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\, 



THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE 



1921-1922 



Containing general informalion concerning the Vninrsily. Announce- 
ments for the Scholaslic Year 1921-102^, and Keconh of 19^0-1931 



i 



Contents 



Calendar of Months 4 

University Calendar 5 

Board of Regents, University Council, Educational Units, Officers 

OF Instruction, Committees, etc 8 

General Information 19 

Location 21 

Historical statement 21 

Building and grounds 22 

Scholarships and self-aid 25 

Honors and awards 26 

Student activities and organizations 27 

Administration 28 

Extension and research , . 30 

Income 32 

Admission and requirements 32 

Degrees, diplomas and expenses 35 

Fees, deposits and expenses 36 

Administrative procedure, including suggestions for new students 38 

Educational Units 

College of Agriculture 41 

College of Arts and Sciences 83 

School of Dentistry 115 

College of Education 117 

College of Engineering 131 

Graduate School 145 

College of Home Economics 148 

Law School 153 

School of Medicine 161 

School of Pharmacy 157 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 163 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation 169 

List of Degrees Conferred, Awards, Register of Students, Summary 

OF Students 170 



\rJ 



'h 



^\y 



Calendar for 1921, 1922, 1923 



1921 



1922 



JULY 



s 


M T 

. • 1 . . 


W 


T 


F S 
1 2 


3 

10 

17 

24 

31 


45 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


8 9 
15 16 
22 23 
29 30 








' ■ 






AUGI 


rsi 


« 



iM T W| TIFiS 
.1 2 3 14 ; 5!6 
7 8 9 101111213 
14 15 16*17 18 19 20 
21 22123 24 25 26 27 
28 29130 31 . ..... 



SEPTEMBER 



SM T W 



4 5 



18| 
25 2 



6!7 
2 13 14 
9 20 21 



T F S 

1 2 j3 

8 j 9 jlO 

15 1617 

22*23 24 



!6 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 
S^WTTiWTlF 



2 : 3 I 4! 5 
9 10 U 12 
16 17 1819 
2324 25 26 

30131 ..i.. 



; 1 

6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 



NOVEMBER 

T W T F S 
1' 2 I 3 4 5 
^'9 !lO!fM2 
l?16tliaaj9 
22r23 24 25i2(5 
29.30r:mT".'. 




DECEMBER 



S.MiT'WjTiFlS 
........ l!2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14,15 16 1 17) 
18 19 20 21122 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30131 



JANUARY 



8 
15 
22 
29 



W 

4 



MIT 

9 lOlll 
16 17 1819 
23 24 25 26 
30 31 



TlF 

5 6 
1213 



20 



S 

7 

14 

21 



27 28 



FEBRUARY 



SjM T W 

..,.. . 1 
5 16 7 8 
1213 14 15 
1920 21 22 
26 27 28 . . 



F 
3 



S 
4 



T 

2 

9 llOiU 

16.17 18 

23 24 25 



MARCH 



S!M 



5 6 
12 13 
19 20 



T!WIT 

..^12 
7 8 9 
14 15 16 
21 22 23 



2627 28,29,30 



F 

3 

IC 

17 

24 

31 



S 

4 

11 

18 

25 



APRIL 




2 

9 

16 

23 

30 



S 

1 

8 

15 

22 







MAY 






s 


M 


T 


W T F 


s 




1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 .. 

: 


. . . . 



JUNE 



SjM 



4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
2526 



TIW 



6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27128 



T 
1 
8 

15 



F 
2 
9 

16 



S 
3 
10 
17 



22 23 24 
29 30i . . 



1923 



JULY 



S M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 
8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• • 

6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


1213 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




..!.. 


• • 


• • 



AUGUST 



s 


MiTW 


T 


F 


S 




.. 1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 89 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 30 

- : . _ i _ _ 


31 






' 


, . 



SEPTEMBER 



SiMiTlW 



F 

1 
8 



S 
2 
9 



3 ! 41 5' 6 

lO'U 1213 

1718 19-20 21 22 23 

24 25 26] 2f 28 29 30 



14115 16 



;26J2f 



OCTOBER 



S MIT 

1 i 2 ' 3 
8 9 110 
15 16ll7 



W 

4 
11 
18 



22 



24 25*26 27 28 29 29 



232425 
30131!.. 



T 

5 

12 

19 

26 



F 
6 
13 
20 

27 



S 

7 

14 

21 

28 



NOVEMBER 



SIM T 


W T F S 


..i.. .. 


12 3 4 


5'6 7 


8 9 10 11 


1213 14 


15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 :z#3 24 25 



DECEMBER 



S M 

u 

17 18:19 

2412526 



1T12 



WIT 



6 
13 
20. 
2 



7 
14 



1 



F 

1 

8 

15 

22 



S 

2 

9 

16 

2i 



1J|..i 



29 30 



JANUARY 




F|S 

5 16 

1213 

18jl9;20 

2526127 



FEBRUARY 



S;M 



4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25126 



6 
13 



Wl 



s 

3 
10 



TIF 

.12 

7j8i9 

14'l5 1617 
20i21i22 23124 
2728'.. I..!.. 



MARCH 



4 
11 
18 
25 



M 



12il3 
19120 
26 



W 



Tl 
1 

81 

15116 
21J22 23 



7 
14 



F! S 
213 
9 10 



17 
24 



27i^29!30|^l 



APRIL 




MAY 



M 



13 
20 
27 



14 
21 
28129 



T 
1 
8 

15 

22 



W 

2 
9 
16 
23 



TiF 

3i4 

1011 

1718 

2425 



30131 



S 

5 

12 

19 

26 



JUNE 



SM 



3 4 
10!11J12 



17 
24 



18 19 



WIT 



67 



F 
I 
8 



S 
2 
9 



13^14!l5jl6 
M2li2223 



25i26!27i28 29130 



University Calendar 1921-1922 

Unless otherwise indicated, this calendar refers to the activities at College 



Park. 



FIRST TERM 



1^21 ^ ^ 

Sept. 19-20 Monday— Tuesday 

Sept. A/jil Wednesday, 8.20 a. m. 

\ 

I Sept^i^ 7, n Wednesday, 11.20 a. m. 
Sept.-2^ Friday, 8.00 p. m. 



Monday 

Monday 
Monday 



Seijt:26- 




■^ 



/ 



Second Friday in 

ovember, 8.00 p. m. 

dnesday, 12.00 m. 



N 



xxvi^^^v ^ Thursday 



? 



Nov. 3^ 



</ 






D^/ 



Tuesday, 8.20 a. m. 

Second Friday after 
Thanksgiving, 8 p. m. 

Friday, 8.00 p. m. 



Entrance and condition examina- 
tions. Registration for all 
students. 
Instruction for first term begins 
No admission to classes without 
class cards. 
Assembly of student body for 

President's annual address. 
President's reception for new 
students. Presentation of Fresh- 
man Code. 
Last day to register or change 
registration without payment of 
additional fee. 
The School of Law. Regular ses- 

sion begins. 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Regular session begins. 

Freshmar^entertainment^ 

Thanksgiving recess begji 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Thanksgiving day. Holiday. 

Classes begins after Thanksgiving 
recess. ^ 



Christmas Dance. 

Presentation by "The Players 
Registration for second term. 



»» 



l^W- ^l 



Dec.^*V \ 






j'^.^n 



Dec. tt 2 Wednesday 



J 



First term ends. 
Christmas recess begins 

The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 
Christmas recess begins 
last lecture period 



after 




<^ SECOND TERM 



1 



Jan. 3 



V 



w<JC^^ 



Jan. 



\ 



— 3\it'!5da> , 8.20 a.m. 
WedncDd u y 



1 



Jan. 



^ 



Feb. I 'l^ 
Feb. 22 



Mar. I 

Mar. 

Mar. 

^ 



Payment of fees and securing class 
cards. (Office of the Financial 
Secretary and Office of the Reg- 
istrar open from 8.00 a.m. to 
5.00 p.m.) 

Instruction for second term begins. 
No admission to classes without 
class cards. 

The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Christmas recess ends. Lec- 
tures begin at 9 a.m. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without paj^ment of 
additional fee. 
First Friday in February Intersociety debate. 
Wed«esrfa3:^"* i.'''Vvw>.^^ Washington's Birthday. General 

1 holiday for College Park colleges 
and the four schools in Balti- 
more 

Intercollegiate debate. 

Registration for third term. 

Second t erm ends.^/ i:a5trTiay for^ 
_ ^ fees^ and securing 

class cards. (Office of the Fi- 
nancial Secretary and Office of 
the Registrar open from '-g 
a.m. to 5.00 p.m.) ,._ ^\ 

Instructidn for third term begins 

3AJUL w ^^ admission to classes without 

^yVAx^ ^ ^ ^j^gg cards. 



Thursday^S.OO p.m. 




0-r\-^ 






-^-M, 



M«r.ii.^ M«i**iy, 8.20;a.m. 




Monday 



'Apr 13 — ' 







J 








June % ^ I 

June \ 



June ^ 
June 9l 
June 9 
June 1^ 



1 



"^xesd^yr^m^scW: 



Wednesday, 8.20 a.m 

Third Friday in May, May Ball. 
8.30 p.m. » \ . , 

Thursday 



Last day to register or change 
registration without payment of 
additional fee. 

-£a£ter reo«6& begi ns ^ » ■ 

The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Easter recess begins after last 

lecture period. 

The School of Medicine 

The School of Law 

The School of Pharmacy 

The School of Dentistry 

Classes begin after Easter recess. 

lasses begin after Easter recess. 



Friday, 8.00 p.m. 
Sunday, 11.00 a.m. 

Thursday, 8.00 p.m. 

Friday 

Friday, 9.00 p.m. 

Saturday, 11.00 a.m. 



Decoration Day. Holiday. 

The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 
Commencement Day. 

Presentation by "The Players." 

Beginning Commencement exer- 
cises. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Class Day exercises. 

Reunion Day. 

Commencement Ball. 

Commencement Day. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

(Members appointed by the Governor for terms of nine years) 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Chairman 1916-1925 

Eccleston, Baltimore County. 

Robert Grain 1916-1924 

Mt. Victoria, Charles County. 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer 1916-1923 

Union Trust Co., Baltimore. 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow 1916-1922 

6 West Madison Street, Baltimore. 

John E. Raine 1921-1930 

413 East Baltimore Street, Baltimore. 

Charles C. Gelder 1920-1929 

Princess Anne, Somerset County. 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary 1919-1928 

Kensington, Montgomery County. 

B. John Black 1918-1927 

Roslyn, Baltimore County. 

Henry Holzapfel 1917-1926 

Hagerstown, Washington County. 



COMMITTEES 

UNIVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAL WORK 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow, Chairman 

Robert Grain 

Dr. W. W. Skinner 

EXPERIMENT STATION AND INVESTIGATIONAL WORK 

B. John Black, Chairman 
Dr. W. W. Skinner 
Henry Holzapfel 

EXTENSION AND DEMONSTRATION WORK 

Robert Grain, Chairman 
B. John Black 
John E. Raine 

INSPECTION AND CONTROL WORK 

John M. Dennis, Chairman 
Henry Holzapfel 
Charles C. Gelder 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



ALBERT F. WOODS, A.M., D. Agr., President. 
H. C. BYRD, B.S., Assistant to the President. 

J. E. PALMER, Executive Secretary. 

MAUDE F. McKENNEY, Financial Secretary. 

G. S. SMARDON, Comptroller. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Registrar. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Superintendent of Hospitals. 

H. L. CRISP, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings. 

T. A. HUTTON, Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students* Supply Store. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., President of the University. 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President. 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Thomas H. Spence, M.A., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

H. F. CoTTERMAN, M.S., Dean of the College of Education. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

T. B. Sy'MONS, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service. 

R. H. Leavitt, Major, U. S. A., Head of the Department of Military Science 
and Tactics. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., President. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph. D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Secretary. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

E. N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

N. E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 



Albert F. Woods, M.A., D.Agr., President 
(The order of the following is that of seniority of appointment) 
H B McDonnell, M.S., M.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
T. h! Spence, M.A., Professor of Modern Languages, Acting Dean of College 

of Arts and Sciences. 
W. T. L. Taliaferro, A.B., Sc.D., Professor of Farm Management. 
J *B S Norton, M.S., Professor of Systematic Botany and Mycology. 
Charles S. Richardson, M.A., Professor of Public Speaking and Extension 

Education. . . ^r- r^ c 

Harry Gwinner, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engmeenng, Vice-Dean of 

College of Engineering. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
E. N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 
C, 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Dean 

of Graduate School. 
Roy H. Waite, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
L. B. Broughton, M.S., Professor of Industrial Chemistry. 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President and Director of Athletics. 
C. E. Temple, M.S., Professor of Plant Pathology. 
J. E. Metzger, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 
O. C. Bruce, B.S., Professor of Soils. 
C. J. PiERSON, M.A., Professor of Zoology. 
P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Professor of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Dean of 

College of Agriculture. 
J. B. Wentz, M.S., Professor of Agronomy. 
A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 
R. C. Reed, D.V.M., Professor of Animal Pathology, Chairman of Animal 

Industry Group. . t^- 4. 

H. F. Cotterman, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agricultural Education, Director 
of Vocational Teacher Training, Dean College of Education. 

J. A. Gamble, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

E. M. Pickens, D.V.S., M.S., Professor of Bacteriology and Animal Patholo- 
gist of the Biological and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. / 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. C. AucHTER, M.S., Professor of Horticulture. 

M. Marie Mount. B.A., Professor of Home and Institutional Management, 
Acting Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Edna B. McNaughton, B.S., Professor of Home Economics Education. 

M. M. Proffitt, Ph.B., Professor of Industrial Education. 

Neil E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry, State Chemist. 

T. B. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Sociology. 



S. S. Steinberg, B.E.. C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering 
Fkeida M. Wiegand, B.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothine 
'R. V. Truitt, B.S., Professor of Aquiculture. 
H. A. Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Vegetable Gardening 
R. W. Carpenter, A.B., Professor of Farm Equipment 

" Chor^l^Musir'^" ^'°^^^^°' °^ ^"2"* ^"^ E"S"* Literature, Director of 

A. N. Johnson, S.B Professor of Highway Engineering, Director of Engi- 
neering Research, Dean of College of Engineering 

M^'" ^- "n^ ^T'""' ^;f-^-' ^'°^'''"'' "^ ^"'*«^ «««»<=« «nd Tactics. 

Tacttc. ' ^' ^' ^""''*' ^"'^^'"'' "^ '^""^^y Science and 

*Frederick Juchhoff, LL.M., Ph.D., Professor of Accounting 
F. W. Bbsley, A.B., M.F., D.Sc, Lecturer on Forestry 

''tntZtla^LaT' ''•^- ''•'•"- ""•^•' ^^^"-^ "" ^^^•-->^ -"^ 

O. G. EiCHLiN, B.S., Professor of Physics. 

H. W. Stinson, B.S., Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

H. W. RiCHEY, M.S., Associate Professor of Pomology 

G.l. SCHULZ, A B Assistant Professor of History and Political Science. 

C.F. Kramer, J. R., A.M., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

J. 1. bPANN, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

R. C. Wiley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

H. B. HosHALL, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. Thurston, M.S., Assistant Professor of Floriculture 

^Tiolo^^'^''^ ^*^*^" ^^^^^^""^ Professor of Animal Pathology and Bacte- 

L. B. HODGINS, B.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

I. G. Gibson, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

George 0. Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

M. A. Pyle, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering 

W. A. Griffith, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene, College Physician. 

MiLTANNA Rowe, Instructor in Library Science, Librarian 

M. D. Bowers, A.B., Instructor in Journalism 

^^and C^oXT ^' ^'''^'''' ^*^" Instructor in Textiles and Clothing, Foods 

L. J. PoELMA, D.V.S., Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology 

Benjamin Berman, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics and Drawing 

W F ^^^^^^^J^' I^f r^^tor in Horticulture, Horticultural Superintendent. 

VV. E. Leer, B.S.A., Instructor in Agronomy. 

Susan E. Harman, A.M., Instructor in English. 

O. C. Lichtenwalner, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Albert Vierheller, B.S.A., Instructor in Horticulture for Federal Board 
otuaents. 

D. C. Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering 

Edward F. New, B.P., LL.M., Instructor in Commercial Law. 



*B. M. WOOLSEY, A.M., Instructor in Business Administration. 

F. D. Day, B.S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 
Carleton Rutledge, Assistant in Poultry Husbandry. 

G. B. Hockman, B.S., Teaching-Fellow in Chemistry. 
E. B. Starkey, B.S., Teaching-Fellow in Chemistry. 
W. J. Sando, B.S., Teaching-Fellow in Agronomy. 

B. L. Goodyear, B.S., B.Mus., Teacher of Voice and Piano. 
M. McManus, Sgt. U.S.A., Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 
E. Ferguson, Sgt. U.S.A., Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 
W. H. Simmons, Sgt. U.S.A., Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

*By Special arrangement with American University. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



Harry J. Patterson, D.Sc Director and Chemist. 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S Botany and Plant Pathology. 

Thos. H. White, M.S Vegetable and Floriculture. 

Chas. O. Appleman, Ph.D Plant Physiology. 

Roy H. Waite, B.S Poultry. 

E. N. Cory, M.S Entomology. 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D Soils. 

J. E. Metzger, B.S Agronomy. 

E. M. Pickens, A.M., D.V.M Animal Pathology. 

E. C. Auchter, M.S Horticulture. 

Albert White, B.S Superintendent, Ridgely Farm. 

F. S. Holmes, M.S Seed Inspection. 

H. A. Jones, Ph.D Vegetable Breeding. 

C. E. Temple, A.M Associate, Plant Pathology. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D Associate, Plant Physiology. 

0. C. Bruce, B.S Associate, Soil Survey. 

A. M. Smith, B.S Associate, Soils. 

H. W. RiCHEY, B.S Associate, Pomology. 

R. L. Sellman, B.S Assistant, Agronomy.*^ 

J. P. Jones, B.S Assistant, Plant Physiology. 

E. V. Miller, B.S Assistant, Plant Physiology. 

H. B. Winant, B.S Assistant, Soils. •- 

W. N. EzEKiEL, B.S Assistant, Plant Pathology. 

C. C. Hamilton, M.S Assistant, Entomology. 

Anna M. Hook Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

Isabella Veitch Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

Caroline Veitch Assistant, Seed Inspection. 



EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 



*Thomas B. Symons, M.S.D., Agr Director. 

*F. B. BoMBERGER, B.S., A.M., D.Sc. . . .Assistant Director and Specialist in 

Rural Organization and Market- 
ing. 

*G. H. Bedell, B.S District Agent and Specialist in An- 
imal Husbandry. 

*E. G. Jenkins State Boys' Club Agent. 

*Peter Chichester, B.S Assistant Boys' Club Agent. 

*Mlss Venia M. Kellar, B.S State Home Demonstration Agent. 

*Miss Ola M. Day District Agent. 

*Mrs. Marion C. Bell, District Agent. 

Bertha Knight, B.S District Agent. 

*Miss Adice S. Jones Assistant State Girls' Club Agent. 

"^^- — tE. C. AucHTER, M.S Specialist in Horticulture. 

W. R. Ballard, B.S Specialist in Vegetable and Land- 
scape Gardening. 

'M. D. Bowers, B.A Specialist in Agricultural Journalism. 

tR. W. Carpenter, A.B Specialist in Farm Equipment. 

tE. N. Cory, M.S Specialist in Entomology. 

tJ. A. Gamble, M.S Specialist in Dairying. 

R. A. Jehle, B.S.A., Ph.D Specialist in Pathology. 

F. W. Oldenburg, B.S Specialist in Agronomy. 

tC. S. Richardson, A.B Specialist in Educational Extension. 

H. W. Rickey Specialist in Poultry Husbandry. 

S. B. Shaw, B.S Specialist in Horticulture. 

-C. E. Temple, M.S Specialist in Pathology. 

G. E. .WoLCOTT, B.S Specialist in Dairying. 

*lii cooperation with XJ. S. Department of Agriculture. 
tDevoting part time to Extension Work. 




COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENTS 

Name County Headquarters 

*R. F. McHenry, B.S Allegany Cumberland. 

*G. W. NoRRis, B.S Anne Arundel Annapolis. 

*Edw. E. McLean, B.S Baltimore Towson. 

Chaney. 

Denton. 

Westminster. 

Elkton. 

La Plata. 

Cambridge. 

Frederick. 

Oakland. 

Bel Air. 

Ellicott City. 



*J. H. Drury Calvert . . . 

*W. C. Thomas, B.S Caroline. . . 

*F. W. Fuller, B.S Carroll. . . . 

*W. C. Snarr, B.S Cecil 

*J. P. Burdette, A.B Charles. . . 

*P. W. Moore, B.S Dorchester 

*P. A. Hauver, B.S Frederick. . 

*J. A. TowLER, B.S Garrett . . . 

*B. B. Derrick, B.S Harford. . . 

*R. L. Post, B.S., M.S Howard. . . 



*H. B. 
I*F. J. 
|*W. B 
1*0. c. 
'♦G. F. 
i*C. Z. 
'*E. P. 
i*G. R. 
|*E. I. 
I*S. E. 

*G. R. 

*J. F. 
*L. H. 



Derrick, B.S 



Kent Chestertown. 



Van Hoesen Montgomery 

. Posey, B.S Prince George 

Jones, B.S Queen Anne's 

Wathen St. Mary's 

Keller, B.S Somerset 

Walls, B.S., M.S Talbot 

Cobb, B.S Wicomico 

Oswald, B.S Worcester 

Day, B.S Washington 

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGENT 
. Stuntz, B.S Harford 

LOCAL AGENTS 
Armstrong (colored) Southern Maryland 



Rockville. 
Upper Marlboro. 
Centreville. 
Loveville. 
Princess Anne. 
Easton. 
Salisbury. 
Snow Hill. 
. Hagerstown. 

. Bel Air. 



Seat Pleasant. 



Martin (colored) Eastern Shore Princess Anne. 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

Name County Headquarters 

*M. Rhea Morgan Allegany Cumberland. 

*Mrs. G. Linthicum Anne Arundel Annapolis. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

♦Edith G. Norman, B.S Caroline Denton. 

♦Rachel Everett Carroll Westminster. 

♦Dorothy Ross Cecil Elkton. 

♦Mrs. Elva Bohannan Charles La Plata. 

♦Celeste F. Crippen Dorchester Cambridge. 

♦Frances Gerber, B.S Frederick Frederick. 

♦Blanche Gittinger, B.S Harford Bel Air. 

Howard 

♦Laura I. Henshaw Garrett Oakland. 

♦Susan V. Hill Kent Chestertown. 

♦Catherine Cowsill Montgomery Rockville. 

♦Ellen L. Davis Prince George Hyattsville. 

♦Klizabeth Hodgson Queen Anne's Centerville. 



♦Ethel Joy St. Mary's. . 

♦Louise M. Mills Somerset . . . 

♦Olive K. Walls Talbot 

♦Clara Mullen Wicomico . . 

♦Lucy J. Walter Worcester. . 

*Sue Garberson Washington 



Leonardtown. 
Princess Anne. 
Easton. 
Salisbury. 
Snow Hill. 
Hagerstown. 



•In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



LOCAL AGENTS 
♦Leah D. Woodson (colored) . .Charles and St. Mary's. . . La Plata. 

GARDEN SPECIALIST 
Mrs. Adelaide Derringer. . .Madison and Lafayette Ave. 
Administration Building, Baltimore. 

*ln Cooperation with the U. S . Department of Agriculture. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1921-1922 



ALUMNI 
Messrs. Broughton, Hoshall, Stinson, Hillegeist and Cory. 

BUILDINGS 
Messrs. Crisp, Gwinner, Creese, Pierson and Carpenter. 

Catalogue, student enrollment and entrance 

Messrsr Zimmerman, Byrd, Spence, Cotterman, Creese, Broughton, Hillegeist, 
Appleman, and Miss Mount. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Messrs. Patterson, Bowers, McDonnell, Richardson and Symons. 

COURSES OF STUDY 
Messrs. Cotterman, Reed, Spence, Zimmerman, Gordon, Hillegeist, Leavitt, 
Appleman, T. H. Taliaferro and Johnson, and Misses Mount and Wiegand 

GROUNDS AND ROADS 
Messrs. Auchter, Thurston, Crisp, Patterson, Steinberg, Metzger and Carpenter. 

COMMENCEMENT 
Messrs. T. H. Taliaferro, Richardson, Cory, Spence, House and Leavitt. 

SANITATION 
Messrs. Pickens, Griffith, McDonnell, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Cory, Pyle and 
Miss Mount. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Messrs. Byrd, Broughton, Cory, Schulz, Bomberger and class presidents. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
Messrs. Steinberg, House, Bowers, Gamble and Lemon. 

FARMERS' DAY 

Messrs. Patterson, Symons and Zimmerman. 

EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS 
Messrs. Appleman, McCall, Gordon, Johnson, Cory and Hillegeist. 

PRE-MEDICAL EDUCATION 
Messrs. Cory, Davis, Broughton, Spence, Wiley and McGlore. 



/ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The University of Maryland 



Location 



The University of Maryland is located at College Park in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington branch of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from 
Baltimore. At least eight trains a day from each city stop at College station, 
thus making the place easily accessible from all parts of the State. Telephone 
connection is made with the Chesapeake and Potomac lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. The 
suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the south, and Laurel, the largest 
town in the countj^, is ten miles to the north on the same road. Access to 
these towns and to Washington may be had by steam and electric railway. 
The site of the University is particularly beautiful. The buildings occupy 
the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with forest trees and over- 
looks the entire surrounding country. In front, extending to the boulevard, 
is a broad rolling campus, the drill ground and athletic field. A quarter of a 
mile to the northeast are the buildings of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 
The farm of the College of Agriculture contains about 300 acres, and is devoted 
to fields, gardens, orchards, vineyard, poultry yards, etc., used for experimental 
purposes and demonstration work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the grounds is exceedingly attractive. They are 
tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower 
beds. 

The location of the University is healthful; the sanitary conditions are 
excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there has been prac- 
tically no serious case of illness among the students for many years. 

The Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Law of the University 
are located in Baltimore at the corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. 

History 

The history of the present University of Maryland practically combines 
the histories of two institutions. It begins with the chartering of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in* 1807, which graduated its first class 
in 1810. In 1812 the institution was empowered to annex other departments 
and was by the same act "constituted an University by the name and under 
the title of the University of Maryland." As such, its Law and Medical 
schools have since been especially prominent in the South and widely known 
throughout the country. The Medical School building in Baltimore, located 
at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure 
in America devoted to medical teaching. 

For more than a century the University of Maryland stood almost as organ- 
ized in 1812, until an act of the Legislature in 1920 merged it with the Maryland 



state College, and changed the name of the Maryland State College to the 
University of Maryland. All the property formerly held by the old University 
of Maryland was turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State 
College, and the Board of Trustees changed to be the Board of Regents. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private manage- 
ment. In 1862 the Congress of the United States, recognizing the practical 
value and increasing need of such colleges, passed the Land Grand Act. This 
act granted each State and Territory that should claim its benefits a propor- 
tionate amount of unclaimed Western lands, in place of scrip, the proceeds 
from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions to the "endow- 
ment, support and maintenance of at least one college where the leading 
object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and 
including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the 
States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of 
life." This grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland. The 
Maryland Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. 
Thus the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 its control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College and made it the Maryland 
State College. 

The University is coeducational and under the charter every power is granted 
necessary to carry on an institution of higher learning and research, comparable 
to the great state universities of the West, in which Agriculture and Engineer- 
ing hold a dominant place along with the Liberal Arts and professions. This 
is in full accord with the Morrill Act of the National Congress and the subse- 
quent acts above referred to. This institution, therefore, is the representative 
of the State and the Nation in higher education and research. The charter 
provides that it shall receive and administer all existing grants from the national 
government and all future grants which may come to the State for this purpose. 



BUILDINGS 

Some eighteen buildings have been erected on the University campus for 
research, extension, and residence educational purposes. The buildings com- 
prised in the group are the Agricultural Building, Calvert Hall, the Library, 
Engineering Buildings, Chemical Building, Morrill Hall, Horticultural Building, 
the Hospital, Stock Judging Pavilion, Poultry Building, temporary dining- 
hall, temporary auditorium. Girls* Home Economics Practice House, and the 
Agricultural Experiment Station group. Other buildings are located in Balti- 
more. 

Agricultural Building 

The Executive Offices, the College of Agriculture, College of Education, 
College of Home Economics, and the Agricultural and Home Economics Exten- 

22 



sion Service are housed in the Agricultural Building. This structure was com- 
pleted and occupied in April, 1918. The building also contains biological, 
soils and bacteriological laboratories. 

Buildings in Baltimore 

The buildings of the University in Baltimore are located at the corner of 
Lombard and Greene streets. They consist of the original building erected in 
1814, and more modern buildings adjoining, one of which is devoted to Law 
and one the University Hospital. 

Calvert Hall 

Excellent dormitory accommodations for men are provided in Calvert Hall, a 
modern fireproof structure erected and occupied in 1914. It took in part the 
place of the two dormitories destroyed by fire in 1912. 

New Dormitories 

Two new buildings are under construction. One is to be used as a men's 
dormitory and the other for women. The men's dormitory will be a large 
four-story building while the women's will be a unit of the Home Economics 

group. 

Morrill Hall 

The College of Arts and Sciences is partially housed in Morrill Hall, which 
is a three-story building erected in 1898. This building formerly was occupied 
by the work in agriculture and engineering. 

Chemical Building 

The Chemical Building provides a place for instruction in Chemistry and 
for the state work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers and agricultural lime. It 
has classrooms, laboratories, and offices for all undergraduate work in chem- 
istry. This work is under the jurisdiction of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Engineering Buildings 

The Mechanical Building was the first of the Engineering group constructed, 
having been completed and occupied by the Department of Mechanical Engi- 
neering in 1898. The Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering additions, 
with accompanying shops, were built in 1910. The three buildings are con- 
nected by closed passageways. 

The Infirmary 

The infirmary was erected in 1901 and makes possible excellent treatment 
for students in cases of sickness. It has a private ward for segregation of 
contagious diseases, quarters for trained nurse, operating room, doctor's office, 
special culinary equipment, and accommodations for twenty patients. 

The Horticultural Building 

Classrooms, propagation rooms, and offices are in the Horticultural Building, 
completed in 1915. Ten modern greenhouses are constructed as a part of this 

building. 

28 



The Stock Judging Pavilion 

This building is used for stock judging competitions, for stock shows, and 
to house a part of the equipment of the dairy husbandry and farm machinery 
departments of the College of Agriculture. Connecting this building with the 
Agricultural Building is an auditorium to seat 600 persons. 

The Poultry Buildings 

Research in poultry projects and laboratory practice is carried on in the 
Poultry Building. The main building contains classrooms, laboratories, offices 
and incubating rooms. 

Experiment Station Group 

The main building of the experiment station group is a large brick structure 
of the colonial period. It contains the office of the Director of the Station, 
the chemical and physiological laboratories, and a laboratory for research in 
soils. Other buildings of this group contain seed and milk testing laboratories 
and classrooms. There are also greenhouses, an Agronomy Building, a secon- 
dary horticultural building, barns, farm machinery buildings, silos, etc. 

Temporary Dining-Hall 

A temporary wooden structure has been erected to serve as a dining-hall 
until the Legislature appropriates money to put up a permanent building. 
This wooden structure is well built and contains kitchen equipment and other 
facilities for comfortably taking care of about 500 persons. 

Other Buildings 

Another wooden structure used for several years as an auditorium is serving as 
a dormitory. The University also maintains a laundry building in which it 
handles the students' laundry at cost. It also has two frame dwelling-houses 
in which it houses part of its labor. A brick power-house contains apparatus 
for pumping all water for College use. Another small frame house contains 
machinery for canning and drying fruits and vegetables. 

The Filtration Plant 

Recently completed is a modern filtration plant for furnishing an ample 
supply of water for use in the dormitories and general college buildings. This 
plant consists of a reservoir with a reserve supply of 1,500,000 gallons, sediment 
tanks, filter beds, pumps, etc. 

Gerneaux Hall 

This building serves as a dormitory and practice house for the girls taking 
courses in Home Economics. It is fitted with all the appliances of the modern 
home. 

Library Building 

The Library is housed in a separate two-story building on the first floor of 
which is collected material relating to agriculture. The special catalogue 
cards issued by the United States Department of Agriculture make accessible 

24 



the large amount of state and national bulletin literature on agricultural and 
related scientific subjects. The second floor is used for general reading and 

reference work. 

Through the Inter-Library Loan systems of the Library of Congress and the 
United States Department of Agriculture the University Library is able to 
supplement its reference material by either personal work in these Washington 
libraries or by actually borrowing the books from them. 

The Library contains 10,000 bound books and 5,000 United States Govern- 
ment documents and unbound reports and pamphlets. All material is on 
open shelves where students can easily locate it. The Library is open from 
8.30 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., Monday to Friday inclusive; Saturday from 8.30 
A. M. to 12.30 P. M.; Sunday afternoon from 2.30 to 5.30; and all evenings 
except Saturday, from 6 to 10. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND SELF AID 



High School Scholarships 

While the University has no endowment nor loan funds with which to assist 
students, it has established for each high and preparatory school in Maryland 
and the district of Columbia one scholarship each year. For the three counties 
of Maryland which do not have high schools, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's, 
one scholarship each year is given. These scholarships have a value of fifty 
dollars and are credited to the holder's account. 

These scholarships are offered under the following conditions: 

1. The holder must be a graduate of a high or preparatory school and 
qualified to enter the freshman class. 

2. The appointment to the scholarships must be made by the county school 
superintendent upon recommendation of the principal of the high school. In 
making recommendations high school principals should not only take into 
consideration class standing but also inability to meet the expenses of a uni- 
versity education. 

3. The appointment shall be made for the term normally required to com- 
plete the curriculum selected. 

4. The scholarship will be forfeited by indifference to scholastic work or by 
disregard of rules of the University. 

5. Scholarships awarded to preparatory schools and to high schools of 
Baltimore and Washington shall be given on recommendation of the princi- 
pals direct to the University. Recipients of preparatory school scholarships 
must be qualified to enter the freshman class. 

6. Applicants from Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert counties niay take one 
of the non-collegiate curriculums or, if entering from another institution, may 
take one of four-year curriculums leading to a degree. 

Fellowships 

The University also offers a number of fellowships. These may be given 
either to its own graduates or the graduates of other colleges who desire to 
pursue courses in the Graduate School leading to advance degrees. Fellow - 

25 



ships are available in the College of Agriculture, College of Engineering and 
College of Arts and Sciences. These fellowships are worth from $500 to $720 
per year. 

Industrial Scholarships 

There are available each year, as they become vacant, a number of industrial 
scholarships, in which students receive compensation for attending to certain 
prescribed duties, such as waiting on the tables in the dining hall, janitor service 
in the dormitory, and postmaster. Students may frequently earn enough in 
this way to cover board and lodging. 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



Honorable mention is given to students for excellence in undergraduate 
work in the upper one-fifth of each college as follows: The upper one-tenth 
is given first honors, and the rest second honors, provided that the student's 
course average is B. 

Debating and Oratory 

An annual debate is held each year in January between the Poe and New 
Mercer Literary societies for the ^'President's Cup," given by Dr. H. J. Patter- 
son. 

A gold medal is awarded by the Alumni Association each year to the best 
debater in the University, the test being a debate between picked teams from 
the two literary societies. 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges, consisting of Washington 
College, Western Maryland College, St. John's College, and University of 
Maryland offers each year gold medals for first and second places in an oratorical 
contest that is held between representatives of the four institutions. 

Athletics 

The class of 1908 offers annually to "the man who typifies the best in college 
athletics" a gold medal. The medal is given in honor of former President R. W. 
Silvester and is known as "The Silvester Medal for Excellence in Athletics." 

The Military Medal 

The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal to the member of the battalion 
who proves himself the best drilled soldier. The medal is awarded after an 
individual drill by each of the contestants. 

The Company Sword 

The class of 1897 awards annually to the captain of the best drilled com- 
pany of the University battalion a silver mounted sword. 

The Citizenship Prize 

A gold medal is presented annually by H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the class 
of 1908, to the member of the senior class who during his collegiate career has 
nearest typified the model citizen and who has done most for the general 
advancement of the interests of the University. 

26 



The Goddard Medal 

The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is aw^arded annually to the 
man from Prince George's County making the highest average in his studies 
and who at the same time embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is 
given by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James of Washington, D. C. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association is an organization composed of alumni of the Uni- 
versity. This Association has an office at the University and has several branch 
associations. It publishes a monthly paper, The State University Alumnus. 
The Association is active in legislative and other measures for the support of 
the University and is represented on the Board of Regents and on the com- 
mittee which controls athletics by four members, two on each. 

The Student Assembly 

The Student Assembly is composed of all the students and is organized to 
carry out a system of student self-government. The Student Executive Council 
is the executive committee of the Student Assembly and acts in cooperation 
with the faculty in the management of student affairs. 

The Dramatic Club 

The Dramatic Club is organized for the purpose of presenting at least one 
play each year. It is made up of students who have had experience in this 
work since coming to the University or in high school. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

There are at the University four national fraternities. Kappa Alpha, Sigma 
Nu, Sigma Phi Sigma, Phi Alpha; two local fraternities, Nu Sigma Omicron, 
Sigma Tau Alpha; two local sororities, Sigma Delta, Lambda Tau. 

Societies 

Two literary societies are maintained by the students, the Poe and New 
Mercer. These hold weekly meetings at which regular programs are presented. 

The Liebig Chemical Society is made up of students specializing in chemistry. 
Special lectures by students and specialists in certain branches of chemistry 
and open discussions of various chemical questions are featured. 

The Engineering Society is composed of students in the College of Engi- 
neering. 

The Agricultural Club is organized according to special interests into the 
Horticultural Society, the Agronomy Society, and the Animal Husbandry 
Society. 

Programs are offered in the Engineering Society and Agricultural Club 
similar to that of the Liebig Chemical Society, except that the subjects pertain 
to engineering or agriculture. 

27 



j 



Le Cercle Francais 

This club was organized in 1919 by the Department of French. Its member- 
ship is composed of the faculty of the department, students pursuing courses 
in ^French, and others interested in the study of that language. The aims of 
the club are to awaken a live interest in French literature, culture, history 
and customs, and to build up an ease in the use of the language. Although 
fostered by the College of Arts and Sciences, this club is not restricted to 
students enrolled therein, but is open to all who are interested in things French. 

Clubs 

The Rifle Club is affiliated with the National Rifle Association and engages 
in matches with other colleges and rifle organizations. 

The Chess and Checker Club is organized for the promotion of these games 
among those that engage in them. Annual tournaments are conducted for 
which gold medals are awarded. 

The County Clubs are organizations of students from the same counties. 
The Baltimore City Club and District of Columbia Club are organizations 
of the same nature. 

The Rossbourg Club is the student organization which has charge of most 
of the formal dances of the students. This club is open to all students. 

The Keystone Club came into being when a score of men from the "Keystone 
State" found each other on the campus. All Pennsylvanians are eligible. 
Its aim is to promote a feeling of interest and good fellowship among the 
students from Pennsylvania. 

The Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations are organized 
to be of general service to the students. They perform important functions 
in matters of obtaining employment for worthy students, in receiving new 
students, and in helping to maintain generally a high morale and state of good 
fellowship in the student body. 

Student Publications 

A weekly five-column newspaper. The Diamondback, is published by the stu- 
dents. Besides this the members of the junior class publish an annual book 
Terra Mariae. Both publications reflect the news and atmosphere of general 
college life. 



ADMINISTRATION 



The government of the University is vested by law primarily in a Board of 
Regents, consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor for terms of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University Council, composed of the President, the Assistant to the 
President, the Director of Agricultural Experiment Station, and Director of 
the Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service, and the Deans acts 

28 



as an advisory board to the President on all phases of University work. The 
faculty of each college or school constitutes a faculty council which passes on 
all questions that have exclusive relationship to the unit represented. 

For purposes of administration and coordination of similar groups of studies, 
the following educational organizations are in effect: 

College of Agriculture. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

School of Medicine. 

The Law School. 

School of Dentistry. ^ 

School of Pharmacy. 

College of Education. 

College of Home Economics. 

The Graduate School. 

The Summer School. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The College of Agriculture offers curricula in: (1) General Agriculture; (2) 

Agronomy; (3) Farm Management; (4) Geology and Soils; (5) Pomology; (6) 

Vegetable Gardening; (7) Floriculture; (8) Landscape Gardening; (9) Economic 

Entomology; (10) Two-Year Agriculture; (11) Animal Husbandry; (12) Dairy 

Husbandry. 

The College of Education offers curricula in: (1) Agricultural Education; 
(2) Home Economics Education; (3) Industrial Education; (4) General Educa- 
tion. 

The College of Engineering offers curricula in: (1) Civil Engineering; (2) 
Mechanical Engineering; (3) Electrical Engineering; (4) Highway Engineering; 
(5) Sanitary Engineering. 

The Graduate School offers courses in any of the subjects in which a graduate 
may desire to obtain an advanced degree. The Graduate School consists of 
all students taking graduate work in the various departments. Those qualified 
to supervise graduate work in the various departments constitute the faculty of 
the Graduate School, presided over by a research specialist designated as Dean. 

The College of Home Economics offers a curriculum in which may be ob- 
tained the general principles of home economics, a knowledge of home economics 
for teaching purposes, or a specialized knowledge of particular phases which 
deal with the work of the dietitian or institutional manager. 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula with majors in: (1) An- 
cient Languages and Philosophy; (2) Economics; (3) English Language, 
Literature and Journalism; (4) General Science; (5) History and Political 
Science; (6) French, German, or Spanish; (7) General, Industrial, and Phys- 
ical Chemistry; (8) Public Speaking with reference to Special Professions; 
(9) Zoology; studies also are offered in Music and Library Science. 

The Department of Military Science and Tactics has charge of the work 
of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit established by the War Depart- 
ment. During the first two years of the student's stay at the University he is 
required to take the Basic R. O. T. C. courses. During his junior and senior 

29 



I! 



k 



years he may elect three credit hours in Reserve Officers' Training Corps each 
term. 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation works in close co- 
operation with the military department and supervises all physical training, 
general recreation, and intercollegiate athletics. 

The Summer School of six weeks offers courses in subjects given during the 
regular session of the University, with the exception of Medicine, Dentistry, 
Pharmacy, and Law, and in special subjects, such as school administration, 
classroom management and principles of secondary education for high school 
and elementary school teachers. Certain courses given in the Summer School 
are of collegiate grade and may be counted toward the bachelor's degree. 
Advanced courses may count toward the master's degree. 

General matter having relationship to offerings of the School of Medicine 
and the Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry, and the School of Law will be 
found elsewhere. 



EXTENSION AND RESEARCH 



Agriculture and Home Economics 

The agricultural and home economics extension service of the University, 
In co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture, carries to 
the people of the State through practical demonstrations conducted by special- 
ists of the College of Agriculture and county agents, the results of investiga- 
tions in the fields of Agriculture and Home Economics. The organization 
consists of the administrative forces, including the director, assistant director, 
specialists and clerical force, the county agricultural demonstration agents, 
and the home demonstration agents in each county and in the chief cities of 
the State. The county agents and the specialists jointly carry on practical 
demonstrations under the several projects in the production of crops or in 
home-making, with the view of putting into practice on the farms of the State 
improved methods of Agriculture and Home Economics that have stood the 
test of investigation, experimentation, and experience. Movable schools are 
held in the several counties. At such schools the specialists discuss phases of 
Agriculture and Home Economics in which the people of the respective counties 
are especially interested. 

The work of the Boys' Agricultural Clubs is of especial importance from an 
educational point of view. The specialists in charge of these projects, in co- 
operation with the county agricultural agents and the county school officers 
and teachers, organize the boys of the several communities of the county into 
agricultural clubs for the purpose of teaching them by actual practice the prin- 
ciples underlying agriculture. The boys hold regular meetings for the dis- 
cussion of problems connected with their several projects and for the com- 
parison of experiences. Prizes are offered for the stimulation of interest in the 
work. 

The Home Economics specialists and agents organize the girls into clubs 
for the purpose of instructing them in the principles underlying canning, 

30 



drying, and preserving fruits and vegetables, cooking, dressmaking and other 
forms of Home Economics work. 

Educational value of the demonstrations, farmers* meetings, movable 
schools, clubs, and community shows is incalculable. They serve to carry the 
institution to the farmer and to the home-maker. 

General Extension 

This phase of the extension service of the University is conducted in co- 
operation with the United States Bureau of Education, and is intended to make 
the general branches of educational curriculum of greater service to the people 
of the State. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Vitally associated with the extension service is the experimental work in 
agriculture. 

In 1847 an act was passed making provision for a State laboratory in which 
the application of chemistry to agriculture was to be undertaken. In 1858 
experimentation was undertaken on the College farm. After two or three years 
this work was interrupted by the general financial distress of the time and by 
the Civil War. In 1888, under the provisions of the Hatch Act of the preceding 
year, the Agricultural Experiment Station was established. 

This act states the object and purpose of the experiment station as follows: 

That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to conduct 
original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants and 
animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the remedies 
for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their different stages 
of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under 
a varying series of crops; the capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; 
the analysis of soils and water; the chemical composition of manures, natural 
or artificial, with experiments designed to test their comparative effects on 
crops of different knids; the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; 
the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic 
animals; the scientific and economic questions involved in the production of 
butter and cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly 
on the agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the res- 
pective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the experiment stations there was practically 
no agricultural science in this country. The work done by these institutions 
during the past quarter of a century has given a science of agriculture to teach , 
and laid a broad foundation for development. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension work on a national 
basis has been the direct outgrowth of the work of the experiment station. 

The students of the University, taking courses in the College of Agriculture, 
are kept in close touch with the investigations in progress. 

The Eastern Branch 

The Eastern Branch of the University of Maryland is located at Princess 
Anne, Somerset County. It is maintained for the education of negroes in 
agriculture and mechanic arts. 

31 



ni 



INCOME 

The University is supported entirely by funds appropriated for its use by 
the State and Federal Government. State appropriations prior to the present 
biennium were very meager but with the awakening of the people to the im- 
portance of the institution adequate appropriations to meet all needs are 
expected. The appropriations from the Federal Government are derived from 
the original Land Grant Act, from the second Morrill Act, the Nelson Act, the 
Smith-Hughes and Smith-Lever Acts, and the Hatch and Adams Acts. The 
University, with the exception of its professional schools in Baltimore, charges 
no tuition and consequently has no funds from that source. 

ADMISSION 

General Statement 

An applicant for admission to any of the colleges or schools of the University 
must be at least sixteen years of age. 

Women are admitted to all of the departments under the same conditions 
and on the same terms as men. 

Students may be admitted at the beginning of any term, but should enter, 
if possible, at the beginning of the fall term (in 1921, September 19). Students 
can seldom enter the College of Engineering of the Schools of Medicine, Law, 
Pharmacy or Dentistry to advantage except at the opening of the school year 
in September, or October, as the case may be. 

In general the requirements for admission to the freshman class are the 
same as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high schools of Mary- 
land. A candidate for admission by certificate must be a graduate of an ap- 
proved high school or other accredited school. Applicants who have not been 
graduated from accredited schools must pass entrance examinations desig- 
nated by the University Entrance Board. 

Number of Units Required 

At least fifteen units of high school or other secondary school work in accept- 
able subjects must be offered by every candidate. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school and 
constitutes approximately a quarter of a full year's work. It presupposes a 
school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 minutes, and 
for each study four or five class exercises a week. Two laboratory periods in 
any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent to one class exer- 
cise. 

Required and Elective Subjects 
* Prescribed Units. 

English 3 

t Mathematics . . .' 2 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 

*In addition the prescribed units listed, two years of any one foreign language are required 
for admission to the pre-medical curriculum. 

tAn additional unit of mathematics is required for admission to the College of Engineering. 
The additional unit should include Algebra, i, ^"d Solid Geometry, h. 

32 

f 



Elective Subjects 



To be selected from 



Agriculture 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Civics 

Commercial Subjects 

Drawing 

Economics 

English 

General Science 



the following subjects: 

Geology 

History 

Home Economics 

Industrial Subjects 

Language 

Mathematics 

Physical Geography 

Physics 

Physiology 

Zoology 



Methods of Admission 

The credits required for admission to the undergraduate departments may 
be secured as follows: 

(a) By certificate 

(b) By examination 

(c) By transfer from another university or college of 

recognized standing. 

(A) ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Blank certificates for students wishing to enter the University by certificate 
from an approved high school or other secondary school may be had of the 
Registrar. They should be obtained early and filled out and sent to the 
Registrar for approval as soon as possible after the close of the high school 
in June. 

Accredited Schools 

The State Board of Education prepares a list of approved high schools each 

year. The University accepts graduates from these schools without question. 

Other preparatory schools may be visited by the high school inspector upon 

request. 

Entrance credit will also be accepted on certificate from the following sources: 

(l)From schools accredited by the Association of Colleges and Preparatory 

Schools of the Southern States. 

(2) From schools accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges 

and Secondary Schools. 

(3) From schools accredited to the state universities which are included in 

the membership of the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

(4) From schools approved by the New England College Entrance Certificate 

Board. 

(5) From high schools and academies registered by the Regents of the Uni- 

versity of the State of New York. 

(6) From College Entrance Examination Board of New York. 

33 



(7) From high and preparatory schools on the accredited list of other state 

boards of education where the requirements for graduation are 
equivalent to the standard set by the Maryland State Board of 
Education. 

(8) From the state normal schools of Maryland and other state normal 

schools having equal requirements for graduation. 

(Bj ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

I. The University Entrance Examinations. 

The University entrance examinations are given at the University in College 
Park immediately before the opening of the fall term in September. Students 
who need to take the examinations should make all necessary preparations 
several weeks in advance. These examinations cover all the subjects required 
or accepted for entrance as outlined. 

An examination fee of $5.00 is charged for entrance examinations. 

II. The Examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

The certificate of the College Entrance Examination Board, showing a 
grade of 60 per cent or higher will be accepted for admission in any elective 
subject. These examinations will be held only once a year beginning the third 
Monday in June. 

All applications for examination must be addressed to the Secretary of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, 43} West 117th Street, New York, 
N. Y., and must be made upon a blank form to be obtained from the Secretary 
of the Board on application. 

Applications for examinations at points in the United States east of the 
Mississippi River and at points on the Mississippi River, must be received by 
the Secretary of the Board at least three weeks in advance of the examinations; 
applications for examinations at points in the United States west of the Mis- 
sissippi River must be received at least four weeks in advance of the examina- 
tions; and applications for examinations outside of the United States must be 
received at least six weeks in advance of the examinations. 

Applications received later than the time specified will be accepted when 
it is possible to arrange for the admission of the candidate concerned, but only 
on payment of $6.00 in addition to the usual fee. 

The examination fee is $6.00 for all candidates examined at points in the 
United States, and $20.00 for all candidates examined outside of the United 
States. The fee, which cannot be accepted in advance of the application, 
should be remitted by postal order, express order, or draft on New York to the 
order of the College Entrance Examin ation Board. 

III. The New York Regent's Examinations. 

Credit will be accepted, also from the examinations conducted by the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York. 

(C) ADMISSION BY TRANSFER OF ENTRANCE CREDITS FROM 

OTHER COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES 

A person who has been admitted to another college or university of recog- 
nized standing will be admitted to this University by presenting a certificate 
of honorable dismissal from the institution from which he comes and an official 

34 



statement of the subjects upon which he was admitted to such institution, 
provided that the work appears to be equivalent to that required by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Students intending to transfer to the University of Maryland should have 
sent an official statement of their college credits to the Registrar. 

Special Requirements of Colleges and Schools 

Requirements for admission to the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy 
and Dentistry will be found elsewhere under chapters given to these schools. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

A student coming from a standard college or university may secure advanced 
standing by presenting a statement of his complete academic record certified 
by the proper officials. This statement must be accompanied by a set of 
secondary school credentials presented for admission to the college or univer- 
sity. Full credit is given for work done in other institutions when found to be 
equivalent in extent and quality to that required at this University An 
applicant may request examination for advanced credit in any subject. In 
case the character of a student's work in any subject is such as to create doubt 
as to the quality of that which preceded, the University reserves the right to 
revoke at any time any credit assigned on certificate. 

Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may secure, in no 
case will he be given the baccalaureate degree with less than one year of resi- 
dent work. 

Unclassified Students 

Mature persons who have had insufficient preparation to pursue any of the 
four-year curricula may, with the consent of the Committee on Courses, 
matriculate for such subjects as thev are fitted to take. Such students, how- 
ever, will be ineligible for a degree initii th u j^ i have satisfied the entrance re- 
quirements and completed an approved four-year course of study! 

Graduation, Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates 

All undergraduate four-year courses lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
or Bachelor of Arts. The total requirements for graduation vary, according 
to the type of work in the different colleges, from 204 to 220 term credit hours. 
A term credit hour is one lecture or recitation each week for one term of twelve 
weeks; two or three hours of laboratory or field work are counted equivalent 
to one lecture or recitation. All practical work is scheduled for two or three 
hours, depending upon the nature of the work. To find full information of 
requirements, the student should refer to the description of the school in 
which interested. 

Candidates are recommended for graduation after they have completed the 
prescribed course of study, including all the required work and enough electives 
to total the required credit hours. 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy in Arts, 
Doctor of Philosophy in Science, Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Elec- 

35 



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trical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental 
Surgery, Graduate in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Chemist. , 

Degrees are not granted to the students in the two-year curricula, but at 
graduation time certificates are awarded. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Make all checks payable to University of Maryland for exact amount 
of bills for term charges. 

The charges for each term must be paid at the beginning of the term. 
Students will not be admitted to classes until payment has been made or 
until satisfactory arrangements have been made for deferring payment. 

No charge is made for resident students for tuition in any of the colleges 
or schools except Law, Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy. 

The estimated average annual expenses of undergraduates at College 

Park are as follows: 

First Second Third Total for 

Term Term Term Year 

Fixed charges $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $60.00 

♦Athletic fee 10.00 10.00 

Damage deposit 10.00 10.00 

Board (36 weeks ® $6.75^ 87.75 81.00 74.25 243.00 

tLodging (38 weeks @ $1.85) 24.05 24.05 22.20 70.30 

Laundry (36 weeks @ 60c) 7.80 7.20 6.60 21.60 

Totals $159.60 $132.25 $123.05 $414.90 

♦These fees constitute a fund which is collected from all students in the university at College 
Park for maintenance of athletics and is turned over in toto to the Athletic Board for disburse- 
ment. 

tStudents not boarding at the University dining hall may obtain rooms in the Dormitory, 
if available, at the tate of $2..>0 per week. Those who board at the dining hall are supplied 
with rooms first. 

Non-residents, except from the District of Columbia, will be charged a 
fee of $10.00 per term or $25.00 per year if paid in advance. 

Students taking pre-Medical work will be charged a special fee of $10.00 
per term. 

The above does not take into consideration the cost of books, supplies and 
personal needs. This depends largely on the tastes and habits of the indi- 
vidual student. Books and supplies average about $40. 

The fixed charges made to all students are a part payment of overhead 
expenses, such as janitor servies, hospital and doctor's fees, general labora- 
tory fees, library, physical training, etc. 

Board, lodging and other charges may vary from term to term, but every 
effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

The damage fee is to cover breakage, loss of library books, and injury to 
which cannot be charged directly against any student. Damage to univer- 
sity property will be charged pro rata to the whole student body unless the 
offender is known. Any unused part of this fee is returned to the student 
upon withdrawal or at the close of the year. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention the 
expense must be borne by the student. 

g 36 




Board and lodging may be obtained at boarding houses or in private fami- 
lies if desired. 

Students rooming outside the University may obtain board and laundry 
at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunch rooms. 

All the University property in possession of the individual student will be 
charged against him, and the parent or guardian must assume responsibility 
for its leturn without injury other than results from ordinary wear. 

All students assigned to dormitories are required to provide themselves 
with one pair of blankets for single bed, two pairs of sheets for single bed, 
four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow, two laundry bags, one broom and one 
waste basket. 

Special Fees 

Bacteriology Laboratory Fee $2 . 00 

Fee for special condition examination 1 . 00 

Fee for changes in registration after first week of term . . 1 . 00 
Fee for failure to register within seven days after opening 

of term ; 2 . 00 

Diploma fee payable prior to graduation 5 . 00 

Certificate fee payable prior to graduation 3 . 00 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to, a stu- 
dent who is in arrears in his accounts. 

Graduate Fees 

Kach graduate student is subject to a matriculation fee of $10.00, a fixed 
charge of $1.00 per term credit hour and a diploma fee of $10.00. 

Withdrawals 

When a student desires to withdraw from the University he is required 
to secure from his Dean a written approval, which must be presented to the 
Registrar. Charges for full time will be continued against him unless 
this is done. 

Students withdrawing before the end of any term will be charged ^7.00 
per week for board and $2.00 per week for lodging for the time during the 
term preceding their withdrawal. 

Refunds 

No fixed charge will be refunded. 

No laboratory fee will be refunded after the middle of the term. 

The low charge for board at the dining hall is made possible only by the 
use of the term basis in figuring costs. The overhead is fixed for the term 
and no refunds can be made for short absences without a loss to the dining 
hall and to the students who eat there. Therefore, no refunds will be made 
except in case of withdrawal or prolonged absence due to sickness or unavoid- 
able cause. 



37 



i 



i'ii:! 



The Fees and Expenses for Schools located in Baltimore are: 

Matriculation Fee Tuition Laboratory 

Medical School $ 5.00 per term $210.00 per year. 

Dental School 5.00 per year 175.00 per year $5.00 

Pharmacy School 5.00 per year 140.00 per year 5.00 

Law School 10.00 per year 100.00 per year. 

There are no dormitories connected with Baltimore Schools. The average 
cost of living per year in that city is $600. 



ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 

Date of Registration and Penalty for Late Registration 

Registration for the fall term takes place during the first two days of the 
term. Students register for the second term before leaving for their Christmas 
holidays and for the third term during the last two weeks of the winter term. 

After seven days from the opening of a term fees are imposed for a change 
of registration or for late registration. 

Students, who for any reason are more than seven days late in registering, 
must secure permission from the instructors in charge for admission to courses. 
Such permission must be given in writing to the student^s dean before course 
cards will be issued. 

Physical Examination and Physical Training 

All students who enter the University undergo a physical examination by 
the physician in charge. This is conducted in co-operation with the Military 
Department under the direction of which most of the work in physical training 
is done. The examination also is a measure for protecting the health of the 
student body. 

Maximum and Minimum Schedule 

The prescribed number of credit hours that a student ordinarily may carry 
ranges from 15 to 19. No student may register for less than the ordinary 
number without permission from his dean. 

A student who obtains an average grade of "B" may, with the permission 
of his dean, be allowed to carry such additional courses as may be scheduled. 
This privilege is forfeited if the student's average grade falls below *'B". 

No regular student working for a degree may carry less than 12 credit hours. 

Examinations 

No final examinations are given. At least two unannounced tests are given 
in each course per term. The final grade is derived by combining the average 
daily grade and the average test grades. 



Grading System 

Students are graded with the following marks: A, B, C, D, E, and F. 
C, and D are passing; E represents a condition and F a failure. 

38 



A,B, 



Student Advisory and Honor System 

A Committee comprising five members of the faculty acts as the advisory 
board to the Students' Executive Council of the Students' Assembly. The 
Students' Executive Council, with the aid of the Advisory Board manages all 
student affairs. The Honor System is in effect for all students, and each 
student always is on his honor to live up to the highest principles of democratic 
government. 

The Students' Assembly 

All students assemble in the Auditorium at 11:20 o'clock every Wednesday. 
Every other Wednesday is turned over to the students to transact business 
that concerns the whole student body. The Department of Public Speaking 
arranges the programjjie for the remaining Wednesdays. Noteworthy speakers 
from various parts of the United States are called upon to talk to the students. 

General Suggestions to New Students 

Candidates for admission to the University should correspond with the 
Registrar at College Park, who in turn will supply them with the necessary 
forms for transferring preparatory credits. It is advisable for prospective 
students to dispose of the preliminaries early in the year in order to prevent 
disappointments. Often a student comes to the University without taking 
the preliminary steps only to find that he does not have enough credits to 
enter. The Registrar is always glad to advise with the students concerning 
their preparations. The Registrar sends out a general statement of the pro- 
cedure for new students to follow after they are duly admitted to the University. 



39 



The College of Agriculture 



The teaching of a rational, practical system of farming is the primary aim 
of the College of Agriculture. The permanent prosperity of rural citizens is 
in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the land. The most successful 
farmer is the one who can produce a maximum quantity per acre of the best 
quality of agricultural products at a minimum cost and dispose of them in the 
markets at the best advantage. The modern farmer must know the kinds of 
plants to grow and how to improve them; how to maintain orchards, gardens, 
and attractive surroundings; something of the soil, its cultivation and con- 
servation of fertility; how to combat plant diseases and insect pests; the selec- 
tion, breeding, and feeding of live stock; the marketing of farm products; 
modern farm buildings, farm equipment and conveniences of the home; and 
finallj^ how to be leaders and promote good citizenship in rural life. 

The curricula are planned to give the student a general knowledge of all 
phases of agriculture and related sciences, but at the same time afford an 
opportunity to specialize along the lines in which he is particularly interested. 
The plan provides for those who wish to take up professions such as teaching, 
research, and county agent work, as well as farming. 

Graduation, Degrees and Certificates 

The College of Agriculture confers the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Two hundred and ten term credit hours are required for graduation. The 
courses required vary according to the departments in which the student elects 
to specialize. 

The non-collegiate, two-year curriculum leads to a Certificate in Agriculture. 

DEPARTMENTS 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: (1) Agronomy, 
(including Forage Crops, Grain Crops, Genetics); (2) Agricultural Education 
(see College of Education); (3) Animal Husbandry; (4) Animal Pathology and 
Veterinary Medicine; (5) Bacteriology and Sanitation; (6) Dairy Husbandry; 
(7) Entomology and Bee Culture; (8) Farm Equipment; (9) Farm Manage- 
ment; (10) Forestry; (11) Horticulture (including Pomology, Vegetable Garden- 
ing, Landscape Gardening, and Floriculture); (12) Plant Pathology; (13 j Plant 
Physiology and Bio-chemistry; (14) Poultry Husbandry; (15) Soils. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

The College of Agriculture works in cooperation with the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. Most of the subject matter in agricultural courses is 
tested by the station or furnished as original from its researches. Methods 
and material which are valuable in one state are often worthless in another, 
and the station makes it a point to find what is best for the State of Maryland. 

The general farm, orchards, gardens, and herds at the Experiment Statior 
are available for laboratory and class use by the college. 

41 



FELLOW SHIPS 

Graduate Fellowships which carry remunerations of $500 to $1,000 yearly- 
are available to graduate students. Students who hold these fellowships spend 
certain time assisting in classes and laboratories. The rest of the time may 
be used for original investigation and assigned study, the time required for 
a degree depending upon the nature of the fellowship held. 

FARM PRACTICE 

Students without farm experience do not, as a rule, secure full benefit from 
any of the agricultural courses. A committee has been appointed for the purpose 
of assisting all students coming to the college without farm training to obtain 
a fair knowledge of actual farm practice. Some time during each year the 
committee will examine each member of the freshman class and any upper- 
classmen who have not already satisfied the farm practice requirements. 

All students must pass a satisfactory farm practice examination before they 
will be allowed to enter their senior year. Those not able to pass this examina- 
tion will be required to spend at least three months on a farm selected by or 
having the approval of the committee. If the student has had no farm experi- 
ence whatsoever before entering college, he may be required to spend six to 
nine months on a farm. 

The committee reserves the right also to call on all students so placed for 
written reports showing the experience gained while on these farms. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE 

All students registered for Agriculture take the same work in the freshman 
and sophomore years, except those registering for Landscape Gardening, 
Floriculture and Animal Pathology and Veterinary Medicine. At the end 
of the sophomore year they may elect to specialize along the lines in which 
they are particularly interested. 

The First Two Years: 



FRESHMAN YEAR Tvrm: 

Gen'l Chem. and Qual. Analysis (Gen. Chem. lOl-lOSj . . 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

jGeneral Botany (Bot. 101) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 

(Elect one of the following groups) 
Group A 

^Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) ' 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) 

Group B 

Language 

Group C 

Mathematics 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101 j 



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♦Repeated during second half year. 
tOffered also during first half year. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Tvrm, 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102a-102b) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Physics (Physics 107-108) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 102) 



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AGRONOMY 



The curriculum in agronomy aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop cul- 
ture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom is 
given the student in the way of electives so that he can register for subjects 
which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular farm. A 
student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well fitted for 
general farming, investigational work in the State or Federal Experiment 
Stations, or county agent work. 

The Agronomy Department has a large, well equipped laboratory in the 
new Agricultural Building and a greenhouse for student use, besides free 
access to the Experiment Station fields and equipment. 



CURRICULUM 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) . . . . 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 105) . . 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101). , 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-101 ) . 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Electives 



Term. 



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SENIOR YEAR Ttrm. 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 108) 

Methods of Crop Investigations (Agron. 109) 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 107) 

Seminar (Agron. 110-111) 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 104) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Electives 



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AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Agricultural Education was organized primarily to 
train students who are preparing to teach agriculture in secondary schools. 
In addition to regular entrance requirements of the University, students electing 
to specialize in Agricultural Education must present evidence of having acquired 
adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students must arrange their work so that approximately forty per cent will 
be spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per cent on scientific subjects 
twenty per cent on subjects of a general educational character and from twelve 
to fifteen per cent on subjects pertaining to professional education. 

(For detailed description of the curriculum in agricultural education see the 
College of Education.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The courses in Animal Husbandry are organized with the idea of equipping 
men as owners, superintendents, or managers of general or special live stock 
farms. Special attention is given to the care, feeding, breeding and manage- 
ment of live stock and to the economics of the live stock industry. Opportunity 
for specialization is offered to those who may desire to become instructors or 
investigators in Animal Husbandry. 

Herds of cattle and swine are maintained at the University. In addition, 
there are available for use in instruction, the herds of live stock owned by the 
Federal Bureau of Animal Industry at Beltsville, Maryland. Through the 
courtesy of Maryland breeders, some private herds are also available for 
inspection and instruction. 



CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Management Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Swine Production (A. H. 105) 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Electives • 

SENIOR YEAR Term. 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 109) ! 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Nutrition (A. H. 119) 

Animal Genetics (A. H. 118) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 

Tractors (F. E. 103) 

Seminar (A. H. 114) 

Electives 



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44 



ANIMAL PATHOLOGY AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The increasing need of veterinarians thoroughly trained in animal husbandry 
as well as in medicine and surgery makes it necessary to give such instruction 
as will fit the student to care for valuable live stock and intelligently advise 
their owners in matters pertaining to successful animal husbandry. The six 
years course leading to the degrees of B. S. and D. V. M., as outlined below^ 
should meet this need. 

Only the first two years of this curriculum, as outlined, will be given during 

1921-22. ^ 

\ , CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I II III 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 4 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 4 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 1 1 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) X 4 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 4 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 2 2 2 

45 



I 



SOPHOiVlOKK YEAR ' Ttrm. 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soils (Soils 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen. Chem. 112-113) 

Entomology (Zool. 107) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102a-102b) ^J 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) '.\ 

Forage Crops (Agron. 103) .\ 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Physics (Physics 107-108) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



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BACTERIOLOGY AND SANITATION 

The present organization of this Department was brought about with two 
main purposes in view. The first is to give all the students of the University 
an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of the subject. This is of prime 
importance, as Bacteriology is a basic subject and of as much fundamental 
importance as Physics or Chemistry. The second purpose, and the one for 
which this curriculum was designed, was to fit students for positions along 
bacteriological lines. This includes Dairy Bacteriologists and Inspectors; 
Soil Bacteriologists; Federal, State, and Municipal Bacteriologists for Public 
Health positions; Research positions; Commercial positions, etc. At present, 
the demand for individuals qualified for this work is much greater than the 
supply, and with the development of the field, this condition is bound to exist 
for some time. 

The Staff of the Department is made up of well trained and experienced men . 
The equipment and facilities for carrying on the work are excellent. 

CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: , I II III 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) \ 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) Xs 3 3 

Mycology (Morph. and Mycol. 106) . . . . 3 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) 4 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) 2. 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) . . . . 3 

Electives 2 Q 6 

46 



SENIOR YEAR /" Term: 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104 106) 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 107 109) 

Market Milk (D. H. 107) 

Milk Testing (D. H. 108) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

Seminar (Bact. 117-119) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Electives 



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DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



The courses in Dairy Husbandry are so organized as to give the student a 
working knowlege of the basic principles underlying successful dairy production, 
market milk, dairy manufacturing and marketing. A dairy herd is maintained 
for experimental purposes, as well as for the purpose of teaching the care, feeding 
and management of dairy cattle. Graduates from these courses should be 
fitted to take up dairy farming, teaching or experiment station work. Graduate 
courses are designed to meet the needs of those who will take up teaching or 
research work. 

Students are sent throughout the State to supervise advanced registry tests 

as well as to study general conditions as they exist on some of the leading dairy 

farms. 

CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104 106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 103) 

General Bacteriology (Gen. Bact. 101-103) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 104) 

Advanced Registry and Association Work (D. H. 102) . . . 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 105) 

Commercial Dairying (D. H. 106-107) 

Judging Dairy Products (D. H. 103) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) .a'. 

Electives 



SENIOR YEAR 
Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Market Milk (D. H. 108) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Advanced Testing (D. H. 109) 

Thesis (D. H. 111-113) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 

Tractors (F. E. 103) 

Electives 



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47 



ENTOMOLOGY AND BEE CULTURE 

This department is concerned with the teaching of entomology to all agricul- 
tural students as basic for future work in economic entomology and for its 
pedagogic and cultural value. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in a large 
measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of preventing or com- 
bating the pests that menace his crops each year. Successful methods of 
control are emphasized in the economic courses. 

There is an ever increasing demand for trained entomologists. The entomo- 
logical work of the Experiment Station, the Extension Service, the College of 
Agriculture and the office of the State Entomologist being in one administrative 
unit, enables the student in this department to avail himself of the many 
advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students have special advantages 
in that they may be assigned to work on station projects already under way. 

Courses in beekeeping are offered and new courses will be added as the 
demand warrants. The field for specialists in beekeeping is especially attrac- 
tive now and commercial beekeeping is productive of greater profits each year. 



CURRICULUM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR \ Tnm: I 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) . . . .: 4 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Physics (Physics 104-106) 4 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 3 

R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 

Electives 3 

JUNIOR YEAR " Term: I 

Insect Morphology (Ent. 102) 2 

Economic Entomology (Ent. 103-104 ) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103 ) 3 

Electives 12 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Economic Entomology (Ent. lOc-lOT) 5 

Thesis (Ent. 109-111) 2 

Electives 1<> 

Note: The Freshman year is the same as for other agricultural students. 



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FARM MANAGEMENT 

In this department are grouped courses in farm management, agricultural 
economics, marketing, and the kindred subjects of rural organization. 

Farm management has been defined as the business of the individual farmer 
to so organize his business as to produce the greatest continuous profit. This 

48 



can be done, however, only when the organization is in accordance with the 
broader principles of agricultural economics. It requires not only knowledge 
of the many factors involved in the production of crops and animals, but also 
administrative ability to coordinate them into the most efficient farm organi- 
zation. 

The aim of the farm management course is to assist the student to perceive 
the just relationship of the several factors of production and disposition as 
applicable to local conditions and to develop in him executive and administra- 
tive capacity. Students -^ell trained in farm management are in demand for 
county agent work, experiment station or United States Government investiga- 
tion, and college or secondary school teaching. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles underlying 
production, distribution, and consumption, more especially as they bear upon 
agricultural conditions. Labor, land and capital are considered in their rela- 
tionship to agriculture. The need for more exact business records on the farm 
is forcing itself imperatively on the minds of all students of agricultural econ- 
omic?. To meet this demand a course is offered in farm accounting. This course 
is not elaborate but is designed to meet the demand for a simple yet accurate 
system of farm business records. 

The comparative isolation of country life tends naturally to individual rather 
than cooperative effort. The course in rural organization aims to show^ the 
student the advantages of combined effort in country communities, to sketch 
the history of rural organization with a discussion of its failures and successes, 
and to point out practical methods of organizing rural communities for mutual 
and individual benefit. 



CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Technical English (Eng. 104-106) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101 ) 

Fertilizers (Soils 105) 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 103) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Grading Grain Crops (Agron. 106) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Term: 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) . . 

Markets and Marketing (A. E. 102) 

Commercial Law (Econ. 110-112) 

Community Study (R. O. 101-103) 

Principles of Rural Organization (R. 0. 104) 

Electives 



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49 



HORTICULTURE 

There are several reasons why the State of Maryland should be pre-eminent 
in the different lines of horticulture and offers such excellent opportunities for 
horticultural enterprises. A few of the more evident ones are the wide varia- 
tion in soil and climate from the Eastern Shore to the mountainous countries 
of Allegany and Garrett in the west, the nearness to all of the large eastern 
markets and the large number of railroads, interurban lines and waterways, 
all of which combine to make marketing easy and comparatively cheap. 

The Department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work, namely: 
Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture and Landscape Gardening. 
Students wishing to specialize in horticulture can arrange to take either a 
general course during the four years or enough work is offered in each division 
to allow students to specialize during the last two years in any of the four divi- 
sions. The courses have been planned to cover such subject matter that upon 
their completion students should be fitted either to engage in commercial work, 
county agent work, or teaching and investigational work in the state and 
federal institutions. 

The department has at its disposal about twenty acres of ground devoted 
to vegetable gardening, eighteen acres of orchards, small fruits and vineyards, 
and twelve greenhouses, in which flowers and forcing crops are grown. Mem- 
bers of the teaching staff are likewise members of the experiment station staff 
and thus students have an opportunity to become acquainted with the research 
which the department is carrying on. Excellent opportunity for investigating 
new problems is afforded to advanced undergraduates and to graduate students. 



Curricula 

Students who intend to specialize in pomology or vegetable gardening are 
required to take the same subjects which other agricultural students take 
during the first two years. Students who specialize in floriculture or landscape 
gardening, however, will take a slightly different curricula. It is felt that such 
students require certain special courses, which it is unnecessary to require of 
all agricultural students. The curricula follow: 



POMOLOGY 

JUNIOR YEAR 

General Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) ... . 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 

Electives 



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SENIOR YEAR Term: 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102) 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 107) 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) / 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Electives 

VEGETABLE GARDENING 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-114) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 

Vegetable Forching (Hort. 118) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 106) 

General Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Term: 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 116) 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 117) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Electives 

FLORICULTURE 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Gen. Chem. 112-113) 

Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 122) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 

51 



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JUMOK YEAR Term: I 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 123-124) 3 

Floricultural Practice (Hort. 125) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 126) 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 129) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132-133) 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 109) 3 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 118) 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Electives 3 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 126 127) 3 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 2 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 1 

Electives 11 

Note: The Freshman year is the same as for other agricultural students. 



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LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

FRESHiMAX YEAR Term. 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) .... 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Speak. 101-103) 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term. 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 

Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 

Plane Surveying 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Electives 

52 



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JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132-133) 

History of Landscape Design (Hort. 138) 

Elements of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 134) 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 128) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Systematic Botany (Morph and Myc, 109) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Electives . %. 

SENIOR YEAR 1 Term: 

Landscape Design (Hort. 35-136) 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 137) 

Civic Art (Hort. 139) ..'..*. 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Electives 



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SOILS 

The Department of Soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer with 
a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to stu- 
dents who desire to specialize in soils. Students who are preparing to take 
up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition to 
the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The department pos- 
sesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the instruction in these sub- 
jects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in con- 
tact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especially in 
the pot culture laboratories and on the experimental fields at the station and 
in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
teaching soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment sta- 
tions, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Soils, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR ' Term: I II III 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106 ) 2 2 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 3 3 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) V. 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen. Chem. 107-108) 3 3 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 103-105) 3 3 3 

Electives 3 3 ^ 

53 



I 



SENIOR YEAR Term. 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102j 

Methods of Crop Investigations (Agron. 106) 

Crop Rotations (Agron. 109) 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106) 

Soil Technology (Soils 111-113) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Seminar (Soils 115) 

Methods of Soil Investigations (Soils 114) 

Electives 



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CURRICULUM FOR GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Those who do not care to specialize in any particular phase of agriculture 
will follow this curriculum. 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 3 . . 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) . . 3 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 4 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 105) 3 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 102) 4 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) . . . . 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 3 3 

Electives , 2 j> 5 5 

Suggested Electives. 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 4 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 3 3 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 3 3 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 3 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 104) Si/ . . 

Judging Dairy Production (D. H. 106) . . . . 2 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 110) . . 2 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) 2 . . . . 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) . . Si/.. 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 3 3 

Farm Poultry (P. H. 101) 3 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 3 

Farm Forestry (For. 101) 3 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 107) . . 2 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 3 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 3 

Tractors and Trucks (F. E. 103) 3 

Electives 11 9 5 

54 



SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

A. Students who have had four years of high school training or its equivalent 
may follow a two-year curriculum of regular college courses designated by the 
dean. A certificate is granted by the college upon completion of the work. If, 
after the student has been awarded a certificate, he is desirous of taking work 
for a degree, he may continue for two years with a regular college curriculum. 

B, Another two-year curriculum, commonly known as "The Two- Year 
Agricultural Course" is sub-collegiate in nature. To enter this two-year work 
the applicant must have preparation at least equal to the work given in the 
seventh grade of the public schools. At the conclusion of the course students 
having completed the regular work as outlined are given a certificate stating 
the studies pursued during the time spent in the college. No college credit 
toward a degree is given for work done in any of these courses. 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 

FIRST YEAR Term: 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 1) 

Breeds and Judging of Livestock (A. H. l) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 1) 

General Botany (Bot. 1) 

General Chemistry (Gen. Chem. 1-2) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 1-2) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 1) 

Landscape and Floriculture (Hort. 9) 

Insect Pests (Ent. 1) a- l- • />r 1 

Paim Wood w oik (Shu p 1) . .f^ .>iS^^^^ 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 1) >. . > 

Forage Crops (Agron. 2) 

General Soils (Soils l) 

Feeds and Feeding of Live Stock (A. H. 2) 

Home Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 5) 

Sprays and Spraying (Ent. 2) 

Forging and Pipe Fitting (Shop 2) 

Vocational Publications (Eng. 3) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 1) 



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SECOND YEAR 

Breeding of Animals (A. H. 3) 

Farm Management (F. M. 1) 

Fertilizers (Soils 2) 

Plant Diseases (Pit. Path. 1) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 1) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 3) 

Farm Accounts (A. E. 1) 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. J^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 1) ^^. 

Farm Buildings (F. E. 6) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 2) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 1) 

Farm Poultry (P. H. 1) ^ . ' 

Farm Forestry (For. 1) 

Farm Drainage (F. E. 8) 

Tractors and Trucks (F. E. 3) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2) 



Term. 



Elect one or a portion of each: 

Advanced Agronomy (Agron .1^ 

Special Animal Husbandry (A. H. 4-6) 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 3) 

Judging of Dairy Products (D. H. 4) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 2-3) 

Small Fruits (Hort. 4) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 6-8) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 10-12) 

Beekeeping (Zool. 3) 



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COURSES IN AGRICULTURE FOR SOLDIERS AND 

SAILORS 

Students who are prepared to take up collegiate work fit directly into one 
of the four-year courses in Agriculture. Others who have but two years to 
spend in the University and are not prepared to enter college, may take the 
regular two-year agricultural course, which does not pre-suppose graduation 
from high school and which does not lead to a degree. There are still others 
who do not fit in any of the regularly planned courses, and for these the Univer- 
sity has set up special unit courses, some of which are outlined on the follow- 
ing page: 



56 



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Description of Courses 



AGRONOMY 



Agron. 101. Cereal Crops — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Freshman year. 

History, distribution, culture and improvement of cereal crops. 

Agron. 102. Forage Crops — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

History, distribution, adaptation, culture, and uses of forage, pasture, cover 
and green manure crops. The laboratory periods are largely devoted to the 
identification and classification of forage plants and seeds, and to purity and 
viability tests of seeds. 

Agron. 103. Grading Farm Crops — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Prerequisites, 
Agron. 101 and 102. 

Market classifications and grades as recommended by the United States 
Bureau of Markets and practice in determining the grades. 

Agron. 104. Grain Judging — One credit hour: one three-hour laboratory 
period. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Agron. 101. 

Practice in judging the cereals for milling, seeding, and feeding purposes. 

Agron. 105. Research and Thesis — Six credit hours. To be arranged. 
Senior year. 

Students are given a chance to do some investigational work either in the 
way of collecting information on some phase of agronomic work or working 
some problem in the laboratory, field, or greenhouse. 



For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

Agron. 106. Genetics — Four credit hours: three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and 
Morph. and Myc. 101. 

General course in genetics designed to prepare students for later courses in 
the breeding of crops in which they are specializing. (Wentz.) 

Agron. 107. Cropping Systems and Methods — Two credit hours: two 
lectures. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisities, Agron. 101-102, Soils 
101-102. 

Principles and factors influencing cropping systems in the United States; 
study of rotation experiments; theories of cropping methods; and practice in 
arranging type farming systems. (Metzger.) 

Agron. 108. Crop Breeding — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Agron. 101, 102, and 104, Bot. 101. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops and detailed studies 
made of methods used in crop improvement work. (Wentz.) 

Agron. 109. Methods in Crop Investigations — Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. 
Prerequisites, Agron. 101-102. 

58 



Methods used by experiment stations in crop investigational work. The 
work of different stations on certain problems is classified with the view of the 
standardization of methods. Students are required to make reports on and 
criticize methods used by the different stations in attacking the problems 

studied. (Wentz.) cj«^^„^ 

Agron. 110-111. Seminar— One credit hour each term: one lecture. Second 

and third terms. Senior year. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by the students on current bul- 
letins and scientific papers dealing with problems in agronomy. (Stall.) 

For Graduate Students 

Agron. 201. Biometry- Amount of credit to be determined by work 
accomplished. Lectures and laboratory periods. ^ ^^i ^ t^ r..A\r.. 

Statistical methods as applied to problems in Genetics and Plant Breeding 
The methods used in the study of variations and correlations are discussed and 
the biometrical constants worked out by the class for certam assigned or 

selected data. (Wentz.) , ^ . - a \..r LorV 

Agron. 202. Crop Breeding-Amount of credit to be determined by work 

accomplished. Lectures and laboratory periods. 

The content of this course is similar to the undergraduate course in Crop 
Breeding, but will be adapted more to graduate students and more of a range 
will be allowed in choice of material to suit special cases. (Wentz.) 

Agron. 203. Research-Amount of credit to be determined by work ac- 

""^ With the approval of the head of the department the student will be allowed 
to work on any problem in agronomy or he will be given a list of suggested 
problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Agron. 1. Cereal Crops— Three credit hours: two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period. First term. First year. 

History, distribution, adaptations, uses, and culture of cereal crops, a larger 
part of the term being spent on corn and wheat. 

Agron. 2. Forage Crops-Three credit hours: two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

History, distribution, adaptations, uses and culture of forage and cover crops 
adapted to Maryland conditions. , , ^ 

Agron. 3. Grain Judging-One credit hour: one three-hour laboratory 
period. Second term. Second year. Prerequisite Agron. 1. ; 

Judging grains from the standpoint of the grower, the feeder and the miller. 

Agron. 4. Advanced Agronomy-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period each term. Second year. 

Short course students specializing in agronomy are given special work in 
judging and grading grains, crop improvement and various other phases of 
crop production. Students are allowed to elect subjects in other departments 
for part of the time. 

59 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 101. Animal Husbandry — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Freshman year. 
Live stock in relation to farm practices; types and breeds of farm animals. 

A. H. 102a-102b. Feeds and Feeding — Three credit hours each term: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. First and second terms. Sophomore year. 

Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the various 
food stuffs to the several classes of farm live stock. Feeding standards; the 
calculation and compounding of rations. 

A. H. 103. Management of Dairy Young Stock — Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock, breeding practices, 
feeding for advanced registry, and dairy cattle judging. 

A. H. 104. Principles of Breeding — Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

This course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including hered- 
ity, variation, selection, growth, development, systems of breeding and 
pedigree study. 

A. H. 105. Swine Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

Types and breeds of swine. Care, feeding, breeding, management, economics 
of swine husbandry and judging. 

A. H. 106. Meat and Meat Products — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. (Not given in 1921-22.) 

The slaughtering of farm live stock, and the production, preparation and 
handling of meat and meat products. 

A. H. 107. Beef Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

Beef and dual purpose breeds. The care, feeding, breeding and management 
of beef herds; fattening; and the economics of the beef industry. 

A. H. 108. Sheep Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Senior year. 

Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding, 
breeding, and management. Grades of wool. Judging and scoring. 

A. H. 109. Horse and Mule Production — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. 

Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding, 
breeding, breaking and training, judging. 

A. H. 110-111. Advanced Judging — Two credit hours each term: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Junior or Senior 
years. Prerequisites, A. H. 103, 105, 107. 

First Term — Competitive judging of beef cattle, sheep and swine. Second 
term. Competitive judging of dairy cattle. Various trips to stock farms 
throughout the State will be made. Such judging teams as may be chosen to 
represent the University will be selected from among those taking this course. 

60 



A. H. 112. Advanced Breed Sfuay-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, A. H. 103, ^ 

'Ipedal 'consideration of the histoiy, development and ^^-tri^-^^- ^^^^^^ 
more important breeds of live stock; important families and individuals, 

assigned reading and pedigree work. 
Th 113. Markets and Marketing-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one 'laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites. A. H. 106, 
107 108 109. (Not given in 1921-22.) 

Histor'v, development, organization and status of the meat, wool, and horse 
industrtes. The packing industry and its by-products. Market classes and 
grades of live stock. Markets and market reports. 

A. H. 114. Seminar-One credit hour: one lecture. Third term. Semor or 

%tb,:m:'t"rg:td discussions on subjects relating to animal husbandry 
A. H. 115-117. Research and Thtsis—Tvio credit hours each term, benior 

^^Original investigations in problems in animal husbandry, the results of 
which research are to be presented in the form of a thesis. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

A H 118. Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods-Fonv credit hours: 
three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year or graduate. 

Prerequisites, A. H. 104. 

An introduction to genetics and statistical methods as applying more es- 
pecially to animal breeding. (Meade.) 

A. H. 119. Nutrition-Three credit hours: three lectures. Third term. 
Seniors or Graduates. Prerequisite, A. H. 102. 

Composition of the animal body, digestion, assimilation, metabohsm. protein 
and energy requirements. Method of investigation and studies m the utiliza- 
tion of food nutrients. (Meade.) 

For Short-Course Students 

A. H. 1. Breeds and Judging-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. First year. 

Live stock in relation to successful farm practices, types and breeds of farm 
animals with special reference to the needs of the practical farmer. 

A. H. 2. Feeds and Feeding-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

A study of the source, composition, characteristics and adaptability of the 
various food stuffs, feeding standards and the calculation of rations. 

A. H. 3. Breeding of Animals— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Second year. . , ,. v, j 

A course covering the practical aspects of animal breeding, including hered- 
ity, variation, selection, systems of breeding and pedigree study. 

A H 4-6 Special Animal Husbandry-Three credit hours: two lectur^ 
and one laboratory period. Throughout the second year. Each term of work 

61 



I 



I. 



is complete in itself and may be elected ^^^rhout regs^d to the work of the term 
precedmg it or of the term following. 

Swine ProducHon—First term. Types and breeds of swine. Care, feeding 
^ breedmg, management, economics of swine husbandry and judging 

Beef Production-Second term. Subject matter of course same as for 
Swme Production." 

Sheep Production-Third term. Subject matter of course same as for 
Swme Production." 

A. H. 7. Manageynent of Dairy Young Stock— Three credit hours* two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock, breeding practices, 
leedmg for advanced registry, and dairy cattle judging. 

GENERAL ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Seminar— A forum for the discussion of subjects relating to animal industry. 
Upen to juniors, seniors and graduate students. 

Research and Thesis~The work will be arranged with each student individ- 
ually. He may select some topic or problem in which he is interested and which 
will require independent investigation. 

ANIMAL PATHOLOGY AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 

During 1921-22 only the first two years of the combined six-year course in 
Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine are given. 

For Students in Agriculture 

V. M. 101. Anatomy and Physiology— Three credit hours: three lectures 
t irst term. Junior year. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with the normal; the 
inter-relationship between the various organs and parts both as to structure 
and function. 

V. M. 102. Animal Diseases— Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. 

Diseases of domestic animals, infectious and non-infectious. Earlv recog- 
nition of disease; hygiene, sanitation, and prevention; first aid. 

For Short-Course Students 

V. M. 1. Ayiimal Diseases— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Second year. 

Briefer course on the diseases of domestic animals; methods of recognizing 
disease in its early stages; relation of care and sanitation to disease. 

BACTERIOLOGY AND SANITATION 

Bact. 101-103. General Bacteriology— Three credit hours each term: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Junior year. 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to 
nature; morphology, classification, identification of species and the different 
methods of sterilization and disinfection; preparation of culture media; isolation 

62 



and cultivation of aerobes and anaerobes; examination of cultures; microscopic 
examination of bacteria; stains with their composition, classification and use; 
vital activities of bacteria; their relation to disease; use of experimental ani- 
mals; bacteria in water, milk and soils; cultural characters of representative 
organisms from the following genera: micrococcus, streptococcus, bacterium, 
bacillus, pseudomonas, streptothrix, protozoa, filtrable viruses and immunity. 

Bact. 103-A. Special for Home Economics Students only — Three credit 
hours: third term. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Junior year. 

The more important bacteria, yeasts and fungi ordinarily encountered in 
the field of domestic economy. Preservation of foods. Sanitation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates or Graduates 

Bact. 104-106. Dairy Bacteriology — Three credit hours each term: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 101-103. 

Historical sketch; relation of bacteria to dairy products; preparation of 
media; plating by the dilution method; sources of contamination, including 
stable atmosphere, udder, exterior of cows and attendants; kinds of utensils 
and their sterilization; kinds of bacteria in milk and their development; direct 
microscopic examination; sedimentation test and centrifugalization; fresh and 
old milk, baby and special milks; market milk; graded milk; certified milk; 
sour milk; whey; cream; butter, cheese; condensed milk; powdered milk and 
milk starters; pasteurization by flash and slow method; changes in milk due 
to bacteria and milk carriers of disease. (Poelma.) 

Bact. 107-109. Advanced Bacteriology — Two to three credit hours each 
term: two to three laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 
101-103. 

This course is intended primarily to give the student a chance to develop his 
own initiative. He will be allowed to decide upon his project and work it out 
as much as possible in his own way under proper supervision. In this manner 
he will be able to apply his knowledge of bacteriology to a given problem. 
He will also get to know something of the methods of research and will receive 
a valuable training in obtaining careful and accurate data. (Pickens.) 

Bact. 110-112. Thesis — Two credit hours each term: senior year. Optional. 

The investigation of a given project, the results of which are to be presented 
in the form of a thesis and submitted for credit toward graduation. (Pickens.) 

Bact. 113-115. Seminar — One credit hour each term: senior year. Required 
of seniors taking Bact. 107-109 and all graduate students. 

The work will consist of reports on individual projects and on recent scientific 
literature. 

For Graduate Students Only 

Bact. 201-203. Research Bacteriology — Three credit hours each term: three 
laboratory periods by assignment. Prerequisites, Bact. 101-103 and in certain 
<?ases 104-106 and 107-109, depending upon the project. (Pickens.) 

For Short-Course Students 
Bact. 1. Agricultural Bacteriology — Two credit hours: two lectures. Second 
term. Second year. 

63 



An elementary course touching upon the following topics: the general char- 
acters of micro-organisms; fermentation; putrefaction and decay; nature's food 
supply; the carbon cycle; decomposition of nitrogenous compounds; nitrifica- 
tion and denitrification; the manure heap and sewage; reclamation of lost 
nitrogen; bacteria and soil minerals; bacteria in water and milk; control of 
milk supply; bacteria in butter and cheese making; alcohol, vinegar, sour kraut, 
tobacco, silage and flax; preservation of food products; resistance against 
parasitic bacteria; tuberculosis and other germ diseases and parasitic diseases 
of plants. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D. H. 101. Principles of Dairying — Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

Origin, history, development and characteristics of the dairy breeds; relation- 
ship of Dairy Husbandry to general agriculture; extent of the dairy business 
and value of products; milk, its secretion, character and composition. 

D. H. 102. Advanced Registry and Association Work — Two credit hours: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

Requirements for advanced registry; the management of long and short 
time tests; breed association rules; general work of the supervisor; care and 
testing of samples; cow testing associations; bull associations. Paid super- 
visors at $3.00 per day are selected for work over week-ends from those taking 
this course. 

D. H. 103. Judging Dairy Products — Two credit hours: one lecture and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. National authorities will 
address the class and trips will be taken to butter, cheese and milk markets for 
the purpose of familiarizing the students with the commercial quality of these 
products. Such teams as may be chosed to represent the University will be 
selected from those electing this course. 

D. H. 104. Dairy Production and Barn Practice — Four credit hours: three 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including selection of 
feeds; feeding standards; systems of herd feeding; silage, soiling crops and pas- 
ture; selection, care and feeding the sire; dairy herd development and manage- 
ment; method of keeping and forms for herd records; dairy barn arrangement 
and equipment; dairy cost accounts and barn practices which influence quan- 
tity and quality in milk. Prerequisite D. H. 101. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 105. Farm Dairying — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equipping 
the stable and milk house; surface coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; 
sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizating utensils; dairy farm score cards; 
composition of milk, butter and cheese and methods of testing. Prerequisites 
D. H. 101 and 104. 



64 



D. H. 106-107. Commercial Dairying — Three credit hours, each term: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Junior or 
Senior years. 

Methods of testing and of manufacturing of dairy products. Dairy mach- 
inery. Theory and practice of cream separation, pasteurization and processing 
of milk and cream: Butter, ice cream and cottage cheese making. Prerequisites 
D. H. 104 and 106. 

D. H. 108. Market Milk — Three credit hours: two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. First term. Senior year. 

A study of market milk conditions, requirements of city milk trade; the 
production of milk; pasteurization of milk; milk and its relation to the public 
health; the food value of milk; methods of handling market milk and market 
cream for direct consumption; the transportation of milk; Babcock testing of 
milk and milk products. In this course visits will be made to dairies and to 
milk plants. Prerequisites D. H. 104 and 105. 

D. H. 109. Advanced Course in Milk Testing — Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Senior year. 

This course includes the determination of moisture and dry matter in milk 
and dairy products; various tests for fat and casein; testing of butter and oleo- 
margarine; adulterations and preservatives. Prerequisite D. H. 107. 

D. H. 110. Seminar — One credit: one lecture. Second term. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current bulletins and 
scientific papers in dairy production and market milk problems. 

D. H. 111-113. Thesis — Six credit hours. Year to be arranged. 

Students are given opportunities to conduct investigational work, either in 
collecting information or original research in Dairy Production and Market 
Milk. 

D. H. 114. City Milk Supply — Two credit hours: two lectures. First term. 

Securing a milk supply for city consumers; methods of buying from pro- 
ducers; the transportation of milk; milk contractors; systems of handling milk 
in the city milk plants; the sterilization of utensils; systems of delivery to 
consumers. 

D. H. 115. Dairy Farm and City Milk Inspection-rTy^o credit hours: two 
lectures. Second term. 

Early attempts at control and the development of milk inspection; systems 
of dairy inspection; systems of milk plant inspection; dairy farm score cards; 
dairy plant score cards; relation of milk to public health; grading milk; milk 
standards; milk and cream regulations; methods of appointment and duties 
of dairy and milk inspectors; general improvement and control of milk supplies 
of cities and towns. 

Graduates 

D. H. 201. Dairy Production — Four credit hours: First term. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feeding stand- 
ards and selection of feeds; systems of herd feeding; silage and silos; soiling 
systems and pastures; the selection, care and feeding of the sire; dairy herd 
development and management; cost accounts and practices w^hich influence 
quantity and quality in milk. (Gamble and staff.) 

65 



D. H. 202. Research — Nine credit hours. Year to be arranged. Graduates. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be allowed to 
work on any problem in dairy production or market milk they may choose, or 
be given a list of problems from which to select a research project. 

Insofar as schedules permit, students will be encouraged to visit the U. S. 
Dairy Division Laboratories and become acquainted with the dairy research 
problems in process and the methods of attack. This acquaints the student 
with the broad phases of research in dairy production and market milk. 
(Gamble and staff. * 

For Short-Course Students 

D. H. 1. Principles of Dairying — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. First year. 

Origin, history, development and characteristics of the dairy breeds; re- 
lationship of Dairy Husbandry to general agriculture; extent of the dairy 
business and value of products; milk, its secretion, character and composition. 

D. H. 2. Advanced Registry and Association Work — Two credit hours: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. First year. 

Requirements for advanced registry; the management of long and short 
time tests; breeds association rules; general work of the supervisor; care and 
testing of samples; cow testing associations; bull associations. Paid super- 
visors at $3.00 per day are selected for work over week-ends from those 
taking this course. Prerequisites Organic Chemistry 112 and 113. 

D. H. 3. Dairy Production and Barn Practice — Four credit hours: three 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including selection of 
feeds; feeding standards; systems of herd feeding; silage soiling crops and pasture; 
selection, care and feeding the sire; dairy herd development and management; 
method of keeping and forms for herd records; dairy barn arrangement and 
equipment; dairy cost accounts and barn practices which influence quantity 
and quality in milk. Prerequisite D. H. 1. 

D. H. 4. Farm Dairying — Three credit hours: two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. Second term. Second year. 

How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equipping 
the stable and milk house; surface coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; 
sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizing utensils; dairy farm score cards; 
composition of milk, butter and cheese and methods of testing. Prerequisites 
D. H. 101 and 102. 

D. H. 5. Judging Dairy Products — Two credit hours: one lecture and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. National authorities will 
address the class and trips will be taken to butter, cheese and milk markets 
for the purpose of familiarizing the students with the commercial quality of 
these products. Such teams as may be chosen to represent the University will 
be selected from those electing this course. 



66 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. 101. General Entomology— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work and field excursions. A collection of insects is 

required. , , ^ • j 

Ent. 102. Insect Morphology— T^o credit hours: two laboratory periods. 

First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 
A course in morphology designed to prepare students for work in economic 

entomology. 

Ent. 103-104. Economic Entomology— Four credit hours each term: two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Junior year. 

Prerequisite, Ent. 101. 

The theory and practice of insect control; their dependence upon insect 
morphology and biology. The discussion of economic insects. 

Ent. 105-107. Economic Entomology— Five credit hours each term: three 
lecture hours and two laboratory periods. The Senior year. Prerequisite, 

Ent. 102-104. ; . 

Problems in applied entomology, including life history, ecology, distribution, 

parasitism and control. 

Ent. 108. Systematic Entomology— T^o credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Ent. 102. 

The student selects some group in which he is particularly interested and 
makes a detailed study of it. The course requires considerable field work and 
is supplemented by laboratory periods and frequent conferences. 

Ent. 109-111. Thesis— Tv^o credit hours each term: laboratory periods to 
be arranged. The Senior year. 

The intensive investigation of some zoological subject, the results of which 
are incorporated in a paper which is submitted as part requirement for gradua- 
tion. 

Ent. 112. Insecticides and their Application— Tv^o credit hours: one 

lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation and application; 
construction, care and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumigation, methods 
and apparatus in mechanical control. 

Ent. 113. Medical Entomology— Three credit hours: three lectures. First 
term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

The relation of animals to disease, directly and as vectors of pathogenic 
organisms; the control of pests of man. 

Ent. 114. Scientific Delineation and Preparation-One credit hour each 
term: one laboratory period. First and second terms. Senior year. 

Photography, photomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera lucida, 
lantern-slide making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit and museum 

material. 

Ent. 115. Horticultural Entomology— Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Ent. 101. 

Lectures, laboratory and field work on the morphology, biology and control 

of insect pests of horticultural crops. 

67 



For Graduate Students 

Ent. 201. Entomological Problems — Maximum credit 5 hours per term. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entomology 
with particular reference to preparation for individual research. (Cory.) 

Ent. 202. Research in Entomology — Maximum credit 15 to 20 hours upon 
completion of the thesis. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation may, with the approval of 
the head of the Department, undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently, the student may be 
allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. The 
student's work may form a part of the final report on the project and be pub- 
lished in bulletin form. A report, suitable for publication, must be submitted 
at the close of the studies and the time and place of its publication will be 
determined by the professor in charge of the work. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203. Advanced Economic Entomology — One credit hour: one lecture. 
Second term. 

Lectures discussing the latest theories and practices in applied entomology. 
(Cory.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Ent. 1. Insect Pests — Two lectures and one laboratory period. Second 
term. First year. 

A study of insects injurious to farm plants. 

Ent. 2. Sprays and Spraying — One lecture and three hours laboratory 
period. Third term. First year. 

Preparation and application of insecticides, together with a consideration of 
other methods of control. 

Ent. 3 Beekeeping — One laboratory period. Third term. 

Consideration of the underlying principles of successful beekeeping, with 
practice in preparation of equipment and the manipulation of bees. 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Farm Equipment is organized to offer students of agri- 
culture a working knowledge of those branches of agriculture which are based 
upon engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped under three 
heads: farm machinery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modern tendency in farming is to replace hand labor, requiring the use 
of many men, by large machines which do the work of many men yet require 
only one man for their operation. In many cases horses are being replaced by 
tractors to supply the motive force for these machines. Trucks and automobiles 
are used on many farms. It is highly advisable that the student of any branch 
of agriculture have a working knowledge of the construction and adjustments 
of these machines. 

About one-sixth of the total value of farms is tied up in the buildings. The 
study of the design of the various buildings, from the standpoint of convenience, 
economy and appearance, is, therefore, important. 

The study of drainage includes the principles of tile drainage, the laying 
out and construction of tile drain systems, the use of open ditches, and a study 
of the Maryland drainage laws. 

68 



Description of Courses 

F. E. 101. Farm Machinery— Three credit hours each term: two lectures and 
one laboratory period; first or third terms. Junior or Senior year. 

A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse and tractor drawn 
machinery. Laboratory work consists of a detailed study of actual machmery, 
calibration tests and practice in adjusting. 

F. E. 102. Gas Engines— Three credit hours: two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Second term. Junior or Senior Year. 

The construction and operation of the various types of internal combusion 
motors encountered in farm practice. 

F. E. 103. Tractors and Trucks— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite: F. E. 102 

A continuation of F. E. 102, with especial emphasis on the four cylmder 
motor. Includes special features of tractor practice. Particular attention 
given to study of ignition. Laboratory work includes a detailed study of 
carburetion and ignition systems, engine operation and adjusting, trouble 

shooting, etc. 

F. E. 106. Farm Buildings— Two credit hours: two lectures. Second term. 

Junior year. . i- i.,.- *. 

A study of all types of farm structures, also of farm heating, lighting, water 

supply, ventilation, and sanitation systems. 

F. E. 108. Farm Drainage— Three credit hours: two lectures, one laboratory 

period. Third term. 

A nudy of farm drainage systems, for the student who has not studied college 
mathematics or surveying. Includes the theory of tile drains, the depth and 
spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, and methods of construction. A 
smaller amount of time will be spent upon drainage by open ditches, and the 
laws relating thereto. 

For Short-Course Students 

The courses for Short-Course students in Farm Engineering cover sub- 
stantially the same ground as the corresponding courses for the college students, 
with due allowance made for the Short Course students' lack of theoretical 

instruction. x^^4. 

F. E. 1. Farm Machinery— Two lectures, one laboratory period, tirst 

term. Second year. 
A study of the operation and adjustments of modern farm machinery. 
F. E. 2. Gas Engines— Two lectures, one laboratory period. Second term. 

Second year. 

A study of gas engine design and construction. 

F. E. 3. Tractors and Trucks— Two lectures, one laboratory period. Third 
term. Second year. Prerequisite: F. E. 2. 

A continuation of F. E. 2, with especial attention to four cylinder motors. 

F. E. 6. Farm Buildings— Two lecture periods. Second term. Second 

year. . 

A study of the various types of farm buildings, and of water, heating, and 

lighting systems. 

69 



F. E. 8. Farm Drainage — Two lectures, one laboratory period. Third term. 
Second year. 

A study of the principles governing the design of farm drainage systems, and 
the construction of the same. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

F. M. 101-102. Farm Management — Three credit hours each term: three 
lectures. First and second terms. Senior year. 

The business of farming from the standpoint of the individual farmer. This 
course aims to connect the principles and practice which the student has 
acquired in the several technical courses and to apply them to the development 
of a successful farm business. 

For Short-Course Students 

F. M. 1. Farm Management — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

A course parallel with F. M. 101-102, arranged for the students in the short 
agricultural courses. 

Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 101. Agricultural Economics — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 

The economic adaptations and adjustments necessary on the part of the 
agriculturist to meet the changing economic conditions. Population trend, 
land tenure, farm incomes, farm labor, agricultural credit, and price movements 
will receive special consideration. 

A. E. 102. Markets and the Marketing — Three credit hours. First term. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 

An analysis of the present system of transporting, storing and distributing 
farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in increasing the 
efficiency of marketing methods and co-operative marketing. 

A. E. 103. Farm Accounting — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

The principles underlying farm accounting, emphasizing cost accounting 
and analysis of farm business. 

For Short-Course Students 

A. E. 1. Farm Accounting — Three lectures. Second term. Second year. 
A course parallel with A. E. 103. For students in the short agricultural 
courses. 

RURAL ORGANIZATION 

R. O. 101-103. Elements of Community Study — Three credit hours each 
term. The Senior year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of community development. 

R. O. 104. Principles of Rural Organization — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Junior year. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers* co-operative organ- 
izations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

70 



FORESTRY 

The course in Farm Forestry aims to give the student in agriculture sufficient 
instruction and practice work to enable him to handle intelligently and scien- 
tifically the farm woodlands. Such a course should be required of all students 
fitting themselves for farm management and be given preferably in the spring 
term (on account of favorable weather for field work) during the Junior or 
Senior year for four-year men and during the Second year for two-year agricul- 
tural men. At the present time Forestry is not offered as a major course, but 
is used to supplement the content of the other courses. 

Description of Courses 

For. 101. Farm Forestry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of forest botany, wood management, measurements, fire protection, 
nursery practice, tree planting, valuation and utilization of forest crops. The 
work is conducted by means of lectures and field work. 

For Short-Course Students 

For. 1. Farm Forestry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

The content of this course is similar to that of For. 101, but is adapted to 
the development and needs of students in the short-course work. 



HORTICULTURE 



POMOLOGY 

Description of Courses 

HoRT. 101. Elementary Pomology — Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

A general course in Pomology. The proper location and site for an orchard 
are discussed. Varieties, planting plans, inter-crops, spraying, cultural 
methods, fertilizing methods, thinning, picking, packing and marketing are 
also given consideration. The subjects are discussed for apples, peaches, 
pears, plums, cherries and quinces. The principles of plant propagation as 
applied to pomology are discussed. 

HoRT. 102-103. Commercial Fruit Growing — Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 101. 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced 
work is taken up on the subjects of orchard culture, orchard fertilization, pick- 
ing, packing, marketing and storing of fruits, orchard by-products, orchard 
heating and orchard economics. Designed for undergraduate or graduate 

students. 

HoRT. 104. Systematic Pomology — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 101. 

71 



The history, botany and classification of fruits and their adaptation to Mary- 
land conditions. Exercises are given in describing and identifying the leading 
commercial varieties of fruits. Students ^re required to help set up the College 
fruit show each year. Designed for undergraduate or graduate students. 

Hort. 105. Advanced Practical Pomology — One credit hour. First term. 
Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principal fruit 
regions of eastern West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. A visit to 
the fruit markets of several large cities will be made. The cost of this trip 
should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each student will be required 
to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. The time for taking this trip 
will be arranged yearly with each class. 

Hort. 106. Small Fruit Culture — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and their 
adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and a study of 
the experimental plots and varieties on the station grounds. The following 
fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, black cap raspberry, 
red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry and loganberry. 

Hort. 107. Economic Fruits of the V/orld — Three credit hours: three lectures. 
Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological and physiological characteristics 
of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such as the date, 
pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut bearing trees, citrus fruits, newly introduced 
fruits and the like, with special reference to their cultural requirements in 
certain parts of the United States and the insular possessions. All fruits are 
discussed in this course which have not been discussed in a previous course. 
Open to undergraduate or graduate students. 

Hort. 108. Fruit and Vegetable Jxidging — Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. Junior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 101 and 111. 

A course designed to tra n men for fruit judging teams and practical judging. 
Students are required to l.now at least one hundred varieties of fruit, and are 
given practice in judging single plates, largest and best collections, boxes, 
barrels and commercial exhibits of fruits and vegetables. Students are required 
to help set up the College fruit show each year. 

Hort. 109. Advanced Fruit Judging — One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 108. 

VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Hort. 111. Elementary Vegetable Gardening — Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures, one laboratory. Third term. Freshman year. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. Each 
student is given a small garden to plan, plant, cultivate, spray, fertilize, har- 
vest, etc. 

Hort. 112. Tuber and Root Crops — Three credit hours: two lectures, and 
one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 
Open to seniors and graduates. 

72 



A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed varieties, 
propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, storing 

and marketing. 

Hort. 113-114. Commercial Vegetable Gardening— Three credit hours: 
First apd second terms. Junior year. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production. Each m- 
dividual crop is discussed in detail. Trips are made to large commercial 
gardens, various markets and other places of interest. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture— Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 112 
and 113-114. Open to seniors and graduates. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetables. Description 
of varieties, and adaptation of varieties to different environmental conditions. 

Hort. 117. Advanced Vegetable Gardening— One credit hour: Third term. 
Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 112, 113-114 and 116. 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking sections of Maryland, 
Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A study of the markets in several 
large cities is included in this trip. Students are required to hand in a detailer' 
report of the trip. Such a trip should not exceed thirty dollars per student. 
The time will be arranged each year with each class. 

Hort. 118. Vegetable Forcing— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. Third term. Junior year. 

All vegetables used for forcing are considered. Laboratory work in steriliza- 
tion and preparation of soils, cultivation, regulation of temperature, and 
humidity, watering, training, pruning, pollination and harvesting. 

FLORICULTURE 

Hort. 121. General Floriculture— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

The management of greenhouses: the production and marketing of florists 
crops; retail methods; plants for house and garden. 

General course for students desiring knowledge of floriculture but not wishing 
to specialize in floriculture. Not required of floricultural students. 

Hort. 122. Elementary Floriculture— Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

The floricultural industry; evolution and development; present status; the 
trade and its various divisions; florists' problems. 

Hort. 123-124. Greenhouse Management— Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

Hort. 125. Floricultural Practice. One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 122-123. 

Practical experience in the various greenhouse operations of the spring 

season. 

Hort. 126. Greenhouse Construction— Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Given 1921-1922. 

73 



I 



The various types of houses, their location, arrangement, construction and 

HORT. 127-128. Commercial Floriculture-Three credit hours each term- 
two lectures and one laboratory nerinH p,Vof j >-"=""^ "ours each term: 
Prerequisite, Hort. 124 ^ ^''''"^- ^"'^ ^""^ ^«<^°"d *«™^- Senior year. 

Cultural methods of florists' bench crops and potted plants- the marketing 

Holf T/o = t' T"" '*'"■''■ " ^^^'^y °f «°>-^' decoration. ' 

Hort. 129. Garden Fto«;m-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
Jaboratory penod. Third term. Junior year. Given 1921-r922 

h.-fh Ti^' ^"'f " "'^= *^^ ^^"""^ "P«««« °f annuals, herbaceous perennials 
":'i:^fZ'S^T;::' -"^ ^-^ ''-'' -'--> recuirements.%rZi 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

.r^T' .^ K ■ f*""""' i-an^tecap. Garderams-Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their aDolioa 
t.on to pnvate and public areas. Special consideration is given to the imorlve' 

Zper'tS 'Td^pfed To 1 T ^T' ^•^"""^^' ^™eads^nd smairsXrn" 
properties. Adapted to students not mtending to specialize in landscape but 

who^wh some theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject oTen^o alt 

toryZ'iJ" F^r/ ^^"'i'^^r-Two credit hours: one lecture and one labora- 
tory period. First term. Junior year. Given 1922-1923 

Platlt ^olve^^^^^^^^^^^ ''-'^ -^ ^^~^ in ornamental 

toryrriof * I^'f^^'^''-^^^^ -edit hours: one lecture and one labora- 
tor> period. Third term. Prerequisite, Hort. 132. Given 1922-192S 
A continuation of Hort. 132 to make the student familiar wifLo^^^^^ 
m spring and summer. Given every other year. 

.JT''' /f • ^^''^^^^" ""f Landscape Design-Three credit hours- one lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Junior year ^^''- ^"^ ^^^^ure 

field rrf'"'"" '' ''' '™'^^^" ^' ^^^^^^^P^ ^-^^^ --^y^^ mapping and 

Hort. 135-136. Landscape Design-Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Three credit hours; three Taboratorv 
periods^ Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 132 and iS^"^ 

The design of private grounds, gardens and of architectural details u^ed in 
landscape; planting plans; analytical study of plans of practictg anXaie 
architects; field observation of landscape developments. landscape 

Hort. 137. Landscape Pra^^tice-Three credit hours: one lecture and twr. 
laboratory periods Third term. Senior year. Prerequisi^ Hor %35 1^^^^^ 

HORT 138. His cry of Landscape Gardening-One credit hour: one lectuer 
Second term. Junior year. Given 1922-1923. iectuer. 

74 



Evolution and development of landscape gardening; the different styles and 
a particular consideration of Italian, English, and American gardens. Given 
every other year. 

HoRT. 139. Civic Art — Two credit hours: one lecture and one laboratory 
period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 134. Given 1921- 
1922. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural improve- 
ment, including problems in design of civic center, parks, school grounds, and 
other public and semi-public areas. Given every other year. 

COURSES INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATES 

HoRT. 201. Experimental Pomology — Three credit hours. Second term. 
Lectures, three hours. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to practices 
in Pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in Pomolgy and 
results of experiments that have been or are being conducted in all experiment 
stations in this and other countries. A limited number of seniors will be allowed 
to take this course with the approval of the head of the department. 

Hort. 202. Experimental Vegetable Gardening — Two credit hours. Lec- 
tures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to practices 
in Vegetable Gardening; methods and difficulties in experimental work in 
Vegetable Gardening and results of experiments that have been or are being 
conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. A limited 
number of seniors will be permitted to take this course with the approval of 
the head of the department. 

Hort. 203. Experimental Floriculture — Two credit hours. Lectures, two 
hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinions as to practices 
in Floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of all experimental work 
in Floriculture which have been or are being conducted will be thoroughly 
discussed. A limited number of seniors will be permitted to take this course 
with the approval of the head of the department. 

Hort. 204. Methods of Research — Two credit hours. Lecture, one hour, 
one laboratory period. Second term. 

For graduate students only. Special drill will be given in the making of 
briefs and outlines of research problems. In methods of procedure in conduct- 
ing investigational work and in the preparation of bulletins and reports. A 
study of the origin, development and growth of horticultural research is taken 
up. A study of the research problems being conducted by the Department of 
Horticulture will be made, and students will be required to take notes on some 
of the experimental work in the field and become familiar with the manner of 
filing and cataloging all experimental work. 

Hort. 205-207. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis — Two, three 
or four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. First, second and third 
terms. 

75 



Graduate students will be required to select problems for original research 
in either Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture or Landscape Garden- 
ing. This work is to continue throughout the full year, and final results will 
be published in the form of a thesis. 

HORT. 208-210. Advanced Horticultural Seminar. 

This course will be required of all graduate students. Students will be 
required to give reports either on special topics assigned them or on the progress 
of their own investigational work being done in course 205. Members of the 
departmental staff will report special research work from time to time. 

REQUIREMENTS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS IN HORTICULTURE 

Pomology — Graduate students specializing in Pomology who are planning to 
take an advanced degree will be required either to take or offer the equivalent 
of the following courses: Hort. 102-103, 104, 107, 201, 204, 205-207 and 
208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 104-6; and Organic Chemistry, 112-113. 

Vegetable Gardening — Graduate students specializing in Vegetable Gardening 
who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 113-115, 116, 202, 204, 
205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology 104-6; Organic Chemistry, 
112-113. 

Floriculture — Graduate students specializing in Floriculture who are planning 
to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or offer the equivalent 
of the following courses: Hort. 122-123, 127, 132, 203, 204, 205-207, 208-210; 
Advanced Plant Physiology 104-6; Organic Chemistry, 112-113. 

Landscape Gardening — Graduate students specializing in Landscape Gar- 
dening who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be required either 
to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 132, 133, 134, 
135, 137, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Advanced Plant Physiology, 104-6. 

Additional Requirements — In addition to the above required courses, all 
graduate students in Horticulture are advised to take Physical Chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in Horticulture have had some course work in 
Entomology, Plant Pathology and Genetics, certain of these courses will be 
required. 

For Short-Course Students 

Hort. 1. Practical Pomology — Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. First year. 

A general course covering the propagation of our common fruits. Such 
subjects as orchard site, location, varieties, planting plans, cultural methods, 
fertilizer requirements, and picking, packing and marketing are discussed. 
All of the tree fruits are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 2-3. Commercial Fruit Growing — Three lectures and one laboratory 
period. First and second terms. Second year. Prerequisite Hort. 1. 

An advanced course dealing with the proper management of commercial 
orchards in Maryland. Special attention is given to the subjects of pruning^ 



picking, packing, marketing and storing of the various fruits. Market prob- 
lems, transportation and shipping associations receive special attention 
Students are required to become familiar with all of the leading commercial 
varieties of all fruits grown in Maryland. Practice is given in fruit judging 
and the arrangement of fruits for exhibition purposes. Horticultural by-prod- 
ucts are given attention in this course. 

Hort. 4. Small Fruits— T^o lectures and one laboratory period. Third 

term. Second year. . ■ , j m i.i,„»„ 

The production of strawberries, bush fruits and grapes is considered. Methods 

of propagation, selection of sites, soils, pruning, cultivation, picking, packing 

and marketing are discussed. 

Hort. 5. Home Vegetable Gardening-Tyro lectures and one laboratory 

neriod. Third term. First year. . 

The general principles of vegetable gardening as applied to the growing of 
vegetables for home use. The laboratory work includes a study of vegetable 
seeds, seed testing, seed sowing, transplanting and the care o plants in the 
greenhouses and cold-frames. The students are reqmred to plan, plant and 
manage a large home garden until the end of the term. 

Hort 6-8. Commercial Vegetable Garckning-Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. First, second and third terms. Second year. Prerequisite, 

^Thfe course is planned to run the entire school year. A study of the principles 
of vegetable gardening, as applied to the growing of vegetables for market and 
for canning. The course includes the construction and management of hot- 
beds and cold-frames, sowing and planting, cultivation, growing early vegetable 
plants, soil preparation, harvesting, grading, packing, marketing canning and 
storage. Each student is allotted a definite area and is required to plan, plant 
and manage it. 

Hort. 9. Landscape and Floricallure-Tvro lectures and one laboratory. 

^^'hf prinriples of iScape gardening and their application to the improve- 
ment of home grounds. The propagation and culture of garden and green- 
house plants. 

Hort 10-12. Commercial FloricuUure-Ty/o lectures and one laboratory 
period First, second and third terms. Second year. Prerequisite, Hort. 9. 

This cours; is planned to run the full school year. Studies m the propaga- 
tion and culture of commercial florist crops are taken up in this course. Methods 
of packing, shipping and marketing will be considered. The course is so organ- 
ized as to fit students for commercial work. 

Hort 13-14. Landscape Design and Practice-T^o lectures and three 
laboratory periods. First and second terms. Second year. Prerequisite. 

" The^!omposition of gardens, private estates and related problems. Grading 
plans construction, drawing, estimates and laying out of grounds are considered. 
Plant materials are thoroughly studied in this course also. 

77 



76 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Plt. Path. 101. General Plant Pathology-Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year 

An introductory study, in laboratory and field, of symptoms, causal organ- 
isms and control measures of horticultural and field-crop diseases. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt Path. 102-104. Methods and Min^ Probkms in Plant Pathology- 
Credit to be arranged. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 101 and Genaral Bacteriology 

Techmque m plant disease investigations including, the preparation of 
man^cnpts for pubhcation. The work will be adjusted to the requirements 

(Temple." '""°'" """'''' "^"^ ^' '""'"^"^ "' " ^^'^ °^ ^^^ '=°"'^«- 

Plt Path 105-107. Advanced Plant Path^logy-FouT credit hours each 
term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. 

.,.t ***!u"^f !*"'*^- 5"^* **'■"'' "^'^^^"^^ "^ f™'*^= ^^'^""d term, diseases of truck 
crops; third term, diseases of cereal and forage crops. The full course is 
intended to give a rather thorough knowledge of the subject, such as is needed 
by those who expect to become advisers in crop production as well as those who 
expect to become specialists in plant pathology. (Temple.) 

ter^^' ^'^™' ^"^~^^^- ^'"'''""' '** ^'"«' Pathology-One credit hour each 
tions"**'^^"''^^ ^"^ ^^^"^^^ "*" '''^"^ pathological literature and recent investiga- 

done^' ^*™' ^^^' ^'''"'"^ '" ^^"""^ Pathology-CTedh according to work 
Original investigations of special problems. (Temple.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Plt Path. 1 Phnt Diseases-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

A general elementary course covering the identification and control of the 
diseases of economic crops. Frequent field trips. 



PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIO-CHEMISTRY 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Undergraduates 

Plt. PHY. 101-102 Plant Physiology-Four credit hours: two lectures and 
two aboratory periods. Second term. Three credit hours: two lectures and 

Tt. ltlT02^ ^ "^'"^ '""• '^^'^"^^^ ''^'- P-e<l--te, Gen 

Water requirements, principles of absorption, mineral nutrients trans- 
piration, synthesis of food, metabolism, growth, movements 

Plt Phys. 103. Plant Ecohgy-Three credit hours: one lecture and two 
laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101-102. 

78 




The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much of 
the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and for this 
purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. It is generally 
necessary to take three or four trips at some distance from the University, in 
which case Saturdays are used for that purpose. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 104-106. Advanced Plant Physiology — Four credit hours each 
term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Junior or Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

A detailed study of all life processes of plants. The laboratory work generally 
consists of special work on one or more problems that may continue through 
the year. Students who write these for their undergraduate degrees, get the 
data from special problems assigned for the laboratory work. 

For Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201. Plant Bio-physics — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Prerequisites, one year's work in 
Physics and an elementary knowledge of Physical Chemistry and Plant Phy- 
siology. 

An advanced study of the operation of physical forces in plant physiological 
proc^es. The relation of climatic conditions to plant growth and practice in 
•ding meteorological data constitute a part of the course. (Johnston.) 

Plt. Phys. 202. Special Problems in Growth and Reproduction — Two credit 
hours. Second term. (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 203. Advanced Physiological Methods and Measurements — Two 
credit hours. Third term. Not given every year. (Appleman, Johnston.) 

Iv^ Plt. Phys. 204-206. Seminar — One credit hour each term. The students 
are required to prepare reports of papers in the current literature. These are 
^discussed in connection with the recent advance in the subject. (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 207. Research — Credit hours according to work done. Students 
mi^t be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit the research 
to be undertaken. (Appleman, Johnston.) 

BIO-CHEMISTRY 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bio-Chem. 101. Physiological Chemistry — Four credit hours. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 101- 
103, 105-106 or their equivalents; also an elementary knowledge of Organic 
Chemistry. 

A general course in chemical biology. It embraces a study of biocolloids and 
their role in physiological processes; cell organization from the standpoint of the 
substratum in which living processes occur; chemistry of protoplasm and its 
products; catalysis and enzymes; electrolytes and their action; requirements 
of foods, including vitamines; and a general consideration of metabolism. 
(Appleman, Miller.) 

79 





^ 14:00 



Bio-Chem. 102. Plant Bio-chemistry. Three credit hours. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Bio-chem. 101 and an 
elementary knowledge of Plant Physiology. 

An advanced course dealing with the chemistry of plant life. Synthesis 
and transformations of materials in plants and plant organs and the relation 
of plant processes to animal food and nutrition are especially emphasized. 
The course also embraces the chemistry of organic compounds. (Appleman, 
Miller.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

P. H. 101. Farm Poultry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Care of poultry on the general farm, including housing, feeding, incubation, 
brooding, breeds, breeding, selection of stock, culling, general management, 
and marketing. 

For Short-Course Students 

P. H. 1. Farm Poultry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one labora- 
tory period. Third term. Second year. 

A general course dealing with care of farm poultry, treating on breeds and 
breeding, selection of the stock, housing, feeding, incubation and brooding, 
culling, marketing, and management. 

SOILS 

Geol. 101. General Geology — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

A text book, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles of 
geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is designed 
primarily for agricultural students in preparation for technical courses, it may 
also be taken as a part of a liberal education. 

Soils 101-102. Principles of Soil Management — Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Geol. 101. 

A study of the physical, chemical and biological principles underlying the 
formation and management of soils. The mechanical composition, classifica- 
tion, and physical properties as related to moisture, temperature, air, organic 
matter, and tillage are concerned. The mixing and applying of commercial 
plant nutrients, the use of green and stable manures and of lime are dis- 
cussed. The influence of continuous cropping, rotations, and fertilizers on the 
productivity of the soil are studied. 

Soils 103-105. Soil Fertility and Fertilizers — Three credit hours: one lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods. Farm manures the first and second terms; 
commercial fertilizers the third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Soils 101- 
102. Alternate years. Not given in 1922-23. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the details of 
soil management. It includes the practical application of the principles of 

80 



„„ ph,»« to method, of •"'•««;f "3'"%':,"' • S l**inS2 

subjected to various treatments. . 

Lis 106 Soil Surveying and Classification-Three credit hours: one 
J^and two laboratory' periods. First term. Senior year. Prere.ms.te. 

't iudy oUhe principal soil regions, series, and types of the Unite^f at^ 
«nd esoecUly of the soils of Maryland, as to formation, competition, and value 
:ScTurat The practical work consists chiefly in identification of soils 

types and in map making. 

SOILS 107. Soil Bacteriology-Fom credit hours: two lectures and wo 
laboratory periods. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 101-10-. 

^'rsruVoTrhe mtlCnisS She soil in relation to fertility. It includes 
th^tudv of theTacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of organic 
matS nittoien fixation, nitrification, sulfafication, and the injurious organisms. 

«5A.,<5 108-110 T/iesis— Two credit hours. The senior year. 

Some speciJ problem is assigned to each student, who is expected to embod, 
the results of the investigation in a thesis. 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

SOILS 111-113. Soil ^^'--'^^^-Three -ed'^ours: o^^^^^ 
laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisites, Soils 101-102, Chemistry 

". .t*7™= Jd^WTp.rtlT.Sions ,« .o» i~v».^..io~. — . 

(McCall and Bruce.) 

sons 114 Me/tods 0/ Soi? /nws<i!?a(ton-Two credit hours. Third term. 

The course tludes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 

stations in soil investigational work. (McCall and Bruce.) 

c^„ e 1 1 Pu.li fi S^mmar— One credit hour. Second and third terms. • 
¥hrsemrni;Ura: devoted largely to the disc™ of t^e current 

bulletins and scientific papers on soil topics. (McCall and Bruce.j 

For Graduate Students 

SOILS 201-203. Special ProbUms and Research-F\ye to ten credit hours. 
ThP vear Lectures and Practice to be arranged. 

OrigTnal invSgations of problems in soils and fertilizers. (McCall.) 

For Short-Course Students 

SOILS 1. Sou Marmemenl-ThreB credit hours: two lectures and one 

laboratory period. Third term. First year. „f ,„:,, in their relation to 

A study of the physical and chemical conditions of soils in their '"eiatio 
profitl^fe agriculture Special attention is given to the apphcation of physics 
and chemistry to the management of Maryland soils. 

81 



Soils 2. Manures and Fertilizers—Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

Lectures and recitations on the care and utilization of farm manures; on the 
sources of fertilizers materials;, on methods of valuation and the effect of fer- 
tilizers on different farm crops. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



I 



82 



The aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is twofold: 

1. To lay a foundation for the learned and technical professions and give 
training in those phases of economics that enlarge the capacity of men and 
'women for handling modern business problems. 

2. To increase knowledge of the broader and cultural phases of learning. 
This College furnishes curricula which develop a liberal education in the 

languages and literatures, the sciences, mathematics, philosophy, history, 
politics, economics, and sociology. It likewise offers excellent opportunities 
to students preparing to enter Schools of Law and Medicine. 

The College includes the following departments: 
Ancient Language and Philosophy. 
Business Administration and Commerce. 
Chemistry. 

English Language, Literature, and Journalism. 
Economics and Sociology. 
General Botany. 
History and Political Science. 
Library Science. 
Mathematics. 

Modern Languages and Literature. 
Music. 
Physics. 

Public Speaking. 
Zoology and Aquiculture. 
The Pre-Medical Curriculum. 

ADMISSION 

The admission of students is in charge of the University Committee on 
Student Enrollment and Entrance, which determines the credits which shall 
be issued on all entrance examinations and certificates. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

The College of Arts and Sciences confers two baccalaureate degrees: 
\. Bachelor of Arts. 
2. Bachelor of Science. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

In order to be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science, the candidate must first have satisfied the requirements for admis- 
sion; and second, have obtained a prescribed minimum number of college 
credits. 

83 



sAt^SZT '*''''' •" *"' ^°"'^^ ""^y ^^ «'^"^«'r«d "Pon a student who 
satisfies all entrance requirements and secures ovf^r^if f^,. o • • . 

hundred and four trimester hours aceordSTthTftownJ ZlZl IJZ 

ZitT""''^ '" ^"'"^'''^ ^ ^"^'"^- Administration for whTc'htSe 

Wf^ he'p'":?'"*,". ''"^'^'""" ""^ Sophomores years f;r those register! 
ing for the Bachelor of Arts degree are coordinated as follows- 

I-RE.SHMA.\ YEAR j.^^,^^. 

' Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) " i I ^'^ 

■ Reading and Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) f , * 

Foreign Language (Gk. 1-3; Gk. 101-103; Lat.' 101-103- 

Sprn""l01-1%)^""- '''-'"'-' ""''■ '-'■' ^--- ^«^-^«^=' 

Ajeb^a'IL^h^^eT':^"^';^'""^^;'^^^^^^^ 4 ! ! 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math;i08)'or Solid Geometry " ^ " 

(Math. Ill) ^ 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 109-111) q *q I 

■ Library Methods (L. S. 101) ^ ** ^ 

Military Science (M. I. 101) 2 

y*General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) . f f ^ 

/ *Entomology (Zool. 107) or General Botany ' (Bot.' 101)'." '4 

♦Required in the Pre-Medical curriculum. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR y^Tm- 

*Modern Poets and Browning (Eng. 107-109) ' '''* o / ^^l 

*American Literature (Eng. 110-112).. « t 

^History of English Literature (Eng. 119-121) t t ^ 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 104-106) j f_ ^ 

(Foreign Language (continued) t ^ ^ 

T^ocial Psychology (Soc. 104-105) ....*'" " " " l l ^ 

tLogical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) *« 

TElements of Economics (Econ. 101-103) " o 'o 

/National Government (Pol. Sc. 101) ..'.'." t ^ 

I State and Local Government (Pol. Sc. 102) *o 

^.Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 103) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) . '^^ ^ 

tEntomology^Zool. 107) ^ • • 

V +General Botany (Bot. 101) W^ ^ 

Military Science (M. 1. 102) ' " ^ 

' 2 2 2 

*SeIect one of these. 

tSelect one of these. ' 

xSelect one of these. 

84 



Junior and Senior Years 

At the beginning of the Junior year every candidate for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree shall select a majoi study in group A or B, in which he shall com- 
plete from twenty-five to forty per cent of the total number of hours neces- 
sary for graduation. Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree shall select 
a major study in group B, C, or D. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, majoring in Chemistry, see Chemistry curricula. Candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics, majoring in Business Adminis- 
tration and Commerce, see curricula of Business Administration and Commerce. 
All candidates shall elect subjects with a direct bearing upon the major amount- 
ing to twenty or thirty per cent of the total number of hours necessary for 
graduation. 

GROUPS OF STUDIES 

A, Languages and Literature: English, Latin, Greek, French, German, 
Spanish, Journalism, Public Speaking. 

J5. Social Sciences: Economics, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Political 
Science, Sociology, Commerce, Business Administration. 

C. Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Physiology, 
Zoology. 

D. Physical Sciences: Chemistry, Geology. 

E. Mathematics and Physics. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

As a result of the increasingly differentiated economic development of this 
country and other countries and owing to the concomitant development 
of higher and more complex forms of business organization, the last two 
decades have witnessed the origin and growth of the full four-year curriculum 
whose aim is to furnish specialized professional training for those who wish to 
enter upon a business career, very much in the same way as schools of law and 
medicine provide specialized training for lawyers and medical men. 

As at present organized, this department offers what is practically a four- 
year curriculum having this special aim. However, the first year is coincident 
with the first year of the College of Arts and Sciences; i. e., subject to same 
conditions of entrance and required subjects. In other words, the student 
who wishes to major in business administration and commerce does not enter 
upon this specialization until the beginning of his sophomore year. 

The student will receive four years of training sufficiently broad to be well- 
balanced and at the same time sufficiently specialized to equip for any mod- 
ern business. 

The following arrangement of studies, therefore, presupposes one year 
of college work, which will be the freshman year in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The last three years, however, should include substantially what 
is here outlined: 



85 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: / 

Modern Language o 

National Government (Pol. Sc. 101) 3 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sc. 102) 

Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 103) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-103) 3 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 3 

Logical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 104-106) '1 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) W'.WW"" 9 

Current History (His. 101-103) \ 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I 

Business Organization (Com. 113) 3 

Business Management (Com. 114) 

Purchasing and Selling (Com. 115) 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103) 3 

Money and Banking (Econ. 104) 

Commerce and Finance (Practicum) or Markets and Mar- 
keting 

Diplomacy (Pol. Sc. 113-115) 3 

Business Law (Com. 110-112) 3 

Accounting (101-103 (104-106) 3 

Group Electives . 3 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sc. 106-108) 3 

Markets and Marketing (Econ. 107) or Commerce and 

Finance 

Group Electives o 

Free Electives >• 

Elective Groups 

Accounting (Com. 101-103) 3 

Advanced Accounting (Com. 104-106) 3 

Commercial Mathematics (Com. 107-109) 3 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 3 

Logical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) 

General Sociology (Soc. 101-102) 3 

Business Law (Com. 110-112) 3 

Modern Language « 

International Law (Pol. Sc. 116-118) 13 

Current History (His. 101) 2 

General History o 

Public Speaking 2 

86 



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CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry of the College of Arts and Sciences offers 
courses in Inorganic, Organic, Physical, Analytical and Industrial Chemistry; 
and also includes the State control work of fertilizers, feed and lime analysis. 

The above named courses, which include the basic principle of Chemistry, 
serve as a necessary part of a general education, and are designed to lay a 
foundation for scientific and technical work; such as medicine, engineering, 
agriculture, etc. 

Besides serving in this fundamental way the courses are grouped to train 
chemists for the following careers: 

1. Industrial Chemist — Chemistry is becoming more and more to be realized 
as the basis of many industries. Many apparently efficient chemical in- 
dustries have become greatly improved by the application of modern chemistry. 
Chemical corporations employ chemists to manage and develop units of their 
plants. 

A curriculum as preparation for Industrial Chemist is given telow. 

2. Agricultural Cfiemist — The curriculum suggested on page 87 fits men to 
carry on work in Agricultural Experiment stations, Bureau of Soils, food 
laboratories, geological surveys, etc. ' 

3. Teacher of Chemistry — There is a growing need of suitably trained science 
teachers in schools. The curriculum on page 88 not only furnishes the neces- 
sary science but also names the educational subjects which are required to 
obtain the Special Teachers Diploma. 

The same curriculum together with graduate work will fit a man to teach in 
college or university. 

4. Research Chemist — The more progressive corporations have established 
chemical research laboratories. These laboratories are run with the main 
purpose of improving old processes and devising new ones. Highly trained 
chemists have charge of these laboratories. The general chemistry curric- 
ulum elsewhere is for the undergraduate work, but for these positions work 
leading to a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy degree is advised. 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term, 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 

Calculus (Math. 110) 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106, 124-126) 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 101) 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 104) 

Machine Shop (Shop 101) 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101) 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) 

87 



o 
3 

• 

3 

4 



// 
5 

• • 

3 
3 

• • 

4 

2 

• • 

2 



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5 

3 
3 



2 



JUNIOR YEAH ^ 

i^ . ^. lerm: I Jj tjj 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 105-107) ^ . 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 104-105) \ t ^ 

Mineralogyand Assaying (Ind. Chem. Ill) 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) '. '. ^ 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) t \ ^ 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103). . , ^ 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 104-106) l I ^ 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) ^ 

^ 3 3' 3 

SENIOR YEAR ^ 

1 crni ' T J J 111 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-102) ± a 

Electro Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104) 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103 j " " ^ 

Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 115-117) 'o *o ^ 

Metallurgical Analysis (Ind. Chem. 113-114) q t ^ 

Metallurgical Calculations (Ind. Chem. 112) i f 

Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) o ' ^ 

Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103) i \ ^ 

Electives in Engineering ^ ^ 

SOPHOMORE^?Eir''^'^^' CHEMISTRY 

1 €TVl' J J J TTT 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) * c 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) o ^ ^ 

Calculus (Math. 110) ^ 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106, 124-126) o ? ^ 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Anal. Chem.lOl) a ^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) ". 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) " ^ ^ 

Botany (Bot. 101) ^ ^ 

Military Science (R. O T C ) " ' ' * 

'^ 2 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR „; 

^ , , ^crm: I IT ttj 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 105-107) \ ! ^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 104-105) o t ^ 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) t t 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) \\ ^ ^ 

Electives ' • • • 3 

Group 1 ^ 4 4 

Cereal Crops (Agro. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) '. 

Porage Crops (Agro. 103) * ^ 

•• .. 4 

88 



JUNIOR YEAR— Continued. Terni: 1 

Group 2 

Geology (Soils 101) 3 

Soils (Soils 102-103) 

Group 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 3 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 102) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Forage Crops (Agro. 101) 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-102) 4 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 104-106) 2 

Agricultural Chemical Analysis (Ind. Chem. 107-109) ... S 

Biological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101-102) 4 

Electives in Agriculture 4-5 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I 

Physics (Phys. ift-103) 5 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) 3 

Calculus (Math. 110) * 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106, 124-126) 3 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 101) 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 3 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 105-107) 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 104-105) 3 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) 1 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 

*Electives 4-5 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-102) 4 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104) 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103) 

Biological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) 4 

Electives in Chemistry 4 

*Electives 5-6 

*Elective groups are offered in Education, Arts, Political Science and Science. 

89 



// /// 



3 
4 



// 
4 

2 
3 

8-9 



// 
5, 

• • 

3 
3 

• * 

4 
3 



II 

2 
3 
4 

3 

• • 

I 

4-5 



4 

3 

/// 

4 
2 
3 
3 
5-6 



/// 
5 

• • 

3 
3 



4 
2 

/// 

2 
3 

4 

1 

3 

4-5 



// /// 

4 

4 

4 



A 

9-10 



4 
5-6 



I 



THE PREMEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The Premedical Curriculum includes the subjects and hours prescribed by 
the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association, to- 
gether with additional subjects and hours totalling 117 to 120 trimester hours. 
Students entering the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland are 
required to present the credits obtained by the successful completion of this 
curriculum or its equivalent in 1923. In 1921 and 1922 all students must 
satisfy the sixty (60) semester hour requirement of the Council on Medical . 
Education of the American Medical Association. 

In addition a combined seven year curriculum is offered leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first three years 
are taken in residence at College Park and the last four years in Baltimore at 
the Medical School. The Fremedical Curriculum constitutes the first two 
years' work and a third year following the general outline given below, with 
the electives approved by the chairman of the Premedical curriculum and the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, completes the studies at College Park. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the Medical School and 
the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Science may be 
conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this combination 
course offers over the minimum requirements of the two years. By completing 
three years, the training may be greatly broadened by a wider latitude in the 
election of courses in the arts subjects. 

Requirements for admission to the Premedical Curriculum may be found 
on pages 90 and 91. 



PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

Two Years 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-103 and 101a, 101b, 103c) ... 4 

Chemistry (Chem. 101-103) 4 

French or German (Fren. or Ger. 101-103) 3 

Composition (Eng. 101-103) 3 

Mathematics (Math. 106-107-108 or 111) 3 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 

R. O. T. C 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Teim: I 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 4 

Comparative Morphology of the Vertebrates (Zool. 106; . 

Organic Chem. (Org. Chem. 105-106) 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 107) 

Physics (Phys. 104-106) 4 

French or German (104-106) 3 

Composition, History, Literature or Sociology (Elect one) 2-3 

R. O. T. C 2 

90 



// 


/// 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


// 


/// 


4 


• • 


• • 


4 


4, 


• • 


• • 


4 


4 

i 


4 
3 


2-3 


2-3 


2 


2 



' Combined Seven-Year Course 

Term: 1 U HI 
JUNIOR YEAR 

''TJvlced Composition (Eng. 104-106)^ ^ 2 2 

Group B-(College of Arts and Sciences) 

Group Electives— rv,omi<5trv Entomol- 
Science (Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, 6 « ^ 

ogy Genetics, Mathematics and Zoology) . . ■ ^ , , 

Non-Science 

lum are not required to take this course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 

J- • ^ ;c V.V a completed Medical Student 
Admission to the curriculum - me<i.cme :s by a^comp ^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^.^ 

Certificate issued ^V the Reg'str" « *,« ^^^^^^^^^ „, ,, ex- 

certificate is obtained on the basis o j^^j„„ ^^ ^^y class, 

amination and credentials, and '^^f 7*;^' J^^^^j.^i students Certificate are: 

The requirements for the ^^^^^J^^^^^^^^^ ,,,,,, course or the ecuiva- 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year nig 

(a) Details of the High School Requirements 

For admission to the Premedical C-^-^J'/^^^^t a standard accredited 

1. Shall have completed a four-year couse^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ „,^ 

high school or other institution of standard econ j ^^. 

2 Shall have the equivalent as demonstrated by successlu y 
trance examinations in the ^f »'^™^«"bjects. ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

Credits for admission to he premedical oUe^e <= ^^^^^^ ^^ ^ 

the subjects shown in thefollow.ng '>«* ^^^^J^; ^ requirement for its diploma, 
standard accredited high -^oo as a part o^ the eq ^^ ^^ 
provided that at least eleven units must be onerea 



91 



Schedule of Subjects Required or Accepted for Entrance 

Subjects Premedical Curriculum 

Group I.— English: ^^^'^ 

Literature and composition 

Group II.-Foreign Languages: 

Latin 

Greek ^~'^ 

French or German ^~^ 

Other foreign languages ^~'^ 

Group III.— Mathematics: ^~^ 

Elementary Algebra 

Advanced Algebra *" ^ ^ 

Plane Geometry 2-I 

Solid Geometry ^ 

Trigonometry J 

Group IV.—History: * 

Ancient History 

Medieval and Modern History \~^ 

English History 2-I 

American History 2-I 

Civil Government ^~^ 

Group V.— Science: ^~^ 

Botany 

Zoology 2-1 

Chemistry 5~1 

Physics 1 

Physiography 1 

Physiology 2~1 

Astronomy 2-I 

Geology i 

Group VL-Misceli.aneous: * '"^ 

Agriculture 

Bookkeeping ■. • • . . 1-2 

Business Law 2-I 

Commercial Geography ^ 

Domestic Science ^-1 

Drawing.-Freehand and Mechanical ]~l 

ii^conomics and Economic History ^ 

Manual Training i~^ 

Music— Appreciation or Harmony. ^~^ 

Stenography 1-2 

92 



to the 

Required 
3 






1 

» • 

1 



the two 
forego- 



(b) Details of the College Requirements 

1. The preliminary college curriculum shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction. 

2. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this preliminary 
college curriculum shall be equal to the work done in the freshman and sopho- 
more years in standard colleges and universities. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Minimum requirements for 1921 and 1922, 60 semester* or 90 trimester 
hours required. 

For 1923 requirements, see Pre-Medical Curriculum, page 89. 

_ . , r^ , . Semester 

Required Subjects: Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects (e) 12 

Subjects Strongly Urged: 

French or German (f) 6-12 

Advanced Botany or Advanced Zoology 3-6 

Psychology 3-6 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry . . 3-6 

Additional Courses in Chemistry 3-6 

Other Suggested Electives: 

English (additional). Economics, History, Sociology, Political Science 
Logic, Mathematics, Latin, Greek, Drawing. 

*A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of one lecture or recita- 
tion period per week (each period to be not less than fifty minutes net) ; at least two hours of lab- 
oratory work to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

Suggestions Regarding Individual Subjects 

(a) Chemistry — Twelve semester hours required, of which at least eight 
semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, including four semester 
hours of laboratory work. In the interpretation of this rule work in qualitative 
analysis may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. The remaining four 
semester hours may consist of additional work in general chemistry or of work 
in analytic or organic chemistry. 

(b) Physics — Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must be 
laboratory work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a course in 
trigonometry. This requirement may be satisfied by six semester hours of 
college physics, of which two must be laboratory work, if preceded by a year 
(one unit) of high school physics. 

(c) Biology — Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist of 
laboratory work. The requirement may be satisfied by a course of eight 
semester hours in either general biology or zoology, or by courses of four semester 
hours each in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 

d3 



(d) English Composition and Literature — The usual introductory college 
course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is required. 

(e) Nonscience Subjects — Of the sixty semester hours required as the measure- 
ment of two years of college work, at least eighteen, including the six semester 
hours of English should be in subjects other than the physical, chemical or 
biologic sciences. 

(f) French or German — A reading knowledge of one of these languages is 
strongly urged. If the reading knowledge in one of these languages is obtained 
on the basis of high school work, the student is urged to take the other language 
in his college course. It is not considered advisable, however, to spend more 
than twelve of the required sixty semester hours on foreign languages. In case 
a reading knowledge of one language is obtained by six semester hours of col- 
lege work, another six semester hours may be well spent in taking the beginner's 
course in the other language; if this is followed up by a systematic reading of 
scientific prose, a reading knowledge of the second language may be readily 
acquired. When a student spends more than two years in college he may well 
spend twelve semester hours of his college work in the second language. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
For Short-Course Students 

Eng. 1-2. Practical Composition — Three credit hours. First and second 
terms. Prerequisites, minimum entaance requirements for short-course 
students. 

Elements, thought processes, types, structure, grammar, mechanical details 
and common errors of plain composition. Study and preparation of commercial 
letters, forms, articles, reports, and advertisements. Regular practice in long 
and short themes. 

Eng. 3. Practical Composition — Two credit hours. Third term. 
A continuation of Eng. 1-2. 

For Undergraduates 

Eng. 101-103. Composition and Rhetoric — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Freshman year. Prerequisites, minimum entrance require- 
ments in English. (Required of all four-year students.) 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective thought communication, 
Reading, study, and analysis of standard contemporary prose specimens. 
Short papers and term themes. 

Eng. 104-106. Advanced English Composition — Two credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Lectures on principles of composition. Study and analysis of the best 
scientific essays. Practice in expository writing. Term themes and mono- 
graphs. 

Eng. 107-108. Modern Poets — Three credit hours each term. First and 
second terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

94 



Lectures on the nature and function of Poet^-- Reading^o. wide Wy 
of English and American lyric poets of recent time. Studies 
sonalia and poetical analysis. 

""^..0-1.2. A«*.. L*,^.r.-Th«« erf. k.»r.. Thr«. ..rm.. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

1. American poetry. 

2 American essay, oration, and debate. 

Lt'Sr fr^h 7 American Literature. Reports on assigned topics. 

''ENG.'nr:il4. Tke .Vo.i-Three credit hours each term. First and 
second terms. Prerequisite, Eng. l^^l-l^J^, ^ ^^ ,e. class reviews 

of the history of the developmeigpf English fiction. Third term 

ENG 115. English and Avterican Essay^^Three creiit honrs. Third term. 

^^rrut'f'SrpSroU^^^^^^ cntlcal essays of England and America: 
Baton tLb, McCaulaf, Carlyle, Ruskin. ^h-terton Emerson. 

ENG 116-118. The Drama-Three credit hours each term. Three terms. 

Tsttpe^r^: Sensive study of a ^ ^1^ Er^h Ir^! 

'71'ntm. Hisiory of English Literature-Three credit hours each 

"Tgen^eJaTsur/of the subject with wide readings of English C.assi. 
ENG. 122-124. Journalism-One credit hour each term. Three terms. 

TsS^'and^riS of the modern newspaper; lectures on the editorial 
meVaSutd^usiness divisions and on the elf^^c^- ^of ^;-j;^. 

-T^'^typesTrrt^rii Z:J:S^-J'^^^^^y and prac- 
ments. I. lypes oi nt;wa ocv^i , „,^;f;rtcr make-UD and edi- 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

continue during the full three terms. 

95 



1. study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lectures 
on the principles of comparative philology and phonetics. 

2. Beowulf through 2,000 lines. 

3. The language and authorship of the Middle English period, ending with 
Chaucer. (House). 

For Graduate Students 

Eng. 201-203. Seminar — Original research and the preparation of dis- 
sertations looking toward advanced degrees. Credit proportioned to the 
amount of work and ends accomplished. (House.) 

Eng. 204-206. Elizahethan Literature, Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. 

1. Shakespeare: Study of all of Shakespeare's plays. 

2. Chief Elizabethan Dramatists (omitting Shakespeare). 

3. Milton. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 207-209. Romantic Poets — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. 

1. Wordsworth and Coleridge. ^ 

2. Byron and Keats. 

3. Shelley and Southey. 

Lectures. Reports on assigned topics. Themes. (Lemon.) 
Eng. 210. Browning's Dramas — Three credit hour?. First term. 
Luria; Return of the Druses; Colombe's Birthday; Pippa Passes; A Blot 
in the 'Scutcheon. (House.) 

Eng. 211. Tennyson — Thr^ credit hours. Second term. 
Lectures on the art of poetry, followed %y a detailed reading of The Princess. 
Survey of other important poems of this author. (House.) 

Eng. 212. Ballad Literature — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Traditional English and Scottish ballads. Modern imitative ballads. 
American folk ballads. Popular song literature. (House.) 



MODERN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



FRENCH 



For Undergraduates 

Fren. 1-3. Elementary French — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. 

Drill upon pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversation, 
easy translation. For beginners. 

This course must be followed by Fren. 101-103. 

Fren. 101-103. Second-Year French — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 1-3 or the equivalent. 

Grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation, and reproduc- 
tions. Texts selected from modern prose and poetry. 

This course must be taken by those who offer two units in French for entrance 

96 



Fren. 104-106. Scientific French— Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. Prerequisite Fren. 101-103. 
Reading and translation of scientific texts and journals. Prose composition 

based upon texts read. 

FREN. 107-109. Development of the French Novel— Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 101-103. 

Detailed study of the history and the development of the novel in French 
literature. Study of the lives, works, and influence of various novelists. 

This course alternates with Fren. 110-112. Given in 1921-22. 

Fren. 110-112. Development of the French Drama-Three ci:edit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 101-103. ^. . 

Analysis and study of the French drama of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and 
nineteenth centuries. Lectures, translation, collateral reading, and reports. 

This course alternates with Fren. 107-109. Not given in 1921-22. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Fren. 113-115. History of French Literature-Three terms. Prerequisite 

Fren. 107-109 or 110-112. , 4. r» a-^.^ 

Study of French literature from the earliest times to the present. Reading 
and translation of representative works; texts and lectures. (Kramer.) 



GERMAN 
For Undergraduates 

Germ. 1-3. Beginning German— Three credit hours each term. Three 

terms. . . .. ^ 

Drill in pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversation, 

dictation, and translation. For beginners. 

This course must be followed by Germ. 101-103. 

Germ. 101-103. Second-Year German-Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite Germ. 1-3 or the equivalent. 

Syntax, composition, conversation, translation, and reproductions. Selec- 
tions from modern prose, poetry, and fiction. 

This course is for those students who offer two units in German for entrance. 

Germ. 104-106. Scientific German— Three credit hours each term. Three 

terms. Prerequisite Germ. 101-103. . ,. , ^ • • i 

Reading and translation of scientific texts and periodicals. Original re- 
productions of texts read. Lectures and practice upon scientific word structure 
and nomenclature. 

Germ. 107. Goethe and the Novel— Three credit hours for the first half year. 
Prerequisite Germ. 101-103. This course is to be followed by Germ. 108 
Given in 1921-1922 and alternate years. . 

Critical study of the life and works of Goethe together with the principles 
and development of the modern German novel. 

Germ. 108. Schilkr and the Drama-Three credit hours for the second half 
year. Prerequisites Germ. 107. 

97 



15 



w 



I 



Detailed study of the life and works of Schiller and his relation to the de- 
velopment of the German drama. 

Germ. 109. Lessing and German Prose- Three credit hours for the first 
half year. Prerequisite Germ. 101-103. This course is to be followed by 
Germ. 110. Alternates with Germ. 107. Not given in 1921-1922. 

A study of the life and works of Lessing and his relation to the history of 
German prose. 

Germ. 110. Hiene and German Poetry — Three credit hours for the second 
half year. Prerequisite Germ. 109. 

Extensive study of Hiene and German poetry. Collateral reading. Lec- 
tures on the history of German poetry. Reports. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Germ. 111-113. History of German Literature — Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite Germ. 107-108 or Germ. 109-110. 

Study of German literature from the earliest times to the present. Reading 
^and translation of representative works. Lectures, collateral reading and 
reports. (Kramer.) 

SPANISH 

For Undergraduates 

Span. 1-3. Beginners' Spanish — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. To be followed by Span. 101-103, 

A study of the elements of grammar with emphasis laid on verb, composition, 
and conversation. 

Span. 101-103. Elementary Spanish — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. To be followed by Span. 104-106. Prerequisite Span. 1-3 or the 
equivalent. 

The advanced study of grammar is commenced. Composition and reading 
of texts relating to the habits, customs, etc., of Spanish countries. Instruction 
is given in Spanish as far as possible. 

Span. 104-105. Intermediate Spanish — Three credit hours each term. Two 
terms. To be followed by Span. 106. Prerequisite Span. 101-103 or the 
equivalent. 

The study of grammar continued. Drill in idioms. Lectures and assigned 
work given in the history and development of Spain and South America. 

Span. 106. Commercial Forms — Three credit hours. One term. Pre- 
requisite Span. 104-105. 

The writing and discussion of business forms and etiquette. A review of 
the field of commerce in South America. 

Foi Advanced Undergraduates 

Span. 107-109. Modern Spanish Literature — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite Span. 104-106. 

Study of modern writers of Spain and South America. Lectures, collateral 
reading and reports. fStinson.; 

98 



Span. 110-112. Spanish Literature in the Golden Age — Three credit hours 
each term. Three terms. Prerequisite Span. 107-109. 

Lectures, a limited amount of class room work, and collateral reading of the 
development of thought during this period. (Stinson.) 

Additional courses in Spanish may be arranged with the consent of the in- 
structor. 



\ 



ZOOLOGY AND AQUICULTURE 

For Undergraduates 

The courses offered by this department cover the biological requirements 
for entrance to the Medical School and furnish the basis for specialization in 
Aquiculture and other branches of Zoology. 

ZOOL. 101-102. General Zoology — Two credit hours. Two lecture periods. 
First and second terms. Repeated second and third terms. Must be taken 
concurrently with Zool. 101a-102b. 

The fundamental concepts of animal biology are stressed rather than the 
morphology of types. Thus the course is made broad enough to serve as a 
foundation to further study in any branch of the subject. Required by the 
Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, and Home Economics. 

ZoOL. 103. A continuation of Zool. 101-10 J — Two credit hours. Two lec- 
tures. Third term. Prerequisite, 101-102. Required of pre-medical stu- 
dents. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 103c. 

Zool. 101a-102b. General Zoology — Two credit hours. Two laboratory 
periods of three hours each. First and second terms. Repeated second and 
third terms. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 101-102. 

Zool. 103c. A continuation of Zool. 101a-102b — Two credit hours. Two 
laboratory periods of three hours each. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 
101a-102b. 

Required of pre-medical students. To be taken concurrently with Zool. 103. 

Zool. 104-105. Embryology — Four credit hours. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods of three hours each. First and second terms. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 101-lOla, 102-102b. 

The early stages of the frog and the development of the chick to the end of 
the fourth day indicates the scope of the course. 

Zool. 106. Comparative Morphology of Vertebrates — Four credit hours. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods of three hours each. Third term. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 104-105. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 107. Aquiculture — Four credit hours. Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period of three hours. First term. Prerequisites, Zool. 101-106 and Bot. 
101. (Open to graduates and undergraduates.) Morphology and ecology of 
representative industrial and game fishes in Maryland, the Chesapeake Blue 
CraJ) and the Oyster. 

This course is an introduction of the Curriculum of Fisheries to be inaugurated 
1921-1922. (Truitt.) 

99 






'.It 



For Short-Course Students 

ZooL. 1. Animal Pests — Three lectures. Second term. 

A study of the wild animals of the farm with practice in identification: 
designed to enable farmers to recognize the beneficial and noxious animals on 
Maryland farms. 



MUSIC 

VOICE 

Courses in Voice Culture are offered, covering a thorough and comprehensive 
study of tone production, based on the Italian method of singing. 

The work required to develop a singer is begun with the most fundamental 
principles of correct breathing. Scale and arpeggio exercises, and all intervals, 
the portamento, legato, and staccato, and trill, and other embellishments to 
develop the technique of singing are studied through the medium of vocal 
exercises arranged by the greatest authorities on the voice, under the careful 
supervision of the instructor. 

The study of songs and ballads is adapted to the ability and requirements 
of each singer, a thorough training being given in diction and phrasing, through 
the medium of sacred and secular ballads, leading to the Oratorio and Opera. 

Opportunities are offered all voice pupils who are capable, to make public 
appearances in the regular pupils' recitals, as well as in the churches of the 
community. 



$30 

$50 



Tuition 

One lesson per week, term of twelve weeks 

Two lessons per week, term of twelve wrecks 

Chorus 

Membership in the Chorus is free to all students, and to persons residing in 
the community. One trimester credit for the year is awarded to students for 
faithful attendance at weekly rehearsals and participation in public concerts. 
Standard part-songs and oratorios are studied. One rehearsal each week. 

Glee Clubs 

A Men's Glee Club and a Women's Glee Club, both of limited membership, 
are recruited from the best vocal talent in the University. Admission is 
gained through tests, or "try-outs," conducted at the beginning of the school 
year. Public concerts are given by both organizations. Each club holds two 
rehearsals each week. » 

Military Band 

This organization, of.limited membership, is a part of the Military organiza- 
tion of the University, and is subject to the restrictions and discipline of the 
Department of Military Science and Tactics, but the direction of its work is 
under the Department of Musicians. 



100 



PIANO 

Elementary Piano Courses. Work for beginners, based on the Leschetizky 

method. 

Advanced Piano Courses. The college work in Piano presupposes three 
years of preparatory study of the piano, part or all of which may be taken at 

the University. 

Lessons are taken twice a week. A four-year college course as follows: 

First Year— Leschetizky technic, Bach Two-part Invention; Heller Etudes, 
Sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; selections from classic and modern 
composers. 

Second Year — Bach Three-part Inventions; concertos by classic masters; 
Jensen Etudes; selections from classic, romantic and modem composers. 

Third Year— Leschetizky technic; Moscheles Etudes; Chopin Preludes and 
Waltzes: Bach Well-Tempered Clavichord; Mendelssohn concertos; Beethoven 
sonatas; selections from romantic and modern composers. 

Fourth Year— Leschetizky technic; Chopin Etudes; Bach Well-Tempered 
Clavichord; sonatas and concertos by Grieg, McDowell, Schutt, Beethoven, 
etc.; concert pieces by modern and romantic composers. 

Tuition (for Elementary Piano Courses) 

One lesson per week, term of twelve weeks $12 

Two lessons per week, term of twelve w^eeks $24 

Note.— Music tuitions are due in advance. 10^7 is added to all tuitions not 
paid in advance. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 101-103. Five credit hours each term. Four recitations. One 
laboratory period. Three terms. Prerequisite, Math. 101. 

Laws and theories pertaining to Mechanics, Heat, Magnetism, Electricity, 
Light, and Sound, with special reference to the problems which concern engi- 
neers and industrial chemists are discussed in the lecture room and applied in 
the laboratory. Required of all students in Engineering and Industrial 
Chemistry. Elective for other students. 

Physics 104-106— Four credit hours each term. Three recitations. One 
laboratory period. Three terms. 

A discussion in the classroom and application in the laboratory of the laws 
of physical phenomena in Mechanics, Heat, Magnetism, Electricity, Light, and 
Sound. Required of students in General and Agricultural Chemistry and 
Medicine. Elective for other students. 

Physics 107-108. Agricultural Physics— Three credit hours. Three lec- 
tures. First and second terms. 

Mechanics and Heat—A discussion of the laws and theories of the mechanics 
of solids and fluids and of heat, as applicable to the problems of the students 
in Agriculture. 

Electricity — A practical course in Electricity and its applications to the 
needs of the agriculturists. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. 

101 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

P, S. 101-103. Reading and Speaking — One credit hour each term. Three 
terms. Freshman year. 

A practical course in delivery. The principles and technique of vocal 
expression; enunciation, emphasis, inflection, force, gesture, and general de- 
livery. Delivery of oratorical selections by students before the class, with 
criticism and suggestions by instructor. Delivery of original speeches. In- 
dividual drill by appointment with instructor. 

P. S. 104-106. Oratory — One credit hour for each term. Three terms. 
Open to students who have credit for P. S. 101-103. 

The rhetoric of oral discourse. The speech for the occasion. Study of 
oratorical masterpieces. Practice in the writing and delivery of orations and 
general speeches and addresses. 

P. S. 107-109. Extempore Speaking — One credit hour each term. Three 
terms. Open to all students. 

Theory and methods. The psychology of public speaking. Class exercises 
in speaking extemporaneously on assigned topics. 

P. S. 110-112. Debate — One credit hour each term. Three terms. Open 
to students who have credit for t*. S. 101-103. 

A study of the principles of argumentation. Study of masterpieces in 
argumentative oratory. Class exercises in debating. 

P. S. 113-115. Oral Reading — Two credit hours each term. Three terms. 
Open to all students. 

Primarily for students intending to be teachers. Study of the technique 
of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of literary masterpieces. Study 
of methods of teaching oral reading in the schools. 

P. S. 116-118. Oral Technical English — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. 

The preparation and delivery of lectures, speeches, reports, etc., on technical 
subjects. All composition required in the preparation of much of the above 
technical matter is criticized and corrected before the oral delivery. For En- 
gineering students or ly. 

P. S. 119-121. Advanced Oral Technical English — Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. 

A continuation of P. S. 116-118. For Engineering students only. 



MATHEMATICS 

Math. 101. Trigonometry — Five credit hours. Five lectures. First term. 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Deduction of formulas and their 
application to the solution of triangles, trigonometric equations, etc. Required 
of students in Engineering who have offered Solid Geometry for entrance. 

Math. 102. Solid Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry — Five credit hours. 
Five lectures. First term. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the relation of the subject to descriptive 
geometry and on areas and volumes of solids. The latter portion of the time 

102 



is devoted to spherical trigonometry. Required of Engineering students who 
have offered Plane Trigonometry for entrance. Elective for other students. 

Math. 103. Analytic Geometry— Five credit hours each term. Five lec- 
tures. Second and third terms. Prerequisites, Math. 101 and 102. 

Geometry of two and three dimensions, loci of equations of second degree, 
higher plane curves, etc. Required of students in Engineering. 

Math. 104. Advanced Algebra —Three credit hours. Three lectures. 

First term. 

Algebra beyond that required for admission. Elementary theory of equa- 
tions, partial fractions, permutations, etc. Required of Engineering students. 

Math. 105. Calculus— Tv^o credit hours. Two lectures. First term. 
Five credit hours each term. Five lectures. Second and third terms. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 103. 

A discussion of the methods used in diflferentation and integration and the 
application of these methods in determining maxima and minima, areas, 
volumes, moments of inertia, etc. Required of Engineering students. 

Math. 106. Algebra— Three credit hours. Three lectures. First term. 

Quadratic Equations, simultaneous quadratic equations, progressions, 
graphs, logarithms, etc. Required of students in the Chemical, Liberal Arts, 
and premedical courses. 

Math. 107. Plane Trigonometry— Three credit hours. Three lectures. 

Second term. 

Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas and their application 
to the solution of trigonometric equations and oblique triangles. Required of 
students in the Chemical, Liberal Arts, and Pre-medical courses. 

Math 108. Plane Analytic Geometry— Three credit hours. Three lectures. 
Third term. Prerequisites, Math. 106 and 107. 

A discussion of !he straight line, conic sections and higher plane curves. 
Required of students in the Chemical, Liberal Arts, and Pre-medical courses. 

Math. 109. Plane Analytic Geometry— Three credit hours. Three lectures. 

First term. 

A continuation of Math. 108. Required of students in Chemistry. 

Math. 110. Calculus— Three credit hours each term. Three lectures. 
Second and third term. Prerequisite, Math. 109. 

A general course in differential and integral Calculus particularly adapted to 
the needs of students in Chemistry. 

Math. 111. So^id Geome/r^/— Three credit hours. Three lectures. Third term. 

A course in Geometry similar to Math. 102. Elective. 

Math. 112. Differential Equations— Three credit hours. Three lectures. 
Second term. Prerequisite, Math. 105. 

The solution of the simpler differential equations is discussed. Elective. 

Math. 113. Least Squares— Tvjo credit hours. Two lectures. Third term. 

A short course in which stress is laid on the application to geodesy. Elective. 

Math. 4 Astronomy— Three credit hours. Three lectures. Second term. 

Prerequisite, Math. 107. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Elective. 

103 



\ 



y 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 101. Library Methods — One credit hour. First term. Freshman 
year. Required of all students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Elective for others. 

This course is intended to help students use the library with greater facility. 
Instruction will be given by lectures and by practical work with the various 
catalogs, indexes, and reference books. This course considers the general 
classification of the library according to the Dewey System. Representative 
works of each division are studied in combination with the use of the library 
catalog. Attention is given to periodical literature, particularly that indexed 
in the Reader's Guide and in the Agricultural Index. Book selection and 
a short bibliography on an assigned subject complete this course. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

HISTORY 

H. 101-103. Current History—One credit hour each term. 
A study of the political, social, and economic problems of the day. Lectures 
and assignments. 

H. 104. American Colonial History—Two credit hours. First term. 
Lectures. Term reports. 

H. 105. American Civil War and Reconstruction— Two credit hours. Second 
term. 

Lectures. Term reports. 

H. 106. Development of American Nationality— Two credit hours. Third 
term. . - 

Lectures. Term reports. 

H. 107. Latin American Republics — Two credit hours. Third term. 
Senior year. Not given in 1921-22. 

Influence of United States in Central and South America; Monroe Doctrine; 
Pan Americanism. 

H. 109-111. Modern and Contemporary History. Three credit hours each 
term. For Freshmen. 

A study of the main events in Europe and American history since 1815. 

H. 112. Imperialism and World Politics— Two credit hours. Second term. 
For Juniors majoring in Political Science. 

A study of the political development of Europe, Canada, United States, 
and South America. Colonial expansion. League of Nations. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

H. 113. Origins and Issues of the World irar—Two credit hours. Third 
term. Not given in 1921-22. 

H. 114-115. The Far East— Two credit hours each term. Second and third 
terms. Senior year. 1922-23. 

A study of the principal events— political, social, and economic— in the 
development of the nations of the Far East. Special emphasis will be given to 
the relations between the nations of the Far East and United States. 

104 



H. 116-118. Epochs in European History — Two credit hours each term. 
For Seniors majoring in History. 

H. 119-121. Historiography — Two credit hours each term. For Seniors 
majoring in History. 

A study of the method of writing history. Examination of the methods of 
prominent historians, and the development of assigned topics in technical form. 
Extensive use will be made of the material in the Library of Congress. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pol. Sc. 101-103. Government of the United States — Three credit hours each 
term. Sophomore year. 

A study of the governmental system of the United States. Evolution of the 
Federal Constitution; functions of the Federal Government; the executive, 
legislative, and judiciary departments. Lectures and assigned cases and 
readings. 

Pol. Sc. 104-105. American State Government — Two credit hours each 
term. Junior year. 

The development of American state constitutions. The structure and 
workings of state governments. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 106-108. Constitutional Law of United States — Two credit hours 
each term. Prerequisites, Pol. Sc. 101-103 and 104-105. 

A study of the American constitution and its interpretation as based on the 
decisions of the Federal Courts and the Supreme Court of the United States. 
Lectures and assigned cases. / 

Pol. Sc. 109-110. Governments of Europe — Two credit hours each term. 
First and second terms. Prerequisites, Pol. Sc. 101-103 and 104-105. 

A comparative study of the political organization of the principal states of 
Europe. Classification of forms; separation of powers; source of power. 
Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 111-112. Municipal Government — -Two credit hours each term. 
Second and third terms. Second term: Government of American Cities. 
Third term: Government of European Cities. Prerequisites, Pol. Sc. 101-103 
and 104-105. 

A study of city government. Source of power; organization and adminis- 
tration. City manager and commission forms of government. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 113-115. American Diplomacy — Two credit hours each term. 
Senior year. Not given in 1920-21. Alternates with International Law. 

A survey of the beginnings of American diplomacy. Important foreign 
relations. Treaties and treaty making. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 116-118. International Law — Three credit hours each term. 
Senior year. Alternates with American Diplomacy. Given in 1922-23. 

A study of the nature and source of international law. Rights and duties 
of states. Freedom of the seas. Lectures and assigned cases. 

Pol. Sc. 119-120. Political Parties and Practical Politics — Two credit hours 
^ach term. First and second terms. For Seniors and Juniors majoring in 
Political Science. 

105 



I 



National and international problems of current interest. Foreign relations. 
Suffrage. Labor problems. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Pol. Sc. 124-126. Research in Political Science—Two credit hours each 
term. Given in 1921-22. For senior in Political Science only. 

Practical work in the development of assigned problems in the Library of 
Congress and the departments of Federal Government. 



GENERAL BOTANY 

Description of Courses 

Gen. Bot. 101-102. General Botany—Credit at the rate of four hours per 
term. (Six credit hours for half year's work.) Two lectures and two labora> 
tory periods. Freshman year. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the subject 
and planned to give the fundamental prerequisites for study in the special 
departments. 

Gen. Bot. 103. Systematic Botany—Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, General Botany 101-102 

A study of the local flora. A study is made of floral parts and the essential 
relations between the groups of flowering plants. Students become familiar 
with the systematic key used to identify plants. 

Gen. Bot. 104. Plant Anatomy— Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, General 
Botany 101-102. 

An anatomical study of leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Where 
possible, plants economically or otherwise of most interest are used as tvoes 
for study. ^ 

Gen. Bot. 105-107. Plant Morphology-Four credit hours each term 
Junior year. Prerequisite, General Bot. 101-102. 

A course designed to give the student a comprehensive view of the plant 
kingdom. It treats of the general morphological evolutionary development 
and relationships of the various groups of plants based upon the examinations 
of selected types from each group. 

Gen. Bot. 108. Mycology-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Introductory comparative study of the morphology, life history, and classi- 
fication of economic fungi. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Gen. Bot. 109. Methods in Plant Histology— Three credit hours: one lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Gen. Bot 104 

Primarily a study in technique. It includes methods of killing, fixing* 
imbedding, sectioning, straining, and mounting on slides of plant materials. 

Gen. Bot. 110. Cytology— Three credit hours: one lecture and two labora- 
tory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Gen. Bot. 109. 

The structure and life history of the plant cell. 

106 



Gen. Bot. 111. Advanced Taxonomy — Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. First term. 

The course is offered for students who want more proficiency in systematic 
botany than the elementary course affords. A student who completes the 
course should be able to classify the grasses and other common plants of the 
state. 

For Graduate Students 

Gex. Bot. 201. Advanced Mycology — Two credit hours each term. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. 

A detailed treatment of the classification, morphology and economics of the 
fungi, with studies of life histories in culture and identification of field material. 

Gen. Bot. 202. Special Studies of Fungi — Credit hours according to work 
done. 

Special problems in the structure or life history of fungi or the monographic 
study of some group of fungi. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

This department aims to provide training for public service, social service, 
and business pursuits, and in a general way aims to train men and women for 
more intelligent discharge of their duties as American citizens inasmuch as 
problems in economics and sociology form the subject matter of most legisla- 
tion. For technical students certain required and elective courses have been 
worked out in consultation with the Deans, supplementary to the work of the 
different schools. Furthermore the department aims to encourage the de- 
velopment of economic and sociological research studies. 

ECONOMICS 

EcoN. 101-102. Elements of Economics — Three credit hours each term. 
First and second terms. Not open to freshmen, but required of students who 
elect to major in this department. 

Elementary phases of the present system; production, exchange, distribution 
and consumption of wealth; the monetary system; public finance; land and 
labor problems; monopolies, taxation and other similar topics. 

EcoN. 103. Corporation Finance — Two credit hours. First term. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 101. 

Methods employed in the promotion, capitalization, financial management, 
consolidation and reorganization of business corporations. 

Econ. 104. Money and Banking — Two credit hours. Second term. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 101. 

A study of the nature and functions of money; standards of value and prices; 
credit; bank clearings and exchanges; history of American and foreign banking; 
the stock exchange and the money market. 

Econ. 105. Public Finance and Taxation — Two credit hours. Third term. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101.* 

A study of public expenditures, receipts, indebtedness and financial adminis- 
tration; theories on public expenditures; theories of taxation; the growth and 



y 



*May not be offered in 1921-22. 



107 



nature of public credit; the forms of public debts; federal, state, and municipal 
budgets. 

EcoN. 106. Economic History of the United States — Three credit hours. 
First term. 

A study of the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce; transportation 
from the simple isolated communities of the early colonies to the complex 
industrial and commercial society of today; its effect on the population in 
terms of successive new adaptations. 

EcoN. 107. Markets and Marketing — Three credit hours. Third term. 

An effort to understand the precise ways in which existing systems of market- 
ing operate and their historical development; evidence that certain old sys- 
tems fail to meet the present needs fully, and that new conditions require new 
adjustments. Study of the methods of auction, direct selling, co-operative 
buying and selling, and the direct and indirect service of governmental agency. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 101-102. Elements of Sociology — Three credit hours each term. First 
and second terms. 

The life of society as affected by rural conditions, cities, wealth, poverty, 
heredity, immigration, etc.; the nature of social organization; different phases 
of social evolution; problems and principles of social control. 

Soc. 104. Social Psychology — Three credit hours. First term. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the work in 
the field of sociology and other social sciences. The fundamental instincts as 
dynamic forces in the individual and in society, their development, organiza- 
tion and control. Analysis of the value problem. 

Soc. 105. Social Psychology — A continuation course of Soc. 104. Three 
credit hours. Second term.* 

A psychological analysis of some main features of an organized modern state. 
Analysis of economic value and other social values continued. 

Soc. 106. Logical Aspects of Sociology — Three credit hours. Third term. 

This course seeks to apply the principles of logic to social phenomena. Nature 
of casual proof, grounds for universal judgments, statistical arguments, cir- 
cumstantial evidence, analogical inference, experimental investigation, and 
nature and function of reasonable doubt in inductive inferences will be studied 
in their basic relation to actual sociological conditions. Practical problems 
of everyday life in their relation to the social order as discussed in the current 
literature and the press will furnish material for the student to test. 

Soc. 107. Philosophical Aspects of Sociology — Three credit hours. First 
term.* 

A rapid survey of the leading systems of thought respecting social phenom- 
ena. The aim will be to show the genetic development of present day theory 
and its bearing on actual life conditions within various social groups. 

Soc. 109. Ethical Aspects of Sociology — Three credit hours. Third term.* 



The application of moral principles of social phenomena. Nature of moral 
judgments and underlying ethical concepts as illustrations m current social 

problems. 
Soc. 103. (R. O. 104.) Principles of Rural Organization— Three credit 

hours. Third term. ^ t e * ^ 

A study of the historical and comparative development of farmers co- 
operative organizations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

Problems of rural life in the light of modern social science; federal and state 
organizations intended to promote rural welfare; purpose and achievements 
of such voluntary organizations as the Grange, the Farmers* Umon, village 
improvement association., boys' and girls' clubs, co-operative societies, etc. 

BUSINESS 

Com. 101-103. Elements of Accounting— Three credit hours each term. 

A thorough but rapid study of the general principles of bookkeeping. Modern 
accounting as practiced in leading establishments. Labor-saving devices; 
special columns and controlling accounts; preparation and interpretation of 
financial statements. 

Com. 104-106. Advanced Accounting— Three credit hours each term. 

A continuation of Com. 103. Depreciation, reserves, and investment 
accounting; bank and corporation accounting; cost accounting and distribu- 
tion of overhead; advanced forms of financial statements. C. P. A. problems. 

Com. 107-109. Commercial Mathematics— Three credit hours each term.* 

Counting-house mathematics. Use of logarithms, slide rule, comptometer, 
and other standard calculating devices; problems relating to sinking funds, 
depreciation, and annuities; elements of statistical methods. 

Com. 110-112. Business Law— Three credit hours each term. 

The aim of this course is to train students for practical business affairs by 
giving the legal information necessary to prevent common business errors. 
The following are some of the phases of the work: Requisites and forms of 
contracts and remedies for their breach; sales, passage of title, warranties; 
negotiable instruments, assignment, and liability of signere; agency, title, 
abstracts, mortgages, leases, etc. 

Com. 113. Business Organization— Three credit hours. First term. 

Evolution and forms of business units; structure and life history of typical 
corporations; the trust problem; public utility corporations; reorganization 

and receivership. 

Com. 114. Business Management— Three credit hours. Second term. 

Internal organization of a business for securing efficiency; departmental 
organization and coordination; various systems of scientific management 
studied and compared. 

Com. 115. Purchasing and Selling— Three credit hours. Third term. 

Principles of purchasing; the purchasing organization; the function of 
agents, brokers, jobbers, and wholesalers; qualifications of a salesman; business 
ethics; specialty selling; the sale of service; prices and profits. 



♦May not be offered in 1921-22. 



*May not be offered in 1921-22. 



108 



109 



*. 



CHEMISTRY 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Inorg. Chem. a. 101-103. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
Four credit hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The 
year. 

A study of the non-metals and metals, the latter being studied from a qual- 
itative standpoint. One of the main purposes of the course is to develop 
original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. This is accomplished by 
the project-method of teaching. 

Course A is intended for students who have never studied chemistry, or 
have passed their high school chemistry with a grade of less than A. 

Inorg. Chem. B. 101-103. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis— 
Four credit hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The 
year. 

This course covers much the same ground as Inorg. Chem. A. 101-103 
except the subject matter is taken up in more detail with emphasis on Chemical 
theory and important generalization. The first term of laboratory deals with 
fundamental principles, the second term takes up the preparation and purifi- 
cation of compounds and the third term deals with a systematic qualitative 
analysis of the more common bases and acids. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high school 
chemistry course with a grade of not less than A. 

Inorg. Chem. C. 101-102. General Chemistry — Four credit hours. The year. 
A study of the non-metals and metals and their application to Pharmacy. 
The laboratory work accompanying this course is chiefly of a pharmaceutical 
nature. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Org. Chem. 101-102. Four credit hours each term: two lectures and two 
laboratory periods. The first and second term. Prerequisites, Inorganic 
Chemistry A or B 101-103. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The course is designed 
primarily for premedical students. 

Org. Chem. 103-104. Three credit hours each term: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. The first and second terms. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 
A or B 101-103. 

This course is designed primarily for agricultural students. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Org. Chem. 105-107. Advanced Organic Chemistry — Four credit hours each 
term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisites, 
Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103. 

This course is particularly designed for advanced students and offers a 
detailed study of the typical organic compounds. (Broughton.) 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Phys. Chem. 101-102. Elements of Physical Chemistry — Four credit hours 
each term: three lectures and one laboratory period. The first and second 

110 



terms. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103, Anal>^ical Chem. 101-103, 

VTath 110, Physics 101-103. 

The cou se will present the portions of Physical Chemistry which are neces- 
sary to every chemist, student of medicine, bacteriologist, or teacher of chem- 
istry with laboratory practice in thermometry and temperature regulation; 
ptyslcri constants; molecular weight determinations; velocity of reactions; 
chemical equilibrium and law of mass action; measurements of conductivity, 
migration of ions; hydrogen ion concentration, etc. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PHYS CHEM. 103. Colloidal Chemistry-FouT credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A 
or B 101-102, Physical Chem. 101-102, Physics 101-103. 

The following topics will be discussed: The general constitution of colloid 
systems; Relations between the physical state and the general properties of 
colloid systems; General energetics of the dispersoids; Distribution of the 
colloid state and the concept of colloid chemistry; Mechanical properties of 
colloid systems. (Gordon.) 

PHYS Chem 104. Ekctrochemistry— Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. The third term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 

101-103, Phys. Chem. 101-102. u- ^ ^^ ^u^ 

Various factors which govern the action of electrolytes when subject to the 
action of the electric current and the factors which determined electromotive 
force are taken up. (Gordon.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. Chem. 201. Special Colloidal Chemisiry-Tv^o credit hours: two 
lectures. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 102. 

Special topics will be taken up with emphasis on the most recent theories 
and research going on in colloid chemistry at the present time. (Gordon.) 

Phys Chem 202. Physical Chemistry-^-Three credit hours each term: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. The first and second terms. Prerequisites, 

Phys. Chem. 101-102. (Gordon.) . -.i. i i ^ 

A study of the more advanced theories of physical chemistry with laboratory 
practice in the more technical physico-chemical measurements. 

Phys. Chem. 203. Thermodynamics— Two credit hours each term: two lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 101-102. . w ^ 

Designed for graduate students who wish an advanced mathematical treat- 
ment of chemical phenomena. Mellor's chemical statics and dynamics will 
be applied to Lewis' system of Physical Chemistry. (Gordon.) 

Phys Chem. 204. Research in Physical Chemistry. 

Physical chemistry problems for investigation will be assigned to graduate 
students who wish to gain an advanced degree in chemistry. (Gordon.) 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Analytical Chem. 101. Advanced Qualitative Analysis— Fomt credit hours: 
one lecture and three laboratory periods. The first term. Prerequisites, Inorg, 
Chem. A or B 101-103. 

Ill 



An advanced course of Qualitative Analysis for chemical students. 

Analytical Chem. 102 103. Quantitative Analysis-FoMr credit hours ead, 
term: one lecture and three laboratory periods. Second and third term. 
Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical Chem. 101. 

The principal operations of gravimetric Analysis. Standardization of chem- 
ical balance. Standardization of weights and apparatus used in chemical 
analysis. 

Analytical Chem. 104-105. Quantitative Analysis-Three credit hours each 
term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. First and second terms. Pre^ 
requisites, Analytical Chem. 102-103. 

Principal operations of volumetric analysis. Standardization of chemical 
glassware. Study of indicators, typical volumetric and colorimetric method^. 

Analytical Chem. 106. Chemical Calculations-One credit hour each term- 
the year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

Chemical problems relating to Analytical Chemistry. 

Analytical Chem. 107. Quantitative Analysis-Foixr credit hours- one 
lecture and three laboratory periods. The third term. Prerequisites, Inorg 
Unem. 101-103. 

Quantitative Analysis for premedical students with special reference to 
volumetric methods. (Broughton.) i^i^ren.e to 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Analytical Chem. 108-109-110. Advanced Quantitative Analysis-Four 
credit hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequi- 
sites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical Chem. 101-106. 

A continuation of courses 102-3, 104-105. 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

IND. Chem. 101. Agricultural Chemistry— Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory in the chemistry of air, soils feeds 
fertilizers, plants and animals. 

iND. Chem. 102-103. Agricultural Analysis-Three credit hours each term- 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms Prereaui 
sites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. ' ^ 

Quantitative Analysis and its application to agricultural products including 
gravimetric and volumetric methods. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

iND. Chem. 104-105-106. Advanced Agricultural Chemistry— Four credit 
hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The year Pre- 
requisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103, Analytical Chem. 102-103-104 105 
Agricultural Chemistry and its application to the soil, the plant, and the animal. 

iND. Chem. 107-108-109. Agricultural Chemical Analysis— Three credit 
hours each term. The year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical 
Chem. 102-103-104-105. (Broughton.) 

Analysis of soils, plants and animal products. 

112 



Ind. Chem. 110. Engineering Chemistry — One credit hour each term: the 
year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103. 

A lecture course dealing with the value of fuels, coal, oils and gases, from 
their chemical analysis. The significance of flue gas analysis. Comparison 
of specifications, particularly chemical requirements of various states, manu- 
facturers and large corporations for fuels, lubricating oils and paints. This 
course is given primarily for students in engineering. (McDonnell.) 

Inp. Chem. 111. Determinative Mineralogy and Assaying — -Three credit 
hours: one lecture and two laborating periods. Third term. Prerequisites, 
Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

The more important minerals are identified by their characteristic physical 
and chemical properties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and lead, etc., are made. 
(Broughton.) 

Ind. Chem. 112. Metallurgical Calculations — One credit hour each term: 
the year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical Chem. 102-103, 
104-105. 

Problems embodying the use of physical, chemical and mechanical principles 
utilized in practical metallurgy. (Broughton.) 

Ind. Chem. 113-114. Metallurgical Analysis — Three credit hours each 
term. First and second term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical 
Chem. 101-105. 

Analysis of industrial ores and alloys. (Broughton.) 

Ind. Chem. 115-116-117. Industrial Chemistry — Two credit hours each 
term: the year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

A thorough course of the practical methods employed in the various Inor- 
ganic and Organic chemical indicators. (McDonnell.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Ind. Chem. 1. Agricultural Chemistry — Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First and second terms. 

This course consists of an elementary study of general chemistry with special 
reference to the chemistry of plants, animals, soils, fertilizers, etc. 

FERTILIZER AND FOOD CHEMISTRY 

Dr. H. B. McDonnell has charge of the State's inspection work including 
sampling, analysis, and the publication of results on fertilizers, stock food, 
and agricultural lime. 

SEMINAR / ^ / 

One credit hour. The year. During these periods there is a discussi4^n of 
the latest bulletins and scientific papers on all phases of Chemistry, byvthe 
graduate students and chemistry staff. -^ 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND PHILOSOPHY 

GREEK 

Gk. 1-3. Beginners' Greek — Three credit hours each term. Three terms. 
Drill and practice upon the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the acqui- 
sition of a vocabulary. To be followed by Gk. 101-103. 

113 




Gk. 101-103. Greek Grammar, Composition, and Translation of Selected 
Prose Works — Three credit hours each term. Three terms. Second year course. 
Prerequisite, Gk. 1-3. 

This course is for those who offer two units in Greek for entrance. 

Gk. 104-106. Greek Literature and Composition — Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite, Gk. 101-103. 

Study and translation of Greek prose and lyric poetry. 

Gk. 107-109. Greek Drama—Three credit hours each term. Three terms. 
Prerequisite, Gk. 104-106. 

A study of the qualities of Greek dramatic poetry and comedy. Translation 
of representative selections. 

LATIN 

Lat. 101-103. Translation, Prosody, Mythology— Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. 

Study and translation of selections from Virgil, together with a study of his 
life and influence. 

This course may be offered for entrance or may be taken as college work by 
those who offer only two units of Latin for entrance. 

Lat. 104-106. Latin Grammar, Composition, and Translation— Three credit 
hours each term. Three terms. 

Review of Latin Grammar. Much practice in prose composition. Transla- 
tion of selections from Livy, Cicero, and Sallust. 

This course is for those who offer four units in Latin at entrance. 

Lat. 107-109. Latin Drama — Three credit hours each term. Three terms. 
Prerequisite, Lat. 104-106 or the equivalent. 

Critical study of selected plays of Plaitus and Terence. 

Lat. 110-112. History of Roman Literature—Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite, Lat. 107-109. 

Lectures, translation of representative works, and collateral reading. 

PHILOSOPHY 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil. 101. Introduction to Philosophy — Three credit hours. First term. 
Junior standing required. 

A study of the meaning and scope of philosophy; its relations to the arts, 
sciences, and religion. To be followed by Phil. 102-103. 

Phil. 102-103. Problems and Systems of Philosophy — Three credit hours. 
Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Phil. 101. 

Study of the problems and systems of philosophy together with tendencies 
of present-day thought. Lectures and reports on the reading of representative 
works. 

Phil. 104-106. History of Philosophy— Three credit hours. Three terms. 
Senior standing required. 

A study of the development of philosophy from prehistoric times, through 
Greek philosophy, early Christian philosophy, mediaeval philosophy to modern 
hilosophical thought. Lectures and reports on outside reading. 

114 



The School of Dentistry 



FACULTY 

T. O. HEATWOLE, M. D., D.D. S., Dean 

E. FRANK KELLY, Phar. D. 

ELDRIDGE BASKIN, M. D., D.D. S. 

ALEX H. PATERSON, D.D. S. 

J. BEN ROBINSON, D.D. S. 

B. MERRILL HOPKINSON, A. M., M. D., D.D. S. 

ROBERT P. BAY, M. D. 

ROBERT L. MITCHELL, Phar. G., M. D. 

H. J. MALDEIS, M. D. 

HORACE M. DAVIS, D.D. S. 

The course of instruction in the School of Dentistry covers a period of 
four Sessions of 32 weeks each, exclusive of holidays, in separate years. 

The thirty-eighth regular session will begin October 1, 1921, and continue 
until about May 25, 1921. Full attendance during this period is demanded 
in order to get advancement to higher classes. Class examinations for the 
session will be held in October, January and May. 

This department of the University is a member, in good standing, of the 
National Association of Dental Faculties, and conforms to all the rules and 
regulations of that body. 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, this School maintains 
a spring and summer session, which follows immediately the termination of 
each regular session and continues until October 1st. This is intended for 
practical work only; no credit for time thus put in is allowed toward gradu- 
ation. The many advantages of the spring and summer session for actual 
practice cannot be overestimated, as the number of patients applying for 
dental services is always very large and the Infirmary is never closed except 
on Sundays and holidays. 

Requirements for Matriculation 

The requirements for matriculation in the School of Dentistry are those 
established by the Dental Educational Council of America, viz; graduation 
from an accredited high school having a four-year course, or its equivalent 

Applicants for matriculation must submit their credentials for verification 
to the Registrar of the University. 

Applicants lacking full credentials may earn same by taking a stated writ- 
ten examination on subjects in which they are deficient. 

115 



Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance not later than ten days after the beginning and remain 
until the close of the regular session. 

In case of sickness, attested by a physician's certificate, students may enter 
twenty days after the opening of the regular session. 

Graduates from reputable and accredited medical colleges are admitted to 
the Sophomore year and credits allowed on all subjects completed which are 
included in the Dental Course. 

Students from other recognized dental colleges will be given credit for all 
work completed in the institution from which they come, except those enter- 
ing for the Senior year only. These will be required to take the work of the 
full Senior courses of this School. 

At the close of each session, each student must pass a satisfactory exami- 
nation on the several subjects of that year before he can be entered in the 
succeeding grade. 

The candidate for graduation must have attended four sessions of instruc- 
tion in some recognized dental college, the last year of which must have been 
in this institution. 

He must have satisfied the requirements of each of the several instructors 
and proved himself proficient in the theory and practice of Dentistry. 

He must have attained the age of twenty-one years and be of good moral 
character. 

Matriculation and Fees 

Students may matriculate by mail by sending money order, or registered 
letter containing the amount of fee, $5.00, to the University Registrar. 

The Diploma fee must be paid by the first of April of the year of graduation. 

A special ticket is issued at the close of each session to every student of 
the first, second and third year classes, as an evidence that he has been suc- 
cessful, or unsuccessful, in examinations for advancement to a higher grade, 
and also has attended a full session. 

Special bulletin of the School of Dentistry may be obtained by addressing 
Dean T. O. Heatwole, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Balti- 
more, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 



116 



College of Education 



The College of Education is an organization of the various activities of the 
University concerned with the preparation of individuals for positions in the 
educational profession. Its courses are planned to serve three classes of 
students: First, those preparing to teach agriculture, arts and ^--ce ho^^^^ 
economics and industrial subjects; second, prospective principals of high schools, 
educational supervisors, county agents, home demonstrators, boys and girls 
club workers, and other educational specialists; third, those majoring m specia 
fields who desire courses in education for their professional and informational 

value. 

DEGREES 

Upon the completion of two hundred and four trimester hours graduates 
from the four-year curricula of the College of Education are awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 

TEACHERS' SPECIAL DIPLOMAS 

The degrees granted for work done in the College of Education indicate 
primarily the quantity of work completed. Teachers' special diplomas certify 
to the professional character of such work. Teachers' special diplomas wil 
be granted only to those who, besides qualifying for a degree, give promise of 
superior professional ability as evidenced by their personality, character, 
experience and success in supervised teaching. , ^ ,. 

Teachers' special diplomas will be granted in agncultural education, arts 
and science education, home economics education, manual training and indus- 

*"The rTcSt of a teachers' special diploma is eligible for certification by the 
State Superintendent of Schools without examination. 

DEPARTMENTS 

The College of Education is organized into two general divisions. viz.-Gen- 
eral Education and Vocational Education. In the main the College includes 
work in the following departments offering general and professional training 
for teachers. Agricultural Education, Arts and Science Education, Home 
Economics Education, and Industrial Education. 

EQUIPMENT 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the institution as a whole by 
special arrangement with the county and state school authorities the high school 
located at HyattsviUe within two miles of the University is used for college 
credit work in teaching. The observation work so necessary for efficient 

117 



teacher training is conducted in Washington and in nearby Maryland schools. 
The nearness of these schools to the institution and the proximity of the federal 
offices and libraries dealing with education provide unusual opportunities for 
contact with actual class-room situations and current administrative problems 
jfn education. 

CURRICULA 

Two general classes of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
and Bachelor of Arts are offered. 

The first of these provides fixed curricula permitting comparatively little 
election for the definite purpose of preparing teachers and supervisors of agricul- 
ture, home economics, manual training, and industrial subjects. As the Univer- 
sity of Maryland is the institution designated by the State Board of Education 
for the training of teachers of vocational agriculture, home economics, and trades 
and industries under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes vocational education 
act, the curricula in this class have been organized to meet t he objectives set 
up in the act and in the interpretations of the Federal Boa rd for Vocational 
Education and the State Board of Education. 

The second class provides a wide range of electives and seeks to train teachers 
of arts and science subjects and specialists for the profession of education. 
Although there are definite and fixed basic requirements, the student may 
choose from a number of subjects the major subject in which he expects to 
qualify for teaching. Correlated with this major may be other subjects which 
he may wish to teach. 

A minimum of 30 hours in education is required as an integral part of all 
four-year curricula of the College of Education. This minimum includes the 
following: education in the United States, 3 hours; educational psychology, 
5 hours; technic of teaching, 5 hours; an introductory teacher's course in the 
subject of specialization, 3 hours; special methods in the subject of specializa- 
tion, 3 hours; principles of secondary education, 3 hours; teaching, 3 to 5 hours. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

By special arrangement courses in education are offered evenings and Satur- 
days to teachers in service and to those who may desire to qualify for teaching 
in the schools of Maryland after having had such work. College credit may 
be granted for this work if taken in course. Only a limited amount of service 
of this kind can be undertaken. School officials should make application for 
this work before arranging for it in their counties. 

As the need for evening classes in industrial and home economics education 
arises, special courses will be offered at centers throughout the state. The 
number and location of these centers will depend entirely upon the need and 
demand for such instruction. The courses will be organized on the short unit 
basis and will be maintained only as long as the demand justifies them. Upon 
the satisfactory completion of such special curricula, students will be issued 
certificates stating the amount and character of work done. 

In summer special courses are offered for the benefit of teachers in service 
and such individuals as may be able to qualify for teaching upon the completion 
of the work. 

118 



TEACHER TRAINING COURSES NECESSARY FOR PROSPECTIVE 

TEACHERS 

Teacher training courses are necessary for prospective teachers, inasmuch as 
the State Board of Education will not certify persons to teach m the approved 
high schools of the state unless such persons have had adequate professional 

trainine for teaching. . . - ., i.* 

Athletics and music are also valuable forms of tra.nmg for the prospective 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean of the 
College of Education regarding possible combinations and the arrangement of 
their work. Upon matriculation each student is required to state the subjects 
for which he desires to prepare to teach and in the election of cou>^ to secure 
the advice and approval of the head of the department m which these subjects 
fall. The previous training of the student, his experience, and his future needs 
govern the head of the department in his recommendations. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Since the student electing this curriculum may become a candidate for 
cither the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, he should upon 
his matriculation state the degree for which he wishes to qualify. Students 
wishing to prepare for the teaching of English, history, the social sciences, 
and language should become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Those wishing to teach general and biological science, chemistry and physics 
s hould become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Upon registration in this curriculum students should state the subjects in 
which they expect to qualify for teaching, designating a major and a minor 
interest Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete, in addi- 
tion to the requirements of the curriculum, a minimum of nine credits in 

'"student "ejecting this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Arts and Sciences. In any case they will register 
with the College of Education for the special teacher s diploma. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I H in 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) - ■ ; • ! t t 

Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin or Greek) ... 3 d -^ 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. iGen. Chem. 101-103) 3 i <i 

■ Algebra (Math. 106) ^ 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 

Plane Analytical Geometry (Math. 108 ) or Solid Geometry 

(Math. Ill) ■■ ■„ o 

History (His. 109-111) i l 1> 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) * ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101-103) 2 V 



119 



/ 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Term. I II III 

Public Education in United States (Ed. 101) 3 

English (Eng. 119-121) 3 3 3 

Political Science (Pol. Sc. 102-103) 3 3 

Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin or Greek) ... 3 3 3 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 4 4 

Botany (Bot. 101) . . . . 4 

Sociology (Soc. 104-106) 3 3 3 

R. 0. T. C 2 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR ' Term: I II III 

C Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 5 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) 5 

Arts and Science Education (Ed. 113, 115, 117, 119, or 121) . . . . 3 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 .2 2 

Reading and Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 ,1 t^ 

Electives 9-12 9-12 9-12 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Arts and Science Education (Ed. 114, 116, 118, 120 or 122) 3 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124) . . 3 

*Teaching Arts and Science Subjects (Ed. 123) 

Electives -. 14-17 14-17 14-17 

*Credit, three to five hours. Given any term. T 

Requirements for a Degree 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester hours 
under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above, the student will 
be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science, depending upon the character of the work elected. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, involv- 
ing graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing the 
agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of having acquired 
adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be selected from any of the 
courses offered by the University for which the student has the necessary 
prerequisites. A student is expected, however, to confine his elections to 
subjects related to farming and to teaching. Though opportunity is afforded 
for specialization in a particular field of agriculture, such as animal husbandry, 
agronomy, pomology, vegetable gardening, or farm management, students 
should arrange their work so that approximately forty per cent, of their time 
will have been spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per cent, on scien- 
tific subjects, twenty per cent, on subjects of a general educational character, 
and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects in professional education. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Agriculture. In either case they will register 
Avith the College of Education *for the special teacher's diploma. 

120 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR • ^>^*^"- ^ ^^ 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) ^ '^ 

Animal Husbandry (An. Hus. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 101) . •• 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 4 / 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) ^ 

General Botany (Bot. 101) . . ^ - 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 ^ 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) 1 ^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 101) 2 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I U 

*Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 3 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 102) ^ - 

Feeds and Feeding (An. Hus. 102A) 3 6 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102) • 

General Geology (Geol. 101) ^ 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101-102) « 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) * 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-102) 3 3 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) -^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 Z 

Note: Students who have not had a substantial course in high school physics must 
Physics during this or subsequent years. 

JUNIOR YEAR '''^'^''''' ^ ^^ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) ^ .. 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) ^ 

Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 104) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 102) ^ 

Farm Poultry (An. Hus. 104) ^ 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) ^ ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 \ 

Electives.. ^"^ ^"^ 

SENIOR YEAR '^'^'^''^- ^ ^^ 

Problems and practice in Teaching Secondary Vocational 

Agriculture (Ed. 105) • ^ 

The Rural Community and Agr. Ed. (Ed. 128) 3 

^Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 106) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124) ^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 3 3 

Electives 10-12 10-12 

♦Credit, three to five hours. Given any terra. 

121 



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12-17 



HOME FXONOMICS EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, involv- 
ing graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing home 
economics education must present evidence of two years' experience in the 
home as a house daughter during which time a large share of the responsi- 
bility in the management of the home was assumed. 

Students may elect from other schools such courses as they may be quali- 
fied to enter. They are expected, however, to confine their election primarily 
to subjects related to home-making and teaching. The curriculum should 
be so arranged that approximately forty per cent, of the student's time will 
be spent on technical home economics subjects, twenty-five per cent, on 
scientific subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of general academic character, 
and from twelve to fifteen per cent, on subjects of a professional character. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Home Economics. In either case they will reg- 
ister with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 



Home Economics Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I J I HI 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Gen. Inorganic Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Chem. 101-103) .444 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 4 4 

Botany (Bot. 101) 4 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) 1 1 1 

Clothing (Cloth. 101) 3 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 3 3 

Hygiene (No credit) 

(And one of the following) 

History 3 3 3 

Language 3 3 3 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I II III 

*Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 3 ... . . 

Foods (Food 101-102) 5 . . 4 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) . . 5 ♦ 

Textiles (Tex. 101) 3 

Millinery (Cloth. 103-104) 2 2 

Art (Art 101) 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-102) 3 3 

English 3 3 

(And one of the following) 

Language 3 3 3 

Sociology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

Note: Students who have not had a substantial course in high school physics must carry 
}*hysics during this or sul)soqupnt years, 

122 



JUNIOR YEAR '^^^' ^ ^^ ^'^ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) » • • 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) • • * * 

Secondary Vocational Home Economics (Ed. 107) ^ 

Costume and Design (Art 103) * ' "^ 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 105-106) ' 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) * ' -^ 

Nutrition (Foods 103-104) * ^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) ^ ^^ ^ 

Public Speaking .^k 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR ^^'•'"' ^ ^^ ^'^ 
Problems and Practice in Teaching Secondary Vocational 

Home Economics (Ed. 108) 

^Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Econ. (Ed. 109) .. .. 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124) • • 9 •_ 

Child Care and Welfare (Ed. 134) ^ 

History of the Family (Ed. 130) ^ - 

Education of Women (Ed. 131) - 

Household Management (H. M. 101-102) • ^ -^ 

Practice House (H. M. 103) ^ 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 104) ^ • • '^ 

Arts and Handicraft ^ "^ _ „ ^ g 

Electives 

*Credit, three to five hours. Given any term. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Three types of curricula are offered in Industrial Education, viz a four-year 
curriculum, a two-year curriculum and a special curriculum The first two 
are offered as resident work at the University and the third is offered at special 
centers in the State where occasion demands. 

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION FOR 

TEACHERS OF RELATED SUBJECTS 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, involving 
graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electmg the four- 
vear curriculum in industrial education must be willing to engage in the trades 
or industries during the three summer vacations. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be chosen from any of the 
courses offered in the University for which the student has the necessary 
prerequisites. 

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION FOR 

TEACHERS OF RELATED SUBJECTS 

This curriculum is designed for mature students who have had considerable 
experience in some trade or industry. . . , ,. 

In addition to the above, applicants for admission to this curriculum must 
have as a minimum requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent 

123 



and must be willing to engage in the trades and industries during the summer 
vacation. 

The curriculum will not be rigidly required as laid down, but will be made 
flexible, in order that it may be adjusted to the needs of students who present 
advanced credits for certain of the required courses. 



SPECIAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF TRADE AND RELATED 

TRADE SUBJECTS 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher training in Baltimore, two types 
of courses are offered of evenings in that city — one for teachers of trade subjects, 
the other for teachers of related trade subjects. The courses open about the 
last of September and close about the last of April. The class for teachers of 
trade subjects meets twice a week, the one for teachers of related trade subjects 
meets once a week. The recitation period in all cases is two hours. 

Applicants for admission to these classes must have had considerable experi- 
ence in the line of work they expect to teach, and must have, as a minimum 
requirement, an elementary school education or its equivalent. The credit 
allowed for these courses depends upon the amount and character of the work 
completed. 

For teachers of trade subjects the term's work deals with the analysis and 
classification of trade knowledge for instructional purposes, the mechanics 
and technique of teaching, shop and class-room management, and the organiza- 
tion of industrial classes. The work for teachers of related subjects is similar 
to that described for teachers of trade subjects except that emphasis is placed 
upon the analysis of their specialties in relationship to the different trades with 
which they are articulated. 

DESCRIPTION OE COURSES 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

Ed. 101. Public Education in the United States — Three credit hours. First 
term. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Required of all students 
in Education. 

The evolution of public education in the United States as the expression and 
promoter of democracy, emphasizing particularly vocational education and 
present tendencies in reorganization; recent state and federal school laws; 
proposed legislation. 

Ed. 102. Educational Psychology — Five credit hours. First term. Open 
to juniors and seniors. Required of all juniors in Education. 

General characteristics and use of original tendencies; principles of mental 
evolution and development; the laws and methods of learning; experiments in 
rate improvement; permanence and efficiency; causes and nature of individual 
differences; principles underlying mental tests; principles which should govern 
school practice. 

Ed. 103. Technic of Teaching — Five credit hours, four lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of 
juniors in Education. Prerequisite Ed. 102. 

124 



The nature of educational objective; steps of the lesson plan; observation 
and critiques; survey of teaching methods; type lessons; lesson plannmg; class 
management. 

Ed. 124. Principles of Secondary Education—Three credit hours. Second 
term. Required of all seniors in Education. 

Evolution of secondary education, articulation of secondary schools with the 
elementary school, colleges, technical schools, and the community and the home; 
the junior high school; programs of study and the reconstruction of curricula; 
the teaching staff and student activities. 

Ed. 125. Psychology of Childhood-Three credit hours. Second term. 
Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in Home Economics Educa- 
tion. Prerequisite Ed. 102. 

The mental development and characteristics of children during the successive 
school ages stressing particularly pre-adolescence and adolescence needs. 

Ed. 126-127. History of Education— Two credit hours. Second and 
Third terms. Open to juniors and seniors. 

History of the evolution of educational theory; institutions; and practices. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Ed 113. English in Secondary Schools— Three credit hours. Third term. 
Open to juniors and seniors, required of juniors preparing to teach English. 

Prerequisite Ed. 103. , 

Objectives in English in the different types of secondary schools; selection ol 
subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; evaluation of 
the course of study in terms of modern practice and group needs. 

Ed. 114. Problems and Practice in Teaching English in Secondary Schools- 
Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. First term. 
Required of seniors preparing to teach English. Prerequisite Ed. 113. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of English m secondary 
schools: the organization of the materials; lesson plans; devices for motivating 
and socializing work; special methods and type lessons in teaching the different 
forms of literary composition; measuring results; observation and critiques. 

Ed 115. History and Civics in Secondary Schools— Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to 
teach history. Prerequisite Ed. 103. r u- + 

Objectives of history and civics in secondary schools; selection of subject 
matter: parallel readings; state requirements and state courses of study; the 
development of civics from the community point of view; reference books, 
maps, charts and other auxiliary materials. 

Ed. 116. Problems and Practice in Teaching History and Civics in Secondary 
Schools-Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory Penod_ First 
term. Required of seniors preparing to teach history. Prerequisite Ed. llo. 
Psychological principles underlying the teaching of history and civics m 
secondary schools; the organization of materials; lesson plans, devices for motiv- 
ating and socializing work; maintenance of the citizenship objective; use of 
maps, charts, and note books in history teaching; checking and measuring 
results; observation and critiques. 

125 



Ed. 117. Foreign Language in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to 
teach foreign language. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of foreign language in secondary schools; selection of subject 
matter; state requirements and state courses of study; special devices and 
other auxiliary materials. 

Ed. 118. Problems and Practices in Teaching Foreign Language in Secondary 
Schools — Three credit hours Two lectures and one laboratory period. First 
term. Required of seniors preparing to teach foreign language. Prerequisite 
Ed. 117. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of foreign language in the 
secondary schools; the organization of material for teaching; lesson plans; 
devices for motivating and socializing work and the use of special material and 
charts; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 119. Mathematics in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to teach 
mathematics. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of mathematics in secondary schools; selection of subject matter; 
state requirements and state courses of study; proposed reorganizations. 

Ed. 120. Problems and Practices in Teaching Mathematics in Secondary 
Schools — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. First 
term. Required of seniors preparing to teach mathematics. Prerequisite 
Ed. 119. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of mathematics in secondary 
schools; lesson plans; devices for motivating and socializing work; checking 
and measuring results; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 121. Science in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to teach science. 
Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of science in secondary schools; selection of subject matter; state 
requirements and state courses of study; sources of material; reference books, 
laboratories and equipment. 

Ed. 122. Problems and Practice in Teaching Science in Secondary Schools — 
Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. First term. 
Required of seniors preparing to teach science. Prerequisite Ed. 131. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of science in secondary 
schools; the organization of materials for instruction; methods of the class 
period; lesson plans; the preparation and organization of laboratory instruction; 
note books. 

Ed. 123. Teaching Arts and Science Subjects — Three to five credit hours: 
determined by amount and character of work done. Given any term senior 
year. Required of seniors preparing to teach arts and science subjects. Sub- 
ject selected depends upon the student's specialty. Ed. 114 or Ed. 116 or Ed. 
118 or Ed. 120 or Ed. 122 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as a parallel of 
this course depending upon the student's specialty. 

Observation; course outline; lesson plans; class teaching; critiques. 

126 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Ed. 134-136. Educational Guidance-One credit hour each term. Open to 
all freshmen. Required of freshmen in Education. 

This course is designed to assist students in adjustmg themselves to the 
demands and problems of college and professional life, and to guide them in 
the selection of college work during subsequent years. Among the topics 
d'scuied are the following: student finances; student welfare; mtel ectua 
ideals- recreation and athletics; general reading; student organizations; student 
government; the purpose of the college; the election of courses and the selection 

of extra curriculum activities. 

Ed 137 Theory of Vocational Education-Three credit hoxxTs. Third term. 
Open' to advanced undergraduates and graduate students by special arrange- 

"" Evolution of vocational education; educational and social forces behind the 
movement: terminology; types of industrial schools; technical high schools, 
vocational education for girls; vocational education in rural communities, 

recent legislation. r^,^.^, 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Ed 104. Secondary Vocational Agriculture-Three credit hours Third 
term.' Open to juniors and seniors. Required in Agricultural Education. 

Prerequisite, Ed. 103. . , j x- i„„,. 

Theory of vocational education; terminology; the vocational education law, 
federal and state interpretations; purposes of secondary vocational agriculture; 
types of agricultural schools and classes; vocational analysis; curriculums and 
short courses; analysis of farm industries for instructional P">-P«.^f r^^^.f^r 
job as the unit in analysis and the organization of material, essential knowledge, 
auxiliary knowledge, and farm shops: the analysis of farm industries by jobs; 
the classification and arrangement of farm jobs; essential knowledge, auxiliary 
knowledge, and farm shop for instructional purposes; the school practicum; 
the home practicum: the demonstration; the field trip; the home project 
method and its administration; records and reports; school plant and equipment. 
Ed 105 Problems and Practice in Teaching Secondary Voeaiiowil Agruul- 
ture-Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period^ First 
term Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 
Relation of the agricultural teacher to the school system; preparation of the 
monthly outline; lesson planning; methods of the class period; the organization 
and conduction of practicums and shop work; the organization of project 
instruction, project study, project work and project supervision; the comparison 
of project records and reports; summer work of the agricultura teacher 
community surveys; improvement of the agricultural library; selection of 
needed equipment; arrangement of daily programs: records and reports; com- 
munity service; professional improvement; the first month's work; observation 
and critiques. 

Ed 106 Teaching Secondary Vocational AgrieuUure-Three to five credit 
hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. Given any 
term senior year. Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. Ed. lOo 
must be offered as' a prerequisite to or as a parallel of this course. 

127 



Observation; monthly outlines; lesson plans; class teaching; conferences; 
critiques. 

Ed. 128. The Rural Community and Agricultural Education — Three credit 
hours. Second term. Senior year. Required of seniors in Agricultural 
Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 

Community surveys from the point of view of the teacher of vocational 
agriculture; nature, structure, historical background and types of rural com- 
munities; the rural mind; essentials of social growth; rural needs; place of 
agricultural education in the rural school system; needed reorganizations and 
developments. 

Ed. 129. History of Agricultural Education — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates by special arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite Ed. 127. 

This course attempts to trace the evolution of ideals in rural living and is 
intended primarily for those who expect to be called upon to assist in shaping 
the destinies of rural people. It embraces a study of literature — poetic, legis- 
lative, and pedagogic — in which the life of the farmer is used as a basis of social 
culture. It traces a recognition of country life in moral and intellectual train- 
ing from the earliest records — biblical, classical, and historical. 

Ed. 138. Problems and Practice in Agricultural Extension — Three credit 
hours. Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. 

Given under the supervision of the Extension Service and designed to equip 
young men to enter the broad field of extension work. Methods of assembling 
and disseminating the agricultural information available for the practical 
farmer; administration, organization, supervision and practical details con- 
nected with the work of a successful county agent, club worker, and extension 
specialist. Students will be required to engage in specialists', county agents' 
and boys' club work as assistants .always under the guidance of men experienced 
in the respective fields. Traveling expenses for this course will be adjusted; 
according to circumstances, the ability of the man, and the service rendered. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Ed. 107. Secondary Vocational Home Economics — Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in Home 
Economics Education. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Theory of vocational education; interpretation of the Smith-Hughes law; 
aims and objectives of secondary vocational home economics; analysis of various 
home activities; organization of a course of study and its relation to the needs 
of the girl and the community; the school and the home project; school plant 
and equipment; reference books. 

Ed. 108. Problems and Practice in Teaching Secondary Vocational Home 
Economics — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. Required of all seniors in Home Economics Education. Pre- 
requisite Ed. 107. 

Relation of the home economics teacher to the school; methods of instruction; 
lesson planning; conduct of a laboratory class; organization of the school and 
the home project instruction; records and reports; the improvement of the 

128 



home economics library; selection of needed equipment; arrangemen^^^^^ 
schedule; community service; professional improvement; the first months 
work; study of types of class room work; observation and critiques. 

Ed 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Hom^ Economics-Three to five 
credit hours, determined by the amount and character of work done Given 
ny term seWor year. Required of seniors in Home Economi^^E^^^^^^^^ 
Ed 108 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as a parallel <>^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Observation, monthly outlines; lesson plans; application ^f the p n^^^^^^ 
of the technic of teaching; conduct of laboratory class; class teaching, confer 

ence and critiques. r> • ^ 

ED. 130. History of the FamUy-Three credit hours. First term. Required 

of seniors in Home Economics Education. •„ j.,<,t,;.i 

ffistoy of the family from the early ages to the present time; the industrial 

revolution and its effect upon family life. 

ED. 131. Education of Women-Three credit hours^ Second tfrm Open 
to juniors and seniors. Required of seniors in Home Economics Education. 

Women's work in relation to the home and to society; opening of occupations 
and professions to women; modern problems of women; civic, educational, 
industrial and family responsibilities. 

Ed. 132. Child Care and Welfare-Three credit hours. Third term. Re- 
quired of seniors in Home Economics Education. 

Child psychology from the standpoint of development; health, habits, play 

and recreation. 

Ed. 139. Problems and Practice in Home Economics Extension Work- Ihree 

credit hours. Third term. . , „„j «.iatinn of 

The Smith-Lever Act; various phases of extension work and relation of 
the extension service to the home, community, and country; analysis of home 
mak ngactivities and the study of the problems of the home; organization o^ 
subject matter; use of illustrative material; scope of women s study groups, 
boys' and girls' club work. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
Ed. 110. Industrial Education in Secondary Schools-Three credit hours 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors m Industrial 

Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 103. „„+;„„. t^nw of 

Theory of vocational education; purposes of industrial education, type« o 

industrial schools; vocational and trade analysis; place of auxUiaj knowledge. 

related trade courses; industrial school population; materials and equipment. 

relation of the industrial teacher to the school system. 
Ed 111 Probkms and Practice in Teaching Industrial Education in Secon^ry 

Schools-Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory per^. IJrst 
term. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. P'^^^'^'^'^^^^^^^; JJJv 

Problems of the related trade teacher as they arise m connection with trade 
analysis; lesson planning; methods of the class period; disciphne; organization 
and management; observation and critiques. 

Ed 112. Teaching Industrial Subjects in Secondary Schools-Three to five 
credit hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. Civen 

129 



any term senior year. Required of seniors in Industrial Education Ed II I 
must be offered as a prerequisite to or as a parallel of this cou^t " 

Observation; outlines; lesson plans; class teaching; conferences and critiques 
tD 131. History of Industrial Education-Three credit hours. Second term 
Open to seniors and graduate students. ™ ' 

History of the origin and development of industrial education in the lieht of 
group needs; industrial education in the United States; development of s hook 
present problems in reorganization. P'"enc oi scnoois. 



13U 



College of Engineering 

Whether a man follows engineering as his life's work or enters other fields, 
it is well recognized that the training received in the engineering colleges of 
today affords a splendid preparation that fits him for many calling^ in public 
and private life outside of the engineering profession. 

The College of Engineering, which includes the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, is undergoing a reorganization. The 
general purpose is to broaden the courses of instruction the better to prepare 
young men to enter the public service. The large public works program con- 
templated in practically every state in the union makes urgent the demand 
for engineers trained for such work. The public service demands the electrical 
and mechanical as well as the civil engineer. Maryland needs such men to 
carry on her great highway work and large public undertakings contemplated 
in various cities and counties. Such training seems preeminently a function 
of the State's university. 

It is not the intention that the subject matter of the courses shall be essentially 
different from that usually given, but that the viewpoint of the student and 
the application of the principles will be that of public service. In order to give 
the time necessary both to the technical subjects and to those of a more general 
character, a careful revision of all courses of study is being made so that the 
utmost time available in each term may be used to the best advantage. 

Beginning with the college year of 1921, it is expected to have the curriculum 
so arranged as to prescribe the same courses of study for all freshmen and all 
sophomores, respectively, in the Engineering College. Among other advantages 
that will accrue from such a change, is the very important one that a young man 
will not be called upon to decide the branch of engineering in which he will 
specialize until his junior year. 

The changes contemplated will necessitate a somewhat greater amount of 
preparation than the standard at present prescribes, and the hearty and sym- 
pathetic co-operation of the high schools of the state is asked that Maryland 
boys may be even better prepared for their university work to the end that 
they may be well qualified to enter on their life's work with the best possible 
university training. 

Engineering research is recognized today as one of the most needed useful 
contributions that the engineering colleges can make to the state. Work of 
this character is already under w^ay at the University of Maryland where, 
through the co-operation with the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads and the Mary- 
land State Roads Commission, highway research problems are being studied, 
the solution of which will prove of utmost value to the people of the state. It 
is planned to develop as rapidly as possible this phase of the work which will 
have, aside from its great economic value to the state, an important educational 

131 



value due to the close contact the students will have with the live engineering 
problems of today. * 

The war brought prominently before all people the work done by the engineers 
and now a most important part is played by the profession in the reconstruction 
problems that confront, not alone the countries of Europe, but the United 
States as well. The opportunities for the well trained engineer were never 
greater than at present. Great projects are under way and even greater con- 
templated which the engineer of the future will be called upon, not only to 
build, but to initiate. He will require the broadest training he can secure He 
must know more than merely the technique of his profession, he must be able 
to grasp the economic problems that underlie all great public works. It is 
towards such a training and understanding that the courses in the College of 
tngineering are being developed. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in Civil 
tlectrical and Mechanical Engineering, respectively. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical Engineer 
will be granted only to graduates of the University who have obtained a 
co^ndSionl- ^^""^ "* engineering. The applicant must satisfy the following 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work for 
three years. «. s «i 

f ^.'u^i^ registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months prior 
to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with his applica- 
tion a complete report of his engineering experience and an outline of his pro- 
posed thesis. ^ 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject 
./'o^f "^""^^ ^^ considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean of 
the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Civil, Electrical, 
and Mechanical Engineering. 

EQUIPMENT 

The Engineering building is equipped with lecture-rooms, recitation-rooms 
drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for all phases of engineering work. 

Drafting-Rooms 

The drafting-rooms are equipped for practical work. Engineering students 
must provide themselves with approved drawing outfit, material and books 
the cost of which during the freshman year amounts to about J?25. 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

This laboratory is fitted with such appliances as may be used to the best 
advantage in engineering practice. These include a potentiometer and standard 
instruments for calibrating the various measuring instruments used in the 
laboratory-. A Sharp-Miller portable photometer and a standard photometer 
for measuring the candle-power of lamps and for determination of illumination 
mtensities. A large number of portable ammeters, voltmeters and indicating 

132 



wattmeters for direct and alternating current measurements, electrostatic volt- 
meter, frequency meters, silver and copper voltameters, Siemen's type electro- 
dynamometer, watthourmeters and an oscillograph. 

A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt compound genera- 
tor, has been installed for testing purposes. This may be used in connection 
with the University lighting plant when needed and will be used for light and 
power service in the Engineering Building. 

The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made readily between 
any part of the University lighting plant and the turbo-generator or any of the 
apparatus in the dynamo-room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo-room includes the following; A 10-kilowatt 
rotary converter of the latest type, with speed limit and end play devices; 
five-horse-power variable speed, commutating pole motor; a 7.5-kilowatt, 
60-cycle, 220-volt alternator designed to operate either as a polyphase generator, 
synchronous motor, frequency changer, constant speed induction motor or 
variable speed induction motor. The following parts are supplied with the 
set to make possible its operation in any of the above-named ways: a stationary 
armature for use either as an alternating current generator or as an induction 
motor field; a revolving field, a squirrel cage induction motor rotor with starting 
compensator having self-contained switches; an induction motor rotor with 
3-phase collector rings, external resistance and controller; a 2-kilowatt booster 
set; a five-horse-power compound direct current motor and a 1.5 horse-power 
shunt motor fully inclosed; a 7.5-kilowatt, 120-volt, 3-phase self-excited genera- 
tor direct connected to a 115-volt compound direct current motor; a motor 
generator set consisting of a 3.6-horse-power shunt motor direct connected to a 
2-kilowatt generator: several small D. C. and A. C. motors and generators; 
two 2-kilowatt transformers to transform power from 110 or 220 volts to 1100 
or 2200 volts. 

The main switchboards are used to mount the necessary circuit apparatus 
to control the generators and motors as well as the various circuits in the 
dynamo-room and testing laboratory. In addition to the special electrical 
engineering equipment, the University lighting plant will be used for illustrative 
and experimental purposes. This plant contains, together with other apparatus 
useful in teaching electrical engineering, two Bullock generators of 40 kilowatts 
total capacity. 

The telephone laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the magneto 
and common battery systems. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

Among the apparatus installed in the laboratory are a cross compound con- 
densing Corliss engine of 50-horse-power, equipped with brake, indicators, 
relief valves, reducing motion, steam and vacuum gauges and speed indicator, 
which gives ample opportunity for steam consumption and brake tests. This 
is connected with the shops, so that at any time it may be switched on and 
drive them. The University power plant, with its vacuum heating system, 
three 100-horse-power return tubular boilers and two electric generating units, 
offers opportunities for experimental work. An eight-horse-power, four-cycle 
gasoline engine equipped with prony brake permits the making of tests in 
gas engineering. 

133 



Materials Laboratory 

In this laboratory the apparatus for testing materials includes a 100,000- 
pound Riehle combined hand and power-testing machine for making tensile, 
compression, shearing and transverse tests on various kinds of materials; a 
1,000-pound Riehle machine for testing cement briquettes, etc. 

Highway Research Laboratory 

A special core drill apparatus of latest design for taking samples from con- 
crete roads has been installed, the whole including engine, pump, etc., being 
mounted upon a truck. Extensive work in this particular line of research has 
been planned and is under way. As the research develops additional equipment 
will be added. 

Hydraulic Laboratory 

Apparatus suitable for the determination of the coefficient of discharge for 
Bmall orifices, weirs, etc., has been installed in this laboratory. Experimental 
work in stream gauging is made on the streams in the vicinity. 

The Shops 

The shops are well lighted and admirably adapted to the purpose for which 
they were designed. The wood-working shop contains accommodations for 
bench work and wood turning. The power machinery in this shop is a band 
and universal circular saw^ one 16-inch by 10-foot pattern-maker's lathe, three 
grindstones, a wood trimmer, 26-inch wood planer, 14-inch joiner and universal 
tool grinder. 

In the forge shops are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, a power emery 
grinder, and a pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of smoke. 
There is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with an iron cupola, which melts 1,200 pounds of 
iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core oven and the necessary flasks and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one 10-inch speed lathe, one 22-inch 
engine lathe with compound rest, one 12-inch combined foot and power lathe, 
two 14-inch engine lathes, one 25-inch drill press, one No. 4 emery tool grinder, 
one No. IJ2 universal milling machine and an assortment of vises, taps, dies, 
pipe-tools and measuring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machine shops is driven by a 9 by 14-inch 
automatic cut-off, high-speed engine, built by members of the junior and senior 
mechanical engineering classes, after the standard design of the Atlas engine. 
An 8 by 12-inch engine drives the machinery of the blacksmith shop and 
foundry. 

Surveying Equipment and Models 

This equipment includes a number of transits, levels, compasses, plane tables 
and minor instruments for use in plane, topographic, railroad, highway and 
geodetic surveying. These are added to as the necessity for other equipment 
arises. The models include various types of roads, bridges, culverts, etc. 

Libraries 

Each department contains a well selected library of books for reference and 
the standard engineering magazines. Students are encouraged to take advan- 

134 



tage of the opportunity for reading afforded in the departmental as well as in 

the general library. 

CURRICULA 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following pages. 
Students are also required to attend and take part in the meetings of the Engin- 
eering Society and Seminar and engineering lectures. 

In addition to the requirements of the regular courses of study all students 
in the Engineering college are required during each of the three summer vaca- 
tions to obtain employment in some lines of commercial work, preferably that 
which relates to engineering. Unless the student can offer some adequate 
reason why he has not been so employed during at least two months of each of 
his summer vacation periods it may be considered sufficient cause for with- 
holding his degree. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washmgton and to other 
places where there are great industrial enterprises offers an excellent opportunity 
for engineering students to observe what is being done in their chosen field. 
An instructor accompanies students on all trips of inspection. 

Freshman Year. 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Term: I U HI 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Oral English (P. S. 101-103). J 1 1 ^ 

Modern Language - - | 

—Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry (Math. 101-103) o 5 5 

Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. A-B, 101-103) 4 4 4 

--Engineering Drafting (Dr. 101-103) 1 1 | 

-.Shop and Forge Practice (Shop 101-103) 1 .1 ^ 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) (M. I. 101) 2 2 2 

Engineering Lectures 

Sophomore Year 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Term: I II HI 

Oral English (Pub. Sp. 104-106) 1 ^ ^ 

♦Modern Language (Adv. Course) ^ 3 3 

♦Modern and Contemporary History (His. 109-111) 3 3 . 3 

Advanced Algebra, Dif. and Intg.Calculus (Math. 104-106) 5 5 5 

Physics (Phys. 101-103). . . ^ 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 104-106) 2 - ^ 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 104-106) (M. & E.) 1^ 1 1 

Civil 1 

Military Science (R. O, T. C.) (M. I. 102) 2 2 2 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-103) (M. &E.)...' 1 2 

Civil 12 2 

Engineering Lectures 

*Alter natives 

135 



CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1922-1923 

♦Current History (His. 101-103) 

*Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107-109) 

♦Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) * " ' 

♦Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) . . . 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) ..........* 

*Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) .... ^ ... 

Design, Structures, Elements (C. E. 101-103) 

Materials of Engineering (C. E. 104) 

Masonry Construction (C. E. 105) ... * 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 104) 

Engineering Lectures .... 



/ 

1 
3 
1 
1 
3 

• • 

3 
3 
3 
3 



// 

1 
3 
1 
1 
3 

• • 

3 
3 
3 



/// 

1 
3 
1 



3 
3 
3 



Senior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) ^'™'' \ ^^ ^^^ 

♦Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103) . W \ \ ^ 

(Seminar Course, one afternoon a week) - ^ 

♦Public Utilities (Engr. 104-106) 

♦Engineering Chemistry (Chem. 109-111) \ I ^ 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) ^ 

Advanced Course (M. I. 104) '« 

Highways (C. E. 106-108) \ ^ ^ 

Design.— Masonry Structures (C. E. 109-111) o t ^ 

Design.— Steel Structures (C.E. 112-114) « t ^ 

Sanitation (C. E. 115-117) ^ ^ 

JRailroads (C. E. 118-120) . . * ^ ^ ^ 

tSanitary Science (Public HealthV (C." E.' 121-123) i \ I- 

+Drainage and Irrigation (C. E. 124-126) \ \ 

Engineering Lectures ■*■ ^ 



♦Required of all Engineering students. 
jAlternatives 

tOpen as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades of A ' 
or B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 



136 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924 

Term: I II III 

*Current History (His. 101-103) 1 1 1 

*Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) 3 3 3 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107-109) 1 1 1 

*Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) 1 1 1 

'"Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) 3 3 3 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) 

Design. — Machine, Elements (M. E. 101) 4 

Direct Currents (E. E. 101-103) 2 6 6 

*Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) 3 3 3 

Engineering Lectures 

♦Required of all Engineering students. 

tOpen as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades of A 
or B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 

Senior Year 



Beginning 1923-1924 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) 

*Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103) 



Term . 



(Seminar Course, one afternoon a week) 

*Public Utilities (Engr. 104-106) 

*Engineering Chemistry (Chem. 109-111) 

tMilitary Science (R. 0. T. C.) 

Advanced Course (M. I. 104) 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 104-106) 

Design.— Electric Machine (E. E. 107-109) 

Telephones, Telegraphs, Electric Railways (E. E. 110-112) 

Illumination, Electric Power Transmission, Radio Tele- 
graphy and Telephony (E. E. 113-115) 

Engineering Lectures 



1 

1 

1 
1 
3 

> • 

5 

2 
3 



// 

1 
1 

1 

1 
3 

• • 

o 
2 
3 



// 



5 
2 
3 



*Required of all Engineering students. 

tOpen as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades of A or 
B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 



137 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1922-1923 

•Current History (His. 101-103) ''''""■" ^ " ^^^ 

•Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) ^ 1 1 

Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107-109) ^ 3 S 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) ^ 1 1 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) l ^ I 

foundry Practice (Shop 107). 3 3 8 

fMihtary Science (R. O. T. C) • • 2 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) 3 3 3 

Design.-Machine, Elements (M.E.loiilOS) '; 

•Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) ' * * 4 

Kinematics (Mech. 104-106) ' 3 3 

Engineering Lectures 2 2 

* * • • 

♦Required of all Engineering students 



Senior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924 

'Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) ^"'"''' ^ ^' ''^ 

♦Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 1 01-103) \ ^ 1 

.P KT'rf *^°"'^^' °"^ afternoon a week) ^ ^ 1 

•Public Utilities (Engr. 104-106) 

♦Engineering Chemistry (Chem. 109-111) ^ ^ 1 

tMihtary Science (R. 0. T. C ) ^ 1 1 

Advanced Course (M. I. lU) ^ 3 S 

Design.— Prime Movers (M. £.104-106) 

Des.gn.--Power Plants (M.E. 107-109, l ^ .3 

Design.-Pumping Machinery (M. E. 113V ^ ^ 2 

1 hermodynamics (Mech. 107-109) • • ^ 

Sanitation (C. E. 115-117) 3 3 3 

Factory Organization (M. E. 110) 3 3 a 

Mechanical Laboratory (M.E.lllliiz) ^ .. .; 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E 114) ^ 1 

Engineering Lectures • ■ - . 3 

•Required of all Engineering students 

«. B^i::rrjrs::!:Lrr^ --^^ -^ - -ve _ge gr.^ .^ . 

138 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

C. E. 101-103. Elements of Design of Structures — Steel Structures — Three 
credit hours. First and second terms. Lectures and laboratory. Required of 
juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Design of steel beams and columns. Analysis of stresses in roof trusses, 
plate girders, bridge trusses and steel buildings. The preliminary steps towards 
complete design of these structures. 

Reinforced Concrete — Three credit hours. Third term. Lectures and labora- 
tory. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

The fundamental principles of the theory and practice of reinforced concrete 
construction, with applications to the design of beams, slabs and columns. 

C. E. 104. Materials of Engineering — Three credit hours. First term. 
Lectures and laboratory. Required of all juniors in Engineering. 

The composition, manufacture and properties of the principal materials used 
in engineering and of the conditions that influence their physical characteristics. 
The interpretation of specifications and of standard tests. Laboratory work 
in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, brick, cement and concrete. 

C. E. 105. Masonry Construction — Three credit hours. Second term. 
Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

The methods employed in the construction of masonry structures; including 
foundations, dams, retaining walls, piers, abutments, culverts, and arches. 
Preliminary steps towards complete design of these structures. 

C. E. 106-108. Highways — Four credits hours each term. Lectures and 
field work. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. Open only to Engineer- 
ing students of senior standing. 

First term: The principles of location, construction and maintenance of 
roads and pavements. 

Second term: Highway contracts and specifications, covering the proposal, 
bidding and letting of contracts, and a complete analysis of the items that 
comprise the specifications. A discussion of the cost of highways both to the 
public and to the contractor and an analysis of the items that influence costs. 

Third term: The road laws of the various states. Highway Department 
organizations.'^ Highway transportation and its interrelationship to other 
methods of transportation, highway traffic, highway economics and highway 
financing. 

Field and drafting room work consists of the necessary surveys, plans and 
estimates of cost for the construction of a section of improved road. 

C. E. 109-111. Design of Masonry Structures — Three credit hours each 
term. Lectures and laboratory. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering, 
Prerequisite C. E. 105, Mech. 101-103. 

The complete design and detailing of structures of concrete and of stone; 
including retaining walls, dams, arches, and bridges, and the preparation of 
plans and bills of materials. 

• 139 



uisite C. E. 101 103 Eh-mios ''"'"'' '" "^''^ Engineering. Prereq- 
^^The complete design and detailing of steel structures, a continuation of C. E. 

C. E. 115-117. SamtoMon— Three credit i^n,,,., o„„u 4. 
laboratory. Required of senior, ;^ r , I t^*"^ *^™- Lectures and 

101-103. "''" '" ^''''' Engineering. Prerequisite, Mech. 

desin of rteLi'lSmtr"'- "'•^'''"'^^ '' ^"'"^^''^ consumption- 
systems. CoS designs arrnen.''"Hf'*'' °' '"^"^^ ""** '^^'S" °^ ««wage 
for a given community "^ "^ '** ^"^ ^"*''" ""^P'^ ^"^ '^^^^^ d^^Posal 

we^k.''•S;Site''Iu;v'toT''^^^''V'°^^^ ^^'^'^ *^™- »«« afternoon per 

The theoTand praclice oi r^lroT7''°' """" '" ^'^^ Engineering. 

maintenance.' I^eld'a^d^f L^ ^ wS^^^^^^^ "^-^^ -'^ 

;rLiVvtr "'^^^ ^" ---«- - rrp:VrofiraT;tLTet 

terS. 'seS^ouSte^a^trt'tri^^^^^^^^^ '^^'^.-'^ 

seniors in Civil Engineering Alternative, open only to 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



E. E. 101-103. Direct Currents—Two credit hoiir<5 fircf f^' 
hours (two laboratory oPrinH*. «n^ ^^" creait nours first term, six credit 

p.^«« P..S. r,?; cr>.nr/.Jrr„nr„r "'" '"™- 

E E 104-106. Alternating Currents—Five credit hour^- fhr.. i. f 
two laboratory oeriods Pa.oh t^r-r^ j> '^.^^^^i^ nours. three lectures and 
A 1 -L- 1 *^^""^^ ^^cn term. Prerequisite E. E 101-10^ 
Analytical and graphical problems on series and parallel alter;»f 
circuits, construction and nra^t.Voi „ ,• l- 7 Parallel alternating current 

140 



voltage phase relations in series and parallel alternating current circuits, alter- 
nating current power measurement, characteristics of synchronous and induc- 
tion generators and motors, single phase transformers and synchronous con- 
verters. 

E. E. 107-109. Electric Machine Design — Two credit hours each term. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 101-103 and M. E. 101. 

Materials of construction and design of the electric and magnetic circuits 
of a direct current motor or generator, principles of design of the electric and 
magnetic circuits of alternating current generators, motors and transformers 
and a complete design either of an alternating current generator, motor or 
transformer. 

E. E. 110-112. Telephones, Telegraphs and Electric Railways — Three credit 
hours each term. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 

History and principles of magneto telephone and variable resistance trans- 
mitter, carbon transmitter, telephone receiver, induction coils, and calling 
equipment. These various components of the" telephone then are studied as 
a complete unit in the local battery and common battery telephones. Magneto 
and common battery switches used in telephone exchanges, automatic tele- 
phone and the operation of simple, duplex and quadruplex telegraphy. 

In the laboratory the units are assembled and operated. 

Traffic studies, train schedules, motor characteristics and the development 
of speed — distance and power — time curves, systems of control, motors and 
other railway equipment, electrification system for electric railways, including 
generating apparatus, transmission lines, substations and distribution and utili- 
zation of electrical energy for car operation; electrification of steam roads 
and application of signal systems, problems in electric railway operation, 
beginning with the selection of proper car equipment and ending at the sub- 
station, 

E. E. 113-115. Illumination — Four credit hours. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. 

Electric Power Transmission — Four credit hours. Four lectures. Second 
term. 

Radio Telephones and Telegraphs — Four credit hours. Three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, E. E. 110-112. 

Series systems of distribution, methods of street lighting, calculation of 
voltage drop, regulation, weights of wire and the methods of feeding parallel 
systems, principles and units used in illumination work, lamps and reflectors, 
candle power measurements of lamps, measurement of illumination intensities, 
and calculations for the illumination of laboratories and class rooms; survey 
of the electrical equipment required in central stations and substations, trans- 
mission of electrical power, including poles, towers, lines, etc.; practical prob- 
lems to illustrate the principles of installation and operation of power machinery , 

Principles of radio telegraphy and telephony, construction and operation of 
modern transmitters, antennae and receiving circuits, with special emphasis 
on the use of the vacuum tube both for transmitting and receiving wireless 
signals, experiments with various types of receiving apparatus. 

141 



DRAFTING 

Dr. 101-103. Engineering Drafting — One credit hour each term. One 
laboratory period. Required of all freshmen in Engineering. 

Freehand Drawing — Lettering, exercises in sketching of technical illustrations 
and objects, proportion and comparative measurements. 

Mechanical Drawing — Use of instruments, projections and working drawings, 
drawing to scale in pencil and in ink, topographic drawing, tracing and blue 
printing. 

Dr. 104-106. Descriptive Geometry — Two credit hours each term. Two 
laboratory periods. Required of all sophomores in Engineering. 

First Term — Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of problems 
relating to the point, line and plane, intersection of planes with solids and 
development. 

Second Term — Generation of surfaces; planes, tangent and normal to sur- 
faces; intersection and development of curved surfaces. 

Third term — Shades and shadows, perspective, map projection. 

GENERAL ENGIN*:ERING 

Engr. 101-103. Engineering Jurisprudence — One credit hour each term. 
Seminar course of one afternoon per week. Required of all Engineer students 
of senior standing. 

A study of the fundamental principles of law relating to business and to 
engineering; including contracts, agency, sales, negotiable instruments, cor- 
porations and common carriers. These principles are then applied to the 
analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and specifica- 
tions. 

Engr. 104-106. Public Utilities — One credit hour each term. Open only 
to students of senior standing. Prerequisite Econ. 101-103. 

The development of public utilities, franchises, functions, methods of financ- 
ing and control of public utilities. Service standards and their attainment 
in electric, gas, water, railway and other utilities. The principles that have 
been adopted by the courts and public service commissions for the evaluation of 
public utilities for rate making and other purposes. 

Engr. 107-109. Prime Movers — Three credit hours each term. Lectures 
and laboratory. Required of all juniors in Engineering. Prerequisite Math. 
104-106. 

Salient features of the operation of steam, gas, hydraulic and electric prime 
movers and pumps. Comparison of types of each, methods of assembling or 
setting up in place for operation. Service tests. 

MECHANICS 

Mech. 101-103. Engineering Mechanics — Three credit hours each term. 
Required of all juniors in Engineering. Prerequisite Math. 104-106. 

Applied Mechanics — The analytical study of statics dealing with the com- 
position and resolution of forces, moments and couples, machines and the laws 
of friction, dynamics, work, energy and the strength of materials. 

142 



^^^™^* ^ • TV.rPP rredit hours each term. Lectures 

and laboratory. Required of seniors 

diagrams. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 10.103. E.^«. 0/ M^^^T^^:r::X^ 

Lecture and l^^^i^^^aXnior Mechanical engineers, 
junior engineer, ^^ f :,f JJ^I^^nvolved in determining the proportions 
The application of the Pnncip^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^.^^^ gears 

and form of machine parts. Ihe aesign 

onrinirs crabs and winches. 

springs, crao:, a - , „ . ,^„„,„ Three credit hours each term. 

Darts and estimatmg the cost 01 eacn. 

*^ <. ^ D7^*.*c. Two credit hours each term. 

J!.i Z'ZJZ" ^= .-- "» "— -^"-^- 

'■'SiSnVa SS p..« Pl.n., IncMing .ped»...»n.. th. b«ildi». 

and Ihe lay out of the equipmnt. Rs„„fred 

M E no. frt.,Or^.Wi<>»-T.o crft hou„ «»t term. Re,u,«d 

=:;ur„TL=eSi .r the .„».. e,».l^^^^^ 

101-103. ,. ,. 4.^^ o^-;n<y<i Indicated and brake horse- 

Calibration of steam gauges and mdicatorsprin^s^^^^^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

power of steam '^^^^^J^Z^To^rltZn of ste'am and gas engines. 
Corliss steam engines and gas engineb. w^^ 

143 



M. E. 113. Design of Pumping Machinery — Two credit hours. Second 
term. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite M. E. 
101-103, Mech. 101-103. 

Elementary design of double acting steam pumps and centrifugal pumps. 
The air lift and the hydraulic ram. Distributing system of water supply in a 
manufacturing establishment. 

M. E. 114. Heating and Ventilation — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite Mech. 101-103, 
Mech. 107-108. 

The principles of heating and ventilation. Radiating surfaces. Steam, hot 
water and hot air systems. Vacuum and vapor systems. 

SHOP ' 

Shop 101-103. Shop and Forge Practice — One credit hour each term. Re- 
quired of all freshmen in Engineering. 

The use and care of wood working tools, exercise in sawing, planing, mortising, 
tenoning and laying out work from blue prints. Principles of pattern making 
with sufficient foundry practice to demonstrate the uses of pattern making. 
Forging of iron and steel, welding and making of steel tools. 

Shop 104-106. Machine Shop Practice — One credit hour each term. Re- 
quired of all sophomores first term, required of sophomores in Mechanical and 
Electrical Engineering second and third terms. Prerequisite Shop 101-103. 

Shop 107. Foundry Practice — Two credit hours. Third term. Required 
of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite, Shop 104-106. 

Molding in brass and iron. Cor« making. The cupola and its management. 
Lectures on selection of iron by fracture, fuels and the mixing and melting of 
metals. 

SURVEYING 

SURV. 101-103. Plane Surveying — One credit hour. First term. Two 
credit hours. Second and third terms. Lectures and field work. Required 
of sophomores in Civil Engineering, first, second and third terms, and of 
sophomores in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering first and second terms. 
Prerequisite Math. 101. 

The theory and practice of plane surveying; including the use and adjustment 
of the transit, level, plane table and minor surveying instruments. Solution 
of practical problems in giving lines and grades for buildings, shafting and 
foundation, and in laying out curves. The computation of area and of earth 
work, and the principles of plan and map making and map reading. 

SURV. 104. Advanced Surveying — Three credit hours. Third term. Lec- 
tures and field work. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite, 
Surv. 101-103. ^ - 

Practical astronomy and geodetic surveying. ' The determination of latitude, 
longitude and azimuth by gtellar and by solar observations. Base line measure- 
ment and precise triangulation. City surveying. Hydrographic surveying. 



The Graduate School 



^ • nff.rPd und^e supervision of the Dean of the Graduate 
Graduate work is offered, '^"''*'^;f '/^..^g faculties of instruction and 

school, by '^<>r-^''-\.:^:''^XUtyTZMn.teScy.ooL 
research. These constitute the faculty of ^^^/^ delegated to the Dean 

The general administrative functions ''[^^^^'oS^.Zl^stiJot nine members, 
and Secretary of the School and a G-^^te Counc.i consistmg o ^^ 

Work in accredited research laboratories "^J^. U-^^^^tr ,omp4tent super- 
culture and other local ^^''°''-\:'^ZLlTZ^t residence for part of 

7aStompTrd. art^lterStr '^iU IL be accepted for part 
of the residence requirement for higher degrees. . 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 



144 



Aami^ion to the Graduate School is op«i ^^^^^^r:^^ 
standard colleges and universities. Before enter g P ^^^.^ ^^^^.^^^ 

^''trir trrol^dtl^:^^^^^^^^ -the Graduate School does 

lotne^raS imply admission - eandida-^-/--- ^,,,,,,, ^^^^^^ ^, 

Every student is required X:^^lnlt fZ^l^^^oin, graduate work 
the beginning of each term ^his ^les t ^^^ ^^^^^_ xhe 

registration can be completed. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

ophy in Liberal Arts. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR A DEGREE 

The applications for ^^^:^^^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ t 

SrJf t^ Saduarilol ""^^^^^^ 

LtaT/e S r^slir rd\S;1sXrby the Graduate Council. 

145 



Each candidate for the Master's degree is required to make application for 
admission to candidacy at the completion of one third of the residence require- 
ment. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be admitted to candidacy at 
a date not later than the beginning of the academic year in which the degree 
is sought. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ARTS 

The degree of Master of Science, or Master of Arts, will be conferred upon 
resident graduates who meet the following requirements: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of a qualified institution and must have 
the necessary prerequisites for the field of advanced work chosen. 

2. He must complete a course of approved graduate study with one major and 
one or two closely related minor subjects, working on a full-time basis of one 
year of advanced work. The work may, when approved, be extended on a 
part-time basis over a longer period. 

3. The candidate must complete at least 45 term credit hours including a 
thesis approved by a committee of the Graduate Faculty. 

4. The candidate must pass a satisfactory examination. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. As prerequisites for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree the 
candidate must be a graduate of a standard college, must have a reading knowl- 
edge of French and German, and the necessary basic training in the chosen 
field for advanced work. 

2. Three years of graduate study will usually be required. The first two 
of these years may be spent in other institutions offering standard graduate 
work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. 
The degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and work, but is 
granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in scholarship and 
ability to carry on independent research in the special field in which the major 
work is done. 

3. The candidate must select a major and one or two closely related minor 
subjects, constituting a single field of research. 

4. The candidate must present a dissertation within the field of research 
selected. This must be in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate School in 
printed or typewritten form at least two weeks before the time at which degrees 
are granted. 

6. The candidate must pass a final oral examination in the major and minor 
subjects. The examination will be given by a committee appointed by the 
Dean. 



ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical Engineer 
will be granted only to graduates of the University who have obtained a 

146 



b.ctalo,'. d,^ m .„gi.«ri„g. Tto .ppli«.t ™.t satUty the lollo^^ 
'°f H°°Ll h.v. 1«» »g.g«i successful!, m accpt.bk »gin«rin, work 

r He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4 He r^ust be considered eligible by a committee eomposej ^J^f e- o 
thtcolire of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of CvU, Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineering. 



147 



The College of Home Economics 



Research into the sciences and the development of industries, art, and pro- 
fessions has so changed the philosophy of our educational system that it is 
now recognized that any educational system must include training of a technical 
nature. It must encourage the student's natural desire for work of a productive 
nature with a vital connection between theory and practice. These views 
have now been generally accepted and the result is noted in the combination 
of vocational, technical, and scientific work with the general studies to form a 
new course of study for young men and women. 

The subjects taught in home economics are designed to fit young women 
to be capable workers and home makers in whatever sphere of life they may 
enter. The knowledge they gain from these subjects should give them con- 
tentment, industry, order, and a womanly feeling of independence and responsi- 
bility. 

The courses of instruction given are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: (1) those students who desire a knowledge of the general 
facts and principles of home economics; (2) those students who wish to make 
a specialty of home economics for the purpose of teaching the subject in second- 
ary schools and colleges; (3) those who are interested in certain phases of home 
economics which deal with the work of the dietitian or of institutional manager* 

DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory completion 
of four years of prescribed courses, or 204 trimester hours. 

DEPARTMENTS 

For administrative purposes and for ease of instruction the College of Home 
Economics is organized into the departments of: Foods and Cookery, Textiles^ 
and Clothing, Hygiene and Health, and of Institutional and Home Manage- 
ment. 

EQUIPMENT 

Besides the usual equipment of class rooms and laboratories, a practice 
house is maintained where the students will keep house for a period of six weeks 
during their senior year. 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS 

All students registered in the College of Home Economics are required ta 
take the same work during the first two years. At the beginning of the third 
they may elect to continue with General Home Economics, in which case the 

148 



following outline of courses has been planned, or they may elect to specialize 
*\Vetit'onhrfaru!-departments together with the students wishing to 
specialize, will outline such courses. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Term- I ^^ ^^ 

FRESHMAN YEAR ^'"^- ^ ^ ^ 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

Inorgan. Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 101-lO.J) •••• 3 3 'S 

Mathematics (106-108) 3 3 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102)^ . ••••.••■•: ; '. . . . . 3 

Garment Construction (Cloth. lUi; ^ ^ 3 

Language ',\VVno\ Ill 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) . . . . -^ . . . • •• • • 

Hygiene (One hour each week. 2 terms) (No credit) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR ^^'^' ^ ^ 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-103) ^ ^ '^ 

Physics (Phys. 104-106) 3 

Art (Art 101) . . . . 8 

Textiles (Tex. 101) ^ 2 

Millinery (Cloth. 103-104)^. •••-•.• ' '-,, \^^. . . 6 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) ^ ^ 

Foods (Foods 101-102) • " " 3 3 3 

Electives 

JUNIOR \EAR • 33. 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) . ... • • • • • • ^ 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) ^ ^ 

Nutrition (Foods 103-104) 3 

Costume and Design (Art 102) 3 3 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 105-106) • •• - • • 3 3 

Social Psychology (Soc. Psy. 104-105) . . . . • • -^ • --^■- 3 

Home Architecture and Interior Decoration (Art 104) ... • ^ ^ ^ 

Electives • 

SENIOR YEAR ^''''''' ^ 
Preservation arid Demonstration (Foods 105) - * 

Experimental Cookery (Fo^^^l^JJ^ ' • ' ' :•;;;;: 3 3 . . 

Household Management (H. M. 101-102) ^ ^ ^ 

Practice House (H. M. 103)^ . ..••• g 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 104) • 3 

Child Care and Welfare " ^^ ^q S 

Electives 

♦Mathematics or Botany may be elected. 

149 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Quantitative Analysis 

Bacteriology (Bact. 103) 

Public Speaking 

Public Speaking 

Language (French, Spanish, German) 

Mathematics (Solid Geometry or Plane Analytics) 

Political Science 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

General and Applied Psychology 

Educational Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Educational Guidance 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101). 

Institutional Management (H. M. 105-106) 

Home Nursing and First Aid (H. M. 107) ..... 

Art and Handicraft. (Art 103) 

Music (Chorus) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Advanced Composition . 

Short Story '/ * ' 

Nineteenth Century Poetry 

The Drama 

The Novel 

History of the Family 

Education of Women 

Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Landscape Gardening 

Poultry 



Term, 



1 
2 
3 

2 
3 



1 
2 
3 



// /// 



1 
2 
3 

• • 

2 
3 
2 



3 
3 



3 

1 

2 

3 

3 

2 

3 

2 

3 
1 



2 

4 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Foods 101. Elementary Foods-Five credit hours. Two lectures and three 
laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite, Chem. 101-103 

Prmciples and Processes of Cookery. Production and composition of foods. 

Foods 102. Advanced Foods— Four credit hours. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Foods 101 

Fancy cookery and meal service. 

Foods 103-104. Nutrilion-Fiye credit hours. Two lectures and three 

pe^ rr :;t :;1 tS^-JS^- - -- - - a^nor.. 

150 



Foods 105. Preservation and Demonstration — Two credit hours. Two 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Foods 101-102. 

Canning and preserving; practice in giving public food demonstrations. 

* 

Foods 106. Experimental Cookery — Four credit hours. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Foods 101-102. 
Experimental work in foods and cookery. 

Textiles 101. Textiles — Three credit hours. One lecture and two labora- 
tory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, lectures in Cloth. 102. 

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of fibers and materials; renovation of 
materials; dyeing and laundering. 

Cloth. 101. Garment Construction — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. Third term. 

Fundamental stitches; darning and patching; practice in hand and machine 
sewing including practical use of machine attachments. 

Cloth 102. Drafting and Elementary Dress Design, Five credit hours. 
Two lectures and three laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, 
Cloth. 101. 

Use of commercial pattern; drafting, cutting, fitting, and designing of pat- 
terns. Construction of cotton dress. 

Cloth. 103-104. Millinery — Tw^o credit hours. Two laboratory periods. 
Second and third terms. 

Millinery stitches and simple trimmings; drafting of patterns for hats; 
making and covering of buckram frames; making hats in velvet, silk, straw, 
and transparent materials; renovation of materials. 

Cloth. 105-106. Dressmaking — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Cloth. 102. 

Application of design and principles of sewing to the construction of silk 
and wool, dresses, made over garment and dinner or evening dress. 

Art. 101. Composition and Design — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. First term. 

Space division and space relation; color schemes and exercises; original 
designs in which lines, values, and colors are put together to produce fine 
harmony; perspective principles. 

Art. 102. Costume Design — Three credit hours. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite Art. 101. 

Appropriate dress; application of color; harmony and proportion of parts to 
costumes designed in ink and water color; history of costume. 

Art. 103. Art and Handicraft — Two credit hours. Two laboratory periods. 
Third term. 
Applied design in embroidery, lace and stencils. 

Art. 104. Home Architecture and Decoration — Three credit hours. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite Art. 101. 

Styles of architecture; construction and plans of houses; application of color in 
home decoration; furnishings from a sanitary, economical, and artistic point of 

view. 

151 



I 



FiS a^d ZZerZ'''tZt:r'^^^^^^ -'^'t '^ours each ter. 

Tht t^™'"t„STeaf "''''^^'"^"'-^^^^'=«- «--)• Six credit hours 

First tl.'1enir;t2"' ""' ^«.^-«.-Two credit hours. Two lectures. 
Selection and purchasing of foods keenino- «f ■ 
H. MlOSlOf? rr,\- , ''^'"^ "^ '"^^"t^"^^ and accounts. 

iaundrS ^ '^^"'""^"^^ ^^^^"-^^- -^^"^-^ dinin. .oo.s, dorn^itoHes, and 
^^ H. M. 107. Home Nursin, an, First Ai,^T,ree credit hours. Second 
inlT::^:^'^^^^^ in thesi.pIeprocedures 



The School of La>v 



FACULTY 



152 



HENRY D. HARLAN, A. M.; LL. B., Dean 

HEN&Y STOCKBRIDGE, A. M.; LL. B. 

JOHN C. ROSE, LL. D. 

ALFRED S. NILES, A. M.; LL. B. 

RANDOLPH BARTON, Jr., A. B.; LL. B. 

EDWIN T. DICKERSON, A. M.; LL. B., Secretary 

The calendar for the opening school and for holidays is the same as for the 
School of Medicine. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study addressed to Students 
and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review pronounced 
to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law which has ever 
been offered to the public," and which recommended a course of study so com- 
prehensive as to require for its completion six or seven years, no regular school 
of instruction in law was opened until 1823. This was suspended in 1836 for 
lack of proper pecuniary support. In 1869 the Law School was organized, and 
in 1870 regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the 
course has been made more comprehensive and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than two thousand, and included 
among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench and Bar of the 
State and many who have attained prominence in the profession elsewhere. 

The Law School building adjoins the Medical School and part of its equip- 
ment is a large library, maintained for the use of the students, which contains 
carefully selected text-books on the various subjects embraced in the curriculum. 
No fee is charged for the use of the library. Other libraries also are available 
for students. 

Courses of Instruction 

The courses of instruction in the Law School extend through three scholastic 
years of thirty-two weeks each, with an average of at least ten hours of class- 
room work each week, and aim to present a general and complete view of the 
science of law, with reference not only to its growth by judicial exposition, but 
also to the principles which have been engrafted upon it by positive enactment. 
The course of study embraces both the theory and the practice of the law, 
and is designed thoroughly to equip the student for the practice of his profession, 
when he attains the Bar. 

153 



Scientific education is afforded in the principles of the Common Law, Equity, 
the Statutory Law of the State of Maryland and the Public Law of the United 
States. 

Instruction is given by discussion of assigned cases and by lectures. The 
system of instruction embraces the study of assigned cases and of approved 
text-books. It is believed that instruction given through the use of cases alone 
is unnecessarily laborious, not conducive to uniformity, and likely to produce 
confusion in the students' mind unless supplemented by the aid of proper text- 
books. Accordingly a system of instruction, involving the use of both cases 
and text-books, is followed. 

Students desiring to do so, may take elective or special courses. Such 
students are not candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, but will receive 
certificates of proficiency in the branches pursued. Courses of instruction will 
be arranged with special reference to those desiring to obtain a knowledge of 
certain branches of the law, as an aid in business, or in the management of 
estates. 

The Law School endeavors to uphold a high standard of legal education and 
it aims to give the student a comprehensive view of the whole field of the Law 
and particularly a knowledge of the fundamentals of American Law, in order 
to enable him to pass the examination for the Bar, if he has chosen the legal 
profession for his life work, or to fit him to care properly for his business interests 
if he desires legal education merely as the accomplishment of the well-equipped 
man of business or man of culture. 

The lectures are intended to present all the leading principles of the common 
law applicable to the subject, and the modification of the common law by 
statute, and to give illustrations of the application of the common and statute 
law. Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such; but the reasons 
for these statutory modifications and local peculiarities are explained so that 
the student may in a short time acquaint himself with the local peculiarities 
of the law in any State in which he may practice. 

Readings from text-books and adjudicated cases are assigned on the subjects 
treated of in the lectures. 

It will be seen that the full course of study extends over three years and as 
the Faculty is satisfied that students, who have not made considerable progress 
in the law before entering the Law School, would do themselves and the School 
an injury by attempting to graduate in a shorter period, no student will be 
permitted to receive the degree of LL. B. until after three full years of study at 
this school, unless admitted to advanced standing. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the Law School must be at least eighteen years 
of age, must present evidence of good moral character and if candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws, will be required to give to the study of the law 
three scholastic years of at least thirty-two weeks each, with an everage of at 
least ten hours' class-room work each week, and to have completed at the time 
of admission to the School a four years' high school curriculum or such a course 

154 



, • • v^ f .. thP Drincipal colleges and 
of preparation as would be required for ^^^^^^^^J^^ fj', ,„% .,th th^ 
unfveSities in Maryland; but P^^"^^^*';;;; i„ the study of law may be 
entrance requirements or to ^1-"^ tt>X£7„, the degree, and upon eom- 
'eceived as special students, no candidates certificates of pro- 

Dletine the whole or any part of ^he fourse. m y 

£ncy in the work completed. -«=<^°'- J"«,f jf ^tperiy qualified for entrance 
""Th^Faculty will consider that ^"^^^^^ZZZerecei.e^ a bachelor's 
as candidates for the degree of Bachelor o^ Laws ^^^^^^^^ ^^ g,adua U)n 

Itrree from any reputable college or ""'^f f^J' .^ „f Maryland, or other 
rom any of the Normal or high schools o^ Je State^J.^^^.i^ ,,o.,n, that 
reputable institution of a ^^^'^^' ^^'^^l^ I one of the principal colleges or 
they have passed the entrance exammat.ons^o ^ standard equal 

universities in Maryland or a college »^ ""^J^^^te. a candidate for the de- 
thereto. In the absence °^-* f ^^y J^^^ toe of matriculation a 
eree of LL. B. must file with the ^'^reta'-y' j Maryland, showmg that 

Sificate from the Clerk of the Court d APP a s o ^ J^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

Advanced Standing 

A' in the Senior or Inter- 

students may be admitted '^^^l^^^^l^Tt^, work of the preceding 

mediate classes upon ^^tisfymg the req^«t^ ^^^ , eertificate 

year or years. These requirements niay be y ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ 

from any law school of -credf d ^^^^^^^^ ^ school, covering as least as 

given for study pursued in a law office. 

Graduation 

The Law School confers the degr^ of^ Bachelor o^^^^^^^ 

have attended the course of \«<=t-f;^;; f^fcourt. and have submitted to the 
standard examinations and in the Practice ^ 
Faculty a satisfactory thesis. 

Fees and Expenses 

ui ;« cAvanee at the commencement of 

of fees. 

The charges for instruction are as follows: ^^ 

For term of four months loO 

to each graduate as a diploma fee. 

155 



I 



reS «ToS^^^^^ 'y -r- of the Ba. or others, not 

SchooT '"'^^ ^^^^^^" ^' ^^^^^"^^ - ^^^ -me as outlined for the Medical 

The President, Univer^&TC^^^^^^^^ ^^'^ - 



The School of Medicine 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M. D., Dean 

L. E. NEALE, M. D., LL. D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M. D., Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D. 

GORDON WILSON, M. D. 

GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A. B., M. D. 

WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M. D., Sc. D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A. B., M. D. 

ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON, M. D. 

GARY B. GAMBLE, Jr., A. M., M. D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M. D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M. D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A. M., M. D. 

HIRAM WOODS, A. M., M. D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A. M., M. D. 

FRANK MARTIN, M. D. 



r 

15? 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in America. 

There for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory part 
of the curriculum; there instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837), and 
there were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of diseases of 
women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate clinical 
instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this hospital 
intramural residency for senior students first was established. 

157 



Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest institution 
for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, and 
at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was reserved for eye cases . 
Additions were made to this building from time to time, but the demands on 
it became so great that a complete new building was erected. The hospital 
now is one of the finest owned and controlled by any medical school in the 
country. It is equipped with all modern conveniences and requirements for 
care of the sick and for clinical instruction of students of the University. 

Besides its own hospital, the Medical School has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year more than 
30,000 persons, the Maryland General Hospital, the Maternity Hospital of 
the University, the Maryland Lying-in Hospital, Maryland Lying-in Asylum, 
the West End Maternity. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door obstetrical clinic 
is conducted. During the past year 1,798 cases were treated in the Iv^ng-in 
hospitals connected with the University. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

Three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital, Mercy Hospital, 
and Maryland General Hospital are organized on a uniform plan in order that 
teaching may be the same in all. Each dispensary has departments of Medi- 
cine, Surgery, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro- 
Enterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Protology, Dermatology, Throat and 
Nose, and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work one day of 
each week in one of these dispensaries; all students in the senior year work one 
hour each day. About 46,000 cases treated last year give an idea of the value 
of these dispensaries for clinical teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes are 
the Anatomical, Chemical, Experimental Physiology, Physiological Chemistry, 
Histology and Embryology, Pathology and Bacteriology, Clinical Pathology. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation the Faculty of the 
School of Medicine offers a gold medal to the candidate who passes the best 
general examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates 
standing next highest. 

A prize of $50 is given each year by Mrs. Jose L. Hirsch as a memorial to 
the late Jose L. Hirsch, formerly Professor of Pathology in this School, to the 
student in the third year who has done the most satisfactory work in Pathology. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha 
Frank as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of the 
University, and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition 
fee for the year. It is awarded each year upon nomination of the Faculty 
"to a medical student who, in the judgment of the said Faculty, is of good 

158 



"Tr/SSph Wm.lo. SchoteWp. »t.bll.h.d by Prof. Randolph Winslo« 
M D LL t' »«!«. th. hold., .0 «.n.p«.n tron, Ih. p.,n,». ot th. 

'tT.'r.-.rfS'lnn'ually by the T,u..». of th. Endo.m.nt l^,nd of ,h. 
Z^:^ no.inaion of the F-'J^'l^r^S-^'rJ "«* Itll 
th. ..niop, junior or .ophomor. cte. of th. "«» "' ~"~'„ ,„ ^^, „„. „f 

f fVo tnitinn fee of the year and is awarded annually by the Faculty of Fhysic 

SSrzir.er.T^::x^"irrr:f'sr^ 

^"; entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition fee of that 

^'xhe Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship was established by bequest of the 
latl MSFrederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption fror^ 
late Mrs- ™ri scholarship is awarded to a second-year student 

7oT he nfoTthTyeaJ passes the best practical e-n.inaU-inAr.tomy 
Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology. Th.s examination 
is competitive. 



Requirements for Entrance 



on the basis of satisfactory credentials, or by examination and credentials, 
is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Certificate are. 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the equiva- 
lent, and in addition, . 

(b) Two years, sixty semester, or ninety trimester hours, of college credits, 
including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 

159 



Fees and Expenses 

Following are the fees for students in the Medical School: 
Matriculation fee (to be paid each year) , , 

Tuition fee (each year) * * 

Estimated living expenses for'students'in Baltimore: ^^^ 

Books... ^™**^ ^""^ -^"^'"^^ ^''X'ral 

College incidentais.' .' ^11 * f ^ * 75 

Board, eight months .' .' 300 Jo ^^ 

Room rent.. ^l^. ^^2 40O 

Clothing and laundry.. ll ^ 100 

All other expenses... °" !® 150 

_25 fio 75 

$386 $600 $820 

inJoVarfM^K^'r^ '^' ^'^''^ '^ ^^^^^^"^ ^^>^ be obtained by address 

Baltimore M^ of tJ^^^^^^ ^Ir^'"' ^' ^^^^^^^^ ^^^-^ of Me<^cin J 
aiumore, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, College Park, Md! 



The School of Pharmacy 



160 



FACULTY 

E. F. KELLY, Phar. D., Dean 

DAVID M. R. CULBRETH, A. M., Phar. G., M. D. 

CHARLES C, PLITT, Phar. G. 

LOUIS J. BURGER, Phar. D., LL. B. 

H. J. MALDEIS, M. D. 

J. CARLTON WOLF, Phar. D. 

ROBERT L. MITCHELL, Phar D., M. D. 

H. E. WICH, Phar. D. 

GEORGE A. STALL, Phar. D. 

The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, largely at the instance of 
members of the Faculty of Medicine, and, for a time, the lectures were delivered 
at the Medical School. Later it became separated and continued an independ- 
ent organization until, as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, it finally be- 
came an actual part of the University. With but one short intermission, 
previous to 1865, it has continuously exercised its functions as a teaching 
school of pharmacy. 

Reference to its records shows it to have been among the first, in every 
\ instance, to adopt advanced methods, and the standards it has always set and 
maintained have equalled the highest. It was the first school of pharmacy to 
employ separate professors for all branches taught; it is the pioneer in estab- 
lishing laboratories for practical teaching and exercise; it took the initiative in 
providing adequate buildings for advanced teaching; it was among those which 
early added plant histology, pharmacognosy, volumetric analysis and alkaloidal 
assay as distinct branches, and the first to add a separate chair of commercial 
pharmacy and dispensing, whereby students may be given better and larger 
experimental knowledge of the actual practice of pharmacy than can be ob- 
tained at the average drug store. 

Equipment and Degrees 

The School of Pharmacy has at its disposal for laboratory instruction and 
lectures several large and well-equipped halls in the University buildings in 
Baltimore. From the beginning the chief aim of the School has been to prepare 
its students for the intelligent practice of pharmacy in the modem drug store. 

In doing this, it takes into consideration that there exist three distinct 
divisions of the profession — preparation, collection and dispensing, which 

161 



e 



foundation for a pharmaceutLir^n! . r'""" ^ ^'^ ^'^^ ^ well-order:.! 
this twoyear curriculum the ,f^ 7 .'* ? ^^^ ^^^'^- ^Pon completion c 
in Pharmacy Ph G \^l"l^^T '' ^^^^^^^^^ with the degree of Gradua 

completion of^L basic twoSS'wkwm""^*^^^^^ ^*"''" '"' "^ ^^^ ^f" 
Chemist, Ph. C. ^ ''' """ '^'^'^^ t''^ d^S^ee of Pharmaceutical 

Phlrltu^tf F^cSran'dt^r^r "^'^ 1". ^'^^ ^'"^"^^'^ ^-^— of 
Education, and all otto state Tl'** • " *''" ^'^ ^"''^ Department of 
American Conference of ptfrl. "^TT '^^^'^^^^n bureaus. The 
Pharmaceutical eduation anTaUstr^^^ ru"" " °^^^"'^^^ *" P™-""" 

.uired to maintain ^^nJ^ ::^^.:f::t^::^i:^^:^^^ '' -' - 

Requirements for Admission 

compLtrrf"olr":ar trdlS^^^ TT^^ ^^^^ °'^ -^ --* '^-e 
The course, or "ts equivalent l.S'h ' ', ™"''^"'"'"' <»• its equivalent, 
yea. Of La'tin, how^: t"Lr?esS.V"'"'^' °"^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^«"- ^^^ 

RetSHf ti: un-;r;'"Thi"ce'rtrar- ' '^^^^"«^^^^ '--'^ "- *^^ 

tials, or by examinationToT botl " '""'^ "" '''' ""^'^ ">' ^^^^en- 

exatSoTi„tX;itltecLr T ^'^ T^^"^' ^^^ ^^-^^ - 

The fee for such ZZZ^tTalTr^r sTb ecV^ 2""^;."^ '''''''■ 
number of subjects. suDject, hve dollars for the entire 

sch?oif7pL™™hSL"rmrh"'j"*^ ""^^ *^ ^*"^-^ -™»« ^-- 

PharmaceutLl Faculties nrov^e^r'' '" *'' '""'"'="" Conference of 

satisfactory completion of s^h lursi'^^anTmlt 't^T "'*'''=^*^ "^ ^"^ 
of this School. ' '^ *"*** ^^^ entrance requirement. 

Requirements for Graduation 

yea;s^oS""'^'^^^ ""^ ^^"^^^ ^ '^'^ --^^ character, and must be twenty 

last .f J.:t:r a^ThifsTho:? '^CreT^^r^ ' ^-^'^^^ ^^ ^^— ^^^ 

inst'ruSon. """'' ''"' ^"^^' ^^ examination in all lec'ture and laboratory 

a lttter\:omtrof ^ "^^^ ^^^^^ *^^ ^-^-tion fee and 

or her age ' ^'''^'' "' '''^' ^^^^^^^^^^i P^^on certifying to his 

dreltg^^; "^ tl' ?;^-^ ^/ ^^--cy may be obtained by ad- 

Baltimo^e;Md.,^Th;S^^^^ ^\T^^"' '^'^^^ ^^ ^^-^^^y- 

, or ine l-resident, University of Maryland, College Park, Md 

162 



Department of Military Science 

and Tactics 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Special Regula- 
tions, No. 44, War Department, 19H9. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers*^Training 
Corps has been established at the University under the provisions of the Act 
of Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended by the acts of June 3, 1916, and 
September 8, 1916. 

Object 

The primary object of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps is to provide 
systematic military training at civil educational institutions for the purpose of 
qualifying selected students of such institutions as reserve officers in the 
military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain this object during 
the time that students are pursuing their general or professional studies with 
the least practical interference with their civil careers, by employing methods 
designed to fit men, physically, mentally and morally for pursuits of peace as 
well as pursuits of war. It is believed that such military training will aid 
greatly in the development of better citizens. 

Required to Take Instruction 

All male students, if citizens of the United States whose bodily condition 
indicates that they are physically fit to perform military duty or will be upon 
arrival at military age, whether pursuing a four-year or a two-year course of 
study, are required to take for a period of two years, as a prerequisite to gradua- 
tion, the military training required by the War Department. 

Credit Given 

Students who have completed satisfactorily the prescribed training with 
a unit of the S. A. T. C. may be credited with one year of the Basic Course 
prescribed for the R. 0. T. C, and those students who have received military 
training at any educational institution under the direction of an army officer 
detailed as professor of military science and tactics may receive credit for 
instruction equivalent to that given in the senior division R, O. T. C, if 
over fourteen years of age. 

163 



Time Allotted "^^ 

For first and second year, basic course, three periods a week of not less than 
one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour is utilized 
for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced courses, elective, five periods a week 
of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least 
three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part in military instruction, and it is 
the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the physical 
training given by civilian teachers, thus co-operating in an effort to promote a 
vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 

Uniforms 

Members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniforms at all military formations and at other specified times. 

Uniforms for the Reserve Officers' Training Corps will be furnished free 
by the Government. The uniforms are the regulation uniform of the United 
States Army, with certain distinguishing features. Such uniforms must be 
kept in good condition by the student. They are the property of the Govern- 
ment and though intended primarily for use in connection with military in- 
struction may be worn at any other time unless the regulations governing their 
use are violated. The uniform can not be worn in part. Uniforms will be 
returned to the Military Department at the end of the year, and before, if 
the student leaves the University. 

Commutation 

Those students who elect the advanced courses and who have signed the 
contract with the Government to continue in the Reserve Officers* Training 
Corps for the two remaining years of the advanced course are entitled to 
commutation of subsistence from and including the date of contract until they 
complete the course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country camps are held 
for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are members of the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These camps are under the strict supervision 
of army officers and are intended primarily to give a thorough and compre- 
hensive practical course of instruction in the different arms of the service. 

164 



who are taking the advanced course. 

Commissions 
(a) Each year upon completion of the Advanced Course students quaUfied 
for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the heads 
he institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(brite m!Xr to be selected from each institution and for each arm of the 
service will be determined by the War Department. 

Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university work 
an^ihe rTquTremLts of this department are proficiency the same as with other 

departments. 

Basic Course, M. I. 

First year (generally given to freshmen and the first-year students in the 
+wrwvpar pourse) Two credit hours per term. ^ , 4. • 

'SdyeaTienerally given to sophomores and the second-year students m 

the two-year course). Two credit hours per term. 

Advanced Course, M. I. (elective) 

Third year (generally given to juniors). Three '^'^^^.XZJZr'tZa 
Fourth year (generally given to seniors). Three credit hours per term. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



M. 1. 101. Basic R. O. T. C— Two credit hours each term. 
The following subjects will be covered: 



Freshman year. 



First Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical). 
School of Squad and Platoon. 
Military Courtesy and Customs of the Service. 

Second Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical). 
School of Squad, Platoon and Company. ... 

SmallArms Firing (Practical and Theoretical), to include 

Practice. 

165 



Gallery 



Lectures, Personal Hygiene. 

Interior Guard Duty (Practical and Theoretical). 

Infantry Weapons and Equipment (Practical and Theoretical), to include 
the Infantry Pack, Rifle and Bayonet. 

Third Term 

Physical Training, Manual of Physical Training (Practical). 

Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical), to include School 

of Company and Ceremonies. 
Small Problems in Minor Tactics (Practical). 
M. I. 102. Basic R. O. T. C, — ^Two credit hours each term. Sophomore 
year. 

The following subjects will be taught; 

First Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 

Athletics. 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical), School of Squad 

and Platoon. 
Minor Tactics (Practical and Theoretical). 
Military Map Reading and Surveying (Practical and Theoretical). 

Second Term 

Physical Training (practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 

Athletics. 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical), School of Squad, 

Platoon and Company. 
Military Map Reading and Topography (Practical and Theoretical). 
Infantry Weapons (Practical and Theoretical). To include the Rifle, 

Automatic Rifle and Machine Gun. 

Third Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games and 

College Athletics. 
Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical and Theoretical), to include School 

of Squad, Platoon, Company and Battalion, and the Ceremonies. 
Minor Tactics (Practical and Theoretical). 
M. I. 103. Advanced R. O. T. C. 
Three credit hours each term. Junior year. 
The following subjects will be covered: 

First Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 
Athletics. 

166 



Infantry Drill Regulations (Practical), all Juniors act as Lieutenants in 

iSructing Sophomores and Freshmen in School ^^ Squa^^^^^^^^ 
Field Engineering (Practical and Theoretical), construction and use o! 
Field Intrenchments. 

Second Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 

Infantry'DriU Regulations (Practical), all Juniors act as Lieutenants in 
instructing Sophomores and Freshmen in School of Squad. Platoon and 

FidrEnrineering fPractical and Theoretical;, organizations of Working 
Parti^and Tasks; selection of location for trenches; concealment of 

InfarrWeapons (Practical and Theoretical), the Pistol, Hand and Rifle 
Grenades, Trench Mortars and One (1) Pounder Gun. 

Third Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises. Mass Games, College 

Infantry'DriU Regulations (Practical), all Juniors act as Lieutenants in 
Instructing sophomores and Freshmen in School of Battahon and 

Ceremonies. 
Minor Tactics (Theoretical and Practical). 
M. I. 104. Advanced R. 0. T. C. Three credit hours each term. 

SENIORS 

The following subjects will be covered: 

First Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 

Infantlf Drill Regulations (Practical), as Captains instructing under- 
classmen in School of Squad and Platoon. 
Minor Tactics (Practical and Theoretical). 
Musketry (Practical and Theoretical). 

Second Term 

Physical Training (Practical), Setting-up Exercises, Mass Games, College 

InfantS' Drill Regulations (Practical), as Captains instructing Under- 
rlassmen in School of Platoon and Company. 

Mm™istory and Policy of the United States (Practical and Theoreti- 
cal). 

167 



^t^cSrw:;.;^^^*"'-" '^^ ^™^ ^^^^ ^^•-'^. -^th Prob,e.s for 
Military Law (Practical and Theoretical) 
Minor Tactics (Practical and Theoretical). 

Third Term 

"■ aSI:'^'"' '■'■""■"">■ «'"^-''P ^»«»«. M- G,„„, Con,„ 

Minor Tactics (Practical and Theoretical). 



Department of Physical Education and 

Recreation 



The Department of Physical Education and Recreation has been organized 
to control all physical training, recreation, intramural, and intercollegiate 
athletics. All work is closely co-ordinated and the ideal is to see that every 
man in the institution gets opportunities to take part in competitive sports. 
The plan under which the department is to operate may be summed up as 
follows: 

1. A series of exercises arranged for every student in the institution and 
compulsory for all, the exercises to be based on mass exercises common in 
Germany and the Scandinavian countries. Neither the German nor Scandina- 
vian system is to be used in its entirety, but a combination of the heavy gym- 
nastic drills of the former with the lighter squad drills of the latter. All students 
will be given physical examination and placed in various classes according to 
their individual physical needs. Students will receive different kinds of work 
and be encouraged to take part in those games which provide the exercise of 
which they are most in need. 

• 2. A general system of intramural athletics is carried out under a regular 
schedule with teams representing different units of the University. All students 
take part in one or more of these branches of sport and the University encour- 
ages enough sports to give each an opportunity. It is the aim of each class to 
have its own wrestling team, basket-ball team, baseball team, volley-ball team, 
track team, and so on for just as many teams as there are students to fill the 
positions. The games between these teams are carried out with regularity of 
schedule and supervision. Besides these, there are general competitions such 
as cross-country runs and interclass track meets in which representatives of 
all classes may compete at the same time. A regular playground is in process 
of construction on which will be available tennis courts, volley-ball courts, 
tether ball poles, stakes for pitching quoits, etc. 

3. All physical training of the students, including mass exercises, intramural 
sports, intercollegiate competitions, and military training, are a part of the 
general educational system of the University. 

For the present practically all general training, such as comes under the head 
of gymnastics and squad exercises, is conducted under direction of the Military 
Department. 




168 



169 



Degrees and Honors 

Degrees Conferred June 16, 1920 
Honorary 

AsBURY Francis Lever, Doctor of Laws 

Edwin Thomas Meredith. Doctor of Agriculture 

Curtis Criss McDonnell, Doctor of Science 

In Course 
Bachelor of Science 




Edward Buckley Ady 
RiDGELY Wilson Axt 
James Hall Barton 
Theodore Lemuel Bissell 
Bradford Lewin Burnside 
Hentiy Morrison Carroll 
Peter Wood Chichester 
George Watson Clendaniel 
John Conyngton 
Bausson Davison 
Edward Elliott Dawson 
Franklin Dronenburg Day 
Thomas Victor Downin 
John Ralph Drawbaugh 
Geary Eppley 

RTHUR DORION EtiENNE 

Walter Ezekiel 
Joseph Alexander Gray, Jr 
Hosmer Pearson Hartshorn 
William Paul Hicks 

^G^RGE BORYER HOCKMAN 

Elizabeth Gambrill Hook 

Allen Stanley Jones 

^HN Earl Keefauver 

^JoHN Stewart Knode 
-Robert Troxell Knode 
--James Hobart Langrall 

Harry Mislon McDonald 
-Edward Brigham McKinley^JU 

Hanson Travers Perkins I 

— -Algeo Newell Pratt 

Ernest Charles E. Ruppert 
— Maurice Talbott Riggs 



170 



Sharon, Maryland 
Catonsville, Maryland 
Centreville, Maryland 
Westover, Maryland 
Hyattsville, Maryland 
Ashland, Maryland 
Aquasco, Maryland 
Kennedyville, Maryland 
Berwyn, Maryland 
Riverdale, Maryland 
Trappe, Maryland 
Burdette, Maryland 
Williamsport, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Berwyn, Maryland 
Landover, Maryland 
Brownsville, Maryland 
Kensington, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Berwyn, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Barton, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Spnngfield, Maryland 
Newark, New Jersey 
Chevy Chase, District of Columbia 
Rockville, Maryland 



William Joseph Sando 

tLTON DuLANY SEWELL 

'^ardney Courtland Snarr 
'iLBUR Frederick Sterling 
Sampson Shaw Ternent 



Washington, District of Columbia 
Hyattsville, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Crisfield, Maryland 
Lonaconing, Maryland 



Bachelor of Arts 



Charles Slaughter Elliott 
B. Andrew Matzen 



Westover, Maryland 
Berwyn, Maryland 



Master of Science 



Chungen Constant Chen 
Clarence Bobo Nickels 



Charles E. Sando 



Shanghai, China 
Artesia, Mississippi 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Washington, District of Columbia 



CERTIFICATES IN TWO-YEAR COURSES ISSUED JUNE 16, 1920 

Agriculture 



^ 



Hatcher H. Ankers 
Lawrence Eugene Cauffman 
George Blake Chapman 
Arthur Payne Dows 
Frank Langhorne Evans 
Edwin Feltman Froelich 
William Presstman Fusselbaugh 
Allyn H. Myers 
Clarence Boice Nourse 
Charles D. Ridout 



Sterling, Virginia 
Merchantville, New Jersey 
Woodstock, Virginia 
Riverside, Maryland 
Charleston, West Virginia 
Somerset County, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Winchester, Virginia 
Alexandria, Virginia 
Annapolis, Maryland 



Mechanic Arts 



Clarence Blake Crippen 
James R. Griest 



Hurlock, Maryland 

Washington, District of Columbia 



TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT AWARDED JUNE 16, 1920 

For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interests of Maryland 



George Morrison 
James B. McLaughlin 
James T. Anthony 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Montgomery County, Maryland 
Kent County, Maryland 



171 



ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE PHI KAPPA PHI, THE HONORARY 

FRATERNITY 



' JUd 






Edward Buckley Ady 
James Hall Barton 
Theodore Lemuel Bissell 
Franklin Dronenburg Day 



Thomas Victor Downin 
Robert Troxell Knode 
Algeo Newell Pratt 
William Joseph Sando 



MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED JUNE 16, 1920 

For Excellence in Debate. Medal offered by the Alumni Association 

Otto Reinmuth, Frederick, Maryland 

The Goddard Medal, for Excellence in Scholarship and Moral Charac- 
ter Medal offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

Peter Wood Chichester, Aquasco, Maryland 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges offers each year gold 
medals for first and second places in an Oratorical Contest 

Medal for second place awarded to 
Robert Malcolm Watkins, Mt. Airy, Maryland 

Citizenship Medal offered by Mr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 
Geary Eppley, Washington, District of Columbia 

For Excellence in Debate, "President's Cup," 
Offered by Dr. H. J. Patterson 

The New Mercer Literary Society 



AWARDS OF MILITARY COMMISSIONS 



Ernest Charles E. Ruppert, Jr. 
Wilbur Frederick Sterling 
James Hall Barton 
Theodore Lemuel Bissell 
Arthur Dorion Etienne 
Edward Elliott Dawson 
Robert Wilhelm Heller 
John Earl Keefauver 
Bradford Lewin Burnside 
Charles Philip Wilhelm 
Sterling Ely Abrams 
Joseph Alexander Gray, Jr. 
Edward Buckley Ady 



Major 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 

First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 



172 



COMPANY 
company a 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION FOR 1920-21 

Battalion Staff 

C. W. cole. Major, R. O. T. C. Commanding 

F Slanker, Honorary Major R. C T. C. Commandmg 

E F Russ^l. 1st Lieutenant. R. O. T. C. Battalion Ajutant 



OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 




Robert V. Haig 



company b 

Captains 
Charles P. Wilhelm 



company c 



Charles E. Darnall 



Howard A. Shank 
Paul S. Frank 



First Lieutenants 

Edward F. Russell 
Mortimer B. Morehouse 



Otto P- Reinmuth 
Augustus W. Hinbs 



Robert N. Young 
George A. Smith 
E. B. Filbert 



Second Lieutenants 

John A. Moran 
Jambs A. Ridout 
Asa C. Miller 



Gerald G. Remsberg 
James M/Huffington 
M. M. Clarke 



Non-Commissioned Staff Officers 

J. P. SCHAEFER, Battalion Sergeant Major 
G. E. GiFFORD. Battalion Supply Sergeant 
T. H. Fitzgerald, First Sergeant, Band 



J. E. Harlow 



First Serjeants 
C. E. White 



A. G. Wallis 



H. I. Moss 
C. P. Harley 
R. Lighter 
H. W. Turner 
J. W. Wisner 



Sergeants 

W. D. Belt 
M. C. Albrittain 
T. R. Betts 
T. K. Miller 
G. A. Wick 
CM. Brewer 



E. M. Richardson 
E. Embrey 
T. K. Alderton 
M. Gurevich 
A. A. McBride 



B. L. Barnes 

J. F. Clagett 

G. Crone 

F. C. Skilling 

E. F. Stanfield 

M. D. Umharger , . 



Corporals 

D. C. Donaldson 
J. B. Himmelheber 
W. C. MEa^viN 

J. E. MUNCASTER 

R. Straka 
L. T. Brown 

173 



C. S. Cook 
N. W. Powell 
W. J. Richards 

L. F. SCHOTT 

W. M. Jones 



4^ 



M$T 



FEDERAL BOARD 




Register of Students 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Bland, Harriet W., Sparks 



q^ 



Utfk 



r\ 



Holter, Edward F., Middletown 

Jester, William C, Jr., Wilmington, Del. 

Johnson, Clarence E., Laurel 

Macdonald, Alexander, Washington, D. C. 



SENIOR CLASS 

Perry, DeWitt P., Clear Spring 
Twilley, Otis S., Hurlock 
Umbarger, Henry L., Bel Air 
Walker, William Paul, Mt. Ai 
Wilhelm, Charles P., Baltimo/e 




%^ 



ivery, Hele^^a D., Washington, D. C. 



'JUNIOR <:LASS 



:t 



i 



zekiel. Bertha B., Berwyn 
l^ii^per, Henry S., Hillsboro 

•^urevich, Henry J., Washington, D. C. 
I^urevich, Morris J., Washington, D. C. 
•^uffington, Jesse M., Eden (Somerset) 
^irby^Waiiaft W^ Washington, D. C. 



t 




Matthews, Irving W., Spark 
^!^oran, John A., Frederick 
l^ewcll, Sterling R., Washington, D 
^i^ainter, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Reynolds, Clayton, Port Deposit 
W^ith, George F., Big Spring 
rder, James H., Lewistown 
ibler, Lawrence J., Washington, D. C. 
Robert 



M5mil 



yj'p SOPHOMO 

orough, N. H. 



)Tinor, George E., 
KDunning, Ernest C, u^^imore 
t^uvall, William M., Baltimore 
l^ank, Pau' S., Falls Church, Va. 
■TFhihrman, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 

Gadd, Albert S., Centreville 
l^arley, Clayton P., Royersford, Pa. 
f^ickey, William F., Delmar 
l^^cure, John M., Harrisburg, Pa. 

McKeever, Galen W., Kensington 
—Marouis. Theodore E., Washington, D. C. 




l^f elro^ Malcolm B., Washington, N. 
I^filler, Thomas K,, Havre de Grace 
Moss, Howard I., Govans 
l^umford, John W., Jr., Newark 
P^rks, Fred H., Timonium 
*Ouaintance, Howard W., Washington, D. C. 
jl^osenberg, Charles L, Hyattsville *T^^ ^Q ^t^,\r 
I Skilling, Francis C, Baltimore ' 

I Stanton, Guy S., Grantsville 
^froy, Virgil S., Centreville 
Ward, Joshua B.^ Jarrettsv|ll( 



re 



.i\yy-^ 



e 
. .. / \'. '/-Li- 
FRESHMAN <:LASS 

|^;iderson, Wilton A., Bristol, Tenn. ^Uj-vw^^ ^ j Nettleton, Malvern, Washington, D. C 



/ 

k 



l^acon, Rankin S., Glencoe 

Benton, Gordon, Stevensville 

Breisch, Ralph J., Catawissa, Pa. 

Bryan, John D., Ruxton 
l^urdette, Sarah B., Martinsburg, W. Va 
l^ickey, David D., Baltimore 
l^robrey, Everett C, Washington, D. C. 
•^ndslow, David K., Mt. Joy, Pa. 
I^eist, Charles H., Upperco 

Ge^stwhite, Charles H., Harrisburg, Pa. 
*^ale, Roger F., Freeland 

Harlan, Paul B., Churchville 
l^laufman, Edward L., Baltimore 
l^ing, Willard A., Washington, D. C. 

Kolb, Ghaile E., Mt. Airy 
l^cQuade, Thomas J., Washington, D. C 

Marquis, Grace, L., Washington, D. C. 
IrMecartnev, John L.^Vaucluse, Va. 



•^enn, William B., Clinton 

Pilchard, Jennings B., Pocomoke City 
li^owell, William D., Woodsboro 

Prough, Marion P., Sykesville 
i^othgeb, Russell G., Luray, Va. 
' Shea, Catherine M., Washington, D. C. 
I^leasman, Arthur R., Smithsburg 

j ^^uart, Leander S., Pepperell, Mass. 

Walker, Lewis J., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
I Wanner, Marie E., Baltimore 
j i/Weber, Wilhelm H., Oakland 

Williams, George W., Jr., Baltimore 

Woollen, Carlton H., Hurlock 
^^ates, Harry O., Abington, Pa. 

Zenter, Frederick A., Jr., Ellicott City 






^ 







Alvin, Stonewall J., Kunstown, Va. 

Banfield, Frank M., Washington, D. C. 

Batson, Lawrence D., Washington, D. C. 

Bethke, Joseph R., Rossville 

Bishop, John, Washington, D. C. 

Bragg, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Brannon, Thomas C, Washington, D. C. 

Cannon, Amos P., Salisbury 

Capaul, Jacob, Washington, D. C. 

Cherry, Joseph C, Brownsville, Pa. ^ 
Church, Carey F , Washington, D. C. 
Cooper, Charles H., Hampstead 
Cornwell, William J., Baltimore 
Coyle, John W., East Syracuse, N. Y. 
Davis, John J., Garrett Park 
Dickinson, Herbert M., Jr., Hyattsville 
Elfront, Robert L., Baltimore 
Fleck, Walter D., Denver, Colo. 
Forsyth, Lewis V., Baltimore 
Graves, Harvey C, Brookland, D. C. 
Grimm, Paul H., Trego 
Hancock, Hugh, Huddleston, Va. 
Harnsberger, John H., Warrenton, Va. 
Harper, Floyd H., Federalsburg 
Hawthorne, Noah B., Round Hill, Va. 
Hill, Neely, Baltimore 
Hohman, Charles W., West. W. Va. 
Holland, Arthur H., Pemberton, Va. 



% » 



Hottel, John T., Bealeton, Va. 
Howell, Clarence L., Chase City, Va. 
Hutchinson, Harry B., Hyattsville 
James, Howard V., Williamsburg, Va. 
Kirby, Wilton G., Havre dGrace 
Lincoln, Leonard B., Takoma Park 
Lint, David L., Washington, D. C. 
Lowman, Clarence A., Funkstown 
Ludlum, Samuel L., Berwyn 
Mantheiy, Felix, College Park 
Moler, Robert C. Mount Rainier 
Parlett, William A., Baltimore 
Pullen, Jesse P., Martinsville, Va. 
Pulliam, James L., Washington, D. C. 
Richards, Felix William, Wa.shington, D. C. 
Ross, Charl«s E., Oriole 
Russell, George O., Norfolk, Va. 
;• Schenkelberg, August C, Ellicott City 
' Shaffer, Harry H., Upperco 
'-•Shields, Thomas, Towson 
' * Snyder, Jesse E., Washington, D. C. 
' Sprinkle, Paul C, Manassas, Va. 
Squires, Waited E., Mount Rainier *- 
Staley, Charles C, Richmond, Va. ^ 

Sullivan, Clifford E., Woodensburg 
Tait, George S., Fairfax, Va. 
Tarbell, William E., Baltimore 
Wood, Ellsworth, Washington, D. C. 



I 



^ 



Barrow, John M., Forest Hill 



UNCLASSI^l 



n. 



JU^im 



I 



Barrow, John M., J? orest mil ^ T-u^w 

^tts. Thomas R., Oberlin, Ohio ^^ ",.^XC)^. 
'^1 i m . n J II 1 11 i T i ii T^ . j ^^! ' "^ ^^ ir** V\ v- 

Crain, Robert, Jr., Washington,' D. C. ^ 
09um^i ^vi^K Wllliaw -i>n Bsitinww'iiX^'-^^ 
Goldstein, Milton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kirk, Grover C, Warfordsburg, Pa. 
James, William B., Hancock 
\^Ceney, Robert ^Silver Springs 




filler, Asa C, Washington, D. C. 
Pannebaker, James G., Balti 



# Pannebaker, James ^TZ 'f^^^^*\..^ - v^ " - 

u4T(iiliiili I iiiiiwi I' Tiiiiiii 1 }r^^ "" ^"^ ' 

Pope, Jacob C, Corry, Pa- * ^ 

4 Raez, Jose L., Huancayo, Per u ^ ^ p-^^^J^ ^ 




TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 
Second Year 



>Tl 



i»v 



Alderton, Thomas E., Takoma Park 

Belt, James D., Island Creek 

Crone, George A., Jessup 

Davis, Malcolm, Washington, D. C. 

Job, Raymond, Carroll 

Mahan, Joseph F., Forest Hill 



Rockville 



tton 



Turner, Howard W., White Hall 
Umbarger, Gardner T., Aberdeen 
umbarger, Marvin D., Bel Air 



4 



-rf<" --^ 



7 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE 
First Class 



KBu 



P^all, Clarkson J., Morristown, N. J. 
^uchheister, Gustav A., Upper Marlboro 
Ducker, Caryl, Englewood, N. J. 
^Gray, Marshall C, Ironsides 



^^arrison, John L., Berlin 
^Harrison, Orlando, Jr., Berlin 



I l^es, Arthur, Davidsonville 
i^lSik, John M., Mt. Rainier 

^attingly, James M., Leonardtown 

*arran, Julius P., Lusby's 
Smith, Ed^rd J., RivgrdaJ^ 



.r 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



FEDERAL BOARD 



SENIOR CLASS 



Dingman, James E., Berwyn 
Eiseman, John H., Washington, D. C. 
Gardner, William T., Clear Spring 
Hamke, Julius C, College Park 
Heller, Robert W., Annapolis 
Peddicord, Herbert R., Dickerson 
Rausch, Robert M., Washington, D. C. 
Reading, Joseph G., Rockville 



Sener, Herman H., Chewsville 
Smith, John W., Norfolk, Va. 
Snyder, Leo W., Washington, D. C. 
Starr, James H., Washington, D. C. 
Stonestreet, Nicholas V., Rock Point 
Sullivan, Jeremiah H., Newburyport, Mass. 
Thomas, Richard B., Washington, D. C. 



JUNIOR GLASS 



Jest, Alfred S., Harwood 
Bosley, Harry L., Washington, D. C. 

I^roach, Keator T., Ridgewood, N. J. 
•^usck, Paul G., Washington, D. C. 
^^utts, John A., Loysburg, Pa. 
•HDarnall, Charles E., Hyattsville 

learner, Edwin F., Hagerstown 
•<^w^ld, Francis G., Mt. 



iitines, Augustus W., Washington, D. C. 
•^^oore, Charles E., Baltimore 
•Neighbours, Herbert E., Lewistown 
•^orwood, Frederick J., Washington, D. C. 
•^usey, Merwyn L., Cape Charles, Va. 

f^^tssell, Edgar F., Washington, D. C. 
I i^asscer, Clarence D., Northkeys 




rMjarittain, Mason C.V La Plata 
Iroailey, Caleb T., Bladensburg 

^S^L i^aldwin, M. J., Washington, D. 

I S>^e\U William B., Hyattsville 

ennett, Frank A., Hagerstown 



SOPHOMORE C 




HtNi^ 



■"X^ 

:<^. 



woteler, Howard M., Laurel 



h^ 



raungard, Paul J., Hagerstown 
l^^mpher, Carlton M., Doubs 
l^ook, Charles S., Frederick 
l^onaldson, De Witt C, Laurel 
I^Uiott, Joseph W., Westover 

Fitzgerald, Gilbert B., Princess Anne 
«^arlow, James H., Havre de Grace 
-^■^<^-^Hightman; Floyd H., Burkittsville 
l^immelheber, Joseph B., Annapolis 





FRESHMAN 



c.e. 

gins, ilerbert W.Jtmion City, Pa. 
^^elvin, Willis G., Havre de Grace 
*TPoweIl, Robert W., Princess Anne 
*^eed, Raymond B., College Park 
•^Hichard, William J., Goldsboro 
•^chaefer, John P., Riverdale 
^^tranahan, Robert J., Union City, Pa. 
Toad vine, Harry L., White Haven 
Van Sant, Bayard R., Greensboro 
Richard, Willian/ J., Goldsboro 
l^oadvine, Harry L., White Haven 
l^an Sant, Bayard R., Greensboro 
^Vallis, Albert G., Frederick 
l^ick, George A., Washington, D. C. 
iXZepp, Willard E., Clarksville * 

MAN CLASS yjA^fKX., 



e.^. 



Wirt D., Centerville 

l^hestnute Frank T., Hyattsville 
^^ohee, Lee A., Easton 
•Conway, James P., Cumberland 

Didier, Frederick B., Baltimore 
l^oard, James H., Aberdeen 

Gjirdner, Cleggitt E., Clearspring 
l^lass, Gerald L., Hyattsville 
l^iall, Charles R., Ridgewood, N. J. 

Henderson, Brice W., Lisbon 

Hess, J. Millard, Elkton 
•^ill, William B.. Hyattsville 
i^Soward, M. Hamilton, Brookeville 
^Oohnson, George W., Elkton 

Kingdon, John, Rockville 
^^tham, Ector B., Washington, D. 



C. 



<» 




.^ii 



Melton, Edward R., Washington, D 
l^iller, Harold, Frederick 
VOrr, Stanley C, Hyattsville 

Rader, William H., Williamsport, Pa. 
^pfi^er, Richard T., Mt. Sftvage 
i l^obertson, Russel A., Washington, N 
j l^chumann, Andrew E., Princess Anne 
j^^ey, Joshua M., Chestertown 
' •^hofnos, William, Washington, D. C. 
•Sipes, Ralph M., Towson 
^"•^•rnrti ^'^tin n "1' ' 
Unseld, Ragan, Hagerstown 
WullLi, Huiij ft tij Waiuhiu^ t Jiij Di C hi 
l^enger, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
hite, John I., Washington, D. C. 
isner, J. Ward, Baltimore 
foiipg, JValter H.. WajJiington, D. C. 



J. 





Claggett, John H., Jr., Roslyn 

Hoppe, John H., Baltimore 

Lewis, Longworth B., Montross, \ a. 



Ryan, William T., Washington, D. C 
Simmons, Frank M., Chicago, HI. 
Sleeth, James R., Washington, D. C. 




UNCLASSIFIED 

t^;^^^ i MJ^ii^e^, Fllint P North Rf 



^^^6 






Lewis, Paul D., Newport N ews, Va . * 



>to)l,.,C,bad 




j^fW^ 



1/ 



TWO-YE 

Second Year 

Stanfield, Edward F., Roslyn 



First Year 



Baker. R. Russell R.. Rockville 
Bean, Alton, Rockville 
Compton, Stephen, Westwood 



Fleming, Richard L., Hagerstown ^ 

Pyles, Kenneth B., Washington, D. C. 
,ll\i iiil | i T i M i ii^ A. I Annnp a W 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
SENIOR CLASS 



Abrams, Sterling E., Jersey City, N. J. 
Cole, C. Walter, Towson 
Diggs, Austii! C, Baltimore * ' 
Donaldson, Edmund C Laurel 
Frere, Francis J.. Tompkinsville 
Groton, Thomas C, Pocomoke 




Morgan, Edwin K., Washington, D. C 

-■ xiiyiuu. D. C i 



Slanker, Frederick, Washington, D. C 
Starkey, Edgar B., Sudlersville 
Thawley, Leonard H., Laurel 



II 



* > 



Mr)rebpuse, Mo»tm 



^achley, Ralph H., Middletown 
k<?lark, Morrison M., Silver Springs 
l/f)arkis, Frederick R., Frederick 
^der, James W., Cumberland 
^/filbert, Herbert D., Frederick 
•iTodgins, Robert J., Union City, Pa 
/!^eene, Victor C, Philadelphia, Pa. 
f^emp. Allen D., Frederick 
V'Xevin, Hyman E., Baltimore 

l^dy, Elizabeth G., Sharon 
^arnes, Benjamin L., Princess Anne 
Lesley, Arthur K., Baltimore 
•Slandford, Mildred, College Park 
^lock, Albert, Laurel 
l^rewer, Brooke, College Park 
M^rewer, Charles M., Washington, D. C. 
Brown. Leo T.. Wa»hinf ton, D. C. 
Buchheister, George G., Leeland 
(burroughs, James E., La Plata 

C«dl«, William, riamsvttie 
l/^hase, Ralph H., Washington, D. C. 
happen, Kenneth B., Kensington 
/^agett, John F., Marlboro 

» 



jiailOR CLASS 

, rr /fCrthara, Alfred J., Pocomoke City 

^ J ^^ ^aganucci. Romeo J.. Waterville, Me. 
Parsley, George M., Brookeville 
^blk, Lawrence W., Pocomoke 
^inmuth. Otto P. H., Frederick 
^hramm, George N., Cumberland 
^ott, Joseph G., Princess Anne 

ihikawa, Masanori, Hyiiga, Japan 
Robeat N.. Washii^g^on, D. C. 



^ 








A. 



C«4»«rfi;...A2It»Hl-l^, "C1iesi'wt»wn 
^,«>ownin, Lauran P., Hagerstown 
y4?ilbert, Edwin B., Baltimore 

Finney. Argyle N., Washington, D. C. 
^^tzgerald, Thomas H., Princess Anne 
^^afflford, George E., Rising Sun 



^aves, Ernest A., Washington. D. C. 
' Heath. Marguerite-F., Baltimore 
' ^fbnea, William M., Chestertown 
^^pure. Wiliam J.. Jr., Harrisburg. Pa. 

•iCfarker, Russell E., Hagerstown 
' Matthews, Harris S., La PJkta 

i ^^ » T^U« IT WuaViinfton. U. C 



'fni^jUj^^ 



•i_* 






I^\jJ'\A^>^<JZ^ 



liKisbet, Andrew N., Baltimore 
■yo fiWk . Samii al L. , N«w H»vw, -(^onn. 

I^orter, Robert G., Hyattsville 

l^ey, M. Winfield, La Plata 

l^eppert, Ruth I., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Shamba<?h,-F«Mjk M., Baltimore 
S^ce, Virginia I., College Park 
^5pence, Charlotte C, College Park 






-Straka, Robert, Homestead, ftr.-;w iW I 
l^urgis, William C, Snow Hill p^ * nUt^^ 

S^iTkn, Gerald A., Washington, D. C. 
•Thompson, Ruth A., Brookland, D. C. 

Towbes, Louis H.. Washington, D. C. 
ii^tkins, Robert M., Mt. Airy 
•^'Hiite, Charles E., College Park 
•JSTynkoop, James C, Wa»hingtoij,.*Trc.^ f^/^ 




i^kor, Norman W., Keistertown'^t rSfT^^S^IwrJ^slbo^N^^^ 'LUa^ 
IBesley, Florence E., Baltimore Jones PHw«rH a c ^i i, >^vv-%^ 

l^laj . Cathenne L.. College Park ^^J : *Cesher. Dean S., Williamsport _ ^^ j 



L i- 



.O-.. 



liClemson, Earle P., Baltimore* 



Jninger, Harry C, Westernport 



Merrill, Francis R., Pocomoke City 



Conklin, Roscoe L., Baltimore ^ j 

Vftarcy, George D College Park^-guA y^wland, Paul F.. Bristol, Tenn. 
•<T)eniio. Alexander W., New Kcnsingto^rt,?m(^kB , ^enn. 



n^ 



\ 



\jjj^ 



f riuL ' ijiitjii) JuiiHim, - OilnflB W 
i^ambrill, Charles M., Pittsburg, Pa. 
I^emmill, William F., Baltimore 

^l ii'i f I , i T ii l i W) Wtjlniii|.() B m, D. m , 
j (garp, Jerauld B., Smithsburg 
^\ iJleidelbach, Henry R., Catonsville 



^Rissl( 
^^an 



3wman, Richard D., Smithsburg 



Hennessey, Thomas J., Lynn, Mass. 
Ijfterlihy, Timothy M., Newburypo; ' . Mass. 
«^olmes, Thomas J., Takoma Pari 

use^Kingsley A^. Collegefark'-',, ♦<^,./ 

U.NCLaSSIFIED 




j t^isinger, John C, Washington, D. C^5^ * 0'W<^ 
issler, Raymond L., Washington, D. C. . C^" * 

lank, James O. C, Smithsburg 

rwilliger, William G., HighlamL N. Y. 

bias, Herbert R., Hancock f/^ 
•^wnsend. Miles D., Reistertown 
|(|Walsh, Humphrey M., Washington, D. C 
^ardwell, Aubrey S., Washington, D. C. 




f i h.h^ 



cs, William S., Frederick 
Joodyear, Louis B., College Park 
Grandfield, Robert F., Dorchester, Mass. 
Gundry, Richard, Catonsville ^^^ / 

•/House, Hugh O., College Park^ ♦ /h4<#«. 

House, Lilian M., College Park 
* ^ nt fffttd . 1 Mil a» , P e ewiwu ke ' 
Lopatin, Samuel, Jr., New Haven, Conn. 
McGouldrick, Paul F., Portland, Me. 
•/MacDoug^l, Alan F., Miitchantville, N. J. 





Moss, William W., Baltimore 

Mulligan, Alleine W., New York City 

Norris, Helen G., Baltimore . * 

Plassnig, Edwin, Baltimore 

Semeniouk, Mary E., Anacostia, D. (xT^" 

Wang, Voong Ung, Shanghai, China^^ 
Weber, Ella K., Fairbank 
Wood, Sidney B., Ashboro, N. C. 



C*- 



y)i^ 



W -cX-'^^v^-X^^/v 



FEDERAL BOARD 

Shepherd, Matson W., Berwyn 

^SCHOOL OF xMEDICINE 

POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 




Chapman. Arthur W.. South Glen Falls, N. Y. Mayoral, Joaquin Havana" 

Femstein, Elliott, Baltimore Pritchard Rnth « m Wl 

Hunt, Rose B., Baltimore | ^: t^li^^pt N^^^^^^^ ^^^^'^^^■ 

Lang, Robert Gibson, Parkersburg, W. Va. ' ^' ^' 

FOURTH-YEAR CLASS ^^^' 

Aubrey, John F., Baltimore Benson, Carl F.. Baltimore ^'^' 

Badaghacca, Francis L., Paterson Bernardo, John R., Wilmington ' Del - ^ 

Barnes. Bruce. Hawthorne, N. J. I Bonfiglio, Vincent, Bait We ' J;^^. 

178 ^ ^"^^ ^ 




Bose, Jogesh C, B.S., Baltimore 

Broadrup, Earl E., Cumberland 

Castro, Andres G., San Jose, Costa Riea 

Costa, Oscar G., San Juan, Porto Rico 

Culver, Samuel H., Delmar, Del. 

Dorf, Herman J., Hunter, N. Y. 

Fisher, C. F., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Fisher, Daniel S., Baltimore 

Foley, Charles J., Havre de Grace 

Franklin, Joseph P., B.A., Birmingham, Ala. 

Freedom, Leon, Baltimore 

Gardner, Willetts W., A.B., Centre Moriches, 

N.Y. 
Golley, Kyle W., Baltimore 
Grabill, J. Stanley, Baltimore 
Guyton, John W., Baltimore 
Hawks, C'yrus E., Lamsburg, Va. 
Heitsch, Hubert M., Pontiac, Mich. 
Hobgood, Legan H., New Bedford, Mass. 
Hoheb, Albert S., Santruce, Porto Rico 
Holofcener, Julius L, Baltimore 
Jaffe, Albert, Baltimore 
John, Ba-xter S., Shawesville, Va. 
Joska, Vincent V., Baltimore 
Joyner, George R., Suffolk, Va. 
Keegan, Daniel F., B.A., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Kemp, Richard J.. Granite 
Lass, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Luban, Benjamin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McCoy, Arley Von, A.B., Mannington, W. Va. 
Martinez, Ezequiel, San Juan, Port Rico 
Matthew.«, Stanley W., Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Monninger, Arthur C, Scranton, Pa. 
O'Rourk, Thomas Rutter, Sparrows Point 
Pacienzo. Frank A., Baltimore 



Paulson, Moses, Baltimore 

Peters, Edgar A. P., B.S., Louisa, Ky. 

Pillsbury, Harold C, Baltimore 

Plyler, Ralph J., A.B., Cleveland, N. C. 

Pokorny, Joseph, Baltimore 

Quinones, Norberto A., San German, Porto 

Rico 
Reynolds, Francis A., Boston, Ma.ss, 
Hies, Ferdinand A., Baltimore 
Romilly, Harold A., Rapidan, Va. 
Ryon, James H., Bowie 
Sabin, Fred C East Syracuse, N. Y. 
Savage, Philip J., New London, Conn. 
Schilling, Jesmond W., Erie, Pa. 
Seay, Thomas W., Spotsylvania, Va. 
Sherman, Solomon, Baltimore 
Shircliff, Elliott W., Cumberland 
Shubert, Felix S., Ranshaw, Pa. 
Skvarla, John A., Passaic, N. J. 
Sowers, Jacob L., B.S., Linwood, N. C. 
Stone, Saul G., Cleveland, Ohio 
Szczerbicki, John V., Baltimore 
Tilghman, Stanley J., Parsons burg 
Timko, Louis M., Northampton, Pa. 
Wangler, Herman Ernest, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ward, Edwin E., Crisfield 
Weinkauf, William F., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Wells, George E., Baltimore 
Wiest, Paul F., Rippon, W. Va. 
Wilkerson, James H., Baltimore 
Williams, Mortimer H., Parksley, Va. 
Wilson, W^ Wellford, Phar.D., Baltimore 
Wolfe, James C, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Yaeger, Leslie A., B.S., Baltimore 



THIRD- YEAR CLASS 



Bailey, Harry, B.A., New Haven, Conn. 
Bolewicki, Peter E., A.B., Baltimoie 
Buchness, Anthony V., A.B, Baltimore 
Champe, Ira P., Jr., Charleston, W. Va. 
Doshey, Louis J., B.A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Fleischmann, Berthold, B.S., New York, N. Y. 
Freidus, Elias, New York, N. Y. 
Fritz, Julius D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Fulton, William J., Baltimore 
Ginsberg, William. B.A., New York, N. Y. 
Goldman, Bernard A., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Gollick, William A.. B.S., Jersey City, N. J. 
Gordon, Herbert, New York, N. Y. 
Greenbaum, Leonard H., Baltimore 
Groff, Morris, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hatfield, Daniel S., Charleston. W. Va. 
Halley, George C, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Harman, Robert D., B.S., Riverton, W. Va. 
Hollister, William, B.S., New Berne, N. C. 
Horowitz, Herman J., B.S., New York, N. Y. 
HuflF, William, B.A., Roanoke, Va. 
Ingram, David N., Baltimore 



Va. 



Va. 



Keefe, George G., A.B., Waterbury, Conn. 

Kerdasha, George, Wood Cliff-on-Hudson, N.J. 

Krager, John J., B.A., Baltimore 

Kunkowski. Andrew, Baltimore 

Lang, Milton C, Baltimore 

Lawson, Lawrence W.. B.A., I..ogan, W. 

Linke, Julian P., Plainfield, N. J. 

McCoy, C. Glen, A.B.. Mannington, W. 

Mercier, Albin S., A.B., Lisbon 

Middlemiss, William R., B.S., Salt Lake city, 

Uteh 
Morgan, Edward N., Batavia, N. Y. 
O'Connor, John A., A.B., Baltimore 
Noll, Louis, B.S., Hartford, Conn. 
Payne, John E., B. S., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Peters, H. Raymond, B.A., Baltimore 
Pittman, Henry L., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Pullen, Guy F., Greenwich, Conn. 
Rhodes, Bricey M., Woodville, Fla. 
Rudisill, John D., A.B., Lincolnton, N. C. 
Salzberg, Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Saporita, Archibald H., Harrison, N. J. 



179 



Sckerak, Arthur J. F.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Scotellaro, Nicholas J., New York, N. Y. 

Shannon, George E., Baltimore 

Shapin, Sydney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shapiro, Louis M., B.A., New Haven, Conn. 

Sternberg, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Stovin, Joseph S., Ph.B., New Haven. Conn 
Stout, Philip D., B.A., Johnson City, Tenn * 
J Sweet, Samuel W., B.S., Utica, N. Y- 
' Trynin, Hyman, B.A., Brooklyn, N Y 

Warfield, John O., Jr.. A.B.. Philadelphia, Pa 
i ^^Ison, Thomas N., A.B., Hebron, Md 



SECOND- YEAR CLASS 



Beck, Nathaniel M., A.B., Baltimore 
Berkson, Morris I., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cortese, Anthony E., Paterson, N. J. 
Dart, Frederick B., Niantic, Conn. 
Desane, Joseph, New York, N. Y. 
Edmonds, John M., Horton, Mich, 
^vatt. Clay W., Greenville, S. C. 
"^-Feraca, Salvadore J., New York, N. Y. 
—Milium, Donald A., Baltimore 
•-—^ass, Benjamin E., Carteret, N. J. 
Y'"**ttldberg, Ben, Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Gutowski, Joseph M., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Harp, J. Elmer, Hagerstown 
Hagerman, Paul, Cameron, W. Va. 
Hirsch, Philip, New York, N. Y. 
Hundley, John T. T., Jr., A.B., Lynchburg, Va 
JCeith, Marion Y., Caledonia, N. C. 

[enney, Joseph R., A.B., Dravosburg, Pa. 
Knipp, George S., Baltimore 
Kraut, Arthur M.. Jersey City, N. J. 
Kyper, Frederick, Clearfield, Pa. 
Long, Ira C, A.B., Moorehead City, N. C. 



Love, William S., Jr., A.B., Baltimore 
McLean, Herbert M., B.A., Jersey City N J 
^^cVay. Edward A., A.B., Pawtucket, R. 'l ' 
I Maurillo, Dominick F., New York N Y 
! Newcomer. David R., B.S., Halfway * 
I Parson. Willard S., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
j Peterman, James E., Cherry Tree, Pa. 
j Pontery, Herbert. Weehawken. N. J. 
I Povalski, Alexander W., Jersey City] N. J 
I Rio. Juan Del, Porto Rico. 
Ruche, Harry C, Pennsylvania 
Rothfuss, Paul A., B.S., Montoursville, Pa 
Schorr, Richard, New York, N. Y. 
Shealy, Walter H., B.A., Seesville,' S. C. 
Smith, Charles F., Uniontown, Pa. 
Steincrohn, Peter J., Hartford, Conn. 
I Sussman, Abram A.. D.D.S.. Baltimore 
jTouhey, Thomas J., Wilmington, Del. 
<r^rare, Harry H.. Jr.. Dunnsville, Va. 
Wasserstrom, Sidney, Brooklyn, N. Y 
Weinert, Henry V., Jersey City. N. J.* 
■""hite. Robert Stanislaus, Camden, W. Va. 



Allen, Moore L., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Anderson, Albert L., Annapolis 
Antonius, Nicholas, Orange, N. J. 

usteriitz, Joh„ Phar.D., Baltimore 
Barnes, D. Keith, Kaysville, Utah 
Bartlett, Charies W., Jr., Florida 
Battistini, Pedro A., Aduadilla, Porto Rico 
Bentz, Felix, New Britain, Conn. 
Bershatsky, William, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bleier, Louis, New York, N. Y. 
Boyd. Kenneth B., Baltimore 
Briglia. Nicholas N.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Carter, Carl J., Catawba, W. Va. 
Da Vila, Jose E., Juana Diaz, Porto Rico 

Edelman, Edward I., Long Island, N. Y. 

Fisher, Harry R., New York, N. Y. 

Flax, Ira I.. Newark, N. J. 

Friedman, Bernard, New York, N. Y. 

Friedman, Irving, Newark, N. J. 

Gattens, Wilber E., Cumberland 

Gottlieb, Bernard N., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Granoff, Joseph F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Greifinger, Marcus H., Newark, N. J. 

Grimm, Wilson O., Buckhannon, W. Va. 

Grossblatt, Philip, Newark, N. J. 
""amilton, Dewey D., Mannington, W. Va. 
Howell, Clewell, B.S., Vineland, N. C. 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



180 



Jacobson, Philip, Baltimore 
Koons, Earie W., B.S., Taneytown 
Knox, Joseph C, Leiard, N. C. 
' Kraczyk. Michael J., Camden, N J 

Kratz, Fred W., Baltimore 
* Kauffman, Aaron W.. B.S., York, Pa 
Lalley. Paul F.. Scranton, Pa. 
Lehman, Julius, New York, N. Y. 
Leibensperger, George P., Kutztown Pa 
Levme, Samuel, Union, N. J. 
Marciniak. Edward S.. Perth Amboy, N J 
Marsh, James T., A.B., Baltimore 
Marton, Samuel. New York. N. Y. 
Maseritz, Isidore. Baltimore 
Megahan, Burke, Williamsport, Pa. 
Messinger, Benjamin, New York, N. Y 
Miller, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Miller, Jacob, Baltimore 
Miller, Joseph G.. Baltimore 
Molinsky, Meyer. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Moriarty, Louis. South Manchester, Conn 
Morris, Philip, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Morrison, William H., Jr., Holmesburg, Pa 
Munoz, Justo L., Juana Diaz, Porto Rico 
McLane, William O., B.S., Frostburg 
Nash. A. E., Rutherford, N. J. 
Nelson. James W., A.B., New York, N. Y. 



Neustaedter. Theodore, New York. N. Y. 
Nocera, Domingo, Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Norment, John E., A.B., Baltimore 
Oyler, Ralph Ziegler, B .S., Gettysburg, Pa. 
Pachtman, Isadore, Braddock, Pa. 
Perry, Arch. H.. Louisburg, N. C. 
P'tkowsky, Louis. New York, N. Y. 
Rodriguez, Virgilio O., Juana Diaz, Porto Rico 
Sarubin, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Scagnetti, Albert, Valley Cottage, N. Y. 
Scheindlinger, Morris I.. New York, N. Y. 
Schlenger. Leo B., Paterson, N. J. 
Schultz. Louis A., New York, N. Y. 



Scimeca, Antonio A., New York, N. Y. 
Seliger, Robert V., New York, N. Y. 
Shapiro, Ralph N., Newark, N. J. 
Tabershaw, Arnold L., New York, N. Y. 
Taub, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Theuerkauf, Frank J., Erie, Pa. 
Urbanski, Adrian X., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Weiner, Hymen L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Weinstock, Alex. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Whaley, Thomas B.. Berlin 
Woodyard. Edwin S., Parkersburg. W. Va. 
Zaslow, John, Woodridge, N. Y. 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



SENIOR CLASS 



Andres, Andrew J., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Ayuso, Antonio, Tabucoa, Porto Rico 
Ashman, George, Baltimore 
Barrett, Thomas E., Baltimore 
Batty, Joseph F., Jr., Baltimore 
Beuchelt, Walter E., Baltimore 
Blades, George C, Baltimore 
Bowes, F. Mackall, Baltimore 
Businsky, Louis C, Baltimore 
Campbell, Percy J., Baltimore 
Charlton, John L., Baltimore 
Cohan, DaNid M., Danville, Va. 
Cohen, Maurice L., Baltimore 
Coller, Harry, Baltimore 
Corcoran, John N., Ontario, Canada 
Cronin, Thomas D., Baltimore 
Davis, John F., Baltimore 
Drummond, Harry A.. Pungateauge, Va. 
Fessenmeir. Leo. Glen Arm 
Fowler, William J., Baltimore 
Galloway, John S., Towson 
Gans, Hilary W., Govans 
Garland, Cassius B., Baltimore 
Colder, George L.. Jr., Catonsville 
Gontrum, Charles H., Baltimore 
Grossman, Julius T., Baltimore 
Hammond, Norris C, Baltimore 
Higinbothom, Paul M., Baltimore 
Hirt, Frank J., Baltimore 
Hooper, James J., Cambridge 
Hudson, James F., Towson 
Jenkins, George G., Baltimore 
Jett, Reese L., Baltimore 
Jones, George S., Baltimore 
Joyner, Roderick S., Farmville, N. C. 
King, Norris C, Baltimore 
Koontz, Edward L., Baltimore 



Langley, William H., Jr., Newport, R. I. 

Laukaitis, William F., Baltimore 

Lehman, Irving L., Baltimore 

Levy, Israel, Baltimore 

Lindsay, James J., Towson 

McEvoy, Charles P., Baltimore 

Marshall, Roland S., Baltimore 

Meyer, John A., Baltimore 

Millar, James H., Baltimore 

Milio, J. T., Baltimore 

Morton, Alfred B., Baltimore 

Mullen, George M., Govans 

Nachlas, Nathaniel S., Baltimore 

O'Brien, Arthur S., Baltimore 

Portmess, Robert R., Baltimore 

Rice, T. Warren, Baltimore 

Ring, Howard J., Baltimore 

Roe, Cornelius, Baltimore 

Rogers, William C, Baltimore 

Rollins, Howard M., Jr., Baltimore 

Rosendale, Ferdinand J., Baltimore 

Sagner, Louis, Baltimore 

Salerno, Peter C, Briston, Conn. 

Scheiner, John, Baltimore 

Seiland, John O., Baltimore 

Siegrist, Louis, Jr., Baltimore 

Siff, Allen E., Baltimore 

Skane, Thomas J., Baltimore 

Stanley, Ernest E., Baltimore 

Stein, David, Baltimore 

Stern, Bernard E., Baltimore 

Walker, Uthman, Baltimore 

Waters, Theodore C. Baltimore 

Welzant. George P., Baltimore 

Whaley. John Staton, Snow Hill 

Wheeler, Francis E., Baltimore 

Wiers, Fracis B., Baltimore 

Wolfson, Benjamin L,, Baltimore 

181 



THE LAW SCHOOL 
INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Aaron, Samuel J., Baltimore 
Addison, Walter W., Baltimore 
Ahrling, George C, Baltimore 
Alvey, Frederick S., Frederick 
Arrington, Charles B., Baltimore 
Arnold, Frank, Baltimore 
Barrett, William L. K., Baltimore 
Baugh, Ernest Van C, Baltimore 
Beall, Paul U., Baltimore 
Beck, I^ouis B., Baltimore 
Benson, Franklin M., Baltimore 
Bennett, Alton Y., Frederick 
Berman, Paul, Baltimore 
Bernard, Richard C, Baltimore 
Blankner, Andrew L., Baltimore 
BoMinger, James W., Baltimore 
Bossard, Stanley R., Thurmont 
Bovey, William H., Hagerstown 
Bradley, Hugh F., Jr., Jarrettsville 
Brown, Meyer, Baltimore 
Bryan, Cecil A., Baltimore 
Burgee, Amon, Jr., Frederick 
Burtscher, Charles N., Baltimore 
Burler, Thomas B., Towson 
Campbell, Stephen P., Jr., Baltimore 
Carey, Clarence W., Sayre, Pa. 
Carmel, Percy, Mt. Winans 
Ciotti, Hector J., Baltimore 
Cohan, Allen E., Baltimore 
Council, Eugene C, Baltimore 
Cummings, George R., Baltimore 
Dail, Harold W., Cambridge 
Deen, Melville L., Preston 
I^insmore, Robert D., Baltimore 
Domenico, Joseph F., Baltimore 
Dooley, John M., Cardiff 
Druery, Oliver K., Jr., Baltimore 
Ermer, Charles F., Baltimore 
Essinger, Paul R., Baltimore 
Etheridge, James F., Baltimore 
Evans, Joseph W., Baltimore 
Fell, John C, Annapolis 
Flentje, George F., Jr., Baltimore 
Freed, Otto, Baltimore 
Freeny, William E., Salisbury 
Friedman, David, Baltimore 
Fyle, George H., Ferryman 
Fyle, Samuel L., Ferryman 
Gay, James E., Baltimore 
Geiselman, Austin H., Jr., Baltimore 
Goertz, Harry E., Baltimore 
Goldstein, Irving C, Baltimore 
Gorey, Matthew A., Baltimore 
Goodman, Alexander, Baltimore 
Guenette, William E., Springfield, Mass. 
Guercio, Samuel V., Baltimore 



Guthrie, Joseph A., Baltimore 
Hall, R. Irving, Baltimore 
Hargest, Edward E., Baltimore 
Hartle, Calvert K., Hagerstown 
Hartman, Stanley E., Baltimore 
Harris, Charles D., Baltimore 
Hecker, Samuel, Baltimore 
Hewitt, Linwood T., Baltimore 
Higgins, Douglas S., Baltimore 
Hilton, George E., Baltimore 
Hirschhorn, Solomon, Baltimore 
Hisky, John G., Catonsville 
Huss, Albert B., Baltimore 
Jones, C. Braddock, Baltimore 
Jones, Edgar A., Baltimore 
Johnson, Edmond H., Annapolis 
Joseph, Saul L., Baltimore 
Kafferman, Gershon, Baltimore 
Kaminski, Marion J., Baltimore 
Kavanaugh, Emmett P., Baltimore 
Kenly, Lacy R., Baltimore 
Kindred, Robert E., Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Kirk, Harris E., Jr., Baltimore 
Klipper, Charles W., Baltimore 
Krebs, John W., Baltimore 
Krieger, Joseph L., Baltimore 
Kruger, S. Harvey, Baltimore 
Kuenne, Herbert F., Baltimore 
Latane, Leios M., Richmond, Va. 
Lebowitz, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lemmert, John V., Baltimore 
I^onhardt, Carroll, Baltimore 
Lepper, Howard J., Baltimore 
Levin, Albert, Baltimore 
Levinson, Saul, EUicott City 
Lowe, Denton S., Go vans 
Lowe, William L., Govans 
Lynch, Charles A., Gardenville 
McCourt, Joseph G., Baltimore 
MacLeod, Elmer J., Baltimore 
Mainen, Robert, Baltimore 
Maas, Frederick L., Baltimore County 
Mallon, Joseph P., Baltimore 
Marine, Edgar D., Baltimore 
Marsh, Paul E., Frederick 
Merriken, William L., Roland Park 
Meissel, Howard A., Baltimore 
Michaelson, Benjamin, Galloways 
Miegel, Charles H., Baltimore 
Miles, Joshua W., Jr., Princess Anne 
Miller, George B., Baltimore 
Minder, John H., Baltimore 
Molz, Joseph T., Baltimore 
Morstein, David H., Baltimore 
Mulford, Harry S., Baltimore 
Naiman, Julius, Baltimore 



182 



Nake, George R., Baltimore 
Nelson, William B., Bel Air 
Nowakowski, John J., Baltimore 
Paca, John P., Jr., Baltimore 
Palmisano, Augustine, Jr., Baltimore 
Patti, Joseph J., Baltimore 
Parr, Joseph T., Baltimore 
Pausch, Richard, Baltimore 
Pirie, Carroll W., Baltimore 
Plassnig, Edwin, Baltimore 
Powell, Thomas R., Baltimore 
Price, William H., Snow Hill 
Pyle, James H., Baltimore 
Reutter, Eberhard E., Baltimore 
Reed, John S., Baltimore 
Roche, James M., Baltimore 
Rogers, Thomas H., Buckeystown 
Rollins, Edward D. E., Baltimore 
Rosenblatt, J. Harold, Baltimore 
Roesiter, Goldsbo rough G., Baltimore 
Ruth, Louis C, Baltimore 
Sanderson, Gustav F., Baltimore 
Savard, Ernest E., Briston, Conn. 
Schad, Harry J., Baltimore 
Scher, Charles K., Baltimore 
Schilling, William James, Baltimore 
Schmelz, Frederick, Jr., Baltimore 
Schmuckler, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Schneider, Leo A., Baltimore 
Schonfield, Eugene, Baltimore 
Schutz, Henry, Baltimore 
Schulze, Paul K., Baltimore 
Seidman, Jesse I., Baltimore 
Sellors, John. Baltimore 
Shechter, Louis E., Baltimore 
Shlessinger, Jacob, Baltimore 
Sherbow, Joseph, Baltimore 
Siems, Valentine B., Baltimore 
Silberstein, Herschel V., Baltimore 
Simmons, Marshall E., Baltimore 



Sklar, Benjamin E., Baltimore 

Skinner, William H., Baltimore 

Skrentny, Joseph, Baltimore 

Sline, Percy, Baltimore 

Small, Leon, Relay 

Smith, William E., Baltimore 

Snyder, Edwin A., Baltimore 

Snyder, Morris S., Baltimore 

Socolow, Harry, Baltimore 

Stanley, John S., Baltimore 

Stern. Abraham, Baltimore 

Sutton, Richard S., Jr., Baltimore 

Talbott, William S., Baltimore 

Tay'or, Walter L., Jr., Catonsville 
Thompson, Charles H., Baltimore 
Thomsen, Royal C, Baltimore 
Tisdale, James W., Annapolis 
Toomin, Philip R., Baltimore 
Trageser, Charles A., Baltimore 
Truitt, Vaughan R., Showell 
Tubman, Samuel A., Baltimore 
Twigg, Lester A., Baltimore 
Urner, Francis H., Frederick 
Vankin, Maurice B., Baltimore 
Victor, Julius A., Baltimore 
Vogeler, John G., Baltimore 
Walker, Owen, Baltimore 
Walter, Eenest W., Baltimore 
Weaver, Edwin C, Baltimore 
Weinberg, La Fayette, Baltimore 
Weiner, Paul N., Baltimore 
Weiskettel, Francis A., Baltimore 
Wenzel, Philip H., Baltimore 
Wilson, James J., Jersey City, N. J. 
Willinger, Thomas S., Baltimore 
Williams, Charles C, Baltimore 
Williams, Richard W., Halethorpe 
Wilson, Lewis M., Cumberland 
Winebrenner, David C, l^d, Frederick 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



Albert, Milton A., Baltimore 
Allen, Howell W., Baltimore 
Austin, Eugene, Baltimore 
Azrael, Judson L., Baltimore 
Bach, Joseph A., Ellicott City 
Backman, John T., Baltimore 
Barrett, Franklin P., Baltimore 
Barron, Irving, Baltimore 
Barron, Robert, Baltimore 
Batty, Howard A., Baltimore 
Bau, Mingchiln J., Yu Yiao, China 
Baum, Albert S., Jr., Baltimore 
Beach, Robert W., Jr., Baltimore 
Bellows, Donald P., Glyndon 
Berman, Benjamin L., Baltimore 



JUNIOR (XASS 



Berman, Sara F., Baltimore 
Berenholtz, Charles S., Baltimore 
Birely, John H., Baltirrore 
Blackburn, Earle W., Baltimore 
Blakistone, Richard P., Baltimore 
Blankner, Earle J., Baltimore 
Blaustein, J. Selman, Baltimore 
Block, Nathan, Baltimore 
Blum, Albert H., Baltimore 
Bordley, Clayto, W., Baltimore 
Bowers, Austin J., Baltimore 
Bregel, Howard C, Baltimore 
Brewer, James P., Baltimore 
Bruce, David K., Baltimore 
Burgess, Edwin E., Jr., Ellicott City 

183 



Burgess, Lionel, Ellicott City 
Caplan, David H.. Baltimore 
Caplan, Meyer, Baltimore 
Caples, Walter R., Baltimore 
Clement, Rupert R., Baltimore 
Chft, Saville, Baltimore 
Cockey, James L., Baltimore 
Cohen, Albert J., Baltimore 
Cohen, Herman, Baltimore 
Cohen, Jacob, Baltimore 
Cohen, Joseph, Baltimore 
Cole, B. Olive, Baltimore 
Cotton, Myron S., Baltimore 
Coughlan, Robert E., Jr., Baltimore 
Covalerchek, Julius, Baltimore 
Cover, James P., Easton 
Cronin, Harold G., Aberdeen 
Crowther, George R., Jr., Baltimore 
Crowther, Lester H., Baltimore 
Cullom, Cecil I.. Baltimore 
Cozajkowski, Walter M., Baltimore 
Parley, John W., Baltimore 
Darnall, William M., Baltimore 
Dies, Eli S., Russia 
Dimarco, Anne E., Baltimore 
Borsey, Philips H., Annapolis 
Drummond, William H., Baltimore 
Due. Paul F., Baltimore 
Ellis. Margaret M., Baltimore 
Feikin, Bernard, Baltimore 
Fine, Harry, Baltimore 
Fisher, Elsa B., Fort McHenry 
Foard, Francis M., Baltimore 
Ford, Lewis McD., Baltimore 
Fox. Goerge G., Baltimore 
France, Robert, Baltimore 
Fulton, Charles C. Baltimore 
Gaskins, Damon S., Baltimore 
Gaver, John M., Frederick City 
Gillum, Wilbur Alex., Baltimore 
Gisrie', Edwin L., Baltimore 
Click, Henry, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Raphael S., Baltimore 
Gontrum, Thomas McC, Raspeburg 
Gorsuch, Walter C, Oxford 
Graham, Homer G., Baltimore 
Graham, Leland J., Baltimore 
Greenburg, Mordecai D., Baltimore 
Griesacker, Joseph B., Baltimore 
Gross, Christian W., Jr., Baltimore 
Groves, Annie L., Baltimore 
Hahn, Theodore J., Baltimore 
Hammerman, Israel H., Baltimore 
Harrington, Thomas M., Baltimore 
Heeker, David, Baltimore 
Hedeman, John R., Baltimore 
Hetzer, Samuel R., Williamsport 
Hobbs. Walter S., Baltimore 
Hochman, Joel J., Baltimore 
Hofferbert, George, Baltimore 



184 



Hopkins, Hastings B.. Baltimore 
Horme, Dawson, Baltimore 
Horney, William R., Centreville 
Horsey, Joshua R., Baltimore 
Horwitz, Hyman, Baltimore 
Hook, Ernest S., Baltimore 
Hudson, Howard E., Baltimore 
Hunter, Lois M.. Baltimore ^ 
Hutchinson, Milo H., Baltimore 
Hutzell, Frank L., Boonsboro 
Hyman. Morris D., Baltimore 
Isaacson. Julius, Russia 
Jett, Robert S., Baltimore 
Jewell, Clay, Baltimore 
Johnson, Russell H., Baltimore 
Jones, Harry L., Baltimore 
Kairys, Harry, Baltimore 
Katzner, Fred, Baltimore 
Kelley, James P., Towson 
Kelley, Stanley, Elkridge, Ala. 
Kerpelman, Morris, Baltimore 
Keyoer. George T., Baltimore 
Kidd, James K., Baltimore 
Kmg, Albert R., Baltimore 
Kirchner, George W., Baltimore 
Klein, Arthur J., New York, N. Y 
Kornmann. Henry E., Baltimore 
KrimskJ, Joseph M., Baltimore 
Kurland. Fannie, Baltimore 
La Porte, Francis A.. Baltimore 
Lazarus, Henry, Baltimore 
Lears, Walter J., Baltimore 
Leavitt, Maurice, Portsmouth, Va 
Lee, O'Donnell, Stevenson 
Legg, John H., Centreville 
Lesinsky, Samuel, Baltimore 
I Levitas, Benjamin L, Baltimore 
! Levy, Edward S., Baltimore 
Lutzky, Ida C, Baltimore 
McAllister, James A., Cambridge 
McCahan, Elmer B., Jr., Baltimore 
McCullough, David N., Baltimore 
McGalenck. Wilbur F.. Weverton 
Mclnnes, Eugene, Seattle, Wash. 
McKenney, Henry H.. Baltimore 
McLaughlin, Charles R.. Baltimore 
Masson. George F., Baltimore 
Maurer, Jenkins G., Relay 
Mazor, Meyer, Baltimore 
Meyerhoff, Jacob, Baltimore 
Miller, Stephen J.. Baltimore 
Mitchell, Thomas F., Thompsonville, Conn 
Morgan, Tilghman V., Baltimore 
Mopsikor, Robert E., Portsmouth, Va 
Mooney, Lawrence R., Baltimore 
Moore, George L., Baltimore 
Mullan. W. G. Read, Baltimore 
Needle, Sidney, Washington, D C 
Neel, John M., Baltimore 
Newcomer, George S.. Baltimore 



Nickerson, Palmer R., Baltimore 
Nowack, Wencel, Baltimore 
Obrecht, Holliday H., Baltimore 
O'Rourke, Andrew G., Roslyn 
O'Toole, Bernard F., Thurmont 
Owinski, Joseph J., Baltimore 
Paltiloff, Sol, Baltimore 
Palees, Mitchell, Baltimore 
Parke, Guy A., Baltimore 
Pausch, George, Baltimore 
Perry, John W., Salisbury 
Phillips, Seymour, Baltimore 
Pierson, Leon, Baltimore 
Piper, William B., Baltimore 
Plank, Cyril A., Baltimore 
Porter, W. Edgar, Baltimore 
Pressman, Maurice J., Baltimore 
Presstman, Marie W., Baltimore 
Pruess, Hans L., Baltimore 
Pugh, Walter J., Baltimore 
Pumpian, Herman, Baltimore 
Rabuck, Le Roy T., Baltimore 
Riddle. John F., Baltimore 
Riggs, Maurice T., Rockville 
Robinson, Morton M., Baltimore 
Rody, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Rogan, Joseph H. A., Baltimore 
Roil, John R.. Baltimore 
Rome, Hyman P., Baltimore 
Rose, Joseph M., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Sarah R., Baltimore 
Russell, Frank J., Baltimore 
Scharf, Frederick, Baltimore 
Schlegel, Edwin M., Baltimore 
Schlein, Morris, Baltimore 
Schonfield, Simon, Baltimore 
Scott, Edward H., Baltimore 
Seamans, William R., Baltimore 



Sweltzer, Eugene P., Baltimore 
Shapiro, Solomon, Baltimore 
Shea, James D., Baltimore 
Sherry, Helen, Baltimore 
Siff, Herman E., Baltimore 
Silberman, Samuel L., Baltimore 
Simons, Jacob I., Baltimore 
Sinn, Walter E., Frederick 
Sloan, David W., Jr., Cumberland 
Smith, Milton R., Glen Arm 
Sokol, Max, Baltimore 
Spedden, Alex W., Jr.. Baltimore 
Stein, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 
Strauss, Raymond F., Baltimore 
Stritehoff, Nelson H., Jr., Baltimore 
Swartz. Harry B., Baltimore 
Swartz, Walter H., Baltimore 
Tannelbaum, Harry, Baltimore 
Tobias, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Tome, Richard E., Baltimore 
Truitt, Jeremiah F., Salisbury 
Twupack, Frank W., Baltimore 
Walker, Alfred F., Baltimore 
Ward, John T., Jarrettsville 
Weintraub, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Wellner, Gabriel D., Baltimore 
Wessels, Asa H., Catonsville 
White, Richard M., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wiegard. Paul J., Annapolis 
Wilson, Frankie D., Birmingham, Ala. 
Winter, Harry, Baltimore 
Wolfson, Benjamin L., Baltimore 
Woods, Florence M., Holyoke, Mass. 
Ucher, Clement V., Jr., Baltimore 
Yaffe, Harry, Baltimore 
York, Claries A., Baltimore 
Zimmerman, Benjamin, Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
SENIOR CLASS 



Anderson, Walter A., Baltimore 

Berg, Edward C, Newark, N. J. 

Brown, Harvey D., Millville, N. J. 

Byer, Nathan, Trenton, N. J. 

Cantor, Louis M., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Casey, Daniel J., Wilmington, Del. 

Clemson, W. Buckey, Baltimore 

Corso, Arthur, Danville, Pa. 

Cowley, W. Hyde, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Davis, Frank W., Waynesville, N. C. 

Davis, Leonard I., Barnes ville 

Doyle, Daniel E., North Attleboro, Mass. 

Garcia, Francisco G., Rio Piedras, Porto Rico 

Hammond, Bennett, Washington, D. C. 

Henchey, Bert L., Bennington, Vt. 

Highstein, Charles, Baltimore 



Hussey, Fay Lee, Berkley, Va. 
Lubore, Jacob, Washington, D. C. 
McLaughlin, Victor B., Mason-Dixon, Pa. 
Malkinson, Jack W., Montreal, Canada 
Martin, William P., Burlington, N. C. 
Moore, William S., New York. N. Y. 
Notes, Louis, Washington, D. C. 
Ricalo, Acacio, Santiago, Cuba 
Roland, Daniel L., Reading, Pa. 
Slifkin, Louis B., Bloomfield, N. J. 
Stern, Carl J., Walton, N. Y. 
Teague, Charles H., Madison, N. C. 
Thalaker, Neil E., Petersburg, W. Va. 
Themper, Joseph, New Haven, Conn. 
Van Winkle, Harold, Passaic, N. J. 
Voelker, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 



185 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aisenberg, Myron S., New Britain, Conn. 
Atno, Winfield J., Newark, N. J, 
Blank, Samuel H., Camden, N. J. 
Bock, C. Adam, Baltimore 
Clark, John F., Utica, N. Y. 
Emmart, L. Lynn, Baltimore 
Gaver, Grayson W., Myersville 
Gibson, Moses, Broo lyn, N. Y. 
Goldstein, Saul, Newark, N. J. 
Greenberg, A. D., New Haven, Conn. 
Kiell, Cecil I., Newark, N. J. 
Leades, Saul, New Britain, Conn. 
Lugar, Troy C, New Castle, Va. 



Reichel, William, Annapolis 
Rothfeder, S. N., New Britain, Conn. 
Saliva, Alfredo S., Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Scherr, Nathan, Baltimore 
Shehan, Daniel E., Baltimore 
Silverman, Jack B., Newark, N. J. 
Smith, Oswald P., Asheville, N. C. 
Soifer, Max E., Hartford, Conn. 
Spinner, Alex. J., Newark, N. J. 
Terhune, W. CliflFord, Paterson, N. J. 
Thomas, H. Burgess, Culpepper, Va. 
Wolfe, Maynard D., Bloomfield, N. J. 



SOPHOMOR CLASS 



Adair, W. V., Grafton. W. Va. 
Amenta, L. J., North East, Pa. 
Ashby, John L., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Betts, Allan R., Morris Plains, N. J, 
Brenner, Morris, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brickner, Lottie.. New York, N. Y. 
Brown, Louis L., Ellicott City 
Callaway, William R., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Campbell, Ralph D., Newark, N. J. 
Childers, Ellsworth W., Salem, W. Va. 
Cook, James R., Frostburg 
Coward, C. C. Cheraw, S. C. 
Crowley, W. H., Troy, N. Y. 
Cummings, E. S., Newark, N. J. 
Davenport, J. M., Thomas, W. Va. 
Davidson, L., Lewisburg, W. Va. 
Gibbins, Edward B., Newark, N. J. 
Givens, Robert, Sinking Creek, Va. 
Goldstein, Joe, Washington, D. C. 
Goomrigian, Summit, N. J. 
Hoff, J. H., Wellsville, Pa. 
Hogan, J. D., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Jerdon, Edward J., North Adams, Mass. 
Jones, J. A., Altoona, Pa. 
Karn, George C, Jefferson 
Kayne, L. E., Baltimore 
Kiser, William R., Keyser, W. Va. 



McCarthy, Harry B., Swanton, Vt. 
Medearis, W. F-, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Mortenson, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Munoz, C, Juana Diaz, Porto Rico 
Nesbitt, H. R., Ransomville, N. Y. 
Nimocks, H. S., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Perry, Elmer A., Warwick, N. Y. 
Prather, Ernest, Burnt House, W. Va. 
Pressly, W. A., Jr., Rock Hill, S. C. 
Richards, V. W., Wardtown, Va. 
Richmond, S. L., Hinton, W. Va. 
Rider, Charles A., Benwood, W. Va. 
Schmalenbach, Herbert M., Baltimore 
Shaak, W. D., Kearney, N. J. 
Sheppe, Alfred H., Lebanon Church, Va. 
Sherry, I. H., Baltimore 
Silberman, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 
Solomon, C. W., Norwich, Conn. 
Spritz, Harry, Baltimore 
Thaman, William C, Baltimore 
Thorn, Allen H., Newark, N. J. 
Walsh, Walter, Moriah Center, N. Y. 
Wasserberg, Irving, New York, N. Y. 
Whitehead, Alvin P., Moorehead City, N. C. 
Yates, Frank F., Grafton, W. Va. 
Young, Goerge W., Oberlin, Pa. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Adkins, Lester O., Parsonsburg 
Bauder, John F., Newark, N. J. 

Bauer, , Elizabeth, N. J. 

Bazinet, Wilford, Jr., Webster, Mass. 
Kegg, John F., Waterbury, Conn. 
Bladen, Donald H., Dundalk 
Boatman, W. W., Orting, Wash. 
Bradshaw, J. P., Burkville, Va. 
Cardona, Oscar de, Aguadilla, Porto Rico 
Casey, John A., Wilmington, Del. 
Chimachoff, Nathan, Newark, N, /. 
Christian, W. P. C, Pedro Migull, C. Z. 



Corcoran, Donald M., New London, Conn. 
De Vita, A. L., Livingston, N. J. 
Dillon, Francis W., Milford, Mass. 
Fernandez, Julio M., Aguadilla, Porto Rico 
Fitzgerald, George E., Churnbusco, N. Y. 
Gibbins, Clifford H., Newark, N. J. 
Goldstein, Milton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gre:npler, Karl F., Baltimore 
Hayes, Francis I., Waterbury, Conn. 
Heywood, John, Jr., North Adams, Mass. 
Hinebaugh, D. S., Thomas, W. Va. 
Hogle, W. Mason, S. Glens Falls, N. Y. 

186 



Hurst, Orville C, Wilsonburg. W. Va. 
Kearfott, J. G., Jr., Shipman, Va. 
Kelley, Harry H., Plattsburg, NY 
Mc Cutcheon, Robert B., Newark, N.J. 

Miller, Wilson L.. Cape May, N. J. 

Moss, W. Wade, Jr., Baltimore 

Myrowitz, Bernhard C, New York, N. Y. 

Nigaglioni, Julio, Yauco. Porto Rico 

Racicot, George, Webster, Mass. 

Rice, Ray E., Seven Stars, Pa. 

Rutrough, Bruce W., Roanoke, Va. 

Sherrard, Vernon F., Presque Isle, Me. 

Short, J. R., Lex, W. Va. 



Sickles, William V., Troy, N. Y. 
Styers, Edward J., Baltimore 
Swing, James P., Jr., Ridgely 
Taylor, J. Kenneth, Frostburg^ 
Thacker, Alice, Franklin, W. Va. 
Thacker, Paul S., Franklin, W. Va. 
Thomas, Carl L., Danville. Va. 
Tressler, Roland A.. Baltimore 
Trettin. Clarence, Baltimore 
Vazquez. Jorge, Ponce, Porto Rico 

Whitehead. J. W., Moorehead City, N. t.. 
Williams, Ben, Jr., Greenwood. S. C. 
Wilson, H. Davis, Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Anderson. Charles R., Pikesville 
Berman. Isador, Baltimore 
Block, Samuel, Baltimore 
Campbell. Stanley L.. fealtimore 
Donohue. Frank J., Jr., Clarksburg, W. \ a. 
Downey, Frederick W., Chevy Chase 
Fields, Thomas E., Pikesville 
Flom, Isaac, Baltimore 
Gaver, Gaither C, Myersville 
Haynes. Marvin C, Dutton, Va. 
Hill, Eric B., Hickory, Miss. 
Johnson, Norman M., Ellicott City 
Joseph, Jacob G., Baltimore 
Kaluska, Joseph C, Lakeland 
Karwacki, Frank W., Baltimore 
Kaylus, Albert G.. Baltimore 
. Kelly, George B., Winchester, Vj. 
Leiva.'C^rlos E., San Luis, Cubi 



Looney, Ernest W.. Spencer, W.\a- 

Maginnis, William S., Baltimore 

Marecki, Philip T., Baltimore 

Marks, Sydney I.. Baltimore 

Morris, Eugene G., Baltimore 

Paxson, Robert L., Round HiU, \ a. 

Pilson, Robert A., Baltimore 

Piraino, Vinient J., Baltimore 

Pross, Clarence. Baltimore 

Rosenberg. Joseph J., Baltimore 
Shannon. Donald A., Baltimore 
Shoemaker. William C. Hampstead 
Sprucebank, Roy A., Sparrow's Point 
Wegad, Evelyn. Baltimore 
W^einberg, Harry, Baltimore 
Weinstein. Abraham H., Baltimore 
Williams, Benja in N.. Greenwood, S. C. 
Wooten. Robert O.. Baltimore 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Andrews. Marvin J.. Bristol, Tenn. 

Batt. William H.. Davis. W. Va. 

Berger, George W.. Sparrow's Point 

Blaine, Edward I., Jr., Pocomoke City 

Burrows, Dudley A., Enfield, N. C. 

Cortes. Octavio. Arecibo, Porto Rico 

Foose. Wilbur C. York, Pa. 

Ginnavan. William J.. Jr., Montgomery, Ala. 

Click, Samuel, Baltimore 

Gordy, Howard L.. Laurel, Del. 

Gould. William M.. Sparrow's Point 

Harbaugh, Arthur C. Hagerstown 

Harmon, Carl M., Dundalk 

Heck, Leroy S., Baltimore 

Herman, David, Baltimore 

Hettleman, Milton L., Baltimore 

Hopkins, Charles H., Baltimore 

Jalil, Ix»uis B., Bahia, Ecuador 



Krieger, Max A., Baltimore 

Kroopnick, Jennie, Baltimore 

Lynon, Andrew T., Havre de Grace 

Marsh, Charles W.. Baltimore 

Morales. Amparo Vila. Rio Piedras. Porto Rico 

Nougueras. Adelo Miguel. Rio Piedras. Porto 

Rico 
O'Neill, Lawrence J., Baltimore 
Pelaez, Jose, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba 
Richardson, James J.. Bel Air 
Richmond. Lewis E., Norfolk. Va. 
Ruff, William A.. Baltimore 
Schapiro. Louis, Baltimore 
Scher, Robert S., Ellicott City 
Smoak, Claude M.. Bamburg. S. C. 
Soraerlatt. Virginia G., Cumberland 
Thompson, William H., Oxford! 
I Viteri, Humberto, Bahia, Ecuador 

187 



UxNCLASSIFIED 



Colucci, Nicholas J., Stamford, Conn. 

Dillon, William J., Baltimore 

Eselhorst, Albert R., Baltimore 

Gallaher, William W., Charles Town, W. Va. 

Green, William O., Hav re de Grace 

Hood, Thomas E,, New Florence, Pa. 

Jester, Henry F., Jesterville 



Koons, George S., Havre de Grace 
Marley, John V., Towson 
Newmeyer, Alvin S., Havre de Grace 
Rosiak, Mitchell B., Baltimore 
Schwartz, John T., Baltimore 
Wagner, Manuel B., Baltimore 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SENIOR CLASS 



Goodwin, Leonard M., Potsdam, N. Y. 
Graham, J. Ralph, Barclay 
Haig, Robert V., Riverdale 



Holter, Cecil K., Jefferson 
Mackert, Charles L., Sunbury, Pa. 



x/ 



*^urroughs, J. Armstead, Clinton 
l^anter, Francis D., Aquasco 
^ClcDonald, William F., Barton 
Morgan, Paul T., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 

j'^elson, Gordon V., Newport News, Va. 
j*T*eterman, Walter W., Clear Spring 
RAedy, Miahael L., Jr., JVjishinatoii*-p. 



^^nderson, Mary P., Washington, D. C- 
•^aldwin, Francis W., Jr., Huntingdon, Pa. 
V . B^iraon, George R., Westminster 

V| ijk.^^r^'^'^'^ghter, Richard C^ Mjjldletown 



f c 



/ 






SOPHOMORE CLASS 

I'^cBride, Austin A., Middletown 

Nock, Randolph M., Stockton f yf 

FRESHMAN. CLASS -«- • /^ ^ 1^^^ ^ 

Beachley, Dewey, Middletown j Groton, A. Brooks, Pocomoke P , , "^ 

^yrd, J. W. Miles, Crisfield j Hope, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 0»//^^'^y 

l^^oster, James J., Parkton li^iorris, Mildred, Salisbury ^ * »> . 

•^lenn, Wilbur J., Smithsburg ^ »l ^Remsberg, Harold A., Middletown 

^ — ^^ ' "■ FEDERAL BOARD 

Triplett, C. Charles, Washington, D. C. 



Kline, Ralph G., Frederick W 




UNCLASSIFIED 

Branner, Cecil G.,^ocomoke v-^-^*^*^ " ^^ f ] 

^ bOLLEGE OF HOME 






ONOMICS 

«IOR CLASS 

Edmonds, Letha G., Rockville 



Tinnnr UllM ih fl . IXTIiil i 



JUNIOR CLASS 

SiwWtr^ifTWfi^U f ., Biuukluiiij, 
Tarbert, Rebecca, Glencoe 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Aman, Helen L., Hyattaville j ly^illiam, Audrey, Del Mar 

tti J in Tl l U, BHjubtlll <j., Sliafkii t^^cCall, Elizabeth G., College Park 

Ellis, Hermania L., Washington, D. C. rinillij Nrth'n O i ^rnrlf'ftnd T^ ^ 



/n 




188 >1a^^, 

lll3 



i;ujjtilln,.nliiiiij Piiiri^dwin 
Eddy, Muriel J., Berwyn 
Haag. Mary S., College Park 

T^ampn. Et HtULUiJ. WilH.llilJPLil't 

Mc Brien, Laura, Riverdale 



PfefFerkorn, Hilda, Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

i^^rris, Sarah E.. Hyattsvillg^ I 

viSurphy, Anna M., Staunton, Va. 



FEDERAL BOARD 

De Vol, Helen Mullen, Crawfordsville, Ind. 




Tin: GRADUATE SCHOOL 




Bailey. Clyde H., St. Paul, Minn. 

Drawbaugh, John R., College Park 

Eppley, Geary, Washington, D. C. 

Ezekiel, Walter N., Berwyn 
Haag, J. Roy, College Park 
Harman, Susan E., Omega, Okla. 
Hockman, Goerge B., Hagerstown 
Holmes. Grace B., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, John P., DavidsonviUe 
Lemon, Frank M., Roanoke, Va. 
Martin, John H.. Corvallis, Ore. 



i 



Matzen, B. Andrew, Berwyn _ 

Miller, Erston V., Hagerstown 

Rohde, W. C. Baltimore 

Sando, William J.. Washington, D. C. 

Shelling. David H., Baltimore 

Smith, Arthur M., College Park 

Stanton, Thomas R.. Hyattsville 

Truitt, Reginal . College Park 

Wiley, R. C. College Park 

Winant, Howard B., Washington, D. C. 

Young, Malcolm R.. Beesley's Point, N 




THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Andrews, Virginia L., Cumberland 
Ashton, Mary M., Clarksburg 
Atkins, Gladys M., La Plata 
Aud, Rose H., Valley Lee 
Baden, Edna I., Baden 
Baden, Elizabeth L., Baden 
Ba'ley, Mary E., Abell 
Baker, Amelia, Ammendale 
Baity, Earl C, Streett 
Baldwin, Nora L, Collington 
Ball, Harry C, Baltimore 
Barnes, Lucille M., Port Tobacco 
Barnhart, Emma J., Hancock 
Barnhart, Orintha P.. Hancock 
Bean, Lillian W., Waldorf 
Bean, Violet M., Great Mills 
Becraft, Mabel V., Washington Grove 
Bell, Louise W., Lonaconing 
Biggs, Grace M., Jessup 
Biser, Belva R., Lewistown 
Blandford, Alma, Clinton 
Bloom. Martha L., Ellicott City 
Bomberger, Lawrence J., College Park 
Boothe, Rosie E., Drayden 
Bounds, Florence, Quantico 
Bowie, Jane R., La Plata 
Bouman, Frances M., Germantown 
Braungard, Paul J., Hagerstown 
Brewer, Mary Mc P., Rockville 
Burdette, Dorothy M., La Plata 
Burke, Mabel, Cumberland 



Burroughs, Alice R., MechanicsviUe 
Burroughs, Louise M., Clinton 
Caltrider, Samuel P.. Westminster 
Canter. Grace M., Hughesville 
Capaul. Jacob. Washington, D. C. 
Carrick, Mary A., Capitol Heights 
Chichester, Peter W., Aquasco 
Clandaniel, George W.. Kennedyville 
Cochrane, Ethel L., La Plata 
Coleman, Cora M., Chester 
Collins, Mildre S., Presto 
Connick, William R.. Baden 
Conway, James P., Cumberland 
Cooksey, Agnes, La Plata 
Cornelius, Mary, Galena 
Coyle, John W., East Syracuse, 
Coyle, Wilbur F., Jr., Baltimore 
Crane, Mary E., Harrington, Del. 
Cressman, Kathryn, Boonsboro 
Crosky. Susan E., FairlHaven 
Davis, Ethe. M., Piscataway 
Davis, John J., Garrett Park 
de Corse, Emma E., MechanicsviUe 
I Dent, Olivia S., Oakley 
i Dixon, Bertha G., Sandgates 
I Dorsey, Ethel A., Beltsville 
• Dryden, Mildred E., Princess Anne 

Dugan, Hazel V., Bowie 
: Dusenbury, UUian, Lanham 

Edmonds. Letha G., Rockville 
1 Engle, Ruth B., Frostburg 

189 



/ 



Ewell, G oldie, Compton 
Exline, Etta F., Hancock 
Fainter, Mary C, Hyattsville 
Fitzgerald, Gilbert B., Princess Anne 
Fletcher, Bertice L., Hancock 
Foltz, Ethel L., Hagerstown 
France, Mazie A., Hagerstown 
Freeman, Mary J., Du Bois 
Garner, Mary E., Baden 
Gladden, Minnie M., Annapolis 
Goldsborough, Philomena D., Hollywood 
Goodman, Nannie D., Deale 
Gough, Lucy B., Wicomico 
Greenwell, Pauline T., Leonardtown 
Greer, Marguerite M., Brentwood 
Hall, Annie L., Glenndale 
Halloran, Marie J., Hyattsville 
Haring, Gladys A., Cambridge 
Harman, Irene N., Marydel 
Harper, J. Norman, Frederick 
Hawkins, Belle P., Gaithersburg 
Hayden, Katharine S., Hurry 
Herbert, Evelyn, Severn 
Hetterly, Ethel M., Mt. Rainier 
Higgins, Daisy C, Gaithersburg 
Hildebrand, Maude E., Hagerstown 
Hileman, Julie M., Frostburg 
Hill, Elsie M., Cumberland 
Hill, Neely, Baltimore 
Hinebaugh, Leota, Cumberland 
Hodges, Loraine G., Oakley 
Hook, Elizabeth G., Baltimore 
Hughes, Helen C, Benedict 
Hughes, Virginia, Easton 
Hyde, Elizabeth G., Port Tobacco 
Irving, Mary R., Boonsboro 
Jaeger, Margaret M., Mitchell ville 
Jarboe, Maude M., Mechanicsville 
Johnson, Clarence E., Laurel 
Jones, Isabel B., Brookeville 
Kaufman, Helen S., Frederick 
Keefauver, Lloyd C, Hampstead 
Kelso, Beulah, Cumberland 
Kemper, Alice C, Brandy wine 
Kerby, Olivia J., Surratts ville 
Kersey, Sarah E., Chester 
Kessler, Mary A., Hyattsville 
Keyes, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 
Keyes, Mary G., Washington, D. C. 
Knipple, Julius G., Manchester 
Lanhan, Mary E., Seat Pleasant 
I^atham, Myrtle M., Clements 
Lemen, Nellie, Williamsport 
Lepson, Thomas E., College Park 
Lint, David L., Washington. D. C. 
McAlpine, Florence K., Lonaconing 
McCoy, Maud V., Beltsville 
McGrady, Loretto, Cumberland 
McGregor, Ellen E., Upper Marlboro 



MacKay, Anna P., Clinton 

Mann, T. T., Piney Grove 

Manning, Roger I., Accokeek 

Matthews, Margaret E., Cambridge 

Mattingly, Laura E., Laurel Grove 

Mayhew, Ruth M., Upper Marlboro 

Mead, Irene C, College Park 

Melvin, Catherine, Henderson 

Miller, Louise, Keedysville 

Mitchell, Rosa A., Laurel 

Morgan, Edwin K., Washington, D. C. 

Morgan, Paul T., Baltimore 

Mullen, Charles L., Hagerstown 

Murphy, Anna L., Ijamsville 

Murray, Edna G., Brandywine 

Murray, Harriet L., Washington, D. C. 

Newman, Hettye, Oxford 

Norris, Lucille A., Great Mills 

Oldenburg, Lester W., Hyattsville 

Oliver, Alice G., Cheltenham 

Park, John, Frostburg 

Patrick, Ethel. D., Woodbine 

Patrick, Olive J., Woodbine 

Payne, Olive G., Surrattsville 

Peden, Virginia, Washington, D. C. 

Penman, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 

Phipps, Emma J., Anne Arundel 

Phipps, Kathryn B., Tracy's Landing 

Plummer, Mattie C, Woodwardville 

Pollitt,. Florence, Princess Anne 

Pope, Jacob C, Corry, Pa. 

Porter, Anna E., Stevensville 

Powell, Robert W., Princess Anne 

Price, Ruth E., Sudley 

Prout, Lina, Friendship 

PuUen, Jesse, Martinsville, Va. 

Pumphrey, Alice L., Germantown 

Pumphrey, Esther, Germantown 

Pumphrey, Nellie L., Upper Marlboro 
1 Purnell, Dorothy, Frostburg 
! Purnell, Henrietta S., Frostburg 
1 Pyles, Katherine, Washington, D. C. 
1 Quaintance, Howard W., Washington. I>. C. 

Queen, Helen H., Waldorf 

Raum. Charles L., Silesia 

Reinhart, Ida N., Frederick City 

Rison, Jennie F., Rison 

Roberts, Barbara W., Ridgely 

Robinson, Edith A., Newark, Del. 

Robinson, Ml Edith, Brightwood, D. C. 

Shaffer, Harry H., Upperco 

Sheeley, Edith L., Hagerstown 

Shorb, Mildred B., Lewistown 

Silver, Isidor, Washington, D. C. 

Smith, George F., Big Spring 

Smith, Mame, Ridgely 

Snyder, Pauline, Keedysville 

Soper, Elsie M., Beltsville 

Soper, Sarah G., Beltsville 



190 



stamp, Adele H., Baltimore 
Storer, Rosalie, Cumberland 
Stout, Robert W., Poolesville 
Sturgis, William C. Snow Hill 
Sussman, Abram A., Baltimore 
Tait, George S., Fairfax 
Tippett, Joseph P., Newport 

Todd, Elma E., Preston 

Triplett, Charles C, College Park 

Turner, Madeline M., Gambrills 

Gwilley, Annette M., Hurlock 

Umbarger, Henry L., Bel Air 

Umhau, Katherine S., Washington, D. C. 

Van Horn, Marie A., Glenndale 



Vansant, Susan A., Chestertown 
Varner, Hilda V., Hagerstown 
WaHers, Edith E., Federalsburg 
Walter, Edith F., Nanjemoy 
Ward, Hilda M., Baden 
Warthen, Albert E., Monrovia 
Weaver, Adah M., Keedysville 
Wheeler, Anna M., Hurry 
Wheeler, Edna M., Hurry 
White, Melva L, Surrattsville 
Willison, Henrietta R., (Cumberland 
Wilson, Lois, Keedysville 
Wolfe. Elmer A., Union Bridge 
Young, Sallie P., Frederick 



SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

SENIOR (XASS 



Bateman, Louise, Bel Air 
Childs, Helen, Howardsville 
Fisher, Mary, Lonaconing 
Gaver, Norman, Meyersville 
Gorman, Ruth, Baltimore 
Hampton, Claribel, Bryson City, N. C. 
Hanna, Isabelle J., Cambridge 
Hogshead, Kate, Greensboro, N. C. 
McDaniel, Mary, Halethorp 



MMler. Sara J., Chestertown 
Minnis, Christine, ConnellsviUe, Pa. 
Neady, Susan, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Reamey, Eugenie, Edwardsville, Va. 
Reese, Zadith, Princess Anne 
Reister, Ruby, Ashville, N. C. 
Rhodes, Geraldine, Ashville, N. C. 
Smith, Julie R., Taneytown 
Wood, Anna E., Annapolis 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Bowie, Lucile L., Front Royal, Va. 
Callaghan, Veronica E.. Dennison. Ohio 
Deputy, Mary J., Worton 
Dubois, Cecile M., Baltimore 



Elgin, Grace L., Forest Park 
' Lord, Nettie B., Preston 

Morrison, Frankie B., Juniata, Pa. 
Yeager, Eva, Cumberland 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Bishop, Maude, Norfolk, Va. 

Boyd, Ruth, Street, 

Doub, Margaret H., Hagerstown 

Edwards, Mary W., Edwardsville Va. 

Graham, Pearl B., Baltimore 

Harkins, Hulda, Street 
Hazen, Dorothy L., Union City, Pa. 
Horst, Kathryn, Hagerstown 
Lewis, Lauverne, Eckhart 
McCann, Wilhelmina N., Street 
Mauer, Mary E., Waterloo, N. Y. 



Mauer, Minnie F.. Waterloo, N. Y. 
Nagel, Ida M., Federalsburg 
Reade, Kathryn A., Harborton, Va. 
Schleuss, Frances M., Martinsburg, \\ . \ a. 
Scheorder, Marie, Cambridge 
Stailey, Margaret, Liverpool, Pa. 
Toms, Kittie R., Funkstown 
Tudor, Rachel, Goldsboro, N. C. 
West, Regina M., Martinsburg. W. Va. 
White. Ruth A., Federalsburg 



PROBATION CLASS 



Dunn, Helen L., Baltimore 
Elliott. Icie M.. Grafton, W. Va. 
Hoffman, Martha M., Smithsburg 
Hoke, Lillie R., Baltimore 



Maxwell, Irene, Owings Mills 
Pannair, Isabelle, Roanoke, Va. 
Pratt. Anna E., Baltimore 
Teeple, Helen S. J., Baltimore 



191 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT AS OF MARCH 15, 1921 

% 

The College of Agriculture 186 

The College of Engineering 113 

The College of Arts and Sciences 132 

The School of Medicine 258 

The Law School 491 

The School of Dentistry 160 

The School of Pharmacy 84 

The College of Education 31 

The College of Home Economics 2L 

The Graduate School 22 

The Summer School, 192() 208 

The School for Nurses 55 

Industrial Teachers' Training Courses 8 

Extension Courses 55- 

Grand Total 1824 

Duplications 22 

Total Net Enrollmknt 1802 



GENERAL INDEX 



Administration, 9, 28, 38 
building, 22 
committees, 8 
council, 10 
officers of, 9 
Administrative officers, 9 

procedure, 38 
Admission, 32 
certificate, by, 33 
elective subjects, 33 
examination, by, 34 
to advanced standing, 35 
transfer, by, 34 
units, number required, 32 
Advanced bacteriology, 63 

degrees, 145 
Agents, county, 15, 16 
Agricultural building, 28 
bacteriology, 63 
chemistry, 87, 88, 112 
county agents, 15, 16 
courses, special, for Federal Board 

students, 57 
economics, 70 

education, 44, 120, 121, 127 
experiment station, 31, 41 
experiment station staff, 13 
eastern branch, 31 
extension, 30 
extension stafi 
Agriculture, College of, 41 
and home economics, 30 
Agronomy, 43, 58 
Algebra, advanced, 103 
Analytical chemistry, 111 
Anatomy and physiology, 62 
Ancient languages and philosophy, 113 
Animal husbandry, 44, 60, 61, 62 
diseases, 62 
general, 62 

industry, division of, 44 
pathology and veterinary medicine, 45 
pests, 68 
Alumni association, 27 
Aquiculture, zoology and, 99 



Architecture, home, 151 
Arts and Sciences, College of, 83 
education, 125 
and handicraft, 151 
civic, 75 
Astronomy, 103 
Athletics, 26 
Bacteriology, 63 

and sanitation, 46, 62 
general, 62 
Band, military, 100 
Barn practice, 66 
Battalion, 163 

Bee culture, entomology and, 48, 68 
Beef production, 60, 62 
Bio-chemistry, 79 
Biometry, 59 
Board of Regents, 8 
Botany, 106 
Breeding: 

animal, 60, G I 
advanced, 61 
Breeds and judging, 61 
Buildings, 22, 23, 24, 25 
Business administration, commerce and, 85 

economics, 109 

management, journalistic, 109 

Calculus, 103 

Calendar, University. 5, 6, 7 

Calvert Hall, 23 

Cereal crops, 58, 59 

Certificates, two-year, 36, 41 

Chemical building, 23 

engineering, 113 

society, 27 
Chemistry, department of, 87 

agricultural, 88 

analytical, 111 

fertilizer and food, 1 13 

general, 89 

industrial, 87, 112 

inorganic, 110 

organic, 110 

physical, 110 
Chemists, 87 



192 



193 



Chorus, 100 

Christian Associations, 28 
Civil engineering, 136 
Clubs, 28 

College of Agriculture, 41 
department of, 41 
general curriculum for, 42 
courses in, for soldiers and sailors, 56, 57 
two-year course, 55 
College of Arts and Sciences, 83 
College of Education, 117-130 
agricultural, 120, 121, 127 
curricula in, 118 
general, 124 

home economics, 122, 128 
industrial, 123, 129 
summer school, 30 
teachers' special diplomas, 117 
teachers* training courses, 1 19 
arts and science, 119, 125 
College of Engineering, 131 

curricula, 135 
College of Home Economics, 148 
description of courses, 150, 151, 152 
elective for students, 150 

Commerce and Business Administration. 85 
Committees, 8 
Contents, table of, 3 
Council of administration, 10 
County demonstration agents, 16 

clubs, 28 
Crop breeding, 59 

Courses, description of, 58, 87. 94, 106, 124, 139 
150, 165 * 

for graduates, 76, 106 
Cytology, 106 
Dairy bacteriology, 63 
husbandry, 47, 64 
production, 65 
Dairying, 64, 66 
advanced registry, 64, 66 
management of dairy young stock, 60, 62 
Debatmg and oratory, 26, 102 
Decoration, home, 151 
Degrees, 35, 41, 117, 132, 145, 146, 148 

conferred in 1920, 170, 171, 172. 173 
Dentistry, School of, 115, 116 
Department of Chemistry, 87 
Department of military science and tactics, l63 

of physical education, 169 
Design, machine, 143 

structural, 139 
Diamondback, 28 
Dining hall, 23 
Diplomas, 35 

teachers' special, 117 
Doctor of Philosophy, 146 
Domestic science, 148 
Dormitories, new 



Drafting, 132, 142 
Drainage, 140 

farm, 70 
Drama, French, 97 
and poetry, German, 97 
eariy English, 95 
Elizabethan, 96 
Dramatic club, 27 
Drawing, 142 

Dress design and making, 151 
Eastern branch, 31 
Economics, 107 
agricultural, 70 

College of Home, 122, 128, 148 
Education, College of, 117-130 
Electrical engineering, 137 
Engineering, College of, 131 
building, 23 
civil, 136, 139 
chemical, 113 
degrees, 132 
electrical, 137 
equipment, 132 
general, 142 

laboratories, 132, 133, 134 
mechanical, 113, 142, 143 
Society, 27 
English, 94 

Elizabethan drama, 96 
Entomology, 67 
and bee culture, 48 
economic, 67 
systematic, 67 
horticultural, 67 
Examinations, 38 

Expenses, fees and, 36, 37, 155, 160 
Baltimore schools, 38 
special, 37 
Experiment Station, Agricultural, 23, 31, 41 
Extension service, 30 
and research, 30 
staff, 15 
Faculty, 10, 11, 12, 13 

committees, 14 
Farm accounting, 70 
building, 69 
dairying, 64 
equipment, 68 
management, 48, 70 
practice, 42 
Federal Board students, 57 
Feeds and feeding, 60, 61 
Fees and expenses, 36, 37, 155, 160 
Baltimore schools, 38 
special, 37 
Fellowships, 25, 42 
Fertilizers and soils, 80, 82 
Filtration plant, 23 
Floriculture, 51, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77 

194 



Foods and nutrition, 61, 150 

Forage crops, 58, 59 

Forestry, 71 

Fraternities and sororities, 27 

French, 96 

Fruits, economic, 72 

commercial, 76 

culture, 71, 72 

judging, 72 
Garden flowers, 74 
Garment construction, 151 
Gas engines, 69 

General agriculture, curriculum for, 54 
chemistry, 89 
education, 124 
extension, 31 

General information, 19 

Genetics, 58, 61 

Geology, 80 

Geometry, 103 

German, 97 

Gerneaux Hall, 23 

Glee clubs, 100 

Government of the United States, 105 

of Europe, 105 
Grading system, 38 
Graduate School, The, 145 

advanced degrees, 145 

council, 10 

courses, 75 

fees, 37 

students, courses for, 59, 79 
Graduation and degrees, 35, 4 1 
Grain judging, 58, 59 
Greek, 113 

letter societies, 27 
Greenhouse construction and management. 
High school scholarships, 25 
Highway engineering, 139 
History and political science, 104 

of the University, 22 
Hog production, 60, 62 
Home economics. College of, 148 

education, 122, 128, 129 

and agriculture, 30 
Honor and awards, 26 
Honor system, 39 
Horse and mule production, 60 
Horticultural building, 23 

entomology, 67 
Horticulture, curricula, 50, 71 

requirements of graduate students in, 76 
Horticulture, curricula, 50, 71 

advanced, 76 

requirements of graduate students in, 76 
Hospital, Baltimore, 23 

College Park, 23 
House administration, 152 
Hydraulics, 134, 143 



73 



Hydraulic and sanitary engineering, 134, 140, 

143 
Income, 32 
Industrial chemistry, 87, 112 

education, 123, 129 

scholarships, 26 
Infirmarj', 23 
Inorganic chemistry, 110 
Insecticides, 67 

Institutional management, 152 
Instruction, officers of, 11, 12, 13 
Journalism, 95 
Judging advanced, 60 

dairy products, 64, 66 

fruit, 72 

grain, 58, 59 

vegetable, 72 
Kappa Alpha, 27 
Keystone club, 28 
Kinematics, 143 
Landscape gardening, 50, 52, 74, 76, 77 

design, 74, 77 

practice, 50, 74, 77 
Language and literature, 85, 94, 95 
Language, ancient, philosophy and, 113 
Late registration fee, 38 
Latin, 114 
Law, School of, 153 
Least squares, 103 
Le Cercle Francais, 28 
Library, 24 

science, 104 
Liebig Chemical Society, 27 
Literature, English language and, 94 

modem language and, 96 
Literary societies, 27 
Live stock sanitation, 62 
Location of the University, 21 
Machine design, 141, 143 
Management of dairy young stock, 60, 62 
Markets and marketing, 61, 70, 108, 152 
Master of Arts, 146 

of Science, 146 
Mathematics, 102 
Meat and meat production, 60 
Mechanical drawing, 132, 142 

engineering, 133 

laboratory, 143 
Mechanics, 142 
Medals and prizes, 26, 27 
Medical curriculum, 91 
entrance requirements, 91 
seven-year course, 91 
Medicine, School of, 157 

Military science and tactics, department of, 163 
band, 100 
commissions, 165 

description of courses, 165, 166, 167, 168 
medal, 26 

195 



MUk, 65 

Millinery, 151 

Mineralogy, 113 

Modem language and literature, 96 

Morrill Hall, 23 

Morphology, 106 

Mule, horse and, production of, 60 

Music, 100 

Mycology, 106 

New Mercer Literary Society, 27 

Nu Sigma Omicron, 28 

Nutrition, 61, 150 

Officers, administrative, 9 

of instruction, 11, 12, 13 
Olericulture, 73 
Oral reading, 102 . 

Oratory, 26, 102 
Organic Chemistry, 110 
Organizations, University, 27 
Pathology, 45, 78 
Pests, 68 

Pharmacy, School of, 161 
Philosophy, ancient languages and, 113, 114 
Physical education and recreation, department 
of, 169 

examination, 38 

training, 38, 164 

chemistry, 110 
Physio ogy, anatomy and, 62 
Physics, 101 
Piano, 101 
Plant anatomy, 106 

diseases, 78 

morphology, 196 

mycology, 106 

pathology, 78 

physiology, 78 
Political science, history and, 104 
Pomology ,^50, 71, 72, 75, 76 
Poultry building, 23 

husbandry, 80 
Pre-medical course, two-year, 90, 93 

curriculum, 92 

requirements for entrance, 92 
Prize, citizenship, 26 
Professional degrees in engineering, 146 
Psychology, 124 
Public speaking, 102 . 
Qualitative analysis, 110 
Quantitative analysis, 112 
Railways, electrical, 141 
Reading and speaking, 102 
Recreation, department of physical education 

and, 169 
Refunds, 37 

Register of students, 174-191 
Registration, date of, 38 

penalty for late, 38 
Research, extension and, 30 



Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 163 

Rhetoric, 94 

Rifle club, 28 

Rossbourg club, 28 

Rural community and its education, 109 

organization, 70 
Sanitary engineering, hydraulic and, 140 

Sanitation, bacteriology and, 46, 62 
live stock, 62 

Schedule, maximum and minimum, 38 

Scholarship and self -aid, 25 

industrial, 26 

prizes and, 158 

School of Dentistry, 1 15 

faculty, 115 

requirements for matriculation, 115 

matriculation and fees, 116 
School of Law, 153 

faculty, 153 

fees, 155 

requirements for admission, 154 
School of Medicine, 157 

clinical facilities, 158 

dispensaries and laboratories, 158 

faculty, 158 

fees, 160 

prizes and scholarships, 158 

requirements for entrance, 91, 159 

requirements for pre-medical college course, 
92 

curriculum, 91 
School of Pharmacy, 161 

requirements for admission, 162 

faculty, 161 
Self-aid, scholarships and, 25 
Seminars, 59, 61, 62, 63, 65, 76, 78, 81, 113 
Seven-year course, combined, 91 
Sheep production, 60, 62 
Shop, 134, 114 
Short courses, two-year, 55, 61, 66, 68, 69, 70, 

78, 81, 94, ICO 
Sigma Nu, 28 
Sigma Phi Sigma, 28 
Social Science, 85 
Societies, 27 
Sociology, 108 
Soils, 53, 80, 81 

and fertilizers, 80, 82 

bacteriology, 81 
Sororities, 27 
Spanish, 98 
Special courses, 118 

for teachers, 124 
Special fees, 37 
Sprays and spraying, 68 
Stock judging pavilion, 23 
Staff, Experiment Station, 13 

Extension Service, 15 
Station, Agricultural Experiment, 31, 41 



Stock judging pavilion, 24 
Structural design, 139 
Student assembly, 27, 39 

organizations and activities, H, ^» 
publications, 28 
Student enrollment, summary o/' 1^-^' V; 
Summary of student enrollment, 19-1. 19- 
Summer camps, 164 
Summer school, 30 
Surveying, 144 
Swine production, 60, 62 
Sword, company 
Teachers' special diplomas, 117 
Teacher training courses, 119 
Telegraphy and telephony, 141 
Terra Mariae, 28 
Testimonials, 170-191 
Textiles, 151 
Tractors and trucks, 69 
Trade and related subjects, 124 
Trigonometry, 103 



Tw^°ekr courses. 55. 61. 66. 68. 69. 70. 78. 81. 

94, 100 

agriculture, 55, 56, 57 

pre-medical, 93 
Unclassified students, 35 
Uniforms, 164 
Units, number required, 32 
University Council, 10 

Veeetable gardening. 50, 51, 72, 73. 7o. 76. 77 
Veterinary medicine, animal pathology and. 

45, 62 
Vocational education, 127 

Voice, 100 
Withdrawals, 37 

Water supply, 24 

Woman's home economics practice house. 24 
Young Men's Christian Association, 28 
Young Women's Christian Association, 28 
Zoology and aquicuUure. 99 



197. 



196