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Full text of "Catalogue"

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^^^l^MliJJ MiimiAlMIMIi^^^^^^ 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

of the, 

University of Maryland 



Vol. 19 



June, 1922 



No. 2 



CATALOGUE 

1922-1923 




* 



Containing general information concerning the Unii 
Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1922-; 
and Records of 1921-1922 



Issued monthly by the University of Maryland at C< 
as second class matter, under Act ol Congress 



^rr•V(^)«vl^/%Yo^«\1^/'•^1^/s^1y•x1rrA^1^/'•^1r/8\1^r^^^^ 



Withdtavftt 




THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 



»M 



Offtci^ p^b. 



LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 



CATALOGUE 



1 1 



1922-1923 





Containing general information concerning the University 
Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1922-23, and Records of 

1921-2^, 



\ 



SIS' 75 



Wiih<^if<* 



Contents 



r 



i- 



'946 



Calendar of Months 4 

UNnT^RSiTY Calendar 5 

Board of Regents, University Council, Educational Units, Officers 

OF Instruction, Committees, etc 8 

General Information 19 

Location 21 

Historical statement 21 

Building and grounds 22 

Scholarships and self-aid 25 

Honors and awards 26 

Student activities and organizations 27 

Administration 30 

Extension and research 32 

Income 33 

Admission and requirements 34 

Degrees, diplomas and expenses 37 

Pees, deposits and expenses 38 

Administrative procedure, including suggestions for new students 40 

Educational Units 

College of Agriculture 43 

College of Arts and Sciences 90 

School of Dentistry 126 

College of Education 129 

College of Engineering 131 

Graduate School 159 

College of Home Economics 162 

Law School 167 

School of Medicine 171 

School of Pharmacy 176 

Department of Military Science and Tactics , 179 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation 185 

List of Degrees Conferred, Awards, Register of Students, Summary 

OF Students 186 

/ 
/ 

Withdrawa / 



CALENDAR 



1922 


1923 


1924 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S 


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1 


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1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


• • 


..|1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 

1 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


718 


9 


10 


11 


12 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


151 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22123 


24 


25 


26 


27 


22I23|24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


31 


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10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11|12 


13 


14 


15| 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18|19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


27 

• • 


28 

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29 

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30 

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31 

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25|26 

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27 

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28 

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27 

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8 


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4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


i 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 

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25 

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26 

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27 

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28 

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29 

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1 


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10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


15|16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


22|23l24i25 


26 


27 


28 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


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21 


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26 


27 


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7 


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10 


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9 


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12113 14 


15 


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16 


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12 


13 


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15 


16 


17 


11 


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13 


14 


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120 21 


22 


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22 


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26 


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19 


20 


21 


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23 


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22 


23 


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27 

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25 

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26 

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DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


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2 


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1 


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6 


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1 


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• • • • 


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1 


12 3 


4 5 


7 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 




8 


9 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


8 9 10 


llil2 


13 


14 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


116 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


17 


18!19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


17 


2\ 


119 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


29 


30 


.. 


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31 


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■ 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1922-1923 

Unless otherwise indicated, this calendar refers to the 

activities at College Park. 



FIRST TERM 



1922 
September 25-26 Monday-Tuesday 



September 25 Monday 



Entrance and condition examina- 
tions. Registration for all stu- 
dents. 

The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 
The School of Law, 

Regular session begins. 

September 27 Wednesday, 8:20 A. M. Instruction for first term begins. 

No admission to classes with- 
out class cards. 

Wednesday, 11:20 A. M. Assembly of student body for 

President's annual address. 

President's reception for new stu- 
dents. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without payment 
of additional fee. Last day to 
file schedule in Registrar's Of- 
fice without payment of fine. 

The School of Medicine 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Regular session begins. 

Freshman entertainment. 



September 27 
September 29 
October 2 



Friday, 8:00 P. M. 



Monday 



October 2 



Monday 



November 10 

November 29 
November 30 



Second Friday in No- 
vember, 8:00 P. M. 

Wednesday, 12 M. 

Thursday 



December 5 Tuesday, 8:20 A. M. 



Thanksgiving recess begins. 

The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of^ Dentistry 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Classes begin after Thanksgiving 
recess. / 



December 8 Second Friday after 

Thanksgiving, 8:00 
P. M. 

December 15 Friday, 8:00 P. M. 

December 11-21 

December 20 Wednesday 



December 21 Thursday, 12 M. 



1923 
January 2 



January 3 



January 3 



January 9 



February 12 
February 22 



March 1 
March 19-27 
March 26 



Christmas dance. 



Presentation by "The Players." 

Registration for Second Term. 

The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 

The School of Medicine 

The School of Law 

The School of Pharmacy 

The School of Dentistry 

Christmas vacation begins af- 
ter last lecture period. 

First Term Ends. Christmas re- 
cess begins. 



SECOND TERM 



Tuesday 



Wednesday, 8:20 A. M. 



Wednesday 



Tuesday 



First Friday in Febru- 
ary 

Thursday 

\ 

Thursday, 8:00 P. M. 



Payment of fees and securing 
class cards. Offices open from 
8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 

Instruction for second term be- 
gins. No admission to classes 
without class cards. 

The School of Medicine 

The School of Law 

The School of Pharmacy 

The School of Dentistry 

Christmas recess ends. Lec- 
tures begin at 9:00 A. M. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without payment 
of additional fee. Last day to 
file schedule card in Regis- 
trar's Office without payment 
of fine. 

Intersociety debate. 

Washington's Birthday. General 
holiday in all colleges and 
schools, College Park and Bal- 
timore. 

Intercollegiate debate. 
Registration for third term. 
Maryland Day exercises. 



March 28, 
March 29 



Wednesday, 4:20 P. M. 



April 3 



April 3 



April 4 



April 10 



Thursday 



Tuesday, 9:00 A. M. 



Tuesday 



Wednesday, 8:20 



Tuesday 



Second term ends. Easter Re- 
cess begins. 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 
The School of Dentistry 
The School of Pharmacy 

Easter recess begins after 
last lecture period. 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 
The School of Dentistry 
The School of Pharmacy 

Classes begin after Easter re- 
cess. 

THIRD TERM 

Payment of fees and securing of 
class cards. Offices open from 
8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 

Instruction for third term be- 
gins. No admission to classes 
without class cards. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without payment 
of additional fee. Last day to 
file schedule card in Regis- 
trar's Office without payment 
of fine. 



May 18 


Third Friday in May, 
8:30 P. M. 


May Ball. 


May 30 


Wednesday 


Decoration Day. Holiday. 


June 1 


Friday 


The School of Commerce (Exten- 
sion Courses) 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Law 
The School of Pharmacy 
The School of Dentistry 

Commencement Day. 


June 1 


Friday, 8:00 P. M. 


Presentation by "The Players." 


June 8 


Friday, 4:10 P. M. 


Classes close for seniors. 


June 10 


Sunday, 11:00 A. M. 


Baccalaureate Sermon. 


June 14 


Thursday, 8:00 P. M. 


Class night exercises. 


June 15 


Friday, 4:10 P.M. 


Third Tei^i ends. 


June 15 


Friday 


Reunion/Day. 
Commencement Day. 


June 16 


Saturday, 11:00 A. M. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

(Members appointed by the Governor for terms of nine years) 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Chairman 1916-1925 

Eccleston, Baltimore County. 

Robert Crain 1916-24 

Mt. Victoria, Charles County. 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer 1916-1923 

Union Trust Co., Baltimore 

Dr. J. Prank Goodnow 1922-1931 

6 West Madison Street, Baltimore. 

John E. Raine 1921-1930 

413 East Baltimore Street, Baltimore. 

Charles C. Gelder 1920-1929 

Princess Anne, Somerset County. 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary 1919-1S28 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

B. John Black 1918-1927 

Roslyn, Baltimore County. 

Henry Holzapfel 1917-1926 

Hagerstown, Washington County. 

COMMITTEES 

UNVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAL WORK 
Dr. Frank J. Goodnow, Chairman 
Robert Crain 
Dr. W. W. Skinner 
EXPERIMENT STATION AND INVESTIGATIONAL WORK 

B. John Black, Chairman 
Dr. W. W. Skinner 
Henry Holzapfel 
EXTENSION AND DEMONSTRATION WORK 
Robert Crain, Chairman 
B. John Black 
John E. Raine 
INSPECTION AND CONTROL WORK 
oOHN M. Dennis, Chairman 
Henry Holzapfel 
Charles C. Gelder 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



ALBERT F, WOODS, A.M., D. Agr., President. 
H. C. BYRD, B.S., Assistant to the President. 

J. E. PALMER, Executive Secretary. 

MAUDE F. McKENNEY, Financial Secretary. 

G. S. SMARDON, Comptroller. 

W. M. HILLGEIST, Registrar. 

H. L. crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings. 

T. A. HUTTON, Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply Store. 




OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., President of the University. 
H. C. Byrd, B. S., Assistant to the President. 
P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Dean of the College of Agriculture. 
A. N. Johnson, S.B., Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Frederick E. Lee, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 
Henry D. Harlan, LL.D., Dean of the School of Law. 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 
H. F. Cotterman, M.S., Dean of the College of Education. 
M. Marie Mount, A.B., Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics. 
C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 
H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 
T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service. 
R. H. Leavitt, Major, U. S. A., Head of the Department of Military Science 
and Tactics. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., President. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Secretary. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

E. N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

N. E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 



Albert F. Woods, M.A., D.Agr., President. 
(The order of the following is that of seniority of appointment) 

H B. McDonnell, M.S., M.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Thos. H. Spence, A.M., Professor of Language and Philosophy, Acting Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro, A.B., Sc.D., Professor of Farm Management. 

J *B. S. Norton, M.S., Professor of Systematic Botany and Mycology. 

C. s! Richardson, A. M., Professor of Public Speaking and Extension Edu- 
cation. 

Harry Gwinner, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Vice-Dean, 

College of Engineering. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. ♦ 

Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
E N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 
C. O. AppiIman, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology and Bio-che^>tStry, 

Dean of Graduate School. ( 

Roy H. Waite, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
L. B. Broughton, M.S., Professor of Industrial Chemistry and chairman of 
Premedical Committee. 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President and Director of Athletics. 

C. E. Temple, M.S., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

J. E. Metzger, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 

0. C. Bruce, B. S., Professor of Soils. 

C. J. Pierson, A.M., Professor of Zoology. 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Professor of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Dean 

of College of Agriculture. 
A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M., Professor of Animal Pathology, Chairman of 

Animal Industry Group. 
H. F. Cotterman, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agricultural Education, Director 
of Vocational Teacher Training, Dean College of Education. 

J. A. Gamble, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

E. M. Pickens, D.V.M., A.M., Professor of Bacteriology and Animal Path- 
ologist of the Biological and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. C. AucHTER, M.S., Professor of Horticulture. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., Professor of Home and Institutionaj/ Management, 
Acting Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Edna B. McNaughton, B.S., Professor of Home Economi^ Education. 

M. M. Proffitt, Ph.B., Professor of Industrial Education, 

N. E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry aAd State Chemist. 

T. B. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Sofciology. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Frieda M. Wiegand, A.B., Professor of Textiles and yfclothing. 



^ 



/ 



R. V. Truitt, B.S., Professor of Agriculture. 

H. A. Jones, Ph.D., Proiessor of Vegetable Gardening. 

Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., Professor of Farm Equipment. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English and English Literature, Director 
of Choral Music. 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., Professor of Highway Engineering, Director of En- 
gineering Research, Dean of College of Engineering. 

R. H. Leavitt, Major, Infantry, D.O.L. Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Fred. Juchhoff, L.L.M., Ph.D., Professor of Accountancy and Business 
Administration. 

C. G. Eichlin, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

Frederick E. Lee, Professor of Social and Political Science, Dean College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

F. W. Besley, A.B., M.F., D.Sc, Lecturer on Forestry. 

A. H. Putney, Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Lecturer on Diplomacy and Interna- 
tional Law. 
Frank Collier, Ph.D., Lecturer on Social Psychology. 
George E. Ladd, A.M., Ph.D., Lecturer in Engineering Geology. 
H. W. Stinson, B.S., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

G. J. ScHULz, A.B., Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 
C. F. Kramer, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Physiology. 
R. C. Wiley, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

L. J. Hodgins, B.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
J. T. Spann, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
H. B. Hoshall, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
A. S. Thurston, M.S., Assistant Professor of Floriculture. 
M. F. Welsh, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology and Bac- 
teriology. 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

George 0. Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
Claribel p. Welsh, B.S., Assistant Professor of Foods, Head of the De- 
partment of Foods and Cookery. 
S. H. Harvey, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
W. A. Griffith, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene, College Physician. 
M. A. Pyle, B.S., Instructor of Civil Engineering. 
M. Rowe (Miss), Instructor in Library Science, Librarian. 
M. D. Bowers, A.B., Instructor in Journalism. 
L. J. PoELMA, iJ.V.S., Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 
Susan Harman,\M.A., Instructor in English. 
Benjamin Berma^^ B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering, 
J. B. Blandford, iWstructor in Horticulture, Horticultural Superintendent. 
W. E. Leer, B.S.A.,\lnstructor in Agronomy. 
O. C. LicHTENWALNEi^, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 
E. F. New, B.P., LL.M'., Instructor in Commerce. 



W. E. Whitehouse, B.S., Instructor in Pomology. 

X? PI ^tarkey M.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

!' R mno"' (Mis;) A.B., instructor in Public Speaking. 

n c' HENNicK, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 

f' D DAT, B.S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 

L H Van Wormer, M.S., Assistant Chemist. 

H R Walls, Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

E B." DONALDSON, M.S.. Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

A. L. Flenneb, B.S., Assistant Chemist. ^ _. „„ 

B L GOODYEAR, B.S., B.MUS., Teacher of Voice and Piano 

JESSIE BLAXSDELL ^^^ > ^ ^^Try ^ D OL." Assistant in Military Science 
J. S. Dougherty, Captain, intaniry, u.kj.lj., ^^ 

J. w'sxANr." captain, Infantry. D.O.L.. Assistant in Military Science 
H iTiirCapUin. Lfantry, D.O.U, (B.S. in Engineering). Assistant in 
W. rSANTwarCt'oS, U. S. A.. Assistant in Military Science 
W. rs^K^NS, sergeant. D.E.M.L.. Assistant in Military Science and 

Tactics. ^ TM?MT Assistant in Military Science and 

Edw. Ferguson, Sergeant, D.E.M.L., Assistant lu 

Tactics. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS IN REHABILITATION 

DEPARTMENT 



E F NEW, B.P.. LL.M.. Educational Director of Rehabilitation. 
i-Lx F. ViERHELLEB, B.S.A.. Instructor in Horticulture. 
F H Leuschneb, B.S.. Instructor in Poultry. 
GEORGE HARRISON, Jb., iBStructor in Apiculture 
EDNA B. New, Instructor in Vocational English. 
Florence Kite, Instructor i n Farm Arithmeti c. 

AGRICULTURAL EX PERIME NT STATION STAFF 

„ n Q^ . .Director and Chemist. 

HARRY J. PATTERSON, D.SC • ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

J. B. S, Norton, MS vegetable and FVoriculture. 

Thos H White, M.S vegeLciuit; a 

IHOS. n. wii ' .p^pj Plant Physiology. 

Chas. O. Appleman, Ph.D ^ 

^.r TTT ^ Tj Q Poultry. 

Roy H. Waite, B.S 

^ XT ^ TvfG Entomology. 

E. N. Cory, M.S , 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D ^^^^S' 

J. E. METZGER, B.S Agronomy. 



r 



E. M. Pickens, A.M., D.V.M Animal Pathology. 

E C. AucHTER, M.S Horticulture. 

Albert White, B.S Supt. Rigely, Farm. 

F. S. Holmes, M.S Seed Inspection. 

H. A. Jones, Ph.D Vegetable Breeding. 

C. E. Temple, A.M Associate, Plant Pathology. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D Associate, Plant Physiology. 

O. C. Bruce, B.S Associate, Soil Survey. 

A. M. Smith, M.S Associate, Soils. 

R. L. Sellman, B.S Assistant, Agronomy. 

H. B. WiNANT, B.S Assistant, Soils. 

W. N. Ezekiel, B.S Assistant, Plant Pathology. 

C. C. Hamilton, M.S Assistant, Entomogy. 

Anna M. Hook Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

Isabella Veitch Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

Caroline Veitch Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

Marion B. Johnson Assistant, Seed Inspection. 

A. L. Shrader, M.S Assistant, Pomology. 

C. M. Conrad, B.S Assistant, Plant Physiology. 

C. P. Wilhelm, B.S Assistant, Soils. 

WnxLiAM Mather, M.S Assistant, Soils. 

Howard Alexander, B.S Assistant, Soils. 



EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 



♦Thomas B. Symons, M.S.D., Agr Director. 

*F. B. Bomberger, B.S., A.M., D.Sc Assistant Director and Specialist 

in Rural Organization and 
Marketing. 

*E. G. Jenkins State Boys' Club Agent. 

*P. W. Chichester, B.S Assistant Boys' Club Agent. 

*Miss Venia M. Kellar, B.S State Home Demonstration 

Agent. 

♦Mrs. Marion C. Bell District Agent and Specialist. 

*Miss Bertha Knight, B.S District Agent and Specialist. 

♦Miss Adice S. Jones Assistant State Girls' Club 

Agent. 

tE. C. Auchter, M.S Specialist in Horticulture. 

W. R. Ballard, B.S Specialist in Vegetable and 

Landscape Gardening. 
M. D. Bowers, B.A Specialist in Agricultural Jour- 
nalism. 

B. E. Carmichael, B.S Specialist in Animal Husbandry. 

tR. W. Carpenter, A.B.. Specialist in Farm Engineering. 



Specialist in Dairying. 

J. A. Conoveb, B.Sc ^ .Specialist in ETitomology. 

tE. N. Cory, M.S specialist in Dairying. 

t J. A. GAMBLE, ^-S- • • ;^: • _• Specialist in Pathology. 

R. A. Jehle, B.S.A., Pn.u Specialist in Agronomy. 

F. w. Oldenburg, B.fe specialist in Educational Exten- 

tC. S. Richardson, A.B ^.^^ 

.Specialist in Horticulture. 

S. B. Shaw, B.S specialist in Pathology. 

tC. E. Temple, M.S 

— .. ui. thP U S. Department of Agriculture. 

* In cooperation with the U. a. ^ 
t Devoting part time to Extension Work. 



r 



COUNTY AGENTS 



County 
Allegany 



Name 



Headquarters 



-g g Cumberland 

lAAJ " ^ "DC! 

K ^A^^ *G W. NoRRiS, rJ.o 

Anne Arundel ^* _ _ „ . 



*R. F. McHenry, B.S 

^ ^, ,« T5Q Annapolis 



Towson 
.Chaney 



.*E. E. McLean, B.S 

* J. H. Drury 

^ ^ ^TiQ ..Denton 

*W C. Thomas, B.b ^ . 

\. T>Q ..Westminster 

*F. W. Fuller, B.b 

;::::::*a.d.radebat;oh. -^^ 

*J. p. BuRDEriE, A.B -Cambridge 

- *P. W. Moore, B.S Frederick 

*P. A. HAinm B.S !^'^?f^ 



Baltimore . . 

Calvert 

Caroline . . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick '^- ^' J;"^ ' ^ , . .Oakland 

*J. A. TOWLER, B.b 

** ^ c^ Bel Air 



' ^ ^ T>q Bel Air 

*B. B. Derrick, B.b 

^ T3 a M c! . . .Ellicott City 
L. Post, B.S., M.b _ .._^^„,„ 

B. 
*W. C. Snarb, B. 



Garrett. 
Harford 

Howard *^- ^' " ""^' ' \^ ^ Chestertown 

^^ . *H. B. Derrick, B.b 

Kent r. G T> pm RockviUe 

Montgomery *W. C. Snarr, ^.^^^ ^^^^^ Marlboro 

Prince Georges *W. B. Posey, ^. CenterviUe 

Queen Anne's *0. C. Jones, B.S LoveviHe 

St. Mary's *G. F. Wathen -/.prmcess Anne 

4. ♦C Z. Keller, B.b 

Somerset * . -d q ms . .Easton 

*Tr» p Walls, B.S., M.o ■" 

Talbot *E- ^' ^^^^^\ ^ ' ... Salisbury 

*Ci R Cobb, B.b 

Wicomico vj. j-v. , Hagerstown 

Washington .*S. E. Day, b. ^ ^^^^ ^.^^ 

, ^^ *E I. Oswald, B.b 

^''"^"'"' : ASSISTANT COUNTY AGENT 

Harford .G. R. Stuntz, B.S ^. Bel Air 

"*''*°'^" LOCAL AGENTS 

,, , n^ *T F Armstbong icol.) Seat Pleasant 

Southern Maryland. *J. F. armstbo princess Anne 

,.o=t.rT, Shore *L- H. Mabtin (col.) 



* In cooperation 



with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 



County Name Headquarters 

Allegany *M. Rhea Morgan .* .Cumberland 

Anne Arundel *Mrs. G. Linthicum Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline , *Emily Kellog, B.S "Denton 

Carroll *Rachel Everett Westminster 

Cecil *Elizabeth Hodgson Elkton 

Charles *E. S. Bohannan (Mrs.) La Plata 

Dorchester ♦Eliz. Van Scoter, B.S Cambridge 

Frederick *Prances Gerber, B.S Frederick 

Garrett *Laura I. Henshaw Oakland 

Harford *Blanche Gittinger, B.S Bel Air 

Howard 

Kent *Susan V. Hill Chestertown 

Montgomery *Catharine Cowsill Rockville 

Prinoe Georges *Ellen L. Davis "Hyattsville 

Queen Anne's *Mary L. Byrn Centerville 

St. Mary's *Ethel Joy Xieonardtown 

Somerset *M. Louise Mills Princess Anne 

Talbot *Olive K. Walls Easton 

Wicomico *Clara Mullen Salisbury 

Worcester *Lucy J. Walter Snow Hill 

Washington *S. S. Garberson , . ."Hagerstown 

LOCAL AGENTS 
Charles & St. Mary's *Leah D. Woodson {col,) La Plata 

GARDEN SPECIALIST 
Madison & Lafayette 

Aves., Administra- 
tion Bldg Adelaide Derringer (Mrs.) Baltimore 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1922-1923 



♦ In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 



ALUMNI - 
Messrs. Broughton, Hosball, Stinson, Hillegeist and Cory. 

BUILDINGS 
Messrs. Crisp, Johnson, Creese, Pierson and Carpenter. 

CATALOGUE, STUDENT ENROLLMENT AND ENTRANCE 
Messrs. Zimmerman, T. H. Taliaferro, Spence, Cotterman, Creese, Brough- 
ton, Hillegeist, Appleman, and Miss Mount. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
Messrs. Patterson, Bowers, McDonnell, Richardson and Symons. 

COURSES OP STUDY 

Messrs. Cotterman, Reed, Spence, Zimmerman, Gordon, Hillegeist, Leavitt, 

Appleman, T. H. Taliaferro, Johnson, Misses Mount, and Wiegand. 

GROUNDS AND ROADS 
Messrs. Auchter, Thurston, Crisp, Patterson, Steinberg, Metzger and Car- 

penter. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Messrs. T. H. Taliaferro, Richardson, Cory, Spence, House and Leavitt. 

SANITATION 
Messrs. Pickens, Griffith, McDonnell, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Cory, Pyle and 

Miss Mount. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Messrs. Byrd, Broughton, Cory, Schulz, Bomberger and class presidents. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
Messrs. Steinberg, House, Bowers, Gamble and Lemon. 

FARMERS' DAY. 
Messrs. Patterson, Symons and Zimmerman and Miss Mount. 

EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS 
Messrs. Appleman, McCall, Gordon, Johnson, Cory and Hillegeist. 

PRE-MEDICAL EDUCATION 
Messrs. Broughton, Cory, Davis, Spence, Wiley and McGlone. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



\ 



\ 
\ 

A 



The University of Maryland 



Location 



The University of Maryland is located at College Park in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington branch of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles 
from Baltimore. At least eight trains a day from each city stop at Col- 
lege station, thus making the place easily accessible from all parts of the 
State. Telephone connection is made with the Chesapeake and Potomac 
lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. The 
suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the south, and Laurel, the 
largest town in the county, is ten miles to the north on the same road. 
Access to these towns and to Washington may be had by steam and electric 
railway. The site of the University is particularly beautiful. The build- 
ings occupy the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with forest 
trees and overlooks the entire surrounding country. In front, extending 
to the boulevard, is a broad rolling campus, the drill ground and athletic 
field. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the buildings of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. The farm of the College of Agriculture con- 
tains about 300 acres, and is devoted to fields, gardens, orchards, vineyard, 
poultry yards, etc., used for experimental purposes and demonstration 
work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the grounds is exceedingly attractive. They 
are tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery 
and flower beds. 

The location of the University is healthful; the sanitary conditions are 
excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there has been 
practically no serious case of illness among the students for many years. 

The Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Law of the Uni- 
versity are located in Baltimore at the corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets. 

History 

The history of the present University of Maryland practically combines 
the histories of two institutions. It begins with the chartering of the 
College of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 1807, which graduated 
its first class in 1810. In 1812 the institution was empowered to annex 
other departments and was by the same act "constituted an University by 
the name and under the title of the University of Maryland.*' As such, its 
Law and Medical schools have since been especially prominent in the 
South and widely known throughout the country. The Medical School 



building in Baltimore, located at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected in 
1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 

For more than a century the University of Maryland stood almost as 
organized in 1812, until an act of the Legislature in 1920 merged it with 
the Maryland State College, and changed the name of the Maryland State 
College to the University of Maryland. All the property formerly held by 
the old University of Maryland was turned over to the Board of Trustees 
of the Maryland State College, and the Board of Trustees changed to be 
the Board of Regents. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States, recognizing the 
practical value and increasing need of such colleges, passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits a proportionate amount of unclaimed Western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Asembly of Maryland. The Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the 
College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 
its control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General As- 
sembly granted a new charter to the College and made it the Maryland 
State College. 

The University is coeducational and under the charter every power Is 
granted necessary to carry on an institution of higher learning and re- 
search, comparable to the great state universities of the West, in which 
Agriculture and Engineering hold a dominant place along with the Lib- 
eral Arts and professions. This is in full accord with the Morrill Act of the 
National Congress and the subsequent acts above referred to. This insti- 
tution, therefore, is the representative of the State and the Nation in 
higher education and research. The charter provides that it shall receive 
and administer all exising grants from the national government and all 
future grants which may come to the State for this purpose. 

BUILDINGS 



' A ' .h. ^roun are the Agricultural Building, Calvert Hall, 
ings comprised in the group are ^^^ f^^ x^uildings Chemical Building, 
Silvester Hall, the Library, Eng-e^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ p,. 

Morrill Hall, Horticultural ^^^^^^^^'^f^J'^^'^'^f temporary auditorium, 
Villon, Poultry Building, temporary ^^^^^f ^.^^V '"°^^^^ Experiment 

rirls' Home Economics Practice House, and the Agricultural i^xp 
Son ioup. Other buildings are located in Baltimore. 



Agricultural Building 



college of Home Economics and the Ag"cuimm ^^^^^ 

Extension Service are housed m the Agr cultural BuiW S _ 

ture was completed and occupied in Apnl. 1918. The building 
a ns biological, soils and bacteriological laboratories. 



Buildings in Baltimore 



Some eighteen buildings have been erected on the University campus 
for research, extension, and residence educational purposes. The build- 

22 



devoted to Law and one the Universiy Hospital. 

Calvert Hall 
Excellent dormitory accommodations tor men are^P^^^^^^^^^^ Calved 
Hall a modern fireproof structure erected and "ccupiea m 
f„ part the place of the two dormitories destroyed by fire in 1912. 

New Dormitories 

TWO new buildings recently were completed. One is used as a men^s 
do^itory and has been dedicated - S"vester Hall^ in ^^^^^^^^ 
Silvester, who served as president of the '^ "^^^^^^J.^jj; ^Id ng while 
r;rersi:a m^eirn^errirof rH=Uomics group. 

Morrill Hall 

The college of Arts and Sciences is parUally ^^^^^^f^Z^:; 
which is a three-story building erected in 1898. This Duuq 
^as occupied by the work in agriculture and engineering. 

Chemical Building 

for the state work in analysis of leeos ^e undergraduate work in 

and Sciences. 

23 



Engineering Buildings 

The Mechanical Buildine wn<? th^ a. * ^ .^ 
structed. having been comDlel. It "' °' '''" Engineering group con- 
chanical Engineering irSSflrLTp"''' '' ''^ department of Me- 
neering ..auions. with almpai^nrsSpTTeS^'^t ^- ^^ ^°^^- 

three buildings are connected by' do's^d passaiC ' " ''''■ "'^ 

The Infirmary 

JntTrer?: :r:/LZr^,Tr ^-^^^^^^ --"- -- 

nation of contagious diseases, barters fotraTne7""'' "'''' '°'' '''''■ 
doctor's office, special culinary en uiDmen^VH """■'"' "^"'^""^ ••'"''"' 

patients. '^ equipment, and accommodations for twenty 

The Horticultural Building 

BuilX:°c':ipfrdl"S5Tn^'n.orr '^''' T^ '"^ ''' "-"--- 
a part of this building. '™ greenhouses are constructed as 

The Stock Judging Pavilion 

.n™: sr- ^Lr:? s ::r*';^^r "r.'- "- '-"• 

sons. sncuitural Building is an auditorium to seat 600 per- 

The Pouhry Buildings 

pouS ?uirdirg""?hrrar rid'r"^"^^ ^^^^"-^^ ^^ -^^•^ - ^^ ^he 

Offices and incubating roomT ' '""'""^ classrooms, laboratories, 



Experiment Station Group 



The main building of the exDPrim<>nt c«o4- 
structure of the colonial period tTT • "" ^'""P '" * '^''^e brick 

the Station, the chem" a and nhvli T ? '''' '^'' "* *^« director of 
for research in soils SLrbuEroTthi'''"'""^' '''' ^ '^^'^'''^^ 
testing laboratories and classro m'k re LTo\? "'' ^"' ""^ 

omy Building, a secondary horticultural LiM.^^'"^"'"'""' ^"^ ^S'-""" 
buildings, silos, etc. ''""'cultural buUdmg, barns, farm machinery 

Temporary Dining-Hall 

A temporary wooden structure has been erertert t^ 

.'ir' ™l srz:rr= ~ -Tr --5 

«4 



Other Buildings 

Another wooden structure used for several years as an auditorium is 
serving as a dormitory. The University also maintains a laundry building 
in which it handles the students' laundry at cost. It also has two frame 
dwelling-houses in which it houses part of its labor. A brick power- 
house contains apparatus for pumping all water for University use. An- 
other small frame house contains machinery for cc.nning and drying 
fruits and vegetables. 

The Filtration Plant 

Recently completed is a modern filtration plant for furnishing an ample 
supply of water for use in the dormitories and general university build- 
ings. This plant consists of a reservoir with a reserve supply of 1,500,000 
gallons, sediment tanks, filter beds, pumps, etc. 

Gemeaux Hall 

This building serves as a dormitory and practice house for the girls 
taking courses in Home Economics. It is fitted with all the appliances of 
the modern home. 

• Library Building 

The Library is housed in a separate two-story building on the first floor 
of which is collected material relating to agriculture. The special cata- 
logue cards issued by the United States Department of Agriculture make 
accessible the large amount of state and national bulletin literature on 
agricultural and related scientific subjects. The second floor is used for 
general reading and reference work. 

Through the Inter-Library Loan systems of the Library of Congress 
and the United States Department of Agriculture the University Library 
is able to supplement its reference material by either personal work in 
these Washington libraries or by actually borrowing the books from them. 

The Library contains 10,000 bound books and 5,000 United States Gov- 
ernment documents and unbound reports and pamphlets. All material 
is on open shelves where students can easily locate it. The Library is 
open from 8.30 A. M. to 5.30 P. M., Monday to Friday inclusive; Saturday 
from 8.30 A. M. to 12.30 P. M.; Sunday afternoon from 2.30 to 5.30; and 
all evenings except Saturday, from 6 to 10. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SELF AID 



High School Scholarships 

While the University has no endowment nor loan funds with which to 
assist students, it has established for each high and preparatory school in 
Maryland and the District of Columbia one scholarship each year. For 

25 



X 



\ 



Qualified to enter the freshfcaTcTals ' "' Preparatory school and 

schU'SS^^orreerrn"^^^ ^^ ^^ -^ count, 

school, in „,aklng recon^n. nda^ns ti^rs^Lol^'';'"- '^' '' ^'^ '^'^'' 
only take into consideration class standing but al'nab;;:-!'%''°""^ °°* 
expenses of a university education JnabUity to meet the 

piei?h:r;rcrr stiSe: "^''^ '"- *^^ ^-- -™^"^ ---^<^ - cc. 

./ail^e^S'^f^^t :;•-: SSy ^ "^"--- - — wor. „r 

cipals direct to the UniSs ty Rec^Zts'or"""'"'""'"^ °' ^^« P"-'"' 
Ships must he qualified to ent theTlSLVJcC^^"'^ "'^°"' ^^''°'^'- 

6. Applicants from Charles, St. Mary's and r.iL . 
one of the non-collegiate curriculums or if enteral f„m""?v. "'^ ''^' 
t.on, may take one of four-year curricuiumsT.TnVra ZTJ. "'^"*"- 



Fellowships 



The University also offers a number of fellowshins Th.=. 
either to its own graduates or the graduates L nth ,f ""^^ "^ ^*''^° 

to pursue courses in the Grartn!tf « ? , ^"^ "^""^^^^ ^'^° desire 

Fellowships are availa^?; in The" C llegt : iStuS c 7^^ "^^^^^^^^ 
neering and College of Arte, ur.^ o Agriculture, College of Engi- 

from 1500 to $720 Sr year "" '"'^^^ fellowships are worfh 



Industrial Scholarships 



There are available each year ac; tbo^ i.^ 

dustrial scholarships, in whLh ;t"denl rece '"'"*' ' ""'"'^^^ °^ '"' 
ing to certain prescribed d.Tt,! r compensation for attend- 

ing hall. JanitoHrr^fce'ln thrdoT;L^7:;r' T ''^ *^'"" '"^ ^'^^ '^^- 
.reauently earn enough in this trtTcrrtr r L^S" "^ -- 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



Honorable mention is given tn «t.irt<.„*c t 
work in the upper one^h o each c^^^^^^^^ ITfr^ ^' undergraduate 
tenth is given first honor. «nH .t . ^''"'''^'- '^^^ "PP^r one- 

student/course a^eLTS B """' '^"^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ the 

26 



Debating and Oratory 

An annual debate is held each year in January between the Poe and 
New Mercer Literary societies for the ''President's Cup," given by Dr. H. J. 
Patterson. 

A gold medal is awarded by the Alumni Association each year to the 
best debater in the University, the test being a debate between picked 
teams from the two literary societies. 

Th Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges, consisting of Washing- 
ton College, Western Maryland College, St. John's College, and University 
of Maryland offers each year gold medals for first and second places in an 
oratorical contest that is held between representatives of the four insti- 
tutions. 

Athletics 

The class of 1908 offers annually to "the man who typifies the best in col- 
lege athletics" a gold medal. The medal is given in honor of former Presi- 
dent R. W. Silvester and is known as "The Silvester Medal for Excel- 
lence in Athletics. 

The Military Medal 

The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal to the member of the 
battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. '' 

The Company Sword 

The class of 1897 awards annually to the captain of the best drilled com- 
pany of the University battalion a silver mounted sword. 

The Citizenship Prize 

A gold medal is presented annually by H. C. Byrd, a graduate of the 
class of 1908, to the member of the senior class who during his collegiate 
career has nearest typified the model citizen and who has done most for 
the general advancement of the interests of the University. 

The Goddard Medal 

The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is awarded annually to the 
man from Prince George's County making the highest average in his 
studies and who at the same time embodies the most manly attributes. 
The medal is given by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James of Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal 

The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma Fraternity offers annually a 
gold medal to that freshman who makes the highest scholastic average 
during the first two terms. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association is an organization composed of alumni of the 
University. This Association has an office at the University and has 

27 






The Student Assembly 



Council is the exeeuUve commUtee o^^^^^^^^^^ '"^^ ^^"•'^'^* ^^^-^^^ve 

operation with the facuItvTn thl If "" ''''"^*"^ ^'^'^ ^^'« !«» «o- 

ine lacuity in the management of student affairs. 

The Dramatic Club 

Fraternities and Sororities 

S jrN::;ijLf;,rsr;mt^^^^^^^ -ppa A,pha, 

mo Omicron. Delta Psi Omega stgma Ta^. I, . ''^''''''''''- ^u Sig- 
Sigma Delta, Lambda Tau. ^^*' *'"'' '"'^^^ sororities. 

Societies 

Two literary societies are maintained by the student, tr, r, 
Mercer. These hold wee.ly meetings at wi:fc; ^^a^ prgrlire ^Je^ 

branches of chemistry and „n.n T ' ^"^ specialists in certain 
tion are featured. '^'^ discussions of various chemical ques- 

Jhe Engineering Society is composed of students in the College of Engi- 

t.JtftSrirL'creV^hTrgrJnV'^T"^ " -^<=^^' ^— ^ '-« 
bandry Society '^' Agronomy Society, and the Animal Hus- 

pertain to engineering or agriculture. ^' ^''''^^^ *-^^*- ^^^ subjects 



Phi Kappa Phi 



in^an h?anche?;fie:rning"' '""""'^ '^^^^™"^ ''^^^ *° ^^^ ^^"''-ts 

upper one^iouHh'of^he g adVarg^a'st-Tefond ^^'"'^'^^'^ ^""""^ *^' 

uduiig Class, second, any graduate student 

28 



who would have been eligible as an undergraduate and who has made an 
honorable record in graduate work. 

The prime object of the fraternity is to emphasize the attainment of 
scholarship and character and to stimulate mental achievement through 
the prize of membership. 

Alpha Zeta 

Alpha Zeta is a National Honorary Agricultural Fraternity open to 
students who have been in the Institution at least five terms and who 
are in the upper two-fifths of the class so far as scholastic standing is 
concerned. Students are elected to the fraternity if they show signs of 
scholarship, and leadership and when they can win the respect of the 
faculty and student body. The object, therefore, of the fraternity is to 
foster scholarship, leadership, and good fellowship. 

Le Cercle Francais 

This club was organized in 1919 by the Department of French. Its 
membership is composed of the faculty of the department, students pur- 
suing courses in French, and others interested in the study of that lan- 
guage. The aims of the club are to awaken a live interest in French lit- 
erature, culture, history an^ customs, and to build up an ease in the use 
of the language. Although fostered by the College of Arts and Sciences, 
this club is not restricted to students enrolled therein, but is open to all 
who are interested in things French. 

Clubs 

The Rifle Club is affiliated with the National Rifle Association and en- 
gages in matches with other colleges and rifle organizations. 

The Chess and Checker Club is organized for the promotion of these 
games among those that engage in them. Annual tournaments are con- 
ducted for which gold medals are awarded. 

The County Clubs are organizations of students from the same counties. 
The Baltimore City Club and District of Columbia Club are organizations 
of the same nature. 

The Rossbourg Club is the student organization which has charge of 
most of the formal dances of the students. This club is open to all students. 

The Keystone Club came into being when a score of men from the 
"Keystone State" found each other on the campus. All Pennsylvanians 
are eligible. Its aim is to promote a feeling of interest and good fellow- 
ship among the students from Pennsylvania. 

The Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations are organ- 
ized to be of general service to the students. They perform important 

29 



functions In matters of obtaining employment for worthy student, i. 



Student Publications 



.tm2T\l"^°'T'",T'''^^^''- ^""^ ^i-rnonai>acK is published by the 

.r;t;rrc:rbrrns"r2^^^^^^^^^^ 

general college life. ^^ atmosphere of 



ADMINISTRATION 



Of Reg^nircrsist nf fT"'"^ 't "^''^ '^ '^^ ^'^^^"^ '^ ^ ^oard 
termsTf n ne ye^rs Th ' ;r w T" ''"'"°'^' '^ ^"^^ «°-^'''°'- '^^ 
President TheTnlvIrslty Z"iT °' ''l ''"'"^'•^"^ *^ ^-^^'^ '-^ the 
sistant to the President th^ ™ ^ °'°'*''°' "' ^''^ President, the As- 
and Director orthr;;J„^l„^!^^^^^^^ Agricultural Experiment Station, 
and th» n./„ 7 Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service 

Un ve' ity w:;r y.^.f t"^'""' ^° ^'^^ ^'•^^''^^"^ - -" P '-- o^ 

For purposes of administration and coordination nf «irr.,-io 
studies, the following educational organiSCare in eVec" "^"""^ **' 
College of Agriculture. 
College of Engineering. 
College of Arts and Sciences. 
School of Medicine. 
The Law School. 
School of Dentistry. 
School of Pharmacy. ' 
College of Education. 
College of Home Economics. 
The Graduate School. 
The Summer School. 
Department of Military Science and Tactics 

The ^n^^T^'^T ^^ ^^'''''^' Education and Recreation. 

The College of Agriculture offers curricula in- ni n^r.^ ^ a . 
(2) Agronomy f^^ T?^*»r«, Tvyr ^"^"cuia m. (1) General Agriculture; 

I J Agronomy, (3) Farm Management; (4) Geoloev and ^niiQ. ft^^ t^ 
mology; (6) Vegetable Gardening; (7) Floricu^^tre m t i ' ^ ^ ^^" 
dening; (9) Economic Entomology^ 10)^w5l^^^^^^^^^ fj" 

mal Husbandry; (12) Dairy Husbandry ^^^^culture, (ii) Am- 

The College of Education offers curricula in: (i) Agricultural Educa- 



tion; (2) Home Economics Education; (3) Industrial Education; (4) 
General Education. 

The College of Engineering offers curricula in: (1) Civil Engineering; 
(2) Mechanical Engineering; (3) Electrical Engineering; (4) Highway 
Engineering; (5) Sanitary Engineering. 

The Graduate School offers courses in any of the subjects in which a 
graduate may desire to obtain an advanced degree. The Graduate School 
consists of all students taking graduate work in the various departments. 
Those qualified to supervise graduate work in the various departments 
constitute the faculty of the Graduate School, presided over by a research 
specialist designated as Dean. 

The College of Home Economics offers a curriculum in which may be 
obtained the general principles of home economics, a knowledge of home 
economics for teaching purposes, or a specialized knowledge of particular 
phases which deal with the work of the dietitian or institutional manager. 
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula with majors in: (1) 
Ancient Languages and Philosophy; (2) Economics; (3) English Lan- 
guage, Literature and Journalism; (4) General Science; (5) History and 
Political Science; (6) French, German, or Spanish; (7) General, Indus- 
trial, and Physical Chemistry; (8) Public Speaking with reference to Spe- 
cial Professions; (9) Zoology; studies also are offered in Music and Li- 
brary Science. 

The Department of Military Science and Tactics has charge of the work 
of the Reserve Oflacers' Training Corps unit established by the War Depart- 
ment. During the first two years of the student's stay at the University 
he is required to take the Basic R. O. T. C. courses. During his junior 
and senior years he may elect three credit hours in Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps each term. 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation works in close co- 
operation with the military department and supervises all physical train- 
ing, general recreation, and intercollegiate athletics. 

The Summer School of six weeks offers courses in subjects given during 
the regular session of the University, with the exception of Medicine, 
Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Law, and in special subjects, such as school ad- 
ministration, classroom management and principles of secondary educa- 
tion for high school and elementary school teachers. Certain courses given 
in the Summer School are of collegiate grade and may be counted toward 
the bachelor's degree. Advanced courses may count toward the master's 
degree. 

General matter having relationship to offerings of the School of Medi- 
cine and the Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry, and the School of Law 
will be found elsewhere. 



30 



31 



EXTENSION AND RESEARCH 



Agriculture and Home Economics 

The agricultural and home economics extension service of the Uni- 
versity, in co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture, 
carries to the people of the State through practical demonstrations con- 
ducted by specialists of the College of Agriculture and county agents, the 
results of investigations in the fields of Agriculture and Home Economics. 
The organization consists of the administrative forces, including the direc- 
tor, assistant director, specialists and clerical force, the county agricul- 
tural demonstration agents, and the home demonstration agents in each 
county and in the chief cities of the State. The county agents and the 
specialists jointly carry on practical demonstrations under the several 
projects in the production of crops or in home-making, with the view of 
putting into practice on the farms of the State improved methods of 
Agriculture and Home Economics that have stood the test of investiga- 
tion, experimentatfon, and experience. Movable schools are held in the 
several counties. At such schools the specialists discuss phases of Agri- 
culture and Home Economics in which the people of the respective 
counties are especially interested. 

The work of the Boys' Agricultural Clubs is of especial importance from 
an educatfonal point of view. The specialists in charge of these projects, 
in co-operation with the county agricultural agents and the county school 
officers and teachers, organize the boys of the several communities of the 
county into agricultural clubs for the purpose of teaching them by actual 
practice the principles underlying agriculture. The boys hold regular 
meetings for the discussfon of problems connected with their several pro- 
jects and for the comparison of experiences. Prizes are offered for the 
stimulation of interest in the work. 

The Home Economics specialists and agents organize the girls into 
clubs for the purpose of instructing them in the principles underlying 
canning, drying, and preserving fruits and vegetables, cookine:. dressmak- 
ing and other forms of Home Economics work. 

Educational value of the demonstrations, farmers* meetings, movable 
schools, clubs, and community shows is Incalculable. They serve to carry 
the institution to the farmer and to the home-maker. 

General Extension 

This phase of the extension service of the University is conducted in co- 
operation with the United States Bureau of Education, and is intended 
to make the general branches of educational curriculum of greater service 
to the people of the State. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Vitally associated with the extension service is the experimental work in 
agriculture. 

32 



in 1847 an act was passed making provision for a State laboratory in 
which the application of chemistry to agriculture was to be undertaken. 
In 1858 experimentation was undertaken on the College farm. After two 
or three years this work was interrupted by the general financial distress 
of the time and by the Civil War. In 1888, under the provisions of the 
Hatch Act of the preceding year, the Agricultural Experiment Station 

was established. 
This act states the object and purpose of the experiment stations as 

follows: 

That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to con- 
duit original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants 
and animals- the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the 
remeSfor'the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their 
different sta^^^^^ growth; the comparative advantages of rotative crop- 
f^nras pSd under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new 
D ants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the chemi- 
^irforposmon of manures, natural or artificial, -^^^^/^^P^^j^^^^^^^^^ f^f, 
signed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds, the 
TdaDtation and^v^^ of grasses and forage plants; the composition and 
dlS^tlbrntv of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
S fie aL econom^^^ involved in the production of butter and 

cheese and such other researches or experiments bearing ^^^^f ^ «^^^^^ 
Sultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
Sable having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the 
respective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the experiment stations there was practi- 
cally no agricultural science in this country. The work done by these 
institutions during the past quarter of a century has given a science of 
agriculture to teach, and laid a broad foundation for development. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension work on a na- 
tional basis has been the direct outgrowth of the work of the experiment 

station. , ^ ,, * *««; 

The students ot the University, taking courses in the College of Agri- 
culture, are kept in close touch with the investigations in progress. 

The Eastern Branch 

The Eastern Branch of the University of Maryland is located at Prin- 
cess Anne, Somerset County. It is maintained for the education of ne- 
groes in agriculture and mechanic arts. 

INCOME 

The University is supported entirely by funds appropriated for its use 
by the State and Federal Government. State appropriations prior to the 
present biennium were very meager but with the awakening of the people 
to the importance of the institution adequate appropriations to meet all 
needs are expected. The appropriations from the Federal Government are 
derived from the original Land Grant Act. from the second Morrill Act 
the Nelson Act, the Smith-Hughes and Smith-Lever Acts, and the Hatch 

33 



and Adams Acts. The University, with the exception of its professional 
schools in Baltimore, charges no tuition and consequently has no funds 
from that source. 



Elective Subjects 



To be selected from 



ADMISSION 



General Statement 

An applicant for admission to any of the colleges or schools of the 
University must be at least sixteen years of age. 

Women are admitted to all of the departments under the same condi- 
tions and on the same terms as men. 

Students may be admitted at the beginning of any term, but should 
enter, if possible, at the beginning of the fall term (in 1921,, September 
19). Students can seldom enter the College of Engineering or the Schools 
of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy or Dentistry to advantage except at the 
opening of the school year in September, or October, as the case may be. 

In general the requirements for admission to the freshman class are the 
same as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high schools of 
Maryland. A candidate for admission by certificate must be a graduate 
of an approved high school or other accredited school. Applicants who 
have not been graduated from accredited schools must pass entrance exami- 
nations designated by the University Entrance Board. 

Number of Units Required 

At least fifteen units of high school or other secondary school work in 
acceptable subjects must be offered by every candidate. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school 
and constitutes approximately a quarter of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Two 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. 

Required and Elective Subjects 
♦Prescribed Units. 

English 3 

tMathematics 2 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 

*In addition to the prescribed units listed, two years of any one foreign language are 
required for admission to the pre-medical curricuhim. 

t An additional unit of mathematics is required for admission to the College of En- 
gineering. The additional unit should include Algebra, ^/2, and Solid Geometry, %. 

34 



Agriculture 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Civics 

Commercial Subjects 

Drawing 

Economics 

English 

General Science 



the following subjects: 

Geology 

History 

Home Economics 

Industrial Subjects 

Language 

Mathematics 

Physical Geography 

Physics 

Physiology 

Zoology 



Methods of Admission 

The credit required for admission to the undergraduate departments 
may be secured as follows: 

(a) By certificate 

(b) By examination 

(c) By transfer from another university or college of 

recognized standing. 



(A) Admission By Certificate 



Blank certificates for students wishing to enter the University by certi- 
ficate from an approved high school or other secondary school may be had 
of the Registrar. They should be obtained early and filled out and sent 
to the Registrar for approval as soon as possible after the close of the high 

school in June. 

Accredited Schools 

The State Board of Education prepares a list of approved high schools 
each year. The University accepts graduates from these schools without 
question. Other preparatory schools may be visited by the high school 

inspector upon request. 

Entrance credit will also be accepted on certificate from the following 

sources: 

(1) From school accredited by the Association of Colleges and Prepara- 

tory Schools of the Southern States. 

(2) From schools accredited by the North Central Association of Col- 

leges and Secondary Schools. 

(3) From schools accredited to the state universities which are in- 

cluded in the membership of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

35 



(4) From schools approved by the New England College Entrance Certi- 

ficate Board. 

(5) From high schools and academies registered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York. 

(6) From College Entrance Examination Board of New York. 

(7) From high and preparatory schools on the accredited list of other 

state boards of education where the requirements for graduation 
are equivalent to the standard set by the Maryland State Board of 
Education. 

(8) From the state normal schools of Maryland and other state normal 

schools having equal requirements for graduation. 

(B) Admission By Examination 

I. The University Entrance Examinjtions. 

The University entrance examinations are given at the University in 
College Park immediately before the opening of the fall term in Septem- 
ber. Students who need to take the examinations should make all neces- 
sary preparations several weeks in advance. These examinations cover 
all the subjects required or accepted for entrance as outlined. 

An examination fee of $5.00 is charged for entrance examinations. 

II. The Examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

The certificate of the College Entrance Examination Board, showing a 
grade of 60 per cent or higher will be accepted for admission in any 
elective subject. These examinations will be held only once a year begin- 
ning the third Monday in June. 

All applications for examination must be addressed to the Secretary of 
the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York, N. Y., and must be made upon a blank form to be obtained from 
the Secretary of the board on application. 

Applications for examinations at points in the United States east of the 
Mississippi River and at points on the Mississippi River, must be received 
by the Secretary of the Board at least three weeks in advance of the ex- 
aminations; applications for examinations at points in the United States 
west of the Mississippi River must be received at least four weeks in 
advance of the examinations; and applications for examinations outside of 
the United States must be received at least six weeks in advance of the 
examinations. 

Applications received later than the time specified will be accepted when 
it is possible to arrange for the admission of the candidate concerned, but 
only on payment of $6.00 in addition to the usual fee. 

The examination fee is $6.00 for all candidates examined at points in 
the United States, and $20.00 for all candidates examined outside of the 
United States. The fee, which cannot be accepted in advance of the appli- 
cation, should be remitted by postal order, express order, or draft on New 
York to the order of the College Entrance Examination Board. 



III. The New York Regents' Examinations. 

Credit will be accepted, also from the examinations conducted by the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

(C) Admission By Transfer of Entrance Credits From Other 

Colleges or Universities 

A person who has been admitted to another college or university of 
recognized standing will be admitted to this University by presenting a 
certificate of honorable dismissal from the institution from which he comes 
and an official statement of the subjects upon which he was admitted to 
such institution, provided that the work appears to be equivalent to that 
required by the University of Maryland. 

Students intending to transfer to the University of Maryland should 
have sent an official statement of their college credits to the Registrar. 

Special Requirements . of Colleges and Schools 

Requirements for admission to the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy 
and' Dentistry will be found elsewhere under chapters given to these 
schools. 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

A student coming from a standard college or university may secure ad- 
vanced standing by presenting a statement of his complete academic record 
certified by the proper oflScials. This statement must be accompanied by 
a set of secondary school credentials presented for admission to the college 
or university. Full credit is given for work done in other institutions 
when found to be equivalent in extent and quality to that required at this 
University. An applicant may request examination for advanced credit in 
any subject. In case the character of a student's work in any subject is 
such as to create doubt as to the quality of that which preceded, the 
University reserves the right to revoke at any time any credit assigned 
on certificate. 

Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may secure, in 
no case will he be given the baccalaureate degree with less than one year 
of resident work. 

Unclassified Students 

Mature persons who have had insufficient preparation to pursue any of 
the four-year curricula may, with the consent of the Committee on 
Courses, matriculate for such subjects as they are fitted to take. Such 
students, however, will be ineligible for degrees. 

Graduation, Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates 

All undergraduate four-year courses lead to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts. The total requirements for graduation vary. 



36 



37 



according to the type of work in the different colleges, from 204 to 220 
term credit hours. A term credit hour is one lecture or recitation each 
week for one term of twelve weeks; two or three hours of laboratory or 
field work are counted equivalent to one lecture or recitation. All practi- 
cal work is scheduled for two or three hours, depending upon the nature 
of the w^ork. To find full information of requirements, the student should 
refer to the description of the school in which interested. 

Candidates are recommended for graduation after they have completed 
the prescribed course of study, including all the required work and enough 
electives to total the required credit hours. 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bach- 
elor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy in 
Arts, Doctor of Philosophy in Science, Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engi- 
neer, Electrical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of 
Dental Surgery, Graduate in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

Degrees are not granted to the students in the two-year curricula, but at 
graduation time certificates are awarded. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



MAKE ALL CHECKS PAYABLE TO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
FOR EXACT AMOUNT OF BILLS FOR TERM CHARGES. 

The charges for each term must be paid at the beginning of the term. 
Students will not be admitted to classes until payment has been made or 
until satisfactory arrangements have been made for deferring payment. 

The estimated average annual expenses of undergraduates at College 
Park are as follows: 

Fii'st Second Third Total for 
Term Term Term Year* 

Fixed charges $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $60.00 

♦Matriculation Fee (paid once).. 5.00 5.00 

Board (36 weeks @ $6.75) 87.75 87.75 67.50 243.00 

Lodging (38 weeks @ $1.85) 24.05 24.05 22.20 70.30 

Laundry (36 weeks @ $0.60) 7.80 7.20 6.60 21.60 

tAthletic Fee 15.00 15.00 

Totals $159.60 $139.00 $116.30 $414.90 

* Paid one.? by students on first enterinp:, be.G:innin.c: first term 1922-1923. 

t These fees constitute a fund which is collected from all students in the University 
nt Cr>llcpe Park for maintenance of athletics, and is turned over in toto to the Athletic 
Board for disbursement. 

Non-residents, except from the District of Columbia, will be charged a 
fee of $10.00 per term or $25^0 per year if paid in advance. 

Students taking pre-Medical work will be charged a special fee of $10.00 
per term. » 

38 



The above does not take into consideration the cost of books, supplies 
and personal needs. This depends largely on the tastes and habits of the 
individual student. Books and supplies average about $40. 

The fixed charges made to all students are a part payment of overhead 
expenses, such as janitor service, hospital and doctor's fees, general labora- 
tory fees, library, physical training, etc. 

Board, lodging and other charges may vary from term to term, but 
every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

Board and lodging may be obtained at boarding houses or in private 

families if desired. 

Students rooming outside the University may obtain board and laundry 
at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunch rooms. 

All the University property in possession of the individual student will 
be charged against him, and the parent or guardian must assume responsi- 
bility for its return without injury other than results from ordinary wear. 

All students assigned to dormitories are required to provide themselves 
with one pair of blankets for single bed, two pairs of sheets for single bed, 
four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow, two laundry bags, one broom and 
one waste basket. 

Special Fees 

Bacteriology Laboratory fee ^2.00 

Fee for special condition examination 1-^^ 

Fee for changes in registration after first week of term 2.00 

Fee for failure to register within seven days after opening of term. . 2.0U 

Graduation fee payable prior to graduation l^-^^ 

Certificate fee payable prior to graduation ^-^^ 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's office within seven 

days after opening of term ^.00 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to, a 
student who is in arrears in his accounts. 

By vote of the Class Presidents' Council of the Baltimore Schools and 
the Student Council of the College Park Schools, the University is re- 
quested to include a uniform fee of $6.00 to cover the cost of subscription 
to the student publications, ''Terra Mariae" and the "Diamondback" 
each year. The University will collect this fee and turn it over to the 
organization in charge of these publications. Each student is earnestly 
requested to cooperate in this way. 

Graduate Fees 

Each graduate student is subject to a matriculation fee of $10.00, a fixed 
charge of $1.00 per term credit hour, and a diploma fee of $10.00. 

39 



Withdrawals 

When a stndent desires to withdraw from the University, he is required 
to secure from his Dean a written approval, which must be presented to 
the Registrar. CHARGES FOR PULL TIME WILL BE CONTINUED 
AGAINST HIM UNLESS THIS IS DONE. 

Students withdrawing before the end of any term will be charged 
$7.00 per week for board and $2.00 per week for lodging for the time dur- 
ing the term preceding their withdrawal. 

Refiuids 

No fixed charge will be refunded. 

No laboratory fee will be refunded after the middle of the term. 

The low charge for board at the dining hall is made possible only by 
the use of the term basis in figuring costs. The overhead is fixed for the 
term and no refunds can be made for short absences without a loss to 
the dining hall and to the students who eat there. Therefore, no refunds 
will be made except in case of withdrawal or prolonged absence due to 
sickness or unavoidable cause. 

* * * * :ti * 

The fees and expenses for Schools located in Baltimore are: 

Matriculation Fee Tuition LaJ)oratory 

Medical School $5.00 per term $250.00 per year 

Dental School 5.00 per year 200.00 per year $5.00 

Pharmacy School 5.00 per year 175.00 per year 5.00 

Law School 10.00 per year 100.00 per year 

Extension Course in Commerce — 

Day Course 5.00 per year 180.00 per year 

Evening Course 5.00 per year 90.00 per year 

There are no dormitories connected with the Baltimore Schools. The 
average cost of living per year in that city is $600.00 

A breakage fee of $10.00 is charged to each student in the Medical 
School and School of Pharmacy. 

(Note: For special fees for Baltimore Schools, see bulletins issued by 
these schools.) 



ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 



Date of Registration and Penalty for Late Registration 

Registration for the fall term takes place during the first two days of 
the term. Students register for the second term before leaving for their 
Christmas holidays and for the third term during the last two weeks of 
the winter term. 

40 



After seven days from the opening of a term fees are imposed for a 
change of registration or for late registration. 

Students, who for any reason are more than seven days late in register- 
ing, must secure permission from the instructors in charge for admission 
to courses. Such permission must be given in writing to the student's 
dean before course cards will be issued. 

Physical Examination and Physical Training 

All students who enter the University undergo a physical examination 
by the physician in charge. This is conducted in cooperation with the 
Military Department under the direction of which most of the work in 
physical training is done. The examination also is a measure for protect- 
ing the health of the student body. 

Maximum and Minimmn Schedule 

The prescribed number of credit hours that a student ordinarily may 
carry ranges from 15 to 19. No student may register for less than the 
ordinary number without permission from his dean. 

A student who obtains an average grade of "B'* may, with the permis- 
sion of his dean, be allowed to carry such additional courses as may be 
scheduled. This privilege is forfeited if the student's average grade falls 

below "B". ^ ^^ 

No regular student working for a degree may carry less than 12 credit 

hours. 

Examinations 

No final examinations are given. At least two unannounced tests are 
given in each course per term. The final grade is derived by combining 
the average daily grade and the average test grades. 

Grading System 

Students are graded with the following marks: A, B, C, D, E, and F. 
A, B, C, and D are passing; E represents a condition and F a failure. 

Student Advisory and Honor System 

A Committee comprising five members of the faculty acts as the advisory 
board to the Students' Executive Council of the Students' Assembly. The 
Students' Executive Council, with the aid of the Advisory Board manages 
all student affairs. The Honor System is in effect for all students, and 
each student always is on his honor to live up to the highest principles of 
democratic government. 

The Students' Assembly 

All students assemble in the Auditorium at 11:20 o'clock every Wednes- 
day. Every other Wednesday is turned over to the students to transact 

41 



business that concerns the whole student body. The Department of Public 
Speaking arranges the programme for the remaining Wednesdays. Note- 
worthy speakers from various parts of the United States are called upon to 
talk to the students. 

General Suggestions to New Students 

Candidates for admission to the University should correspond with the 
Registrar at College Park, who in turn will supply them with the neces- 
sary forms for transferring preparatory credits. It is advisable for pro- 
spective students to dispose of the preliminaries early in the year in order 
to prevent disappointments. Often a student comes to the University 
without taking the preliminary steps only to find that he does not have 

enough credits to enter. The Registrar is always glad to advise with the 
students concerning their preparations. The Registrar sends out a general 
statement of the procedure for new students to follow after they are duly 

admitted to the University. 



The College of Agriculture 



The teaching of a rational, practical system of farming is the primary 
aim of the College of Agriculture. The permanent prosperity of rural 
citizens is in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the land. The 
most successful farmer is the one who can produce a maximum quantity 
per acre of the best quality of agricultural products at a minimum cost 
and dispose of them at the markets to the best advantage. The modern 
farmer must know the kinds of plants to grow and how to improve them; 
how to maintain orchards, gardens, and attractive surroundings; some- 
thing of the soil, Its cultivation and conservation of fertility; how to com- 
bat plant diseases and insect pests; the selection, breeding, and feeding of 

live stock; the marketing of farm products; modern farm buildings, farm 

equipment and conveniences of the home; and finally how to be leaders 

and promote good citizenship in rural life. 

The curricula are planned to give the student a general knowledge of all 
phases of agriculture and related sciences, but at the same time afford an 
opportunity to specialize along the lines in which he is particularly inter- 
ested. The plan provides for those who wish to take up professions such 
as teaching, research, and county agent work, as well as farming. 

Graduation, Degrees and Certificates 

The College of Agriculture confers the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Two hundred and ten term credit hours are required for graduation. The 
courses required vary according to the" departments in which the student 
elects to specialize. 

The non-collegiate, two-year curriculum leads to a Certificate in Agri- 
culture. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: (1) 
Agronomy (including Forage Crops, Grain Crops, Genetics); (2) Agricul- 
tural Education (see College of Education); (3) Animal Husbandry; (4) 
Animal Pathology and Veterinary Medicine; (5) Bacteriology and Sanita- 
tion; (6) Dairy Husbandry; (7) Entomology and Bee Culture; (8) Farm 
Equipment; (9) Farm Management; (10) Forestry; (11) Horticulture 
(including Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Landscape Gardening, and 
Floriculture); (12) Plant Pathology; (13) Plant Physiology and Bio- 
chemistry; (14) Poultry Husbandry; (15) Soils. 



Agricultural Experiment Station 

The College of Agriculture works in cooperation with the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. Most of the subject matter in agricultural courses is 



42 



43 



tested by the station or furnished as original from its researches. Methods 
and material which are valuable in one state are often worthless in an- 
other, and the station makes it a point to find what is best for the State 
of Maryland. 

The general farm, orchards, gardens, and herds at the Experiment Sta- 
tion are available for laboratory and class use by the college. 

Fellowships 

Graduate Fellowships which carry remuneration of $500 to $1,000 yearly 
are available to graduate students. Students who hold these fellowships 
spend certain time assisting in classes and laboratories. The rest of the 
time may be used for original investigation and assigned to study, the 
time required for a degree depending upon the nature of the fellowship 
held. 

FARM PRACTICE 

Students without farm experience do not, as a rule, secure full benefit 
from any of the agricultural courses. A committee has been appointed for 
the purpose of assisting all students coming to the college without farm 
training to obtain a fair knowledge of actual farm practice. Some time 
during each year the committee will examine each member of the fresh- 
man class and any upperclassmen who have not already satisfied the 
farm practice requirements. 

All students must pass a satisfactory farm practice examination before 
they will be allowed to enter their senior year. Those not able to pass this 
examination will be required to spend at least three months on a farm 
selected by or having the approval of the committee. If the student has 
had no farm experience whatsoever before entering college, he may be re- 
quired to spend six to nine months on a farm. 

The committee reserves the right also to call on all students so placed 
for written reports showing the experience gained while on these farms. 

Curricula In Agriculture 

All students registered for Agriculture take the same work in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years, except those registering for Landscape Garden- 
ing, Floriculture and Animal Pathology and Veterinary Medicine. At the 
end of the sophomore year they may elect to specialize along the lines in 
which they are particularly interested. 



44 



The First Two Years: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 'Term'. I U III 

Gen'l Chem. and Qual. Analysis (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 4 4 4 

=!General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) * 2 

fGeneral Botany (Bot. 101) ^ 4 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) Ill 

(Elect one of the following groups) 

Group A 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) * 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) * 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) 4 

Group B 3 

Language 

Group C 

Mathematics ^ ^ ;* 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 101) 2 2 I 

*Repeated during second half year. 
tOffered also during first half year. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I U III 

Plant Physiology ( Pit. Phys. 101-102 ) * 3 

General Geology (Geol. 101) ^ .. .. 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101-102) * 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 3 3 .. 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) • 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102a-102b) 3 3 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) * * 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) ^ 

Physics (Physics 107-108) ^ ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 2 2 

AGRONOMY 

The curriculum in agronomy aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he can register for 
subjects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular 
farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well 
fitted for general farming, investigational work in the State or Federal 
Experiment Stations, or county agent work. 

The Agronomy Department has a large, well equipped laboratory in the 
new Agricultural Building and a greenhouse for student use, besides free 
access to the Experiment Station fields and equipment. 

45 



Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 105) 

Plant Anatomy (Morph. and Myc. 101) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-101) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Term 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 109) , 

Methods of Crop Investigations (Agron. lOS) , 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 107) 

Seminar (Agron. 110-111) , 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 104) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 

Electives 



II III 



• 


3 


• • 


• 


4 


• • 


3 


3 


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3 


3 


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• 


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3 


3 


• • 


• • 


• 


• • 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


• • 


• 


• • 


3 


3 


2 


2 


I 


II 


/// 


m 


• • 


3 


3 


• • 


• • 


• 


2 


• • 


• 


1 


1 


3 


■ • 


• • 


3 


3 


• • 


3 


• • 


• • 


. 


1 


• • 


• 


• • 


3 


3 


• • 


• • 


2 


10 


10 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Agricultural Education was organized primarily to 
train students who are preparing to teach agriculture in secondary schools. 
In addition to regular entrance requirements of the University, students 
electing to specialize in Agricultural Education must present evidence of 
having acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of 
fourteen years. 

Students must arrange their work so that approximately forty per cent 
will be spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per cent on scientific 
subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of a general educational character 
and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects pertaining to professional 
education. 

(For detailed description of the curriculum in agricultural education see 
the College of Education.) 

46 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The courses in Animal Husbandry are organized with the i^ea of eQuip 
ning men as owners, superintendents, or managers of general or special 
r stock farms. Special attention is given to the care feedmg^^ breed , 
and management of live stock and to the economics of the live stock in 
dustrT opportunity for specialization is offered to those who may desire 
.0 become instructors or investigators in Animal Husbandry. 
^ Herds of cattle and swine are maintained at the U-versity. In a^d^ 
tion there are available for use in instruction, the herds of live stock 
rned by the Federal Bureau of Animal Industry at Beltsville Maryl^^^^ 
Through the courtesy of Maryland breeders, some private herds are also 
available for inspection and instruction. 



Curriculum 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) 

Management Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 

Swine Production (A. H. 105) 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Electives 



Term: 



I 
2 
3 

■ • 
3 
3 



II 
2 



2 



SENIOR YEAR 

Farm Managenient (F. M. 101-102) 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 109) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Nutrition (A. H. 119) 

Animal Genetics (A. H. 118) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 

Tractors (F. E. 103) 

Seminar (A. H. 114) 

Electives 



Term: 



I 
3 
3 



3 



3 
4 
3 

/// 



4 
3 



3 
3 



5 



11 



3 
1 
6 



ANIMAL PATHOLOGY AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The increasing need of veterinarians thoroughly trained in animal hus- 
bandry as well as in medicine and surgery makes it necessary to give such 
instruction as will fit the student to care for valuable live stock and in- 

47 



telligently advise their owners in matters pertaining to successful animal 
husbandry. The six years course leading to the degrees of B. S. and 
D. V. M., as outlined below, should meet this need. 

Curriculum 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I II III 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 4 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 4 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 1 1 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 4 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 4 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) 2 2 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I II III 

Beef Production (A. H. 107) 3 

Management of Dairy Young Stock (A. H. 103) 3 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 3 

Soils (Soils 101-102) 3 3 

Organic Chemistry (Gen. Chem. 112-113) 3 3 

Entomology (Zool. 107) 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102a-102b) 3 3 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 4 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102 ) . . 4 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 4 

Physics (Physics 107-108) 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 2 2 



BACTERIOLOGY AND SANITATION 

The present organization of this Department was brought about with 
two main purposes in view. The first is to give all the students of the 
University an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of the subject. 
This is of prime importance, as Bacteriology is a basic subject and of as 
much fundamental importance as Physics or Chemistry. The second 
purpose, and the one for which this curriculum was designed, was to fit 
students for positions along bacteriological lines. This includes Dairy 
Bacteriologists and Inspectors; Soil Bacteriologists; Federal, State, and 
Municipal Bacteriologists for Public Health positions; Research positions; 
Commercial positions, etc. At present, the demand for individuals quali- 
fied for this work is much greater than the supply, and with the develop- 
ment of the field, this condition is bound to exist for some time. 



The Staff of the Department is made up of well trained and experienced 
men. The equipment and facilities for carrying on the work are excellent. 

Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II HI 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103) ^ ^ 3 

Mycology (Morph. and Mycol. 106) 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) 4 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) ^ 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) ^3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) ^ 

2 B V 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II HI 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) ^ 3 3 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 107-109) 3 3 3 

Market Milk (D. H. 107) ^ 

Milk Testing (D. H. 108) ^ ' * 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) • 

Seminar (Bact. 117-119) ^ ^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) ^ 3 

4 4 Y 

Electives 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The courses in Dairy Husbandry are so organized as to give the student 
a working knowledge of the basic principles underlying successful dairy 
production, market milk, dairy manufacturing and marketing. A dairy 
herd is maintained for experimental purposes, as well as for the purpose 
of teaching the care, feeding and management of dairy cattle. Gradu- 
ates from these courses should be fitted to take up dairy farming, teach- 
ing or experiment station work. Graduate courses are designed to meet 
the needs of those who will take up teaching or research work. 

Students are sent throughout the State to supervise advanced registry 
tests as well as to study general conditions as they exist on some of the 
leading dairy farms. 



48 



49 



\- 



Curriculum 
JUNIOR YEAR Term: 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 103) 

General Bacteriology (Gen. Bact. 101-103) 

Anatomy and Physiology (V. M. 101) 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 104) 

Advanced Registry and Association Work (D. H. 102). 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 105) 

Commercial Dairying (D. H. 106-107) 

Judging Dairy Products (D. H. 103) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Term: 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104-106) 

Market Milk (D. H. 108) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) 

Advanced Testing (D. H. 109) 

Thesis (D. H. 111-113) ..,,.[. 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 

Tractors (F. E. 103) ' 

Electives 



/ 


// 


/// 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


• • 


• • 


• • 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


• • 


• • 


4 


• • 


• • 


2 


• • 


• • 


• • 


3 


• • 


9 • 


3 




9 • 


• • 


2 


1 • 


• • 


4 


• 


3 


• • 


I 


// 


/// 


3 


3 


3 


3 


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« 


• • 


4 


• 


3 


• • 


2 


2 


2 


3 


• • 


• • 


• 


3 


• • 


• 


• • 


3 


6 


6 


5 



ENTOMOLOGY AND BEE CULTURE 

This department is concerned with the teaching of entomology to all 
agricultural students as basic for future work in economic entomology and 
for its pedagogic and cultural value. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in a large 
measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of preventing or 
combating the pests that menace his crops each year. Successful methods 
of control are emphasized in the economic courses. 

There is an ever increasing demand for trained entomologists. The en- 
tomological work of the Experiment Station, the Extension Service, the 
College of Agriculture and the office of the State Entomologist being in one 
administrative unit, enables the student in this department to avail him- 
self of the many advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students have 
special advantages in that they may be assigned to work on station pro- 
jects already under way. 

Courses in beekeeping are offered and new courses will be added as the 
demand warrants. The field for specialists in beekeeping is especially 
attractive now and commercial beekeeping is productive of greater profits 
each year. 

50 



Curriculum 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 4 

General Entomology (Ent. 1(T1) 

Physics (Physics 104-106) 4 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 3 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 

Electives 3 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I 

Insect Morphology (Ent. 102) 2 

Economic Entomology (Ent. 103-104 ) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-103 ) 3 

Electives 12 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I 

Economic Entomology (Ent. 105-107) 5 

Thesis (Ent. 109-111) 2 

Electives 10 

Note: The Freshman yaar is the same as for other agricultural students. 



// 


/// 


4 


• • 


• • 


3 


4 


.4 


2 


2 


3 


• • 


2 


2 


3 


7 



II III 



4 


4 


3 


3 


10 


10 


// 


III 


5 


5 


2 


2 


10 


10 



FARM MANAGEMENT 

In this department are grouped courses in farm management, agricul- 
tural economics, marketing, and the kindred subjects of rural organization. 

Farm management has been defined as the business of the individual 
farmer to so organize his business as to produce the greatest continuous 
profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is in ac- 
cordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It re- 
quires not only knowledge of the many factors involved in the production 
of crops and animals, but also administrative ability to coordinate them 
into the most efficient farm organization. 

The aim of the farm management course is to assist the student to per- 
ceive the just relationship of the several factors of production and dispo- 
sition as applicable to local conditions and to develop in him executive 
and administrative capacity. Students well trained in farm management 
are in demand for county agent work, experiment station or United States 
Government investigation, and college or secondary school teaching. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles underlying 
production, distribution, and consumption, more especially as they bear 
upon agricultural conditions. Labor, land and capital are considered in 
their relationship to agriculture. The need for more exact business records 
on the farm is forcing itself imperatively on the minds of all students of 
agricultural economics. To meet this demand a course is offered in farm 



51 



Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Technical English (Eng. 104-106) ^^^' ^ ^^ ^^^ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) f ^ ^ 

Agricultural Economics ( A. E. 101 ) ^ 

Fertilizers (Soils 105) .' '• '• 3 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 103) ...!...... " ' ' ^ 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) ... " * * ^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) ....^ ^ 

Drainage (F. E. 108) * * * * ^ ^ 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) " * • ^ 

Electives • • 3 

6 6 3 

SENIOR YEAR 

Farm Management (F. M. 10M02) * ^ ^^ ^^^ 

Markets and Marketing (A. E. 102) ^ ^ 

Commercial Law (Econ. 110-112) . ^ 

Community Study (R. o. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

Principles of Rural Organzation (R.' o *104 )* ^ ^ ^ 

Electives • • • • 3 

6 9 9 



HORTICULTURE 

tunities for horticultural enterprises a few 'fh '"'"^ '"''"'"' "^P"^" 
the wide variation in soil ^ST' . . ™°'"® ®^'<^«nt o°es are 

mountainous cou:L"orAii:t;rrG Zt^ tr^"". ''°^^ *" ^-^^ 

to «11 of th« laree ,m,™ „.,t.. ° '■""<' '» the weM, tl.e ne.rnejs 
easy Mi cooip.r.Uv™ lip '"'°""°= "> ™'« »"t.u»g 

....«.o .0 .„o. „„i- xzL" ozrfjs rr„'r.r 

52 



of the four divisions. The courses have been planned to cover such subject 
niatter that upon their completion students should be fitted either to en- 
gage in commercial work, county agent work, or teaching and investiga- 
tional work in the state and federal institutions. 

The department has at its disposal about twenty acres of ground devoted 
to vegetable gardening, eighteen acres of orchards, small fruits and vine- 
yards, and twelve greenhouses, in which flowers and forcing crops are 
grown. Members of the teaching staff are likewise members of the ex- 
periment station staff and thus students have an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the research which the department is carrying on. Ex- 
cellent opportunity for investigating new problems is afforded to ad- 
vanced undergraduates and to graduate students. 

Curricula 

Students who intend to specialize in pomology or vegetable gardening 
are required to take the same subjects which other agricultural students 
take during the first two years. Students who specialize in floriculture 
or landscape gardening, however, will take a slightly different curricula. 
It is felt that such students require certain special courses, which it is 
unnecessary to require of all agricultural students. The curricula follow: 



Pomology 

JUNIOR YEAR 

General Floriculture (Hort. 1*21) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102)... 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 104) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108). 
General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101).. 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

Genetics (Agron. 106) 

Electives 



Term : 



I 
3 
3 

» • 

2 

3 



II 

m • 

3 

• • 

2 



/// 



3 
2 



Term: 



SENIOR YEAR 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102) 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 107) 

Advanced Fruit Judging (Hort. 109) 

Advanced Practical Pomology (Hort. 105) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 

Electives 



53 



3 
3 

1 
1 

2 
1 
6 



4 
8 

• • 

3 
3 
3 



/// 
3 



2 
1 
5 



1 

2 

1 

10 



I 



Vegetable Gardening 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Principles of Economics (Econ. 10M02) '^""'"" f 

Agricultural Economics (A. E 101) 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hori' llVlui ". 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106^ '^ ^ 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 'loi)' : 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) ^ 

Oenetlcs (Agron. 106) 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 118) 

Technical Composition ( Eng. 104-106 )' : ' 

Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. ■l'o6)' ^ 

General Floriculture (Hort 121 ) 

Electives ' 3 

3 

SENIOR YEAR 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort 112) ^'''''"'' ' 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort 116) ^ 

Advanced Vegetable Gardening (HortVli?)' ^ 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort 142) " 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131 ) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-l'45; o 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-1481 

Electives 1 

8 

Floriculture 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Plant Physiology (Pit. Pi^ys. 101-102) "^''"^ ' 

General Geology (Geol. 101) ... 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101*102) ^ 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) ; 

Entomology (Ent. 101) ^ 

Elementary Floriculture (Hort. 122) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) . . 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) ^ 

Electives 2 

4 



3 



/// 



2 

4 



Z 

1 

14 



// 
4 

• • 

3 
3 

• • 

3 

• • 

2' 

2 

1 



3 
2 



// /// 



1 

1 
3 
2 
1 

9 



/// 
3 



2 
2 
5 



54 



JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 123-124) 3 3 

Floricultural Practice (Hort. 125) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 126) 2 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 129) 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132-133) 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 3 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent. 115) 

Systematic Botany (Morph. and Myc. 109) 3 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 118) 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 134) . . 3 

Electives 3 6 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 126-127) 3 3 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 142 ) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 143-145) 2 2 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 1 1 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-148) 1 1 

Electives 11 11 

Note : The Freshman year is the same as for other agricultural students. 

Landscape Gardening 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: I II 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 4 4 

General Botany ( Bot. 101 ) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 

Public Speaking (Pub. Speak. 101-103) 1 1 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 104) 3 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) 3 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 101) 2 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I II 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 4 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 3 

Soil Physics and Management (Soils 101-102) 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103-104) 3 3 

Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 4 

Plane Surveying (Sur. 101-103) 1 2 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 1 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 2 

Electives . , r r r r r r 2 2 

55 



1 

• • 

3 
2 



3 
3 

• • 

2 

/// 

• • 

1 
2 
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2 

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• I 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Plant Materials (Hort. 132-133) ^^^^* ^ ^^ ^^l 

History of Landscape Gardening' ^HorV. *138) ^ 'l ^ 

^lements of Landscape Design (Hort. 134) ' ' l " 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 128) " ^ 

Principles of Economics ( Econ.* *l()'i-i02 ) " ' * ^ 

Technical Composition (Eng. 104-106) ^ ^ 

Horticultural Entomology (Ent 115) ^ ^ 2 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101)' '' " ^ 

Systematic Botany (Morph and Myc. 109) I ' ' • ' 

Drainage (P. E. 108) ^ 

Electives • . . . 3 

4 8 4 

SENIOR YEAR 

Landscape Design (Hort. 135-136) ^^"^^^ ^ ^^ ^^^ 

Landscape Practice (Hort. 137) ^ ^ 

Civic Art (Hort. 139).... •• •• 3 

Horticultural Research and Thesis Vnori ' 143:145 j f ' ' ' ' 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 146-14^) ^ ^ ^ 2 

Electives 1 1 i 

;^^^^^^_—-—- 9 11 11 

Th»n . SOILS 

biol\?o?:reTon;tlfruSr.e^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^-^- '=>^-,str., an. 

With a complete knowiedre o/m sJif I^f? '^ ''"^" ^'^ ^"'"'^ ^— 
to students who desire to sp^ iaUze /n sol St^lT T""""''' '''''''^' 
to take up research or teaching are expecied tf LT "" ^'' ^'■"^"'''"^ 
addition to the regular undererL!,.! ^^ graduate work in 

partment possesses the necessarveo". """f"' '''^' ^■"^ '"'''■^''- ^''^ -lo- 
tion in these subject and ^11^ on ^r.' ""' '^''""'^^ ^°'- ^^^ '"^truc 
to come in contact w th the re'eich «f °' 7''"""°'"'' """ ''^^ '^"•^^'^^ 
tion. especially in the pot cu ture Lhl )" ^^'•'^""ural Experiment Sta- 
flehls at the station andTn :ZZlTo7T:Z' ""^ ''' ^-^^^^raent.1 

tearn:tiisti;rtur err tTc^rr *° «^ ^^— ^ - 
ernt-^^r=- - - - B -r:; stiirsiT 

JUNIOR YEAR Curriculum 

Technical Compdsition (Eng. 104-106) ''^'"'"^ f " "^ 

Principles of Economies ( Econ. 101-102 ) ^ ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A E 101) ' ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) •• ^ 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) * 3 

Quantitative Analysis (Gen. Chem.' 107-108) ' ' * ' ■* 

w = ' ' 



SENIOR YEAR Term: 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Methods of Crop Investigations (Agron. 108) 

Cropping Systems (Agron. 107) 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 106) 

Soil Technology (Soils 111-113) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 

Seminar (Soils 115) 

Methods of Soil Investigations (Soils 114) 

Electives 



I 


II 


III 


3 


3 


• • 


3 


• • 


• • 


• 


2 


• • 


3 


• • 


• • 


3 


3 


3 


• 


• • 


3 


• 


1 


1 


• 


• • 


2 


5 


8 


8 



CURRICULUM FOR GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Those who do not care to specialize in any particular phase of agricul- 
ture will follow this curriculum. 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) .. .. 3 

Technical Writing (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Genetics (Agron. 106 ) 4 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers (Soils 105) 3 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 102) 4 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 3 3 

Farm Poultry (P. H. 101) 3 

Electives 2 5 2 

Suggested Electives 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) 4 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102-103) 3 3 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113-115) 3 3 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 106) . . . . 3 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 104) 3 

Judging Dairy Production (D. H. 106) 2 

Advanced Judging (A. H. 110) 2 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 108) 2 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 3 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 3 3 

Drainage (F. E. 108) 3 

Farm Forestry CFor. 101) 3 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 107) 2 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 101) 3 

Gas Engines (F. E. 102) 3 

Tractors and Trucks (F. E. 103 ) 3 

Electives 11 9 8 

57 



I 



J 



^ 



' 



SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULUTRE 

A. Students who have had four years of high school training or its 
equivalent may follow a two-year curriculum of regular college courses 
designated by the dean. A certificate is granted by the college upon com- 
pletion of the work. If, after the student has been awarded a certificate, 
he is desirous of taking work for a degree, he may continue for two 
years with a regular college curriculum. 

B. Another two-year curriculum, commonly known as "The Two-Year 
Agricultural Course" is sub-collegiate in nature. To enter this two-year 
work the applicant must have preparation at least equal to the work given 
in the seventh grade of the public schools. At the conclusion of the 
course students having completed the regular work as outlined are given 
a certificate stating the studies pursued during the time spent in the col- 
lege. No college credit toward a degree is given for work done in any of 
these courses. 



Two-Year Agriculture 

FIRST YEAR Term 

Cereal Crops ( Agron. 1 ) 

Breeds and Judging of Livestock (A. H. 1) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 1) , 

General Botany (Bot. 1) 

General Chemistry (Gen. Chem. 1-2) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 1-2) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 1) 

Landscape and Floriculture (Hort. 9) 

Animal Pests ( Zool. 1 ) 

Farm Woodwork ( Shop 1 ) 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 1) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 2) 

General Soils ( Soils 1 ) 

B'eeds and Feeding of Live Stock (A. H. 2) 

Home Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 5) 

Sprays and Spraying (Ent. 2) 

Forging and Pipe Fitting (Shop 2) 

Vocational Publications (Eng. 3) 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 1) 



/ 
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1 



2 



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2 
2 



SECOND YEAR 

preeding of Animals (A. H. 3) 

Farm Management (F. M. 1) 

Fertilizers (Soils 2) 

Plant Diseases (Pit. Path. 1) 

Farm Machinery (F. E. 1) 

Grain Judging (Agron. 3) 

Farm Accounts (A. E. 1) • • • • • •_• • * • * * * 

Dairy Production and Barn Practice (D. H. 1) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 1) 

Farm Buildings (F. E. 6) 

Gas Engines (F. E. 2) 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 1) 

Farm Poultry (P. H. 1) 

Farm Forestry (For. 1) 

Farm Drainage (F. E. 8) 

Tractors and Trucks (F. E. 3) 

R. O. T. C. (M. L 2) 

Elect one or a portion of each: 



Term 



I 
3 
3 



o 



II III 



Advanced Agronomy (Agron. 3) 

Special Animal Husbandry (A. H. 4-6) ... • 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 3) 

Judging of Dairy Products (D. H. 4) 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 2-3)... 



3 
3 
3 



Small Fruits (Hort. 4) 'V*;'*;;; 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 6-8) 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 10-12) 

Beekeeping (Zool. 3) 



4 
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COURSES IN AGRICULTURE FOR SOLDIERS AND 

SAILORS 

A +^ +5,vp nn collegiate work fit directly into 
students ^^•ho are prepared to ^^'^^'J'''^^,^^^^ ,,^, have but two 

one o£ the ^^-^^-^^^^er^y^rrre not prepared to enter college, 
years to spend in the University ana a ^^^^^ 

may take the regular two-year ^^''^""^'^^^[^^^'Z'Jnotleai to a degree, 
pose graduation from high -^^^ ^/J^^'^/^ ^e .e,^^^^^^^^^ planned 

:::-:JZ 1^^^^^^^ -.1 umt course. so.e 
Of which are outlined on the following page: 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Agronomy 

Agron. 101. Cereal Crops — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Freshman year. 

History, distribution, culture and improvement of cereal crops. 

Agron. 102. Forage Crops — Four credit hours: three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

History, distribution, adaptation, culture, and uses of forage, pasture, 
cover and green manure crops. The laboratory periods are largely devoted 
to the identification and classification of forage plants and seeds, and to 
purity and viability tests of seeds. 

Agron. 103. Grading Farm Crops — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Prerequi- 
sites, Agron. 101 and 102. 

Market classifications and grades as recommended by the United States 
Bureau of Markets and practice in determining the grades. 

Agron. 104. Grain Judging — One credit hour: one three-hour laboratory 
period. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Agron. 101. 

Practice in judging the cereals for milUng, seeding, and feeding pur- 
poses. 

Agron. 105. Research and Thesis — Six credit hours. To be arranged. 
Senior year. 

Students are given a chance to do some investigational work either in 
the way of collecting information on some phase of agronomic work or 
working some problem in the laboratory, field, or greenhouse. 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

Agron. 106. Genetics — Four credit hours: three lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Prerequisites, Bot. 
101 and Morph. and Myc. 101. 

General course in genetics designed to prepare students for later courses 
in the breeding of crops in which they are specializing. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 107. Cropping Systems and Methods — Two credit hours: two 
lectures. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Agron. 101-102, Soils 
101-102. 

Principles and factors influencing cropping systems in the United States; 
study of rotation experiments; theories of cropping methods; and practice 
in arranging type farming systems. (Metzger.) 

Agron. 109. Crop Breeding — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Agron. 101, 102, and 104, Bot. 101. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops and detailed studies 
made of methods used in crop improvement work. (Kemp.) 

61 



Agrox. 108. Methods in Crop Invc^finnNm.. rpr, 
lectures and one three-hour labLarfpel^ FlsTVr"''^ *^° 

Prerequisites, Agron. 101-102 ™- ^''°'°'" y^^r. 

of the standardization of methodlstudem " "^'"""^ ^"'^ ^''^ ^*«- 

on and criticize method Ted b^heSrer s7ar'"' •'" "^'^ '"•^^"'•^^ 
problems studied. (Kemp.) cliliferent stations in attaclcing the 

Agrox. 110-111. Seminar—One credit hm,,. ^o i, . 
First and second terms. Senior year ^"'"'^ """ '^^t"''^- 

The seminar is devoted largely to reDort<5 hv *>, . ^ 

For Graduate Students 

discussed and the biometrLi !nf f , variations and correlations are 
tain assigned o'lSfdata Zmp"? '''''''' ""* '' '^^ ^>- ^- -r- 

Agrox. 202. Crop J5reecfiw^— Amount of prpdit f.. h ^ * 
accomplished. Lectures and laboraJory periods ''«*—«<' "y work 

CrIpVr:Sng bu;'^„T::d^'f"" '" ^'^ undergraduate course in 

Of a range wiu'S III" weV n ToicTof maflSl^ ^^""^^"^ ^"^ ^^^ 
(Kemp.) ""^ ""^ material to suit special cases. 

Agrox. 203. Research— Amount at credit tn ho ^^f • . 
complished ^^ ^^ determined by work ac- 

suggested problems from which he mav m^P » , T ^"'^ ^ ""' °^ 

WHICH ne may make a selection. (Staff.) 



For Short-Course Students 



Agrox. 1. Cereal Crops—Three credit hours- Tw^ lo . 

Judging grains from the standnnint „f ,., 
miller. standpoint of the grower, the feeder and the 



Agron. 4. Advanced Agronomy — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory period each term. Second year. 

Short course students specializing in agronomy are given special work 
in judging and grading grains, crop improvement and various other 
phases of crop production. Students are allowed to elect subjects in other 
departments for part of the time. 

Animal Husbandry 

A. H. 101. Animal Husbandry — Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Freshman year. 

Live stock in relation to farm practices; types and breeds of farm 
animals. 

A. H. 102a-102b. Feeds and Feeding — Three credit hours each term: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. First and second terms. Sopho- 
more year. 

Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various food stuffs to the several classes of farm live stock. Feeding 
standards; the calculation and compounding of rations. 

A. H. 103. Management of Dairy Young Stock — Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third ternu Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock, breeding prac- 
tices, feeding for advanced registry, and dairy cattle judging. 

A. H. 104. Principles of Breeding — Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

This course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity, variation, selection, growth, development, systems of breeding 
and pedigree study. 

A. H. 105. Swine Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

Types and breeds of swine. Care, feeding, breeding, management, eco- 
nomics of swine husbandry and judging. 

A. H. 106. Meat and Meat Products — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

The slaughtering of farm live stock, and the production, preparation 
and handling of meat and meat products. 

A. H. 107. Beef Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

Beef and dual purpose breeds. The care, feeding, breeding and man- 
agement of beef herds; fattening; and the economics of the beef industry. 

A. H. 108. Sheep Production — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. 

Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding, 
breeding, and management. Grades of wool. Judging and scoring. 

A. H. 109. Horse and Mule Production — Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. 



$2 



63 



Breeds, their history, characteristics and adaptability. Care, feeding, 
breeding, breaking and training, judging. 

A. H. 110-111. Advajiced Judging — Two credit hours each term: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Junior or 
Senior years. Prerequisites, A. H. 103, 105, 107. 

First Term — Competitive judging of beef cattle, sheep and swine. Sec- 
ond term. Competitive judging of dairy cattle. Various trips to stock 
farms throughout the State will be made. Such judging teams as may be 
chosen to represent the University will be selected from among those tak- 
ing this course. 

A. H. 112. Advanced Breed Study — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisites, A. H. 
103, 105, 107, 108. 

Special consideration of the history, development, and distribution of 
the more important breeds of live stock; important families and individ- 
uals; assigned reaaing and pedigree work. 

A. H. 113. Markets and llarTceting — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites, A. H. 
106, 107, 108, 109. 

History, development, organization and status of the meat, wool, and 
horse industries. Tl^.e packing industry and its by-products. Market classes 
and grades of 11 vo slock. Markets and market reports. 

A. H. 114. Seminar — One credit hour: one lecture. Third term. Senior 
or graduate students only. 

Problems, readings and discussions on subjects relating to animal hus- 
bandry. 

A. H. 115-117. Research and Thesis — Two credit hours each term. 
Senior year. 

Original investigations in problems in animal husbandry, the results 
of which research are to be presented in the form of a thesis. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

A. H. 118. Animal Genetics and Statistical Methods — Four credit 
hours: three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year 
or graduate. Prerequisites, A. H. 104. 

An introduction to genetics and statistical methods as applying more 
especially to animal breeding. (Meade.) 

A. H. 119. Nutrition — Three credit hours: three lectures. Third term. 
Seniors or Graduates. Prerequisite, A. H. 102. 

Composition of the animal body, digestion, assimilation, metabolism, 
protein and energy requirements. Method of investigation and studies in 
the utilization of food nutrients. (Meade.) 

For Short-Course Students 

A. H. 1. Breeds and Judging — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. First year. 

64 



T ive stock in relation to successful farm practices, types and breeds of 
f,nn animals with special reference to the needs of the practical farmer 
A. H. 2. Feeds and Feeding-Thvee credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. First year. 

A study of the source, composition, characteristics and adaptability of 
the various food stuffs, feeding standards and the calculation of rations. 

1. H. 3. Breeding of Animals-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Second year. 

A course covering the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity variation, selection, systems of breeding and pedigree study. 

A h'4-6 Special Animal Hushandry-Thvee credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Throughout the second year. Each tern, 
of work is complete in itself and may be elected without regard to the 
work of the term preceding it or of the term following. 

Sioine Production-First term. Types and breeds of swine. Care, teed- 
ine breeding, management, economics of swine husbandry and judging 
Beef Production-Second term. Subject matter of course same as tor 

"Swine Production." „„ f^,. 

Sheep Production-Third term. Subject matter of course same as for 

"Swine Production." 
A H 7 Management of Dairy Young Stock-Three credit hours: two 

lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Second year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy young stock, breeding prac- 
tices, feeding for advanced registry, and dairy cattle judging. 

General Animal Husbandry 

Seininar-A forum for the discussion of subjects relating to animal 
industry. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. 

Research and Thesis-Tbe work will be arranged .^>th each student in- 
dividually. He may select some topic or problem in which he is inter- 
ested and which will require independent investigation. 

Animal Pathology and Veterinary Medicine 

During 1922-23 only the first two years of the combined six-year course 
in Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine are given. 



For Students in Agriculture 



V. M. 101. Anatomy and Physidlogy-Thvee credit hours: three lec- 
tures. First term. Junior year. „„rmal- 

Structure of the animal body: abnormal as contrasted with the norma 
the inter-relationship between the various organs and parts both as to 

structure and function. i„„t„^<,c. and 

V M 102. Animal Diseases-Four credit hours: three lectures and 

one laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. 

65 



Diseases of domestic animals, infectious and non-infectious. Early 
recognition of disease; hygiene, sanitation, and prevention; first aid. 

For Short-Course Students 

V. M. 1. Animal Diseases-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Second year 

Briefer course on the diseases of domestic animals; methods of recog- 
nizmg disease in its early stages; relation of care and sanitation to dll 



Bacteriology and Sanitation 



Bact 101-103. General Bacteriology-Three credit hours each term- 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Junior year 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation 
i!ff2T' "^°7^°'°«y- classification, identification of species and the 
m!r w '' °'/t^"»==-"°» --^ disinfection; preparation of cultur 
med a isolation and cultivation of aerobes and anaerobes; examination 
of cultures; microscopic examination of bacteria; stains with their com- 
positiofl. classification and use; vital activities of bacteria; their relation 
to disease; use of experimental animals; bacteria in water, milk and 
sous; cultural characters of representative organisms from the following 
genera: micrococcus, streptococcus, bacterium, bacillus, pseudomonas 
streptothrlx, protozoa, filtrable viruses and immunity. Qomonas, 

Bact. 103-A. Special for Home Economics Students only— Three credit 
hours: thlrf term. One lecture and two laboratory periods. JunlorTear 

m tSe ^eld'of?""'?- "*''''■''• ''"''" ^""^ *"°^' "■•'''"^'•"y encountered 
m the field of domestic economy. Preservation of foods. Sanitation. 

For Advanced Undergraduates or Graduates 

Bact. 104-106. Dairy Bacteriology-Three credit hours each term: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 101- 

me^ir nf/- ^''t'^'':- '•«'^"°° °« bacteria to dairy products; preparation of 
media. Plating by the dilution method; sources of contamination, includ- 
ing s able atmosphere, udder, exterior of cows and attendants; kinds of 
utensils and their sterilization; kinds of bacteria in milk and their de 
velopment; direct microscopic examination; sedimentation test and centri- 
fugalization; fresh and old milk, baby and special milks; market mUk- 
graded milk; certified milk; sour milk; whey; cream; butter chTee' 
condensed milk, powdered milk and milk starters; pasteurization "; 

oTdirar^rr "^''""^ ^^ ""' ^"^ '^^ ^^^^^^ ^-^ -^^^ --^-^ 

ter^nt"; J!?"f;. ""^r:^"'^ Bac«enoZoi,2/-Two to three credit hours each 
loMOS. ' 'aboratory periods. Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 



This course is intended primarily to give the student a chance to develop 
his own initiative. He will be allowed to decide upon his project and work 
it out as much as possible in his own way under proper supervision. In 
this manner he will be able to apply his knowledge of bacteriology to a 
given problem. He will also get to know something of the methods of 
research and will receive a valuable training in obtaining careful and ac- 
curate data. (Pickens.) 

Bact. 110-112. Thesis — Two credit hours each term: senior year. Op- 
tional. 

The investigation of a given project, the results of which are to be pre- 
sented in the form of a thesis and submitted for credit toward graduation. 
(Pickens.) 

Bact. 113-115. Seminar — One credit hour each term: senior year. Re- 
quired of seniors taking Bact. 107-109 and all graduate students. 

The work will consist of reports on individual projects and on recent 
scientific literature. 

For Graduate Students Only 

Bact. 201-203. Research Bacteriology — Three credit hours each term: 
three laboratory periods by assignment. Prerequisites, Bact. 101-103 and 
in certain cases 104-106 and 107-109, depending upon the project. (Pickens.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Bact. 1. Agricultural Bacteriology — Two credit hours: two lectures. 
Second term. Second year. 

An elementary course touching upon the following topics: the general 
characters of micro-organisms; fermentation; putrefaction and decay; na- 
ture's food supply; the carbon cycle; decomposition of nitrogenous com- 
pounds; nitrification and denilrification; the manure heap and sewage; 
reclamation of lost nitrogen; bacteria and soil minerals; bacteria in 
water and milk; control of milk supply; bacteria in butter and cheese 
making; alcohol, vinegar, sour kraut, tobacco, silage and flax; preservation 
of food products; resistance against parasitic bacteria; tuberculosis and 
other germ diseases and parasitic diseases of plants. 

Dairy Husbandry 

# 

D. H. 101. Principles of Dairying — Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. 

Origin, history, development and characteristics of the dairy breeds; 
relationship of Dairy Husbandry to general agriculture; extent of the 
dairy business and value of products; milk, its secretion, character and 
composition. 

D. H. 102. Advanced Registry and Association Work — Two credit hours: 
one lecture and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 



66 



67 



Requirements for advanced registry; the management of long and short 
time tests; breed association rules; general work of the supervisor; care 
and testing of samples; cow testing associations; bull associations. Paid 
supervisors at $3.00 per day are selected for work over week-ends from 
those taking this course. 

D. H. 103. Judging Dairy Products — Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. National authorities 
will address the class and trips will be taken to butter, cheese and milk 
markets for the purpose of familiarizing the students with the commercial 
quality of these products. Such teams as may be chosen to represent the 
University will be selected from those electing this course. 

D. H. 104. Dairy Production and Barn Practice — Four credit hours: 
three lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including selection of 
feeds; feeding standards; systems of herd feeding; silage, soiling crops 
and pasture; selection, care and feeding the sire; dairy herd development 
and management; method of keeping and forms for herd records; dairy 
barn arrangement and equipment; dairy cost accounts and barn practices 
which Influence quantity and quality in milk. Prerequisite D. H. 101. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

D. H. 105. Farm Dairying — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equip- 
ping the stable and milk house; surface coolers and precooling; milk 
cooling tanks; sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizating utensils; 
dairy farm score cards; composition of milk, butter and cheese and meth- 
ods of testing. Prerequisites D. H. 101 and 104. 

D. H. 106-107. Commercial Dairying — Three credit hours, each term: 
one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Junior 
or Senior years. 

Methods of testing and of manufacturing of dairy products. Dairy 
machinery. Theory and practice of cream separation, pasteurization and 
processing of milk and cream: Butter, iee cream and cottage cheese mak- 
ing. Prerequisites D. H. 104 and 106. 

D. H. 108. Market Milk — Three credit hours: two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. First term. Senior year. 

A study of market milk conditions, requirements of city milk trade; the 
production of milk; pasteurization of milk; milk and its relation to the 
public health; the food value of milk; methods of handling market milk 
and market cream for direct consumption; the transportation of milk; 
Babcock testing of milk and milk products. In this course visits will be 
made to dairies and to milk plants. Prerequisites D. H. 104 and 105. 

D. H. 109. Advanced Course in Milk Testing — Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Second term. Senior year. 

68 



This course includes the determination of moisture and dry matter in 
milk and dairy products; various tests for fat and casein; testing of 
butter and oleomargarine; adulterations and preservatives. Prerequi- 
site D. H. 107. 

D H 110. -Seminar— One credit: one lecture. Second term. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current bulle- 
tins and scientific papers in dairy production and market milk problems. 

D H 111-113 Thesis— Six credit hours. Year to be arranged. 

Students are given opportunities to conduct investigational work, 
either in collecting information or original research in Dairy Production 

and Market Milk. , . tt.- + 

D. H. 114. City Milk Supply— Tv^o credit hours: two lectures. First 

term 

Securing a milk supply for city consumers; methods of buying from 
producers; the transportation of milk; milk contractors; systems of han- 
dling milk in the city milk plants; the sterifization of utensils; systems 

of delivery to consumers. 
D. H. 115. Dairy Farm and City Milk Inspection— t^io credit hours: 

two lectures. Second term. 

Early attempts at control and the development of milk inspection; sys- 
tems of dairy inspection; systems of milk plant inspection; dairy farm 
score cards; dairy plant score cards; relation of milk to public health; 
grading milk; milk standards; milk and cream regulations: methods of 
appointment and duties of dairy and milk inspectors; general improve- 
ment and control of milk supplies of cities and towns. 

Graduates 

D H 201 Dairy Production— Fovtr credit hours: First term. 

The care feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feeding 
standards and selection of feeds; systems of herd feeding; silage and silos; 
soiling systems and pastures; the selection, care and feeding of the sire; 
dairy herd development and management; cost accounts and practices 
which influence quantity and quality in milk. (Gamble and staff.) 

D. H. 202. Research— mne credit hours. Year to be arranged. Gradu- 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be al- 
lowed to work on any problem in dairy production or market milk they 
may choose, or be given a list of problems from which to select a re- 

sparch nroiect 

Insofar as schedules permit, students will be encouraged to visit the 
U S Dairy Division Laboratories and become acquainted with the dairy 
research problems in process and the methods of attack. This acquaints 
the student with the broad phases of research in dairy production and 
market milk. (Gamble and staff.) 

69 



For Short-Course Students 

D H 1. Principles of Dairying-row credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. First year. 

Origin, history, development and characteristics of the dairy breeds- 
relationship of Dairy Husbandry to general agriculture; extent of th; 
comTos^Uor'' ^""^ ''^'"^ °^ products; milk, its secretion, character and 

D. H. 2. Advanced Registry and Association Work— Two credit hours- 
one lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. First year 

Requirements for advanced registry; the management of long and short 
time tests; breeds association rules; general work of the supervisor; care 
and testing of samples; cow testing associations; bull associations. Paid 
supervisors at $3.00 per day are selected for work over week-ends from 
those taking this course. Prerequisites Organic Chemistry 112 and 113 

D. H. 3. Dairy Production and Barn Practice— Voxxr credit hours- three 
lectures and one laboratory period. First term. Second year 

nf'^tT.^Tl' ^*^^'°^ ^""^ management of dairy cattle, including selection 
of feeds; feeding standards; systems of herd feeding; silage soiling crops 
and pasture; selection, care and feeding the sire; dairy herd development 
and management; method of keeping and forms for herd records; dairy 
trvT-T^"™'"* ^""^ equipment; dairy cost accounts and barn practices 
^^hlch influence quantity and quality in milk. Prerequisite D H 1 

D. H. 4. Farm Dairying-Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Second term. Second year 

How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equip- 
ping the stable and milk house; surface coolers and precooling; milk cool- 
ing tanks; sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizing utensils; dairy 
farm score cards; composition of milk, butter and cheese and methods of 
testing. Prerequisites D. H. 101 and 102. 

D. H. 5. Judging Dairy Products-Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Second year 

Competitive judging of milk, butter and cheese. National authorities 
will address the class and trips will be taken to butter, cheese and milk 
markets for the purpose of familiarizing the students with the commercial 
quality of these products. Such teams as may be chosen to represent the 
University will be selected from those electing this course. 

Entomology 

E.VT 101. General Entomology-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one^laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite. Zool. 

General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work and field excursions. A collection of Insects 
IS required. 

E,NT^102. Insect Morphology-Two credit hours: two laboratory peri- 
ods. First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

7Q 



A course in morphology designed to prepare students for work in ecd- 
nomic entomology. 

Ent. 103-104. Economic Entomology — Pour credit hours each term: 
two lectures and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Junior 
year. Prerequisite, Ent. 101. 

The theory and practice of insect control; their dependence upon in- 
sect morphology and biology. The discussion of economic insects. 

Ent. 105-107. Economic Entomology — Five credit hours each term: 
three lecture hours and two laboratory periods. The Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 102-104. 

Problems in applied entomology, including life history, ecology, distri- 
bution, parasitism and control. 

Ent. 108. Systematic Entomology — Two credit hours: two laboratory 
periods. First term. Senior year. Prerequisite. Ent. 102. 

The student selects some group in which he is particularly interested 
and makes a detailed study of it. The course requires considerable field 
work and is supplemented by laboratory periods and frequent conferences. 

Ent. 109-111. Thesis — Two credit hours each term: laboratory periods 
to be arranged. The Senior year. 

The intensive investigation of some zoological subject, the results of 
which are incorporated in a paper which is submitted as part require- 
ment for graduation. 

Ent. 112. Insecticides and Their Application — Two credit hours: one 
lecture and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation and appli- 
cation; construction, care and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumi- 
gation, methods and apparatus in mechanical control. 

Ent. 113. Medical Entomology — Three credit hours: three lectures. 
First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Zool. 101-102. 

The relation of animals to disease, directly and as vectors of pathogenic 
organisms; the control of pests of man. 

Ent. 114. Scientific Delineation and Preparation — One credit hour each 
term: one laboratory period. First and second terms. Senior year. 

Photography, photomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera 
lucida, lantern-slide making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit and 
museum material. 

Ent. 115. Horticultural Entomology — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Ent. 
101. 

Lectures, laboratory and field work on the morphology, biology and 
control of insect pests of horticultural crops. 

For Graduate Students 

Ent. 201. Entomological Problems — Maximum credit 5 hours per term. 
Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 

71 



mology with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 
(Cory.) 

Ent. 202. Research in Entomology — Maximum credit 15 to 20 houra 
upon completion of the thesis. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation may, with the approval 
of the head of the Department, undertake supervised research in mor 
phology, taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently, the 
student may be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Depart- 
ment projects. The student's work may form a part of the final report on 
the project and be published in bulletin form. A report, suitable for 
publication, must be submitted at the close of the studies and the time and 
place of its publication will be determined by the professor in charge of 
the work. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203. Advanced Economic Entomology — One credit hour; one lec- 
ture. Second term. 

Lectures discussing the latest theories and practices 'in applied ento- 
mology. (Cory.) 

For Short-Course Students 

Ent. 1. Sprays and Spraying — One lecture and three hours laboratory 
period. Third term. First year. 

Preparation and application of insecticides, together with a considera- 
tion of other methods of control. 

Ent. 2. Beekeeping — Two credit hours: one lecture and one laboratory 
period. Second term. One credit hour: one laboratory period. Third 
term. Students who are qualified may be given college credit for the 
work. 

A practical course for students who expect to keep bees for home or 
commercial purposes. 

Farm Equipment 

The Department of Farm Equipment is organized to offer students of 
agriculture a working knowledge of those branches of agriculture which 
are based upon engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped 
under three heads: farm machinery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modern tendency in farming is to replace hand labor, requiring the 
use of many men, by large machines which do the work of many men yet 
require only one man for their operation. In many cases horses are being 
replaced by tractors to supply Ihe motive force for these machines. Trucks 
and automobiles are used on many farms. It is highly advisable that the 
student of any branch of agriculture have a working knowledge of the 
construction and adjustments of these machines. 

About one-sixth of the total value of farms is tied up in the buildings. 
The study of the design of the various buildings, from the standpoint of 
convenience, economy and appearance, is, therefore, important. 

The study of drainage includes the principles of tile drainage, the laying 



72 



out and construction of tile drain systems, the use of open ditches, and a 
study of the Maryland drainage laws. 

Description of Courses 

F E 101. Farm Machinery— Three credit hours each term: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period; first or third terms. Junior or Senior 

year. ^ + * 

A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse and tractor 

drawn machinery. Laboratory work consists of a detailed study of actual 

machinery, calibration tests and practice in adjusting. 

F. B. 102. Gas EngiJies—Three credit hours: two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. Second term. Junior or Senior Year. 

The construction and operation of the various types of internal com- 
bustion motors encountered in farm practice. 

F. E. 103. Tractors and Trucks— Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite: F. E. 102. 

A continuation of F. E 102, with especial emphasis on the four cylinder 
motor. Includes special features of tractor practice. Particular attention 
given to study of ignition. Laboratory work includes a detailed study 
of carburetion and ignition systems, engine operation and adjusting, trou- 
ble shooting, etc. 

F. E. 104. Advanced Gas Engines— T^o credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisite F. E. 102 

and 103. 

An advanced study of the design and operation of the gasoline motor. 
F. E. 106. Farm Buildings— Tv^o credit hours: two lectures. Second 

term. Junior year. 

A study of all types of farm structures, also of farm heating, lighting, 
water supply, ventilation, and sanitation systems. 

F. E. 108. Farm Drainage— Three credit hours: two lectures, one labor- 
atory period. Third term. 

A study of farm drainage systems, for the student who has not studied 
college mathematics or surveying. Includes the theory of tile drains, the 
depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, and methods of con- 
struction. A smaller amount of time will be spent upon drainage by open 
ditches, and the laws relating thereto. 

For Short-Course Students 

The courses for Short-Course students in Farm Engineering cover sub- 
stantially the same ground as the corresponding courses for the college 
students, with due allowance made for the Short-Course students' lack of 

theoretical instruction. 
F. E. 1. Farm Machinery— Tvfo lectures, one laboratory period. First 

term. Second year. 

73 






A study of the operation and adjustments of modern farm machinery. 

F. E. 2. Gas Engines — Two lectures, one laboratory period. Second term. 
Second year. 

A study of gas engine design and construction. 
F. E. 3. Tractors and Trucks — Two lectures, one laboratory period. Third 
term. Second year. Prerequisite: F. E. 2. 

A continuation of F E. 2, with especial attention to four cylinder motors. 

F. E. 6. Farm Buildings — Two lecture periods. Second term. Second 
year. 

A study of the various types of farm buildings, and of water, heating, 
and lighting systems. 

F. E. 8. Farm Drainage — Two lectures, one laboratory period. Third 
term. Second year. 

A study of the principles governing the design of farm drainage sys- 
tems, and the construction of the same. 

Farm Management 

F. M. 101-102. Farm Management — Three credit hours each term: 
three lectures. First and second terms. Senior year. 

The business of farming from the standpoint of the individual farmer. 
This course aims to connect the principles and practice which the stu- 
dent has acquired in the several technical courses and to apply them to 
the development of a successful farm business. 

For Short-Course Students 

F. M. 1. Farm Management — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Second year. Prequisite A. E. 103. 

A course parallel with F. M. 101-102, arranged for the students in the 
short agricultural courses. 

Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 101. Agricultural Economics — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 

The economic adaptations and adjustments necessary on the part of the 
agriculturist to meet the changing economic conditions. Population trend, 
land tenure, farm incomes, farm labor, agricultural credit, and price move- 
ments will receive special consideration. 

A. E. 102. Markets and the Marketing — Three credit hours. First term. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Econ. 101-102. 

An analysis of the present system of transporting, storing and distribut- 
ing farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in increas- 
ing the efficiency of marketing methods and co-operative marketing. 

A. E. 103. Farm Accounting — ^Four credit hours: three lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 



'The principles underlying farm accounting, emphasizing cost account- 
ing and analysis of farm business. 

For Short-Course Students 

A. E. 1. Farm Accounting — Three lectures. Second term. Second 
year. 

A course parallel with A. E. 103. For students in the short agricultural 
courses. 

Rural Organization 

R. O. 101-103. Elements of Community Study — Three credit hours each 
term. The Senior year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of community develop- 
ment. 

R. 0. 104. Principles of Rural Organization — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Junior year. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' co-operative organ- 
izations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

Forestry 

The course in Farm Forestry aims to give the student in agriculture 
sufficient instruction and practice work to enable him to handle intelli- 
gently and scientifically the farm woodlands. Such a course should be re 
quired of all students fitting themselves for farm management and be given 
preferably in the spring term (on account of favorable weather for ?(-ld 
work) during the Junior or Senior year for four-year men and during th'3 
Second year for two-year agricultural men. At the present time Forestry 
is not offered as a major course, but is used to supplement tl e content of 
the other courses. 

Description of Courses 

For. 101. Farm Forestry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

A study of forest botany, wood management, measurements, fire protec- 
tion, nursery practice, tree planting, valuation and utilization of forest 
crops. The work is conducted by means of lectures and field v.ork. 

For Short-Course Students 

For. 1. Farm Forestry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. Third term. Second year. 

The content of this course is similar to that of For. 101, but is adapted 
to the development and needs of students in the short-course work. 



I 



74 



75 



■I 



HORTICULTURE 



Pomology 

Description of Courses 

HoET. 101. Elementary Pomology—Four credit hours: three lectures 
and one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year 

A general course in Pomology. The proper location and site for an 
orchard are discussed. Varieties, planting plans, inter-crops, spraying 
cu tural methods, fertilizing methods, thinning, picking, packing and mar^ 
ketmg are also given consideration. The subjects are discussed for ap- 
ples, peaches, pears, plums, cherries and quinces. The principles of 
plant propagation as applied to pomology are discussed. 

HoRT. 102-103. Commercial Fruit Growing-Three credit hours- two 
ectures and one laboratory period. First term. Three credit hours- 
two lectures and one laboratory period. Second term. Senior year Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 101. ^ 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced 
work IS taken up on the subjects of orchard culture, orchard fertiliza- 
tion, picking, packing, marketing and storing of fruits, orchard by-prod- 
ucts, orchard heating and orchard economics. Designed for undergraduate 
or graduate sudents. 

Hort. 104. Systematic Pomology-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Hort 101 

The history, botany and classification of fruits and their adaptation to 
Maryland conditions. Exercises are given in describing and identifying 
the leading commercial varieties of fruits. Students are required to help 
set up the College fruit show each year. Designed for undergraduate or 
graduate students. 

Hort. 105. Advanced Practical Pomology-One credit hour. First term 
Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A trip occuping one week's time will be made through the principal fruit 
regions of eastern West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. A visit to 
the fruit markets of several large cities will be made. The cost of this 
trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each student will 
be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. The time for 
taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

HoRT. 106. Small Fruit Culture-Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and their 
adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and a study 
of the experimental plots and varieties on the station grounds The fol- 
lowing fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, black cap 
raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry and loganberry. 

76 



Hort. 107. Economic Fruits of the World — Three credit hours: three 
lectures. Second term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102-103 and 104. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological and physiological character- 
istics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such as 
the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut beaVing trees, citrus fruits, 
newly introduced fruits and the like, with special reference to their cul- 
tural requirements in certain parts of the United States and the insular 
possessions. All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been 
discussed in a previous course. Open to undergraduate or graduate stu- 
dents. 

Hort. 108. Fruit and Vegetable Judging — Two credit hours: two lab- 
oratory periods. First term. Junior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 101 and 
111. 

A course designed to train men for fruit judging teams and practical 
judging. Students are required to know at least one hundred varieties of 
fruit, and are given practice in judging single plates, largest and best 
collections, boxes, barrels and commercial exhibits of fruits and vege- 
tables. Students are required to help set up the College Horticultural 
show each year. 

Hort. 109. Advanced Fruit Judging — One credit hour: one laboratory 
period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 108. 

Vegetable Gardening 

Hort. 111. Elementary Ve0etahle Gardening — Four credit hours: three 
lectures, one laboratory. Third term. Freshman year. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. Each 
student is given a small garden to plan, plant, cultivate, spray, fertilize, 
harvest, etc. 

Hort. 112. Tuber and Root Crops — Three credit hours: two lectures, 
and one laboratory period. First term. Senior year Prerequisite, Hort. 
111. Open to seniors and graduates. 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed varieties, 
propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, 
storing and marketing. 

Hort. 113-114. Commercial Vegetable Gardening — Three credit hours: 
First and second terms. Junior year. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production. Each in- 
dividual crop is discussed in detail. Trips are made to large commercial 
gardens, various markets and other places of interest. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture — Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 
112 and 113-114. Open to seniors and graduates. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetables. Description 
of varieties, and adaptation of varieties to different environmental condi- 
tions. 

77 






K 



HoBT. 117. Advanced Vegetable Gardening — One credit hour: Third 
term. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 112, 113-14 and 116. 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking sections of 
Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A study of the mar- 
kets in several large cities is included in this trip. Students are required 
to hand in a detailed report of the trip. Such a trip should not exceed 
thirty dollars per student. The time will be arranged each year with 
each class. 

HoBT. 118. Vegetable Forcing — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. Third term. Junior year. 

All vegetables used for forcing are considered. Laboratory work in 
sterilzation and preparation of soils, cultivation, regulation of tempera- 
ture, and humidity, watering, training, pruning, pollination and har- 
vesting. 

Floriculture 

HoBT. 121. General Floriculture — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

The management of greenhouses: the production and marketing of flor- 
ists crops; retail methods; plants for house and garden. 

General course for students desiring knowledge of floriculture but not 
wishing to specialize in floriculture. Not required of floricultural students. 

HoBT. 122. Elementary Floriculture — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Sophomore year. 

The floricultural industry; evolution and development; present status; 
the trade and its various divisions; florists' problems. 

HoBT. 123-124. Greenhouse Management — Three credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Two credit hours: one lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. 
HoBT. 125. Floricultural Practice — One credit hour: one laboratory period. 
Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Hort. 122-123. 

Practical experience in the various greenhouse operations of the spring 
season. 

HoBT. 126. Greenhouse Construction — Two credit hours: one lecture and 
one laboratory period. Second term. Junior year. Given 1923-1924. 

The various types of houses, their location, arrangement, construction, 
and cost; principles and methods of heating; preparation of plans and 
specifications for commercial and private ranges. This course is given 
every other year. 

HoBT. 127-128. Commercial Floriculture — Three credit hours each term: 
two lectures and one laboratory period. First and second terms. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Hort. 124. 

Cultural methods of florists' bench crops and potted plants: the market- 
ing of cut flowers; the retail store; a study of floral decoration. 

HoBT. 129. Garden Flowers — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. Given 1923-1924. 

78 



Plants for garden use; the various species ot a-ua^s ^^^^^^^^ 
ennlals, bulbs, bedding plants, and roses and their cultural requ 
This course is given every other year. 

Landscape Gardening 
HOKT 131. General Landscape Gar.enina-Three credit hours: two lec- 
tufes Ld one laboratory period, ^^^f ^^^^.T^r'^^^r.lZ. their ap- 
The theory and Seneral prU.c.pl^^^^ "^ :S eo^sfderttion'is given to the 

crrrarbrurrnT.\he\o.^^ 

the subject. Open to all students. ^^^ j^^. 

HOBT. 132. Plant Matmais-Two credit hours, one lectu 

oratory period. First term. Junior year. ^^^Z'^'^-^^^ ^^^^ ,, ^^na- 
A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs and vines us 

and field work. ^^^au hmirci- one lecture and 

StrrsST^rUr ..„. P,er.,>„»ue., „o«. « „. 
"The design ol private Brou.te garden, and of ar.b.MWral delall. m^ 

,a^::r i, j,.^ r,;;"rr;.r'.;' =.:Lr.r ™ 

scape architects; field observation ui lecture and 

and a particular consideration of Italian, English, ana 

dens. Given every other year. laboratory 

HORT. 139. Civic Art-Two credit hours, one lectur 
period. First term. Senior year. Prerequisites. Hort. 134. Given 

''principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 

79 



improvement, including problems in design of civic center, parks, school 
grounds, and otlier public and semi-public areas. Given every other year. 

General Horticultural Courses 

HoRT. 142. Horticultural Breeding Practice — One credit hour: one lab- 
oratory period. Third term. Senior year. Prerequisite, Genetics, Plant 
Phys. 101-102. 

Practice in plant breeding, including pollination, hybridization, selec- 
tion, note taking, and the general application of the theories of heredity 
and selection to practice are taken up in this course. 

HoRT. 143-145. Horticultural Research and Thesis — Two, three or four 
credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of Seniors. Advanced students in any of the 
four divisions of horticulture may select some special problem for indi- 
vidual investigation. This may be either the summarizing of all the 
available knowledge on a particular problem or the investigation of some 
new problem. Where original investigation is carried on, students should 
in most cases start the work during the junior year. The results of the 
research work are to be presented in the form of a thesis and filed in the 
horticultural library. 

HoRT. 146-148. Horticultural Seminar — One credit hour each term. 
Hours to be arranged. 

This course is required of seniors; juniors are permitted to attend. In 
this course papers are read by members of the class upon subjects per- 
taining to their research or thesis work, or upon special problems as- 
signed them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to time by 
members of the departmental staff. 

Courses Intended Primarily for Graduates 

HoRT. 201. Experimental Pomology — Three credit hours. Second term. 
Lectures, three hours. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in Pomology; methods of difficulties in experimental work in Po- 
mology and results of experiments that have been or are being conducted 
in all experiment stations in this and other countries. A limited num- 
ber of seniors will be allowed to take this course with the approval of 
the head of the department. 

HoRT. 202. Experimental Vegetable Gardening — Two credit hours. Lec- 
tures, two hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in Vegetable Gardening; methods and difficulties in experimental 
w^ork in Vegetable Gardening and results of experiments that have been 
or are being conducted in all experiment stations in this and other coun- 
tries. A limited number of seniors will be permitted to take this course 
with the approval of the head of the department. 

80 



HORT. 203. Experimental Floriculture— T^o credit hours. Lectures, two 

hours. Second term. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinions as to prac- 
tices in Floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of all ex- 
perimental work in Floriculture which have been or are being conducted 
will be thoroughly discussed. A limited number of seniors will be per- 
mitted to take this course with the approval of the head of the department. 
HORT. 204. Methods of Research— Tv^o credit hours. Lecture, one hour, 
one laboratory period. Second term. 

For graduate students only. Special drill will be given in the making 
of briefs and outlines of research problems. In methods of procedure in 
conducting investigational work and in the preparation of bulletins and 
reports. A study of the origin, development and growth of horticultural 
research is taken up. A study of the research problems being conducted 
by the Department of Horticulture will be made, and students will be re- 
quired to take notes on some of the experimental work in the field and 
become familiar with the manner of filing and cataloging all experimental 

HORT 205-207. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis— Two, three 
or four credit hours each term. Hours to be arranged. First, second and 

third terms. , . . , 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original re 
search in either Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Floriculture or Land- 
scape Gardening. These problems will be continued until completed and 
linal results are to be published in the form of a thesis. 

HoBT 208-210. Advanced Horticultural Seminar— This course will be 
required of all graduate students. Students will be required to give re- 
ports either on special topics assigned them or on the progress of their 
own investigational work being done in course 205. Members of the de- 
partmental staff will report special research work from time to time. 

Requirements of Graduate Students In Horticulture 

PoMoroGY-Graduate students specializing in Pomology who are planning 
to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or offer the 
equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 102-103, 104, 107. 201, 204, 
205-207 and 208-10; Physiological Chemistry 101, Plant Bio-physics 201, 
Bio-chemistry 102; and Organic Chemistry 105-107. ,, , u. 

Vegetable GARDENiNG-Graduate students specializing in Vegetable 
Gardening who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required 
either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 
113-115 116, 202, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Physiological Chemistry 101, Plant 
Bio-physics 201, Bio-chemistry 102; and Organic Chemistry 105-107. 

FLORicitLTURE-Graduate students specializing in Floriculture who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 122-123, 124, 125, 126, 
127, 128, 129, 132, 203, 204, 205-207, 208-210; Physiological Chemistry 101, 

81 



Plant Bio-physics 201, Bio-chemistry 102, and Organic Chemistry 105-107. 

Landscape Gardening— Graduate students specializing in Landscape 
Gardening who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be required 
either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 132 
133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 204, 205-207, 208-210. 

Additional Requirements— In addition to the above required courses, 
all graduate students in Horticulture are advised to take Physical and 
Colloidal Chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in Horticulture have had some course work 
in Entomology, Plant Pathology and Genetics, certain of these courses 
will be required. 

For Short-Course Students 

Hort. 1. Practical Pomology—Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. First year. 

A general course covering the propagation of our common fruits. Such 
subjects as orchard site, location, varieties, planting plans, cultural meth- 
ods, fertilizer requirements, and picking, packing and marketing are dis- 
cussed. All of the tree fruits are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 2-3. Commercial Fruit Growing— Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period. First and second terms. Second year. Prerequisite Hort. 1. 

An advanced course dealing with the proper management of commer- 
cial orchards in Maryland. Special attention is given to the subjects of 
pruning, picking, packing, marketing and storing of the various fruits. 
Market problems, transportation and shipping associations receive special 
attention. Students are required to become familiar with all of the lead- 
ing commercial varieties of all fruits grown in Maryland. Practice is 
given in fruit judging and the arrangement of fruits for exhibition pur- 
poses. Horticultural by-products are given attention in this course. 

Hort. 4. Small Fruits— Two lectures and one laboratory period. Third 
term. Second year. 

The production of strawberries, bush fruits and grapes is considered. 
Methods of propagation, selection of sites, soils, pruning, cultivation, pick- 
ing, packing and marketing are discussed. 

Hort. 5. Home Vegetable Gardening— Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Third term. First year. 

The general principles of vegetable gardening as applied to the growing 
of vegetables for home use. The laboratory work includes a study of vege- 
table seeds, seed testing, seed sowing, transplanting and the care of plants 
in the greenhouses and cold-frames. The students are required to plan, 
plant and manage a large home garden until the end of the term. 

Hort. 6-8. Commercial Vegetable Gardening— Two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First, second and third terms. Second year. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 5. 

This course is planned to run the entire school year. A study of the 
principles of vegetable gardening, as applied to the growing of vegetables 

82 



for market and for canning. The course includes the construction and 
management of hot-beds and cold-frames, sowing and planting, cultiva- 
tion, growing early vegetable plants, soil preparation, harvesting, grading, 
packing, marketing, canning and storage. Each student is allotted a defi- 
nite area and is required to plan, plant and manage it. 

HoRT. 9. Landscape and Floriculture — Two lectures and one laboratory. 
Second term. First year. 

The principles of landscape gardening and their application to the im- 
provement of home grounds. The propagation and culture of garden and 
greenhouse plants. 

Hort. 10-12. Commercial Floriculture — Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First, second and third terms. Second year. Prerequisite, Hort. 9. 

This course is planned to run the full school year. Studies in the propa- 
gation and culture of commercial florist crops are taken up in this course. 
Methods of packing, shipping and marketing will be considered. The 
course is so organized as to fit students for commercial work. 

Hort. 13-14. Landscape Design and Practice — Two lectures and three 
laboratory periods. First and second terms. Second year. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 13. 

The composition of gardens, private estates and related problems. Grad- 
ing plans, construction, drawing, estimates and laying out of grounds are 
considered. Plant materials are thoroughly studied in this course also. 



PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Undergraduates 

Plt. Phy. 101-102. Plant Physiology — Four credit hours: two lectures 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, 
Gen. Bot. 101-102. _.-«».- 

Water requirements, principles ef absorption, mineral nutrients, trans- 
piration, synthesis of food, metaboUsm, growth, movements. 

Plt. Phys. 103. flant Ecology — Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory perioJTs. Third term. Prerequisite, Bot. 101-102. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant forma- 
tions and successions in various parts of the country are briefiy treated. 
Much of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the 
field, and for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are se- 
lected. It is generally necessary to take three or four trips at some dis- 
tance from the University, in which case Saturdays are used for that 
purpose. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 104-106. Advanced Plant Physiology — Four credit hours 
each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. Junior or Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

83 



It 



The laboratory work generally consists of special work on one or more 
problems that may continue through the year. Students who write theses 
for their undergraduate degrees, may use data obtained from special prob- 
lems assigned for the laboratory work. (Zimmerman.) 

Bio-CiiEM. 101. Physiological Chemistry — Four credit hours. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 
101-103, 105-106 or their equivalents; also an elementary knowledge of 
Organic Chemistry. 

A general course in chemical biology. It embraces a study of biocolloids 
and their role in physiological processes; cell organization from the stand- 
point of the substratum in which living processes occur; chemistry of 
protoplasm and its products; catalysis and enzymes; electrolytes and their 
action; requirements of foods, including vitamines; and a general consid- 
eration of metabolism. (Appleman, Conrad.) 

Bio-Chem. 102. Plant Bio-chcmistry — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Bio-chem. 101 and 
an elementary knowledge of Plant Physiology. 

An advanced course dealing with the chemistry of plant life. Synthesis 
and transformations of materials in plants and plant organs and the rela- 
tion of plant processes to animal food and nutrition are especially empha- 
sized. (Appleman, Conrad.) 

For Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201. Plant Bio-physics — Three credit hours: two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Prerequisites, one year's work 
in Physics and an elementary knowledge of Physical Chemistry and Plant 
Physiology. 

An advanced study of the operation of physical forces in plant physio- 
logical processes. The relation of climatic conditions to plant growth and 
practice in recording meteorological data constitute a part of the course. 
(Johnston.) 

202. Special Problems in Growth and Reproduction — Two 
Second term. (Applemafa, Johnston.) 

203. Advanced Physiological Methods and Measurements — 
Third term. Not given every year. (Appleman, Johns- 



Plt. Phys 
credit hours. 

Plt. Phys 
Two credit hours. 



ton.) 

Plt. Phys. 204-206. Seminar — One credit hour each term. The students 
are required to prepare reports of papers in the current literature. These 
are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the subject. (Ap- 
pleman). 

Plt. Phys. 207. Research — Credit hours according to work done. Stu- 
dents must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit 
the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, Johnston.) 



84 



Plant Pathology 

PI.T PATH 101. General Plant Pathology-TY^vee credit hours: two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. First term. Junior year. 

'"a" ntrrctory study, in laboratory and ^f^^^/^^ZTai^^^^^^ 
ganisms and control measures of horticultural and field-crop diseases. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PTT PATH 102-104. Methods and Minor Problems in Plant ^^^^^^^f" 
Cr!dlt To be arranged. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 101 and General Bacten- 

'Tchnique in plant disease investigations including, the preparation of 

T"'p7r?oVl07. Aavancea Plant Pamomy-Vo.r credit hours each 
farm- two lectures and two laboratory periods. 

A de^ed stuW: first term, diseases of fruits; second term, d.seases o 
truck cr^DS- third term, diseases of cereal and forage crops The full 
truck crops, tmra v ■ thorough knowledge of the subject, 

^'"pTpath. 108-110. seminar in Plant Patnology-One credit hour each 
'"conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and recent in- 
"Sfp!™. 202. nesearcn in Plant PatHology-Cvem according to work 

*^°Original investigations of special problems. (Temple.) 

For Short-Course Students 
PI.T PATH 1. Plant Diseases-Three credit hours: two lectures and 

the diseases of economic crops. Frequent field trips. 



PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIO-CHEMISTRY 

Plant Physiology 
For Undergraduates 

PLT PHT 101-102. Plant Physiology-Four credit hours: two lectures 
and wo "boratory periods. Second term. ^'^^ -^J^/X^-p^l^J^. 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Sophomore year. Prerequi 

site. Gen. Bot. 101-102. 

85 



and successions'in vaH^us pa 3 „? ,^^^^^^^^^^^^ «ant for..atio„s 

Of the work, especially the practical ITk'^ ^"^ ^"'"^ ^''^^ted. Much 
for this purpose type regions ad jacent ToLtt '^"'''^ °" '"^ '""^ «^1^' «°d 
generally necessary to take three or fottlsT'"' '" '''^'''- « ^ 
l^-versity. in which case Saturdays it ^^ ;;-- J^ot """^ *" 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

eachVr two'^^elVa'nTt;: farator'^*'"^.^^-^"" -<^'^ '^O"- 
year. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys m '*°'^''"^ ''^''''^^- Junior or Senior 

A detailed studv nf nii n^^ 

generally consists^/spec f wTkToSe ''"'^- ^'^ '^*'"^^'-^ --"^ 
continue through the year sTude.f T °'' '"'"^ ^'"^^^'^^ t^at may 
graduate degrees, get the data Jrom Z T"' ''^^^^ '"' '""^'^ -^'^-' 
laboratory work. ""^ ^P^'^'^' Problems assigned for the 



For Gradual 



es 



onfrabXr^erforferd';^^^^^^^^^^ "^^" '^"-^ ^- lectures and 

Pbyslcs and an elementary knowTeL 177^"''''' "''' ^'^''^ ^"''k in 
Physiology. ^ Knowledge of Physical Chemistry and Plant 

ion.) "'""°- N°' nv,„ „„„.„. |Appl,„„, joi,.. 

P™. Phto. 2M-J0S. SeM„„_o„ ^ 

86 



Bio-Chemistry ' 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bio-Chem. 101. Physiological Chemistry — Four credit hours. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 
101-103, 105-106 or their equivalents; also an elementary knowledge of Or- 
ganic Chemistry. 

A general course in chemical biology. It embraces a study of biocolloids 
and their role in physiological processes; cell organization from the 
standpoint of the substratum in which living processes occur; chemistry 
of protoplasm and its products; catalysis and enzymes; electrolytes and 
their action; requirements of foods, including vitamines; and a general 
consideration of metabolism. (Appleman, Miller.) 

Bio. Chem. 102. Plant Bio-Chemistry — Three credit hours. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Bio-chem. 
101 and an elementary knowledge of Plant Physiology. 

An advanced course dealing with the chemistry of plant life. Synthesis 
and transformations of materials in plants and plant organs and the re- 
lation of plant processes to animal food and nutrition are especially em- 
phasized. The course also embraces the chemistry of organic compounds. 
(Appleman, Miller.) 

Poultry Husbandry 

P. H. 101. Farm Poultry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Junior year. 

Care of poultry on the general farm, including housing, feeding, incu- 
bation, brooding, breeds, breeding, selection of stock, culling, general 
management, and marketing. 

For Short-Course Students 

P. H. 1. Farm Poultry — Three credit hours: two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period. Third term. Second year. 

A general course dealing with care of farm poultry, treating on breeds 
and breeding, selection of the stock, housing, feeding, incubation and 
brooding, culling, marketing, and management. 

Soils 

Geol. 101. General Geology — Three credit hours: two lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. 

A text book, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles 
of geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is de- 
signed primarily for agricultural students in preparation for technical 
courses, it may also be taken as a part of a liberal education. 

Soils 101-102. Principles of Soil Management — Three credit hours: two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Second and third terms. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Geol. 101. 

87 



A study of the physical, chemical and biological principles underlying 
the formation and management of soils. The mechanical composition, clas- 
sification, and physical properties as related to moisture, temperature, air, 
organic matter, and tillage are concerned. The mixing and applying of 
commercial plant nutrients, tTie use of green and stable manures and of 
lime are discussed. The influence of continuous cropping, rotations, and 
fertilizers on the productivity of the soil are studied. 

Soils 103-105. Soil Fertility and Fertilizers — Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Farm manures the first and second 
terms; commercial fertilizers the third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, 
Soils, 101-102. Alternate years. Not given in 1922-23. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the details 
of soil management. It includes the practical application of the principles 
of soil physics to methods of tillage and cropping and a study of the fac- 
tors governing the use of manures and fertilizers. The practical work in- 
cludes special studies of the soils from the college station farms that have 
been subjected to various treatments. 

Soils 106. Soil Surveying and Classification — Three credit hours: one 
lecture and two laboratory periods. First term. Senior year. Prerequi- 
site, Soils 101-102. 

A study of the principal soil regions, series, and types of the United 
States, and especially of the soils of Maryland, as to formation, composi- 
tion, and value agriculturally. The practical work consists chiefly in 
identification of soils types and in map making. 

Soils 107. Soil Bacteriology — Four credit hours: two lectures and two 
laboratory periods. Third term. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 101- 
102. Alternate years. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposi- 
tion of organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, sulfafication, such 
as fungi, algae and protozoa. 

Soils 108-110. Thesis — Two credit hours. The senior year. 

Some special problem is assigned to each student, who is expected to 
embody the results of the investigation in a thesis. 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

Soils 111-113. Soil Technology — Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisites, Soils 101-102; Chemistry 
101-103. Alternate years. Not given in 1923-24. 

The technique of field, laboratory and greenhouse manipulation as ap- 
plied to the study of soil problems. (McCall.) 

Soils 114. Methods of Soil Investigation — Two credit hours. Third 
term. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (McCall and Bruce.) 

88 



For Graduate Students 

For Short-Course Students 

^* Thrpe credit hours: two lectures and one 
Soils 1. Soil Management— Three creau no 

laboratory period. Third term. First y^^^' .^^ ^^ their rela- 

tion to profitable agriculture. y ^^^oeement of Maryland soils. 

Uon of physics and ^ll^f^jJ^l^J^^Zll .ours: two lectures and 

SOILS 2. ^-««;* ""-^p^^^;'* ;;'r second year, 
one laboratory period. First ter utilisation of farm manures; 

Lectures and recitations on the care d valuation and the 

on the sources of fertilizer material, on methoas 
effect of fertilizers on different farm crops. 



89 



College of Arts and Sciences 

The aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is twofold: 

1. To lay a foundation for the learned and technical professions and 
give training in those phases of economics that enlarge the capacity of 
men and women for handling modern business problems. 

2. To increase knowledge of the broader and cultural phases of learning. 
This College furnishes curricula which develop a liberal education in 

the languages and literature, the sciences, mathematics, philosophy, his- 
tory, politics, economics, and sociology. It likewise offers excellent op- 
portunities to students preparing to enter Schools of Law and Medicine. 
The College includes the following departments: 

Ancient Language and Philosophy. 

Business Administration and Commerce. 

Chemistry. 

English Language, Literature and Journalism. 

Economics and Sociology. 

General Botany. ' 

History and Political Science. 

Library Science. • 

Mathematics. ' 

Modern Languages and Literature. 

Music. 

Physics. 

Public Speaking. 

Zoology and Aquiculture. • , 

The Pre-Medical Curriculum. 

Admission 

The admission of students is in charge of the University Committee on 
Student Enrollment and Entrance, which determines the credits which 
shall be issued on all entrance examinations and certificates. 

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degree 

The College of Arts and Sciences confers two baccalaureate degrees: 

1. Bachelor of Arts. 

2. Bachelor of Science. 

General Requirements 

In order to be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bach- 
elor of Science, the candidate must first have satisfied the requirements for 
admission; and second, have obtained a prescribed minimum number of 
college credits. 

90 



reauired for graduation in %^-;^^f:J;^:^'Z^Z^-eey. during a 
grees. The "hour" represents o^^ rmtati^^^ ho ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ 

term Two or three hours of laboratory or ucxu 

equivalent to one lecture o^^^^f^^;""- ^^ ,,^fe„ed upon a student 

A baccalaureate degree m this College ^^y °« ^ minimum 

..0 satisfies all entrance XXr^t^ fa coTd^glo the following pro- 

:Lrs.rr f^thr Srtr .n -m- ^^ ---c^^ 

:- rthTe ;S=rrr=Sr Se are coordinated 

as follows: ^^^. ^ ji m 

FRESHMAN YEAR 3 3 3 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-^3) • ^ ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking ^ff "^f "^ .\- ' -; VoMOa": 
Foreign Language (Gk. 1-3, Cxk. lui luo, ^^. 

Fren. 1-3; Fren. 101-103; Ger. 1-3; Germ. 101-103, ^ ^ ^ 

Span. 101-103) \^^\'(^i\ 4 4 4 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. ( Inorg. Chom. 101-103 ) . . . . ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Algebra (Math. 106 or 107) ^ ^ 3 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 108) * ' ^ 3 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 109) ^ . ....... • " ^ 3 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 109-111) ...... ^ ^ 

Library Methods (L. S. 101) '^' ^ ^ 2 

Military Science (M. I. 101) * * ^ ^ 

♦General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) • • • • • •••••• ^ 

♦Entomology (Zool. 107) or General Botany (Bot. 101) . . . 

"Ti^^uired in the Pre-Medical curriculum. ^^^^ ^ jj ju 

SOPHOMORE YEAR * 8 3 3 

♦Modern Poets and Browning (Eng. 107-109) ^ ^ ^ 

♦American Literature (Eng. 110-112) ^ ^ 3 

♦History of English Literature (Eng. 119-121 ) ^ ^ ^ 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 104-106) ^ 3 3 

Foreign Language (continued) ^ 3 

tSocial Psychology (Soc. 104-105) . . . . • -^ • ^ ^ 3 

tLogical Aspects of Sociology (S^c- 106) ^ ^ 3 

tElements of Economics (Econ. 101-103 ) ^ ^ ^ 

National Government (Pol. Sc. 101) ^ ^ 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sc 102 ) ^ ^ 

Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 103) ^ ^ 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) **'*'//. .. -. ^ 

^Entomology (Zool. 107) * * ^ 4 

jGeneral Botany (Bot. 101) * * * * ^ 2 2 

Military Science (M. I. 102) 

♦Select one of these. 
tSelect one of these. 
^Select one of these, 91 . 



Junior and Senior Years 

At the beginning of the Junior year every candidate for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree shall select major work in group A or B, in which he shall 
have completed by the end of his Senior year from twenty-five to forty 
per cent of the total number of hours necessary for graduation. Candi- 
dates for the Bachelor of Science degree shall select major work in group 
B, C, or D. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science, majoring 
in Chemistry, see Chemistry Curricula. Candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Economics, majoring in Business Administration 
and Commerce, see curriculum of Business Administration and Commerce. 
All candidates shall select subjects with a direct bearing upon their major 
work amounting to twenty or thirty per cent of the total number of hours 
necessary for graduation. 

Groups of Major Work 

A. Languages and Literature: English, Public Speaking, Journalism, 

Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish. 

B. Social Sciences: Economics, Commerce, Business Administration, His- 

tory, Political Science, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology. 

C. Biological Sciences: Bacteriology, Botany, Zoology. 

D. Physical Sciences: Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Geology. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

As a result of the increasingly differentiated economic development of 
this country and other countries and owing to the concomitant develop- 
ment of higher and more complex forms of business organization, the last 
two decades have witnessed the origin and growth of the full four-year 
curriculum, the aim of which is to furnish specialized training for those 
who wish to enter upon a business career, very much in the same way as 
schools of law and medicine provide specialized training for lawyers and 
medical men. 

As at present organized, this department offers what is practically a 
four-year curriculum having this special aim. However, this first year 
is coincident with the first year of the College of Arts and Sciences; i. e., 
subject to the same conditions of entrance and required subjects. In 
other words, the student who wishes to major in business administration 
and commerce does not enter upon this specialization until the beginning 
of his sophomore year. 

The student will receive four years of training sufficiently broad and 
well balanced and at the same time sufficiently specialized to equip him 
for any modern business. 

The following arrangement of studies, therefore, presupposes one year 
of college work, which will be the freshman year in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The last three years, however, should include what is here out- 
lined: 

92 



SOPHOMORE YEAR ^^'"^- ^ 

Modern Language • • • • • ^ 

National Government (Pol. ^^^ "^"^^ * * * * * * * 

State and Local Government (Pol. Sc. 102 ) 

Municipal Government (Pol. Sc. 103) '^ 

Elements of Economics (Econ. 101-103) ^ 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 

Logical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) ^ 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 104-106) ^ 

R. O. T. C. (M. L 102) ^ 

Current History (His. 101-103) ^ 

English (Eng. 104-106) 

JUNIOR YEAR '^^'*'^* ^ 

Business Organization (Com. 113) 

Business Management (Com. 114) 

Industrial Management (Com. 115) - 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103) 

Money and Banking (Econ. 104) • • • • v- • • • - 

Commerce and Finance (Practicum) or Markets and 

* • • • • • * 

Marketing ^ 

Diplomacy (Pol. Sc. 113-115) ^ 

Business Law (Com. 110-112) ^ 

Accounting (101-103, 104-106) ••••• ^ 

Group Electives 

SENIOR YEAR ^^'''^'' ^ 

Constitutional Law (Pol. Sc. 106-108) • - 

Markets and Marketing (Econ. 107) or Commerce and 

• • • • • • • 

Finance ^ 

Group Electives ^ 

Free Electives 

Elective Groups 

3 

Accounting (Com. 101-103) ^ 

Advanced Accounting (Com. 104-106) 

Commercial Mathematics (Com. 107-109) ^ 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 

Logical Aspects of Sociology (Soc. 106) - 

General Sociology (Soc. 101-102) ^ 

Business Law (Com. 110-112) ^ 

Modern Language 3 

International Law (Pol. Sc. 116-118) ^ 

Current History (His. 101) ^ 

General History " g 

Public Speaking 

93 



n 

3 



/// 
3 



3 
3 

» • 

1 
2 
1 
2 



3 

1 

2 
1 
2 



II III 



• 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


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/// 


3 


3 


• • 


3 


9 


9 


6 


3 


S 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


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• • 


3 


3 


• • 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


2 



CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry of the College of Arts and Sciences offers 
courses in Inorganic, Organic, Physical, Analytical and Industrial Chem- 
istry; and also includes the State control work of fertilizers, feed and lime 
analysis. 

The above named courses, which include the basic principle of Chem- 
istry, serve as a necessary part of a general education, and are designed 
to lay a foundation for scientific and technical work; such as medicine, 
engineering, agriculture, etc. 

Besides serving in this fundamental way the courses are grouped to 
train chemists for the following careers: 

1. Industrial Chemist — Chemistry is becoming more and more to be 
realized as the basis of many industries. Many apparently efficient chemi- 
cal industries have become greatly improved by the application of modern 
chemistry. Chemical corporations employ chemists to manage and develop 
units of their plants. 

A curriculum as preparation for Industrial Chemist is given below. 

2. Agricultural Chemist — The curriculum suggested on page 94 fits men 
to carry on work in Agricultural Experiment stations. Bureau of Soils, 
food laboratories, geological surveys, etc. 

3. Teacher of Chemistry — There is a growing need of suitably trained 
science teachers in schools. The curriculum on page 95 not only furnishes 
the necessary science but also names the educational subjects which are 
required to obtain the Special Teachers Diploma. 

The same curriculum together with graduate work will fit a man to 
teach in college or university. 

4. Research Chemist — The more progressive corporations have estab- 
lished chemical research laboratories. These laboratories are run with the 
main purpose of Improving old processes and devising new ones. Highly 
trained chemists have charge of these laboratories. The general chemistry 
curriculum, page 96, is for the undergraduate work, but for these positions 
work leading to a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy degree is 
advised. 

Industrial Chemistry 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I I III 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 5 5 6 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 110) 3 

Calculus (Math. Ill) 3 S 

Modern Language (M. L, 104-106, 124-126) 3 3 3 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 101) 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) 4 4 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 104) 2 

Machine Shop (Shop 101) 2 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101) 2 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) 2 2 2 

Note: The Freshman year for those majoring in Chemistry is the same as for other 
$tvident3 in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

H 



2 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3-4 



JUNIOR YEAR ^^''^' ^ 4 

organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. lOS-lOTK ^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chena. 104-105) 

Mineralogy and Assaying (Anal. Chem 108) ^ ^ 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) ^ ^ 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) ^ ^ 

Engineering Geology ( Geol. 101-103 ) ^ ^ 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 104-106) • ^ ^ 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) 

Term/' I 

SENIOR YEAR * ^ 4 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem, 101-102) 

Electro Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104) 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103) '^ 

Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 115-U7) ^ 

Metallurgical Analysis (Ind. Chem. 113-114) ^ 

Metallurgical Calculations (Ind. Chem. 112) ^ 

Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) ''';'''' 1 

Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103) • ^^ 

Electives in Engineering 

Agricultural Chemistry 

SOPHOMORE YEAR ^^''^' ^ 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) .••• ^ 

Plane Analytic Geometry ( Math. 110 ) • - 

Calculus (Math. HI) :'''\'c\"^or[ 3 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106 124-126). 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis ^^""^'^ ^Z^^^'^^ . 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) ^ 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) •••••• 

Botany (Bot. 101) 2 2 

Military Science (R. O. T. C. ) 

,,„._ Term: I II 

JUNIOR YEAR ^ 2 

English (Eng. 104-106) •**' ^ 3 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) • • • ^ 4 

Organic Chemistry (Org. ^hem 105-107) .^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 104-105) ^ ^ 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) •••' "^ 4 

Electives 

Group 1 4 . . 

Cereal Crops (Agro. 101) • • • ^ 

Plant Physiology (PH. Pl^ys. 101-102) • • • • • 

Forage Crops (Agro. 103) 



4 

• • 

3 

1 

3 

1 

2 

3 

III 

• • 

4 
4 
2 
* • 
1 
3 
1 
3-4 



II 

3 
3 

• • 

4 
3 



III 
5 

• • 

3 
3 



4 
2 

III 
2 
3 

4 

• • 

1 
3 
4 



3 
4 



I 



Group 2 

Geology (Soils 101) 3 

Soils (Soils 102-103) 3 3 

Group 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 3 3 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 102) 4 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 4 

Forage Crops (Agro. 101) 3 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I IT III 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-102) 4 4 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103) 4 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Agricultural Chemical Analysis (Ind. Chem. 107-109).. 3 3 3 

Biological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101-102) 4 . . 3 

Electives in Agriculture 4-5 8-9 5-6 

General Chemistry 

SOPHOMORE YEAR • Term: I II III 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) 6 5 5 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Bath. 110) ^ 3 

Calculus (Math. Ill) 3 3 

Modern Language (M. L. 104-106, 124-12G) 3 3 3 

Advanced Qualitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 101) 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 102-103) 4 4 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 3 3 

Botany (Bot. 101) 4 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) 2 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Economics (Econ. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 105-107) 4 4 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 104-105) 3 3 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 106) Ill 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) , . . 3 

*Electives 4-5 4-5 4-5 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101-102) 4 4 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 104) 4 

Colloidal Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 103) 4 

Biological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) 4 

Electives in Chemistry 4 4 4 

*Electives 5-6 9-10 5-6 

* Elective groups are offered in Education, Arts, Political Science and Science. 

9C 



THE PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The Premedical Curriculum includes the subjects and hours prescribed 
JSe Council on Medical Education of the American M^^^^^^^^^^ 
tfon together with additional subjects and hours totalling 68 to 70 semes 

%S"r wrj'.°"lTuSs ».,r.n. *e Sc-.o, o< MedWa. .. 

jSwersity of Maryland, who present the credits oM^i-d^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
pp^^ful completion of this curriculum or its equivalent of 68 hours m 
'^^Tl^lTZ 1923 all students must satisfy the sixty (60) semes- 
ler hour requirement of the Council on Medical Education of the Amen- 

^^XntdS^^^^^^^ seven-year curriculum is o.ered leading to the 

degrees o Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first three 
vea s Le taken in 'residence at College Park and the last four years in 
S more at the Medical School. The Premedical Curriculum constitutes 
TZIM years> work and a third year following the ^en-^^^^^^^^^ 
given below, with the electives approved by the chairman of the P^emedi 
crcurricui;m and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, completes 

the studies at College Park. yuc^A^^^^ cjphool 

upon the successful completion of the first year ^f ^be Medicf ^^^^^^^^^ 
and the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bache or of Science 
may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this combina- 
tlon coursroi^^^ the minimum requirements of the two years. By 

complXg three years, the training may be greatly broadened by a 
wider latitude in the election of courses in the arts subjects. 

tquirf^^^^^^ admission to the Premedical Curriculum may be found 
on pages 97 and 98. 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 

Two Years 

FRESHMAN YEAR ^^^^^ { '\ ''\ 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-103 and 101a, 101b, 103c) ... 4 4 ^ 

Chemistry (Chem. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

French or German (Fren. or Ger. 1-3) ^ ^ ^ 

Composition (Eng. 101-103) , 

Mathematics (Math. 106-107-108-109) ill 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

R. O. T. C •• 



97 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I II III 

Embryology (Zool. 104-105) 4 2 

Comparative Morphology of the Vertebrates (Zool. 107) .. .. 3 

Organic Chem. (Org. Chem. 105-106) 4 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 107) 4 

Physics (Phys. 104-106) 4 4 4 

French or German (101-103) 3 3 3 

Composition, History, Literature or Sociology (Elect 

one) 2-3 2-3 2-3 

R. O. T. C 2 2 2 

Combined Seven- Year Course 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Required 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Group B — (College of Arts and Sciences) 3 3 3 

Group Electives — 
Science (Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Entomol- 
ogy, Genetics, Mathematics and Zoology) 6 6 6 

Non-Science 7 7 7 

SENIOR YEAR 

The curriculum of the first year of the Medical school. 

The student may also elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses 

offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

« 

Requirements for Entrance 

Admission to the curriculum in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of Maryland. 
This certificate is obtained on the basis of satisfactory credentials, or by 
examination and credentials, and is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student's Certificate 
are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the 
equivalent, and in addition: 

(b) Two years, sixty semester, or ninety trimester hours, of college 
credits, including chemistry, biology, physics and English in 1922. In 
1923 the completion of 117 to 120 trimester hours as outlined in the Pre- 
medical Curriculum, or its equivalent, will be required. 

Women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 

(a) Details of the High School Requirements 

For admission to the Premedical Curriculum, students 
1. Shall have completed a four-year course of 15 units in a standard ac- 
credited high school or other institution of standard secondary school 
grade, or: 

98 



2. Shall have the equivalent as demonstrated by successfully passing en- 
trance examinations in the following subjects: 

Credits for admission to the premedical college course may be granted 
for the subjects shown in the following list and for any other subject 
counted by a standard accredited high school as a part of the requirement 
for its diploma, provided that at least eleven units must be offered m 
Groups I-V: 

Schedule of Subjects Required or Accepted for Entrance to the 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 

„ ^. ^ Units Required 

Subjects 

Group I.~English: ^ 

Literature and composition 

Group II. — Foreign Languages: 

Latin ^^ ;2 

Greek 

French or German 

Other foreign languages 

Group III. Mathematics: 

Elementary Algebra 

Advanced Algebra " * * 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry ^ 

Trigonometry ^^ 

Group IV.— History: 

Ancient History ^'^ 

Medieval and Modern History V2-I • • 

English History ^'^ 

American History ^" 

Civil Government '^' 

Group V. — Science: 

Botany JJ 

Zoology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Physiography ^" 

Physiology ^^^ 

Astronomy ^^ 

^ , %4>-l 

Geology 



99 



i 



Group VI. — Miscellaneous: 

Agriculture 

Bookkeeping 

Business Law 

Commercial Geography 

Domestic Science 

Drawing. — Freehand and Mechanical, 

Economics and Economic History 

Manual Training 

Music. — Appreciation or Harmony . . . 
Stenography 



1-2 

y2-i 
¥2-1 

1-2 

¥2-2 

¥2-1 
1-2 

1-2 

■ 

1 



♦Both of the required units of Foreign Language must be of the same language, but 
the two units may be presented in any one of the languages specified. 
fr^r^^Jr.' u ^"i ""lu^ ^v }^^^^ school work, eight units are required, as indicated in the 

s^hlduk^ schedule ; the balance may be made up from any of the other subjects in the 

(b) Details of the College Requirements 

1. The preliminary college curriculum shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction. 

2. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this prelimi- 
nary college curriculum shall be equal to the work done in the freshman 
and sophomore years in standard colleges and universities. 

Schedule of Subjects of the Two- Year Pre-Medical Course 

Minimum requirements for 1922, 60 semester* or 90 trimester hours 
required. 

For 1923 requirements, see Pre-Medical Curriculum, page 96. 



Semester 
Hours 
12 



Required Subjects: 

Chemistry (a) 

Physics (b) 

Biology (c) 

English Composition and Literature (d) 

Other Non-Science Subjects (e) 

Subjects Strongly Urged: 

French or German (f ) ; ■ 

Advanced Botany or Advanced Zoology 

Psychology 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry. 

Additional Courses in Chemistry 

Other Suggested Electives: 
English (additional). Economics, History, Sociology, Political Science 
Logic, Mathematics, Latin, Greek, Drawing, 



8 

8 

6 

12 

6-12 
3-6 
3-6 
3-6 
3-6 



A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of one lecture 
or recitation period per week (each period to be not less than fifty minutes net) : at 
least two hours of laboratory work to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or 
recitation period. 

100 



Suggestions Regarding Individual Subjects 

(a) Chemistry — Twelve semester hours required, of which at least eight 
semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, including four 
semester hours of laboratory work. In the interpretation of this rule, work 
in qualitative analysis may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. 
The remaining four semester hours may consist of additional work in gen- 
eral chemistry or of work in analytic or organic chemistry. 

(b) Physics — Eight seemster hours required, of which at least two must 
be laboratory work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a course in 
trigonometry. This requirement may be satisfied by six semester hours of 
college physics, of which two must be laboratory work, if preceded by a 
year (one unit) of high school physics. 

(c) Biology — Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist 
of laboratory work. The requirement may be satisfied by a course of 
eight semester hours in either general biology or zoology, or by courses of 
four semester hours each in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature — The usual introductory col- 
lege course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is required. 

(e) Conscience Subjects — Of the sixty semester hours required as the 
measurement of two years of college work, at least eighteen, including 
the six semester hours of English should be in subjects other than the 
physical, chemical or biological sciences. 

(f) French or German — A reading knowledge of one of these languages 
is strongly urged. If the reading knowledge in one of these languages is 
obtained on the basis of high school work, the student is urged to take 
the other language in his college course. It is not considered advisable, 
however, to spend more than twelve of the required sixty semester hours 
on foreign languages. In case a reading knowledge of one language is ob- 
tained by six semester hours of college work, another six semester hours 
may be well spent in taking the beginner's course in the other language; 
if this is followed up by a systematic reading of scientific prose, a reading 
knowledge of the second language may be readily acquired. When a stu- 
dent spends more than two years in college he may well spend twelve se- 
mester hours of his college work in the second language. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Eng. 
terms. 



English Language and Literature 

For Short-Course Students 

1-2. Practical Composition — Three credit hours. First and second 
Prerequisites, minimum entrance requirements for short-course 



students. 

Elements, thought processes, types, structure, grammar, mechanical de- 
tails and common errors of plain composition. Study and preparation of 

101 



commercial letters, forms, articles, reports, and advertisements. Regular 
practice in long and short themes. 

Eng. 3. Practical Composition — Two credit hours. Third term. 

A continuation of Eng. 1-2. 

For Undergraduates 

Eng. 101-103. Composition and Rhetoric — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Freshman year. Prerequisites, minimum entrance require- 
ments in English. (Required of all four-year students.) 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective thought communication. 
Reading, study, and analysis of standard contemporary prose specimens. 
Short papers and term themes. 

Eng. 104-106. Advanced English Composition — Two credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Lectures on principles of composition. Study and analysis of the best 
scientific essays. Practice in expository writing. Term themes and mono- 
graphs. 

Eng. 107-108. Modern Poets — Three credit hours each term. First and 
second terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Lectures on the nature and function of poetry. Reading from wide 
variety of English and American lyric poets of recent time. Studies in 
literary personalia and poetical analysis. 

Eng. 109. Poems of Robert Browning — Three credit hours. Third term. 

A continuation of Eng. 107-108. The shorter poems of Browning read 
and discussed. 

Eng. 110-112. American Literature — Three credit hours. Three terms. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

1. American poetry. 

2. American essay, oration, and debate. 

3. American short story. 

Lectures on growth of American literary types. Reports on assigned 
topics. Term themes. 

Eng. 113-114. The Novel — Three credit hours each term. First and 
second terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class re- 
views of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. Some 
account of the history of the development of English fiction. 

Eng. 115. English and American Essays — Three credit hours. Third 
term. (Designed to follow Eng. 113-114.) 

A study of the philosophical and critfcal essays of England and America: 
Bacon, Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Chesterton, Emerson. 

Eng. 116-118. The Drama — Three credit hours. Three terms. Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 101-103. 

1. Modern Drama, including the plays of English and American drama- 
tists of modern times. Wilde, Pinero, Jones, Galsworthy, Barker, Yeats, 



102 



Synge Gregory, Fitch, Moody, Thomas, Mackaye, Bennett, Knoblock, 
Mangham, Drinkwater, Ervine, Dunsany, Walter, Peabody, and Hazelton. 

2 American Drama, covering the best and most successful plays m the 
history and development of the dramatic art in America: Godfrey, Tyler, 
Dunlap, Barker, Payne, Irving, Smith, Autis, Bird, Willis, Ritchie Baker, 
Howe, Boncicault, Jefferson, Howard, Gillette, Belasco, Long, Sheldon, 

Crothers, and Tarkington. 

3 English Drama, including a study of dramatic types, and a survey of 
the principal English dramatists (excluding Shakespeare). Lyly, Mar- 
lowe, Dekker, Heywood, Beaumont, Fletcher, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, 
Rowley, Dryden, Otway, Congreave, Addison, Steele, Fielding, Goldsmith, 
Sheridan, Shelley, Bulwer-Litton and Wilde. 

Eng. 119-121. History of English Litcrature-Thvee credit hours each 

term. Three terms. ,. ^ ^, 

A general survey of the subject with wide readings of English Classics. 
Eng. 122-124. JournaliS7n-One credit hour each term. Three terms. 

Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

1 Study and criticism of the modern newspaper; lectures on the edi- 
torial mechanical, and business divisions and on the classification of 
duties and responsibilities. Introduction to news writing. Class practice 
and assignments. 2. Types of news stories, new sources, and editorial 
theory and practice, including copy reading, proof reading, head writing, 
make-up, and editorial functions and qualifications. Lectures, class prac- 
tice and assignments. 3. Feature writing with a study of types and 
styles of feature stories. Practical application with a view to correlat- 
ing the journalistic course with other university courses. Lectures, class 
practice, and assignments. 

Eng. 125-127. Shakespeare— Three credit hours each term. Three 

terms. Prerequisite, Eng. 101-103. 

An intensive study of selected plays. 

Eng. 128-130. Modern Business Writing— One credit hour each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisites, Eng. 101-103 and Eng. 104-106. 

The following topics will be studied: the language of business, good 
usage and the elements of expression, the type-written form, special 
study' of words, paragraph structure, correct punctuation, everyday let- 
ters correspondence in form and practice, circulars and advertisements, 
the selling appeal, the psychological approach as applied to the letter. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng 131-133. Anglo-Saxon and Middle English— Three credit hours each 
term. Students must enter at the beginning of the year, and should plan 
to continue during the full three terms. 

1. Study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lec- 
tures on the principles of comparative philology and phonetics. 

2. Beowulf through 2,000 lines. 

3. The language and authorship of the Middle English period, ending 

with Chaucer. (House). 

103 






: 






For Graduate Students 

Eng. 201-203. Seminar — Original research and the preparation of dis- 
sertations looking toward advanced degrees. Credit proportioned to the 
amount of work and ends accomplished. (House.) 

Eng. 204-206. Elizabethan Literature — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. 

1. Shakespeare: Study of all of Shakespeare's plays. 

2. Chief Elizabethan Dramatists (omitting Shakespeare). 

3. Milton. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 207-209. Romantic Poets — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. 

1. Wordsworth and Coleridge. 

2. Byron and Keats. 

3. Shelley and Southey. 

Lectures. Reports on assigned topics. Themes. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 210. Broivning's Dramas — Three credit hours. First term. 

Luria; Return of the Druses; Colombe's Birthday; Pippa Passes; A Blot 
in the 'Scutcheon. (House.) 

Eng. 211. Tennyson — Three credit hours. Second term. 

Lectures on the art of poetry, followed by a detailed reading of The 
Princess. Survey of other important poems of this author. (House.) 

Eng. 212. Ballad Literature — Three credit hours. Third term. 

Traditional English and Scottish ballads. Modern imitative ballads. 
American folk ballads. Popular song literature. (House.) 



MODERN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



French 
For Undergraduates 

Fren. 1-3. Elementary French — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. 

Drill upon pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversa- 
tion, easy translation. For beginners. 

This course must be followed by Fren. lul-103. 

Fren. 101-103. Second-Year French — Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 1-3 or the equivalent. 

Grammar continued, composition, conversation, translation, and repro- 
ductions. Texts selected from modern prose and poetry. 

This course must be taken by those who offer two units in French for 
entrance. 

Fren. 104-106. Development of the French Novel — Three credit hours 
each term. Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 101-103. 

Detailed study of the history and the development of the novel in French 



104 



literature. Study of the lives, works, and influence of various novelists. 

This course alternates with Fren. 107-109. 

FREN. 107-109. Development of the French Drama-Three credit hoi.r. 
each term. Three terms. Prerequisite Fren. 101-103. •>,,„.>, 

Analysis and study of the French drama of the seventeenth eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. Lectures, translation, collateral readmg and re- 

ports. 

This course alternates with French 104-106. 



For Advanced Undergraduates 



Fren. 110-112. History of French Literature^Thvee terms. Prerequisite 

TTrPTi 107-109 or 104-106. . ^ . 

study of French literature from the earliest times to the present. Read- 
ing and translation of representative works; texts and lectures. (Kramer.) 

German 
For Undergraduates 

Germ. 1-3. Beginning German-Three credit hours each term. Three 

fprms • 

Drill in pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, conversation. 

dictation, and translation. For beginners. 

This course must be followed by Germ. 101-103. 

Geem 101-103. Second-Year German-Three credit hours each term. 
Three terms. Prerequisite Germ. 1-3 or the equivalent 

Syntax, composition, conversation, translation, and reproductions. Se- 
lections from modern prose, poetry, and fiction. 

This course is for those students who offer two units in German for en- 

*' Gebm 104. Goethe and the Novel-Three credit hours for the first half 
year, 'prerequisite Germ. 101-103. This course is to be followed by Germ. 
105 Given in alternate years. 

Critical study of the life and works of Goethe together with the prin- 
ciDles and development of the modern German novel. 

GEEi 105 Schiller and the Drama-Three credit hours for the second 
half year Prerequisites Germ. 104. 

Detailed study of the life and works of Schiller and his relation to the 
development of the German drama. 

Germ. 106. Leasing and German Prose-Three credit hours *<>>• the first 
half year. Prerequisite Germ. 101-103. This course is to be followed by 
Germ. 107. Alternates with Germ. 104. 
A study of the life and works of Lessing and his relation to the history 

of German prose. ^ ,, 

GERM. 107. Heine and German Poetry-Three credit hours for the sec- 
ond half year. Prerequisite Germ. 106. 

105 



! 



Extensive study of Heine and German poetry Collateral r.=-,- 
tures on the history of German poetry. Reports' ' 



For Advanced Undergraduates 



and reports. (Kramer.) ^^"'^''''^''''^ ^^^^^- lectures, collateral reading 



Spanish 
For Undergraduates 

Span. 1-3. Beginners' Spanish— Three credit hnnrc «« x, . 
term*? Tn k^ f^u^ ^ ^ ^ i^^itje creait nours each term. Threp 

lerms. lo be followed by Span. 101-103 

the equivalent. " "*■ P'^eau'slte Span. 1-8 or 

the equivalent. Prerequisite Span. 101-103 or 

The study of grammar continued nnii t^ t/i- , 

signed work given in the hTtnrv !' h . . °'^- ^^^^^ures and as- 

America. '^"'"^ ^""^ development of Spain and South 

requisite Zn.'lTM;r ^''^-^-^''- -^» '^ours. One term. Pre- 

The writing and discussion of business fortn= »r,H »♦■ 
Of the field of commerce in South ZeZl '"'"'• ^ """^'^^ 



For Advanced Undergraduates 



Span. 107-109. Modern Spanish Literature-Thr^^ n..^; v. 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite Span. T04T06 '* ^""'"^ ""''^ 

Study of modern writers of Spain anrt C3m,fv, a 
lateral reading and reports. (StSso;.) '"'"• '^''"''''' ^°'- 

Span. 110-112. Spanish Literaturp ir, fh^ n i^ 

Additional courses in Spanish may be arranged with th 
instructor. arranged with the consent of the 

106 



ZOOLOGY AND AQUICULTURE 

For Undergraduates 

The courses offered by this department cover the biological requirements 
for entrance to the Medical School and furnish the basis for specializa- 
tion in Aquiculture and other branches of Zoology. 

ZooL. 101-102. General Zoology — Credit at the rate of two hours per 
term. (Three credit hours for half year's work). Two lecture periods. 
First term and the first half of the second term. Repeated the latter half 
of the second term and the third term. Must be taken concurrently 
with Zool. 101a-102b. 

The fundamental concepts of animal biology are stressed rather than 
the morphology of types. Thus the course is made broad enough to serve 
as a foundation to further study in any branch of the subject. Required 
by the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Home Economics and 
Education. 

ZooL. 103. A Continuation of Zool. 101-102 — Two credit hours. Two lec- 
tures. Third term. Prerequisite, 101-102. Required of pre-medical stu- 
dents. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 103c. 

ZooL. 101a-102b. General Zoology — Credit at the rate of two hours per 
term. (Three credit hours for half year's work.) Two laboratory periods. 
First term and first half of second term. Repeated the latter half of the 
second term and the third term. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 
101-102. 

Zool. 103c. A Continuation of Zool. 101a-102b — Two credit hours. Two 
laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 101a-102b. Required 
of Pre-Medical students. To be taken concurrently with Zool. 103. 

Zool. 104-105. Embryology — Four credit hours for 104; two credit hours 
for 105. Two lectures and two laboratory periods for 104; two laboratory 
periods for 105. First and second terms. Prerequisite, Zool. 101, 101a, 102, 
102b. The early stages of the frog and the development of the chick to 
the end of the third day will be studied. 

Zool. 106. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology — Three credit hours. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Zool. 
101, 101a, 102, 102b. 

Zool. 107. Normal Animal Histology — Three credit hours. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Zool. 101, 101a, 102, 102b. Not 
offered in 1922-23. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 110. Aquiculture — Credit hours, lectures and laboratory to be ar- 
ranged. Prerequisites, Zool. 101-106 and Bot. 101. Plankton studies and 
the determination of other aquatic life of nearby streams and ponds. Mor- 
phology and ecology of representative commercial and game fishes in 
Maryland, the Chesapeake Blue Crab and the Oyster. (Truitt.) 

107 



Zooi. J . *^°'' ^*^«rt-Cour8e Students 

^■ooL. 1. Animal Pests—Threp ipnf,„.oo o 

A study Of the Wild ani Jals Of 1^^ wuT ^T" " ''*"* ^^^••• 
designed to enable farmers to reZjTtTl ""T"' '° "^^''tiflcation ; 
mals on Maryland farms. "^^"^^eo'^e the beneficial and noxious ani- 

MUSIC 
p Voice 

hensTvrslud^Ir'Lf^rucZlr',' "'"^°^ ^ '^"••-^^ --^ -mpre. 
The work required to d^C'a s 1^1 .' "'"'"^ "^*'^°'' «^ «''^^'"^- 
mental principles of correct breathinl « t *"" ^''^ '^^ "^"^t funda- 
an intervals, the Portamento Teg^^ndt "' ''"'"^'° ^^^■•"-^' -'i 
embellishments to develop the'tecfn^'ue ^?<, '°'^'°' "'"' *""' ^'^'^ "'her 
medium Of vocal exercises arranged by the. ?'°^ ^'' ''""^''^ t^''""^'' 'be 

"":: zirr ^-^^^"^^^'^ o'l'^nsifeior ^""°^"^^^ ^^^ -^ -- 

ments oreLr rg^r^anbruiiratrb^" ^^^ ^^^^ - --^ 

Opportunities are offerpri oti ,.«• 

lie appearances in the regula ZSJ"^ T '" ^^^^"^' ^« ^^^^^ P«b- 
of the community. ^ ^ ^^ '^^"*^'«' «« ^'e'l as in the churches 

„ , Tuition 

One lesson per week, term of twelve weeks 

Two lessons per week, term of twelve weeks ''" 

$50 

„ , Chorus 

Membership in the Chorus is free to an <=fnw . 
.n the community. One trimester cred ZT' '"' '" "''''''' '''"''^^ 
dents for faithful attendance at w/pI.I I ''^^'" '" ^^'^'•^'^d to stu- 
PUblic concerts. Standard part so^s a "^^ '"''"'' "'^'^ Participation in 
hearsal each week. ^' ^"'^ oratorios are studied. One re- 

A Ti, , ^^®® Clubs 

A Men s Glee Club and a Women's r^.u n, ^ . 
ship, are recruited from the best voc^.Tf ? ^ ^' ^°^^ °^ "-^"^l member- 
is gained through tests, or ' try-oms ' con^ ?.*'' University. Admission 

school year. Public concerts Ire iven^r- '' '''" ''^'"°'°^ "' *^^ 
holds two rehearsals each week "^ ^'"^ organizations. Each club 

T,j„. Military Band 

.aniza^tirofr unilsrfnr'^'r '^' ^^ ^ -^ '>^ ^^e Military or- 
Pii-e Of the Departlr: ^Simari'scl'"' 'T' ^"^''^^"-^ ^-^ "^^^ - 
Of its work is under the DepT^eTt ^S'^ieTans^""''^' '"* ^'^^ '^'^'^'''^^ 

108 



Piano 

Elementary Piano Courses. Work for beginners, based on the Lesch- 
etizky method. 

Advanced Piano Courses. The college work in Piano presupposes three 
years of preparatory study of the piano, part or all of which may be taken 
at the University. 

Lessons are taken twice a week. A four-year college course as follows: 

First Year — Leschetizky technic, Bach Two-part Invention; Heller 
Etudes, Sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; selections from classic 
and modern composers. 

Second Year — Bach Three-part Inventions; concertos by classic masters; 
Jensen Etudes; selections from classic, romantic and modern composers. 

Third Year — Leschetizky technic; Moscheles Etudes; Chopin Preludes 
and Waltzes; Bach Well-Tempered Clavichord; Mendelssohn concertos; 
Beethoven sonatas; selections from romantic and modern composers. 

Fourth Year — Leschetizky technic; Chopin Etudes; Bach Well-Tempered 
Clavichord; sonatas and concertos by Grieg, McDowell, Schutt, Beethoven, 
etc., concert pieces by modern and romantic composers. 

Tuition (for Elementary Piano Courses) 

One lesson per week, term of twelve weeks $12 

Two lessons per week, term of tw^elve weeks 24 

Note. — Music tuitions are due in advance. 10% is added to all tuitions 
not paid in advance. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 101-103. Arts Physics — Four credit hours each term. Three 
recitations. One laboratory period. Three terms. Prerequisite, Math. 
107. (Students of Pre-Medical curriculum will take one additional labora- 
tory period each week.) 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of the 
laws governing the physical phenomena in Mechanics, Heat, Magnetism,. 
Electricity, Light and Sound. Required of students in the Pre-Medical 
curriculum. Elective for other students. 

Physics 104-106. Engineering Physics — Five credit hours each term. 
Four recitations. One laboratory period. Three terms. Prerequisite 
Math. 101. 

Laws and theories pertaining to Mechanics, Heat, Magnetism, Electric- 
ity, Light and Sound, w^ith special reference to the problems which con- 
cern engineering, are discussed in the lecture room and applied in the 
laboratory. Required of all students in Engineering and Chemistry. Elec- 
tive for other students. (In the third term the students in Chemistry are 
given a special course in Heat and Light, Physics 103c, instead of the 
course given to the engineering students.) 

Physics 107-108. Special Applications of Physics — Three credit hours 
each term. Three lectures. First and second terms. 

^ 109 



4 



'i 



Mechanics and Heat— A disrii«?^inTi ^f +v. , 
chanics Of solids and flufds a„d o Lf *"'' ''''°''^^ «' ^'^^ «"«- 

the students in AgricuHure ' ^' ^PP"'^^'"^ to the problems of 

neSHf^f-ieSSf ^°"" ^^^ ^'^^^^'^"^ ^^ "^ ^P^"-tion to the 

A discussion of the phenomena in Physical Onti^c <= . 
duetion Of Electricity through Gases. RadLTctivUy ' '^"*'-°^'=''^^' <^-- 
Elective for students who have completed Physics 10M03, or 104-106. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

terms'- SmanTa^ "' ^^^"^^"^"^^ -^-^'t hour each term. Three 

A practical course in delivery Th*. T.T.;r,«{^i ^ . 

expression; enunciation, emSs, -^ ottr^ge 2:^7' ^"^' 
delivery. Delivery of nra+nri^ni i x- ' gesture, and general 

wUh criticism aTd^sulg^rnT: ntrtr IZT^ '''''' ^ '''''' 
Individual drill by appointment withTnstruc^o? °"^'°'' '^'''=^^^- 

P. S. 104-106. Oratorv~One credit hour for each term Th,.. * 
Open to students who have credit for P. S 101-103 "''• 

The rhetoric of oral discourse. The sneenh fnr ti,„ 
oratorical masterpieces Practice L.^t ^ occasion. Study of 

and general speeches and addresse" "' ''"'"' °' °'^"°°^ 

terms'- Zn to JltuTe^s.^^^'^'^-^-^''^ ''^''' ^^^ ^''^ -- -^^-e 

Theory and methods. The psychology of public speaking r,«„ „ 
cises m speaking extemporaneously on assigned topics " " ''"■ 

P. S. 110-112. Debate-One credit hour each term Th.. . 
Open to students who have credit for P. S. 101-103 ' 

A study of the principles of argumentation <3t„^„ * 
argumentative oratory. Class exeLses Tn de.atfng ' '' ^-^-^^-^ i- 

Op^n Viriuder ^-^^^^~^- -^^t ^ours each term. T.ree terms. 

Three terms • "' ^"'^^"^ ^^^^i^^-Three credit hours each term. 

the ahove technical maLrT cHtTci: and^^rTtT^^^^^^^^ T' 1 
delivery. For Engineering students only. ^^^^^^^^^ before the oral 

110 



P. S. 119-121. Advanced Oral Technical English — Three credit hours 
each term. Three terms. 
A continuation of P. S. 116-118. For Engineering students enly. 



MATHEMATICS 

Math. 101. Trigonometry — Five credit hours. Five lectures. First term. 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Deduction of formulas and their 
application to the solution of triangles, trigonometric equations, etc. Re- 
quired of students in Engineering who have offered Solid Geometry for 
entrance. 

Math. 102. Solid Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry — Five credit 
hours. Five lectures. First term. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the relation of the subject to de- 
scriptive geometry and on areas and volumes of solids. The latter por- 
tion of the time is devoted to spherical trigonometry. Required of En- 
gineering students who have offered Plane Trigonometry for entrance. 
Elective for other students. 

Math. 103. Analytic Geometry — Five credit hours each term. Five 
lectures. Second and third terms. Prerequisites, Math. 101 and 102. 

Geometry of two and three dimensions, loci of equations of second de- 
gree, higher plane curves, etc. Required of students in Engineering. 

Math. 104. Advanced Algehra and Elements of Calculiis — Five credit 
hours. Five lectures. First term. 

Algebra beyond that required for admission. Elom«intary theory of 
equations, partial fractions, permutations, elementary differentiation, etc. 
Required of Engineering students. 

Math. 105. Calculus — Five credit hours each term. Five lectures. Sec- 
ond and third terms. Prerequisite, Math. 103 and 104. 

A discussion of the methods used in differentiation and integration and 
the application of these methods in determining maxima and minima,, 
areas, volumes, moments of inertia, etc. Required of Engineering students. 

Math. 106. Algebra — Three credit hours. Three lectures, ^'irst term. 

Quadratic equations, simultaneous quadratic equations, progressions, 
graphs, logarithms, etc. Required of students in the Chemistry, Liberal 
Arts, and Pre-medical courses. 

Math. 107. Advanced Algebra — Three credit hours. Three lectures. 
First term. 

Elementary theory of equations, partial fractions, permutations, combina- 
tions, etc. Required of students in Chemistry, Liberal Arts, and Pre- 
medical courses who have had the equivalent of Math. 106. 

Math. 108. Plane Trigonometry — Three credit hours. Three lectures. 
Second term. 

Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas and their application 
to the solution of trigonometric equations and oblique triangles. Required 
of students in the Chemistry, Liberal Arts and Pre-medical courses. 

Ill 



f4 

X 



I'll 



tur^^s^Th'ir!.' f '''""^/""'^"^^ Geometry-TUvee credit hours. Three lee 
tures. Third term. Prerequisites, Math. 106 or 107 and 108 '"'^^ ^^^ 

JveTnT" 1 T '''''^'* "'^^' '''''' ^««"°- and' higher plane 
Sri efuTer' °' ""'^^"^ '"^ ^'"^ ^•^^-'-^- ^"^-a. Arts and'p?: 

tur'^rjirsttr" ^'"'""^ ^--e.'-.-Three credit hours. Three lec 
A continuation of Math. 109. Required of students in Chemistry 

seforan:?;hir?tr.%^eXs:rMr nr '-■ ^^-^ — 
aatrt:i~ :;t;:re?tiirchS^ ^^'-^^ — ^ 

term^""" ''"' '"'"" (^eometry-TUree credit hours. Three lectures. Third 
A course in Geometry similar to Math. 102. Elective 

SerotT; "'■ f ^''■""""^ ^5«anon.-Three credit hours. Three lectures. 
Second term. Prerequisite, Math. 105. 

^_ The solution of the simpler differential equations is discussed. Elec- 
term"™' '"' """'' ^^""'"^^-Two credit hours. Two lectures. Third 

ElLive"' "*"■" " "'"' ^'"-"^ '^ ^^'^ - '^' -PP»-t,on to geodesy. 

Math 115. ^s<rono»»y-Three credit hours. Three lectures s^nn.^ 
term. Prerequisite, Math. 108. lectures. Second 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Elective. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

History 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

year' Riaufr^dTf "^f "^^^f-^^^ '='-«<J" I'our. First term. Freshman 
S^nce^Sivrfofothet"^ '''''''''' " "^ ^°"^- °^ ^^^ -^ 

fa.^m ""r? '' '°'""*'*^ '° ^"'P ^^"''^''t^ »«« tl'e library with greater 
facaluy Instruction will be given by lectures and by practLl work w th 
he various catalogs, indexes, and reference books. This coure considers 
the genera classification of the library according to the Dewey System 
Representa ive works of each division are studied in combination wiSTe 
use of the library catalog. Attention is given to periodical meratrre^lr 
ticularly that indexed in the Reader's Guide and in t7e AgSural In 

"ete thifcotr '^ ^" ^ ''-' ''^''"--^^ - - ---- -^ com- 



SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

I. Far Eastern History, Economics and Finance — Two credit hours each 
term. Second and third terms. Open to seniors. 

A study of social, economic and political conditions in the Far East, with 
special emphasis on the economic and industrial development of China and 
Siberia, and on the relations of the countries of the Far East with the 
United States and other Western Nations. 

II. Diplomatic and Consular Procedure in Connection With American 
Interests Abroad — Two credit hours each term. Second and third terms. 
Open to seniors. 

The functions of Consular and Diplomatic Officers of the United States 
in connection with our foreign relations, with particular emphasis on the 
economic investigational and trade promotion services of these officers; 
notorial and quasi-legal, public health, and other routine consular func- 
tions. Comparisons made with consular and diplomatic practices of other 
countries. 

III. Principles and Practices of International Trade — Two credit hours 
each term. Second and third terms. Open to juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 101 and/ or Econ. 106. 

Commercial and Trade relations of the United States with foreign 
countries; the forces governing the import and export markets; the geo- 
graphical, social and economic factors affecting commercial development 
and expansion; the mechanism of international exchange and the financ- 
ing of foreign trade. 

IV. American Social Conditions — Three credit hours each term. Sec- 
ond and third terms. Open to juniors and seniors. 

A study of contemporary society in the United States, dealing with its 
economic organization, the family institution, and the place of religion and 
education in modern society. 

V. Economic Resources of the United States — Two credit hours each 
term. Second and third terms. Open to sophomores and elective for up- 
per classes. Prerequisite, Econ. 101, or may be taken concurrently. 

A study of the growth of agriculture, industry, manufactures, commerce, 
transportation and population in the United States, with emphasis on the 
commercial and export possibilities of our national resources. Special at- 
tention given to the resources of Maryland. 

VI. Foreign Markets for American Products — Two credit hours. Third 
term. (Omitted, 1922-23.) 

A continuation of the study of the economic resources of the United 
States dealing with the disposition of our export products. 



112 



113 






\n. Social Surveys in Theory and Practice-Two credit hours eafih 
term. (Omitted 1922-23.) i-'eujt aours eacft 

Clitd1^i°ar<,r''' 'r.**'"^"'''' undergraduates and graduates in Ap- 

earnerm.-rtZ fol^Zl "' ''''''''''' ^'"^^"^^^ ^^^ '^o- 

RecitSons °' '"^^ "^^'^'"^ Government. Lectures and 

Two°crfdU hn!,!:!'fl 'l^'^f '"""''"' ^""^ "'^'^ ^«**«r^ «/ tUe Unitea States- 
Istudv of.. A ^ '''"'''' '''■'°'- ^'•^■•^Q^isites Pol. Sci. 101-103. 

t.f dtr : r trs™m?sr"^ ^°^ " '"^--'^"- ^-- -- 

p:J::aui:ue"L.'srroTS ^^^^^^ ^^'^-^ ^^^^ -- 

A rapid survey and comparative study of the political oreanizatinn nf 
the principal states of Eurone Cla<5<,ifiPatin^ „, / organization of 

ers- sovereientv "' f ""^"P®- ^I'^s^'fication of forms, separation of pow- 
ers, sovereignty. Lectures and Recitations. 

f/""" !w "^" ^'"^'■'^«« Municipal Government-Two credit hours first 
term. Alternates with Pol. Sci. 106. Prerequisites as for PoJ Scl' ^09 
Not given 1922-23 '• '"^*- ^"^• 

nt.^^T ""^ "^""""^^^^ «ty Government; organization and administra- 
tujn. city manager and commission plans; initiative, referendum, and re- 

PoL. Sci. 113-114. American Diplomacy-Two credit hours, second and 

nrnTo" Ii/nT' •" ^"V'^'"'^^""''^^ ^^- Prereaui'sits^/xo 
ana ti 109-111. Not given 1922-23. 

iJ"!^: ^'''' "^'^^'^- ^^^^^^«^^o^«^ Lato-Three credit hours Second and 
third terms. Alternates with American Diplomacy 

A study of the nature and sources of International Law. Rights and 

i922:r ''" '^"'''" ^^ ^'^ '^^^' ^-^-- -^ — . £tiiet 

terZe!Z\rvJ"'T^^^^ Par«e.-Three credit hours, second term. Al- 
ternates wt h Political Science 102. Prerequisites Pol. Sci. 101 

The devolpment and growth of American Political Parties' Party Ma 
chmery. Lectures and recitations. Not given 1922-23. 

ECONOMICS 

EcoN. 101-103. Elements of Economics-Three credit hours each term 
depanTent '"^^^ '^' "^"^^^' '' ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^-^ ^^ malTin thTs 

hnHn?'"'',^'^ ''''^'"' ^^ ^^' ^''''^^ ^^^^^^' production, exchange distri- 

iZlTtZ^^^^^^^ '' ""^'''* ^'^ "^^^^^^^ ^^^^^-'- public finan 
land and labor problems; monopolies, taxation and other similar topics. 

114 



EcoN. 104. Money and Banking — Three credit hours. Second term. Pre- 
requisite Econ. 101. 

A study of the nature and functions of money; standards of value and 
prices; credit; bank clearings and exchanges; history of American and 
foreign banking; the stock exchange and the money market. 

Econ. 105. Puhlic Finance and Taxation — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 

A study of the public expenditures, receipts, indebtedness and financial 
administration; theories on public expenditures; theories of taxation; the 
growth and nature of public credit; the forms of public debts; federal, 
state and municipal budgets. 

Econ. 106. Economic History of the United States — Three credit hours. 
First term. 

A study of the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce; transportation 
from the simple isolated communities of the early colonies to the complex 
industrial and commercial society of today; its effect on the population in 
terms of successive new adaptations. 

Econ. 107. Markets and Marketing — Three credit hours. Third term. 

An effort to understand the precise ways in which existing systems of 
marketing operate and their historical development;' evidence that cer- 
tain old systems fail to meet the present needs fully, and that new con- 
ditions require new adjustments. Study of the methods of auction, direct 
selling, cooperative buying and selling, and the direct and indirect service 
of governmental agency. 

Econ. 108. Corporation Finance — Three credit hours. First term. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 101. 

Methods employed in the promotion, capitalization, financial manage- 
ment, consolidation and reorganization of business corporations. 

For Graduate Students 

Econ. 109-112. Advanced Theory — Two credit hours. 
By special arrangement graduate students in the University of Mary- 
land may take this course at the American University, Washington, D. C. 
Econ. 113. Seminar — Open to students interested in research. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 101-102. Elements of Sociology — Three credit hours each term. First 
and second terms. 

The life of society as affected by rural conditions, cities, wealth, pov- 
erty, heredity, immigration, etc.; the nature of social organization; differ- 
ent phases of social evolution; problems and principles of social control. 

Soc. 104. Social Psychology — Three credit hours. First term. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the work 
in the field of sociology and other social sciences. The fundamental in- 
stincts as dynamic forces in the individual and in society, their develop- 
ment, organization and control. Analysis of the value problem. 

115 



II 



i 



I r 



i ( 



I 



t 



Soc. 105. Social Psychology — A continuation course of Soc. 104. Three 
credit hours. Second term. 

A psychological analysis of some main features of an organized modern 
state. Analysis of economic value and other social values continued. 

Soc. 106. Logical Aspects of Sociology — Three credit hours. Third term. 

This course seeks to apply the principles of logic to social phenomena. 
Nature of casual proof, grounds for universal judgments, statistical argu- 
ments, circumstantial evidence, analogical inference, experimental investi- 
gation, and nature and function of reasonable doubt in inductive inferences 
will be studied in their basic relation to actual sociological conditions. 
Practical problems of everyday life in their relation to the social order as 
discussed in the current literature and the press will furnish material for 
the student to test. 

Soc. 109. Ethical Aspects of Sociology — Three credit hours. Third 
term. 

The application of moral principles of social phenomena. Nature of 
moral judgments and underlying ethical concepts as illustrated in current 
social problems. 

Soc. 103. (R. O. 104.) Principles of Rural Organization — Three credit 
hours. Third term. 

A study of the historical and comparative development of farmers' co- 
operative organizations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

Problems of rural life in the light of modern social science; federal and 
state organizations intended to promote rural welfare; purpose and 
achievements of such voluntary organizations as the Grange, the Farm- 
ers' Union, village improvement associations, boys' and girls' clubs, co- 
operative societies, etc. 

COMMERCE 

Com. 101-103. Constructive Accountancy — Three credit hours each term. 

The fundamental principles of single and double entry bookkeeping; 
subsidiary records and controlling accounts; partnership accounts and 
adjustments; corporation accounts; types of stocks and bonds; sinking 
funds; voucher system; manufacturing accounts. Preparation of balance 
sheet. 

Com. 104-106. Advanced Accountancy — Three credit hours each term. 

Statement of affairs and Deficiency Accounts; realization and liquida- 
tion statements; valuation of assets; operating and other statements; ex- 
ecutor's and administrator's accounts; corporate organization and disso- 
lution. Auditing. Income discussion and solution of C. P. A. problems 
taken from the various state examinations. 

Com. 107-109. Commercial Mathematics — Three credit hours each term. 

Counting-house mathematics. Use of logarithms, slide rule, comptome- 
ter, and other standard calculating devices; problems relating to sinking 
funds, depreciation, and annuities; elements of statistical methods. 

Com. 110-112. Business Law — Three credit hours each term. 



The aim of this course is to train students for practical business affairs 
bv giving the legal information necessary to prevent common business 
errors The following are some of the phases of the work: Requisites 
and forms of contracts and remedies for their breach; sales, passages of 
title, warranties; negotiable instruments, assignment, and liability of 
signers; agency, title, abstracts, mortgages, leases, etc. 

Com 113. Business Organization— Three credit hours. 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of business organization. 
Different types of business. Methods of control. Selection of location 
and determination of products to be handled. Business policies. The ap- 
plication of principles to the solution of specific problems. 

Com 114. Business Management— Three credit hours. 

The internal organization of the business for securing efficiency; depart- 
mental organization and co-ordination; advertising; salesmanship; office 

organization. 

Com 115. Industrial Management— Three credit hours. 

The problems and principles of factory organization. Tayler system of 
Scientific management. Cost records. Methods of wage payments. Distri- 
bution of overhead. Time and motion studies. 

Com. 116. Practicum— Three credit hours. 

Study of a leading trade journal. Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 

Com 117. Geography of Commerce— Three credit hours. 

A study of the various countries of the world with reference to raw 
materials, agricultural products, markets, trade routes, transportation sys- 
tems, and industrial development. 

Com 118. Principles of Foreign Trade— Three credit hours. 

A general survey of the principles of the foreign trade of the United 
States. Methods of shipping and marketing. Trade practices and cus- 
toms. Foreign exchange. 



HISTORY 

H. 101-103. Current History— One credit hour each term. Maximum 
number of credit hours may not exceed six for the College course. 

H. 104. American Colonial History— T^so credit hours. First term. Not 
open to freshmen. Lectures and assignments. 

A study of the political, economic and social conditions of the American 
Colonies from the settlement at Jamestown to the adoption of the Consti- 
tution. 

H. 105. Amencan Civil War— Two credit hours. Second term. Not open 

to Freshmen. Lectures and assignments. 

A study of the causes of the Civil War. 

H. 106. Development of American Nationality— Tvfo credit hours. Third 
term. Not open to freshmen. Lectures and assignments. Alternates every 



116 



117 



I 



i; 



other year with the third term of American Diplomacy for students major- 
ing in History and Political Science. 

H. 109-111. Modern and Contemporary European History — Three credit 
hours each term. Lectures and assignments. Freshmen. 

The object of the course is to acquaint freshmen with the chief events 
in World History during the Modern period. The lectures are so arranged 
as to present a comparative and contrastive view of the most important 
occurrences during the period covered. 

H. 112. Imperialism and World Politics — Two credit hours. Second 
term. Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the political development of Europe, Canada, the United 
States, and South America. Colonial Expansion. League of Nations. Lec- 
tures and assignments. Alternates with H. 105. Not given during 1922-23. 

H. 114. The Far East — Two credit hours. Third term. Not open to 
freshmen. 

A study of the principal events in the development of the Far East. Al- 
ternates with H. 106. Not given during 1922-23. 



GENERAL BOTANY 

Description of Courses 

Gen. Bot. 101-102. General Botany — Credit at the rate of four hours per 
term. (Six credit hours for half year's work.) Two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. Freshman year. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the 
subject and planned to give the fundamental prerequisites for study in the 
special departments. 

Gen. Bot. 103. Systematic Botany — Three credit hours: one lecture and 
two laboratory periods. Third term. Prerequisite, General Botany 
101-102. 

A study of the local flora. A study is made of floral parts and the essen- 
tial relations between the groups of flowering plants. Students become 
familiar with the systematic key used to identify plants. 

Gen. Bot. 104.. Plant Anatomy — Three credit hours: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. First term. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Gen- 
eral Botany 101-102. 

An anatomical study of leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Where 
possible, plants economically or otherwise of most interest are used as 
types for study. 

Gen. Bot. 105-107. Plant Morphology — Four credit hours each term. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, General Bot. 101-102. 

A course designed to give the student a comprehensive view of the 
plant kingdom. It treats of the general morphological evolutionary de- 
velopment and relationships of the various groups of plants based upon 
the examinations of selected types from each group. 

118 



0„ BOT. 108. »c..«W-Tl>r,. edit M«: Wo >~l«". "« •" 

sification of economic fungi. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

'*S: BO,, n.. WoW^T^re, »o.l. to"-: «« «- "« '«> "'• 
oratory perM.. Socood term. Pr=r«,».nto, G.n. Bot. 109. 

z rTi."i:"»rr..:Z°-^c;:i» .o... o.. «.™ 

plants of the state. 

For Graduate Students 

GEN BOT 201. Advanced Mycology-'i^o credit hours each term. One 

'T:.^Z^^^i7iTL.S^c.no., morphology and economics of 
tht futrwith sSes of life histories in culture and identification of 

'trSx^Oa. special Btuaies 0/ Fun.i-Credit hours according to 

Xec'Tprohlems in the structure or life history of fungi or the mono- 
graphic study of some group of f ungi. 

CHEMISTRY 
Inorganic Chemistry 

Tx-npr Phem a 101-103. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis- 
Kor^redit hout eacii term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. 

""""l study of the non-metals and metals, the latter being studied from a 
autinatfve standpoint. One of the main purposes of the course - to d^- 
Jelop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. This is 

-Sri ?s^;:idrSrurts°rra;7never studied Chemistry, or 
have passed their high school chemistry with a grade of less than A. 

119 



I 



t 



loRG. Chem. B. 101-103. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis- 
Four credit hours each term: two lectures and two laboratory periods. The 
year. 

This course covers much the same ground as Inorg. Chem. A. 101-103 
except the subject matter is taken up in more detail with emphasis on 
Chemical theory and important generalization. The first term of labora- 
tory deals with fundamental principles, the second term takes up the 
preparation and purification of compounds and the third term deals with a 
systematic qualitative analysis of the more common bases and acids. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade of not less than A. 

Organic Chemistry 

Org. Chem. 101-102 — Four credit hours each term: two lectures and 
two laboratory periods. The first and second term. Prerequisites, Inor- 
ganic Chemistry A or B 101-103. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The course is de- 
signed primarily for premedical students. 

Obg. Chem. 103-104 — Three credit hours each term: two lectures and 
one laboratory period. The first and second terms. Prerequisites, Inorg. 
Chem A or B 101-103. 

This course is designed primarily for agricultural students. 

Org. Chem. 105-107 — Four credit hours each term: two lectures and two 
laboratory periods. The year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103. 

This course is particularly designed for students taking chemistry as a 
major, and offers a detailed study of the typical organic compounds. 

For Graduates 

Org. Chem. 201-203. Advanced Organic Chemistry — Three credit hours, 
two lectures, and assigned laboratory work. The year. Prerequisites, 
Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103, and Org. Chem. 105-107. 

A more advanced treatment of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds, 
with special emphasis on the most recent theories of structure and re- 
actions. 

Physical Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. Chem. 101-102. Elements of Physical Chemistry — Three credit 
hours each term: two lectures and one laboratory period. The first and 
second terms. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101-103, Physics 101-103. 
Math. 110 recommended. 

The course will present the portions of Physical Chemistry which are 
necessary to every chemist, student of medicine, bacteriologist, or teacher 
of chemistry, with laboratory practice in thermometry and temperature 
regulation; physical constants; molecular weight determinations; velocity 

120 



rnn.. chemical equilibrium and law of mass action; measurements 
of reactions, ^^^^^.^^\^.^''''', . ^g. hydrogen ion concentration, etc. (Gor- 
of conductivity; migration of ions, nyarogen lu 

^''''^' n ^^ lO*^ Elements of Colloidal Chemistry-Three credit 
PHTS. Chem. 103. Liemenis uj Prerequi- 

hours; two lectures and one laboratory period. The third term. 

sites. Physical Chem 101-10^^^^^^ and " ultra-filtration ; optical properties 

lOorion.) „,^,r„MmUtn-Tam credit Mors: Iwo lectures 

„n. ?."« Z:TTZ,i ter„, P„re,u,.,te.. P.^. «.. 

•rL. ,.ct,r. wMc -'"v^rLiitSTetrrrn:."""- 

the action of the electric current and the factors whicn aet 
motive force are taken up. (Gordon.) 

For Graduates 

two lectures and one laboratory period. The year. Frereq 

Chem. 201-202. Phys. Chem. 203. (Gordon.) ,^^^,,^ mathematical 

.r.r.r./:Lrr.\rr- a:.riicr,=. .«. «~^^^^ 

treatment oi physical Chemistry. (Gordon.) 

lectures and one laboratory period. The year, i-rerequ 

101-102. Phys. Chem^ ll'X^':;i,,^ emphasis on the most recent the- 

orfera'dreLrirrr conoid Chemistry at the present time. 

'TnZln.M. 207. Researcn in PUysical Cnemistry. 

j-rn\st:^^Lr^^^^^^^^ 

Analytical Chemistry 

.„„„». c,.«. «. .«c. o..»-« ^-s-i'-r : 

chemistry. 

121 



I 



i 



I 



Analytical Chem. 102-103. Quantitative Analysis — Three credit hours 
each term: three laboratory periods. Second and third terms. Prerequi- 
sites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical Chem. 101. 

The principal operations of gravimetric analysis. Standardization of 
chemical balance. Standardization of weights and apparatus used in 
chemical analysis. 

Analytical Chem. 104-105. Quantitative Analysis — Three credit hours 
each term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. First and second 
terms. Prerequisites, Analytical Chem. 102-103. 

Principal operations of volumetric analysis. Standardization of chemi- 
cal glassware. Study of indicators, typical volumetric and colormetric 
methods. 

Analytical Chem. 106. Chemical Calculations — One credit hour. First 
and second terms. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

Chemical problems relating to Analytical Chemistry. 

Analytical Chem. 107. Quantitative Analysis. Three credit hours: three 
laboratory periods. The third term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

Quantitative Analysis for premedical students with special reference 
to volumetric methods. 

Analytical Chem. 108. Determinative Mineralogy and Assaying — 
Three credit hours: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Third term. 
Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

The more important minerals are identified by their characteristic 
physical and chemical properties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and 
lead are made. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Analytical Chem. 201-203. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Four 
credit hours each term: two lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequi- 
sites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103, Analytical Chem. 101-106. (Wiley.) 

A continuation of courses 102-3-104-5. 

Industrial Chemistry 

Ind. Chem. 101. Agricultural Chemistry — Four credit hours: three lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 
101-103 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory in the chemistry of air, soils, feeds, 
fertilizers, plants and animals. 

Ind. Chem. 102-103. Agricultural Analysis — Three credit hours each 
term: one lecture and two laboratory periods. Second and third terms. 
Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101-103. 

Quantitative Analysis and its application to agricultural products, in- 
cluding gravimetric and volumetric methods. 

Ind. Chem. 104. Engineering Chemistry — One credit hour each term: 
the year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 103. 

122 



from their chemical analysis ^he s gni ^^ j.e^ents of various 

^^^'^"'^ :L?ctr; ^d iC c Sattr S Js. luhrica«n. oils and 
states, '"^"f ;;";3^f .^"g^^^^^^^ for students in engineering, 

paints Thi '=°;/«^ ^J/;]7 J TextUes-Three credit hours: two lectures 
IND. Chem. 105. <^''^"^!«''^ ^ Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 

and one laboratory period. The tnira lerm. 

A or B 101-103. Org. Chem 103-104. „iechanical 

^„„.. ,w. ..cure. .M <>» '"'"^^S » 3 « Ch « °«M04. 

"""''■ For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

108 ItO Advanced Agricultural Chemistry-Fonr credit 

'"■ h t;rm two itctm^ and two laboratory periods. The year, 
hours each term, two leciuieb d i03-104. 

ton.) , rrv-oo orodit hours each term: 

^ 111 in Plant Analysis — Three creaii uuuio 

IxD. Chem. 111-113. i'lam ^""'«^ Prerequisites, Inorg. 

one lecture and two laboratory periods. The year. 
Chem. A or B 101-103, Org. Chem. 103-104. .^ ^^ 

A discussion and the ^l^^^^^^^.f Zt"^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
termining the inorganic and organic P'^"';^ „ ^^edit hour each 

1.0. CHKM. 114-116. ^^^.<^^^;f^^^'^^^^^ rnaiytical Chem. 

term: The year. Prerequisites, Inorg. Ctiem. lux , 

''pio'wemrembodyihg the use of physical, chemical and mechanical 
prLcTpirutllized in practical -taUurgy. (Broughton^) 

1.1,. CHKM. 117,119. ^^!^!;:;'Zr.Z^'^^^^^ ^^-- 

term. The year. Prerequisites, Inorg. cnem. iu± 

'Analysis of industrial ores and alloys, fuels, oils and gases. (Brough- 

'"li CHEM. 120-122. Mustrial CHemistry-r.o credit hours each term: 

^^I ^'^^u^rrur:;' Z%SZ ^:-l empl^ed . ... vanous 
inorganic and Organic chemical industries. (Broughton.) 



For Short-Course Students 



trie chemistry of plants, animals, soils, fertilizers, etc. 
Fertilizer and Food Chemistry 

r>r. H. B. McDonnell has eharep nf th^ ofo* . • 

sampling, analysis, and the PuSa ol /retus'rSl^r ""' ^'^'^'"'^'"^ 
and agricultural lime. results on fertilizers, stock food, 

Seminar 

One credit hour. The vear nn^,-,,^ ^i 
Of the latest bulletins and scientific Lf '""'^ '''''' '^ " ''^^'=''-'«" 
by the graduate students anrrhemistrys^ir" '" ^'"" ''^ ^'^^'^^^^'•^' 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND PHILOSOPHY 

Greek 

course. Prerequisite Gk 1 3 ^^ *^'"'"^- S«'=°°d year 

Prerequisite, Gk. 104-106. ^^^ ^^'"^- "^^'ee terms. 

A study of the qualities of Greek dramatin n^^t 
lation of representative selections ^ "" ^""^ '°'^'''^- T''^'^^- 

Latin 

term." SUr'^""''"'' ^^''^''''^' ^^"'o/o^.-Three credit hours each 

ofrmranrru";:: "^ ^^'^^"'-^^ ^^^'-^ ^^-"' --^•^^ -^h . study 
credirhrrrih^rm.'^rr.rmr""''"' "'^'^ ^'•"'^^'«"- - -^- 



Review of Latin Grammar. Much practice in prose composition. Trans- 
lation of selections from Livy, Cicero, and Sallust. 

This course is for those who offer four units in Latin at entrance. 

Lat. 107-109. Latin Drama — Three credit hours each term. Three 
terms. Prerequisite, Lat. 104-106 or the equivalent. 

Critical study of selected plays of Plaitus and Terence 

Lat. 110-112. History of Roman Literature — Three credit hours each 
term. Three terms. Prerequisite, Lat. 107-109. 

Lectures, translation of representative works, and collateral reading. 

PHILOSOPHY 



For Advaced Undergraduates 



Phil. 101. Introduction to Philosophy — Three credit hours. First term. 
Junior standing required. 

A study of the meaning and scope of philosophy; its relations to the 
arts, sciences, and religion. To be followed by Phil. 102-103. 

Phil. 102-103. Problems and Systems of Philosophy — Three credit 
hours. Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Phil. 101. 

Study of the problems and systems of philosophy together with ten- 
dencies of present-day thought. Lectures and reports on the reading of 
representative works. 

Phil. 104-106. History of Philosophy — Three credit hours. Three terms. 
Senior standing required. 

A study of the development of philosophy from prehistoric times, 
through Greek philosophy, early Christian philosophy, mediaeval philoso- 
phy to modern philosophical thought. Lectures and reports on outside 
reading. 



n 



f- 



124 



125 



The School of Dentistry 
Faculty of the School of Dentistry 

T. O. HEATWOLE, Dean. 



T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D D S 
Professor of Dental Materia Medxca and Therapeutics. 
ALEXANDER HORN PATERSON, D.D S 
Professor of Prosthesis and Technics. 
„ ^ J- EDGAR ORRISON, D.D.S 

Professor of Operative Dentistry, Dental Anatomy and Technics 
B. MERRILL HOPKINSON, A.M., M.D. D D S 
Professor of Oral Hygiene and Oral History 
HOWARD LEE HURST, D D S 
Professor of Exodontia and Local Anaesthesia 
NEIL E. GORDON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry. 
ROBERT P. BAY, M.D., 
Professor of Oral Surgery and Physical Diagnosis 
ROBERT L. MITCHELL, Phar.G., M.D 
Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology ' 

HOWARD J. MALDEIS, M.D 

Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

J. LeROY WRIGHT, M.D. 

Professor of Anatomy and Biology 

OREN H. GAVER, D D S 

Professor of Physiology and Infirmary Chief 

MAGNUS B. MILNER, D.D.S. 

Professor of Orthodontia 

^ , ALLIE Y. RUSSELL, D D.S 

Professor of Crown and Bridgework, Instructor of X-Ray and Associate 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry 

E, PRANK KELLY, Phar.D. 

L. B. BROUGHTON, M S 

Associate Professors of Chemistry and* Metallurgy 

J. C. KRANTZ, JR., Ph C. 

Instructor in Physics and Associate Professor of Chemistry 

GEORGE S. KOSHI, D D S • 

Instructor of Crown and Bridge Technics and Clinic 

D. EDGAR FAY, M.D 
Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis 
NEIL E. THALAKER, D.D.S. 
Instructor of Exodontia. 

126 



CARL J. STERN, D.D.S. 
Instructor of Operative Technics and Clinical Assistant. 

F. G. GARCIA, D.D.S. 
Instructor of Dental Anatomy Technics and Clinical Assistant. 

H. L. CAPLES, A.M. 

Professor of English. 

SAMUEL P. PLATT 

Instructor of Mechanical Drawing. 

ADALBERT ZELWIS, A.M., D.D.S. 

GERALD I. BRANDON, D.D.S. 
Assistants in Prosthetic Technics. 



The course of instruction in the School of Dentistry of the Univer- 
sity OF Maryland covers a period of four Sessions of 32 weeks each, ex- 
clusive of holidays, in separate years. 

The Forty-first Regular Session wall begin October 2nd, 1922, and 
continue until June 1st, 1923. Full attendance during this period is de- 
manded in order to get advancement to higher classes. Class Examinations 
for the Session will be held in September, January, and May. 

This Department of the University of Maryland is a member, in good 
standing, of the National Association of Dental Faculties, and conforms 
to all the rules and regulations of that body. 

The many men of eminence in professional, civil and social life, gradu- 
ates of this institution, distributed throughout the civilized world, will 
amply attest to the high standard and thorough training in vogue in the 
past, and no effort will be lost in an attempt to keep abreast of the devel- 
opment in the practical scientific advancement of the profession in the 
future. 

Aside from and independent of the Regular Session, this institution 
maintains a Spring and Summer Course, which follows immediately the 
termination of each Regular Session and continues until October 1st. 
This Course is intended for practical work only; no credit for time thus 
put in is allowed toward graduation. The many advantages of the Sum- 
mer Session for actual practice cannot be overestimated, as the number 
of patients applying for dental services is always very large and the In- 
firmary is never closed except on Sundays and other holidays. 

Requirements for Matriculation 

The requirements for matriculation in the Dental Department of the 
University of Maryland are those established by the Dental Educational 
Council of America, viz, graduation from an accredited high school having 
a four-year course, or its equivalent. 

Applicants for matriculation must submit their credentials for verifica- 
tion to the Registrar of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 

Applicants lacking full credentials may earn same by taking a stated 
written examination on subjects in which they are deficient. 

127 



I 



Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full Session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance not later than ten days after the beginning 
and remain until the close of the Regular Session, the dates for which have 
been announced in the Annual Catalogue. 

In case of sickness, attested by a physician's certificate, students may 
enter twenty days after the opening of the Regular Session. 

Advanced Standing 

Graduates from reputable and accredited medical colleges are admitted 
to the Sophomore Year and credits allowed on all subjects completed which 
are included in the Dental Course. 

Students from other recognized dental colleges will be given credit for 
all work completed in the institution from which they come, except those 
entering for the Senior Year only. These will be required to take the 
work of the full Senior Course of this School. 

At the close of each i^ession, each student must pass a satisfactory exami- 
nation on the several subjects of that year before he can be entered in the 
succeeding grade. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The candidate for graduation must have attended four sessions of in- 
struction in some recognized dental college, the last year of which must 
have been in this institution. 

He must have satisfied the requirements of each of the several instruc- 
tors and proved himself proficient in the theory and practice of Dentistry. 

He must have attained the age of twenty-one years and be of good 
moral character. 

Students may matriculate by mail by sending money order, or registered 
letter containing the amount of fee, $5.00, to Dr. T. O. Heatwole, Dean, 
Corner Green and Lombard Sts., Baltimore, Md. 

Fees for Each Regular Winter Course 

Matriculation (paid once only), $5.00. Tuition fee, $200.00. Diploma fee, 
$30.00. Dissecting fee (paid once onlyO, $15.00. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(The Diploma Fee must be paid by the first of April of the year of grad- 
uation.) 

The tuition fee may be paid as follows: One hundred dollars at the 
beginning of session, and balance during the first week of the succeeding 
February; this rule must be strictly observed. 

A special ticket is issued at the close of each session to every student of 
the first, second and third year classes, as an evidence that he has been 
successful, or unsuccessful, in examinations for advancement to a higher 
grade, and also has attended a full session. 

No assessment is made on candidates for graduation, the University 
hearing all the expenses attending the Commencement Exercises, 

128 



College of Education 



the university concerned w th '\^^^^^^^^^^\^ ^^^^^d to serve three 
in the educational profession. Its '^''^'"f . *'^ J;\_i,„it^re, arts and 
classes of students: First, those preparing to teach agricultu - 

demonstrators, boys' and gir s ^^^^ ^^;^^;^' ^^^ ^^^.^^ ,„„,,es in educa- 
ists- third, those majoring in special neiub wuu 
tlon for their professional and informational value. 

upon * .c™,.«o. «;- r/ctreTBi^rr r.-.srs 

from the four-year curricula of tne i^oiieBe 
degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 

Teachers' Special Diplomas 

The degrees granted for work done in the College of Education indl- 
The degrees gra completed. Teachers* special diplo- 

ml: cenTfy" ttpToSla; character It such work.- Teachers' spec^l 

ar^sand Lience education, home economics education, manual training 

and industrial education. ninloma is eligible for certification 

The recipient of a teachers' special diploma is eiigiDie 
by the State Superintendent of Schools without examination. 

Departments 

The College of Education is organized into two general divisions viz.- 

rrera?Education and Vocational Education. In the main the College in- 

1 .1 vnrk in he Slowing departments offering general and professional 

;: nirLr teir Agricultural Education. Arts and Science Educa- 

tloT Home Economics Education, and Industrial Education. 

Equipment 

in addition to the general facilities offered by the ■-"t""^;^^^^^^ 
by special arrangement with the county and sta e ^''^'"'^''^^ZZX 
hLh school located at HyattsviUe within two miles of the University is 

S ?nr college credit work in teaching. The observation work so neces- 

for' emSraler training is conducted in Washington and ^nea. 

Hv Marvland schools. The nearness of these schools to the institution and 

1 proxTmUy of t,e federal offices and libraries dealing with education 

129 



provide unusual opportunities for contact with actual class-room situa- 
tions and current administrative problems in education. 

Curricula 

Two general classes of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science and Bachelor of Arts are offered. 

The first of these provides fixed curricula permitting comparatively little 
election for the definite purpose of preparing teachers and supervisors of 
agriculture, home economics, manual training, and industrial subjects. As 
the University of Maryland is the institution designated by the State 
Board of Education for the training of teachers of vocational agriculture, 
home economics, and trades and industries under the provisions of the 
Smith-Hughes vocational educational act, the curricula in this class have 
been organized to meet the objectives set up in the act and in the interpre- 
tations of the Federal Board for Vocational Education and the State Board 
of Education. 

The second class provides a wide range of electives and seeks to train 
teachers of arts and science subjects and specialists for the profession 
of education. Although there are definite and fixed basic requirements, 
the student may choose from a number of subjects the major subject in 
which he expects to qualify for teaching. Correlated with this major 
may be other subjects which he may wish to teach. 

A minimum of 30 hours in education is required as an integral part of all 
four-year curricula of the College of Education. This minimum includes 
the following: education in the United States, 3 hours; educational psy- 
chology, 5 hours; technic of teaching, 5 hours; an introductory teacher's 
course in the subject of specialization, 3 hours; special methods in the 
subject of specialization, 3 hours; principles of secondary education, 3 
hours; teaching, 3 to 5 hours. 

Special Courses 

By special arrangement courses in education are offered evenings and 
Saturdays to teachers in service and to those who may desire to qualify 
for teaching in the schools of Maryland after having had such work. Col- 
lege credit may be granted for this work if taken in course. Only a limited 
amount of service of this kind can be undertaken. School officials should 
make application for this work before arranging for it in their counties. 

As the need for evening classes in industrial and home economics educa- 
tion arises, special courses will be offered at centers throughout the state. 
The number and location of these centers will depend entirely upon the 
need and demand for such instruction. The courses will be organized on 
the short unit basis and will be maintained only as long as the demand 
justifies them. Upon the satisfactory completion of such special curricula, 
students will be issued certificates stating the amount and character of 
work done. 

In summer special courses are offered for the benefit of teachers in 

130 



service and such individuals as may be able to qualify for teaching upon 
the completion of the work. 

Teacher Training Courses Necessary for Prospective Teachers 

Teacher training courses are necessary for prospective teachers, inas- 
much as the State Board of Education will not certify persons to teach 
in the approved high schools of the state unless such persons have had 
adequate professional training for teaching. 

Athletics and music are also valuable forms of training for the prospec- 
tive teacher. 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean of 
the College of Education regarding possible combinations and the arrange- 
ment of their work. Upon matriculation each student is required to state 
the subjects for which he desires to prepare to teach and in the election of 
courses to secure the advice and approval of the head of the department in 
which these subjects fall. The previous training of the student, his ex- 
perience, and his future needs govern the head of the department in his 
recommendations. 

Arts and Science Education 

Since the student electing this curriculum may become a candidate for 
either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, he should 
upon his matriculation state the degree for which he wishes to qualify. 
Students wishing to prepare for the teaching of English, history, the 
social sciences, and language should become candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Those wishing to teach general and biological science, 
chemistry and physics should become candidates for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science. 

Upon registration in this curriculum students should state the sub- 
jects in which they expect to qualify for teaching, designating a major and 
a minor interest. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 
plete, in addition to the requirements of the curriculum, a minimum of 
nine credits in foreign language. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Arts and Sciences. In any case they will 
register with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 'J'^rm: I II HI 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin or Greek) .333 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 3 3 3 

Algebra (Math. 106) ^ 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107) ^ 

Plane Analytical Geometry (Math. 108) or Solid Ge- 
ometry (Math. Ill) ^ 

History (His. 109-111) * ^ ^ 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) Ill 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101-103) « 2 2 

131 



• SOPHOMORE YEAR y,,^, j jj ^^^ 

Public Education in United States (Ed. 101) 3 

English (Eng. 119-121) 3 3 *q 

Political Science (Pol. Sc. 102-103) 3 

Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin or Greek) 3 3 2 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) ^ 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Sociology (Soc. 104-106) « * * t 

^- "• ^' ^ 2 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR y,,^. ^ ^^ ^^^ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 5 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) * * ' * l 

Arts and Science Education (Ed. 113, 115, 117 119 or 

121) 

English (Eng. 104-106) 2 2 2 

Reading and Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 1 ^ 

^^^^"^^^ y^'^'y^ 9-12 9-12 9-12 

SENIOR YEAR y,^^. j j^ ^^^ 

Arts and Science Education (Ed. 114, 116, 118 120 or 

122) ^ 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124) \ 3 

♦Teaching Arts and Science Subjects (Ed 123) 

Electives ^,Vn ./.l 

14-17 14-17 14-17 

♦Credit, three to five hours. Given any term. 

Requirements for a Degree 

Upon the satisfactory completion of two hundred and four trimester 
hours under the restrictions and requirements prescribed above the stu- 
dent will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, depending upon the character of the work 
elected. 

Agricultural Education 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University in- 
volvmg graduation from a standard four-year high school, students elect- 
mg the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of having 
acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen 
years. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be selected from any of 
the courses offered by the University for which the student has the neces- 
sary prerequisites. A student is expected, however, to confine his elections 
to subjects related to farming and to teaching. Though opportunity is 
afforded for specialization in a particular field of agriculture, such as ani- 
mal husbandry, agronomy, pomolgy, vegetable gardening, or farm man- 

132 



agement, students should arrange their work so that approximately forty 
per cent, of their time will have been spent on technical agriculture, 
twenty-five per cent, on scientific subjects, twenty per cent, on subjects of 
a general educational character, and from twelve to fifteen per cent, on 
subjects in professional education. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Agriculture. In either case they will register 
with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 



Agricultural Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR Term: 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) 

Animal Husbandry (An. Hus. 101) 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 101) 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Gen. Chem. 101-103) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) \ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Term : 

*Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 102) 

Feeds and Feeding (An. Hus. 102A) 

Principles of Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102) 

General Geology (Geol. 101) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101-102) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101-102) 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-102) 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 



II 

m • 

4 

• • 

4 

4 

• • 

3 

1 
2 



/// 



4 

4 

4 
3 
1 
2 



II III 



3 

2 



3 

» • 

3 



3 

4 
3 

» • 

2 



4 

4 

> • 

3 
3 

3 
2 



// III 



Note: Students who have not had a substantial course in high school physics must 
carry Physics during this or subs^uent years. 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 102) 5 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) 

Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 104) 

Dairy Production (D. H. 102) 4 

Farm Poultry (An. Hus. 104) 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Advanced Composition (Eng. 104-106) 2 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103) 1 

Electives 3-5 

133 



3 

• • 

2 
1 

6-8 



3 
2 
1 

6-8 






h 

U 

■♦"-ir 






H 



SENIOR YEAR 



Term 



Problems and practice in Teaching Secondary Vocation- 
al Agriculture (Ed. 105) 

The Rural Community and Agr. Ed. (Ed. 128) 
*Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 106) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124) 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Methods, Materials and Practice in Farm' Shop (Ed! iVo- 
141) 

Electivcs 



// III 



3 
3 



11 

9-12 9-12 12-17 



•Credit, three to five hours. Given any term. 



Home Economics Education ' 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University m- 
volvmg graduation from a standard four-year high school, student e'lec": 

nee ttrhoT f T'""'' ""^* ^'■"^'^^ ^^"^"^^ '' ^-° years e,p - 

the responslMlUv in th ' ''"^'*'' '"'"'"^ "'^^''^ "'"^ ^ '-«« -'^-e ot 
the responsibility m the management of the home was assumed 

S udents may elect from other schools such courses as they mav h^ 

qualified to enter. They are expected, however, to confine thSr Section 

primarily to subjects related to home-making and teaching. The ctrHcu 

lum should be so arranged that approximately forty per cent Zf T 

student's time win be spent on technical home econoiTubji twenty 

students electing this curricmlum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Home Economics, m either case thlv -^ 
register with the College of Education for the spel, teacJA ' "'" 

Home Economics Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) 
Gen Inorganic Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Chem.* ioi-ios) 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 

Botany (Bot. 101) 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 134-136) 

Clothing (Cloth. 101) * * ' 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104-105) 

Hygiene (No credit) /.. . 

(And one of the following) 
History 

Language 



s diploma. 



Term : 



/ 

3 
4 
4 



II 

3 
4 
4 



/// 
3 



4 
1 
3 



3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 



134 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Term: I 11 III 

*Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 3 

Foods (Food 101-102) 5 . . 4 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102)... .. 5 

Textiles (Tex. 101) 3 

Millinery (Cloth. 103-104)....^ 2 2 

Art (Art 101) .' 3 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-102) 3 3 

English 3 3 

(And one of the following) 

Language 3 3 3 

Sociology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

Note; Students who have not had a substantial course in high school physics must 
carry Physics during this or subsequent years. 

JUNIOR YEAR Term: I II III 

Educational Psychology (Ed 102) 5 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 103) 6 

Secondary Vocational Home Economics (Ed. 107) 3 

Costume and Design (Art 103) 3 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 105-106) 3 3 

Physiological Chemistry (Bio. Chem. 101) 4 

Nutrition (Foods 103-104) 5 5 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) 3 3 

Public Speaking 1 1 l 

Electives 1-3 1-3 4-6 

SENIOR YEAR Term: I II III 
Problems and Practice in Teaching Secondary Vocation- 
al Home Economics (Ed. 108) 3 

♦Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Econ. (Ed. 109) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed, 124) 3 

Child Care and Welfare (Ed. 134) 3 

History of the Family (Ed. 130) 3 

Education of Women (Ed. 131) 3 

Household Management (H. M. 101-102) 3 3 

Practice House (H. M. 103) 6 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 104) 2 

Arts and Handicraft . . . . 2 

Electives 5-8 5-8 5-8 

♦Credit, three to five hours. Given any term. 

Industrial Education 

Three types of curricula are offered in Industrial Education, viz., a four- 
year curriculum, a two-year curriculum and a special curriculum. The 



1 



185 



first two are offered as resident work at the University and the third is 
offered at special centers in the State where occasion demands. 

Four- Year Curriculum in Indutrial Education for Teachers 

OF Related Subjects 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the four-year curriculum in industrial education must be willing to en- 
gage in the trades or industries during the three summer vacations. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be chosen from any of the 
courses offered in the University for which the student has the necessary 
pi erequisites. 

Two-Year Curriculum in Industrial Education for Teachers of 

Related Subjects 

This curriculum is designed for mature students who have had consid- 
erable experience in some trade or industry. 

In addition to the above, applicants for admission to this curriculum 
must have as a minimum requirement an elementary school education or 
its equivalent and must be willing to engage in the trades and industries 
during the summer vacation. 

The curriculum will not be rigidly required as laid down, but will be 
made flexible, in order that it may be adjusted to the needs of students 
who present advanced credits for certain of the required courses. 

Special Courses for Teachers of Trade and Related Trade 

Subjects 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher training in Baltimore, two 
types of courses are offered of evenings in that city — one for teachers of 
trade subjects, the other for teachers of related trade subjects. The courses 
open about the last of September and close about the last of April. The 
class for teachers of trade subjects meets twice a week, the one for teach- 
ers of related trade subjects meets once a week. The recitation period in 
all cases is two hours. 

Applicants for admission to these classes must have had considerable ex- 
perience in the line of work they expect to teach, and must have, as a 
minimum requirement, an elementary school education or its equivalent. 
The credit allowed for these courses depends upon the amount and char- 
acter of the work completed. 

For teachers of trade subjects the term's work deals with the analysis 
and classification of trade knowledge for instructional purposes, the me- 
chanics and technique of teaching, shop and class-room management, and 
the organization of industrial classes. The work for teachers of related 
subjects is similar to that described for teachers of trade subjects except 
that emphasis is placed upon the analysis of their specialties in relation- 
ship to the different trades with which they are articulated. 

i36 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
General Education 

ED 101 I^Wc Education in the Vnited Staf.s-Three ^^'^^ ^^^^ 
Pifst term. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Required of all stu- 

laboratory period. Second term. uv«" J 
of juniors in Education. Prerequisite Ed. 102 _ 

planning; class management. ,„„.,„„ Three credit hours. Sec- 

En 124. Principles of Secondary Bducahon-Three creait 

end term. Required of all ««^;°" J^^^-^'^Mlon of secondary schools 
Evolution of secondary ^^^^'''''''J^^^'^Zol. and the community 

.ith the element-y school, coueges^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^„„. 

and the home; the junior ^"Sh school, progr ^^ti^uies. 

.truction of curricula; '^^ j^^^^Zl^T^Z c!:TLlr.. Second term, 
open r^unirrdTnir Cred Jf juniors in Home Economics Edu- 
cation. Prerequisite Ed. 102. . ^ children during the sue- 

needs. F.iucation—Two credit hours. Second and 

Ed 126-127. History of hducaiiun 

tices 

Arts and Science Education 

■ En 113 Enoli.n in Secondary Sc.oo?.-Three credit ^''«- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
open " iunloi and seniors, required of juniors preparing to teach i.ng 

" VctSt EnSih in the different types of .e.ond.ry scUools; selec- 

137 



II 



u 



I 



tion of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; 
evaluation of the course of study in terms of modern practice and group 
needs. 

Ed. 114. Problems and Practice in Teaching English in Secondary 
Schools — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. Required of seniors preparing to teach English. Prerequisite 
Ed. 113. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of English in secondary 
schools; the organization of the materials; lesson plans; devices for moti- 
vating and socializing work; special methods and type lessons in teaching 
the different forms of literary composition; measuring results; observa- 
tion and critiques. 

Ed. 115. History and Civics in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to ;juniors and seniors. Required of jUniors preparing 
to teach history. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of history and civics in secondary schools; selection of sub- 
ject matter; parallel readings; state requirements and state courses of 
study; the development of civics from the community point of view; 
reference books, maps, charts and other auxiliary materials. 

Ed. 116. Problems and Practice in Teaching History and Civics in 
Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. Required of seniors preparing to teach history. 
Prerequisite Ed. 115. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of history and civics in 
secondary schools; the organization of materials; lesson plans, devices 
for motivating and socializing work; maintenance of the citizenship ob- 
jective; use of maps, charts, and note books in history teaching; checking 
and measuring results; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 117. Foreign Language in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing 
to teach foreign language. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of foreign language in secondary schools; selection of subject 
matter; state requirements and state courses of study; special devices and 
other auxiliary materials. 

Ed. 118. Problems and Practices in Teaching Foreign Langwage in 
Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. Required of seniors preparing to teach foreign 
language. Prerequisite Ed. 117. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of foreign language in 
the secondary schools; the organization of material for teaching; lesson 
plans; devices for motivating and socializing work and the use of special 
material and charts; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 119. Mathematics in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to 
teach mathematics. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of mathematics in secondary schools; selection of subject 

138 



matter; state requirements and state courses of study; proposed reorgani- 
zations. . 

Ed 120. Problems and Practices in Teaching Mathcmxitics in Secondary 
SchoolSr^Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First term. Required of seniors preparing to teach mathematics. Pre- 
requisite Ed. 119. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of mathematics in 
secondary schools; lesson plans; devices for motivating and socializing 
work; checking and measuring results; observation and critiques. 

Ed.' 121. Science in Secondary Schools— Three credit hours. Third 
term* Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors preparing to 
teach science. Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Objectives of science in secondary schools; selection of subject matter; 
state requirements and state courses of study; sources of material; ref- 
erence books, laboratories and equipment. 

Ed. 122. Problems and Practice in Teaching Science in Secondary 
Schools— Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory period. First 
term. Required of seniors preparing to teach science. Prerequisite 

Ed. 131. 

Psychological principles underlying the teaching of science in secondary 
schools; the organization of materials for instruction; methods of the 
class period; lesson plans; the preparation and organization of laboratory 

instruction; note books. 

Ed. 123. Teaching Arts and Science Subjects— Three to fiive credit hours; 
determined by amount and character of work done. Given any term senior 
year. Required of seniors preparing to teach arts and science subjects. 
Subject selected depends upon the student's specialty. Ed. 114 or Ed. 116 or 
Ed. 118 or Ed. 120 or Ed. 122 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as 
a parallel of this course depending upon the student's specialty. 

Observation; course outline; lesson plans; class teaching; critiques. / 

Vocational Education 

Ed. 134-136. Educational Guidance— One credit hour each term. Open 
to all freshmen. Required of freshmen in Education. 

This course is designed to assist students in adjusting themselves to the 
demands and problems of college and professional life, and to guide them 
in the selection of college work during subsequent years. Among the 
topics discussed are the following: student finances; student w^elfare; in- 
tellectual ideals; recreation and athletics; general reading; student or- 
ganization; student government; the purpose of the college; the election 
of courses and the selection of extra curriculum activities. 

Ed. 137. Theory of Vocational Education— Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students by special 
arrangement. 

Evolution of vocational education; educational and social forces be- 
hind the movement; terminology; types of industrial schools; technical 

139 



high schools; vocational education for girls; vocational education in 
rural communities; recent legislation. 

Agricultural Education 

Ed. 104. Second-ary Vpcational Agriculture — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required in Agricultural Education. 
Prerequisite Ed. 103. 

Theory of vocational education; terminology; the vocational education 
law; federal and state interpretations; purposes of secondary vocational 
agriculture; vocational analysis and vocational needs; curriculums and 
short courses; analysis of farm enterprises; the classification ana arrange- 
ment of farm jobs; knowledges, and skills for instructional purposes; the 
checking of skills; the determination of the point of attack; the home 
project; practice records; the important farm enterprise as the vehicle 
for general agricultural information; short course work and problems; 
the agricultural work of the last two years of a four year curriculum; 
farm shop. 

Ed. 105. Prphlems and Practice in Teaching Secondary Vocational Agri- 
culture — Three credit hours. One lecture and two laboratory periods. 
First term. Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite, 
Ed. 104. 

Relation of the agricultural teacher to the school system; relation to 
the community; the organization and conduction of project instruction; 
departmental organization and problems; the community survey; the 
analysis of enterprises; the making of monthly and yearly outlines; the 
checking of skills; methods of the class period and lesson planning; 
the organization and conduction of practicums and shop work; equip- 
ment; records and reports; summer work of teacher; the first months 
work; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 106. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture — Three to five credit 
hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. Given 
any term senior year. Required of seniors in Agricultural Education. 
Ed. 105 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as a prarallel of this 
course. 

Observation; monthly outlines, lesson plans; class teaching; confer- 
ences; critiques. 

Ed. 128. The Rural Community and Agricultural Education — Three 
credit hours. Second term. Senior year. Required of seniors in Agri- 
cultural Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 

Community surveys from the point of view of the teacher of vocational 
agriculture; nature, structure, historical background and types of rural 
communities; the rural mind; essentials of social growth; rural needs; 
place of agricultural education in the rural school system; needed reorgan- 
ization and developments. 

Ed. 129. History of Agricultural Education — Three credit hours. Third 
term. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates by special arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite, Ed. 127. 

140 



TMs course attempts to t^ce the ^^'^^^^j[^:Zr:Xio::istt 
is intended primarily for those -^I'-^'^'^^^Z^'^'^J^t literature- 
shaping the destinies of rural peop e. ItJ-~/^^ J ,„^,, ,« used 
poetic, legislative and pedagog-m ^^^^^.^^ ^^ ^^^^,^^ ,,,, ,, ^oral 

Z:^^::^^^^^^- Lords-hlhUcal. classlea.. and 
'CS Promms ana Practice in A.ricmural E.tension-Tr.ree credit 

bourL Third term. Open to ^"^^^-?BL~Service and designed to 

Given under the supervision of t^^^^ ^f ^f ^^^ '' .„_ ^^rk. Methods of 

eauip young men to enter the broad «« * of extension^ work ^^^ 

assembling and disseminating the «S"*=^"XSion sTpervision. and prac- 
tice practical ^^^raer;.6r.m^^t^o^or,..^-^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^,„, 
tical details connected with he ^"'^^ °* * ^ ^,^^ to engage in 
worker, and extension «P--^^;;,^f J^,^^^^^^^^ assistants, always under 
specialists', county agents and boys club ^^^ Traveling ex- 
the guidance of men experienced m the respective f^\ ^^^^^^^ ^^, 
penses for this course will be adjusted, according 

ability of the man. and the service rendered sftop-One credit 

Eo. 140-141. Metnoa., ^-^^^^.^-J^^.r' Ve^u^^^^^^ seniors in Agri- 

hour. Laboratory. Second and Third terms, xv y 

cultural Education. Prerequisite. Ed^ l";^. ^^ j^ secondary 

Objectives and methods of approach j^ t^^^^J^J^Xck.ng and measur- 

schools, devices for motivating -''^ socif zm^^^^^^ ^S Je in handling 

ing results, selection and ^"'^'^sement of equipment. F ^^^^^^ 

*°\nSS ^:^S' -Si:" rirrSnrand hot and cold 
rn'proTectrando\r Somali repair projects that arise on the farm. 

Home Economics Education 

Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required ot jun 

Economics Education. Prerequisite. Ed. 103 o„ith-Hughes law; 

aims and objectives of seconaaiy vu . .^„ ^^d its relation 

First term. Required of all seniors m numc 

'TeSL'^of Ihe home economics teacher to the school; methods of in- 

improvement of the home economics library, selection 01 

141 



ment; arrangement of schedule; community service; professional im- 
provement; the first month's work; study of types of class room work; 
observation and critiques. 

Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vooational Home Economics — Three to 
five credit hours, determined by the amount and character of work done. 
Given any term senior year. Required of seniors in Home Economics 
Education. Ed. 108 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as a parallel of 
this course. 

Observation, monthly outlines; lesson plans; application of the prin- 
ciples of the technic of teaching; conduct of laboratory class; class teach- 
ing; conference and critiques. 

Ed. 130. History of the F^armly — Three credit hours. First term. Re- 
quired of seniors in Home Economics Education. 

History of the family from the early ages to the present time; the in- 
dustrial revolution and its effect upon family life. 

Ed. 131. Education of Women — Three credit hours. Second term. Open 
to juniors and seniors. Required of seniors in Home Economics Edu- 
cation. 

Women's work in relation to the home and to society; opening of occu- 
pations and professions to women; modern problems of women; civic, edu- 
cational, industrial and family responsibilities. 

Ed. 132. Child Care and Welfare — Three credit hours. Third term. 
Required of seniors in Home Economics Education. 

Child psychology from the standpoint of development; health, habits, 
play and recreation. 

Ed. 139. Problems and Practice in Home Economics Extension Work — 
Three credit hours. Third term. 

The Smith-Lever Act; various phases of extension work and relation of 
the extension service to the home, community, and country; analysis of 
home making activities and the study of the problems of the home; organ- 
ization of subject matter; use of illustrative material; scope of women's 
study groups; boys' and girls' club work. 

« 

Industrial Education 

Ed. 110. Industrial Education in Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. 
Third term. Open to juniors and seniors. Required of juniors in Industrial 
Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 103. 

Theory of vocational education; purposes of industrial education; types 
of industrial schools; vocational and trade analysis; place of auxiliary 
knowledge; related trade courses; industrial school population; materials 
and equipment; relation of the industrial teacher to the school system. 

Ed. 111. Problems and Practice in Teaching Industrial Education in 
Secondary Schools — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. First term. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. Pre- 
requisite, Ed. 110. 

Problems of the related trade teacher as they arise in connection with 



organization and •"-''f^^;;^';"^"^ Secondary ScWo.s-Three to 

BO. 112. Teaching Industrial S«^^^^«* J^ character of work done. 

flve credit hours, determined ^J^^eTotsl^ors in Industrial Education. 

r l^n^^hr -ereTIs H^uisite to or a. a para.lel o. this 

"SSrvation; outlines; lesson plans; class teaching; conferences and 
"'Tin History of mustrial Eaucation-^^ree credit hours. Second 
term'. Open to seniors -^^/^Xment o" Industrial education in the 

it of schools; present problems in reorganization. 



143 



142 



College of Engineering 



Whether a man follows engineering as his life's work or enters other 
helds. ,t is well recognize.} that the training receiver! in tL 
colleges of to.a. ai^orCs a splen.id prepTrati^nTa L'ti^T^lZ 
camngs m pubhc and private life outside of the engineering pro ession 

The College of Engineering, which includes the Departments of CMI 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, is undergoing a reorganLt on 
The general purpose is to broaden the courses of instruction the bette to 
prepare young men to enter the public service. The large public work! 
program contemplated in practically every state in the un on makes uTg n 
the demand for engineers trained for such work. The pubirservice de 
mands the electrical and mechanical as well as the civil engineer Mary 
land needs such men to carry on her great highway work and Targe 
pubhc undertakings contemplated in various cities and counties Such 
trammg seems preeminently a function of the State's University 

sential y different from that usually given, but that the viewpoint of the 

I OM r'to g v'eThfr""" "' *'^ '''''''''"'' ^"' *^ '-^^^ "' public servile 
in order to give the time necessary both to the technical subjects and to 

hose of a more general character, a careful revision of all courses of study 

To SesTatLage"" """"^^ """^ ^'^^'^ "^ ^^ -^ -^ - "- 
Beginning with the college year of 1921, it Is expected to have the cur 
nculum so arranged as to prescribe the same courses of study for aUfresh 
men and all sophomores, respectively, in the Engineering College Zot 

tant one that a young man will not be called upon to decide the branch ' 
Of engineering in which he will specialize until his Junior year 

The changes contemplated will necessitate a somewhat greater amount 
of preparation than the standard at present prescribes, and the hearty and 
sympathetic co-operation of the high schools of the state is asked that 
Maryland boys may be even better prepared for their unive sity work to 
the end that they may be well qualified to enter on their fferwork 
with the best possible university training. 

Engineering research is recognized today as one of the most needed 
WoTk ofl"'T"' '"'* '"' engineering colleges can make Tthe s ate 
7Z\l *'''^f ^••^'^t^'- »« ^"-eady under way at the University of Sry. 
land where, through the co-operation with the U. S. Bureau of Fu^Hc 
Roads and the Maryland States Roads Commission, highway rLearch^rob 
ems are being studied, the solution of which will prove of utmost value 
o the people Of the state. It is planned to develop as rapidly Vspossfble 
this phase Of the work which will have, asiae from its great economic 

144 



value to the state, an important educational value due to the close contact 
the students will have with the live engineering problems of today. 

The war brought prominently before all people the work done by the 
engineers and now a most important part is played by the profession in 
the reconstruction problems that confront, not alone the countries of 
Europe, but the United States as well. The opportunities for the well 
trained engineer were never greater than at present. Great projects are 
under way and even greater contemplated, which the engineer of the 
niture will be called upon, not only to build, but to initiate. He will 
require the broadest training he can secure. He must know more than 
merely the technique of his profession, he must be able to grasp the eco- 
nomic problems that underlie all great public works. It is towards such 
a training and understanding that the courses in the College of Engineer- 
ing are being developed. 

Batchelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, respectively. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of the University who have 
obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work 
for three years. 

2. His registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months 
prior to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with his 
application a complete report of his engineering experience and an outline 
of his proposed thesis. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

Equipment 

The Engineering building is equipped with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for all phases of engineer- 
ing work. 

Drafting-Rooms 

The drafting-rooms are equipped for practical work. Engineering stud- 
ents must provide themselves with approved drawing outfit, material and 
books, the cost of which during the freshman year amounts to about $25. 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

This laboratory is fitted with such appliances as may be used to the 
best advantage in engineering practice. These include a potentiometer 

145 



n 



t 



I' 



¥ 



t 



If • 

il 



and standard instrument for calibrating the various measuring instru- 
ments used in the laboratory. A Sharp-Miller portable photometer and a 
Standard photometer for measuring the candle-power of lamps and for 
determination of illumination intensities. A large number of portable 
ammeters, voltmeters and indicating wattmeters for direct and alternating 
current measurements, electrostatic voltmeter, frequency meters, silver 
and copper voltameters, Sieman's type electrodynamometer, watthour- 
meters and an ascillograph. 

A Curtis steam turbine, direct connected to a 35-kilowatt compound 
generator, has been installed for testing purposes. This may be used in 
connection with the University lighting plant when needed and will be 
used for light and power service in the Engineering Building. 

The laboratory is so wired that connection may be made readily between 
any part of the University lighting plant and the turbo-generator or any 
of the apparatus in the dynamo-room. 

The apparatus in the dynamo-room includes the following; A 10-kil6watt 
rotary converter of the latest type, with speed limit and end play devices; 
five-horse-power variable speed, commutating pole motor; a 7.5 kilowatt, 
60-cycle, 220-volt alternator designed to operate either as a polyphase 
generator, synchronous motbr, frequency changer, constant speed induc- 
tion motor or variable speed induction motor. The following parts are 
supplied with the set to make possible its operation in any of the above- 
named ways: a stationary armature for use either as an alternating cur- 
rent generator or as an induction motor field; a revolving field, a squirrel 
cage induction motor rotor with starting compensator having self-con- 
tained switches; an induction motor rotor with 3-phase collector rings, 
external resistance and controller; a 2-kilowatt booster set; a five-horse 
power compound direct current motor and a 1.5 horse power shunt motor 
fully inclosed; a 7.5-kilowatt, 120-volt, 3-phase self-excited generator direct 
connected to a 115-volt compound direct current motor; a motor generator 
set consisting of a 3.6-horse-power shunt motor direct connected to a 2- 
kilowatt generator; several small D. C. and A. C. motors and generators, 
two 2-kilowatt transformers to transform power from 110 or 220 volts to 
1100 or 2200 volts. 

The main switchboards are used to mount the necessary circuit appar- 
atus to control the generators and motors as well as the various circuits 
in the dynamo-room and testing laboratory. In addition to the special 
electrical engineering equipment, the University lighting plant will be 
used for illustrative and experimental purposes. This plant contains, 
together with other apparatus useful in teaching electrical engineering, 
two Bullock generators of 40 kilowatts total capacity. 

The telephone laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the mag- 
neto and common battery systems. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

Among the appartus installed in the laboratory are a cross compound 
condensing Corliss engine of 50-horse-power, equipped with break, in- 

146 



dicators, relief valves, reducing motion, steam and vacuum gauges and 
speed indicator, which gives ample opportunity for steam consumption 
aud brake tests. This is connected with the shops, so that at any time 
it may be switched on and drive them. The University power plant, 
with its vacuum heating system, three 100-horse-power return tubular 
boilers and two electric generating units, offers opportunities for experi- 
mental worK. An eight-horse-power, four-cycle gasoline engine equipped 
with prony brake permits the making of tests in gas engineering. 

Materials Laboratory 

In this laboratory the apparatus for tesing materials includes a 100,000- 
pound Riehle combined hand and power-testing machine for making tensile, 
compression, shearing and transverse tests on various kinds of materials; 
a 1,000-pound Riehle machine for testing cement briquettes, etc. 

Highway Research Laboratory 

Several highway research problems have been undertaken. A study of 
the traffic over the highway system of Maryland has been made and a 
traffic map prepared. This work was done in cooperation with the State 
Roads Commission and the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. 

A study of the concrete roads of the State is in progress. For this 
purpose a special core drill apparatus was engaged the entire past summer 
drilling cores from the various points, collecting, in all, over 800 samples. 
These are being examined to determine their physical properties. The 
object of this research is to ascertain what effect traffic has on the life 
of the concrete. Closely related to this investigation is the determination 
of the "fatigue" ofi concrete, for which special apparatus has been made 
at the University laboratory and work is actively under way. 

As the research work develops, additional equipment will be added. 

Hydraulic Laboratory 

Apparatus suitable for the determination of the coefficient of discharge 
for small orifices, weirs, etc., has been installed in this laboratory. Ex- 
perimental work in stream gauging is made on the streams in the vicinity. 

The Shops 

The shops are well lighted and admirably adapted to the purpose for 
which they were designed. The wood-working shop contains accommo- 
dations for bench work and wood turning. The power machinery in this 
shop is a band and universal circular saw, one 16-inch by 10-foot pattern- 
maker's lathe, three grindstones, a wood trimmer, 26-inch wood planer, 
14-inch joiner and universal tool grinder. 

In the forge shop are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, a power 
emery grinder, and a pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free 
of smoke. There is a full assortment of smith's tools for each forge. 

147 






,4 



I 



The foundry is equipped with an iron cupola, which melts 1,200 pounds 
of iron per hour, a brass furnace, one core oven and the necessary flasks 
and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one 10-inch speed lathe, one 
22-inch engine lathe with compound rest, one 12-inch combined foot and 
power lathe, two 14-inch engine lathes, one 25-inch drill press, one No. 4 
emery tool grinder, one No. 1% universal milling machine and an assort- 
ment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and measuring instruments. 

The machinery of the pattern and machinei shops is driven by a 9 by 
14-inch automatic cut-off, high-speed engine, built by members of the junior 
and senior mechanical engineering classes, after the standard design of the 
Atlas engine. An 8 by 12-inch engine drives the machinery of the black- 
smith shop and foundry. 

Surveying Equipment and Models 

This equipment includes a number of transits, levels, compasses, plane 
tables and minor instruments for use in plane, topographic, railroad, high 
way and geodetic surveying. These are added to as the necessity for other 
equipment arises. The models include various types of roads, bridges, 
culverts, etc. 

Libraries 

Each department contains a well selected library of books for reference 
and the standard engineering magazines. Students are encouraged to 
take advantage of the opportunity for reading afforded in the departmental 
as well as in the general library. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are also required to attend and take part in the meetings 
of the Engineering Society and Seminar and engineering lectures. 

In addition to the requirements of the regular courses of study all 
students in the Engineering college are required during each of the three 
summer vacations to obtain employment in some lines of commercial work, 
preferably that which relates to engineering. Unless the student can offer 
some adequate reason why he has not been so employed during at least two 
months of each of his summer vacation periods it may be considered suffi- 
cient cause for withholding his degree. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington and to 
other places where there are great industrial enterprises offers an excellent 
opportunity for engineering students to observe what is being done in their 
chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all trips of inspection. 



148 



Freshman Year 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

Term : i 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103) ^ 

oral English (P. S. 101-103) •••••• ^ 

Modern Language ! * * VJ * Vni in^^ 5 

Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry (Math. 101-103) .... 5 

Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. A-B, 101-103) ^ 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. 101-103) 

Shop and Forge Practice (Shop 10M03) 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) (M. I. 101) • • • • 

Engineering Lectures 

Sophomore Year 

Required of all students in Engineering, 

Term: 1 

Oral English (Pub. Sp. 104-106) ^ 

^Modern Language (Adv. bourse) .. ..^. ..........••• • 

.Modern and Contemporary History (His^l09-lll) .^^. 3 

Advanced Algebra, Dif. & Intg. Calculus (M^th. 104-105) 6 

Physics (Phys. 101-103) ^ 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 104-106) J * * * : * " * , 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 104-106) (M & E.).... 1 

Civil * 

Military Science (R. O. T. C.) (M. I. 102 ) « 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-103) (M. & E.) * 

Civil •■• 

Engineering Lectures 

^Alternatives. ^^^^^ ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1922-1923. 

Term : I 

♦Current History (His. 101-103) ^ 

♦Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107-109) ^ 

♦Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) ^ 

♦Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) "^ 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) ^ 

Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) 

Design, Structures, Elements (C. E. 101-103) ^ 

Materials of Engineering (C. E. 104) 

Masonry Construction (C. E. 105) 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 104) 

Engineering Lectures 

149 



II 



3 

1 
3 

5 
4 

1 
1 

2 



II 

1 
3 
3 
5 
5 
2 
1 

• • 

2 
2 
2 



III 
3 
1 
3 
5 
4 
1 
1 
2 



II 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 



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1 
3 
3 
5 
5 
2 
1 



JII 
1 
3 

1 
1 
3 



3 3 

3 3 

3 3 



Senior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924. 

Term: I II III 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) 1 1 1 

♦Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103) 1 1 1 

(Seminar Course, one afternoon a week) 

♦Public Utilities (Engr. 104-106) Ill 

♦Engineering Chemistry (Chem. 109-111) 1 1 1 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) 

Advanced Course (M. I. 104) 3 3 3 

Highways (C. E. 106-108) 4 4 4 

Design.— Masonry Structures (C. E. 109-111) 3 3 3 

Design.— Steel Structures (C. E. 112-114) 3 3 3 

Sanitation (C. E. 115-117) 3 3 3 

^Railroads (C. E. (118-120) 1 1 1 

ISanitary Science (Public Health) (C. E. 121-123) 111 

i:Drainage and Irrigation (C. E. 124-126) 1 1 1 

Engineering Lectures 

♦Required of all Engineering students. 
^Alternatives. 

tOpen as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades 
of A or B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1922-1923. 

Term: I II III 

♦Current History (His. 101-103) 1 1 1 

♦Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) 3 3 3 

♦Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107-109) 1 1 1 

♦Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) 1 1 1 

♦Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103) 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) 3 3 3 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) 

Design. — Machine, Elements (M. E. 101) 4 

Direct Currents (E. E. 101-103) 2 6 6 

♦Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) 3 3 3 

Engineering Lectures 

♦Required of all Engineering students. 

tOpen as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades 
of A or B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 



Senior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924. 

Term: I *^ ^^ 

111 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) . . . ••••;;.;:•• ' i 1 1 

.Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 101-103 ) 

(Seminar Course, one afternoon a week) ^ ^ ^ 

.public Utilities (Engr. 1^4-106) ... .. • ' * ^ ^ ^ 

^Engineering Chemistry (Chem. 109-111) ^ ^ 3 

military Science (R. O. T. C.) ^^ . 

Advanced Course (M. I. 104 • ^ 5 5 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 1<^4-106) • • .^^ - ^ 

Design-Electric Machine (^•.E;^^^^-^^^- '^ ' Vl0:il2; 3 3 3 

Telephones, Telegraphs, Electric ^-y^^^f ^^ ^Jf ^lle. 

Illumination, Electric Power Transmission, Radio, Tele ^ ^ ^ 

graphy and Telephony (E. E. 113-115) • • • • 

Engineering Lectures 

ISSi'ala^n^ eftrfcllTs^f thl^ students only who have average grades 

of A m B fo? both Freshman and Sophomore years. 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

Junior Year 

Beginning 1922-1^)23. 

Term: I '^ ^^^ 

111 

♦Current History (His. 101-103) .^ ^ ^ ^ 

•Political Economy (Econ. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

*Orcil English (I'ub. Sp. 107-109) . . .' ^ ^ ^ 

^^Engineering Geology (Geol. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

♦Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-103 ) ^ 

Foundry Practice (Shop 107) 3 3 3 

tMilitary Science (R. O. T. C.) 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) •••••••••* -'''' 4 4 

Design.-Machine, Elements (M. E. 101-103) ^ ^ ^ 

♦Prime Movers (Engr. 107-109) ^ ^ 

Kinematics (Mech. 104-106) 

Engineering Lectures 

"ISn^ala^n^ e^ilrfc^lTsftS^htf S^^^^ students only who have average grades 

of A or B fo? both Freshman and Sophomore years. 



151 



150 



Senior Year 

Beginning 1923-1924. 

♦Oral English (Pub. Sp. 110-112) ^^'■'"^ ' " W/ 

♦Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr.' 101403 )' .' J ] ^ 

(Senimar Course, one afternoon a week) * * ^ 

Public Utilities (Engr. 104-106) 

im^T'^'l^^ Chemistry (Chem. ' lOMii )' ". ] ^ ^ 

tMilitary Science (R. O T C ) ■* * 1 

Advanced Course (M. I. 104) ^ 3 3 

Design.-Prime Movers (M. E.' loV-lOei ' ' ' " • " 

Des.gn.-Power Plants (M. E. 107-109 ) ' ^ » 

Des.gn.-Pun,pi„g Machinery (M. E. 113) ' ' = 

Thermodynamics (Mech. 107-109 ) " • 2 . . 

Sanitation (C. E. 115-117) ^ 3 3 

Factory Organization (M. E 110 i 833 

Mechanical Laboratory ( M. E. lims )' ^ " • • • 

Heatmgand Ventilation (M E 114) ^ 1 •• 

Engineering Lectures •• •• ;! 

T^n'^a°n%1cL'="cf!rrirr..'*"*"*- " " 

or A or B .or ^ot^K;=„^-,"l„,^^^^^^^^^^ on,. ..o W average ...e 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Civil Engineering 

cre^ifbrur ESralTseirrm? ^--..-... ..„e.,.._.,ree 
Of Juniors in Civil Engineering '*"''"" ^""^ laboratory. Required 

Design of steel beams and columns An». • 
trusses, plate girders, bridge trusses r^d.. 1 k ^"^ "^ '""^^^^^ 1" roof 
steps towards complete desfgn of thesrst ,.? '''"^'- '"^^ Preliminary 

iee,„/orce<i Concrete-Three credTt ?' •■''• 
laboratory. Required of Juniors in Civi."p "^""''^ *^™- ^^^'-res and 

The fundamental principles of ^h^ 7k Engineering, 
conc^ete construction, with -"^-nsrt'Iersig^tai-S:^^^ 

^Sstd .rrr^cs;rr:^i:— - --. -st term. 
J^inTnS-r nre r^^^^^ 

Characteristics. The mterpretat oHf sSiicaH '"'""'^''^ ^'^^'^ P^^'^'-I 

152 



The methods employed in the construction of maSoliry structui*esj in- 
cluding foundations, dams, retaining walls, piers, abutments, culverts, and 
arches. Preliminary steps towards complete design of these structures. 

C. E. 106-108. Highways — Four credit hours each term. Lectures and 
field work. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. Open only to En- 
gineering students of senior standing. 

First term: The principles of location, construction and maintenance of 
roaas and pavements. 

Second term: Highway contracts and specifications, covering the 
proposal, bidding and letting of contracts, and a complete analysis of the 
items that comprise the specifications. A discussion of the cost of high- 
ways both to the public and to the contractor and an analysis of the items 
that influence costs. 

Third term: The road laws of the various States, Highway Deparament 
organizations. Highway transportation and its interrelationship to other 
methods of transportation, highway traffic, highway economics and high- 
way financing. 

Field and drafting room work consists of the necessary surveys, plans 
and estimates of cost for the construction of a section of improved road. 

C. E. 109-111. Design of M*asK)nry Structures — Three credit hours each 
term. Lectures and laboratory. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 
Prerequisite C. E. 105, Mech. 101-103. 

The complete design and detailing of structures of concrete and of 
stone; including retaining walls, dams, arches, and bridges, and the 
preparation of plans and bills of materials. 

C. E. 112-114. Design of Steel Structures — Three credit hours each term. 
Lectures and laboratory. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. Pre- 
requisite C. E. 101-103, Mech. 101-103. 

The complete design and detailing of steel structures, a continuation of 
C. E. 101-102. 

C. E. 115-117. Sanitation. — Three credit hours each term. Lectures 
and laboratory. Required) of seniors in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 101-103. 

Water supply and sewage disposal. Methods of estimating consumption- 
design of water system. Estimating quantity of sewage and design of 
sewage systems. Complete designs are prepared for water supply and 
sewage disposal for a given community. 

C. E. 118-120. Railroads — One credit hour each term. One afternoon 
per week. Prerequisite Surv. 104. Alternative for seniors in Civil 
Engineering. 

The theory and practice of railroad design, construction, operation and 
maintenance. Field and drafting room work consists of a reconnoissance 
and survey of a short railroad and preparation of the map, profiles and 
estimates from the survey. 

C. E. 121-123. Sanitary Science (Public Health) — One credit hour each 
term. Seminar course one afternoon per week. Alternative, open only to 
seniors in Civil Engineering. 

153 



I 



Electrical Engineering 

Principles of des,^; lZrllZZ7,e?:Z ZT' . 
erators and motors direct errant ..„. "Peration of direct current gen- 
used in connection' ^ItTstrgebatteS ''''"'"^' ^"^"'"^ ^''^^-^^ 

Laboratory experiments on the raJihrAtiV.T, ^p • * 

'e e ior,of *^" ^™^ s":rrrarrotr"'"^°"' ^'^'^ ^"'"'"^'- 

and t^o =orrprorL?tr.%!::^^^^^^ iT^ -res 

puances. the use of Te oseSraph'Tn """ T''''' ^^'^^^^o.ra ap- 
ments to show current and viit ^ \ connection with various expen- 

alternating currenT c rcuUs auf T '''""""' '° ^^"^^ ^^"^ »--"«' 
Characteristics of sU^ J's a^ir SonTenTrltorard T"^™'' 
Phase transformers and synchronous converters "' ''"^"^ 

o.?rrurrr rtrorTenStTr";^r^ ^" ""--"^ — 

and magnetic circuits of aUernatrJ!. ' ^"'^^'Pl^^ "^ design of the electric 
formers and a comp ete desLn e .h 7' generators, motors and trans- 
>«otor or transfomer! "' '° alternating current generator, 

cre^ditlurTeach tem'^Twriecf ''"■"^' "'^' ^'^'^'"'^ i^ai.w„.-Three 
site, E. E. 101 103 "'"' ^""^ °°" laboratory period. Prerequi- 

tra"n;Ser:trr^;frsmUteT?er\'^'^^^^^ ^""^ ^"'^^'^ -^«^-- 
calling equipment ihese vlSuril"' """"' '"'"•="^" •^°"^' ''"" 
studied as a completfunft In hriocaTbauL: f ^ '^'^""''"^ *''^" ^- 
Phones. Magneto and common bit "S^e^usTTn"^ ^ 
Changes, automatic telephone and the operatt^ nf . '*'""'' ^^■ 

quadruplex telegraphy. operation of simple, duplex and 

in the laboratory the units are assembled and operated. 

154 



TraflBc studies, train schedules, motor characteristics and the develop- 
ment of speed — distance and power — time curves, systems of control, 
motors and other railway equipment, electrification system for electric 
railways, including generating apparatus, transmission lines, substations 
and distribution and utilization of electrical energy for car operation; 
electrification of steam roads and application of signal systems, problems 
in electric railway operation, beginning With the selection of proper car 
equipment and ending at the substation. 

E. E. 113-115. Illumination — Four credit hours. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period. First term. Prerequisite, E. E. 101-103. 

Electric Power Transmission — Four credit hours. Four lectures. Second 
term. Prerequisite, E. E. 101-103. 

Radio Telephones and Telegraphs — Four credit hours. Three lectures 
and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, E. E. 110-112. 

Series systems of distribution, methods of street lighting, calculation 
of voltage drop, regulation, weights of wire and the methods of feeding 
parallel systems, principles and units used in illumination work, lamps 
and reflectors, candle power measurements of lamps, measurement of illu- 
mination intensities, and calculations for the illumination of laboratories 
and class rooms; survey of the electrical equipment required in central 
stations and substations, transmission of electrical power, including poles, 
towers, lines, etc., practical problems to illustrate the principles of in- 
stallation and operation of power machinery. 

Principles of radio telegraphy and telephony, construction and operation 
of modern transmitters, antennae and receiving circuits, with special 
emphasis on the use of the vacuum tube both for transmitting and 
receiving wireless signals, experiments with various types of receiving 
apparatus. 

Drafting 

Dr. 101-103. Engineering Drafting — One credit hour each term. One 
laboratory period. Required of all freshmen in Engineering. 

Freehand Drawing — Lettering, exercises in sketching of technical illus- 
trations and objects, proportion and comparative measurements. 

Mechanical DravAng — Use of instruments, projections and working 
drawings, drawing to scale in pencil and in ink, topographic drawing, 
tracing and blue printing. 

Dr. 104-106. Descriptive Geometry — Two credit hours each term. Two 
laboratory periods. Required of all sophomores in Engineering. 

First Term — Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of 
problems relating to the point, line and plane, intersection of planes with 
solids and development. 

Second Term — Generation of surfaces; planes, tangent and normal to 
surfaces; intersection and development of curved surfaces. 

Third term — Shades and shadows, perspective, map projection. 



155 






Ill 



ill 



>i 



General Engineering 

Engr. 101-103. Engineering Jurisprudence — One credit hour each term. 
Seminar course of one afternoon per week. Required of all Engineer 
students of senior standing. 

A study of the fundamental principles of law relating to business and 
to engineering; including contracts, agency, sales, negotiable instruments, 
corporations and common carriers. These principles are then applied to 
the analysis of general and technical clauses in engineering contracts and 
specifications. 

Engr. 104-106. Public Utilities — One credit hour each term. Open only 
to students of senior standing. Prerequisite, Econ. 101-103. 

The development of public utilities, franchises, functions, methods of 
financing and control of public utilities. Service standards and their 
attainment in electric, gas, water, railway and. other utilities. The prin- 
ciples that have been adopted by the courts and public service commis- 
sions for the evaluation of public utilities for rate making and other 
purposes. 

Engr. 107-109. Prime Movers — Three credit hours each term. Lectures 
and laboratory. Required of all juniors in Engineering. Prerequisite, 
Math. 104-106. 

Salient features of the operation of steam, gas, hydraulic and electric 
prime movers and pumps. Comparison of types of each, methods of 
assembling or setting up in place for operation. Service tests. 

Mechanics 

Mech. 101-103. Engineering Mechanics — Three credit hours each term. 
Required of all juniors in Engineering. Prerequisite, Math. 104-106. 

Applied Mechanics — The analytical study of statics dealing with the 
composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples, machines 
and the laws of friction, dynamics, work, energy and the strength of 
materials. 

Graphic Statics — The graphic determination of stresses in framed 
structures. 

Elements of Hydraulics — Flow of water in pipes, through orifices and 
in open channels. Determination of the coefficient of discharge, velocity 
and contraction in pipes and orifices. 

Mech. 104-106. Kinematics — Two credit hours. First and second terms. 
Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite Math. 104-106. 

Principles^ — Determination of the instantaneous axis and instantaneous 
center. Analysis of displacement, velocity and acceleration diagrams. 
Design of cams. Form of tootlx outline in the epicycloidal and involute 
systems of gearinjg. 

Mech. 107-109. Thermodynamics — Three credit hours each term. Lectures 
and laboratory. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Pre- 
requisite Mech. 101-103. 

Laws underlying the fundamental equations. Perfect gases. Relation 



" state. Oalculation and drawms 

:ntropy diagrams. ^^^^^^^^ Engineering 

T> •«•. TTnnr rredit hours each 
,, E. 101-103. mementsof Machine ^-<';^^:; ;ruec^..uic.X and 

^erm. Lectures and l^^^^f ^j, ^io2 103 required of junior Mechanical 
Electrical junior engineers, M. E. lu^ 

pnglneers. , .„. „ s-volved in determining the pro- 

'°TUe application of t'^^. ^''^^^'^^nS-gn „! bolts, screws, shafting, 
portions and form of machine parts. The 

gears, springs, crabs and 7"^^^^;- ^^^^rs-Three credit hours each term. 
J.Sstd"ibSr;.Ve;T;d"o7seniors in Mechanical Kngineermg. 

prerequisite M. E. 101-103. ^ proportioning the 

Analysis of the stress °Jf^ ^''^^ Jj ^, .^^h. The steam boiler; its 
essential parts and estimatmg the 
design and cost. pinnts— Two credit hours each term. 

it r ?^=" -= --- '^ ""-'-'''' ^'^'''^'■ 
^TrS^of -a'complete power plant; including specification,, the 

building and the lay out »f. ^'^^^^^^^.dn hours first term. Required 
M B. 110. Factory Orffantzatton—Tyfo creaii 

of seniors in Mechanical Engineering ,^^^^ systems and 

Discussions relating to °»»'i'»***=*7^"'^„^,;°' The ebb and flow of labor. 

eost accounting. f^-^ZT^ZZ l«idered from the personal 
The economic exi>ansion ui uu .r 

equation side. r nhoratorv-One credit hour first and second 

JJ- ^^LrrnrsT M-ranical Engineering. Prerequisite 

^Srt^n Of steam gauges --^Jicator sprin.^^ rrrprin"": 
horsepower of steam and gas engines^ Sett S ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

valve and Corliss steam engines and gas engines, 
gas engines. if„.<.iitnen/— Two credit hours. Second 

The air lift and the hydraulic ram. Distributing 

in a manufacturing establishment ,j,^.^^ t^rm. 

M. E. 114. Heating and ^^^f » "l^^^rl^f^J Prerequisite Mech. 101-103. 
Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prer q 

Mech. 107-108. ventilation. Radiating surfaces. Steam, 

The P""'^^^ ^"„f ^f;*"!'t^^3 vacuum and vapor systems, 
hot water and hot air systems, voi-u 

157 » 



156 



^ i 



'4 



i 



m 



SHOP 

steel tools. ^ °^ °* '"^"^ ^""J ^^eel, welding and making of 

Shop 104-106. Machitie Shon Pmotir^ r^ 
Required of all sophomores first term ' "'"*'" '^°"' ^^'^'^ te™ 

c..ie. .d .leetri.i ....^^^^^^^ 

af ro/ti^sTn^srCnU-r t- .™- -- - 

Molding in brass and iron. Core mak "fe J'''''''^'''''' Shop 104-106. 
ment. Lectures on selection of iron bv fr^^i . ^'"^"^^ ^''^ "s manage- 
melting of metals. ^ fracture, fuels and the mixing and 

Surveying 

SuBv. 101-103. Plane Survcving~One credit hn ^. 
credit hours. Second and third teril, t I "•"• ^'''' *«''°- Two 
Quired Of sophomores in Civil Eng ne^Hng fl'r t''' '"f '''''' ^°'''^- «*^- 
and of sophomores in Electrical and m» '„ ' '^'*""^ ^^^^ ^^''^ terms, 
second terms. Prerequisite Math Wl ''^'^'^"'^^^ Engineering first and 

^^^'^^:!::::'^^:^^^. ^— the use and a. 
Solution Of practical problems i„ 1^?^ ""^ '"^'^'°^ *"^*''"°»^'^t«- 
Shafting and foundation, anJin laying out ' '°^ ^"'^^ '''^ ^""<»'»^«. 

area and of earth work, and t^e iTcLesornT ?« *='»»P"t-"on of 
map reading. Prmcipies of plan and map making and 

SuBv. 104. Aamnced Surveying—Three cr^ciit i.« 

Hne measurement and pre^e Lw^^^^ Base 

graphic surveying. triangulation. City surveying. Hydro- 



The Graduate School 



158 



Graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of the 
Graduate School by competent members of the various faculties of in- 
struction and research. These constitute the Faculty of the Graduate 
School. 

The general administrative functions of the faculty are delegated to the 
Dean and Secretary of the School and a Graduate Council consisting of 
nine other members. 

Work in accredited research laboratories of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and other local national research agencies under competent 
supervision is accepted, when previously arranged, as work in residence 
for part of the requirement. These laboratories are located in easy 
daily reach of the University. When previously arranged, certain ap- 
proved courses, satisfactorily completed, at the American University, will 
also be accepted for part of the residence requirement for higher degrees. 

Admission and Registration 

Admission to the Graduate School is open to all graduates of this and 
other standard colleges and universities. Before entering upon graduate 
work all applicants must present evidence that they are qualified by their 
previous work to pursue the courses desired. Admission to the Graduate 
School does not necessarily imply admission to candidacy for a degree. 

Every student is required to register at the office of the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each term. This applies to all students doing 
graduate work in the University even though they are not candidates 
for degrees. The student is given a registration card for the term on 
which after consultation with the professor in charge of the major sub- 
ject, the program of work is entered. This must be approved by the 
departments involved and by the Dean before registration can be com- 
pleted. 

Advanced Degrees 

The advanced degrees conferred are Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy for work in Agriculture and the Natural Sciences; Master of 
Arts for work in Liberal Arts, Education and Home Economics, and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Liberal Arts. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 

The application for admission to candidacy for either the Master's or 
the Doctor's degree are made on application blanks which are obtained 
at the office of the Graduate School. These applications are first ap- 
proved by the professor in charge of the major subject after consultation 
with the professors in charge of minor subjects, and then passed upon 
by the Graduate Council. 

159 • . 






:' / 






i * 



Each candidate for the Master's degree is required to make application 
for admission to candidacy at the completion of one third of the res- 
idence requirement. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be admitted 
to candidacy at a date not later than the beginning of the academic 
year in which the degree is sought. 



conferred 

and must 
chosen, 
with one 
on a full- 
approved, 

including 



Master of Science and Master of Arts 

The degree of Master of Science, or Master of Arts, will be 
upon resident graduates who meet the following requirements: 

1. The candidate must be a graduate of a qualified institution 
have the necessary prerequisites for the field of advanced work 

2. He must complete a course of approved graduate study 
major and one or two closely related minor subjects, working 
time basis of one year of advanced work. The work may, when 
be extended on a part-time basis over a longer period. 

3. The candidate must complete at least 45 term credit hours 
a thesis approved by a committee of the Graduate Faculty. 

4. The candidate must pass a satisfactory examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. As prerequisites for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree 
the candidate must be a graduate of a standard college, must have a read 
ing knowledge of French and German, and the necessary basic training in 
the chosen field for advanced work. 

2. Three years of graduate study will usually be required. The first 
two of these years may be spent in other institutions offering standard 
graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be corres- 
pondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificate of 
residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research 
in the special field in which the major work is done. 

3. The candidate must select a major and one or two closely related 
minor subjects, constituting a single field of research. 

4. The candidate must present a dissertation within the field of research 
selected. This must be in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate School 
in printed or typewritten form at least two weeks before the time at 
which degrees are granted. 

5. The candidate must pass a final oral examination in the major and 
minor subjects.The examination will be given by a committee appointed 
by the Dean. 

Advanced Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of the University who have 
obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

160 



1. He shall have been engaged successfully in acceptable engineering 

work for three years. o„r.rnvprl at least 12 months 

2. His registration for a degree must be ^PP'^^'^'^/^Van present with 

outline of his proposed ^^^'^: ^^ ^^ approved subject. 

■X Wp shall present a satisfactory tnesis ou au w 

3. He snail pr eligible by a committee composed of the 

4. He must be considered eligible oy a Departments of 
Dean of the College of Engineering and the heads of the uep 

Civil. Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

Graduate Fees 

Each graduate student is subject to a matriculation fee of $10.00, a 
fixS charge of $1.00 per term credit hour and a diploma fee of $10.00. 



Fellowships and Assistantships 



The university offers fellowships ^-^^^^^Z':^^-^^^'ll\^^^^^ 
aepartments. The fellowships are worth *f «J"f ^^/^^^/^ Z remitted, 
assistantships $1000 to $1500. AH fees -'^^^^.^^^^f ^^StiTshTps together 

All applications for fellowships and ^^^^^^^f^.^^^'^^'^^^^te school not 
.Kh credentials S-^.r^rdl^U brrde^U^uriS of each year. 
'Z\Tsnf::£ cJn'idr; must signify their acceptance within two 
weeks after the awards are made. ^ 



161 



The College of Home Economics 

Research into the sciences and the development of industries, art, and 
professions has so changed the philosophy of our educational system that 
it is now recognized that any educational system must include training of 
a technical nature. It must encourage the student's natural desire for 
work of a productive nature with a vital connection between theory and 
practice. These views have now been generally accepted and the result is 
noted in the combination of vocational, technical, and scientific work 
with the general studies to form a new course of study for young men 
and women. 

The subjects taught in home economics are designed to fit young women 
to be capable workers and home makers in whatever sphere of life they 
may enter. The knowledge they gain from these subjects should give 
them contentment, industry, order, and a womanly feeling of independence 
and responsibility. 

The courses of instruction given are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: (1) those students who desire a knowledge of the 
general facts and principles of home economics; (2) those students who 
wish to make a specialty of home economics for the purpose of teaching 
the subject in secondary schools and colleges; (3) those who are in- 
terested in certain phases of home economics which deal with the work 
of the dietitian or of institutional manager. 

Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory 
completion of four years of prescribed courses, or 204 trimester hours. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes and for ease of instruction the College of 
Home Economics is organized into the departments of: Foods and Cookery, 
Textiles and Clothing, Hygiene and Health, and of Institutional and Home 
Management. 

Equipment 

In addition to the usual class room and laboratory facilities, the College 
maintains a newly built and equipped practice house in which the students 
will keep house for a period of six weeks during their senior year. 

Curriculum in Home Economics 

All students registered in the College of Home Economics are required 
to take the same work during the first two years. At the beginning of the 
third they may elect to continue with General Home Economics, in which 

162 



„„ « M,.w... o«U„ «. c..,„. Ws wen ,^^. o- .«y "^ *« 
i„g to specialize, will outline such courses. 

Home Economics 

FRESHMAN YEAR. * ^ 3 3 

composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101-103 ^ ^ 

morgan. Chem. (Inorgan. Chem. 10M03) ^ ^ 

Mathematics (106-108) ^ 2 

Zoology (Zool. 101-102) 2 4 

Botany (Bot. 101-102) 3 3 3 

Language ***\*ni\ •• •* ^ 

Garment Construction (Cloth. 101 ) */////..... 1 

Hygiene 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. * ^ 3 . . 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101-103) . . .^ • • 3 

Chemistry of Textiles (Industrial Chem. 105) -^ ^ 

Agricultural Physics (Physics 107-108) • • ^ 

Art (Art 101) * * * _ . . 8 

Textiles (Tex. 101) 2 2 

Millinery (Cloth. 103-104) ^. • • • • • y^* * * * •J..;** ' . . 5 . . 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) ... ^ ^ 

Foods (Foods 101-102) " 3 3 3 

Electives * -Iaox 1 ^ ^ 

Public Speaking (Pub. Sp. 101-103 ) 

Tcrtfi' I ** 

JUNIOR YEAR. ' ^ 3 . . 

Bacteriology (^a^^- I(^^"^^^\ V:: * *•' VaV 107^ » 3 

Chemistry of Foods (Industrial Chem. 106-107 ) ^ ^ ^ 

Nutrition (Foods 103-104) ^ 

Costume and Design (Art 102) ^ 3 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 105-106)...... ^ ^ 

Social Psychology (Soc. Psy. 104-105) ....... '''''''' " . . 3 

Home Architecture and Interior Decoration (Art 104) ' • • ' , 

Electives 

Term : I ^I ^^^ 

SENIOR YEAR. „ 

Preservation and Demonstration (Foods 105) - ' ' 

Experimental Cookery (Foods IW-.-- •' 3 

Household Management (H. M. 101-102 ) ^ ^ 

Practice House (H. M. 103) • • ^ 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 104) ^ 

Child Care and Welfare 10 10 S 

Electives 

163 



I 



a 'il 



i 



I 

2 
8 

» • 

2 
3 



1 
2 
3 



1 
2 
3 

» • 

2 
3 

2 



3 

3 



3 



1 

2 
3 
3 

2 
3 
2 

I « 

3 
1 



Suggested Electives for Students in the College of Home 

Economics 

Quantitative Analysis ^^^^ ' ^ ^^ ^^^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 103) .,.. 

Public Speaking 

Public Speaking .....!... 

Language (French, Spanish* German) 

s^crSeic:"'! !::':t!. z .''!'" ''^'"'''''^ ■ ■ • ■ 

Economics (Econ. 101-102) 

General and Applied Psychology 

Educational Psychology 

Rural Sociology ^ * 

Educational Guidance 

Public Education in the United States* (Ed* * 101) 

Institutional Management (H. M. 105-106) 

Home Nursing and First Aid (H. M. 107) 

Art and Handicraft (Art 103) 

Music (Chorus) * 

Botany (Bot. 101) ..,.,. 

Advanced Composition ,,[[[ 

Short Story 

Nineteenth Century Poetry 

The Drama 

The Novel 

History of the Family * * * 

Education of Women ^ 

Horticulture ^ 

Floriculture 

Landscape Gardening ' * * 

Poultry 

Description of Courses 

Principles an^p/otsses f Sery riu<; „''' H " '''-'''■ 
foods. ^uoKery. i-roduction and composition of 

Foods 102. Advanced Foods—Four credit hnnr-o rp , , 
laboratory periods. Third ter.. Pre^isUe Too J m^"^"" ^""^ *^° 

Fancy cookery and meal service 

Foods 103-104. Nutntion,—-Fiye credit hni,rc rru 
laboratory periods Second J^Z V ^^""^^ lectures and two 

Chemistry of Foods. '^'"^ ''''^'- ^'^'^^^^^^te, Foods 101-102, 

Pood requirements and metabolism Diet^ fnr. *v.^ 
nornaal persoa; invalid. cookery; Tding oTiiwiL '"*' ""' *'' ^'^ 

164 



Foods 105. Preservation and Demonstration — Two credit hours. Two 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Foods 101-102. 

Canning and preserving; practice in giving public food demonstrations. 

Foods 106. Experimental Cookery — Four credit hours. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, Foods 101-102. 

Experimental work in foods and cookery. 

Textiles 101. Textiles — Three credit hours. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, lectures in Cloth, 102. 

Identification of textile materials; variation of weave in regard to 
beauty and strength; use and value of fibers for clothing and household 
furnishing. Renovation of materials, dyeing and laundering. 

Cloth. 101. Garment Construction — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. Third term. 

Fundamental stitches; darning and patching; practice in hand and 
machine sewing in making children's clothes, including practical use or 
machine attachments. 

Cloth 102. Drafting and Elementary Dress Design — Five credit hours. 
Two lectures and three laboratory periods. Second term. Prerequisite, 
Cloth. 101. 

Use of commercial pattern; drafting, cutting, fitting, and designing of 
patterns. Construction of cotton dress. 

Cloth 103-104. Millinery — Two credit hours. Two laboratory periods. 
Second and third terms. 

Millinery stitches and simple trimmings; drafting of patterns for hats; 
making and covering of buchram frames; making hats in velvet, silk, 
straw, and transparent materials; renovation of materials. 

Cloth 105-106. Dressmaking — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. Second and third terms. Prerequisite, Cloth. 102 and Art 102. 

Application of design and principles of sewing to the construction of 
silk and wool dresses, made over garment and dinner or evening dress. 

Art. 101. Composition and Design — Three credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods. First term. 

Space division and space relation; color schemes and exercises; original 
designs in which lines, values, and colors are put together to produce fine 
harmony; perspective principles. 

Art. 102. Costume Design. — Five credit hours. Two lectures and three 
laboratory periods. First term. Prerequisite, Art, 101. 

Appropriate dress; application of color, harmony and proportion of parts 
to costumes designed in ink and water color; history of costume. 

Art. 103. Art. and Handicraft. — Two credit hours. Two laboratory 
periods. Third term. 

Applied design in embroidery, lace and stencils. 

Art. 104. Home Architecture and Decoration — Three credit hours. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Third term. Prerequisite, Art. 101. 

Styles of architecture; application of color in home decoration; furnish- 
ings from a sanitary, economical, and artistic point of view. 



165 



: 



First term. Senior year ^"^'"''-Two credit hours. Two lecturas. 

^^H. M. ,07. «„e »,„.,.„ „, „,„ M-T^„. cm b,„„. s«».« 

Instruction in domestic emereenciPQ anH fi^o* -^ 
procedure in the home care of the s^cl ^ ' '"' ''^ '^^ ^^^^^^^ 



The School of Law 



166 



The Faculty Council 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A M., LL. B., LL. D., Dean. 
Hon. Alfred S. Niles, A. M., LL. B. 
Hon.. John C. Rose, LL. B., LL. D. 
Randolph Barton, Jr., E3sq., A. B., LL. B. 
Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A. M., LL. B., Secretary. 
Hon. James P. Gorter, A. M., LL. D. 
Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A. B., LL. B. 
Hon. Morris A. Soper, A. B., LL. B. 

The calendar for the opening of the school and for holidays is the same 
as for the School of Medicine. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a 
course of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or 
seven years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. 
This was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper pecuniary support. In 1869 
the Law School was organized, and in 1870 regular instruction therein was 
again begun. From time to time the course has been made more com- 
prehensive and the staff of instructors increased in number. Its graduates 
now number more than two thousand, and included among them are a 
large proportion of the leaders of the Bench and Bar of the State and 
many who have attained prominence in the profession elsewhere. 

The Law School building adjoins the Medical School and part of its 
equipment is a large library, maintained for the use of the students, which 
contains carefully selected text-books on the various subjects embraced in 
the curriculum. No fee is charged for the use of the library. Other 
libraries also are available for students. 

Courses of Instruction 

The courses of instruction in the Law School extend through three 
scholastic years of thirty-two weeks each, with an average of at least ten 
hours of class-room work each week, and aim to present a general and 
complete view of the science of law, with reference not only to its growth 
by judicial exposition, but also to the principles which have been engrafted 
upon it by positive enactment. The course of study embraces both the 

167 



theory and the practice of the law, and is designed thoroughly to equip 
the student for the practice of his profession, when he attains the Bar. 

Scientific education is afforded in i the principles of the Common La^v. 
Equity, the Statutory Law of the State of Maryland and the Public Law of 
the United States. , 

Instruction is given by discussion of assigned cases and by lectures. The 
system of instruction embraces the study of assigned cases and of approved 
text-books. It is believed that instruction given through the use of cases 
alone is unnecessarily! laborious, not conducive to uniformity, and likely to 
produce confusion in the students' mind unless supplemented by the aid of 
proper text-books. Accordingly a system of instruction, involving the use 
of both cases and text-books, is followed. 

Students desiring to do so, may take elective or special courses. Such 
students are not candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, but will 
receive certificates of proficiency. in the branches pursued. Courses of in- 
struction w^U be arranged with special reference to those desiring to obtain 
a knowledge of certain branches of the law, as an aid in business, or in the 
management of estates. 

The Law School endeavors to uphold a high standard of legal education 
and it aims to give the student a comprehensive view of the whole field of 
the Law and particularly a knowledge of the fundamentals of American 
Law, in order to enable him to pass the examination for the Bar, if he has 
chosen the legal profession for his life work, or to fit him to care properly 
for his business interests if he desires legal education merely as the ac- 
complishment of the well-equipped man of business or man of culture. 

The lectures are Intended to present all the leading principles of the 
common law applicable to the subject, and the modification of the common 
law by statute, and to give illustrations of the application of the common 
and statute law. Special attention is given to the statutes in force in 
Maryland, and to peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are 
such; but the reasons for these statutory modifications and local peculiari- 
ties are explained so that the student may in a short time acquaint him- 
self with the local peculiarities of the law in any State in which he may 
practice. 

Readings from text-books and adjudicated cases are assigned on tke sub- 
jects treated of in the lectures. 

It will be seen that the full course of study extends over three years and 
as the Faculty is satisfied that students, who have not made considerable 
progress in the law before entering the Law School, would do themselves 
and the School an injury by attempting to graduate in a shorter period, no 
student will be permitted to receive the degree of LL. B. until after three 
full years of study at this school, unless admitted to advanced standing. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the Law School must be at least eighteen 
years of age, must present evidence of good moral character and if can- 

168 



.•H.tes for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, will be required to give to the 
tdfoftU law three scholastic years of at least thirty-two weeks each 
th an averagl of at least ten hours' class-room work each week, and to 
with an average ot ai: ^^^igsion to the School a four years 

\a tr^v admission to the principal colleges and universities in Mary- 
Tnd but peSnsTho are unable to comply with these entrance requlre- 
Ss or t7 peL three years in the study of law may be received as 
t^^i students not candidates for the degree, and upon completing the 
;S or "art of th^e course, may receive certificates ot proficiency in 
tlie work completed, according to standards to be fixed. 

T^ Faculty will consider that students are properly qualified for en- 
trance L candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws who have received 
a bachelor's degree from any reputable college or university - cert^cate 
of graduation from any of the Normal or high schools of the State of 
Maryland or other reputable institution of a similar character, or have 
Scates showing that they have passed the entrance examma ions to 
one of the principal colleges or universities in Maryland or a college or 
rnlvlu; maintaining a standard equal thereto, ^tbe absence o such 
degree or certificate, a candidate for the degree of LL. B. must file witn 
the s^retary, at the time of matriculation, a certificate from the Clerk of 
the Court of Appeals of Maryland, showing that he has been registered as a 
law student, as provided by Chapter 426 of the Acts of the General 
Assembly of Maryland, passed at the Session of 1918. 

Advanced Standing 

Students may be admitted to advahced standing in the ^^^^^l^'^J^l''^ 
mediate classes upon satisfying the requirements for the work of the pre 
ceding year or years. These requirements may be met by P'-esent.ng a 
certificate from any law school of accredited standing «.1»°--^J^*^ ^J^ 
student has successfully completed equivalent courses in a law school 
covering at least as many hours as are required for such subjects In this 
school. No credit will be given for study pursued in a law office. 

Graduation 

The Law School confers the degree of Bachelor of Laws on students who 
have attended the course of lectures for three years have attained the 
required standard in examinations and in the Practice Court, and have sub- 
mitted to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis. 

Fees and Expenses 

The f^es for each term are payable in advance at the commencement of 
each term, and tickets of admission to the lectures are issued only on 
payment of fees. 

iG9 



The charges for instruction are as follows: 

For term of four months $50.00 

For session of eight months 100.00 

Special students will be charged according to the courses pursued. 

There will be a matriculation fee of ten dollars charged and payable for 
each student at the time of matriculation and an additional charge of ten 
dollars to each graduate as a diploma fee. 

Special arrangements may be made by members of the Bar, or others, 
not regular students of the Law School, for atteding any particular part 
or branch of instruction at rates of charges in proportion to the above. 

General living expenses of students are the same as outlined for the 
Medical School. 

A special bulletin of The Law School may be obtained by addressing 
Edwin T. Dickerson, Secretary, University of Maryland Law School, Balti- 
more, Md., or The President, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 



School of Medicine 



170 



Medical Council 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M. D., Dean. 
ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D. 
GORDON WILSON, M. D. 
HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A. B., M. D. 
WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M. D. 
STANDISH McCLEARY, M. D. 
JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A. M., M. D. 
ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A. M., M. D. 
BARTGIS McGLONE, A. B., Ph. D. 
HUGH R. SPENCER, M. D. 
H. BOYD WYLIE, M. D. 
CARL L. DAVIS, M. D. 
WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph. B., Ph. D. 
M. C. PINCOFFS, S. B. M. D. 

Board of Instruction 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

RANDOI.H Wi^SLOW, A. M., M. D.. LL. D ^.^ • • • ^. • • • • -^ ---^^^J^ 

SAMUEi. K. MEBBicK IVL a .^ R^m gy ^^^^^^^,^^ 

GEORGE W. ^OBB,y A.B.,U. D ;;:;opVhalmology and Otology 

HIRAM WOODS, A. M..M.D.._. up ^^ p,yehiatry 

CHARi^s G. Hiix, A. M.. M. D ^^^^^^^ 

A C Pole M D ...» * 

J. FRANK CROUCH, M. D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

CHARLES O'DONOVAN, A. M., M. D., LL. D.. .Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

JOHN R. WINSLOW. A. B. M. D Rhlnology and X^^l^^ry 

Edward N. Brush, M. D • 

L. E. Neale, M. D.. LL. D., Professor of Obstetrics. , ^,. . i 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M. D.. Ph. D., Sc. D., LL. D.. Professor of Clinical 

Medicine 
Arthur M. Shipley, M. D., Professor of Surgery. 
Gordon Wilson, M. D., Professor of Medicine. 
William Royal Stokes, M. D., Sc. D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A. B.. M. D., Professor of Opthalmology and Otology. 
Archibald C. Harrison, M. D., Professor of Surgery. 
Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A. M., M. D., Professor of Medicine. 

171 



William S. Gardner, M. D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M. D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A. M., M. D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A. M., M. D., Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M. R. C. S., L. S. A., M. D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A. M., M. D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

W. B. Perry, M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman B. Marden, A. B., M. D., Professor of Histplogy and Embryology. 

J. Mason Hundley, M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A. B., M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Jos. E. GioHNER, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics 

Charles W. McElfresh, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M. D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M. D., C. M. (Edinburg), M. D., Professor of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M. D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A. M., M. D., Professor of Proctology. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in America. 

There for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the curriculum ; there instruction in Dentistry was first given 
(1837), and there were first installed independent chairs for the teaching 
of diseases of women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases 
(1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 

hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 

... - • - i 

Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest in- 
stitution for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in Septem- 
ber, 1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye cases. Additions were made to this building from time 
to time, but the demands on it became so great that a complete new 
building was erected. The hospital now is one of the finest owned and 
controlled by any medical school in the country. It is equipped with all 
modern conveniences and requirements for care of the sick and for clinical 
instruction of students of the University. 



Besides its own hospita, the Med^-^riTtrtrii^^ 

hospitals connected with the University. 

Dispensariea and Laboratories 

X..ee dispensaries associated ^^^^ V^r^ Hospi^i and Mercy 
Hospital, -f— -,,:;r^^^^^^ ot Medicine. Sur.ery. 

same in all. ^^f _f '"^ ^^^ito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro Enterology, 
Children. Eye and Ear. Genito ur '' ^ ^ ^^d Nose, and 

Neurology. Orthopedics. Protology. J^^'^^^°^%'^^1^ ^^^ ^^y of each week 
Tuberculosis. All students in their j'^'' °' ^X^^'f^; "' ^ ^o^k one hour 
in one of these dispensaries; -";\"^^-^;;;;^^^^^^^^^ Ithe value of 

each day. About 85.000 cases treated last year give an m 

these dispensaries for «»'^jf^\te^"-^^^^^^^^.ty _„,ely for medical purposes 

Laboratories <^^^^^2J ^^^l^^^r^^ysiolo^y. Physiological 

j;UtrrmsiranrEmbryology. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Clinical Pathology. , ^ , i i • 

Prizes and Scholarships 

the best general examination. Certmcaies oi n u 

five '^'^-^^^^^^^X^lnZ^'SX Mrs. Jose U Hirsch as a memorial 
. ^''"rt. lose L mrsch former Professor of Pathology in this School. 
Z Z Tdent in ihe thtd year who has done the most satisfactory worK 

*%he'DrTamuel Leon Frank Scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha 
Frlnk^a remorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Prank, an alumnus of 
fhe Uni^ersir and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of he 
^rrirfor the year. It is awarded each year upon nomination of the 
ptulV'' o a -S student, who in the judgment of the said Faculty 
fs of good character and in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his 

"?;om ITequLt to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. HUch- 
coIkM D an alumnus of the University, two scholarships have been 
eSbli^hed which entitle the holders to exemption from payment of tuition 

''?hese Scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic to 
Jdents who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year ortrcurriculum In medicine, and who present to the Faculty sat.s- 

173 • ' 




factory evidence of good moral character and of inability to continue the 
course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph 
Winslow, M. D., LL. D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment 
of the tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a needy student 
of the senior, junior or sophomore class of the Medical School. He must 
have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent in all his work up to the 
time of awarding the scholarship. He must be a person of good character 
and must satisfy the Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of 
assistance.'* 

The University scholarship entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year and is awarded annually by the Faculty 
of Physic to a student of the senior class who presents to the Faculty 
satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of 
and in need of assistance to complete his work. 

The St. John's College Scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty 
of Physic upon the nomination of the president of St. John's College, of 
Annapolis, Md. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition fee 
of that year. 

The Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship was established by bequest of the 
late Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees. This scholarship is awarded to a second-year 
student who at the end of the year passes the best practical examination in 
Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology. This 
examination is competitive. 

The Karlinsky Scholarship, established by Mrs. Leo Karlinsky, in 
memory of her husband. Dr. Leo Karlinsky, entitles the holder to exemp- 
tion from payment of tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination of the Medical Council, to "a needy student 
of the senior, junior, or sophomore class of the Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

Requirements for Entrance 

Admission to the curriculum in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University. This cer- 
tificate is obtained on the basis of satisfactory credentials, or by examina- 
tion and credentials, and is essential for admisson to any class. 
The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Certificate are: 
(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the 
equivalent, and in addition. 

174 



ci^tv semester or ninety trimester hours, of college 
(b) Two years, sixty semester, ui . , Fn^lish 

credits, including chemistry, biology, f''J''''\''^,\^^^^ 
women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 

Fees and Expenses 

Following are the fees for students in the Medical School: ^ ^ 

Matriculation fee (to be paid each year) • • • • ^lo 

Tuition fee (each year ) '"'." n„'uim„rp- 

Estimated nvinyxpenses for students .n Bammore^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 

|27 $ 48 * '^ 

Books 20 20 20 

College incidentals ^^^ 322 400 

Board, eight months ^^ g^ ^qq 

Room rent ^^ gQ 150 

Clothing and laundry ....-• ^^ ^^ ^^ 

AH other expenses 

.. $386 5600 $820 

*Total ^ 

Park, Md. 



It - 



175 



School of Pharmacy 



Faculty 

E. F. KELLY, Phar. D., Dean 

B. OLIVE COLE, Phar. D., Secretary. 
PHARMACY— 

E. F. Kelly, Phar D., Professor of Pharmacy. 
J. Carltox Wolf, B. Sc, Phar. D., Professor of Dispensing. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph. C, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
LoLns J. Burger, Phar. G., LL. B., Lecturer on Pharmaceutical 
Jurisprudence. 

Stanley L. Campbell, Phar G., Demonstrator in Dispensing 
MATERIA MEDICA— 

David M. R. Culbreth, A. M. Phar. G., M. D., Professor Emer- 
itus of Botany and Materia Medica. 
Chas. C. Plitt, Phar. G.. Sc. D., Professor of Botany and Materia 
Medica. v 

B. Olive Cole, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Botany and 
Materia Medica. 

chemistry- 
Neil E. Gordon, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 
L. B. Broughton, M. S., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
H. E. WicH, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE AND BACTERIOLOGY— 

RoBT. L. Mitchell, Phar. D., M. D., Professor of Physiology and 

Hygiene, and Bacteriology. 
H. J. Maldbis, M. D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SUBJECTS— 

W. W. CuTCHiN, Phar. D., LL. B., Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

T. H. Spence, a. M., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Harry Gwinner, M. E. Professor of Mathematics. 

F. M. Lemon, A. M., Professor of English. 

O. G. EicHLiN, B. S., Professor of Physics. 
The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, largely at the instance 
Of members of the Faculty of Medicine, and, for a time, the lectures were 
delivered at the Medical School. Later it became separated and continued 
an independent organization until, as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, 
It finally became an actual part of the University. With but one short 

p'f rTrj^""' ""T'T '"^ ^^^^' '' ^^' continuously exercised its functions 
as a teaching school of pharmacy. 

Reference to its records show it to have been among the first, in every 
instance, to adopt advance methods, and the standards it has always set 
and maintained have equalled the highest. 



Location 

The School of Pharmacy is located at the northeast corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, with the Schools of Medicine, Law and Dentistry. 

Policy and Degrees 

From the very beginning of its career the chief purpose of this college 
has been to prepare its matriculants for the intelligent practice of phar- 
macy in the retail drug store. It does not, howevere, overlook the fact 
that there exist other divisions of the profession and that all need to be 
scientifically taught. 

The School has so arranged its curriculum as to give a well-ordered 
foundation for a pharmaceutical specialist in two years. Upon completion 
of this two-year curriculum, the student is graduated with the degree of 
Graduate in Pharmacy, Ph. G. 

Students who continue their studies for one year after completion of 
the basic two years' work will receive the degree of Pharmaceutical 
Chemist, Ph. C. Students of other colleges who wish to pursue this ad- 
vanced training must have obtained the Ph. G., diploma from a college 
holding membership in the American Conference of Pharmaceutical Fac 
ulties and must meet the entrance requirements of this school. 

In the course set forth, all the work as specified in the Pharmaceutical 
Syllabus is included and in addition general educational subjects suflicient 
to give successful students full collegiate credit. 

Women are admitted on the same basis as men. 

Recognition 

The School of Pharmacy holds membership in the American Conference 
of Pharmaceutical Faculties and is registered in the New York Depart- 
ment of Education, and all other states which maintain registration 
bureaus. The American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties is or- 
ganized to promote pharmaceutical education, and all schools holding 
membership in it are required to maintain certain standards for en- 
trance and graduation. 

Requirements for Matriculation 

The applicant must be not less than seventeen years old and must have 
completed a four year standard high school course, or its equivalent. 

Admission to the course in pharmacy is by certificate issued by the 
Registrar of the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Md. The certificate is issued on the basis of credentials, or 
by examination, or both. 

Applicants whose credentials do not meet the requirements must 
stand an examination in appropriate subjects to make up the required 
number of units. The fee for such examination is one dollar per subject; 
five dollars for the entire number of subjects. 



176 



177 



Credit will be given for pharmaceutical subjects to only those student, 
commg from schools of pharmacy holding membership in the AmeHcan 

cert S:\f the'^lTT".""^ ''^^""'^^' ^'•"^^^^'^ '^^' P--"* - P-P" 
certificate of the satisfactory completion of such courses, and meet the 

suWeTs\inr"*\"'.r" "''"'''• ^'•^•^" ^"^ ^^--' -''"-"-a 
c^otSedTor'^ofeZlv "ur ""^"^ "^^^""^ ^"''^'^^^ "^ ^^^^'"^ 



Requirements for Graduation 



1. The candidate must possess a good moral character 

2. He or she must have attended two (Ph. G.) or three (Ph. C ) sessions 
at the school Of pharmacy, the last in eitHer case at this school. 

ato;y?nsTru?t™ '^^^ ^"^^' ^^ ^^^"^^^^^^^ '^ ^" ^-^-^ and labor- 
4. On or before May 1st the candidate must present the graduation fee. 



Department of Military Science and Tactics 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Special 
Regulations, No. 44, War Department, 1921. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve OflScers' Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act 
of Congress of June 3, 1916, as amendecl by the acts of June 3, 1916, and 
September 8, 1916. 

Object 

The primary object of the Reserve OflScers* Training Corps is to provide 
systematic military training at civil educational institutions for the pur- 
pose of qualifying selected students of such institutions as reserve offi- 
cers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain 
this object during the time that students are pursuing their general or 
professional studies with the least practical interference with their civil 
careers, by employing methods designed to fit men, physically, mentally 
and morally for pursuits of peace as well as pursuits of war. It is believed 
that such military training will aid greatly in the development of better 
citizens. 

Required to Take Instruction 

All male students, if citizens of the United States whose bodily condi- 
tion indicates that they are physically fit to perform military duty or will 
be upon arrival at military age, whether pursuing a four-year or a two- 
year course of study, are required to take for a period of two years, as a 
prerequisite to graduation, the military training required by the War 
Department. 

Advance Work 

Students who complete the Basic Course satisfactorily and who are 
recommended by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and whose 
application is approved by the President, may continue their military 
training for a period of two years in the Advanced Course. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second year, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour 
is utilized for theoretical instruction. 



m 

II 



178 



179 



we^^of not Zs Jhaf "T" ^^'^"""'^ ''''''''• ^'^''«^«' «-« P^'lods a 
weeK or not less than one hour each are devoted to this work of whs ^ 

at least three periods are utUized for theoretical instruct'or ' '' 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part In military instructior, nr.^ 



Physical Examination 



Uniforms 

Members of the Reserve Officer<^' Trair.,-r,or r. 
uniforms at all military forZuZZT::i.i7:,S:!^: ^" '''''' 

thrreTnmlT^runir ^""' ''''''''''' ^°^^^ -"' '^ ^^^' '- hy 

States A™:itrcrirdrn;;i?hi^^^^^^^ -"- 

be kept m good condition by the student T^v.JT "^^ """'' 

Government and though Intended pHmarllylT use nT^'T "' '^^ 
military Instruction may be worn at anv Lh! . connection with 

tions governing their use are v^ated The 1 fn ' ""'"'' ''"' '■"^"'^■ 
part. Uniforms will be returned to tt; Jn. ^ '^° °"^ "^ ^"'''^ *" 
the year, and before. Stride;: ZTZVZZ'''' " ''' '''' "' 

Commutation 

th j^trr itb t: Svt:mUTrnt~ ^" ^'^^ ^-^ ^^-- 

Training Corps for the^wo reSaiLng Tea "of the Id' ^Z^' ^'"'=^^^' 
entitled to commutation nf o,.k<. ^ ! ^ advanced course are 

contract untU Tey coZlete T^''''""" '"'"^ "''** '°*'^"'^^°^ ^he date of 
U.LH.II Liitjy complete the course at thp incfifii+j^« -n 

amounts to approximately $110.00 a year '"^^^'t^tion. Commutation 



Summer Camps 



the strict supervision of armv nmnZ . ^ ^^ ''^'"P^ ^^^ "^<i^^ 

180 



recreation are the key-note to contentment. Social life is not neglected 
and the morale branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for those students 
who are taking the advanced course. The War Department recommends 
that as many basic students as possible attend the summer camps. 

The students who attend the summer camps are under no expense. The 
Goverament furnishes transportation from the institution to the camp 
and from the camp to the institution, or to the student's home, unless the 
mileage is greater than that from the camp to the institution. In this 
case, the amount of mileage from the camp to the institution is allowed 
the student. Quarters and food are furnished. The advanced Course 
men, in addition to receiving quarters and food, are paid One Dollar per 
day for each day spent in camp. 

Commissions 

(a) Each year upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
heads of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm 
of the service will be determined by the War Department. . . 

Credits 

Military instruction at this "University is on a par with other university 
work and the requirements of this department are proficiency the same as 
with other departments. 

Students who have completed satisfactorily the prescribed training 
with a unit of the S. A. T. C. may be credited with one year of the Basic 
Course prescribed for the R. O. T. C, and those students who have re- 
ceived military training at any educational institution under the direction 
of an army officer detailed as professor of military science and tactics 
may receive credit for instruction equivalent to that given in the senior 
division R, O. T. C, if over fourteen years of age. ' 

Basic Course, M. I. 

First year (generally given to freshmen and the first-year students in 
the two-year course). Two credit hours per term. 

Second year (generally given to sophomores and the second-year stu- 
dents in the two-year course). Two credit hours per term. 

Advanced Course, M. I. (elective) 

Third year (generally given to juniors). Three credit hours per term. 
Fourth year (generally given to seniors). Three credit hours per term. 



181 



i 



I 



Military Department 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

year''- '^ "'' ^^^"^ ^^ °- ''■ <^-Two credit hours each term. Freshman 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Term 

1. Physical Training (Practical) 

SSr^^^^^ ^'•'^ ^"^^^- '>^ ^'^^ «-ice (Theoretical and 

'■ PrS,.^^"'' ^^''''°' "^ ^°>'^'- -^ «-ad (Theoretical and 

Second Term 
1. Physical Training (Practical). 

PriSi)'^^'"' '-''"'' '^^ ^'^^ «-^«^ -<^ Platoon (Theoretical and 

i Rifle M^r" "'^''■''""^ (Theoretical and Practical) 

X'^eTiSrrd'pU" iSr ""^^ ^^^^"- ^^^ "«-- --»- 

5. Personal Hygiene (Lectures) 

6. Infantry Equipment (Practical). 

Third Term 

'• PrSS)''^'"' '^''°°' ^^ P'^^- -^ Company (Theoretical and 

^^^ M. I. 102. Basic R. O. T. C.-Two credit hours each term. Sophomore 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Term 

1. Physical Training (Practical). 

<T'rirLrp°,:L;L!r """"■ ''°"- ■""- "- ■^-^ 

182 



Second Term 

1. Infantry Weapons, viz: Bayonet, Hand Grenades, Rifle Grenades, 
Automatic Rifles (Theoretical and Practical). 

2. Military Hygiene, Sanitation and First Aid (Theoretical and Prac- 
ticable). 

Third Term 

1. Musketry (Theoretical and Practical). 

2. Infantry Drill, School of Company (Practical). 

3. Physical Training (Practical). 

M. I. 103, Advanced R. 0. T. C. — Three credit hours each term. Junior 
Year. 

The following subjects are covered: 

First Term 

1. Physical Training (Practical). 

2. Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, Command and Leadership 
(Theoretical and Practical). 

3. Field Engineering (Theoretical and Practical). 

Second Term 

1. Military Law (Theoretical and Practical). 

2. Accompanying Weapons, viz., Machine Guns, 37 m.m. Guns and 
Mortars (Theoretical and Practical). 

Third Term 

1. Physical Training (Practical). 

2. Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, Command and Leadership 
(Theoretical and Practical). 

3. Field Engineering (Theoretical and Practical). 

4. Problems in Use of Accompanying Weapons. 

M. I. Advanced R. O. T. C. — Three Credit hours each term. Senior 
Year. 

The following subjects are covered: 

First Term 

1. Physical Training (Practical). 

2. Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, Command and Leadership 
(Theoretical and Practical). 

3. Minor Tactics (Theoretical and Practical). 

Second Term 

1. Minor Tactics (Theoretical and Practical). 

2. Administration, Army Paper Work (Theoretical and Practial). 

3. Military History and Policy of the United States (Theoretical). 



Third Term 

1. Minor Tacics (Theoretical and Practical), 

2. Physical Training (Practical) 

'■ pS'lc^f """'"■• '"■ '"'«"• «•«« '■'»«" tTh.ore,.ca, „„ 



Department of Physical Education and Recreation 



The Department of Physical Education and Recreation has been or 
ganized to control all physical training, recreation, intramural, and in- 
tercollegiate athletics. All work is closely co-ordinated and the ideal is 
to see that every man in the Institution gets opportunities to take part 
in competitive sports. The plan under which the department is to 
operate may be summed up as follows: 

1. A series of exercises arranged for every student in the institution and 
compulsory for all, the exercises to be based on mass exercises common in 
Germany and Scandinavian countries. Neither the German nor Scandi- 
navian system is to be used in its entirety, but a combination of the 
heavy gymnastic drills of the former with the lighter squad drills of the 
latter. All students will be given physical examination and placed in 
various classes according to their individual physical needs. Students 
will receive different kinds of work and be encouraged to take part in 
those games which provide the exercise of which they are most in need. 

2. A general system of intramural athletics is carried out under a reg- 
ular schedule with teams representing different units of the University. 
All students take part in one or more of these branches of sport and the 
the University encourages enough sports to give each an opportunity. 
It is the aim of each class to have its own wrestling team, basket-ball 
team, baseball team, volley-ball team, track team, and so on for just as 
many teams as their are students to fill the positions. The games between 
these teams are carried out with regularity of schedule and supervision. 
Besides these, there are general competitions such as cross-country runs 
and interclass track meets in which representatives of all classes may 
compete at the same time. A regular playground is in process of con- 
struction on which will be available tennis courts, volley-ball courts, tether 
ball polls, stakes for pitching quoits, etc. 

3.A11 physical training of the students, including mass exercises, in- 
tramural sports, intercollegiate competitions, and military training, are a 
part of the general educational system of the University. 

For the present practically all general training, such as comes under the 
head of gymnastics and squad exercises, is conducted under the direction of 
the Military Department. 

A new gymnasium and stadium, to be constructed this summer, will add 
greatly to the facilities for general athletics and physical education. Com- 
bined they will give the University the most modern athletic plant in the 
South. 



184 



185 






I 



Degrees Conferred 1921 



Honorary Degrees 

Ferdinand Foch, Marshal of France, Doctor of Laws 

Henry Gantweix Wallace, Doctor of Agriculture 

Philander Priestly Claxton, Doctor of Laws 

Lee Cleveland Corbett, Doctor of Agriculture 

Milton Whitney, Doctor of Agriculture 

TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT 
For distinguished achievement in the promotion of the agricultural 

interest of Maryland 



John Haines Kimble 
Rush R. Lewis 
William Bernard McGrath 
George P. Radebaugh 



Port Deposit, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Bynum, Maryland 



Clyde Harold Bailey 



The Graduate School 
Doctor of Philosophy 

St. Paul, Minnesota 

Master of Science 

Walter Naphtali Ezekiel Berwyn, Maryland 

John Paul Jones Davidsonville, Maryland 

John Holmes Martin Corvallis, Oregon 

Erston Vinton Miller Hagerstown, Maryland 

William Joseph Sandow Washington, District of Columbia 

Arthur Mathias Smith College Park, Maryland 

Thomas Ray Stanton Hyattsville, Maryland 

College of Agriculture 
Bachelor of Science 



Harriet Willete Bland 
Edward Franklin Holter 
William Clayton Jester 
Alexander Macdonald 
DeWitt Prather Perry 
Otis Spooner Twilley 
Henry Lafayette Umbarger 
William Paul Walker 
Charles Philip Wilhelm 



Sparks, Maryland 
Middletown, Maryland 
Wilmington, Delaware 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Clearspring, Maryland 
Hurlock, Maryland 
Bel Air, Maryland 
Mt. Airy," Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Certificates Issued in the Two-Year Course in Agriculture 



Thomas Ezra Alderton 
George Anthony Crone 
John Edwin Muncaster, Jr. 
Howard Whiteford Turner 
Marvin Dwight Umbarger 



Takoma Park, Maryland 
Jessup, Maryland 
RockviUe, Maryland 
White Hall, Maryland 
Bel Air, Maryland 



College of Arts and Sciences 
Bachelor of Art8 



11 



Charles Walter Colb 
Austin Campbell Diggs 
Thomas Clay Groton 
Edwin King Morgan 
Frederick Knight Blanker 



Towson, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Pocomoke, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Washington, District of Columbia 



Bachelor of Science 



Sterling Ely Abrams 
Edmund Calvin Donaldson 
Francis Joseph Frere 
Edgar Bennett Starkey 
Leonard Herman Thawley 



Jersey City, New Jersey 
Laurel, Maryland 
Tompkinsville, Maryland 
Sudlersville, Maryland 
Laurel, Maryland 



School 
Doctor of 



OF Dentistry 
Dental Surgery 



Walter Anders Anderson 
Edward Conroy Berg 
Harvey Donald Brown 
Nathan Byeb 
Louis Maxwell Cantor 
Daniel Joseph Casey 
Acacio Ricalo Cisneros 
Walter Buckby Clemson 
Arthur Cobso 
WiLLLfliM Hyde Cowley 
Frank Willard Damis 
Leonard Isaac Davis 
Daniel Edward Doyle 
Bennett Hammond 
Bert Lawrence Henchey 
Charles Highstein 
"Fay Lee Hussey 
Jacob Lubore 
Victor Bruce McLaughlin 
Jack Walter Malkinson 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Newark, New Jersey 
Millville, New Jersey 
Trenton, New Jersey 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Cuba 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Cuba 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Waynesville, North Carolina 

Barnesville, Maryland 

North Attleboro, Massachusetts 

Pennsylvania 

Bennington, Vermont 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Berkley, Virginia 

District of Columbia 

Mason Dixon, Pennsylvania 

New Haven, Connecticut 



186 



187 






li 



* 



William Paul Martij^ 
William Siebert Moore 
Louis Notes 

Francisco G. Garcia Pelliccia 
Daniel Lynton Roland 
Louis Burton Slifkin 
Carl Joseph Stern 
Charles Henry Teague 
Neil Eugene Thalaker 
Joseph A. Themper 
Harold Van Winkle 
Joseph William Voelker 



Burlington, North Carolina 
Brooklyn, New York 
District of Columbia 
Porto Rico 

Reading, Pennsylvania 
Bloomfield, New Jersey 
Walton, New York 
Madison, North Carolina 
Petersburg, West Virginia 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Passaic, New Jersey 
District of Columbia 



College of Education 
Bachelor of Science 



Leonard Maxwell Goodwin 
Julian Ralph Graham 
Robert Van Rensselaer Haw 
Cecil Kefauver Holtkr 



Potsdam, New York 
Barclay, Maryland 
Riverdale, Maryland 
Jefferson, Maryland 



Charles LeRoy Mackebt 



Bachelor of Arts 



Sunbury, Pennsylvania 



Harry Christian Ball 
Harriet Willette Bland 
Letha Gordon Edmonds 
Julian Ralph Graham 
Robert Van Rensselaer Haig 
Cecil Kefauver Holter 
Charles LeRoy Mackert 
John Frederick Sendelbach 
Ferdinand Charles Smith 
Paul Alexander Wilhide 



Special Teachers' Diplomas 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Sparks, Maryland 
Rockville, Maryland 
Barclay, Maryland 
Riverdale, Maryland 
Jefferson, Maryland 
Sunbury, Pennsylvania 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



College of Engineering 
Bachelor 



James E. Dingman 
John Hartshorn Eiseman 
William Thomas Gardner 
Julius Carl Hamke 
Robert Wilhelm Heller 
Herbert Rowles Peddicord 
Robert M. Rausch 



of Science 

Berwyn, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Clearspring, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Annapolis, Maryland 
Dickerson, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 



Joseph Gassaway Reading 
Herman Huyette Sener 
John Walter Smith 
Leo William Snyder 
James Hammond Starr 
Nicholas Volney Stonestreet 
Jeremiah Henry Sullivan 
Richard Branson Thomas 



Rockville, Maryland 
Chewsville, Maryland 
Norfolk, Virginia 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Rock Point, Maryland 
Newburyport, Massachusetts 
Washington, District of Columbia 



Certificate in Two-Year Course in Mechanic Arts 



Edward Fite Stanfield 



Roslyn, Maryland 



College of Home Economics 
Bachelor of Science 



Letha Gordon Edmonds 



Rockville, Maryland 



The School of Law 
Bachelor of Laws 



188 



Joseph Frank Batty, Jr. 

Don Booze 

John Franklin Davis 

Harry Ames Drummond 

John William Farrell 

Leo Fessenmeir 

Hilary Wall Gans 

George Lawrence Golder, Jr. 

Charles Henry Gontrum 

Julius Grossman 

Paul Maurice Higinbothom 

Albert Charles Hoffman 

George S. Jones 

Norris Carroll King 

Edward L. Koontz 

William F. Laukaitis 

Charles Philip McEvoy 

George Maurice Mullen 

Nathaniel Samuel Nachlas 

Arthur Seymour O'Brien 

Howard Jesse Ring 

Cornelius Roe 

William Charles Rogers 

Howard Montague Rollins, Jr. 

Louis J. Sagner 

John Scheineb 

John Oliveb Seiland 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Pungateague, Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Ellicott City, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Arizona 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



189 



I 



Ernest E. Stanley 
Joseph W. Stallings 
David Stein 

Theodore Cooke Waters 
George Philips Welzant 
Francis B. Wiers 



Baltimore, 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore, 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 
Maryland 



The School of Medicine 
Doctor of Medicine 



John Forsyth Aubrey 

Francis Lucian Badagliacca 

Bruce Barnes 

Carl Fisher Benson 

John Ralph Bernardo 

Vincent Bonfiglio 

Jogesh Chandra Bose 

Earl Edgar Broadrup 

Andres G. Castro v 

Oscar G. Costa 

Samuel Hearn Culver 

Herman Jacob Dorf 

C. F. Fisher 

Daniel Sebastian Fisher 

Charles J. Foley 

Joseph P. Franklin 

Leon Freedom 

Willets Walton Gardner 

Kyle Wood Golley 

J. Stanley Grabill 

John Willis Guyton 

Cyrus Eugene Hawks 

Legan Henry Hobgood 

Albert Salomon Hoheb 

Julius I. Holofcener 

Albert Jaffe 

Baxter S. John 

Vincent Vernon Joska 

George Richardson Joyner 

Daniel Francis Keegan 

Richard Joseph Kemp 

Louis Lass 

Benjamin Luban 

Arley Von McCoy 

Ezequiel Martinez 

Stanley William Matthews 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Paterson, New Jersey 
Hawthorne, New Jersey 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Wilmington, Delaware 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Cumberland, Maryland 
Costa Rica 
Porto Rico 
Delmar, Delaware 
Hunter, New York 
Parkersburg, West Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Havre de Grace, Maryland 
Bham, Alabama 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Centre Moriches, New York 
Hamilton, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Lambsburg, Virginia 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Porto Rico 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Shawsville, Virginia 
Baltimore, Mjaryland 
Suffolk, Virginia 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 
Granite, Maryland 
Brooklyn, New York 
Brooklyn, New York 
Mannington, West Virginia 
Porto Rico 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina 



THOMAS Rutter O'Rourk 

Frank Anthony Pacienzo 

Moses Paulson 

Edgar Allen Poe Peters 

Harold C. Pillsbury 

Ralph Johnson Plyler 

Joseph Pokorny 

Norberto a. Quinones 

Francis A. Reynolds 

Ferdinand A. Ries 

Harold A. Romilly 

James Barry Ryon 

Fred Sabin 

Philip J. Savage 

Jesmond William Schilling 

Thomas Waller Seay 

Solomon Sherman 

Elliott Walter Shircliff 

Felix S. Shubert 

John Augustus Skvarla 

Jacob Long Sowers 

S. Gordon Stone 

John Valentine Szczerbicki 

Stanley J. Tilghman 

Louis Michael Timko 

Herman Ernest Wangler 

Edwin E. Ward 

William Ferdinand Weinkauf 

George Edward Wells 

Paul Foreman Wiest 

James Herbert Wilkerson 

Mortimer H. Williams 

W. Wellford Wilson 

James Clinton Wolfe 

Leslie Arno Yaeger 



Sparrow's Point, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Louisa, Kentucky 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Cleveland, North Carolina 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Porto Rico 

Boston, Massachusetts 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Rapidan, Virginia 
Bowie, Maryland 
Syracuse, New York 
New London, Connecticut 
Erie, Pennsylvania 
Spotsylvania, C. H., Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Cumberland, Maryland 
Ranshow, Pennsylvania 
Passaic, New Jersey 
Linwood, North Carolina 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Parsonsburg, Maryland 
Northampton, Pennsylvania 
Syracuse, New York 
Crisfield, Maryland 
Corunna, Michigan 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Rippon, West Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Parksley, Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Bloomfield, New Jersey 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Graduates— School for Nurses 



Louise B. Bateman 
Helen Childs 
Mary Fisher 
Norma Gayer 
Ruth Gorman 
Claribel Hampton 

ISABELLE HANNA 

Kate Hogshead 
Mary Belle McDaniel 



Bel Air, Maryland 
Baltimore County, Maryland 
Lonaconing, Maryland 
Myersvill^, Maryland 
Mt. Airy, Maryland 
Boyson City, North Carolina 
Cambridge, Maryland 
Greensboro, North Carolina 
Halethorpe, Maryland 



190 



191 



Blanche Lee Mabtin 
Christine Minnis 
Susan P. Neady 
Eugenia Reamy 
Zadieth Violet Reese 
Ruby Reister 
Jessie Geraldine Rhodes 
Julia Rebecca Smith 



Greensboro, North Carolina 
Connellsville, Pennsylvania 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 
Edwardsville, Virginia 
Princess Anne, Maryland 
Ashville, North Carolina 
Forney, North Carolina 
Taneytown, Maryland 



Elected Members of the Phi Kappa Phi, the Honorary 

Fraternity 



The School of Pharmacy 
Graduate in Pharmacy 



Charles Rose Anderson 
I. Ellis Berman 
Samuel Block 
Stanley Lewis Campbell 
Frank Joseph Donohue, Jr. 
Fred Wm. Downey 
Thomas E. R. Fields ^ 
Isaac Flom 
Gaither Calvin Gaver 
Marvin Colquitte Haynes 
Eric Bozeman Hill 
Norman Monroe Johnson 
Joseph Chester Kaluska 
Frank William Karwacki 
Albert George Kaylus 
George Benner Kelly 
Ernest Ward Looney 
William Stuart Maginnis 
Philip Thomas Marecki 
Sydney Is adore Marks 
Eugene Gibbons Morris 
Robert Lodge Pax son 
Robert Adrian Pilson 
Clarence Pross 
Joseph Jesse Rosenberg 
Donald Alexander Shannon 
William Chester Shoemaker 
Roy Aloysius Sprucebank 
Evelyn Wegad 
Harry Weinberg 
A. Henry Weinstein 
Benj. Nicholson Williams 
Robert Onla Wooten 



Pikesville, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Clarksburg, West Virginia 
District of Columbia 
Pikesville, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Myersville, Maryland 
Dutton, Virginia 
Hickory, Mississippi 
Ellicott City, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Winchester, Virginia 
Sponcci, West Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Round Hill, Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Hampstead, Maryland 
Sparrow's Point, Maryland 
Russia 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Greenwood, South Carolina 
Ellicott City, Maryland 



John Hartshorn Eiseman 
Joseph Gassaway Reading 

HERMAN HUYETT SeNEE 

Edgar Bennett Starkey 
William Paul Walker 



Washington, District of Columbia 
Rockville, Maryland i 

Chewsville, Maryland 
Sudlersville, Maryland 
Mt. Airy, Maryland 



Medals and Prizes Awarded 1921 
For Excellence in Debate. Medal offered by the Alumni 

Association 

Charles Waltee Cole, Towson, Maryland 

The Goddard Medal, for Excellence in Scholarship and Moral 

Character, to student of Prince George s County, 

offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

Charles Edwakd White, College Park. Maryland 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges offers each year 
gold medals for first and second places in an 

Oratorical Contest 

Medal for second place awarded to 

ROBERT Malcolm Watkins, Mt. Airy, Maryland 
Citizenship Medal offered by Mr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

John Walter Smith, Norfolk, Virginia 
Athletic Medal offered by the Class of 1908 

Andrew Nelson Nisbet 

For Excellence in Debate, "President's Cup," offered by Dr. H. J, 

Patterson 

The New Mercer Literary Society 



193 



192 



Awards of Military Commissions 



Charles Walter Cole 
Frederick Knight Slankeb 
Charles Eugene Darnall 
Robert Van Rensselaer Haig 
Hushes Shank 
Edgar Farr Russell 
Mortimer Bryan Morehouse 
Augustus Webster Hines 
Otto Philip Henry Reinmuth 
Paul Sabdo Frank 
George Francis Smith 
Robert Nicholas Young 
James Atlee Ridout 
Asa Cicero Miller 
Gerald Grosh Remsbeug 
Jesse Marion Huffington 
Morrison McDowell Clark 
John Austin Moran 
Edwin Bennett Filbert 



Major 
Major 
Captain 
Captain 

First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 



James Herbert Wilkerson 
Charles Frederick Fisher 
Ferdinand A. Ries 
John Ralph Bern ado 
Jogesh Chandra Bose 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Wilmington, Delaware 
Baltimore, Maryland 



\:ZmrZZTjose L. Hirsch prize of 150.00 was awarded to Oscar 
G ZTtor the best work in Pathology during the second and third years. 

Clinical Medicine Prize 

Charles F. Fisher, Baltimore, Maryland 



School of Dentistry 
University Gold Medal for Highest General Average 

Jack Walter Malkinson, New Haven, Connecticut 
Honorable Mention for Second Highest Average — 

Francisco G. Garcia Pelliccia, Porto Rico 

School of Pharmacy 
Gold Medal for General Excellence 

Clarence Pross, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Simon Prize for Practical Chemistry 

Clarence Pross, Baltimore, Maryland 
Honorable Mention — 

Frank William Karwacki Thomas E. R. Fields 

and Stanley Lewis Campbell 

School of Medicine 
University Prize — Gold Medal 

Oscar G. Costa, Porto Rico 
Certificates of Honor 



194 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION FOR 1921-1922 

BATTALION STAFF 

"^ Jf" "■i"*"''' "*^°'"' ^- O- T. C. Commanding 

G. E. GiFFOBD, First Lieutenant, BattaUon Adjutant 

COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 
COMPANY A COMPANY B CAMPANY C COMPANY D 

Captains 
H.N.VOUKO A.W.H.K.S E. B. F,u.bkx p. s. P„.«k 



G. F. Smith 
H. A. Shank 



G. F. Pollock 
A. G. Wallis 



L. F. SCHOTT 

C. S. Cook 

M. C. Albrittain 



Additional Captains 
E. F. Russell j. a. Ridout 

J. A. MoRAN G. G. Remsberg 

First Lieutenants 
K. B. Chappell c. E. White 

J. P. SCHAEFER p. T. KnaPP 

Second Lieutenants 
H. M. Terry e. C. Embrey 

C. M. Brewer e. A. Graves 

R. E. Marker j. w. Mumford 

H. I. Stites 



T. J. McQuade 



Non-Commissioned Staff Officers 
D. K. Endslow. Battalion Sergeant Major 
F. T. Chesnut. Battalion Supply Sergeant 

First Sergeants 
B. H. Roche 



J. M. Mattingly 



Supply Sergeants 

H. M. Walter 



Sergeants 



A. R. Schuman 
W. H. Weber 
T. H. Herlihy 

R. L. RiSSLER 

M. F. Brothers 



L. COHEE 

J. H. Foard 
J. J. Foster 
C. H. Geist 
W. J. GLENir 



J. M. 'Sjsney 
C. W. Wenger 
H. L. Dav^ 



H. O. Yates 
C. R. Hall 
J. P. Conway 
J. F. Barton 



M. H. Howard 
W. B. Hill 
G. Johnson 
W. A. King 
D. S. Lesher 



Corporals 



J. M. Link 
J. L. Mecartney 
W. P. Newcomer 
S. C. Orr 
J. P. Parran 



O. P. H. Reinmuth 
J. M. Hupfington 



J. W. WiSNER 

J. F. Clagett 



W. H. Young 
E. M. Richards 
G. A. Wick 
W. M. Jones 



G. M. Clarke 



J. M. Lankford 



F. Newland 
W. D. Bart LETT 
R. D. Newman 
R. F. Hale 
T. J. Holmes 



W. B. Penn 
J. C. Reisinger 

R. G. ROTHGEB 



Register of Students 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SENIOR GLASS 



Avery, Helena D., Washington, D. C. 
Browne, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Ezekiel, Bertha B., Berwyn 
Fisher, Henry S., Hillsboro 
Fusselbaugh, William P., Baltimore 
Gurevich, Henry J., Washington, D. C. 
Gurevich, Morris J., Washington, D. C. 
Holder, Thomas D., Vienna 
Huffington, Jesse M., Eden (Somerset) 
Kirby, William W., Berwyn 

JUNIOR 

♦Bishop, John, Washington, D. 0. 

Burdette, Robert C, Gaithersburg 

Dunning, Ernest C, Baltimore 

Duvall, William M., Baltimore 

Frank, Paul S., College Park 

Fuhrman, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
♦Hancock, Hugh, Huddleston, Va. 

Harley, Clayton P., Royersford, Pa. 

Hickey, William F., Delmar 
♦Holland, Arthur H., Cartersville, Va. 



Malcolm, Wilbur G., Barton 

Moran, John A., Frederick 

Newell, Sterling R., Washington, D. C. 

Painter, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Reynolds, Clayton, Oxford, Pa. 

Smith, George F., Big Spring 

Snyder, James H., Lewistown 

Stabler, Lawrence J., Washington, D. C. 

Sutton, Robert L.,! BaDston, Va. 



CLASS 

Huffard, Charles L.., Wytheville, Va. 
Lescure, John M., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Melroy, Malcolm B., Washington, N. J. 
Miller, Thomas K., Havre de Grace 
Mumford, John W., Jr., Newark 
Rosenberg, Charles I., Hyattsville 
Shaffer, Harry H., Upperco 
Skilling, Francis C, Baltimore 
Trivanovitch, Vaso, 2^greb, Jugoslavia 
Troy, Virgil S.. Centreville 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Anderson, Wilton A., Bristol, Tenn. 
Bacon, Rankin S., Glencoe 
Barton, J. Frank, Centreville 
Embrey ij Everett C, Washington, D. C. 
Endslow, David K., Mt. Joy 
Geist, Charles H., Upperco 
Hale, Roger F., Freeland 
Harlan, Paul B., Churchville 
Hawthorne, Noah B., Round Hill, Va, 
Kaufman, Edward L., Baltimore 
King, Willard A., Washington, D. C. 
Ludlum, 'Samuel L., Chevy Chase 
McQuade, Thomas J., Washington, D. C. 
Mecarteny, John L., Vaucluse, Va. 
Miller, Robert H., Burtonville 



Nichols, Norris N., Delmar, Del. 

Nichols, Robert S., Delmar, Del. 

j>enn, William B., Clinton 

Powell, William* D., Woodsboro 

Prince, Charles E., Baltimore 

Quaintance, Howard W., Washington, D. C. 

Richardson, Edward M., Washington, D. C. 

Roche, B. Hamilton, Baltimore 

Rothgeb, Russell G., Luray, Va. 

Rowe, Taylor P., Fredericksburg, Va. 

Sleasman, Arthur R., Smithsburg 

Stuart, Leander S., Pepperill, Mass. 

Tarbell, William E., Baltimore 

Weber, Wilhclm H.. Oakland 

Yates, Harry O., Abington, Pa. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Baker, John H., Winchester, Va. 
*Banfield, Frank W., Washington, D. C. 

Bonis, George E., Mt. Washington 
*Brannon, Thomas C, Washington, D. C. 



Bromley, Walter D., Pocomoke 
Buckman, Horace D., Accotink, Va. 
Bull, Frederick L., Pocomoke 
Burdette, Sarah B., Martinsburg, W. Va. 



196 



197 



II 



1 



^1 

'i 



♦Church, Carey F., Barnard, Vt. 
Cluff, Francis, Pocomoke 
Coney, William J., Baltimore 

*Coyle, John W., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Cromwell, Richard H., Ruxton 
Dawson, Walker M., Silver Spring 
Dickey, David D., Baltimore 
Dietz, George J., Baltimore 
Dorsett, Telfair B., Forestville 
England, Howard A., Rising Sun 
Faber, John E., Washington, D. C. 

*Harper, Floyd H., College J*ark 
Heine, George R., Washington, D. C. 
Hough, John F., Mt. Rainier 
Johnson, J. Dorsey, Cambridge 

♦Lowman, Clarence A., Funkstown 



♦Mitchell, William, Berwyn 

Myers, Victor S., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Nielson, Knute W., McLean, Va. 

Pearce, Wilbur, Sparks 

Price, M. Myron, Queenstown 

Skirven, James F., Chestertown 

Sullivan, John F., Washington, D. C. 

Summerill, Richard L., Penn's Grove, Pa. 
♦Tillinghast, Jesse L., Cherrydale, Va. 

Vivanco, Carlos D., Washington, D. C. 

Walker, Dwight T., Mt. Airy 

Waters, Joseph B., Riverdale 

Williams, Richard E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Wood, Ellsworth, Washington, D. C. 
♦Worthington, Leland G., Hagerstown 

Zalesak, Emmanuel F., Washington, D. C. 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURE CLASS 



♦Allen, Kenneth, Berwyn 
♦Appel, Carl S., Baltimore 
♦Ratson, Lawrence D., Brentwood 

Beall, Clarkson J., Morristown, N. J. 

Beckenbaugh, John H., Sharpsburg 
♦Bollinger, Perry R., Reisterstown 
♦Bonnett, Harold M., E. St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
♦Bray, Walter C, Emporia, Va. 

Buchheister, Gustav A., Upper Marlboro 
♦Campbell, Thomas A., Lanbam 
♦Chassagne, Leo J., Highlandtown 
♦Cherry, Joseph C, Brownsville, Pa. 

Clay, Winston C, CoUege Park 

Coale, Hargrave H., Aberdeen 
♦Cooper, Charles H., College Park 
♦Davis, John H., Washington, D. C. 
♦Dawson, James H., Falls Church, Va. 
♦Decker, Henry, Charleroi, Pa. 
♦Dennis, General E. H., Greenrich, Va. 
♦Dietz, Ernest C, College Park 
♦Dodson, William A., Culpepper, Va. 
♦Ferguson, Walter M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Flannery, Michael J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Forsyth, Lewis V., Berwyn 
♦Foster, Patil P., Washington, D. C. 

Ganoza, Luis F., Tripillo, Peru 
♦Graves, Harvey C, Branchville 

Gray, Marshall C, Ironsides 
♦Grimm, Pa\il H., Trego 

Harrison, John L., Berlin 

Harrison, Orlando, Berlin 
♦Hearold, John W., Miskinon, Va. 
♦Hevessy, Michael, South Norwalk, Conn. 
♦Hicks, Harry W., Kernstown, Va. 
♦Higgins, Newett G., Beltsville 
♦Hohman, Charles W., West, W. Va. 
♦Holmer, John, New York City 
♦Howell, Clarence, Chase City, Va. 
♦James, Howard V., Williamsburg, Va. 
♦Johnson, Leo C, Conduit Road 



Jones, Arthur, Davidsonville 
♦King, David, Monrovia 
♦Kirby, Wilton G., Havre de Grace 
♦Lincoln, Leonard B., Takoma Park 

Link, John M., Mt. Rainier 
♦Lint, David L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Llewellyn, P. Carrington, Esmont, Va. 
♦Lynn, Winfield, S., Washington, D. C. 
♦McAvoy, James R., New York City 
♦McGlone, Joseph F., Baltimore 
♦Mantheiy, Felix, College Park 

Mattingly, James M., Leonardtown 
♦Maxwell, Haddy O., Kingstown, N. Y. 
♦Moler, Robert C, Mt. Rainier 
♦Molesworth, Roger W., Ijamsville 

Morsell, John B., Bowens 
♦Norris, Elmer A., Berwyn 
♦Parlett, William A., College Park 

Parran, Julius P., Lusby's 
♦Persinger, Harry B., Berwyn 
♦Pierce, John R., Washington, D. C. 
♦Poppen, Alvin W., Hyattsville 
♦Richards, Felix W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Richardson, Harry F., Washington, D. C. 
♦Ritter, Floyd H., Middletown 
♦Rodeheaver, Ddbert C, Oakland 
♦Ross, Charles E., Oriole 
♦Rowe, George, Brentwood 
♦Russell, George O., Norfolk, Va. 

Schrider, Paul, Takoma Park 
♦Shoemaker, Charles, Bethesda 
♦Simpich, Ira M., Landover 
♦Smith, Arthur, Washington, D. C. 
♦Staley, Charles C, Berwyn 
♦Stanley, Edward A., Bluefidd, W. Va. 

Stewart, Harry A., Rustburg, Va. 
*Strathman, George F., Baltimore 
♦Sullivan, Clifford, Reisterstown 
♦Sullivan, Jeremiah, Branchville 
♦Sunday, WiUiam P., Washington, D. C. 



*Tait. George S., Fairfax, Va. 
Thompson, Franklin H., Baltimore 
♦Tobin. William J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Trower, Hugh C, Norfolk. Va. 
*Vaushn. William J., Lotta, N. C. 
Vick, Clyde M., Baltimore 
*Vis:us. Edwin E., Baltimore 
*Weistling, Howard H., Washington, D C. 



♦White. George A., Winchester, Ind. 
*Whiteford, Mitchall, Whiteford 
.♦Wiley. Benjamin H.. Bittinger 
WiUiams, Edward L.. Selbyville 
♦Wilson, Aseal S., Phoenix 
♦Woodward. Amos R., Watersville 
♦Wootten, John F., Berwyn 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Beits. Thomas R., Oberlin, Ohio 

Bullock, Earl M., Riverdale 

Clarke, Glen, Clarksville 

Grain, Robert, Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Higgins, Warren F., Hyattsville 

MaW. Ivan M., Roland Park 



Miller. Asa C, Washini?ton, D. C. 
Pollock, George F., Boyds 
Ross, Marion A., Princess Anne 
Smith. Edward J., Riverdale 
Voegeli, Osoar E., Washington, D. C. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SENIOR CLASS 



Beachley, Ralph H., Middletown 
*Bosley, Lester W.. Washington, D. C. 

Brewer. Brooke. CoUege Park 

Butler, Sidnia. New York City 

Clark, Morrison M., Silver Springs 

Darkis. Frederick R., Frederick 

Elder, James W., Cumberland 

Gilbert, Herbert D., Frederick 
Graham, Walter S., Hyattsville 
Hodgins, Robert J., Union City, Pa. 
Keene, Victor H., Snow Hill j 

Kemp, Allen D., Frederick | 

JUNIOR 

Ady, Elizabeth G., Sharon 

Barnes. Benjamin L.. Princess Anne 

Besley. Arthur K.. Baltimore 

Blandford, Mildred, College Park 

Block, Albert. Laurel 

Brewer, Charles M., College Park 

Currouffhs. James E.. La Plata 

Chappell, Kenneth B., Kensington 

Chase. Ralph H., Washington, D. G. 

Clagett. John F., Marlboro 

Daskais, Morris H., Baltimore 

Downin. Lauran P., Hagerstown 

Filbert, Edwin B., Baltimore 

Fitzgerald, Thomas H., Princess Anne 

Gifford, George E., Rising Sun 

Gordon. Isadore, Riverdale 

Graves. Ernest A.. Washington. D. C. 

Jones, William M., Chestertown 



Levin. Hyman E., Baltimore 
Northam, Alfred J., Pocomoke 
Paganucci. Romeo J.. Waterville. Me. 
Reinmuth. Otto P. H.. Frederick 
Remsberg. Gerald G., Braddock Heights 
Scheuch, John D.. Washington. D. C. 
Sxjhramm, George N.. Cumberlar.d 
'Scott. Joseph G., Princess Anne 
Semler, Harry E., Hagerstown 
Shank, Hughes A., Smithsburg 
Young, Robert N., Washington, D. C. 

CLASS 

Lescure, William J., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Marker, Russell E.. Hagerstown 
Mathias, Leonard G.. Hagerstown 
Mayers, Ruth E.. Washington, D. C. 
Moore. John F., Washington, D. C. 
Nisbet, Andrew N., Baltimore 
Polk, Lawrence W., Pocomoke City 
Porter, Robert G., Hyattsville 
Posey, M. Winfidd, La Plata 
Reppcrt. Ruth I., Washington. D. C. 
Rex, Elmer G., Reinersville, Ohio 
Simmons. Lawrence D.. Takoma Park 
Spence, Charlotte C. College Park 
'Sturgia, William C, Snow Hill. 
-T^ervAlli-er, V/il!ln-i C Hithlr-d. N. V. 
Thompson, Ruth A.. Washington, D. C. 
Watkins, Robert M., Mt. Airy 
V/hite, Charles E.. College Park 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Baker, Norman W.. Reisterstown 
Beers, Wilson C, Waterford, Conn. 
Besley, Florence E., Baltimore 
♦Bragg, John H., Washington, D. C. 



198 



Brewer, Virginia W., College Park 
♦Cannon, Amos P., Salisbury 
Clay, Catherine L., College Park 
Carty, Clarence, Frederick 

199 



ir 



Clemson, Earle P., Baltimore 

Darcy, George D., College Park 

Davis, Henry V., Berlin 

Demio, Alexander W., New Kensington, Pa. 

Ensor, Zita, Sparks 

Froelich, Juanita, Crisfield 

PMske, Clarence W., Kensington 

Gambrill, Charles M., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gemmill, William F., Baltimore 

Harned, Frank M„ Merchantsville, N. J. 

Heidelbach, Henry R,, Catonsville 

Herlihy, Timothy M., Newberryport, Mass. 

Hitchcock, Albert E., Washington, D. C, 

Holmes, Thomas J., Takoma Park 

House, Kingsley A., Ccdlege Park 

Knotts, James T., Jr., Sudlersville 

Lesher, Dean S., Williamsport 

Lininger, Harry C, Westernport 

Luckey, George J., Trenton, N. J. 

McRae, John C, Washington, D. C. 

Merva, Andrew J., Nanticoke, Pa. 



Nemphos, Peter C, Baltimore 
Newcomer, W. Park, Denton 
Newland, Paul F., Bristol, Tenn. 
Newman, Richard D., Smithsburg 
Reisinger, John C, Washington, D. C. 
Rissler, Raymond L., Washington, D. C. 
Robertson, Harold S., Summerill, Mass. 
Shank, James O. C, Smithsburg 
Shepherd, M. Wayne, Berwyn 
Silverman, I., Washington, D. C. 
Spence, Virginia I., College Park 
Swank, James L., Elk Lick, Pa. 
Tayntor, Lewis O., Salisbury 
Tobias, Herbert R., Hancock 
Townsend, Miles D., Reisterstown 
Walsh, Humphrey M., Washington, D. C. 
Wardwell, Aubrey S., Washington, D. C. 
Walter, Henry M., Washington, D. C. 
Warrenfeltz, Mary 'S., Hagerstown 
Weimer, Winifred R., Washington, D. C. 
Weseley, Louis J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Atkinson, Rollins J., Frederick 

Beaven, George F., Hillsboro 

Benton, Gordon, Stevensville 

Berger, William A., Bloomfield, N. J, 

Binkley, Walter, State Line, Pa. 

Blandy, Tbelma, College Park 

Bogley, Preston P., Washington, D. C. 

Brown, Robert A., High Point, N. C. 

Burger, Joseph C, Washington, D. C. 

Cannon, James, Hyattsville 

Chasser, Rudolph R., Homestead, Pa. 

Clapp, Houghton C, Washington, D. C. 

Coe, Grace, Berlin 

Cook, Robert, Lanham 

Coombs, Walter C, Washington, D. C. 

Cranford, Harold L., Riverdale 

Daugherty, Walter E., Washington, D. C. 

Dorsey, Anna H. E., Ellicott City 

Dougall, James L., Garrett Park 

Duke, Henry A., Durham, N. C. 

Emack, Ellen P., "Beltsville 

Fewell, Russell W., Baltimore 

Flanagan, Virginia M., McKeesport, Pa. 

Foird, Edwin L., Washington, D. C. 

Froelich, Wilfred L., Crisfield 

♦Furbershaw, Joseph A., Washington, D. C. 
Gambale, Francis J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Gaylor, Edward C, Branchville 
Greager, Oswald H., Hyattsville 
Gurley, Revere B., Garrett Park 
Hak, Samuel H., New York City 

♦Harmon, Mary, Washington, D. C. 
Hawkshaw, John W., HyattsviUe 
Hill, Minnie M., Washington, D. C. 
Holmes, Clarence S., Riverdale 



Horn, Millard J., Washington, D. C. 

Hubbard, James H., Cordova 

Hubbell, Vance R., La Junta, Col. 

Jones, Joseph W., Washington, D. C. 

Juska, Edward F., Elberon, N. J. 

Keane, John P., Sandy Hook, Conn. 

Klein, Truman S,, Union Bridge 

Lang, Idamay, Washington, D. C. 

Levy, Herman F., Baltimore 

Littman, Isaac, College Park 

Logue, William I., College Park 
♦Loving, George W., Washington, D. C. 

Lowden, Henry M., Gaithersburg 

McDonald, C. Kingsley, Barton 

Mace, John, Jr., Cambridge 

Macko, Joseph A., Homestead, Pa. 

Marden, Tilghman B., Annapolis 

Marshall, Housden L., Washington, D. C. 

Massicott, Marie M., Muscogee, Ga. 

Merrill, William H., Pocomoke 

Minkoff, Alvin H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Monk, Henry L., Salisbury, N. C. 

Moulton, Earle W., West Haven, Conn. 

Mullen, Beulah O., College Park 

Nash, Mabel M., Berwyn 

Netzger, Solomon, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
♦Newcome, Troy A., Hyattsville 

Nichols, Marshall H., Clarksville 

Norris, Helen G., Baltimore 

Pabst, William F., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Parks, Leston C, Bristol, Tenn. 

Peake, Clarence W., Aberdeen 

Peebles, Irving, Lonaconing 

Phillips, Garrfd S., Hagerstown 

Powers, Selwyn L., Hyattsville 



Ramos, Jose, San Lorenzo, Porto Rico 
Roberts. Henry J. B., Clara 
Robertson, Dorothy, Laurel 
Rolen, Jesus M., Aibonito. Porto Rico 
Ryon. Allison F., Waldorf 
Schmidt, George H., Baltimore 
Schotte, Victor T., Oella 
*Scott. Edward A., Bristol, Tenn. 
Scott. Fred S.. Galax, Va. 
Scott, WilUam M., Princess Anne 
'Singer. Jacob J., Baltimore 



Smith, George H., Taft, Va. 
Stambaugh. Bruce T.. Woodsboro 
Stewart, Charles K., HiUsboro 
Tan, Felix H., Brintengong. Java 
Taylor, Ritchie P., Washington, D. C. 
Weseley, Harry B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wheaton. Isaac E., Greenwich, N. J. 
White, Russell B.. Kittanning, Pa. 
Wickard, Walter L., McKeesport. Pa. 

Wissinger, Zona A., Johnstown, Pa. 

Wollak, Theodore M.. Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Crooks. WiUiam S., Frederick 

Goodyear, Louis B., CoUege Park 

House, Hugh O., College Park 

Lankford, J. Miles, Pocomoke 

Latham. James D., Baltimore 

Lawson, Lee W., Williamson, W. Va. 

MacDougall, Alan F., Merchantville. N. J. 



Porton, Robert H.. Hyattsville 
Pugh. Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Purvis. Matthew R., Baltimore 
Schott, Loren F., Washington, D. C. 
Walls. Henry R.. Churchville 
WUmeth. Clyde F., Takoma Park, D. C. 



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE (Extension Courses) 
SOPHOMORE CLASS (Day) 



Bodin. A. J., Baltimore 
Cummons, Owen D., Baltimore 
Edmeades, William T., Jr., Baltimore 

FRESHMAN 

Arrara's, J. Enrique. Baltimore 
Bell, Wylie K., Baltimore 
Boyd, Radcliffe MacN., Baltimore 
Bradfield, Norris, Baltimore 
Braun. Millard L.. Baltimore 
Bressler, David R., Baltimore 
Bridges. Thomas F.. Baltimore 
Buckey. Charles G.. Frederick, Md. 
Cosimi, Euripides. Baltimore 
Creighton, James C, Baltimore 
Davis, Ben S.. Baltimore 
Dorsch. Earl P., Baltimore 
DiPaula, Joseph S.. Baltimore 
Finnan. C. Marshall. Baltimore 
Goodwin, Leon F., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Samuel R., Baltimore 
Gray, Arthur W., Baltimore 
HUl. J. William. Jr.. Baltimore 
Hinsch, Henry. Baltimore 
Ives, Mrs. Elizabeth M., Baltimore 
Kennedy, John, Baltimore 
Kdley, William B., Baltimore 
King, John C Baltimore 
King, Howell A., Baltimore 
Liles, Robert S., Baltimore 



Hughes, Earle R., Baltimore 
Pema, Philander F., Baltimore 

CLASS (Day) 

] Lynch, James, Baltimore 
Meirs, William G., Baltimore 
Mendels. Joel, Baltimore 
Morales. Carlos J., Baltimore 
Odend'hal, Sebastien, Jr.. Baltimore 
Padlibsky. S. Hess. Charleston, W. Va. 
Prissman, Harold H.. Baltimore 
Pullen, Frank H., Baltimore 
Robinson, J. O., Baltimore 
Robinson, Moody. A., Baltimore 
Schooler, Benjamin H.. Baltimore 
Sheats, Alonzo J., Baltimore 
Silverstein, Jack, Baltimore 
Speert, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Straughn, Frederick N., Baltimore 
Strouse. Howard S.. Baltimore 
Stunz. Robert C. Lansdowne. Md. 
'SuUivan, Dennis B.. Baltimore 
Sullivan. Joseph L.. Baltimore 
Tawney. Arthur W.. Baltimore 
Weisman. Benjamin. Baltimore 
White. Porter T.. Baltimore , . , ^- , 

Waiiams. Edward R.. Prince Frederick, Md. 
Yenchus. Ella M.. Baltimore 



201 



200 



ij 



•it 



SENIOR CLASS (Evening) 



. ^1 
.f 



Bolstler, Eugene, Baltimore 
Clabaugh, John E., Baltimore 
Katz, Sylvan, Baltimore 
Metcalfe, H. C, Baltimore 
Otto, J. Rollin, Baltimore 
Scherer, George M., Baltimore 



Schwarz, H. A., Baltimore 
Terlitzky, Bessie, Baltimore 
Tippett, Frank F., Baltimore 
Wetzel, William M., Baltimore 
Wooldridge, A. V., Baltimore 



Euchtman, Joseph, Baltimore 
Fagan, Jacob B., Baltimore 
Garmer, J. Harry, Baltimore 
Knabe, Lloyd C., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS (Evening) 

Koch, Catharine M., Baltimore 
Miller, Elizabeth, Baltimore 
Needalman, Hyman, Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS (Evening) 



Abramson, Hyman, Baltimore 
Beiifcld, 'Samuel J., Baltimore 
Clemens, Maynard A., Baltimo>re 
Hoflferbert, Vernon T., Baltimore 
Hudson, W. C, Baltimore 

FRESHMAN 

Albrecht, Wilbur T., Baltimore 
Appel, Louis C, Baltimore 
Await, James A., Baltimore 
Baddock, Herman V., Baltimore 
Bishop, Mark Z., Baltimore 
Bouis, Grace G., Baltimore 
Boyer, Mitchell M., Baltimore 
Carroll, James C, Baltimore 
Carter, Calvin J., Baltimore 
Chayt, Leon, Baltimore 
Clark, J. RajTiiond, Baltimore 
Dashiell, Charles W., Baltimore 
Dauer, William F., Baltimore 
Dawson, C. E., Fork, Md. 
Edwards, S. M., Baltimore 
Estcrson, MacM., Baltimore 
Feldman, Charles A., Baltimore 
Frenz, Charles A., Baltimore 
Friedman, Nathan, Baltimore 
Fusek, J. G., Lutherville, Md. 
Gary, Judson Emmet, Jr., Baltimore 
Gilbert, J. B., Laurel, Md. 
Glcichman, R. Wheeler, Baltimore 
Goodnvan, Morris, Baltimore 
Gore, Nellie B., Reisterstown, Md. 
Gore, S. Marie, Reisterstown, Md. 
Gosnell, William L., Baltimore 
Griffin, James Albert, Baltimo«re 
Ilabert, Marie W., Baltimore 
Hallam, J. Henry, Baltimore 
Idelson, Michael N., Baltimore 
Jackson, Howard E., Baltimore 
Kaufman, Edward L., Jr., Baltimore 
Kirby, Harry W., Baltimore 
Knier, Earl W., Baltimore 



Levinson, William G., Baltimore 
Rosenfeld, Nathan, Baltimore 
Tucker, John H., Baltimore 
Wannen, C. L., Baltimore 



CLASS (Evening) 

Kramer, William H., Baltimore 
Krengel, Ethel A., Baltimore 
Langrall, Lee, Baltimore 
Lavine, Simon, Baltimore 
Lindsay, G. Easby, Baltimore 
Linn, Charles D., Baltimore 
McKewen, John L., Baltimore 
McCahan, R. S., Baltimore 
Mallet, Victor J., Baltimore' 
Mansur, Douglas B., Baltimore 
Markland, F. K., Baltimore 
Mellor, Harry P., Baltimore 
Milener, Jr., Eugene D., Baltimore 
Miller, Harry, Baltimore 
Monoker, Harry, Baltimore 
Morris, John C, Baltimore 
Murray, E. Churchill, Baltimore 
Nasdor, Harry L., Baltimore 
Nemphos, P. Charles, Baltimore 
Neumann, Herbert E., Baltimore 
Nusbaum, Jerome W., Baltimore 
Palees, Wolf, Baltimore 
Parr, Gerard J., Baltimore 
Pickus, Morris, Baltimore . 
Rapperport, Albert A., Baltimore 
Rodgers, Patrick A., Baltimore 
Rose, Charles J., Baltimore 
Rossman, E. A., Baltimore 
Rowles, L. B., Baltimore 
Sanford, Vernon E., Baltimore 
Schmidt, Oswald, Baltimore 
Shevitz, Max S., Baltimore 
Sindall, John Wesley, Baltimore 
Snyder, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Smith, Nathan, Baltimore 

202 



St Clair, William V., Baltimore 
Stigile. Cecil M., Baltimore 
Tharle, Herbert D., Baltimore 
Timm, Harry J.. Baltimore 
Strauss, H. M., Baltimore 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Alger, Harry B., Baltimore 
Applestein. H. A.. Baltimore 
Arnold, Harry A., Baltimore 
Atkinson, M. S., Jr.. Baltimore 
Bagwell, R., Baltimore 
Baker, Louis B., Baltimore 
Barget, Florence K., Baltimore 
Behncy, William Clair, Baltimore 
Blum, Albert H., Baltimore 
BDSch, Harry, Baltimore 
Boyce. Fred G., Baltimore 
Boyce, Heyward E., Baltimore 
Briscoe (Miss), Baltimore 
Broderick, Frank J., Baltimore 
Buckingham, Lewis G., Baltimore 
Bugg, Ray S., Baltimore 
Burns, H. J., Baltimore 
Byrnes, Bernard J., Baltimore 
Cahn, Charles M., Baltimore 
Carpenter, W. H., Baltimore 
Cherkosky, Samuel 
Cole, James M., Baltimore 
Comegys, W. F., Baltimore 
Crowther, Lester H., Baltimore 
Dallas, Harry A., Baltimore 
Davis, John F., Baltimore 
Davis, Marion B., Elkridge, Md. 
Dawson, Garland H., Baltimore 
Dietrick, John F., Baltimore 
Dilworth, Paul H., Baltimore 
Dix, Sherwood, Baltimore 
Englar, D. Fred. Baltimore 
Elfont, Louis, Baltimore 
Emmerich, H. J. S., Baltimore 
Everhart, John F., Baltimore 
Famous, Frank E., Baltimore 
Franke, Louis, Baltimore 
Foard, J. Stanley, Baltimore 
Franz, Charles P., Baltimore 
Friedman, Theodore, Baltimore 
GaUagher, William V., Baltimore 
Garrison, F., Baltimore 
Gill, Lawrence T., Elkridge, Md. 
Gordon, Maurice, Baltimore 
Gould, Helen, Baltimore 
Gregory, Arthur W., Baltimore 
Griffith, R. S.. Baltimore 
Gross, George, Baltimore 
Gross, B. W., Jr., Baltimore 
Gurwitz, Herman, Baltimore 
Gwynn, Hazel F., Baltimore 



Vaeth, James E., Baltimore 
von Briesen, Roy, Baltimore 
Williams, Nat., Baltimore 
Wright, Millard F., Jr., Baltimore 
Zieve, Lewis S., Baltimore 

(Evening) 

Habsit, Marie \Y., Baltimore 
Hafele, Chris. C, Baltimore 
Hillegeist, W. M., Baltimore 
Howard, J. L., Baltimore 
Hulin, Joseph E., Baltimore 
Hundley, J. M., Jr., Baltimore 
Hutchinson, George R., Baltimore 
Jendrek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Jenkins, George G., Baltimore 
Jones, Ira W., Baltimore 
Jones. S. Edith, Baltimore 
Kalb, Harry W., Baltimore 
Katz, David, Baltimore 
Kearney. James, Baltimore 
Keller, Frank R., Baltimore 
Kelley, J. W.. Baltimore 
Kemp, Grace V., Baltimore 
Kindred, Robert Elmer, Baltimore 
Kennedy, J. C, Baltimore 
Keonan, John J., Baltimore 
Keiper, W. McH., Baltimore 
Knoerr, Paul E., Sudbrook, Md. 
Koppelman, Charles H., Baltimore 
Kurland, Fannie. Baltimore 
Lan^crood. Charles J., Jr.. Baltimore 
Lankford, CKnton C, Baltimore 
Lappa, Cornelius A., Baltimore 
Lr-vcnstoin, Ruth, Baltimore 
LesinsV.% Samurl, Baltimore 
Levin, Raphael I., Baltimore 
Loetell, Albert W., Baltimore 
McAbee, Mollie, Baltimore 
McCollister, J. G., Baltimore 
McCreary, George W., Baltimore 
McDaniel, Lillian K., Baltimore 
McAfee, C. N. Baltimore 
McLaughlin, William G., Baltimore 
McVay, Lillian, Baltimore 
Madigan, Margaret M.. Baltimore 
Meade, Arthur C, Balthnore 
Mellor, George O., Baltimore 
Meyer, Ehlandt A., Baltimore 
Mooney, Lawrence R., Baltimore 
Mooney, John H., Baltimore 
Morporeth, Frank H., Baltimore 
Morrison, Edna, Baltimore 
Nicklas, Tulita, Baltimore 
Oakley, Columbus K., Baltimore 
Pesscl, J. S.. Baltimore 
Phillips, Harry C, Baltimore 
Pickert, George J., Baltimore 



203 



T 

"f 
i 



PoWhand, Walter C. Baltimore 
Pj^ss. Herman, Baltimore 
Riley, D. A., Baltimore 
Roberts, Marjorie, Baltimore 
Robinson. C. M., Baltimore 
Roeder, WiUiam A., Jr.. Baltimore 
Rose. Francis J., Baltimore 
RusseU, Nina M., Baltimore 
Sacks, Samuel J., Baltimore 
Sanner, Harry W.. Baltimore 
Schaefer,, Wilmer F., Baltimore 
Schaffer, Charles D., Baltimore 
Schmidt, Mildred M., Baltimore 
Schnick. William D., Baltimore 
Schutz, Robert C. Jr., Baltimore 
Schwartz, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Scott, T. Parkin, Relay, Md. 
Seidman, Jene I.. Baltimore 
Shapiro, Frank B., Baltimore 
Sheedy, J. E., Baltimore 
'Sherry, Mrs. Helen, Baltimore 
Shevlin, Hugh T., Baltimore 
'Siehler, Rosa, Baltimore 
Silbernagel, L. F., Baltimore 
Sloan, James S., Baltimore 
Smith, Alma E., Baltimore 



Snyder, Benjamin B., Baltimore 
Stauge, Miss A., Baltimore 
Stein, Ira, Baltimore 
Stepanek, Rose, Baltimore 
'Stem, Ernestine, Baltimore 
Stitzenberger, William, Baltimore 
Stromberg, Sydney, Baltimore 
Sutton, John A., Washington, D. C. 
Tarshish, Allen, Baltimore 
Tarsis, Miss Bessie, Baltimore 
Taylor, Charles Irvin, Baltimore 
Taylor, Wilson E., Baltimore 
Tittsworth, W. B., Baltimore 
Tooell, G. Walter, Baltimore 
Trott, Ida M., Baltimore 
Tucker, Gertrude E., Baltimore 
Vinup, Frederick R., Baltimore 
Wanner, Marie E., Baltimore 
Wea, S. L., Baltimore 
Wells, Mary E., Baltimore 
Whaley, William B., Baltimore 
Wheeler, Charles H., Baltimore 
Wheeler, Pauline, Baltimore 
White, Alvan H., Baltimore 
Wicks, Katherine, Baltimore 
Zeller, Charles F., Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

SENIOR CLASS 

Aisenberg, Myron S.. New Britain, Conn. I 

Atno, Winfield. J., Newark, N. J. 

Blank, Samuel H., Camden, N. J. 

Bock, Charles A., Baltimore, Md. 

Bugg. Emmett, P., Madison, Ga. 

Burke, William F., Amesbury, Mass. 

Clark, John F., Utica, N. Y. 

Emmart, Luther L., Baltimore, Md. 

Gaver, Grayson W., Myersville, Md. 
Gibson, Moses, Baltimore, Md. 
Goldstein, Saul, Newark, N. J. 
Greenberg, Abe D., New Haven, Conn. 

Grossman, Louis, Newark, N. J. 
KieU, CecU I., Newark N. J. 
Leades. 'Saul D., New Britan, Conn. 



Lugar, Troy C, New Castle, Va. 
Reichel, William, Annapolis, Md. 
Rothfeder. Sidney N., New Britain, Conn. 
Saliva. Alferdo S., Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Scheer, Nathan, Baltimore, Md. 
Shehan, Daniel E., Baltimore,Md. 
Silverman, Jacob, Newark, N. J, 
Smith, Oswald P., Asheville, N. C. 
Soifer, Max E., Hartford, Conn. 
Spinner, Alex. J., Newark, N. J. 
Terhune, William C, Paterson, N. J. • 
Thomson, Henry Burgess, Culpeper, Va. 
Wolfe, Maynard DeWitt, Bloomfield, N. J. 
Wolf, Morris. Washington. D. C. 



JUNIOR 

Adair. William V., Grafton, W. Va. 
Amenta, Lawrence J., North East, Pa. 
Ashby, John L. Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Betts. Allan R., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Brenner, Morris. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brickner, Lottie, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brown, Louis L., Ellicott City, Md. 
Campbell, Ralph D., Taunton, Mas3. 
Childers, Ellsworth W., Salem, W. Va. 
Cook, James R., Frostburg, Md. 
Coward, Charles C, Cheraw. S. C. 



CLASS 

Crowley, William H., Troy. N. Y. 
Cummings, Edwin S., Newark, N. J. 
Davenport, Joseph M., Thomas, W. Va. 
Davidson, Lewis C, Lewisburg, W. Va. 
Gibbins, Edward B., Newark, N. J. 
Givens, Robert I., Sinking Creek, Va. 
Goldstein, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Goomrigian, Leon H., Summit. N. J. 
Hoff, Joseph H., WeUsville, Pa. 
Hogan, Jesse D., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Jones, James A., Altoona, Pa. 

204 



Karn, George C. Jefferson. Md. 
Kayne, Louis E., Baltimore, Md. 
Kiser, William R.. Keyser, W. Va, 
McCarthy, Harry B., Swanton, Vt. 
Medearis, William F., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Mortenson, Peter M., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Munoz, Cristino, Jr., Juana Diaz, Porto Rico 
Nesbitt, Harry R., Baltimore, Md. 
Nimocks, Henry S., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Perry, Elmer A., Warwick, N. Y. 
Prather, Ernest, Burnt House, W. Va. 
Pressly, William A., Rock Hill, S. C. 
Richards, Vernon W., Wardtown, Va. 
Richmond, Selman L., Hinton, W. Va. 



Rider, Charles A., Benwood, W. Va. 
Schmalenbach, Herbert, Baltimore, Md. 
Shaak, Walter D., Kearny, N. J. 
Sheppe, Alfred H., Frenchton, W. Va. 
'Silberman, Harry A., Washingrf;on, D. C. 
Schwartz, Max M., Jersey City, N. J. 
Thaman, William C, Baltimore, Md. 
Thorn, Allen H., Newark, N. J. 
Walsh, Walter T.. Moriah Center, N. Y. 
Waserberg, Irving, New York, N. Y. 
Whitehead, Alvin P., Morehcad City. N. C. 
Yates, Frank F., Grafton, W. Va. 
Young, George W„ Rutherford Heights, Pa. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Adkins, Lester O., Parsonsburg, Md. 
Bauder, John Frank, Newark, N. J. 
Bauer, Edwin L., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Bazinet, Wilfred J., Jr., Webster, Mass. 
Begg, John F., Waterbury. Conn. 
Boatman. Willis W., Orting. Wash. 
Bradshaw, John P., Burkeville, Va. 
Casey, John Andrew, Wilmingrfx>n, Del. 
Chimachoff, Nathan T., Newark, N. J. 
Christian, William P., Pedro Miguel, C. Z. 
Corcoran, Donald M., New London. Conn. 
De Vita, Anthony L., Livingston, N. J. 
Dillon, Francis W.. Milford, Mass. 
Fernandez, Julio M., Aguadilla, Porto Rico 
Fitzgerald, George E., Chumbusco, N. Y. 
Gibbins, Clifford H., Newark, N. J. 
Grempler, Karl F., Baltimore, Md. 
Hayes, Francis I., Waterbury, Conn. 
Hejrwood, John J., Jr., North Adams, Mass. 
Hogle. W. Mason, So. Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Hurst, Orville Clayton, Wilsonbury, W. Va. 
Kearfott. Joseph G., Shipman, Va. 
KeUey. Harry. H.. Plattsburg. N. Y. 



McCutcheon. Robert Bell 
Miller, WUson L., Cape May, N. J. 
Moran, Michael Edwa.rd, Manchester, N. H. 
Nigaglioni, Julio Rafael, Porto Rico 
Racicot, George J., Webster, Mass. 
Rice, Ray E., Seven Stars, Pa. 
Rutrough, Bruer W., Roanoke, Va. 
Sherrard, Vernon F., Presque Isle, Maine 
'Shart, Joseph R., Lexington, W. Va. 
Sickles, WiUiam V., Troy, N. Y. 
Styers, Edward J., Baltimore, Md. 
Swing, James P., Jr., Ridgely, Md. 
Taylor, John Kenneth, Frostburg, Md. 
Thatcker, Paul S., Franklin, W. Va. 
Thomas, Carl Livingston, Danville, Va. 
Tressler, Roland A., Baltimore, Md. 
Trettin, Clarence, Baltimore, Md. 
Vazquez, Jorge A., Ponce, Porto Rico 
Wallace, Louis A., Springfield, Mass. 
Whitehead. JohnW., Morehead City, N. C. 
Wilson, Harry Davis, Baltimore, Md. 
Wright, Joseph L., Baltimore, Md. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Abramson, Leonard, Bayonne. N. J. 
Basehoar, Clyde E., Littlestown, Pa. 
Baum. Theodore A.. Baltimore, Md. 
Beard. John H., York, Pa. 
Benazzi, Bomeda B., Danville, Va. 
Benick, Carroll R., Baltimore, Md. 
Berlioz,, Guillermo, Comayagua. Honduras 
Bishop. Charles B., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Blaisdell. Virgil C. Sullivan. Me. 
Bomberger, Paul S., Lancaster, Pa. 
Bridger, Roy H., Lewiston. N. C. 
Brigadier. Leonard R., Bayonne, N. J. 
Brightfield, Lloyd O., Baltimore, Md. 
Brown, Bruce D., Greenbank, W. Va. 
Browning, Balthis A., Baltimore, Md. 
Buchness, Joseph V., Baltimore, Md. 
Burt, Joseph F., Williamstown, W. Va. 



Cahill, Thomas J., 'Smithton, W. Va. 
Campbell, Samuel L., Charleston, W. Va. 
Capo, Enrique, Ponce, Porto Rico 
Chase, Herman, Newark, N. J. 
Chcwning, Carroll W., Orange, Va. 
Cohen, Meyer H., Carbondale, Pa. 
Cooper, Arthur S., Austin, Pa. 
Dixon, Charles M., Jr., Frederick, Md. 
Doble, Howard R., Presque Isle, Me. 
Dolan, Joseph K., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fisher, Jacob D., Hampton, Va. 
Garrett, Charles R., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Goldstein, Harry, Baltimore, Md. 
Greenwald, Louis E.. Passaic. N. J. 
Hall, Howard V., Westfield, N. J. 
Hart, William I., Jr., Johnson City. Tenn. 
Heaps. Guy A., Lancaster. Pa. 



205 



Higrby, Clifford C, Newark. N. J. 
Hinrichs, Ernest H., Baltimore, Md. 
Hitchcock, Lcwin N., Taneytown, Md. 
Hoover, Samuel H., Sparrow's Point, Md. 
Ingram, William A., Cheraw, S. C 
Keister, Walter L., Upper Tract, W. Va. 
Kerlejza, George J., New Britain, Conn. 
LaRoe, John Edward, Plainfield, N. J. 
LeFevre, Edward W., Newport News, Va. 
Lcvine, Milton, Bayonne, N. J. 
Lewis, Frank Lucas, Baltimore, Md. 
Loehwing, George Henry, Paterson, N. J. 
Lynch, Daniel F., Waterbury, Conn. 
McCormick, Richard E., Springfield, Mass. 
McCrystle, Frank Christian, MinersvMle, Pa. 
McEvoy, George F., Waterbury, Conn. 
Matney, William G., Looney, Va. 
Mercader, Miguel A.,. Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Meyer, Oscar W., East Rutherford, N. J, 
Moulton, Earle W., West Haven, Conn. 
Ortd, Linwood, Baltimore City 
Phelps. Frederick, W., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Phillips, George J., Monk, Va. 
Polk, Charles J., Hartford, Conn. 



Powell, Albert C, Adamston W. Va. 
Rieman, Bamett, Bayonne, N. J. 
Sakac, John J., Wallington, N. J. 
Schaff, Fred L., Greencastle, Pa. 
Scholtes, Charles P., Minersville, Pa. 
Shea, Edward W., Holyoke, Mass. 
Siegel, Arthur, Long Island, N. Y. 
Smith, Henry H., Adamston, W. Va. 
Stewart, William, Jr., Wilmington, Del. 
Stoner, Edgar T., Hagerstown, Md. 
Teague, Henry N., Martinsville, Va. 
Thomas, Cecil A., Newport News, Va. 
TowUl, Robert B., Wake, Va. 
Ulanet, Louis. Newark, N. J. 
Van Auken, Ross D., New Brunswick, N. J. 
Viera, Providencia, Rio Piedras, Porto Rico 
Voorhees, John A, Jr., East Orange, N, J. 
Webb, Charles S., Bowling Green, Va. 
Wierciak, Paul A., Ludlow, Mass. 
Wildemann, Elmer M., Keyser, W. Va. 
Wilhelm, Paul, Whiteford, Md. 
Williams, Edgar R.. Inez, N. C. 
Willis, George A., Bel Air, Md. 



ii 



COLLEGE O:^ EDUCATION 



Burroughs, J. Armstead, Clinton 
Canter, Francis D., Aquasco 
Ensor, Hulda, Sparks 
McDonald, William F., Barton 



SENIOR CLASS 

Morgan, Paul T., Baltimore 
Nelson, Gordon V., Newport News, Va. 
Peterman, Walter W., Clear Spring 
Smith, Mildred P., Washington, D. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Anderson, Mary P., Washington, D. C. 
Baldwin, Francis W., Huntington, Pa. 
Cissel, Paul C, Highland 
Crowther, G. Elizabeth, Sparks 
Graham, James F., Barclay 
Lighter, Richard C, Middletown 



Jones, Miriam E., Chestertown 
McBride, Austin A., Middletown 
♦Pullen, Jesse P., Martinsville, Va. 
Smith, Nellie O., Washington, D. C. 
Vaiden, Victoria, Baltimore 
Watkins, Donald E., Mt. Airy 



C. 



Castella, Olive W., Riverdale 
Colbert, Alice, Washington, D 
Dorsey Ethel A., Beltsville 
Foster, James J., Parkton 
Glenn, Wilbur J., Smithsburg 
Groves, John, Wasington, D. C. 
Knox, Lucy, Buena Vista, Fla. 
Lemon, Frances D., Williamsport 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Morris, Mildred, Salisbury 
Mountain, Eunice, Davis, W. Va. 
Remsberg, Harold A., Middletown 
Soper, Elsie M., Beltsville 
Stewart, J. Raymond, Street 
Walrath, Edgar, Annapolis 
Williams, Esther, Lanham 



♦Bennett, Benjamin H., Washington, D. C. 
Buckey, Nellie S., Mt. Rainier 
Byrd. J. W. Miles, Crisfield 
Coblente, Roscoe, Middletown 
Columbus, Ruth, Washington, D, C. 
Dolly, Virgil O., Flintstone 

206 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Duvall, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C. 
Earnest, Lillian O., Mt. Rainier. 
Evansi Robert B., Bel Air 
Gardner, George P., Middletown 
Grosdidier, Edith H., Hyattsville 
Guthridge, Eleanor C, Washington, D. C. 



Hadaway, Ella, Rock Hall 
Harbaugh. Mary, Washington, D. C. 
Hicks, Martha E., Gambrills 
Longridge, Joseph C, Barton 
Magruder, John W.. Gaithersburg 
Nicol, Victorine G., Manassas. Va. 
Orme'. Elsie L.. BarnesviUe 



Rigdon, Wilson O., Street 

Rutter, Grace, Denton 

Shank. Elizabeth R., Smithsburg 

Simpson. Vivian V.. Washington. D. C. 

WilUs. Rebecca C, Hyattsville 

Willis, Theodora. Hyattsville 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Branner, Cecil G., Dover, Del. j 

INDUSTRIAL TEACHER 

Bryarly. M. M., Baltimore 
Deussen. Henry. Baltimore 
Dietz. Frank J., Baltimore 
Edwards. Paul C. Baltimore 
Hedrick. M., Baltimore 
Hipsley. S. P.. Baltimore 
Oswald. Charles. Baltimore 
Roberts. E., Baltimore 



Kline, Ralph G., Frederick 

TRAINING CLASS 

Russo, v., Baltimore 
Schnider, K. A., Baltimore 
Spann, J. Norman. Baltimore 
Spartana, O. R.. Baltimore 
Stapleton. Edward G.. Baltimore 
Ullman. M. J. Baltimore 
Wallace. O. A.. Baltimore 
Wilson. A., Baltimore 



FOREMANSHIP TRAINING CLASS 

... f T\ T 



I 



Alger. Harry B., Baltimore 
Arnold, Hary A., Baltimore 
Broderick. Frank F.. Baltimore 
Dietrich. John F., Baltimore 
Gregory. Arthur W., Baltimore 
Griffith.. R. S.. Baltimore 
Kalb, Harry, Baltimore 
Kelley. J. W.. Baltimore 
Lanford, Clinton C, Baltimore 



Merritt, L. D., Baltimore 
Miller, Hartman, B., Baltimore 
McLaughlin, William G., Baltimore 
Roeder, WUliam A., Jr., Baltimore 
Schaefer. Wilmer F.. Baltimore 
Scoot, Thomas P.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Stromberg, Sydney, Baltimore 
Ulrich, Jerome, Baltimore 
Wheeler, Charles H.. Baltimore 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

SENIOR CLASS 



Best, Alfred S.. Harwood 
Broach. Keator T., College Park 
Busck, Paul G.. Wasington, D. C. 
Butts, John A., Loysburg, Pa. 
Darnall. Charles E.. Hyattsville 
Darner. Edwin F., Hagerstown 
Ewald. Francis G., Mt. Savage 



Hines. Augustus W., Washington, D. C. 
Moore, Charles E., Baltimore 
Neighbors, Herbert E.. Lewistown 
Norwood. Frederick J.. Washington, D. i. 

Pusey, Merwyn L., Cape Charles. Va. 

Russell. Edgar F., Washington. D. C. 
Sasscer, Clarence D., Croom 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Albrittain, Mason C. La Plata 
Bailey, Caleb T.. Bladensburg 
Baldwin. M. J., Washington. D. C. 
Belt. William B.. HyattsvUle 
Bennett. Frank A., Hagerstown 
Boteler. Howard M.. Laurel 
Braungard, Paul J.. Hagerstown 
Chichester, Frederick, Aquasco 
Compher. Carlton M., Doubs 
Cook, Charles S., Frederick 
Donaldson. DeWitt C, Laurel 
Elliott. Joseph W., Hebron 
Harlow. James H., Havre de Grace 



Himmelheber, Joseph B.. Baltimore 
Knapp. Peter T.. Overlea 
McMurtrey. Clifton C. WashingtDn. D. C. 
Melvin. Willis G.. Havre de Grace 
Montgomery, Wilbur B.. Washington. D. C. 
Neuman. AUen B.. Washington. D. C. 
Owings. Elliott P.. North Beach 
Powell. Robert W.. Princess Anne 
Reed, Raymond B., College Park 
Richard. William J.. Goldsboro 
Schaefer. John P., Riverdale ^ 

Simmons, Lansing G.. Takoma Park 
Stranahan, Robert J., Union City. Pa. 



207 



I 



Toadvine, Harry L., White Haven 
Van Sant, Bayard R., Greensboro 
Walden, Frederick P., Raspeburs: 
WaUis, Albert G., Frederick 

SOPHOMORE 

Bartlett, Wirt D., CenterviUe 
Brothers, Maurice F., Washington, D. C. 
Bunten, William H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chestnut, Frank T., Hyattsville 
Cohee, Lee A., Easton 
Conway, James P., Cumberland 
Foard, James H., Aberdeen 
Glass, Gerald, L., Hyattsville 
Hall, Charles R., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Hill. WUliam B.. HyattsviUe 
Howard, M. Hamilton, Brookeville 
Johnson, George W., Chesapeake City 
Kraft, John F., Ellicott City 
Latham, Ector B., Washington, D. C. 



Wick, George A., Washington, D. C. 
Wisner, J, Ward, Jr., Baltimore 
Zepp, Willard E.. Clarksville 

CLASS 

Miller, Harold, Frederick 
Orr, Stanley C, Hyattsville 
Rizer, Richard T., Mt. Savage 
Robertson, Russel A., Washington, N. J. 
Schumann, Andrew E., Princess Anne 
Seney, Joshua M., Chest^rtown 
Shofnos, William, Washington, D. C. 
Sipes, Ralph M., Towson 
♦Sleeth, James R., Washington, D. C. 
Steele, Eugene P., Hagerstown 
Terry, Henry M., College Park 
Wenger, Charles W., Washington. D. C. 
White, John I., Washington, D. C. 
Young, Walter H., Washington, D. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aldridge, Davis D., Frederick 
Aldridge, Howard R., Mt. Savage 
Allen, James C, Washington, D. C. 

♦Allison, Carl O., Washington, D. C, 

*Barr, Tandy L., Washington. D. C. 
Beach, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 
Bennett, Leslie C, Upper Marlboro 
Blades, Samuel L., Sudlersville 
Bowers, Walter L., Hagerstown 
Bowie, John, Jr., Annapolis Juct. 
Bowser, Merl L., Kittaning, Pa., 
Brooks, William C, Sparrows Point 
Burnside, Douglas D., Washingrton, D. C. 
Cardona, Oscar de. Aquadillo, Porto Rico 
Gastella, Charles C, Riverdale 

*Clagett, John H., Roslyn 
Collins, Stanton J., Sparrows Point 

♦Davis, Earnest G., Hyattsville 
Day, Austin W., Washington, D. C. 
Dent, George H., Churchton 
Derickson, John C, Bel Air 
Evans, George W. Pocomoke 
Fisher, A. Boyd, Point of Rocks 
Fisk, Willis H., Kensington 
Friese, Nervin W., Hagerstown 
Funk, Wilson S., Denton 
Glover, Charles P., Mt. Airy 
Graham, Ralph M., Washington, D. C. 

♦Grimm, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Harper, Donald N., Royal Oak 
Hook, Addison E., Baltimore 

♦Hoppe, John H., Riverdale 
Huyett, Earl D., Hagerstown 
Jones, William B., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
King, Barnwell R., Branchville 
Kline, William M., Washington, D. C. 
Knox, Howard L., Miami, Fla. 



Knox, Lloyd T., Buena Vista, Fla. 

Lewis, Gomer, Washingon, D. C. 

Lewis, William H., Elkton 

Lilly, Thomas A. Ellicott City 

Litchfield Charles W, Washington, D. C. 

McClung, Marvin R., Norrisville 

McCune, William T., Elkton 

McFadden, Charles P., Elkton 
♦MacKintosh, Lewis M., Mt. Rainer 

Magalis, Benjamin W., Brunswick 

Meeds, Nelson T., Silver Springs 

Melchior, Lewis F., Washington, D. C. 

Melvin, Dudley A., Havre de Grace 

Mills, J. E. Wayne, Washington Grove 

Morris, Paul, St. Michaels 

Nihiser, Edwin E., Hagerstown 
*Noe, Ira J., Washington, D. C. 

Norment, Cassius L., Bastrop, Texas 

Orr, Robert G., Lonaconing 
♦Patton, Gordon S., Jackson, Miss. 

Prangley, Arthur G., Washington, D. C. 

Price, Walter H., Washington, D. C. 

Price, William D., Washington, D. C. 

Richardson, James O., Washington, D. C. 

Rogers, Frederick H., Washington, D. C. 

Sanders, Warrington P., Washington, D. C. 

Staley, Daniel R., Knoxville 
♦Taylor, Donald S., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Troxell, William F., Gaithersburg 

Usilton, Noel E., Worton 

Vandegrift, Edgar D., Cumberland 
♦Vandoren, Theodore J., Hyattsville 

Warren, John S., Pocomoke 

Watkins, Benjamin III, Davidsonville 

Wilson, N. John, Frederick 

Woodruff, Charles M., Sparrows Point 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Baum, Edwin C, Washington, D. C. 
Coronel. Ulpiano, New York 
DeCaindrey, William A.. Baltimore 
Lewis, Paul D., Newport News, Va. 
Ridout, James A., Annapolis 



Sampson, Hugh, BranchviUe 

StoU, Charles C, Brooklyn 

Stites, Howard I., Washington. D. C. 

Thurtell, Charles S., Washington, D. C. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Alexander, Howard B., Oil City, Pa. 
Conrad, Carl M., Riverdale 
Donaldson, E. Calvin, Laurel 
Eaton, Orson N., BeltsviUe 
Ezekiel, Walter, Berwyn 
Flenner, A. L., Glen Mills, Pa. 
Harman, Susan E., Omega, Oklahoma 
Juchhoff, Edna Z., Washington, D. C. 
Lichtenwalner, D. C, CoUege Park 
Mather, William, Amherst Mass. 



Matzen, B. Andrew, Berwyn 
New, Edward F., Hyattsville 
Schrader, Albert L., So. Kaukanna, Wis. 
Shillinger, J. E., Washington, D. C. 
Starkey, Edgar B., Sudlersville 
VierheUer, Albert F., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Whitehouse, William E., Amherst, N. H. 
Wilhelm, Charles P.. Baltimore 
Winant, H. B.. Washington, D. C. 
Young, Malcolm R., Beesleys Point, N. J. 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
JUNIOR CLASS 

Gregg, Edith W., Washington. D. C. I McCaU. Eli«.beth G.. College Park 

Killiam, Audrey, Delmar | 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Geschickter, Josephine, Washington, D. C.l Murphy. Anna M., Staunton. Va. 
Morris, 'Sarah E., Hyattsville | 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

.De Vol, Helen M.. College Park Simmonds, Lillis P.. Riverdale 



Kerig, Florence D., Baltimore 
*Langenfeldt, Marie E., Hyattsville 
*Pfefferkorn, Hilda, Baltimore 

Simmonds, Helen F., Riverdale 



I 



*Stewart, Anne S., Rustburg, Va. 
Tepper, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 
Wolfe, Mary T.. Forest Glenn 



THE LAW SCHOOL 

SENIOR CLASS 



Aaron, Samuel J., Baltimore 
Ahrling, George C, Baltimore 
Arnold, Frank, Baltimore 
Baugh, Ernest V., Jr., Baltimore 
Beall, Paul U., Baltimore 
Bennett, Alton Y., Frederick, Md. 
Benson, Franklin M., Baltimore 
Berman, Paul, Baltimore 
Bernard, Richard C, Baltimore 
Blankner, Andrew L., Baltimore 
Bollinger. James W., Reisterstown. Md. 
Bosard, Stanley R., Thurmont, Md. 
Bovey, William H., Hagerstown, Md. 
Bradley, Hugh F., Jr., JarrettsviUe. Md. 
Brennan. Joseph T., Baltimore 
Brown, Meyer, Baltimore 



Bruce, David, Ruxton, Md. 

Burgee, Amon, Jr., Frederick, Md. 

Burtscher, Charles N., Baltimore 

Butler, Thomas B., Towson, Md. 
Cohan, Allan E. M., Baltimore 
Cohen, Lewis W., Baltimore 
Cohen, Maurice L., Baltimore 
CouncUl, Eugene C, Baltimore 
Cummings, George R., Baltimore 
DiDomenico, Joseph F., Ealtimcre 
Dooley, John M., Cardiff, Md. 
Fell, John Corry, Annapolis. Md. 
Flentje, George F.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Freeny, William E., Salisbury, Md. 
Fricke, Henry W. L.. Baltimore 
Friedman, David, Baltimore 



208 



TS^Totes students detailed to the University by the Veterans' Bureau, 

209 



/ 



I 



Gay, James E., Jr., Greensboro, N. C. 

Geiselman, Austin H., Jr., Baltimore 
Goertz, Harry E., Baltimore 
Goodman, Alexander, Baltimore 
Guercio, Samuel V., Baltimore 
Guthrie, Joseph A., Baltimore 
Hall, Reginald I., Baltimore 
Hargest, Edward E., Jr., Baltimore 
Hartle, Calvert K., Hagerstown, Md. 
Hecker, Samuel, Baltimore 
Hewitt, Linwood T., Jr., Baltimore 
Hisky, John G., Catonsville, Md. 
Hooper, James J., Cambridge, Md. 
Jacobs, Frank H., Jr., Bel Air Md. 
Johnson, Edmond H., 'Snow Hill, Md. 
Joseph, Saul Lipman, Baltimore 
Kahn, Karl R., Baltimore 
Kindred, Robert E., Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Klipper, Charles W., Baltimore 
Krebs, John W., Baltimore 
Kruger, Harry, Baltimore 
Kuenne, Herbert F., Baltimore 
Lebowitz, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lemmert, John Vernon, Baltimore 
Leonhardt, Carroll, Baltimore 
Levin, Albert A., Baltimore 
Levinson, Saul R., Baltimore 
Levy, Nathan B., Baltimopre 
Lindenberg, Adelaide H., Baltimore 
Lowe, Denton S., Wittman, Md. 
Lowe, William L., Baltimore 
Lynch, Charles A., Raspeburg, Md. 
Maas, Frederick L., Rossville, Md. 
Mainen, Robert, Baltimore 
Marbui-y. Fendall, Baltimore 
Marsh, Paul Everhart, Baltimore 
Marshall, Roland S., Baltimore 
Matthews, Charles N., Baltimore 
Merriken, William L., Baltimore 
Miegel, Charles H., Baltimore 
Miles, Joshua W., Marion Md. 
Miller, George B., Baltimore 
Millar, James H., Baltimore 
Minder, John H., Baltimore 
Molz, Joseph T., Baltimore 
Naiman, Julius, Baltimore 
Nake, George R., Baltimore 
Newcomer, George S., Baltimore 
Nowakowski, John J., Baltimore 
Paca, John P., Baltimore 
Palmisano, Augustine, Jr., Baltimore 



Parr, Joseph T., Baltimore 

Patti, Joseph J., Baltimore 

Pausch, Richard, Baltimore 

Powell, Thomas R., Baltimore 

Price, WiUiam H., Snow Hill, Md. 

Pyle, James H., Baltimore 

Reutter, Eberhard E., Baltimore 

Roche, James M., Baltimore 

Rollins, Edward D., Baltimore, Md. 

Rome, Paul H., Baltimore 

Rossiter, Goldsborough G., Baltimore 

Sanderson, Gustav, F., Baltimore 

Savard, Ernest E., Bristol, Conn. 

Schad, Harry J., Baltimore 

Schmelz, Fred, Jr., Baltimore 

Schneider, Leo A., Baltimore 

Schonfield, Eugene, Baltimore 

Schulze, Paul K., Baltimore 

Seidman, Jesse Israel, Baltimore 

Sellars, John, Baltimore 

Sherbow, Joseph, Baltimore 

Siems, Valentine B., Baltimore 

Sinn, Walter E., Frederick, Md. 

Skrentny, Joseph, Baltimore 
'Sline, Percy, Baltimore 

Small, Leon, Baltimore 

Snyder, Morris I., Baltimore 

Socolow, Harry, Baltimore 

Stanley, John Snowden, Laurel, Md. 

Stem, Abraham, Baltimore 
Sutton, Richard B., Baltimore 
Talbott, Wm. S., Baltimore 
Taylor, Walter L., Jr., Catonsville 
Thompson, Charles H., Relay, Md. 
Thomsen, Roszel C, Baltimore 
Trageser, Charles A., Baltimore 
Truitt, Vaughan R., Showell, Md. 
Twigg, Lester A., Twiggtown, Md. 
Urner, Frances Hammond, Frederick 
Vogder, John G., Baltimore 

Victor, Julius A., Jr., Baltimore 
Walker, Uthman, Baltimore 
Weaver, Edwin C, Baltimore 
Weinberg, LaFayette, Baltimore 
Weiskittel, Francis A., Baltimore 
Williams, Charles C, Baltimore 
Williams, Richard W., Halethorpe. Md. 
Wilson, I^wis M., Cumberland, Md. 
Winebrenner, David C, 3rd., Frederick, Md. 
Wolf, Arnold J., New York, N. Y. 
Wolf son, Benjamin L., Baltimore 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Albert, Milton A., Baltimore 
Allen, Howell, W., Jr., Baltimore 
Austin, Eugene, Castor, La. 
Azrael, J. L., Baltimore 
Bach. Joseph A., Ellicott City, Md. 
Backman, John T., Baltimore 
Baiirett, Franklin P., Baltimore 



Barrett. William L. K., Baltimore 
Barron, Irving, Baltimore 
Barron, Robert, Baltimore 
Batty, Howard A., Baltimore 
Baum. Albert S., Jr.. Baltimore 
Bellows, Donald P.. Glyndon. Md. 
Berenholtz. SoL C. Baltimore 



Herman, Benjamin L.. Baltimore 

Herman. S. Frances. Baltimore 

Hlackburn, Earle W.. Baltimore 

Blackistone, Richard P., Palmers, Md. 

Hlaustein. J. Selman. Baltimore 

Hlum. Albert H., Baltimore 

Howling, Joseph T.. Hughesville, Md. 

Hregel. Howard C, Baltimore 

Caplan, David H., Baltimore 

Caplan, Meyer. Baltimore 

Caples. Walter R.. Baltimore 

Ciotti. Hector J.. Baltimore 

Cockey, Jr., James 'S., Stevensville, Md. 

Cohen, Herman, Baltimore 

Cohen, Jacob, Baltimore 

Cohen, Joseph, Baltimore 

Cole, Bessie O., Baltimore 

Cole, Thomas W., Baltimore 

Cotton, Myron S., Baltimore 

Cover, James P., Easton, Md. 

Crowther, George R.. Smithsburg. Md. 

Crowther, Lester, H., Baltimore 

Czajkowski, Walter M., Baltimore 

Darley, John W., Baltimore 
Dimarco, Anne E., Baltimore 
Due, Paul F., Baltimore 
Farmer, James F., Baltimore 
Feikin, Bernard, Baltimore 
Fine, Harry, Baltimore 
Foard, Frances M., Baltimore 
France. Robert, Baltimore 
Freed, Otto Raymond, Baltimore 
Fyle, George H., Ferryman, Md. 
Gaskins, Damon S.. Baltimore 
G ilium, Wilbur A.. Baltimore 
Gisriel, Edwin L.. Baltimore 
Click, Henry, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Raphael S., Baltimore 
Gontrum, Thomas McC. Baltimore 
Gorsuch, Walter C, Oxford, Md. 
Greenberg, Mordacai D., Baltimore 
Griesacker, Joseph B.. Baltimore 
Gross, Christian W., Jr., Baltimore 
Hahn, Theo. J., Baltimore 
Hammerman, Israel H., Baltimore 
Harrington, Thomas M., Baltimore 
Hedeman, John R. T., Baltimore 
Hochman, Joel J.. Baltimore 
Hofferbert, George. Baltimore 
Horine, Dawson, Myersville. Md. 
Homey, William R.. Centreville. Md. 
Horsey, Joshua R., Crisfield. Md. 
Hunter, Lois M. B., Baltimore 
Hyman, Morris D.. Baltimore 
Isaacson, Julius, Baltimore 
Jett, Robert S., Baltimore 
Jewell, Clay. Baltimore 
Johnson, Russell H.. Baltimore 
Kairys Harry, Baltimore 



Kelley. James P.. Towson. Md. 
Kelley, Stanley. Eldridge. Ala. 

Kerpelman, Morris E., Baltimore 

Kidd, James K., Baltimore 

Kirchner, George W.. Baltimore 

Kommann, Henry E., Baltimore 

Krymski, Joseph M., Baltimore 

Kurland, Fannie, Baltimore 

Latane, Lewis M.. Baltimore 

Lazarus, Henry. Baltimore 

Leavitt. Maurice M., Baltimore 

Lesinsky, Samuel, Baltimore 

Lickle, William F., Towson, Md. 

Loughran, Jerome A., Ellicott City, Md. 

Lutzky, Ida C, Baltimore 

McCaban, Elmer B., Jr., Baltimore 

McFaul, George, Baltimore 

Mclnnis, Eugene, Baltimore 

McKenney, Henry H., Baltimore 

McLaughlin, Charles R., Baltimore 

Maurer, Julius G., Relay Md. 

Mazor, Meyer, Baltimore 

Miller, Stephen J., Baltimore 

Mooney, Lawrence R., Baltimore 

Moore, George L., Baltimore 

Mopsikov, Robert E., Portsmouth, Va. 

Morgan, Tilghman, V., Baltimore 

MuUan, W. G. R., Baltimore 

Needle, Sidney, Baltimore 

Neel, John M., Baltimore 
Nickerson, Palmer R., Baltimore 
Obrecht, Holliday H., Baltimore 
O'Rourke, Andrew G., Roslyn, Md. 
0'Tool«, Bernard F., Baltimore 
Palees, Mitchell, Baltimore 
Parke, G. Arch, Baltimore 
Pausch, George Baltimore 
Perry, John W„ Salisbury, Md. 
Phillips, Seymour, Baltimore 
Pierson, Leon H. A., Baltimore 
Piper, William B., Baltimore 
Porter, W. Edgar, Baltimore 
Pressman, Maurice J., Baltimore 
Presstman, Marie W., Baltimore 
Pugh, Walter J.. Baltimore 
Pumpian, I*erman, Baltimore 
Rabuck, LeRoy T., Coraopolis, Pa. 
Riddle, John F., Baltimore 
Rody, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Roil, John R., Baltimore 
Rose, Joseph M., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Sarah R., Baltimore 
Scharf, Frederick, Baltimore 
Schlegel, Edwin M., Reading, Pa. 
Schonfield, 'Simon, Baltimore 
Seltzer, Eugene P., Baltimore 
Shapiro, Solomon, Baltimore 
Shea, James D., Baltimore 
Sherry, Helen (Mrs). Baltimore 



11 



211 



210 



1 



I 



Siff, H. E., Baltimore, Md. 
Skinner, William H., Baltimore 
Sloan, David W., Jr., Cumberland 
Smith, Milton R., Glen Arm, Md. 
Sokol, Max, Baltimore 
Spedden, Alexander W., Jr., Baltimore 
Stein, Charles F. H., Baltimore 
Strauss, Raymond F., Baltimore 

JUNIOR 

Abell, Joseph W., Baltimore 

Adams, Richard B., Baltimore 

Ades, Bernard, Baltimore 

Adler, Irwin H., Baltimore 

Alexander, John Davis, Deal Island, Md. 

Alexander, John G., Atlanta, Ga. 

Arthur, Frank 'S., Jr., Baltimore 

Baroway, Israel, Baltimore 

Bartholomay, William P., Jr., Baltimore 

Baugher, Irving B., Catonsville, Md. 

Bearman, Sidney, Baltimore 

Benson, Charles M., Baltimore 

Benson, Francis M., Baltimore 

Berlin, Herman, Baltimore 

Biggs, Richard D., Baltimore 

Biser, Leon W., Ijamsville, Md. 

Blickenstoff, Lloyd S., Boonsboro, Md. 

Borden, Aaron, Baltimore 

Bousman, Floyd W., Baltimore 

Boyer, Grace F., Halethorpe, Md. 

Bramble, Forrest F., Baltimore 

Bready, Henrietta Y., Baltimore 

Brenner, David M., Baltimore 

Browne, Alfred J., Baltimore 

Brown, Ridgely R., Pikesville, Md. 

Brownstein, Abraham, Baltimore 

Caplan, Frank L., Baltimore 

Carney, Robert E., Baltimore 

Carroll, Paul E., Baltimore 

Chen, St. Lake, Baltimore 

Coburn, Benjamin H., Jr., Rock Hall, Md 

Clayton, John M., Cambridge, Md. 

Cockey, Albert D., Baltimore 

Cockey, Bennett F. B., Cockeysville, Md. 

Codd, William A., Baltimore 

Cohen, Leon, Baltimore 

Colebum, George R., Accomac, Va. 

Connor, Campbell, Baltimore 

Coolahan, Charles L., Baltimore 

Coughlan, Robert E., Jr., Baltimore 

Crockett, Charles C, Baltimore 

Daisey, Carey J., Chincoteague, Va. 

Dallam, Richard, Jr., Bel Air, Md. 

Dankmeyer, Theodore R., Baltimore 

Day, Carl L., Baltimore 

Deady, Frank H.. Baltimore 

Debel, Neils H., Baltimore 

dcKowzan, Paul A., Baltimore 



StritehoflF, Nelson H., Jr., Baltimore 
Tome, Richard E., Baltimore 
Truitt, Jeremiah F., Salisbury, Md. 
Walker, Alfred F., Baltimore 
Weintraub, Ben., Baltimore 
Wilson, Frankie D., Lansdowne, Md. 
Zimmerman, Benjamin, Baltimore 



CLASS 

DeLashmutt, Emilie F., Baltimore 
Dellone, Catherine R., Baltimore 
DeMarco, Pasquale C, Baltimore 
Donald. James, Hoguian, W.tsIi. 
Dorsey, Phillip H., Annapolis 
Doyle, James J., Baltimore, Md. 
Edelson, Milton Benjamin, Baltimore 
Ehudin, Marcy M., Baltimore 
Epstein, Samuel C, Baltimore 
Famous, Franklin E., Street, Md. 
Farber, George, Baltimore 
Feinberg, Isidore B., Baltimore 
Feldman, Isadore, Baltimore 
Feldman, Sydney, Baltimore 
Fenwick, James S., Baltimore 
Figinski, Marion, Baltimore 
Fine, Melvin, Baltimore 
Fine, Phylburt E., Baltimore 
Fineman, Isidor 'S., Baltimore 
Finney, Esther Miriam, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Fitzpatrick, John J., Baltimore 
Flack, Benjamin W., Jessup, Md. 
Forrest, Otto, N., Baltimore 
Foster, Reuben, Baltimore 
Fox Herman, Baltimore 
Frankel, Albert H., Baltimore 
Fried, Louis C, Baltimore 
Click, Maurice, Baltimore 
Goldberg, Charles F., Baltimore 
Goldbloom, Milton, Baltimore 
Goldston, Herbert N., Baltimore 
G'^uld, Theodore, Jr.. Baltimors 
Greenberg, Alexander, Baltimore 
Greene, Melvin J., Baltimore 
GrifRn, Felix A., Baltimore 
Gundry, Richard, Catonsville, Md. 
Gutberlet, Joseph C, Baltimore 
Hammerman, Herman, Baltimore 
Hampson, George M., Baltimore 
Hanna Frank C, Cambridge, Md. 
Harrington, Thomas B., Baltimore 
Henneberger, J. E. Mt. Washington, Md. 
Hoene, Mary Martin, Chicago, 111. 
Hoff, Albert J., Baltimore 
Hoffman, George L., Baltimore 
Honejrwell, James O., Baltimore 
Hopkins, Hastings B., Baltimore 
Hopkins, Ira Crook, Ball's, Maryland 

212 



Hudson, H. E.. Gumboro, Del. 

Huss, Albert B.. Baltimore 

Iddings, Frederick T., Catonsville, Md. 

Isaacson, Simon L.. Baltimore 

Jarboe. John M., Pearron. Md. 

Johnson, Nathan, Baltimore 

Jones, Elmer J., Baltimore 

Kaiser, Leona J., Arnold, Md. 

Kelley, Estel C, Westernport, Md. 

Kennady, Bascom K., Baltimore 

Keman, Anthony E., Baltimore 

KUner, John I.. Halethorpe, Md. 

King, Daniel D., Ellerson, Va. 

Kirby, Joseph S., Mt. Washington, Md. 

Kirk, Grover C, Washington, D. C. 

Kratz, John E., Baltimore 

Lamberd, Luther S., Baltimore 

Langsdale, Hewett, Easton, Md. 

Lee, James J., Baltimore 

Levin, Celia I., Baltimore 

LohmxiUer, George B., Baltimore 

McCullough, James, Baltimore 

McKinsey, Katherine, Baltimore 

Maddox. William P.. Baltimore 

Macht, Louis E. Baltimore 

Massey, William F., Sudlersville, Md. 

Stevenson, Masson, Baltimore 

Mechanic, William G., Baltimore 

Meid, Albert, Jr., Baltimore 

Meiser, Fred W., Baltimore 

Mercer, Beverly H., Baltimore 

Merrill. Irving W., Baltimore 

Meyerhoff, Louis, Baltimore 

Mihm, William A., Mt. Washington, Md 

Morris, Virginia C Baltimore 

Moshkevich, Gersh I., Baltimore 

Moylan, Charles E., Ijamsville, Md. 

Mulford, Harry S., Baltimore 

Mulliktn, James C, Easton, Md. 

Nathan, Walter R., Baltimore 

Neale, James S., Jr., Baltimore 

Newell, Beach, Baltimore 

Newman, Irving, Baltimore 

Norton, George T., Baltimore 

Novak, Charles J., Baltimore 

Oletsky, Benjamin, Baltimore 

Oppel, Louis J., Baltimore 

Osborne, Herman B., Baltimore 

Owinski, Joseph J., Baltimore 

Oxley. John E., Poolesville, Md. 

Paregol, Goldie, Baltimore 

Parr, Frank T.. Baltimore 

Pence, Samuel A., Baltimore 

Pennington, James N., Havre de Grace, 

Peregoff, Louis, Baltimore 

Perlman, Arthur. Baltimore 



I 






Md. 



Poole, John H., New Market, Md. 
Post. PhUip T., Baltimore 
Price, WUliam J., Centerville, Md. 
Proper, Jerome, Baltimore 
Rhodes, Walter E., Baltimore 
Rhynhart, William W., Baltimore 
Robins, Stanley G., Crisfield, Md. 
Robinson^ Irving E., Baltimore 
Roesch, EmU A., Baltimore 
Rosner, Jeanette, Baltimore 
Roth. Edward P., Baltimore 
Rowe, Roscoe C, Annapolis, Md. 
Rubenstein, Abraham J., Baltimore 
Russell, Frank J., Baltimore 
Samuelson, Herman, Baltimore 
Saxon, Joseph, Baltimore 
Scaggs, George W., Washington, D. C. 
Scaggs. Howard I.. Baltimore 
Schapiro. Ruth, Baltimore 
Schiaffino, Frank P., Baltimore 
Schlossberg, Abe., Baltimore 
Schmitt, Martin F., Baltimore 
Schraml, WUliam J., Baltimore 
Schulbe, George P., CatonsvUle, Md. 
Sear, Abram, Hampton, Va. 
Seliterman, Ben B., Baltimore 
Semans, WiUiam R., Baltimore 
Seymour. Charles C. Cumberland 
Shea, Jeremiah D., Colchester, Conn. 
Shockett, Harry M., Baltimore 
Shockley, Elisha V., St. Michaels. Md. 
Siegmund, Carl R., Baltimore 
Simpson, Albert L., Portsmouth, Va. 
Smith, Albert Van Deaver, Baltimore 
Snyder, Karolyn P., Glyndon, Md. 
Stevens, Edward W., SudlersviUe, Md. 
Stevens. James W., Baltimore 
Stocksdale, Howard B.. Baltimore 
Sultan. Walter E.. Baltimore 
Swartz, Jerome, Baltimore 
Tarshish, Allen, Baltimore 
Taylor, Charles R., Baltimore 
Tippett, WiUiam T., Baltimore 
Truitt, Hughey B., Baltimore 
Umbarger, Henry L., Bel Air. Md. 
Vanger, Henry R.. Baltimore 
Vinci, Salvatore P., Baltimore 
Walker, Owen, Baltimore 
Watson, John G., Centerville, Md. 
Webster, E. H., Bel Air. Md. 
Wellmore, Grace L.. Baltimore 
Williams, Donald H.. Halethorpe. Md. 
Williams. Matilda D.. Baltimore 
Williams. Max, Baltimore 
Woelfel, George B., Annapolis, Md. 
Zetzer. Rose S., Baltimore 



213 



*' 



* 



t 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 



I 



Barnes, Harry A., Princess Anne, Md. 
Bowers, Ralph C, Grantsville, Md. 
Craige, Branch, El Paso, Texas 
deCaesar, Dominick J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Foxwell, Raymond K., Washington, D. C. 
Hawkins, Vallie, Fawn Grove, Pa. 

SENIOR 

Baiky, Harry, New Haven, Conn. 

Buchness, Anthony V., Baltimore 

Champe, Ira P., Jr., Charleston, W. Va. 

Doshay, Louis J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fleischmann, Berthold, New York, N. Y. 

Freidus. Elias, New York. N. Y. 

Fritz, J. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fuiton, William J., Baltimore 

Ginsberg, William. New York, N. Y. 

Goldmann, Bernhard A., Pittsburg, Pa. 

GoUick, WiUiam A., Jersey City, N. J. 

Gordon. Elias, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gordon, Herbert, New York, N. Y. 
Greenbaum, Leonard H., Baltimore 
Groff, Morris, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Halley, George C, Twin Falls, Idaho 

Harman, Robert D., Riverton, W. Va. 

Hatfield, Daniel S., Charleston, W. Va. 

Heitsch, Hubert M., Pontias, Mich. 

Hollister, William, New Berne, N. C. 

Horowitz, Herman J., New York, N. Y. 

Huff, William, Roanoke, Va. 

Ingram, David N., Baltimore 

Keefe, George G., Waterbury, Conn. 

irerdasha, Weehawken, N. J. 

Kra.?er, John J., Baltimore 

Kunkowski, Andrew, Baltimore 

Lang, Milton Charles, Baltimore ' 

JUNIOR 

Beck, Nathaniel M, Baltimore 
Berkson, Morris I., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Bowers, Thaddeus R., Jr., Littleton, N. C. 
Clapham, Roger E., Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Cortese, Anthony Edward, Paterson, N. J. 
Dart, Frederick B., Niantic, Conn. 
Desane, Joseph, New York, N. Y. 
Edmonds, John M., Harton, Mich. 
Fleshman,, D. L., Pence Springs, W. Va. 
Goldberg, Ben., Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Gordon, Abraham S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Giffin, Theodore C, Rowlesburg, W. Va. 
Grose, Robert G., Harmony, N. C. 
Groves, Robert B., Lowell, N. C. 
Gutowski, Joseph M., Perth Amboy, N. J 



214 



King, W. P. 

Krieger, Emanuel, Baltimore 
Meintzberger, Gilbert S., Baltimore 
Norman, John S., Boardman, N. C. 
Preston, D. G., Stephenson, Va. 
'Shepard, Gertrude, Atlanta, Ga. 

CLASS 

Lawson, Lawrence W., Logan, W. Va. 
Linke. Ju»:&n P., Plainfield, N. J. 
McCoy, C. Glenn, Mannington, W. Va. 
Mercier, Albin S., Lisbon, Md. 
Middlemiss, W. R., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Monninger, Arthur C, Scranton, Pa. 
Morgan Ed. N., Batavia, N. Y. 
Noll, Louis, Hartford, Conn. 
O'Connor, John A., Baltimore 
Payne, John E., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Peters, H. Raymond, Baltimore 
Pittman, Henry L., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Pullen, Guy F., Greenwich, Conn. 
Rhodes, Bricey M., Tallahassee, Fla. 
Rudisill, John D., Lincolnton, N. C. 
Saporita, Archibald, R., Harrison, N. J. 
Salzberg. Abraham, New York, N. Y. 
Sekerak, Arthur J. F., Bridgeport, Conn. 
'Shannon, George E., Baltimore 
Shapin, Sydney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shapiro, Louis M., New Haven, Conn. 
Sternberg, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Stout, Philip D., DoeviUe, Tenn. 
Stovin, Joseph S., New Haven, Conn. 
'Sweet, Samuel W., Utica, N. Y. 
Trynin, Aaron H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Warfield, John O., Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wilson, Thomas N., Hebron, Md 



CLASS 

Hagerman, Paul, Cameron, W. Va. 
Harp, J. Elmer, Hagerstown, Md. 
Hirsch, Philip, New York, N. Y. 
Hundley, John T. T., Jr., Lynchburg, Va. 
Hunt. William B., Lexington, N. C. 
Jennette. Will C, Fremont, N. C. 
Keith, Marion Y., Wilmington, N. C. 
Knipp, George A., Baltimore 
Kraut, A. M., Jersey City, N. J. 
Kyper, Frederick T., Clearfield, Pa. 
Lally, Leo Aloysius, Scranton, Pa. 
Long, Ira C, Morehead City, N. C. 
Love, William Samuel, Jr., Baltimore 
McCuUough, C. S. L., Burgettetown, Pa. 
McLean, Herbert E., Jersey City, N. J. 



Moler, Raleigh M., Morgantown, W. Va. 
Murray, Robert L., St. Pauls, N. C. 
Myers, Karl J., Philippi, W. Va. 
Newcomer, David R., Hagerstown, Md. 
Newcomer, Ward E., McClellandtown, Pa. 
Parssn, Willard S., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Peterman, James E., Cherry Tree, Pa. 
Pondfield, Louis F., Baltimore 
Pontery, Herbert, Weehawken, N. J. 
Povalski, Alexander W., Jersey City, N. J. 
Prather, F. G., Burnt House, W. Va. 
Rothfuss, Paul A., Montoursville, Pa. 
Ruche, Harry Charles, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Schorr, Richard, New York, N. Y. 
Shealey, Walter H., Leesville, S. C. 



Sherman, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smith, Charles F., Uniontown, Pa. 
'Snaith, Theresa O., Weston, W. Va. 
Saurborne, Sylvia M. B., Bridgeport. W. Va. 
Sowers, Roy Gerodd, Linwood, N. C. 
Steincrohn, Peter J., Hartoid, Conn. 
Sussman, Abram A., Baltimore 
Touhey, T. J., Wilmington, Del. 
Walker, William Wallace, Winona. W. Va. 
Wasserstrom, Sidney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weinert, Henry V., Jersey City, N. J. 
Welton, William A., Petersburg. W. Va. 
Werner, Walter I., Cleveland, O. 
White, Francis W. M., Windsor, N. C. 
White, James F., Morgantown, W. Va. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Allen, Moore L., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Anderson, Albert L., Annapolis, Md. 
Antonius, Micholas, Orange, N. J. 
Barnes, D. Keith, Kaysville, Utah 
Bartlett, Charles W., Jr.. Tampa, Fla. 
Bershatsky, William, New York, N. Y. 
Boyd, Kenneth B., Baltimore 
Briglia, Nicholas N., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Carter, Carl J.. Catawba, W. Va. 
Edelman, Edward L, Woodhaven, L. I. 
Fisher, Harry R., New York, N. Y. 
Flax, Ira I., Newark, N. J. 
Frehling, Joseph M., Louisville, Ky. 
Friedman, Bernard, New York, N. Y. 
Friedman. Irving, Newark, N. J. 
Gattens, Wilber E., Cumberland, Md. 
Gottleib, Bernard N., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
GrfinofT, Joseph F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Greifinger, Marcus H., Newark, N. J. 
Grossblatt, Philip, Newark, N. J. 
Howell, Clewell, Vineland, N. C. 
Jacobson, Philip, Baltimore 
Knox, Joseph C Leland, N. C. 
Koons, Earle W., Taneytown, Md. 
Kratz, Fred W., Baltimore 
Lelbensperger, George F., Kutztown, Pa. 
Levine, Samuel, Union, N. J. 
McZane, William O., Frostburg, Md. 
McClosky, William T., Washington, D. C. 
Marsh, James T., Baltimore, Md. 
Marton, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Megahan, Burke, Williamsport, Pa. 
Messinger, Benjamin, New York, N. Y. 



Miller, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Miller, Joseph G., Baltimore 
Miller, Jacob M., Baltimore 
Monroe, Clement R., Biscoe, N. C. 
Moriarty, Louis, Manchester, Conn. 
Morris, Philip, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Morrison, William H., Jr., Holm«sburg, Pa. 
Maseritz, Isidore, Baltimore 
Maurillo, Dominick F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Nash, Alexander E., Rutherford, N. J. 
Nelson, James W., Baltimore 
Neustaedter, Theodore M., New York, N. Y. 
Nocera, Domingo, Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Norment, John E., Baltimore 
Pachtman, Isadore, Braddock, Pa. 
Perry, A, H., Louisburg, N. C. 
Pitkowsky, Louis K., New York, N. Y. 
Sarubin, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Scagnetti, Albert, Congers, N. Y. 
'Scheindlinger, Morris I., Baltimore 
Schultz, Louis A., New York, N. Y. 
Scimeca, Antonio A., New York, N. Y. 
Schlenger, Leo E., Paterson, N. J. 
Sdiger, Robert V., New York, N. Y. 
Shapiro, Ralph N., Newark, N. J. 
Tabershaw, Arnold L., New York, N. Y, 
Theuerkauf, Frank J., Erie, Pa. 
Urbanski, Adrian X., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Weiner, Hyman, L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Weinstock, Alex. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Whaley, Thomas Bravard, Berlin, Md. 
Woodyard, Edwin S., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Zaslow, John Woodridge, N. Y. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Balcerzak, Stanley P., Wabash, Pa. 
Bentz, Felix, New Britain, Conn. 
Brender, Max, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brown, Leo T., Washington, D. C. 
Burke, E. N., Bonanza, Ky. 
Cadle. William R.. Frederick Jet.. Md. 



Cantor, Nathan, Hartford, Conn. 
Carder, Joe R., Bristol, W. Va. 
Oardinale, P. F., Newark, N. J. 
Casey, Calvert E., Providence, R. I. 
Cassidy, John J.. Wilminprton, Del. 
Clahr, Abraham A., New York, N. Y. 



215 



It 



¥ 



¥ 



Coe, John M., Washington, D. C. 
Coffindaffer. R. S., West Virginia 
Coonan, Thomas J., Jr., Westminster, Md. 
Cope, Arthur A., Hamburg, Pa. 
Davis, Norvel R., Frederick, Md. 
Davidov, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Davidson, Meyer, Baltimore 
Demely, Louis A., Baltimore 
DeVincentis, Henry, Orange, N. J. 
Diffenderffer, Robert T., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Donohoe, Edward C, Greensburg, Pa. 
Donovan, Charles M., Terryville, Conn. 
Draper, Leonidas McF., Warrenton, N, C. 
Dreskin, Jacob L., E. Orange, N. J. 
Dwyer, D. R., Waterbury, Conn. 
Elgin, Lee W., Baltimore 
Ellis, Francis A., Baltimore 
Epstein, Harry H., New York, N. Y. 
Everett, Franklin R., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fancher, H. Wilson, Jr., Winsted, Conn. 
Farber, Raphael, Wellsboro, Pa. 
Ferrara, James, New York, N. Y. 
Fields, Abijah CEnsley, Ala. 
Fine, Morris A., Baltimore 
Finell, Reuben A., Baltimore 
Fischman, Harold, Newark, N. J, 
Fishof, Frank, New York, N. Y. 
Fuchs, Abner, New York, N. Y. 
Gale, Louis H., Erie, Pa. 
Gastin, William B., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Geraghty, Francis J., Baltimore 
Glickel, Henry, New York, N. Y. 
Grandfield, R. Francis, Dorchester, Mass 
^Greenwald, M., New York, N. Y, 
Grimm, W. O., Jr., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Gross, Siegmund, New York, N. Y. 
Hale, Elwin F., Simonson, Va. 
Herbert, Alpha N., Oakhurst, N. J. 
Hertz, Ben., New York, N. Y. 
Hibbitts, John T., Baltimore 
Hulla, Jaroslav, Baltimore 
Jacobs, Morris A., Baltimore 
Keating, John Patrick, Sandy Hook, Conn 
Kelly, Allen W., Taneytown, Md. 
Kiesel, Henry, New York, N. Y. 
Knotts, W. K., Sudlersville, Md. 
Lalley, Paul F., Scranton, Pa. 
Laus, Edward R., New York, N. Y. 
Linde, S. A., Baltimore 
London, Daniel, New York, N. Y. 
Lopatin, Samuel, New Haven, Conn. 
Lowe, Claude M., Fawn Grove, Pa. 



Marcinick, E. S., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Merchant, Harry McC, Gainesville, Fla. 
Metsky, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Miller, Edgar R., New Freedom, Pa. 
Minnefor, Charles A., Newark, N. J. 
Mitchell, Charles A., Haynesville, Maine 
Molina, Rafael Rodriguez, San Juan, P. r 
Morales, Jaime Vila, Rio Piedras, P. R. 
Mullenusky, Joseph John, Shenandoah, Pa. 
Nataro, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Nimaroff, Meyer, Newark. N. J. 
Nock, Randolph M., Stockton, Md. 
Norment, Clinton C, Baltimore 
Orton, Lyman R., Athol, Mass. 
Oshrin, Henry, Jersey City, N. J. 
Pearrell, Ernest H., Brunswick, Md. 
Pierce, J. L., Marianna, Fla. 
Pinsky, Myer M., Camden, N. J. 
Polizzotti, Joseph L., Paterson, N. J. 
Plassnig, Edwin, Baltimore 
Poplack, Samuel L., New Haven, Conn. 
Pulaski, Leo E., Shenandoah, Pa. 
Pullen, Lawrence H., Baltimore 
Radest, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rathsprecher, Isadore, Newark, N. J. 
Resh, George Daniel, Hampstead, Md. 
Rezek, George J., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, H. S., New York, N. Y. 
Rosenstein, Jacob, New York, N. Y. 
Rocco, Frank, Newark, N. J. 
Samoff, Jack, New York, N. Y. 
Schachter, Eugene J., North Braddock, Pa. 
Schilling, A. B., New Jersey 
Seiken, George, Liberty, N. Y. 
Silverstein, Jacob M., Millbum, N. J. 
Simon, Joseph R., East Pittsburg, Pa. 
Smith, James B., Jr., Sharps, Va. 
Skilling, Francis C, Baltimore 
Sinton, William A., Newport News, Va. 
Straka, Robert P., Homestead, Pa. 
Sulman, William R., Reading, Pa. 
Sweeney, J. J., Jr., Baltimore 
Tomainoli, H. F., Hoboken, N. J. 
Turner, Thomas B., Prince Frederick, Md. 
Visconti, Joseph A., Hoboken, N. J. 
Wallace, Ervin, B., Baltimore 
Wassersweig, Martin Max, Reading, Pa. 
Webb, Elmore M., Baltimore 
Wiener, Joseph, New York, N. Y. 
Weintraub, Harry, Baltimore 
Weitzen, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Zimmermann, Charles C, Cumberland, Md. 



SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

SENIOR CLASS 



Bowie, Lucille L., Front Royal, Va. 
Callaghan, Vera E., Dennison, O. 
Deputy, Mary J.. Chestertown, Md. 
DuBois, CecUe M., Baltimore 
Elgin, Grace L., Baltimore 



Lord, Nettie B., Preston, Md. 
Bowman, Morrisson F., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Paunair, Isabel J.. Roanoke. Va. 
Yeager, Eva L., Cumberland, Md. 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Bishop, Maude O., Belhaven. N. C. 
Boyd, Ruth, W., Street, Md. 
Dunn, Helen, Baltimore 
Edwards, Mary M., EdwardsviUe, Va. 
Garvey. Kathryn A., Oil City, Pa. 
Graham. Evelyn P. (Mrs.) . Huntingdon,Pa 
Harkins, Hulda F., Street, Md. 
Hazen, Dorothy L.. Union City, Pa. 
Hoke, LiUie. R.. Emmittsburg, Md. 
Horst, Kathryn E.. Hagerstown. Md. 
Kish, Vilma C, Trenton, N. J. 
Lewis, Alice L., Eckhart, Md. 

JUNIOR 

Alexander, Edith L., Matthews, N. C. 
Appleton, Pauline V., Punxsutawney, Pa. 
Barnes, Merian, Nashville, N. C. 
Boyd. Edith A., Baltimore 
Callaway, Esther, A. BridgeviUe Del 
Compton, Pinkie L., Ronceverte, W. Va. 
Copenhauer, Elizabeth E., Bel Air, Md. 
Crownover, Carrie E., Huntingdon, Pa. 
Davis, Marie M., Frostburg, Md. 
Davis, Ruth E., Federalsburg, Md. 
Duncombe, Caroline R.. Union City, Pa. 
Fisher, Mary E., Cumberland. Md. 
Forrest, Lola R., Keymar, Md. 
Herrington, Mazie M., Meadville, Pa. 
Kinder, Minnie, MiUersville, Md. 
McCormack, M. J.. North Adams, Mass. 
Morgart. Julia H., Rainsburg. Pa. 



McCann, Wilhelmina N.. Street, Md. 
Maxwell, Irene A., Owings Mills. Md. 
Nagel, Ida M., Federalsburg, Md. 
Pratt, Anna E., Baltimore 
Reade, Kathryn A., Painter, Va. 
Schroeder, Marie E. C Cambridge, Md. 
StaUey, Margaret May. Liverpool, Pa. 
Teeple, Helen S., Baltimore 
Toms, Kittie R., Funkstown, Md. 
West, Medora R., Martinsburg, W. Va. 
White, Ruth A., Federalsburg, Md. 



1 



CLASS 



Morse, Rachel, CambridRe. Md. 
Penn. Ruth Virginia. Savannah, Ga. 
Pope, Jane T., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Putt, Bernice G., Saxton, Pa. 
Rowe, Sarah E., Keedysville, Md. 
Schaale. Bernice D. E., Baltimore 
Schroeder, Ruth deB., Cambridge, Md. 

Scott. Jane. Eckhart, Md. 

Shaffer, Mary C, Westminster, Md. 

Slez, Irene M., MUlington, Md. 

Suead, Lecy P.. Tyro. Va. 

Spencer. Lenora F.. Westminster Md. 

Thomas, K. A., East Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Thompson, Irelene, Street, Md. 

Tillinghast, Robina H., Fayetteville, N. C. 

Wertz, Gladys A., Batesburjr. S. C. 

WUey, Grace E., WellsviUe, Pa. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
THIRD-YEAR CLASS 

Shannon, Donald A., Baltimore, Md. 

SECOND-YEAR CLASS 



Andrews, Marvin J., Bristol, Tenn. 

Batt, William H., Davis, W. Va. 

Berger, George W., Baltimore 

Blaine, Edward I., Jr., Pocomoke City, Md. 

Burrows, Dudley A., Enfield, N. C. 

Colucci, Nicholas J.. Stamford, Conn. 

Eselhorst, Albert R.. Baltimore 

Harmon, Carl M., Dundalk, Md. 

Fopse, Wilbur Clifford. Baltimore 



Gordy, Hov/aid L., I aurcl, Del. 
Gould, William M., Baltimore 
Harbaugh, Arthur C. Hagerstown. Md. 
Heck, Leroy Savin, Baltimore 
Hermon. David, Baltimore 
Hettleman. MUton L.. Baltimore 
Hopkins, Charles H.. Baltimore 
Krieger, Max A., Baltimore 
Kroopnick. Jennie, Baltimore 



216 



217 



f\ 



i 



Rivas, Leiva, Carlos E., San Luis, Cuba 
Lyon, Andrew T., Havre de Grace, Md. 
Marsh, Charles W., Baltimore 
Morley, John V., Baltimore 
Mpxley, Reuben B., Baltimore 
Newmeyer, A. 'S., Havre de Grace, Md. 
O'Neill, Lawrence J., Baltimore 
Payant, William W., Baltimore 
Pelaez Bringas, Jose M., Santiago, Cuba 



Piraino, Vincent J., Baltimore 
Richardson, James J., Bel Air, Md. 
Ruff, William A., Baltimore 
Schapiro, Louis, Baltimore 
Scher, Robert S., Baltimore 
Smoak, Claude M., Bamburg, S. C. 
Somerlatt, Virginia G., Cumberland, Md. 
Willson, Emory R., Staunton, Va. 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Baker, Israel, Baltimore, Md. 

Barall, William, L., Towson, Md. 

Basil. Cecrpe C, Annapolis, Md. 

Block, Solomon, G., Phoebus, Va. 

Carliner, Louis A., Baltimore 

Chertkof, Frieda, Baltimore 

Coplin, Louis I., Baltimore 

Cohsn, Bernard J., Baltimore 

Currier, Calona D., Havre de Grace, Md. 

Donnet, John, Baltimore 

Downey, Ralph C, Frostburg, Md. 

Eldridge, Arthur C, Myersville, Md. 

Ernst, Myrle P., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Fields, Lorraine D., Pikesville, Md. 

Finkelstein, Morris L., Baltimore 

Flom, Charles, Baltimore 

Frieman, Harry, Baltimore 

Friedman, Alexander, Baltimore 

Glass, Louis, Baltimore 

Hantman, Harry H., Baltimore 

Hinton, Murray S., Baltimore 

Hecker, Nathan, Baltimore 

Hurwitz, Louis, Baltimore 

Kalb, Francis P., Baltimore 

Katz, Benjamin R., Baltimore 

Kelley, Guy C, Salisbury, Md. 

Kirson, Abe R., Baltimore 

Klosinski, Andrew L., Baltimore 

Kramer, Morris, Baltimore 



Leibowitz, Louis, Laurel, Del. 
Levin, Harry, Baltimore 
Marmor, Leon, Baltimore 
Mattox, William H., Elberton, Ga. 
Mears, Chase K., Nasaawadox, Va. 
Mears, Lee K., Salisbury, Md. 
Millison, Harry, Baltimore 
Moran, John E., Manchester, N. H. 
Mullen, Charles L., Hagerstown, Md. 
Musgrove, Walter G., Baltimore 
Neel, Jerrold W., Baltimore 
Norton (Mrs.) Edward, Laurel, Md. 
Parlett, Edward L., Baltimore 
Powers, John Ambrose, Baltimore 
Ritt, Paul Edward, Baltimore 
Roche, Louis C, Reisterstown, Md. 
Rockman, Morris, Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Emanuel, Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Lewis R., Baltimore 
Shea, Harold J., Baltimore 
Sheehan, John L., Hillsboro, N. H. 
Stacy, Theodore E., Jr., Baltimore 
Stagmer, Owen R., Baltimore 
Stuck, Raymond D., Baltimore 
Van Slyke, Amos R., Baltimore 
Voigt, Herman A., Baltimore 
Wag»er, Raphael H., Baltimore 
Weinberg, Sol B., Staunton, Va. 
Wright, Lawrence M., Baltimore 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Abbott, Jessie B., Lonaconing 
Abbott, Lilias C, Lonaconing 
Aist, Elsie, Chettenham 
Aist, Lorena, Chettenham 
Albaugh, Mary L., New Market 
Albrittain, Maria L., La Plata 
Albrittain, Mary, La Plata 
Albrittain, Pearl M., La Plata 
Allen, Helen M., Cumberland 
Allen, Kenneth, Berwyn 
Andrews, Myrtle, Crapo 
Andrews, Virginia L., Cumberland 
Aud, Rose H., Valley Lee 
Avery, Helena D., Washington, D. C. 
Baden, Elizabeth L., Baden 
Bailey, Mary E. AbeU 



Baity, Bessio M., Street 

Baity Earl C, 'Street 

Baldwin, Virgie M., Savage 

Banfield, Frank W., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Batson, Lawrence D., Brentwood 

Deall, Katherine M., Anacostia 

Beall, Susie C, Beltsville 

Bennett, Alton Y., Frederick 

Benson, Margaret R., Berwyn 

Benton, Gordon, Stevensville 

Birmingham, Angela M., Cumberland 

Bishop, John, Washington 

Blandford, Mildred C, College Park 

Blandy, Thelma, College Park 

Bonn, Florence R., Baltimore 

Boone, Blanche L., Mt. Airy 



218 



Boone. Lydia L, Mt. Airy 
Boston, Marguerite E.. Cumberland 
Bouis, George E.. Mt. Washington 
Bowling. Marybeth, Upper Marlboro 
Bowser. Katherine R., WUliamsport 
Bragg. John H., Washington, D. C. 
Brakeall. Janet E.. Hancock 
Brannan, Thomas C, HyattsviUe 
Branner, Cecil G., Dover. Del. 
Branner. Ruth M., Dover, Del. 
Brewer, Brooke, Washington, D. C. 
Brewer, Margaret G., College Park 
Brackbill. Mary E., Berwyn 
Brown, Kathryn G., Hagerstown 
Briwre, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Bullock, Earl M., Riverdale 
Burdette, Eunice E., La Plata 
Burris, I. Grace, Centerville 
Burroughs, James E., La Plata 
r.iitlcr. Blanch H., Hoobs 
Caltrider, Samuel P.. Westminster 
Cannon, Amos P.. Salisbury 
Carlisle, Sophia M., BarnesvUle 
Carr, Isabel P., Laurel 
Carroll. James G.. Cumberland 
Cawley. Eleanor D.. Elkton 
Cherry. Joseph C CoUege Park 
Church. Carey F.. College Park 
Clagett, John H., Jr., Roslyn 
ri' r':. Mirrison M., Silver Sprlrgs 
Clarke, Leona A., California 
Clayton, Louella M.. Mt. Rainier 
Clinton. Sara F., Riverdale 
Coleman, Adelaide A., Chester 
Colem.-»n, Cora M., Chester 
Combs, Mary E., Ridge 
Combs, Hilda E.. Ridge 
Comer, Alverta E., Frederick 
Coney, William J.. Roland Park 
Coombs. Lillian M.. Great Mills 
Cooper. Charles H.. College Park 
Cooper, Mary E., Hancock 
Corey. Flora I., Worton 
Corkran. Delema I., Vienna 
Corkran, Jesse A., Vienna 
Cottrill, Frances M., Williamsport 
Coyle, John W., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Cross. Janie A., Westwood 
Crothers, John L., Northeast 
Curbow, Leone, HyattsviUe 
Darcy, George D., College Park 
Davis, John J., Washington, D. C. 
Davis, Frank R., Darlington 
Davis, Nannie C Bart«n 
De Corse. Helen C MechanicsvUle 
Dehner, Margaret P., Hanover 
Derr. Lena J., Frederick 
De Vol, Helen M., College Park 
Dietz, Ernest C. College Paark 



Ditto, Lucy C, Sharpsburg 
Donahoe, Mamie C, Massey 
Dorsey, Ethel A., Burtonsville 
Drury, Eleanor A., Barton 
Dryden. Sallie P., Princess Anne 
Dunnock. Ellen L.. Woolford 
Dunnock, Mildred I.. Reid's Grove 
Durst, Isabella C, Barton 
Dusenbury, Lillian, Washington, D. C. 
Duvall, Margaret J., Groom 
Duvall, William M., Baltimore 
Dyson, Alice E., Du Bois 
Early, Angela D., Brandywino 
Early, Josephine, Brandywine 
Edelen, Mary G., Bryantown 
Elliott. Clara M.. Vienna 
Ells. Ida J., Ellicott City 
Engle. Ruth B., Frostburg 
Eskridge. Margaret. Rhodesdale 
Ewell, Ethel I., Compton 
Ewell, Goldie, Compton 
Fiery, Ruth C, Hagerstown 
Finzel, Marie F., Frostburg 
Fitzgerald, Margaret D.. Washington, D. C. 
Flanagan, Sherman E., WalkersviUe 
Fleck. Walter, D.. Denver, Col. 
Fleenor, Audra L., Bristol, Va. 
Fleming, Mabel, Seaford. Del. 
Forsyth. Lewis V., Berwyn 
Foster, Paul A., Ferrum, Va. 
Foxwell, Erva R., Leonardtown 
Freeman, Mary J., Du Bois 
Frenzel, Elizabeth B.. Barton 
GiflEen. 'SaUie. Cumberland 
Glisan, Sarah M., Libcrtytown 
Goldsborough, Mary B., Hollywood 
Goldsborough, Philomena D., HoUywood 
Goldsborough. Roberta A., Hollywood 
Goldsmith, Caroline O., Waldorf 
Goodman, Nannie D., Bristol 
Gooding, Jeannette, Chestertown 
Goodwin, Leonard M.. CoUege Park 
Goodyear, Louis, Riverdale 
Gordon, Neil E., College Park 
Gossard, Mary Katherine, Williamsport 
Grandfield, Robert F.. Dorchester, Mass. 
Graves. Birdie E.. Harper's Ferry. W. Va. 
Graves, Harvey C. BranchvUle 
Graves, Sophia E.. Ix)veville 
Gray, Effie J., Riverside 
Gray, Henry W., Richmond, Va. 
Gray, Sadie L.. Riverside 
Green. Mary E.. Boyds 
Griffith, Mary I., ForestviUe 
Grimes, Maye E., Woodbine 
Grimm, Paul H., College Park 
Grove, Ethel A., Charlton 
Gutheridge, Eleanor C, Washington, D. C. 
Hackett, Lavada E., Vienna 

219 



Haller, Grace P., Boonsboro 
Hancock, Huffh. Huddleston, Va. 
Hanson, Louise L., Port Tobacco 
Harper, Floyd H.. College Park 
Harris, Catherine V., Chester 
Harris, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa 
Harrison, Dora, Charlotte HaU 
Harrison. May A., Brandywine 
Hart. Cecelia M., Oakland 
Hawthorne. N. B., Jr., Round Hill, Va 
Hayden. Beatrice, Pope's Creek 
Hetterly. Ethel M., Mt. Rainier 
HUl, Elsie M., Cumberland 
Hoffmaster, T. V., Harper's Ferry W 
Hmebaugh, Mary L.. Cumberland 
Hoffmaster, Viola P., Funkstown 
Hohman, Charles W., West. W. Va 
Holland. Arthur H., Cartersville. Va 
Holland. Esther M.. Ridgely 
Holland. Eunice, Ridc^rly 
Hood, Clinton, I., Berwyn 
Hook, Elizabeth G., College Park 
Horine, Randolph A., Brunswick 
Hottel, John T., College Park 
House, Mrs. H. C. College Park 
House, Hugh O.. College Park 
House, Kingsley A.. College Park 
Howell. Clarence L., Chase City, Va. 
Huemmer, Mary K., Seaford. Del. 
Huffington. Jesse M.. CoUege Park 
Husted. Leila, Berwyn 
Hutchinson. Harry B., Hyattsvillo 
Hyde, Ethel J., barton 
Inskeep, Lillie M., Barton 
James. Howard V., Williamsburg. Va. 
James. Jennie P., Mt. Rainier 
Jones, Neva M., Trappe 
Jewell. Edgar G.. Poolesville 
Kaetzel, Clarence W.. Brunswick 
Kauffman, Dorothy A., Westover 
Kefauver. J. Orville, Mt. Savage 
Kelley, Esther E., Hobbs 
Kemp, Mary. Welcome 
Kersey. 'Sarah E., Chester 
Kershner, Susye G., WiUiamsport 
Kmg, Estella M., MUlington 
Kirby. Wilton G., Havre de Grace 
Kooken, Nellie R.. Westernport 
Koontz, Roy L., Elkton, Va. 
Kriner. Bertha H., Big Spring 
Krmer, Julia E., Big Spring 
Landers, Esther M., Hancock 
LeCompte, Nancy D., Cambridge 
Lefevre. Claud M.. Littlestown, Pa 
Lescure, John M., Harrisburg, Pa 
Lescure, William J., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lincoln, Leonard B., Takoma Park 
Lindsay, Ruth. Sandy Spring 



Vr 



Lint. David L.. Washington, D. C. 
Longenecker, John D., Keymar 
Lowman, Clarence A., Funkstown 
Ludlum, Samuel L.. Chevy Chase 
Lynch, Anna E., Ridgely 
McAllister, Charlotte. Elkton 
McCauley, Eva K., Chestertown 
McCoy, Maud V., Beltsville 
McCready, Mattie M., Vienna 
McGann, Anna M., Frostburg 
McLaughlin. Thomas E.. Hyattsville 
MacDonald, Alexander, Washington, D. C. 
Major, Mary. Barton 
Maloney. Elizabeth C, Elkton 
Matthews, Laura K., Laurel 
Mattingly, Anna E., Leonardtown 
Mattingly, Elizabeth G.. Leonardtown 
Mattingly. Mary C, Abell 
Mattingly, Violet S.. Leonardtown 
Matzen. Antoinette S.. Berwyn 
Matzen. B. Andrew. Berwyn 
Meredith. Ruby O., Cambridge 
Millar, Edna L., Ironside 
Miller, Jessie L., Crandon, Va. 
MiUer. Mary E., Elkton 
Mitchell, William E.. Washington. D. C. 
Moler. Robert C, Mt. Rainier 
Moore. Gertrude C, Brookeville 
Moreland, Mary B.. Waldorf 
Mudd, Christine E., Waldorf 
Mudd, Lucille A., Waldorf 
MuUer, Charles L., Hagerstown 
Mullinix, Virginia W., Chevy Chase 
Murphy, Mary A., Vienna 
Newcome, Troy A., Keyser, W. Va. 
Newcomer, Gertrude, Hagerstown 
Nev/man. Mrs. H. D.. Beltsville 
Nicht, Anna M., Frostburg 
Nicol, Mary B., Rockville 
Nichols, Marjorie A., Federalsburg 
Ohler, Mary R., Taney town 
Ohicr, Ruth V.. Taneytown 
Oliphant, Catherine M., Vienna 
Oldenburg, LiUian J.. Hyattsville 
Palmer, Clara E.. Hurlock 
Palmer, Mildred E., Stevensville 
Park, John, Frostburg 
Parker, Helen J., Cumberland 
Parlett, William A.. Baltimore 
Parran, Elizabeth, St. Leonard 
Penman, Mary L., Mt. Rainier 
Persinger, Harry B., Hogsett, W. Va. 
Perry, Ruth L., Clear Spring 
Pfefferkorn, Hilda, Baltimore 
Phillips. Gladys E., Cambridge 
Phillips, Matilda E., Vienna 
Picken, Marion D.. Lonaconing 
Pierce, John R., College Park 



220 



Plummer, Martha C. Bristol 

Poppen, Alvin W., Washington, D. C. 

Porter, Florence M.. Stevensville 

Porter, Josephine, Salisbury 

Porter. Vivien W., Washington, D. C. 

Pry, Hazel G., Keedysville 

PuUen, Jesse P.. Martinsville, Va. 

Quaintance, Howard W., Washington, D. C. 

Quickel, Sara L., Washington, D. C. 

Raeph, Emma W., Cambridge 

Raedy, Michael L., Washington. D. C. 

Reese, Margaretta S., Cordova 

Reid, Lena L., Vienna 

Reynolds, Clayton, Oxford, Pa. 

Rice, Carrie M., Knoxville 

Richards. Felix W., Washington, D. C. 

Ridenour, Mary C, Hagerstown 

Rieck, Elsa L.. Preston 

Robinette, Catherine G., Flintstone 

Rolph, Norton J., Streator, 111. 

Rosenberg. Charles I., Hyattsville 

Ross, Charles E., College Park 

Rowe, George Brentwood 

Runkles, Eader B., Mt. Airy 

Russell, Esther A.. Federalsburg 

Russell, G. Oliver, Norfolk, Va. 

Russell, Lillian C, Elkton 

Russell. Mary M.. Valley Lee 

Russell. Mary T., Frederick 

Ryman, William M.. Mt. Jackson, Va. 

Saldana, James, Berwyn 

Sasscer, Ellen B., Croome 

Schnebly. Katie L.. WiUiamsport 

'Schweppe, Marie U.. Anacostia 

Schwien, Erna A., Townshend 

Scott, Joseph G.. Princess Anne 

Seeger, Pauline R., Frederick 

Shaffer. Harry H., Upperco 

Shepherd, Matson W., Berwn 

Shives, Margaret A., Hancock 

Short, Myrtle R., v ienna 

'Silverman, Israel D., Washington, D. C. 

Simpich, Ira M., Landover 

'Simpson, Elizabeth H., Libertytown 

Slacum. Elsie M., Federalsburg 

Sloan, Margaret H., Lonaconing 

Smith, Arietta H.. Salisbury 

Smith, Belle Jackson, Salisbury 

Smith, Carrie B.. Easton 

Smith, Josie, Locust Grove, Va. 

Smith. Mame, Ridgely 

Snyder, Loyola. Hagerstown 

Snyder, Pauline, Keedysville 

Soper, Elsie M., Beltsville 

Sparks, Mary H., Sudlersville 

Spurrier, Catharine G.. Brookeville 

Staley, Charles C, College Park 



Stamp, Adele H., Baltimore 
Starkey, Vairs H.. Ridgely 
Stewart, Clotilda A., Easton 
Stine, Leila M., Hagerstown 
Storer, Ethel R., Cumberland 
Straub, Marietta E., Cumberland 
Strock, Carolyne, Hagerstown 
Strong, Talmage A. R.. Chestertown 
Sturgis, William C, Snow Hill 
Sullivan, Alice A., Branchville 
Sullivan, Clifford E., College Park 
Sullivan Jeremiah J., Branchville 
Sussman, Abram A., Baltimore 
Swann, Laura V., Anacostia 
Tait, George S.. Fairfax, Va. 
Tarbell, William E., Baltimore 
Taylor, Lola C, Bcachville 
Teeter, Benjamin F., Flintstone 
Thomas, Gladys M., Boonsboro 
Thomas. Margaret, Barton 
Thomas, Mai-y E., Frederick 
Thomas, Mary F., Hancock 
Thompson, Nina M., Brownsville 
Tighe. Catherine L. Riverdale 
Tipton, Ada M., Mt. Airy 
Triplett. Charles C, Washington, D. C. 
Troup, Ellett H.. Hagerstown 
Turner. Madeline M., Gambrills 
Twilley. Annette M., Hurlock 
Vaughan. Clara B., Spring Valley, Va. 
Vivanco, Carlos D., Washington, D. C. 
Wagner, Julia A., Westernport 
Walker, William P., Mt. Airy 
Walters, Edith E., Federalsburg 
Walters. Nellie E., Chestertown 
Warrenfeltz. Ruth P.. Funkstown 
Weaver, Adah M., Keedysville 
W^cst, Katherino E.. Centerv'lle 
White. Agnes H., Lonaconing 
White, Beulah I., Lonaconing 
White, T/iilu B., Gaithcrsbuig 
White, Melva I., Washington, D. C. 
Whiteford, Michael W., Whiteford 
Whitt, Marie B., Riverdale 
Wickham, Helen, Nottingham 
Wiley, Benjamin H.. Bittinger 
Wiley, I-ucy M., Bittinger 
Wilson, Ida B., Pocomoke 
Wilson, Josephine E., Charlotte Hall 
Winders, Eva M., Hagerstown 
Wise, Grace V.. Issue 
Wolfe, Elsie I.. Sugarloaf, Pa. 
Wood, Ellsworth, Washington, D. C. 
Yeatts, Mildred O., Hagerstown 
Younkins, Morse A., Weverton 
Younkins, Oliver M., Weverton 
Zimmerman, Ralph L., Frederick 



221 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLMENT AS OF MARCH 1, 1922 



The College of Agriculture giR 

The College of Arts and Sciences 214 

The School of Commerce o-,r 

315 

The School of Dentistry 

The College of Education „^ 

96 

The College of Engineering 

loi 

The Graduate School.. 

20 

The College of Home Economics. 

15 

The School of Law. . 

489 

The School of Medicine 

The School for Nurses 

66 

The School of Pharmacy 

The Summer School.. 

380 

Extension Courses 

75 



GENERAL INDEX 



2,651 



222 



Administration, 9, 30, 40 

buUding, 22 

committees, 8 

council, 10 

officers of, 9 
Administrative officers, 9 

procedure, 40 
Admission, 34 

certificate, by, 35 

elective subjects, 35 

examination, by, 36 

to advanced standing:, 37 

transfer, by, 37 

units, number required, 34 
Advanced bacteriology, 66 

degrees, 159 
Agents, county, 15, 16 
Agricultural building, 30 

bacteriology, 66 

chemistry, 112, 94, 95, 119 

county agents, 15, 16 

courses, special, for Federal Board 
students, 60 

economics, 74 

education, 46, 132, 133, 140 

experiment station, 32, 43 

experiment station staff, 13 

eastern branch, 33 
extension, 32 

extension staff, 14 
Agriculture, College of, 43 

and home economics, 32 
Agronomy, 45, 61 
Algebra, advanced. 111 
Analytical chemistry, 121 
Anatomy and physiology, 65 
Ancient languages and philosophy, 124 
Animal husbandry, 47, 63, 64, 65 

diseases, 65, 66 

general, 65 

industry, division of, 47 

pathology and veterinary medicine, 47 
Alumni association, 27 
Aquiculture, zoology and, 107 
Architecture, home, 165 
Arts and Sciences, College of, 90 



education, 131 

and handicraft, 165 

civic, 79 
Astronomy, 112 
Athletics, 27 
Bacteriology, 66 

and sanitation, 48, 66 

general, 66 
Band, military, 108 
Bam practice, 70 
Battalion, 179 

Bee culture, entomology and, 50, 72 ffl 
Beef production, 63, 64 
Bio-chemistry, 87 
Biometry, 62 
Board of Regents, 8 
Botany, 118 
Breeding: 

animal, 63, 64 

advanced, 64 
Breeds »nd judging, 63 
Buildings. 22. 23, 24 
Business administration, commerce and, 92 

economics, 114 

management, 116 
Calculus. Ill 

Calendar, University, 5, 6, 7 
Calvert Hall, 23 
Cereal crops. 61, 62 
Certificates, two-year, 38, 43 
Chemical building, 23 

society, 27 
Chemistry, department of, 94 

agricultural, 95 

analytical, 121 

engineering, 122, 123 

fertilizer and food, 124 

general, 96 

industrial, 94, 122 

inorganic. 119 

organic, 120 

physical, 120 
Chemists 94 



Chorus, 108 

Christian Association, 29 



223 



X 



I 



V 



5' 



Civil engineering, 149 

Clubs, 27, 28, 29 

College of Agriculture, 43 

department of, 43 

general curriculum for, 44 

courses in, for soldiers and sailors, 59, 60 

two-year course, 52 
College of Arts and Sciences, 90 
College of Education, 129 

agricultural, 121, 127, 132, 133. 140 

curricula in, 130 

arts and science 131 137 

general 137 

home economics, 134, 141 

industrial, 135, 142 

summer school, 31 

teachers* special diplomas, 129. 

teachers' trainijig courses, 131 
College of Engineering, 144 

curricula, 148 ' 

College of Home economics, 162 

description of courses. 163, 164, 165 
>^ctive for students, 164 - — 

Commerce^yand Business Admi^iistration. 

92, 116' ^ 

Committees, 8 / 

Council of administration, 10 ' 
County demonstration agents, 16 

clubs, 28 
Crop breeding, 61, 62 

Courses, description of, 61, 90, 94, 101, 118 
137, 152, 164, 182 
for graduates, 81, 118 
Cytology, 119 
Dairy bacteriology, 66 
husbandry, 49, 67 
production, 69 
Dairying, 67, 68, 69 
advanced registry, 70 

management of dairy young stock, 63, 65 
Debating and oratory, 27, 110 
Decoration, home, 165 
Degrees, 37, 43, 129, 145, 159, 160, 162 
conferred in 1921, 186, 187, 188. 189, 190 
191, 192, 193, 194, 195 
Dentistry, School of, 126, 127, 128 
Department of Chemistry, 94 
Department of military science and tactics 
179 

of physical education, 185 
Design, machine, 157 

structural, 152, 153 
Diamondhack, 30 
Dining hall, 24 
Diplomas, 37 ^ 

teachers' special, 129 
Doctor of Philosophy, 160 
Domestic science, 162 
Dormitories, new, 23 

224 



Drafting, 145, 155 
Drainage, 154 

farm, 74 
Drama, French, 104 

and poetry, German, 105 
early English, 102 
Elizabethan, 104 
Dramatic club, 28 
Drawing, 155 

Dress design and making, 165 
Eastern branch, 33 
Economics, 114 
agricultural, 74 

College of Home, 134, 135, 141, 162 
Education, College of, 129 
Electrical engineering, 150, 151 
Engineering, College of, 144 
building, 23 
civU, 149, 152 
chemical, 122 
degrees, 145 
electrical, 150, 154 
equipment, 145 
general, 156 

laboratories, 145, 146, 147 
medhanical, 151, 157 
Society, 28 
English, 101 
Elizabethan drama, 104 
Entomology, 70 
and bee culture, 50 
economic, 71 
systematic, 71 
horticultural, 71 
Examination, 41 

Expenses, fees and, 38, 40, 170, 175 
Baltimore schools, 40 
special, 39 

Experiment Station, Agricultural, 24, 32, 43 
Extension service, 32 

and research, 32 

staff, 14 
Faculty, 10, 11, 12, 13 

committees, 17 
Farm accounting, 75 

building 74 

dairying, 68 

equipment, 72 

management, 51, 74 

practice, 44 
Federal Board students, 57 
Feeds and feeding, 63, 65 
Fees and expenses, 38, 40, 170, 171 

Baltimore schools, 40 

special, 39 
Fellowships, 26, 44 
Fertilizers and soils, 87, 88, 89 
Filtration and plant, 25 
Floriculture, 54, 77, 78. 79, 80, 81, 82, 83. 



Foods and nutrition, 65, 164 

Forage crops, 61, 62 

Forestry, 75 

Fraternities and sororities, 28 

French. 104 

Fruits, economic, 77 

commercial, 77 

culture, 76, 77 

judging, 77 
Garden flowers, 78 
Garment construction, 165 
Gas engines, 73 
General agriculture, curriculum for, 57 

chemistry, 95 

education, 132 

extension, 32 
General information, 19 
Genetics, 61, 64 
Geology, 87 
Geometry, 111, 112 
German, 105 
Gerneaux Hall, 25 
Glee clubs, 108 
Government of the United States, 114 

of Europe. 114. 
Grading system, 41 
Graduate School, The, 159 

advanced degrees, 159 

council, 10 

courses, 80 

fees, 38 

students, courses for, 62, 86 
Graduation and degrees, 37, 43 
Grain judging, 61, 62 
Greek, 124 

letter societies, 28 
Greenhouse construction & management, 78 
High school scholarships, 25, 26 
Highway engineering, 153 
History and political science, 113, 117 

of the University, 21 
Hog production, 63, 65 
Home economics. College of, 162 

education, 134, 141, 142 

and agriculture, 32 
Honor and awards, 26 
Honor system, 41 
Horse and mule production, 63 
Horticultural building, 25 

entomology, 7 1 
Horticulture, curricula, 52, 76 

requirements of graduate students in, 81 

advanced, 81 
Hospital, Baltimore, 23 

College Park, 24 
House administration, 166 
Hydraulics, 147, 156 

Hydraulic and sanitary engineering, 147 153 
156 



Income, 33 

Industrial chemistry. 94, 122 

education. 135, 136. 142 

scholarships, 25, 26 
Infirmary, 24 
Inorganic chemistry, 119 
Insecticides, 71 

Institutional manajjement, 166 
Instruction, officers of, 11, 12, 13 
Journalism, 103 
Judging, advanced, 64 

dairy products, 68, 70 

fruit, 77 

grain, 61, 62 

vegetable, 77 
Kappa Alpha, 28 
Keystone club, 29 
Kinematics, 156 
Landscape gardening, 52, 55, 79, 82, 83 

design, 79. 83 

practice, 52, 79, 83 
Language and literature, 92, 101, 102 
Language, ancient, philosophy and, 124 
Late registration fee, 40 
Latin, 124 
Law, School of, 167 
Least squares, 112 
Le Cercle Francais, 29 
Library, 25 

science, 112 
Literature. English language and, 101 

modern language and, 104 
Literary societies. 28 
Live stock sanitation, 66 
Location of the University, 21 
Machine design, 154. 157 
Management of dairy young stock, 63, 65 
Markets and marketing, 64, 74, 115, 166 
Master of Arts, 160 

of Science, 160 
Mathematics, 111 
Meat and meat production, 63 
Mechanical drawing, 145, 155 

engineering, 157 

laboratory. 146 
Mechanics. 156 
Medals and prizes. 26, 27 
Medical curriculum, 92, 98 

entrance requirements, 98 
seven-year course, 98 
Medicine, School of, 171 

Military science and tactics, department of, 
179 
band, 108 

description of courses, 182, 183, 184 
medal, 27 
Milk, 68, 69 
Millinery, 165 
Modern language and literature, 104 

225 



vf 



MorriU Hall. 23 

Morphology, 118 

Mule, horse and, production of, 63 

Music, 108 

Mycology, 119 

New Mercer Literary Society, 28 

Nu Sigma Omicron, 28 

Nutrition, 65, 164 

Officers, administrative, 9 

of instruction, 11, 12, 13 
Olericulture, 77 
Oral reading, 110 
Oratory, 26 110 
Organic Chemistry, 120 
Organization, University, 27, 28 
Pathology, 47, 85 
Pests, 70 

Pharmacy, School of, 176 
Philosophy, ancient languages and, 124 
Physical education and recreation, depart- 
ment of, 185 

examination, 41 

training, 41, 180 

chemistry, 120 
Physiology, anatomy and, 65 
Physics, 109 
Piano, 109 
Plant anatomy, 118 

diseases, 85 

morphology, 118 

mycology, 119 

pathology, 85 

physiology, 85 
Political science, history and, 113, 117 
Pomology. 53, 76, 80, 81 
Poultry building, 24 

husbandry, 87 

Pre-medical course, two-years, 97, 99 

curriculum, 97, 98 

requirements for entrance, 99 
Prize, citizenship, 27 

Professional degrees in engineering, 160 
Psychology, 137 
Public speaking, 110 
Qualitative analysis, 119, 120 
Quantitative analysis, 121, 122 
Railways, electrical, 154 
Reading and speaking, 110 
Recreation, department of physical educa- 
tion and, 185 
Refunds, 40 

Register of students, 174-191 
Registration, date of, 40 

penalty for late, 39 
Research, extension and, 32 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 179 
Rhetoric, 102 
Rifle club, 29 
Rossbourg club, 29 



Rural community and its education, 116 

organization, 75 
Sanitary engineering, hydraulic and, 153 
■Sanitation, bacteriology and, 48 66 

live stock, 66 
Schedule, maximum and minimum, 41 
Scholarship and self-aid, 25 

industrial, 26 

prizes and, 173 
School of Dentistry, 126 

faculty, 126 

requirements for matriculation, 127 

matriculation and fees, 128 
School of Law, 167 

faculty, 167 

fees, 40, 170 

requirements for admission, 168 
School of Medicine, 171 

clinical facilities, 172 

dispensaries and laboratories, 173 

faculty, 171, 172 

fees, 40, 170 

prizes and scholarships, 173 

requirements for entrance, 97, 174 

requirements for pre-medical college 
course, 98 

curriculum, 98 
School of Pharmacy, 176 

requirements for admission, 177 

faculty, 176 
•Self-aid, scholarships and, 25, 26 
Seminars, 58, 62, 64, 66, 67, 69, 81, 84, 

85, 124 
Seven year course, combined, 98 
Sheep production, 63, 65 
Shop, 147, 158 
Short courses, two-year, 58, 62, 67, 70, 72, 

73, 75, 82. 85, 101, 108 
Sigma Nu, 28 
Sigma Phi Sigma, 28 
Social Science, 92 
Societies, 28 
Sociology, 115 
Soils, 56, 87. 88, 89 

and fertilizers. 87, 88 

bacteriology, 88 
Sororities, 28 
Spanish, 106 
Special courses, 130 

for teachers, 136 
Special fees, 38 
Sprays and spraying, 72 
Stock judging pavilion, 24 
'Staff, Experiment Station, 13, 14 

Extension Service, 14, 15 
Station, Agricultural Experiment, 32, 43 
Stock judging pavilion, 24 
Structural design, 152 
Student assembly, 28, 41 



organizations and activities, 28, 29 

publications. 30 
Student enrollment, summary of, 1922, 222 
Summary of student enrollment, 1922, 222 
Summer camps, 180 
Summer school, 31 
Surveying, 158 
Swine production, 63, 65 
Teachers* special diplomas. 129 
Teacher training courses, 131 
Telegraphy and telephony, 154 
Terra Marine, 30 
Testimonials, 186, 221 
Textiles, 165 
Tractors and trucks, 73 
Trade and related subjects, 136 
Trigonometry, 111 
Tuition, 38 



Two-year courses, 58, 62, 64, 66, 67, 69, 81, 
84, 85, 124 

agriculture, 57, 58, 59 

pre-medical, 99 
Unclassified students, 37 
Uniforms, 180 
Units, number required, 34 
University Council 10 

Vegetable gardening, 54, 77, 78, 80, 81, 82 
Veterinary medicine, animal pathology and, 

47, 65 
Vocational education, 139 

Voice, 108 
Withdrawals, 40 
Water supply, 25 

Woman's home economics practice house, 25 
Young Men's Christian Association, 29 
Young Women's Christian Association, 29 
1 Zoology and agriculture, 107 



227 



226 



Any furdier infonnation desired concerning the 
University of Maryland will be funushed upon applica* 
tion to DR. ALBERT F. WOODS, President, CoUege 
ParkfMd. 



V> 



f 



ii 
P 



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