. 



m 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF 

AGRICULTURE* 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103) 

Herd Management (A. H. 115) 

Mechanical Drawing (Draw. 107) , 

"Woodwork (Shop 104) , 

Forging and Pipe-fitting (Shop 107) 

General Physics (Phy. 104) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-107) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 125) 

Entomology (Zool. 103) 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phy. 103) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101). 
Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102)... 

Modern Language 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 1) 

Survey of English Literature (Eng. Lit. 
Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. ) 



Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Foreage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Frame Crops (Hort. 118) 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

Elementary Landscape Gardening 

History of Modern Education (Prin. of Ed. 101) 



4 
4 



3 
3 



3 
2 
2 
1 



II 



4 

5 



3 
3 



4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 



3 
3 



III 



1 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 



♦Subjects not elected in sophomore year may be elective in the junior or 
senior year. 



87 



JUNIOR YXAR. 



Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 107) 

Fertilisers (Soils 104) 

Genetics (Pit. Phy. 108) 

Advanced Plant Physiology (Pit Phy. 103-105). 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 102) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Farm Poultry (A. H. 105) 

Swine Production (A. H. 106) 

Beef Production (A. H. 108) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 109) 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 110) 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 111-112) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soil 107) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 103) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 112-123) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132) 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 124) 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 126) 

Amateur Floriculture (Hort. 126) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. ) 



Educational Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 103-104) 



4 

4 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 
3 



3 
3 



2 



4 
3 



2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 

4 

2* 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Advanced Soils (Soils 105) 

Soil Chemistry (Soils 106) 

Plant Micro-Chemistry (Pit. Phy. 107) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) . . 
Economic Fruits of the World (Hort, 107). 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 117). 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125) 

Floral Decorations (Hort. 127) 

Landscape Design (Hort. 133-134) 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 135) 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 104-105) 

Methods in Crop Investigation (Agron. 106) 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 109) 

Advanced Drainage (Hyd. 110) 

Farm Machinery (Farm Equip. 101) 

Tractors (Farm Equip. 103) 

Farm Building (Struct. Design 109) 



2 

1 



3 
2 



3 
1 



ELECTIVES OFFERED IN THE ANIMAL INDUSTRY DIVISION 



SUBJECT. 



Term; 



II 



III 



Meat and Meat Products (A. H. 107) 

Beef Production (A. H. 108) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 109) 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 110) 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 111-112) 

Advanced Breed Study (A. H. 113) 

Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods (A. H. 114). 

Markets and Marketing (A. H. 115) 

Nutrition (A. H. 116) 

Barn Practice or Dairy Production (D. H. 104) 

Market Milk (D. H. 105) 

Advanced Milk Testing (D. H. 106) 

Commercial Dairying (D. H. 107) 

Judging Dairy Products (D. H. 108) 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 107-109) 



3 
2-3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



4 
2 



3 

2-3 



2 

4 



2 
4 



2 

3 

2-3 






88 



THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY 



■!| I'! 

'.M\ 

)l l! 



> I ■ ' 



i>j'll 




'illi 



Ourricula offered in the School of Chemistry prepare students for 
practical work as research, general analytical, and manufacturing chem- 
ists, or to be teachers. Contributory instruction also is given, as most 
of the students enrolled in other schools of the College are required to 
take a year or more of chemistry. 

Four coordinate departments make up the School of Chemistry. They 
are organized as follows: 

Department of Greneral Chemistry, 

Department of Industrial Chemistry, 

Department of Biological Chemistry, 

Department of Fertilizer and Food Analysis and Inspection. 

The chemical building contains laboratories, offices, and balance room 
for the State fertilizer, feed and lime control work, lecture rooms, sup- 
ply room and four student laboratories. In addition, classrooms in Mor- 
rill Hall are used as needed. The laboratories are well equipped with 
standard apparatus and chemicals, chemical and assay balances, polari- 
scopes, refractometers, spectroscopes, microscopes, etc. Each student is 
provided with a locker, reagents, and apparatus, and has the use of a 
working desk. 

The school is provided with a library of standard reference books on 
chemistry and related subjects, to which necessary additions are made 
from time to time. 

/ GENERAL CHEMISTRY 



The curriculum offered by the Department of General Chemistry lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science presents the opportunity for a 
broad training in chemistry. In order that students may become not 
merely capable analytical chemists, but also may be grounded as deeply 
as possible in the fundamental principles of all departments of chemical 
work, practical laboratory manipulation is brought into close relation- 
ship with lectures, demonstrations and the work of the classroom. The 
w^ork prepares students to fill positions in analytical or manufacturing 
chemistry, as chemists in technical industry, as chemical, sanitary, or 
consulting experts. The course is well adapted for students wishing to 
take graduate work in chemistry, as it gives a broad and general knowl- 
edge of the science. 



89 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Trigonometry (Math. 101) 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Modern Language (M. L. 101-103 or 121-123) 

Oen'l Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 
Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 101) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Modern Language (M, L. 104-106 or 121-123) 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101, Phys. Lab. 101). . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102, Phys. Lab. 102) 

Light and Heat (Phys. 103, Phys. Lab. 103) 

Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 104-105) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



3 
1 
5 



3 

4 
1 



3 
3 



o 



II 



3 

1 



5 
3 

4 
1 



3 
3 



3 
3 



III 



3 

1 



5 
3 

4 
1 



3 
V 



5 
4 



Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Adv. Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 109-111).. 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Economics (Econ. 106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

United States Government (Pol. Sci. 105-106) 
Political Science (Pol. Sci. 110) 



4 
5 
3 



3 
2 



4 
5 
3 



3 
2 



4 
5 



3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Adv. Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 120) 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 129-131) 

Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 132-133) 

Industrial Chemistry (Chem. 126-128) 

Electro Chemistry (Chem. 134) 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sci. 115-116)... 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 104-106) 



4 
3 



2 
2 
1 



3 
4 
5 



2 
2 
1 



3 

4 
5 
3 



2 
1 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 



Curricula in the Department of Industrial Chemistry are Chemical En- 
gineering and Agricultural Chemistry. The former is designed to equip 
students with a highly specialized knowledge of the construction and 
management of manufacturing establishments involving chemical princi- 
ples; the latter prepares for research and analytical work that have to 
do with the relationship of chemistry to agriculture. Technical and edu- 
cational positions are open to men and women trained in various phases 
of chemical engineering, in plant and animal chemistry, in the analysis 
of soils, fertilizers, and spray materials, and in food and dairy studies. 

In addition to many of the subjects in chemistry, chemical engineering 









m 



90 

includes the study of boilers, steam engines, drawing and desifi^n, ele- 
ments of machinery, measurement of power, and work in the engineering 
laboratory. It also includes advanced courses in electricity and magnet^ 
ism, dynamos and motors, and experimental practice in the electrical and 
dynamo laboratories. However, the grraduates primarily are chemists 
with a good knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering, and 
with additional training in the special mechanical and electrical ap- 
pliances of industrial chemistry. 



o. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term : 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103). . 

Trigonometry (Math. 101) 

Analytics (Math. 102-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102-103) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork (Shop 103) 



3 

1 

4 
5 



1 

9 



II 



3 
1 

4 



o 
2 



1 

1 



III 



3 

1 

4 



5 

1 



3 





SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Modern Language (M. L. 101-103 or 121-123) 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105-106) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 104-105) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 101-102) . . 

Min. and Assaying (Chem. 136) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101, Phys. Lab. 101) 

Electricitv and Magnetism (Phys. 102, Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103, Phys. Lab. 103) 

Technical Analysis (Chem. 112-114) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. Ill, E. E. Lab. 112) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 104-105) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



4 
5 



4 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 

2 



4 
5 



4 
3 



3 
3* 



3 
3 
2 



5 

4 



3 

1 




Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Economics (Econ. 106) 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 129-131) 

Industrial Chemistry (Chem. 126-128) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Mechanical Engineering (M. E. 104-105).. 
Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 104) 
Electro Chemistry (Chem. 134) 



3 

5 
3 
2 
1 



3 
6 



3 
1 



3 
3 
5 



3 
1 
3 



91 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103). . 

Trigronometry (Math. 101) 

Analytics (Math. 102-103) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 



3 
1 

4 
5 



3 

1 
4 

t • < 

5 

4 



3 
1 

4 



•••••• 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Modern Language (M. L. 101-103 or 121-123) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 

Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Bot. 102) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 104-106) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Elective in Agriculture 



3 
3 



2 
1 
1 

4 



3 
3 



4 
2 

1 



3 
3 

4 



2 

1 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Agr'l Chemical Analysis (Chem. 117-119) 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106 or 124-126) 
Physics (Phys. 104-106, Phys. Lab. 104-106). 
Electives in Agriculture 



4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



5 
4 
3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Adv. Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 120-122)... 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 129-131) 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Economics (Econ. 110) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 132-133) 
Chemistry of Foods (Chem. 135) 



4 
3 
3 



3 
V 



4 
3 
3 



3 

4 



4 
3 



3 
3 

4 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 



In arranging the curriculum in the Department of Biological Chem- 
istry has borne in mind the many calls for men trained in chemistry with 
a working knowledge in general biology. The course should meet the 
needs of several classes of men : those desiring to follow chemical studies 
of a biological nature; those preparing for the study of medicine, for 
which a college training in biology, chemistry and allied subjects, as well 
as in liberal studies, is almost essential; and those preparing to become 
teachers. 



i : 



92 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Composition and Rhetoric (Engr. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Trigonometry (Math. 101) 

Analytics (Math. 102-103) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Modern Language (M. L. 101-103 or 121-123) 

Plant Physiology (Bot. 102-103) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 104-105) 

Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102-103) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102, Phys. Lab. 102). 

Light and Heat (Phys. 103, Phys. Lab. 103) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106 or 124-126) 

Adv. Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 109-111) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



3 
1 

4 
5 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



4 
3 
5 



II 



3 
1 
4 



5 
4 



3 
4 
3 



3 
1 



4 
3 
5 



III 



3 

1 
4 



5 
V 



3 
3 



4 
3 



3 
1 



5 
5 
3 
5 



Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Economics (Econ. 106) 

Adv. Agr'l Chemistry (Chem. 120) 

Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 132-133) 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 129-131) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Chemistry of Foods (Chem. 135) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 104-106) 



3 

4 



3 
3 
2 
3 



5 
3 
3 
2 



5 
3 
3 
2 



DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZER AND FOOD ANALYSIS AND 

INSPECTION 

Under the jurisdiction of the Department of Fertilizer and Food 
Analysis and Inspection is conducted the State's inspection work, includ- 
ing sampling, analysis, and the publication of results on fertilizers, stock 
foods, and agricultural lime. 

Description of Courses 
Chem. 101-103: General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 

Four credit hours each term: three lectures and one laboratory period. 



93 



The first term. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. The second 
and third terms. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. The non-metals are first con- 
sidered. Special attention is given those elements and compounds which 
are of industrial importance. The laboratory work accompanying this 
course in the first term consists, chiefly, of experiments illustrative of 
the work in the class. During the last two terms systematic qualitative 
analysis of the more common bases and acids is the laboratory work 
pursued. 

Chem. 104-105. Inorganic Chemistry. Three credit hours each 
term: three lectures. The first and second term. Prerequisite, Chem. 
101-103. 

An advanced course covering more in detail the subject matter set 
forth in the general chemistry offered in the freshman year. 

Chem. 106-108. Quantitative Analysis. Three credit hours each 
term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 101-103. 

The principal operations of quantitative analysis. Standardization of 
chemical balance. Standardization of weights and apparatus used in 
chemical analysis. Typical gravimetric, volumtetric, colorimetric and 
electrolytic methods are taken for study. 

Chem. 109-111. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Five credit 
hours each term: two lectures and three laboratory periods. The year. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 101-103, 106-108. 

A continuation of courses 106-108. An advanced course of quantita- 
tive analysis where the student may elect to study the methods used in 
agricultural, biological, or industrial chemistry. 

Chem. 112-114. Technical Analysis. Four credit hours each term: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisite, Chem. 
101-103, 106-108. 

The analysis of ores, oils, fuels, gases, boiler waters, etc., for students 
in industrial chemistry. 

Chem. 115. Quantitative Analysis. Three credit hours: one lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods. The first term. Prerequisite, Chem. 
101-103. 

Same as Chem. 106-108, but abbreviated for agricultural students. 

Chem. 116. Agricultural Chemistry. Four credit hours, three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisite, Chem. 
101-103. Chem. 115. 

A course including lectures, recitations, and laboratory in the chemistry 
of air, soils, feeds, fertilizers, plants and animals. 



I|: 



II 



i 



III! 






r:'i 



94 

Chem. 117-119. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. Four credit hours! 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. Prere-| 
quisite, Chem. 101-103, 115-116. 

Lectures, laboratory work, analysis of soils, fertilizers, plant and ani-| 
mal products. 

Chem. 120-122. Advanced Agricultural Chemistry. Four credit 
hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 116-119. 

A continuation of chemistry 116-119. Special problems in agricultural 
chemistry. 

Chem. 123-125. Organic Chemistry. Four credit hours. First and 
second terms. Five credit hours. Third term: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First and second terms: three lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. The second term. Prerequisite, Chem. 101-103. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds. 

Chem. 126-128. Industrial Chemistry. Five Credit hours each 
term: three lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. Prere- 
quisite, Chem. 101-103, 104-105, 106-108, 123-125. 

The study of practical methods employed in the various inorganic and 
organic chemical industries. Visits are mlade to ice, fermentation and 
gas plants, also to fertilizer, glass, coke, iron and steel works. The lab- 
oratory work accompanying this course consists of the analysis of in- 
dustrial products. 

Chem. 129*131. Physical Chemistry. Three credit hours each term: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. The year. Prerequisite, Chem. 
101-103, 106-108. 

A study of the advanced theories of chemistry. Laboratory work con- 
sists of the determination of the boiling and melting points, lowering the 
freezing point by substances in solution. Determination of vapor densi- 
ties, study of ref ractometer, polariscope, etc. 

Chem. 132-133. Physiological Chemistry. Five credit hours each 
term: three lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third 
terms. Prerequisite, Chem. 101-103, 106-108, 123-124. 

Recitations, lectures, laboratory in general physiological chemistry. 

Chem. 134. Electrochemistry. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
The third term. Prerequisite, Chem. 101-103, 129-131. 

In this course the various factors which govern the action of elec- 
trolytes when subject to the action of the electric current and the factors 
which determine electromotive force are taken up. 

Chem. 135. The Chemistry of Foods and Nutrition. Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Prere- 
quisite, Chem. 101-103, 123-125. 



95 



Lectures and recitations dealing with human foods and nutrition, the 
composition of foods, energy values, etc. 

Chem. 136. Determinatiye Mineralogy and Assaying. Three credit 
hours: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Third term. Prere- 
quisite, Chem. 101-103, 106-108. 

This is a course of determinative mineralogy. The more important 
minerals are identified by their characteristic physical and chemical prop- 
erties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and lead, etc., are made. 

For Short-Course Students 

Chem. 1. Farm Chemistry. Two lectures and one laboratory per- 
iod. The year. 

This course consists of an elementary study of general chemistry with 
special reference to the chemistry of plants, animals, soils, fertilizers, 
etc., for students in the two-year course in agriculture. 



96 






SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



I'S 



i«>ll^fc 



n 



The school of Education consists of an organization of the various 
activities of the College which are concerned with the professional 
preparation of teachers. Its courses are planned to serve three classes 
of students: First, those preparing to teach agriculture, home economics, 
industrial and general subjects in secondary schools; second, prospective 
principals of high schools, educational supervisors, county agents, home 
demonstrators, boys' and girls' club workers, and other extension work- 
ers; third, those majoring in other lines of work who desire courses in 
education and psychology for their professional and informational value. 

CURRICULA 

Two general classes of curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Bachelor of Arts are offered. 

The first of these provides fixed courses permitting comparatively lit- 
tle election for the definite purpose of preparing teachers and super- 
visors of agriculture, home economics, manual training, and industrial 
subjects. 

The second class provides a wide range of electives and seeks to train 
superintendents, principals and teachers of general high school subjects. 
Although there are definite and fixed basic requirements, the student 
may choose from a number of subjects the major subject in which he 
expects to qualify for teaching. Correlated with this may be other 
subjects which he may wish to teach. 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean 
of the School of Education regarding the arrangement of their work. 
Upon matriculation each student is required to state his major interest 
and in the election of courses to secure the advice and approval of the 
head of the department in which his major falls. The previous trainings 
of the student, his experience, and his future needs govern the head 
of the department in his recommendations. 

TEACHERS' SPECIAL DIPLOMAS 

The degrees granted for work done in the School of Education indicate 
primarily the quantity of work completed. Teachers' special diplomas 
certify to the professional character of such work. Teachers* special 
diplomas will be granted only to those who, besides qualifying for a 
degree, give promise of superior professional ability as evidenced by 
their personality, character, experience, and success in supervised teach- 
ing. Teachers' special diplomas will be granted in agricultural educa- 
tion, home economics education, manual training, industrial education^ 
and in general education. 



97 

The recipient of a teacher's special diploma is eligible for certification 
by the State Superintendent of Schools without examination. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

By a system of extension teacher training, special courses in education 
are offered in evenings and on Saturdays to teachers in service and to 
those who may qualify for teaching in the schools of Maryland after 
having had such work. College credit will be granted for this work if 
taken in course. Only a limited amount of service of this character 
can be undertaken by the faculty of the School of Education in any year. 
School officials should make application for this wrok before arranging 
for it in their counties. 

As the need for evening classes in industrial and home economics 
education arises, special courses will be offered at centers throughout 
the State. The number and location of these centers will depend entirely 
upon the need and demand for such instruction. The courses will be 
organized on the short unit basis and will be maintained only as long 
as the demand justifies it. Upon the satisfactory completion of such 
special curricula, students will be issued certificates of proficiency. 

In summer special courses are offered for the benefit of teachers in 
service and such individuals as may be able to qualify for teaching upon 
the completion of the work. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the College, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students elect- 
ing the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of hav- 
ing acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of four- 
teen years. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be selecetd from any of 
the courses offered by the College for which the student has the neces- 
sary prerequisites. 

A student is expected, however, to confine his elections to subjects re- 
lated to farming and to teaching. Though opportunity is afforded for 
specialization in a particular field of agriculture, such as animal hus- 
bandry, agronomy, pomology, vegetable gardening and farm management, 
students should arrange their work so that at least forty per cent of 
their time will have been spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per 
cent on scientific subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of a general edu- 
cational character and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects in pro- 
fessional education. 



u 



m 



98 



▲OBZCnXiTUBA:^ SOUCATXOH. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term : 



Gen'l Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) . . 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102 ) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Educational Guidance (Prin. Ed. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 

Ijibrarv Science 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. ioi-loV)'.'.*.*.*.*.*.*.'. ...... 

AND ONE OP THE FOLLOWING GROUPS: 

Group I — . 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 

Animal Husbandry (An. Hb. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 101) 



Group ZI — 

Social and Economic History of the United States 
(Hist. 118-120) 



Group ZZZ — 

Language (French, German or Spanish) 

Group IV — 

Mathematics 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



History of Modern Education (Prin. Ed. 104) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 102) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Electives 



4 

4 



1 
1 
1 
3 



3 
3 
3 



2 

4 



4 

'3* 
4-6 



II 



4 
4 



1 
1 



3 
3 
3 



4 
4 



3 

4-6 



III 



4 
1 
1 



3 
3 
2 



2 
V 



3 

5-8 



JUNIOR YEAR. 







Educational Psychology (Prin. Ed. 107) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Prin. Ed. 108) 

Schoolroom Observation (Prin. Ed. 109) 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Agr'l (Ag. Ed. 101) 
Observation and Teaching Problems (Ag. Ed. 102). . . 

Feeds and Feeding (An. Hb. 102) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Farm Poultry (An. Hb. 104) 

Technical Composition 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Elective 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Seminar in Agricultural Education (Ag. Ed. 103) 

The Rural Community and It's Education (Ag. Ed. 104) 
Principles of Secondary Education (Prin. Ed. 110) .... 

♦Supervised Teaching (Ag. Ed. 105) 

Farm Management 

Electives 



2 

3 

4-6 



3 
11-14 



8 
2 



3 

6-9 



3 
11-14 



o 

it 



4 
2 

V-V 



14-17 



•Given any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 



it 



99 

Requirements for a Degree 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, a stu- 
dent will be recommended for the dejrree of Bachelor of Science. 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURAL 

EDUCATION 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



II 



III 



107) 



106) 



Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-124) 

Entomology (Zool. 103) , 

Mechanical Drawing (Draw. 

Woodwork (Shop 104) 

Forging and Pipe-fitting (Shop 107) 

Farm Buildings (Struc. Des. 109) 

Cement Work 

Swine Production (A. H. 106) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Herd Management (A. H. 103) 

Beef Production (A. H. 108) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 109) 

Advanced Judging (A. H. Ill) 

Market Milk (D. H. 105) 

Advanced Milk Testing (D. H. 106) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 104) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 192) 

General Physics (Phys. 104) 

Farm Machinery 

Motors and Trucks 

Drainage (Hyd. 108) 

Elementary Surveying (Surv. 110-111) 

Genetics (Pit. Phys. 108) 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 108) 

Marketing and Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 10) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Advanced Soils (Soils 105) 

Systematic Entomology (Zool. 104) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 105) 

Insecticides and Their Application (Zool. 110) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zool. 113) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 103) 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Tuber Root Crops and Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 112) . . . 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 

Frame Crops (Hort. 118) 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 122-123) 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 124) 

Elementary Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Tree Repair and Surgery (Hort. 138) 

Agricultural Economics (Econ. 103) 

Markets and the Marketing of Farm Products (Econ. 108) 

Co-operative Marketing (Econ. 109) 

Farm Accounting (Econ. 107) 

Public Speaking 

Current History (H. 113-115) 

History 

Political Science 

Literature 

Language 

Methods in Agricultural Extension Work (Ag. Ed. 106) . . 



4 

i 



3 
3 



4 
2 



3 
3 
2 



3 
2 



3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 



1 
2 



4 
3 
2 
4 



3 
4 
3 



2 
3 



4 
2 



1 
3 



3 
3 



1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 



3 
1 



1 
V 



3 
2 



3 
1 
2 



4 
V 
'3' 



3 
2 



3 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 



100 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



II 



III 



♦Agricultural Extension Practice (Ag. Ed. 107) 

Methods in Elementary School Agriculture and Club 

Work (As. Ed. 108) 

Methods of Teaching General and Biological Sciences 

in High Schools (Arts and Sc. Ed. 104) 

Methods of Teaching Chemistry in High Schools (Arts 

and Sc. Ed. 105) 

Methods of Teaching Physics in High Schools (Arts and 

Sc. Ed. 106) 

Theory of Vocational Education (Prin. Ed. Ill) 

School Administration (Prin. Ed. 112) 

School Hygiene (Prin. Ed. 113) 

Recreational Leadership in High Schools (Prin. Ed. 114) 

Philosophy of Education (Prin. Ed. 113-116) 

Seminar in Education (Prin. Ed. 117-118) 



2 
1 



2 
1 



♦Given any term. Credit not to exceed two hours. 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the College, involv- 
ing graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
home economics education must present evidence of two years* experience 
in the home as a house daughter during which time a large share of the 
responsibility in the management of the home was assumed. 

Students may elect from the general college such courses as they may 
be qualified to enter. They are expected, however, to confine their elec- 
tions primarily to subjects related to home making and teaching. The 
course should be so arranged that approximately forty per cent of the 
student's time will be spent on technical home economics subjects, twen- 
ty-five per cent on subjects of general academic character and from 
twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects of a professional character. 



101 



TLOiaS ECONOMICS EDUCATION. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



General Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Composition and Design (Art 101) 

Freehand Perspective (Art 102) 

Food Industries (Foods 101) 

Textiles (Textiles 101-102) 

Garment Construction (Cloth. 101) 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) . . . . 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Educational Guidance (Prin. Ed. 101-103) 

Library Science - 

AND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING: 
Social and Economic History of the U. S. (H. 119-120). . 

Language (French, Spanish, or German) 

Mathematics 



4 
2 



1 
3 



3 

1 
1 

3 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



History of Modern Education (Prin. Ed. 104) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 

Problems in Preparation and Service of Food (Foods 

103-105) 

Food Economics (Foods 105-107) 

Costume Design (Art 103) 

Advanced Dressmaking (Cloth. 104-105) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 108-109) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 



3 
2 
2 



4 
4 



II 



4 
2 



1 
3 



3 
1 



3 
3 
3 



3 
2 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



2 
4 
4 



III 



3 
3 
1 



3 
3 
3 



3 
2 



Educational Psychology (Prin. Ed. 107) 

Survey of Teaching (Prin. Ed. 108) 

Schoolroom Observation (Prin. E3d. 109) 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics 

(H. E. Ed. 101) 

Observation and Teaching Problems (H. E. Ed. 102) 

Household Administration (H. M. 101-102) 

Home Architecture and Decoration (Art 105) 

Advanced Textiles (Textiles 103-105) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 



2 
2 
3 



3 

2 



2 
2 



3 
2 



3 

2 
2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Seminar in Home Economics Education (H. E. Ed. 103) 
The Rural Community and Its Education (Ag. Ed. 104) 
Principles of Secondary Education (Prin. Ed. 110) .... 

♦Supervised Teaching (H. E. Ed. 104) 

•Home Management (H. M. 103) 

Nutrition (Foods 109) 

Nutrition (Foods 110) 

Clothing Economics (Cloth. 109) 

Child Care and Welfare (H. E. Ed. 110) 



3 



2 
3 



>l 



•Given anl term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 

Requirennefits for a Degree 

U,pon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours, under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, a stu- 
dent will be recommended for the deg^ree of Bachelor <*€ Science. 



102 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN HOME ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 

Art and Handicraft (Art 104) 

Millinery (Cloth. 106) 

Camp Cookery (Foods 108) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Tailoring (Cloth. 107) 

Dietetics (Poods 111-113) 

Draping and Advanced Technique of Clothing (Cloth. 110) 

Advanced Millinery (Cloth. Ill) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 102-103) 

Language 

Current History (H. 113-115) 

History 

Political Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 

Literature 

Public Speaking 

Public Speaking 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (H. E. Ed. 107). . 

♦Home Economics Extension Practice (H. E. Ed. 108) . . . 

Methods in Elementary School Home Economics Exten- 
sion and Club Work (H. E. Ed. 109) 

Methods of Teaching (jreneral and Biological Science 
(Arts and Sc. Ed. 104) 

Methods of Teaching Chemistry (Arts and Sc. Ed. 105) . . 

Methods of Teaching Physics (Arts and Sc. Ed. 106)... 

History of the Family (H. E. Ed. 105) 

Education of Women (H. E. Ed. 106) 

Theory of Vocational Education (Prin. Ed. Ill) 

School Administration (Prin. Ed. 112) 

School Hygiene (Prin. Ed. 113) 

Recreational Leadership in High Schools (Prin. Ed. 114) . 

Philosophy of Education (Prin. Ed. 115-116) 

Seminar in Education (Prin. Ed. 117-118) 



3 
2 



3 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 



2 
3 



II 



2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 



2 
1 



III 



2 
3 

4 



3 
5 



3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 



2 
1 



♦Given any term. Credit not to exceed two hours. 



103 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



The curriculum in Industrial Education is designed to prepare teach- 
ers of related industrial subjects and fulfills the requirements of the 
Maryland State Law for manual training teachers in state-aided high 
schools. 

Iin>nSTBIAIk EDUCATION. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term: 



English (Eng. 101-103) 

General Physics (Phys. 1) 

Trigonometry (Math. 4) 

Algebra (Math. 2) 

Shop Arithmetic (Math. 5) 

Freehand Drawing (Draw. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Draw. 2) ^ 

Woodworking Shop (Shop 3) 

Forge Shop (Shop 106) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 
Library Science 



SECOND YEAR. 



3 
4 
4 



1 

2 
2 



II 



3 

4 



2 
2 
1 
2 



III 



3 

4 



2 
2 
1 
2 



^f 



Mechanics of Teaching (Ind. Ed. 101) 

Shop Teaching Methods (Ind. Ed. 102) 

Prin. of Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 103) 

Observation and Practice Teaching (Ind. Ed. 104-105) 

Elements of Sociology (Econ. 113) 

Industrial History (Hist. 138) 

Industrial Geography (Econ. 115) 

Elementary Mechanics (M. E. 5) 

Advanced Woodworking (Shop 112) 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 7) 

Automobile Shop Practice (Shop 113) 

Electrical Shop Practice (E. E. 11) 



3 
3 



3 
1 
2 
2 



3 
2 



3 
3 

2 



2 
2 
1 



2 

2 

1 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A TEACHER'S SPECIAL DIPLOMA 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the curriculum as outlined, under 
the restrictions and reflations presented above, the student, who g^ives 
promise of superior professional ability, will be recommended for the 
teacher's special diploma. 



104 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

Since the student electing this curriculum may become a candidate for 
either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, he should 
upon his matriculation state the degree for which he wishes to qualify. 
Students wishing to prepare for the teaching of English, history, and 
the social sciences, language, and mathematics should become candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Those wishing to teach general 
and biological sciences, chemistry, and physics, should become candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Students should also state the subjects in which they expect to qualify 
for teaching, designating a major and a minor interest; they should 
complete approximately sixty-three hours in their major and related 
subjects and twenty-seven hours in their minor and related subjects. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete in addition 
to the requirements of the curriculum a total of twenty-four credit hours 
of science, at least twelve of which must be in biology. Candidates for 
the Bachelor of Science degree must complete in addition to the require- 
ments of the curriculum nine hours of history and nine hours of language. 

OEVSBAZi SDUCATZON. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Language (Spanish, French, German or Latin) 

Educational Guidance (Prin. Ed. 101-103) 

Fublic Speal^ing (Pub. Spk. 101-103) 

Library Science (Lib. Sci. 101) 



AND TWO OF THE FOLLOWING GROUPS; 



Group Z — 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101-102) 
Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 103).. 



G-ronp ZZ — 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 
General Botany (Bot. 101) 



Group ZZZ — 

History . 



Group ZV — 

Mathematics 



3 
3 

1 
1 
1 



3 
3 



3 
3 

1 
1 



4 



3 
3 

1 
1 



3 
3 



4 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



History of Modern Education (Prin. Ed. 104) 

General Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 

Economic and Social History of the U. S. (Hist. 118-120) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Major 

Minor 

Electives 



3 
2 
5 
2 
3-6 



2 
3 
2 
5 
2 
3-6 



2 
3 
2 
5 
2 
3-6 



105 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Educational Psychology (Prin. Ed. 107) 
Survey of Teaching Methods (Prin. Ed. 
Schoolroom Observation (Prin. Ed. 109) 

School Hygiene (Prin. Ed. 113) 

Arts and Science Education 103 or 106 or 
Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102). 

Public Finance (Econ. 106) 

Major 

Minor 

Electives 



108) 



107 



5 

2 

2-5 



3 
2 



5 

2 

2-5 



3 
2 



3 
5 
2 

2-5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Theory of Vocational Education (Prin. Ed. Ill) 

School Administration (Prin. Ed. 112) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Prin. Ed. 110) 

Recreational Leadership in High Schools (Prin. Ed. 114) 

Philosophy of Education (Prin. Ed. 115-116) 

Arts and Science Education 101 or 104 

Arts and Science Education 102 or 105 

♦Supervised Teaching (Arts and Sci. Ed. 108) 

Major 

Electives 



5 

5-8 



2 
2 



5 
5-8 



3 
2 



5 

7-10 



♦Given any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 



Requirements for a Degree 

U|pon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours, under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, the stu- 
dent will be recommiended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, depending upon the character of the work 
elected. 



106 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN GENERAL 

EDUCATION 



V[- I 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



Nineteenth Century Poetry (Eng. 107-108) 

The Essay (Eng. 109) 

English W^ords (Eng. 110) 

Literature in America (Eng. 111-112) 

Novelists of the Nineteenth Century (Eng. 113-114) 

The Short Story (Eng. 115) 

Early English Drama (Eng. 116) 

Elizabethan Drama (Eng. 117-118) 

Modern English Drama (Eng. 119-120) 

Technique of the Drama (Eng. 121) 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Oratory (P. S. 104-106) 

Extempore Speaking (P. S. 107-109) 

Debate (P. S. 110-112) 

Oral Reading (P. S. 113-115) 

History of Ancient Peoples (H. 101) 

Continental European History (H. 102-103) 

Modern and Contemporary European History (H. 104-105) 

History of the United States (H. 106-107) 

History of Maryland (H. Ill) 

History of Agriculture (H. 112) 

Current History (H. 113-115) 

♦English Social and Industrial History (H. 116-117) 

Latin American Republics (H. 118-119) 

Origin of the State (Pol. Sc. 101-102) 

Governments of Europe (Pol. Sc. 103-104) 

Government of United States (Pol. Sc. 105-106) 

♦Federal State and Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 107-8) 
Contemporary Political Problems of the U. S.(Pol. Sc. 109) 

Constitutional Law of U. S. (Pol. Sc. 112-113) 

Political Parties and Practical Politics (Pol. Sc. 117)... 

Beginning French (M. L. 101-103) 

Scientific French (M. L. 107) 

French (M. L. 108-110; 104-106; 111-113) 

Beginning German (M. L. 121-123) 

German (M. L. 124-126; 128-130; 131-133) 

Scientific German (M. L. 127) > . . . 

Beginning Spanish (M. L. 141-143; 144-146) 

Trades Course (M. L. 147-149; 150-152) 

Literary Course (M. L. 153-155) 

Latin (A. L. 121-123; 124-126) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phy. 106) 

Genetics (Pit. Phy. 108) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Histology and Embryology (Zool. 103-105) 

Entomology (Zool. 106) 

Systematic Entomology (Zool. 113) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 108-109) 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101-102) 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 103) 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 123-125) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 106-108) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Chem. 116) 

Physics 

Physics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 



3 
3 



3 
3 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 



2 
2 



1 
2 



2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 



4 
3 
4 
4 



4 
3 



3 
5 
3 
5 



II 



3 
3 



3 
3 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



2 
2 
2 



3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
.2 



2 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
4 



4 
4 



4 

4 



4 
3 



3 
5 
3 
5 



m 



3 

V 



3 

V 



3 
1 

1 
1 

1 
2 



3 
V 



2 
2 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 

4 



3 
3 



4 
3 



4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
5 
3 



'Not given in 1919-20. 



107 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Principles of Education 

Prin. Ed. 101-103. Educational Guidance. One credit hour each 
term. Freshman year. Mr. Cotterman, with the co-operation of the 
President and the Deans. 

This course is designed to assist freshman students in adjusting them- 
selves to the demands and problems of college life, and to aid them in 
the selection of courses in subsequent years. Among the topics discussed 
are the following: the purposes of the College; principles and methods of 
study; the use of a library; general reading; mental recreation; student 
finances; student welfare; health; athletics; the relation of the College 
to the community; the choice of a vocation; and the election of courses. 
Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

Prin. Ed. 104. History of Modem Education. Two credit hours. 
First term. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Required of 
sophomores in Education. Mr. Cotterman. 

It is the purpose of this course to introduce the student to present 
day problems of education by means of a study of the development of 
educational theory and practice from the Renaissance to the present time, 
with a consideration of the historical development of American secondary 
education and existing school systems. 

Prin. Ed. 105-106. General and Applied Psycholos^y. Two credit 
hours each term. Second and third terms. Open to sophomores, juniors 
and seniors. Required of sophomores in Education. Mr. Cotterman. 

An introductory course embracing a study of human life from the 
biological point of view. The nervous system ; attention ; sensation ; per- 
ception; imagination; memory; the formation of concepts; judgment; 
reasoning; reflexes; instincts; emotions; interest; eifort; personality; 
and the psychology of efficiency. 

Prin. Ed. 107. Education Psychology. Five credit hours. First 
term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in Education. 
Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 105-106. Mr. Cotterman, Miss Saunders. 

A study of attention and interest; instincts and their appearance; the 
mental development of children during the successive school ages, stress- 
ing particularly adolescence; the psychology of learning; individual 
differences and their causes; mental tests and measurements. 

Prin. Ed. 108. Survey of Teaching Methods. Three credit hours. 
Second term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in Edu- 
cation. Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 107. Mr. Cotterman and Miss Saunders. 

A course dealing with the nature of teaching; the nature of subject 
matter; types of learning; types of lessons; methods of adding new 
knowledge; methods of developing skill; methods of habit formation; 



108 



the use of the question; lesson planning; moral training; discipline; the 
teacher's relation to the supervisor and to the course of study. 

Prin. Ed. 109. Schoolroom Observation. Two credit hours: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of juniors in Education. This course must parallel 
Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Cotterman and Miss Saunders. 

A study of methods as exemplified in the classroom teaching of high 
school teachers in Maryland and in the City of Washington; critiques; 
and lesson plans. 

Prin. Ed. 110. Principles of Secondary Education. Three credit 
hours. Third term. Open to seniors and graduate students. Required 
of seniors in Education. Mr. Cotterman. 

A study of the evolution of secondary education and of high schools; 
influence of traditions, of higher institutions, of associations, of sec- 
ondary schools and colleges, and of state departments of education; 
articulation with elementary schools, colleges, technical schools, the com- 
munity and the home; programs of study and the reconstruction of cur- 
riculums; the teaching staff; student activities. 

Prin. Ed. 111. Theory of Vocational Education. Three credit 
hours. First term. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents by special arrangement. Mr. Emerson, Miss Saunders and Mr. 
Cotterman. 

A study of the development of vocational education; educational and 
social forces behind the movement; terminology; types of industrial 
schools; trade unions and industrial education; technical high schools; 
vocational education for girls; vocational education in rural communities; 
recent legislation. 

Prin. Ed. 112. School Administration. Three credit hours. Sec- 
ond term. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students by 
special arrangement. Mr. Emerson and Mr. Cotterman. 

A study of state, county and city school systems; administrative con- 
trol; the problems of centralization in administration; duties of boards; 
problems of officials; taxation for schools; the distribution of school 
funds; inspections and supervision; the training of teachers; physical 
equipment; records and reports; measuring educational products; qual- 
ities of merit and causes of failure in teachers; meetings and other 
agencies for improving the educational service. 

Prin. Ed. 113. School Hygiene. Three credit hours. Third term. 
Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students by special ar- 
rangement. Miss Saunders, Dr. Griffith. 

A study of school architecture and equipment from the standpoint of 
health; heating; ventilation and lighting; posture; exercise and fatigue; 
rest periods; commjunicable diseases and their detection; first aid; school 
lunches; relation of school authorities to health authorities. 



109 



Prin. Id. 114. Recreational Leadership in High Schools. Two 

credit hours. First term. Open to advanced underg^raduates and gradu- 
ate students by special arrangement. Mr. Byrd. 

A study of the aim and organization of extra-curriculum activities in 
representative schools. Special emphasis will be placed on those phases 
of student affairs which provide a definite training in citizenship. A de- 
tailed study will be made of types of student activities in schools in 
Maryland and in the city of Washington. Such activities as are repre- 
sented in student councils and in general organizations for directing the 
social, literary, athletic, and musical affairs of schools and for organzing 
students to co-operate with the life of the community will receive special 
attention. 

Prin. Ed. 115-116. Philosophy of Education. Five credit hours 
each term. Second and third terms. Open to advanced undergraduates 
and graduates by special arrangement. Mr. Gotterman. 

A study of the theory of education in a democratic society; the func- 
tion of educational institutions in a democracy ; the nature of education ; 
the basis of method; and the relation between educational objectives and 
group needs. 

Prin. Ed. 117-118. Seminar in Education. One credit hour each 
term. Second and third terms. Open to advanced undergraduates and 
graduates by special arrangement. Mr. Gotterman and members of the 
staff. 

A consideration of problems and methods, investigations, reports, and 
discussions. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Ag. Ed. IDl. Methods in Secondary Vocational Agriculture. 

Three credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Re- 
quired of juniors in Agricultural Education. Mr. Gotterman. 

This course embraces a thorough study of the home project method 
of teaching agriculture, covering such topics as the purpose of the proj- 
ect; the organization of project activities; project agreements; project 
study; project study outlines and reports; project work, supervision and 
records; final project reports; aims in secondary vocational agriculture; 
high school courses in agriculture; the correlation of project work with 
high school courses; methods of presenting high school agricultural in- 
struction ; practice in applying the methods studied as suitable for use in 
giving high school instruction in agriculture; a brief consideration of 
the purposes and methods in such related agricultural subjects as plant 
and animal physiology, agricultural chemistry, agricultural physics, and 
farm shop. 

Ag. Ed. 102. Observation and Teaching Problems. Two credit 
hours. One lecture and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 





?• 
^ 



I 



m 



110 



1 * 

m 



\h 



seniors. Required of juniors in A^icultural Education. This course 
must accompany Ag. Ed. 101. Mr. Cotterman. 

A study of methods as exemplified in classroom presentations of agri- 
cultural material; critiques; and lesson plans. 

Ag. Ed. 103. Seminar in Agricultural Education. Three credit 
hours. First term. Senior year. Required of seniors in Agricultural 
Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 101. M)r. Cotterman. 

The work of this course embraces a study of problems in administra- 
tion, organization, materials, and equipment. 

Ag. Ed. 104. The Rural Community and its Education. Three 
credit hours. Second term. Open to seniors and graduate students by 
special arrangement. Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. 
Mr, Cotterman. 

A study of the history, structure, and forces at work in rural com- 
munities as a basis for determining the educational needs of such com- 
munities. 

Ag. Ed. 105. Supervised Teaching. Credit not to exceed five 
hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. Required 
of seniors in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 101. Mr. 
Cotterman. 

Class teaching; conferences; lesson plans; and critiques. 

Ag. Ed. 106. Methods in Agricultural Extension. Two credit 
hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite, Prin. 
Ed. 108. Given under the supervision of the Extension Service, T. B. 
Symons, director. 

This course is designed to equip young men to enter the broad field of 
extension work. The course will cover methods of assembling and dis- 
seminating the agricultural information that is available for the prac- 
tical farmer. It will include administration, organization, supervision, 
and the practical details connected with the work of a successful county 
rvgent. 

Ag. Ed. 107. Agricultural Extension Practice. Credit not to ex- 
ceed two hours, determined by amount and character of work done. 
Given any term. Open to a limited number of seniors in Agricultural 
Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 106. Given under the supervision of 
the Extension Service, T. B. Symons, director. 

This practice course is especially designed to give young men practical 
experience in the conduct of extension work. Students will be required 
to engage in specialists*, county agents' and boys' club work as assistants 
always under the guidance of experienced men in the respective fields. 
Traveling expenses for this course will be adjusted according to circum- 
stances, the ability of the man, and the service rendered. 



Ill 



Ag* Ed. 108. Methods in Elementary School Agriculture and Club 
Work. Three credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Cotterman. 

TMs course is intended primarily for those who expect to be called 
upon to advise rural teachers in the teaching of agriculture in the ele- 
mentary rural schools and covers such topics as purposes, content, meth- 
ods, materials, the organization of club project activities, project super- 
vision, reports based on the boys* and girls' club work of the extension 
service, and school exhibits. 

Ag. Ed. 109. History of Husbandry as Social Control. Two credit 
hours. Third term. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates 
by special arrangement. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 104. Mr. Cotterman. 

This course attempts to trace the evolution of ideals in rural living and 
is intended primarily for those who expect to be called upon to assist in 
the shaping the destinies of rural people. It embraces the study of the 
literature — ^poetic, legislative, and pedagogic — in which the life of the 
farmer is used as basis of social culture. It traces a recognition of 
country life in moral and intellectual training from the earliest records — 
Biblical, classic, and historical. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

H. E. Ed. 101. Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics. 

Three credit hours. Third ternu Open to juniors and seniors. Miss 
Saunders. 

This course considers the relation of home economics to education ; the 
methods of teaching; relation to high school curriculum; the planning 
of lessons and courses of study suitable to the methods and purpose of 
vocational home economics; studies and experiments with materials and 
subjects leading to operations involving household occupations in prepa- 
ration for organization of project work. 

H. £. Ed. 102. Observation and Teaching Problems. Two credit 
hours: one lecture and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 101. Miss Saunders. 

A study of types of classroom exercises teaching plans, and manage- 
ment as observed in high schools visited. 

H. E. Ed. 103 Seminar in Home Economics Education. Three 

credit hours. First term. Senior year. 

This course includes the study of problems in administration, organi- 
zation, materials, and equipment. 

H. E. Ed. 104. Supervised Teaching. Credit not to exceed five 
hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. Prere- 
quisite, H. E. Ed. 101. 

Practice in planning and presenting of courses; conferences and 
critiques. 



112 






H. E. Ed. 105. History of the Family. Three credit hours. Any 
term. Senior year. 

This course includes the history of the family from early ages to the 
present time; the industrial revolution and its effects upon family life; 
and an examination of the present situation and tendencies as they affect 
the life of the American family. 

H. E. Ed. 106. Education of Women. Two credit hours. First 
term. Senior year. 

Woman's work and her industrial and economic conditions are studied 
with reference to the home and to society. Opening of occupations and 
professions to women; a study of modern problems of woman and the 
home, suffrage, education, economic function of woman and the family. 

H. E. Ed. 107. Methods in Home Economics Extension Work. 

Two credit hours. Third term. Senior year. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Given under the supervision of the Extension Service, T. B. 
Symons, director. 

The course will take up the study of subject matter and administrative 
problems in home economics extension, demonstrations, and the use of 
graphic materials. Emphasis will be placed upon the improvement of 
the country home through organization and practical demonstrations as 
conducted in this State. 

H. E. Ed. 108. Home Economics Extension Practice. Credit not 
to exceed two hours, determined by amount and character of work done. 
Given any term. Open to a limited number of seniors in Home E<jo- 
nomics Education. 

Students will be given an opportunity to work as assistants to county 
agents and specialists in order to acquaint them with the practical phcscs 
of extension work in home economics. Traveling expenses for this course 
will be adjusted according to circumstances, the ability of the student, 
and the service rendered. 

H. E. Ed. 109. Methods in Elementary School Home Economics 
and Club Work. Three credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors 
and seniors. Miss Saunders. 

This course is intended primarily for those who expect to be called 
upon to advise rural teachers in the teaching of home economics in the 
rural schools. The aim of the course will be to deal with such phases of 
home economics as may be correlated and given with the elementary 
school subjects. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Ind. Ed. 101. Mechanics of Teaching. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. First term. Mr. Emerson. 

Methods of classroom instruction, lesson and term plans, instructional 
materials, discipline, etc. 



113 

Inci. Ed. 102. Shop Teaching Methods. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. Second term. Mr. Emerson. 

A study of shop methods, toolroom and stockroom practice, care of the 
tools and equipment, project plans, shop organization, producing a use- 
ful product, etc. 

Ind. Ed. 103. Principles of Industrial Education. Three credit 
hours: three lectures. First term. Mr. Emerson. 

Aims of industrial education; comparison with manual training; types 
of industrial schools; the all-day school; evening classes; part-time 
schools; corporation schools, etc. 

Ind. Ed. 104-105. Observation and Practice Teaching. Two credit 
hours : practice and conference. Second term. Three credit hours : prac- 
tice and conference. Third term. Mr. Emerson. 

In this course the student observes the work of expert teachers in sec- 
ondary classes in the College and nearby schools and does practice teach- 
ing in one or two secondary subjects under a critic teacher. 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 101. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary 
Schools. Two credit hours. First term. Senior year. Written Eng- 
lish, Mr. Reed; oral English, Mr. Richardson. 

The study of oral and written English requirements in representative 
secondary schools. Lectures and papers and the choice, interpretation, 
arrangement, and presentation of material. Approximately two-thirds 
of the course will be devoted to a study of the methods of teaching writ- 
ten English and one-third to a study of methods of teaching oral English. 

Arts Sl Sc. Ed. 102. Methods of Teaching History and the Social 
Sciences in Secondary Schools. Two credit hours. Second term. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Schulz. 

This course embraces the study of the requirements in history and 
social sciences in representative secondary schools; aims, materials; 
methods; lesson plans; and the presentation of type lessons. 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 103. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages in 
Secondary Schools. Two credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Spence, Mr. Stinson, and 
Mr. Kramer. 

It is the aim of this course to organize the various kinds of knowledge 
used in the teaching of foreign languages in the secondary schools. It 
deals with the subject matter and the apparatus of foreign language 
teaching and embraces the study of methods, text-books, pronunciation, 
conversation, grammar, reading, pictures, and charts. 



F 



!!!f 




m 



114 



'J 



I 



i 



Arts & Sc. Ed. 104. The Teaching of General and Biological Sci< 
ences in Secondary Schools. Two credit hours. First term. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Zimmennaii. 

Aims, materials, and methods; a survey of text-books; the preparation 
of a course of study; securing of material and special equipment; writ- 
ing of lesson plans and presentation of type lessons. 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 105. Methods of Teaching Chemistry in Secondary 
Schools. Two credit hours. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisite, 
Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Broughton. 

This course covers the selection, arrangement, and treatment of sub- 
ject matter suitable for secondary schools and embraces the study of 
methods, materials, equipment, and management of laboratories. 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 106. Methods of Teaching Physics in Secondary 
Schools. Two credit hours. Third term.. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Creese. 

This course embraces the study of aims, materials, and methods; the 
selection of subject matter suitable for secondary schools ; and the man- 
agement of laboratories; practical laboratory projects that may be intro- 
duced into the average high school. 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 107. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Sec- 
ondary Schools. Two credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisite, Prin. Ed. 108. Mr. Spann. 

It is the purpose of this course to present the best modem practice of 
the teaching of algebra, plane and solid geometry, and trigonometry in 
secondary schools; the possible adaptation of mathematics to meet the 
needs of all classes of i)eople; tendencies and curriculum requirements; 
the management of a mathematics department. 

Arts & Sc. Ed. 108. Supervised Teaching. Credit not to exceed 
five hours, depending on the amount and character of work done. Given 
any term. Senior year. Mr. Cotterman, in co-operation with the in- 
structor in charge of the specialty. 

Class teaching, conferences, lesson plans, and curriculums. 



115 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
AND MECHANIC ARTS 



The engineering group includes, in addition to the departments of 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, the departments of Mathe- 
matics and Physics. 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in 
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and Rural Engineering, respectively. An 
outline of each is found on the succeeding pages. The four-year courses 
are arranged with a view to preparing the student for immediate useful- 
ness in the technical world. The fundamental principles are emphasized 
through lectures, recitations and practical exercises in the laboratory, 
drafting room, shop and field. The courses allow some latitude in the 
selection of subjects in the senior year, particularly in Civil Engineering 
in which an opportunity to specialize in Highway or Sanitary Engineer- 
ing is afforded, but in the main they are fixed in character, since experi- 
ence indicates that the faculty is better qualified to select the subjects 
to be studied than the average undergraduate. The curriculums include 
studies which provide a broad general culture as well as a good founda- 
tion for technical engineering. Emphasis is placed on the necessity for 
the development of self-reliance, honest and accurate methods of work, 
and good judgment in addition to the mastering of the scientific laws 
underlying the profession of engineering and applying them. 

INSTRUCTION 

The school is organized, first, to instruct the students who desire to 
practice engineering as a profession, and, second, to teach students inter- 
ested in agriculture and applied science, such branches of mechanic arts 
and engineering as will promote their individual interests. Instruction 
in certain subjects required under the provision of the Smith-Hughes Act 
for the training of teachers in the industrial arts will be given. 

The demand for instruction in the mechanic arts and the elementary 
applications of engineering on the part of those who, for any reason, are 
unable to enter the four-year courses is met by the establishment of the 
two-year course in which several options are allowed. This is a prac- 
tical course for which College credit is not given. Full information re- 
garding this course will be found on pages 146, 147, 148. 

An opportunity is afforded each year for practicing road engineers to 
take an intensive course in road building and maintenance, and for per- 
sons attending the short courses in agrriculture to obtain instruction in 
farm machinery, woodwork, the mixing and placing of concrete, etc. 

The work in the departments of Mathematics and Physics is developed 
with a view both to its cultural and its utilitarian value. The utilitarian 




^ 




116 

point of view is probably more emphasized because scientific training is 
ec largely dependent on these subjects, particularly mathematics. Their 
value, however, in mental training and in general culture is clearly pre- 
sented to the students. 

SUMMER WORK AND INSPECTION 

In addition to the work given during the regular session, summer work 
covering 100 hours of field, laboratory, shop or office practice is required 
of members of the freshman class. This work will be developed to in- 
clude also a specified amount of time at the close of the sophomore and 
junior years. Summer employment will be accepted as a substitute for 
this work, if found to be equivalent. 

The proximity of the College to Baltimore and Washington and to 
other places where there are great industrial enterprises offers an ex- 
cellent opportunity for engineering students to observe what is being 
done in their chosen field. A21 instructor accompanies students on all 
trips of inspection. 

Information and advice is given to farmers and others interested con- 
cerning drainage, sanitation, water supply, lighting, farm machinery and 
other small engineering problems whenever possible, although neither an 
experiment station nor an extension department in engineering has as 
yet been established. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 

Tihe normal curriculum of each four-year course is outlined on the 
following pages. Students are also required to attend and take part in 
the meetings of the Engineering Society at which problems relating to 
engineering in its many phases are discussed. 









117 



CmXi MMQ'. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term; 



II 



in 



Trigonometry or Solid Greometry (Math. 101 or 102) . 

Analytics (Math 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng-. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) 

General Chem. and Qualitative Anal. (CJhem. 101-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork (Shop 103) 



3 

1 
4 



1 

o 



5 
3 
1 
4 
2 



1 

1 



5 
3 
1 

4 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Light and Heat (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Determinative Mineralogy (Min. 101) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 103-104) 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 105-106) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 



3 
2 
5 



3 



5 
5 



4 
3 



5 
2 



1 

V 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104) { 

Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 104).! 

Principles of Economics 

Law of Contracts (GrOV. 104) 

Topographic Surveying (Surv. 107) 

Railway Curves and Earth Work (Rwys. 101-102) 

Railway Surveying (Rwys. 103) 

Highways (Hwys. 101) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103-104) 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101-102) 

Shades, Shadows. Perspective (Dr. 109-110) 

Elementary Structural Design (Str. Des. 101) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. Ill) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 102) 
Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 



1 
3 



2 
5 



2 
1 



1 
3 



2 
2 



2 
3 



1 

V 



2 
2 



2 
V 
V 






118 



SENIOR TEAR. 



Differential Equations (Math. 107) 

Least Squares (Math. 108) 

Estimates of Cost (Math. 110) 

Astronomy (Math. Ill) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 105) I 

Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 106). f 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 103 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 102) 

Geodesy (Surv. 108-109) 

Highway Engineering (Hwys. 102) 

Materials Laboratory (Hwys. 103) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Elements of Sanitary Engineering (Hyd. 104) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 105) 

Sewerage (Hyd. 106) 

Hydraulic Design (Hyd. 107) 

Structural Design (Str. Des. 102) 

Masonry and Concrete (Str. Des. 104) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 



1 

5* 
5* 
5* 



3 
3 



3t 



3t 

1 

5* 
5* 
5» 



3t 



3t 



3 
5 



2t 



1 

5* 
5* 
8t 
3t 
4t 
It 



4t 
It 
3 



3t 



•Alternative. 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the? 
necessary credits. 



119 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102). . . . 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) 

General Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Technical Instruction (M. E. 101) 

Woodwork (Shop 101) 



3 
1 
4 



2 
1 



5 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 



3 

1 
4 



3 

1* 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) .. . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 103) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 105) 

Foundry (Shop 108) 

Machine Work (Shop 109) 



3 
2 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104) .... I 

Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 104) f 

Principles of Economics 

Law of Contracts (Gov, 104) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103-104). 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. 111-112) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 
Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101). 

Machine Design (M. Des. 102-103) 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. Des. 104) .... 

Machine Work (Shop 110) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 102). 



102-103) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Differential Equations (Math. 107) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 105) I 

Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 10e).f •' 

French 104 

Germanl04 

Spanish 103 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 105) 

Structural Design (Str. Des. 103) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 104-105) 

Heat and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 104) 



4 
3 



1 
3 



2 

1 
o 



I > 



1 

5* 
5* 



4 
2 



1 
1 



5 



2 
2 



3 



2 
2 



2 
1 



3 



2 
1 



3t 

1 

5* 
5* 
5* 



3t 

3 

3 



5 
V 



2 

1 



3 
2 



4 
3 



1 

5* 
5* 
5* 



3 



•Alternative. 

^Electives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
necessary credits. 



*'f I! 



I. ■•it 
-ill 



m 



I!i' 



I 



120 



i 



.'« 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 


I 



"Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102) 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

■Composition and Rhetoric (Engr. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) 

•General Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

t*reehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 103) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork (Shop 102) 



3 

1 

4 



1 

2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106 ) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 101) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 106) 



3 

2 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



^ 



f 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104) ... 
Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 104) 

Principles^ of Economics 

Law of Contracts (Gov. 104) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Direct Current Theory (E. E. 102) 

Dynamos and Alternating Currents (E. E. 103) 

"Wireless Telegraphy (E. E. 108) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110). . 

Direct Current Design (E. Des. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 

Wireless Laboratory (El. Lab. 107) 

Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101). . 

Machine Design (M. Des. 102) 

Machine W^ork (Shop 111) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 



104) 



1 
3 



5 
3 



2 
2 

i 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Technical Composition (Eng. 105)... I 
Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 106) S ' ' 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 103 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 104) 

Lights and Illumination (E. E. 105) 

Electric Power Plants (E. E. 106) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 107)... 

Electric Railways (E. E. 108) 

Alternating CJurrent Design (E. Des. 102) 

Electrical Laboratory (Bl. Lab. 105) 

Telephone Laboratory (El. Lab. 106) 

Heat Engineering (M, E. 104) 



1 

5» 

5» 

5* 

3 

3 



1 
2 



5 
3 

1 
4 
2 



1 

i 



5 
5 



2 
1 



1 
3 



1 
2 



1 

1 



3 
1 
1 



5* 
5» 
5* 



3 
2 



2 

1 



III 



S 

3 
1 
4 
1 



5 
V 



1 
2 
1 



1 
*3 



3 
3* 



5 
2 



1 

5» 
5* 
5* 



3 
3 



3 
V 



^Alternative. 

t Elect ives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
necessary credits. 



121 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term; 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102) 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) 

General Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102 ) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork (Shop 102) 



3 

1 
4 



1 

1 

1 



II 



5 
3 
1 
4 
2 



III 



5 
3 
1 

4 
1 



3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 103-104) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 101) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 101) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 106) 



3 
2 
5 



3 

4 



5 
5 



3 



2 
1 

1 



1 
2 

1 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104)... i 
Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 104) f 
Principles of Economics ( ) — 

Law of Contracts (Gov. 104) 

Cereal Crops (Agro. ) 



Introductory Soils (Soils 101) 

Vegetable Gardening (Veg. G. 101) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 102) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Elementary Structural Design (Str. Des. 101) . . . 

Lights and Illumination (B. E. 105) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 102) 

Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101) 

Farm Equipment ( * — ) 

Machine Work (Shop 111) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 



1 
3 



4 
5 



1 
2 



1 
3 



3 



4 

1 
1 



3 



3 
3 
3 



122 



SENIOR TEAR. 



Estimates of Cost (Math. 108) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 105) ) 

Technical Public Speaking (P. S. 106).) 

French 104 

German 104 

Spanish 103 

Soils ( r-*— ) 

Farm Forestry (For. ) 

General Animal Husbandry (A. H. 

Farm Dairying (A, H. ) 



■) 



Poultry (A. H. 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 102) 

Highways (Hwys. 101) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Elements of Sanitary Engineering (Hyd. 104) . 

Advanced Drainage (Hyd. 110) 

Design of Farm Structures (Str. Des. 105)... 

School Architecture (Str. Des. 106) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 107) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110) 

Telephone Laboratory (El. Lab. 106) 

Design of Farm Machinery (M. Des. 105) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 



5» 
5* 
5* 
3t 

4* 



2 

3t 

3t 



3t 

i* 



St 



3t 



2t 
2 

It 
3t 



1 

5* 
6» 



2t 
Vt* 



2t 
3t 
4t 



3t 
V* 



* A.ltemati ve 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
necessary credits. 

DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

The subjects oflPered in the different departments of the school are 
divided into g:roups, each of which is given a title more or less indicative 
of the subjects included in it. An abbreviation of this title is placed be- 
fore each subject in the group. This is used with the subject title in the 
tabulated outline of the curriculum of each course. 



DRAWING AND DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

Dr. 101. Freehand Drawing. Elementary practice; lettering, ex- 
ercises in sketching, both in pencil outline and pencil rendering; line 
drawing, composition, proportion and comparative measurements; exer- 
cises in sketching of technical objects, and pen and ink shading. Plates 
upon completion are bound and properly titled. Required of students in 
engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st or 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 102. Mechanical Drawing. Practice in plain lettering; use of 
instruments, projection and simple working drawings, the plates upon 
completion being enclosed in covers properly titled by the students. Re- 
quired of students in mechanical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Dr. 103. Mechanical Drawing. A course similar to Dr. 102 for 

students in civil and electrical engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours, 1st term; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 3. 



123 



Dr. 104. Engineering Drawing. Conventional signs used in max>- 
ping. Scale making, contours, hachures. Profiles and mapping. Re- 
quired of students in civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st or 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 105. Descriptive Geometry. Detailing of machinery and draw- 
ing to scale from blue-prints. Tracing and blue-printing, and represen- 
tation of flat and round surfaces by ink shading. Its relation to mechani- 
cal drawing and the solution of such problems relating to magnitudes in 
space as bear cKrectly upon those which present themselves to civil, elec- 
trical, mechanical and rural engineers. Prerequisites, Dr. 102 and Solid 
Geometry. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Dr. 106. Descriptive Geometry. A continuation of Dr. 105. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 6 hours ; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Dr. 107. Mechanical Drawing. Practice in plain lettering, use of 
instruments, geometrical constructions and plans of simple buildings. 
Elective for non-engineering students. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 108. Drafting. In this course problems pertinent to the work 
of students in each branch of engineering are selected. Drawings are 
made to scale. Empirical formulas for determining dimensions are used 
whenever possible. Prerequisites, Dr. 102 and 103. 

Practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 109. Shades, Shadows, Perspective. Theory of shadows and 
perspective of objects, and of shadows in i)erspective. Prereq., Dr. 106. 
Must be taken with Dr. 110. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; 1st and 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 110. Shades and Shadows. Development and application of 
Dr. 109 in the drawing room. Prerequisites, Dr. 106. Must be taken 
with Dr. 109. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours ; 1st and 2d term. Credit 1. 

Dr. 1. Farm Drawing. A course similar to Dr. 107, for students 
in the two-year course in agriculture. 
Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Dr. 2. Mechanical Drawing. Instruction in commercial drafting. 
This is preceded by a study of drafting instruments and freehand letter- 
ing. Projection applied to shop drafting of machine parts. Tracing 
and blue-printing. The making of detail and assembly drawings. Free- 
hand sketching of machine tools. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 




I 



124 



Dr. 3. Freel&and Drawing. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d teniL 



A course similar to Dr. 101. 



! "i 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

E. E. 101. Electricity and Magnetism. The elementary theories 
of electrical and mas^netic phenomena are carefully developed, the course 
being correlated with the technical work taken up later. Required of 
students in electrical and rural engineering. Must be taken with El. 
Lab. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4, 

E. E. 102. Direct Current Theory. The study of the principles 
involved in the construction and operation of direct and alternating cur- 
rent generators and motors. Also the characteristic curves and effi- 
ciencies of the various types of machines, the selection of machines for 
specific duties and the proper methods of installing and operating. Re- 
quired of students in electrical engineering. Must be taken with El. 
Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 6. 

E. E. 103. Dynamos and Alternating Currents. This is a con- 
tinuation of E. E. 102, which covers the characteristics of direct current 
naachinery. A number of analytical and graphical problems are required 
to give a clear conception of the effects of inductance and capacity in al- 
ternating current circuits. Required of students in electrical engineer- 
ing. Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 104. Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Ma- 
chinery. The theory, construction and practical applications of single 
phase and polyphase alternating current machinery, including genera- 
tors, synchronous, induction, and repulsion motors, converters, trans- 
formers, etc., are taken up in detail. Required of students in electrical 
engineering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 105. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

E. E. 105. Lights and Illumination. A study of the various sys- 
tems of distribution used in arc and incandescent lighting. Lectures on 
the manufacture and characteristics of the many forms of electric lamps ; 
the selection of lamps for commercial work; and the principles of cor- 
rect interior and exterior illumination. Required of students in elec- 
trical and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 106. Electric Power Plants and Transmission. This course 
includes the principles governing the installation and operation of power- 
house and substation machinery and systems. A number of practical 



125 



problems are given to illustrate the principles. Required of students 
in electrical engineering. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 107. Telephones and Telegraphs. The application of 
electricity to telephones and telegraphs, with a study of the construction 
and operation of the apparatus required for the magneto, common bat- 
tery and automatic exchanges. The principles of the operation of simple, 
duplex, quadruplex and simultaneous telegraph. Required of electrical 
and elective for rural engineering students. Must be taken with El. 
Lab. 106. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E E. 108. Wireless Telegraphy. The principles of the application 
of electric waves to wireless telegraphy and telephony are followed by a 
study of the various systems in commercial use. Required of students 
in electrical engineering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 107. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; 2d term. Credit 1. 

E. E. 109. Electric Railways. The course includes the considera- 
tion of the design and operation of the electric railway systems, power- 
plants and substations. Many problems are given which involve the en- 
gineering features of modern railway development. Required of stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

E. E. 110. Primary and Secondary Batteries. A study of the va- 
rious types of primary batteries and their application to commercial 
work. The theory, construction and application of lead storage cells and 
Edison storage batteries. A short outline of the auxiliary apparatus 
used in connection with storage cells. Required of students in electrical 
and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 111. Dynamos and Motors. A general course in direct and 
alternating currents, covering the principles of construction and opera- 
tion of machines used in commercial practice. Required of civil and 
mechanical engineering students. Must be taken with El. Lab. 102. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 112. Dynamos and Motors. A continuation of E. E. 111. 

Required of mechanical engineering students. Must be taken with El. 
Lab. 103. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

E. E. 1. Elements of Direct Current Machinery. The study of 
the fundamental principles involved in the construction and operation of 
direct current generators and motors. Characteristic curves and the se- 



126 

lection of machines for specific purposes. Methods for installing and 
maintaining various types of generators and motors. The laboratory in- 
cludes the installation of generators and motors with the necessary aux- 
iliary apparatus, and commercial tests of the various types of direct cur- 
rent machines. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. 

£. £. 2. Elements of Alternating Current Machinery. This course 
includes the study of fundamental principles and the design and con- 
struction of alternating machinery. The laboratory work consists of 
commercial tests of single phase and polyphase machinery, including 
generators, motors, converters, transformers, etc. 

Recitations, 4 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

£. E. 3. Illumination. Lectures on the manufacture and charac- 
teristics of the various forms of arc and incandescent lamps; the selec- 
tion of lamps and reflectors for commercial work; the principles of cor- 
rect interior and exterior illumination. The laboratory work includes 
the determination of the operating characteristics, the measuring of the 
candle-power of lamps, and the measurement of the efficiency of actual 
lighting installations. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

E. E. 4. Electric Power Plants and Transmission. The principles 
governing the installation and operation of power-house and substation 
machinery, transmission and distribution systems. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 5. Telephones and Telegraphs. A study of the construction 
and operation of the apparatus required for magneto, common battery 
and automatic exchange. The principles of the operation of simple, du- 
plex and quadruplex telegraphy. The laboratory work includes experi- 
ments with the various types of apparatus and the operation of ex- 
changes. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 6. Primary and Secondary Batteries. The study and test- 
ing of various types of primary batteries and their application to com- 
mercial work. The theory and construction of lead storage cells and 
Edison storage batteries. Actual testing of batteries in operation. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

E. E. 7. Electrical Measuring InstrumenU. The theory governing 
the design, construction and application of all types of direct and alter- 
nating current instruments. The repairing, testing and calibration of 
the different types of instruments. 

Recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 



I 



127 



E. £. 8. Electrical Equipment Repairs. This course includes the 
rewinding of armature and field coils, testing of commutators, repairs for 
signal systems, etc. 

Recitation, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

E. E. 10. Switchboards. Lectures on the design and construction 
of standard switchboards of various types. 
Recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. 

E. E. 9. Interior Wiring. A thorough study of the Underwriters' 
Rules concerning all classes of interior wiring. Calculations for circuits 
and the design of interior light and power systems. The practice in- 
cludes the installation of residence and commercial light and power sys- 
tems. 

Recitations, 2 hours, 1st term, 1 hour, 2d term; practice, 6 hours, 1st 
term, 3 hours, 2d term. 

E. E. 10. OuUide Line Construction. The design and construc- 
tion of short transmission and distribution systems. 
Recitation, 1 hour; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 

E. Des. 101. Direct Current Design. This course covers the de- 
sign of direct current generators and motors, including the use of the 
different conducting, magnetic and insulating materials. Required of 
students in electrical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 9 hours ; 3d term. Credit 5. 

E. Des. 102. Alternating Current Design. The complete design of 
an alternating current generator or a transformer. Required of stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. 

Pratice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

EI. Lab. 101. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. A laboratory 
course designed to verify the laws and principles outlined in E. E. 101. 
Required of students in electrical and rural engfineering. Must be taken 
with E. E. 101. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 2. 

El. Lab. 102. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. This course in- 
cludes the methods of measuring resistance, current and electromotive 
force; photometry; and elementary testing of generators and motors. 
Required of civil and mechanical engineering students. Must be taken 
with E. E. 111. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 






I 



''I 



128 



( 11 



li 



« 



# 



El. Lab. 103. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. A continuation^, 
of El, Lab. 102. Required of students in mechanical eng^ineering. Must 
be taken with E. E. 112. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

El. Lab. 104. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. — Study and cali^ 
bration of instruments. Measurement of resistance, current and electro- 
motive force ; commercial tests on generators and motors ; arc lamp test- 
ing and photometry. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with E. E. 102 and 103. 

Practice, 6 hours, 1st and 3d terms; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 5. 

El. Lab. 105. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Measurement 
of inductance, impedance, condensance, etc.; power measurements in al- 
ternating current circuits; regulation and eflSciency tests of alternators 
and transformers; operating characteristics of synchronous and induc- 
tion motors. Required of students in electrical engineering. Must be 
taken with E. E. 104. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

El. Lab. 106. Telephone Laboratory. This course covers experi- 
mental work with all types of telephone apparatus and the operation of 
the magneto and common battery exchanges. Required of students in 
electrical engineering and elective for students in rural engineering. 
Must be taken with E. E. 107. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

El. Lab. 107. Wirele«8 Laboratory. At present this course is con- 
fined to practice in sending and receiving signals in the Continental Code 
by means of radio instruction sets. Required of students in electrical 
engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 108. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY 

Exp. Lab. 101. Testing. Study of testing machines and accessories. 
Operation of steam engine. Study of planimeter and indicator. Test of 
gas engines. Tension tests of wrought iron and steel. Transverse tests 
of cast iron and timber. Compression tests of long and short wood and 
concrete columns. Prereq. Mech. 103. Required of all engineering stu- 
dents. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 102. Experimental Engineering. Determining the amount 
of moisture in steam; the efficiency of the injector; the transit and its 
uses; indicator practice; slide valve setting; the slide rule and microme- 
ter; the analysis of boiler feed water; flue gases; lubricating oils; and^ 



I 



129 



the determination of the heating value of fuels and moisture in steam. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 103. Cement Testinsf. Standard tests of cement and 
concrete mortars. Time of setting. Tension and compression tests. Re- 
quired of students in civil, mechanical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Exp. Lab. 104. Experimental Engineering. — A continuation of 
Exp. Lab. 102. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours, 1st and 3d terms; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 4. 

Exp. Lab. 1. Experimental Laboratory. — Tests of steam, gas and 
oil engines. Determining the strength of iron and steel. The efficiency 
cf pumps and injectors. Tests of heating values of fuels. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 

Hwys. 101. Highways. Principles of location, construction and 
maintenance of country roads and city streets and pavements. Required 
of civil and rural engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Hwys. 102. Highway Engineering. Advanced course in highway 
design, construction and maintenance. Fieldwork in making the neces- 
sary surveys for the preparation of the plans, specifications and esti- 
mates of cost for the building of a short stretch of improved road. Study 
cf highway construction machinery. Study of highway economics, ad- 
ministration and legislation. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours, 2d and 3d terms; practice, 3 hours, 
2d term; 6 hours, 3d term. Credit 7. 

Hwys. 103. Materials Laboratory. Tests of oils, alphalts, tars and 
road binders. Prereq. Chem. 102. Elective for students in civil engi- 
neering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hwys. 1. Country Roads. Elementary course in the location, con- 
struction and maintenance of country roads and bridges. Theory and 
field practice in location, establishing grades, drainage, computation of 
earthwork, methods of construction and road machinery. Study of the 
utilization of local road and bridge materials. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

HYDRAULIC AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 
Hyd. 101. Hydraulics. Principles of Hydraulics. Flow in open 
channels and pipes and through orifices. Methods of n>easurement, 



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steam gauging, etc. Prereq. IVIech. 102. Required of all students in 
engineering. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 102. Hydraulics. Determination of the coefficient of dis- 
charge, velocity and contraction in pipes, orifices and weirs. Stream 
gauging methods. Flow measurements. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Required of 
students in civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 103. Hydromechanics. Pumps, pumping machinery, water 
wheels and turbines. Friction losses in plants and water systems. Study 
of distribution systems. Prereq. Hyd. 101. Required of students in civil, 
electrical and mechanical engineering. Elective for rural engineering 
students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 104. Elements of Sanitary Engineering. In this course the 
principles underlying water supply and sewerage are discussed and the 
general problems which present themselves to an engineer in practice 
are emphasized. Required of civil engineering and elective for rural en- 
gineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

Hyd. 105. Water Supply. This course deals with the principles of 
water supply engineering. It includes the methods of obtaining a good 
supply, its purification, and the design and operation of distribution sys- 
tems and filtration plants. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 8. 

Hyd. 106. Sewerage. This course takes up the principles involved 
in and methods of sewage disposal and the design of sewerage systems 
and septic tanks. House connections and plumbing are also considered. 
Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 6 hours ; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Hyd. 107. Hydraulic Design. Design of small sewerage system 
and disposal plant. Elective for students in civil and rural engineering. 
Must be taken with Hyd. 106. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 108. Drainage. Study of the principles of underground flow. 
Drainage of farm lands. Planning of the systems. Elective for non- 
engineering students. Must be taken with Surv. 110. 

Lecture or recitation, 1 hour; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Hyd. 109. Drainage. Field practice in study of drainage condi- 
tions. Planning the system from notes in field. Elective for non-engi- 
neering students. Must be taken with Hyd. 108. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 



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Hyd. 110. Advanced Drainage. Elective for rural engineering 
and plant industry students. 

Lecture, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours. Credit 2. 

Hyd. 1. Drainage. Elementary course in farm drainage for stu- 
dents in two-year course in agriculture. Theory and field practice in 
farm drainage. Surveying, designing and constructing drainage sys- 
tems for the improvement of agricultural lands. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 6 hours. 

Hyd. 2. Drainage. Principles of underground flow and the rela- 
tion of soils to drainage. Land drainage systems and methods. Field 
practice in the surveying of drainage areas, plotting of maps, designing 
systems, estimating costs and setting stakes for construction. Drainage 
laws and assessments. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

Hyd. 3. Water Supply. In this course consideration is given to 
applications of the principles of hydraulics, methods of purifying water, 
and design of small water supply systems and filtration plants. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Hyd. 4. Sanitation. This course has for its object the considera- 
tion of the principles involved in the design of small sewerage systems 
for individual houses or for small towns, supplemented by discussions 
relative to house drainage and plumbing. Methods for the disposal of 
sewage and garbage are also considered. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



MACHINE DESIGN 

M. Des. 101. Elementary Machine Design. Freehand sketching 
of the details of machinery and making working drawings of same. Cal- 
culations and drawings of a simple type punching press. Prereq. Dr. 
108. Required of students in electrical, mechanical and rural engi- 
neering. 

Lecture or recitation, 1 hour, 1st term; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 
Credit 2. 

M. Des. 102. Machine Design. A continuation of M. Des. 101. 
Required of students in electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 3. 

M. Des. 103. Machine Design. A continuation of M. Des. 102. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 6 hours ; 3d term. Credit 4. 

M. Des. 104. Kinematics of Machinery. Centrodes. Determina- 
tion of the instantaneous axis and instantaneous center. Preparation of 






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displacement, velocity and acceleration diagrams. Design of cams. Slow 
advance and quick return motion for machine tools. Form of tooth out- 
lines in the epicycloidal and involute systems. Prereq. M. Des. 101. Re- 
quired of students in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

M. Des. 105. Design of Farm Machinery. The design and draft- 
ing of those portions of farm machinery common to engines, and to har- 
vesting, pumping and fertilizing machinery, such as levers, shafts, gears 
and frames. Prereq. M. Des. 101, Elective for students in rural engi- 
neering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 

M. Des. 1. Machine Drafting and Design. The designing and de- 
tailing of a complete machine, including the determination of the stresses 
and the calculations for the various parts. Both empirical and rational 
methods are used. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 



MATHEMATICS 

Ma til. 101. Trigonometry. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 
Deduction of formulas and their application to the solution of triangles, 
trigonometric equations, etc. Required of students in engineering who 
have offered Math. 102 for entrance. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 1st term. Credit 5. 

Math. 102. Solid Geometry. In this course emphasis is placed on 
the relation of the subject to descriptive geometry and on areas and 
volumes of solids. Required of engineering students who have offered 
Math. 101 for entrance. Elective for other students. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 1st or 3d term. Credit 5. 

Math. 102. Trigonometry. An abbreviated course similar to Math. 
101, Required of chemical and elective for agricultural students. 
Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 1st term. Credit 5. 

Math. 103. Analytic Geometry. Geometry of two and three di- 
mensions, loci of general equations of second degree, higher plane curves, 
etc. Prerequisite, Math. 101 and 102. Required of students of chemistry 
and engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 10. 

Math. 104, Advanced Algebra, Algebra beyond that required for 
admission. Elementary theory of equations, partial fractions, permuta- 
tions, etc. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 



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Math. 105. Calculus. A discussion of the methods used in dif- 
ferentiation and integration and the application of these methods in de- 
termining maxima and minima, areas, volumes, moments of inertia, etc. 
Prereq. Math. 103. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours, 1st term; 5 hours, 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 12. 

Math. 106. Mathematics. A general course in algebra and calculus 
suited to the needs of the students of chemistry. Prereq. Math. 103. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 9. 

Math. 107. Di£Ferential Equations. The solution of the simpler 
differential equations is discussed. Prereq. Math. 105. Elective for stu- 
dents in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Math. 108. Least Squares. A short course in which stress is laid 
on the application to geodesy. Elective. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Math. 109. Algebra. Quadratic equations, simultaneous quadratic 
equations, progressions, graphs, logarithms, etc. Elective. 
Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 2d term. Credit 5. 

Math. 110. Estimates and Costs. Methods of estimating costs, sup- 
plemented by problems of a practical nature. Required of students in 
civil and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Math. 111. Astronomy. A course in descriptive astronomy. Elective. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Math. 1. Shop Mlathematics. Advanced arithmetic. Preliminary 
review. Common and decimal fractions. Short methods and checks. 
Percentage. Ratio and proportion. Powers and roots. These are based 
on their relation to shop problems. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 

Math. 2. Shop Mathematics. Algebra. Notation and definitions. 
Addition and subtraction. Multiplication and divisions. Exponents. 
Powers and roots. Formulas. E)quations. Sufficient drill is given to 
make direct applications to practical problems in the shop and drawing 
room. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. 

Math. 3. Shop Mathematics. Geometry. Plane surfaces, lines and 
angles. Triangles. Circles. Pyramids. Prisms. Cones and frustums. 
Spheres. Some elementary proofs are required of the students. Facts 






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or principles are discussed in ways to show their reasonableness. De- 
vices and methods used by practical men are applied to the solution of 
problems pertaining to the various trades. 
Recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Math. 4. Shop Mathematics. Trigonometry and Logarithms. An 
introduction to trigonometry covering the functions of angles and the 
solution of right triangles. Logarithms. Trigonometric tables and their 
uses. Emphasis is placed upon applications to practical problems. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 

Math. 5. Shop Mathematics. Engineering mathematics. The cor- 
relation of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and trigonometry is clearly 
shown in this course and such problems are involved as include a combi- 
nation of all the student's mathematics in the solution. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. 

Math. 6. Estimates and Costs. The object of this course is to 
teach the student to analyze the probable cost of the construction of ma- 
chines from the drawings and how to deal with such items as profits, 
overhead charges and depreciation. 

Recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 101. Technical Instruction. Explanation of the reading of 
mechanical drawings; the proper cutting angles, care and adjustment of 
carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, its shrinking and 
warping, and how to correct and prevent. Drill in problems in arith- 
metic, algebra and drawing by notes and lectures. Required of students 
in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 102. Steam Engines, Boilers and Dynamos. The principles 
of steam and the steam engine. The slide valve and valve diagrams. 
The indicator and its diagram. Steam boiler, the various types and their 
advantages. Each student taking this course is required to spend cer- 
tain hours in the power plant actually operating the engine, boilers and 
dynamos. Required of students in electrical and mechanical engineering. 
Elective for rural engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 3. 

M. E. 103. Technical Mechanics. Elementary principles of ap- 
plied mechanics, calculation of gear and pulley trains, bent levers, calcu- 
lation of belt lengths, lacing belts, the suction pump, and bolts and 
screws. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



135 



M. E. 104. Heat Engineering. Laws of fundamental equations; 
perfect gases; compound, hot-air and gasoline engines; theory of vapors; 
relation between pressure, volume, temperature, work and heat for spe- 
cial changes of state; calculation and drawing of Carnot's cycle and 
temperature entropy diagram. The steam turbine. Compressed air and 
refrigeration machinery. Prereq. M. E. 102. Required of students in 
electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

M. E. 105. Heat Engineering. A continuation of M. E. 104. Re- 
quired of mechanical engineering students. 
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

M. E. 106. Heating and Ventilation. The principles of venti- 
lating; amount of heat required for warming; radiating surfaces; steam, 
hot-water and hot-air systems ; vacuum and vapor systems ; pipe and pipe 
systems; appliances; specifications and contracts. Prereq. Dr. 108. Re- 
quired of mechanical and rural and elective for civil engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 3. 

M. E. 107. Gas Engines. The fundamental principles concerning 
the gas engine. Its applications to agricultural operations. Elective for 
students in agricultural courses. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 4. 

M. E. 1. Gas Engines. A course similar to M. E. 109, for students 
in the two-year course in agriculture. Elective. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

M. £. 2. Technical Instruction. Explanation of the reading of 
mechanical drawings; the proper angles for wood-cutting tools, care and 
adjustment of carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, its 
shrinking and warping, and how to prevent and correct. Sketching by 
freehand of tools and apparatus. 

Recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

M. E. 3. Heat Engines. Elementary laws of steam and gases* 
Principles of the steam, gas and oil engine. The steam turbine. Com- 
pressed air and refrigeration machinery. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. 

M. E. 4. Technical Mechanics. — ^Mechanics of materials with ap- 
plications to strength of machine parts, power transmission, belting, 
gears, cams, rope and chain drives, boilers and pumps. 

Recitations, 4 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 

M. E. 5. Power Plant Operation. The actual operation of boilers, 
engines, pumps and electric generators. This includes heating systems.. 
The work will be done on Friday nights. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 






136 

MECHANICS AND MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION 
Mech. 101. Graphic Statics. The theory and practice of the method 
of determining stresses in cranes, roof trusses and bridges, and stresses 
on beams and girders due to traveling loads. Analysis of the stresses 
in roof trusses by the force polygon. Application of the equilibrium 
polygon to beams and girders. Analysis of stresses in bridge trusses. 
Prereq. Phys. 101 and Dr. 102 or 103. Required of engineering students. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Meek. 102. Analytical Mechanics. A study of statics dealing with 
the composition and resolution of forces, moments, couples, machines and 
laws of friction; and of dynamics, dealing with velocity, acceleration, 
laws of motion, work, energy and applications to problems. Prereq. Phys. 
101 and Math. 105. Required of engineering students. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 3. 

Mech. 103. Mechanics of Engineering. The mechanics of solids. 
Statics of material point and of rigid bodies. Chains and cords. Cen- 
trifugal and centripetal forces. Work. Power. Energy. Sliding fric- 
tion, friction of journals, friction of pivots, friction of ropes and belts. 
Analysis of stresses in thick cylinders. Prereq. Mech. 102. Required of 
students in engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 5 hours; 1st term. Credit 5. 

Mech. 104. Mechanics of Engineering. A continuation of Mech. 
103. Required of students in civil and mechanical engineering. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d and 3d terms. Credit 4. 

Mech. 105. Materials of Constructon. A study of the manu- 
facture, composition and properties of the various materials used in engi- 
neering. Required of students in civil and mechanical engineering. 
Prereq. Mech. 103. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours ; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Mech. 1. Concrete. Consideration is given in this course to the 
materials used in making concrete, the properties of concrete, both plain 
and reinforced, and its use in the construction of simple structures. The 
practical work includes the mixing and placing of concrete and the ap- 
plication of formulas to the design of beams, girders, etc. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

PHYSICS 

Phys. 101. Mechanics and Sound. Lectures, recitations and demon- 
strations on mechanics and sound. Prereq. Math. 101. Required of stu- 
dents in engineering and chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. Lab. 101. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 1st term. Credit 4. 



137 

Phys. 102. Electricity and Magnetism. The elementary theory of 
electricity and magrnetism and the practical application of the various 
laws. Required of students in engineering and chemistry. Must be 
taken with Phys. Lab. 102. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Phys. 103. Heat and Light. Nature of heat; expansion, change of 
state; transmission and radiation of heat, and the elements of thermo- 
dynamics. Theory of light; reflection, refraction; dispersion, etc.; use 
of prisms, lenses and mirrors. Required of students in engineering and 
chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. Lab. 103. 

Lectures and recitations, 4 hours; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Phys. 104. General Physics. A discussion of such branches of 
physics as are suited to the needs of students in the agricultural courses. 
Elective. Mtist be taken with Phys. Lab. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 6. 

Phys. 1. General Physics. An elementary course including lec- 
tures, recitations and laboratory work in mechanics, heat, light, elec- 
tricity and magnetism. Special attention is paid to practical application. 

Recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. 



PHYSICS LABORATORY 

Phys. Lab. 101. Mechanics and Sound. Quantitative experiments 
illustrating the laws and principles studied under Phys. 101. Required 
of students in engineering and chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. 101. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 102. Electricity and Magnetism. The study of mag- 
netic fields and the measurement of current, electromotive force, resist- 
ance, etc. Required of students in engineering and chemistry. Must be 
taken with Phys. 102. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 103. Heat and Light. — Quantitative experiments in 
heat and light. Required of students in engineering and chemistry. 
Must be taken with Phys. 103. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Phys. Lab. 104. General Physics. Experiments illustrating the sub- 
jects discussed in Phys. 104. Elective for students in the agricultural 
courses. Must be taken with Phys. 104. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms. Credit 3. 



138 

RAILWAY ENGINEERING 

Rwys. 101. Railway Curves. Simple and compound curves, frogs, 
turnouts and crossings. Spirals. Prereq. Surv. 105. Required of stu- 
dents in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 3. 

Rwys. 102. Railway Earthwork. Cross-sectioning. Earthwork 
computations. Haul. Overhaul. Mass diagrams. Prereq. Rwys. 101. 
Required of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Rwys. 103. Railway Surveying. Preliminary surveys, location sur- 
veys, taking of cross-sections. Computation of quantities. Estimates. 
Prereq. Rwys. 101. Must be taken with Rwys. 102. Required of stu- 
dents in civil engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Rwys. 104. Railway Economics. Ballasting, track fastenings, rails^ 
buildings and structures, terminals, signaling, rolling stock. Promotion, 
operating expenses, effects of curvature and grade. Valuation, repairs 
and renewals. Prereq. Rwys. 101. Required of students in civil engi- 
neering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



SHOP PRACTICE 

Shop 101. Woodwork. During the first term is taught the use and 
care of bench tools, exercise in sawing, mortising, tenoning and laying 
out work from blue-prints. The second term is devoted to projects in- 
volving construction, decoration and wood-turning. During the third 
term the principles and processes of pattern-making are taught, together 
with enough foundry work to demonstrate the uses of pattern-making. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 3d terms; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 4. 

Shop 102. Woodwork. A course similar to Shop 101 for students 
in electrical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Shop 103. Woodwork. A short course similar to the first term of 
Shop 101 for students in civil engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Shop 104. Woodwork. A course for students in agricultural 
courses, in which emphasis is laid on the types of woodwork used on the 
farm. Elective. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 



139 

Shop 105. Blacksmithing. The making of the fire and how to keep 

it in order. The operations of drawing out, upsetting and bending of 
iron and steel, including the calculations of stock for bent shapes. Weld- 
ing. Construction of steel tools for use in the machine shop, including 
tool dressing and tempering. Annealing. Prereq. Shop 101. 
Practice, 6 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 



Shop 105, for 



Shop 106. Blacksmithing. A course similar to 
students in electrical and rural engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 107. Forging and Pipefitting. A course fitted to meet the 
needs of students in agriculture. Elective. 
Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 108. Foundry Work. Molding in iron and brass. Core- 
making. The cupola and its management. Lectures on the selection of 
irons by fracture, fuels, melting and mixing of metals. Prereq. Shop 105. 
Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 

Shop 109. Machine Work. Elementary principles of vise and 
machine work, which include turning, planing, drilling, screw-cutting and 
filing. This is preceded by study of the different machines used in ma- 
chine shops. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Shop 110. Machine Work. A continuation of Shop 109. Required 
of students in mechanical engineering. 
Practice, 9 hours, 1st term; 6 hours, 2d term. Credit 5. 

Shop 111. Machine Work. A course suited to the needs of stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours; 1st and 2d terms. Credit 2. 

Shop 1. Farm Woodwork. Use of tools in constructing trestles, 
gates and frames. Required of students in the two-year course in agri- 
culture. 

Practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 

Shop 2. Forging and Pipefitting. Similar to Shop 107, for students 
in the two-year course in agriculture. 
Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 3. Carpentry and Pattem-Making. Joinery. Pattern and 
core-box construction. Wood-turning. 
Practice, 6 hours; 1st termu 

Shop 4. Advanced Woodwork. In this course the special needs of 
the student are considered in laying out the work. 
Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. 



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Shop 5. Blacksmithing. The making of the fire and how to keep 
it in order. The operations of drawing out, upsetting and bending of 
iron and steel, including calculation of stock for bent shapes. Welding. 
Making, tempering and annealing of steel tools. 

Practice, 6 hours; 2d term. 

Shop 6. Foundry. Molding in iron and brass. Core-making. The 
cupola and its management. Lectures on the selection of irons by frac- 
ture, fuels, melting and mixing of metals. 

Practice, 6 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 7. Machine Work. Elementary principles of vise and machine 
work, which includes chipping, filing, turning, planing, drilling, screw- 
cutting and polishing. The study of the different machines precedes the 
operations. 

Practice, 6 hours; 1st term. 

Shop 8. Advanced Machine Work. Milling, gear-cutting, tool- 
making, including taps, dies and reamers. Plain and differential index- 
ing. Pipe cutting and fitting. 

Practice, 9 hours, 2d term. 

Shop 9. Shop Work. Students will be permitted to specialize in 
any of the shop courses. The work is of an advanced nature. 
Practice, 9 hours; 3d term. 

Shop 10. Machine Work. A course similar to Shop 7 for students 
in electricity. 

Practice, 8 hours; 3d term. 

STRUCTURAL DESIGN 

Sir. Des. 101. Elementary Structural Design. This course includes 
the complete design and detailing of a steel roof truss and a plate girder; 
the detailing from standard commercial drawing sheets of floor beams, 
girders and columns, and the complete design of a bridge truss of either 
the Warren or Pratt type. The stresses are determined by both analyti- 
cal and graphic methods. Prereq. Mech. 103. Required of students in 
civil and rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 

Str. Des. 102. Structural Design. Analysis of stresses in structural 
steel buildings. Design of roof trusses. Design of truss bridges and 
highway bridges. Design of plate girders under dead and live loads. 
Design of riveted connections. Both analytical and graphical methods 
are used. Prereq. Str. Des. 101. Required of students in civil engi- 
neering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d 
terms. Credit 9. 



141 

Str. Des. 103. Structural Design. Analysis of stresses in travel- 
ing cranes and derricks. Design of crane girders and lattice girders. 
Design of cranes. Both analytical and graphical methods are used. De- 
sign of riveted connections. Prereq. M. Des. 102. Required of students 
in mechanical engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st, 2d and 3d terms; practice, 6 
hours, 1st and 3d terms; 3 hours, 2d term. Credit 11. 

Str. Des. 104. Masonry and Concrete. A study of the materials 
used in masonry construction, the design and construction of foundations 
and retaining walls, and the elementary theory of reinforced concrete 
construction with its application in the design of beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Required of students in civil engineering. 

LfCctures and recitations, 4 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 5. 

Str. Des. 105. Design of Farm Structures. The design and ar- 
rangement of farm buildings and equipment. Lectures also cover the 
heating, lighting, ventilation, plumbing and costs. Prereq. Str. Des. 
101. Elective for students in rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d and 3d terms. 
Credit 6. 

Str. Des. 106. School Architecture. The planning and detailing of 
moderate-priced and medium-sized school buildings, including the heating, 
ventilation, lighting and plumbing. Prereq. Str. Des. 101. Elective for 
students in rural engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours ; practice, 3 hours ; 3d term. Credit 4. 

Str. Des. 107. Farm Buildings. Design and sx)€cifications of a 
simple typical building in timber or concrete and lectures upon the de- 
tails. The course 'is very practical and latitude is permitted the student 
to develop his ideas. Prereq. Dr. 107. Elective for non-engineering 
students. 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Str. Des. 1. Farm Buildings. An elementary course similar to 
Str. Des. 109. Prereq. Dr. 1. Required of students in the two-year 
course in agriculture and in engineering (surveying option). 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 1st term. 

Str. Des. 2. Concrete Structures. Design of simple concrete 
houses, bridges and culverts. Estimate of bills of material and cost. 
Prereq. Str. Des. 1. Required of students in two-year course in engi- 
neering (surveying option). 

Lectures and recitations, 1 hour; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



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SURVEYING 

Surv. 101. Surveying. Elements of surveying. Measurement of 
horizontal and level lines. Errors, use of compass, transit and level. 
Prereq. Math. 101. Kequired of students in civil, electrical and rural 
engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 2d term. Credit 2. 

Surv. 102. Surveying. Application of the principles of elementary 
surveying to practical operations in the field. Measurement of lines, 
angles, elevations. Introductory use of the transit and level. Prereq. 
Surv. 101. Required of students in civil, electrical and rural engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 103. Surveying. Theory of adjustment of instruments. De- 
termination of direction. Measurement of angles. Land survey meth- 
ods and computations. Prereq. Surv. 102. Required of students in civil 
and rural engineering. Must be taken with Surv. 104. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 1st term. Credit 2. 

Surv. 104. Surveying. Transit lines, level lines, traversing, map- 
ping, computation of areas. Required of students in civil and rural en- 
gineering. Must be taken with Surv. 103. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 105. Advanced Surveying. Theory of stadia. General sur- 
veying methods. Topographic surveying. Plane table. Earthwork com- 
putations. City surveying. Hydrographic surveying. Theory of sex- 
tant. Field practice when weather permits. Prereq. Surv. 103. Re- 
quired of students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. Credit 4. 

Surv. 106. Advanced Surveying. Field work in adjustment of in- 
struments. Use of plane table. Topographic mapping. Uise of sextant. 
Solar observations. Prereq. Surv. 105. Required of students in civil 
engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 107. Topographic Surveying. Field work in topographic 
methods. Base-line measurements. Elements of triangulation and ad- 
justment of quadrilaterals. Prereq. Surv. 106. Required of students in 
civil engineering. 

Practice, 3 hours; 1st term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 108. Geodesy. Applications of the method of least squares 
to precise surveying, leveling and triangulation. Astronomical observa- 
tions for azimuth, latitude, time and longitude. Prereq. Surv. 105. Elec- 
tive for students in civil engineering. 

Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; 3d term. Credit 2. 



143 

Surv. 109. Geodesy. Practice in problems developed in Surv. 108. 
Elective for students in civil engineering. 
Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 110. Elementary Surveying. Measurement of lines, angles 
and elevations. Elementary use of transit and level. Prereq. Math. 101. 
Elective for non-engineering students. Must be taken with Hyd. 108. 

Lecture or recitation, 1 hour; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 111. Elementary Surveying. Application of principles of 
plane surveying to practical operations in the field. Profiles and tra- 
verses, computations of areas. Elective for non-engineering students. 
Mtist be taken with Surv. 110. 

Practice, 3 hours; 3d term. Credit 1. 

Surv. 1. Elementary Surveying. Theory and practice of ele- 
mentary surveying. Use and care of chain, tape, compass, transit and 
level. Determination of direction and of elevation. Keeping of field 
notes. Land survey methods, computations and mapping. 

Lectures and recitations, 3 hours; practice, 6 hours; 1st term. 

Surv. 2. Elementary Surveying. Continuation of Surv. 1. 
Lectures and recitations, 2 hours; practice, 3 hours; 2d term. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

The Engineering Building is well equipped with lecture-rooms, recita- 
tion-rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for engineering work. 
The departments of Mathematics and Physics also are located in the En- 
gineering Building. 

Drafting-rooms. The three drafting-rooms are well equipped for 
practical work. Two of these are used by the junior and senior classes, 
each student being provided with a separate desk. The third room is 
used jointly by the freshman and sophomore students and contains 15 
drawing tables, accommodating about 90 students. 

Engineering students are to provide themselves with approved draw- 
ing outfit, materials and book, cost of which during the freshman year 
amounts to about $25. The College does not furnish these, but they are 
purchased by the student and are his property. 

The combined blue-print and dark room, with its commodious printing 
frames, affords splendid opportunities for sun-printing, which is so use- 
ful to engineering students. 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory. This laboratory is fitted with 
such appliances as may be used to the best advantage in engineering 
practice. These include a potentiometer and standard voltmeter and 
ammeter for calibrating the various measuring instruments used in the 



144 



(f! 



i 




laboratory. A Sharp-Miller portable photometer and a standard photo- 
meter for measuring the candle-power of lamps and for determination of 
illumination intensities. A large number of portable ammeters, volt- 
meters and indicating wattmeters for direct and alternating current 
measurements, standard curve drawing voltmeter and ammeter, electro- 
static voltmeter, frequency meters, silver and copper voltameters, Sie- 
men's type electrodynaomometer, watthour meters and an oscillograph. 
A standard portable testing set, heating devices, condensers, tachometers, 
multiple circuit ammeter and voltmeter switches. D'Arsonval galvano- 
meters, standard resistance boxes and bridges. The lamps used for ex- 
perimental purposes include direct and alternating current multiple car- 
bon arc, metallic arc, mercury vapor and nemst lamps. 

A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt compound 
generator, has been installed for testing purposes. This may be used in 
connection with the College lighting plant when needed and will be used 
for light and power service in the Engineering Building. 

The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made readily be- 
tween any part of the College lighting plant and the turbo-generator or 
any of the apparatus in the dyamo-room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo-room includes the following: A 10-kilo- 
watt rotary converter of the latest type, with speed limit and end play 
devices; a five-horse-power variable speed, conwnutating pole motor; a 
7.5-kilowatt, 60-cycle, 220-volt alternator designed to operate either as 
a polyphase generator, synchronous motor, frequency changer, constant 
speed induction motor or variable speed induction motor. The following 
parts are supplied with the set to make possible its operation in any of 
the above-named ways : a stationary armature for use either as an alter- 
nating current generator or as an induction motor field ; a revolving field, 
a squirrel cage induction motor rotor with starting compensator having 
self-contained switches; an induction motor rotor with 3-phase collector 
rings, external resistance and controller; a 2-kilowatt booster set; a five- 
horse-power compound direct current motor and a 1.5-horse-power shunt 
motor fully inclosed; a 7.5-kilowatt, 120- volt, 3-phase self-excited gen- 
erator direct connected to a 115-volt compound direct current motor; a 
motor-generator set consisting of a 3.6-horse-power shunt motor direct 
connected to a 2-kilowatt generator; several small D. C. and A. C. motors 
and generators; two 2-kilowatt transformers to transform power from 
110 or 220 volts to 1100 or 2200 volts; various types of starting rheostats 
with automatic overload and no voltage release; field rheostats. 

The main switchboards are used to mount the necessary circuit ap- 
paratus to control the generators and motors as well as the various cir- 
cuits in the dynamo-room and testing laboratory. Wire and water rheo- 
stats are arranged for load and regulation. Portable lampboards and 
portable switchboards have been constructed for use in machine tests. In 
addition to the special electrical engineering equipment, the College light- 






145 



inff plant will be used for illustrative and experimental purposes. This 
plant contains, tojfether with other apparatus useful in teaching electri- 
cal engineering, two Bullock generators of 40 kilowatts total capacity. 

An eight-inch Waltham bench lathe, with all the necessary attach- 
ments, has been installed in the dyamo-room for the use of students in 
making small articles, such as binding posts, connecters, etc., for use in 
the laboratories. 

The telephone laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the mag- 
neto and common battery systems. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Among the apparatus installed 
in the laboratory are a cross compound condensing Corliss engine of 50- 
horse-power, equipped with brake, indicators, relief valves, reducing mo- 
tion, steam and vacuum gauges and speed indicator, which gives ample 
opportunity for steam consumption and brake tests. This is connected 
with the shops, so that at any time it may be switched on and drive 
them. The College power plant, with its vacuum heating system, three 
100-horse-power return tubular boilers and two electric generating units, 
offers unexcelled opportunities for experimental work. A six-horse- 
power, four-cycle gasoline engine equipped with prony brake permits the 
making of tests in gas engineering. 

Materials Laboratory. In this laboratory the apparatus for testing 
materials includes a 100,000-pound Riehle combined hand and power- 
testing machine for making tensile, compression, shearing and transverse 
tests on various kinds of materials; a 1,000-pound Riehle machine for 
testing cement briquettes, etc. The testing of asphalts, tars, etc., used 
in roadwork is carried on under the direction of the Department of 
Chemistry. 

Hydraulic Laboratory. Apparatus suitable for the determination of 
the coeflScient of discharge for small orifices, weirs, etc., has been in- 
stalled in this laboratory. Opportunity for experimental work in stream 
gauging, etc., is aiforded by the streams in the vicinity. 

Physics Laboratory. This laboratory is well supplied with apparatus 
for lecture-room demonstrations and for experiments undertaken by stu- 
dents. New pieces of apparatus are added to the equipment each year. 

The Shops. The shops are well lighted and admirably adapted to 
the purpose for which they were designed. The wood-working shop con- 
tains accommodations for bench work and wood turning. The power ma- 
chinery in this shop is a band and universal circular saw, one 16-inch by 
10-foot pattern-maker's lathe, three grindstones, a wood trinuner, 26-inch 
wood planer, 14-inch joiner and universal tool grinder. 

In the forge shops are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, and a 
pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of smoke. There 
is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 



f 



146 

The foundry is equipped with an iron cupola, which melts 1,200 pounds 
of iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core oven and the necessary flasks 
and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one 10-inch speed lathe, one 
22-inch en^rine lathe with compound rest, one 12-inch combined foot and 
power lathe, two 14-inch engine lathes, one 24-inch drill press, one No. 4 
emery tool grinder, one No. 1% universal milling machine and an as- 
sortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and measuring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machine shops is driven by a 9 by 
14-inch automatic cut-off, high-speed engine, built by members of the 
junior and senior mechanical engineering classes, after the standard de- 
sign of the Atlas engine. An 8 by 12-inch engine drives the machinery 
of the blacksmith shop and foundry. 

Surveying Equipment and Models. This equipment includes a num- 
ber of transits, levels, compasses, plane tables and minor instruments for 
wse in plane, topographic, railroad, highway and geodetic surveying. 
These are added to as the necessity for other equipment arises. The 
models include various types of roads, bridges, culverts, etc. 

Library. Each department contains a well selected library of books 
for reference and the standard engineering magazines. Students are 
encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity for reading afforded in 
the departmental as well as in the general library. 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS 

The object of the course is to prepare men for positions of responsi- 
bility in lines of work in which training in mechanic arts and elementary 
engineering is necessary. There is a special need for such men at all 
times and particularly during the reconstruction period. The course 
affords an excellent opportunity for training to such persons as find it 
impossible for any reason to enter any of the four-year courses in engi- 
neering. A certificate is granted to each student who satisfactorily 
completes the course. The first year of the course is devoted to the lay- 
ing of a foundation in shop mathematics, physics and English, as well 
as in drawing and shop work. In the second year most of the time is 
devoted to subjects closely related to mechanical, electrical and civil en- 
gineering, the student selecting the branch in which he thinks he may 
use his talents to the greatest advantage. 

Throughout the course emphasis is laid on the necessity for turning 
out work in the drafting-room, shop and field which will meet the re- 
quirements of the commercial work. The student is taught that a task 
worth doing at all is worth doing well and that the finished product from 
the hand, brains, or both, must not only pass inspection, but be better 
than the average if one wishes to succeed. Parallel with the practical 
wx)rk instruction is given in the fundamentals upon which practice is 



147 



based. Thus the head and hand are brought into that intimate and har- 
monious relation so necessary to the normal development of the individual 
engaged in any industrial pursuit. 

Among the positions which the course equips a man to fill may be 
noted the following: Tracers, draftsmen, rodmen, inspectors, chainmen, 
linemen, station operators, assistants in various branches related to en- 
gineering, salesmen for different kinds of machinery, and assistant 
foremen. 

To enter the course a student must have completed at least the equiva- 
lent of the seventh grade in the Maryland public schools and be not less 
than 16 years of age. 

The tabulated curriculum of the course follows. It gives the outline 
cf the work in its different aspects: 



148 



m\ 



TWO-TBAB MSBOHAmC ABTS. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term: 



Shop Mathematics (Math. 1, 2 and 8) 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 1) 

Composition (£n^. 4) 

Technical Instruction (M. B. 3) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 2) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 3) 

Carpentry (Shop 3 ) 

Advanced Woodwork (Shop 4) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 5) 

Foundry (Shop 6) 



SECOND YEAR. 



4 

3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 



II 



4 

3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 



III 



3 

3(3) 

3 

2 
(6)» 
(6) 



(3) 
*(V)V 



4 




il; 



III 



i 



1! 



Shop Mathematics (Math. 4 and 5) 
Estimates and Costs (Math. 6)... 
Business Law ( — ) 



OPTION IN MECHANICS. 



Heat Engines (M. E. 3) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 4) 

Direct Current (E. E. 1) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 2) 

Machine Work (Shop 7 and 8) 

Shop Work (Shop 9) 

Machine Drafting (M. Des. 1) 

Experimental Laboratory (Exp. Lab. 
Power Plant Operation (M. E. 5)... 



1) 



4 

z 

2(3) 



(6) 



(6) 



2 
2(3) 



(6) 
(6) 
(3) 



OPTION IN ELECTRICITY. 



Direct Current (E. E. 1) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 2) 

Illumination (E. E. 3) 

Power Plants (E. E. 4) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 5) 

Batteries (E. E. 6) 

Measuring Instruments (E. E. 7) . . . 

Equipment Repairs (E. E. 8) 

Interior Wiring (E. E. 9) 

Outside Lines (E. E. 10) 

Machine Work (Shop 10) 



2(6) 



2(3) 
2(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



1(3) 
1(3) 



OPTION IN SURVEYING. 



1(3) 



4 
*4(3) 



(9) 
(6) 
(3) 



4(3) 



• • • • 



2 
3(3) 



1(6 



(6) 
(3) 



ft! 



Elementary Surveying (Surv. 1 and 2) 

Country Roads (Hwys. 1) 

Drainage (Hyd. 2) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 8) 

Sanitation (Hyd. 4) 

Concrete (Mech. 1) 

Farm Buildings (Str. Des. 1) 

Concrete Structures (Str. Des. 2) 

Farm Equipment ( ) 

Farm Forestry (For. 1) 



3(6) 



2(3) 



2(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



1(3) 
1(3) 



3(3) 
3(6) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



• ? 



♦Students electing in mechanics take foundry; others take freehand drawing. 



149 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Graduate work is offered to graduates of this or other standard col- 
leges who, in the judgment of the Dean of the Graduate School, are quali- 
fied to undertake that work. Each individual case must be determined 
upon its merits. 

The graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of 
the Graduate School, by competent members of the various faculties of 
instruction and research. These constitute the Faculty of the Graduate 
School. 

Work in accredited research laboratories of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and other local national research agencies under competent 
supervision is accepted, when previously arranged, as work in residence 
for part of the requirement. These labroatories are located in easy daily 
reach of the College. 

AdTaBced Degrees 

The advanced degrees conferred are Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy for work in Agriculture and the natural sciences; Master of 
Arts for work in Ldberal Arts, Education and Home Economics, and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Ldberal Arts. 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 

The degree of Master of Science, or Master of Arts, will be conferred 
upon resident graduates who meet the following requirements: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of a qualified institution and 
must have the necessary prerequisites for the field of advanced work 
chosen. 

2. Hje must complete a course of approved graduate study with one 
major and one closely related minor subject, working on a full-time basis 
of one year of advanced work. The work may, when approved, be ex- 
tended on a part-time basis over a longer period. 

3. The candidate must submit a thesis approved by the Graduate 
Faculty. 

4. The candidate must pass a satisfactory examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. As prerequisites to registration for the Doctor's degree, the candi- 
date must be a graduate of a standard college, must have a reading 
knowledge of French or German, and the necessary basic training in the 
field in which he proposes to take advanced work. 

2. Three years of graduate study will usually be required. At least 
one year must be in residence. The importance and quality of the work, 
as well as the time element, will be considered. On a part-time basis the 



150 



i 



m 



time needed will be correspondingly increased. The work must be inten- 
sive research, resulting in an important contribution. 

3. The candidate must select a major and one or two closely related 
minor subjects, constituting a single field of research. 

4. The candidate must present a thesis within the field of research 
selected. This must be in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate School 
in printed or typewritten form at least two weeks before the time at 
which degrees are granted. 

5. The candidate must pass a final examination in the major and 
minor subjects. The examination will be given by a committee appointed 
by the Dean. 

Advanced Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of this College who have ob- 
tained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

1. He shall have been engaged successfully in acceptable engineering 
work for three years. 

2. His registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months 
prior to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with 
his application a complete report of his engineering experience and an 
outline of his proposed thesis. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the 
Head of the School and heads of the Departments of Civil, Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineering. 



151 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Research into the sciences and the development of industries, art, and 
professions has so changed the philosophy of our educational system that 
il: is now recognized that any educational system must include training 
of a technical nature. It must encourage the student's natural desire 
for work of a productive nature with a vital connection between theory 
and practice. These views have not been generally accepted and the re- 
sult is noted in the combination of vocational, technical, and scientific 
work with the general studies to form a new course of study for our 
young men and women. 

The subjects taught in home economics are designed to fit young women 
to be capable workers and home makers in whatever sphere of life they 
may enter. The knowledge they gain from these subjects should give 
them contentment, industry, order, and a womanly feeling of independ- 
ence and responsibility. 

The courses of instruction given are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: (1) those students who desire a knowledge of the 
general facts and principles of home economics; (2) those students who 
wish to make a speciality of home economics for the purpose of teaching 
the subject in secondary schools and colleges; (3) those who are inter- 
ested in certain phases of home economics which deal with the work of 
the dietitian or of institutional manager. 

Organization 

For administrative purposes and for ease of instruction the School of 
Home Economics is organized into departments as follows: 

1. Department of Foods and Cookery. 

2. Department of Textiles and Clothing. 

3. Department of Hygiene and Health. 

4. Department of Institutional and Home Management. 

Equipment 

Besides the usual equipment of classrooms and laboratories for the 
efficient procedure of the work, the college has recently equipped and 
furnished a house which is to be used as a practice house where the 
students will live and conduct the operations of the household for a 
period of from six to ten weeks during their senior year. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory 
completion of four years of prescribed courses. 

Curricula in Home Economics 

All students registered in the School of Home Economics take the 
same work in the freshman year. At the end of the year they may 




^ 



152 

elect to specialize in a particular department or they may withhold the 
election until after the sophomore year without loss of time. 

Those who do not wish to specialize in any particular phase of home 
economics may elect a curriculum of general home economics best suited 
to their needs. 

SOICB SCONOXZCS. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



General Chemistry and Qualitative Anal. (Chem. 101-103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Composition and Design (Art 101) 

Freehand Perspective (Art 102 ) 

Food Industries (Food 101) 

Textiles (Tex. 101-102) 

(Garment Construction (Cloth. 101) 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) . . . . 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 103) 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 101-103) 

Liibrary Science 

Physical Education (Phy. Ed. 101-103) 

AND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING: 
Social and Economic History of the United States (H. 

108-110) 

Language (French, Spanish, or German) 

IVIathematics 



4 
3 
2 



1 
3 



1 
1 

1 



3 
3 

o 
«> 



II 



4 
3 



2 

i 



3 

i 
i 



3 

3 

o 

u 



III 



4 

s 



3 
1 



3 
3 

o 
«> 



niii 



I*'' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Orgranic Chemistry (Chem. 123-124) 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 110) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

History 

Problems in Preparation and Service of Food (Food 

103-105) 

Costume Design (Art 103) 

Advance Dressmaking (Cloth. 104-105) 

Physical Education (Phy. Ed. 104-106) 

Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Household Administration (H. M. 101-102).. 
Home Architecture and Decoration (Art 105) 

Household Economics (H. M. 104) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Dietetics (Poods 112-114) 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



4 
3 

3 
2 



1 

2-4 



2 
3 

6-9 



4 
3 



2 

1 

2-4 



3 
3 



Home Management (H. M. 103) 

Nutrition (Foods 109-111) j 

Sanitation and Public Health 

Child Care and Welfare (H. E. Ed. 110) 

Current History ' 3 

History of the Family \ 

Education of Women 1 

Drapery and Advanced Technique of Clothing (Cloth. 109) , 

Seminar in Home Economics j 3 

Electives • ••••■ 6-8 



3 

2 

3 

6-9 



6 
3 
3 



3-5 



4 
3* 
3 



2 
1 

6-8 



3 
3 



2 

3 

6-9 



3 
3 



3 

5 



4-6 



^a 



153 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF 

HOME ECONOMICS 



SUBJECT. 



Term : 



Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 110) 

Physiological Chemistry (Chem. Ill) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 103) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Literature 

Public Speaking 

Public Speaking 

Language (French, Spanish, German) 

Mathematics 

Music 

Political Science 

Economics 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-lOG) 

Educational Sociology 

Educational Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Historic Ornament and Dress Design (Art 106) ... . 

Tailoring (Cloth. 107) 

Clothing Economics (Cloth. 108) 

Food Economics (Food 105-107) 

Advanced Textiles (Tex. 103-105) 

Lunchroom Management (H. M. 105-106) 

Catering (Food 109 ) 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 107-108) 

Camp Cookery (Foods 108) 

Housewifery (H. M. 109) 

Art and Handicraft (Art 104) 

Millinery (Cloth. 106) 

Advanced Millinery (Cloth. 110) 



(General Courses in Agriculture) 



3 
1 
2 
3 
? 
2 
2 
3 



2 
2 
3 



II 



3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
3 

2 
2 
3 



2 



III 



3 

4 
3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 



2 
2 



2 
2 



3 
S 



3 



Description of Courses 

Foods 101. Food Industries. Three credit hours. Third term. 

This course describes the preparation of the various staple foods from 
the raw state to the finished product in marketable form, and includes a 
discussion of the composition, nutritive value, and cost of the materials. 

Foods 102-104. Problems in Preparation and Service of Foods. 

Three credit hours each term. 

Preparation and service of meals for a family and larger groups; cost 
and dietetic values; individual problems in tht manipulation of food 
materials. 

Foods 105-107. Food Economics. Two credit hours each term. 
Prerequisite, Food 102-104 or the equivalent. 

This course includes a discussion of the functions and nutritive values 
of food, the feeding of families, and larger groups with particular refer- 
ence to nutritive requirements and the cost of food in relation to the 
family budget. 



154 

Focxls 108. Camp Cookery. Three credit hours. Third term. 

This course is designed to give a knowledge of the simplest processes 
of cookery and such adaptations as are practicable in the types of out- 
door cookery. 

Foods 109-111. Nuirition. Three credit hours each term. Prere- 
quisite, Chem. 110-111. 
The physiological, chemical, and bacteriological aspects of food. 

Foods 112-114. Dietetics. Three credit hours each term. Prere- 
quisites, Foods 102-104; 109-111. 

This course deals with the requirements of the individual in health 
and disease throughout infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life, and 
old age, in the light of the chemistry and physiology of digestion, the 
energy value of food, and the nutritive properties of the proteins, fats, 
carbohydrates, and ash constitutents. Typical dietaries are planned for 
each group. 

Foods 115. Catering. Three credit hours. Third term. Prerequi- 
sites, Foods 102-104; H. M. 105-106. 

This course is intended for students who are interested in the problems 
connected with the management of the rooms and catering establish- 
ments. 

Tex. 101-102. Textiles. One credit hour. First and second terms. 
Freshman year. 

This course considers the textile industry from primitive ages to 
modern times; the important fibers and materials made from them. 

Tex. 103-105. Advanced Textiles. Two credit hours each term. The 
year. 

Behavior of textile fibers toward various chemical reagents; physical 
tests for identification of fibers; bleaching and dyeing; laundry processes 
as they affect color, shrinkage, etc.; art and economic considerations in 
selection and purchase of materials for clothing and household furnishing. 

Cloth. 101 Garment Construction. Three credit hours. First term. 
Freshman year. 

This course includes the making of fundamental stitches ; darning and 
patching; practice in hand and machine sewing applied to simple 
garments. 

Cloth. 102. Drafting and Elementary Dress Design. Three credit 

hours. Second term- 
Practice in drafting, cutting, fitting, designing of patterns. Emphasis 

is laid upon the development of one pattern from another. Designs are 

worked out upon paper patterns and adapted in the construction of a 

simple wash dress. 



155 



Cloth. 103. Dressmaking. Three credit hours. Third term. 

Consideration of quality, suitability, and cost of materials adapted to 
technique involved in the construction of a tailored silk shirt, wool skirt, 
lingerie blouse. Commercial patterns and those made in Cloth. 102 are 
used. 

Cloth. 104-105. Advanced Dressmaking. Two credit hours. Second 

and third term. Sophomore year. 

This course includes remodeling of a dress and problems in wool and 
silk determined by the needs of the students. 

Cloth. 106. Millinery. Three credit hours. Second term. 
A study of the processes and materials used in millinery; designing, 
making, and trimming hats. 

Cloth. 107. Tailoring. Three credit hours. Second term. 
The technique and methods of construction employed in the making of 
tailored suits and wraps. 

Cloth. 108. Clothing Economics. Three credit hours. Second term. 

General consideration of economic function of woman; history of 
woman's place in home and industry with reference to clothing and tex- 
tiles ; study of clothing budget and standardization of dress. 

Cloth. 109. Draping and Advanced Technique of Clothing. Five 
credit hours. Third term. Senior year. 

This course emphasizes the artistic in lines and decoration; deals with 
the design and adaptation of materials for the individual. It includes 
practice in cutting, fitting, finishing, and draping of such materials as 
silks, satin, chiffons, and laces. 

Cloth. 110. Advanced Millinery. Two credit hours. Second term. 
Emphasis on trimming and more elaborate finishing of hats. 

Art 101. Composition and Design. Two credit hours. First term. 

Practice drawing in charcoal and pencil; space division and space re- 
lation; color; color schemes and exercises; original designs in which 
lines, tones, and colors are put together to produce fine quality. 

Art 102. Freehand Perspective. Two credit hours. Second term. 
Study of perspective principles with application. 

Art 103. Costume Design. Two credit hours. First term. 
Appropriate dress ; proportion of parts ; application of color, harmony, 
art, to design for textiles and costumes in pencil and water color. 

Art 104. Art and Handicraft. Two credit hours. First tenn. 
A^pplied design in embroidery, lace, stencils, as adapted to materials 
for articles of dress and house furnishing. 



Hi 



i' 



t 



156 



Art 105. Home Architecture and Decoratian. Three credit hours. 
Third term. 

Situation, surroundings, and construction of the house; evolution of 
the house and home; application of color in home decoration; furnishings 
from a sanitary and artistic standpoint; perspective drawing of rooms. 

Art 106. History of Ornament and Design. Two credit hours each 
term. The year. 

This course continues the work of Art 103. Historic costume is 
studied with reference to its influence upon modern style. Whenever 
possible, the designs made will be used in Cloth. 109 to give the student 
an opportunity to see the practical value of her work. 

H. M* 101-102. House Administration. Three credit hours. First 
and second term. Junior year. 

This course deals with the operation and maintenance of the house- 
hold; its sanitation, plumbing, furnishing, and equipment. 

H. M. 103. Home Management (Practice House). Six credit hours. 
Term to be arranged. Senior year. 

From six to ten weeks' experience as manager and helper in a house- 
hold of five senior students. 

H. M. 104. Household Economics. Three credit hours. Third 
term. 

This course deals with the organization and control of family and 
personal life through the economic relations of the household. 

M. M. 105-106. Lunchroom Management. Three credit hours. 
First and second term. 

A general course in lunch-room management for those who wish a 
knowledge of the problem of feeding large numbers. 

H. M. 107-108. Marketing and Buying. One credit hour. First 
and second term. 

Hbw to buy foods; qualities and prices; market grades and related 
values. 

H. M. 109. Housewifery. Three credit hours. Third term. 

This course treats of kinds of service needed in various parts of the 
household, and the systematic planning of the daily routine; labor-sav- 
ing appliances; repairing and renovation; household efficiency with ref- 
erence to housekeeping methods. 

H. M. 110. Home Nursing and First Aid. Three credit hours. 
Second term. 

Instruction in domestic emergencies and first aid. and in the simple 
procedures in the home care of the sick. 



157 



SCHOOL OF LffiERAL ARTS 



The School of Liberal Arts has as its prime object the offering of 
foundational and specialized instruction in lang:uage and literature and 
in social science. It aims to provide a stock upon which to graft techni- 
cal and scientific education; to prepare the foundation for business, law, 
journalism, administration, philanthropic work, the more responsible 
civil service positions and the higher teaching positions; and to afford 
the opportunity for general cultivation and refinement of the mind. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the School of Liberal Arts includes the 
following departments: Ancient Languages and Philosophy, Economics, 
English Language and Literature, History and Political Science, Jour- 
nalism, Modem Languages, Public Speaking, Library Science and Music. 
These departments, however, do not represent the scope of liberal arts 
instruction provided by the College. Additional curricula in bacteri- 
ology, botany, chemistry, drawing, entomology, geology, mathematics, 
pedagogy, physics, psychology and zoology are offered in the Schools 
where such subjects have a basic application. Between the School of 
Liberal Arts and the other Schools there exists a close cooperation. 

Courses and Degree 

Curricula in the School of Liberal Arts are organized according to the 
group elective system. This arrangement undertakes to fit the course 
to the student, rather than the student to the course, and particularly 
enables the School to embody in its curricula the following fundamental 
principles: First, such breadth of training as is characteristic of the 
well-educated man; second, a freedom of election that will motivate 
study and develop individuality and special aptitude; and, finally, the 
desirability of a student's deciding on a major interest so that there will 
be neither aimless nor dissipated effort. 

By the group elective system a part of every student's cuiriculum is 
prescribed. Such prescription, however, includes only what is basic 
and fundamental. The remainder of the student's work is elective. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

On satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester hours 
of college work, in addition to the military drill and physical education 
of the first two years, a student will be recommended for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Credits towards this degree are subject to the fol- 
lowing regulations: 

Regulations 

Subject-Matter Groups. First of all, the student's curriculum is 
governed by four distinct subject-matter groups. These are: 






^ 



158 



A. Lan^fuage and Literature: English, French, German, Greek, 
Journalism, Latin, Public Speaking, Spanish and Library Science. 

B. Social Science: Economics, History, Philosophy and Political 
Science. 

C Natural Science: Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, 
Geology, Physics, Physiology and Zoology. 

D. Mathematics and Psychology: Mathematics, Psychology and 
Drawing. 

The administration of Groups A and B lies wholly within the School 
of Liberal Arts; of Groups C and D, in other Schools of the Maryland 
State College, with all of which the Arts School cooperates. 

Courses Open to Freshmen. The only courses open to freshmen are 
the following: 

English 101-103, nine credit hours; 107-108, six credit hours; 109, 
three credit hours. 

French 101-103, nine credit hours; 104-106 (for students who enter 
with two units in French), nine credit hours; 108-110 or 111-113 (for 
students who enter with three or more units in French), nine credit 
hours. 

(Jerman 121-128, nine credit hours; 124-126 (for students who enter 
with two units in GJerman), nine credit hours; 128-130 or 131-133 (for 
students who enter with three or more units in Crerman), nine credit 
hours. 

Latin 111-113 (for students who enter with two units in Latin), twelve 
credit hours; 118 (for students who enter with three or more units in 
Latin), four credit hours. 

Library Science 101, one credit hour, first term. 

Public Speaking 101-103, three credit hours; 107-109, three credit 
hours; 113-115, six credit hours. 

Spanish 141-143, nine credit hours; 144-146 (for students who enter 
with two units in Spanish), nine credit hours. 

History 101, three credit hours; 102-103, six credit hours. 

Zoology 101-102, eight credit hours. 

Botany 101, four credit hours. 

Chemistry 101-103, twelve credit hours. 

Mathematics, nine credit hours. 

Educational Guidance, three credit hours. 

Course Combinations for Freshmen. In order to assist freshmen in 
their independent selection of courses and to encourage definiteness of 
purpose in students working for the Bachelor of Arts degree, there have 
been arranged for the freshman year certain combinations of courses 
which prepare for major interests according to the following tables: 



159 



Major: Latin, Greek or Philosophy, 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 

History (H. 101 and 102-103), 9 credit hours. 

Latin (A. L. 128-129 and 130), 12 credit hours. 

Greek, French, German or Spanish (select one), 9 to 12 credit 

hours. 
Mathematics ( ), 9 credit hours. 

Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 
Military Drill. 

Major : Economics. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 

French, German or Spanish (select one), 9 credit hours. 

History (H. 101 and 102-103), 9 credit hours. 

Natural Science, 12 credit hours. 

Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 

Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 

Military Drill. 

M'ajor: English Langwige and Literature. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 

A foreign language in which the student has passed two years' 

work, 9 credit hours. 
A second foreign language or history, 9 credit hours. 
A laboratory science, 12 credit hours. 
Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 
Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 
Military Drill. 

Major: General Science. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 

French, Grerman or Spanish (select one), 9 credit hours. 

Zoology (Zoo. 101-102), 8 credit hours. 

Botany (Bot. 101), 4 credit hours. 

Chemistry, 12 credit hours. 

Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 

Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 

Military Drill. 

Major: History and Political Science. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 
Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 






160 



French, German or Spanish (select one), 9 credit hours. 

History (H. 101 and 102-103), 9 credit hours. 

Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 

Library Methods (L, S. 101), 1 credit hour. 

Educational Guidance, 3 credit hours. 

Military Drill. 

Major: Joumalianu 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 
Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 
French, German or Spanish (select one), 9 credit hours. 
BQstory of Ancient Peoples (H. 101), 3 credit hours. 
Continental European History (H. 102-103), 6 credit hours. 
Nineteenth Century Poetry (Bng. 107-108), 6 credit hours. 
The Essay (Eng. 109), 3 credit hours. 
Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 
Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 
Educational Guidance, 1 credit hour. 
H^rgiene, 1 credit hour. 
Military Drill. 

Major: French, German or Spanish. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 
Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), 3 credit hours. 
History (H. 101 and 102-103), 9 credit hours. 
A modem language in which the student has passed two years' 

work, 9 credit hours. 
A second foreign language, 9 credit hours. 
Mathematics, 9 credit hours. 
Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 
Military Drill. 

Major: Public Speaking (with special reference to professions). 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103) , 3 credit hours. 

Extempore Speaking (P. S. 107-109), 3 credit hours. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), 9 credit hours. 

A modern language, 9 credit hours. 

Library Methods (L. S. 101), 1 credit hour. 

Electives: Latin, Greek, History, U. S. Government, Chemistry, 

Bible History. 
Military Drill. 

Group Prescription 
A. Language and Literature: English 101-103, Public Speaking 101- 
103 and Library Science 101 are required of all students during their 
freshman year. 



161 



The student's combined work in high school and college must include 
at least two foreign languages. When the student enters with six units 
in foreign languages, he will be required to secure nine hours of credit 
in college ; when the student enters with four units in foreign languages, 
he will be required to secure eighteen credits in college; when the stu- 
dent enters with two units in foreign languages, he will be required to 
secure twenty-seven credits in college; when the student enters with one 
unit in foreign languages, he will be required to secure thirty credits in 
college; when the student enters with no units in foreign languages, he 
will be required to secure thirty-six credits in college. Less than one 
unit in a foreign language will not be recognized. 

Note. — Only the first three prescriptions of Group A apply to students 
majoring in the Department of Journalism. 

B. Social Science: Every student must secure credit in the social 
science group for not less than eighteen trimester hours. At least nine 
of these credits must be in history. If, however, the student offers one 
or more high school units in history, then only nine trimester hours of 
credit in this group are prescribed. 

C. Natural Science: Every student must secure credit for not less 
than nine trimester hours in either bacteriology, botany, physiology or 
zoology. If, however, the student offers one high school unit in any one 
of these four biological sciences, then no additional college credit is re- 
quired. Every student must also secure credit for at least nine tri- 
mester hours in either chemistry, geology or physics. Students entering 
with neither chemistry nor physics must take a one-year's course in one 
of the two. 

Note. — The prescriptions of Group C do not apply to students major- 
ing in the Department of Journalism. 

D. Mathematics and Psychology: Every student must secure credit 
either in high school or college for algebra through quadratics and for 
plane geometry. He must in addition secure credit in college for at least 
nine trimester hours in mathematics. 

Majors and Minors. All students registered in the School of Lib- 
eral Arts must secure at least sixty- three trimester hours of credit in 
either Group A or Group B, and at least twenty-seven trimester hours, 
or their equivalent, in some one subject of the group selected. All stu- 
dents of this School must also secure twenty-seven hours of credit in one 
of Groups A. C and D or B. C and D (according to the group in which 
the major is chosen), and at least eighteen trimester hours, or their 
equivalent, in some one subject of the group selected. The student is 
not permitted to secure more than one hundred and two trimester hours 
of credit in any one group ; in this School, this applies to Groups A and 
B only. 



162 

Relations with Other Schools of the Maryland State College. Any 

student, after securing one hundred and two trimester hours of credit 
in subject-matter Groups A, D, C and D, may, with the permission of 
his adviser, elect six hours a trimester for each of the remaining two 
years from work offered in any other School. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Students comipleting the curri- 
culum of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, as defined in General 
Order 49 of the War Department, will be allowed six trimester credits 
towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. These credits, however, will 
count as part of the six hours a trimester for the last two years, taken 
in other Schools, as explained in the preceding section. 

Thesis. In tiie senior year a thesis in the student's major field of 
study will be required of all candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Advisers. The Dean and the Secretary of the School of Liberal Arts, 
together with the professor representing a prospective major, become 
the adviser of each student during his freshman year. The relation 
between adviser and student will be frank and fraternal, without re- 
straint on either side. After the first year, the professor under whom 
the student does the major portion of his work becomes his adviser. 

General Restrictions on Elections. Every Student in electing work 
must bear in mind the following general restrictions: (1) Only courses 
may be chosen for which the student has had sufficient prerequisite 
training; (2) Only such courses may be elected as do not conflict on the 
College class-schedule; (3) A study once elected must be pursued through 
one year or to the completion of the subject; (4) The student's electives 
must exhibit a definite purpose; (5) All elections are subject to the ap- 
proval of the student's adviser and one of the executive officers of the 
School of Liberal Arts. 

Graduate Courses 

In certain departments of the School of Liberal Arts provisions are 
made for instruction toward advanced degrees. A description of courses 
so offered follows the exclusively undergraduate courses. The general 
requirements for graduate degrees wall be found in the sections devoted 
to the Graduate School. 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND PHILOSOPHY 

Greek 

For Undergraduates 
A. L. 101-103. Elementary Greek. Four credit hours each term. 
Freshman year. 

Grammar, composition and easy reading. 



163 



A. L. 104-106. Translation and Composition. Four credit hours 
each term. Sophomore year. 

Selections from Xenophon's Anabasis. Original compositions based on 
text read. 

A. L* 107-109. Translation. Four credit hours each term. Junior 
year. 
Selections from Homer. Prosody and mythology. 

A. L. 110. History of Greek Literature. Three credit hours, one 
term. 

Latin 

For Undergraduates 
Courses 121-126, inclusive, may be offered for entrance or taken as 
college work by students who offer only two units in Latin for entrance. 

A. L. 121-123. Translation. Four credit hours each term. Fresh- 
man year. 
Selections from Virgil. Prosody and mythology. 

A. L. 124-126. Translation and Composition. Four credit hours 
each term. Sophomore year. 

Selections from Cicero. Origfinal composition based on text read. 
Study of assigned topics on Roman life and philosophy. 

A. L. 127. Translation and Composition. Four credit hours, first 
tenn. Junior year. 
Selections from Livy. Original composition based on text read. 

A. L. 128-129. Translation. Four credit hours, second term. Four 
credit hours, third term. Junior year. 

Selections from Horace. Translation, prosody and study of Roman 
life and customs. 

A. L. 130. Translation and Composition. Four credit hours, first 
term. Senior year. 
Selections from Tacitus. Original composition based on text read. 

A. L. 131-132. Translation. Four credit hours, second term. Four 
credit hours, third term. Senior year. 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Critical study of the Latin 
drama. 

A. L. 133. History of Roman Literature. Three credit hours, one 
term. 

Philosophy 

For Undergraduates 
The following courses in philosophy are general, giving a survey of 
conscious processes and the application of these processes to the prob- 
lems of everyday life: 



164 

Ph. 101-103. History of Philosophy. Three credit hours each term. 
A general course in the history of philosophy from the time of the 
Greeks to the present. 

Ph. 104. Ethics. Three credit hours, first term. 
Ethical theories and their practical application. 

Ph. 105. Logic. Three credit hours, second term. 
The methods of induction and deduction. Exercises in the detection 
of fallacies and in the expression of argument. 

Ph. 106. Modem Philosophy. Three credit hours, third term. 
A study of the systems of the greatest modem philosophers. 

ECONOMICS 

For Undergraduates 

Econ. 101-102. Principles of Economics. Three credit hours, first 
term. Three credit hours, second term. Not open to freshmen, but re- 
quired of all students electing their major in this department. 

A study of the principles of political economy. 

Econ. 103. Corporation Finance. Three credit hours, first term. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 

An analysis of the principles of organization, management and finan- 
cing of the corporation, and its social effects. 

Econ. 104. Money and Banking. Three credit houn, second term. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 
The history and theory of money, credit and banking. 

Econ. 105. Public Finance. Three credit hours, third term. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 101-102. 

Financial administration, principles and theories of taxation, public 
expenditures and debts. 

Econ. 106. Economic History. Three credit hours, first term. 
The industrial development of modern Europe and the United States 
with emphasis on international economic relations. 

Econ. 107-108. History of Economic Thought. Two credit hours, 
second term. Two credit hours, third term. 
A critical survey of European and American economic theory. 

Econ. 109. Elementary Sociology. Three credit hours, first term. 
The origin of social institutions, and theories of social progress. 

Econ. 110. Rural Sociology. Three credit hours, second term. 
Problems of rural life in the light of modem social science. 



165 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

For Short-Course Students 

Enff. 1-2. Practical Composition. Three credit hours, first term. 
Three credit hours, second term. First year. Prerequisites, minimum 
entrance requirements for short-course students. 

Elements, thought processes, types, structure, grammar, mechanical 
details and common errors of plain composition. Study and prepara- 
tion of commercial letters, forms, articles, reports and advertisements. 
Regular practice in the writing of long and short themes. 

Eng. 3. Vocational Publications. Three credit hours, third term. 
First year. Prerequisite, Eng. 1-2. 

Reading and study of the leading periodicals, representative bulletins 
and significant association reports of the technical vocations, with spe- 
cial attention to agriculture and engineering. Written assignments. 

For Undergraduates 

Eng. 101-103. Composition and Rhetoric. Three credit hours each 
term. Freshman year. Prerequisites, minimum entrance requirements 
in English. Required of all four-year students. 

Parts, principles and conventions of effective thought communication. 
Reading, study and analysis of standard contemporary prose specimens. 
Daily short themes and periodical essays. 

Eng. 104-106. Technical Writing and Scientific Thought. Two 

credit hours each term. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Advanced exposition. Principles of technical composition; examina- 
tion and analysis of scientific bulletins, typical articles from technical 
publications, and scholarly monographs. Study of specimens of the best 
scientific thought. Practice in the composition of the leading forms of 
technical writing. 

Eng. 107-108. Nineteenth Century Poetry. Three credit hours, 
first term. Three credit hours, second term. Prerequisite, approval of 
the instructor. 

Reading and criticism of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, 
Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne and their most distinguished 
contemporaries. Lectures on the history of English poetry, with special 
attention to the Romantic movement and the age of Victoria. Discus- 
sion of the nature of poetry, versification, style, critical methods and the 
relation of literature to social forces. 

Eng. 109. The Essay. Three credit hours, third term. Prerequisite, 

approval of the instructor. 

Development of the artistic elements of modern English prose and of 
the essay as a literary type. Reading and criticism of Bacon, Swift, 
Addison, Lamb, DeQuincey, Carlyle, Emerson, Macaulay, Ruskin and 
Arnold. 



166 



Eng. 110. English Word*. Three credit hours, first term. Prere« 

quisite, Eng. 101-103. Given in 1919-20 and alternate years. 

Practical study of the origin, growth, nature and use of the English 
vocabulary. 

Eng. 111-112. Literature in America. Three credit hours, second 
term. Three credit hours, third term. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 
Given in 1919-20 and alternate years. 

Critical study of Irving, Cooper, Bryant, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, 
Whittier, Longfellow, Lowell, Whitman and recent writers. Considera- 
tion of national life in American letters and America's contributions to 
world literature. Lectures, discussions, reports. 

Eng. 113-114. Novelists of the Nineteenth Century. Three credit 
hours, first term. Three credit hours, second term. Prerequisites, Eng. 
101-103, Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Not given in 1919-20. 

Reading of Scott, Jane Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, Hawthorne, 
George Miot, Meredith, Hardy, Stevenson and others. Critical analysis 
in class of a few model novels, with special reference to characteriza- 
tion, plot and setting. Preparation of written critiques and short theses 
on assigned topics. Historical development of the novel traced by lec- 
tures. 

Eng. 115. The Short Story. Three credit hours, third term. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Not given in 
1919-20. 

Lectures on the development and structure of the short story. Read- 
ing and study of all the recognized types. Critical reports and story- 
writing. 

Eng. 116. Early English Drama. Three credit hours, first term. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Given in 1919- 
1920 and alternate years. 

Development of pre- Shakespearean drama; examination of liturgical, 
mystery and miracle plays, Robinhood and St. George plays, moralities 
and interludes, and the early regular comedies and tragedies. 

Eng. 117-118. Elizabethan Drama. Three credit hours, second 
term. Three credit hours, third term. Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 
107-108, Eng. 109 and Eng. 116. Given in 1919-20 and alternate years. 

Shakespeare, his principal contemporaries and his immediate succes- 
sors. Analysis, interpretative study and rapid reading. Consideration 
of Shakespeare in relation to his sources, his stage and general Eliza- 
bethan life. Lectures, collateral readings and reports. 

Eng. 119-120. Modern English Drama. Three credit hours, first 
term. Three credit hours, second term. Prerequisites, junior or senior 
standing and the approval of the instructor. Not given in 1919-20. 



167 



Reading of representative plays by Dryden, Wycherley, Congreve, 
Farquahar and Vanbrugh; Goldsmith and Sheridan; Wilde, Pinero, 
Jones, Shaw, Galswoilhy, Barker, Yeats and Synge; Fitch, Mioody, 
Thomas and Mackaye. Written criticisms and reports. Lectures on the 
history of the English drama from 1642 to the present time. 

Eng. 121. Technique of the Drama. Three credit hours, third term. 
Trerequisites, junior and senior standing, Eng. 117-118 or Eng. 119-120, 
and approval of the instructor. Not given in 1919-20. 

Principles of dramatic construction and criticism. Lectures, discus- 
sions and practice. 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Seminar. Two credit hours each term. 

Subject according to needs of students in attendance. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

History 

The courses in History are of three classes : required, general elective 
and advanced elective. The required work aims both to give a survey 
of European and American history and to lay the foundation for further 
study in the following years. The general electives offer lines of study 
in American, Ancient and English history; also in the history of the 
Far East and Modern Russia. These courses afford an opportunity for 
the independent use of original material. The more advanced elective 
courses continue the several subjects of the previous years, allowing 
more scientific treatment and individual investigation. 

For Undergraduates 

H. 101. History of Ancient Peoples. Three credit hours, first term. 

A study of the social and political life of the ancient peoples from the 
foundations of civilization and history through the establishment of the 
Roman Empire. This course is given as a background for the classics 
and as a preparation for teaching history and the classics. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

H. 102-103. Continental European History. Three credit hours, 
second term. Three credit hours, third term. 

The development of Western Europe from the period of the Barbaria 
Invasions to the rise of modern states; the political, social and economic 
institutions of this period. Lectures and assigned readings. 

H. 104-105. Modern and Contemporary European History. Two 

credit hours, first term. Two credit hours, second term. General elec- 
tive. Prerequisite, H. 102-103. 

A study of those great events and characteristics of the European 
peoples which in their evolution tended to produce the Great World War. 



168 

European diplomacy; alliances; balance of power; industrial, intellectual 
and relifi^ious revolutions. Lectures and assigned readings. 

H. 106.107. History of the United States. Two credit hours, sec- 
ond term. Two credit hours, third term. 

A rapid survey of the principal events in the life of the American 
people. The Colonial period; the Revolution; growth of population; the 
Civil War; reconstruction; nationalism; rise to leadership. Lectures 
and assigned readings. 

H. 108-110. Social and Economic History of the United States. 

Three credit hours each term. 

A study of the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce, transpor- 
tation and labor from the agricultural communities of the Colonies to 
the industrial and commercial society of today. Lectures and assigned 
readings. 

H. 111. History of Maryland. Three credit hours, third term. Ad- 
vanced elective. Prerequisite, H. 108-110. 

The political, social and economic development of the Common wealth 
considered in its relation to the growth of the nation. Maryland's con- 
tribution to the progress of the age; Maryland men and women and the 
part they have played as leaders, from Colonial days to the present time. 

H. 112. History of Agriculture. Three credit hours, second term. 
General elective. 

A rapid survey of the development of agriculture as an industiy. 
Primitive agriculture; pioneer methods; development of specialized and 
diversified farming; improvements in methods and machinery; the place 
of the experiment station and agricultural college; growth of markets; 
modem tendencies. Lectures and assigned readings. 

H. 113-115. Current History. One credit hour each term. 

A study of the political, social and economic problems of the day. 

H. 116-117. English Social and Industrial History. Two credit 
hours, first term. Two credit hours, second term. General elective. Not 
given, 1919-20. 

A surrey of the social and industrial evolution of the English people; 
the growth of English institutions; commercial policy and expansion; 
industrial and agricultural achievements. Lectures and assigned read- 
ings. 

H. 118-119. Latin and American Republics. Two credit hours, sec- 
ond term. Two credit hours, third term. Advanced elective. Not 
given, 1919-20. 

The development of the Latin- American Republics; influence of the 
United States in Central and South America; Monroe Doctrine; develop- 



169 

nient of South American agriculture and industry. Pan-Americanism. 
Lectures and aseigned readings. 

Political Science 

For Undergraduates 

Pol. Sc. 101-102. Origin of the State. Two credit hours, first term. 
Two credit hours, second term. 

A study of the nature and form of governments. Earliest forms of 
government; governments of Greece and Rome; governments of France, 
Germany and Switzerland; governments of Great Britain and the United 
States. Lectures. 

Pol. Sc. 103-104. Governments of Europe. Two credit hours, sec- 
ond term. Two credit hours, third term. 

A comparative study of the political organization of the principal 
states of Europe. A classification of forms of government; nature of 
government; departments of government; separation of powers; source 
of power. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 105-106. Government of the United States. Two credit 
hours, first term. Two credit hours, second term. 

A study of the governmental system of the United States. Evolution 
of the Federal Constitution; functions of the Federal government and 
the relation of the states to the Federal government; the executive, legis- 
lative and judiciary departments; suffrage; foreign relations. Lectures 
and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 107-108. Federal, State and Municipal Government. Two 

credit hours each of two terms. Not given, 1919-20. 

A survey course in the government of the nation, the state and the 
city. The object of this course is to show not only the government of 
each integral part of the nation but the relation of these parts. Lectures 
and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 109. Contemporary Political Problems of the United States. 

Three credit hours, third term. 

A series of lectures on national and international problems of current 
interest. American ideals; essentials of democracy; education and de- 
mocracy; foreign relations; suffrage; labor problems. 

Pol. Sc. 110-111. Municipal Government. Two credit hours each of 
two terms. First term: Government of American cities. Second term: 
Government of European cities. Not given, 1919-20. 

A study of city government. Source of power; organization and ad- 
ministration; influence of the city upon state and national politics; eco- 
nomic problems of cities; city planning; development of scientific man- 
agement. City manager and commission forms of government. Initia- 
tive, referendum and recall; short ballot. 



170 

Pol. Sc. 112-113. Constitutional Law of the United States. Two 

credit hours, first term. Two credit hours, second term. 

A study of the American constitution and its interpretation as based 
on the decisions of the U. S. Federal and Supreme courts. Separation 
of powers; interstate commerce; protection of civil and political rights; 
police power. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 114-116. International Law and Diplomacy. Three credit 
hours each term. Not given, 1919-20. 

A study of the nature, sources and sanctions of international law. 
Rights and duties of states; relations between belligerents; rights and 
duties of neutrals; general principles of diplomatic usage; rights, privi- 
leges and immunities of diplomatic and consular officers ; treaty making ; 
the Hague conventions; the League of Nations. Lectures and assigned 
readings. 

Pol. Sc. 117. Political Parties and Practical Politics. Three credit 
hours, third term. 

A study of the organization and methods of modern political parties; 
growth of the party system; suffrage; proceedure of legislative bodies; 
reform movements. Lectures and assigned readings. Visits to th^ 
State Legislature and to Congress. 

JOURNALISM 

The curriculum in journalism not only gives the student an excellent 
knowledge of English and subjects coincident with general education, 
but provides courses wherein direct application of such knowledge is 
shown in actual publication of the modem newspaper. Besides taking 
up in a general way practically all phases of newspaper work, some 
courses in the curriculum are designed to give the student a knowledge 
of the specific conditions that apply to the development of trade jour- 
nals, peridicals, magazines, and the weekly country paper. 



■*'-^- ~ T-J— -^t^ 



171 



JOURWATiTBM. 



'»•: 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Oratory (P. S. 104-106) 1 

Technical Writing and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 2 

Spanish, French or German 3 

History of Education (Prin. of Ed. 104) ! 2 

psychology 

Principles of Economics (Ec. 101-102) 3 

Government of United States (Pol. Sc. 105-106) ' 2 

Contemporary Political Problems of U. S.(PoI. Sc. 109) ..... . 

History of British Empire 2 

United States As a World Power 

News Writing (Journalism 101-102) i 3 

The Daily Paper (Journalism 103) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Extempore Speaking (P. S. 107-109) 

Principles of Philosophy (Phil. 101-103) 

International Law and Diplomacy (Pol. Sc. 114-116)... 
Political Parties and Practical Politics (Pol. Sc. 117) . . . 

Corporation Finance (Ec. 104) 

Money and Banking (Ec. 105) 

Public Finance (Ec. 106) 

Novelists of the Nineteenth Century (Eng. 113-114). . . . 

The Short Story (Eng. 115) 

History of Journalism (Journalism 104) 

Newspaper Editing (Journalism 105-107) 

News and Editorial Writing (Journalism 108-110) 



o 



II 



1 

2 
3 



2 
3 
2 



2 
3 



1 
3 
3 



1 1 

2 2 
2 2 



in 



1 

2 
3 



8 

2 
3 



1 
3 



3 



3 
1 
2 

2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Sociology 

Modern Language, History, Economics, Philosophy, 
Literature, or Political Science , 

The Country Newspaper (Journalism 111) 

The Trade Journal and Magazine (Journalism 112) . . . . , 

Feature Writing (Journalism 113) 

Agricultural and Industrial Feature Writing (Jour- 
nalism 114-115) 

Principles of Journalism (Journalism 116) 

Business Management, Circulation and Advertising 
(Journalism 117-118) 

Head Writing, Make-Up and Mechanical Details (Jour- 
nalism 119) 

Practical Newspaper Operation (Journalism 120-121).., 



3 
2 
2 
3 



2 
2 
2 




10 



2 

3 



10 



For Undergraduates 

101-102. News Writing. Three credit hours, first term. Three 
credit hours, second term. Sophomore standing required. 

What constitutes news; news values; sources of news; gathering of 
news; types of newspaper stories. 

103. The Daily Paper. Three credit hours, third term. Sophomore 
standing required. 

A study of the methods and styles of the big metropolitan dailies; 
functions of a daily paper; file system; morgue; analysis of weekly pap- 
ers; Sunday supplements; and syndicates. 



i;i 






I 



172 

104. History of Journalism. One credit hour each term. Junior 
standing required. 

A study of journalism since its beginning, with special attention to 
the various types that developed in the nineteenth century; effect of 
journalism on world civilization and industrial development; relation- 
ship of journalism to the arts and sciences; present standards. 

105-107. Newspaper Editing. Two credit hours each term. Junior 
standing required. 

Copy reading; proof-reading; general editorial supervision; type se- 
lection; printers' marks; problems of the copy-reader and proof-reader. 

108-110. News and Editorial Writing. Three credit hours each 
term. Prerequisite, Journalism 101-102. 

The interview; general reportorial duties; newspaper correspondence; 
human interest; rewrites; interpretation of news; function of an edi- 
torial in the newspaper; study of sources of material for editorials; prin- 
ciples embodied in news and editorial writing; relationship of the edi- 
torial to the news story; exchanges. 

111. The Country Newspaper. Two credit hours, first term. Senior 
standing required. 

A study of the conditions affecting the country paper; sources of news 
for it; kinds of editorials; and different emphasis placed on news values; 
and the problems confronting the average small town weekly paper in 
obtaining paper supplies; and putting news in type; advertising and 
circulation problems; relationship of the paper to its community. 

112. The Trade Journal. Two credit hours, second term. Senior 
standing required. 

Kinds of trade journals and their requirements for special articles; 
agricultural weeklies; publicity departments of great industrial organi- 
zations, and methods of operation. 

113. Feature Writing. Three credit hours, first term. Senior stand- 
ing required. 

Nature of the feature story; the narrative and the articles; kinds of 
material, and sources of material; treatment of topics and methods of 
handling features; markets for such material. 

114-115. Agricultural and Industrial Feature Writing. Three credit 
hours, second term. Three credit hours, third term. Senior standing 
required. 

Applications of principles embodied in Journalism 113 to articles and 
stories of an agricultural nature, with particular reference to existing 
agricultural magazines, weekly farm papers, country papers, and agri- 
cultural departments of big dailies. 



173 



.-i 



Special study of the technical demands of trade and industrial jour- 
nals, kinds of material they are likely to accept, and a general applica- 
tion of the principles of Journalism 113 in preparation of articles for 
such papers. 

116. Principles of Journalism. One credit hour, first term. Senior 
standing required. 

Ethics of the newspaper profession from the view of the editorial of- 
fices, the business office and the news department; relationship of the 
several departments of the newspaper and courtesies between newspaper 
men; laws of copyright, author's rights and libel. 

117. Business Management. Circulation and Advertising. One credit 
hour, second term. One credit hour, third term. Senior standing re- 
quired. 

Problems encountered by the business manager, circulation manager, 
and advertising manager; methods of increasing circulation; develop- 
ment of new territory; analysis of markets; the advertising agency; 
national and local advertising; special type for advertising display; ad- 
vertising rates; relationship of the cost of production of the newspaper 
to circulation and advertising. 

118. Head writing, make-up, and mechanical details. Two credit 

hours, first term. Senior standing required. 

Kinds of type for use in heads; relationship of the head to the story; 
what the head should embody; mechanical details of the head; general 
principles to be observed in making up the paper; placing of advertis- 
ing; mechanics of the composing-room, the sterotyping-room, the press- 
room and problems in each. 

119-120. Practical Newspaper Operation. Ten hours each week, 
second and third terms. Senior standing required. 

This time will be devoted to the production of a regular weekly coun- 
try newspaper, a monthly magazine, and a daily paper; a newspaper 
plant is to be installed at the College in the summer of 1920, and stu- 
dents will get actual experience in almost every phase of newspaper 
creation and production. Conditions in the modem newspaper plant are 
to be duplicated in every detail possible. Students will be given practi- 
cal application of all the principles acquired during their previous three 
years of study. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

French 

For Undergraduates 

M. L. 101-103. Elementary French. Three credit hours each term. 
Freshman year. For students who have entered college without French^ 

Thorough drill in pronunciation, inflections, elements of syntax, com- 
position and easy translation. 






174 



M. L. 104-106. Translation. Three credit hours each term. Sopho- 
more year. 

This course may be taken by students who have entered with two years 
of French. 

M. L. 107. Scientific French. Three credit hours, one term. 
Translation of selected texts. 

M. L. 108-110. History and Fiction. Three credit hours each term. 
Junior year. 
Translation of selected authors; composition and conversation. 

M. L. 111-113. Drama and Poetry. Three credit hours each term. 
Senior year. 
Translation of selected authors; composition and conversation. 

M. L. 114. History of French Literature. Three credit hours, one 
term. 

German 

For Undergraduates 

M. L. 121-123. Elementary German. Three credit hours each term. 
Freshman year. For students who have entered college without German. 

Thorough drill in pronunciation, inflections, elements of syntax, com- 
position and easy translation. 

M. L. 124-126. Translation. Three credit hours each term. Sopho- 
more year. This course may be taken by students who have entered 
with two years of German. 

Selections from German fiction, composition and conversation. 

M. L. 127. Scientific German. Three credit hours, one term. 
Translation of selected texts. 

M. L. 128-130. History and Fiction. Three credit hours each term. 
Junior year. 

Translation of selected authors; conversation and composition. 

M. L. 131-133. Drama and Poetry. Three credit hours each term. 
Senior year. 
Translation of selected authors; composition and conversation. 

M. L. 134. History of German Literature. Three credit hours, one 
term. 

Spanish 

At the end of the Sophomore year a student should be able to converse 
in Spanish as well as read and write it. The subject matter involved 
will be such as is ordinarily encountered by persons residing in Spanish- 
speaking countries. After this basic work a student has an option of 
two fields of specialization. The first line of specialization is concerned 



175 

with ihe commercial needs of the United States in its relation, particu- 
larly, with the South American republics. Subjects receiving special 
attention are the trade interests of the proprietor and agent. The sec- 
ond line of major study has to do with the special interests of scholars 
and diplomats. 

For Undergraduates 
The trader's curriculum in Spanish embraces, primarily, courses 147 
to 152. The literary Spanish curriculum consists of courses 153 to 156. 

M. L. 141-143. Three credit hours each term. Freshman year. 
Grammar; conversation; writing and reading of easy texts. 

M. L. 144. Three credit hours, first term. Sophomore year. Pre- 
requisite, M. L. 143. 
Thorough knowledge of grammar; emphasis laid on the verb. 

J M. L. 145-146. Three credit hours, second term. Three credit hours, 

third term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, M. L. 144. 

Reading and conversation. Reading of easy periodicals with direct 
application of M. L. 144. All instruction from this point on is given in 
Spanish. 

M. L. 147-148. Three credit hours, first term. Three credit hours, 
second term. Junior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 146. 

Vocabulary of trade. Special attention to the names of articles of 
hardware, agricultural implements, engineering instruments, etc. 
Trade problems assigned. 

M. L. 149. Three credit hours, third term. Junior year. Prere- 
quisite, M. L. 148. 

Business correspondence and etiquette. Direct application of M. L. 
148 as used in the soliciting of trade. Actual copies of letters of South 
American business houses are taken as models. 

M. L. 150. Three credit hours, first term:. Senior year. Prere- 
quisite, M. L. 149. Jr. 112. 

Methods of advertising in South America and Mexico compared with 
those of the United States. Writing and criticism of original adver- 
tisements* 

M. L. 151-152. Three credit hours, second term. Three credit 
hours, third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, M. L. 146, Ec. 101-102, 
Pol. Sc. 117-119 and H. 104-106. 

General study of the commercial development and possibilities of the 
South American countries and the Philippines. Lectures by recognized 
authorities. 



176 



1 



M. L. 153-154. Early Spanisk Literature. Three credit hours, first 
term. Three credit hours, second term. Junior year. Prerequisites, 
M. L. 146, H. 104-106, Pol. Sc. 117-119. 

Development of Spanish literature from the heroic period to the seven- 
teenth century. Selections from Bivar, Ruiz and LfOpez. 

M. L. 155. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literature. Three 

credit hours, third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 154. 

Critical study of selected works of Cervantes, Calderon, Perez, Quevedo 
and Montimeyer. 

M. L. 156. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Literature. Three 
credit hours, first term. Senior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 155. 

Selected reading from Ferrari, Ayala, Cabellero and their contempo- 
raries. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(With special reference to professions) 

It is generally recognized that certain professions, using this term in 
both a special and a broad sense, not only have public speaking as a 
base, but that the very character of these professions is such that public 
speaking is the medium through which the professional activities must 
to a large extent operate. This is particularly true in the Law, in the 
Ministry, in Leadership for social service work, and in Lecture and Ex- 
tension Work for public and private organizations. 

The curriculum in Public Speaking, with special reference to profes- 
sions, will be offered to students preparing for the professions named 
above and to those preparing for such other professions as justify pub- 
lic speaking as a major study. In this curriculum the student will elect 
from all the subjects offered in the School of Liberal Arts those par- 
ticular studies which will best prepare him for the profession in view. 
Public speaking, both general and specially applied, will run through 
the entire curriculum, and at the different stages of the student's prog- 
ress in acquiring he will be taught to give oral expression to that which 
he has acquired. The general studies pursued give the educational 
preparation; the drill and oral expression create and develop the medium 
through which this preparation can be utilized and made efficient. 

After the freshman year the studies in this curriculum are elective, 
except the prescribed work in public speaking. In addition to the regu- 
lar courses in public speaking, specially adapted and prescribed courses 
will be offered. 

For Undergraduates 

P. S. 101-103. Reading and Speaking. One credit hour each term. 
Freshman year. 

A practical course in delivery. The principles and technique of vocal 
expression; enunciation, emphasis, inflection, force, gesture and general 



— —^-jjt^tt^^h^a 



177 

delivery. Delivery of oratorical selections by students before the class, 
with criticisms and suggestions by instructor. Individual drill by ap- 
pointment with instructor. 

p. S. 104-106. Oratory. One credit hour each term. Open to stu- 
dents who have credit for P. S. 101-103. 

The rhetoric of oral discourse. The speech for the occasion. Study 
of oratorical masterpieces. Practice in the writing and delivery of ora- 
tions and general speeches and addresses. 

P. S. 107-109. Extempore Speaking. One credit hour each term. 
Open to all students. 

Theory and methods. The psychology of public speaking. Class exer- 
cises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned topics. 

P. S. 110-112. Debate. One credit hour each term. Open to stu- 
dents who have credit for P. S. 101-103. Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the principles of argumentation. Study of masterpieces in 
argumentative oratory. Class exercises in debating. 

P. S. 113-115. Oral Reading. Two credit hours each term. Open 
to all students. 

Primarily for students intending to be teachers. Study of the techni- 
que of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of literary master- 
pieces. Study of methods of teaching oral reading in the schools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 101. Library Methods. One credit hour, first term. Fresh- 
man year. Required of all Liberal Arts students. Elective for others. 

This course is intended to help students use the library with greater 
facility. Instruction will be given by lectures and by practical work 
with the various catalogs, indexes and reference books. This course con- 
siders the general classification of the library according to the Dewey 
System. Representative works of each division are studied in combi- 
nation with the use of the library catalog. Attention is given to periodi- 
cal literature, particularly that indexed in the Reader's Guide and Agri- 
cultural Index. Book selection and a short bibliography on an assigned 
subject complete this course. 

L. S. 102-103. Advanced Library Methods. Two credit hours, sec- 
ond term. Two credit hours, third term. Prerequisites, L. S. 101 and 
Eng. 101-103. 

A continuation of Library Science 101, emphasizing selection and pur- 
chase of books; administration of libraries; elementary work in classify- 
ing, cataloging and mending of books; charging and loan desk practice. 
Designed especially for those interested in prospective library work. 



ill 



m 



*i 



it 



178 

MUSIC 

In the Department of IVTusic the courses of study are thorough and 
comprehensive, and the methods of instruction are along modern lines. 
The aim of this department is to teach music not only as an accomplish- 
ment, but also as an aid in the development of the highest type of man- 
hood and womanhood. The ultimate aim is to train for life and to use 
the art of music as a means of intellectual, aesthetic and moral culture. 

The instruction is planned to meet the personal needs of each student. 
Since students possess varying degrees of talent and diligence, it is im- 
possible to estimate exactly the time required to complete a curriculum 
of study. Each student is advanced as rapidly as talent, applicatioir 
and thoroughness warrant. 

PIANO COURSES 

Firit Grade. Beyer's Method, Book I of Matthews* Graded Course; 
studies in sight reading and pieces suitable for this grade. 

Second Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Book II, Koehler Studies, 
op. 242, and selections suitable to this grade. 

Third Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books III and IV; Czemy's 
Etudes de la Velocite, op. 120 and 299 Book I; Lichner's sonatas; com- 
positions from Mendelsohn, Mozart, Godard and others. 

Fourth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books V and VI; Czemy's 
Etudes de la Velocite, op. 299, Book II; Kuhlan's sonatas; studies from 
Bach, Brahms, Weber; also Mozart's easier sonatas. 

Fifth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books VII and VIII; 

Czemy's Etude de la Velocite, op. 299, Books III and IV; Cramer's Fifty 
Selected Studies, Books I and II; the more difficult of Mozart's sonatas 
and the easier of Beethoven's sonatas; compositions from Chopin, 
Schuman, Schubert and others. 

Sixth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books IX and X; Cle- 
mente's Gradus and Parnassum; the more diffiicult sonatas of Beethoven; 
composition from Chopin, Taussig, Rubenstein and others. 

Special courses on all brass and reed instruments may also be ar- 
ranged. 

Each student who is pursuing a course in music will be assigned one 
or more periods daily; these assignments will be made in such a manner 
that neither instruction nor practice on the piano will conflict with the 
student's other academic interests. 

Instruction may be begun at any time by such students as bring the 
director of music a receipt showing that they have met all the require- 
ments explained above, to the full satisfaction of the college authorities. 



179 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

AND TACTICS 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

The work in this department follows the outline given in General 
Orders Nlzmber 49, War Department. 

Instruction 

An infantry unit of the senior division of the Reserve Officers' Train- 
is ing Corps has been established at the College under the provisions of 
the Ajct of Congress of June 3, 1916. All male students, if citizens of 
the United States, whether pursuing a four-year or a two-year course 
of study, are required to take for a period of two years, as a prerequi- 
site to gfraduation, the military training furnished by the War Depart- 
ment. Three periods a week of not less than one hour each are devoted 
to this work, of w^hich one period is utilized for theoretical instruction. 
At the end of the sophomore year a student may volunteer for further 
training. His record is examined by the president of the College and 
the professor of military science and tactics. If accepted, the volunteer 
will, after signing a written agreement prescribed by the Secretary of 
War, be enrolled for two or more years of training in the Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Corps. Such students are required to give five hours a 
week to this advanced training, two of which are utilized for theoretical 
instruction. These students are required also to attend two summer 
camps of four weeks each. Any student completing this advanced train- 
ing course is eligible for appointment by the President of the United 
States as a Reserve Officer of the United States Army for a period of ten 
years. They are also eligible for appointment, under certain prescribed 
conditions, as temporary second lieutenants in the Regular Army for a 
period of six months. 

The Federal Government furnishes uniforms, or commutation there- 
for, to all members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, and also 
commutation of subsistence to such students as are selected for advanced 
training during the junior and senior years. The Government further- 
more pays the expenses of attendance at the required summer training 
camps, including traveling expenses. 

All physically fit male students, not members of the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, are required by the College regulations to take two 
hours a week each year of practical drill, unless excused by the presi- 
dent for some satisfactory reason. 

College credit is given for work in the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps. Since the credits obtained for the first two years of this train- 
ing are prerequisite to graduation, any student of either sex who for 



M 



180 






any reason whatever does not take this work must elect approved sub- 
jects in place thereof to obtain equivalent credits. 

Uniform — Members of the Student Battalion must appear in uniform 
at all military formations and at other specified times. 

Uniforms for members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps will be 
furnished free by the War Department. The uniforms are the refla- 
tion uniform of the United States Army. Such uniforms will have to 
be kept in g^ood condition except for ordinary wear and tear, and be re- 
turned to the Military Department at the end of the year. 

Description of Courses 

(G. 0. No. 49-— War Department). 

M. I. 101. Basic R. O. T. C. Course — 

1. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Physical Train- 
ing — ^Koehler) ; Infantry drill (U. S. Infantry Regulations), to include 
the School of the Soldier, Squad and Company, close and extended order. 
Preliminary instruction sighting position and aiming drills, gallery prac- 
tice, nomenclature and care of rifle and equipment. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Theory of target practice, individual and 
collective (use of landscai)e targets made up by U. S. Military Disci- 
plinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; military organization (Tables 
of Organization) ; map reading; service of security; personal hygiene. 

2. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Physical Train- 
ing — Koehler) ; infantry drill (U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations), to in- 
clude school of battalion, special attention devoted to fire direction and 
control; ceremonies; manuals (Part V, Infantry Drill Regulations); 
bayonet combat; intrenchments (584-595, Infantry Drill Regulations); 
first-aid instruction; range and gallery practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, general military policy as 
shown by military history of United States and military obligations of 
citizenship; service of information; combat (to be illustrated by small 
tactical exercises) ; United States Infantry Drill Regulations, to include 
School of Company; camp sanitation for small commands. 

M. I. 102. Basic R. O. T. C. Course — 

3. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2 (a). Combat fir- 
ing, if practicable, but collective firing should be attempted in indoor 
ranges by devices now in vogue at Uliited States Disciplinary Barracks. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. United States Infantry Drill Regula- 
tions, to include School of Battalion and Combat (350-622) ; Small- Arms 
Firing Regulations; lectures as in (b) course 2; map reading; camp 
sanitation and camping expedients. 



181 



4. Military Art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2 (a) ; signaling; 
semaphore and flag; first aid. Work with sand table by constructing to 
scale intrenchments, field works, obstacles, bridges, etc. Comparison of 
ground forms (constructed to scale) with terrain as represented on map ; 
range practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, military history (recent) ; 
service of information and security (illustrated by small tactical prob- 
lems in patrolling, advance guards, rear guards, flank guards, trench and 
mine warfare, orders, messages and camping expedients) ; marches and 
camps (Field Service Regulations and Infantry Drill Regulations). 

M. I. 103. Advanced R. O. T. C. Course — 

5. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank as cadet 
officers or non-commissioned officers in connection with the practical work 
and exercises laid down for the unit or units. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Minor tactics; field orders (studies in 
minor tactics, United States School of the Line) ; map maneuvers. 
Weight 8. Company administration, general principles (papers and re- 
turns). Weight 1. Military history. Weight 2. 

6. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Same as (a) course 5. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Minor tactics (continued) ; map ma- 
neuvers. Weight 8. Elements of international law. Weight 2. Prop- 
erty accountability; method of obtaining supplies and equipment (Army 
Regulations). Weight 1. 

M. I. 104. Advanced R. O. T. C. Course — 

7. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank as cadet of- 
ficers or non-commissioned officers in connection with the practical work 
and exercises scheduled for the unit or imits. Military sketching. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Tactical problems, small forces, all arms 
combined; map maneuvers; court-martial proceedings (Manual for 
Courts-martial). International relations of America from discovery to 
present day; gradual growth of principles of international law embodied 
in American diplomacy, legislation and treaties. Lectures: Psychology 
of war and kindred subjects; general principles of strategy only, planned 
to show the intimate relationship between the statesman and the soldier 
(not to exceed five lectures). 

8. Military Art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units) . 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Same as course 7 (a) . 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Tactical problems (continued) ; map 
maneuvers. Rifle in war. Lectures on military history and policy. 



182 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AND RECREATION 



I 



The Department of Physical Education and Recreation has been or- 
ganized to control all physical training, recreation, intramural, and in- 
tercollegiate athletics. All work is closely coordinated and the ideal is 
to see that every man in the institution gets opportunities to take part 
in competitive sports. The plan under which the department is to oper- 
ate may be summed up as follows: 

1. A series of exercises arranged for every student in the institution 
and compulsory for all, the exercises to be based on mass exercises com- 
mon in Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Neither the German 
nor Scandinavian system is to be used in its entirety, but a combination 
of the heavy gymnastic drills of the former with the lighter squad drills 
of the latter. All students will be given physical examination and placed 
in various classes according to their individual physical needs. Students 
v/ill receive different kinds of work and be encouraged to take part in 
those games which provide the exercise of which they are most in need. 

2. A general system of intramural athletics is carried out under a 
regular schedule with teams representing different units of the College. 
All students take part in one or more of these branches of sport and 
the College encourages enough sports to give each an opportunity. It 
is the aim of each class to have its own wrestling team, basket-ball team, 
baseball team, volley-ball team, track team, and so on for just as many 
teams as there are students to fill the positions. The games between 
these teams are carried out with regularity of schedule and supervision. 
Besides these, there are general competitions such as cross-country runs 
and interclass track meets in which representatives of all classes may 
compete at the same time. A regular playground is in process of con- 
struction on which will be available tennis courts, volley-ball courts, 
tether ball poles, stakes for pitching quoits, etc. 

3. All physical training of the students, including mass exercises, in- 
tramural sports, intercollegiate competitions, and ?nilitary training, 
henceforth are a part of the general educational system of the College. , 

DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 30, 1918. 

HONORARY 

Doctor of Agriculture 

Bradford Knapp Washington, D. C. 

Thomas B. Symons College Park, Md. 

Master of Science 

Temple deRochbrune Jarrell College Park, Md. 



183 

IN COURSE 

Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Education 

John Homer Remsburg Middletown, Md. 

Agronomy 

Percival Ellsworth Clark La Plata, Md. 

WILLLA.M ViCKERY CuTLER Washington, D. C. 

MoRDECAi J. B. EZEKDGL Hyattsville, Md. 

John Paul Jones Davidsonville, Md. 

ROBERT Steel Kann Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Animal Husbandry 

WILLL4M Harold Carroll Ashland, Md. 

Walter Kingsley Grigg Port Chester, N. Y. 

Frederick Morgan Haig Riverdale, Md. 

Biology 

Allen Bowie Duckett. Bladensburg, Md. 

Horticulture 

Edward Lawrence Wilde Washington, D. C. 

Chemistry 

Francis Clay Brimer Stockton, Md, 

Civil Engineering 

Roy Smallwood Eyre Highland, Md. 

Milton Allender Pyle. Baltimore, Md. 

CERTIFICATES IN TWO-YEAR COURSES ISSUED MAY 30, 19ia 

Agriculture 

Robert Forrest, Jr Rockville, Md. 

Henry Herman Schulte .Newark, N. J. 

Arthur Mead Scribner Philadelphia, Pa. 

Charlotte Ann Vaux Washington, D. C. 

Henry Weaver Greensboro, Md. 

TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT AWARDED MAY 30, 1918 

For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interests of Maryland: 

Robert H. Miller Montgomery Co., Md. 

Robert L. Graham Baltimore, Md. 

B. F. Shriver XarroU Co., Md. 

MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED MAY 30, 1918 

For excellence in the Animal Husbandry Course — Medal offered by 

the College: 

F. M. Haig Riverdale, Md. 

For excellence in the Agronomy Course — Medal offered by the College: 

M. J. B. EZEKIEL Hyattsville, Md. 



«? 



iii 



184 

For excellence in the Civil Engfineerinff Course — ^Medal offered by '■ 

the College: 
M. A. Pyle Baltimore, Md. 

.For excellence in the Two- Year Course in Agriculture — Medal offered 

by the College: 
TRoBERT Forrest, Jr Rockville, Md. 

For excellence in Debate — Medal offered by the Alumni Association : 
M. J. B. EzEKiEL Hyattsville, Md. 

The Goddard Medal, for excellence in Scholarship and Moral Character — 

offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James : 

F. M. Haig Riverdale, Md. 

Medal offered to the winner of Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest by 
the Association of Colleges comprising Western Maryland, St. John's, 
Washington College and Maryland State College. In the contest at 
Chestertown, April 24, 1918, E. M. Sawyer, of Worcester County, Mary- 
land, class of 1919, was the winner. 

For excellence in Debate, "President's Cup," offered by 

Dr. H. J. Patterson: 

PoE Literary Society. 

BATTALION ORGANIZATION 
Battalion Staff 

George W. Norris .Captain and Adjutant. 

J. W. Smith 1st Lt. and Personnel Adjutant. 

J. R. Drawbaugh 1st Lt. and Small- Arms Instructor. 

R. B. Thomas 1st Lt. and Bayonet Instructor. 

M. T. RiGGS 1st Lt. and Infantry Drill Instructor. 

T. L. BisSELL Sergeant-Major. 

M. L. Raedy Sergeant and Clerk. 

COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

The Band 

G. R. Stuntz 1st Lieutenant. 

E. V. Miller 2nd Lieutenant. 

Company "A" Company "B** Company "C" 

Captains 

M. C. Brown E. M. Sawyer H. S. Berlin 

First Lieutenants 

H. O. Coster Charles Paine K. C. Posey 

Second Lieutenants 

W. R. Hardisty E. W. Hand E. C. E. Ruppert 



185 



J. H. ElSEMAN 
B. L. BURNSIDE 

L. W. Snyder 
R. S. Knode 



C. W. Cole 
R. Stone 
H. H. Sener 
R. W. Heller 
A. B. Neumann 
F. Slanker 



First Sergeants 

S. E. Abrams 

Supplj Sers^eants 

J. G. Reading 

Mess Sergeants 
A. W. HiNES 

Sergeants 

H. L. Bosley 

E. B. Ady 

Corporals 

H. G. Edmonds 

F. J. Frere 

C. B. Molster 
H. R. Peddicord 
N. V. Stonestreet 
J. S. Knode 



J. D. SCHEUCH 



J. A. Gray 



W. F. Sterling 



E. E. Dawson 
J. C. Hamke 



P. T. Morgan 
H. D. Gilbert 
A. A. Miller 
W. T. Gardner 
T. C. Groton 



MEMBERS OF THE STUDENTS' ARMY TRAINING CORPS 

SecUon "A''— Collegiate 

Name Postoffice County 

Abbott, J. S Washington District of Columbia 

Abrams, S. E Hagerstown Washington 

Ady, E. B Sharon Harford 

Alberti, H. V Council Bluffs Iowa 

Alcorn, J. A Laurel Prince George's 

Allard, W. C, Jr Takoma Park District of Columbia 

Allen, W. T Washington District of Columbia 

Allison, B. J Stony Point New York 

Ankers, H. H Sterling Virginia 

Archer, R. B Washington District of Columbia 

Ayers, C. W Cumberland Allegany 

Babcock, K. W , Hagerstown Washington 

Baer, a. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Bailey, C. T Eladensburg Prince George's 

Barall, W. L Towson Baltimore 

Barton, J. H Centreville Queen Anne's 

Baumgardner, B. R Frederick Frederick 

Baurman, W. L Washington District of Columbia 

Belt, W. H Washington District of Columbia 

Bender, A. J Grantsville Garrett 

Bender, B Brooklyn New York 

Berenter, P Washington District of Columbia 

Berkman, M. H Washington District of Columbia 

Berlin, H. S Baltimore Baltimore City 

Herman, H. A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Bernard, L. E Jersey City New Jersey 

BissELL, T. L Westover Somerset 

Bissett, a. L Brunswick Frederick 

Bletsch, C. F Washington District of Columbia 

Bosley, L. W Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 



■ l'' 

lit' 






186 



Name Poatoffice 

Boston, A. D Berlin 

Bower, R. G Hagerstown . . 

Bradley, G. A Washin^n . . 

Braungard, p. J Hagerstown . . 

Broach, K. T Ridgewood 



County 

Worcester 

Washington 

District of Columbia 

Washington 

New Jersey 

Brown, C. E Frederick Frederick 

Brown, Chauncey Washington District of Columbia 

Brown, M. C Seattle Washington 

Burbank, C. R Relay Howard 

Burnside, B. L Hyattsville Prince George's 

Burroughs, W. R jMechanicsville St. Mary's 

BusKiRK, M Cumberland Allegany 

Butt, T. A Rockville Montgomery 

Butts, J. A ijaysburg Pennsylvania 

Cadle, W. R Ijamsville Frederick 

Cadwallader, R. R .Monnesson Pennsylvania 

Calvin, G. F Washington District of Columbia 

Campbell, B. K Baltimore Baltimore City 

Canter, F. D Aquasco Prince George's 

Carlisle, J. F Gaithersburg Montgomery 

Carroll, H. M .Ashland Baltimore 

Cash, E. F Baltimore Baltimore City 

Chatlin, B Washington District of Columbia 

Cheezum, F. L Preston Caroline 

Clarke, S. M,, Jr Landover Prince George's 

Compher, C. M Doubs Frederick 

CoNYNGTON, J Berwyn Prince George's 

CoRKRAN, E. B Rhodesdale Dorchester 

Crippen, C. C Chester Pennsylvania 

Crockett, F _. . .Pocomoke City Worcester 

Croggon, W. N Washington District of Columbia 

Darkis, F. R Frederick Frederick 

Darnall, C. E Hyattsville Prince George's 

Davies, G. G Easton Talbot 

Dawson, E. E Trappe Talbot 

Defibaugh, R. J Ridgely West Virginia 

Dinterman, G. H Middletown Frederick 

Donaldson, E. C Laurel Prince George's 

DuvALL, W. M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Edmonds, H. G Washington District of Columbia 

Edwards, T. V Hamilton Baltimore 

EiSEMAN, J. H Washington District' of Columbia 

Elliott, J. W Westover Somerset 

Engle, J. C Frederick Frederick 

Etchison, a. H Jefferson Frederick 

Etienne, a. D Berwyn Prince George's 

EwALD, F. G Mt. Savage Allegany 

Filbert, E. B Baltimore Baltimore City 

Fleischman, J. L Frederick Frederick 

Flora, F Jersey City New Jersey 

Foght, p. R Washington District of Columbia 

Forrest, R., Jr Rockville Montgomery 

Frere, F. J Tompkinsville Charles 

Freundlich, H Baltimore Baltimore City 

FLTiR, A. H Washington District of Columbia 



187 



l^wmM Postojfice County 

FussELBAUGH, W. P Baltimore Baltimore City 

Garber, p. E Washington District of Columbia 

Gardner, W. T Clearspring Washington 

Gerlach, G. M Cambridge Dorchester 

Getty, G. E Silver Spring Montgomery 

Gilbert, C. H. D Frederick Frederick 

Gilpin, W. H Sandy Spring Montgomery 

Gormley, W. a Branchville Prince George's 

Grabill, E. W Brunswick Frederick 

Graham, W. S Washington District of Columbia 

Gray, J. A Brownsville Washington 

Gray, W. D Prince Frederick Calvert 

Greenwood, A. H Forestville Prince George's 

Groton, T. C Pocomoke City Worcester 

Groves, J Washington District of Columbia 

GuREViCH, H. J Washington District of Columbia 

GuREViCH, M. J Washington District of Columbia 

Haig, R. V Riverdale Prince George's 

Hamke, J. C Rockville Montgomery 

Hand, E. W Berwyn Prince George's 

Handler, H Newark New Jersey 

Hardisty, W. R Seabrook Prince George's 

Hartmann, C. J Elizabeth New Jersey 

Harvey, V. H Deer Park Garrett 

Hayes, A. W Washington District of Columbia 

Haynes, H. R Baltimore Baltimore City 

Heischober, S Brooklyn New York 

Heisler, H. E Washington District of Columbia 

Heller, R. W .Eastport, Annapolis. . .Anne Arundel 

Hemp, R. L Jefferson Frederick 

Herwig, C. H Frederick Frederick 

Hines, a. W Washington District of Columbia 

Holter, C. K Jefferson Frederick 

Holter, E. F Middletown Frederick 

Hopkins, P. J Cordova Talbot 

Hopkins, T. R Washington District of Columbia 

Hopkins, W. H Cordova Talbot 

Jefferson, H. W Roselle Park New Jersey 

Jenkins, P. A Clinton Prince George's 

Jester, W. C Washington District of Cc^umbia 

Johnson, A. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Johnson, C. E Myersville Frederick 

Johnston, M. S Hagerstown Washington 

Karn, G. C Jefferson Frederick 

Kaufman, S Baltimore Baltimore City 

Keepauver, J. E Berwyn Prince George's 

Keen, H. V Snow Hill Worcester 

Keller, L. J Trumbauersville Pennsylvania 

Kemp, A. D Frederick Frederick 

Kemp, H. S Princess Anne Somerset 

Keyes, C. C Barton Alleeany 

King, E. S., Jr Branchville Prince George's 

KiSLiUK, D. E Washington District of Columbia 

Knepper, C. L Clearspring Washington 

Knode, J. S Uniontown Pennsylvania 



188 






1 



Name Postoffice County 

Laikin, G. J Town of Union New Jersey 

Lane, J. J., Jr Ridgely Caroline 

Langrall, J. H Roland Park Baltimore City 

Latimer, T. M Hyattsville Prince George's 

LeCompte, H. a Vienna Dorchester 

Levin, A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Levin, H. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

LiLLiE, F. T Takoma Park District of Columbia 

Lorch, G. H Washington District of Columbia 

LUCKE, R. H Catonsville Baltimore 

LUCKEY, G. J Frederick Frederick 

Lyon, F. M Oakland Garrett 

McGuiRE, M. M Washington District of Columbia 

McLean, D. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

McNamara, W. E Washington District of Columbia 

Mackenzie, H. B Capitol Heights Prince George's 

Magruder, J. M Washington District of Columbia 

Mahoney, p. H Tooele Utah 

Manning, R. I Accokeek Prince G-eorge's 

Marks, A Cincinnati Ohio 

Martz, J. W Frederick Frederick 

Mathias, L. G Hagerstown Washington 

Mattfeldt, G. E Washington District of Columbia 

Melnicove, S Baltimore Baltimore City 

Mertz, p. W Mulberry Indiana 

Michael, P. S Frederick Frederick 

Middleton, T. B., Jr Clinton Prince George's 

Miles, C. F Brunswick Frederick 

Miller, A. A College Park Prince George's 

Miller, E. V Hagerstown Washington 

MiNTZ, S. A Bayonne New Jersey 

MOLSTER, C. B Washington District of Columbia 

Moore, C. E., Jr Roland Park .Baltimore City 

MooRE, J. F Washington District of Columbia 

Moran, J. A Frederick Frederick 

Morehouse, M. B Washington District of Columbia 

MoRELAND, G Gallant Green Charles 

Morgan, E. K Washington District of Columbia 

Morgan, P. T Baltimore Baltimore City 

MouLDEN, J. S Rockville Montgomery 

MULLiNix, H. E Mt. Airy Carroll 

Mutter, F. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Myers, A. H Winchester Virginia 

Myers, E. H. L., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Myers, W. E Street Harford 

Neighbours, H. D Lewistown Frederick 

Neumann, A. B Washington District of Columbia 

Nevius, C. a Easton Talbot 

Newell, S. R Washington District of Columbia 

Nichols, H. R Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

NicoDEMUS, A. W Monrovia Frederick 

NoRTHAM, A. J Pocomoke Worcester 

NOYES, John Westwood Prince George's 

P VINE, C. E Washington District of Columbia 

Painter, J. H Washington District of Columbia 



189 



N<Mn« Postoffice County 

Palmer, N. F Charleston West Virginia 

pARKMAN, C. B Passaic New Jersey 

Pabsly, G. M Brookeville Montgomery 

Parsons, D. A Washington . . .District of Columbia 

Pepper, T. D Washington restrict of Columbia 

PERRY, D. P Clearspring Washington 

Peterman, W. W Clearspring Washington 

Polk, L. W Pocomoke Worcester 

PoOLE, A. S Frederick Frederick 

Powell, E. W Princess Anne Somerset 

Pboss, C Baltimore Baltimore City 

QuiNN, H. V. Frederick Frederick 

Raedy, M. L Washington .District of Columbia 

RauSCH, R. M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Reading, J. G Rockville Montgomery 

Redmile, H. W Kennedyville Kent 

Remsburg, E. E Buckeystown Frederick 

Richardson, P. S Williamsburg Dorchester 

Roberts, F. G Baltimore Baltimore City 

Rockwell, H. P Gambrills Anne Arundel 

Roelke, C. R Burkittsville Frederick 

RosENBUSCH, L. A Washington District of Columbia 

Routzahn, I. R Middletown Frederick 

RuARK, W. H Westover Somerset 

Ruppert, E. C. E., Jr Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

Rynearson, a. C .Washington District of Columbia 

Sasscer, C. D Northkeys Prince George's 

Sawyer, E. M Manila Philippine Islands 

ScHAFTEL, J. B Baltimore Baltimore City 

ScHEUCH, J. D Washington District of Columbia 



SCHNIDER, F Washington 

ScHOLL, W Washington 

Schramm, G. N Cumberland 

SCHROEDER, R. E Frederick . , 

SCHROEDER, R. S Frederick . , 

Scott, E. C Hutton 

ScoTT, H. I Washington 



District of Columbia 
. . .District of Columbia 
. . .Allegany 
. . . Frederick 
. . . Frederick 
.. .Garrett 
. . .District of Columbia 



Scott, J. G Princess Anne Somerset 

Sener, H. H Chewsville .Washington 

Shank, H. A Smithsburg Washington 

Shaw, A. M Washington District of Columbia 

Shipley, G. R Frederick Frederick 

Shulters, E. S Washington District of Columbia 

Silberman, H. a Washington District of Columbia 



Slanker, F Washington 

Sliger, R Oakland . . , 

Smith, G. F Clearspring 

Smith, J. L Baltimore . 

Snyder, L. W Washington 

SoLLOD, H. A Baltimore . 

Solomon, J. A Brooklyn New York 

Spurrier, W. L Mt. Airy Carroll 

Stabler, L. J Washington District of Columbia 

Starkey, E. B Sudlersville Queen Anne's 

Sterling, W. F Crisfield Somerset 



District of Columbia 
Garrett 
Washington 
Baltimore City 
District of Columbia 
Baltimore City 



190 



Name 

Stone, M. X 

Stone, R., Jr 

Stonestreet, N 

Stranahan, R. J 

Strange, R. T 

Strott, G. a 

Stubbs, J. S 

Tawes, W. I 

Terry, H. M 

Thawley, L. be 

Thomas, W. P 

Tipton, A. L 

Trader, F. F 

Umbarger, H. L 

Utterback, C. L 

VonEifp, E. L 

Walford, H. C 

Walker, Paul 

Ward, H. B 

Ward, J. B 

Watkins, D. E 

Weaver, H 

WILHELM, \j» Jl************* 

Wilson, J. S 

Wynkoop, J. C 

Yaffe, a. K 

Yerkes, E. L 

Young, R. N 

Zimmerman, S. G. H., Jb. . . . 



Postoffiee County 

Dynard St. Mary's 

Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Rock Point .Charles 

Union City Pennsylvania 

Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Charleston West Virg^inia 

Crisfield Somerset 

Jacksonville Florida 

Laurel Prince George's 

Jefferson Frederick 

Jarrettsville Harford 

Berlin Worcester 

Bel Air Harford 

Brunsvdck Frederick 

Washington District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Mt. Airy Carroll 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Jarrettsville Harford 

Mt. Airy Carroll 

Greensboro Caroline 

Arlington Baltimore 

Sussex New Jersey 

Washington District of Columbia 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Delta Pennsylvania 

Washingrton District of Columbia 

Frederick Frederick 



Section "B"— VocaUonal 

Abramowitz, a. M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Adam, J. M Passaic New Jersey 

April, D Washington District of Columbia 

Bartlett, F. a Centreville Queen Anne's 

Beachy, W. a Grantsville Garrett 

Benjamin, C. C Baltimore Baltimore City 

Berkow, B Baltimore Baltimore City 

BoTHUM, L. W Cambridge Dorchester 

Bowerman, H. H Loreley Baltimore 

Branner, C. E Pocomoke Worcester 

Brill, W. B Springfield New Jersey 

Brown, Jacob Baltimore Baltimore City 

BtJRKET, R. E Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

Calkins, A. L .Colby Kansas 

Carroll, F. U Easton Talbot 

Gartner, G. S Wiashington District of Columbia 

Chapman, G. B Woodstock Virginia 

COE, W. G Wiashington District of Columbia 

Coffin, J. G., jR Berlin Worcester 

Cohen, D. B Wiashington District of Columbia 

Cohen, H. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Cohen, Max Baltimore Baltimore City 

COHN, D. D Baltimore Baltimore City 



191 



I^ame Poatoffice County 

OoMOBA, P West Hoboken New Jersey 

CooNiN, Abe Washington Dd&trict of Columbia 

CORCORAN, W. J Passaic New Jersey 

Cox, B. N Huntington Calvert 

Crawford, A. A Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

Cropper, E. S Berlin Worcester 

CusTis, R. S Pocomoke Worcester 

Davis, B. J Keyser West Virginia 

Davis, L. B Whitef ord Harford 

Davis, M!alcolm Washington District of Columbia 

Day, a. W Adamstown Frederick 

Devoe, C. F Rocks Harford 

DEY, W. S Towson Baltimore 

Diggs, J. G. K Baltimore Baltimore City 

DiLLEY, J. N Cumberland Allegany 

DiSKiN, M. M Baltimore Baltimore City 

DixoN, W. J Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

Douglas, R. W Keyser West Virginia 

Downey, H. L Frederick Frederick 

Edel, S. T Baltimore Baltimore City 

Edlowitz, Samuel Washington District of Columbia 

EiCHMANN, L West Hoboken New Jersey 

EiSENBERG, I. J Baltimore Baltimore City 

Elder, J. W Cumberland Allegany 

Elfrey, Russell Baltimore Baltimore City 

Emery, R. W., Jb Snow Hill Worcester 

Engle, p. F Forest Glen Montgomery 

Evans, B. D Pocomoke City Worcester 

Evans, E. G Pocomoke City Worcester 

Findlay, J. Trappe Talbot 

Fisher, O. S Easton Talbot 

Foltz, E. T Witheville Virginia 

Friedenberg, Charles Washington District of Columbia 

Garber, p. E Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

GiVENS, H. B Berlin Worcester 

GouLDMAN, R. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Gregg, C. S Frederick Frederick 

Green, S. J Midland Virginia 

Griest, J. R Washington District of Columbia 

Griffith, H. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Grove, G. E Frederick Frederick 

Grubb, B. E Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

GULLEY, R. H Baltimore Baltimore City 

Haase, H. F., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Handleman, M. C Hopewell Virginia 

Harrington, E. F Fall River Massachusetts 

Harrison, J. M Keyser West Virginia 

Hayward, T. W Berlin Worcester 

Hecht, R. J Baltimore Baltimore City 

Heckel, W. F West Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Helbig, E. H Oakland Garrett 

Henry, J. T New York New York 

Herring, A. S Frederick Frederick 

Hirschhorn, L. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

HixsoN, C. K Cumberland Allegany 



t 



II 



192 



h 



Name Postoffice County 

Hoffman, Habby Baltimore Baltimore City 

Holder, G. D Cambridge Dorchester 

HoLLYDAY, H. R Easton Talbot 

Horsey, H. S Easton Talbot 

Houseman, J. W Baltimore Baltimore City 

Hoyle, L. H Olney Montgomery 

Hugo, J. A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Hume, G. W Washington District of Columbia 

Huntress, A. Vv'' Washington District of Columbia 

Jacobs, Abe Baltimore Baltimore City 

Jacobs, H. H Baltimore Baltimore City 

James, Robert Frederick Frederick 

Jenkins, H. T Washington District of Columbia 

King, J. B ^ . .Baltimore Baltimore City 

King, J. W South Boston Massachusetts 

KiRSTEiN, C. H Washington District of Columbia 

KiSLiUK, A. P Washington District of Columbia 

Klein, H. J Washington District of Columbia 

Kline, L. M Cumberland Allegany 

Kline, R. G Frederick Frederick 

Krause, E. a Bison Kansas 

Lazorow, Samuel Washington District of Columbia 

Lebow, Meyer Baltimore Baltimore City 

LeCato, C. B Easton Talbot 

Lerner, Noah Washington District of Columbia 

Levin, I. E Baltimore Baltimore City 

LiPPMANN, M. L Atlantic City New Jersey 

Lewis, G. R Friendship Anne Arundel 

LosiNSKY, Abe Baltimore Baltimore City 

McAllister, R. N Atlantic City New Jersey 

McClintic, F. R Herndon Virginia 

McDonaugh, B. L Washington District of Columbia 

McElroy, H. O Atlantic City New Jersey 

McMichael, H. E Pocomoke City Worcester 

MacDonald, G. a Shenandoah Junction. .West Virginia 

Malman, J. J Baltimore Baltimore City 

Marceron, L. W Washington District of Columbia 

Margolis, B. C Baltimore .Baltimore City 

Maroney, R. L Oakland Garrett 

Mayers, A. A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Menzel, K. F Washington District of Columbia 

Meyer, M. C Baltimore Baltimore City 

MfeYERS, Max Baltimore Baltimore City 

Miller, Harold Frederick Frederick 

Miller, Herbert Baltimore Baltimore City 

Miller, Israel Baltimore Baltimore City 

Miller, J. R Cumberland Allegany 

Morgan, R. G., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Mullen, C. L Hagerstown Washington 

Mundle, G. S East Orange New Jersey 

Munford, G. T Washington D&strict of Columbia 

Naiman, Julius Baltimore Baltimore City 

Naylor, E. C Kenilworth District of Columbia 

Newman, A. L. C Cherrydale Virginia 

Newman, Herman Covington Virginia 



193 



Name Postofflce 

Nevius, R. a Easton , 

Newcomer, W. D Denton 

Offutt, D. K Washington . . 

OSTROW, E. C Washington . . 

Paddy, M. J Friendship . . . . 

Paldauf, R. C Washington . . 

Palmer, J. C Washington 



Cowaty 

■ Talbot 

Caroline 

District of Columbia 

District of Colun>bia 

Anne Arundel 

District of Columbia 

District of Columbia 



Pearce, W. M Mt. Savage Allegany 



Perham, H. R Hagerstown 

Perlstein, E. J Atlantic City New Jersey 



.Washington 



District of Columbia 
Worcester 
Montgomery 
District of Columbia 



Philips, J. J Washington 

Purnell, a. H Berlin 

Raney, E.J Kensington 

Rawley, W. H Washington 

RiTTOFF, Leo Coronado California 

Robbin, P. C Washington District of Columbia 

Robertiello, a. E Washington District of Columbia 

Roberts, H. L Vale Oregon 

Roberts, J. C Washington District of Columbia 

Robertson, E. C Cumberland Allegany 

Robinson, Nathan Baltimore Baltimore City 

Roy, E. S Sussex New Jersey 

Sachs, Abraham Baltimore Baltimore City 

Sansbury, E. W Friendship Anne Arundel 

Schamback, J. M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Schladt, P. B Washington District of Columbia 

Schwartzman, Harry Baltimore Baltimore City 

Schwartzman, I. A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Schwartzman, Leon Baltimore Baltimore City 

Schwartzman, Uriel Baltimore Baltimore City 

Shepley, E. F Myersville Frederick 

Skills, E. R Atlantic City New Jersey 

Shockley, C. N Snow Hill Worcester 

Shuck, S. M Cumberland Allegany 

Simon, S. A Baltimore Baltimore City 

Simpson, H. H Centreville Queen Anne's 

Sonneman, K. O Washingix)n Dfistrict of Columbia 

Stagg, a. M Snow Hill Worcester 

Stanton, G. S Grantsville Garrett 

Starr, R. F. S Easton Talbot 

Staub, J. M Frederick Frederick 

Steebins, W. C Cleveland Ohio 

Stull, C. Frederick Frederick 

Stultz, R. L., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Talton, W. L Cape Charles .Virginia 

Tarr, M. E Pocomoke City Worcester 

Taylor, W. A., Jr Ocean City Worcester 

Tayman, B. R Baltimore Baltimore City 

Thornton, M. S Crisfield Somerset 

Tongue, C. W Coster Calvert 

Townsend, William Easton Talbot 

Traver, H. R Williamsport Washington 

Truex, W. W Atlantic City New Jersey 

Uppercue, W. B Washington District of Columbia 

Vogelstein, Albert Baltimore Baltimore City 



IHi 



l! 



194 

Name Postoffice County 

Waller, H. W Washington District of Columbia 

Warner, H. K Washington District of Columbia 

Waters, F. G Frederick Frederick 

Webb, O. K Friendship Anne Arundel 

Weiman, J. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Weinberg, H. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Weiss, Walter Atlantic City New Jersey 

Whitehill, H. W Unionville Frederick 

Williamson, J. A Alexandria Virginia 

Wilson, J. W Mt. Airy Carroll 

Wolf, S. E Washington District of Columbia 

Wolfe, D. D Washington District of Columbia 

Wrightson, W. K Preston Caroline 

Yearley, C. K Baltimore Baltimore City 

YOKUM, O. M Washington District of Columbia 

Younkin, F. M Grantsville Garrett 

Zelditch, Morris Baltimore Baltimore City 

Zepp, N. B Clarksville Hioward 

REGISTER 
Session 1918-1919 

Graduate Students 

Farr, Wanda M. (Mrs.) Takoma Park District of Columbia 

Gray, W. D Prince Frederick Calvert 

Nickels, C. B Starkville Mississippi 

Truitt, R. V Girdletree Worcester 



Aitcheson, J. L. 
Babcock, K. W. 

Bacon, C. H 

Berlin, H. S.... 
Eletsch, C. F., 
Brown, M. C. . . 
Coster, H. O.... 

Hand, E. W 

Hardisty, W. R. 
Hicks, W. P..., 

Horn, P. V 

Lewis, R. R. ... 
Miller, E. V. .. 
NORRIS, G. W.., 

Paine, C. E 

Posey, K. C 

Sawyer, E. M.. 
Sellman, R. L . . 
Stevens, J. W 



oTUNTZ, Cx. Jlv..».»*»*»«*«»« 



Senior Class 

Burtonville Montgomery 

Hagerstown Washington 

Silver Spring Montgomery 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

Sparrows Point Baltimore 

Coster Calvert 

Berwyn Prince George's 

Seabrook Prince George's 

Govans Baltimore 

Mt. Airy Carroll 

Frederick Frederick 

Hagerstown Washington 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Washington District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Manila Philippine Islands 

Beltsville Prince Greorge's 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Washington . . ., District of Columbia 



Junior Class 

Abrams, S. E Hagerstown Washington 

Ady, E. B Sharon Harford 

Barton, J. H Centreville Queen Anne's 



195 



BISSELL: 



Name Postoffice County 

T. L Westover Somerset 



Baltimore 

Prince George's 

Talbot 

District of Columbia 

Prince Greorge's 



OTR\siDE, B. L Hyattsville Prince George's 

IriBROLL, H. M Ashland "^-'^ 

foNYNGTON, JOHN Berwyn 

DaVson, E. E Trappe 

DraWBAUGH, J. R Washington 

Etienne, a. D Benvyn 

I EzEKiEL, Walter Hyattsville Prince George's 

Gray, J. A Brownsville Washington 

Hartshorn, H. P Kensington Montgomery 

HocKMAN, G. B Hagerstown Washington 

Hook, E. G. (Miss) Baltimore Baltimore City 

Keefauver, J. E Berwyn Prince George's 

Knode, J. S Martinsburg West Virginia 

Knode, R. T Martinsburg West Virginia 

Langrall, J. H Baltimore Baltimore City 

RiGGS, M. T Rockville Montgomery 

RuPPERT, E. C. E Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

Setvell, M. D Hyattsville Prince George's 

Snarr, W. C Washington District of Columbia 

Sterling, W. F Crisfield Somerset 

« 

Sophomore Class 

Bland, H. W. (Miss) Sparks Baltimore 

Caldwell, D. R Washington District of Columbia 

Cole, C. W Towson Baltimore 

Donaldson, E. C Laurel Prince George's 

Eiseman, J. H Washington District of Columbia 

Frere, F. J Tompkinsville Charles 

Gardner, W. T Clearspring Washington 

Goodwin, L. M Potsdam New York 

Graham, J. R Barclay Queen Anne's 



Worcester 
Prince George's 
Montgomery 
Anne Arundel 
Frederick 
. Frederick 
Delaware 



Groton, T. C Pocomoke City 

Haig, R. V Riverdale 

Hamke, J. C Rockville 

Heller, R. W Annapolis 

Holter, C. K Jefferson 

Holter, E. F Middletown 

Jester, W. C Wilmington 

Manning, R. I. C Accokeek Prince George's 

Neumann, A. B Washington District of Columbia 

Peddicord, H. R Dickerson .Montgomery 

Perry, D. P Clearspring Washington 

Powell, E. W Princess Anne Somerset 

Rausch, R. M Washington District of Columbia 

Reading, J. G Rockville Montgomery 

Scheuch, J. D Washinprton District of Columbia 

Sener, H. H Chewsville Washington 

Silberman, H. a Washington District of Columbia 

Slanker, Frederick Washington District of Columbia 

Smith, J. W Arlington Baltimore 

Snyder, L. W Washington District of Columbia 

Starkey, E. B Sudlersville Queen Anne's 

Stone, R., Jr Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Stonestreet, N. V Rock Point Charles 



196 



1 



■f' 



Name Postofflce County 

Sullivan, J. H Newburyport Massachusetts 

Thawley, L. H Laurel Prince George's 

Thomas, R. B Washington District of CoWi 

TwiLLEY, O. S Hurlock Dorchester 

Walker, Paul Mt. Airy Carroll 

WiLHELM, C. P Arlingrton Baltimore 



Freshman Class 



Allison, B. J 

Avery, H. A. (Miss) 

Bailey, C. T 

Barall, W. L 

Beachley, R. H 

Best, A. S 

BOSLEY, H. L 

Bosley, L. W 

Bower, R. G 

Braungard, p. J 

Broach, K. T 

Brown, Chauncey 

Burgess, E. A 

Burroughs, J. A 

Butts, J. A 

Caldwell, F. R 

Calvin, G. F 

Canter, F. D 

Carroll, C. G 

Cheezum, F. L 

Clark, Morison 

Darkis, F. R 

Darnall, C. E 

Darner, E. F 

duvall, w. m 

Edmonds, H. G 

Elder, J. W 

England, C. W 

Ensor, Huldah (Miss) 

EWALD, F. G 

EzEKiEL, Bertha (Miss) . . . . 

Filbert, E. B 

FouTS, R. M 

Gilbert, H. D 

Graham, W. S 

gurevich, h. j 

HiNES, A. W 

HUGG, J. A 

Keene, H. V 

Kemp, A. D 

King, E. S., Jr 

Love, Douglas 

McDonald, W. F 

Mahoney, p. H 

Matthews, I. W 

Miller, A. A 

MOHLHENRICH, E. G 



Stony Point New York 

Washington District of Columbia! 

Bladensburg .Prince George^s 

Towson Baltimore 

Middletown Frederick 

Birdsville Anne Arundel 

Washington District of Columbia i 

Washington District of Columbia 

Hagerstown Washington 

Hagerstown Washington 

Ridgewood New Jersey 

Washin^n District of Columbia 

McDonogh Baltimore 

Clinton Prince George^s 

Laysburg Pennsylvania 

Washington District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Aquasco Prince George's 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Preston Caroline 

Takoma Park District of Columbia 

Frederick Frederick 

Hyattsville Prince George's 

Hagerstown Washington 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Brookland District of Columbia 

Cumberland Allegany 

Rising Sun Cecil 

Sparks Baltimore 

Mt. Savage Allegany 

Hyattsville Prince George's 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Washin^n District of Columbia 

Frederick Frederick 

Washin^n District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Snow Hill Worcester 

Frederick Frederick 

Branchville Prince George's 

East Orange New Jersey 

Barton Allegany 

Tooele Utah 

Sparks Baltimore 

College Park Prince George's 

Govans Baltimore 



197 



"Same Postoffice County 

fnLSTEBj C. B LWashin^n District of Columbia 

SooBE C. E., JR Roland Park Baltimore 

foBAN, J. A Frederick Frederick 

MOBEHOUSE, M. B Washington District of Columbia 

UOBGAN, E. K Washington District of Columbia 

KioBGAN, P. T Baltimore Baltimore City 

MOBisoN, E. C Washington District of Columbia 

MYERS, E. H. L., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Keighbours, H. E Lewistown PVederick 

JEWELL, S. R Falls Church Virginia 

koBTHAM, A. J Pocomoke City Worcester 

lOwiNGS, E. P North Beach Calvert 

Painter, J. H Washington District of Columbia 

P4BSLY, G. M Brookeville Montgomery 

'parsons, D. a Washington District of Columbia 

Peterman, W. W Clearspring Washington 

Polk, L. W Pocomoke City Worcester 

Price, J. M., jR Centreville Queen Anne's 

PusEY, M. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Raedy, M. L., Jr Washington District of Columbia 

Iremsburg, G. G Braddock Heights Frederick 

I Russell, E. F Washington District of Columbia 

Sasscer, C. D Northkeys Prince George's 

Schramm, G. N Cumberland Allegany 

Scott, H. I Washington District of Columbia 

Scott, J. G Princess Anne Somerset 

Shank, H. A Smithsburg Washin^n 

Smith, G. F Big Spring Washington 

Smith, Mildred (Miss) Washin^n District of Columbia 

Snyder, J. H Lewistown Frederick 

Stabler, L. J Washington District of Columbia 

Stone, M. X Dynard St. Mary's 

Stranahan, R. J Union City Pennsylvania 

Sutton, R. L Ballston Virginia 

Tarbert, Rebecca (Miss) . . .Glencoe Baltimore 

Terry, H. M Jacksonville Florida 

Ward, J. B Jarrettsville Harford 

Waterbury, E. P New Haven Connecticut 

Wertheimer, Chas., Jr Frederick Frederick 

White, W. F Washington District of Columbia 

Wynkoop, J. C Washington District of Columbia 

Young, R. N Washington District of Columbia 

Sub-Frethman Class 

Beachy, W. a Grantsville . . 

Braungard, J. E Hagerstown . 

McCeney, R, S Takoma Park 

Miedwig, J. M Baltimore . ... 

MULLEN, C. L Hagerstown . 

Palmer, J. c Washington . 

Stanton, G. S Grantsville 



WiLLUMSON, J. A Alexandria Virginia 

Zehner, R. h Grantsville Garrett 



Garrett 
Washington 
District of Columbia 
Baltimore City 
Washington 
District of Columbia 
Garrett 



■I 



198 

Name Postofflce County 

Second- Year Agricultural Class 

CoRKRAN, E. B Rhodesdale Dorchester 

Bolder, T. D Vienna Dorchester 

Menzel, K. F Washington District of ColumLa 

Richardson, P. S Williamsburg Dorchester 

Umbarger, H. L Bel Air Harford 

First- Year Agricultural and Engineering Classes 



Ankers, H. H 

Bandes, Herman 

Branner, C. E 

Burt, Ronald 

Chapman, G. B 

Clark, J. R 

Crippen, C. C 

Davis, Malcolm 

DeYcaza, J. M 

DiGGS, J. G. K 

Dows, A. P 

Edel, S. T 

Evans, F. L 

Fisher, H. S 

FUSSELBAUGH, W. P 

Griest, J. R 

Harner, B. V 

James, W. B 

Jarrell, C. L., Jr 

McFaddin, H. E..... 

Malcolm, Wilbur 

Marden, C. C, Jr 

Myers, A. H 

NOURSE, C. B 

RiCAUD, V. J 

RiDOUT, C. D 

WOOTTEN, J. F 



sterling Virginia 

New York New York 

Pocomoke City Worcester 

Westover Somerset 

Woodstock Virginia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Chester Pennsylvania 

Washington District of Columbia 

New York New York 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Riverside Charles 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Huntington West Virginia 

Hillsboro Caroline 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Washington District of Columbia 

Tuxedo Prince George's 

Hancock Washington 

Greensboro Caroline 

Hagerstown Washington 

Barton Allegany 

Princeton New Jersey 

Winchester Virginia 

Alexandria Virginia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Berwyn Prince George's 



Unclassified 

Conger, Raymond Washington District of Columbia 

Hill, L. M. (Miss) Baltimore Baltimore City 

Jones, A. S Washington District of Columbia 

Kerr, E. A. (Miss) Riverdale Prince George's 

Maisack, E. C. (Miss) Hagerstown Washington 

Sargent, V. W. (Miss) Washington District of Columbia 

Taylor, E. G Wisharts Virginia 

ViLLACRES, Luis Guayaquil Ecuador 



199 



Summary of Regular Students After January 6, 1919, The Beginninf 

of The Second Term 1918-19 

Graduates 4 

Seniors 20 

Juniors 24 

Sophomores 38 

Freshman 89 

Sub-Freshman 9 

Second Year Agricultural 5 

First Year Agricultural and Engineering 27 

Unclassified 8 

Total 224 



GENERAL INDEX 



lAdministration, 9 

building, 30 

committees, 17 

council of, 9 
, officers of, 9 
Administrative officers, 9 
Admission, 27 

to advanced standing, 28 

certificate, 27 

elective subjects, 28 

examination by, 27 

units, number required, 27 
Advanced standing, 28 
Advisers, Arts School, 162 
Agents, county, 14 
Agricultural building, 30 

chemistry, 91, 93, 94 

club, 33 

economics, 41 

education, 97, 98, 109, 110 

education methods, 109 

Experiment Station, 41 

Experiment Station staff, 13 

Extension, 23 

Extension staff, 14 

Society, 33 
Agriculture, 40 

and home economics, 23 

courses in, 42 

curricula offered in, 42 

economic history of, 164 

extension work in, 23 

general curriculum in, 43 

history of, 168 

School of, 40 

short course in, 84 

two-year course in, 82, 83 
Agronomy, 55, 56, 58 
Algebra, 132, 133 
Alternating currents, 124 

design, 127 

machinery, 126 
A umni Association, 33 
Alumnus, State College, 33 
America, literature in, 166 
Analytical chemistry, 93 

mechanics, 136 
Anatomy and physiology, 70 
, comparative, 81 
Ancient people, 167 
Animal and dairy husbandry. 64, 67 

diseases, 70 

Industry, Division of. 63, 71 

pests, 82 
Annual expenses. 36 
Aquiculture, 81 
Architecture, school, 141 



Art and handicraft, 155 

civic, 51 
Arts, School of Liberal, 157 
Assistants in administration, 9 
Astronomy, 133 
Athletics, 35 

Awards and competitions, 35 
Bachelor's degree, 29, 42, 99, 101, 105, 

157 
Bacteriology, 69, 70 
Band music, 178 
Battalion, 184 
Batteries, 125, 126 
Beekeeping 82 
Beef production, 65 
Biological chemistry, 91, 92 
Biometry, 58 
Blacksmithing, 139, 140 
Board of Trustees, 7 

committees, 8 

officers, 8 

organization, 8 
Botany, 58, 59, 60, 62 
Breeding, 65, 66 
Breeds and judging, 66 
Buildings, 30 
Business management, journalistic, 

173 
Calculus, 133 
Calendar, College, 5 

general, 4 
Calvert Hall, 30 
Carpentry, 139 
Catalog, committee on, 17 
Catering, 154 
Cement testing, 129 
Cereal crops, 56, 58 
Certificate, admission by, 27 
Certificates, two-year, 42, 183 
Chemical building, 30 

club, 33 

engineering, 90 
Chemistry, agricultural, 91, 93 

biological, 91 

curriculum, 89 

general, 88, 92 

industrial, 89 

inorganic, 93 

School of, 88 
Chess and Checker Club, 34 
Christian Associations, 34 
Citizenship prize, 35 • 

Civil engineering, 117 

curriculum, 117 
Clothing economics, 155 
Clubs, 34 
College entrance, committee on, 17 



202 



I 



requirements, 27 
College, Schools of, 10 
Colored workers, 15 
Committees, 

Council, 9 

Faculty, 17 

Trustees, 8 
Community study, 73 
Comparative anatomy, 81 
Composition and rhetoric, 165 

practical, 165 
Concrete, 36, 141 

structure, 141 
Conditions, entrance, 27 
Constitutional law, 170 
Contemporary political problems, 169 
Contents, table of, 3 
Continental European history, 167 
Cookery, camp, 154 
Council of administration, 9 
Country newspaper, 172 
County agricultural agrents, 14 

clubs, 34 
Courses, description of, 47, 64, 107, 

122. 153 
Crop breeding, 57, 58 

investigation, 57 

rotation, 57 
Current history, 168 
Cytology, 60 
Daily paper, 179 
Dairy husbandry, 67 

production, 69 
Dairying, 67, 68, 69 
Deans and secretaries, 10 
Debate, 177 

Debating and oratory. 35 
Decoration, home, 156 
Degrees, 29, 42, 99, 101, 105, 149, 150, 

157 

Bachelor's, 29, 42, 99, 101, 105, 157 
conferred 1918, 182 
Delineation, scientific, 81 
Departments, 41, 88, 96, 117, 149, 151, 

157 
Description of courses, 47, 64, 107, 

122, 153 
Descriptive geometry, 122, 123 
Design, machine, 131, 132 

structural, 140, 141 
Differential equations, 133 
Dining hall, 31 

Diplomas, teachers' special, 96, 103 
Direct current theory, 124 

current design, 127 

current machinery, 125 
Division of Animal Industry, 63 

Plant Industry, 44 
Doctor of Philosophy, 149 
Domestic Science, 152 
Drafting, 123, 130, 131, 143 
Drama and poetry, French, 174 

and poetry, German, 174 

early English, 166 

Elizabethan, 166 

modern English, 166 

technique of, 167 
Dramatic club, 33 
Drawing, 122 

freehand, 122, 124 

general engineering, 123 

mechanical, 122, 123 
Dress design, 154, 155 

making, 153 



Dynamos and alternating currj 

and motors, 125 
Ecology, 61 
Economic history, 164 

thought, history of, 164 

zoology, 78 
Economics, 159, 164 

agricultural, 73 

Home, School of, 151 
Education, agricultural, 97, 98, 

curricula in, 98 

general, 104, 113 

home economics, 100, 101, li] 

industrial, 103 

of women, 112 

School of, 96 

Summer School, 25 
Educational guidance, 107 
Electric power plants and trai 

sion, 124, 126 
Electrical design, 127 

design laboratory, 123, 128, 14) 

engineering, 120 

equipment repairs, 127 

interior wiring, 127 

measuring instruments, 126 

outside line construction, 127 

railways, 125, 126 

switchboards, 127 
Electives in agriculture, 86 

in agricultural education, 99 

in animal industry, 87 

in general education, 106 

in home economics, 153 

in home economics education, 

in liberal arts, 158-161 
Elections, restrictions on, 162 
Electricity and magnetism, 124, 
Electro-chemistry, 94 
Elizabethan drama, 163 
Embryology, 79 
Engineering and Mechanic Arts, Set 

of. 115 

building, 30 
civil, 117 
curricula, 117 
electrical, 120 
mechanical, 119-134 
rural, 121 
Society, 33 
English, 159, 165 

composition and rhetoric, 165 

history, 168 

words, 166 
Entomologist, State, 77 
Entomology, 80, 81 

economic, 80, 81 

medical, 80 

systematic, 80 
Essay,165 

Estimates and costs, 133, 134 
Ethics, 164 

Europe, governments of, 169 
Examinations, 27 
Expenses, fees and, 36 
Experiment Station, Agricultural, 2' 

buildings, 31 

Eastern Branch, 24 

staff, 13 
Experimental engineering, 128, 129 

laboratory, 128 
Extension Service, 14 

home economics, 23 

general, 23 



203 



staff, 14 
Faculty, 11 

committees of, 17 
Family, history of, 112 
Farm accounting, 73 

buildings, 141 

chemistry, 95 

crops, classification of, 57 

drawing, 123 

equipment, 71 

experience, 42 

management, 71, 72, 73 

practice, 85 

structures, design of, 141 
Feature writing, 172 
Federal, state, and municipal govern- 
ment, 169 
Feeds and feeding, 64, 66 
Fees and expenses, 36 
Fellowships, 38, 42 
Fertilizer Work, State, 16 
Fertilizers and soils, 76, 77 
Filtration plant, 31 
Finance, corporation, 164 
Floriculture, 46, 49, 50, 52, 55 
Food economics, 153 

industries, 153 
Foods and nutrition, 94 

preparation and service of, 153 
Forage crops, 56, 58 
Forestry, 70 

Forging and pipe-fitting, 139 
Foundry work, 139, 140 
Frame crops, 49 
Fraternities, 33 
Freehand drawing, 124 

perspective, 155 
French, 160, 173 

scientific, 174 
Freshman, course combination for, 158 

courses open to. Art School, 168 
Fruit culture, 47 

judging, 48 
Fruits, economic, 48 
Garment construction, 154 
Gas engines, 135 
General education, 104, 113 

information, 19 
Genetics, animal, 66 

plant, 61 
Geodesy, 142, 143 
Geology, 77 

and soils, 74, 75 

engineering, 77 
Geometry analytical, 132 
German, 160, 174 

scientific 174 
Government of United States, 169 
Governments of Europe, 169 
Grading farm crops, 57 
Graduate School, 149 

courses, 52, 76, 162, 167 
Grain judging, 56 
Graduation and degrees, 29 
Graphic status, 136 
Greek, 159, 162 

letter societies, 33 

literature, 163 
Greenhouse management and con- 
struction, 50 
Group prescription, Art School, 160 
Head writing and makeup, 173 
Heat and light, 137 

and ventilation, 135 



i 



engineering, 135 

engines, 135 
Herd management, 64, 67 
Highway engineering, 129 
Histology, 60, 79 
History. 159, 167 

and fiction, French, 174 

and fiction, German, 174 

of husbandry. 111 

of the college, 21 
Home architecture, 156 
Home economics, 152, 112 

agriculture and, 23 

education, 100, 101. Ill 

School of, 151 
Home nursing, 156 
Horse and mule production, 65 
Horticultural building, 31 

entomology, 81 
Horticulture, curricula, 44 

general courses, 51 

requirements of graduate students 
in, 53 

State Department of, 16 
Hospital, 30 

House administration, 156 
Household economics, 156 
Housewifery, 156 
Hydraulic engineering, 129, 130 

design, 130 
Hydraulics, 129, 130 
Hydromechanics, 130 
Hygiene, school, 108 
Illumination, 126 
Industrial education, 103, 112 
Information, general, 19 
Inorganic chemistry, 93 
Insecticides, 80 
Instruction, oflicers of, 11 
Interfraternity council, 33 
International law, 170 
Journalism, 160, 170, 171, 178 

history of, 172 
Judging Dairy Products, 68 

domestic animals, 65 
Kappa Alpha, 33 
Kinematics, 131 
Laboratory fees, 36 
Land Grant, Morrill, 32 
Landscape desig^i, 51 

gardening, 46, 50, 51, 55 

practice, 51 
Language and literature, 158, 161 
Languages, ancient, 162 
Late registration fee, 36 
Latin, 159, 163 

and American republics, 168 
Least squares, 133 
Liberal Arts, School of, 157 

admission, 27 

advisers, 162 

bachelor's thesis, 162 

course combination for freshman. 
158 

courses open to freshman, 158 

curricula, 159 

group prescription, 160 

majors and minors, 159, 161 

organization and purpose, 157 

regulations, 157 

relations with other Schools, 162 

restriction, general, 162 
Library, 32, 146 

building, 32 



204 



i* 



nnBT 



methods, 177 

science, 177 
Liiebig: Chemical Society, 33 
Light and illumination, 124 
Literary societies, 33 
Literature, French, 174 

Grerman, 174 

in. America, 166 
Live stock sanitation, 16 
Location of the College, 21 
Logic, 164 

Lunchroom management, 156 
Machine design, 131 

work, 139, 140 
Machinery, farm, design of, 132 
Majors, 159, 161 

Markets and marketing, 66, 73, 156 
Maryland, history of, 168 

water resources, 81 
Masonry, 141 
Master^ Arts, d^er^^of, 149 

of Science, degree of, 149 
Materials, la'bQratory. 129, 145 

of constructton, 136 
Mathematics, 132, '133, 161 

shop, 133, 134 
Miatriculation fee, 36 
Meat and meat production, 65 
Mechanical drawing, 123 

engineering, 119, 134 

laboratory, 145 
Mechanics and materials, 136 

and sound, 136, 137 

of engineering, 136 

of teaching, 112 
Medal, military, 35 
Medals and prizes, 183 
Medical entomology, 80 
Methods in agricultural extension, 110 

in elementary agriculture. 111 

In home economics, 112 

in home economics extension, 112 

in vocational agriculture, 109 

of teaching chemistry, 114 

of teaching English, 113 

of teaching history and political 
science, 113 

of teaching languages, 113 

of teaching mathematics, 114 

of teaching physics, 114 

of teaching science, 114 

shop teaching, 113 
Military medal, 35 

science and tactics, department of, 
25 179 
Milk, market, 68 

testing, 68 
Millinery, 155 
Mineralogy, 95 
Minors, 161 
Modern and contemporary European 

history, 167 

education, history of, 107 
English drama, 166 
languages, 173 
philosophy, 164 
Money and banking, 164 
Morrill Hall, 30 

Land Grant, 22 
Morphology, insect, 80 

plant, 60 
Mule, horse and, production, 65 
Municipal government, 169 
Music, 178 



fees, 36 
Mycology, 60 

New Mercer Literary Society, 33 
News and editorial writing, 172 

writing, 171 
Newspaper editing, 172 

operation, 173 
Nineteenth century poetry, 165 
Novelists of the nineteenth century, 

166 
Nu Sigma Omicron, 33 
Nutrition, 66, 154 
Observation and teaching problems. 

109, 111, 113 
Offices, administrative, 30 
Officers, administrative, 9 

of instruction, 11 
Olericulture, 49 
Oral reading, 177 
Oratory, 177 

Oratorical Association, Maryland, 35 
Organizations, College, 32 
Origin of the State, 169 
Ornament and design, 156 
Pathology, 62 
Pattern-making, 139 
Pests, animal, 82 
Philosophy, 159, 162, 163, 164 

of education, 109 
Physical chemistry, 94 

Education and Recreation, Depart- 
ment of, 25, 182 
Physics, 136, 137 

laboratory, 137, 145 
Physiological chemistry, 94 
Piano, courses in, 178 
Pipe-fitting, 139 
Plant anatomy, 60 

diseases, 63 

Industry, Division of, 44 

materials, 50 

micro-chemistry, 61 

morphology, 60 

mycology, 60 

pathology, 62 

physiology, 60, 61, 62 
Poe Literary Society* ZZ 
Poetry, nineteenth century, 165 
Political parties, 170 

science, 159, 167, 169 
Pomology, 45, 47, 52, 54 
Poultry, 65, 67 

building, 31 
Power-plant operation, 135 
Pre-medical curriculum, 79 
Principles of education, 107 
President, Albert F. Woods, D. Agr., 9 
President's office, 30 
Prize, citizenship, 35 
Professional degrees in engineering, 

150 
Psychology, 107, 160 

educational, 107 
Public finance, 164 

speaking, 160, 176 
Qualitative analysis, 93 
Quantitative analysis, 92 
Railway engineering, 138 

curves, 138 

earthwork, 138 

economics, 138 
Railways, electrical, 125 
Reading and speaking, 176 
Recreational leadership, 109 '. 



205 



Register of students, 194 
Registrar's office, 30 
Registration, 28 
Regulation, Arts School, 157 
Relations with other Schools, Arts 

School, 162 
Research, extension and, 23 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 162, 

179, 180, 181 
Reveille, 34 

Review, Maryland State, 34 
Rhetoric, 165 
Rifle Club, 34 
Roads, country, 129 
Roman literature, 163 
Rossbourg Club, 34 
Rural community and its education, 

110 

engineering, 121 
organization, 73 
Sanitary engineering, 129, 130 
Sanitation, 131 

live stock, 16 
Scholarships and self -aid, 38 
School administration, 108 

of Agriculture, 25, 40 

of Chemistry, 25, 88 

of Education, 25, 96 

of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, 
25, 115 

Graduate, 25, 149 

of Home Economics, 25, 151 

of Liberal Arts, 25, 157 
Schoolroom oyservation, 108 
Schools, officers of, 10 
Science, general, 159 
Scientific thought, 165 
Secondary education, 108 
Self-aid, 38 

Seminars, 52, 53, 57, 167 
Sewerage, 130 

Shades, shadows, perspective, 123 
Sheep production, 65, 66, 68 
Shop mathematics. 133 

practice, 138, 140 
Shops, 145 
Short courses, 54, 58, 62, 65, 66, 68, 70, 

73, 74, 76, 82. 84. 95, 165 
Short story, 166 
Sigma Nu, 33 
Sigma Phi Sigma, 33 
Social science, 158, 161 
Societies, 33 

Greek letter, 33 

literary, 33 
Sociology, 164 
Soils, 74, 75, 76 

bacteriology, 76 

chemistry, 76 
Spanish, 160, 174, 175 

literature, 17th and 18th century, 

176 

literature, 19th and 20th century, 

176 
Special courses, teachers', 97 
Speaking, extemporaneous, 177 
Sprays and spraying, 82 
Staff, Experiment Station, 13 



Extension Service, 14 
Standing, advanced, 28 
State chemist, 11 

entomologist, 11 
Station, Experiment, 24 
Steam engines, boilers, and dynamos. 

134 
Stock judging pavilion, 31 
Structural design, 140 
Student assembly, 33 

labor, 39 

organizations and activities, 33 
Students, list of, 94 
Students' Army Training Corps, 185 

publications, 34 

publications, committee on, 17 
Subject-matter groups, 157 
Subjects accepted for admission, 27 
Summary of regular students, 199 
Summer school, 25 

work and inspection, 116 
Surveying, 138, 142, 143, 144 
Swine production, 65 
Tailoring, 155 
Taxonomy, 60 

Teachers' special diplomas, 96, 103 
Teaching methods, 107 

supervised, 110, 111, 114 
Technical analysis, 93 

instruction, 134, 135 

mechanics, 134, 135 

writing, and scientific thought, 165 
Technique of the drama, 167 
Telegraphy and Telephony, 125, 126 
Telephone laboratory, 128 
Testimonials, 183 
Textiles, 154 
Trade journal, 172 
Tree repair and surgery, 51 
Trigonometry, 131, 132 
Trustees, Board of, 7 

organization of, 8 
Tuition, no change for, 36 
Tw^o-year agriculture, 82, 83 

mechanic arts. 146, 148 
Unclassified students, 28 
Uniform, 180 
Unit, definition of, 27 
United States, history of, 168 

social and economic history of, 168 
Urban workers, 15 

Vegetable gardening, 45, 48, 49, 52, 54 
Veterinary medicine, 70 
Vocational education, 108 

publications, 165 
Water supply, 130, 131 
Wireless laboratory, 128 

telegraphy, 125 
Women, admitted to all courses, 27 
Women's home economics practice 

house, 30 
Woodworking, 138, 139 
Young Men's Christian Association, 34 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion, 34 
Zoology, 77, 79 

economic, 77 



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