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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

o/ the 

University of Maryland 



Vol. 20 



June, 1923 



No. 2 



CATALOGUE 

1923-1924 




Containing genera! Information concerning tlie Unfyersity, 

Announcements for tlie Scholastic Year 1923-1924 

and Records of 1922-1923 




I»aed monthly by th« UnlTtfiity of Maryland at College Park, Md^ 
as second-clasf matter, ander Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



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THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE 



1923-1924 



Containing general information concerning the University ^ Announce- 
ments for the Scholastic Year 1923-1924^ and Records of 1922-1923, 



J 



Contents 



Calendar of Months 4 

University Calendar 5 

Board of Regents, University Senate, Educational Units, Officers 

OF Instruction, Committees, etc 8 

General Information 19 

Location 21 

Historical statement 21 

Buildings 22 

Scholarships and Fellowships 26 

Honors and awards 26 

Organizations 28 

Administration 30 

Extension and research 32 

Income 34 

Admission and requirements 34 

Fees and Expenses 38 

Administrative procedure 41 

Educational Units ? • 

College of Agriculture 43 

College of Arts and Sciences 82 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 126 

School of Dentistry 130 

College of Education 134 

College of Engineering 148 

Graduate School 163 

College of Home Economics 166 

Law School 171 

School of Medicine 173 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 180 

School of Nursing 184 

School of Pharmacy 189 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation 193 

List of Degrees Conferred, Awards, Register of Students, Sum- 
mary OF Students 194 



Calendar for 1923, 1924, 1925 



1923 



1924 



1925 





JULY 








S iMiT|W 


T 


F 


S 


12 3 ' 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31j.. 

. . . . I . . 









AUGUST 



5 
12 



M 



6 
13 



1920 
26 27 



T,W 

. . 1 
7 1 8 
1415 



T 

2 
9 
16 



21 22 23 
28 2930 



F 

3 

10 

17 

24 

31 



S 

4 

11 

18 

25 



SEPTEMBER 



s 


M 


T 


W 


T F 


S 
1 
8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 26,27 


28 


29 


30 


1 


. . 


. . 



OCTOBER 




S M 


T|W 


T|F 


S 


..' 1 


2!3 


415 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 


13 


14 15,16 17 


Ig 19 


20 


21 221 23 24 


25 26 


27 


28 29 30 31 






_ _ i 


1 _ 





NOVEMBER 



S M T ^ T ' F ! S 

..;.. ..,.. 1|2|3 
4 I 5 6 7 8 ! 9 110 
11112 13 14 1516 17 
18! 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25,26 27 28 29 30 . . 





DECEMBER 


S 

• • 


M T 

• • • • 


• • 


T 


F S 
.. 1 


2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 . . 


. 


1 > . 







JANUARY 



6 
13 
20 
27 



M 

7 
14 
21 
28 



T 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 



WiTIF 
2 I 3 4 
9 llO 11 
16117 18 
23 24 25 
J0 31 . . 



S 

5 

12 

19 

26 



FEBRUARY 



SIMIT 



3 
10 

17 

24 



4|5 
11 12 



W 



F 
1 
8 



S 
2 
9 



1314 15 16 



18 1920 21 22 23 



25 26 



27128 29 



MARCH 



M 



2 3 
9 10 
16 17 



W 



6 
13 



F S 

• •!i 

7 8 

14 15 



11112 

18 19 20i21 22 
23!24:25,26,27128,29 
301311. 



APRIL 



5 M 

6 7 
13 14 
20 21 



T 
1 
8 
15 



W T F S 

2 3 I 4 5 
9 10 11 12 
16:17 18 19 
22 23 i 24 25 26 



27 


28 


29 

• • 


30 


• • » • 

.. .. 


■ • 


MAY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T|F 

1 2 


S 
3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 110 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 30 31 


JUNE 



s 
1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



M 

2 
9 



4 
11 



T 
3 

10 
161718 
23124 25 
30 



T 

5 
12 
19 
26 



F S 
6 7 

13 14 
20 21 
27 28 



JULY 



s 


M 


T W 


T 


F 


s 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8:9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15,16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 29 3C 

1 
I 


n 




• • 



AUGUST 



SiMT 



W 



3 4 \ 
10 11 12 13 
17 18 1920 
24 25 26:27 

3li..i..i.. 



7 

14 
21 
28 



F 

1 

8 

15 



S 
2 
9 
16 



22 23 
29 30 



SEPTEMBER 



S M T "WIT F S 

. . 1 2 : 3 i 4 I 5 I 6 
7 8 9 IC 11 12 13 
14 15 16il7;l8 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29,30; 



OCTOBER 



s 


M T W 


T 


FiS 


• " 


.. .. 1 


2 


34 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 

• • 


27 

■ • 


28 29 

• ■ * • 


30 

• • 


31 

• • 


• • 



NOVEMBER 




S M T W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


2 3 4 5 

9 10 11 12 
16 17 18 19 
23 24 25 26 

30 . . i . . i . . 


6 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
2i 


8 
15 
22 
29 



DECEMBER 



S 


»5 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


• > 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 


^1 




* • 





JANUARY 



SM 


T 


W 


T 


Fi S 










1 


2 1 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 28,29 


30 31 


FEBRUARY 



S M 

1 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22123 



T 
3 
10 
17 



W|T 

4 5 
11112 
IS 19 



24 25 26 



F 
6 
13 



S 
7 
14 



20 21 
2728 



MARCH 



S 


M T WIT 


F 


S 


1 


2 3 4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 IC 11 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 1819 


2C 


21 


22 


23 24 25126 


27 


28 


29 


3C,31 .. 

1 

. . 1 . . . . 









APRIL 



S 


M T 


^ 


TFIS 




. . 1 . . 


1 

8 


2 
9 


3 ! 4 


5 


6 7 


IC 11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20 21 


2? 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 28 29 

i ! 


30 


.... 









MAY 




S 


M T 


W 


T 


F S 
1 2 


3 


4l5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 


2526 


27 


28 


29 30 


31 


1 
. . i . . 


. . 




.... 









JUNE 



S MjT 

..■ 1 ! 2 
789 
14 15 16 
21122 23 
28 29 30 



WIT 

31 4 
1011 
17 18 



24 



25 



F 

5 

12 

19 

26 



S 

6 

13 

20 

27 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1923-1924 

Unless otherwise indicated, this calendar refers to the activities 

College Park. 



at 



1923 
Sept. 17-18 

Sept. 17 
Sept. 19 

Sept. 19 

Sept. 21 
Sept. 24 



Oct. 1 



Oct. 3 

Nov. 9 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 28 
Nov. 29 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Monday-Tuesday 



Monday 



Wednesday, 8.20 a. m. 



Wednesday, 11.20 a. m. 



Friday, 8.00 p. m. 
Monday 



Monday 



Wedtnesday 

Second Friday, 8 p. m. 
Monday 

Wednesday, 12 m. 
Thursday 



Dec. 4 



Tuesday, 8.20 a. m. 



Entiance Examinations. Regis- 
tration for all students. 

The School of Law, Regular Ses- 
sion begins. 

Instruction for first term begins. 
No admission to classes with- 
out class cards. 

First Student Assembly. 

President's annual address. 

President's reception for new 
students. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without payment 
of additional fee. 

Last day to file schedule in Reg- 
istrar's office without payment 
of fine. 

The School of Medicine. 

The School of Pharmacy. 

The School of Dentistry. 

College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Extension Courses in Commerce. 
Regular Session begins. 

School for Nurses, Regular Ses- 
sion begins. 

Freshman Entertainment. 

Observance of Armistice Day. 
Thanksgiving recess begins. 
The School of Medicine. 
The School of Law. 
The School of Pharmacy. 
The School of Dentistry. 
College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 
Extension courses in Commerce. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
Thanksgiving recess ends. 

Classes begin. 



Dec. 7 

Dec. 15 
Dec. 21 



Dec. 22 

Dec. 22 

1924 

Jan. 2 



Jan. 8 

Jan. 18 

Jan. 21-26 

Jan. 28 

Feb. 2 



Feb. 4 
Feb. 12 



Feb. 15 
Feb. 22 

Mar. 25 



Second Friday after 

Thanksgiving, 8 p. m. 
Friday, 8.00 p. m. 
Friday 



Saturday, 12 m. 
Saturday 



Wednesday, 9.00 a. m. 



Tuesday, 8.20 a. m. 

Friday, 8.00 p. m. 
Monday-Saturday 

Monday, 8.20 a. m. 

Saturday 



Christmas Dance. 

Presentation by "The -Players." 

The School of Medicine. 

The School of Law. 

The School of Pharmacy. 

The School of Dentistry. 

College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Extension courses in Commerce. 
Christmas recess begins after 
last lecture period. 

Christmas recess begins. 

School for Nurses, Christmas 
Recess begins. 

The School of Medicine. 

The School of Law. 

The School of Pharmacy. 

The School of Dentistry. 

College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Extension courses in Commerce. 

School for Nurses. 
Christmas recess ends. Lec- 
tures begin. 

Christmas recess ends. Classes 
begin. 

Entertainment by Glee Club. 

Registration for second semes- 
ter. 

First semester examinations be- 
gin. 

First semester examinations 
end. 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Monday, 8.20 a. m. 
Tuesday 



Third Friday 
Friday 

Tuesday, 11.20 a. m. 



Classes begin. No admission to 
classes without class cards. 

Last day to register or change 
registration without addition- 
al fee. Last day to file sched- 
ule card in Registrar's office 
without payment of fine. 

Intersociety debate. 

Washington's Birthday. Nation- 
al holiday. 

Maryland Day exercises. 



April 17 
April 17 



April 22 



April 23 



Thursday, 12 m. 
Thursday 



Tuesday, 9.00 a. m. 



Wednesday, 8.20 a. m. 



May 14 


Wednesday 


May 16 


Third Friday, 8.30 p. m 


May 23 


Friday, 8.00 p. m. 


May 30 


Friday 


June 2 


Monday, 8.20 a. m. 


June 5 


Thursday, 8.20 a. m. 


June 6 


Friday, 4.10 p. m. 


June 7 


Saturday 



June 8 


Sunday, 11.00 a. m. 


June 11 


Wednesday, 4.10 p. m 


June 12 


Thursday 


June 13 


Friday 



June 14 



Saturday, 11.00 a. m. 



Easter recess begins. 
The School of Medicine. 
The School of Law. 
The School of Dentistry. 
The School of Pharmacy. 
College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 
Extension courses in Commerce. 
Easter recess begins after last 
lecture period. 
The School of Medicine. 
The School of Law. 
The School of Pharmacy. 
The School of Dentistry. 
College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 
Extension courses in Commerce. 

Easter recess ends. 
Easter recess ends. Classes be- 
gin. 
Festival of Music. 

May Ball. 

Presentation by "The Players." 
Decoration Day. National Holi- 
day. 
Examinations for seniors begin. 

Second Semester examinations 

begin. 
Examinations for seniors end. 

The School of Medicine. 
School of Law. 
The School of Dentistry. 
The School of Pharmacy. 
School for Nurses. 
College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. 
Extension Courses in Commerce. 

Commencement Day. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Second Semester examinations 

end. 
Class day. 

Reunion Day. Final Student As- 
sembly. President's Address. 
Commencement Day. Second 
Semester ends. 



'M 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

(Members appointed by the Governor for terms of nine years) : 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Chairman 1916-1925 

Eccleston, Baltimore County 

Robert Grain 1916-24 

Mt. Victoria, Charles County 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer 1916-1923 

Union Trust Co,, Baltimore 

Dr. J. Frank Goodnow 1922-1931 

6 West Madison Street, Baltimore 

John E. Raine 1921-1930 

413 East Baltimore Street, Baltimore 

Charles C. Gelher 1920-1929 

Princess Anne, Somerset County 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary 1919-1928 

Kensingon, Mongomery County 

B. John Black 1918-1927 

Randallstown, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel 1917-1926 

Hagerstown, Washington County 



COMMITTEES 

EXECUTIVE 
Samuel M. Shoemaker, Chairman 
Dr. Frank J. Goodnow 
B. John Black 
Robert Grain 
John M. Dennis 

UNIVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAI WORK . 
Dr. Frank J. Goodnow, Chairman 
Robert Grain 
Dr. W. W. Skinner 

EXPERIMENT STATION AND INVESTIGATIONAL WORK 

B. John Black, Chairman 
Dr. W. W. Skinner 
Henry Holzapfel 

EXTENSION AND DEMONSTRATION WORK 
Robert Grain, Chairman 
B. John Black 
John E. Raine 

INSPECTION AND CONTROL WORK 
John M. Dennis, Chairman 
Henry Holzapfel 
Charles C. Gelder 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 



ALBERT F. WOODS, A.M., D. Agr., LL.D., President 
H. C. BYRD, B.S., Assistant to the President 
DEANS AND DIRECTORS 
J. E. PALMER, Executive Secretary 
MAUDE F. McKENNEY, Financial Secretary 
G. S. SMARDON, Comptroller 
W. M. HILLEGEIST, Registrar 
ALMA H. PREINKERT, Assistant Registrar 
H. L. CRISP, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings 
T. A. HUTTON, Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' 

Supply Store 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President of the University. 
H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 
T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service. 
P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Dean of the College of Agriculture. 
A. N. Johnson, S.B., Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Frederic E. Lee, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 
Henry D. Harlan, LL.D., Dean of the School of Law. 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 
W. S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education. 
M. Marie Mount, A.B., Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics. 
C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 
R. H. Leavitt, Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. A., Head of the Department of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., DAgr., LL.D., President. 
• C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 
E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Secretary. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of Agricultural Experiment Station. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
E. N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 
A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
N. E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 
Frederic E. Lee, Ph.D., F.R.E.S., Professor of Sociology and Political 
Science. 



(The following list is arranged in groups according to title and time of 

appointment) 

Albert F. Woods, M.A., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

Thos. S. Spence, A.m., Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, 
Dean Emeritus of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro, A^B., D.Sc, Professor of Farm Management. 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S., Professor of Systematic Botany and Mycology. 

C. S. Richardson, A.M., Professor of Public Speaking and Extension 
Education. 

Harry Gwinner, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Vice-Dean 
of the College of Engineering. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

*L. B. Broughton, M.S., Professor of Industrial Chemistry, Chairman of 
the Premedical Committee. 

E. N. Cory, M.S., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Physiology and Bio-Chemistry. 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Roy H. Waite, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President and Director of Athletics. 

C. E. Temple, M.S., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

J. E. Metzger, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 

0. C. Bruce, M.S., Professor of Soils. 

C. J. Pierson, A.B., A.M., Professor of Zoology. 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S., Professor of Plant Physiology and Ecology, 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 

R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M., Professor of Animal Pathology. 

H. F. Cotterman, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agricultural Education and 
Rural Sociology, Associate Dean of the College of Education. 

J. A. Gamble, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

E. M. Pickens, D.V.M., A.M., Profc^.ssor of Bacteriology and Animal 
Pathologist of the Biological and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

E. C. Auchter, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., Professor of Home and Industrial Management, 
Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

Edna B. McNaughton, B.S., Professor of Home Economics Education. 

*M. M. Proffitt, Ph.B., Professor of Psychology and Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

N. E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry, State Chemist. 

T. B. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration. 




♦ On leave of absence during 1923-24. 



.♦ 



S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Frieda M. Wiegand, A.B., Professor of Textiles and Clothing 

R. V. Truitt, B.S., M.S., Professor of Aquiculture 

Frederic E. Lee, Ph.D., F.R.E.S., Professor of Sociology and Political 

Science, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Ray W. Carpenter, A.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English and English Literature 

Director of Choral Music. 
A. N. Johnson, S.B., Professor of Highway Engineering, Director of 

Engineering Research, Dean of the College of Engineering. 
R. H. Leavitt, Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry, D.O.L., U. S. A., Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics. 

Adele Stamp, B.S., Dean of Women, Assistant Instructor in Physical 
Education. 

F. W. Geise, M.S., Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education, Professor of 

Education, Director of the Summer School. 
A. E. ZuCKER, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

F. W. Besley, A.B., M.F., D.Sc, Lecturer on Forestry 

Fred Juchhoff, L.L.M., C.P.A., Ph.D., Lecturer on Accountancy and 

Business Administration. 
Frank Collier, Ph.D., Lecturer on Social Psychology. 
George E. Ladd, A.M., Ph.D., Lecturer on Engineering Geology. 
J. H. Shepherd, Special Lecturer on Commercial Law. 
H. W. Stinson, B.S., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

G. J. ScHULZ, A.B., Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 
C. F. Kramer, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

E. S. Johnston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Physiology. 
R. C. Wiley, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
A. S. Thurston, M.S., Associate Professor of Floriculture. 
C. G. EiCHLEiN, A.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Physic's. 
W. B. Kemp, B.S., Associate Professor of Genetics and Agronomy 
J. N. G. Nesbit, B.S., M.E., E.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

A. M. Smith, M.S., Associate Professor of Soils. 
M. Kharasch, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
L. J. Hodgins, B.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
J. T. Spann, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
H. B. HosHALL, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
W. H. McManus, Warrant Officer, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

M. F. Welsh, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Susan Harman, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

George 0. Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Claribel p. Welsh, B.S., Assistant Professor of Foods. 

S. H. Harvey, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 



J. S. Dougherty, Captain, Infantry, D.O.L., Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

J. W. Stanley, Captain, Infantry, D.O.L., Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

H. Linden, Captain, Infantry, D.O.L. (B.S. in Engineering), Assistant 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

S. H. DeVault., A.m., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

G. Eppley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

Leslie E. Bopst, B.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Tressa B. Johnson, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Malcolm R. Haring, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

W. A. Griffith, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene," College Physician. 

M. A. Pyle, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Miltanna R. McVey, Instructor in Library Science, Librarian. 

M. D. Bowers, A.B., Instructor in Journalism. 

L. J. PoELMA, D.V.S., Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

Benjamin Berman, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

J. B. Blandford, Instructor in Horticulture, Horticultural Superin- 
tendent. 

D. C. Lichtenwalner, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

E. F. New, B.P., LL.M., Lecturer on Geography of Commerce. 
W. E. Whitehouse, B.S., Instructor in Pomology. 

Pearl Anderson, A.B., Instructor in Zoology. 

W. H. Simmons, Sergeant, D.E.M.L., U.S.A., Military Instructor. 

E. B. Starkey, M.S., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Arleta R. Dymond, A.B., Instructor in Public Speaking. 
J. H. SCHAD, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

F. J. DoAN, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry. 

D. C. Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 
F. D. Day, B.S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 
L. H. Van Wormer, M.S., Assistant Chemist. 
H. R. Walls, Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

E. C. Donaldson, M.S., Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

A. L. Flenner, B.S., Assistant Chemist. 

B. L. Goodyear, B.S., B. Mus., Teacher of Voice and Piano. 
Jessie Blaisdell (Mrs.), Assistant in Music. 
E. E. Erickson, B.A., Assistant in English. 



n 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS IN REHABILITATION 

DEPARTMENT 

E. F. New, B.P., LL.M., Director of Rehabilitation. 
Albert F. Vierheller, B.S.A., Instructor in Horticulture. 

F. H. Leuschner, B.S., Instructor in Poultry. 
George Harrison, Jr., Instructor in Agriculture. 
Edna B. New, Instructor in Vocational English. 
Florence Kite, Instructor in Farm Arithmetic. 
L. W. Ingham, Instructor in Dairy Husbandry. 
R. W. CuLLEN, Assistant in Farm Engineering. 

G. E. House, Assistant in Horticultural Projects. 
T. H. Bartilson, Assistant in Poultry. 

M. McMaster, Assistant in Greenhouse Management. 



FELLOWS AND LABORATORY ASSISTANTS 



H. F. Jenkins 
J. E. Flynn 
J. N. Fields 
K. B. Chappell 
J. W. Elder 
Mildred Grafflin 
R. E. Marker 



O. P. H. Reinmuth 

J. D. SCHEUCH 

E. G. Vanden Bosche 
H. G. Lindquist 
L. Z. FouTZ 
G. S. Langford 
P. Walker 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

Harry J. Patterson, D.Sc Director and Chemist 

H. B. McDonnell Chemist for the Animal Patho- 
logy Investigations. 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S Botany and Plant Pathology 

Thos. H. White, M.S Vegetable and Floriculture 

Chas. O. Appleman, Ph.D Plant Physiology 

Roy H. Waite, B.S Poultry 

E. N. Cory, M.S Entomology 

A. G. McCall, Ph.D Soils 

J. E. Metzger, B.S Agronomy 

E. M. Pickens, A.M., D.V.M Animal Pathology 

E. C. AucHTER, M.S., Ph.D Horticulture 

Albert White, B.S Superintendent Ridgely Farm 

F. S. Holmes, M.S Seed Inspection 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D , Animal Husbandry 

J. A. Gamble, M.S Dairy Husbandry 

F. W. Geise, M.S Vegetable Breeding 



..m. ^■m -^^ -^^ .M. ^,^M.^KJ M.A.'^ 



M.vM:jKir%.r»LLjl L 2\.Ll\jn 



DEPARTMENT 

E. F. New, B.P., LL.M., Director of Rehabilitation. 
Albert F. Vierheller, B.S.A., Instructor in Horticulture. 

F. H. Leuschner, B.S., Instructor in Poultry. 
George Harrison, Jr., Instructor in Agriculture. 
Edna B. New, Instructor in Vocational English. 



^xT T>v> n .... Associate, Plant Physiology 

E. S. JOHNSTON, Ph.D ^^^ p^^^^ p^^^^^^gy 

T A. Jehle, Ph.D ' 

ios. M. s™. M.S -.v.v.iri:;:: ? ~y 

J^ C^ H^OK. M-S: ::::::::::: Associate. Ento„.ology 

B. L. 1™an;B.S Assistant Agronomy 

«T «, -Q G . ..Assistant, Soils 

I N eTieL M S ■ ■ ■ •;;;:;::.■... ...Assistant, Plant Pathology 

W.N. 5^" ^-^ Assistant. Seed Inspection 

^''''* v™ Assistant. Seed Inspection 

ISABEL V EITCH Assistant. Seed Inspection 

CAKOLINE VEiTCH . .Assistant. Seed Inspection 

MAKION JOHNSON Assistant Animal Pathologist 

L. J POELMA D.V.S .Assistant. Pomology 

^M cZt^'BS ::::: ...Assistant. Plant Physiology 

C. M. Conrad. B S Assistant. Horticulture 

V- R- Bosw-'l^. B.S • • • • ^^^.^^^^^; Entomology 

W D kTmbrough; B-S ;.■;.■.■.■.■.■.■ Assistant, Plant Physiology 

./n u^;..,=.« R 9 Assistant, Agronomy 

M. G. HOLMES B^S ^^^ ^^.^^j Husbandry 

S^r ;.M M S Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 

H- ^'^r ™,nv B S Assistant, Dairy Husbandry 

0. W. Anderson, B.b 

EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF 

*Thomas B Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director . ,• * • 

IHOMAbc. oijviu , . Assistant Director and Specialist in 

*F B BOMBERGER. B.S., A.JVl., U.ac. .ASSisjt.iiii' 1-'"^'- r 

it . c. DuiviBt- , ^^^^j Organization and Market- 

ing 

,^ r Tfnktns State Boys' Club Agent 

*?■ W rmcLESTER' B S Assistant Boys' Club Agent 

:LT VENrM. KELLi B.S State Home Demonstration Agent 

*M?S SiON C. BELL District Agent and Specials 

*Miss B™a knight, B.S District Agent and Specialist 

+v r AiTCHTER M S Ph.D Specialist in Horticulture 

'w R. BALrrD. bJ : Specialist in Vegetable and Land- 

scape Gardening 

M D. bowers, B.S Specialist in Agricultural Journal- 

ism 

T^ T^ TAPMirHAEL BS Specialist in Animal Husbandry 

B. E. C armichael, 15.^ Specialist in Agricultural Engineer- 

tR. W. Carpenter, A.B j^pecidii&t & 

ing 

T A n^.T^,np„ R ^n Specialist in Dairying 

/e N Corvm' S . :::::::::::... .specialist in Entomology 

Ts. H. DEVIULT. A.M., Ph.D specialist in Marketing 

tJ. A. GAMBLE, M.S Specialist m Dairying 

^cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

" „„ pu n .... Associate, Plant Physiology 

B. s. JOHNSTON. Ph.D • p^^^^ p^^j^^j^gy 

T A. Jehle, Ph.D ' 

5.. M. SHVP^ M.S ■;;;;.l:SS; ?~y 

T ■ at T «1m B S Assistant, Agronomy 

R. L. SELLM AN, B_S Assistant, Soils 

H. B. WiNANT, B^S AssistanLJlanl^atholoj 






N 



+S.v;/m"'''^' ^d't- ^^-^ Specialist in Pathology 

^? W O^nl'i^^' ^^li ^P^"^"^* •" ^"™«' Husbandry 

+r^ o D ' Specialist in Poultry 

S" B J^TvTrT' ^-^ ^P^"""^^ '" Educational Extension 

+w T T ^' Specialist in Horticulture 

Ic "f TPMptt' mT°' '^•^•' ^'■^- ■ ■ -Specialist in Farm Management 
tC. E. Temple. M.S Specialist in Pathology 



COUNTY AGENTS 



County 



An^ ^"^^ Headquarters 

l":f 7- -y : 3 F. Mchenry. B.S Cumberland 

Anne Arundel *G. W. Norris, B.S Annapolis 

^^^T' *W. C. ROHDE, B.S Towson 

?^^f^ *J.H.Drury chaney 

^^""^^,^^ *W. C. Thomas, B.S Denton 

?,Zu *F. W. Fuller, B.S Westminster 

p^ , *A. D. Radebaugh Elkton 

^^^^^^^ * J. P. BuRDETTE, A.B La Plata 

2"'f ".^^f *E- W. MONTELL, B.S ; : Cambridge 

• Frederick *John Mc. Gill, Jr Frederick 

?,Z7'', *W. C. JESTER, M.S Oakland 

^^^^^^^ *B. B. Derrick, B.S Bel Air 

Sr'"^ :?f-^-i^^^^^^^^ */.*.;;;Eiiicottcity 

Vf^'l *H. B. Derrick, B.S Chestertown 

Montgomery.. *W. C. Snarr, B.S Rockville 

Prmce George^s. . . . *W. B. Posey, B.S Upper Marlboro 

^^M ^^"^'^ :^- S- '^"^^' ^-^ CeTervme " 

f • ^^^f *G. F. Wathen Loveville 

S^"^^^set *C. Z. Keller, B.S Princess AnnP 

l^}^^': *E. P. WALLS, B.S., M.S :::::Easton '"' 

Z'TZ *?; ^- ^"""^ ^-^ Salisbury 

J^^^^^f ^" If ^' Moore, M.S Hagerstown 

^"^^^^^^^ *E. I. OSWALD, B.S Snow Hill 



ASSISTANT COUNTY AGENT 
Harford *G. R. Stuntz, B.S 



HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 



County. Name Headquarters 

Allegany *Bessie M. Volk Cumberland 

Anne Arundel *Mrs. G. Linthicum Annapolis 

Caroline *Emily C. Kellogg B.S Denton 

Carroll *Rachel Everett Westminster 

Cecil *Elizabeth V. Hodgson Elkton 

Charles *Mrs. E. S. Bohannan La Plata 

Frederick *Elizabeth R. Thompson, B.S Frederick 

Harford * Annie M. Holbrook Bel Air 

Kent *Susan V. Hill Chestertown 

Montgomery *Blanche A. Corwin, B.S Rockville 

Prince Georges *Ellen L. Davis Hyattsville 

St. Mary's *Ethel Joy Leonardtown 

Talbot *Mrs. Olive K. Walls Easton 

Washington *Susan S. Barberson Hagerstown 

Wicomico *Florence H. Mason, B.S Salisbury 

Worcester *LuCY J. Walter Snow Hill 



LOCAL AGENT 
Charles & St. Mary's*LEAH D. Woodson (Col.) 



La Plata 



GARDEN SPECIALIST 

Madison & Lafayette 
Aves., Administra- 
tion Building Adelaide Derringer (Mrs.) 



Baltimore 



Bel Air 



*In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



LOCAL AGENTS 
Southern Maryland. *J. F. Armstrong (Col.) ...'..... Seat Plea.c^anf 
^^^*^- Shore *L. H. Martin (Col.)..! Scfss Tnne 



♦In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture 
fDevoting part time to Extension Work. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1923-1924 

College Park 



ALUMNI 
Messrs. Broughton, Hoshall, Stinson, Hillegeist, Cory, Bomberger, Rich- 
ardson and Spence. 

BUILDINGS 
Messrs. Crisp, Johnson, Creese, Pierson, Carpenter and Mackert. 

CATALOGUE, STUDENT ENROLLMENT AND ENTRANCE 

Messrs. Zimmerman, T. H. Taliaferro, Lee, Creese, Broughton, Hillegeist, 
Appleman, Small and Miss Mount. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Messrs. T. H. Taliaferro, Richardson, Cory, House, Leavitt, Broughton 
and Thurston. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Messrs. Cotterman, Lee, Zimmerman, Appleman, Johnson, Small, Leavitt, 
T. H. Taliaferro, Gordon, and Misses Mount and Preinkert. 

EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS 
Messrs. Appleman, McCall, Gordon, Johnson, Small, Lee and Hillegeist. 

FARMERS' DAY 
Messrs. Patterson, Symons, Zimmerman and Miss Mount. 

GROUNDS AND ROADS 

Messrs. Auchter, Thurston, Crisp, Patterson, Steinberg, Metzger and 
Carpenter. 

PRE-MEDICAL EDUCATION 
Messrs. Cory, Broughton, Davis, Lee, Spence, Wiley and McGlone. 

SANITATION 

Messrs. Pickens, Griffith, McDonnell, Reed, W. T. L. Taliaferro, Cory, 
Pyle and Miss Mount. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Messrs. Byrd, Small, Broughton, Cory, Johnson, Spence and Miss Stamp. 

STUDENT BUSINESS AND AUDITING 

Miss McKenney, and Messrs. Spann, Hoshall, Mackert, Shadick, Bowers 
and President of Students' Assembly. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The University of Marj land 



Location 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park in Prince 
George's County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington branch of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from Washington and thirty- 
two miles from Baltimore. At least eight trains a day from each city 
stop at College Station, thus making the place easily accessible from all 
parts of the State. Telephone connection is made with the Chesapeake 
and Potomac lines. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. The 
suburban town of Hyattsville is two miles to the south, and Laurel, the 
largest town in the county, is ten miles to the north on the same road. 
Access to these towns and to Washington may be had by steam and elec- 
tric railway. The site of the University is particularly beautiful. The 
broad rolling campus and most of the buildings occupy a commanding 
hill, which is covered with forest trees and overlooks the surrounding 
country. In front, on either side of the boulevard, lie the drill ground 
and the athletic field. The buildings of the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion face the boulevard. The farm of the College of Agriculture contains 
about 300 acres, and is devoted to fields, gardens, orchards, vineyards, 
poultry yards, etc., which are used for experimental purposes and demon- 
stration work in agriculture and horticulture. 

The general appearance of the grounds is exceedingly attractive. They 
are tastefully laid off in lawns and terraces ornamented with shrubbery 
and flower beds. 

The location of the University is healthful; the sanitary conditions are 
excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there has been 
practically no serious cases of illness among the students for many years. 

The Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Law, and College of 
Commerce and Administration of the University are located in Baltimore 
at the corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. 

History 

The history of the present University of Maryland practically combines 
the histories of two institutions. It begins with the chartering of the 
College of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 1807, which graduated 
its first class in 1810. In 1812 the institution was empowered to annex 
other departments and was by the same act ^'constituted an University by 
the name and under the title of the University of Maryland." As such, 
its Law and Medical schools have since been especially prominent in the 
South and widely known throughout the country. The Medical School 
building in Baltimore, located at Lombard and Green Streets, erected in 
1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 



For more than a century the University of Maryland stood almost as 
organized in 1812, until an act of the Legislature in 1920 merged it with 
the Maryland State College, and changed the name of the Maryland 
State College to the University of Maryland. All the property formerly 
held by the old University of Maryland was turned over to the Board of 
Trustees of the Maryland State College, the name of which was changed 
to Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered in 1856 under the name 
of the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in 
the Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States, recognizing the 
practical value and increasing need of such colleges, passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits a proportionate amount of unclaimed Western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This 
grant was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland. The Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus 
the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 its control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the Gen- 
eral Assembly granted a new charter to the College and made it the 
Maryland State College. 

The University is coeducational and under the charter every power is 
granted necessary to carry on an institution of higher learning and re- 
search, comparable to the great state universities of the West, in which 
Agriculture and Engineering hold a dominant place along with the Lib- 
eral Arts and the Professions. This is in full accord with the Morrill Act 
of the National Congress and the subsequent acts. This institution, there- 
fore, is the representative of the State and the Nation in higher educa- 
tion and research. The charter provides that it shall receive and ad- 
minister all existing grants from the national government and all future 
grants which may come to the State for this purpose. 

BUILDINGS 



Some eighteen buildings have been erected on the University campus 
for research, extension, and residence educational purposes. The build- 
ings comprised in the groups are the Agricultural Building, Calvert Hall, 
Silvester Hall, the Library, Engineering Buildings, Chemical Building, 

22 



group other buildings are located in Baltimore. 

Agricultural Building 

.• r.ffi.»<= tViP Colleee of Agriculture, College of Educa- 
The Executive Offices, the College oi k g^^^. 

tion. College of Home Economics, ^"^^^^^^fjitr Building. This 
omics Extension Service are housed '" ^^ '^f ~\he building also 
.structure was completed and occupied in April, laio. x 
fontains biological, soils and bacteriological laboratories. 

Buildings in Baltimore 

The buildings of the University in Baltimore are ^f^f^^^^^l^^^ 
of Lombard and Greene streets. The^ consist of he or g ^^^ .^ 

erected in 1814, and more modern buildings adjoining, 
devoted to Law and one the University Hospital. 

Calvert Hall 

Excellent dormitory accommodations for -^^-J^^J^'ltu TZl 
Hall a modern fireproof structure erected and occupied in l»i«- ^ 
fn pU Xe place of the two dormitories destroyed by fire in 1912. 

Silvester Hall 

This large, modern, ^0"-^*-^ ^^"'^^'^^"^f.SttiWesJ!' Ha" in 
used as a men's dormitory and has b^e" ^f ca\edj^, ' the LtituUon 
honor of Dr. R. W. Silvester, who served as president ol 

for 20 years. 

Morrill Hall 

was used for the work in agriculture and engineering. 

Chemical Building 

work in chemistry. 

Engineering Buildings 

The Mechanical Building was the first of^^'l^^.f ^™ Sfo^^ 
structed, having been completed ^^^1^^^^^'^^:^:^'^ Electrical 
tgtetinrSSL,^raccom;an^^^ shJps, -re built in 1910. 
?he ThreTbuiWings are connected by closed passageways. 

23 



New Construction 

The General Assembly of the Legislature appropriated certain funds 
to be expended on new construction at the University. Three structures 
are now under way, and, unless something unforeseen occurs to prevent, 
they will be ready for service before opening of the University in Septem- 
ber. These are as follows: 

1 Dairy Building. — This building will be thoroughly modern in every 
detail. It will be used in the development of dairying in its commercial 
as well as scientific aspects. * 

2. Gymnasium. — This building provides quarters for the Military De- 
partment, as well as adequate facilities to carry on the physical develop- 
ment of the student. 

3. Stadium. — This structure provides adequate accommodation for 
spectators at the outdoor contests, dressing rooms for contestants and 
rest rooms for patrons. 

The Infirmary 

The infirmary was erected in 1901 and makes possible excellent treat- 
ment for students in cases of sickness. It has a private ward for segre- 
gation of contagious diseases, quarters for the trained nurse, operating 
room, doctor's office, special culinary equipment, and accommodations for 
twenty patients. 

The Horticultural Building 

Classrooms, propagation rooms, and offices are in the Horticultural 
Building, completed in 1915. Ten modern greenhouses are constructed as 
a part of this building. 

The Stock Judging Pavilion 

This building is used for stock judging competitions, for stock shows, 
and to house a part of the equipment of the dairy husbandry and farm 
machinery departments of the College of Agriculture. Connecting this 
building with the Agricultural Building is an auditorium in which 600 
persons may be seated. 

The Poultry Buildings 

Research in poultry projects and laboratory practice is carried on in the 
Poultry Building. The main building contains classrooms, laboratories, 
offices and incubating rooms. 

Experiment Station Group 

The main building of the experiment station group is a large brick 
structure of the colonial period. It contains the office of the Director of 
the Station, the chemical and physiological laboratories, and a laboratory 
for research in soils. Other buildings of this group contain seed and milk 
testing laboratories and classrooms. There are also greenhouses, an 
Agronomy Building, a secondary horticultural building, barns, farm 
machinery buildings, silos, etc. 

24 



Temporary Dining-Hall 

A temporary wooden structure has been erected to serve as a dining- 
. t unT he Legislature appropriates money to put up a permanent 
bu d"g This wo'oden struct'u're is well built and contains ^-tchen equ^^^^^ 
ment and other facilities for comfortably taking care of about 500 per- 

^^"^* Other Buildings 

dwelling-houses in which it houses part of its labor. A brick power 
Srue contains apparatus for pumping all water for University us- 
Another small frame house contains machinery for canning and drymg 

fruits and vegetables. 

The Filtration Plant 

Recently completed is a modern filtration plant for furnishing an ample 
supply of water for use in the dormitories and general ""-«-• yb-'J^ 
ws This plant consists of a reservoir with a reserve supply of 1,500.000 
gallons, sediment tanks, filter beds, pumps, etc. 

Gerneaux Hall 

This building is a dormitory for girls, and is fitted with several con- 

veniences for their use. 

Practice House 

This house is newly built and equipped with all appliances of a modern 
home. It also serves as a dormitory for girls. 

Library Building 

ofi\ic?irc^iS^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

rnd^rjLidsViSc subjects. The second floor is used for general read- 

"'Thl;f trin^Librarv Loan systems of the Library of Congress 
and the United Stltes Department of Agriculture the University Library 

5.30 P. M.i .«d .11 evenings exc.pt Saturday, from 6 P. M. to 10 P. M. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS 



High School Scholarships 

While the University has neither endowment nor loan funds with which 
to assist students, it has established for each high and preparatory 
school in Maryland and the District of Columbia one scholarship each 
year. For the three counties of Maryland which do not have high schools, 
Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's, one scholarship each year is given. 
These scholarships have a value of fifty dollars and are credited to the 
holder's account. 

These scholarships are offered under the following conditions: 

1. The holder must be a graduate of a high or preparatory school and 
qualified to enter the freshman class. 

2. The appointment to the scholarships must be made by the county 
school superintendent upon recommendation of the principal of the high 
school. In making recommendations high school principals should take 
into consideration not only class standing but also inability to meet the 
expenses of a university education. 

3. The appointment shall be made for the term normally required to 
complete the curriculum selected. 

4. The scholarship will be forfeited by indifference to scholastic work 
or by disregard of rules of the University. 

5. Scholarships awarded to preparatory schools and to high schools of 
Baltimore and Washington shall be given on recommendation of the prin- 
cipals direct to the University. Recipients of these scholarships must be 
qualified to enter the freshman class. 

6. Appointees from Charles, St. Mary's and Calvert counties may take 
one of the non-collegiate currigulums or they may, if qualified, take one 
of four-year curriculums leading to a degree. 

Fellowships 

The University also offers a number of fellowships. These may be given 
either to its own graduates or the graduates of other colleges who desire 
to pursue courses in the Graduate School leading to advance degrees. 
Fellowships are available in the College of Agriculture, College of Engi- 
neering and College of Arts and Sciences. These fellowships are worth 
from $500 to $720 per year. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 



Honorable mention is given to students for excellence in undergraduate 
work in the upper one-fifth of each college as follows: The upper one- 
tenth is given first honors, and the rest second honors, provided that the 
student's course average is at least B. 

26 



Debating and Oratory 

four institutions. . , , .. 

Athletics 

„, , t 1 onR nffpr., annually to "the man who typifies the best in 

The class of 1908 offers ^"7^''\'° , , j^ j^en in honor of former 
college athletics" a gold medal The n^^dal is g.v • ^^^ 

President R. W. Silvester and is known as The bilvestei 
Excellence in Athletics." ^^^ ^.^.^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

The class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal to the member of the 
battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. 

The Company Sword 
The class of 1897 awards annually to the captain of the best dr^ed 
company of the University battalion a silver mounted sword. 

The Citizenship Prize 

^::'^::^:^^v^^e. the model <^^^^:x'''' 

the general advancement of the interests of the University. 

The Goddard Medal 

The j™ D.«ia. G.dd.rd M"«™v"'':L\rr*™»ri"'' ". 

r ::r,1s;trbX AnrL Goddard ,.^. o. Wa.hin^.n. D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal 

^1 i. 4? c^.»TY,o PVii ^iema Fraternity offers annually a 

during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal 

Tho Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually 
a :«« naHLu.,., s.ud,„. i„ .he .-Ij"-'- t.-^ S S 

recognition of high scholarship. 

27 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The Alumni Association 

Un^ver^!r"k1rAt""K' «" organization composed of alumni of the 

sev rl branch tstarns" It" Hr f""' '' ^'^ ^"'^^"-^"^ -<1 ^^ 
uictiiLii associations. It publishes a monthlv nan^r Tv.^ q^- ^- 

Universitv AlnmTmc tv,^ a • ^- . '"^iitmy paper, ihe btate 

The Student Assembly 

The Student Assembly is composed of all the students «nH ic .. • 7 

council IS the executive committee of the Student As^PmhU. or,/ / 
co-operation .ith the faculty in the management ^fsSntaff^t:^'^ " 

The Dramatic Club 
The Dramatic Club is organized for the purpose of presenting at least 
one play each year. It is made up of students who have had experience 
in th>s work since coming to the University or in high schoot '^^'"'"'^^ 

Fraternities and Sororities 

Societies 

Me^rreV'^TheZ ri.' "'' f^ '"^="t«'"«d by the students, the Poe and New 
Mercer. These hold weekly meetings at which regular programs are pre 

che'mttfv'sneln'T'"' >f '"' 1^ "''"'' "^ "" ^*»<*-t^ specializing in 
chemistry Special lectures by students and specialists in certain branches 

of^chem:stry and open discussions of various chemical questions are fe" 

Enl?neen"n^g""""^ ^°"''^ " '^"'"P"^^^ «^ ^^^'^-t^ - the College of 

th^^t.«"TtS'':' 'irT'^^' --'•''-^ to special interests into 
bandrj Soctty "*'' ''' ^"""°"^ '°'='^*^' ^"^ '"^^ •^"■-al Hus- 

simZTt^tZlfZ^'ri" "?' f "f 'r""^ ^''''"''' '^' Agricultural Club 
""IneeHngt' a^lulturr"^^' '''"'' ^^"^' *'^^ ^'^^ ^'^''^"^'^^ P^*-" to 

Student Grange 
The University is fortunate in having a chapter of the time-honored 
national fraternity known as "The Grange." Wfth the excepUon o^tw^^ 
faculty advisers, the Student Grange membership is made up entire^ 
from the student body. New members are elected by ballot when thev 
have proven their fitness for the organization. ^ 

28 



The general purposes of the Student Grange are to furnish a means 
through which students keep in touch with state and national problems 
of agricultural, economic or general educational nature; to gain expe- 
rience in putting into practice our parliamentary rules; to learn the 
meaning of leadership and to learn how to assume leadership that aids 
in the ultimate task of serving in one's community. 

Economics Club 

This club is composed of students preparing for business careers in 
the Department of Economics and Business Administration of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Phi Kappa Phi 

Phi Kappa Phi is a national honorary association open to honor stu- 
dents in all branches of learning. 

Two classes of students may become eligible for election to membership 
in Phi Kappa Phi. First, any senior who ranks in scholarship among the 
upper one-fourth of the graduating class; second, any graduate student 
who would have been eligible as an undergraduate and who has made an 
honorable record in graduate work. 

The prime object of the fraternity is to emphasize the attainment of 
scholarship and character and to stimulate mental achievement through 
the prize of membership. 

Alpha Zeta 

Alpha Zeta is a* National Honorary Agricultural Fraternity open to 
students who have been in the institution at least three terms and who 
are in the upper two-fifths of the class so far as scholastic standing is 
concerned. From this number students are elected to the fraternity who 
show signs of scholarship and leadership, and have won the respect of the 
faculty and student body. The object, therefore, of the fraternity is to 
foster scholarship, leadership and good fellowship. 

Le Cercle Francais 

This club was organized in 1919 by the Department of French. Its 
membership is composed of the faculty of the department, students pur- 
suing courses in French, and others interested in the study of that lan- 
guage. The aims of the club are to awaken a live interest in French lit- 
erature, culture, history and customs, and to acquire facility in the use 
of the language. Although fostered by the College of Arts and Sciences, 
this club is not restricted to students enrolled therein, but is open to all 
who are interested. 

Clubs 

The Rifle Club is affiliated with the National Rifle Association and en- 
gages in matches with other colleges and rifle organizations. 

The Chess and Checker Club is organized for the promotion of these 
games among those that engage in them. Annual tournaments are con- 
ducted for which gold medals are awarded. 

29 



The County Clubs are organizations of students from the same counties. 
The Baltimore City Club and District of Columbia Club are organizations 
of the same nature. 

The Rossbourg Club is the student organization which has charge of 
most of the formal dances of the students. This club is open to all stu- 
dents. 

The Keystone Club came into being when a score of men from the 
"Keystone State" found each other on the campus. All Pennsylvanians 
are eligible. Its aim is to promote a feeling of interest and good fellow- 
ship among the students from Pennsylvania. 

The Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations are or- 
ganized to be of general service to the students. They perform important 
functions in matters of obtaining employment for worthy students, in 
receiving new students, and in helping to maintain generally a high 
morale and a state of good fellowship in the student body. 

The DiaiTiondback 

A weekly five-column newspaper, The Diamondback, is published by 
the students. This publication reflects the news and atmosphere of gen- 
eral college life. 

ADMINISTRATION 



The government of the University is vested by law primarily in a 
Board of Regents, consisting of nine members, each of whom is appointed 
by the Governor for a term of nine years. The administration of the 
University is vested in the President. The University Senate and the 
Administrative Council act in an advi5:ory capacity to the President. The 
composition of these bodies is given elsewhere. The faculty of each col- 
lege or school constitutes a group which passes on all questions that have 
exclusive relationship to the unit represented. 

For purposes of administration and coordination of similar groups of 
studies, the following educational organizations are in effect : 

College of Agriculture. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Commerce and Business Administration. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Home Economics. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

Graduate School. 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Law. 

School of Medicine. 

School of Pharmacy. 

Summer School. 

30 



The College of Agriculture offers curricula in; (1) General Agricul- 

. . (2r£ronomy; (3) Farm Management; (4) Geology and Soils; 

'ATvlmolty^^^^^^ Gardening; (7) Floriculture; (8) Land- 

cape Ga^^^^^^^^^^ (^) Economic Entomology; (10) Animal Husbandry; 

(11) Dairy Husbandry; (12) Two- Year Agriculture. 

tL Colleee of Arts and Sciences offers courses of study with majors 
i,.^' irSgtaTsciences; (2) Classical Languages -d Literature; 
rq\ EnLlish including Journalism and Public Speaking; (4) History and 
S ?oJal ScSS %) Mathematics; (6) Modern Languages and Lit- 
ratSe ^FreS^^^^ and Spanish) ; (7) Philosophy and Psychology; 

^^PhS Sciences, including Chemistry, Physics and Geology. 
Surs!s are also offered in Music and Library Science. Special curricula 
are Sed in the Pre-Medical Group, and in Industrial, General and Agn- 

cultural Chemistry. 

The College of Education offers curricula in: (1) Agricultura Educa- 
tion^ (2rHome Economics Education ; (3) Industrial Education; (4) 

General Education. . ., ^ . 

The College of Engineering offers curricula in: (1) CivU Engineering, 
(2) Electrical Engineering; (3) Mechanical Engineering. 

The College of Home Economics offers a curriculum in which may 
be obtaS'the general principles of home ^<^<^-^-^l\:J^l''Ji:l 
liome economics for teaching purposes, or a specialized knowledge of pai 
Sai phases which deal with the work of the dietitian or institutional 

manager. . , i_ # fv^^ 

The Department of Military Science and Tactics has charge of the 
worl< of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit established by the War 
Department During the first two years of the male student's stay at the 
SSty he is required to take the Basic ^^-O-Tf courses. In case o 
physical disability a course covering an equivalent ^^""^^ j\''^l 
hours must be taken. During his junior and senior y^-'^^^^^J'^^XSg 
ble, elect each year six credit hours in the Reserve Officers Training 

Corps. . 1 • 1 ,,« 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation -"^^s in c^se 
cooperation with the military department and supervises all physical 
training, general recreation and intercollegiate athletics. 

The Graduate School offers courses in any of the ^^^J^cts given in the 
colleges of the University in which a graduate may f-- J^J^^^",.^; 
advanced degree. The Graduate School consists of all students taking 
g u te wS In the various departments. Those ^-'/f ^J^^-^, 
graduate work in the various departments constitute he ff^^^^y «f/^ 
Laduate School, presided over by a research specialist designated as 

^formation in regard to offerings of the S^^^f ^^^^^^If'^VSlSet? 
of Pharmacy and Dentistry and the School of Law and the College 
Con.merce and Business Administration will be found elsewhere. 

31 



The Summer School of six weeks offers courses in subjects given during 
the regular session of the University, with the exception of Medicine 
Dentistry, Pharmacy and Law, and in special subjects, such as school 
administration, classroom management and principles of secondary edu 
cation for high school and elementary school teachers. Certain courses 
given m the Summer School are of collegiate grade and may be counted 
toward the bachelor's degree. Advanced courses may count toward the 
master's degree. 

EXTENSION AND RESEARCH 



Agriculture and Home Economics 

The agricultural and home economics extension service of the Uni- 
versity, m co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture 
carries to the people of the State through practical demonstrations con- 
ducted by specialists of the College of Agriculture and county agents the 
results of investigations in the fields of agriculture and home economics 
The organization consists of the administrative forces, including the direc 
tor, assistant director, specialists and clerical force, the county agricul- 
tural demonstration agents, and the home demonstration agents in each 
county and in the chief cities of the State. The county agents and the 
specialists jointly carry on practical demonstrations under the several 
projects m the production of crops or in home-making, with the view of 
putting into practice on the farms of the State improved methods of 
agriculture and home economics that have stood the test of investiga- 
tion, experimentation and experience. Movable schools are held in the 
several counties. At such schools the specialists discuss phases of agri- 
culture and home economics in which the people of the respective counties 
are particularly interested. 

The work of the Boys' Agricultural Clubs is of especial importance from 
an educational point of view. The specialists in charge of these projects, 
in co-operation with the county agricultural agent and the county school 
officers and teachers, organize the boys of the several communities of the 
county into agricultural clubs for the purpose of teaching them by actual 
practice the principles underlying agriculture. The boys hold regular 
meetings for the discussion of problems connected with their several proj- 
ects and for the comparison of experiences. Prizes are offered to stimu- 
late interest in the work. 

The home economics specialists and agents organize the girls into 
clubs for the purpose of instructing them in the principles underlying 
canning, drying and preserving fruits and vegetables, cooking, dressmak- 
ing and other forms of home economics work. 

The educational value of the demonstrations, farmers' meetings, mov- 
able schools, clubs and community shows is incalculable. They serve to 
carry the institution to the farmer and to the home-maker. 

32 



General Extension 

This phase of the extension service of the University is conducted in co- 
operation with the United States Bureau of Education, and is intended 
to make the general branches of the educational curriculum of greater 
service to the people of the State. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Intimately associated with the extension service is the experimental 
work in agriculture. 

In 1847 an act was passed making provision for a State laboratory in 
which the application of chemistry to agriculture was to be undertaken. 
In 1858 experimentation was undertaken on the College farm. After two 
or three years this work was interrupted by the general financial distress 
of the time and by the Civil War. In 1888 under the provisions of the 
Hatch Act of the preceding year, the Agricultural Experiment Station 
was established. 

This act states the object and purpose of the experiment stations as 
follows : 

That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to con- 
duct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants 
and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the 
remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their 
different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative crop- 
ping as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new 
plants or trees for acclimation ; the analysis of soils and water ; the chemi- 
cal composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments de- 
signed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the 
adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and 
digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and 
cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the 
agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed 
advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of the 
respective States or Territories. 

Prior to the establishment of the experiment stations there was practi- 
cally no agricultural science in this country. The work done by these 
institutions during the past quarter of a century has given a science of 
agriculture to teach, and laid a broad foundation for development. 

The placing of agricultural demonstrations and extension work on a 
national basis has been the direct outgrowth of the work of the experi- 
ment station. 

The students of the University, taking courses in the College of Agri- 
culture, are kept in close touch with the investigations in progress. 

The Eastern Branch 

The Eastern Branch of the University of Maryland is located at Prin- 
cess Anne, Somerset County. It is maintained for the education of ne- 
groes in agriculture and the mechanic arts. 

33 



INCOME 

The University is supported entirely by funds appropriated for its use 
by the State and Federal Governments. The appropriations from the 
Federal Government are derived from the original Land Grant Act, from 
the second Morrill Act, the Nelson Act, the Smith-Hughes and Smith- 
Lever Acts and the Hatch and Adams Acts. The University, with the 
exception of its professional schools in Baltimore, charges no tuition and 
consequently has no funds from that source. 

ADMISSION 



General Statement 

An applicant for admission to any of the colleges or schools of the 
University must be at least sixteen years of age. 

Women are admitted to all of the departments under the same condi- 
tions and on the same terms as men. 

Students may be admitted at the beginning of either semester but 
should enter, if possible, at the beginning of the first semester (in 1923, 
September 17). Students can seldom enter the University to advantage 
except at the opening of the school year. 

In general the requirements for admission to the freshman class are 
the same as those prescribed for graduation by the approved high schools 
of Maryland. A candidate for admission by certificate must be a grad- 
uate of an approved high school or other accredited school. Applicants 
who have not been graduated from accredited schools must pass entrance 
examinations designated by the University Entrance Board. 

Number of Units Required 

At least fifteen units of high school or other secondary school work in 
acceptable subjects must be offered by every candidate. 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school 
and constitutes approximately a quarter of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 
60 minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Two 
laboratory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as 
equivalent to one class exercise. 

Required and Elective Subjects 
* Prescribed Units 

English 3 

fMathematics 2 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total ~7 

♦In addition to the prescribed units listed, two years of any one foreign language are 
required for admission to the pre-medical curriculum. 

tAn additional unit of mathematics is required for admission to the College of En- 
gineering. The additional unit should include Algebra, i^o. and Solid Geometry, %. 

34 



Elective Subjects 



To be selected from 

Agriculture 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Civics 

Commercial Subjects 

Drawing 

Economics 

English 

General Science 



the following subjects: . 

Geology 

History 

Home Economics 

Industrial Subjects 

Language 

Mathematics 

Physical Geography 

Physics 

Physiology 

Zoology 



Methods of Admission 

The credits required for admission to the undergraduate departments 
may be secured as follows : 

(a) By certificate 

(b) By examination 

(c) By transfer from another university or college of 

recognized standing 

(a) Admission by Certificate 

Blank certificates for students wishing to enter the University by cer- 
tificate from an approved high school or other secondary school may be 
had of the Registrar. They should be obtained early and filled out and 
sent to the Registrar for approval as soon as possible after the close of 
the high school in June. 

The State Board of Education prepares a list of approved high schools 
each year. The University accepts graduates from these schools without 
question. Other preparatory schools may be visited by the high school 
inspector upon request. 

Entrance credit will also be accepted on certificate from the following 

sources : 

(1) From school accredited by the Association of Colleges and Prepara- 

tory Schools of the Southern States. 

(2) From schools accredited by the North Central Association of Col- 

leges and Secondary Schools. 

(3) From schools accredited to the state universities which are in- 

cluded in the membership of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

(4) From schools approved by the New England College Entrance 

Certificate Board. 

(5) From high schools and academies registered by the Regents of the 

University of the State of New York. 



35 



(6) From College Entrance Examination Board of New York. 

(7) From high and preparatory schools on the accredited list of other 

state boards of education where the requirements for graduation 
are equivalent to the standard set by the Maryland State Board 
of Education. 

(8) From the state normal schools of Maryland and other state normal 

schools having equal requirements for graduation. 

(b) Admission by Examination 

I. The University Entrance Examinations. 

The University entrance examinations are given at the University in 
College Park immediately before the opening of the first semester in 
September. Students who need to take the examinations should make all 
necessary preparations several iveeks in advance. These examinations 
cover all the subjects required or accepted for entrance outlined. 

An examination fee of $5.00 is charged for entrance examinations. 

II. The Examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

The certificate of the College Entrance Examination Board, showing a 
grade of 60 per cent, or higher will be accepted for admission in any 
elective subject. These examinations will be held only once a year beg'n- 
ning the third I^onday in June. 

All applications for examination must be addressed to the Secretary of 
the College Entrance Examination Board, 431 West 117th Street, New 
York, N. Y., and must be made upon a blank form to be obtained from 
the Secretary of the board on application. 

Applications for examinations at points in the United States east of the 
Mississippi River and at points on the Mississippi River must be received 
by the Secretary of the Board at least three weeks in advance of the ex- 
aminations; applications for examinations at points in the United States 
west of the Mississippi River must be received at least four weeks in 
advance of the examinations; and applications for examinations outside 
of the United States must be received at least six weeks in advance of the 
examinations. 

Applications received later than the time specified will be accepted when 
it is possible to arrange for the admission of the candidate concerned, but 
only on payment of $6.00 in addition to the usual fee. 

The examination fee is $6.00 for all candidates examined at points in 
the United States, and $20.00 for all candidates examined outside of the 
United States. The fee, which cannot be accepted in advance of the ap- 
plication, should be remitted by postal order, express order or draft on 
New York to the order of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

III. The New York Regents' Examinations. 

Credit will be accepted also from the examinations conducted by the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

36 



(c) Admission by Transfer of Entrance Credits From Other 

Colleges or Universities 

A person who has been admitted to another college or university of 
recognized standing will be admitted to this University by presenting a 
certificate of honorable dismissal from the institution from which he 
comes and an afficial statement of the subjects upon which he was ad- 
mitted to such institution, provided that the work appears to be equiva- 
lent to that required by the University of Maryland. 

Students intending to transfer to the University of Maryland must 
present an official statement of their college credits to the Registrar. 

Special Requirements of Colleges and Schools 

Requirements for admission to the Schools of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy 
and Dentistry will be found elsewhere under chapters given to these 
schools. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

A student coming from a standard college or university may secure ad- 
vanced standing by presenting a statement of his complete academic rec- 
ord certified by the proper officials. This statement must be accompanied 
by a set of secondary school credentials presented for admission to the 
college or university. Full credit is given for work done in other institu- 
tions when found to be equivalent in extent and quality to that required 
at this University. An applicant may request examination for advanced 
credit in any subject. In case the character of a student's work in any 
subject is such as to create doubt as to the quality of that which preceded 
it elsewhere, the University reserves the right to revoke at any time any 
credit assigned on certificate. 

Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may secure, 
in no case will he be given the baccalaureate degree with less than one 
year of resident work. 

Unclassified Students 

Mature persons who have had insufficient preparation to pursue any of 
the four-year curricula may, with the consent of the Committee on En- 
trance, matriculate for such subjects as they are fitted to take. Such 
students, however, will be ineligible for degrees. 

Graduation, Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates 

All undergraduate four-year courses at College Park lead to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. The total requirements for 
graduation vary, according to the type of work in the different colleges 
and schools. A credit hour is one lecture or recitation each week for one 
semester; two or three hours of laboratory or field work are counted 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation. All practical work is scheduled 
for two or three hours, depending upon the nature of the work. To find 
full information of requirements, the student should refer to the descrip- 
tion of the school in which interested. 

37 



Candidates are recommended for graduation after they have completed 
the prescribed course of study, including all the required work and 
enough electives to total the credit hours required in the various colleges 
and schools. ^ 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Master of Arts, 
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy in Arts, Doctor of Philosophy in 
Science, Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Bache- 
lor of Laws, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, Graduate in 
Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

Degrees are not granted to the students in the two-year curricula, but 
at graduation time certificates are awarded. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 



MAKE ALL CHECKS PAYABLE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT OF THE SEMESTER 
CHARGES. 

In order to reduce the cost of operation, all fees are due and payable 
as a part of the student's registration and all persons must come pre- 
pared to pay the full amount of the semester charges. No student will 
be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

The following listed charges represent the fees which must be paid by 
all students who room and board at the University. Special fees will be 
found in paragraphs immediately following the list of chargea. 

First Second Year 

Semester Semester Totals 

Fixed charges $30.00 $30.00 $60.00 

Board (36 weeks at $6.75) 121.50 121.50 243.00 

Lodging (38 weeks at $1.85) 35.15 35.15 70.30 

Laundry (36 weeks at $ .60) 10.80 10.80 21.60 

♦Reserve fee 10.00 10.00 

tAthletic fee 15.00 15.00 

Totals (exclusive of special fees) $222.45 $197.45 $419.90 

A matriculation fee of $5.00 will be charged to all freshmen. 

No credits will be issued to students who leave the University without 
having turned in the required clearance slip to the Financial Department 
and paid all charges shown thereon. 



•This fee will be returned at the close of the year, less damage charges, if any, 
except to those students who have occupied rooms -without first signing the room register 
kept by the Dormitory Manager at his office in Room No. 121 Silvester Hall, or who have 
moved from the rooins assigned to them, without his approval, in which case the entire 
fee will be forfeited, and damage or other charges which may be shown on their clear- 
ance slips will be made against them. 

tThese fees constitute a fund whifh is collected from all students in the University 
at College Park for the maintenance of athletics, and the entire amount is turned over to 
the Athletic Board for disbursement. 

38 



Non-residents, except from the District of Columbia, will be charged 
a fee of $50.00 per semester. 

Students taking pre-medical work will be charged a special fee of 
$25.00 per semester. 

If a check or draft accepted by the Financial Department for collec- 
tion is returned by the bank on which it is drawn, the student who pre- 
sented it will be required to pay a fine of $5.00 in addition to the amount 
of the check and the protest fees. An additional fine of 50 cents per day 
will be added for every day in excess of seven days from the time notice 
is sent to the student until the check or draft is made good. 

Room Reservations. Students who desire to reserve rooms in the 
dormitories must register their names and their selection of rooms with 
the dormitory manager, depositing $10.00 with him as a reserve fee. 
(See table of expenses.) This fee will be deducted from the first semes- 
ter charges if a student returns. If not, it will be forfeited. For further 
information regarding this fee see preceding paragraph. Students who 
fail to make reservation may not be able to obtain rooms upon their re- 
turn. Reservations may be made at any time during the closing month 
of the year by students already in the University, and by new students 
up to September 1st, 1923. No rooms will be held for old students unless 
the reservation fee has been paid. 

The cost of books, supplies and personal needs is not taken into con- 
sideration in the foregoing statement. They depend largely on the tastes 
and habits of the individual student. Books and supplies average about 

$40.00. 

The fixed charges made to all students are a part payment of overhead 
expenses, such as janitor service, hospital and doctor's fees, general lab- 
oratory fees, library, physical training, etc. 

Board, lodging and other charges may vary from semester to semester, 
but every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

Board and lodging may be obtained at boarding houses or in private 
families if desired. 

Students rooming outside the University may obtain board and laundry 
at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunch at nearby lunch rooms. 

All the University property in possession of the individual student will 
be charged against him, and the parent or guardian must assume respon- 
sibility for its return without injury other than results from ordinary 

wear. ., ^. i 

All students assigned to dormitories are required to provide themselves 

with one pair of blankets for single bed, two pairs of sheets for single 
bed, four pillow cases, six towels, one pillow, two laundry bags, one broom 
and one waste basket. 

39 



$2.00 
1.00 
1.00 

2.00 

10.00 

5.00 

1.00 
to, a 



Special Fees 

Bacteriology Laboratory fee 

Fee for special condition examination 

Fee for changes in registration after first week of semester 

Fee for failure to register within seven days after opening of semes- 
ter 

Graduation fee payable prior to graduation 

Certificate fee payable prior to graduation 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's office within 

seven days after opening of semester 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted 
student who is in arrears in his accounts. 

Graduate Fees 

Each graduate student is subject to a matrculation fee of $10.00, a 
fixed charge of $1.50 per semester credit hour, and a diploma fee of $10.00. 

Withdrawals 

When a student desires to withdraw from the University, he is required 
to secure from his Dean a written approval, which must be presented to 
the Registrar. CHARGES FOR FULL TIME WILL BE CONTINUED 
AGAINST HIM UNLESS THIS IS DONE. 

Students who withdraw before the end of any semester will be charged 
$7.00 per week for board and $2.00 per week for lodging for that portion 
of the semester preceding their withdrawal. 

Refunds 

No fixed charge will be refunded. 

No laboratory fee will be refunded after the middle of the semester. 

The low charge for board at the dining hall is made possible only by 
the use of the semester basis in figuring costs. The overhead is fixed by 
the semester and no refunds can be made for short absences without a 
loss to the dining hall and to the students who eat there. Therefore, no 
refunds will be made except in case of withdrawal or prolonged absence 
due to sickness or unavoidable cause. 

Baltimore Schools 

The fees and expenses for schools located in Baltimore are: 

Matriculation Tuition Laboratory Gradiuttion 

Medical $5.00 each year 

Dental 5.00 once only 

Pharmacy 5.00 

Law 10.00 



« 



$300.00* 






200.00 


$10.00 


$15.00 


175.00 




10.00 


lOO.OOt 




10.00 



♦Medical Students who are permanent residents of the State of Maryland are allowed 
a reduction in tuition of $50.00. 

tTuition for freshmen and new students in -the Law School is $125.00. 



40 



Commercial Extension Course 

Matriculation fee of $5.00 is charged all regular or special students. 
Payable once only. 

Day Course $185.00 a year, payable $92.50 each semester in advance 

Evening Course. . . 95.00 a year, payable 47.50 each semester in advance 

Special Evening Classes — $35.00 in advance, or $20.00 each semester. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00. 

Applicants for admission to any of the schools are charged a record 
investigation fee of $2.00. 

Dental students are required to pay, once only, a dissecting fee of 
$15.00. 

A breakage fee of $10.00 is charged to each student in the Medical 
School and School of Pharmacy. 

ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 



Data of Registration and Penalty for Late Registration 

Registration for the first semester takes place during the first two days 
of the term. Students register for the second semester during the week 
beginning January 21, 1924. 

After seven days from the opening of a semester fees are imposed for 
a change of registration or for late registration. 

Students, who for any reason are more than seven days late in register- 
ing, must secure permission from the instructors in charge for admission 
to courses. Such permission must be given in writing to the student's 
dean before course cards will be issued. 

Physical Examination and Physical Training 

All students who enter the University undergo a physical examination 
by the physician in charge. This is conducted in cooperation with the 
Military Department under the direction of which most of the work in 
physical training is done. The examination is also a measure for pro- 
tecting the health of the student body. 

Maximum and Minimum Schedule 

The prescribed number of credit hours that a student ordinarily may 
carry ranges from 15 to 19. No student may register for less than the 
ordinary number without permission from his dean. 

A student who obtains an average grade of "B** in any semester may, 
with the permission of his dean, be allowed to carry such additional 
courses in the succeeding semester as may be scheduled. This privilege 
is forfeited if the student's average grade falls below "B". 

No regular student working for a degree may carry less than 12 credit 
hours. 

41 



Examinations 

Examinations are given at the end of each semester. The final grade 
is derived from the average daily grade and the examination grade. 

Grading System 

Students are graded with the following marks: A, B, C, D, E, and F. 
A, B, C, and D are passing; E represents a condition and F a failure. 

Student Advisory and Honor System 

A Committee comprising five members of the faculty acts as the advi- 
sory board to the Students' Executive Council of the Students' Assembly. 
The Students' Executive Council, with the aid of the Advisory Board, 
manages all student affairs. The Honor System is in effect for all stu- 
dents, and each student always is on his honor to live up to the highest 
principles of democratic government. 

The Students' Assembly 

All students assemble in the Auditorium at 11:20 o'clock every Wednes- 
day. Every other Wednesday is turned over to the students to transact 
business which concerns the whole student body. The Department of 
Public Speaking arranges the programme for the remaining Wednesdays. 

General Suggestions t6 New Students 

Candidates for admission to the University should correspond with the 
Registrar at College Park, who in turn will supply them with the neces- 
sary forms for transferring preparatory credits. It is advisable for pro- 
spective students to dispose of the preliminaries early in the year in order 
to prevent disappointments, for if a student comes to the University with- 
out taking the preliminary steps he may find that he does not have 
enough credits to enter. The Registrar is always glad to advise with the 
students concerning their preparation. The Registrar sends out a general 
statement of the procedure for new students to follow after they are duly 
admitted to the University. 



42 



College of Agriculture 



Agriculture is the great primary pursuit of the human race. Perma- 
nent prosperity is in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the 
land. Land-Grant Colleges were founded, therefore, to foster the teach- 
ing of scientific agriculture. The primary aim of the College of Agri- 
culture of the University of Maryland is to teach the best and most 
practical methods of farm production, the economics of marketing and 
distribution, and methods to improve the economic and social position of 
the farmer. Agriculture is constantly changing; no cropping system can 
be worked cut once and for all time; new as well as old pests and diseases 
must be constantly combatted; better feeding and breeding of live stock 
and more efficient marketing methods must be substituted for the old 
and inefficient methods if agriculture is to maintain its importance with 
the other industries. Above all agriculture must be made profitable to 
the tiller of the soil and must be established as a great paying business 
for those who engage in it as well as for town and city dwellers. 

The curricula of the College of Agriculture are planned to give the 
student a thorough and practical course in agriculture and related sci- 
ences, and at the same time afford an opportunity to specialize along the 
lines in which he is particularly interested. Likewise, instruction is given 
which will prepare students for teaching positions in agriculture, for 
governmental investigation and experimental work, for positions as 
county agents, farm bureau leaders, farm supervisors, as well as for 
farming. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: (1) 
Agronomy (including Forage Crops, Grain Crops, Genetics); (2) Agricul- 
tural Education (see College of Education); (3) Animal Husbandry; (4) 
Veterinary Medicine; (5) Bacteriology and Sanitation; (6) Dairy Hus- 
bandry; (7) Entomology and Bee Culture; (8) Agricultural Engineering; 
(9) Farm Management; (10) Farm Forestry; (11) Horticulture (includ- 
ing Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, Landscape Gardening and Floricul- 
ture); (12) Plant Pathology; (13) Plant Physiology and Bio-chemistry; 
(14) Poultry Husbandry; (15) Soils. 



Admission 

The college is open on equal terms to both sexes. To be admitted to 
full standing the applicant must be a graduate of an approved high school 
or its equivalent. Non-graduates of high school must present by exami- 

43 



nation or certificate fifteen units of secondary school work. Of the fifteen 
units seven are required as follows: 

English 3 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 

A list of elective subjects and other general information may be found 
in the fore part of the catalogue under the heading "Admission". 

Requirements for Graduation 

One hundred and thirty-nine semester credit hours are required for 
graduation. The prescribed work is the same for all freshmen and sopho- 
mores (except for those specializing in Floriculture, Landscape Garden- 
ing, Farm Forestry and Entomology) ; thereafter the work required 
varies according to the major and minor subjects pursued by the students. 

Major Subject 

Before the beginning of the third year the student chooses a department 
in which he will do his major work. After choosing his major subject 
some member of the department (appointed by the head of the depart- • 
ment) will become the student's advisor in the selection of courses. The 
advisor may designate a minor subject if he deems it necessary. 

The minimum requirements for a major in one department are fourteen 
semester credit hours, and the maximum hours permitted to count toward 
a degree are thirty-five semester credit hours. 

Farm Practice 

Students without farm experience do not, as a rule, secure full benefit 
from any of the agricultural courses. A committee has been appointed 
for the purpose of assisting all students coming to the college without 
farm training to obtain a fair knowledge of actual farm practice. Some 
time during the year the committee will examine all members of the 
freshman class to determine whether or not their experience satisfies the 
farm practice requirements. Those not able to pass this examination 
will be required to spend at least three months on a farm designated by 
or having the approval of the committee. If the student has had no 
experience whatsoever before entering college, he may be required to 
spend six to nine months on a farm. The committee reserves the right 
also to call on all students so placed for witten reports showing the 
experience gained while on these farms. 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

The College of Agriculture works in cooperation with the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. Much of the subject matter in agricultural 
courses is tested by th 3 station or furnished as original from its re- 
searches. Methods and material which are valuable in one state are 

44 



often worthless in another, and the station makes it a point to find what 
is best for the State of Maryland. , 

The general farm, orchards, gardens and herds at the Experiment Sta- 
tion are available for laboratory and class use by the college. 

Fellowships 
A limited number of graduate fellowships which carry remuneration of 
s;500 to $1,000 yearly are available to graduate students. Students who 
hold these fellowships spend a portion of their time assisting m classes 
and laboratories. The rest of the time may be used for original investi- 
gation or assigned study. The time required for a degree depends upon 
the nature of the fellowship held. 

Curricula in Agriculture 
All students registered for agriculture take the same work in the 
freshman and sophomore years, except those registered for landscape 
gardening, floriculture and entomology. At the end of the sophomore 
year they may elect to specialize along the lines in which they are par- 
ticularly interested. 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I H 

Gen'l Chem. and Qual. Analysis (Inorg. Chem. 101) 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) '^ 

*General Botany (Bot. 101) • 

Composition and Rheoric (Eng. 101) « 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) * 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 101) ^ 

(Elect one of the following groups) 

Group A — - 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) * -^ 

Vegetable Gardening 

Group B — S 8 

Language 

Group C — 2 ^ 

Mathematics 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I // 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ag. Chem. 101) » 

Geology (Soils 100) • '' 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101) ^ 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) ^ - 

Field Crop Production ( Agron. 101) 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) '^ 

Dairying (D. H. 101) *.* * ' '.oV "* " VnV'n; "' 

**Fhysics or Principles of Economics (Physics 103 or ^ 

Econ. 103) • o 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 102) 

"~^nf;fhor st^dTn^twh^ are excused from Physics will take Economics. 

45 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering is organized to offer 
students of agriculture training in those branches of agriculture which 
are based upon engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped 
under three heads: farm machinery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modern tendency in farming is to replace hand labor, requiring the 
use of many men, by large machines which do the work of many men yet 
require only one man for their operation. In many cases horses are being 
replaced by tractors to supply the motive force for these machines. 
Trucks ^nd automobiles are used on many farms. It is highly advisable 
that the student of any branch of agriculture have a working knowledge 
of the construction and adjustments of these machines. 

About one-sixth of the total value of farms is invested in the buildings. 
The study of the design of the variotis buildings, from the standpoint of 
convenience, economy and appearance, is, therefore, important. 

The study of drainage includes the principles of tile drainage, the lay- 
out and construction of tile drain systems, the use of open ditches, and a 
^ study of the Maryland drainage laws. 

Agronomy 

The curriculum in agronomy aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he can register for 
subjects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particu- 
lar farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be 
well fitted for general farming, investigational work in the State or 
Federal Experiment Stations, or county agent work. 

The Agronomy Department has a large, well equipped laboratory in the 
new Agricultural Building and a greenhouse for student use, besides free 
access to the Experiment Station fields and equipment. 

Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Genetics (Agron. 110) 3 

Grain and Hay Judging (Agron. 104) 1 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103) . . 2 

Crop Varieties (Agron. 112) . . 2 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 3 

Soil Bacteriology (Soils 107) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) 2 2 

Economics (Econ. 103) . . 4 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101) 4 

Electives 5 4 



46 



SENIOR YEAR Semester: / // 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 113) 

Advanced Genetics (Agron. Ill) " 

Methods of Crop Investigation (Agron. 121) 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 120) • 

Soil Survey and Classification (Soils 105) ^ -^ 

Farm Drainage (Ag. Eng. 107) * 

Farm Machinery (Ag. Eng. 101) ^ 

Farm Forestry (For. 101) ' 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) ^ - 

Seminar (Agron. 129) ^ ^ 

Electives 

Agricultural Education 

The Department of Agricultural Education was organized primarily to 
train students who are preparing to teach agriculture ^J^ -^^^^'J 
schools. In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the Univer- 
sity, students electing to specialize in Agricultural Education must pre- 
sent evidence of having acquired adequate farm experience after reaching 

the SLse of fourteen years. . , ^ x <- 

students must arrange their work so that approximately forty per cent 
will be spent on technical agriculture, twenty-five per cent on scientific 
Tubjects, twenty per cent on subjects of a general educational character 
and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects pertaining to professional 

"^Studenis electing Agricultural Education for their major work may 
register in either the College of Agriculture or College of Education. 

Tpor detailed description of the curriculum in agricultural education 
see the College of Education.) 

Animal Husbandry 

The courses in animal husbandry have been developed with the idea of 
teaching the essential principles underlying the breeding feeding, growth, 
development and management of livestock, together with the economics 

of the livestock industry. i. ,i„„ „* r.iont^ 

The curriculum in animal husbandry is so planned as to allow of Pl^nty 
of latitude in the selection of courses outside of the dep^'" mj"*^^^^^^^ 
giving the student a broad, fundamental training and fitting h n« to 
become the owner, manager or superintendent of general or special Uve- 

'* OppoTtui'ty for specialization is offered to those who may de^re to 
becor^e instructors or investigators in the fie d of animal husband'ry^ 

Some livestock are maintained at the umversity. In addition there 
are available for use in instruction, the herds of livestock owned by the 
Federal Bueau of Animal Industry at BeltsviUe. Maryland. Through the 
courtesy of Maryland breeders, some private herds are also available for 
inspection and instruction. 

47 



Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: / /; 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) 2 2 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) ]] 3 ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) * 3 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 103) *^ 

Swine Production (A. H. 104) 3 

Horse and Mule Production (A. H. 106) *2 

Dairy Production (D. H. 103) 4 

Anatomy Physiology (V. M. 101) 3 

Genetics (Agron. 110) 

Electives 

3 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I // 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) 4 

Sheep Production (A. H. 107) , . * . * .' * '3 

Farm Machinery ( Ag. Eng. 101) 3 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 102) "a 

Meat and Meat Products (A. H. 108) 3 

Farm Drainage (Ag. Eng. 107) '2 

Physiological Chemistry (Agri. Chem. 108) q 

Seminar (A. H. Ill) ^ 

Electives I ^ 

3 7 

Bacteriology and Sanitation 

The present organization of this department was brought about with 
two main purposes in view. The first is to give all the students of the 
Umversity an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of the subject. 
Ihis is of prime importance, as bacteriology is a basic subject and is of 
as much fundamental importance as physics or chemistry. The second 
purpose, and the one for which this curriculum was designed, is to fit 
students for positions along bacteriological lines. This includes dairy 
bacteriologists and inspectors; soils bacteriologists; federal, state and 
municipal bacteriologists for public health positions; research positions; 
commercial positions, etc. At present, the demand for individuals quali- 
fied for this work is much greater than the supply, and with the develop- 
ment of the field this condition is bound to exist for some time 



48 



Curriculum 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I 11 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ag. Chem. 101) 3 3 

♦Physics (Phys. 103) or Economics (Econ. 103) . . 4 

Language 3 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) 3 

Dairying (D. H. 101) 3 

Geology (Geol. 101) 3 

Electives 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-2) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) 2 

Language 3 

Agricultural Economics (Ag. E. 101) 3 

Dairy Production (D. H. 103) 4 

Market Milk (D. H. 108) 3 

Electives 3 5 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 104-5) 2-5 2-5 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 103) 3 3 

Physiological Chemistry (Ag. Chem. 108) 3 

Seminar (Bact. 110-111) 1 1 

Electives 5-8 8-11 



3 
2 

// 
3. 
2 
3 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

The courses in dairy husbandry are organized to give the student a 
working knowledge of the basic principles underlying successful dairy 
production, market milk, dairy manufacturing and marketing. The 
options offered in dairy production are planned to meet the needs of 
students desiring to become breeders of purebred dairy cattle, farm 
managers and teachers. The options offered in dairy manufactures are 
planned to meet the needs of students desiring to enter commercial work 
in the manufacture of butter, cheese and ice cream and those desiring to 
become inspectors of these products. 

A dairy herd is maintained for experimental purposes as well as for 
teaching, the care, feeding and management of dairy cattle. Graduates 
from these courses should be fitted to take up dairy farming, teaching, 
or experiment station work. Students are sent throughout the state to 
supervise Advanced Registry tests and to study general conditions as they 
exist on leading dairy farms. 

The graduate courses are designed to meet the needs of those who de- 
sire to take up advanced work in dairy husbandry. Proximity to the 
laboratories and libraries of the Department of Agriculture in Washing- 



*Only those students who are excused from Physics will take Economics. 

49 



ton and the Government herds at Beltsville place this department in a 
splendid position to offer an exceptional opportunity in graduate work in 
the fields of production, manufacture and marketing to those desiring 
such training. 

DAIRY PRODUCTION 

Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: 1 II 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105) 2 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101) . . 4 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 3 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 103) . . 3 

Dairy Production (D. H. 103) 4 

Advanced Registry Work and Breed Study (D. H. 104) .... . . 2 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 102) 3 

Judging of Dairy Cattle (D. H. 105) 2 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104) 3 

Electives 8 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 3 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104) 3 

Market Milk (D. H. 108) 3 3 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 101) . , 3 

Advanced Testing (D. H. 109) 4 

Thesis (D. H. Ill) 2 2 

Seminar (D. H. 110) 1 1 

Electives 5 4 



DAIRY MANUFACTURES 

Curriculum 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester 

Agricultural Chemistry (Agr. Chem. 101-102) , 

Geplogy (Soils 100) , 

Physics (Phy. 103) 

Language 

Elementary Economics (Econ. 101) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 

Field Crop Production (Agro. 101) , 

Dairying (D. H. 101) 

Electives 



/ 


// 


3 


3 


3 


• • 


• 


4 


3 


3 


8 


• • 


2 


2 


• 


3 



3 



8 



50 



JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I U 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105) ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) ^ '^ 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 103) * ^ 

Accountancy ^ 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 102) "^ 

Dairy Manufactures (D. H. 107) ^ 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I U 

Market Milk (D. H. 108) ^ 

Advanced Testing (D. H. 109) ^ 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 104) "^ 

Seminar (D. H. 110) .^ 

Thesis (D. H. Ill) g Y 

Electives 

ENTOMOLOGY AND BEE CULTURE 

This department is concerned with the teaching of entomology to all 
agricultural students as basic for future work in economic entomology 
and for its pedagogic and cultural value. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in a 
large measure dependent upon his knowledge of the inethods of prevent- 
ing or combating the pests that menace his crops each year. Successful 
methods of control are emphasized in the economic courses. 

There is an ever-increasing demand for trained entomologists. The 
entomological work of the Experiment Station, the Extension Service the 
College of Agriculture and the office of the State Entomologist being m 
one administrative unit, enables the student in this ^^If'-^^^'Jlll^^ 
himself of the many advantages accruing therefrom. Advanced students 
have special advantages in that they may be assigned to work on station 

projects already under way. aa a ^^ ^\^c. 

Courses in beekeeping are offered and new courses will be added as the 

demand warrants. The field for specialists in beekeeping •« «;P«"«"y 

attractive now and commercial beekeeping is productive of greater profits 

each year. 

Curriculum 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I U 

Embryology (Zool. 104) "^ 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) ' ^ 

Physics (Physics 104) ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-6) ^ 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103) 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 102) ^ ^ 

Electives 

51 



JUNIOR YEAR c^ 

Semester: / jj 

Advanced Entomology (Ent. 102) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) o t 

Electives *^ 3 

10 10 

SENIOR YEAR e^ 

Semester: / // 

Economic Entomology (Ent. 103) ^ 

Thesis (Ent. 105) ^ ^ 

Seminar (Ent. 110) ^ 2 

Electives ^ 1 

9 9 

FARM FORESTRY 

Designed to furnish instruction to students in the College of Agriculture 
UnitJS T :r"'"' '" '"^^ '^^^^^^^- ^^ ^^^ ^-tL third of t^^^^ 

far^acre! " ^Zf^^' ''^ '^™^ ^^"^^^^"^^^ ^^ P- ^-t of the tota 

thl^ 1 -^ ' 7. ' *^' improved land on farms constitutes 52 per cent 

he remaining 11 per cent is largely waste land, unsuited for fieL crops 

that should be planted in timber crops to make it productive Fa™ 

tions. The field for graduates in this course might properly include 
^eloZZToU^^^^^ ^^ -'^'- ^^^-^-"^ -0^^-^^ ^ut partly 

largely'Tfl^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^'^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^ -^^^-s consisting 

the'-fafncrX'"^^^ "'"' "'^'^'^'^ "^^'^'^^^ ^ ^^"^^^^^^^^^ ^^'^ ^^ 

4 An undergraduate training in forestry that will give advanced 
standing m a graduate forestry school. aavancea 

Freshman Year 

Same as general agricultural course. 

Sophomore Year 

Same as general agricultural course except substitution of systematic 
botany for principles of dairying and the addition of forestry, ToS? 

JUNIOR YEAR g,^,^,^^. ' ^ 

Forest Botany 

Silviculture 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-103).......** 3(2+1)3 

Plant Anatomy (Bot. 104) .*.'.*.** ^ ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-106) ... .'.*.'.*.'.*.'. g 9 

Elements of Economics (104) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) t 

Forest Entomology " * ^ 

Electives ... ^ 

• * 3 6 

52 



SENIOR YEAR Semester: 

Forest Measurements 

Management of Woodlands 

Protection of the Forest 

Wood Technology 

Utilization of Forest Products 

Wood Preservation 

Forest Pathology 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102) 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 103) 

Soil Surveying and Classification of Soils (106) . . . . (1 + 1) 
Electives 



/ // 

2 2 

2 2 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

4 

..(1 + 1)2 
2 
5 7 



FARM MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

In this department are grouped courses in farm management and agri- 
cultural economics. 

Farm management has been defined as the business of the individual 
farmer to organize his business so as to produce the greatest continuous 
profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is in 
accordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It 
requires not only knowledge of the many factors involved in the produc- 
tion of crops and animals, but also administrative ability to coordinate 
them into the most efficient farm organization. Farming is a business 
and as such demands for its successful conduct the use of business meth- 
ods. As a prerequisite to the technical farm management course there 
is offered a course in farm accounting. This course is not elaborate, but 
is designed to meet the need for a simple yet accurate system of farm 
business records. 

The aim of the farm management course is to assist the student to 
perceive the just relationship of the several factors of production and 
disposition as applicable to local conditions and to develop in him execu- 
tive and administrative capacity. 

Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles underly- 
ing production, distribution and consumption, more especially as they 
bear upon agricultural conditions. Land, labor and capital are considered 
in their relationship to agriculture. 

The farmer^s work does not end with the production of crops or animal 
products. More and more it is evident that economical distribution is as 
important a factor in farming as is economical production. 

Students well trained in farm management and agricultural economics 
are in demand for county agent work, farm bureau work, experiment 
station or United States Government investigation and college or second- 
ary school teaching. 



53 



TTTXTT^T. , Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) Semester: / 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102) ^ 

Farm Accounting (F. M. 101) 

Business Law (Econ. 118) 

American Literature (Eng. *109 and 110) f 

Grarling Farm Crops (Agron. 103) 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) . 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-6) ......'. f 

Electives ... 



2 
5 



SENIOR YEAR ^ 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E 103) Semester: / 

Transportation of Farm Products (A. E *104) ^ 

beminar in Marketing (A. E. 105) 

Seminar (A. E. 106) ^~^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 102) 

Farm Machinery (Ag. Eng. 101)'. ^ 

Farm Drainage (Ag. Eng. 107) ^ 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 108) 

Elttter "' '^"'*"" "' International T;ade'(Com;il8; 



• • 

3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

• • 

2 
3 

// 



1-3 



2 

2 
2-4 



2 
7-9 



Semester: 



I 
3 



// 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101). . 

Farm Dairying (D. H. 102) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101) . ^ 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) l 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) ! 

Poultry (P. H. 101) 2 

Genetics (Agron. 110) \\\ 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 103) 

Principles of Breeding (A. H 103) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR 
Farm Management (F. M. 101) 

Farm Machinery and Farm Shop (Ag.' Eng.' ioij [[ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 

Gas Engines, Tractor and Automobil'es' (Ag.*Eng *102) ' * * 
Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron 120) 

Farm Drainage (Ag. Eng. 107) 

Farm Forestry (Forestry 101) ...!........ 

Electives .... 



Semester: 



3 

/ 

3 
3 
3 



2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
4 

// 



8 



3 
2 
2 
3 

7 



HORTICULTURE 

There are several reasons why the State of Maryland should be pre- 
eminent in the different lines of horticulture and offers such excellent 
opportunities for horticultural enterprises. A few of the more evident 
ones are the wide variation in soil and climate from the Eastern Shore to 
the mountainous counties of Allegany and Garrett in the west, the near- 
ness to all of the large eastern markets and the large number of railroads, 
interurban lines and waterways, all of which combine to make marketing 
easy and comparatively cheap. 

The Department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work, 
namely: pomology, olericulture, floriculture and landscape gardening. 
Students wishing to specialize in horticulture can arrange to take either 
a general course during the four years or enough work is offered in each 
division to allow students to specialize during the last two years in any 
of the four divisions. The courses have been planned to cover such sub- 
ject matter that upon their completion students should be fitted either to 
engage in commercial work, county agent work, or teaching and investi- 
gational work in the state and federal institutions. 

The department has at its disposal about twenty acres of ground de- 
voted to vegetable gardening, eighteen acres of orchards, small fruits and 
vineyards, and twelve greenhouses, in which flowers and forcing crops 
are grown. Members of the teaching staff are likewise members of the 
experiment station staff and thus students have an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the research which the department is carrying on. Ex- 
cellent opportunity for investigating new problems is afforded to advanced 
undergraduates and to graduate students. 

Curricula 

Students who intend to specialize in pomology or olericulture are re- 
quired to take the same subjects which other agricultural students take 
during the first two years. Students who specialize in floriculture or 
landscape gardening, however, will take a slightly different curricula. 
It is felt that such students require certain special courses, which it is 
unnecessary to require of all agricultural students. The curricula follow: 

POMOLOGY 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 103) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 105) 

Fruit and Vegetable Judging (Hort. 107) 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-6) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101) 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 103) 

General Floriculture (Hort. 121) 

General Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 

General Entomology (Ent. 101) . . • 2 

Genetics (Agron. 110) . . 3 

Electives 2 5 



Semester: 



I 
3 

» • 

2 
2 
3 

• • 

2 
3 



II 
2 



54 



55 



SENIOR YEAR Semester: I 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102) 3 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 106) 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 135) 1 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 131) 

Farm Management (F. M. 102) 4 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 141) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 142-143) 2 

Electives 7 

Olericulture 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 103) 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 105) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101) 3 

Genetics (Agron. 110) 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-6) 2 

General Floriculture (Hort. 121) 2 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 101) 3 

Truck Crop Production (Hort. 113) 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 116) 

Electives 7 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I 

Farm Management (F. M. 102) 4 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 127) 

Horticultural Breeding Practice (Hort. 133) 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 112) 2 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 114) 2 

Advanced Truck Crop Production (Hort. 115) 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 134) 2 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 135) 1 

Electives 6 

Floriculture 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101) 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101) 4 

General Geology (Soils 100) 3 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 102) 

General Floriculture (Hort. 121) 2 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 3 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 127) 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-106) 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 102) 2 

Electives 5 

56 



. « 
2 

1 
2 

• • 

1 
2 
9 



// 
4 
2 

• • 

3 
2 



3 
3 

• • 

• • 

2 
1 



2 
2 
1 
9 



// 
3 



2 
2 
2 
5 



JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I 

Greenhouse Management (Hort. 122) ^ 

Floricultural Practice (Hort. 123) 

Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 124) ^ 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 126) ^ 

Aerie. Economics (A. E. 101) 

General Plant Pathology (Pit Path. 101) ^ 

Systematic Botany (Bot. 103) • • -• • 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 129) 

Electives 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: / 

Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 125) ^ 

Plant Materials (Hort. 128) 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 116) • • • •^- • * 

Horticultural Breeding and Practice (Hort. 133) ^ 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 135) • • • 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 134) ^ 

Electives 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I 

Gen. Chem. and Qual. Anal. (Inorg. Chem. 101) ^ 

General Zoology (Zoo. 101) 

General Botany (Bot. 101) ^ 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) ^ 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-103) ^ 

Mathematics (Math. 101) ^ 

Basic R. 0. T. C ; 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 101) " 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101) ^ 

General Geology (Geol. 100) 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101) ^ 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) ^ 

Plane Surveying (Sur. 101-103) 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 127) ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105-6) ^ 

Freehand Drawing (Dr. 101) 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 102) .^ 

Basic R. O. T. C (M. I. 102) * ^ 

Electives * 



// 

3 
2 



8 

// 

3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
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// 

4 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
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2 
2 
2 

• • 

1 
2 
2 



57 



JUNIOR YEAR e 

Plant Materials (Hort. 128). Semester: / ;; 

History of Landscape Gardening (HortVlSl) ^ ? 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 129) o ^ 

trarden Flowers (Hort. 126) 

Agricultural Economics (A. E 101) ^ 

General Plant Pathology (Pit.' Path.* 101) I 

Systematic Botany (Bot. 103) 

Drainage (F. E. 108) ..,.. ^ 

Electives • • 2 

SENIOR YEAR ^" " '" ' ^ ^^ 

Landscape Design (Hort. 130) .... semester: I U 

Civic Art (Hort. 132) ^ 3 

Horticultural Research and Thesis' (Hort.* 134) * * « '^ 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 135) . . ^ 

Electives . . ^ 1 

9 11 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

TTTXTx^^ Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR e 

Poultry Production (Poultry 103) Semester: I // 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) „ t 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101-102) . . t Z 

Genetics ( Agron. 110) ^ 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 103) ^ 

Poultry Keeping (Poultry 102) * .' '' ^ 

Electives ... ^ 

4 4 

SENIOR YEAR e 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) Semester: I // 

Farm Accounting (A. E. 101) ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 102) ...... * * ^ 

Animal Diseases (V. M. 101) ^ 

Poultry Breeds (Poultry 104) * * ^ 

Poultry Management (Poultry 105) ^ 

Electives . • • 4 

6 6 

SOILS 

The Department of Soils gives instrucHnn ir, fv,^ i, • 

farmer w.th a complete knowledge of his soil and also to gfve adequSe 

58 



S 



training to students who desire to specialize in soils. Students who are 
preparing to take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate 
work in addition to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. 
The department possesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the 
instruction in these subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the 
student to come in contact with the research at the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, especially in the pot culture laboratories and on the experi- 
mental fields at the station and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
teaching soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment 
stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Soils, United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

Curriculum 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Expository Writing (Eng. 105 and 106) 2 2 

Principles of Economics (Gen. Econ. 105) . . 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 3 

Soil Micro-biology (Soils 107) 3 

Fertilizers and Manures (Soils 102) 3 

Soil Fertility (Soils 103) 3 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101) 4 

Cropping Systems and Methods (Agron. 120) . . 2 

Electives 5 3 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) . . 3 

Methods of Soil Investigation (Soils 113) 2 

Soil Surveying and Classification (Soils 105) . . 3 

Soil Technology (Soils 110) 3 3 

Farm Drainage (A. Eng. 105) . . 2 

Seminar (Soils 114) 1 1 

Electives 8 5 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

A definite project dealing with the genital diseases of domestic animals 
is now being developed. This research course is offered for those gradu- 
ates of approved veterinary colleges who desire to lay special emphasis 
on this subject in connection with their work for an advanced degree. 

The nearness to the libraries and laboratories of the various Federal 
Departments in Washington offers special facilities for the investigator. 



SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

A. Students who have had four years of high school training or its 
equivalent may follow a two-year curriculum of regular college courses 
designated by the dean. A certificate is granted by the college upon com- 

59 



pletion of the work If o^^ ^i. 

he is desirous of tak „rk';„^^^^^ ^^ ^-^ awarded a cert.ficate 

'T T\' '■^^"^^'- -"ege currLlum^'-' '^ "^^ '=°"«»- ^^ two' 

A.rieu,rrX7r:e'' •: sTiS""' r""^"'^ ^™ ^ "The Two-Year 
work the applicant mu S'; pSrl^i " ?,"''" ^-^ ^"*- ^^^^ t"-Jea 
'n the seventh grade of the ZIZIT ^ '^'' '<'"^' *" ^^e work g^e^ 
course students having completed tLf" "^^ *^' <=onclusion oHh^ 
a certificate stating tfe stLts pJLV/dS/tf k^ """'"^'^ ^^ ^-- 
ege. No college credit toward riZl 1 ^ f *""' "P""* '" ^e col- 
these courses. ^ "^^^"^^^ '» &'^en for work done in any of 

Description of Courses 
^ AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

■^^^f<^rr,L^^^^^^ Farm S.o^^rst semester. 

A study of the de<!;c,r, ''V^- '^l^oi-atory period, 
drawn mJchiner;. ITb raToVrrcr4t' '^t™ ^"^^ ^^^ ^^^or 
machines, their calibration, adiuTtLelTn,' "''' '^"'^ '' ^'^t"^' 

Agr. Eng. 102. Gas EnghtZ Vrn^, '"'f ""• 
semester. Four credits. Three Lturpf'^ "'^, ^"^'''"^''tZes-Second 

A study of the design and op^Sio! Tf^' '^•'"^^tory period, 
combustion engines used in farrpractice ""' ^^^'^ °^ '"*«'•"-' 

One^t";:- and • onl '^0?; feS^f " ^^"-^^ ^^ -dits. 
An advanced study of the fo7r cyHnder .a' r'""'*'- ^^'^ ^"^- "2. 

wf t^pS :Lr„it:^i?„™ :r "'^^' ^'- ^^ ^-- ^-- ^ghtin. 

lectuTe a^nront7abofary^p7ri:r~'"°"' ''""'''''■ ''^^ "edits. One 

dralnttthl 'Z.'T.ZlC^ftf^f''' ?^ ^''-^^ "^ ti=e under- 
methods of construct:on Tsmfller ' <=^'^"'a«on of grades and 

drainage by open ditches, atdT LTSin^ "S^^T '' ^^"^ -" 

AGRONOMY 

Agron. 102. Field Cmn pJlT f ^a^ure crops. 
Two lectures and ^nf fZra^o '^^^^^^^^^ ---^- ^hree credits. 

Continuation of Agron. 101. 

60 



^-^f 



Agron. 103. Grading Farm Crops — Second semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Agron. 101 and 102, 

Market classifications and grades as recommended by the United States 
Bureau of Markets and practice in determining the grades. 

Agron. 104. Grain and Hay Judging — First semester. One Ci'edit. 
One laboratory period. Prerequisite, Agron. 101 and 102. 

Practice in judging the cereals for milling, seeding and feeding pur- 
poses and practice in judging hay. 

Agron. 105. Tobacco Production — Second semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Offered only in even years; 
1924, 1926 etc. 

This course takes up in detail the handling of the crop from prepara- 
tion of the plant bed through marketing, giving special attention to 
Maryland types of tobacco. 

Agron. 109. Research and Thesis — The year. Four credits. 

Students are given a chance to do investigation work either in col- 
lecting information or in solving some problem in the laboratory, field 
or greenhouse. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agron. 110. Genetics — First semester. Three credits. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. 

General courses in genetics designed to prepare students for later 
courses in the breeding of animals or crops in which they are specializ- 
ing. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 111. Advanced Genetics — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Agron. 110. 

This course takes up further details of mutants and chromosome ir- 
regularities, interference and coincidence, interspecies crosses and the 
results of physical attempts to modify germplasm. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 112. Crop Varieties — Second semester. Two credits. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Agron. 101 and Botany 
101. 

A study of the cereal classifications that have been adopted by the 
American Society of Agronomy with brief consideration of variety char- 
acteristics of other crop plants. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 113. Crop Breeding — First semester. Two credits. One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Agron. 110. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops and methods used 
in crop improvement. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 120. Cropping Systems and Methods — Second semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures. Prerequisites, Agron. 101 and Soils 101. 

Principles and factors influencing cropping systems in the United 
States; study of rotation experiments; theories of cropping methods; 
and practice in arranging type farming systems. (Metzger.) 

61 



Agron. 121. Methods of Crop Investigations — Second semester. Two 
credits. One lecture and one laboratory period. 

A consideration of crop investigation methods at the various experi- 
ment stations and' the standarization of such methods. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 129. Seminar — The year. Two credits. One report period 
each week. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current 
scientific publications dealing with problems in agronomy. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Biometry — The year. Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

Statistical methods as applied to problems in genetics and plant breed- 
ing. The methods used in the study of variations and correlations are 
discussed and the biometrical constants worked out by the class for 
certain assigned or selected data. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 202. Crop Breeding — The year. Credits determined by work 
accomplished. 

The content of this course is similar to the undergraduate course in 
crop breeding but will be adapted more to graduate students and more 
of a range will be allowed in choice of material to suit special cases. 
(Kemp.) 

Agron. 209. Research — The year. Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

With the approval of the head of the department the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy or he will be given a list 
of suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 101. Types and Breeds — Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

The origin, history, characteristics and adaptability of the various 
breeds of livestock. 

A. H. 102. Feeds and Feeding — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lecture and one laboratory period. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics and adaptability of the 
various food stuffs to the several classes of livestock. Feeding standards, 
the calculation and compounding of rations. 

A. H. 103. Principles of Breeding — Second semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory, period. Junior year. 

This course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding including 
heredity, variations, selections, growth, development, systems of breeding 
and pedigree work. 

A. H. 104. Swine Prodicction — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

62 



The care, feeding, breeding, management and judging of swine and • 
the economics of the swine industry. 

A H 105 Beef Production-Second semester. Two credits. 

^^r c^^rrerrrdinTltnagement of heef herd, fattening and 
, eonom^softhebeen^^^^^^^^^ — " ^^ 

Jdl- Z lecture and one laboratory Pe^od. Junior year. 
The care, feeding, breeding and management of horses. MarRet 

and grades and judging. - tv,vop credits Two 

A H 107. Sheep Production-Second semester. Three credits. 

lectures and one laboratory period. Senior year 

Care, feeding, breeding and management of the farm flock. 

''rS it. 1.rt:!£:toducts^.. semester. Three credits. 

and handling of meat ^f ^f * J'-^'^^J" ^wo credits. One labora- 

A H 109. Advanced Judging— ihe year, iwo c 

tory period. Junior or senior year ^^^ ^.^ging of sheep 

First ^^^l^!;-^^:J^^^::Secorav^r.ti.e and competitive judging 
and swme. Second Semester y ^^^^^ throughout the 

of horses and beef cattle Vano- tP^^ - may be chosen to repre- 
state will be made, bucn juugi s „„„„,, tho<?P taking this course, 

sent the University will be selected f iwi -J^^^^'^^^^^^'""^^,,, credits. 

A H 110 Markets and Marketing— First semester. 

Two lectures and one laboratory. . Se"i°'' ye^', ^ ■^^^ „,^t, wool 

husbandry. tu.o^o Thp vear Six credits. 

A H 112, Research and Thesis— ine year, o . , ;«vesti. 

to be presented in the form of a thesis. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

A. H. 113. N«<ritto«-Second semester. Three credits. Two lectures 

and one laboratory. Senior Vear- ^^olism protein and energy 

A study of digestion, assimilation "^t^bolism P utilization 

requirements. Methods of investigation and studies m 
of food and nutrients. (Meade.) 

63 



Three credit. T^ eti .L^lTf 'T' Methods-First semester. 

An introduction to genetirld t . T*"'^ P"""*^" ^^^'^^ ^^^r. 
especially to animal breedt^' (Me^S ) "' "^''"'^ ^^ ^^^^^^ "-e 

Graduate Courses 

A. H. 201. Research — The vear Cy-^Au 4. i. 
amount and character of work done determined by the 

BACTERIOLOGY AND SANITATION 

A brief history of bacteriology • m-croscnnv ^I' ^ • 
to nature; morphology classlLh^n ^^' *^"^ """"^ ^^^'^ '•^'^""n 
sterilization and disinfection ,^1 ' ^'^^^'^^""^ "^ <^"Iture media; 
of bacteria; classification cn;,^ I '''". ^"'^ macroscopic examination 
tivation and ide"ti/cat S^f S^^^^^ uses of stains; isolation, cul- 

ties of bacteria; bacteria in rXt^n To' wTermnk' t:f ' T' T'''' 
pathogens and immunity. water, milk, food, soil, and air; 

.ect?a Jtwf Eitt;";::Lir'^^°"'^ -""'-'-■ -^'-^ "^^^*^- O-e 

Continuation of Bact. 101. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 103. Dairi/ Bacteriolooy—The vpar Q,v a-^ ^ 
and two laboratory periods. Se^L yeaVTrereSisU^Bact^m '"^"^'^ 

kinds of bacter:a in Lra^d the r d ' ,'"''' ""-roscopic examination; 
and slow methods- sources o^ con^ '^^^^ "P^^ent; pasteurization by flash 
mosphere. udder exterior of rni^'"^*"°" °* '""^' '"*='»*^'"? «t«ble at- 
of utensils and "Lir I ^rilization H^ ^''"'P^^"*' -"^ attendants; kind 
methelyne blue redact on es - ^^ sedimentation test, centrif ugalization ; 
test; fresh and old m L bl; anr^ • f^'n '"^"°" ' ^"^^^^^ ^P"'"^ 
milk; certified mi!k- Tour milk wh '"'" "''^'' '""'^^* "'"'^'- ^^aded 
«i.k; powdered milk rn^m^s'taneTs: 7ZLT"' '''''"' '"'''''"'' 

Seni^U'r.- Pre^lte^trS-"'^ -^^ ^^^ *« ^^ -^"s. 

devX Ss"::„*L£r;' 5rr,;"j *°/'^"^. ''- -'^'^^^ ^ ^^^-ce to 

and work it out as mu h as posIibL in h . '" "'"'^ "P°" '''^ P^-*-* 

vision. In this manner he wS b ible ^^LnT ^l""'?'' ^^^^^^ ^"P^^' 
ology to a given problem inThl Lv, ^ ^^^ '^ knowledge of bacteri- 

He will get to know ometh nf o? S .?!'^ '" ^''•^'' ''^ '^ interested. 
«7i+v. Tu 'viiuw sometning of the methods of researpli t?^^!- -x 

w.th library practices and current literature will be TcSed. (S^n"! 

64 



Bact. 105. Hematology — First semester. Two credits. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

Procuring blood; estimating the amount of hemoglobin; color index; 
examination of red cells and leucocytes in fresh and stained preparations; 
numerical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes; differential count of 
leucocytes; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; 
pathological forms and counts. (Pickens.) 

Bact. 106. Urinalysis — Second semester. Two credits. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

Bact. 107. Thesis — The year. Four credits. Senior year. Prere- 
quisites, Bact. 101 and at least one of the advanced courses. 

Investigation of given project, results of which are to be presented in 
the form of a thesis and submitted for credit toward graduation. 
(Pickens.) 

Bact. 108. Seminar — The year. Two credits. Senior year. 

The work will consist of making reports on individual projects and on 
recent scientific literature. (Pickens and Staff.) 

For Graduate Students Only 

Bact. 201. Research Bacteriology — The year. Two to six credits. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 101 and in certain cases, Bact. 103, depending upon 
the project. (Pickens.) 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

D. H. 101. Dairying — Second semester. Three credits. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. 

Origin, history, development and characteristics of the dairy breeds. 
Extent of the dairy business and value of products. Composition of 
milk and Babcock testing. A study of production and handling of milk 
and milk products on the farm and the care, feeding and management of 
the farm herd of dairy cattle. 

D. H. 102. Farm Dairying — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

The secretion of milk and factors effecting the same; how bacteria 
and dirt get in; how they may be kept out; straining and handling during 
milking; surface coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and 
sterilizing dairy utensils; practical work in the production of milk of 
low bacteria and low sediment content; practice in the handling of 
milking machines. Dairy barn arrangement and equipment and practices 
which influence quality in milk. 

D. H. 103. Dairy Production and Baym Practices — Second semester. 
Four credits. Three lectures and one laboratory period. Junior year. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including selection 
of feeds ; systems of herd feeding ; feeding silage standards, soiling crops 
and pasture; selection, care, feeding and management of the sire; dairy 

65 



young stock and dairy herd development and management; method of 
keepmg and forms for herd records; dairy cost accounts and barn pract- 
ices which influence quantity in milk. 

D. H. 104. Advanced Registry, Association Work and Breed Study— 
Second semester. Two credits. 

Requirements for advanced registry; the management of long and short 
tinie tests; breed association rules; general work of the supervisor; care 
and testing of samples; cow testing associations; bull associations. Sys- 
tems of breeding and pedigree study. Paid supervisors at $3.00 per day 
are selected for work over week-ends from those taking this course 

D. G 105. Judging of Dairy Cattle-Second semester. Two credits 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Junior year 

T),!^*?^ '"i!l^ '^'''*!°" "' ^^''^ ^"™^'" f*''- production and exhibition. 
The feeding, fitting and showing of dairy animals. Trips to stock farms 

about the state will be taken in this course and such judging teams as 
may be chosen to represent the University will be selected from among 
those taking this course. 

D. H 106. Judging Dairy Products-Second semester. Two credits 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Junior year 

w;nT//'"''!J"''f '"^ "^ '""''' ''""^'' ^"'^ '^^^'^- National authorities 
W.1 address the class and trips will be taken to butter, cheese and milk 

Zlit r.f ' '''''^T "* f^'»"'^"-i"g the students with the commercial 
quality of these products. Such teams as may be chosen to represent 
the University will be selected from those electing this course. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

=n?;"',^K^' f "^■'^ ^«««/«'^<"'-^«-The year. Six credits. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, D H 101 

buurrmfrfS "' ^""f ' '^''''' ''' *="^™ ""'^ preparation of culture 
buttermilks Theory and practice of cream separation, pasteurization 

^s s^SefaS;*: ^"^ ~ ''-' — ^' — - p-^- 

onf iaJoraSy S' '"''"'''^ "''• '^^ '''''''■ ^^° '^^*"'^^ ^"^ 

me'?h«!rc=''!>f°'r^'r^* '""'' ^''"'^^'^"^ ^"^ requirements of city milk trade; 
methods of handling market milk for direct consumption; securing a 
milk supply; methods of buying from producers; the transportation of 
milk, milk contractors; systems of handling milk in the city milk plants- 
dairy farm and city milk inspection, including dairy farm and dairy Xt 

Zt ''h ; k'"' r/"^' ^*""*'"'^^' regulations, methods of ap^int- 
ment and duties of dairy and milk inspectors, control of milk supply 
m cities and towns. ^^h'yiy 

D. H. 109. Advaiiced Testing—Second semester. Four credits One 
lecture and three laboratory periods. 

This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge and 
laboratory practice in the systematic analysis of all dairy products, 

66 



especially work linked with the manufacturing of these products or with 
their classification under the food laws. Practice is given in the detection 
of milk watering, using the cryoscope and serum methods, the addition 
of preservatives or colors, the comparison of butter and oleomargarine, the 
examination of filled milks and products, etc. Methods of working out 
a quality grading system for receiving stations and the preparation, 
standardization and use of solutions involved will be considered. Mojon- 
nier methods will be taken up and each student showing sufficient progress 
will be given an opportunity to do individual work of practical value. 

D. H. 110. Seminar — The year. One or more credits. Senior year. 

The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current bul- 
letins and scientific papers in dairy production, manufacturing and 
market milk problems. 

D. H. 111. Thesis — The year. Four credits. Senior year. 

Students are given opportunities to conduct investigational work, either 
in collecting information or original research in Dairy Production, Manu- 
factures and Market Milk. 

D. H. 112. Markets and Marketing of Dairy Products — First sem- 
ester. Three credits. Three lectures. Elective. Senior year. 

History, development and organization of dairy marketing from the 
standpoint of producer, dealer and consumer. 

D. H. 113. Manufacture of Concentrated and Powdered Milks — First 
semester. Two credits. One or two lectures. Elective. Senior year. 

Evaporated milk, condensed milks, powdered milks — history of indus- 
try; location of factories; equipment; processes; standards and standard- 
izing; filling; labeling; wrapping; packing of finished products; uses of 
and work in commercial testing. 

Graduates 

D. H. 201. Fami Dairying — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

The secretion of milk and factors affecting; how bacteria and dirt get 
in; how they may be kept out; straining and handling during milking; 
surface coolers and precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and steriliz- 
ing dairy utensils; practical work in the production of milk of low 
bacteria and low sediment content; practice in the handling of milk ma- 
chines. Special problems will be assigned to graduate students taking 
this course. 

D. H. 202. Dairy Production — Second semester. Four credits. Three 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including selection 
of feeds; systems of herd feeding; silage, soiling crops and pasture; 
selection, care and feeding the sire ; dairy herd development and manage- 
ment; method of keeping and forms for herd records; dairy barn arrange- 
ment and equipment; dairy cost accounts and barn practices which 

67 



influence quality and quantity in milk. Special problems will be assigned 
to graduate students taking this course. 

D. H. 203. Research— The year. Eight credits. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be 
allowed to work on any problem in dairy production, manufactures or 
market milk they may choose, or be given a list of problems from which 
to select a research project. 

In so far as schedules permit, students will be encouraged to visit the 
U. S. Dairy Division Laboratories and become acquainted with the dairy 
research problems in process and the methods of attack. This acquaints 
the student with the broad phases of research in dairy production and 
market milk. 

D. H. 204. Semmar— Credits according to work done during the year. 

Three Weeks' Course in Dairy Husbandry 

Testing milk and cream. One week, January 7 to 12, 1924. 

Dairy Production. Two weeks, January 14 to 26, 1924. 

The subject matter in both courses is entirely practical, consisting of 
work in the testing laboratories and with the herd, supplemented by 
lectures. 

In the Babcock testing course, the history, volume and value of dairy 
products are taken up as well as the study of the secretion of milk, the 
composition of milk, cream, condensed, evaporated milks and powders, 
the proper sampling of dairy products, and their accurate testing. 

In the dairy production course which begins at the close of the milk 
testing work, practice will be given in the care, feeding and management 
of dairy cows, including feeds and feeding, breeds and breeding, Cow 
Tesfng Association and Advanced Registry work. 

The purpose of the first course is to supply milk and cream testers 
for milk plants and creameries; and of the second to provide cow testers 
for Association and Advanced Registry work. The second course should 
also be of interest and value to farm boys concerned with dairy im- 
provement. 

Admission and Expenses 

The requirements for entrance are that the applicants be at least 18 
years of age and have a good common school education. No entrance 
examination is required. Persons having practical experience on the 
farm or who are working in milk receiving stations or milk plants 
should derive the greatest benefit from these courses. No tuition is 
charged to residents of Maryland. A fee of $5 to cover cost of materials 
supplied in the various laboratories is assessed in this three weeks' course. 

Room and board may be had with private families for from $10 to 
$15 per week. For additional information address inquiries to Dairy 
Husbandry Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land. Lack of space limits the course to 25 persons. 

68 






i 



ENTOMOLOGY AND BEE CULTURE 

Ent. 101. General Entomology — Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory. 

General principles of structural and systematic entomology. The 
relation of insects to the past experience and the future activities of the 
student. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work and collection trips. 

Ent. 102. Advanced Entomology — The year. Four credits. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Ent. 101. 

Insect morphology and biology, with special relation to applied ento- 
mology. The theory and practice of insect control. 

Ent. 103. Economic Entomology — The year. Five credits. Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite Ent. 102. 

Problems in applied entomology, including life history studies, ecology 
and distribution, parasitism and control. 

Ent. 104. Systematic Entomology — First semester. Two credits. Two 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite Ent. 101. 

The student selects some group in which he is particularly interested 
and makes a detailed study of it. The course requires considerable field 
work and is supplemented by laboratory periods and frequent conferences. 

Ent. 105. Thesis — The year. Two credits. 

The intensive investigation of some zoological subject, the results of 
which are incorporated in a paper which is submitted as part of the 
requirement for graduation. 

Ent. 106. Insecticides and Their Application — Second semester. Two 
credits. One lecture and one laboratory period. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation and appli- 
cation; construction, care and use of spray and dusting machinery; 
fumigation, methods and apparatus in mechanical control. 

Ent. 107. Medical Entomology — First semester. Two credits. Two 
lectures. 

The relation of animals to disease, directly and as vectors of patho- 
genic organisms; the control of pests of man. 

Ent. 108. Scientific Delineation and Preparation — First semester. 
Two credits. Two laboratory periods. 

Photography, photomicrography, drawing freehand and with camera 
lucida, lantern-slide making, optical projection, preparation of exhibit 
and museum material, with especial reference to entomology. 

Ent. 109. Horticultural Entomology — Second semester. Three cred- 
its. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite Ent. 101. 

Lectures, laboratory and field work on the morphology, biology and 
control of insect pests of horticultural crops. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 110 Seminar — ^^The year. One credit. Time to be arranged. 
Presentation of original work, book reviews and abstracts of the more 
important literature. 

60 



Graduate Students 

Ent. 201. Entomological Problems— Two credits. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied en- 
tomology, with particular reference to preparation for individual re 
search. (Cory and Hamilton.) 

Ent. 202. Research in Entomology—The year. Six to ten credits ' 
Advanced students having sufficient preparation may, with the approval 
of the head of the department, undertake supervised research in mor- 
phology, taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently the 
student may be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural De 
partment projects. The student's work may form a part of the final 
report on the project and be published in bulletin form. A report 
suitable for publication, must be submitted at the close of the studies 
and the time and place of its publication will be determined by the 
professor in charge of the work. (Cory.) 

FARM MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Farm Management 

F. M. 101. Farm Accounting— Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Second semester open to juniors and 
seniors. 

A concise practical course in the keeping of farm accounts and in 
determining the cost of farm production. 

F. M. 102. Farm Management— First semester. Four credits Four 
lectures. 

The business of farming from the standpoint of the individual farmer 
This course aims to connect the principles and practice which the student 
has acquired in the several technical courses and to apply them to the 
development of a successful farm business. Prerequisite, F. M. 101. 

Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 101. AgHcultural Enonomics— First semester. Three credits 
Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Econ. 101 

A general course in Agricultural Enonomics, with spec:al reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricul- 
tural credit, the tariff, price movements and marketing and co-operation. 

A. E. 102. The Marketing of Farm Products— Second semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 101. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing and 
distributing farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort 
m increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. 

A. E. 103. Co-operation in Agriculture— First semester. Three cred- 
its. Three lectures or recitations. Open to juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 101. 

70 



„ 



"f 



4 



Historical and comparative development of farmers' co-operative or- 
ganizations, stressing particularly present tendencies. 

A. E. 104. Transportation of Farm Products — Second semester. 
Three credits. Three lectures cr recitations. Open to juniors and 
seniors. 

A study of the development of transportation in the United States, 
the different agencies for transporting farm products, with special at- 
tention to such problems as tariffs, rate structure and the development 
of fast freight lines, refrigerator service, etc. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. 105. Seminar in Marketing — First semester. One to three 
credits. Open to seniors and graduate students. 

This course will consist of special reports by students on subjects re- 
lating to the marketing of farm products, and a discussion and criticism 
of the same by the members of the class and the instructor. (De Vault.) 

A, E. 106. Seminar — Second semester. One to three credits. Open 
to seniors and graduate students. 

With the permission of the instructor, students will be permitted to 
work on any research problem in agricultural economics which they may 
choose, or a special list of subjects will be made up from which the 
students may select their research problems. There will be occasional 
class meetings for the purpose of reports on progress of work, methods 
of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Description of Courses 
Pomology 

HoRT. 101. Elementary Pomology. — First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. 

A general course in pomology. The proper location and site for an 
orchard are discussed. Varieties, planting plans, inter-crops, spraying, 
cultural methods, fertilizing methods, thinning, picking, packing and 
marketing are also given consideration. The subjects are discussed for 
apples, peaches, pears, plums, cherries and quinces. The principles of 
plant propagation as applied to pomology are discussed. 

HoRT. 102. Commercial Fi^t Growing — First semester. Three cred- 
its. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 101. . 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Ad- 
vanced work is taken up on the subject of orchard culture, orchard 
fertilization, picking, packing, marketing and storing of fruits, orchard 
by-products, orchard heating and orchard economics. Designed for under* 
graduate or graduate students. 

71 



HoRT. 103. Systematic Poinolo gy~First oemester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 101. 

The history, botany and classification of fruits and their adaptation 
to Maryland conditions. Exercises are given in describing and identify- 
ing the leading commercial varieties of fruits. Students are required to 
help set up the fruit show each year. Designed for undergraduate or 
graduate students. 

Hort. 104. Advanced Practical Pomology — First semester. One cred- 
it. Senior year. Prerequisites, Hort. 102 and 103. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principle 
fruit regions of eastern West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. 
A visit to the fruit markets of several large cities will be made. The 
cost of this trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. Each 
student will be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip. 
The time for taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

Hort. 105. Small Ft-uit Culture — Second semester. Two credits. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and 
their adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and 
a study of the experimental plots and varieties on the Station grounds. 
The following fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, 
blackcap raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry and 
loganberry. 

Hort. 106. Economic Fruits of the World — Second semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures. Prerequisites, Hort. 102 and 103. 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological and physiological charac- 
teristics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, 
such as the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut bearing trees, citrus 
fruits, newly introduced fruits and the like, with special reference to 
their cultural requirements in certain parts of the United States and the 
insular possessions. All fruits are discussed in this course which have 
not been discussed in a previous course. 

Hort. 107. Fruits and Vegetable Judging — First semester. Two 
credits. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Hort. 101 and 111. 

A course designed to train men for fruit judging teams and practical 
judging. Students are required to know at least one hundred varieties 
of fruit, and are given practice in judging single plates, largest and best 
collections, boxes, barrels and commercial exhibits of fruits and vege- 
tables. Students are required to help set up the college horticultural 
show each year. 

Hort. 108. Advanced Fruit Judging—First semester. One credit. 
One laboratory Period. Prerequisite, Hort. 107. 

Olericulture 

HoRT. 111. Principles of Vegetable Culture — Second semester. Three 
credits. Two lectures and one laboratorv. 

72 



A study of fundamental principles underlying all garden practices. 
Each student is given a small garden to plan, plant, cultivate, spray, 
fertilize, harvest, etc. 

HoRT. 112. Tuber and Root Crops — First semester. Two credits. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. Open to 
seniors and graduates. 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed varie- 
ties, propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, har- 
vesting, storing and marketing. 

HoRT. 113. Truck Crop Production — Second semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite Hort. 111. 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production. Each 
individual crop is discussed in detail. Trips are made to large commer- 
cial gardens, various markets and other places of interest. 

Hort. 114. Systematic Olericulture — First semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Hort. 112 and 113. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetables. De- 
scription of varieties and adaptation of varieties to different environ- 
mental conditions. 

Hort. 115. Advanced Truck Crop Production — Second semester. Two 
credits. Prerequisites, Hort. 112, 113, and 11^ 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking sections of 
Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A study of the 
markets in several large cities is included in this trip. Students are 
required to hand in a detailed report of the trip. Such a trip should not 
exceed thirty dollars per student. The time will be arranged each year 
with each class. 

Hort. 116. Vegetable Forcing — Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 111. 

All vegetables used for forcing are considered. Laboratory work in 
sterilization and preparation of soils, cultivation, regulation of temper- 
ature and humidity, watering, training, pruning, pollination and har- 
vesting. 

Floriculture 

Hort. 121. General Floriculture — First semester. Two credits. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. 

The management of greenhouse; the production and marketing of flor- 
ists crops; retail methods; plants for house and garden. 

Hort. 122. Greenhouse Management — The year. Six credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

A consideration of the methods employed in the management of green- 
houses; including the operations of potting, watering, ventilating, fumi- 
gation and methods of propagation. 

Hort. 123. Floricultural Practice — The year. Four credits. Two 
laboratory periods. 

73 



Practical experience in the various greenhouse operations of the fall, 
winter and spring seasons. 

HoRT. 124. Greenhouse Construction — Second semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period. 

The various types of houses, their location, arrangement, construction, 
and cost; principles and methods of heating; preparation of plans and 
specifications for commercial and private ranges. This course is given 
every other year. 

HoRT. 125. Commercial Floriculture — The year. Six credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 122. 

Cultural methods of florists* bench crops and potted plants, the 
marketing of the cut flowers, the retail store, a study of floral decoration. 

Hort. 126. Garden Flowers — First semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous 
perennials, bulbs, bedding plants and roses and their cultural require- 
ments. This course is given every other year. 

Landscape Gardening 

Hort. 127. General Landscape Gardening — Second semester. Two 
credits. One lecture and one laboratory period. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and their 
application to private and public areas. Special consideration is given 
to the improvement and beautification of the grounds, farmsteads and 
small suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to spec- 
ialize in landscape, but who wish some theoretical and practical know- 
ledge of the subject. Given every other year. 

Hort. 128. Plant Materials — The year. Four credits. One lecture 
and one laboratory period. 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs and vines used in orna- 
mental planting. 

Hort. 129. Elements of Landscape Design — First semester. Three 
credits. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Hort. 127. 

A consideration of the principles of landscape design ; surveys, mapping 
and field work. 

Hort. 130. Landscape Design — The year. Six credits. Three labor- 
atory periods. Prerequisite, Hort. 129. 

The design of private grounds, gardens and of architectural details 
used in landscape, planting plans, analytical study of plans of practicing 
landscape architects; field observation of landscape developments. 

Hort. 131. History of Landscape Gardening — Second semester. One 
credit. One lecture or laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 129. 

Evolution and development of landscape gardening; the different 
styles and a particular consideration of Italian, English and American 
gardens. Given every other year. 

74 






HoRT. 132. Civic Art— First semester. Two credits. One lecture and 
one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Hort. 129. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 
improvement, including problems in design of civic center, parks, school 
grounds and other public and semi-public areas. Given every other year 

General Horticultural Courses 

Hort. 133. Horticultural Breeding Practices— Second semester. One 
credit. One laboratory period. Senior year. Prerequisites, Genetics, 

Plant Phys. 101. 

Practice in plant breeding, including pollination, hybridization, selec- 
tion, note taking, and the general application of the theories of heredity 
and selection to practice are taken up in this course. 

Hort. 134. Horticultural Research and Theses— The year. Four to 

six credits. 

Advanced students in any of the four divisions of horticulture may 
select some special problem for individual investigation. This may be 
either the summarizing of all the available knowledge on a particular 
problem or the investigation of some new problem. Where original in- 
vestigation is carried on, students should in most cases start the work 
during the junior year. The results of the research work are to be pre- 
sented in the form of a thesis and filed in the horticultural library. 

Hort. 135. Horticultural Seminar — The year. Two credits. 

In this course papers are read by members of the class upon subjects 
pertaining to their research or thesis work or upon special problems 
assigned them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to time 
by members of the departmental staff. 

Courses Intended Primarily for Graduates 

Hort. 201. Experimental Pomology — First semester. Three credits. 

Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to 
practices in pomology; methods of difficulties in experimental work in 
pomology and results of experiments that have been or are being con- 
ducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. A limited 
number of seniors will be allowed to take this course, with the approval of 
the head of the department. 

Hort. 202. Experimental Olericulture — Second semester. Two cred- 
its. Two lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to 
practices in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental 
work in vegetable production and results of experiments that have been, 
or are being conducted in all experiment stations in this and other 
countries. A limited number of seniors will be permitted to take this 
course with the approval of the head of the department. 

75 



HORT. 203. Experimental Floriculture— Second semester. Two cred- 
its. Two lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinions as to 
practices in floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of 
all experimental work in floriculture which have been, or are being con- 
ducted, will be thoroughly discussed. A limited number of seniors will 
be permitted to take this course with the approval of the head of the 
department. 

HoRT. 204. Methods of Research— Second semester. Two credits One 
lecture and one laboratory period. 

For graduate students only. Special drill will be given in the making 
of briefs and outlines of research problems, in methods of procedure 
m conducting investigational work, and in the preparation of bulletins 
and reports. A study of the origin, development and growth of horti- 
cultural research is taken up. A study of the research problems being 
conducted by the Department of Horticulture will be made, and students 
will be required to take notes on some of the experimental work in the 
field and become familiar with the manner of filing and cataloging all 
experimental work. 

HoRT. 205. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis— The vear 
Four, SIX or eight credits. 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original re- 
search m either pomology, vegetable gardening, floriculture or land- 
scape gardening. These problems will be continued until completed and 
final results are to be published in the form of a thesis. 

HoRT. 206. Advanced Horticultural Seminar— The year Two credits 
This course wiill be required of all graduate students. Students will 
be required to give reports either on special topics assigned them, or on 
the progress of their work being done in courses, 205 and 206. Members 
of the departmental staff will report special research work from time 
to time. 

Requirements of Graduate Students in Horticulture 

Po7nology-~Gvaduate students specializing in Pomology who are 
plannmg to take an advanced degree will be required to take or offer 
the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 102, 103 106 201 204 
205 and 206; Physiological Chemistry 101; Plant Bio-phyics 20i ;' S 
chemistry 102; and Organic Chemistry ( ) 

0/enci^/^i^re--Graduate students specializing in vegetable gardening 
who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be required either 

S2 2oV2nf 'VpL'^^^'i'^^^'?' '^ '^" ^"""^^"^ ^""^^^^^ Hort. 113, 114, 
202, 204 205 and 206; physiological chemistry 101; plant bio-physics 201 • 
bio-chemistry 102; and org. chem. 102. Physics zui, 

Floriculture-~Graduate students specializing in floriculture who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 122, 123, 124, 125, 

76 



126, 128, 129, 203, 204, 205 and 206; physiological chemistry 101; plant 
bio-physics 201; bio-chemistry 102; botany 103, and organic chem stry. 

Landscape Gardening — Graduate students specializing in landscape 
gardening, who are planning to take an advanced degree, will be re- 
quired either to take or offer the equivalent of the following courses: 
Hort. 128, 129, 130, 132, 204, 205 and 206; Bot. 103; Drawing 101-102; 
and Surveying 101 and 102. 

Additional Requirements — In addition to the above required courses, 
all graduate students in horticulture are advised to take physical and 
colloidal chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in horticulture have had some course work 
in entomology, plant pathology and genetics certain of these courses will 
be required. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Plt. Path. 101. Diseases of Plants — First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, gen. bot. 101. 

An introductory study in the field, in the laboratory and in the litera- 
ture, of symptoms, casual organisms and control measures of the diseases 
of economic crops. 

Plt. Path. 102. Forest Pathology — Second semester. One credit. 
One lecture and an occasional field trip or laboratory period. 

The diseases of forest trees of economic importance. Intended especially 
for students in forestry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Path. 103. Methods and Problems in Plant Pathology — The 
year. Credit to be arranged. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 101. 

Technique in plant disease investigations: A survey of the literature 
on the subject; practice in the use of pathological equipment and in the 
making of culture media, isolations and inoculations; preparation of a 
manuscript for publication or for a thesis. Work in this course may be 
begun and it may be ended any time during the calendar year. Register 
only after consulation with the instructor in charge. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 104. Advanced Plant Pathology — The year. Six credits. 
Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 101. 

An intensive study: First semester, diseases cf fruits; second semester, 
diseases of garden and field crops. The full course is intended to give 
a rather thorough knowledge of the subject matter, such as is needed by 
those who expect to become advisers in crop-production as well as 
those who expect to become special "sts in plant pathology. The project 
method of study is used; the student is assigned several subjects closely 
related to his major interest, he consults the original papers on each 
subject, organizes the information and presents it as a complete report 
before the class. (Temple.) 

77 



Plt. Path. 105. Seminar — The year. Two credits. 
Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on recent 
investigations. (Temple.) 

For Graduates 

Plt. Path. 201. Research — Credit according to the work done. 
Original investigations of special problems. (Temple.) 



PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIO-CHEMISTRY 

Plt. Phy. 101. Plant Physiology — First semester. Four credits. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite Gen. Bot. 101. 

Water requirements, principles of absorption, mineral nutrients, trans- 
piration, synthesis of food, metabolism, growth and movements. 

Plt. Phy. 102. Plant Ecology — Second semester. Three credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite. Bot. 101. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant forma- 
tions and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. 
Much of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the 
field and for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are 
selected. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Phy. 103. Advanced Plant Physiology — The year. Four credits. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Pit. Phy. 101. 

The laboratory work generally consists of special work on one or more 
problems that may continue through the year. Students who write theses 
for their undergraduate degrees, may use data obtained from special 
problems assigned for laboratory work. (Zimmerman.) 

Bio-Chem. 101. General Bio-Chemistry — First semester. Four cred- 
its. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Gen'l Chem. 
101, Org. Chem. 103 or their equivalents; also an elementary knowledge 
of organic chemistry. 

A general course in chemical biology treated from the point of view 
of both animals and plants. The first half of the course is devoted to 
the chemistry of protoplasm and its products. The second half of the 
course deals with cell metabolism and embraces processes and problems 
of fundamental importance in both animal and plant life. 

For Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201. Plant Bio-Chemistry — Second semester. Three 
credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Bio- 
Chem. 101 and an elementary knowledge of plant physiology. 

An advanced course on the chemistry of plant life. It follows Bio- 
Chem. 101 and deals with materials and processes characteristic of plant 
life. The relation of primary syntheses and transformations of ma- 
terials in plants and plant organs to animal food is especially emphasizedL 
(Appleman, Conrad.) 



78 



PLT Phys. 202. Plant Bio-Physix^s-Second semester. Three credits 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisites one year s work 
in physics and an elementary knowledge of physical chemistry and 

''71 fd^antf study of the operation of physical forces in plant physio^ 
logical processes. The relation of climatic conditions to plant growth and 
practice in recording meteorological data constitute a part of the course, 

(Johnston.) , ^ , ^. „^„ 

Plt Phys 203. Special Problems in Growth and Reproduction-Sec- 
ond semester. One or two credits. (Appleman, Johnston.) 

PLT Phys 204. Advanced Physiological Methods and Measurements 
-First semester. Two credits. Not given every year. (Appleman, John- 
ston.) ^ J.. 

Plt Phys. 205. Seminar— The year. Two credits. 

The students are required to prepare reports of papers in the cur- 
rent literature. These are discussed in connection with the recent ad- 
vances in the subject. (Appleman, Johnston.) 

Plt. Phys. 207. Research^The year. Credit hours according to 

work done. . . ^ ,„;hu 

students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, Johnston.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Poultry 101. Farm Poultry— Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. • . 

A general course in poultry raising including housing, feeding, incu- 
bation, brooding, breeds, breeding, selection of stock, culling, general 
management and marketing. 

Poultry 102. Poultry Keeping— First semester. Four credits. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Poultry 101 

A study of housing and yarding, practice in making poultry house 
plans, feeding, killing and dressing. 

Poultry 103. Poultry Production-Second semester. Four credits. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Poultry 101 

J -I Art 

The theory and practice of incubation and brooding, both natural and 
artificial Study of incubators and brooders, assembling, etc. Consider- 
able stress will be placed on the proper growing of chicks into good laying 
pullets General consideration of poultry disease. Caponizing. 

Poultry 104. Poultry Breeds-First semester. Four credits Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Poultry 101, 102 and 

103 

A study of the breeds of poultry, the judging of poultry, fitting for 

exhibition and the methods of improvement by breeding. 

79 



Poultry 105. Poultry Management — Second semester Four credits. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Poultry 101, 
102, 103 and 104. 

A general fitting together and assembling of knowledge gained in the 
previous courses. Culling, marketing, including both selling of poultry 
products and the buying of supplies, keeping poultry accounts, a study 
of poultry profits, how to start. 

SOILS 

Description of Courses 

Soils 100. Geology — First semester. Three credits. Twe lectures 
and one laboratory period. 

A text-book, lecture and laboratory course, dealing with the principles 
of geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is de- 
signed primarily for agricultural students in preparation for technical 
courses, it may also be taken as part of a liberal education. 

Soils 101. Principles of Soil Management — Second semester. Four 
credits. Two lectures, one quiz and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, 
Soils 100. 

A study of the physical, chemical and biogical principles underlying 
the formation and management of soils. The relation of mechanical 
composition, classification, moisture, temperature, air, organic matter 
and tillage are considered. The use and value of commercial plant 
nutrients, green and stable manure and of lime are discussed. 

Soils 102. Fertilizers and Manures — First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Soils 100-101. 

This course includes a study of the nature, properties and use of 
fertilizers; the source and composition of fertilizer materials and the 
principles underlying the mixing of commercial plant-food. A study is 
made of the production, value and uses of animal and vegetable manures. 
The practical work includes special studies of the effect of fertilizers 
and manures on the crop-producing power of the various soil types. 

Soils 103. Soil Fertility — Second semester. Three credits. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Soils 100, 101 and 102. 

A study of the soil fertility systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the inter-relation of total to available plant food, the 
balance of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping sys- 
tems and the economic and national aspect of permanent soil improve- 
ment. The practical work includes a resume of the important fertility 
studies and laboratory and greenhouse practice in soil improvement. 

Soils 105. Soil Surveying and Classifications — Second semester. Three 
credits. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Soils 
100 and 101. 

80 



A study of the principal soil regions, series and types of the United 
Stftes and especially of the soils of Maryland, as to formation, com- 
pSS; and S^ agriculturally. The practical work includes a field 
survey, identification of soil types and map makmg. 

Soils 107. Soil Micro-Biology-Second semester. Three credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It 
includes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposi- 
Sotof oSa^^^^^ nitrogen fixation, nitrification, sulphofication and 
such injurious organisms as fungi, algae and protozoa. 

Soils 108. Thesi^-The year. Four to eight credits 

Some special problem is assigned to each student, who is expected to 
embody the results of the investigation in a thesis. 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

Soils 109. SoU Technology-The year. Six credits. One lecture and 
two labor^^^^^^ periods. Prerequisites, Soils 100 and 101; Chemistry 

^^The technique of the field, laboratory and greenhouse manipulation as 
applied to the study of soil problems. (McCall, Smith.) 

SOILS 110. Methods of Soil Investigation-First semester. Two credits 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigation work (McCall.) 

Soils 111. Seminar— The year. Two credits. 

The seminar periods are devoted largely to the discussion of the cur- 
rent bulletins and scientific papers on soil topics. (McCall.) 

For Graduate Students 

Soils 201. Special Problems and Research-The year. Ten to twenty 

" oSinal investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. (McCall.) 



81 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal train- 
ing in biological sciences, economics and business administration, history, 
languages and literature, mathematics, philosophy, physical sciences, 
political science, psychology and sociology. It thus affords the student 
an opportunity to acquire a general education which shall serve as a 
foundation for success in whatever profession or vocation he may 
choose. It particularly prepares the way and lays the foundation for 
the learned professions of law, medicine, theology, teaching and even 
for the more technical professions of engineering, public health service 
and business administration. 

This College is an outgrowth of the Division of Language and Litera- 
ture of Maryland State College and later of the School of Liberal Arts 
of the University. In 1921 the School of Liberal Arts and the School 
of Chemistry were combined and other physical and biological sciences 
were brought into the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences, thus 
making it a thoroughly standardized Arts and Science College. In 1922- 
1923 the scope and program of the various groups and departments of 
the College were extensively reorganized in order to broaden and amplify 
the courses of instruction offered. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are 
in general the same as those for admission to any college or school of 
the University. At least fifteen units of high school or other secondary 
school work in acceptable subjects must be offered by every candidate 
for admission, among which the following are prescribed:* 

English 3 

Mathematics 2 

Science 1 

History 1 

Total 7 

Two years of any one foreign language are required in addition to 
the above units for admission to the pre-medical curriculum. 

Credentials and all correspondence relating to admission to the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences should be addressed to the Registrar, University 
of Maryland. 

•students entering with conditions must remove such conditions before enrolling for 
a second year in this college. 

82 



Degrees 

.,. ..,«s .„.„ea upon ,. J... wj» ^^^^j:"'"^' 

conditions for a degree m the College oi 

Bachelor of Arts. 
Bachelor of Science. 

Departments Offering Courses in the College 
Courses of instruction are offered in the following Groups and De- 
partments : 



Groups 

I. Biological Sciences: 



II. Classical Languages and Litera- 
tures : 
III. English: 

IV. History and the Social Sciences: 



Departments 

Bacteriology* 

Botany 

Entomology* 

2;oology and Aquiculture 

Greek 

Latin 

English Language and Literature 

Journalism 

Public Speaking 

Economics and Business Administration 

History 

Political Science 
Sociology 

Mathematics 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 
Hispanic Languages and Literature 
Romance Languages and Literature 
Philosophy and Psychology 

Chemistry 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Physics 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 

Home Economics 

Education 

Library Science 

Military Science 

Music 

Physical Education 



ji";.»sa-ej:»r. r^-i-s-AfSii."' - ■"' ^•'•"•" " 



83 



V. Mathematics: 
VI. Modern Languages: 

VII. Philosophy: 
VIII. Physical Sciences: 



IX. Pre-Medical: 
X. Miscellaneous and Work from 
other Colleges: 



Credit Hours 

The semester credit hour represents one lecture or recitation hour 
per week throughout the semester. Two or three hours of laboratory 
or field work are counted as equivalent to one lecture or recitation. For 
each credit hour in any course the student is expected to devote himself 
for three hours either in the classroom or laboratory, or in outside pre- 
paration. 

Major and Minor Requirements 

(a) A major shall consist of not less than 45 and of not more than 
60 credit hours in Group I to VIII. Students majoring in Group II 
may count not to exceed fifteen credit hours in Modern Languages as 
part of their major requirements; and students majoring in Groups III 
or VI may count not to exceed ten credit hours in Classical Languages 
as part of their Major requirements. 

(b) A minor shall consist of not less then 20 and of not more than 
30 credit hours in a group related to the major group. Any hours taken 
in excess of this maximum in the minor group will not count as credit 
hours toward a degree. 

(c) At the beginning of his Junior year each student must select a 
major in one of Groups I to VIII, and before graduation must com- 
plete one major and one minor. In certain exceptional cases two minors 
may be allowed but in no case will any hours above the maximum of 
30 in either minor be counted for credit toward a degree. 

(d) The courses constituting a major must be chosen under the 
supervision of the faculty of the department in which the majority of 
the work is done and must include a substantial number of courses not 
open to freshmen and sophomores. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 

The Bachelor of Arts degree may be conferred upon students who 
have completed majors in Groups II, III, IV, V, VI or VII and minors 
in cognate groups. The Bachelor of Science degree may be conferred 
upon students who have completed majors in Groups I, IV, V, or VIII 
and minors in related groups. 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may 
be conferred upon a student who has satisfied all entrance requirements 
and has secured credit for a minimum of 129 credit hours including 
eight hours of military science for all able-bodied men students and 
eight hours of physical education for all women students and one hour 
of library science for all students, except for students taking the special 
curricula in chemistry in which there are special requirements. 

Scholarship Requirements 

In conformity with the University policy not less than three-fourths of 
the credits required for graduation must be earned with grades of A, 
B, or C. 

84 



Normal Load 

11 A^^r the Freshman year will be eighteen hours for 

°i:fZ„t »V;S" ~f ,e„, .»o ..„. 0. »H,cH 
shall be military science or physical ^ducation. ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

The normal load for the Junior and Senior years wi 

'%ZTL ^vill not be alWd to enroll for more nor less than the normal 
load without the consent of the Dean. 

Absolute Maximum 

students whose average grade for f^^^^^^^^lZ Ire'dif wit the 
or above may be permitted to take f^^^^l'^ZJte.naximurn of 19 
approval of the Dean. l,ut.n «o case ska^^Je aW. ^^ _^ .^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

hours per week be .^-'i^^^'^. '^^^ in meeting the requirements for a 
Z:S'^r:i%'^oZ:f2'';:.rs. m a shorter period by taking 

additional hours. ^ 

Prescribed Curricula 

1 ^ .1.0 Frpshman and Sophomore years of the College of 
The work of the Freshman ana op » ,, r ^11 students other 
Arts and Sciences has ^een co-ordmated as foU^^^^ ^^^ 

than those taking prescribed curricula m the Chemistry u p 

in the Pre-Medical Group. ^ 

Curriculum .. 

,, . ^r AT-c^ A T> Semester i '' 

FRESHMAN YEAR 3 3 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101)^.. • .... '-'''''. ;^ 
Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) or Physical Education ^ ^ 

/phvs Ed. 101) ** t 1 

101.) ; . 1 

Library Science (Lib.S.lOl) ' • • 

(One of these) ,tt mi^ 3 3 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 101 ) ^ ^ 

Elements of Literature (Eng. 102) • ^ ^ 3 

*Mathematics (Mat. 101) 

(One of these) ^ . 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. 101) Either Semester 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) Either Semester^ J ^ 

*Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 101 A or 101 B) 

TOTAL HOURS ^^ ^' 

-7p-.™en students intending to follow the Special ^urr^^f^Jr.^^^^^^ 

ouired to take both Mathem^.^^f ^^1^1^ Sophomore year are required to 

^uf Mathert^cflO? ^^.^l^e Fr/shman year. 

85 



. SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Basic R. O T r nw t lno^ ^, i^emester j jj 

(Phys. Ed 102; ^ '"'^ "'^ ^'^^'^^^ ^'^"'^-tion 

Advanced Public Speaking (P.' sVlOS) .' .' f 2 

Debate (P. S. 118) or 2 

Machine Shop (101) or 

Determinative Mineralogy (Anal. Chem. 104) or 

Economy H.tory of the United States (Econ. 1^2) .... ^ 

(One of these) ^ 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. Sci. 101) 

American History (Hist. 102-103) ^ 2 

Elements of Psychology ( Psych. 101)' f 2 

Geographyof Commerce (Econ 103) ^ 2 

Economic Resources of the World (Ec;„' '104)' ^ 

(One of these) 2 

English (One three hour course) 

Mathematics (Math. 101) or ^ 3 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus (Math. 105) 

Modern and Contemporary History (H 101 l ^ 

Advanced Foreign Language (One coLe) * ^ 

(Two of these) ^ 3 

Foreign Language (One four hour course) 

General Zoology (Zool. 101 ) Either semester" or . * 

Advanced Zoology (Course Totaling four h-rsT 1 * 

■ f-;'-«'.Botany(Bot. 101) Either Semester t \ 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 101-A or 101-B) 'or \ * 

Advanced Chemistry Courses "^ ^"i «) or 4 ^ 

Geology (Geol. 104) Either Semes'ter ." .' : ' " " \ *'' 

**Arts Physics (Phys. 101) ■* 4 

General Entomology (Ent 101) ■* ^ 

Government of the United States '(Po' Sci ■l02i ' 

General Economics (Econ. 105) .... ; . . ^ 4 

TOTAL HOURS ~ ' — ^ 

Regulations Governing the Selection of Courses 

Hm^?s%:tder%:^rurai:i2:t?°" r'^''"^^ """^^ "- -'^- -tain 
for a broad foundation re^rrltirslS""^^*^"" ^^' ^ ^^^^'^ 

Freshman-Sophomore Requirements 

♦♦Prerequisite. Math. 101. 

86 



(b) Not more than twenty of these hours may be taken in one 
department. 

(e) Freshmen and sophomores may not carry more than twelve hours 
in one group at a time. 

Junior-Senior Requirements 

The work in the Junior and Senior years will be elective within the 
limits set by the Major and Minor requirements. 

Students With Advanced Standing 

Students entering the Junior year of the College of Arts and Sciences 
with advanced standing from other universities or from other colleges 
of this university will be required to meet the requirements respecting 
studies of the first two years only to the extent of their deficiencies in 
credits in Arts and Science subjects for full junior standing. 

Credit for Professional Courses 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College 
of Arts and Sciences for work done in professional schools or for courses 
of a professional character in other colleges of the University. 

Student Responsibility 

The individual student will be held responsible for the selectiori of his 
courses and major in conformity vnth the preceding regulations. 

Advisers 

Each new student is assigned to a member of the faculty as his per- 
sonal adviser who will assist him in the selection of his courses, the 
arrangement of his schedule, and any other matters on which he may 
need assistance or advice. The faculty adviser acts in this capacity as 
assistant and representative of the Dean, who is charged with the execu- 
tion of all of the foregoing rules and regulations. 



GROUPS AND DEPARTMENTS 

GROUP I. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

BACTERIOLOGY AND SANITATION 

The purposes of this department are to give all of the students of 
the University an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of the 
subject of bacteriology and to fit certain students for positions along 
bacteriological lines in the field of bacteriological research and public 
health service. For description of Courses see pages 64, 65. 

BOTANY 

This Department aims to give a general introduction to the field of 
botany and to afford ample opportunities for the prosecution of research 
for qualified students in advanced courses in this field. 

87 



Description of Courses 
For Undergraduates 

essential relatits be lee„ theVro^^^^^ ZT' "' ^^'-f ^^'^ ^^^ ^he 
tur?r„d'::e fatraSr;S7'^^°"'^ ---'-■ ^- -'^-- one ,ee- 

ciaSSro^f ernSr„i"'^ '^ ^'^ '"°^^'°'^^^' "^^ '^^^'-^ -^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bot. 101. ^ "^ *""" laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Gen. 

=r;is7tb:r^ " ^^'^ ^° e.rsy/r.r^3efatX" 

• creS: ^o'e leLrfardTnt S"'?^"^'"* "^ ^^--^ -»-*-• ^wo 
101 and Bact. loi °'''*°'"^ P""*"^- Prerequisite, Gen. Bot. 

of IhetnS. S't^diel S^litf 'r"""'- '"^^P^"'"^^ -'^ economics 
of field materials. ' ^''"'''^' '" ^"'^"'•e ^^d identification 

For Graduates 

Gen. Bot. 202. Special Studies of Funai Pr^HJ^ ,, 
work done. Prerequisite, Gen. Bot 103 or 106 ' ''"""^'"^ *° 

Special problems in the structnrp nr. ^\fr. u-\ 
graphic study of some group ^f fungi "^' '"'*"'"^ "' ^""^' ^ the mono- 

PrerTquisite, Get g^^f «;;[^'-'-Credit hours according to work done. 

88 



Taxonomy, distribution, life history and economics of algae and other 
plants of Maryland waters. 

Gen. Bot. 204. Special Plant Taxonomy — Credit hours according to 
work done. Prerequisite, Gen. Bot. 105. 

Original studies in the taxonomy on some group of plants. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This department offers an opportunity for a general study of the struc- 
ture, life and classification of insects, with special reference to economi- 
cally important forms, and to the problems of economic entomology. 
An extensive list of courses in entomology and bee culture will be found 
listed under the College of Agriculture. 

For description of Courses, see pages 51, 52. 

ZOOLOGY AND AQUICULTURE 

This department affords an opportunity to acquire a fundamental 
knowledge of animal life; the relation of animals to man and their various 
relations to plant life; and the effects of these relationships on the 
development of civilization. It furnishes the necessary biological training 
for pre-medical students and for teachers of biology and zoology. It is 
designed to satisfy the requirements of those students who study zoology 
and aquiculture as a necessary complement of a liberal education. 

Description of Courses 
For Undergraduates 

ZooL. 101. General Zoology — First or second semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 101a. 

This course presents the fundamental principles of animal biology that 
constitute the foundation which is necessary for further study in any 
line of biology; and develops those concepts of animal life which are an 
essential part of a liberal education. 

Zool. 101a. General Zoology — First or second semester. Two credits. 
Two laboratory periods. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 101. 

Zool. 102. General Zoology for Pre-Medical Students — First semester. 
Two credits. Two lectures. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 102a. 

Zool. 102a. General Zoology for Pre-Medical Students — First semes- 
ter. Two credits. Two laboratory periods. Must be taken concurrently 
with Zool. 102. 

Zool. 103. General Zoology for Pre-Medical Students — Second semes- 
ter. Two credits. Twe lectures. Must be taken concurrently with Zool. 
103a. A continuation of Zool. 102. 

Zool. 103a. General Zoology for Pre-Medical Studeyits — Second semes- 
ter. Two credits. Two laboratory periods. Must be taken concurrently 
with Zool. 103. A continuation of Zool. 102a. 



/i 



89 



aqlatTc toZ7J"''"'T ^" /''"^'^t'"^ «"d «t"dyi„g both land and 
aquatic forms of nearby woods, fields and streams with special emnhasis 

fnrhabifr '""'*'' "''^^' *^°^^' "-^P"'^^' ^"--^^ -d rodenTs the ^Seed 
mg habits, environment and economic importance. 

Th^ercr'edt/r'^rf' '^^'•^^^'-^^^ MorpAoW^^-First semester. 

cre^dHs ■ 'ot Wt""' ^IT' ^-^o^oplZ-First or second semester. Three 
101 101a. ' '"'^ *^° laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Zool. 

stutTpt;at;iSr ''^^^^ '' '-'^''- -"' — - ^^« 
semper" Tw:^t"H-."^ Co^para^^•.e Veree6r„fe MorpAo/o^j^-Second 
loHr Us equivalent " "^ *° '^ ''''''''''■ ^-^quisite. Zool. 

^^This is a continuation of Zool. 108. but will consist of laboratory work 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Zool. 120. Embryology—First semester. Four crediK= T„,„ u„*. 

Zool. 125. Aquiculture — Credit hours Ipptnr^c or,^ i«u i. x , 

arranged. Prerequisites, Zoo,. 101, lOU? lotS a^ B^ m""^ *^ '^ 

Plankton studies and the determination of other aauafiV lif. '^ u 

»:S ;nd gTrne^ ^''t'^ T'^ ecolo^y'^ofTe ^nU^trrS 

theTyster (TruL) " " '''^^''"'' ^''^ ^^^^^^^^''^ ^'^ -«»> -^ 

Zool. 130. Orflra«ic EvolutionS^conA semester. Two credits Two 

rt^ eit^hr/r s :r; roTaTzUf ?r ^^-' --- -- -- 

(STo'n.?'"^'^ ^"' ""^^^'■^' '-^^'''"^- Enrollment 'iLited to fiLet 
Zool 135 Vertebrate Zoology-Second semester. Credit hour.., and 
Each *V'r""":' '° ^"' '""^ '"'^■^'''-' --^-s of the cLss 

fiefd (SrsTn.)"'" '^'""^ "'*'" ^^'•*^'" "'»"^' ^^"^ ^ »>- "wn special 



90 



GROUP II. CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND 

LITERATURES 

The departments under this group offer a cultural and liberal training 
in classical languages and literatures. 

Description of Courses 



CLASSICAL LITERATURE 
For Undergraduates 

C. L. 101. Ancient Civilization — First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures or recitations. 

Treatment of ancient times including Geography, Mythology and Phil- 
osophy. 

GREEK 

For Undergraduates 

Gk. 1. Beginners' Greek — ^The year. Eight credits. Four lectures 
or recitations each semester. 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the 
acquisition of a vocabulary. 

Gk. 101. Greek Grammar, Composition and Translation of Selected 
Prose Works — The year. Eight credits. Four lectures or recitations 
each semester. Prerequisite, Gk. 1, or two entrance units in Greek. 

LATIN 
For Undergraduates 

Lat. 1. Elementary Latin — The year. Eight credits. Four lectures 
or recitations each semester. 

This course is offered to cover a substantial and accurate course in 
grammar and syntax with translation of simple prose. 

Lat. 2. Translation and Prose Composition — The year. Eight credits. 
Four lectures or recitations each semester. Prerequisite, Lat. 1. or its 
equivalent. 

Texts will be selected from the works of Caesar and Sallust. 

Lat. 101. First semester. Four credits. Four lectures or recitations. 
Prerequisite, Lat. 2, or two entrance units in Latin. 

Texts will be selected from Virgil with drill on prosody. 

Lat. 102. Second semester. Four credits. Four lectures or recitations 
Prerequisite, Lat. 2, or three entrance units in Latin. 

Selections from Cicero^s orations with parallel reading of the world's 
masterpieces of oratory. 

91 



Lat. 103. First semester. Three credits. Three lectures or recita- 
tions. Prerequisite, Lat. 101 and 102. 

Histories of Livy with parallel reading of Napoleon's campaign in Italy. 

Lat. 104. Second semester. Three credits. Three lectures or recita- 
tions. Prerequisite, Lat. 101 and 102. 

Odes and Epodes of Horace with appropriate study of prosody. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Lat. 105. First semester. Three credits. Three lectures or recita- 
tions. Prerequisite, Lat. 101 and 102. 

The writings of Tacitus. (Spence.) 

Lat. 106. Second semester. Three credits. Three lectures or recita- 
tions. Prerequisite, Lat. 101 and 102. 

Selected Plays of Terence and Plautus. (Spence.) 

Lat. 107. First semester. Three credits. Three lectures or recita- 
tions. Prerequisite. Lat. 101 and 102. 

Satires of Juvenal and Horace. (Spence.) 

Lat. 108. Classical Literature — Second semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures or recitations. Knowledge of Greek or Latin desirable 
but not essential. 

Study and criticism of translations of the classics, biographies of 
classic authors. (Spence.) 



GROUP III. ENGLISH 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The introductory coursse in composition and rhetoric is required of 
all students of the University who are candidates for a degree. The 
instruction in this department is designed to give a fundamental and 
thorough training in English language and literature. 

Description of Courses 

For Undergraduates 

Eng. 101. Composition and Rhetoric — The year. Six credits. Three 
lectures each semester. Freshman year. Prerequisite, three units of high 
school English. Required of all four-year students. 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective thought communication. 
Reading, study, and analysis of standard contemporary prose specimens. 
Short papers and term themes. 

Eng. 102. Elements of Literature — The year. Six credits. Three 
lectures each semester. Freshman year. Prerequisite, three units of high 
school English. 

Lectures on the principles of literary form. Study and interpreta- 
tion of selected English and American classics. 

92 



ENG. 103. Advanced Composition and ^'^^^^^^^-F;^^^,f ^"'^"";, J."^^ 
credits. Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. Optional with Eng. 105-106 
as a requirement for all students whose major is English. ^ 

Lectures on principles of composition. Study and analysis of the best 
scientific essay's. Practice in expository writing. Term themes and 

"^ eTTo^4.* Advanced Composition and Rhetoric-Second semester. Two 

credits. . .^ t:- mo 

Continuation of Eng. 103. Prerequisite, Eng. 103. 

Eng 105. Expository Writing-First semester. Two credits. Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. Optional with Eng. 103-104 as a re- 
auirement for all students whose major is English. , . ,• „ 

'Lectures on the principles of expository writing. The main ob.ec ive 
of the course is to direct the student's efforts in analysing interpreting, 
and preparing material bearing upon scientific matter. Themes, papers, 

*"eng W6^.' Expository Writing— Second semester. Two credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 105. Prerequisite, Eng^ 105. 

ENG. 107. History of English Literature-First semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. Required of all students 
whose major is English. 

A general survey, with extensive reading and class papers. 

Eng. 108. History of English Literature— Second semester. 

credits 

Continuation of Eng. 107. Prerequisite Eng. 101. 

Eng. 109. American Literature (by types)— First semester, 
credits Three lectures. Prerequisite, Junior standing. 

Lectures on the development of American literary types. Repots on 
assigned topics. Term themes. Special attention will be paid to the 
growth in America of lyric poetry, epic poetry, the drama, the ballad 
the historical account, oration, biography, letters, essays, novel, and 

'''eng'^110. American Literature-Second semester. Three credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 109. Prerequisite. Junior standing. 

Eng. 111. Modern Poets-First semester. Three credits. Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. xt- ,. tu „,i 

English and American poets of the latter part of the Nineteenth and 
of the Twentieth Century. Intensive study of the shorter poems of 

Robert Browning. 

Eng. 112. Modern Poets— Second semester. Three credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 115. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. 

Eng. 113. The Drama— First semester. Three credits. Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Junior standing. . ,. . * 

The work of the first semester will be devoted to a survey of the best 
and most successful plays in the history and development of the dramatic 
art in England and America. Lyly, Marlowe, Dekker, Heywood, Beau- 
mont, Fletcher, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, Rowley. Dryden, Otway, 

93 



Three 



Three 



1 



Congreve, Addison, Steele, Fielding, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Shelly, Bulwer- 
Lytton, Godfrey, Tyler, Dunlop, Barker, Payne, Irving, Smith, Bird, 
Willis, Ritchie, Baker, Howe, Boucicault, Jefferson, Howard, Gillette, 
Belasco, Long, Sheldon, and Crothers. Lectures, Reports, and Term 
themes. Not given in 1923-1924. 

Eng. 114. The Drama — Second semester. Three credits. Continua- 
tion of Eng. 113. Prerequisite, Junior standing. 

The second semester will include the plays of modern dramatists: 
Wilde, Moody, Mackaye, Bennett, Shaw, Knoblock, Maugham, Drink- 
water, Ervine, Dunsany, Walter, Peabody, Hazelton, Barrie, O'Brien, 
Tarkington, and Molnar. Not given in 1923-1924. 

Eng. 115. Shakespeare — First semester. Three credits. Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. 

An intensive study of selected plays. 

Eng. 116. Shaketpeare — Second semester. Three credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 115. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. 

Eng. 117. Business English — First semester. Two credits. Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 101. 

This course develops the best methods of effective expression, both 
oral and written, used in business relations. The application of these 
methods includes correspondence, advertising, and salesmanship, and is 
based upon a psychological attitude toward the subject. 

Eng. 118. Business English — Second semester. Two credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 117. Prerequisites, Eng. 101 and 117. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Eng. 119. Anglo-Saxon and Middle English — The year. Six credits. 
Three lectures each semester. Prerequisite, some knowledge of Latin 
and German. Required of all students whose major is English. 

A study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lec- 
tures on the principles of comparative philology and phonetics. Beowulf 
through 1500 lines. The language and authorship of the Middle English 
period, ending with Chaucer. (House.) 

Eng. 120. Aesthetics of Literature and the other Arts — First semester. 
Two credits. Two lectures. 

A philosophical approach to the criticism of literature, based upon 
Aristotle's Poetics and Longinus on the Sublime. The study of the basic 
structural principles of the various forms of literature will be supple- 
mented by those principles governing all good art. (Johnson.) 

Eng. 121. Aesthetics of Literature and the Other Arts — Second semes- 
ter. Two credits. Continuation of Eng. 120. Prerequisite, Eng. 120. 

Eng. 122. The Novel — First semester. Two credits. Two lectures. 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class re- 
views of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. 
Some account of the history of the development of English fiction. Not 
given in 1923-1^24. (Horse.) 



94 



Eng 123. The Nove/— Second semester. Two credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 122. Not given in 1923-24. (House.) 

Eng. 124. English and American Essays— ¥\v^t semester. Two cred- 
its. Two lectures. i j a 

A study of the philosophical and critical essays of England and 
America: Bacon, Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Chesterton, Emerson. 
Not given in 1923-1924. (House.) 

Eng. 125. Ballad Literature—Second semester. Two credits. Two 

lectures. 

Traditional English and Scottish ballads. Modern imitative ballads. 
American folk ba.lads. Popular song literature. Not given 1923-1924. 

Eng. 126. Tennyson— Firs^t semester. Two credits. Two lectures. 

Lectures on the art of poetry followed by a detailed reading of the 
Princess. Survey of other important poems of this author. (House.) 

Eng. 127. Browning's Dramas— Second semester. Two credits. Two 

lectures. 

Luria; Return of the Druses; Colombe^s Birthday; Pippa Passes; A 

blot on the 'Scutcheon. (House.) 

Eng. 128. Authorship— First semester. Two credits. Two lectures. 
Admission to class on recommendation of instructor. 

Practice in the making of literature of various types; verse, essay, 
fiction, drama. Not given in 1923-24. (House.) 

Eng. 129. Authorship — Second semester. Two credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 128. Prerequisite, Eng. 128. Not given 1923- 
1924. (House.) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Seminar— Credit proportioned to the amount of work and 
ends accomplished. (House.) 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations looking toward 

advanced degrees. 

Eng. 202. Elizabethan Literature— First semester. Three credits. 

Three lectures 

A study of Shakespeare and the chief Elizabethan dramatists, also a 
survey course of Milton*s prose and poetry. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 203. Elizabethan Literature— Second semester. Three credits. 

Continuation of Eng. 202. (Lemon.) 

JOURNALISM 

During the academic year 1923-1924 the only courses offered in prepara- 
tion for Journalism are certain of the courses offered by the Department 
of English Language and Literature. It is planned to offer advanced 
courses in this field during 1924-1925. 



95 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Four credit hours of public speaking are required in the curricula of 
the freshman and sophomore years. Courses are so arranged in this 
department that the student may do some work in this field throughout 
the four years of his college course. 

Description of Courses 

P. S. 101. Reading and Speaking — First semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

The principles and technique of oral expression ; enunciation, emphasis, 
inflection, force, gesture and general delivery of short speeches. Im- 
promptu speaking. Theory and practice of parliamentary procedure. 

P. S. 102. Reading and Speaking — Second semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

Continuation of P. S. 101. 

P. S. 103. Advanced Public Speaking — First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures or recitations. 

Advanced work on basis of P. "S. 101-2 with special applications and 
adaptations. At each session of the class a special setting is given for the 
speeches — civil, social and political organizations, etc., and organizations 
in the field of the prospective vocation of the different students. When 
a student has finished this course he will have prepared and delivered 
one or more speeches which would be suitable and appropriate before 
any and all bodies that he would probably have occasion to address in 
after life. 

P. S. 105. Oral Technical English — First semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, etc. on both techni- 
cal and general subjects. Argumentation. This course is especially 
adapted to the needs of engineering students and is co-ordinated with 
the seminars of the College of Engineering. 

P. S. 106. Oral Technical English — Second semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitaton. 

Continuation of P. S. 105. 

P. S. 107. Oral Technical English — First semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

The preparation and delivery of lectures, speeches, reports, etc., on both 
technical and general subjects. Argumentation. This course is es- 
pecially adapted to the needs of students of chemistry. The head of the 
Department of Chemistry co-operates in the preparation of class pro- 
grams. For sophomore chemistry students only. 

P. S. 108. Oral Technical English — Second semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

Continuation of P. S. 107. 



96 



P. S. 109. Advanced Oral Technical English — First semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures or recitations. 

This course is a continuation with advanced work of P. S. 105-106. 
Much attention is given to Parliamentary Procedure. Some of the class 
programs are prepared by the students and carried out under student 
supervision. For junior engineering students only. 

P. S. 110. Oral Technical English — Second semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures or recitations. 
Continuation of P. S. 109. 

P. S. 111. Advanced Oral Technical English — First semester. One 
credit. One lecture or recitation. 

Advanced work on the basis of P. S. 109-110. Work not confined to 
class room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different 
bodies in the University and elsewhere. For senior engineering students 
only. 

P. S. 112. Oral Technical English — Second Semester. One credit. 
One lecture or recitation. 
Continuation of P. S. 111. 

P. S. 113. Oratory — First semester. One credit. One lecture or 
recitation. Prerequisite P. S. 101. 

The rhetoric of oral discourse. The speech for the occasion. Study 
of masterpieces of oratory. Practice in the writing and delivery of ora- 
tions. 

P. S. 114. Oratory — Second semester. One credit. One lecture or 
recitation. 

Continuation of P. S. 113. 

P. S. 115. Extempore Speaking — First semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class 
exercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects. 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. 

P. S. 116. Extempore Speaking — Second semester. One credit. One 
lecture or recitation. 

Continuation of P. S. 115. 

P. S. 117. Argumentation — First semester. One credit. One lecture 
or recitation. 

Theory and practice of argumentation and debate. Similar to course 
118. This course is offered for the benefit of those who may find it im- 
practicable to take this work in the second semester. 

P. S. 118. Debate — Second semester. Two credits. Two lectures or 
recitations. 

A study of the principles of argumentation. A study of masterpieces 
in argumentative oratory. Class work in debating. It is advised that 
those who aspire to intercollegiate debating should take this course. 



97 



p. S. 119. Oral Reading — First semester. Two credits. Two lectures 
or recitations. 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation 
of literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 

P. S. 120. Oral Reading — Second semester. Two credits. Two lec- 
tures or recitations. 

Continuation of P. S. 119. 



GROUP IV. HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

As a result of the increasingly differentiated economic development 
of this country and other countries and owing to the concomitant de- 
velopment of higher and more complex forms of business organization, 
the last two decades have witnessed the growth of a more widespread 
interest in courses of instruction in the field of economies and the newer 
field of business administration. The work of this department is planned 
for two classes of students: (a) those who desire a general training in 
economics and the other social sciences; and (b) those who need a more 
or less specialized training in preparation for modern business. 

The student majoring in this department will receive four years of 
training sufficiently broad and well balanced and at the same time suffi- 
ciently specialized to equip him for modern business pursuits. 



Description of Courses 

For Undergraduates 

Soc. Sci. 101. Elements of Social Science — The year. Four credits. 
Two lectures each semester. 

This course deals with the basis and nature of society; the process of 
social evolution; the economic organization of society; the rise of govern- 
ment and law as institutions; and the nature and extent of social control 
of man's activities. It forms the foundation upon which the principles 
of economics, the principles of sociology, and the science of government 
are based. 

EcON. 102. Economic History of the United StMes — First semester. 
Two credits. Two lectures and recitations. 

A study of the growth of industry, agriculture, commerce; transporta- 
tion from the simple isolated communities of the early colonies to the 
complex industrial and commercial society of today; its effect on the 
population in terms of successive new adaptations. 

EcoN. 103. Geography of Commerce — First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures and recitations. 

98 



A study of the various countries of the world with reference to raw 
materials, agricultural products, markets, trade routes, transportation 
systems and industrial development. 

EcoN. 104. Economic Resources of the World — Second semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures and recitations. 

A study of the world's principal agricultural and mineral resources, 
with particular reference to basic and strategic raw materials; govern- 
mental policies of conservation ; disposition of surplus products. 

EcoN. 105. General Economics — Second semester. Four credits. Four 
lectures and recitations. Not open to freshmen but required of students 
who elect to major in this department. Prerequisite, Soc. Sci. 101, 
except in case of students in the College of Agriculture. 

General principles of economics; production, exchange, distribution 
and consumption of wealth; the monetary system; public finance; land 
and labor problems; monopolies, taxation and other similar topics. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

EcoN. 106. The Mathematical Theory of Investment — The year. 
Six credits. Three lectures. 

The application of mathematics to financial transactions; compound 
interest and discount, construction and use of interest tables, sinking 
funds, annuities, depreciation, valuation and amortization of securities, 
building and loan associations, life insurance, etc. (Spann.) 

EcoN. 108. Economics for Engineers — The year. Six credits. Three 
lectures and recitations each semester. 

General principles of economics specially adapted for engineers. 
(Thompson.) 

EcoN. 110. Money and Banking — First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 105. 

A study of the nature and functions of money; standards of value 
and prices; credit; bank clearings and exchanges; history of American 
and foreign banking; the stock exchange and the money market. 
(Thompson.) 

Econ. 111. Corporatioyi Finance — Second semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 105. 

Methods employed in the promotion, capitalization, financial manage- 
ment, consolidation and reorganization of business corporations. (Thomp- 
son.) 

Econ. 112. Public Finance — First semester. Two credits. Two lec- 
tures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 105. 

A study of the public expenditures, receipts, indebtedness and financial 
administration, theories of public expenditures; theories of taxation; 
the growth and nature of public credit; the forms of public debts; 
federal, state and municipal budgets. (Thompson.) 

Econ. 113. Practicum — Two (or one) credit hours. Prerequisites, 
Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 105. 

Study of a leading trade journal. (Thompson.) 

99 



EcoN. 115. Business Organization — First semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 105. 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of business organization. 
Different types of business. Methods of control. Selection of location 
and determination of products to be handled. Business policies. The 
application of principles to the solution of specific problems. 

Econ. 116. Business Management — Second semester. Three credit 
hours. Three lectures and recitations. Prerequsites, Soc. Sci. 101; Econ. 
105. 

The internal organization of the business for securing efficiency; de- 
partmental organization and co-ordination; advertising; salesmanship; 
office organization. 

Econ. 118. Business Law — The year. Six credits. Three lectures 
and recitations each semester. 

The aim of this course is to train students for practical business affairs 
by giving the legal information necessary to prevent common business 
errors. The following are some of the phases of the work: Requisites 
and forms of contracts and remedies for their breach; sales, passages 
of title, warranties; negotiable instruments, assignment and liability of 
signers; agency, title, abstracts, mortgages, leases, etc. 

Econ. 120. General Accountancy — The year. Six credits. Three 
lectures with problems each semester. 

The fundamental principles of single and double entry book-keeping; 
subsidiary records and controlling accounts; partnership accounts and 
adjustments; corporation accounts; types of stocks and bonds; sinking 
funds; voucher systems; manufacturing accounts. Preparation of balance 
sheet. (Juchhoff.) 

Econ. 123. Principles and Practices of International Trade — Second 
semester. Three credits. Three lectures and discussions. Prerequisites, 
Soc. Sci. 101, Econ. 105. 

Commercial and Trade relations of the United States with foreign 
countries; the forces governing the import and export markets; the 
geographical, social and economic factors affecting commercial develop- 
ment and expansion; the mechanism of international exchange and the 
financing of foreign trade. 

For additional undergraduate courses in Economics see pages 70, 71 
under agricultural economics. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 201. History of Economic Theory — The year. Four credits. 
Two lectures and assignments each semester. 

History of economic doctrines and theories from the eighteenth century 
to the modern period, with special reference to the theories of value and 
distribution. (Thompson.) 

Econ. 210. Economics and Business Administration Seminar — The 
year. Two or four credits. Open to students interested in research with 
proper training in general economics. (Department.) 



100 



Econ. 220. Labor Problems— The year. Four credits. Two lectures 
and assignments each semester. (May be omitted 1923-1924.) 

A study of labor from the point of view of the employer, the employee 
and the public; the conflicts between labor and capital; methods employed 
to obtain industrial peace. 

HISTORY 

For the year 1923-1924 the courses in history and in political science 
are given under one department. 

Description of Courses 
For Undergraduates 

H. 101. Modern and Contemporary European History — The year. 
Six cred'ts. Three lectures and assignments each semester. 

The object of the course is to acquaint students with the chief events 
in World History during the modern period. The lectures are arranged 
so as to present a comparative and contrastive view of the most import- 
ant events during the period covered. 

H. 102. American History, U92-1860— First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures and assignments. Open to sophomores or advanced under 

graduates. 

A study of the political, economic and social development of the Ameri- 
can people, from the discovery of America to the Civil War period. 

H. 103. American History, 1860-1920— Second semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures and assignments. 

A study of the Civil War and reconstruction periods and the period 
of national development from the close of the reconstruction period to 

the present time. 

H. 105. History of Maryland— Second semester. Two credits. Two 

lectures or recitations. 

A study of the Colony of Maryland and its development into statehood. 

H. 110. Ancient Civilization (C. L. 101)— First semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. 

See Classical Languages and Literature for description. 

For additional courses in this field see courses listed under Political 
Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

For Undergraduates 

Soc. Sci. 101. Elements of Social Science— The year. Four credits. 

Two lectures. 

For description of course see page 98 under Economics. 

Pol. Sci. 102. Government of the United States— Second semester. 
Four credits. Four lectures and recitations. Prerequisite, Soc. Sci. 101, 
or may be taken concurrently. Not open to freshmen. 

101 



A study of the Government of the United States. Evolution of the 
federal constitution; function of the federal government. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 103. Govemtiients of Europe — First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Pol. Sci. 102. 

A rapid survey and comparative study of the political organization 
of the principal states of Europe. Classification of forms, separation of 
powers. (Schulz.) 

Pol. Sci. 104. American Municipal Government — Second semester. 
Two credits. Two lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, Soc. Sci. 
101 ; Pol. Sci. 102. 

A study of American City Government: organization and administra- 
tion; city manager and commission plans; initiative, referendum and 
recall. (Schulz.) 

Pol. Sci. 110. Constitutional Law and History of the Uyiited States. 
The year. Four credits. Two lectures and cases each semester. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Pol. Sci. 102. Alternates with Pol. Sci. Ill 
and 112. Seniors and Graduate students. (Omitted 1923-1924.) 

A study of the historical background of the Constitution and its 
interpretation. (Schulz.) 

Pol. Sci. 111. International Law — The year. Four credits. Two 
lectures, assigned reading and cases each semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 
Sci. 101; Pol. Sci. 102; H. 101-103. Alternates with Pol. Sci. 110 and 
112. Seniors and Graduate students. 

A study of the sources, nature and sanction of international law, 
peace, war and neutrality. (Schulz.) 

Pol. Sci. 112. American Diplomacy — The year. Four credits. Two 
lectures and cases each semester. Prerequisites as Pol. Sci. 111. (Omit- 
ted 1923-1924.) Alternates with Pol. Sci. 110 and 111. To be taken 
concurrently with Pol. Sci. 113. 

A study of American foreign policy. (Schulz.) 

Pol. Sci. 113. Diplomatic and Consular Procedure in Connection with 
American Interests Abroad — The year. Two credits, one each semester. 
Prerequisites as for Pol. Sci. 112. To be taken concurrently with Pol. 
Sci. 112. (Omitted 1923-1924.) 

The functions of Consular and Diplomatic Officers of the United 
States in connection with our foreign relations, with particular emphasis 
on the economic investigational and trade promotion services of these 
officers; notarial and quasi-legal, public health and other routine con- 
sular functions. Comparisons made with consular and diplomatic prac- 
tices of other countries. (Lee.) 

Pol. Sci. 116. Political Parties in the United States — First semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and assigned readings. Prerequisites, 
Soc. Sci. 101; Pol. Sci. 102. 

The development and growth of American Political Parties. Party 
organization and machinery. (Schulz.) 

102 



Pol. Sci. 120. Political and Historical Survey of the Far East. 
First semester. Two credits. Two lectures and assignments. 

A study of the social and economic history of the principal countries 
of the Far East with special emphasis upon political and economic move- 
ments in China and Siberia. (Lee.) 

Pol. Sci. 121. Political and Economic Relations with the Far East. 
Second semester. Two credits. Two lectures and assignments. 

Continuation of Pol. Sci. 120. 

A study of the relations of the countries of the Far East with the 
United States and other Western Nations: policies of various govern- 
ments toward countries of the Far East. (Lee.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Students majoring in this department must have a good foundation 
in history, biological sciences and modern languages. In connection with 
the work of this department students have opportunities to visit such 
charitable and penal institutions and agencies of social betterment as 
are in Washington and Baltimore or within easy access of the University. 

Description of Courses 
For Undergraduates 

Soc. Sci. 101. Elements of Social Science— The year. Four credits. 

Two lectures. 

For description of course see page 98 under Economics. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 102. Anthropology— First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures and assignments. Prerequisite, Soc. Sci. 101. (May not be 

given 1923-1924.) 

A study of prehistoric institutions; origins of capital, language, the 
family, state, religions and rights, with some reference to the natural 

history of man. (Lee.) 

Soc 103. Ethnology— Second semester. Three credits. Three lectures 
and assignments. Prerequisites, Soc. 101-102. (May not be given 1923- 

1924.) 

A comparative study of races and racial differentiation ; the dispersion 
of races over the earth. Wide reading in ethnography required. (Lee.) 

Soc. 105. General Sociology— First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures and assignments. Prereuisites, Soc. Sci. 101; Soc. 102-103. 

(Omitted 1923-1924.) 

A study of the fundamental principles of the science of society ; devel- 
opment of early industrial, religious, family, and regulative organiza- 
tions, modes of social activity among savage, barbarous, and civilized 
peoples. (Lee.) 

103 



Soc. 106. Applied Sociology — Second semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures and assignments. Prerequisites Soc. Sci. 101; Soc. 102-105. 
Seniors and graduates. (Omitted 1923-1924.) 

A comparative study of modern social conditions dealing with a cross 
section of modern society; its economic organization, labor, housing and 
health conditions; pauperism, crime, and remedial and corrective agen- 
cies; social surveys in theory and practice. (Lee.) 

Soc. 110. Social Psychology — The year. Six credits. Three lectures 
and recitations each semester. Prerequisite, at least Soc. Sci. 101 and 
preferably Soc. 102-105. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the 
work in the field of sociology and other social sciences. The fundamental 
instincts as dynamic forces in the individual and in society, their devel- 
opment, organization and control. Analysis of the value problem. 
( Thompson-Collier. ) 

For courses in rural sociology, educational sociology, history of the 
family, see pages 145, 146 under Education. 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201. Sociological Systems (Seminar) — The year. Four credits. 
Two each semester. 

A comparative study of the most important sociological literature. 
(Lee.) 

Soc. 205. Self -Maintenance^ of Society — The year. Four credits. Two 
lectures. 

Extensive study of the beginning of the industrial organization of 
society; division of labor; capital; war; classes, and social organization. 
(Omitted 1923-1924.) (Lee.) 



104 



GROUP V. MATHEMATICS 



Description of Courses 
For Undergraduates 

Math. 101. Algebra; Plane Trigonometry; Plane Analytic Geometry 
—The year. Six credits. Three lectures. Alternative for students in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Elective for other students. 

Algebra is studied until the Christmas recess, plane trigonometry 
during January, February and March, and plane analytic geometry 
from April 1 to the end of the year. 

Algebra includes for students who have entered with one unit of Alge- 
bra the study of quadratics, simultaneous quadratic equations, graphs, 
progressions, logarithms, etc., and for students who have entered with 
two units of Algebra, the study of elementary theory of equations, bi- 
nomial theorem, permutations, combinations, etc. 

Plane Trigonometry includes trigonometric functions and the deduction 
of formulas with their application to the solution of triangles and tri- 
gonometric equations. 

Plane Analytic Geometry includes a discussion of the loci of equations 
in two variables, the straight line, the circle and the parabola. 

Math. 102. Algebra— Yirst semester. Three credits. Three lectures. 
Arranged for Pre-medical and Pharmacy students in Baltimore. 

This course is, in the main, similar to the portion of Math. 101 devoted 
to Algebra. 

Math. 103. Plane Trigonometry — Second semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures. Arranged for pre-medical and pharmacy students in 
Baltimore. Prerequisite, Math. 102. 

This course is, in most respects, similar to the portion of Math. 101 

devoted to Trigonometry. 

Math. 104. Plane Trigonometry; Plane Arialytic Geometry; Ad- 
vanced Algebra — The year. Ten credits. Four lectures and one labora- 
tory period each semester. Required of freshmen in the College of En- 
gineering. Elective for other students. 

A review of Algebra during the first two weeks of the year, followed 
by the study of Plane Trigonometry until the Christmas recess. Plane 
analytic geometry is begun at the close of the Christmas recess and 
continued until April 15. Advanced Algebra is begun on April 15 and 
is studied until the end of the year. 

Plane trigonometry includes trigonometric functions, the deduction 
of formulas and their application to the solution of triangles, trigono- 
metric equations, etc. 

Plane analytic geometry includes the curve and equation, the straight 
line, the conic sections and transcendental curves. 

Advanced Algebra includes the elementary theory of equations, bi- 
nomial theorem, permutations, combinations and other selected topics. 

"•-05 



Math. 105. Plane Analytic Geometry; Calculus — The year. Six 
credits. Three lectures each semester. Required of students in chemistry. 
Elective for other students. Prerequisite, Math. 101. 

Plane analytic geometry is studied until the Christmas recess and 
calculus for the remainder of the year. 

Plane analytic geometry includes the study of the ellipse, hyperbola 
and transcendental curves; and the development of empirical equations 
from graphs. 

Calculus includes the study of the methods of differentiation and in- 
tegration and the application of these methods in determining maxima 
and minima and areas, lengths of curves, etc. in the plane. 

Math. 106. Calculus; Mathematics of Space; Special Topics — The 
year. Ten credits. Five lectures each semester. Required of sophomores 
in the College of Engineering. Elective for other students. Prerequisites, 
Math. 104 and solid geometry. 

Calculus is studied from the beginning of the year until April 1. The 
mathematics of space is studied during April and May. The last two 
weeks of the year are devoted to special topics. 

Calculus includes a discussion of the methods of differentiation and 
integration and the application of these methods in determining maxima 
and minima areas, lengths of curves, etc., in the plane. 

Mathematics of Space includes the solution of spherical triangles; the 
discussion 6f surfaces, curves and equations in three variables, the 
straight line, the plane and quadric surfaces; and the determination of 
areas, volume, etc. by the methods of the calculus. 

Special Topics includes the determination of centers of gravity and 
moments of inertia; the development of empirical equations from graphs, 
etc. 

Math. 107. Astronomy — First or second semester. Two credit hours. 
Two lectures either semester. Elective. Prerequisite, a knowledge of 
the elements of trigonometry. 

An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Math. 108. Differential Equations — First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures. Elective. Prerequisite, Math. 105 or Math. 106. 

The solution of the simpler differential equations is discussed. 

Math. 109. Least Squares — Second semester. Two credit hours; two 
lectures. Elective. Prerequisite, Math. 105 or Math. 106. 

A short course in which stress is laid on the application to engineer- 
ing, chemistry, etc. 

Math. 110. Theory of Equations — First semester. Two credits. Elec- 
tive. 

Math. 111. Elementary Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable — 
Second semester. Two credits. Elective. 



106 



GROUP VI. MODERN LANGUAGES 

In addition to the following lists of courses in modern languages 
particular attention is called to the course in comparative literature, 
(Mod. Lang. 201) for graduate students. This course deals with western 
literature from the time of Homer down to modern times, in which the 
literatures of various western peoples are studied by the comparative 
method. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Description of Courses 

For Undergraduates 

Germ. 1. Elementary Germayi — The year. Eight credits. Four lec- 
tures or recitations each semester. 

Drill upon pronunciation, elements of grammar, composition, dictation, 
translation. For beginners. 

Germ. 101. Second-Year German — The year. Six credits. Three lec- 
tures or recitations each semester. Prerequisite, Germ. 1 or the equiva- 
lent. 

Syntax, compositon, conversation, translation, reproductions. Selections 
from modern prose, poetry, fiction. This course is for those who offer 
two units in German for entrance. 

Germ. 102. Schiller and the Drama — First semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Germ. 101. 

Detailed study of the life and works of Schiller and his relation to the 
development of the German drama. Texts, lectures, reports. Given in 
alternate years. 

Germ. 103. Goethe and the Novel — Second semester. Three credits. 
Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Germ. 101. 

Critical study of the life and works of Goethe together with the prin- 
ciples and development of the modern German novel. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Germ. 104. Lessing and German Prose — First semester. Three cre- 
dits. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Germ. 101. 

A study of the life and works of Lessing and his relation to German 
criticism and philosophy. Texts, lectures, reports. Offered in alternate 
years. (Zucker.) 

Germ. 105. Heine and German Poetry — Second semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Germ. 104. 

Extensive study of Heine and the growth of German poetry. Lectures, 
collateral reading, reports. (Zucker.) 



107 



Germ. 106. History of German Literature — The year. Six credits. 
Three lectures or recitations each semester. Prerequisites, Germ. 102 
and 103 or 104 and 105. 

Study of German literature from the earliest times to the present. 
Translation of representative works; lectures, reading, reports. (Zucker.) 

HISPANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Description of Courses 

Span. 1. Beginners* Spanish — The year. Eight credits. Four recita- 
tions each semester. 

Pronunciation, conversation, composition and the study of the elements 
of grammar. For beginners. 

Span. 101. Elementary Spanish — The year. Eight credits. Four 
recitations each semester. Prerequisite, Span. 1. or the equivalent. 

Conversation, study of grammatical forms and easy reading from 
selected texts. 

Span. 102. Intermediate Spanish — The year. Six credits. Three lec- 
tures or recitations each semester. Prerequisite, Span. 101. 

Spanish grammar and the reading of texts relating to the habits, 
customs, etc. of the people of Spanish countries. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Span. 103. Advanced Spanish — First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Span. 102 and the approval of 
the instructor. 

Grammar is completed and the study of modern literature is com- 
menced. (Stinson.) 

Span. 104. Advanced Spanish — Second semester. Three credits. 
Continuation of Span. 103. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

FRENCH 

Description of Courses 

For L^ndergraduates 

Fren. 1. Elemeyitary French— The year. Eight credits. Four lec- 
tures or recitations each semester. 

Drill upon pronunciation, elements of grammar; composition, con- 
versation, easy translation. For beginners. 

Fren. 101. Second-Year French— The year. Six credits. Three lec- 
tures or recitations each semester. Prerequisite, Fren. 1. or the equiva- 
lent. 

Grammar continued; composition, conversation, translation, reproduc- 
tions. Texts selected from modern prose and poetry. This course is 
for those who offer two units in French for entrance. 

108 



Fren. 102. Development of the French Drama — First semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Fren. 101. 

Analysis and study of the French drama of the seventeenth, eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. Lectures, translation, collateral reading and 
reports. 

Fren. 103. Development of the French Novel — Second semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Fren. 101. 

Detailed study of the history and growth of the novel in French litera- 
ture; of the lives, works and influence of various novelists. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Fren. 104. History of French Literature — First semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite, Fren. 102 or 103. 

Study of French literature from the earliest times to the present. 
Translation of representative works, reading and reports. (Kramer.) 

Fren. 105. History of French Literature — Second semester. Three 
credits. 

Continuation of Fren. 104. 

For Graduates 

Mod. Lang. 201. Comparative Literature — 'The year. Six credits. 
Three lectures and assignments each semester. 

A comparative study of the literatures of Western peoples from the 
Greek and Roman period to the Twentieth Century. 

A limited number of senior students will be admitted to this course 
provided they have the proper foundation in languages and literatures. 



GROUP VII. PHILOSOPHY 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

For Undergraduates 

Psych. 101. Elements of Psychology — The year. Four credits. Two 
lectures and recitations each semester. 

The facts and uniformities of mind; types of behavior, conscious ex- 
perience, sensation and image, perception, attention, memory, emotion, 
action and thoughts. Experimental methods and their results are illus- 
trated in lectures. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phil. 101 Introduction to Philosophy — First semester. Three credits. 
Lectures and assignments. 

A study of the meaning and scope of philosophy: its relations to the 
arts, sciences and religion. To be followed by Phil. 102. 

109 



Phil, 102. Problems and Systems of Philosophy — Second semester. 
Three credits. Three lectures and reports on the reading of representa- 
tive works. Prerequisite, Phil. 101. 

Study of the problems and systems of philosophy together with ten- 
dencies of present-day thought. 

Phil. 104, Histai-y of Philosophy — The year. Six credits. Three lec- 
tures each semester. Senior standing required. 

A study of the development of philosophy from prehistoric times, 
through Greek philosophy, early Christian philosophy, mediaeval philo- 
sophy to modern philosophical thought. (May be omitted 1923-1924.) 

Psych. 110. (Soc. 110.) Social Psychology — The year. Six credits. 
Three lectures and demonstrations each semester. 

For description of Course, see Sociology 110. (Thompson-Collier.) 

For courses in educational psychology and psychology of childhood see 
page 146 under Education. 



GROUP VIII. PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

CHEMISTRY 

The Department of Chemistry of the College of Arts and Sciences 
offers courses in inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and industrial 
chemistry; and also includes the State control work of fertilizers, feed 
and lime analysis. 

The above named courses which include the basic principles of chem- 
istry serve as a necessary part of a general education and are designed 
to lay a foundation for scientific and technical work, such as medicine, 
engineering, agriculture, etc. 

Besides serving in this fundamental way the courses are grouped to 
train chemists for the following careers: 

1. Industrial Chemist — Chemistry is becoming more and more to be 
realized as the basis of many industries. Many apparently efficient 
chemical industries have become greatly improved by the application of 
modern chemistry. Chemical corporations employ chemists to manage 
and develop units of their plants. 

2. Agricultural Chemist — The curriculum suggested fits men to carry 
on work in agricultural experiment stations, bureaus of soils, food 
laboratories, geological surveys, etc. 

3. Teacher of Chemistry — There is a growing need of suitably trained 
science teachers in schools. The curriculum as outlined not only fur- 
nishes the necessary science but also affords the opportunity, in co-opera- 
tion with the College of Education to take the educational subjects which 
are required to obtain the special teacher's diploma. 

The same curriculum, together with work in the College of Education 
and graduate work, will fit a man to teach in college or university. 



no 



4 Research Chemist~-The more progressive corporations have es- 
tabiished chemical research laboratories. These '^^^^^f^l^l^ 
with the main purpose of improving old processes and devising new ones 
Sfghly tr'ined'chemists have charge of these laboratories. The genera 
chemistry curriculum is for the undergraduate work, but for these 
posSs work leading to a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree is advised. 

Curricula in Chemistry 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: / // 

Physics (Phys. 102) ^ g 

Plane Analytic and Calculus (Math. 105) 

Qualitative Analysis ( Analyt. Chem. 101) 

Elements of Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101) ^ * 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. 101) 

Public Speaking (P. S. 107-108) J 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 103-104) ^ 

JUNIOR YEAR - 

Public Speaking (P. S. 111-112) J ^ 

English (Eng. 103) ^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) • ^ 

Economics (Econ. 105) ^ 

Organic Chemistry (O. Chem. 103.) ^ 

Quantitative Analysis (Anal. Chem. 105) 

Chemical Calculations (Anal. Chem. 102) 

SENIOR YEAR . 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 102-103) * ^ 

Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) ^ 

Physics (Phys. 105) ^ ^ 

^NOTE^'Th^ 'Freshman 'year* *f;; 't^^eVmaiorin^Vin 'cene^al' Chemistry is the same as 
for other students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I // 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) ^ 

Modern Language (Fr. or Germ. 1) ^ 

Mathematics (Math. 101) ^ 

Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 101) ^ 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. 101) 

Shop and Forge Practice (Shop 101) ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 101) ^ 



111 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Oral English (P. S. 101-102) 1 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101) ./.......... 2 

Qualitative Analysis (Analyt. Chem. 101) 2 

Physics (Phys. 102) '" ^ 

Plane Analytics and Calculus (Math. 105) 3 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 103) 1 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 103) . 2 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101) ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Economics (Econ. 108) 3 

Engineering Geology (Geol. 101) .!........ 1 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101-102) 4 

Prime Movers o 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103) .........,..,[ 4 

Analytical Chemistry (Analyt. Chem. 105) .*.***' 1 

Chemical Calculations (Analyt. Chem. 102) i 

SENIOR YEAR 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 102) 4 

Industrial Chemistry (Ind. Chem. 101) .....,..[ 4 

Eng. Jurisprudence (Engr. 105) 2 

Public Utilities (Engr. 106) 

Electives in Engineering o 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 3 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-102) 1 

Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 101) 4 

Modern Language (Fr. or Germ. 1) 4 

Botany (Bot. 101) " ^ 

Zoology (Zool. 101) 

Mathematics (Math. 104) [[ 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 101) * .' * ][[ 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 101) 2 

Qualitative Analysis (Analyt. Chem. 101) *. • 2 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102) * o 

Dairy Products (D. H. 107) 

Geology (Soils 101) . 

Soils (Soils 102) 

Arts Physics (Phys. 101) . 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 102) * * * * * * .' [ * * ' * '" g 

112 



1 
4 

5 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 

3 
1 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 



4 

4 

1 

9 



// 
3 
1 
4 
4 

4 
3 
2 



4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


8 


8 


4 


4 


4 


4 




4 


9 


6 



3 
4 
2 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 103) 

Agricultural Chemistry (103-109) 

English (Eng. 103) 

Electives in Agriculture 

SENIOR YEAR 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem. 102) 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ag. Chem. 103) 

Economics (Econ. 105) 

Electives 

Description of Courses 
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Inorg. Chem. A. 101. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
The year. Eight credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each 
semester. 

A study of the non-metals and metals, the latter being studied from a 
qualitative standpoint. One of the main purposes of the course is to 
develop original work, clear thinking and keen observation. This is ac- 
complished by the project-method of teaching. 

Course A is intended for students who have never studied chemistry, 
or have passed their high school chemistry with a grade of less than A. 

Inorg. Chem. B. 101. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — 
The year. Eight credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each 
semester. 

This course covers much the same ground as Inorg. Chem. A. 101, 
except the subject matter is taken up in more detail with emphasis on 
chemical theory and important generalization. The laboratory work 
deals with fundamental principles, the preparation and purification of 
compounds and a systematic qualitative analysis of the more common 
bases and acids. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade of not less than A. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Analyt. Chem. 101. Advanced Qualitative Analysis — First semester. 
Two credits. Two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Chem. A or B 101. 

An advanced course in qualitative analysis for students in chemistry. 

Analyt. Chem. 102. Chemical Calculations — The year. Two credits. 
One each semester. Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. 101. 

Chemical problems relating to analytical chemistry. 

Analyt. Chem. 103. Quantitive Analysis — Second semester. Three 
credits. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. 101. 

Quantitative analysis for premedical students with special reference 
to volumetric methods. 

113 



Analyt. Chem. 104. Determinative Mineralogy and Assaying— Sec^ 
ond semester. Two credits. One lecture and one laboratory period Pre- 
requisite, Inorg. Chem. 101. 

The more important minerals are identified by their characteristic 
physical and chemical properties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and 
lead are made. 

Analyt. Chem. 105. Qwantitive Analysis— The year. Eight credits 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. lOl! 

The principal operations of gravimetric analysis. Standardization 
of weights and apparatus used in chemical analysis. The principal opera- 
tions of volumetric analysis. Study of indicators, typical volumetric 
and colorometric methods. Required of all students majoring in chem- 
istry. 

Analyt. Chem. 106. Electro-Chemical Analysis— The year. Three 
credits. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite Phvs 
Chem. 107. n , j^ . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Analyt. Chem. 107. Advanced Qimntitative Analysis— The year 
Eight credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each semester' 
Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101; Analyt. Chem. 105. 

A continuation of course 105. (Wiley.) 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Org. Chem. 101. Elementary Organic Chemistry— The year. Eight 
credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each semester Pre- 
requisite, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The course is de- 
signed primarily for premedical students. 

Org. Chem. 102. Elementary Organic Chemistry— First semester 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite' 
Inorg. Chem. A or B 101. * 

This course is designed primarily for agricultural students. 

Org. Chem. 103. Elementary Organic Chemistry— The year Eight 
credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each semester Pre- 
requisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B. 101. 

This course is particularly designed for students taking chemistry 
as a major, and offers a detailed study of the typical organic compounds. 

For Graduates 

Org. Chem. 201. Advanced Organic Chemistry— The year Six credits 
Two lectures and assigned laboratory work each semester. Prerequisites' 
Inorg. Chem. A or B 101 and Org. Chem. 103. 

A more advanced treatment of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds, 
with .special emphasis on the most recent theories of structure and 

114 



reactions from the standpoint of the electronic conception of valence. 
(Kharasch.) 

Org. Chem. 202. Organic Preparations — First semester. Five credits. 
One lecture and laboratory work. 

The laboratory work consists in preparing compounds described in the 
literature. No text book. (Kharasch.) 

Org. Chem. 203. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry — Second sem- 
ester. Two credits. Two lectures. 

Discussion of the theories of tautomerism, electromerism, molecular 
rearrangements, etc. (Kharasch.) 

Org. Chem. 204. Dyestuffs — Second semester. Two credits. Two 
lectures. 

The theory of color as related to chemical constitution is included in 
this course. (Kharasch.) 

Org. Chem. 205. Elementary Organic Analysis (Combustions) — First 
semester. Three credits. (Kharasch.) 

Org. Chem. 206. Identification of Organic Compounds — Second sem- 
ester. Five credits. 

An outline of the methods and the theory for the qualitative identifica- 
tion of the most common organic compounds. (Kharasch.) 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Undergraduates 

Phys. Chem. 101. Elemeyits of Physical Chemistry — The year. Eight 
credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods each semester. Pre- 
requisites, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101; Physics 101; Math. 105 recommended. 

The course will present the portions of physical chemistry which are 
necessary to every chemist, student of medicine, bacteriologist, or teacher 
of chemistry, with laboratory practice in thermometry and temperature 
regulation; physical constants; molecular weight determinations; veloc- 
ity of reactions; chemical equilibrium and law of mass action; measure- 
ments of conductivity; migration of ions; hydrogen ion concentration. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Phys. Chem. 102. Physical Chemistry — First semester. Four credits. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Phys. Chem. 101. 

A study of the more advanced theories of physical chemistry with 
laboratory practice in the more techntel physico-chemical measure- 
ments. (Gordon.) 

Phys. Chem. 103. Electro-chemistry — Second semester. Four credits. 
Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Phys. Chem. 102. 

Various factors which govern the action of electrolytes when subject 
to the action of the electric current and the factors which determine 
electromotive force are taken up. (Gordon.) 

115 



For Graduates 

Phys. Chem. 201. Thennodynam:cs— The year. Four credits Tw« 
lectures each semester. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 102"o3 

treatment of oh/'-'Tl' "'""''"' "''° ^'^*' ^" ^'^^^"'^^^ mathematical 

lecw!' !:", f K "' CAe««str2/_The year. Six credits. tL 

Chem lo! °" ""'"'"^ P'^""'^ ''"'' ^^'"«^*-- Prerequisite, Phys. 
Special topics will be taken up with emphasis on the most recent theor 
.s^and research ,oi„, on in colloid chemistry at the pre::nt ire! (Gor-" 

seL" te; "^ tI'I^' ed-/"f "^'"'■^*''^ "'^ ^^"-^ S..uc*u.e-First 
semester. Two credits. Two lectures. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 102- 

«.H t*T' Z ""' '^*''* development of radio activity and allied topics 
and modern theories of atomic structure. (Gordon ) ^ 

credr* iZloT'- ''p'"""^ ^.-^^•ft-.^.-Second semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. Chem. 103. 

Lectures dealing with the application of chemical equilibrium to cer 

TuZ P'^'-lf /'^7'^«1 problems with assignments of tSe original litera 
ture for collateral reading. (Gordon ) "riginai mera- 

Phys. Chem. 205. The Phase-One semester. Two credits Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. Chem. 103 

Lectures with collateral reading dealing especially with aoDlicatinn 
of the phase rule to industrial problems. (Gordon ) ^PPl><=«tion 

Phys. Chem. 206. Research in Physical Chemistry. 

Physical chemistry problems for investigation will be a«i<.„.^ .. 

srv'"'^"*^ "'° ^''' '- ^^^■" ^" ^^'^"-'^ Sre^in sl;^ 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY 
Agricultural Group 

ortl ^""l^' ?^' ^'''''''^ ^^ncuZ^ura/ CA.mtsir2/-The year Six 
Srsklrthem. iJl^ -^ '^^-^^- -- -- --r.- pt 

cide^ciTstr;!"^ "'"^ °' ^'^"*' ^"™^'' ^^''' ^-^"--. -d in-ti- 

tictrnrturrdZr '^ " 'f '""'' ""' '^ "^ ^ quantitative and synthe- 

Ag Chem in^^r.' ^'Z' ^'''^^' ^''^ agricultural material. 
creISs t1 1; ^''^'«»«"-2' «/ ^oods-Second semester. Three 

CW \0lX Ch-A"oi.''" '^'^'■^^^'•^ ^^^^"•^- ^--'^-i^ites, Inorl 

The purpose of this course is to present the principles of the chemistrv 

P.c^t:a:rr. ^"' '''-''' '-'--- '^ ^^^ ^-' carbotdrS 

110 



Ag. Chem. 103. Chemistry of Textiles — Second semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101, 
Org. Chem. 101. 

A study of the principal textile fibers, their chemical and mechanical 
structure; chemical methods are given for identifying the various fibers, 
dyes and mordants. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ag. Chem. 104. Dairy Chemistry — First semester. Three credijs. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem, 101, Ag. 
Chem. 101. 

Lectures and assigned reading on the constituents of dairy products. 
The laboratory work is designed to teach the methods of analysis of milk 
and its products. (Broughton.) 

Ag. Chem. 105. Plant Analysis — First semester. Three credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. 101, Ag. 
Chem. 101. 

A discussion and the application of the analytical methods used in 
determining the inorganic and organic plant constituents. (Broughton.) 

Ag. Chem. 106. Soils and Fertilizer Analysis — Second semester. Three 
credits. One lecture and two laboratory hours. Prerequisites, Inorg. 
Chem. 101, Ag. Chem. 101, Soils 101. 

A complete analysis of soils and fertilizers, with training in the more 
refined analytical procedures as applied. (Broughton.) 

Ag. Chem. 107. Food Analysis — ^he year. Six credits. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods each semester. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem, 
101, Analyt. Chem. 101. 

Lectures and laboratory work including the analysis of edible fats and 
oils, sugars and syrups, vinegars, flavoring extracts, cereal foods and 
beverages. (Broughton.) 

Ag. Chem. 108. Physiological Chemistry — First semester. Three 
credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Inor- 
ganic Chem. 101, Org. Chem. 101. 

The chemistry of carbohydrates, lipins, proteins, digestion, matabolism, 
and excretion. Open only to undergraduates. (Broughton.) - 

Industrial Chemistry Group 

Ind. Chem. 101. The year. Four credits. Two lectures each semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101, Analyt. Chem. 101. 

A fundamental lecture course in industrial chemistry, dealing with the 
problems of the chemical industries. The work in the first half of the 
year deals especially with inorganic industries, while that of the second 
is related to the organic industries. Students are required to go on 
inspection trips and make satisfactory written report upon the work 
of the trip. 

117 



Ind. Chem. 102. Metallurgical Analysis — The year. Four credits. 
Two laboratory periods each semester. Prerequisites, Inorg. Chem. 101, 
Analyt. Chem. 101-104. 

Analysis of industrial ores and alloys, fuels, oils and gases. 

Ind. Chem. 104. Engiyieering Chemistry — The year. Two credits. One 
lecture. Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. A or B 101. 

A lecture course dealing with the value of fuels, coal, oils, and gases, 
from their chemical analysis. The significance of flue gas analysis. Com- 
parison of specifications, particularly chemical requirements of various 
states, *manufacturers and large corporations for fuels, lubricating oils 
and paints. This course is given primarily for students in engineering. 

Chemistry Seminar — The year. Two credits. 

During these periods there is a discussion of the latest bulletins and 
scientific papers on all phases of chemistry by the graduate students 
and chemistry staff. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY 

For Undergraduates 

Geol. 104. General Geology — First or second semester. Four credits. 
Three lectures and one laboratory period either semester. 

The surface features of the earth with emphasis on their origin and 
significance; the processes of geologic change; the effects of composition, 
hardness and structure of rocks on evolution of topographic forms; 
study of common rocks, minerals and soils. 

Geol. 105. (Analyt. Chem. 104) Determinative Mileralogy — Second 
semester. Two credits. One lecture and one laboratory period. Pre- 
requisite, Inorg. Chem. 101. 

The more important minerals are identified by their characteristic 
physical and chemical properties. Assays of gold, silver, copper and 
lead are made. 

PHYSICS 

For Undergraduates 

Physics 101. Arts Physics — The year. Eight credits. Three lec- 
tures or recitations and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Math. 101. 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of the 
laws governing the physical phenomena in Mechanics, Heat, Sound, 
Magnetism, Electricity and Light. Required of students in the Pre-Med- 
ical curriculum. Elective for other students. 

Physics 102. Engineering Physics — The year. Ten credits. Four 
lectures (or recitations) and one laboratory period each semester. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 104. 

Laws and theories pertaining to Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Magnetism, 
Electricity, and Light, with special reference to the problems which are 
concerned with engineering, are discussed in the class room and applied 

118 



in the laboratory. Required of all students in engineering and chem- 
istry. Elective for other students. p^„-j„_Second semester. Four 

Physics 103. Special Applications of Physics becon 
credits. Four lectures (^^ recitations ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^.^^ ^^ ^^^^.^^ 

This course consists of a discussion "^ ^ Required of students 

from the viewpoint of their practical applications. Kequir 
in agriculture and home economics. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

(or recitations) and one laboratory perioa. rre 4 

-Z course is ^^-^^ ./^ Jjj ^3^^^" th ^^^^^ 

^'SScs'Sf "L,.e. P...cs-First semester. Three or four 
cre^s Three lectures (or recitations) and one laboratory period. Pre- 

'Tn^c!t:'' ZZTpky^s-Seco., semester. Three or four 
crers?hree- lectures (or recitations) and one laboratory period. Pre- 

T^Strs^ff re;Lrmena in P^--l Op«es Sp^troscopy. Con- 
duction of Electricity through Gases, Radioactivity. Elective. 



GROUP IX. THE PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The pre-medical curriculum includes fl^^^i^^^^^ ^^^r^^o^t 

the University of Maryland wnoP ^ ^^^lent of 68 hours in 

ISin r9?3^anTtuir ru^tttiSy the si'xty (60) semester hour 
JSuirement o? the Council on Medical Education of the American Med- 

^Intddtfnt-combined seven-year curriculum is offered leading to^^^^^ 

deUs of Bachelor o^.^^^^-^ctir^^^^^^ 

years are taken '" J^^^l^^f f'^^^^* f ""^ Pre-Medical Curriculum consti- 
ffT^ttt^o dears' wfrk and a third year following the general 
oSn given b^rowjS Z electives approved by the chairman of the 
pr! merarcurricuium and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
completes the studies at College Park. 

119 



Upon the successful completion of the first year in the Medical School 
and the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Scence 
may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences at Co lege pfrk 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this com 
Brcomn,Tt"".f '" °'^'" '""^ "'"'"^"^ requirements ot^e two ye"" 

wLrTa? udTiX' f T '''. '"""^ "^^ ''^ ^-^"y broadenedTy a 
wiaer latitude m the election of courses in the arts subiects 

cufrSuT"'' '" ^""'^^'°" '"^^ '^ '^^"' ^""-^i ^^^e P--medica, 



Pre-Medical Curriculum 

Two Years 

FRESHMAN YEAR o 

Composition (Eng. 101) Semester / jj 

Mathematics (Math. 101) ^ ^ 

General Zoology (Zool. 102-103) . f ^ 

German or French (Germ, or Fr 1) ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) * ' * * "^ ^ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR ^ ^ 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-102) 

Physics (Phys. 101) ^ 1 

Organic Chem. (Org, Chem*. *io3) * " ^ ^ 

Zoology (Zool. 108) ^ 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Analyt. ChemVlOS) ^ 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. Sci. 101) « f 

Psychology (Psych. 101).. ^ 2 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 102) ^ ^ 

2 2 

Combined Seven- Year Course 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Adv. Composition (Eng. 103) 

Embriology (Zool. 120) ***** ^' * ^ ^ 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) * 

Physical Chemistry (Phys. Chem'.'lOl) ^ 

Economics (Econ. 105) ^ 

Electives 4 

SENIOR YEAR ^ 

The curriculum of the first vpnr nf fi,^ ^ j- i , , 
may also elect the fourth yeL^ work fro^H ''^'"- ^'^ ^^"'^""^^ 
the College of Arts and ScLncel ^''"'"'' '"""^^^ °^^^«<1 '» 

Requirements for Entrance 

120 



or by examination and credentials, and is essential for admission to any 
class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student's Certificate 
are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or 
the equivalent, and in addition: 

(b) Two years, sixty semester, or ninety trimester hours of college 
credits, including chemistry, biology, physics and English in 1923. In 
1924 the completion of 68 semester hours as outlined in the Pre-Medicai 
Curriculum, or its equivalent, will be required. 

Women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 
(a) Details of the High School Requirements 

For admission to the Pre-Medical Curriculum students, 

1. Shall have completed a four-year course of 15 units in a standard 
accredited high school or other institution of standard secondary school 
grade or ; 

2. Shall have the equivalent as demonstrated by successfully passing 
entrance examinations in the following subjects : 

Credits for admission to the pre-medical course may be granted 
for the subjects shown in the following list and for any other subject 
counted by a standard accredited high school as a part of the require- 
ment for its diploma provided that at least eleven units must be offered 
in Groups I-V: 

Schedule of Subjects Required or Accepted for Entrance to the 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 

Subjects Units Required 

Group I. — English: 

Literature and composition 3-4 3 

Group II. — Foreign Languages: 

Latin 1-4 *2 

Greek 1-3 

French or German 1-4 

Other foreign languages 1-4 

Group III. — Mathematics: 

Elementary Algebra 1 1 

Advanced Algebra Yi-l 

Plane Geometry 1 1 

Solid Geometry I/2 

Trigonometry j/^ 



♦Both of the required units of Foreign Language must be of the same language, but 
the two units may be presented in any one of the languages specified. 

Of the fifteen units of high school work, eight units are required, as indicated in the 
foregoing schedule: the balance may be made up from any of the other subjects in the 
schedule. 

121 



Subjects 
Group IV.--History : ^'"^^ 

Ancient History 

Medieval and Modern History (}\ 

English History * * * * ^^-l 

American History )/K^ 

Civil Government {} 

X2-1 

Group V.— Science: 

Botany 

Zoology \)~] 

Chemistry ^ "^ 

Physics 

Physiography _ 

Physiology * * * * w] 

Astronomy ^" 

GeoIofiTv . ^ 

K2-I 

Group VI.— Miscellaneous: 

Agriculture 

Bookkeeping ■ 

Business Law '^"^ 

Commercial Geography , . "^ 

Domestic Science 

Drawing— Freehand and Mechanical *.' ,/ "f 

Economics and Economic History (/': 

Manual Training ^^-l 

Music— Appreciation or Harmony* .*.'.* ]'l 

Stenography "^ 



Required 



GROUP X. MISCELLANEOUS AND WORK FROM OTHER 

COLLEGES 

MUSIC 

The Department serves students of two general clascp.,. ti,„=. u 

iiiusii, leacners and those who pursue musica] cfuHi^c, f 

enjoyment and general culture F«r ,Z ™"^'''^' ^^"'''^^ *<"^ purposes of 

the various dub activities and public lectures and recitalT ' 



122 



Description of Courses* • 

Music 101. History of Music — The year. Two credits. 

A comprehensive study of the development of music from the beginning 
to modern times. The early church influence. The ancient composers; 
those of the middle ages; and those of modern times. 

Music 102. Music Appreciation — The year. Two credits. 

A study of all types of classical music with a view to developing the 
ability to listen and enjoy. Lecture recitals will be presented with the aid 
of performers and records. A study of the orchestra, the instruments 
that it employs. The development of the symphony and orchestra instru- 
ments for solo performance. The development of the opera and oratorio. 
Great singers of the past and present. 

Chorus 

Membership in the Chorus is free to all students, and to persons re- 
siding in the community. One semester hour of credit for the year is 
awarded to students for faithful attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public concerts. Oratorios and standard part-songs are 
studied. The Chorus presents an annual festival of music in May. 

Glee Club 

A Glee Club, of limited membership, is recruited from the best vocal 
talent among the men of the University. Admission is gained through 
tests, or "try-outs", conducted at the beginning of the school year. The 
club holds two rehearsals per week. Public concerts are given. 

Military Band 

This organization, of limited membership, is a part of the military 
organization of the University, and is subject to the restrictions and dis- 
cipline of the Department of Military Science and Tactics, but the 
direction of its work is under the Department of Music. 

Voice 

Courses in voice culture are offered, covering a thorough and com- 
prehensive study of tone . production, based on the Italian method of 
singing. 

The work required to develop a singer is begun with the most funda- 
mental principles of correct breathing. Scale and arpeggio exercises, 
and all intervals, the portamento, legato, and staccato, and trill, and 
other embellishments to develop the technique of singing are studied 
through the medium of vocal exercises arranged by the greatest authori- 
ties on the voice, under the careful supervision of the instructor. 



♦NOTE: Lessons in harmony may be arranged for upon application to the head of 
the department. 



123 



The study of songs and ballads is adapted to the ability and require- 
ments of each singer, a thorough training being given in diction and 
phrasing, through the medium of sacred and secular ballads, leading to 
the oratorio and opera. 

Opportunities are afforded all voice pupils who are capable to make 
public appearances in the regular pupils* recitals, as well as in the 
churches of the community. 

Tuition 

One lesson per week, term of eighteen weeks $24 

The above price for lessons in voice are those offered to students of 
the University who are pursuing regular academic courses. Terms for 
private instruction outside the University may be secured from the in- 
structor in voice. 

Piano 

Elementary piano courses. Work for beginners, based on the Lesch- 
etizky method. 

Advanced piano courses. The college work in piano presupposes 
three years of preparatory study of the piano part or all of which may 
be taken at the University. 

Lessons are taken twice a week. A four-year college course is as 
follows : 

First Year — Technical studies based on the modern weight and rotary 
method: Heller Etudes, Sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; selec- 
tions from classic and modern composers. 

Second Year — Bach Preludes; concertos by classic masters; Jensen 
Etudes; selections from classic, romantic, and modern composers. 

Third Year — Leschetizky technic; Chopin Preludes and Waltzes; Bach 
Inventions; Mendelssohn Concertos, Beethoven Sonatas; selections from 
romantic and modern composers. 

Fourth Year — Leschetizky technic; Chopin Etudes; Bach Well-Temp- 
ered Clavichord; sonatas and concertos by Grieg, McDowell, Schutt, 
Beethoven, etc , concert pieces by modern and romantic composers. 

Tuition 

One lesson per week, term of eighteen weeks $24 

Note. — Music tuitions are due in advance. Ten per cent, is added to 
all tuitions not paid in advance. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 101. Library Methods — First semester. One credit. Freshman 
year. Required of all students registered in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Elective for others. 

This course is intended to help students use the library with greater 
facility. Instruction will be given by practical work with the various 

124 



catalogs, indexes and reference booUs. ^s c<n.se considers «.e general 

?T^:r^ SoVrtsrd r cosr wu^ z use o^ 

he irary catdogue. Attention is given to periodical literature part.c- 

helpful throughout his college course. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The requirements for all students of the College of Arts and Sciences 

in tiesefie Ms are explained above in the section dea ing w.th Reqmre- 

pltffor he Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. A 

TescripUon of the'courscs and work required will be found elsewhere 

in the catalogue. 

ELECTIVES IN OTHER COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 
A certain number of courses in the Colleges of Agriculture Education. 
En^neerTg and Home Economics may be taken as electives by ad- 
vanced undergraduate students upon the approval of the dean and the 
rhoriza«on of the dean of the college in which the courses are offered. 



125 



College of Commerce and Business 

Administration 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 



^ ' * • "• ^- S., Advisory Dean 
*^AYNARD A. CLEMENS, M.A., Acting Dean 

'eSUE W'.'.^' /"^"" -' Se'eretaJof I Paculty 
LESLIE W. BAKER, M.C.S., C.P.A. (Accountancy) 

MORRIS E. SPEARE, Ph.D. (English) 

WTTTT./ • ^^^^* ^^'^' (Economics) 

WILLIAM H. S. STEVENS, Ph.D. (Corporation Finance) 
ORMAND MILTON, B.A. (Banking and InvestI nlT^ 
FREDERICK JUCKHOFF, LL.M., Ph.D., CPA 
(Business Administration and Accountancy) 
K. E. KARLSON, Ph.D. (Foreign Trade) 
W. R. MANNING, Ph.D. (Foreign Trade) 
RICHARD B. PUE (Real Estate) 
FRANK M. COLLIER. Ph.D. (Social Psychology) 
CHARLES F. RANFT, M.A. (History) 

IL'^''^''^'^''^ '''^' (Commercial Mathematics) 

ANDREW H. KRUG, Ph D. (Salesmanship) 

VICTOR RAY JONES, M.A., (Modern Languages) 

T. B. THOMPSON, Ph.D. (Economic History) 

PETER PECK, A.B., LL.B. (Business Law) 



126 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

In response to repeated requests from men and women in Baltimore, 
the University of Maryland opened in that city in the fall of 1921 Exten- 
sion Courses in Commerce to provide systematic instruction in those 
subjects which would be of benefit to those who were engaged in or who 
expected to engage in business. The demand for such courses proved to 
be so great — over five hundred students having been enrolled during the 
academic year 1922-1923 — it was decided in the spring of 1923 to create, 
on the foundation of these Extension Courses, a College of Commerce and 
Business Administration which would be closely articulated with the 
College of Arts and Sciences of the University. In order to maintain a 
close relationship between the two colleges the dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences was made Advisory Dean of the College of Commerce 
and Business Administration, and all matters pertaining to standards, 
degrees, courses of study, etc , are under the advisory control of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

The rapid expansion of business in recent years has placed upon uni- 
versities the duty of giving students systematic preparation for a busi- 
ness career. Modern business is now, in its higher forms, as much a 
learned profession as law, medicine, engineering or agriculture, and 
demands of those who enter it a professional training more definite and 
practical than that usually afforded by the general college course. These 
demands of modern business are being partially met by the University 
in its Department of Economics and Business Administration of the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, in which students may 
major in the work of this department in courses leading to a B.S. or a 
B.A. degree. To provide for other types and classes of students of the 
state, however, and for a more technical preparation in this line, this 
reorganization of the courses in commerce in the city of Baltimore has 
taken place. The object of making this reorganization was to standard- 
ize the courses offered in this field in order that fully qualified students 
might complete a college course and receive, upon its completion, a 
standard collegiate degree. The courses and departments of study of this 
college are designed to meet the needs of three classes of students: 

I. Graduates of high schools who wish a thorough professional 
training for business careers, supplemented by the elements 
of a broad, liberal culture. 
II. Employed men and women who have completed one or more 
years of a college course and who desire to continue their 
education and complete the requirements for a university 
degree. 
III. A limited number of special students who desire to pursue 
certain courses in order to increase their efficiency, without 
reference to candidacy for a degree. Such special students 
must satisfy the instructors that they have adequate prepa- 
ration for carrying the courses desired. 

127 



Late Afternoon and Evening Courses 

In response to the needs of the greater number of students of the Col- 
lege of Commerce and Business Administration the work of the college 
for the present ,s centered in the late afternoon and evening classfs 

fL»7 f ^"^'^"^ '*'^^*'' Baltimore. Students who desire fuU- 

!t Colri" P r '^\' ""''^ '""^ '"^"" '" *^ C°»^^« °f Arts and Sciences 
BaSore! ' '^ '**'' *° ^''^ """'^ Professional courses in 

Requirements for Admission 

Bn:i.^.W^"TT" ^^' admission to the College of Commerce and 
Business Administration for regular students who are candidates for a 
degree are. m general, the same as those for admission to any other 
undergraduate college or school of the University. Such studS rnust 
present evidence of the completion of a four-year high schoof coursTof 
15 units or its equivalent. Only such can obtain the Bachelor's Degree 

a f„„r?«^"^i u u' f '"^*'""' ^^' ^^" ^^^^ °"ly Partially compfeted 
a four-year high school course or its equivalent may be admitted, and 

fr TV." '^""^- '''"*^'" '''"'"'^' ^"-^ *° ^^'"""^ candidates for a certifi- 

: . Al admission of such students will depend entirely upon the 

extent of their education and business experience. These students cannot 

obtain a degree unless the complete entrance requirements are made up. 

credit IT^ T -.f r''"''^'^ '°'''''' *°*^»"^ ^t '^^^t ^2 semester 
who have fnlfin'H ""n ! ^""*''' ^ Certificate of Proficiency. Students 
who have fulfilled all entrance requirements and have no immediate in- 
tention of completing a four-year course for a degree may also become 
candidates for a certificate. J »« uetome 

III. Unclassified students may be admitted to special courses of study 
but not as candidates for a degree or certificate. Upon full matriculation 
tl5' y"7"''^'t ^y '^^ fulfillment of all entrance requirements, credits 
tTficate ''""'"'^^ "^^ ^^ **'^" *'°""*^'* ^°^''''^ * ^^^^^ *''• ^^^J"- 

Admission to Advanced Courses 

Full credit is given for work in acceptable subjects completed at in- 

ttthnrn/i-V. 1^^'"*^'" ''^"'^"'*' °^ ^'""'^^•°" ^"^ graduation equal 
to those of this University. Students who have been regularly admitted 

lr^^Hlll''^'"rfjf '°"'"''' '" ^^^'^^ A't^ «"d S"^"'^^ subjects in 
creditable institutions for a period of two years or more will be able 

to complete the requirements for a degree from this College in two years 
or by the completion of sixty semester credit hours of work. The last 
thirty hours of credit toward a degree, however must be secured in a 
college of the University of Maryland. secureo m a 

Requirements for the Degree 

colWe^'lt'f "^,^7^^^?,^ \"^ ^"^i"-«« Administration is a professional 
college. Its graduates who have fulfilled all entrance requirements and 

128 



have completed one of the required or approved courses of study, and 
have secured credit for a minimum of 120 semester credit hours in liberal 
and professional subjects will be granted the degree of Bachelor of Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Students who have successfully completed two years of college study 
in an approved institution may be granted the degree of Bachelor of 
Business Administration when they have successfully completed a mini- 
mum of 60 credit hours in required professional courses. Business 
demands to-day particularly men who are broadly trained and not men 
narrowly drilled in routine. It needs managers; not rank and file. Hence, 
two years of liberal college training are very desirable for students 
desiring to enter a business career. 

Requirements for Certificate 

Students not candidates for a degree who have pursued approved 
courses of study and have secured a total of 72 semester credit hours 
may be granted a Certificate of Proficiency. Such courses of study 
ordinarily require a period of four years of three evenings a week. 

Credits 

The "credit hour'* represents one lecture or recitation hour per week 
throughout a semester. 

To encourage a high grade of scholarship a system of credit for 
quality has been established. 

For the purpose of evaluation to determine graduation, the following 
values of grades apply: 

The grade "A" gives 1.2 times the normal credit. 

The grade "B" gives 1.1 times the normal credit. 

The grade "C" gives 1.0 times the normal credit. 

The grade "D" gives .9 times the normal credit. 

Thus a grade of "A" received in a 3-credit course has a value of 3.6 

credits; a grade of "B" 3.3 credits; a grade of "C" 3 credits; a grade 

of "D" 2.7 credits. 

The grades of "A", "B", "C", and "D'' are the only ones carrying 
university credit. All other grades signify failure or condition. Not 
less than three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with grades of "A", "B", or "C". 

Courses and Programs 

The following fields of business training are provided for in the College 
of Commerce and Business Administration: 

1. Accountancy 

2. Business Administration 

3. Banking and Investments 

4. Foreign Trade and Commerce 

5. Real Estate and Insurance 

Full detailed information regarding courses of study, fees, etc., may be 
obtained from a special bulletin of the College of Commerce and Business 
Administration which may be secured by addressing Maynard A. Cle- 
mens, Acting Dean, College of Commerce and Business Administration, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, or the President of the University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 



129 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

T. O. HEATWOLE, Dean 



T. O. HEATWOLE, M. D., D. D. S. 
Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics 

R. P. BAY, M. D. 

Professor of Oral Surgery 

B. M. HOPKINSON, A. M., M. D., D. D. S. 
Professor of Oral Hygiene and Oral History 

R. L. MITCHELL, PHAR. G., M. D. 

Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology 

H. J. MALDEIS, M. D. 

Professor of Histology and Embryology 

J. EDGAR ORRISON, D. D. S. 
Professor of Operative Dentistry 

M. B. MILNER, D. D. S. 
Professor of Orthodontia 

O. H. GAVER, D. D. S. 
Professor of Physiology and Infirmary Chief 

A. Y. RUSSELL, D. D. S. 
Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, Chief of Clinic and 

Radiodontia Instructor 

J. LEROY WRIGHT, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy and Biology 

E. FRANK KELLY, PHAR. D. 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry 

NEIL E. GORDON, PH., D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

E. B. STARKEY 
Instructor of Chemistry 

M. KHARASCH, PH., D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

0. B. EICHLIN, B. S. 
Professor of Physics 

HOWARD LEE HURST, D. D. S. 
Professor of Exodontia 

GERALD I. BRANDON, D. D. S. 
Professor of Crown and Bridge and Associate in Prothetic Technics 

130 



GEORGE S. KOSHI, D. D. S. 

Associate in Crown and Bridge and Dental Clinic 

D. EDGAR FAY, M. D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis 

F. M. LEMON, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of English 
: SAMUEL P. PLATT 

Instructor of Mechanical Drawing 

ALEX H. PATERSON, D. D. S. 

Special Lecturer on Advanced Prosthetic Dentistry 

B. B. IDE, D. D. S. 

Special Lecturer on Dental Economics 

ADALBERT ZELWIS, A. M., D. D. S. . 

Associate in Prosthetic Technic . ' ' 

GRAYSON W. GAVER, D. D. S. - 

Assistant in Prosthetic Clinic and Technic 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, D. D. S. 
Assistant in Science Laboratories and Clinical Demonstrator 

C. R. GOLDSBOROUGH, M. D. 
Assistant in Histology and Embryology 

W. A. HALL, D. D. S. 
Clinical Demonstrator and Orthodontia Technic 

C. ADAM BOCK, D. D. S. 
Demonstrator Exodontia and X-Ray 

L. LYNN EMMART, D. D. S., 
Assistant Clinical Demonstrator 



-• » 



Administrative Officers 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, Registrar 
GEORGE S. SMARDON, Comptroller 
RUTH LEE BRISCOE, Librarian 
KATHARINE TOOMEY, Secretary to Dean 
SARAH KELLY, Extracting Room Nurse 
DOROTHY HARDY, Clinical Supply Clerk 
VIOLA MAY KELLER, Senior Stenographer 



131 



The course of instruction in the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland covers a period of four Sessions of 32 weeks each, exclusive 
of holidays, in separate years. 

The Forty-Second Regular Session will begin October 1st, 1923, and 
continue until June 1st, 1924. Full attendance during this period is de-. 
manded in order to get advancement to higher classes. Class Examina- 
tions for the Session will be held in September, January, and May. 

This Department of the University of Maryland is a member, in good 
standing, of the National Association of Dental Faculties, and conforms 
to all the rules and regulations of that body. 

The many men of eminence in professional, civil and social life, gradu- 
ates of this institution, distributed throughout the civilized world, will 
amply attest to the high standard and thorough training in vogue in the 
past, and effort will be kept abreast of the development in the practical 
scientific advancement of the profession in the future. 

Aside from and independent of the Regular Session, this institution 
maintains a Summer Course, which follows immediately the termination 
of each Regular Session and continues until October 1st. This Course 
is intended for practical work only; no credit for time thus put in is 
allowed toward graduation. The many advantages of the Summer Ses- 
sion for actual practice cannot be overestimated, as the number of pa- 
tients applying for dental services is always very large and the Infirmary 
is never closed except on Sundays and other holidays. 

Requirements for Matriculation 

The requirements for matriculation in the Dental Department of the 
University of Maryland are those established by the Dental Educational 
Council of America, viz, graduation from an accredited high school having 
a four-year course, or its equivalent. 

Applicants for matriculation must submit their credentials for verifi- 
cation to the Registrar of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md, 

Applicants lacking full credentials may earn the same by taking a 
stated written examination on subjects in which they are deficient. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full Session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance not later than ten days after the beginning 
and remain until the close of the Regular Session, the dates for which 
are announced in the Annual Catalogue. 

In case of sickness, attested by a physician*s certificate, students may 
enter twenty days after the opening of the Regular Session. 

Advanced Standing 

Graduates from reputable and accredited dental colleges are admitted 
to the Sophomore Year and credits allowed on all subjects completed 
which are included in the Dental Course. 



132 



Students from other recognized dental colleges will be given credit for 
all work completed in the institution from which they come, except those 
entering for the Senior Year only. These will be required to take the 
work of the full Senior Course of this School. 

At the close of each Session, each student must pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination on the several subjects of that year before he can be entered 
in the succeeding class. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The candidate for graduation must have attended four sessions of in- 
struction in some recognized dental college, the last year of which must 
have been in this institution. 

He must have satisfied the requirements of each of the several instruc- 
tors and proved himself proficient in the theory and practice of Dentistry. 

He must have attained the age of twenty-one years and be of good 
moral character. 

Students may matriculate by mail by sending money order, or regis- 
tered letter containing the amount of fee, $5.00, to Dr. T. O. Heatwole, 
Dean, Corner Green and Lombard Sts., Baltimore, Md. 

Fees for Each Regular Winter Course 

Matriculation (paid once only), $5.00. Tuition fee, $200.00. Dissecting 
fee (paid once only), $15.00. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Ihe Diploma fee must be paid by the first of April of the year of 
graduation.) 

The tuition fee may be paid as follows: One hundred dollars at the 
beginning of session, and balance during the first week of the succeed- 
ing February; this rule must be strictly observed. 

A special ticket is issued at the close of each session to every student 
of the first, second and third year classes, as an evidence that he has 
been successful, or unsuccessful, in examinations for advancement to a 
higher class, and also that he has attended a full session. 

No assessment is made on candidates for graduation, the University 
hearing all the expenses attending the Commencement Exercises, 



133 



College of Education 



The College of Education is an organization of the various activities of 
the University concerned with the preparation of individuals for position 
m the educational profession. Its courses are planned to serve three 
classes of students: First, those preparing to teach agriculture, arts and 
science, home economics and industrial subjects in high schools; second 
prospective principals of high schools, educational supervisors, county 
agents, home demonstrators, boys' and girls* club workers, and other 
educational specialists; third, those majoring in special fields who desire 
courses m education for their professional and informational value. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in 
general the same as for the admission to any other college or school of 
the University Fifteen units of secondary school work in acceptable 
subjects must be offered by every candidate for admission, including the 
following prescribed subjects: 

E^S^^s^ 3 units 

Mathematics 2 units 

S^^^^c^ 1 unit 

History 1 ^^i^ 

'^^^al 7 units 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the prescribed con- 
ditions for a degree in the College of Education are: Bachelor of Arts- 
Bachelor of Science. ' 

Teachers' Special Diplomas 

The degrees granted for work done in the College of Education indi- 
cate primarily the quantity of work completed. Teachers' special diplo- 
mas certify to the professional character of such work. Teachers' special 
diplomas will be granted only to those who, besides qualifying for a 
degree, give promise of superior professional ability as evidenced by their 
personality, character, experience and success in supervised teaching. 

Teachers' special diplomas will be granted in agricultural education 
arts and science education, home economics education, manual training 
and industrial education. 

The recipient of a teacher's special diploma is eligible for certification 
by the State Superintendent of Schools without examination. 

134 



Departments 

The College of Education is organized into two general divisions: 
General Education and Vocational Education. In the main the College 
includes work in the following departments offering general and profes- 
sional training for teachers: Agricultural Education, Arts and Science 
Education, Home Economics Education and Industrial Education. 



Curricula 

Two types of curriculum are offered. These correspond with the two 
general divisions of the college organization: General Education and 
Vocational Education. 

The first of these is designed to prepare teachers of the arts and sciences 
in the high schools and to prepare specialists for the profession of Educa- 
tion. It therefore provides a wide range of electives. The basic require- 
ments are fixed and definite, but the student may select from a number of 
subjects the major and minor subjects in which he exi>ects to qualify for 
teaching. The student may secure the degree either of Bachelor of Arts 
or Bachelor of Science, depending upon his major content subject.* 

The curricula in Vocational Education are designed for the definite pur- 
pose of preparing teachers and supervisors of agriculture, home econom- 
ics, manual training and industrial subjects. They permit, therefore, 
comparatively little choice of subjects. As the University of Maryland 
is the institution designated by the State Board of Education for the train- 
ing of teachers of vocational agriculture, home economics, and trades and 
industries under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes vocational educa- 
tional act, the curricula in this class have been organized to meet the 
objectives set up in the act and in the interpretations of the Federal 
Board for Vocational Education and the State Board of Education. These 
curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

As an integral part of every curriculum of the College of Education 
leading to a degree, a minimum of 20 credits in Education is required. 
This minimum includes the following prescribed subject units: 

Education in the United States 2 

Educational Hygiene 2t 

Educational Psychology 3 

Technic of Teaching 3 

Special Methods 3 

Principles of Secondary Education 3 

Supervised Teaching 3 

Upon completion of 134 credits in conformity with the requirements 
specified above and in conformity with general requirements of the Uni- 
versity, the appropriate degree will be conferred. 



•For information in reg^ard to Arts and Science Departments and subjects see pa^e 82. 
tExcept in Agricultural Curriculum. 

135 



Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the institution as a 
whole, by special arrangement with the county and state school authori- 
ties the high school located at Hyattsville within two miles of the Univer- 
sity is used for college credit work in supervised teaching. The observa- 
tion work necessary for efficient teacher training is conducted in 
Washington and in nearby Maryland schools. The nearness of these 
schools to the institution and of the federal offices and libraries dealing 
with education provide unusual opportunities for contact with actual 
classroom situations and current administrative problems in education. 

Special Courses 

By special arrangement courses in education are offered evenings and 
Saturdays to teachers in service and to others who may desire to qualify 
for teaching in the schools of Maryland after having had such work. 
College credit may be granted for this work if taken in course. With 
present facilities only a limited amount of service of this kind can be 
undertaken. 

As the need for evening classes in industrial and home economics 
education arises, special courses will be offered at centers throughout the 
State. The number and location of these centers will depend entirely 
upon the need and demand for such instruction. The courses will be 
organized on the short unit basis and will be maintained only so long as 
the demand justifies them. Upon the satisfactory completion of such 
curricula, students will be issued certificates stating the amount and 
character of work done. 

In summer special courses are offered for the benefit of teachers in 
service and such individuals as may be able to qualify for teaching upon 
the completion of the work. 

Professional Preparation for Prospective Teachers 

The State Board of Education will certify to teach in the approved high 
schools of the State only such persons as have had satisfactory profes- 
sional preparation. In terms of quantity this requires a minimum of 20 
semester hours of professional education courses. Students who hope to 
teach in approved high schools of the State must, therefore, secure this 
professional preparation. 

The State Department of Education is stimulating and encouraging 
instruction in music and athletics in the high schools of the State. In 
the majority of these schools the instruction in these subjects will have 
to be carried on by teachers who teach other subjects as well. Training 
in either or both of these subjects will be valuable for prospective teach- 
ers. 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean of 
the College of Education regarding possible combinations and the arrange- 

13G 



ment of their work. At the time of matriculation each student is expected 
to make a provisional choice of the subjects which he desires to prepare 
to teach and to secure the advice and approval of the head of the depart- 
ment which offers these subjects. The previous training, the experience 
and the probable future needs of the student will govern the head of the 
department in his recommendations. 

CURRICULA 
ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 
Upon registration for this curriculum students should state the subjects 
in which they expect to qualify for teaching, designating a major and a 
minor interest. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must com- 
plete, in addition to the requirements of the curriculum, a minimum of 
eight credits in foreign language. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 

Education or the College of Arts and Sciences. In any case they will 

register with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I II 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 8 3 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 100) 1 1 

Reading and Speaking (P. S. 101) 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 101) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 101) ;• 2 2 

Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish, Latin, 

Greek) ^ ^ 

♦Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. 101-A or 101-B) 4 4 

(One of these) 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 101) 3 3 

English Literature (Eng. 102) 3 3 

Mathematics (Math. 101) 3 3 

18 18 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I II 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 2 

Educational Hygiene (Ed. 102) 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) or Physical Education (Phy. 

Ed. 102) 2 2 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. 101) 2 2 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) 4 

General Botany (Bot. 101) or Entomology (Ent. 101) or 

Field Zoology (Zool. 106) * 

fElectives ^ 8 

18 18 

♦This requirement may be modified in case of students who enter with three years of 
Chemistry in the high school. Such students, with the advice and consent of the Head 
of the Department of Chemistry, may elect advanced Chemistry; or with the consent of 
the Dean may substitute some other subject. Students purposing to major in Chemistry 

see page 110 for prerequisite. ,.,..,. .. u-* 

tThe electives will be determined by the student s choice of major and minor subjects. 

137 



JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 103) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 104) 3 

English (one three hour course) 8 3 

*Electives 10 10 

16 16 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Special Methods (Ed. 110, 111, 112, 113, 114) 3 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 105) . . 3 

"Supervised Teaching (Ed. 115) 

♦Electives 12 12 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, 
involving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students 
electing the agricultural education curriculum must present evidence of 
having acquired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of four- 
teen years. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be selected from any of 
the courses offered by the University for which the student has the neces- 
sary prerequisites. A student is expected, however, to confine his elec- 
tions to subjects relating to farming and to teaching. Though opportunity 
is afforded for specilization in a particular field of agriculture, such as 
animal husbandry, agronomy, pomology, vegetable gardening or farm 
management, students should arrange their work so that approximately 
forty per cent of their time will have been spent on technical agriculture, 
twenty-five per cent on scientific subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of 
a general educational character, and from twelve to fifteen per cent on 
subjects in professional education. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Agriculture. In either case they will register 
with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I II 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101) 4 

Vegetable Gardening (Hort. Ill) . . 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101- A or 101-B) 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. 101) 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) . . 4 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 3 3 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 100) 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 101) 2 2 

♦The electives will be determined by the student's choice of major and minor subjects, 
and by requirements of Education courses. 
•{•Either semester ; 3 or 5 credits. 

138 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I II 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) 2 

Agricultural Chemistry (Ag. Chem. 101) 3 3 

Field Crop Production (Agron. 101-102) 3 3 

Geology (Soils 100) 3 

Principles of Soil Management (Soils 101) . . 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 101) 3 

Dairying (D. H. 101) 3 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101) 3 

Principles of Economics (Ec. 105) . . 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 102) 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 103) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 104) 3 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) 1 1 

Farm Machinery and Farm Shop (Agr. Eng. 101) 3 

Poultry (Poultry 101) 3 

Bacteriology (Bact. 101) 3 

Landscape Gardening (Hort. 127) . . 2 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 101) 3 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102) . . 3 

Electives 3-5 3-6 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I II 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 121) ... 3 
*Practicum Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 

(Ed. 123) 3 3 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 105) . . 3 

Rural Sociology and Educational Leadership (Ed. 123) ... . . 3 

Farm Management (F. M. 101) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 104) 2 2 

Electives 8-10 8-10 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, 
involving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students 
electing home economics education must present evidence of two years* 
experience in the home as a house daughter, during which time a large 
share of the responsibility in the management of the home was assumed. 

Students may elect from other schools such courses as they may be 
qualified to enter. They are expected, however, to confine their election 
primarily to subjects related to home-making and to teaching. The cur- 
riculum should be so arranged that approximately forty per cent of the 
students* time will be spent on technical home economics subjects, twenty- 
five per cent on scientific subjects, twenty per cent on subjects of general 

•Either semester; 3-5 credits. 

139 



H' 



academic character, and from twelve to fifteen per cent on subjects of a 
professional character. 

Students electing this curriculum may register either in the College of 
Education or the College of Home Economics. In either case they will 
register with the College of Education for the special teacher's diploma. 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester: I // 

Educational Guidance (Ed. 100) 2 ^ 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) !!!.!! 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101-A or 101-B) 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) ........!. 4 

General Botany (Hot. 101) .!..!..!. 4 

Modern and Contemporary History (H. 101) 3 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed, 101) .'.*.".'.'.''.*..' 2 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR Smiester: I U 

Educational Hygiene (Ed. 102) 2 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101) . ! .* ! . . . . . .* . '2 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 102) 3 

Chemistry of Foods ( Ag. Chem. 102) *.'.'..'.. . . '3 

Elementary Foods (Foods 101) 3 3 

Art (Art 101) ......!.!..*.!* 3 

Costume and Design (Art 102) 3 

Textiles (Textiles 101) *!!!!!!!..!!.. 2 

Garment Construction (Cloth. 101) ' * ' 2 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. 101) 2 2 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 102) ,......., 2 2 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I // 

Educational Psychology (Ed. 103) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 104) ..*.... 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) * * 3 

Physics (Physics 103) '4 

Dressmaking and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth 102).. 3 

Nutrition (Foods 102-103) 3 '3 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101) l 1 

Electives ^ g 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I ;/ 

Methods of Teaching Vocational Home Economics (Ed. 130) 3 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 105) 3 

Supervised Teaching Secondary Voc. Home Economics 

(Ed. 131) Q 

Home Management and Mechanics of the Household 

(H. M. 101) 3 

Practice House (H. M, 102) '4 

Education of Women (Ed 132) * * '3 

Child Care and Welfare (Ed. 133) .'!..!.* . . 3 

Electives n ^ 

140 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR ELECTIVES 

History of Education (Ed. 106) 

Advanced Educational Psychology (Ed. 107) 

Rural Sociology and Education Leadership (Ed. 123) 

Home Architecture and Interior Decoration (Art. 104) .... 

Millinery (Cloth 104) 

Chemistry of Textiles (Textile 102) 

Dressmaking (Cloth 102) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



3 

3 
2 



3 



3 
2 
3 



Three types of curricula are offered in Industrial Education, viz., a 
four year curriculum, a two year curriculum and a special curriculum. 
The first two are offered as resident work at the University and the third 
is offered at special centers in the State where occasion demands. 

Four- Year Curriculum in Industrial Education for Teachers of 

Related Subjects 

In addition to the regular entrance requirement of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students 
electing the four-year curriculum in industrial education must be willing 
to engage in the trades or industries during the three summer vacations. 

The electives allowed by this curriculum may be chosen from any of the 
courses offered in the University for which the student has the necessary 
prerequisite. 

Two- Year Curriculum in Industrial Education for Teachers of 

Related Subjects 

This curriculum is designed for mature students who have had consid- 
erable experience in some trade or industry. 

In addition to the above, applicants for admission to this curriculum 
must have as a minimum requirement an elementary school education or 
its equivalent and must be willing to engage in the trades and industries 
during the summer vacation. 

The curriculum will not be rigidly required as laid down, but will be 
made flexible, in order that it may be adjusted to the needs of students 
who present advanced credits for certain of the required courses. 

Special Courses for Teachers of Trades and Related 

Trade Subjects 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher training in Baltimore, two 
types of courses are offered in the evenings in that city — one for teachers 
of trade subjects, the other for teachers of related trade subjects. The 
courses open about the last of September and close about the last of 
April. The class for teachers of trade subjects meets twice a week, the 
one for teachers of related trade subjects meets once a week. The recita- 
tion period in all cases is two hours. 

141 



Applicants for admission to these classes must have had considerable 
experience in the line of work they expect to teach, and must have, as a 
minimum requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. 
The credit allowed for these courses depends upon the amount and char- 
acter of the work completed. 

For teachers of trade subjects the term's work deals with the analysis 
and classification of trade knowledge for instructional purposes, the me- 
chanics and technique of teaching, shop and class-room management, and 
the organization of industrial classes. The work for teachers of related 
subjects is similar to that described for teachers of trade subjects except 
that emphasis is placed upon the analysis of their specialties in relation- 
ship to the different trades with which they are articulated. 



Description of Courses 



GENERAL EDUCATION 



A. Principles and History 



Ed. 100. Educational Guidance — The year. Two credits. One lecture 
each semester. Open to all freshmen. Required of freshmen in Educa- 
tion. 

This course is designated to assist students in adjusting themselves 
to the demands and problems of college and professional life and to guide 
them in the selection of college work during subsequent years. Among 
the topics discussed are the following : student finances ; student welfare ; 
intellectual ideals; recreation and athletics; general reading; student 
organization; student government; the purpose of the college; the elec- 
tion of courses and the selection of extra curriculum activities. 1 

Ed. 101. Public Education in the United States — First semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures. Required of all sophomores in Education. 

The evolution of public education in the United States as the expres- 
sion and promoter of democracy, emphasizing particularly vocational 
education and present tendencies in reorganization; recent state and 
federal school laws; proposed legislation. 

Ed. 102. Educational Hygiene — Second semester. Two credits. Two 
lectures. Open to sophomores and juniors. Required of sophomores in 
Education. 

Elements of general, individual and group hygiene; causes of health 
and disease; habits; knowledge and ideals of health; health as an object- 
ive of education. 

Ed. 103. Educational Psychology — First semester. Three credits. Open 
to juniors and seniors. Required of all juniors in Education. 

General characteristics and use of original tendencies; principles of 
mental evolution and development; the laws and methods of learning; 

142 



experiments in rate improvement; permanence and efficiency; causes and 
nature of individual differences; principles underlying mental tests; prm- 
ciples which should govern school practices. 

Ed 104. Technic of Teaching— Second semester. Three credits. Four 
lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and seniors. Re- 
quired of juniors in Education. Prerequisite, Ed. 103. 

The nature of educational objectives; steps of the lesson plan; observa- 
tion and critiques; survey of teaching methods; type lessons; lesson 
planning; class management. 

Ed. 105. Principles of Secondary Education— Second semester. Three 
credits. Required of all seniors in Education. 

Evolution of secondary education; articulation of the secondary school 
with the elementary school, college technical school, and with the commun- 
ity and the home; the junior high school; programs of study and the re- 
construction of curricula; the teaching staff and student activities. 

Ed. 106. History of Education— First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures. Open to juniors and seniors. 

History of the evolution of educational theory, institutions, and prac- 

tices. 

Ed. 107. Educational Sociology— First or second semester. Three 

credits. Three lectures. Open to advanced undergraduates and grad- 

uates * 

The sociological foundations of education; group needs; educational 
objectives; educational institutions; the program of studies; need for 
special organizations; possibilites of the special group leaders in adult 
education; educational programs. 

Ed. 108. Advanced Educational Psychology— Second semester. Three 
credits. Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ed. 103. 

The problem of individual differences, causes and influences making 
for individual differences, such as sex, race, ancestory, maturity, and en- 
vironment. Mentality and its development, variations in mentality, 
types of intellect and character, measurement of intelligence, intelligence 
tests, their uses and limitations. 

Ed. 109. Seminar in Education— Second semester. Three credits. 

Graduates. 

Problems in educational administration. 

B. Arts and Science Education 

Ed. 110. Eriglish in Secondary Schools— First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Required of seniors preparing 
to teach English. Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 

Objectives in English in the different types of secondary schools; se- 
lection of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; 
evaluation of the course of study in terms of modern practice and group 
needs ; the organization of the materials ; lesson plans ; measuring results ; 
observations and critiques. 

143 



Ed. 111. History and Civics in Secondary Schools — First semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of seniors preparing to teach history. Prerequisite, 
Ed. 104. 

Objectives of history and civics in secondary schools; selection of sub- 
ject matter; parallel reading; state requirements and state courses of 
study; the development of civics from the community point of view; ref- 
erence books, maps, charts and other auxiliary materials; the organiza- 
tion of materials ; lesson plans, checking and measuring results ; observa- 
tions and critiques. 

Ed. 112. Foreign Language in Secondary Schools — First semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of seniors preparing to teach foreign language. Pre- 
requisite, Ed. 104. 

Objectives of foreign language in secondary schools; selection of sub- 
ject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; the organi- 
zation of material for teaching; lesson plans; special devices and auxili- 
ary materials; observation and critics. 

Ed. 113. Mathematics in Secondary Schools — First semester. Three 
credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of seniors preparing to teach mathematics. Prerequi- 
site, Ed. 104. 

Objectives of mathematics in secondary schools; selection of subject 
matter; State requirements and State courses of study; proposed reor- 
ganizations; lesson plans; checking and measuring results; observation 
and critiques. 

Ed. 114. Science in Secondary Schools — First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and seniors. Re- 
quired of seniors preparing to teach science. Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 

Objectives of science in secondary schools; selection of subject matter; 
State requirements and State courses of study; sources of materials; the 
organization of materials for instruction; methods of the class period; 
lesson plans; the preparation and organization of laboratory instruction; 
note books. 

Ed. 115. Teaching Arts and Science Subjects — Three to five credits. 
Determined by amount and character of work done. Required of seniors 
preparing to teach arts and science subjects. Subject selected depends 
upon the student's specialty. Ed. 110 or Ed. Ill or Ed. 112 or Ed. 113 or 
Ed. 114 must be offered as a prerequisite to or as parallel with this 
course depending upon the student*s specialty. 

Observation; course outline; lesson plans; class teaching, critiques. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Ed. 120. Theory of Vocational Education — Second semester. Three 
credits. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students by 
special arrangement. 



144 



Evolution of vocational education, educational and social forces behmd 
the movement; terminology; types of vocational schools; technical high 
schools; vocational education for girls; vocational education m rural 
communities ; recent legislation. 

A. Agricultural Education and Rural Sociology 

Ed 121. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture— First semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, 

Sociological foundations of vocational education; needs of the special 
groups of the farming population; evolution of agricultural education 
development and problems of the day class-projects, the selection of 
content; the use of the double class period, equipment; problems of the 
part-time class; problems of evening classes; directed and supervised 
practical work ; measuring results. .,.-,* 

Ed 121. Practicum Teaching Secondary Vocational Agrumlture--^ 
First or second semester. Three to five credits. Credit determined by 
the amount and character of the work done. Ed. 104 must be offered 
as a prerequisite to or as a parallel of this course. 

Observation; monthly outline, lesson plans; class teaching; conferences; 

critiques^.^ J?wrar Sociology and Educatioiml Leadership— Second sem- 
ester. Three credits. Three lectures. Open to advanced undergraduates 

and graduates. 

The rural community— nature, history, structure, types; the com- 
munity survey; present tendencies, needs, and problems of rural life; 
the villages and place in American social organization ; special functions 
of the school and other institutions in relation to the needs of the rural 
group This course is designed especially for persons who expect to be 
called upon to assist in shaping educational and other community pro- 
grams for rural people. , ^ mu 

Ed 124. Practicum Rural Sociology— First or second semester. Three 
to five credits. Credit determined by the amount and character of work 
done Open to graduate students only. Prerequisite, Ed. 123. 

Essentially a field course in rural sociology. Students must make a 
social survey of a community and write a satisfactory report of the 

survey. ^ , . o j 

Ed. 125. Problems and Practice in Extensian Teaching— Second sem- 
ester. Three credits. Three lectures. Open to advanced undergraduates 

and graduates. . , j • j 

Given under the supervision of the Extension Service and designed 
to equip young men to enter the broad field of extension work. Methods 
of assembling and disseminating the agricultural information available 
for the practical farmer; administration, organization, supervision and 
practical details connected with the work of a successful county agent, 
club worker, and extension specialist. Students will be required to 

145 



gain experience under the guidance of men experienced in the respective 
fields. Traveling expenses for this course will be adjusted; according 
to circumstances, the ability of the man and the service rendered. 

B. Home Economics Education 

Ed. 130. Methods of Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics 
— First semester. Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Ed. 104. 

History of Vocational Education; interpretation of Smith Hughes law; 
aims and objectives in teaching secondary vocational home economics; 
making of a course of study and its ^adaptation to the needs of the girls 
and the homes of the community; methods of instruction, lesson plan- 
ning; use of illustrative material; improvement of Home Economics 
library; selection of equipment, observation and critiques. 

Ed. 131. Supervised Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics 
— First semester three to five credits. Credit determined by the amount 
and character of work done. Prerequisite, Ed. 130. 

Observation; outline units of instruction; lesson plans; class teaching; 
conference and critiques. 

Ed. 132. Education of Women — First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures. Open to juniors and seniors. 

History of the family; its members and their relation to the home; 
change in women's position as affected by the progress of civilization; 
training for citizenship, professions and the home. 

Ed. 133. Child Care and Welfare — Second semester. Three credits. 
Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites for health teaching Foods 
101 and Education 104. 

Child psychology, child care and health teaching. 

C. Industrial Education 

Ed. 140. Industrial Education in Secondary Schools — Either semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Open to juniors and 
seniors. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. Prerequisite, 
Ed. 104. 

Theory of vocational education ; purposes of industrial education ; types 
of industrial schools; vocational and trade analysis; place of auxiliary 
knowledge; related trade courses; industrial school population; materials 
and equipment; relation of the industrial teacher of the school system; 
problems of the related trade teacher as they arise in connection with 
trade analysis; lesson planning; methods of the class period; discipline; 
organization and management; observation and critiques. 

Ed. 141. Teaching Industrial Subjects in Secondary Schools — Either 
semester. Three to five credits determined by the amount and character 
of work done. Required of seniors in Industrial Education. Ed. 140 
must be offered as a prerequisite to or as parellel with this course. 

Observation; outlines; lesson plans; class teaching; conferences and 
critiques. 

146 



Ed. 142. History of Industrial Education — Second semester. Two 
credits. Two lectures. Open to seniors and graduate students. 

History of the origin and development of industrial education in the 
light of group needs; industrial education in the United States; develop- 
ment of schools ; present problems in reorganization. 



147 



College of Engineering 



Whether a man follows engineering as his life's work or enters other 
fields it is well recognized that the training received in the engineering 
colleges of today affords a splendid preparation that fits him for many 
callings in public and private life outside of the engineering profession. 

The College of Engineering, which includes the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, has been reorganized. The gen- 
eral purpose has been to broaden the courses of instruction the better to 
prepare young men to enter the public service. The large public works 
program contemplated in practically every state in the Union makes 
urgent the demand for engineers trained for such work. The public 
service demands the electrical and mechanical as well as the civil engi- 
neer. Maryland needs such men to carry on her great highway work and 
large public undertakings contemplated in various cities and counties. 
Such training seems pre-eminently a function of the State's University. 

The subject matter of the courses is not essentially different from that 
usually given, but the viewpoint of the student and the application of the 
principles are those of public service. In order to give the time neces- 
sary both to the technical subjects and to those of a more general charac- 
ter, a careful revision of all courses of study was made so that the utmost 
time available in each semester may be used to the best advantage. 

Beginning with the college year of 1921, the curriculum was arranged 
so as to prescribe the same courses of study for all freshmen and all 
sophomores, respectively, in the Engineering College. Among other 
advantages that accrue from such a change, is the very important one 
that a young man will not be called upon to decide the branch of engi- 
neering in which he will specialize until his junior year. 

These changes necessitate a somewhat greater amount of preparation 
than formerly prescribed, and the hearty and sympathetic cooperation of 
the high schools of the state is asked that Maryland boys may be even 
better prepared for their university work to the end that they may be 
well qualified to enter on their life's work with the best possible univer- 
sity training. 

Engineering research is recognized today as one of the most needed 
useful contributions that the engineering college can make to the state. 
Work of this character is under way at the University of Maryland, 
where, through cooperation with the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads and 
the Maryland State Roads Commission highway research problems are 
being studied, the solution of which will prove of utmost value to the 
people of the State. It is planned to develop as rapidly as possible this 
phase of the work which will have, aside from its great economic value 

148 



to the State, an important educational value due to the close contact the 
students will have with the live engineering problems of today. 

The war brought prominently before all people the work done by the 
engineers and now a most important part is played by the profession m 
he reconstruction problems that confront, not alone the -untr-s of 
Europe but the United States as well. The opportumties for the well- 
franed engineer were never greater than at present. Great projects are 
under way and even greater contemplated, which the engineer of the 
future will be called upon, not only to build, but to initiate. He will re- 
ou^^e the broadest training he can secure. He must know more than 
r rely the technique of his profession; he must be able to grasp the 
economic problems that underlie all great public works. It is to-^^^^^ 
such a training and understanding that the courses m the College of 
Engineering are being developed. 

Admission Requirements 
The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the under 
graduate departments of the University, except as to the requirements in 

"" Thrhigh-hool units that are required for entrance to the College of 
Engineering are as follows : ^ 

English ^_^ 

Algebra complete ' ^ 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry ^ ^ 

Science 

History 

Electives 

Total ^^ 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in 
Civil Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, respectively. 

Not less than three-quarters of the credits required for graduation 
must be earned with grades of A, B or C. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering is given to those 
students registered in the Graduate School, who hold Bachelor Degrees 
in Engineering, prerequisite for which requires a similar amount of 
preparation and work as required for Bachelor Degrees m the Engineer- 
ing College of the University of Maryland. . ^ . •„„..„ 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are 
accepted in accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Gradu_ 
ate School, as will be found explained in the catalogue under the head 
of Graduate School. 

149 



Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of the University who have 
obtained a bachelor's degree in engineering*. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work 
for three years. 

2. His registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months 
prior to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with his 
application a complete report of his engineering experience and an outline 
of his proposed thesis. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Civil, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

Equipment 

The Engineering building is provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories and shops for all phases of engineer- 
ing work. 

Drafting-Rooms 

The drafting-rooms are equipped for practical work. Engineering stu- 
dents must provide themselves with an approved drawing outfit, material 
and books, the cost of which during the freshman year amounts to about 
$40.00 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory 

The equipment includes many of the various types of direct current 
and alternating current generators and motors, rotary converter, dis- 
tribution transformers, control apparatus and the measuring instruments 
essential to practical electrical testing. For experimental work electrical 
power is obtained from engine driven units and a turbine generator; a 
storage battery is used for constant voltage testing purposes. 

Instruments are available for measuring the candle power of lamps 
and for the determination of illumination intensities. The standardizing 
laboratory apparatus includes primary and secondary standards used in 
calibrating laboratory instruments. 

The telephone laboratory is equipped with apparatus for experimental 
work on magneto and common battery systems. The radio apparatus is 
limited, at present, to receiving sets. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 

The apparatus consists of Corliss and plain slide valve engines, steam 
turbine set, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed water heaters, tacho- 
meters, injectors, flow meters, apparatus for determination of the B. T. U. 

150 



in coal, gas and liquid fuels, pyrometers, draft gauges, planimeters ther- 
mometers and other necessary apparatus and equipment for a mechamcal 
laboratory. 

Materials Laboratory 

Apparatus and equipment are provided for making standard tests on 
various construction materials as steel, concrete, timber and brick. 

Equipment includes two 100,000 pound universal testing machines 
cement testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauge^ and 
oXer special devices for ascertaining the elastic properties of different 

"" Spedll' apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of 
the University is also made available for student work. 

Highway Research Laboratory 

Certain problems in highway research have been «^?d«rtak^"/^^ ^^« 
actively under way, being carried on in co-operation with the U. S. Bureau 
of Public Roads and the State Roads Commission. 

A study of the traffic over the Maryland State Highway system ,s m 
nroeress and a preliminary traffic map has already been prepared. 

A specfal investigation into the elastic properties of concrete is well 
under way this work directly coordinating with the general program of 
"esearrp;oblems undertaken by the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. In 
connect: with this study, there have been taken over sixteen hundred 
samples in the past two summers from the concrete roads of the State 
tS samples Consisting of cores which were <^-\'^^-^ ^^JZf ^^^ 
.necial core drill apparatus mounted upon a specially equipped truck 
The resuHs that have been obtained from the testing of these con rete 

lores will be studied in connection with the ^^^^^'^^^ ;^:^:f^Z- 
which are being made upon the fatigue of concrete. The fatigue ot con 
Tre'i^is being studied by'means of a specially devised machine which was 
designed and built at the University laboratory. 

Machine Shops and Foundry 

The machine shops and foundry are well lighted and fully equipped 
Ships fT tod wording, metal, forge and foundry practice are provided 

%Z'i::f:<:5T^ov has fun equipment of hand and power ma- 

%\7machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 

milling machines and drill presses. furnace and coke 

The foundry is provided with an iron cupola, a brass furnace ana cone 

"'The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill and instruction 
for students but makes possible the complete production of special ap- 
paratuffor 'conducting experimental and research work m engineering. 

151 



Surveying Equipment 

Surveying equipment for plane, topographic and geodetic surveying is 
provided sufficient properly to equip several field parties. A vdde variety 
of types of instruments is provided, including domestic as v^ell as foreign 
makes. 

Special Models and Specimens 

A number of models illustrating various types of highway construction 
and highvi^ay bridges are available for students in this branch of engi- 
neering. ^ 

There has also been collected a wide variety of specimens of the more 
common minerals and rocks from various sections of the country, particu- 
larly from Maryland. 

Library 

Each department contains a well-selected library of books for reference 
and the standard engineering magazines. 

The class work, particularly in the higher courses, requires that the 
students consult special books of reference and current technical litera- 
ture. 

Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are also required to attend and take part in the meetings 
of the Engineering Society and Seminar and engineering lectures. 

All members of the freshman engineering class are required to attend 
a series of twenty to twenty-five lectures a year, the speakers, for the 
most part, being other than engineers. 

Each student is required to hand in a very brief written summary of 
each lecture. 

In addition to the requirements of the regular courses of study, all 
students in the Engineering College are required, during each of the three 
summer vacations, to obtain employment in some line of commercial 
work, preferably that which relates to engineering. Unless the student 
can offer some adequate reason why he has not been so employed during 
at least two months of each of his summer vacation periods, it may be 
considered sufficient cause for withholding his degree. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are great industrial enterprises, offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for engineering students to observe what is being done 
in their chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all trips of 
inspection. 



152 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Required of all students in Engineering 

Semester: I I^ 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) ^ ^ 

Modern Language g ^ 

Freshman Mathematics (Math. 104) ^ ^ 

General Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 101) ^ ^ 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. 101) ^ ^ 

Shop and Forge Practice (Shop 101) ^ ^ 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 101) 

Engineering Lectures 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Required of all students in Engineering. 

• Semester: I ^^ 

Oral English (Pub. Sp. 105 and 106) ^ ^ 

*Modern Language (Adv. Course) • • • • ^ 

*Modern and Contemporary History (Hist. 101) ^ ^ 

Sophomore Mathematics (Math. 106) ^ ^ 

Physics (Phys. 101) ^ g 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 102) ll' * * * ;.\ t 2 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 102-103, M. & E ) J 

Civil ■*• 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 102) • • • • • \ 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 101-102) (M. & EO .^._. ••••••••• J " g 

* 

Engineering Lectures 

*Alternatives 

CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: / // 

*Political Economy (Econ. 108) ^ 2 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107 and 108) ^ ^ 

*Engineering Geology (Engr. 102) ^ ^ 

^Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101) ^ ^ 

tAdvanced R. O. T. C. (M. I. 103) ^ 2 

*Prime Movers (Engr. 101) -^ • _''''' 5 

Design Steel Structures, Elements (C. J^. lu^) • • ^ 

♦Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102) ^ 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 103) ^ 

Railroads Elements (C. E. 101) * * ' 

Engineering Lectures 

Squired of all Engineering Students ^^^^^^^ ^^^^. ^^^ ^^^^ ^^,^^^^^ grades 

of A\rB^^o^\"otr?reTra;"a.^^^^^^^^ years. 

153 



SENIOR YEAR ^ , , 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 109 and 110) ^^rnester: / /; 

*Eng:ineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 103) i ^ 

*Public Utilities (Engr. 104) 

*Engineering Chemistry (Engr. 105) ^ ^ 

tAdvanced R. O. T. C. (M. I. 104) " " \ l 

Highways (C. E. 103) ^ 

Design-Masonry Structures (C. E. 104) f ^ 

Design-Steel Structures (C. E. 105) ... o ^ 

Sanitation (C. E. 106) [ ^ 

^Railroads (C. E. 107) • ^ 

iSanitary Science (Public Health) (C. E. 108) \ ] 

•j-Drainage and Irrigation (C. E. 109) . 

Engineering Lectures * ^ 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester- I Ji 

♦Political Economy (Econ. 108) . . ' \ i 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107 and 108) .... o 9 

♦Engineering Geology (Engr. 102) f . 

♦Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101) * ' 4 \ 

♦Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102) . . t 

Foundry Practice (Shop 104) ^ 

tAdvanced R. 0. T. C. (M. L 103). . .!.!.!!*.!;*.*. 3 \ 

Design-Machine, Elements (M. E. 101) j 

^ Direct Currents (E. E. 101) * t '' 

♦Prime Movers (Engr. 101) 2 2 

Engineering Lectures 

SENIOR YEAR Semester' I ii 

'^Oral English (Pub. Sp. 109 and 110) * 11 

♦Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 103) 1 

♦Public Utilities (Engr. 104) *i 

♦Engineering Chemistry (Engr. 105) \ ^ 

tAdvanced R. O. T. C. (M. I. 104) !.!!.!!!!!."" 3 3 

Alternating Currents (E. E. 102) .....'. 5 5 

Design-Electric Machine (E. E. 103) .... ! . . . . . . . ..... j 9 

Electric Railways (E. E. 104) 2 

Telephone and Telegraphs (E. E. 105) .....!!*.... . '4 

Radio Telephony and Telegraphy (E. E. 106) 4 

Illumination (E. E. 107) * ' 'A 

Electric Power Transmission (E, E. 108) .* .' 2 

Thermodynamics (Mech. 104) 3 

Engineering Lectures 

............... .^ ^ ^ 

♦ Required of all Engineering Students. 

Of A o?&" Ic.^fh •rr/sZrn 'aVaXhS^Pik^r/*""^"'^ °"'^ -"^ »>-e average .rade, 
^Alternatives. j^c^ra. 

154 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I JI 

^Political Economy (Econ. 108) 3 3 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 107 and 108) 2 ' 2 

•Engineering Geology (Engr. 102) 1 1 

*Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 101) 4 3 

*Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102) . . 2 

Foundry Practice (Shop 104) . . 1 

tAdvanced R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 103) 3 8 

Advanced Course (M. I. 103) 

Design-Machine, Elements (M. E. 102) 5 

*Prime Movers (Engr. 101) 2 2 

Kinematics (Mech. 103) 1 4 

Engineering Lectures 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I // 

*Oral English (Pub. Sp. 109 and 110) 1 1 

^Engineering Jurisprudence (Engr. 103) 1 

^Public Utilities (Engr. 104) 1 

^Engineering Chemistry (Engr. 105) 1 1 

tAdvanced R. O. T. C. (M. L 104) 8 8 

Design-Prime Movers (M. E. 103) 8 3 

Design-Power Plants (M. E. 104) 2 2 

Design-Pumping Machinery (M. E. 105) . . 2 

Thermodynamics (Mech. 104-105) 8 8 

Sanitation (C. E. 106) 8 8 

Factory Organization (M. E 106) 2 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. 107) 1 1 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 108) 2 

Engineering Lectures 

C. E. 101. Elements of Railroads — First semester. Three credits. 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, Surv. 102. Required of juniors in Civil 
Engineering. 

The theory and practice of railroad surveys, alignment and earthwork. 
Preliminary steps toward complete plans for a short railroad. 

C. E. 102. Elemeyits of Design of Steel Structures — Second semester. 
Five credits. Four lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, 
Mech. 101, 102. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Design of steel beams and columns. Analysis of stresses in roof 
trusses, plate girders, bridge trusses and. steel buildings. The prelimi- 
nary steps toward complete design of these structures. 



* Required of all Engineering students. 

t Open as an extra course to those Engineering students only who have average grades 
of A or B for both Freshman and Sophomore years. 

155 



C. E. 103. Highways — The year. Eight credits. Three lectures and 
one laboratory period first semester. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods second semester. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Location, construction and maintenance of roads and pavements. High- 
way contracts and specifications, estimates and costs, highway work, 
highway legislation, highway economics and highway transportation. 

The course will include, in addition to lecture and class room work, 
preparation of plans and specifications for special projects connected with 
highways. 

C. E. 104. Design of Masonry Structures — The year. Eight credit 
hours. Three lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Mech. 
101. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

The theory and practice of the design of structures of stone and of 
reinforced concrete; with applications to beams, slabs, columns, retaining 
walls, dams, arches and bridges. The preparation of plans and bills 
of material. 

C. E. 105. Design of Steel Structures — The yes^r. Six credits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, C. E. 102. Required 
of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

The complete design and detailing of steel structures, a continuation 
of C. E. 102. 

C. E. 106. Sanitation — The year. Six credits. Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Mech. 101, 102. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. 

C. E. 107. Railroads — The year. Two credits. One laboratory per- 
iod. Prerequisite, C. E. 101. Alternative for seniors in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

The theory and practice of railroad design, construction, maintenance 
and economics; a continuation of C. E. 101. Field and drafting room 
work consists of a reconnoissance and survey of a short railroad and 
preparation of the map, profiles and estimates. 

C. E. 108. Sanitary Science (Public Health) — The year. Two credit 
hours. One laboratory period. To be taken co-ordinately with C. E. 109- 
110. Alternative for seniors in Civil Engineering. 

State and municipal sanitary laws, organization, and functions of 
state and municipal health departments, public health surveys. Also 
in co-ordination with C. E. 109-110, complete plans are prepared for 
water supply and sewerage disposal systems for a given community. 

C. E. 109. Drainage and Irrigation — The year. Two credit hours. One 
laboratory period. Prerequisite, Mech. 101, 102. Alternative for seniors 
in Civil Engineering. 

The application of engineering principles to the design and construc- 
tion of drainage and irrigation works. Field and drafting room work 
consists of surveying, designing and mapping of a proposed drainage 
project. 

156 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



E E 101. Direct Currents-^The year. Ten credits. Three lectures 
and 'two laboratory periods. Prerequisite Phys. 101, 102. 

Principles of design, construction and operation of direct current 
Je Ss and motors and direct current control apparatus. The con- 
Jructtn characteristics and operation of primary and secondary bat- 
f^riP«5 ind the auxiliary control equipment. 

'^'Zl^LTlo. the'calibration of laboratory instrun^ents the mam- 
pulatL of precision instruments, battery characteristics and the opera 
Sn and characteristics of direct current generators and motors. 

E. E. 102. Alter^atin, Currents-TY.. year Ten credits^ Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, E. E 101-lOi. 

inalytical and graphical solution of problems on smgle phase and 
t,ornhase circuits; construction, characteristics and operation of all 
tvies of alternating current generators and motors; switchboard appli- 
ances, the use of the oscillograph; alternating current power measure- 

""Te 103. Electric Machine Deswn-'^\^e ye^r. Three credits. One 
laboratory period first semester; two laboratory periods second semester. 
Prpreauisite. E. E. 101, 102 and M. E. 101. . 

MatSs'of construction and design of the electric and magne^^cir- 
cuits of direct current generators and motors, principles of design of 
Sf electric and magnetic circuits of alternating current generators, 
motors and transformers. 

E. E. 104. Electric Railways-First semester. Two credits. Two 

lectures. Prerequisite, E. E. 101, 102. , ■ ^- ^ „„A tl,p Hpvelon- 

Traffic studies, train schedules, motor, characteristics ^"^ ^he 'ieve^P 
ment of speed-distance and power-time curves, systems of control, motors 
Id other railway equipment, electrification system for f^^H^^l^^^^ 
including generating apparatus, transmission '•■;^^; .^J^^^^^^'^/^,^^"^ 
distribution of electrical energy for car operation; electrification of steam 
riadTand application of signal systems, problems in operation from the 
selection of proper car equipment to the substation apparatus. 

E E. 105. Telephones and Telegraphs-Second semester. Four 
credits Three lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, E. fc. 101. 
H story and principles of magneto telephone and variable resistance 
transmTtter carbon transmitter, telephone receiver, induction coils and 
camJg equ Pment. These components of the telephone then are studied 
as a Complete unit in the local battery and common battery telephones. 
Magnerand common battery switchboards used in telephone exchanges 
automatic telephones, and the operation of simple, duplex and quadruplex 

telegraphy. , , , , , , 

In the laboratory the units are assembled and operated. 
E. E. 106. Radio Tlegraphy and Telephony-Fnst semester. Four 

credits. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 

157 . 



Principles of radio telegraphy and telephony, design, construction and 
operation of transmitting and receiving apparatus and special study of 
the use of the vacuum tube for short wave transmitting and receiving. 
Experiments include radio frequency measurements and the testing of 
various types of receiving circuits. 

E. E. 107. Illumination — Second Semester. Two credits. Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, E. E. 103, 104. 

Series systems of distribution, methods of street lighting, calculation 
of voltage drop, regulation, weights of wire and methods of feeding 
parallel systems, principles and units used in illumination problems, 
lamps and reflectors, candle power measurements of lamps, measure- 
ment of illumination intensities and calculations for illumination of 
laboratories and class rooms. 

E. E. 108. Electric Power Transmission — Second semester. Two cred- 
its. Two lectures. Prerequisite, E. E. 103 and 104. 

Survey of the electrical equipment required in central stations and 
substations, transmission of electrical power, practical problems illus- 
trating the principles of installation and operation of power machinery. 

DRAFTING 

Dr. 101. Engineering Drafting — The year. Two credits. One labora- 
tory period. Required of all freshmen in Engineering. 

Freehand Drawing — Lettering, exercises in sketching of technical 
illustrations and objects, proportion and comparative measurements. 

Mechanical Drawing — Use of instruments, projections and working 
drawings, drawing to scale in pencil and in ink, topographic drawing, 
tracing and blue printing. 

Dr. 102. Descriptive Geometry — The year. Four credits. Two lab- 
oratory periods. Required of all sophomores in Engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of problems relating 
to the point, line and plane, intersection of planes with solids and develop- 
ment. Generation of surfaces; planes, tangent and normal to surfaces; 
intersection and development of curved surfaces. Shades and shadows, 
perspective, map projection. 

GENERAL ENGINEERING 

Engr. 101. Prime Movers — The year. Four credits. Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 106. Required of all juniors in Engineering. 

Salient features of the operation of steam, gas, hydraulic and electric 
prime movers and pumps. Comparison of types of each, methods of as- 
sembling or setting up in place for operation. Service tests. 

Engr. 102. Engineering Geology — The year. Two credits. One 
laboratory period. Lectures and field trips. 

Study of common rocks and minerals, geologic processes and conditions 
affecting problems of water supply, bridge, railroad and highway con- 

158 



struction, dams and reservoirs, tunnels, canals, river and harbor im- 
provements, irrigation works and rock ™;;°-^^^^^^^ ^ne credit. 

3= "^^''^'^^^^E!. . ...ness and 

rr^S :f iraraTtec^icrL^r^ engineering contracts 
^"ES"l0r'7.6h-c t7t,mea-Second semester. One credit. One lec- 

finan ing and c:ntrol of public utilities. Service standards a.d the^ 
atTaiLent in electric, gas water ^^^^^f^^,^^^ I^^. 

sr^tiTairar^^^^^^^ -^ -- 

laboratory period second semester^ ^""^TrllhS chemical Ssis. 
ThP value of fuels, coal, oils and gases, from their ciiemicai a y 

large corporations for fuels, lubricating oils and paints. 

MECHANICS 

MprH 101 £n<7ineermff Mec/iflMics-The year. Seven credits. Three 
Jure'and onf laborator'y period first --^^ ; two lectures and o^^^ 
laboratory period second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 106. RequireU 

'' tS^::^r^^^^- -dy of -ics jalmg wl. the 

f^.r. «nH resolution of forces, moments and couples, machines ana 

rfa^oTf ctiord;namics, work, 'energy and the strength of mater aU 

Gra^Hic Stuti.s-T^e graphic solution of P-'^f --" sT^etefin ram 
of gravity, moments of inertia and determination of sti esses in iram 

''X71 of Hyaraulics-mo. of water -^ P^P-' f ^ar^f reLSy 
in open channels. Determination of the co-efflcient of discharge, velocity 

and contraction in pipes and orifices. „^„^„,. Two credits 

MECH. 102. Ma<ertaiso/E»>firmeeW«ff-Second semester. Two credits. 

Two laboratory periods. Required of all juniors m Engineering. 

The comSon. manufacture and properties of the principal material 
usid inTngineering and of the conditions that influence th-r physical 
characteristics. The interpretation of specifications and of standard 
tiis LTborLry work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, 
brick, cement and concrete. 

159 



Mech. 103. Kinematics — The year. Five credits. One lecture first 
semester; four lectures second semester. Required of juniors in Mechan- 
ical Engineering. Prerequisite, Math. 106. 

The theory and practice of the kinematics of machinery, as applied 
to ropes, belts, chains, gears and gear teeth, wheels in trains, epicyclic 
trains, cams, linkwork, parallel motions. Miscellaneous machanisms and 
aggregate combinations. 

Mech. 104. Thermodyna/mics — First semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, Phys. 101 and 102, Eng. 101 and 102. Required 
of seniors in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 

Mech. 105. Thermodynamics — Second semester. Three credits. Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, Mech. 106. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Thermodynamics as applied to properties of gases, cycles of heat engines 
using gages. Properties of vapors. Entropy. The internal combustion 
engine. The steam turbine. Flow of fluids, and the application of ther- 
modynamics to compressed air and refrigerating machinery. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 101. Elements of Machine Design — First semester. One credit. 
One laboratory period. Prerequisite, Math. 106. Required of juniors 
in electrical engineering. 

Empirical design of machine parts. 

M. E. 102. Elements of Machine Design — First semester. Five credits. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Math. 106. 
Required of juniors in mechanical engineering. 

The application of the principles involved in determining the propor- 
tions and forms of machine parts. The design of bolts, screws, shafting 
and gears. 

M. E. 103. Design of Prime Movers — The year. Six credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods first semester; two lectures and one 
laboratory period second semester. Prerequisite, M. E. 102. Required 
of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Analysis of the stresses in gas and steam engines. Proportioning the 
essential parts and estimating the cost of each. The steam boiler; its 
design and cost. 

M. E. 104. Design of Power Plants — 'The year. Four credits. One 
lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisites, Engr. 101, 102 and 
M. E. 102. Required of seniors in mechanical engineerng. 

The design of a complete power plant, including the layout of building 
and installation of equipment. The selection of types and capacities of 
the various units required. 

M. E. 105. Design of Pumping Machinery — Second semester. Two 
credit hours. One lecture and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, M. E. 
102 and Mech. 101, 102. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

160 



Elementary design of double acting steam pumps and centrifugal 
rMimn^ The air lift and the hydraulic ram. 

P"S E Io6. Facto.-v Organization-S^o.A semester. T^vo credits. 
Two' lectures. Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

TheDract ce in both organization and administration, dealing with 
Jt'o yTocaS and designin their relation to P-ductije capaot^' ;-^ 
and finances, rate fixing, time studies, wage systems and the underlying 
conditions that may affect the establishment of any system of factory 
organization and administration. 

M E 107. Mechanical Laboratory-The year. Two credxts^ One 
lab^iy period. Prerequisites, Engr. 101, 102; Mech. 101. 102 and 
Mech 103 Required of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

Caiibration o'f instruments, gauges, indicator springs, planimeters. 

^l^^aLY^nd^tL^trepower of steam and internal combustion en- 
«nes setting of plain valves, corliss valves. Tests for economy and 
Spacity of toilers engines, turbines. Pumps and other prime movers 
Feed water heater^ condensers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous and 
liquid fuels and other complete power plant tests. 

M. E. 108. Heating and Ventilation-First semester. Two credits. 
Two lectures. Prerequisites, Engr. 101, 102 and Mech. 101, 102. Re- 
nuired of seniors in mechanical engineering. 

'The principles and methods of construction in use in various systems 
of heating and ventilating; the design, erection and operation of heating 
plants. 

SHOP 

SHOP 101. Shop and Forge Practice-The year. Two credits. One 
laboratory period. Required of all freshmen in Engineering. 

The use and care of wood working tools, exercise in sawmg planing, 
mortising, tenoning and laying out work from blueprints. P"n<=>Pj^^ 
of patte?; making with sufficient foundry practice t'*, d^-^^J-^, ^^ 
uses of pattern making. Forging of iron and steel, welding and makmg 

of steel tools. 

Shop 102. Machine Shop Practice-First semester. One credit. One 
laboratory period. Required of all sophomores in Engineering. Pre- 
requisite. Shop 101. 

Shop 103. Machine Shop Practice— Second semester. Two credits. 
Two laboratory periods. Required of sophomores in mechanical and 
electrical engineering. Prerequisite, Shop 102. 

Study and practice with various machines used m machine shops, 
principles of turning, planing, drilling, screw cutting and filing. 

Shop 104. Foundry Practice— Second semester. One credit. One 
laboratory period. Required of juniors in mechanical engineering. Pre- 
requisite, Shop 103. 

161 



Molding in brass and iron. Core making. The cupola and its manage- 
ments. Lectures on selection of iron by fracture, fuels and the mixing 
and melting of metals. 

SURVEYING 

SuRV. 101. Plane Surveying—First semester. One credit. Lecture 
and laboratory work. Required of all sophomores in engineering. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 101. 

SuRV. 102. Plane Surveying—Second semester. Two credits. Lec- 
ture and laboratory work. Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering. 

The theory and practice of plane surveying; including the use and 
adjustment of the transit, level, plane table and minor surveying instru- 
ments. Solution of practical problems in giving lines and grades for 
buildings, shafting and foundations, and in laying out curves. The 
computation of area and of earthwork, and the principles of plan and 
map making and map reading. 

SuRV. 103. Advanced Surveying— First semester. Three credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite Surv. 101-102. Re- 
quired of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Practical astronomy and geodetic surveying. The determination of 
latitude, longitude and azimuth by stellar and by solar observations. 
Base line measurement and precise triangulation. City surveying. Hy- 
drographic surveying. 



162 



The Graduate School 



Graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of the 
Graduate School by competent members of the various faculties of in- 
struction and research. These constitute the Faculty of the Graduate 
School. 

The general administrative functions of the faculty are delegated to the 
Dean and Secretary of the School and a Graduate Council. 

Work in accredited research laboratories of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and other local national research agencies under competent 
supervision is accepted, when previously arranged, as work in residence 
for part of the requirement. These laboratories are located in easy 
daily reach of the University. When previously arranged, certain ap- 
proved courses, satisfactorily completed, at the American University, will 
also be accepted for part of the residence requirement for higher degrees. 

Admission and Registration 

Admission to the Graduate School is open to all graduates of this and 
other standard colleges and universities. Before entering upon graduate 
work all applicants must present evidence that they are qualified by their 
previous work to pursue the courses desired. Admission to the Graduate 
School does not necessarily imply admission to candidacy for a degree. 

Every student is required to register at the office of the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each semester. This applies to all students 
doing graduate work in the University even though they are not candi- 
dates for degrees. The student is given a registration card for the 
semester on which, after consultation with the professor in charge of the 
major subject, the program of work is entered. This must be approved 
by the head of the major department and by the Dean before registration 
can be completed. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 

The application for admission to candidacy for either the Master's or 
the Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained 
at the office of the Graduate School. These applications are first ap- 
proved by the professor in charge of the major subject after consulta- 
tion with the professors in charge of minor subjects, and then passed 
upon by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the student's 
undergraduate course must accompany the application. 

Each candidate for the Master's degree is required to make applica- 
tion for admission to candidacy at least four months prior to the date 
at which the degree is sought, but not until at least the equivalent of 
one semester's work has been completed. Candidates for the Doctor's 
degree must be admitted to candidacy at a date not later than the be- 
ginning of the academic year in which the degree is sought. 

163 



The Master's Degrees 

The degree of Master of Science, Master of Arts, or Master of Science 
in Engineering, will be conferred upon resident graduates who meet the 
following requirements: 

1. The candidate must have received the Bachelor's degree from a 
college of sufficiently high standing and must have the necessary pre- 
requisites for the field of advanced work chosen. 

2. During a period of at least one academic year the candidate must 
pursue a course of approved graduate study. Such a course is equiva- 
lent to 30 semester credits, including a thesis approved by a committee 
of the Graduate Faculty. From 10 to 12 credits must lie outside the 
major subject and form a coherent group of courses, intended to supple- 
ment and support the major work. Graduate students must elect courses 
designated in the catalogue for graduates or for advanced undergraduates 
and graduates. In special cases a student may with the approval of the 
professor in charge of the major subject, and the Dean, elect for gradu- 
ate credit one or two courses not listed for graduates. For such courses 
only partial graduate credit will be allowed, or extra work will be re- 
quired for full graduate credit. 

3. The candidate must pass a final oral examination on aH graduate 
work including the thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. As prerequisites for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree 
the candidate must be a graduate of a standard college, must have a 
reading knowledge of French and German, and the necessary basic train- 
ing in the chosen field for advanced work. 

2. Three years of graduate study will usually be required. The first 
two of these years may be spent in other institutions offering standard 
graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be corres- 
pondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificate of 
residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research 
in the special field in which the major work is done. 

3. The candidate must select a major and one or two closely related 
minor subjects, constituting a single field of research. 

4. The candidate must present a dissertation within the field of re- 
search selected. This must be in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate 
School in printed or typewritten form at least two weeks before the time 
at which degrees are granted. 

5. The candidate must pass a final oral examination in the major and 
minor subjects. The examination will be given by a committee appointed 
by the Dean. 

Advanced Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer or Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of this University who have 

104 



obtained a Bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy 
the following conditions: 

1. He shall have been engaged successfully in acceptable engineering 
work for three years. 

2. His registration for a degree must be approved at least 12 months 
prior to the date at which the degree is sought. He shall present with 
his application a complete report of his engineering experience and an 
outline of his proposed thesis. 

3. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

4. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the 
Dean of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

Graduate Fees 

Each graduate student is subject to a matriculation fee of $10.00, a 
fixed charge of $1.50 per semester credit and a diploma fee of $10.00. 

Graduate Work in the Summer 

Work done in the Summer Session of the University under the rules 
and regulations of the Graduate School may be counted as residence 
toward a graduate degree. A student may satisfy the requirements for 
the Master's degree by attending the Summer School for four summers 
and submitting a satisfactory thesis. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

A number of fellowships and graduate assistantships have been es- 
tablished by the University. They are open to graduates of standard 
colleges and universities. All applications for both fellowships and 
graduate assistantships should be filed with the Dean of the Graduate 
School not later than May 15 of each year. Blanks for this purpose may 
be obtained from the office of the Graduate School. Applications must 
be accompanied by sufficient evidence of necessary training and ability 
to pursue with profit the graduate work desired. Such evidence will in- 
clude testimonials from instructors and an official transcript of the under- 
graduate work. 

The fellowships are worth $500 and it is possible to complete the re- 
quirements for the Master's degree in one academic year. In certain 
cases fellows may be required to spend two or three summer months in 
addition to the nine months of the college year. Each fellow is expected 
to give a limited portion of his time to instruction or perform equivalent 
prescribed duties for his major department. 

The stipend attached to the graduate assistantships is $1000 to $1500 
per annum and is fixed by the amount of service given to the University. 
Several $1000 research assistantships are offered by the Experiment 
Station and the service required is in connection with research projects. 
The minimum time for the Master's degree is two years. 

Graduate students holding appointments as fellows, graduate assis- 
tants and instructors are exempt from all fees except the diploma fee. 

165 



it 



The College of Home Economics 



Research into the sciences and the development of industries, art and 
professions has so changed the philosophy of our educational system that 
it is now recognized that any educational system must include training of 
a technical nature. It must encourage the student's natural desire for 
work of a productive nature with a vital connection between theory and 
practice. These views have now been generally accepted and the result 
is noted in the combination of vocational, technical and scientific work 
with the general studies to form a new course of study for young men 
and women. 

The subjects taught in home economics are designed to fit young women 
to be capable workers and home makers in whatever sphere of life they 
may enter. The knowledge they gain from these subjects should give 
them contentment, industry, order and a womanly feeling of independence 
and responsibility. 

The courses of instruction given are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: (1) those students who desire a knowledge of the 
general facts and principles of home economics; (2) those students who 
wish to make a specialty of home economics for the purpose of teaching 
the subject in secondary schools and colleges; (3) those who are inter- 
ested in certain phases of home economics which deal with the work of 
the dietitian or of the institutional manager. 

Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory 
completion of four years of prescribed courses, or 136 semester hours. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes and for ease of instruction the College of 
Home Economics is organized into the departments of: Foods and Cook- 
ery, Textiles and Clothing, and of Institutional and Home Management. 

Equipment 

In addition to the usual class room and laboratory facilities, the College 
maintains a newly built and equipped practice house in which the students 
will keep house for a period of six weeks during their senior year. 

Curriculum in Home Economics 

All students registered in the College of Home Economics are required 
to take the same work during the first two years. At the beginning of 
the third they may elect to continue with General Home Economics, in 
which case the following outline of courses has been planned, or they may 
elect to specialize in a particular department. 

The heads of the various departments, together with the students wish- 
ing to specialize, will outline such courses. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR Semester. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Inorgan. 101-A or 101-B) 

Zoology (Zool. 101) 

General Botany (Gen. Botany 101) 

Language 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 101) 

Library Methods (L. S. 101) 



/ 
3 

4 

4 

• • 

4 
2 
1 

18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR Semester: I 

Organic Chemistry (Organ. Chem. 102) 3 

Chemistry of Foods (Ag. Chem. 102) 

Public Speaking (Public Speaking 101-102) 1 

Elementary Foods (Foods 101) ^ 

Art (Art 101) ^ 

Costume and Design (Art 102) 

Textiles (Textiles 101) 2 

Garment Construction (Cloth 101) 

Language or History ^ 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 102) 2 

17 

* 

JUNIOR YEAR Semester: I 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 101) . . 3 

Physics (Physics 103) 

Drafting and Elementary Dress Design (Cloth. 102) 3 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 103) 

Home Architecture and Interior Decoration (Art 104) 3 

Millinery (Cloth 104) 

Nutrition (Foods 102-103) 3 

Chemistry of Textiles ( Ag. Chem. 103) 2 

Electives ♦ 

SENIOR YEAR Semester: I 

Home Management and Mechanics of the Household (H. 

M. 101) ^ 

Practice House (H. M. 102) 

Marketing and Buying (H. M. 103) 3 

Child Care and Welfare 

Preservation and Demonstration (Foods 104) 3 

Electives 



// 

3 

4 

• • 

4 
4 
2 



17 
// 

• • 

3 
1 
3 



2 
3 
2 

17 
// 



8 

S 
8 



4 

• • 

8 



166 



167 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Description of Courses 

Foods 101. Elernentary Foods — The year. Six credits. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Inorganic Chemistry. 

Principles and processes of Cookery. Production and composition of 
foods. Planning and serving of meals. 

Foods 102. Nutrition — First semester. Three credits. Three lectures. 
Required of all home economics students. Prerequisite, FoodiS 101 
and Organic Chemistry. 

Food requirements and metabolism. Diets for the normal person. 

Foods 103. Nutrition — Second semester. Three credits. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Foods 102. 

Diets and metabolism of the abnormal person; invalid cookery; feeding 
of children. 

Foods 104. Preservation and Demonstration — First semester. Three 
credits. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Foods 101. 
Canning and preserving; practice in giving public demonstrations. 

Foods 105. Advanced Foods — Second semester. Three credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Foods 101. 
Experimental work in foods and cookery; fancy cookery; catering. 

H. M. 101. Home Management and Mechanics of the Household — First 
semester. Three credits. Three lecture periods. 

The operation and maintenance of the household; its furnishings and 
equipment. Lectures on heating, lighting, plumbing, wood finishes and 
all mechanics of the household, as applied to average rural or city 
dwelling, will be given by the staff of the College of Engineering. 

H. M. 102. Practice House — Second semester. Four credits. Six 
weeks experience in keeping house in a household of six students. 

H. M. 103. Marketing and Buying — First semester. Three credits. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period. 

Food budgets and household accounts. Selection, purchasing and care 
of foods for the family. Lectures will be given by specialists in the 
Department of Dairy Husbandry Animal Husbandry and Horticulture, 
in the College of Agriculture, on the choice and care of dairy products, 
meats, vegetables and fruits. 

H. M. 104. Institutional Management — The year. Six credits. Three 
lectures each semester. Prerequisites, oods 101 and Home Management 
101. 

General Institutional organization including dining halls, dormitories 
and laundries. 

H. M. 105. Home Nursing and First Aid — Second semester. Three 
credits. 

Instruction in domestic emergencies and first aid, and in the simple 
procedure in the home care of the sick. 



168 



Cloth. 101. Garment Construction — Second semester. Two credits. 
Two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Textiles 101. 

Fundamental stitches; darning and patching; practice in hand and 
machine sewing; use of machine attachments; study of commercial 
patterns. 

Cloth. 102. Drafting and Elementary Dress Design — First semester. 
Three credits. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, 
Clothing 101 or equivalent. 

Drafting, cutting, fitting and designing of patterns. Construction of 
woolen dress from pattern designed in class. Clothing Economics. 

Cloth. 103. Dressmaking — Second semester. Three credits. Three 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Clothing 102. 

Construction of silk dress; made over dress; dinner or evening gown. 

Cloth. 104. Millinery — Second semester. Three credits. Three 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Clothing 101. 

Millinery stitches and simple trimmings ; drafting of patterns for hats ; 
making and covering of frames; making hats in velvet, silk, straw and 
transparent materials; renovation of materials. 

Cloth. 105. Advanced Dressmaking — Second semester. Three credits. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Clothing 103. 

Designing and dress construction continued. 

Textiles 101. Textiles — First semester. Two credits. One lecture 
and laboratory period. 

History of textile fibers, identification of textile materials; variation 
of weave in regard to beauty and strength; use and value of fibers for 
clothing and household furnishings. 

Textiles 102. Chemistry of Textiles — Second semester. Two credits. 
One lecture and one laboratory period.* Prerequisite, Textiles 101. 

Art Store Management — 'The year. Six credits. Three laboratory 
periods. Prerequisite, Clothing 103 and Art. 103. 

Buying, making and selling of art materials; keeping accounts; prin- 
ciples of salesmanship. 

Art. 101. Composition and Design — First semester. Three credits. 
Three laboratory periods. 

Space division and space relation; color schemes and exercises; original 
designs in which lines, values, and colors are put together to produce fine 
harmony; perspective principles. 

Art. 102. Costume Design — Second semester. Three credits. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, Art. 101. 

Appropriate dress; application of color, harmony and proportion of 
parts to costumes designed in ink and water color; history of costume. 

Art. 103. Art and Handicraft — Second semester. One credit. One 
laboratory period. 

Applied design in embroidery, lace and stencils. 



169 



Art. 104. Home Architecture and Interior Decoration — First semester. 
Three credits. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Prerequisite, 
Art. 101. 

Styles of architecture; application of color in home decoration; fur- 
nishings from a sanitary, economical and artistic point of view. 

Art. 105. Basketry — First semester. One credit. One laboratory 
period. 

A study of the various weaves and their application in reed pieces; 
manipulation of materials in raffia work. 

Students majoring in Textiles and Clothing are required to take the 
following courses in addition to the general home economics schedule. 

Junior Year 

Cloth. 105. Advanced Dressmaking — First semester. Three credits. 
Art. 103. Art and Handicraft — Second semester. Two credits. 

Senior Year 

Art Shop Management — The year. Six credits. 



The School of Law 



THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

HON. HENRY D. HARLAN, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean 
HON. ALFRED S. NILES, A.M., LL.B. 
HON. JOHN C. ROSE, LL.B., LL.D. 
RANDOLPH BARTON, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 
EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Esq., A.M., LL.B., Secretary. 
HON. JAMES P. GORTER, A.M., LL.D. 
CHARLES McHENRY HOWARD, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 
HON. MORRIS A. SOPER, A.B., LL.B. 

The 1923-4 session of the Law School will commence on Monday, Sep- 
tember 17, 1923. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was 
chosen in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed 
to Students and the Profession Generally,'* which the North American 
Review pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study 
of law which has ever been offered to the public," and which recom- 
mended a course of study so comprehensive as to require for its com- 
pletion six or seven years, no regular school of instruction in law was 
opened until 1823. This was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper pecu- 
niary support. In 1869 the Law School Was organized, and in 1870 regu- 
lar instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the course 
has been made more comprehensive and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than two thousand, and 
included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence in the 
profession elsewhere. 

The Law School Building adjoins the Medical School and part of its 
equipment is a large library maintained for the use of the students, 
which contains carefully selected text-books on the various subjects em- 
braced in the curriculum, reports of American and English Courts, 
digests and standard encyclopedias. No fee is charged for the use of the 
library. Other libraries also are available for students. 

Courses of Instruction 

The courses of instruction in the Law School extend through three 
scholastic years of thirty-live weeks each, with an average of at least 
ten hours of classroom work each week, and aim to present a general 



if 



il 



170 



171 



and complete view of the science of law, with reference not only to its 
growth by judicial exposition, but also to the principles which have been 
engrafted upon it by positive enactment. The course of study embraces 
both the theory and the practice of law, and is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the 
Bar. 

Scientific education is afforded in the principles of the Common Law, 
Equity, the Statutory Law of the State of Maryland and the Public Law 
of the United States. 

The Law School endeavors to uphold a high standard of legal educa- 
tion and it aims to give the student a comprehensive view of the whole 
field of the law and particularly a knowledge of the fundamentals of 
American Law, in order to enable him to pass the examination for the 
Bar, if he has chosen the legal profession for his life work, or to fit him 
to care properly for his business interests if he desires legal education 
merely as the accomplishment of the well-equipped man of business or 
man of culture. 

Instruction is given by discussion of assigned cases and by lectures. 
The lectures are intended to present all the leading principles of the com- 
mon law applicable to the subject, and the modification of the common 
law by statute, and to give illustrations of the application of the common 
and statute law. Special attention is given to the statutes in force in 
Maryland, and to peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are 
such; but the reasons for these statutory modifications and local pecu- 
liarities are explained so that the student may in a short time acquaint 
himself with the local peculiarities of the law in any State in which he 
may practice. 

Readings from text-books and adjudicated cases are assigned on the 
subjects treated in the lectures. 

It will be seen that the full course of study extends over three years 
and as the Faculty is satisfied that students, who have not made con- 
siderable progress in the law before entering the Law School, would do 
themselves and the school an injury by attempting to graduate in a 
shorter period, no student will be permitted to receive the degree of 
LL.B. until after three full years of study at this school, or if admitted 
to advanced standing, until after one year of residence and study at this 
school. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the Law School must present evidence of 
good moral character, and must have completed at the time of adm'ssion 
to the school a four years' high school curriculum or such a course of 
preparation as would be required for admission to the principal colleges 
and universities in Maryland. 



172 



The School of Medicine 



AND 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D. 

BARTGIS McGLONE, A.B., Ph.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D Obstetrics 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D Ophthalmology and Otology 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D Psychiatry 

A. C. Poole, M.D Anatomy 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Opthalmology and Otology 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D .. Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine 



173 



L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., ScD., Professor of Surgery. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Opthalmology and Otology. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

TiLGHMAN B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Jos. E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Ther- 
apeutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

Frank Dyer S^^nger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor Clinical Medicine. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and 
Roentgenology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Psychiatry. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 



174 



Anton G, Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

JOSEPH W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Nose 

and Throat. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Hubert C. Knapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Abraham Samuels, Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
William W. Requardt, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
George W. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat 

and Nose. 
Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
J. R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. . 
H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 

C. C. W. JUDD, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Chnical Sur- 
gery. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

0. Glenn Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

John Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Roentgenology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

J. F. Lutz, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

F. W. Hachtel, M.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Wm. J. Carson, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 



175 



Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sidney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point 
of age among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school 
building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one 
of the first medical libraries and the first medical college library in Amer- 
ica. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 

part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given 

(1837), and here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching 

of diseases of women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases 

(1873) . 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clmical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 

Clinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest in- 
stitution for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in Septem- 
ber, 1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye cases. Additions were made to this building from time 
to time, but the demands on it became so great that a complete new 
building was erected. The hospital now is one of the finest owned and 
controlled by any medical school in the country. It is equipped with all 
modern conveniences and requirements for care of the sick and for clinical 
instruction of students of the University. 

Besides its own hospital, the Medical School has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year more 
than 30,000 persons, the Maternity Hospital of the University, the Mary- 
land Lying-in Asylum, and the West End Maternity. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstetrical clinic 
IS conducted. During the past year about 1200 cases were treated in the 
lying-in hospitals connected with the University. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

Three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital, organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be the 
same in all. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery 
Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro Enterologyi 
Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Dermatology, Throat and Nose, and 

176 



Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work one day of each 
week in one of these dispensaries ; all students in the senior year work one 
hour each day. About 85,000 cases treated last year give an idea of the 
value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes 
are tlie Anatomical, Chemical, Experimental Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry, Histology and Embryology, Pathology and Bacteriology, 
and Clinical Pathology. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation the Faculty of 
the School of Medicine offers a gold medal to the candidate who passes 
the best general examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the 
five candidates standing next highest. 

A prize of $50 is given each year by Mrs. Jose L. Hirsch as a memorial 
to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsch, former Professor of Pathology in this 
School, and is awarded to the student in the third year who has done the 
most satisfactory work in Pathology. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship was established by Mrs. Ber- 
tha Frank as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus 
of the University, and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of 
one-half of the tuition fee for the year. It is awarded each year upon 
the nomination of the Faculty "to a medical student who in the judgment 
of the said Faculty is of good character and in need of pecuniary assist- 
ance to continue his medical course." 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitch- 
cock, M. D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships have been 
established which entitle the holders to exemption from payment of one- 
half of the tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic to 
students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year of the curriculum in medicine, and who present to the Faculty satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character and of inability to continue the 
course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph 
Winslow, M.D., LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment 
of one-half of the tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a needy stu- 
dent of the senior, junior or sophomore class of the Medical School. He 
must have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent in all his work up 
to the time of awarding the scholarship. He must be a person of good 
character and must satisfy the Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and 
in need of assistance." 

The University scholarship entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year and is awarded annually by the Fac- 

177 



Ill 



ulty of Physics to a student of the senior class who presents to the Faculty 
satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of 
and in need of assistance to complete his work. 

The St. John's College scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty 
of Physic upon the nomination of the president of St. John's College, of 
Annapolis, Md. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition fee 
of that year. 

The Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship was established by bequest of the 
late Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees. This scholarship is awarded to a second-year 
student who at the end of the year passes the best practical examination 
in Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology. 
This examination is competitive. 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship, established by Mrs. Leo Karlinsky 
in memory of her husband, Dr. Leo Karlinsky, entitles the holder to ex- 
emption from payment of tuition fee of that year to the extent of $200.00. 
It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University upon nomination of the Medical Council, "to a needy student 
of the senior, junior or sophomore class of the Medical School. He 
must have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent in all his work 
up to the time of awarding the scholarship. He must be a person of good 
character and must satisfy the Medical Council that he is worthy of and 
in need of assistance." 

Requirements for Entrance 

Admission to the curriculum in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University. This cer- 
tificate is obtained on the basis of satisfactory credentials, or by exami- 
nation and credentials, and is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Certificate 
are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the 
equivalent, and in addition, 

(b) Two years, sixty semester, or ninety trimester hours, of college 
credits, including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the Medical School of this University. 

Fees and Expenses 

Following are the fees for students in the Medical School : 

Matriculation fee (to be paid each year) $ 5.00 

Tuition fee (each year) 300.00 



Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore : 

TTT?M«^ Low Average Liberal 

^ ^ ^ $27 $48 $75 

Books 20 20 

College incidentals ^^^ 

Board, eight months ^J^ ^^^ ^^^ 

Room rent ... . • g^ ^^q 

Clothing and laundry ^" ^^ ^. 

All other expenses "^^ 

♦Total ^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 



178 



179 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

RESERVE OFFICERS* TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Special 
Regulations, No. 44, War Department, 1921. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Ac^ 

Object 

The primary object of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps is to provide 
systematic m.htary training at civil educational institutions for tL pur! 
rty,f^^y! ''7 ««'ected students of such institutions as reserve officers 
m the mihtary forces of the United States. It is intended to attain this 
objec durmg the t.me that students are pursuing their general or profes- 
sional studies with the least practical interference with their civil careers 
by employing methods designed to fit men, physically, mentally and mor- 
ally for pursuits of peace as well as pursuits of war. It is believed that 
such military training will aid greatly in the development of better citi- 



zens. 



Required to Take Instruction 



All male students, if citizens of the United States whose bodily con- 
dition indicates that they are physically fit to perform military duty or 
will be upon arrival at military age, whether pursuing a four-year or a 
two-year course of study, are required to take for a period of two years 
as a prerequisite to graduation, the military training required by the War 
Department. 

Advanced Work 

Students who complete the Basic Course satisfactorily and who are 
recommended by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and whose 
application is approved by the President, may continue their military 
training for a period of two years in the Advanced Course. 

Time Allotted 

For first and second year, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour 
is utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced courses, elective, five periods a 
week of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which 
at least three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

180 



Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part in military instruction, and 
it is the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the 
physical training given by civilian teachers, thus co-operating in an effort 
to promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 

Uniforms 

Members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniforms at all military formations and at other specified times. 

Uniforms, or commutation in lieu of uniforms for the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps, will be furnished free by the Government. The uniforms 
are the regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain 
distinguishing features, or if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then 
such uniform as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must 
be kept in good condition by the student. They are the property of the 
Government and, though intended primarily for use in connection with 
military instruction, may be worn at any other time unless the regula- 
tions governing their use are violated. The uniform cannot be worn in 
part. Uniforms which are furnished by the Government will be returned 
to the Military Department at the end of the year or before, if the student 
leaves the University. In case commutation of uniforms is furnished, the 
uniform becomes the property of the student upon completion of two 
years' work. 

Commutation 

Those students who elect the advanced course and who have signed the 
contract with the Government to continue in the Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps for the two remaining years of the advanced course are entitled 
to commutation of subsistence from and including the date of contract 
until they complete the course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country 
camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are 
members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These camps are under 
the strict supervision of army officers and are intended primarily to give 
a thorough and comprehensive practical course of instruction in the dif- 
ferent arms of the service. 

Parents may feel assured that their sons are carefully watched and 
safeguarded. Wholesome surroundings and associates, work and healthy 

181 



recreation are the keynote to contentment. Social life is not neglected 

wh?are awTh! 7""""'; '""^^ '' compulsory only for those students 
who are taking the advanced course. The War Department recommends 
that as many basic students as possible attend the summer camps. 

The students who attend the summer camps are under no expense The 
Government furnishes transportation from the institution to the camp 
and from the camp to the institution, or to the student's home! unless t^e 
mileage is greater than that from the camp to the institution In this 
case, the amount of mileage from the camp to the institution is aUowed 
the sudent. Quarters and food are furnished. The Advanced Course 

Tm7a^f Ta ^""'^*"^ ^"^rters and food, are paid seventy cents 

($0.70) for each day spent in camp. 

Commissions 

(a) Each year upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm 
of the service will be determined by the War Department. 

Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university 

r.h ?v. A '■^^"''•^'"ents of this department are proficiency the same as 
with other departments. 

Students who have completed satisfactorily the prescribed training 
with a unit of the S. A. T. C. may be credited with one year of the Bas^ 
Course prescribed for the R. 0. T. C, and those students who have re- 
ceived military training at any educational institution under the direction 
of an army officer detailed as professor of military science and tactics 
may receive credit for instruction equivalent to that given in the senior 
division R. O. T. C, if over fourteen years of age. 

MILITARY ; DEPARTMENT 

Description of Courses 

M I 101. Basic R. O. T. C.-The year. Four credits. Freshman year. 
Ine lollowing subjects are covered: 

First Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Military Courtesy and Customs of 
the service (Theoretical and Practical), Infantry Drill, School of Soldier 
Squad and Platoon (Theoretical and Practical), Scouting and Patroling 
(Theoretical and Practical), Rifle Marksmanship, to include gallery 
practice and range practice (Theoretical and Practical), Personal Hy- 
giene (Lectures). ^ 



182 



Second Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Infantry Drill, School of Platoon and 
Company (Theoretical and Practical), Scouting and Patroling (Theo- 
retical and Practical), Infantry Equipment (Practical). 

M. I. 102. Basic R. O. T. C. — The year. Four credits. Sophomore year. 

The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Infantry Drill, School of the Soldier, 
Squad, Platoon and Company (Theoretical and Practical), Musketry 
(Theoretical and Practical), Military Map Reading and Sketching 
(Theoretical and Practical), Infantry Weapons, viz: Bayonet, Hand 
Grenades, Rifle Grenades, Automatic Rifles (Theoretical and Practical), 
Military Hygiene, Sanitation and Frst Aid (Theoretical and Practical). 

Second Semester: 

Military Map Reading and Sketching (Theoretical and Practical), 
Infantry Drill, School of Company (Practical), Physical Training (Prac- 
tical). 

M. I. 103. Advanced R. O. T, C. — The year. Six credits. Junior year. 

The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, 
Command and Leadership (Theoretical and Practical), Field Engineering 
(Theoretical and Practical), Military Law (Theoretical and Practical), 
Accompanying Weapons, viz: Machine Guns, 37 mm. Gun and Mortars 
(Theoretical and Practical). 

Second Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, 
Command and leadership (Theoretical and Practical), Field Engineering 
(Theoretical and Practical), Problems in Use of Accompanying Weapons. 

M. I. 104. Advanced R. O. T, C, — The year. Six credits. Senior year. 

The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester: 

Physical Training (Practical), Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, 
Command and leadership (Theoretical and Practical), Minor Tactics 
(Theoretical and Practical), Administration, Army Paper Work (Theo- 
retical and Practical), Military History and Policy of the United States 
(Theoretical). 

Second Semester: 

Minor Tactics (Theoretical and Practical), Physical Training (Prac- 
tical), Infantry Drill, Duties of Instructors, Command and leadership 
(Theoretical and Practical), Pistol Marksmanship, to include Range 
Practice (Theoretical and Practical). 



183 



School of Nursing 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

ANNIE CRIGHTON, R. N. 
Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 

STELLA M. RICKETTS 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

JANET NESBITT SMITH, R. N. 
Instructor in Nursing 

EVA FISCHER, R. N. 
Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

ELIZABETH AITKENHEAD, R. N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

MARIAN CONNELLY 
Instructor in Dietetics 

EDITH WALTON 
Instructor in Massage 

GRACE PEARSON, R. N. 
Instructor in Social Service 

Ruth Clement, R. N Night Supervisor. 

Mary E. Rolph, R. N Supervisor — Nurses Home. 

Bertha Rawlings, R. N Supervisor — Dispensary. 

Frankie Morrison, R. N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward. 

Margaret Lauper, R. N Head Nurse — Men's Medical 

Ward. 

Bessie Maston, R. N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical 

Ward. 

Eleanor Butler, R. N Head Nurse — Accident Ward. 

Grace Elgin, R. N Head Nurse— Women's Medical, 

Gynecological and Surgical 
Ward. 

Blanche Hoffmaster, R. N Head Nurse— Private Hall. 

Pauline H. Esslinger, R. N Head Nurse — Private Hall. 

*. Assistant Dietitian. 






LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy and Physiology 
JOSEPH W. HOLLAND, M. D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. HACTEL, M. D. 

Materia Medica 
C. C. HABLISTON, M. D. 

Medicine 
MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, M. D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M. D. 
Surgery 

L. H. DOUGLASS, M. D. 
Obstetrics 

CHARLES L. SUMMERS, M. D. 
Pediatrics 

G. M. SETTLE, M. D. 
Psychiatry and Neurology 

HARRY M. ROBINSON, M. D. 
Skin and Venereal Diseases 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, M. D. 
Otology and Ophthalmology 

E. A. LOOPER, M. D. 
Laryngology and Rhinology 

HUGH BRENT, M. D. 
Gynecology 

R. TUNSTALL TAYLOR, M. D. 
Orthopedic Surgery 



184 



185 



General Statement 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University of 
Maryland Hospital. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning 
prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 285 beds. It is equipped to give yoiing women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing including experience 
in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its oppor- 
tunity for varied experience and in its thorough curriculum taught by 
well qualified instructors and members of the medical staff of the 
University. 

Admission Requirements 

In order to become a candidate for admission to the Training School, 
application must be made in person or by letter, to the superintendent of 
nurses. An application by letter should be accompanied by a statement 
from a clergyman testifying to good moral character and from a physic- 
ian certifying to sound health and unimpaired faculties. No person will 
be considered who is not in a good physical condition between the ages of ' 
18 and 35. She must also show that she has a high school education or 
its equivalent. This is the minimum requirement, for women of superior 
education and culture are given preference provided they meet the re- 
quirements in other particulars. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismis- 
sing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation, is left to the 
decision of the superintendent of nurses. Misconduct, disobedience, in- 
subordination, inefficiency, or neglect of duty are causes for dismissal at 
any time by the superintendent of nurses with the approval of the presi- 
dent of the University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February, June and September. 

HOURS ON DUTY: During the probation term the students are on 
duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, Intermediate and 
Senior years, the students are on eight hour day du^y, with six hours on 
Sunday and holidays, and ten hour night duty. The night duty periods 
are approximately two months each, with one day at the termination of 
each term for rest and recreation. The period of night duty is approxi- 
mately five or six months during the three years. 

SICKNESS: A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill all 
students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in ex- 
cess of two weeks, during the three years must be made up. Should the 
authorities of the school decide that through the time lost the theoretical 






work has not been sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue 
rn that year it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the 

next class. j o 4. i^ A 

VACATIONS: Vacations are given between June and S^P*^™^?- f 

period of three weeks is allowed the student at the completion of first 

and second years. 

EXPENSE: A student receives her board, lodging and a reasonable 
amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her Penod of 
ToraWon she provides her own uniforms made in accordance with the 
hospital regulations. After being accepted as a student nurse she wears 
Se Uniform furnished by the hospital. The student is ^ - Pro^ded w^ 
text-books and in addition to this is paid five dollars ($5.00) a month. 
Her personal expenses during the course of training and instruction will 
depend entirely upon her individual habits and tastes. 

General Plan of Instruction 
The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

Junior Year— First Term 
The Junior Year is divided into two periods. The first term is the 
preparatory period (4 mos.) and the second the junior term. 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical instruction in:- 
1. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost of hospital 
materials, apparatus and surgical instruments. 

2 Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

3 The hospital outpatients department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant supervision, 
and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen rooms, laundry 

and store room. . .. j- -j j 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruction divided 
into lecture and laboratory periods is thirty hours and includes courses 
in anatomy and physiology, dietetics, materia medica, personal hygiene 
drugs and solutions, household economics, short course m ethics and 

history of nursing. . , 

At the close of the first half of junior year the students are required 
to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, and failure to do so 
will be sufficient reason to terminate the course at this point. 

Subsequent Course 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary period oc- 
cupies two and three-fourth years, and students are not accepted for 

a shorter period. . 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly engaged in prac- 
tical work under the immediate supervision and direction of the head 
nurses and instructors. 

187 



186 



Throughout the three years, regular courses of instruction and lec- 
tures are given by members of the medical and nursing school faculties. 

Junior Year — Second Term 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction in mas- 
sage, general surgery and general medicine. Practical instruction is 
received in the male and female, medical, surgical and children's wards. 

Intermediate Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes pediatrics, in- 
fectious diseases, obstetrics and gynecology. The practical work pro- 
vides experience in the nursing of obstetrical and gynecological patients 
in the operating rooms and the outpatient department. 

Senior Year 

During this period the student receives short courses of lectures on 
subjects of special interest. This includes a consideration of the work 
of institutions of public and private charities, of settlements, and various 
branches of professional work in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administration work to those 
showing exceptional ability in the senior year. With these students 
conferences are held on administration and teaching problems. 

GRADUATION. The diploma of the school will be awarded to those 
who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three years, and have 
passed successfully the final examinations. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. One scholarship has been established by the alum- 
nae of the training school. It entitles a nurse to six weeks course at 
Teachers College, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest ex- 
cellence, and who desires to pursue post-graduate study and special work. 

An alumnae pin is presented by the Woman's Auxiliary Board to the 
student who at the completion of three years shows exceptional execu- 
tive ability. 



The School of Pharmacy 






FACULTY 

E. F. KELLY, Phar. D., Dean. 
B. OLIVE COLE, Phar. D., Secretary. 

PHARMACY— 

E F. Kelly, Phar. D., Professor of Pharmacy. 
J Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar. D., Professor of Dispensing. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.C, Associate Professor of Pharmacy 
Louis J. Burger, Phar. G., LL.B., Lecturer on Pharmaceutical Juris- 

prudence. 
Wm L Reindollar, Phar. G., Assistant in Pharmacy. 
Stanley L. Campbell, Phar. G., Assistant in Dispensing. 

MATERIA ME Die A— 

DAVID M. R. CULBRETH, A.M., Phar. G., M.D., Professor Emeritus 

of Botany and Materia Medica. , ,, ^ • 

Chas. C. Plitt, Phar. G., Sc.D., Professor of Botany and Materia 

Medica. ^ ^ . j n*^ 4. «;„ 

B. Olive Cole, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Botany and Materia 

Medica. 

CHEMISTRY— 

Neil E. Gordon, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

M. Kharasch. Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

H E WiCH, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

E. B. Starkey, Associate Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. 

PHYSIOLOGY and HYGIENE and BACTERIOLOGY— 

ROBT. L. Mitchell, Phar. D., M.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Hygiene, and Bacteriology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SUBJECTS— 

W. W. CUTCHIN, Phar. D., LL.B., Professor of Business Admmistra- 

tion. . ,, , T 

C F Kramer, M.A., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

H. J. SCHAD, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Professor of English. 

C. G. EiCHLiN, M.S., Professor of Physics. 

Geo. S. Smardon, Comptroller, 

W. M. HiLLEGEiST, Registrar. 



188 



189 



The school of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, largely at the instance 
of members of the Faculty of Medicine, and, for a time, the lectures were 
delivered at the Medical School. Later it became separated and continued 
an independent organization, as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, until 
it finally became part of the University in 1904. With but one short in- 
termission, previous to 1865, it has continuously exercised its functions 
as a teaching school of pharmacy. 

Location 

The School of Pharmacy is located at the northeast corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, with the Schools of Medicine, Law and Dentistry. 

Policy and Degrees 

The chief purpose of this college has been to prepare its matriculants 
for the intelligent practice of retail pharmacy, without overlooking the 
fact that there exist other divisons of the profession and that all need 
to be scientifically taught. With this in view, the School of Pharmacy 
has arranged a graded course, so that it may, first, build for the student 
a well ordered foundation, upon which the pharmaceutical specialist can 
be developed. Upon completion of the first two years of the course, the 
diploma of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.) is awarded, which admits the 
holder to the board examinations in the various states for registration 
as a pharmacist. In this basic division of the course, in addition to the 
work as specified in the Pharmaceutical Syllabus, general educational 
subjects are included, sufficient to give the successful students full col- 
legiate credit, and they become eligible for admission into the Medical 
School of the University of Maryland upon further completion of six 
semester hours in Zoology. 

The diploma of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C.) will be awarded upon 
the completion of the advanced work prescribed for the third year of the 
course to those students who have completed the Ph.G. division of the 
course in this or other schools holding membership in the American Con- 
ference of Pharmaceutical Faculties, and have met the entrance require- 
ments of this school. 

Recognition 

This school holds membership in the American Conference of Pharma- 
ceutical Faculties. The object of the Conference is to promote the inter- 
ests of pharmaceutical education and all institutions holding membership 
must maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and gradua- 
tion. Through the influence of this Conference uniform and higher stand- 
ards of education have been adopted from time to time and the fact that 
several states by law or by Board ruling recognize the standards of the 
Conference is evidence of its influence. 

This school is registered in the New York Department of Education, 
and by the Boards of Pharmacy of Ohio and other states that maintain a 
registration bureau. 

Its diploma is recognized in all states. 



190 



Requirements for Matriculation 

The applicant must have completed a four-year standard high school 
course, or its equivalent. A minimum age of seventeen years is demanded 
except when the candidate is a graduate of an accredited high school or 

of an institution of equal grade. , . ^.i. 

Admission to the course in pharmacy is by certificate issued by the 
Registrar of the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Md. The certificate is issued on the basis of credentials, or 

by examination, or both. ^ j. . a 

Applicants whose credentials do not meet the requirements must stand 
an examination in appropriate subjects to make up the required number 
of units. The fee for such examination is one dollar per subject; five 
dollars for the entire number of subjects. 

Credit will be given for first year pharmaceutical subjects to those - 
students coming from schools of pharmacy holding membership m the 
American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties, provided they present 
a proper certificate of the satisfactory completion of such subjects and 
meet the entrance requirements of this school. Credit for general educa- 
tional subjects will be given to those students presenting evidence of 
having completed work of equal value. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1 The candidate must possess a good moral character. 

2 He or she must have successfully completed the work specified in the 
first two years of the course if a candidate for the Graduate in Pharmacy 
(Ph.G.) diploma; or three years if a candidate for the Pharmaceutical 
Chemist (Ph.C.) diploma; in each instance the last year to be taken m 
this school. 

Table of Fees 

Matriculation, paid but once ?^.00 

For Full First Year 1^^'^" 

For Full Second Year 1^^-"" 

For Full Third Year ^Ij^-^^ 

Graduation fee (returned in case of failure) 10.00 

Yearly charge to cover breakage l^-^^ 

Special Fees 

Students who wish to take special subjects and not the full curriculum 
are expected to matriculate and make necessary arrangements as to 
charges. 

Payments 

The Matriculation Tickets must be procured from tha office of the 
School of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before entering the classes. 

191 



?i!;VV7 *"'"°",^'-^ P*y*W« in two equal installments, on October 1, 

llfl^. TT"" t' ^^'*- ^'^^ ''^^^''^^^ f«^ '^ P^y«ble on October 1 
and the graduation fee not later than May 1st. 

Students in arrears for tuition will not be admitted to the mid-year 
examinations and if the tuition be not paid in full by April 1 they wS 
be asked o withdraw, unless satisfactory assurance be given that The 
tuition will be paid before the close of the session. 

Art!^'^ ^"l!'*i" TJ"^ '"""'^ ™ Pharmacy may be obtained by ad- 
dressing the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore^ Md. 



192 



Department of Physical Education and 

Recreation 



The Department of Physical Education and Recreation has been organ- 
ized to control all physical training, recreation, intramural and inter- 
collegiate athletics. All work is closely co-ordinated and the ideal is to 
see that every man in the institution gets opportunities to take part in 
competitive sports. The plan under which the department is to operate 
may be summed up as follows: 

1. A series of exercises arranged for every student in the institution 
and compulsory for all, the exercises to be based on mass exercises com- 
mon in Germany and Scandinavian countries. Neither the German nor 
Scandinavian system is to be used in its entirety, but a combination of the 
heavy gymnastic drills of the former with the lighter squad drills of the 
latter. All students will be given physical examination and placed in 
various classes according to their individual physical needs. Students 
will receive different kinds of work and be encouraged to take part in 
those games which provide the exercise of which they are most in need. 

2. A general system of intramural athletics is carried out under a reg- 
ular schedule with teams representing different units of the University. 
All students take part in one or more of these branches of sport and the 
University encourages enough sports to give each an opportunity. It is 
the aim of each class to have its own wrestling team, basket-ball team, 
baseball team, volley-ball team, track team, and so on for just as many 
teams as there are students to fill the positions. The games between these 
teams are carried out with regularity of schedule and supervision. Besides 
these, there are general competitions such as cross-country runs and 
interclass track meets in which representatives of all classes may compete 
at the same time. A regular playground is in process of construction on 
which will be available tennis courts, volley-ball courts, tether ball polls, 
stakes for pitching quoits, etc. 

3. All physical training of the students, including mass exercises, in- 
tramural sports, intercollegiate competitions, and military training, are a 
part of the general educational system of the University. 

For the present practically all general training, such as comes under 
the head of gymnastics and squad exercises, is conducted under the direc- 
tion of the Military Department. 

A new gymnasium and stadium, now being constructed, will add greatly 
to the facilities for general athletics and physical education. Combined 
they will give the University the most modern athletic plant in the South. 



193 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1922 



Certificates Two- Year-Course in Agriculture 

Marshall Clagette Gray Ironsides, Maryland 



HONORARY DEGREES 

John Joseph Pershing, Doctor of Laws 

Arthur Roscoe Hirst, Doctor of Engineering 

John Nathaniel Mackall, Doctor of Engineering 

Eugene Amandus Schwarz, Doctor of Science 

William Oxley Thompson, Doctor of Laws 

HONORARY TESTIMONIALS OF MERIT IN AGRICULTURE 

Richard Smith Snader New Windsor, Maryland 

Isaac Henry Moss Govans, Maryland 

John Cook Baltimore, Maryland 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Master of Science 

Edmund Calvin Donaldson Laurel, Maryland 

Edgar Bennett Starkey Sudlersville, Maryland 

Reginald Van Trump Truitt Snow Hill, Maryland 

Raymond Clifford Wiley College Park, Maryland 

Charles Philip Wilhelm Baltimore, Maryland 

Malcolm Russell Young Beesleys Point, New Jersey 



COLLEGE OF 
Bachelor 

Helena Dodge Avery 
Edward Leland Browne 
Bertha Brill Ezekiel 
Henry Saulisbury Fisher 
William Presstman Fusselbaugh 
Henry Jacob Gurevich 
Thomas Dail Holder 
Jesse Marion Huffington 
William Wallace Kirby 
George Wilbur Malcolm 
George Mahlon Merrill 
John Austin Moran 
Sterling Ruffin Newell 
John Howe Painter 
Clayton Reynolds 
Jacob Edward Shillinger 
James Herbert Snyder 
Laurence Janney Stabler 
Roland Lee Sutton 



AGRICULTURE 
of Science 

Washington, District of Columbia 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 
Berwyn, Maryland 
Hillsboro, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Vienna, Maryland 
Eden, Maryland 
Berwyn, Maryland 
Barton, Maryland 
Crisfield, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Falls Church, Virginia 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Oxford, Pennsylvania 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Lewistown, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Ballston, Virginia 






194 



Charles William Hohman 
Julius Parcell Parran 

Veterans' 

John Bishop 
John Wallace Coyle 
John Joseph Davis 
Clarence Lee Howell 
Howard Van James 
Wilton Gerald Kirby 
David Lawrence Lint 
Robert Curtis Moler 
George Oliver Russell 
George Smith Tait 
Clifford Edwin Sullivan 



West, West Virginia 
Lusby, Maryland 

Bureau Certificates 

Washington, District of Columbia 
East Syracuse, New York 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Chase City, Virginia 
Williamsburg, Virginia 
Havre de Grace, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Mount Ranier, Maryland 
Norfolk, Virginia 
Fairfax, Virginia 
Reisterstown, Maryland 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Bachelor of Arts 

SiDNiA Butler New York City 

Robert Nicholas Young Washington, District of Columbia 



Bachelor 

Ralph Henry Beachley 
Edward Brooke Brewer 
Morris MacDowell Clark 
Frederick Randolph Darkis 
James William Elder 
Charles Herbert Dewey Gilbert 
Walter Scott Graham 
Robert James Hodgins 
Hyman Edmund Levin 
Alfred James Northam 
Romeo Joseph Paganucci 
Otto Philip Henry Reinmuth 
John Dorsey Scheuch 
George Nelson Schramm 
Joseph Gunby Scott 
Harry Edwin Semler 



of Science 

Middletown, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Silver Springs, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Cumberland, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Hyattsville, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Pocomoke, Maryland 
Waterville, Maine 
Frederick, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Cumberland, Maryland 
Princess Anne, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 



Extension Course in Commerce 

Bachelor of Commercial Science 

John Edward Clabaugh Baltimore, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Sylvan Katz 
Joseph Rollin Otto 
William McK. Wetzel 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



195 






l*> 



Certificates of Proficiency 

Herbert Collins Metcalfe Baltimore, Maryland 



George M. Scherer 
Bessie Terlitzky 
Frank Freeman Tippett 
Arthur Victor Wooldridge 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



Myron Samson Aisenberg 
WiNFiELD Joseph Atno 
Samuel Harry Blank 
Charles Adam Bock 
Emmett Perrin Bugg 
William Francis Burke 
John Francis Clark 
Luther Lynn Emmart 
Grayson Wilbur Gaver 
Moses Gibson 
Saul Goldstein 
Abe David Greenberg 
Louis Grossman 
Cecil Isidor Kiell 
Saul David Leades 
Troy Carl Lugar 
William Reichel 
Sidney Naphtalin Rothfeder 
Alfredo Saudalio Saliva 
Nathan Scherr 
Daniel Edward Shehan 
Jacob Silverman 
Oswald Patton Smith 
Max Emmanuel Soifer 
Alex J. Spinner 
William Clifford Terhune 
Henry Burgess Thomson 
Maynard DeWitt Wolfe 
Morris Wolf 



New Britain, Connecticut 
Newark, New Jersey 
Camden, New Jersey 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Madison, Georgia 
Amesbury, Massachusetts 
Utica, New York 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Myersville, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Newark, New Jersey 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Newark, New Jersey 
Newark, New Jersey 
New Britain, Connecticut 
New Castle, Virginia 
Annapolis, Maryland 
New Britain, Connecticut 
Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Newark, New Jersey 
Asheville, North Carolina 
Hartford, Connecticut 
Newark, New Jersey 
Pater son, New Jersey 
Culpeper, Virginia 
Bloomfield, New Jersey 
Washington, District of Columbia 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Science 



John Armistead Burroughs 
Francis DeSales Canter 
HuiDAH Elizabeth Ensor 
William Fleming McDonald 



Clinton, Maryland 
Aquasco, Maryland 
Sparks, Maryland 
Barton, Maryland 



Paul Tyler Morgan 
Gordon Vernon Nelson 
Walter William Peterman 
Mildred Pauline Smith 

Special 

John Armistead Burroughs 
Francis DeSales Canter 
Henry Deussen 
Frank J. Deitz 
HuLDAH Elizabeth Ensor 
Paul C. Edwards 
William Fleming McDonald 
Paul Tyler Morgan 
Gordon Vernon Nelson 
Walter William Peterman 
Kurt A. Schneider 
Mildred Pauline Smith 
Anthony R. Spartana 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Newport News, Virginia 
Clear Spring, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 

Teachers' Diplomas 

Clinton, Maryland 

Aquasco, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Sparks, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Barton, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Newport News, Virginia 

Clear Spring, Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Washington, District of Columbia 

Baltimore, Maryland 



COLLEGE OF 
Bachelor 



Alfred Sellman Best 
Keator Thompson Broach 
Poul Gunni Busck 
John Albert Butts 
Charles Eugene Darnall 
Edwin Foltz Darner 
Francis George Ewald 
Augustus Webster Hines 
Charles Edgar Moore, Jr. 
Herbert Eutaw Neighbours 
Frederick James Norwood 
Merwyn Leon Pusey 
Edgar Farr Russell 

Clarence DeSales Sasscer 



ENGINEERING 

of Science 

Harwood, Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Loysburg, Pennsylvania 
Hyattsville, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
Mount Savage, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Lewistown, Maryland 
Washington, District of Columbia 
Cape Charles, Virginia 
Washington, District of Columbia 

Croom, Maryland 



Civil Engineer 

Herschel Heathcote Allen Baltimore, Maryland 

SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Laws 

Samuel Jay Aaron Baltimore, Maryland 

George Charles Ahrling Baltimore, Maryland 

George Zadock Ashman Baltimore, Maryland 

Thomas Edward Barrett, Jr. Baltimore, Maryland 

197 



19G 



Paul U. Beall 

Alton Young Bennett 

Paul Berman 

Richard Constable Bernard 

William Harbaugh Bovey 

Joseph T. Brennan 

Meyer Brown 

Thomas Baldwin Butler 

Allan Eli Cohan 

Eugene Conwell Councill 

George Roland Cummings 

Joseph Francis DiDomenico 

George F. Flentje, Jr. 

William Jacob Fowler 

David Friedman 

John Stuart Galloway 

Alexander Goodman 

Joseph Aloysius Guthrie 

Edward Everett Hargest, Jr. 

Calvert Keeper Hartle 

Samuel Hecker 

George Granger Jenkins 

Edmond Hough Johnson 

Robert Elmer Kindred 

Charles William Klipper 

Harry S. Kruger 

Herbert Ferdinand Kuenne 

Louis Moncure Latane 

John Vernon Lemmert 

Albert A. Levin 

James J. Lindsay, Jr. 

Denton Scott Lowe 

J. A. Meyer 

Frederick Leonard Maas 

Robert Lee Mainen 

Fendall Marbury 

Charles Hermann Miegel 

Joshua Weldon Miles, Jr. 

James Howard Millar 

Thomas Francis Mitchell 

Joseph Theodore Molz 

George Robert Nake 

George Stephenson Newcomer 

John Jerome Nowakowski 

John Philemon Paca, 5th 

Joseph Theodore Parr 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Towson, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Snow Hill, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Wittman, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Rossville, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Thompsonville, Connecticut 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 



198 



William Hawkes Price 

Edward D. E. Rollins 

GusTAV Frederick Sanderson 

Ernest Emil Savard 

Leo Albert Schneider 

Eugene Schonfield 

Jessie L Seidman 

Joseph Sherbow 

Joseph Skrentny 

Leon Small 

Morris S. Snyder 

Abraham Stern 

Walter Lee Taylor, Jr. 

Charles Henry Thompson 

ROSZEL C. Thomsen 

John George Vogeler 

Edwin Clay Weaver 

Francis Edward Wheeler 

Richard W. Williams 

Lewis M. Wilson 

David Charles Winebrenner, 3rd 

Benjamin Louis Wolfson 

Antonio Ayuso Valdivielso 



Snow Hill, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Bristol, Connecticut 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Catonsville, Maryland 
Relay, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Halethorpe, Maryland 
Cumberland, Maryland 
Frederick, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Porto Rico 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
Doctor of Medicine 



Harry Bailey 

Anthony Vincent Buchness 

Ira Preston Champe, Jr. 

Louis Jacob Dorshay 

Berthold Fleischmann 

Elias Freidus 

J. Dudley Fritz 

William J. Fulton 

William Ginsberg 

Bern hard A. Goldman 

William A. Gollick 

Herbert Gordon 

Elias Gordon 

Leonard Harry Greenbaum 

Morris Groff 

George Conrad Halley 

Robert Dove Harm an 

Daniel Samuel Hatfield 

Hubert M. Heitsch 



New Haven, Connecticut 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Charleston, West Virginia 
Brooklyn, New York 
New York City 
New York City 
Brooklyn, New York 
Baltimore, Maryland 
New York City 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Jersey City, New Jersey 
New York City 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Brooklyn, New York 
Twin Falls, Idaho 
Riverton, West Virginia 
Charleston, West Virginia 
Pontiac, Michigan 



199 



t 



William Hollister 

Herman Jack Horowitz 

William Huff 

David Neill Ingram 

George Gregory Keefe 

George S. Kerdasha 

John J. Krager 

Andrew Kunkowski 

Milton Charles Lang 

Lawrence Wells Lawson 

James Julian Paul Linke 

Cecil Glen McCoy 

Albin S. Mercier 

William Robert Middlemiss 

Arthur Ceril Monninger 

Edward Nicholas Morgan 

Louis Noll 

John A. O'Connor 

John Edward Payne 

H. Raymond Peters 

Henry L. Pittman 

Guy Foote Pullen 

Bricey Milton Rhodes 

John David Rudisill 

Abraham Hellman Salzberg 

Archibald Richard Saporito 

Arthur Joseph Francis Sekerak 

George Edmon Shannon 

Sydney Shapin 

Louis Mendelsohn Shapiro 

Harry Melmuth Sternberg 

Joseph Samuel Stovin 

Philip David Stout 

Samuel Waterman Sweet 

Aaron Hyman Trynin 

John Ogle Warfield, Jr. 

Thomas Norwood Wilson 



New Berne, North Carolina 
New York City 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Waterbury, Connecticut 
Weehawken, New Jersey 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Logan, West Virginia 
Plainfield, New Jersey 
Mannington, West Virginia 
Lisbon, Maryland 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Batavia, New York 
Hartford, Connecticut 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Clarksburg, West Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 
Greenwich, Connecticut 
Tallahassee, Florida 
Lincolnton, North Carolina 
New York City 
Harrison, New Jersey 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Brooklyn, New York 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Brooklyn, New York 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Doeville, Tennessee 
Utica, New York 
Brooklyn, New York 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Hebron, Maryland 



SCHOOL FOR NURSES 
Graduate Nurse 



LuciLE Bowie 
Vera Ellen Callahan 
Mary Julia Deputy 
Cecile Marie DuBois 
Grace Lovell Elgin 



Front Royal, Virginia 
Dennison, Ohio 
Chestertown, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 






Nettie Bradley Lord 
Frankie Bowman Morrison 
Isabel Jamison Pannair 
Eva Louise Yeager ** 



Preston, Maryland 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Cumberland, Maryland 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
Graduate in Pharmacy 



Marvin Jackson Andrews 
William Harold Batt 
George Wilbur Berger 
Edward Irwin Blaine, Jr. 
Dudley Asahel Burrows 
Nicholas Joseph Colucci 
Howard Lee Gordy 
William Michael Gould 
Arthur Cleo Harbaugh 
Carl Marks Harmon 
Leroy Savin Heck 
David Hermon 
Milton L. Hettleman 
Charles Howard Hopkins 
Max a. Krieger 
Jennie Kroopnick 
Carlos Esteban Rivas Leiva 
Andrew Tolson Lyon 
Charles Weede Marsh 
Reuben Bowen Moxley 
William Wallace Payant 
Vincent Joseph Piraino 
James Jerome Richardson 
William August Ruff 
Louis Schapiro 
Robert Samuel Scher 
Claude Melvin Smoak 
Virginia Garten Somerlatt 



Bristol, Tennessee 
Davis, West Virginia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Pocomoke City, Maryland 
Enfield, North Carolina 
Stamford, Connecticut 
Laurel, Delaware 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Hagerstown, Maryland 
Dundalk, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
San Luis, Cuba 
Havre de Grace, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Bel Air, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Bamburg, South Carolina 



Cumberland, Maryland 

Pharmaceutical Chemist 

Donald Alexander Shannon Baltimore, Maryland 



*♦ Miss Yeager died before graduating, but her diploma was issued and given to her 
parents. 

201 



200 






MEDALS, PRIZES AND HONORS, 1922 



Elected Members of the Phi Kappa Phi, The Honorary Fraternity 






Alfred Sellman Best 
poul gunni busck 
John Albert Butts 
Francis DeSales Canter 
HuLDAH Elizabeth Ensor 
Francis George Ewald 



Bertha Brill Ezekiel 
Augustus Webster Hines 
John Howe Painter 
Otto Phillip Henry Reinmuth 
James Herbert Snyder 
Laurence Janney Stabler 



J^; 



Alumni Association Medal for Excellence in Debate 

George Edward Gifford, Rising Sun, Maryland 

The Goddard Medal, for Excellence in Scholarship and Moral Character, 

to Student of Prince George's County, offered by 

Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

John Francis Clagett, Marlboro, Maryland 

The Oratorical Association of Maryland Colleges offers each year Gold 
Medals for First and Second Places in an Oratorical Contest 

Medal for First Place awarded to 
Robert Malcolm Watkins, Mt. Airy, Maryland 

Citizenship Medal offered by Mr. H. C. Byrd, Class of 1908 

Robert Nicholas Young, Washington, District of Columbia 

Athletic Medal offered by the Class of 1908 
Harry Edwin Semler, Hagerstown, Maryland 

"President's Cup," for Excellence in Debate, offered by 

Dr. H. J. Patterson 

The Poe Literary Society 

Company Sword offered by the University to the Captain of the 

Best Drilled Company 

Captain Paul Sardo Frank, Company E 

Gold Medal offered by the Class of 1899 for Excellence in Drill 
Private Clyde Fairfax Wilmeth, Company E 

Corporation Law Prizes offered by Prof. E. F. New 

First Prize — James Edward Burroughs, Jr. 

Second Prize — Paul Frederick Newland 



202 



War Department Awards of Commissions as Second Lieutenants 

in the Infantry Reserve Corps 

Morrison MacDowell Clark James Atlee Ridout 

Charles Eugene Darnall Edgar Farr Russell 

Edwin Bennett Filbert Hughes Adams Shank 

Augustus Webster Hines George Francis Smith 

Jesse Marion Huffington Robert Nicholas Young 

John Austin Moran Gerald Grosh Remsberg 

Otto Philip Henry Reinmuth 

Awards of Military Commissions 



Morrison MacDowell Clark 
Robert Nicholas Young 
Augustus Webster Hines 
Edwin Bennett Filbert 
Paul Sardo Frank 
George Francis Smith 
Hughes Adams Shank 
Edgar Farr Russell 
John Austin Moran 
James Atlee Ridout 
Gerald Grosh Remsberg 
Otto Philip Henry Reinmuth 
Jesse Marion Huffington 
George Findlay Pollock 
Kenneth Baldwin Chappell 
Charles Edward White 
Jackson Ward Wisner 
Albert Grafton Wallis 
John Philip Schaefer 
Peter Thomas Knapp 
John Francis Clagett 
George Edmund Gifford 
Everett Clayton Embrey 
Walter Hempstone Young 
Henry Marvin Terry 
Mason Carpenter Albrittain 
Loren Fletcher Schott 
Ernest Alexander Graves 
Edward Marshall Richardson 
George Allen Wick 
Russell Earl Marker 
Charles Smallwood Cook 
John Wesley Mumford 
Milburne William Jones 
Howard Ingham States 



Major 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 
Captain 

First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second L-'eutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 



203 



HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors — Bertha Brill Ezekiel, James Herbert Snyder 
Second Honors — Henry Jacob Gurevich 

College of Arts and Sciences 

First Honors — Otto Philip Henry Reinmuth, Hyman Edmund Levin 

Second Honors — George Nelson Schramm 

College of Education 

• First Honors — Huldah Elizabeth Ensor 

College of Engineering 

First Honors — Paul Gunni Busck 
Second Honors — Alfred Sellman Best 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship — Grayson Wilbur Gaver 
First Honorable Mention — Myron Samson Aisenberg 

School of Law 

Prize of $100 for the highest average grade for the entire course 

RoszEL C. Thomsen 
Prize of $100 for the most meritorious thesis — RoszEL C. Thomsen 

School of Medicine 
University Prize, Gold Medal — J. Ogle Warfield, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

C. Glen McCoy A. V. Buchness 

H. Raymond Peters Elias Freidus 

T. Norwood Wilson 

The Dr. Jose L. Hirsch Memorial Prize of $50.00 for Excellence in 

Pathology during the second and third years 

J, Ogle Warfield, Jr. 

School for Nurses 

University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association Scholarship to 

Columbia University 

Grace Lovell Elgin 

University of Marvland Nurses' Association Pin and Membership in 

the Association 
Frankie Bowman Morrison 

School of Pharmacy 

Gold Medal for General Excellence — Leroy Savin Heck 

Simon Medal for Practical Chemistry — Charles Weede Marsh 

Simon Medal for Practical Chemistry (1917) 

William Wallace Payant 

Junior Class, Honorable Mention 

Mrs. E. J. Norton and Miss Frieda Cherthof 

204 



! 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION FOR 1922-1923 

Battalion Stafif 

p. S. Frank, Lieut. CoL, R. O. T. C, Unit Commander 

G. F. Pollock, Major, R. O. T. C, Battalion Commander 

J. P. ScHAEFER, Captain, R. O. T. C, Adjutant 

R. L. Rissler. First Lieutenant. R. O. T. C, Battalion Adjutant 



\ 



COMPANY OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 



COMPANY A 



J. W. WiSNER 



J. F. Clagett 
A. G. Wallis 



J. W. MUMFORD 

E. M. Richardson 



T. J. MCQUADE 



L. F. Melchior 
H. M. Walter 



T, J. Holmes 

G. J. LUCKEY 

N. T. Meeds 

D. D. BURNSIDE 



F. L. Bull 
C. Castella 
M. J. Horn 
W. H. Lewis 
W. A. DeCaindry 

E. S. Ford 

W. L. Wickard 

F. E. Fader 

E. D. Huyett 

F. S. Scott 

A. D. OSBORN 

R. G. Orr 

C. P. Glover 

B. I. W ATKINS 

D. A. Staley 
W. S. Funk 



COMPANY B 

Captains 
E. C. Embrey 

First Lieutenants 

W. H. Young 
G. A. Wick 

Second Lieutenants 
C. S. Cook 

L. F. SCHOTT 

First Sersreants 

J. H. F. BiTTNER 

Platoon Sergeants 

M. F. Brothers 
H. L. Marshall 

Sergeants 

H. M. Howard 
W. R. Sanders 
E. R. Steele 
R. G. Clapp 

Corporals 

E. F. Zalesak 
W. E. Daugherty 
W. C. Binkley 
J. F. Doug ALL 

B. R. King 

H. R. Aldridge 
G. E. Bouis 
E, R. Melton 
J. D. Morris 

C. K. Stewart 
M. M. Price 
T. B. Marden 
J. W. Jones 
J. W. Skirven 
J. Macko 

J. L. Swank 



COMPANY C 



W- M. Jones 



C. E. White 
K. B. Chafpell 



E. A. Graves 



B. H. Roche 



J. L. Mecartney 
R. P. Taylor 



S. C. Orr 
J. M. Seney 
R. M. Graham 
O. H. Grbagor 



J. F. Sullivan 
G. Lewis 

F. H. Rogers 
W. M. Kline 
R. G. Cook 
S. L. Powers 

G. P. Gardner 
E. F. Juska 

E. H, Miller 
C. Peake 
J. H. Rutter 
I. E. Peebles 
M. L. Bowser 
R. D. Buckman 
C. P. McFadden 
J. H. Baker 



205 



Register of Students 



I 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SENIOR 

Burdette, Robert C, Gaithersburg 
Dunning, Ernest C, Govans 
England, C. Walter. Rising Sun 
Fuhrman, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
Gurevich, Morris J., Washington, D. C. 
Hancock, Hugh, Berwyn 
Harley, Clayton P., College Park 
*Ha\vthorne, Noah B., Washington, D. C. 
Huffard, Charles L.. Wytheville, Va. 

Troy, Virgil S., 

JUNIOR 

Bacon, Rankin S., Glencoe 

Barton, J. Frank, Centreville I 

Duvall, William M., Baltimore ' 

Embrey, Everett C, Washington, D. C. 

Endslow, David K., Mt. Joy, Pa. 

Geist, Charles H,, Upperco 

Hale, Roger F., Freeland 
♦Harper, Floyd H., College Park 
♦Holland, Arthur H., Cartersville, Va. 
♦Ludlum, Samuel L., Chevy Chase 

McQuade, Thomas J., Washington. D. C. 

Mecartney, John L., Vaucluse. Va. 



CLASS 

Lescure, John M., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Melroy, Malcolm B., Washington, N. J 
Miller, Thomas K., Havre de Grace 
Mumford, John W., Jr., Newark 
Pollock, George F., Boyds 
•Shaffer, Harry H., Upperco 
Skilling, Francis C, Baltimore 
Smith, George F., Big Spring 
Trivanovitch, Vaso, Zagreb, Jugoslavia 
Centreville 

CLASS 

Miller, Robert H., Jr., Spencerville 
Nichols, Norris N., Delmar, Del. 
Nichols, Robert S., Delmar, Del. 
Penn, William B., Clinton 
Powell, William D., Woodsboro 
Prince, Charles E., Baltimore 
Remsberg, Harold A., Middletown 
Roche, B. Hamilton, Baltimore 
Rothc^eb, Russell G., Washington, D. C. 
SJeasman, Arthur R., Smithburg 
Weber, Wilhelm H.. Oakland 
Yates, Harry O., Abington, Pa. 



Anderson, Wilton A., Bristol, Tenn. 
Baker, John H., Winchester. Va. 
Bonis, George E., Mt. Washington 
Bromley, Walter D., Pocomoke 
Buckman. Horace D., Accotink, Va. 
Bull, Frederick L., Pocomoke 

♦Church, Carey F., College Park 
Cluff, Francis P., Pocomoke 
Dawson, Walker M., Silver Spring 
Dietz, George J., Baltimore 
Dorsett, Telfair B., Forestville 
England, Howard A., Rising Sxin 
Faber, John E., Washington, D. C. 
Heine, George R., Washington, D. C. 

♦Hevessy, Michael, Gloucester Point, Va 

♦Hohman, Charles W., West, W. Va. 

♦Hottel, John T., Bealeton. Va. 
Hough, John F., Mt. Rainier 

♦Lincoln, Leonard B., Takoma Park 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



♦Lowman, Clarence A., Funkstown 

McKeever, Galen W., Kensington 

♦Mitchell, William, Riverdale 

Myers, Victor S., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Nielson, Knute W., McLean, Va. 
♦Parlett, William A., College Park 

Pearce, Wilbur, Sparks 

Price, M. Myron, Queenstown 
♦Shoemaker, Charles, Bethesda 

Skirven, James F., Chestertown 

Sullivan. John F., Washington, D. C. 

Summerill, Richard L., Penn's Grove, Pa. 

Vivanco, Carlos D., Arequepa, Peru 

Walker, Dwight T., Mt. Airy 
♦Whiteford, Michael W., Whiteford 

Williams. Richard E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Wood, Ellsworth, Washington, D. C. 
♦Worthin^ton, Leland G., Hagerstown 

Zalesak, Emanuel F., Washington, D. C 



Abrams, George J., Washington, D. C. 

Ady, Albert A., Sharon 

Anderson, James H., Washington, D. C. 
♦Banfield, Frank W., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Barron, Edward M., Hyattsville 

Bauer, Paul E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Bonnett, Harold M., E. St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Brinsfield, C. Sedgewick, Cordova 

Buchheister, Gustav A., Leeland 

Bye, John M., Denton 
♦Carter, John H., Chilhowie, Va. 

Conklin, Charles W., Smithfield. Va. 
♦Crotty, Leo A., Utica, N. Y. 

Ditman, Lewis P., Westminster 

Downey, Mylo S., Williamsport 

Duvall, Archie E., Naylor 

Duvall, Peter W., Croom 

Endslow, Joseph S., Mt. Joy, Pa. 

Ensor, Lionel K., Sparks 

Evans, William H., Pocomoke 

Ganoza, Luis F., Tripillo, Peru 

Hartshorn, Robert H., Washington, D. C 

Hoopes, J. D., Bel Air 

Hubbard, Harry S., Cordova 

Hungerford, Vincent B., Marshall Hall 

Kelley, Thomas C, Washington, D. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

King, Eugene W., Branchville 

Lloyd, Harry E., Sparks 

Lupton, Helen A., Washington, D. C. 

Mankin, W. Douglas, Washington, D. C. 

Matthews, Malcolm G., Pocomoke 

McDowell, Charles J., Washington, D. C. 

McGlone, Joseph L., Baltimore 

♦Moffitt, William J., Beltsville 
Newcomer, L. E., Harper's Ferry, W. Va. 
Price, Kent S., Centreville 

*Reed, Emmons H., Denton 
Rice, Warren W., Sylmar 
Rippey, Aaron S., Chevy Chase, D. C. 

♦Ritter, Floyd V., Middletown, Va. 
Ronsaville, Edwin W., Kensington 
Smith, Paul W., Washington, D. C. i 

♦Stanley, Edward A., Bluefield, W. Va. 
Stokes, George C. A., Cockeysville 
Stoudt, Paul M., Hershey, Pa. 
Supplee, William C, Washington, D. C. 

♦Taylor, Letha E., Wilmington, N. C. 

♦Trower, Hugh C, Norfolk, Va. 
Walker, Earnest, Mt. Airy 
Whaley, Milton S., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, John K., Pylesville 
Worrilow, George, North East 



♦Denotes students detailed to the University by the Veteran's Bureau 

206 



TWO-YEAR 

♦Allen, Kenneth, Brandywine 

♦Beall, Morris, Mt. Rainier 

♦Boender, John A., Laurel 

♦Bollinger, Perry R., Reisterstown 

♦Bray, Walter C, Emporia, Va. 
Butts, Herbert R., Marydel 

♦Callis, Cecil R., Washington, D. C. 

♦Campbell, Thomas A., Lanham 

♦Casey, Charles, Wheeling, W. Va. 

♦Chassagne, Leo J., Highlandtown 

♦Cherry, Joseph C, Berwyn 
Clymer, Lee, Rawlings 
Coleman, Francis G., Baltimore 

♦Collins, George T., Roslyn, Va. 

♦Connors, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 

♦Conte, Marion V., Norfolk, Va. 

♦Crenshaw, John A., Clover, Va. 

♦Crews, Chas. W., St. Mary's City 

♦Crozier, Henry T., Ballston, Va. 

♦Dawson, James H., Falls Church, Va. 

♦Decker, Henry, Charleroi, Pa. 

♦Dennis, General E. H., Greenrich, Va. 

♦Dobbins, William E., College Park 

♦Dodson, William A., College Park 

♦Duke, John, Baltimore 

♦Ferguson, Walter M., Berwyn 

♦Fitzwater, Oscar, Moorefield, W. Va. 

♦Flannery, Michael J., College Park 



AGRICULTURE CLASS 

♦Fletcher, Raymond M., Berwyn 
♦Foote, Chester F., Washington, D. C. 
♦Ford, Eli H., Virgilina, Va. 
♦Forsyth, Lewis V., Berwyn 
♦Foster, Paul P., Berwyn 
♦Garrett, William N., Ballston, Va. 
♦Graves, Harvey C, Branchville 

Gray, Marshall C, Ironsides 
♦Grayson, Edley H., Columbia Station, Va. 
♦Griefu, John, College Park 
♦Grimm, Paul H., Trego 

♦Grosskurth, William F., Washington, D. C. 
♦Grove, Claude M., Winchester, Va. 
♦Guilday, Michael, College Park 
♦Harlan, James C, Baltimore 

Harry, Lawrence W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hamlin, Harry, Silver Spring 
♦Hearold, John W., Miskinon, Va. 
♦Heath, Frank M., Silver Spring 
♦Hedberg, Edwin L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hediger, Frank J., Wheeling, W. Va. 
♦Hicks, Harry W., Kernstown, Va. 
♦Horak, Anton, Brooke, Va. 
♦Johnson, Leo C, Falls Church, Va. 

Joyce, Fletcher S., Millersville 
♦Kelley, Frank J., Beltsville 
♦King, David, Monrovia 
♦Lample, Charles S., Baltimore 



207 



♦Leverage, Clarence J., Easton 
♦Lint, David L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Llewellyn, P. Carringto.i, Esmont. Va. 
•Lynn, Charles S., Livia, Ky. 
♦McAvoy, James R., New York City 
♦McCarthy, Harry L., Brookville 
♦McGarvey, John, College Park 
♦McLain, Charles L., Washington, D. C. 
♦McNabb, Charles G., Washington, D. C. 
♦Mantheiy, Felix, Colleg3 Park 
♦Martin, Virgil E., Atlanta, Ga. 
♦Mauzy, James L., Herman, W. Va. 
♦Mess, George B., Washington, D. C. 
Morsell, John B., Bowens 
♦Mortimer, Walter S., Neavitt 
♦Murphy, Thomas W., New Britain, Conn. 
' ♦Myers, John A., Tom's Brook, Va. 
♦Nace, Jesse J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Newberry, James R., Macon, Ga. 
♦Norris, Elmer A., Berwyn 
♦Ollerenshaw, James, Washington, D. C. 
♦O'Rourke, James H., Lorton, Va. 
•Osborne, Herman B., Baltimore 
♦Oswald, Louis H., Ballston. Va. 
♦Otter, John C, Raspeburg 
♦Parr, Herbert F., Washington, D. C. 
♦Persinger, Harry B., Berwyn 
♦Peirce, John R., Washington, D. C. 
•Poole, Harry C, Beltsville 
♦Poppen, Alvin W.. Toluca, Va. 
•Porter, Ward W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Potter. Albert R., Trappe 



♦Richards, Felix W.. Washington, D. C. 

♦Richards, Philip W., White Plains 
♦Richardson, Harry F., Berwyn 
♦Rodeheaver, Delbert C, Oakland 
♦Rowe, George, Brentwood 
♦Ryan, Bernard T., Washington, D. C. 
♦Ryon, Matthew G., Clement's P. O. 
•Schmedegaard, G. W., Washington, D. C. 

Schrider, Paul, Takoma Park 
♦Senne, Henry R., Accotink, Va. 
♦Simpich, Ira M., Landover 
♦Snyder, Jesse E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Sprinkle, Paul C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Stauffer, Charles A., Baltimore 

Stewart, Harry A., Rustburg, Va. 
♦S^rathman, George F., Baltimore 
♦Sullivan, Jeremiah J., Branchville 
♦Tait, George S., Fairfax, Va. 
•Thompson, Franklin, Baltimore 
•Tobin, William J., Washington, D. C. 
♦Vaughn, William J., Lotta, N. C. 

Vick, Clyde M., Baltimore 
♦Vigus, Edwin E., Deposit, N. Y. 
♦Walker, Francis M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Walker, Mitchell P., Birmingham. Ala. 
♦Wardles, William L, Anacostia, D. C. 
♦White, George A.. Winchester, Ind. 
♦Wiley, Benjamin H., Bittinger 
•Wilson, Aseal S., Phoenix 
•Woodward, Amos R., Woodbine 
•Wootten, John F., Berwyn 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Beall, Clarkson J., Morristown, N. J. 
Clark, Glen, Clarksville 
Coller, Jesse A., Snover. Michigan 
Grain, Robert, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Higgins, Warren F., Hyattsville 



Kemp, Leonard, Relay 
Marty, Ivan M., Roland Park 
Richardson, Edward M., Washinjiton, D.C. 
Ross, Marion A., Princess Anne 
Rowe, Taylor P., Fredericksburg, Va. 
Smith, Edward J., Riverdale 



WINTER SHORT COURSE IN DAIRYING 



Bayne. Edgar C, Washington, D. C. 
Bryant, Richard A., Belle Grove 
Flanigan, Allen L., Woodsboro 
Jones, M. Parton, Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
Kaufman, Edward L., Baltimore 



Linthicum, Walker S., Mt. Airy 
Martin, John A., Smithsburg 
Roller, Jared S., Woodstock 
Stevens, John H., Pocomoke City 
Swanson, Robert, Upper Marlboro 
Trittijoe. Ralph W., Ijamsville 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



SENIOR CLASS 



Ady, Elizabeth G., Sharon 
Barnes, Benjamin L., Princess Anne 
Besley, Arthur K., Baltimore 
Blandford. Mildred C, College Park 



Block, Albert, Laurel 
•Bosley, Lester W., Washington, D. C. 
Brewer, Charles M., College Park 
Burroughs, James E.. La Plata 



208 



Chappell, Kenneth B., Kensington 
Clagett, John F., Upper Marlboro 
Daskais, Morris H., Baltimore 
Downin, Lauran P., Hagerstown 
Ensor, Zita, Sparks 
Filbert, Edwin B., Baltimore 
Fitzgerald, Thomas H., Princess Anne 
Gifford, George E., Rising Sun 
Gordon, Isador, Riverdale 
Graves, Ernest A., Washington, D. C. 
Jones, William M., Chestertown 
Keene, Victor H., Snow Hill 
Kemp, Allen D., Frederick 
Lescure, William J., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Marker, Russell E., Hagerstown 
Mathias, Leonard G., Hagerstown 



JUNIOR 

Beers, Wilson C, Waterbury, Conn. 
♦Bragg, John H., Washington, D. C. 
Brewer, Virginia W., College Park 
Chase, Ralph H., Washington, D. C. 
Clay, Catherine L., College Park 
Darcy, George D., College Park 
Gambrill, Charles M., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Gemmill, William F., Baltimore 
Harned, Frank M., Merchantsville, N. J. 
Hedgecock, Leland M., Takoma Park 
Heidelbach, Henry R., Catonsville 
Hitchcock, Albert E., Washington, D. C. 
Holmes, Thomas J., Takoma Park 
House, Kingsley A., College Park 
Knotts, James T., Jr., Sudlersville 
Lesher, Dean S., Williamsport 
Lininger, Harry C, Westernport 



Mayers, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 
Moore, John F., Washington, D. C. 
Nisbet, Andrew N., Baltimore 
Porter, Robert G., Hyattsville 
Posey M. Winfield, La Plata 
Remsberg, Gerald G., Braddock Heights 
Reppert, Ruth I., Washington, D. C. 
Rissler, Raymond L., Washington, D. C. 
Shank, Hughes A., College Park 
♦Shepherd, Matson W., Berwyn 
Simmons, Lawrence D., Takoma Park 
Spence, Charlotte C, College Park 
Sturgis, William C, Snow Hill 
Thompson, Ruth A., Washington, D. C. 
Watkins, Robert M., Mt. Airy 
White, Charles E., College Park 

CLASS 

Luckey, George J., Trenton, N. J. 
Nemphos, Peter C, Baltimore 
Newland, Paul F., Bristol, Tenn. 
Reisinger, John C, Washington, D. C. 
Ruiz, Emilio, Arecibo, Porto Rico 
Shank, James O. C Smithsburg 
Suence, Virginia I., College Park 
Swank, James L., Elk Lick, Pa. 
Swartzwelder, W. R., Mercersburg, Pa. 
Wack, Frederick V., Point Pleasant, N. J. 
Walsh, Humphrey M., Washington, D. C. 
Walter, Henry M., Washington, D. C. 
Wardwell, Aubrey S., Washington, D. C. 
Warrenfeltz, Mary S., Hagerstown 
White. John I., Washington. D. C. 
Zepp, Willard E.. Clarksville 



Atkinson, Rollins J., Frederick 
Berger, William A., Bloomfield, N. J. 
Binkley, Walter C, State Line, Pa. 
Blandy, Thelma, Helena, Mont. 
Bowen, George C, Hyattsville 
Burger, Joseph C, Washington, D. C. 
Campbell, Bennett K., Baltimore 
Cannon, James H., Hyattsville 
Chasser, Rudolph R., Homestead, Pa. 
Clapp, Houghton C, Washir ?ton, D. C. 
Clarke, Anna P., Hyattsville 
Coe, Grace, Berlin 
Cook, Robert, Lanham 
Daugherty, Walter E., Washington, D. C. 
Demio, Alexander W., New Kensington, Pa 
Dorsey, Anna H. E., Ellicott City 
Dougall, James L., Garrett Park 
Duke, Henry A., Durham, N. C. 
Flanagan, Virginia M., McKiesport, Pa. 
Flenner, Martha E., Glen Mills, Pa. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Ford, Edwin L., Washington, D. C. 
Froelich. Wilfred L., Crisfield 
Gambale, Francis J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Greager, Oswald H., New York City 
Haywood, John H., Washington, D. C. 
Hill, Minnie M., Washington, D. C. 
Horn, Millard J., Washington, D. C. 
Hubbard, James H., Cordova 
Jones. Joseph W., Washington. D. C. 
Juska. Edward F.. Elberon. N. J. 
Keane, John P., Sandy Hook, Conn. 
Kwik, Pock H., Djocdijakarta, Java 
Lankford, J. Miles, Pocomoke 
Lewton, Myrtle H., Takoma Park 
Littman, Isaac, College Park 
Longridge, Joseph C, Barton 
McClung, Marvin R., Norrisville 
McDonald, C. Kingsley, Barton 
Mace, John, Jr., Cambridge 
Macko, Joseph A., Homestead, Pa. 



209 



Marden, Tilghman B., Annapolis 
Marshall, Housden L., Washington, D. C. 
Massicott, Marie M., Columbus, Ga. 
Merrill, William H., Pocomoke 
Myers, Brayton O., Washington, D. C. 
Nash, Mabel M., Berwyn 
Nichols, Marshall H., Clarksville 
Padlibsky, Solomon H., Charleston, W. Va. 
Parks, Leston C, Bristol, Tenn. 
Peake, Clarence W., Aberdeen 
Peebles, Irvin, Lonaconing 
Phillips, Gerald S., Hagerstown 
Powers, Selwyn L., Hyattsville 
Pugh, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Rutter, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Ryon, Allison F., Waldorf 
Schmidt, George H., Baltimore 
Schotta, Victor T., Oellc 



♦Scott, Edward A., Bristol, Tenn. 
Scott, Fred S., Galax, Va. 
Scott, William M., Princess Anne 
Singer, Jacob J., Baltimore 
Smith, George H., Taft, Va. 
Stambaugh, Bruce T., Woodsboro 
Stewart, Charles K., Hillsboro 
Tan, Felix H., Buitenzorg, Java 
Tan, Joseph H., Fukien, China 
Taylor, Donald S., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Taylor, Ritchie P., Washington, D. C. 
Werner, Sidney E., Baltimore 
Wheaton, Isaac E., Greenwich, N. J. 
White, Russell B., Kittanning, Pa. 
Wickard, Walter L., McKeesport, Pa. 
Wilson, N. John, Frederick 
Wohlreich, Joseph J., Newark, N. J. 
Wollak, Theodore M., Baltimore 



FRESHMAN 

Abrecht, George F., Frederick 
Armstrong, Wiliam P., Chestertown 
Baber, Richard H., Riverdale 
♦Bauer, Joseph, Blackstone, Va. \ 

Beatty, William P., Long Branch, N. J. 
Black, James W., Cecilton 
Blackistone, Robert D., Jr., Palmer's 
Bogley, Preston P., Washington, D. C. 
Bounds, James A,, Sharptown 
Bounds, James H., Salisbury 
Brightman, Carl G., Jr., Baltimore 
Brocato, Charles V., Baltimore 
Browne, Tom A., Chev,- Chase 
Carter, Calvin J., Catonsville 
Chappius, Maurice K., Washington, D. C. 
Christmas, Edward A, Upper Marlboro 
Clark, Alfred H., Washington, D. C. 
Clement, Eugenia W., Washington, D. C. 
Cohen, Alexander, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Comer, Walter R., Frederick 
Cowan, William C, Roslyn 
Crowther, Aloha H., Laurel 
Banner, Edward G., Unionville 
Deibert, Elmore R., Elkton 
Dement, Paul E., Branchville 
Dent, Wade, Clinton 
Dent, T. Hatch, Oakley 
Dow, Scott H., Newburyport, Mass. 
Ennis, John, Pocomoke 
Evans, Edward T., Cumberland 
Evans, George W., Pocomoke 
Fisher, Irwin H., Baltimore 
Fleming, Christian M., Baltimore 
Fogg, George W., Bangor, Me. 
Gary, Edward T., Washington, D. C. 
Gillespie, Victor P., Sudlersville 
Green, Harry J., Baltimore 



CLASS 

Greenfield, C. Myron, Takoma Park 

Gundry, Jesse K., Catonsville 

Hall, Irving, Chevy Chase 

Hawkshaw, John W., Hyattsville 

Heber, Carl H., Cumberland 

Hernblom, Theodore E., Olean, N. Y. 

Herzog, Frederick C, Washington, D. C. 

Hirst, Edwin D., Cambridge 

Holmes, George K., Washington, D. C. 

Hopwood, Mason H., Washington, D. C. 

Huffington, Paul E., Allen 

Kaufman, Edward L., Baltimore 

Kaufman, Max, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kay, George F., Elk Mills 

Langer, Clayton W., Washington, D. C. 

Lanigan, John R., Washington, D. C. 

Leginus, Peter G., Wyoming, Pa. 

Leithiser, Eldon F., Havre de Grace 

Lohse, Edward M., Washington, D. C. 

Longyear, Edward B., Poplar Hill 

McQuain, James, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Marriott, Paul M., Cumberland 

Mason, John E., Newark 

Matsumura, Junichi, Mari, Hawaii 

Meloy, William C, Washington, D. C. 

Men dels, Joel, Baltimore 

Merrick, Charles H., Barclay 

Miller, Clarence L., Baltimore 

Miller, Lewis A., Hagerstown 

Moretti, John J., Newark, N. J. 

Ninas, George A., Gaithersburg 

O'Neil, Catherine A., Bladensburg 

Osborn, A. Downey, Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Osborn, Samuel S., Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Parsons, Arthur C, Ormsby, Pa. 

Pear, Henry R., Baltir'.ore 

Pearce, Clyde A., Ocean Grove, N. J. 



210 



Pfeiflfer, Karl G., Washington, D. C. 

Porton, Harry P., Washington, D. C. 

Pyles, Joseph T., Frederick 

Ray, John J., Waterbury, Conn. 

Reading, Hugh D., Rockville 

Rice, John E., Frederick 

Richardson, Louise, Washington, D. C. 

Rogers, Annabell, Hyattsville 

Ryon, William A., Washington, D. C. 

Schaefer, Herbert S., Riverdale 

Scott, William R., Wytheville, Va. 
Shipley, Ernest H., Frederick 
Silver, Abraham, New Haven, Conn. 
Somerville. Duncan S., Cumberland 
Spence, Mary, College Park 
Spinney, Archie B., Baltimore 
Staley, Ira M., Knoxville 
Stein, Joseph M., Camden, N. J. 



Stoner, Kenneth G., Hagerstown 
Strite, John H., Clear Spring 
Sumner, Howard C, Washington, D. C 
Taylor, Thelma I., Washington, D. C. 
Troxell, Walter H., Northampton, Pa. 
Truesdell, Philip B., Waupaca. Wis. 
Wallace, Sarah O., Landover 
Waters, Douglas G., Germantown 

Whaley, Mildred C, Washington, D. C 

Whelpley, Louisa R., Riverdale 

Whiteford, William H.. Baltimore 

Wilson, Nathan J., Waterbury, Conn. 

Wilton, E. Craig, Washington, D. C. 

Winkjer, Thelma H., Washington, D. C. 

Wishnefsky, Jacob, Paterson, N. J. 

Wolf, John M., Washington, D. C. 

Wright, Nadia V., Washington, D. C. 

Young, Dorothy O., Washington, D. C. 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Bohannon, William T., Baltimore 
Branner, Claude E., Pocomoke 
Clay, Lucy, College Park 
Coney, William, Jr., Roland Park 
Crisp, Edwin S., Washington, D. C. 
Crooks, William S., Baltimore 



Henderson, George W., Washington. D. C 

House, Hugh O., College Park 

MacDougall, Alan F., Merchantville. N. J. 

Malone, Ruth F., College Park 

Moss, W. Wade, Baltimore 

Schott, Loren F., Washington, D. C. 



Extension Courses in Commerce 



SENIOR CLASS (Day) 
Bodin. A. J.. Baltimore ^ Edmeades, William T., Jr.. Baltimore 

Cummons, Owen D.. Batimore Hughes, Earle R.. Baltimore 

JUNIOR CLASS (Day) 



Bell, Wylie K., Baltimore 

Bressler, David R., Baltimore ; 

Darsch. Earl Philip, Baltimore '■ 

Goodwin, Leon F., Baltimore | 

Gray, Arthur W., Baltimore i 

Kennedy, John M., Baltimore 

King, Howell A., Baltimore 

SOPHOMORE 

Bradfield, Norris, Baltimore 
Bridges, Thomas F., Baltimore 
Buckey, Charles G., Frederick 
Canton, W. L., Baltimore 
DiPaula, Joseph S., Baltimore 
Goldberg, Samuel Robert. Baltimore 
Hosen. Eli, Baltimore 
Jones. Norman M., Baltimore 



Liles. Robert S., Baltimore 
Lynch. Robert S.. Baltimore 
Schooler, Benjamin H., Catonsville 
Silverstein, Jack, Baltimore 
Stunz, Robert Edward, Lansdowne 
Sullivan, Joseph L., Baltimore 
White, Porter T., Baltimore 

CLASS (Day) 

Kelley, William B., Baltimore 
McClyment, W. Herbert, Baltimore 
Odendhal, Sebastien, Jr.. Baltimore 
Robinson, J. O., Baltimore 
Robinson. M. A., Baltimore 
Sheats, A. James, Baltimore 
Smith, Nathan. Baltimore 
Strouse, Howard S., Baltimore 
Sullivan, D. Bradley, Baltimore 



211 



Beyer. Herbert G.. Baltimore 
Clemens, Theodore R., Baltimore 
Feldman, Max, Baltimore 
Gould, Helen, Baltimore 
Hobson, William C, Baltimore 
Holmslykke. Christian, Baltimore 
Jones, Norman Lee, Baltimore 
Krantz, John C, Jr., Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS (Day) 



Masters. Julian J., Baltimore 
Ralston, Frank J., Baltimore 
Robinson, Russell C, Baltimore 
Stein, Leon W.. Baltimore 
Thomas. L. G., Baltimore 
Weisman. Benjamin, Baltimore 
Whitehurst, Francis DeP., Baltimore 
Wilner, Maurice A., Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS (Evening) 



Extension Courses in Commerce 

GRADUATE STUDENT (Evening) 
Bolstler, Eugene, Baltimore, Md. 



SENIOR 

Davis. Clarence E.. Washington. D. C. 
Euchtman, Joseph, Baltimore 
Fagan, Jacob B., Baltimore 
Garmer, J. Harry, Baltimore 
Jackson, Howard E., Baltimore 
Johnson. George E., Washington, D. C. 
Keller, Frank R., Washington, D. C. 



CLASS (Evening) 

Knabe, Lloyd C, Baltimore 

Koch, Catharine M.. Baltimore 

Miller, Elizabeth, Baltimore 

Needalman, Hyman, Baltimore 

Schwarz, H. A., Baltimore 

Sydow, Charles B., Washington, D C 

Worley, Joseph F.. Washington, D. C 



JUNIOR CLASS (Evening) 
Abramson, Hyman. Baltimore Gilbert, Q. E.. Baltimore 

Clemens. M. A., Baltimore T pv,n=«« wn- 

i^evinson, William G., Baltimore 



I 



Albrecht, W. T., Baltimore 

Appel, Louis C, Baltimore 

Baddock, Herman V., Baltimore 

Bishop, Mark Z., Baltimore 

Chayt, Leon, Baltimore 

Cohen, Max, Baltimore 

Dauer, William F., Baltimore 

Davis, Ben, Baltimore 

Dawson. C. Everett, Baltimore 

Elton, George R., Baltimore 
Friedman, Nathan I., Baltimore 
Wheeler, Gleichman R., Baltimore 
GrifRn, James A., Baltimore 
Heinmijler, Paul, Baltimore 
Hlavin. J. A., Baltimore 
Kramer, W. H., Baltimore 
Loppe, Cornelius A., Baltimore 
Lindsay, George E., Baltimore 
Lesnar, Maurice, Baltimore 
McBride, Charles L., Baltimore 
McCahan, Robert S., Linthicum Heights 
McKewen, John L., Baltimore 
Madigan, Margaret M., Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS (Evening) 



Mallet, Victor J., Baltimore 
Manekin, Leonard, Baltimore 
Milener, Eugene D., Jr.. Baltimore 
Miller, Harry, Baltimore 
Monoker, Harry, Baltimore 
Nemphos, P. Charles. Baltimore 
Neumann. Herbert E.. Baltimore 
Pullen. Frank H.. Baltimore 
Rapperport. Albert A., Baltimore 
Rowles, L. B., Baltimore 
Sanford, Vernon E., Baltimore 
Schindler, Nathan, Baltimore 
Schmidt. Oswald, Baltimore 
Shevitz, Max S., Baltimore 
Sindall, J. Wesley, Baltimore 
Snyder, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Stange, Arbutus, Baltimore 
Stigile, Cecil M., Baltimore 
Tharle, Herbert D., Baltimore 
Vaeth, James E., Baltimore 
von Briesen, Roy, Baltimore 
Williams, Nat, Baltimore 
Wright, Millard Fillmore. Baltimore 






Andriekas, Clement. Baltimore 
Armstrong, J. El wood. Jr., Baltimore 
Austin, Frank A., Baltimore 
Baldwin, Eu?ene F., Baltimore 
Benesch, Isadore, Baltimore 
Berlin, Herbert, Baltimore 
Bernstein, Robert, Baltimore 
Bosch, Harry, Baltimore 
Bucher, David, Upperco 
Busch, Alfred D., Baltimore 
Byrd, William Earl, Baltimore 
Byrnes, Bernard J.. Baltimore 
Campbell, Donald R., Baltimore 
Chenowith, Elmer E., Baltimore 
Cohen, S". J., Baltimore 
Coleman, Samuel A.. Dundalk 
Collins, Owen L., Baltimore 
Conley, Alonzo J., Baltimore 
Crosby, Wilbur C, Baltimore 
Darsch, G. M,, Baltimore 
Dent, Benjamin B., Baltimore 
Dent, Richard D., Baltimore 
Diehl, George C, Jr., Baltimore 
Diver, Grant, Baltimore 
Diver, John H., Baltimore 
Donoway, Harry S., Baltimore 
Eckhardt, F. S., Glyndon, Md. 
Eichert, Bruno. Baltimore 
Elliott, William J., Baltimore 
Eskridge, Ira E,, Baltimore 
Fairall, John T., Baltimore 
Farber, Ellis R., Baltimore 
Farbman, Joseph L., Baltimore 
Finifter, Joseph, Baltimore 
Frick, Frederick M. W., Baltimore 
Friedmann, Alan, Baltimore 
Funk. James M.. Baltimore 
Gately. Frank Bernard, Jr., Baltimore 
Geraghty, James J. A., Baltimore 
Ginsberg, Alexander, Baltimore 
Goldenberg, Jack, Baltimore 
Goldman, Rose, Baltimore 
Goncharsky, Isidore H,, Baltimore 
Greenfield, J. Chas., Annapolis 
Gutberlet, Irvin W., Baltimore 



Harant, John J., Baltimore 
Harrington, G. Shepard, Baltimore 
Hart. Kirke M., Baltimore 
Kaminsky. Oscar R., Baltimore 
Kaspar, Charles J.. Baltimore 
Kramer, Louis Benjamin, Baltimore 
Landrus, Frederick C, Baltimore 
Larson, Oscar Theodore, Baltimore 
Lattier, George Frederick, Baltimore 
Levitt, Maurice M., Baltimore 
Lewis, Herman M., Baltimore 
McCusky, Eleanor, Baltimore 
McDonald, Thomas Francis, Baltimore 
Manfuso, J. G., Baltimore 
Meijer, Jacob H., Baltimore 
Millison, G. Harry, Baltimore 
Moan, Chas. S., Baltimore 
Moshkevich, Leon, Baltimore 
Naegele, Joseph A., Baltimore 
Norris, George W.. Baltimore 
Otto, Charles W., Baltimore 
Payant, W. Wallace, Baltimore 

Pickus, Morris, Baltimore 
Porter, Kenneth, Baltimore 

Prodoehl, Emile H., Baltimore 
Ripple, Walter W., Linthicum Heights 

Rothaus, Julius, Baltimore 

Rothbaum, Daniel, Baltimore 

Rubenstein. Sidney S., Baltimore 

Schapiro, Harry Bernard, Baltimore 

Seidel, Morris, Baltimore 

Seim, William, Baltimore 

Shipley, Samuel K., Baltimore 

Smith, Albert E., Baltimore 

Smith, Walter K., Baltimore 

Stutman, William, Baltimore 

Taylor, Louis T., Baltimore 

Thau, Oscar F., Baltimore 

Trageser, C. A.. Baltimore 

Walton, William Ramsey, Jr., Baltimore 

Weber, Gerald M., Baltimore 

Weitzman, Theo., Baltimore 

Winand, William T., Baltimore 

Wright, Edwin Q., Baltimore 

Yates, James Roger, Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED (Evening) 



212 



Alperstein, Samuel L., Baltimore 
Anderson, Marvin A., Gambrills, Md. 
Andrews, Charles E., Baltimore 
Baer, Blankard F., Raspeburg, Md. 
Baker, Atta M., Baltimore 
Baker, Frank M., Jr.. Baltimore 
Baker, Henry S., Baltimore 
Baker, Morris, Baltimore 
Baldwin, Dorothy M., Baltimore 



Barnickol, Frank G., Baltimore 
Behler, William H., Baltimore 
Benson, James L., Baltimore 
Blair, Henry D., Baltimore 
Blight, Howard N., Baltimore 
Blumenfeld, Irvin, Baltimore 
Booth, Lawrence R.. Baltimore 
Bond, Virginia C, Cockeysville 
Bosz, Adam. Baltimore 



213 



Brady, Norman C, Baltimore 
Bremer, Henry F., Jr., Baltimore 
Brooks, William E., PikesvUle 
Brown, L. W., Jr.. Baltimore 
Calwell, Walter S.. Baltimore 
Caplan, Howard, Baltimore 
Carroll, James C. Baltimore 
Carstens, G. W., Jr.. Baltimore 
Carter, Joseph L., Glen Burnie 
Carter, Norra V., Baltimore 
Cassen, John S., Towson 
Chernak, Anna, Baltimore 
Clemson, W. B., Baltimore 
Cline, Elizabeth T., Baltimore 
Cohen, Anna, Baltimore 
Cole, Anna. Baltimore 
Collins. Margaret A.. Baltimore 
Connelly. Helen K., Baltimore 
Cook, Chas. H., Baltimore 
Corey, John N., Baltimore 
Corbin, Clinton W., Baltimore 
Dackhorn, William C, Baltimore 
deLauder. Thomas A.. Baltimore 
Deussen. Henry, Baltimore 
Donlan, Lullus I., Baltimore 
Dudley, Katherine, Baltimore 
Duitscher, Hannah, Baltimore 
Eichelberger. F. S.. Glen Burnie 
Emrich, William F., Baltimore 
Engle, Kenneth, Baltimore 
Faimann, Amos V., Baltimore 
Fedder, William C, Baltimore 
Feldman, Charles A., Baltimore 
Feldman, Reba B., Baltimore 
Foard, J. Stanley, Baltimore 
Fort, Wetherber, Baltimore 
Fox, Lilian L., Baltimore 
Gable, Clara L., Baltimore 
Gerber, David. Baltimore 
Gilman, Miriam, Baltimore 
Ginsburg, Herman R., Batimore 
Gischel, Anna K., Baltimore 
Glantz, Irving P., Baltimore 
Goldstein, Dr. Albert E., Baltimore 
Goldstein, Elsie M., Baltimore 
Goldstein, Herman, Baltimore 
Goldstein, Lina, Baltimore 
Gore, Nellie B., Baltimore 
Gore, S. Marie, Baltimore 
Gouline,' Jeanne B., Baltimore 
Griffith, R. S.. Baltimore 
Griffith, S., Baltimore 
Grinnalds, Jefferson C, Baltimore 
Grossman. Gertrude M., Baltimore 
Hankin, David. Baltimore 
Hargett, A. E.. Baltimore 
Hartz, R. S. B.. Baltimore 



Hayes, Howard V., Baltimore 
Hendrix, Ernest C. Baltimore 
Herzog. Louis J.. Baltimore 
Hopkins, T. C. Edgewater 
Hillegeist. Carl E., Baltimore 
Hoff. Albert J.. Baltimore 
Hoffman, Frederica, Baltimore 
Hoffman, Mrs. Ida, Baltimore 
Honemann, H. L.. Baltimore 
Hoot, D. A., Baltimore 
Hopkins, R. Milton, Baltimore 
House, Harold N., Baltimore 
Hubka, Josephine E., Baltimore 
Hughes, Ethel M., Baltimore 
Hughes, Mildred, Baltimore 
Hulbert, Mrs. Victoria C. Baltimore 
Hutchinson. George R., Baltimore 
Ireland, Richard H., Baltimore 
Jacobs, Benedict W.. Baltimore 
Jacobs, Lillian J., Baltimore 
Johnson, Victor H., Baltimore 
Joyce, Katherine J., Baltimore 
Jurgens, Howard, Baltimore 
Katz, Hilda V. L., Baltimore 
Kearney, James, Baltimore 
Kenny. James W., Baltimore 
Kleim. C. E.. Ruxton 
Knipp. Charles R., Baltimore 
Knopfler. Adam O.. Baltimore 
Knopfler. Richard H., Baltimore 
Kraft, M. Loretta, Baltimore 
Kraus. Elsa B., Baltimore 
Kriel, Christian C, Baltimore 
Lacrosse, Leopold L., Baltimore 
Langenfelder, Henry J.. Baltimore 
Langrall, Herbert L., Baltimore 
Lauer, Joseph B., Baltimore 
Lawson, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Layman, Florence, Baltimore 
Lazinsky, Joseph W., Baltimore 
League, Norma E., Baltimore 
Leister, E. Morgan, Baltimore 
Leu^chner, Anna, Baltimore 
Lewis, Charles W., Baltimore 
Lewis, H. A.. Baltimore 
Lewis. Richard A., Towson 
Lockard, Ralph. Baltimore 
McAfee, Carey N.. Baltimore 
McCallip, Carrington A., Baltimore 
McClintock, Cora A., Baltimore 
McCuIlough, Mary M., Baltimore 
MacPherson, Helen, Baltimore 
Maconachy. E. Marion. Baltimore 
Magers, H. B., Baltimore 
Martin. Bertha E.. Hampstead 
Mahool. Katherine A.. Baltimore 
Menkel, Edith. Baltimore 



214 






( 



Merriam, Russell W., Baltimore 
Meyer, Ehlaudt A., Baltimore 
Miller, David, Baltimore 
Miller, T. Denton, Jr., Baltimore 
Minder, Helene, Baltimore 
Nittler, Frances, Baltimore 
Montgomery, Regina C, Baltimore 
Morgan, Chas. A. J., Baltimore 
Morris, Ernest F., Baltimore 
Muehlhause, William, Baltimore 
Mulford, Harry S.. Baltimore 
Naylor. Lewis V.. Baltimore 
Neumann. Rev. H.. FuUerton 
Nicolls. Robert, Owings Mills 
Oliver, Marion, Baltimore 
O'Rourke, Andrew J., Roslyn 
Palees, Wolf, Baltimore 
Parr, Katharine B., Baltimore 
Peddicord. Kenneth L.. Baltimore 
Penniman. Geo. D.. Stevenson 
Phillips. H. C. Baltimore 
Pooler. Blanche F.. Baltimore 
Pope, Henry F., Baltimore 
Powell, Gilbert S., Baltimore 
Pritzker, William, Baltimore 
Quarangesser, Edward J., Baltimore 
Randel. Alma L.. Baltimore 
Rauck. William A.. Baltimore 
Reaney. Howard A.. Ruxton 
Reed, Dorsey M.. Baltimore 
Rice, Emory C, Baltimore 
Richardson, Margaret, Baltimore 
Ritter, Elbert F., Baltimore 
Robinson, J. P., Baltimore 
Rochen, Louise, Reisterstown 
Rosch, Anna. Baltimore 
Rosenblum. Isador F.. Baltimore 
Rosenstock. Ezra. Baltimore 
Ruane, Loretta, Baltimore 
Russ, John J., Baltimore 
Russell, Nina M., Baltimore 
Sacks, William L., Baltimore 
Salan, Sol C, Baltimore 

Sands, Walter, Baltimore 

Scalley, Jessie C, Baltimore 

Scarborough, Vernon, Baltimore 

Schall, August, Baltimore 

Schall, Paul, Jr., Baltimore 

Schmidt, Carl P., Baltimore 

Schmidt, Frank, Baltimore 

Schneider, Frederick L., Baltimore 

Schrager, William K., Halethorpe 

Schreiber, John A., Baltimore 

Schultz. Dorothy N., Mt. Washinsrton 



Schuppner. William G., Baltimore 
Segall, Helen. Baltimore 
Seliterman, Isidor. Baltimore 
Shackelford, Arnold E., Baltimore 
Shaw, Miriam W., Baltimore 
Sheely, Harry M., Baltimore 
Shipley, Gloria, Baltimore 
Sickel, J. F- Cooper, Baltimore 
Smith, Charles A., Baltimore 
Smith, James R., Baltimore 
Smrcina, James F., Jr., Baltimore 
Snyder. Mattie. Baltimore 
Spence. Lydia E., Baltimore 
Spielmann, Otto, Baltimore 
Stange, Evelyn L., Baltimore 
Stein, David, Baltimore 
Stoll, Joseph M.. Baltimore 
Street. Leo J.. Baltimore 
Stulman. Fannie E.. Baltimore 
Swartz. Richard P., Baltimore 
Sweeney, Dennis J.. Baltimore 
S'weeney, Madeline, Baltimore 
Tarshish, Allan, Baltimore 
Teipe, Emma M., Halethorpe 
Terlitzky, Bessie, Baltimore 
Thomas, Joseph H., Baltimore 
Thompson, William E., Jr., Baltimore 
Tilghman. William D,. Jr.. Elkridge 
Trott, Ida M.. Baltimore 
Tucker. John H.. Baltimore 
Tuecker. Gertrude E.. Baltimore 
Wagner, Julian T., Baltimore 
Walters, A. P.. Baltimore 
Wannen, C. L., Baltimore 
Wanner. Marie E.. Baltimore 
Watts. B. Rutherford, Baltimore 
Weaver, Elizabeth S.. Baltimore 
Weaver. J. Allen. Baltimore 
Weis. Mrs. Fred. Baltimore 
Wellmore, Grace L.. Baltimore 
Wertheim, Sadie. Baltimore 
Wheeler. Pauline. Baltimore 
Wheeler. Pearl E., Baltimore 
White, Irving C, Baltimore 
Whitmore, B. L., Baltimore 
Wilson. Beulah, Baltimore 
Wimmer. John Ernest, Baltimore 
Wissel, William F.. Baltimore 
Witham. James M.. Baltimore 
Yates. R. Hood. Baltimore 
Zeiler. Van Iden. Baltimore 
Zeller, Ruth. Baltimore 
Zentz, Earl, Baltimore 



215 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

SENIOR CLASS 



Adair, William V., Grafton, W. Va. 
Amenta, Lawrence J., North East, Pa. 
Ashby, John L., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Belts, Allan R., Morris Plains, N. J. 
Brenner, Morris, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brickner, Lottie, Bronx, N. Y. 
Brown, Louis L., Ellicott City 
Childers, Ellsworth W., Salem, W. Va. 
Cook, James R., Frostburg 
Coward, Charles C, Cheraw, S. C. 
Crowley, William H., Troy, N. Y. 
Cummings, Edwin S., Newark, N. J. 
Davenport, Joseph M., Thomas, W. Va. 
Davidson, Lewis C, Lewisburg, W. Va. 
Gibbins, Edward B., Newark, N. J. 
Givens, Robert I., Sinking Creek, Va. 
Goldstein, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Goomrigian, Leon H., Summit, N. J. 
Hoff. Joseph H., Wellsville, Pa. 
Hogan, Jesse D., Mt. Airy, N. C 
Jones, James A., Altoona, Pa. 
Karn, George C, Jefferson 
Kayne, Louis E., Baltimore 
Kiser, William R., Keyser, W. Va. 



Landry, H. G., Montreal, Can. 

McCarthy, Harry B., Swanton, Vt. 

Medearis, William F., Winston-Salem, NC. 

Mortenson, Peter M., Perth Amboy, N. J 
. Munoz, Cristino, Jr., Juana Diaz, P. R. 
! Nesbitt, Harry R., Baltimore 

Nimocks, Henry S., Fayetteville, N. C. 

Perry, Elmer A., Warwick, N. Y. 

Prather, E., Burnt House, W. Va. 

Pressly, William A., Jr., Rock Hill, S. C. 

Richards, Vernon W., Wardtown, Va. 

Richmond, Silman L., Hinton, W. Va. 

Rider, Charles A., Benwood, W. Va. 

Schmalenbach, Herbert, Baltimore 

Schwartz, Max, Jersey City, N. J. 

Shaak, Walter D., Kearny, N. J. 

Sheppe, Alfred H., Frenchton, W. Va. 

Silberman, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 

Thaman, William C, Baltimore 

Walsh, Walter T., Moriah Center, N. Y. 

Wasserberg, Irving, New York City 

Whitehead, Alvin P., Morehead City, N. C. 

Yates, Frank F., Grafton, W. Va. 

Young, George W., Rutherford Heights, Pa. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Adkins, Lester C, Parsonsburg 
Bauder, John F., Newark, N. J. 
Bazinet, W. J., Jr., Webster, Mass. 
Begg, John F., Waterbury, Conn. 
Boatman, W. W., Orting, Wash. 
Bradshaw, John P., Burkeville, Va. 
Casey, John A., Wilmington, Del. 
Chimachoff, Nathan T., Newark, N. J. 
Christian, W. P., Pedro Miguel, Canal Zone 
Corcoran, Donald M., New London, Conn. 
DeVita, Anthony L., Livingston, N. J. 
Fernandez, Julio M., Aguadilla, P. R. 
Fitzgerald, George E., Chembusco, N. Y. 
Gibbins, Clifford H., Newark, N. J. 
Goble, R. C, Paterson, N. J. 
Grempler, Karl F., Baltimore 
Hayes, Francis I., Waterbury, Conn. 
Hogle, W. Mason, So. Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Hurst, Orville, Clayton, Wilsonburg, W.Va. 
Jerdon, E. J., North Adams, Mass. 
Kearfott, Joseph G., Shipman, Va. 
Kelley, Harry H., Plattsburg. N. Y. 



McCutcheon, Robert B., Newark, N. J. 
Miller, Wilson L., Cape May, N. J. 
Moran, Michael E., Manchester, N. H. 
Nigaglioni, Julio R., Yauco, Porto Rico 
Racicot, George J., Webster, Mass. 
Rice, Ray E., Seven Stars, Pa. 
Rutrough, Bruce W., Roanoke, Va. 
Sherrard, Vernon F., Presque Isle, Me. 
Short, Joseph R., Lexington, W. Va. 
Sickles, WiUiam V.. Troy, N. Y. 
Smith, Max, Baltimore 
Styers, Edward J., Baltimore 
Swing, James P., Jr., Ridgely 
Thacker, Paul S., Franklin, W. Va. 
Thomas, Carl L., Danville, Va. 
Thorn, Allan H., Newark, N. J. 
Tressler, Roland A., Baltimore 
Trettin, Clarence, Baltimore 
Vazquez, J. A., Ponce, P. R. 
Whitehead, John W., Morehead City, N. C. 
Wilson, Harry Davis, Baltimore 
Woodard, Charles F., Black Mountain, N.C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abramson, Leonard, Bayonne, N. J. 
Basehoar, Clyde E., Littlestown, Pa. 
Baum, Theodore A., Baltimore 
Beard, John H., York, Pa. 



Benazzi, Bomeda B., Danville, Va. 
Benick, Carroll R., Baltimore 
Bishop, Charles B., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Blaisdell, Virgil, Sullivan, Me. 









216 



Bridger, R. H., Lewiston, N. C. 
Brigadier. Leonard R., Bayonne, N. J. 
Brightfield, Lloyd C, Baltimore 
Brown, Bruce D.. Greenbank, W. Va. 
Browning, Balthis A.. Baltimore 
Buchness, Joseph V.. Baltimore 
Burt, Joseph F., Williamstown, W. Va. 
Cahill, Thos. J.. Smithton, W. Va. 
Campbell, Samuel L., Charlestown. W. Va. 
Capo, Enrique, Ponce, P. R. 
Chase, Herman, Newark, N. J. 
Chewning, Carroll W., Orange, Va. 
Cohen, Meyer H., Carbondale, Pa. 
Cronauer, F. A., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Dixon, Charles M.. Jr., Frederick 
Doble, Howard R., Presque Isle, Me. 
Dolan, Joseph K., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fisher, Jacob D., Hampton, Va. 
Garrett, Charles R., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Goldstein, Harry, Baltimore 
Greenwald, Louis E., Passaic, N. J. 
Hall, Howard V., Westfield, N. J. 
Hart, William I.. Jr.. Johnson City, Tenn. 
Higby, Clifford C, Newark, N. J. 
Hinrichs. Ernest H., Baltimore 
Hitchcock, L. N., Taneytown 
Hoover, Samuel H.. Sparrows Point 
Ingram, William A., Cheraw, S. C. 
Keister, Walter L., Upper Tract. W. Va. 
Kerlejza, George J., New Britain, Conn. 
LaRoe, John E., Plainfield, N. J. 
LeFevre, Edward W., Newport News, Va. 
Levine, Milton, Bayonne, N. J. 
Lewis, Frank Lucas, Baltimore 
Loehwing, George H., Paterson, N. J. 



Lusardi, J., Rockaway, N. J. 
Lynch, Daniel F., Waterbury. Conn. 
McCormick. Richard E.. Springfield. Mass. 
McCrystle, Frank C, Minersville, Pa. 
McEvoy. George F.. Waterbury, Conn. 
Matney, William G., Looney, Va. 
Mercader, Miguel A., Mayaguez, P. R. 
Meyer, Oscar W., East Rutherford, N. J- 
Ortel, Linwood, Baltimore 
Phelps. Frederick W., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Phillips, George J.. Monk, Va. 
Polk, Charles J., Hartford, Conn. 
Powell, Albert C Adamston, W. Va.. 
Rieman, Barnett, Bayonne. N. J. 
Schaff, Fred L., Greencastle. Pa. 
Scholtes. Charles P.. Minersville, Pa. 
Shea. Edward W., Holyoke, Mass. 
Siegel, Arthur. Long Island, N. Y. 
Smith, Henry H., Adamston, W. Va. 
Stewart, William. Jr.. Wilmington, Del. 
Stoner, Edgar T., Hagerstown 
Taylor. Kenneth, Frostburg 
Teague, Henry N.. Martinsville, Va. 
Thomas. Cecil A., Newport News, Va. 
Towill, Robert B., Wake, Va. 
Ulanet, Louis. Newark, N. J. 
Van Auken, Ross D., New Brunswick, N. J. 
Viera, Providencia (Miss), Rio Piedras, 

Porto Rico 
Webb, Charles S., Bowling Green, Va. 
Wierciak, Paul A., Ludlow, Mass. 
Wademann, Elmer M., Keyser. W. Va. 
; Wilhelm, Paul, Whiteford 

Williams, Edgar R.. Inez, N. C. 
Willis, George A., Bel Air 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Akers. James Lee, Baltimore 
Badger, W. L., Baltimore 
Bailey, R. C Keyser, W. Va. 
Binns, E. V., Baltimore 
Biosca, Henry, Camaguey, Cuba 
Bell, B. R., Charlotte, N. C. 
Brown, C. S., Lick Creek. W. Va. 

Brown, W. D., Barnegat, N. J. 

Bulnick, Louis. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Caine, Louis P., Newark, N. J. 

Crespo, Demetrio, Cabo Rojo, Porto Rico 

Crickenberger, H. Hugh, White Sulphur 
Springs, W. Va. 

Davis, William R., East Orange, N. J. 

Degling, Harry H., East Orange, N. J. 

Deslandes, Leo E., Providence, R. I. 

Driscoll, Joseph, Ansonia, Conn. 

Dunphy, Albert F., Providence, R. I. 

Ellor, Arthur B.. Bloomfield, N. J. 
Farber, Arthur. Newark, N. J. 



Farley, Pipes tem, W. Va. 
Fiess, Paull, New Martinsville, W. Va. 
Gaskins. Harry C, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Geisler, George D., Brackenridge, Pa. 
Gregory, A. W., Webster Springs, W. Va. 
Hernandez, Carlos J., Manati, P. R. 
Jacobs, Benjamin J., Elizabeth. N. J. 

Johnson. Franklin J.. Waterbury, Conn. 

Joule. James. Kearny. N. J. 

Kaplon. Morton. Summit. N. J. 

Klock. James H., Orlando, Fla. 

Kozubski, Michael, Baltimore 

Lazzell, Charles B., Baltimore 

Levenson, Leon H.. Holyoke, Mass. 

Little, Maine. Darlington 

Lonergan. Robert C. New London, Conn. 

Long, Godfrey M., Lancaster, Pa. 

Lopatin, Samuel, New Haven, Conn. 

McAlexander, A., Orange, Va. 
McGann, James F.. Providence. R. I. 



217 



McGonigle. William I. L . Newark. N J 
McMullen. Charles A.. Mingo Junction. O. 
Marx, Joseph, Passaic, N. J. 
Mehring, Wilbur B., Taneytown. Md. 
Monk, David, Potchefstroom. Transvaal 

South Africa 
Nelson, Joseph T., Jr., Baltimore 
Newell, Ward M.. Stephens City. Va 
Oggesen, Walter L., New Haven, Conn. 
O'Hara. Thomas J., Connellsville, Pa 

Phreaner, Richard M.. Greencastle. Pa 

Pmsky. Benjamin, Baltimore 

Plaster, Hubert S., Winston-Salem, N C 

Quillen. Joseph E., Rehoboth. Delaware 

Raciborski A. J.. Indian Orchard, Mass. 

Rauch, Albm W., Newark, N. J. 

Rice. Theron. Cameron, N. C. 

Richmond. C. W.. Coatesville, Pa 

Rohrabaugh. Walter E.. Belington. W. Va 

St. Marie. Gerald. Holyoke. Mass. 

Sammarcelli. Jules T., Douglas, Ariz. 

Seery. Paul R.. Wilmington. Del. 

Shapiro. Louis. Newark, N. J. 

Sharpe, Nicholas, New Haven, Conn. 



Shoaf, R. Reynolds, Lexington, N. C. 

Shutters, Abram A., Timberville, Va. 

Siegle, Irving M., Huntington, N. Y. 

Sifontes, Jose E.. Arecibo, P. R. 
Smith. Wallace P., Cambridge 
Towers, J. Milton, Newark, N. J. 
Townes, George E., Martinsville, Va. 
Trail, W. E., Pipestem, W. Va. 
Trone, James LeRoy, Carlisle, Pa. 
Usilton, Noel E., Worton 
Veasey, E. E., Pocomoke 
Walker. Robert D.. Harrisburg. Pa. 
Walsh. William P.. Wilmington. Del. 
Walter, Henry M., Baltimore 
Ward, James F., Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Warshawsky. Sam'l H., Asbury Park, N. J. 
Watson. Hugh A.. Lenoir, N. C. 
Watts, Allan Lee, Carlisle, Pa. 
Weeks. William P.. Charlotte. N. C, 
Whitcomb. Robert W.. New London, Conn 
vVniis, L. C, Worton 
Winchester, Phil W., Summerfield, N. C. 
Zelinski, Edward W., Baltimore 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



Anderson, Mary P.. Washington, D. 
Burns, Landon C, Burnsville. Va. 
Cissel, Paul C. Highland 
Crowther, Elizabeth G., Sparks 
Engle. Ruth B.. Frostburg 
Frank. Paul S., College Park 
Graham. James F.. Barclay 
Jones. Miriam E.. Chestertown 



SENIOR CLASS 



Lighter. Richard C, Middletown 
McBride. Austin A.. Middletown 
♦Pullen, Jesse P., Martinsville, Va. 
Smith. Nellie O., Washington, D. C. 
Soper, Elsie M., Beltsville 
Vaiden. Victoria. Baltimore 
Watkins, Donald E.. Mt. Airy 



Castella, Olive W., Riverdale 
Colbert, Alice. Washington. D. C. 
Dorsey. Ethel A.. Beltsville 
Earnest, Lillian O., Mt. Rainier 
Foster. James J., Parkton 
Glenn. Wilbur J., Smithsburg 
Kline, Ralph G., Frederick 
Knox, Lucy. College Park 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Lemon. Frances D.. Baltimore 
Long. Lillian H.. Cumberland 
Melown. Portia. Cumberland 
Morris. Mildred. Salisbury 
Mullin. Vera D., Mt, Savage 
Stewart, J. Raymond, Street 
*Tarbell. William E.. Berwyn 
Walrath. Edgar, Annapolis 
Williams. Esther, Lanham 



♦Bennett, Benjamin H.. Falls Church. Va 
Buckey. Nellie S.. Mt. Rainier 
Coblentz. Roscoe Z,. Middletown 
Dolly. Virgil O.. Flintstone 
Duvall, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C. 
Evans, Robert B., Bel Air 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Gardner, George P., Middletown 
Grosdidier, Edith H., Hyattsville 
Hadaway, Ella, Rock Hall 
Harbaugh, Mary, Washington, D. C. 
Klein, Truman S., Union Bridge 
Magruder. John W., Gaithersburg 



218 



Mountain, Eunice, Davis, W. Va. 
Nicol, Victorine G., Washington, D. C. 
Orme, Elsie L., Barnesville 
Rigdon. Wilson O.. Cardiff 
Robertson. Dorothy, Laurel 
Rutter, Grace, Denton 



FRESHMAN 

Amos, Laura L, Forest Hill 

Anderson, Dorothy B., Washington, D. C. 

Baker, Katherine L., Edgemont 

Corkran, Daniel E., Rhodesdale 

Flanagan, Mary R., Brookland. D. C. 

Funke. Blanche L.. Oriole 

Funke. Esther N., Oriole 

Gibbons, Harold H., Princess Anne 

Grosdidier. Grace H.. Hyattsville 



Simmonds. L. Dale, Riverdale 
Simpson, Vivian V.. Washington, D. C. 
Simmonds, Helen F., Riverdale 
Willis, Rebecca C, Hyattsville 
Willis, Theodora, Hyattsville 



CLASS 

Kessler, Mary A., Hyattsville 
Morgan, Phyllis, Lonaconing 
Murray, Dorothy. Clinton 
Pancoast. Priscilla B.. Woodstown, N. J. 
Remsberg. Charles H., Middletown 
Samuels, Mrs. L. Inman, La Jolla, Calif. 
Seibert, John C, Clear Spring 
Smith, Rose M.. Washington, D. C. 
Swenk, Elizabeth R., Washington, D. C. 



Branner, Cecil G., Dover, Del. 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Groves, John, Washington, D. C. 



EXTENSION COURSES 

Baer, B. F., Baltimore 

Baker, I., Baltimore 

Bandel, Frank, Baltimore 

Bandtholz, George, Baltimore 

Barkalow, Louise, Baltimore 

Barnes, Marie, Baltimore 

Barr, Donald, Baltimore 

Bayley, Joseph, Baltimore 

Blaha, F. J., Baltimore 

Blaustein, Mildred, Baltimore 

Blessing, Mabel, Baltimore 

Booth, Lawrence R., Baltimore 

Brice, Percy, Baltimore ' 

Brown, Louis E., Baltimore 

Bryarly, Marshall, Baltimore 

Carroll, L. Hope, Baltimore 

Cook, Lula, Baltimore 

Delcher, Catherine, Baltimore 

Diehm, Harry, Baltimore 

Douglas, Hazen, Baltimore 

Ebaugh, Effie, Baltimore 

Emmart, C. F., Baltimore 

Fargo, Jessie, Baltimore 

Fiedl, Edward F., Baltimore 

Fielder, Wilbur, Baltimore 

Forney, Lewis S., Baltimore 

Frush, Marguerite E., Baltimore 

Fuehs, Ruby A., Baltimore 

Forrest, Maud B., Baltimore 

Gardner, Dorothy, Baltimore 

Gaule, J. H., Baltimore 

Gillis, Mabel, Baltimore 

Goldsmith, Maud, Baltimore 

Goldsmith, Flora, Baltimore 

Griffith, Raight S., Baltimore 



IN EDUCATION (Baltimore) 

Haefner. William F.. Baltimore 
Harper. Florence. Baltimore 
Haughey. Edith. Baltimore 
Healey, William G., Baltimore 
Hedrick. Melvin, Baltimore 
Hershey, Edith, Baltimore 
Hicks. Rose E., Baltimore 
Hipsley, Stanley, Baltimore 
Homburg, Ernest F., Baltimore 
Homburg, William F., Baltimore 
Honrigan, Anna, Baltimore 
Hopkins, Helen, Baltimore 
Horlebeim, Edwin, Baltimore 
Hyatt, Emma, Baltimore 
Hyatt, Neva, Baltimore 
Hyland, Marie, Baltimore 
Jackson, Mary, Baltimore 
Johns, George, Baltimore 
Kirchner, John, Baltimore 
Krager, Josephine, Baltimore 
Letzer, J. H., Baltimore 
Lochary, Caroline, Baltimore 
Magers, Ida R., Baltimore 
McGarvey, Mary, Baltimore 
McLellan, Maude, Baltimore 
Morgan, Charles A. J., Baltimore 
Morgan, Leah A., Baltimore 
Moritz, C, Baltimore 
Naylor, Alice, Baltimore 
Norris, Grace B., Baltimore 
O'Brennan. W. J., Baltimore 
Oswald, Charles, Baltimore 
Packard, C, Baltimore 
Fascoe, Ethel, Baltimore 

219 



Patterson, Ella, Baltimore 

Peterson. H. D.. Baltimore 

Rest, Anna, Baltimore 

Reynolds, Ada, Baltimore 

Richardson, S. M., Baltimore 

Ripenhring, Edward, Baltimore 

Roberts, Daisy, Baltimore 

Rodenmayer. Nettie, Baltimore 
Ross, Elizabeth, Baltimore 
Russo, Vincent, Baltimore 
Sappington, Nellie, Baltimore 
Scheib, Mary, Baltimore 
Schrage, William K., Baltimore 
Schreiber, John A., Baltimore 
Shackelford. Arnold, Baltimore 
Smith, James I^., Baltimore 
Smith, Robert A., Baltimore 
Spawn. J., Baltimore 

EXTENSION COURSES 

Buck, Lura, Landover 
Clayton, Louella, Mt. Rainier 
Curbow, Leone. Hyattsville 
Day. Frank. Hyattsville 
Espey, Agnes. Hyattsville 
Fleming, Agnes, Bladensburg 
Hand. Mary. Bladensburg 
Hotson, Edith. Mt. Rainier 
Jump, Margaret, College Park 



Sweeney, Dennis J., Bt'timore 
Thomas, Emma, Baltimore 
Tilghman, Helen, Baltimore 
Townley, R. Wolfe, Baltimore 
Townshend, Lillian R., Baltimore 
Towson. Ruth, Baltimore 
Waidner, Emma, Baltimore 
Walters, A. P.. Baltimore 
Wardsworth. Julia. Baltimore 
Watkins, Miriam, Baltimore 
Weaver, Ruth P., Baltimore 
Weller. Nannie. Baltimore 
Wicks. O. Lula, Baltimore 
Wilson, Alice, Baltimore 
Wilson, Hugh, Baltimore 
Winkleman, Helen, Baltimore 
Zentz, Earl, Baltimore 



IN EDUCATION (Hyattsville) 

Payne, Nellie, Hyattsville 
Schotthofer, Frances, Hyattsville 
Smith, Kathleen, Riverdale 
Sterling, Margaret. Hyattsville 
Temple, Martha, Riverdale 
Whitt, Marye, Riverdale 
Youngblood. Ruth, Hyattsville 
Zeller. Grace, Riverdale 



Albrittain. Mason C, La Plata 
Bailey, Caleb T., Bladensburg 
Baldwin, Morris J., Woodridge, D. C. 
Belt, William B., Hyattsville 
Bennett, Frank A., Hagerstown 
Boteler, Howard M., Laurel 
Cook, Charles S., Frederick 
Donaldson, DeWitt C, Laurel 
Elliott, Joseph W., Hebron 
Harlow, James H., Havre de Grace 
Himmelheber, Joseph B., Baltimore 
Knapp, Peter T., Overlea 

^ , JUNIOR 

Bartlett, Wirt D.. Centerville 

Bittner, John H., Branchville 
Braungard. Paul J., Hagerstown 
Brothers, Maurice F., Washington, D. C. 
Chestnut. Frank T., Hyattsville 
Fitzgerald, Gilbert B., Princess Anne 
Foard, James H., Aberdeen 
Glass, Gerald L., Hyattsville 
Hill, William B., Hyattsville 
Howard, M. Hamilton, Brookeville 
Johnson. George W., Chesapeake City 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

SENIOR CLASS 



Melvin, Willis G., Havre de Grace 
Montgomery, Wilbur B.. Washington. D.C, 
Owings, Elliott P., North Bei.a 
♦Patton, Gordon S.. Jackson. Miss. 
Richard, William J., Goldsboro 
Schaefer, John P., Riverdale 
Simmons. Lansing G., Takoma Park 
Walden, Frederick P., Raspeburg 
Wall is, Albert G.. Frederick 
Wick, George A., Washington, D. C. 
Wisner, J. Ward, Jr., Baltimore 

CLASS 

Latham, Ector B., Washington, D. C. 

Lillie. Francis T.. Takoma Park 

McMurtrey, Clifton C. Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Harold. Frederick 

Orr. Stanley C. Hyattsville 

Powell. Robert W.. Princess Anne 

Reed, Raymond B., College Park 

Rizer, Richard T., Mt. Savage 

Santos. Bernardino, Rio Piedras, P. R. 

Schumann. Andrew E., Princess Anne 



4 



Seibert, Joseph H.. Clear Spring 
Seney. Joshua M., Chestertown 
Shofnos. William. Washington, D. C. 
Steele, Eugene P.. Hagerstown 



Toadvine, Harry L., White Haven 
Van Sant, Bayard R., Greensboro 
Wenger, Charles W.. Washington, D. C 
Young. Walter H., Washington. D. C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Aldridge, David D., Frederick 
Aldridge, Howard R., Mt. Savage 

♦Allison, Carl O., Washington. D. C. 
Baum, Edwin C, Washington, D. C. 
Blades, Samuel L.. Sudlersville 
Bowers, Walter L., Hagerstown 
Bowie, John, Jr., Annapolis Junction 
Bowser, Merle L., Kittanning, Pa. 
Burnside, Douglas D., Washington, D. C 
Castella, Charles C. Riverdale 

*Clagett, John H., Jr., Roslyn 
Collins, Stanton J., Sparrows Point 
Conway, James P.. Cumberland 

♦Davis, Ernest G., Hyattsville 
Dent, George H., Churchton 
Fisher, A. Boyd, Point of Rocks 
Fisk, Willis H., Kensington 
Ford. Watson I., Baltimore 
Friese, Nevin W., Hagerstown 
Glover, Charles P., Mt. Airy 
Graham, Ralph M., Washington. D. C. 
Harper, Donald N., Royal Oak 
Hook, Addison E., Baltimore 

♦Hoppe, John H.. Riverdale 
Huyett, Earl D., Hagerstown 
King, Barnwell R.. Branchville 
Kline, William M.,, Washington, D. C. 
Knox, Howard L., College Park 



C. 



Knox. Lloyd T., College Park 

Lewis, Gomer, Washington, D. 

Lewis, William H., Elkton 

Litchfield, Charles W., Washington. D. C 

McCune, William T., Elkton 

McFadden. Charles P.. Elkton 

Magalis, Benjamin W.. Brunswick 

Matthews, Kenneth F., Washington, D. C. 

Meeds, Nelson T.. Silver Spring 

Melchior, Louis F., Washington. D. C. 

Melton. Edward R., Washington, D. C. 

Mills, J. E. Wayne, Washington Grove 

Morris, Paul, St. Michaels 

Nihiser, Edwin E., Hagerstown 
♦Noe, Ira J.. Washington, D. C. 

Orr, Robert G.. Lonaconing 

Prangley, Arthur G., Washington, D. C. 

Price, William D., Washington, D. C. 

Richardson, James O., Washington. D. C. 

Rogers, Frederick H., Washington, D. C. 

Sanders. Warrington P., Washington, D.C. 

Staley, Daniel R., Knoxville 

Troxell, William F., Gaithersburg 

Vandegrift, Edgar D., Cumberland 
♦Vandoren, Theodore J., Hyattsville 

Warren, John S., Pomonkey 

Watkins, Benjamin III, Davidsonville 

Woodruff, Charles M., Sparrows Point 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



220 



Allen, Edward R., Towson 
Allen, James C, Washington, D. C. 
Armstrong. Robert B., Washington, D. C 
Atkinson, Walter S., Pocomoke 
Aubinoe, Alvin L., Washington. D. C. 
Barber, Charles T.. Hagerstown 
Bishop, William E., Washington, D. C. 
Bonnett, Arthur E., Washington, D. C 
Brayton, Jean H., Washington, D. C. 
Buckingham, Stephen A.. Chevy Chase 
Butler, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Caruthers, Robert S., Riverdale 
Coakley, Forrest. Havre de Grace 
Coblentz, Edward P., Catonsville 
Conwell, Stephen F.. Tauntum 
Cooling, William C, Chesapeake City 
Crawford, Thomas B., Havre de Grace 
Davis, Douglas M., Hyattsville 
DeAtley, Ellsworth F., Washington. D. C. 
Fox. Daniel M.. Baltimore 



Funk. Wilson S.. Denton 
Gannon, Clarence B., Baltimore 
Gazze, Sylvius. Greensburg, Pa. 
Green, Winship I., Kensington 
Halley, Edward B.. Washington, D. C. 
Hough. George W.. Washing^ton. D. C. 
Jeffers, Ralph A., Elkton 
Johnson, Theodore W., Washington, D. C. 
Kaiser. John. Washington, D. C. 
Kellerman. William F.. Washington, D. C. 
Kurth. William C, East New Market 
Lang, John C, Pocomoke City 
Lebowitz, Samuel, Mt. Rainier 
Lehman, Laurence L., Rockville 
Loughborough, D. S., Washintgon, D. C. 
Matson, Frederic C, Washington, D. C. 
McCabe, Paul W., Spring Gap 
McCauley, George M., Washington, D. C. 
McKeige, Edward E., Mt. Rainier 
Meehan, Clarence M., Waynesboro, Pa. 



221 



Melchior, George E., Mr.rriottsville 
Melvin, Dudley A., Havre de Grace 
Metzeroth, Eric C, Washington, D. C. 
Mitchell, James R., Wetipquin 
Mitchell, John H., La Plata 
Morris, John D., Sykesville 
Moseman, Carvel G., Washington, D. C. 
Parker, Alvin M., Washington, D. C. 
Phillips. Lawrence A., Washington, D. C. 
Pinney, Millard A., Washington, D. C. 
Quinn, George^ H., Crisfield 
Revelle, John E., Washington, D. C. 
Rothenhoefer, Frank W., Frederick 
Runkles, Oliver W., Mt. Airy 
Seth, Joseph B., St. Michaels 



Stitt, Edward W., Washington, D. C. 
Strite, Russell B., Hagerstown 
Thall, Charles J., Dushore, Pa. 
Thompson, Edward S., Roslyn, Va. 
Tingley, Egbert F., Hyattsville 
Trimble, William R., Washington, D. C. 
Waters, John W., Washington, D. C. 
White, Martin H., Washington, D. C. 
Wilcox, Chester M., Anacostia, D. C. 
Williams, Robert S., Jr., Washington, D.C. 
Wilson, Charles G., Catonsville 
Winnemore, L. P., Washington, D. C. 
Wolff, Lyman H,, Washington, D. C. 
yilek, Joseph J., Washington, D. C. 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Coronel, Ulpiano, New York • — L-.^pson, Hugh, Branchvville 

DeCaindry, William A., Baltimore Stoll, Charles C, Brooklyn 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Anderson, O. W., Timmonsville, S. C. 
Anderson, Pearl, Amherst, N. H. 
Boswell, Victor R., Columbia, Mo. 
Browne, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Canter, Francis D., Aquasco 
Conrad, Carl M., Burlington, Kan. 
Darkis, F. R., Frederick 
Day, Frank D., Hyattsville 
Eaton, Orson N., Belt^ville 
Elder, James W., Cumberland 
Eppley, Geary, College Park 
Ezekiel, Walter N., Berwyn 
Fields, J. Newton, Lamar, S. C. 
Flenner, A. L., Riverdale 
Flynn, John E., Friendsville, Pa. 
Grafflin, Mildred W., Baltimore 
Holmes, Myron G., Northwood, N. H. 
Howe, Charles H., Chapman, Kan. 
Huffington, Jesse M., Eden 
Jenkins, Harvey F., Concord, N. H. 
Juchhoff, Frederick, Washington, D. C. 
Kimbrough, William D., Summerdale, Ala. 
Lagasse, Felix S., Lochmere, N. H. 
Langford, George S., Blythewood, S. C. 
Lichtenwalner, Daniel C, Riverdale 
Lindquist, Harry G., Holden, Mass. 



Mackert, C. L., College Park 

Malcolm, W. G., Barton 

McCarron, Marcus A., Worcester, Mass. 

Moran, John A., Frederick 

Olive, James G., Apex, N. C. 

Potts, S. F., Crawford, Miss. 

Preinkert, Alma H., Washington, D. C. 

Reinmuth, O. H., Frederick 

Sanders, Paul D., West, Miss. 

Scheuch, John D., Washington, -D. C. 

Schrader, Albert L., So. Kaukauna, Wis. 

Schramm, G. N., Cumberland 

Semler, Harry E., Hagerstown 

Sher, Ben, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Shillinger, J. E., Washington, D. C. 

Smith, A. M., College Park 

Smith, John W., Norfolk, Va. 

Stamp, Adele H., College Park 

Sturgis, William C, Snow Hill 

Twilley, Otis S., Hurlock 

Vierheller, Albert F., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Walker, William P., Mt. Airy 

Waller, Harry B., Verona, Ky. 

Whitehouse, William E., Amherst, N. H, 

Wiley, R. C, College Park 

Winant, H. B., Brentwood 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SENIOR CLASS 

Killiam, Audrey, Delmar | McCall, Elizabeth G., College Park 

JUNIOR CLASS 

♦DeVol, Helen M.. Crawfordsville, Ind. Morris, Sarah E., Hyattsville 



Johnstone, Lott, Washington, D. C. 



Murphy, Anna M., Staunton, Va. 
♦Stewart, Anne S., Rustburg, Va. 



222 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 
Wolfe, M. Frances, Forest Glen 

FRESHMAN CLASS 



Corsette, Helen J., Washington, D. C-. 
Cowles, Lois A., Washington, D. C. 
Dent, Alice L., Townshend 
Ferrell, Marian F.. Washington, D. C. 



Johnson, Julia C. Washington, D. C. 
♦Langenfeldt. Marie E., Hyattsville 
Wolfe, Margaret B., Forest Glen 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Clay, Margaret, Washington, D. C. 



SCHOOL 

SENIOR 

Albert, Milton A., Baltimore | 

Arnold, Frank, Baltimore j 

Allen, Howell W., Jr., Baltimore 

Azrael, Louis, Baltimore 

Bach, Joseph A., Ellicott City 

Barrett, Franklin P., Baltimore 

Barrett, William L. K., Jr., Baltimore 

Barron, Irving, Baltimore 

Barron, Robert, Baltimore 

Batty, Howard A., Baltimore 

Baugh, Ernest V., Jr., Baltimore 

Baum, Albert S., Jr., Baltimore 

Bellows. Donald P., Glyndon 

Berenholtz, Sol. C, Baltimore 

Berman, Benjamin, Baltimore 

Berman, S. Frances, Baltimore 

Blackburn, Earle W., Baltimore 

Blackiston, Richard P.. Palmers 

Blaustein, J. Selman, Baltimore 

Blum, Albert H., Baltimore 

Bollinger, James W., Reisterstown 

Bordley, Clayton W., Baltimore 

Bowling, Joseph T., Hughesville 

Bregel, Howard C, Baltimore 

Caplan, David H., Baltimore 

Caplan, Meyer, Baltimore 

Caples, Walter, Baltimore 

Carmel, Percy, Baltimore 

Christensen, Einon, Baltimore 

Cockey. James Sudler, Jr.. Stevensville 

Cohen, Herman, Baltimore 

Cohen, Jacob, Baltimore 

Cole, B. Olive, Baltimore 

Cornthwaite, Elmer B., Baltimore 

Cotton, Myron S., Baltimore 

Cover, James P., Easton, Md. 

Crowther, George R., Jr.. Smithsburg 

Crowther. Lester H., Baltimore 

Backman, John T., Baltimore 

Darley, John Wilmerton, Baltimore 

Dimarco, Anna E., Baltimore 



OF LAW 

CLASS 

Druery, Oliver R., Baltimore 
Due. Paul F., Baltimore 
Feikin, Bernard. Baltimore 
Fine, Harry. Baltimore 
Foard, Francis M.. Baltimore 
France, Robert, Baltimore 
Freed, Otto R.. Baltimore 
Gaskins, Damon S., Baltimore 
Gay. James E., Jr.. Baltimore 
Gillum, Wilbur A., Baltimore 
Click, Henry. Baltimore 
Goertz. Harry E., Baltimore 
Goldstein. Raphael S., Baltimore 
Gorsuch. Walter C, Oxford. Md. 
Greenberg, Mordecai D.. Baltimore 
Griesacker, Joseph B., Baltimore 
Gross. Christian W.. Baltimore 
Hahn. Theodore J., Baltimore 
Hall, Reginald Irving. Baltimore 
Hammerman, Israel, Baltimore 
Harrington, Thomas M., Baltimore 
Hedeman. John R. T.. Baltimore 
Hirt, Frank J., Baltimore 
Hisky. John G.. Catonsville 
Hochman, Joel J.. Baltimore 
Hofferbert, George, Baltimore 
Homey, William R., Centreville 
Horsey, Joshua R.. Baltimore 
Hudson, J. Frank, Towson 
Hyman, Morris David. Baltimore 
Isaacson. Julius, Baltimore 
Jett, Robert Samuel. Baltimore 
Jewell, Clay, Baltimore 
Johnson. Russell H.. Baltimore 
Kairys, Harry. Baltimore 
Kelley, James P., Towson 
Kelley, Stanley. Eldridge. Ala. 
Kerpelman, Morris E., Baltimore 
Kidd. James K., Baltimore 
Kirchner. George W.. Baltimore 



223 



Krymski, Joseph M., B&ltimore 

Kurland, Fannie, Baltimore 

Lazarus, Henry, Baltimore 

Leavitt, Maurice M., Baltimore 

Leonhardt, W. C, Baltimore 

Lesinsky, Samuel, Baltimore 

Lickle, William F., Towson 

Lindenberg, Adelaide H., Baltimore 

Littleton, Oliver, Baltimore 

Lougran, Jerome Aloysius, Ellicott City 

Lutzky, Ida Claire, Baltimore 

Lynch, Charles A., Baltimore 

Mandelberg, Abraham H., Baltimore 

Marshall, Roland S., Baltimore 
Matthews, Charles N., Baltimore 
Maurer, Julius G., Relay 
Mazor, Meyer, Baltimore 
McAllister, James A., Cambridge 
McCahan, Elmer, Jr., Baltimore 
McFaul, George, Baltimore 
Mclnnis, Eugene, Baltimore 
Memkin, William L., Baltimore 
Minder, John Henry, Baltimore 
Mooney, Lawrence R., Baltimore 
Moore. George L., Baltimore 
Morgan, Tilghman V., Baltimore 
MuUan, W. G. R., Baltimore 
Needle. Sidney, Baltimore 
Neel, John M., Baltimore 
Nickerson, Palmer R., Baltimore 
Obrecht, Holliday H., Baltimore 
O'Rourke, Andrew G., Roslyn 
Palees, Mitchell, Baltimore 
Palmisano, Augustine, Jr., Baltimore 
Parke, G. Arch, Baltimore 
Patti, Joseph J., Jr., Baltimore 
Perry, John W., Salisbury 
Phillips, Seymour, Baltimore 
Pierson, Leon H. A., Baltimore 
Porter. William Edgar, Baltimore 
Pressman, Maurice J., Baltimore 
Presstman, Marie W., Baltimore 
Pugh. Walter J., Baltimore 



Pumpian, Herman, Baltimore 
Rabuek, LeRoy T., Coraopolis, Pa. 
Reese, John G., Baltimore 
Riddle, John F., Baltimore 
Rody, Benjamin F., Baltimore 
Roil, John R.. Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Sarah Rita, Baltimore 
Rossiter. Goldsborough G., Baltimore 
Salerno, Peter C, Bristol, Conn. 
Scharf, Frederick, Baltimore 
Schmelz, Fred, Baltimore 
Schonfield, Simon, Baltimore 
Sellers, John, Baltimore 
Shaffer, Samuel S., Baltimore 
Shapiro, Solomon, Baltimore 
Shea, James D., Baltimore 
Sherry, Mrs. Helen I., Baltimore 
Siegrist, Louis, Jr., Baltimore 
Siems, Valentine Bernard, Baltimore 
Siff, H. E., Baltimore 
Sinn, Walter E., Frederick 
Sinsky, William. Baltimore 
Skinner. William H.. Baltimore 
Sline, Percy, Baltimore 
Sloane, David W., Cumberland 
Smith, Milton R., Glen Arm 
Sokol, Max, Baltimore 
Spedden, Alex W., Jr., Baltimore 
Stein, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 
Strauss, Raymond F., Baltimore 
Stritehoff, Nelson H., Jr., Baltimore 
Talbott. William S., Baltimore 
Tome, Richard E., Baltimore 
Truitt, Jeremiah F., Salisbury 
Walker, Alfred F., Baltimore 
Walker, Uthman, Baltimore 
Weiner, Paul N., Baltimore 
Weintraub, Ben., Baltimore 
Weiskittel, Francis A., Baltimore 
Whiteley, George C, Centreville 
Williams, Charles C, Baltimore 
Wilson, Frankie D., Linthicum Heights 
Zimmerman, Ben., Baltimore 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Abell. Joseph Walter. Baltimore 
Adams, Richard B., Baltimore 
Ades, Bernard, Baltimore 
Adler, Irwin H., Baltimore 
Alexander, John D., Baltimore 
Alexander, John Gunnels, Atlanta, Ga. 
Barnett, Ralph O., Sykesville 
Bartholomay, William P., Jr., Baltimore 
Bearman, Sidney, Baltimore 
Berlin, Herman, Baltimore 
Biggs, Richard D., Baltimore 



Biser, Leon Windsor, Ijamsville 
Blickenstaff, Lloyd S., Boonsboro 
Borden, Aaron, Baltimore 
Bousman, Floyd W., Baltimore 
Bramble, Forrest F., Baltimore 
Bready, Henrietta Y., Baltimore 
Brenner, David M., Baltimore 
Brindle, Robert H., Hagerstown 
Brown, Howard, Bladensburg 
Browne, Alfred, Jr., New York City 
Brownstein. Abraham A., Baltimore 



224 



Caplan, Frank L., Baltimore 

Carney, Robert E., Baltimore 

Carroll, Paul E., Baltimore 

Chin, St. Lake, Baltimore 

Clayton, John M., Cambridge 

Cockey, Bennett F. B., Cockeysville 

Codd, William A., Baltimore 

Cohen, Leon, Baltimore 

Cole, Thomas W., Baltimore 

Coleburn, George R., Accomac, Va. 

Connor, I. Campbell, Baltimore 

Coughlan, Robert E., Jr., Mt. Washington 

Czajkowski, Walter M., Baltimore 

Daisey, Carey J., Chincoteague Island, Va. 

Dallam, Richard, Jr., Bel Air 

Dankmeyer, Theodore R., Baltimore 

Darrough, William J., Baltimore 

Day, Carl L., Baltimore 

Deady, Frank H., Baltimore 

Debel, Niels H., Baltimore 

DeKowzan, Paul A., Baltimore 

DeLashmutt, Emilie F., Baltimore 

Dellone, Catherine R., Baltimore 

DeMarco, Pasquale Charles, Baltimore 

Dorsey, Philip H., Annapolis 

Doyle, James J., Baltimore 

Edelson, Milton B., Baltimore 

Epstein, Samuel C, Baltimore 

Famous, Franklin E., Street 

Farber, George, Baltimore 

Feinberg, Isidore B., Baltimore 

Feldman, Isadore E., Baltimore 

Feldman, Sydney, Baltimore 

Fenwick, James S., Baltimore 

Figinski, Marion A., Baltimore 

Fine, Melvin L., Baltimore 

Fine, Phylburt E., Baltimore 

Fitzpatrick, John J., Baltimore 

Forrest, Otto N., Baltimore 

Foster, Reuben, Baltimore 

Frankel, Albert H., Baltimore 

Glick, Maurice, Baltimore 

Goldberg, Charles F., Baltimore 

Goldbloom, Milton S., Baltimore 

Goldstein, Milton E., Baltimore 

Greenberg, Alexander, Baltimore 

Greene, Melvin J., Baltimore 

Griffin, Felix A. , Baltimore 

Gutberlet, Joseph C, Baltimore 

Hammerman, Herman, Baltimore • 

Hampson, George Mobray, Baltimore 

Hanna, F. Carlos, Cambridge 

Harrington, Thomas B., Baltimore 

Hoff, Albert J., Baltimore 

Hoffman, George L., Baltimore 

Honeywell, James O., Baltimore 



Hopkins, Hastings B., Baltimore 
Hopkins, Ira C, Halls 
Hudson, Howard E., Gumboro, Del. 
Hunter, Edgar J., York, Pa. 
Huss, Albert B., Baltimore 
Isaacson, Simon L., Baltimore 
Jarboe, John M., Pearson 
Johnson, Nathan, Baltimore 
Kalb, Edgar Seymour, Baltimore 
Kelley, Estel C, Westernport 
Kernan, Anthony E., Baltimore 
Kirby, Joseph S., Mt. Washington 
Lamberd, Luther S., Baltimore 
Langsdale, Kewett, Easton 
Lee, James J., Baltimore 
Levin, Celia I., Baltimore 
Levitas, Benjamin I., Baltimore 
Lohmuller, George B., Baltimore 
Macht, Louis E., Baltimore 
Massey, William F., Sudlersville 
Masson, Stevenson, Baltimore 
McKinsey, Katherine, Baltimore 
Mechanic, William G., Baltimore 
Meid, Albert, Jr., Baltimore 
Meiser, Fred W., Baltimore 
Mercer, B. H., Baltimore 
Merrill, Irving W., Baltimore 
Meyerhoff, Louis, Baltimore 
Mihm, William A., Mt. Washington 
Moshkevich, Gersh I., Baltimore 
Moylan, Charles E., Ijamsville 
Mullikin, James C, Easton 
Muth, Gerard J., Catonsville 
Newell, Beach, Baltimore 
Newman, Irving, Baltimore 
Norton, George T., Baltimore 
Novak, Charles J., Baltimore 
Owinski, Joseph J., Baltimore 
Oxley, John E., Poolesville 
Parr, Frank T., Baltimore 
Perlman, A., Baltimore 
Poole, John H., New Market 
Post, Philip T., Baltimore 
Proper, Jerome, Baltimore 
Rhodes, Walter E., Baltimore 
Rhynhart, William W., Baltimore 
Robins, Stanley G., Crisfield 
Robinson, Morton M., Baltimore 
Roesch, Emil A., Baltimore 
Rosner, Jeannette, Baltimore 
Roth, Edward P., Baltimore 
Rowe, Roscoe C Annapolis 
Rubenstein, Abraham J., Baltimore 
Saiontz, Carl B., Baltimore 
Samuelson, Herman, Baltimore 
Scaggs, George W., Baltimore 
Scaggs, Howard I., Baltimore 



'll 



225 



Schapiro, Ruth, Baltimore 
Schiaffino, Frank P., Baltimore 
Schlegel, Edwin M., Reading, Pa. 
Schlossberg, Abe., Baltimore 
Schulbe, George Philip, Jr., Catonsville 
Sear, Abram, Hampton, Va. 
Seliterman, Ben B., Baltimore 
Semans, William R., Baltimore 
Sesrmour, Charles C, Cumberland 
S-hea, Jeremiah D., Colchester, Conn. 
Shockett, Harry M.. Baltimore 
Shockley, Elisha V., St Michaels 
Siegmund, Carl R., Baltimore 
Silverman, Samuel L., Portsmouth, Va. 
Simpson, Albert L., Portsmouth, Va. 
Smith, Albert VanDeaver, Baltimore 
Smith, Edward M., Baltimore 



Smith. Michael P., Baltimore 
Snyder, Carolyn P., Glyndon 
Stevens, Edward W., Sudlersville 
Stocksdale, Howard B., Baltimore 
I Swartz, Jerome, Baltimore 
Tarshish, Allan, Baltimore 
Tippett, William Thomas, Jr., Baltimore 
Truitt, Hughey B., Baltimore 
Vanger, Henry R., Baltimore 
Watson. John G., Centreville 
Webster. Edwin H., Bel Air 
Wellmore. Grace L., Baltimore 
Wellner, Gabriel D., Baltimore 
Williams. Matilda D., Baltimore 
Woelfel, George B., Annapolis 
Yaflfe, Harry, Baltimore 
Zetzer. Rose &., Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aaron, Howard L., Baltimore 
Abramowitz, Max, Baltimore 
Abramson, Oscar, Baltimore 
Adkins, John E., Jr., Salisbury 
Aiken, Gerald R., Catonsville 
Arnold, Charles G., Brunswick 
Bacon, John, Baltimore 
Baer, Eli, Baltimore 
Baker, Orison W., Baltimore 
Barron, Sylvan, Baltimore 
Bartholow, Joseph C, Baltimore 
Baumann, John, Baltimore 
Bennett, Aubrey K., Federalsburg 
Bennett, John C, Baltimore 
Benson, James L., Baltimore 
Bisson, Joseph P., Baltimore 
Blankford, Roger J., Baltimore 
Bolard, Rudolph F., Jr., Baltimore 
Bounds, Carroll E., Allen 
Bounds, Wade G., Allen 
Bowen, John B., Baltimore 
Bozeman, Mrs. Anna K., Baltimore 
Brawner, Henry P., Baltimore 
Brennan, Peter J., Baltimore 
Bressler, Ida, Baltimore 
Bronner, Charles J., Detroit, Mich. 
Brown, Forrest N., Frederick 
Brown, Richard P., Baltimore 
Brownstein, William N., Baltimore 
Buchoff, Joseph, Baltimore 
Budwitz, Emil A., Baltimore 
Burch, James C, Baltimore 
Cairns, Huntington, Baltimore 
Calloway, Newell M., Sharptown 
Caplan, Howard. Clarksburg, W. Va, 
Carter, Joseph L., Eckhart Mines 



Chambers. Benjamin, Baltimore 
Coburn, Benjamin H., Rock Hall 
Coe, Marion W., Reisterstown 
Cohen, Elias, Baltimore 
Cohen, Samuel, Baltimore 
Cohen, Sara, Baltimore 
Collins, Oliver D., Jr., Snow Hill 
Collins, Stephen R., Chestertown 
Coniff, John J., Baltimore 
Cooper, Margaret B., Baltimore 
Coyle, Wilbur F., Jr., Baltimore 
Crockett, C. Clyde, Baltimore 
Culotta. Joseph J., Baltimore 
Diamond, Albert E., Baltimore 
Dickel, Hans G., Frankfurt, Germany 
DiCenzo, George G., New Haven, Conn. 
Diehm, Victor C, Sparrows Point 
Diggs, Austin C, Baltimore 
Disney, Kenith D., Baltimore 
Donaway, Harry S., Baltimore 
Drummond, William H., Baltimore 
Dunton. William R., 3rd, Baltimore 
Edelman, Jacob J., Baltimore 
Ehudin, Marcy M., Baltimore 
Faithful. Boyd L., Baltimore 
Farbman, David J., Baltimore 
Fedder, Morris, Baltimore 
Feldman, Charles M., Baltimore 
Feldstein. Samuel H.. Baltimore 
Fink, Herbert, Baltimore 
Flaccomio, Joseph V., Baltimore 
Freilachoff, Louis J., Baltimore 
Fried, Louis C, Baltimore 
Friedenberg, Aaron, Baltimore 
Gaugh, Ralph A., Lewistown 
Gerber, Sherman J., Baltimore 



226 



Getz, Meyer H., Bel Air 

Gilbert, Rodman I., ^Baltimore 

Ginsberg, Samuel, Baltimore 

Glatt, Bernard, Baltimore 

Gomborov, Samuel H., Baltimore 

Goodman, Max, Baltimore 

Greenstein, Edward, Baltimore 

Greenwell, Charles B., Jr., Leonardtown 

Grillo, Vincent R., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grzelecki, Kajetan W., Baltimore 

Hagner, Thomas J., Baltimore 

Hamm, William J., Baltimore 

Hammond, Francis H., Baltimore 

Harris, Alexander C, Baltimore 

Harris, Gertrude, Baltimore 

Hart, Mrs. Isabella, Baltimore 

Harwood, James K., Catonsville 

Helfrich, George Edmund, Baltimore 

Hendelberg, Philip, Baltimore 

Henneberger, J. Edmund, Mt. Washington 

Herman, Harry, Norfolk, Va. 

Hill, Stirling S., Baltimore 

Hillman, Sddney, Baltimore 

Hoff, Charles W., Baltimore 

Hoofnagle, C. C, Fairfield, Pa. 

Horn, Henry J., Baltimore 

Humphreys, Harry N., Baltimore 

Hurwitz, James J., Baltimore 

Jacobs, Benedict W., Baltimore 

Jacobs, Sidney M., Baltimore 

Jacobsen, Eric, Baltimore 

Jenkins, Merton E., Margaretville, N. Y. 

Johns, Thomas M., Baltimore 

Kallinsky, Sigmund R., Baltimore 

Kaufman, Norman, Baltimore 

Keating, Thomas, Jr., Centreville 

King, David D., Baltimore 

Kirwan, Katharine, Towson 

Klein, Nathan, Baltimora 

Knight, Edwin J., Baltimore 

Kramer, Herman W., Baltimore 

Kramer, John E., Baltimore 

Kriegel, Leo, Baltimore 

Krieger, Abraham, Baltimore 

Kurland, Edwin L., Baltimore 

Kurland. Milton B., Baltimore 

Lambert, Milton F., Baltimore 

Landers, Stewart, Newport, R. I. 

Lankford, Henry J., Norfolk, Va. 

LeBrun, George D., Baltimore 

Legg, John H. E., Centreville 

Levin, Isidore E., Baltimore 

Levin, Louis, Baltimore 

LeViness, Charles T., Baltimore 

Levy, Herman F., Baltimore 

Levy, Julius S., Baltimore 

Lloret, Rafael G., Bulacan, Philippines 



Lloyd. William T., Baltimore 

Lober. Albert F., Baltimore 

McAllister, Lloyd Goldsbo rough, Vienna 

McDonnell, Joseph E.. Baltimore 

McGovern, Joseph F., Baltimore 

McKeldin, Theodore R., Baltimore 

Maher, Edward A.. Baltimore 

Mallik, Emil T., Baltimore 

Marbury, Charles C, Upper Marlboro 

Mazor, Alfred, Baltimore 

Mele, Amelia M., Baltimore 

Miller, Goldie R., Baltimore 

Miller, Harry M., Baltimore 

Mortillaro, Louis D., Baltimore 

Moshkevich, Max, Baltimore 

Mullikin, Oliver S., Easton 

Murray, James H., EUicott City 

Myers, Willis A.. Baltimore 

Narunsky, Jerome H., Baltimore 

Novak, Joseph S., Jr., Baltimore 

Obrecht, Charles F., Baltimore 

O'Dell, Edward C, Baltimore 

Parlett, Edward L., Baltimore 

Pausch, George, Baltimore 

Pekar, Rufus J., Baltimore 

Peregoff, Ellis, Baltimore 

Perel, Samuel, Baltimore 

Perry, Merrill G., Goldsboro 

Pittman, Martin L., Baltimore 

Pritchett, Willye J., Jr., Bishop's Head 

Proser, Bernard U., Baltimore 

Putzel, Edward L., Baltimore 

Race. Allan M., Baltimore 

Real, Carroll A., Catonsville 

Reed, Robert L., Brunswick 

Richardson, Stanley L., Baltimore 

Riddle, William E., Woodlawn 

Riley, Wagner W. M., Baltimore 

Rose, Douglas H., Baltimore 

Rosenstock, Benjamin B., Frederick 

Rosenstock, Ezra, Westminster 

Rostovsky, Abraham, Baltimore 

Rothel, Adelbert L., Baltimore 

Russell, P*rank J., Baltimore 

Samuelson, Walter, Baltimore 

Sandrock, Julius F., Baltimore 

Schilber, David L., Baltimore 

Schmidt, George J., Baltimore 

Scholtz, Erwin V., Baltimore ' - 

Schwinn, Leslie B., Baltimore 

Shefferman, Julius, Baltimore 

Shehan, William H., Baltimore 

Sherlock, Thomas P., Baltimore 

Schmuckler, Benjamin, Baltimore 

Silesky, Hamilton A., Baltimore 

Silver, Morris L., Baltimore 

Silverman, Benjamin H., Portsmouth, Va. 



227 



Sinnott, Katherine, Baltimore 
Smith, Edward A., Baltimore 
Smith, John R., Baltimore 
Smith, Nicholas McC, Baltimore 
Snyder, Edwin A., Baltimore 
Snyder, John P., Providence, R. I. 
Sopher, Harry. Baltimore 
Sowers, William R., Annapolis 
Spector, Joseph W., Baltimore 
Stine, Isaac F., Winchester, Va. 
Stonestreet, Henrietta D., Baltimore 
Stuhlman, Oscar, Baltimore 
Sybert, Cornelius F., Elkridge 
Sykes, Alfred J., Baltimore 
Taylor, Charles R., Baltimore 
Taylor, Wilson E., Baltimore 
Thomas, Eugene M., Jr., Baltimore 
Thompson, Richard H., Baltimore 
Tongue, Franklin M., Solomon's 



Townsend, Miles D., Reisterstown 
Trew, Bartus, Baltimore 
Truitt, Alfred T., PittsvUle 
Vorsteg, Ethel R., Baltimore 
Walbeck, James M., Forest Hill 
Walker, Owen, Baltimore 
Wase, Joseph, Baltimore 
Watkins, Robert D., Mt, Washington 
Weil, Isador, Baltimore 
White, Beulah M., Baltimore 
Williams, Donald C, Mt. Washington 
Williams, Donald Howard, Halethorpe 
Williams, Max, Baltimore 
Winter, Harry, Baltimore 
Wolfe, Philip. Baltimore 
Wrightson, William D. G., Baltimore 
Yarmosky, Morris, Baltimore 
Zwick, Henry Ludwig, Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

POST-GRADUATE 

Snyder. George A., Island Falls, Me. 

SENIOR CLASS 



Beck, Nathaniel M., Baltimore 
Belenky, Jacob. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Berkson, Morris I., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bowers, Thaddeus R., Littleton, N. C. 
Dart, Frederick U . Nantic, Conn. 
Desane, Joseph. Long Island City, N. Y. 
Edmonds, John M., Harton, Mich. 
Fleshman, D. L., Pence Springs, W. Va. 
Giffin, Theodore C, Rowlesburg, W. Va. 
Goldberg, Ben, Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Gordon, Abraham S., Bronx, N. Y. 
Grose, Robert G.. Harmony, N. C. 
Gutowski, Joseph M., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Haddock, D. A., Calais, Me. 
Hagerman, Paul, Cameron, W. Va. 
Harp, J. Elmer, Hagerstown 
Hirsch, Philip, New York City 
Hundley, John T., Jr., Lynchburg, Va. 
Hunt, William B., Lexington, N. C. 
Jennette, William C, Fremont, N. C. 
Keith, Marion Y., Wilmington, N. C. 
Knipp, George A., Baltimore 
Kraut, Arthur M., Jersey City, N. J. 
Kyper, Frederick T., Clearfield, Pa. 
Lally. Leo A., Scranton, Pa. 
Long, Ira C, Morehcad City, N. C. 
Love, William S., Baltimore 
McCullough, C. S. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



McLean, Herbert, Jersey City, N. J. 
Moler, Raleigh M., Morgantown, W. Va. 
Murray, Robert L., St. Pauls, N. C. 
Myers, Karl Johnson, Philippi, W. Va. 
Newcomer, David R., Hagerstown 
Peterman, James E., Baltimore 
Povalski, Alexander W., Jersey City, N. J. 
Prather, Fonzo G., Burnt House, W. Va. 
Renichi, Murano, Tokyo, Japan 
Rothfuss, Paul A., Montoursville, Pa. 
Ruche, Harry C, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Saurborne, Sylvia B., Bridgeport, W. Va. 
Schorr, Richard, New York City 
Shealy, Walter H., Leesville, S. C. 
Sherman, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smith. Charles F., Uniontown, Pa. 
Snaith. Theresa O., Weston, W. Va. 
Sowers. Roy Gerodd, Linwood, N. C. 
Steincrohn, Peter J.. Hartford, Conn. 
Sussman, Abram A., Baltimore 
Touhey, T. J., Wilmington, Del. 
Walker, Wallace W., Winona, W. Va. 
Wasserstrom, Sidney. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weinert, Henry V., Jersey City, N. J. 
Welton, William A., Petersburg, W. Va. 
Werner, Walter I., Cleveland, O. 
White, James F., Morgantown, W. Va. 



228 



JUNIOR 

Anderson, Albert L., Annapolis 
Anderson, Richard S., Whitaker, N. C. 
Antonius, Nicholas, Orange, N. J. 
Aycock, Thomas B., Pikeville, N. C. 
Barnes, D. Keith, Raysville, Utah 
Boyd, Kenneth B., Baltimore 
Nicholas, N. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Best, DeLeon E., Warsaw, N. C. 
Bell, Roy A., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
Beerman, Herman M., Johnstown, Pa. 
Berenfield, Simon, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Caso, Jose, Santurce, Porto Rico 
Clamson, T. A., Jr., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Daughtridge, A. L., Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Davenport, Carlton A., Mackeys, N. C. 
Dean, Hugh E., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Edelman, E. I., Woodhaven, L. I., N. Y. 
Felger, Walter B., Canton, Ohio 
Fields, Daniel A., Laurinburg, N. C. 
Finegold, Abraham, Carnegie, Pa. 
Fisher, Harry R., New York, N. Y. 
Flax, Ira I., Newark, N. J. 
Frehling, Joseph M., Louisville, Ky. 
Friedman, Bernard, New York, N. Y. 
Friedman, Irving, Newark, N. J. 
Given, Arnold I., Elkview, W. Va. 
Goff. John T., Burnt House, W. Va. 
Golembe, Julius, New York City 
Granoff, Jerry F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Greifinger, Marcus H., Newark, N. J. 
Grossblatt, Philip, Newark, N. J. 
Howell, Clewell, Vineland, N. C. 
Jacobson, Philip, Baltimore 
Kafka, Maximilian M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Knox, Joseph C, Leland, N. C. 
Kratz, Fred W., Baltimore 
Leibensperger, George F., Kutztown, Pa. 
Levine, Samuel, Union, N. J. 
Marsh, James T., Baltimore 
Marton, Samuel, New York City 
Maseritz, Isadore, Baltimore 
Maurillo, Dominick F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McConnell, Harvey R., Chester, S. C. 



CLASS 

McZane, William O., Jr., Frostburg 
Megahan, Burke, Williamsport, Pa. 
Messinger, Benjamin, New York, N. Y. 
Miller, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Miller, Jacob, Baltimore 
Miller, Joseph G., Baltimore 
Monroe, Clement R., West End, N. C. 
Montani, Anthony C, Youngstown, Ohio 
Moriarty, Louis, So. Manchester, Conn. 
Morris, Philip, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Morrison, Wm. H., Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Motta, Peter G., Carnegie, Pa. 
Neustaedter, Theodore, New York City 
Nocera, Domingo, Mayaguez, Porto Rico 
Norment, John E., Baltimore 
Pachtman, Isadore, Braddock, Pa. 
Parks, Walter B., Huntersville, N. C. 
Perry, Archibald H,, Louisburg, N. C. 
Pitkowsky, Louis K., New York City 
Roberts, Bennett W., Gates ville, N. C. 
Robertson, Edwin M., Woodsdale, N. C. 
Salvati, Leo H., Monongah, W. Va. 
Scagnetti, Albert, Congers, N. Y. 
Scheindlinger, Morris L, Baltimore 
Schlenger, Leo B., Paterson, N. J. 
Schultz, Louis A., New York City 
Schwab, Joseph H., Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Scimeca, Antonio A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Seliger, Robert V., New York City 
Shapiro, Ralph, Newark, N. J. 
Sherman, Maurice A., Hazelwood, Pa. 
Siegel, Samuel, Cleveland, Ohio 
Simpson, Henry H.. Altamohaw, N. C. 
Staeck, Felix Cecil, McMechen, W. Va. 
Tabershaw, Arnold L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Talbott. Richard B., Elkins, W. Va. 
Theuerkauf, Frank J., Erie, Pa. 
Ward, Titus William, Ryland. N. C. 
Warren, Bryan P., Blounts Creek, N. C. 
Weinstock, Alexander A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Whaley, Thomas B., Berlin 
Winstead. John L., Elm City, N. C. 
Zaslow^, John, Woodridge, N. Y. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Aarache, Pedro, Aquadilla, Porto Rico 
Balcerzak, Stanley P., Wabash, Pa. 
Bentz, Felix John, New Britain, Conn. 
Bizub, Emil Nicholas, Passaic, N. J. 
Brown, Leo T., Washington, D. C. 
Cadle, William R., Frederick Junction 
Cardinale, Pasquale F., Newark, N. J. 
Cassidy, John J., Wilmington, Del. 
Clahr, Abraham A., New York City 
Coe, John M., Brandywine 



Coonan, Thomas J., Westminster 
Cope, Arthur A., Hamburg, Pa. 
DeVincentis, Henry, Orange, N. J. 
Donohoe, Edward C, Greensburg, Pa. 
Draper, Leonidas McF., Warrenton, N. C. 
Dreskin, Jacob L., E. Orange, N. J. 
Dwyer, Daniel R., Waterbury, Conn. 
Eastland, John S., Darien Center, N. Y. 
Elgin, Lee W., Baltimore 
Ellis, Francis A., Baltimore 



229 



Epstein, Harry H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Everett, Franklin R., Millington 
Fancher, Henry W., Jr., Winstfed, Conn. 
Farber, Raphael, Wellsboro, Pa. 
Fields, Abijah C, Ensley, Ala. 
Fine, Morris A., Baltimore 
Fischman, Harold H., Newark, N. J. 
Fishof, Frank, New York City 
Fuchs, Abner M., New York, N. Y. 
Gale, Louis H., Erie, Pa. 
Gaston, William B., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Gattens, Wilbur E., Cumberland 
Glick, Samuel, Baltimore 
Grandfield, Robert F., Dorchester, Mass. 
Grimm, Wilson O., Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Hertz, Ben, New York City 
Hibbitts, John T., Baltimore 
Hulla, Jaroslav, Baltimore 
Jacobs, Morris A., Baltimore 
Keating, John P., Sandy Hook, Conn. 
Kelley, Edward B., Carbondale, Pa. 
Knotts, William K., SudlersvUle 
Lalley, Paul F., Scranton, Pa. 
Laus. Edward R., New York, N. Y. 
Linde, S. A., Baltimore 
London, Daniel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lowe, Claude M., Fawn Grove, Pa. 
Metsky, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Miller, Edgar R., New Freedom, Pa. 
Minnefor, Charles A., Newark, N. J. 
Morales, Jaime V., Rio Piedras, P. R. 
Mullenusky, Joseph J., Shenandoah, Pa. 
Muncy, John W., Welch, W. Va. 



Nataro, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Nathan, Herbert Alpha, Oakhurst, N. J. 
Navarro, Vicente A., Cadiz, P. I. 
Nimaroff, Meyer, Irvington, N. J. 
Nock, Randolph M., Stockton 
Orton, L. R., Baltimore 
Oshrin, Henry, Jersey City, N. J. 
Ottenberg, Gilbert, Washington, D. C. 
Pierce, James L., Marianna, Fla. 
Pinsky, Myer M., Camden, N. J. 
Plassnig, Edwin, Baltimore 
Polizzotti, Joseph L., Paterson, N. J. 
Poplack, Samuel L., New Haven, Conn. 
Pulaski, Leo E., Shenandoah, Pa. 
Rathsprecher, Isadore, Newark, N. J. 
Rodriguez, Rafael M., San Juan, P. R. 
Rosenstein, Jack, New York City 
Sarnoff, Jack, New York City 
Schacter, Eugene J., North Braddock, Pa. 
Seiken, George, Liberty, N. Y. 
Silverstein, Jacob M., Millburn, N. J. 
Simon, Joseph R., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sinton, William A., Newport News, Va. 
Straka, Robert P., Homestead, Pa. 
Sulman, William, Reading, Pa. 
Tomaivoli, Michael F., Hoboken, N. J. 
Turner, Thomas B., Frederick 
Visconti, Joseph A., Hoboken, N. J. 
Wassersweig, Martin M., Reading, Pa. 
Weintraub, Harry, Baltimore 
Wiener, Joseph, Bensonhurst, N. Y. 
Zimmerman, Charles C, Cumberland 



i 

FRESHMAN 

Alperin, Benjamin. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Anker, Harry. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Askin, Aaron J., Baltimore 
Baker, Norman W., Reisterstown 
Ballard, Maggie B., Greenville, W. Va. 
Barranco, Salvatore H., Baltimore 
Beamon, Horace V., Savage, N. C. 
Beachley, Jack H., Hagerstown 
Bennett, Luther H., Akron, Ohio 
Bloch, Adolph, Passaic, N. J. 
Bronstein, Irving, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buccieri, Samuel F., Steelton, Pa. 
Caplan, Samuel H., EUicott City 
Campbell, Brice, Pleasant City, Ohio 
*Castagna, Joseph V., Baltimore 
Castronovo, Joseph, Providence, R. I. 
Clemson, Earle P., Baltimore 
Cohen, Morris, Baltimore 
Coniff, Arthur A., Baltimore 
Connell, Albert J., Carbondale, Pa. 
D'Angelo, Antonio F., Providence 
Davis, Henry V., Berlin, Md. 



CLASS 

Diamond. H. Elias, New York City 
DiPaula. Frank R.. Baltimore 
DiPaula, Samuel R., Baltimore 
Eanet, Paul. Washington, D. C. 
Edmonds, Charles W., Baltimore 
Efron, Bernard G., Baltimore 
Feemster, Olive S., Baltimore 
Feldman, Solomon C, Baltimore 
Finkelstein, Abraham H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Freedman, Herman, Freehold, N. J. 
Freedman, Max, Newark, N. J. 
French, August M., Vessie, Ky. 
Freuder, Arthur N., Coney Island, N. Y. 
Gahan, Emanuel, New York City 
Gerber, Isadore, Baltimore 
Gomez, Pedro J., Nicaragua, C. A. 
Gordon, Abel, Passaic, N. J. 
Graham. Kenneth L., Baltimore 
Gulck, Georg K., Aalborg, Denmark 
Hecht, Lawrence W., Havre de Grace 
Helfond, David M., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hyman, Calvin, Baltimore 



230 



Jensen, Jacob R., Aalborg, Denmark 
Jolson, Meyer S., Baltimore 
Karns, Clyde F., Cumberland 
Knapp, Alphonse J., Columbia, Pa. 
Kralikauckas, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Lavy, Louis T., Baltimore 
Levanovich, Charles J., Baltimore 
Levin, H. Edmund, Baltimore 
Levin, Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Lista, Louis J., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Lumpkin, Lloyd U., Baltimore 
Lusby, Frank F., Baltimore 
Manginelli, Emanuel, New York City 
Martino. George C, Newark, N. J. 
Matassa, Vincent L., Baltimore 
Mattikow, Bernard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Merva, Andrew J., Nanticoke, Pa. 
Meyls, George Adam, Jr., Baltimore 
Miller, Harry, New York City 
Misenheimer, Ed A., Concord, N. C. 
Moriconi, Albert F., Trenton, N. J. 
Nanigian, Elizabeth, Paxton, Mass. 
Nanigian, Mary, Paxton, Mass. 
Naylor, S. T., Oakland 
Newman, Richard D., Smithsburg 
Norment, Clinton C, Baltimore 
O'Boyle, Thomas J., Scranton, Pa. 
Plitt, Frieda R., Baltimore 
Polsue, William C, Charleston, W. Va. 
Radest, Louis J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rattenni, Arthur, Providence, R. I. 
Reifschneider, Herbert E., Baltimore 
Rex, Elmer G., Reinersville, O. 



Roberts, William F., Naugatuck, Conn. 
Robertson, Harold S., Somerville, Mass. 
Rocco, Frank, Newark, N. J. 
Roseman, Ned, Bronx, N. Y. 
Rosenberg, Albert A., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Rosenfeld, Max H., Baltimore 
Rothberg, Abraham S., New York City 
Sashin, David, New Yor!: City 
Sax, Benjamin J., New York City 
Scheuker, Paul, Baltimore 
Schmukler, Jacob, Newark, N. J. 
Schneider, David, Baltimore 
Schuman, William, Baltimore 
Schwartz, Ralph A., Newark, N. J. 
Shank, Louis W., Baltimore 
Sherman, Elizabeth B., Front Royal, Va. 
Shortess, George S., Baltimore 
Smith, Jesse E., Westminster 
Smith, Paul L., Altoona, Pa. 
Spano, Frank, West New York, N. J. 
Susser, Max H., Bayonne, N. J. 
Taub, Samuel, New York City 
Tayntor, Lewis O.. Salisbury 
Teitelbaum, Maurice L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tenaglia, Eutimic D., Providence, R. L 
Thompson, Thomas P., Forest Hill 
Tobias, Herbert R., Hancock, Md. 
Totterdale, William G., Baltimore 
Weinstein, Samuel, Freehold, N. J. 
Weiss, Louis L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weseley, Louis J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Winkler, Morris, Sharon, Pa. 
Wolfe, Samuel B., Baltimore 



SCHOOL FOR NURSES 



Bishop, Maud, Norfolk, Va. 
Boyd, Ruth, Street 
Dunn, Helen L., Baltimore 
Garvey, Kathryn A.. Oil City, Pa. 
Graham, Pearl B., Baltimore 
Harkins, Hidda, Street 
Hazen, Dorothy L., Union City, Pa. 
Herrington, Mazie, Meadville, Pa. 
Hoffman, Martha M., Smithsburg 
Hoke, Lillie R., Baltimore 
Horst, Kathryn E., Hagerstown 
Kish. Vilma C, Trenton, N. Y. 



SENIOR CLASS 

. Maxwell, Irene A.. Baltimore 
McCann, Wilkelminia N., Street 
Nagel, Ida M.. Federalsburg 
Pratt, Anna E., Baltimore 
Reade, Kathryn A., Harborton, Va. 
Schroeder, Marie, Cambridge 
Stailey, Margaret, Liverpool, Pa. 
Teeple, Helen S., Baltimore 
Toms, Kittie R., Funkstown 
West, Regina M., Martinsburg, W. Va. 
White, Ruth A., Federalsburg 



Alexander, Edith L., Matthews, N. G. 
Appleton, Pauline V., Punxsutawney, Pa. 
Barnes, Mirian U., NashvUle, N. C. 
Bell, Janet M., Waterbury, Conn. 
Bennett, Alice M., Baltimore 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 

Bennett, Bertha P., Sharptown 
Brude, Lucy A., Baltimore 
Callaway, Esther A., Bridgeville, DeL 
Compton, Pinkie L., Ronceverte, W. Va. 
Copenhaver, Elizabeth E., Bel Air 



231 



Davis, Marie M., Frostburg 
Davis, Ruth E., Federalsburg 
Fisher, Mary E., Cumberland 
Forrest, Lola R., Keymar 
Griffith, Myrtle, Princeton, Ind, 
Headley, Sarah P., Village, Va. 
Hughes, Claire, Baltimore 
Kraft, Dorothy C, EUicott City 
McCormick, Margaret J., North Adams, 

Mass. 
Moore, Rachel, Cambridge 
Morgart, J. Helen, Rainsburg, Pa. 
Pope, Jane, Fayetteville, N. C. 



Putt, Bernice G., Saxton, Pa. 

Rowe, Sarah E., Keedysville 

Schaale, Bernice D., Baltimore 

Scott, Jane, Eckhart 

Shaffer, Mary C, Westminster 

Slez, Irene M., Millington 

Spencer, Lenora F., Westminster 

Sponsler, Mary, Petersburg, Pa. 

Thomas, Kathryn A., East Mauch Chunk, 

Pa. 
Thompson, Icelene, Street 
Tillinghast, Robina H., FayetteviUe, N. C. 
Whitworth, Esther W., Elkton 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Barnsley, Martha, Olney 
Barr, Alberta, Port Deposit 
Cannon, Elizabeth, Seaford, Del. 
Coleman, Pearl, Burgess Store, Va. 
Coulter, Zelder, Newton, N. C. 
Croll, Mildred M., Federalsburg 
Forrest, Louise, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Frick, Esther E., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Garman, Helen M., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Hathcock, Mary A., Norwood, N. C. 
Haugh, Hazel C, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Hood, Dorothy, Baltimore 
Kirtner, Mattie, Radford, Va, 
McWhirter, Grace, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Mitchell, Gladys, Gaithersburg 
Moore, Kate, Claxton, Ga. 
Nock, Myrtle, Pocomoke 
Rankin, Margaret, Norfolk, Va. 
Scarborough, Annie L., Delta, Pa. 
Scarborough, Marietta, Georgetown, Del. 
Scott, Mary, Baltimore 
Shatzer, Myrtle, Cumberland 
Shoemaker, Charlotte, Huntingdon 
Stafford, Alyce, Connellsville, Pa. 
Wall, Laura, Nashville, N. C. 
Walter, Charlotte, Westminster 
Wertz, Gladys A., Batesburg, S. C, 
Whitley, Estelle, Albemarle, N. C, 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

THIRD-YEAR CLASS 

Andrews, Marvin Jackson, Bristol, Tenn. 



SECOND 

Albrecht, Walter E., Baltimore 
Baker, Israel, Baltimore 
Barall, William L., Towson 
Basil, George C, Annapolis 
Block, Solomon G., Phoebus, Va. 
Carliner, Louis A., Baltimore 
Chertkof, Frieda, Mt. Washington 
Cohen, Bernard J., Baltimore 
Coplin, Louis I., Baltimore 
Donnet, John, Baltimore 
Eldridge, Arthur C, Myersville 
Ernst, Myrle P., Gettysburg, Pa. 
Fields, Lorraine D., Pikesville 
Finkelstein, Morris L., Baltimore 
Flom, Charles, Baltimore 
Freiman, Harry, Baltimore 
Glass, Louis, Baltimore 
Hecker, Nathan, Baltimore 
Hinton, Murray S., Baltimore 



■YEAR CLASS 

Kalb, Francis P., Baltimore 

Katz, Benjamin R., Baltimore 

Kelley, Guy C, Salisbury 

Kirson, Abe R., Baltimore 

Kramer, Morris, Baltimore 

Leibowitz, Louis, Laurel, Del. 

Levin, Harry, Baltimore 

Marmor, Leon, Baltimore 

Mattox, William H., Elberton, Ga. 

Mears, Chase K., Nassawadox, Va. 

Mears, Lee K., Salisbury, Md. 

Moran, John E., Manchester, N. H. 

Mullen, Charles L., Hagerstown 

Musgrove, W. Gilbert, Baltimore 

Neel, Jerrold W., Baltimore 

Norton, Mrs. Edward, Laurel, Md. 

Pelaez, y Bringas, Jose M., Santiago, Cuba 

Ritt, Paul E., Baltimore 



232 



Rockman, Morris, Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Emanuel, Baltimore 
Rosenthal, Lewis R., Baltimore 
Shea, Harold J., Baltimore 
Sheehan, John L., Hillsboro, N. H. 
Stacy, Theodore E., Jr., Baltimore 



Slagmer, Owen R., Baltimore 
VanSlyke, Amos R., Overlea 
Voigt, Herman A., Baltimore 
Wagner, Raphael H., Baltimore 
Weinberg, Sol B., Staunton, Va. 
Wright, Lawrence Malcolm, Baltimore 



FIRST-YEAR CLASS 



Archer, Theodore, Joppa 

Barnes, Robert D., Baltimore 

Bettigole, Philip, Baltimore 

Bindok, Edward J., Baltimore 

Bleckman, Charles, Baltimore 

Block, Frank, Baltimore 

Calmen, Elmon H., Baltimore 

Carrera, Thomas C, Fajardo, P. R. 

Carey, Alford R., Towson 

Cohn, Nathan, Baltimore 

Corrado, Ernest M., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Cowan, William C, Roslyn 

Davidov, Louis, Baltimore 

Davies, Sydney P., Baltimore 

Fedder, Eli, Baltimore 

Finkelstein, David, Baltimore 

Fisher, Edward H., Catonsville 

Fisher, Michael A., Swissvale, Pa, 

Gaver, Paul G., Myersville 

Gerber, Minnie, Hagerstown 

Goldberg, Victor, Baltimore 

Goodman, Jerome, Baltimore 

Greenberg, Harry, Baltimore 

Hampson, Carol A., Baltimore 

Hantman, Harry H., Baltimore 

Harryman, Chauncey B., Mt. Washinffton 

Hayes, William B., Baltimore 

Henderson, Upshur K., Bridgetown, Va. 

Higger, Samuel, Baltimore 

Hirschowitz, Reuben J., Baltimore 

Hope, John William, Hampton, Va. 

Hopkins, Josephine E., Linthicum Heights 

Jones, Charles H., Baltimore 

Jones, Henry Alvan, Baltimore 

Kern, Joseph, Baltimore 

King, Melvin L., Westminster 

Kirson, Abraham, Baltimore 

Kolman, Minnie Freda, Baltimore 

Kfonthal, Jacob L., Baltimore 

LeGrande, George W., Crewe 

Levin, Abraham, Baltimore 

Levin, Bernard, Baltimore 

Levin, Morton, Baltimore 

Little, Luther E,, Darlington 

McCormick, Arthur F., Chateaugay, N. Y. 

McKay, William K., Luray, Va. 



Marciniak, Edward S., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Matthews, Vincent W., Baltimore 
Meikle, John D., Baltimore 
Miller, Leo, New York City 
Millman, Morton Max, Baltimore 
Monen, Joseph B., Baltimore 
Parsons, Herman, Ocean City » 

Paulson, Aaron A., Baltimore 
Pass, Victor E., Baltimore 
Pfeifer, Edward, Baltimore 
Poltilove, George J., Baltimore 
Raap, Irvin L., Baltimore 
Reamer, Israel T., Baltimore 
Robinson, Robert, Baltimore 
Rodman, Morris, Baltimore 
Rubin, Mortimer, Baltimore 
Rubinstein, Hyman Solomon, Baltimore 
Samuelson, Oscar, Baltimore 
Sanner, Richard T., Westemport 
Scher, Michael, Baltimore 
Schlein, Maurice, Baltimore 
Schmidt, Charles J., Baltimore 
Schmidt, George M., Baltimore 
Schoenfeld, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Schuster, John N., Baltimore 
Shapiro, Henry, Baltimore 
Slama, Frank J., Baltimore 
Smith, Francis E., Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Solomon, S. S., Baltimore 
Sothoron, Levin J., Mechanicsville 
Sloan, James J., Fairmont, W. Va. 
Staley, C. B., Fallston 
Straun, James S., Connellsville, Pa. 
Sussman, Hyman J., Woodbine, N. J. 
Swiskowski, Frank L., Baltimore 
Von Schulz, Augustine Paul, Baltimore 
Voshell, Harvey W., Centreville 
Tenner, David, Baltimore 
Vidal, Manuel J., Santiago de Cuba, Cuba 
Walter, Frank P., Kennett Square, Pa. 
Warfield, Harry N., Baltimore 
Warrenfeltz, J. F. F., Hagerstown 
Weiner, Solomon, Baltimore 
Wilkerson, Albert R., Baltimore 
Wilson, Julian F., DuBois, Pa. 
Wright, Edna Kirk, Baltimore 



233 






SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Ginsburg, Abraham, Baltimore 
Krauss, Louis H., Baltimore 
Lovely, Paul R., Manchester, N. H. 



«l 






THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1922 



Adams. J. Holland (Mrs.), Waldorf 

Allen, Kenneth, Berwyn 

Anderson, Janet T., Ocean 

Andrews, Virginia L., Cumberland 

Avery, Helena D., Washington, D. C. 
•Bacon, Ada E., Glencoe 

Baden, Edna I., Baden 

Baldwin, Nora I., Collington 

Baldwin, Virgie M., Savage 

Banfield, Frank W., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Barnhart, Emma J., Hancock 

Barnhart, Orintha P., Hancock 

Bartlett, Edith V., Cumberland 

Bass, Mamie L., Churchton 

Bassett, Mary E., Vienna 

Beall, Clarkson J., Summit, N. J. 

Bean, Lillian W., Waldorf 

Bean, Violet M., Great Mills 

Beitzell, Josephine M., Abells 

Bennett, Benjamin H., Washington, D. C. 

Bennett. Pauline M., Elkton 

Bennett, Ruth Leona, Artemas, Pa. 

Beyer, Elsie, Rognel Heights 

Billingsley, G. Katarah, Brandywine 

Biggs, Grace M., Jessup 
•Bland, Harriet W., Sparks 

Blonskey, Lula M., Cumberland 

Bloom, Louise M., Ellicott City 

Bollinger, Peary R., Reisterstown 

Bonnett, Harold M., Hyattsville 

Boston, Marguerite E., Cumberland 
•Bos well, Victor R., Columbia, Mo. 

Bowling, Marybeth, Marlboro 

Brady, Angela, Frostburg 

Bragg, John H., Washington, D. C. 

Brain, Earl F., Midlothian 

Branner, Cecil G., Pocomoke 

Branner, Ruth M., Dover, Del. 

Branson, James H., Douglas, Ga. 

Bray, Nona D., Hyattsville 

Bray, Walter C, Emporia, Va. 

Brinsfleld, Eva M., Rhodesdale 

Brookbank, Annie V., Charlotte Hall 

Brown, Kathrine, Centreville 

Brown, Mabel C, St. George Island 

Browne, Edward L., Chevy Chase 

Buck, A. P. (Mrs.), Landover 

Bullock, Earl M., Riverdale 



f Burns, Landon C, Burnsville, Va. 

•Burroughs, John A., Clinton 
Burroughs, James E., La Plata 
Bussley, Madeleine M., Compton 
Caldwell, John H., Galena 
Callis, Cecil R., Washington, D. C. 
Caltrider, Samuel P., Westminster 
Campbell, Thomas A., Lanham 
Carrick, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 
Carroll, James G., Cumberland 
Chassagne, Leo J., Baltimore 
Cherry, Joseph C, Brownsville, Pa. 
Cheseldine, Carrie L., Palmer's 
Childress, Marguerithe P., Cumberland 
Church, Carey F., Barnard, Vt. 
Clagett, John H., Jr., Roslyn 
Cleary, Hazel K., Mt. Airy 

•Clendaniel, George W., Clarksville 
Clinton, Sara F., Riverdale 
Cochrane, Ethel L., La Plata 
Cochrane, Laura C, Greensboro 
Colbert, Alice, Washington, D. C. 
Coleman, Veronica C, Cumberland 
Collins, George T., Rosslyn, Va. 
Collins, Mildred S., Preston 
Condry, Irene, Frostburj 
Coney, William, Jr., College Park 
Connors, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 
Connick, Edna M., Baden 
Connick, Elmer L. (Mrs.), Baden 
Connick, Wm. R. C, Baden 
Conte, Marion V., Norfolk, Va. 
Corey, Flora I., Worton 
Coronel, Ulpiano, College Park 
Coyle, John W., East Syracuse, N. Y, 
Craig, Evelyn M., Elkton 
Crane, Mary E., Harrington, Del. 
Crews, Charles W., Riverdale 
Crozier, Henry T., Ballston, Va. 
Davis, Birdie V., Chaptico 
Davis, Frank R., Darlington 
Dawson, Georgetta, Mayo 
Dawson, J. H., Falls Church, Va. 

•Day, Frank D., Hyattsville 
Dean, Blanch M., Elkton 
Decker, Henry, Charleroi, Pa. 
Dennis, General E., Greenrich, Va. 
Dent, Frances J., Oakley 



234 



Dent, Howard M., Cedarville 
Dent, Ida L., Oakley 
"Dent, Lettie M., Oakley 
Dix, Ethel M., Pocomoke City 
Dixon, Ida W., Galloways 
Dobbins, Wm. E., Lowell, Mass. 
Dodson, William A., Culpeper, Va. 
Donoho, Mary E., Oxford 
Dorsey, Ethel A., Beltsville 
Downs, Genevieve R., Poolesville 
Dronenburg, Margaret E., Ijamsville 
Dunning, Ernest C, Govans 
Easterlin, Leonard P., Gainesville, Fla. 
Ebbert, Asenath, Union Bridge 
•Elder, James W., Cumberland 
Elliott, Sarah V., Laurel 
Engel, Margaret G., College Park 
Engle, Ruth B., Frostburg 
Ericson, Charlotte M., Riverdale 
Espey, Agnes L., Hyattsville 
•Euster, K. Wilson, Pocomoke City 
•Evans, Josephine O., Washington, D. C. 
Eveland, Ethel M., Hillsboro 
Ewald, Margaret L., Mount Savage 
Eyler, Marie A., Thurmont 
Eyster, Mary E., Emmitsburg 
Faer, Nellie R., Hurry 
Faith, Gladys C, Clear Spring 
Falkenstein. Ruth A., Baltimore 
Farnsworth, Virginia B., Washington, D.C. 
Fawsett, Anna E., Gaithersburg 
Ferguson, W. M., Berwyn 
Filbert, Edwin B., Baltimore 
Flanagan, Sherman E., Walkersville 
Flannery, Michael J., Washington, D. C. 
Fleming, Gertrude R., Savage 
Forsyth, Lewis V., Berwyn 
Foster, Paul P., Washington, D. C. 
Fowler, Annie L., Chaptico 
Foxwell, Erva R., Leonardtown 
Fox well, Gertrude E., Leonardtown 
Frank, Paul, College Park 
Gaither, Anna W. B., Washington, D. C. 
Ganoza, Louis F., Peru, S. A. 
Gardner, Cleggit E., Williamsport 
Garrett, Alpha, Frostburg 
Garrott. Emily A., Knoxville 
Garver, Kathryu M., Hagerstown 
Gaver, Helen E., Mount Airy 
Gibbons, Edna H., Princess Anne 
Giffen, Sallie, Cumberland 
Glass, Gerald L., Hyattsville 
Glisan, Cora E., Libertytown 
Goldberg, Belle Sherma i, Baltimore 
Goldberg, Mary B., Baltimore 
Goldblatt, Leo A., Baltimore 
Goodman, Nancy D., Beaverdam, Va. 



Grabenstein, Mary E., Cumberland 
•Grafflin, Mildred W., Baltimore 
Graham, Laura N., Cabin John 
Grandfield, Robert F., Dorchester, Mass. 
Graves, Ellen S., Loveville 
Graves, Harvey C Branchville 
Green, Mary E., Boyds 
Griffith, Eleanor C, Forestville 
Grimes, Helen K., Cedarville 
Grimm, Paul H., Trego 

Grosskurth, William F., Washington, D. C. 
Guy, Blanche M. L., Clements 
Guyther, Claudia V., Valley Lee 
Hall, Annie L., Glenndale 
Hall, Harvey B.. Frederick 
Hancock, Hugh, Huddleston, Va. 
Harper, Floyd H., College Park 
Harrison. Alma V., Mt. Airy 
Harrison, Louise, Davidsonville 
Hawkins, Margaret A., Washington, D. C. 
Hawthorne, Noah B., Jr., Round Hill, Va. 
Hayden, Katharine S., Hurry 
Hearold, John W., Miskinon, Va. 
Heath, Frank M., Silver Spring 
Heck, Marian V., Harman 

Herbert, Evelyn, Severn 

Hevessy, Michael, South Norwalk, Conn. 

Hicks, Harry W., Kernstown, Va. 

Hileman, Julia M., Frostburg 

Hill, Elsie M., Cumberland 

Hill, Miriam P., Upper Marlboro 

Hill, William B., Hyattsville 

Hoffman, John C, Adamstown 

Hohman, Charles W., West, W. Va. 

Holland, Arthur H., Cartersville, Va. 

Holland, Eunice, Laurel 

Hosken. Stella L., Frostburg 
"Howland, Lionel B., Upper Marlboro 

Hughes, Helen C, Benedict 

Hull, George R., Woodsboro 

Hull, Harry B., Hagerstown 

Hunt, Eleanor E., Lonaconing 

Hunt, Viola M., Lonaconing 

James, Howard V., Williamsburg, Va. 

•Jenkins, Harvey F., Concord, N. H. 

Jewell, Edgar G., Poolesville 

Jewell, Lillian E., Hamilton 

Johnson, Leo C, District Line 

Jones, Mildred L., Snow Hill 
Kaetzel, Claren«e W.. Bmnswick 
Kefauver, J. Orville, Mt. Savage 
Kefauver, J. O. (Mrs.), Mt. Savage 
Keister, Monroe F., Midlothian 

•Keller, Earl R., Middletown 
Keller, Minnie S., Buckeystown 
Kelly, Esther E., Hobbs 
Kelly, Frank J., Beltsville 



235 



Kinsell, Hazel L., Clear Spring 

Knadler, Etelka F., Keedysville 

Knadler, Ruth W., Keedysville 
"Krabill, Verlin C, Burkittsville 

Kriecrer, Kathrjm G., Baltimore 
*Kupjian, Gabriel, Takonaa Park, D. C. 

Kwik, Pock, Djocdjakarta, Java 
**Lagasse, Felix S., Lochmere, N. H. 

Lample, Charles S., Baltimore 

Langenfeldt, Marie E., Hyattsville 
*Lark, Cornelia E., Shamokin, Pa. 

Lawrence, Ruth J., Elk Mills 

Layman, Florence M., Baltimore 

Leary, Lois M., Baltimore 

Lease, Ruby D., Unionville 

Lescure, John M., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lescure, William J., Harrisburg, Pa. 
"Lichtenwalner, D. C, Riverdale 

Lighter, Mary K., Middletown 

Lincoln, Leonard B., Takoma Park 

Lint, David L., Washington, D. C. 

Llewellyn, Carrington P., Esmont, Va. 

Long, L. S., Washington, D. C. 

Lowman, Clarence A., Funkstown 

Lucas, Jane, Cumberland 

Ludlum, Samuel L., Chevy Chase 

Lynn, Charles S., College Park 
•MacKay, Anna P., Clinton 

Malcolm, Wilbur G., Barton 

Manley, Anna, Midland 

Manley, Mary M., Midland 

Manning, Roger L, Accokeek 

Mantheiy, Felix L., College Park 

Marriotte, Nina V., Lander 

Martin, Virgil E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Martz, Ada E.. Frederick City 
"Martz, Grace S., Frederick 

Mauzy, James L., Harman, W. Va. 

Maxwell, Haddy O., Kingston, N. Y. 

McAllister. Emily D., Elkton 

McArdle, Madeline C, Washington, D. C* 

McAtee, Evelyn W., Germantown 

McAvoy, James R., College Park 

McCarthy, Harry L., Brookeville 

McConnell, Hattie B., Preston 

McCoy, Maud V., Beltsville 

McDonald, William F., Barton 

McGeady, Loretto, Cumberland 

McGlone, Joseph L., Baltimore 

McGregor, Elizabeth, Upper Marlboro 

McKnight, Snie, Cumberland 

McLain, Charles L., Washington, D. C. 

McNabb, Charles G., Ridgely 

Melown, Portia, Cumberland 

Mess, George B., Washington, D. C. 

Milburn, Rosa I., Charlotte Hall 

Miles, Zenobia, Upper Fairmount 



Miller. Edith, Pinto 

Miller. Effie M.. Beltsville 

Miller. Mary E., Elkton 

Miller, Ruby E., Clear Spring 

Miller, Ruth, Parkton 

Mitchell, Rosa A., Laurel 

Mitchell, William E., Berwyn 

Moffitt. Wm. J., Beltsville 

Moore, Addie M., Anacostia, D. C. 

Moore, Mary O., Centreville 

Moreland, Fannie E., Waldorf 

Morris, Alma, Abell 

Morris, Hilda V., Abell 

Morris, Sadie A., Abell 

Mortimer, Walter S., Neavitt 
"Morton, McKinley C, McConnellsburg, Pa. 

Moulton, Parthia C, Berwyn 

Mullen, Mason T., Baltimore 

Mullin, Vera D., Mt. Savage 

Mullinix, Margaret A., Woodbine 

Murray, Mabel N., Cumberland 

Mutz, Mary D., Omaha, Nebr. 

Myers, John A., Tom's Brook, Va, 

Nemphos, P. Charles, Baltimore 

Newkirk, Mabel I„ Big Springs 

Newkirk, Nellie K., Big Spring 

Nicht, Anna M., Frostburg 

Nicol, Victorine G. Manassas. Va. 

Noble, Ruth Poole, Denton 

Nolan, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 

Noon, B. A., Cumberland 

Norris, Ada L., Great Mills 

Norris, Elmer A.. Berwyn 

Norris, Lucille A., Great Mills 

Ogle, Edna K., Jefferson 

Ogle, Evelyn, Croome 

Oldenburg, Lillian J., Hyattsville 

Ollerenshaw, James J., Washington, D. C. 

Otter, John C. F., Raspeburg 

Owens, Lenora, Greenrock 

Parlett, William A., College Park 

Parr, Herbert F., Washington. D. C. 

Patrick, Olive J., Woodbine 

Payne, Olive G., Anacostia, D. C. 

Penman, Christene, Mt. Rainier 

Perdue, Dorothy, Salisbury 

Persinger, Harry B., Berwyn 

Peters, Elizabeth S., Sudlersville 

Pierce, John R., Washington, D. C. 

Poppen, Alvin W., Hyattsville 

Posey, Marian W.. La Plata 

Powers, Selwyn L., Hyattsville 
"Preinkert, Alma H., Washington, D. C. 

Price, Ruth E., Sudley 

Pullen, Jesse P., Martinsville, Va. 

Pumphrey, Esther, Germantown 

Racine. Clara E., Childs 



236 



Raley, Frances R., Leonardtown 
Raley. Nellie T.. Frostburg 
Raley. Zach. T.. St. George Island 
Ramas, Jose, Riverdale 
Randol, Lucile L., Omaha, Nebr. 
Reed, Emmons H., Denton 
Reeder. May D., Morganza 
Richardson. Elizabeth S., Snow Hill 
Richardson. Harry F., Washington. D. C 
Rider, Fanny R., Woodsboro 
Rieck, Adela A., Preston 
Ritter, Floyd V., Middletown. Va. 
Ritzel, Mary E., Westover 
Robinette. Catherine G., Flintstone 
Rodeheaver. Delbert C, Oakland 
Roelke, Laura D., Frederick 
Roelke, Mary E., New Market 
Roelke, Susie A., New Market 
Rogers, Annabell, Hyattsville 
Ross, Charles E., Oriole 
Rowe, George. Brentwood 
Rowe, Margaret A.. Cumberland 
Runkles, Eader B., Mt. Airy 
Russell, George O., Norfolk, Va. 
Sampson, H. B., Branchville 
Schaefer, Edna M., Frederick 
Scharflfetter, E. L., Washington. D. C. 
Schmedegaard, G. W., Washington, D. C. 
Screen, Isabelle, Cumberland 
Sears, Gustavus W., Clinton 
Selby, Hattie I., Cheltenham 
Senne, Henry L., Alexandria, Va. 
Shaffer, Harry H.. Berwyn 
Shanholtz. Mary S., Glen Echo 
Shatzer, Lilla V., Cumberland 
Shepherd, Matson, Berwyn 
Shives, Margaret A., Hancock 
Shoemaker, Charles, Bethesda 
•Shoemaker, Henry R., Middletown 
Simpich, Ira M., Landover 
Simpson, Ella M., Milestown 
Simpson, Vivian V., Takoma Park. D. C 
Skelley. Florence, Oldtown 
•Smith, Arthur M., College Park 
Smith, George F., Big Spring 
Smith, Nellie V., Flintstone 
Smith, Opal L., Landover 
Snively, Mary V., Keedysville 
Soper, Elsie M., Beltsville 
Soper. Sarah G., Beltsville 
Sparks. Elva, Barclay 
Sparks, Mary H., Sudlersville 
Specht, Bettie A., Tuscarara 
Spence, Lydia E., Baltimore 
Spence, Virginia, College Park 
Sprinkle, Paul C, Manassas, Va. 
Stanley, Edward A., Bluefield. W. Va. 



Stewart, Ann S., Rustburg, Va. 
Stewart, Caroline L.. Mitchellville 
Stewart, Harry Abernathy. Rustburg, Va. 
Strathman. George F.. Baltimore 
Strawbridge. Viola. Freeland 
Stull, Robert B., Frederick 
Sullivan, Clifford E.. Reisterstown 
Sullivan, Jeremiah J., Branchville 
Sussman, Abram A., Baltimore 
Tait, George S., Fairfax, Va. 
Tames, Katharine L., Hamilton 
Tammany, Charles A., Frederick 
Tan, H. L., Buitenzorg, Java 
Tarbell, Wm. E., Baltimore 
Taylor, Roland P.. Preston 
Tayman, Mary M., Brandywine 
Teague, Ethel M., Elkton 
Teeter, Benj. F., Flintstone 
Thibault, Gabrielle, Washington 
Thomas, Effie B., Frostburg 
Thompson, Franklin H., Baltimore 
Thornburg, Stella M., Cedarville 
Tobin, William, Washington, D. C. 
Townshend, Mildred H., Bel Alton 
Trivanovitch, Vaso M.. Zagreb. Jugoslavia 
Trower, Hugh C, Norfolk, Va. 
Twigg, Margaret M.. Oldtown 
Twilley, Annette M., Hurlock 
Unkle, Lillian V., Piscataway 
Vaughn, Wm. J., Lotta, N. C. 
Vigus, Edwin E., Baltimore 
Vivanco, Carlos D., Peru, S. A. 
Voshell, Ruth E., Centreville 
Walker, Francis M., Washington, D. C. 
Walker, Mitchell P., Washington 
Wall, Michael F., Washington, D. C. 
Walls, Henry R., College Park 
Ward, Hilda M., Baden 
Wardles. Wm. I., Anacostia, D. C. 
Watkins, Myrtie E., Monrovia 
Weaver, Adah M., Keedysville 
Welch, Mary M., Ridge 
White, Arthur P., Pittsville 
I White, Beulah I., Lonaconing 
White, Geo. A., College Park 
White, Saranna, Emmitsburg 
Whiteford, Michael W., Whiteford 
•Wickard. Harold C, Cumberland 
Widmyer, Charles L., Mt. Rainier 
Wiley, Benj. H., Bittinger 
Willison, Aileen, Cumberland 
Willison, Henrietta R., Cumberland . 
Wilson, Annie B., Laurel 
Wilson, Aseal S., Phoenix 
Wilson, Janice M., Keedysville 
Wilson, Lois, Keedysville 



237 



*Wolfe, Elsie I., Sugarloaf, Pa. 
Woodward, Amos R., Watersville 
Wood, Ellsworth, Washingrton, D. C. 
Worthingrton, Leland G., Hagerstown 
Wyand, Abbie V., Sharpsburg 



Wyvill, Ruth C, Marlboro 
Young, Laura M., Cumberland 
Zentz, Dorothy, Thurmont 
Zies, Orintha B., Hancock 



Summary of Student Enrollment as of March 1, 1923 



'Denotes graduate students in summer school. 



College of Agriculture 274 

College of Arts and Sciences 271 

Extension Courses in Commerce 445 

School of Dentistry 258 

College of Education 196 

College of Engineering 181 

Graduate School 69 

College of Home Economics 16 

School of Law 563 

School of Medicine : 336 

School for Nurses 98 

School of Pharmacy 145 

Summer School ^ 446 

Grand Total 3298 

Duplicates 184 

Net Total 3114 



238 



239 



GENERAL INDEX 



Administration, 9, 30, 40 

building, 22 

committees, 8 

council, 10 

officers of, 9 
Administrative officers, 9 

procedure, 40 
Admission, 84 

certificate, by, 35 

elective subjects, 35 

examination, by, 36 

to advanced standing, 37 

transfer, by, 37 

units, number required, 34 
Advanced bacteriology, 64 
Agents, county, 15, 16 
Agricultural building, 30 

chemistry, 116 

county agents, 15, 16 

economics, 53 

education, 138, 139, 145 

engineering, 60 

experiment station, 32, 43 

experiment station staff, 13 

eastern branch, 33 

extension, 32 

extension staff, 14 
Agriculture, College of, 43 

and home economics, 32 
Agronomy, 46, 60 
Algebra, advanced, 105 
Analytical chemistry, 113 
Animal husbandry, 47, 62 
Alumni association, 27 
Aquiculture, zoology and, 89 
Arts and Sciences, College of, 82 
Astronomy, 106 
Athletics, 27 
Bacteriology, 64, 65 
Bee culture, entomology and, 52, 69 
Bio-chemistry, 78 
Biometry, 62 
Board of Regents, 8 
Botany, 87 
Buildings, 22, 23, 24 



Calendar, University, 5, 6, 7 
Calvert Hall, 23 
Certificates, two-year. 38, 43 
Chemical building, 23 

society, 27 
Chemistry, department of, 110, ff 
Chorus, 123 
Clubs, 27. 28, 29 
College of Agriculture, 43 

department of, 43 

general curriculum for, 44 
College of Arts and Sciences, 82 
College of Education, 134 

agricxiltural, 138 

arts and science, 137 

home economics, 139 • 

industrial, 141 

summer school, 31 

teachers' special diplomas, 134 
College of Engineering, 148 

curricula, 153, ff 
College of Home Economics, 166 
Commerce and Business Administration, 

126 
Committees, 8 

Council of administration, 10 
County demonstration agents, 16 

clubs, 28 

husbandry, 49, 65 
Debating and oratory, 27 
Degrees, 37 

Dentistry, School of, 130 

Department of military science and tactics, 
180 

of physical education, 193 
Diamondback, 30 
Dining hall. 24 
Diplomas, 37 

Doctor of Philosophy. 164 
Domestic science, 166 
Dormitories, new, 23 
Dramatic club, 28 
Eastern branch, 33 
Economics, 98 

agricultural, 53, 54, 70 



241 



Education College of, 134, ff 
Electrical engineering, 154, 157 
Engineering, College of, 148 

building, 23 

civil, 153, 156 

degrees, 149 

mechanical, 155, 160 

Society. 28 
English, 92 
Entomology, 51, 69 
Examination, 41 
Expenses, fees and, 38, 40 

Baltimore schools, 40 

special, 39 
Experiment Station, Agricultural, 24, 32, 43 
Extension service, 32 

and research, 32 

staff, 14 
Faculty, 10, 11, 12, 13 

committees, 17 
Fellowships, 26, 45 
Floriculture, 56, 73 
Foods and nutrition, 166 
Forestry, 52 

Fraternities and sororities, 28 
French, 108 

General agriculture, curriculum for, 54 
General information, 19 
CTenetics, 61 
German, 109 
Gerneaux Hall, 25 
Glee clubs, 123 
Grading system, 41 
Graduate School, The, 163 

council, 10 

fees, 38 
Graduation and degrees, 37, 43 
High school scholarships, 25, 26 
Highway Engineering, 156 
Home economics. College of, 166 
Honor and awards, 26 
Honor system, 41 
Horticultural building, 25 
Hospital, Baltimore, 23 

College Park, 24 
Income, 33 
Industrial chemistry. 111, 117 

scholarships, 25, 26 
Infirmary, 24 

Instruction, officers of, 11, 12, 13 
Kappa Alpha, 28 
Keystone club, 29 
Language and literature, 83 
Late registration fee, 40 
Latin, 91 

Law, school of, 171 
Le Cercle Francais, 29 



Library, 25 

Literature, English language and, 83 

Literary societies, 28 

Location of the University, 21 

Master of Arts, 164 

of Science, 164 
Mathematics, 105 
Medals and prizes, 26, 27 
Medicine, School of, 173 

Military science and tactics, department of, 
180 

medal, 27 
Morrill Hall, 23 
Music, 122 

New Mercer Literary Society, 28 
Nu Sigma Omicron, 28 
Officers, administrative, 9 

of instruction, 11, 12, 13 
Oratory, 26 

Organic Chemistry, 114 
Organization, University, 27, 28 
Pharmacy, School of, 189 
Physical education and recreation, depart- 
ment of, J 93 

examination, 41 

training, 41 
Physiology, 78 
Physics, 118 
Poultry building, 24 

husbandry, 58, 79 
Pre-medical course, two-years, 119 

curriculum, 120 
Prize, citizenship, 27 
Refunds, 40 

Register of students, 194 
Registration, date of, 40 

penalty for late, 39 
Research, extension and, 32 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 180 
Rifle club, 29 
Rossbourg club, 29 

Sanitary engineering, hydraulic and, 148 ff. 
Scholarship and self-aid, 25 

industrial, 26 
School of Dentistry, 130 
School of Law, 171 
School of Medicine, 173 
School of Pharmacy, 189 
Self-aid, scholarships and, 25, 26 
Sigma Nu, 28 
Sigma Phi Sigma, 28 
Societies, 28 
Sociology, 103 
Soils, 80 
Sororities, 28 
Spanish, 108 
Staff, Experiment Station, 13, 14 

Extension Service, 14, 15 



242 



Station, Agricultural Experiment, 32, 43 
Student assembly, 28, 41 

organizations and activities, 28, 29 

publications, 30 
Summer camps, 181 
Summer school, 31 
Surveying, 162 
Terra Marine, 80 
Tractors and trucks, 60 
Trigonometry. 106 



Tuition, 38 

Unclassified students, 37 

Uniforms, 181 

University Council, 10 

Veterinary medicine, 59, 81 

Vocational education, 138, 144 

Withdrawals, 40 

Water supply, 25 

Woman's home economics practice Louse, 25 

Zoology. 89 



243 



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