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Full text of "Catalogue"

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

OF THE 

University or Maryland 



v»i. ir 



JULY, 1920 



No. 1 



CATALOGUE 



1920—1921 




ContainiDg general information concerning the 
University, Announcements for the Scholastic 
Year 1920-1921. and Records of 1919-1920 



Issued montMy by the University of Maryland, at College Park, Md., a« second- 
cUflt matter, uadcr Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 






CATALOGUE 
1920—1921 



^ 



Containing general information concerning the 
University Announcements for tne Scnolastic 
Year 1920-1921, and Records of 1919-1920. 



^ 



CONTENTS 



Pages 
Calendar of Months. 4 

University Calendar 5-6 

Board of Regents, University Council, Officers of Instruction, 

Committees, etc 7-17 

General Information: 

Location 21 

History 21-22 

Extension and Research 23-24 

Administration 25-26 

Admission 26-29 

Buildings 29-32 

Organizations 32-34 

Honors and Awards 34 

Fees and Expenses 35-36 

Scholarships and Self Aid 37-38 

Educational Units: 

College of Agriculture 39-88 

School of Engineering 89-123 

School of Liberal Arts 124-147 

School of Medicine 148-154 

The Law School 155-158 

School of Dentistry 159-161 

School of Pharmacy 162-164 

School of Education 165-179 

School of Chemistry 180-189 

School of Home Economics 190-197 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 198-202 

Elective Courses 203-212 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation 213 

List of Degrees Conferred, Awards, Register of Students, Sum- 
mary of Students, etc 214-230 



CALENDAR 1920, 1921, 1922 



1920 



1921 



1922 



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JUNE 






UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1920-1921 



FIRST TEBK 



Sept. 20-21, Monday-Tuesday. 
Sept. 22. Wednesday 

Sept. 24, Friday 
Sept. 29, Wednesday 

Nov. 12, Second Friday in 
November 

Nov. 24, Wednesday, 12 m. 

Nov. 30, Tuesday, 8 a. ra. 

Dec. 3, Second Friday after 
Thanksgiving 

Dec. 10, Friday 

Dec. 15-22 

Dec. 22, Wednesday, 11 a. m. 



Entrance and condition examinations. 
Registration days for old and new students. 

11:15 a. m. Assembly of student body; 
President's annual address. 
1:20 p. m. All classes begin. 

President's reception for new students and 
presentation of Freshman Code. 

Last day for change of registration without 
fee; last day to register without payment 
of late registration fee. 

Freshman entertainment night. 



Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Thanksgiving recess ends. 
Football Dance. 

Presentation by Dramatic Club. 

Registration for second term. 

First term ends. Christmas vacation begins. 



Jan. 4, Tuesday, 8 a. m. 



Jan. 11, Tuesday 



Feb. 4, First Friday in 
February 



SECOm> TZSBM 

Christmas vacation ends, 
second term begins. 



Instruction for 



Last day to change registration without fee 
and last day to register without late regis- 
tration fee. 

Intersociety debate. 



Feb. 22, Tuesday 



Washington's Birthday. 



March 3, Thursday 

March 4, Friday 

March 16-22 

March 23, Wednesday, 12 m. 



Intercollegiate debate. 

Inauguration Day. Holiday. 

Registration for third term. 

Second term ends. Easter recess begins. 



March 29, Tuesday, 8 a. m. 

April 29, Last Friday in April 

May 14, Saturday 

May 21, Third Friday in May 

May 30, Decoration Day 

June 3, Friday 

June 6-10 

June 11, Saturday 

June 12, Sunday 

June 13, Monday 

June 14, Tuesday 

June 14, Tuesday, 9 p. m.-l a m. 

June 15, Wednesday 



Easter recess ends. Third term begins. 
All classes meet at scheduled time. 

Annual contest of the Oratorical Associa- 
tion of Maryland colleges. 

All required theses must be presented. 

May Ball. 

Farmers' Day. 

Presentation by Dramatic Club. 

Registration for first term 1921-1922. 

Student Organizations* Day. 

Beginning Commencement Exercises. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Class Day. 

Alumni Day. 

Commencement Ball. 

Commencement Day. 



v 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, Chairvian Term expires 1925 

Eccleston, Baltimore County 

ROBERT GRAIN Term expires 1924 

Mt. Victoria, Charles County 

JOHN M. DENNIS, Treasurer Term expires 1923 

Union Trust Co., Baltimore 

DR. FRANK J. GOODNOW Term expires 1922 

6 W. Madison St., Baltimore 

JOHN E. RAINE Term expires 1921 

413 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore 

CHARLES C. GELDER Term expires 1929 

Princess Anne, Somerset County 

Dr. W. W. skinner, Secretary Term expires 1928 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

B. JOHN BLACK Term expires 1927 

Roslyn, Baltimore County 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL Term expires 1926 

Hagerstown, Washington County 



COMMITTEES 



University and Educational Work: 

Dr. F. J. GooDNOW, 

Chairman 

Robert Chain 

Dr. W. W. Skinner 



Experiment Station and Investi- 
gational Work: 

B. John Black, 

Chairman 

Dr. W. W. Skinner 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. 



Extension and Demonstration 
Work: 

Robert Grain, 

Chairman 
B. John Black 
John E. Raine 



Inspection and Control Work: 

John M. Dennis, 

Chairman 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. 
Charles C. Gelder 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 



ALBERT F. WOODS, A.M., D. Agr. 
President of the University. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S. 
Assistant to the President. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S. 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D. 
Dean of the School of Engineering. 

♦FREDERIC E. LEE, Ph. D. 
Dean of the School of Liberal Arts. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M. D. 
Dean of the School of Medicine. 

HENRY D. HARLAN, L.L. D. 
Dean of the School of Law. 

E. FRANK KELLY, Phar. D. 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

T. O. HEATWOLE, M. D., D.D. S. 
Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, M. S. 
Dean of the School of Education. 

H. B. MCDONNELL, M. S., M. D. 
Dean of the School of Chemistry. 

M. MARIE MOUNT, A. B. 
Acting Dean of the School of Home Economics. 

C. O. APPLEMAN, Ph.D. 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

H. J. PATTERSON, D. Sc. 
Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

THOMAS B. SYMONS, M. S., D. Agr. 
Director of the Extension Service. 



•Absent on leave for government work in China. 



THE EDUCATIONAL UNITS 



THE COZO^EGE OF AG&ZCUIiTVBE. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., Dean. 

TSE SCHOOI^ OF EKOZEEEBINa. 

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D., Dean. 

TSE SCHOOI^ OF JUBERAI^ ARTS. 

T. H. SPENCE, M. A., Acting Dean. 

THE SCHOOX^ OF lOBDZCZNE. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M. D., Dean. 

THE JmAW SCHOOI^. 

HENRY D. HARLAN, L.L. D., Dean. 

SCHOOIk OF DENTISTRY. 

T. O. HEATWOLE, M. D., D. D. S., Dean. 

SCHOOi; OF FHARSCACnr. 

E. F. KELLY, Phar. D., Dean. 

THE SCHOOI^ OF EDUCATION. 

H. F. COTTERMAN, M. A., Dean. 

THE SCHOOIi OF CHEMISTR'S'. 

H. B. MCDONNELL, M. S., M. D., Dean. 

THE SCHOOII OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

M. MARIE MOUNT, A. B., Acting Dean. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOIi. 

C. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Dean. 

DEPARTMENT OF MIUTARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

CAPT. GEORGE A. MATILE, U. S. A., Professor. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAX. EDUCATION AND RECREATION. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., Director. 

THE SXTMMER SCHOOXm 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Director. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



ALBERT F. WOODS, M. A., D. Agr., President. 

The order of the foUewing names is that of seniority of office: 

H. B. McDonnell, M. S., M. D., Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist, Dean 

of School of Chemistry. 

T. H. SPENCE, M. A., Professor of Modern Languages, Acting Dean of School 

of Liberal Arts. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A. B., Sc. D., Professor of Farm Management. 

J. B, S. NORTON, M. S., Professor of Mycology. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, M. A., Professor of Public Speaking and Exten- 
sion Education. 

HARRY GWINNER, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing, 

Superintendent of Shops. 

T. H. TALIAF^BRRO, Ph. D., C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering and Mathe- 
matics, Dean of School of Engineering. 

MYRON CREESE, B. S., E. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

E. N. CORY, M. S., Professor of Zoology, State Entomologist. 

C. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Professor of Plant Physiology, Dean of Graduate 

School. 

L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., Professor of General Chemistry. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., Assistant to the President and Director of Athletics. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

J. E. METZGER, B. S., Professor of Agronomy. 

O. C. BRUCE, B. S., Professor of Soils. 

C. J. PIERSON, M. A., Professor of Vertebrate Morphology. 

P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., Professor of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Dean 

of College of Agriculture. 

J. B. WENTZ, M. S., Professor of Farm Crops. 

P. I. REED, M. A., Ph.D., Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

A. G. McCALL, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

R. C. REED, Ph. B., D. V. M., Professor of Animal Pathology, Dean of Divi- 
sion of Animal Industry, 

H. F. COTTERMAN, B. S., M. A., Professor of Agricultural Education, Dean 

of School of Education. 

J. A. GAMBLE, M. S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

E. M. PICKENS, D. V. S., M. S., Professor of Bacteriology and Animal 
Pathologist of the Biological and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. 



DeVOE MEADE, Ph. D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. C. AUCHTER, M. S., Professor of Horticulture. 

M. MARIE MOUNT, B. A., Professor of Home and Institutional Management, 

Acting Dean of School of Home Economics. 

E. B. McNAUGHTON, B. S., Professor of Home Economics Education. 

R. WELLINGTON, M. S., Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

N. M. PROFFITT, Ph. B., Professor of Trade and Industrial Education. 

NEIL E. GORDON, Ph. D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

T. B. THOMPSON, Ph. D., Professor of Economics. 

CAPT. GEORGE A. MATILE, U. S. A., Professor of Military Science and 

Tactics. 

E. S. JOHNSTON, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Plant Physiology. 

S. S. STEINBERG, B. E., C. E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

G. J. SCHULZ, B. A., Assistant Professor of History. 

L. J. HODGINS, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Physics. 

C. F. KRAMER, M. A., Assistant Professor of Modern Language. 

J. T. SPANN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

R. C. WILEY, B. S.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

W. R. BALLARD, B. S., Assistant Professor of Pomology. 

H. W. STINSON, B. S., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

H. B. HOSHALL, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

A. S. THURSTON, M. S., Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening and 

Floriculture. 

FRIEDA M. WIEGAND, B. A., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

M. F. WELSH, D. V. M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology and 

Bacteriology. 

H. D. McMURTRAY, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Physics. 

F. W. BESLEY, B. A., Sc. D., Lecturer in Forestry, State Forester. 
M. A. PYLE, B. S., Instructor in Engineering. 

W. A. GRIFFITH, M. D., Instructor in Hygiene, College Physician. 

MILTANNA ROWE, Instructor in Library Science, Librarian. 

MRS. JANET THURSTON, Ph. B., Instructor in Textiles and Clothing, Foods 

and Cookery. 

J. B. BLANDFORD, Instructor in Horticulture, Horticultural Superintendent. 

R. V. TRUITT, B. S.. Assistant in Entomology. 

SGT. M. McMANUS, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

F. D. DAY, B. S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 

NOTE. — ^Faculties of the Schools of Medicine and Law and of the Schools 
of Pharmacy and Dentistry are given with the other information about those 
organizations. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



HARRY J. PATTERSON Director and Chemist. 

J. B. S. NORTON Botany and Plant Pathology. 

THOS. H. WHITE Vegetable and Floriculture. 

CHAS. O. APPLEMAN Plant Physiology. 

ROY H. WAITE .* Poultry. 

W. R. BALLARD Small Fruits. 

E. N. CORY Entomology. 

A. G. McCALL Soils. 

J. E. METZGER Agronomy. 

E. M. PICKENS Animal Pathology. 

E. C. AUCHTER Pomology. 

ALBERT WHITE Supt. Ridgely Farm. 

F. S. HOLMES Seed Inspection. 

R. WELLINGTON Vegetable Breeding. 

C. E. TEMPLE Associate Plant Pathology. 

E. S. JOHNSTON " Plant Physiology. 

O. C. BRUCE " Soil Survey. 

A. M. SMITH " Soils. 

R. S. ALLEN Assistant, Swine Husbandry. 

R. C. TOWLES " Animal Husbandry. 

GEO. R. STUNTZ " Agronomy. 

J. P. JONES •• Plant Physiology. 

E. V. MILLER " Plant Physiology. 

C. B. NICKELS •• Entomology. 

H. B. WINANT •• Soils. 

J. ROY HAAG •• Soils. 

E. H. PARFITT •• Biochemistry. 

C. C. CHEN • Plant Pathology. 

C. C. HAMILTON " Entomology. 

ANNA M. HOOK •' Seed Inspection. 

CLARA M. HODGINS •• 

CAROLINE VEITCH •• •• •• 



EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 



♦THOMAS B. SYMONS, M. S.. D. Agr., Director. 

*F. B. BOMBERGER, B. S., A. M., D. S. C, Assistant Director and Specialist 

in Rural Organization and Marketing. 
*T. E. McLaughlin, B. S., District Agent and Specialist in Animal Industry. 
*S. S. BUCKLEY, M. S., D. V. S., Specialist in Animal Husbandry. 
♦G. E. WOLCOTT, B. S., Specialist in Dairying. 

S. B. SHAW, B. S., Specialist in Horticulture. 

F. W. OLDENBURG, B. S., Specialist in Agronomy. 

B. N. CORY. M. S., Specialist in Entomology. 

C. E. TEMPLE, M. S., Specialist in Pathology. 

H. W. RICKEY, Specialist in Poultry Husbandry. 

C. L. OPPERMAN, Agricultural Editor. 

E. C. AUCHTER, M. S., Specialist in Horticulture. 

C. S. RICHARDSON, A. B., Specialist in Educational Extension. 
♦VENIA M. KELLAR, B. S., State Home Demonstration Agent. 

R. W. WELLINGTON, M. S., Specialist in Vegetable Gardening. 

C. B. NICKELS, B. S., Fellowship Assistant in Entomology. 
♦MARGARET SCHMIDT, B. S., *MABEL L. STEPHENSON, ♦OLA M. DAY 

(District Agents in Home Demonstration Work.) 
♦ADICE S. JONES, Specialist in Girls' Club WORK. 
•E. G. JENKINS, State Boys' Club Agent. 
♦PETER CHICHESTER, Assistant Boys' Club Agent. 



COnNT7 DEMONSTRATION AGENTS. 

♦K. C. COLE Allegany 

♦G. W. NORRIS, B. S Anne Arundel 

♦J. F. HUDSON Baltimore 

•J. H. DRURY Calvert 

♦W. C. THOMAS, B. S Caroline 

♦P. W. FULLER, B. S Carroll 

♦J. H. KNODE, B. S Cecil 

♦J. P. BURDETTE, A. B Charles 

♦J. F. DAVIS, B. S Dorchester 

*P. A. HAUVER, B. S Frederick 

♦J. A. TOWLER, B. S Garrett 

♦B. B. DERRICK, B. S Harford 

♦R. L. POST, B. S., M. S Howard 

*H. B. DERRICK, B. S Kent 

•F. J. VAN HOESEN Montgomery 

*W. B. POSEY Prince George 

*0. C. JONES, B. S Queen Anne's 

*G. F. WATHEN, Jr St. Mary's 

*C. Z. KELLER, B. S Somerset 

♦E. P. WALLS, B. S., M. S Talbot 

*S. E. DAY, B. S Washington 

•G. R. COBB, B. S Wicomico 

*E. L OSWALD, B. S Worcester 

*L. H. MARTIN (colored) Eastern Shore 

•J. F. ARMSTRONG (colored) Southern Maryland 



Cumberland 

Annapolis 

Towson 

Chaney 

Denton 

Westminster 

Elkton 

La Plata 

Cambridge 

Frederick 

Oakland 

Bel Air 

Ellicott City 

Chestertown 

Rockville 

Upper Marlboro 

Centerville 

Loveville 

Princess Anne 

Easton 

Hagerstown 

Salisbury 

Snow Hill 

Princess Anne 

Seat Pleasant 



♦In cooperation with the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



COVN'irZ' EOME DElSONSTRATZOir AGENTS. 



♦ (Miss) RHEA MORGAN Allegany 

•(Mrs. ) GEORGIANA LINTHICUM Anne Arundel 

•(Miss) BERTHA IDE Baltimore 

•(Mrs. ) EDITH G. NORMAN, B. S Caroline 

•(Miss) RACHEL EVERETT Carroll 

•(Miss) ESTHER WOTRING, B. S Cecil 

•(Miss) JULIA ETCHISON, B. S Charles 

•(Miss) FRANCES G. STUART Dorchester 

•(Miss) BLANCHE GITTINGER, B. S. . .Harford 

•(Mrs. ) NELL C. LAWSON Howard 

•(Miss) SUSAN V. HILL Kent 

•(Miss) CATHERINE COWSILL Montgomery 

•(Miss) ELLEN DAVIS Prince George 

•(Miss) MARY BYRN Queen Anne's 

•(Miss) M. LOUISE MILLS Somerset 

•(Miss) KATHERINE MURRIN St. Mary's 

•(Mrs. ) OLIVE K. WALLS Talbot 

•(Miss) SUE W. FRICK Washington 

•(Miss) OLIVE C. MITCHELL Wicomico 

•(Miss) LUCY J. WALTER Worcester 

•(Miss) LEAH D. WOODSON (colored) . .Charles & St. Mary's 



Cumberland 

Annapolis 

Baltimore City 

Denton 

Westminster 

Elkton 

La Plata 

Cambridge 

Bel Air 

Ellicott City 

Chestertown 

Rockville 

Upper Marlboro 

Centerville 

Princess Anne 

Leonardtown 

Easton 

Hagerstown 

Salisbury 

Snow Hill 

La Plata 



CZTIT WOBXZmS. 

Baltimore City MRS. ADELAIDE DERRINGER. 

Baltimore City MISS GWYNNETH GMINDER. 



•In cooperation with the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 



♦THOMAS B. SYMONS, Director. 
E. N. CORY, State Entomologist. 
C. E. TEMPLE, State Pathologist. 
W. C. TRAVERS, Inspector. 



STATE FERTILIZER WORK 



H. B. McDonnell. 

state Chemist. 

L. B. BROUGHTON. 

Assistant Chemist. 

NEIL H. GORDON, 

Assistant Chemist. 

R. C. WILEY, 

Assistant Chemist. 

L. H. VANWORMER, 

Assistant Chemist. 

C. F. BLETSCH, 

Assistant Chemist. 

R. H. WALLS, 

Assistant Chemist. 

A. D. ETIENNE, 

Assistant Chemist. 

J. S. WHITBY, 

Inspector. 

CHARLES T. DAY, 
Inspector. 

J. S. SCARBOROUGH, 
Inspector. 



LIVE STOCK SANITATION 

R. C. REED Chief, Animal Industry. 

J. B. GEORGE Secretary. 

E. M. PICKENS Pathologist, Live Stock Sanitary and Biologic* 

Laboratory. 

Assistant. 

D. R. HOFFMAN Veterinarian in Charge of Stock Yards. 

G. H. GRAPP Veterinary Inspector. 

♦1. K. ATHERTON Inspector in Charge Hog Cholera Control. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

TT A. BILLINGS Farm Management Investigator. 

•In cooperation with the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1920-1921 



AlkUMNI. 

MESSRS. CORY, BROUGHTON, BYRD, HOSHALL, STINSON, HILLEGEIST. 



MESSRS. CRISP, GWINNER. CREESE and PIERSON. 

CATAl^OGUE, STUDENT JUSTROUmVUNT AXn> XSNTBANCS. 

MESSRS. ZIMMERMAN, BYRD, SPENCE, COTTERMAN, CREESE, P. I. 
REED, BROUGHTON, HILLEGEIST and APPLEMAN. 

uzrivziRsiTir fubi^ications. 

MESSRS. PATTERSON, BYRD, BOWERS, McDONNELL, RICHARDSON 

and SYMONS. 

COUXtSES OF STUDY. 

MESSRS. COTTERMAN, R. C. REED, McDONNELL, SPENCE, ZIMMERMAN, 
T. H. TALIAFERRO, HILLEGEIST, MATILE and MISS W^EGAND. 

GROUNDS AND BOADS. 

MESSRS. AUCHTER, THURSTON, CRISP, PATTERSON, STEINBERG and 

STUNTZ. 

COMXIBNCEMENT. 

MESSRS. T. H. TALIAFERRO, RICHARDSON, CORY, SPENCE, P. I. REED 

and MATILE. 

SANITATION. 

MESSRS. PICKENS, GRIFFITH, McDONNELL, W. T. L. TALIAFERRO. 

CORY, PYLE and MISS MOUNT. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS. 

MESSRS. BYRD, CORY, BROUGHTON, SCHULZ, BOMBERGER and CLASS 

PRESIDENTS. 

STUDENT FUBi;iCATIONS. 

MESSRS. P. I. REED, BYRD, BOWERS and GAMBLE. 

FARMERS' DAT. 

MESSRS. PATTERSON, SYMONS and ZIMMERMAN. 



NOTE. — These faculty committees apply only to the group of schools at 
College Park. 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 



ALBERT F. WOODS, M. A., D. Agr., President. 

C. O. APPLEMAN, Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman, ex-officio. 

E. S. JOHNSTON, Secretary. 

DIRECTOR PATTERSON, PROFESSORS TALIAFERRO. CORY, REED. 

McCALL, MEADE and GORDON. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



ALBERT F. WOODS, A. M., D. Agr.. President. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., Assistant to the President. 

MAUDE F. McKENNEY, Financial Secretary. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Registrar. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D., Superintendent of Hospitals. 

H. L. CRISP, M. M. E., Superintendent of Buildings. 

MILTANNA ROWE, Librarian. 



/ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



I 



■ 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Location 



The University of Maryland is located at College Park in Prince 
George's County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington branch of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from Washington and 
thirty-two miles from Baltimore. At least eight trains a day from each 
city stop at College station, thus making the place easily accessible 
from all parts of the State. Telephone connection is made with the 
Chesapeake and Potomac lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. 
The suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the south, and Laurel, 
the largest town in the county, is ten miles to the north on the same 
road. Access to these towns and to Washington may be had by steam 
and electric railway. The site of the University is particularly beautiful. 
The buildings occupy the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered 
with forest trees and overlooks the entire surrounding country. In 
front, extending to the boulevard, is a broad rolling campus, the drill 
ground and athletic field. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the 
buildings of the Agricultural Experiment Station. The farm of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture contains about 300 acres, and is devoted to fields, 
gardens, orchards, vineyard, poultry yards, etc., used for experimental 
purposes and demonstration work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the grounds is exceedingly attractive. 
They are tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces which are ornamented 
with shrubbery and flower beds. The view from the grove and campus 
cannot be surpassed. 

The location of the University is healthful ; the sanitary conditions are 
excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there has 
been practically no serious case of illness among the students for 
many years. 

The Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Law of the Uni- 
versity are located in Baltimore at the corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets. 

History 

The history of the present University of Maryland practically com- 
bines the histories of two institutions. It begins with the chartering of 
the College of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 1807, which gradu- 
ated its first class in 1810. In 1812 the institution was empowered to 
annex other departments and was by the same act "constituted an Uni- 
versity by the name and under the title of the University of Maryland." 



/ 



22 



As such, its Law and Medical schools have since been especially promi- 
nent in the South and widely known throughout the country. The 
Medical School building in Baltionore, located at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, erected in 1814-1815 is the oldest structure in America devoted 
to medical teaching. 

For more than a century the University of Maryland stood almost as 
organized in 1812, until an act of the last Legislature merged it with 
the Maryland State College, and changed the name of the Maryland 
State Ck>llege to the University of Maryland. Ail the property formerly 
held by the old University of Maryland was turned over to the Board 
of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and the Board of Trustees 
will hereafter be known as the Board of Regents. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered in 1856 under the 
name of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural col- 
lege in the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under 
private management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States, recog- 
nizing the practical value and increasing need of such colleges, passed 
the Land Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that 
should claim its benefits a proportionate amount of unclaimed Western 
lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply 
under certain conditions to the "endowment, support and maintenance of 
at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States may 
respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical edu- 
cation of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life." This grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Mary- 
land. The Maryland Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary 
of the grant. Thus the College became, at least in part, a State insti- 
tution. In the fall of 1914 its control was taken over entirely by the 
State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter to the Col- 
lege and made it the Maryland State College. 

Under the new charter, which this year makes it a university, the in- 
stitution is co-educational. Every power is granted necessary to de- 
velop an institution of higher learning and research, comparable to the 
great state universities of the West, in which Agriculture and Engi- 
neering hold a dominant place along with the Liberal Arts and profes- 
sions. This is in full accord with the Morrill Act of the National 
Congress and the subsequent acts above referred to. This institution^ 
therefore, becomes the representative of the State and the Nation in 
higher education and research. The charter provides that it shall re- 
ceive and administer all existing grants from the national government 
and all future grants which may come to the State for this purpose. 



23 



EXTENSION AND RESEARCH 



Agriculture and Home Economics 

The agricultural and home economics extension service of the Univer- 
sity, in co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture, 
carries to the people of the State through practical demonstrations con- 
ducted by specialists of the College of Agriculture and county agents, 
the results of investigations in the fields of Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics. The organization consists of the administrative forces, includ- 
ing the director, assistant director, specialists and clerical force, the 
county agricultural demonstration agents, and the home demonstration 
agents in each county and in the chief cities of the State. The county 
agents and the specialists jointly carry on practical demonstrations 
under the several projects in the production of crops or in home-making, 
V7ith the view of putting into practice on the farms of the State im- 
proved methods of Agriculture and Home Economics that have stood the 
test of investigation, experimentation, and experience. Movable schools 
are held in the several counties. At such schools the specialists discuss 
phases of Agriculture and Home Economics in which the people of the 
respective counties are specially interested. 

The work of the Boys* Agricultural Clubs is of especial importance 
from an educational point of view. The specialists in charge of these 
projects, in co-operation with the county agricultural agents and the 
county school officers and teachers, organize the boys of the several 
communities of the county into agricultural clubs for the purpose of 
teaching them by actual practice the principles underlying agriculture. 
The boys hold regular meetings for the discussion of problems con- 
nected with their several projects and for the comparison of experiences. 
Prizes are offered for the stimulation of interest in the work. 

The Home Economics specialists and agents organize the girls into 
clubs for the purpose of instructing them in the principles underlying 
canning, drying, preserving of fruits and vegetables, cooking, dress- 
making and other forms of Home Economics work. 

Educational value of the demonstrations, farmers' meetings, movable 
schools, clubs, and community shows is incalculable. They serve to carry 
the institution to the farmer and to the home-maker. 

General Extension 

This phase of the extension service of the University is conducted in 
cooperation with the United States Bureau of Education, and is intended 
to make the Liberal Arts and other branches of educational curriculum 
cf greater service to the people of the State. 



/ 



v' 



k 







24 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Vitally associated with the extension service is the experimental 
work in agriculture. 

In 1847 an act was passed making provision for a State laboratory 
in which the application of chemistry to agriculture was to be under- 
taken. In 1858 experimentation was undertaken on the College farm. 
After two or three years this work was interrupted by the general 
financial distress of the time and by the Civil War. In 1888, under 
the provisions of the Hatch Act of the preceding year, the Agricultural 
Experiment Station was established. 

This act states the object and purpose of the experiment station as 
follows : 

That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to 
conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of 
plants and animals ; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with 
the remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at 
their different stages of growth ; the comparative advantages of rotative 
cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity oi 
new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the 
chemical comi>osition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the 
adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants ; the composition and 
digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and 
cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the 
agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of 
the respective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the experiment stations there was prac- 
tically no agricultural science in this country. The work done by these 
institutions during the past quarter of a century has given a science of 
agriculture to teach, and laid a broad foundation for development. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension work on a 
national basis has been the direct outgrowth of the work of the ex- 
periment station. 

The students of the University, taking courses in the College of Agri- 
culture, are kept in close touch with the investigations in progress. 



!:i 



The Eastern Branch 

The Eastern Branch of the University of Maryland is located at 
Princess Anne, Somerset County. It is maintained for the education of 
negroes in agriculture and mechanic arts. 



25 



ADMINISTRATION 



The government of the Umiversity is vested by law primarily in a 
Board of Regents, consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor 
for terms of nine years. The administration of the Uiiiversity is vested 
in the President. The University Council, composed of the President, 
the Assistant to the President, the Director of Agricultural Experiment 
Station, and Director of the Agricultural and Home Economics Exten- 
sion Service, and the Deans, acts as an advisory board to the President 
on all phases of Utiiversity work. The faculty of each college or school 
constitutes a faculty council which passes on all questions that have 
exclusive relationship to the unit represented. 

Pending permanent coordination and reorganization of some depart- 
ments, the following educational organizations are in effect: 

College of Agriculture. 

School of Engineering. 

School of Liberal Arts. 

School of Medicine. 

The Law School 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Pharmacy. 

School of Education. ' 

School of Chemistry. 

School of Home Economics. 

The Graduate School. 

The Summer School. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The College of Agriculture offers curricula in: (1) General Agricul- 
ture; (2) Agronomy; (3) Botany; (4) Farm Management; (5) Geology 
and Soils; (6) Pomology; (7) Vegetable Gardening; (8) Floriculture; 
(9) Landscape Gardening; (10) Economic Zoology; (11) Pre-Medical; 
(12) Two- Year Agriculture; (13) Animal Husbandry. 

The School of Chemistry offers curricula in: (1) Greneral Chemistry; 
(2) Chemical Engineering; (3) Agricultural Chemistry; (4) Biological 
Chemistry. 

The School of Education offers curricula in: (1) Agricultural Educa- 
tion; (2) Home Economics Education; (3) Industrial Education; (4) 
General Education. 

The School of Engineering offers curricula in: (1) Civil Engineering; 
(2) Mechanical Engineering; (8) Electrical Engineering; (4) Highway 
Engineering; (5) Sanitary Engineering; (6) Two- Year Courses in 
Mechanic Arts. 



l1 



26 



The Graduate School offers courses in any of the subjects in whicl 
a graduate may desire to obtain advanced degrees. The Graduate School 
consists of all students taking graduate work in the various depart-l 
ments. Those qualified to supervise graduate work in the various de- 
partments will constitute the faculty of the Graduate School, presided] 
over by a research specialist designated as Dean. 

The School of Home Economics offers a curriculum in which may be 
obtained the general principles of home economics, a knowledge of home 
economics for teaching purposes, or a specialized knowledge of particular 
phases which deal with the work of the dietitian or institutional manager. 

The School of Liberal Arts offers curricula with majors in: (1) An- 
cient Languages and Philosophy; (2) Economics; (3) English Language 
and Literature; (4) General Science; (5) History and Political Science; 
(6) Journalism; (7) French, German, or Spanish; (8) Public Speaking 
with reference to Special Professions; studies also are offered in Music 
and Library Science. 

The Department of Military Science and Tactics has charge of the 
work of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit established by the 
War Department. During the first two years of the student's stay at 
the University he is required to take the Basic R. O. T. C. courses. Dur- 
ing his junior and senior years he may elect three credit hours in Reserve 
Officers* Training Corps each term. 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation works in close 
co-operation with the military department and supervises all physical 
training, general recreation, and intercollegiate athletics. 

The Summer School of six weeks offers courses in subjects given in 
any of the schools during the regular session of the University, with 
the exception of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Law, and in spe- 
cial subjects, such as school administration, classroom management and 
principles of secondary education for high school and elementary school 
teachers. Certain courses given in the Summer School are of collegiate 
grade and may be counted toward the bachelor's degree. Advanced 
courses may count toward the master's degree. 

General matter having relationship to offerings of the School of Medi- 
cine and the Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry, and the School of Law 
will be found elsewhere. 



ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission to the University must be at least sixteen 
years of age. Women are admitted to all courses and under the same 
conditions as men. Students may be admitted at any time, but should^ 
enter at the beginning of one of the three terms. 



27 

Students may be admitted by examination, or by certificate from an 
accredited high school or preparatory school, or by transfer from another 

institution. 

In general the requirements for admission to the freshman class are 
the same as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high 
schools of Maryland. An applicant must offer for admission at least 
15 units of credit by examination, or by a certificate from an approved 
high school or its equivalent. A unit represents a year's study in any 
subject in a secondary school and constitutes approximately a quarter 
of a full year's work. It presupposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, 
recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and for each study four 
or five class exercises a week. Two laboratory periods in any science or 
vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class exercise. 

Of the fifteen units presented, seven are specifically designated — eight 
for the School of Engineering — ^and eight may be elected from any sub- 
ject that the high school offers toward graduation. 

Students are admitted without examination, if they can present cer- 
tificates showing that they have completed the necessary entrance sub- 
jects. The certificates presented by the candidates must be officially 
certified by the principals of the schools attended and must state in 
detail the work completed. Blank certificates conveniently arranged for 
the desired data will be sent upon application. 

Candidates not admitted by certificates will be required to take written 
examinations on the entrance subjects. These examinations are offered 
in June and September. Exact dates will be sent upon request. 

Required and Elective Subjects 
Prescribed Units 

English 3 

Mathematics 2 (For Engineering 3) * 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 (For Engineering 8) 



♦Additional unit includes Algebra 
Geometry %. 



% and Solid Geometry or Plane 



28 



Requirements for admission to the Medical School and Schools of 
Dentistry, Pharmacy and Law will be found under the chapters given 
to these schools. 

Elective Units (eight) — ^To be selected from the following subjects: 



Agriculture, 

Astronomy, 

Botany, 

Chemistry, 

Civics, 

Commercial subjects, 

Economics, 

English, 

General Science, 

Geology, 



History, 

Home Economics, 

Industrial subjects, 

Language, 

Mathematics, 

Physical Geography, 

Physics, 

Physiology, 

Zoology, 



Advanced Standing 

A student coming from a standard college or university may secure 
advanced standing by presenting a statement of his complete academic 
record certified by the proper officials. This statement must be accom- 
panied by a set of secondary school credentials presented for admission 
to the college or university. Full credit is given for work done in other 
institutions when found to be equivalent in extent and quality to that 
required at this University. An applicant may request examination for 
advanced credit in any subject. In case the character of a student's 
work in any subject is such as to create doubt as to the quality of that 
which preceded, the University reserves the right to revoke at any time 
any credit assigned on certificate. 

Registration 

The University year begins September 20 and ends June 15, except 
for the branches located in Baltimore. (See calendar on page 5). Mon- 
day, September 20, and Tuesday, September 21, are devoted to matricu- 
lation and registration of students for the first term. Registration for 
the second and third terms takes place before the close of the preceding 
terms. 

New students should go at once to the new agricultural building, 
where they will find a committee in charge of matriculation and regis- 
tration. 

Upper classmen should consult their advisers or deans and then pro- 
ceed in the regular way. Students are not admitted to classes for which 
they are not registered in due form. 

Unclassified Students 

Mature persons who have had insufficient preparation to pursue any 
of the four-year courses may, with the consent of the Committee on 
Courses, matriculate for such subjects as they are fitted to take. Such 



29 

students, however, will be ineligible for a degree until they have satisfied 
the entrance requirements and completed an approved four-year course 
of study. 

Graduation, Degrees, and Certificates. 

AH undergraduate four-year courses lead to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science or Bachelor of Arts. The total requirements for graduation 
vary, according to the type of work in the different colleges, from 
204 to 220 term credit hours. A term credit hour is one lecture or 
recitation each week for one term of twelve weeks; two or three hours 
of laboratory or field work are counted equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation. All practical work is scheduled for two or three hours, 
depending upon the nature of the work. To find full information of 
requirements, the student should refer to the description of the school 
in which he is interested. 

Candidates are recommended for graduation after they have completed 
the prescribed course of study, including all the required work and 
enough electives to total the required credit hours. 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of 
Philosophy in Arts, Doctor of Philosophy in Science, Civil Engineer, 
Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of 
Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, Graduate in Pharmacy and Pharma- 
ceutical Chemist. 

Degrees are not granted to the students in the two-year curricula, 
but at graduation time certificates are awarded. 



BUILDINGS 



Some eighteen buildings have been erected on the University campus 
for research, extension, and residence educational purposes. The build- 
ings comprised in the group are the Agricultural Building, Calvert Hall, 
the Library, Engineering Buildings, Chemical Building, Morrill Hall, 
Horticultural Building, the Hospital, Stock Judging Pavilion, Poultry 
Building, temporary dining-hall, temporary auditorium. Girls' Home 
Economics Practice House, and the Agricultural Experiment Station 
group. Other buildings are located in Baltimore. 

Agricultural Building 

The Executive Offices, the College of Agriculture and School of Edu- 
cation and the Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service are 
housed in the Agricultural Building. This structure was completed and 
occupied in April, 1918. The building also contains biological, soils and 
bacteriological laboratories. 



30 

Buildings in Baltimore 

The buildings of the University in Baltimore are located at the corn] 
of Lombard and Greene streets. They consist of the original buildii 
erected in 1814, and more modem buildings adjoining, one of which 
devoted to Law and one the University Hospital. 

Calvert Hall 

Excellent dormitory accommodations are provided in Calvert Hall, 
modem fireproof structure erected and occupied in 1914. It took tl 
place of the two dormitories destroyed by fire in 1912. 

Morrill Hall 

The School of Liberal Arts and the Department of Zoology are house 
in Morrill Hall, which is a three-story building erected in 1898. Thi 
building formerly was occupied by the work in agriculture and engi 
neering. 

Chemical Building 

The Chemical Building provides a home for the School of Chemistry 
and for the state work in analysis of feeds, feritlizers and agricultura 
lime. It has classrooms, laboratories, and offices for all undergraduat( 
and graduate work in chemistry. 



19 t 



Engineering Buildings 

The Mechanical Building was the first of the Engineering group con- 
structed, having been completed and occupied by the Department oi 
Mechanical Engineering in 1898. The Civil Engineering and Electrical 
Engineering additions, with accompanying shops, were built in 1910 
The three buildings are connected by closed passageways. 

The Infirmary 

The infirmary was erected in 1901 and makes possible excellent treat- 
ment for students in cases of sickness. It has a private ward for segre- 
gation of contagious diseases, quarters for trained nurse, operating room 
doctor's office, special culinary equipment, and accommodations foi 
twenty patients. 

The Horticultural Building 

Classrooms, propagation rooms, and offices are contained in the Horti 
cultural Building, completed in 1915. In connection with this, ten mod 
ern greenhouses are so constructed as to have entry into each direc 
from building. 

The Stock Judging Pavilion 

T*^his building is used for stock judging competitions, for stock shows 
and to house a part of the equipment of the dairy husbandry and fam 



31 

machinery departments of the College of Agriculture. Connecting this 
building with the Agricultural Building is an auditorium capable of 
seating 600 persons. 

The Poultry Buildings 

Research in poultry projects and laboratory practice is carried on in 
the Poultry Building. The main building contains classrooms, labora- 
tories, offices and incubating rooms. 

Experiment Station Group 

The main building of the experiment station group is a large brick 
structure of the colonial period. It contains the office of the Director 
of the Station, the chemical and physiological laboratories, and a labora- 
tory for research in soils. Other buildings of this group contain seed 
and milk testing laboratories, classrooms, and others are greenhouses, 
Agronomy Building, a secondary horticultural building, barns, farm 
machinery buildings, silos, etc. 

Temporary Dining-Hall 

A temporary wooden structure has been erected to serve as a dining- 
hall until the Legislature appropriates money to put up a permanent 
building. This wooden structure is well built and contains kitchen 
equipment and other facilities for comfortably taking care of about 600 
persons. 

Other Buildings 

Another wooden structure has been used for the last few years as 
an auditorium. It is capable of seating about 400 persons. The College 
also maintains a laundry building in which it handles the students' 
laundry at cost. It also has two frame dwelling-houses in which it 
houses part of its labor. A brick power-house contains apparatus for 
pumping all water for College use. Another small frame house contains 
machinery for canning and drying of fruits and vegetables. A small 
brick gas-house has apparatus for manufacturing gas for use in the 
laboratories. 

The Filtration Plant 

Recently completed is a modern filtration plant for furnishing an 
ample supply of water for use in the dormitories and general college 
buildings. This plant consists of a reservoir with a reserve supply 
of 1,500,000 gallons, sediment tanks, filter beds, pumps, etc. 

The Library 

The two-story brick building housing the Library was built in 1894. 
On the first floor is collected material relating to the various phases 
of the subject of agriculture — books, bound periodicals. Experiment Sta- 
tion Records, all Experiment Station Bulletins of the United States, 



J 



32 

United States Department of Agriculture and Farmers' Bulletins. The 
special catalog cards issued by the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture make accessible the large amount of state and national bulletin 
literature on agricultural subjects. 

The second floor of the Library is used as a general reading and ref- 
erence room as well as a stack room for all books except the agricultural. 

The entire Library contains approximately 5,000 bound books and 5,000 
United States Government documents and unbound reports and pamph- 
lets. All material is on open shelves where students can easily locate it. 
The Library is open from 8.30 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., six days of the week; 
all evenings, with the exception of Saturday, from 6.30 to 10; and on 
Sunday afternoon, from 2.30 to 5.30. The librarian or an assistant is 
always in charge. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The Alumni Association.! 

The Alumni Association is an organization composed of alumni of 
the Uttiiversity. This Association has an office at the University and has 
several branch associations. It publishes a monthly paper. The State 
University Alumnus, and a Bi-Annuxil Record, The Association is active 
in legislative and other measures for the support of the University and 
is represented on the Board of Trustees and on the committee which 
controls athletics by four members, two on each. 

The Student Assembly 

The Student Assembly is composed of all the students for carrying out 
a system of student self-government. The Student Executive Council 
is the executive committee of the Student Assembly and acts in coopera- 
tion with the faculty in the management of student affairs. 

The Dramatic Club 

The Dramatic Club is organized for the purpose of presenting at least 
one play each year. It is made up of men who have had experience 
either in this work since coming to the University or in high school. 

Fraternities and Sororities. 

There are at 'flie University four national fraternities. Kappa Alpha, 
Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Sigma, Phi Alpha; two local fraternities, Nu 
Sigma Omicron, Sigma Tau Alpha; one local sorority, Sigma Delta. 

Societies 

Two literary societies are maintained by the students, the Poe and 
New Mercer. These hold weekly meetings at which regular programs 
are presented. 



33 



The Liebig €heniical Society is made up of students specializing in 
chemistry. Special lectures by students and specialists in certain 
branches of chemistry and open discussions of various chemical questions 
are featured. 

The Engineering Society is composed of students in the School of 
Engineering. 

The agricultural Club is organized according to special interests into 
the Horticultural Society, the Agronomy Society, and the Animal Hus- 
bandry Society. 

Programs are offered in the Engineering Society and Agricultural Club 
similar to that of the Liebig Chemical Society, except that the subjects 
pertain to engineering or agriculture. 

Le Cercle Francais 

This club was organized in 1919 by the Department of French. Its 
membership is composed of the faculty of the department, students pur- 
cuing courses in French, and others interested in the study of that lan- 
guage. The aims of the club are to awaken a live interest in French 
literature, culture, history and customs, and to build up an ease in the 
use of the language. Although fostered by the School of Liberal Arts, 
this club is not restrcited to students enrolled therein, but is open to all 
who are interestd in things French. 

Clubs 

The Rifle Club is affiliated with the National Rifle Association and 
engages in matches with other colleges and rifle organizations. 

The Chess and Checker Club is organized for the promotion of these 
games among those that engage in them. Annual tournaments are con- 
ducted for which gold medals are awarded. 

The County Clubs are organizations of students from the same coun-. 
ties. The Baltimore City Club and District of Columbia Club are organ- 
izations of the same nature. 

The Rossbourg Club is the student organization which has charge of 
most of the formal dances of the students. This club is open to all 
students. 

The Keystone Club 

This organization came into being during the past academic year when 
a score of men from the "Keystone State" found each other on the 
campus. All Pennsylvanians are eligible. Its aim is to promote a feel- 
ing of interest and good fellowship among the students from Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations are 
organized to be of general service to the students. They perform im- 
portant functions in matters of obtaining employment for worthy stu- 



34 

dents, in receiving new students, and in helping to maintain generally 
a high morale and state of good fellowship in the student body. A read- 
ing-room, chess and checkers, and other games are maintained by the 
association for use of all the students. 

Student Publications 

A weekly five-column newspaper. The Review, is published by the stu- 
dents. Besides this the members of the junior class publish each year 
an annual book The Reveille, Both publications reflect the news and 
atmosphere of general college life. 

NOTE. — For this issue of the catalogue it has been impossible to get in 
print the student organizations in the Law and Medical Schools. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



inlffi 



Honorable mention is given to students for excellence in under- 
graduate work in the upper one-'fifth of each school as follows: The 
upper one-tenth is given first honors, and the rest second honors, pro- 
vided that the student*s course average is above 80. 

Debating and Oratory 

An annual debate is held each year in January between the Poe and 
New Mercer literary societies for the "President's Cup," given by Dr. 
H. J. Patterson. 

A gold medal is awarded by the Alumni Association each year to the 
best debater in the University, the test being a debate between picked 
teams from the two literary societies. 

The University gives gold medals to members of winning teams in in- 
tercollegiate debates. 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges, consisting of Wash- 
ington College, Western Maryland College, St. John's College, and 
University of Maryland offers each year gold medals for first and second 
places in an oratorical contest that is held between representatives of 
the four institutions. 

Athletics 

The class of 1908 offers annually to "the man who best typifies the 
college athlete" a gold medal. The medal is given in honor of former 
President R. W. Silvester and is known as "The Silvester Medal for 
Excellence in Athletics." 

The Military Medal 

The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal to the member of the 
battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. The medal is 
awarded after an individual drill by each of the contestants. 



35 



The Citizenship Prize 



A gold medal is presented annually by H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the 
class of 1908, to the member of the senior class who during his collegiate 
career has nearest typified the model citizen and who has done most for 
the general advancement of the interests of the Utniversity. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



NOTE. — ^Following information about fees, scholarships, etc., has no rela- 
tionship to the Medical and Law group. This information in their connec- 
tion will be found under their group headings. 

Make all checks payable to University of Maryland. 

The charges for each term must be paid at the beginning of the 
term. Students will not be admitted to classes until payment has been 
made or until satisfactory arrangements have been made for deferring 
payment. An additional charge of 10% will be added to accounts 
remaining unpaid at the close of the first month after registration. 

No charge is made for tuition in any of the colleges or schools except 
Law, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy. 

The estimated average annual expenses of undergraduates are as 
follows : 

First Second Third 

Term. Term. Term, Total. 

Fixed Charges 20.00 20.00 20.00 60.00 

Board (36 weeks) 80 . 60 67 . 70 67 . 70 216 . 00 

Lodging (39 weeks) .. . 24.05 24.05 24.05 72.15 

Laundry (36 weeks) ... 7.20 7.20 7.20 21.60 

Damage Fee 5 . 00 .... .... 5 . 00 

♦Athletic Fee 10.00 10.00 

Totals $146.85 $118.95 $118.95 $384.75 

The above does not take into consideration the cost of books, supplies 
and personal needs. This depends largely on the tastes and habits of 
the individual student. Books and supplies average about $40. 

The fixed charges made to all students are a part payment of over- 
head expenses, such as janitor services, hospital and doctor's fees, 
general laboratory fees, library, physical training, etc. 

Board, lodging and other charges may vary from term to term, but 
every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

The damage fee is to cover breakage, loss of library books, and injury 
to property which cannot be charged directly against any student. 



*This is a special fee collected by the University for the support of Ath- 
letics and is turned over, in toto, to the Athletic Board, which expends it. 



.11 



36 



li!i 



111' ■ 




Damage to university property will be charged pro rata to the whole 
student body unless the offender is known. Any unused part of this 
fee is returned to the student upon withdrawal or at the close of the 
year. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical atten- 
tion the expense must be borne by the student. 

Board and lodging may be obtained at boarding-houses or in private 
families if desired. 

Students rooming outside the University may obtain board and laun- 
dry at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunch rooms. 

All the University property in possession of the individual student 
will be charged against him, and the parent or guardian must assume 
responsibility for its return without injury other than results from ordi- 
nary wear. 

All Students assigned to dormitories are required to provide them- 
selves with one pair of blankets for single bed, two pairs of sheets for 
single bed, four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow, two laundry bags, 
one broom and one waste basket. 

Special Fees. 

Bacteriology Laboratory Fee $2 . 00 

Fee for special condition examination 1 .00 

Fee for changes in registration after first week of term 1 . 00 
Fee for failure to register within seven days after 

opening of term 2 . 00 

(.25 for each succeeding day of delay) 

Diploma fee payable prior to graduation 5.00 

Certificate fee payable prior to graduation 3 . 00 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 
student who is in arrears in his accounts. 

Graduate Fees. 

Each graduate student is subject to a matriculation fee of $10.00, a 
fixed charge of $1.00 per term credit hour and a diploma fee of $10.00. 

Withdrawals. 

When a student desires to withdraw from the University he is re- 
quired to secure from his Dean a written approval, which must be pre- 
sented to the Registrar. Charges for full time vnll he continued against 
him unless this is done. 

Students withdrawing before the end of any term will be charged 
$7.00 per week for board and $2.00 per week for lodging for the time 
during the term preceding their withdrawal. 



I«i{ 



87 



Refunds 

No fixed charge will be refunded. 

No laboratory fee will be refunded after the middle of the term. 

The low charge for board at the dining hall is made possible only 
by the use of the term basis in figuring costs. The overhead is fixed 
for the term and no refunds can be made for short absences without 
a loss to the dining hall and to the students who eat there. Therefore, 
no refunds can be made except in case of withdrawal or prolonged 
absence due to sickness or unavoidable cause. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND SELF AID 



High School Scholarships. 

While the Ubiiversity has no endowment nor loan funds with which to 
assist students, it has established for each high and preparatory school 
in Maryland and the District of Columbia one scholarship each year. 
For the three counties of Maryland which do not have high schools, 
Calvert, Charles and St. Mary^s, one scholarship each year is given. 
These scholarships have a value of fifty dollars and are credited to the 
holder's account. 

These scholarships are offered under the following conditions: 

1. The holder must be a graduate of a high school and qualified to 
enter the freshman class. 

2. The appointment to the scholarships must be made by the county 
school superintendent upon recommendation of the principal of the 
high school. In making recommendations high school principals should 
not only take into consideration class standing but also inability to 
meet the expenses of a university education. 

3. The appointment shall be made for the term normally required 
to complete the curriculum selected. 

4. The scholarship will be forfeited by indifference to scholastic work 
or by disregard of rules of the University. 

5. Scholarships awarded to preparatory schools and to high schools 
of Baltimore and Washington shall be given on recommendation of the 
principals direct to the University. Recipients of preparatory school 
scholarships must be qualified to enter the freshman class. 

6. Applicants from Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert counties may 
take one of the non-collegiate curriculums or, if entering from another 
institution, may take one of four-year curriculums leading to a degree. 

Fellowships 

The University also offers a number of fellowships. These may be 
:given either to its own graduates or the graduates of other colleges who 
<iesire to pursue courses in the Graduate School leading to advance de- 



38 

^ees. Fellowships are available in the College of Agriculture, School 
of Engineering, School of Chemistry, and School of Liberal Arts. These 
fellowships are worth from $500 to $720 per year. 

Industrial Scholarships 

There are available each year, as they become vacant, a number of 
industrial scholarships, in which students receive compensation for at- 
tending to certain prescribed duties, such as waiting on the tables in the 
dining hall, janitor service in the dormitory, and postmaster. Students 
may frequently earn enough in this way to cover board and lodging. 

Student Labor 

Students may earn a considerable portion of their expenses by doing 
work for the several departments on an hour basis. Services of those 
who have a good knowledge of stenography, typewriting, electrical, or 
mechanical work are in demand. Considerable work is available around 
the buildings and grounds and on the Agricultural Experiment Station 
farm. 



mi!- 



n ; iiji 



1 


: j; 


li k 



39 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



The teaching of a rational, practical system of farming is the primary 
aim of the College of Agriculture. The permanent prosperity of rural 
citizens is in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the land. 
The most successful farmer is the one who can produce a maximum 
quantity per acre of the best quality of agricultural products at a 
minimum cost and dispose of them in the markets to the best advantage. 
The modern farmer must know the kinds of plants to grow and how 
to improve them; how to maintain orchards, gardens, and attractive sur- 
roundings; something of the soil, its cultivation and conservation of 
fertility; how to combat plant diseases and insect pests; the selection, 
breeding, and feeding of live stock; the marketing of farm products; 
modem farm buildings, farm equipment and conveniences of the home; 
and finally how to be leaders and promote good citizenship in rural life. 

The curricula are planned to give the student a general knowledge 
of all phases of agriculture and related sciences, but at the same time 
afford an opportunity to specialize along the lines in which he is par- 
ticularly interested. The plan provides for those who wish to take up 
professions such as teaching, research, county agent work, as well as 
farming. 

Organization 

For administrative purposes and for ease of instruction the School of 
Agriculture is organized as follows: 

A. Division of Plant Industry, including the following departments: 

1. Horticulture. 

a. Pomology. 

b. Vegetable Gardening. 

c. Landscape Gardening. 

d. Floriculture. 
Agronomy. 

a. Forage Crops. 

b. Grain Crops. 
Plant Morphology and Mycology. 
Plant Physiology. 
Plant Pathology. 
Foresty. 

B. Division of Animal Industry, including the following departments: 

1. Department of Dairy Husbandry, comprising Dairy Stock, 
Production, Dairy Manufacture and Marketing. 

2. Department of Animal Husbandry, comprising Cattle, 
Horses, Swine, Sheep, Goats. 



2. 



8. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



■l! 



lit 



40 

^3. Department of Poultry Husbandry. 

4. Department of Animal Pathology and Veterinary Medicine. 
6. Department of Bacteriology and Sanitation. 
6. Laboratory of Biological Products. 

C The Department of Geology and Soils. 

T>. The Department of Farm Management, including also Agricul- 
tural Economics, Markets, and Rural Organization. 

E. The Department of Zoology, including General Zoology, Ento- 
mology, Bee Culture, and Fish Culture. 

P. The Department of Farm Equipment. 

G. The Department of Short Courses in Agriculture. 

Equipment 

The College has about 320 acres of land for use in experimental work, 
orchards, truck gardens, and for pasture land. A portion of the land is 
given over solely for instructional purposes. 

The College of Agriculture is housed in the newest building on the 
campus. Agricultural Hall. This building is the home of the Depart- 
ments of Agronomy, Soils, Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, Farm 
Management, Bacteriology, Botany, and in part Horticulture. Many of 
the departments now have very well equipped laboratories and others 
are under way. 

The Horticultural Department has at its disposal a range of ten 
greenhouses that are fifty by twenty feet and which join with spacious 
laboratories in a long brick structure. Together with the greenhouses, 
necessary cold-frames and hotbeds are provided. 

The Department of Zoology has quarters on the first and second floor 
of Science Hall with laboratories well supplied with collections of in- 
sects, models, microscopes, and other supplies necessary for practical 
work in zoology and entomology. A greenhouse with an aquarium and a 
screen insectary adjacent to the laboratories are available for class and 
investigational work. 

The proximity of the College to Washington, D. C, with its United 
States Department of Agriculture, offers unusual opportunities for 
agricultural students. 

With its new building, laboratories, greenhouses, and farm, the College 
of Agriculture is prepared to give a thorough training in the science 
and art of farming. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

The College of Agriculture works in cooperation with the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. Most of the subject matter in agricultural courses 
is tested by the station or furnished as original from its researches. 
Methods and material which are valuable in one state are often worth- 



hiit'i' 



41 



less in another, and the station makes it a point to find what is best 
for the State of Maryland. 

The members of the staff employed for research are available to spend 
some time teaching advanced students. Some are employed to divide 
their time between college instruction, experiment station research, and 
extension teaching. 

Fellowships 

The experiment station employs several graduate students to conduct 
experiments along certain lines with the privilege at the same time of 
working toward advanced degrees by taking graduate instruction in the 
College. There are also several fellowships in the College of Agricul- 
ture where graduate students are employed to spend part time assisting 
in class and laboratory work. The time required for a degree de- 
pends on the nature of the fellowship held. The arrangement makes it 
possible for a student to get valuable experience while he still is in 
College. Those who are interested and qualified should write to the 
Dean of the College for information. 

Farm Experience 

It is impossible for students who have not had farm experience to 
secure the fullest benefit from any of the agricultural courses. A com- 
mittee of the faculty is appointed to see that all students have a fair 
knowledge of actual farm practices before graduation. Students are 
often required to spend from three to nine months on a farm approved 
by the committee in charge. Weekly reports of the farm operations are 
sent to the College and a final examination is given upon the student's 
return. The University degree is withheld until the student satisfies the 
requirement. 

Instruction, Degrees, and Certificates 

The various needs of students of agriculture are met by the following 
curricula : 

1. Graduate curricula extending over one year for the degree of 
master of science and three years for the degree of doctor of philosophy, 
given under the supervision of the Graduate School. Further informa- 
tion will be found under that heading. 

2. Four-year curricula leading to the degree of bachelor of science 
in general agriculture and biological sciences or any special phase of 
these sciences. 

3. Two-year non-collegiate agriculture leading to a certificate of 
credit. 

4. One-week course — "Fartners' Week." 

Curricula in Agriculture 
All students registered in the College of Agriculture take the same 
work in the freshman year. At the end of the year they may elect 
to specialize in a particular department or they may withhold the 
decision to the end of the sophomore year without loss of time. 



42 



GEZrZJBAI^ FBESHMAN CTTBSICU^UM: 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal. (Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

General Zoology (Zoo. 101-102) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Survey of Agriculture (Gen'l Agr. 101-102) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 

ELECT ONE OP THE FOLLOWING GROUPS: 
Group A — 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) 

Group B — • 

Social and Economics History of U. S. (H. 118-120). 
Group C — 

Language 

Group D — 

Mathematics 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



4 
3 



1 
3 
1 



3 

3 

3 
2 



II 



4 
3 



1 
3 
1 



3 

3 

3 
2 



III 



4 

V 



3 
1 



4 
3 
3 

3 

2 



Those who do not care to specialize in any particular phase of agri- 
culture will follow the curriculum called General Agriculture. 



GENERAI^ AGRICUZiTUBi:. 



SOPHMORE YEAR. 



Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 102) 
Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103). 

Pomology (Hort. 102) 

Geology (Soils 101) 

Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 102-103) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Grain Judging (Agro. 102) 

Forage Crops (Agro. 103) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. 1. 102) 

Elective 



4 
3 



4 
3 



2 
2 



3 

4 
1 



2 
5 



3 
3 



4 
2 
S 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Farm Dairying (D. H. 107) 

Farm Machinery 

Tractors and Trucks 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Entomology (Zoo. 103) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) . . 
Elective 



3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



2 

12 



3 

2 
9 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (Agri. Econ. 10) 

Farm Buildings 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Elective 



3 
2 



12 



4 
10 



17 



43 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE. 

Geni Agr. 101-103. Survey of Agriculture. One credit hour each 
term: one lecture. First and second terms. Freshman year. 

A course designed to assist the new students in adjusting themselves 
to the demands and problems of college life, and to aid them in the 
selection of courses in the subsequent years. Students will have an 
opportunity to hear the different phases of agriculture discussed by the 
heads of the various departments of the College of Agriculture. 

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY 



HORTICULTURE 

There are several reasons why the State of Maryland should be pre- 
eminent in the different lines of horticulture and offer such excellent 
opportunities for horticultural enterprises. A few of the more evident 
ones are the wide variation in soil and climate from the Eastern Shore 
to the mountainous counties of Allegany and Garrett in the west, the 
nearness to all of the large eastern markets, the large number of rail- 
roads, interurban lines and waterways, all of which combine to make 
marketing easy and comparatively cheap. 

The Department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work, 
namely: Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. Students wishing to specialize in Horticulture can arrange 
to take either a general course during the four years or enough work is 
offered in each division to allow students to specialize during the last 
two years in any of the four divisions. The courses have been so 
planned and cover such subject matter that upon their completion stu- 
dents should be fitted either to engage in commercial work, county agent 
work, or teaching and investigational work in state and federal in- 
stitutions. 

CURRICULA IN HORTICULTURE 

Students who intend to specialize in any of the four divisions of 
Horticulture are required to take the same subjects during the first 
two years. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soils 101-102 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101). . . 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 118) 

Elementary Landscape Gardening (Hort, 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Entomology (Zoo. 106) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Elective 



131) 



3 
3 

4 



4 
3 
2 




3 
3 



3 
2 





3 
V 



3 

4 
3 



i 



Inn 



44 

FOMOl^OGir. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) . . . 

Technical Composition (En&. 104-106) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108)... 
General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) . . . 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

Genetics (Agron. 107) 

Elective 



S 
2 
3 
S 



2 

3 



2 

2 
3 



4 
5 



3 
*8 



Imd 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 107) 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



1 

1 



2 

I 
9 



8 



2 
1 

8 



1 

2 

1 

13 



VEGETABXiE GABDENING. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

Genetics (Agron. 107) 

Elective 



S 
2 
8 
8 



3 
2 
8 



2 
3 

V 

8 
V 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 116) 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 117) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



8 

8 



2 

1 
8 



2 
8 

1 
9 



1 

1 

* t 

1 

12 



46 



JUNIOR YRA.R. 



Term: 



Greenhouse Management (Hort. 122-123) 

Floriculture Practice (Hort. 124) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125) 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 128) 

plant Materials (Hort. 132) 

plant Materials (Hort. 133) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102). 
Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106)... 
Gen Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) .. . 

Hort. Entomology (Zoo. 113) 

Genetics (Agron. 107) 

Elective 



3 
2 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 126-127) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



ZiANDSCAFi: 6ABDENIKG. 



II 



3 
2 



3 

2 



4 
3 



m 



3 


3 


2 


2 


3 




1 


i 


11 


11 







t 

*2 



2 

V 



1 

2 

1 

13 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Plant Materials (Hort. 132-133) 

History of Landscape Design (Hort. 138). 
Elements of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 127) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102). . . 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 102) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zoo. 121) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101). 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Surveying 

Elective 



134) 



3 
2 



3 
1 



1 
2 



3 

2 



2 
3 
3 



2 

4 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Landscape Design (Hort. 135-136) 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 137) 

Civic Art (Hort. 139) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Elective 



2 
2 
1 
9 



2 

1 

11 



2 

1 

11 



46 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



POMOLOGY 



lifii' 



Hort. 101. Elementary Pomology. Four credit hours; three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term, sophomore year. 

In this course a study is made of the general practices in Pomology. 
The proper location and site for an orchard are discussed. Also 
varieties, planting plans, inter-crops, spraying, cultural methods, fer- 
tilizing methods, thinning, picking, packing and marketing are given 
consideration. In this course these subjects are discussed for apples, 
peaches, pears, plums, cherries and quinces. The principles of plant 
propagation as applied to pomology are discussed. 

Hort. 102-103. Commercial Fruit Growing. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year, 
prerequisite, Hort. 101. 

In this course a study is made of the proper management of com- 
mercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced work is taken up on the sub- 
jects of orchard culture, orchard fertilization, picking, packing, market- 
ing and storing of fruits, orchard by-products, orchard heating and 
orchard economics. 

Hort. 104. Systematic Pomology. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term, junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 
101. 

The history, botany and classification of fruits and their adaptation 
to Maryland conditions are discussed in this course. Exercises are given 
in describing and identifjring the leading commercial varieties of fruits. 
Students in this course are required to help set up the College fruit 
show each year. 

Hort. 105. Advanced Practical Pomology. One credit hour. First 
term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principal 
fruit regions of Eastern West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. 
A visit to the fruit markets of several large cities will be made. The 
cost of this trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each 
student will be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. 
The time for taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

Hort. 106. Small Fruit Culture. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term, junior year. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations are discussed in 
this course. Varieties and their adaptation to Maryland soils and 
climate, packing, marketing, and a study of the experimental plots and 



47 

varieties on the station grounds are made. The following fruits are 
discussed in the course: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, black cap 
raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry and logranberry. 

Hort. 107. Economic Fruits of the World. Three credit hours: 
three lectures. Second term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102- 
103 and 104. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological and physiological char- 
acteristics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, 
such as the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut bearing trees, citrus 
fruits, newly introduced fruits and the like, with special reference to 
their cultural requirements in certain parts of the United States and the 
insular possessions. All fruits are discussed in this course which have 
not been discussed in a previous course. 

Hort. 108. Fruit and Vegetable Judging. Two credit hours: tWO 
laboratory periods. First term, junior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 101, 

and 111. 

This is a course designed to train men for fruit judging teams and 
practical judging. Students are required to know at least one hundred 
varieties of fruit, and are given practice in judging single plates, largest 
and best collections, boxes, barrels and commercial exhibits of fruits 
and vegetables. Students in this course are required to help set up the 
College fruit show each year. 

Hort. 109. Advanced Fruit Judging. One credit hour: one labora^ 
tory period. First term, senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 108. 



VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Hort. 111. Elementary Vegetable Gardening. Four credit hours: 
three lectures and one laboratory period. Third term, freshman year. 

This course includes a study of the different types of vegetable gar- 
dening, methods of propagation, construction and management of hot- 
beds and cold-frames. Growing early vegetable plants under glass and 
the planting, cultivating and harvesting under irrigation and in a large 
farmer's garden are discussed. 

Hort. 112. Tuber 2nd Root Crops. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term, junior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 111. 

In this course a study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes is made, 
which includes considerations of seed, varieties, propagation, soils, fer- 
tilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, storing and market- 
ing. 

Hort. 113-115. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. Three credit 
hours each term. Junior year. Two lectures and one laboratory i)eriods. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 



• 



48 



The methods employed by truckers and market gardeners in commer- 
cial production, equipment, use of hotbeds and cold-frames, field plant- 1 
ing, rotation of crops and irrigation. Cultural directions for all veg- 
etables are given, including their varieties, requirements, tillage, control 
of insects and diseases, grading, storing, packing and marketing. Each 
student plans and manages intensive cropping systems on small areas 
and under irrigation, and extensive planting on larger areas in a six- 
year rotation. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture. Three credit hours: one lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods. First term, senior year. Prerequisites, 
Hort. 112 and 113-115. 

This course includes a systematic and descriptive study of the leading 
varieties of the most important vegetables, their origin and botany, 
adaptation of the various varieties to the different cultural and market 
conditions, judging and exhibition work. 

Hort. 117. Advanced Vegetable Gardening. One credit hour; 
Third term, senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 112, 113-115 and 116. 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking sections of 
Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A study of the 
markets in several large cities is included in this trip. Students are re- 
quired to hand in a detailed report of the trip. Such a trip should not 
exceed thirty dollars per student. The time will be arranged each year 
with each class. 

Hort. 118. Vegetable Forcing. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term, sophomore year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 111. 

The forcing of vegetables under glass is covered in this course. All 
vegetables used for forcing are considered, as also the preparation of 
soils, cultivation, regulation of temperature and humidity, watering, 
training, pruning, pollination, and harvesting. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Hort. 121. Elementary Floriculture. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term, sophomore year. 

An elementary course in the culture of greenhouse and home plants, 
and of the common annuals and perennials used in outdoor work. 

Hort. 122-123. Greenhouse Management. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Two credit hours: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

A consideration of the methods employed in the management of 
greenhouses, including the operations of potting, watering, ventilating) 
fumigation, and methods of propagation. 

Hort. 124. Floriculture Practice. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 122-123. 



49 



Designed to give students practical experience in the varoius green- 
house operations of the spring season. 

Hort. 125. Greenhouse Construction. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Second term Junior year. 

A study of the various types of houses, their location, arrangement, 
construction, and cost; the principles and methods of heating; also 
the preparation of plans and specifications for commercial and private 
ranges. 

Hort. 126-127. Commercial Floriculture. Three credit hours each 
term: two lectures and one laboratory period. First and second terms. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 124. 

The method of culture of florists' bench crops and potted plants; the 
marketing of cut flowers; the retail store; a study of floral decoration. 

Hort. 128. Garden Flowers. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the variety of material 
available for garden use, being a study of the species of annuals, her- 
baceous perennials, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses; including their 
cultural requirements. 

Hort. 129. Amateur Floriculture. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory. Third term. 

A general study of floriculture in relation to the home; the care of 
house plants; home gardening. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

Hort. 131. General Landscape Gardening. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 
application to private and public area. Special consideration is given 
to the improvement and beautification of the home grounds, farmsteads, 
and small suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to 
specialize in landscape, but who wish some theoretical and practical 
knowledge of the subject. Open to all students. 

Hort. 132. Plant Materials. Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental planting. 

Hort. 133. Plant Materials. Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Hort, 132. 

A continuation of Hort. 132 to make the student familiar with the 
woody plants in spring and summer. 



i 



It 



I 



50 



Hort. 134. Elements of Landscape Design. Two credit hours: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

A consideration of the principles of landscape design; surveys, map- 
ping, and field work. 

Hort. 135-136. Landscape Design. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. First term. Three credit hours: three 
laboratory periods. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 
133 and 134. 

* The design of private grounds, gardens, and of architectural details 
used in landscape; planting plans; analytical study of plans of prac- 
ticing landscape architects; field observation of landscape developments. 

Hort. 137. Landscape Practice. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Hort. 135-136. 

Tracing and drafting of plans; construction methods; field practice. 

Hort. 138. History of Landscape Gardening. One credit hour: one 
lecture. Second term. Junior year. 

A study of the different styles and a particular consideration of 
Italian, English, and American gardens. 

Hort. 139. Civic Art. Two credit hours: one lecture and one 
laboratory period. First term. (Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 134. 

General study of principles of city planning and their application 
to village and rural improvement, including problems in design of civic 
centers, parks, school grounds, and other public and semi-public areas. 

GENERAL COURSES 

Hort. 142. Horticultural Breeding Practice. One credit hour; one 
laboratory period. Third term, senior year. Prerequisite, Genetics, 
Plant Phys. 104. 

Practice in plant breeding, including pollination, hybridization, selec- 
tion, note taking, and the general application of the theories of heredity 
and selection to practice are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 143-145. Horticultural Research and Thesis. Two, three or 
four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of seniors. Advanced students in any of the 
four divisions of horticulture may select some special problem for indi- 
vidual investigation. This may be either the summarizing of all the 
available knowledge on a particular problem or the investigation of some 
new problem. Where original investigation is carried on, students 
should in most cases start the work during the junior year. The results 
of the research work are to be presented in the form of a thesis and 
filed in the horticultural library. 



51 

Hort. 146-148. Horticultural Seminar. One credit hour each 
term. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of seniors; juniors are permitted to attend.- 
In this course papers are read by members of the class upon subjects 
pertaining to their research or thesis work, or upon special problems 
assigned them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to 
time by members of the departmental staff. 



COURSES INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATES. 

Hort. 201. Experimental Pomology. Three credit hours. Second 
term. Lectures, three hours. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in Pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in 
Pomology and results of experiments that have been or are being con- 
ducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. A limited 
number of seniors will be allowed to take this course with the approval 
of the head of the department. 

Hort. 202. Experimental Vegetable Gardening. Two credit hours. 
Lectures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to 
practices in Vegetable Gardening; methods and difficulties in experi- 
mental work in Vegetable Gardening and results of experiments that 
have been or are being conducted in all experiment stations in this and 
other countries. A limited number of seniors will be permitted to take 
this course with the approval of the head of the department. 

Hort. 203. Experimental Floriculture. Two credit hours. Lec- 
tures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinions as to 
practices in Floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of all 
experimental work in Floriculture which have been or are being con- 
ducted will be thoroughly discussed. A limited number of seniors will 
be permitted to take this course with the approval of the head of the 
department. 

Hort. 204. Methods of Research. Two credit hours. Lecture, one 
hour, one laboratory period. Second term. 

In this course special drill will be given in the making of briefs and 
outlines of research problems, in methods of procedure in conducting in- 
vestigational work and in the preparation of bulletins and reports. A 
study of the origin, development and growth of horticultural research is 
taken up. A study of the research problems being conducted by the de- 
partment of horticulture will be made, and students will be required to 
take notes on some of the experimental work in the field and become 
familiar with the manner of filing and cataloging all experimental work. 




8 



52 

Hort. 205-207. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis. Two, 
three or four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. First, 
second and third terms. 

Students will be required to select problems for original research in 
either Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture or Landscape Gar- 
dening. This work is to continue throughout the full year, and final re- 
sults will be published in the form of a thesis. 

Hort. 208-219. Advanced HorticulturaP Seminar. 

This course will be required of all graduate students. Students will 
be required to give reports either on special topics assigned them or on 
the progress of their own investigational work being done in course 205. 
Members of the departmental staff will report si)ecial research work 
from time to time. 



REQUIREMENTS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS IN HORTICULTURE 

Pomology — Graduate students specializing in Pomology who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 102-103, 104, 107, 
201, 204, 205-207 and 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 103-5; and 
Organic Chemistry. 

Vegetable. Gardening — Graduate students specializing in Vegetable 
Gardening who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required 
either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 
113-115, 116, 202, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 
103-5; Organic Chemistry. 

Floriculture — Graduate students specializing in Floriculture who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 122-123, 127, 132, 
203, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 103-5; Organic 
Chemistry. 

Landscape Gardening — Graduate students specializing in Landscape 
Gardening, who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be re- 
quired either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: 
Hort. 132, 133, 134, 135, 137, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant 
Physiology 103-5. 

Additional Requirements — In addition to the above required courses, 
all graduate students in Horticulture are advised to take Physical 
Chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in Horticulture have had some course worls 
in Entomology, Plant Pathology and Genetics, certain of these courses 
will be required. 



53 

For Skcrt-Course Students 

Hort. 1. Practical Pomology. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. First year. 

This is a general course covering the propagation of our common 
fruits. Such subjects as orchard site, location, varieties, planting plans, 
cultural methods, fertilizer requirements, and picking, packing and mar- 
keting are discussed. All of the tree fruits are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 2-3. Commercial Fruit Growing. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First and second terms. Second year. Prere- 
quisite, Hort. 1. 

This is an advanced course dealing with the proper management of 
commercial orchards in Maryland. Special attention is given to the 
subjects of pruning, picking, packing, marketing and storing of the 
various fruits. Market problems, transportation and shipping associa- 
tions receive special attention. Students are required to become familiar 
with all of the leading commercial varieties of all fruits grown in Mary- 
land. Practice is given in fruit judging and the arrangement of fruits 
for exhibition purposes. Horticultural by-products are given attention in 
this course. 

Hort. 4. Small Fruits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Third term. Second year. 

In this course the production of strawberries, bush fruits and grapes 
is considered. Methods of propagation, selection of sites, soils, pruning, 
cultivation, picking, packing and marketing are discussed. 

Hort. 5. Home Vegetable Gardening. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

The general principles of vegetable gardening as applied to the grow- 
ing of vegetables for home use. The laboratory work includes a study 
of vegetable seeds, seed testing, seed sowing, transplanting and the care 
of plants in the greenhouses and cold-frames. The students are re- 
quired to plan, plant and manage a large home garden until the end 
of the term. 

Hort. 6 8. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First, second and third terms. Second year. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 5. 

This course is planned to run the entire school year. A study of the 
principles of vegetable gardening, as applied to the growing of vegetables 
for market and for canning. The course includes the construction and 
management of hotbeds and cold-frames, sowing and planting, cultiva- 
tion, growing early vegetable plants, soil preparation, harvesting, grad- 
ing, packing, marketing, canning and storage. Each student is allotted a 
definite area and is required to plan, plant and manage it. 



i 



54 

Hort. 9. Landscape and Floriculture. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Second term. First year. 

The principles of landscape gardening and their application to the 
improvement of home grounds. The propagation and culture of gar- 
den and greenhouse plants. 

Hort. 10-12. Commercial Floriculture. Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. First, second and third terms. Second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 9. 

This course is planned to run the full school year. Studies in the pro- 
pagation and culture of commercial florist crops are taken up in this 
course. Methods of packing, shipping and marketing will be considered. 
The course is so organized as to fit students for commercial work. 

Hort. lS-14. Landscape Design and Practice. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods. First and second terms. Second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 13. 

The composition of gardens, private estates and related problems. 
Grading plans, construction, drawing, estimates and laying out of 
grounds are considered. Plant materials are thoroughly studied in this 
course also. 

AGRONOMY 



The curriculum in agronomy aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the 
work to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field 
crop culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough 
freedom is given the student in the way of electives so that he can 
register for subjects which might go along with the growing of crops 
on his particular farm. A student graduating from the course in agro- 
nomy should be well fitted for general farming, investigational work in 
the State or Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The Agronomy Department has a large, well equipped laboratory in 
the new agricultural building and a greenhouse for student use, besides 
free access to the experiment station fields and equipment. 



55 
AaBONoanr. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102).. 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

Entomology (Zoo. 106) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 



3 
3 



3 

4 



2 




II 



1 
3 



4 
3 



2 
2 
3 



III 



3 
3 



2 




JUNIOR YEAR. 



Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 107) 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 106) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 
Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 105) 
Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106). . . 
Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Tractors (Farm Equip. 103) 

Farm Machinery (Farm Equip. 101) 

Electives 



3 
3 



2 
3 



2 
4 



3 

• • • 



2 
3 



3 
2 



3 
V 



SENIOR YEAR. 



105) 



Crop Breeding (Agron. 104) 

Methods in Crop Investigations (Agron. 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 108) 

Seminar (Agron. 109) 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Studies in Agricultural Economics (A. E. 103) 

Farm Forestry ( ) 

Electives 



3 
3 



8 



2 
1 



11 



3 
3 

8 



Description of Courses 

Agron. 101. Cereal Crops. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. First term. Freshman year. 

A study of the history, distribution, culture, and improvement of the 
cereal crops. 

Agron. 102. Grain Judging. One credit hour: one three-hour 
laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 101. 

Practice in judging the cereal crops for milling, seeding, and feeding 
purposes. 






s. I :,i , 



56 

Agron. 103. Forage Crops. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Third term Sophomore year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptation, culture, and uses 
of forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. The laboratory per- 
iods are largely devoted to the identification and classification of forage 
plants and seeds, and purity and viability tests of the seeds. 

Agron. 104. Crop Breeding. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prere- 
quisites, Agron. 101, 103, and 107, Bot. 101. 

In this course the principles of breeding are applied to field crops 
and detailed studies made of methods used in crop improvement work. 

Agron. 105. Methods in Crop Investigations. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one three-ihour laboratory period. First term. Senior 
year. Prerequisites, Agron. 101-103. 

This course deals with methods used by experiment stations in crop 
investigational work. The work of different stations on certain problems 
is classified with the view of the standardization of methods. 'Students 
.are required to make reports on and criticise methods used by the dif- 
ferent stations in attacking the problems studied. 

Agron. 106. Grading Farm Crops. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 
Prerequisites, Agron. 101, 102, and 103. 

A study of market classifications and grades as recommended by the 
United States Bureau of Markets and practice in determining the 
grades. 

Agron. 107. Genetics. Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. iSecond term. Junior year. Prere- 
quisites, Bot. 101 and Morph. and Myc. 101. 

A general course in genetics designed to prepare students for later 
courses in the breeding of crops in which they are specializing. 

Agron. 108. Crop Rotation. Two credit hours: two lectures. 
Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Agron. 101-103 and Pet. 
Phy. 101-102. 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of 
the principles and practice of crop rotation. Rotations used in this and 
other states and the scientific principles involved are studied. 

Agron. 109. Seminar. One credit hour: one lecture. Second 
term. Senior year. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by the students on current 
bulletins and scientific papers dealing with problems in agronomy. 



57 



Agron. 110. Research and Thesis. Six credit hours. To be ar- 
ranged. Senior year. 

Here the students are given a change to do some investigational work 
either in the way of collecting information on some phase of agronomic 
work or working some problem in the laboratory, field, or greenhouse. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Agon. 201. Biometry. Amount of credit to be determined by work 
accomplished. Lectures and laboratory periods. 

A study of the statistical methods as applied to problems in Genetics 
and Plant Breeding. The methods used in the study of variations and 
correlations are discussed and the biometrical constants worked out by 
the class for certain assigned or selected data. 

Agron. 202. Crop Breeding. Amount of credit to be determined 
by work accomplished. Lectures and laboratory periods. 

The content of this course is similar to the undergraduate course in 
Crop Breeding, but will be adapted more to graduate students and 
more of a range will be allowed in choice of material to suit special 
cases. 

Agron. 203. Research. Amount of credit to be determined by work 
accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy or he will be given a 
list of suggested problems from which he may make a selection. 



For Short-Course Students 

Agron. 1. Cereal Crops. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
three-ihour laboratory period. First term. First year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptations, uses, and culture of 
cereal crops, a larger part of the term being spent on com and wheat. 

Agron. 2. Forage Crops. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

A study of the history, distribution, adaptations, uses, and culture 
of forage and cover crops adapted to Maryland conditions. 

Agron. 3. Grain Judging. One credit hour: one three-hour labor- 
atory period. Second term. Second year. 

A laboratory course in judging grains from the standpoint of the 
grower, the feeder and the miller. 

Agron. 4. Advanced Agronomy. Three credit hours: two lectures 

and one three-hour laboratory period each term. Second year. 



58 

Students specializing in agronomy are given special work in judging 
and grading grains, crop improvement and various other phases of crop 
production. Students are allowed to elect subjects in other departments 
for part of the time. 

BOTANICAL GROUP 



The purpose of the group is to supply students in Agriculture and 
General Science with such information as is thought fundamental to 
their special work and to train specialists in the different phases of the 
subject. This training includes such knowledge of plants as would fit 
one for various positions, such as teachers in high schools, normal 
schools, colleges, and investigators in experiment stations and govern- 
ment service. 

BOTAznr. 



SUBJECT. 



Term; 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 107-108) 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 114-116) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

Introductory Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 102) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Elective 



3 



3 
4 
3 



2 
3 



I 


II 







4 
3 

4 



2 
2 



m 



3 
V 



3 
3 

2 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



1 



General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Genetics (Agron. 107) 

Methods in Plant Histology (Morph. and Myc. 107) 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phy, 106) 

Mycology (Morph. and Myc. 106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

General Physics (Phys. 104) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Elective 



3 
3 

2 
6 



4 
3 



3 
3 
2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 



59 



e*ii<ipnts specializing in Morphology and Mycology will take Group A; those- 
'^ in Physiology, Group B; and those in Plant Pathology, Group C. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



0-roup A: 

Plant Morphology (Morph. and Myc. 103-105) 
Advanced Taxonomy (Morph. and Myc. 109). . 

Cytology (Morph. and Myc. 108) 

Elective 



Group B: 
Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 103-105)... 
Plant Micro-Chemistry (Pit. Phy. 107).. 
Physiological Chemistry (Bio-Chem. 101) 
Elective 



G-ronp C: 

Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 105-107) 

Methods in Pathology (Pit. Path. 102-104) 

Seminar in Pathology (Pit. Path. 108-110) 

Elective 



4 
3 



10 



4 
9 



4 
3 

1 



II 



3 

10 



4 
3 



10 



4 
3 
1 



III 



13 

4 



13 



4 
3 

1 



Description of Courses 

Bot. 101. General Botany. Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Freshman year. 

A general introduction to botany touching briefly on all phases of 
the subjects and planned to give the fundamental prerequisites for study 
in the special departments. 

For Short-Course Students 

Bot. 1. General Botany. Two lectures and one laboratory i>eriod.- 
First term. First year. 

A survey of the field of botony. Effort is made to give the student an 
understanding of how plants take up water and nutrients from the soil, 
how they manufacture foods, and the structures necessary to carry on 
these processes. 

MORPHOLOGY AND MYCOLOGY 

For Undergraduates. 

Morp. & Myc. 101. Plant Anatomy. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 101. 

An anatomical study of leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Where 
possible plants of economic value are used as type specimens. 

Morph. & Myc. 102. Systematic Botany. Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of the local flora. A study is made of floral parts and the 
essential relations between the groups of flowering plants. Students be- 
come familiar with the systematic key used to identify plants. 



60 



Morph. & Myc. 103-105. Plant Morphology. Four credit hours 
each term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A course designed to give the student a comprehensive view of the 
plant kingdom. It treats of the general morphological evolutionary de- 
velopment and relationships of the various groups of plants, based upon 
the examinations of selected types from each group. 

Morph. & Myc. 106. Mycology. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Introductory comparative study of the morphology, life history, and 
classification of economic fungi. 

Morph. & Myc. 107. Methods in Plant Histology. Three credit 
hours: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prere- 
quisites, Morph. and Myc. 101. 

Primarily a study in technique. It includes methods of killing, fixing, 
imbedding, sectioning, staining, and mounting on slides of plant 
materials. 

Morph. & Myc. 108. Cytology. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Morph. and 
Myc. 107. 

The structure and life history of the plant cell. 

Morph. & Myc. 109. Advanced Taxonomy. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. First term. 

This course is offered for students who want more proficiency in sys- 
tematic botany than the elementary course affords. A student who com- 
pletes the course should be able to classify the grasses and other com- 
mon plants of the state. 

For Graduate Students. 

Morph. & Myc. 201. Advanced Mycology. Two credit hours each 

term. One lecture and one laboratory period. 

A detailed treatment of the classification, morphology and economics 
of the fungi, with studies of life histories in culture and identification 
of field material. 

Morph. & Myc. 202. Special Studies of Fungi. Credit hours accord- 
ing to work done. 

Special problems in the structure or life history of fungi or the mono- 
graphic study of some group of fungi. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Undergraduates. 

Pit. Phy. 101-102. Plant Physiology. Four credit hours: two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods. Second term. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 101. (Third term given also in first term.) 



61 



A summary view of the phenomena occurring: in plants; complex life 
of processes are interpreted in terms of simpler ones and reduced finally 
to the principles of physics and chemistry. The first term is devoted to 
a study of the constituents of plants, the synthesis of carbohydrates, 
fats, proteins, respiration, fermentation, and digestion. The second 
term deals with water requirements, elements essential to plant growth, 
transpiration, growth and movement. 

Pit. Phy. 103. Plant Ecology. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. It 
is generally necessary to take three or four trips at some distance from 
the University, in which case Saturdays are used for that purpose. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Pit. Phy. 104-106. Advanced Plant Physiology. Four credit hours 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Pit. 
Phy. 101. 

A detailed study of all life processes of plants. The laboratory work 
generally consists of special work on one or more problems that may con- 
tinue through the year. Students who write theses for their under- 
graduate degrees, get the data from special problems assigned for the 
laboratory work. 

Pit. Phy. 107. Plant Micro-Chemistry. Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Pit. 
Phy. 101, 102. 

Micro-technical methods applied to the identification of organic and in- 
organic substances found in the plant tissues. These methods are of 
especial value in the localization of plant substances and in the study of 
metabolism of plants. 

For Graduates. 

Pit. Phy. 201. Plant Biophysics. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. 

An advanced study of the application and operation of physical 
forces in plant physiology, and the relation of climatic conditions to 
plant growth. Practice in recording meterological data and the re- 
lating of such measurements to plant growth, constitute a part of the 
course. 

Pit. Phy. 202. Special Problems in Growth and Reproduction. Two 

credit hours. Third term. 



5 



62 

Pit. Phy. 203-5. Seminar. One credit hour each term. 

Students are required to prepare reports of papers in the current 
physiological biochemical literature. These are discussed in connection 
with recent advances in the subject. 

Pit. Phy. 206. Research. Credit hours according to work done. 
Graduate students taking a major in Plant Physiology may elect 
physiological chemistry No. 132 and plant bio-chemistry No. 133. 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Undergraduates. 

Pit. Path. 101. General Plant Pathology. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and onelaboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

An introductory study of the disease of plants. Especial attention is 
given symptoms, control measures, and microscopic study of the parasites 
causing diseases. As far as possible choice of material includes repre- 
sentatives of the principal orders of parasitic fungi. 

Pit. Path. 102-104. Methods in Plant Pathology. Three credit hours 
each term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Pit. Path. 101. 

The first term presents an introduction to the special methods of 
investigating plant diseases, culture methods for plant parasites, inocu- 
lation experiments, the use of scientific instruments, making records, 
preparing and illustrating scientific papers. The second term is occu- 
pied with the diagnosis of plant diseases, and the third term with 
methods of treating diseases. 

Pit. Path. 105-107. Advanced Plant Pathology. Four credit hours 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Senior year. 

A detailed study of diseases of economic plants. Much of the labora- 
tory work is of experimental nature and students who take pathology 
as a major can easily find a special problem for thesis material. 

Pit. Path. 108-110. Seminar in Pathology. One credit hour each 
term. 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological research, special prob- 
lems and literature. 

For Graduate Students 

Pit. Path. 201. Special Problems In Pathology. Four credit hours 
each term. 

An advanced study of causal agents, symptoms, diagnosis, and treat- 
ment of diseases. Offered for students who have had a thorough training 
in undergraduate pathology and physiology. 



63 

pit. Path. 202. Research In Plant Pathology. Credit arranged ac- 
cording to work done. 
Original investigation of special problems. 

For Short-Course Students 

Pit. Path. 1. Plant Diseases. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

A practical study of diseases of plants to enable the student to recog- 
nize them in the field. A course in sprays and spraying is given in co- 
operation with Zoology Department in which the student is taught meth- 
ods of disease control. 

FORESTRY. 

The course in Farm Forestry aims to give the student in agriculture 
sufficient instruction and practice work to enable him to handle intelli- 
gently and scientifically the farm woodlands. Such a course should be 
required of all students fitting themselves for farm management and 
be given preferably in the spring term (on account of favorable weather 
for field work) during the Junior or Senior Year for four-year men 
and during the Second Year for two-year agricultural men. At the 
present time Forestry is not offered as a major course, but is used to 
supplement the content of the other courses. 

Description of Courses 

For. 101. Farm Forestry. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of forest botany, wood management, measurements, fire pro- 
tection, nursery practice, tree planting, valuation and utilization of 
forest crops. The work is conducted by means of lectures and field 
work. 

For Short-Course Students 

For. 1. Farm Forestry. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. 

The content of this course is similar to that of For. 101, but is adapted 
to the development and needs of students in the short-course work. 

DIVISION OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



The work of this division consists in giving instruction along the lines 
of general animal husbandry, dairy husbandry and animal pathology; 
also of the live stock disease control of the State and the general better- 
ment of live stock conditions in Maryland. The curriculum offered in 
this division is prepared with the idea of giving the student an oppor- 
tunity to specialize along animal industry lines and at the same time 
Rive him the broad foundations in general agriculture. He is given 



64 



such instruction as should enable him (1) to conduct his own farming 
operations successfully; (2) to secure positions in the various lines of 
work which demand men trained along animal industry lines. 

Equipment and Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities offered by the new building are now being made use of 
and, as rapidly as machinery and apparatus can be provided and in- 
stalled, the laboratory instruction in market milk and dairy manufac- 
turing will be emphasized in proportion to the demand for this kind 
of work. 

Herds of cattle and swine are maintained at the Utniversity farm and 
are available for instructional purposes. In addition to these animals, 
because of the location of the University, it is possible to make use of the 
excellent herds maintained by Maryland breeders and by the Federal 
Bureau of Animal Industry, thus giving the student a wide range of 
material for study. The students are urged, so far as possible, to take 
advantage of every opportunity to apply in a practical way the instruc- 
tion given in the classroom. Advanced students are sent throughout 
the State to supervise advanced registry tests as well as to study gen- 
eral conditions as they exist on some of the leading stock farms of 
Maryland. These trips give the students an opportunity of observing 
the most up-to-date farms and farm practices and at the same time 
bring them into actual contact with the live stock breeders and feeders 
who are accomplishing the results in this State. Each year judging 
teams participate in the students' contest in judging dairy cattle and 
dairy products at the National Dairy Show. Students in any of the 
agricultural courses are eligible to compete for places on these teams. 



! 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



H 



III 



Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 102) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 



3 
3* 
8 
4 



2 
3 



3 



8 

2 
3 



3 

4* 



2 
3 



65 



I 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 103) 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) 

Swine Production (A. H. 105) 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108) 

Farm Buildings (Str. Des. 107) 

Gas Engines (M. E. 107) 

Elective 



SENIOR YEAR. 



2 
3 
3 



2 
4 



II 



3 
3 



4 
2 



III 



2 
V 



4 
V 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Horse Production (A. H. 109) 

Tractors ( ) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 103) 
Animal Genetics (A. H. 
Nutrition (A. H. 115). . 

Seminar (A. H. 116) 

Elective 



113) 



3 



8 
4 



1 



S 
3 



2 
V 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



.^; 



■^ 




A. H. 101. Animal Husbandry. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Freshman year. 

Live stock in relation to successful farm practices; types and breeds 
of farm animals; principles underlying successful live stock husbandry. 

A. H. 102. Feeds and Feeding. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

A study of the composition and digestibility of foodstuffs, the source, 
characteristics and adaptability of the various food stuffs, feeding stan- 
dards and the calculation of rations. 

A. H. 103. Management of Dairy Young Stock. Three credit 
hours: two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore 
year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock. Methods 
and practices followed in the development and improvement of the dairy 
herd so far as relates to breeding and selection. The keeping of herd 
records, feeding for advanced registry, and barn practice from the 
standpoint of general herd management. A study of breeds and the 
judging of dairy cattle. 

A. H. 104. Principles of Breeding. Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. 



66 



This course will cover the practical aspects of animal breeding, Iq. 
eluding heredity, variation, selection, systems of breeding and pedigree 
study. 

A. H, 105. Swine Production. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

Types and breeds of swine. Care, feeding, breeding, management, 
economics of swine husbandry and judging, 

A. H. 106. Meat and Meat Products. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. (No; 
given 1920-21.) 

The slaughtering cf farm live stock, and the production, handling, and 
care of meat on the farm. 

A. H. 107. Beef Porduction. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

Beef and dual purpose breeds. The care, feeding, breeding and man- 
agement of beef herds; fattening, fitting for show and economics of 
the beef industry. 

A. H. lOS. Sheep Production. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Breeds of sheep, their history and adaptability. Care, feeding, breed- 
ing an management. Grades of wool. Judging and scoring. 

A. H. 109. Hc-se and Mule Production. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. 

Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding. 
breeding, breaking and training, judging and fitting for show. 

A. H. 110-111. Advanced Judging. Two credit hours each term: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Junior 
or senior years. Prerequisite, A. H. 101 and A. H. 103. 

Competitive judging of beef cattle, sheep and swine. During the 
course various trips to stock farms throughout the State will be made. 
Such teams as may be chosen to represent the College will be selected 
from among those taking this course. 

A. H. 112. Advanced Bre«jd Study. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prere- 
quisite, A. H. 103, 105, 107, 108. 

Special consideration of the history, development, and distribution of 
the more important breeds cf live stock; important families and indi- 
viduals, assigned reading and pedigree work. 

A. H. 113. Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods. Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior 
or graduate. Prequisite, A. H. 104. 



67 



A study of theories reg'arding the heredity and transmission of char- 
sctiers, pure lines, Mendelism, etc. Correlation and methods of studying 
hereditary problems. 

A. H. 114. Markets and Marketing. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. Pre- 
requisites, A. H. 106, 108, 109. (Not given in 1920-21.) 

History, development, organization and status of the meat, wool, and 
horse industries. The packing industry and its by-products. Market 
classes and grades of live stock, markets and study of market reports. 

A. H. 115. Nutrition. Two credit hours: two lectures. Third term. 
Seniors or g^raduares. Prerequisite, A. H. 102. 

Composition of the animal body, digestion, assimilation, metabolism, 
protein and energy requirements. Methods of investigation and studies 
in the utilization of food nutrients. 

A. H. 116. Seminar. One credit hour: one lecture. Second term. 

Senior or graduate students only. 

Problems, readings and discussions on subjects relating to animal 
husbandry. 

A. H. 117-19. Research and Thesis. Two credit hours each term. 
Senior year. 

Original investigation in problemis in animal husbandry. The results 
of which research are to be presented in the form of a thesis. 

For Short-Course Students 

A. H. 1. Breeds and Judging. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. First year. 

Live stock in relation to successful farm practices, types and breeds 
of farm animals with special reference to the need of the practical 
fanner; principles and practices of successful live stock husbandry. 

A. H. 2. Feeds and Feeding. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

A study of the source, composition, characteristics and adaptability 
of the various foodstuffs, feeding and standards and the calculation of 
rations. 

A. H. 3. Breeding of AnimaU. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Second year. 

A course covering the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity, variation, selection, systems of breeding and pedigree study. 

A. H. 4-6. Special Animal Husbandry. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Throughout the second year. Each 



68 



I 



term of work is complete in itself and may be elected without regard to 
the work of the term preceding it or of the term following. 

Swine Production: First term. Types and breeds of swine. Care, 
feeding, breeding management, economics of swine husbandry and 
judging. 

Beef Production: Second term. Subject matter of course same as 
for "Swine Production." 

iSheep Production: Third term. 'Subject matter of course same as 
for "Swine Production." 

A. H. 7. Management of Dairy Young Stock. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock. Methods 
and practices followed in the development of the dairy herd so far as 
relates to breeding and selection. The keeping of herd records, feeding 
for advanced registry, and barn practice from the standpoint of general 
herd management. A study of breeds and the judging of dairy cattle. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

P. H. 101. Farm Poultry. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Care of poultry on the general farm; breeds of poultry; breeding, 
feeding, and selection of stock; incubation, brooking, fattening, killing, 
marketing, and construction. 

For Short-Course Students 

P. H. 1. Farm Poultry. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Third term. Second year. 

A general course dealing with the care of poultry on the farm; feed- 
ing and selection of stock; poultry house construction*; fattening, killing, 
marketing, incubation and breeding. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The courses in Dairy Husbandry are organized with a view to giving 
the student a working knowledge of the basic principles underlying 
successful dairy production, market milk, and commercial dairying. 
Graduates from these courses should be fitted to take up dairy farming, 
teaching or experiment station work. However, if teaching or investi- 
gation is elected, it is advisable for students to remain for the 
graduate work offered. In the Dairy Husbandry courses use is made of 
the College of Agriculture herd and newly-equipped milk testing labora- 
tory. A new dairy manufacturing laboratory is in process of completion 
and should be available during the latter part of the present year. 

The Head of this Department has direct charge of the dairy work in 
the College of Agriculture, Experiment Station and Extension Service. 



69 

Official connection with the U. S. Dairy Division also gives the Dairy 
Husbandry classes free access to the dairy research laboratories of the 
Government in Washington and the Government Farm herds at Belts- 

ville. 

As a State, Maryland has splendid dairy possibilities as yet not fully 
realized. Fertile soil, long growing seasons, mild winters, and splendid 
markets made easily accesible by good roads, assure a bright future in 
the production of dairy cattle and market milk in this State. 

Whenever possible dairy students are given opportunities to do ad- 
vanced registry testing about the state during week-ends and vacations. 
This service not only pays ?3.00 per day for transportation, but gives 
the dairy student a splendid opportunity to become acquainted with 
methods of feeding and care practised by the leading breeders of pure- 
bred cattle within the state. This practice is invaluable to those 
students intending to go back to their own farm or to engage in the 
production of pure-bred cattle. 

The Department of Dairy Husbandry, supplementing the work of 
other subject matter departments, offers three major lines of workt 
(1) Dairy production, covering the care, feeding, and management of 
dairy cattle; (2) Market Milk, dealing with the factors which control 
quality and quantity in milk; (3) Commercial Dairying, which takes up 
the processing and manufacture of dairy products with special reference 
to the needs of the state in this direction. Sufficient opportunities for 
electives are given so that men intending to go back to their own 
farms may register for subjects of prime importance to their own par- 
ticular farm problems. 

CUBBZCUI^ IN DAIS'Sr HUSBANDBT. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Introductory Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geo. 101) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen 1 Chem. 112-113) 
Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101). 

Public Speaking (104-106) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Uairy Production (D. H. 102) 

History of Dairy Cattle (D. H. 103) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Elective 



3 
3 



1 
4 



2 
2 



II 



3 
3 



1 
4 



2 
4 



III 



4 
1 

4 



2 

2 
1 



v.i 






70 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



Principles of Economics (R. E. 101-102) 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

General Bacteriology (Beet. 101-103) . . . 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101). 

Advanced Judging (A. H. Ill) 

Farm Dairying (D. G. 104) 

Commercial Dairying (D. H. 105) 

Judging of Dairy Products (D. H. 106) 

Agricultural Education (105) 

Farm Accounts (A. E. 106) 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Forging and Pipe-fitting (Shop 2)... 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) 

Cooperative Marketing (A. E. 105) . . . 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106).. 

Market Milk (D. H. 107) 

Advanced Testing (D. H. 108) 

Research and Thesis (D. H. 110-112) 
Electives 



3 
2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
6 



II 



3 
o 



3 
3 



4 
3 



3 
o 



m 



2 
3 
3 



2 
3 



3 
V 



2 

8 



i! 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D. H. IQl. Principles of Dairying. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

The relationship of dairying to general agriculture; the extent of the 
dairy business and value of dairy products; milk, its secretion, char- 
acter and composition and the fundamentals of dairy cattle, care, feed- 
ing and management. 

D. H. 102. Dairy Production and Barn Practice. Three credit 
hours: two lectures and one laboratory period. (Second term. Sopho- 
more or Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feeding 
standards, the balancing of rations, selections of feeds, systems of herd 
feeding, silage and silos, soiling systems and pastures, the selection, 
care and feeding the sire, dairy herd development and management, 
methods of keeping and forms for herd records, dairy barn construction, 
arrangement and equipment, requirements for advanced registry and 
management of tests, dairy cost accounts and bam practices which 
influence quantity and quality in milk. 

D. H. 103. History and Development of Dairy Cattle. Two credit 
hours: two lectures. Third term. Sophomore year. 

A study of the origin, history, development and characteristics of the 
dairy breeds; the value of official records; bull associations, cow testing 
associations. 



71 

D. H. 1<>4. Farm Dairying. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

Ccmtposition of milk, butter and cheese; methods of testing for 
butterfat and for total solids; equipping the stable and milk house; how 
bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; surface 
coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and sterilization 
of utensils. 

D. H. 105. Commercial Dairying. Three credit hours: one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Junior year. Given in 1920- 
1921 if equipment is available. 

Power separators ; pasteurizers ; churns and butter workers ; the ripen- 
ing of cream; churning, washing, salting, working, packing, scoring and 
selling butter. 

D. H. 106. Judging Dairy Products. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. Various outside lec- 
turers on these subjects will address the class and trips will be taken 
to butter, cheese and milk markets for the purpose of familiarizing the 
students with the commercial quality of milk, butter and cheese. Such 
teams as may be chosen to represent the College will be selected from 
those electing this course. 

D. H. 107. Market Milk. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Senior year. 

A study of market milk conditions; requirements of city milk trade; 
the production of milk; pasteurization of milk; milk and its relation to 
the public health; the food value of milk; methods of handling market 
milk and market cream for direct consumption; the transportation of 
milk; Babcock testing of milk and milk products. In this course visits 
will be made to dairies and to milk plants. 

D. H. lOS. Advanced Course in Milk Testing. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Senior year. 

This course includes the determination of moisture and dry matter in 
milk and dairy products; various tests for fat and casein; testing of 
butter and oleomargine, adulterations and preservative. 

D. H. 109. Seminar. One credit: one lecture. Second Term. 
Senior year for graduate students. 

The Seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current 
bulletins and scientific papers in dairy production and market milk 
problems. 

D. H. 110-112. Research and Thesis. Six credit hours: to be ar- 
ranged. iSenior year. 



72 



Students are given opportunities to conduct investigational work, 
either in collecting information or original research in Dairy Production 
and Market Milk. 

For Graduate Students 

D. H. 201. City Milk Supply. Two credit hours: two lectures. First 
term. Graduates. 

Securing a milk supply for city consumers; methods of buying from 
producers; the transportation of milk; milk contractors; systems of 
handling milk in the city milk plants; the sterilization of utensils; 
systems of delivery to consumers. 

D. H. 202. Dairy Farm and City Milk Inspection. Two credit 
hours: two lectures. tSecond term. Graduates. 

Early attempts at control and the development of milk inspection; 
systems of dairy inspection; systems of milk plant inspection; dairy 
farm score cords; dairy plant score cards; relation of milk to public 
health; grading milk; milk standards; milk and cream regulations; 
methods of appointment and duties of dairy and milk inspectors; general 
improvement and control of milk supplies of cities and towns. 

D. H. 203. Research. Nine credits: To be arranged. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be 
allowed to work on any problem in dairy production or market milk 
they may choose, or be given a list of problems from which to select 
a research project. 

In so far as schedules permit, students will be encouraged to visit the 
U. S. Dairy Division Laboratories and become acquainted with the 
dairy research problems in process and the methods of attack. This 
acquaints the student with the broad phases of research in dairy produc- 
tion and market milk. 

For Short-Course Students 

D. H. 1. Principles of Dairying. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. First year. 

Relationship of dairying to general agriculture ; the extent of the dairy 
business and value of dairy products; milk, its secretion; character and 
composition; and fundamentals of dairy cattle, care, feeding and man- 
agement. 

D. H. 2. Dairy Production and Barn Practice. Three credit hours: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second term. Second year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feeding 
standards, the balancing of rations; selections of feeds, systems of 
herd feeding, silage and silos, soiling systems and pastures, the selec- 
tion, care and feeding the sire, dairy herd development and manage- 



73 

ment methods of keeping and forms for herd records, dairy barn con- 
struction, arrangement and equipment, requirements for advanced 
re<'istry and management of tests, dairy cost accounts and barn prac- 
tices which influence quantity and quality in milk. 

D. H. 3. Farm Dairying. Three credit hours : two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

Composition of milk, butter and cheese; methods of testing for butter- 
fat and for total solids; equipping the stable and milk house; how bac- 
teria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; surface coolers 
and precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and sterilization of utensils. 

D. H. 4. Judging of Dairy Products. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. Various outside lec- 
turers on these subjects will address the class and trips will be taken 
to butter, cheese and milk markets for the purpose of familiarizing the 
students with the commercial quality of milk, butter and cheese. Such 
teams as may be chosen to represent the University will be selected from 
those electing this course. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
BACTEBIOI.OGY. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H, 104) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Introductory Study (Soils 101-102) 

Entomology (Zool. 106) 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 107-108) 

Agricultural (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Organic (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 



4 
3 



3 
o 

3 



II 



4 
3 



3 
2 

9 



III 



3 
3 



2 

6 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 103) 

General (Bact. 101-103) 

Mycology (Morph. and Mycol. 106) 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio-Chem. 
Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) . . . 
Economic Entomolgy (Zool. 108) . . . 
Electives 



101) 



4 
2 



4 
3 



2 
4 
4 



3 
3 



2 
V 



74 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



Methods in Pathology (Pit. Path. 102) 

Dairy (Bact. 104-106) 

Advanced (Bact. 107-109) 

Market Milk (D. H. 107) 

Milk Tseting (D. H. 108) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Seminar (Bact. 117-119) 

Electives 



3 
3 
5 



1 
5 



II 



3 
3 
3 



1 
3 



III 



3 
3 



3 
1 

7 



BACTERIOLOGY 

Bact. 101-103. General Bacteriology. Three credit hours each 
term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Junior year. 

This subject includes the following topics: A brief history of bac- 
teriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to nature; morphol- 
ogy, classification, identification of si)ecies and the different methods of 
sterilization and disinfection; preparation of culture media, isolation and 
cultivation of aerobes and anaerobes; examination of cultures; micro- 
scopic examination of bacteria; stains with their composition, classifica- 
tion and use ; vital activities of bacteria ; their relation to disease ; use of 
experimental animals; bacteria in water, milk and soil; cultural charac- 
ters of representative organisms from the following genera : micrococcus, 
streptococcus, bacterium, bacillus, pseudomonas, streptothrix, protozoa, 
filtrable viruses and immunity. 

Bact. 103-A. Special for Home Economics Students only. Three 
credit hours: third term. One lecture and two laboratory periods. 
Junior year. 

The subject matter of the course will consist largely of the study of 
the more important bacteria, yeasts and fungi ordinarily encountered in 
the field of domestic economy. 

Bact. 104-106. Dairy Bacteriology. Three credit hours each term: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 101-103. 

This course deals with the following topics: historical sketch; relation 
of bacteria to dairy products; preparation of media; plating by the 
dilution method; sources of contamination, including stable atmosphere, 
udder, exterior of cows and attendants ; kinds of utensils and their steril- 
ization; kinds of bacteria in milk and their development; direct micro- 
scopic examination, sedimentation test and centrifugalization, fresh and 
old milk; baby and special milks, market milk, graded milk; certified 
milk, sour milk, whey, cream, butter cheese, condensed milk, powdered 
milk and milk starters; pasteurization by flash and slow method; changes 
inmilk due to bacteria and milk as a carrier of disease. 



75 



Bact. 107-109. Advanced Bacteriology. Two to three credit hours 
each term: two to three laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 101-103. 

This course is intended primarily to give the student a chance to de- 
velop his own initiative. He will be allowed to decide upon his project 
and work it out as much as possible in his own way under proper super- 
vision. In this manner he will be able to apply his knowledge of bac- 
teriology to a given problem. He will also get to know something of the 
methods of research and will receive a valuable training in obtaining 
careful and accurate data. 

Bact. 110-112. Thesis. Two credit hours each term: senior year 
Optional. 

The investigation of a given project, the results of which are to be 
presented in the form of a thesis and submitted for credit toward 
graduation. 

Bact. llS-115. Seminar. One credit hour each term: senior year. 
Required of seniois taking Bact. 107-109 and all graduate students. 
The work will consist of reports on individual projects and on recent 
scientific literature. 

For Graduate Students 

Bact. 201-203. Research Bacteriology. Three credit hours each 
term: three laboratory periods by assignment. Prerequisite, Bact. 101- 
103 and in certain cases 104-106 and 107-109, depending upon the project. 



For Short-Course Students 

Bact. 1. Agricultural Bacteriology. Two credit hours: two lec- 
tures. Second term. Second year. 

An elementary course touching upon the following topics: The gen- 
eral characters of micro-organisms; fermentation; putrefaction and 
decay; nature's food supply; the carbon cycle; decomposition of nitrog- 
enous compounds; nitrification and denitrification ; the manure heap and 
sewage ; reclamation of lost nitrogen ; bacteria and soil minerals ; bacteria 
in water and milk; control of milk supply; bacteria in butter and cheese 
making; alcohol, vinegar, sour kraut, tobacco, silage and flax; preserva- 
tion of food products; resistance against parasitic bacteria; tuberculosis 
and other germ diseases and parasitic diseases of plants. 



76 






i:i 



PBE-VETEBINART. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Forage Crops (Agron, 103) 

Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 102) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103). 
Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Swine Production (A. H. 105) 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108) 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 110-111)... 
Electives 



3 
3 
3 



2 
3 



II 



4 
3 



3 
3 
2 
3 



3 
2 
3 



2 
7 



III 



3 
V 



3 
3 



2 
3 



2 



3 
2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Horse Production (A. H. 109) 

Animal Genetics (A, H. 113) 

Nutrition (A. H. 115) 

Electives 



3 

4 



S 

4 



10 



2 

12 



VETERINARY MEDICINE 

V. M. 101. Anatomy and Physiology. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. First term. Junior year. 

A brief study of the structure of the animal body with a view to rec- 
ognizing the abnormal as contrasted with the normal and to the gaining 
of a knowledge of the inter-relationships between the various organs 
and parts, both as to structure and function. 

V. M. 102. Animal Diseases. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. 

A brief study of diseases of domestic animals, both infectious and non- 
infectious. Early recognition of disease; hygiene, sanitation, and pre- 
vention; first aid. 



77 

For Short-Course Students. 

V. M. 1. Animal Diseases. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Second year. 

Briefer course on the diseases of domestic animals; methods of recog- 
nizing disease in its early stages; relation of care and sanitation to 
disease. 

GENERAL ANIMAL INDUSTRY COURSES 

Seminar. A forum for the discussion of subjects relating to animal 
industry. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students only. 

Research and Thesis. The work will be arranged with each student 
individually. He may select some topic or problem in which he is es- 
pecially interested and which will require independent investigation. 

SOILS 

The Department of Soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, 
and biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future 
farmer with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate 
training to students who desire to specialize in soils. Students who are 
preparing to take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate 
work in addition to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. 
The department possesses the necessary equipment and facilities for 
the instruction in these subjects, and in addition affords opportunities 
for the student to come in contact with the research of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, especially in the pot-culture laboratories and on the 
experimental fields at the station and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
teaching soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experi- 
ment stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Soils, United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

soniS. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

boil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Physics General (Phys. 104) 

ife'c&v^es'^; ''■ ^- ^^- ^- ^''' 



3 
3 
2 
4 



II 



3 
3 



4 
3 
2 
3 



III 



3 

1 

4 



3 

2 
2 



78 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102).... 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 107-108). 
Determinative Mineralogy (Gen'l Chem. 120) 

Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 103-105) 

Elective 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Methods of Crop Investigation (Agron. 106) 

Crop Rotations (Agron. 109) 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106).. 

Soil Technology (Soils 111-113) 

Surveying and Drainage 

Seminar (Soils 115) 

Methods of Soil Investigation (Soils 114).. 
Elective 



II 



2 
3 
3 



S 
3 



3 
3 



3 

3 



2 
3 
3 



S 
3 



2 
3 



1 
8 



III 



3 
3 
5 



3 
3 
1 
2 

8 



Description of Courses 

Geo!. 101. General Geology. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. 

A text-book, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles 
of geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is 
designed primarily for agricultural students in preparation for technical 
courses, it may be taken as a part of a liberal education. 

Soils 101-102. Soil Physics and Management. Three credit hours 
each term: two lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third 
terms. Prerequisite, Geol. 101. 

The physical and chemical properties of soils in their relation to til- 
lage operations, preparation of seed beds, and the maintenance of soil 
fertility. Field excursions are made to study soil formation and their 
physical properties. The practical work consists chiefly of experiments 
and demonstrations in soil physics. 

Soils 103-105. Soil Fertility and Fertilizers. Three credit hours 
each term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Farm manures 
the first and second terms; commercial fertilizers the third term. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 101-102. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the details 
of soil management. It includes the practical application of the princi- 
ples of soil physics to methods of tillage and cropping and a study of the 
factors governing the use of manures and fertilizers. The practical work 
includes special studies of the soils from the colleges and station famis 
that have been subjected to various treatments. 



79 



Soils 106. Soil Surveying and Classification. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite, 
Soils, 101-102. 

A study of the principal soil regions, series, and types of the United 
States, and especially of the soils of Maryland, as to formation, com- 
position, and value agriculturally. The practical work consists chiefly in 
identification of soil types and in map making. 

Soils 107. Soil Bacteriology. Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bact. 101-102. . 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It 
includes the study of nitrogen transformers, etc., and the injurious soil 
organisms. The work is carried on in the laboratory, lectures, and 
library. 

Soils 108-110. Thesis. Two credit hours. Senior year. 
Some special problem is assigned to each student, who is exi>ected to 
embody the results of the investigation in a thesis. 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

Soils 111-113. Soil Technology. Three credit hours each term: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Soils 101-102, 
Chem. 101-103. 

A study of methods used by experiment stations in soil problems and 
technique of laboratory manipulation. Laboratory work deals with soil 
problems in which the student is interested and includes a study of the 
effect of different manures and fertilizers as determined by pot and 
plot culture experiments. 

Soils 114. Methods of Soil Investigation. Two credit hours. Third 
term. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experi- 
ment stations in soil investigational work. 

Soils 116-116. Seminar. One credit hour. Second and third terms. 
The seminar periods are devoted largely to the discussion of current 
bulletins and scientific papers on soil topics. 

For Graduate Students. 

Soils 201-203. Special Problems and Research. Five to ten credit 
hours. The year. Lectures and practice to be arranged. 
Original investigations of problems in soils and fertilizers. 

For Short-Course Students 

Soils 1. Soil Management. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. 



80 

A study of the physical and chemical conditions of soils in their rela- 
tion to profitable agriculture. Special attention is given to the appli, 
cation of physics and chendstry to the management of Maryland Soils. 

Soils 2. Manures and Fertilizers. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. 

Lectures and recitations on the care and utilization of farm manures; 
on the sources of fertilizer materials; methods of valuation and the 
effect of fertilizers on different farm crops. 



FARM EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Farm Equipment was organized from an out- 
growth of the increased demands for farm machinery and other farm 
equipment as labor-saving devices. 

The department has charge of farm machinery, farm automobiles, 
trucks and tractors, farm motors and gas engines, farm mechanics, 
farm buildings, conveniences of the home, and will take up other courses 
as the needs demand. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 



In this department are grouped courses in farm management, agri- 
cultural economics, and markets, together with the kindred subject of 
rural organization. 

Farm management has been defined as the business of the individual 
farmer to so organize his business as to produce the greatest continuous 
profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is in ac- 
cordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It re- 
quires not only knowledge of the many factors involved in the produc- 
tion of crops and animals, but also administrative ability to properly 
coordinate them into the most efficient farm organization. 

The aim of the farm management course is to assist the student to 
perceive the just relationship of the several factors of production and 
disposition as applicable to local conditions and to develop in him execu- 
tive and administrative capacity. Students well trained in farm man- 
agement are in demand for county agent work, experiment station or 
United States Government investigation, and college or secondary 
school teaching. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles under- 
lying production, distribution, and consumption, more especially as they 
bear upon agricultural conditions. Labor, land and capital are con- 
sidered in their relationship to agriculture. The need for more exact 
business records on the farm is forcing itself imperatively on the minds 
of all students of agricultural economics. To meet this demand a 



81 

course is offered in farm accounting. This course is not elaborate but 
is designed to meet the demand for a simple yet accurate system oi 
farm business records. 

The comparative isolation of country life tends naturally to individual 
rather than cooperative effort. The course in rural organization aims to 
ghow the student the advantages of combined effort in country com- 
munities, to sketch the history of rural organization with a discussion of 
its failures and successes, and to point out practical methods of organ- 
izing rural communities for mutual and individual benefit. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Meat and Meat Products (A. H. 106) 

Poultry (P. H. 101) 

Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 



3 

4 



2 
2 



4 
3 



1 

2 
1 



4 
3* 



2 
2 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Technical English (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 
Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) .... 

Fertilizers (Soils 105) 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 104) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Surveying and Drainage ( ) . 

Grading Grain Crops (Agron. 106) 

Electives 



2 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



3 
6 



3 



3 
3 
3 



4 
*2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Markets and Marketing (A. E. 102) 

Cooperative Marketing (A. E. 103) 

Community Study (R. O. 101-103) 

Prmciples of Rural Organization (R. O. 104) 
Electives 



3 



2 
3 
9 



3 
3 



2 
9 



3 
2 



12 



82 



;i " 



Description of Courses 

F. M. 101-102. Farm Management.' Three credit hours each 
term: three lectures. First and second term. 

A study of the business of farming from the standpoint of the indi- 
vidual farmer. This course aims to connect the principles and practice 
which the student has acquired in the several technical courses and to 
apply them to the development of a successful farm business. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

A. £. 101. Studies in Agricultural Economics. Three credit hours. 
Third term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

A study of the economic adaptations and adjustments necessary on the 
part of the agriculturist to meet the changing economic conditions. 
Population flows, land tenure, farm incomes, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, and price movements will receive special consideration. 

A. E. 102. Markets and the Marketing. Three credit hours. Sec- 
ond term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

An analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and dis- 
tributing farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort 
in increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. 

A. E. 103. Cooperative Marketing. Three credit hours. Third 
term. Prerequisite, A. E. 101-102. 

A study of the cooperative marketing, endeavors of farmers with a 
view to developing methods of distributing perishable and specialized 
farm products. 

A. E. 104. Farm Accounting. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. 

A study of the principles underlying farm accounting, emphasizing 
cost accounting and analysis of farm business. 

RURAL ORGANIZATION 

R. O. 101-103. Elements of Community Study. Three credit 
hours each term. The year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of community de- 
velopment, 

R. O. 104. Principles of Rural Organization. Three credit hours. 
First term. 

A study of the historical and comparative development of farmers' co- 
operative organizations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

For Short-Course Students 

F. M. 1. Farm Management. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. 

A course parallel with F. M. 101-102 arranged for the studenti of 
the short agricultural courses. 



83 

A. E. 1. Farm Accountinir. Two lectures. Second Term. 

A course parallel with A. E. 106. For students of the short agri- 
cultural courses. 

R. O. 1. Rural Organization. Three lectures. Third term. 

A survey of the functions, scope, and present forms of organization of 
rural interests primarily for economic purposes. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

The training of economic zoologists and the preparation of students 
for entrance to the Medical School is the function of this department, 
in addition to teaching zoology, as a basic science. 

In the preparation of entomologists, the aim is to give a broad train- 
ing in zoology and allied sciences, with specialization in the senior year. 
All the work of the State and Station Entomologist is done through this 
department, thus offering better opportunities for students desiring to 
specialize in entomology. 

The pre-medical curriculum includes the scheduled subjects as pre- 
scribed by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association for the two-year pre-medical course. "Students registered 
for the pre-medical course now offered in the Department of Economic 
Zoology, may, after the completion of three years* work as prescribed, 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Science upon the successful completion 
of the first year in the School of Medicine of the University." 

Close cooperation is maintained with the Bureau of Fisheries and the 
Maryland Conservation Commission in the development and conservation 
of Maryland's Water Food Resources. 

ZOOZiOOY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Military Instruction (Basic R. O. T. C. 101) 

Electives 



3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 


6 


6 



3 

4 
4 
2 
5 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Histology (Zool. 103) 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 

General Entomology (Zool. 107) 

Quant. Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 107-108) 

General Physics (Phys. 104) 

General Physics Lab. (Phys. 104) 

J-xposition and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 

Military Instruction (Basic R. O. T. C. 102) 

iiilectives 



3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
4 



3 
2 
1 

2 
2 

4 



2 
1 
2 
2 
4 



i 



84 



f 

!:"i 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



Insect Morphology (Zool. 108) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 109-110) 

Insecticides and Their Application (Zool. 
Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 
General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) .... 
Electives 



118) 



3 
3 
9 



II 



4 
2 
3 
3 

5 



III 



3 

10 



m. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Bio. Chemistry (101-102) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 111-113) 

Thesis (Zool. 115-117) 

Electives 



4 




5 


5 


2 


2 


6 


10 



3 
5 
2 

7 



The student must secure the approval of the head of the division in his 
elections. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Mammalian Anatomy (Zool. 102-a) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal. (Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Language (French or German) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Military Instruction (Basic R. O. T. C. 101) 

Electives 



3 
4 
3 



2 
3 



3 
4 
3 



2 
3 



1 
3 

4 
3 
4 
2 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Histology (Zool. 103) 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 

Exposition and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Physics 101, 102, 103 

Language (French or German 

Military Instruction (Basic R. O. T. C. 102) 

Electives 



2 
3 
5 
3 
2 



4 
2 
3 
5 
3 
2 



4 

2 



5 
3 
2 
2 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Comparative Morphology of Vertebrates (Zool. 106) 

Quant. Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 107-108) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Language (French or German) 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 
Electives 



3 
3 
3 



8 



3 
3 
3 

2 
6 



3 
3 

2 
5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Bio. Chemistry (101-102) 

Medical Entomology (Zool. 119) 

Thesis (Zool. 115-117) 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Language 

Electives 





^ 


4 


• • • • ' • 


3 




2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


10 



3 



2 
2 
3 

7 



The student must secure the approval of the head of the division in his 
elections. 



85 



For Undergraduates 

Zool. 101-102. General Zoology. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and two laboratory periods. First and second terms. 

The relationships of animals, their general form and structure, their 
responses to environing conditions and their development and evolution 
are discussed in a broad manner. 

Zool. 102a. Mammalian Anatomy. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 
Required of pre-medical students. 

Zool. 103. Normal Histology. Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite, Zool, 101-102. 

A study of the normal tissues, chiefly of the mammals; covers the 
ground usually assigned to general histology. 

Zool. 104-105. Embryology. Four credit hours each term: two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 101-102. 

This course is based on the chick. 

Zool. 106. Comparative Morphology of Vertebrates. Two to four 
credit hours: laboratory periods to be arranged. Third term. Prere- 
quisite, Zool. 103-105. 

Lectures and laboratory work on one or more of the following systems 
of organs: skeletal, nervous, and circulatory. 

Zool. 107. Entomology. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work and field excursions. A collection of insects 
is required, properly arranged to orders. 

Zool. 108. Insect Morphology. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. Prerequisite, Zool. 107. 

A course in morphology designed to prepare students for work in eco- 
nomic entomology. 

Zool. 109-110. Economic Entomology. Four credit hours each 
term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 107. 

Morphologfy of type insects to acquaint the student with special struc- 
tures bearing on insect control; insect biology, including methods of 
study. The theory and practice of insect control. 

Zool. 111-113. Economic Entomology. Five credit hours each term: 
three lecture hours and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 109-110. 



86 



I 



M 



I 



lit 



i 



Problems in applied entomology, including life history, ecology, dis- 
tribution, parasitism and control. 

Zool. 114. Systematic Entomology. Two credit hours: two labora- 
tory periods. First term. 

The student selects some group in which he is particularly interested 
and makes a detailed study of it. The course requires considerable field 
work and is supplemented by laboratory periods and frequent confer- 
ences. 

Zool. llS-117. Thesis. Two credit hours each term: laboratory peri- 
ods to be arranged. The year. 

The intensive investigation of some zoological subject, the results of 
which are incorporated in a paper which is submitted as part require- 
ment for graduation. 

Zool. 118. Insecticides And Their Application. Two credit hours: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation and appli- 
cation; construction, care and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumi- 
gation and mechanical controls. 

Zool. 119. Medical Zoology. Three credit hours: three lectures, 
tures. First term. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

The relation of animals to disease, directly and as vectors of patho- 
genic organisms; the control of pests of man. 

Zool. 120-121. Scientific Delineation And Preparations. One credit 
hour each term: one laboratory period. First and second terms. 

Photography, photomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera 
lucida, lantern-slide making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit 
and museum material. 

Zool. 122. Horticultural Entomology. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 106. 

Lectures, laboratory and field work on the morphology, biology and 
control of insect pests of horticultural crops. 

Zool. 123-125. Seminar. One credit hour each term: one lecture. 
The year. The staff. 

Meetings to discuss zoological topics; to review the literature of the 
subject and in general to acquaint the student with his chosen field. 

Zool. 126. Introduction to Agriculture. Credit hours and labora- 
tory periods to be arranged. Not offered in 1920-21. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 101-102 and Botany 101. 

The biology of the fresh and tidal waters of Maryland. A qualitative 
study of the aquatic organisms with special reference to their possibili- 
ties in sustaining aquatic life. 



87 

For Graduate Students 

Zool. 201. Investigations in Entomology. Credit according to 
work done. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 
mology under the direction of a member of the staff, with particular ref- 
erence to preparation for individual research. 

Zool. 202. Research in Entomology. Credit according to work 

done. 

Advanced students having suiEcient preparation may, with the ap- 
proval of the head of the division, undertake supervised research in mor- 
phology, taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently the 
student may be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural De- 
partment projects. The student's work may form a part of the final 
report on the project and be published in bulletin form. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Economic Entomology. One credit hour: one 
lecture. Second term. 

Lectures discussing the latest theories and practices in applied 
entomology. 

For Short-Course Students 

Zool. 1. Animal Pests. Two lectures and two hours laboratory. 
Second term. 

A study of the wild animals of the farm with practice in identifi- 
cation; designed to enable the farmer to recognize the beneficial and 
noxious animals on Maryland farms. 

Zool. 2. Sprays and Spraying. One lecture and three hours labora- 
tory. Third term. 

Prepai^tion and application of insecticides, together with a consider- 
ation of other methods of control. 

Zool. 3. Beekeeping. One laboratory period. Third term. 

Consideration of the underlying principles of successful beekeeping, 
with practice in preparation of equipment and the manipulation of 
bees. Not offered 1920-21. 



SHORT COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 

A. Students who have had four years of high school training or its 
equivalent may follow a two-year curriculum of regular college courses 
designated by the dean. A certificate is granted by the college upon 
completion of the work. If, after the student has been awarded a 
certificate, he is desirous of taking work for a degree, he may continue 
for two more years with a regular college curriculum. 



88 

B. Another two-year curriculum, commonly known as "The Two- Year 
Agricultural Course/' is sub-collegiate in nature. To enter this two- 
year work the applicant must have preparation at least equal to the 
work given in the seventh grade of the Maryland public schools. At 
the conclusion of the course students having completed the regular work 
as outlined are given a certificate stating the studies pursued during 
the time spent in the college. No college credit toward a degree is 
given for work done in this course. 



II 



TWO-TEAS AGRZCUXiTnBi:. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term: 



Cereal Crops (Agron. 1) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 2) 

General Soils (Soils 1) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 1) 

Breeds and Judging of Live Stock (A. H. 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 2) 

General Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 1) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 1) 

Landscape and Floriculture (Hort. 9)... 
Home Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 5)... 

General Botany (Bot. 1) 

Animal Pests (Zool. 1) 

Sprays and Spraying (Zool. 2) 

Farm Drawing (Dr. 1) 

Farm Woodwork (Shop 1) 

Forging and Pipe-fitting (Shop 2) 

Composition (Eng. 1-2) 

Vocational Publications (Eng. 3) 

R. O. T. C. (M. 1. 1) 



1) 



3 
3 



1 
1 



3 
2 



II 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 

2 



III 



S 

s 



s 

*2 



2 
2 



SECOND YEAR. 



Grain Judging (Agron. 3) 

Breeds of Animals (A. H. 3) 

Animal Diseases (D. M. 1) 

Farm Poultry (P. H. 1) 

Management (F. M. 1) 

Accounts (A. E. 1) 

Organization (R. O. 1) 

Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 2) 

Fertilizers (Soils 2) 

Plant Diseases (Pit. Path. 
Bacteriology (Bact. 1) . . . . 
Farm Forestry (For. 1).. 
Farm Machinery (F. E. 1) 

Farm Buildings 

Drainage 



Farm 
Farm 
Rural 
Dairy 



1) 



4-6) 



Elect one or a portion of each: 
Advanced Agronomy (Agron, 4) . . . 
Special Animal Husbandry (A. H. 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 3) 

Judging of Dairy Products (D. H. 
Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 

Small Fruits (Hort. 4) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 6-8) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 10-12) 

Oas Engines 

Beekeeping (Zool. 3) 



4).. 
2-3) 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 



1 
3 



2 
3 



3 

9 



3 
3 



3 
3 



• • • • 



3 
V 



3 
3 



3 
S 
3 
8 
1 



89 



THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



The engineering group includes, in addition to the departments of 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, the departments of Mathe 
matics and Physics. 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in 
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and Rural Engineering, respectively. An 
outline of each is found on the succeeding pages. The four-year courses 
are arranged with a view to preparing the student for immediate useful- 
ness in the technical world. The fundamental principles are emphasized 
through lectures, recitations and practical exercises in the laboratory, 
drafting room, shop and field. The courses allow some latitude in the 
selection of subjects in the senior year, particularly in Civil Engineering 
in which an opportunity to specialize in Highway or Sanitary Engineer- 
ing is afforded, but in the main they are fixed in character, since experi- 
ence indicates that the faculty is better qualified to select the subjects 
to be studied than the average undergraduate. The curriculums include 
studies which provide a broad general culture as well as a good founda- 
tion for technical engineering. Emphasis is placed on the necessity for 
the development of self-reliance, honest and accurate methods of work, 
and good judgment in addition to the mastering of the scientific laws 
underlying the profession of engineering and applying them. The gen- 
eral policy of the School is to keep in close touch with and to advance 
the best interests of the students at all times. To promote this policy 
some member of the school faculty is assigned to act as the advisor of 
each student who registers. Students are expected to consult their ad- 
visors concerning any subject in which they may be interested, while the 
advisors keep themselves informed as to the progress and general wel- 
fare of the students. 



INSTRUCTION 

The school is organized, first, to instruct the students who desire to 
practice engineering as a profession, and, second, to teach students inter- 
ested in agriculture and applied science, such branches of mechanic arts 
and engineering as will promote their individual interests. Instruction 
m certain subjects required under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes 
Act for the training of teachers in the industrial arts will be given. 

The demand for instruction in the mechanic arts and the elementary 
applications of engineering on the part of those who, for any reason, are 
unable to enter the four-year courses is met by the establishment of the 
two-year course in which several options are allowed. This is a prac- 
tical course for which University credit is not given. 



90 



i 



An opportunity is afforded each year for practicing road en^^ineers to 
take an intensive course in road building and maintenance, and for per- 
sons attending the short courses in agriculture to obtain instruction in 
farm machinery, woodwork, the mixing and placing of concrete, etc. 

The work in the departments of Mathematics and Physics is developed 
with a view both to its cultural and its utilitarian value. The utilitarian 
point of view is probably more emphasized because scientific training is 
so largely dependent on these subjects, particularly mathematics. Their 
value, however, in mental training and in general culture is clearly pre- 
sented to the students. 

SUMMER WORK AND INSPECTION 

In addition to the work given during the regular session, summer work 
covering 100 hours of field, laboratory, shop or office practice is required 
of members of the freshman class. This work will be developed to in- 
clude also a specified amount of time at the close of the sophomore and 
junior years. Summer employment will be accepted as a substitute for 
this work, if found to be equivalent. 

The proximity of the School to Baltimore and Washington and to 
other places where there are great industrial enterprises offers an ex- 
cellent opportunity for engineering students to observe what is being 
done in their chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all 
trips of inspection. 

Information and advice is given to farmers and others interested con- 
cerning drainage, sanitation, water supply, lighting, farm machinery and 
other small engineering problems whenever possible, although neither an 
experiment station nor an extension department in engineering has as 
yet been established. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED 

The normal curriculum of each four-year course is outlined on the 
following pages. Students are also required to attend and take part in 
the meetings of the Engineering Society and Seminar or lectures at which 
problems relating to engineering in its many phases are discussed. 

CXVIXi ENOXNSEBnrO. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term : 



II 



III 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102).. 

Analytics (Math 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101 ) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 103) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork rShop 103) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



3 
1 
4 



1 
2 



1 
2 



5 
3 
1 
4 



1 
1 



5 
3 
1 
4 



• • • • • 

9. 



n 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Advanced Al&Q^bra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101)... 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Light and Heat (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Determinative Mineralogy 

rUine Surveying (Surv. 103-104) 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 105-106) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analvtical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



JUNIOR TEAR. 



3 
2 
5 



9 



4 

2 



II 



4 
3 



III 



5 
2 



1 

V 



1 

2 



Oral Technical English (P. S. 116-118) 

Current History (H. 101-103) 

Modern Language 

Topographic Surveying (Surv. 107) 

Railway Curves and Earth Work (Rwys. 101-102) 

Railway Surveying (Rwys. 103) 

Highways (Hwys. 101 ) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103-104) 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101-102) 

Shades, Shadows. Perspective (Dr. 109-110) 

Elementary Structural Design (Sir. Des. 101).... 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. Ill) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 102) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 

R. O. T. C. (M. L 103) 



1 

1 
3* 

1 



2 
5 



2 
1 



3* 



1 
1 
3» 



3 



2 
2 



2 
3 



1 
3» 



1 
1 
3* 



2 
2 



2 
V 
V 



8* 



♦Alternative. 



SENIOR YEAR.t 



Differential Equations (Math. 112) 

Least Squares (Math. 113) 

Estimates of Cost (Math. 114) 

Astronomy (Math. 115) 

Oral Technical English (P. S. 119-121) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Engineering Law (Pol. Sci. 118) 

Modern Language 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 102) 

Geodesy (Surv. 108-109) 

Railway Economics (Rwys. 104) 

Highway Engineering (Hwys. 102) 

Materials Laboratory (Hwys. 103) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Elements of Sanitary Engineering (Hyd. 104) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 105) 

Sewerage (Hyd. 106) 

Hydraulic Design (Hyd. 107) 

Structural Design (Str. Des. 102) 

Masonry and Concrete (Str. Des, 104) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 104) 



1 
3 



3 
3 



1 



3+ 



3t 

1 

3 



3t 
3t 



3t 



3 

5 



2f 



3 

3* 
3t 
3t 



4t 
It 



4t 
It 
3 



3t 



•Alternative. 

tElectives to b« selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
necessary credits. 

tSenior Tear for Class 1921 as in Catalogue for 1919-20. 



! ? 



92 



EUBCTRXCAI^ ElTOINEEBZSrO. 




FRESMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102)... 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 103) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Woodwork (Shop 102) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



3 
1 
4 



1 

2 



1 
2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



A.dvanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 109 ) 

Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 101) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 106) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



3 

2 
5 



• - • • 



JUNIOR YEAR, 



103) 



Oral Technical English (P. S. 116-118) . . . 

Current History (H. 101-103) 

Modern Language 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103)... 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Direct Current Theory (E. E. 102) 

Dynamos and Alternating Currents (E. E. 

Wireless Telegraphy (E. E. 108) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110) .... 

Direct Current Design (E. Des. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 104) 

Wireless Laboratory (El. Lab. 107) 

Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101) 

Machine Design (M. Des. 102) 

Machine Work (Shop 111) 

Testing (Exp, Lab. 101) 

R. O. T. C. (M. 1. 103) 



1 
1 

3* 
5 



2 
2 



1 
3* 



SENIOR YEAR.t 



Oral Technical English (P. S. 119-121)... 
Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102). . 

Engineering Law (Pol. Sci. 118) 

Modern Language 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 104) 

Lighting and Illumination (E. E. 105) 

Electric Power Plants (E. E. 106) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 107)... 

Electric Railways ( E. E. 108 ) 

Alternating Current Design (E. Des. 102) 

Electrical Laboratory (El. Lab. 105) 

Telephone Laboratory (El. Lab. 106) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 104) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 104) 



1 
8* 



3* 

3 

3 



1 

2 



2 
8* 



♦Alternative. 

tSenior Year for Class 1921 as in Catalogue for 1919-20. 



II 



5 
3 
1 

4 
2 

• < 

1 



• • • • 



1 
2 



2 
1 

i 

2 



1 
1 



1 

2 



1 
1 

3* 
1 
1 
3* 



1 
8* 



3* 
3* 



3 
2 



2 
1 



III 



5 

3 
1 

4 



3 

2* 



5 

V 

1 
2 
1 



1 
1 
3* 

3* 

» • • 

3 



5 
2 



3* 



8 
3* 

*3* 
3 



3 
*2 



93 



FRESMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102) 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

romposition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speakingr (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . . 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Technical Instruction (M. E. 101) 

Woodwork (Shop 101) 

R. o. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



3 
1 
4 



1 
1 
2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) . . . 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 103) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 105) 

Foundry (Shop 108) 

Machine Work (Shop 109) 

R. O. T. C. (M. 1. 102) 



3 
2 
5 



4 
3 



II 



5 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 



1 
2 
2 



5 
5 
3 



2 
2 



III 



3 
1 

4 



1 
2 



5 
V 
1 



2 
1 

2 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Oral Technical English (P. S. 116-118) 

Current History (H. 101-103) 

Modern Language 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103-104) 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. 111-112) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 102-103).. 

Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101) 

Machine Design (M. Des. 102-103) 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. Des. 104) 

Machine Work (Shop 110) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 102) 

ROT. C. (M, I. 103) 



1 

1 

3* 

5 



2 
1 
2 



3 
3* 



SENIOR YEAR.t 



1 
3 



4 
2 



1 
1 
3* 



3t 

1 

3 



3t 

3 

3 



2t 
3* 



3 
3* 



Differential Equations (Math. 107) 

Oral Technical English (P. S. 119-121) 

Prmciples of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Engineering Law (Pol. Sci. 118) 

Modern Language 

Technical Analysis ( ) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 105) 

structural Design (Str. Des. 103) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 104-105) 

Heat and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Manne Engineering (M. E. 107) 

bteam Turbines (M. E. 108) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 

S^Pf^'^ental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 104) 

gi_ 0: T. C. (M. L 104) 

•Alternative. 

,.««*^^®^*^^^®^ ^^ ^« selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
necessary credltii. 

^Senior Tear for Class 1921 as In Catalogue for 1919-20. 



1 

1 

3* 

2 

2 



2 
1 



2 
1 



1 
1 

3* 
2 



4 
3 



1 
3* 



4 

3 

3 

2t 

2t 



1 
3* 



94 



BU&AI^ EHGZinBZSHIira. 



FRESHMAN TEAR. 



Term; 



II 



III 



3 
1 

4 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102).. 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Plane Surveying cSurv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 103) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

'Woodwork (Shop 102) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



1 

2 



1 
2 



5 
3 
1 
4 
2 

1 
1 



o 

] 

4 
1 



• • • • • 

2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) .... 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 103-104) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 102) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 101) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 110) 

Electricity and Magnetism (E. E. 101) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 101) 

Blackv^mi thing (Shop 106) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



3 

2 
5 



S 
4 



5 
5 



2 
1 
1 

2 



5 

« ■ 

V 



« • ■ . « 



• • ♦ • 



1 

2 
1 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Oral Technical English (P. S. 116-118) 

Current History (H. 101-103) 

Modern Language 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Elementary Structural Design (Str. Des. 101) 

Lights and Illumination (E. E. 105) 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory (El. Lab. 
Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101). 

Machine Work (Shop 111) 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 

Electives in Agriculture 

R. O. T. C. (M. L 103) 



102) 



1 
1 

3* 
5 



1 
2 
1 

4 

3* 



1 
1 
1* 



1 
1 
8 
S* 



1 
3* 

3 " 

3 

3 



4 

3* 



95 



SENIOR YEAR4 



Term: 



Fstimates of Cost (Math. 108) 

Oral Technical English (P. S. 119-121) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Engineering Law (Pol. Sci. 118) 

Modern Language 

Farm Forestry (For. 101) 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 102) 

Highways (Hwys. 101 ) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Elements of Sanitary Engineering (Hyd. 104). 

Advanced Drainage (Hyd. 110) 

Design of Farm Structures (Str. Des. 105)... 

School Architecture (Str. Des. 106) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 107) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110) 

Telephone Laboratory (El. Lab. 106) 

Design of Farm Machinery (M. Des. 105) .... 

Stp^n Engines (M. E. 102) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

pP^.ATit T^'sfner ^Evp. Lab. 103) 

Electives in Agriculture 

R. O. T. C. (M. L 104) 



1 
1 
3 



2 

3t 

3t 



3t 



1 

7t 
3* 



II 



1 
3 



3t 



2t 
2 

It 
3t 



3t 
3* 



III 



3 

3* 
3 
3t 



2t 
3t 

4t 



3t 
V * 



2t 
3* 



♦Alternative. 

tElectives to be selected with the approval of the Dean to supply the 
neces'^ary credits. 

JSenior Year for Class 1921 as in Catalogue for 1919-20. 



DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS OFFERED 

The subjects offered in the different departments of the school are 
divided into groups, each of which is given a title more or less indicative 
of the subjects included in it. An abbreviation of this title is placed be- 
fore each subject in the group. This is used with the subject title in the 
tabulated outline of the curriculum of each course. 



DRAWING AND DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

Dr. 101. Freehand Drawing. One credit hour: one laboratory per- 
iod. First term. 

Elementary practice; letering, exercises in sketching, both in pencil 
outline and pencil rendering; line drawing, composition; proportion and 
comparative measurements; exercises in sketching of technical objects. 
Plates upon completion are bound and properly titled. Required of 
students in engineering. 

Dr. 102. Mechanical Drawing. One credit hour each term: one 
laboratory period. First and secnod terms. 

Practice in plain lettering; use of instruments, projection and simple 
working drawings, the plates upon completion being enclosed in covers 
properly titled by the students. Required of students in mechanical 
engineering. 



96 

Dr. 103. Mechanical Drawing. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. One credit hour: one laboratory period. Second 
term. 

A course similar to Dr. 102 for students in civil, electrical, rural, and 
chemical engineering. 

Dr. 104. Engineering Drawing. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Second term. 

Conventional signs used in mapping. Scale making, contours, 
hachures. Profiles and mapping. Required of students in civil, rural 
and chemical engineering. 

Dr. 105. Descriptive Geometry. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Dr. 102 and 
Solid Geometry. 

Detailing of machinery and drawing to scale from blue-prints. Tracing 
and blue-printing, and representation of flat and round surfaces by ink 
shading. Its relatioa to mechanical drawing and the solution of such 
problems relating to magnitudes in space as bear directly upon those 
which present themselves to engineers. 

Dr. 106. Descriptive Geometry. Four credit hours: two lectures 
and two laboratory periods. First term. 

A continuation of Dr. 105 for all engineers other than chemical. 

Dr. 107. Mechanical Drawing. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. First term. 

Practice in plain lettering, use of instruments, geometrical construc- 
tions and plans of simple buildings. Elective for non-engineering 
students. 

Dr, 108. Drafting. One credit hour: one laboratory period. Third 
term. Prerequisites, Dr. 102 and 103. 

In this course problems pertinent to the work of students in each 
branch of engineering are selected. Drawings are made to scale. Em- 
pirical formulas for determining dimensions are used wherever possible. 

Dr. 109. Shades, Shadows, Perspective. Two credit hours each 
term: two laboratory periods. First and second terms. Prerequisite, 
Dr. 106. 

A practical course in the development and application of the theory 
of shadows and perspective of objects, and of shadows in perspective, 
supplemented by lectures. Must be taken with Dr. 110. Required of 
students in civil engineering. 



97 

For Short-Course Students 

Dr. 1. Farm Drawing. One laboratory period. First tenm. 
A course gimilar to Dr. 107, for students in the two-year course in 
Agriculture. 

Dr. 2. Mechanical Drawing. Two laboratory periods. First, sec- 
ond and third terms. 

Instruction in commercial drafting. This is preceded by a study of 
drafting instruments and freehand lettering. Projection applied to shop 
drafting of machine parts. Tracing and blue-printing. The making of 
detail and assembly drawings. Free hand sketching of machine tools. 

Dr. 3. Freehand Drawing. One laboratory period. Third term. 
A course similar to Dr. 101. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



E. E. 101. Elementary Electricity. Two credit hours each term: 
two lectures. Second and third terms. 

The elementary theories of electrical and magnetic phenomena are 
carefully developed, the course being correlated with the technical work 
taken up later. Required of students in electrical and rural engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

E. E. 102. Direct Current Theory. Three credit hours each term: 
three lectures. First and second terms. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 

The study of the principles involved in the construction and operation 
of direct and alternating current generators and motors. Also the char- 
acteristic curves and efficiencies of the various types of machines, the 
selections of machines for specific duties and the proper methods of in- 
stalling and operating. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

E. E. 103. Dynamos and Alternating Currents. Three credit hours: 
three lectures. Third term. Prerequisite, E. E. 102. 

This is a continuation of E. E. 102, which covers the characteristics of 
direct current machinery. A number of analytical and graphical prob- 
lems are required to give a clear conception of the effects of inductance 
and capacity in alternating current circuits. Required of students in 
electrical engineering. Must be taken with El. Lab. 104. 

E. E. 104. Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Machinery. 

Three credit hours each term: three lectures. First, second and third 
terms. Prerequisite, E. E. 103. 



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The theory, construction and practical applications of single phase 
and polyphase alternating current machinery, including generators, syn- 
chronous, induction, and repulsion motors, converters, transformers, etc., 
are taken up in detail. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 105. 

E. E. 105. Lighting and Illumination. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. Third term. 

A study of the various systems of distribution used in arc and in- 
candescent lighting. Lectures on the manufacture and characteristics 
of the many forms of electric lamps; the selection of lamps for commer- 
cial work, and the principles of correct interior and exterior illumina- 
tion. Required of students in electrical and rural engineering. 

£. £. 106. Electric Power Plants and Transmission. Three credit 
hours: three lectures. Second term. 

This course includes the principles governing the installation and 
operation of power-house and substation machinery and systems. A num- 
ber of practical problems are given to illustrate the principles. Required 
of students in electrical engineering. 

E. E. 107. Telephones and Telegraphs. Two credit hours: two 
lectures. Second term. 

The application of electricity to telephones and telegraphs, with a 
study of the construction and operation of the apparatus required for 
the magneto, common battery and automatic exchanges. The principles 
of the operation of simple, duplex, quadruplex and simultaneous tele- 
graps. Required of electrical and elective for rural engineering stu- 
dents. Must be taken with El, Lab. 106. 

E. E. 108. Wireless Telegraphy. One credit hour: one lecture. 
Second term. Prerequisite, E. E. 102. 

The principles of the application of electric waves to wireless tele- 
graphy and telephony are followed by a study of the various systems 
in commercial use. Required of students in electrical engineering. 
Must be taken with El. Lab. 107. 

E. E. 109. Electric Railways. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
Third term* 

The could includes the consideration of the design and operation 
of the electric railway systems, power plants and sub-stations. Many 
problems are given which involve the enginering features of modern 
raiway development. Required of students in electrical engineering. 

E. E. 110. Primary and Secondary Batteries. Two credit hours: 
two lectures. Second term. 

A study of the various types of primary batteries and their appli- 
cation to commercial work. The theory, construction and application of 



99 

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lead storage cells and Edison storage batteries. A short outline of 
the auxiliary apparatus used in connection with sorage sells. Required 
of studuents in electrical and rural engineering. 

E. E. 111. Dynamo Electric Machinery. Two credit hours: twO 
lectures. First term. 

A general course in direct and alternating currents, covering the 
principles of construction and operation of machines used in commercial 
practice. Required of civil, mechanical and chemical engineering stu- 
dents. Must be taken with El. Lab. 102. 

E. E. 112. Dynamo Electric Machinery. Two credit hours: two lec- 
tures. Second term. Prerequisite, E. E. 111. 

A continuation of E. E. 111. Required of mechanical and chemical 
engineering students. Must be take with El. Lab. 103. 



For Short-Course Students 

E. E. 1. Elements of Direct Current Machinery. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First and second terms. 

The study of the fundamental principles involved in the construc- 
tion and operation of direct current generators and motors. Character- 
istic curves and the selection of machines for specific purposes. Methods 
for installing and maintaining various types of geerators and motors. 
The laboratory practice includes the installation of generators and 
motors with the necessary auxiliary apparatus, and commercial tests of 
the various types of direct current machines. 

E. E. 2. Elements of Alternating Current Machinery. Four lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, E. E. 1. 

This course includes the study of fundamental principles and the 
design and construction of alternating current machinery. The labora- 
tory work consists of commercial tests of single phase and jrolyphase 
machinery, including generators^ motors, converters, transformers, etc. 

E. E. 3. Illumination. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Second term. 

Lectures on the manufacture and characteristics of the various forms 
of arc and incandescent lamps; the selection of lamps and reflectors 
for commercial work; the principles of correct interior and exterior 
illumination. The laboratory work includes the determination of the 
operating characteristics, the measuring of the candle-power of lamps, 
and the measurement of the efficiency of actual lighting installations. 

E. E. 4. Electric Power Plants and Transmission. Two lectures. 
Third term. 



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The principles governing the installation and operation of power- 
house and substation machiery, transmission and distribution systems. 

E. E. 5. Telephones and Telegraphs. Three lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. Third term. 

A study of the construction and operation of the apparatus required 
for magneto, common battery and automatic exchanges. The principles 
of the oi)eration of simple, duplex and quadruplex telegraphy. The 
laboratory work includes experiments with the various types of ap- 
paratus and the operation of exchanges. 

E. E. 6. Primary and Secondary Batteries. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. 

The study and testing of various types of primary batteries and their 
application to commercial work. The theory and construction of 
lead storage cells and Edison storage batteries. Actual tetsing of 
batteries in operation. 

E. E. 7. . . Electrical Measuring Instruments. Two lectures and one 
laboratory i>eriod. First term. 

The theory governing the design, construction and application of all 
types of direct and alternating current instruments. The repairing^ 
testing and calibration of the different types of instruments. 

E. E. 8. Electrical Equipment Repairs. One lecture and one labora- 
tory period. Second term. 

This course includes the rewinding of armature and field coils, testing 
of commutators, repairs for signal systems, etc. 

E. E. 9. Interior Wiring. Two lectures and two laboratory per- 
iods. First term. One lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. 

A thorough study of the Underwriters* Rules concerning all classes 
of interior wiring. Calculations for circuits and the design of interior 
light and power systems. The practice includes the installation of 
residence and commercial light and power systems. 

E. E. 10. Outside Line Construction. One lecture and one labora- 
tory period. Third term. 

The design and construction of short transmission and distribution 
systems. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN 



E. Des. 101. Direct Current Dsign. Five credit hours: two lee 
tures and three laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, E. E. 
102. 

This course covers the design of direct current generators and motors, 
including the use of the different conducting, magnetic and insulating 
materials. Required of students in electrical engineering. 



101 

£. Des. 102. Alternating Current Design. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. First term. Prerequisite, E. Des. 101. 

The complete design of an alternating current generator or a trans- 
former. Required of students in electrical engineering. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 



£1. Lab. 101. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. One credit hour 
each term: one laboratory period. Second and third terms. 

A laboratory course designed to verify the laws and principles out- 
lined in E. E. 101. Required of students in electrical and rural engi- 
neering. Must be taken with E. E. 101. 

El. Lab. 102. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. One credit hour: 
one laboratory period. First term. 

This course includes the methods of measuring resistance, current and 
electromotive force; photometry; and elementary testing of generators 
and motors. Required of civil, mechanical and chemical engineering 
students. Must be taken with E. E. 111. 

El. Lab. 103. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. One credit hour: 
one laboratory period. Second term. 

A continuation of El. Lab. 102. Required of students in mechanical 
and chemical engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 112. 

El. Lab. 104. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Two credit hours 
each term: two laboratory periods. First and third terms. One credit 
hour: one laboratory period. Second term. 

Study and calibration of instruments. Measurements of resistance, 
current and electromotive force; commercial tests on generators and 
motors; arc lamp testing and photometry. Required of students in elec- 
trical engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 102 and 103. 

El. Lab. 105. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. Two credit hours 
each term: two laboratory periods. First, second and third terms. 

Measurement of inductance, impedance, condensance, etc.; power 
measurements in alternating current circuits; regulation and efficiency 
tests of alternators and transformers; operating characteristics of syn- 
chronous and induction motors. Required of students in electrical engi- 
neering. Must be taken with E. E. 104. 

El. Lab. 106. Telephone Laboratory. One credit hour: one labora- 
tory period. Second term. 

This course covers experimental work with all types of telephone ap- 
paratus and the operation of the magneto and common battery ex- 
changes. Required of students in electrical engineering and elective for 
students in rural engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 107. 



I 

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102 

El. Lab. 107. Wireless Laboratory. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Second term. 

The course includes practice in sending and receiving signals in Con- 
tinental Code, the design and construction of radio receiving sets, and 
the operation of long distance receiving apparatus. Kequired of stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. Must be taken with E. E. 108. 

EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY. 



Exp. Lab. 101. Testing. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Second term. Prerequisite, Mech. 103. 

Study of testing machines and accessories. Operation of steam en- 
gine. Study of planimeter and indicator. Test of gas engines. Ten- 
sion tests of wrought iron and steel. Transverse tests of cast iron and 
timber. Compression tests of long and short wood and concrete columns. 
Required of all engineering students, except chemical. 

Exj. Lab. 102. Efflperimental Engineering. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. Third term. 

Determining the amount of moisture in steam; the efficiency of the in- 
jector; the transit and its uses; indicator practice; slide valve setting; 
the slide rule and micrometer; the analysis of boiler feed water; flue 
gases; lubricating oils; and the determination of the heating value of 
fuels and moisture in steam. Required of students in mechanical engi- 
neering. 

Exp. Lab. 103. Cement Testing. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. First term. 

Standard tests of cement and concrete mortars. Time of setting. Ten- 
sion and compression tests. Required of students in civil, mechanical 
and rural engineering. 

Exp. Lab. 104. Experimental Engineering. One credit hour each 
term: one laboratory period. First and third terms. Two credit hours: 
two laboratory periods. Second term. 

A continuation of Exp. Lab. 102. Required of students in mechanical 
engineering. 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 



I 



Hwys. 101. Highways. Two credit hours: two lectures. First 
term. 

Principles of location, construction and maintenance of country roads 
and city streets and pavements. Required of civil and rural engineering 
students. 



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103 



Hwys. 102. Highway Engineering. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Four credit hours : two 
iHitures and two laboratory periods. Third term. 

Advanced course in highway design, construction and maintenance.^ 
Field work in making the necessary surveys for the preparation of the 
plans, specifications and estimates of cost for the building of a short 
stretch of improved road. Study of highway construction machinery. 
Study of highway economics, administration and legislation. Elective 
for students in civil engineering. 

Hwys. 103. Materials Laboratory. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. Prerequisite, Chem. 102. 

Tests of oils, asphalts, tars and road binders. Elective for students 
in civil engineering. 

For Short-Course Students 

Hwys. 1. Country Roads. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Third term. 

Elementary course in the location, construction and maintenance of 
country roads and bridges. Theory and field practice in location, estab- 
lishing grades, drainage, computation of earthwork, methods of con- 
struction and road machinery. Study of the utilization of local road 
and bridge materials. 

HYDRAULIC AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 



Hyd. 101. Hydraulics. Three credit hours: three lectures. Third 
term. Prerequisite, Mech. 102. 

Principles of Hydraulics. Flow in open channels and pipes and 
through orifices. Methods of measurement, stream gauging, etc. Re- 
quired of all students in engineering. 

Hyd. 102. Hydraulics. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
First term. Prerequisite, Hyd. 101. 

Determination of the coefficient of discharge, velocity and contraction 
in pipes, orifices and weirs. Stream gauging methods. Flow measure- 
nients. Required of students in civil and rural engineering. 

Hyd. 103. Hydromechanics. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
First term. Prerequisite, Hyd. 101. 

Pumps, pumping machinery, water wheels and turbines. Friction 
losses in plants and water systems. Study of distribution systems. Re- 
quired of students in civil, electrical, mechanical and chemical engineer- 
ing. Elective for rural engineering students. 

Hyd. 104. Elements of Sanitary Engineering. Three credit hours: 
three lectures. First term. 



104 

In this course the principles underlying water supply and sewerage 
are discussed and the general problems which present themselves to an 
engineer in practice are emphasized. Required of civil engineering and 
elective for rural engineering students. 

Hyd. 105. Water Supply. Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. 

This course deals with the principles of water supply engineering. It 
includes the methods of obtaining a good supply, its purification, and 
the design and operation of distribution systems and filtration plants. 
Elective for students in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Hyd. 106. Sewerage. Four credit hours: two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. Third term. 

This course takes up the principles involved in and the methods of 
sewage disposal and the design of sewerage systems and septic tanks. 
House connections and plumbing are also considered. Elective for stu- 
ilents in civil engineering. 

Hyd. 107. Hydaaulic Design. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. • 

Design of a small sewerage system and disposal plant. Elective for 
students in civil and rural engineering. Must be taken with Hyd. 106. 

Hyd. 108. Drainage. One credit hour: one lecture. Third term. 

Study of the principles of underground flow. Drainage of farm lands. 
Planning systems. Elective for non-engineering students. Must be 
taken with Surv. 110. 

Hyd. 109. Drainage. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Third term. 

Field practice in study of drainage conditions. Planning the system 
from notes in field. Elective for non-engineering students. Must be 
taken with Hyd. 108. 

Hyd. 110. Advanced Drainage. Two credit hours, one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Third term. 

Elective for rural engineering and non-engineering students. 



For Short-Course Students 

Hyd. 1. Drainage. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. First 
tenxi. 

Elementary course in farm drainage for students in two-year course in 
agriculture. Theory and field practice in farm drainage. Surveying, 
designing and constructing drainage systems for the improvement of 
agricultural lands. 



105 



Hyd. 2. Drainage. Three lectures and two laboratory periods. 

Third term. 

Principles of underground flow and the relation of soils to drainage. 
Land drainage systems and methods. Field practice in the surveying 
of drainage areas, plotting of maps, designing systems, estimating costs 
and setting stakes for construction. Drainage laws and assessments. 

Hyd. 3. Water Supply. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. 

In this course consideration is given to applications of the principles 
of hydraulics, methods of purifying water, and design of small water 
supply systems and filtration plants* 

Hyd. 4. Sanitation. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Sec- 
ond term. 

This course has for its object the consideration of the principles 
involved in the design of small sewerage systems for individual houses 
of for small towns, supplemented by discussions relative to house drain- 
age and plumbing. Methods for the disposal of sewage and garbage 
are also considered. 

MACHINE DESIGN 



M. Des. 101. Elementary Machine Design. Two credit hours: one 

lecture and one laboratory period. First term. Prerequitite, Dr. 108. 

Freehand sketching of the details of machinery and making working 
drawings of same. Calculations and drawings of a simple type punch- 
ing press. Required of students in electrical, mechanical and rural 
engineering. 

M. Des. 102. Machine Design. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. 

A continuation of M. Des. 101. Required of students in electrical and 
mechanical engineering. 

M. Des. 103. Machine Design. Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. 

A continuation of M. Des. 102. Required of students in mechanical 
engineering. 

M. Des. 104. Kinematics of Machinery. Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, M. 
Des. 101. 

Centrodes. Determination of the instantaneous axis and instant- 
aneous center. Preparation of displacement, velocity and acceleration 
diagrams. Design of cams. Slow advance and quick return motion 
for machine tools. Form of tooth outlines in the epicycloidal and 
involute eystems. Reuired of students in mechanical engineering. 



m 



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106 

M. Des. 105. Design of Farm Machinery. Three credit hours eachJ 
term : two lectures and .one laboratory period. Second and third termsj 
Prerequisite M. Des. 101. 

For Short-Course Students 

The design and drafting of those portions of farm machinery common 
to engines, and to harvesting, pumping and fertilizing machinery, such 
as levers levers, shafts, gears and frames. Elective for students in ' 
rural engineering. 

M. Des. 1. Machine Drafting and Design. Two laboratory periods 
each term. First, second and third terms. 

The designing and detailing of a complete machine, including the de- 
termination of the stresses and the calculations for the various parts. 
Both empirical and rational methods are used. 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 101. Trigonometry. Five credit hours: five lectures. First 
term. 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Deduction of formulas and their 
application to the solution of triangles, trigonometric equations, etc. Re- 
quired of students in engineering who have ojffered Soldid Geometry for 
entrance. 

Math. 102. Solid Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry. Five 
credit hours: five lectures. First term. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the relation of the subject to de- 
scriptive geometry and on areas and volumes of solids. The latter por- 
tion of the time is devoted to spherical trigonometry. Required of en- 
gineering students who have offered plane trigonometry for entrance. 
Elective for other students. 

Math. 103. Analytic Geometry. Five credit hours each term: five 
lectures. Second and third terms. Prerequisites, Math. 101 and 102. 

Geometry of two and three dimensions, loci of general equations of 
second degree, higher plane curves, etc. Required of students in engi- 
reering. 

Math. 104. Advanced Algebra. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
First term. 

Algebra beyond that required for admission. Elementary theory of 
equations, partial fractions, permutations, etc. Required of engineering 
students. 

Math. 105. Calculus. Twe credit hours: two lectures. First term. 
Five credit hours each term: five lectures. Second and third terms. 
Prerequisite, Math. 103. 



:iii 



107 



A discussion of the methods used in differentiation and integration^ 
and the application of these methods in determining maxima and- 
minima, areas, volumes, moments of inertia, etc. Required of engineer- 
ing students. 

Math. 106. Algebra. Three credit hours: three lectures. First 

term. 

Quadratic Equations, simultaneous quadratic equations, progressions, 
graphs, logarithms, etc. Required of students in chemistry. 

Math. 107. Plane Trigonometry. Three credit hours: three lec- 
tures. Second term. 

Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas and their appli- 
cation to the solution of trigonometric equations and of right and ob- 
lique triangles. Required o fstudents in chemistry. 

Math. 108. Plane Analytic Geometry. Three credit hours: three- 
lectures. Third term. Prerequisites, Math. 106 and 107. 

A discussion of the straight line, conic sections and higher plane 
curves. Required of students in chemistry. 

Math. 109. Plane Analytic Geometry. Three credit hours: three 
lectures. First term. 
A continuation of Math. 108. Required of students in chemistry. 

Math. 110. Calculus. Three credit hours each term: three lectures.. 
Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Math. 109. 

A general course in differential and integral calculus particularly- 
adapted to the needs of students in chemistry. 

Math. 111. Solid Geometry. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
Third term. 
A course in geometry similar to Math. 102. Elective. 

Math. 112. Differential Equations. Three credit hours: three lec- 
tures. Second term. Prerequisite, Math. 105. 

The solution of the simpler differential equations is discussed. Elec- 
tive for students in civil and mechanical engineering. 

Math. 113. Least Squares. Two credit hours: two lectures. Third, 
term. 

A short course in which stress is laid on the application to geodesy. 
Elective. 

Math. 114. Estimates and Costs. One credit hour: one laboratory^ 
period. First term. 

Methods of estimating costs, supplemented by problems of a practical, 
nature. Required of students in civil and rural engineering. 



108 

Math. 115. Astronomy. Three credit hours: three lectures. Sec- 
ond term. 
A course in descriptive astronomy. Elective. 

For Short-Course Students 

Math. 1. Shop Mathematics. One lecture. First, second and third 
terms. 

Applications of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and trigonometry to the 
solution of practical shop problems. 

Math. 2. Algebra. Three lectures. First and second terms. 
Algebra from the beginning to quadratic equations. 

Math. 3. Plane Geometry. Three lectures. Third term. 

A thorough first course in plane geometry, using a standard text. 

Math. 4. Plane Geometry. Three lectures. First term. 
A continuation of Math. 3. 

Math. 5. Shop Mathematics. One lecture. First and second terms. 
A continuation of Math. 1. 

Math .6. Plane Trigonoemtry. Three lectures. Second term. 
Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas. Logarithms. So- 
lution of triangles. 

Math. 7. Applied Mathematics. Three lectures. Third term. 
The application of mathematics previously taught to the solution of 
shop problems. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 101. Technical Instruction. One credit hour each term: one 
lecture. First and second terms. 

Explanation of the reading of mechanical drawings; the proper cut- 
ting angles, care and adjustment of carpenter tools; relative strength 
of wood joints; wood, its shrinking and warping, and how to correct and 
prevent. Drill in problems in arithmetic, algebra and drawing supple- 
mented by notes and lectures. Required of students in mechanical en- 
gineering. 

M. E. 102. Steam Engines, Boilers and Dynamos. Three credit 
hours: three lectures. First term. 

The principles of steam and the steam engine. The slide valve and 
valve diagrams. The indicator and its diagram. Steam boilers, the 
various types and their advantages. Each student taking this course is 
required to spend certain hours in the power plant actually operating 



109 



the engine, boilers and dynamos. Required of students in electrical and 
mechanical engineering. Elective for rural engineering students. 

M. E. 103. Technical Mechanics. Two credit hours: two lectures. 

Second term. 

Elementary principles of applied mechanics, calculation of gear and 
pulley trains, bent levers, calculation of belt lengths, lacing belts, the 
suction pump, and bolts and screws. Required of students in mechani- 
cal engineering. 

M. E. 104. Heat Engineering. Two credit hours: two lectures. 
First term. Prerequisite, M. E. 102. 

Laws underlying the fundamental equations. Perfect gases. Com- 
pound, hot-air and gasoline engines. Theory of vapors. Relation be- 
tween pressure, volume, temperature, work and heat for special changes 
of state. Calculation and drawing of Camot's cycle and temperature 
entropy diagram. The steam turbine. Compressed air and refrigera- 
tion machinery. Required of students in electrical and mechanical en- 
gineering. 

M. E. 105. Heat Engineering. Three credit hours each term: 
three lectures. Second and third terms. 

A continuation of M. E. 104. Required of mechanical engineering 
students. 

M. E. 106. Heating and Ventilation. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Dr. 108. 

The principles of ventilating; amount of heat required for warming; 
radiating surfaces; steam, hot- water and hot-air systems; vacuum and 
vapor systems; pipe and pipe systems; appliances; specifications and 
contracts. Required of mechanical and rural and elective for civil en- 
gineering students. 

M. E. 107. Marine Engineering. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. Third term. 

This is a preliminary course in marine engineering aranged for those 
desiring to specialize in marine eng^ineering and deals with the theory 
of compound and triple expansion engines and the design of the prin- 
cipal parts of these types and of the marine boiler. Elective for stu- 
dents in mechanical engineering. 

M. E. 108. Steam Turbine Engineering. Two credit hours: two 
laboratory periods. Third term. 

This is a preliminary course arranged for those desiring to specialize 
m turbine engineering and deals with the theory of the various types 
of turbines and the design of the essential parts. Elective for students 
^n mechanical engineering. 



110 



M, E. 109. Ga« Ens^ines. Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. 

The fundamental principles concerning the gas engine. Its applica- 
tions to agricultural operations. Elective for students in the four-year 
agricultural courses. 

For Short-Course Students 

M. E. 1. Gas Engines. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Third term. 

A course similar to M. E. 109, for students in the two-year course in 
agriculture. Elective. 

M. E. 2. Technical Instruction. Two lectures. First, second and 
third terms. 

Explanation of the reading of mechanical drawings ; the proper angles 
for wood-cutting tools, care and adjustment of carpenter tools; relative 
strength of wood joints; wood, its shrinking and warping, and how to 
prevent and correct. Freehand sketching of tools and apparatus. 

M. E. 3. Heat Engines. Four lectures. First term. 

Elementary laws of steam and gases. Principles of the steam, gas 
and oil engine. The steam turbine. Compressed air and refrigeration 
machinery. 

M. E. 4. Technical Mechanics. Four lectures. First, second and 
third terms. 

Mechanics of materials with applications to strength of machine parts, 
power transmission, belting, gears, cams, rope and chain drives, boilers 
and pumps. 

M. E. 5. Power Plant Operation. One laboratory period. First 
term. 

The actual operation of boilers, engines, pumps and electric genera- 
tors. This includes heating systems. The work will be done on Friday 
nights. 

MECHANICS AND MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION 

Mech. 101. Graphic Statics. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Prerequisites, Phys. 101 and Dr. 
102 or 103. 

The theory and practice of the methods of determining stresses in 
cranes, roof trusses and bridges, and stresses on beams and girders due 
to traveling loads. Analysis of the stresses in roof trusses by the force 
polygon. Application of the equilibrium polygon to beams and girders. 
Analysis of stresses in bridge trusses. Required of all engineering stu- 
dents, except chemical. 



Ill 

Mech. 102. Analytical Mechanics. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Phys. 101 
and Math. 105. 

A study of statics dealing with the composition and resolutions of 
forces, moments, couples, machines and laws of friction; and of dyna- 
mics, dealing with velocity, acceleration, laws of motion, work, energy 
and applications to problems. Required of engineering students. 

Mech. 103. Mechanics of Engineering. Five credit hours: five lec- 
tures. First term. Prerequisite, Mech. 102. 

The mechanics of solids. Statics of material point and of rigid bodies. 
Chains and cords. Centrifugal and centripetal forces. Work. Power. 
Energy. Sliding friction, friction of journals, friction of pivots, fric- 
tion of ropes and belts. Analysis of stresses in thick cylinders. Re- 
quired of all students in engineering, except chemical. 

Mech. 104. Mechanics of Engineering. Two credit hours each 
term: two lectures. Second and third terms. 

A continuation of Mech. 103. Required of students in civil and me- 
chanical engineering. 

Mech. 105. Materials of Construction. Two credit hours: two lec- 
tures. Second term. Prerequisite, Mech. 103. 

A study of the manufacture, composition and properties of the various 
materials used in engineering. Required of students in civil and me- 
chanical engineering. 

For Short-Course Students 

Mech. 1. Concrete. Two lectures and one laboratory period. First 
term. 

Consideration is given in this course to the materials used in making 
concrete, the properties of concrete, both plain and reinforced, and its 
use in the construction of simple structures. The practical work in- 
cludes the mixing and placing of concrete and the application of formu- 
las to the design of beams, girders, etc. 



PHYSICS 

Phys. 101. Mechanics and Sound. Four credit hours: four lec- 
tures. First term. Prerequisite, Math. 101. 

Lectures, recitations and domonstrations on mechanics and sound. Re- 
quired of students in engineering and chemistry. Must be taken with 
Phys. Lab. 101. 

Phys. 102. Electricity and Magnetism. Four credit hours: four 

lectures. Second term. 



112 



I 



The elementary theory of electricity and magnetism and the practical 
application of the various laws. Required of students in engineering 
and chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. 102. 

Phyi. 103. Heat and Light. Four credit hours: four lectures. Third 
term. 

Nature of heat, expansion, change of state, transmission and radiation 
of heat, and the elements of thermodynamics. Theory of light, reflec- 
tion, refraction, dispersion, etc.; use of prisms, lenses and mirrors. Re- 
quired of students in engineering and chemistry. Must be taken with 
Phys. Lab. 103. 

Phys. 104. General Physics. Two credit hours each term: two lec- 
tures. First, second and third terms. 

A discussion of such branches of physics as are suited to the needs of 
students in the non-technical courses. Elective. Must be taken with 
Phys. Lab. 104. 

For Short-Course Students 

Phys. 1. Elementary Physics. Three lectures. First, second and 
third terms. 

An elementary course including lectures and recitations in mechanics, 
heat, light, electricity and magnetism. Special attention is paid to prac- 
tical applications. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY 

Phys. Lab. 101. Mechanics and Sound. One credit hour: one lab- 
oratory period. First term. 

Quantitative experiments illustrating the laws and principles studied 
under Phys. 101. Required of students in engineering and chemistry. 
Must be taken with Phys. 101. 

Phys. Lab. 102. Electricity and Magnetism. One credit hour: one 
laboratory period. Second term. 

The study of magnetic fields and the measurement of current, electro- 
motive force, resistance, etc. Required of students in engineering and 
chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. 102. 

Phys. Lab. 103. Heat and Light. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. 

Quantitative experiments in heat and light. Required of students in 
engineering and chemistry. Must be taken with Phys. 103. 

Phys. Lab. 104. General Physics. One credit hour each term: one 
laboratory period. First, second and third terms. 

Experiments illustrating the subjects discussed in Phys. 104. Elec- 
tive for students in the non-technical courses. Must be taken with 
Phys. 104. 



113 



For Short-Course Students 



phys. Lab. 1. Elementary Physics. One laboratory period. First, 
second and third terms. 

An elementary course including experiments selected to illustrate the 
principles discussed under Phys. 1. Must be taken with Phys. 1. 

RAILWAY ENGINEERING 

Rwys. 101. Railway Curves. Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Prerequisite, Surv. 105. 

Simple and compound curves, frogs, turnouts and crossings. Spirals. 
Required of students in civil engineering. 

Rwys. 102. Railway Earthwork. Two credit hours: two lectures. 
Third term. Prerequisite, Rwys. 101. 

Cross-sectioning. Earthwork computations. Haul. Overhaul. Mass 
diagrams. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Rwys. 103. Railway Surveying. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Rwys. 101. 

Preliminary surveys, location surveys, taking of cross-sections. Com- 
putation of quantities. Estimates. Must be taken with Rwys. 102. Re- 
quired of students in civil engineering. 

Rwys. 104. Railway Economics. Three credit hours: three lectures. 
Second term. Prerequisite, Rwys. 101. 

Ballasting, track fastenings, rails, buildings and structures, termi- 
nals, signaling, rolling stock. Promotion, operating expenses, effects of 
curvature nad grade. Valuation, repairs and renewals. Elective for 
students in civil engineering. 

SHOP PRACTICE 

Shop 101. Woodwork. One credit hour each term: one laboratory 
period. First and third terms. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. Second term. 

During the first term is taught the use and care of bench tools, ex- 
ercise in sawing, mortising, tenoning and laying out work from blue- 
prmts. The second term is devoted to projects involving construction, 
decoration and wood-turning. During the third term the principles and 
processes of pattern-making are taught, together with enough foundry 
work to demonstrate the uses of pattern-making. Required of students 
in mechanical engineering. 

Shop 102. Woodwork. One credit hour each term: one laboratory 
period. First and second terms. 

A course similar to the first and second terms of Shop 101 for stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. 



114 



<i 



^ 



Shop 103. Woodwork. One credit hour: one laboratory perid. First 
term. 

A short course similar to the first term of Shop 101 for students in 
civil and rural engineering. 

Shop 104. Woodwork. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Second term. 

A course for students in agricultural courses, in which emphasis is 
laid on the types of woodwork used on the farm. Elective. 

Shop 105. Blacksmithing. Two credit hours: two laboratory per- 
iods. Second term. Prerequisite, Shop 101. 

The making of the fire and how to keep it in order. The operations of 
drawing out, upsetting and bending of iron and steel, including the cal- 
culations of stock for bent shapes. Welding. Construction of steel tools 
foi use in the machine shop, including tool dressing and tempering. An- 
nealing. 

Shop 106. Blacksmithing. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Second term. 

A course similar to Shop 105, for students in electrical and rural 
engineering. 

Shop 107. Forging and Pipefitting. One credit hour: one labora- 
tory period. Third term. 

A course fitted to meet the needs of students in the four-year courses 
in agriculture. Elective. 

Shop 108. Foundry Work. Two credit hours: two laboratory per- 
iods. Third term. Prerequisite, Shop 105. 

Molding in iron and brass. Coremaking. The cupola and its manage- 
ment. Lectures on the selection of irons by fracture, fuels, melting and 
mixing of metals. Required of students in mechanical engineering. 

Shop 109. Machine Work. One credit hour: one laboratory per- 
iod. Third term. 

Elementary principles of vise and machine work, which include turn- 
ing, planing, drilling, screw-cutting and filing. This is preceded by 
study of the different machines used in machine shops. Required of 
students in mechanical engineering. 

Shop 110. Machine Shop. Three credit hours: three laboratory 
periods. 

A continuation of Shop 109. Required of students in mechanical en- 
gineering. 

Shop 111. Machine Work. One credit our each term: one labora- 
tory period. First and second terms. 

A course suited to the needs of students in electrical and rural engi- 
neering. 



115 



For Short-Course Students 

Shop 1. Farm Woodwork. One laboratory period. Second term. 
Use of tools in constructing trestles, gates and frames. Required of 
students in the two-year course in agriculture. 

Shop 2. Forging and Pipefitting. One laboratory period. Third 
term. 

Similar to Shop 107, for students in the two-year course in agricul- 
ture. 

Shop 3. Carpentry and Pattern-Making. Two laboratory periods. 
First term. 
Joinery. Pattern and core-box construction. Wood turning. 

Shop 4. Advanced Woodwork. One laboratory period. Third term. 
In this course the special needs of the student are considered in lay- 
ing out the work. 

Shop 5. Blacksmithing. Two laboratory periods. Second term. 

The making of the fire and how to keep it in order. The operations of 
drawing out, upsetting and bending iron and steel, including the calcu- 
lations of stock for bent shapes. Welding. Making, tempering and an- 
nealing of steel tools. 

Shop 6. Foundry. Two laboratory periods. Third term. 

Molding in iron and brass. Core-making. The cupola and its man- 
agement. Lectures on the selection of irons by fracture, fuels, melting 
and mixing of metals. 

Shop 7. Machine Work. Two laboratory periods. First term. 

Elementary principles of vise and machine work, which includes chip- 
ping, filing, turning, planing, drilling, screw-cutting and polishing. The 
study of the different machines precedes the operations. 

Shop 8. Advanced Machine Work. Two laboratory periods. Sec- 
ond term. 

Milling, gear-cutting, toolmaking, including taps, dies and reamers. 
Plain and differential indexing. Pipe-cutting and fitting. 

Shop 9. Shop work. Three laboratory periods. Third term. 
Students will be permitted to specialize in any of the shop courses. 
The work is of an advanced nature. 

Shop 10. Machine Work. One laboratory perid. Third term. 
A course similar to Shop 7, for students in electricity. 



116 



ll( 



n 



STRUCTURAL DESIGN 

Str. De». 101. Elementary Structural Design. Three credit hours 
each term: two lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third 
terms. Prerequisite, Mech. 103. 

This course includes the complete design and detailing of a steel roof 
truss and a plate girder; the detailing from standard commercial draw- 
ing sheets of floor beams, girders and columns, and the complete design 
of a bridge truss of either the Waren or Pratt type. The stresses are 
determined by analytical and graphical methods. Required of students 
in civil and rural engineering. 

Str. Des. 102. Structural Design. Three credit hours each term: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. First, second and third terms. 
Prerequisite, Str. Des. 101. 

Analysis of stresses in structural steel buildings. Design of roof 
trusses. Design of truss bridges and highway bridges. Design of plate 
girders under dead and live loads. Design of riveted connections. Both 
analytical and graphical methods are used. Required of students in 
civil engineering. 

Str. Des. 103. Structural Design. Four credit hours each term. 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. First and third terms. Three 
credit hours: two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. 
Prerequisite, M. Des. 102. 

Analysis of stresses in traveling cranes and derricks. Design of crane 
girders and lattice girders. Design of cranes. Both analytical and 
graphical methods are used. Design of riveted connections. Required 
of students in mechanical engineering. 

Str. Des. 104. Masonry and Concrete. Five credit hours: four lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. 

A study of the materials used in masonry construction, the design and 
construction of foundations and retaining walls, and the elementary 
theory of reinforced concrete construction with its application in the de- 
sign of beams, slabs, girders and columns. Required of students in civil 
engineering. 

Str. Des. 105. Design of Farm Structures. Three credit hours each 
term: two lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. 
Prerequisite, Str. Des. 101. 

The design and arrangement of farm buildings and equipment. Lec- 
tures also cover the heating, lighting, ventilation and plumbing, together 
with their cost. Elective for students in rural engineering. 

Str. Des. 106. School Architecture. Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Str. Des. 
101. 



117 

The planning and detailing of moderate-priced and medium-sized school 
buildings, including the heating, ventilation, lighting and plumbing. 
Elective for students in rural engineering. 

Str. Des. 107. Farm Buildings. Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. First term. Prerequisite, Dr. 107. 

Design and specifications of a simple typical building in timber or 
concrete and lectures upon the details. The course is very practical and 
latitude is permitted the student to develop his ideas. Elective for non- 
engineering students. 

For Short-Course Students 

Str. Des. 1. Farm Buildings. One lecture and one laboratory per- 
iod. First term. Prerequisite, Dr. 1. 

An elementary course similar to Str. Des. 107. Required of students 
in the two-year course in agriculture and in engineering (surveying 
option) . 

Str. Des. 2. Concrete Structures. One lecture and one laboratory 
pf;riod. Second term. Prerequisite, Str. Des. 1. 

Design of simple concrete houses, bridges and culverts. Estimate of 
bills of material and cost. Required of students in the two-year course 
in engineering (surveying option) . 



SURVEYING 

Surv. 101. Surveying. Two credit hours: two lectures. Second 
term. Prerequisite, Math. 101. 

Elements of surveying. Measurement of horizontal and level lines. 
Errors, use of compass, transit and level. Required of students in civil, 
electrical, rural and chemical engineering. 

Surv. 102. Surveying. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Third t*>rm. Prerequisite, Surv. 101. 

Application of the principles of elementary surveying to practical 
operations in the field. Measurement of lines, angles, elevations. In- 
troductory use of the transit and level. Required of students in civil, 
electrical, rural and chemical engineering. 

Surv. 103. Surveying. Two credit hours: two lectures. First term. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 102. 

Theory of adjustment of instruments. Determination of direction. 
Measurement of angles. Land survey methods and computations. Re- 
quired of students in civil and rural engineering. Must be taken with 
Surv. 104. 

Surv. 104. Surveying. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 

First term. 






118 

Transit lines, level lines, traversing, mapping, computation of areas. 
Required of students in civil and rural engineering. Must be taken with 
Surv. 103. 

Surv. 105. Advanced Surveying. Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Prerequisite, Surv. 103. 

Theory of stadia. General surveying methods. Topographic survey- 
ing. Plane table. Earthwork computations. City surveying. Hydro- 
graphic surveying. Theory of sextant. Field practice when weather 
permits. Required of students in civil engineering. 

Surv. 106. Advanced Surveying. One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. Third term. Prerequisite, Surv. 105. 

Field work in adjustment of instruments. Use of plane table. Topo- 
graphic mapping. Use of sextant. Solar observations. Required of 
students in civil engineering. 

Surv. 107. Topographic Surveying. One credit hour: one labora- 
tory period. First term. Prerequisite, Surv. 106. 

Field work in topographic methods. Base-line measurements. Ele- 
ments of triangulation and adjustment of quadrilaterals. Required of 
students in civil engineering. 

Surv. 108. Geodesy. Two credit hours: two lectures. Third 
term. Prerequisite, Surv. 105. 

Applications of the method of least squares to precise surveying, level- 
ing, and triangulation. Astronomical observations for azimuth, latitude, 
longitude and time. Elective for students in civil engineering. 

Surv. 109. Geodesy. One credit hour: one laboratory period. Third 
term. 

Practice in problems developed in Surv. 108. Elective for students in 
civil engineering. 

Surv. 110. Elementary Surveying. One credit hour: one lecture. 
Third term. Prerequisite, Math. 107. 

Measurement of lines, angles and elevations. Elementary use of tran- 
sit and level. Elective for non-engineering students. Must be taken 
with Hyd. 108. 

Surv. 111. Elementary Surveying. One credit hour: one labora- 
tory period. Third term. 

Application of principles of plane surveying to practical operations in 
the field. Profiles and traverses, computations of areas. Elective for 
non-engineering students. Must be taken with Surv. 110. 



119 



For Short-Course Students 

Surv. 1. Elementary Surveying. Three lectures and two labora- 
tory periods. First term. 

Theory and practice of elementary surveying. Use and care of chain, 
tape, compass, transit and level. Determination of direction and of ele- 
vation. Keeping of field notes. Land survey methods, computations and 
mapping. 

Surv. 2. Elementary Surveying. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Second term. 

Continuation of Surv. 1. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

The Engineering Building is well equipped with lecture-rooms, recita- 
tion-rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for engineering work. 
The departments of Mathematics and Physics are located in the En- 
gineering Building. 

Drafting-rooms. The three drafting-rooms are well equipped for 
practical work. Two of these are used by the junior and senior classes, 
each student being provided with a separate desk. The third room is 
used jointly by the freshman and sophomore students and contains 15 
drawing tables, accommodating about 90 students. 

Engineering students must provide themselves with approved draw- 
ing outfit, materials and book, cost of which during the freshman year 
amounts to about $25. 

The combined blue-print and dark room ,with its commodious printing 
frames, affords splendid opportunities for sun-printing, which is so use- 
ful to engineering students. 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory. This laboratory is fitted with 
such appliances as may be used to the best advantage in engineering 
practice. These include a potentiometer and standard voltmeter and 
ammeter for calibrating the various measuring instruments used in the 
laboratory. A Sharp-Miller portable photometer and a standard photo- 
meter for measuring the candle-power of lamps and for determination of 
illumination intensities. A large number of portable ammeters, volt- 
meters and indicating wattmeters for direct and alternating current 
measurements, standard curve drawing voltmeter and ammeter, electro- 
static voltmeter, frequency meters, silver and copper voltameters, Sie- 
men*s type electrodynamometer, watthourmeters and an oscillograph. 
A standard portable testing set, heating devices, condensers, tachometers, 
multiple circuit ammeter and voltmeter switches. D'Arsonval galvano- 
meters, standard resistance boxes and bridges. The lamps used for ex- 
perimental purposes include direct and alternating current multiple car- 
bon arc, metallic arc, mercury vapor and nemst lamps. 



4 



120 



A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt compound 
generator, has been installed for testing purposes. This may be used in 
connection with the University lighting plant when needed and will be 
used for light and power service in the Engineering Building. 

The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made readily be- 
tween any part of the University lighting plant and the turbo-generator 
or any of the apparatus in the dyamo-room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo- room includes the following: A 10-kilo- 
watt rotary converter of the latest type, with speed limit and end play 
devices; a five-horse-power variable speed, commutating pole motor; a 
7.5-kilowatt, 60-cycle, 220-volt alternator designed to operate either as 
a polyphase generator, synchronous motor, frequency changer, constant 
speed induction motor or variable speed induction motor. The following 
parts are supplied with the set to make possible its operation in any of 
the above-named ways : a stationary armature for use either as an alter- 
nating current generator or as an induction motor field ; a revolving field, 
a squirrel cage induction motor rotor with starting compensator having 
self-contained switches; an induction motor rotor with 3-phase collector 
rings, external resistance and controller; a 2-kilowatt booster set; a five- 
horse-power compound direct current motor and a 1.5-horse-power shunt 
motor fully inclosed; a 7.5-kilowatt, 120- volt, 3-phase self -excited gen- 
erator direct connected to a 115-volt compound direct current motor; a 
motor-generator set consisting of a 3.6-horse-power shunt motor direct 
connected to a 2-kilowatt generator; several small D. C. and A, C. motors 
and generators; two 2-kilowatt transformers to transform power from 
110 or 220 volts to 1100 or 2200 volts; various types of starting rheostats 
with automatic overload and no voltage release; field rheostats. 

The main switchboards are used to mount the necessary circuit ap- 
paratus to control the generators and motors as well as the various cir- 
cuits in the dynamo-room and testing laboratory. Wire and water rheo- 
stats are arranged for load and regulation. Portable lampboards and 
portable switchboards have been constructed for use in machine tests. In 
addition to the special electrical engineering equipment, the College light- 
ing plant will be used for illustrative and experimental purposes. This 
plant contains, together with other apparatus useful in teaching electri- 
cal engineering, two Bullock generators of 40 kilowatts total capacity. 

An eight-inch Waltham bench lathe, with all the necessary attach- 
ments, has been installed in the dyamo-room for the use of students in 
making small articles, such as binding posts, connecters, etc., for use in 
the laboratories. 

The telephone laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the mag- 
neto and common battery systems. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. Among the apparatus installed 
in the laboratory are a cross compound condensing Corliss engine of 50- 



121 



horse-power, equipped with brake, indicators, relief valves, reducing mo- 
tion, steam and vacuum gauges and speed indicator, which gives ample 
opportunity for steam consumption and brake tests. This is connected 
with the shops, so that at any time it may be switched on and drive 
them. The University power plant, with its vacuum heating system, 
three 100-horse-power return tubular boilers and two electric generating 
units, offers opportunities for experimental work. An eight-horse-power, 
four-cycle gasoline engine equipped with prony brake permits the mak- 
ing of tests in gas engineering. 

Materials Laboratory. In this laboratory the apparatus for testing 
materials includes a 100,000-pound Riehle combined hand and power- 
testing machine for making tensile, compression, shearing and transverse 
tests on various kinds of materials; a 1,000-pound Riehle machine for 
testing cement briquettes, etc. The testing of asphalts, tars, etc., used 
in roadwork is carried on under the direction of the Department of 
Chemistry. 

Hydraulic Laboratory. Apparatus suitable for the determination of 
the coefficient of discharge for small orifices, weirs, etc., has been in- 
stalled in this laboratory. Opportunity for experimental work in stream 
gauging, etc., is afforded by the streams in the vicinity. 

Physics Laboratory. This laboratory is well supplied with apparatus 
for lecture-room demonstrations and for experiments undertaken by stu' 
dents. New pieces of apparatus are added to the equipment each year. 

The Shops. The shops are well lighted and admirably adapted to 
the purpose for which they were designed. The wood-working shop con- 
tains accommodations for bench work and wood turning. The power ma- 
chinery in this shop is a band and universal circular saw, one 16-inch by 
10-foot pattern-maker's lathe, three grindstones, a wood trimmer, 26-inch 
wood planer, 14-inch joiner and universal tool grinder. 

In the forge shops are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, a power 
emery grinder, and a pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop 
free of smoke. There is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with an iron supola, which melts 1,200 pounds 
or iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core oven and the necessary flasks 
and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one 10-inch speed lathe, one 
22-inch engine lathe with compound rest, one 12-inch combined foot and 
power lathe, two 14-inch engine lathes, one 25-inch drill press, one No. 4 
emery tool grinder, one No. 1% universal milling machine and an as- 
sortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and measuring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machine shops is driven by a 9 by 
14-inch automatic cut-K)ff, high-speed engine, built by members of the 



fe 



122 

junior and senior mechanical engineering classes, after the standard de- 
sign of the Atlas engine. An 8 by 12-inch engine drives the machinery 
of the blacksmith shop and foundry. 

Surveying Equipment and Models. This equipment includes a num- 
ber of transits, levels, compasses, plane tables and minor instruments for 
use in plane, topographic, railroad, highway and geodetic surveying. 
These are added to as the necessity for other equipment arises. The 
models include various types of roads, bridges, culverts, etc. 

Library. Each department contains a well selected library of books 
for reference and the standard engineering magazines. Students are 
encouiaged to take advantage of the opportunity for reading afforded in 
the departmental as well as in the general library. 



TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS 

The object of the course is to prepare men for positions of responsi- 
bility in lines of work in which training in mechanic arts and elementary 
engineering is necessary. There is a special need for such men at all 
times and particularly during the reconstruction period. The course 
affords an excellent opportunity for training to such persons as find it 
impossible for any reason to enter ony of the four-year courses in engi- 
neering. A certificate is granted to each student who satisfactorily 
completes the course. The first year of the course is devoted to the 
laying of a moundation in mathematics, physics and English, as well 
as in drawing and shop work. In the second year most of the time is 
devoted to subjects closely related to mechanical, electrical and civil en- 
gineering, the student selecting the branch in which he thinks he may 
use his tlents to the greatest advantage. 

Throughout the course emphasis is laid on the necessity for turning 
out work in the drafting-room, shop and field which will meet the re- 
quirements of the commercial work. The student is taught that a task 
worth doing at all is worth doing well and that the finished product from 
the hand, brains, or both, must not only pass inspection, but be better 
than the average if one wishes to succeed. Parallel with the practical 
work instruction is given in the fundamentals upon which parctice is 
based. Thus the head and hand are brought into that intimate and har- 
monious relation so necessary to the normal development of the individual 
engaged in any industrial pursuit. 

Among the positions which the course equips a man to fill may be 
noted the following: Tracers, draftsmen, rodmen, inspectors, chainmen, 
linemen, station operators, assistats in various branches related to en- 
gineering, salesmen for different kinds of machinery, and assistant 
foremen. 



123 



To enter the course a student must have completed at least the equiva- 
lent of the seventh grade in the Maryland public schools and be not less 
than 16 years of age. 

The tabulated curriculum of the course follows. It gives the outline 
of the work in its different aspects: 

TWO-YEAB MECHANIC ABTS. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



1) 



Shop Mathematics (Math. 1) 

Algebra (Math. 2) 

Plane Geometry (Math. 3) . . . 
Elementary Physics (Phys. 

Composition (Engr. 4) 

Technical Instruction (M. E 
Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 2) 
Freehand Drawing (Dr. 3).... 

Carpentry (Shop 3) 

Advanced Woodwork (Shop 4) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 5) 

Foundry (Shop 6) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 



2) 



1 
3 



3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 



1(2) 



1 
3 



3(3) 
3 
2 
(6) 



(6) 

i(2) 



SECOND YEAR. 



Plane Geometry (Math. 4) 

Shop Mathematics (Math. 5).. 
Plane Trigonometry (Math. 6). 
Applied Mathematics (Math. 7) 

Business Law ( ) . . . . 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



3 
1 



1(2) 



1 
3 



3 

1(2) 



OPTION IN MECHANICS. 



Heat Engines (M. E. 3) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 4) . . . 

Direct Current (E. E. 1) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 2) . . . 
Machine Work (Shop 7 and 8). . . 

Shop Work (Shop 9) 

Machine Drafting (M. Des. 1) . . . 
Power Plant Operation (M. B. 5) 



4 

a 

2(3) 



(6) 



(6) 



2 
2(3) 



(6) 



(6) 
(3) 



OPTION IN ELECTRICITY. 



2) 



Direct Current (E. E. 1) . . . 
Alternating Currents (E. E. 

Illumination (E. E. 3) 

Power Plants (E. E. 4) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 5) 

Batteries (E. E. 6) 

Measuring Instruments (E. E. 7)... 

Equipment Repairs (E. E. 8) 

Interior Wiring (E. E. 9) 

Outside Lines (E. E. 10) 

Machine Work (Shop 10) 



2(3) 



2(3) 
2(3) 



2(6) 



2(3) 



2(3) 



1(3) 
1(3) 



OPTION IN SURVEYING. 



Elementary Surveying (Surv. 1 and 2) 

Country Roads (Hwys. 1) 

Drainage (Hyd. 2) 

Water Supply (Hyd. 3) 

Sanitation (Hyd. 4) 

Concrete (Mech. 1) 

Farm Buildings (Str. Des. 1) 

Concrete Structures (Str. Des. 2) 

Farm Equipment ( ) 



3(6) 



2(3) 



2(3) 
1(3) 



2(3) 



III 



2(3) 



1(3) 
1(3) 



3 

3(3) 

3 

2 
(6)« 
(3) 



(3) 



(6)* 
1(2) 



1(2) 



4(3) 



(9) 
(6) 



4(3) 

V " * 
3(3) 



1(3) 
(3) 



2(3) 
3(6) 



2(S) 



Farm^ore stry (For. 1) ' > ' 2(3 ) 

♦Students electing option in mechanics take foundry; others take mechani- 
cal drawing. 



124 



THE SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 



The School of Liberal Arts has as its prime object the offering of 
foundational and specialized instruction in language and literature and 
in social science. It aims to provide a stock upon which to graft techni- 
cal and scientific education; to prepare the foundation for business, law, 
journalism, administration, philanthropic work, the more responsible 
civil service positions and the higher teaching positions; and to afford 
the opportunity for general cultivation and refinement of the mind. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the School of Liberal Arts includes the 
following departments: Ancient Languages and Philosophy, Economics, 
English Langruage and Literature, History and Political Science, Jour- 
nalism, Modern Languages, Public Speaking, Library Science and Music. 
These departments, however, do not represent the scope of liberal arts 
Instruction provided by the University. Additional curricula in bacteri- 
ology, botany, chemistry, drawing, entomology, geology, mathematics, 
pedagogy, physics, psychology and zoology are offered in the Schools 
where such subjects have a basic application. Between the School of 
Liberal Arts and the other schools there exists a close cooperation. 

Courses and Degree 

Curricula in the School of Liberal Arts are organized according to the 
group elective system. This arrangement undertakes to fit the course 
to the student, rather than the student to the course, and particularly 
enables the School to embody in its curricula the following fundamental 
principles: First: such breadth of training as is characteristic of the 
well-educated man; second, a freedom of election that will motivate 
study and develop individuality and special aptitude; and, finally, the 
desirability of a student^s deciding on a major interest so that there will 
be neither aimless nor dissipated effort. 

By the group elective system a part of every student's curriculum is 
prescribed. Such prescription, however, includes only what is basic 
and fundamental. The remainder of the student's work is elective. 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 

On satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester hours 
of college work, a student will be recommended for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Credits towards this degree are subject to the fol- 
lowing regulations: 



125 



Regulations 

Subjcct-Matter Groups. First of all, the student's curriculum is 
governed by four distinct subject-matter groups. These are: 

A. Language and Literature: English, French, German, Greek, 
Journalism, Latin, Public Speaking, Spanish and Library Science. 

B. Social Science: Economics, History, Philosophy,, Political Science 
and Sociology. 

C. Natural Science: Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, 
Geology, Physics, Physiology and Zoology. 

D. Mathematics and Psychology: Mathematics, Psychology and 
Drawing. 

The administration of Groups A and B lies wholly within the School 
of Liberal Arts; of Grops G and D, in other Schools of the University, 
with all of which the Art School cooperates. 

Courses Open to Freshmen. The only courses open to freshmen are 
the following: 

English 101-103, nine credit hours. 

French 101-103, nine credit hours; 104-106 (for students who enter 
with two units in French), nine credit hours; 108-110 or 111-113 (for 
students who enter with three or more units in Freeh), nne credit 
hours. 

German 121-123, nine credit hours; 124-126 (for students who enter 
with two units in German), nine credit hours; 128-130 or 131-133 (for 
students who enter with three or more units in (xerman), nine credit 
hours. 

Latin 111-113 (for students who enter with two units in Latin), twelve 
credit hours; 118 (for students who enter with three or more units in 
Latin), four credit hours. 

Library Science 101, one credit hour, first term. 

Public iSpeaking 101-103, three credit hours; 107-109, three credit 
hours; 113-115, six credit hours. 

Spanish 141-143, nine credit hours; 144-146 (for students who enter 
with two units in Spanish) , nine credit hours. 

History 101, three credit hours; 102-103, six credit hours. 

Zoology, 101-102, eight credit hours. 

Botany 101, four credit hours. 

Chemistry 101-103, twelve credit hours. 

Mathematics, nine credit hours. 

Educational Guidance, three credit hours. 

Course Combination for Freshmen: In order to ^arantee to stu- 
dents during their first year a sound balance of content and to prevent 
unwise deviation from the fundamental principles of standard arts edu- 
cation, there has been arranged for all freshmen in this school the 
following combination of courses: 



126 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103), nine credit hours. 
Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103), three credit hours. 
A Foreign Language, nine credit hours. 
A Laboratory Science, twelve credit hours. 
History or Political Science, six credit hours. 
Mathematics or a Freshman elective'* nine credit hours. 
Library Methods (L. S. 101), one credit hour. 



uA 



m 



Group Prescription 

A. Language and Literature: English 101-103, Public Speaking 101- 
103 and Library Science 101 are required of all students during their 
freshman year. 

The student's combined work in high school and university must include 
at least two foreign languages. When the student enters with six units 
in foreign languages, he will be required to secure nine hours of credit 
in college; when the student enters with four units in foreign languages, 
he will be required to secure eighteen credits in the University; when 
the student enters with two units in foreign languages, he will be re- 
quired to secure twenty-seven credits in the University; when the stu- 
dent enters with one unit in foreign languages, he will be required to 
secure thirty credits in the University; when the student enters with no 
units in foreign languages, he will be required to secure thirty-six credits 
in the University. Less than one unit in a foreign language will not be 
recognized. 

B. Social Science: Every student must secure credit in the social 
science group for not less than eighteen trimester hours. At least nine 
of these credits must be in history. If, however, the student oifers one 
or more high school units in history, then only nine trimester hours of 
credit in this group are prescribed. 

C Natural Science: Every student must secure credit for not less 
than nine trimester hours in either bacteriology, botany, physiology or 
zoology. If, however, the student offers one high school unit in any one 
of the«e four biological sciences, then no additional college credit is re- 
quired. Every student must also secure credit for at least nine tri- 
mester hours in either chemistry, geology or physics. Students entering 
with neither chemistry nor physics must take a one-year's course in one 
of the two. 

D. Mathematics and Psychology: Every student must secure credit 
either in high school or university for algebra through quadratics and for 
plane geometry. He must in addition secure credit in the University 
for at least nine trimester hours in mathematics. 



•If requirements in mathematics have been satisfied prior to entering the 
University or before the end of the freshman year, this time may be devoted 
to other freshman subjects. 



127 



Majors and Minors. All students registered in the School of Lib- 
eral Arts must secure at least sixty-three trimester hours of credit in 
either Group A or Group B, and at least twenty-seven trimester hours, 
or their equivalent, in some one subject of the group selected. All stu- 
dents of this School must also secure twenty-seven hours of credit in one 
of Groups A. C and D or B. C and D (according to the group in which 
the major is chosen), and at least eighteen trimester hours, or their 
equivalent, in some one subject of the group selected. The student is 
not permitted to secure more than one hundred and two trimester hours 
of credit in any one group ; in this School, this applies to Groups A and 
B only. 

Relations with Other Schools of the University. Any student, after 
securing one hundred and two trimester hours of credit in subject-mat- 
ter Groups A, D, C and D, may, with the permission of his adviser, elect 
six hours a trimester for each of the remaining two years from work 
offered in any other School. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Students completing the curri- 
culum of the Reserve Oflficers' Training Corps, as defined in General 
Order 49 of the War Department, will be allowed six trimester credits 
towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. These credits, however, will 
count as part of the six hours a trimester for the last two years, taken 
in other Schools, as explained in the preceding section. 

Thesis. In the senior year a thesis in the student's major field of 
study will be required of all candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Advisers. The Dean and the Secretary of the School of Liberal Arts, 
together with the professor representing a prospective major, become 
the adviser of each student during his freshman year. The relation 
between adviser and student will be frank and fraternal, without re- 
straint on either side. After the first year, the professor under whom 
the student does the major portion of his work becomes his adviser. 

General Restrictions on Elections. Every student in electing work 
must bear in mind the following general restrictions: (1) Only courses 
may be chosen for which the student has had sufficient prerequisite 
training; (2) Only such courses may be elected as do not conflict on the 
University class-schedule; (3) A study once elected must be pursued 
through one year or to the completion of the subject; (4) The student's 
electives must exhibit a definite purpose; (5) All elections are subject to 
the approval of the student's adviser and one of the executive officers 
of the School of Liberal Arts. 

Graduate Coars«t 

In certain departments of the School of Liberal Arts provisions are 
^roade for instruction toward advanced degree*. A deicription of courses 



128 

so offered follows the exclusively undergraduate courses. Tihe general 
requirements for graduate degrees will be found in the sections devoted 
to the Graduate School. 

Some time before the end of his first year in college the student must 
decide on his major study. This choice will be determined by the field 
that the student expects to be qualified to enter upon graduation. In 
order to acquaint the learner with some of the major interests for which 
the Arts faculty assume responsibility, the following type curricula se- 
quences are submitted: 

English Teaching, the Ministry, Literary Work or General Education: 

A student intending to become a teacher of English, to enter the minis- 
terial field, to devote himself to literary work, or to acquire a thorough 
general education would usually major in the JEnglish Language and 
Literature, and during the last three years study: (sophomore year) 
English, Foreign Languages, History or Political Science, Psychology, 
or Mathematics, or Logic, Public Speaking, Military Instruction and 
electives; (junior year) English, Foreign Lanuages, History, Philosophy 
and electives; (senior year) English, Foreign Languages, Economics, 
Political Science and electives. 

Foreign Language Teaching, Foreign Political and Commercial Con- 
nections or Translation Work: A student wishing to follow the various 
literary pursuits would major in Foreign Languages and during the last 
three years would study: | sophomore year) his major foreign language, 
English, a second foreign language, and electives consisting of Social 
Science and Natural Science; (junior year) his major language, English, 
a second language and electives consisting of Economics, Logic, Ethics 
and Psychology; (senior year) his major language, English a second 
language and electives consisting of Philosophy, Political Science and 
History. 

Law, History and Political Science Teaching, Politics or Consular 
Service: A student wishing to follow History and Political Science 
would study during the last three years: (sophomore year) American 
State (Government, American History, European History, Current His- 
tory, Modern Language, Economics, Finance, Public Speaking, Psy- 
chology; (junior year) Constitutional Law, Municipal Government, 
European and American; Governments of Europe, Money and Banking, 
Sociology, Current History, European History, Public Speaking, Logic, 
Research in Political Science, Historiography; (senior year) Political 
Problems and Practical Politics Latin American Republics, American 
Political Ideals, The Far East, American Diplomacy, International Law, 
Ethics, Thesis 

Public Speaking: Students preparing for the Law, the Ministry, Social 
Work, general or special lecture work, or any other professions of which 
public speaking is not only the base but also the positive medium through 



■11 

i!: 



129 

which the professional activities must operate, may major in Public 
Speaking. In addition to the freshman studies prescribed for students 
in the School of Liberal Arts, the course includes the following; (sopho- 
more year) Public Speaking, general and special; English Language, 
and electives consisting of Foreign Language Social Science and Natural 
Science; (junior year) Public Speaking, general and special; English 
Language, including Literature; and electives consisting of Foreign 
Language, Economics, Logic, Eethics, and Psychology; (senor year) 
Public Speaking, general and special; English Language, including 
Literature; and electives from Foreign Language, Philosophy, Political 
Science and History. 

Economics and Sociology: Problems in Economics and Sociology 
form the subject matter of most legislation; these courses are therefore 
intended in a general way to train men and women for citizenship. More 
particularly, to provide economic and sociological training for technical 
students, certain required and elective courses have been worked out in 
consultation with the deans, supplementary to the work of the different 
schools. Primarily, those students who wish to follow any of the 
various lines of business are advised to major in economics and during 
the last three years would usually study: (sophomore year) a foreign 
language, social psychology, principles of economics, industrial history 
of the United States, markets and marketing, technical writing, general 
oradvanced accounting; (junior year) business law, corporation and 
finance, money and banking, labor problems, rural economics, rural 
organization; (senior year) public finance, insurance, transportation, 
scientific management, general sociology, political science and history, 
international relations. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

For Short-Course Students 

Eng. 1-2. Practical Composition. Three credit hours, first term. 
Three credit hours, second term. First year. Prerequisites, minimum 
entrance requirements for short-course students. 

Elements, thought processes, types, structure, grammar, mechanical 
details and common errors of plain composition. Study and prepara- 
tion of commercial letters, forms, articles, reports and advertisements. 
Regular practice in the writing of long and short themes. 

Eng. 3. Vocational Publications. Two credit hours, third term. 
First year. Prerequisite, Eng. 1-2. 

Reading and study of the leading periodicals, representative bulletins 
and significant association reports of the technical vocations, with spe- 
cial attention to agriculture and engineering. Written assignments. 




130 



' For Undergraduates 

En^. 101-103. Composition and Rhetoric. Three credit hours each 
term. Freshman year. Prerequisites, minimum entrance requirements 
in English. Required of all four-year students. 

Parts, principles and conventions of effective thought communication. 
Reading, study and analysis of standard contemporary prose specimens. 
Daily short themes and periodical essays. 

Eng. 104-106. Technical Writing and Scientific Thought^ Two 

credit hours each term. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Advanced exposition. Principles of technical composition; examina- 
tion and analysis of scientific bulletins, typical articles from technical 
publications, and scholarly monographs. Study of specimens of the best 
scientific thought. Practice in the composition of the leading forms of 
technical writing. 

Eng. 107-108. Nineteenth Century Poetry. Three credit hours 
each term. First and second terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103 or ap- 
proval of the instructor, 
the instructor. 

Reading and criticism of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, 
Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne and their most distinguished 
contemporaries. Lectures on the history of English poetry, with special 
attention to the Romantic movement and the age of Victoria. Discus- 
sion of the nature of poetry, versification, style, critical methods and the 
relation of literature to social forces. 

Eng. 109. The Essay. Three credit hours. Third term. Prere- 
quisite, Eng. 101-103 or approval of the instructor, 
approval of the instructor. 

Development of the artistic elements of modem English prose and of 
the essay as a literary type. Reading and criticism of Bacon, Swift, 
Addison, Lamb, DeQuincey, Carlyle, Emerson, Macaulay, Ruskin and 
Arnold. 

Eng. 110. English Words. Three credit hours. First term. Prere- 
quisite, Eng. 101-103. Not given in 1920-21. 

Practical study of the origin, growth, nature and use of the English 
vocabulary. 

Eng. 111-112. Literature in America. Three credit hours each 
term. Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. Not given 
in 1920-21. 

Critical study of Irving, Cooper, Bryant, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, 
V/hittier, Longfellow, Lowell, Whitman and recent writers. Considera- 
tion of national life in American letters and America's contributions to 
world literature. Lectures, discussions, reports. 



131 



£ng. 113-114. Novelists of the Nineteenth Century. Three credit 
hours each term. First and second terms. Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103, 
Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Given in 1920-21 and alternate years. 

Reading of Scott, Jane Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, Hawthorne, 
George Eliot, Meredith, Hardy, Stevenson and others. Critical analysis 
in class of a few model novels, with special reference to characteriza- 
tion, plot and setting. Preparation of written critiques and short theses 
on assigned topics. Historical development of the novel traced by lec- 
tures. 

Eng. lis. The Short Story. Three credit hours. Third term. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Given in 1920-21 
and alternate years. 

Lectures on the development and structure of the short story. Read- 
ing and study of all the recognized types. Critical reports and story- 
writing. 

Eng. 116. Early English Drama. Three credit hours. First term. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 107-108 and Eng. 109. Not given in 
1920-21. 

Development of pre- Shakespearean drama; examination of liturgical, 
mystery and miracle plays, Robinhood and St. George plays, moralities 
and interludes, and the early regular comedies and tragedies. 

Eng. 117-118. Elizabethan Drama. Three credit hours each term. 
Second and third terms. Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103, Eng. 107-108, Eng. 
109 and Eng. 116. Not given in 1920-21. 

Shakespeare, his principal contemporaries and his immediate succes- 
sors. Analysis, interpretative study and rapid reading. Consideration 
of Shakespeare in relation to his sources, his stage and general Eliza- 
bethan life. Lectures, collateral readings and reports. 

Eng. 119-120. Modern English Drama. Three credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Prerequisites, junior or senior standing 
and the approval of the instructor. Given in 1920-21 and alternate 
years. 

Reading of representative plays by Dryden, Wycherley, Oongreve, 
Farquahar and Vanbrugh; Goldsmith and Sheridan; Wilde, Pinero, 
Jones, Shaw, Galsworthy, Barker, Yeats and Synge; Fitch, Mbody, 
Thomas and Mackaye. Written criticisms and reports. Lectures on the 
history of the English drama from 1642 to the present time. 

Eng. 121. Technique of the Drama. Three credit hours. Third 
torm. Prerequisites, junior and senior standing, Eng. 117-118 or Eng. 
119-120, and approval of the instructor. Given in 1920-21 and alternate 
years. 



132 

Principles of dramatic construction and criticism. Lectures, discus- 
sions and practice. 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Seminar. Two credit hours each term. 
Subject according to needs of students in attendance. 



ii 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Greek 

A. L. 101-103. Beginners' Greek. Three credit hours each term. 
Drill and practice upon the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the 
acquisition of a vocabulary. To be followed by A. L. 104-106. 

A. L. 104-106. Grammar, Composition and Translation of Selected 
Prose Works. Three credit hours each term. Second year course. 
Second-year course. Prerequisite, A. L. 101-103 or equivalent. 

For those who offer Greek for entrance. 

A. L. 107-109. Greek Literature and Composition. Three credit 
hours each term. Prerequisite, A. L. 104-106 or equivalent. 
(Study and translation of Greek prose and lyric poetry. 

A. L. 110-112. Greek Drama. Three credit hours each term. Pre- 
requisite, A. L. 107-109. 

A study of the qualities of Greek dramatic poetry and Greek comedy. 
Translation of selected representative works and modern imitations of 
older works. 

Latin 

A. L. 121-123. Latin Prosody and Mythology. Three credit hours 
each term. 

Study and translation of selections from Virgil, together with a study 
of his life and influence. This course may be offered for entrance or 
taken as college work by those who offer only two units in Latin for 
entrance. 

A. L. 124-126. Latin Grammar, Composition and Translation. Three 
credit hours each term. 

Review of Latin grammar. Much practice in prose composition. 
Translation of selections from Livy, Cicero and Sallust. For those who 
offer four units for entrance. 

A. L. 127-129. Study of Roman Life and Customs. Three credit 
hours each term. Prerequisite, A. L. 124-126. 

Translation of selections from the Odes and proverbs of Horace and 
the letters and histories of Tacitus. This course alternates with A. L. 
130-132. 



133 

A. L. 130-132. Critical Study of Latin Drama. Three credit hours 
each term. Prerequisite, A. L. 124-126. 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. The course alternates with 
A. L. 127-129. 

A. L. 133-135 Hi»tory of Roman Literature. Three credit hours 
each term. Prerequisite, A. L. 127^129 or A. L. 130^132. 
Lectures and translation of representative works. 



MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

French 

For Undergraduates 

M. L. 101-103. Elementary French. Three credit hours each term. 

Drill in pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversation 
and easy translation. For students who have entered college without 
French. To be followed by M. L. 104-106. 

M. L. 104-106. Second-year Cource. Grammar Continued. Three 
credit hours each term. Prerequisite, M. L. 101-103 or equivalent. 

Composition, conversation, dictation and reproductions. Reading and 
translation of selections from modern prose and poetry. For students 
who offer French for entrance. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. L. 107-109. Scientific French. Three credit hours each term. 
Prerequisite, M. L. 104-106. 

Reading and translation of scientific texts and journals. Discussions 
of word structure. 

M. L. 110-112. Developmient of the French Novel. Three credit 
hours each term. Prerequisite, M. L. 104-106. 

Detailed study of least three French novelists (one each term) with 
careful study of their lives, works and influence. This course alternates 
with M. L. 113-115. 

M. L. 113. Seventeenth Century French Drama. Three credit 
hours. First term. Prerequisite, M. L. 104-106. 

Analysis of the drama of the seventeenth century. Translation, col- 
lateral reading and reports. Alternates with M. L. 110-112. 

M. L. 114. Eightenth Century French Drama. Three credit hours. 
Second term. Prerequisite, M. L. 113. 
A continuation of French 113. 

M. L. 115. Nineteenth Century French Drama. Three credit hours. 
Third term. Prerequisite, M. L. 114. 



f 



134 

Continuation of French 114, with recent developments in modem 
drama. 

M. L. 116-118. History of French Literature. Three credit hours 
each term. Prerequisite, M. L. 110-112, or M. L. 113-115. 

Study of French literature from the earliest times to the present. 
Reading and translation of representative works. Texts and lectures. 

M. L. 119-121. French for Engineers. Five credit hours each term. 

This course is a combination of M. L. 101-103 and M. L. 104-106. Drill 
upon the essentials of grammar. Oral exercises and composition. Study 
of texts from the beginning of the course. Practice in translation at 
sight. Recitation periods. 

German 

For Undergraduates 

M. L. 121-123. Beginning German. Three credit hours each term. 
Drill in pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversa- 
tion and dictation. For students who do not offer German for entrance. 

M. L. 124-126. Second-year German. Three credit hours each term. 
Prerequisite, M. L. 121-123 or equivalent. 

Syntax, composition, conversation, translation and reproduction. Se- 
lections from modem prose, poetry and fiction. For students who offer 
German for entrance. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

M. L. 127-129. Scientific German. Three credit hours each term. 
Prerequisite, M. L. 124-126. 

Reading and translation of scientific texts and periodicals. Original 
reproductions of texts read. Lectures on scientific nomenclature. 

M. L. 130. Goethe and the Noved. Three credit hours for first 
half-year. Prerequisite, M. L. 124-126. To be followed by M. L. 131. 
Given in alternate years. 

Critical study of the life and works of Goethe together with the prin- 
cipals and development of the modem German novel. 

M. L. 131. Schiller and the Drama. Three credit hours for the 
second half-year. Prerequisite, M. L. 130. 

Detailed study of the life and works of Schiller and his relation to the 
drama. 

M. L. 132. Lessinsr and German Prote. Three credit hours for the 
first half-year. Prerequisite, M. L. 124-126. To be followed by M. L. 
133. This course alternates with M. L. 130. 

M. L. 133. Heine and German Poetry. Three credit hours for the 
second half-year. Prerequisite, M. L. 132. 

Extensive study of Heine and German Poetry. Collateral reading. 



135 



M. L. 134-136. History of German Literature. Three credit hours 
each term. Prerequisite, M. L. 130-131 or M. L. 132-133. 

Study of German literature from the earliest times to the present. 
Reading and translation of representative works. Texts and lectures. 

M. L. 137-139. German for Engineers. Five credit hours each 
term. Five recitation periods. Senior year. 

This course is a combination of M. L. 121-123 and M. L. 124-126. Drill 
upon the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Conversation and writ- 
ten reproductions of texts read. Original composition. Sight reading 
and much translation. 

Italian 

M. L. 13S-140. Elementary Italian. Three credit hours each term. 

Open to those who have had two years of either French or Spanish. 
A thorough study of the essentials of Italian grammar, with the aim of 
acquiring a working vocabulary. Drill upon syntax. Constant practice 
in translation and easy composition. 

Spanish 

Alt the end of the Sophomore year a student should be able to converse 
in Spanish as well as read and write it. The subject matter involved 
will be such as is ordinarily encountered by persons residing in Spanish- 
speaking countries. After this basic work a student has the option of 
two fields of specialization. The first line of specialization is concerned 
with the commercial needs of the United States in its relation, particu- 
larly, with the South American republics. Subjects receiving special 
attention are the trade interests of the proprietor and agent, The sec- 
ond line of major study has to do with the special interests of scholars 
and diplomats. 

For Undergraduates 

M. L. 141-143. Grammar; Conversation. Three credit hours each 
term. Freshman year. 
Writing and reading of easy texts. 

M. L. 144. Thorough Knowledge of Grammar. Three credit hours. 
First term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, M. L. 143 or its equivalent. 
Emphasis laid on the verb. 

M. L. 145. Reading and Conversation. Three credit hours. Second 
ttrm. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, M. L. 144 or its equivalent. 

Reading of easy periodicals with direct application of M. L. 144. All 
instruction from this point on is given in Spanish. 



M. L. 146. Letter Writing. Three credit hours. Third 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, M. L. 145 or its equivalent. 
Study of American Commercial methods in foreign countries. 



term. 



» 



136 



M. L. 147-148. Vocabulary of Trade. Three credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Junior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 146. 

Special attention to the names of articles of hardware, agricultural 
implements, engineering instruments, etc. Trade problems assigned. 

M. L. 149. Business Correspondence and Etiquette. Three credit 
hours. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 148. 

Direct application of M. L. 148 as used in the soliciting of trade. 
Actual copies of letters of South American business houses are taken as 
models. 

M. L. 150. Methods of Advertising in South American and Mexico 
compared with those of the United States. Three credit hours. First 
term. Senior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 149, Jr. 112. 

M. L. 151-152. Study of Commercial Development. Three credit 
hours each term. Second and third terms. Senior year. Prerequisite, 
M. L. 150, Ec. 101-102, Pol. Sc. 

Study of commercial development and possibilities of the South Anneri- 
can countries and the Philippines. Lectures by recognized authorities. 

M. L. 153-154. Early Spanish Literature. Three credit hours each 
term. P^rst and second terms. Junior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 146, 
H. 104-106, Pol. Sc. 

Development of Spanish literature from the heroic period to the seven- 
teenth century. 

M. L. 155. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literature. Three 
credit hours. Third term. Junior year. Three credit hours. First 
term. Senior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 154. 

Critical study of selections from Cervantes, Calderon, Perez, Quevedo 
and others. 

M. L. 156. Spanish Literature after the Eighteenth Century. Three 
credit hours. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisite, M. L. 155. 

Selected readings from Ferrari, Ayala, Ibanez, and their con- 
temporaries. 

M. L. 157. Literature of Spanish-Speaking Countries. Three credit 
hours. Third term. Senior year. 

Lectures with collateral reading, of the development of thought of the 
Latin-American countries and the Philippines. 

M. L. 158-160. Spanish for Engineers. Five credit hours each term. 
Five recitation periods. Senior year. 

Drill upon the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Conversation 
and written reproductions of texts read. Original composition. Sight 
reading and much translation. 



137 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

History 

H. 101-103. Current History. One credit hour each term. 

A study of the political, social, and economic problems of the day. 
Lectures and assignments. 

H. 104. American Colonial History. Two credit hours. First term. 
Lectures. Term reports. 

H. 105. American Civil War and Reconstruction. Two credit hours. 
Second term. 

Lectures. Term reports, 

H. 106. Development of American Nationality. Two credit hours. 
Third term. 

Lectures. Term reports. 

H. 107. Latin American Republics. Two credit hours. Third term. 
Senior year. 

Influence of United States in Central and South America; Monroe Doc- 
trine; Pan Americanism. 

H. 109-111. Modern and Contemporary History. Two credit hours 
each term. 

A study of the main events in European and American history since 
1815. 

H. 112. Imperialism and World Politics. Two credit hours. Sec- 
ond term. Not given in 1920-21. 

A study of the political development in Europe, Canada, United States, 
and South America. Colonial expansion, Leag^ue of Nations. Lectures 
and assi^ed readings. 

H. 113. Origins and Issues of the World War. Two credit hours. 
Third term. Not given in 1920-21. 

H. 114-115. The Far East. Two credit hours each term. Second 
and third terms. Senior year. 

A study of the principal events — political, social and economic — in the 
development of the nations of the Far East. Special amphasis will be 
given to the relations between the nations of the Far East and United 
States. 

H. 116-118. Epochs in European History. Two credit hours each 
term. Not given in 1920-21. 



138 



H. 119-121. Historiography. Two credit hours each term. Junior 
year. Not given in 1920-21. 

A study of the method of writing history. Examination of the meth- 
ods of prominent historians, and the development of assigned topics in 
technical form. Extensive use will be made of the material in the Li- 
brary of Congress. 

Political Science 

Pol. Sc. 101-103. Government of the United States. Two credit 
hours each term. 

A study of the governmental system of the United States. Evolution 
of the Federal Constitution; functions of the Federal Government; the 
executive, legislative and judiciary departments. Lectures and assigned 
cases and readings. 

Pol. Sc. 104-105. American State Government. Two credit hours 
each term. Sophomore year. 

The development of American state constitutions; the structure and 
workings of state governments. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 106-108. Constitutional Law of United States. Two credit 
hours each term. Prerequisites, Pol Sc. 101-103 and 104-105. 

A study of the American constitution and its interpretation as based 
on the decisions of the Federal Courts and the Supreme Court of the 
United States. Lectures and assigned cases. 

Pol. Sc. 109-110. Governments of Europe. Two credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Prerequisites, Pol. Sc. 101-103 and 104- 
105. Not given in 1920-21. 

A comparative study of the political organization of the principal 
states of Europe. Classification of forms; separation of powers; source 
of powers. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 111-112. Municipal Government. Two credit hours each 
term. Second and third terms. Second term : Government of American 
Cities. Third term: Government of European Cities. Prerequisites, 
Pol. Sc. 101-103 and 104-105. Not given in 1920-21. 

A study of city government. Source of power; organization and ad- 
ministration. City manager and commission forms of government. Lec- 
tures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 113-115. American Diplomacy. Two credit hours each 
term. Senior year. Not given in 1920-21. 

A survey of the beginnings of American diplomacy. Important for- 
eign relations. Treaties and treaty making. Lectures and assigned 
readings. 

Pol. Sc. 116-118. International Law. Three credit hours each 
term. Senior year. Given in 1921-22. 



139 

A study of the nature and sources of international law. Rights and 
duties of states ; freedom of the seas. Lectures and assigned cases. 

Pol. Sc. 119-120. Political Parties and Practical Politics. Two 

credit hours each term. First and second terms. Senior year. Not 
given in 1920-21. 

The organization and methods of modem political parties; growth of 
party system. Lectures, assigned readings, and visits to Congress. 

Pol. Sc. 121. Contemporary Political Problems of the United States. 

Two credit hours. Given in 1921-22. 

National and international problems of current interest. Foreign re- 
lations; suffrage; labor problems. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 122-123. American Political Ideals. Two credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Not given in 1920-21. 

American ideals as found reflected in the writings of Hamilton, Jef- 
ferson, Webster, and other great Americans. Lectures and assigned 
readings. 

Pol. Sc. 124-126. Research in Political Science. Two credit hours 
each term. Given in 1921-22. 

Practical work in the development of assigned problems in the College 
library and in the Library of Congress. 



ECONOMICS 

Econ. 101-102. Elements of Economics. Three credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Not open to freshmen, but required of 
students who elect to major in this department. 

Elementary phases of the present system; production, exchange, dis- 
tribution and consumption of wealth; the monetary system; public 
finance ; land and labor problems ; monopolies ; taxation and other similar 
topics. 

Econ. 103. Corporation Finance. Two credit hours. First term. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 

Methods employed in the promotion, capitalization, financial manage- 
ment, consolidation and reorganization of business corporations. 

Econ. 104. Money and Banking. Two credit hours. Second term. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 

A study of the nature and functions of money ; standards of value and 
prices; credit; bank clearings and exchanges; history of American and 
foreign banking; the stock exchange and the money market. 

Econ. 105. Public Finance and Taxation. Two credit hours. Third 
term. Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 



1 



140 

A study of public expenditures, receipts, indebtedness and financial ad- 
ministration ; theories on public expenditures; theories of taxation; the 
growth and nature of public credit; the forms of public debts; federal, 
state and municipal budgets. 

Econ. 106. Economic History of the United States. Three credit 
hours. First term. 

A study of the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce, transporta- 
tion from the simple isolated communities of the early colonies to the 
complex industrial and commercial society of to-day; its effect on the 
population in terms of successive new adaptations* 

Econ. 107. Rural Economics. Two credit hours. Second term. 

Agricultural markets and marketing; rural credit; tenancy and own- 
ership; transportation; free delivery; intensive and extensive farming 
and kindred topics. Use will be made of bulletins published by the 
United States Department of Agriculture. 

Econ. 108. Elements of Accounting. Three credit hours. Second 
term. 

The application of fundamental principles of debit and credit entries 
t) different forms of bookkeeping; farm accounting; bank accounting; 
financial statements. 

Econ. 109. Advanced Accounting. Three credit hours. Third 
term. 

A continuation of Econ. 108, in which bulletins of the Uhited States 
Department of Agriculture will largely furnish the subject matter. It 
will include a study of voucher systems and financial statements of gov- 
ernment and private corporation accounting. 

Econ. 110-112. Commercial Law. Three credit hours each term. 

The aim of this course is to train students for practical business af- 
fairs by giving the legal information necessary to prevent the conomon 
business errors. The following are some of the phases of the work; 
Requisites and forms of contracts and remedies for their breach; sales, 
passage of title, warranties, and remedies; negotiable instruments, as- 
signment negotiation, and liability of signers; agency; title, abstracts, 
mortgages, leases of property, etc. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 101. Elements of Sociology. Three credit hours. Second 
term. 

The life of society as affected by rural conditions, cities, wealth, 
poverty, heredity, immigration, etc.; the nature of social organization; 
different phases of social evolution; problems and principles of social 
control. 



141 

Soc. 102. Charities and Corrections. Three credit hours. Third 
term. Not given in 1920-21. 

Soc. 103. Rural Sociology. Three credit hours. Third term. 

Problems of rural life in the light of modern social science; federal 
and state organizations intended to promote rural welfare; purpose and 
achievements of such voluntary organizations as the Grange, the Farm- 
ers* Umion, village improvement associations, boys' and girls* clubs, co« 
operative societies, etc. 

Soc. 104. Social Psychology. Three credit hours. First term. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the work 
in the fields of sociology and other social sciences. The fundamental in- 
Btincts as dynamic forces in the individual and in society; their develop- 
ment, organization and control receive special attention. 

Soc. 105. Social Psyschology. A continuation course of Soc. 104. 
Three credit hours. Second term. 
A psychological analysis of some main features of an organized modern 

Btate. 

Soc. 106. Logical Aspects of Sociology. Three credit hours. Third 
term. 

This course seeks to apply the principles of logic to social phenomena. 
Nature of causal proof, grounds for universal judgments, statistical 
arguments, circumstantial evidence, analogical inference, experimental 
investigation, and nature and function of reasonable doubt in inductive 
inferences will be studied in their basic relation to actual sociological 
conditions. Practical problems of everyday life in their relation to the 
social order as discussed in the current literature and the press will fur- 
nish material for the student to test. 

Soc. 107. Philosophical Aspects of Sociology. Three credit hours. 
First term. 

A rapid survey of the leading systems of thought respecting social 
phenomena. The aim will be to show the genetic development of present 
day theory. 

Soc. 108. Philosophical Aspects of Sociology. A continuation 
course of Soc. 107. Three credit hours. Second term. 

The bearing of various concepts of ultimate reality, such as dualism 
and monism, atomism, theism and pantheism, on actual life conditions 
within various social groups. 

Soc. 109. Ethical Aspects of Sociology. Three credit hours. Third 
term. 

The application of moral principles to social phenomena. Nature of 
nioral judgments and underlying ethical concepts as illustrations in cur- 
rent social problems. 



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JOURNALISM 

The curriculum in journalism not only gives the student an excellent 
knowledge of English and subjects coincident with general education, 
but provides courses wherein direct application of such knowledge is 
shown in actual publication of the modem newspaper. Besides taking 
up in a general way practically all phases of newspaper work, some 
courses in the curriculum are designed to give the student a knowledge 
of the specific conditions that apply to the development of trade jour- 
nals, periodicals, magazines, and the weekly country paper. 

Jour. 101-102. News Writing. Three credit hours each term. First 
and second terms. Sophomore standing required. 

What constitutes news; news values; sources of news; gathering of 
news; types of newspaper stories. 

Jour. 103. The Daily Paper. Three credit hours. Third term. 
Sophomore standing required. 

A study of the methods and styles of the big metropolitan dailies; 
functions of a daily paper; file system; morgue; analysis of weekly pap- 
ers; Sunday supplements; and syndicates. 

Jour. 104. History of Journalism. One credit hour. First term. 
Junior standing required. 

A study of journalism since its beginning, with special attention to 
the various types that developed in the nineteenth century; effect of 
journalism on world civilization and industrial development; relation- 
ship of journalism to the arts and sciences; present standards. 

Jour. 105-107. Newspaper Editing. Two credit hours each term. 
Junior standing required. 

Copy reading; proof-reading; general editorial supervision; type se- 
lection; printers' marks; problems of the copy-reader and proof-reader. 

Jour. 108-110. News and Editorial Writing. Three credit hours 
each term. Prerequisite, Journalism 101-102. 

The interview; general reportorial duties; newspaper correspondence; 
human interest; rewrites; interpretation of news; function of an edi- 
torial in the newspaper; study of sources of material for editorials; prin- 
ciples embodied in news and editorial writing; relationship of the edi- 
torial to the news story; exchanges. 

Jour. 111. The Country Newspaper. Two credit hours. First term. 
Senior standing required. 

A study of the conditions affecting the country paper; sources of news 
for it; kinds of editorials; and different emphasis placed on news values; 
and the problems confronting the average small town weekly paper in 
obtaining paper supplies; and putting news in type; advertising and 
circulation problems; relationship of the paper to its community. 



143 



Jour. 112. The Trade Journal. Two credit hours. Second term. 
Senior standing required. 

Kinds of trade journals and their requirements for special articles; 
agricultural weeklies; publicity departments of great industrial organi- 
zations, and methods of operation. 

Jour. 113. Feature Writing. Three credit hours. First term. 
Senior standing required. 

Nature of the feature story; the narrative and the articles; kinds of 
material, and sources of material; treatment of topics and methods of 
handling features; markets for such material. 

Jour. 114-115. Agricultural and Industrial Feature Writing. Three 
credit hours each term. Second and third terms. Senior standing re- 
quired. 

Applications of principles embodied in Journalism 113 to articles and 
stories of an agricultural nature, with particular reference ta existing 
agricultural magazines, weekly farm papers, country papers, and agri- 
cultural departments of big dailies. 

Special study of the technical demands of trade and industrial jour- 
nals, kinds of material they are likely to accept, and a general applica- 
tion of the principles of Journalism 113 in preparation of articles for 
such papers. 

Jour. 116. Principles of Journalism. One credit hour. First term. 
Senior standing required. 

Ethics of the newspaper profession from the view of the editorial of- 
fices, the business office and the news department; relationship of the 
several departments of the newspaper and courtesies between newspaper 
men; laws of copyright, author's rights and libel. 

Jour. 117-118. Business Management, Circulation and Advertising. 

One credit hour each term. Second and third terms. Senior standing 
required. 

Problems encountered by the business manager, circulation manager, 
and advertising manager; methods of increasing circulation; develop- 
ment of new territory; analysis of markets; the advertising agency; 
national and local advertising; special type for advertising display; ad- 
vertising rates; relationship of the cost of production of the newspaper 
to circulation and advertising. 

Jour. 119. Head Writing, Make-up, and Mechanical Details. Two 

credit hours. First term. Senior standing required. 

118. Head writing, make-up, and mechanical details. Two credit 

hours, first term. Senior standing required. 

Kinds of type for use in heads; relationship of the head to the story; 
v%at the head should embody; mechanical details of the head; general 



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principles to be observed in making: up the paper; placing of advertis- 
ing; mechanics of the composing-room, the sterotyping-room, the press- 
room and problems in each. 

Jour. 120-121. Practical Newspaper Operation. Ten hours each 
week. Second and third terms. Senior standing required. 

This time will be devoted to the production of a regular weekly coun- 
try newspaper, a monthly magazine, and a daily paper; a newspaper 
plant is to be installed at the University, and students will get actual 
experience in almost every phase of newspaper creation and production. 
Conditions in the modern newspaper plant are to be duplicated in every 
detail possible. Students will be given practical application of all the 
principles acquired during their previous three years of study. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

(In Preparation for Special Professions) 

It is generally recognized that certain professions, using this term in 
both a special and a broad sense, not only have public speaking as a 
base, but that the very character of these professions is such that pubhc 
speaking is the medium through which the professional activities must 
to a large extent operate. This particularly is true in the Law, in the 
Ministry, in social service work, and in lecture and extension work for 
public and private organizations. 

The curriculum in Public Speaking, with special reference to profes- 
sions, will be offered to students preparing for the professions named 
above and to those preparing for such other professions as justify pub- 
lic si)eaking as a major study. In this curriculum the student will elect 
from all the subjects offered in the School of Liberal Arts those par- 
ticular studies which will best prepare him for the profession in view. 
Public speaking, both generally and specially applied, will run through 
the entire curriculum, and at the different stages of the student's 
progress in acquiring he will be taught to give oral expression to that 
which he has acquired. The general studies pursued give the educa- 
tional preparation; the drill and oral expression create and develop the 
medium through which this preparation can be utilized and made 
efficient. 

After the freshman year the students in this curriculum are elective, 
except the prescribed work in public speaking and English language. In 
addition to the regular courses in public speaking, specially adapted and 
prescribed courses will be given. 

P. S. 101-103. Reading and Speaking. One credit hour each term. 
Freshman year. 

A practical course in delivery. The principles and technique of vocal 
expression; enunciation, emphasis, inflection, force, gesture and general 



145 



delivery. Delivery of oratorical selections by students before the class, 
^th criticisms and suggestions by instructor. Delivery of original 
speeches. Individual drill by appointment with instructor. 

p. S. 104-106. Oratory. One credit hour each term^ Open to stu- 
dents who have credit for P. S. 101-103. 

The rhetoric of oral discourse. The speech for the occasion. Study 
of oratorical masterpieces. Practice in the writing and delivery or ora- 
tions and general speeches and addresses. 

P. S. 107-109. Extempore Speaking. One credit hour each term. 
Open to all students. 

Theory and methods. The psychology of public speaking. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned topics. 

P. S. 110-112. Debate. One credit hour each term. Open to stu- 
dents who have credit for P. S. 101-103. 

A study of the principles of argumentation. Study of masterpieces 
in argumentative oratory. Class exercises in debating. 

P. S. 113-115. Oral Reading. Two credit hours each term. Open 
to all students. 

Primarily for students intending to be teachers. Study of the techni- 
que of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of literary master- 
pieces. Study of methods of teaching oral reading in the schools. 

P. S. 116-118. Oral Technical English. Three credit hours each 
term. 

The preparation and delivery of lectures, speeches, reports, etc., on 
technical subjects. All composition required in the preparation of much 
of the above technical matter is criticized and corrected before the oral 
delivery. Required of engineering students. 

P. S. 119-121. Advanced Oral Technical English. Three credit 
hours each term. 
A continuation of P. S. 116-118. Required of engineering students. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 101. Library Methods. One credit hour. First term. Fresh- 
man year. Required of all Liberal Arts students. Elective for others. 

This course is intended to help students use the library with greater 
facility. Instruction will be given by lectures and by practical work 
with the various catalogs, indexes and references books. This course 
considers the general classification of the library according to the Dewey 
System. Representative works of each division are studies in combina- 
tion with the use of the library catalog. Attention is given to periodi- 
cal literature, particularly that indexed in the Reader's Guide and Agri- 




146 



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cultural Index. Book selection and a short bibliography on an assigned 
subject complete this course, 

L. S. 102. Advanced Library Methods. Two credit hours. Second 
term. Prerequisites, L. S. 101 and Eng. 101-103. 

A continuation of Library Science 101, emphasizing selection and pur- 
chase of books; administration of libraries; elementary work in classi- 
fying, cataloging and mending of books; charging and loan desk prac- 
tice. Designed especially for those interested in prospective library 
work. 

MUSIC 

In the Department of IVTusic the courses of study are thorough and 
comprehensive, and the methods of instruction are along modern lines. 
The aim of this department is to teach music not only as an accomplish- 
ment, but also as an aid in the development of the highest type of man- 
hood and womanhood. The ultimate aim is to train for life and to use 
the art of music as a means of intellectual, aesthetic and moral culture. 

The instruction is planned to meet the personal needs of each student. 
Since students possess varying degrees of talent and diligence, it is im- 
possible to estimate exactly the time required to complete a curriculum 
of study. Each student is advanced as rapidly as talent, application 
and thoroughness warrant. 

PIANO COURSES 

First Grade. Beyer's Method, Book I of Matthews' Graded Course; 
studies in sight reading and pieces suitable for this grade. 

Second Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Book II, Koehler Studies, 
op. 242, and selections suitable to this grade. 

Third Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books III and IV; Cfeemy's 
Etudes de la Velocite, op. 120 and 299 Book I; Lichner's sonatas; com- 
positions from Mendelsohn, Mozart, Grodard and others. 

Fourth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books V and VI; Czemy's 
Etudes de la Velocite, op. 299, Book II; Kuhlan's sonatas; studies from 
Bach, Brahms, Weber; also Mozart's easier sonatas. 

Fifth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books VII and VIII; 
Czerny's Etude de la Velocite, op. 299, Books III and IV; Cramer's Fifty 
Selected Studies, Books I and II; the more diflScult of Mozart's sonatas 
and the easier of Beethoven's sonatas; compositions from Chopin, 
Schuman, Schubert and others. 

Sixth Grade. Matthews' Graded Course, Books IX and X; Cle- 
mente's Gradus and Pama&sum; the more difiiicult sonatas of Beethoven; 
composition from Chopin, Taussig, Rubenstein and others. 



147 

Special courses on all brass and reed instruments may also be ar- 
ranged. 

Each student who in pursuing a course in music will be assigned one 
or more periods daily ; these assignments will be made in such a manner 
that neither instruction nor practice on the piano will conflict with the 
student's other academic interests. 

Instruction may be begun at any time by such students as bring the 
director of music a receipt showing that they have met all the require- 
ments explained above, to the full satisfaction of the college authorities. 



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THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



= 



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III 



J. M. H. ROWLAND, M. D., Dean 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A. M., M. D., LL. D. 

L. E. NEALE, M. D., LL. D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M. D., Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D. 

SAMHJEL K. MERRICK, M. D. 

GORDON WILSON, M. D. 

WILLIAM F. LOCKWOOD, M. D. 

GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A. B., M. D. 

WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M. D., Sc. D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A. B., M, D. 

ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON. M. D. 

CARY B. GAM3BLE, Jr., A. M., M. D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M. D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M. D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A. M., M. D. 

HIRAM WOODS, A. M., M. D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A. M.. M. D. 

FRANK MARTIN, M. D. 



HI 



149 
CALENDAR 

1920-1921 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University, Mercy and Mary- 
land General Hospitals. 

September 22. — Examination of Conditioned Students and Examination 

for Advanced Standing. 
October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

November 25. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p. m. 

November 29. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a. m. 

December 23. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p. m. 

January 3. — Christmas Recess ends. — 9 a. m. 

February 22. — ^Waehington's Birthday. 

March 24. — ^Easter Recess begins. 6 p. m. 

March 29. — Easter Recess ends. 9 a. m. 

June 1. — Commencement. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in 
point of age among the medical colleges of the United States. In the 
school building at Lombard and Greene streets in Baltimore was founded 
one of the first medical libraries and the first medical college library in 
America. 

There for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the curriculum; there instruction in Dentistry was first given 
(1837) , and there were first installed independent chairs for the teaching 
of diseases of women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases 
(1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in 
this hospital intra-mural residency for senior students first was estab- 
lished. 

Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest in- 
stitution for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in Sep- 
tember, 1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye cases. Additions were made to this building from time 
to time, but the demands on it became so great that a complete new 
building was erected. The hospital now is one of the finest owned and 
controlled by any medical school in the country. It is equipped with 
all modem conveniences and requirements for care of the sick and for 
clinical instruction of students of the University. 



150 



Besides its own hospital, the Medical School has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year more 
than 30,000 persons, the Maryland General Hospital, the Maternity hos- 
pital of the Umversity, the Maryland Lying-in Hospital, Maryland Ly- 
ing-in Asylum, the West End Maternity. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door obstetrical 
clinic is conducted. During the past year 1,798 cases were treated in 
the lying-in hospitals connected with the University. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

Three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital, Mercy 
Hospital, and Maryland General Hospital are organized on a uniform 
plan in order that teaching may be the same in all. Each dispensary 
has departments of Medicine, Surgery, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito- 
urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Pro- 
tology. Dermatology, Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. All students 
in their junior year work one day of each week in one of these dispensa- 
ries; all students in the senior year work one hour each day. About 
46,000 cases treated last year give an idea of the value of these dispensa- 
ries for clinical teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes 
are the Anatomical, Chemical, Experimental Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry, Histology and Embryology, Pathology and Bacteriology, 
Clinical Pathology, 

Prizes and Scholarships 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation the Faculty 
of the School of Medicine offers a gold medal to the candidate who 
passes the best general examination. Certificates of Hlonor are awarded 
to the five candidates standing next highest. 

A prize of $50 is given each year by Mrs. Jose L. Hirsch as a me- 
morial to the late Jose L. Hirsch, formerly Professor of Pathology in 
this School, to the student in the third year who has done the most 
satisfactory work in Pathology. 

The Dr. Sanrnel Leon Frank Scholarship was established by Mrs. 
Bertha Frank as a memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an 
alunmus of the University, and entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee for the year. It is awarded each year upon 
nomination of the Faculty "to a medical student who, in the judgment 
of the said Faculty, is of good character and in need of pecimiary as- 
sistance to continue his fedical course." 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M. D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships have 
been established which entitle the holders to exemption from payment 
of tuition fees for the year. 



151 



These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic to 
students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year of the curriculum in medicine, and who present to the Faculty satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character and of inability to continue 
the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph 
Winslow, M. D., LL. D., entitles the holder to exemption from the pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a needy 
ntudent of the senior, junior or sophomore class of the Medical School. 
He must have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent, in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. He must be a person 
of good character and must satisfy the Faculty of Physic that he is 
j^rorthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Umiversity Scholarship entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year and is awarded annually by the 
Faculty of Physic to a student of the senior class who presents to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is 
worthy of and in need of assistance to complete his work. 

The St. John's College Scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty 
of Physic upon the nomination of the president of St. John's College, of 
Annapolis, Md. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition 
fee of that year. 

The Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship was established by bequest of 
the late Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. This scholarship is awarded to a second- 
year student who at the end of the year passes the best practical exami- 
nation in Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Pharma- 
cology. This examination is competitive. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 

Admission to the curriculum in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the State Department of Education of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Department of Educa- 
tion on the basis of satisfactory credentials, or by examination and cre- 
dentials, and is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Certificate 
are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the 
equivalent, and in addition, 

(b) Two years, sixty semester, or ninety trimester hours, of college 
credits, including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 



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Of 



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(A) Details of the High School Requirement 

1. Graduation from an accredited high school after pursuing a four- 
year course based upon an eight-year elementary course or its full 
equivalent; or 

2. Successfully passing entrance examinations in the following sub- 
jects: 

(a) Required Eleven (11) Units 

Units 

English 4 years 3 

Elementary and Intermediate Algebra 1 

Plane Geometry (first five books) 1 

Two years of a foreign language 2 

Two of the three sciences — Biology, Chemistry, Physics 2 

American History and Civics 1 

Ancient History or English History 1 

(b) ElectiveSf Four (U) Units 

(1) History and Political Science: 

Ancient History or English History 1 

Mediaeval and Modem History 1 or % 

General History 1 or ^ 

Civics % 

Economics % 

(2) Language: 

French 2 years 2 

German 2 years 2 

Greek 2 years 2 

Hebrew 2 years 2 

Italian 2 years 2 

Latin 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Spanish 2 years 2 

( 3 ) Mathematics : 

Advanced Arithmetic ^ 

Advanced Algebra 1 

Plane Trigonometry % 

Solid Geometry % 

(4) Science: 

Physics, Biology or Chemistry 1 

Physical Geography and Geology 1 

Astronomy V2 

Physiology and Hygiene % 

(5) Vocational and cultural subjects: 

Agriculture 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Commercial Geography ^ 

Domestic Science 1 

T\_,^' I Mechanical 1 and 2 % each 

^^^^^ f Freehand 1 and 2 ^ each 

Manual Training 1 

Music 1 

Stenography 1 or 2 



153 



One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subject for 
fjve periods per week for a year of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to 
be not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 
2 semester credits or 2 points. 

(B) Details of the College Requirement 

a. The preliminary college curriculum shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this prelimi- 
nary college curriculum shall be equal to the work done in the freshman 
and sophomore years in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college work shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and English, each course to embrace at least six, eight 
or twelve hours of work in each subject, as shown in the schedule fol- 
lowing. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester or Ninety Trimester Hours Required 

Semester 

Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 
A modem foreign language 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy 
Psychology 
Social science 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting 
of one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less 
than fifty minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work 
to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. A 
trimester hour is the same work pursued over a period of twelve weeks. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester or eighteen trimester hours re- 
quired, of which at least eight semester hours must be in general inor- 
ganic chemistry, including four semester hours of laboratory work. In 
the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis may be 
counted as general inorganic chemistry. The remaining four semester 
or six trimester hours required shall consist of work in organic chemistry. 



154 

(b) Physics. Eight semester or twelve trimester hours required, of 
which at least two or three must be laboratory work. This course pre- 
supposes a knowledge of plane trigonometry, i^v it- YJ'K>i ini/i3 c:i>i»i cinrt -j 

(c) Biology. Eight semester or twelve trimester hours required, of 
which four or six must be laboratory work. This requirement may be 
satisfied by a course of eight semester or twelve trimester hours in 
either general biology or zoology, or by courses of four semester or six 
trimester hours each in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 
The requirement may be satisfied by six semester hours of college 
biology, including three semester hours in laboratory work, if preceded 
by a year (1 unit) of high school biology. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The li^ual mt&ductb'ry 
college course of six semester or nine trimester hours, or its equivalent, 
is required. •*-* ^^' '*^*^^' <^*-'^ 

Fees and Expenses^ >*'^ov/ 10 v/suod oyJ 

Following are the fees for students in the Medical School: 

Matriculation fee (to be paid each year) $ 5 

Tuition fee (each year) 200 

Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore: 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $ 27 $ 48 > > <' $ 75 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 _ 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and washing 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 f^'' f^ 75 

♦Total $386 $528 $695 

♦Students take the pre-medical work at College Park, for which there is no 
charge for tuition and for which other expenses are detailed in the first part 
of the catalogue. 

The special bulletin of the School of Medicine may be obtained by ad- 
dressing Dean J. M. H. Rowland, University of Maryland School of 
Medicine, Baltimore, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. 



;i i i V» 



f,I -J 



M"f? ..... aoxfu ' ' y.' 



'i--.- ' 



155 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



FACULTY 

HENRY D. HARLAN, A. M.; L.L. B., Dean 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, A.M.; L.L. B. 

JOHN C. ROSE, L.L. D. 

ALFRED S. NILES, A. M,; L.L. B. 

RANDOLPH BARTON, Jr., A. B.; L.L. B. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, A. M,; L.L. B., Secretary 



The calendar for the opening of school and for holidays is the same 
as for the School of Medicine. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was 
chosen in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study ad- 
dressed to Students and the Profession Grenerally," which the North 
American Review pronounced to be *'by far the most perfect system for 
the study of law which has ever been offered to the public," and which 
recommended a course of study, so comprehensive as to require for its 
completion six or seven years, no regular school of instruction in law 
was opened until 1823. This was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper 
pecuniary support. In 1869 the Law School was organized, and in 1870 
regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the 
course has been made more comprehensive and the Board of Instructors 
increased in number. Its graduates now number more than two thou- 
sand, and included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of 
the Bench and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence 
in the profession elsewhere. 

The Law School building adjoins the Medical School and part of its 
equipment is a large library, maintained for the use of the students, 
which contains carefully selected text-books on the various subjects em- 
braced in the curriculum. No fee is charged for the use of the library. 
Other libraries also are available for students. 

Courses of Instruction 

The courses of instruction in the Law School extend through three 
scholastic years of thirty-two weeks each, with an average of at least 
ten hours of class-room work each week, and aim to present a general 
and complete view of the science of law, with reference not only to its 
growth by judicial exposition, but also to the principles which have been 
engrafted upon it by positive enactment. The course of study embraces 



ic 



156 

both the theory and the practice of the law, and is designed thoroughly 
to equip the student for the practice of his profession, when he attains 
the Bar. 

Scientific education is afforded in the principles of the Common Law, 
Equity, the Statutory Law of the State of Maryland and the Public 
Law of the United States. 

Instruction is given by discussion of assigned cases and by lectures. 
The system of instruction embraces the study of assigned cases and of 
approved text-books. It is believed that instruction given through the 
use of cases alone is unnecessarily laborious, not conducive to uni- 
formity, and likely to produce confusion in the students's mind unless 
supplemented by the aid of proper text-books. Accordingly a system of 
instruction, involving the use of both cases and text-books, is followed. 

Students desiring to do so, may take elective or special courses. Such 
students are not candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, but will 
receive certificates of proficiency in the branches pursued. Courses of 
instruction will be arranged with special reference to those desiring 
to obtain a knowledge of certain branches of the law, as an aid in busi- 
ness, or in the management of estates. 

The Law School endeavors to uphold a high standard of legal educa- 
tion and it aims to give the student a <;omprehensive view of the whole 
field of the Law and particularly a knowledge of the fundamentals of 
American Law, in order to enable him to pass the examination for the 
Bar, if he has chosen the legal profession for his life work, or to fit him 
to care properly for his business interests, if he desires legal education 
merely as the accomplishment of the well-equipped man of business or 
man of culture. 

The lectures are intended to present all the leading principles of the 
common law applicable to the subject, and the modification of the com- 
mon law by statute, and to give illustrations of the application of the 
common and statute law. Special attention is given to the statutes in 
force in Maryland, and to peculiarities of the law in that State, where 
there are such; but the reasons for these statutory modifications and 
local peculiarities are explained so that the student may in a short time 
acquaint himself with the local peculiarities of the law in any State in 
which he may practice. 

Readings from text-books and adjudicated cases are assigned on the 
subjects treated of in the lectures. 

It will be seen that the full course of study extends over three years 
and as the Faculty is satisfied that students, who have not made con- 
siderable progress in the law before entering the Law School, would do 



157 



themselves and the School an injury by attempting to graduate in a 
shorter period, no student will be permitted to receive the degree of 
LL. B. unta after three full years of study at this school, unless ad- 
mitted to advanced standing. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the Law School must be at least eighteen 
years of age, must present evidence of good moral character and if 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, will be required to give 
to the study of the law three scholastic years of at least thirty-two 
weeks each, with an average of at least ten hours' class-room work each 
week, and to have completed at the time of admission to the School a 
four years* high school curriculum or such a course of preparation as 
would be required for admission to the principal colleges and universi- 
ties in Maryland; but persons who are unable to comply with these en- 
trance requirements or to spend three years in the study of law may be 
received as special students, not candidates for the degree, and upon 
completing the whole or any part of the course, may receive certificates 
of proficiency in the work completed, according to standards to be fixed. 

The Faculty will consider that students are properly qualified for en- 
trance as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws who have re- 
ceived a bachelor's degree from any reputable college or university, or 
certificate of graduation from any of the Normal of high schools of the 
State of Maryland, or other reputable institution of a similar character, 
or have certificates showing that they have passed the entrance exami- 
nations to one of the principal colleges or universities in Maryland or a 
college or university maintaining a standard equal thereto. In the ab- 
sence of such degree or certificate, a candidate for the degree of LL. B. 
must file with the secretary, at the time of matriculation, a certificate 
from the Clerk of the CJourt of Appeals of Maryland, showing that he 
has been registered as a la^fr student, as provided by Chapter 426 of the 
Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland, passed at the Session of 
1918. 

Advanced Standing 

Students may be admitted to advanced standing in the Senior or Inter- 
mediate classes upon satisfying the requirements for the work of the 
preceding year or years. These requirements may be met by presenting 
a certificate from any law school of accredited standing showing that 
the student has successfully completed equivalent courses in a law school, 
covering at least as many hours as are required for such subjects in this 
school. No credit will be given for study pursued in a law office. 

Graduation 

The Law School confers the degree of Bachelor of Laws on students 
who have attended the course of lectures for three years, have attained 
the required standard in examinations, and in the Practice Court, and 
have submitted to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis. 



158 






Fees and Expenses 

The fees for each term are payable in advance at the commencement 
of each term, and tickets of admission to the lectures are issued only on 
payment of fees. 

The charges for instruction are as follows: 

For term of four months $ 50 

For session of eight months 100 

Special students will be charged according to the courses pursued. 

There will be a matriculation fee of ten dollars charged and payable 
for each student at the time of matriculation and an additional charge 
of ten dollars to each graduate as a diploma fee. 

Special arrangements may be made by members of the Bar, or others, 
not regular students of the Law School, for attending any particular 
part or branch of instruction at rates of charges in proportion to the 
above. 

General living expenses of students are the same as outlined for the 
Medical School. 

A special bulletin of The Law School may be obtained by addressing 
Henry D. Harlan, Dean, University of Maryland Law School, Balti- 
more, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, Ck)llege Park, Md. 



159 



'i f'"r.[;(;; .);iiiiff no?' 



.hiu,w-i THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



f^CO: 



i}Oi;^ia « ^.'lfy(i.ul v<( f5rji?:;? fl'Ci?> 



r) Kw 



r..r 



T. O. HEATWOLE, M. D., D.D. S., Dean 
E. FRANK KELLY, PhiiV.T). 
r/i\t{ .bf/fit Ifiof): ELDRIDGE BASKIN, M. D., D.D. S. 

ALEX H. PATERSON, D.D. S. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D. S. 

B. MERRILL HOPKINSON, A. M., M. D., D.D. S. 

ROBERT P. BAY, M. D. 

' ROBERT L. MITCHELL, Phar. G.] M. D. " 



nTf 



h' . •/! 



, >. * I'j 



H. J. MALDEIS, M. D. 
HORACE M. DAVIS, D.D. S. 



U ■ :■ .. 



' J ^ 1 ^ wm^ 



uCo I 



;c: The calendar for the School of Dentistry is the same as for the School 
of Medicine, except that the clinics are held in the Dental Infirmary of 

this School. fj-.,,,r-vQ ^%4^ % ,r..^ 

The course of instruction in the School of Dentistry covers a period 
of four Sessions of 32 weeks each, exclusive of holidays, in separate 
years. 

The thirty-eighth regular session will begin October 1, 1920, and con- 
tinue until about May 25, 1921. Full attendance during this period is 
demanded in order to get advancement to higher classes. Class exami- 
nations for the session will be held in October, January and May. 

This department of the University is a member, in good standing, of 
the National Association of Dental Faculties, and conforms to all the 
rules and regulations of that body. 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, this School main- 
tains a spring and summer session, which follows immediately the termi- 
nation of each regular session and continues until October 1st. This is 
intended for practical work only; no credit for time thus put in is al- 
lowed toward graduation. The many advantages of the spring and sum- 
mer session for actual practice cannot be overestimated, as the number 
of patients applying for dental services is always very large and the 
Infirmary is never closed except on Sundays and holidays. 

j^(»^7 Requirements for Matriculation ^r) ^f>^r^'en*\ 
The requirements for matriculation in the School of Dentistry are 
those established by the Dental Educational Council of America, viz: 
graduation from an accredited high school having a four-year course, 
or its equivalent. 



.5 ^. -• 



-^ ^ V k 



160 

Applicants for matriculation must submit their credentials for verifi- 
cation to the State Department of Education^ Baltimore, Maryland. 

Applicants lacking full credentials may earn same by taking a stated 
written examination on subjects in which they are deficient. 

Attendance Requiremients 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance not later than ten days after the beginning 
and remain until the close of the regular session. 

In case of sickness, attested by a physician's certificate, students may 
enter twenty days after the opening of the regular session. 

Graduates from reputable and accredited medical colleges are admitted 
to the Sophomore year and credits allowed on all subjects completed 
which are included in the Dental Course. 

Students from other recognized dental colleges will be given credit for 
all work completed in the institution from Which they come, except those 
entering for the Senior year only. These will be required to take the 
work of the full Senior courses of this SchooL 

At the close of each session, each student must pass a satisfactory 
examination on the several subjects of that year before he can be en- 
tered in the succeeding grade. 

The candidate for graduation must have attended four sessions of 
instruction in some recognized dental college, the last year of which must 
have been in this institution. 

He must have satisfied the requirements of each of the several instruc- 
tors and proved himself proficient in the theory and practice of Dentistry* 

He must have attained the age of twenty-one years and be of good 
moral character. 



Matriculation and Fees 

Students may matriculate by mail by sending money order, or regis- 
tered letter containing the amount of fee, $5.00, to Dr. T. 0. Heatwole, 
Dean, comer Greene and Lombard streets, Baltimore, Md. 

The fees (vnth the exception of the Diploma fee), must he paid as fol- 
lows : One-half on the entrance day, and the balance during the first week 
of the succeeding Fehrvjary, 



161 



Matriculation (paid once only), $5.00. Tuition fee, $150.00. Diploma 
lee, $30.00. Dissecting fee (paid once only), $15.00. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 

The Diploma fee must be paid by the first of April of the year of 
graduation. 

A special ticket is issued at the close of each session to every student 
of the first, second and third year classes, as an evidence that he has 
been successful, or unsuccessful, in examinations for advancement to a 
higher grade, and also has attended a full session. 

Special bulletin of the School of Dentistry may be obtained by ad- 
dressing Dean T. O. Heatwole, University of Maryland School of 
Dentistry, Baltimore, Md., or The President, Uiniversity of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. 



162 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



FACULTY 

E. P. KELLY, Phar. D., Dean 

DAVID M. R. CULBRETH, A. M., Phar. G., M. D. 

HENRY P. HYNSON, Ph.D. 

CHARLES C. PLITT. Phar. G. 

LOUIS J. BURGER, Phar. D., LL. B. 

H. J. MALDEIS, M. D. 

DANIEL BASE, Ph.D. 

J. CARLTON WOLF, Phar. D. 

ROBERT L. MITCHELL, Phar. D., M:. D. 

H. E. WICH, Phar. D. 

GEORGE A. STALL, Phar. D. 



The calendar is the same as for the School of Medicine, except for 
the statement in the latter about clinics. 

The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, largely at the instance 
of members of the Faculty of Medicine, and, for a time, the lectures 
were delivered at the Medical School. Later it became separated and 
continued an independent organization until, as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy, it finally became an actual part of the University. With but 
one short intermission, previous to 1865, it has continuously exercised its 
functions as a teaching school of pharmacy. 

Reference to its records shows it to have been among the first, in 
every instance, to adopt advanced methods, and the standards it has 
always set and maintained have equalled the highest. It was the first 
school of pharmacy to employ separate professors for all branches 
taught; it is the pioneer in establishing laboratories for practical teach- 
ing and exercise, it took the initiative in providing adequate buildings 
for advanced teaching; it was among those which early added plant 
histology, pharmacognosy, volumetric analysis and alkaloidal assay as 
distinct branches, and the first to add a separate chair of commercial 
pharmacy and dispensing, whereby students may be given better and 
larger experimental knowledge of the actual practice of pharmacy than 
can be obtained at the average drug store. 



163 



Equipment and Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy has at its disposal for laboratory instruction 
and lectures several large and well-equipped halls in the University 
buildings in Baltimore. From the beginning the chief aim of the School 
bas been to prepare its students for the intelligent practice of pharmacy 
in the modern drug store. 

In doing this, it takes into consideration that there exist three distinct 
divisions of the profession — preparation, collection and dispensing, which 
vj the manufacturer, jobber and retailer — ^and that all need to be scien- 
tifically taught. The School has so arranged its curriculum as to give 
a well-ordered foundation for a pharmaceutical specialist in two years. 
Upon completion of this two-year curriculum, the student is graduated 
vvith the degree Graduate in Pharmacy, Ph. G. Students who continue 
their studies for one year after completion of the basic two years'. work 
vnll receive the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist, Ph. C. 

The School of Pharmacy holds membership in the American Confer- 
ence of Pharmaceutical Faculties and is registered in the New York 
Department of Education, and all other states which maintain registra- 
tion bureaus. The American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties is 
organized to promote pharmaceutical education, and all schools holding 
membership in it are required to maintain certain standards for en- 
trance and graduation. 

Requirements for Admission 

The applicant must be not less than seventeen years old and must 
have completed a four-year standard high school curriculum, or its 
equivalent. The course, or its equivalent, must have included one year 
of Latin. Two years of Latin, however, are more desirable. 

Admission to the curriculum in pharmacy is by certificate issued by 
the State Department of Education, Baltimore, Md. The certificate is 
issued on the basis of credentials, or by examination, or both. Evalua- 
tion of credentials can be made by the Department of Education only, 
and all applicants, whether their entrance qualifications are clearly 
satisfactory as per the requirements for matriculation outlined above, or 
not, must secure a certificate from said Department of Education to be 
presented to the Dean before they will be allowed to matriculate. 

Applicants should secure a Census Blank from the Credential Clerk 
of the Department of Education, or from the Dean of this School, prop- 
erly fill it out and return it at the earliest possible date, together with 
the fee of two dollars (Money Order). Diplomas or certificates need 
not be sent. The Department of Education will secure all credentials 
desired after the Census Blank has been received. The applicant will 
be notified of the result of the investigation; if his preparation is suffi- 
cient, he will be granted a certificate of entrance. 



164 



This certificate, carrying the approval of the State Department of 
Education, will receive recognition by authorities of other states. 

Applicants, whose credentials do not meet the requirements, must 
stand an examination in appropriate subjects to make up the required 
number of units. The fee for such examination is one dollar per sub- 
ject; five dollars for the entire number of subjects. 

Credit will be given for first-year subjects to students only coming 
from schools of pharmacy holding membership in the American Confer- 
ence of Pharmaceutical Faculties, provided they present a proper certi- 
ficate of the satisfactory completion of such courses, and meet the en- 
trance requirements of this School. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. The candidate must possess a good moral character, and must be 
twenty years old. 

2. Hie or she must have attended two sessions at a school of pharmacy, 
the last in all instances, at this school. Credit will be given only for 
first-year subjects which have been successfully completed in a school 
or college holding membership in the American Conference of Pharma- 
ceutical Faculties. The student also must have had four years of high 
school work. 

3. He or she must have passed an examination in all lecture and 
laboratory instruction. 

4. On or before May 1st the candidate must present the graduation 
fee and a letter from his or her parents or some authorized person certi- 
fying to his or her age. 

Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation fee $ 5 

For full first year 110 

For full second year 115 

Graduation fee 15 

Deposit to cover breakage 5 

If the student desires to remain in school for the third year to obtain 
the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist the tuition will be $125. 

Living expenses are practically the same as those detailed for stu- 
dents of the Medical School. 

The special bulletin of the School of Pharmacy may be obtained by ad- 
dressing E. F. Kelly, Dean, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 
Baltimore, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Md. 



165 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



The School of Education consists of an organization of the various 
activities of the University which are concerned with the professional 
preparation of teachers. Its courses are planned to serve three classes 
of students : First, those preparing to teach agriculture, home economics, 
industrial and general subjects in secondary schools; second, prospective 
principals of high schools, educational supervisors, county agents, home 
demonstrators, boys' and girls' club workers, and other extension work- 
ers; third, those majoring in other lines of work who desire courses in 
education and psychology for their professional and informational value. 



CURRICULA 

Two general classes of curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Bachelor of Arts are offered. 

The first of these provides fixed courses permitting comparatively lit- 
tle election for the definite purpose of preparing teachers and super- 
visors of agriculture, home economics, manual training, and industrial 
subjects. 

The second class provides a wide range of electives and seeks to train 
superintendents, principals and teachers of general high school subjects. 
Although there are definite and fixed basic requirements, the student 
may choose from a number of subjects the major subject in which he 
expects to qualify for teaching. Correlated with this may be other 
subjects which he may wish to teach. 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean 
of the School of Education regarding the arrangement of their work. 
Upon matriculation each student is required to state his major interest 
and in the election of courses to secure the advice and approval of the 
head of the department in which his major falls. The previous training 
of the student, his experience, and his future needs govern the head 
of the department in his recommendations. 



TEACHERS' SPECIAL DIPLOMAS 

The degrees granted for work done in the School of Education indicate 
primarily the quantity of work completed. Teachers' special diplomas 
certify to the professional character of such work. Teachers' special 
diplomas will be granted only to those who, besides qualifying for a 
degree, give promise of superior professional ability as evidenced by 
their personality, character, experience, and success in supervised teach- 



166 






ii: 



ing. Teachers' special diplomas will be granted in agricultural educa- 
tion, home economics education, manual training, industrial education, 
and in general education. 

The recipient of a teacher's special diploma is eligible for certification 
by the State Superintendent of Schools without examination. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

By special arrangement courses in education are offered evenings 
and on Saturdays to teachers in service and to those who may qualify 
for teaching in the schools of Maryland after having had such work. 
College credit will be granted for this work if taken in course. Only 
a limited amount of service of this character can be undertaken by 
the faculty of the School of Education in any year. School officials 
should make application for this work before arranging for it in their 
counties. 

As the need for evening classes in industrial and home economics 
education arises, special courses will be offered at centers throughout 
the State. The number and location of these centers will depend entirely 
upon the need and demand for such instruction. The courses will be 
organized on the short unit basis and will be maintained only as long 
as the demand justifies it. Upon the satisfactory completion of such 
special curricula, students will be issued certificates of proficiency. 

In summer special courses are offered for the benefit of teachers in 
service and such individuals as may be able to qualify for teaching upon 
the completion of the work. 

GENERAL EDUCATION. 



Since the student electing this curriculum may become a candidate 
for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, he 
should upon his matriculation state the degree for which he wishes to 
qualify. Students wishing to prepare for the teaching of English, 
history, the social sciences, and language should become candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Those wishing to teach general and 
biological sciences, chemistry, and physics should become candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Students should also state the subjects in which they expect to 
qualify for teaching, designating a major and a minor interest; they 
should complete approximately sixty-three hours in their major and 
related subjects and twenty-seven hours in their minor and related 
subjects. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete, in addi- 
tion to the requirements of the curriculum, a minimum of eighteen credit 
hours of science, at least nine of which must be in biology; and must 



167 



have completed a minimum of thirty-six credits in foreign language. 
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete, in addi- 
tion to the requirements of the curriculum, nine hours of history and 
nine hours of language. 

Students electing this curriculum must register either in the School 
of liberal Arts, Education, Chemistry, or College of Agriculture. In 
any case they must register with the School of Education for the special 
teacher's diploma. 

GENEBAI^ EDUCATION. 



FRESHMAN TEAR. 



Term; 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) , 

Language (Spanish, French, German, Italian, Latin or 

Oreek) 
Educational Guidance (Ed. 101-103) . . . . . . . . . '. . .' . . . . . . . 

Public Speaking (Pub. Spk. 101-103) 

Library Science (Lib. Sci. 101) 

Military or Physical Education 



AND TWO OF THE FOLLOWING GROUPS: 



•ROUP I— 

General Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 101-102) 
Qualitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 103) . . . 



CROUP II— 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 
General Botany (Bot. 101) 



GROUP III — 

American Colonial History (H. 104) 

Civil War and Reconstruction (H. 105) 

Development of American Nationality (H. 106) 
Current History (H. 101-102) 



•ROUP IV— 

Mathematics (Math. 106-108) 



3 
1 
1 
1 
2 



II 



3 

1 
1 



2 

i 



III 



3 

1 
1 



2 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Public Education in the U. S. (Ed. 101) 

General Applied Psychology (Psy. 101-102) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Major 

Minor 

Military or Physical Education 

Electives 



2 
5 
2 
2 

5-7 



2 
2 
5 
2 
2 
5-7 



2 
2 
5 
2 
2 
5-7 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Ed. 103) . . 

Education 104 or 105 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Public Finance (Econ. 106) 

Major 

Minor 

Electives 



5 

2 

2-3 



5 

2 

2-3 



3 

5 

2 

2-3 



168 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



i 







Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 107).. 
♦Supervised Teaching of General Subjects (Ed, 

Major 

Electives 



106) 



5 
8-10 



5 
8-10 



5 
8-10 



•Given any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 

Requirements for a Degree. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours, under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, the 
student will be recommended for the de^ee of Bachelor of Arts or for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science, depending upon the character of the 
work elected. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students elect- 
ing the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of hav- 
ing acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of four- 
teen years. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be selected from any of 
the courses offered by the Ujiiversity for which the student has the neces- 
sary prerequisites. 

A student is expected, however, to confine his elections to subjects re- 
lated to farming and to teaching. Though opportunity is afforded for 
specialization in a particular field of agriculture, such as animal hus- 
bandry, agronomy, pomology, vegetable gardening and farm management, 
students should arrange their work so that at least forty per cent of 
their time will have been spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per 
cent on scientific subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of a general edu- 
cational character and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects in pro- 
fessional education. 

Students electing this curriculum must register either in the College 
of Agriculture or the School of Education. In either case they must 
register with the School of Education for the special teacher *s diploma. 

AGRICT7Z.TI7RAII EDUCATION. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 

Animal Husbandry (An. Hus. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 101) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 

Military 

Educational Guidance (Ed. Guid. 101-103) 



4 
3 



3 
1 
2 
1 



4 
3 



3 
1 
2 
1 



4 
4 



4 
3 
1 
2 
1 



169 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



101) 



Public Education in the U. S. (Ed. 
Elementary Pomology (Hort. 102) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 102) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Psy. 101-102) 

Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Geology (Geol. 101) 

General and Applied Psychology (Psy. 101-102) 

Military 

Electives 



2 
4 



2 
4-6 



3 
3 
3 



9 

2 
4-6 



3 
3 



2 

2 

4-6 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Ed. 103) 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Ag'l (Ag. Ed. 101). 

Feeds and Feeding (An. Hb. 102) 

Farm Poultry (An. Hb. 104) 

Tech. Writing and Scientific Thought (Eng. 104-106) 

Social Science 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



2 
3 

4-6 



2 

3 

6-8 



Problems in Agricultural Education (Ag. Ed. 102-104) 
The Rural Community and Its Education (Ag. Ed. 106) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 107) 

♦Supervised Teaching of Ag'l Subjects (Ag. Ed. 105) . 

Farm Management 

Electives 



1 
3 



1 
3 



3 I 3 
10-12 I 10-12 



3 
2 



6-8 



15-17 



♦Given any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 

Requirements for a Degree 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, a stu- 
dent will be recommended for the degpree of Bachelor of Science. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students 
electing home economics education must present evidence of two years' 
experience in the home as a house daughter during which time a large 
share of the responsibility in the management of the home was assumed. 

Students may elect from other schools such courses as they may be 
qualified to enter. They are expected, however, to confine their elections 
primarily to subjects related to home making and teaching. The cur- 
riculum should be so arranged that approximately forty per cent, of the 



170 

student's time will be spent on technical home economics subjects, twen- 
ty-five per cent on subjects of general academic character and from, 
twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects of a professional character. 

Students electing this curriculum register in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics and with the School of Education for the special teacher's 
diploma. 

HOICE ZSCONOBCZCS EDtTCATIOlT. 



FRESHMAN TEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



II 



•Garment Construction (Clothing 101) 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102)... 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 103) 

Textiles 101 

Foods 101 

Composition and Design (Art 101) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Educational Guidance 

Physical Education 

Electives 



2 
4 



4 
3 
1 
2 
2-4 



3 
1 



4 
3 
1 
2 

2 



4 
3 
1 
2 
2 



♦Students with high school training in Textiles and Clothing presenting 
satisfactory credentials are not required to take Clothing 101. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. ~~ 



Public Education in the U. S. (Ed. 101) 

General and Applied Psychology (Psy. 101-102) 

Foods 102 

Costume Design (Art. 103) 

Laundering (Textiles 102) 

Advanced Textiles (Textiles 103) 

Household Management (H. M. 101) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Botany 101 

Zoology 101-102 

Physical Education 

Electives 



2 
1 



3 

1 
4-6 



2 
4 



3 

1 

3-5 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Ed. 103) 

Methods in Secondary Voc. Home Ec.(H. E. Ed. 101) 

Freehand Perspective (Art. 102) 

Home Architecture and Design (Art. 105) 

Household Management (H. M. 102) 

Home Management (H. M. 103) 

Clothing 104 

Bacteriology 101-103 

Physical Education 

Electives 



2 

3 

1 

8-5 



2 
3 



3 

1 

3-5 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Problems in Home Econ. Edu. (H. E. Ed. 102-103-104) . 

t Supervised Teaching (H. E. Ed. 105) 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio-Chem. 101) 

Nutrition (Foods 105) 

Dietetics (Foods 106) 

Child Care and Welfare (H. E. Ed. 109) 

Electives 



10-12 



5 
10-l'2* 



2 
3 



3 

V 



1 
3-5 



3 

1 

3-5 



5 
2 

8-10 



tGiven any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 



171 

Requirements for a Degree 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours, under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, a stu- 
dent will be recommended for the de^ee of Bachelor of Science. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



Three types of curricula are offered in Industrial Education, viz., a 
four-year curriculum,, a two-year curriculum and a special curriculum. 
The first two are offered as resident work at the University and the 
third is offered at special centers in the State where occasion demands. 



FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION FOR 

TEACHERS OF RELATED SUBJECTS 



In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students 
electing the four-year curriculum in industrial education must be willing 
to engage in the trades or industries during the three summer vacations. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be chosen from any of 
the courses offered in the University for which the student has the neces- 
lary prerequisites. 

nrDTTSTBXAX EDnCATZOir. 

(Four-year ctLrriculiuxi for teadiers of related subjects.) 



FRESMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Trigonometry or Solid Geometry (Math. 101 or 102)... 

Analytics (Math. 103) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Technical Instruction (M. E. 101) 

Woodwork (Shop 101) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Educational Guidance (Prin. Ed. 101-103) 

Military 

Summer Work in Trade or Industry 



1 

1 



1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
2 



1 
2 

4 
3 
1 
2 



1 
4 
3 

1 






K 

•.I 



■{ 



• 



I 



I: 



172 



SOPHOMIORE YEAR. 



Term: 



Public Education in the U. S. (Ed. 101) 

General Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 

Advanced Algebra (Aiath. 104) 

Calculus 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101 and Phys. Lab. 101) 
Elec. and Magnetism (Phys. 102 and Phys. Lab. 102) . . 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103 and Phys. Lab. 103) 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 103) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 105) 

Foundry (Shop 108) 

Machine Work (Shop 108) 

Military 

Summer Work in Trade or Industry 



3 
5 



4 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Ed. 103) 

Methods in Ind. Edu. for Secondary Schools (Ind. Ed. 101) 

Elementary Machine Design (D. Des. 101) 

Machine Design (M. Des. 102-103) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. 111-112) 

Electrical Engineering Lab. (El. Lab. 102-103) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 102) 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Machine Work (Shop 110) 

Oral and Technical English (P. S. 116-118) 

Electives 

Summer Work in Trade or Industry 



2 
1 



3 

1 

3-6 



II 



5 
3 



2 
2 



3 
2 
1 



1 
3-6 



III 



2 
3 



2 
1 
2 



5 
V 



1 

V 



1 

3-6 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Problems in Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 102- 
History of Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 106) . . . 
♦Supervised Teaching in Ind. Education (Ind. Ed, 
Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 107). . . . 

Social Sciences 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 104) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110) . . . . 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Lights and Illumination (E. E. 105) 

Electives 



104) 



105) 



3 
3 
3 
1 



5-8 



2 
3 



2 
2 



5-8 



3 
V 



3 
3 

5-8 



I 



*Given any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 



Requirements for a Degree. 



Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, a stu- 
dent will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



i! 



173 

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION FOR 

TEACHERS OF RELATED SUBJECTS 



This curriculum is designed for mature students who have had con- 
siderable experience in some trade or industry. 

In addition to the above, applicants for admission to this curriculum 
must have as a minimum requirement an elementary school education 
or its equivalent and must be willing to engage in the trades and indus- 
tries during the summer vacation. 

The curriculum will not be rigidly required as laid down, but will be 
made flexible, in order that it may be adjusted to the needs of students 
who present advanced credits for certain of the required courses. 

ZNDUSTBZAXi EDUCATION. 

(Two-year cnrrlcnlani for teachers of related subjects.) 



FIRST YEAR. 



Term 



II 



III 



(6) 



(3) 

(6) 

2 

3(3) 

2(3) 

3 



Essentials of Methods I 

Methods in Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 2) 

Foundry (Shop 6) 

Power Plant Operation (M. E. 5) 

Carpentry (Shop 3) 

Technical Instruction (M. E. 3) 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 1) 

Chemistry (Chem. 1) 

Composition (Eng. 2) 

Electives 

Summer Work in Trade or Industry 



(6) 



2 
3(3) 
2(3) 

3 



•Alternative. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Problems in Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 102) . . 
tSupervised Teaching in Indus. Education (Ind. Ed. 

Direct Current (E. E. 1) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 2) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 4) 

Shop Mathematics (Shop 4) 

Plane Geometry (Math. 5) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 6) 

Applied Mathematics (Math. 7) 

Electives 



104) 



2(3) 2(3) 



2 
1 
3 



6-7 



2 
1 



3 

6-7 



5 

(6)* 
6* 



2 
3(3) 

" V " 
2-3 



4(3) 
4 



3 
3-4 



tGiven any term. Credit not to exceed five hours. 

Requirements for a Teacher's Special Diploma. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the curriculum as laid down, or 
its equivalent, under the restrictions and regulations presented above, 
the student who gives promise of superior professional ability will be 
recommended for a Teacher's Special Diploma. 



174 



SPECIAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF TRADE AND REUVTED 

TRADE SUBJECTS 



I! 



To meet the needs for industrial teacher training in Baltimore, two 
types of courses are offered of evenings in that city — one for teachers 
of trade ^bjects, the other for teachers of related trade subjects. The 
courses open about the last of September and close about the last of 
April. The class for teachers of trade subjects meets twice a week, 
the one for teachers of related trade subjects meets once a week. The 
recitation period in all cases is two hours. 

Applicants for admission to these classes must have had consider- 
able experience in the line of work they expect to teach, and must 
have, as a minimum requirement, an elementary school education or its 
equivalent. The credit allowed for these courses depends upon the 
amount and character of the work completed. 

For teachers of trade subjects the term*s work deals with the analysis 
and classification of trade knowledge for instructional purposes, the 
mechanics and technique of teaching, shop and class-room management^ 
and the organization of industrial classes. The work for teachers of 
related subjects is similar to that described for teachers of trade sub- 
jects except that emphasis is placed upon the analysis of their special- 
ties in relationship to the different trades with which they are articu- 
lated. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Education 



Ed. 101. Public Education in the U. S. Two credit hours. First 
term. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Required of sopho- 
mores in Education. 

It is the purpose of this course to introduce the student to present 
day problems of education by means of a study of public education in 
the United States, with the emphasis on secondary education and its 
reorganization. 

Ed. 102. Educational Psychology. Five credit hours. First term. 
Open to juniors and seniors. Required of Juniors in Education. Pre- 
requisite, Psy. 101-102. 

A study of instincts and their appearance, the psychology of learning; 
mental tests and measurements; individual differences; and the mental 
development and characteristics of children during the successive school 
ages. 

Ed. 103. Survey of Teaching Methods. Five credit hours: Four 
lectures and one laboratory. Second term. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of juniors in Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 102. 



11 



175 



A course dealing with the teaching process; the nature of objectives; 
the lesson plan; observation, critiques; teaching methods; type lessons; 
and motivation. 

Ed. 104. Methods in Secondary Eng^lish, History and the Languages. 

Five credit hours: four lectures and one laboratory. Third term. 
Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in General Educa- 
tion who are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Pre- 
requisite, Ed. 103. 

This course deals with the aims; content; sources of materials; 
analysis and arrangement of subject matter; psychology of the subjects; 
special methods; note book and other necessary auxiliary work. 

Ed. 105. Methods in the Secondary School Sciences. Five credit 
hours: four lectures and one laboratory. Third term. Open to 
juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in General Education who 
are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. Prerequisite, 
Ed. 103. 

This course deals with the aims; content; sources of materials; 
analysis and arrangement of subject matter; psychology of the subjects; 
special methods; equipment and its proper use; note books and other 
necessary auxiliary work. 

Ed. 106. Supervised Teaching of General Subjects. Credit not t% 
exceed five hours, depending on the amount and character of work done. 
Given any term. Senior year. 

Class teaching, conferences, lesson plans and critiques. 

Ed. 107. Principles of Secondary Education. Three credit hours. 
First term. Open to seniors and to graduate students by special ar- 
rangement. Required of seniors in General, Agricultural and Industrial 
Education. 

A study of the evolution of secondary education; the articulation of 
the secondary school with the elementary school, colleges, technical 
schools, the community and the home; the junior high school, programs 
of study and the reconstruction of curriculums; the teaching staff and 
student activities. 

Ed. 108. Theory of Vocational Education. Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students 
by special arrangement. 

A study of the development of vocational education; educational and 
social forces behind the movement; terminology; types of industrial 
schools; technical high schools, vocational education for girls; vocational 
education in rural communities; recent legislation. 






176 



1 



Educational Guidance 

Ed. Guid. 101-103. Educational Guidance. One credit hour each 
term. Freshmen year. Required of freshmen in Education. 

This course is designed to assist freshmen students in Education in 
adjusting themselves to the demands and problems of college and pro- 
fessional life, and to guide them in the selection of college work during 
subsequent years. Among the topics discussed are the following: 
Student finances; student welfare; health; althletics; general reading; 
mental recreation; principal and methods of study; the use of the 
library; student organizations; student government; the purpose of the 
college; the election of courses and the selection of extra curriculum 
activities. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

P»y. 101-102. General and Applied Psychology. Two credit hours 
each term. iSecond and third terms. Open to sophomores, juniors and 
seniors. Required of sophomores in Education. 

This course embraces a study of human life from the biological point 
of view; the nervous system; attention, interest, instincts; reflexes; 
habit, effort; personality; the psychology of efficiency; the application of 
psychology, to advertising, salesmanship, employment, and education. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Ag. Ed. 101. Methods in Secondary Vocational Agriculture. Five 
credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of 
juniors in Agricultural Education. 

This course embraces a study of the purposes of secondary vocational 
agriculture; types of schools offering such instruction; vocational analy- 
sis; the arrangement of vocational information for instructional pur- 
poses ; curriculums ; daily programs ; the farm job as the unit of instruc- 
tion; the place of auxiliary knowledge; the analysis, classification and 
arrangement of farm jobs and auxiliary knowledge for instructional 
purposes; lesson plans; observation; critiques; methods of the class 
period; the home project method and its administration; methods in other 
supervised practical work; plant and equipment; the relation of the 
agricultural teacher to the school system. 

Ag. Ed. 102-104. Problems in Agricultural Education. One credit 
hour each term: One laboratory period. Senior year. Required of 
seniors in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 101. 

The work of this course embraces a study of problems in administra- 
tion; methods; organization materials; and equipment. 



lij 



177 
Ag. Ed. 105. Supervised Teaching of Agriculture. Credit not to 

exceed five hours. Determined by the amount and character of work 
done. Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite, Ag. 
Ed. 101. 
Class teaching; observation; lesson plans; conferences; and critiques. 

Ag. Ed. 106. The Rural Community and Its Education. Three 
credit hours. Second term. Senior year. Required of seniors in Agri- 
cultural Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 101. 

A study of the history, structure, and forces at work in rural communi- 
ties as a basis for determining the educational needs of such communities 
and the duties of rural teachers. 

Ag. Ed. 107. Methods in Agricultural Extension.. Two credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. 

This course is given under the supervision of the Extension Service 
and is designed to equip men to enter the broad field of extension work. 
The course will cover methods of assembling and disseminating the agri- 
cultural information that is available for the practical farmer. It will 
include administration, organization, supervision and the practical de- 
tails connected with the work of a successful county agent, club worker, 
and extension specialist. 

Ag. Ed. 108. Agricultural Extension Practice. Credit not to ex- 
ceed two hours. Determined by amount and character of work done. 
Given any term. Open to a limited number of seniors in Agricultural 
Education. Prerequisite, Ag. Ed. 107. 

This practice course is given under the supervision of the Extension 
Service and is especialy designed to give young men practical experience 
in the conduct of extension work. Students will be required to engage 
in specialists', county agents* and boys* club work as assistants always 
under the guidance of experienced men in the respective fields. Travel- 
ing expenses for this course will be adjusted according to circumstances, 
the ability of the man, and the service rendered. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



H. E. Ed. 101. Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics. 

Five credit hours. Third term. Required of juniors in Home 
Economics Education. 

The purposes of Secondary Vocational Home Economics; a study of 
types of class-room work and management as observed in high schools; 
discussion of the methods of teaching; the relation of home economics 
to the school and home; the planning of lessons and courses of study 
suitable to the methods and purpose of vocational home economics; 
analysis of the various home activities in preparation for the home 



I 



178 

project; organization of the project; sui>ervision and project reports. 
H. £. Ed. 102-104. Problem* in Home Economics Education. One 

credit hour each term. Required of seniors in Home Economics Edu- 
cation. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 101. 

This course includes the study of problems in administration; organ- 
ization; materials; and equipment. 

H. E. Ed. 105. Supervised Teaching of Home Economics. Credit 
not to exceed five hours. Determined by the amount and character of 
work done. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 101. 

Practice in planning and presenting of courses; conferences and 
critiques. 

H. E. Ed. 106-107. History of the Family. Two credit hours. First 
and second terms. 

This course includes the history of the family from early ages to the 
present time; the industrial revolution and its effects upon family life; 
and an examination of the present situation and tendencies as they 
affect the life of the American family. 

H. E. Ed. 108. Education of Women. Two credit hours. Third 
term. 

Woman's work and her industrial and economic conditions are studied 
with reference to the home and to society. Opening of occupations and 
professions to women; a study of modern problems of woman and the 
home, suffrage, education, economic function of woman and the family. 

H. E. Ed. 109. Child Care and Welfare. Two credit hours. Third 
term. Required of seniors in Home Economics Education. 

This course deals primarily with the training of children and includes 
such topics as health habits and child psychology. 

H. E. Ed. 110. Methods in Home Economics Extension Work. Two 

ocredit hours. Third term. 

The course will take up the study of subject matter and administrative 
problems in home economies extension, demonstrations, and the use of 
graphic materials. Emphasis will be placed upon the improvement of 
the country home through organization and practical demonstrations as 
conducted in this State. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



Ind. Ed. 101. Methods in Industrial Education for Secondary 
Schools. Five credit hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Required of juniors in Industrial Education. 

Types of industrial schools; vocational and trade analysis; the place 
of auxiliary knowledge; related trade courses; lesson plans; methods; 



179 



critiques; the industrial school population; materials and equipment; 
the relation of the industrial teacher to the school system. 

Ind. Ed. 102-104. Problems in Industrial Education. Two credit 
hours each term: two laboratory periods. Senior year. Required of 
seniors in ludustrial Education. 

A consideration of the problems of the related trade teacher as they 
arise in connection with trade analysis; practice teaching; lesson plans; 
observation; critiques; methods; discipline; organization; management. 

Ind. Ed. 105. Supervised Teaching of Industrial Subjects. Credit 
not to exceed five hours. Determined by the amount and character of 
work done by the student. 

Class teaching; lesson plans; observations; critiques. 

Ind. Ed. 106. History of Industrial Education. Three credit hours. 
Second term. Senior year. 

A study of the origin and development of industrial education in the 
light of group needs; industrial education in the United States; the de- 
velopment of schools; present problems in reorganization. 



180 



THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY 



Curricula offered in the School of Chemistry prepare students for 
practical work as research, general analytical, and manufacturing chem- 
ists, or to be teachers. Contributory instruction also is given, as most 
of the students enrolled in other schools of the College are required to 
take a year or more of chemistry. 

Five coordinate departments make up the School of Chemistry. They 
are organized as follows: 

Department of General Chemistry, 

Department of Industrial Chemistry, 

Department of Biological Chemistry, 

Department of Physical Chemistry. 

Department of Fertilizer and Food Analjrsis and Inspection. 

The chemical building contains laboratories, offices, and balance room 
for the State fertilizer, feed and lime control work, lecture rooms, sup- 
ply room and four student laboratories. In addition, classrooms in Mor- 
rill Hall are used as needed. The laboratories are well equipped with 
standard apparatus and chemicals, chemical and assay balances, polari- 
scopes, refractometers, spectroscopes, microscopes, etc. Each student is 
provided with a locker, reagents, and apparatus, and has the use of a 
working desk. 

The school is provided with a library of standard reference books on 
chemistry and related subjects, to which necessary additions are made 
from time to time. 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY 



The curriculum offered by the Department of General Chemistry lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science presents the opportunity for a 
broad training in chemistry. In order that students may become not 
merely capable analytical chemists, but also may be grounded as deeply 
as possible in the fundamental principles of all departments of chemical 
work, practical laboratory manipulation is brought into close relation- 
ship with lectures, demonstrations and the work of the classroom. The 
work prepares students to fill positions in analytical or manufacturing 
chemistry, as chemists in technical industry, as chemical, sanitary, or 
consulting experts. The course is well adapted for students wishing to 
take grraduate work in chemistry, as it gives a broad and general knowl- 
edge of the science. 



181 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Composition and Rhetoric (Engr. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Algebra (Math. 106) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 

Mod. Language (M. L. 101-103 or 121-123) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



3 

1 
3 



3 
4 
3 



3 

1 



3 

4 
3 



3 

1 



3 
3 

4 



4 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Adv. Inorganic Chem. (Phys. Chem. 101-103) 
Adv. Qualitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 104). 
Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 105-106). 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 

Calculus (Math. 110) 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 

Mod. Language (M. L. 104-106-124-126) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



3 
3 



5 
3 

1 



3 
3 



3 
5 
3 
1 



3 
V 



3 
5 
3 

1 



Organic Chemistry (Gen'l CJhem. 114-116) 

Adv. Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 117-119) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Economic (Econ. 101-103) 

Elective 



4 4 

4 4 

3 3 

3 3 

3 3 



4 
4 
3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104-105) 

Electro Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 107) 

Colloid Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 106) 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) . 

Plant Biochemistry (Bio. Chem. 102) 

Industrial Chem. (Ind. Chem. 107-108) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Elective 



5 
2 
2 



5 
2 
6 



4 

4 



3 



2 

4 



Gen'l Chem. 101-103. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 

Four credit hours each term: three lectures and one laboratory period. 
The first term. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. The second 
and third terms. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. The non-metals are first con- 
sidered. Special attention is given those elements and compounds 
which are of industrial importance. The laboratory work accom- 
panying this course in the first term consists, chiefly, of experiments 
illustrative of the work in the class. During the last two terms sys- 
tematic qualitative analysis of the more common bases and acids is the 
laboratory work pursued. 



182 



Gen'l Chem. 104. Advanced Qualitative Analysis. Three credit 
hours: three laboratory jxeriods. The first term. Prerequisite, Gen*l 
Chem. 101-103. 

An advanced course of Qualitative Analysis for chemical students. 

Gen'l Chem. 105-106. Quantitative Analysis. Three credit hours: 
three laboratory periods. The second and third terms. Prerequisites, 
Gen'l Chem. 101-103, 104. 

The principal operations of quantitative analysis. Standardization of 
chemical balance. iStardardization of weights and apparatus used in 
chemical analysis. Typical gravimetric volumetric, colorimetric and 
electrolytic methods are taken for study. 

Gen'l Chem^ 107>108. Quantitative Analysis. Three credit hours: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. The first and second terms. 
Prerequisite, Gen'l Chem. 101-103. 

Quantitative analysis for agricultural students. Typical gravimetric 
and volumetric methods. 

Gen'l Chem. 109. Technical Analysis. Two credit hours: two 
laboratory periods. The second term. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 
101-103. 

The analysis of oils, fuels, gases, boiler waters, etc., for students in 
engineering. 

Gen'l Chem. 110. Determinative Mineralogy and Assaying. Three 
credit hours: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Third term. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 101-103, 104. 

This is a course of determinative mineralogy. The more important 
minerals are identified by their characteristic physical and chemical 
properties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and lead, etc., are made. 

Gen'l Chem. 111. Metallurgical Calculations. Two credit hours: 
two lectures. The second term. 

A course of problems embodying the use of physical, chemical and 
mechanical principles utilized in practical metallurgy. 

Gen'l Chem. 112-113. Organic Chemistry. Three credit hours each 
term: two lectures and one laboratory period. The first and second 
terms. Prerequisite, Gen'l Chem. 101-103. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The course is 
designed primarily for agricultural students. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Gen'l Chem. 114-116. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Four credit 
hours each term: three lectures and one laboratory period. The year. 
Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-103 (105^106 or 107-108)). 



183 

This course is particularly designed for advanced students and offers 
a detailed study of the typical organic compounds. 

Gen'l Chem. 117-119. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Four credit 
hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-103, 104-106. 

A continuation of courses 105-106. An advanced course of quan- 
titative analysis where the student may elect to study the methods used 
in agricultural, biological, or industrial chemistry. 

For SKort^Course Students 

Gen'l Chem. 1. General Chemistry. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. The first and second terms. 

This course consists of an elementary study of general chemistry, with 
special reference to the chemistry of plants, animals, soils, fertilizers, 
etc., for students in the two-year course in agriculture. 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 



Curricula in the Department of Industrial Chemistry are Chemical En- 
gineering and Agricultural Chemistry. The former is designed to equip 
students with a highly specialized knowledge of the construction and 
management of manufacturing establishments involving chemical princi- 
ples; the latter prepares for research and analytical work that have to 
do with the relationship of chemistry to agriculture. Technical and edu- 
cational positions are open to men and women trained in various phases 
of chemical engineering, in plant and animal chemistry, in the analysis 
of soils, fertilizers, and spray materials, and in food and dairy studies. 

In addition to many of the subjects in chemistry, chemical engineering 
includes the study of boilers, steam engines, drawing and design, ele- 
ments of machinery, measurement of power, and work in the engineering 
laboratory. It also includes advanced courses in electricity and magnet- 
ism, dynamos and motors, and experimental practice in the electrical and 
dynamo laboratories. However, the graduates primarily are chemists 
with a good knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering, and 
with additional training in the special mechanical and electrical ai)- 
pliances of industrial chemistry. 



.1' 
I 



184 



CHSMICAl^ SNOINXSERINO. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



Composition and Rhetaric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Trigonometry (Math. 101) 

Analytics (Math. 102-103) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102-103) 

Engineering Drawing <^Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) ; 

Woodwork (Shop 103) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



3 

1 
4 
5 



1 
2 



1 
1 



II 



3 

1 
4 



5 

2 



1 

1 



III 



3 

1 
4 



5 
1 



3 
1 



SOPHOMORE TEAR. 



Adv. Inorganic Chem. (Phys. Chem. 101-103) 

Adv. Qualitative Anal. (Gen'l Chem. 104) 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 105-106). 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 

Adv. Algebra (Math. 104) 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Steam Engines (M. E. 102) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Graphic Statistics (Mech. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101 X 



3 
3 



5 
3 
2 
3 



3 
5 



3 
1 



3 
5 



5 
3 
1 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 114-116) 

Adv. Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 117-119) 

Mod. Language (French 104 or German 104) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104) 

Dynamos and Motors (E. E. 111-112) 

Electrical Engineering Lab. (El. Lab. 102-103) . . . 
Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 



4 4 

4 4 

5 5 

1 1 

2 2 
1 1 



4 
4 
6 
1 



3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104-105) . . 

Electro Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 107) 

Colloid Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 106) 

Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 107-108).. 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 104-105) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Metallurgical Calculations (Gen'l Chem. Ill) 
Min. and Assaying (Gen'l Chem. 110) 



5 
3 
2 
3 



5 
3 
3 



4 
4 



3 
3 



185 



AGBICUl^TUHAIi CHSMZSTBY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term; 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng, 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Oen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

Mod. Language (M. L. 101-103, 121-123) 

Algebra (Math. 106) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



3 

1 
4 
3 
3 



II 



3 

1 
4 
3 



3 
3 

i 



III 



3 

1 
4 
3 



4 
1 



Adv. Inorganic Chem. (Phys. Chem. 101-103) 
Adv. Qualitative Anal. (Gen'l (jhem. 104).... 
Quantitative Analysis (Gen. Chem. 105-106).. 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 

Mod. Language (M. L. 104-106, 124-126) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 

Calculus (Math. 110) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



3 
3 



5 
3 
3 



3 
5 
3 



3 
1 



3 
5 
3 



3 
1 



Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 114-116) 

Adv. Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 117-119) 

Economic (Econ. 101-103) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Electives in Agriculture 



4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



4 
4 
3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104-105) . . 

Colloid Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 106) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 105-106) 
Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101)... 

Plant Bio. Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 102) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Electives in Agriculture 



2 

7 



4 
5 



2 
6 



4 
5 



3 
2 
8 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Ind. Chem. 101. Agricultural Chemistry. Four credit hours: three 
lectures and one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisites, 
Gen^ Chem. 101-103, 107-108. 

A course including lectures, recitations, and laboratory in the chemis- 
try of air, soils, feeds, fertilizers, plants and animals. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Chem. 102-104. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. Four credit 
hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. 



186 

Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-103, 105-106 or 107-108. 

Lectures, laboratory work, analysis of soils, fertilizers, plant and 
animal products. 

Ind. Chem. 105-106. Advanced Agricultural Chemistry. Five credit 
hours each term: three lectures and two laboratory periods. The 
second and third terms. Prerfequisites, Gren^l Chem. 101-103 (105-106 or 
107-108), 114-116. 

A study of special problems in agricultural chemistry. 

Ind Chem. 107-108. Industrial Chemistry. Five credit hours each 
term: three lectures and two laboratory periods. The first and second 
terms. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-103, 104-105, 106-108, 114-116. 

The study of practical methods employed in the various inorganic and 
organic chemical industries. Visits are made to ice, fermentation and 
gas plants, also to fertilizer, glass, coke, iron and steel works. The 
laboratory work accompanying this course consists of the analysis of 
industrial products. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 



In arranging the curriculum the Department of Biological Chemistry 
has borne in mind the many calls for men trained in chemistry with a 
working knowledge in general biology and the chemistry of foods and 
nutrition. With proper electives the biochemical curriculum also affords 
a good foundation for the study of medicine and for those desiring to 
pursue graduate work in biochemistry or plant physiology. 

BIO-CHEMISTBir. 



FRESHMAN TEAR. 



Term: 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Mod. Laniruage (M. L. 101-103, 121-123) 

Algebra (Math. 106) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) . 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



3 
1 
3 
3 



4 
3 



II 



3 
1 
3 



4 
3 



III 



3 
1 
3 



3 

4 



4 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Adv. Inorganic Chem. (Phys. Chem. 101-103) 
Adv. Qualitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 104) 
Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 105-106) 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 

Mod. Language (M. L. 104-106. 124-126) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 

Calculus (Math. 110) 

Basic R. O. T. C. Course (M. I. 101) 



3 
3 



5 
3 
3 



3 
5 
3 



3 
1 



3 
5 
3 



8 

1 



187 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



TERM: 



Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 114-116) 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Plant Physiology (Plant Phys. 101-102).. 
Electives 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104-105) 

Colloid Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 106) 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101). 

Plant Bio. Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 102) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 105).. 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Elective 




4 4 

3 3 

3 3 

4 
7 3 



2 

7 



5 
2 
6 



4 
3 



S 

7 



2 
8 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For Graduates or Advanced Undergraduates 

Bio-Chem. 101. Physiological Chemistry. Four credit hours: two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisites, Genl 
Chem. 101-103, 105-^106, 114-116. 

The course embraces a study of the chemistry of protoplasm and 
the cell; the nutritive requirements of foods and the chemical com- 
position of foodstuffs; catalysis and enzymes; electrolytes and their 
action; the chemical and physiological processes of digestion, absorption, 
secretion, excretion, respiration, metabolism and nutrition in general. 

Bio-Chem. 102. Plant Biochemistry. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. 

An advanced course in biochemistry from the standpoint of plants 
and plant products. iSynthesis and transformations of materials in 
plants and plant organs and the relation of plant processes to animal 
food and nutrition are especially emphasized. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

The Physical Chemistry courses have been designed to give the 
students a knowledge of physico-chemical phenomena and methods of 
treating such phenomena as will be helpful in the study of biological, 
medical and industrial problems. Some courses are de&igned for 
graduate work, and research problems will be assigned to students who 
are properly qualified. 



188 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Phys. Chem. 101-103. Inorganic Chemistry. Three credit hours 
each term: three lectures. The year. Prerequisites, Greni Chem. 101- 
103. 

An anvanced course covering more in detail the subject matter set 
forth in general chemistry with emphasis on chemical theory and im- 
portant generalization. Required of all students who have chosen 
chemistry as major. Tert-book Mellor. 

Phys. Chem. 104-105. Elements of Physical Chennistry. Four credit 

hours each term: three lectures and one laboratory period. The first 
and second terms. Prerequisites, G^n'l Chem. 101-106, Math. 105 or 
110, Physics 101-103. 

Will present those iwrtions of physical chemistry which are necessary 
to every chemist, student of medicine, bacteriologist, or teacher of 
chemistry with laboratory practice in thermomentry and temperature 
regulation; physical constants; molecular weight determinations; velocity 
of reactions; chemical equilibrium and law of mass action; measure- 
ments of conductivity; migration of ions; hydrogen-ion concentration, etc. 

For Graduates and Advanced Underg^raduates 

Phys. Chem. 106. Colloidal Chemistry. Four credit hours: three 
lectures and one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisites, 
Gen'l Chem. 114-116, Phys. Chem. (104-105), Physics 101-103. 

The following topics will be discussed: The general constitution of 
colloid systems; Relations between the physical state and the general 
properties of colloid systems; General energetics of the dispersoids; 
Distribution of the colloid state and the concept of colloid chemistry; 
Mechanical properties of colloid systems. 

Phys. Chem. 107. Electrochemistry. Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisites, Phys. 
Chem. 104-105. 

In this course the various factors which govern the action of elec- 
trolytes when subject to the action of the electric current and the 
factors which determined electramative force are taken up. 

For Graduates 

Phys. Chem. 201. Special Colloidal ChemHtry. Two credit hours: 
two lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. Chem. (106). 

Special topics will be taken up with emphasis on the most recent 
theories and research going on in colloid chemistry at the present time. 



189 



Phys. Chem. 202. Physical Chemistry. Three credit hours each 
term: two lectures and one laboratory period. The first and second 
terms. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-103, 106-108, Physics 101-103. 

A study of the more advanced theories of physical chemistry with 
laboratory practice in the more technical physico-chemical measurements. 

Phys. Chem. 203. Thermodynamics. Two credit hours each term: 
two lectures. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101-108, Phys. Chem. 104-105, 
Math. 101-105, Physics 101-103. 

Desired for ^aduate students who wish an advanced mathematical 
treatment of chemical phenomena. Mellor's chemical statics and dyna- 
mics will be applied to Lewis' system of Physical Chemistry. 

Phys. Chem. 204. Research in Physical Chemistry. 

Physical chemistry problems for investigation will be assigned to 
graduate students who wish to gain an advanced degree in chemistry. 

DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZER AND FOOD ANALYSIS AND 

INSPECTION 

Under the jurisdiction of the Department of Fertilizer and Food 
Analysis and Inspection is conducted the State's inspection work, in- 
cluding sampling, analysis, and the publication of results on fertilizers, 
stock foods, and agricultural lime. 



190 



THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Research into the sciences and the development of industries, art, and 
professions has so changed the philosophy of our educational system that 
it is now recognized that any educational system must include training 
of a technical nature. It must encourage the student's natural desire 
for work of a productive nature with a vital connection between theory 
and practice. These views have not been generally accepted and the re- 
sult is noted in the combination of vocational, technical, and scientific 
work with the general studies to form a new course of study for our 
young men and women. 

The subjects taught in home economics are designed to fit young 
women to be capable workers and home makers in whatever sphere of 
life they may enter. The knowledge they gain from these subjects 
should give them contentment, industry, order, and a womanly feeling of 
independence and responsibility. 

The courses of instruction given are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: (1) those students who desire a knowledge of the 
general facts and principles of home economics; (2) those students who 
wish to make a speciality of home economics for the purpose of teaching 
the subject in secondary schools and colleges; (3) those who are inter- 
ested in certain phases of home economics which deal with the work of 
the dietitian or of institutional manager. 

Organization 

For adminstrative purposes and for ease of instruction the School of 
Home Economics is organized into departments as follows: 

1. Department of Foods and Cookery. 

2. Department of Textiles and Clothing. 

3. Department of Hygiene and Health. 

4. Department of Institutional and Home Management. 

Equipment 

Besides the usual equipment of classrooms and laboratories for the 
efficient procedure of the work, the college has recently equipped and 
furnished a house which is to be used as a practice house where the 
students will live and conduct the operations of the household for a 
period of from six to ten weeks during their senior year. 

Requirements for the Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory 
completion of four years of prescribed courses. 



191 



Curricula in Home Economics 



All students registered in the School of Home Economics take the 
same work in the freshman year. At the end of the year they may 
elect to specialize in a particular department or they may withhold the 
election until after the sophomore year without loss of time. 

Those who do not wish to specialize in any particular phase of home 
economics may elect a curriculum of general home economics best suited 
to their needs. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Term: 



II 



III 



Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Gen'l Chem. and Qualitative Anal.(Gen'l Chem. 101-103) 

•Garment Construction (Cloth. 101) 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102).. 

Textiles (Tex. 101) 

Clothing (Cloth. 103) 

Composition and Design (Art 101) 

Foods 101 

Physical Education (Phy. Ed. 101-103) 

Electives 



3 

4 
2 

4 



2 

2-4 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



3 
4 



1 
3 
2 



2 
3 



3 

4 



6 
2 
3 



Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Zoology (Zool, 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

History 

Laundering (Tex. 102) 

Advanced Textiles (Tex. 103) 

Costume Design (Art 103) 

Foods 102 

Library Science 

Physical Education 

Electives 



3 
3 



t 
2 

1 



1 

2 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



3 
3 



2 
3 



4 
3 



3 

4 



2 
2 



Bacteriology (Bact, 101) 

Household Administration (H. M. 101-102)... 

Home Management (H. M. 103) 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 106) 

Advanced Dressmaking (Cloth. 104-105) 

Freehand Prospective (Art 102) 

Home Architecture and Decoration (Art 105) 
Electives 



3 
3 



2 
2 



SENIOR YEAR. 



3 
3 



2 
6 



5 

2 



8 



Physiological Chemistry (Bio-Chem. 101) 

Nutrition (Foods 105) 

Dietetics (Foods 106) 

Child Care and Welfare (H. E. Ed. 109) 

Drapery and Advanced Technique of Clothing (Cloth. 106) 

English 

Seminar in Home Economics 

(Hours and time to be arranged) 
Electives 



3 
3 



3 

10 



5 
2 
5 
3 



8 



•Students with high school training in Textile and Clothing presenting 
satisfactory credentials are not required to take Cloth. 101. 



192 



SUGG-ESTED EIiECTIVES FOB STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOI^ OF 

HOME ECOKOUCS. 



SUBJECT. 



Term: 



Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 105-106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 103 ) 

Literature 

Public Speaking 

Public Speaking 

Language (French, Spanish, German) 

Mathematics 

Political Science 

Economics 

General and Applied Psychology (Prin. Ed. 105-106) 

Educational Sociology 

Educational Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Educational Guidance 

Public Education in the U. S. (Ed. 101) 

Lunchroom Management (H. M. 105-106) 

Catering (Food 109) 

Housewifery (H. M. 109) 

Home Nursing and First Aid (H. M, 107) 

History of the Family (H. E. Ed. 106-107) 

Education of 'Women (H. E. Ed. 108) 

Tailoring (Cloth. 107) 

Millinery (Cloth. 108) 

Historic Ornament and Dress Design (Art 106) 

Art and Handicraft (Art 104) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

History of Art (Art 107) 

Music 



3 

1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 



1 
2 
3 



3 

2 



II 



3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 



3 

2 



3 
3 
3 



3 
2 



III 



8 
3 
Z 

1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 



2 
2 
1 



3 
3 



3 
2 



Description of Courses 
Foods 101. Preparation and Service of Foods. Six credit hours 

ethree lectures and three laboratory periods. 

Preparation and service of meals for a family and larger groups; 
cost and dietetic values; invividual problems in the manipulation of food 
materials. 

Foods 102-103. Advanced and Experimental Cookery. Four credit 
hours each term : two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites 
Foods 101. 

Advanced work in cookery in treating cooking in large amounts and 
various experimental problems to be worked out. 

Foods 104. Nutrition. Five credit hours: Second term. Prere- 
quisite, Chem. 110-111, 132. 

The physiological, chemical, and bacteriological aspects of food. 

Foods 105. Dietetics. Five credit hours. Third term. Prere- 
quisite, Foods 104. 

This course deals with the requirements of the individual in health 
and disease throughout infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life, and 
old age, in the light of the chemistry and physiology of digestion, the 



193 



energy value of food, and the nutritive properties of the proteins, fats, 
carbohydrates and ash constituents. Typical dietaries are planned foi 
each group. 

Foods 106. Catering. Three credit hours. Third term. Prere- 
quisites, H. M. 104-105. 

This course is intended for students who are interested in the problems 
connected with the management of the rooms and catering establish- 
ments. 

Tex. 101. Textiles. One credit hour: one lecture. Scond term. 
This course considers the textile industry from primitive ages to 
modern times; the important fibres and materials made from them. 

Tex. 102. Laundering. Two credit hours: two laboratory periods. 
First term. 

Behavior of textile fibers toward various cehmical reagents; physical 
tests for identification of fibers; bleaching; laundry processes as they 
affect color, shrinkage, etc.; art and economic considerations in selection 
and purchase of materials for clothing and household burnishing. 

Tex. 103. Advanced Textiles. One credit hour: one laboratory per- 
iod. 

This course deals with textile dyeing. Problems will be worked out 
that are especially adaptable for home use. 

Cloth. 101. Garment Construction. Two credit hours: two labora- 
tory periods. First term. 

This course includes the making of fundamental stitches, darning and 
patching; practice in hand and machine sewing applied to simple gar- 
ments. 

Cloth. 102. Drafting and Elementary Dress Design. Four credit 
hours :f our laboratory periods. First term. 

The first half of the term is devoted to the use of the commercial 
pattern and the making of a simple woolen skirt. The second half deals 
with drafting, cutting, fitting and designing of patterns. Emphasis is 
laid upon the development of designs from a simple foundation pattern. 
Designs are worked out upon paper patterns and adapted in the con- 
struction of a cotton or linen dress. 

Cloth. 103. Dressmaking. Three credit hours: one lecture and two 
laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Cloth 102. 

The lecture work is chiefly devoted to clothing economics and the 
clothing budget. The pattern designed in Cloth 102 is used in the con- 
struction of a cotton or linen garment. Special attention is given to 
the technique involved. 



194 



t^loth. 104-105. Advanced Dressmaking. Two credit hours each 
term: two laboratory periods. First and second terms. Prerequisites, 
Cloth. 102, 103, Art 101, 103. 

This course includes remodeling of a dress and problems in wool or 
gilk. 

Cloth. 106. Draping and Advanced Technique of Clothing. Five 
credit hours; one lecture and four laboratory periods. First term. 
Prequisite, Cloth. 105. 

This course emphasizes the artistic in lines and decoration ; deals with 
the design and adaption of materials for the individual. It includes 
practice in cutting, fitting, finishing, and draping of such materials as 
silks, satin, chiffons and laces. 

Cloth. 107. Tailoring. Three credit hours: three laboratory per- 
iods. Second term. Prerequisite, Cloth. 106. 

The technique and methods of construction employed in the making 
of tailored spits and wraps. 

Cloth. 108. Millinery. Three credit hours: three laboratory per- 
iods. Second term. 

A study of the processes and materials used in millinery; designing, 
making, and trimming hats. 

Art 101. Composition and Design. Two credit hours: two labora- 
tory oeriods. Second term. 

Practice drawing in charcoal and pencil; space division and space 
relation; color; color schemes and exercises; original designs in which 
lines, tones, and colors are put together to produce fine quality. 

Art 102. Freehand Perspective. Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. 

Study of perspective principles with application. 

Art 103. Costume Design. Three credit hours: one lecture, two 
laboratory periods. 

Appropriate dress, proportion of parts; application of color, harmony, 
art to design for costume in ink and water color. This history of cos- 
tume is discussed in the lecture work. 

Art 104. Art and Handicraft. Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. First term. 

Applied design in emibroidery, lace, stencils, as adapted to materials 
for articles of dress and house furnishing. 

Art. 105. Home Architecture and Decoration. Two credit hours: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. First term. Prerequisite, Art 
101, 102. 



195 

Situation, surroundings, and construction of the house; evolution of 
the house and home; application of color in home decoration; furnishings 
from a sanitary and artistic standpoint; perspective drawing of rooms. 

Art 106. History of Ornament and Design. Two credit hours. 
First term. 

This course continues the work of Art 103. 

H. M. 101-102. House Administration. Three credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Junior year. 

This course deals with the operation and maintenance of the house- 
hold; its sanitation, plumbing, furnishing, and equipment. 

H. M. 103. Home Management (Practice House). Five credit 
hours. Third term. Junior year. 

From eight to ten weeks* experience as manager and helper in a house- 
hold of five students. 

H. M. 104-105. Lunchroom Management. Three credit hours each 
term. First and second terms. Prerequisites, Foods 101, 102. 

A general course in lunchroom management for those who wish a 
knowledge of the problem of feeding large numbers. 

H. M. 106. Marketing and Buying. Two credit hours. Second 
term. 

How to buy foods; qualities and prices; market grades adn related 
ralues. 

H. M. 107. Homie Nursing and First Aid. Three credit hours. Sec- 
ond term. 

Instruction in domestic emergencies and first aid, and in the simple 
procedures in the home care of the sick. 



196 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Graduate work is offered to graduates of this or other standard col- 
leges who, in the judgment of the Dean of the Graduate School, are quali- 
fied to undertake that work. Each individual case must be determined 
upon its merits. 

The graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of 
the Graduate School, by competent members of the various faculties of 
instruction and research. These constitute the Faculty of the Graduate 
School. 

Work in accredited research laboratories of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and other local national research agencies under competent 
supervision is accepted, when previously arranged, as work in residence 
for part of the requirement. These laboratories are located in easy daily 
reach of the University. 

Advanced Degrees 

The advanced degrees conferred are Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy for work in Agriculture and the natural sciences; Master 0/ 
Arts for work in Liberal Arts, Education and Home Economics, and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Liberal Arts. 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 

The degree of Master of Science, or Master of Arts, will be conferred 
upon resident graduates who meet the following requirements: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of a qualified institution and 
must have the necessary prerequisites for the field of advanced work 
chosen. 

2. Ke must complete a course of approved graduate study with one 
major and one closely related minor subject, working on a full-time basis 
of one year of advanced work. The work may, when approved, be ex- 
tended on a part-time basis over a longer period. 

3. The candidate must submit a thesis approved by the Graduate 
Faculty. 

4. The candidate must pass a satisfactory examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. As prerequisites to registration for the Doctor's degree, the candi- 
date must be a graduate of a standard college, must have a reading 
knowledge of French or German, and the necessary basic training in the 
field in which he proposes to take advanced work. 



197 



2. Three years of graduate study will usually be required. At least 
one year must be in residence. The importance and quality of the work, 
as well as the time element, will be considered. On a part^ime basis the 
time needed will be correspondingly increased. The work must be inter- 
sive research, resulting in an important contribution. 

3. The candidate must select a major and one or two closely related 
minor subjects, constituting a single field of research. 

4. The candidate must present a thesis within the field of research 
selected. This must be in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate 
School in printed or typewritten form at least two weeks before the time 
at which degrees are granted. 

5. The candidate must pass a final examination in the major and 
minor subjects. The examination will be given by a committee appointed 
by the Dean. 

Advanced Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of this College who have ob- 
tained a bachelor^s degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

1. He shall have been engaged successfully in acceptable engineering 
work for three years. 

2. His registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months 
prior to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with 
his application a complete report of his engineering experience and an 
outline of his proposes thesis. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the 
Dean of the School and the heads of the Departments of Civil, Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Engineering. 



198 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

AND TACTICS 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Special 
Regulations No. 44, War Department, 1919. 

Authorization. An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Re- 
•erve Officers' Training Corps has been established at the Uliiversity 
under the provisions of the Act of Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended 
by the acts of June 3, 1916, and September 8, 1916. 

Object. The primary object of the Reserve Officers Training Corps 
is to provide systematic military training at civil educational institutions 
for the purpose of qualifying selected students of such institutions as 
reserve officers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended 
to attain this object during the time that students are pursuing their 
general or professional studies with the least practicable interference 
with their civil careers, by employing method designed to fit men, physi- 
cally, mentally and morally for pursuits of peace as well as pursuits of 
w^ar. It is believed that such military training will aid greatly in the 
development of better citizens. 

Required to Take Instruction. All male students, if citizens of the 
United States whose bodily condition indicate that they are physically 
fit to perform military duty or will be upon arrival at military age, 
whether pursuing a four-year or a two-year course of study, are re- 
quired to take for a period of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation, 
the military training required by the War Department. 

Credit Given. These students who have completed satisfactorily, the 
prescribed training with a unit of the S. A. T. C. may be credited with 
one year of the Basic Course prescribed for the R. O. T. C, and those 
students who have received military training at an educational institu- 
tion under the direction of an army officer detailed as professor of mili- 
tary science and tactics may receive credit for instruction equivalent to 
that given in the senior division R. 0. T. C. 

Time Allotted. For first and second year, basic course, three period* 
a week of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which 
at least one hour is utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced courses, elective, five periods a 
week of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which 
mt least three periods are dutilized for theoretical instruction. 



199 

Physical Training. Physical training forms an important part in 
military instruction, and it is the policy of the Miliary Department to 
encourage and support the physical training given by civilian teachers, 
thus cooperating in an effort to promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination. All members of the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps are required to be examined physically at least once after 
entering the University. 

Uniforms. Members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps must ap- 
pear in proper uniforms at all military formations and at other speci- 
fied times. 

Uniforms for the Reserve Officers' Training Corps will be furnished 
free by the Government. The uniforms are the regulation uniform of 
the United States Army, with certain distinguishing features. Such 
uniforms must be kept in good condition by the student. They are the 
property of the Government and though intended primarily for use in 
connection with military instruction may be worn at any other time un- 
less the regulations governing their use are violated. The uniform can- 
not be worn in part. Uniforms will be returned to the Military Depart- 
ment at the end of the year, and before if the student leaves the 
University. 

Commutation. Those students who elect the advanced courses and 
who have signed the contract with the Grovemment to continue in the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps for the two remaining years of the ad- 
vanced course are entitled to commutation of subsistence from and in- 
cluding the date of contract until they complete the course at the 
institution. 

Summer Camps. An important and excellent feature of the Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps is the summer camp. In specially selected parts 
of the country camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for 
students who are members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These 
camps are under the strict supervision of army officers and are intended 
primarily to give a thorough and comprehensive practical course of in- 
struction in the different arms of the service. Parents may feel as- 
sured that their sons are carefully watched and safeguarded. Whole- 
some suiTOundings and associates, work and healthy recreation are the 
key-note to contentment. Social life is not neglected and the morale 
branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for those stu- 
dents who are taking the advanced course. 

Commissions, (a) Each year upon completion of the Advanced 
Course, ertudenta qualified for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps 



200 

will be selected by the heads of the institution and the professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm 
of the service will be determined by the War Department. 

Credits. Military instruction at this University is on a par with other 
university work and the requirements of this department are proficiency 
the same as with other departments. 

Basic Course, M. I. 

First year (generally given to freshmen and the first-year students in 
the two-year course). Two credits per term. 

Second year (generally given to sophomores and the second-year stu- 
dents in the two-year course. Two credits per term. 

Advanced Course, M. I. (elective) 

Third year (generally given to juniors). Three credits per term, 
Fourth year (generally given to seniors). Three credits per term. 



Description of Courses 

M. I. 101. Basic R. O. T. C. Two credit hours each term. Fresh- 
man year. 

The following subjects will be covered: 

First Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical). 
School of Squad, inclusive. 

Small Arms Firing; Collective Firing, inclusive (Practical and Theo- 
retical). 
Military Courtesy, Customs of the Service. 
Care and Handling of Equipment (Practical and Theoretical). 
Lectures. Personal Hygiene. 
Examination at end of term. 

Second Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations to include the platoon (Practical and Theo- 
retical). 
Small Arms Firing. 

Map Reading. Military Sketching (Theoretical). 
Minor Tactics, Infantry, Map Problems (Practical and Theoretical). 
Examination at end of term. 



201 



Third Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations, Company and Battalion Drill (Practical). 
Service of Security and Information (Practical and Theoretical). 
Camp Hygiene. Infantry Map Problems (Practical and Theoretical). 
Lecture to cover other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

M. I. 102. Basic R. O. T. C. Two credit hours each term. Sopho- 
more year. 

The following subjects will be taught: 

First Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations; School, of the Squad, inclusive (Practical 

and Theoretical). 
Theory of Target Practice (Practical and Theoretical). 
Military Courtesy and Discipline (Practical and Theoretical). 
Minor Tactics. Map Problems. 
Personal Hygiene. Lectures on other subjects. 
Examination at end of term. 

Second Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 

Infantry Drill Regulations, Drill with Battalion (Practical). 

Camp Sanitation (Theoretical). 

Trench and Open Warfare (Theoretical). 

Military Engineering (Practical and Theoretical). 

Topography (Practical and Theoretical). 

Small Arms Firing (Theoretical). 

Lecture to cover other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

Third Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 

Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical). 

Minor Tactics. Map Problems. Topography (Theor. and Practical). 

Same for all Arms (Practical and Theoretical). 

Lecture to cover other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

M. I. 103. Advanced R. O. T. C. Three credit hours each term. 
Junior year. 

The following subjects will be covered: 

First Term 

Physical Training (Practical). Infantry Drill Regulations, Drill wath 
Battalion. 

Use of Infantry Arm in War. Special Arms, Machine Guns, Auto- 
matic Rifles, Trench Mortars (Theoretical and Practical). 



1! 



1:^ 



202 

Military Drawing (Practical). Minor Tactics. B/H Relief Map.- 
Hygiene, 1st Aid and Sanitation (Theoretical). 
Military Courtesy and Discipline (Theoretical and Practical). 
Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

Second Term 

Physical Training. Minor Tactics. B/H Relief Map (Practical and 

Theoretical). 
Design of Military Structures (Practical and Theoretical). 
Equipment (Prac. and Theor.). Field Engineering (Theoretical). 
Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

Third Term 

Physical Training. Infantry Drill Regulations. Drill with Battalion 

(Practical). Minor Tactics. 
Map and Terrain Problems (Prac). Topography (Prac. and Theor.).. 
Law, Common and Military (Theor). Military Policy (Theor.). 
Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

M. L 104. Advanced R. O. T. C. Three credit hours per term. 
Senior year. 

The following subjects will be covered: 

First Term 

Physical Training. Infantry Drill Regulations. 

Drill with Battolion. The War Game on B/H Relief Map. 

Administration. Army Paper Work (Theoretical). 

Personal Hygiene, 1st Aid and Sanitation (Theor.). Minor Tactics. 

Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

Second Term 

Physical Training (Practical). Hippology (Theoretical). 

Military Law (Theoretical). The War Game on B/H Relief Map. 

Musketry (Theoretical and Practical). 

Topography and Map Reading (Theoretical and Practical). 

Minor Tactics (Practical). 

Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 

Third Term 

Physical Training (Practical). Infantry Drill Regulations. 
Drill with the Battalion. Military Policy of the United States. 
Military History to include the Study of War with Germany (Theor.). 
Minor Tactics. Terrain and Map Problems (Theor. and Prac). 
Lectures on other subjects. Examination at end of term. 



203 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



TERM: 



SCHOOI^ OF AGBZCUI^TXTBE 

HORTICULTURE: 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) . 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 107) 
Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) . . 
Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 



Ill) 



Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 116) 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 117) 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 118) 



Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 121) .... 
Greenhouse Management (Hort. 122-123) 

Floriculture Practice (Hort. 124) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 125)... 
Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 126-127). 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 128) 

Amateur Floriculture (Hort. 129) 



General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) . . . 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 133) 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 134). 

Landscape Design (Hort. 135-136) 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 137) 

History of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 138) 
Civic Art (Hort. 139) 



105) 



BOTANICAL GROUP: 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 102) 

Plant Morphology (Morph. and Myc. 103-105) 

Mycology (Morph. and Myc. 106) 

Methods in Plant Histology (Morph. and Myc. 107) 

Cytology (Morph. and Myc. 108) 

Advanced Taxonomy (Morph. and Myc. 109) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101-102) 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phy. 103) 

Advanced Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 104-106) 



4 
3 
3 
1 



2 

1 



3 
3 
3 



Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145)... 
Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

AGRONOMY: 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103 ) 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 104) 

Mtethods in Crop Investigations (Agron. 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 106) 

Genetics (Agron. 107) 

Crop Rotation (Agron. 108) , 

Seminar (Agron. 109) 

Research and Thesis (Agron. 110) 



3 

1 



II 



III 



3 
2 



2 
3 



2 
3 



3 
1 



3 
4 
2 
1 



3 
3 

4 

4 



4 

V 
1 



3 
t 



1 
I 

1 



4 
3 



S 
4 
S 



S 
t 

4 



204 



t 



I 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



SCHOOZi OF AGBICUZiTURE — Continued 

BOTANICAL GROUP — Continued 

Plant Micro-Chemistry (Pit. Phy. 107) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Methods in Plant Pathology (Pit. Pth. 102-104). 
Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 105-107). 
Seminar in Pathology (Pit. Path. 108-110) 



FORESTRY: 

Farm Forestry (For. 101) 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY: 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 

Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Swine Production (A. H. 105) 

Meat and Meat Products (A. H. 106) 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108) 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 109) 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 110-111) 

Advanced Breed Study (A. H. 112) 

Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods (A. H. 113) 

Markets and Marketing (A. H. 114) 

Nutrition (A. H. 115 ) 

Seminar (A. H. 116) 

Research and Thesis (A. H. 117-119) 



Farm Poultry (P. H. 101) 



Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 102) 
History and Development of Dairy Cattle (D. H. 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 104) 

Commercial Dairy Products (D. H. 106) 

Judging Dairy Products (D. H. 106) 

Market Milk (D. H. 107) 

Advanced Course in Milk Testing (D. H. 108).. 

Seminar (D. H. 109) 

Research and Thesis (D. H. 110-112) 



103) 



General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103 , 

Special Bacteriology for Home Economics Students 

(Bact. 103-A) 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 107-109) 

Thesis (Bact. 110-112) 

Seminar (Bact. 113-114) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 



SOILS: 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102) 
Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 103-105). 
Soil Surveying and Classification (Soils 106) . 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Thesis (Soils 108-110) 

Soil Technology (Soils 111-113) 

Methods of Soil Investigation (Soils 114) 

Seminar (Soils 115-116) 



3 
3 
4 
1 



3 
2 
2 
1 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



II 



3 
4 
1 



3 
3 



1 
2 



3 
3 



3 
1 

2 



3 
2 
2 
1 



3 
3 



2 
3 



III 



3 
4 
1 



2 
3 



2 
'2 
4 

*2 

i 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 



3 
3 

'4 
2 
3 
2 

1 



205 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



SCHOOI^ OP AGRICUI^TUSE — Continued 



FARM MANAGEMENT: 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Studies in Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101). 

Markets and Marketing (A. E. 102) 

Cooperative Marketing (A. E. 103) 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 104) 

Elements of Community Study (R. O. 101-103) 
Principles of Rural Organization (R. O. 104). 



ZOOLOGY: 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Mammalian Anatomy (Zool. 102-A) 

Normal Histology (Zool. 103) 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 

Comparative Morphology of Vertebrates (Zool. 106) 

Entomology (Zool. 107) 

Insect Morphology (Zool. 108) 

Economic Entomology (Zool, 109-110) 

Economic Entomology (Zool. 111-113) 

Systematic Entomology (Zool. 114) 

Thesis (Zool. 115-117) 

Insecticides and Their Application (Zool. 

Medical Zoology (Zool. 119) 

Scientific Delineation and Preparations (Zool. 120-121) 

Horticultural Entomology (Zool. 122) 

Seminar (Zool. 123-125) 

Introduction to Aquiculture (Zool. 126) 



4 
3 
3 



118) 



5 
2 
2 



3 
1 



104) 



SCHOOI^ OF CHEMISTBT 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY: 

General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis (Gen'l 
Chem. 101-103) 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 105-106) 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 107-108) 

Technical Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 109) 

Determinative Mineralogy and Assaying (Gen'l 

Chem. 110) 

Metallurgical Calculations (Gen'l Chem. Ill) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 112-113) 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Gen'l Chem. 114-116). . . 

Advanced Quantitative Analysis (Gen'l Chem. 117-119) 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY: 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Agricultural Chemical Analysis (Ind. Chem. 102-104) . . 
Advanced Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 105-106) 
Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 107-108) 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY: 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio-Chem. 101) 

Plant Biochemistry (Bio-Chem. 102) 



4 
3 



PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: 

Inorganic Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-103) 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104-105) 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 106) 

Electrochemistry (Phys. Chem. 107) 



3 
4 
4 



4 
5 
5 



3 
4 



II 



3 
3 



3 
4 



4 
o 

2 
2 

i 
i 



3 
3 
2 



2 
3 
4 
4 



4 
5 
5 



3 
4 



III 



3 
3 
V 



4 
3 
3 

V 
5 



4 
V 



4 
4 



4 

4 
5 



4 
4 



206 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



I 






TERM: 



SCHOOIi OF SDVCATION 

EDUCATION: 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 

Survey of Teaching Methods (Ed. 103) , 

Methods in Secondary English, History and the Lan- 
guages (Ed. 104 ) 

Methods in the Secondary School Sciences (Ed. 105) . 
Supervised Teaching of General Subjects (Ed. 106) . , 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 107) 

Theory of Vocational Education (Ed. 108) 



2 
5 



5 or 
3 



EDUCATIONAL. GUIDANCE: 

Educational Guidance (Ed. Guid. 101-103) 



PSYCHOLOGY: 

General and Applied Psychology (Psy. 101-102) 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION: 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Agric. (Ag. Ed. 101). 
Problems in Agricultural Education (Ag. Ed. 102-104) . 

Supervised Teaching of Agriculture (Ag. Ed. 105) 

The Rural Community and Its Education (Ag. Ed. 106) 

Methods in Agricultural Extension (Ag. Ed. 107) 

Agricultural Extension Practice (Ag. Ed. 108) 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION: 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics 
(H. E. Ed. 101) 

Problems in Home Economics Education (H. E. Ed. 
102-104) 

Supervised Teaching of Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 105) 

History of the Family (H. E. Ed. 106-107) 

Education of Women (H. E. Ed. 108) 

Child Care and Welfare (H. E. Ed. 108) 

Methods of Home Economics Extension Work (H. E. 
Ed. 110) 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION: 

Methods in Industrial Education for Secondary Schools 
(Ind. Ed. 101) 

Problems in Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 102) 

Supervised Teaching of Industrial Subjects (Ind. 
Ed. 105) 

History of Industrial Education (Ind. Ed. 106) 



2 or 



1 
2 



SCHOOIi OF ENOnrSEBING' AKS ICECSANZC 



DRAWING AND DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY; 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 103) 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. 104) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 105) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 106) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 107) 

Drafting (Dr. 108) 

Shades, Shadows, Perspective (Dr. 109) 



1 
2 



4 
1 



II 



III 



5 or 



1 
5 
3 



2 or 



1 
5 
2 



5 
3 



1 
1 
1 



8 
8 



1 
2 



8 

1 



2 
2 



8 

1 



2 
2 



3 

V 



207 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



II 



III 



SCHOOI^ OF ENGINSERXNG- ANB XCECKAHIC 

ARTS — Continued 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING: 

Elementary Electricity (E. E. 101) 

Direct Current Theory (E. E. 102) 

Dynamos and Alternating Currents (E. E. 103) . . . . , 
Alternating" Currents and Alternating Current 

chinery (E. E. 104) 

Lighting and Illumination (E. E. 105) 

Electric Power Plants and Transmission (E. E. 106) 

Telephones and Telegraphs (E. E. 107) 

Wireless Telegraphy (E. E. 108) 

Electric Railways (E. E. 109) 

Primary and Secondary Batteries (E. E. 110) 

Dynamo Electric Machinery (E. E. Ill) 

Dynamo Electric Machinery (E. E. 112) 



Ma- 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN: 

Direct Current Design (E. Des. 101) 

Alternating Current Design (E. Des. 102) 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 



Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Electrical 
Telephone 



Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Laboratory (El. Lab. 106) 



Laboratory (El. Lab. 101) 
Laboratory (El Lab. 102) 
Laboratory (El. Lab, 103) 
Laboratory (El. Lab. 104) 
Laboratory (El. Lab. 105) 



Wireless Laboratory (El. Lab. 107) 



2 

2 



EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY: 

Testing (Exp. Lab. 101) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 102) 

Cement Testing (Exp. Lab. 103) 

Experimental Engineering (Exp. Lab. 



104) 



HIGHWAY ENGINEERING: 

Highways (Hwys. 101) 

Highway Engineering (Hwys. 
Materials Laboratory (Hwys. 



102) 
103). 



1 
1 



HYDRAULIC AND SANITARY ENGINEERING; 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 101) 

Hydraulics (Hyd. 102) 

Hydromechanics (Hyd. 103) 

Elements of Sanitary Engineering (Hyd. 104) . . 
Water Supply (Hyd. 105) 



Sewerage (Hyd. 106) 

Hydraulic Design (Hyd. 107).. 

Drainage (Hyd. 108) 

Drainage (Hyd. 109) 

Advanced Drainage (Hyd. 110) 



1 
3 
3 



JtfACHINE DESIGN: 

Elementary Machine Design (M. Des. 101) 
Machine Design (M. Des. 102) 



Machine Design (M. Des. 103) 
TCinematics of Machinery (M. Des. 104). . . 
Design of Farm Machinery (M. Des. 105) 

MATHEMATICS: 

Trigonometry (Math. 101) 



Solid Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry (Math. 102) 
Analytic Geometry (Math. 103) 



5 

5 



2 
3 



3 
2 
1 



2 

2 



1 
1 
2 
1 

1 



i 

V 

s 
s 



2 
2 



1 
1 



4 
1 



4 
1 
1 
1 

2 



4 

s 



208 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM : 



SCHOOIk OF ENGINZZmiNG- AND 2^i:3CHANIC 

ARTS — Continued 



MATHEMATICS— Continued 



104) 



Advanced Algebra (Math. 

Calculus (Math. 105) 

Algebra (Math. 106) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 
Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 

Calculus (Math. 110) 

Solid Geometry (Math. Ill) 

Differential Equations (Math. 112). . . 

Least Squares (Math. 113) 

Estimates and Costs (Math. 114) .... 
Astronomy (Math. 115) 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING: 

Technical Instruction (M. E. 101) 

Steam Engines, Boilers and Dynamos (M. E. 102) 

Technical Mechanics (M. E. 103) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 104) 

Heat Engineering (M. E. 105) 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106) 

Marine Engineering (M. E. 107) 

Steam Turbine Engineering (M. E. 108) 

Gas Engines (M. E. 109) 



MECHANICS AND MATERIALS OP CONSTRUCTION: 

Graphic Statics (Mech. 101) 

Analytical Mechanics (Mech. 102) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 103) 

Mechanics of Engineering (Mech. 104) 

Materials of Construction (Mech. 105) 



3 
2 
3 



1 
3 



PHYSICS: 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. 101) 

Electricity and Magnetism (Phys, 102) 

Heat and Light (Phys. 103) 

General Physics (Phys. 104) 



PHYSICS LABORATORY: 

Mechanics and Sound (Phys. Lab. 
Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. 
Heat and Light (Phys. Lab. 103). 
General Physics (Phys. Lab. 104) 



101) 
Lab. 



102) 



RAILWAY 

Railway 
Railway 
Railway 
Railway 



ENGINEERING: 

Curves (Rwys. 101) . . . . 
Earthwork (Rwys. 102) 
Surveying (Rwys. 103). 
Economics (Rwys. 104) 



SHOP PRACTICE: 

Woodwork (Shop 101) 

Woodwork (Shop 102) 

Woodwork (Shop 103) 

Woodwork (Shop 104) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 105) 

Blacksmithing (Shop 106) 

Forging and Pipe-fitting (Shop 

Foundry Work (Shop 108) 

Machine Work (Shop 109) 

Machine Work (Shop 110) 

Machine Work (Shop 111) 



1 
1 
1 



107) 



1 
3 
1 



II 



3 
3 



1 
2 
3 



2 



2 

i 
i 



3 
3 



2 
1 

i 

9 



1 

2 
1 



III 



3 
3 



3 
3 
2 
2 
4 



3 



4 
2 



1 
1 



2 
2 



1 

9 



209 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



SGKOOlb or BNOXNEESZNG' JlND MECHAVZC 

ARTS — Continued 



STRUCTURAL. DESIGN: 

Elementary Structural Design (Str. Des 

Structural Desigrn (Str. Des. 102) 

Structural Design (Str. Des. 103) 

Masonry and Concrete (Str. Des. 104) 

Design of Farm Structures (Str. Des. 105) 

School Architecture (Str. Des. 106) 

Farm Buildings (Str. Des. 107) 



101) 



SURVEYING: 

Surveying (Sury. 
Surveying (Surv. 
Surveying (Surv. 
Surveying (Surv. 
Advanced 
Advanced 



101) 

102) 

103) 

104) 

Surveying (Surv. 105) 
Surveying (Surv. 106) 



3 

4 



Topographic Surveying (Surv. 107) 

Geodesy (Surv. 108) 

Geodesy (Surv. 109) 

Elementary Surveying (Surv. 110). 
Elementary Surveying (Surv. 111). 



SCHOOI^ OF HOKE ECONOIQCS 

FOODS: 

Preparation and Service of Foods (Foods 101) 



Advanced and Experimental Cookery (Foods 102-103) 

Nutrition (Foods 104) 

Dietetics (Foods 105) 

Catering (Foods 106) 



TEXTILES: 

Textiles (Tex. 101) 

Laundering (Tex. 102) 

Advanced Textiles (Tex, 103) 



CLOTHING: 

(3«rment Construction Cloth. 101) , 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102)., 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 103) 

Advanced Dressmaking (Cloth. 104-105) 

Draping and Advanced Technique of Clothing (Cloth. 

106) 

Tailoring (Cloth. 107) 

Millinery (Cloth. 108) 



ART: 

Composition and Design (Art 101) 

Freehand Perspective (Art 102) 

Costume Design (Art 103) 

Art and Handicraft (Art 104) 

Home Architecture and Decoration (Art 105) 
History of Ornament and Design (Art 106) . . 



HOME MANAGEMENT: 

House Administration (H. M. 101-102) 

Home Management (Practice House) (H. M. 103) 

Lunchroom Management (H. M. 104-105) 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 106) 

Home Nursing and First Aid (H. M. 107) 



2 
1 



2 

4 



2 
5 



2 
2 
2 



II 



3 
3 
3 
5 
3 



4 
5 



3 
2 



3 
3 



3 
2 
8 



III 



3 
3 
4 

V 

4 



2 

1 
1 
1 



6 

4 

V 

3 



3 



210 



ELECTIVE COURSES — Continued 



TERM: 



SCHOOIk OF USE'RAXm ABTS 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Technical Writing and Scientific Thought (Eng-. 104-106) 

Nineteenth Century Poetry (Eng. 107-108) 

The Essay (Eng. 109) 

English Words (Eng. 110) 

Literature in America (Eng. 111-112) 

Novelists of the Nineteenth Century (Eng. 113-114) . . 

The Short Story (Eng. 115) 

Early English Drama (Eng. 116) 

Elizabethan Drama (Eng. 117-118) 

Modern English Drama (Eng. 119-120) 

Technique of the Drama (Eng. 121) 



II 



III 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES: 

Beginners' Greek (A. L. 101-103) 

Grammar, Composition, and Translation of Selected 

Prose Works (A. L. 104-106) 

Greek Literature and Composition (A. L. 107-109) . . . . 
Greek Drama (A. L. 110-112) 



Latin Prosody and Methology (A. L. 121-123) 

Latin Grammar, Composition, and Translation (A. L. 

124-126) 

Study of Roman Life and Customs (A. L. 127-129).. 
Critical Study of Latin Drama (A. L. 130-132) 



MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES: 

Elementary French (M. L. 101-103) 

Grammar Continued (M. L. 104-105) 

Scientific French (M. L. 107-109) 

Development of the French Novel (M. L. 110-112).. 
Seventeenth Century French Drama (M. L. 113) .... 

Eighteenth Century French Drama (M. L. 114) 

Nineteenth Century French Drama (M. L. 115) 

History of French Literature (M. L. 116-118) 

French for Engineers (M. L. 119-121) 



Beginning German (M. L. 121-123) 

Second Year German (M. L. 124-126) 

Scientific German (M. L. 127-129) 

Goethe and the Novel (M. L. 130) 

Schiller and the Drama (M. L. 131) 

Lessing and German Prose (M. L. 132) 

Heine and German Poetry (M. L. 133) 

History of German Literature (M. L, 134-136) 
German for Engineers (M. L. 137-139) 



Elementary Italian (M. L. 138-140) 

Spanish Grammar, Conversation (M. L. 141-143) 

Thorough Knowledge of Grammar (M. L. 144) , 

Reading and Conversation (M. L. 145) , 

Letter Writing (M. L. 146) , 

Vocabulary of Trade (M. L, 147-148) 

Business Correspondence and Etiquette , 

Methods of Advertising in South America and Mexico 

Compared with Those of the U. S. (M. L. 150) 

Study of Commercial Development (M. L. 151-152).., 

Early Spanish Literature (M. L, 153-154) 

Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Literature 

(M. L. 155) 



3 

2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
5 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3 

5 



3 
3 



3 
3 



2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
5 

3 
3 
3 



3 
5 

3 

3 

3 

3 



3 
3 



3 
2 

V 

V 

*3 

*3 

V 



3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
5 

3 

3 
3 



3 
3 
5 

3 

3 

V 
'3 

V 

8 



211 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



SCKOOZi OF AZBESAXi AlEtTS— <;ontinued 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES— Con. 

Spanish Literature After the Eighteenth Century 

(M. L. 156) 

Literature of Spanish-Speaking Countmes (M. L. 157). 
Spanish for Engineers (M. L. 158-160) 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE: 

Current History (H. 101-103) 

American Colonial History (H. 104) 

American Civil War and Reconstruction (H. 105) 

Development of American Nationality (H. 106) 

Latin American Republics (H. 107) 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 109-111) 

Imperialism and World Politics (H. 112) 

Origins and Issues of the World War (H. 113) 

The Far East (H. 114-115) 

Epochs in European History (H. 116-118) 

Historiography (H, 119-121) 



Government of the United States (Pol. Sc. 101-103)... 

American State Government (Pol. Sc. 104-105) 

Constitutional Law of United States (Pol. Sc. 106-108) 

Governments of Europe (Pol. Sc. 109-110) 

Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 111-112) 

American Diplomacy (Pol, Sc. 113-115) 

International Law (Pol. Sc. 116-118) 

Political Parties and Practical Politics (Pol. Sc. 119-120) 
Contemporary Political Problems of the United 

States (Pol, Sc. 121) 

American Political Ideals (Pol. Sc. 122-123) 

Research in Political Science (Pol. Sc, 124-126) 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY: 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103) 

Money and Banking (Econ. 104) 

Public Finance and Taxation (Econ. 105) 

Economic History of the United States (Econ. 106) . . . 

Rural Economics (Econ. 107) 

Elements of Accounting (Econ. 108) 

Advanced Accounting (Econ. 109) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 110-112) 



Elements of Sociology (Soc. 101) 

Charities and Corrections (Soc. 102) 

Rural Sociology (Soc. 103) 

Social Psychology (Soc 104) 

Social Psychology (Soc. 105) 

Logical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) 

Philosophical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 107) 
Philosophical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 108) 
Ethical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 109) 



JOURNALISM: 

News Writing (Jour. 101-102) 

The Daily Paper (Jour. 103) 

History of Journalism (Jour. 104) 

Newspaper Editing (Jour. 105-107) 

News and Editorial Writing (Jour, 108-110) 

The Country Newspaper (Jour. Ill) 

The Trade Journal (Jour. 112) 

Feature Writing (Jour. 113) 



1 
2 



2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 



2 
3 
2 



2 
2 



3 
2 



3 



1 
2 
3 
2 



II 



3 
5 



1 
2 



2 
2 



2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 



2 
2 



3 
2 



2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 



2 
3 



III 



3 

5 



2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 



a 

2 
3 



2 

V 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 
V 

V 

V 
3 



3 



212 



ELECTIVE COURSES— Continued 



TERM: 



SCHOOL OF TtTBBRAT* ABTS — Continued 

JOURNALISM— -Continued 

Agricultural and Industrial Feature Writing (Jour. 

114-115) 

Principles of Journalism (Jour. 116) , 

Business Management, Circulation, and Advertising 

(Jour. 117-118) 

Head Writing, Make-up, and Mechanical Details 

(Jour. 119) 

Practical Newspaper Operation (Jour. 120-121) 



PUBLIC SPEAKING: 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101-103) 

Oratory (P. S. 104-106) 

Extempore Speaking (P. S. 107-109) 

Debate (P. S. 110-112) 

Oral Reading (P. S. 113-115) 

Oral Technical English (P. S. 116-118) 

Advanced Oral Technical English (P. S. 119-121) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE: 

Library Methods (L. S. 101) 

Advanced Library Methods (L. S. 102) 



MUSIC: 



DEFA&TlCElirT OF MTLXTARY SCZENCB AHB 

TACTICS 

Basic Reserve Officers' Training Corps (M. I. 101) 

Basic Course (M. I. 102) 

Advanced R. O. T. C. (M. I. 103) 

Advanced R. O. T. C. (M. I. 104) 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 



II 



3 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 



3 

2 
2 



III 



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V 



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8 
8 



213 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AND RECREATION 



The Department of Physical Education and Recreation has been or- 
ganized to control all physical training, recreation, intramural, and in- 
tercollegiate athletics. All work is closely coordinated and the ideal is 
to see that every man in the institution gets opportunities to take part 
in competitive sports. The plan under which the department is to oper- 
ate may be summed up as follows: 

1. A series of exercises arranged for every student in the institution 
and compulsory for all, the exercises to be based on mass exercises com- 
mon in Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Neither the German 
nor Scandinavian system is to be used in its entirety, but a combination 
of the heavy gymnastic drills of the former with the lighter squad drills 
of the latter. All students will be given physical examination and placed 
in various classes according to their individual physical needs. Students 
v/ill receive different kinds of work and be encouraged to take part in 
tliose games which provide the exercise of which they are most in need. 

2. A general system of intramural athletics is carried out under a 
regular schedule with teams representing different units of the University. 
All students take part in one or more of these branches of sport and 
the University encourages enough sports to give each an opportunity. It 
is the aim of each class to have its own wrestling team, basket-ball team, 
baseball team, volley-ball team, track team, and so on for just as many 
teams as there are students to fill the positions. The games between 
these teams are carried out with regularity of schedule and supervision. 
Besides these, there are general competitions such as cross-coimtry runs 
and interclass track meets in which representatives of all classes may 
compete at the same time. A regular playground is in process of con- 
etruction on which will be available tennis courts, volley-ball courts, 
tether ball poles, stakes for pitching quoits, etc. 

3. All physical training of the students, including mass exercises, in- 
tramural sports, intercollegiate competitions, and military training, 
henceforth are a part of the general educational system of the 
University. 

For ihe present practically all general training, such as comes imder 
the head of gymnastics and squad exercises, is conducted under direction 
of the Military Department. 



214 



DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 30, 1919 

This does not include the list of degrees given in the Schools in Baltimore. 
Nor does it include the list of students of the Baltimore Schools. Lack of 
time for getting out the lists prevent such inclusion this year. 

HO>PORARY 
Doctor of Science 

James Harris Rogers Hyattsville, Md. 

Franklin Byers Bomberger College Park, Md. 

Doctor of Agriculture 
Merton Benway Waite Washington, D. C. 

IN COURSE 
Bachelor of Science 

Joseph Leiter Aitcheson Burtonsville, Md. 

Kenneth Warren Babcock Hagersotown, Md. 

Chester Frederick Bletsch Washington, D. C. 

Grace Bruce Holmes Washington, D. C. 

Paul Valentine Horn (Class of 1918) Mount Airy, Md. 

Ransom Rush Lewis, Jr Frederick, Md. 

Erston Vinton Miller Hagerstown, Md. 

George Wesley Norris Baltimore, Md. 

Kenneth Carlisle Posey Washington, D. C. 

Earle Milton Sawyer Manila, Philippine Islands 

James Wilmer Stevens Baltimore, Md. 

George Ray Stuntz Washington, D. C. 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Robert Lee Sellman Beltsville, Md. 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Cecil Harlow Bacon Silver Springs, Md. 

Homer Sidney Berlin Baltimore, Md. 

Walter Roberts Hardisty Seabrook, Md. 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Milton Carroll Brown Sparrows Point, Md. 

Edwin Walker Hand Berwyn, Md. 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Howard Owen Coster Coster, Md. 

Charles Edwin Paine Washington, D. C. 

CERTIFICATES IN TWO-YEAR COURSES ISSUED MAY 30, 1919 

Agriculture 

Emory Bryan Corkran Rhodesdale, Md. 

Thomas Dail Holder Vienna, Md. 

Kurt Frederick Menzel Washington, D. C. 

Philip Stevens Richardson Williamsburg, Md. 

Henry Lafayette Umbarger Bel Air, Md. 

Hugh Roberts Wilmer (Class of 1918) Faulkner, Md. 



215 

TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT AWARDED MAY 30, 1919 

For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interests of Maryland: 

Howard Mann Howard County 

David Garfield Harry Harford County 

A. P. Snader Carroll County 

MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED MAY 30, 1910 

For excellence in Debate. Medal offered by the Alumni Association: 
Edward B. Ady Sharon, Md. 

The Goddard Medal, for excellence in Scholarship and Moral Character — 

offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James : 

R. Lee Sellman Beltsville, Md. 

For excellence in Debate, "President's Cup," offered by 

Dr. H. J. Patterson: 

PoE Literary Society. 

AWARDS OF MILITARY COMMISSIONS 

Milton Carroll Brown Major 

Homer Sidney Berlin Captain 

Earle Milton Sawyer Captain 

Charles Edwin Paine Captain 

Edwin Walker Hand First Lieutenant 

Walter Roberts Hardisty Second Lieutenant 

BATTALION ORGANIZATION 

Battalion Staff 

E. C. E. RUPPERT Major, R. 0. T. C. Commanding 

R. W. Heller 1st Lieut., R. O. T. C. Battalion Adjutant. 

J. A. Gray 2nd Lieut., R. O. T. C. Battalion Supply Officer. 

COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

Company A Company B Company C 

Captains 

Wilbur F. Sterling James H. Barton Theodore L. Bissell 

First Lieutenants 

John E. Keefauver Edward E. Dawson Dorlan A. Etienne 

Second Lieutenants 

Charles P. Wilhelm Sterling E. Abrams Bradford L. Burnside 
Additional Officer — Edward B. Ady, 2nd Lieutenant 



216 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF OFFICERS 

Edward F. Russell Battalion Sergeant Major 

Howard A. Shank Battalion Supply Sergeant 

Charles L. Mullen Corporal Bugler 

Company A Company B Company C 





First Sergeants 




A. S. Best 


G. G. Remsberg 

Sergeants 


C. E. Moore 


C. W. Cole 

A. W. HiNES 

C. E. Darnall 

H. L. BOST.EY 

R. C. McCeney 

C D. MOLSTER 


A. N. Pratt 
F. Slanker 
P. S. Frank 
T. E. Marquis 
L. E. Cauffman 
A. S. Gadd 
F. R. Caldwell 

Corporals 


R. V. Haig 

D. R. Caldwell 

0. P. Reinmuth 

L. W. BOSLEY 

W. F. McDonald 
H. H. Ankers 


R. N. Young 
H. D. Gilbert 
J. H. Painter 
J. A. Burroughs 
J. A. Moran 
A. D. Kemp 
G. N. Schramm 
H. S. Matthews 


J. M. Price 
C. E. White 
W. A. Beachley 
H. E. McFaddin 
C. D. Sasscer 

C. B. NOURSE 

K. F. Froelich 
T. R. Betts 

• 


K. T. Broach 
R. J. Stranahan 

A. J. NORTHAM 

E. F. Darner 
L. J. Stabler 
G. B. Fitzgerald 
C. C. Crippen 
H. E. Levin 
i C. W. England 



Name 



REGISTER 
Session 1919-1920 
Graduate Students 

Hom^ 



Chen, Chunjen C Shanghai China 

Haag, J. Roy Kingston Rhode Island 

Jones, John P Davidsonville Anne Arundel 

Leukel, Robert W Brillion Wisconsin 

Martin, John H Corvallis Oregon 

Miller, E. V Hagerstown Washington 

Nickels, Clarence B Artesia Mississippi 

Parfitt, Elliott H Brooklyn New York 

Rhode, W. C Baltimore Maryland 

Sando, Charles E Washington District of Columbia 

Smith, Arthur M College Park Prince George's 

Stanton, Thomas R Hyattsville Prince George's 



217 



Senior Class 

Name Home County or State. 

Abrams, Sterling E Jersey City New Jersey 

Ady, Edward B Sharon Harford 

AxT, RmGELY W Catonsville Baltimore 

Barton, J. Hall Centreville Queen Anne 

BissELL, Theodore L Westover Somerset 

Burn SIDE, Bradford L Hyattsville Prince George's 

Carroll, Henry M Ashland Baltimore 

Chichester, Peter W Aquasco Prince George's 

Clendaniel, George W Kennedyville Kent 

Conyngton, John Berwyn Prince George's 

Davison, Bausson Riverdale Prince George's 

Dawson, Edward E Trappe Talbot 

Day, Franklin D Burdette Montgomery 

DowNiN, Thomas V Williamsport Washington 

Drawbaugh, John R Washington District of Columbia 

Elliott, Charles S Westover Somerset 

Eppley, Geary F Washington District of Columbia 

Etienne, Arthur D Berwyn Prince George's 

Ezekiel, Walter Landover Prince George's ^ 

Gray, Joseph A Brownville Washington 

Hartshorn, Hosmer P Kensington Montgomery 

Hicks, William P Govans Maryland 

HocKMAN, George B. . .^/<'. .Hagerstown Washington 

Hook, Elizabeth G. ..';.. . .College Park Prince George's 

Jones, Allen S Washington District of Columbia 

Keefauver, John E Berwyn Prince George's 

Knode, John S Baltimore Maryland 

Knode, Robert T Baltimore Maryland 

Langrall, James H Baltimore Maryland 

McDonald, Harry M Barton Allegany 

Matzen, Broder a Berwyn Prince George's 

Merrill, George M Crisfield Somerset 

Perkins, Hanson T Springfield Prince George's 

Pratt, Algio N Newark New Jersey 

Ruppert, Ernest C. E., Jr. .Chevy Chase District of Columbia 

RiGGS, Maurice T Rockville Montgomery 

Sando, William J Washington District of Columbia 

Sewell, Milton D Hyattsville Prince George's 

Snarr, Wardney C Washington District of Columbia 

Starr, James H Washington District of Columbia 

Sterling, Wilbur F Crisfield Somerset 

Ternent, Sampson S Lonaconing Allegany 



X 



Junior Class 

Bland, Harriet W. . : Sparks Baltimore 

Caldwell, David R Washington District of Columbia 

Cole, Charles W Towson Baltimore 

DiGGS, Austin C Baltimore Maryland 

DiNGMAN, James E Berwyn Prince G-eorge's 

Donaldson, Edmund C,^, . , Laurel Prince George's 

Edmonds, Letha G. . ^. Rockville Montgomery 

Eiseman, John H Washington District of Columbia 

Frere, Francis J Tompkinsville Charles 



218 



Name 

FtJHRMAN, Carl J 

Gardner, Wm. Thomas 

Goodwin, Leonard M 

Graham, Julian R 

Haig, Robert V 

Hamke, Julius C 

Heller, Robert W 

Holder, Thomas D 

HoLTER, Cecil K 

Holter, Edwards F 

Jester, William C 

Johnson, Clarence E 

Mackert, Charles L 

Manning, Roger C 

Peddicord, Herbert R 

Perry, DeWitt P 

Rausch, Robert M 

Reading, Joseph G 

ScHEucH, John D 

Sener, Herman H 

Silberman, Harry A 

Blanker, Frederick 

Smith, John W 

Snyder, Leo William 

Starkey, Edgar B 

Stonestreet, Nicholas V . . . 

Sullivan, Jere H 

Thawley, Leonard H 

Thomas, Richard Branson. . 

TwiLLEY, Otis S 

Walker, Paul W 

WiLHELM, Charles P 



Home County or State^ 

Brentwood Prince G-eorge's 

Clear Spring Washington 

Potsdam New York 

Barclay Queen Anne 

Riverdale Prince George's 

College Park Prince George's 

Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Vienna Dorchester 

Jefferson Frederick 

Middletown Frederick 

Wilmington Delaware 

Brooklyn New York 

Sunbury Pennsylvania 

Branlywine Prince George's 

Dickerson Montgomery 

Clear Spring Washington 

Washington District of Columbia 

Rockville Montgomery 

Washington District of Columbia 

Chewsville Washington 

Washington District of Columbia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Norfolk Virginia 

Washington District of Columbia 

Sudlersville Queen Anne 

Rock Point Charles 

Newburyport Massachusetts 

Laurel Prince George's 

Washington District of Columbia 

Hurlock Dorchester 

Mt. Airy Frederick 

Baltimore Maryland 



Sophamore Class 

Allison, Brewster Stony Point New York 

Austin, James A ^. . . .College Park Prince George's 

Avery, Helena D ..... .Washington District of Columbia 

Bailey, Caleb T Bladensburg Prince George's 

Barall, William Louis Towson Baltimore 

Beachley, Ralph H Middletown Frederick 

Best, Alfred S Harwood Anne Arundel 

BosLEY, Harry L Washington District of Columbia 

Bosley, Lester W Washington District of Columbia 

Broach, Keator T Ridgewood New Jersey 

Brown, Chauncey Washington District of Columbia 

Burgess, Edgar A Thurmont Frederick 

Burroughs, John A Clinton Prince George's 

BuscK, Paul G Washington District of Columbia 

Butts, John A Loysburg Pennsylvania 

Caldwell, Frank R Washington District of Columbia 

Calvin, George F Washington .^District of Columbia 

Canter, Francis D Aquasco Prince George's 

Darkis, Frederick R Frederick Frederick 

Darnall, Charles E Hyattsville Prince George's 



219 



iVame Home County or State, 

Dakner, Edwin F Hagerstown Washingrton 

DuvALL, William M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Dunning, Ernest C Baltimore Baltimore City 

Edmonds, Henry Gordon. . . Brookland District of Columbia 

Elder, James W Cumberland Allegany 

England, Charles W Rising Sun Cecil 

Ensor, Huldah. .k<7 Sparks Baltimore 

EWALD, Francis G ,. Mt. Savage Allegany 

Ezekiel, Bertha. . . ^^. . . . .Landover Prince George's 

Filbert, Edwin B Baltimore Baltimore City 

Fisher, Henry Hillsboro Caroline 

Gilbert, Herbert D Frederick Frederick 

Graham, Walter S Hyattsville Prince George's 

GuREVicH, Henry J Washington District of Columbia 

Hanford, Reginald B Marion Somerset 

HiNES, Augustus W Washington District of Columbia 

Hodgins, Robert J Union City Pennsylvania 

Keen, Howard V Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Kemp, Allen D Frederick Frederick 

Kirby, William W Washington District of Columbia 

McDonald, Willla^m F Barton Allegany 

Malcolm, Wilbur G Barton Allegany 

Matthews, Irving W Sparks Baltimore 

Miller, Albert A College Park Prince George's 

MOHLHENRICH, EuGENE G. . . Govans Baltimore City 

MoLSTER, Charles B Washington District of Columbia 

Moore, Charles E., Jr Roland Park Baltimore City 

Morgan, John A Frederick Frederick 

Morgak, Edwin K Washington District of Columbia 

Morgan, Paul T Baltimore Baltimore City 

Myers, Edwin H. L Washington District of Columbia 

Neighbours, Herbert E Lrewistown Frederick 

Newell, Sterling R Falls Church Virginia 

North am, Alfred J Pocomoke Worcester 

Norwood, Frederick J Washington District of Columbia 

OwiNGS, Elliott P North Beach Calvert 

Painter, John H Washington District of Columbia 

Parsly, George M Brooke ville Montgomery 

Peterman. Walter W Clear Spring Washington 

Polk, Lawrence W Pocomoke Somerset 

Price, John M., Jr Centreville Queen Anne 

Pusey, Merwyn L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Raedy, Michael L Washington District of Columbia 

Reinmuth, Otto P. H Frederick Frederick 

Remsberg, Gerald G Braddock Heights Frederick 

Reynolds, Clayton Port Deposit Cecil 

Russell, Edgar F Washington District of Columbia 

Sasscer, Clarence D Northkeys Prince George's 

Schramm, George Nelson. .Cumberland Allegany 

Scott, Josejph G Princess Anne Somerset 

Shank, Hughes A Smithsburg Washington 

Smith, George F ,y^, . Big Spring Washington 

Smith, Mildred P . . . .Vf. . . . Brookland District of Columbia 

Snyder, James H Lewistown Frederick 



220 



Name Home County or State. 

Stabler, Lawrence J Washin^on . . . ., Ddstrict of Columbia 

Stranahan, Robert J Utiion City Pennsylvania 

Sutton, Roland .^ .Ballston Virginia 

Tarbert, Rebecca i/f\ . . Glencoe Baltimore 

Ward, Joshua B Jarrettsville Harford 

White, Wilfred F Chevy Chase Montgomery 

YOSHIKAWA, Masanori Hyuga Japan 

Young, Robert N Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 



Freshman Class 

Nam,e ^ Hom^e 

Ady, Elizabeth G Sharon 

Albrittain, Mason C . . .^. . La Plata 

Anderson, Mary P. . . k\ . . .Washington 

Baldwin, Francis W., Jr. . . Huntingdon 

Barnes, Benjamin F Princess Anne 

Beachy, Walter A Grantsville 

Belt, William B Hyattsville 

Bennett, Frank A Hagerstown 

Benson, George R Westminster 

Besley, Arthur K Baltimore 

Betts, Thomas R Oberlin 

Blanton, Frank M Elkton 

Block, Albert Laurel 

BOTELER, Howard M Laurel 

BoYER, Oliver P Ferryman 

Branner, Claude E Pocomoke 

Braungard, John E Hagerstown 

Braungard, Paul J Hagerstown 

Brewer, Charles M College Park 

Bromley, George R Stockton 

Brothers, Maurice F Washington 

Brown, Leo T Washington 

BucHHEiSTER, George G Leeland 

Burroughs, James E La Plata 

Cadle, William R Ijamsville 

Cannon, Lloyd P Preston 

Chambers, Donald L Baltimore 

Chappell, Kenneth B Kensington 

Chase, Ralph H Washington 

Clagett, John F Marlboro 

Clark, Charles F Pelham Manor 

Clark, John Walkersville 

Cohen, Alfred B Chestertown 

COMPHER, Carlton M Doubs 

CoMPTON, Stephen J Westwood 

CoNKLiNG, John F Baldwin 

Cook, Charles S •. /Frederick 

Crowther, Elizabeth G. V. Sparks 

Diekroeger, Fred E Gerald 

DiETZ, George J Baltimore 

Donaldson, DeWitt C Laurel 



County or State, 

Harford 

Charles 

District of Columbia 

Pennsylvania 

Somerset 

Garrett 

Prince George's 

Washington 

Carroll 

Baltimore City 

Ohio 

Cecil 

Prince Greorge's 

Prince George's 

Harford 

Somerset 

Washington 

Washington 

Prince George's 

Worcester 

District of Columbia 

District of Columbia 

Prince George's 

Charles 

Frederick 

Caroline 

Baltimore City 

Montgomery 

District of Columbia 

Prince George's 

New York 

Frederick 

Kent 

Frederick 

Prince (George's 

Baltimore 

Frederick 

Baltimore 

Missouri 

Baltimore City 

Prince George's 



221 



Name Home County or State» 

DOWNIN, Lauran P Hagerstown Washington 

Elliott, Joseph W . . . . .^^ . . Westover Somerset 

Ellis, L. Kerminia. . krTT. . .Washington District of Columbia 

Finney, Argyle N Washington District of Columbia 

Fitzgerald, Gilbert B Princess Anne Somerset 

Fitzgerald, Thomas H Princess Anne Somerset 

Flanagan, Sherman E Walkersville Frederick 

Frank, Paul S Falls Church Virginia 

FRantz, Donald H Lutherville Baltimore 

Fridinger, Norman S^ Washington District of Columbia 

FUHRMAN, Ruth. . *<^. Washington District of Columbia 

Gadd, Albert S Centreville Queen Anne 

GiFFORD, George E Rising Sun Cecil 

Gillespie, Rees A Fort Washington Prince George's 

Glass, John D Conway Springs Kansas 

Graves, Ernest A Washington District of Columbia 

Groton, Alvey B Pocomoke Worcester 

Groves, John Washington District of Columbia 

Hammond, James D Alexandria Alexandria 

Harley, Clayton P Royersford Pennsylvania 

Harlow, James H Havre de Grace Harford 

Hawkins, Joseph M., Jr. ^ ^^arrisburg Pennsylvania 

Heath, Marguerite F. . .I«<\ Baltimore Baltimore City 

HiCKEY, William F Delmar Wicomico 

HiGHTMAN, Floyd H Burkittsville Frederick 

Himmelheber, James B Annapolis Anne Arundel 

HODGINS, Herbert W Utnion City Pennsylvania 

HOLDEN, Milton M Princess Anne Somerset 

HUTTON, JosiAH J BrookeviUe Montgomery 

Jones, Milburne W. .^^ . . . . Chestertown Kent 

KiLLiAM, Audrey. . , .VT . .... Delmar Wicomico 

KiSLiUK, David E Washington Dlistrict of Columbia 

Kline, Ralph G Frederick Frederick 

KooGLE, Paul W Brunswick Frederick 

Latta, James B Washington District of Columbia 

Lescure, John M Harrisburg Pennsylvania 

Lescure, Wm. Joseph Harrisburg Pennsylvania 

Levin, Hyman E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Lighter, Richard C Middletown Frederick 

Luckey, George J Trenton New Jersey 

McBride, Austin A .,y, Middletown Frederick 

McCall, Elizabeth L. . K . .College Park Prince George's 

McCeney, Robert S Silver Spring Montgomery 

McKeever, Galen W Kensington Montgomery 

Marker, Russell E Hagerstown Washington 

Marquis, Theodore E Washington Diistrict of Columbia 

Mathlvs, Leonard G Hagerstown Washington 

Matthews, Harris S La Plata Charles 

Mellor, Sidney M Hagerstown Washington 

Melvin, Willis G Havre de Grace Harford 

Miedwig, John M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Miller, Thomas K Havre de Grace Harford 

MoLLOY, Thomas J Catonsville Baltimore City 

Moore, John F Washington District of Columbia 



222 



Name Home County or State. 

Moss, Howard I Grovans Baltimore City 

Mullen, Charles L Hagerstown Washington 

MuLLiNEAUX, Paul T Mount Airy .Carroll 

MuMFORD, John Wesley. . . .Newark Worcester 

Naudain, Morgan C Sparrow's Point Baltimore 

Nelson, Almon S Washington District of Columbia 

Nichols, Norris N Delmar Wicomico 

Nichols, Robert S Delmar Wicomico 

NiSBET, Andrew N Baltimore Baltimore City 

Nock, Randolph M Stockton Worcester 

Parks, Fred H Timonium Baltimore 

Porter, Robert G. . . .^ . . . .Hyattsville Prince George's 

Posey, Marion W. .l<. La Plata Charles 

Powell, Robert W Princess Anne Somerset 

Quaintance, Howard W Washington District of Columbia 

Quaintance, Leland C Washington District of Columbia 

Reed, Raymond B College Park Prince George's 

Reinmuth, Karl E . ^ Frederick Frederick 

Reppert, Ruth I. .V. Takoma Park District of Columbia 

Richard, William J Goldsboro Caroline 

Rogers, Joseph H Hyattsville Prince George's 

Rosenberg, Charles I Hyattsville Prince George's 

Schaefer, John P Riverdale Prince George's 

Shambach, Frank M^ Baltimore Baltimore City 

Shaw, Elva M . . . . JLc. ..... Barton Allegany 

Shetzen, William Brooklyn New York 

Simons, Roland E Washington District of Columbia 

Skilling, Francis C Baltimore Baltimore City 

Slingland, Earl J. . .y . . . . Allendale New Jersey 

Smith, Nellie O \/,y, . . . Brookland District of Columbia 

Spence, Virginia. 1. .,V\ College Park Prince George's 

Stanton, Guy S ' Grantsville Garrett 

Stoll, Charles C Brooklyn Baltimore 

Straka, Robert P Homestead Pennsylvania 

Sturgis, William C Snow Hill Worcester 

Swan, Gerald A Washington District of Columbia 

Tavenner, Donald B Laurel Prince George's 

Terry, Henry M y, . . Washington District of Columbia 

Thompson, Ruth A. . .vT. . . Brookland District of Columbia 

ToADViNE, Harry L White Haven Wicomico 

Towbes, Louis H Washington District of Columbia 

Troy, Virgil S Centreville Queen Anne 

Van Sant, Bayard R Greensboro Caroline 

Vincent, James M Hyattsville Prince George's 

Walker, Lewis J Clarksburg West Virginia 

Wallis, Albert G Frederick Frederick 

W ATKINS, Donald E Mount Airy Carroll 

Watkins, Robert M Mount Airy Carroll 

White, Charles E College Park Prince George's 

Wick, George A Washington District of Columbia 

Wynkoop, James C Washington District of Columbia 

Yowler, Clarence J Smithsburg Washington 

Zepp, Willard E Clarksville Howard 



223 



Second- Year Agricultural Class 



Name Home County or State. 

Ankers, Hatcher H Sterling Virginia 

Burt, Ronald T Westover Somerset 

€auffman, Lawrence E Merchantville New Jersey 

Chapman, George B Woodstock Virginia 

Davis, Malcolm Washington District of Columbia 

Donovan, Charles A Washington District of Columbia 

Dows, Arthur P Riverside Charles 

Evans, Frank L Charleston West Virginia 

Froelich, Edwin F Crisfield Somerset 

FussELBAUGH, WiLLiAM P. . .Baltimore Baltimore City 

James, Wiluam B Hancock Washington 

Jarrell, Charles L Greensboro Caroline 

Myers, Allyn H Winchester Virginia 

Bourse, Clarence B Alexandria Virginia 

HiDOUT, Charles D Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Second-Year Mechanic Arts Class 

Crippen, Clarence C Hurlock Dorchester 

Edel, Samuel T Baltimore Baltimore City 

Griest, James R Washington District of Columbia 

McFaddin, Harvin E Hagerstown Washington 



First-Year Agricultural Class 



Alderton, Thomas E 

Barron, Alexander M 

Belt, James D 

Bennett, James A 

Eranner, Cecil G 

Crone, George A 

PE YcAZA, Juan M 

Fanciulli, Jack H 

Cundry, Richard 

Johnston, Reginald G 

Jones, Arthur 

Krauk, Edward B 

KuBiTZ, Erich 

Mahan, Joseph F 

Melroy, Malcolm B 

MuNCASTER, John E 

NoRTHAM, A. Floyd 

Richardson, Edward M 

Strawn, Fakr W 

Stubblefield, William L. . . 

Turner, H*ward W 

Umbarger, Gardner T 

Umbarger, Marvin D 



Takoma Park Montgomery 

CoUingswood New Jersey 

Island Creek Calvert 

Vienna Dorchester 

Pocomoke Somerset 

Jessup Howard 

New York City New York 

Washington District of Columbia 

Catonsville Baltimore 

Geneva New York 

Davidsonville Anne Arundel 

Colgate Baltimore 

Annapolis Anne Arundel 

Forest Hill Harford 

Washington New Jersey 

Rockville Montgomery 

Pocomoke Worcester 

Washington District of Columbia 

Landover Prince (George's 

Washington District of Columbia 

White Hall L. . . Harford 

Aberdeen Harford 

Bel Air Harford 



224 
First- Year Mechanic Arts Class 

Name Home County or State» 

DiGGS, John G. K Baltimore Baltimore City 

Ketcham, John R Solomons Calvert 

Lewis, Paul D Newport News Virginia 

Owens, William H Riverdale Prince George's 

SCHOTT, LoREN F Mount Rainier Prince George's 

Smith, Harry B Htirlock Dorchester 

Stanfield, Edward F Roslyn Baltimore 



Barrett, Alfred J 

Barrow, John M 

Chase, Frank S 

Clarke, Glen M .y. 

Cook, Elizabeth . . .t< 

Crawford, Arnold N 

Crooks, William S 

Gingrich, Roy M 

Groton, Thomas C 

ILITCH, DUSHAN M 

Kile, Bryan Z 

Macdonald, Alexander 

Malone, Ruth F \t\. . . . . 

Mann, Riborg G 

Menzel, Kurt F 

Moore, Nathan C 

Nelson, Gordon V 

Paganucci, Romeo J 

Perrie, Alvin L 

Pollock, George F 

Roemer, John P 

Steidel, Oscar L ^, . . . 

Thompson, Bertina. .r. . . . . 

Trail, Oscar 

Umbarger, Henry L 

Wiltshire, Turner H 



Unclassified 

Washington District of Columbia 

Forest Hill Hiarford 

White Stone Virginia 

Clarksville Howard 

Lanham Prince George's 

Cecilton Howard 

Baltimore Baltimore City 

Palmyra Pennsylvania 

Pocomoke Worcester 

Padsg Serbia 

Ridgeland Mississippi 

Washington District of Columbia 

College Park Prince George's 

Washington District of Columbia 

College Park Prince George's 

Rochester New York 

Newport News Virginia 

Waterville Maine 

Clinton Prince George's 

Boyds Montgomery 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Washington District of Columbia 

Riverdale Prince George's 

Easton Talbot 

Bel Air Harford 

Baltimore Baltimore City 



Federal Board for Vocational Education Stadents 

( Rehabilitation ) 

Barton, Wh^ey O Sugar Grove Virginia 

Beaty, Oscar C Washington District of Columbia 

Bird, James F Jackson Wyoming 

Bishop, John Washington District of Columbia 

Boyd, Harry Burdette Baltimore Baltimore City 

Brannan, Thomas C Washington District of Columbia 

Cannon, Amos P Salisbury Wicomico 

Carew, John N Baltimore Baltimore City 

Carter, Lloyd S Westover Somerset 

Chalmers, James S Riverdale Prince George's 

COLMAN, Perry H Washington District of Columbia 

Cooper, Charles H Hampstead "..... Carroll 

COYLE, John W East Syracuse New York 



225 

Name Home County or State, 

Dalton, Robert F Richmond Virginia 

Edmunds, Henry R Farmsville Virginia 

Flynn, Leo G College Park Prince George's 

Franz, Raymond E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Friend, Clarence Hodgenville Kentucky 

Garnett, Robert C Washington District of Columbia 

Grigg, Joseph B Washington District of Columbia 

Hancock, Hugh Huddleston Virginia 

Harnsberger, John H Catlett Virginia 

Harris, Frank B Baltimore Baltimore City 

Hawthorne, N. B., Jr Round Hill Virginia 

Hess, Oscar C Baltimore Baltimore City 

Holland, Arthur H Pemberton Virginia 

Holmes, Orland D Richmond Virginia 

Howell, Clarence L Chase City Virginia 

Hughes, George D Baltimore Baltimore City 

James, Howard V Williamsburg Virginia 

JUGCHEK, Max College Park Prince George's 

Kessler, Thomas J Baltimore Baltimore City 

Knappen, Judson N. C Washington District of Columbia 

LePreaux, William N Sterling Virginia 

Lewis, Longworth B Montross Virginia 

Lint, David L Washington District of Columbia 

Lipscomb, Thomas E Washington District of Columbia 

LuDLUM, Samuel L Bethesda Montgomery 

Morris, Floyd B Centreville Queen Anne 

Nehring, Henry F Laurel Prince George's 

Phelps, Joseph Cambridge Dorchester 

PuLLEN, Jesse P Martinsville Virginia 

Redmond, John E Frederick Frederick 

Ryan, Willla.m T Washington District of Columbia 

Rybak, Joseph Baltimore Baltimore City 

Saunders, William G Landover Prince George's 

Scruggs, Albert T Depot Virginia 

Shaffer, Harry H Upperco Baltimore 

Shepherd, Matson W Berwyn Prince George's 

Simmons, Frank M Chicago Illinois 

Sitwell, Herbert C. F Bedford Virginia 

Sleeth, James R Ronceverte West Virginia 

Snell, Robert L Naranja Florida 

Telman, John Baltimore Baltimore City 

Triplett, Charles C Brunswick Frederick 

Weiss, Edward F Baltimore Baltimore City 

Wheedleton, William C...East New Market Dorchester 

WiLBAND, Seward E Seattle Washington 

WiNEBRENNER, JOSEPH J Cumberland Allegany 



Industrial Teacher Training Courses (Baltimore) 

AuLBACH, Harry W Baltimore Baltimore City 

Baker, Edwin Baltimore Baltimore City 

Ball, Harry E Baltimore Baltimore City 

Caldwell, H. L Baltimore Baltimore City 

Call, Leo F Baltimore Baltimore City 

Cook, Conrad Baltimore Baltimore City 



226 



Name Home County 

Engel, Louis Baltimore Baltimore 

Green, George W Baltimore Baltimore 

Kerner, William Baltimore Baltimore 

Knochel, Ulysses S Baltimore Baltimore 

KUEBERTH, Harry J Baltimore Baltimore 

Panettiere, Vincent Baltimore Baltimore 

Prender, George Baltimore Baltimore 

Rivers, Harry Clermont. . .Baltimore Baltimore 

Sendelbach, John F Baltimore Baltimore 

Skinner, Ross K Baltimore Baltimore 

Smith, Ferdinand C Baltimore Baltimore 

Taylor, Lewis T Baltimore Baltimore 

Walsh, M. L Baltimore Baltimore 

Willhide, Paul A Baltimore Baltimore 



or State. 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 

City 



STUDENTS IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Abell, Daisy S St. Imgoes St. Mary's 

Abell, Emerald St. Imgoes St. Mary's 

Abrams, Sterling E Hagerstown Washington 

Adams, Annie C Baden Prince George's 

Adams, Phyllis G Atholton Howard 

Adoms, J. Holland (Mrs.) . .Waldorf Charles 

AiST, Elsie Cheltenham Prince George's 

Alrbittain, Maria L La Plata Charles 

Albrittain, Pearl M La Plata Charles 

Allee, Helen M Cumberland Allegany 

Andrew, Mildred A Denton Caroline 

Atkins, Alme L La Plata Charles 

AxT, RiDGELY W Baltimore Baltimore City 

Baden, Clara G Brandywine Prince George's 

Baden, Edna I Baden Prince George's 

Baden, Elizabeth L Baden Prince George's 

Baity, Earl C Streett Harford 

Barall, William L Towson Baltimore 

Barnes, Lucille M Port Tobacco Charles 

Beall, Ruth E Poolesville Montgomery 

Beall, Virgie M Germantown Montgomery 

Beall, Wallace R Libertytown Frederick 

Bennett, Frances L. S Churchton Anne Arundel 

BiDDiNGER, Virginia L Walkersville Frederick 

Biggs, Irma V Frederick Frederick 

BisSELL, Dorothy E Westover Somerset 

Bloom, Louise M Ellicott City Howard 

BoARMAN, Sara S Bel Air Harford 

BoDMER, Jessie M Poolesville Montgomery 

Bowerman, Rosalie S Loreley Baltimore 

Branner, Ruth M Pocomoke City Worcester 

Brookbank, Annie V Charlotte Hall St. Mary's 

Brown, Howard Bladensburg Prince George's 

Buckey, Hattie McE Frederick Frederick 

Buckingham, Beryl B Mt. Airy Carroll 

Burdette, Eunice E La Plata Charles 

Burroughs, Louise Clinton Prince George's 



227 



Name Home County or State, 

Caltrider, Samuel P Westminster Carroll 

Campbell, Sarah M Baltimore Baltimore City 

Carrick, Mary A Capitol Heights Prince George's 

Castella, Olive W Riverdale Prince George's 

Chapman, Nannie T Spring Hill Charles 

Christopher, Nellie W Cambridge Dorchester 

Cleary, Hazel K Mt. Airy Carroll 

Cline, Anna G Frederick Frederick 

Coleman, Cora M Chester Queen Anne's 

Combs, Mary E Ridge St. Mary's 

Comer, Alverta E Frederick Frederick 

Conyngton, John Berwyn Prince George's 

Cramer, Blanche B. (Mrs.) . Glen Echo Montgomery 

Crawford, Ruby Quantico Wicomico 

Cromwell, Nannie W Poolesville Montgomery 

Crooks, William S Baltimore Baltimore City 

Cross, Janie A Westwood Prince George's 

CULBERTSON, Mary W Baltimore Baltimore City 

Dail, Jessie R Salem Dorchester 

DoNAHOE, Mamie C Massey Kent 

DORSEY, Ethel A Beltsville Montgomery 

DouB, RoscoE M Middletown Frederick 

DOWNIN, Thomas V Williamsport Washington 

Drawbaugh, John R Washington District of Columbia 

Earnest, Hazel V Mt. Rainier Prince George's 

Ebert, Catherine G Baltimore Baltimore City 

Edwards, Fannie I Massey Kent 

Edwards, Myrtle E Bengies Baltimore 

Evans, Frank L Charleston West Virginia 

Filbert, Edwin B Baltimore Baltimore City 

Flynn, Leo G Seat Pleasant Prince George's 

Fox, ESTON F Hagerstown Washington 

Gallahan, Jessie M Brandywine Prince George's 

Gardiner, Mary M Indian Head Prince George's 

Gilmer, Mary K Elkridge Howard 

Glisan, Sarah M Libertytown Frederick 

Gray, Effie J Nanjemoy Charles 

Gray, J. Alexander Brownsville Washington 

Gray, Sadie L Nanjemoy Charles 

Greer, Mary M Brentland Charles 

Grimes, Maye E Woodbine Carroll 

Guyther, Vera Piney Point St. Mary's 

Hackett, Lavada E Vienna Dorchester 

Haislin, Etta L Welcome Charles 

Hancock, Hugh Huddleston Virginia 

Hand, Mary E Berwyn Prince George's 

Harman, Claudia V Marydel Caroline 

Harrison, Mae A Budds' Creek St. Mary's 

Hart, Cecilia M Oakland Garrett 

Hartman, Sarah A Middletown Frederick 

HiGGiNS, Sarah E Lonaconing Allegany 

Hill, Elsie M Cumberland Allegany 

Hill, James H Hyattsville Prince George's 

Hirsch, Leo Baltimore Baltimore City 



228 



Name Home County or State, 

Holland, Esther M Ridgely Caroline 

HOLTER, Helen L Frederick Frederick 

Houghton, Margaret A Halethorpe Baltimore 

Hunt, Lula W Galloways Anne Arundel 

Johnson, Ella Long Allegany 

Jones, Alice (Mrs.) Capitol Heights Prince George's 

Jones, Allen S Washing^ton District of Columbia 

Keefauver, Lloyd C Hampstead Carroll 

Keim, Horace G Berlin Worcester 

Keller, Minnie S Buckeystown Frederick 

Kepler, Myrie K Middletown Frederick 

Kerry, Katherine E Brandywine Prince George's 

Kersey, Sarah E Chester Queen Anne's 

Key, In a M. (Mrs.) Hyattsville Prince George's 

King, Estelle M Chestertown Kent 

King, Olive E Tippett Prince George's 

Knipple, Julius G. C Westminster Carroll 

Lanham, Mary E Seat Pleasant Prince George's 

Lauterbach, Maynard F. . .Baltimore Baltimore City 

Lawrence, Sarah Capitol Heights Prince George's 

Love, Anna M Morganza St. Mary's 

Lowe, Mary F Mt. Rainier Prince George's 

McCall, Elizabeth L College Park Prince George's 

McNamara, Katherine Cumberland Allegany 

Maggio, Lena V Frederick Frederick 

Malone, Ruth F College Park Prince George's 

Marker, Russell E Hagerstown Washington 

Martin, Ruth Hughesville Charles 

Martz, Grace S Frederick Frederick 

Matthaei, Dorothea E Cumberland Allegany 

Matzen, a. S. (Mrs.) Berwyn Prince George's 

Matzen, Broder a New Market Frederick 

Mealey, Helen L Chestertown Kent 

Meeks, Hope W Hagerstown Washington 

Mellor, Sidney M Washington IMstrict of Columbia 

Menzel, Kurt F Frederick Frederick 

Michael, Elizabeth E Ijamsville Frederick 

Moore, Addie M Station "H" Prince George's 

Moore, Belle Station "H" Prince George's 

MORELAND, Fannie Estelle. Gallant Green Charles 

Morgan, Edwin King Washington District of Columbia 

Morris, Alma Abell St. Mary's 

Morris, Sadie Agnes Abell St. Mary's 

MoxLEY, Sadie Elizabeth. . . Mt. Airy Frederick 

MuLLiNix, Margaret A Woodbine Carroll 

Murphy, Anna Louise Ijamsville Frederick 

Murphy, Joseph Dinsmore . Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Murray, Harriet Lenore. . .Washington District of Columbia 

Nelson, Delia Blanche. . . .Denton Caroline 

NoRRis, Anna Byrd Fullerton Baltimore 

NoRRis, Jane Edith Great Mills St. Mary's 

NouRSE, Clarence Boice Alexandria Virginia 



229 



Name Home County or State. 

Ohler, Mary Rozella Taneytown Carroll 

Padgett, Myrtle Isabel Station "H" Prince George's 

Parran, Ethel Hellen Island Creek Calvert 

Patrick, Ethel Dorothy. . .Woodbine Howard 

Patterson, Wm. Calvin College Park Prince George's 

Pearce, L. Nellie Rock Hall Kent 

Peden, Virginia Batesville Arkansas 

Peel, Mollie Lonaconing Alleghany 

Pinch, Thomas M Glendale Prince George's 

Price, Jay Samuel Snow Hill l Worcester 

PuMPHREY, Alice Lee G^rmantown Montgomery 

PUMPHREY, Esther Germantown Montgomery 

Queen, Marla. Carmolita. . .Waldorf Prince George's 

Raedy, Michael Leo Washington District of Columbia 

Redmond, John Edward Frederick Frederick 

Rison, Eloise Virginia Rison l Charles 

Ritzel, Mary Elizabeth Westover Somerset 

ROBEY, Mary Lucile Croome Prince George's 

Robinson, M. Edith Brightwood District of Columbia 

RocKHOLD, M. Evangeline . . Friendship Anne Arundel 

Roe, Lulu Winniefred Denton Caroline 

Roe, Mildred Charolette. . .Denton Caroline 

Seeger, Pauline Randall. . Frederick Frederick 

Selby, Hattie Idella Cheltenham Prince (George's 

Shaffer, Harry Harrison. .Upperco Baltimore 

Short, Mildred Bell Lewistown Frederick 

Short, Mary Meridian Mississippi 

Short, Myrtle Rebecca Vienna Dorchester 

Sibley, Frances Irene Germantown Montgomery 

Smith, Grace Elizabeth Marydel Caroline 

Snyder, Bertie Irene Taneytown Carroll 

Snyder, Lillie Mae Taneytown Carroll 

SoPER, Elsie May Beltsville Montgomery 

Specht, Bettie Ann Tuscarora Frederick 

Steinle, Kathryn Louise. . .Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

Steuart, Caroline Louise. . Mitchellville Prince Gorge's 

Strawbridge, Viola Fawn Grove Harford 

Templeton, Katherine a. ..Cumberland Allegany 

Thonssen, Ruby Ella Washington District of Columbia 

Trask, Henry Sherwood. . .Washington Ddstrict of Columbia 

Trask, Marion Booth Washington District of Columbia 

Troxell, Thomas Gaithersburg Montgomery 

Umhan, Katharine Sophie . Washington District of Columbia 

Van Horn, Marie Adele Brentwood Prince George's 

Walters, Josephine Eliz . . . Chestertown Kent 

Watson, Mary Ellen Malcolm Charles 

Welch, Mary Myrtle Ridge St. Mary's 

Wheat, Myra Connelly. . . . Chestertown Kent 

White, Helen Elizabeth. ..Baltimore Baltimore City 

White, James Wilson Gaithersburg Montgomery 

WiCKHAM, Helena Nottingham Prince George's 

Wolfe, Elmer A Union Bridge Carroll 



230 

Name Home County or State. 

Wooden , Louis Elizabeth .. Baltimore Baltimore City 

Wynkoop, J. Cartwright. . .Washington District of Columbia 

Wyvill, Ruth Cleveland. . .Marlboro Prince George*s 

YouNKiN, Hazel Geviene. . . Grantsville Garrett 

Zantzinger, Jr., Otway B. . Hyattsville Prince George's 



Summary of Student Enrollment at tke Close of the Second Term, 

March 23, 1920 

Graduate Students 12 

Seniors 42 

Juniors 41 

Sophomores 82 

Freshmen 148 

Second Year Agricultural 15 

Second Year Mechanic Arts 4 

First Year Agricultural 23 

First Year Mechanic Arts 7 

Unclassified 26 

Federal Board for Vocational Education (Rehabilitation) . . 59 

Industrial Teachers' Training Course 20 

Summer School 201 

Total 680 

Duplications 25 

Total Net Enrollment 655 



GENERAL INDEX 



Administration, 25 
building, 29 
committees, 16 
council of, 8 
officers of, 7 
Administrative officers, 17 
Admission, 26 

to advanced standing-, 28 
certificate, 26 
elective subjects, 28 
examination by, 27 
units, number required, 27 
Advanced undergraduates, 61 
Advanced graduates, 61 
Advanced standing, 28 
Advisers, Arts School, 127 
Agents, county, 14 
Agricultural building, 29 
chemistry, 30 
club, 33 
economics, 139 
education, 176 
education methods, 109 
Experiment Station, 40 
Experiment Station staff, 12 
Extension, 23 
Extension staff, 13 
Society, 32 
Agriculture, 39 

and home economics, 23 
college of, 39 
courses in, 42 
curricula offered in, 42 
economics, 82 
general curriculum in, 42 
short course in, 87 
two-year course in, 88 
Agricultural education, 168 
Agronomy, 54, 56 
Algebra, 106 

Alternating currents, 101 
design, 100 
machinery, 106 
Alumni Association, 32 
Alumnus, State College, 32 
America, literature in, 130 
Mechanics, 110 
Anatomy and physiology, 76 

comparative, 85 
Ancient people, 167 
Animal husbandry, 64, 65, 67 
diseases, 76 
Industry, courses, 77 
pests, 82 
Annual expenses, 35 
Aquiculture, 82 
Architecture, school, 116 



Art and handicraft, 194 

civic, 50 
Arts, School of Liberal, 124 
Astronomy, 108 
Athletics, 34 

Bachelor's degree, 29, 124 
Bacteriology, 73, 74, 75 
Band music, 146 
Battalion, 215 
Batteries, 98 
Beekeeping, 87 
Beef production, 66 
Biological chemistry, 186 
Biometry, 57 
Blacksmithing, 114 
Board of Regents, 7 
committees, 7 
officers, 8 
Botanical Group, 58 
Botany, 58, 59, 60 
Breeding, 67 
Breeds and judging, 67 
Buildings, 29, 30 
Buildings in Baltimore, 30 
Business management, journalistic, 143 
Calculus, 107 
Calendar, College, 5 

general, 4 
Calvert Hall, 30 
Carpentry,115 
Catalog, committee on, 17 
Catering, 193 
Cement testing, 102 
Cereal crops, 55, 57 
Certificate, admission by, 27 
Certificates, two-year, 41, 214 
Chemical building, 30 

club, 33 

engineering, 184 
Chemistry, agricultural, 185 

biological, 186 

curriculum, 186 

general, 180 

industrial, 183 

inorganic, 188 

School of, 180 
Chess and Checker Club, 33 
Christian Associations, 33 
Citizenship prize, 35 
Civil engineering, 90, 91 

curriculum, 90 
Clothing economics, 194 
Clubs, 33 

College entrance, committee on, 16 
College of Agriculture, 39, 40 

requirements, 27 



232 



College of Pharmacy, 162 
faculty, 162 
fees and expenses, 164 
College, Schools of, 9 
City workers, 14 
Committees, 7 

Board of Rgents, 7 
Council, 8 
Faculty, 16 
Community study, 82 
Comparative anatomy, 85 
Composition and rhetoric, 130 

practical, 129 
Concrete, 117 

structure, 117 
Conditions, entrance, 27 
Constitutional law, 138 
Contemporary political problems, 139 
Contents, table of, 3 
Council of administration, 8 
Country newspaper, 142 
County demonstration agents, 13 

clubs, 33 
Courses, description of, 46, 63, 107, 

122, 153 
Courses for graduates, 51 
Crop breeding, 56, 57 

investigation, 56 

rotation, 56 
Current history, 137 
Curricula in agriculture, 41 
Curricula in dairy husbandry, 69 
Cytology, 60 
Daily paper, 142 
Dairy husbandry, 68, 70 

production, 70 
Dairying, 68, 69, 70 
Deans, 9 
Debate, 145 

Debating and oratory, 34 
Decoration, home, 194 
Degrees, 29, 41, 124, 168, 169, 171, 196, 

197 

Bachelor's, 29, 41, 168, 169, 171, 

196 
conferred 1919, 214 
Delineation, scientific, 86 
Departments, 39, 40 
Description of courses, 46, 65, 107, 

122, 153 
Description of courses, 174 
Descriptive geometry, 95, 96 
Design, machine, 105, 106 

structural, 116 
Differential equations, 107 
Dining hall, 31 

Diplomas, teachers' special, 165 
Direct current theory, 97 

current design, 100 

current machinery. 99 
Division of Animal Industry, 63 

Plant Industry, 43 
Doctor of Philosophy, 196 
Domestic Science, 191 
Drafting, 96, 119 
Drama, French, 133 

and poetry, German, 134 

early English, 131 

Elizabethan, 131 

modern English, 131 

technique of, 131 
Dramatic Club, 32 
Drawing, 95 

freehand, 95 



general engineering, 96 

mechanical, 96 
Dress design, 193, 194 

making, 193 
Dynamos and alternating current, 97 
Ecology, 61 
Economic history, 140 

zoology, 83 
Economics, 139, 140 

agricultural, 82 

Home, School of, 190 
Education, agricultural, 168, 176 

curricula in, 168 

general, 42, 43 

home economics, 169, 170, 177 

industrial, 171 

of women, 178 

School of, 165 

Summer School, 25 
Educational guidance, 176 
Educational units, 9 
Electric power plants and transmis- 
sion, 98, 99 
Electrical design, 100 

design laboratory, 101, 102 

engineering, 92, 99 

equipment repairs, 100 

interior wiring, 100 

measuring instruments, 100 

outside line construction, 100 

railways, 98 
Electives in agriculture, 88 

in agricultural education, 203 

in animal industry, 63 

in general education, 206 

in home economics, 209 

in liberal arts, 210 
Elections, restrictions on, 127 
Electricity and magnetism, 111 
Electro-chemistry, 188 
Elizabethan drama, 131 
Embryology, 85 
Engineering, School of, 89 

building, 30 

civil, 90 

curricula, 90 

electrical, 92 

mechanical, 93 

rural, 94 

Society, 32 
English, 128 

composition and rhetoric, 130 

history, 137 

language and literature, 129, 130, 131 

words, 83 
Entomologist, State, 130 
Entomology, 85, 86 

economic, 85 

systematic, 86 
Essay, 130 

Estimates and costs, 107 
Europe, governments of, 138 
Examinations, 27 
Expenses, fees and, 36 
Experiment Station, Agricultural, 24 

buildings, 31 

Eastern Branch, 24 

staff, 12 
Experimental engineering, 102 

laboratory, 102 
Extension Service, 13 

home economics, 23 

general, 23 

staff, 13 



233 



Facilities for instruction, 119, 121, 122 
Faculty, 10, 11 

committees of, 16 
Family, history of, 178 
Farm accounting, 83 

buildings, 117 

chemistry, 95 

crops, classification of, 56 

drawing, 96 

equipment, 80 

experience, 41 

management, 15, 80, 81 

practice, 85 

structures, design of, 116 
Feature writing, 143 
Federal, state, and municipal govern- 

m.ent, 138 
Feeds and feeding, 102 
Fees and expenses, 35 
Fellowships, 37, 41 
Fertilizer and food analysis, 189 
Fertilizer work, state, 16 
Fertilizers and soils, 77, 78 
Filtration plant, 31 
Finance, corporation, 139 
Floriculture, 45, 49, 50, 52. 54 
Food economics, 190 
Foods and nutrition, 192 

preparation and service of, 192 
Forage crops, 56, 57 
Forestry, 63 

Forging and pipe-fitting, 114 
Foundry work, 114 
Frame crops, 48 
Fraternities, 32 
Freehand drawing, 95 

perspective, 194 
French, 133 

scientific, 133 
Freshman, course combination for, 125 

courses open to, Art School, 125 
Fruit culture, 46 

judging, 47 
Fruits, economic, 47 
Garment construction, 193 
Gas engines, 110 
General education, 166 

agriculture, 43 

information, 19 
Genetics, animal, 66 
Geodesy, 118 
Geology, 78 

soils, 77 
Geometry analytical, 106 
German, 134 

Government of United States, 138 
Governments of Europe, 138 
Grading farm crops, 56 
Graduate Council, 17 
Graduate School, 196 
Graduate fees, 36 
Grain judging, 55 
Graduation and degrees, 29 
Graphic status, 110 
Greek, 132 

letter societies, 32 
literature, 132 
Greenhouse management and con- 
struction, 48, 49 
Group prescription, Art School, 126 
Head writing and makeup, 143 
Heat and light, 112 
and ventilation, 109 

engineering, 109 
engines, 108 



Highway engineering, 102 
High school scholarships, 37 
Histology, 60, 85 

History and political science, 137, 138, 
139 

and fiction, French, 134 

and fiction, German, 135 

of the college, 21 
Home architecture, 194 
Home economics, 177 

agriculture and, 23 

education, 177 

School of, 190 
Home economics education, 169, 170 
Home nursing, 195 
Honors and awards, 34 
Horse and mule production, 66 
Horticultural building, 30 

entomology, 86 
Horticulture, curricula, 43 

general courses, 50 

requirements of graduate students 
in, 52 

State Department of, 15 
Hospital, 30 

House administration, 195 
Hydraulic and sanitary engineering, 
103 

design, 105 
Hydraulics, 103 
Hydromechanics, 103 
Hygiene, school, 108 
Illumination, 99 
Industrial education, 178 

chemistry, 183 
Industrial education, 171 

related subjects — 4-year course, 171, 
172 

related subjects — 2-year course, 173 
Infirmary, 30 
Information, general, 19 
Inorganic chemistry, 188 
Insecticides, 86 
Instruction, officers of, 10, 11 
Instruction, 89 

Interfraternity council, 32, 33 
International law, 138 
Journalism, 142 

history of, 142 
Judging dairy products, 71 

domestic animals, 67 
Kappa Alpha, 32 
Keystone Club, 33 
Kinematics, 105 
Laboratory fees, 35 
Landscai>e design, 50 

gardening, 45, 50, 51, 54 

practice, 50 
Language and literature, 126 
Languages, ancient, 132 
Late registration fee, 36 
Latin and American republics. 137 
Le Cercle Francais, 33 
Least squares, 107 
Liberal Arts, School of, 124 
admission, 26 
advisers, 127 
course combination for freshman, 

125 
courses open to freshmawi, 125 
group prescription, 126 
majors and minors, 127 
organization and purpose, 124 
regulations, 125 



234 



relations with other schools, 127 
restriction, general, 127 
Library, 31 
building, 32 
methods, 145 
science, 145 
Liebig Chemical Society, 33 
Light and illumination, 98 
Literary societies, 33 
Literature, French, 134 
German, 134 
in America, 130 
Live stock sanitation, 15 
Location of the College, 21 
Lunchroom management, 195 
Machine design, 105 

work, 114 
Machinery, farm, design of, 106 
Markets and marketing, 67 
Maryland, history of, 137 
Masonry, 116 
Master of Arts, degree of, 196 

of science, degree of, 196 
Materials, laboratory, 121, 153 

of construction, 110 
Mathematics, 106, 107, 108 

shop, 108 
Matriculation fee, 35 
Meat and meat production, 66 
Mechanical drawing, 96 
engineering, 93, 108 
laboratory, 120 
Mechanics and materials, 110, 111 
and sound, 111 
of engineering. 111 
of teaching, 178 
Medal, military, 34 
Medals and prizes, 215 
Methods in agricultural extension, 177 
in home economics, 178 
in home economics extension, 178 
in vocational agriculture, 176 
Military medal, 34 

science and tactics, department of, 
25, 198 
Milk, market, 71 

testing, 71 
Millinery, 194 
Mineralogy, 182 

Modern and contemporary European 
history, 137 

English drama, 131 
languages, 133, 134, 135, 186 
Money and banking, 139 
Morrill Hall, 30 

Land Grant, 22 
Morphology, insect, 85 

plant, 59, 60 
Mule, horse and, production, 66 
Municipal government, 138 
Music, 146 
fees, 36 
Mycology, 60 

New Mercer Literary Society, 38 
News and editorial writing, 142 

writing, 142 
Newspaper editing, 142 

operation, 144 
Nineteenth century poetry, 130 
Novelists of the nineteenth century, 

131 
Nu Sigma Omicron, 32 
Nutrition, 67, 192 
Offices, administrative, 29 
of instruction, 10, 11 



Olericulture, 48 
Oral reading, 145 
Oratory, 145 

Oratorical Association, Maryland, 34 
Organizations, College, 32 
Ornament and design, 195 
Pathology, 62 
Pattern-making, 115 
Pests, animal, 87 
Physical chemistry, 187 
Education and Recreation, Depart- 
ment of, 25, 213 
Physics, 111 

laboratory, 112 
Physiological chemistry, 189 
Piano, courses in, 146 
Pipe-fitting, 115 
Plant anatomy, 59 
diseases, 63 

Industry, Division of, 43 
materials, 49 
micro-chemistry, 61 
morphology, 60 
mycology, 60 
pathology, 62 
physiology, 60, 61, 62 
Poe Literary Society, 32 
Poetry, nineteenth century, 130 
Political parties, 139 

science, 169 
Pomology, 44, 46, 52, 53 
Poultry husbandry, 68 

building, 31 
Power-plant operation, 110 
Pre-medical curriculum, 84 
President, Albert P. Woods, D. Agr.. 8^ 
Prize, citizenship, 35 
Professional degrees in engineering^ 

197 
Psychology, 176 
Public finance, 164 

speaking, 144 
Qualitative analysis, 181 
Quantitative analysis, 182 
Railway engineering, 113 
curves, 113 
earthwork, 113 
economics, 113 
Railways, electrical, 98 
Reading and speaking, 128 
Refunds, 37 

Register of students, 216 
Registrar's oflSce, 29 
Registration, 28 
Regulation, Arts School, 125 
Relations with other Schools, Arts 

School, 127 
Research, extension and, 23 
Reserve Oflicers' Training Corps, 127^. 

198 
Reveille, 34 

Review, Maryland State, 34 
Rhetoric, 130 
Rifle Club, 33 
Roads, country, 108 
Roman, literature, 188 
Rossbourg Club, 33 
Rural community and its education^ 
177 

engineering, 94 
organization, 82, 83 
Sanitary engineering, 108 
Sanitation, 105 
live stock, 16 
Scholarships and self-aid, 37 



235 



School 

of chemistry, 180 

of education, 165 

of engineering, 89 

graduate, 26 

of home economics, 25, 190 

of liberal arts, 25, 124 
School of Dentistry, 159 

faculty, 159 

matriculation and fees, 160 
School of Education, 165 

curricula, 165 

teachers' special diplomas, 165 

special courses, 166 

general education, 166, 167 
School of Law, 155 

faculty, 155 

courses of instruction, 155 

fees and expenses, 158 
School of Medicine. 148 

faculty, 148 

calendar, 149 

facilities, 149 

dispensaries and laboratories, 150 

prizes and scholarships, 150 

requirements for entrance, 150 

schedule for pre-medical college 
course, 153 

fees and expenses, 154 
Schools, officers of, 10 
Secondary education, 175 
Self -aid, 38 
Seminars, 52, 53, 57 
Sewerage, 104 

Shades, shadows, perspective, 96 
Sheep production, 66 
Shop mathematics, 138 

practice, 113, 114 
Short courses, 53, 57, 63, 67, 68, 72, 75, 

77, 79, 87, 97 
Short story, 131 
Sigma Nu, 32 
Sigma Phi Sigma, 32 
Social science, 125 
Societies, 32 

Greek letter, 32 

literary, 32 
Sociology, 140, 141 
Soils, 77, 78, 79 

bacteriology, 73 

chemistry, 77 
Spanish, 135 

literature, 17th and 18th century, 
136 
Special courses, teachers', 166 
Special courses for teachers, 174 
Special fees, 36 
Sprays and spraying, 87 
Staff, Experiment Station, 12 

Extension Service, 14 
State fertilizer work, 15 
Standing, advanced, 28 



State chemist, 10 

entomologist, 10 
State Horticultural Department, 15 
Station, Experiment, 24 
Steam engines, boilers, and dynamos, 

108 
Stock judging pavilion, 30 
Structural design, 116 
Student assembly, 32 
labor, 38 

organizations and activities, 32 
Students, list of, 216 
publications, 34 
publications, committee on, 16 
Subject-matter groups, 124 
Subjects accepted for admission, 27 
Summary of regular students. See 

form 
Summer school, 26 

work and inspection, 90 
Surveying, 117, 118, 119 
Swine production, 66 
Tailoring, 194 
Taxonomy, 60 

Teachers' special diplomas, 165 
Teaching methods, 174 

supervised, 175, 176, 177 
Technical analysis, 182 
instruction, 110 
mechanics, 110 

writing, and scientific thought, 130 
Technique of the drama, 131 
Telegraphy and Telephony, 98, 100 
Telephone laboratory, 101 
Testimonials, 215 
Textiles, 193 
Trade journal, 143 
Trigonometry, 106, 107 
Tuition, no change for, 35, 36 
Two-year agriculture, 87, 88 

mechanic arts, 122, 123 
Unclassified students, 28 
Uniform, 199 
Unit, definition of, 27 

United States, history of, 

social and economic history of, 140 
Urban workers, 14 

Vegetable gardening, 44, 48, 49, 52, 53 
Veterinary medicine, 76 
Vocational education, 175 

publications, 129 
Water supply, 104, 105 
Wireless laboratory, 102 

telegraphy, 98 
Withdrawals, 36 

Women, admitted to all courses, 26 
Women's home economics practtce 

house, 29 
Woodworking, 113, 114 
Young Men's Christian Association, 33 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion, 33 
Zoology, 83 



(K^Oi-