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Full text of "Catalogue 1929-1930"

1929-1930 



THE 
CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 




CATALOGUE 

1315-1930 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA • PENNSYLVANIA 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

WAS CREATED, IN I92.4 
UNDER AN ENDOWMENT 

By MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

AND IS OPERATED UNDER A CHARTER OF THE 
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Philip S. Collins 

SECRETARY 

Cary William Bok 

TREASURER 

William Curtis Bok 

"^oard of "Directors 

Mary Louise Curtis Bok 
William Curtis Bok Cary William Bok 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis Philip S. Collins 

Mrs. Samuel S. Fels 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



T)i rector 
JOSEF HOFMANN 



PURPOSE 

TO HAND DOWN THROUGH CONTEMPORARY 

MASTERS THE GREAT TRADITIONS 

OF THE PAST 

TO TEACH STUDENTS TO BUILD 
ON THIS HERITAGE FOR 
THE FUTURE 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 
OFFERS TO STUDENTS 

Instruction by world-famous artists who give individual 
lessons. 

Free tuition. 

Financial aid, when warranted. 

Steinway Grands, string and wind instruments rent free, 
to deserving students; the Steinways being placed in the 
domiciles of students who major in Pianoforte. 

Summer sojourns in the United States and Europe, to 
advanced and exceptionally gifted students, under artistic 
supervision of their respective master-teachers of the Curtis 
Institute. 

Opportunities to attend concerts of the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra and important visiting artists, also performances of 
the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York and the 
Philadelphia Grand Opera Company, as part of their 
musical education. 



DURING THE PERIOD OF STUDIES WHEN 
WARRANTED BY THEIR PROGRESS 

Participation as soloists in performances of the Philadelphia 
Grand Opera Company, recently affiliated with The Curtis 
Institute of Music. 

Participation in twenty radio concert programs which are 
broadcast from Casimir Hall through the Columbia Broad- 
casting System. 

Participation in the Curtis Orchestra in concerts, radio and 
grand opera performances. 

Participation in the Curtis Institute concert courses at uni- 
versities, colleges, music clubs and civic organizations, and 
as soloists with the Curtis Orchestra. 

Financial assistance in launching the Curtis graduate stu- 
dents of exceptional achievement upon a public career. 

[ PAGE NINB ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Director 
JOSEF HOFMANN 

Dean 
GRACE H. SPOFFORD 

Assistant to the Dean 
ELIZABETH Z. SWENSON 

Kegistrar 
MARGARET H. BENKERT 

Student Counselor 
EMILY L. McCALLIP 

Librarian 
MARJORIE WINN . 

Comptroller 
H. W. EASTMAN 

Consultant 

and 
Radio Supervision 

GEOFFREY HARRIS 

Concert Management 
RICHARD COPLEY 

Publicity 
EMIL RAYMOND 



[ PAGE ELEVEN j 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

The various Departments of The Curtis Institute of Music are under the 
personal direction and supervision of the following members of its Faculty: 

Marcella Sembrich Voice 

Leopold Auer Violin 

Josef Hofmann Pianoforte 

Emil Mlynarski Orchestra and Opera 

Felix Salmond Violoncello 

Louis Bailly .... Viola and Chamber Music 
RosARio Scalero .... Theory and Composition 

Carlos Salzedo Harp 

Harry Kaufman Accompanying 

Lynnwood Farnam Organ 

Anton Brees Campanology 

These artists, in addition to their duties as Heads of Departments, 
personally instruct students. 



[ PAGE TWELVE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE FACULTY 



MUSICAL 



Aronoff, Max 
AuER, Leopold 
Bachmann, Edwin 
Bailly, Louis 
Barclay, Dagmar Rybner 
BoLOTiNE, Leonid 
Brees, Anton 
Cailliet, Lucien 
Chasins, Abram 
Cohen, Sol 
CoNNELL, Horatio 
Deak, Stephen 
Del Negro, Ferdinand 
De Gogorza, Emilio 
DoNATELLi, Philip A. 
Drummond, Ethel S. 
Farnam, Lynnwood 

Fonaroff, Vera 

GuETTER, Walter 

Hageman, Richard 

HoFMANN, Josef 

Horner, Anton 

Kaufman, Harry 

Kincaid, William M. 



Lambert, Alexander 

Levin, Sylvan 
Luboshutz, Lea 
Meiff, Albert 

MlQUELLE, ReNEE LoNGY 

Mlynarski, Emil 
Pons, Max 
Salmond, Felix 
Salzedo, Carlos 
Saperton, David 
Saumelle, Minna 
scalero, rosario 
Schwar, Oscar 
Sembrich, Marcella 
Simons, Gardell 
Soffray, Anne-Marie 
Svecenski, Claire 
Tabuteau, Marcel 
ToRELLO, Anton 
Van Emden, Harriet 
Vengerova, Isabelle 
Von Wymetal, Jr., Wilhelm 
Zechiel, Ernest 

ZiMBALlST, EfREM 



ACADEMIC 



Beck, Jean B. 
Daudon, Rene 
Fernberger, Samuel W. 
Gregory, Eufemia Giannini 
Harbeson, William Page 



King, Samuel Arthur 
Lenrow, Elbert 
Nichols, Roy F. 
Summers, Helen 
Turk, Martha 



Wesner, Mary B. 



[ PAGE THIRTEEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OT MUSIC 



STUDIES 



Accompanying 

Campanology 

Chamber Music and 
Ensemble Playing 

Conducting 

Harp 

History of Music 

Languages, Literature 
AND Diction: 

English 
French 
German 
Italian 

Operatic Acting and 
Stage Deportment 

Operatic Coaching and 
Repertoire 

Orchestra Playing: 
Violin 
Viola 

Violoncello 
Double Bass 
Flute 
Oboe 
Clarinet 
English Horn 
Bassoon 
Contrabassoon 



French Horn 

Trumpet 

Trombone 

Tuba 

Percussion 

Organ 

Pianoforte : 
Grade A 
Grade B 

Platform Deportment 

Psychology 

Theory and Composition: 
Elements of Music 
Solfege 
Harmony- 
Counterpoint 
Instrumentation and 

Orchestration 
Chamber Music Score 

Reading 
Orchestra Score Reading 
Dictation 

Viola 

Violin 

Violoncello 

Voice 

World History 



[ PAGE FOURTEEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



BUILDINGS AND LOCATION 



[ PAGE FIFTEEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Occupying three fine old remodelled residences, The Curtis 
Institute of Music, facing the green of Rittenhouse Square, 
is in the heart of the best residential section of Philadelphia. 
It is within four blocks of the Academy of Music where the 
symphony concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the con- 
certs of important visiting artists and the performances of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company of New York and the Phila- 
delphia Grand Opera Company are given. 

CASIMIR HALL 

Casimir Hall has a seating capacity of 300, and adjoins the 
main building of the school. The interior walls, of white 
mahogany, are panelled up to the domed ceiling. The illumi- 
nation is effected by indirect lighting. 

The concert organ is a four-manual Aeolian and is used for 
students' lessons as well as for concerts. 

A proscenium elevator facilitates the placing on the stage 
of pianos* that are stored on the floor below. 

In this hall, the students are given the opportunity of 
acquiring experience in performing before an audience under 
conditions similar to those which they will encounter later 
in professional life. 

LIBRARY 

The library consists of 11,000 volumes — books, music and 
scores. It includes many original and unedited editions of 
music of the great masters. Also, it embraces a generous 
collection of Victor, Columbia, Brunswick, Odeon and Polydor 
records. 

*Thc Steinway is the official piano of the Institute. 

[ PAGE SIXTEEN ] 




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ENTRANCE TO CASIMIR HALL 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VOICE 

Marcella Sembrich 
Head of Department 



Instructors 

Marcella Sembrich 

Emilio de Gogorza 

Harriet van Emden 

Horatio Connell 

Coaching and Repertoire 

Richard Hageman 

Harry Kaufman 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Sylvan Levin 

Max Pons 

Diction 

Rene Daudon 

Eufemia Giannini Gregory 

Samuel Arthur King 

Minna Saumelle 

Martha Turk 



[ PAGE TWENTY-ONB ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MARCELLA SEMBRICH 

Marcella Sembrich Kochanski, who was destined to become 
one of the world's greatest sopranos, was born in Lemberg, 
Poland. She adopted her mother's maiden name of Sembrich 
to serve her professional career. At the age of five she received 
her first musical instruction from her father in piano and violin. 
Young Marcella entered the Lemberg Conservatory when she 
was eleven to study the piano with Guillaume Stengel, har- 
mony with Miculi and violin with Bruchmann. Five years 
later, Marcella was sent to Vienna to continue her piano 
studies under Julius Epstein and violin under Helmesberger, 
It was there that her great possibilities as a singer were dis- 
covered. One year later, the girl was sent to study voice with 
Lamperti in Milan. 

Her debut as singer was made in Athens, in 1877, and suc- 
cess in opera came swiftly. Engagements in London, Paris, 
Dresden, Berlin, St. Petersburg (Leningrad), Vienna and 
Madrid followed in quick succession, and in 1883, Madame 
Sembrich was engaged as leading soprano at the Metropolitan 
Opera and made her debut as Lucia. Concert tours and oper- 
atic engagements in Europe alternated with her visits to 
America and from 1302. to 1909 she was continuously engaged 
by the Metropolitan Opera Company. After retiring from 
operatic and concert work, Madame Sembrich devoted her- 
self to teaching and has since developed such singers as 
Jeritza, Dusolina, Giannini, Hulda Lashanska and Queena 
Mario. 



[ PAGE TWENTY-TWO ] 




MARCELLA SEMBRICH 




EMILIO DE GOGORZA 





HARRIET VAN EMDEN 



HORATIO CONNELL 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EMILIO de GOGORZA 

Spain, France and England have all shared in the musical 
endowment bestowed upon this artist. He was born of Span- 
ish-American parentage in Brooklyn, New York. In En- 
gland, he undertook singing as a serious study and became a 
favorite as a boy soloist in church and school choirs. He 
then continued his studies at the Ecole Monge and the 
Lycee Louis-le-Grand in Paris, and it was in France where 
he made his first appearance on the concert stage. 

de Gogorza returned to America and received instruction 
from Moderati and Agramonte in New York. A visit to 
Paris resulted in his becoming a pupil of the famous Emile 
Bourgeois, singing master of the Opera Comique. In 1897, 
de Gogorza was heard in a concert in New York with Mar- 
cella Sembrich. From that date his appearances have been 
continuous both in recitals and with the leading orchestras 
in the United States and Europe. 

With his unusual gift for languages, Emilio de Gogorza 
has been able to enrich his programs with the rarely heard 
songs and folk music of many races. He has cultivated in 
his audiences a taste and appreciation for the songs of the 
younger French composers, for Russian folk songs, and has 
revealed a new world of Spanish art song in the melodies of 
Andalusia, Catalonia, and the Country of the Basques. 



[ PAGE TWENTY-FIVE J 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HARRIET VAN EMDEN 

Miss van Emden was born in Milwaukee. At an early age 
she came to New York and enrolled as a vocal student at the 
Institute of Musical Art, and later went to Berlin to study 
with Vittorino Moratti. In 1917 she was accepted as a pupil 
by Madame Marcella Sembrich, with whom she studied until 
her debut, which took place in New York City in 192.1. 

Miss van Emden appeared extensively in recitals in this 
country during that season, and the next year made her 
European debut as soloist with the Concertgebouw Orchestra 
in Amsterdam under the conductorship of Willem Mengelberg ; 
she subsequently was engaged as soloist with symphony 
orchestras in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. 

HORATIO CONNELL 

Horatio Connell was born in Philadelphia, and had his first 
instruction there with Emil Gastel. He completed his studies 
at Frankfurt-on-Main, Germany, under Julius Stockhausen, 
a pupil of Manuel Garcia. 

Mr. Connell made his debut at Queens Hall with the London 
Symphony Orchestra in 1905 and thereafter made most suc- 
cessful tours of Germany and Great Britain, where he was 
recognized as one of the foremost oratorio singers. 

Having spent nine years abroad in study and concertizing, 
Mr. Connell returned to the United States in 1909, and has 
since been heard in recitals and at most of the important 
music festivals throughout the country. He has also appeared 
as soloist with the leading symphony orchestras in this 
country and abroad. 



[ PAGE TWENTY-SIX ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF PIANOFORTE 

Josef Hofmann 
Head of Department 

Division of Pianoforte* — Grade A 

Josef Hofmann 
Head of Division 

Instructors 

Josef Hofmann Alexander Lambert 

David Saperton Isabelle Vengerova 

(Assistant to Mr. Hofmann) 



Division of Pianoforte — Grade B 

Abram Chasins 
Head of Division 

Instructors 

Abram Chasins Claire Svecenski 

Ethel S. Drummond 

AND OTHERS, DRAWN FROM THB STUDENT 
BODY OF THE INSTITUTE 



THE STEINWAY IS THE OFnCIAL PIANO OF 
THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



[ PAGE TV^'ENTY-SEVEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



JOSEF HOFMANN 

Josef Hofmann was born of musical parents; his father was a 
teacher, pianist-composer and orchestra leader of repute, and 
his mother, a noted soprano of the Cracow Municipal Opera. 
He began to study music before the age of four; his first teacher 
was his sister. A year later Hofmann senior undertook the 
boy's musical training. 

Josef Hofmann made his first public appearance in a town 
near Warsaw when he was five years old. Other concerts 
followed in the leading cities of Poland and when he was 
eight he was heard by Anton Rubinstein, who predicted a 
career of exceptional brilliance for the youthful prodigy. At 
the age of nine, Josef Hofmann was heard in Germany, France, 
England and Scandinavia. Soon after, in 1887, he appeared 
for the first time in the United States, where he gave forty 
concerts. The remarkable playing of the eleven-year-old child 
aroused the enthusiasm of Alfred Corning Clark of New York 
and he generously offered to provide the boy's father with the 
necessary means to further his musical education and artistic 
growth. Young Josef then returned to Europe to study music 
in Berlin. Four years later, in 1891, he became the pupil 
of Anton Rubinstein. 

In 1894, then eighteen years old, Hofmann returned to the 
concert platform. He toured Germany and England, and in 
1896 made his Russian debut. Two years later he again toured 
the United States and since then has been constantly before 
the public as concert pianist. 

Hofmann 's compositions are numerous. His orchestra works 
have been performed in the United States and Europe by 
Nikisch, Schuch, Safonoff, Stokowski, Zach, Gabrilowitsch, 
Damrosch and Stock. 

[ PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT ] 




JOSEF HOFMANN 




DAVID SAPERTON 




ALEXANDER LAMBERT 





ISABELLE VENGEROVA 



ABRAM CHASINS 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DAVID SAPERTON 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, David Saperton began the 
study of piano at the age of six, under the guidance of his 
grandfather, an internationally-knovvrn tenor and musician. 
Mr. Saperton 's father was a graduate physician of the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh and a basso of repute. At the age of ten, 
young Saperton made his first public appearance with the 
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and at fifteen made his New 
York debut in a recital; appearing soon after as soloist at one 
of the Metropolitan Opera House Sunday concerts. He then 
went to Europe and, in 1908, made his Berlin debut in a joint 
recital with Geraldine Farrar, and followed this with success- 
ful appearances throughout Europe. Since his return, Mr. 
Saperton has been concertizing and teaching extensively in 
this country. 

ALEXANDER LAMBERT 

Born of a musical family in Warsaw, Poland, Alexander 
Lambert received his first piano instruction from his father, 
a well-known violinist. Upon the advice of Anton Rubinstein 
he was sent to Vienna and there studied with Julius Epstein. 
He later became a pupil of Liszt. 

In 1880 Mr. Lambert came to America, where he remained 
for three years, concertizing and teaching. Thereafter he 
returned to Europe, to appear in concerts with Joachim and 
Sarasate, and with the leading orchestras. In addition to this 
he taught at "Kullaks Akademie der Tonkunst," in Berlin. 

Mr. Lambert's love for teaching has always been upper- 
most and his music school in New York City enjoyed an 
international reputation for eighteen years. He is acknowl- 
edged as one of the leading teachers of pianoforte. 



[ PAGE THIRTY-ONE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ISABELLE VENGEROVA 

A native of Vilna, Russia, Madame Isabelle Vengerova is a 
descendant of a family widely known in the Russian literary 
world. At an early age she was sent to the Vienna Conserva- 
tory to study the piano with Josef Dachs. She later became 
a pupil of Leschetizky. 

Returning to Russia she continued her studies at the St. 
Petersburg Conservatory with Madame Essipoff and was soon 
named her assistant. In 1910, by the unanimous vote of a 
faculty which included Auer and LiadofF, she was elected 
Professor of Pianoforte under the direction of GlazounofF and 
held this position for twelve years. 

She has been a member of the piano faculty of The Curtis 
Institute since its foundation . MadameVengerova has appeared 
in concerts in the principal musical centers of Europe and 
America. 

ABRAM CHASINS 

Abram Chasins was born in New York. At six, young Chasins 
became a pupil of Bertha Tapper; soon afterward he won a 
scholarship at the Institute of Musical Art and later was 
accepted as a pupil by Richard Epstein. Between the age of 
sixteen and twenty he received private instruction from Ernest 
Hutcheson and for the following two years continued his 
lessons with Mr. Hutcheson at the Juilliard Graduate School, 
where he w^as awarded a fellowship in piano. Chasins was 
also successful in winning a fellowship in composition at the 
same school and pursued this study with Rubin Goldmark. 
Since 192.6 he has been studying piano with Josef Hofmann 
at The Curtis Institute of Music. Mr. Chasins has composed 
many works for piano, a number of which have been per- 
formed by prominent artists here and abroad. His piano 
concerto was recently introduced by the Philadelphia Sym- 
phony Orchestra under Gabrilowitsch, with Mr. Chasins as 
the soloist. 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VIOLIN 

Leopold Auer 
Head of Department 

Instructors 

Leopold Auer 

Efrem Zimbalist 

Lea Luboshutz 

Vera Fonaroff 

Edwin Bachmann 



Violin Division of Chamber Music 
and Orchestra Departments 

Instructors 

Albert Meiff 

Leonid Bolotine 



[ PAGE THIRTY-THREB ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LEOPOLD AUER 

Professor Auer, dean of violin pedagogues and "maker of 
violinists," has enjoyed throughout a long life the highest 
distinction in many realms of music. Pre-eminent as soloist, as 
orchestra conductor and as teacher, he is also widely known 
for his original compositions and transcriptions. During the 
past twenty years, the success of his pupils has brought him 
worldwide fame. 

Leopold Auer was born in Hungary. He studied first at the 
Vienna Conservatory and later with Joachim; before he was 
twenty young Auer was named conductor of the Dusseldorf 
Orchestra and occupied a similar post in Hamburg. In 1868 
he was appointed court violinist at St. Petersburg (Leningrad) 
and held this post continuously until the overthrow of the 
Imperial regime in Russia. He succeeded Wieniawski as Pro- 
fessor of the St. Petersburg Conservatory and during this entire 
period was conductor of the Imperial Music Association. He 
has been acclaimed in the principal cities of Europe as the 
leading violinist of the age. 

Political hazards compelled Professor Auer to leave St. 
Petersburg in 1917, and after a brief visit to Norway he 
came to America early in 1918. Here he was engaged for a 
concert tour of the principal cities, after which he devoted 
himself to teaching privately in New York City. Among his 
pupils are numbered Elman, Heifetz, Zimbalist, Kathleen 
Parlow, Poliaken, Cecilia Hansen, Rosen and Seidel. 



[ PAGE THIRTY-FOUR ] 




LEOPOLD AUER 




EFREM ZIMBALIST 



LEA LUBOSHUTZ 




VERA FONAROFF 



EDWIN BACHMANN 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Known throughout the musical world as one of the most 
brilliant of concert violinists, Efrem Zimbalist displayed as 
a child the genius that was to bring him future renown. At 
the age of nine he was appointed first violinist of the orchestra 
at the Opera House in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, his birthplace. 
Soon after, he was accepted as a pupil by Professor Auer at 
the Imperial Conservatory of Music, in Petrograd. 

In 1911, when he made his American debut, the principal 
cities of Europe had already acclaimed him as one of the 
world's greatest violinists. Since then, Mr. Zimbalist has 
made several concert tours around the world. He has con- 
tributed original compositions for the violin, piano and voice, 
and has composed successful light operas. 

L£A LUBOSHUTZ 

Lea Luboshutz was born in Odessa, and began her concert 
career as a violinist at the age of six. Upon the advice of 
Vassily Safonoff, noted Russian conductor, she pursued her 
studies at the Moscow Conservatory, where he was director. 
There she was awarded a gold medal and, at the age of six- 
teen, was heard in recitals in Poland, Germany, and France. 
She appeared also as soloist with orchestras under the con- 
ductorship of Safonoff and Arthur Nikisch. This was followed 
by concerts in America and tours of European countries. 

Madame Luboshutz later studied for three years with Eugene 
Ysaye and became one of his most brilliant pupils. Since 
then she has appeared extensively in concerts and as soloist 
with leading orchestras, both in the United States and abroad. 



[ PAGE THIRTY -SEVEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



VERA FONAROFF 

Vera Fonaroff, born in Russia, began to study the violin 
when she was seven with Mark FonarofF in New York City, 
and two years later, at the tender age of nine, appeared as 
soloist at a Sunday concert with the Metropolitan Opera 
House Orchestra. After making frequent appearances as a 
child, she was sent to England to study with Dr. Adolph 
Brodsky at the Royal Manchester College of Music, and five 
years later was awarded a Diploma with Distinction as 
artiste and teacher. Vera FonarofF toured England exten- 
sively, playing both in recitals and with the important sym- 
phony orchestras; she also participated in the Ancoats 
Brotherhood Concerts in conjunction with the musical lec- 
ture-recitals given by Bernard Shaw, and later studied with 
Franz Kneisel. 

Since 1908 Madame Fonaroff has made several transconti- 
nental tours and, following in the footsteps of her distin- 
guished husband, Mark Fonaroff, she has become a well-known 
pedagogue. 

EDWIN BACHMANN 

Born in Hungary, Edwin Bachmann received his musical 
training at the Budapest Conservatory and the Budapest 
Academy of Music. He was first taught to play the violin 
by Berre and later studied with the famous teacher, Henri 
Gobbi. Edwin Bachmann made his debut as soloist with the 
Budapest State Symphony Orchestra at the age of seventeen 
and was subsequently engaged as concert master of the Buda- 
pest Symphony Orchestra. He continued his studies with Jeno 
Hubay and was accepted as a chamber music student by Popper. 

Mr. Bachmann made a concert tour in South America before 
coming to the United States, where he has been heard fre- 
quently as soloist. Mr. Bachmann was engaged as a member 
of the Russian Symphony and the New York Symphony 
Orchestras and was with the Letz Quartet for seven years, as 
well as the Elman Quartet during its existence. 

[ PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENTS OF VIOLA AND 
CHAMBER MUSIC 

Louis Bailly 
Head of Departments 

and 

Instructor 

Max Aronoff 

Instructor in Viola Division of 

Chamber Music and Orchestra Departments 



DEPARTMENT OF VIOLONCELLO 

Felix Salmond 

Head of Department 

and 

Instructor 



Stephen Deak 

Instructor in Violoncello Division of 
Chamber Music and Orchestra Departments 



[page thirty-nine 1 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LOUIS BAILLY 
A native of Valenciennes, France, Louis Bailly, at the age of 
seventeen, won a first prize for viola playing at the Paris Con- 
servatoire. He soon gained a reputation as soloist, playing 
with the Concerts Colonne, the Societe des Concerts du Con- 
servatoire and other larger orchestras. 

Having decided upon a career as a specialist in Chamber 
Music, he became a founder-member of the famous Capet 
Quartet. From this organization he passed to the Geloso 
Quartet, and later became a member of the Flonzaley and 
Elman Quartets. 

Mr. Bailly has appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the National Symphony 
under Bodansky and with the Friends of Music, New York 
City. Since 192.0 he has been a member of the Jury of the 
Paris Conservatoire. 

FELIX SALMOND 
A musical endowment was the birthright of this violoncel- 
list; his father was Normand Salmond, the celebrated English 
bass-baritone; his mother was a professional pianist. Felix 
Salmond was born in London. His early gifts matured under 
the tutelage of Professor W. E. Whitehouse of the Royal Col- 
lege of Music in London. He then continued his studies in 
Brussels with Edouard Jacobs. 

Mr. Salmond made his debut in London in 1909, and there- 
after appeared in concerts throughout Great Britain. In 1911 
he made his debut on the Continent. 

Mr. Salmond has appeared in concerts with the most cel- 
ebrated pianists of the day, and as soloist with the leading 
orchestras. He made his first concert appearance in the 
United States in 192.2., and has alternated his visits here with 
concert tours of Europe. 

[ PAGE FORTY ] 




LOUIS BAILLY 




FELIX SALMOND 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF ACCOMPANYING 

Harry Kaufman 

Head of Department 

Instructor 

and 

Official Accompanist at the Institute 

Other Accompanists 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Theodore Saidenberg 

Sylvan Levin 

AND OTHERS, DRAWN FROM THE STUDENT 
BODY OF THE INSTITUTE 



[ PAGE FORTY-THREE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HARRY KAUFMAN 

Harry Kaufman was born in New York City, of Russian 
parentage. At the early age of ten he was vocal soloist and 
choir leader in the principal synagogues of that city. 

When Mr. Kaufman was twelve years of age he commenced 
his piano lessons with Gottfried Kritzler at the New York 
College of Music, and at fifteen became the pupil of Sigismond 
Stojowski; later continuing his studies with Josef Hofmann. 

Mr. Kaufman has appeared as soloist and assisting artist 
with the New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia 
Orchestras respectively, and has also been heard in numerous 
solo recitals. His linguistic abilities and wide acquaintance 
with violin, 'cello and chamber music, as well as vocal litera- 
ture, have made Mr. Kaufman much in demand as an artist- 
accompanist. 

He has toured the United States with Efrem Zimbalist, 
Carl Flesch, Lea Luboshutz, Toscha Seidel, Arthur Hartmann, 
Theodore Spiering, Miron Poliaken, Felix Salmond, Louis 
Bailly, Alma Gluck, Charlotte Lund, Erica Morini, the late 
George Hamlin, and other artists of prominence. 



[ PAGE FORTY-rOUR ] 




HARRY KAUFMAN 




DAGMAR RYBNER BARCLAY 




SYLVAN LEVIN 



THEODORE SAIDENBERG 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF HARPt 

Carlos Salzedo 
Head of Department 

and 

Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF ORGAN* 

Lynnwood Farnam 
Head of Department 

and 

Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF CAMPANOLOGYt 

Anton Brees 
Head of Department 

and 

Instructor 



JThc Curtis Institute of Music uses Lyon and Healy harps exclusively. 

*Thb Organ is an Aeolian four-manual. 

tThc Carillon to which The Curtis Institute students are sent for their study of Campanology 
is at Mountain Lake, Florida, and consists of a set of seventy-one bells ranging in weight 
from seven pounds to eleven tons. These bells were cast by the famous bellmakers, Taylor and 
Company, Loughborough, England. This unique Singing Tower was conceived and erected 
by Edward Bok who very kindly offered the use of its famous CarriUon to the students of 
Campanology of The Curtis Institute of Music. 

[ PAGE FORTY-SEVEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CARLOS SALZEDO 

Carlos Salzedo, who has elevated the harp to a position of 
undisputed popularity, was born in the province of Gironde, 
France, and entered the Bordeaux Conservatory at the age of 
seven. In two years he had won first prizes in piano and 
solfege. Thence he went to the Paris Conservatory, and at the 
age of twelve began the study of harp; in four years he won the 
first prizes for piano and harp at the latter-named conservatory. 

Until the age of twenty Salzedo toured Europe both as 
pianist and harpist, and it was only when Gatti-Casazza 
engaged him in 1909 as solo harpist with the Metropolitan 
Opera that Salzedo finally determined the harp would fashion 
his career. As harpist, he has since toured America and Europe 
extensively. 

Salzedo organized the Harp Ensemble which bears his name 
and was elected President of the National Association of 
Harpists in United States. With Edgar Varese, he formed the 
International Composers' Guild, and issued a magazine, Eolus, 
devoted to contemporary music. His "Modern Study of the 
Harp" is the recognized textbook in this branch of music. 
Salzedo's compositions and transcriptions are numerous. His 
symphonic works have been played by the Symphony 
Orchestras of Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Boston, 
Cleveland and Cincinnati. 



[ PAGE FORTY-EIGHT ] 




CARLOS SALZEDO 




LYNNWOOD FARNAM 




ANTON BREES 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LYNNWOOD FARNAM 

Born at Sutton in the Province of Quebec, Lynn wood Farnam, 
organist, began his musical studies as a pianist in Dunham, 
where, at the age of fifteen, he won the Montreal Music 
Scholarship. This scholarship, contributed by Lord Strath- 
cona and Lord Mount Stephen, made possible his four years 
study at the Royal College of Music in London. His teachers 
were Franklin Taylor and Herbert Sharpe for piano, and 
Dr. James Higgs, F. A. Sewell, and W. S. Hoyte for organ. 
The organ won young Farnam 's preference. 

Returning to Canada in 1904, Mr. Farnam received his 
first appointment as church organist in Montreal and was 
soon engaged as organist of the Christ Church Cathedral. 
He gave up this post in 191 3 to accept a call to the Emmanuel 
Church in Boston. Mr. Farnam was organist of the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City, during 1919- 
10, and since then has been engaged at the Church of the 
Floly Communion in New York. 

Lynnwood Farnam has had an extensive concert career, 
having appeared as soloist with the Society of the Friends 
of Music in New York, at the Coolidge Foundation Festival 
of Chamber Music in Washington, the Cincinnati Music 
Festival, and on other notable occasions. He has given 
public performances at York Minster, Bath Abbey, the 
Cathedrals of Westminster, Southwark, Exeter, Christ 
Church, Oxford, in England; the American Cathedral in 
Paris and at the Church of St. Ouen in Rouen, France. 



[PAGB FIFTY-ONB] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ANTON BREES 

Acknowledged as one of the master carillonneurs of the 
world and as one of the leading authorities on Campanology, 
Anton Brees possesses the distinction of having opened many 
of the important carillons in America during the past five 
years. Mr. Brees holds the position of bellmaster at the 
Mountain Lake Singing Tower in Florida for the winter 
season and is engaged at the Scottish Rite Temple in Indiana- 
polis during the summer months. 

A Belgian by birth, Mr. Brees was trained for his profes- 
sion by his father, who held the position of city carillonneur 
in Antwerp. The fame of young Brees spread rapidly and in 
19x3 he was chosen to give recitals on the War Memorial 
Carillon in Loughborough, England, where he met with 
great success. 

The following year Mr. Brees came to America, giving 
carillon recitals in Birmingham (Alabama), Andover and 
Gloucester (Massachusetts) and Morristown (New Jersey). 

In 19x5 he opened the Cape Town Carillon in South Africa 
in the presence of the Prince of Wales, and in the same year 
opened the Rockefeller Memorial Carillon of the Park Avenue 
Baptist Church, in New York City. 



[ PAGE FIFTY-TWO ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

DEPARTMENT OF OPERA 

£mil Mlynarski 
Head of Department 

WiLHELM VON WyMETAL, Jr. 

Stage Director 

Instructor in Operatic Acting 
and Stage Deportment 

Coaches 
Richard Hageman Max Pons 

Harry Kaufman Sylvan Levin 

Concert-Stage Deportment 
Samuel Arthur King 

DEPARTMENT OF ORCHESTRA 

£mil Mlynarski 
Head of Department 

Conductor of Student Orchestra 

Instructor of Conducting 

and Orchestra Classes 

Instructors 

Violin, Albert Meiff Oboe, Marcel Tabuteau* 

Violin, Leonid Bolotine Bassoon, Walter Guetter* 

Viola, Max Aronoff Conrrabassoon, Ferdinand del Negro* 

Violoncello, Stephen Deak Horn, Anton Horner* 

Double Bass, Anton Torello* Trumpet, Sol Cohen* 

Flute, William M. Kincaid* Trombone, Gardell Simons* 

Clarinet, Lucien Cailliet* Tuba, Philip A. Donatelli* 
Percussion, Oscar Schwar* 

Librarian 
Charles N. Demarest 

♦Members of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

[ PAGE FIFTY-THREE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



£MIL MLYNARSKI 

£mil Mlynarski was born in Poland and received his early- 
musical training as a violinist under Professor Leopold Auer 
in Petrograd. He made his debut as a violinist in his native 
land and appeared for the first time in London in 1889. Four 
years later his genius for conducting was recognized in his 
appointment as conductor of the Warsaw Imperial Orchestra. 

The following year he became conductor of the Odessa 
Music Society. In 1899 he returned to Warsaw as conductor of 
the Opera and two years later founded the Warsaw Philhar- 
monic Society which he conducted for several years. During 
the same period he was director of the Warsaw Conservatory 
of Music. 

He accepted the position as conductor of the London Sym- 
phony in 1907, and three years later became director of the 
Glasgow Orchestral Union and Conductor of the Scottish 
Orchestra, appearing for six years in London, Glasgow and 
Edinburgh. 

His compositions include a Concerto for Violin which 
received the Paderewski prize in Leipzig, two symphonies and 
several operas. 

WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Born in Vienna, Wilhelm von Wymetal was graduated from 
the Vienna Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art. As an 
actor, he started his career in his home city and continued in 
Berlin. Later he specialized in operatic stage directing, and 
became connected with the Leipzig and Vienna Opera. 
Called to the Metropolitan Opera House in 19x7 he, in co- 
operation with his father, Wilhelm von Wymetal, 'staged 
many of the important works of that organization. 

In the season of i^iS-i.^, von Wymetal, Jr. became head of 
the Department of Operatic Acting at The Curtis Institute of 
Music in addition to his duties at the Metropolitan Opera 
House. In the summer of 192.9, he was released by Mr. Gatti 
Casazza, General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera House, 
to assume the post of General Stage Director of the Philadel- 
phia Grand Opera Company. 

[ PAGE FIFTY-FOUR ] 




EMIL MLYNARSKI 




WILHELM VON WYMETAL 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF 
THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

ROSARIO SCALERO 

Head of Department 

and 

Instructor in Composition, 
Instrumentation and Orchestration 

Ernest Zechiel 

Instructor in Elementary Counterpoint 
and Elementary Harmony 

Instructors in Solfege 

Renee Longy Miquelle 
Anne-Marie Soffray 



PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ROSARIO SCALERO 

Rosario Scalero, who is recognized as a great authority on 
theory and composition, began his musical career as a violin- 
ist at the Liceo Musicale in Turin. Later he studied with 
Camillo Sivori in Genoa and August Wilhelmj in London. At 
the early age of twenty, Mr. Scalero won the title of Distin- 
guished Academician of the Royal Academy of St. Cecilia 
in Rome. 

Mr. Scalero's love for theory and composition led him to 
study for seven years with the master Mandyczewski who 
was one of the most intimate associates of Brahms and the 
editor of Schubert's and Haydn's complete works. Thereafter, 
Mr. Scalero was appointed Docent of Musical Form at the 
Royal Academy of St. Cecilia. 

After a series of concerts in the principal cities of Europe 
in which Mr. Scalero appeared as a violinist, he settled in 
Rome and there founded the Societa del Quartetto for the 
performance of ensemble and choral works. 

Mr. Scalero has also acted as High Commissioner for Exami- 
nations for the Conservatories of Naples, Rome and Parma. 
His works are numerous and include compositions for violin, 
piano and orchestra. 



[ PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT ] 




ROSARIO SCALERO 




ERNEST ZECHIEL 





RENEE LONGY MIQUELLE 



ANNE-MARIE SOFFRAY 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

World History 

Roy F. Nichols, A. M., Ph. D. 

[Assistant Professor of History at 

University of Pennsylvania] 

History of Music 
Jean B. Beck, Ph. D. 

[Professor of Romance Languages and 

Literature 

Lecturer — History of Music at 

University of Pennsylvania] 

Psychology 
Samuel W. Fernberger, Ph. D. 
[Assistant Professor of Psychology at 
University of Pennsylvania] 

English Composition and 

English Literature 

William Page Harbeson, Llb. B., Ph. D. 

[Assistant Professor of English Literature at 
University of Pennsylvania] 

Elbert Lenrow, A. M. 

[Instructor of English at 
University of Pennsylvania] 

English Diction 

Samuel Arthur King, M. A. (London) 

[Lecturer— English Diction at 

Bryn Mawr College] 

Academic Tutor 
Mary B. Wesner, A. B. 



[ PAGE SIXTY-ONE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LANGUAGES 

English 

Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 
Helen Summers 



French 
Rene Daudon 

German 
Martha Turk 



Italian 

EuFEMIA GiANNINI GrEGORY 



[ PAGE SIXTY-TWO ] 



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[ PAGE SIXTY-THREE ] 



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PAGE SIXTY-SIX 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CALENDAR 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1919-1930 

First Term Begins Tuesday, October i, 192.9 

First Term Ends Friday, January 31, 1930 

Second Term Begins . . . Saturday, February i, 1930 
Second Term Ends Thursday, May 2.9, 1930 

HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving .... Thursday, November 18, 192.9 

Christmas Vacation . . December 2.3, 192.9 to January 2., 

1930 (both inclusive) 

Washington's Birthday . . Saturday, February zz, 1930 

Easter Vacation . April 18 to 2.3, 1930 (both inclusive) 



[ PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 

EXAMINATIONS 

The entrance requirements are presented here in a general 
form, allowing the applicant latitude in the selection of works 
to be presented for examination. While the choice of compo- 
sitions is important, the manner of performance carries far 
greater weight. The final decision as to the suitability of an 
applicant for acceptance rests upon the evidence of talent 
shown in the examination, rather than upon the degree of 
advancement already attained. Admission is limited to those 
applicants whose natural musical talent gives promise of devel- 
opment to a point of artistic achievement. Selection from 
among the applicants is made by competitive elimination. 
The examiners do not assume the obligation of hearing all that 
an applicant is required to have in readiness for examination. 

VOICE 

The applicant must possess an exceptionally good voice, 
health, vitality, musical talent and personality. In addition, 
the applicant should have at least an elementary knowledge 
of music and of pianoforte, while some knowledge of languages 
is very desirable. 

Four selections from operatic arias, oratorios or songs, 
showing the range and power of the voice, should be sub- 
mitted from memory. The selections should be chosen from 
the works of the following composers: Parisotti, Handel, 
Schubert, Schumann, Franz, Brahms, Strauss, Tschaikowsky, 
Rachmaninoff, Faure, Debussy, Duparc, Mozart, Bizet, Saint- 
Saens, Puccini, or Wagner. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

[ PAGB SIXTY-NINE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PIANOFORTE 

Applicants must play from memory a Three-part Invention or 
a Prelude and Fugue from The Well-Tempered Clavichord of 
Bach; a Beethoven sonata, complete; two selections — one slow 
and one brilliant — from the works of Chopin or Schumann 
(preferably Chopin). 
Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

VIOLIN 

Applicants should have a precise knowledge of the positions 
and the change of positions, double notes, and a complete 
command of scales and the usual ways of bowing. They should 
be able to play selected studies from Kreutzer, Rode and 
Fiorillo, and one or more concertos from the works of the 
following composers: de Beriot, Viotti, Spohr, or Vieux- 
temps. Selections should be submitted from memory. 
Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

VIOLA 

Applicants must have some knowledge of the clefs, the posi- 
tions, scales and arpeggios; and be familiar with some of the 
standard violin studies such as those of Kreutzer, Rode, and 
also Campagnoli's 41 Caprices, Opus 2.1, which are especially 
written for the viola. They should also be able to play one 
movement of Firket's or Hans Sitt's Concertos. 
Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

VIOLONCELLO 

Applicants must be able to play satisfactorily all major and 
minor scales and arpeggios; also, a fast and a slow movement 
from a Bach Suite. They may choose for a second composition 
one movement of a concerto from the standard repertoire or 
one movement from a sonata for piano and violoncello, 
classical or modern. It is desirable, but not obligatory, that 
selections be submitted from memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

[ PAGE SEVENTY ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CHAMBER MUSIC PLAYING 

Applicants must possess a good ear, be able to read fluently 
at sight from standard works of chamber music, and show 
command of the instrument of their selection. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ACCOMPANYING 

Applicants must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability to 
play satisfactorily some of the more difficult studies of Cramer, 
Clementi-Tausig, or Czerny, Opus 740; be able to read at 
sight, with a certain degree of accuracy, such accompaniments 
as the Examiners may choose, and have a fair knowledge of 
the standard violin, 'cello and song literature. 

HARP 

Applicants should possess a knowledge of the principles of 
modern harp playing and be familiar with its "fundamental 
position." Knowledge of piano playing is desirable. Appli- 
cants should submit from memory two works of contemporary 
composers and two transcriptions from the classics. 
Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ORGAN 

The following should be submitted from memory : (a) Fugue 
or principal movement from a sonata or symphony, (b) a trio 
and (c) a slow movement. 

Applicants must also play the following on the pianoforte: 
(a) a study, (b) a nocturne or other slow movement. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

CAMPANOLOGY 

QBelli) 
Applicants (preferably men) must be able to play the organ 
and should have a thorough knowledge of harmony, being 
able to read music easily and to transpose a composition at 
sight. They must be at ease at the keyboard, and should pos- 
sess a sound physique, as the playing of bells is a strenuous art. 
Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

[ PAGE SEVENTY-OhfE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OPERA 

Applicants must possess a good voice and be w^ll advanced 
in the art of singing. They should give evidence of a musical 
background and general musicianship and show some knowl- 
edge of opera repertoire. They must be able to read music at 
sight easily. A knowledge of languages is desirable. 

They should have a good stage presence and sound physique. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ORCHESTRA PLAYING 

Applicants must possess an elementary knowledge of music, 
a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, be able to read from sight, 
and show talent and aptitude for the instrument of their 
selection. 
Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

CONDUCTING 

Applicants must possess a working knowledge of clefs and 
transposition, a good ear, a fair knowledge of the piano, organ 
or a string instrument, and adequate theoretic preparation. 
Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

COMPOSITION 

Applicants must send their manuscripts by registered mail for 
examination, presenting themselves in person only when so 
requested by the Institute. All manuscripts must be in the 
handwriting of the applicant. 

Only such manuscripts as show genuine creative ability 
will be considered. 

There is no limitation on age of applicants. 



[ PAGE SEVBNTY-TWO ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

INFORMATION ON CHAMBER MUSIC, 
ORCHESTRA PLAYING, OPERA CLASSES, 
ACCOMPANYING AND CAMPANOLOGY 

CHAMBER MUSIC 
This Department has been created to provide advanced 
Students with the necessary experience in chamber music 
playing and to enable them to gain a comprehensive and 
practical knowledge of the chamber music repertoire. 

ORCHESTRA PLAYING 

There is in the United States a lack of players of woodwind, 
brass and percussion instruments qualified to hold posts in the 
many symphony orchestras scattered throughout the country. 
There exist, today, more excellent positions waiting to be 
worthily filled than there are players to fill them. This applies 
also to string instruments, although in a lesser degree. 

In view of the aforesaid conditions. The Curtis Institute of 
Music undertakes the training of orchestra students, believing 
that such preparation will not only develop them by way of 
artistic discipline and foster their general musical education, 
but will also provide them with an artistic and professional 
outlet for the future. 

Orchestra classes will give students preliminary training in 
orchestra technique, routine, and sight-reading. 

Orchestra students in need of professional advice will receive 
individual instruction in their respective instruments. 

OPERA CLASSES 

The Department of Opera has been created to provide Curtis 
Institute vocal students with the necessary training for the 
career of an opera singer. This is done by solo vocal instruc- 
tion, coaching in opera repertoire, and stage deportment. 
When sufficiently advanced in their studies, operatic students 
are given opportunities to appear in regular opera perform- 
ances which have been made possible by the affiliation of 
The Curtis Institute of Music with the Philadelphia Grand 
Opera Company, thus preparing the students for their pro- 
fessional careers. 

[ PAGE 8BVBNTY-THREB ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ACCOMPANYING 

Accompanying is, in its way, as much an art as solo playing, 
requiring a thorough musicianship and pianistic ability, and 
as a profession it has been much neglected. There is a great 
shortage of well-trained accompanists and the field is remu- 
nerative and wide open to those who will make it their life 
work. 

To succeed in this field, would-be accompanists should make 
up their minds to start early in the direction of their goal and 
not arrive there by way of failure in solo work. 

Recognizing and appreciating this situation, The Curtis 
Institute of Music has established the Department of Accom- 
panying, to develop young pianists who desire to make the 
art of accompanying their profession. Besides the specific 
instruction which they receive, there are manifold opportuni- 
ties to apply and perfect what they acquire by their studies 
at the Institute. These opportunities are made possible by the 
co-operation of the Vocal, Instrumental, Chamber Music and 
Ensemble Departments. 

CAMPANOLOGY (Bells') 

The Curtis Institute of Music offers a course of instruction 
in carillon playing to its graduate organ students and will 
send a limited number to study with Anton Brees, for a six 
weeks' course, beginning January second and continuing until 
April tenth, at the Singing Tower in Mountain Lake, Florida. 

The Singing Tower houses a set of seventy-one bells of 
beautiful tone and perfect pitch. 

Students will learn the rudiments of bell playing upon a 
practice clavier in the Tower. They will be allowed to use the 
actual bells when their progress shall warrant such promotion. 



[ PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

Upon request, rooming accommodations selected by the 
Student Counselor will be recommended to students, accord- 
ing to individual needs and means. Scale of rentals and any- 
further details desired may be obtained from the Student 
Counselor. 

PRACTICE FACILITIES AT THE 
CURTIS INSTITUTE 

For this purpose the Institute has studios equipped with 
Steinway pianos which may be used by students. One of these 
practice studios is equipped with a three-manual Aeolian 
practice organ. 

HEALTH MEASURES 

A physician has been appointed by the Institute to give 
immediate attention to students in case of illness. 



DINING-ROOM 

Home-cooked meals are served at cost. Students and members 
of the faculty meet at the same tables and thus become better 
acquainted and bridge the distance which so often exists 
between student and instructor. 



[ PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE COLLECTION 

OF INSTRUMENTS FOR THE USE OF 

CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 

Fine Instruments 

VIOLINS 

NicoLAus Amati Cremona 

Januarius Gagliano Naples i75Z 

NiccoLO Gagliano Naples 1709 

NiccoLO Gagliano Naples 1716 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Parma 1764 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Milano 1753 

Gaspar LoRENziNi Placentiae 1784 

Pique Paris 1793 

Laurentius Storioni Cremona 1784 

PiETRO RoGERi Brescia 

VIOLAS 

Antonius and Hieronymous Amati . . Cremona 161 6 

Gasparo da Salo Brescia 1570 

Gasparo da Salo Brescia, end of 1 6th century 

VIOLONCELLOS 

Tomasso Ballestrieri Mantua 1765 

Matteo Goffriller Venice, early iSth century 

Giovanni Grancino Milano 1704 

Jean Baptiste Vuillaume Paris 1 840-1 850 

DOUBLE BASSES 

Amati Italian School 

Baldontoni Ancona 1770 

Carcassi Italian School 

Carcassi Italian School 

Cavallini Italian School 

Darches Paris 182.0 

Gagliano Italian School 

PiATELLiNi Italian School 

Raffo Italian School 

Storioni Italian School 

D. Tecchler Italian School 

{Continued on next ^age) 

[ PAGE SEVENTY-SIX ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



(FINE mSTKVUENTS— Continued') 

BOWS 

Violin 

Dominic Peccatte Paris 

Charles Peccatte Paris 

Francois Tourte Paris 

Francois Tourte Paris 

AiNE Tourte Paris 

VoiRiN Paris 

NiJRNBERGER Dresden 

Vigneron Pans 

Gold Bow French School 

Viola 
7 Fetique Pans 

Double Bass 
4 Fetique Pans 

PIANOS 
X Steinway Concert Grands 6 Steinway Uprights 
6x Steinway Grands i Duo-Art Grand 

HARPS 
I Lyon and Healy Concert Grand 

Other Instruments 

9 Violins 9 Violas 

■L Violoncellos 4 Double Basses 

BOWS 
3 Violin i Violoncello 

HARPS 
II Lyon and Healy Practice 

ORCHESTRA 

(Woodwind and Brass') 

± Piccolos i Bassoon 

I Flute i Contrabassoon 

z Oboes i Trumpet 

5 Clarinets 2. Trombones 

I English Horn i Tuba 

complete battery 



[ PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PRIZES WON 

BY CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 

192.8-1^19 

Columbia University Pulitzer Prize for Musical Composition 
Won by Carl Bricken, pupil of Kosario Scalero 

Columbia University Joseph H. Bearnes Prize for Musical 

Composition 

Won by Samuel O. Barber, pupil of Kosario Scalero 

Matinee Musical Club of Philadelphia Scholarship for Piano 
Won by Florence Frantz, pupil of Madame Vengerova 

Young Artists' Piano Contest of the National Federation of 
Music Clubs, held in Boston, June 9, 1919 

Won by Florence Frantz, pupil of Madame Vengerova 



[ PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PUBLIC APPEARANCES 
OF CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 

1918-19x9 

According to the Institute's policy of affording opportunities 
to students for public appearances, the following activities 
were scheduled: 

The Curtis Orchestra with Tibor de Machula as soloist in 
the following concerts : 

The Forum, Academy of Music, Philadelphia — December 

17, 192.8 

Academy of Music, Philadelphia — March 3, 1919 
Carnegie Hall, New York City — March 8, 192.9 

The artist-students of the opera class and the Curtis Orches- 
tra in a complete performance of d Albert's "Tiefland" in the 
Academy of Music, Philadelphia, May 12., 192.9. 

Eighteen concerts before twelve different civic and educa- 
tional groups in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, 
with programs furnished by students of the Voice, Piano, 
Accompanying, Violin, Violoncello, Harp and Chamber 
Music Departments. 

Ten fortnightly concerts broadcast to radio audiences by 
the Curtis Orchestra, and students of the Voice, Piano, Ac- 
companying, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Organ, Harp and 
Chamber Music Departments. 

A series of six chamber music concerts in the new Pennsyl- 
vania Museum at Fairmount, in Philadelphia, by the Casimir 
and the Swastika Quartets and other student groups from the 
Chamber Music Department. 

The Swastika Quartet in two concerts in New York City 
and one in Washington, D. C. 



[ PAGE SEVENTY-NINE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CONCERT 

GIVEN BY 

THE CURTIS ORCHESTRA 

Artur Rodzinski, Conductor 

March 8, 192.9 

Carnegie Hall New York City 

Soloist 

TiBOR DE MaCHULA 



PROGRAM 

Richard Wagner .... Prelude to ''Die Meistersinger' 

Cesar Franck Symphony in D minor 

Edouard Lalo Concerto in D minor, for 

Violoncello and Orchestra 

TiBOR DE Machula, VioloncclUst 
Nicholas Rimsky-Korsakov . . . La Grande Pdque Russe 

The same program was given at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia on March 3rd, 1919. 



[ PAGE EIGHTY ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OPERA 

given by 

Artist-Students of The Curtis Institute of Music 
WITH The Curtis Orchestra 

The Academy of Music, Philadelphia 
May 12., 192.9 



TIEFLAND 

(The Lowlamf) 

By Eugene d' Albert 

A Music Drama in a Prologue and Two Acts 

(In German) 

Artur Rodzinski, Conductor 
Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr., Stage Director 

Characters 
Sebastiano, a rich land-owner (Baritone) . Conrad Thibault 



Tommaso, the village elder (Bass) 
Moruccio, miller's 1 

man (Baritone) 

Marta | (Soprano) 

Pepa ^ (Soprano) 

Antonia > | (Soprano) 

Rosalia I (Alto) . 

Nun '^ (Soprano) 

Pedro, a shepherd ^ (Tenor) 
Nando, a shepherd J (Tenor) 
Villagers (men and women) 

Students of The 



Ralph Jusko 

Benjamin Grobani 
Genia Wilkomirska 
Selma Amansky 
Natalie Bodanskaya 
Paceli Diamond 
.Eleanor Lewis 
Albert Mahler 
. Daniel Healy 



Curtis Institute of Music 



[ PAGE EIGHTY-ONB ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENTS' CONCERTS 

GIVEN AT 

CASIMIR HALL 

192.8-19x9 

Forty-two programs were presented by students in Pianoforte, Organ, 
Voice, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Harp and Chamber Music. Ten pro- 
grams were devoted to chamber music, and the following works were played 



Beethoven . 

Block . 
bourgault- 

DuCOUDRAY 

Brahms . 
Chausson . 



Dohnanyi . 
Glazounov 
Griffes . 

Haydn . 
Mozart 



Navratil . 

PlERNE . 

Saint-Saens 
Schubert 



Schumann 



String Quartet in F major, Opus 59, No. i 
String Quartet in F minor, Opus 95 
String Quartet (191 6) 

Abergavenny for String Quartet and Flute 
Pianoforte Trio in C minor, Opus loi 
String Sextet in B flat major, Opus 18 
Chanson Perpetuelle for Voice, Pianoforte 

and String Quartet, Opus 37 
Concert in D major, for Pianoforte, Violin 

and String Quartet, Opus 2.1 
Pianoforte Quintet in E flat, Opus i6 
Four No vellettes for String Quartet, Opus 15 
Two Sketches for String Quartet, based on 

Indian Themes 
String Quartet in D major. Opus 64, No. 5 
String Quartet in D minor, Kochel 42.1 
String Quintet in C minor, Kochel 406 
Symphonie Concertante in E flat major for 

Violin, Viola and Chamber Orchestra 
Pianoforte Quintet in D major. Opus 16 
Pianoforte Quintet in Three Movements, 

Opus 41 
Septet in E flat major. Opus 65, for Piano- 
forte, Trumpet, and String Quintet 
Pianoforte Quintet in A major, Opus 114 

"Forellen" (The Trout) 
String Quintet in C major. Opus 163 
Pianoforte Quintet in E flat major. Opus 44 



[ PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FACULTY RECITALS 




GIVEN AT 




CASIMIR HALL 




192.8-19X9 




November 11, 1918 * Harriet van Emden . 


. Soprano 


November 2.7 . . Lynnwood Farnam . 


. Organist 


December 12. . . *Lea Luboshutz 


. Violinist 


January 9, 1919 Harry Kaupman . 


. Pianist 


January 14. . . **The Curtis Quartet 




January 16. . . *Horatio Connell . 


. Baritone 


* JFelix Salmond 
^ * * ijosef hofmann 


. Violoncellist 
. Pianist 


March 2.7 .. . *Efrem Zimbalist . 


. Violinist 


April 4 . ... Abram Chasins . 


. Pianist 


April 10 . . . Emilio de Gogorza 


. Baritone 


April 17 . . . Carlos Salzedo 


. Harpist 



*Harry Kaufman at the Piano. 
**The Curtis Quartet also gave the following recitals: 

January 16, 1919 — Jordan Hall, Boston 

January 13, 192.9 — Foyer, Academy of Music, Philadelphia 

January 2.8, 19x9 — Town Hall, New York 



SPECIAL CONCERT 

February 14 . .La Societe des Instruments Anciens, 

DE Paris 



[ PAGE EIGHTY-THRBE ] 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENTS ARE FROM THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES: 



Belgium 


France 


Italy 


Czecho-Slovakia Germany 


Latvia 


Denmark 


Holland 


Palestine 


England 


Hungary 

IHE UNITED STATE5 

(43 states) 


Russia 


Alabama 


Kentucky 


Ohio 


Arkansas 


Louisiana 


Oklahoma 


California 


Maine 


Pennsylvania 


Colorado 


Massach usetts 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut 


Maryland 


South Carolina 


Delaware 


Michigan 


Tennessee 


District 


Minnesota 


Texas 


OF Columbia 


Mississippi 


Utah 


Florida 


Missouri 


Vermont 


Georgia 


New Hampshire 


Virginia 


Idaho 


New Jersey 


Washington 


Illinois 


New Mexico 


West Virginia 


Indiana 


New York 


Wisconsin 


Iowa 


North Carolina 


Wyoming 


Kansas 


North Dakota 




Cuba 


Porto Rico 

CANADA 


Hawaii 


Alberta 




Ontario 


Manitoba 


Quebec 




MEXICO 






SOUTH AMERICA 


8T THE AQUATOKB 1 




Colombia