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Full text of "Catalogue 1932-1933"

I 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Catalogue 
1952-1933 



Owing to adverse financial 
conditions there is no 
printed edition of the Cat- 
alogue for the year 1952-1933. 
For record, three official 
type?/ritten copies were made. 

This is official copy number 
Three. 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILi^JDELPHIA, PEl^NSYLVANIA 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

FOUNDED AND ENDO'^vED IN 1924 BY 
MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

NOW RECEIVES ITS SUPPORT FROM 
THE MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK FOUITOATION 

CREATED ^lARCH 25, 1952 



THE INSTITUTE IS OPERATED 
UNDER A CHARTER 
OF THE COilMON^vEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THE INSTITUTE IS ACCREDITED 
BY THE UNITED STATES GOVERNI;iENT 
FOR THE TRAINING OF NON-QUOTA 
FOREIGN STUDENTS 



A letter dated September 5, 1926 from the Com- 
missioner General of Immigration to The Curtis 
Institute of Music, states; 

"It gives me pleasure to advise that your school 
has been duly approved by the Secretary of Labor 
as an institution of learning for immigrant stu- 
dents, in accordance with the Immigration Act of 
1924. The Department of State has been notified 
of this action for transmission of the informa- 
tion to all American consular officers, who will 
then be in a position to consider applications 
for the required non quota student visas." 

(signed) Harry E. Hull 

Commissioner General 



PURPOSE 



TO HAND mm 

THROUGH CONTMPORARY MSTERS 
THE GREAT TRADITIONS OF THE PAST 

TO TEACH STUDENTS TO BUILD 

ON THIS HFJIITAGE FOR 

THE FUTURE 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Students receive 

Instruction by world-famous artists who give 
individual lessons 

Free tuition 

Financial aid, when warranted 

Steinway grand pianos, string and 7/ind instru- 
ments rent free, when deserving 

Opportunities to attend concerts of the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra, as part of their musical 
education 

Students have opportunity to appear in The Curtis 
Institute Concert Courses given outside of Phil- 
adelphia, They also appear as members of 
Chamber Music Groups at The Pennsylvania Museum 
of Art in Philadelphia, and in other cities. 
In public concerts given by The Curtis Symphony 
Orchestra in Philadelphia and its suburbs, and 
in other communities, students participate as 
members of the orchestra or as soloists with it „ 
— and over radio regularly broadcast from Cas- 
imir Hall over The Columbia Broadcasting System. 

Upon satisfactory completion of his studies 

The Curtis graduate of exceptional achieve- 
ment is given assistance in beginning a public 
career 



Concert Management 
Richard Copley, New York 
The Curtis Institute Concert Bureau, 

Philadelphia 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF :jUSIC 



OFFICERS 



President 
ims. MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

Vice-President 
PHILIP S. COLLINS 

Secretary 
CART V^TLLIAM BOK 

Treasurer 
V.ILLI/lM CURTIS BOK 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

imS. ivlARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

r^ilRS. SAIi^EL S. FELS CYRUS H. K. CURTIS 

PHILIP S. COLLINS YaLLI.<^il CURTIS BOK 

CARY WILLIAI^ BOK 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EXECUTIVE STAFF 



JOSEF HOFFJANN 
Director 



Jane Hill Registrar 

Dorothy Lynch 

Student Counselor 

Marjorie Vvinn Librarian 

H, W, Eastman Comptroller 

W. Creary Woods 

Publicity, Concerts 

and Radio 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MSIC 



THE FACULTY 



Aronoff , Max 
Bailly, Louis 
Barber, Samuel 
Bimboni, Alberto 
Bonade, Daniel 
Brees, Anton 
Brodsky, Jascha 
Caston, Saul 
Chasins, Abraa 
Connell, Horatio 
de Gogorza, Erailio 
del Negro, Ferdinand 
de I/Iontoliu, Placido 
Donatelli, Philip 
Drununond, Ethel 
Finn, Caesar 
Frantz, Florence 
Fugmann, Andreas 
Gerhard, Charles 
Germani, Fernando 
Goldovslcy, Boris 
Halbv;achs, Martha 
Harms, Yiilliam 
Hilsberg, Alexander 
Hofmann, Josef 
Homer, Anton 



Musical 

Kaufman, Harry 
Kincaid, William 
La-;.'rence, Lucile 
Levin, Sylvan 
Levine, Joseph 
Luboshutz, Lea 
Mario, Queena 
Meredith, Eleanor 
Miller, Frank 
Miquelle, Eenee Longy 
Pons, Max 
Reiner, Fritz 
Rybner-Barclay, Dagmar 
Salmond, Felix 
Salzedo, Carlos 
Saperton, David 
Scalero, Rosario 
Schi(/ar, Oscar 
Tabuteau, Marcel 
Torello, Anton 
van Emden, Harriet 
Vengerova, Isabelle 
von Yvymetal, Jr., Y/ilhelm 
Vi'estmoreland, Elizabeth 
Zechiel, Ernest 
Zimbalist, Efrem 



Academic 



Daudon, Rene 

de Montoliu, Placido 

Gregory, Eufemia Giannini 



Shumv/ay, Mary 
Tiirk, Martha 
Y/esner, Mary 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDIES 
Accorapan3''ing 
Aesthetics, Applied 
Campanology 



Chamber Liusic and 
Ensemble Playing 

Conducting 

Eurhythmies 

Harp 



Languages and Diction 
English Italian 
French Latin 
German Spanish 

Opera 

Operatic Acting and 
Stage Deportment 

Operatic Coaching 
and Repertoire 

Orchestra 

Orchestra Playing 
Violin 
Viola 

Violoncello 
Double Bass 
Flute 
Clarinet 
Oboe 



English Horn 

Bassoon 

Contrabassoon 

French Horn 

Trumpet 

Trombone 

Tuba 

Percussion 

Organ 

Pianoforte 

Grade A 
Grade B 

Theory and Composition 
Composition 
Elements and Forms of 

Musical Expression 
Instruraentation and 

Orchestration 

. Solfege 
Dictation 

Harmony 
Counterpoint 

Chamber Music Score 
Reading 

Orchestra Score 

Reading 

Viola 

Violin 

Violoncello 

Voice 



THE CURTIS INvSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Division I 
VOICE 



Instructors 



Queena Mario 
Harriet van Smden 



Emilio de Gogorza 
Horatio Connell 



Coaching and Repertoire 
Max Pons Dagmar Rybner-Barclay 

Diction 

Rene Daudon Euf emia Giannini Gregory 
Placido de Montoliu Mary Shumv;ay 
Martha Tiirk 



I 


N ME 


MORI 


A M 




Minna 


Saumelle 





THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF I^JSIC 



Emilio de Gogorza 

Emilio de Gogorza -was born of Spanish-American 
parents in Brooklyn, New York. In England, he 
undertook singing as a ^erious study and contin- 
ued his studies at the Ecole Monge and the Lycse 
Louis-lG-Grand in Paris. He made his first 
appearance on the concert stage in France. 

^Returning to America, the young singer studied 
v/ith Moderati and Agramonte in New York. Later, 
a visit to Paries resulted in his becoming a pupil 
of the famous Emile Bourgeois, singing master of 
the Opera Comique. 

In 1897 Emilio de Gogorza was heard in a con- 
cert in Nev/ York with Marcella Sembrich. Since 
then his appearances have been continuous both in 
recitals and with the leading orchestras in the 
United States and Europe. 



Queena Mario 

Queena Mario, a native of Akron, Ohio, received 
her first musical training in Plainfield, New Jer- 
sey, vanning a scholarship at the National Conser- 
vatory of ijiusic in New York, she undertook the 
serious study of the piano. She first studied 
voice with Oscar Saenger, continuing with him for 
three years. During this time she contributed 
articles to the New York newspapers. 

After becoming a pupil of I.ladame Marcella Sem- 
brich and studying with that famous artiste ^f or 
three years. Miss Mario made her operatic debut as 
" Juliet " in " Romeo and Juliet" y given by the San 
Carlo Opera Company. In 1921 she was engaged by 
Antonio Scotbi for his transcontinental opera tour, 
and in the follovnng year she became a member of 
the Ravinia Opera Company and of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company of New York, with which companies 
she is still associated. 

10 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IwUSIC 



Harriet van Smden 

Harriet van Emden v.-as born in Milwaukee. At 
an early age she came to Nev; York and enrolled 
as a vocal student at the Institute of i»iusical 
Art, later going to Berlin to study with Vittor- 
ino Moratti. In 1917 she ¥^as accepted as a pupil 
by Madame Marcella Sembrich, with v/hom Miss van 
Eraden studied until making her debut in 1921 in 
New York City. 

During that season Miss van Einden appeared ex- 
tensively in recitals in this country and the 
following year made her European debut, in Amster- 
dam, as soloist with the Concertgebouw Orchestra 
under the conductorship of V.'illem Mengelberg. 
Since then she has appeared as soloist v/ith sym- 
phony orchestras in the Eastern and V;estern Hemi- 
spheres. 



Horatio Connell 

Horatio Connell was bom in Philadelphia, and 
had his first instruction there with Emil Gastel. 
He completed his studies at Frankfurt-on-Main, 
Germany, under Julius Stockhausen, a pupil of 
Manuel Garcia. 

Mr. Connell made his debut at Queens Hall with 
the London Symphony Orchestra in 1905 and there- 
after made most successful tours of Germany and 
Great Britain, where he was recognised as one of 
the foremost oratorio singers. 

Having spent nine years abroad in study and 
cone erti zing, Mr. Connell returned to the United 
States in 1909, and has since been heard in re- 
citals and at most of the important music festi- 
vals throughout the country. He has also appeared 
as soloist with the leading symphony orchestras 
in this country and abroad. 



11 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IwUSIC 



Division II 

PIANOFORTE 



Grade A 

Instructors 

Josef Hofinann Isabelle Vengerova 

•«-David Saperton ^'^Florence Frantz 



Grade B 

Instructors. 

Abraia Chasins 
Ethel Dr-ummond 

and others, drav/n from the 
student body of the Institute 



■)«-Assistant to Mr. Hofraann 
^^- Assistant to I-lme. Vengerova 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis 
Institute of Music 



1^ 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Josef Hofmann 

His father a teacher, pianist-composer and or- 
chestra leader of repute, and his mother a noted 
soprano of the Cracow Municipal Opera, Josef Hof- 
mann' s heritage was a musical one. At four years 
of age he had already begun the study of the 
piano. His sister was his first teacher and af- 
ter a year of instruction the boy came under his 
father • s tutelage • 

T.hen five years old, Josef Hofmann made his 
first public appearance, playing in a town near 
Y»arsaw. Other concerts follov/ed, in the leading 
cities of Poland. At eight the youthful prodigy 
was heard by Anton Rubinstein ?/ho predicted for 
him a career of exceptional brilliance. In his 
ninth year the boy pianist played in Germany, 
France, England and Scandinavia, and in 1387 ap- 
peared for the first time in the United States. 
He gave forty concerts and his remarkable playing 
aroused the enthusiasm of Alfred Corning Clark, 
of New York, who generously offered to provide the 
means for the furthering of the eleven-year-old 
boy's musical education and artistic growth. 
Thereupon the young Josef returned to Europe and 
studied in Berlin. In 1392, four years later, he 
became the pupil of Anton Rubinstein. 

In 1894 the eighteen-year-old youth returned 
to the concert platform, touring Germany and 
England. He made his Russian debut in 1896 and 
tv;o years later again toured the United States. 
Since that time Josef Hofmann has been constant- 
ly before the public as a concert pianist. 

His compositions are numerous. His orchestra • 
works have been performed in the United States 
and Europe by Nikisch, Schuch, Safonoff , Stokow- 
ski, Zach, Gabrilowitsch, Damrosch and Stock. 



15 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF r.iUSIC 



David Saperton 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, David Saper- 
ton began the study of piano at the age of six, 
under the guidance of his grandfather, an inter- 
nationally-knoviH tenor and musician. Mr. Saper- 
ton' s father, a graduate physician of the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, v.^as also a basso of repute. 
At the age of ten, David Saperton made his first 
public appearance with the Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra, and at fifteen made his New York debut 
in a recital, appearing soon after as soloist at 
one of the Metropolitan Opera House Sunday con- 
certs. He then \vent to Europe and, in 1908, made 
his Berlin debut in a joint recital with Geraldine 
Farrar, follo\'v'ing this with successful appear- 
ances throughout Europe and in the United States. 

Of late I»ir. Saperton has been devoting his time 
to teachiniT. 



Isabelle Vengerova 

A native of Vilna, Russia, Madame Isabelle 
Vengerova is a descendant of a famil^r widely 
knoTfn in the Russian literary v/orld. At an early 
age she was sent to the Vienna Conservatory to 
study the piano v-dth Josef Dachs. She later be- 
CoUiie a pupil of Leschetizky. 

Returning to Russia she continued her studies 
at the St. Petersburg Conservatory with Madame 
Essipoff and was soon named her assistant. In 
1910, by the unanimous vote of a faculty v;hich 
included Auer and Liadoff , she v;as elected Pro- 
fessor of Pianoforte under the direction of Gla- 
zounoff and held this position for twelve years. 

She has been a member of the piano faculty of 
The Curtis Institute since its foundation. Mad- 
arae Vengerova has appeared in concerts in the 
principal iiiusical centers of Europe and America. 



14 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF iviUSIC 



Abram Chasins 

Abrara Chasins v;as born in Nev/ York, He began 
to study music at six with Bertha Tapper. Soon 
after^'vard he won a scholarship at the Institute 
of I'iusical Art and later was accepted as a pupil 
by Richard Epstein, Between the ages of sixteen 
and twenty he received private instruction from 
Ernest Hutcheson and for the following tv/o years 
continued his lessons with Mr, Hutcheson at the 
Juilliard Graduate School, where he was awarded 
a fellowship in piano. Chasins v/as also success- 
ful in winning a fellowship in composition at the 
same school and pursued this study with Rubin 
Goldmark. From 1926 to 1929 he studied piano 
Y/ith Josef Hofmann at The Curtis Institute of 
Music • 

r.lr, Chasins has composed many works for piano, 
violin, violoncello and voice, a number of v/hich 
have been performed by prominent artists here and 
abroad. His symphonic v/orks have been played by 
the Philadelphia Orchestra under Stokowski and 
Gabrilowitsch and by the Philharmonic Symphony of 
New York under Toscanini, as well as by European 
orchestras. 



15 



THE CURTI3 INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Division III 
VIOLIN 



Instructors 
Efrem Zimbalist Lea Luboshutz 



16 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Efrem Zimbalist 

Known throughout the musical world as one of 
the most brilliant of concert violinists, Efrem 
Zimbalist displaj^ed as a child the genius that 
was to bring him future reno\7n. At the age of 
nine he was appointed first violinist of the or- 
chestra at the Opera House in Rostov-on-Don, 
Russia, his birthplace. Soon after, he was ac- 
cepted as a pupil by Professor Auer at the Impe- 
rial Conservatory of ivlusic, in Petrograd. 

In 1911, when he made his American debut, the 
principal cities of Europe had already acclaimed 
him as one of the world's greatest violinists. 
Since then, Mr. Zimbalist has made several con- 
cert tours around the v.'orld. He has composed 
music for violin, piano and voice and has success- 
ful light operas to his credit. 



Lea Luboshutz 

Lea Luboshutz was born in Odessa, and began 
her concert career as a violinist at the age of 
six. Upon the advice of Vassily Safonoff , noted 
Russian conductor, she pursued her studies at the 
wioscoYs Conservatory, where he was director. There 
she was awarded a gold medal and, at the age of 
sixteen, r/as heard in recitals in Poland, Germany, 
and France. She appeared also as soloist v/ith 
orchestras under the conductorship of Safonoff and 
Arthur Nikisch, following this v.dth concerts in 
America and tours of European countries, 

Madame Luboshutz later studied for three jears 
with Eugene Ysaye and became one of his most bril- 
liant pupils. Since then she has appeared exten- 
sively in concerts and as soloist with leading 
orchestras, both in the United States and abroad. 



17 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LIUSIC 



Division IV 

VIOLA AND CHiU>iBER MUSIC 

Instructor 
Dr. Louis Bailly 



Assistant 



Max Aronof f 



Chamber Music 



The purpose is to provide advanced students 
with the necessary experience in chamber music 
playing and to enable them to gain a comprehen- 
sive and practical knowledge of chamber music 
repertoire. 



18 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OFMUSIC 



Dr. Louis Bailly 

A native of Valenciennes, France, Louis Baillv, 
at the age of seventeen, v;on first prize for viola 
playing at the Paris Conservatoire. He soon 
gained a reputation as soloist, playing Y/ith the 
Concerts Colonne, the vSociete des Concerts du Con- 
servatoire, and other larger orchestras. 

Having decided upon a career as chamber music 
artist, Louis Bailly became a founder-member of 
the famous Capet Quartet. From this organization 
he passed to the Geloso Quartet and later he be- 
came a member of the Flonaaley and Elman Quartets. 
He has appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the St. Louis 
Orchestra, the National Symphony under Bodanaky, 
and with the Friends of i.iusic, New York City. 

On May 21, 1950 he received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Music and he has been a member of the 
Jury of the Paris Conservatoire since 1920, 



19 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF .aUSIC 



Division V 
VIOLONCELLO 



Instructo r 
Felix Salraond 



20 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LiUSIC 



Felix Salmond 

A musical endoiNTnent was the birthright of this 
violoncellist. His father was Normand Salmond, 
the celebrated Englisli bass-baritone, Ms mother 
a professional pianist. 

Felix Salmond v;as born in London. There his 
gifts were developed under the tutelage of Pro- 
fessor W. E. T^hitehouse of the Royal College of 
Music. Later, in Brussels, the young man con- 
tinued his studies v/ith Fdouard Jacobs. 

In 1909 Mr. Salmond made his debut, in London, 
and afterwards he appeared in concerts throughout 
Great Britain. 

Hie debut on the Continent, in 19r:l, was fol- 
lov.'ed in the succeeding year by his first concert 
appearance in the United States. 

In frequent tours of the United States and 
Europe, Felix Salmond is now appearing in concerts 
y/ith the most celebrated pianists of the day, and 
as soloist vdth the leading orchestras. 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF T.iUSIC 



Division VI 

ACCOI^iPMYING 



Instructo r 

Harry Kaufman 
(Official Accompanist of the Institute) 



Accompanying as a profession has been much 
neglected, although the field is remunerative and 
full of opportunity for those v/ho will malce it 
their life work. In its way as much an art as 
solo playing, requiring a thorough musicianship 
and pianistic ability, accompanj-ingdemands of 
students a singleness of purpose and a faith- 
fulness to theirv.'ork. The Division provides the 
necessary'- training and experience through specif- 
ic instruction and manifold opportunities for 
students to appl^/ and perfect what they acquire 
by their studies, through the co-operation of the 
Vocal, Instrumental and Chamber Music Divisions. 



2.2 



THE. CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Harry Kaufman 

Hari*j^ Kaufman ^^as born in Nbtj York City, of 
Russian parentage. At the early age of ten he 
v.^as vocal soloist and choir leader in the princi- 
pal synagogues of that city. 

Yvhen twelve years of age he comLienced his 
piano lessons v;ith Gottfried Kritzler at the New 
York College of LIusic, and at fifteen he became 
the pupil of Sigismond Stojovvski, later continu- 
ing his studies vdth Josef HofmcUin. 

Mr, Kaufman has apx^eared as soloist and assist- 
ing artist with the Hev; York Philharmonic and the 
Philadelphia Orchestras respectively, and has also 
been heard in numerous solo recitals. His lin- 
guistic abilities and v.dde acquaintance vd th vio- 
lin, 'cello and chamber music, as ^A'ell as vocal 
literature, have made Mr. Kaufman much in demand 
as an artist-accompanist. 

He has toured vdth Efrem Zimbalip.t, Carl Flesch, 
Lea Luboshuta, Toscha Seidel, Arthur Hartmann, 
Theodore Spiering, Miron Poliaken, Felix Salmond, 
Louis Bailly, Alma Gliick, Charlotte Lund, Erica 
Morini, the late George Hamlin, and other artists 
of prominence. 



25 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTK OF MUSIC 



Division VII 
HAKP 

Instructor 
Carlos Salzedo 
Assis tant 
Lucile Lav.Tence 



Carlos Salzedo, who has elevated the harp to 
a position of undisputed popularity, vras born in 
the province of Gironde, France, and entered the 
Bordeaux Conservatory at the age of seven. In 
tv/o years he had v.'on first prizes in piano and 
solfege. Thence he went to the Paris Conserva- 
tory Tihere, at the age of tvjelve, he began the 
study of the harp and four years later v^on the 
first prizes for both piano end harp. 

Until he was twenty Carlos Salzedo toured Eu- 
rope both as pianist and harpist, and only when 
Gatti-Casazza engaged him in 1909 as solo harpist 
vdth the Metropolitan Opera did Mr. Salzedo fi- 
nally determine the harp should fashion his 
career. As harpist he has since toured America 
and Europe extensively. 

Mr. Salzedo organized the Harp Ensemble v-;hJ.ch 
bears his name and with Edgar Varese formed the 
International Composers' Guild. Mr. Salzedo is 
President of the National Association of Harp- 
ists and an editor of " ^olus ". its publication. 
His " Modern Study of the Harp " is the recognized 
textbook for harp study. 

Carlos Salzedo' s compositions ejid transcrip- 
tions are numerous. His s;>nnphonic works have 
been played by the Symphony Orchestras of Nev; 
York, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Boston, 
Cleveland and Cincinnati. 

Lyon and Hesly harps used exclusively 



THE CURTIvS INSTITUTE OF LuUSIC 



Division VIII 

ORG-M 

Instructor 
Fernando Germani 



A native of Rome, Fernando Germani, at the age 
of three, began his study of music at the Royal 
Conservatory of Saint Cecelia, He studied piano, 
composition and organ, 7/ith Bajardi, Respighi and 
Manari, and was graduated at a youthful age. 

V.Tien fifteen he 7>as appointed official organ- 
ist of the Augusteo Orchestra, Virhich position he 
has held for eleven years. He took part in many 
performances under Berncirdino Llolinari and other 
celebrated conductors, and also played \'i±th. 
various other symphony orchestras. 

In 19<8 Fernando Germani made his American de- 
but. Besides playing on the YJanamaker organs in 
Nev; York and Philadelphia, and vdth the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Germ&jii's concert tours 
in the ?i;estern Hemisphere have carried him to the 
Pacific coast, and from Canada to the Gulf of 
Mexico • 

In 1929, then tv^enty- three years of age, Mr. 
Germejii was made head of the Organ Department of 
the Royal Conservatory of Saint Cecelia in Rome, 
and High Commissioner of Examinations for organ 
and organ composition for the Royal Academy of 
Saint Cecelia. 



The organ is a four-manual Aeolian, 

26 



THE CURTIS IMSTITUTE OF I>/IOSIC 

Division IX 

CMIPMOLQGY 

Instructor 
Anton Brees 



The Curtis Institute of I^sic offers a course 
of instruction in carillon playing to advanced 
organ students and sends a limited number to stu- 
dy v/ith Anton Brees for a period of six weeks, at 
the Mountain Lake Singing Tower, in Mountain Lake, 
Florida. 

The Singing Tower is the creation of the late 
Edward W. Bok, who housed in it a set of seventy- 
one bells of beautiful tone and perfect pitch, 
and who gave the use of the bells to students of 
The Curtis Institute of Music enrolled for the 
study of Campanology'-. 

Students learn the rudiments of bell playing 
on a practice clavier in the Tower and are allowed 
to play the actual bells when their progress has 
warranted such promotion. Another practice cla- 
vier is installed in one of the studios of the 
Institute. 



The bells, cast by Taylor and Company, of Lough- 
borough, England, range in weight from seven pounds 
to eleven tons. 



26 



THE CURTIS IKGTITUTE OF i^USIC 



Anton Brees 



In a mannerof speaking, the bell playing of 
Anton Brees has been heard around the v/orld. He 
is a Belgian, trained for his profession by his 
father, Gustaaf Brees, city carillonneur in Ant- 
werp; and a graduate of the Royal Flemish Conser- 
vatory. 

In 192.^, having v/on a reputation in Belgium, 
Holland and Ireland, Anton Brees v.as chosen to 
give recitals on the War Memorial Carillon in 
Loughborough, England. In the follov/ing year he 
made his first visit to the United States, and a 
year later opened the Cape Tovvn Csrillon in South 
Africa and the Rockefeller Iiilemorial Carillon of 
the Park Avenue Baptist Church, Nev/ York City. 
He has since opened carillons in almost every 
section of the United States, including the one 
in the Mountain Lake Singing Tower, Mountain Lake, 
Florida, where he is bell-master. 



27 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF mSlC 



Eurhythmic s 
Instructor — Placido de Montoliu 



A native of Tarragona, in Catalonia, Placido de 
Montoliu received a Bachelor of Arts degree at St. 
Ignatius of Loyola College, in Barcelona, and be- 
gan his musical education at the Academia Granados, 
in the same city, continuing in Geneva, at the Con- 
servatoire and at the Jaques-Dalcroze Institute. 
He later was graduated from the Jaques-Dalcroze 
Institute in Hellerau, Germany, and became assis- 
tant to Professor Jaques-Dalcroze. 

Coming to the United States, Mr. de Montoliu v/as 
for nine years instructor in Eurhythmies, Solfege 
and Choral Singing at Brjm Mawr College, Bryn Uaxo', 
Pennsylvania. Later, he v/as director of the rhyth- 
mic ballet at the Theatre National de 1' Opera in 
Paris, for three years. 

Mr. de Montoliu is the creator of ballets on 
Giuseppe San Martini's Concerto in G Major for 
String Orchestra, and Philippe Gaubert's " Fresgue s". 
also incidental dances in Massenet's " Griselidis " 
and Ernest Reyer's opera, " Sigurd " . all of which 
were given at the Theatre National de 1' Opera. 



28 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IvIUSIC 



Division X 
THEORY AUD COMPOSITION 



Instructor in Composition 
Instrum entation and Orchestration 

Rosario Scalero 



Instructor in Elementary Counterp oint 
and Elementary Harmony 

Ernest Zechiel 



Instructors in Solfege 

Renee Longy Miquelle 
Eleanor Meredith 



29 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF mSlC 



Rosario Scalero 

Rosario Scalero, who is recognized as a great 
authority on theory-'- and composition, began his 
musical career as a violinist at the Liceo Musi- 
cale in Turin. Later he studied with Camillo 
Sivori in Genoa and August Viilhelmj in London. 
At the age of twenty, Mr. Scalero won the title 
of Distinguished Academician of the Royal Academy 
of St. Cecilia in Rome. 

Mr. Scalero' s love for theory and com.position 
led him to study for seven years with the master 
Mandyczev/ski who was one of the most intimate 
associates of Brahms and the editor of Schubert's 
and Haydn's complete v/orks. Thereafter, Mr. Sca- 
lero v/as appointed Decent of Musical Form at the 
Royal Academy of St. Cecilia, 

After a series of concerts in the principal 
cities of Europe in v/hich Mr. Scalero appeared as 
a violinist, he settled in Rome and there founded 
the Societa del Quartette for the performance of 
ensemble and choral works. 

Mr. Scalero has also acted as High Commission- 
er for Examinations for the Conservatories of 
Naples, Rome and Parma. His works are numerous 
and include compositions for violin, piano and 
orchestra. 



50 



TliE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IvIUSIC 



Division XI 

OPERA 

Conductor 
Fritz Reiner 

Instructor in Operatic Acting 
V^ilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 



Coaches 

Alberto Biraboni Sylvan Levin 

Andreas Fuginann Boris Goldovsky 

Elizabeth ^'estmor eland 



51 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Fritz Reiner 

Fritz Reiner was born in Budapest, and studied 
at the National Academy of Music under Thoman and 
Koessler, 

He has been conductor for the Komische Opera 
and the Volksoper in Budapest, the Municipal Opera 
in Laibach, the Dresden Opera and the Dresden 
State Orchestra. 

In Rome in the year 192£ Fritz Reiner conducted 
as guest the first performance of " Die Ivleister- 
singer " ever given in the Teatro Costanzi, and 
some of the concerts of the Augusteo Orchestra. 
In Barcelona he conducted at the Teatro Liceo. 

In the same year Mr. Reiner made his first 
appearance in the United States, becoming the suc- 
cessor of the late Eugene Ysaye as conductor of 
the Cincinnati Orchestra, which position Mr. Rei- 
ner held until the end of the season 1930-51, re- 
signing then to become a conductor of the Phila- 
delphia Grand Opera Company. 

During the period of his engagement by the Cin- 
cinnati Orchestra, Mr. Reiner conducted some of 
the concerts given at the Levdsolm Stadium in New 
York and at the Hollywood Bowl. He also conducted 
German operas at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Ayres 
and in the v/inter of 19?7-1928 was guest conductor 
of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

In 1952 Mr. Reiner was decorated by King Victor 
Emmanuel III of Italy with the title "Officer of 
the Crov.n", for great musicianship and distinction 
as a conductor. 



32 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LIUSIC 



Vvilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 

?.ilhelin von fiymetal the younger is a graduate 
of the Vienna Conservatory of Music and Dramatic 
Art, As an actor, he started his career in Vienna, 
his home city, and continued in Berlin. Later he 
specialized in operatic stage directing, and be- 
csjae connected v/ith the Leipzig and Vienna Operas. 
Called to the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York in 1927 he co-operated with his father, Wil- 
helm von IVymetal, in staging many of the important 
productions of that organization. 

Mr. von Y.yrnetal, Jr. was released by Mr. Gatti 
Casazza in the summer of 1929 to become Stage Di- 
rector of the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 



Alberto Bimboni 

Alberto Bimboni was born in Florence, one of 
a large family of musicians. He studied piano, 
organ and composition and at the age of sixteen 
conducted his first orchestral composition. Two 
years later he made his debut as operatic direc- 
tor. 

Mr. Bimboni organized the Society of Popular 
OrchestrsuL Concerts and was its conductor for 
four years, the inaugural concert being given with 
Busoni and Ysaye as soloists. In 1911 Mr. Bimboni 
toured the United States, conducting, with Giorgio 
Polacco, Puccini' s " Girl of the Golden lest'.' He 
has been associated v.-ith a number of opera com- 
panies, among which were the Hammer stein, the 
Boston, and the Philadelphia OperaticSociety, as 
conductor, and is himself the composer of two 
operas. Mr. Bimboni is Director of the Orpheus 
Club of Philadelphia and a member of the faculty 
in the Music Department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 



33 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF P*!USIC 



Andreas Pugmann 

Andreas Pugmann' s musical education began at 
the age of ten \^ith the study of the violin. In 
his fifteenth year he entered the Royal Conserva- 
tory of Music in Dresden, the city of his birth, 
and there studied piano, violin, trumpet, theory 
and composition. He served as bandmaster in the 
German Array during the V/orld Tiar, after v;hich he 
returned to the Dresden Conservatory for graduate 
work. 

In 1919 Mr. Fugmann became conductor and cho- 
rus master at the Municipal Opera in Erfurt. 
Later he acted in the same capacities at the 
State Theatre in Coburg and at the National Opera 
of Holland. 

In 1925 Mr. Fugmann was coach and accompanist 
for Madame Elisabeth Rethberg on her tour of the 
United States and Cuba. Besides Madame Rethberg, 
he has coached such distinguished artists as 
Anne Roselle, Editha Fleischer, Giovanni Marti- 
nelli, Edward Johnson and Mario Chamlee. 



54 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF WSIC 



Division XII 

ORCHESTRA 



Instructor of Conducting 
and Orchestr a Classes 
Conductor of The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

Fritz Reiner 



Other Instructors 

■^■Alexander Hilsberg - String Ensemble 
■^Marcel Tabuteau - r/oodv;ind Ensemble 
*Saul Cohen Caston - Brass Ensemble 

Jascha Brodsky - Violin --Marcel Tabuteau- Oboe 
Max Aronoff - Viola -^-Ferdinand del Negro - 
*Frank Miller - Bassoon and 

Violoncello Contrabassoon 

^Anton Torello - Double -^-Anton Plorner - Horn 

Bass ^Saul Cohen Caston - 
■^Vvilliani Kincaid - Flute Trumpet 

Daniel Bonade- Clarinet -^^Charles Gerhard - 

Trombone 
•^•Philip Donatelli - Tuba 
■^scar Schwar - Percussion 



Orchestra Librarian 
Andrev: Luck 

^-Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra 



55 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF l^USIC 



Language s 

Instruct ors 

Mary ?/esner, A.E English 

Rene Daudon French 

Mary Shuinway, Ph. D. ) ^^^^ 

Martha Tiirk ) 

Euf emia Giannini Gregory ....••• Italian 

Placido de Montoliu Spanish 

Mary Wesner, A.B Latin 



Tutors 

Mary T/esner, A.B. 
Ua.ry Shumv;ay, Ph.D. 



56 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PLAIIS OF STUDY 

The courses of study at The Curtis Institute of 
Llusic are not rigid. The curriculum of each stu- 
dent is carefully adjusted to his individual 
needs. In general, the folloT.dng may be consid- 
ered as typical: 

(Major subject in capitals; supplementary 
subjectsunderneath) 

VOICE PIMOFORTE 

Piano, Grade B Chamber Music 

Coaching and Reper- Solfege and Theory 

toire English 
Solfege and Theory French 
English German 

French Italian 

German Spanish 

Italian Eurhythmies 

Spanish 
Diction 

Operatic Acting 
Eurhythmies 



VIOLIN. VIOLA AND VIOLONCELLO 



Piano, Grade B 

Chamber Music 

Orchestra 

Orchestra Class 

Solfege and Theory 

English 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Eurhythmies 



57 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IvIUSIC 



PLMS OF STUDY, Continued 



CHiilvlEER idUSIC 



Piano (To those in need of professional 
Violin (advice, individual instruction in 
Viola (their respective instruments will 
Violoncello (be given 

Piano, Grade B 

Orchestra 

Orchestra Class 

Solfege and Theory 

English 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 
Eurhythmies 



ACCOMPALJYIKG 



H/iEP 



ORGM 



Piano, Grade B 

Chamber Music 

Solfege and Theory 

English 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Eurhythmies 



Piano, Grade B 
Harp Ensemble 
Orchestra 
Orchestra Class 
Solfege and 

Theory 
English 
French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 
Eurhythmies 



Piano, Grade B 
Organ Class 
Solfege and 

Theory 
English 
French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 
Eurhythmies 



58 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF mSlG 



PLANS OF STUDY. Continued 



■ ^ .X . X - S i 



Ci^iPANOLQGY COLiPOSITION ORCIiESTRA INSTRUMENTS 



Organ 

Piejio, Grade B 
Organ Class 
Solfege and 

Theory 
English 
French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 
Eurhythmies 



Piano, Grade B 

Elements of 

Music 

Instrumenta- 
tion and Or- 
chestration 

Chamber Ii/hisic 
Score Read- 
ing 

Orchestra 
Score Read- 
ing 

English 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 



Double Bass, Wood- 
\vind. Brass or 

Percussion 
Piano, Grade B 
Orchestra 
Orchestra Class 
Chamber Music 
Solfege and Theory 
English 
French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 
Eurhythmies 



ORCHESTRA PLAYING 



Violin (To those in need of professional ad- 
Viola (vice, individual instruction in their 
Violoncello (respective instruments will be given 

Piano, Grade B 

Orchestra 

Orchestra Class 

Solfege and Theory 

English 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Eurh ythmies 



59 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PLANS OF STUDY, Oon timisd 



CONDUCTING OPERA 



Conducting of Student Coaching and Repertoire 

Orchestra Operatic Acting 

Conducting of Practice English 

Groux>s French 

Score Reading at Piano German 

Instrumentation Italian 

Playing in Orchestra Spanish 

Piano, Grade B Diction 

Solfege and Theory Eurhythmies 
English 
French 
German 
Italian 
Spanish 

Eurhytlunics ^__ 



40 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Living Accominodations - Upon request, the Student 
Counselor v/ill advise students and assist them in 
obtaining suitable living accomiQodations, A scale 
of rentals and any further information regarding 
rooms may be obtained through the office of the 
Counselor. 

Practice Facilities - For practice purposes, 
studios are equipped ivith Steimvay pianos, one 
studio with a three-manual Aeolian practice organ, 
and one studio v;ith a practice clavier for stu- 
dents of Campanology. 

Health Measures - Upon request, the Institute v/ill 
recommend physicians to attend students in case 
of illness. 



41 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IVlUSIC 



REQUIRMENTS FOR EI^TRi^JICE EXiU^-lINATIONS 

The entrance requirements are presented here in 
a general form, allowing the applicant latitude 
in the selection of works to be presented for ex- 
amination. While the choice of compositions is 
iraportant, the manner of performance carries far 
greater weight. The final decision as to the 
suitability of an applicant for acceptance rests 
upon the evidence of talent shov/n in the examina- 
tion, rather than upon the degree of advancement 
already attained. Admission is limited to those 
applicants whose natural musical talent gives 
promise of development to a point of artistic 
achievement. Selection from among the applicants 
is made by competitive elimination. The examiners 
do not assume the obligation of hearing all that 
an applicant is required to have in readiness for 
examination. 

VOICE 

The applicant must possess an exceptionally good 
voice, health, vitality, musical talent and x^er- 
sonality. In addition, the applicant should have 
at least an elementary knowledge of music and of 
pianoforte, while some knov^ledge of languages is 
very desirable. 

Four selections from operatic arias, oratorios 
or songs, showing the range and power of the voice, 
should be submitted from memory. The selections 
should be chosen from the works of the follo?/ing 
composers: Parisotti, Handel, Schubert, Schumann, 
Franz, Brahms, Strauss, Tschaikowsky, Rachmaninoff, 
Faure, Debussy, Duparc, Mozart, Bizet, Saint-Saens, 
Puccini, and V/agner. 

Applicants should not be over twentj'"- three years 
of age. 



42 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF i^USIC 



PIMOFORTE 

Applicants must play from aemorj'- a Three-part 
Invention or a Prelude and Fugue from The V.' ell- 
Tempered Clavichord of Bach; a Beethoven sonata, 
complete; tvjo selectionwS — one slovv and one 
brilliant — from the v/orks of Chopin or Schu- 
mann (preferably Chopin) • 

Applicants should not be over tv/enty years of 
age. 

VIOLIN 

Applicants should have a precise Imowledge of 
the 2DOsitions and the change of positions, doub- 
le notes, and a complete command of scales and 
the usual ways of hovrLng, They should be able 
to play selected studies from Kreutzer, Rode and 
Fiorillo, and one or more concertos from the 
works of the follov/ing composers: de Beriot, 
Viotti, Spohr, or Vieuxtemps, Selections should 
be submitted from memory. 

Applicants should not be over tv/enty j^ears of 
age. 

VIOLA 

Applicants must have some knowledge of the 
clefs, the positions, scales and arpeggios; and 
be familiar v.lth some of the standard violin 
studies such as those of Kreutzer, Rode, and also 
Campagnoli's 41 Caprices, Opus 22, which are es- 
pecially written for the viola. They should also 
be able to play one movement of Firket's or Hans 
Sitt's Concertos. 

Applicants should not be over tY.'ent3'--five years 
of age. 



43 



TPIE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MSIC 



VIOLONCELLO 

Applicant,s must be able to play satisfactorily 
all major and minor scales and arpeggios; also, 
a fast and a slow movement froia a Bach Suite. 
They may choose for a second composition one move- 
ment of a concerto from the standard repertoire 
or one movement from a sonata for piano and violon- 
cello, classical or modern. It is desirable, but 
not obligatory, that selections be submitted from 
memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of 
age. 

CHAJJIBER mSlG 

Applicants must possess a good ear, be able to 
read fluentlj/ at sight from standard v/orks of 
chamber music, and shov/ coiomand of the instriLment 
of their selection. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of 
age. 

ACCOI];IPANyiNG 

Applicants must demonstrate sufficient pianis- 
tic ability to play satisfactorily some of the 
more difficult studies of Cramer, Clementi-Tausig, 
or Czerny, Opus 740; be able to read at sight, v.dth 
a certain degree of accuracy, such accompaniments 
as the Examiners may choose, and have a fair 
knowledge of the standard violin, ' cello and song 
literature. 

HARP 

Applicants should possess a knowledge of the 
principles of modern harp playing and be familiar 
Y/ith its "fundamental position" and "sj-mbols". 



44 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Knowledge of piano playing is desirable. Appli- 
cants should submit from memory two v/orks of con- 
temporary composers and tv.-o transcriptions from 
the classics. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of 
age. 

ORGM 

The follov/ing should be submitted from memory: 
(a) Fugue or principal movement from a. sonata or 
symphony, (b) a trio and (c) a slow movement. 

Applicants must also play the folloiving on the 
pianoforte: (a) a study, (b) a nocturne or other 
slow movement. 

Applicants should not be over tv/enty-three years 
of age. 

C/ii,IPMOLOGY (Bells) 

Applicants (preferably men) must be able to play 
the organ and should have a thorough loioivledge of 
harmony, being able to read music easily and to 
transpose a composition at sight. They must be at 
ease at the keyboard, and should possess a sound 
physique, as the playing of bells is a strenuous 
art. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of 
age. 

COMPOSITION 

Applicants must send their manuscripts by regis- 
tered mail for examination, presenting themselves 
in person only when so requested by the Institute. 
All manuscripts must be in the handwriting of the 
applicant. 

Only such manuscripts as show genuine creative 
ability will be considered. 



45 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

OPERA 

Applicants nust possess a good voice and be 
well advanced in the art of singing. They shoiild 
give evidence of a musical background, general 
musicianship, and some knowledge of opera reper- 
toire. They inu.st be able easily to read music at 
sight. A icnowledge of languages is desirable. 

They should have a good stage presence and 
sound physique. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of 
age. 

ORCHi]STP^ PLAYING 

Applicants must possess an elementary Icnov/ledge 
of music, a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, be 
able to read at sight, and shov; talent and apti- 
tude for the instrument of their selection. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of 
age. 

CONDUCTING 

Applicants must possess an accurate ear, a de- 
veloped rhythmic sense, and a theoretical knoY;- 
ledge of the range and technique of orchestral 
instruments in the modern orchestra. They must 
be able to transpose at sight and demonstrate a 
Icnov/ledge of harmony and musical form. 

Applicants must likewise shor; fsoniliarity vdth 
classical and romantic orchestral literature and 
be able to read scores fluently at the piano, 
such as the nine symphonies of Beethoven; the C 
major, E flat major and G minor Sjifmphonies of 
Mozart; the four spnphonies of Brahzis; and the 
overtures of V^eber, Mendelssohn and V,agner. 



46 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LIUSIC 



PliYSICAL EQUIPMIi^JT 

Buildings and location 

Occupying three fine old remodelled residences 
facing the green of Rittenhouse Square, The Cur- 
tis Institute of Music is in the heart of the 
best residential section of Philadelphia, It is 
vdthin four blocks of the Academy of Llusic ivhere 
the symphony concerts of the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra, the concerts of important visiting artists 
and the performances of the Metropolitan Opera 
Company of New York are given. 

Casimir Hall has a seating capacity of 500, and 
adjoins the main building of the school. The in- 
terior walls, of white mahogany, are panelled up 
to the domed ceiling. The illumination is effec- 
ted by indirect lighting. 

The concert organ, a four-manual Aeolian, is 
used for students* lessons as well as for concerts. 

A proscenium elevator facilitates the placing on 
the stage of pianos that are stored on the floor 
below. 

In this hall students acquire experience in per- 
forming before an audience under conditions sim- 
ilar to those which they will encounter later in 
professional life. 

The library consists of r.5,000 volumes — books, 
music and scores. It includes many original and 
unedited editions of music of the great masters. 
Also it embraces a generous collection of Victor, 
Columbia, Brunswick, Edison, Odeon, Polydor and 
Gramaphonic records, as well as Duo-Art rolls. 
An interesting feature is a collection of Stereo- 
graphs • 



47 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE INSTRUMENT COLLECTION 

Old Instr^auents 

Violins 

Nicolaus Amati Cremona 

Januarius Gagliano Naples 1752 

Niccolo Gagliano Naples 1709 

Niccolo Gagliano Naples 1726 

Francesco Goffriller Udine 1725 

Jean Baptiste Guadag-nini Milano 1755 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Milano 1755 

Jean Baptiste Guadagnini Parma 1764 

Pietro Guarnerius Venice 1750 

Carlo Ferdinando Landolphus ... Milano 1755 

Nicolas Lupot Paris 1S15 

Nicolas Lupot Paris circa 1300 

Nicolas Lupot ••. Paris 

Gaspar Lorenzini Placentiae 1784 

Pique Paris 1795 

Pique (three-quarter size) •••• Paris 

Pietro Giacomo Rogeri Brescia 1700 

Laurentius Storioni Cremona 1784 

Antonius Stradivarius Cremona 1697 

Carl Antonio Testori IJilano 1729 

Jean Baptiste Vuillaume Paris 

Violas 

Antonius and 

Hieron;yniious Amati Cremona 1616 

Gasparo da Salo Brescia 1570 

Gaspare da Salo ••.•• Brescia, end of 

16th century- 
Violoncellos 

Tomasso Ballestrieri Mantua 1765 

48 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF T.'IUSIC 



Old Instiniraents . Continued 

Violoncellos, Continued 

Matteo Goifriller Venice, early 

18th century 

Giovanni Grancino Milano 1704 

Jean Baptiste Vuillaiune Paris 1840- 

1850 

Double Basses 

Amati Italian School 

Baldontoni Italian School 

Carcassi Italian School 

Carcassi Italian School 

Cavallini Italian School 

Darches Paris 1820 

Gagliano Italian School 

Gagliano Italian School 

Piatellini Italian School 

Raffo Italian School 

Storioni Italian School 

D. Tecchler . . Italian School 

B o w s 
Violia 

Charles Peccatte (silver) .... Paris 1825 
Charles Peccatte (silver) .... Paris 1826 
Charles Peccatte (silver) .... Paris 1827 

Dominic Peccatte (gold) 

Peccatte (silver) 

Lamy, le pere (silver) Paris 1899 

Lamy, le pere (silver) 

Lupot ( silver) Paris 1810 

Lupot (silver) Paris 1812 

Niirnberger 

Pfretzschner . 



49 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF TvlUSIC 



Bows, Continued 
Violin, Continued 

Pfretzschner 

Pf retz schner 

Sartory ( silver) 

Silver tre Maucotel (gold) . . Paris 1898 

Tourte (ivory frog) 

Tourte (gold; tortoise frog) 

Tourte, Aine (silver) 

Tourte, le jeune (silver)... 
Tourte, Francois (tortoise frog) 

Vigneron 

Voirin (silver) 1860 

Voirin (silver) 

Gold 

Viola 

Dobb ( silver) 

Charles Peccatte (silver) •. 
Dominic Peccatte (silver) .. 
Vuillaume ( silver) 

Violoncello 

Lupot (silver) Paris 1808 

Dominic Peccatte (silver) •• Paris 1826 

Simon ( silver) Paris 1827 

Voirin ( silver) Paris 1856 

Voirin (silver) Paris 1865 



Mod ern Instruments 

12 violins 5 violoncellos 

14 violas 3 double basses 

Bows 

1 violin 1 violoncello 

15 viola 4 double bass 



50 



THE CURTIS INSTITJTE OF iViUSIC 



Moder n Instruments . Continued 



Pianos 

2 Steinway Concert Grands 6 Steinv/ay Uprights 
61 Steinway Grands 1 Duo-Art Grand 

Harps 

1 Lyon and Healy Concert Grand 
15 Lyon and Healy Practice 



Woodwind and Brass Instruments 



51 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF iVIUSIC 



TiORKS OF ART 

Believing that the study of one form of Art is 
stimulated by an appreciation of another, and that 
environment plays an important part in education, 
The Curtis Institute of l/iusic seeks to provide an 
atmosphere that will furnish this subtle influ- 
ence. Within its buildings are paintings, etch- 
ings, lithographs and watercolors, by eminent 
artists of the past and the present, sculpture, 
tapestries, Oriental rugs, antique furniture and 
fine r/rought iron pieces. 

On the v.-alls are some forty paintings, by 
George Y^harton Edv/ards, Emil Carlsen, Childe Has- 
sam, George Inness, Jr., Yi. L. Lietcalf, Elmer 
Schofield, Frederick J. Yfaugh, Paul King, Hovsep 
Pushman, Ralph Albert Blakelock, and other con- 
temporary artists, as well as a few older v/orks 
including two flov/er pieces by Jean Baptiste Mon- 
noyer, a portrait of the Countess of Carlisle by 
Sir Peter Lely, and a predella panel of the Umbri- 
an School. Etchings include the very fine " Joseph 
Conrad Listening to Music", by Muirhead Bone, and 
one of James McBey' s best works, entitled "The 
Pianist ", besides portraits of Beethoven, nagner 
and Paderewski, by Emil Orlik, Jacques Reich and 
Emil Fuchs respectively. There are also some 
Fantin-Latour lithographs, V^agnerian in inspira- 
tion, and a charming water color sketch of Chopin 
by his friend Kwiatkowsky, 

The finest piece of sculpture is a bronze head 
of Beethoven by Enile Antoine Bourdelle. There 
are also a bas relief portrait of Edward MacDov/- 
ell by Helen Farnsworth Mears, and a bronze group 
by Benjamin Turner Kurtz entitled " Music ", besides 
statuettes by Ary Bitter and Edward Berge. 

The tapestries incltide three antique Oudenarde 



52 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LiUSIC 



WORfCS OF ART, Continued 

pieces, while some old Beauvais and Brussels frag- 
ments are used as chair covers. 

The iron door, entrance to Casimir Hall, is by 
Samuel Yellin. 



55 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF mSIC 



PUBLIC APPEAR/ulCES 
OF 
CURTIS INSTITUTE STUDENTS 
1931-1932 

Carrying out the policy of providing public ap- 
pearances for students, the Institute scheduled 
the follov;ing activities: 

Concerts by The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, with 
students as soloists: 

The Academy of Music, Philadelphia 
( the Philadelphia Forum) , con- 
ducted by Mr. Reiner December 16, 

1951 

Carnegie Hall, New York, conducted 
by Mr. Reiner and Dr. Bailly .... 
* January 29, 1932 

Twenty concerts before eleven educational and 
civic groups in Pennsj/^lvania, Nev/ Jersey, Dela- 
ware, Maryland and Connecticut, by students of 
Voice, Piano, Accojapanying, Violin, Harp, Chamber 
Music, Flute and Organ 

Twenty weekly concerts broadcast to radio audi- 
ences by The Curtis Symphony Orchestra, and stu- 
dents of Voice, Piano, Accompanying, Organ, Vio- 
lin, Viola, Violoncello, Chamber Music and Orches- 
tra Playing 

A series of five chamber music concerts in the 
Pennsylvania Museum of Art at Fairmount, Philadel- 
phia, by the Sv^^astika Quartet and other groups 
composed of students of chcimber music, orchestra 
playing, voice and piano 



54 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF IvlUSIC 



PUBLIC APPEARANCES, Continued 

Fourteen concerts by the Swastika Quartet, at 
Seal Harbor, Sorrento and Portland (Maine) , Ex- 
eter (New Hampshire) , Cambridge and Worcester 
(Massachusetts), Vfinter Park (Florida), Coker 
College (South Carolina) , and Philadelphia 

Besides the foregoing, there were numerous 
other student activities. 

Twenty-three students of Voice and Opera par- 
ticipated as soloists in eighteen of the nineteen 
performances of grand opera given in Philadelphia 
by the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company. 

Four students appeared as soloists in the per- 
formance of " Wozzeck ". repeated by the Philadel- 
phia Grand Opera Company, with the same cast, in 
New York City. 

A student of Conducting conducted seven of the 
Philadelphia performances of the Philadelphia 
Grand Opera Company, 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra played the or- 
chestra parts of the performances of " Gianni 
Schicchi " and "Cav alle ria Rusticana " by the Phil- 
adelphia Grand Opera Company. 

A student of Voice appeared as soloist in the 
annual Bach Festival at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Two students of Voice, one student of Piano, 
and the Elbee String Quartet participated in the 
Mozart Festival given at Harrisburg, Pennsylvan- 
ia. 

Three graduates toured Europe. Four students 
toured Europe, one toured South Africa, and one 
appeared in Havana, Cuba, 

A graduate and a student gave recitals in Car- 
negie Hall, Nev; York City, 



55 



TKE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF UUSIC 



PUBLIC APPEAEANCES, Continued 

Three students appeared in the performeLnces of 
Schoenberg's " Gurrelie der" by the Philadelphia 
Orchestra in Philadelphia and New York. One 
student appeared twice as soloist viith the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra. Ten students appeared in the 
Wagnerian performances of the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra in Philadelphia and Nev/ York. 

A student obtained a three-year contract Ydth 
the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York. 

A student secured a position as organist and 
carillonneur at Duke University, Durham, North 
Carolina. 



56 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



WORKS PERFORI^ED 
BY THE CURTIS SYI^HONY ORCHESTRA 
AT THE ACADEI:iY OF MSIC, PHILADELPHIA 
AND CiJRNEGIE HALL, NE?; YORK CITY 
1951-1952 

Bach-Pick-Mangiagalli . . , Two Preludes for String 

Orchestra 

Brahms Symphony Number 4 in E minor 

Faure Requiem for Soli , Chorus, 

Organ and Orchestra 

Mozart Symphonie Concertante for Violin 

and Viola 

Tschaikovsky Concerto in B flat minor 

for Piano and Orchestra 
(first movement) 
von y/eber .••.... Overture to "Oberon" 

Soloists 

I so Briselli, violinist 

Max Aronoff , violist 

Jorge Bolet, pianist 

Natalie Bodanskaya, soprano 

Conrad Thibault, baritone 

Lawrence Apgar, organist 

Conductors 

Fritz Reiner 
Dr. Louis Bailly 



57 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF LIUSIC 



Y.ORKS PERFORMED 
IN THE CHAi'iEER I^IUSIC CONCERTS 
AT THE PENNSYLVAIUA MUSEUtl OF ART 
1331-1932 

Arensky Quintet in D major, opus 51, for 

Piano and String Quartet 

Beethoven String Quartet in F major, opus 

18, Number 1 
Brahms .•••, Clarinet Quintet in B minor, opus 
115, for Clarinet and String 

Quartet 

Brahms " Das Madchen spricht " , opus 107, 

Number 3 

Brahms " Madchenf luch" . opus 69, Number 9 

d'Indy .... Suite in D major, opus 24, dans le 

style ancien, for truiapet, two flutes, 
tv;o violins, viola, violoncello and 

double bass 

Dohnanyi String Quartet in D flat major, 

opus 15 

Faure Quartet in C minor, opus 15, for 

Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello 
Glazounov ... Quintet, opus 39, for two Violins, 
Viola and tv/o Violoncelli 

GluGk Recitative and aria: " Che f aio senza 

Euridlce", from " Orpheus " 

Handel Recitative and aria: " Ombra mai fu " 

from " Xerxes " 
Handel .... Fantasia in C major (piano) 

Liszt Valse-Impromptu in A flat major 

(piano) 

Loeffler Four songs for Voice, Viola and 

Piano, opus 5 

Mozart Quintet in A major, Kochel Nuraber 

531 for Clarinet and String Quartet 
Mozart Rondo alia Turca (piano) 



58 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF :v.USIC 



WORKS PERF0PJ.1ED IN MUSEUiU CONCERTS, Continued 

Novacek Sinfonietta, opus 48, Octet for 

Vvind Instruments 

Pieme Quintet in three movements, opus 41, 

for Piano and String Quartet 

Pizzetti Three Songs for Soprano and 

String Quartet 
Schubert ..... Quintet in A major, opus 114, for 
Piano, Violin, Viola, Violoncello and 

Double Bass 

Schumann Intermezzo in E minor, opus 4 

Number 8 (piano) 
Smetana ..... String Qluartet in E minor, opus 

116 - "Aus meinem Leben" 



>r -jr >r -<<■ -/f -/c 

STUDENTS' CONCERTS GIVEN IN CASIIiilR HALL 
1951-1952 

Thirty programs were presented by students in 
Pianoforte, Voice, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, 
Harp, V<ind Ensemble, Composition and Chamber 
Music. 



59 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF 1^310 



FACULTY RECITALS GIVEI^ IN CASIMIR RAXL 
1951-195S 

Novembor 30, 1951 ...*Mr. Felix Salmond, violon- 
cellist 
December 14, 19S1 ...■''^Miss Harriet van Emden, 

soprano, and 
Miss Lucile Lav.Tence, 

harpist 
Januar;^^ 18, 1952 ....^Mr. Horatio Connell, 

baritone, assisted by students 
January £1, 195?. ..•• Compositions of Mr. Ernest 

Zechiel, plaj'-ed by students 
January £5, 1952 .... Miss Lucile Lav/rence and 

Mr. Carlos Salaedo, 

harpists 
Mr. I'Villiam Kincaid, flutist, 
and Mr. Max Aronoff , violist, 
collaborating 
February 1, 1952 •... ^-Madame Lea Luboshutz, 

violinist 
February 15, 1952 ... -^^-Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, 

violinist 
February/ 25, 1952 ... Mr. Abram Chasins, pianist 
March 14, 1952 .... Madame Queena Mario, sopranoi 
Mr. V.ilfred Pelletier at the Piano 
April 4, 1952 .... Mr. David Saperton, pianist 
April 11, 1952 ....-^Dr. Louis Bailly, violist 
April 18, 1952 .... Mr. Fernando Germani, 

organist 

*Mr. Harry Kaufman at the Piano 

ADDITIONAL EVENT IN CASIMIR liALL 

Januarj^ 9, 1952 .... Concert by The Musical Art 
Quartet and Mr. Josef Hofmann 



60 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF ...USIC 



STUDENTS ARE FROM THE FOLLOv^ING COUNTRIES: 



CHINA 

ENGLAND 

FRAI^CE 



CUBA 



RUSSIA 

THE 'UNITED STATES 
(51 STATES) 

HA^VAII 

PUERTO RICE 

CANADA 

uiEXICO 



GERiviANY 

HUNGiJlY 
IT/iY 



BERLiUDA 



61 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF :.USIC 



C/iLaiDAPt FOR THE SCHOOL YEiJl 195£-19SS 

School Year begins ■'"-October 5, 1932 

School Year ends May 31, 195f 

Holidays 

Thanl-zsgiving Day November 24, 1932 

Christmas vacation ... December 24, 1932 to 
January 5, 1935 (both inclusive) 

Washington's Birthday ... February 22, 1933 

Easter vacation April 16, 1955 to April 25, 

1955 (both inclusive) 

Memorial Day May 50, 1955 



Opening postponed until October 17, 1932 
(on account of Infantile Paralysis epidemic) 



7\"~v»~7<-jr7\-?wC"/r7r