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Full text of "Catalogue"

A. H. St3,rnp 






^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFHCIAL PUBLICATION 



V0L33 



:) 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



Catalogue Number 



1936 . 1937 



No. 2 



X 



i 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

i 



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m 



ll 



V, 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 
MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1936 - 1937 




Containing general information concerning the University. 

Announcements for the Scholastic Year 1936-1937 

and Records of 1935-1936. 

Facts, conditions, and personnel herein set forth are as 
existing at tlie time of publication, February, 1936 



Issued Monthly by The University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
Entered as Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR FOR 1936, 1937, 1938 



1936 


1937 


1938 \ 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


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1 


2 


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1 


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1 


5 


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24 


16 


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1819 


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21 


22 


26 


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29 


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31 




24 
31 


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29 


30 


25 


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27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 29 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


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»••••> 






1 


•••••• 


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1 


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13119 


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23 24 


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31 


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— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29 


30 31 




— 


— 


— 


27 


28 












30 








1 




SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


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9 


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12 


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8 


2 
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3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 








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3 4 


6 


-j 


1 

8 


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910 


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1112 


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22; 23 24 


25 26 


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28 29 


30 








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31 






.•»•. 


26 27 


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OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


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31 










.... 




1 
1 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


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••*••• 


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• -.— 


29 


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— 




— 


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— 


— 


•••••« 

(••••«« 


DECEMBER 


- 1 
JUNE •; DECEMBER 


JUNE 


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30131 






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i 26 


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26 


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— -. 



\ 






THE UNIVERSITY 

of 
MARYLAND 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1936 - 1937 







Cotdahimn general informniwn rovrerynvff thr rttiversitH, 

Atinonncemcnt^ for the Scholastic Year UfJd-19JT 

mid Ri'conis of 19J5'19J0, 

Facta, co)HUtio)ii^, ami personnel herein >iet forth are afi 

existinff at the time of imhlication, Febnutrn, 19JG 



Issutd Monthly by The Univor.sity of Maryland. College Park. Md. 
Entered a.s Second Class Matter Under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Table of Contents 



Page 

University Calendar 4 

Board of Kegents „ 7 

Officers of Administration 8 

Officers of Instruction 9 

Section I — General Information 37 

History „ „ _. 37 

Administrative Organization „ „ _ 38 

Princess Anne Academy 38 

Location - - - 39 

Equipment - 39 

Entrance - ~ -. 41 

Regulations, Grades, Degrees 47 

Expenses » - — 50 

Honors and Awards » 56 

Student Activities - 58 

Alumni „ 62 

Section II — Administrative Divisions _ -.- 63 

College of Agriculture - > 63 

Agricultural E xper iment Station 84 

Extension Service ^ 86 

College of Arts and Sciences 87 

College of Education 112 

College of Engineering 131 

College of Home Economics „ _ - 142 

Graduate School _ 147 

Summer Session ~ - _ 156 

Department of Military Science and Tactics ^ 157 

Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics 161 

School of Dentistry _ „ -. 162 

School of Law „ 171 

School of Medicine ~ - 175 

School of Nursing. „.... „ _ 178 

School of Pharmacy 184 

State Board of Agriculture ~ ...._ 187 

Department of Forestry ., _ _ 189 

Weather Service „ 189 

Geological Survey „ » 190 

Section III — Description of Courses _ 

(Alphabetical index of departments, p. 191) 

Section IV — Degrees, Honors, and Student Register 300 

Degrees and Certificates, 1935-1936 „ _ 300 

Honors, 1935-1936 „ _ 312 

Student Register „ 320 

Summary of Enrollment 369 

Index 370 



1936 
Sept. 14-15 

Sept. 16 
Sept. 17 
Sept. 23 

Nov. 25-30 

Dec. 22 

1937 
Jan. 4 
Jan. 20-27 



Jan. 11-19 
Feb. 1 



Feb. 2 
Feb. 8 

Feb. 22 
March 25-30 

May 15-22 

May 24-June 2 

May 30 
May 31 
June 4 
June 5 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1936-1937 
COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 



Monday-Tuesday 
Wednesday 

Thursday, 8:20 a. m. 
Wednesday 



Wednesday, 4:10 p. m. 
Monday, 8:20 a. m. 

Tuesday, 4:10 p. m. 



Registration for freshmen. 

Upper classmen complete regis- 
tration. 

Instruction for first semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Thanksgiving recess. 
Christmas recess begins. 



Monday, 8:20 a m. Christmas recess ends. 

Wednesday-Wednesday First semester examinations. 

Second Semester 



Monday-Tuesday 
Monday 



Tuesday, 8:20 a. m. 
Monday 



Monday 

Thursday, 4:10 p. m. 
Tuesday, 8:20 a. m. 

Saturday-Saturday 

Monday- Wednesday 
Noon 

Sunday, 11:00 a. m. 

Monday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Registration for second semester. 

Last day to complete registration 
for second semester without 
payment of late registration 
fee. 

Instruction for second semester 
begins. 

Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without 
penalty. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess. 

Registration for first semester, 
1937-1938. 

Second semester examinations.! 

Baccalaureate sermon. 
Memorial Day. Holiday. 
Class Day. 
Commencement. 



I 



Summer Term, 



June 14-19 
June 23 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 5-10 
Sept. 7-9 



Monday- Saturday 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Thursday-Tuesday 

Tuesday-Thursday 



Rural Women's Short Course. 
Summer Session begins. 
Summer Session ends. 
Boys' and Girls' Club Week. 
Volunteer Firemen's Short Course. 



BALTIMORE (PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS) 

First Semester 



1936 
September 14 


Monday 


September 16 


Wednesday 


September 22 


Tuesday 


September 23 


Wednesday 


September 24 


Thursday 


November 25 


Wednesday 


November 30 


Monday 


December 19 


Saturday 


1937 
January 4 


iVIonday 


January 25 to 
January 30, inc. 


Monday- 
Saturday 


January 30 


Saturday 



* Registration for evening students 

(LAW). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (LAW — Evening). 

* Registration for first- and second-year 

students (DENTISTRY, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

* Registration for all other students 

(DENTISTRY, LAW— Day, MEDI- 
CINE, PHARMACY). 

Instruction begins with the first sched- 
uled period (DENTISTRY, LAW— 
Day, MEDICINE, PHARMACY). 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the 
last scheduled period (ALL 
SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Christmas recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

* Registration for the second semester 

(ALL SCHOOLS). 

First semester ends after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 



Second Semester 



February 1 Monday 



February 22 
March 24 

March 31 



June 5, 
11:00 a. m. 

June 16 



Monday 
Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 



Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period (ALL SCHOOLS). 

Commencement. 



Second semester ends (LAW -— Even- 
ing). 






c 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman 1936 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary , 1938 

3902 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 

W. Calvin Chesnut 1942 

Post Office Building, Baltimore 

William P. Cole, Jr _.... 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. _ 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Harry H. Nuttlr 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

J. Milton Patterson 1944 

Cumberland, Allegany County 

John E. Raine _ 1939 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Clinton L. Riggs _... > _.... „.1942 

903 N. Charles St., Baltimore 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 
^^P^^^* J' Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station; 
Dean of the College of Agriculture. 
T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the Extension Service. 



/^T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Law. 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Law. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.D., D'ean of the School of Pharmacy. 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Secretary of the Baltimore Schools. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

^ W. S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Education. 

^^^ M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A., Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

"^ C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

~7 S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Acting Dean of the College of Engineering. 

y Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the President. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

T. A. Hutton, A.B., Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply 
Store (College Park). 



8 



A 



For the Year 1935-1936. 
At College Park 

PROFESSORS 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology, Dean of 

the Graduate School. 
Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
t^-^RACE Barnes, B.S., B.L.S., M.A., Librarian. 

F. W. BeSLEY, Ph.D., Professor of Farm Forestry, State Forester. 

L. A. Black, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist, Chairman 

of the Pre-Medical Committee. 
W. H. Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
O. C. Bruce, M.S., Professor of Soil Technology. (On leave 1935-1936.) 

B. E. Carmichael, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

R. W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 
H. F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Myron Creese, B.S., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

C. G. ElCHLiN, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

W. F. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages. 

Harry Gwinner, M.E., Professor of Engineering Mathematics. 

Charles B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Malcolm Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

Homer C. House, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

L. W. Ingham, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng., Professor of Highway Engineering, Dean 

Emeritus of the College of Engineering. 
W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Statistics, Assistant Dean 
of the College of Agriculture. 

B. T. Leland, B.S., M.A., Professor of Industrial Education. 
Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

C. L. Mackert, M.A., Professor of Physical Education for Men 

F. A. Magruder, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 
T. B. Manny, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

H. B. McDonnell, M.S., M.D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
"^^T'rieda W. McFarland, M.A., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
"^TEdna B. McNaughton, M.A., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
^^ DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 



. 




J. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A., Professor of Agronomy. 
\ J. A. MiLLE!R, B.S., Administrative Coordinator of Practice Teaching. 
^>^. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 
Dean of the College of Home Economics. 
J. N. G. Nesbit, B.S., M.E., E.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
J. B. S. Norton, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Systematic Botany and Mycology. 
J. D. Patch, Lt. Col., Inf., Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
C. J. PlERSON, A.M., Professor of Zoology. 
R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M., Professor of Animal Pathology. 
C. S. Richardson, A.M., Professor of Speech. 
A. L. SCHRADER, Ph.D., Professor of Pomology. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion, Director of the Summer Session. 
Thos. H. Spence, A.m., Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures, 

Dean Emeritus of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
J. W. SpROWLS, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, Acting Dean 
of the College of Engineering, Acting Director of Engineering 
Research. 
T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. 
W. T. L. Taliaferro, A.B., D.Sc, Professor of Farm Management. 
C. E. Temple, M.A., Professor of Plant Pathology, State Plant Pathologist. 
A. S. Thurston, M.S., Professor of Floriculture and Landscape Gardening. 
R. V. Truitt, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Aquiculture. 
R. H. Waite, B.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
Harry Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
.^Claribel p. Welsh, M.A., Professor of Foods. 

LECTURERS 

0. E. Baker, Ph.D., Lecturer in Agricultural Economics. 

1. A. Hx::Lor, M.S., Special Lecturer in Insect Taxonomy. 

R. E. Snodgrass, A.B., Division of Insect Pathology and Morphology, Bu- 
reau of Entomology, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Lecturer in 
Insect Morphology. 

Charles Thom, Ph.D., Principal Microbiologist, Bureau of Chemistry and 
Soils, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Lecturer in Soil Microbiology. 

J. Franklin Yeager, Ph.D., Division of Insect Physiology, Bureau of En- 
tomology, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Lecturer on Physiology of 
Insects. 

10 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
Myron H. Berry, M.A., Associate Professor of Daii-y Husbandry. 
Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 
H. B. Cordner, M.S., Associate Professor of Olericulture. 
Charles W. England, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy Manufacturing. 
Geary Eppley, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 
W. A. Frazier, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture. 
•^^USAN Emolyn Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Englishr- 
I. C. Haut, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pomology. 
L. J. Hodgins, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
C. F. Kramer, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 
^^-(Mrs.) Eleanor L. Murphy, M. A., Associate Professor of Home Manage-, 
ment. 
Geo. D. Quigley, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
A. W. RiCHESON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics (Baltimore). 
Ross W. Sandeirson, A.B., D.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
J. T. Spann, B.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
R. P. Thomas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Technology. 
W. Paul Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
S. M. Wedeberg, B.A., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Accountancy and 

Business Administration. 
S. W. Wentworth, B.S., Associate Professor of Pomology. 
Charles E. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
R. C. WiLETif, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Russell B. Allen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Wayland S. Bailey, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Howard Clark, 2nd, Major, Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Harry G. Clowes, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Geo. O. S. Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modem Languages. 

Eugene B. Daniels, Ph.D., M.F.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

R. T. Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

John W. Harmony, 1st Lieut. Inf. (D.O.L.), Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

H. B. HosHALL, B.S., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
\^^;::;;^ATE KarpeL£S, M.D., Physician to Women. 

Paul Knight, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

F. M. Lemon, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Geo. Machwart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Chemistry. 

R. A. Mackie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Henry Peel, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

11 



v/ 



N. E. Phillips, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

M. A. Pyle, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ralph Russell, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

J. H. ScHAD, M.A., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (Baltimore). 

Meno H. Spann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

E. B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry (Balti- 
more) . 

Reuben Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Guy p. Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology (Baltimore). 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 
(Baltimore). 

Frank Ward, Capt. Inf. (D.O.L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

R. M. Watkins, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
«*^Mrs. F. H. Westney, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

R. C. Yates, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Geo. F. Alrich, M.S., E.E., Instructor in Mathematics. 
•~Mary Barton, C.D.E.F., M.A., Instructor in Education, and Critic Teacher. 
M. Thomas Bartram, B.S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
J. B. Blandford, Instructor in Horticulture. 
S. O. BURHOE, M.S., Instructor in Zoology. 

C. W. CissEL, M.A., Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. 
O. C. Clark, B.S., Instructor in Physics. 
rvf^ Beryl H. Dickinson, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

"^-'Amy J. Englund, B.S., A.M., Instructor in Home Economics. 
J. E. Faber, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
George W. Fogg, M.A., Instructor in Library Science. 
Gardner H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English (Baltimore). 
L. C. Hutson, Instructor in Mining Extension. 
Wm. H. McManus, Warrant Officer, Instructor in Military Science and 

Tactics. 
C. D. Murphy, A.M., Instructor in English. 
C. L. Newcombe, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modem Languages (Baltimore). 
-*^ Elizabeth Phillips James, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education for 

Women. 
Melvin a. Pittman, M.S., Instructor in Physics (Baltimore). 
\J -—Hester W. Provenson, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English (Baltimore). 
Harlan Randall, Instructor in Music. 

H. Hewell Roseberry, M.A., Instructor in Physics (Baltimore). 
Mark Schweizer, M.A., Instructor in Modem Languages. 
Otto Siebeneichen, Instructor in Band Music. 

12 



y 



H. B. Shipley, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Arthur Silver, M.A., Instructor in History, 
■r Kathleen M. Smith, A.B., Ed.M., Instructor in Education. 

W. C. Supplee, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

H. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

Boone D. Tillbtt, B.E., M.S., M.Agr., J.D., Instructor in Sociology. 

C. B. Tompkins, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 
. G. J. Uhrinak, Corporal Inf., Instructor in Military Science and Tactics. 

Wm. F. Vollbrecht, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

G. S. Weiland, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Joseph C. White, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
■* Helen Wilcox, M.A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

Leland G. Worthington, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Education. 



ASSISTANTS 

G. J. Abrams, M.S., Assistant in Entomology. ' 

Jessie Blaisdell, Assistant in Music. 

Rachel L. Carson, M.A., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 

Adelaide C. Clough, M.A., Assistant in Education, and Critic Teacher. 

Franklin D. Cooley, A.M., Assistant in English. 

Gladys Dickerson, Ph.D., Assistant in Education. 

L. P. DiTMAN, Ph.D., Assistant in Entomology. 

W. G. Friedrich, Ph.D., Assistant in Modem Languages (Baltimore). 

Arthur M. Gibson, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry (Baltimore). 

Donald Hennick, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 

Charles D. Howell, A.B., Assistant in Zoology (Baltimore). 

Frances Ide, M.A., Assistant in English. 

Audrey Killiam, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

Olga C. Lofgren, B.S., B.P.E., Assistant in Speech, 

Mary Jane McCurdy, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

Leona S. Morris, Assistant in History. 

G. L. SiXBEY, M.A., Assistant in English. 

W. C. Warfield, B.S., Assistant in Horticulture. 



18 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 



1935-1936 



Earl J. Anderson Botany (Plant Pathology) 

John Bartlett Agronomy 

C. R. Ball English 

W. E. Bell Agricultural Economics 

Genevieve Blev^ Modern Languages 

LiLA Marie Blitch English 

William P. Campbell Chemistry 

Alaric a. Evangelist _.„ Modern Languages 

A. P. Dunnigan Bacteriology 

Henrietta Goodner „ Modern Languages 

WiLLARD T. Haskins Chemistry 

Claron D. Hesse Horticulture 

Frank L. How^ard Chemistry 

Samuel S. Lear... Dairy Husbandry 

G. F. Madigan Agronomy 

Lewis P. McCann _ Botany 

Paul R. Poffenberger Agricultural Economics 

Erna Riedel Home Economics 

Ann Shaw ; Home Economics 

H. D. Slade „ Bacteriology 

H. L. Stier Horticulture 

Edwin G. Stimpson Chemistry 

Walter R. Volckhausen Mathematics 

Everett C. Weitzell Agricultural Economics 

Charles W. Williams , Mathematics 

Ralph Williams „ „ Agronomy 

Paschal P. Zapponi _ Chemistry 

Mark Woods „ Botany 



14 



FELLOWS 

1935-1936 

Albert C. Adams - » - -- Chemistry 

Paul S. Brooks Chemistry 

Homer W. Cajihart Chemistry 

Harry M. Duvall. - Chemistry 

Joseph T. Elvove Economics 

Henry G. Harns Entomology 

Jean Grace Hamilton Education 

Hugh A. Heller Chemistry 

Arthur Hersberger Chemistry 

William A. Horne Chemistry 

Henry G. Ingersoll Chemistry 

Jane Jack Economics 

George P. Lachar Agricultural Economics 

Roy W. Lennartson „ Agricultural Economics 

Charles Samuel Lowt: Chemistry 

George Reynard Botany 

Harold Shirk ...Plant Physiology 

Albert H. Tillson -.... Botany 

Verna M. Zimmerman > Mathematics 

LIBRARY STAFF (College Park) 

Grace Barnes, B.S„ B.L.S., M.A Librarian 

George W. Fogg, M.A Reference and Loan Librarian 

Alma Hook, B.S — Head Cataloguer 

Louise W. Getchell, B.A., B.S. in L.S Cataloguer 

Kate White _ Assistant 



INSPECTION AND REGULATORY SERVICE 



(Feeds, Fertilizer, and Lime) 



L. B. Broughton, Ph.D - State Chemist 

L. E. BoPST, B.S Associate State Chemist 

E. C. Donaldson, M.S - Chief Inspector 

W. M. J. Footen -....- ~ Inspector 

E. M. Zentz „ Inspector 

H. R. Walls Assistant Chemist and Micro-analyst 

L. H. Van Wormer - » Assistant Chemist 

R. E. Baumgardner, B.S. - Assistant Chemist 

Albert Heagy, B.S _ Assistant Chemist 

W. C. Supplee, Ph.D Assistant Chemist 

15 



BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Dean Patterson, Dr. Symons, Dean Taliaferro, Dean Row- 
land, Dean Howell, Dean DuMez, Dr. Heatwole, Dean Robinson, Dean 
Small, Dean Mount, Dean Appleman, Acting Dean Steinberg, Dean 
Stamp, Colonel Patch, Dr. Lomas, Dr. Kemp, Mr. Hillegeist, Miss 
Preinkert, Miss Kellar, Professor Metzger, Dr. Broughton, Dr. Hale, 
Dr. Brown, Dr. White. 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY, STANDARDS, AND COORDINATION 

Dr. Warfel, Chairman; Dr. DeVault, Dr. Broughton, Professor Metzger, 
Dr. White, Dr. Dantzig, Mrs. Welsh, Dr. Cotterman, Dr. Truitt, Dr. 
Bamford, Professor Steinberg, Dr. Gaver, Dr. Jenkins, Dr. Wylie, 
Professor Strahorn. 



STUDENT LIFE 

Professor Eppley, Chairman; Major Clark, Mr. Hoshall, Dr. Hays, Mr. 
Faber, Professor Mackert, Professor Eichlin, Professor Phillips, Dr. 
Harman, Miss Stamp, Mr. Pollock, Mr. Williams, Mr. Hottel, Miss Ide, 
Professor Carpenter. 

THE LIBRARIES 

Dr. HaJe, Chairman; Dr. Long, Dr. Crothers, Dr. Haring, Dr. Bamford, 
Mrs, Welsh, Dr. Anderson, Dr. Spencer, Mr. Strahorn. 

RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Dr. Manny, Chairman; Dr. Kemp, Dr. White, Professor Quigley, Mrs. 
McFarland, Professor Eppley. 

EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND ADJUSTMENT 

Dr. Long, Chairman; Dr. White, Dr. Phillips, Professor Pyle, Dr. Stein- 
meyer. Dr. Falls, Dr. Crothers, Professor Ingham, Dr. Hale, Professor 
Quigley, Dr. Sprowls. 7lu>%^ »Ti>MAJb . 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID 

Professor Metzger, Chairman; Dr. Cotterman, Professor Eichlin, Miss 
Stamp, Professor Eppley, Miss Mount. 

16 



( 



RESEARCH 

Dr. Appleman, Chairman; Dr. Gregerson, Dr. Uhlenhuth, Dr. Thompson, 
Dr. Drake, Dr. Manny, Dr. DeVault. 

EXTENSION EDUCATION 

Mr. Oswald, Chairman ; Miss Kellar, Dr. Manny, Dr. Crothers, Dr. DeVault, 
Dr. Steinmeyer, Dr. Hale, Dean Small, Professor Richardson, Dr. 
Warfel. 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS, NON-RESIDENT LECTURES, AND 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dr. Symons, Chairman; Professor Richardson, Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, Dr. 
Cory, Dr. Schrader, Mr. Snyder, Mr. Pollock, Dean Robinson, Dr. 
Besley, Miss Stamp, Dean Mount, Dean DuMez. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Dr. Broughton, Chairman; Professor Richardson, Dr. Cory, Professor 
Eppley, Dr. Kemp. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Mr. Snyder, Chairman; Dr. House, Dr. Falls, Mr. Oswald, Dr. Heatwole, 
Professor Metzger, Dr. Warfel. 

COORDINATION OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Dr. Patterson, Chairman; Dr. Symons, Dr. Welsh, Mr. Bopst, Dr. Besley, 
Mr. Holmes, Dr. Kemp, Mr. Shaw, Dr. Cory, Mr. Oswald. 

GENERAL ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Dr. Patterson, Chairman ; Dr. Appleman, Dr. Hale, Dr. Manny, Dr. Symons, 
Dr. Warfel, Professor Eppley, Dr. Long, Professor Metzger, Mr. 
Oswald, Dr. Broughton, Mr. Snyder. 



17 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

Harry J. Patterson, D.Sc. - Director 

Agricultural Economics: 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D Agricultural Economist 

Ralph Russell, M.S Assistant Agricultural Economist 

W. Paul Walker, M.S Associate Agricultural Economist 

Arthur B. Hamilton, M.S - Assistant Agricultural Economist 

B. B. Powell, M.S. Assistant Agricultural Economist 

Agricultural Engineering : 
R. W. Carpenter, A.B., LL.B Agricultural Engineer 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) : 

tJ. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A Agronomist 

*W. B. Kemp, Ph.D ..- ^ Geneticist 

G. Eppley, M.S Associate Agronomist (Crops) 

R. P. Thomas, Ph.D - Soil Technologist 

0. C. Bruce, M.S „ Associate Soil Technologist 

R. G. Rothgeb, Ph.D Associate Geneticist (Plant Breeding) 

E. H. Schmidt, M.S Assistant in Soils 

H. B. WiNANT, M.S Assistant in Soils 

R. L. Sellman, B.S Assistant in Agronomy, Supt. of Station Farm 

Animal and Dairy Husbandry : 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Dairy and Animal Husbandman 

B. E. Carmichael, M.S - Animal Husbandman 

L. W. Ingham, M.S ^ Dairy Husbandman 

M. H. BEaiRY, M.S. -.... Dairy Husbandman 

Charles W. England, Ph.D. Associate Dairy Husbandman 

H. L. Ayres Superintendent, Dairy Manufacturing Laboratory 

Animal Pathology and Bacteriology : 

Mark Welsh , D. V.M State Veterinarian 

R. C. Reed, Ph.B., D.V.M Animal Pathologist 

A. L. Brueckner, B.S., D.V.M Animal Pathologist 

L. J. Poelma, D.V.M., M.S Assistant Animal Pathologist 

H. M. DeVolt, M.S., D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Poultry) 

C. L. EvERSON, D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Baltimore) 

C. R. Davis, M.S., D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Poultry) 

M. T. Bartram, M.S Assistant in Bacteriology 

1. M. Moulthrop, D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist (Poultry) 

W. R. Teeter, B.S., D.V.M Assistant Animal Pathologist 



fAssistant Director of Experiment Station. 
♦ Assistant Dean, College of Agriculture. 



18 



Botany, Pathology, Physiology: 

*C. O. Appleman, Ph.D Plant Physiologist and Botanist 

J. B. S. Norton, M.S., D.Sc - - Plant Pathologist 

0. E. Temple, M.S P^^nt Pathologist 

R. A. Jehle, Ph.D Associate Plant Pathologist 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D - Associate Botanist 

Entomology : 

E N Cory, Ph.D Entomologist 

H. S.* McConnell* B.S..' - Associate Entomologist 

Geo. S. Langford, Ph.D •. - Associate Entomologist 

L. P. DITMAN, Ph.D - Assistant Entomologist 

C. Graham, M.S Assistant Entomologist 

Geo. Abrams, M.S Assistant Entomologist 

ff fiftit*u,lture * 

A L Schrader, Ph.D Acting Horticulturist and Pomologist 

T H White M S Olericulturist and Floriculturist 

s' W. Wentworth, B.S. - - Associate Pomologist 

F B Lincoln, Ph.D Associate Pomologist (Plant Propagation) 

H. B. CORDNER, Ph.D....... Associate Olericulturist 

W. A. Frazier, Ph.D Associate Olericulturist (Canning Crops) 

J *B Blandford. Assistant in Horticulture, Supt. of Horticultural Farm 

l' C. Haut, Ph.D - - - Associate Pomologist 

Poultry Husbandry : 

R. H. Waite, B.S - - Poultry Husbandman 

GEO. D. QUIGLEY, B.S Associate Poultry Husbandman 



Ridgely Sub-Station: 
Albert White, B.S.. 



Superintendent 



Seed Inspection: ^ ^ j r 4-^^ 

p. S. HOLMES, B.S S^d Inspector 

ELLEN Emack - Assistant Seed Ana yst 

Olive Kelk - Assistant Seed Analyst 



♦ Dean of Graduate SchooL 



19 



f> 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
(College Park) 

TiioMAS B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr.. Director 

E. I. OSWALD. B.S County Age~nt Leader 

Miss Venia M. Kellar, B.S State Home Demonstration Agent 

A. H. Snyder, B.S E^jt^r 

P. E. Nystrom, M.S., 

Assistant County Agent Leader, and Specialist in Farm Management 

E. G. Jenkins State Boys' Club Agent 

Miss Dorothy Emerson State Girls' Club Agent 

Miss P^rence H. Mason, B.S., 

District Home Demonstration Agent, and Specialist in Home Furnishing 

Miss K. G. Connolly. Administrative Assistant 

0. R. Carrington, B.A Assistant Editor 

SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 
(Headquarters College Park) 

W. R. Ballard, B.S . — Vegetable and Landscape Gardening 

H. C. Barker, B.S Dairying (Advanced Registry Ttesting) 

^. C. BEAVEN, B.S _ Marketing 

R. W. CARPENTER, A.B., LL.B Agricultural Engineering * 

J. A. CONOVER, B.S Dairying 

„• ^- ^^^^' ^^-^ Entomology and Apiculture 

S. H. DeVault, Ph.D Marketing 

H. A. HUNTER, M.S Canning Crops 

R. A. Jehle, Ph. D Plant Pathology 

A. V. Krewatch, M.S., E.E Rural Electrification 

G. S. Langford, Ph.D Insect Control 

Miss Margaret McPheeters, M.S Nutrition 

T. B. Manny, Ph.D. „ .; Rural Sociology 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D Animal Husbandry 

F W. Oldenburg, B.S Agronomy 

W. B. Posey, B.S _ _ ^^^^eeo 

Harlan Randall jyi„3i^ 

P. A. Raper, B.S Poultry Certification and Marketing 

W. H. Rice, B.S _ p„„,t,^ 

C. S. Richardson, A.M Educational Extension 

S. B. Shaw, B.S Marketing; and Chief, State Department of Markets 

Miss Helen Shelby, M.A Clothing 

M. M. Shoemaker, A.B., M.L.D Landscape Gardening 

W. W. SiMONDS, M.F Forestry 

20 



C. E. Temple, M.A..„ Plant Pathology 

J. M. Vial, B.S - - Animal Husbandry 

A. F. Vierheller, M.S — Horticulture 

E. P. Walls, Ph.D Marketing and Canning Crops 

ASSISTANT SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS 
(Headquarters (College Park) 

H. A. Edge, M.S Farm Management and Statistics 

L. E. Downey, B.S Marketing 

M. S. Downey, B. S - Club Work 

Castillo Graham, M.S Entomology 

H. J. TwiLLEY, B.S Marketing 



COUNTY AGENTS 
(Field) 

County Ncume 

Allegany. _.R. F. McHenry, B.S 

Anne Arundel S. E. Day, B.S 

Baltimore .....H. B. Deirrick, B.S 



Headquarters 

Cumberland 

Annapolis 

Towson 



Calvert. _ John B. Morsell, B.S Prince Frederick 

Caroline ...G. W. Clendaniel, B.S Denton 

Carroll X. C. Burns, B.S Westminster 

Cecil .J. Z. Miller, B.S Elkton 

Charles «... Paul D. Brown, B.S La Plata 

Dorchester Wm. R. McKnight, B.S , Cambridge 

Frederick „.... H. R. Shoemaker, B.S., M.A Frederick 

Garrett - John H. Carter, B.S Oakland 

Harford - H. M. Carroll, B.S Bel Air 

Howard ...E. K. Ramsburg, B.S Ellicott City 

Kent - _ James D. McVean, B.S >. Chestertown 

Montgomery O. W. Anderson, M.S „ Rockville 

Prince Georges P. E. Clark, B.S..„ - Upper Marlboro 

Queen Annes _... K. W. Bake21, B.S ^ „„ Centre ville 

St. Marys „..J. J. Johnson „ „ Leonardtown 

Somerset C. Z. Keller, B.S Princess Anne 

Talbot _ R. S. Brown, B.S _ Easton 

Washington M. D. Moore, M.S Hagerstown 

Wicomico J. P. Brown, B.S Salisbury 

Worcester R. T. Grant, B.S Snow Hill 

21 



Assistant County Agents 
Allegany, Garret, 

and Washington H. W. Beggs, B.S - Cumberland 

Baltimore J. W. Ensor, B.S _ Towson 

Harford ^. W. G. Myers, B. S „ Bel Air 

Kent Stanley Sutton Chestertown 

Montgomery A. A. Ady, B.S „ Rockville 



Southern Md 

Eastern Shore.... 



Local Agents — Negro Work 

.J. F. Armstrong Seat Pleasant 

.L. H. Martin Princess Anne 



COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

(Field) 

County Name Headqiuirters 

Allegany _ Maude A. Bean Cumberland 

Anne Arundel Mrs. G. Linthicum, B.S Annapolis 

Baltimore Anna TIrentham, B.S Towson 

Calvert Angela M. Feiser, B.S. Prince Frederick 

Caroline ...Bessie M. Spafford, B.S Denton 

Carroll Adeline M. Hoffman, M.A „ Westminster 

Cecil „ ......Gertrude Denning, B.A Elkton 

Charles Mary Graham La Plata 

Dorchester Hattie E. Brooks, A.B Cambridge 

Frederick .'FLORENCE E. Williams, B.S Frederick 

Garrett _.. Margaret K. Burtis, B.S Oakland 

Harford...... Catharine Maurice, B.S Bel Air 

Howard Martha E. Manahan, A.B Ellicott City 

Kent. Helen N. Schellinger Chestertown 

Montgomery Edythe M. Turner. Rockville 

Prince Georges Ethel M. Regan Hyattsville 

Queen Annes Isabel D. Bewick, B.S. Centreville 

St. Marys Ethel Joy, A.B „ _ Leonardtown 

Somerset Hilda Topfer, B.S -... Princess Anne 

Talbot. Margaret Smith, B.S Easton 

Washington — Ardath Martin, B.S _ Hagerstown 

Wicomico Gertrude M. Cookinham, B.S Salisbury 

Worcester Lucy J. Walter Snow Hill 



Assistant County Home Demonstration Agents 

rr T /.AP Cumberland 

Allegany Margaeet T. Loar 

Baltimore and ^^ ...Towson 

Harford Elizabeth R. Johnson, B.b 

Carroll, Frederick, Frederick 

and Montgomery... Judith Ault 

Local Home Demonstration Agents-Negro Work 

Somerset Mrs. Justine N. Clark P-cess Anne 

Charles, St. Marys, 






22 



23 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

(For the Year 1935-1936) 
At Baltimore 

PROFESSORS 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of (Comparative Dental 
Anatomy and Orthodontia. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., F.A.C.S., Professor of Anatomy and Oral Surgery 
(Dentistry); Professor of Oral Surgery (Medicine). 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A. James Casner, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of the School of 
Nursing. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and 
Otology. 

David M. R. 'Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany 
and Materia Medica. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anesthesia. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Anesthesia and Exodontia (Den- 
tistry); Professor of Exodontia (Medicine). 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

C. G. EiCHLiN, A.B., M.S., Professor of Physics. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Gynecology. 

Oren H. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., Professor of Metallurgy and Physiology. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 
Therapeutics. 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 

24 



Magnus Gregersen, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
HON. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean Emeritus of the School 

Roge'L Howell, A.B., Ph.D., LL.B., Professor of Law, Dean of the School 

of Law. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Operative Dentistry. 
Glenn L. Jenkins, Ph.G., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
C. LorinG Joslin, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
M Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.S.C., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (Den- 
tistry) ; Advisory Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

T Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Benjamin T. Leland, B.S., M.A., Professor of Trade and Industrial Edu- 
cation. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

A. J. LOMAS, M.D., D.P.H., Superintendent of the University Hospital. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D. Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Howard J. Maldeis, M.D., Professor of Embryology and Histology (Dentis- 
try) ; Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence (Medicine). 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M. D., Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 

olocry 
John Rathbone Ouver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 

Medicine. 
Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Crown and Bridge, 

and Prosthetic Dentistry. 
C. J. Pierson, A.m., Professor of Zoology. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
J Dawson Reeder, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
G Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D., Professor of Law. 
CoMPTON RiELY, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Harry M Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 
J. Ben. Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Professor of Dental Anatomy and 

Operative Technics, Dean of the School of Dentistry. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics, Dean of 

the School of Medicine. 
Edwin G. W. Ruge, B.A., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

WiLUAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

25 



I 



W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology: 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
John S. Strahorn, Jr., A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., J.S.D., Professor of Law. 
Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.C, Ph.D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology. 
W. H. TOULSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S., Professor of Periodontia. ^ 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr. P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public 
Health. 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and 

Laryngology. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Sc.D., Professor of Dispensing Pharmacy, 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. MoFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B., Associate Professor of Economics and 

Pharmaceutical Law. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery, and Associate in 

Gross Anatomy, and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
O. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Physiology. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
R. W. LocHER, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral 
Surgery (Medicine); Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery (Dentistry). 
A. W. Richeson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Walter S. Root, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Helen E. Wright, R.N., Supervisor of Nursing Education. 
Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Embryology 

and Histology. 
Marvin J. Andrews, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. 
Bridgewater M. Arnold, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 
Arthur H. Bryan, V.M.D., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Frank H. Figge, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
A. H. Finklestein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology, and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Grayson W. Gaver, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Orville €. Hurst, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Clinical Crown and 

Bridge. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George C. Karn, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Radiodontia. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Harry E. Latcham, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Assistant Professor of Operative 

Dentistry. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Instructor 

in Pathology. 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Harry M. Murdock, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
Walter L. Oggesen, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J. Harry Schad, B.S., LL.B., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 



26 



27 



Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Biological Chem- 
istry. 

Edgar B. Starkey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

A. Allen Sussman, D.D.S., A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Vesta L. Swartz, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 

Guy p. Thompson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Inorganic and Physical 
Chemistry. 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

J. Herbert Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

Lawrence F. Wooley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

LECTURERS 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Testamentary Law. 

J. Wallace Bryan, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Carriers and Public 

Utilities, and Pleading. 
Huntington Cairns, LL.B., Lecturer on Taxation. 
James T. Carter, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Legal Bibliography. 
Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Insurance and Federal 

Procedure. 
Walter L. Clark, LL.B., Lecturer on Evidence. 
Edwin T. Dickerson, A.B., A.M., LL.B., Lecturer on Contracts. 
Hon. Eli Frank, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Ophthalmic Pathology. 
George Gump, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Property. 
T. O. Heatwole, D.D.S., M.D., D.Sc, Lecturer on Ethics and Jurisprudence; 

Secretary of the Baltimore Schools. 
Richard C. Leonard, D.D.S., Lecturer on Oral Hygiene and Preventive 

Dentistry. 
John M. MoFall, A.B., M.A., LL.B., Lecturer on Suretyship, Mortgages, 

and Insurance. 
Emory H. Niles, A.B., B.C.L., M.A., LL.B., Lecturer on Admiralty. 
Charles G. Page, A.B., LL.B., Lecturer on Suretyship and Mortgages. 
G. Ridgely Sappington, LL.B., Lecturer on Practice; Director of Practice 

Court. 
William H. Triplett, M.D., Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis (Dentistry); 

Assistant in Medicine (Medicine), 
R. Dorsey Watkins, A.B., Ph.D., LL.B., Lecturer on Torts. 

ASSOCIATES 

John R. Abercrombib, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat, and Otology. 
Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 



H. F. BONGARDT, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine, and Assistant in Bacteriology. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate in Medicine, and Physician in Charge of 

Medical Care of Students. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate in Art as Applied to Medicine. 
Richard G. Coblentz, M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
WiLUAM G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Samuel S. Guck, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
M. Harold Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

John E. Legge, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., Associate in Histology. 

N. Glyde Marvel, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 
Walter C. Merkle, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
L. J. MiLLAN, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics, and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

F, Strattner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Chester L. Reynolds, B.M., M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
L 0. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
ISADORE A. SiEGEL, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
Frederick Smith, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery (Medicine) ; and Lec- 
turer on Oral Oncology (Dentistry). 
William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 



28 



29 



« 



I. 



R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Geni to-Urinary Surgery. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
William V. Adair, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
John Conrad Bauer, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry. 
Alvin H. Berman, D.D.S., Instructor in Practical Anatomy. 
Jose Bernardini, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 
J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Balthis a. Browning, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Samuel H. Bryant, A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics, and Assistant in Medicine, 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Morris E. Coberth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Bernard J. Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Miriam Connelly, Instructor in Nutrition and Cookery. 
W. A. C. COUNCILL, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Charles C. Coward, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
David C. Danforth, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Paul A. Deems, D.D.S., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 
S. DeMarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Edward 0. Dobbs, D.D.S., Instructor in Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and 

Therapeutics. 
Meyer Eggnatz, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia and Technics. 
William Ellsworth Evans, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Luther W. Fetter, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
Gardner P. H. Foley, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Joseph D. Fusco, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia. 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and 

Pathology, and Assistant in Surgery. 
M. G. GiCHNER, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Diagnostician. 

Samuel W. Goldstein, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Karl F. Grempler, D.D.S., Instructor in Operative Technics. 
L. P. GUNDRY, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
William E. Hahn, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Exodontia (Dentistry) ; 

Instructor in Exodontia (Medicine). 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
George E. Hardy, Jr., A.B., D.D.S., Instructor in Comparative Dental 

Anatomy. 

30 



Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Sur- 

' gery, and Assistant in Pediatrics. 
R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Hugh T. Hicks, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 
John F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
LILLIE R. Hoke, R.N., Instructor in Nursing. 

F. a. HoldeN, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
JAROSLAV HULLA, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
William H. Hunt, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Frank Hurst, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 

John M. Hyson, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pathology. 
Conrad L. Inman, D.D.S., Instructor in Anesthesia. 
Marius p. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 
Hammond L. Johnston, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 
Louis E. Kayne, D.D.S., Instructor in Physiological Chemistry. 
M. S. KOPPELMAN, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

G. Bowers MansDORFER, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

C. Paul Miller, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Dentistry. 

A. C. MONNINGER, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy, and Assistant 

in Surgery and Obstetrics. 
Mayo B. Mott, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Joseph T. Nelson, Jr., D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 
Ernest B. Nuttall. D.D.S., Instructor in Ceramics. 
Thomas R. 0*Rourke, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat, 

and Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 
Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B., Instructor in Physiology. 
Arthur C. Parsons, A.M., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
George J. Phillips, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 
Melvin a. Pittman, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
Samuel P. Platt, Instructor in Technical Drawing. 
Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 
W. Arthur Purdum, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy. 
J. Thomas Pyles, M.A., Instructor in English. 
James E. Pyott, D.D.S., Instructor in Prosthetic Technics. 
Herbert E. Reifschneider, A.B., M.D., Instructor in General Anesthesia. 



C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
H. Hewell Roseberry, M.A., M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
Milton S. Sacks, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
pJathan Scheer, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Pedodontia. 
William Schuman, M.D., Instructor in Practical Anatomy. 
Daniel E. Shehan, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Orthodontia. 
Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Frank J. Slama, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Instructor in Botany. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
E. H. TONOLLA, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Robert B. Towill, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
M. G. TuLL, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 
W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
B. Sargent Wells, D.D.S., Instructor in Dental Technics. 
John W. Wolf, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Periodontia. 
L. Edward Wojnarowski, D.D.S., Instructor in Clinical Prosthetic Den- 
tistry. 
Thomas Gorsuch Wright, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

ASSISTANTS 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technic for 

Nurses and Supervisor of Operating Pavilion. 
Walter A. Anderson, D.D.S., M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Neurology. 
EsTELLA Baldwin, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing and 

Supervisor of Pediatric Department. 
Cecil R. Ball, A.M., Assistant in English. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
EsTELLE Boynton, A.B., B.S., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Simon H. Brager, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Bernice Brittain, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. 
Ruth Broadbelt, Instructor in Lettering. 
Lucy A. Brude, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing Private Patients and 

Supervisor of Private Halls. 
A. V. BucHNESS, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. Howard Burns, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Rachel Louise Carson, M.A., Assistant in Zoology. 
Eli Contract, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

32 



Marie Olga Cox, R.N., Assistant Insti-uctor in First Aid and Supervisor of 

Accident and Admission Department. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Margaret Currens, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Clinical Nursing and 

Supervisor of Clinical Department. 
GUSTAV Edward Cwalina, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry. 
E. HoLLiSTER Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 
Melvin B. Davis, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Anesthesia. 
Amelia C. DeDominicis, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Botany. 
Grace Dick, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical Nursing and Supervisor 

of Medical Wards. 
Melvin F. W. Dunker, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Chemistry. 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 
Mary Emory, R.N., Night Supervisor. 
Freda Fazenbaker, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Nursing and 

Supervisor of Surgical Wards. 
S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
George L. Fite, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Philip D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Ruth Foster, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
H. D.^Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
W. G. Friedrich, Ph.D., Assistant in Modern Languages. 
Arthur M. Gibson, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Maurice Hardin, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of 

Wards. 
GusTAv Highstein, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Bertha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical 

Supplies, and Supervisor of Central Supply Room. 
Eva Holloway, R.N., Supervisor of Out-patients' Department. 
Charles D. Howell, A.B., Assistant in Zoology. 

Casimer T. Ichniowski, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Pharmacology. 
Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 
H. Alvan Jones, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Lawrence Katzenstein, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Beatrice Krause, R.N., Assistant Instructor in Obstetrical Nursing and 

Supervisor of Obstetrical Department. 
Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Ernest Levi, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
H. Edmund Levin, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 
L. Lavan Manchey, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Assistant in Chemistry. 

33 



I 



iii 



Mary Anna Mandirow, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

William N. MoFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat, 
and Otology. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Howard Anthony Miller, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Pharmacy. 

Sylvia Millett, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Economics. 

Robert B. Mitchell, Jr., B.S., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

DwiGHT MOHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. WiLUAM Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

E. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

KOBE V. Rice, B.S. in Phar., M.S., H.A.B. Dunning Research Fellow, Assist- 
tant in Pharmacy. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

Harry Rosen, B.S., in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology, and Obstetrics. 

A. ScAGNETTi, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Paul Schneker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S. in Phar., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

L. R. Schoolman, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Emanuel V. Shulman, B.S. in Phar., Ph.D., Assistant in Botany. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gross Anatomy. 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

0. Walter Spurrier, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
David Tenner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

T. J. TouHEY, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

1. RiDGEWAY Trimble, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Edith Walton, Instructor in Massage. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Max Morton Zervitz, B.S. in Phar., M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

34 



PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS, BALTIMORE 

Mary A. Adams, M.A., Principal, School No. 44, Baltimore. 

Glen D. Brown, M.A., Principal, Occupational School No. 93, Baltimore. 

Clyde B. Edgeworth, A.B., LL.B., Supervisor of Commercial Education, 

Public Schools, Baltimore. 
George M. Gaither, Supervisor of Industrial Education, Public Schools, 

Baltimore. 
Paul B. Gillen, M.A., Special Assistant School No. 70, Public Schools, 

Baltimore. 
Millard C. Kent, M.A., Principal, The Boys' Vocational School, Baltimore. 
Francis A. Litz, Ph.D., Head of the Department of English, Western High 

School, Baltimore. 
E. L. Longley, B.S., Instructor, Sheet Metal Work, Garrison Junior High 

School, Baltimore. 
Melvin Moritz, Instructor, Metal Work, Clifton Park Junior High School, 

Baltimore. 
Frances E. North, M.A., Commercial Teacher, Western High School, Bal- 
timore. 
Albert G. Packard, B.S., In Charge of Tests and Measurements, The Boys' 

Vocational School, Baltimore. 
John L. Stenquist, Ph.D., Director, Bureau of Research, Public Schools, 

Baltimore. 
E. H. Stevens, M.A., J.D., Extension Instructor, University of Maryland, 

Baltimore. 
Charles W. Sylvester, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Public 

Schools, Baltimore. 
Riley S. Williamson, Ed.M., Head of Scientific Technical Department, 

Baltimore City College. 
Leon L. Winslow, B.S., Director of Art Education, Public Schools, Balti- 
more. 
Howard E. Ziefle, B.S., Department of Science, The Boys* Vocational 

School, Baltimore. 



35 



SECTION I 
General Information 



»l 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

« 

At Baltimore 

LIBRARY 

(Medicine) Doctors Lockard, Wylie, and Love, Jr.; (Dentistry) Doctors 
Gaver, Aisenberg, and Hardy; (Pharmacy) Dean DuMez, Messrs. 
Jenkins, M. R. Thompson, and Slama; (Law) Messrs. Casner and 
Strahorn. 

The Faculty Councils of the Baltimore Schools are included in the de- 
scriptive statements of the respective schools in Section II. 

The Faculty Committees of the Baltimore schools are given in the 
separate announcements issued by the several schools. 



36 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The history of the present University of Maryland, before the merger in 
1920, is the history of two institutions: the old University of Maryland in 
Baltimore and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) in College Park. 

The beginning of this history was in 1807, when a charter was granted 
to the 'College of Medicine of Maryland. The first class was graduated in 
1810. A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of 
the building at Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore, the oldest struc- 
ture in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute faculties of divinity, law, 
and arts and sciences," and by the same act declared that the "colleges or 
faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the name and 
under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority of this act, 
steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and in 1823 a reg- 
ular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently there were added 
a college of dentistry, a school of pharmacy, and a school of nursing. No 
significant change in the organization of the University occurred until 1920, 
more than one hundred years after the original establishment in 1812. 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private man- 
agement. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land Grant 
Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim its bene- 
fits a proportionate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place of scrip, 
the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain conditions 
to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where 
the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical 
studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such a manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." This grant was accepted by the 
General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College was 
named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus the College became, at least 
in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 control was taken over en- 

37 



I» 



tirely by the State. In 1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter V 
to the College, and made it the Maryland State College. ' 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the name of the latter 
was changed to the University of Maryland. 

All the property formerly held by the old University of Maryland was 
turned over to the Board of Trustees of the Maryland State College, and 
the name was changed to the Board of Regents of the University of Mary- 
land. Under this charter every power is granted necessary to carry on an 
institution of higher learning and research. It provides that the University 
shall receive and administer all existing grants from the Federal Govern- 
ment for education and research and all future grants which may come to 
the State from this source. The University is co-educational in all its 
branches. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of nine members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 
The University Senate and the Administrative Council act in an advisory 
capacity to the President. The composition of these bodies is given else- 
where. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative 
divisions : 

College of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Extension Service. 

College of Arts and Sciences. 

College of Education. 

College of Engineering. 

College of Home Economics. 

Graduate School. 

Summer Session. 

Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

School of Dentistry. 

School of Law. 

School of Medicine. 

School of Nursing. 

School of Pharmacy. 

The University Hospital. 

The University faculty consists of the President, the Deans, the instruc- 
tional staffs of all the divisions of the University, and the Librarians. The 
faculty of each college or school constitutes a group which passes on all 
questions that have exclusive relationship to the division represented. The 
President is ex-officio a member of each of the faculties. 

38 



The organization and activities of the several administrative divisions are 
described in full in the appropriate chapters of Section II. 



PRINCESS ANNE ACADEMY 

Princess Anne Academy, located at Princess Anne, Somerset County, is 
maintained for the education of Negroes in agriculture, the mechanic arts, 
and home economics. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. The campus fronts on 
the Baltimore- Washington Boulevard. 

The Professional Schools of the University and the University Hospital 
are located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 
College Park 

Grounds. The University grounds at College Park comprise 291 acres. 
The site is healthful and attractive. The terrain is varied. A broad roll- 
ing campus is surmounted by a commanding hill which overlooks a wide 
area of surrounding country and insures excellent drainage. Many of the 
original forest trees remain. Most of the buildings are located on this 
eminence. The adjacent grounds are laid out attractively in lawns and 
terraces ornamented with shrubbery and flower beds. Below the brow of the 
hill, on either side of the Washington-Baltimore Boulevard, lie the drill 
grounds and the athletic fields. The buildings of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station adjoin the boulevard. About 100 acres are used by the College 
of Agriculture for experimental purposes, and for orchards, vineyards, 
poultry yards, etc. Recently 270 acres additional have been purchased, 
about two miles north of the University campus, and this land is devoted 
especially to research in horticulture. 

The water supply and sewage disposal are provided by the Washington 
Suburban Sanitary Commission. 

Buildings. The buildings comprise about 28 individual structures, which 
provide facilities for the several activities and services carried on at Col- 
lege Park. 

Administration and Instruction. This group consists of the following 
buildings: the Agriculture Building, which accommodates the College of 
Agriculture, the College of Education, the Agricultural and Home Eco- 
nomics Extension Service, and the Auditorium; the Library Building, which 

39 



it^ 



i 



nouses the Library and the Executive Offices ; Morrill Hall, which accommo- 
dates in part the College of Arts and Sciences; the Old Library Building, 
in which are the offices of the Dean of Women; the Engineering Building; 
the Student Center, in which are located the offices of the student publica- 
tions, the Religious Work Council, and the Maryland Christian Association ; 
the Home Economics Building; the Chemistry Building for instruction in 
Chemistry and for State work in analysis of feeds, fertilizers, and agricul- 
tural lime; the Dairy Building; the Horticulture Building, which adequately 
accommodates all class room and laboratory work in horticulture, and also 
work in horticultural research for both Government and State; the Plant 
Research Building; the poultry buildings; the Central Heating Plant; and 
an Arts and Sciences BuUding. 

Experiment Station, The offices of the Director of the Experiment Sta- 
tion are in the Agriculture Building, while other buildings house the 
laboratories for research in soils and for seed testing. Other structures 
are as follows: an agronomy building; a secondary horticulture building; 
and barns, farm machinery building, silos, and other structures required in 
agricultural research. Some of the research is being conducted in the Ross- 
bourg Inn. 

Physical Education, This group consists of The Ritchie Coliseum, which 
provides quarters for all teams, an athletic office, trophy room, rooms for 
faculty, and visiting team rooms, together with a playing floor and per- 
manent seating arrangements for 4,262 persons; Byrd Stadium, with a 
permanent seating capacity of 8,000, also furnished with rest rooms for 
patrons, dressing rooms, and equipment for receiving and transmitting in- 
formation concerning contests in progress; a Gymnasium, used in part by 
the Military Department and generally for physical education work; and 
the Girls' Field House, for all girls' sports. Playing and practice fields and 
tennis courts are adjacent to the field houses. 

Dormitories, Two dormitories, Calvert Hall and Silvester Hall, provide 
accommodations for 462 men students. Accommodations for 228 women 
students are provided by Margaret Brent Hall and the new dormitory, 
completed this year. Gerneaux Hall, formerly used as a dormitory for 
women students, is now occupied by one of the sororities. The Practice 
House, which for several years was used as a dormitory, has been turned 
over entirely to the Home Economics Department. 

Service Structures, This group includes the Central Heating Plant; the 
Infirmary, with accommodations for twenty patients, physician's office, 
operating room, and nursing quarters; Dining Hall, and Laundry. 

U, S. Bureau of Mines Building. A new research laboratory building for 
the United States Bureau of Mines, to cost approximately half a million 
dollars, is now under construction on the campus. In this building will be 
housed a geological museum and a technical library, which will be one of 
the finest of its kind in the United States. These facilities will be available 
to students. 

40 



Baltimore 

The group of buildings located in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets provides available housing for the Baltimore division of the 
University. The group comprises the original Medical School building, 
erected in 1814, the University Hospital, the Central Office building, a new 
Laboratory building for the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy, and a new 
Law School building. Full descriptions of these parts of the University 
equipment are found in the chapters devoted to the Baltimore Schools in 
Section II. 

A new University Hospital, at the corner of Greene and Redwood Streets, 
containing 400 beds and providing fine clinical facilities, was completed in 
November, 1934. 

Libraries 

Libraries are maintained at both the College Park and the Baltimore 
branches of the University. 

The Library Building at College Park houses the executive offices, post- 
office, and students' supply store. The building is well equipped and well 
lighted. The reading room on the second floor has seats for 236, and about 
4,500 reference books and periodicals on open shelves, the other books being 
kept in the stack room and three seminar rooms. The stack room is 
equipped with five tiers of metal stacks and 18 cubicles for advanced study. 
About 5,500 of the 56,000 books on the campus are shelved in the Engineer- 
ing, Chemistry, and Entomology Departments, the Graduate School, and 
other units. 

The Library facilities in Baltimore for the School of Medicine are housed 
in Davidge Hall; those for the Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy and the 
courses in Arts and Sciences are located in the Dentistry and Pharmacy 
Building; and those for the School of Law are in the new Law Building. 

Tlie libraries, main and departmental, contain a total of 97,995 bound 
volumes, and large collections of unbound journals. In the two central 
libraries there are approximately 12,000 United States Government docu- 
ments, unbound reports, and pamphlets. 

Through the Inter-library Loan Systems of the Library of Congress, the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and other Government Libraries 
in Washington, the University Library is able to supplement its reference 
material, either by arranging for personal work in these Libraries or by 
borrowing books from them. 

ENTRANCE 

All communications regarding entrance should be addressed to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. Those pertaining to entrance to the College Park Col- 
leges should be addressed to the University of Maryland, College Park, 

41 



Maryland; those pertaining to the Baltimore Schools, to the University of 
Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Age of Applicants. A student who is less than sixteen years of age must 
have his residence with parents or guardians. 

Entrance Preliminaries. Candidates for admission should apply as early 
as possible for the necessary forms for the transfer of preparatory credits. 
After these forms have been filled out by the applicant and the high school 
principal, they should be returned to the Director of Admissions. It is 
advisable for prospective students to attend to this matter as early as 
possible after graduation from high school, in order to make sure that the 
units offered are sufficient and acceptable. The Director of Admissions is 
always glad to advise with students, either by correspondence or in person, 
concerning their preparation. A general statement of the procedure to fol- 
low after they are duly admitted to the University is sent out to new 
students. 

Time of Admission. Applicants for admission should plan to enter at the 
beginning of the school year in September. It is possible, however, to be 
admitted to certain colleges at the beginning of either semester. 

Registration. Registration for the first semester, except for new students, 
takes place at the end of the second semester of the preceding year. Stu- 
dents register for the second semester during the week preceding final 
examinations of the first semester. 

Late Registration. Students who do not complete their registration and 
classification on regular registration days will be required to pay $3.00 extra 
on the day following the last registration day and $5.00 extra thereafter. 
Students who fail to file course cards in the specified periods in May and 
January are considered late registrants. 

After seven days from the opening of a semester, a fee is imposed for a 
change of registration. 

Students who, for any reason, are more than ten days late in registering 
must secure permission from the instructors in charge for admission to 
courses. Such permission must be given in writing to the student's dean 
before course cards will be issued. 

Freshman Registration. Registration of freshmen for the first semester 
will take place Thursday of the opening week. All freshmen are expected to 
register at this time. <Ma.\v^4l>i 

Dormitories will be ready for occupancy by freshmen WcdiiLJlf^y of the 
opening week. 

A special freshman program is planned covering the time between regis- 
tration day and the beginning of the instruction schedule, the object of 
which is to complete the organization of freshmen so that they may begin 
the regular work promptly and effectively, and to familiarize them with 
their new surroundings. 

42 



ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 
REQUIREMENTS AND METHODS. 

An applicant from a secondary school may be admitted either by certin- 
cate or by examination. 

Admissi^on by Certificate: For admission by certificate an applicant must 
be a graduate of a secondary school which is approved either by the Mary- 
land State Board of Education or by an accrediting agency of equal rank. 
Such applicant must have completed at least fifteen units of preparatory 
work. A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, 
and constitutes approximately one-fourth of a full year's work. It pre- 
supposes a school year of 36 to 40 weeks, recitation periods of from 40 to 60 
minutes, and for each study four or five class exercises a week. Two labora- 
tory periods in any science or vocational study are considered as equivalent 
to one class exercise. Normally, not more than three units are allowed for 
four years of English. If, however, a fifth course has been taken, an extra 
unit will be allowed. 

An applicant for admission by certificate from a preparatory school not 
located in Maryland or the District of Columbia must be recommended by 
his high school principal, and must attain the college recommendation grade 
of his school, or, if his school has no college recommendation grade, an 
average in his high school work at least ten per cent higher than the lowest 
passing grade. 

The additional and special requirements for admission to the various 
undergraduate curricula, the professional schools, and the Graduate School 
are given in detail in the Tabular Summary of Subject Matter Require- 
ments for Entrance, or in chapters devoted to these schools. 

Admission by Examination: An applicant from a secondary school who 
is not eligible for admission by certificate may seek entrance through either 
of two types of examination. (1) He may appeal to the Director of Ad- 
missions for permission to report at the University for college aptitude 
tests, which will be used in addition to the preparatory school record in 
determining whether the applicant shall be admitted to the University. 
(2) He will be admitted upon presenting evidence of having passed, satis- 
factorily, examinations in the subjects required for graduation from an 
accredited secondary school. Such examinations are offered in various 
parts of the country by the College Entrance Examination Board, with 
headquarters at 431 West 117th St., New York City. Examinations are 
offered also by Regents of the University of the State of New York and by 
the Department of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania. College 
Entrance Board examinations must be passed with a grade of 60. New 
York Regents and Pennsylvania examinations must be passed with a grade 
of 75. 



43 



Tabular Summary of Subject Matter Requirements for Entrance 

The University offers undergraduate curricula as follows : 

Agricultural Economics — A Home Economics Education — B 

Animal Husbandry — A Home Economics Extension — B 

Arts — Nursing — A Industrial Education — A 

Arts — Law — A Institution Management — B 

Arts and Science Education — A Landscape Gardening — A 

Bacteriology and Pathology — A Mathematics — C 

Biological Science — A Mechanical Engineering— C 

Botany — A Modern Language — A 

Business Administration — A Olericulture — A 

Civil Engineering — C Pomology — A 

Crops — A Physical Education — A 

Commercial Education — E Physical Science — A 

Dairy Manufacturing — A Physics — C 

Dairy Production — A Plant Pathology — A 

Economics — A Political Science — A 

Electrical Engineering — C Poultry Husbandry — A 

English — A Pre- Dentistry — A 

Entomology — A Pre-Medicine — D 

Floriculture — A Rural Education— A 

Foods — B Sociology — A 

General Agriculture — A Soils — A 

General Chemistry — A Textiles and Clothing — B 

General Home Economics — B 2k)ology — A 

History — A 

Letters following curricula refer to entrance requirement captions pre- 
sented in the following table. 

The requirements for admission to the foregoing curricula are indicated 
in the following table, the requirements for a specific curriculum being 
given in that column headed by the letter which follows the name of the 
curriculum in the foregoing list. 

A B C D E 

English „ 3 3 3 3 3 

Algebra -....- 1 **2 11 

Plane Geometry *1 11 

Solid Geometry ** ^/^ 

History 11 111 

Science - - 11 1 11 

Foreign Language 2 

Stenography _ 2 

Typewriting 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Electives 8 8 6^^ 6 5 

♦In the College of Agriculture, with the exception of those curricula which include 
trigonometry, a second unit of any mathematics may be substituted for the requirement in 
plane geometry, provided the applicant ranks in the upper two-thirds of his high school class. 
**Students who do not offer entrance units in algebra, completed, and in solid geometry 
may enter the Engineering College, but will be obliged, during the first semester, to take 
courses which will make up the unit in algebra, completed, and one-half unit in solid geom- 
etry, and then they may enter upon the regular freshman mathematics at the beginning of 
the second semester. The work of the second semester freshman mathematics will be offered 
these students in the summer session. 

44 



Conditions: A student who is eligible to enter the University, but who 
cannot meet specific requirements for admission to the curriculum of his 
choice, may enter without regular classification and transfer to the specific 
curriculum as soon as his deficiencies shall have been removed. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER FROM OTHER COLLEGES 

OR UNIVERSITIES 

A candidate for admission by transfer from another college or university 
must present evidence that he has maintained a satisfactory and honorable 
record at the institution which he has attended. 

For admission by transfer the applicant should file with the Director of 
Admissions as soon as possible after the close of the school year in June, 
an application for admission made out on the blank form furnished by the 
University. In addition, he should have the institution he has attended 
furnish a complete official transcript of his record, including the secondary 
school record and a statement of honorable dismissal. 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing is granted to students transferring from institutions 
of collegiate rank for work completed which is equivalent in extent and 
quality to the work of the University of Maryland, subject to the following 
provisions : 

(1) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may secure, 
in no case will he be given the baccalaureate degree with less than 
one year of resident work, 

(2) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may secure, 
in no case will he be given the baccalaureate degree until he shall 
have satisfied the full requirements of the curriculum he may elect. 

(3) In case the character of a student's work in any subject is such as to 
create doubt as to the quality of that which preceded it elsewhere, 
the University reserves the right to revoke at any time any credit 
allowed. 

(4) Credit will not be allowed for more than one-fourth of those courses 
in which the grade is the lowest passing grade of the college 
attended. 

(5) An applicant may request examination for advanced credit in any 
subject in keeping with requirements prescribed by the University. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Students at least twenty-one years of age who have had insufficient 
preparation to be admitted to any of the four-year curricula may register, 
with the consent of the Director of Admissions, for such subjects as they 
appear fitted to take. So long, however, as a student remains unclassified, 
he is ineligible to matriculate for a degree. One may attain regular classi- 
fication at any time by satisfying the entrance requirements. 

45 



REQUIREMENT IN MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

All male students, if citizens of the United States, whose bodily condition 
indicates that they are physically fit to perform military duty are required 
to take military training for a period of two years, as a prerequisite to 
graduation. 

Graduation Requirements for Students Excused from Military Instruction 

and Physical Education 

Students excused from basic military training or physical education with- 
out academic credit shall be required to take an equivalent number of credits 
in other subjects, so that the total credits required for a degree in any col- 
lege shall not be less than 127 hours. The substitution must be approved 
by the dean of the college concerned. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

All women students whose bodily condition indicates that they are phy- 
sically fit for exercise are required to take physical education for a period 
of two years, as a prerequisite to graduation. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

As soon as possible after the opening of the fall semester, as a measure 
for protecting the general health, all students who enter the undergraduate 
colleges at College Park are given a physical examination. The examination 
of the men students is conducted by the University Physician in cooperation 
with the Physical Education and Military Departments. 

The examination of women students is conducted by a woman physician 
in cooperation with the office of the Dean of Women and the office of Physi- 
cal Education for Women. The woman physician has her offices in the Girls' 
Field House. She is available for consultation by all women students at 
hours to be arranged. 

INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All undergraduate students may receive dispensary service and med- 
ical advice by reporting at the Infirmary during regular office hours estab- 
lished by the physician in charge. 

Office hours every day at 8 to 9 o'clock in the morning except on Sun- 
days. Evening office hours every day at 6 to 6:30 except Saturday and 
Sunday. Office hours on Sunday by appointment only. 

2. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours at the Infirmary. 
Between the hours of 2 and 4 in the afternoon, quiet hour is observed. 

During this time students are requested not to report except in case of an 
emergency. 

3. Students not living in their own homes who need medical attention 
and who are unable to report to the Infirmary should call one of the Uni- 
versity physicians. Such visits will be free of charge except in cases where 
additional visits are necessary. For such additional visits as may be 

46 



necessary, the University physician will make his usual charge. But, if a 
student so desires, he may call a physician of his own choice and at his 
own expense. 

4. Students not residing in their own homes may, upon the order of the 
University physician, be cared for in the Infirmary to the extent of the 
facilities available. Students who live off the campus will be charged a 
fee of two dollars a day. 

6. The visiting hours are 4 to 5 and 7 to 8 p. m. daily. No visitor may 
see any patient until permission is granted by the nurse in charge. 

6. Hospitalization is not available at the Infirmary for graduate students 
and employees. Dispensary service, however, is available for graduate 
students and employees who are injured in University service or University 
activities. 

7. For employees of the University who handle food and milk, the Uni- 
versity reserves the right to have its physician make physical examinations, 
and such inspections of sanitary conditions in homes as in the opinion of 
the University physician, may be desirable. 

8. Students living in the dormitories who are unable to attend classes 
because of illness or who are unable to report to the Infirmary should report 
to their dormitory matrons, who will notify the Infirmary immediately. 

9. Students who are ill in their homes, fraternity houses, or dormitor- 
ies and wish a medical excuse for classes missed during the time of illness 
must present written excuses from their physicians, parents, or house 
mothers. These excuses will be approved by the University physicians or 
nurse 

REGULATIONS, GRADES, DEGREES 

REGULATION OF STUDIES 

Course Numbers. Courses for undergraduates are designated by numbers 
1__99; courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates, by numbers 
100 199 ; and courses for graduates, by numbers 200 — 299. 

The letter following the number of a course indicates the semester in 
which it is offered ; thus, course If is offered in the first semester ; Is, in the 
second semester. The letter ''y" indicates a full-year course. The number 
of hours' credit for each course is indicated by the arable numeral in paren- 
theses following the title of the course. No credit is allowed for a "y" 
course until it is completed. 

Schedule of Courses. A semester time schedule of courses, giving days, 
hours, and rooms, is issued as a separate pamphlet at the beginning of each 
semester. Classes are scheduled beginning 8:20 A. M. 

Definition of Credit Unit. The semester hour, which is the unit of credit 
in the University, is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a week 
for one semester. Two or three periods of laboratory or field work are 
equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week in classroom or laboratory or in outside prepara- 
tion for each credit hour in any course. 

47 



Number of Hours. The normal student load is from 15 to 19 semester 
hours, according to curriculum and year. These variations are shown in 
the appropriate chapters in Section II describing the several divisions of 
the University. No student may carry either more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours without specific permission from the dean of his 
college. 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES 

Examinations. Examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
accordance with the official schedule of examinations. Students are required 
to use the prescribed type of examination book in final examinations; and 
in tests, when requested to do so by the instructor. 

Final examinations are held in all courses except in classes where the 
character of the work will permit the instructor to note frequently the 
progress and proficiency of the student — in which case they may be omitted 
upon approval of the head of the department and dean of the college. 
Periodic examinations and tests are given during regularly scheduled class 
periods. Final examinations, where required, are given according to schedule 
and are of not more than three hours' duration each. 

Grading. The system of grading is uniform in the different departments 
and divisions of the University. 

The following grade symbols are used: A, B, C, D, E, F, and I. The first 
four, A, B, C, and D, are passing; E, condition; F, failure; I, incomplete. 

Grade A denotes superior scholarship; grade B, good scholarship; grade 
C, fair scholarship; and grade D, passing scholarship. 

A student who receives the grade D in more than one-fourth of the credits 
required for graduation must take additional courses or repeat courses until 
he has the required number of credits for a degree, three-fourths of which 
carry a grade above D. A student is not permitted to repeat a course to 
raise a D grade after a lapse of two years. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this in- 
stitution. 

A student with the grade of E is conditioned in the course. The grade 
of E will be changed by a reexamination during the succeeding semester to 
D or F. The grade cannot be raised to a grade higher than D. Only one 
reexamination is permitted, and if a student does not remove the condition 
at the time scheduled for this reexamination the condition becomes a failure. 
No student is permitted to take a reexamination to remove a condition 
within four weeks after the condition has been acquired. 

The mark I (Incomplete) is exceptional, and is given only to a stu- 
dent whose work has been qualitatively satisfactory and who has a proper 
excuse for not having completed the requirements of the course. In case 
of a student whose work has been unsatisfactory and who is absent from 
the final examination, the grade will be E or F, in accordance with the 
character of the previous work. In cases where the mark I is given the 

48 



student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of 
the first semester in which that subject is again offered, or the grade be- 

'^'^ Work of grade D, or of any passing grade, cannot be raised to a higher 
ffrade except by repeating the course. This must be done withm a period 
of two years after the course was originally taken. A student who repeats 
a course for which he has received credit for work done at this University 
or elsewhere, must meet all the requirements of the course, including reg- 
ular attendance, laboratory work, and examinations. His final grade will 
be substituted for the grade already recorded, but he will not receive any 
additional credit for the course. 

REPORTS 
Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guar- 
dians at the close of each semester. 

ELIMINATION OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 
The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to 
his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satis- 
factory to the authorities of the University. Students of the last class may 
be asked to withdraw even though no specific charge be made against them, 

JUNIOR STANDING 

No student will be certified as a junior, or be permitted to select a major 
or minor, or to continue in a fixed curriculum until he or she shall have 
passed with an average grade of C the minimum number of semester credits 
required for junior standing in any curriculum. (This regulation is effective 
beginning with the class entering in September, 1935.) 

Students in the College of Engineering who have grades of D m the 
second semester of either sophomore physics or mathematics cannot reg- 
ister in junior engineering subjects until those grades are raised to C or 

better. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
^ of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Civil 
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Bachelor of Laws, 
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Bachelor of Science in 

Pharmacy. TluA/^*^*^ ' , j j i.« 

Students in the two-year and three-year curricula are awarded certifi- 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the different colleges and schools. For full information regarding the 
requirements for graduation in the several colleges consult the appropriate 

chapters in Section II. , , , i. j i 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had less 
than one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty credits of 

49 




any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence 
at the University of Maryland. 

At least three-fourths of the credits required for graduation must be 
earned with grades of A, B, and C. 

In the case of a candidate for a combined degree or of a transfer student 
with advanced standing, a grade of D will not be recognized for credit 
towards a degree in more than one-fourth of the credits earned at this 
institution. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar before 
March 1st of the year in which he expects to graduate, a formal application 
for a degree. 

EXPENSES 

Make all checks payable to the University of Maryland for the 

EXACT amount OF THE SEMESTER CHARGES. ' 

In order that the cost of operation may be reduced, all fees are due and 
payable as a part of the student's registration, and all persons must come 
prepared to pay the full amount of the semester charges. No student will 
be admitted to classes until such payment has been made. 

EXPENSES AT COLLEGE PARK 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
costs as any occasion may make necessary. Such changes, however, in com- 
parison with the total cost to the student would be only nominal. 

FEES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Maryland 

First Semester 

Fixed Charges _ $67.50 

Athletic Fee 15.00 

♦Special Fee _ „ 10.00 

** Student Activities Fee „ 10.00 

Infirmary Fee _ 3.00 

Post Office Box „ _ 2.00 



Second Semester 


Total 


$67.50 


$135.00 




15.00 




10.00 




10.00 




3.00 




2.00 



$107.50 

District of Columbia 

First Semester 
General Fees listed above _ $107.50 



$67.50 



$175.00 



Non-Resident Fee 



25.00 



Second Semester Total 

$67.50 $175.00 

25.00 50.00 



$132.50 



$92.50 



$225.00 



* This fee, established by special request of the Student Government Association for a 
period of eight years, beginning Sept. 1. 1930, was for the purpose of further improving the 
University grounds and the physical training facilities. The income now being derived from 
it is used to amortize bonds issued by the Athletic Board for the purpose of constructing 
Ritchie Coliseum. 

♦* The Student Activities Fee is included at the request of the Student Government Associa- 
tion. Its payment is not mandatory, but it is really a matter of economy to the student, since 
it covers subscription to the student weekly paper, the literary magazine, and the year book : 
class dues, including admission to class dances ; arid admission to the performances of the 
musical and dramatic clube. 

50 



General Fee - 

Non-Resident Fee 



Other States and Countries 

First Semester Second Semester Total 

$107.50 $ 67.50 $175.00 

62.50 



$170.00 



62.50 



$130.00 



125.00 



$300.00 



Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee, payable on first entrance. $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee for bachelor's degree _ — -— 10.00 

Certificate Fee for Teacher's Diploma and other certificates where 

reouix eci eticn _...._...... ..............„.„.—.——.—.—....«.—....—.-..—— t/.vrv 

Pre-Medical and Pre- Dental Fee — Per semester in addition to fees 

shown above: 



Maryland „ — $25.00 

District of Columbia -...._ ...- 25.00 



V 



Other States and Countries... 



62.50 



Expenses of Students Living in Etormitories 

'^ First Semester Second Semester 

Board 1.. $135.00 $135.00 

Lodging 38.00 38.00 



$173.00 



$173,00 



Total 

$270.00 

76.00 

$346.00 



Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 



Bacteriology 

General, Pathological Tech- 
nique, Hematology and 

Urinalysis _ $5.00 

Pathogenic and Serology $8.00 

All other courses $7.00 

Botany $2.00 



Industrial, Inorganic, and 

Physical Chemistry $7.00 

All other courses in Chem- 
istry - _ _ $8.00 

Experimental Psychology $2.00 

Home Economics: Foods _ $5.00 

Zoology $5.00 



Miscellaneous Fees 

Late Registration Fee - $3.00-$5.00 

Fee for each change in registration after first week _ _ $1.00 

Fee for failure to file schedule card in Registrar's Office during first 

week of semester - $1.00 

Absence Fee twenty-four hours before or after holiday $3.00 

Condition Examination Fee - $1.00 

Special Examination Fee - — $5.00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment $2.00 

Part-time students carrying six semester hours or less — per semester 

credit hour - - - „ $6.00 

Laundry service, when desired — per semester „ _ $13.50 

51 



students will be charged for wilful damage to property. Where responsi- 
bility for the damage can be fixed, the individual student will be billed for 
It; where it cannot, the entire student body will be charged a flat fee to 
cover the loss or damage. 

Fees For Graduate Students 
Matriculation Fee «innA 

* ^^ — -. _ ^ _ ^lU.UU 

Fee for each semester credit hour. 4.00 

Diploma Fee — Master's Degree ^.I lo'oo 

Graduation Fee — Doctor's Degree _ ...1 20.00 

EXPLANATIONS 

The Fixed Charges made to all students cover a part of the overhead ex- 
penses not provided for by the State. 

The Board, Lodging, aad Laundry charge may vary from semester to 
semester, but every effort will be made to keep expenses as low as possible. 

Fees for Students Entering in February. Students entering the Univer- 
sity for the second semester are charged the following fees for the items 
indicated: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $5.00, and Student Activities, $8.00. 

Fees for Part-Time Students. Undergraduate students carrying six 
semester hours or less of regularly scheduled courses are charged $6.00 per 
semester credit and regular laboratory fees. Students carrying seven or 
more semester hours are charged the regular fees. In the case of special 
courses with special fees this rule does not apply. A matriculation fee of 
$5.00 IS charged at the first registration. 

The Athletic Fee constitutes a fund which is collected from all students 
in the University at College Park for the maintenance of athletics, and the 
entire arnount is turned over to the Athletic Director for disbursement. 
Ihis fund IS audited annually by the State Auditors. 

Late Registration Fee. Students who do not complete their registration 
and classification on regular registration days will be required to pay $3 00 
extra on the day following the last registration day, and $5.00 thereafter. 
Students who fail to file course cards in the specified periods in May and 
January are considered late registrants. 

Absence Fee. In cases of absence during a period beginning 24 hours be- 
fore the close of classes for a vacation or holiday and ending 24 hours after 
the resumption of classes, a student will be penalized by being required to 
pay a special fee of $3.00 for each class missed. Unless properly excused 
students will be penalized as in the case of a holiday, LSnce "rom 
the first meeting of each class at the beginning of the second semester. 

Students desiring to be excused from classes before and after a holiday 
must make application to the Dean at least one week before such holiday 

^Z?l T r J .'^""ditions specified, no excuse for an absence before or 
after a holiday will be granted. 

In exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in the family, application 
for an excuse must be made within one week after a student returns. 

52 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this Statet 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the time of 
their registration they have been residents of this Statet for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this Statet, by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a 
non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to regis- 
tration for a semester in any academic year. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

In case of illness requiring a special nurse or special medical attention, 
the expense must be borne by the student. 

Students not rooming in the dormitories may obtain board and laundry 
at the University at the same rates as those living in the dormitories. 

Day students may get lunches at the University cafeteria or at nearby 
lunch rooms. 

The costs of books and supplies and personal needs will vary according 
to the tastes and habits of the individual student. Books and supplies 
average about $40.00 per year. 

No diploma will be conferred upon, nor any certificate granted to a 
student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. A 

DORMITORY RULES AND REGULATIONS^ C, U^' 



^^ff^ 



Room Reservations. All new students desjj3»g"*to^ room in the dormi- 
tories should request room reserv^^idW^Sards. Men should apply to the 
Dormitory Manager; women ttT' m m OffitL jjT the Dean of Women. When 
the room reservation card is returned, it must be accompanied by a $5 
deposit. This fee will be deducted from the first semester charges when 
the student registers; if he fails to register, the fee will be forfeite.d. 
Reservations by students already at the University may be made at any 
time during the closing month of the school year. 

Men's Dormitories. The office of the Dormitory Manager is located in 
"A" Section, Calvert Hall. After the student has been officially admitted 
and has paid his bill, he will be able to receive his room key and take pos- 



♦ The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of and stand in loco parentis to such 
minor students. 

t Students in the College Park Colleges who are residents of the District of Columbia art 
charged two-fifths of the non-resident fee charged to other non-residents. 

53 



resT^To'n.s "rru""""- /" T™"" ''"''""*^ ^'^'^ ^^^^ "^^^e dormitory 
reservations should report to the dormitory to which they have been as 

signed, nstructions regarding rules and regulations and Ly other Tnfor- 

Pr^^ontrh ^ '"*' ''"'^"' ""' ""' ^'^''^ "^y '"^^ '^-^e mother on duty. 

doSorv to 1^-T>''"*/'.^ *^' ^'"^"•^^^ ^'^P'^- -d marked for the 
dormitory to which it is to be sent will be delivered there direct All bae- 

S?k wZfett ""T ""' '! '^^°^'*^^ ^* ^'^^ -"-^^ iatn m^ollele 

made' aT the Cen"? ^ '''T' '"' ^ '""" ^"^"'^^ ^^-^h arrangement 
maae at the General Service Department of the University 

qufreft'o Li'lt' f I'-"' " '^'"''''''^ '*"• ^^^ ""''■ E-h student is re- 
quired to hav^akey for his room in the dormitory 

'?2:^sei?'wHrsuffi^ student^assigned to a dormitory should provide him- 
f '^'^'^..f^ffi^ent single blankets, at least two pairs of single sheets a 
pillow pillow cases, towels, a laundry .bag, and a waste basket 

chtr^J'I^^^^ w""''^7. ^'''^"''^ '" '^^ •'^'^'^^'^"^l «t"dent will be 

wiS deTtrl 'r"^ i' """f ^'"'"^ responsibility for its possession 

Tnd Sr ^''^^ ^'''''' ""^y ""^"'* ^™™ "'•dinary wear 

Maid service is furnished without charge for all rooms. 

>L All freshmert students, except those who live at home are reauired tn 

' room in the dorktories and board at the University dining h^l 

^ ^ WITHDRAWALS 

Students registering for the dormitories and dining hall must continue 
for the year, as contracts for faculty and other service and for supplies are 
made on an annual basis, and fees are fixed on the supposition that sudenJ 
will remain for the entire year. btuuenis 

A student desiring to withdraw from the University must secure the 
written consent of the parent or guardian, to be attached to the wSrawal 
slip which must be approved by the Dean and presented to the RiSrar a 
least one week m advance of withdrawal. Charges for full time will be 
continued against him unless this is done. The withdrawal slip muS beTr the 
approval of the President before being presented to the CasLTfor refund 

REFUNDS 

For withdrawal within five days full refund is made of fixed charges 
athletic fee, special fee, and student activities fee. with a deduction of $5 00 

prrlT* "^^'"*""- ^" "'""'^^ '""^ ^^^'^' lodging,td rundry^re 

After five days, and until November 1, the first semester, or March 10 the 

second semester, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated, with a deduct on 

of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. ueaucnon 

54 



After November 1, or March 10, refunds are granted for board and 
laundry only, amounts to be pro-rated. 

No refunds are made without the written consent of the student^s parent 
or guardian, except to students who pay their own expenses. 

No student is given cash for any part of his or her refund until all 
outstanding checks have been honored by the banks on which they are drawn. 

EXPENSES AT BALTIMORE 

The fees and expenses for the professional schools located in Baltimore 
will be found in the section of this catalogue pertaining to the several 
schools in Baltimore. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A considerable number of students earn some money through employment 
while in attendance at the University. No student should expect, however, 
to earn enough to pay all his expenses. The amounts vary, but some earn 
from one-fourth to three-fourths of all the required funds. 

Generally the first year is the hardest for those desiring employment. 
After one has demonstrated that one is worthy and capable, there is much 
less difficulty in finding work. 

During the past two and a half years, through the National Youth 
Administration, the University has been enabled to offer needy students 
a limited amount of work on special projects, the remuneration for which 
averages about $15 monthly. It is not known how long the Government will 
continue to extend this aid. 

The University assumes no responsibility in connection with employment. 
It does, however, maintain a bureau to aid needy students. The nearby 
towns and the University are canvassed, and a list of available positions 
is placed at the disposal of the students. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AT COLLEGE PARK 

The Board of Regents awards a limited number of scholarships annually. 
A faculty committee reviews the applications and makes recommendations 
as to the awards. These recommendations are made to the President, and 
appointments are subject to the approval of the Board of Regents. 

All applications must be filed on a blank form furnished by the University, 
and no applicant will be awarded a scholarship until after he or she has 
had a physical examination given by the University of Maryland Depart- 
ment of Health. 

Applicants may be requested to appear before the faculty committee for 
a personal interview. 

The faculty committee, in its consideration of applicants, holds as a pri- 
mary factor the apparent capacity of the applicant for leadership. 

Tlie scholarship holders are appointed on a yearly basis, but reappoint- 
ment may be made in any case in which the student proves worthy. 

The scholarship exempts the holder from payment of fixed charges 

55 



($135.00) and froip non-resident fees, wherever such fees are applicable. 
Board and lodging and all other expenses, including laboratory and other 
fees, must be paid by the student holding a scholarship. These charges, 
payable after the scholarship allowance has been deducted, amount to a 
little more than $400.00 per year for a boarding student. No scholarships 
covering board and lodging are awarded. 

Applications should be sent to the Chairman, Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships, College Park, Md. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS AND AWARDS 

Scholarship Honors. Final honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class in each college. First honors 
are awarded to the upper half of this group; second honors to the lower 
half. 

The Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the man from Prince George's County who makes the 
highest average in his studies and who at the same time embodies the most 
manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne K. Goddard James, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal. The Delta Chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma Fra- 
ternity offers annually a gold medal to the freshman who makes the high- 
est scholastic average during the first semester. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Honorary Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who attains the highest average record in academic work. The mere 
presentation of the medal does not elect the student to the fraternity, but 
simply indicates recognition of high scholarship. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Herman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. The medal is given by 
Benjamin Berman. 

Mortar Board Cup. Offered to the woman member of the senior class who 
has been in attendance at least three full years, and who has made the 
highest scholastic average. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. The sorority awards a medal annually to the 
girl who attains the highest average in academic work during the sopho- 
more year. 

American Institute of Chemists Medal. The American Institute of Chem- 
ists awards annually a medal and a junior membership to the graduating 
student, of good character and personality, majoring in chemistry, who 
shall have attained the highest average grade in this major subject for the 
entire undergraduate course, exclusive of credit received for the final 
semester. 

56 



MILITARY AWARDS 
The Governor's Cup. Offered each year by His Excellency, the Governor 
of Maryland, to the best drilled company. 

Military Faculty Award. The Military faculty of the University presents 
an award to the student who has done most for the Reserve Officers Tram- 
ing Corps. 

Class of '99 Gold Medal. The Class of 1899 offers each year a gold medal 
to the member of the battalion who proves himself the best drilled soldier. 
Company Saber. The Military Department awards annually to the cap- 
tain of the best drilled company of the University a silver mounted saber. 
The Alumni Cup. The Alumni offer each year a cup to the commanding 
officer of the best drilled platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Saber. This saber is offered for the commander of 
the winning platoon. 

Scabbard and Blade Medals. These medals are offered for the freshman 

students who remain longest in the individual competition, one per battalion. 

Gold Medals. Offered by the Military Department to the two students 

who contribute the most to the success of the band. Gold Medals are 

offered also to the members of the best drilled squad. Gold Medals are 

likewise presented by the Department to the respective battalion commanders. 

A Silver Medal is presented by the Military Department to the student 

who makes the highest score in the Third Corps Area Match. 

A Bronze Medal is similarly awarded to the student making the second 
highest score in the Third Corps Area Match. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Varsity R. 0. T. C. Rifle 
Team who fired the high score of the season. 

A Gold Medal is awarded to the member of the Freshman Rifle Team who 
fired the high score of the season. 




LOANS -^ 

The Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority offers annually^ loan of one hundred 
dollars, without interest, to a woman student registered in the University 
of Maryland and selected by the Scholarship Committee-the said Com- 
mittee to be composed of the deans of all Colleges in which girls are regis- 
tered, including the Dean of Women and the Dean of the Graduate School. 
A A U W Loan. The College Park Branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women offers annually a loan of one hundred dollars to a 
woman student of junior or senior standing who has been m attendance at 
the University of Maryland for at least one year. Awards are made on th. 
basis of scholarship, character, and financial need. Applications should 
be made to the Scholarship Committee of the A. A. U. W. 

57 



PUBLICATIONS AWARDS 

Medals are offered in Diamondback, Terrapin, and Old Line work, for the 
students who have given most efficient and faithful service throughout the 
year. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. The Class of 1908 offers 
annually to "the man who typified the best in college athletics" a gold 
watch. The watch is given in honor of a former President of the Univer- 
sity, R. W. Silvester. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered by Charles L. Linhardt to 
the Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

CITIZENSHIP AWARDS 

Citizenship Prize for Men. A gold watch is presented annually by H. C. 
Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, to the member of the senior class 
who, during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, 
and has done most for the general advancement of the interests of the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. The Citizenship Prize is offered by Mrs. 
Albert F. Woods to the woman member of the senior class who, during her 
collegiate career, has most nearly typified the model citizen, and has done 
most for the general advancement of the interests of the University. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The following description of student activities covers those of the under- 
graduate divisions of College Park. The description of those in the Balti- 
more divisions is included in the appropriate chapters in Section II. 

GOVERNMENT 

Regulation of Student Activities. The association of students in organ- 
ized bodies, for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student activities in 
orderly and productive ways, is recognized and encouraged. All organized 
student activities are under the supervision of the Student Life Committee, 
subject to the approval of the President. Such organizations are formed 
only with the consent of the Student Life Committee and the approval of 
the President. Without such consent and approval no student organization 
which in any way represents the University before the public, or which 
purports to be a University organization or an organization of University 
students, may use the name of the University in connection with its own 
name, or in connection with its members as students. 

Student Government. The Student Government Association consists of 
the Executive Council, the Women^s League, and the Men's League, and 
operates under its own constitution. Its officers are a President, a Vice- 

58 



President, a Secretary-Treasurer, President of Women's League and Presi- 
dent of Men's League. 

The Women's League handles all affairs concerning women students ex- 
clusively. It has the advisory cooperation of the Dean of Women. 

The Men's League handles all matters pertaining to men students. It has 
the advisory cooperation of the Assistant in Student Activities. 

The Executive Council performs the executive duties incident to manag- 
ing student affairs, and works in cooperation with the Student Life Com- 
mittee. 

The Student Life Committee, a faculty committee appointed by the Presi- 
dent, keeps in close touch with all activities and conditions, excepting class- 
room work, that affect the student, and, acting in an advisory capacity, en- 
deavors to improve any unsatisfactory conditions that may exist. 

A pamphlet entitled Academic Regulations, issued annually and distrib- 
uted to the students in the fall, contains full information concerning student 
matters as well as a statement of the rules of the University. 

Eligibility to Represent the University. Only students in good standing 
are eligible to represent the University in extra-curricular contests. No 
student while on probation may represent the University in such events as 
athletic contests, glee club concerts, dramatic performances, and debates. 

Discipline. In the government of the University, the President and faculty 
rely chiefly upon the sense of responsibility of the students. The student 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes regularly, lives honor- 
ably, and maintains good behavior meets this responsibility. In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who fail to maintain these 
standards are asked to withdraw. Students are under the direct super- 
vision of the University only when on the campus, but they are responsible 
to the University for their conduct wherever they may be. 

Fraternities and sororities, as well as all other clubs and organizations 
recognized by the University, are expected to conduct their social and finan- 
cial activities in accordance with the rules of good conduct and upon sound 
business principles. Where such rules and principles are observed, indi- 
vidual members will profit by the experience of the whole group, and thereby 
become better fitted for their life's work after graduation. Rules governing 
the different activities will be found in the list of Academic Regulations. 

SOCIETIES 

Honorary Fraternities. Honorary fraternities and societies in the Uni- 
versity at College Park are organized to uphold scholastic and cultural 
standards in their respective fields. These are Phi Kappa Phi, a national 
honorary fraternity open to honor students, both men and women, in all 
branches of learning; Sigma Xi, scientific fraternity; Alpha Zeta, a national 
honorary agricultural fraternity recognizing scholarship and student leader- 
ship; Tau Beta Pi, a national honorary engineering fraternity; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, men's national honor society, recognizing conspicuous attain- 

59 



merit in non-curricular activities and general leadership ; Kappa Phi Kappa, 
a national educational fraternity; Beta Phi Theta, an honorary French 
fraternity; Sigma Delta Pi, a national honorary Spanish fraternity; Alpha 
Chi Sigma, a national honorary chemical fraternity; Scabbard and Blade, 
a national military society; Pershing Rifles, a national military society for 
basic course R. O. T. C. students; Pi Delta Epsilon, a national journalistic 
fraternity; Mortar Board, the national senior honor society for women; 
Alpha Lambda Delta, a national freshman women's honor society promot- 
ing scholarship; Theta Gamma, a local Home Economics society; Alpha Psi 
Omega (Iota Chapter), national dramatic society; and Chi Alpha, local 
women's journalistic fraternity. 

Fraternities and Sororities. There are thirteen national fraternities and 
one local fraternity, and five national sororities and two local sororities at 
College Park. These in the order of their establishment at the University 
are Kappa Alpha, Sigma Phi Sigma, Sigma Nu, Phi Sigma Kappa, Delta 
Sigma Phi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Theta Chi, Phi Alpha, Tau Epsilon Phi 
Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta Theta, Lambda Chi Alpha, and Alpha Lambda 
Tau (national fraternities); and Alpha Omicron Pi, Kappa Delta, Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Delta Delta Delta, and Alpha Xi Delta (national sororities) • 
and Sigma Alpha Mu (local fraternity). Beta Pi Sigma (local sorority), and 
Alpha Sigma (local club). 

Clubs and Societies, Many clubs and societies, with literary, scientific, 
social, and other special objectives are maintained in the University. Some 
of these are purely student organizations ; others are conducted jointly by 
students and members of the faculty. The list is as follows : Agricultural 
Council, Authorship Club, Bacteriological Society, Engineering Society, En- 
tomological Society, Horticulture Qub, Latin American Club, Live Stock 
Club, New Mercer Literary Society, Poe Literary Society, Calvert Forum 
Women's Athletic Association, Girls' "M" Club, Footlight Club, Debating 
Club, Rossbourg Club, Mathematics Society, Economics Club, Chess Club 
Strauss Club, DeMolay Club, Psyche Club, Der Deutsche Verein, Riding 
Club, Swimming Club, Opera Club, Poetry Club, International Relations, 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, American Society of Civil En- 
gineers, and Radio Club. 

Student Grange. The Student Grange is a chapter of the National Grange. 
With the exception of two faculty advisers, the Student Grange member- 
ship is made up entirely from the student body. New members are elected 
by ballot when they have proved their fitness for the organization. 

The general purposes of the Student Grange are to furnish a means 
through which students keep in touch with state and national problems of 
agricultural, economic, or general educational nature; to gain experience in 
putting into practice parliamentary rules ; to learn the meaning of leader- 
ship, and to learn how to assume leadership that aids in the ultimate task 
of serving in one's community. 

60 



RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

Staff. The University recognizes its responsibility for the w^elfare of the 
students, not only as intellectual, but as moral and spiritual beings. Student 
Pastors representing the major denominational bodies are officially ap- 
pointed by the Churches for work with the students of their respective 
faiths. Each of the Student Pastors is also pastor of a local church of his 
denomination, which the students are encouraged to attend. 

Religious Work Council. The Religious Work Council, comprising the 
President of the University, acting as Chairman, the Student Pastors, 
members of the Faculty, and students, focalizes, reviews, and stimulates 
the religious thought and activity of the student body. This Council has 
an executive secretary with an office in the Student Center, who is daily at 
the service of the students and the churches. 

While there is no interference with any one's religion, religion itself is 
recognized, and every possible provision made that the student may keep 
in contact with the church of his choice. 

Denominational Clubs. The Episcopal Club, the Lutheran Club, the Pres- 
byterian Club, and the Baptist Club are active organizations of the students 
(both men and women) of their respective denominations, and their friends, 
banded together for mutual fellowship and Christian service. 

The Maryland Christian Association. The Maryland Christian Associa- 
tion is a fellowship of students and teachers, both men and women, who 
unite for religious fellowship and service. The Association includes the 
Y. M. tC. A. and the Y. W. C. A. of the University, and all students and 
Teachers are invited to join and to participate in its activities. The Asso- 
ciation renders a number of services upon the campus, such as welcoming 
and assisting new students, securing speakers, holding religious services, 
seminars, discussion groups, forums, and social functions. The Association 
also sponsors the Cosmopolitan Club, which seeks to welcome and to create 
fellowship between students at the University from foreign countries. 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Three student publications are conducted under the supervision of the 
Faculty Committee on Student Publications. 

The Diamondback, a weekly, six-to-eight-page newspaper, is published by 
the students. This publication summarizes the University news, and pro- 
vides a medium for discussion of matters of interest to the students and 
the faculty. 

The Terrapin is the student annual published by the Junior Class. It is 
a reflection of student activities, ser\dng to commemorate the principal 
events of the college year. 

The Old Line is a comic magazine put out quarterly by the students. 

61 



ALUMNI 

The alumni are organized into several units, which elect representatives 
to the Alumni Council, an incorporated body which manages all general 
alumni affairs. Different alumni units represent the School of Medicine, 
the School of Pharmacy, the School of Dentistry, the School of Law, and the 
School of Nursing, while the group of colleges at College Park are repre- 
sented by one unit. This College Park unit is governed by a board made 
up of representatives of the various colleges located at College Park. 

The Alumni Council is made up of elected representatives from the several 
units, with a membership of twenty-four. Each alumni unit in Baltimore 
elects two representatives to the Council; the alumni representing the Col- 
lege Park group of colleges elect twelve representatives. 



SECTION II 
Administrative Divisions 



62 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Harry J. Patterson, Dean 

Agriculture is the primary pursuit of the human race, and permanent 
prosperity is in direct proportion to the producing capacity of the land. 
Land-Grant Colleges were founded to foster teaching of scientific agri- 
culture. 

The College of Agriculture has a two-fold purpose. On the one hand, it 
gives a liberal educational background in order that its graduates may live 
more satisfying lives, no matter what may be their eventual occupations. 
On the other hand, it trains men and women for the various occupations 
based upon those sciences which are fundamental to agriculture. With this 
training, some will find occupation as scientific specialists, others will en- 
gage in business and professional pursuits having close agricultural contacts, 
while others will take up practical farming. 

Agriculture is constantly changing; no cropping system can be worked 
out once and for all time; new as well as old pests and diseases must be 
constantly combated ; better feeding and breeding of live stock, and efficient 
marketing methods must be substituted for inefficient methods if agriculture 
is to maintain its position with the other industries. Above all, agriculture 
must be made profitable to the tiller of the soil, and must be established as 
a paying business for those who engage in it. 

The curricula of the College of Agriculture are planned to give the stu- 
dent thorough and practical instruction in agriculture and related sciences, 
and at the same time afford him an opportunity to specialize along the lines 
in which he is particularly interested. 

Departments 

The College of Agriculture includes the following departments: Agri- 
cultural Economics; Agronomy (including Crops and Soils); Animal Hus- 
bandry; Bacteriology; Botany; Dairy Husbandry; Entomology and Bee 
Culture; Farm Forestry; Farm Management; Farm Mechanics; Genetics 
and Statistics; Horticulture (including Pomology, Vegetable Gardening, 
Landscape Gardening, and Floriculture) ; Plant Pathology; Plant Physiology 
and Bio-chemistry; Poultry Husbandry. 

Admission 

The requirements for admission are discussed under Entrance, in Sec- 
tion I. 

63 



Requirements for Graduatton 

Hon"^ T^^Irf f "/ *^^"*y-«'«ht semester hours are required for gradua- 
tion. The detailed requirements for each department are included in the 
discussion of Curricula in Agriculture. mciuaea in the 

Farm and Laboratory Practice 

foJDractfilln! ^T"*"'"* ^"' '•"'P *" ""^^^ ^^^"^bl« opportunities 
for practical or technical experience along his major line of study for each 

student whose major is in that department and who is in need of Juch 

bfrnetTonfoV"''''"'""' ^'"'^^"^^ '" '"^"^ departments this need m"5 
be met by one or more summers spent on a practical farm. 

Student Organizations 

The students of the College of Agriculture maintain a Student Grange an 
Agricultural Council, a Bacteriological Society, an EntomologTcal Soc"e ^a 
Horticulture Club a Livestock Club, and an honor fraternity. Alpha Zeta 

Membership and work in these is voluntary, and no college credL are 
given for work done in them; yet much of the training obtained! them is 
fuUy as valuable as that acquired from regularly prescribed courses 

The Student Grange represents the Great National Farmers' fraternity of 
the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, and emphasizes training for rural 
leadership. It sponsors much deputation work in local granges throughout 
the State -Die Horticulture Club sponsors the Horticulture Show in the 
fail and the Livestock Club, the Fitting and Showing Contest in the spring 
Both of these exhibitions are creditable University functions. They give 
valuable training and inspiration to the students. 

Alpha Zeta— National Agricultural Honor Fraternity 

Membership in this fraternity is chosen from students in the College of 
Agriculture who have displayed agricultural motive and executive ability 
This organization fosters scholarship, and to that end awards a gold medal 
to the member of the freshman class in agriculture who makes the highest 
record during the year. "'gnebi 

Fellowships 

^aL ^'^Ifc.r'^^^^ ""^ ^''^^''^^^ fellowships, which carry remuneration of 
$400 to $800 yearly, are available to graduate students. The holders of 
these fellowships spend a portion of their time assisting in classes and 
laboratories. The rest of the time is used for original investigation or as- 
signed study. (See Graduate School.) 

Curricula in Agriculture 

claiT''''^^ ^'^^''' ^^^ ^"""^^^ ""^ Agriculture divide into three general 

(1) Scientific curricula are designed to prepare students for positions as 
technicians, teachers, or investigators. These positions are usually i^the 
various scientific and educational departments, or bureaus of the Federal, 

64 



State, or Municipal governments; in the various schools or experiment 
stations; or in the laboratories of private corporations. 

(2) Technical curricula are designed to prepare students for farming as 
owners, tenants, managers, or specialists; for positions as county agricul- 
tural agents, or teachers of agriculture in high schools ; as executives, sales- 
men, or other employees in commercial businesses with close agricultural 
contact and point of view. 

(3) Courses of study may be arranged for any who desire to return 
to the farm after one or more years of training in practical agricultural 
subjects. (For details see Special Students in Agriculture, page 83.) 

Student Advisers 

Each freshman in the College of Agriculture is assigned to an adviser 
from the faculty, who is selected with due consideration for the major line 
of interest of the student. Not more than five or six students are assigned 
to any one person. With the advice and consent of his adviser and the 
Dean, any student may make such modifications in his curriculum as arc 
deemed advisable to meet the requirements of his particular case. 

The suggested curricula in the catalogue include a sufficient number of 
electives to afford opportunity for those who so desire to select major 
and minor fields of study from different departments. As an illustration, a 
student may decide to have his major in entomology and yet may want to 
be well informed in pomology. In the entomology curriculum (see page 76) 
there is room for 26 semester credit hours, distributed through the last two 
years, which may be elected from courses in, or associated with pomology. 



General Curriculum 



Semester 




1 

3 

-7 
4 
5 



Freshman Year I 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. 1 y) 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 1 y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 1 y or Phys. Ed. 2 y and 4 y) _ ,.... 1 

Reading and Speaking (Speech, ly) 1 

Elect one from each of the following groups : 

Biology (Bot. lAf or s and Zool. If or s) ) 

Botany (Bot. If and 2 s) \ ^ 

Mathematics (Math, llf and 14s) ^ 

Modem Language (French ly or German ly) | 

Entomology (Ent. If and 3 s) J. 

Agriculture (A. H. If and D. H. Is) _.... 

or (Agron. If and 2 s) 

or (Hort. If and lis) 

65 



// 

4 
3 

1 
1 



8 



^ , Semester 

bophomore Year j jj 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) 2 2 

Elect one of the following: 
Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay and 12Bf or s) ) 

6 Economics (A. E. If and Econ. 5 s) .ZIZ~A ^"^ ^-3 

Elect three or four of the following: 

7 Mathematics (Math. 16y) 3.3 ^ ^ 

7 Physics (Phys. ly) _ 4.4 ^ \ io_i2 1I-12 

5 Geology and Soils (Geol. If and Soils 1 s) 3-5 1 

5 Agriculture (Any freshman elective or Poultry 1 s) J 

0. Required of all students except those whose major is Botany. 

1. Required of students whose major is Botany. 

3. Required of students whose major is Agricultural Chemistry, Bacteri- 

ology, or Landscape Gardening. 

4. Required of students whose major is Entomology. 

5. Recommended for students who contemplate farming or employment in 

industries closely associated with farming. 

6. Required of students whose major is Agricultural Economics. 

3 and 7. Recommended for students who are interested in biological science 
and Dairy Manufacturing, and are likely to pursue graduate 
studies. 

(See special curricula for Agricultural Education, Bacteriology, Botany, 
Dairy Manufacturing, Entomology, Floriculture, Landscape Gardening,' 
Olericulture, and Pomology.) 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

The objective of the curriculum in Agricultural Chemistry is the fitting 
of students for work in agricultural experiment stations, and in soil, fer- 
tilizer, and food laboratories. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The objectives of the curricula in Agricultural Education are the teach- 
ing of secondaiy vocational agriculture, the work of county agents, and 
allied lines of the rural education service. 

(For special requirements and curricula see page 120, College of Edu- 
cation.) 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

The courses in this department are designed to give students funda- 
mental training in the basic economic principles underlying the agricultural 
industry. Training in both agricultural economics and farm management 
is included in the curriculum. 

66 



Agricultural economics considers the fundamental principles underlying 
the production, distribution, and consumption of farm products. The most 
efficient and economical use of the factors of production — land, labor, and 
capital — are emphasized. Farm resources and tax revenues, and methods 
of financing agricultural production from both public and private points 
of view, are considered. The cost of getting products from the producer 
to the consumer, cooperative and private types of organization, the agencies 
involved and services rendered, are also included, since the farmer's work 
does not end with producing crops, animals, and animal products. Eco- 
nomical distribution and the return of a fair proportion of the selling price 
are as important factors in farming as economical production. 

The purpose of the study of farm management is to enable the individual 
farmer so to organize his business that it may produce the greatest con- 
tinuous profit. This can be done, however, only when the organization is 
in accordance with the broader principles of agricultural economics. It 
requires not only knowledge of many factors involved in the production of 
crops and animals, but also administrative ability to coordinate them into 
the most efficient farm organization. Farming is a business, as well as 
a way of life, and as such demands for its successful conduct the use of 
business methods. The aim of the courses in farm management is to train 
the student in the methods of keeping farm business records, analyzing the 
farm business, and organizing and operating the farm as a business en- 
terprise. This enables the student to perceive the just relationship of the 
several factors of production and distribution as applicable to local con- 
ditions, and to develop in him an executive and administrative capacity. 

Students well trained in agricultural economics and farm management 
are in demand for county agent work, farm bureau work, experiment station 
or United States Government investigation, and college or secondary school 
teaching. 



Sennester 

Junior Year I II 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) „ 3 — 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102 s) — 3 

Analysis of the Farm Business (A. E. 107 s) — 3 

Business Law (Econ. 107y) 3 3 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) 2 — 

Statistics (Gen. lllf and 112 s) 2 2 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

Electives 4 3 



16 



16 



67 



Senior Year 

Cooperation in Agriculture (A. E. 103f) 3 — 

Transportation of Farm Products (A. E. 101s) — 3 

Seminar (A. E. 202y) 1-2 1-2 

Farm Organization and Operation (A. E. 108f) 3 — 

Farm Machinery (F. Mech. lOlf) 3 — 

Agricultural Finance (A. E. 104 s) „ „.... — 3 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 104 s) _ — 3 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) 2 — 

Electives 4-3 &-5 

16 16 



AGRONOMY 

In the Department of Agronomy are grouped the courses in farm crops, 
soils, and plant breeding. 

The curriculum in farm crops aims to give the student the fundamental 
principles of crop production. Special attempt is made to adapt the work 
to the young man who wishes to apply scientific principles of field crop 
culture and improvement on the farm. At the same time enough freedom 
is given the student in the way of electives so that he may register for sub- 
jects which might go along with the growing of crops on his particular 
farm. A student graduating from the course in agronomy should be well 
fitted for general farming, for the production of improved seeds, for em- 
ployment with commercial firms, for investigational work in the State or 
Federal Experiment Stations, or for county agent work. 

The division of soils gives instruction in the physics, chemistry, and 
biology of the soil, the courses being designed to equip the future farmer 
with a complete knowledge of his soil and also to give adequate training to 
students who desire to specialize in soils. Those who are preparing to 
take up research or teaching are expected to take graduate work in addition 
to the regular undergraduate courses that are offered. The division pos- 
sesses the necessary equipment and facilities for the instruction in these 
subjects, and in addition affords opportunities for the student to come in 
contact with the research at the Agricultural Experiment Station, especially 
in the pot culture laboratories, and on the experimental fields at the station 
and in other parts of the State. 

Graduate students will find unusual opportunities to fit themselves for 
teaching soils in agricultural colleges, to conduct research in experiment 
stations, and to carry on work with the Bureau of Soils, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 



68 



Crops Division 

Senbester 

Junior Year ^ " 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf ) ~ - - - — — " 

Technology of Crop Quality (Agron. 102f) - 2 or 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) -....- - 2 2 

Elementary Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) - -- 4 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) - — ^ 

Electives - ~ ^ ** 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Crop Breeding (Agron. 103f) - ^ — 

Advanced Genetics (Gen. 102 s) * 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) — 2 

Selected Crop Studies (Agron. 104f and s) 1 4 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) ^ — 

Farm Drainage (F. Mech. 107s) -.. --. — 2 

Farm Machinery (F. Mech. lOlf) - — 3 — 

Farm Forestry (For. Is) - ^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) - - ^ 

Electives - — - •••* - - 

16 16 

Soils Division 

Semester 

Junior Year * " 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) - -- 2 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) - — 3 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) - - 4 

Soils and Fertilizers ( Soils If) 5 — 

Soil Management (Soils 102 s) — ^ 

Elementary Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 — 

Electives -■- ^ ^ 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) 3 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 — 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) - — 2 

Soil Geography (Soils 103f) -.... - --■ 3 — 

Farm Drainage (F. Mech. 107s) -.. -- — 2 

Electives ^ ^2 



16 



69 



16 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The courses in animal husbandry are designed to furnish instruction in 
the essential principles and practices that are concerned in the breeding, 
feeding, management, judging, and marketing of horses, beef cattle, sheep,' 
and swine. Attention is given to meat, to wool, and to by-products of the 
meat industry. 

The curriculum in animal husbandry is so planned as to allow plenty of 
latitude in the selection of courses outside of the department, thus giving 
the student fundamental training and fitting him to become the owner or 
superintendent of general or specialized livestock farms. 

Opportunity for specialization is offered to those who may desire to 
become instructors or investigators in the field of animal husbandry. 

Sermester 
Junior Year j jj 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) _ „ 2 2 

General Bateriology (Bact. If or s) Z~I1 4 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) 3 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) _ '~"Z. — 3 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. lOlf) "ZIIl 3 — . 

Genetics ( Gen. lOlf ) „.... _ IZZZ'.. 3 — 

Advanced Livestock Judging (A. H. 105f and 106 s) 2 2 

Electives , P u 

- — — _ „.„ ^ ^ 



16 16 

Semester 

Senior Yewr j jj 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) ^ 3 __ 

Farm Machinery (F. Mech. lOlf) 'IZII.'Z 3 — 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106s) >... _ ZIZ'Z." — 3 

Livestock Management (A. H. 103f and 104 s) ......Z"Z*' 5 5 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) _ — 4 

Electives c a 



16 



16 



BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

The present organization of this department has been brought about with 
two main purposes in view. The first is to give all students of the Uni- 
versity an opportunity to obtain a general knowledge of this basic sub- 
ject. The second purpose is to prepare students for bacteriological positions 
(including those of dairy, sanitary, food, and soil bacteriologists; and fed- 
eral, state, and municipal bacteriologists); and for public health, research, 
and industrial positions. The demand for persons qualified for this work 
is usually much greater than the supply. 



70 



Sophonnore Year 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) _ „.. 

German or French _ — — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2 s) - 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y ) _ -. 

Electives - - - 

16 
Junior Year 

Dairy Bacteriology ( Bact. lOlf ) 3 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 112 s) _ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) - 

Serology (Bact. 115f) - - 

Hematology (Bact. 103f) - _ 

Advanced Methods (Bact. 122 s) - _ 

Bacteriology Electives 

Electives _ _.. 



Sen 


yuester 


I 


II 


2 


4 


3 


3 


4 




— 


4 


2 


2 


5 


3 



16 



Senior Year 

Bacteriological Problems (Bact. 123 f and 124 s) 2 

Statistics ( Gen. lllf ) _ 2 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 s) _._ „ 

Research Methods (Bact. 121f) „_ 1 

Advanced Bacteriology (Bact. 127f).^ „ 2 

Journal Club (Bact. 131f and 132 s) - 1 

Bacteriology Electives 3-5 

Electives ~.... „._ 5-3 



— 


8 


2 


2 


4 


— 


2 




— 


2 


— 


3-5 


5 


6-4 


L6 


16 


Semester 


I 


// 



— 4 



1 

2r-5 

6-3 



16 



16 



BOTANY 



The department of Botany offers three major lines of work: general 
botany and morphology, plant physiology, and plant pathology. The 
courses listed for the curricula in botany and morphology, and plant 
physiology, make a kind of skeleton of essentials, to which the student 
adds the individual requirements to make a complete four year course. 
In the junior and senior years botanical courses may be elected to fit the 
individual needs of the student and the particular line to which he is in- 
clined. Both the junior and senior years also allow considerable freedom in 
the election of non-botanical courses, in order to round out a fairly broad 
cultural education and to satisfy the educational requirements for those who 



71 



desire to qualify for high school teaching. The curriculum as outlined lays 
a good foundation for graduate work in any field of botanical science. 

The curriculum offered in plant pathology is designed to give the student 
the fundamental principles of plant disease control and investigation. 
Trained plant pathologists find opportunities to do advisory, extension, and 
research work in the various agricultural colleges, experiment stations, and 
the United States Department of Agriculture, and also in numerous com- 
mercial concerns, such as seed companies, companies making spray ma- 
terials, farmer cooperatives, etc. For the student who elects a major in 
plant pathology, the following suggested curriculum will also lay a strong 
foundation for the type of graduate work usually required for a success- 
ful career as a professional plant pathologist. The curriculum may be 
modified to meet individual needs. 

General Botany and Morphology, Physiology, and Pathology 

Semester 
Freshman Year j j] 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2 s). _.„. 4 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Modern Language (French or German) 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) _.... 1 i 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 _ 

Local Flora (Bot. 4s) 2 

General Zoology (Zool. 1 s) 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) „ „ 4 

College Algebra (Math, llf) and Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) 3 3 

Modern Language ^ 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y ) „ 2 2 

Electives ^ „ 2 



16 

General Botany and Morphology, and Plant Physiology 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) „ 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) IIZ~I1. — 

Electives o 



16 



16 



4 
3 
9 

16 



Senior Year 

Genetics ( Gen. 10 If) -^ 3 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107f or s) — 

Botanical Electives ( Maximum) 7 

Other Electives ( Minimum ) 6 

16 
Plant Pathology 

Junior Year 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) _ 4 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ _... 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) _ — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) „ - 2 

Mycology (Bot. 102f) _ 4 

Research Methods (Pit. Path. 103s) - — 

Methods in Plant Histology (Bot. 107s) „ -- 

Electives 2 

16 
Senior Year 

Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 102s) „ — 

Plant Anatomy (Bot. lOlf) _ _._ 3 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) 3 

Pit. Path. 101 or 102 _ „ 2 

Electives _ _ 8 



2 

10 
4 

16 



16 



4 
3 

4 

2 
2 

1 

16 
3 



2 

11 

16 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



72 



The department of Dairy Husbandry offers courses in two major lines: 
dairy production and dairy manufacture. The curriculum in each of these 
is so arranged as to give the student an intimate knowledge of the science, 
and facility in the art of dairy husbandry practice. The dairy production 
option is organized to meet the specific requirements of students who are 
especially interested in the care, feeding, breeding, management, and im- 
provement of dairy cattle and in the production and sale of market milk. 

The option in dairy manufactures is planned to meet the particular de- 
mands of those interested in the processing and distribution of milk, in dairy 
plant operation, and in the manufacture and sale of butter, cheese, ice-creamy 
and other milk products. 

The dairy herd and the dairy laboratories are available to students for 
instruction and for research. Excellent opportunity is, therefore, afforded 
to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students for original investi- 
gation and research. Graduates in the courses in dairy husbandry should 
be well qualified to become managers of dairy farms, teachers, and investi- 
gators in the State and Federal Agricultural Experiment Stations, or to en- 
ter the field of commercial dairying. 

73 



Dairy Manufacturing 

Senuester 

Sophomore Year I II 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) „ 2 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 4f or s) „ .„ — 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) - 4 — 

Introductory Dairy Science (D. H. If or s) 3 — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5f or s) — 3 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y) 2 2 

Electives 5 3 



16 



16 



Junior Year 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf and 102 s) 3 

Dairy Manufacturing (D. H. 104f and 105s) _.„ 5 

Grading Dairy Products (D. H. 108s) _ — 

Dairy Plant Experience (D. H. llOf) _ _ 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) „ 2 

Electives _ 3 

16 

Senior Year 

Market Milk (D. H. 106f) 5 

Analysis of Dairy Products (D. H. 107s) 

Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (D. H. 109f) _ 1 

Dairy Plant Experience (D. H. lllf) „ 3 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOly) 3 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) » 3 

Electives 1 

16 

Dairy Production 

Junior Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s) 4 

Dairy Production (D. H. lOly) 3 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) _.. — 

Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging ( D. H. 102 s) „ - — 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. lOlf ) -...._ _ 3 

Farm Drainage (F. Mech. 107 s) ....- — 

Electives ^ _ — 4 



3 
5 
1 

2 
5 

16 



— 3 

10 
16 



2 
3 

3 
3 
1 

2 
2 



16 



74 



16 



Semester 

Senior Yea/r I II 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) - 3 — 

Market Milk (D. H. 106f) _ 5 — 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. lOlf) „ 3 — 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106 s) — 8 

Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (D. H. 103 s) — 2 



16 



16 



ENTOMOLOGY 

This department is engaged in the teaching of entomology to all agri- 
cultural students as a basis for future work in pest control, in the prepara- 
tion of technically trained entomologists, and in furnishing courses to 
students in Arts and Sciences and Education. 

The success of the farmer and particularly the fruit grower is in large 
measure dependent upon his knowledge of the methods of preventing or 
combating the pests that menace his crops. Successful methods of control 
are emphasized in the economic courses. 

The fact that the entomological work of the Experiment Station, the 
Extension Service, the College of Agriculture, and the office of the State 
Entomologist are in one administrative unit, enables the student in this 
department to avail himself of the many advantages accruing therefrom. 
Advanced students have special advantages in that they may be assigned to 
work on Station projects already under way. The department takes every 
advantage of the facilities offered by the Bureau of Entomology of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, the Beltsville Research Center, the 
National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, various other local laboratories, 
the libraries in Washington, and the Washington Entomological Society. 
There is an active Entomological Society composed of th^ students and staff 
of the department. A monthly news magazine is published, and there are 
numerous other profitable projects in which all students may participate. 
Thus students are given many opportunities of meeting authorities in the 
various fields of entomology, to observe projects under way, consult col- 
lections, and hear addresses on every phase of entomology. Following is 
the suggested curriculum in entomology. It can be modified to suit indi- 
vidual demand. Students not starting this curritmlum in their freshman 
year can with a few changes in schedule meet the requirements in the 
four years. 



75 



Semester 



Freshman Year I 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 

General Zoology ( Zool. Is ) — 

General Botany (Bot. If) 4 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. If) 3 

Insect Biology (Ent. 3s) „ — 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) „ 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. ly) 1 

Sophomore Year 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) 2-4 

College Algebra ( Math. 1 If) „ _ 3 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) — 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 

French or German _ _ 3 

Insect Morphology and Taxonomy (Ent. 2y) _ 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Ed. 3y) 2 



// 
4 
4 



1 
1 

16 



4-2 

3 
8 

n 

3 



16^18 16-18 



Junior Year I 

General Physics (Phys. ly) 4 

French or German „ _ 3 

*Economic Entomology (Ent. lOly) _ 2 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - 4 

General Bacteriology (Bact. Is) — 

Electives _ ~ 3 

16 
Senior Year 

♦Insect Pests of Special Groups (Ent. 104y) 3 

Seminar (Ent. 103y) _....... 1 

Special Problems (Ent. 4f or 4s) 2 

Electives - ...-.- 10 



11 

4 
3 
2 

4 
3 

16 

8 

1 
2 

10 



16 



♦ Ent. lOly and Ent. 104y taught in alternate years. 



16 



76 



FARM MECHANICS 

The department of Farm Mechanics is organized to offer students of 
agriculture training in those agricultural subjects which are based upon 
engineering principles. These subjects may be grouped under three heads : 
farm machinery, farm buildings, and farm drainage. 

The modern tendency in farming is to replace hand labor by the opera- 
tion of machinery. In many cases horses are being replaced by tractors. 
Trucks, automobiles, and stationary engines are found on almost all farms. 
It is highly advisable that the student of any branch of agriculture have a 
working knowledge of the design, adjustments, and repair of these 

machines. 

More than one-fourth of the total value of Maryland farms is represented 
by the buildings. The study of the design of various buildings, from the 
standpoint of economy, sanitation, efficiency, and appearance, is, therefore, 

important. . . 

Studies included in the study of drainage are as follows : the prmciples 
of tile drainage, the laying out and construction of tile drain systems, the 
use of open ditches, and Maryland drainage laws. 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Those who do not care to specialize in any particular phase of agriculture 

will pursue the following curriculum: 

Semester 

Junior Year * " 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) - ^ — 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) 4 — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

Farm Poultry (Poultry Is) - — 3 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) ^ — 

Farm Accounting (F. M. Is) — ^ 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 102 s) _ - - — 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 3 

Electives ~ _- 

17 16 

Senior Year 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) •. 3 — 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 -— 

Farm Machinery (F. Mech. lOlf) -.- ~ 3 — 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (F. Mech. 102 s) - — 8 

Farm Drainage (F. Mech. 107 s) — 2 

Farm Forestry (For. Is) - - — 8 

Electives ~ - _^ _^ 

16 16 

77 



GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Rapid accumulation of knowledge in the field of genetics has changed 
the viewpoint of those interested in plant and animal breeding and in 
eugenics. 

Teachers and investigators have increasing occasion to interpret statisti- 
cal data presented by others, as well as to gather and organize original 
material. 

The department of Genetics and Statistics offers students training in (1) 
the principles of heredity and genetics, and (2) the tools and methods em- 
ployed in statistical description and induction. 

HORTICULTURE 

There are several reasons why the State of Maryland should be pre- 
eminent in horticulture and offer excellent opportunities for horticultural 
enterprises. The more evident ones are the wide variation in soil and 
climate from the Eastern Shore to the mountains in the West, the nearness 
to many large Eastern markets, and the large number of railroads, inter- 
urban lines, highways, and waterways, which combine to favor the growing 
of horticultural crops and to make marketing easy and comparatively cheap. 

The department of Horticulture offers four major lines of work: 
pomology, olericulture, floriculture, and landscape gardening. Students 
wishing to specialize in horticulture may take a general course during the 
four years, or the student may specialize in any of the four divisions. The 
courses have been so planned that upon their completion students should 
be fitted to engage in commercial work, county agent work, or teaching and 
investigational work in State and Federal institutions. 

On the University campus, the department has at its disposal ten acres 
of ground devoted to vegetable gardening, eighteen acres of orchards, small 
fruits, and vineyards, twelve greenhouses, in which research and teaching 
are conducted, and one building which is devoted to horticultural teaching 
and research. In addition, the department has acquired 250 acres of land, 
three miles from the college, which tract is used for experimental and 
teaching purposes. Members of the teaching staff are likewise members of 
the experiment station staff, hence students have an opportunity to 
become acquainted with the research being carried on in the department. 
Excellent opportunity for investigating new problems is afforded to ad- 
vanced undergraduates and to graduate students. 

Students who intend to specialize in Pomology, Olericulture, Floriculture, 
or Landscape Gardening are required to take courses of study which it is 
felt will best equip them for their future work in Horticulture. 

The following curricula will be adjusted to the special needs of the 
student whose interests lie in the general scientific field or the one who is 
preparing for work in technical lines. The object is to fit students most 
effectively to fill positions of certain types, as noted above. 



78 



Pomology-Olericulture— Floriculture Semester 

Freshman Year 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2s) -..- - - •;—"■"-"""■"": ^ o 

College Algebra (Math, llf); Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) 6 ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - ■•"■-"- — 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Eel. ^ 

ly) — — 

16 16 
Sophomore Yea/r 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) ^ ^ 

Geology (Geol. If) - - __ ^ 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) - - 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12y) - ^ ^ 

*Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) - ^ 

♦Principles of Vegetable Culture (Hort. lis) - 

**General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) — * 

Practical Pomology Lab. (Hort. 7f, 8s) _ -^. 

Basic R.O.T.C. (M.I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y) ^ ^ ^^^ 

Electives - - " — 

16 18 

Pomology 

Junior Year ^ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) ■" 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 4 s) ^ 

Fruit Judging (Hort. 5f) ^ _ 

Systematic Pomology (Hort. 107f) -- ^ ^ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) ^ ^ 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) ^ ^ 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) ~ ^ q 

Electives - - - — 

16 16 

Senior Yenr 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. lOlf) ^ ^ 

Economic Fruits of the World (Hort. 102f) ^ ^ 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y)..... ^ 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) » ^ 

General Floriculture (Hort. 21f) ^ ^ 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) ~ - 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) ^ ^^ 

Electives - — 

16 16 

♦Required for students in Pomolopy and Olericulture. 
**Requircd for students in Floriculture. 

79 



Olericulture 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) — 3 

Small Fruit Culture (Hort. 4 s) — 2 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 ~ 

Genetics ( Gen. lOlf ) 3 ~ 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

Truck Crop Production (Hort. 12f) 3 — - 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort, 13 s) „ ^. — 3 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. Is) _ — 3 

Electives ^ .._ 4 3 



16 

Senior Year 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 

General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) 

General Floriculture (Hort. 21f ) 2 

Tuber and Root Crops (Hort. 103f) 2 

Systematic Olericulture (Hort. 105f) 3 

Advanced Truck Crop Production (Hort. 104 s) -.. — 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) , 2 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y) „ 1 

Electives 2 

16 

Floriculture 

Junior Year 

* Greenhouse Management (Hort. 22y) 3 

Floricultural Practice (Hort. 23y) 2 

Floricultural Trip (Hort. 27 s) — 

♦Greenhouse Construction (Hort. 24 s) — 

♦Garden Flowers (Hort. 26f ) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) _ „.. — 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) _ 4 

Local Flora (Bot. 4 s) _ — 

Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 32f) 3 

Electives „ , — 



17 



• Courses taken by both sophomores and juniors in alternate years. 



16 



— 2 



2 
2 
1 

9 

16 



3 
2 
1 
2 

2 

3 

2 
1 

16 



i 



Serrbester 

Senior Year * " 

♦Commercial Floriculture (Hort. 25y) — — 3 3 

Plant Materials (Hort. 106y) - 2 3 

Vegetable Forcing (Hort. 13 s) - ^ 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) ^ 

Horticultural Seminar (Hort. 43y) ^ ^ 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) - 2 2 

Electives - -- ^ 

16 16 



Landscajie Gardening 

Freshman Year 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) - 4 

General Zoology (Zool. 1 s) — 

General Botany (Bot. If) - - 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - 1 

College Algebra (Math, llf); Analytic Geometry (Math. 14 s) 3 
Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) - 1 



16 



Sophomore Year 

French or German _ - 3 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 4 

Geology ( Geol. If) 3 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) — 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) - 2 

♦General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31s) — 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. ly) 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. L 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 2 

Electives » — 

17 



♦ Courses taken by both sophomores and juniors in alternate years. 



4 
4 

3 
1 
3 

1 

16 



3 
2 

2 
2 
1 

2 
2 

16 



80 



81 



Semester 

Junior Year / jj 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) 3 

t Plant Materials (Hort. 106y) __ 2 3 

tHistory of Landscape Gardening (Hort. 35f) 1 — 

♦Elements of Landscape Design (Hort. 32f) _ 3 __ 

tLandscape Design (Hort. 33 s) 3 

t Garden Flowers (Hort. 26f) _ _ 3 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) 3 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. lOlf) „ .ZIIZ. 4 ~ 

Local Flora (Bot. 4 s) 2 

Farm Drainage (F. Mech. 107 s) ...Z..Z.Z. — 2 

Electives „ o 



16 

Senior Year 

tLandscape Design (Hort. 34f ) 3 

tLandscape Construction and Maintenance (Hort. 36 s) — 

tCivic Art (Hort. 37 s) "' _ 

Horticultural Research and Thesis (Hort. 42y) ..Z 2 

Horticultural Seminar ( Hort. 43y ) 1Z.Z 1 

Electives _ ^ 2q 



16 



16 



1 
2 
2 
1 

10 

16 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The curriculum in poultry husbandry is designed to give the student a 
comprehensive view of the practices of poultry raising. Students who expect 
to become teachers, extension workers, or investigators should choose as 
electives such subjects as psychology, economic history, sociology, philos- 
ophy, and political science. 

Junior Year 

Poultry Production (Poultry 103 s) 4 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6 s) 2 2 

General Bacteriology (Bact. If) 4 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2 s) 4 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) ^ 3 _ 

Poultry Keeping (Poultry 102f) 4 _ 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) 3 

Electives 3 « 



16 



16 



* Courses taken by both sophomores and juniors in alternate years, 
t Courses taken by both juniors and seniors in alternate years. 

82 



i 

i 



Semester 

Senior Yea/r I 11 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) ^ - 3 — 

Farm Management (F. M. 2f) 4 — 

Farm Accounting (F. M. Is) - — 3 

Animal Hygiene (Bact. 106 s) _ _ — 3 

Poultry Breeds (Poultry 104f) „ 4 — 

Poultry Management (Poultry 105 s) — — 4 

Marketing of Farm Products (A, E. 102 s) — 3 

Electives — -.... ....- 5 3 

16 16 

COMBINED PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURE AND VETERINARY 

MEDICINE 

By arrangement with the Veterinary School of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, students who wish to specialize in veterinary medicine may pursue 
a combined six-year program of study. The first three years of this pro- 
gram are taken at College Park. The last three years are taken at the 
Veterinary School of the University of Pennsylvania. After successful 
completion of the three years' work at the University of Maryland and the 
first year's work at the University of Pennsylvania, the student receives his 
B. S. degree from the University of Maryland. After successful completion 
of the last two years' work at the University of Pennsylvania he receives 
his degree in Veterinary Medicine from the Veterinary School. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE 

Mature students who are not candidates for degrees may, on consent 
of the dean, register as special students and pursue a program of studies 
not included in any regular curriculum, but arranged to meet the needs 
of the individual. In case such persons have not fulfilled the regular col- 
lege entrance requirements, they may arrange to audit (to attend without 
''credit") certain of the agricultural classes. All university fees for these 
special students are the same as fees for regular students. 

There are many young farmers who desire to take short intensive courses 
in their special lines of work during slack times on the farm. Arrange- 
ments have been made to permit such persons to register at the office of 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture and receive cards granting them 
permission to visit classes and work in the laboratories of the different de- 
partments. This opportunity is created to aid florists, poultrymen, fruit- 
growers, gardeners, or other especially interested persons who are able to 
get away from their work at some time during the year. 

The regular charges are *$5.00 for registration and $1.00 per week for 
the time of attendance. 



* One registration is good for any amount of regular or intermittent attendance during 
a period of four years. 

83 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Harry J. Patterson, Director. 

The agricultural work of the University naturally comprises three fields : 
research, instruction, and extension. The Agricultural Experiment Station 
is the agricultural research agency of the University, which has for its 
purpose the increase of knowledge relating to agriculture, primarily for the 
direct benefit of the farmer. It is also the real source of agricultural infor- 
mation for use in the classroom and for demonstrations in the field. 

The Experiment Station work is supported by both State and Federal 
appropriations. The Hatch Act, passed by Congress in 1887, appropriates 
$15,000 annually; the Adams Act, passed in 1906, provides $15,000 annu- 
ally; and the Purnell Act, passed in 1925, provides $60,000 annually. The 
State appropriation for 1935 was $54,660. 

The objects, purposes, and work of the Experiment Station as set forth 
by these acts are as follows: 

"That it shall be the object and duty of said Experiment Stations to con- 
duct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants 
and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the 
remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at their 
different stages of growth; the comparative advantages of rotative cropping 
as pursued under a varying series of crops; the capacity of new plants or 
trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and water; the chemical composi- 
tion of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test 
their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation and 
value of grasses and forage plants ; the composition and digestibility of the 
different kinds of food for domestic animals; the scientific and economic 
questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such other 
researches or experiments bearing directly on the agricultural industry of 
the United States as may in each case be deemed advisable, having due 
regard to the varying conditions and needs of the respective States or 
Territories." 

The Purnell Act also permits the appropriation to be used for conducting 
investigations and making experiments bearing on the manufacture, prepa- 
ration, use, distribution, and marketing of agricultural products, and for 
such economic and sociological investigations as have for their purpose the 
development and improvement of the rural home and rural life. 

The Maryland Station, in addition to the work conducted at the Univer- 
sity, operates a sub-station farm of fifty acres at Ridgely, Caroline County, 
and a farm of about sixty acres at Upper Marlboro for tobacco investiga- 
tion. Experiments in co-operation with farmers are conducted at many 
different points in the State. These tests consist of studies with soils, fer- 
tilizers, crops, orchards, insect and plant disease control, and stock feeding. 






The results of the Experiment Station work during the past quarter of 
a century have developed a science of agriculture to teach, and have laid 
a substantial foundation for agricultural development. The placing of agri- 
cultural demonstrations and extension work on a national basis has been 
the direct outgrowth of the work of the Experiment Stations. 

Students taking courses in agriculture are kept in close touch with the 
investigations in progress. 



84 



85 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

T. B. Symons, Director, 

The Extension Service is that branch of the University of Maryland, 
established by Federal and State law, which is designed to assist farmers 
and their families in promoting the prosperity and welfare of agriculture 
and rural life. Its work is conducted in co-operation with the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

The Extension Service is represented in each county of the State by a 
county agent and a home demonstration agent. Through these agents and 
its staff of specialists, it comes into intimate contact with rural people and 
with the problems of the farm and home. 

Practically every phase of agriculture and rural home life comes within 
the scope of the work undertaken by the Extension Service. Farmers are 
supplied with details of crop and livestock production, and with instructions 
for controlling diseases and insect pests; they are encouraged and aided in 
organized effort, helped with marketing problems, and in every way possible 
assisted in improving economic conditions on the farm. 

This service is charged with carrying out in Maryland the program of the 
Agricultural Adjustment Administration. 

Rural women are likewise assisted in the problems of the home. They are 
made acquainted with time- and labor-saving devices, with simpler and 
easier methods of work, with new knowledge of foods, with new ideas about 
home furnishing, with practical methods of home sewing and millinery con- 
struction, and with such other information as tends to make rural home 
life attractive and satisfying. 

For rural boys and girls, the Extension Service provides a valuable type 
of instruction in agriculture and home economics through its 4-H Club 
work. Actual demonstrations conducted by the boys and girls themselves, 
under supervision of the county and home demonstration agents, are the 
best possible means of imparting to youthful minds valuable information in 
crop and livestock production and in the household arts. The 4-H Club 
work affords rural boys and girls a real opportunity to develop self-confi- 
dence, perseverance, and leadership. 

The Extension Service works in accord with all other branches of the 
University of Maryland and with all agencies of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. It co-operates with all farm and community organi- 
zations in the State which have as their major object the improvement of 
agriculture and rural life; and it aids in every way possible in making 
effective the regulatory work and other measures instituted by the State 
Board of Agriculture. 

The Extension Service is gradually developing activities in the general 
adult educational field. 



86 



^ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

T. H. Taliaferro, Dean, 

The College of Arts and Sciences provides four years of liberal train- 
iriR in biological sciences, economics and finance, history, languages 
and literatures, mathematics, philosophy, physical sciences, political sci- 
ence, psychology, and sociology. It thus affords an opportunity to ac- 
nu '; a general education which shall serve as a foundation for success in 
whatever profession or vocation the student may choose. In particular it 
prepares the ground and lays the foundation for the learned professions 
of law, medicine, theology, and teaching, and even the more technical prof es- 
sions of engineering, public health service, and business administration. 
Through the aid which it furnishes other colleges of the University it ^ms 
to give the students of these colleges the outlook necessary for liberal 
culture and for public service. 

Divisions 

The College of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower Division 
and three Upper Divisions. Under the latter are grouped the various de- 
partments as follows: (1) The Division of humanities: Cassical Lan- 
guages, Comparative Literature, English Literature and Phi ology Modern 
Languages, Music, Philosophy, and Speech; (2) The Division of Natural 
Sciences: Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Zoology and associ- 
ated departments in other colleges of the University such as Bacteriology, 
Botany, and Entomology; (3) The Division of Social Sciences: Business Ad- 
ministration. Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, 
and associated departments in other colleges. ^ . a ^ a - ^ fV^oiV 

These Upper Divisions direct the courses of study of students doing their 
major work in departments of the College of Arts and Sciences, and desig- 
nate minimum requirements, the fulfillment of which is necessary to qualify 
a student for admission to major work in each Upper Division. 

Requirements for Admission 
The requirements for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences are 
in general the same as those for admission to the other colleges and schools 
of the University. See Section I, Entrance. ^ 

For admission to the pre-medical curriculum, two years of any one foreign 
language in addition to the regularly prescribed units are reqmred^ A 
detailed statement of the requirements for admission to the School of Medi^ 
cine and the relation of these to the pre-medical curriculum will be found 
under the heading School of Medicine. 

Students With Advanced Standing 
Students entering the junior year of the College of Arts and Sciences 
with advanced standing from other accredited universities or from other 

87 



colleges of this university must meet the requirements of the first two years 
to the extent of their deficiencies in credits in Arts and Sciences. Scholar- 
ship requirements as outlined in Section I of this catalogue will apply 
to all courses offered for advanced standing. 

Electives in Other Colleges and Schools 

A limited number of courses may be counted for credit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences for work done in other colleges and schools of the 
University. 

The number of semester hours accepted from the various colleges is as 
follows : 

College of Agriculture — Fifteen.* 

College of Education — Twenty. 

College of Engineering — Fifteen. 

College of Home Economics — Fifteen. 

School of Law — In the combined program the first year of law must be 
completed. 

School of Medicine — In the combined program the first year of medicine 
must be completed. i 

School of Nursing — Three years in combined program. 

Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the prescribed con- 
ditions for degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences are Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts and Sciences may be 
conferred upon a student who has satisfied all entrance requirements and has 
secured a minimum of 120 semester credit hours not including the six credit 
hours of basic military science required of all able-bodied men students, or 
the six credit hours of physical education for women and for such men as 
are excused from military science. Of these 120 academic credits 60 are to 
be acquired in the Lower Division and 60 in the Upper Division. 

Graduates of this college who have completed the regular course are 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts, except that, upon request, any 
student who has met the requirements for that degree may be awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, provided the major portion of the work has 
been done in the field of science, and the application has the approval of the 
department in science in which the major work has been carried. Students 
who have elected the combined program of Arts and Medicine may be 
granted the degree of Bachelor of Science after the completion of at 
least three years of the work of this college and the first year of the 
School of Medicine. Those electing the combined five-year Academic and 
Nursing Course, for which the degree of Bachelor of Science may be 



awarded upon the completion of the full course, must take the Pre- 
Nursing curriculum at College Park before the Nursing Course in Baltimore. 
Those taking the combined course in Arts and Law may be awarded the 
Bachelor of Arts degree after the completion of three years of the work 
of this college and one year of full-time law course, or its equivalent, in 
the School of Law. 

In the regular course and in all the combined programs the last thirty 
credit hours of courses in the Arts and Sciences must be completed in 
residence at College Park, or under members of the faculty of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Student Responsibility 

The individual student will be held responsible for the selection of the 
courses and the major in conformity with the regulations of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. The student will also be held responsible for a knowledge 
of the general Academic Regulations, 

THE LOWER DIVISION 

The work of the first two years in the College of Arts and Sciences 
is designed to give the student a basic general education, and to prepare 
him for specialization in the junior and senior years. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop in these years such proficiency 
in basic subjects as may be necessary for his admission into one of the 
Upper Divisions of the College. Personal aptitudes and a general scholastic 
ability must also be demonstrated in these two years if permission to pursue 
a major study is desired. 

Suggested courses of study for the freshman and sophomore years are 
given under each of the Divisions. The student should follow the curriculum 
for which he is believed to be best fitted. It will be noted that there is a 
great deal of similarity in these outlines for the freshman and sophomore 
years, and a student not taking a special curriculum need not consider him- 
self attached to any particular Division until the beginning of the junior 
year, at which time it is necessary to select a major. 

The work of this Division is under the direction of the Dean and the 
Chairman of the Lower Division. 



♦students electing botany, bacteriology, or entomology as the major field are not limited 
to fifteen hours. 

88 



89 



Typical Freshman Program 



t Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

*Foreign Language 3 

Science (Physical or Biological) - „ 3-4 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly 

or 2y and 4y) , 1 

JElect six to seven credits from the following: 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) „ 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 

General European History (H. ly) _ 

History of England and Greater Britain (H. 3y) 

Mathematics (Math. 8f, llf and 14s or 10s, 12f and 15s „ 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If or s) 

Library Methods (L. S. If or s) „... 

State Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) 

Freshman Lectures „.... 



Semester 
I II 

3 
3 
3-4 



6-7 6-7 



Total - 16-18 1^18 



Typical Sophomore Program 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 

Foreign Language . 

R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 
or 6y and 8y ) ^ 

General Electives from the College of Arts and Sciences, of 
which not more than three hours per semester may be 
taken in the Humanities J 

Total - _ l._ 

Normal Load 



3 
3 



3 
3 



9-10 9-10 



17-18 17-18 



The normal load for the freshman year is seventeen credit hours each 
semester. This includes one hour of basic military science or physical edu- 
cation. The normal load for the sophomore year is seventeen credit hours 
per semester, two hours of which are military science or physical educa- 
tion. 



tA placement test is given during Freshman Week to determine whether the student is 
adequately prepared for Eng. ly. Students failing this are required to take Eng. lA. 
a one-semester course, without credit. After five weeks, students may be transferred from 
lA to ly, for which they will receive full credit, or from ly to lA, according to their dem- 
onstrated ability. 

♦Students who offer two units of a foreign language for entrance, but who because of 
inadequate preparation register for the first year of the subject, will receive only one- 
half credit. 

JThe choice should be in accordance with the special requirements of the Upper Division 
which the student may design to enter. 

90 



I 



i 

I 



In no case shall the load in the freshman and sophomore years exceed 
eighteen credit hours, except for sophomore students whose average grade 
is B or above for the preceding year at this university. With the approval 
of the Dean these honor students may be permitted to carry a maximum of 
nineteen credit hours. 

Advisers in the Lower Division 

Each student is assigned to a member of the faculty who will act as his 
personal adviser, assisting him in the selection of his courses and the ar- 
rangement of his schedule, and in any other matters on which he may need 
assistance or advice. Students are expected to report to the advisers at 
periodic intervals for conferences. 

Number of Credits and Quality of Work Required for Advancement 

to the Upper Divisions 

A student must acquire at least fifty-eight semester credits, exclusive 
of military science, with an average grade of C, in this division, before being 
admitted to an advanced division. The average grade in subjects taken in 
the major department desired must be C or better. 

THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division consists of the departments of Classical Languages, Com- 
parative Literature, English Literature and Philology, Modem Languages, 
Music, Philosophy, and Speechv It has charge of students who elect major 
work in English or Modem Languages, and also may provide minors for 
students who take their major work in other Divisions or Colleges. Stu- 
dents are assigned to the Division when they have successfully met divi- 
sional requirements for junior standing. 

Requirements for Entering the Division of Humanities 

A student is eligible to enter his major or minor work in the Division of 
Humanities when he has fifty-eight semester credit hours of academic work 
(exclusive of physical education or military science) to his credit, with an 
average of C or above. He must also have an average as high as C in his 
major department. 

The following minimum requirements should be completed, as far as 
possible, before the beginning of the junior year, and must be completed 
before graduation: 



91 



\ 



I. 

II. 
III. 



hours 
Military Science or Physical Education 6 

Library Science > „ 1 

A. Division of Humanities: 

1. English and Speech 14 

English ly 

English 2f and 3 s 
Speech ly 

2. Modern Languages (12) * 

(see note below)* 

3. Philosophy 3 

B. Division of Social Sciences 15 

(Three hours must be in psychology.) 

C. Division of Natural Sciences „ 12 

(At least one complete year of a natural science 
must be included.) 

Major and Minor Requirements 

< 

At the beginning of the junior year, each student must select a major in 
one of the fields indicated below, and before graduation must complete one 
major and one minor. The courses constituting the major and the minor 
must conform to the requirements of the department in which the major 
work is done. A minimum of 126 hours, of which a minimum of 60 hcMrs 
must be completed in the junior and senior years, shall be completed before 
the Division will recommend a student for graduation. The average of 
work taken in the major field must be as high as C. 



Fields 



** Classical Languages 
fComparative Literature 
English 
French 
German 



**Music 
tPhilosophy 
** Speech 
Spanish 



♦To be accepted unconditionally in the Division of Humanities, a student must have at- 
tained a reasonable proficiency in at least one modern foreign language, and in any case, 
he must give proof of this proficiency before graduation. In order to satisfy this require- 
ment, the grade of C or better must be obtained in one of the general language examina- 
tions which are given during the first and last days of each school year. The student must 
show in this examination that he has reached the level of attainment to be expected 
after two years of a college language course: (1) that he can translate with reasonable 
accuracy; (2) that his pronunciation is approximately correct; (3) that he is acquainted with 
the elements of grammar. The student may elect to take this examination whenever he 
wishes, and when he passes it, he will have satisfied requirement III.A.2 above ; but in no 
case will a student in the Division of Humanities be graduated who has not had at least 
6 semester hours of modem language work in college. 

fNot available at present for a major. 
♦* Not available at present for a major or a minor. 



A major shall consist of not fewer than 20 nor more than 40 semester credit 
hours in one of these fields of study, in addition to courses listed in the 
schedule of minimum requirements above. At least 16 of these hours shall 
be taken in courses listed for advanced undergrad^iates and graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 12 nor more than 24 semester 
credit hours in one of these fields of study (or in fields of study in the Divi- 
sion of Natural Sciences, the Division of Social Sciences, or the College of 
Education) in addition to courses listed in the schedule of minimum require- 
ments above. At least 9 of these hours shall be taken in courses listed for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. 

Students in this Division may combine philosophy and psychology to 
fonn a minor; or combine courses offered by the various departments in 
the Division of Natural Sciences. 

General Regulations 

In addition to the special requirements of the Division and the major 
department, the student must satisfy the general requirements of the Uni- 
versity. See pages 49-50. Attention is also called to the separate pamphlet 
entitled Academic Regulations. 

Advisers 

The student shall consider the head of his major department his special 
adviser, and shall consult him about the arrangement of his schedule and 
any other matters in which he may need advice. The Chairman of the 
Division shall determine each student's load, in conformity with the regula- 
tions of the Division. 

Normal Load 

The normal load in the junior and senior years shall be 15 hours per 
semester. With the permission of the Chairman of the Division, the load 
may be increased to 17 hours, an absolute maximum except for honor 
students. The load of honor students shall lie within the discretion of the 
Division, which shall pass on each case individually. 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Natural Sciences is composed of the departments of 
Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, and Zoology of the College of 
Arts and Sciences, and the associated departments of Bacteriology, Botany, 
and Entomology in other colleges of the University. 

Since a knowledge of natural science is deemed essential to any well- 
rounded education, all students in the University are required to pursue at 
least one year's study in one or more of its fields. In its curricula, each 
requiring four years for completion, this Division prepares students for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. Its graduates are prepared to occupy posi- 



92 



93 



tions as bacteriologists, botanists, chemists, entomologists, mathematicians, 
physicists, zoologists, in commercial laboratories, employees in various 
branches of the Government service, patent examiners, technical salesmen, 
instructors in high schools and colleges, and as teachers or research assist- 
ants in universities. Students in the scientific pre-professional curricula 
are prepared for entrance to colleges of dentistry, medicine, and nursing. 

The sciences have so grown and their applications have become so 
extensive that it is impossible to deal with all phases of any one of them 
in the four years of college study. For this reason a vital part of the work 
of the Division is in the form of graduate courses. In the work leading 
towards the Degree of Master of Science the student is to become acquainted 
with the general aspects of his chosen field. In preparation for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy the student is trained in methods of research which 
should enable him to add to human knowledge, undertake independent inves- 
tigation in his science, or take charge of industrial developments. Courses 
for undergraduates and graduates in this division are described in another 
part of this catalogue. 

Specific Requirements 

Requirements for Entering the Division of Natural Sciences 

A student is eligible to enter his major or minor work in the Division 
when he has obtained fifty-eight semester hours of academic work (exclusive 
of physical education or military science) to his credit, with an average 
grade of C. He must also have an average as high as C in his major depart- 
ment. This rule applies also to students following special curricula in any 
of the science outlines. 

The following minimum requirements should be completed, as far as 
possible, before the beginning of the junior year, and must be completed 
before graduation. 

A, A student selecting his curriculum in this Division must complete a 
minimum of 126 credits (including the basic requirements in military science 
or physical education), in accordance with the requirements listed below, 
(B), (C), (D). 

B. Specific Minimum Requirements. 

Each student must fulfill from the following groups 6G semester credits 
of work, as specified in each group. 

1. English and Speech, 14 semester hours. This must include the required 
course in Survey and Composition I and two hours of Speech. 

2. Foreign Languages and Literature, 12 semester hours (or equivalent) 
in one language. In satisfaction of this requirement, college credit of 6 
semester hours is allowed for two units of credit in any one language 
offered for entrance. At least a year of scientific reading in the language 
must be included. 

3. Economics, Education, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology, 12 semester hours. 

94 



4. Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, 25 semester hours. 
These shall include Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Biology. 

This requirement may be modified for General Science students to include 
any two of the four basic sciences, and electives taken in the Humanities 
and the Social Sciences. 

5. Military Science or Physical Education, 6 semester hours. 

C. Major and Minor Requirements. 

At the beginning of the junior year, the general science student must 
select a major in one of the fields of study offered by the Division, and a 
minor in some related field. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the specific requirements, of no fewer 
than 16 nor more than 24 semester hours in the field of study selected. At 
least 8 of these hours must be in courses offered for advanced students, 
or courses in the 100 group. 

In addition to the specific requirements, a minor shall consist of no fewer 
than 8 nor more than 18 semester hours in another field of study. At least 
6 of these credit hours must be in the 100 group. 

Not more than 15 semester hours may be taken in any field of study 
other than the major or minor in addition to the specific requirements. 

General Requirements 

In addition to the special requirements of the Division and the major 
department, the student must satisfy the general requirements of the Univer- 
sity. See pages 49-50. Attention is also called to the separate pamphlet 
entitled Academic Regulations. 

Advisers 

The student must consider the head of his major department his special 
adviser, and shall consult him about the arrangement of his outline of 
courses and any other matters in which he may need advice. 

Normal Load 

The normal load in the junior and senior years shall be 15 hours per 
semester. With the permission of the Chairman of the Division, the load 
may be increased to 17 hours, ah absolute maximum except for honor 
students. The load of honor students shall lie within the discretion of the 
Division, which shall pass on each case individually. 

FIELDS OF STUDY 
Bacteriology 

Bacteriology offers training in general, pathogenic, dairy, and sanitary 
bacteriology, and prepares students for positions in federal, state, public 
health, research, and commercial bacteriological laboratories. For the four 
year outline of study in Bacteriology, see College of Agriculture, page 7L 

95 



Botany 

Botany offers students an opportunity for training for positions as 
teachers, and investigational workers in state or governmental experiment 
stations, for governmental inspection work, or for the various vocations 
involving botanical applications. For the four year outline of study in 
Botany, sea College of Agriculture, page 72. 

Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry includes Agricultural, Analytical, Industrial, 
Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry, together with the State Control 
Work. 

Courses in these branches of Chemistry are arranged with a view to 
contributing toward the liberal education of the student in Arts and Sciences; 
the laying of the scientific foundation necessary for the professions of 
medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, engineering, and agriculture; and the training 
of students for careers in chemistry. 

Curricula 

It should be noted that the chemistry curricula hereinafter outlined are 
designed to insure adequate instruction in the fundamentals of chemistry, 
as well as to meet the specific requirements of the Division. At the same 
time, it has been considered desirable to preserve as high a degree of flexi- 
bility as possible, in order to afford the student who has a definite end 
in view as regards chemistry an opportunity to fit his course to his actual 
needs. In general it may be said that the curricula offered prepare students 
to enter the following fields: 

1. General Chemistry: Here the student is offered a liberal selection of 
subjects in the arts and sciences. Through cooperation with the College of 
Education, he may so supplement this basic outline with work in Education 
as to meet the requirements for the State high school teacher's certificate. 
To prepare for college teaching, one requires graduate study leading to a 
higher degree. 

2. Industrial Chemistry: If the student wishes to prepare himself for 
the chemical industry or, by further study, chemical engineering, he will 
elect mechanical drawing in the first year, and advanced mathematics and 
physics and industrial chemistry in the third and fourth years. 

3. Biological Chemistry (Agricultural Chemistry) : The object of this 
curriculum is to provide training for students desiring to prepare for the 
application of chemistry in the fields of agriculture and biology. This is 
accomplished by electing zoology and botany in the first year and additional 
courses in biology and physiological chemistry in the third and fourth years. 

4. Chemical Research: Preparation for research and graduate study in 
chemistry is also based upon the preceding curricula. For advanced study, it 
is advisable that election be made largely from courses in chemistry and the 
allied sciences. The graduate outline offered by the Department of Chem- 
istry is found in detail fn the catalogue of the Graduate School. 

96 



The Chemistry Curriculum 
Outline Suggested 



Semester 
I II 



Freshman Year 



Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

French or German (French ly or German ly). 

College Algebra and Analytic Geometry (Math, llf and 14s )..^-.. 

General Chemistry ( Chem. ly ) . — - 

Electives - - — — 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. ly 

or 2y and 4y ) - — — 

Freshman Lectures - 



3 
3 
3 
4 

4 



18 



Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) ^ 

Scientific French or German (French 3y or German 3y). 3 

i_/alcuius ( jyiaLn. J. oy ) ................._...._ ...~ „„..«..............^......— ..~..~»...— ~— 

Qualitative Analysis ( Chem. 2y ) - — 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Ay and 8By) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 
or 6y and 8y ) - - — 2 



18 



Junior Year 



Quantitative Analysis (CJhem. 6y) - -... 4 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Chem. 116y and 117y) 3 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) - — — 5 

Electives (Arts and Sciences or Education) - 3 



15 



Senior Year 



Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102y) 5 

Electives (Arts and Sciences or Education) _.... ~ 10 



15 



Ehitomology 



3 
3 
3 

4 
4 



18 



3 


8 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


8 


3 


3 


1 


1 



18 

4 
3 
5 
8 

15 

6 

10 

15 



This department offers training in entomology for future work in pest 
control, and in the preparation of technically trained entomologists. For 
the four year outline of study in entomology see College of Agriculture, 
page 76. 



97 



General Science 

For the benefit of such students as desire a general basic knowledge of 
the natural sciences without immediate specialization in any one of them, 
a general curriculum may be arranged. 

By a proper selection of electives a student upon completion of the course 
would be eligible to pursue graduate work in any department of the Division. 

If electives be ptoperly chosen in the educational field, a prospective 
teacher of general science or of any of the specific sciences included in the 
Division may obtain a state teacher's certificate, and in turn be prepared to 
pursue graduate work in Education. 

Mathematics 

The department of Mathematics offers a curriculum of study based on 
the recognition of four distinct categories of students to whom mathematics 
is taught: 

A. To students who regard mathematics as but a part of the cultural 
equipment acquired in college, who have little or no interest in the technical 
aspects of the subject, but desire to know the place which mathematics 
occupies in the general scheme of things, the department offers an orienta- 
tion course in mathematics (Math. 10s). Courses lllf and 112s have also 
been devised to meet such requirements. 

B. To students who need a rudimentary knowledge of mathematics in 
order that they may understand its application to such fields as physics, 
thermodynamics, statistics, etc., the department offers basic courses in 
algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. 

C. To prospective engineers, industrial chemists, statisticians, and others 
who have chosen professions where mathematics is an indispensable aid to 
design and research, the department, in addition to the basic work outlined 
above, offers courses in calculus, pure and applied, and elementary differen- 
tial equations. Moreover, such students, upon completion of these basic 
studies, will be equipped to enter many of the advanced special courses listed 
elsewhere in this catalogue. 

D. Finally, there are students who have chosen mathematics for a career 
vnth the view either of teaching the subject or of engaging in mathematical 
investigation. The department has designed for such students a compre- 
hensive curriculum of study, leading towards the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts and Master of Arts. Prospective candidates for such degrees will be 
expected to acquire during their college career a well balanced education; 
they are, therefore, urged to apply as early as possible to the head of the 
department for a comprehensive outline of study. A typical schedule of 
the kind is the following: 



98 



The Mathematics Curriculum 

Outline Suggested Semester 

Freshman Year I 11 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

French or German (French ly or German ly) „ 3 3 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

llf, 12f, 14s, and 15s) _ _ 4 4 

Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (Math. 18y).. 1 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _.„. „ 4 4 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. 

Freshman Lectures _ — — 



16 



16 



Sophomore Year 



Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) _ 3 

French or German (French 3y or German 3y) 3 

Calculus (Math. 16y and 17y) _ 4 

Advanced Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (Math. 19y) 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) _ 5 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 3y 

or 6y and 8y) _ „ „ 2 



3 
3 
4 
1 
5 



18 



Junior Year 



18 



Plane Curves (Math. 125f) _ 2 

Advanced Topics in Calculus (Math. 127f) 2 

History of Mathematics (Math. 122s) _ — 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 128s) _ - — 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102 Ay) _ 3 

Advanced Physics (Phys. 106s or 108s) - — 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ 1 

Biology - _ '.. 3 

Electives (History, Sociology, or Economics) » 4 

15 

Senior Year 

Electives (Mathematics and Astronomy) _. 4 

Seminar and Dissertation (Math. 140y) 1 

Advanced Physics (Phys. 109y) 3 

Education (Ed. Psych. If, and Ed. 5s and 6s) 2 

Electives (Philosophy, Logic, etc.) _ 5 



2 
2 

3 
3 

1 



15 

4 
1 
3 
3 

4 



15 



15 



99 



Physics 

The courses in Physics are designed to provide the Arts student with a 
knowledge of the basic principles of his physical world and an insight to the 
functioning of a quantitative science; to lay some of the scientific foundation 
for the structures of dentistry, engineering, home economics, medicine, 
pharmacy, etc.; to prepare prospective teachers and instructors for high 
schools and colleges; to train students, specifically interested in physics, 
for positions in experimental and research physical laboratories (collegiate, 
governmental, and industrial). 

The curriculum given here is intended for the student who, on entering 
the University, has chosen to do his major work in physics. Any student 
completing this curriculum will be prepared for graduate study in physics, 
or, by a proper selection of the electives in his senior year, for graduate 
work in chemistry or mathematics. 

If the electives in the senior year be chosen in the Education field, the 
student can meet the requirements for the state high school teacher's cer- 
tificate, and, with additional graduate work in Education, be eligible for a 
Master's degree in Education. 

Students who have met the specific requirements in chemistry, mathe- 
matics, and physics as outlined in Group B-3, and have completed calculus 
and plane analytic geometry (Math. 5y) may, with the consent of the head 
of the department, on the completion of such additional work as may be 
deemed individually necessary, select a major in physics. 

Students desiring some knowledge of advanced physics from a liberal 
education point of view may elect Phys. 103y. 



The Physics Curriculum 
Outline Suggested 



Semester 
I II 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 3 

French or German (French ly or German ly) - 3 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

llf, 12f, 14s and 15s) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ - 4 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. ly) ^ 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) _ 1 

Freshman Lectures — 



16 



3 
3 

4 
4 
1 



y 

I 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 

Scientific French or German (French 3y or German 3y) — 

Calculus (Math. 16y and 17y) 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) •"• 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I.^2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) - — 



3 
3 
4 
5 
1 



3 
3 
4 
5 
1 



18 



18 



Junior Year 

4 
Electives 

Advanced Topics in Calculus (Math. 127f ) ~ - - 2 

Advanced Differential Equations (Math. 128s) ~ - — 

Advanced Physics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 109y) - 6 

Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 2y) -.... ^ 

Elective in Biology - - 

15 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry (Chem. 102Ay) - - ^ 

Advanced Physics (Phys. lOlf, 102s, 105f, 109y) -- - 3 

Elective - ~ 



15 



2 
3 
8 
3 

15 

3 
3 
9 

15 



Zoology 



The curriculum of the department of Zoology is designed to meet two 
general needs: cultural and professional. 

Zoology, a life science, has a cultural value for those who wish to under- 
stand the living world and man's relation to it. It provides the fundamental 
training in biology necessary for future study in the fields of medicme, 
dentistry, and nursing; and provides the background for an understandmg 
of the human body and its activities. ^ . 4. 

With the selection of certain courses in the College of Education, a student 
whose major is zoology may obtain a state teacher's certificate, qualifying 
him to teach in secondary schools of Maryland. 

The subject matter of certain courses is of a character which qualifies 
the student for service in the several biological bureaus of the United 
States Government or the biological departments of Maryland and other 

states. - , ,, 

The courses offered for graduates thoroughly ground the student m the 
methods of teaching and research in vertebrate morphology, physiology, 
hydrobiology, and ecology, with special reference to marine biology. r>epart- 
mental facilities for the latter work are supplemented by those of the 
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. (See page 299.) 



100 



101 



The Zoology Curriculum 

Outline Suggested Semester 

Freshman Year j jj 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) , 4 __ 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) _ 1177 — 4 

General Botany (Bot. If and 2s) '. _ 4 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry (Math. 

llf and 14s) g o 

French or German (French ly or German ly) 3 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) „ _ ^ 1 

Freshman Lectures . 

- " — ~ — — 

Sophomore Year ^^ ^^ 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f) ^ 3 _ 

Vertebrate Embryology (Zool. 20s) ZZIII — 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) _ IIZI""" 4 4 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) IIIZZII" 3 3 

Scientific French or German (French 3y and German 3y)"I. . 3 3 

Electives _ „_ 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phyl 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Comparative Embryology (Zool. lOOf) _ 3 

Invertebrate Zoology (Zool. 108f) ~ZZ1 3 

Vertebrate Zoology (Zool. 109s) IIZZI — 3 

Animal Genetics (Zool. 120f) 3 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ „ .I..IZ 4 4 

Electives , 2 R 

cr . 15 15 

Senior Year 

Journal Club (Zool. 106f and 107s) _ ^ 1 j^ 

General Animal Physiology (Zool. 103f and 104s) 3 3 

Electives 21 1 1 



15 



15 



Those who intend to qualify for the teacher^s certificate must elect Ed. 
2f and 3s in the sophomore year and elect 16 additional hours during 
the junior and senior years in courses prescribed by the College of Education. 



102 



THE PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Fre-Medical 

The minimum requirement for admission to the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland is two years of academic training in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. The subjects prescribed by the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association are covered in the first two 
years of the Pre-Medical Curriculum. In view of the fact, however, that 
at least five times as many students, most of whom have a baccalaureate 
degree, apply for admission to the School of Medicine of the University 
as can be accommodated, students are strongly urged to complete the full 
three-year curriculum before making application for entrance. 

Preference will be given students requesting entrance to the School of 
Medicine of the University who present the credits obtained by the successful 
completion of the three-year curriculum or its equivalent of 96 semester 
hours. For recommendation by the Pre-Medical Committee, a student must 
complete the curriculum with an average grade of B or above, and must 
also satisfy the Committee that he is qualified by character and scholarship 
to enter the medical profession. Only in exceptional cases will students 
who have been less than two years in residence at College Park be recom- 
mended for admission to the School of Medicine. 

Another advantage the three-year curriculum offers over the minimum 
requirement of 67 hours is, that the students who successfully complete 
this program may, on the recommendation of the Dean of the School of 
Medicine, be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science after the completion 
of the first yearns work in the Medical School. This combined program 
of seven years leads to the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon the comple- 
tion of the full course. The first three years are taken in residence at CJollege 
Park, and the last four in Baltimore in the School of Medicine. At least two 
years of residence at College Park is necessary for students transferring 
from other colleges and universities who wish to become candidates for the 
combined degrees. 

For requirements for admission see Section I, Entrance. 

The Curriculum Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) -.... 3 3 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s or llf and 14s) _... 3 3 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) - — 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) -. - 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - — 1 1 

Freshman Lectures _ ~ ~ — — 



16 



103 



16 



Sophomore Year 

General Physics (Phys. ly) „ - 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8Av and 8By) 

French or German „ [ 

Animal Histology (Zool. 12f) _ 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 3f and 4s) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) „ 2 

Junior Year 

Rural Sociology ( Soc. lOlf ) „ 2 

Urban Sociology (Soc. 102s) _ — 

Elementary Physical Chemistry (Chem. lOy) 3 

Electives: General Bacteriology (Bact. If or s), Quantitative 
Analysis (Chem. 4f or s), General Physiological Chem- 
istry (Chem. 108s), Zoology. 4 

Electives (Humanities and Social Sciences) ^ 6 



Semester 


I 


// 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


— 


3 


3 


3 



18 

2 
3 



4 
6 



Senior Year 
The curriculum of the first year of the School of Medicine. The student 
also may elect the fourth year's work from advanced courses offered in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. In either case the Specific Requirements 
of the Division of Natural Sciences for graduation must have been met. 

Pre- Dental 

Students entering the College of Arts and Sciences desiring to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistry are offered the following two-year 
outline, which meets the pre-dental requirements of the American Associa- 
tion of Dental Colleges. This outline can also be used by the student if he 
desires to continue his college training and complete work for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. 

The Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) ^ 1 1 

Mathematics (Math. 8f and 10s or llf and 14s) _.... 3 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) „ 4 4 

Invertebrate Morphology (Zool. 3f) - 4 — 

Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (Zool. 4s) _ _ — 4 

Drawing . — _ _ - 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) - „ 1 1 

Freshman Lectures -.... - — — 



104 



17 



17 



Semester 



Sophomore Year 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 Ay) - 

Elementary Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8By) 

General Physics ( Phys. ly ) 

Electives (Social Sciences and Arts) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) - ~ 

French or German -..- ■ - 



/ 
2 
1 

4 
5 

2 
3 

17 



// 
2 
1 

4 
5 

2 
3 

17 



Five-Year Combined Arts and Nursing Curriculum 

The first two years of this course are taken in the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park. If students enter this combined program with 
advanced standing, at least the second full year of the course must be com- 
pleted in College Park. This course is prerequisite, and cannot be taken 
after the Diploma in Nursing is granted. 

The remaining three years are taken in the School of Nursing in Balti- 
more or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. In addition 
to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of Bachelor of Science may, upon 
the recommendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be granted 
at the end of the five-year course. Full details regarding this course may 
be found in the section of the catalogue dealing with the School of Nursing. 



The Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 

Foreign Language ~ - ^ 

General Chemistry ( Chem. ly ) - 4 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 1 

History (H. ly, 2y, or 3y) 3 

State Government (Pol. Sci. 4s) - — 

Library Methods (L. S. If) - 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) ^ — 1 

Freshman Lectures — ~ - 

16 

Sophomore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 2 

Principles of Sociology (Soc. If) ^ 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) — 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — — 

General Bacteriology (Bact. lAs) — 

General Zoology (Zool. If) - --- ^ 



3 
3 
4 
1 
3 
2 



17 



3 
3 
2 



105 



Senuester 

I n 

Foods (H. E. Sly) 3 3 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f) 3 — 

Child Nutrition (H. E. 136s) — 2 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) -. 2 2 



17 



17 



THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

This Division has charge of students who elect their major work in the 
departments of Economics and Business Administration, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, and Sociology. It also provides minor courses of study 
for students who take major work in this or other Divisions or Colleges. 

Requirements for Entering the Division of Social Sciences 

A student becomes eligible to do major or minor work in the Division 
of Social Sciences when he has fifty-eight semester hours of academic work 
(exclusive of military science or physical education) with an average of C or 
above. He must also have an average as high as C in the field which he 
selects for his major work. 



Major and Minor Requirements 

At the beginning of the junior year students entering the social sciences 
must select a major from one of the fields indicated below. The minor 
may be selected from any field in the College of Arts and Sciences or the 
College of Education. 



Fields 



Accounting and Finance 

Economics 

History 



Political Science 
* Psychology 
Sociology 



A major shall consist of not fewer than 18 semester hours in one of the 
above fields of study. At least 10 of these hours must be in the courses listed 
for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. 

A minor shall consist of not fewer than 10 semester hours in one of 
the above fields of study, or in any field of study in the College of Arts 
and Sciences or in the College of Education. At least 6 of the hours must 
be in courses listed for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. The 
courses constituting the minor must conform to the requirements of the 
department in which the major work is done. 



♦Psychology may be chosen for minor work, or combined with Philosophy to form a 
major. 

106 



General Requirements 

A. Military Science or Physical Education, six hours. 

B. General Division Requirements: 

I. Humanities (English, Foreign Languages and Literature, Philos- 
ophy, and Speech.) 

1. English and Speech — 14 semester hours. These courses must 
include the required course in Survey and Composition I and 
two hours in Speech. 

2. Foreign Languages and Literature — 12 semester hours (or 
equivalent) in any one language. In satisfaction of this re- 
quirement, college credit of 6 semester hours will be allowed 
for two units of credit in any one language offered for 
entrance. 

II. Biological and Physical Sciences (Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, 
Physics, and Zoology.) 

A minimum requirement of 12 semester hours in this group. 

III. Social Sciences (Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, 
and Sociology.) 

A minimum requirement of 12 semester hours in this group. 

At least 126 semester hours are required for graduation. 

Advisers 

The student shall consider the head of his major department his special 
adviser, and shall consult him about the arrangement of his schedule and 
any other matters in which he needs advice. In making out schedules the 
adviser is expected to limit the number of hours to a maximum of sixteen 
per semester, with fifteen hours considered as a normal load. With the 
permission of the division as a whole, the load may, in exceptional cases, 
be increased to eighteen hours in a given semester. The maximum amount 
of work to be carried by an honor student shall be determined by the divi- 
sion, which shall pass on each individual case. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The aim of these curricula is to afford those who have chosen business 
as a career a training in the general principles of business, because men 
who seek advancement must be broadly trained and not merely drilled in 
specific routine. Both curricula combine a program of cultural development 
with the valuable mental discipline involved in a study of the best business 
methods and technic. Curriculum I is provided to meet the needs of students 
who desire a general training; but for students who seek more highly 
specialized work in accounting and finance. Curriculum II is suggested. 

107 



Curriculum I 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Ck)mposition I (Eng. ly) - 3 3 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Zoology) „ 4 4 

Modern Language _ 3 3 

Algebra (Math. 8f or llf) 3 — 

. Economic Geography and Industry (Econ. If) 3 — 

History of World Commerce (Econ. 2s) — 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) — 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) ....- _ 1 l 

Freshman Lectures — — 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 

American History (H. 2y) 3 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) _ 3 3 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f ) _ 3 — 

Business English (Eng. 4s) — 2 

Principles of Accounting (A. and F. 9y) 4 4 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) _ 2 — 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) „ — 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) -.. 2 2 

17 17 
Junior Year 

Experimental Psychology (Psych. 102f) 3 — 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) 3 3 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) _ _ 2 — 

Banking (Econ. 102s) — 2 

Inland Transportation (Econ. 112s) — 3 

Mathematical Theory of Investment (Math. lOlf) 3 — 

Elements of Statistics. (Gen. 114s)..!..- _ : — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ _ 1 1 

♦Electives _ - 3 3 

Senior Year 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103f) 2 — 

Investments (A. and F. 104s) — 3 

Insurance (Econ. 105f) 2 — 

Public Finance (Econ. 114s) „ — 3 

Public Utilities (Econ. 113f) _ 2 — 

Personnel Management (A. and F. 106s) ....„ — 1 

Extempore Speaking (Speech 7f) - 1 — 

♦Electives _ - 8 8 

15 15 

*Electives must be chosen first to fulfill the common requirements for graduation. At 
least 6 hours each year must be elected from Accounting and Finance or Economics. 

108 



I 



: 



Curriculum II 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Science (Botany, Chemistry, Zoology) „ 

A^ flj^t^LJX c^ I xTXd vXX* OJL v/X J. ^X ? •••••«••.••*•••.*••••■•■•••••«••••»••••>••*••••#-•••••••->•••-••••••••••••••••••••••-••••••••-•>*-• 

Economic Geography and Industry (Econ. If) - 

History of World Commerce (Econ. 2s) 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. Is) — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
ly or 2y and 4y) — 

Sophomore Year 

American History (H. 2y ) — 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) ..~ 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f) 

Principles of Accounting (A. and F. 9y) - 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) -.... 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) _ - 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y or 6y and 8y) .- 



Junior Year 

Experimental Psychology (Psych. 102f) _ 

Business Law (A. and F. 107y) 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf). — - 

Banking (Econ. 102s) 

Advanced Accounting (A. and F. llOy) _ 

Auditing (A. and F. 126s) 

Mathematical Theory of Investment (Math. lOlf ). 

Elements of Statistics (Gen. 114s) _ 

Personnel Management (A. and F. 106s) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 



Semester 



I 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



17 



Senior Year 

Corporation Finance (Econ. 103f) 

Investments (A. and F. 104s) 

Cost Accounting (A. and F. 121f and 122s). 

Income Tax Accounting (A. and F. 124s) 

Public Utilities (Econ. 113f) „ 

Insurance (Econ. I05f) ~ 

*Electives - - - 



♦Electives must be chosen first to fulfill the common requirements for graduation. 

109 



// 
3 
4 
3 



3 
3 



17 



3 


3 


8 


3 


3 


— 


— 


2 


4 


4 


2 


— 


— 


3 


2 


2 


17 


17 


3 


— . 


3 


3 


2 


— 




2 


3 


3 




2 


3 


— 




3 




1 


1 


1 


15 


15 


2 


— 




3 


2 


2 


— . 


3 


2 


— 


2 


— 


7 


7 


15 


15 



COMBINED PROGRAM IN ARTS AND LAW 

The School of Law of the University requires two years of academic 
credit for admission to the school, or sixty semester hours of college credit. 

The University offers a combined program in Arts and Law, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Students pursuing 
this combined program will spend the first three years in the College of Arts 
and Sciences at College Park. During this period they will complete the 
prescribed curriculum in pre-legal studies as outlined below, and must com- 
plete the common Requirements for Graduation, as indicated elsewhere. If 
students enter the combined program with advanced standing, at least the 
third full year's work must be completed in residence at College Park. Upon 
the successful completion of one year of full-time law courses in the School 
of Law in Baltimore, the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be awarded on 
the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Law. The degree of 
Bachelor of Laws will be awarded upon the completion of the combined 
program. 

Semester 
I II 

Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 4-3 4-3 

History of England and Greater Britain (H. 3y) 3 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) _ 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y).... „ > 1 1 

Freshman Lectures _ _ — — 



16-17 16^17 

SophoTYiore Year 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) -.... 2 2 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 3 

American History (H. 2y) „ _ 3 3 

American National Government (Pol. Sci. If) 3 — 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. Is) _ — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

♦Electives _ 3 - 3 



17 



17 



♦Electives should be in English, history, Latin, or modern languages, economics or po- 
litical science, or some of the common requirements for graduation. 



110 



Junior Year 
Largely electives, including the completion of the General Requirements 
for Graduation as outlined on Page 107. 

Senior Year 

First year of regular law course. 

Students who are unable to take the combined program in Arts and Law 
may fulfill the entrance requirements of the School of Law by completing 
the first two years of pre-legal studies as outlined in the above combined 
course. 



Ill 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

WiLLARD S. Small, Dean. 

The College of Education is organized to meet the needs of the following 
classes of students: (1) undergraduates preparing to teach the cultural 
and the "Vjbcational studies in the high schools, preparatory schools, and 
vocational schools; (2) students who will enter higher institutions to pre- 
pare for work in specialized educational and institutional fields; (3) stu- 
dents preparing for educational work in the trades and industries; (4) 
students preparing to become county agents, home demonstrators, boys* 
and girls* club leaders, other extension workers, and social workers; (5) 
students whose major interest is in other fields, but who desire courses in 
education for their informational and cultural values; (6) advanced stu- 
dents preparing to become high school principals, elementary school prin- 
cipals, educational supervisors, attendance officers, and school administra- 
tors. 

The Summer Session, although organically distinct from the College of 
Education, is administered by the Dean of the College of Education, and is 
in effect an administrative division of the College. 



Departments 

The instructional work of the College of Education is conducted by the 
following functional divisions: History and Principles of Education, Educa- 
tional Psychology, Methods in High School Subjects, Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Home Economics Education, Industrial Education, Commercial Educa- 
tion, and Physical Education. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are in gen- 
eral the same as for the other colleges of the University. See Section I, 
Entrance. 

For additional requirements for admission to the curriculum in Agricul- 
tural Education, see page 120. 

Candidates for admission whose high school records are consistently low 
are strongly advised not to seek admission to the College of Education. 

Admission of Normal School Graduates 

Graduates of the two- and three-year curriculums of the Maryland Nor- 
mal Schools and other accredited normal schools whose scholastic records 
in the respective normal schools were satisfactory, will be admitted to 
advanced standing and classified provisionally in the appropriate classes. 
Graduates of the two-year normal school curriculum, in most cases, may 



112 



satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elemen- 
tary Education by attendance for two full college years; graduates of the 
three-year curriculum, by attendance for one full college year. 

Those who wish to satisfy the requirements for certification as high 
school teachers need more time. The amount of time required is not 
uniform, but depends upon the high school subjects to be taught and the 
individual ability of the student. 

For detailed information, one should apply to the Dean of the College 
of Education. 

Night Courses for Teachers 

A program of Night Courses for Teachers is offered at College Park. For 
fees for such courses, see Fees for Part-time Students, page 52. A special 
circular describing this program is issued in September, and may be had by 
applying to the Registrar, College Park, Maryland. 



Degrees 

The degrees conferred upon students who have met the conditions pre- 
scribed for a degree in the College of Education are Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science. Upon completion of 128 credits in conformity with 
the requirements specified under Curricula and in conformity with the gen- 
eral requirements of the University, the appropriate degree will be con- 
ferred. 

Teacher's Special Diploma 

The Teacher's Special Diploma is not awarded to all students who satisfy 
the requirements for graduation. It is awarded, at the time of graduation, 
to students whose quality of scholarship, personal traits, successful practice 
teaching, and professional attitude indicate distinct promise of success as 
teachers. Each award is by vote of the Faculty of the College of Education. 

This diploma is not required by official certificating authorities. 

A graduate who, at the time of graduation, is not eligible for this award, 
may be awarded the Teacher's Special Diploma upon presentation of evi- 
dence of a year or more of successful teaching experience. 

Teachers' special diplomas are granted in the Biological Sciences, Chem- 
istry, English, French, General High School Science, History and Social 
Sciences, Mathematics, Mathematics-Physics, Vocational Agriculture, Vo- 
cational Home Economics, Industrial Education, Commercial Education, and 
Physical Education. 

Facilities 

In addition to the general facilities offered by the University, certain im- 
portant supplementary facilities are available. 

Supervised Teaching. Actual experience in teaching under competent 
supervision is of basic importance in the preparation of teachers. Since 

113 



1920 a cooperative arrangement with the Prince Georges County School 
authorities has been in effect whereby students preparing to teach get this 
experience in the Hyattsville High School. This arrangement is supple- 
mented by opportunities for supervised teaching in the high schools of 
Montgomery County and Howard County and in the junior and senior high 
schools of the District of Columbia. 

Observation. The observation of teaching necessary for efficient teacher 
training is conducted in Washington and in nearby Maryland schools. The 
number, variety, and nearness of these schools provide ample and unusual 
opportunities for observation of actual classroom situations. 

Other Facilities in Washington. The library of Congress, the Library 
of the U. S. Office of Education, and the special libraries of other Govern- 
ment offices are accessible. The information services of the National Educa- 
tion Association, the American Council on Education, the U. S. Office of 
Education, and of other institutions, public and private, are available to 
students. 

Curricula 

The departments of the College of Education fall into two main groups: 
General Education and Vocational Education. Two types of curricula are 
offered, corresponding with these two major groupings. 

GkneraJ Education. The first of these is designed to prepare teachers 
of academic and scientific subjects and the special subjects in high 
schools. The basic requirements are fixed and definite, but the student may 
select from a number of subjects the major and minor subjects in which he 
expects to qualify for teaching. One may qualify for the degree either of 
Bachelor of Arts or of Bachelor of Science, depending upon one's election 
of major subject. 

The requirements for majors and minors (see Specific Requirements, page 
118) satisfy the regulations of the State Department of Education in regard 
to "the number of college credits required in any two or more subjects 
which are to be placed on a high school teacher's certificate." 

Some of the most common combinations of academic subjects in the high 
schools of the State are as follows: English and History; English and 
French; History and French; Mathematics and one or more of the high 
school Sciences. 

Combinations of academic and scientific subjects with Physical Education, 
Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Commercial Subjects, and Music are 
desirable. 

Vocational Education. The curricula in Vocational Education are de- 
signed for the definite purpose of preparing teachers of agriculture, home 
economics, and trade and industrial Education. As the University of 
Maryland is the institution designated by the State Board of Education for 
the training of teachers of vocational agriculture, home economics, and 
trades and industries imder the provisions of the Smith-Hughes Vocational 



114 



Educational Act, the curricula in this class have been organized to meet the 
objectives set up in the act and in the interpretations of the Federal Board 
of Vocational Education and the State Board of Education. These curri- 
cula lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Professional Requirements 

The first two years of college work are preparatory to the professional 
work of the junior and senior years. Students who, in the first two years, 
by reason of temperament, health, industry, and scholastic progress, give 
promise of becoming successful teachers are encouraged to continue in the 
curricula of the College of Education; those who, by reason of health de- 
ficiencies, of weakness in oral and written English, and of unfavorable per- 
sonal traits, are unlikely to succeed as teachers are advised to transfer to 
other fields. 

Sophomore Status 

The Introduction to Teaching scheduled for the sophomore year is 
an orientation course. It is designed with the twofold purpose of giving 
students a view of the teacher^s job and of testing the aptitude and fitness 
of students for teaching. Admission to this course is based upon (1) com- 
pletion of at least 30 semester hours of freshman work with a standing in 
the upper four-fifths of the class; and (2) passing of series of tests which 
are designed to determine the student's preparation for the special demands 
of this course. 

Professional Courses 

The professional courses recognized by the State Department of Educa- 
tion for certification are given only in the junior and senior years. The 
minimum requirement for these is 16 semester hours, and includes the follow- 
ing: Educational Psychology, Technic of Teaching, Observation of Teach- 
ing, Special Methods and Supervised Teaching, and Principles of Secondary 
Education. To he eligible to enter the professional courses in the junior 
year, a student must have an average grade as high as C at the end of the 
sophomore year. Continuance in such courses will he contingent upon his 
maintaining an average grade as high as C; and a grade as high as C in 
each required professional course. 

The requirement of the District of Columbia of 24 semester hours of 
professional courses is fully met. 

The special requirements of each curriculum are shown in the tabular 
statements of the curricula for the several departments. 

Certification of High School Teachers 

The State Department of Education certifies to teach in the approved 
high schools of the State only graduates of approved colleges who have 
satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and professional requirements. Spe- 
cifically it limits certification to graduates who "rank academically in the 
upper four-fifths of the class and who make a grade of C or better in 
practice teaching." 

115 



Guidance in Registration 

All students wishing to prepare for teaching should consult the Dean of 
the College of Education regarding possible combinations and the arrange- 
ment of their work. At the time of matriculation each student is assigned 
to a member of the faculty who acts as the student's personal adviser. 
Choice of subjects the student will prepare to teach should be made at the 
beginning of the sophomore year with the advice and approval of the appro- 
priate heads of departments. 

It is advisable for students who purpose to teach to register in the College 
of Education, in order that they may have continuously the counsel and 
guidance of the faculty which is directly responsible for their professional 
preparation. Such guidance is provided by regular monthly conferences of 
faculty and students, and by group and individual conferences between 
students and personal advisers. It is permissible, however, for a student to 
register in that college which in conjunction with the College of Education 
offers the majority of the courses he will pursue in satisfying the require- 
ments of the curriculum he elects. 

The teacher's special diploma will be awarded only to the student who 
shall have fulfilled all of the requirements of the curriculum he elects. 
Students in other colleges desiring to qualify for the teacher's special 
diploma should consult with the Dean of the College of Education at the 
beginning of the sophonnore year in order to plan satisfactorily their sub- 
sequent programs. Adjustments may be made as late as the beginning of 
the junior year. It is practically impossible to make adjustments later than 
that on account of the sequence of professional subjects in the junior and 
senior years. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Arts 
and Sciences or in the College of Education. In either case they will register 
with the College of Education for the teacher's special diploma. Students 
will be certified for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements 
of this curriculum. 

Greneral Requirements 

In addition to Military Science or Physical Education, required of all 
students in the University, the following requirements must be fulfilled by 
all candidates for degrees in this curriculum, preferably by the end of the 
sophomore year: 

(1) Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly), 6 semester hours, and in addi- 
tion not less than a year of work in English Language or Literature. 

(2) Reading and Speaking (Speech ly), 2 semester hours. 

(3) Two years of foreign language, if the student enters with less than 
three years of foreign language; one year, if he enters with three years. 
No foreign language is required of students who enter with four or more 
years of foreign language. 

116 



(4) Twelve semester hours of history and the social sciences, of which 
six must be history. 

(5) Twelve hours of natural science or of natural science and mathe- 
matics, including General Zoology (Zool. 1 f or s). 

Semester 

Freshman Year i " 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) ^ ^ 

* Foreign Language - - - 3 o 

Science (Biological or Physical) 4 4 

From the following groups : 

History, Social Sciences, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Lan- 
guage - - ....~ - - 2-4 3-4 

15-16 15-16 

Sophomore Yea/r 

(See Sophomore Status, p. 115) 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) ^ 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y ) ~ 2 2 

t Foreign Language - 3 3 

Electives - — lO-H 10-11 

17-18 17-18 



Junior Year 

(See Professional Courses, p. 115) 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) - - — 

Special Methods (Ed. 120 s; 122 s; 124 s; 126 s; 128 s) — 

Electives •— - ^^ 



16 



Senior Year 

Observation of Teaching (Ed. 6f) - - 1-2 

Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) -..._ „ 2 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) _ — 

Hi lec Lives ......—.... „....«—.........-. .......— ...^..... ^...._.. — ...— ~ x^ x x 

15 



2 
2 

12 

16 



2 

3 
10 

15 



♦ Except students entering with four or more units of language, 
t For students entering with less than three units of language. 

117 



I 



Specific Requirements 

Each student is expected to prepare for the teaching of at least two high 
school subjects in accordance with the certification requirements of the 
State Department of Education (By-law 30 revised). These are designated 
as major and minor subjects, with a requirement of from 30 to 36 semester 
hours of credit for a major and from 20 to 24 hours for a minor. If it is 
deemed advisable for a student to prepare for the teaching of three high 
school subjects, the requirement for a major may be modified at the discre- 
tion of the Dean to permit the pursuit of three subjects to the extent re- 
quired for State certification. Semester hour requirements are detailed 
below. 

No student who Ims not met all previous requirements will he permitted 
to do practice teaching. 

English, For a major in English 36 semester hours are required as fol- 
lows: 

Survey and Composition I 6 semester hours 

Survey and Composition II - 6 semester hours 

Reading and Speaking _ _ 2 semester hours 

Literature - -.... 16 semester hours 

Total 36 

For a minor in English 26 semester hours are required : 

Survey and Composition I 6 semester hours 

Survey and Composition II ~ 6 semester hours 

Reading and Speaking - 2 semester hours 

Literature ^ ~ 12 semester hours 

Total 26 

Students with a major or minor in English must complete Survey and 
Composition I, Reading and Speaking, and Survey and Composition II by 
the end of the junior year. 

Additional courses required in the major group are Shakespeare and 6 
hours from the following: The Novel, English and American Essays, Mod- 
ern Poets, Minor Victorian Poets, Tennyson, Browning, Prose and Poetry 
of the Romantic Age, Survey of American Literature, and Comparative 
Literature. (The electives for the minor in English must be from this 
group.) 

History and Social Sciences, For a major in this group 30 semester 
hours are required, as follows: 

History 18 semester hours 

Economics or Sociology » 6 semester hours 

Electives 6 semester hours 

For a minor, the same requirements less the electives. 

118 



Students with a major or minor in History and Social Sciences must com- 
plete Modem European History and American History by the end of the 
junior year. 

Modem Languages. French is the only modern language for which super- 
vised teaching is available. For a major in Modem Languages 30 semester 
hours are required; for a minor 24 semester hours. 

At least 18 hours of a major or minor in modern language must be com- 
pleted by the end of the junior year. 

A major or minor in French must include French 9y, French lOy, and at 
least one course of the 100 group. 
A major or minor in Spanish must include Spanish 6y, and at least one 

course of the 100 group. 

A major or minor in German must include German 6f and 7s or German 
8f and 9s, and at least one course of the 100 group. 

Mathematics. Twenty-eight semester hours are required for the major. 
The following sequence is recommended: Math, llf, Math. 12f, Math. 18y, 
Math. 7s, and Math. 10s in the freshman year; Math. 19y, Math. 14s, and 
Math. 15s in the sophomore year; Math. 16y, Math. 17y (optional), in the 
junior year; Math, lllf. Math. 112s, Math. 123f, Math. 122s in the senior 

year. 

For the minor the following course sequence is advised: Math, llf, Math. 
7s, Math. 10s in the freshman year; Math. 14s in the sophomore year; Math. 
16y in the junior year; Math, lllf, Math. 122s in the senior year. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometry or trigonometry 
may be excused from Math. 7s or Math. lOs, respectively. For all majors 
and minors in mathematics, Ed. 128s and Ed. 135f are indicated. 

MathemjaticS'Physics. This major consists of 18 hours in mathematics 
and 18 hours in physics. The normal sequence of courses is Math, llf. 
Math. 7s, Math. 10s, Math. 14s, Math. 16y, Math, lllf, Math. 122s, and 

Phys. ly, Phys. 103y. 

Students who pass an examination in solid geometrj- or trigonometry 
may be excused from Math. 7s or Math. 10s, respectively. 

Chemistry ly is required as a supporting course to this major. Ed. 128s, 
Ed. 135f , and Ed. 137s should be taken. 

If a minor in general science is offered in connection A\'ith this major, 
a total of 38 hours in the natural sciences should be presented. 

Science. In general science, a major and a minor are offered consisting of 
34 and 28 hours respectively, each including elementary courses in chem- 
istry, physics, and biology (zoology and botany). Minors of twenty semester 
hours are offered in chemistry, physics, and biological science. A minor in 
biology must include the basic courses in botany and zoology. 

A minor in chemistry must be supported by the elementary course in 
physics. Minors in physics and biology must be supported by the elementary 
course in chemistry, which should be completed before the beginning of 
the junior year. For students whose main interest is in biological science, 

119 



Ed. 126s and Ed. 136f are indicated, as are Ed. 126s and Ed. 137s for those 
who are interested chiefly in physics or chemistry. 

If a major in general science is accompanied by a minor in chemistry, 
physics, or biology, the same credits may be counted towards both, pro- 
vided that they number not less than 52 semester hours in natural science. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The objectives of the curricula in Agricultural Education are the teaching 
of secondary vocational agriculture, the work of county agents, and allied 
lines of the rural education service. 

Curriculum A is designed for persons who have had no vocational agri- 
culture in high school or less than two years of such instruction. Cur- 
riculum B is designed for persons who have had two or more years of 
thoroughgoing instruction in secondary agriculture of the type offered in 
Maryland high schools. Curriculum B relieves the student of the necessity 
of pursuing beginning agriculture courses in the first two years of his 
college course, permits him to carry general courses in lieu of those dis- 
placed by his vocational program in high school, and offers him an oppor- 
tunity to lay a broad foundation for the advanced work in agriculture of 
the last two college years. 

In addition to the regular entrance requirements of the University, in- 
volving graduation from a standard four-year high school, students electing 
the agricultural education curricula must present evidence of having ac- 
quired adequate farm experience after reaching the age of fourteen years. 

Students with high averages upon petition may be relieved of certain re- 
quirements in these curricula, when evidence is presented showing that 
either through experience or through previous training the prescription is 
non-essential ; or they may be allowed to carry an additional load. 

Students electing these curricula may register in the College of Agricul- 
ture or in the College of Education. In either case they will register with 
the College of Education for the teacher's special diploma. Students will 
be certified for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements of 
this curriculum. 



Semester 



••• ■•••••••••»•••••#• 



Curriculum A. 

Freshman Year 

General Animal Husbandry (A, H. If) 

Principles of Vegetable Culture (Hort. lis) 

General Chemistry (Chem. lAy or IBy) , 

(jeneral Zoology \Lt00i, 1 s). » — —..^ ^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) - 



120 



Semester 



I 
3 

4 
4 

3 

1 
15 



// 

3 

4 

4 
8 



Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) 

Introductory Entomology (Ent. 1 s) _.-.- - ~ 

Cereal Crop and Forage Crop Production (Agron. If and 2 s) 

Geology (Geol. lf)..» - -- - 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) - - 

Dairy Production (D. H. 101 y) -. - - 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. If) 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5 s) -.-. - 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 
3y) - -- - - 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) - 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf and 102 s) 

Special Advanced Speaking (Speech 15f and 16s)... ~. 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. ly) ~ 

Farm Machinery (F. Mech. lOlf) 

Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (F. Mech. 102 s) 

Farm Poultry (Poultry 1 s) 

Genetics (Gen. lOlf) — 

Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (Agron. 121s) - 

Agricultural Economics (A. E. 2f) - -.- - -• 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 104 s) 



/ 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 



17 

3 
1 
2 
1 
3 



3 
3 



16 

Senior Year 
Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107f) — — • *^ 

Project Organization and Cost Accounting (R. Ed. 105f) 2 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f) 3 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112 s) — 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120f or s).. — - — — 

Farm Shop Work (F. Mech. 104f) — ^ 

Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114 s) _ — 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) 

Marketing of Farm Products (A. E. 102 s) - — 

The Novel (Eng. 120f and 121 s) or Expository Writing (Eng. 

5f and 6 s) - - - 

General Floriculture (Hort. 21f) 

(General Landscape Gardening (Hort. 31 s) - - - - 

Farm Organization and Operation (A. E. 108f) 3 



15 



16 



// 

8 
3 

3 
3 



2 

17 



1 
2 



3 

3 



3 
3 

17 



2 
2 

1 
3 
3 

2 

2 

15 



121 



/ 



Curriculum B. Semester 

Freshman Year I U 

General Chemistry (Chem. lAy or IBy) 4 4 

General Botany (Bot. If) 4 — 

General Zoology (Zool. Is) _ _ - — 4 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y)... _ ~ - — 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys Ed. 

ly) - 1 1 

15 15 
Sophomore Year 

Diseases of Plants (Pit. Path. If) „ 4 — 

General Entomology (Ent. 1 s) - — 3 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) - 2 2 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 1 A s) - — 2 

Geology ( Geol. If) - * 3 — 

Soils and Fertilizers (Soils Is) „ — 3 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 2 2 

Electives „ 1 — 

15 15 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 — 

Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (R. Ed. lOlf and 102 s) 1 1 

Special Advanced Speaking (Speech 15f and 16 s) _ 2 2 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. ly) - 1 — 

Rural Life and Education (R. Ed. 104 s) _ — 3 

Electives 10 11 



17 
Senior Year 

Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 

Students (R. Ed. 107f ) 3 

Project Organization and Cost Accounting (R. Ed. 105 f) 2 

Departmental Organization and Administration (R. Ed. 112 s) — 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (R. Ed. 109f) 3 

Farm Shop Work (F. Mech. 104f) 1 

Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (R. Ed. 114 s) — 

Practice Teaching (R. Ed. 120f or s) - _ — 

Electives _ _.... - 8 



17 



f 



1 

2 

12 



Electives to be as follows : 

Advanced Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Poultry _ - 8 hours 

Advanced Agricultural Economics, Farm Management 6 hours 

Advanced Agronomy — ^ hours 

Advanced Horticulture ^ hours 

Advanced Farm Mechanics - ^ hours 

English, History, Philosophy, Secondary Education, Genetics, 

Advanced Educational Psychology. - - 6 hours 

Subjects of Special Interest — 4 hours 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is for students who are pre- 
paring to teach vocational home economics or to engage in any phase of 
home economics work which requires a knowledge of teaching methods. 

This is a general course including work in all phases of home economics 
and the allied sciences, with professional training for teaching these subjects. 
Electives may be chosen from other colleges. 

A combination curriculum for Home Economics and Physical Education 
is offered. This satisfies the state certification requirements for both 
subjects. 

Opportunity for additional training and practice is given through directed 
teaching, home management house, and special work and observation of 
children in the University Nursery School. 

Students electing this curriculum may register in the College of Home 
Economics or in the College of Education. In either case they will register 
with the College of Education for the teacher's special diploma. Students 
will be certified for graduation only upon fulfillment of all the requirements 
of this curriculum. 

Home Economics Education 

Semester 

Freshman Year ^ ^^ 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - ^ ^ 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. llf) - - - - -■ ^ -" 

Design (H. E. 21s) ~ -. - — ^ 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) ^ * 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - ^ ^ 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 1 1 

Electives •- — - ^ 

16 16 



17 



122 



17 



123 



I 



n 



\ 

{ 

V- Semester 

Sophoinore Year / jj 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) 2 2 

Foods ( H. E. Sly) ^ _ _ I.IIZ] 3 3 

Costume Design (H. E. 24f) 3 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 12 s) „ _ 3 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12Ay) 2 2 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3y) ^ 3 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Electives - ^ _ 1 1 



f i 



1^ 

Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) _ — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) _ _.._ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) 

Nutrition (H. E. 131f and 132 s) 1.IZIIZZZIZ1 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141f and 142 s) ., 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 1..1" 3 

Electives a 

16 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102f) 4 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143f) 4 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H E Ed 

io3f) _. ; J 4 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121y) _ 3 

Problems in Teaching Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 106s) >.. 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) ~ 

Electives 2^ 



16 



2 

1-2 

3 

3 



3-4 
16 



3 
1 
3 
9 

16 



16 

Electives should include one course in each of the following groups : 
Botany, Zoology, Physiology, Genetics; Sociology; English Literature. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Three types of program are offered in Industrial Education: a four-year 
curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Edu- 
cation; a program of professional courses to prepare teachers to meet the 
certification requirements in vocational and pre-vocational or occupational 
schools; a program of courses for the improvement of teachers in service. 



Four- Tear Curriculum in Industrial Education 

This curriculum is designed to prepare both trade and industrial teachers 
and teachers of industrial arts. There is sufficient latitude of electives so 
that a student may also meet certification requirements in some other high 
school subject. 

The entrance requirements are the same as for other curricula offered in 
the University. Students entering this curriculum will be benefited by en- 
gaging in some trade or industry during the summer vacations. 

One hundred twenty-eight semester credits are required for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. 

Students entering an Industrial Education curriculum must register in 
the College of Edu^catioru 

This curriculum, with slight variations according to the needs of the two 
groups, is so administered as to provide (A) a four-year curriculum in resi- 
dence at College Park; (B) a four-year curriculum for teachers in service 
who have had some college work. 

A. Curriculum for Students in Residence 

The distribution of the curriculum requirements is approximately as 
follows : 

Military Training or Physical Education 6 semester hours 

English, including Speech. - ~ 12 semester hours 

History and the Social Sciences 20 semester hours 

Science and Mathematics ^ -.... 20 semester hours 

Shop Work and Drawing ^ 30 semester hours 

xiiQucaLion ..............................................^.•••••-•^•..^•.^.••••••..•.•...•••••~«— ..^mmmbo*.— .~>~»..»»«- ^^ sdncowcir nours 

• > 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) 1 1 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Engineering Drafting (Dr. ly) - 2 2 

Forge Practice (Shop If) 2 — 

Mathematics (Math, llf and 14 s) ^ 3 3 

From the following groups: 

History, Social Science, Science, Foreign Language, Physi- 
cal Education ~ -... 3-5 5-7 

1&-17 15-17 



124 



125 



HniT 



Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) _ 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

Qv^ 9 O 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f and 4 s) 1 2 

Plane Surveying (Surv. If) ^ 1 — 

From the following groups : 

English, History, Social Science, Mathematics, Science, For- 
eign Language, Physical Education - 10-11 9-10 

16-17 16-17 

The curriculum in the junior and senior years follows closely the pattern 
of the Arts and Science Education curriculum. (See page 117.) 

Attendance at one Summer Session is necessary in order to get certain 
IndustHal Arts courses offered only in the Summer Session. 

B. Curriculum for Teachers in Service 

The distribution of curriculum requirements is the same as for Cur- 
riculum A, except that the military-physical training requirement is 
waived. In the mathematics and science group, and in the history and social 
science group, there is reasonable latitude for individual choice, but courses 
in mathematics as related to shopwork and courses in American history and 
government are required. 

These curriculum requirements may be met by the in-service courses in 
Baltimore offered by the Department of Industrial Education and by Sum- 
mer Session attendance. 

Program for Vocational and Occupational Teachers 

This curriculum is designed for students who have had experience in 
some trade or industry or in the teaching of shopwork. 

Applicants for admission to this curriculum must have as a minimum 
requirement an elementary school education or its equivalent. The curricu- 
lum is prescribed, but it is administered flexibly in order that it may be ad- 
justed to the needs of students. 

To meet the needs for industrial teacher-training in Baltimore and in 
other industrial centers, extension courses are offered. The work of these 
courses deals with the analysis and classification of trade knowledge for 
instructional purposes, methods of teaching, observation and practice of 
teaching, organization and management of trade and industrial classes, 
psychology of trade and industrial education, and occupational information, 
guidance, and placement. 

The completion of eight teacher-training courses, which require, in gen- 
eral, two years of two hundred fifty-six clock hours, entitles one to a full 
three-year vocational teacher's certificate in the State of Maryland, and to a 
special diploma from the College of Education of the University of Mary- 
land. 

126 



Courses for Teachers in Service 

Courses are offered for teachers in service who are seeking to satisfy 
Requirements for promotion. 

A special announcement of the in-service courses in Baltimore is issued 
in August of each year. This may be obtained from the office of the 
Registrar either in Baltimore or in College Park. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

The entrance requirements for the curriculum in Commercial Education 
are as follows: English 3 units; Algebra 1 unit; Science 1 unit; History 1 
unit; Stenography 2 units; Typewriting 1 unit; Bookkeeping 1 unit; 

elective 5 units. 

The Commercial Education curriculum includes a solid foundation of 
economics, social science and history, accounting and business administration 
subjects, adequate courses in methods of teaching commercial subjects, and 
supervised teaching. 

The number of electives is large enough to enable a student to prepare 
for teaching some other subject in addition to the commercial subjects. 

The curriculum does not include any college courses in shorthand and 
typewriting for the improvement of skill in these arts. Any student desir- 
ing to become a candidate for the bachelor's degree in commercial education 
must meet the speed and accuracy requirements in shorthand and type- 
writing and transcription necessary to become a teacher of commercial sub- 
jects either by work in commercial offices during the summer or by such 
other means as may be practicable for improving his skill and accuracy. 

Semester 

Freshman Year ^ " 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - - 3 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 3 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly or 2y and 4y) ---- - ^ ^ 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - - - 1 1 

Science (Biological or Physical) - ^ ^ 

One from the following groups : 

History, Mathematics, Literature, Foreign Language ^ ^ 

15 15 

SophoTnore Year 

American History (H. 2y) „...- - • 3 3 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3 s) 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y or 6y and 8y) 2 2 

Economic Geography and Industry (Econ. If) 3 — 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 8 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) 3 S 

Electives - -- _^ _^ 

18 18 

127 



Semester 



Semester 



Junior Year I 

Principles of Accounting (Econ. 109y) 3 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f ) 2 

Money and Credit (Econ. lOlf) „....- 2 

Banking (Econ. 102 s) — 

Elements of Statistics (Gen. 114 s) - — 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) -.... — 

16 

Senior Yea/r 

Business Law (Econ. 107y) '. 3 

Commercial Subjects in the High School (Ed. 150f and 151s)...... 2 

Observation of Teaching (Ed, 6f) 1 

Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (Ed. 139 s) — 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103 s) — 

Electives 10 

16 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



11 
3 



2 
3 

2 
6 

16 



8 
2 

2 
3 

4 

14 



The Physical Education Curriculum is designed primarily to prepare 
teachers of physical education for the high schools. It includes 31 semester 
hours of physical education courses, exclusive of methods and supervised 
teaching. It is sufficiently specialized to meet that need. At the same time 
it is flexible enough so that certification requirements in other high school 
subjects may be met. 

The curriculum includes separate courses for men and for women. Certain 
of these courses are open to both men and women. (See Sec. Ill, p. 233.) 

A combination curriculum for Physical Education (women) and Home 
Economics satisfies the State certification requirements for both subjects. 
Plans for such combination should be made at the beginning of the sopho- 
more year. The variations in the curriculum for men and for women are 
shown in the curriculum outlined below. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the curriculum the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred. 

Students electing this curriculum must register in the College of Educa- 
tion, 

General Requirements 

The general requirements are the same as for Arts and Science Educa- 
tion (see p. 116), except that a foreign language is not required, and 14 
semester hours of biological science are required as specified in the schedule. 

128 



Freshman Year 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) - 

General Zoology (Zool. If) - - 

General Bacteriology (Bact. 1 s) 

Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 

From the following groups: 

History, Science, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Home 



/ 

3 
1 

4 



Economics 



- 3-4 



(Women) 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4y) 

Fundamentals of Rhythm and Dance (Phys. Ed. lOy) - 

Music Appreciation (Mus. ly) 

(Men) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. ly) - 

Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. ly) 

Personal and Community Hygiene (Phys. Ed. lly) 



1 
1 
1 



1 

1 
2 



Sophom/yre Year 

Introduction to Teaching (Ed. 2f and 3s) - 2 

Survey and Composition II (Eng. 2f and 3s) or 

Expository Writing (Eng. 5f and 6s) 3-2 

Human Physiology (Zool. 15f) — 3 

Pathogenic Bacteriology (Bact. 2As) ~ - 



Electives 



(Women) 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8y) 

Games (Phys. Ed. 12f) 

Natural Gymnastics (Phys. Ed. 20 s) 

Clogs and Athletic Dances (Phys. Ed. 28f) - 

Folk Dancing (Phys. Ed. 30 s) -. 



3-4 

2 
2 



// 

3 

1 

4 
3 



3-4 



1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
2 



17-18 17-18 



2 — 



2 

3-2 

2 
4-5 

2 
2 
2 



(Men) 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) .- 2 

Physical Activities (Phys. Ed. 3y) 2 

Survey of Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 21y) _2 

17 
Junior Year 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) — 3 

Technic of Teaching (Ed. 5 s) — 

First Aid (Phys. Ed. 16 s) - 

Electives - 



129 



6-7 



2 
2 
2 

17 



2 
1 

7-8 



(Women) 

Physical Edwation Activities for High School Girls (Phys. Ed. 
x^Kjy ) _^ 

Athletics (Phys. Ed. 18 f and s) 

Natural Dancing (Phys. Ed. 32 f) ZZIZII 

(Men) 
Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 5 v) 
Technics of Teaching Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 23y) 
Coaching High School Athletics (Phys. Ed. 13y) J~l 



Semester 

1 II 

2 2 
2 2 
2 ~- 



1 1 

2 2 
2 2 



15 
Senior Year 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 103s) __ 

Physical Education m the High School (Ed. 141f or Ed 142f ) or 
Supervised Teaching (Ed. 139f or s) _ 2 

(Women) 

Coaching and Officiating; Athletics for Girls (Phys. Ed. 26 y) 2 

Electives ^ ' 

(Men) 

Advanced Physical Education Practice (Phys. Ed. 7y) i 

Special Advanced Speaking (Speech 15f and 16 s) ZZIZ 2 

Management of Intramural Athletics (Phys. Ed. 15 y)ZZZZI 2 

Electives " „ 



15 

3 
2 

2 

7-8 

1 

2 
2 

5 



14-15 14-15 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

S. S. Steinberg, Acting Dean* 

The primary purpose of the College of Engineering is to train young men 
to practice the profession of Engineering. It endeavors at the same time 
to equip them for their duties as citizens and for careers in public service 
and in industry. 

The new economic conditions with which the engineering graduate will 
be faced when he goes into practice have emphasized the necessity for the 
adjustment of engineering curricula in their scope and objectives. It has 
become evident that greater emphasis than heretofore should be placed 
on the fundamentals of engineering, and that the engineer's training should 
include a knowledge of the sciences which deal with human relations and 
a familiarity with business organization and administration. 

Accordingly, our engineering curricula have been revised to increase the 
time devoted to fundamentals and to non-technical subjects, which are a 
necessary part of the equipment of every educated man, and which are 
now considered essential to the proper training of engineers because of 
the practical application of these subjects in professional and business life. 
It is well recognized that an engineering training affords an efficient 
preparation for many callings in public and private life outside the engi- 
neering profession. 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of CJivil, Electrical, 
and Mechanical Engineering. In order to give the student time to choose 
the branch of engineering for which he is best adapted, the freshman year 
of the several courses is the same. Lectures and conferences will be used to 
guide the student to make a proper selection. The courses differ only slightly 
in the sophomore year, but in the junior and senior years the students are 
directed more definitely along professional lines. 

Admission Requirements 

The requirements for admission to the College of Engineering are, in 
general, the same as elsewhere described for admission to the undergraduate 
departments of the University, except as to the requirements in mathematics. 
See Section I, Entrance. 

It is possible, however, for high school graduates having the requisite 
number of entrance units to enter the College of Engineering withotit the unit 
of advanced algebra, or the one-half unit of solid geometry, provided such 
students are prepared to devote their first summer to a course in analytic 
geometry. The program for such students would be as follows: During 
the first semester, five hours a week would be devoted to making up ad- 
vanced algebra and solid geometry; in the second semester, mathematics 
of the first semester would be taken, and the second semester mathematics 



130 



131 



would be taken in the summer session. Thus, such students, if they passed 
the course, would be enabled to enter the sophomore year the next f aU with 
their class without loss of time. 

Bachelor Degrees in Engineering 

Courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are offered in civil 
electrical, and mechanical engineering, respectively. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering is given to students 
registered m the Graduate School who hold bachelor degrees in engineering 
which represent an amount of preparation and work similar to that required 
for^bachelor degrees in the College of Engineering of the University of Mary- 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering are ac- 
cepted m accordance with the procedure and requirements of the Graduate 
Sch(X)l as will be found explained in the catalogue under the head of Gradu- 
ate School. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

The degrees of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, and Mechanical En- 
gineer will be granted only to graduates of the University who have ob- 
tained a bachelor's degree in engineering. The applicant must satisfy the 
following conditions: 

1. He shall have engaged successfully in acceptable engineering work not 
less than four years after graduation. 

2. He must be considered eligible by a committee composed of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering and the heads of the Departments of Civil 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. 

3. His registration for a degree must be approved at least twelve months 
prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred. He shall present 
with his application a complete report of his engineering experience and 
an outline of his proposed thesis. 

4. He shall present a satisfactory thesis on an approved subject. 

Equipment 

The Engineering buildings are provided with lecture-rooms, recitation- 
rooms, drafting-rooms, laboratories, and shops for various phases of engi- 
neering work. 

Drafting.Rooms. The drafting-rooms are equipped for practical work. 
The engineering student must provide himself with an approved drawing 
outfit, material, and books, the cost of which during the freshman vear 
amounts to $16.00 to $20.00. 

132 



Electrical Engineering Laboratory. The equipment includes many of 
the various types of direct current and alternating current generators and 
motors, rotary converter, distribution transformers, control apparatus, and 
the measuring instruments essential to practical electrical testing. For 
experimental work, electrical power is obtained from engine-driven units 
and a turbine generator; a storage battery is used for constant voltage- 
testing. 

Instruments are available for measuring the candle power of lamps and 
for the determination of illumination intensities. The standardizing labora- 
tory apparatus includes primary and secondary standards used in calibrating 
laboratory instruments. 

The telephone laboratory is equipped with apparatus for experimental 
work on magneto and common battery systems. Radio apparatus is avail- 
able for student use as well as for experimental purposes. 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The apparatus consists of plain 
slide valve engines, steam turbine set, fans, pumps, indicators, gauges, feed 
water heaters, tachometers, injectors, flow meters, apparatus for determi- 
nation of the B. T. U. in coal, gas, and liquid fuels, pyrometers, draft 
gauges, planimeters, thermometers, and other necessary apparatus and 
equipment for a mechanical laboratory. 

Materials Laboratory, Apparatus and equipment are provided for 
making standard tests on various construction materials, such as steel, con- 
crete, timber, and brick. 

Equipment includes two 100,000-pound universal testing machines, cement- 
testing apparatus, extensometer and micrometer gauges, and other special 
devices for ascertaining the elastic properties of different materials. 

Special apparatus which has been designed and made in the shops of the 
University is also made available for student work. 

The College of Engineering owns a Beggs deformeter apparatus for the 
mechanical solution of stresses in structures by use of celluloid models. 

Research Laboratory. Certain problems in highway research have been 
undertaken in cooperation with the State Roads Commission of Maryland 
and the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads. These studies have included traffic 
surveys over the Maryland State highway system, studies of cores cut 
from the State roads by means of a special core drilling apparatus, and 
laboratory studies of the elastic properties of concrete. 

It is planned to continue and extend this type of cooperative research 
with other departments of the State and the federal government as well as 
with the industries of Maryland. 

Machine Shops and Foundry. The machine shops and foundry are well 
lighted and fully equipped. Shops for wood working, metal, forge, and 
foundry practice are provided. 

The wood-working shop has full equipment of hand and power machinery. 

133 



i 



The machine shops are equipped with various types of lathes, planers, 
milling machines, and drill presses. 

The foundry is provided with an iron cupola, a brass furnace, and a coke 
even. 

The shop equipment not only furnishes practice, drill, and instruction for 
students, but makes possible the complete production of special apparatus 
for conducting experimental and research work in engineering. 

Surveying Equipment. Surveying equipment for plane topographic, 
and geodetic surveying is provided properly to equip several field parties! 
A wide variety of instruments is provided, including domestic as well as 
foreign makes. 

Special Models and Specimens. A num^ber of models illustrating various 
types of highway construction and highway bridges are available. 

A wide variety of specimens of the more common minerals and rocks 
has been collected from various sections of the country, particularly from 
Maryland. 

Library 

In addition to the general University Library, each department maintains 
a library for reference, and receives the standard engineering magazines. 

The class work, particularly in the higher courses, requires that the 
students consult special books of reference and current technical literature. 



Curricula 

The normal curriculum of each department is outlined on the following 
pages. Students are expected to attend and take part in the meetings of 
the student chapters of the technical engineering societies, and the courses 
of special lectures provided for the different classes. The freshman engi- 
neering students are required to attend a series of non-technical lectures, 
the speakers, for the most part, being other than engineers. The student 
is required to submit a brief written summary of each lecture. 

Junior and senior students with requisite standing may elect with the 
permission of the Dean of the College of Engineering, additional courses 
not exceeding three credits a semester. 

All engineering students are urged to secure work during the summer, 
particularly in engineering fields. 

The proximity of the University to Baltimore and Washington, and to 
other places where there are large industrial enterprises, offers an excellent 
opportunity for the engineering student to observe what is being done in 
his chosen field. An instructor accompanies students on all inspection trips, 
and the student is required to submit a written report of each trip. 



134 



FTeshman Yea/r 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. « 
Alike for all engineering courses. 

Survey and Composition I (Eng. ly) - 3 S 

*Introduction to the Social Sciences (Soc. Sci. ly) 3 8 

Reading and Speaking (Speech ly) _ , 1 1 

College Algebra (Math, llf ) 3 — 

Laboratory in Algebra (Math. 12f ) „ 1 — 

Analytic Geometry (Math. 14s) — 3 

Laboratory in Geometry (Math. 15s) — 1 

General Chemistry (Chem. ly) 4 4 

Engineering Drawing (Dr. If) ., 2 — 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 2s) „ — 2 

Forge Practice (Shop Is) „. — 1 

Introduction to Engineering (Engr. If) _ 1 — 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. ly) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

ly) - - 1 1 

Non-technical Lectures _ „.... — — 

19 19 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of 

highways, railroads, waterways, bridges, buildings, water supply and sewer- 
age systems, harbor improvements, dams, and surveying and mapping. 

Sophomore Year 

1936-1937 (Transition Year) 

*General European History (H. ly) „ 3 3 

Oral Technical English (Speech 4y) „ 1 1 

Calculus (Math. 16y) _ - 3 3 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) „ 1 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 4f ) _ 3 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) _ — 3 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 3y) 2 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) „ 2 2 

Engineering Lectures _ _ — — 



20 



20 



*With permission, the student may substitute a course in History or Modern Language 
of equal credit. 



135 



Sophomore Year _, 

Semester 

As revised to take effect m 1937-1938. ^ 

^General European History (H. ly) 3 

Oral Technical English (Speech 4y) 1 

Calculus (Math. 16y) _..... 3 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y). _ 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 3f )^ ^ 2 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) „ — 

Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y) _ 3 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) - ^....~ 2 

Engineering Lectures - > — 



// 

3 
1 
3 
1 
5 

3 
2 



20 



20 



Junior Year 
1936-1937 (Transition Year). 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) _ 1 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 

Engineering Report Writing (Eng. 128s) - — 

Engineering Economy (Engr. lOlf ) „ 1 

Engineering Geology (Engr. 102f) _ 2 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 105y) _ 5 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) — 

Elements of Prime Movers (Engr. 103s) — 

Railroad Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) 3 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. 10 If) 3 

Technical Society „ — 



1 
3 
1 



4 
2 
2 



— 5 



18 



18 



♦With permission, the student may substitute a course in English or Modern Language 
of equal credit. 



136 



Junior Year Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. / // 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) - 1 1 

Principles of Economics (Econ. 3y) 3 3 

Engineering Report Writing (Eng. 128s) — 1 

Engineering Economy (Engr. lOlf ) 1 — 

Engineering Geology (Engr. 102f) 2 — 

Strength of Materials (Mech. lOlf) - 5 — 

Hydraulics (C. E. 101s) — ♦ 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) — 2 

Elements of Prime Movers (Engr. 103s) — 2 

Railroad Curves and Earthwork (C. E. 103f) 3 — 

Theory of Structures (C. E. 104s) — 5 

Advanced Surveying (Surv. lOlf) 3 — 

Technical Society — — 

18 18 

Senior Year 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 1 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f ) 2 — 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 104s) — 2 

Engineering Chemistry (Chem. Ills) — 2 

Sanitary Bacteriology (Bact. 4s) — 1 

Elements of Highways (C. E. 105f) 3 — 

Concrete Design (C. E. 106y) 4 3 

Structural Design (C. E. 107y) 4 3 

Municipal Sanitation (C. E. 108y) 3 3 

Thesis (C. E. 109y) 1 ^ 

Technical Society 

18 18 



137 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering deals with the generation, transmission, and dis- 
tribution of electrical energy; electrical transportation, communication, illu- 
mination, and manufacturing; and miscellaneous electrical applications in 
industry, commerce, and home life. 

Sophomore Year Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. / // 

^General European History (H. ly) 3 3 

Oral Technical English (Speech 4y) 1 1 

Calculus (Math. 16y) - 3 3 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) 1 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 5f) 2 — 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv. If) 1 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 2f) 1 — 

Elements of Electrical Engineering (E. E. ly) 1 2 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 3 

Basic R. 0. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 2 2 

Engineering Lectures — — 



20 



Junior Year 

1936-1937 (Transition Year) 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — 

Engineering Economy (Engr. lOlf) 1 

DiflPerential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 104y) 4 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) „ — 

Direct Currents (E. E. 102f) _ 6 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 103s) 

Electrical Measurements (E. E. 104f) 3 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. 105s) — 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103s) — 

Technical Society — 



18 



20 



1 
3 



3 
2 



— 1 



5 
8 



18 



♦With permission, the student may substitute a course in English or Modern Language 
' equal credit. 

138 



Junior Year 
As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. 



Semester 
I II 



Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — 

Engineering Economy (Engr. lOlf) 1 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f) 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 103f) _ — 4 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) — 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) — 

Direct Currents (E. E. 102f) 6 

Direct Current Design (E. E. 103s) 

Electrical Measurements (E. E. 104f) 3 

Alternating Current Circuits (E. E. 105s) — 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 103s)..... - — ^... — 

18 



Senior Year 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) 1 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) 2 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 104s) — 

Alternating Current Machinery (E. E. 106y) 4 

Alternating Current Design (E. E. 107f) 1 

Electric Railways and Electric Power Transmission (E. E. 108y) 3 

Electrical Communications (E. E. 109y) 3 

Illumination (E. E. llOy) 3 

Thesis (E. E. Illy) - - -. 1 

Technical Society — 

18 



1 
3 



3 
2 



— 1 



5 
3 



18 



2 

4 

3 
3 
3 
2 



18 



139 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Mechanical Engineering deals with the design, construction, and mainte- 
nance of machinery and power plants; refrigeration, heating, and ventila- 
tion; and the organization and operation of industrial plants. 

Sophomore Yea/r Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. / 7/ 

♦General European History (H. ly) 3 3 

Oral Technical English (Speech 4y) 1 1 

Calculus (Math. 16y) 3 3 

Laboratory in Calculus (Math. 17y) 1 1 

General Physics (Phys. 2y) ^ 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry (Dr. 5f) 2 — 

Elements of Plane Surveying (Surv, if) 1 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop 3f) _ 2 — 

Statics and Dynamics (Mech. Is) — 3 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. E. Is) — 2 

Basic R. O. T. C. (M. I. 2y) or Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 

3y) 2 2 

Engineering Lectures — — 



20 



Junior Year 

1936-1937 (Transition Year) 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) — 

Engineering Economy (Engr. lOlf) „ 1 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f ) 3 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Chem. 120f ) 3 

Engineering Chemistry (Chem. Ills) — 

Engineering Mechanics (Mech. 104y) _ 4 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) — 

Kinematics and Machine Design (M. E. 101 Ay) 3 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104 Ay) _ 3 

Foundry Practice (Shop 102s) — 

Technical Society ^ — 



20 



1 

3 



3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
1 



18 



18 



♦With permission, the student may substitute a course in English or Modern Language 
of equal credit 



140 



Junior Year Semester 

As revised to take effect in 1937-1938. / // 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 5y) 1 1 

Fundamentals of Economics (Econ. 5s) „ _ — 3 

Engineering Economy (Engr. 10 If) 1 — 

Differential Equations for Engineers (Math. 114f ) 3 — 

Elements of Chemical Engineering (Chem. 120f) 3 — 

Engineering Chemistry (Chem. Ills) — 3 

Strength of Materials (Mech. 103f ) 4 — 

Hydraulics (C. E. 102s) — 3 

Materials of Engineering (Mech. 102s) — 2 

Kinematics of Machinery (M. E. lOlf) _ 3 — 

Machine Design (M. E. 102f) 2 — 

Machine Shop Practice (Shop lOlf) 1 -— 

Foundr>^ Practice (Shop 102s) „ — 1 

Thermodynamics (M. E. 104s) — 5 

Technical Society — — 



18 



18 



Senior Year 

As revised to take effect in 1936-1937. 

Advanced Oral Technical English (Speech 6y) :.. 1 

Business Organization and Operation (Econ. 7f) 2 

Engineering Law and Specifications (Engr. 104s) — 

Internal Combustion Engines (M. E. 105f) 3 

Heating and Ventilation (M. E. 106f ) 3 

Refrigeration (M. E. 107s) „ „ — 

Design of Prime Movers (M. E. 108y) 3 

Design of Power Plants (M. E. 109s) — 

Principles of Electrical Engineering (E.E.lOly) 4 

Mechanical Laboratory (M. E. llOy) „.. 1 

Thesis (M. E. Illy) 1 

Technical Society — 



1 
2 



3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
2 



18 



18 



141 



I 

CX)LLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

M. Marie Mount, Dean 

Home economics subjects are planned to meet the needs of the following 
classes of students: (1) those who desire a general knowledge of home 
economics without specializing in any one phase; (2) those who wish to 
teach home economics or to become extension specialists in home economics; 
(3) those "who are interested in certain phases of home economics with the 
intention of becoming dietitians, restaurant and cafeteria managers, textile 
specialists, designers, buyers of clothing in department stores, or demon- 
strators for commercial firms. 

Departments 

For administrative purposes the College of Home Economics is organized 
into the Departments of Foods and Nutrition; Textiles, Clothing, and Art; 
and Home and Institution Management. 

Facilities 

The Home Economics Building is equipped with class rooms and labora- 
tories. In addition the college maintains a home management house, in 
which students gain practical experience in home-making during their senior 
year. 

Baltimore and Washington afford unusual opportunities for trips, addi- 
tional study, and practical experience pertaining to the various phases of 
home economics. 

Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of four years of prescribed courses, of 128 semester hours. In ac- 
cordance with the University policy, not less than three-fourths of the 
credits for graduation must be earned with grades of A, B, or C. 

Prescribed Curricula 

All students registered in the College of Home Economics follow the Gen- 
eral Home Economics Curriculum for the first two years. At the beginning 
of the junior year a student may continue with the General Home Eco- 
nomics Curriculum, or elect one of the following special curricula, or a com- 
bination of curricula. A student who wishes to teach home economics may 
register in Home Economics Education in the College of Home Economics, 
or in the College of Education (see Home Economics Education). 

Following are the outlines of the Curricula for General Home Economics, 
Textiles and Clothing, Foods and Nutrition, Institution Management, and 
Home Economics Extension. 



142 



GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

i 

Freshman Year 



Semester 
I II 



Survey and Composition I (Eng. 1 y) 3 

General Chemistry (Chem. 1 y) - „ - 4 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 11 f) 3 

Design (H. E. 21 s) - — 

Reading and Speaking (Speech 1 y) 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 2y and 4 y) - 1 

* Language or, E lecti ves 3 

Home Economics Lectures — 



3 
4 

3 

1 
1 
3 



15 



15 



'6 



Sophomore Year 

Costume Design (H. E. 24 f) ^ 

Textiles and Clothing (H. E. 12 s) ~~ — 

Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay and Chem. 12 B 

f or s) _ 3 

Foods (H. E. 31 y) .- 3 

Elementary Physics (Phys. 3 y) _ -. 3 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 6y and 8 y) 2 

**Electives - j^ 

17 
Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f and 132 s) _.... 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. Ill f ) 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) — 

Electives - - "^C^S^ 



Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) ^ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f) 

Choice of one unit in Foods, Clothing, or Textiles, or an addi- 
tional unit in Child Study ^ 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 
**Electives - 



17 



4 
4 

4 
3 



8 

3 

S 
2 

2 

16 

3 

3 

3 
8 

17 



8 
12 



15 



15 



♦ The language requirement may be waived for students entering with three or more years 
of a language. 

*♦ In addition to the curriculum as prescribed, one course in each of the groups indicated 
below, is required : 

economics ; psychology ; sociology : and one of the following sciences : 
zoology, botany, physiology, or genetics. 

143 



Senior Year 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f) 

ChiW Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) 

Practice in Institution Management (H. E. 145 f) 

or 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135 f) 

Advanced Institution Management (H. E. 146 s) 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 

Mental Hygiene (Ed. Psych. 105 s) _ _ _ 

Electives 



17 



4 

4 



r 



15 



HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f and 132 s) 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) 3 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) „ 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psych. If) 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) — 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) — 

Demonstrations (H, E. 133 f ) 2 

Electives ^ 3 



17 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 f) _ 4 — 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) „.... — Z 

"•Nutrition (H. E. 131 f and 132s) 3 8 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) -.. 3 3 

Institution Management (H. E. 144 y) 3 3 

Technic of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 5 s) — 2 

Observation of Teaching (H. E. Ed. 6 s) — 1 

Electives _ 4 2 



17 



4 ~ 

3 

3 3 

3 

6 



15 



3 
3 



— 3 



2 
1 



17 



* In addition to Nutrition (H. E. 131 f and 132 s). Child Nutrition (H. E. 136 s) or Seminar 
in Nutrition (H. E. 201 f or s) is recommended. 



144 



Semester 



Senior Year i 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) 4 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f ) 4 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135 f) 4 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 3 

Mental Hygiene (Ed. Psych. 105 s) — 

Human Physiology (Zool. 15 f ) - — 

Methods in Home Economics Extension (H. E. 151 s) — 

Applied Art (H. E. 122 s) — 

Electives - — 



n 



3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 



15 



15 



Fundamentals of Economics and Principles of Sociology are required in 
the sophomore year in the Home Economics Extension Course. One course 
in each of the following is recommended: Government, Community Recrea- 
tion, and First Aid. 



♦TEXTILES AND CLOTHING CURRICULUM 

Junior Year 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) ~. — 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f) - 3 

Advanced Clothing (H. E. lllf) „.... - 3 

Chemistry of Textiles (Chem. 14 s) — — 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 

Advanced Textiles (H. E. 114 f) ~ 3 

Electives ...._ 5 

17 



3 
3 

8 

17 



Senior Year 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f) 4 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) 4 

Problems and Practice in Textiles, Clothing, or Related Art 

(H. E. 113 f) _ 4 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 3 

Advanced Design (H. E. 123 s) — 

Special Clothing Problems (H. E. 112 s) — 

Electives - — — 



3 
3 
3 
6 



15 



15 



* Upon the advice of the instructor in charge, the Textiles and Clothing curriculum may 
be modified for the election of art courses. 



145 



FOODS CURRICULUM 

, . ^, Semester 

Junior Year » 

General Physiological Chemistry (Chem. 108 f) 4 _ 

Nutrition (H. E. 131 f and 132 s) '~. 3 

Management of the Home (H. E. 141 f and 142 s) 3 o 

Demonstrations (H. E. 133 f) 2 ^ 

Household Bacteriology (Bact. 3 s) _ 

Electives ^ ^ 

5 8 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Child Study (H. E. Ed. 102 f) 4 _ 

Practice in Management of the Home (H. E. 143 f) 1.1". 4 — 

Problems and Practice in Foods (H. E. 135 f) l.IIZZ" 4 — 

History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (H. E. 121 y) 3 3 

Advanced Foods (H. E. 134 s) __ 3 

Electives 



15 



15 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. 0. Appleman, Dean, 

The Graduate School Council 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University. 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

A. N. Johnson, D.Eng., Professor of Highway Engineering. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

E. C. Auchter, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Wm. H. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of French. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

G. L. Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Baltimore). 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 

General Information 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master^s degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the General Faculty. The 
Graduate School was establishel in 1918, and organized graduate instruction 
leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's degree was undertaken. The 
faculty of the Graduate School includes all members of the various faculties 
who give instruction in approved graduate courses. The general adminis- 
trative functions of the Graduate Faculty are delegated to a Graduate 
Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School is chairman. 



LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University library, the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset 
to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminai 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 



146 



147 



( 



THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The graduate students maintain an active Graduate Qub. Several meet- 
ings for professional and social purposes are held during the year. Students 
workmg in different departments have an opportunity to become acquainted 
with one another and thus profit by the cultural values derived from asso- 
ciation with persons working in different fields. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Graduates from a recognized college regarded as standard by the institu- 
tion and by regional or general accrediting agencies are admitted to the 
Graduate School. The applicant shall present an official transcript of his 
college record, which for unconditional admission shall show creditable com- 
pletion of an undergraduate major in the subject chosen for specialization 
m the Graduate School. Any deficiencies may be made up in courses without 
credit toward a graduate degree. Special students who do not expect to be- 
come candidates for degrees are permitted to take such courses as in the 
opinion of the departments concerned they are prepared to pursue with 
profit. 

Application blanks for admission to the Graduate School are obtained from 
the office of the Dean. After approval of the application, a matriculation 
card, signed by the Dean, is issued to the student. This card permits one to 
register in the Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation 
card is stamped and returned. It is the student's certificate of membership 
m the Graduate School, and may be called for at any succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree, 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register at the begin- 
ning of each semester in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School, Room 
T-214, Agriculture Building. Students taking graduate work in the Sum- 
mer Session are also required to register in the Graduate School at the 
beginning of each session. In no case will graduate credit be given unless 
the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. The pro- 
gram of work for the semester or the summer session is arranged with the 
major department and entered upon two course cards, which are signed first 
by the professor in charge of the student's major subject and then by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. One card is retained in the Dean's office. The 
student takes the other card, and, in case of a new student, also the matricu- 
lation card, to the Registrar's office, where a charge slip for fees is issued. 
The charge slip, together with the course card, is presented at the Cashier's 
office for adjustment of fees. After certification by the Cashier that fees 

148 



have been paid, class cards are issued by the Registrar. Students will not be 
admitted to graduate courses without class cards. Course cards may be 
obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads of 
departments usually keep a supply of these cards in their respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates, or 
Fffr Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates, Graduate students may 
elect courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate 
credit will not be allowed for these. Students with inadequate preparation 
may be obliged to take some of these courses as prerequisites for advanced 
courses. No credit toward graduate degrees may be obtained by corre- 
spondence or extension study. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the stu- 
dent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program including suitable 
minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To 
encourage thoroughness in scholarship through application, graduate stu- 
dents in the regular sessions are limited to a program of thirty credit hours 
for the year, 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the Summer Session may be counted as residence 
toward an advanced degree. By carrying approximately six semester hours 
of graduate work for four summer sessions, and upon submitting a satisfac- 
tory thesis, a student may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. In some instances a fifth summer may be required, in order that 
a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

Upon recommendation by the head of the student's major department, and 
with the approval of the Graduate Council, a maximum of six semester 
hours of graduate work done at other institutions of sufficiently high stand- 
ing may be substituted for required work here; such substitution does not 
shorten the required residence period. 

By special arrangement, graduate work may be pursued in some depart- 
ments during the entire summer. Such students as graduate assistants, or 
others who may wish to supplement work done during the regular year, 
may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by full-time graduate 
work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory supervision and 
facilities for summer work are available in their special fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin, giving full information con- 
cerning the Summer Session and the graduate courses offered therein. • The 
bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

149 



I! 



*ff 



GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in 
the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet the 
same requirements and proceed in the same way as do graduate students in 
other departments of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester, and who continue their residence in 
the University for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register in 
the Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor^s degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, credits for which may be transferred toward 
an advanced degree at this University; but the total of undergraduate 
and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for either the Master's or the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks, which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate 
and, after the required endorsements are obtained, the applications are acted 
upon by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the candidate'^ 
undergraduate record and of any graduate courses completed at other insti- 
tutions must be filed in the Dean's office before the application can be con- 
sidered. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree but 
merely signifies that he has met all the formal requirements and is 'con- 
sidered by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such 
graduate study and research as are demanded by the requirements of the 
degree sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship by the type 
of graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 

AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
date when instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
m which the degree is sought, but not Until at least twelve semester course 

150 



hours of graduate work have been completed with an average grade of B 
or above. 

Residence Requirements. Two semesters or four summer sessions may 
satisfy the residence requirements for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science. Inadequate preparation for the graduate courses the 
student wishes to pursue may make a longer period necessary. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours in 
courses approved for graduate credit is required for the Master's degree. 
If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, 
in either the major or the minor subjects, additional courses may be required 
to supplement the undergraduate work. Not less than twelve semester 
hours and not more than fifteen semester hours in graduate courses must 
be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits of the total of twenty- 
four hours required must be outside the major subject, and they must com- 
prise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits for 
the Master's degree must be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. 
The entire course of study must constitute a unified program approved by 
the student's major adviser and by the Dean of the Graduate School. No 
credits that are reported with a grade lower than C are acceptable for an 
advanced degree. 

At least eighteen of the twenty-four semester course credits required for 
the Master's degree must be taken at this institution. In certain cases grad- 
uate work done in other graduate schools of sufficiently high standing may 
be substituted for the remaining required credits, but any such substitu- 
tion of credits does not shorten the normal required residence at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The Graduate Council, upon recommendation of the 
head of the major department, passes upon all graduate work done at other 
institutions. The final examination will cover all graduate work offered in 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the Master's degree. 
It must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work, and it 
must be acceptable in literary style and composition. It is assumed that 
the time devoted to thesis work will be not less than the equivalent of 
six semester hours earned in graduate courses. If the Master's thesis is 
based upon independent research, the student may register in research 
courses in the amount prescribed by his department, but not more than four 
semester hours in these may be included in the twenty-four semester hours 
required in graduate courses for the Master's degree. With the approval 
of the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the 
thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under direction and 
supervision of a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The thesis should be typewritten, double spaced, on a good quality of 
paper 11 x BV2 inches in size. The original copy must be deposited in the 

151 



office of the Graduate School not later than two weeks before commencement. 
It should be held together with removable clamp, and placed in a manila 
or other durable folder, with the title and the name of the writer on the out- 
side. The thesis should not be stapled, as it is later bound by the University 
and placed in the University library. One or two additional carbon copies 
should be provided for use of members of the examining committee prior to 
the final examination. If the thesis contains extensive charts or graphs, it is 
not necessary to duplicate them in the carbon copies, as the official copy will 
be accessible to the examining committee. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts 
as chairman of the committee. The other members are persons under whom 
the student has taken most of his major and minor courses. The chairman 
and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the examining committee 
at least one week prior to the period set for oral examinations. The chair- 
man of the committee selects the exact time and place for the examination 
and notifies the other members of the committee and the candidate. The 
examination should be conducted within the dates specified, and a report 
of the committee sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. 
A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the com- 
mittee. Such a report is the basis upon which recommendation is made to 
the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree sought. The period 
for the oral examination is usually one hour. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample op- 
portunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the exami- 
nation. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the grant- 
ing of the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's 
degree must be deposited in the office of the Dean not later than the first 
Wednesday in October of the academic year in which the degree is sought. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Department of Mod- 
em Languages a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French 
and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as 
the departments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be 
correspondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificate 
of residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 

152 



attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research in 
the special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. Thirty semester hours of minor work 
are required. The remainder of the required residence is devoted to in- 
tensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the 
individual candidate. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shov^Ti by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. The original 
typewritten copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the Dean 
at least three weeks before commencement. One or two extra copies should 
be provided for use of members of the examining committee prior to the 
date of the final examination. The thesis is later printed in such form 
as the committee and the Dean may approve, and fifty copies are deposited 
in the University library. 

Final Examination. The final orai examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the Graduate Faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the 

student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his attainments 
in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed procedures 
are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDI- 
DATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written exam- 
ination that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. 
The passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in 
his specialized field. It is not required that the candidate recognize every 
word of the text, but it is presumed that he will know sufficient grammar 
to distinguish inflectional forms, and that he will have a large enough vo- 
cabulary to give a good translation without the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office of 
the Dean of the Graduate School at least ten days in advance of the tests, 
and should be accompanied by some 500 pages of text from which the ap- 
plicant wishes to have his examination chosen. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the unsuc- 
cessful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these tests. 

4. Examinations are held in the Seminar room. Library building, on 
the first Wednesdays in February, June, and October, at 2 p. m. 

153 



GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon 
admission to the Graduate School. 

A fixed charge, each semester, at the rate of $4.00 per sem- 
ester credit hour. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduation fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. A few industrial fellowships are also available in certain depart- 
ments. The stipend for University fellows is $400 for the academic year 
and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 

Application blanks for University fellowships may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary cre- 
dentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their respec- 
tive major departments. The usual amount of service required does not 
exceed twelve clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full 
graduate program, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for 
higher degrees in the normal time. 

The selection of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow- 
ships are assigned, with the approval of the dean or director concerned, but 
all applications must first be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 
The awards of University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 

Teaching and Research Assist ant ships. A number of teaching and re- 
search assistantships are available in several departments. The stipend for 
assistantships varies with the services rendered, and the amount of graduate 
work which an assistant is permitted to carry is determined by the head of 
the department, with the approval of the dean or director concerned. 

The compensation for each of a number of assistantships is $800 a year. 
The assistant in this class devotes one-half of his time to instruction or 
research in connection with Experiment Station projects, and he is required 
to spend two years in residence for the Master's degree. If he continues 
in residence for the Doctor's degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence 
credit for each academic year at this University. The minimum residence 
requirement from the Bachelor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four 
academic years and one summer, or three academic years and three sum- 
mer sessions of eleven or twelve weeks each. 

No minimum residence requirement for a higher degree has been estab- 
lished for other assistants. The Graduate Council, guided by the recom- 
mendation of the student's advisory committee, prescribes the required 

154 



residence in each individual case at the time the student is admitted to 
candidacy. 

All graduate fees except the diploma fee are remitted to all assistants, 
provided they are in full graduate status and are carrying programs leading 
directly to an academic higher degree. 

Further information regarding assistantships may be obtained from the 
departments or colleges concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is con- 
ferred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean and the President of 
the University. 



155 



SUMMER SESSION 

WiLLARD S. Small, Director 

A Summer Session of six weeks is conducted at College Park. The pro- 
gram serves the needs of the following classes of students: (1) teachers 
and supervisors of the several classes of school work — elementary, secondary, 
vocational, and special; (2) regular students who are candidates for degrees; 
(3) graduate students; (4) special students not candidates for degrees. 

Terms of Admission 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. Before 
registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean 
of the College or School in which he wishes to secure the degree. Teachers 
and special students not seeking a degree are admitted to the courses of the 
summer session for which they are qualified. All such selection of courses 
must be approved by the Director of the Summer Session. 

Credits and Certificates 

The semester hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the Uni- 
versity. In the summer session, a course meeting five times a week for six 
weeks and requiring the standard amount of outside work has a value of 
two semester hours. 

Courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State Depart- 
ment of Education towards satisfying certification requirements of all 
classes. 

Summer Graduate Work 

For persons wishing to do graduate work towards an advanced degree in 
the summer sessions, special arrangements are made supplementing the 
regular procedure. Teachers and other graduate students working for a 
degree on the summer plan must meet the same requirements as to admis- 
sion, credits, scholarship, and examinations as do students enrolled in the 
other sessions of the University. 

For detailed information in regard to the Summer Session, consult the 
special Sumnuer Session announcement, issued annually in April, 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Joseph D. Patch, Lieut Col, Infantry, U, S, Army, Professor 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The work in this department is based upon the provisions of Army Regu- 
lations No. 145-10, War Department. 

Authorization 

An infantry unit of the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps was established at the University under the provisions of the Act of 
Congress of June 3, 1916, as amended. 

Organization 

The unit is organized as a regiment of three battalions of three rifle 
companies each, and a band. All units are commanded by Advanced Course 
students, who have been selected for these commands on a basis of merit. 
The course of instruction is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. 

Objectives 
* Basic Course 

The object of this course is to afford to students enjoying the privileges 
of State and Federal aided education an opportunity to be trained for posi- 
tions involving leadership, within either the State or the nation. To this end 
the methods employed are designed to fit men mentally, physically, and 
morally for pursuits of peace or, if necessity requires, for national defense. 
A member of the R.O.T.C. is not in the Army of the United States, and 
membership in the unit carries no legal obligation to serve in the Army, or 
any of the armed forces. 

** Advanced Course 

The primary object of the Advanced Course is to provide military instruc- 
tion and systematic training through the agency of civil educational in- 
stitutions to selected students, to the end that they may qualify as reserve 
officers in the military forces of the United States. It is intended to attain 
this objective during the time the students are pursuing their general or 
professional studies, thus causing minimum interference to the preparatory 
requirements of their projected civil careers. 

A student prior to enrollment in this course must have satisfactorily 
completed the basic course and must have indicated in writing his desire to 



* Required of qualified students. 
•• Elective for qualified students. 



156 



157 



undertake the course. The applicant further must obtain on this document 
the recommendation of both the Dean of his College and the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, and submit same to the President of the Insti- 
tution for approval. No student will be enrolled in the Advanced Course 
without the approval of the President of the University. 

« 

Time Allotted 

For first and second years, basic course, three periods a week of not less 
than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least one hour is 
utilized for theoretical instruction. 

For third and fourth years, advanced course, elective, five periods a week 
of not less than one hour each are devoted to this work, of which at least 
three periods are utilized for theoretical instruction. 

Physical Training 

Physical training forms an important part of military instruction, and it 
is the policy of the Military Department to encourage and support the 
physical training given by civilian teachers, thus cooperating in an effort 
to promote a vigorous manhood. 

Physical Examination 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps are required to be 
examined physically at least once after entering the University. 

Uniforms 

Members of the Reserve Officers* Training Corps must appear in proper 
uniform at all military formations and at such other times as the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics may designate with the approval of the 
President of the University. 

Uniforms, or commutation in lieu of uniforms, for the Reserve Officers* 
Training Corps, are furnished by the Government. The uniforms are the 
regulation uniforms of the United States Army, with certain distinguishing 
features; or, if commutation of uniforms is furnished, then such uniforms 
as may be adopted by the University. Such uniforms must be kept in good 
condition by the students. They remain the property of the Government; 
and, though intended primarily for use in connection with military instruc- 
tion, may be worn at other times unless the regulations governing their use 
are violated. The uniform will not be worn in part nor used while the 
wearer is engaged in athletic sports other than those required as a part of 
the course of instruction. A Basic Course uniform which is furnished to a 
student by the Government will be returned to the Military Department 
at the end of the year ; or before, if a student severs his connection with the 
Department. In case commutation of uniforms is furnished, the uniform so 
purchased becomes the property of the student upon completion of two 
years' work. 

158 



Commutation 

Students who elect the Advanced Course and who have signed the con- 
tract with the Federal Government to continue in the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps for the two remaining years of the Course are entitled to a 
small per diem money allowance, for commutation of subsistence, payable 
quarterly from and including the date of contact, until they complete the 
course at the institution. 

Summer Camps 

An important and excellent feature of the Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps is the summer camp. In specially selected parts of the country, 
camps are held for a period not exceeding six weeks for students who are 
members of the Advanced Course Reserve Officers' Training Corps. These 
camps are under the close and constant supervision of army officers, and 
are intended primarily to give a thorough and comprehensive practical course 
of instruction in the different arms of the service. 

Parents may feel assured that their sons are carefully watched and safe- 
guarded. Wholesome surroundings and associates, work and healthy recre- 
ation are the keynote to contentment. Social life is not neglected, and the 
morale branch exercises strict censorship over all social functions. 

The attendance at summer camps is compulsory only for students who are 
taking the advanced course, which, as has been previously stated, is elective. 

Students who attend the summer camps are under no expense. The 
Government furnishes transportation from the institution to the camp and 
from the camp to the institution, or to the student's home, unless the mile- 
age is greater than that from the camp to the institution. In this case, the 
amount of mileage from the camp to the institution is allowed the student. 
Clothing, quarters, and food are furnished. The Advanced Course students, 
in addition to receiving quarters and food, are paid sixty cents for 
each day spent in camp. To obtain credit for camp a student must be in 
attendance at camp at least 85 per cent of the prescribed camp period. 

Commissions 

(a) Each year, upon completion of the Advanced Course, students quali- 
fied for commissions in the Reserve Officers' Corps will be selected by the 
head of the institution and the professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

(b) The number to be selected from each institution and for each arm of 
the service will be determined by the War Department. 

(c) The University of Maryland has received a rating from the War De- 
partment of "Generally Excellent" for the past several years. This rating 
indicates that the work of its R. 0. T. C. unit has been recognized by the 
Federal Government as being of a superior order. The "Generally Excel- 
lent" rating supersedes the former designation of "Distinguished College," 
which designation has been discontinued by the War Department for insti- 
tutions such as this University. 

169 



Credits 

Military instruction at this University is on a par with other university 
work, and the requirements of this department as to proficiency the same 
as those of other departments. 

Students who have received military training at any educational insti- 
tution under the direction of an army officer detailed as professor of 
military science and tactics may receive such credit as the professor of 
military science and tactics and the President may jointly determine. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS 

The purpose of the program of physical education at the University is 
broadly conceived as the development of the individual student. To accom- 
plish this purpose, physical examinations and classification tests are given 
the incoming students to determine the relative physical fitness of each. 
Upon the basis of the needs disclosed by these tests, and individual prefer- 
ences, students are assigned to the various activities of the program. 

Freshmen and sophomores assigned to physical education take three ac- 
tivity classes each week throughout the year. In the fall, soccer, touch 
football, and tennis are the chief activities; in the winter, basketball, volley 
ball, and other team games; and in the spring, track, baseball, and tennis. 
In addition to these team activities, sophomore students may elect a consid- 
erable number of individual sports, such as fencing, boxing, wrestling, horse- 
shoes, ping pong, bag punching, and the like. 

An adequate program of intramural sports is conducted, also. Touch 
football and soccer in the fall, basketball and volleyball in the winter, base- 
ball and track in the spring, are the chief activities in this program. Plaques, 
medals, and appropriate awards in all tournaments of the program are pro- 
vided for the winning teams and individual members. 

Every afternoon of the school session the facilities of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department are thrown open to all students for free unorganized 
recreation. Touch football, soccer, basketball, basket shooting, apparatus 
work, fencing, boxing, wrestling, bag punching, tennis, badminton, and ping 
pong are the most popular contests engaged in. 

The University is particularly fortunate in its possession of excellent 
facilities for carrying on the activities of the program of physical education. 
A large modern gymnasium, a new field house, a number of athletic fields, 
tennis courts, baseball diamonds, running tracks, and the like, and an athletic 
plant provided solely for the program of physical education conducted for 
the girls, constitute the major part of the equipment. 

In addition to the activities described above, the University sponsors a 
full program of intercollegiate athletics for men. Competition is promoted 
in varsity and freshman football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, lacrosse, 
and tennis, which are all major sports of this program. The University is 
a member of the Southern Conference, the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, and other national organizations for the promotion of amateur 
athletics. 

The University also maintains curricula designed to train men and women 
students to teach physical education and coach in the high schools of the 
State. 

For a description of the courses in Physical Education, see College of 
Education, and Section III, Description of Courses, 



160 



161 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, Dean. 
Faculty Council 

George M. Anderson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Bbice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Oren H. Gaver, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Robert L. Mitchell, Phar.D., M.D. 

Alexander H. Paterson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

Leo a. Walzak, D.D.S. 

HISTORY 

The University of Maryland was organized December 28, 1807, as the 
College of Medicine of Maryland. On December 29, 1812, the University 
of Maryland charter was issued to the College of Medicine of Maryland. 
There were at that period but four medical schools in America — the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, founded in 1765; the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons of New York, in 1767; Harvard University, in 1782; and Dartmouth 
College, in 1797. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1821 and 1825. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal 
dissension in the School of Medicine, but were continued in the year 1837. 
It was Dr. Hayden's idea that dentistry merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medical instruction, and he undertook to develop this spe- 
cialty as a branch of medicine. With this thought in mind he, with the 
support of Dr. Chapin A. Harris, appealed to the Faculty of Physic of the 
University of Maryland for the creation of a department of dentistry as a 
part of the medical curriculum. The request having been refused, an inde- 
pendent college was decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted 
by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. The first faculty meeting 
was held February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. H. H. Hayden was elected 
President and Dr. C. A. Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was de- 
livered by Dr. Harris on November 3, 1840, to the five students matriculated 
in the first class. Thus was the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, the 
first and oldest dental school in the world, created as the foundation of the 
present dental profession. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, was organized and continued instruction in dental 

162 



subjects until 1879, at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. A department of dentistry was organized at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a class each year 
from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered as a corporation and con- 
tinued as a privately owned and directed institution until 1920, when it 
became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it merged 
with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, 
School of Dentistry, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a 
distinct department of the State University under State supervision and 
control. Thus we find in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, a merging of the various efforts at dental 
education in Maryland. From these component elements have radiated de- 
velopments of the art and science of dentistry until the strength of its 
alumni is second to none either in number or degree of service to the pro- 
fession. 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry now occupies its new building at the northwest 
corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital, 
being so situated that it offers opportunity for abundant clinic material. 
The new building provides approximately 45,000 square feet of floor space, 
is fire proof, and is ideally lighted and ventilated. A sufficient number of 
large lecture rooms and classrooms, a library and reading room, science 
laboratories, technic laboratories, clinic rooms, locker rooms, etc., are pro- 
vided. The building is furnished with new equipment throughout with every 
accommodation necessary for satisfactory instruction under comfortable 
arrangements and pleasant surroundings. The large clinic wing accommo- 
dates one hundred and thirty-nine chairs. The following clinic departments 
have been provided: Operative, Prosthetic (including Crown and Bridge and 
Ceramics), Anesthesia and Surgery, Pathology, Orthodontia, Pedodontia, 
Radiodontia, and Photography. Modern units with electric engines have 
been installed in all clinics, while provision has been made for the use of 
electric equipment in all technic laboratories. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a four-year course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the 
medical sciences, the dental sciences, the ancillary sciences, and clinical 
practice. Instruction consists of didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, 
demonstrations, conferences, and quizzes. Topics are assigned for collateral 
reading to train the student in the values and use of dental literature. 

163 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Care is observed in selecting students to begin the study of dentistry, 
through a strict adherence to proved ability in secondary education and in 
the completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. The 
secondary school requirements observed by the College of Arts and Sciences, 
University of Maryland, are strictly -adhered to. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THP COLLEGE OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The requirement for admission is graduation from an accredited secondary 
school which requires for graduation in a four-year course of not less than 
fifteen units. *(See note.) The equivalent in entrance examinations may 
be offered by a non-graduate of a secondary school. 

REQUIRED: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 
unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total 7 units. 

ELECTIVE: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home economics, voca- 
tional subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, 
or any other subject offered in a standard high or preparatory school for 
which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 
Eight units must be submitted from this group. 

All applicants must present their credentials for verification to the Regis- 
trar of the University of Maryland. A blank form for submitting credentials 
may be had by applying to the office of the Dean. The form must be filled 
out in full with names of all schools attended, signed by the applicant and 
returned to the Registrar's office with two dollars investigation fee. The 
applicant should not send diplomas or certificates. The Registrar of the 
University of Maryland will secure all necessary credentials after the 
application has been received. One should not make application unless 
reasonably certain that preparation is sufficient, or unless intending to com- 
plete preparation if insufficient. Ample time should be allowed for securing 
credentials and investigating schools. If the applicant qualifies for the study 
of the profession, a certificate will be issued; otherwise, notice will be given 
concerning whatever deficiency exists. 

The applicant for admission must present a certificate of recommendation 
from the principal of the high school from which he has graduated. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

Dental education is advancing from a one-year predental collegiate re- 
quirement to a two-year predental collegiate requirement. The School of 
Dentistry, University of Maryland, will begin to make the two-year require- 
ment with the regular session 1936-1937. 



♦Required seven (7), and Elective eight (8), units for entrance. Total fifteen (15) units. 

164 



Applicants for admission to the Dental School must present credit for at 
least sixty semester hours of college work including eight semester hours 
of inorganic chemistry, eight semester hours of zoology, six semester hours 
of English, six semester hours of college mathematics, six semester hours 
of organic chemistry, and six semester hours of physics. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION— PREDENTAL 

The University of Maryland offers the following predental course of in- 
struction to students desiring to equip themselves for admission to the 
School of Dentistry under the two-four plan. Admission to this course is 
based upon the requirements for admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Suggested Predental Curriculum 

Semester 

I n 

Freshman Year 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. ly) 3 3 

Algebra (Math. If) „ 3 — 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 2s) „ — - — 3 

Reading and Speaking (Eng. 2y) ~ 1 1 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chem. ly)... 4 4 

General Zoology (Zool. If) - - 4 — 

Vertebrate Zoology (Zool. 2s) — 4 

Total Semester Hours - 16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 2y) 2 2 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Chem. 3y) - 2 2 

General Physics (Physics ly) - -^ 4 4 

Modem Language (French or German) 4 4 

Fundamentals of Economics - 3 — 

Government, Psychology, or Sociology - — 8 

Metallurgy - - 1 1 

Total Semester Hours — 16 16 

For the information of high school graduates anticipating the two-year 
predental course, the fees for this are included in this catalogue on page 
168. This course is offered in the Baltimore branch of the University. 



Transfers 

Applicants desiring to transfer from another recognized dental school 
must show record of creditable scholarship in all years previously devoted to 

165 



(>. 



'A- 

r 



I:-* 



the study of dentistry. No applicant carrying conditions or failures in any 
year of his previous dental instruction will be considered. All records must 
show an average grade of 5% over the passing mark of the school in which 
the transfer credits were earned. Applicants whose records show habitual 
failures and conditions will not be considered for admission. The trans- 
ferring student must satisfy the preliminary educational requirement out- 
lined under Requirements for Matriculation. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at 
which time lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the 
session, the dates for which are announced in the Calendar. 

Regular attendance is demanded. Students with less than eighty-five per 
cent attendance in any course will be denied the privilege of final exami- 
nation in any and all such courses. In certain unavoidable circumstances 
of absence the Dean may honor excuses, but students with less than eighty- 
five per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding class. 

In cases of serious illness, as attested by a physician, students may 
register not later than the twentieth day following the advertised opening 
of the regular session. Students may register and enter not later than ten 
days after the beginning of the session, but such delinquency will be charged 
as absence from the class. 

Promotion 

To be promoted to the next succeeding year a student must have passed 
courses amounting to at least 80 per cent of the total schedule hours of 
the year, and must have an average of 80 per cent on all subjects passed. 

A grade of 75 i>er cent is passing. A grade between 60 per cent and 
passing is a condition. A grade below 60 per cent is a failure. A con- 
dition may be removed by a reexamination. In such effort, failure to make 
a passing mark is recorded as a failure in the course. A failure can be re- 
moved only by repeating the course. A student with combined conditions 
and failures amounting to 40 per cent of the schedule hours of the year will 
not be permitted to proceed with his class. Students carrying conditions will 
not be admitfed to senior standing; a student in any other class may carry 
one condition to the next succeeding year. All conditions and failures must 
be removed within twelve months from the time they were incurred. 

Eqiuipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic 
and clinic courses, and text books for lecture courses will be announced for 
the various classes. Each student will be required to provide himself with 
whatever is necessary to meet the needs of his course, and present the same 
to a responsible class officer for inspection. No student will be permitted 
to go on with his class who does not meet this requirement. 

166 



Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires 
evidence of good moral character of its students. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 
to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. 
Integrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority 
and associates, and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a 
student will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary 
to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate 
who has met the following conditions: 

1. Documentary evidence that he has attained the age of 21 years. 

2. Evidence that the candidate has taken the full four-year course of 
study of the dental curriculum, the last year of which shall have been spent 
in this institution. 

3. A general average of 80 per cent or higher during the full course of 
study. 

4. The satisfaction of all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. Liquidation of all indebtedness to the college and satisfactory adjust- 
ment of all financial obligations in the community prior to the beginning of 
final examinations. 

FEES FOR THE DENTAL COURSE 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for -admis- 
sion) - - - - — ?2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at time of enrollment) 10.00 

Tuition for the session, resident student ~ 250.00 

Tuition for the session, non-resident student - - 350.00 

Dissecting fee (first semester, freshman year) - 15.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) 20.00 

Locker fee — freshman and sophomore years (first semester) 3.00 

Locker fee — junior and senior years (first semester) 5.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit — freshman and sophomore years (first 

semester) - ^-^^ 

Graduation fee (paid with second semester fees of senior year) 15.00 

Penalty fee for late registration 5.00 

Examinations taken out of class and reexaminations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record will be issued to each student free 

of charge. Each additional copy will be issued only on payment of 1.00 

167 



FEES FOR THE PREDENTAL COURSE 

Application fee (paid at time of filing application for admission) $2.00 

Matriculation fee (paid at the time of enrollment) 10.00 

Tuition for the session, resident student 200.00 

Tuition for the session, non-resident student 250.00 

Laboratory fee (each session) 20.00 

Locker fee ( each session ) 3.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (each session) - 5.00 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a Professional School of the University or from 
one Professional School to another, he must pay the usual matriculation 
fee required by each Professional School. 

A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or 
days specified for his school, will be called upon to pay a fine of $5.00. The 
last day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon 
of the week in which instruction begins, following the specified registration 
period. (This rule may be waived only on the written recommendation of 
the Dean.) 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and pay to the Comptroller one-half of the tuition fee in 
addition to all other fees noted as payable first semester before being ad- 
mitted to class work at the opening of the session. The remainder of tuition 
and second semester fees must be in the hands of the Comptroller on the 
registration day for the second semester. 

According to the policy of the Dental School no fees will be returned. 
In case the student iJiscontinues his course, any fees paid will be credited to 
a subsequent course, but are not transferable. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration their parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this State for at least one 
year; provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full 



• The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand in loco parentis to such minor 
students. 

168 



calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

Summer Courses 

Aside from and independent of the regular session, special courses are 
offered during the summer recess. The course in clinical instruction is 
conducted from June 1 to August 1 and from September 1 to 19 inclusive. 
The course is open only to students registered in the school. It offers op- 
portunities to students carrying conditions in the clinic from the preceding 
session as well as those who desire to gain more extended practice during 
their training period. The clinics are under the direction of capable dem- 
onstrators, full credit being given for all work done. 

The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1914 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The 
society is named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental 
education, a teacher of many years experience, and during his life a great 
contributor to dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his 
name that the society adopted it. 

Students become eligible for membership at the beginning of their junior 
year if, during their preceding years of the dental course, they have at- 
tained a general average of 85 per cent or more in all of their studies. 
Meetings are held once each month, and are addressed by prominent dental 
and medical men, an effort being made to obtain speakers not connected 
with the University. The members have an opportunity, even while stu- 
dents, to hear men associated with other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental fraternity was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, during the session of 1928-1929. Membership in the 
fraternity is awarded to a number not exceeding twelve per cent of the 
graduating class. This honor is conferred upon students who through their 
professional course of study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, 
and whose conduct, earnestness, evidence of good character, and high 
scholarship recommend them to election. 



Scholarship Loans 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations have been available to students in the School of Dentistry. 
These loans are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attain- 
ment and the need on the part of students for assistance in completing 

169 



p 



their course in dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty to recom- 
mend only students in the last two years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation — From this fund, established 
under the will of General Henry Strong, of Chicago, an annual allotment 
is made to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, for loans available for the use of young men and 
women students under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations for the 
privileges of these loans are limited to students in the junior and senior 
years. Only students who through stress of circumstances require financial 
aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational progress are con- 
sidered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S, Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund — Under a pro- 
vision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New Haven, Conn., 
an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds of 
which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This 
organization has continued in existence to the present, its name having been 
changed to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

Roger Howell, Dean 

THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., A.M., LL.B. 

Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut, A.B., LL.B. 

G. Ridgely Sappington, Esq., LL.B. 

Roger Howell, Esq., A.B., Ph.D., LL.B. 

Edwin G. W. Ruge, Esq., A.B., LL.B. 

A. J. Casner, A.B., LL.B. 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, A.B., Ph.D., J.D. 

While the first faculty of law of the University of Maryland was chosen 
in 1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally," which the North American Review 
pronounced to be "by far the most perfect system for the study of law 
which has ever been offered to the public," and which recommended a course 
of study so comprehensive as to require for its completion six or seven 
years, no regular school of instruction in law was opened until 1823. The 
institution thus established was suspended in 1836 for lack of proper pecuni- 
ary support. In 1869 the School of Law was reorganized, and in 1870 
regular instruction therein was again begun. From time to time the course 
has been made more comprehensive, and the staff of instructors increased 
in number. Its graduates now number more than three thousand, and 
included among them are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained prominence in the pro- 
fession elsewhere. 

The Law School has been recognized by the Council of the Section of Legal 
Education of the American Bar Association as meeting the standards of the 
American Bar Association, and has been placed upon its approved list. 

The Law School is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
an association composed of the leading law schools in the United States, 
member schools being required to maintain certain high standards relating 
to entrance requirements, faculty, library, and curriculum. 

The Law School is also registered as an approved school on the New York 
Regents* list. 

The Law School Building, erected in 1931, is located at Redwood 
and Greene Streets in Baltimore. In addition to classrooms and offices for 



170 



171 



the Law faculty, it contains a large auditorium, practice-court room, stu- 
dents* lounge and locker rooms, and the law library, the latter containing 
a collection of carefully selected text-books, English and American reports, 
leading legal periodicals, digests, and standard encyclopedias. No fee is 
charged for the use of the library, which is open from 9.00 A. M. to 10.30 
P. M., except on Saturday, when it closes at 5.00 P. M. 

Course of Instruction 

The School of Law is divided into two divisions, the Day School and the 
Evening School. The same curriculum is offered in each school, and the 
standards of work and graduation requirements are the same. 

The Day School course covers a period of three years of thirty-two weeks 
each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held during the day, 
chiefly in the morning hours. The Practice Court sessions are held on Mon- 
day evenings from 8.00 to 10.00 P. M. 

The Evening School course covers a period of four years of thirty-six 
weeks each, exclusive of holidays. The class sessions are held on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday evenings of each week from 6.30 to 9.30 P. M. This 
plan leaves the alternate evenings for study and preparation by the student. 

The course of instruction in the School of Law is designed thoroughly to 
equip the student for the practice of his profession when he attains the Bar. 
Instruction is offered in the various branches of the common law, of equity, 
of the statute law of Maryland, and of the public law of the United States. 
The course of study embraces both the theory and practice of the law, and 
aims to give the student a broad view of the origin, development, and func- 
tion of law, together with a thorough practical knowledge of its principles 
and their application. Analytical study is made of the principles of sub- 
stantive and procedural law, and a carefully directed practice court enables 
the student to get an intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

Special attention is given to the statutes in force in Maryland, and to 
any peculiarities of the law in that State, where there are such. All of the 
subjects upon which the applicant for the Bar in Maryland is examined are 
included in the curriculum. But the curriculum includes all of the more 
important branches of public and private law, and is well designed to pre- 
pare the student for admission to the Bar of other States. 

Requirements for Admission 

The requirements for admission are those of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Applicants for admission as candidates for a degree are re- 
quired to produce evidence of the completion of at least two years of college 
work; that is, the completion of at least one-half the work acceptable for a 
Bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study by the 
University of Maryland or other principal college or university in this State. 

To meet this requirement, a candidate for admission must present at least 
sixty semester hours (or their equivalent) of college work taken in an insti- 
tution approved by standard regional accrediting agencies and exclusive of 

172 



credit earned in non-theory courses in military science, hygiene, domestic 
arts, physical education, vocal or instrumental music, or other courses 
without intellectual content of substantial value. Such pre-legal work must 
have been done in residence, no credit being allowed for work done in corre- 
spondence or extension courses, and must have been passed with a scholastic 
a^'?erage at least equal to the average required for graduation in the institu- 
tion attended. 

In compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law Schools, 
a limited number of special students, not exceeding 10 per cent of the aver- 
age number of students admitted as beginning regular law students during 
the two preceding years, applying for admission with less than the aca- 
demic credit required of candidates for the law degree, may be admitted 
as candidates for the certificate of the school, but not for the degree, where, 
in the opinion of the Faculty Council, special circumstances, such as the 
maturity and apparent ability of the student, seem to justify a deviation 
from the rule requiring at least two years of college work. Such applicants 
must be at least twenty-three years of age and specially equipped by train- 
ing and experience for the study of law. 

Combined Program of Study Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts 

and Bachelor of Laws 

The University offers a combined program in arts and law leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. 

Students pursuing this combined program in college and pre-legal sub- 
jects will spend the first three years in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park. The fourth year they will register in the School of Law, and 
upon the successful completion of the work of the first year in the Day 
School, or the equivalent work in the Evening School, the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts will be awarded. The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be 
awarded upon the completion of the work prescribed for graduation in the 
School of Law. 

Details of the combined course may be had upon application to the 
Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., or by reference to 
page 110. 

Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the requirements for admission to the school 
who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law elsewhere in 
an approved law school, may, in the discretion of the Faculty Council, upon 
presentation of a certificate from such law school showing an honorable 
dismissal therefrom, and the successful completion of equivalent courses 
therein, covering at least as many hours as are required for such subjects 
in this school, receive credit for such courses and be admitted to advanced 
standing. No credit will be given for study pursued in a law office, and 

173 



no degree will be conferred until after one year of residence and study at 
this school. 



Fees and Expenses 

The charges for instruction are as follows: 

Registration fee to accompany application. $ 2.OO 

Matriculation fee, payable on first registration io!oo 

Diploma fee, payable upon graduation _. 15.00 

Tuition fee, per annum : 

Day School. „ ^ .„ $200.00 

Evening School ^ 150.00 

An additional tuition fee of $50.00 per annum must be paid by students 
who are non-residents of the State of Maryland. 

The tuition fee is payable in two equal instalments, one-half at the time 
of registration for the first semester, and one-half at the time of registra- 
tion for the second semester. 

Further information and a special catalogue of the School of Law may 
be had upon application to the School of Law, University of Marylana, 
Redwood and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Magnus Gregersen, Ph.D. 



I 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of age 
among the medical colleges of the United States. In the school building at 
Lombard and Greene Streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory part 
of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) ; and 
here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of diseases of 
women and children (1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for senior students first was established. 



Qinical Facilities 

The University Hospital, property of the University, is the oldest institu- 
tion for the care of the sick in Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, and at that time consisted of four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 



174 



175 



Besides its own hospital, the School of Medicine has control of the clinical 
facilities of the Mercy Hospital, in which were treated last year 23,237 
persons. 

In connection with the University Hospital, an outdoor obstetrical clinic 
is conducted. During the past year 1,614 cases were treated in the Lying 
In Hospital and outdoor clinic. 

The hospital now has about 400 beds — for medical, surgical, obstetrical, 
and special cases; and furnishes an excellent supply of clinical material for 
third- and fourth-year students. 

Dispensaries and Laboratories 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital are organized on a uniform plan in order that teaching may be 
the same in each. Each dispensary has departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, 
Cardiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Dermatology, 
Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. All students in their junior year work 
two hours daily for ten weeks in one of these dispensaries; all students in 
the senior year work one hour each day; 111,689 cases were treated last 
year, which fact gives an idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical 
teaching. 

Laboratories conducted by the University purely for medical purposes 
are the Anatomical, Chemical, Experimental Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry, Histology and Embryology, Pathology, Bacteriology and Im- 
munology, Clinical Pathology, Pharmacology, and Operative Surgery. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

The following prizes and scholarships are offered in the School of Medi- 
cine. (For details see School of Medicine Bulletin.) 

Faculty Medal; Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Prize; Dr. Samuel Leon Frank 
Scholarship; Hitchcock Scholarships; Randolph Winslow Scholarship; Uni- 
versity Scholarships; Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship; Dr. Leo Karlinsky 
Memorial Scholarship; Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships; Israel 
and Cecelia A. Cohen Scholarships. 

Requirements for Admission 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical Student 
Certificate issued by the Director of Admissions of the University of Mary- 
land, Baltimore, Maryland. This certificate is obtained on the basis of satis- 
factory credentials, or by examination and credentials, and is essential for 
admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student's Certificate 
are as follows: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or the 
equivalent in entrance examinations, and in addition: 

176 



*(b) Two years of basic college credits, including chemistry, biology, 
physics, modem foreign language, and English, and exclusive of Military 
Drill or Physical Education as outlined in the Pre-Medical Curriculum (page 
103), or its equivalent. The foregoing will meet the minimum requirement 
for admission. Students are strongly recommended, however, to complete the 
three-year pre-medical curriculum before making application for admission. 

Men and women are admitted on equal terms to the School of Medicine 
of this University. 

Expenses 

The following are the fees for students in the School of Medicine : 

Matriculation Resident— Non-Resident Laboratory Graduation 

$10.00 (only once) $400.00 $600.00 $25.00 (yearly) $15.00T 

Estimated living expenses for students in Baltimore: 

llQ^iYis ^ow Average Liberal 

Books : - ?50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals - 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent -.-- 64 80 100 

Clothing and Laundry. 50 80 150 

All other expenses -~ 25 50 75 

Total -... - $409 $556 $720 



* For admission to the Pre-Medical Curriculum the requirements are the same as for the 
freshman class in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University with the prescribt^d 
addition of two years of one foreign language. (See Section I, Entrance.) 

tThe above tuition fees applicable until the end of the session 1936 only. The right is 
reserved to make changes in these fees whenever the authorities deem them expedient. 



177 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Annie Crighton, R.N., Director and Superintendent of Nurses 

The University of Maryland School of Nursing was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland Hospital. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning 
prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 400 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of 
instruction and practice in all phases of nursing, including experience in 
the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its opportunity 
for varied experience and in its thorough curriculum taught by well-qualified 
instructors and members of the medical staff of the University. 

Programs Offered 

The program of study of the School is planned for two groups of students : 
(a) The three-year group; (b) the five-year group. 



Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission to the School of Nursing must be a graduate 
of an accredited high school or other recognized preparatory school, and 
must present record showing that she has completed satisfactorily the 
required amount of preparatory study. Preference will be given to students 
who rank in the upper third of the graduating class in their respective 
preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance: Required (7), 
and Elective (8). 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, drawing, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational sub- 
jects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any 
other subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory school for 
which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 
Eight units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than 
four units may pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above, students must meet certain other definite re- 
quirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. Women 

178 



of superior education and culture are given preference, provided they meet 
the requirements in other particulars. If possible, a personal interview 
with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday or Friday 
from 11:00 A. M. to 12:00 M. 

Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director' of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 

By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, all 
students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the beginning of 
their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible for examination 
and license on completion of this course. Blanks necessary for this purpose 
will be sent with application forms. A fee of $2 is charged for registration. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, or neglect of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the 
President of the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Special catalogue will be 
sent upon request.) The three-year program is designed to meet the re- 
quirements for the diploma in Nursing and comprises the work of the first, 
second, and third hospital years. 

Admission to the School 

Students for the spring term are admitted in February and those for the 
fall term in September or October, and for the five-year course in September. 



Hours of Duty 

During the preparatory period the students are engaged in class work 
for the first four months with no general duty in the hospital, and for the 
remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight-hour duty. 
During the first, second, and third years the students are on eight-hour day 
duty and nine-hour night duty with six hours on holidays and Sundays. 
The night-duty periods are approximately two months each with one day 
at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The period of 
night duty is approximately five to six months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours, and includes courses in anatomy, physiology, 
cookery and nutrition, dosage and solution, hygiene, bacteriology, chem- 
istry, materia medica, practical nursing, bandaging, ethics, and history 

179 



of nursing. During the last two months of the probation period the stu- 
dents are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction in bedside 
nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to them by the 
Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the students are 
required to pass both written and practical tests; failure to do so will be 
sufficient reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Sickness 

A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill, all students are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two weeks, dur- 
ing the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the school 
decide that through the time lost the theoretical work has not been suffi- 
ciently covered to permit the student to continue in that year, it will be 
necessary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations 

Vacations are given between June and September. A period of four 
weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first year and of the 
second year. 

Expenses 

A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from each student. This 
will not be returned. A student receives her board, lodging, and a reason- 
able amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her period of 
probation she provides her own uniforms, obtained through the hospital at 
a nominal cost. After being accepted as a student nurse, she wears the 
uniform supplied by the hospital. The student is also provided with text- 
books and shoes. Her personal expenses during the course of training and 
instruction will depend entirely upon her individual habits and tastes. 

THREE- YEAR PROGRAM 

First Year 

The first year is divided into two periods: the first semester, or the pre- 
paratory period (6 months), and the second semester. 

First Semester 

In the first semester, or preparatory term, the student is given practical 
instruction in the following: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies, the cost of hospital 
material, apparatus, and surgical instruments. 

II. Household economics and preparation of foods, particularly applied 
to invalid cooking and nutrition. 

180 



During this term the practical work is done under constant supervision, 
and teaching is given correlatively. ^ 

Excursions are made to filtration and sewerage plants, markets, hygienic 
dairies, linen rooms, laundry, and store room. 

At the close of the first half of the first year the students are required 
to pass both written and oral tests, and failure to do so will be sufficient 
reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Subsequent Course 

The course of instruction, in addition to the first semester, or the prepara- 
tory period, occupies two and one-half years, and students are not accepted 
for a shorter period, except in special instances. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly engaged in practical 
work under the immediate supervision and direction of the head nurses and 

instructors. 

Throughout the three years, regular courses of instruction and lectures 
are given by members of the medical and nursing school faculties. 

First Year 

Second Semester 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction in massage, 
general surgery, urinalysis and laboratory methods, diet in disease, and 
advanced nursing procedures. 

Practical instruction is received in the male and female, medical, surgical, 

and children's wards. 

Second Year 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes pediatrics ; general 
medicine; infectious diseases; obstetrics; gynecology; orthopedics; skin and 
venereal; eye, ear, nose, and throat; X-ray and radium; and dental. The 
practical' work provides experience in the nursing of obstetrical and gyne- 
cological patients, in the operating rooms and the out-patient department. 

Third Year 

Theoretical instruction includes psychiatry, public sanitation, profes- 
sional problems, and survey of the nursing field. 

During this period the student receives short courses of lectures on sub- 
jects of special interest. These include a consideration of the work of insti- 
tutions, of public and private charities, of settlements, and of the various 
branches of professional work in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administrative work for those show- 
ing exceptional ability in the Third Year. With these students conferences 
are held on administration and teaching problems. 

181 



Attendance at Classes 

Attendance is required at all classes. Absences are excused by the Di- 
rector of the School only in case of illness or absence from the school. 

Examinations 

These are both written and oral, and include practical tests. The stand- 
ing of the student is based upon the general character of work throughout 
the year as well as the results of the examinations. Students must pass 
upon all subjects of each year before entering upon the work of the follow- 
ing year. 

Graduation 

The diploma of the school will be awarded to those who have completed 
satisfactorily the full term of three years and have passed the final exami- 
nations. 

Scholarships 

One scholarship has been established by the Alumnae of the Training 
School, which entitles a nurse to a six-weeks course at Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York. This scholarship is awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose work has been of the highest ex- 
cellence, and who desires to pursue post-graduate study and special work. 
There are two scholarships of the value of $50.00 each, known as the Edwin 
and Leander M. Zimmerman and the Elizabeth Collins Lee prizes. An 
Alumnae Pin is presented by the Woman's Auxiliary Board to a student 
who at the completion of three years shows marked executive ability. A 
prize of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst to a student who at 
the completion of three years shows exceptional executive ability. 

Five- Year Program 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, as shown on page 105 of this catalogue, are spent in the 
College of Arts and Sciences of the University, during which period the 
student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects which are con- 
sidered fundamental in any college training. At least the latter of these 
two years must be spent in residence at College Park, in order that the 
student may have her share in the social and cultural activities of college 
life. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore 
or in the Training School of Mercy Hospital, which is also affiliated with 
the School of Medicine of the University. In the fifth year of the combined 
program, certain elective courses such as public health nursing, nursing 
education, practical sociology, and educational psychology are arranged. 

182 



Degree and Diploma 

The Diploma in Nursing will be awarded to those who have completed 
satisfactorily the three-years' program. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing are 
awarded to students who complete successfully the prescribed combmed 
academic and nursing program. 



183 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

A. G. Du Mez, Dean 

Faculty Council 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Glenn L. Jenkins, Ph.G., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
E. F. Kelly, Phar.D. 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph.G., B.S., Ph.D. 
J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar.D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar.D., LL.B. 
H. E. WiCH, Phar.D. 

The School of Pharmacy began its existence as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy. The latter was organized in 1841, and operated as an inde- 
pendent institution until 1904, when it amalgamated with the group of 
professional schools in Baltimore then known as the University of Maryland. 
It became a department of the present University when the old University 
of Maryland was merged with the Maryland State College in 1920. With 
but one short intermission, just prior to 1865, it has continuously exercised 
its function as a teaching institution. 

Location 

The School of Pharmacy is located at Lombard and Greene Streets, in 
close proximity to the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry. 

AIMS 

The School of Pharmacy provides systematic instruction in pharmacy, 
the collateral sciences, and such other subjects as are deemed to be essential 
in the education of a pharmacist. Its chief aim is to prepare its matriculants 
for the intelligent practice of dispensing pharmacy, but it also offers the 
facilities and instruction necessary for the attainment of proficiency in the 
practice of the other branches of the profession and in pharmaceutical re- 
search. 

Combined Curriculum in Pharmacy and Medicine 

A combined curriculum has been arranged with the School of Medicine of 
the University by which students may obtain the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy and Doctor of Medicine, in seven years. Students who 
successfully complete the first three years of the course in pharmacy and 
an additional four semester hours in zoology, and show that they are quali- 
fied by character and scholarship to enter the medical profession, are elig- 
ible for admission into the School of Medicine of the University; and upon 
the successful completion of the first two years of the medical course will 
be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy by the School 
of Pharmacy. 

184 



This privilege will be open only to students who maintain a uniformly 
jrood scholastic record during the first two years of the course in Pharmacy ; 
and those who wish to avail themselves of it must so advise the School of 
Pharmacy before entering upon the work of the third year. 

Recognition 

This school holds membership in the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy. The object of the Association is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education; and all institutions holding membership must 
maintain certain minimum requirements for entrance and graduation. 
Through the influence of this Association, uniform and higher standards of 
education have been adopted from time to time; and the fact that several 
States by law or by Board ruling recognize the standards of the Association 

is evidence of its influence. 
The school is registered in the New York Department of Education, and 

its diploma is recognized in all States. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The requirement for admission is graduation from an accredited high 
or preparatory school which requires for graduation in a four-year course 
not less than 15 units of high-school work grouped as shown below. In 
case an applicant is not a graduate of a high or preparatory school, as 
defined above, the full equivalent of such education in each individual case 
must be established and attested by the highest public educational officer 
of the State. 

UNITS FOR ENTRANCE: Required, 7; elective, 8; total, 15. 

REQUIRED: English, (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 
1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit Total, 7 
units. 

ELECTIVE: Agriculture, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home economics, 
vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, 
zoology, or any other subject offered in a standard high or preparatory 
school for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university 
entrance. Eight units must be submitted from this group. 

An application blank for admission may be had by applying to the office 
of the Dean. The form must be filled out in full with names of all schools 
attended, signed by the applicant and returned to the office of the Director 
of Admissions with two dollars investigation fee. Do not send diplomas or 
certificates. The Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland 
will secure all necessary credentials after the application has been received. 
Do not make application unless reasonably certain that preparation is 
sufficient, or unless intending to complete preparation if insufficient. Ample 
time should be aUowed for securing credentials and investigating schools. 
If the applicant qualifies for the study of the profession, a certificate will 

be issued. 

185 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who present in addition to high-school requirements credit for 
subjects taken in schools of pharmacy holding membership in the Ameri- 
can Association of Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit for corres- 
ponding courses of equal length and content scheduled for the first three 
years of the course, provided they present a proper certificate of honorable 
dismissal. 

Credit for general educational subjects will be given to students pre- 
senting evidence of having completed work equal in value to that outlined 
in this catalogue. 

Transferring students in either case must satisfy the preliminary educa- 
tional requirements outlined under Requirements for Admission. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An applicant who cannot furnish sufficient entrance credit and who does 
not care to make up the units in which he is deficient may enter as a special 
student and pursue all the branches of the curriculum, but will not be eli- 
gible for graduation, and will not receive a diploma. The School of Phar- 
macy reserves the right to decide whether or not the preliminary training 
of the applicant is sufficient. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. in 
Pharm.) must be of good moral character, and must have completed all of 
the prescribed work for that degree. 

The work of the last year must be taken in this School. 

The requirements for higher degrees are stated in the Graduate School 
Bulletin. 

MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION 

The matriculation ticket must be procured from the office of the School 
of Pharmacy, and must be taken out before one enters classes. After 
matriculation, all students are required to register at the office of the 
Director of Admissions. The last date of matriculation is Sept. 26, 1936. 



Matriculation 
$10.00 (only once) 



Expenses 

Tuition 
Resident — Non-Resident 

$200.00 $250.00 



Laboratory 

and 
Breakage 

$60.00 (yearly) 



Graduation 
$15.00 



Tuition for the first semester and laboratory and breakage fee shall be 
paid to the Comptroller at the time of registration; and tuition for the 
second semester and graduation fee (the latter returned in case of failure) 
on or before Feb. 1, 1937. 

A bulletin giving details of the course in Pharmacy may be obtained by 
addressing the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

186 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 
H. C. Byrd. _ - „.... Executive Officer 



F. K. Haszard 



^ - Executive Secretary 



The law provides that the personnel of the State Board of Agriculture 
shall be the same as the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland. 
The President of the University is the Executive Officer of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

General Powers of Board: The general powers of the Board as stated in 
Article 7 of the Laws of 1916, Chapter 391, are as follows : 

"The State Board of Agriculture shall investigate the conditions sur- 
rounding the breeding, raising, and marketing of live stock and the products 
thereof, and contagious and infectious diseases affecting the same; the rais- 
ing, distribution, and sale of farm, orchard, forest, and nursery products, 
generally, and plant diseases and injurious insects affecting the same; the 
preparation, manufacture, quality analysis, inspection, control, and distri- 
bution of animal and vegetable products, animal feeds, seeds, fertilizers, 
agricultural lime, agricultural and horticultural chemicals, and biological 
products; and shall secure information and statistics in relation thereto and 
publish such information, statistics, and the results of such investigations 
at such times and in such manner as to it shall seem best adapted to the ef- 
ficient dissemination thereof; and except where such powers and duties are 
by law conferred or laid upon other boards, commissions, or officials, the 
State Board of Agriculture shall have general supervision, direction, and 
control of the herein recited matters, and generally of all matters in any 
way affecting or relating to the fostering, protection, and development of 
the agricultural interests of the State, including the encouragement of de- 
sirable immigration thereto, with power and authority to issue rules and 
regulations in respect thereof not in conflict with the Constitution and Laws 
of the State or the United States, which shall have the force and effect of 
law, and all violations of which shall be punished as misdemeanors are 
punished at common law; and where such powers and duties are by law 
conferred or laid on other governmental agencies may co-operate in the 
execution and performance thereof, and when so co-operating each shall be 
vested with such authority as is now or may hereafter by law be conferred 
on the other. The powers and duties herein recited shall be in addition to 
and not in limitation of any power and duties which now are or hereafter 
may be conferred or laid upon said board." 

Under the above authority and by special legislation, all regulatory work 
is conducted under the general authority of the State Board. This includes 
the following services: 

187 



LIVE STOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

816 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Maryland. 

This Service has charge of regulatory work in connection with the control 
of animal and poultry diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis. Bang's Disease, 
hog cholera, encephalomyelitis, rabies, anthrax, blackleg, and scabies in 
animals; and pullorum disease and blackhead in poultry. The Service co- 
operates in these activities with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Well equipped laboratories for research, diagnostic work, and the examina- 
tion of specimens, are maintained at College Park, and a branch laboratory 
for the convenience of persons residing in the Northern and Western parts 
of the State is maintained at Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

Mark Welsh -._ _ State Veterinarian 

STATE HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

College Park, Maryland. 

The State Horticultural Law was enacted in 1898. It provides for the 
inspection of all nurseries and the suppression of injurious insects and dis- 
eases affecting plants of all kinds. The work of the department is con- 
ducted in close association with the departments of Entomology and 
Pathology of the University. The regulatory work is conducted under the 
authority of the law creating the department as well as the State Board of 
Agriculture. For administrative purposes, the department is placed under 
the Extension Service of the University on account of the close association 
of the work. 

T. B. Symons Director of Extension Service 

E. N. Cory State Entomologist 

C. E. Temple State Pathologist 

FEED, FERTILIZER, AND LIME INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

The Feed, Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection Service, a branch of the Chem- 
istry Department of the University, enforces the State regulatory statutes 
controlling the purity and truthful labeling of all feeds, fertilizers, and 
limes that are offered or exposed for sale in Maryland. 

L. B. Broughton , » State Chemist 

L. E. Bopst. -..Associate State Chemist 



SEED INSPECTION SERVICE 

College Park, Maryland. 

The Seed Inspection Service is placed by law under the general super- 
vision of the Agricultural Experiment Station. This service takes samples 
of seed offered for sale, and tests them for quality and germination. 

F. S. Holmes ~ -.-. - Seed Inspector 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. 

The Department of Forestry was created and organized to protect and 
develop the valuable forest resources of the State ; to carry on a campaign 
of education; and to instruct counties, towns, corporations, and individuals 
as to the advantages and necessity of protecting from fire and other enemies 
the timber lands of the State. All correspondence and inquiries should be 
addressed to The State Forester, 1411 Fidelity Building, Baltimore. 

Studies have been made of the timber resources of each of the twenty- 
three counties; and the statistics and information collected are published 
for free distribution, accompanied by a valuable timber map. The Depart- 
ment also administers six state forests, comprising about 5,000 acres. The 
Roadside Tree Law directs the Department of Forestry to care for trees 
growing within the right-of-way of any public highway in the State. A 
State Forest Nursery, established in 1914, is located at College Park. 

F. W. Besley ~ - -State Forester 



STATE WEATHER SERVICE 

The State Weather Service compiles local statistics regarding climatic 
conditions and disseminates information regarding the climatology of Mary- 
land under the Regents of the University of Maryland through the State 
Geologist as successor to the Maryland State Weather Service Commission. 
The State Geologist is ex-officio Director, performing all the functions of 
former officers with the exception of Meteorologist, who is commissioned by 
the Governor and serves as liaison officer with the United States Weather 
Bureau. All activities except clerical are performed voluntarily. The 
officers are as follows: 

Edward B. Mathews, Director -... _ Baltimore 

John R. Weeks, Meteorologist, U. S. Custom House-Baltimore 



188 



189 



r 




V 



THE STATE GEOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SURVEY 



The Geological and Economic Survey Commission is authorized under the 
general jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
to conduct the work of this department. The State Geological and Eco- 
nomic Survey is authorized to make the following: 

Topographic surveys showing the relief of the land, streams, roads, rail 
ways, houses, etc. 

Geological surveys showing the distribution of the geological formations 
and mineral deposits of the State. 

Agricultural soil surveys showing the areal extent and character of the 
different soils. 

Hydrographic surveys to determine the available waters of the State for 
potable and industrial uses. 

Magnetic surveys to determine the variation of the needle for land 
surveys. 

A permanent exhibit of the mineral wealth of the State in the old Hall 
of Delegates at the State House, to which new materials are constantly 
added to keep the collection up-to-date. 

Edward B. Mathews, State Geologist _ Baltimore 



190 



SECTION III 

Description Of Courses 

The^ courses of instruction descHbed in this section are offered at College 
Park. Those offered in the Baltifruyre Schools are described in the separate 
announcements issued by the several schools. 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically : 

Page 

Agricultural Economics - - - 192 

Agricultural Education ^ 229 

Agi'onomy (Crops and Soils) 195 

Animal Husbandry 197 

Aquiculture _ 297 

Art - _ 199, 260 

Astronomy _ _199 

Bacteriology and Pathology ...199 

Botany _. , 204 

Chemistry : 209 

Comparative Literature „ 216 

Dairy Husbandry 217 

Economics and Business Administration 220 

Education 223 

Engineering 235 

English Language and Literature 245 

Entomology 251 

Farm Forestry 254 

Farm Management - ...254 

Farm Mechanics ...254 

French - _277 

Genetics and Statistics ...255 

Geology _ - ~ ...255 

German - ...280 

Greek ...256 

History _ _ _ _ , „ ..256 

Home Economics - 259 

Home Economics Education - ^..228 

Horticulture ...262 

Latin „ - ........268 

Library Science ...269 

Mathematics ...269 

Military Science and Tactics „ ...276 

Modem Languages - ...277 

191 



^ 



Page 

Music ^ ^.... 283 

Philosophy ^ 284 

Physics 286 

Political Science - „......289 

Poultry Husbandry - 290 • 

Psychology - 225, 291 

Speech. 294 

Rural Life and Education ^ 229 

Sociology 292 

Spanish _ 282 

Zoology „ 295 

Courses for undergraduates are designated by the numbers 1-99; courses 
for advanced undergraduates and graduates, 100-199 ; courses for graduates, 
200-299. 

The letter following the number of the course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered: thus, 1 f is offered the first semester; 1 s, the 
second semester ; 1 y, the year. A capital S after a course number indicates 
that the course is offered in the summer session only. 

The number of hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in parentheses 
after the title of the course. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his program. Students will obtain these schedules when they register. 

Students are advised to consult the statements of the colleges and schools 
in Section II when making out their programs of studies; also Regulation 
of Studies, Section I. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professor DeVault; Associate Professor Walker; Assistant 

Professors Russell, Hamilton. 

A. E. If. Agricultural Industry and Resources (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Open to sophomores. 

A descriptive course dealing with agriculture as an industry and its re- 
lation to climate, physiography, soils, population centers and movements, 
commercial development, transportation, etc.; the existing agricultural re- 
sources of the world and their potentialities, commercial importance, and 
geographical distribution; the chief sources of consumption; the leading 
trade routes and markets for agricultural products. The history of Ameri- 
can agriculture is briefly reviewed. Emphasis is upon the chief crop and 
livestock products of the United States. 

A. E. 2f. Agricultural Economics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 5 f or s. 

A general course in agricultural economics, with special reference to 
population trend, agricultural wealth, land tenure, farm labor, agricultural 
credit, the tariff, price movements, and marketing. 

192 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

A. E. 101s. Transportation of Farm Products (3)— Two lectures; one 

laboratory. 

A study of the development of transportation in the United States, and the 
different facilities for transporting farm products, with special attention to 
such problems as tariffs, rate structure, the development of fast freight 
lines, refrigerator service, truck transportation of agricultural products, 
and obsen-ation of transportation agencies in action. Not open to students 
who have taken or who are taking Econ. 112s. (Russell.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Fami Products (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 5 f or s. • 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction of effort m 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Cooperation in Agriculture (3)— Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' cooperative organi- 
zations with some reference to fanner movements ; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Russell.) 

A. E. 104 s. Agricultural Finance (3)— Three lectures. 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm orgamzations 
and industries. Farm insitrance— fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance 
with special reference to mutual development— how provided, benefits, and 
needed extension. ^ ^^^ *'' 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
cooperation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruc- 
tion in the grading, standardizing, and inspection of fruits and vegetables, 
dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food products. Theoretical 
instruction covering the fundamental principles will be given in the form of 
lectures, while the demonstrational and practical work will be conducted 
through laboratories and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Staff.) 

A. E. 106 s. Prices (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Russell.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3)— One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing of 
farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

193 



A. E. lOSf. Farm Organization and Operation (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of 
farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as suc- 
cessful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 y. Research Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. Inhere will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (De Vault.) 

For Graduates 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in AgriculturaJ, Economics (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer; such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and cooperation. (De Vault.) 

A. E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203y. Research (8). 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under 
the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original in- 
vestigation in problems of agricultural economics, and the results will be 
presented in the form of theses. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 210 s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture: general prop- 
erty tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license taxes, in- 
heritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm tax reduc- 
tion through greater efficiency and economies in local government. 

(DeVault and Walker.) 

A. E. 211 f. Taxation in Theory and Practice (3^) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory period a week. 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare of 
society; theory of taxation: the general property tax, business and license 
taxes, the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, inheritance 

194 



^nd estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax reforms; 
Conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units; Practical 
and cu^^^^ problems in taxation. (DeVault and Walker.) 

A. E. 212 f. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3)— Two 
double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation by regions of the basic physical conditions of the economic 
^nd social forces that have influenced agricultural settlement, and of the 
resultant utilization of the land and production of farm products; followed 
bv a consideration of regional trends and interregional shif ts m land utiliza- 
don and agricultural production, and the outlook for further <^^a^^^^^^^^^^^ 
each region. 

A. E. 213 s. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living 
(3)— Two double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation of the trends in population and migration for the Nation 
and by States, of trends in exports of farm products and their regional sig- 
nificance, of trends in diet and in per capita consumption of rion-food prod- 
ucts- fol owed by a consideration of the factors that appear likely to mfiu- 
:fce these trends in the future, and of the outlook for commercial as con^^ 
trasted with a more self-sufficing agriculture. ii^aKer.; 

A E. 214 f. Advanced Cooperation (2)—Two lectures. 

Intensive study of specific phases of agricultural cooperation. (Russell.) 

AGRONOMY 
Division of Crops 

Professors Metzger, Kemp; Associate Professor Eppley. 

AGRON. If. Cereal Crop Production (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. 

History, distribution, adaptation, culture, improvement, and uses of cereal, 
forage, pasture, cover, and green manure crops. 

AGRON. 2 s. Forage Crop Production (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Continuation of Agron. If. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGEON. 102 f. Technology of Crop Qmlity (2 or 3)-Students other than 
those specializing in ag«,nomy, may register for either h^« °%tjf !°";\^- 
Part one (Grading Fwrm Crops;— one lecture; one laboratory. The market 
classifications an/grades as recommended by the United States Bureau of 
Markets, and practice in determining grades. Part two fGratn, fay^^ 
Seed Judging and Identification)— one laboratory. tn-ppiey.; 

AGRON. 103 f. Crop Breeding (2)-0ne lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Gen. 101 f. . J • 
The principles of breeding as applied to field crops, and methods us^ in 

crop improvement. 

195 



Agron. 104 f and s. Selected Crop Studies (1-4)— Credit according to 
work done. This course is intended primarily to give an opportunity for 
advanced study of crop problems or crops of special interest to students. 

(Staff.) 

Agron. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations (2)— Two lec- 
tures. 

A consideration of crop investigation methods at the various experiment 
stations, and the standardization of such methods. (Metzger.) 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10)— Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103 f, but will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range will be allowed in 
choice of material to suit special cases. (Kemp ) 

Agron. 203 y. Seminar (2)— One report period each week. 
The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scientific 
publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. 

Agron. 209 y. Research (6-8)— Credit determined by work accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list of 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 
Professor Bruce; Associate Professor Thomas; Lecturer Thom. 

Soils If and s. Soils and Fertilizers (3-5)— Three lectures; two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Geol. 1 f, Chem. 1 y, Chem. 13 s, or 
registration in Chem. 13 s. 

A study of the principles involved in soil formation and classification. 
The influence of physical, chemical, and biological activities on plant growth, 
together with the use of fertilizers in the maintenance of soil fertility. 
Lectures may be taken without the laboratory. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soils 102 s. Soil Management (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Soils 1. 

A study of the soil fertiUty systems of the United States, with special 
emphasis on the interrelation of total to available plant food, the balance 
of nutrients in the soil with reference to various cropping systems, and the 
economic and national aspect of permanent soil improvement. The practi- 
cal work includes laboratory and greenhouse practice in soil improvement. 

Soils 103 f. Soil Geography (3) — Two lectures; one discussion period. 

A study of the genealogy of soils, the principal soil regions of North 
America, and the classification of soils. Field trips will be made to empha- 
size certain important phases of the subject. 

196 



For Graduates 

Soils 204 s. Soil Micro-Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the micro-organisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition of 
organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 

The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Thom.) 



Soils 201 y. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 
Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. 



(Staff.) 



Soils 202 y. Soil Technology (7-5 f, 2 s) — Three lectures; two labora- 
tories first semester; two lectures second semester. Prerequisites, Geol. 1, 
Soils 1, and Chem. 1. 

In the first semester, chemical and physico-chemical study of soil prob- 
lems as encountered in field, greenhouse, and laboratory. In the second 
semester, physical and plant nutritional problems related to the soil. 

(Thomas.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Meade and Carmichael. 



A. H. If. General Animal Husbandry (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Place of livestock in the farm organization. General principles underlying 
efficient livestock management. Brief survey of types, breeds, and market 
classes of livestock, together with an insight into our meat supply. 

A. H. 2 s. Elementary Livestock Judging (2) — Two laboratories. 

An introduction to livestock judging, including scoring and comparative 
judging of horses, beef cattle, sheep, and swine. Attention is given to the 
different types, breeds, and market classes of livestock. 

For Advanced Uiidergraduates and Graduates 

A. H. 101 f. Feeds and Feeding (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Elements of nutrition; source, characteristics, and adaptability of the 
various feeds to the several classes of livestock. Feeding standards, the 
calculation and compounding of rations. (Meade.) 

A. H. 102s. Principles of Breeding (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

ITiis course covers the practical aspects of animal breeding, including 
heredity, variation, selection, development, systems of breeding, and ped- 
igree work. (Meade.) 

197 



A. H. 103 f; 104 s. Livestock Management (5) — Four lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

First semester instruction relates to the care, feeding, breeding, manage- 
ment, and marketing of beef cattle and horses. Second semester, similar 
instruction relative to swine and sheep. (Carmichael.) 

A. H. 105 f; 106 s. Advanced Livestock Judging (2) — Two laboratories. 

In each semester, attention is given to the judging of horses, beef cattle, 
sheep, and swine. Critical study of individual animals is made, and extended 
practice in comparative judging given. Preparation for competitive judging 
is stressed, and teams to represent the University in livestock judging 
contests may be chosen from sttidents taking this course. (Carmichael.) 

A. H. 107s. Sttidy of Breeds of Livestock (3)— Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

This course includes a study of the historical background of breeds; devel- 
opment, with special reference to recent changes; outstanding individuals 
and families, and more prominent blood lines; pedigree studies; advertis- 
ing; public sales, catalogues, and management; private records of pure- 
bred herds, studs, and flocks; registration procedure; registry associations 
and herd books. (Carmichael.) 

A. H. 108 f; 109 s. Meat and Meat Packing (2) — Two laboratory periods. 

The slaughtering of meat animals; the handling of meat, and the process 
involved in the preparation, curing, and distribution of meat and its prod- 
ucts. 

A. H. 110 s. Nutrition (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of digestion, assimilation, metabolism, and protein and energy 
requirements. Methods of investigation and studies in the utilization of 
feed and nutrients. (Meade.) 

For Graduates 

A. H. 201 y. Special Problems in AnimxU Husbandry (4-6). 

Problems which relate specifically to the character of work the student 
is pursuing are assigned. Credit given in proportion to the amoimt and 
character of work completed. (Meade, Carmichael.) 

A. H. 202 y. Seminar (2)— One lecture. 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon their research for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203 y. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and char- 
acter of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student pursues 
original research in some phase of animal husbandry, carries the same to 
completion, and reports the results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Carmichael.) 
198 



ART 

Professor Marti 

Art. 1 f. Appreciation of Art I (1) — One lecture and one hour of slide 

study. 

An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. 
The material used will be taken chiefly from the history of occidental art, 
from Egypt to the Renaissance. Occasional visits to the museums in Wash- 
ington and Baltimore. No prerequisite. 

Art. 2 s. Appreciation of Art II (1) — One lecture and one hour of slide 
study. 

Similar to Art 1 f . The material will be mainly European art from the 
Renaissance to the present. Occasional visits to museums. No prerequisite. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor T. H. Taliaferro 

ASTR. 101 y. Astronomy (4) — Two lectures. Elective, but open only to 
juniors and seniors. 
An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. (Taliaferro.) 



BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 

Proftjssors Reed, Black; Mr. Faber, Mr. Bartram, Mr. Dunnigan. 

Bact. 1 f or s. General Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. 

A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to 
nature; morphology; classification; metabolism; bacterial enzymes; applica- 
tion to water, milk, foods, and soils; relation to the industries and to dis- 
eases. Preparation of culture media; sterilization and disinfection; micro- 
scopic and macroscopic examination of bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and 
identification of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; effects of physical and 
chemical agents ; microbiological examinations. 

Bact. 1 A f or s. General Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 1. 

Bact. 2 s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Principles of infection and immunity; characteristics of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Isolation and identification of bacteria from pathogenic ma- 
terial; effects of pathogens and their products. 

Bact. 2 A s. Pathogenic Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Sophomore 
year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

This course consists of the lectures only of Bact. 2 s. 

199 



Bact. 3s. Household Bacteriology (3) — Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. Junior year. Home Economics students only. 

A brief history of bacteriology; bacterial morphology, classification, and 
metabolism; their relation to water, milk, dairy products, and other foods; 
infection and immunity; personal, home, and community hygiene. 

Bact. 4 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (1) — One lecture. Senior year. Engi- 
neering students only. 

Bacteria and their application to water purification and sewage disposal. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Bact. 101 f. Dairy Bax^teriology (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria in milk, sources and development; milk fermentation; sanitary 
production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation of 
milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; practice in the bacteriological control of milk 
supplies and plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dairy Bacteriology (Continued) (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 101 f or Bact. 1 and consent of 
instructor. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
starters, fermented milks, ice cream, butter, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; occa- 
sional inspection trips. . (Black.) 

Bact. 103 f. Hematology (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. Registration limited. 

Procuring blood; estimating the amount of hemoglobin; color index; 
study of red cells and leucocytes in fresh and stained preparations; 
numerical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes; differential coimt of 
leucocytes; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; 
pathological forms and counts. (Reed.) 

Bact. 104 s. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Junior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

Physiologic, pathologic, and diagnostic significance; use of clinical meth- 
ods and interpretation of results. (Reed.) 

Bact. 105 f. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (3) — Three lectures. 
Junior year. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; the 
interrelationship between the various organs and parts as to structure and 
function. (Reed.) 



200 



Bact. 106s. Animal Hygiene (3)— Three lectures or demonstrations. 

Junior year. -• • 

Care and management of domestic animals, with special reference to 
maintenance of health and resistance to disease; prevention and early recog- 
nition of disease; general hygiene; sanitation; first aid. (Reed.) 

Bact. 109 f. Pathological Technic (3) — Three laboratories. Junior year. 
Bact. 1 desirable. 

Examination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectioning by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin embedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. (Reed.) 

Bact. 110 s. Pathological Technic (Continued) (2-5) — Laboratory course. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 109 f or consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory procedures 
which may be applied to clinical diagnosis. (Reed.) 

Bact. Ill f. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Bacteria, yeasts, and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoil- 
age; sanitary production and handling; food plant sanitation; food regu- 
lations; food infections and intoxications. Microbiological examination of 
normal and spoiled foods ; factors affecting preservation. Offered alternate 
years, alternating with Bact, 125 f. (Not offered 1936-1937.) (Black.) 

Bact. 112s. Sanitary Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purification; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal, industrial wastes; 
disposal of garbage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Practice in stand- 
ard methods for examination of water and sewage; differentiation and 
significance of the coli-aerogenes group; other bacteriological analyses. 

(Bartram.) 

Bact. 115 f. Serology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Junior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 2 s or consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Infection and resistance; agglutination, precipitation, lytic and complement 
fixation reactions; principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness. Prepara- 
tion of necessary reagents; general immunologic technic; factors affecting 
reactions; applications in the identification of bacteria and diagnosis of 
disease. (Faber.) 

Bact. 116 s. Epidemiology (2)— Two lectures. Junior year. Prerequi- 
site, Bact. 1. 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, including history, charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and control; per- 
iodicity; principles of investigation; public health applications. Offered al- 
ternate years, alternating with Bact. 126 s. (Not offered 1936-1937.) 

(Faber.) 

201 



Bact. 121 f. Resea/rch Methods (1) — One lecture. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation of 
papers; research institutions, investigators; laboratory design, equipment 
and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 122 f or s. Advanced Methods (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Registration 
limited. 

Microscopy, dark field and single cell technic, photomicrography; color- 
imetric and potentiometric determinations; oxidation-reduction, electropho- 
resis; surface tension; gas analysis; special culture methods; filtration; an- 
imal care; practice in media and reagent preparation. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 123 f. Bacteriological Problems (2-3) — Laboratory. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the projects. Regis- 
tration limited. 

Subject matter suitable to the needs of the particular student or problems 
as an introduction to research will be arranged. The research is intended 
to develop the student's initiative. The problems are to be selected, out- 
lined, and investigated in consultation with and under the supervision of a 
member of the department. Results are to be presented in the form of a 
thesis. (Black.) 

• 

Bact. 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (Continued) (2-3) — Laboratory. 
Senior year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the 
projects. Registration limited. (Black.) 

Bact. 125 f. Clinical Methods (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Senior 
year. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Clinical material, diagnostic features. Methods in the qualitative and 

quantitative determination of important constituents of gastric contents, 

blood, urine, feces, and exudates. Offered alternate years, alternating with 

Bact. Ill f. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 126 s. Public Health (1) — One lecture. Senior year. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration, by 
the staff members of the Maryland State Department of Health, represent- 
ing each of the bureaus and divisions. Offered alternate years, alternating 
with Bact. 116 s. (Black, in charge.) 

Bact. 127 f. Advanced Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Senior year. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

History; genetic relationships; special morphology; bacterial varia- 
tion ; growth ; chemical composition ; action of chemical and physical agents ; 
systematic bacteriology, classification, review of important genera. (Black.) 

202 



Bact. 128 s. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Senior year. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1, Chem. 12 f or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

Oxygen relations; enzymes; bacterial metabolism and respiration; chem- 
ical activities of microorganisms; changes produced in inorganic and or- 
ganic compounds; industrial fermentations. Offered alternate years, alter- 
nating with Bact. 206 s. (Not offered 1936-1937.) (Black.) 

Bact. 131 f. Journal Club (1) — Senior year. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
at least one of the advanced courses. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticised by 
members of the class and staff. (Black and Staff.) 

Bact. 132 s. Journal Club (Continued) (1) — Senior year. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and at least one of the advanced courses. (Black and Staff.) 



For Graduates 

Bact. 201 f. Advanced General Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, degree in biological sciences and consent of instruc- 
tor. Students with credit in an approved elementary course will not receive 
credit for this course. 

History; microscopy; morphology; classification; metabolism; relation to 
industries and to diseases. Media preparation; examination of bacteria; 
staining; cultivation and identification of bacteria. Minor credit will not be 
given for Bact. 201 f unless Bact. 202 s is satisfactorily completed. 

(Faber.) 

Bact. 202s. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 or 201 f or equivalent. Registration lim- 
ited. 

Infection and immunity; pathogenic microorganisms. Isolation, identifi- 
cation, and effects of pathogens. (Faber.) 

Bact. 203 f. Animal Disease Resea/rch (2-6) — Prerequisite, degree in 
veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or consent of 
instructor. Laboratory and field work by assignment. (Reed.) 

Bact. 204 s. Animal Disease Research (Continued) (2-6) — Prerequisite, 
degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college or con- 
sent of instructor. (Reed.) 

♦Bact. 205 f. Advanced Food Bacteriology (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 

Critical review of microorganisms necessary or beneficial to food prod- 
ucts; food spoilage; theories and advanced methods in food preservation; 
application of bacteriological control methods to manufacturing operations. 



♦This course will be griven in the evening. A special fee is charged. The course will not 
be given unless a sufficient number register. One or more of the other scheduled courses 
may also be given by other staff members under these conditions. 

203 



Bact. 206 s. Physiology of Bacteria (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact., 10 hours and Chem. 108 s or equivalent. 

Growth; chemical composition; physical characteristics; energy relation- 
ships; influence of environmental conditions on growth and metabolism; dis- 
infection; physiological interrelationships; changes occurring in media. Of- 
fered alternate years, alternating with Bact. 128 s. (Black.) 

Bact. 207 f. Special Topics ( 1 ) —Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 
Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 208 s. Special Topics (Continued) (1) — Prerequisite, Bact., 10 
hours. (Black.) 

Bact. 209 f. Seminar (1) — Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours and consent of 
instructor. 

Conferences and reports prepared by the student on current research and 
recent advances in bacteriology. (Black.) 

Bact. 210 s. Seminar (Continued) (1) — Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours and 
consent of instructor. (Black.) 

Bact. 211 f. -Researc/i (1-6)— Laboratory. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
any other courses needed for the particular projects. Credit will be de- 
termined by the amount and character of the work accomplished. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. The results ob- 
tained by a major student working towards an advanced degree are pre- 
sented as a thesis, a copy of which must be filed with the department. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 212 s. Research (Continued) (1-6) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the particular projects. (Black.) 

BOTANY 

Professors Appleman, Norton, Temple; 

Associate Professor Bamford; Assistant Professors Greathouse, 

Parker; Mr. Woods, Mr. McCann, Mr. Tillson, Mr. Reynard, 

Mr. Shirk, Mr. Stuart. 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

BOT. If. General Botany (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject. The chief aim in this course is to present fundamental biological 
principles rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The 
student is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods, and the value of its results. 

204 



BoT. 2 s. General Botany (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

A study of algae, bacteria, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and seed 
plants. The development of reproduction, adjustment of plants to land, 
habit of growth, and the attendant changes in vascular and anatomical 
structures are stressed. Several field trips will be arranged. With Bot. 1, 
a cultural course intended also as foundational to a career in the plant 
sciences. 

BOT. 3s. Introductory Botany (3) — Two lectures; one demonstration 
or laboratory period. 

A course similar to Bot. 1 f, except that only one demonstration or lab- 
oratory period is required. 

BoT. 4 s. Local Flora (2) — Two laboratories. 

A study of common plants, both wild and cultivated, and the use of keys, 
floral manuals, and other methods of identifying them. Largely field work. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

BoT. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems, and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are required. (Bamford.) 

BoT. 102 f. Mycology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory study of the morphology, life histories, classification, 
and economics of the fungi. Methods of cultivating fungi and identification 
of plant pathogens constitute a part of the laboratory work. (Norton.) 

Bot. 103 f. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying 
it; the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic founda- 
tions; methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium, and 
library. Each student to work on a special problem during some of the 
laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Bot. 104 s. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of cur- 
rent taxonomic literature. Each student works on an original problem dur- 
ing the laboratory time. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Norton.) 

Bot. 105 s. Economic Plants (2) — Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
By examination of plant products from markets, stores, factories, and gar- 
dens, students become familiar with the useful plants both in the natural 
form and as used by man. (Norton.) 

205 



BoT. 106 f. History and Philosophy of Botany (1)— One lecture. Dis- 
cussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Norton.) 

BoT. 107f ors. Methods in Plant Histology (2) — Two laboratories. 
Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 

(Bamford.) 

For Graduates 

BoT. 201s. Cytology (4) — TVo lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite. 
Bot. 1 f . 

A detailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 
The major portion is devoted to chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and 
the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity and evolution. 
The laboratory involves the preparation, examination, and illustration of 
cytological material by current methods. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy, and cytology. 

(Bamford.) 
Bot. 204. Research — Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 
Note: See announcement on page 299 for further botany courses given 
at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 

B. Plant Pathology 

Plt. Path. If. Diseases of Plants (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f . 

An introductory study in the field, in the laboratory, and in the literature, 
of symptoms, causal agents, and control measures of the diseases of plants. 
The work is so arranged that a student may devote part of his time to the 
important diseases of the plants in which he is particularly interested. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Plt. Path. 101 s. Diseases of Fruits (2-4)— Two lectures; laboratory ac- 
cording to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f . 

An intensive study intended to give a rather thorough knowledge of the 
subject matter, such as is needed by those who expect to become advisers in 
fruit production, as well as those who expect to become specialists in plant 
pathology. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 102 s. Diseases of Garden and Field Crops (2-4) — Two lec- 
tures; laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

The diseases of garden crops, truck crops, cereal and forage crops. In- 
tended for students of vegetable culture, agronomy, and plant pathology, 
and for those preparing for county agent work. (Temple.) 

206 



Plt. Path. 103 s. Research Methods (2) — One conference and five hours 
of laboratory and library work. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f or equivalent. 

Technic of plant disease investigations : sterlization, culture media, isola- 
tion of pathogens, inoculation methods, single-spore methods, disinfectants, 
fungicides, photography, preparation of manuscripts, and the literature in 
the scientific journals and bulletins on these subjects. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 104 f and s. Minor Investigations (1-3) — ^Credit according 
to work done. A laboratory course with conferences. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 
If. 

In this course the student may enter or withdraw at any time, including 
the summer months, and receive credit for the work accomplished. Only 
minor problems or special phases of major investigations may be imder- 
taken. Their solution may include a survey of the literature on the prob- 
lem under investigation and both laboratory and field work. 

(Temple, Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 105 s. Diseases of Ornamentals (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. 

The most important diseases of plants growing in greenhouse, flower gar- 
den, and landscape, including shrubs and shade trees. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 106 y. Semina/r (1). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on recent 
investigations. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 107 f. Plant Disease Control (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practice of plant disease 
control; the preparation of sprays and other fungicides and the testing of 
their toxicity in greenhouse and laboratory; demonstration and other ex- 
tension methods adapted to county agent work and to the teaching of agri- 
culture in high schools. (Temple.) 

For Graduates 



Plt. Path. 201 f. Virus Diseases (2) — Two lectures. 

An advanced course, including a study of the current literature on the 
subject and the working of a problem in the greenhouse. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 203 s. Non-Pa/rasitic Diseases (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due to 
climate, soil, gases; dusts and sprays, fertilisiers; improper treatment and 
other detrimental conditions. (Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 205 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple.) 

207 



C. Plant Physiology 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduateu 

Plt. Phys. 101 f. Plant Physiology (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories 
Prerequisite, Bot. If. 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim in this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. 

Plt. Phys. 102 s. Plant Ecology (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, Bot. If. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 

For Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201s. Plant Biochemistry (4) —Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology, in which the chemical aspects 
are especially emphasized. It deals with the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and with the important processes in plant life. 

(Appleman, Parker.) 

Plt. Phys. 202 f. Plant Biophysics (4)— Two lectures; two laboratories 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f and Pit. Phys. 101 f or equivalent. An elementary 
knowledge of physics or physical chemistry is highly desirable. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in life 
processes and physical methods of research in plant physiology. Practice 
m recording meterological data constitutes a part of the' course. 

(Greathouse.) 

Plt. Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2)— One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f , Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, indentification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found in plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use of 
these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized. 

(Parker.) 

Plt. Phys. 204 f. Growth and Development (2). (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 205 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports on papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 

subject. /A^ 1 X 

(Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 206 y. Research— Credit according to work done. 

Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 

profit the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, Greathouse, Parker.) 

208 



CHEMISTRY 

Professors Broughton, Drake, Haring, McDonnell; 

Associate Professors White, Wiley; 

Assistant Professor Machwart; 

Dr. Supplee, Dr. Weiland, Dr. White, Mr. Adams, Mr. Brooks, 

Mr. Campbell, Mr. Carhart, Mr. Duvall, Mr. Haskins, 

Mr. Heller, Mr. Hersberger, Mr. Horne, Mr. Howard, 

Mr. Ingersoll, Mr. Lowe, Mr. Stimpson, Mr. Zapponi. 

A. General Chemistry 

Chem. 1 Ay. General {Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of the non-metals and metals. One of the main purposes of the 
course is to develop original work, clear thinking, and keen observation. 

Course A is intended for students who have never studied chemistry, or 
have passed their high school chemistry '\\dth a grade lower than B. 

Chem. 1 B y. General Chemistry (8) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

This course eoviers the same ground as Chem. 1 A y; but the subject 
matter is taken up in more detail, with emphasis on chemical theory and 
important generalization. The laboratory work deals with fundamental 
principles, the preparation and purification of compounds, and a systematic 
qualitative analysis of the more common metals and acid radicals. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school chemistry course with a grade not lower than B. 

Chem. 2y. Qualitative Analysis (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory the 
first semester: and one lecture; two laboratories the second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. 

A study of the reactions of the common metals and the acid radicals, their 
separation and identification, and the general underlying principles. 

Chem. 3 y. Introductory Chemistry (6) — Two lectures; one demonstra- 
tion. 

The subject matter is essentially the same as that of Chem. 1 A y. This 
course is designed for students desiring a working knowledge of elementary 
chemistry, without the laboratory part. It is not accepted as a prerequisite 
for advanced chemistry courses. If one subsequently desires credit for 
Chem. 1 y, he may secure this by adding two credits in the laboratory of 
Chem. 1 y s. A demonstration fee of five dollars is required. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 104 f. Advanced Inorganic ^Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. Lectures may be taken without 
laboratory. 

This course is an advanced study of the general principles of inorganic 
chemistry. Special emphasis is given to the reactions and the more unusual 

209 



properties of the common elements. Laboratory experiments are selected 
which mvolve important theoretical considerations. (White!) 

For Graduates 

req^'ife, Chem.^2 T"""'"^' "^ "^ """" ^''"'"''^ ^'^-''"'' '^^*'''^^- P^^ 

the''lrnrri%tr *° ^ ''''' °' "^^ ^'^-"*« -* "-"^ --<*«-<! in 

* (White.) 

PrSrZisS^I^;nt^on^:ict:'*^^^^ ^'>-^"° ^^'>-^"- 

sidtst^s;r2oo'rr '"^''^^^ ^"' ''^ ^''"'^""'^ **^ ^'^T*^ -»■ 

''' (White.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

toSerPreUuis^te^Sm^tr ^"^^'^ ^'^"^"^ ^^'*""^' *^" '^'^^'^- 
volTtrf mTth?df ^'^ '" '"■""''^^^ ^*"'^^"*^' ^-^^^ «P--^ -^— to 

pS^^^^:£T^^' ^^'^^^^ ^'>-^^'* ^^'=*--'- *- '-^o-to-- 

wJ!J^t/'li!!f'^^^ operations of gravimetric analysis. Standardization of 
weights and apparatus used in chemical analysis. The principal operations 
of volumetnc^alysis. Study of indicators, typical vlmetric and clr- 
metnc methods. The calculations of volumetric and gravimetric anaWsis 

quired of all students whose major is chemistry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. lOly. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (10)— Two lectures- three 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or its equivalent 

semeSTr iinir J "^ ^'•^"'^ °' '"°T"'*= 'l»^"«t^«^« analysis. In the first 
semester mineral analysis is given. Included in this is analysis of silicates 

taken up. However, the student is given wide latitude as to the type of 
quantitative analysis he pursues during the second semester. (Wiley.) 

C Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 8 Ay. Elementary Organic Chemistry (4)— Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 1 y. 

This course includes an elementary study of the fundamentals of organic 
chemistry, and is designed to meet the needs of students specializing in 
chenustry, and pre-medical students. 

210 



Chem. SBy. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental 
methods of the organic laboratory. This course, with Chem. 8 A y, satisfies 
the pre-medical requirements in organic chemistry. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 116 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y or their equivalent. 

This course is devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of 
carbon than is undertaken in Chem. 8 A y. Graduate students who desire 
an accompanying laboratory course should elect Chem. 210 y. Juniors 
taking Chem. 116 y are expected to accompany it with Chem. 117 y, and to 
elect Chem. 118 y in their senior year. (Drake.) 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Ltohoratory (2) — One laboratory. 

This course is devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative 
analysis. The work includes the identification of xmknown organic com- 
poimds, and corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 207. (Drake.) 

Chem. 118 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen, 
and halogen are carried out, and syntheses more difficult than those of 
Chem. 8 B y are studied. (Drake.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 203f ors. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2-4-6) — A lec- 
ture course, which will be given any half-year when there is sufficient 
demand. 

The course will be devoted to an advanced study of topics which are too 
specialized to be considered in Chem. 110 y. Topics that may be covered are 
dyes, drugs, carbohydrates, plant pigments, etc. The subject matter will b«». 
varied to suit best the needs of the particular group enrolled, and a student 
may register for the course for three semesters and acquire a total of six 
credits. (Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f or s. Organic Preparations (4) — A laboratory course, de- 
voted to the synthesis of various organic compounds. 

This course is designed to fit the needs of students whose laboratory ex- 
perience has been insufficient for research in organic chemistry. (Drake.) 

Chem. 206 f or s. Organic Microanalysis (4) — A laboratory study of the 
methods of Pregl for the quantitative determination of halogen, nitrogen, 
carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc., in very small quantities of material. 

This course is open only to properly qualified students, and the consent of 
the instructor is necessary before enrollment. (Drake.) 

211 • 



Laboratory work devoted to the identification of pure organic s^uh.t. 
and of mixturp«? Tha. f«v<- , j • t^ . pu^e uig^anic substances 

mixtures. The text used is Kamm's Qualitative Organic Analvsk 

problems of identification „« J iTf '' ^" '"''""'"* preparation for the 
search. ^''"^^'S'^^tion one is likely to encounter while conducting re! 

Chem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6) ""^ ^'^ 

the ctrfe^■:tSi*/v^har f ?r '^ ^'"* "^^'"- "«^- '^^« -t«"t of 

within wide lin^ ts "S he n: dfoTth/l^-'".' VV'.'"* "^^ "^ ^^"^^ 

cne needs ot the individual student. (Drake.) 

I>. Physical Chemistry 

Chem. 10 y. Elementary Physical Chemistry (6) Two i ^ 

advanced standpoint and hlT. I aT f '"organic chemistry from an 
in physical chemistry. ^ foundation for more advanced work 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

c'eTeyXs^y'ZTuT'''"^' '''~'''^^^ '-*-es. Prerequisites, 

the latsTf^:™: S ctmfstrTWri ""\^ ^'•''^^"^^ ^^'^^^-'^ ^^ 
tions, elementary thermod^arnks thermiT' ''';"*''= ''''''^' "^^'^s, solu- 
kinetics. etc., will be discuS ' *^^™*'*^'>«'"'^^t'-y. equilibrium, chemical 

Chem. 102 B y. Pky^eal Chemistry Laboratorr, (4, Tw , K ^^ ""^'^ 
This course must bo t«l.»r. », .. ^aooratory (4)— Two laboratories. 

tory work in coZctl^n witTcter loTX'r'" "'° '"^^^ *° *^'^^ ^^^-- 

^' (Haring.) 

For Graduates 

Note: Chem. 102 A y and 102 B y or their ef,n,v=i. <■ 
all advanced courses in physical cheniistix ^ "'^^^'"* ^""^ prerequisites for 

CHEM. 212 A f and s. Colloid Chemistry (4)_Two lectures. 

facete'gVSt «e? Seor' *^''""^ °' ™^*^^ --"^^^^ with sur- 
(Not g?L iflSSy ) ''' ''''"' ''"'^^*^'-' P^^'^^'^^l applications. 

(Haring.) 

• 212 



Chem. 212Bfands. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two labora- 
tories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 A f and s. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Haring.) 

CHbM. 213 f. Phase Rtde (2) —Two lectures. ^ 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One, two, and three com- 
ponent systems will be considered, with practical applications of each. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 214 s. Structure of Matter (2) — Two lectures. 

Subjects considered are radioactivity, isotopes, the Bohr and Lewis-Lang- 
muir theories of atomic structure, and allied topics. (Haring.) 

Chem. 215 s. Catalysis (2) — Two lectures. 

This course consists of lectures on the theory and applications of catalysis. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 217 A f and s. Electrochemistry (4) — TSvo lectures. 
A study of the principles and some of the practical applications of electro- 
chemistry. First semester, theory; second semester, practical applications. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 217Bfands. Electrochemistry Laboratory (4) — Two labora- 
tories, which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 217 A f and s. 

(Haring.) 

Chem 218 y. Cheinical Thermodynamics (4) — Two lectures. 
A study of the methods of approaching chemical problems through the 
laws of energy. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Haring.) 

Chem. 219 f and s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4 or 6) — Two labora- 
tories and one conference. 

Students taking this course may elect 6 credits of lectures in Chem. 102 
A y to replace the conference. (Haring.) 

E. Agricultural Chemistry 

Chem. 12 A y. Elements of Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 

The chemistry of carbon and its compounds in relation to biology. This 
course is particularly designed for students in Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Chem. 12 B y. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2) — One laboratory. 
A course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental meth- 
ods of the organic laboratory. The course is designed to accompany Chem. 

12 Ay. 

Chem. 14 s. Chemistry of Textiles (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B f or s. 

A study of the principal textile fibres, their chemical and mechanical 
structure. Chemical methods are given for identifying the various fibres and 
for a study of dyes and mordants. 

213 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

practice in dairy chemistry and analysis. Practice TilfenL evw ^^ 
dazry products for coniirmation under'the food law . deSctlon of wS"- 
sS. r y. P'^^^^'^^^Wves and added colors, and the detection of adSS' 

Sd elec't to iZf ""T'^'l ^"""^^^^ '""^ '^"^^ *h« --"•J semester'fwork 
and elect to isolate and make complete analysis of the fat or protein of m° Ik! 

Chem 108 s. General Physiological Chemistry (4)-Two lecturr"tti 
laWatones. Prerequisite, Chem. 12 A y and C^i^m! 12 B y or their eU" 

the^ctmirtrvifLt'j"'!^' fundamental principles of human nutrition, 
and exc^lSo^ Th^f k f''""' *,''^«^««n' assimilation, tissue composition 
salivfrv t,?;. laboratory work consists of experiments in food analyst 
salivary, gastnc. pancreatic and intestinal digestion, and respiration. 

P„_„ 11- - . . (Broughton.) 

Pre?eauis te ^hL'' 4 Z^"""' ^<^'^*^ ^^^-°"* '"'=*"^^' "^^^'^ laboratories, 
i-rerequisite, Chem. 4 f or s or Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y. 

This course gives a connected introductory training in organic analvsis 
especially as apphed to plant and animal substances and their mTnufacWd' 

r fS'- ^^ ^r''l P"* "' *^^ '"'^'^ - d«^°ted to quanStXe me hSs 
^Li fTT'^^'. ^""^ ^^^^^^ substances. Standard works and the pubHca 
rrrences.' "" °' '''^•^''' Agricultural Chemists are useS freely as 

(Broughton.) 

For Graduates 
Chem. 208 s. Biological Analysis (2) -Two laboratories 

«»«s ., .he Wlvidua, „h.„ po.s.bU. ""'?BlX*LdtupE' 

Chem. 221 f or s. Tissue Analysis (3)— Three lahoratn^,-... d 
Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y or thefr equivalent ^^^'^'^''''- Prerequisite, 

minir'li'fTf '• °" ^"'^- *''' .^PP"'^^""" "f the analytical methods used in deter- 
mining the morganic and organic constituents of plant and animal tw! 

Chem. 223 A f and s. Physiological Chemistry (4)-Two leltu^f Pr^ 
requisite, Chem. 12 A y and Chem. 12 B y or their equivalent 

course clS 7?'/" P'^^^'f ^ical chemistry. For the fi;st semester the 
course consists of lectures and assigned reading on the constitution and 

iCZcf '" hT^e'^*!; '^^'^^r ^r •, ^"'^ ^"''^ compounTsTHoTogS 
importance. ihe second semester deals with pnT-vmo o/»f;« j- t. 

absorption, metabolism, and excretion. '^'^"^' (Brot^^^^^^ 

214 



Chem. 223 B f. Physiological Chemistry Laboratory (2). Prerequisites, 
Chem. 4 f or s and Chem. 12 A y and 12 B y. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chem. 223 A f . Qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis of foods; salivary, gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal diges- 
tion; and respiration. (Broughton and Supplee.) 

Chem. 224 f or s. Special Problems (4-8) — A total of eight credit hours 
may be obtained in this course by continuing the course for two semesters. 
Laboratory, library, and conference work amounting to a minimum of ten 
hours each week. Prerequisites, Chem. 223 A f and s, and consent of in- 
structor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates or 
amino acids, and the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a pro- 
tein. The students will choose, with the advice of the instructor, the particu- 
lar problem to be studied. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 226 f or s. Toxicology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Theory and practice of the detection and estimation of toxic substances. 
The laboratory work includes alkaloids, toxic gases, and inorganic poisons. 

(McDonnell.) 

F. Industrial Chemistry 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Chem. 110 y. Industrial Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y and 8 y. 

A study of the principal chemical industries; plant inspection, trips, and 
reports ; the preparation of a report on some chemical industry. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. Ills. Engineering Chemistry (2 or 3) — ^Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. This course may be taken with or without laboratory. 

A study of the chemistry of engineering materials. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 113 y. Advanced Industrial Chemistry (6) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 110 y. 

Unit operations typical of industrial practice; fluid flow, heat transfer, 
distillation, etc. Examination of materials. Plant design. Application of 
unit operations to a complete chemical process. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 120 f. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. 

A theoretical discussion of heat transfer, pyrometry, liquid flow, humidity, 
air-conditioning, refrigeration, etc. (Machwart.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 222 y. Unit Operations (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. 

A theoretical discussion of evaporation, distillation, filtration, etc. Prob- 
lems. (Machwart.) 

215 



Quantitative determination of common gases. Flue gas and w«t.. 
analyses, including calorific determinations !f the latter.^ ProblenTs ^"^ 

(Machwart.) 
G. History of Chemistry 

Chem. 121 y. The History of Chemistry (2)~.0ne lecture Prprpm,- •. 

twl^! ^r^^Pn?«nt of <=hemical knowledge, and especially of the general do. 

Snnin jtTtT "'"' 'T '^^" ^^^"^"^^^ evolved.' from tfeTrTall t" 
Degmnmgs up to the present day. /t> ^«^^*^«st; 

^ (Broughton.) 

H. Seminar and Research 

che'SsSy"'" ' ^""^ '• ^'"'''"'" <2)-Required of all graduate students in 

u.t^'^T^^ ^'"^ '■'T'''^ *° P^'P^''" '•^P'"'*^ -"^ Papers in the current litera- 

Sect "' ''"'''' "'^ ^°""^^''°" "'^'^ ^•^^ --»* advances in The 

(The Chemistry Staff.) 

r..?^^^' ^^l\T^- ^^'^"'"'h '■» Chemistry. The investigation of special 
problems and the preparation of a thesis towards an advanced degree 

(The Chemistry Staff.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

the^DepTrtmint^'oTrf r ^"TTZ' '' °^^'^ J"'""^ "^ '^^ f-<^"lties of 
tne Department of English and the Department of Modem Languages 

A mmor only may be taken in Comparative Literature. English 113 f and 

JimrLiTor^r 106 r^^--"^^^ ^^*^-*-^ '^ ^^-^-^ -^» ^-^ ^- 

lectres.' ^"' ^^^ ^' '''*'''"'«'^**'''« *° Comparative Literature (3) -Three 

tranTt^iontnf r^^'l!'^'^"^ ""^ ^"°^^" "'"'"^'"'•^ ^'"""^'^ «tudy in English 

ment of the eS t ' . '"" "*''""*"'''- ^'"^'^"^'^ '« '^'^^ °" the develop- 
ment of the epic, tragedy, comedy, and other typical forms of literarv 

IZsZZ: ' ''"' "' "°'^'-" "^^'-^^"'-^ *° ^'^^ -"-*« is discusiS 

(Spann.) 

lectures,' ^"' ^°^^" '^"''■'"^'"'**''"* *" CompamftVe Literature (3)-Three 

tine^SnSurl '•''"''• ^"^ '^^ '= '''''' "" ""^'^^^^ ^^' -««^- C- 

(Spann.) 

216 



CoMP. Lit. 103 s. Types of English Literature (2) — Two lectures. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of English litera- 
ture, with special attention to the influence of classical myth and legend and 
of classical literary ideals upon English and American writers. (Not given 
in 1936-1937.) • (Harman.) 

CoMP. Lit. 104 s. Tlie Old Testament as Literature (2) — Two lectures. 
For seniors and graduate students. 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale.) 

CoMP. Lit. 105 f. Romanticism in France (3) — ^Three lectures. 

Introduction to the chief authors of the Romantic movement in France. 
Lectures on the thought currents and literary movements of the late eight- 
eenth and early nineteenth centuries. The reading in this course is done in 
English translations. (Wilcox.) 

CoMP. Lit. 106 s. Romanticism in Germany (3) — Three lectures. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105 f. German literature from Buerger to 
Heine. The reading is done in English translations. (Spann.) 

COMP. Lit. 110 y. The Modem Continental Drama (2) — T'w^o lectures. 

The Continental drama of the past fifty years will be studied as an expres- 
sion of modern thought and as an art form. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

( Spann. ) 
DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Meade, Ingham; Associate Professor England; 

Mr. Mecham. 

D. H. Ifors. Introductory Dairy Science (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y. 

A general survey of the dairy industry, including its history and devel- 
opment, the composition of milk and its physical and chemical properties, 
the production and distribution of market milk, ice cream, butter, cheese, 
and other dairy products, and the principles involved in the common dairy 
manufacturing processes. The Babcock Test, other quantitative tests for 
fat and other constituents, simple qualitative tests for adulterants and pre- 
servatives, and visits to the University milk plant and manufacturing lab- 
oratories. 

D. H. 2f. Dairy Breeds and Judging (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
An introduction to the origin, development, characteristics, and qualities 
of dairy breeds of cattle, with attention to elementary judging practice. 

For Advanced Undergrajduates and Graduates 

Dairy Production 

D. H. 101 y. Dairy Production (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of the care, feeding, breeding, and management of the dairy 
herd; dairy farm buildings and equipment; A. R. testing and herd improve- 
ment; bull associations; milking machines; sanitation and the production 

217 



of clean, low bacteria count milk ; dairy farm practices ; fitting and showing 
dairy cattle; judging; record forms; pedigrees; regulations for the produc- 
tion of market milk; transportation; cooling; and dairymen's marketing 
organizations. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 102 s. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging — Juniors -Seniors (1 or 2) 
— One laboratory. 

One hour credit, except for those who are selected to represent the Uni- 
versity on the judging team. The persons composing the team and the 
alternate will each receive 2 hours credit. 

Comparative judging of dairy cattle. Trips to various farms. Such dairy 
cattle judging teams as may be chosen to represent the University will be 
selected from among those taking this course. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 103 s. Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. 

A study of the historical background, characteristics, noted individuals 
and families, and the more important blood lines in the Holstein, Guernsey, 
Ayrshire, and Jersey breeds. (Ingham.) 

Dairy Manufacturing 

D. H. 104 f. Dairy Manufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4 hour 
laboratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making casein, cheese, and butter, includ- 
ing a study of the physical, chemical, and biological factors involved. The 
laboratory practice will include visits to commercial factories. (Not given 
in 1936-1937.) (England.) 

D. H. 105s. Dmry Manufacturing (5) — Two lectures; two 4 hour lab- 
oratories. Junior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact. 1. 

The principles and practice of making condensed milk and milk powders; 
and ice cream, including a study of the physical, chemical, and biological 
factors involved. The laboratory practice will include visits to commercial 
factories. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (England.) 

D. H. 106 f. Market Milk (5) — Three lectures; two laboratories. 
Senor year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1 and Bact. 1. 

Commercial and economic phases of market milk, with special reference 
to its improvement; milk as a food; shipping stations; transportation; pas- 
teurization ; clarification ; standardization ; refrigeration ; certified milk ; com- 
mercial buttermilk; acidophilus milk; milk laws; duties of milk inspectors; 
distribution; milk plant construction and operation. The laboratory practice 
includes visits to local dairies. (England.) 

D. H. 107 s. Analysis of Dairy Products (3) — One lecture; one 4 hour 
laboratory (consecutive). Senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, Chem. 
4, Chem. 12 y. 

The application of chemical and bacteriological methods to commercial 
dairy practice; analysis by standard chemical, bacteriological, and factory 
methods; standardization and composition control; tests for adulterants and 
preservatives. (England.) 

218 



p. H. 108 s. Grading Dairy Products (l)-One laboratory. Junior 
vear. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. 

Market ^ades and the Judging of millc. butter. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
the commercial neld. ^ 

D. H. 109 f. Advanced Grading of Dairy Products (1)— One laboora- 
torv. Senior year. Prerequisite, D. H. 108. ^ 

Advanced work on the judging of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 

D. H. 110 f. ^airy Plant ExpeHence (3)-^unior year. Prerequisite, 

D. H. 1. . , 

Twelve weeks practical experience or its equivalent (following comple- 
tion of sophomore year) in an approved market milk plant or factory manu- 
facturing dairy products. A written report of the work is required. 
D. H. lllf. Dairy Plant Experience (3)— Senior year. Prerequisite, 

D. H. 110 f . 

Twelve weeks practical experience or its equivalent (following comple- 
tion of junior year) in an approved market milk plant or factory manu- 
facturing dairy products. A written report of the work is required. 

For Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and man- 
agement. Readings and assignments. (Ingham.) 

D H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2)— Two lectures. 

A consideration of milk and dairy products from the physio-chemical 

. , - . (England.) 

point of view. 

D. H. 203 s. MUk Products (2)— Two lectures. 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of nulk 

(England.) 
products. 

D H 204 y Special Problems in Dairying (4-6). 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is pur- 
suing will be assigned. Credit will be given in accordance with the amount 
and character of work done. ^^^^ *^ 

D. H. 205 y. Seminar (2). . 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to dairying or upon their research for presentotion 
before and discussion by the class. i&tan.; 

D. H. 206 y. Research-<:Tedit to be determined by the amount and 

quality of work done. , ^ xi. i.^«j ^^ 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of 

the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 

carry the same to completion, and report results in the form of a thesis. 

^ (Meade, Ingham, England.) 

219 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Brown; Associate Professor Wedeberg; Assistant 
Professors Daniels, Peel; Mr. Cissel, Mr. Elvove, Miss Jack. 

ECON. If. Economic Geography and Industry (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the economic and political factors which are responsible for 
the location of industries, and which influence the production, distribution, 
and exchange of commodities throughout the world. 

EcoN. 2 s. History of World Commerce (3) — Three lectures. 

Commercial development throughout the three major periods of history 
viz., Ancient, Medieval, and Modern. Special emphasis is laid upon im- 
portant changes brought about by the World War. 

EcoN. 3y. Principles of Economics (6)— Three lectures. Prerequisite 
sophomore standing. ' 

A study of the general principles of economics: production, exchange 
distribution, and consumption of wealth. The study is based upon a recent 
text, lectures, collateral readings, and student exercises. 

EcON. 5f or s. Fundamentals of Economics (3) —Three lectures Re- 
quired of students in the Colleges of Engineering and Agriculture. 

A study of the general principles underlying economic activity. Not open 
to students having credit in Econ. 3 y. 

♦EcoN. 7f. Business Organization and Operation (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the growth of large business organizations. Types of organi- 
zations are studied from the viewpoints of legal status, relative efficiencv 
and social effects. 

A. AND F. 9y. Principles of Accounting (8) — Three lectures; one 
laboratory. 

This course has two aims; namely, to give the prospective business man an 
Idea of accounting as a means of control, and to serve as a basic course for 
advanced and specialized accounting. Methods and procedure of account- 
ing m the single proprietorship, partnership, and corporation are studied. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

* EcoN. 101 f. Money and Credit (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y, or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the origin, nature, and functions of money, monetary systems, 
credit and credit instruments, prices, interest rates, and exchanges. 

* r- i^rt ^ (Brown.) 
EcoN. 102 s. Banking (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 101 f. 

Principles and practices of banking in relation to business. Special em- 
phasis upon the Federal Reserve System. (Brown.) 

an^Ffnance."^^ ™^'' ^^ """^^ ^^' ^ °'^''*'^ °^ "^^'^^^ ^" ^^^ ^^^^^ «^ Economics or Accounting 

220 



* EcoN. 103 f. Corporati(m Finance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y. 

Principles of financing, the corporation and its status before the law, basis 
of capitalization, sources of capital funds, sinking funds, distribution of 
surplus, causes of failures, reorganizations, and receiverships. (Brown.) 

* A. AND F. 104 s. Investments (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y, and senior standing. 

Principles of investment, analyzing reports, price determination, taxation 
of securities, corporation bonds, civil obligations, real estate securities, and 
miscellaneous investments. Lectures, library assignments, and chart 
studies. (Brown.) 

* EcON. 105 f. Insurance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

A survey of the major principles and practices of life and property in- 
surance, with special reference to its relationship to our social and economic 
life. (Peel.) 

A. AND F. 106 s. Personnel Management (1) — One lecture. 

A study of sources of labor supply; methods of selection and placement; 
retention, transfer, and promotion of labor; human values as affecting labor 
loyalty and efficiency. (Wedeberg.) 

A. AND F. 107 y. Business Law (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
junior standing. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

(Peel.) 

EooN. 109 f. Labor Problems (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
3 y or Soc. 1 f . 

The background of labor problems; labor organizations; labor legislation; 
unemployment and its remedies; wages, working conditions, and standards 
of living; agencies and programs for the promotion of industrial peace. 

(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Cissel.) 

A. AND F. 110 y. Advanced Accounting (6) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, A. and F. 9 y. 

A continuation of A. and F. 9 y, with emphasis on the theory of account- 
ing. Special phases of corporation accounting are studied. The introduc- 
tion of accounting systems for manufacturing, commercial, and financial 
institutions. (Cissel.) 

EcoN. 112 s. Inland Transportation (3) — Three lectures. Prerequis- 
ite, Econ. 3 y or Econ. 5 f or s. 

The development of inland means of transportation in the United States. 
This course is devoted largely to a survey of railway transportation. Some 
study is given to other transportation agencies. (Daniels.) 



♦These courses may be used for a major or minor in the fields of Economics or Accounting 
and Finance. 

221 



t... 



EcoN. 113 f. Public Utilities (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3y. 

The development of public utilities in the United States, economic and 
legal characteristics, regulatory agencies, valuation, rate of return, and 
public ownership. (Peel.) 

* Ecx)N. 114 s. Public Finance (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 

3y. 

The nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, taxation, and 
budgeting. Special emphasis on the practical, social, and economic prob- 
lems involved. (Peel.) 

♦Econ. 116s. Principles of Foreign Trade (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 3 y, Econ. 1 f , and Econ. 2 s, or their equivalent. 

The basic principles of import and export trade, as influenced by the 
differences in methods of conducting domestic and foreign conmierce. 

(Daniels.) 

Econ. 117 f. History of Economic Theory (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 3 y and senior standing. 

History of economic doctrines and theories from the eighteenth century 
to the modem period. (Peel.) 

E(X)N. 118 s. History of Economic Theory (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 117 f or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of Econ. 117 f. (Peel.) 

Econ. 119 f. Advanced Economics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y and senior standing. 

An analysis of the theories of contemporary economists. Special attention 
is given to the problems of value and distribution. (Brown.) 

Econ. 120 s. Applied Economics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
119 f or consent of instructor. 

Current economic problems are studied from the viewpoint of the econo- 
mist. Lectures and class discussions based on assigned readings. (Brown.) 

A. AND F. 121 f. Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 109 y, and consent of instructor. 

Process cost accounting; specific order cost accounting; manufacturing 
expense; application of accounting theory; preparation of analytical 
statements. (Cissel.) 

A. AND F. 122 s. Cost Accounting (2) — TSvo lectures. Prerequisite, A. 
and F. 121 f. 

A continuation of A. and F. 121 f. (Wedeberg.) 



•These courses may be used for a major or minor in the fields of Economics or Accounting 
and Finance. 

222 



A. AND F. 123 f. Income Tax Accounting (3)— Three lectures. Pre- 
reqi^site, A. and F. 110 y, or consent of instructor. 

Selected cases illustrating the definition of taxable income of individuals, 
corporations, and partnerships. (Wedeberg.) 

A. AND F. 126 s. Auditing (2) —Two lectures. Prerequisite, A. and F. 
110 y, or consent of instructor. 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, the 
preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. (Wedeberg.) 

For Graduates 

EcON. 201 y. Reseo/rch (4-6). Credit proportioned to work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

Econ. 203 f and s. Seminxir (4)— Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory. Presentation 
of reports based upon original investigations. Designed for students in the 
department of Economics. (Brown.) 

Econ. 205 y. History of Economic Doctrines (4). 

Development from classical antiquity with discussions of the different 
schools of economics. Extensive readings, with student reports. (Peel.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors Small, Cotterman, Sprowls, Mackert, Long; 

Associate Professor Brechbill; Miss Smith, 

Mrs. James, Mrs. Barton, Miss Clough. 

A. History and Principles 

Ed. 2f. Introduction to Teaching- A (2)— Required of sophomores in 
Education. 

A finding course, with the purpose of assisting students to decide whether 
they have qualities requisite to success in teaching. Study of the physical 
qualifications, personality traits, personal habits, use of English, speech, 
and habits of work; and of the nature of the teacher's work. 

Ed. 3 s. Introduction to Teaching-B (2). 

A continuation of Ed. 2 f . 

Ed. 5 s. Technic of Teaching (2). Required of juniors in Education. 
Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f. 

Educational objectives and outcomes of teaching; types of lesson; prob- 
lem, project, and unit; measuring results and marking; socialization and 
directed study; classroom management. 

Ed. 6f. Observation of Teaching (1-2). 

Observation and preliminary participation in the classes in which super- 
vised teaching is to be done. Reports, conferences, and criticism. 

223 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. 101 f. History of Education: Education in Europe to Apjyroxirnately 
1600 A. D, (2). Prerequisite, senior standing. 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of educational institutions, practices 
and theory from the Greco-Roman era and through the Christian era up to 
and including the Reformation. (Small.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modem Education (2) . 

A continuation of Ed. 101 f. Attention is centered upon the creators of 
modern education and the development of education in America. (Small.) 

Ed. 103 s. Principles of Secondary Education (3). Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Evolution of the high school; European secondary education; articulation 
of the high school with the elementary school, college, and technical school, 
and v^rith the community and the home; the junior high school; high school 
pupils; programs of study and the reconstruction of curricula; teaching 
staff; student activities. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology I (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of education as social control and emergent life, w^ith emphasis 
upon the application of the recently developed concepts in modern school 
procedures. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 107 f or s. Comparative Education (3). 

The forces that cause different systems of education, and the character- 
istic differences in the educational policies and practices in various countries 
are studied in this course. The major emphasis is upon certain European 
systems. (Long.) 

Ed. 108 f or s. Comparative Education (3). 

This course is similar to Ed. 107, an important difference being that edu- 
cation in Latin America receives major attention. (Long.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (3). 

This course considers the functions of the junior high school in the 
American public school system. Its development, present organization, cur- 
ricula, and relation to upper and low^er grades will be emphasized. (Long.) 

Ed. Ill f . Lives of Scientists (2). 

A study of the major achievements and interesting incidents in the lives 
of the pioneers of science. Though designed especially to provide enrich- 
ment material for the use of high school teachers, the course is of general 
cultural value. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Brechbill.) 

For Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). 
This course deals objectively with the organization, administration, cur- 
ricula, and present status of public education in the United States. 

(Small.) 
224 



Ed. 201s. Educational Interpretations (3). 

In this course a study is made of the social, economic, political, and cul- 
tural environment in which American educational institutions and policies 
have developed; and of the function of education in environmental change. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 202 s. Higher Education in the United States (3). One seminar 

period. 

European backgrounds of American higher education; the development 
of higher education in the United States; present day adjustment move- 
ments in college ; points of view in college teaching ; uses of intelligence and 
other standardized tests; short answer examinations; course construction. 

(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 204 s. High School Administration and Supervision. (3). 

This course considers the principal's duties in relation to organization 
for operation, administration, and supervision of instruction, and community 
relationships. (Long.) 

Ed. 205 s. Educational Sociology 11 (3) — Three lectures. 

This course deals with education as social adjustment through an analy- 
tical consideration of the objectives in the American program of educa- 
tion, methods of determining educational objectives, and a brief survey of 
the ways in which education has been used as social adjustment in foreign 
countries. ( Cotterman. ) 

Ed. 206 s. History of American Education to 1850. (3). 

The development of the public school in America up to 1850. (Long.) 

Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Edux^ation (2-4). 

Required of all candidates for the Master's degree whose majors are in 
the field of education. (Staff.) . 

(For additional courses see Rural Life and Agricultural Education and 
Home Economics Education.) 

B. Educational Psychology 

Ed. Psych. 1 f. Educational Psychology (3). Required of all juniors in 
Education. Open to others only by special permission. 

The laws of learning and habit formation in their application to teaching 
in the high school ; types of learning and their relation to types of subject 
matter; psychological principles involved in lesson assignments, tests, exami- 
nations; individual differences; incentives and discipline; mental hygiene 
in relation to personality problems and classroom instruction. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ed. Psych. 101 s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3). Prerequisites, 
Ed. Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. The latter may be taken concurrently with Ed. 

Psych. 101 s. 

Principles of genetic psychology; nature and development of the human 
organism; development and control of instincts. Methods of testing intelli- 

225 




I 



I 



gence; group and individual differences and their relation to educational 
practice. Methods of measuring rate of learning; study of typical learning 
experiments. 

(Not given in 1936-1937.) 

Ed. Psych. 102 f. Educational Measurements (3). Prerequisites, Ed 
Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

A study of typical educational problems involving educational scales and 
standard tests. Nature of tests, methods of use, analysis of results and 
practical applications in educational procedure. Emphasis is upon tests for 
high school subjects. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. Psych. 105 s. Mental Hygiene (3). Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f or 
Psych. 1 f or s or equivalent. 

Normal tendencies in the development of character and personality. Solv- 
ing problems of adjustment to school and society; obsessions, fears, com- 
pulsions, conflicts, inhibitions, and compensations. Methods of personality 
analysis. (Sprowls.) 

For Graduates 

Ed. Psych. 200 f. Sijstematic Educational Psychology (3). 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. It deals with 
the major contributions of psychologists from Herbart to Watson to educa- 
tional theory and practice. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. Psych. 250 y. Seminar. 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 

For Advanced Undergrajduates and Graduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the College of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (2). Prerequisites, Ed. Psych. 1 f 
and Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection and 
organization of subject matter in terms of modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; 
measuring results. (Smith.) 

Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (2). Prerequisites, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Selection and organization of subject matter in relation to the objectives 
and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson 
plans ; measuring results. (Long.) 

226 



Ed. 124 s. Modern Language in the High School (2). Prerequisites, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school; selection and 
organization of subject matter in relation to modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies. Methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons ; lesson plans ; special devices ; measuring results. 

(Barton.) 

Ed. 126 s. Science in the High School (2) . Prerequisites, Ed. Psych. 1 f 
and Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives of science teaching, their relation to the general objectives of 
secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class room situation; selection and organization of 
subject matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, and 
laboratory equipment. Technic of class room and laboratory; measurement, 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature; observation 
and criticism. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 128 s. Mathematics in the High School (2). Prerequisites, Ed. Psych. 
1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature; observation and criticism. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 130 f. High School Course of Study — Composition (2). 

Content and organization of the materials of written and oral composition 
in the several high school grades. (Smith.) 

Ed. 131 s. High School Course of Study — Literature (2). 

Content and organization of the literature course in the several high 
school grades. (Smith.) 

Ed. 135 f. High School Course of Study — Geometry (2). 

Content and organization of intuitive and demonstrative geometry. Meth- 
ods of analysis and problem solving. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 136 f. High School Course of Study — Biology (2). 

Content and organization of biology. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 137 s. High School Course of Study — Physical Science (2). 

Content and organization of physics. Some consideration is given to con- 
tent of chemistry. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 139 f or s. Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (2). 
Observation and supervised teaching. A minimum of 20 teaching periods. 

E. English (Smith.) 

S. S. Social Studies (Clough.) 

L. Modern Language (Barton.) 

227 



Sc. Science (BrechbDl.) 

M. Mathematics (Brechbill.) 

P. E. Physical Education (James, Mackert.) 

C. Commercial Subjects 

Ed. 140 y. Physical Education Activities for High School Girls (4). 

Required of juniors with Physical Education major or minor. 

The principles and practices of activities appropriate for both class work 
and extra-curriculum programs in senior and junior high schools. 

(James.) 

Ed. 141 f. Physical Education in the High School (Boys) (3) — Prerequi- 
sites, Ed. Psych. 1 f, Ed. 5 s, Phys. Ed. 25 y. 

Objectives of physical education for high school boys; lesson planning; 
problem cases; methods of handling classes, meets, pageants, and the like; 
physical and medical examinations; care of equipment; records; grading. 

(Mackert.) 

Ed. 142 f. Physical Education in the High School (Girls) (3) — Prerequi- 
sites, Ed. Psych. 1 f, Ed. 5 s, Ed. 140 y. 

Objectives in physical education for girls in the different types of high 
schools; programs appropriate to high school girls; selection and organiza- 
tion of subject matter; lesson plans. (James.) 

Ed. 150 f; Ed. 151s. Commercial Subjects in the High School (2-6). 
Prerequisites, Ed. Psych. 1 f and Ed. 5 s. 

Aims and methods for the teaching of shorthand, typewriting, and book- 
keeping in high schools. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Professor McNaughton. 

H. E. Ed. 5 s. Technic of Teaching (2) — Required of juniors in Home 
Economics Education. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f. 

Philosophy of home economics education; survey of the needs of the 
community; analysis of the characteristics and interests of the high school 
girl ; objectives for teaching home economics in high school ; construction of 
units; use of problem, discussion, demonstration, and laboratory methods; 
selection of illustrative material; the home project. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 6 s. Observation of Teaching (1-2) — Minimum of 20 class 
periods. 

Classroom management; individual differences; types of lessons; obser- 
vations and critiques; conferences. (McNaughton.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 101 s. Child Psychology (3). Open to juniors. 
Study of the nervous system; the glandular system; sensory develop- 
ment; habit formation; emotional controls. (McNaughton.) 



H. E. Ed. 102 f. Child Study (4). 

The study of child development in relation to the physical, mental, and 
educational phases of growth; study of textbooks and magazines; adaptation 
of material to teaching of child care in high school ; observation and partici- 
pation in University Nursery School. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 103f ors. Teaching Secondary Vocational Home Economics: 
Methods and Practice (4). Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 5 s. 

Observation and teaching in a vocational department of a Maryland 
high school or in a junior high school in Washington. Organization of 
units, lesson plans, field trips; planning and supervision of home projects. 
After completing the teaching unit the student observes in home economics 
departments other than one in which she has taught. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems in Child Study (5) — Open to sen- 
iors. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 102 f. 

Methods and practice in nursery school work in University Nursery 
School; making of particular studies related to the mental, emotional, or 
physical development of preschool children. (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 106 s. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (1). 

Analysis of the units in the State course of study; study of various 
methods for organization of class period; analysis of text-books; evalua- 
tion of illustrative material. (McNaughton.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics 

(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

(McNaughton). 

fl. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Home Economics Edux:ation (2-4). (See Ed. 
250 y.) (McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-4) — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with profit 
the research to be undertaken. (McNaughton.) 

RURAL LIFE AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Professors CoTTERMAN, Carpenter; Mr. Worthington, 

Mr. Poffenberger 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

R. Ed. 101 f. Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (1) — One laboratory. 
Cannot be used for graduate credit. 

This course is designed to assist the student in relating the learning ac- 
quired in the several departments of the University with the problems of 



228 



229 



doing and demonstrating which he faces in the field and in the classroom 
as a teacher. It aims particularly to check his training in the essential 
practicums and demonstrations in vocational agriculture, and to introduce 
him to the conditions under which such activities must be carried on in the 
patronage areas and laboratories of vocational departments. Laboratory 
practice in deficiencies required, (Poffenberger.) 

R. Ed. 102 s. Farm Practicums and Demonstrations (1) — One laboratory. 
Cannot be used for graduate credit. 

Continuation of R. Ed. 101 f. (Poffenberger.) 

R. Ed. 104 s. Rural Life and Education (3) — Three lectures. 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural communi- 
ties, stressing an anlysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of 
normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the con- 
ditioning effects of economic differences. The course is designed especially 
for persons who expect to be called upon to assist in shaping educational 
and other conununity programs for rural people. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 105 f. Project Organization and Cost Accounting (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

The development of project programs in terms of placement opportunities; 
project forecasting as a form of motivation; project estimating; systems of 
project cost accounting; practice in project accounting. (Worthington.) 

R. Ed. 107 f . Observation and the Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural 
Students (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych, If. 
Open to juniors and seniors; required of seniors in Rural Life and Agri- 
cultural Education. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 109 f. Teaching Seconda/i-y Vocationjal Agriculture (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 105 f, 107 f; A. H, 1, 2; D. H. 1; Poultry 1; 
Soils 1; Agron. 1, 2; Hort. 1, 11; F, Mech. 101, 104; A. E. 2, 102; F. M. 2. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of voca- 
tional agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farm- 
ing programs, the organization and administration of Future Farmer work, 
and objectives and methods in all-day, continuation, and adult instruction. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 112 s. Depa/rtmental Organization and Administration (2) — Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 f, 105 f, 109 f. 

The work of this course is based upon the construction and analysis of 
administrative programs for high school departments of vocational agri- 
culture. As a project, each student prepares and analyzes in detail an admin- 
istrative program for a specific school. Investigations and reports. 

(Worthington.) 

230 



R. Ed. 114 s. Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (1)— -One lecture. 
Objectives in the teaching of farm shop ; contemporary developments ; de- 
termination of projects; shop management; shop programs; methods of 

teaching; equipment; materials of instruction; special projects. 

(Carpenter.) 

R. Ed. 120 f or s. Practice Teaching (2)— Prerequisites, R. Ed. 105 f, 107 

f, 109 f . 

Under the direction of a critic teacher the student in this course is 
required to analyze and prepare special units of subject matter, plan lessons, 
and teach in cooperation with the critic teacher, exclusive of observation, 

not less than twenty periods of vocational agriculture, 

(Cotterman, Worthington.) 

Ed, 105 f. Educational Sociology (3)— See Education. 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201 f; 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3). Prerequisite, R. Ed, 
104 s, or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good life 
in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, administra- 
tion, and supervision of the several agencies of public education as compon- 
ent parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and human de- 
velopment. Discussions, assigned readings, and major term papers in the 
field of the student's special interest. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f ; 208 s. Problems in Vocational A gricultuT'e, Related Science, 
and Shop (2-4). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing 
teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. The three 
phases of the vocational teacher's program— all day, part-time, and adult 
work— receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision of the sev- 
eral agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-4). Credit hours according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 202 s. Higher Education in the United States (3). (See Education.) 

Ed. 205 s. Educational Sociology II (3). (See Education.) 



231 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A. Physical Education for Men 

Professor Mackert and Student Assistants 



*Phys. Ed. 1 

An activities 
throughout the 
ball, volleyball, 

*Phys. Ed. 3 

An activities 
throughout the 
ball, volleyball, 
ing, wrestling, 
nasties. 



y. Physical Activities (2). 

course for freshman boys, meeting three periods a week 
year. Activities included are soccer, touch football, basket- 
baseball (soft), track, and natural gymnastics. 

y. Physical Activities (4). 

course for sophomore boys, meeting three periods a week 
year. Activities included are soccer, touch football, basket- 
track (indoor and outdoor), baseball (soft and hard), fenc- 
boxing, ping pong, horseshoes, tennis, and natural gym- 



Phys. Ed. 5y. Physical Education Practice (2). 

An activities course required of junior men, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Activities included are gymnastics, stunts, tumbling, 
apparatus, games, and calisthenics. 

Phys. Ed. 7y. Advanced Physical Education Practice (2). 
An activities course required of senior men, meeting three periods a week 
throughout the year. Continuation of Phys. Ed. 5 y. 

Phys. Ed. 11 y. PersoTial and Community Hygiene (4). 

Freshman course required of men whose major is physical education and 
open to other freshmen and sophomores. 

This course is designed to help the incoming student live at his best and 
to realize the finest ideals of his group. 

Phys. Ed. 13 y. Coaching High School Athletics (4). 

Junior course required of men whose major is physical education; elective 
for other junior and senior students. 

Football, soccer, basketball, track, and baseball are analyzed from the 
point of view of successful team play on an interscholastic basis. The man- 
agement of athletics is studied thoroughly. 

Phys. Ed. 15 y. Management of Intramural Athletics (4). 

A senior course required of men whose major is physical education. 

It is designed to give the student practice in supervising, directing, and 
planning the intramural program. 

Prerequisite, three years of successful participation in intramural ath- 
letics. 



!♦ ^, "5^"^ ^^** ^^* registered in the College of Education, or in Rural Life and Agri- 
cultural Education or Arts and Science Education curricula, and whose major or minor is 
±;nysical Education may take both Basic Military and first and second year Physical Educa- 
tion courses for credit. In all other curricula credit will be allowed for either Basic Military 
or first and second year Physical Education, but not for both. 

232 



Phys. Ed. 21 y. Survey of Physical Education (4). 

Sophomore course required of men whose major is physical education; 
elective for other students. 

This course is an introduction to the study of physical education. It in- 
cludes a survey of the possibilities of the profession. 

Phys. Ed. 23 y. Technics of Teaching Physical Education (4). 
Junior course required of men whose major is physical education. 
A thorough study of the physiological and psychological aspects of in- 
struction in the performance of physical activities. 

Ed. 141 f. Physical Education in the High School (Boys) (3). 

Ed. 143 f or s. Supervised Teaching of Physical Education (Boys) (2). 

For Graduates 

**Phys. Ed. 201 y. Administration of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion (6). 

This course is designed to aid in solving the multitude of problems that 
arise in the administration of health and physical education in public 
schools. An attempt will be made to set up standards for evaluating the 
effectiveness of programs of health and physical education. (Mackert.) 

B. Physical Education for Women -y,^,^ ^ _^ x^-J^ 
Miss Stamp, Mno. Jamec , Dr. Karpeles 

Phys. Ed. 2y. Personal Hygiene (1). 

Freshman course required of all women. 

This course consists of instruction in hygiene one period a week through- 
out the year. The health ideal and its attainments, care of the body relative 
to diet, exercise, sleep, bathing, etc., and social hygiene. 

Phys. Ed. 4y. Physical Activities (1). 

Freshman course required of all women. 

This is an activities course, which meets two periods a week throughout 
the year. It will present the following phases of physical education : sports, 
such as hockey, soccer, basketball, baseball, speedball, archery, and volley- 
ball; natural activities, such as tumbling and stunts; and dancing, such as 
clog, folk, and athletic. 

Phys. Ed. 6y. Community Hygiene (2). 

Sophomore course required of all women. 

This course is a continuation of the freshman course. The work in 
hygiene includes the elements of physiology, the elements of home, school, 
and community hygiene, and a continuation of social hygiene. 



♦•Open to men and women. 



233 



s 



Phys. Ed. 8y. Phijsical Activities (2). 

Sophomore course required of all women. 

This course is a continuation of the work of the freshman year. In ad- 
dition to the regular work, the student is permitted to elect clog, folk or 
natural dancing. - ' 

fPHYS. Ed. 10 y. Fundamentals of Rhythm and Damce (2)--0ne lecture 
a week. Required of all freshman students planning to make physical edu- 
cation a major, and open to other freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

The fundamentals of rhythm, principles of class organization, suggested 
lesson plans for teaching various types of dancing, as well as the aims and 
objectives of creative dancing will be presented in this course. 

Phys. Ed. 12 f. Games (2). 

Required of all sophomores whose major is physical education, and open 
to other undergraduates. 

This course will aim to present games and stunts suitable for the ele- 
mentary school and recreational groups. Both theory and practice will be 
offered. 

tPHYS. Ed. 16 s. First Aid (1). 

This course is required of all juniors whose major is physical education. 

It presents the fundamentals necessary for caring for accidents and 
mjuries until medical a^ttention can be secured. Practical work will be 
required of all students.' 

Phys. Ed. 18Af;18Bs. Athletics (2-2). 

Required one semester of all juniors whose major is physical education 
and open to other juniors and seniors. ' 

This course includes one lecture a week, and two periods of practical work 
each semester. The practical work is organized in a series of sport units, 
four for each semester, as shown below and designated as "practical sec- 
tions." Any three of the four may be selected. 

First semester (18 f) : hockey, soccer, fieldball, basketball. Second sem< 
ester (18 s) : volleyball and handball, speedball, archery, baseball. Instruc- 
tion will be given in the theory, practice, organization, and teaching of each 
sport. 

Phys. Ed. 20 s. Natural Gy nasties (2). 

Required of all sophomores with a major in physical education. 

This course presents stunts, games, and self-testing activities based upon 
fundamental movements which are inherent in the race. Teaching technics 
will be considered and material offered which is suitable to varying age 
groups. ^ & c> 

Phys. Ed. 22s. Organization of Athletic Activities for Girls (2). 
This course is open to juniors and seniors with a major in physical edu- 
cation. 



A lecture course dealing with the organization of material and the de- 
veloping of athletic activities for girls in such situations as camp, school, 
and playground. (Given in alternate years. Not given in 1936-1937.) 

Phys. Ed. 26 y. Coaching and Officiating; Athletics for Girls (4). 

This course is open to seniors with a major in physical education. It 
trains the student to coach and officiate in women's athletics. Opportunity 
is given for the student to apply practically the theory and methods which 
she has learned in this class. 

tPHYS. Ed. 28 f. Clogs and Athletic Dances (2). 

Two practical classes a week. Required of all sophomores planning to 
make physical education a major, and open to other sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors. 

This course includes suitable teaching material for both high school boys 
and girls. 

Tap shoes are required. 

tPHYS. Ed. 30 s. Folk Dancing (2). Two practical classes a week. Re- 
quired of all sophomores planning to make physical education a major, and 
open to other sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

This course includes folk dances of various countries. 

tPHYS. Ed. 32 f or s. Natural Dancing (2). Two practical classes a week. 
This course is required of all juniors planning to make physical education 
a major, and is open to other juniors and seniors. 

This course consists of a type of dancing based upon free and natural 
movements, such as skipping, walking, and running. 

A special costume is required. 

fPHYS. Ed. 34 f or s. Advanced Clog (2). 

Two practical classes a week. Open to all students who ha\^ had Phys. 
Ed. 28 f or its equivalent. This course includes more advanced and difficult 
dances suitable for use with both boys and girls. Tap shoes required. 

Ed. 140 y. Physical Education Activities for High School Girls (4). 

Ed. 142 f. Physical Education in the High Schools (Girls) (3). 

ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Johnson, Creese, Nesbit; Associate Professor 
HoDGiNS; Assistant Professors Hoshall, Bailey, Pyle, Allen; 
Mr. Hennick; Additional Instructors and Lecturers. 

Civil Engineering 

C. E. 101 s. Hydraulics (4) — Three lectures, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Mech. 101 f. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Hydrostatic pressures on tanks, drains, and pipes. Flow throusrh orifices, 
nozzles, pipe lines, canals, and weirs. Measurement of water. Elementary 

hydrodynamics. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 



F 

♦. 

i 

r 

pi 



t 



k 



fOpen to men and women. 



234 



tOpen to men and women. 



235 



C. E. 102 s. Hydraulics (3)— Two lectures, one laboratory Prerpo,,; 

A shorter course than C. E. 101 s, with emphasis on water wheels tur 
bmes, and centnfugal pumps. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

C. E. 103f. Railroad Curves and Earthwork (3)— Two lectures n„« 
laboratory. Prerequisite. Surv. 3 y. Required of juniors in CiTEng^Z 

Computation and field work far simple, compound, and reversed circular 
curves; easement curves; vertical and horizontal parkbolic cur.i ASvii 
^^turnouts and computation of earthwork, including haul and mass dS 

(Allen.) 

C. E. 104 s. Theory of Structures (5) -Four lectures, one laboratory 

neerii"""" ' ''""''• "' ^^ ''"'""^' '' ^'""^"^^ ^" ^'^^^ ^5 

Analytical and graphical deterinination of stresses in simple framed 
ments of the design of steel and timber members for tension, compression 

(Allen.) 

P.o;^"-^-?^.^^*"'^'''^ "^ fft>fe«^o2/s (3)-Two lectures, one laboratory 
Prerequisite, Mech. 105 y. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 

Location, construction, and maintenance of roads and pavements Hiob 
way contracts and specifications, estimates of cost, highwSXnomics The 
course includes, in addition to lecture and classroom work! SSsptct^on 

(Steinberg.) 

C. E. 106 y. Concrete Design (7) -Three lectures, one laboratory first 
semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semestek PrerequisK, C E 
104 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

A continuation of C. E. 104 s, with special application to the design and 
detailing of plain and reinforced concrete structures. These wiU ETclude 

EkmenT "T'', ""'JT' '^^" '"'^^^' ^^^^-' ^^^aining walls, and damt 
Smef ^l«P*-d-fl«<=t'on and moment distribution theorie; and rigid 

(Allen.) 

semesL'^IJ; iT.^'"'"''^ ""VT (^^^^hree lectures, one laboratory first 
semester, two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Prequisite, C E 
104 s. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

A continuation of €. E. 104 s, with special application to the design 
and dealing of structural steel sections, members and their connectTons 
for roof trussses, plate girders, highway and railway bridgesXiS ' 
bracmg systems, and grillage foundations. ' (AlleS 



236 



C. E. 108 y. Municipal Sanitation, (6) — Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 105 y. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

Methods of estimating consumption and designing water supply and 
sewerage systems. 

C. E. 109 y. Thesis (4) — One laboratory first semester; one lecture, two 
laboratories second semester. Required of seniors in Civil Engineering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in civil engineering 
design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as may be 
needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent conferences 
are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student is assigned 
for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliography, is required 
to complete the thesis. (Staff.) 

Drawing 

Dr. 1 a f . Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. Required of 
freshmen in Engineering. 

Lettering, use of instruments, orthographic projection, technical sketches, 
dimensioning. Drawing from memory; drawing from description; inking, 
tracing, blueprinting, isometric and oblique projection and sections. 

Course A is intended for students who have not had mechanical drawing. 

Dr. 1 B f . Engineering Drawing (2) — Two laboratories. 

Advanced engineering drawing, with applications to engineering practice. 

Course B is intended for students who have passed an approved high 
school course in mechanical drawing. 

Dr. 2 s. Descriptive Geometry (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 1 A f or Dr. 1 B f . Required of freshmen in Engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line and plane. Intersection of planes with solids, 
development. Applications to practical problems in engineering drafting. 

Dr. 3 f . Descriptive Geometry (2) — One lecture, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 2 s. Required of sophomores in Engineering. 

Continuation of Dr. 2 s, including curves, plane and space, generation 
of surfaces, tangent planes, intersection and development of curved sur- 
faces. Shades, shadows, and perspective. Applications to practical prob- 
lems in engineering drafting. (Given commencing 1937-1938). 

Dr. 4 f . Descriptive Geometry (3) — One lecture, two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 1 A f or Dr. 1 B f . Required of sophomores in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line and plane, generation of surfaces, intersections, 
developments, shades, shadows, perspective. 

237 



« 



I 



I 



Dr. 5 f . Descriptive Geometry {2) — One lecture, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Dr. 1 A f or Dr. 1 B f . Required of sophomores in Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Orthographic projection as applied to the solution of space problems 
relating to the point, line and plane, intersections, developments. 

Electrical Engineering 

E. E. 1 y. Elements of Electrical Engineering (3) — One lecture first 
semester; one lecture and one laboratory second semester. Prerequisites, 
Math. 11 f, 12 f, 14 s, 15 s. Required of sophomores in Electrical Engineer- 
*mg. 

Principles involved in flow of direct currents in conductors; current and 
voltage relations in simple circuits; magnetism and magnetic circuits; elec- 
tromagnetic induction, dielectric circuits and condensers. 

E. E. 101 y. Principles of Electrical Engineering (8) — Three lectures, 
one laboratory. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 2 y. Math. 16 y and 17 y. 

Study of elementary direct current and alternating current characteristics. 
Principles of construction and operation of direct and alternating current 
machinery. Experiments on the operation and characteristics of generators, 
motors, transformers, and control equipment. 

E. E. 102 f. Direct Currents (6) — Four lectures, two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 2 y, Math. 16 y and 17 y, and E. E. 1 y. Required of juniors 
in Electrical Engineering. 

Construction, theory of operation and performance characteristics of 
direct current generators, motors, and control apparatus. Principles of 
construction, characteristics and operation of primary and secondary bat- 
teries and control equipment. Experiments on battery characteristics, and 
the operation and characteristics of direct current generators and motors. 

(Hodgins.) 

E. E. 103 s. Direct Current Design (1) — One laboratory. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 102 f. Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Materials of construction and design of the electric and magnetic circuits 
of direct current generators and motors. (Hodgins.) 

E. E. 104 f. Electrical Measurements (3) — Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. Math. 16 y and 17 y, and E. E. 1 y. Required of 
juniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The theory and practice of important methods of precision measurement 
of current, voltage, resistance, capacity, and inductance. A study and cali- 
bration of commercial and laboratory instruments for direct and alternating 
current. 



laboratories. Prerequisites, E. E. 10^ t ana r.. r-. i" 

i„ Electrical Engineering. ,. ^^^j^ ,„rent circuits, both single 

Introduction to the theory of ^»«"^ "^^ ^^^^^ alternating 

unbalanced polyphase systems. 

laboratory. Prerequisite, E. E. 105 s. Kequireu 

Engineering. n^rformance characteristics of 

Construction, theory "^y'-^^Jjl^^.'^ronousniotors, synchro- 
transformers, -'ternato^s -duc^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ,„, 
nous converters, commutator type luutu , (Creese.) 
experiments. ^ 

E E 107f Alternating Current Design (l)-One laboratory. Pre- 

re^uisftes! E E. 104 f, E. E. 105 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 106 y. 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. ^^^^^^ 

Materials of construction and design of ^^e electnc an^ ^^ j„^ ^ 

of alternating current generators, motors, and transformers. i s 

E E 108y Electric Railways and Electric Power rrar,s««s^o« (6)- 
Three^cture . Prerequisite, E. E. 105 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. 
Sgv S'red of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

"^TJaff^rdies. train schedules, motor ^^^^ ^tZ^^s 
ment of speed-distance and ^:>^Z'SLZL%lTS>r^llciri. r'ailways. 
and other railway equipment, electrification ^f^^"* , ^ ^j^^ ^nd distri- 
including generating apparatus, transmiss^n Ij-/ ;^'^^5^^^'°;f ^eam roads 

bution of electrical energy for car "P^.^;";" ' ^ptS *^ ^^^''=*'°" 

and application of signal systems, problems in operation 

:" U'er car equipment to the -^^^^ J J^^^^^^^ral stations and sub- 
Survey of the electrical equipment required ^n <J" illustrating the 
stations, transmission of electric power, f^^*^^f J^^~ry. (Hodgins.) 
principles of installation and operation of power machinery. 

P F 109 V Electrical C<mmunications (6)-Three lectures first semes- 

105 s. Taken concurrently with E. E. iwy y. nequi c 

^"p'^t^nlltof wire and radio communication; telegraph and telephone sys- 
telreSo^ tX th Tory and application to wire and radio communication. 

E.'E.110y. Illur^ination i^^'^^^^llf^^^^^l^TT^^^^^ 
rurStl^trE^^^erHTqS^ 0?=^ ElectnC Engineering. 

ElTrric Illumination; principles involved in design of %hting systoms, 
illumination calculations, photometric measurements. (^ 

239 



238 



i i 



(Staff.) 
General Engineering Subjects 

freiTen in^n'SetiS:" '" ^'^^"'^^'^''^^ <l>-0- lecture. Required of 
oAhlZTLl'tT"" '°''""^ '*'" engineering professional fields, the work 

selecting the particular field „f° f '' *° ^''''* *^" freshman in 

s e particular field of engineering for which he is best adapted 

JunlTin E^gineSS""''^^ ''"^'"'' ^'^"^"^ ^^'=*"^^- ^^^-^ '^^ 

se^reil^n^f :o:tsT;tt?nXi;l:Lr?%^^^^ 

parisons of ultimate economy '^' *''*'"'' °^ estimating costs, and com- 

TT ino^ (Steinberg.) 

JuntrTin S EfgTnirinT ''''''''' ^'^-^"'^ ^"*"^^^- ^"^^^ ^^ 

The fundamentals of geology with engineering applications. (Metzger.) 
Engr. 103 s. Elements of Prime Movpr^ f9\ n i i. 

ReS o^^'sLofrf SeeS; "'^'^ "^^^^^^'^^^"'^^ <^>-0- lecture. 

enginSgfiid'"g:r^^^^^^^^^ "V^" "'^""^ ^^ *'-'-- -^ to 

pofations, anrcomi eaSe • Tese f" "' r^°'"'^^ -^truments, cor- 
analysis of general and t^chZl\ , P"""P'es are then applied to the 

ficatfons. ^"'"^^ "'^"""^ '" engineering contracts and speci- 

( Steinberg and Creese.) 
Mechanics 

Engineering. ^' *^ *''• ^^ ^ ^"'^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^'^ed of sophomores in 

syfti?etSLr5"riL"lr?"^ °' ^"'"r^^ ^"'^ non-coplanar force 

and momeni o^^z^ si^:L:^!:;-:f ::^ij:^ ^^^ 

240 



Mech. 101 f. Strength of Materials (5) — Four lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Riveted joints; shear and bending moment diagrams; stresses in beams 
and columns; torsional stresses, rivets in eccentric connections; combined 
stresses ; diagonal tension ; deflection of beams ; composite members including 
reinforced concrete beams. Use of American Institute of Steel Construction 
Handbook in solution of problems. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

Mech. 102 s. Materials of Engineering (2) — One lecture, one labora- 
tory. Taken concurrently with Mech. 104 y or Mech. 105 y. Required of 
juniors in Engineering. 

The composition, manufacture, and properties of the principal materials 
used in engineering, and of the conditions that influence their physical char- 
acteristics. The interpretation of specifications and of standard tests. Lab- 
oratory work in the testing of steel, wrought iron, timber, brick, cement, and 
concrete. 

Mech. 103 f. Strength of Materials (4) — Three lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 1 s. Required of juniors in Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineering. 

A shorter course than Mech. 101 f. Use of American Institute of Steel 
Construction Handbook in solution of problems. (Given commencing 1937- 
1938.) 

Mech. 104 y. Engineering Mechanics (7) — Three lectures, one labora- 
tory first semester; two lectures, one laboratory second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 16 y and 17 y; Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineering. 

Applied Mechanics: the analytical study of statics dealing with the com- 
position and resolution of forces, moments and couples, machines. The laws 
of friction, dynamics, work, energy, and the strength of materials. 

Graphic Statics: the graphic solution of problems in mechanics, center of 
gravity, moments of inertia. Determination of stresses in framed structures. 

Elements of Hydraulics: flow of water in pipes, through orifices and in 
open channels. Determination of the co-efficient of discharge, velocity, and 
contraction in pipes and orifices. 

Mech. 105 y. Engineering Mechanics (9) — Four lectures, one labora- 
tory first semester; three lectures, one laboratory second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 16 y and 17 y; Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in Civil 
Engineering. 

This course is similar in content to Mech. 104 y, but with greater em- 
phasis on strength of materials and hydraulics. 

Mechanical Engineering 

M. E. Is. Kinematics of Machinery (2) — One lecture, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Math. 11 f , 12 f, 14 s, 15 s. Required of sophomores in Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

The application of the principles involved in determining the design and 

241 




size of bolts, screws, shafting, and gears. The theory and practice of the 
kinematics of machinery as applied to ropes, belts, chains, gears, and gear 
teeth; wheels in trains, cams, linkwork, parallel motions. Miscellaneous 
mechanisms and aggregate combinations. 

M. E. 101 f. Kinematics of Machinery (3) — Two lectures, one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, M. E. 1 s. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

A continuation of M. E. 1 s, with special emphasis on cams, linkwork, 
mechanisms, and aggregate combinations. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

(Hoshall.) 

M. E. 101 A y. Kinematics and Machine Design (6) — Two lectures, one 
laboratory. Prerequisites, Math. 16 y and 17 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of 
juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

The application of the principles involved in determining the properties 
and forms of machine parts. The design of bolts, screws, shafting, and gears. 
The theory and practice of the kinematics of machinery as applied to ropes, 
belts, chains, gears, and gear teeth, wheels in trains, epicyclic trains, cams, 
linkwood, parallel motions. Miscellaneous mechanisms and aggregate com- 
binations. (Hoshall.) 

M. E. 102 f. Machine Design (2) — One lecture, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y and 17 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The application of mechanics to the determination of stresses and the 
proportioning of machine parts. (Given commencing 1937-1938.) 

M. E. 103 s. Thermodynamics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y and 17 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering. 

The theory and application of thermodynamics to the steam engine, steam 
turbine, nozzles. The properties of vapors, cycles of heat and entropy, in- 
cluding discussion of machines and their uses. (Bailey.) 

M. E. 104 s. Thermodynamics (5) — Five lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 
16 y and 17 y, Phys. 2 y. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and vapors. Thermo- 
dynamics of heat cycles, air compressors, and steam engines. (Given com- 
mencing 1937-1938.) 

M. E. 104 A y. Thermodynamics (5) — Three lectures first semester; 
two lectures second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 16 y and 17 y, Phys. 2 y. 
Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases and viapors. Thermo- 
dynamics of heat cycles, air compressors, and steam engines. (Bailey.) 

M. E. 105 f. Internal Combustion Engines (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, M. E. 104 A y and Mech. 104 y. Required of seniors in Mechani- 
cal Engineering. 

Theory, construction, and operation of gasoline and oil engines. Design 
and operation of Otto and Diesel cycle engines. (Nesbit.) 



M E 106 f. Heating and Ventilation (3)— Two lectures, one labora- 
tory* Prerequisites, Mech. 104 y, M. E. 104 A y. Required of seniors m 
Mechanical Engineering. 

The study of types of heating and ventilating systems for a particular 
building; layout of piping and systems, with complete calculations and esti- 
mates of costs; fundamentals of air conditioning. 

M E 107 s. Refrigeration (3)— Two lectures, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 104 y, M. E. 104 A y. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Problems involving the different methods and processes of refrigeration. 
Air conditioning for offices, buildings, factories, and homes. 

M E 108 y. Design of Prime Movers (6)— Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Mech. 104 y, M. E. 104 A y. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The design and proportioning of parts of essential prime movers for power 
plants, and industrial uses. (Nesbit.) 

M E 109 s. Design of Power Plants (2)— One lecture, one laboratory. 
Taken concurrently with M. E. 108 y. Required of seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

The design of power plants, including the layout and cost of building, 
installation of equipment, and determination of size for most economical 

,. (Nesbit.) 

operation. ^ 

M. E. 110 y. Mechanical Laboratory (2)— One laboratory. Required 
of seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

Calibration of instruments, gauges, indicators, steam, gas and water 
meters. Indicated and brake horsepower of steam and internal combustion 
engines, setting of v)alves, tests for economy and capacity of boilers, engines, 
turbines, pumps, and other prime movers. Feed water heaters and con- 
densers; B. T. U. analysis of solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels, and power 
plant tests. ^ 

M. E. Illy. Thesis (3)— One laboratory first semester; one lecture, 
one laboratory second semester. Required of seniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

The student selects, with faculty approval, a subject in mechanical engi- 
neering design or research. He makes such field or laboratory studies as 
may be needed. Weekly progress reports are required, and frequent 
conferences are held with the member of the faculty to whom the student 
Is assigned for advice. A written report, including an annotated bibliog- 
raphy, is required to complete the thesis. (Staff.) 



242 



243 



Shop 

p ^""^^I^ /V^ ^'''''^^''^^ (l)-One combination lecture and laboratory 
Required of freshmen in Engineering. ""raiory. 

of ^?r n ^""^ ^f ^*,^^^«^« ^« the principles of forging and heat treatment 
of steel. Demonstrations in acetylene and electric welding, brazing, cutS 
and case hardening. Laboratory practice in drawing, Lding, upsetS 
welding, hardening, tempering, and thread cutting. upsetting, 

Shop 2f. Ma^Mr^ Slwp Practice (l)-One laboratory. Required of 
sophomores m Electrical Engineering. *^4"irea of 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

Shop 3f. Machine Shop Practice (2)-0ne lecture, one laboratory Re 
quired of sophomores in Mechanical Engineering. 

Study of the fundamental principles of machine tools, such as lathe 
planer, shaper, mUling machine, drilling machine, and grinding machines' 
Calculation for cutting threads, spur and helical gears, and fluting 

Practice in bench work, turning, planing, drilling, and pipe threading. 

Shop 101 f. Mac/^me Shop Practice (l)-One laboratory. Required of 
juniors m Mechanical Engineering. ^"i^«u oi 

Advanced practice with standard machine tools. Exercises in thread 
cutting, surface grinding, fluting, and cutting spur and helical gears. 

(Hoshall.) 
Shop 102 s. Foundry Practice (l)-One combination lecture and lab- 
oratory. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 

eaifnm'tn? ^^^^ ;^^^^*^^^\<!^ ^^^^^^ry products and layout, materials and 
equipment, hand and machine moulding, cupola practice and calculating 
mixes. Core making, moulding, casting in aluminum, brass, and gray iron 

(Hoshall.) 
Surveying 

SURV. If. Elements of Plane Surveying (l)~Combined lecture and 
laboratory work. Prerequisites, Math. 11 f, 12 f, 14 s, 15 s Required of 
sophomores in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. Required of 

CotnuStinnrf ' '"" '^" """" ^^ '""^ '^^' ''"^^^''^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^«it' ^^d stadia. 
Computations for area, coordinates, volume, and plotting. 

SURV. 2y. Plane Surveying (5)— Two lectures, one laboratorv first 
semester; one lecture, one laboratory second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
11 1, IZ f, 14 s, 15 s. Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering 

Theory of and practice in the use of the tape, compass, transit, and level 
General survey methods, traversing, area, coordinates, profiles, cross-T^- 

!;^ri9l7 m8.r^ ^^' '"'''''"'' '''^'^''' """"'^' '^^^- <^^^^- ^^"^-^"- 

244 



SURV. 3 y. Plane Surveying (4) — One lecture, one laboratory. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 11 f, 12 f , 14 s, 15 s. Required of sophomores in Civil 
Engineering. 

Land surveying and map making for topography and planning. Practice 
in stadia. Computations of coordinates. Plotting of control and detail. 
Establishment of line and grade for construction purposes. Laying out 
simple curves. Estimates of earthwork. 

SuRV. 101 f. Advanced Surveying (3) — One lecture, two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Surv. 3 y. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Adjustment of instruments, triangulation, precise leveling, geodetic sur- 
veying, together with the necessary adjustments and computations. Topo- 
graphic surveys. Plane table, land surveys, and boundaries. Mine, tunnel, 
and hydrographic surveys. (Pyle.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors House, Hale, Warfel; 

Associate Professor Harman; Assistant Professors Lemon, 

Fitzhugh; *Mr. Murphy, Mr. Cooley, Mr. Sixbey, 

Miss Ide, Miss Blitch. 

Eng. ly. Survey and Composition I (6) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful passing 
of the qualifying examination given by the Department, or successful com- 
pletion of English A. Required of all four-year students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an 
historical study of the literature of the 19th Century. Written themes, book 
revjiews, and exercises. 

Eng. Af. Special Preparatory Course (0) — Three lectures. Freshman 
year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English. Required of all 
students who fail to pass the qualifying examination. Students who show 
sufficient progress after five weeks of English A will be transferred to 
English 1 y. Others will continue with English A for one semester. The 
department reserves the right to transfer students who make unsatisfactory 
progress from English 1 y to English A f . 

A course in grammatical and rhetorical principles designed to help stu- 
dents whose preparation has been insufficient for English 1 y. Exercises, 
conferences, precis writing. 

Eng. 2 f. Survey and Composition II (3) — One general lecture given by 
various members of the department, two quiz sections. Sophomore year. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Required of all students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

A continuation of work in composition based on the work accomplished 
in Eng. 1 y. An historical study of English literature from the beginnings 
to the 19th Century. Themes, book reports, conferences. 



(♦Absent on leave, 1936-1937.) 



245 



CoSua'tLotrnlTi'""'^'"^ (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 5f. 

req^uLTtejEn/r;;' ''^ ^"""'''" ^^''^'•"'"'•^ <^)-Three lectures. Pre- 

American thought and expression from 1607 to ISfi'^ wui, ., • 
colonial cultural patterns „nnn tv.1 I t \. ^^^^' "^^^^ emphasis upon 
conflict. Reports andlrm pa^r. " -t--lism, and upon sectional 

reqSieXtr' "^ ^"'"""" ''^'"■'^*"^^ <'>-'^^^- >-*— P- 

Ha^d;c,r«-d:^-jjMi^^^^^^^ -- ^V. 

An"S;nsiU-.tJroreSef^l-?^^^ '^^*--- ^-^''^«^*^. E'^^- ^ V- 
CoSuaUon ofE^TlT ''^-^""^ ^"*"'-^^- ^^-^'^^^'^' ^^^^ 1^- 

prfr::uiiii!-Entrrs:;ore„tx:iten'^^^^^^^^^^ ^^>-^-« ^— 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

sitfs^Enr/y'and Enf Tr:nd'5""T'''''^ ^'^"^"^ '^'=*"-«- P--^-" 
ma/be tSken'aLcond semester for cr^drR^"^ ^T T ''""'''''' ""* 
major is En.iish. Open to oTh^ b^ ;:.SssitT^ttltorr ^"*^ ^'^"^^ 

e.?r:tr is:/;i'^:ii:r '"'''"^' ^'^^ *^^^^ ^° ''^ -^'^^ -^^ — 

(Staff.) 
246 



*Eng. 101 f. College Grammar (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1 y. Required of students preparing to teach English, and an alternative 
requirement with Anglo-Saxon for others whose major is English. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of modem English. (Harman.) 

*Eng. 102 s. History of the English Language (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 101 f. Alternative requirement with Anglo-Saxon for stu- 
dents whose major is English. 

An historical survey of the English language: its nature, origin, and devel- 
opment, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in English 
speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. (Harman.) 

*Eng. 103 y. Anglo-Saxon (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 
Alternative requirement with College Grammar and History of the English 
Language for students whose major is English. 

A study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lectures 
on the principles of phonetics and comparative philology. 

Eng. 104 y. Chaucer and Other Poetry of the 14th Century (4) — Two 
lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the principal poets and poems of England in the 14th Century, 
including Chaucer, Langland, Gawaine and the Green Knight, The Pearly 
and early poems about Arthur. Chaucer and Langland will be read in the 
original; other works in modernized versions. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

(Hale.) 

Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its beginning 
to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Not 
given in 1936-1937.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 106 s. Elizabethan Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the change in spirit and form of English drama from 1540 to 
1640, as seen in the works of the important dramatists other than Shake- 
speare. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Not 
given in 1936-1937.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng, 107 s. Elizabethan Non-Dramatic Literature (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Survey of the non-dramatic poetry and prose from 1557 to 1600, with 
emphasis tipon the sonnet cycle, the epic, and the beginnings of fiction. 

(Warfel.) 



*A student whose major is EInglish is required to take Eng. 103 y, or Eng. 101 f and 
Eng. 102 s. 

247 



JTs. ''''• '''"'" ^'^-''"" '^^*"^^^- P-^equisites. Eng. ly and 2f 
^^A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. (Not given in 1936- 

(Murphy ) 
t-NG. 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (2\ t. 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. <2)-Two 

A study of the chief prose writers and of the Metaphysical and Cavai;. 
traditions m poetry. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Murphy J 

1 y^'nd En"g!-2 ItlAT^ '''''''' ^'^"'^^'^ '^•=*^^^^- ^-requisites. En'g. 

This course emphasizes the relation of literatnrp fn fi.^ ^i,-i 
movements of the age. (Not given in 193^ 1937.) ' JZihT)' 

V^^^^li^TZLVt^TStiT ^^""^^ <^)-^^ lectures. 
^^Readmgs in the period dominated by Defoe, Swift, Addison, Steele, and 

V i,o (Fitzhugh.) 

a^i^G. l\2s. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2)— Two ler-tnr.c 

Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. lectures. 

A continuation of Eng. Ill f. Dr. Johnson and his Circle- the Rise of 

Romanticism; the Letter Writers. ' ,^.^^^,°^ 

*„ (Rtzhugh.) 

ture^'^P. ■• -f*""*^ "'^ ''"^'"^ "f ^^^ Romantic Age (3)-Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s 

exfrnSL^K ''?! *l^^e'«P"^ent of the Romantic movement in England as 

?urey?Saztt!td"oXrr ^^"" ^^ ^''^^^-''"^' ^"'-^^- ^-^' ^e 
♦17. (Hale.) 

Pr.i''''* ^^^ "'t. ^''''^^ ^nd Poetry of the Romantic Age (3)~-Three lectures 
Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. lectures. 

T t^T^ ""^ ^^^ ^^^^ Romantic writers, including Byron, Shelley Keats 
Landor, Moore, Scott, and others. oneiiey, -K^eats, 

(Hale.) 

anfE^'ni ILn^f ''Vt''^^'^~''^" ^^^^^^^^- Prerequisites, Eng. ly 

ReSiJ'/s in the." ,''\^:!,r^^^^^ '' '^- Scottish dialect required. ^ ' 

^ K n ^ I Scottish Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthornden- son^ 

and Si 'T'''^'''^ r'^ ^' ^he vernacular revival: Rarsa" F^^^^^^^^^ 

and Bums. Papers and reports. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (FitzbTgh ) 

EngJ'S'f'and^ s'^"'^"" ^'^""^"" '''''''''' Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Wide reading of the poems, with detailed study of The Princess, (House ) 
Enf 2% in'd% s^"~^ ^'^""^"^ '^^'^^^" Prerequisites, Eng ly and 
__Study^of selections from Browning other than the dramas. 

hav/h^f -(il^p' 11?. foTf inVd^m^.^LriSet ^' "^^^^'^^-^ Literature by students who 

248 



Eng. 118 s. Victorian Prose (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A survey of trends of thought from about 1830, and analysis of the style 
of several writers. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 119 f. TJie Letter as a Literary Type (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Beginning with the Paston letters, the course is designed as a study of 
English and American letters, with special attention to use and changes in 
prose style. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 120 f. The Novel (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class reviews 
of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. (House.) 

Eng. 121s. The Novel (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Continuation of Eng. 120 f . 

Eng. 122 f. English and American Essays (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of the philosophical, critical, and familiar essays of England and 
America. Bacon, Lamb, Macaulay, Emerson, Chesterton, and others. 

(House.) 

Eng. 123 f. Modem Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly 
and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A survey of English drama during the two centuries from 1660 to 1860. 
Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 124 s. Contemporary Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng, 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen to 
O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 

(Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 125 f. Emerson and American Transcendentalism, (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Study of the writings of the Concord group: Emerson, Thoreau, Haw- 
thorne, Parker, Alcott, and Margaret Fuller. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

(Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. Whitman, Twain, and the Rise of Realism (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 

Intensive study of the writings of Whitman, Twain, the local colorists, and 
the early realists. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 f and 3 s. 
Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. (Warfel.) 

249 



eZ'^^'J^I ^«fft«een«i, Report Writing (l)_One lecture. Prerequisite 
J^ng. 1 y. Required of juniors in Civil Engineering. ^requisite, 

Content and form of engineering reports; collection, assembly and inte 
pretation of data; preparation of papers, letters, and ;eportr " (Lemo:.; 



For Graduates 

anfeL'accomZhS '''''■ '''''' ^"^^"'^^''"^'^ *^ '^^ — * «^ -r. 

ad^aTclTLSr '"' ""^ ^"^^'•^"'*" ^^ ^'^^^^^*-- ^-'^-^ towards 

(Staff.) 

ENG. 202 y. Beovmlf (4)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y 
Critical study of grammar and versification, with some account of the 
legendary lore. (Not given in 1936-1937.) Tnaman ) 

Eng 203 f. Middle English (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y 

etytl^Vnd ^' ""' ''' ""''''' ^"^"^^ P-'^'^' ^^^h reference to' 

(House.) 
Eng. 204 s. Gothic (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y 

CotreSn^of ^Cntht™' ^f ''^*/"' ^'"'^ ''"^'''"S^ ^'""^ '^^ Ulfilas Bible, 
^.orrelation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (House.) 

Eng. 205 s. Brovming's Dramas (2)— Two lectures. 

ntlV^'J^'l *f r" "^ *^ ^'^''' ^'PP'' ^'^«««. Colombe's Birthday A 
Blot in the 'Scutcheon, and others. '"-'i^y, a 

( House. ) 
llf and'Eng. jf^"^^^^"^^ ^'^^"^ (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 

prl:r7nl!Seir'^ '='*"'''^*^ "'*^'^^' -•^'^ ^P--' -tt«"«on to major 

(Harman.) 

Eng. 207 y. Medieval Romance in England (4)— Two lectures 

val^ EnT r^ T.u'^^" '"^ '^' '^'"'^^ ^"^ non-cyclical romances in Medie- 
val England, and their sources, including translations from the Old French. 

(Hale.) 

tufeT' ^^^^' ^^'^^^^ in Eighteenth Century Literature (2)— Two lec- 

centu'^r'Tv '/""^^ ""^ one man's work or of one important movement of the 
century. (Not given in 1930-1937.) (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 209 y. Seminar in American Literature (4)— Two lectures 
^^Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth-century American litera- 

(Warfel.) 
250 



Eng. 210 y. Seminar in the Romantic Period (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 115 f and Eng. 116 s or an equivalent satisfactory to the 
instructor. 

One discussion period of two hours. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
movement. The subject-matter of the course will vary with the interests 
of the class. (Hale.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Cory; Assistant Professor Knight; • 
Lecturers Snodgrass, Yaeger, Hyslop; Mr. Abrams, 

Dr. Ditman, Mr. Harns. 

Ent. 1 f or s. Introductory Entomology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Zool. 1 f or s. 

The relations of insects to the daily life and activities of the student. 
General principles of structural and systematic entomology. Field work 
and the preparation of a collection of insects. 

Ent. 2 y. Insect Morphology and Taooonomy (6) — A two-semester course. 
Two laboratories. Credit not given for second semester alone. Prerequi- 
site, Ent. 1 f or s. 

Studies of the anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of insects. A funda- 
mental course given in preparation for most of the advanced courses. Lec- 
tures given at opportune times during laboratory periods. 

Ent. 3 s. Insect Biology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 f or s. 

A continuation of general entomological problems begun in the first 
course, with particular emphasis on the adaptations, ecology, interrelations, 
and behavior of insects. 

Ent. 4 f or s. Special Problems — Prerequisite — consult department. 

The intensive investigation of some entomological subject. A report of 
the results is submitted as part of the requirement for graduation. 

Ent. 5 s. Insecticides and Their Application (1) — One laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

The principles of insecticides, their chemistry, preparation, and applica- 
tion; construction, care, and use of spray and dusting machinery; fumi- 
gation; methods and apparatus in mechanical control. (Not offered in 1936- 
1937.) 

Ent. 6 f . Apiculture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 1 f or s, and Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the life history, yearly cycle, behavior, and activities of the 
honeybee. The value of honeybees as pollenizers of economic plants and as 

251 



producers of honey and wax. Designed to be of value to thp cf„^ . 
agriculture, horticulture, entomology^and zolgj. " '*"^'"* "' 

Enf 6f.'^'' ^^■'^'^"'-^ (3>-Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite. 

Theory and practice of apiary management. Designed for the <itnHo . 
who^w.hes to keep bees or desires a knowledge of pTacticlTaSLrm'r 

reqSte?Lt.?fr^""' '''''''"' "'"' ^"^"^^ ^^'--^^^ <4). Pre- 

fin?l!^"'J.?^^^""?' P'^^^^'^'^g' and mounting of insects. The prepara 
t.on of exhibits, materials for instruction, entomological records E !" 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ent. 101 y. Economic Entomology (4)— Two lectures. 

hi'LT^^'f^ "t"^^ °^ *' problems of applied entomology, including life 
h.sto,-y, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and con?;r (Cory [ 

Ent. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) -Two laboratories 

•^ (Cory.) 

Ent. 103 y. Seminar (2). 

impSSraSrf"'"'' "''^'' '°°'^ '^^^^^-^' ^^^ ^^^*-^*« o^ *e more 

(Cory, Knight.) 

^ ENT. 104 y. Insect Pests of Special Groups (6). Prerequisite, Ent. 

A study of the principal insects of one or more of the following ffroun. 
founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course islnteTded to S 
the general student a comprehensive view of the insects thatlre of import 

SaLLg r::jr^oV^:^'-' -^ ^-"- — «- - thi =t 

Insect Pests of 1. Fruit. 2. Vegetables. 3. Flowers, both in the onen and 
under glass. 4 Ornamentals and Shade Trees. 5. Forests, r^eld Crop" 
T Stored Products. 8. Live Stock. 9. The Household. (Not offered tnS-' 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 105 f. Medical Entom<,logy (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite Ent 
1 f or s, and consent of instructor. ^erequisiie, lint. 

The relation of insects to diseases of man, directly and as carriers of 

paraS^"'^'"""" ''^"*^''' °' ^'^'^ "^ --• ^^^ fundamental of 

(Knight.) 

252 



Ent. 106f ors. Insect Tdxonomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

An advanced course dealing with the principles and practices underlying 
modem systematic entomology. 

Note: Course 106 runs from November 15 to March 15 to accommodate 
field workers. (Hyslop). 

Ent. 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (2) — Two lectures. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, with regard to 
their chemistry, toxic action, compatability, and foliage injury. Recent 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. (Ditman.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201 y. Advanced Entomology (1-3) — One lecture; one laboratory by 
arrangement. 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy, and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 202 y. Hesearch in Entomology (6-10). 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with the approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy, or biology and control of insects. Frequently the student may 
be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. 
The student's work may form, a part of the final report on the project and 
be published in bulletin form. A dissertation suitable for publication must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203. Insect Morphology (2-4) — Two lectures, and laboratory work 
by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 
preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

(Snodgrass.) 

Note: Course 203 begins November 15 and closes March 15, and is taught 
at 4:30 P. M. in order to accommodate field workers, 

Ent. 204 y. Economic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. Studies of the 
principles underlying applied entomology, and the most significant advances 
in all phases of entomology. (Cory.) 

Ent. 205 f. Insect Physiology (2) — Two lectures; occasional demonstra- 
tions. Enrollment subject to consent of instructor. 

A study of the insect from the standpoint of the functioning of various 
of its cells, tissues, and organs, especially with regard to blood, circulation, 
digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, ner\^ous system, reflex action, 
metabolism, and secretion. (Yaeger.) 

253 



FARM FORESTRY 

Professor Besley. 

For. Is. Farm Forestry (3)-Two lectures; one laboratory. Alternat 
year course. Junior and senior years. Prerequisite, Bot. 101 f '*' 

„„V*"f^ °^ the principles and practices involved in managing woodland, 
on the farm. The course covers briefly the identification of Ll^fZt 
protection; management, measurement, and utilization of forest' cl! 
nursery practice; and tree planting. The work is conducted by mea^s o 
lectures and practice in the woods. °' 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

Professor W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

toTunts L^eS.^;"^^ ^'^-^-^ '^''^^^^'^ ^"^ ^^^--^-^- Open 

teitiZ?ft P^^f ^f /^"^^^ ^^ the keeping of farm accounts and in de- 
termining the cost of farm production. 

F. M. 2f. /^arw Manapewewi (4) —Four lectures. 

The business of farming from the standpoint of the individual farmer 
This course aims to connect the principles and practice wS th sJuS 
has acquired m the several technical courses and to apply them to ^e7e 
velopment of a successful farm business. 

See also Agricultural Economics, page 192. 

FARM MECHANICS 

Professor Carpenter. 

F. Mech. 101 f. Farm Machinery (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A study of the design and adjustments of modern horse- and tractor- 

mTr. "^'.^ ''Vk^^^"'^'""^ ^"'^ ''''''''' ^^ d^t^il^d study of actual 
machmes, their calibration, adjustment, and repair. 

F. Mech. 102 s. Gas Engines, Tractors, and Automobiles (3)— Two lec- 
tures; one laboratory. ^^ iwo lec 

i.^.f^'^^f^^^ ^^^'^' operation, and repair of the various types of in- 
ternal combustion engines used in farm practice. 

F. Mech. 104 f. Fwrni Shop Work (l)~One laboratory. 

A study of practical farm shop exercises, offered primarily for prosnective 
teachers of vocational agriculture. prospective 

F. Mech. 105 f. Farm Buildings (2)-Two lectures. 

A study of all types of farm structures; also of farm heating lichtinff 
water supply, and sanitation systems. rearing, lighting, 

254 



F. Mech. 107 s. Farm Drainage (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of farm drainage systems, including theory of tile under-drain- 
age, the depth and spacing of laterals, calculation of grades, and methods of 
construction. A smaller amount of time will be spent upon drainage by 
open ditches, and the laws relating thereto. 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 

Professor Kemp. 

Gen. 101 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of genet- 
ics, or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in the 
breeding of animals or of crops. 

Gen. 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
101 f . Alternate year course. 

A consideration of chromosome irregularities and other mutations, inter- 
species crosses, identity of the gene, genetic equilibrium, and the results of 
attempts to modify germplasm. 

Gen. Ill f . Statistics (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of 
statistics. The course includes a study of expressions of type, variability, 
correlation, and significance of differences. 

Gen. 112 s. Advanced Statistics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
Ill f or its equivalent. 

A study of the theory of error, measures of relationship, multiple and 
partial correlation, predictive formulas, curve fitting, and analysis of vari- 
ance. 

Gen. 114 s. Elements of Statistics (3) — Three lectures. Required of 
students in Business Administration. 

A study of the fundamental principles used in statistical investigation. 
Gen. 201 y. Plant Breeding — Credit according to work done. 
Gen. 209 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Bruce. 

Geol. If. Geology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A textbook, lecture, and laboratory course, dealing with the principles of 
geology and their application to agriculture. While this course is designed 
primarily for agriculture students in preparation for technical courses, it 
may also be taken as part of a liberal education. 

255 



GREEK 

Professor Spence. 

Greek ly. Elementary Greek (6) — Three lectures. 

Drill and practice in the fundamentals of Greek grammar and the acqui- 
sition of a vocabulary, with translation of simple prose. 

Greek 2y. Greek Grammar, Composition, and Translation of Selected 
Prose Work (8) — Four lectures. Prerequisite, Greek 1 y or two entrance 
units in Greek. 

HISTORY 

Professor Crothers; Mr. Thatcher, Mr. Vollbrecht, Mr. Murphy, 

Mr. Silver, Miss Morris. 

H. ly. General European History (6) — Two lectures and one discussion 
a week. 

A general course in European History, covering the important institutions 
of the Middle Ages and the main events and movements in Modern History. 

H. 2y. American History (6) — Two lectures and one discussion section. 
Open to sophomores. 

An introductory course in American History from the discovery of the 
New World to the present time. 

H. 3y. History of England and Greater Britain (6) — Two lectures and 
one discussion covering the lectures and assignments. 

A survey course of English History from earliest times to the World War. 

H. 5 f . Ancient History (2) — Two lectures. 

A general survey course — the Near East, Greece and Rome. 

H. 6 s. Ancient History (2) — Two lectures. 
A continuation of H. 5 f . 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

H. 101 y. American Colonial History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. 

A study of the political, economic, and social development of the Ameri- 
can people from the discovery of America through the formation of the 
Constitution. (Crothers.) 

H. 102 y. Recent American History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. 

The history of national development from the close of the Civil War to 
the present time. (Thatcher.) 

H. 104 f. Social and Economic History of the United States (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

An advanced course, giving a synthesis of American life from 1607 to 
1790. (Crothers.) 

256 



H. 105 s. Social and Economic History of the United States (3)— Three 

lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2y. . , r iTon +ia 

This course is similar to H. 104 f., and covers the perxod ^-m 179^^ to 

I860. ^ _ ^ 

H. 106 f. Diplomatic History of the United States (2) -Two lectures. 

Prerequisite, H. 2 y. ^Thatcher ) 

A study of American foreign policy. ^ 

H. 107 s. Diplomatic History of tfie United States (2) -Two lectures. 

Prerequisite, H. 2 y. (Thatcher.) 

This course is a continuation ot H. lUb i. 

H. 108 f. Constitutional History of the United States (3) -Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. ,. . .v, r«r, 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of .the €on- 
stituttn%nd of the development of American constitutionalism m ^theory 
and practice thereafter. 

H. 109 s. Constitutional History of the United States (3)— Three lec- 
tures. ^^''^^''''^' ^-'ll' (Thatcher.) 

A continuation of H. 108 1. 

H. 110 f. History of the United States. 1789^1865 (2)-TVo lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

The history of national development to the end of the Cml Wan ^^^^^ 

H. Ills. History of the United States, 1789-1865 (2)-Two lectures. 

Prerequisite, H. 2 y. (Thatcher.) 

This course is a continuation of H. llOf. 
H. 115 y. Mediaeval Civilization (4) - TSvo lectures. Prerequisite, 

" Thl'cultural. institutional, economic, and political d^^^'^P^f * "nJwn^ 
from the decline of the Roman Empire to the opening of the^Foj;^;^"* 

Century. 
H. 117 f. Renaissance and Refor^nation (2)-Two lectures. Prereqm- 

'1' fei2d study of movements and leaders as vital factors i" the^*--^ 
tion from mediaeval to modem times. 

H. 118 s. Renaissance and Reformation (2) -T^^■o lectmes. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. „*H ii7f (Vollbrecht.) 

This course is a continuation ot ti. iii i. 

H. 119 f. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

"Thf court dLls with the French Revolution and the relations of Revolu- 
tionary France wnth the rest of Europe. 

257 



refuishe, H. ^l"'^'"'''^'^'' ^^ Napoleonic Europe (2)-Two lectures. Pre- 

This course is a continuation of H. ll&f zo-i 

(silver.) 

^H^ 121f. Expansion of Europe (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

A treatment of European History from the Crusades to the present em 
Phasxzmg especially the expansion of national states. (sJver )" 

^ a 122 s. Expansion of Europe (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

This course is a continuation of H. 121 f. /gil 

Prfr'eJSsL, H^ ir*'" ^''""^ of Europe siv^e 1871 (3) -Three lectures. 

A study of European alliances and alignments. World politics and imperi- 
al! m m the pre-World War period, and dewlopments since the World Wa" 
(Not given m 1936-1937.) (Vollbrerh?.)" 

H. 124s. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3)— Three I^r 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. ' ^ 

This course is a conlinuation of H.123 f 

(Not given in 1936-1937.) ' (Vollbrecht.) 

req^'uisS H. ZT^X. "'''^' '^ '^'''^'^ ^'^-''"^'^ '-^--- P- 

tiont'' '""""^ ''*'^' ^^^ ^''*°"'*' development of English political institu- 

( Silver.) 

reauiZ H ^J^^^'t'T^ ^^^""^ of England (3) -Three lectures. Pre- 
icijujMce, a. 1 y or ti. S y. 

This course is a continuation of H. 125 f. (Silver ) 

req^is^ite, H fr"''' ''"'' '''' (3)-Three lectures and assignments. Pre- 

An intensive course in European History from 1815 to the present time. 

w IOC rr • (Vollbrecht) 

requisite, H. fr""' ''"'' '''' (3)--Three lectures and assignments. Pre- 

This course is a continuation of H. 127 f. (Vollbrecht.) 

For Graduates 
H. 200 y. Research (2-4)-Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

on^reS'toplT""" '" ^""""" ^"'"^ (4)-Conferences and [fj^ril 
Tj QAo (Crothers.) 

H. ^02 y. Bibliography and Historical Criticism (4). (Staff.) 

258 



HOME ECONOMICS 

/ PROFESSORS MoipJ T. McFARLAND, WELSH ; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MURPHY; 

j 1 Assistant Professor.^ Westney ; Mrs. Englund. 

Textiles and Clothing 

H. E. 11 f. Textiles and Clothing (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. 

History of textile fibers; budgeting; care of clothing; construction of 
one garment of wool and one of silk. (Westney.) 

H. E. 12s. Textiles and Clothing (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 

Standardization and identification of textile fibers and materials. Con- 

/ struction of tailored suit; application of construction methods used by the 

trade. (Westney.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ill f. Advanced Clothing (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisites, 
H. E. 11 f and H. E. 12 s or equivalent. 

The principles governing modeling and draping of garments; specific ap- 
plications in paper and materials. (Westney.) 

H. E. 112 s. Special Clothing Problems (3) — One recitation; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, H. E. Ill f. 

Each student selects and develops three individual clothing problems. 

(Westney.) 

H. E. 113 f. Problems and Practice in Textiles, Clothing^ or Related 
Art (4). 

Investigations pertaining to subjects in textiles, clothing, or related art. 

(McFarland.) 

H. E. 114 f or s. Advanced Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one labora- 
tory. 

Advanced study of textiles; historic textiles; the textile industry as it 
affects the consumer; eight trips to museums and stores. (Westney.) 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

H. E. 31 y. Foods (6) — One recitation; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. ly. 

Principles of food preparation; composition of foods; planning and serv- 
ing of meals. (Welsh, Englund, and Riedel.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

*H. E. 131 f or s. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 
31 y and Chem. 12 f . 

Nutritive value, digestion and assimilation of foods. (Welsh.) 



* H. £. 131 f is repeated in the second semester as H. E. 131 s, for Pre-Nursing students. 

259 



H. E. 132 s. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisite, H. E. 131 f. 
Selection of food to promote health; diet in disease. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 133 f. ^Demonstrations (2) — Two laboratories. 

Practice in demonstrations. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 134 s. Advanced Foods (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 31 y. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food materials. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 135 f. Problems and Practice in Foods (4). 

Experimental foods. (Welsh, Englund.) 

H. E. 136 s. Child Nutrition (2) — Two recitations. 

Lectures and discussions relating to the principles of child nutrition. 

For Graduates 

H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (3). 

Oral and written reports on assigned readings in the current literature 
of Nutrition. Preparation and presentation of reports on special topics. 

H. E. 202 f or s. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and 
quality of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, the student may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The result may form the 
basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. 

H. E. 203 f or s. Advanced Experimental Foods (3) — One recitation; two 
laboratories. Experimental work with foods. 

ART 

H. E. 21s. Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Elements of design; application of design principles to daily living; prac- 
tice in designing. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 22 s. Still Life (1)— One laboratory. Prerequisite, H. E. 21 f. 
Work in charcoal and color. (McFarland.) 

H. E. 23 s. Figure Sketching (1) — One laboratory. Alternates with 
Still Life (H. E. 22 s.) (McFarland.) 

H. E. 24 f. Costume Design (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, H. E. 21 f. 

A study of fundamentals underlying taste, fashion, and design as they 
relate to the expression of individuality in dress. (McFarland.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 121 y. History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (6) — Two 
recitations; one laboratory. Prerequisite, H. E. 21 f. 

Study of historic styles of architecture and period furniture: their adap- 
tation and use in modem architecture and furniture. 

260 



Historic designs of rugs, tapestries, draperies, etc.: their use in interior 
aeSrSn and influence upon modem textile design. Application of the 
Sles of design, line-proportion, etc., color, harmony, balance rh^^^^^^^ 
emphasis, to interior decoration. \ f j 

H E. 122 s. Applied Art (1)— One laboratory. 

Application of the principles of design and color to practical ^r^^;^^ 

H. E. 123 s. Advanced Design (3) -Three laboratories. Prerequisites, 

H. E. 24 s and 21 f. 
Advanced study in design, with application to particular P'^j'^lj™^;^^^^^ 

Home and Institution Management 

H. E. 141 f. Management of the Home (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 

tory. . .. 

study and discussion of household organization and management; time 
and money budgets; house construction and planning; selection, operation, 
3 Tare of equipment; selection and care of household furnishings, with a 
vtewToprovitog well-being and satisfaction for the members of the family. 

H. E. 142 s. Managejtwnt of the Home (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 

° The family, its history; discussion of questions and problems of the family 
in relation to changing social and economic conditions. 

H E 143 f . Practice in Management of the Home (4) . 

Experience in operating and managing a household composed of a mem- 
ber of the faculty and a small group of students for ^PP^^^^'^^j^^^J J^^^ 
third of a semester. 

H E 144 y. Institution Management (6)— Three recitations. 

The organization and management of food service in hospitals, clubs, 
schools, cafeterias, and restaurants; management of room service m dormi- 
tones; organization of institution laundries. 

H. E. 145 f. Practice in Institution Management (4)— Prerequisite, H. 

E 144 y 
Practice work in one of the following: the University dining hall, a tea 

room, hospital, cafeteria, or hotel. 

H E 146 s Advanced InstituUon Maiiagement (Z)—TreTeqmsi\^,n.^. 
144 y. 'one recitation weekly and individual conferences with the in- 
structor. 

Special problems in institution management. 

261 



Home Economics Extension 

H. E. 151s. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3) — Given under 
the direction of Miss Venia Kellar and specialists. 

H. E. 152 f. Field Practice in Honve Economics Extension (4) — Given 
under the direction of Miss Venia Kellar, State Home Demonstration Agent. 
Should be taken during the summer vacation. 

Home Economics Seminar 

H. E. 161s. Seminar (3) — Three recitations. 

Book reviews, and abstracts from scientific papers and bulletins relating 
to home economics, together with criticisms and discussions of the work 
presented. (Murphy and Staff.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Schrader, T'hurston; Associate Professors Wentworth, 

CORDNER, FRAZIER, HAUT, LINCOLN. 

A. Pomology 

HORT. If. Elementary Pomology (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course in pomology. The proper location and site for an 
orchard; varieties, planting plans, pollination requirements, inter-crops, 
spraying, cultural methods, fertilizing methods, thinning, picking, spray 
residue removal, packing, and marketing are given consideration. These 
subjects are discussed for apples, peaches, pears, plums, cherries, and 
quinces. The principles of plant propagation as applied to pomology are 
also discussed. 

HoRT. 4 s. Small Fruit Culture (2) — Two lectures. Given in alternate 
years. 

The care and management of small fruit plantations. Varieties and their 
adaptation to Maryland soils and climate, packing, marketing, and a study 
of the experimental plots and varieties on the Station grounds. The fol- 
lowing fruits are discussed: the grape, strawberry, blackberry, blackcap 
raspberry, red raspberry, currant, gooseberry, dewberry, loganberry, and 
blueberry. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

HORT. 5 f. Fruit Judging (2) — Two laboratories. 

A course designed to train students for fruit-judging teams and practical 
judging. Students are required to know at least one hundred varieties of 
fruit, and are given practice in judging single plates, largest and best col- 
lections, boxes, barrels, and commercial exhibits of fruits. Students are 
required to help set up the college horticultural show each year. 

HORT. 6 f . Advanced Fruit Judging (1) — One laboratory. 

HORT. 7 f. Practical Pomology Laboratory (2) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 1 f or taken in conjunction with Hort. 1 f . Seasonal 
practical experience in carrying out orchard and small fruit operations, in- 

262 



Mudine spraying, harvesting, spray residue removal, grading, packing, 
'Jiouse and borer control, pruning, budding, grafting, planting, pollmation, 

'* The course will include trips to the principal horticultural regions of 
Maryland and of neighboring states, and to nurseries or other points of 
interest. 
HORT. 8s. Practical P(rrmlogy Laboratory (2)— Two laboratories. Pre- 

requisite. Hort. 1 f. 
A continuation of Hort. 7 f as above outlined. 

B. Vegetable Crops 

HORT. lis. PrindpUs of Vegetable Culture (3) - Two lectures; one 

laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental principles underlying all garden Practices 
Tht laboratory work is organized from the point of view of the home 
Srden. Specfal studies are made of vegetable seed identification methods 
^growing plants, garden planning, pest control, etc. Each student is given 
a small garden to fertilize, plant, cultivate, spray, etc. 

HORT. 12 f. Truck Crop Production (3)— Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

Hort. 11 s. , . -ri u 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production Each crop 
is discussed in detail. Trips are made to large commercial gardens, various 
markets, and other places of interest. 

HoRT. 13 s. Vegetable Forcing (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 11 s. , . . 

All vegetables used for forcing are considered. Laboratory work m ster- 
ilization and preparation of soils, cultivation, regulation of temperature and 
humidity, watering, training, pruning, pollination, harvesting, and packing. 
Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

C. Floriculture 
HORT. 21 f. General Floriculture (2)~0ne lecture; one laboratory. ^ ^ 
The management of greenhouses; the production and ^^^^^f f^^ 
crops; retail methods; plants for house and garden. Given m alternate 
vears. (Not offered in 193^-1937.) 
^ HORT 22 y. Greenhouse Management (6)-Tv,o lectures; one Uhor^txyry. 

A consideration of the methods employed in the ^^^^^'JT^'^^^^ 
houses, including the operations of potting, watering, J^^^^^f ^^^^^ 
tion, akd methods of propagation. Given m alternate years. (Not offered 

in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 23 y. Floricidtural Practice (4)— Two laboratories. 

Practical experience in the various greenhouse operations of the fall, 
winter, and spring seasons. 

263 



HORT. 24s. Greenhouse Construction (2)--0ne lecture; one laboratory 

The various types of houses; their location, arrangement, construction' 

and cost; principles and methods of heating; preparation of plans and' 

specifications for commercial and private ranges. Given in alternate year. 

(Not offered m 1937-1938.) ^ * 

HORT. 25 y. Commercial Floriculture (6)— Two lectures; one laboratory 
Prerequisite, Hort. 22 y. ^* 

Cultural methods of florists' bench crops and potted plants, the marketing 
of the cut flowers, the retail store, a study of floral decoration. Given in 
alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

Hort. 26 f. Garden Flowers (3)— Two lectures; one laboratory. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbaceous peren- 
nials bulbs, beddmg plants, and roses and their cultural requirements. Given 
m alternate years. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 27 s. Floricultural Trip (1)— Prerequisite, Hort. 22 y. 

A trip occupying one week's time will be made through the principal 
floricultural sections, including Philadelphia and New York, visiting green- 
house establishments, wholesale markets, retail stores, nurseries etc The 
cost of this trip should not exceed thirty dollars to each student. ' Each 
student will be required to hand in a detailed report covering the trip The 
time for taking this trip will be arranged yearly with each class. 

D. Landscape Gardening 

Hort. 31s. General Landscape Gardening (2)— Two lectures. 

The theory and general principles of landscape gardening and'their appli- 
cation to private and public areas. Special consideration is given to the 
improvement and beautification of the home grounds, farmsteads, and small 
suburban properties. Adapted to students not intending to specialize in 
landscape but who wish some theoretical and practical knowledge of the 
subject. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

Hort. 32 f. Elements of Landscape Design (3)--0ne lecture; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Hort. 31 s. 

A consideration of the principles of landscape design; surveys, mapping, 
and held work. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

Hort. 33 s. Landscape Design (3)— Three laboratories. Prereauisite. 
Hort. 32 f. H » 

The design of private grounds and gardens and of architectural details 
used in landscape; planting plans; analytical study of plans of practicing 
landscape architects; field observation of landscape developments. Given 
in alternate years. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 



Hort. 34 f. Landscape Design (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Hort. 33 s. 

Continuation of course as outlined above. Given in alternate years. 
(Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

Hort. 35 f. History of Landscape Gardening (1) — One lecture. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 31s. 

Evolution and development of landscape gardening; the different styles, 
and a particular consideration of Italian, English, and American gardens. 
Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 36 s. Landscape Construction and Maintenance (1) — One lecture 
or laboratory. 

Methods of construction and planting; estimating; park and estate main- 
tenance. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Hort. 37 s. Civic Art (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Principles of city planning and their application to village and rural 
improvement, including problems in design of civic center, parks, school 
grounds, and other public and semi-public areas. Given in alternate years. 
(Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

E. General Horticulture Courses 

Hort. 42 y. Horticultural Research and Thesis (4-6). 

An advanced student in any of the four divisions of horticulture may 
select a special problem for investigation. This may be either the sum- 
marizing of all the available knowledge on a particular problem or the 
investigation of some new problem. Where original investigation is carried 
on, the student should in most cases start the work during the junior year. 
The results of the research are to be presented in the form of a thesis and 
filed in the horticultural library. 

Hort. 43 y. Horticultural Seminar (2). 

In this course papers are prepared by members of the class upon subjects 
pertaining to their research or thesis work or upon special problems as- 
signed them. Discussions of special topics are given from time to time 
by members of the departmental staff. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Hort. 101 f. Commercial Fi-uit Growing (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Hort. 1 f . 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced 
work is taken up on the subjects of culture, fertilization, pollination, prun- 
ing, thinning, spraying, spray removal, picking, packing, marketing, and 
storage of fruits. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

(Schrader.) 



264 



265 



HoRT. 102 f. Economic Fruits of the World (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Hort. 1 f and Hort. 101 f . 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological, and physiological character- 
istics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such as 
the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut-bearing trees, citrus fruits, and 
newly introduced fruits, with special reference to their cultural require- 
ments in certain parts of the United States and the insular possessions. 
All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been discussed in a 
previous course. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

. (Schrader.) 

Hort. 103 f. Tuber and Root Crops (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Hort. 11 s and 12 f . 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed, varieties. 
propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting^ 
storing, and marketing. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936- 
1937.) (Frazier.) 

Hort. 104 s. Advanced Truck Crop Production (2) — Prerequisites, Hort. 
11 s, 12 f, and 13 s. 

A detailed study of some of the more important problems encountered 
in the commercial production of truck crops. A thorough study is made of 
recent literature pertaining to such problems as soil acidity, soil organic 
matter relationships, new developments in insect and disease control, plant 
production and transplanting, etc. (Cordner.) 

Hort. 105 f. Systematic Olericulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Hort. 11 s and 103 f . 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops and the 
description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties to 
different environmental conditions and their special uses in vegetable pro- 
duction. ((Cordner.) 

Hort. 106 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 
A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental planting. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

(Thurston.) 

Hort. 107 f. Systematic Pomology (3) —Two lectures; one laboratory. 

The history, botany, and classification of fruits and their adaptation to 
Maryland conditions. Exercises are given in describing and identifying th^ 
leading commercial varieties of fruits. Given in alternate years. (Not offered 
in 1937-1938.) (Wentworth.) 

Hort. 108 f or s. Advanced Practical Pomology, 

A trip of one week to the fruit regions of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Dela- 
ware, and Virginia, for the purpose of studying the commercial and experi- 
mental phases of the fruit industry. Before making the trip the students 

266 



will be required to make a study of the experimental work in progress at 
the Experiment Stations to be visited and to know the commercial aspects 
of the industry in the several states. A detailed report will be required 
after the trip. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201 y. Experimental Pomology (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tice in pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in pomology 
and results of experiments that have been or are being conducted in all 
experiment stations in this and other countries. (Schrader.) 

Hort. 202 y. Experimental Olericulture (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tice in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental work in 
vegetable production and results of experiments that have been or are being 
conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. 

(Cordner and Frazier.) 

Hort. 203 s. Experimental Floriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to practice 
in floriculture. The results of all experimental work in floriculture which 
has been or is being conducted is thoroughly discussed. 

Hort. 204 s. Methods of Research (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Methods of conducting horticultural research are stressed, to familiarize 
the student with methods used and the technic involved. Laboratory and 
field measurements on projects are used to develop technical skill. Outlines 
of research problems and preparation of research publications are studied, 
as well as drill in methods of oral presentation of material. (Staff.) 

Hort. 205 y. Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis (4, 6, or 8). 
Students will be required to select problems for original research in pomol- 
t>gy, vegetable gardening, floriculture, or landscape gardening. These 
problems will be continued until completed, and final results are to be pub- 
lished in the form of theses. (Staff.) 

Hort. 206 y. Advanced HorticulturcU Seminar (2). 

This course is required of all graduate students. Students are required 
to give reports either on special topics assigned them, or on the progress of 
their work being done in courses. Members of the departmental staff report 
special research from time to time. (Staff.) 

Requirements of Graduate Students in Horticulture 

Pomology — Graduate students specializing in Pomology who are planning 
to take advanced degrees will be required to take or offer the equivalent of 
the following courses: Hort, 1 f, 101 f, 102 f, 107 f, 201 y, 204 s, 205 y, 2.06 y, 

267 



/™.^^^' ^'*"* Biochemistry (Pit. Phys. 201s); Plant Microchemistrv 
(Pit. Phys. 203 s) ; Plant Biophysics (Pit. Phys. 202 f) ; Organic Chemistrv 
(Chem. 8 y) ; Plant Anatomy (Bot. 101 f ) . 

Olericidtme— Graduate students specializing in vegetable gardening who 
are planning to take an advanced degree will be required to take or offer the 
equivalent of the following courses : Hort. 12 f , 13 s, 103 f , 105 f , 202 v 204 « 
f^\^^fll^^' ^^^"* Microchemistry (Pit. Phys. 203 s); Plant Bi^chem 
istry (Pit. Phys. 201 s) ; Plant Biophysics (Pit. Phys. 202 f ) ; Organic Chem- 
istry (Chem. 8 y) ; Plant Anatomy (Bot. 101 f). 

Floriffulture— Graduate students specializing in floriculture who are 
planning to take an advanced degree will be required to take or offer the 
equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 22 y, 23 y, 24 s, 25 y, 26 f, 203 s 
^ ' fof/'^t"*^ ^^^^' ^^^"* Biophysics (Pit. Phys. 202 f) ; Plant Biochem- 
'rS S ; ^t- 201s); Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8y); Plant Taxonomy 
(Bot 103 f or s) ; Plant Anatomy (Bot. 101 f) ; Plant Ecology (Plant Phys. 

Landscape Gardening^Gradusite students specializing in landscape gar- 
dening who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required to 
take or offer the equivalent of the following courses : Hort 32 f 33 s 35 f 
105 f, 204 s, and 206 y; Plant Taxonomy (Bot. 103 f or s) ; Dr. ly and 
2y; Plane Surveying (Surv. 2y); and Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 101s). 

Additional Requirements— In addition to the above required courses, some 
graduate students in horticulture are advised to take physical and colloidal 
chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in Horticulture have had certain courses in 
entomology, plant pathology, genetics, and biometry, certain of these courses 
will be required. 

Note: For courses in Biochemistry and Biophysics, see Plant Physioloffv 
under Botany. 

LATIN 

Mr. Murphy. 

Lat. ly. Elementary Latin (6) — Three lectures. 

This course is offered to cover a substantial and accurate course in gram- 
mar and syntax, with translation of simple prose. It is substantially the 
equivalent of one entrance unit in Latin. 

Lat. 2y. (6)--Three lectures. Prerequisite, Lat. ly or one entrance 
unit in Latin. 

Texts are selected from Virgil, with drill on prosody, and from Cicero. 



268 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Miss Barnes, Mr. Fogg. 

L. S. If or s. Library Methods (1) — Freshman year. 

This course is intended to help students use the library with greater 
facility. Instruction is given by practical work with the various catalogues, 
indexes, and reference books. This course considers the general classi- 
fication of the library according to the Dewey system. Representative 
works of each division are studied in combination with the use of the library 
catalogue. Attention is given to periodical literature, particularly that 
indexed in the Reader's Guide and in other periodical indexes; and to 
v<arious much-used reference books, which the student will find helpful 
throughout the college course. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors T. H. Taliaferro, Dantzig, Gwinner; Associate Professor 

Spann; Assistant Professor Yates; Mr. Alrich, Dr. Tompkins, 

Mr. Volckhausen, Mr. Williams, Miss Zimmerman. 

Math. 7 f . Solid Geometry (2) — TSvo lectures. Prerequisite, plane ge- 
ometry. College credit given only to students in the College of Education. 
Open without credit to students desiring to enter the College of Engineer- 
ing who have had no opportunity to take the subject in high school. 

Lines and planes; cylinders and cones; the sphere; polyhedra. 

Math. 8f. Introductory Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, one 
year of high school algebra. Elective. Open without credit to students 
who are required to take Math. 11 f, but lack the requisite preparation for it. 

Fundamental operations; linear and quadratic equations; exponents, 
logarithms, etc. 

Math. 9f. Introductory Trigonometry (1) — One laboratory. Prere- 
quisite to Math. 12 f . Students who have had an equivalent course in high 
school will have the privilege of entering Math. 12 f directly upon passing 
an aptitude test. 

Math. 10 s. Plane Trigonometry (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
plane geometry. Required of students in the College of Education who elect 
mathematics as their minor subject. 

« 

Trigonometric functions; fundamental identities; solution of plane tri- 
angles, and other applications to geometry and surv^eying. 

Math. 11 f. College Algebra (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, high 
school algebra completed and aptitude test. Required of all students in the 
College of Engineering; of students majoring in mathematics, physics, and 
chemistry; of students in the College of Education w^ho elect mathematics as 
a major or minor subject. 

269 



Review of the fundamental concepts and operations, simultaneous equa- 
tions; the binomial theorem; progressions; logarithms; permutations and 
combinations; numerical solutions of equations. This course will be repeated 
during the second semester. 

Math. 12 f. Laboratory in Algebra and Trigonometry (1) — One labora- 
tory. Required of students majoring in mathematics or physics and of 
students in the College of Education who elect mathematics as their major 
subject; also, of all students in the College of Engineering. This course 
and Math. 11 f may be taken collaterally; if taken separately, the prerequi- 
sites are Math. 9 f and 11 f. 

Supplementary topics in algebra and trigonometry; mathematical induc- 
tion; determinants; complex numbers; theory of equation; De Moivre's 
theorem; trigonometric equations; elements of spherical trigonometry. 

Math. 14 s. Analytic Geometry (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 11 f. Required of all students in the College of Engineering; of 
students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology; of pre- 
medical and pre-dental students; of students in the College of Education 
who elect mathematics as major or minor subject. 

Principles of trigonometry; coordinates; metrical relations; the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola; empirical equations; graphing of 
periodic functions; applications to the solution of equations. 

Math. 15 s. Laboratory in Geometry (1) — One laboratory. Required 
of all students majoring in mathematics or physics, and of students in the 
College of Education who elect mathematics as their major subject; also of 
all students in the College of Engineering. This course may be taken col- 
laterally with Math. 1 s; if taken separately, the prerequisites are Math. 
12 f and 14 s. 

Supplementary topics from geometry and anayltic geometry; transforma- 
tion of coordinates; the general equation of the second degree; polar co- 
ordinates; elements of the theory of curves; classical curves, algebraic and 
transcendental; principles of solid analytic geometry. 

Math. 16 y. Calculus (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 14 s. 
Required of all students in the College of Engineering; of students major- 
ing in mathematics, physics, or chemistry, of students in the College of 
Education who elect mathematics as their major or minor subject. 

Derivative and differential, maxima and minima, applications to graph- 
ing, curvature; methods of integration; applications of the definite integral 
to calculations of areas, arcs, voltimes, moments, etc.; elementary series. 

Math. 17 y. Laboratory in Calculus (2) — One laboratory. Required of 
students majoring in mathematics or physics; and of students in the College 
of Education who elect mathematics as their major subject; also of all 
students in the College of Engineering. This course and Math. 16 y may 
be taken collaterally; if taken separately. Math. 15 s and 16 y are prere- 
quisite. 

270 



SupplemenUry topics in calculus; elements of the theory of functions, 
hvperbolic functions; advanced methods in maxima and mmima problems; 
partial derivatives; advanced methods in integration; multiple integrals; 
Taylor series; integration in series; differential equations. 

Math. 18 y. GeometHcal Drwwing and Modeling (2)-0ne laboratory. 
Required of students who major in mathematics or physics, or m education 
with mathematics as their major subject. 

Problems in geometrical construction, in projective geometry, in geo- 
metrical optics; mechanical generation of curves. 

Math 19 y. Advanced Geometrical Drawing and Modeling (2) — One 
laborato'ry. Prerequisite, Math. 18 y. Required of students who major m 
mathematics or physics, or in education with mathematics as their major 

subject. 

Elements of descriptive geometry; projections of skew curves and sections 
of surfaces; construction of models of space configurations. 

MATH. 20 s. Survey of Mathematics (3) - Three lectures Elective. 
Credit is given only to students who take no other college mathematics as 
required subject. 

An orientation course, which aims at acquainting the student with the cul- 
tural aspects of mathematics. Technical details are avoided, and emphasis 
is laid on the fundamental ideas of mathematics as they evolved historically. 
The scope and validity of mathematical concepts and the applications of 
mathematics to science and industry are among the topics ^""^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

(Courses Math. 101 s, 111 s, 112 s, 114 f, 115 f, and 140 y are taught every 
year; all other courses are given on alternate years.) 

Math 101 f. Mathematical Theory of Investment (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 11 f or 8 f . Open only to juniors and seniors. Required 
of all students in Business Administration. 

Application of mathematics to financial transactions; compound interest 
and discount; construction and use of interest tables; sinking funds; annu- 
ities; depreciation, valuation, and amortization of securities; building and 
loan associations; life insurance, etc. (bpann.) 

Math. lllf. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 
(2) — Two lectures. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers m 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathematics 
, _ . (Jjantzig. j 

and physics. 



271 



Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. Ill f or 8 f, or equivalent high school courses. 

A survey course of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and the 
calculus, intended for workers in the biological sciences and for prospecti\^ 
teachers of mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 114 f. Differential Equations for Engineers (3) — Three lectures. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the College of Engineer- 
ing, and deals with aspects of mathematics which arise in engineering 
theory and practice. Among the topics treated are the following: linear 
differential equations; advanced methods in kinematics and dynamics; appli- 
cations of analysis to electrical circuits, to aero-dynamics, bridge-design, etc. 

(Dantzig.) 

Math. 115 f. Applied Calculus for Chemists (3) — Three lectures. 

Prerequisite, Math. 16 y. Required of students in Industrial Chemistry. 
Elective for others. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise in the theory 
and practice of chemistry. Among the topics treated are the following: 
partial and total derivatives; applications of mathematical analysis to 
thermo -dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and to physical 
chemistry. (Tompkins.) 

Math. 121s. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 

Foundations of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and analysis. The evolu- 
tion of such concepts as number, limit, continuity, and infinity; the axioms 
of geometry; spatial forms and measurement; the concepts of space, time, 
and matter, leading up to the theory of relativity. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 122 s. History of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 

History of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, the calculus, and the theory of 
functions; from the period of classical Greece to modem times. (Not given 
in 1936-1937.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 123 f. Theory of Equ/itions (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Symmetric functions; elimination; the fundamental theorem of algebra; 
algebraic solution of equations; the Galois theory; asymptotic solutions of 
equations. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Taliaferro.) 

Math. 124 s. Theory of Numbers (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
16 y. 

Linear congruences, continued fractions and diophantine equations; criteria 
of primality; quadratic residues; higher congruences; the Problem of 
Fermat. (Dantzig.) 



Math. 125 f. Plane Curves (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 16 y. 

Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; contact and osculation; asymp- 
otes and singular points; algebraic curves; polarity; the Plucker characters 
of a curve; cubic and quartic curves. (Alrich.) 

Math. 126 s. Analytic Geometry in Space (2)— Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 16 y. 

Point, plane, and line; line geometry; quadratic surfaces; twisted cubics; 
algebraic curves and surfaces; many-dimensional geometry. (Not given in 
1936-1937.) (Alrich.) 

Math. 127 f. Advanced Topics in Calculus (2)— Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 16 y. 

Evaluation of definite integrals; expansion into series; line and surface 
integrals; the theorems of Green and Stokes; elements of the calculus of 
variations. (Yates.) 

Math. 128 s. Advanced Differential Equations (2)— Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. 

Existence theorems; integration in series; asymptotic solutions; general 
theory of linear equations; ordinary differential equations of the second 
order; singular solutions; elements of partial differential equations. (Yates.) 

Math. 129 f. Non-Euclidean Geometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Evolution of geometrical ideas; the axioms of geometry; theory of paral- 
lels; projective approach to geometries of Lobatchevsky and Riemann; the 
Gayley-Klein theory; the problem of space and the theory of relativity. 

(Dantzig.) 

Math. 130 f. Modem Algebra (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
16 y. 

Sets, groups, and extension of groups; polynomials; rings and fields; gen- 
eral theory of ideals; polynomial ideals; elements of algebraic geometry. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) (Tompkins.) 

Math. 131s. Analytical Mechanics (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y and Math. 126 s. 

Kinematics; the dynamics of a particle; statics; the principle of D'Alem- 
bert; the dynamics of a system; the equations of Lagrange and Jacoby; 
the principle of Hamilton. (Mnch.) 

Math. 132 s. Theory of Probabilities (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

Math. 16 y. 

Frequency and probability; the concept of "equally likely"; combinatorial 

analvsis; addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of distribution; 

continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, theories of errors and 

correlations, and to molecular theories. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

(Dantzig.) 



272 



273 



Math. 133 f. Famous Mathematical Problems (2) —Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y and 17 y. Open only to students with outstanding rec- 
ords in mathematical studies. 

Prime numbers; the problem of Fermat; trisection of angles; regular 
polygons and kindred problems; squaring the circle; transcendentality of pi 
and e; famous integrals; maxima and minima; probability problems- the 
three-body problem. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 140 y. Undergraduate Seminar (2)— -One session. 

Required of students who major in mathematics. This course is intended 
as a clearing house of problems which arise in the undergraduate courses 
in mathematics. (Dantzig, Yates, Alrich, Tompkins.) 

For Graduates 

(With the exception of the Graduate Seminar, Math. 240 y, all the courses 
listed below are taught on alternate years.) 

Math. 221 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex VaHahle (2)— Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Math. 127 f . 

Cauchy-Riemann conditions; power series and infinite products; conformal 
mapping; the Cauchy integral theory; residues and periods; uniform func- 
tions; analytical continuation. (Yates ) 

Math. 221 s. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2)— Two lecture^ 
Prerequisites, Math. 16 y and Math. 121 s. 

Logical development of the concept of number; aggregates, point-sets; 
convergence, limit; continuous and discontinuous functions; differentiation 
and generalized integration. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Tompkins.) 

Math. 223 s. Vectors and Matrices (2)-— Two lectures. Prereauisite 
Math. 123 f. ^ 

Scalars, vectors, matrices, and determinants; transformations; linear de- 
pendence; canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geometry 
and quantum theory. (Tompkins.) 

Math. 224 f. Algebraic Geometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y and Math. 125 f. 

Bi-rational transformations; invariants of algebraic curves and surfaces; 
residuation; genus. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Alrich.) 

Math. 225 f. Projective Geometry (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 125 f and 126 s. 

The postulates of geometry; metric and descriptive properties; the prin- 
ciple of duality; the group of collineations; projective equivalence; projec- 
tive theory of curves; projective differential geometry; non-Euclidean 
geometry. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Dantzig.) 

274 



Math. 226 s. Infinitesimal Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y. Math. 125 f , and Math. 126 s. 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves and surfaces; curvature, 
asymptotic lines and geodesies; triple orthogonal systems; the problem of 
space structure. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 227 f. Infinite Processes (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 

127 f and 128 s. 

Criteria of convergence for series and products; continued fractions; trig- 
onometric series; series of polynomials; orthogonal functions; functions 
defined by power series. (Alrich.) 

Math. 228 s. Elliptic Functions (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
221 f. 

The theories of Legendre and Jacoby; the Weierstrass theory; doubly 
periodic functions; elliptic integrals; applications to algebra, geometry, and 
mechanics. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Yates.) 

Math. 229 f. Calculus of Variations (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 127 f and 128 s. 

Classical problems; the conditions of Euler; the Weierstrass theory; 
strong and weak minima; case of extremals with variable endpoints; exten- 
sion to multiple integrals. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Yates.) 

Math. 230 s. Continuous Groups of Transformations (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Math. 126 s and Math. 223 s. 

Correspondence; transformation; semi-groups and groups; invariants; the 
Lie theory of groups; infinitesimal transformations; contact transforma- 
tions; applications to differential equations and to geometry. (Not given in 
1936-1937.) (Dantzig.) 

Math. 231 s. Partial Differential Equations with Applications to Mathe- 
matical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Math. 127 f and Math. 

128 s. 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear equa- 
tions; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere type; 
the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, elasticity, 
and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Yates.) 

Math. 232 s. The Theory of Relativity (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 226 s and Math. 131 f. 

History of the problem of relativity; the Maxwell equations; special the- 
ory of relativity; elements of tensor analysis; the general theory of rela- 
tivity. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Tompkins.) 

Math. 240 y. Graduate Seminar (2) — One session. 

Required for all graduate students. Intended as a clearing house of 
problems arising in the graduate courses. Reports on progress on disser- 
tations and critical discussion of results achieved. 

(Dantzig, Yates, Alrich, Tompkins.) 

275 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

PROFESSOR OF Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph 
f; ' Assistant Professors Major Howard Clark 2d 

Major Frank Ward, and One Officer to be Detailed ; ' ' 
Warrant Officer Wiluam H. McManus; 
Corporal George J. Uhrinak 

♦BASIC COURSE 

Freshman Yeat^l lecture; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 1 y. Basic R, O. T. C. (2). 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester 

National Defense Act, including basic organization and the R O T C • 
military courtesy, command and leadership; military hygiene and first aid- 
marksmanship. ' 

Second Semester 

Physical drill, command and leadership, map reading; military history 
and policy; military hygiene and first aid; citizenship; international situa- 
tion. 

Sophonwre Year—1 lecture; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 2y. Basic R. O. T. C. (4). 
The following subjects are covered : 

First Semester 

Scouting and patrolling, automatic rifle, military history, leadership. 

Second Semester 

Military history, musketry, combat principles of the squad and section, 
leadership. 

** ADVANCED COURSE 

Junior Year— 3 lectures; 2 drill periods. 
M. I. 101 y. Advanced R, 0, T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered: 

First Semester 

Aerial photograph reading, machine guns, howitzer weapons, combat 
principles, leadership. 



* Required of qualified students. 
** Elective for qualified students. 



276 



Second Semester 

Combat principles of rifle, machine gun, and howitzer platoons, pistol 
marksmanship, review of rifle marksmanship, leadership. 

Senior Year — 3 lectures; 2 drill periods. 

M. I. 102 y. Advanced R. 0. T. C. (6). 
The following subjects are covered; 

First Semester 

Combat principles (including organization of larger combat units), com- 
mand and leadership, weapons (tanks), chemical agents and uses, mecha- 
nization. 

Second Semester 

Company administration, military history and policy, military law, 
Officers' Reserve Corps regulations. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Falls; Associate Professor Kramer; Assistant Professors 

Darby, Spann ; Miss Wilcx)x, Mr. Schweizer, Mr. Evangelist, 

Mrs. Blew, Miss Goodner. 

All students whose major is in Modern Languages are required to take 
Introduction to Comparative Literature (Comp. Lit. 101 f and 102 s) and 
a Conference Course in Reading (French, German, Spanish 120). The fol- 
lowing courses are recommended: General European History (H. ly), In- 
troduction to Philosophy (Phil. If or Is), The Old Testament as Litera- 
ture (Comp. Lit. 104 f). Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (Eng. 113 f 
and 114 s), Romanticism in France and Germany (Comp. Lit. 105 f and 
106 s). For a major in (German, Anglo-Saxon (Eng. 103 y). 

Specific requirements for the majors in the different languages are as 
follows: for French, French 9y, 10 y, 15 y, 120, and two additional year- 
courses in literature in the 100 group; for German, German 10 y, 120, and 
two additional year-courses in the 100 group; for Spanish, Spanish 6 y, 15 y, 
120, and two additional year-courses in the 100 group. 

A. French 

French ly. Elementary French (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in French for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year French, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

French 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 1 y. Students who are 
interested in French, and who have done well in. the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of French 1 y. 

277 



French 3y. Second-Year French (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
French 1 y or equivalent. Students who offer three units in French for 
entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for work beyond the level 
of French 3 y, receive half credit for this course. 

Study of grammar continued; composition; conversation; translation of 
narrative and technical prose. 

French 4f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particular- 
ly for students who enter with three or more units in French, who expect 
to do advanced work in the French language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take French 10 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as French 6 y, 7 y, 8 y, 15 y. 

French 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of French 3 y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in French literature, and who have com- 
pleted the first semester of French 3 y with the grade of A or B, should 
take this course in conjunction with the second semester of French 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in French of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

French 6y. The Development of the French Novel (6) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Introductory study of the history and growth of the novel in French 
literature ; of the lives, works, and influence of important novelists. Reports. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) 

French 7y. Tfie Development of the French Drama (6) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Introductory study of the French drama of the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
and nineteenth centuries. Translation and collateral reading. Reports. 

French 8y. Readings in Contemporary French (6) — Three lectures. 

Translation; collateral reading; reports on history, criticism, fiction, 
drama, lyric poetry. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

French 9y. French Phonetics (2) — One lecture. Prerequisite, French 

ly. 

French 10 y. Intermediate Gramma/r and Composition (4) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, French 3y. 

(French 9 y and 10 y are required of students preparing to teach French.) 

French 15 y. Introduction to French Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, French 3y. 

An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in French literature. This course is given in French. 

278 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates * 

^ more intensive survey of modern French literature is offered by means 
of Rotating courses roughly divided by centunes. 
French 102 y. French Literature of the 17th Century (^)~'^jj^^; 

tures. 

FRENCH 103 y. French Literature of the 18th Century (4)-Two ec- 

tures. (Not given in 1936-1937.) ^^^"^'^ 

FKENCH 104 y. French Literature of the 19th Century (4)-Two lec- 
tures. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Wilcox.; 

FRENCH 105 y. French Literature of the 20th Century ('*>-'^J^^Jj*=j" 
tures. 
French 110 y. Advanced Composition (4)-Two lectures. Prerequisite. 

French 10 y. ■. ^ ,-c n \ 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach French.) (Falls. ) 

French 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors, 4 
semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours.) 

A. two-year course open to majors and minors in French. It proposes: 
(1) to fix the attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 
whole rather than upon the detailed knowledge of the subject-matter of such 
bourses as he has taken in the field; (2) to develop m the student the 
ability to read independently. Conferences with qualified members of the 
tartment take the place of formal lectures. This course prepares majors 
and minors in French for the comprehensive examination m modem French 
literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 

FRENCH 201 y. Research (2-4) -Credits determined by ^«>'k ao»m- 
plished. 

French 202 y. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (4) -Two l^^t"'^^^- ^J^J** 
given in 1936-1937.) ^ * ^'' 

French 203 y. Aspects and Conceptions of Nature ^^ {'l^^i f *;!« Jf;.* 
of the 18th Century (4)-Two lectures. (Not given m 1936-1937.) (Falls.) 

French 204 y. Georges DuJiamel. Poet, Dramutist, Novelist (4)-T^° 
lectures. • 

French 205 y. French Literature of the Middle Ages and th^ Renais- 
sance (4)-TSvo lectures. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Darby.) 

French 210 y. Seminar (2-4) -One meeting weekly. (Required of all 
graduate students in French.) 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 105 f , Romanttcisnv m 

France, 

279 



B. German 

German 1 y. Elementary German (6) — Three lectures. Students who 
offer two units in German for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year German, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

GE21MAN 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 1 y. Students who are 
interested in German, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of German 1 y. 

German 3y. Second-Year German (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
German 1 y or equivalent. Students who offer three units in German for 
entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for work beyond the level 
of German 3 y, receive half credit for this course. 

Reading of narrative and technical prose, grammar review and oral and 
written practice. 

German 4 f. Grammar Review (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more imits in German and who 
expect to do advanced work in the German language or literature, but who 
are not prepared to take German 10 y. Properly qualified students may 
elect this course at the same time as German 6 f or 8 f . 

German 5 s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A or B in the first semester of German 3 y. Students 
who expect to take advanced work in German literature, and who have com- 
pleted the first semester of German 3 y with the grade of A or B, should 
take this course in conjunction with the second semester of German 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in German of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

German 6f. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of novels and short stories from recent German literature. 
(Not given in 1^36-1937.) 

German 7 s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 6 f . (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

German 8 f . Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 3 y or equivalent. 

Rapid reading of dramas from recent German literature. This course 
alternates with German 6f. 

German 9 s. Advanced German (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of German 8 f . 

280 



GERMAN 10 y. German Gram.na^ and Composition (4)-Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, German 2y. , /- \ 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach German.) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

GERMAN 101 f. German Literature of the 18th Century (3) -Three lec- 

'^Th; earlier classical literature. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Spann.) 

GERMAN 102 s. German Literature of the 18th Century (3)-Three lec- 

"^Th; later classical literature. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Spann.) 

GERMAN 103 f. German Literature of the 19th Century (3)-Three lec- 
tures. (Spann.) 

Romanticism and Young Germany. 

GERMAN 104 s. German Literature of the 19th Century (3)-Three lec- 
tures. (Spann.) 

The literature of the Empire. 

GERMAN 120. Conference Course in ReaMng (credits allowed: majors. 
4 semester hours; minors, 2 semester hours). 

A two-vear course open to majors and minors in German. It proposes, 
nt t7fix ^e attention of the student upon his field of concentration as a 

r: "::£: tC upon the ^-^^i^^^^z x:^^ 

Qiinh rourses as he has taken m the field; (^) to aeveiop m tuc 

man literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 
GERMAN 201 y. Research (2-4)_Credits determined hy -ork ^ac^om- 

plished. 

(5ERMAN 202 y. The Modem German Drama (4) -Two lectures. 

Study of the naturalistic, neo-romantic, and expressiomstic d^ama agams 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. ( Spann. ) 

German 203 y. Schiller '(4) -Two lectures. ^ 

Study of the life and works of ghiller. with emphasis on the hist ^jf 
his dramas. (Not given m 1936-1937.) 

German 210 y. Seminar (2-4) -One meeting weekly. 

(Required of all graduate students in German ) r>„,nanticism in 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 106 ., Romanticism xn 

Germany, 

281 



C. Spanish 

Spanish ly. Elementary Spanish (6) — Tliree lectures. Students who 
offer two units in Spanish for entrance, but whose preparation is not ade- 
quate for second-year Spanish, receive half credit for this course. 

Elements of grammar; composition; pronunciation and translation. 

Spanish 2 s. Elementary Conversation (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, 
the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 1 y. Students who are 
interested in Spanish, and who have done well in the first semester of the 
elementary year-course, should take this course in conjunction with the 
second semester of Spanish 1 y. 

Spanish 3 y. Second-Year Spanish (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 1 y or equivalent. Students who offer three units in Spanish for 
entrance, but whose preparation is not adequate for work beyond the level 
of Spanish 3 y, receive half credit for this course. 

Reading of narrative works and plays; grammar review; oral and written 
practice. 

Spanish 4f. Grammar Revieiv (2) — Two lectures. Designed particu- 
larly for students who enter with three or more units in Spanish, who expect 
to do advanced work in the Spanish language or literature, but who are not 
prepared to take Spanish 6 y. Properly qualified students may elect this 
course at the same time as Spanish 7 f or 15 y. 

Spanish 5s. Intermediate Conversation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, the grade of A or B in the first semester of Spanish 3 y. Students who 
expect to take advanced work in Spanish literature, and who have completed 
the first semester of Spanish 3 y with the grade of A or B, should take this 
course in conjunction with the second semester of Spanish 3 y. 

Practical exercises in conversation; discussion in Spanish of simple texts 
in prose and verse. 

Spanish 6y. Advanced Composition and Conversation (4) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Spanish 3 y or equivalent. 

Introduction to phonetics; oral and written composition. 

(This course is required of students preparing to teach Spanish.) 

Spanish 7f. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 

Designed to develop facility in reading. Somewhat simplified, edited 
texts of classic novels and short stories of the Golden Age will be used. 
(Not given in 1936-1937.) 

Spanish 8 s. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of Spanish 7f. Reading of some modem novels. (Not 
given in 1936-1937.) 

Spanish 15 y. Introduction to Spanish Literature (6) — Three lectures. 
An elementary survey introducing the student to the chief authors and 
movements in Spanish literature. This course is given in Spanish. 

282 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

SPANISH 101 f. Spani./. Poetry/ (3)-Three lectures. ^^^^^ 

L epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyncs, poetry of the^G^^^^^^^^ 
^ge (Not given in 1936-1937.) 
' SPANISH 102 s. Spanish Poetry (3) -Three lectures. 

clnLation of Spanish 101 f. Poetry of the 18th, l^h, and 20th cen- 
turies. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 
SPANISH 103 f. The Spanish Drarm (3)-Three lectures. ^^^^^^^ 

The drama of the Golden Age. 

SPANISH 104 s. The Spanish Dram. (3) -Three lectures. 
Continuation of Spanish 103 f . The drama since Calderon. (Daiby.) 

SPANISH 120. Conference Course in Reading (credits allowed: majors. 
4 semester hours; minors. 2 semester hours). Tt nroDoses- 

whole rather than ^pon the .^^^^f ^ ,"' to develop in the student the 
such courses as he has taken m the field. (2) to deve op 
vrt„ +« -ra^A indpoendentlv. Conferences with quaunea memoers u 
ability to reaa maepenueuny. «mirse nrepares majors 

literature at the end of the senior year. 

For Graduates 
SPANISH 201 y. Research (2-4)-Credits determined by -rk ^accj- 

plished. , 

SPANISH 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6) -Three lec- 

'"Se'ailed study of the classical authors. (Not given in 1936-193^0^^^^ 

SPANISH 203 y. Cervantes (6) -Three lectures. 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. ( ^aroy. 

Spanish 210 y. Seminar (2-4)— One meeting weekly. 

(Required of all graduate students in Spanish.) 

MUSIC 

Mr. Randaix, Sekgt. Siebeneichen. Mrs. Blaisdell. 
Music ly Music Appreciation (2)— One lecture. 

283 



it employs. A study of musical form. The development of the opera and 
oratorio. Great singers of the past and present. Well-known musicians 
occasionally appear as guest lecturers and performers. 

Music 2y. History of Music (2) — One lecture. 

A comprehensive course in the history of music covering the development 
of all forms of music from ancient times through the renaissance; the 
classic and the romantic schools; and the more modem composers. 

Music 3 y. University Chorus (1). 

This course is offered for those interested in part-singing. After voice 
trials, students who have ability to read and sing music of the grade of easy 
songs are admitted. Members of the Women's Chorus and the Men's Glee 
Club indicated hereafter are combined at times for mixed chorus singing. 

(a) Women's University Chorus. Study of part-singing for women's 
voices. Credit is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly 
rehearsals and participation in public performances of the chorus. 

(b) Men's Glee Club. Study of part-singing for men's voices. Credit 
is awarded for each year's regular attendance at weekly rehearsals and 
participation in public performances of the Glee Club. 

Music 4 y. University Orchestra (1). 

The purpose of the University Orchestra is study of the classics. Works 
of the standard symphonists from Haydn and Mozart to Wagner and the 
modern composers are used. Students who play orchestral instruments are 
eligible for membership. At least one rehearsal of two hours duration is 
held each week, and all players are expected to take part in public perform- 
ances. 

Music 5y. Harmony (4) — Two lectures. 

This course includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, har- 
monic progressions, primary and secondary triads in root position and first 
and second inversions, the dominant seventh chord in its root position and 
inversions. 

The above theory is taught to give the student a basis for ear training, 
dictation, melody writing, and melody harmonization. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Marti 

Phil. 1 f or s. Introduction to Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. 

Not open to freshmen. 

A study of the development of philosophical thought from the early 
Greeks to the modem era. 

Phil. lis. Modern European Philosophy (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. 

A continuation of Phil. 1 f or s. Alternates with Phil. 12 s. 

284 



PHIL. 12 s. American Philosophy (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

'1:!lZ^onofTy^,liors, Alternates with Phil. 11 s. (Not offered 
in 1936-1937.) 

PHIL. 21 f. Aesthetics (3)-Three lectures. Prerequisite Phil 1 f or s 
and prerecjuisite or, by special permission, coreqmsite: Art 1 f or s. 
M,i<,ic 1 V or 2 y, or a 100 course in literature. . _, . ,^ 

rWstorical and systematic introduction to the pHlosophy of art. Alter- 
mates with Phil. 22 f and 23 f . 

PHIL 22 f. Logic (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phil 1 f or s, and 
satisfactory preparation in mathematics or science. 

An introductory course, designed -pecian^ for -enc« majors. Alter 
nates with Phil. 21 f and 23 f . (Not offered m 1936-1937.) 

PHIL 23 f. Ethics (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite. Phil. If or s. 

A study of the implications of problems of the good life. Alternates with 
Phil 21 f and 22 f . (Not offered in 1936-1937.) 

PHIL. 31 f. Readings in Philosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 

requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. , , j j j;» 

One or several relatively easy philosophical works will be «ad, and dxs- 

Not more than two credits allowed to any one student. 

PHIL. 33 f. Readings in PhUosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. (Not given m 1936-1937.) 

PHIL. 34 s. Readings in PhUosophy (l)-One hour of discussion. Pre- 
requisite, Phil. 1 f or s. (Not given m 1936-1937.) 

PHIL 101 f Systems of Philosophy: KANT (3)-Three hours of ec- 
tuS student reports, an/discussion. Prerequisite, two courses m philos- 
ophy, and the permission of the professor. 

The svstem of one philosopher, or the development of one movement, will 
be^S rough"ou? the sLester. The topic ^^Xfti^f^J^Z^^ 

.ester to semeste-lthoug';- ^^^ ^l ^i rcrX aUo^el TLTone 
may be chosen agam. JNot more likih (Marti.) 

student. 

PHIL 102 s Systems of Philosophy: HEGEL (3) -Three hours of lec- 
turerstudent ^orts, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses m phxlos- 

ophy, and the permission of the professor. 

., ^^^ - (Marti.) 

Continuation of Phil. 101 f . 

285 



the peissi;n of thepXsor ' *"° '""'^^ ^" Philosophy, and 

Similar to Phil. 101 f. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Marti 

Phil. 104 s. Systems of Philosophy (3)— Thrpp hra„.= ^f t ^ 
dent reports, and discussion Pr»rJ«„l-! \ ^ **^ lectures, stu- 

the peLssi^n of treprSssor^^ ' ° '"""'^ '" Philosophy, and 

Similar to Phil, loi f. (Not given in 1936-1937.) /^ ,. , 

' I Marti.) 

PHYSICS 

Professor Eichlin; Dr. Dickinson, Mr. Clark 

requisites, concurrent Math. 16 y and 17 y students. Pre- 

A study of mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light 

coSll^sigSTotSrhfnL^'J-^?" '"*"^"- '^'^ -*^^-t-y 

quainted with'Jhe !?:« P^nc^plefof'^^wS: 'tl *" '""'"^ ^^- 
ffiven bv lAr»fn>.oe >. -^4.. i'^^ncipies ot physics. Instruction will be 

cTurse,'^t^slr;dd" o^^^^^^^ mTbTdr' demonstrations. This 
payment, ^11 be acceptedlsT^quiSnt^f^S J"""^ '^ *'^ ^'" 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

sitrClyor1ratdC.T67a^^^^^^^ ^— -— 

dafa,trpTecion^rSf^".""'^^^^^"^ *'^ *^^^*--* «^ experimental 
etc., wTth emphas s on the r "'' T'''' ^''*«^°I-«on, curve analysis, 
ment^ Til ? ■ P'^nnmg of investigations involving measure- 

m::;^! ^l """ " "*^"'^' ^^ ^^ introduction to quantitative ex^eri- 

(Eichlin.) 

r.Z'^^'l' .^' Q^iaTiiitotiVe P%^caZ Measurements (2) -One lecturP- 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Phys 101 f t»ne lecture, 

so obtained P^^^lems, and the adaptation and analysis of data 

(Eichlin.) 
286 



PHYS. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 1 y. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is an advanced study of physical 
phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, conduction of electricity through gases, 
photoelectricity, etc., with a comprehensive review of basic principles in- 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student in a general survey with 
some of the recent developments in physics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 104 y. Advanced Experiments (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 103 y. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is intended to pro\^de the student 
with experience in experimental physics. (Dickinson..) 

Phys. 105 f. Heat and Thermodynamics (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

The classical phenomena of heat and radiation phenomena are developed 
on the basis of the kinetic molecular theory and the quantum theory. The 
first and second laws of thermodynamics are applied to physical processes. 

(Dickinson.) 

Phys. 106 s. Theoretical Mechanics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

Am analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented, with problems and laboratory exercises to illustrate 
these principles. The use of generalized coordinates is illustrated. The 
equations of La Grange are applied to selected topics in the field of dynam- 
ics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 107 f. Optics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2 y. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, inter- 
ference, diffraction, and polarization of light. The principles are employed 
on a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectro- 
scope, and interferometer. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 108s. Electricity and Magnetism (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

A study is made of elementary and mathematical theorj^ of electrostatics, 
magnetostatics, magnetism, electrical currents, etc. 

An experimental study of electrical instruments and their use in physical 
measurements is included. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 109 y. Electric Discharge (6) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, at least two courses of the 105 f-108 s group. 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity, and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include discus- 
sion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics, and atomic structure. 
(Not given in 1936-1937). (Dickinson.) 

287 



Graduates 

Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3) — Three lectures. 

Development of theories on the structure of the atom through discussion 
of optical and X-ray spectra, atomic models as applied to the periodic table, 
and related topics. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 202 s. Advanced Spectroscopy (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201 f . 

Continuation of Phys. 201 f. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 203 f. Quxintum Theory (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the application of the principles of the quantum theory to 
black body radiation, spectroscopy, collision processes, valence, etc. 

(Eichlin.) 

Phys. 204 s. Nuclea/r Physics (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the constitution of the nucleus, natural radioactivity dis- 
integration processes, neutron, positron, nuclear energy states, artificial dis- 
integration, etc. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 205 f. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Comprehensive survey of the history of physics; the electromagnetic 
theory of radiation; interaction of radiation and matter; introduction to the 
quantum mechanics. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 206 s. Fundamental Concepts of Modem Physics (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Phys. 205 f . 

Continuation of Phys. 205 f. (Not given in 1936-1937.) * (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 207 f. Electrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of electrostatics and electromagnetics with appli- 
cations to diffraction, dispersion, electro- and magneto-optics. (Not given 
in 1936-1937.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 208 s. Physical Optics (3) — Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light, with appli- 
cations to interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization. (Not given in 
1936-1937.) (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 209 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of reports and discussion of current developments in physics 
and of original investigations on special problems. (Staff.) 



Phys. 210 y. Research, 

The investigation of special problems in physics. 



(Staff.) 



288 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

professor Magruder; Assistant Professor Steinmeyer 
POL SCI If or s. American Nationxil Government (3)-Three lee- 

tions of the national government of the United btates. 
course for political science majors. 

Pnr SCI 4 s State G<>vem.ment (2) -Two lectures. Open to freshmen. 

Itudy of the legislative, executive, andjudicial functions of the States. 
^ifhempLsis given to the govermnent of Maryland. 

POL. Sa. 5f. Mrmidpal Govemmmt (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

work. ^ • •» 

POL. sa. 7 f. €<m.parative Government (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite. 

Pol Sci. 1 f or s. including a study in detail of the par- 

Hat:rr7s?st?m ^TltJZ^L Cours^ covers the governmental sys- 
terns of France and Switzerland. 
POL. SCI. 8 s. Ccymparative Government (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, 

Pol. Sci. 1 f or S. T, •„ Tf ol^ Tanan 

A comparative study of the governments of Germany. Russia, Italy, Japan, 
etc. * 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

POL. sa. 101 f. Intematiorml Law (3)-Three lectures. 
A study of the principles governing international i"*--^'^^^^^^^^;^; 
peace as well as war, as illustrated in texts and cases. (Stemmeyer.) 

POL. Sa. 102 s. International Relations (3) -Three lectures. 

zations. 
POL. sa. 103 f. Current Problems in Government (2)-Two lectures 
Thi^ course deals with the governmental problems having an international 
ehl^ ter^Iuch as the causes'of war, the problem of neutraMy^ propaganda 
etc. Cou;se conducted by lecture and discussior method, ^^^ ^^^^e^*^^;^ 
quired to report on readings from current hterature. (Stemmeyer., 

289 



Pol. Sci. 104 s. Current Problems in Government (2) — Two lectures. 

This course, conducted along lines similar to those of Pol. Sci. 103 f , deals 

with domestic problems of the government of the United States. (Magruder.) 

Pol. Sci. 105 f. Constitutional Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of constitutional law in the United States, as interpreted by the 
Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the American federal system, 
the amending clause, the powers of the President, Congress, and the National 
Judiciary. (Magruder.) 

Pol. Sci. 107 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

The political party as a part of the political machinery; party organiza- 
tion; party activities; campaign methods; public opinion and party leader- 
ship; the true function of parties. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Magruder.) 

Pol. Sa. 109 f. Early Political Theory (2)-— Two lectures. 

A survey of the principal theorists who have influenced political thought 
and development. This course covers the various theories from Plato to the 
middle of the nineteenth century. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 110 s. Recent Political TJwught (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the political schools of thought from the middle of the nine- 
teenth century to the present time. Special reference is made to such recent 
developments as Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Nazism, etc. 

(Steinmeyer.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professor Waite; Associate Professor Quigley. 

Poultry Is. Farm Poultry (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course in poultry raising, including housing, feeding, incuba- 
tion, brooding, breeds, breeding, selection of stock, culling, general man- 
agement, and marketing. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Poultry 102 f. Poultry Keeping (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Students encouraged but not required to take Poultry 1 s as a prerequisite. 

A study of housing and yarding, practice in making poultry house plans, 
feeding, killing, and dressing. 

Poultry 103 s. Poultry Production (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Poultry 1 s and 102 f. 

The theory and practice of incubation and brooding, both natural and 
artificial. Study of incubators and brooders, assembling, etc. Considerable 
stress will be placed on the proper growing of chicks into good laying pul- 
lets. General consideration of poultry disease. Caponizing. 

290 



POULTRY 104 f. Poultry Breeds. (4)-Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Poultry 1 s, 102 f, and 103 s. 

A sJudy of the breeds of poultry, the Judging of Po^^ry, inc^^ng culhng, 
fitting for exhibition, and the methods of improvement by breeding. 

POULTRY 105 s. Poultry Management (4) -Two lectures; two labora- 
tories Prerequisites, Poultry 1 s, 102 f , 103 s, and 104 f . . ^ . ^, 

A ^.npral fitting together and assembling of knowledge gained m the 
p^fviSr Is^^^^ marketing, including both se^nyf^P^^^^^^ 

Suets and the buying of supplies, keeping poultry accounts hatchery 
iSment and operation, a study of poultry profits, how to start. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Sprowls. 
PSYCH If or s. Elements of Psychohgy (3)-Two lectures and one 

psychology. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

PSYCH. 102 f or s. Experimental Psychology (3) -One lecture and one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 f or s. 
Theoretical discussion and experimental investigation of the cutane»u^' 

guISy lual, olfactory, auditory and ^^^^^!^;f ^^^:^^,t:iZ 
See. Kyxnographic recording of reflexes associated with 'V'^^^^l^^^^ 
tional and esthetic processes. 

PSYCH. 106 s. Mental Hygiene (3)-Two lectures and one clinic at St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital. Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 1 f or Psych. 1 f or s. 

BPsiffned especially for students of education, home economics, pre-medi- 

sions, fears, conflicts, inhibitions, and compensations. (bprowis., 

For Graduates 

Fn PSYCH 200 f Systematic Educational Psychology (3) -An advanced 
coSef" teachers an7prospective teachers. Open only to graduate .tuden^ 

Deals with the major contributions of psychology to educational theory 
from Herbert to the present time. 



291 



SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Manny; Associate Professor Sanderson; 
Assistant Professors Mackie, Clowes; Mr. Tillett. 

Soc. Sci. 1 y. Introduction to the Social Sciences (6) — One lecture; two 
discussions. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. 

This course ser\^es as an orientation to advanced work in the social sci- 
ences. In the first semester, the basis, nature, and evolution of society and 
social institutions are studied. During the second semester the major prob- 
lems of modem citizenship are analyzed in terms of knowledge contributed 
by economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. 

Soc. 1 f or s. Principles of Sociology (3) — Three discussions. Prerequi- 
site, sophomore standing. 

An analysis of society and the social processes; the relation of the indi- 
vidual to the group; social products; social change. 

Soc. 2 s. Cultural Anthropology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, soph- 
omore standing. 

An analysis of the cultures of several primitive and modem societies, the 
purpose of which is to ascertain the nature of culture and the processes re- 
lated to it. Museum exhibits will be utilized. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Soc. 101 f. Rural Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The structure and functions of rural communities, ancient and modem; 
the evolution of rural culture; rural institutions and their problems; the 
psychology of rural life; composition and characteristics of the rural popu- 
lation; relation of rural life to the major social processes; the social aspects 
of rural planning. (Manny.) 

Soc. 102 s. Urban Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Each graduate student 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The ongin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the nature and significance of urbanization; the social struc- 
ture and functions of the city; urban personalities and groups; cultural con- 
flicts arising out of the impact of urban environment. (Sanderson.) 

Soc. 104 s. Social Psychology (3) — Three discussions. Prerequisite. Soc. 
1 f or s or Psych. 1 f or s. 

The development of human nature and personality as products of social 
experience and interaction; the behavior of public audiences, g^roups, crowds, 
and mobs; the development and functioning of such psycho-social forces as 
imitation, styles, fads, leadership, public opinion, propaganda, nationalism, 
etc. (Manny.) 

292 



soc 105 f. Social Organization (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 f. 

Social groupings above the family in size as found among primitives and 
modem civilizations including neighborhoods, communities, special interest 
^gani^tions, etc.; leadership and followership in organization act^^^^^^^^^ 
interorganizational conflict and cooperation. (Not offered m 1937-1938.) 

soc. 107 s. Social Pathology (3) -Three lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 

1 f or consent of instructor. , , , 4.1.^ 

Causative factors and social complications in individual and group patho- 

logical conditions; historic methods of dealing with ^^P^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
and delinquent classes. 

Soc. 109 f. Introduction to Social Work (3)-Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site Soc. 107 s, or consent of instructor. 

Brief historical review of the evolution of social work. Present day types 
of social work, Institutional treatment, public and private agencies; the 
theory and technic of social case work; recent developments arising out of 
the depression; visits to representative social agencies. This course is 
intended primarily for persons intending to take advanced professional 
training in this field. 

Soc. 110 s. The Family (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. If. 

Anthropological and historical backgrounds; biological, economic, psycho- 
logical, and sociological bases of the family; the role of the family in per- 
sonality development; family and society; family disorgamzation; family 
adjustment and social range. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Sanderson.) 

SOC. lllf. Recent Social Ttwught. (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc 
1 f, and consent of instructor; intended mainly for sociology majors and 

""critical study of the leading schools of sociological thought in various 
countries since 1900. (Not given in 1936-1937.) 

Soc. 113 f. Oynamics of Population (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisite. 
Soc. 1 f and Gen. Ill f, or consent of instructor. 

Causes of population growth and decline; major population migrations 
population pressure and international problems; eugenic f^t«5"' ^Jf ^J^^^J 
analyses of population trends in the United States. (Not given m 1937-1938.) 

Soc. 115 f. The ViOage (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite junior stand- 
ing. An extra term paper will be required of each post-graduate student. 

The evolution of the American village; present day social structure and 
functions of the village; an analysis of village population; the refetwnship 
of the village to urban and open-country areas; village planmng. (Not given 
in 1936-1937.) (Manny.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201 f or s. Sociological Resewrch (2-4). Credit proportional to 

work accomplished. . , , i •_ «* 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 

., J , . (Staff.) 
compiled data. 

293 



I 



Soc. 202 f or s. Seminar in Sociological Theories (2). 

Assigned topics for discussion, dealing primarily with major sociological 
theories and problems. Designed for major students in the department of 
Sociology. (Staff.) 

SPEECH 

Professor Richardson; Assistant Professor Watkins; Miss Lofgren, 

Mrs. Provenson. 

Speech ly. Reading aiid Speaking (2) — One lecture. 

The principles and technique of oral expression: enunciation, emphasis, 
inflection, and force. The preparation and delivery of short original 
speeches. Impromptu speaking. Theory and practice of parliamentary 
procedure. 

Speech 2 f. Advanced Public Speaking (2) — ^Two lectures. 

Advanced work on basis of Speech 1 y, with special applications and adap- 
tations. At each session of the class a special setting is given for the 
speeches — civil, social, and political organizations, etc., and organizations in 
the fields of the prospective vocations of the different students. When a 
student has finished this course he will have prepared and delivered one or 
more speeches which would be suitable and appropriate before any and all 
bodies that he would probably have occasion to address in after-life. 

Speech 3 s. Advanced Public Speaking (2) — ^Two lectures. Ck)ntinua- 
tion of Speech 2 f . 

Speech 4y. Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. 

The preparation and delivery of speeches, reports, etc., on both technical 
and general subjects. Argumentation. This course is especially adapted to 
the needs of engineering students, and is coordinated with the seminars of 
the College of Engineering. 

Speech 5y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. 

This course is a continuation with advanced work of Speech 4 y. Much at- 
tention is given to parliamentary procedure. Some of the class programs 
are prepared by the students and carried out under student supervision. 
For junior engineering students only. 

Speech 6 y. Advanced Oral Technical English (2) — One lecture. 

Advanced work on the basis of Speech 5 y. Work not confined to class 
room. Students are encouraged to deliver addresses before different bodies 
in the University and elsewhere. Senior seminar. For senior engineering 
students only. 

Speech 7 f. Extempore Speaking (1)— One lecture. 

Much emphasis on the selection and organization of material. Class ex- 
ercises in speaking extemporaneously on assigned and selected subjects. 
Newspaper and magazine reading essential. 

294 



Speech 8 s. Extempore Speaking (1)— One lecture. 
Continuation of Speech 7 f . 

Speech &f. Debate (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the principles of argumentation. Class work in debating. It 
is advised that those who aspire to intercollegiate debating should take this 
course. 

Speech 10 s. Argumentation (2)— Two lectures. 

Theory and practice of argumentation and debate. Similar to coiu-se 
Speech 9 f . This course is offered for the benefit of those who may find it 
impracticable to take this work in the first semester. 

Speech 11 f. Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. 

A study of the technique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of 
literature. The practical training of students in the art of reading. 

Speech 12 s. Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. 
Continuation of Speech 11 f . 

Speech 13 f. Advanced Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Speech 11 f or 12 s or the equivalent (if work is entirely satisfactory). 
Advanced work in oral interpretation. 

Speech 14 s. Advanced Oral Reading (1)— One lecture. Prerequisite, 
Speech 11 f or 12 s (if work is entirely satisfactory) or the equivalent. 

Continuation of Speech 13 f . 

Speech 15 f. Specixil Advanced Speaking (2)— Two lectures. 

Class is organized as a Civic Club, and the work consists of such activities 
as are incident to such an organization—parliamentary law, committee 
work, prepared and impromptu speeches, etc. 

Primarily for students in the College of Education. 

Speech 16 s. Special Advanced Speaking (2)— Two lectures. 
Continuation of Speech 15 f . 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors Pierson, Truitt; Assistant Professor Phillips; 

Mr. Burhoe, Dr. Newcombb 

ZooL. If or s. General Zoology (4)~Two lectures, two laboratories. 

An introductory course, which is cultural and practical in its aim. It 
deals with the basic principles of animal development, structure, relation- 
ships, and activities, a knowledge of which is valuable for a proper apprecia- 
tion of the biological sciences. Typical invertebrates and the white rat, or 
other mammal, are studied. 

295 



ZooL. 2 f or s. Elements of Zoology (3) — Two lectures, one demon- 
stration. 

A course for the student who desires a general knowledge of the prin- 
ciples underlying the growth, development, and behavior of certain animals, 
including man. 

This course will be accepted for credit in fulfilling a major in zoology, if, 
later, supplemented by additional work. 

ZoOL. 3 f . Invertebrate Morphology (4) — Two lectures, two labora- 
tories. Required of students whose major is zoology, and of pre-medical 
students. 

This course consists in a study of the comparative morphology of selected 
invertebrate groups. 

ZooL. 4 s. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4) — Two lectures, two 
laboratories. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain classes. Required 
of pre-medical students and those whose major is zoology. 

ZoOL. 5 s. EconoTnic Zoology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, one course 
in zoology, and one course in botany. 

The content of this course will center around the problems of preserva- 
tion, conservation, control, and development of the economic wild life of 
Maryland. The lectures will be supplemented by assigned readings and 
reports. 

This course, combined with Zool. 6 s, should form a part of the basic 
training for professional foresters, game proctors, and conservationists. 

2k)0L. 6 s. Field Zoology (3) — One lecture, two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, one course in zoology and one in botany. 

This course consists in collecting and studying both land and aquatic 
forms of nearby woods, fields, and streams, with emphasis upon insects and 
certain vertebrates, their breeding habits, environment, and economic im- 
portance. Intended for teachers of biology, and also for those who have an 
interest in nature study and outdoor life. 

Zool. 12 f. Animal Histology (3) — One lecture, two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, one course in zoology. 

A study of animal tissues and the technic involved in their preparation 
for microscopic examination. 

Zool. 15 f. Hmman Physiology (3) — Two lectures, one laboratory. 

For students who desire a knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. 
Emphasis is placed upon the physiology of digestion, circulation, respira- 
tion, and reproduction. 

Zool. 16 s. HumxLn Physiology (3) — Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Similar to Zool. 15 f . Primarily for home economics students. 

296 



TtoOL 20 s. Vertebrate Embryology (3)--0ne lecture, two aboratones 
Pr^^qizisL, one course in zoology. Limited to thirty students Conf !J 
S Lstructor must be obtained before registering. Required of students 
whose major is zoology. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day. 

Advanced Undergraduates a»d Graduates 

7^L 100 f Cimiparative Embryology (3)— Two lectures, one labora- 
tory Permission of instructor must be obtained before registration. 

A study of types of cleavage, methods of germ layer and organ differen- 
tiation of animals representative of the different phyla, with special refer- 
ent to the invertebrates. (Not given in 1936-1937.) (Burhoe.) 

700L 101 f- 102 s. Mammalian Anatomy ( 2-6) -Laboratory Registra- 
tionTmited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before regis- 

^'Vcourse in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. Recommended for 
pre-meS students, for those whose major is zoology, and for prospective 
teachers of science in high schools. ^ 

Zool 103 f: 104 s. General Animnl Physiology (3-6)-Two lectures, 
one^aborator^. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in 
vertebrate anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of in- 
structor must be obtained before registration. 

The first semester work deals with the principles of cellular and general 
physiology; the second semester is devoted to an application of th^^jP""" 
ciples to the higher animals. 

ZOOL. 105 y. Aquicvlture (4) -One lecture, one laboratory. Prerequisite, 

one course in zoology. 

A comprehensive consideration of the properties of natural waters which 
render them suitable for animal environments. iirui«.; 

Zool. 106 f ; 107 s. Jourml Club (1-2) . 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. R^^'^i'^J'^^" 
students whose major is zoology. 

Zool 108 f. Invertebrate Zoology (3) -Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 3 f . Required of students whose major is zoology. 

Taxonomy and distribution, with special reference to local ^^^^J^^^^^^ 

Zool. 109 s. Vertebrate Zoology (3)-Two lectures, one laboratory. 
Prerequisite. Zool. 4 s. Required of students whose major is zoology. 

Classification, geological distribution, and environmental «;*«»««' T^*l; 
special reference to local fauna. (Newcomoe.; 

297 



ZOOL. lllf; 112 s. Htuman Osteology (2-6) — A laboratory course. Reg- 
istration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 

A descriptive study of the human skeleton. (Pierson.) 

^OOL. 120 f. Animal Genetics (3) — Two lectures, one laboratory. Per- 
mission of the instructor must be obtained before registration. 

An introductory course, designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental principles of heredity and variation. While primarily of interest to 
students of biology, it will be of value to those interested in the humanities. 
Required of students in zoology who do not have credit for Gen. 101 f . (After 
1936-1937 this course will be given the second semester.) (Burhoe.) 

ZooL. 125 f and s. Practice Teaching (2) — Assisting in laboratory in- 
struction under the direction of the regular instructors. Open only to those 
taking the pre-medical curriculum and to seniors whose major is zoology. 
The permission of the head of the department must be obtained before reg- 
istering for this course. Registration limited. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

ZooL. 200 y. Marine Zoology (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Problems in salt water animal life of the higher phyla. (Truitt.) 

ZoOL. 201 y. Advanced Vertebrate Morphology (6) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. 

Comparative morphology of selected organ systems of the important 
vertebrate classes. (Pierson.) 

ZooL. 202 y. Advanced Anhnal Ecology (6) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Animal populations, their distribution, behavior, and environmental rela- 
tions. (Newcombe.) 

ZooL. 204 y. Advanced Animal Physiology (6) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Analysis of certain phases of the physiology of activities of animals. 

(Phillips.) 

ZooL. 205 y. Biology of Marine Organisms (6) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Biotic, physical, and chemical factors of the marine environment, includ- 
ing certain fundamental principles of oceanography. Special reference 
is made to the Chesapeake Bay region. (Newcombe and Phillips.) 

ZooL. 206 y. Research — Credit to be arranged. (Staff.) 



CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country. ^^ 
on Salomons Isllid, Maryland. It is sponsored by the l^-^^^^^^' 
nnerTtion with the Maryland Conservation Department, Goucher Co^^iege, 
WasSoI College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Maryland College, 
SSe C^^^^^^ ^f Washington, in order to afford a center for 

Sid life research and study where facts tending toward a fuller apprecia- 
tn of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The program projects 
a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake region. 

The laboratory is open from June until September, inclusive; and during 
the summer of i936 courses will be offered in the following subjects: Algol- 
oS, Sial Ecology, Physiology, Invertebrates, Diatoms, Economic Zool- 
ozy. Invertebrate Zoology, Biological Problems. 

These courses, of three credit hours each, are for ^^^^^^^^ .^^^^^^^ 
graduates and graduates. They cover a period of s^^/^^\«- , ^fj^f^^ 
San two courses may be taken by a student, who must meet the requii^ 
ments of the Department of Zoology as well as those of the LaWtory 
before matriculation. Each class is limited to five matrictilants. Students 
worSi^n special research problems may establish residence for the entire 

summer period. 

Laboratory facilities, boats of various types fully equipped (V^fV^.J^eU, 
dreJges, ani other apparatus), and shallow water col ectmg devices are 
available for the work without extra cost to the student. 

For fuU information consult special announcement, which may be ob- 
tained by applying to R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



298 



299 



SECTION IV 
DEGREES, HONORS, STUDENT REGISTER 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1934-1935 



Elmer William Greve 

B.S. Ohio State University, 1930 

M.S. Ohio State University, 1932 



HONORARY DEGREE 

Harry Whinna Nice, Doctor of Laws 

HONORARY CERTIFICATES OF MERIT 

Charles Egbert Bryan tt.„ 

^ ,, Harry Hopkins Nuttle 

Ray Norman 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Doctor of Philosophy 

L^ Thomas Alexander Dissertation : 

B.S. University of Arkansas, 1928 "Vapor Pressure Relations of Cer- 

tain Typical Soil Colloids." 

ARTHua^^DoNAii) BOWERS Dissertation: 

ii.b. University of Maryland, 1931 "The Mercurv WoiVV^f r- i x » 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 ^ ^''^^^ Coulometer." 

ORSON Northrop Eaton Dissertation: 

B.S Cornell University, 1917 "An Anatomical and Chemical Studv 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1923 of Inbred and CroSbrTLS 

of Guinea Pigs." 
Raymond ANDE3S0N Fisher Dissertation: 

L "S""' "' ^"'"^ '^°'"™- "^'•^ Colorimetric Determination of 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 XJsTLn^" '""''•^"" ^'°^- 
Samuel Wilham Goldstein Dissertation: 

MarylanHS """"""" '' "^. ^^^^-he-i-l and Pharmacolo- 

M.S. S^T/of Maryland. 1931 ^SaS.^ ^^^^^^ ^™-^- 
Fredebick Vahujamp Grau Dissertation: 

Mll^j:sZV£^^::,'?is "aT r-""^ ^^^*"- Q-«*^- 

ty 01 Maryland, 1933 An Inventory of Soils, Vegetation 

and Management of Maryland Per- 
manent Pastures." 
300 



Dissertation: 

"Some Responses of the Howard 17 

Strawberry Plant to Applications 

of Nitrogen and Moisture in the 

Non-Fruiting and Fruiting Year." 



Marcus Rankin Hatfield Dissertation: 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1931 "The Standard Electrode Potential 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 of Lead." 



Robert Jacx)bsen 
A.B. Doane College, 1930 
M.A. George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1931 



Dissertation: 

"The Isolation of Friedelin and 
Cerin from Cork and A Study of 
the Properties and Molecular 
Weight of Friedelin." 



John Richard King Dissertation: 

A. B. Indiana University, 1931 "Cytological Studies in the Genus 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 Ipomoea and Related Genera." 

David Victor Lumsden Dissei-tation : 

B.S. Cornell University, 1921 "A natomical and Biochemical 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 Changes in Narcissus Bulbs during 

Summer Storage at Various Tem- 
peratures." 



L. Lavan Manchey 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1929 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1931 

Earle Dwight Matthews 
B.S. University of Florida, 1931 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1932 

Emma Janet McDonald 
A.B. Lawrence College, 1924 
M.A. University of Illinois, 1926 

J. Harvey Roberts 
B.S. University of Wisconsin, 1929 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1931 



Dissertation : 
"Relation of the Carbonyl Group to 
Vermicidal Activity." 

Dissertation : 

"A Biochemical Study of Soil Or- 
ganic Matter as Related to Brown 
Root Rot of Tobacco." 

Dissertation : 
"Difructose Anhydrides from Hy- 
drolyzed Inulin. The Structure of 
Difructose Anhydride III." 

Dissertation : 
"Evidence of the Taxonomic Rela- 
tions of the Trichoptera Based on 
a Study of the Skeletal Muscula- 
ture." 



Sterl Amos Shrader Dissertation: 

B.S. West Virginia Wesleyan Col- "Some Functional Derivatives of 

lege, 1931 Friedelin and Cerin." 

M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 

301 



Emanuel Veritus Shulman 
B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1929 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1931 

Frank J. Slama 

B.S. in Pharmacy, University of 

Maryland, 1928 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1930 

Fletcher Pearre Veitch, Jr. 
B.S. University of Maryland, 1931 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 

Edgar Perkins Walls 

B.S. Maryland College of Agricul- 
ture, 1903 

M.S. Maryland College of Agricul- 
ture, 1905 

Joseph Clark White 

B.S. West Virginia Wesleyan Col- 
lege, 1930 
M.S. University of Maryland, 1933 



Dissertation : 

"The Anatomy of the Transition 
Zone of Some Species of Passiflora 
and the Pharmacognostic Anatomy 
of Pdssiflora Incarnata L." 

Dissertation : 

"A Comparative Study of Maryland 
Sennas." 



Dissertation : 

'A Study of the Action of Sulfuric 
Acid on Secondary Butyl Alcohol." 



it 



Dissertation : 
"The Vascular Anatomy of the 
Floral Parts of Some Solanaceous 
Plants." 

Dissertation : 
"The Activity of Tin in Tin Amal- 
gams and the Standard Electrode 
Potential of Tin." 



Master of Arts 



ROLFE Lyman Allen 
Grace Barnes 
KLatharine Stickney Bliss 
LiLA Marie Butch 
Adoniram Judson Boun 
Stanley Dowdell Brown 
William Henderson Carpenter 
Elmer Kirk Chandlee 
Wilbur Devilbiss 
Daniel Robert Edwards 
Helen Farrington 
Joseph Glenn Gould 
Frederic Fern Harver 



Howard E. Metcalfe 
Fred Lothar Miller 
Wilbur Churchill Nicols 
Harold Zeigler Reber 
Gerald Emil Richter 
Louise Talitha Saylor 
F. Alfons Schutte 
Catherine Lee Ter Veer 
James Rittenhouse Ullrich 
Agatha McDowell Varela 
Catherine Theresa Wold 
Naomi Sherman Yates 



Master of Science 



Keith Gilbert Acker 
John Robert Adams, Jr. 
RiDGELY B. Bond 
Charles Frederick Bruening 
Donald Whitehead Chappell 



Harold E. Crowther 
David Edward Derr 
William E. Hauver, Jr. 
William Appler Horne 
Floyd B. Hornibrook 



MARY Elizabeth Klinger 
Herbert Lapinsky 
lewis Paul McCann 
RUSSELL Kent Mead 
CLINTON Marion Mecham 

PAUL ANDREW PARENT 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN ReINDOLLAR 

RALPH Walker Ruble 



Alma Willis Rutledge 

CLIFFORD SCHARFF SCHOPMEYER 

Louis Lazar Sherman 
Minna Elaine Strasburger 
Albert Holmes Tillson 
Everett C. Weitzell 
Llewellyn Hopkins Welsh 
Sol Wilner 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Bachelor of Science 



DONALD F. ASHTON 

LAURENCE Ray Bower 
James Wilson Brown 
Edward Lloyd Bunch 
Kenneth Lee Caskey 
William Henry Chilcoat 
Charles Edwin Clark 

CHARLES HORNBERGER CLARK 

*james Francis Crotty 
♦Charles Henry Cunningham 
Wilson Francis Dawson 
Fred Chalis Downey 
Ralph Conrad Fisher 
Merrill B. Fullerton 
Clifford L. Gross 
Henry George Harns 
Warren William Hastings 
Truman A. Hobbs 
John Leister Hull 
Walter F. Jeffers 
Omar James Jones, Jr. 
Arthur Spalding Kidwell 



JEANETTE BAKER KiTWELL 

Roy W. Lennartson 

Alfred Willla^m Lewis 

Paul H. Lung 

Cecil Arthur Marshall 

Nicholas Bosley Merryman 

WiLMER Smith Noble, Jr. 
Norman Beall Pfeiffer 
Stephen Heath Physioc 
Paul Routzahn Poffenberger 

* Edward Wiluam Sebold 
John Austen Silkman 
Hutton Davison Slade 
Marvin Luther Speck 
Joseph Lewis Staley 
Daniel Boyer Stoner 
Ramsay Berry Thomas 
Warren Edward Tydings 
John Wesley Webster 
Marie Elizabeth Wenzel 
Donald Bryan Williams 
* Ernest Elmer Wooden, Jr. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Bachelor of Arts 



Robert Harris Archer, Jr. 
Hubert Kennard Arnold 
John Clayton Ashton 
William Eugene Bounds 
John Joseph Bourke, Jr. 
William Hampton Brady 
* Stanley Dowdell Brown 



Evelyn Rose Brumbaugh 
Thomas W. Campbell 
Martha Atkinson Cannon 
Harvey Jackson Cheston, Jr. 
Edward Louis Chiles 
Peter Nicholas Chumbris 
Richard Waller Cooper 



♦Degree conferred September, 1934. 



302 



803 



Thomas Parker Corwin 
Richard Edmund Cullen 

*J0HN Maxwell Dickey 
Lillian Drake 
Thaddeus Ronsaville Dulin 

*Earl Lester Edwards 
Lea Kathryn Engel 
Jean Ferguson 
Robert J. Graves 
Kathleen Renton Hannigan 
Joseph Irving Herman 
Stanley Morton Hollins 
Paul Edward Holmes 

Gaza K. Horvath 

Margaret Euzabeth Jones 
♦Thomas Webb Jones, Jr. 

Eugene Leonard Kressin 

James Frank Lane, Jr. 

Saul R. Lasky 

Barbara Martha Lee 

Gilbert Ralph Lee 

Alfred Milton Loizeaux 

Eloise Genevieve Long 

Ruth Lord 

Eugene Thomas Lyddane 

Joseph Marshall Mathias 

Amos I. Meyers 
*J0HN Edward Monk 

Richard Davis Mumford 
William €. H. Needham 
Grace Lois Nelson 



Edward Arthur Newman, Jr. 
Donald Edwin Peck 
Robert Arthur Peck 
♦Robert Raymond Pitts 
Virginia Lawrence Potts 
Herbert M. Pratt 
Charles Kiepfer Rittenhouse 
Herbert H. Rosenbaum 
John Alvin Ruehle 
Jerome C. Salganik 
Henry Karl T. Schaaf 
Frances Anita Schrott 

♦Ann Baker Shaw 
John Gilliland Simpson 
John Robinson Small 
Talbert Aloysius Smith 
Peter Smyrnas 
Mary Leslie Stallings 
Marion Pennington Sutton 

♦Homer E. Tabler 

Walter Noble T'alkes 

Emery Wells Thompson 

Charles David Wantz 

John Warhol, Jr. 

WiLLLiAM Bernard Weirich 

Bettina Mae Weist 

Berma J. West 

June Eleanor Wilcoxon 

Mary Alice Worthen 

Verna Margarite Zimmermann 

JOHN H. ZiRCKEL 



Herbert Monroe Allison 
♦Richard Paul Anderson 

WiLLARD APPLEFELD 

Willis Harford Baldwin 
Paul L. Beach 
Harold Bernstein 
Morris Bloom 
Gilbert Bernard Blumberg 
Mayne Reid Coe, Jr. 
Sanford Cohn 
♦Ada Lythe Conklin 
Joseph Vincent Crecca 
Chester Burton Cross 

♦Degree conferred September. 1934. 



Bachelor of Science 



♦Everett Schnepfe Diggs 
Herman Dubnoff 
David Edelson 

♦Joseph Tevya Elvove 
Robert Hall Flanders 
Martin Abner Friedman 
Solomon Herman Garter 

HiLLMAN CORNELIOUS HARRIS 

Charles Edward Herring, Jr. 
Woodrow White Jones 
Arthur Edward Kahn 
Jerome Harold Kaye 
William Bradford Lanham, Jr. 



Max Lipsitz 

Edwin Machkowsky 
♦Irene Thelma Marino 

Jason Ernest Matthews, Jr. 

Mary Louise Miller 

Richard Wagener Ockershausen 

James William Pike 

Arthur Jerome Rich 
* Louis Milton Riehl 

John Rizzolo 

Samuel Rochberg 

Henry Rothkopf 



Ruth Mildred Roush 
John A. Ruppert 
Ralph A. Shulman 
George Tartikoff 
Bernard 0. Thomas, Jr. 
WiNFiELD Lynn Thompson 
Peter John Valaer, III 
John Vignau 
Herman Warshafsky 
Samuel Cottrell White 
Ralph Charles Williams 
Franklin Bratt Wise 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Doctor of Dental Surgery 



Philip Warren Anderson 
John Angalone 
Samuel Beckenstein 
Wiluam Allen Beetham 
Joseph Benjamin Berke 
Henry Chandler Bernard 
Pasquel John Bisese 
Joseph Heatwole Black 
Harris Blake 
John Clarence Bodnar 
William Boyarsky 
Donald Frederick Bradshaw 
Stanley J. Bridges 
J. Theodcmie Caldwell 
Richard Ernest Cofrancesco 
Louis Frank Coroso 
William Benjamin Costenbader 
Robert James Craig 
Gerald Preston Cross 
Frederick James Cuddy 
Emil Louis Curcio 
Edward Jay deKoning 
Anthony Domenic DeNoia 
* Ernesto Davila Diaz 
Thomas Van Donohue 
Stanley Hyde Dosh 
William Stephen Eramo 
Kenneth David Eye 
Harry Wallace Fallowfield, Jr. 
Milton Louis Feuer 



804 



♦Degree conferred September, 1934. 



Michael James Flannery 
Gerson Armand Freedman 
Julius William Friedman 
♦Abraham Click 
Eugene Ashton Goldberg 
Morris Goldstein 
Casimir Francis Golubiewski 
John William Gourley 
Nathan Grossman 
Aaron Guth 
Thomas Grant Hartley 
Clifford Owen Hills 
S. Edmund Hoehn 
John Joseph Houlihan 
Jack Isador Ingber 
Arthur Jorjorian 
Benjamin Kayne 
Taffy Theodore Kobrinsky 
Donald Krulewitz 
William Lerner 
Adolph Thomas Levickas 

ISADORE LEVINSON 

John Patrick Mahoney 
Aaron Burton Markowitz 
Vernon Brensley Marquez 
Leo Herbert Minkofp 
Samuel Morris 
John Benjamin Morrissey 
William Woods Noel 
Frederick Joseph Parmesano 

805 



m 



<l 



ik 



Angelo' Pasqual Pente 
Raymond Edward Phillips 
Frank Reber Pittman 
Charles Taylor Pridgeon 
Elmer Rivkin 
Rafael Escalona Robert 
Milton Louis Robinson 
Julian Francis Rosiak 
Morris Ellis Rubin 
Stanley Anthony Rzasa 
Francis Ambrose Sauer 
Joseph Henry Scanlon, Jr. 
Alfred Hugo Schilling 



Gerald Shoben 
Marcy Lee Shulman 
ISADORE Lee Singer 
Maurict: Skoblow 
Hansel Hedrick Snider 
Louis Sober 

Richard Alphonse Soja 
Richard Andrews Stevens 
Harvey Benjamin Stone 
Brainerd Foster Swain 
Edward Wallace Wallwork 
John Harry Whitaker 
DeWitt Creech Woodall 



Bachelor of Science 
Industrial Education 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Bachelor of Arts 



Jean Ruth Ashmun 
Charles Robert Boucher 
Eleanor Fawcett Cissel 
Guy Graham Dennis 
Maude Russell Duvall 
Louise Katharine Elizabeth 
Louise Ella Mae Fenton 

MARYBETH M. GARlTTi!^ 

Margaret Hackett Gibson 
James Burnside Graham 
Jean Grace Hamilton 
Clark Heironimus 



♦Robert Wilson Jones 

Helen Frances Klingsohr 
♦Jeannette Elizabeth Lovell 
♦John F. Manley 

Leona Gary Miller 
Eyler Frances Richey 

Ralph Windsor Ruffner 
*Cora Dodson Sasscer 
♦James Earl Solt 

Jean Lowe Somerville 
♦Mildred Della Walk 

Genevieve Asenath Yonkers 



Bachelor of Science 



CoNARD B. Allison 
Maurine Allison 
Elinor Myra Boyd 
Nell Connor 

♦Beatrice Woodford Crocker 
Laurel Marion DeMeritt 
Alice Lee Dix 
Ellen Florence Ensor 
James Glenn Graham 
Roberta Marjorie Hannum 
Eleanor Violet Hasson 
Frank Shawn Hoffecker, Jr. 
EuzABETH Virginia I jams 
Temple Rolph Jarrell 



Ruth Amanda Jehle 
Mary Lee Lankford 

WiLLARD McKeEVER LAWALL 

♦Carl Marshall Mann 
Frederick Stewart MoCaw 
Evelyn Layton Neal 
William Sherman O'Berry 
Dorothy Louise Ordwein 
Louis Lester Pistel 
Edward Francis Quinn, Jr. 
Marjorie Doran Rosenfield 
Adolph Schwartz 
Edna Louise Weigel 
Earl G. Widmyer 



♦Henry DoTEEffiR Blair 

Raymond Nelson Donelson 

Samuel Goldsmith 

Edward Herman Goldstein 
♦William Henry Jolly 

Harvey Chester Jones 



Samuel Krivitsky 
Mildred Crowley MoCaghey 
♦Frances Morell Mitchell 
John Willliam Myers 
Aquilla Joseph Pumphrey 



Teachers' Diplomas 



Jean Ruth Ashmun 
Harold Bernstein 
Elinor Myra Boyd 
Anna Betti Buschman 
Harvey Jackson Cheston, Jr. 
Eleanor Fawcett Cissel 
* Beatrice Woodford Crocker 
Laurel Marion DeMeritt 
Guy Graham Dennis 
Louise Katharine Elizabeth Eyler 
Marybeth M. Garvey 
James Glenn Graham 
Jean Grace Hamilton 
Roberta Marjorie Hannum 
Margaret Fawcett Hardy 
Eleanor Violet Hasson 
Gaza K. Horvath 
Sarah Griffith Jack 
Felice Edith Jacob 
Ruth Amanda Jehle 
Omar James Jones, Jr. 
Helen Frances Klingsohr 
James Frank Lane, Jr. 
Mary Lee Lankford 

WiLLARD McKEEVER LAWALL 



Robert Anthony Littleford 
Ernestine Marie Loeffler 
Frederick Stewart McCaw 
Leona Gary Miller 
Julia Ann Norman 
Dorothy Louise Ordwein 
Louis Lester Pistel 
Paul Routzahn Poffenberger 
Frances Richey 
Marjorie Doran Rosenfield 
Ralph Walker Ruble 
Ralph Windsor Ruffner 
F. Alfons Schutte 
♦Edward William Sebold 
♦Sara Louise Short 
Florence Tucker Simonds 
John Robinson Small 
Agnes Priscilla Soper 
Hazel Mae Speicher 
Mary Leslie Stallings 
Edna Louise Weigel 
Earl G. Widmyer 
Helen Elise Wollman 
Mary Alice Worthen 
Genevieve Asenath Yonkers 



•Degrreea conferred September, 1934. 



306 



♦Awarded September, 1934. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Civil Engineer 

-c^.^rni^ r-A^HFLL JOHN THOMAS O'NEILL 

Charles Francis cashell •'^ 

John Herbert Mitton 

Electrical Engineer 
Frank Theodore Chesnut 

807 



'^ 



I 

I 

I 



Mechanical Engineer 
Robert L. Evans 



Bachelor 

Karl Ferguson Baldwin, Jr. 

Edward Sewell Barber 
♦James Carroll Beatty 

Alfred Raymond Bolz 

Paul Samuel Bowers 

Charles David Briddell, Jr. 

Samuel Howard Brooks 

Harold Joseph Burns 

James Alan Campbell 

Ray Francis Chapman 

Henry M. Chick 

Tracy Carlisle Coleman 

John Harrison Costinett 

Denzel Everett Davis 

Edwin Austin Davis 

Robert Anthony Dunnigan 

Marland W. Duvall 
*JoHN Clinton Dye 

Charles Tage Foltz 

Daniel M. Foltz 

John Michael Gangler 

Julius Louis Goldman 

Carl Springmann Gregory 

Charles Gardner Grosh 

William Alexander Harmon 
♦Donald Albert Hay 

John Alan Herold 

Harry Hyland Howard, Jr. 

Edward Kaminski 

Albert Kanode 

John M. Kemper, Jr. 



of Science 

Richard Bennett Knight 
William Martin Koenig 
Richard Francis Lane 
♦Edwin Hubbard Lawton 
Clinton George Light, Jr. 
John Arthur Logan 
Constantine Lozupone 
Charles Herbert Ludwig 
Fielding Lewis Mitchell 
Julius Edward Morcock, Jr. 
Charles Herbert Morris 
Milton Christian Peper 
George S. Peratino 
Robert Richardson Poole 
Olaf S. Pruss 
Joseph Henry Pyles 
Edward Preston Rahe 
Albert William Rosenberger 
Clinton Gay Skidmore 
John Roger Smith 
Allan Morten Thomas, Jr. 
Levy Rhame Tindal 
Franklin Leroy Walker 
Julian Fairfax Walters, Jr. 
Pelham Alden Walton 
Thomas Holliday Webster, III 
♦Harmon Crane Welch 
Lee WILLL4MS 
Thomas Logan Wolard 
Charles Harding Zimmisch 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science 



Mildred Lowndes Berry 
Euzabeth Binsw anger 
Ruth Elizabeth Burslem 
Anna Betti Buschman 
Bertie Louise Caruthers 
Mabel Elizabeth Ewald 



Emma Carroll Gibbs 
Lenna Louisa Gross 
Margaret Fawcett Hardy 
Ruth Lee Hill 
Norma Ruth Hoage 
Sarah Griffith Jack 



FELICE Edith Jacob 
Elizabeth Rozelle Johnson 
Habgabet Estelle Langrall 
Ernestine Marie Loeffler 
Kathryn Melissa Moore 
juuA Ann Norman 
Dorothy O. Pierce 



Agnes Priscilla Soper 
Hazel Mae Speicher 
Estelle Stanley 
Marian Palmer White 
Helen Elise Wollman 
Anita Blanche Wright 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
Bachelor of Law 



CHARLES Bates Barker 
Richard McCormick Carlin 
FETTER John Carpenti 
fTHOMAS West Claggett, Jr. 
FRANas Irwin Cockrell 
t George Howard Dowell 
Wilbur R. Dulin 
Benjamin Francis Epstein 
Joseph Gregory Finnerty 
John Royden Forsythe 
fLouis Getz 

Robert Lee Gill, Jr. 

WiNSON Gilbert Gott, Jr. 

Walter Reckord Haile 
IThomas Hughlett Henry, Jr. 

Frederick William Invernizzi 

Laurance Jones, Jr. 

Francis L. Kenney, Jr. 
tTHOMAS James Kenney 

Thomas Henry Kerlin 

Louis Behr Kravetz 

tJoHN Bernard Lotz, Jr. 



Philip Lee Lotz 
•f Edwin William Lowe 

Francis Xavier McCormick 
♦Joseph Rieman McIntosh 

Daniel Miller 

Walter Charles Mylander, Jr. 

Zadoc Townsend Parks, Jr. 

Robert Carey Reeder, Jr. 

JOHN Henry Ritz 

George Griffin Rudolph 

tJOHN LOWRY SaNFORD, JR. 

Ernest Allen Schilpp 
Robert Lee Smith 
Stewart Lee Smith 
David Samuel Sykes 
Gerald Edward Topper 
David Titus Woodward Vauthier 
Frank Charles Wachter 
tWiLLiAM Ernest Wellmann, Jr. 
Thomas Hammond Welsh, Jr. 
Robert E. Wigginton 
tEDMUND Farley Yocum 



Certificate of Proficiency 
Thomas Hunt Mayfield, Jr. Columbus Knight Oakley 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
Doctor of Medicine 



Milton Harris Adelman 
John Warren Albrittain 
Edward James Alessi 
Miguel Alonso 
George Alfert 



John Bascom Anderson 
Melvin Rauch Aungst 
Henry Eugene Barnes, Jr. 
Dominic Thomas Battaglia 
Dan George Bierer 



•Degrees conferred September, 1984, 



tWitb honor. 

♦Degree conferred September, 1934. 



308 



309 



Charles Aloysius Bock 
George Hector Brouillet 
James Pbttigrew Bunn, Jr. 
William Adrian Cassidy 
Ernest Ivon Cornbrooks, Jr. 
Edward Francis Cotter 
Frank Henry Cutler 
Francis George Dickey 
Earl Henry Diehl 
Douglas Rude Dodge 
Alexander Andrew Doerner 
Kobert Lionel DuBois 
WiLUAM -Charles Dunnigan 
Samuel Edward Einhorn 
August Ludwig Ewald, Jr. 
Ferdinand Fader 
Irving Freeman 
Robert Pearson Fruchtbaum 
Philip Jacob Galitz 
Walter Henry Gerwig, Jr. 
John Randolph Godbey 
WiLUAM Howard Grenzer 
Joseph Bernard Gross 
Gerard Paul Hammill 
John Carl Hamrick 
Aaron Harris 
Ira Franklin Hartman 
Jeannette Rosaline Eisen- 

brandt Heghinian 
William Goldsborough Helfrich 
James Kennedy Herald 
Lewis Charles Herrold 
Arthur Hollander 
John Henry Hugo 
JosLVH Arnold Hunt 
William Pritchard Jordan 
Aaron Louis Kaminsky 
Harry Francts Kane 
Michael Lawrence Keller 
Harold Henry Klein 
Irving Klompus 
Frederick Edwin Knowles, Jr. 
Frank Armento Laino 
Edwin Charles Lane 
Caleb Rodney Layton 



Archie Clifton Lewis 
Walter Lichtbnberg 
Saul Lieb 

Louis Grandin Llewelyn 
Donald Clay MacLaughlin 
Charles Bernard Marek 
Howard Brooks Mays 
Oscar Tracy McDonough, Jr. 
Alpine Watson McGregor 
Lorenzo Watson McGregor 
DeArmond John MoHenry 
Karl FiEiEDERicK Mech 
Lawrence Hoy Mills 
Bruce Montgomery 
Milton Alexander Noon, Jr. 
Philip Owen 
Anthony James Pepe 
William Raffel 
Charles Henry Reier 
David P. Roberts 
Harry Maximilun Robinson, Jr. 
Milton Irving Robinson 
Frank Tipton Rogers 
Israel Rosen 
Sol Rosen 

Harold William Rosenberg 
* Nathan Rudo 
John Carroll Russell 
Milton Schlachman 
George Fredrick Schmitt, Jr. 
Paul Schonfeld 
Joseph Shapiro 
Sydney Harold Shapiro 
John Melvin Shaul 
Milton Siscovick 
Leo Brown Skeen 
Vernon Edward Spitznagle 
Benjamin Maxwell Stein 
Louis Teitel 

Harry Allen Teitelbaum 
Joseph Joel Tuby 
Luther Franklin Vozel 
Julius Meyer Waghelstein 
John MoCullen Warren 
James Block Wheless 



1 



Jesse Frank Williams, Jr. 
CHARLES Vernon Williamson 
Norman James Wilson 



Alvin Eugene Willl\m Wode 

EVERET HARDENBERGH WOOD 

Lewis Klair Woodward, Jr. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Graduate in Nursing 



THELMA Alice Barden 
Sara Kathryn Bowman 
Yolande Wellington Chaney 
Helen Chelluk 
Mabel Jackson Coley 
Alice Vera Elchenko 
Ethel Irene Evans 
Thelma Gwaltney 
Elsie Avlona Hamilton 
Beatrice Edison Hoddinott 
Ann Frances Hoke 
Marguerite Louise Kurtz 
Helen Marie Miller 
Rita Virginia Miller 



Elizabeth Lewis Nunnelee 
Mary Potter 
Ruth R. Price 
Dorothy Anne Rencher 
Mary Garnet Richards 
Mabel Pearl Roth 
Ruth Mildred Roush 
June Rullman 
Marie Hopfield Shimp 
Emma Virginia Thompson 
Claudia Maxine Wheeler 
Doris Virginia Whitehurst 
Lillian Louise Wilson 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Graduate in Pharmacy 



* Bernard Carlton Cohen 
James Holly Drennen 
Hannah Euzent 
Julius Walter Feret 
Abraham Leonard Glass 

Jerome Honkofsky 
*Isadore Horwitz 

Benjamin Leibowitz 

Israel Levin 



♦William Randolph Lumpkin 

Sister Mary Adamar Mess 

Salvatore Molinari 

Harry Pressman 

Sister Mary Theodosia Pruner 

Harold Steel 

Morris Walman 
* Michael James Ward 



Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 



Louis Blitz 

Bernard Carlton Cohen 
*Leo Michael Czekaj 
Louis Eugene Daily 
Isaac Frohman 
SiGMUND Goldberg 
William George Healey, Jr. 
Isadore Kaplan 



iRviN Bernard Kemick 
Catharine Evans Kirk 
Mary Anna Mandrow 
Harriett Ruth Noel 
Samuel Novey 

Alexander John Ogrinz, Jr. 
Isidore Earl Pass 
Harry Prostic 



♦Degree conferred September, 1934. 



810 



♦Degree conferred September. 1934. 



311 



^ 



Elton Resnick 

Sidney Safran 

Jacob Edward Schmidt 



Meyer Robert Shear 
Dorothy Stain 
Albert Steiner 



HONORS. MEDALS. AND PRIZES. 1934-1935 
Elected Members of Phi Kappa Phi. Honorary Fraternity 



Edward Shwell Barber 
Arthur Donald Bowers 
Evelyn Rose Brumbaugh 
James Alan Campbell 
Bertie Louise Caruthers 
Harvey Jackson Cheston, Jr 
Henry M. Chick 
Eleanor Fawcett Cissel 
Charles Hornberger Clark 
Laurel Marion DeMeritt 
Louise Ella Mae Penton 
Charles Gardner Grosh 
Lenna Louisa Gross 
Jean Grace Hamilton 
William Alexander Harmon 
Henry George Harns 

Elected Members of Sigma 
Lyle Thomas Alexander 
William Henry Anderson 
Myron Herbert Berry 
Arthur Donald Bowers 
Raymond Anderson Fisher 
Samuel Willlvm Goldstein 
Frederick Vahlcamp Grau 
Elmer William Greve 
Marcus Rankin Hatfield 
John Richard King 
David Victor Lumsden 



HiLLMAN CORNELIOUS HARRIS 

Truman A. Hobbs 
Gaza K. Horvath 
Felice Edith Jacob 
Robert Jacobsen 
John Richard King 
Richard Francis Lane 
L. Lavan Manchey 
Richard Davis Mumford 
Robert Arthur Peck 
Edward Preston Rahe 
Samuel Rochberg 
Hazel Mae Speicher 
Mary Leslie Stallings 
Charles David Wantz 
Edgar Perkins Walls 

Xi, Honorary Scientific Fraternity 
L. Lavan Manchey 
Earle Dwight Matthews 
Emma Janet McDonald 
OLE Anker Nelson 
John Jenkins Parks 
Sterl Amos Shrader 
Fletcher Pearre Veitch, Jr. 
Edgar Perkins Walls 
Joseph Clark White 
Mark Winton Woods 



Citizenship Medal, offered by Mr. H. C. Byrd. Class of 1908 

Warren Edward TYdings 

Citizenship Prize, oflFered by Mrs. Albert F. Woods 
Elizabeth Virginia Ijams 

Athletic Medal, offered by the Class of 1908 

John Willlvm Guckeyson 
312 



Maryland Ring, offered by Charles L. Linhardt 
Albert Walter Webb 

Goddard Medal, offered by Mrs. Annie K. Goddard James 

Andrew Bennie Beveridge 

Sigma Phi Sigma Freshman Medal 

Norbert Frankenberger 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal 
Bernice Grodjesk 

Medal and Junior Membership, offered by the American Institute of Chemists 

Hillman Cornelious Harris 

Dinah Herman Memorial Medal, offered by Benjamin Berman 

William Augustus MoCool 

Mortar Board Cup 

Jean Grace Hamilton 

Awards in Recognition of the Greatest Contribution to Women's 

Organizations 
Mary Leslie Stallings Mary Alice Worthen 

Phi Delta Epsilon Journalistic Fraternity Awards 

Joseph Marshall Mathias Walter George Lohr 

Herbert Monroe Allison 

The Diamondback Medals 

Marion Elizabeth Parker Wilson Francis Dawson 

George Leslie Crossley Paul Routzahn Poffenbeirger 

Lea Kathryn Engel Walter Noble Talkes 



Betty Claire Quirk 



The Terrapin Medals 

George David Garber 



The Old Line Medals 

Mary Leslie Stallings Robert Grant Litschert 

James Gardner Brooks Frank Patrick Duggan 

Governor's Drill Cup 
Company B, Commanded by Captain Talbert Aloysius Smith 

313 



m 



r<*nr.„ T MUitary Faculty Award 

CAI,.X LieCXKNA.X COLONBX J.UAK FAXKPAX Wa.^, Jk. 

CAO.. M.,oH THOM.S ^:^'cZT'ZTm . 

Military Medal, offered by the Class of 1899 

Cadet Welch Smith 
Washington Chapter Alumni Military Cup 

■ CAlSTxK^Ji^r''' ^"'""^'^^ G' COMMANDED BY 
CADET FIRST LIEUTENANT PeLHAM AU,EN WaJtON 

University of Maryland Prize (Saber), to the Best Comn. r 

CADET CAPTAIN TAI.EKT Al^VS^US Sr^' """''"^' 

The Scabbard and Blade Sabpr f^ r 
CADET NICHOI^ Sn rAGNm """^ "^"""^ ^«^™ 

r*n™ T ®"'*^ Medals (Military Band> 

Cadet John Gibson Wilson Ja 

Cadet Price Godman Piquett ^^'' ^^*^d Everett Savage 



CAnP. ^ ^''"'"' ^'"P**"'*" Gold Medals 

Cadet Corporal Houlder HuDcmq /-.„ , 

Cadet Robert Otto Hammerlund T" "'''^ "^"^^ Chappei^, 

Cadet Herman Willum Beb- 

GER, Jr. 

Cadet Richard Crandall Breaden 



Jr. 

Cadet Max David Zankel 
Cadet Philip Brooks Franck 
Cadet Charles Harvey Cooke 



Inter-Collegiate Third Corps Area Silver Medal 
Cadet Robert Lee Mattingly 

Inter-Collegiate Third Corps Area Rifle Bronze Medal 

CADET Sergeant William Randolph Schneider 

Military Department Gold Medal, University of Maryland Rifle Team 

Cadet Corporal Raymond Davis, Jr. 

314 



Military Department Gold Medal, University of Maryland Freshman 

Rifle Team 

Cadet Robert Lee Mattingly 

WAR DEPARTMENT AWARDS OF COMMISSIONS AS 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 



The Infantry 

Charles Robert Boucher 
Harold Joseph Burns 
Ray Francis Chapman 
Tracy Carlisle Coleman 
Thomas Parker Corwin 
Joseph Vincent Crecca 
Guy Graham Dennis 
Frank Patrick Duggan 
Thaddeus Ronsaville Dulin 
Robert Anthony Dunnigan 
Julius Goldman 
Raymond Jensen Goodhart 
Charles Gardner Grosh 
William Alexander Harmon 
Charles Herbert Ludwig 



Reserve Corps 

Frederick Stewart McCaw 
Philip Lawrence Mossburg, Jr. 
Richard Hare Nelson 
Joseph Henry Pyles 
Albert William Rosenberger 
John Alvin Ruehle 
Ralph Windsor Ruffner 
Talbert Aloysius Smith 
Walter Noble Talkes 
Peter John Valaer, hi 
Julian Fairfax Walters, Jr. 
Pelham Alden Walton 
Charles David Wantz 
John Wesley Webster 
Earl G. Widmyer 



The National Guard of the United States 
Robert Harris Archer, Jr. Ralph Conrad Fisher 

HONORABLE MENTION 

College of Agriculture 

First Honors — Charles Hornberger Ciark, Henry George Harns, Tru- 
man A. HOBBS, Donald F. Ashton. 

Second Honors — Marvin Luther Speck, Fred Challis Downey, Warren 

William Hastings, Hutton Davison Slade. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

First Honors — Evelyn Rose Brumbaugh, Robert Arthur Peck, Harvey 

Jackson Cheston, Jr., Grace Lois Nelson, Hillman 
CoRNELious Harris, Gaza K. Horvath, Mary Leslie 
Stalungs, Samuel Rochberg, Richard Davis Mum- 
ford, Charles David Wantz, Peter John Valaer, hi, 
Bernard 0. Thomas, Jr. 

Second Honors — Kathleen Renton Hannigan, Amos I. Meyers, Lea 

Kathryn Engel, Joseph Vincent Crecca, James 
Frank Lane, Jr., Donald Edwin Peck, Joseph Mar- 
shall Mathias, Herbert H. Rosenbaum, Max Lipsitz, 
Richard Waller Cooper, Frances Anita Schrott. 

315 



I 



I 



• 



College of Education 

First Honors-JEAN Grace Hamilton, Laurel Marion DeMeritt 

Second Honors-MA^^ RUSSELL Dtn^ALL, Jean Euth Ashmun, Mar^ 

Garvey, Helen Frances Klingsohr, Margaret Hack 
ETT Gibson. "ack- 

College of Engineering 

First Honors-EDWARD Sewell Barber, Richard Francis Lane 

Chari^ Gardner Grosh, William Alexander HaT-' 
MON, James Alan Campbell, Henry M. Chick. 

Second Honors-EDWARD Preston Rahe, John Michael Gangler Con 

STANTINE LOZUPONE, EDWARD KaMINSKI, JoHN M. Kem- 

*ek, Jr. 

College of Home Economics 

First Honors-HA^m.jAE Speicher, Lenna Louisa Gross, Felice Edith 

Second Honors-HELEN Elise Wollman. Bertie Louise Cakuthers. 

School of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship 
Eugene Ashton Goldberg 

Certificates of Honor 
William Benjamin Costonbader Hansel Hedrick Snider 
Kenneth David Eye s. Edmund Hoehn 

John William Gourley 



Course, 



School of Law 

Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire 

Day School, 
TiioMAs West Claggett, Jr. 

Prize of $100.00 for the Highest Average Grade for the Entire Course 

Evening School, ' 

Edwin William Lowe 

Alumni Prize of $50.00 for Best Argument in Honor Case in 

the Practice Court, 
Thomas Hughlett Henry, Jr. 

316 



George 0. Blome Prizes to Representatives on Honor Case in 

the Practice Court, 

Joseph Gregory Finnerty Francis Xavier McCormick 

Thomas Hughlett Henry, Jr. Stewart Lee Smith 

School of Medicine 

University Prize — Gold Medal 
George Fredrick Schmitt, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 
Waltek Lichtenberg Norman James Wilson 

EWDARD FRANaS COTTEE JOHN WARREN ALBRITTAIN 

Douglas Rude Dodge 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the Best Work in 
Genito-Urinary Surgery During the Senior Year, 

Edward Francis Cotter 

School of Ntirsing 

The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship Given by the University of Maryland 

Nurses' Alumnae Association, to Pursue a Course in Administration, 

Supervisory, or Public Health Work at Teachers College, Columbia 

University, to the Student Having the Highest Record 

in Scholarship, 

Alice Vera Elchenko 

The Elizabeth Collms Lee Prize of $50.00 to the Student Having the Second 

Highest Average in Scholarship, 

Rita Virginia Miller 

The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize of $25.00 for the Highest Average in 

Executive Ability, 

Ann Frances Hoke 

The Edwin and Leander M. Zimmerman Prize of $50.00 for Practical 
Nursing and for Displaying the Greatest Interest and 

Sympathy for the Patients, 

Ann Frances Hoke 

The University of Maryland Nurses* Alumnae Association Pin, and 
Membership in the Association, for Practical Nursing and 

Executive Ability, 
Ethel Irene Evans 

School of Pharmacy 

Certificate of Honor 
Sister Mary Theodosia Pruner 

317 



I 



REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION, R. O. T. C. Unit, 1935-1936 

FRANCIS b^H8iMAKERr.«t?''"^5'^ Adjutant 

LEONARD SMITH™tS Re|SeAt5f StTff n 7"^^^^"^ ^^^ ^^^^^" ^mer 

JAMES F. ZIMMERMAN, Captain, Regimental St^ Officer 

FIRST BATTALION 

HARRY^P^r^^^'t^*^'^^- Commanding 

ROBERT WTOOmIq' ilS^^.H^?' Second-in-Command 
xvui5if.Ki w. THOMAS. First Lieutenant, Adjutant 



COMPANY "A" 



Edward M. Minion. 
Ckimmanding 



Bennard F. Bruns 
J. Hope Morgan 
Jack W. Phillips 
J. Brady Smith 



COMPANY "B" 

Captains 

Howard F. Allard, 
Commanding 

First Lieutenants 

Rajrmond F. Bartelmes 
Arthur R. Buddington 
Austin J. Hall 
William A. Hart 

SECOND BATTALION 



COMPANY "C" 



Edward H. D. Gibbs. 
Commanding 



Corbin C. Cogswell 
Sidney P. McFerrin 
Joseph W. Sisson 



COMPANY "D" 

James F. Hart, Jr. 
Commanding 



Charles L. Callahan 
John F. Christhilf 
George E. Gilbert 
Milo W. Sonen 



H^mS ?• ^?^S5SJF^A M»^<"-. Commanding 



COMPANY "E" 

Captains 

George C. Hart, 
Commanding 

First Lieatenants 

George E. Harrington 
William A. Pates 
Hugh H. Saum 

THIRD BATTALION 



COMPANY ••F'* 



Robert M. Slye, 
Commandinjr 



William N. Garrott 
Paul L. King 
William R. Schneider 
Ellis P. Root 



Mv?^!??- J^?^^^' Major. Commanding 

AETO^E^^-R^BrnTT''?- IT^'^I' Se?ond.in-Command 
A1.XUJN t,. KABBITT, First Lieutenant, Adjutant 



COMPANY "G" 



Alton L. Sanford, 
Commanding 



William R. Beall 
Lewis T. Gibbs 



COMPANY "H" 

Captains 

Albert W. Webb, 
Commanding 

First Lieutenants 

Theodore H. Erbe 
William R. Evans 
Louis F. Flagg 
Kenneth R. Mason 



COMPANY "I" 



Ernest R. Eaton 
Commanding 



Louis Park 
George H. Sachs 
Henry C. Strobel 



COMPANY "A" 



NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 

FIRST BATTALION 
COMPANY "B" 



Martin L. Brotemarkle 



Charles H. Beebe 
Herman W. Berger, Jr. 



Warren L. Bonnett 
John E. Boothe 
John S. Shinn 



COMPANY "D" 



Charles F. El linger 



Elmer A. Hennig 
Louis R. Hueper 



Wayne P. Ellis 
Charles W. Felton 
J. Wilmer Price, Jr. 



COMPANY "G* 



Houlder Hudgins 



Paul E, Pfeiffer 
Clarence T. Thomason 



George B. Kelly 
Robert J. McLeod 
Eugene F. Mueller 



First Sergeants 
Charles H. Cooke 

Platoon Sergeants 

Francis M. Bower 
Philip Firmin 

Sergeant Guides 

Marriott W. Bredekamp 
Willson C. Clark 
Irving Mendelsohn 

SECOND BATTALION 

COMPANY "E" 
First Sergeants 
John J. Gormley 

Platoon Sergeants 

Richard M. Hunt 
Justin D. Paddleford 

Sergeant Guides 

Edward J. Fletcher 
R. Bernard Graeves 
Albert P. Backhaus 

THIRD BATTALION 

COMPANY "H" 

First Sergeants 
Julius W. Ireland 

Platoon Sergeants 

Clay M. Webb 
Aaron W. Welch 

Sergeaint Guides 

Jesse D. Patterson 
Karlton W. Pierce 
Charles E. Morgan 

BAND 

A. E. SAVAGE, First Sergeant 



COMPANY **a 



Herman P. Dial 



Charles S. Furtney 
Thomas D. Harryman 



Raymond Davis, Jr. 
Harry A. Dosch 
Norman L. Hobbs 



COMPANY "P" 



John G. Hart 



Norman P. Patterson 
Alfred B. Fettit 



Robert O. Hammerlund 
Carlisle H. Humelsine 
Joseph S. Lann 



COMPANY 'T' 



Harold L. Kelly, Jr. 



Samuel G. Wood 
Max D. Zankel 



Walter K. Scott 

Maurice B. Sinsheimer, Jr. 



I 



p 



CADET BAND 

^^'^y'B^^''^t^^rB%{^.t:'y,^&,^^'^. Sjebeneichen. Retired, fonner.y with the 

318 



819 



Register of Students, 1935-1936 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SENIOR 

Allard, Howard F., Clarendon, Va. 
Armiger, Walter H., Beltsville 
Bailey, John W., Aberdeen 
Bartlett, Fitz J.. Mt. Rainier 
Boarman, William F., Hyattsville 
Buddinsrton, Arthur R., College Park 
Buscher, Bernard E., Washington, D. C. 
Byrd, Harry C, Jr., College Park 
Carter, Edward P., Washington, D. C. 
Cissel, Chester M., Ellicott City 
Clark, Harry W.. Forest Hill 
Croft, Charles C., Washington, D. C. 
DeVolt, Harold M., Bameveld, N. Y. 
Biker. Walter M., Washington, D. C. 
Fales, John H., Silver Spring 
Garrott, William N., Knoxville 
Greenwood, Grace-Louise, Brentwood 
Hamilton, Wayne B., Oakland 
Harrington, George E., Washington, D. C. 
Henderson, William H., Woodbine 
Hoehall, Thomas J., Parkton 
Huntington, Elizabeth L., Upper Darby, 

Pa. 
Imphong, Paul H., Hancock 

JUNIOR 

Bourke, Anne R., Washington, D. C. 
Bowers, Lloyd C, Oakland 
Butler, Henry E., Worton 
Cowgill, William H., Hyattsville 
Crump, Robert, Froetburg 
Daly, Edmond T., New Brighton, N. Y. 
Dawson, Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Fletcher, Edward J., Washington, D. C. 
Gormley, John J., Chevy Chase 
Grodjesk, Bernice, Jersey City, N. J. 
Guckeyson, John W., Chevy Chase 
Hill, Rodney T., Laurel 
Hobbs, Lewis F., Jr., Silver Spring 
James, William S., Hancock 
Keller, Charles E., Middletown 
Kirshbaum, Amiel, Washington, D. C. 
Leighty, Raymond V., Clarendon, Va. 
McFadden, Burton M., Hagerstown 
Mendelsohn, Irving P., Washington, D. C. 



CLASS 

King, Addison W., Baltimore 
Lovell, John C, New Windsor 
Maccubbin, H. Pearce, Baltimore 
Mayer, Elmer L., Washington, D. C. 
Mehring, Amon L., Hyattsville 
Miller, Oscar J., Clarksburg 
Mullinix, Paul E., Woodbine 
Felczar, Michael J., Jr., Stemmers Run 
Puncochar, Joseph F., Curtis Bay 
Babbitt, Alton E., College Heights 
Radebaugh, Garnett D., Forest Hill 
Ramsburg, Herman F., Frederick 
Sisson, Joseph W., Jr., Washingrton, D. C. 
Sockrider, Elsie M., Washington, D. C. 
Stevens, C. Grayson, New Market 
Terbush, Theron L., Alma, Okla. 
Thorne, Clayton T., Silver Spring 
Toole, Elizabeth L., Lanham 
Vawter, James H., Laurel 
Warfield. William C, College Park 
Weber, J. Logan, Oakland 
Willis, Victor, Elkton 
Wolk, Jack, Washington, D. C. 



CLASS 

Nellis, David C, Takoma Park 
Nezbed, Robert L., Baltimore 
Nolte, William A., Washington, D. C. 
O'Hanlon, Ardle P., Washington, D. C. 
Oswald, Elizabeth J., Chevy Chase 
Pettit, Alfred B., Takoma Park 
Rodier, John M., Lanham 
Schulz, Ray, Washington, D. C. 
Shegogue, Edward R., Landover 
Sippel. William L., Baltimore 
Stevenson, Elmer C, Takoma Park 
Stoddard, David L., Hyattsville 
Thomas, Virginia E., Newark, Del. 
Wagaman, Kenneth R., Sabillasvillc 
Watkins, Dayton O., Baltimore 
Webb, Clay M., Vienna 
Welch, Aaron W., Galena 
White, Horace R., Annapolis 



Downey, Charles L., WiUiamsport 
Farrington, Edith, Chevy Chase 
Fisher, Elwood G., Washington, D. C. 
Gibbs. William E.. Hyattsville 
Gilbertson, Warren H.. Bladensburg 
Goldsmith. John S.. Allen 
Gottwals, Abram Z., Goldsboro 
Guill. John H., Takoma Park 
Gupton, Ewing L., Berwyn 
Henkin, Allen E., Washington, D. C. 
Johnson, Daniel B., Beltsville 
Johnston. Frederick A.. Takoma Park 
Kuhn, Albin O., Woodbine 
Lewis, Glenn W., Lantz 
Lung. Ernest H., Smithsburg 
Marche, William T., Hyattsville 
McBride, Dorothy M., Elkridge 
Miller. George P., Clinton 
Piquett. Price G., Catonsville 



Price, J. Wilmer. Jr., Catonsville 
Ravenburg, Ralph R., Edgewater 
Remsen, Peter, Takoma Park 
Schmidt, Edward H., Jr.. Seat Pleasant 
Schutz, J. Logan. Washington, D. C. 
Seabold, George W., Jr., Glyndon 
Shaffer, Charles H., Jr.. Washington. D. C. 
Shepherd, Edward O., Bristol 
Sisler, Fred D., Washington, D. C. 
Skinner, Calvin L., Sudlersville 
Snyder, Fannye D., Annapolis 
Steiner, Wilmer W.. Washington. D. C. 
Stevenson. Frank V.. Takoma Park 
Thornton. Eugene. Jr.. Chestertown 
Wall. Dorothy S.. Catonsville 
Williams, Donald H.. Washington. D. C. 
Yeager. S. Anita. Baltimore 
Young. George A.. College Park 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Bishop, James W., Laurel, Del. 
Boekhoff, Claire L., Chevy Chase 
Bowie, Oden, Mitchellville 
Buchholz, James H., Catonsville 
Caplan, Raphael F., Freeland 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Carter, Henry H., Rockville 
Carver, Ann E., Perryville 
Connelly, John V., Riverdale 
Converse, Henry T., Jr., Beltsville 
DeCecco, James N., Vienna 



Adler. Bernice, Newark, N. J. 

Astle, Charles C. Rising Sun 

Baker, Alva S., Baltimore 

Berkowitz, Melvin, Washington, D. C. 

Biskin. Shirley L.. Takoma Park 

Brinckerhoff. Mary L.. Chevy Chase 

Brownell. James F., Takoma Park, D. C. 

Browning, Frank M. W., Lanham 

Cohen, Charlotte F., E. Orange. N. J. 

Crane, Julian C. College Park 

Davis, Virginia E.. Washington, D. C. 

Dean, William H.. Newark, Del. 

Eck. Clarence A.. Raspeburg 

Egan, John J., Waterbury. Conn. 

Freedman. Irving J.. S. Norwalk. Conn. 

Fugitt. Donald T.. Washington. D. C— Unc. 

Galbreath. Paul M.. Street 

Gatch, Benton R.. Raspeburg 

Gianoly. Louis W.. Lanham 

Gordon, Thomas W., Baltimore 

Gude, John J.. Hyattsville 

Halla, Walter R., Indian Head 

Hauver, Roland T., Myersville 

Hayman. Linwood G.. Kingston 

Hess, Kenneth S.. Washington. D. C. 

Heubeck. Elmer, Jr.. Catonsville 

Kite, Norbome A.. Port Deposit 

Homewood. Jeanne C. Havre de Grace 

Hopper, Guy S., Brentwood 

Hopping, Catherine E.. Washington. D. C. 

Hughes. Frank W., Washington, D. C. 

Jacques, Denton R.. Smithsburg 

James. Lynwood B.. Jr.. Chevy Chase— Unc. 

Jarrell, William E., Ridgely 

Johnson, Edwin R., Germantown 



Jones, Griffiith D., Woodbine 

Kilby, Wilson M.. Conowingo 

Kluge, Gordon L., Washington, D. C. 

Martin, Clifton O., Rockville 

McFarland. Frank R.. Jr.. Cumberland 

Melman. Harold. Crestview 

Michlovitz. Louis E.. Baltimore 

Miller, Lee A.. Hyattsville 

Miller. Thomas E.. Washington. D. C. 

Nutter. Charles W.. Washington. D. C. 

Oakley. Ned H.. Washington, D. C. 

Peaslee. Joseph K., Washington, D. C 

Phelps, Richard N., McDonogh 

Potter. Lloyd A.. Bethesda 

Punnett, Ruth S.. Leonia, N. J. 

Remsberg. George C. Jr., Middletown 

Rinehart. John W.. Relay 

Ruble, Kyle, Poolesville 

Schmier. Charles N., Woodlawn 

Shaw, Clay W., Stewartstown, Pa. 

Sutton, Richard S.. Kennedyville 

Sweeney, Edward K., Brentwood 

Talcott, Ellen E.. Washington. D. C. 

Tarbett. Lewis N.. Takoma Park 

Wallace. John A., Bethesda 

Ward. Stephenson A.. Havre de Grace 

Willingham. Patricia M.. University Park 

Wilmeth. Edward L.. Takoma Park— Unc. 

Winkler, Fred B., Chevy Chase 

Witt, Detlef J.. Anacostia, D. C. 

Wood. Edgar W.. Washington, D. C. 

Wright, Arthur E., Washington, D. C. 

Yates, William B., Cambridge 

Young. James G., Baltimore 

Zipkin. Norman N.. Capitol Heights 



320 



321 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 

Anthony, James T., Chestertown Katsura, Saburo, Washington, D. C. 

Drennan, Mary F., Washington, D. C. Mills, Elizabeth B., Washington, D. C. 

Frazer, Mary W., Washington, D. C. Ortenzio, Louis F., College Park 
Hughes. George B., Ammendale 



Anderson, Helen H., Beltsville 
Attick, Arabelle L., Berwyn 
Cockerill, Albert A., Purcellville, Va, 
Davidson, James, Jr., Bowie 
Dryden, James H„ Newark 
Fogle, Frank W., Union Bridge 



WINTER SCHOOL 

Garner, Racheal H., Westminster 
Huff, James E., Jr., Street 
King, Ben A., Gambrills 
Morgan, Hillen J.. Welcome 
Schwab, William I., Rockville 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



SENIOR CLASS 



Allen, Dorothy V., Washington, D. C. 
Ambrose, H. Duvall, Baltimore 
Baldwin, David H., Washington, D. C. 
Barnsley, June, Rockville 
Beacham, Eklmund G., Baltimore 
Bogley, Samuel E., Friendship Heights 
Bowie, William B., Bennings, D. C. 
Brill, J. Herbert, Baltimore 
Brooks, Lester, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buckingham, William C, Washington, 

D. C. 
Burroughs, Reginald, Upper Marlboro 
Callahan, Charles L., Baltimore 
Cave, Edward F., Washington, D. C. 
Chapin. Mildred F., Chevy Chase 
Cogswell, Charles L., Washington, D. C. 
Cogswell, Corbin C, Jr., Pikesville 
Cummings, Bernard A., Chevy Chase 
Dantzig, George B., Hyattsville 
Davidson, Mildred, Chevy Chase 
Donovan, Dorothy C, Washington, D. C. 
Duggan, Frank P., Baltimore 
Eaton, Ernest R., Washington, D. C. 
Edmondson, Charles E., Cambridge 
Ellis, Wayne P.. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Ennis, Louis A., Long Branch, N. J. 
Erbe, Theodore H., Baltimore 
Evans, Ralph I., Washington, D. C. 
Farson, John H., Showell 
Fisher, Ethel A., Upper Marlboro 
Forman, Sylvan E., Baltimore 
Fowler, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Friedman, Harold B., Silver Spring 
Gammon, Nathan, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Golden, Lex B., Washington, D. C. 
Goodhart, Raymond J., Washington, D. C. 
Graham, William J., Washington, D. C. 
Greenfield, Ray H.. Takoma Park 
Grinstead, Marjorie R., Washington, D. C. 
Handler, Isidor, Kingston, N. Y. 



Hart, George C, Baltimore 

Hart, James F., Jr., Baltimore 

Haskin, Frederic J., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Hathaway, Caleb R., Chevy Chase 

Helfgott, Jack L., Mitchelville 

Hyatt, Herbert S., Damascus 

Jones, William R., Ridgely 

Kesler, Katherine E., Silver Spring 

Kohn, Schuyler G., Baltimore 

Kozloski, Henry R., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Langley, Theodore C, Washingrton, D. C. 

Leishear, Samuel A., Washington, D. C. 

Litschert, Robert G., Hyattsville 

Love, Solomon, Washington, D. C. 

Lung, Homer D., Smithsburg 

Lutes, Lawrence V., Silver Spring 

Lynn, Harry J., Washington, D. C. 

Maddox, H. Louise, Hyattsville 

Marche, Louise C, Hyattsville 

Mason, Kenneth R., Newark 

Maurer, Richard H., Washington, D. C. 

McAboy, Lyman R., Washington, D. C. 

McFerrin, Sidney P., Baltimore 

Mclntire, Mary L., Oakland 

Meloy, Samuel W., Washington, D. C. 

Miles, Dorothy H., Washington, D. C. 

Miller, David, Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Jean, Berwyn 

Miller, Rebecca C, Berwyn 

Minion, Edward M., Newark, N. J. 

Moreland, Miriam L., Washington, D. C. 

Morgan, J. Hope, Welcome 

Murray, Guy E., Washington, D. C. 

Nevius, Wilford E., College Park 

Norment, Nancy L., Hagerstown 

Gland, Charles D., Olney 

Padgett, E. Anne, Baltimore 

Parker, Marion E., Washington, D. C. 

Powell, Frances K., Brookeville 

Quirk, Anna-Marie L., Washington, D. C. 



Quirk. Betty C. Washington. D. C. 
Reich. Morris H.. Astoria, L. I.. N. Y. 
Reicher. Sol M.. Baltimore 
Reid Robert T., Baltimore 
Ritcher. Christian F.. Jr.. Overlea 
Rintoul. James L.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Robertson. Thomas E.. Washington. D. C. 
Rothschild. Carl. Chefoo, China 
Ruben, Mortimer. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Sacks. Jerome G., Baltimore 
Sanford. Alton L.. Chevy Chase 
Saum. Hugh H.. Lanham 
Schaffer. George H.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Scheele. Thomas F.. Washington. D. C. 
Schneider. William R.. EUicott City 
Sieling. Frederick W.. Annapolis Junction 
Simon. Ruth. Washington. D. C. 
Small. Milton. Hempstead. N. Y. 
Smith. J. Brady, Baltimore 
Smith. Leonard, Washington, D. C. 
Soltanoff. Walter. Montclair. N. J. 



Spencer. Harman L., Washington, D. C. 

Stanton. William A.. Hyattsville 

Stark, Elwood V.. Aberdeen 

Sweeney. Thomas R.. Washington. D. C. 

Thomas, Robert W.. Silver Spring 

Tucker, Lester W.. Abingdon 

Velenovsky. Joseph J., Baltimore 

Voris. J. Calvin. Laurel 

Waller. William F.. Silver Spring 
Wasserman, Sidney. Baltimore 
Webb. Albert W., Vienna 
Whiteford, Charles G.. Baltimore 
Wiederlight, Seymour, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Willard. Daniel D.. Cumberland 
Willey, Edward J.. Washington. D. C^ 
Williams. William W.. Washington. D. C. 
Wilson. Meredith R., White Hall 
Wolfe, John K.. Washington. D. C. 
Yeager. Paul J.. Catonsville 
Young, Harold K.. Detour 
Yowell. Roy H.. Washington. D. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Araerman, Theodore M.. New York, N. Y. 

Amiss. Helen C. Chevy Chase 

Athey. Thomas B.. Severna Park 

Avery. John L.. Washington, D. C. 

Balch. Clyde W., Hyattsville 

Beebe. Charles H.. Washington. D. C. 

Bell, John W., Riverdale 

Bennett, Lucille K., Hyattsville 

Benson, Brian M.. Baltimore 

Herman, David P.. Hoboken. N. J. 

Billig. S. Deborah. Huntington, L. L, 

N. Y. 
Bittinger, Charles. Washington, D. l>. 
Bonnett, Warren L.. Aberdeen 
Boothe, John E., Washington. D. C. 
Bower. Francis M., Mt. Rainier 
Bradley, W. Brooks, Baltimore 
Bredekamp, Marriott W.. Washington. 

D. C. 

Brian, Walter P.. Ellicott City 
Brown, A. Freeborn, III. Havre de Grace 
Brueckner, Fred L.. College Park 
Campiglio, Robert G.. Milton. Pa. 
Capalbo. John L.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cayton, Marcelle I.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cole, Harold S., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Cooke, Charles H., Washington. D. C. 
Coster. William F.. Jr., Elmhurst. L. L. 

N. Y. 
Cowie, Jean A.. Perry Point 
Gulp. Charles H., Whiteford 
Cutler. Dorothy M.. Silver Spring 
Daniel. Daniel R.. Baltimore 
Dane. Edwin O.. Jr., Silver Spring 
Davis, L. Voncile, College Park 



Davis, Raymond. Jr.. Washington. D. C. 
Deskin, Mark. Riverdale 
Dittmar. Gordon F.. Baltimore 
Dolan. Loretta M.. Sparrows Point 
Dosch. Harry A.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Downin, John E.. Hyattsville 
Drake. H. Daniel. Jr.. Washington. D. C. 
Dresher. Edward, Hackensack. N. J. 
Edwards. William W.. Chevy Chase 
Ellinger. Charles F.. Baltimore 
Ellison. Max M.. Baltimore 
Evans. Dorothy E.. Takoma Park 
Everett. Genevieve. Pasadena 
Farr. Earl W.. Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Fischer, Isadore. Washington, D. C. 
Fosbroke. Gerald E.. Elkridge 

Fuller, Frances E.. Crisfield 

Gaczynski. Eugenia T.. Jersey City. N. J. 

Garber. George D.. Frederick 

Gengnagel, Rosella B.. Catonsville 

Getty, Gorman E.. Lonaconing 

Godwin, Donnie, Annapolis 

Goldberg. Harry. Baltimore 

Graeves. R. Bernard. Silver Spring 

Gray. Ralph. Chevy Chase 

Hammerlund. Robert O.. Washington. 

Hargy. Francis R.. College Park 
Hart. John G., Hagerstown 
Hebb. John S.. HI. Baltimore 
Hendrix. Nevins B., Port Deposit 
Hennig. Elmer A.. Washington. D. C. 
Hill, Florence R.. Laurel 
Hobbs. Norman L., Silver Spring 
Hobson, Barbara E.. Washington. D. C. 



I' 



323 



322 



Hoenes, Sophia W., Baltimore 

Hooton, Elizabeth L., Hyattsville 

Hughes, Robert L., Jr., Aberdeen 

Hunt, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 

Hutchinson, James E., Hyattsville 

Ireland, Alfred W., Baltimore 

Jacques, Lancelot, Jr., Smithsburg 

Jaffe, Vita R.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Jewell, Benjamin A., Grasonville 

Johns, Gladys V., Beltsville 

John, Malcolm L., Washington, D. C, 

Johnson, Pyke, Washington, D. C. 

Johnston, Doris H., Takoma Park 

Jones, Joseph F., Baltimore 

Jones, Marguerite E., Owings Mills 

Jordan, FYancis X., Washington, D. C. 

Kalis, Samuel D., Baltimore 

Kelly, George B., Washington, D. C. 

Kelly, John F., Towson 

Kemper, Betty J., Washington, D. C. 

Keplinger, Anna-Lura, Washington, D. C 

Klein, Alvin S., Frederick 

Krieg, Edward F., Baltimore 

Krulevitz, Keaciel, Baltimore 

Land, Robert H., Baltimore 

Lankford, Melvin C, Baltimore 

Lann. Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 

Laukaitis, Peter E., Waterbury, Conn. 

Leet, Harvey T., Chevy Chase 

Levy, Arthur I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewis, Mary W., Bethesda 

Lindner, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 

Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 

Lugar, Charles E., Hagerstown 

Lundell, Ernst D., Chevy Chase 

Maccubbin, Mary F., Laurel 

Martin, Clarence W., Baltimore 

Martinez Cortez, Josefina, Baltimore 

Matson, Ruby I., Takoma Park 

Matthews, William B., Worton 

May, John B., Ill, Washington, D. C. 

McCarthy, Joseph H., Washington, D. C 

Miller, Clark R., Spokane, Wash. 

Miller, Eunice, Berwyn 

Mitchell, William A., Baltimore 

Mobus, Paul F., Ellerslie 

Molofsky, Bernice, Baltimore 

Morgan, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 

Nedomatsky, Ivan E., Lansdowne 

Nordeen, Georgia A., Mt. Rainier 

Oliver, Elmer R., Washington, D. C. 

Osbom, James M., Washington, D. C. 

Paddleford, Justin D., Washington, D. C. 

Panoflf, Mortimer, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Park, Charles A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 



Patterson, Jesse D., Indian Head 
Phillips, William S., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Pierce, Karlton W., Washington, D. C. 
Polack, Samuel J., Hagerstown 
Pollack, Frank L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Posner, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Remington, Jesse A., Jr., Laurel 
Richmond, Marion B., Washington, D. C. 
Roby, Dorothy V., Riverdale 
Russell, Thomas E., Jr., Frederick 
Sallow, William H., Baltimore 
Schuh, Geraldine J., Chevy Chase 
Schvraxtz, Stanley E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Scott, Walter K., Landover 
Scrivener, David S., Washington, D. C. 
Seidenberg, Abraham, Washington, D. C. 
Sesso, George A., Washington. D. C. 
Silberg, Melvin S., Baltimore 
Sinsheimer, Maurice B., Jr., Washington, 

D. C. 
Sklar, Leo J., Far Rockaway, N. Y. 
Smith, F. Edward, Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Frank S., Pasadena 
Smith, Herbert L., Washington, D. C. 
S^merville, Ruth E., Cumberland 
Stambaugh, Kenneth A., Baltimore 
Sterling, Meta A., Crisfield 
Talbott, Priscilla M., Bristol 
Thomason, Clarence T., Washington, D. C. 
Thompson, Kathryn E., Daytona Beach, 

Fla. 
Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
Thurston, Eugene B., Floral Park, N. Y. 
Tuerk, C. Edward, Baltimore 
Turner, Phillip R., Takoma Park 
Venemann, Chester R., College Park 
Venemann, Virginia L., Riverdale 
Wahl, Carleton W., Silver Spring 
Waite, Merton T., Odenton 
Wasserman, Jerome, Baltimore 
Waters, Albert G., Washington, D. C. 
Watson, Stanley B., Brandywine 
Whalin, James T., Hyattsville 
White, George W., Baltimore 
Whitney, Mary F., Washington, D. C. 
Wilkins, Jesse L., Pocomoke City 
Wilson, Iris E., Takoma Park 
Wood. Samuel G., St. Michaels 
Wocd"ll, John H., Baltimore 
Zankel, Max D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Zebelean, John, Catonsville 
Zihlman, Frederick A., Washington, D. C. 
Zimmerman, Richard E., Frederick 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Ackerman, Julius E.. Washington D.C. 
Atkin, Maurice D., Washington. D. C. 
BrevsW. William D., Penns Grove. N. J. 
Baker, Herbert W., Edgemont 
Baker. Robert E., Washington. D. C. 
Barnett. Robert E., Washington. D. C. 
Baxley. Joshua W., Ellicott City 
r, v.«. Pari Jr., Baltimore 
ren^o; Charles L.. Jr.. Linthicum H^.hts 
Bernstein, Norman, Washington, DC 
Berry. James B.. Jr.. Bennings. D. C. 
Sn^l^am. Thomas J., Sparrows Point 
Bishop Eleanor. Bethesda 
Bitzing. Phyllis A.. Takoma Park 
Bowen, Joseph J.. Waterbury, Conn. 
Brice, Nancy T.. MiUbum. N. J. 
Brockman, E. Louise, Riverdale 
Brooks, Thomas R.. Hyattsville 
Brotman. Alfred, Baltimore 
Brown. Thomas C, Havre de Grace 
Browning. Warren. Lanham 
Burton, Robert J.. Cumberland 
Calladine, Virginia J.. Niagara Falls. N. Y. 
Campagnoli. Francis P.. Washington, D. C. 
Campbell. Robert van L.. Hagerstown 
Carleton. Harold B.. Washington. D. C. 
Cayton. William I.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Chrisler. Willard L., Washington, D. C.. 
Clapp, Helen E., Chevy Chase 
Clark. Fitzhugh, Chevy Chase 
Clark, Ralph E., Dundalk 
Clements. Samuel B., Washington. D. C. 
Cohen. Gertrude C. Passaic. N. J. 
Cohen, Maxwell L.. Washington, D. C. 
Collier. David L., Baltimore 
Conley, Virginia C, Baltimore 
Corridon, John R.. Washington. D. C. 
Crampton. William G„ Washington, D. C. 
Crastnopol, Philip. Newark, N. J. 
Creamer, Robert M.. Baltimore 
Gulp. Richard T., Chevy Chase 
Danforth, Dorothy M.. Baltimore 
Denney. Fred H., Bladensburg 
DeVilbiss. Preston S.. Jr., Walkersville 
Dolan. Patrick L.. Sparrows Point 
Donahoo. Harry C. Chester, Pa, 
Donohue. Mildred D., Baltimore 
Dow, Mary F.. College Park 
DuBrow, Rita, Newark, N. J. 
Duley. Oscar R.. Croome Station 
Edwards, John B., Washington, D. C. 
Epstein, Edwin. Centreville 
Ernest, Lois E., Kensington 
Feinberg, Florene Z., Thomasville. Ga. 
Fink, Kenneth E., Baltimore 
Ford. John H., Baltimore 
Forman, Morris, Baltimore 



324 



Foss, George E., Relay 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington. D. C. 
Freiman, Herbert G., Baltimore 
Friedman, Jack, Washington, D. C. 
Fuerst, Robert G.. Hyattsville 
Garneau. Pierre J., Stratford, Conn. 
Gebhardt. Russell G.. Silver Spring 
Gilbertson. Kenneth G.. Bladensburg 
Greer. Margaret A., Bel Air 
Gunby, Laura E., Marion Station 
Gunther, Francis J., Washington, D. C. 
Gutschmidt, Nathan. N. Bergen. N. J. 
Haimovicz. Joseph P.. Washington. D. C. 
Harmatz. Herb J.. Washington. D. C. 
Hay, Perry I., Washington. D. C. 
Haynes. Anne M.. Trenton. Tenn. 
Haynes. Sallie T., Trenton, Tenn. 
Heaton. Charles C, Baltimore 
Henderson. Joseph. Rockville 
Heringman. Leo A., Baltimore 
Hoagland, Philip L.. Washington. D. C. 
Holbrook, Richard D.. Washington, D. C. 
Hughes. Fred J.. Foolesville 
Hughes. Warren A., Washington. D. V.. 
Hyslop, Charles D., Silver Spring 
Jackson, Frank H., Chevy Chase 
Jacobs, Bernice E., Baltimore 
Jacobs, John S., Washington, D. C. 
Jacobs. Nathaniel J.. Baltimore 
Jacobs. Norman B.. Jr.. Gaithersburg 
Johnson, George A.. Baltimore 
Johnson. William R.. Baltimore 
Jones, Jacob L., Laurel 
Judd, Barbara. Merion. Pa. 
Kempton. Christine. Lanham 
Kennon. W. Stanley. Washington. D. C. 
Keppler. William J.. Washington. D. C. 
Keyes. Karl E.. Hyattsville 
Lang. Richard E., Passaic, N. J. 
Lawless, Van Ness, Washington. D. C. 
Lawson, J. Keith, Washington. D. C. 
Lee. Richard E.. Landover 
Lehmann, Theodore S.. Baltimore 
Lewis. Barbara R.. Washington, D. C. 
Liberato. Venancio Q.. Riverdale 
Lindsay, Gorton P.. Baltimore 
Linn. Lois B., University Park 
Littleford. Rita T.. Washington. D. C. 
Lovell. Marker J.. New Windsor 
Lowe. William C, Stevensville 
Lowitz, Irving R.. Baltimore 
Mason. John H., Silver Spring 
Mattingly. Joseph A.. Leonardtown 
Maxwell, Francis T., Towson 
McCaffrey. Richard H.. Baltimore 
McCurley. James W., Relay 



326 



McFadden, Duncan B., Aberdeen Proving 

Grounds 
McGoury, Thomas E., Odenton 
Mclntire, John N., Oakland 
McLaughlin, Arlene M., Baltimore 
McWilliams, William J., Indian Head 
Miller, Gary H., Branchville 
Miller, Harry A., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Mary E., Baltimore 
Miller, Philip, Brentwood 
Moore, John E., Ellicott City 
Morris, Felix R., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Mullett, William B., Silver Spring 
Newman, Robert A., Chevy Chase 
dinger, Carolyn, Bloomfield, N. J. 
O'Loughlin, Richard K., Takoma Park 
Owens, James D., Linthicum Heights 
Pailthorp, Robert W., Takoma Park 
Palmer, Arnaldo, San German, Puerto Rico 
Panzer, Hubert, Newark, N. J. 
Paterson, H. Jean, Towson 
Pearson, H. R., St. George's Island 
Peffer, Paul R., Washington, D. C. 
Perry, A. Gordon, Hyattsville 
Potts, B. Sheba, Baltimore 
Prescott, Harriet J., Winchester, N. H. 
Purnell, William M., Ocean City 
Quigley, John L., Washington, D. C. 
Reeves, Samuel W., Ill, Fort George G. 

Meade 
Richardson, Donald W., Washington, D. C. 
Richardson, Vaughn E., Willards 
Robertson, Corneliuett B., Annapolis 
Robinson, Charles H., Cardiff 
Rochlin, Martin, Baltimore 
Ross, Dorothy, Washington, D. C. 
Sachs, Harold, Washington, D. C. 
Sadie, Alexander, Washington, D. C. 
Sagotsky, Samuel R., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Schaar, Walter S., Catonsville 
Schiffler, Robert A., Wheeling. W. Va. 
Schreter, Harvey A., Baltimore 
Shaffer, Betty B., Wilmington. Del. 
Shapiro, Helen, Baltimore 
Sherrill, Elizabeth B., Sparks 
Sherwood, William T., Washington, D. C. 
Shewbridge. Benjamin B., Baltimore 



Shipley, Amy E., Harman 

Smith, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 

Smith. Harold W., Baltimore 

Snyder, Roger W., Hagerstown 

Sokal, Mitchell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Spalding, Joseph P., Silver Spring 

Spruill, William T.. Brandywine 

Staire, John R., Jr., Canonsburg, Pa. 

Stein, Martin K., Baltimore 

Stevens, Evelyn M., Laurel 

Stevens, Grace, Washington, D. C. 

Stonebraker, John E., Hagerstown 

Strauss, Charles D., Baltimore 

Thies, William N., Washington, D. C. 

Thomas, Fred B., Washington, D. C. 

Thompson, Robert H., Washington, D. C. 

Tolker, Ethel B., Silver Spring 

Townsend, Mary E., Frostburg 

Towson, William O., Baltimore 

Treacy, James J., Oakland 

Turpin, Robert D., Centreville 

Vandervoort, Susan H., Middletown, Pa. 

Vaught, Valerie V., Riverdale 

Vogel, Louis, Jr., Baltimore 

Waldman, Sylvia R., Hyattsville 

Walzer, Howard B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Watson, George B., Towson 

Weis, Helen L., Baltimore 

Wells, Robert L., Gaithersburg 

Werner, Janet, Catonsville 

White, Mary M., Dickerson 

White, Robert P., Washington, D. C. 

Whiton, Alfred C, Brentwood 

Wilson, Margaret F., Baltimore 

Wilson, Ruby E.. Mt. Rainier 

Wise, Paul S., Dover, Del. 

Wohlstadter, Leonard. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wojtcszuk, John A., Baltimore 

Wolf, John F., Hyattsville 

Woll, Ephraim, Bronx, N. Y. 

Wood, George F., Washington, D. C. 

Woodwell, Lawrence A., Kensington 

Yochelson, Aaron, Hyattsville 

Young, Edmond G., Baltimore 

Young, Jerome L., Washington, D. C. 

Zabrek, Herman M., Washington, D. C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aarons, Ralph. Baltimore 
Abrams, Norman J., Baltimore 
Adams, George D., Washington, D. C. 
Aitcheson, William W., Berwyn 
Albert, Milton J., Waterbury, Conn. 
Aldridge, William A., Baltimore 
Alexander, Louis E., Frederick — Unc. 
Allen, Frances M., Takoma Park 
Allen, George D., Takoma Park 



Allen, John J., Hagerstown 
Alter, Irving D., Baltimore 
Anskitis, John P., Waterbury, Conn. 
Anspon, Harry D., Washington, D. C. 
Aring, Berniee C, Baltimore 
Armstrong, George L., Baltimore 
Auerbach, Lawrence W., Brooklyn, N. Y, 
Badenhoop, H. John, Baltimore 
Balmer, Charles B., Lyndhurst, N. J. 



Barthel. Robert A., Jr., Catonsville 

Batch, Francis E., Hyattsville 

Heers,' John H.. Washington, D. C. 

Bellows. Henry J.. North Haven, Conn. 

Benbow, Robert P., Sparrows Point 

Benjamin. Louis, Baltimore 

Bens, Henry J., Washington. D. C. 

Bergmann, William F.. Takoma Park-Unc. 

Barman. Albert D., Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Berman, Robert, Trenton. N. J. 

Berryman, Esther O.. Baltimore 

Bethell, Margei-y L., Yonkers. N. Y. 

Bishopp, Fred T.. Silver Spring 

Bloom, Morton L, Baltimore 

Bonanno, Antonio C. Washington, D. C. 

Bonnett, Howard G.. Washington, D. C. 

Boose. Dorothy M.. Washington. D. C. 

Borlik, Ralph, Washington, D. C. 

Bormel. Albert M., Baltimore 

Bowman, John D., Rockville 

Bowman, Leonard C, Lucketts. Va. 

Bowyer, Ernestine C, Washington, D. C. 

Boyle, John B.. Jr., Baltimore 

Bradley, Robert J., Hyattsville 

Brainerd, William F., III. Towson 

Brannock. Harold S., Washington, D. C. 

Brelsford, Jean R., Jr., Berwyn 

Brigham, David L., Ashton 

Brinckerhoff. John G., Chevy Chase 

Broadwater, Norman I., Jr., Oakland 

Brown, Allan H., University Park 

Brown, Vernon L., Landover 

Bryant, Roswell A., Jr., Takoma Park 

Buchbinder, Robert H., Bayonne, N. J. 

Buck, Marjorie M., Indian Head 

Burk, Joseph, Linthicum Heights 

Burrows, Milford D.. Washington, D. C. 

Byers, Lloyd D., Catonsville 

Capossela. Thomas J., Washington, D. C. 

Carpel, Albert J., Washington, D. C. 

Gary. Charles G,. Riverdale 

Case. Richard W.. Berwyn 

Charuhas, George P., Cumberland 

Checket. Irene R.. Baltimore 

Chumbris. Angelos N., Washington. D. C. 

Chumbris, Cleom G., Washington, D. C. 

Clark. John T., Greensboro 

dayman, Stanley, Washington, D. C. 

Cleaver. William F., Washington. D. C. 

Close, Horace W.. Washington, D. C. 

Coe, Paul M., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Samuel, Washington. D. C. 

Cole. William H., Baltimore 

Collins. Garner F., Rockville 

Collins, Roberta E., Hyattsville 

Comer, Florence R., Hyattsville 

Cook, Charlotte C, Washington. D. C. 

Cook, Harry I., Hyattsville 



326 



Cooke, Alfred A.. Hyattsville 

Cornnell. Ellner A.. Cottage City 

Costello. Peter E., Baltimore 

Crisafull, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 

Cross, Roy E., Chevy Chase 

Cullen, Russell H., Hyattsville 

D'Adamo, Charles, Baltimore 

daCruz, Francis, Washington, D. C. 

Dantzig. Henry, Hyattsville 

Davidson, Oscar M., Baltimore 

Davis, Harry L., Baltimore 

Davis, Warren P.. Washington, D. C. 

Demaree, Nancy B.. College Park 

Denney, James B.. Bladensburg 

DeVor, George A., Silver Spring 

Dieudonne, Erasmus L., Jr.. Bladensburg 

Dippel, Francis X., Baltimore 

Dobres, Robert M.. Baltimore 

Durity. Hari-y L.. Marlboro 

Durnell, James R.. Bethesda 

D Wiggins, Roscoe D., College Park 

Egnell. Edward W.. New Brighton. N. Y. 

Edlavitch. Robert, Hyattsville 

Edmonds, William R., Baltimore 

Ehrmantraut, John M.. Brentwood 

Eichlin, Doris E., Washington, D. C. 

Eierman, George H. P., Baltimore 

Ellis, William E., Baltimore 

Ely, Charles T., Washington, D. C. 

Enfold. John G.. Ellicott City 

Evans. Frank D., Chevy Chase 

Evans, Lydia M.. Chevy Chase 

Eyler. Mervin S., Taneytown 

Faul. R. Virginia, Washington, D. C. 

Findlay, William F., Cumberland 

Fox, Ava S., Chestertown 

Franklin, Joseph G., Hyattsville— Unc. 

Fraser. Donald L., Washington, D. C. 

Eraser, Doris E., Takoma Park 

Freseman. Richard D., Mars, Pa. 

Freemire, Elmer L., Takoma Park 

Frey, Louis M., Mt, Rainier 

Fulks, Moir M., Rockville 

Ganzert. Mary L., Washington, D. C. 

Cast, John P., Cheverly—Unc. 

Geiser, Jesse B., College Park 

George. Frank H.. Baltimore— Unc. 

Gifford, John F.. Washington, D. C. 

Glynn, Gwendolyn M., Stratford, Conn. 

Goldberg. Alvin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Gabriel, Baltimore 

Goldman, Leon. Washington, D. C. 

Goodlett, Max W., Washington. D. C. 

Cough, James J., Chaptico 

Gram. Edith-Marie, Washington. D. C. 

Grant, Charles R., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Gratz, Ezra B. A., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Greenbaum, Irwin, Newark, N. J. 

327 



Grodjesk, Joseph E., Baltimore 
Groff, William D., Jr., Owings Mills 
Grotlisch, Louise K., Silver Spring 
Gulbrandsen, Oskar S., Baltimore 
Hardy, Carol T., Hyattsville 
Hardy, Jerome S., Silver Spring 
Harris, Herman L., Baltimore 
Harrison, John R., Hyattsville 
Haydon, Margaret J., Hyattsville 
Hellman, Myra, Lawrence, N. Y. 
Hellweg, Vincent P., Washington, D. C. 
Hemphill, Aloysius L., Silver Spring — Unc. 
Hemsley, Hugh H., Washington, D. C. 
Henderson, Adrienne M., Chevy Chase 
Hennies, Mary L., Chester, S. C. 
Henry, Frances L., Washington, D. C. 
Herbert, Joseph G., Washington, D. C. 
Hester, Jean C, Washington, D. C— Unc. 

Hirsch, Albert, Frederick 

Hirsh, Harold L., Washington, D. C. 

Holt, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 

Hooton, Kittie M., Hyattsville 

Hoover, Lawrence G., Takoma Park 

Hortman, William F., Jr.. Washington, 
D. C. 

Houck, Roland V., Vineland, N. J. 

Hoyle, Jack G., Washington, D. C. 

Hudson, Sally A., Washington, D. C. 

Hunter, Frances E., Chevy Chase 

Hurley, John J., Landover 

Hurley, Walter V., Jr., Hyattsville 

lager, Evelyn L., Bay Ridge 

Ireland, Julius W., Baltimore 

Irwin, Robert C, Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Isis, Philip S., Washington, D. C. 

Jacobs, Robert A., Rockaway Beach, N. Y. 

James, Helen M., Chevy Chase 

Jarboe, James P., Bel Alton 

Jensen, Willard C, Washington, D. C. 

Jett, Geraldine V., Chevy Chase 

Johnson, Henry C, Washington. D. C. 

Johnson, Vivian H.. Baltimore 

Jones, Robert M. Baltimore 

Jordan, Margaret A., Hyattsville— Unc. 

Joseph, David R., Stamford. Conn. 

Kaplan, Solomon, Baltimore 

Katz, Albert I., Washington, D. C. 

Kaufman, Millard. Baltimore 

Keefer, Ruth L„ Takoma Park 

Keister, Helen D., Hyattsville 

Keller, Joseph E., Washington, D. C. 
Kephart, Mary E., Taneytown 

Keppler, Millicent M., Washington, D. C. 

Kirkpatrick, Miriam A., Trenton, N. J. — 

Unc. 
Kline. Horace F., Frederick 
Kraemer, Edwin, Hackensack, N. J. 
Kramer. Florence H., Baltimore 



Krynitsky, John A., Chevy Chase 

Ladson, Marcia, Rockville 

Lang, Grace M., Passaic, N. J. 

Langmaid, C. Russell, Washington, D. C. 

Langschmidt, Edward G., Relay 

Lanigan, James M., Washington, D. C. 

Lankford, Stephen E., Washington, D. C. 

Lapidus, Stanley J., Baltimore 

Lavine, Isidor M., Mt. Rainier 

Lear, Paul D., Jr., Cumberland 

Ledoux, Landreville, Jr., Quantico, Va. 

Leasure, Robert L., Silver Spring 

Lee, Whiting B., Hyattsville 

Lesser, Alfred I., Newark, N. J. 

Levenson, Bertha, Baltimore 

Levin, Harriet A.. Baltimore 

Levine, Ethel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levine, Milton, Baltimore 

Lewald, James H., Laurel 

Lilge, Louis M.. Washington, D. C. — Unc. 

Linthicum, George E., Jr., Baltimore 

Liskey, Robert B., Hagerstown 
Lloyd, Merrill L., Norfolk, Va. 
Long, Edwin D., Westover 
Lyon, Elnora L., Baltimore 
MacDonald, Charles R., Cumberland 
Machen, Hervey G., Hyattsville 
Maer, Wallace N., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Maguire, John N., Penns Grove, N. J. 
Maris, Helen B., Riverdale 
Markley, Robert R., Baltimore 
Maslin, Margaret L., Port Chester. N. Y. 
Matelson, Joseph, Washington, D. C. 
Mattingly, Lawrence J., Washington, D. C. 
Mattoon, Laura I., Takoma Park 
McCall, Harriett A., College Park— Unc. 
McCann, George E., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
McClay, Harriette N., Hyattsville 
McClayton, M. Elaine, Baltimore 
McConnaughy, Robert L., Berwyn 
McFarlane, Samuel B., Lonaconing 
McGinniss, Harry, Kensington 
McKeever, Regina W., Silver Spring— Unc. 
McLean, Anne, Pennington, N. J. 
McNaught, John P., Perry Point 
McNicholas, Marie K., Washington, D. C. 
McNutt, M. Tyler, Collingswood, N. J. 
Mears, Thomas W., Washington. D. C. 
Meenehan, M. Frank, Washington, D. C. 
Mehl, Joseph M., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Mellen, Luther E.. Jr., Baltimore 
Melnicove, Miriam N., Baltimore 
Meng, Ralph H., Perry Point 
Mertie, Robert B., Silver Spring 
Meyers, Melvin H., Hagerstown 
Michelson, Elaine P., Baltimore 
Miller, John W., Boonsboro — Unc. 
Miller, Walter L., Washington, D. C. 



328 



Miller, William I., Baltimore 
MisKimon, Raymond M., Baltimore 
Mitchell, Alfred G., Baltimore 
Mitchell, Doris J., Baltimore 
Mobley, Edward L., Hagerstown 
Moise, Davis D., Sumter, S. C. 
Morton, Helen C, Silesia 
Myllo, Stanley W., Linthicum Heights 
Nattans, Ralph A., Baltimore 
Needle, Barnett M., Washington, T>. C. 
Neilson, Robert S., Baltimore 
Neiman, Robert M., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Nevy, Inez A., Cumberland 
Newell, Robert T., Jr., Centreville 
Norman, Richard E., Hyattsville 
Odebrecht, Mary M., Takoma Park 
O'Neill, Richard J., Baltimore 
Oursler, Griffith B., Clinton 
Page, John F., Baltimore 
Panciotti, Michael, Derby, Conn. 
Parks, John A., Cumberland 
Person, Gladys M., Chevy Chase 
Pickens, James L., Washington, D. C. 
Piozet, Dolores A., Hyattsville 
Pitzer, James E., Cumberland 
Plum, John P., Cumberland 
Powell, Alice L., Berwyn 

Powell, William A., Baltimore 

Pratt, Stanford C, Washington, D. C. 

Preston, Thomas T., Jr., Joppa 

Prettyman, Dan T., Trappe 

Price, Robert S., Catonsville 

Quinn, Thomas J., Providence, R. I. 

Quitt, Herman, Baltimore 

Rabai, Ermine J., Baltimore — Unc. 

Rabak, Richard W., Washington, D. C. 

Rabinowitz, Alex, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Raisin, Herman S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Reeser, Doris W., Washington, D. C. 

Reeser, Victor K., Washington, D. C. 

Reindollar. Helen L., Baltimore 

Remsburg, Charles G., Berwyn 

Resnick, Solomon, Bayonne, N. J. 

Rice, Floyd E., Takoma Park 

Rieg, Mary, Washington, D. C. 

Ripple, Roland C, Cheltenham 

Robinson, Gordon S., Patchogue, N. Y. 

Robinson, Joseph M., Cardiff 

Rochkind, Joseph M., Baltimore 

Rogers, Hatton B., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Rosen, Martin, Fort Salonga, L. I., N. Y. 

Rouse, Edgar B., Baltimore 

Rozzelle, David E., Bethesda 

Rudolph, Herbert I., Baltimore 

Sadowsky, Wallace H., North East 

St. Clair, Jean, College Park 

Schaufele, Walter J., Jr., Fullerton 

Schindler, Elaine, Baltimore 



Schneider, Howard, Yonkers, N Y. 
Schrott, John D., Washington, D. C. 
Schutz. Patricia S., Annapolis 
Schulte, William G., Baltimore 
Schwartz, Norton B., Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Schweitz, Edwin P., Washington, D. C. 
Scott, Mary J., Hyattsville 
Secrest, John P., Brentwood 
Seidel, David L., Takoma Park 
Seitz, Charles E., Glen Rock, Pa. 
Sesso, Raymond F., Washington, D. C. 
Shaffer, Arthur J., Washington, D. C. — 

Unc. 
Shaffer, Hugh M., Cumberland 
Shaw, Edward L., Chevy Chase 
Shegogue, Mac M., Landover 
Sheriff, Roger E., Landover 
Sherman, Delia E„ Baltimore 
Sherzer, Charles L., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Shmuner, Daniel P., Baltimore 
Silberg, I. Walter, Baltimore 
Silverstein, David, Belmar, N. J. 

Simms, William G., Washington, D. C. — 
Unc. 

Simon, Fred L., Baltimore 

Sindler, Samuel R., Baltimore 

Slote, Herbert W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, Edward A., Washington, D. C. 

Solomon, Muriel, Charleston, S. C. 

Smith, Thomas L., Baltimore 

Soule, Floyd A., Washington. D. C. 

Spiegelglass, Harriett H., Hackensack, N. J. 

Stapf, Austin M., Relay 

Stark, Alice D., Aberdeen 

Stedman, Samuel F., Baltimore 

Stegmaier, James G., Cumberland 

Steinberger, Janet I., Baltimore 

Stokes, Samuel R., Washington, D. C. 

Stuart, Phyllis M., Washington, D. C. 

Stup, Charles R., Frederick — ^Unc. 

Sweitzer, Edward H., Baltimore 

Taylor, Thomas G., Baltimore 

Trazzare, Doris L., Denton — ^Unc. 

Treacy, John T., Oakland 

Trice, Frederic W.. Preston 

Trundle, Lula S., Ashton 

Tucker, Beatrice L., Abingdon 

Turner, Katherine L., Washington, D. C. 

Tyler, Homer H., Hagerstown 

Updike, Edna M., Washington, Va. 

Upham, Charles M., Jr., Marbury 

VanHorn, Robert P., Glenn Dale 

Vaught, Cecelia J., Riverdale 

Vogt. John F., Catonsville 

Waddill, Roland A., Washington, D. C. 

Wade, Robert L., Halethorpe 

Waingold, George, Cumberland 

Waite, Maiden D., Odenton 



329 



Walsh, William C, Tilghman 
Waters, Robert W., Princess Anne 
Watkins, Jack H., Aberdeen 
Weber, June E., Washington, D. C. — Unc. 
Weber, Sylvia E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weinberg, Bernice R., Baltimore 
Weinblatt, Mayer, Baltimore 
Weinreb, Seymour, Washington, D. C. 
Weiser, Theodore T., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wellinger, Phyllis M., Hagerstown 
Wharton, Edward M., College Park 
Williamson, Martha L., Catonsville 
Wilson, Robert G., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Thomas L., Havre de Grace 



Winter, Joseph S., Washington, D. C. 

Witzke, Leroy M., Baltimore 

Wolf, Frances W., Washington, D. C. 

Wohlmuth, Doris E., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Wood, Albert K., Catonsville 

Wood, Charles L., Bethesda 

Wood, Robert W., New York. N. Y.—Unc. 

Wood, William F., Washington, D. C. 

Wyatt, Henry F., Baltimore 

Wyant, Adam M., Greensburg, Pa. 

Yochelson, Bernard A., Washington, D. C. 

Young, Herbert S., Washington, D. C. 

Zimmerman, Loy M., Baltimore 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Babylon, Thomas C, Westminster 
Brvns, L#awrence A., Relay 
Campbell, Charles R., Landover 
Gauss, Lenna O., Washingrton, D. C. 



Magdeburger, Elviria, Washington, D. C. 
Mitnick, Harry, Baltimore 
Schiff, Adelaide S., Allentown, Pa. 
Turner, Raymond E., Takoma Park 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



SENIOR CLASS 



Andreorio, Patrick Louis, Morristown, N. J. 
Arends, Theodore George, Washington, D. C. 
Baylin, George Jacob, Baltimore 
Blanchard, Kenneth Earl, Waterbury, 

Conn. 
Bonante, John Andrew, Sykesville, Pa. 
Brodie, Leo, New York, N. Y. 
Brotman, Irwin Norton, Baltimore. 
Brown, Herbert Samuel, Stamford, Conn. 
Buppert, Stuart George, Baltimore. 
Carrill, Howard Allen, Smithsburg. 
Centanni, Alfonse Guide, Newark, N. J. 
Cooper, Herman Milton, Hackensack, N. J. 
Corbin, Lance Nathaniel, Bel Air. 
Corthouts, James Leopold, Hartford, Conn. 
Cronin, John William, Sparrows Point. 
Decesare, William Frank, Providence, R. I. 
DiGristine, Michael Joseph, Baltimore. 
Dionne, Eugene Joseph, New Bedford, Mass. 
Donohue, Terrence David, Baltimore 
Evans, Marvin Ratledge, Clemmons, N. C. 
Fischer, William August, Baltimore. 
Friedman, Samuel, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Glaser, Isadore, New York, N. Y. 
Goldberg, Solomon, Hartford, Conn. 
Greenberg, Alvin A., Baltimore. 
Hampson, Robert Edward, Baltimore. 
Hanik, Samuel, Paterson, N. J. 
Harris, Lawrence, Paterson, N. J. 
Hawley, Carlotta Augusta, Washington, 

D. C. 
Hodges, Ralph Warren, North Providence, 

R. I. 



Hoffman, Elmer Norman, Baltimore. 
Horowitz, Morris, East Orange, N. J. 
Hunter, Donald Scott, Baltimore. 
Impresa, Michael, Waterbury, Conn. 
Inman, Byron Wallace, Mount Airy, N. C. 
Jerome, Bernard, Union City, N. J. 
Johnston, Samuel Burke, IIL Dover, N. J. 
Kaufman, Vernon Delbert, Baltimore. 
Klotz, Otto Guido, Gloucester, N. J. 
Kreshtool, Louis, Wilmington, Del. 
Kress, William, Baltimore. 
Kuta, Bruno Leon, Newark, N. J. 
Lacher, Henry Arthur, Baltimore. 
Leahy, Roland Paul, Franklin, N. H. 
Levinson, Louis, Washington, D. C. 
Levy, Meyer Lewis, Newark, N. J. 
McCauley, Henry Berton, Jr., Baltimore. 
Metz, Joseph Francis, Jr., Baltimore. 
Meyer, Everett Nelson, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Milobsky, Louis, Washington, D. C. 
Mitten, Harry William II, Balboa, Canal 

Zone. 
Muller, Frank Harry, Woodbury, N. J. 
Myers, James Richard, Westminster. 
Myers, Norman Frederick, Edgewood. 
Nelson, Walter Josef, Providence, R. I. 
Niebergall, Gerald Maher, Hackensack, N. J. 
Orman, Herbert, Baltimore. 
Paskell, Ray Sidna, Cumberland. 
Philpot, William Charles Christopher. Jr.. 

Elizabeth. N. J. 
Racicot, Ralph Raymond, Webster, Mass. 



Riddlesberger, Merklein Mills, Waynesboro, 

Pa. 
Rogler, Wesley Edward, Weehawken, N. J. 
Rosen, Harold, West Norwood, N. J. 
Sabloff, Herbert, East Orange, N. J. 
Schoenbrun, Alexander, Passaic, N. J. 
Schwartz, Daniel David, Paterson, N. J. 
Seyfert, Ernest Gustave, Stratford, Conn. 
Shackelford, John Hinton, Beverlyville, Va. 
Shapiro, Abe Alvin, Washington, D. C. 
Shipman, Lewis Hamilton, Worcester, Mass. 
Silverman, Edward, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Sullivan, William Francis, Windsor Locks, 

Conn. 



Switzer, John Robert, Jr., Harrisonburg, 

Va. 
Tarant, Leonard Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Trupp, Garrison, Baltimore. 
TuUy, Edward Albert, West Hartford, 

Conn. 
Tyburski, Fi'ank Casimir, Derby, Conn. 
Walker, James Arthur, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Walsh, William Thomas, St. Johnisbury, 

Vt. 
Weinstein, Herbert Milton, Union City, 

N. J. 
Wien, Robert, Newark, N. J. 
Zea, Alvaro, Colombia, S. A. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Aks, Harry, Norfolk, Va. 
Barsky, Sol, Washington, D. C. 
Beetham, Curtis Muse, Baltimore. 
Berkowitz, Bernard Robert, Baltimore. 
Herman, Irving, New Haven, Conn. 
Burton, Wilbur Darwin, Jr., Dover, Del. 
Byer, Joseph, Trenton, N. J. 
Caputo, Anthony Victor, Newark, N. J. 
Casey, William Raymond, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Clewlow, Albert Thomas, Atlantic City, 

N. J. 
Colby, Maurice Rubin, Long Branch, N. J. 
Davis, Henry, Baltimore. 
Davis, Mark O., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Downes. Kenneth Forsythe, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Downs, Joseph Lawrence, Jersey City, N. J. 
Eamich, Richard James, Washington, D. C. 
Edwards, Melvin Frederick, Belford, N. J. 
Finkelstein, Louis Benjamin, Newark, 

N. J. 
Fox, Isadore Edward, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Friedberg, Herbert, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Fulmer, James Ambrose, Jr., Fountain 

Inn. S. C. 
Gare, Morris Ralph, Newark, N. J. 
Gaudreau, Raymond Joseph, Sayesville, 

R. I. 
Click, George Harold, Passaic, N. J. 
Greenberg, Jesse Jerome, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gregoire, Gaetan Georges, Moosup, Conn. 
Heck, John Conrad, Baltimore. 
Heuser, Victor Lemoine, Glen Ridge, N. J. 
Hirshorn, Abraham, Camden, N. J. 
Jacobs, Vivian M. J., Harrison. N. J. 
Jones, Donald Beebe Booth, Takoma Park. 
Kanelos, Peter Theodore, Providence, R. I. 
Kuperstein, Charles B., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lavine, Harold Harry, Mt. Rainier. 
Leonard, Melvin Ralph, Chincoteague, 

Va. 
Lessow, Harold Jack, Hartford, Conn. 
Levin, David Aaron, Baltimore. 



Levitas, Guilford, Westwood, N. J. 
Lubarsky, Milton Seth, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ludwig, Roderick Joseph, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Lupshutz, Bernard Melvin, Washington, 

D. C. 
Markos, Simon George, Dover, N. H. 
McLean, Harry, Cumberland. 
Miksinski, Boleslaw Walter, Jr., Baltimore. 
Miller, Robert Greer, Baltimore. 
Mirabella, Joseph Anthony, Jr., Newark, 

N. J. 
Moorefield, Paul Boyd, Mount Airy, N. C. 
Myers, Ernest Linwood, Frederick. 
Nacrelli, Chris Anthony, Marcus Hook, Pa. 
Poster, Benjamin Leonard, Baltimore. 
Pugh, Gordon Scott, Baltimore. 
Ralph, Joseph Emile, Keyport, N. J. 
Reed, Robert Alton, Milford, Del. 
Reilly, Bernard Henry, Central Aguirre, 

Puerto Rico 
Reynolds, Jotham Gay, Waterbury, Conn. 
Richardson, Richard Edgeworth, Leaksville, 

N. a 

Riggin, Harry Ewell, Crisfield. 

Roh, Frank John, Baltimore. 

Rosen, Irving, Norfolk, Va. 

Salvatore, Joseph Zeoli, Bristol, Conn. 

Seidler, Alonzo LePage, Towson. 

Shobin, Jack, Baltimore. 

Shure, Maurice David, New Haven, Conn. 

Silverstein, William Herman, Woodcliff, 

N. J. 
Simington, William Bower, Danville, Pa. 
Simon, Morris David, Clifton, N. J. 
Sloan, Isaac, Dunbar, W. Va. 
Swinehart, Darwin Robert, Baltimore 
Sydney, Elmer Louis, Providence, R. I. 
Yoffe, Gilbert, Baltimore. 
Zeiner, Raymond Edward, Torrington, 

Conn. 
Zerdy, Alfonce Walter, New Philadelphia, 

Pa. 



330 



331 



Aaron, Alvin, Biddeford, Maine. 

Aaronson. Fabius Fox. Washington, D. C 

Asbell, Milton Baron, Camden, N. J. 

Bailey, Carl Elliott, Baltimore. 

Baker. Edward Keefer Jr., Pikesville 

Barker. John Paul, Laurel. 

Barnes, Bradley Bingham, Maplewood. 
N. J. 

Boro, Alex Louis. Severna Park 
Bozzuto. John Michael. Jr.. Waterbury. 
Conn. 

Cabler. James Titus. Baltimore. 
Cammarano. Frank Peter, New Haven 
Conn. ' 

Carrigan. Harold Joseph, Jersey City. 
N. J. 

Cohen, Sigmund. Baltimore. 
Connell. Edward William. Norwich. Conn. 
Cooper. David. Atlantic City, N. J. 
Cramer, Paul Edward, Monessen, Pa. 
Cruit, Edwin Deller, Poolesville. 
Donofrio. Richard Salvatore. Danbury, 
Conn. 

DuBoflf. Leonard. West Hartford, Conn. 
Erlich, William, Baltimore. 

Eskow, Alexander Bernard. Perth Amboy. 
N. J. 

Falk, Wilbur Nelson. Branford. Conn. 
Farrington, Charles Calhoun, Chelmsford, 
Mass. 

Ferguson. Norman. Washington, N. C. 
Finegold, Raymond, Belmer. N. J. 
Gemski. Henry John. New Haven, Conn. 
Giuditta, Nicholas Richard, Jr., Westfield. 
N. J. 

Goe, Reed Thomas, Weston, W. Va. 
Habercam. Julian Wetmore, Baltimore. 
Haggerty, Jack Stanley. Sussex, N. J. 
Hartwell. Perley Burton, Jr.. St. Johns- 
bury. Vt. 

Heil, Roland William, Baltimore. 
Johnson. William Basil. Jr., Annapolis. 
Johnston, Arthur James. Providence, R. I. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Jonas, Charles Saul. Atlantic City N j 
Joyce. Osier Collinson. Baltimore ' * ' 
Kraus. George Carl. Baltimore. 
Lasley. Frank A., Jr., Staunton, Va. 
Lau, Irvin Martin, Jr., York, Pa. 
Levin. Leonard Lee. Norfolk. Va. 
Liberman. Sidney E.. Baltimore. 
Lyon. Eugene Davisson. Baltimore. 
Margulies. David Benjamin. Linden. N J 
Marsh. Edmond Formhals. North Adams' 
Mass. 

Massucco, Lawrence Philip, Bellows Falls. 
V t. 

Mathias, Craig Prescott. Waynesboro Pa 
McCausIand. Charles Patterson. Baltimore' 
McMillin. Clarence Vaden. Campobello! 
o. C. 

Meadows. Stanley J., Brunswick. 
Mendelsohn. Harry Benjamin. Norfolk Va 
Messner. Jack Menefee. Washington. D c' 
Morris. Hugh Beryl, Baltimore. 
MuUer, Edward Joseph. Bayonne, N. J 
Myer, Edward Herman. Jr., Mahwah. N. J 
Neal. Floyd Warren. Southington. Conn 
N^n. William Joseph. Jr.. Providence. 
R. I. 

Rich, Otto Morris, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Roitman, Irvin. Trenton, N. J. 
Ryan, William Henry. Frostburg. 
Saltman. David, Holyoke, Mass. 

Silverman, Stanley Gabriel. Portsmounth. 
Va. 

Slavinsky. Edwin Anthony. Baltimore 
Smyth, Lawrence Curtis. Quincy. Mass. 
Stepan. Jerry James. Baltimore. 
Stewart. Ford Atwood, Baltimore. 
Theodore, Raymond Marwin. Baltimore. 
Turok, Seymour. Passaic, N. J. 
Weigel, Sterling John, York, Pa. 
Westerberg. Carl Victor, Simsbu'ry. Conn 
Wheeler, Elias Ogden. Lynchburg, Va 
Williams. Ernest Vincent. Washington. 
D. C 



Allen. Joseph Paul, North Martinsville 

W. Va. 

Auerbach, Bernard Berry, Baltimore 
Barsamian, Samuel. Providence. R. I. 
Bernstein, Norman Nathaniel. Washington. 

D. C. 

Blais. Raymond Holyoke, Mass. 
Blevins, George Coffman. Centreville 
Brown, Frank Anderson, Lansdowne 
Cannaday. Henry Lee. Roanoke. Va. 
Carvalho, Antone Richard. New Bedford, 
Mass. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



332 



Chan-Pong, Bertrand Oswald, Trinidad. 
B. W. I. 

Connolly, John Alvin. Baltimore 
Davis, Francis Cecil. Bader, Pa. 
Davis. James Clarke, Silver Spring 
Dorfman. Joseph Sol. Washington, D. C. 
Dubansky, Paul Samuel. Baltimore 
Dunn, Naomi Ada. New Britain. Conn. 
Edgar. Benjamin Delbert, Viola. 111. 
Eichenbaum. Irving William. New Haven. 
Conn. 

Fallon. Charles Huff. Trenton. N. J. 



Feindt. William Becker. Baltimore 
Francis. Garnet Paul. Jr., Alexandria. Va. 
Gane. Eugene Michael, Hartford, Conn, 
Gilden, Paul. Baltimore 
Goldstein. Leonard Nathan, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Gorsuch, Gilbert Franklin. Sparrows Point 
Griesbach, Hans Henry. Naugatuck, Conn. 
Grove. Harry C'yde. Jr., Fairplay 
Hirschman, Leonard Mai-vin. Baltimore 
Hoffacker, Henry Jacob, Hanover, Pa. 
Jacoby, Robert Ellsworth, Halethorpe 
Jakob, Robert, Norwalk, Conn. 
James, Verda Elizabeth. Milford, Del. 
Johnson, Walter Edgar. Berlin. N. H. 
Kader. Marshall Irvin. Baltimore 
Krug, Frederick Robert, Baltimore 
Labasauckas, Charles Frank. Watertown, 

Conn. 
Lavoie, Odilon Joseph, Jr., Southbridge, 

Mass. 
Legum, Isidore, Baltimore 
Lisker, Nathan, Providence. R. I. 
Maislen, Irving Lawrence, Hartford, Conn. 
McConnell, William Lewis. West Union, 

W. Va. 
MeCracken, Jules, Cameron, W. Va. 
Meinster, Leon H., Baltimore 
Mebon. William Franklin, Wilmington, Del. 



Miller, Max, Baltimore 

Moorad, Vincent Jacob, New Britain, Conn. 
Morris, Albert William, Salisbury 
Myers, Melvin Irving, Washington. D. C. 
Piccolo, James Anthony, New Haven, Conn. 
Plaster, Harold Edwin, Winston-Salem. . 

N. C. 
Rabinowitz, Seymour Albert, New Britain, 

Conn. 
Randolph, Kenneth Vincent, Lost Creek, 

W. Va. 
Reed. Paul, Port Henry, N. Y. 
Robinovltz, Irving Kay, Fall River, Mass. 
Rogers, Everett Tryon, Waterbury, Conn. 
Schoepke, Oscar John, Oakfield, Wis. 
Schriver, Alfred Bradbury, Bangor, Me. 
Shaudis, Leo Joseph, New Philadelphia, Pa. 
Shea, Erwin Edward, Hartford, Conn. 
Sidoti. Vincent FYancis, Winstead, Conn. 
Stinebert, Edward Rennert. Baltimore 
Tinsley. William Carter, Lynchburg, Va. 
Tipton, Dorsey Robert, Baltimore 
Varipatis, Michael Stephen, Baltimore 
Waldman, Bernard, New Haven, Conn. 
Walker, Harold Jones, Catonsville 
Weiner, Irving Solwin, Hartford, Conn. 
Wooden, John Hoffman, Jr., Baltimore 
Wright, Dan, Greenville, N. C. 



PRE-DENTAL CLASS 



Beaven, Sterrett Patterson, Baltimore 
Herman, Daniel Elihu, Baltimore 
Caldwell, Gilbert Lee, Baltimore 
Cavallaro, Ralph Carmine, Branford. Conn. 
Chmar. Phillip Lee, Rockville 
Cohen, Jerome Sylvan, Baltimore 
Farrell, Lawrence Daniel. Norwich, Conn. 
Frey, Donald Tiemeyer. Catonsville 
Goldhaber, Samuel, Flushing, Long Island. 

N. Y. 
Goodwich, Louis, Waterbury, Conn. 
Gurny, Henry Frank, Baltimore 
Haynes, Frank Preston. Baltimore 
Hewitt, Earl Christian. Baltimore 
Kennedy. Walter Edward, Baltimore 
Lawler, Vincent Joseph, Baltimore 



Lawrence. Ronald, Elk Mills 
Levinson, Cecil Abraham, Baltimore 
Link, Etta Carolyn, Halethorpe 
Marshall, Lolah Harrington, Baltimore 
Mayes, Irvin Curtis, Jr., Phoenix 
Maynard, Elmer John, New Britain, Conn. 
McClees, Joseph Govane. Baltimore 
McDaniel, Edward Paul Jr., Jarrettsville 
Merendino, Albert Peter, Baltimore 
Perentesis, Christopher, Baltimore 
Pettit, Burnett Alexander, Baltimore 
Rudo, Frederick Bernard. Raspeburg 
Sanner. James Harris, Jr., Phoenix 
Schultheis, Carl Haid, Baltimore 
Smith, Bernard, Hagerstown 
Storch, Murray, Passaic. N. J. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

SENIOR CLASS 



Andorka, William, Lorain, O. 
Asero, John J., Washington, D. C. 
Beall, William R., Hyattstown 
Beitler, Mary E., Relay 
Benner, Willis A., Washington, D. C. 
Brechbill, Edith L.. College Park 



Byers, John G., Lonaconing 
Conner, Virginia, Hagerstown 
Downs, Glendora M., Williamsport 
Duvall, Wilbur I., Gaithersburg 
Edmunds, Lois T., Washington, D. C. 
Edwards, Velma B.. Riverdale 



333 



Evans, Warren R., Bladensburg 
Fisher, Mary C, Rockville 
B'ord, M. Mell, Abingdon 
Friedman, David, Silver Spring 
Hande, Dorothy E., Baltimore 
Herbsleb, Jack M., Washington, D. C. 
Hickey, Routh V., Popes Creek 
Koller. Mary C, Washington, D. C. 
Kenny, Catherine P., Quogue, N. Y. 
Lohr, Walter G., Baltimore 
Lustbader, Isadore W., Baltimore 
Lyddane, Blanche L., Washington, D. C. 
Matthews, Robert H., Jr., Cambridge 
Mayhew, Polly H., Hyattsville 
McComas, Laura A., Abingdon 
McFarland, Cathryn E., Cumberlard 
Merrill, William E., Pocomoke City 
Morrison, Mary E., Bennings, D. C. 
Northrop, Everett H., Hagerstown 
Over, Ira E., Hagerstown 
Parker, Ruth E., Baltimore 

JUNIOR 

Barnsley, Jean, Rockville 
Bell, Edith U.. Williamsport 
Berman, Bertrand S., Baltimore 
Bowen, Gertrude E., Bennings, D. C. 
Bradford, Evelyn M., Towson 
Brown, Elizabeth D., Washington, D. C. 
Buhrow, Viola M., Brentwood 
Burtner, Rosemary J., Boonsboro 
Cartee, Janet L., Hagerstown 
Chatham, Jeanette F., Salisbury 
Cochran, A. Mildred, Takoma Park 
Crisp, Mary B., Baltimore. 
Davis, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 
Doub, June B., Hagerstown 
Farrell, Albert B., Washington, D. C. 
Fatkin, Marshall W., Luke 
Forsyth, Blanche E., Friendsvllle 
Gebelein, Conrad G., Baltimore 
Gretz, Harry B., Washington, D. C. 
Hall, Thomas W., Bel Air 
Headley, L. Coleman, College Park 
Henley, Robert C, Washington, D. C. 
Hepler, M. Eleanor, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Higgins, Marjorie A.. Hurlock 
Humelsine, Carlisle H., Hagerstown 
Jimmyer, John K., Baltimore 
Kreiter, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
Lane, M. Helen, Goldsboro 
Laws, Lucile V., Silver Spring 



Posey, Margaret A., La Plata 

Reuling, Fay I., Baltimore 

Rohr. Aileen M., Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 

Rowland, M. Jean, Washington, D. C. 

Sachs, George H., Washington, D. C. 

Sanford, Leora L., Chevy Chase 

Shank, R. Karl, Hagerstown 

Slye, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 

Small, Florence F., Hyattsville 

Smith, Dorothy, Hyattsville 

Sonen, Milo W., Washington, D. C. 

Stiles, Edith L., Rockville 

Terhune, Kathryn M., Washington, D. C. 

Thompson, Elizabeth B., Daytona Beach, 

Fla. 
Turner, Evelyn C, Salisbury 
Turner, Virginia P., Salisbury 
Wall, Christine L., Catonsville 
Weld, John R., Sandy Spring 
Zerman, Claire E., Trenton, N. J. 
Zimmerman, James F., Frederick 

CLASS 

Lightfoot, Georgiana C, Takoma Park. 
Lombardo, Michael A., Newark, N. J. 
Melchior, Donald F., Baltimore 
Merritt, H. Virginia, Dundalk 
Minker, Dorothy, Washington, D. C. 
Nordeen, Eleanor C, Mt. Rainer 
Norris, Elizabeth M., Washington, D. C. 
Parker, Harry E., East New Market 
Pence, Mary, Conway, Ark 
Pfeiflfer, Paul E., Annapolis 
Pusey, J. Frank, Delmar, Del. 
Ryan, Michael J., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Schwartz, Mortimer, New York, N. Y. 
Scop, Abraham, Catonsville 
Shaw, Roberta F., Stewartstown, Pa. 
Shmuner, Anne, Baltimore 
Smith, S. Margaret, Bel Air 
Stalfort, Carl G., Baltimore 
Stratmann, Elsie A., Sparrows Point 
Sugar, Beatrice, St. Pauls, N. C. 
Swanson, Harry R., Washington, D. C. 
Talcott, Lois L., Washington, D. C. 
Tax, Jeremiah J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Teal, Dorcas R., Hyattsville 
Williams, Margaret, Silver Spring 
Yaeger, Charles F., Jr., Baltimore 
Young, Carolyn R., Clintonville, Conn. 
Zulick, Charles M., Houtzdale, Pa. 



Enderle, Ethel E.. Glen Burnie 

Evans, Halbert K., Bladensburg 

Freas, Karl G., Silver Spring 

Fuss, Lucille A.. Frederick 

Gearing. Jessie E., E. Falls Church. Va. 

Goldsmith, Cecelia E., La Plata 

Hamilton, Isabel, Hyattsville 

Hammett, James T., Leonardtown 

Harlan, Doris E., Silver Spring 

Heaps. Mary M.. Cardiff 

Heffernan. Maryelene, Washington, D. C. 

Hobbs, Dorothy M., Silver Spring 

Jack, Margaret C Rowlandville 

Jemison, Dorothy A.. Washington, D. C. 

Katz, Lillian, Washington, D. C. 

Keller, Ralph W., Frederick 

Kellermann, Eileen A., Hyattsville 

Krumpach, Mary E., Luke 

Lee, Frank D., Baltimore 

Long, Elsie G., Marion 

Lovell. Grace R., Brentwood 

Lowry, Ruth V., Baltimore 

Marriott, Margaret. Washington, D. C. 

Maxwell, Edna C Luke 



Moore, Elizabeth A., Queen Anne 
Morgan, Alice S., Washington, D. C. 
O'Keefe, Bernice E., Rockville 
Polack, Bella R., Hagerstown 
Powell, Dorothy M., Dorsey 
Resnitsky, Isabel, Jersey City, N. J. 
Robinson, Grace E., Baltimore 
Shamberger, Ruth C, Baltimore 
Shipley. Cora L., Branchville 

Sinclair, Dorothy L., Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Ruth R., Washington, D. C. 

Sullivan, Ross H., Pleasantville, N. J. 

Surgent, Michael G., Eckley, Pa. 

Swanson, Margaret E.. Washington, D. C. 

Trout, Dorothy V., Riverdale 

Weisberg, Bertha, Baltimore 

Weisberg, Maurice M.. Baltimore 

Weller, Lucille B., Beallsville 

Wheeler, Elwood L., Glyndon 

Wheeler, Waverley J., Baltimore 
White, Elsie L., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 
Wiser. Vivian D., Branchville 
Wolfe. William C. Altoona, Pa. 



FRESHMAN 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Ayers, Alice J., Barton Bryant, William C. Takoma Park 

Bayley, John S., Baltimore Conway, Mary V., Washington, D. C. 

Beal, Anne A., Washington. D. C. Danforth, Shirley F., Riverdale 

Birkland, John V., Washington, D. C. Dominek, Mary R., College Park 

334 



Alperstein, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Anders. Anne F., Frederick 
Aud, William E., Poolesville 
Beamer. Francis X., Washington, D. C. 
Bennett, Gordon, Cambridge 
Bird, Jane deL., Sandy Spring 
Bishop, Betty J.. Bethesda 
Bohlin, Mary H., Washington, D. C. 
Bowling, Thelma P., Faulkner 
Bowling, Virginia P.. Wicomico 
Bowman. Anna K.. Annapolis Junction 
Brokamp. Raymond W., Glen Burnie 
Browne, Mary E., Baltimore 
Burton, Beulah M.. Washington, D. C. 
Byers, Ellsworth G., Lonaconing 
Callow, Charles E., Mt. Rainier 
Case, Sara V.. Felton, Del. 
Coffey, Lillian S., Landover 
Crocker. Lillian E., Baltimore 
Cronin, Frank H., Joppa 
Cutting, Maude, Washington, D. C. 
Dennis. Margaret A., Berlin— Unc. 
Durrant. Robert E„ College Park 
Forker, Jessie M.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Fowble, Florence W., Reisterstown 
Freudenberger, John G., Baltimore 
Garman, Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
Garrott. Myrtle V.. Knoxville 
Goldberg, Helen E., Kingston, N. Y. 
Grove, Georgia L., Riverdale 
Handler, Sylvia, Kingston. N. Y. 
Hardesty, Anna M., Newburg 



CLASS 

Hayden, Byron T., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Heaps, Laura F., Cardiff 

Howard. William F., Baltimore 

Huber, Nora L., Baltimore 

lager, Helen L., Hyattsville 

Jeppesen. H. Louise, Lanham 

Jones, John S.. Jr., Washington. D. C. 

Knepley, George W.. Altoona, Pa. 

Kuhn, Eleanor M.. Bethesda 

Landis, Phyllis A.. Baltimore 
LeCompte. William S., Arbutus 
Males, Alexander, Pittsburgh. Pa.— Unc. 
Manghum. Shirley. Washington. D. C— Unc. 
Mayes. Marian V., Phoenix 
Mayhew, Elizabeth A., Hyattsville 
McCarthy, John J., Washington, D. C. 
McChesney, Douglas W., University Park 
McLaughlin, Alice S., Hagerstown 
McNaughton, Edwina B., Washington, 

D. C. 
Meade, James G., Port Deposit 
Mileto, Catherine. Annapolis 
Morris, Joseph B., Port Deposit 
Murphy, Celia E., Walkersville 
Nichols, Lee H.. Washington, D. C. 

Petersen, Olga C Hyattsville 

Peurach, John S., Johnstown, Pa. 

Rawley, Mary E., Hyattsville 

Scharf, Thomas M., Glen Burnie 

Schmid, Harriet J., Erie, Pa. 

Shulman, Morris G.. Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Blair H., Mt. Rainier 



335 



Smith, Mildred E., Walkersville 
Sparlingr. Edith R., Washington, D. C. 
Starlings, Cable P., Cheshire, Conn. 
Stillings, Charles A., Baltimore 
Stoddard, Sara L., Hyattsville 
Sullivan, Evelyn L., Hyattsville 
Tetlow, Robert M., Boyds 
Townsend, Frances J., Rivei-dale 



Trundle, Lucy W., Ashton 
Unger, Fannie M., Hancock 
Webster, Carolyn I., Pylesville 
Weidinger, Charles W., Baltimore 
Weinstein, Jerry B., Baltimore 
Williams, Dorothy E., College Park 
Wilson, Naomi L., Fulton 
Wynn, Evelyn F., Washington, D. C. — Unc. 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 



Alderton, Loretta P., College Park 

Beall, Susie C, Beltsville 

Bickmore, Helen D., Washington, D. C. 

Bilbrough, Catherine R., Greensboro 

Blundell, Mary A., Washington, D. C. 

Bonner, Anna B., Hyattsville 

Bowie, B. Lucille, La Plata 

Bowie, Frances M., Berwyn 

Burgess, Maurine D., Washington, D. C. 

Carpenter, Virginia P., Washington, D. C. 

Casbarian, Louise W., Hyattsville 

Chatham, Elizabeth E., Salisbury 

Clark, Ellen N., Silver Spring 

Close, Marion B., Washington, D. C. 

Craig, Madie E., Brentwood 

Detwiler, F. J., Takoma Park 

DeWilde, Jennie D., Preston 

Diller, Frances M., Kensington 

Downing, Elizabeth S., College Park 

Dunn, May A., Hyattsville 

Forshee, Edith D., Washington, D. C. 

Cough, Katharine L,, Laurel 

Granbery, Helen L., Washington, D. C. 

Griffiths, Leonard S., Baltimore 

Grubbs, Birdie A., Washington, D. C. 

Harden, Nellie G., Washington, D, C. 

Hearne, Ethel G., La Plata 

Hess, Margaret S., Silver Spring 

Hess, Palmer F., Silver Spring 

Hiatt, Pearl M., Brentwood 

Hickman, Mildred M., Washington, D. C. 

Hiller, Clara, Washington, D. C. 

Howard, Addie J., Hyattsville 

Howard, Adrienne R., College Heights 



Joyce, Agnes C, Washington, D. C. 
Kasper, Helen M., Washington, D. C. 
Keefauver, Helen R„ College Heights 
Kemp, Mary, College Park 
King, Willamy S., Washington, D. C. 
Lehr, Emily C, Bethesda 
Lines, Helen J., Silver Spring 
Lynch, Elizabeth S., Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Martin, Miller L., Hyattsville 
Matthews, Abigail G., La Plata 
McCall, Mildred L., Washington, D. C. 
Mudd, H. Virginia, Pomfret 
Myers, Constance, Riverdale 
Nolan, Edna P., Mt. Rainier 
Pendleton, Charles H., Washington, D, C. 
Perdue, Anna G., Snow Hill 
Pultz, Kathryn E., Takoma Park 
Queen, Helen H., Waldorf 
Reich, Elinor G. J., La Plata 
Reidy, Kathryn L., Chevy Chase 
Sessions, Ruth W., Silver Spring 
Shoemaker, Goldie G., Bethesda 
Simmons, Ralph A., College Park 
Simpson, Ruth M., Takoma Park 
Sims, Olivia K., Rockville 
Smoot, Mildred D., Kensington 
Tarbett, Clara M., Takoma Park 
Taylor, Mary M., Washington, D. C. 
Turner, Emily B., Aquasco 
Webb, Margaret O., Hyattsville 
Whitt, Marie B., Washington, D, C. 
Williams, Edith M., Washington, D. C. 



EXTENSION TEACHERS-TRAINING COURSES 



Albert, Dorothy E. 
Annan, Clara L. 
Arnold, Charles M. 
Baer, Bankard F. 
Baer, Harris 
Ball, Frances ' 
Bargteil, Ralph 
Baughman, E. Elizabeth 
Benner, Elisabeth 
Benson, Mark 



(INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, Baltimore) 

Bien, Margaret H. 
Blackiston, James T. 
Boote, Howard S. 
Boylan, Edward M. 
Brickley, Clarence E., Jr. 
Brusowankin, Bessie 
Bull, Carl E. 
Burns, H. Spilman 
Cantwell, Hammond D. 
Carroll, James G. 

336 



Cesky. Frank A. 
Clayman, Julius Y. 
Cohen, Sidney 
Conradi, Verta 
Cox, John H. 
Denaburg, Gertrude 
Denaburg, Jerome 
Ptwling, Evelyn E. 
Dickman, Milton J. 
Dietz, Hyman 
torelson, Raymond 
Downing, Rebecca D. 
Dudderar, Charles W. 
Dunwoody, Ruth 
DuShane, Doris A. 
Edgeworth, Clyde B. 
Ekas, Alice A. 
fAy, James H., Jr. 
Freedman, Norman 
Freehof, Jeanette 
Freeland, Minerva 
French, Ella M. 
Galley. Joseph N. 
Gorman, John R, 
Gillan, Andrew S. 
Gipe, Ramon D. 
Glatt, Bernard 
Goldman, Lillie 
Goldstein, Manuel Q. 
Grafton, William N. 
Grimes, John J. 
Gross, Charles R. 
Grove, Elmer K. 
Griffith, Leonard 
Haffner, Emanuel B. 
Hamel, Ramont W. 
Hardy, Earl C. 
Harward, Lydia 
Hawkins, Nannie 
Hays, Howard R., Jr. 
Hearn, Helen T. 
Hensen, Henry L. 
Hepting, Irene D. 
Heylmun, Stanley 
Hild, Charles D. 
Hinson, Eflfie C. 
Hisley, Lillian P. 
Hocheder. Harry P. 
Holden, Delma M. 
Holecamp, Marion 
Hollander, Anna 
Hubbard, Arthur M. 
Hucksoll, William J. 
Jaeobson, Anne 
Jenkins, Adelaide 
Jerabeck, Gertrude B. 
Jirsa, Charles 
Jolly, Julia 



Jones, Julia E. 
Kalb. Merrill 
Karpa, Lillian 
Keating, Lydia 
Kidd. Frank 
Kierson, Belle 
Kinsey, Allan S., Jr. 
Kirk, Harriet 
Kornblatt, Joseph 
Krausse, Harry 
Krotee, Samuel 
Kuehn, Peter 
Levin, Sol 
Ligon, Jennie D. 
Longley, E. Leroy 
Magness, Hattie E. 
Mahannah, Erwin C. 
Mainen, Allan 
Marshall, Charles 
Martin, Carrie P. 
Marx, Ernest B. 
Matthaei, Lewis A. 
Mayo, Charles 
Mele, Virginia 
Merkle, Clifford 
Messick, Carter D. 
Meyer, Arthur A. 
Meyers, George A. 
Mitnick, Harry 
Muller, Howard 
MacBride, J. B. 
McCaghey, Mildred C. 
McCann, Harold R. 
McCarriar, Herbert G. 
MoCollister, Mary G. 
McDairmant, John 
Neilson, Julia M. 
Newlin, Hershel 
Nides, Nicholas 
O'Neill, James 
O'Keeffe, Violet 
Phillips, John L. 
Powell, George C. 
Proctor, Jame^ O. 
Purnell, Andasia A. 
Randall, Roland 
Rankin, George 
Reiter. Charles 
Rich, Bessie A. 
Richards, Ruth 
Rock, Charles V. 
Rohde, Clarence 
Rosenberg, Albert J. 
Rosenberg, Albert L. 
Rubin. Hilda R. 
Saltzman, Michael 
Schmidt. Thekla D. 
Scott. Charles E. P. 

337 



Sheridan, John 
Siegel, Esther F. 
Silbert, Celia 
Silbert, Keel 
Silverman, Frank 
Slade, Margaret 
Smith, Ferdinand 
Smith, Robert 
Spencer, Alma F. 
Spiegel, Anna 
Stevens, Mary A. 
Stone, John T. 
Thoms, Martha A. 
Towsend, Howard 
Vogel, George P. 



Volland, Frederick 
Walker, Dunaway H. 
Waltham, Alan 
Watkins, Robert 
Webster. George L. 
Weisberg, Maurice M. 
Weller, Nannie 
Wiegman, Elgert 
Wilson, Ruth 
Winter, Ralph A. 
Wolfe, Charles 
Wondrack, Walter J. 
Yaffe, Paul 
Ziefle, Howard E. 



Addison, Edmund F. 
Ames, Cornelius 
Armstrong, Milton 
Berry, Ida L. 
Boston, Georgia M. 
Boston, Portia 
Britain, Edward E. 
Brown, J. Alexander 
Callis, Nellie M. 
Carter, James H. 
Gary, Charles 
Cephas, Charles 
Cothorn, John 
DeNeal, Ola L. 
Edmonds, Walter T. 
Echols, David 
Fisher, Gladys C. 
Fisher, Mabel 
Flanagan, LeRoy 
Ginn, Sylvester 
Grinage, Jeanette P. 
Grooms, David 
Harman, Martha 
Harris, Genevieve H. 
Hays, Ella G. 
Hill, John O. 
Hughes, Helen G. 
Jackson, Maricne 
Jackson, Pearl 
Johnson, Carrie A. 
Johnson, Tazewell 
Jones, Reuben F. 



COLORED 



Kyler, Margaret E. 
Lewis, James R. 
Long, Oscar 
Mero, Inez 
Montague, Pattie E. 
Moore, James E. 
Moore, Levi 
Nixon, William C. 
Peck, Edward J, 
Phillips, Hazel M. 
Pollard, Clara J. 
Rawlings, Cephas, Jr. 
Reavis, Newman B. 
Reavis, Bessie D. 
Reed, Milton B. 
Roberts, Lawrence 
Savage, Mary 
Stevenson, Eulalia 
Snowden, Louis 
Tilghman, John 
Travers, Helen 
Traynham, Hezekiah 
Turner, Walter T. 
Waters. Wilmore E., Jr. 
Watts, Reginald S. 
Williams, Arthur 
Williams, Edward A. 
Williams, Leon 
Wilson, Hallie H. 
Woods, Leo C. 
Wright, David N., Jr. 
Wynn. Vernice H. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Anderson, Carroll S., Baltimore 
Armentrout. John B.. Bethesda 
Bartelmes. Raymond F.. Washington. D. C 
Beveridge. Andrew B., Berwyn 



SENIOR CLASS 

Bollman. Roger T., Baltimore 
Brooks. J. Gardner, Washington, D C 
Bruns, Bennard F.. Baltimore 
Bryan. Harry V., Washington, D. C. 

338 



Castle, Noel O., Brookmont 

Christhilf, John F., Baltimore 

Davis, Leon B., Chevy Chase 

Dayton, B. James. Bivalve 

Firmin, John M.. Washington, D. C. 

Flagg, Louis F., Takoma Park 

Foley, Robert B., Washington. D. C. 

Frank. Selby M.. Washington. D. C. 

Galliher, Joseph H.. Jr., Washington. D. C. 

Gall, Ralph G.. Thurmont 

Gibbs, Lewis T., Washington. D. C. 

Gilbert. George E., College Park 

Hall. Austin J., Washington, D. C. 

Hardie, Richard E.. Washington, D. C. 

Harris. Joseph M.. Washington, D. C. 

Hart, William A., Washington, D. C. 

Hensell, Robert L.. Hagerstown 

Hilder. Peter F., Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, William T., Baltimore 

King, Paul L., Washington. D. C. 

Knoche, Henry G., Baltimore 

Leasure, William C, Silver Spring 

Lutz, Richard L., Riverdale 

Maynard, John F., Baltimore 



McConnell, Andrew G., Havre de Grace 
McLean, John A., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Menke, Fred H.. Washington, D. C. 
Mossburg, Philip L., Jr., Baltimore 
Norris, Joseph V., Baltimore 
O'Neill. Bernard A., Annapolis 
Owens, James L., Federalsburg 
Park. Louis. Baltimore 
Parratt. Lyle F.. Washington. D. C. 
Pates, William A., Chevy Chase 
Phillips, Jack W.. Washington. D. C. 
Poole, Charles W., Frederick 
Reading, William M.. Jr., Kensington 
Rimmer, James S.. Hyattsville 
Robertson, Gordon W.. Washington, D. G 
Robinson, Howard O., Baltimore 
Root. Ellis P.. Annapolis 
Ruppert. Edwin L., Silver Spring 
Shipley, James W., Harman 
Shoemaker, Francis D., Bethesda 
Steen, H. Melvin, Washington, D. C. 
Strobel, Henry C, Washington, D. C. 
Volland, Richard E., Washington, D. C. 
Zuk, Walter, New Britain, Conn. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Bartoo, Donald G., Hyattsville 

Beckham, Robert W., Bethesda 

Belt, Kenneth G., Washington, D. C. 

Berger, Herman W., Jr., Baltimore 

Brotemarkle, Martin L., Cumberland 

Calder, Wright G., Baltimore 

Clark, Willson C, Takoma Park 

Constance, Harry S., Catonsville 

Dial, Herman P., Baltimore 

Donahue, William J., Washington, D. C. 

Eggers. Harold A.. Washington, D. C. 

Felton. Charles W.. Washington. D. C. 

Firmin, Philip. Washington, D. C. 

Furtney, Charles S., Cumberland 

Gibbs, Edward H. D., Hyattsville 

Groverman, Arthur B., Washington, D. C. 

Harryman, Thomas D., Baltimore 

Haspert, Mathews J„ Chester 

Heiss, John W.. Washington, D. C. 

Horman, Austin S., Baltimore 

Home, John F., Chevy Chase 

Hudgins, Houlder, Washington, D. C. 

Hueper, Louis R., Berwyn 

Hynson, B. Thomas, Washington, D. C. 

Jackson, Robert A., Rockville 

Janes, Charles F., Oxon Hill 

Kelly, Harold L., Jr., Forest Glen 

Lodge, Fred R., Washington, D. C. 

Lopata. Alexander A., Baltimore 



Ludlow, Francis W., Washington, D. C. 
Mann, Arthur W., Washington, D. C. 
Marans, Allen, Washington, D. C. 
McCool, William A., Hagerstown 
McCurdy, Philip C, Kensington 
McDonald, Thomas S., Ferryman 
McLaughlin, Thomas O., Woodbridge, N. J. 
McLeod, Robert J., Edmonston 
Morgan, Lee, Washington, D. C. 
Mueller, Eugene F., Washington, D. C. 
Ogle, Emerson, Catonsville 
Orcutt, Charles B., Washington, D. C. 
Patterson, Norman P., Baltimore 
Phillips, Clarence W., Princess Anne 
Piatt, Doran S., Jr., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Reichard, Donald S., Washington, D. C. 
Rose, Glen W.. Washington, D. C. 
Roylance, Merriwether L., Branchville 
Savage, Alfred E.. Washington, D. C. 
Shinn, John S., Washington, D. C. 
Shupp, Erwin H., Washington, D. C. 
Siems, John L., Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Warner T., College Park 
Staples, Samuel J., Lanham 
Tibbets, William L., Chevy Chase 
Wedding, Presley A„ Washington, D. C. 
Willett, LeRoy G., Washington, D. C. 
Willis. Alvin H., Washington, D. C. 



339 



Andrews. John T.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Babcock, William H.. Washington, D C 
Backhaus. Albert P., Baltimore 
Baldwin. Franklin H., Chevy Chase. D. C. 
Bennett, Joseph H., Washington. D C 
Bishoff. Frederick M.. Washington, D. *C. 
Bishop, John C. Queenstown 
Bowman, George A., Annapolis Junction 
Brockman, Carl L., Baltimore 
Brode, Carl K., Frostburg 
Brookhart, George C. Jarrettsville 
Browning. John R.. Washington, D. C. 
Cannon. Leon F., Washington, D C 
Chappelear, James A.. Jr.. Washington. 

Chilcoat, Ralph L.. Washington. D. C 
Cladny, Harold. Washington, D. C. 
Collins. James E., Crisfield 
Collins, Ralph A.. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Collison, Malcolm N., Takoma Park 
Connery. Edward F., Washington, D. C. 
Corbin, Maurice F., Woodbine 
DeArmey. Frank T.. Windber, Pa. 
Diggs, Robert S., Baltimore 
Fenton. William R., Berwyn 
Finch, Alvah H., Baltimore 
Funk, William R., Jr.. Baltimore 
Gebhardt. Charles M., Silver Spring 
Gerber, Sigmund I., Baltimore 
Goldbeck. Page. Chevy Chase 
Goldberg, Paul, Baltimore 
Gray, Vernon H., Chevy Chase 
Harris. Fred. Washington. D. C. 
Hines. Stedman W.. Scarsdale, N Y 
Hollister. Curtis L., Washington. D.'c 
Hood, Robert K., Washington. D. C. 
Hutton, Joel W.. College Park 
Jordan, Ralph S.. Washington, D. C. 
Kelly, Thomas J., Bergenfield. N. J. 
Kennedy. Edward J., Baltimore 
Kluckhuhn, Frederick H., Laurel 
Korab. Arnold A., Washington, D. C 
Latterner, Henry. Chevy Chase 
Loweth. Donald C. Washington. D. C. 
Luttrell, John C. Washington, D. C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Lynham, John C, Hyattsville 
Main, Irwin I.. Jr.. Seat Pleasant 
Malakoflf, Norman, Washington, D. C 
Mattingly, Robert L.. Washington.' D C 
Maynard. William G., Baltimore 
McClenon, Donald, Takoma Park 
McCleskey, Benjamin C, Washington 
D. C. 

McKnew, Benjamin P., Laurel 
Meinzer. Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
Mims, James R.. Jr.. College Park 
Muncks. John D., Baltimore 
O'Connell, Daniel T., Washington. D. C 
Odell, Robert C, Ellicott City 
Owens. Herbert M., Federalsburg 
Parce. John R.. Annapolis 
Pariseau. Roger G., Bethesda 
Parsons. Charles R., Washington. D. C 
Peck. Alvin B., Washington, D. C. 
Phillips. Adon W., Bethesda 
Pierce, Charles H., Jr., Washington, D C 
Porter. Wade T., Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Putman. Raymond S., Washington, D. C 
Raymond. Gilbert J., Fort George G. 

Meade 
Reed, I. Lee, Laurel 
Ropes, John C, Chevy Chase 
Roundy, Paul C. Chevy Chase 
Ryan, William H., Washington, D. C. 
Schreiber, Irvin R., Washington, D. C. 
Schwartz, Charles H., Branchville 
Shaffer, Thomas N., Washington, D. C. 
Shearer, RossW., University Park 
Smith, John P., Jr., Washington. D. C. 
Smith. Welch, Washington, D. C. 
Sperry. Harold C. Baltimore 
Steward, John A., Ellicott City 
Teabo, Marshall W., Baltimore 
Turnbull, James, Takoma Park 
Vernay, Howard A.. Jr.. Baltimore 
Walton, Robert L., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
Wettje, Robert H., Riverdale 
Wilson, J. Gibson, Washington, D. C. 
Wolk. Reuben. Washington, D. C. 
Yourtee. Leon R., Jr., Brownsville 



Adams, Clifton L.. Jr.. Silver Spring 
Ashmun. Van S.. Washington, D C 
Bamman, Richard K., Palmers 
Batch. Donald T., Hyattsville 
Bebb. Edward K., Chevy Chase 
Berg. Charles M.. Baltimore 
Boarman, James L.. Brentwood 
Bowman, William S., Aberdeen 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Boyd. Robert H.. Washington. D. C. 
Brashears. Richard S., Washington. D. C. 
Breaden, Richard C. Berwyn 
Brookes. Thomas R., Jr., Bel Air 
Brown, Elton H., Mt. Rainier 
Brown. Lee L.. Washington, D. C 
Budkoff. Nicholas. Lynn. Mass. 
Carpenter. Bryon L., Washington. D. C. 



Clark, Howard W., CoUegre Park 

Cohen, Manuel, Baltimore 

Cook, Robert P., Washington. D. C. 

Daly, C. Robert, Baltimore 

Daneker, Million. Bel Air 

Davis, Preston L., Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Davis, Robert L.. Cumberland 

Davis, William B.. Washington, D. C. 

Day, George S.. Alexandria. Va. 

DeArmey, John J.. Windber, Pa. 

Deeley, Haskin U., Jr.. Baltimore 

Dix, Francis X., Washington. D. C. 

Dorr, George W.. Washington, D. C. 

Duvall, William D., Washington, D. C. 

Eaton, Ralph A., Washington, D. C. 

Elvove, Elies, Washington. D. C. 

Essex, H. Alfred, Washington, D. C. 

Etkind, Irving J., New Haven, Conn. 

Farrall, John A., Washington, D. C. 

Fleming, Harold E.. Savage 

Forrester, James L., Berwyn 

Franke, Harold H.. Washington, D. C. 

Gessford, Richard L.. Mt. Rainier 

Gottlieb, Robert, Washington. D. C. 

Greenwood, Orville W., Brentwood 

Hall, Herbert P., Washington. D. C. 

Harris, George M., Bladensburg 

Hart, Robert L., Hagerstown 

Harvey, Cecil L., Washington, D. C. 

Hawley, Walter O., Takoma Park 

Held, Robert L., Baltimore 

Hewitt, Frederic M., Chevy Chase 

Hill, Harold C, Baltimore 

Hutchison, James D., Washington, D. C. 

Janes. Henry W.. Anacostia, D. C. 

Johnson, Clifford E., Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Stephen H., Leonardtown 

Kern, Richard E., Braddock Heights 

Kestler, Paul G., Baltimore 

Kinney, Robert W., Washington, D. C. 

King, Thomas O., Savage 

Krafft, Robert E., Washington, D. C. 

Krautler. Charles M., Washington, D. C. 

Kreuzburg, Harvey W., Silver Spring 

Ladson, Francis H., Rockville 

Lasswell, Philip M., Takoma Park 

Leaf, Albert L., Williamsport 

Leusenkamp, Harry A., Washingrton, D. C. 

Lynt, Richard K., Jr., Washington, D. C. 



Manown. George F., Baltimore 

Mause, John D.. Myersville 

McGill, Lloyd H. R., Thurmont 

Mears, Frank D., Pocomoke City 

Mitchell, David H., Washington, D. C. 

Molesworth, Carlton, Jr., Frederick 

Moore, William F., Bethesda 

Moran, Joseph T., Westernport 

Morris. Francis C, Washington. D. C. 

Mulitz. Milton M.. Washington. D. C. 

Murray, Harold F., Bethesda 

Myers, George H., Hyattsville 

Nicholls, Robert D., Boyds 

Perkins. Fred W., Jr., Chevy Chase 

Perros. Agamemnon P., Washington. D. C. 

Phillips, Irving, Washington, D. C. 

Poole. Lewis A., Annapolis 

Pugatch. Melvin T.. Baltimore 

Reese, Carrollton E., Washington, D. C. 

Roberts, E. Richard, Washington, D. C, 

Robertson, Eliott B., Bethesda 

Russell, Joseph S., Maddox 

Schafer, George G., Brooklyn 

Scott, Elgin W., Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Scully, Walter D.. Washington. D. C. 

Seeley. G^rge E., Baltimore 

Sherwood, James L.. Washington, D. C. 

Simms, Harvey C, Washington, D. C. 

Smith, John T., Rockville 

Smith, Ralph N., Washington, D. C. 

Stedman, Henry T., Baltimore 

Steiner, Warren E., Washington, D. C. 

Stevens, John W., Takoma Park 

Strausbaugh, Donn P., Chevy Chase 

Talbott, Horace J., Bennings, D. C. 

Talone, Edward R., Brentwood 

Tate, Roy A., Mt. Rainier 

Thompson, Thomas M., Washington, D. C. 

Tillotson, George B., Jr.. Washington, 

D. C. 
Walsh, Ambrose J., Jr., Brentwood 
Warfield, Gustavus A.. College Park 
Warren, Paul W., Washington, D. C. 
West, Vernon E., Jr., Chevy Chase 
Wharton, Thomas P., College Park 
Wheeler, Francis W., Silver Spring 
Witt, Emitt C, Washington. D. C. 
Wolf, Charles C, Hagerstown 



UNCLASSIFIED AND PART TIME 

Guerra. Joseph C, Roma, Texas Holbrook, Charles C, College Park 

Hutton, Junius O., Chevy Chase 



340 



341 



EXTENSION CLASSES IN MINING 



BARRELVILLE 



Bennett, John 
Blank, Samuel 
Bridges, Cecil 
Carter, Edward J. 
Chambers, Gerald 
Crowe, Edward C. 



Diehl, Irvin A. 
Graham, Colin 
Loar, Harry 
Porter, James 
Ringler, James 
Winner, Charles F. 



BARTON 



Arnold, Dominic L. 
Ashby, R. M. 
Beeman, Walter 
Bosley, Charles W. 
Bosley, Paul 
Custer, Thomas 
Dye, Cecil 
Frenzel, Albert 
Hoffa, A. P. 
Houdersheldt, Robert 



Hyde, Chester 
Jones, Thomas J. 
Metz, Samuel A. 
Miller, E. L. 
Roberts, John 
Tichnell, Olyn 
Tranum, Thomas 
Wilson, Jacob V. 
Wilt, Guy E. 



CRELLIN 



Adams, Howard 
Alexander, Luther 
Ashby, Dorsey 
Ashby, Lee 
Ashby, Stanley 
Bowser, Lawrence 
Cannon, Harold 
Dawson, Paul 
DeWitt, Adrian 
DeWitt, Otis 
DeWitt, T. A. 
DeWitt, William 
Durst, Wendell 
Ellis, Dale 
Fahrety, Edward 
Fahrety, William 
Forman, John H. 
Friend, Arthur 



Gilmore, Junior 
Hahn, Carroll 
Henline, Robert 
Henline, T. C. 
Hinebaugh, George 
Jordan, Kenneth 
Lewis, Archie 
Lewis, Burruss 
Murphy, William H. 
Uphole, Raymond 
Reckart, Carlos 
Roy, Arthur 
Roy, E. R. 
Savage, William 
Shaffer, Nordeck 
Skipper, Wilbur 
Smith, Hubert 



FROSTBURG 



Anderson, Roy 
Bretz, Frederick L. 
Erode, Solomon H. 
Condon. Thomas 
Edwards, R. L. 
Edwards, Jack 
Geis, Charles E. 
Glime, Charles H. 
Hendley, John 
Keister, Harry 
Keister, John 



Keister, Russell 
Loar, Stanley M. 
Montana, Joseph 
Powell, Thomas B 
Powers, Frank T. 
Richards, Arnold 
Rephan, William H. 
Smouse, John L. 
Stroup, Richard 
Sweitzer, Ben K. 
Weimer, Stanley 



342 



GORMAN 



Butts, Roy 

Cosner, Sidney 
Evans, Maynard 
Foley, Lester 
Gilbert. Robert 
Hughes, John T. 
King, Ronald 
Miller, Claude 
Miller, Riley 
Miller, W. H. 
Pase, John R. 



Alexander, Guy F. 
Beachy. Elmer 
Beachy. Lee 
Beachy, Vernon 
Butler, Robert 
Durst, William 
Folk, Glen 

Glotfelty, H. M. 

Glotfelty, Ralph 

Landis, M. L. 

Miller, Glen 

Miller, J. C. 

Alexander, Guy F. 
Billmeyer, Elmer 
Bittinger, Harry 
Durst, Garland 
Durst, Harry 
Hare, Clarence 
Henagban. John J. 
Hoover. Russell 
Ohler, John 
Platter, Edward 
Ross, Clark 



Buckley, Harry 
Cosner, D. E. 
Fink, Creede 
Hoopengardner, George 

Jackson, Robert 
Jennings, Arn-ld 



Burrell, Edward 
Burrell, Fitzhugh 
Burrell, Wilbur 
Coleman, John 
Iman, Gerald 
Long, Frank 



Reall, Harry 
Reall, John 
Reall, Peter 
Reall, Walter 
Reall. William 
Ridings, J. A. 
Schell, Harold 
Schell, Herman 
Sisler, Leo 
Williams, G. L. 
Williams, Jack 



GRANTSVILLE 



Patton, Henry 
Schaefer, Charles 
Schaefer, J. A- 
Schaefer, Mark 
Schaefer, M. W. 
Swauger, Ivan 
Walls, John 
Walls, Bernard 
Yoder, A. J. 
Yommer, L. D. 
Younkin, Walter 

JENNINGS 

Ryman, Herman 
Stein, Fred 
Stein, Roy 
Warnick, Homer 
Warnick. Marvin 
Weise. Robert A. 
Wilburn, Perry 
Wilburn. Walter 
Wilt, Harry 
Yommer. L. D. 
Yommer, Qney 

KEMPTON 

King, Arthur 
Kovach, Andrew 
Luzier, Carl 
Ryan. Richard 
Tasker, Albert 
Tasker. Cassel 



KITZMILLER 



Pritts. Fredlock 
Shore. John A. 
Tpsker, O. W. 
Walker, Clark 
Walker, J. J. 
Weicht, Ronald 



343 



Alexander, James H. 
Bittinger, Fred 
Brooks, James D, 
Goebel, Joseph 
Langley. William 
Loar, George 
Loar, John 



LONACONING 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Bohn, Steve 

Brady, Elzie 

Brady, John 

Brady. Oscar 

Carp, Tony 

Conley, Carl 

Grouse. Frank 

Grouse, John 

Cummingrs. George 

Cutchall. W. H. 
Fazenbacker, Eugene 
Feathers, Orville 
Gough, Carl 
Harvey, Willis 
Helmick, Blaine 
Hipp. Howard 
Hobbs, W. G. 
Kinney, S. R. 
Lantz, J. T. 
Lickliter, Don 
Lyons, George 
I^ons. Howard 
Lyons, Melvin 
Martin, Charles 



Beeman, Fred 
Butler. A. C. 
Butler, Orville 
Clark, James 
Cline, Lawrence 
Comp, El wood 
Dahlgren, Arthur 
Dahlgren, Roy 
Damon. Frank 
Davis, Robert 
Dixon, Oliver 
Dixon, Raymond 
Edwards, Harry 
Edwards, James 
Ellenberger, Edgar 
Ellifritz. C. F. 
Ellifritz, Ellis 



Martin, Matthews, Sr. 
Martin, William H. 
Sigler, Charles A. 
Snyder, David 
Steele, Harry 
Steele, John J. 
Sulser, Harry 



SHALLMAR 



Moon, Milton 
Murray, W. J. 
Mclntyre. Albert 
Mclntyre, Claude 
Nelson, Raymond 
Phillips, Clarence 
Phillips, Ross 
Pranda, Jesse 
Prando, Scott 
Prando, Wolford 
Rohm, James 
Shaffer. Albert 
Shaffer, Ward 
Sharpless, R. A. 
Spiker, E, C. 
Spiker, Edward 
Swansboro, Thomas 
Tasker, Samuel 
Turner, Edward 
Warnick, Anthony 
Warnick, Russell 
Warnick, W. M. 
Wright. Harry 



VINDEX 



Ellifritz, Ralph 
Friend, George 
Keefer, William 
Kitzmiller, Orange 
Knox, Lawrence 
Lanham, Lee 
McRobie, Albert 
Michaels, John 
Muffley, R. E. 
Nelson, James 
Simms, James 
Simms, Monzel 
Stewart, A. G. 
Stewart, J. y, 
Stewart, Marshall 
Stewart, William 
Sweitzer, Robert 



Adams, Albert G., Bristol, Tenn. 

Adams, John R., Jr., Takoma Park 

Alderton, Harold L., College Park 

Allen, Rolfe L., Washington, D. C. 

Anderson, Earl J., College Park 

Baldwin, Willis H., Havre de Grace 

Ball, Cecil R., Ditchley, Va. 

Ballou, Evelyn F., Washington, D. C. 

Bartlett, John B., Baltimore 

Bartram, M. Thomas, Berwyn 

Beck, Frances F., Baltimore 

Behrens, Arthur H., Washington, D. C. 

Bell, William E., Cochranton, Pa. 

Billings, Samuel C, Silver Spring 

Blew, Genevieve S., Washington, D. C. 

Blitch, Lila M., StateFboro, Ga. 

Blue, Elmer C, Takoma Park 

Boyles, William A., College Park 

Brewer, Charles M., Hyattsville 

Brooks, Paul S., Buckhannon, W. Va. 

Bruening, Charles F., Baltimore 

Bryson, Beth, Baltimore 

Burch, Dorothy F.. Washington, D. C. 

Burton, John O.. Washington, D. C. 

Caltrider, Samuel P., Westminster 

Campbell, William D„ Hagerstown 

Carhart, Homer, Santiago, Chile 

Carr, C, Jelleff, Baltimore 

Chase, Spencer P., Riverdale 

Citrin, Estelle, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cox, B. F., Berwyn 

Grossman, Mora, Brooklandville 

Cwalina, Gustav E., Baltimore 

D'Ambrogi, Giulio D., Baltimore 

Dean, Reginald S., Washington, D. C. 

DeDominicis, Amelia C, Baltimore 

Douglass, E. M., Silver Spring 

Dozois, K. Pierre, Baltimore 

DuBose, Clyde H., Pocomoke City 

Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 

Dunnigan, A. P., Pylesville 

Duvall, Harry M., Cheverly 

Elliott, Crystol, Oakland 

Elvove, Joseph T., Washington, D. C. 

Engel, Lea K., Washington, D. C. 

Essex, Alma. Washington, D. C. 

Evangelist, Alaric A., Jenkintown, Pa. 

Evans, William E., Jr., Baltimore 

Everett, Edward, Washington, D. C. 

Everhart. Herbert W., Kearneysville, W. 

Va. 
Faber. J. E., College Heights 
Fisher, Ralph C, Hyattsville 
Flint, Einar P., Washington, D. C. 
Flanders. Robert H., Washington, D. C. 
Funk, Clifford E., Boonsboro 



Goodner, Henrietta, Cherrydale, Va. 
Green, Catherine R., College Park 
Grove, Donald C, Baltimore 
Hack, Alfred C, Overlea 
Haenni, Ekiward O., Takoma Paik 
Haller, H. S., Baltimore 
Hamilton, Jean G., Hyattsville 
Hammond, Elmer G., Baltimore 
Harns, Henry G., Washington, D. C. 
Harris, Hillman C, Washington, D. C. 
Hart, William J., Mt. Rainier 
Haskins, Willard T., Binghamton, N. Y. 
Haszard, Frank K., Hyattsville 
Haviland, Elizabeth E., Brookeville 
Heironimus, Clark W., Washington, D. C 
Heller, Hugh A., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Hersberger, Arthur B., Barnesville 
Hesse, Claron O., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Hookom, Don W., College Park 
Home, William A., Chevy Chase 
Houston, David F., Washington, D. C. 
Howard, Frank L»., Hyattsville 
Hunt, Ruth A., Hyattsville 
Hunt, William H., Baltimore 
Ichniowski, Casimir T., Baltimore 
Ingersoll, H. Gilbert, Chestertown 
Jack, Jane W., Rowlandville 
Jacobs, Marion L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Jahns, Frederick W., Jr., Baltimore 
Jansen, Eugene F., Washington, D. C. 
Jarrell, Temple R., Hyattsville 
Jeffers, Walter F., Berwyn 
Jehle, Ruth A., Hyattsville 
Jessup, Daniel A., Washington, D. C. 
Johnson, Mary W., Burlington, N. C. 
Kalousek, G. L., Washington, D. C. 
Kalavski, Paul, Baltimore 
Kanagy, Joseph R., Washington, D. C. 
Kemp, Robert T., Casper, Wyo. 
Lachar, CJeorge P., Detroit, Mich. 
Lakin, Hubert W., Silver Spring 
Lanham, William B., College Park 
Lankford, Mary L., Elkridge 
Lawall, Willard M., Washington, D. C. 
Lear, Samuel A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lehr, H. Franklin, Bethesda 
Lennartson, R. W., Washington, D. G. 
Lenoci, Ralph J., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Littleford, Robert A., Washington, D. C. 
Lofgren, Olga C, Colmar Manor 
Lowe, Charles S., College Park 
Lutz, Harry, Sodus, Mich. 
Lutz, Jacob M., Washington, D. C. 
MacCreary, Donald, Newcastle, Del. 
Madigan, George F., Washington, D. G. 
Mandel, Jacob, Jersey City, N. J. 



344 



345 



Mandrow, Mary A., White Marsh 
Marth, Paul C. College Park 
McCann, Lewis P., Dayton, O. 
McGowan. George E., Baltimore 
McVey, Warren C. Landover 
Middleton. F. A., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Fred L., Mt. Rainier 

Miller, Howard A., Rochester, N. Y. 

Miller, Roman R., Washington, D. C. 

Millett, Sylvia, Pen-Mar. Pa. 

Morgan, Claudine M., Lonaconing 

Morris, Leona S., Baltimore 

Munsey. Virdell E.. Washington. D. C. 

Myers, Gibbs. Washington, D. C. 

Myers, Alfred T., Riverdale 

Nash. Carroll B.. College Park 

Nelson, Eleanor R., Washington. D. C. 

Nusinow, S., Baltimore 

Ostrolenk. Morris. Washington. D. C. 

Fainter, Elizabeth. New Freedom. Pa. 

Parent. Paul A., Washington, D. C. 

Pigman, William W., Oak Park, 111. 

Poflfenberger, Paul R., Hagerstown 

Powell, Burwell B., Riverdale 

Purdum. William A.. Baltimore 

Quinn. Edward F.. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 

Reynard, George B., Hiram, O. 

Rhodes, Harry C, Poolesville 

Rice. Robb V.. Missoula, Mont. 

Richardson, Howard E., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Riedel, Erna M., Gambrills 

Riley, Virginia L., Snow Hill 

Roberts, Bertran S., Westernport 

Rose, Frank W.. Jr.. Washington. D. C. 

Rosen. Harry. Washington, D. C. 

Sadowsky, Irving. North East 

Schneiter. Roy, Silver Spring 

Schutt. Cecil. Takoma Park 

Seltzer, Sarah L.. Washington, D. C. 

Shaw. Ann B., College Park 

Shirk, Harold G.. West Lawn. Pa. 

Singer, Louis. Washington, D. C. 

Sixbey. George L.. Mayville. N. Y. 

Slade, Hutton D.. Baltimore 



Sloan. Joseph W., Bayonne, N. J. 
Slocum. Glenn G., Washington, D. C. 
Smith. DeWitt. Takoma Park 
Soper, Agnes P.. Washington, D. C. 
Speicher, John P.. Accident 
Stansby, Maurice E., St. Paul, Minn. 
Steinbauer, Clarence E.. Laurel 
Stier, Howard L.. Glenelg 
Stimpson, Edwin G., College Heights 
Stinnett. Lucille L., Brentwood 
Stirton, Alexander J., Washington, D. C. 
Strauss, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
Stuart. Leander S., Washington, D. C. 
Sugrue, Berned A., Chevy Chase 
Taylor, John K., Mt. Rainier 
Teitelbaum, Harry A., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Thompson, James U., Cambridge 
Thompson, Ross C, Chevy Chase 
Tillson, Albert H., Clarendon, Va. 
Turner. Carla S.. Takoma Park 
Tymeson. Sidney W.. Takoma Park 
Ullrich. James R., Baltimore 
Volckhausen, Walter R., New York, N. Y. 

Walker, Earnest A., Mount Airy 

Walker, William P., Berwyn 

Wallace. David H., Barclay 

Watkins. Grace O.. Hyattsville 

Weitzell, Everett C. Accident 

Welsh. Llewellyn H.. Washington. D. C. 

Wester. Robert E., Washington. D. C. 

Weyman. L. Arthur. Washington, D. C. 

Whiteman. Thomas M., Washington, D. C. 

Wilkinson, Mabel B., Washington, D. C. 

Williams, Charles W.. Ashland. Ky. 

Williams, Ralph C, Silver Spring 

Wilson, C. Merrick, Poolesville 

Wilson, Vivian K.. Washington, D. C. 

Wingate, Phillip J.. Wingate 

Woods, Mark W.. Berwyn 

Yonkers. Genevieve A.. Flintstone 

Zapponi. Paschal P., Wcoster, O. 

Zervitz. Max M.. Baltimore 

Zimmermann. Verna M., Baltimore 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 



SENIOR CLASS 



Aitcheson. Catherine E., Laurel 
Benedict, Frances. Silver Spring 
Bowker, Lucile, Washington, D. C. 
Carlton, Mildred E.. Bethesda 
Cornell. Barbara E.. Silver Spring 
Cross. Mary E., Queenstown 
Fonts. N. Rebekah. Washington, D. C. 
Goss. Betty J., Chevy Chase 



Merritt, Jeanette R.. Chevy Chase 
Rea. Florence R.. Washington, D. C. 
Rymer, Joan W.. Hyattsville 
Spitler, Elizabeth. Luray, Va. 
Taylor, Mary V.. Ferryman 
Vogt, Carolyn L., Annapolis 
Wellington, Ruth E., Takoma Park 
White, Virginia L., Washington. D. C. 



346 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Benton, Betty L., Glen Echo 
Booth, Emma L.. Brunswick 
Craig, Katherine N., Hyattsville 
Ellis. Bernice A.. Washington. D. C. 
Franklin, Sarah E., Hyattsville 
Garner, Mary F., Washington, D. C. 
Giles, Martha L., Washington, D, C. 
Goll, Katharine E., Washington, D. C. 
Gorsuch, M. Jeannette R., New Windsor 
Hardy, Katharine R., Hyattsville 
Hazard, Edith W„ Takoma Park 
Hughes, Elizabeth, Chevy Chase 
Leishear, Virginia E., Washington, D. C. 
Mattoon, Catherine V., Takoma Park 



Millar, Dorothy V., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Mary F., Silver Spring 
Price, Margaret A., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Schmidt, Valette A., Washington, D. C. 
Snyder. Ruth I.. College Park 
Solliday, Alice J., Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 
Somers, Helen, Hyattsville 
Starr, Margaret E., Hyattsville 
Stearns, Lois E., Mt. Rainier 
Stolzenbach, Helen A., Baltimore 
Waldman, Flora E., Washington, D. C. 
Weaver, Ella K., EUicott City 
Weidemann, Janet S., Washington, D. C. 
Wulf, Vivian E., Washington, D. C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Allen, Josephine R., Takoma Park 
Baines, Anna M., Lanham 
Beall, Virginia L., Bethesda 
Beggs, Mary A., Baltimore 
Broughton, Elinor C, College Park 
Barrier, Letitia S., Baltimore 
Caldwell, Katherine, Chevy Chase 
Cammack, Ella V., Washington, D. C. 
Cochran. Olive A,. Mercer. Pa. 
Cruikshank, Eleanor M. A., Baltimore 
Dahn. N. Eloise, Chevy Chase 
Davis, Katherine I., Washington, D. C. 
Dulin, Jean M. A.. Chevy Chase 
Fisher. Ida A.. Takoma Park 
Galloway. Rhea M., Lonaconing 
Gould, Irene S., Takoma Park 
Hearn. Mildred L.. Washington. D. C. 
Hershberger, Anna L.. Luray, Va. 
Hutchinson. M. Carol, Takoma Park 
Jeffers, Betty C, Washington, D. C. 
Jefferson, E. Marguerite, Salisbury 



Johnson, Edna E., Brentwood 

Jones, Audrey S., Washington, D. C. 

Kaylor, Helen L., Hagerstown 

Knight, Ruth E., Washington, D. C. 

Krauss, Mary G., Baltimore 

Kuhn, Lois M., Bethesda 

Lyons, Betty L., Baltimore 

Meaker, Doris E., Washington, D. C. 

Mills, Josephine H., Cumberland 

Patch, Barbara J., Hyattsville 

Quirk, Eleanor K., Washington, D. C. 

Reville, Ruth C. Baltimore 

Rosen, Janet A., Fort Salonga, L. I., N. Y. 

Rosin, Anne, Silver Spring 

Shearer, Kathleen M., Baltimore 

Smeltzer, Mary B., Silver Spring 

Snyder, Paula W., Washington, D. C. 

Walker, Vera H., Ellicott City 

Weber, Ruth P., Cumberland 

Wellington, Elsther R., Takoma Park 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Abbott, Kathryn F., District Heights 
Adkins, Kathryn, Salisbury 
Bain. Betty B., Washington, D. C. 
Balderston. Helen G.. Colora 
Barker, Marian E., Washington, D. C. 
Beals, Jane H., Washington. D. C. 
Bloom, Betty R., Cleveland Heights, O. 
Bosley, Audrey M., Baltimore 
Byrd, Evelyn W.. College Park 
Cain, Harriet G.. Felton. Del. 
Davis, Barbara J., Chevy Chase 
DeAlba, Doris E., Glen Burnie — Unc. 
Dotterer. Jacklyn S.. Chevy Chase 
Duncan, Eunice C. Washington, D. C. 
Dunnington, Doris M., Chevy Chase 
English, Alice L., Union, N. J. 



George, Mary E., Mt. Rainier 
Hartig, Jean M., Washington. D. C. 
Hill, Millie L., Silver Spring 
Huff, Dorothy A., Chevy Chase 
Hurley, Grace M., Berwyn 
Johnson, Virginia M., Baltimore — Unc. 
Kephart, Jane F,, Takoma Park 
Kolan, Rosalind L., Baltimore 
Law, Betty H., Washington, D. C. 
Lind, Thelma V.. Washington, D. C. 
MacDonald, Margaret E., Bethesda 
McCann, Virginia E., Annapolis 
McGinniss, Bell W.. Kensington 
McGinnis, Verneena, Pomonkey 
Miller, Alma V.. Baltimore 
Myers, Edith W., Washington, D. C. 



/ 



347 



Nash, Alice M. Berwsm 
Nash, Constance M., Chevy Chase 
Neumann, Eileen C, Freeport, N. Y. 
Peruzzi, Dolores M., Washington, D. C. 
Piatt, Helen B., Takoma Park, D. C. 
Pollard, Kitty L., Baltimore 
Pope, Beverly M., Hagerstown 
Samson, Catherine M., Takoma Park 
Schindel, Jeannette S., Takoma Park 
Sherman, Eleanor, Baltimore 
Skinner, Doris E., Port Republic 



Smith, Virginia E., Mt. Airy 
Soper, Ruby E., Washington, D. C. 
Speake, Mary M., Luray, Va. 
Spehnkouch, Lucia A., Baltimore 
Stevenson, Marguerite S., Takoma Park 
Stewart, Dorothy M., Gambrills 
Thawley, H. Eloise, Denton 
Tuttle, Ella M., Baltimore 
Waldman, Fredricka I., Washington, D. C. 
Wilson, Ethel J., Rock Hall 



UNCLASSIFED AND PART TIME 

GrandstafF, Helen B., Brentwood Patterson, Dorothy H., Weaverville, N. C. 

SCHOOL OF LAW 



FOURTH YEAR 

Blake, William French, Baltimore 
Cohen, Elbert H., Baltimore 
Engeman, George Hyde, Baltimore 
Gardiner, Norman Bentley, Jr., Riderwood 
Hurlock, C. Harlan, Jr., Baltimore 
Lurz, Thomas Albert, Baltimore 
Macaluso, Samuel James, Annapolis 
Manekin, Bernard, Baltimore 
Miller, Irvin, Baltimore 



EVENING CLASS 

Moran, Francis Robert, Baltimore 
Moran, John Joseph, Jr., Baltimore 
Patrick, John Francis DeValangin, Balti- 
more 
Rothschild, Randolph Schamberg, Baltimore 
Tippett, J. Royall, Jr., Baltimore 
Waidner, Robert Allen, Baltimore 
Watchorn, Carl William, Baltimore 
Wood, Howard Graham, Baltimore 



THIRD YEAR DAY CLASS 



Boylston, Edward Shoemaker, Columbia, 

S. C. 
Brinsfield, Calvin Linwood, Rhodesdale 
Chesnut, Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll, Bal- 
timore 
Clark, Ernest Collins, Salisbury 
Constable, Albert, Elkton 
Depro, Frank Smith, Baltimore 
Dickey, John Maxwell. Deale 
Digges, John Dudley, La Plata 
Doub, Elizabeth Boys, Cumberland 
Hamburger, Herbert David, Baltimore 
Horchler, Edwin Maxwell, Cumberland 
Kaiser, Joseph, Baltimore 
Karper, Sharpe D., Hagerstown 
Lung, Clarence Wesley, Smithsburg 
McCabe, James Gordon, Towson 
McGrath, James Joseph, Jr., Baltimore 
Miller, Sydney Boroh, Baltimore 



Naughton, Harold Edward, Cumberland 
Pergler, Carl, Washington, D. C. 
Rafferty, William Bernard, Baltimore 
Renneburg, John Norris, Baltimore 
Renninger, Julius Christian, Jr., Oakland 
Roney, James Albert, Jr., North East 
Russell, Joseph Crandell, Annapolis 
Schwaab, H. Donald, Baltimore 
Singley, Frederick J., Jr., Baltimore 
Smith, Everett Irving, Oradell, N. J. 
Stansbury, William Benton, Jr., Baltimore 
Stirling, Campbell Lloyd. Baltimore 
Sullivan, Daniel Stephen, Jr., Baltimore 
Tarantino, Henry Joseph, Annapolis 
Tubman, Vincent Alexander, Westminster 
Verlin, Bernard Monaham, Baltimore 
Whitworth, Horace Pritchard, Jr., West- 
ern port 
Young, Thomas Gorsuch, Jr., Baltimore 



THIRD YEAR EVENING CLASS 



Applefeld, Irving J., Baltimore 
Athey, Charles Edwards, Severna Park 
Becker, James Stephen, Baltimore 
Bender, William Francis, Baltimore 
Bloom, Joseph Gerald, Baltimore 



Bonn, Douglas Keith, Baltimore 
Buck, Hugh Quinn, Baltimore 
Carr, Eberle William, Baltimore 
Clarke, DeWitt Forman, Baltimore 
Cohen, Bernard Solomon, Baltimore 



Coolahan, Joseph Paul, Baltimore 
Dixon, Earl Martin. Baltimore 
Gamse, Leroy Levald, Baltimore 
Graves, Clifford Holmes, Baltimore 
Houff. Thomas M., Baltimore 
jacobson, Alfred Theodore. Baltimore 
Kaplan, Maurice A., Baltimore 
Keech, Frank Bartholomew, Baltimore 
Linthicum, Sweetser, Linthicum Heights 
Mattingly, Edward Wiegand, Baltimore 



Mraz, Anton Joseph, Perth Amboy. N. J. 

Picario, Philip John, Baltimore 

Power, Gordon Gilbert, Baltimore 

Power, John Carroll, Baltimore 

Reynolds, Lee Bishop, Baltimore 

Rouse, James Wilson, Easton 

Stissel, Carl Frederick, Baltimore 

Tucker, William Randolph, Baltimore 

Walker, D. Merle, Baltimore 

Wesner, Lawrence Everingham, Baltimore 



SECOND YEAR DAY CLASS 



Barron, William Wallace, Baltimore 
BuzzelU Allen Eugene, Sparrows Point 
Caiscaden, William Robert, Cumberland 
Cullen, Richard Edmund, Delmar, Del. 
Ewing, Sherley, Baltimore 
James, William Smith, Havre de Grace 
Jencks, Elizabeth Pleasants, Baltimore 
Karow, William Kenneth, Baltimore 
Lipin, Edward John, Pasadena 
Maginnis, Paul Tobin, Baltimore 
McFaul, Harry Algire, Baltimore 
Meyers, Amos I., Baltimore 
Moore, Charles Davis, Baltimore 



SECOND YEAR 

Athey, William Bernard, II. Severna Park 
Boyd, J. Frank, Barstow 
Boyd, Omar Klauder, Baltimore 
Cohen, Jerome Bernard, Baltimore 
Cooper, Norman Edgar, Baltimore 
Culverwell. J. Mason, Sparrows Point 
Daneker, Clayton W., Baltimore 
Dunn, Sylvan Raymond, Baltimore 
Dunnington, Frank Patterson, Jr., Balti- 
more 
Ferguson, Jean, Baltimore 
France, Ralph Hayward, Baltimore 
Goldberg, Herman, Baltimore 
Harding. Henry Joseph, Baltimore 
Higinbothom, Edward Dulany, Bel Air 
Hoffman, Grace, Baltimore 



Morton, James Cooke, Jr., Linthicum 

Heights 
Perman, Morris Louis, Baltimore 
Potts, Charles Joseph, Salisbury 
Rouse, John Gould, Jr.. Baltimore 
Schaub, Edward Anthony, Jr., Baltimore 
Sfekas, Pete, Baltimore 
Sinskey, Henry Lyon, Jr., Baltimore 
Struzinski, Henry Paul, Baltimore 
Toula, Jaroslav Jerry, Baltimore 
Tyler, J. Edward, III. Baltimore 
Warhol, John, Jr., Mahwah, N. J. 
Welsh, John Thomas, Cumberland 
Williams, Robert Hope, Jr., Baltimore 

EVENING CLASS 

Hohman, Martin Aloysius, Baltimore 
Hood, Mary Dorothy. Baltimore 
Hopkins, Samuel. Catonsville 
Jackson, Charles Elmer, Jr.. Baltimore 
Karasik, Abe Sidney, Baltimore 
Katzenstein, Alvin. Baltimore 
Kelly, Caleb Redgrave. Baltimore 
Mclntyre, Edward LeRoy. Baltimore 
Mitchell, Joseph Paul. Baltimore 
Motry, George Oswald, Baltimore 
Mueller, Henry Anthony, Baltimore 
Sattler, Eugene Joseph, Baltimore 
Silverman, Arnold, Baltimore 
Storm, Edward Daniels, Frederick 
Sybert, Edward James, Elkridge 
Thompson, Charles Wellington, Baltimore 



FIRST YEAR DAY CLASS 



Archer, Robert Harris, Jr., Bel Air 
Ayres, Mary Ann, Ocean City 
Barbour, John Kent, Jr., Baltimore 
Barrett. John Herbert, Jr., Baltimore 
Bartlett, Thomas Rogers, Baltimore 
Beck, James Dudley, Baltimore 
Beck, S. Scott, Jr., Chestertown 
Bell, Julius Raymond, Baltimore 
Benjamin, Paul Elmer, Baltimore 
Benson, Alvin LaMar, Westminster 



Bernstein, Leonard Samuel. Baltimore 
Clark, John Lawrence, Ellicott City 
Colgan, C. Warren, Baltimore 
Dove, Samuel Busey. Jr., Annapolis 
Duggan, William Matthew, Aberdeen 
Earnshaw, Benjamin Arthur, Baltimore 
Ellis, Joseph Alpheus. Hebron 
Evarts, Roger Sherma*n, Towson 
Farrell, Joseph William, Baltimore 
Filler, Edwin Walter, Baltimore 



348 



349 



Frailey, Carson Gray, Emmitsburg 
Garfunkel, Sylvan Adler, Savannah, Ga. 
Gillis, Lee Seth, St. Michaels 
Groldstein, Louis Lazarus, Prince Frederick 
Handy, Francis Davis, Baltimore 
Harkness, David Arthur, Mutual 
Hecht, Isaac, Baltimore 
Hopkins, Roger Brooke, Jr., Wocdbrcok 
Horsey, Thomas Clayton, Jr., Greensboro 
Jacob, John Edwin, Jr., Baltimore 
Kirsner, Milton Franklin, Baltimore 
Laughlin, James Francis, Jr., Wet^tor: port 
Long, Eloise Genevieve, Salif^bury 
Long, John William, Fruitland 
Love, Richard Harvey, Hyattsville 
Macgill, James, Simpsonville 
Magers, John Edgar, Jr., Ruxton 
M«Greevy, John Rowan, Baltimore 
Meiser, Woodrow Wilson, Baltimore 
Meyer, Bernard Stern, Baltimore 
Mitchell, Robert Watson, Salisbury 
Murray, Donald Gaines, Baltimore 

FIRST YEAR 

Alexander, Eugene Archibald, Frederick 
Andrew, Thomas Gordon, Baltimore 
Banks, Talbot Winchester, Baltimore 
Barclay, Frederick Henry, Jr., Baltimore 
Blackhurst, James Watts, Baltimore 
Bowles, Martin Clint, Baltimore 
Buppert, Doran Henry, Baltimore 
Clark, Louis Dorsey, EUicott City 
Cohen, Irvin Henry, Baltimore 
Coughlin, Peter Cornelius, Baltimore 
Daley, James Lawrence, 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Dyer, Harry E., Jr., Havre de Grace 
Farinholt, Leroy Whiting, Jr., Baltimore 
Green, Thomas Opie, Jr., Towson 
Hardesty, S. Aloysius, Baltimore 
Hart, Matthew H., Baltimore 
Hartzell, Harry Oscar, Jr., Baltimore 
Haydon, Robert Lee, Jr., Hyattsville 
Hopkins, John Henry, IV, West River 
Jobson, George Jarvis, Catonsville 
Joyce, Jerome Joseph, Baltimore 
Kirby, Raymond Aloysius, Baltimore 
Kolker, Fabian Homer, Baltimore 
Kutz, Harvey Doner, Baltimore 
Lassotovitch, Vladimir Stephen, 

Havre de Grace 



Nowak, Henry Lawrence, Wilmington, Del. 
Ostroff, Julius Joseph, Baltimore 
Pearson, Craven Pearre, Jr., Elkridge 
Prettyman, Charles Wesley, Rockville 
Rascovar, Roy Lewis, Baltimore 
Riehl, Louis Milton, Lansdowne 
Robb, John MacDonald, Cumberland 
Round, Simeon Joseph, Baltimore 
Rubin, Jesse Jay, Baltimore 
Starr, John Edward, Hyattsvile 
Sullivan, John Carroll, Jr., Bal'imore 
Tull, Miles Tawes, Marion 
Waterman, Caroline Henrietta, 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Weir, Albert Edward, Baltimore 
Welsh, Paul Edward, Baltimore 
Wenchel, John Philip, II, 

Washington, D. C, 
Whalin, Cornelius, Hyattsville 
Williams. Thomas Bayard, Jr., Baltimore 
Williamson, George Lewis, Cumberland 

EVENING CLASS 

Levinson, Irvin Armand, Baltimore 
Loeser, Richard Alan, Baltimore 
Long, Hugh Blair Grigsby, Baltimore 
Lubinski, Edmund William, Baltimore 
Lunt, William Burnham, Baltimore 
Mackenzie, Robert Henry, Baltimore 
McKenrick, Stratford Eyre, Baltimore 
Newcomb, Lamar Adrian, Baltimore 
Peace, Robert Lee, Round Bay 
Plant, Albin Joseph, Baltimore 
Pcsner, Louis, Baltimore 
Rasin, Alexander Parks, Jr., Chestertown 
Redmond, James Albert, Jr., Baltimore 
Rich, Charles Stanley, Baltimore 
Rittenhouse, Charles Kieffer, Baltimore 
Russell, Turner Reuben, Baltimore 
Saks, Benson Jay, Baltimore 
Scherr, Max, Baltimore 
Schneider, John Zacharia, Catonsville 
Sheridan, Hugh Lewis, Baltimore 
Siemon, John Alfred, Baltimore 
Slowik, Lawrence Raymond, Baltimore 
Tiralla, Henry Merryman, Jr., Baltimore 
Tobler, John Oscar, Baltimore 
Topper, Bernard Carroll, Baltimore 
Wilson, Frank Kennedy, Jr., Baltimore 
Wisotzki, Clark Thompson, Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



UNCLASSIFIED DAY 

Martin, Richard, Baltimore 

UNCLASSIFIED EVENING 

Coonan, Margaret Elizabeth, Baltimore Warfel, Robert Warren, Havre de Grace 

Loden, Joseph Daniel, Catonsville White, Edgar Alfred, Annapolis 

Scoll. Hannah-Leah, Baltimore 

350 



Beck, Frances Ford, Baltimore 

Carr, C. Jelleff, Baltimore 

Dozois. K. Pierre, Baltimore 

Evans, William Ellsworth, Jr., Baltimore 



Painter, Elizabeth Edith, Baltimore 
Teitelbaum, Harry Allen, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Thompson, James Upshur, Cambridge 



SENIOR CLASS 



Batalion, Abraham Louis, Baltimore 
Beers, Reid Lafeal, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Bernstein, Milton, Baltimore 
Bieren, Roland Essig, Baltimore 
Booth, Harold Thomas, North Tarrytown. 

N. Y. 

Bowie, Harry Clay, La Plata 

Bunn, James Harry, Jr., Henderson, N. C. 

Burka, Irving, Washington, D. C. 

Burns, Harold Hubert, Girardville, Pa. 

Burton. Jerome Kermit, Catonsville. 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, Hampstead 

Chesson, Andrew Long, Elizabeth City, 

N. C. 
Coplin, George Joseph, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Ctibor, Vladimir Frantisek, Ridgewood, 

N. J. 
Curtis, Leo Michael, Baltimore 
Davidson, Nachman, Baltimore 
Davis, George Howey, Brunswick 
Deehl, Seymour Ralph, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Dittmar, Stuart Watt, Ingram, Pa. 
Dixon, Darius McClelland, Oakland 
Drozd, Joseph, Baltimore 
Feldman, Jerome, Baltimore 
Fissel, John Edward, Jr., Baltimore 
Fox, Lester Mitchel, Baltimore 
Franklin, Philip Lair, Baltimore 
Frich, Michael Garland, Belle Vernon, Pa. 
Gillis, Marion Howard, Jr., St. Michaels 
Gimbel, Harry Solomon, Baltimore 
Glassner, Frank, Baltimore 
Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., Jersejrtown, Pa. 
Greengold, David Bernard, Annapolis 
Gregory, Philip Orson, Boothbay Harbor, 

Me. 
Greifinger, William, Newark, N. J. 
Grollman, Jaye, Baltimore 
Herman, Daniel Loeb, Baltimore 
Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, Baltimore 
Jones, Ceirianog Henry, Scranton, Pa. 
Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr., Mount Hope. 

W. Va. 
Karfgin, Walter Esselman, Baltimore 
Karpel, Saul, New York, N. Y. 
Katz, Joseph, Baltimore 
Kleiman, Norman, Baltimore 
Knobloch, Howard Thomas, Greensburg, Pa. 



Kolodner, Louis Joseph, Baltimore 
Kroll, Louis Joseph, Baltimore 
Lipin, Raymond Joseph, Pasadena 
Lowman, Robert Morris, Baltimore 
Lund, Grant, St. George, Utah 
Mansfield, William Kenneth, Carnegie, Pa. 
Maser, Louis Robert, Baltimore 

McCauley, Arthur Franklin, BaLimore 
McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr.. Riverdale 
McNinch, Eugene Robinson, West Alexan- 
der, Pa. 

Moran, James Blessing, Providence, R. I. 

Moran. James Patrick, New York, N. Y. 

Moses, Benjamin Bernard, Baltimore 

Myerovitz, Joseph Robert, Baltimore 

Myers, William, Pittsburgh. Fa. 

Nester, Hansford Dorsey, Ronceverte, W. 

Va. 

Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Providence, R. I. 
Nicholson, Morris John, Dundalk 
Nowak, Sigmund Roman, Baltimore 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., Passaic, 

N. J. 
Parr, William Andrew, Baltimore 
Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., Park Hall 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante. Bloomfield. 

N. J. 
Pigman, Carl, Farraday, Kentucky 
Reichel. Samuel Marvin, Annapolis 
Reynolds, John Henry, Jr., Kennett Square. 

Pa. 
Rochlin, Narcisse, Baltimore 
Roseman, Ralph Bernard, Philadelphia. Pa 
Rosenthal, Victor, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Royster, James Dan, Bullock, N. C. 
Schmieler, George Peter, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Selby, George Durward, Baltimore 
Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph, Baltimore 
Smith, William Caiey, Goldsboro. N. C. 
Solomon, Cyril, Baltimore 
Sorin, Matthew, Jersey City, N. J. 
Spain, David Michael, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr., Elkton 
Stapen. Milton Honore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Stecher, Joseph Louis, Baltimore 
Steinberg, Samuel, Baltimore 
Stern, Morris Harold, Passaic, N. J. 
Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, Baltimore 



351 






Terr, Isaac, New York, N. Y. 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph. New Bedford, 
Mass. 

Tierney, Lawrence Matthew, West Haven. 
Conn. 

Troutman, Baxter Suttles, Adder. N. C. 
Viewegr, George Louis. Jr.. Wheeling. W. 
Va. 

Waller, William Kennedy, Baltimore 



Wehner. Daniel George, Baltimore 
Weinstein, Jacob Joseph, Baltimore 
Wells, Gibson Jackson, Baltimore 
Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., Baltimore 
Wilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, Orange. Conn 
Wolf, Nathan, Baltimore 
Yavelow, Charles Sidney. Mount Vernon. 

Zimring, Joseph George, Brooklyn. N. Y. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Abbott. Thomas Gilbert, Baltimore 
Bank. R. Stanley, Baltimore 
Barnett, Ernest, New York, N. Y. 
Bereston, Eugene Sydney, Baltimore 
Brill, Leonard. Baltimore 
Burtnick, Lester Leon, Baltimore 
Carlson, Carl Edwin. New Haven, Conn 
Casanova Diaz. Jose Ramon. Hato Rey. 
Puerto Rico 

Christensen, Roland Arnold, Philadelphia. 
Pa, 

Cocimano. Joseph Michael. Washington. 
D. C. 

Cooney. Robert Francis. Scranton. Pa 

Coughlan. Stuart Gray. Baltimore 

Daily, Louis Eugene, Baltimore 

D'Alessio, Charles Magno, Derby. Conn. 

D'Amico, Thomas Vincent. Newark. N J 

Davidson, Eli, New York, N. Y. 

Deradorian. Neshon Edward. New Britain, 
Conn. 

Diggs, Everett Schnepfe. Baltimore 
Eisner. William Monroe, Brooklyn, N Y 
Ellison, Emanuel Simon. Baltimore 
Ensor, Helen Robinson, Baltimore 
Feldman. Philip Michael. Brooklyn. N. Y 
Finn. John Hannon. Pittsfield. Mass. 
Frenkil. James. Baltimore 
Frohman. Isaac. Baltimore 
Gehlert, Sidney Richard. Baltimore 
Gillespie, John Lawrence, Arlington, N. J 
Goffm, Herbert, New York, N. Y. 
Goldberg. Sigmund, Baltimore 
Gordon, William Cecil, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gore. Robert Joseph, Baltimore 
Gottdiener. Elvin Edward. Baltimore 
Greenwald, Frank, New York, N. Y. 
Hahn, Charles Solomon, Brooklyn N Y 

H^rick, Grover Cleveland. Jr., ' Beckley. 
W. Va. 

Highstein. Benjamin, Baltimore 
Hochfeld, Leo, New York, N. Y. 
Hodgson, Eugene Welch, Houston. Pa. 
Hoffman, Charles Wilbur. Jr.. Baltimore 
Humphries. William Coolidge. Baltimore 
Insley, James Knox. Jr.. Baltimore 



Jackson, Samuel, New York, N. Y. 
Jacobson. Alan, Baltimore 
Johnston, Clarence Frederick. Jr.. Balti- 
more 

Jones, James Porter. Pennsboro, W. Va. 
Kadan, J. Earl, Baltimore 
Kagen, Gordon Arthur, Reading, Pa. 
Kaltreider, D. Frank Olewiler. Jr.. Red 

Lion, Pa. 
Kaplan, Isadore, Baltimore 
Kaplan, Jack Allen, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kaplan, Nathan, Baltimore 
Katz, Albert Herbert, Baltimore 
Katz. Isadore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kemick, Irvin Bernard, Baltimore 
Klemkcski, Irvin Philip. Baltimore 
Kolman, Lester Norman, Baltimore 
Kunkowski. Mitchell Frank, Baltimore 
LaMar, David William. Middletown 
Leskin, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Levine, Leonard Warren, Hartford, Conn. 
Levinson, Leonard Jules, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Linhardt, Elmer George, Eastport 
Lisansky, Ephraim Theodore. Baltimore 
Long, William Broughton. Jr.. Princess 
Anne 

Lubinski, Chester James, Baltimore 
Mackowiak. Stephen Casimir, Dundalk 
Manieri, Frank Vincent, Baltimore 
Marino, Irene Thelma, Allegany, N. Y. 
Matheke, Otto George, Jr.. Newark, N.J. 
Meyer. Milton Joseph. Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 
Muller, S. Edwin, Bradshaw 
Muse, Joseph Ennalls, Baltimore 
Myers, Philip. Baltimore 
Nataro, Maurice, Newark. N. J. 
Novey. Samuel. Baltimore 
Owens. Richard Spurgeon, Jr., Roanoke. 
Va. 

Pass, Isidore Earl, Baltimore 

Pavlatos, August Constantine. Lancaster, 
Pa. 

Perlman, Lawrence, Ridgewood, N. Y. 
Piccolo, Pasquale Albert. New Haven, 
Conn. 

Pokrass. Fred Phillip, Towanda. Pa. 



Resnick, Elton, Baltimore 

Revell, Samuel Thompson Redgrave, Jr., 

Louisville, Ga. 
Rigdon, Heni-y Lewis, Aberdeen 
Robins. Isadore Morris, Luzerne, Pa. 
Robinson, Martin Herman, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Rochkind, Reuben, Baltimore 
Roseman, Ephraim, Baltimore 
Rubin, Morris, New Haven, Conn. 
Riidman, Gilbert Elmore, Baltimore 
Safran, Sidney, Baltimore 
Sakowski. John Paul, Bayonne. N. J. 
Sartorius, Norman Ellis, Jr., Pocomoke 

City 
Scarborough. Clarence Parke, Jr., Delta, 

Pa. 
Schmidt, Jacob Edward, Baltimore 
Schmulovitz, Maurice Jacob, Baltimore 
Seegar, John King Beck Emory, Baltimore 
Seidel, Joshua, Baltimore 



Semoff, Milton C. F., Sea Gate, 

New York Harbor, N. Y. 
Shapiro, Abraham Albert, Baltimore 
Shear, Meyer Robert, Baltimore 
Spielman. Morton Marvin, Baltimore 
Stapen, Mannie, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Statman, Bernhardt Joseph, Newark, N. J. 
Steiner, Albert, Baltimore 
Sullivan, Thomas John, Teaneck, N. J. 
Suwalsky, Sydney, Hartford, Conn. 
Trupp, Mason, Baltimore 
Weems, George Jones, Prince Frederick 
Weiss, Henry Wolf, EUenville. N. Y. 
Whitworth, Frank Dixon, Westernport 
Wilkin, Mabel Giddings. Houston, Texas 
Williams, Richard Jones. Cumberland 
Williams, Robert Roderic. Rochester, N. Y. 
Wolff, Eldridge Henry, Cambridge 
Woodrow, Jack Henry, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Zacek, Frank Anthony, Webster. Mass. 
Zeligman. Israel. Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abarbanel, Milton G., Jersey City, N. J, 

Abramson, Daniel Jerome, Baltimore 

Applefeld, Willard, Baltimore 

Baum, Max, Baltimore 

Bonner, Robert Alexander, Jr., Waterbury, 

Conn. 
Borden. Melvin Nachlas, Baltimore 
Bowers, John Zimmerman, Catonsville 
Bradley, Stanley Edward, Baltimore 
Brooks, Wilbur Starr, New York, N. Y. 
Brown, Manuel, Baltimore 
Bunting, John James, Clifton, N. J. 
Callahan, Timothy Andrew, Jr., Bel Air 
Chance, Burton, Jr., Radnor, Pa. 
Cohen, Hilliard, Baltimore 
Colleran, Harold Leo, Jessup, Pa. 
Coolahan, John Francis, Baltimore 
Cooper, Donald Dwight, Towson 
Costas, Jaime Luis, Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Cowherd, William Jerome, Long 
Crawford, Robert Clifford, Baltimore 
Dausch, Michael Joseph, Baltimore 
Dodd, William Anthony, Baltimore 
Dolfman, Victor, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Eichert, Arnold Herman, Woodlawn 
Feder, Aaron, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
Fox, Lester Irving, Haverhill, Mass. 
Fox, Samuel Louis, Baltimore 
Gareis, Louis Calvin, Baltimore 
George, Joseph Mathias, Jr., Sudlersville 
Gertman, Samuel, Baltimore 
Gibel, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ginsberg, Milton, Baltimore 
Classman, Edward Lewin, Baltimore 



Goodman, Louis E., Jr., Baltimore 
Goodman, Sylvan Chauncey, Baltimore 
Gottdiener, Florence Harris, Baltimore 
Govons, Sidney Robert, Baltimore 
Graff, Frederick Lewis, Parkersburg, 

W. Va. 
Guyton, William Lehman, Baltimore 
Haase, John Henry, Baltimore 
Harris, Sidney, Paterson, N. J. 
Hayleck, Mai-y Lodema, Baltimore 
Horky, John Ralph, Bel Air 
Januszeski, Francis Joseph, Baltimore 
Katz, Milton Aaron, Westminster ■ 

Kelmenson, Harry, Baltimore 
Knox, John Joseph, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Kotleroff, Jerome, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Kump, Albert Barker, Bridgeton, N. J, 
Kurtz, Gerald Independence, Paterson, N. J. 
Ladensky, Milton, Baltimore 
Lauve, Celeste Constance. Baltimore 
Lenker, Luther Albert, Harrisburg, Pa, 
Lipsitz, Morton Hirsch, Baltimore 
Lopez, Hilton Louis, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 
Lumpkin, William Randolph, Baltimore 
Michaelson, Ernest A., Bladensburg 
Milholland, Arthur Vincent, Baltimore 
Miller, Clarence Lee, Hannibal, Mo. 
Miller, Royston, Baldwin 
Miniszek, James Haight, Baltimore 
Molofsky, Leonard Carl, Baltimore 
Palmer, David Waugh, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Post, Laurence Caldwell. Buckhannon, 

W. Va. 
Powell. Geraldine Kennedy, Baltimore 



352 



353 



Rizzolo, John, Newark, N. J. 
Roman, Paul. Baltimore 
Rossello, Juan A., Ponce, Puerto Rico 
Rothkopf, Henry, EllenviUe, N. Y. 
Sabatino, Bernard Joseph, Baltimore 
Sarajian, Aram Martyr, Ridgefield Park, 
N. J. 

Schaefer, John Ferdinand, Baltimore 
Schammel, Adam John, Baltimore 
Schenthal. Joseph Edwin, Baltimore 
Scherlis, Sidney, Baltimore 
Schlesinger, Robert Abraham, Flushing 
N. Y. 

Scott, John Matthai, Baltimore 
Seveik, Charles Vincent, Baltimore 
Sheppard, Robert Clay, Baltimore 
Siegel, Edward, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Silberman, Donald Jared, Birmingham, 

Alabama 
Smith. John P., Baltimore 



Sprei, Emanuel, New York, N. Y. 
Stein, Aaron, Baltimore 
Steinberg, Morris William, Baltimore 
Swiss, Adam George, Baltimore 
Thomas, Bernard Oscar, Frederick 
Thompson, Winfield Lynn, Rehobeth 
Twardowicz, Albin Harry, Baltimore 
Urlock, John Peter, Jr., Baltimore 
Vollmer. Frederick Joseph, Baltimore 
Wagner, John Alfred, Baltimore 
Warres, Herbert Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Welfeld, Alvan Abram, Baltimore 
White, Harry Fletcher, Jr.. Baltimore 
White, S. Cottrell, Baltimore 
Winer, Albert Sidney, Baltimore 
Woodward, Theodore Englar. Westminster 
Worthington, Richard Walker, Baltimore 
Wulwick, Michael, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Yaflfe, Kennard Levinson. Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Aaron. James Philip, Jr., Baltimore 
Abrahams, John James, Port Deposit 
Algire, Glenn Horner, Baltimore 
Baile, John Ray, New Windsor 
Baylus. Herman, Baltimore 
Beck, Harry McBrine, Baltimore 
Berman, Edgar Frank. Baltimore 
Bernstein, Aaron, Baltimore 
Bernstein, Albion Older, New York, N. Y. 
Bess, Elizabeth Grant, Keyser, W. Va. 
Brezinski, Edward Joseph, 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Briele, Henry Alison, Baltimore 
Brodsky, Bernard. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cianos, James Nicholas, Baltimore 
Coffman, Robert Thornhill, Keyser, W. Va. 
Cohen, Frank Samuel, Baltimore 
Conley, Carroll Lockard. Baltimore 
Corbitt, Richard Wylie. Parkersburg, 
W. Va. 

Cunningham. Raymond Murray, Baltimore 
Evans, Virginia John. Baltimore 
Filtzer, David Leonard, Baltimore 
Fine, Morton Norman, Baltimore 
Fink, Francis Thomas, Baltimore 
Fish, Eugene Arthur, Baltimore 
Freed, Arnold Ulysses, Baltimore 
Fusting. William Hammond, Baltimore 
Gaver, Leo Junior, Myersville 
Goldberg, Nathan Zanvyl, Baltimore 
Goldberg, Raymond Bernard. Baltimore 
Goldberg, Sylvan David, Baltimore 
Grier. George Smith. III. Milford. Del. 
Grott, Harold Allan. Baltimore 
Haimowitz, Samuel Isaac. Philadelphia. Pa. 



Hartman, Oscar, Baltimore 
Hartz, Alvin Sidney, Baltimore 
Heimoff, Leonard Lincoln, New York 
N. Y. 

Hooker, Charles Bullard, Takoma Park 
Hutchins, Thomas Manning. Bowens 
Isaacson, Benjamin, Hyattsville 
Jandorf, R. Donald, Baltimore 
Jannarone, Lewis Henry, Belleville, N. J. 
Jones, Charles Wilson. Baltimore 
Kairys, David, Baltimore 
Kammer. William Henry, Jr., Baltimore 
Kappelman, Melvin Daniel, Baltimore 
Keister, Philip Weyforth. Lansdowne 
Kerr, James Patterson. Jr., Boyd 
Kiely, James Arthur. Cortland, N. Y. 
Kinnamon, Howard Franklin, Jr., Easton 
Kleiman. Bernard Stanley, Baltimore 
Kurland, Albert Alexander, Baltimore 
Kyle, Henry Hall, Waterbury 
Lapinsky, Herbert, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lavenstein, Arnold Fabian, Baltimore 
Layman. William Templeton, Hagerstown 
Leitch. William Harvey, Friendship 
Levin, Bernard. Baltimore 
Magness, Stephen Lee, Baltimore 
Magruder. John Robinson, Baltimore 
Marks. Irving Lowell, Baltimore 
McClafferty, William James, Jr., 

West Warwick, R. I. 
McGinity, Francis Rowland, Baltimore 
McLaughlin, Francis Joseph, Towson 
Meyer, Alvin Francis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miller. William Shepherd, Baltimore * 
Minor, Michael Maurice, Kelayres. Pa. 



354 



Moran, John Anthony. Conway, Mass. 
Nuttall, James Baker, Sharptown 
polek, Melvin Frank, Baltimore 
Reimann, Dexter LeRoy, Baltimore 
Richter, Conrad Louis, Baltimore 
Rochberg, Samuel, Passaic. N. J. 
Ruzicka, Edwin Russell, Baltimore 
Sadove. Max Samuel, Baltimore 
Scher, Isadore. Baltimore 
Sexton, Thomas Scott, Sistersville, W. Va, 
Siegel, Maurice Bert, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Smoak, Philip Laurens, Tampa, Fla. 
Solarz, Sylvan Daniel, Baltimore 
Spiegel, Herbert, McKeesport, Pa. 
Steger, William Joseph, Wheeling, W. Va. 



Stevens, Leland Bates, Millington 
Stires, Carroll Chapin, Baltimore 
Tartikoff, George, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Taylor, William Wallace, Williamsport 
Thomas, Ramsay Berry, Towson 
Wallenstein, Leonard, Baltimore 
Wanner, Jesse Rosenberger, Jr., Salisbui-y 
Weisberg, Millard, Baltimore 
Whitworth, Fuller Barnard, Westernport 
Wilder. Milton Jay. Baltimore 
Williams, Herman Joseph, Reading, Pa. 
Wilner, Sol, New York, N. Y. 
Wilson, Harry Thomas, Jr., Baltimore 
Zalis. Daniel Leonard, Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Wylie, Alice Bonsai, Baltimore 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Evans, Ethel Irene, Dundalk 

Hoddinott, Beatrice Edison, Harrington, 

Del. 
Price, Ruth Rattenbury, Denton 



Rullman, June, Towson 

Shimp, Marie Hopfield, Baltimore 

Wilson, Lillian Louise, Pocomoke City 



SENIOR CLASS 



Bowling, Vernice Lee, Elm City, N. C. 
Claiborne, Nina Stirling, Beckley, W. Va. 
Connelly, Frances Emily, Rising Sun 
DeLawter, Margaret Tressa, Williamsport 
Dodson, Ruth Elizabeth, Baltimore 
Dooley, Angela Rose, Linthicum Heights 
Fowble, Mary Eleanor, Upperco 
Heilman, Marian Elizabeth, Weirton, 

W. Va. 
Johannes, Norma Louise, Pekin, 111. 
Kefauver, Mary Catherine, Smithsburg 
Knoeller, Mary Olree, Waverly. Va. 
Lindsay. Grace Elizabeth. Lexington, N. C. 
Lloyd, Glylispie Doris. Whiteford 



Lubinski. Sophie Ann. Baltimore 
Magaha. Annabelle Louise, Frederick 
Miller. Hazel Almeda, Fawn Grove, Pa. 
Myers, Charlotte Fisher, Baltimore 
Odom, Marguerite, Ahoskie, N. C. 
O'Sullivan, Anne Jessup, Hertford, N. C. 
Riley, Delia Pauline. Emmitsburg 
Rose, Margaret Bowen. Atlanta. Ga. 
Smith. Florence Beryl. Marlinton, W. Va. 
Tayloe. Frances. Ahoskie. N, C. 
Thomas. Lucile Gordon. Jefferson. S. C. 
Thompson, Ruby Jean, Logan, W. Va. 
Wicker, Virginia Dare Courtney, Danville, 
Va. 



INTERMEDIATE CLASS 



Banes, Mary Virginia, Manokin 
Bosley, Wanda Delphine, White Marsh 
Carpenter, Catherine E., Waverly, Va. 
Cook, Frances Julia, Catonsville 
Cornelius, Sarah, Baltimore 
Cramer, Mildred Elizabeth, Walkersville 
Dallmus, Esther Mary, Baltimore 
Fadeley, Anne Elizabeth, Havre de Grace 
Hersh, Naomi Grace, Manchester 
Hooe. Mina Geraldine, Charles Town, 

W. Va. 
Kautz, Marjorie Lucile, Somerset, Pa. 



Kluka, Mary, Farrell, Pa. 

Knight, Sallie Frances, Courtland, Va. 

Lewis, Evelyn Edith, Havre de Grace 

Mattson, Evelyn Lucile, Baltimore 

McArthur, Muriel Hill, Charleston, S. C. 

Moye, Louise Manning. (Joldsboro, N. C. 

O'Connor. Beatrice Patricia, Sanford, Fla. 

Parks, Willye Frances, Parksley, Va. 

Pennington, Rose, Bel Air. 

Pilgrim, Beatrice Lorraine, Chambersburg, 

Pa. 
Quarterman, Lena Winifred, Nicholls, Ga. 



355 



Rajnne, Carolyn Roberta, Fullerton 
Rudisill, Mary Laurie, Iron Station, N. C. 
Sappington, Frances Virginia, Hagerstown 
Scarborough, Dusetta Elizabeth, Street 
Shaffer, Charlotte Eileen, Hampstead 
Sherrill, Evelyn Freelove, Sparks 
Skinner, Mary Imogene, Shepherds town, 

W. Va. 
Slick, Jane Isabelle, Hagerstown 



Stauffer, Eleanor Frances, Cardiff 
Strickland, Elizabeth R., Curwensville, Pa. 
Sutton, Edna Earl, Goldsboro, N. C. 
Toom, Dorothy, Knoxville, Iowa 
Turner, Margaret Catherine, Mayodan, 

N. C. 
Wagner, Helen Kathryn, Barrackville, 

W. Va. 
Wilson, Mabyl Jane, Belleville, Pa. 



SENIOR CLASS 



JUNIOR CLASS 



♦Bates, Victoria Willard, Greenville, S. C. 
♦Baughman, Anna Mildred, Somerset, Pa. 
♦Coleman, Dorothy Ellen, Livermore, Pa. 
♦Coleman, Myrtle Ashley, Baltimore 
♦Connelly, Nancy Virginia, Rising Sun 
♦Dees, Mary Ann, Goldsboro, N. C. 
♦Gambill, Treva IjOU, Bel Air 
♦Garrison, Alice Virginia, Washington, 
D. C. 



♦Haugh, Gwendolyn, Upperco 
♦McNabb, Lena, Greeneville, Tenn. 
♦Monath, Vivian Virdin, Hagerstown 
♦Stephenson, Doris Virginia, Baltimore 
♦Strawbridge, Minnie Gemmill, 

Fawn Grove, Pa. 
♦Tharpe, Iva Lois, Bel Air 
♦Wilson, Kathryn, Randallstown 



PROBATION CLASS 



Albright, Ann Elizabeth, Nanticoke 
Bowling, Ada Grey, Elm City, N. C. 
Bunn, Mildred Wilson, Spring Hope, N. C. 
Burbage, Katharine Elizabeth, Salisbury 
Cox, Mildred Juanita, Four Oaks, N. C. 
Grumpier, Daisy Marie. Elm City, N. C. 
Dixon, Dorothy Lee, Wilmington, N. C. 
Dorsett, Frances Elizabeth, Indian Head 
Eckenrode, Mary Rachel, Manchester 
Elmore, Dorothy Margaret, Baltimore 
Ensor, Beatrice Frances, Westminster 
Finks, Ruth Anna, Marshall, Virginia 
Flint, Mary Jane, Bowden, W. Va. 
Forsyth, Jane Norma, Berwyn 
Graham, Catx)la Beatrice, Hampstead 
Griesemer, Emma Louise, Baltimore 
Hanna. Lois Catherine, Mount Solon, Va. 
Hedrick, Anna Lee, Beckley, W. Va. 
Jones, Florence Ellen, Waynesboro, Pa, 
Kalar, Nelda, Westminster 
Kalbaugh, Mary Esther, Luke 
Kroh, Louise Emily, Chase 



Lepley, Mary Catherine, Hyndman, Pa. 
Llewellyn, Anne Parry, Cockeysville 
Mathias, Gladys Louise, Currituck, N. C. 
Mays, Sara Jane, Cockeysville 
Powers, Lucille Cornelia, Brunswick 
Rafter, Helen Brownie, Morristown, N. J. 
Reaney, Evelyn Anna, Takoma Park 
Schmid, Rosina Dorothy, Baltimore 
Selkamaa, Ingrid Elizabeth, Warren, Ohio 
Shapro, Evelyn Lucille, Frederick 
Stephens, Katherine Elizabeth, Hertford, 

N. C. 
Streett, Flora Mitchell, Street 
Terry, Virginia Annette, Washington, 

D. C. 
Walker, Alice Jane, Ellicott City 
Walter, Emma Lucinda, Hanover, Pa. 
Wert, Janice Marguerite, Sparrows Point 
Winfield, Irma Hott, Rohrersville 
Yarrison, Freda Isabel, William sport. Pa. 
Yeager, Susan Margaret, Thomas, W. Va. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



GRADUATE 

Bruening, Charles Frederick, Baltimore 
Cwalina, Gustav Edward, Baltimore 
DeDominicis, Amelia Carmel, Baltimore 
Dunker, Melvin Frederick William, Balti- 
more 
Hunt, William Howard, Baltimore 
Ichniowski, Casimer Thaddeus, Baltimore 
Jacobs, Marion Lee, Chapel Hill, N, C. 



STUDENTS 

Mandrow, Mary Anna, White Marsh 
Miller, Howard Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. 
Millett, Sylvia, Pen Mar 
Purdum, William Arthur, Baltimore 
Rice, Robb Vernon, Missoula, Montana 
Roberts, Bertran S., Westemport 
Rosen, Harry, Washington, D. C. 
Zervitz, Max Morton, Baltimore 



Bellman, Frank Albert, Baltimore^ 
Berkowich, Melvin Irvin, Oxford. Pa. 
Cherry, Bernard, Baltimore 
Cohen, Sammie Herbert, Baltimore 
David, Irvin, Baltimore 
Foster, Carroll Pross, Baltimore 
Freedman, Albert, Baltimore 
Hewing. Ada Chamberlain, Baltimore 

Hoffman, Asher. Baltimore 

Jacobs. Harry, Baltimore 

Jankiewicz, Frank Joseph, Baltimore 

Kamber, Bertram, Baltimore 

Kandel, Leonard Elliot, Baltimore 

Katz, Gabriel Elliott, Baltimore 

Kleczynski, Thomas Carter, Baltimore 

Levin, Benjamin, Baltimore 

Levin, Nathan. Baltimore 

Libowitz, Aaron M., Baltimore 
Liss, Nathan Isaic. Baltimore 
McNamara, Bernard Patrick, Baltimore 

Moskey, Thomas Andrew, Jr., Washington. 
D. C. 



Muskatt, Edith, Baltimore 

Ogurick, Alexander. Baltimore 

Paul. Frank Ronald, Baltimore 

Piatt, William. Baltimore 

Rachuba. Lawrence William. Baltimore 

Reamer. Sidney Harold. Baltimore 

Robinson. Harry Bernard. Baltimore 

Robinson. Raymond Clarence Vail. Balti- 

more 
Rodney, George. Baltimore 
Sause, Milton Philip. Baltimore 
Shochet, Sidney, Baltimore 
Silberg, Harvey Gerald. Baltimore 
Silverman. Sylvan, Baltimore 
Smith, William Harry. Jr.. Baltimore 
Survil, Anthony Adolph, Baltimore 
Tenberg, David Paul, Baltimore 
Thompson, Paul Howard, Waubay, S. D. 
Tramer, Arnold, Baltimore 
Winakur, Arthur, Baltimore 
Yaffe, Morris Robert, Baltimore 
Youch, Charles Anthony, Baltimore 



JUNIOR CLASS 



♦Entered probation class, February 1, 1935. Promoted to junior class, August 1, 1935. 

356 



Allen. Benjamin Frank. Baltimore 

Alliker, Morris Joshua. Baltimore 

Alperstein, Reuben Robert, Baltimore 

Beck. Sylvan E., Baltimore 

Bliden, Abraham, Baltimore 

Brune, Richard C, Baltimore 

Cermak, Jerome Jerry, Baltimore 

Cohen. Hershel. Baltimore 

Crane, Warren Eugene, Loch Arbor, N. J. 

Damico, Samuel, Baltimore 

Dawson, Leroy Oldham, Baltimore 

Einbinder, Sylvan Phillip, Baltimore 

Ellerin, Albert Abraham, Baltimore 

Enten. Harry, Baltimore 

Fish, Herman Jesse. Baltimore 

Friedman. Charles S., Grafton, W. Va. 

Glickman. Shirley Madelvn. Baltimore 

Gounaris, Themistocles Nicholas, Baltimore 

Hanna, William Melvin, Baltimore 

Heyman, Albert, Baltimore 

Hoffman, Sylvan Allan, Baltimore 

Hope, Daniel, Jr., Ellicott City 

Inloes. Benjamin Harrison. Jr., Baltimore 

Karns, James Roscoe, Cumberland 

Karpa, Jerome Jay. Baltimore 

Kellough. Elmer Robert, Jr., Cumberland 

Kobin, Benny, Baltimore 

Kosakowski, Chester George, Baltimore 

Laken, Benjamin Bernard, Baltimore 

Levy, Frank Ferdinand, Raspeburg 

Lieb, Frank Joseph, Baltimore 



Mayer, Alexander Maass, Baltimore 
Merkel, Henry. Baltimore 
Meusel. Jerome Andrew. Baltimore 
Miller. Milton, Baltimore 
Miller, Solomon. Baltimore 
Mindell, Charles. Baltimore 
Morgenstern. Emma Louise. Woodlawn 
Mouat. Gordon Anthony. Baltimore 
Musacchio. Leo Milton, Baltimore 
Myers. Irvin Louis, Baltimore 
Neutze, John Frederick, Baltimore 
Novak, Arthur Francis, Baltimore 
Nurkin, Bernice Vivian. Baltimore 
Pierpont. Ross Zimmerman. Woodlawn 
Purdum, Frank Lewis, Baltimore 
Rabinowitz, Irving Wolf, Baltimore 
Rapoport, Leonard, Baltimore 
Raudonis, John Anthony. Hudson, N. H. 
Rosenfeld, Israel Aaron. Baltimore 
Rutkowski. Edward Vincent Paul. Balti- 

more 
Santoni, Daniel Anthony, Baltimore 
Sapperstein. Edward Isidore. Baltimore 
Sborofsky. Isadore. Baltimore 
Scherr. Melvin Gerald. Baltimore 
Schumm, Frederick Albert, Baltimore 
Seechuk, William Walter. Baltimore 
Semer. Gerald Melvin. Baltimore 
Silverman. Irvin Israel, Baltimore 
Stone, Harry. Baltimore 
Supik. William Joseph. Baltimore 
Tompakov, Sylvan, Baltimore 



357 



Traband, Millard Tolson, Jr., Sudbrook 

Park 
Turner, Albert Franklin, Baltimore 
Valle, Philip Joseph, Baltimore 
Vondracek, John Wesley, Baltimore 
Walb, Winfield Alexander, Baltimore 



Wasilewski, Theodore John, Baltimore 
Weiner, David, Baltimore 
Weisberg, Ruth R., Baltimore 
Winn, Solomon, Baltimore 
Zenitz, Bernard Leon, Baltimore 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Aaronson, Alfred Irving, Baltimore 

Beam, Merlin Ayler, Garrison 

Bixler, Richard Stevenson, New Windsor 

Boyd, Frank Elmer, Baltimore 

Bundick, William Ross, Baltimore 

Cohen, Bernard Isaac, Baltimore 

Colvin, Ralph, Baltimore 

Combs, Joseph Lee, Jr., Baltimore 

DiGristine, Charles Lawrence, Baltimore 

Edlavitch, Sam, Baltimore 

Feldman, Jack, Baltimore 

Floyd, Melvin Luther, Catonsville 

Fribush, Sidney, Baltimore 

Friedman, Marion, Baltimore 

Gakenheimer, Walter Christian, Catonsville 

Galley, Roland Paul, Baltimore 
Gendason, Harry Benjamin, Baltimore 
Giller, Morris, Baltimore 
Ginaitis, Alphonsus Stephen, Brooklyn 

Park 
Gregorek, Frank J., Baltimore 
Gude, William Diffenderffer, Baltimore 
Hager, George Philip, Jr., Baltimore 
Hamburger, Morton Leonard, Baltimore 
Hamlin, Kenneth Eldred, Jr., Baltimore 
Heyman, Bernice, Baltimore 
Hopkins, Carville Benson, Annapolis 
Jarowski, Charles, Baltimore 
Jones, Cyrus Francis, Baltimore 
Kaminkow, Joseph, Baltimore 
Kardash. Theodore, Baltimore 
Katz, Emanuel Oscar, Baltimore 
Katz, Morton, Baltimore 
Kelley, Gordon William, Baltimore 



Kramer, Bernard, Baltimore 
Levin, Benjamin Samuel, Baltimore 
Levin, Jacob Benny, Baltimore 
Levin, Norman Jack, Baltimore 
Levy, Bernard, Baltimore 
Matelis, Olga Pauline, Baltimore 
Morgenstern, William August. Jr.. 

Woodlawn 
Muehlhause, Ruth Virginia, Baltimore 
Oleszczuk, Melvin Joseph, Baltimore 
Pearlman, Albert, Baltimore 
Pressman, Isadore, Baltimore 
Pucklis, Frank Stanley, Baltimore 
Rhode, John George, Baltimore 
Richman, Jacob Louis, Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Morris, Baltimore 
Schade, Joseph Hollis, Westernport 
Schneyer, Herbert David, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Schwartz, Harry, Baltimore 
Sharp, Martin Burke, Cumberland 
Shuman, Louis Harry, Scotland 
Silverstein, Bernard, Ferndale 
Stoler, Myer, Baltimore 
Sussman, Bernard. Baltimore 
Swearer, Conrad, Larchmont 
Thompson, Robert Edward, Waubay, S. D. 
Vadala, Eugene Clarence, Baltimore 
Wachsman, Irvin Louis, Baltimore 
Webster, Thomas Clyde, Baltimore 
Wich, Joseph Carlton, Baltimore 
Woody, Earl Leslie, Arbutus 
Zerofsky, Harold, Baltimore 
Zetlin, Henry Paul, Baltimore 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Alessi, Alfred Henry, Baltimore 
Allen, Donald Albert, Baltimore 
Amorky, Herman Maurice, Alexandria, Va. 
Baker, Daniel S., Baltimore 
Binstock, Albert, Baltimore 
Blivess, Louis Bernard. Baltimore 
Bowman, Luke Streett, Jr., Baltimore 
Brennan, Thomas Joseph, Baltimore 
Bressler, Sidney Sid, Baltimore 
Brodsky, Alexander Emmanuil. 

Baltimore 
Broth, Henry Morris, Baltimore 
Bull, Trossett Alexander. Sudlersville 



Cohen, Harry, Baltimore 
Dobropolski, Anthony Joseph, Baltimore 
Dorsch, Joseph Urban, Baltimore 
Dosh, Wilbur Hyde, Baltimore 
Ensor, Joseph Clifton, Cockeysville 
Folus, Irving Herbert. Baltimore 
Foxman, Norma Miriam, Baltimore 
Francik, Joseph, Baltimore 
Freedman, Leonard, Baltimore 
Gillis, Andrew Colin. Jr., Baltimore 
Ginsberg, Samuel Harry, Baltimore 
Gitomer, Harold Abraham, Baltimore 
Gitomer, Norman Moses, Baltimore 



358 



Glaser, Louis Lester, Baltimore 
Golditch, Henry M., Baltimore 
Gordon, Jeanette, Baltimore 
Gruz, Nathan I., Baltimore 
Hackett, Angela Rose, Baltimore 
Heneson, Irving Jerome, Baltimore 
Herman, Irvin Ralph, Baltimore 
Honigman, Alvin Herbert, Baltimore 
Ichniowski, William Marion, Baltimore 
Jacobs, Eugene, Baltimore 
Kamanitz, Irvin Leonard, Baltimore 
King, James Forrest, Baltimore 
Kline, Sidney, Baltimore 
Knipp, Harry Oliver, Baltimore 
Koontz, John Edward, Baltimore 
Kovitz, Armand, Baltimore 
Kremer, Beryle Philip, Baltimore 
Krepp, Martin William, Jr., Baltimore 
Leise, Joshua Melvin, Baltimore 
Lieberman, Lawrence Lipman, Front 

Royal, Va. 
Lipsitz, Benjamin, Baltimore 
Loftus, Howard Edmond, Dundalk 
Mask, Jerojne, Baltimore 
Massing, David, Baltimore 
Mendelsohn, Daniel, Arbutus 
Mermelstein, Daniel Morris, Baltimore 
Miedusiewski, Francis Joseph, Baltimore 
Miller, Manuel, Baltimore 
Mitnick, Herbert, Baltimore 
Moser, John Taft, Baltimore 
Mutchnik, Melvin, Baltimore 
Norton, John Charles, Baltimore 



Odell, James Eldridge, Catonsville 
Okrasinski, Joseph Leon, Baltimore 
Pannone, Armand Milio, Cumberland 
Parker, Katherine Justina, Baltimore 
Passen, Lillian, Baltimore 
Pope, Martha Katharine, Dundalk 
Rangle, Raymond Veto, Baltimore 
Rice, Bernard, Baltimore 
Rosenbaum, Joseph, Baltimore 
Rosenstein, Louis Nathan, Baltimore 
Rostacher, Harry Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sabatino, Louis Thomas, Baltimore 
Sachs, Albert, Baltimore 
Sama, Mario Alfred, Baltimore 
Saperstein, Paul, Baltimore 
Sapperstein, Louis, Baltimore 
Shalowitz, Marion, Baltimore 
Snyder, Nathan Morton, Baltimore 
Sollod, Leonard, Baltimore 
Steinbach, Morton, Baltimore 
Sturchio, Lawrence Eugene, Newark, N. J. 
ToUey, Leonard Joseph, Baltimore 
Vanni, Frank Lewis, Baltimore 
Ving, Charles William, Baltimore 
Volkmer, Edward Carrol, Baltimore 
Warminski, Thaddeus John, Baltimore 
Weinstein, Daniel David, Baltimore 
Wicks, Robert Lee, Baltimore 
Wiener, Maurice, Baltimore 
Wikberg, Vieno Hellin, Dundalk 
Wohl, Milton, Baltimore 
Young, George Ira, Catonsville 
Zuskin, Raynard Frank, Baltimore 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Anderson, Clair Sherrill, Littleton, W. Va. Marriott, Beatrice, Baltimore 

Baier, John Cletus, Baltimore Mazer, Robert, Baltimore 

Dobbs, Edward Clarence, Baltimore Priester, Philip Clinton, Baltimore 
Hamilton, Kathleen B., Baltimore 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL— 1935 



Abrams, Norman J., Baltimore 
*Adams, Albert C, Bristol, Tenn. 
Adams, Lida C, Trappe 
Adkins, Aline V., Salisbury 
Albin, William D., Rohrersville 
Albrecht, Ruth B., Glen Burnie 
Albright, Cora E., Cumberland 
Alder, Betty, Princess Anne 
Alderton, Loretta P., College Park 
Alderton, Mary N., Vale Summit 
Alexander, Nelle M., Accident 
Alter, Irving D., Baltimore 
Ambrose, Herbert D., Baltimore 
Amerman, Theodore, New York City, 
N. Y. 



•^ Graduate Students 



Amiss, Helen C, Chevy Chase 
Anderson, Janet T., Cumberland 
Andrews, Flora E., Shady Side 
Armstrong, Esther P., Gaithersburg 

♦Armstrong, Joseph E., Annapolis 
Arnold, Julia C, Laurel 
Asay, Esther, Riverdale 
Ashley, Martha B., Rock Hall 
Athey, Thomas B. .Severna Park 

♦Ayres, Thomas B„ Rock Hall 
Backhaus, Albert P., Baltimore 
Baer, Kathleen, Finzel 
Bailey, Pauline B., Church Hill 

♦Baker, Harry, Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Balch, Clyde W., Hyattsville 



359 



I 



Banks, Elizabeth B., Rockville 
Banks, 01iv« H., Salisbui-y 
Barber, Pauline R., Charlotte Hall 
Barber, Samuel P., Charlotte Hall 
Barber, Tena B., Vale Summit 
Bardwell, Katharine K., Washington, 

D. C. 
Bargteil, Ralph, Baltimore 
Barnes, Edna B., Kansas City, Kan, 

•Barnes, Edwin H., Elkton 

♦Bamsley, Catherine D,, Rockville 
Baron, Herman L., Baltimore 
Barton, Mary W., Hyattsville 
Bartram, Frances S., Berwyn 

♦Bartram, M. Thomas, Berwyn 
Batie, Verna O., Laurel 
Bates, Byrtle Y., Damascus 
Bayley, John S., Baltimore 
Beal, Anne A., Washington. D. C. 
Beall, Susie C. Beltsville 
Beatty, Thelma D., Hyattsville 
Beck, Mildred, Cumberland 
Becraft, Mabel V., Washington Grove 
Bell, Bessie M., Thurmont 
Benjamin, Louis, Baltimore 
Bennett, Bertha M., Upper Marlboro 

•Bennett, Dill G., Sharptown 
Bennett, I. Ruth, Flintstone 
Benson, Brian M., Baltimore 
Berger. Herman W., Jr., Baltimore 
Berkowitz, Melvin, Baltimore 
Berman, Bertrand S., Baltimore 
Bernstein, Norman, Washington, D. C. 

•Biggs, Gerald A., Oldtown 
Biggs, Ruth v., Cumberland 

•Bigwood, James F., Indian Head 
Birch, Marian, Hyattsville 
Blacklock, Josiah A., Towson 
Blackman, Raymond S., Vienna, Va. 

♦Blue, Elmer C, Takoma Park 
Bogley, Samuel E., Chevy Chase 
Bollman, Roger T., Baltimore 
Bomberger, Hulda B., College Park 
Bonner, Anna B., East New Market 
Bonnett, Warren L., Aberdeen 
Bowen, Gertrude E., Bennings, D. C. 
Booker, Carrie G., Barclay 

•Boston, William T., Linkwood 
Boswell, Alice A., Brookeville 
Bowers, Helma H., Frederick 
Bowie, JaneR., La Plata 
Bowie, William B., Bennings, D. C. 
Bowman, Emma M., Berwyn 
Bowman, Urban N., Landov^r 

•Brain, Earl F., Frostburg 

•Brandenburg, Annie L., Lisbon 



Brashears, Florence P., Bennings, D. C. 

Brewer, William, Baltimore 

Brightwell, Ralph E., Lisbon 

Bromwell, Emily, Madison 

Brooke, Roger, Sandy Spring 

Brotemarkle, Martin L., Cumberland 
♦Brown, Beulah G., Conneaut, Ohio 

Brown, Dorothy H., Centreville 

Brown, Elizabeth D., Washington, D. C. 
*Brown, George C, Asheville, N. C. 
♦Brown, Marshall G., Oakland 

Brown, Maud E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Brown, Paul E., Massillon, Ohio 
♦Bruehl, John T., Jr., Centreville 

Bryant, Slater W., Jr.. Hyattsville 

Buckingham, Dorothy, Mt. Airy 

Burall, Margaret O., Mt. Savage 

Burbank, Melcinia H., Kensington 

Burdette, Eunice E., Bowie 

Burdette, Mildred R., Woodbine 
♦Burley, Maude M., Frostburg 

Burrier, Letitia S., Baltimore 

Burroughs, Nellie W., Mechanicsville 

Burroughs, Viola J., Aquasco 

Burton, Beulah M., Washington, D. C. 
* Burton, Fred C, Cumberland 

Burton, Julia H., Washington, D. C. 

Busey, Mary J., Providence, R. I. 
♦Busick, James G., Cambridge 

Byer, Henry L., Sparrows Point 
♦Caldwell, John H., St. Michaels 

Caldwell, Katherine, Chevy Chase 

Callahan, Lucinda A., Easton 

Callahan, Mary N., Easton 

Campbell, Katherine E., Memphis, Tenn. 

Campbell, Marjorie H., Washington, 
D. C. 
♦Campbell, William P., Hagerstown 

Cannon, Catherine S., Washington, D. C. 

Capalbo, John L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Capel, John W., Frostburg 

Carleton, Harold B., Washington. D. C. 
♦Carlson, C. Allen, Crisfield 

Carpenter, Virginia P.. Washington, 
D. C. 
•Carr. C. Jelleff, Baltimore 

Carr, Phyllis O., Bartlesville, Okla. 
♦Carrington, George F., Crisfield 

Carter, Edward P., Washington, D. C. 

Cashell, Irving G., Washington, D. C. 

Cashell, Mary-Margaret, Washington, 
D. C. 

Cayton, Marcelle I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Chaconas, Harry J., Washington, D. C. 
Chandler, Miriam T., Grayton 

Cheezum, M. Lillian, Preston 



Cherrix, Nellie V., Snow Hill 
Cheyney, Elizabeth B.. Ballston, Va. 
Chrisler, Willard L., Washington, D. C. 
Cissel, Beatrice S., West Friendship 
♦Cissel, Eleanor F., Silver Spring 
Claflin, Alison R., Chevy Chase 

Clark, Ellen N., Silver Spring 

Clark, Fitzhugh, Chevy Chase 
♦Clark, Lyal W., Westminster 

Clark, Ralph E., Dundalk 

Clajrton, Dorothy R., Relay 

Clements, Samuel B., Washington. D. C. 
*Clevenger, Helen E., Everett. Pa. 

Close, Annie A., Lonaconing 

Close, Marion B., Frostburg 

Cogswell, Charles L., Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, Sidney, Baltimore 

Cole, Mary A., Church Hill 

Collins, Caroline. Washington, D. C. 

Cook. Charlotte C, Washington, D. C. 

Cook, Mildred L., Hyattsville 

Cook, Nellie E., Hyattsville 

Cooke, Charles H., Washington, D. C. 
♦Cooke, Virginia B., Washington. D. C. 

Copes. Ella, Silver Spring 

Cornell, Barbara E., Silver Spring 
♦Cornell. Florence N., Chevy Chase 

Cosgrove, Katherine D., Lonaconing 

Coulbourn, Alice M.. Crisfield 

Cowie, Jean A.. Perry Point 

Cox, Tessie. Severna Park 

Craig. Madie E., Brentwood 

Cranford, Lela, Washington, D. C. 
♦Crankshaw, Harold G., Washington, D. C. 

Cressman, Kathryn L., Boonsboro 

Cronise, A. Katherine, Frederick 

Crosby, Muriel E., Washington, D. C 

Crossley, George L., Washington, D. C. 

Crow, Wallace J., Washington. D. C. 
♦Cubbage, Nancy, Brentwood 

Culp. Richard T.. Chevy Chase 

Curley, Kathryn, Cumberland 

Curley, Erma W., Washington, D. C. 

Cusick, Mary L.. Anacostia, D. C. 

Custer, Helen. Friendsville 
♦Custis, Edward M.. Louisville. Ky. 

Cutler, Dorothy M., Silver Spring 

Cutting, Maude. Washington. D. C. 

Dahn. Eloise N.. Chevy Chase 

Danenhower. Myrtle B., Upper Marlboro 

Daniel. Daniel R.. Baltimore 

Davidson, Lida M., Washington, D. C. 

Davis, Edward F., Cherrydale, Va. 

Davis, Elsie H., Woodbine 
♦Davis, Gertrude J.. Frostburg 

Davis, Preston L.. Jr., Washington, D. C. 



Davis, Raymond. Jr.. Washington, D. C. 
Davis. Ruth, North East 
Dawson. Roy C, Washington, D. C. 
DeMoss, Mildred V., Cumberland 
Denaburg, Jerome, Baltimore 
Deppish, John R., Aberdeen Proving 

Grounds 
DePue, Catherine, Washingrton. D. C. 
Derr. L. Hubert. Monrovia 
♦Derr. Melvin H., Thurmont 
Deskin, Mark. Riverdale 
♦DesPrez, Frances E., Florence, Ala. 
DeVilbiss, Preston S.. III. Walkersville 
*DeVolt. Harold M., Bameveld, N. Y. 
DeWilde. Jennie. D.. Preston 
Dey, Dorothy R., Wellington, Kan. 
Diamond, Milton A.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Diggs, Ruth E.. Catonsville 
Dinger, Adeline S., Washington, D. C. 
Dittmar, Gordon F.. Baltimore 
Dixon, Beulah K., Pocomoke City 
♦Dixon. Clara M.. Olivet 
Dixon. Marion B., Cumberland 
Dixon, Rebecca W., Mechanicsville 
Dobyns, Elizabeth L., Oldhams, Va. 
Doenges, Helen E., Cambridge 
Donahue, William J., Washington, D. C. 
Dondero. Angela W., Hyattsville 
♦Donoho, Dorsey. Marion Station 
Donovan, Dorothy C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Doordan, Martin L., Bridgeville, Del. 
Dorsett, Frances E., Indian Head 
Dorsey, Agatha V., Midland 
♦Doub. Charles A., Leonardtown 
Doub. June B.. Hagerstown 
Douglass, William F., Washington, D. C. 
Downin, John E., Baltimore 
Downs, Glendora M., Williamsport 
Doyle, Catherine M., Washington. D. C. 
♦Doyle. Mary J., Westminster 
♦Dozois. Kenneth P., Baltimore 
Dryden, Ruth B.. Snow Hill 
Di-yer, Hilda Y., Washington, D. C. 
♦DuBose. Clyde H.. Pocomoke City 
Duley. Oscar, Croome Station 
♦Dunker, Melvin F. W., Baltimore 
♦Dunnigan, Arthur P., Pylesville 
Dunwoody, Ruth M., Baltimore 
Durham, R. Lucille. Forest Hill 
Durisoe, Lela R., Washington, D. C. 
♦Dutterer, Barbara M., Westminster 
♦Duvall, Maude, Rockville 
♦Earhart, Lyman D., Westminster 
Eckenrode, Mary R., Manchester 
♦Edgeworth, Clyde B., Towson 
Edson, Peggie M., Washington, D. C. 



•Graduate Students 



*Graduate Students 



360 



361 



Edwards, John B., Hyattsville 
Ehrmantraut, Doris W., Washington, 

D. C. 
Ekas, Alice A., Baltimore 
Eigenbrode, Sanford D., Jr., Baltimore 
Ellegood, Georgia G., Delmar, Del. 
Elliott, E. v., Baltimore 
Elliott, Marguerite A.. Washington. D. C. 
Ellis, Bernice A.. Washington, D. C. 
Ellis, Elsie B., Cheri-ydale, Va. 
Ellis, Joseph A., Hebron 
Emmons, Elizabeth, Suitland 
Emory, Adelaide V., Fort Meade 
*Engle, Ruth B., Frostburg 
Epstein, Edwin, Centreville 
Ericson, Charlotte M., Hyattsville 
Ernest, Lois E., Kensington 
Esch, Marion E., Chevy Chase 
Eshenko, Annabelle E., Butte, N. D. 
Eskridge, Maude E., Rhodesdale 
Esworthy, Corrie B., Lisbon 
♦Evans, Jesse D„ Crisfield 
Evans, Ralph I., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
Evans, Thomas H., Cambridge 
Ewing, Hanna A., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
Ewing, Margaret T., Baltimore 
*Eyler, Marian G., Cumberland 
Falls, Mildred M., Gastonia, N. C. 
Farrell, Hugh, Metuchen, N. J. 
Farwell, Gladys P., Riverdale 
Feddeman, Edna S., Washington, D. C. 
♦Felten, Eliza C, Wood, Pa. 
Felton, Charles W.. Washington, D. C. 
Fenton, William R., Berwyn 
Finch, Alvah. Baltimore 
Fink, Kenneth, Baltimore 
♦Fink, William C, Cordova 
Firmin, Philip, Washington, D. C. 
Fischbach, Anna R., Catonsville 
Fischer, Isadore, Washington, D. C. 
Fisher, Ethel A., Upper Marlboro 
Fisher, Joseph R., Baltimore 
Fisher, Mary C, Rockville 
Fleming, Euclid S., Washington, D. C. 
Flint, Anne L., Chevy Chase, D. C. 
♦Flint, Einar P., Washington. D. C. 
♦Flook. Elizabeth E.. Myersville 
Flowers, Richard H., Baltimore 
Fogle, Frances M., Thurmont 
Footen, Margaret, Hyattsville 
Footen. Paul L., Barton 
Ford. John H., Baltimore 
Forshee. Edith D., Washington, D. C. 
Forshee, Esther L., Washington, D. C. 
Fosbroke, Gerald E., Elkridge 
Foss, George E., Relay 



Fouts, N. Rebekah, Washington, D. C. 
Fowler, Charles R., Washington, D. C. 
Franklin, Sarah E., Hyattsville 
Frantz, Merle D., Friendsville 
Franzoni, Joseph D., Washington, D. C. 
Freeman, L. Louise, Boonsboro 
Freeman, Willye B., Washington, D. C. 
French, John E., Cordova 
French, Lillian E., Cordova 
Friedman, David, Silver Spring 
Friedman, Harold B., Silver Spring 
Friedman, Jack, Washington. D. C. 
Friend, Chauncey M., Fearer 
Fuchs, Marguerita L., Relay 
Fuller, Ruth M., Riverdale 
Fulmer, Edna M., Frederick 
♦Funk, Merle R., Boonsboro 
Fuss, Lucille A., Hagerstown 
Gaczynski, Eugenia T., Jersey City, 

N. J. 
Galloway, Rhea, Lonaconing 
Ganzert, Mai-y L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Garber, William J., Waynesboro, Va. 
Garey, Lucy V., Baltimore 
Garlock, EMward A., Bethesda 
Gebelein, Conrad G.. Baltimore 
Gehauf, Bessie, Frostburg 
Geltmacher, Katharyn L., Rohrersville 
Gengnagel, Rosella B., Catonsville 
George, Claire C, Washington, D. C. 
Gerrits, Genevieve M., Mt. Rainier 
Gienger, Ada G., Landover 
♦Gifford, Elizabeth M., College Park 
Gilbertson, Kenneth G., Bladensburg 
Gillespie, Fannie R., Pocomoke 
Giltner, Harriet C. Washington, D. C. 
♦Given, Maurice X., Salem, Va. 
♦Glading, Rebekah F., Lanham 
Goldman, Luther C, Washington, D. C. 
Goode, Hazel N. W., Brunswick 
Gordon, Thomas W., Baltimore 
Gossett, Eleanor J„ Washington, D. C. 
Gough, Hazel O., Gaithersburg 
♦Graham, James G.. Washington, D. C. 
Gray, Ellen H.. Reisterstown 
Gray, Jane E., Port Tobacco 
Green, Catharine R., College Park 
Green, Hazel L., Hagerstown 
Greenwell, Hope, Leonardtown 
Griffith, Elizabeth W., Laytonsville 
Grimes, Dora E., Ellicott City 
Grimes, lone C, Takoma Park 
Grimes, John J., Baltimore 
Gross, Charles R„ Stemmers Run 
Grove, Harry C, Fairplay 
Gruver, Frances I., Hyattsville 



♦Graduate Students 



362 



Gullickson, Hazel A., Granite Falls, Minn. 
*Gwynn, Thomas S., Jr., Clinton 
*Hackett, Thomas P., Queen Anne 
Haddaway, Ella, Oxford 
Haines, Helena J., Hyattsville 
Hall, Eleanor, Fairmont, W. Va. 
Hall, George, Washington, D. C. 
Hamill, Lela M., Deer Park 
Hamilton, Elizabeth, College Park 
Hammerlund, Robert O., Washington, 

D. C. 

Hanna, Mary G., Westernport 
Hannon, Agnes, Frostburg 
Hannon, Alice, Frostburg 
Harbaugh, Melba L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Harden, Elmer P., Washington, D. C. 
Harden, Nellie G., Washington, D. C. 
Hardy, Mary E., Silver Spring 
Hargy, Francis R., College Park 
Harman, Louise D., Accident 
Harmon, Katharyn E., Salisbury 
Harris, Herman L., Baltimore 
Hart, Leona N., Oakland 
Hartman, Gertrude B., Camden, Del. 
♦Haskins, Willard T., Binghamton. N. Y. 
Hauver, Catharine L., Myersville 
Hauver, Charlotte C, Hagerstown 
♦Hauver, William E., Myersville 
Hawkins, Elsie, Bethesda 
Hayden, Agnes, Pope's Creek 
Hays, Carlotta A., Braddock Heights 
Hearne, Ethel G., La Plata 
Hebb, John S., Ill, Baltimore 
♦Heironimus, Clark, Washington, D. C. 
Heiss, John W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Helbig, Kathryn S., Oakland 
Helfgott, Jack L., Mitchelville 
♦Henderson, Eleanor B,, Cumberland 
Henley, Robert C, Washington, D. C. 
Heringman, Leo A., Baltimore 
Hershberger, Anna L., Luray, Va. 
Hess, L. Grace, Fallston 
♦Hesse, Claron O., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Hesson, Cassandra T., Thurmont 
Hettleman, Rose, Baltimore 
Heylmun, Stanley L., Baltimore 
Hickman, Mildred, Washington, D. C. 
Hicks, Ara L., Dickerson 
Hicks, Minnie E., Chestertown 
Higgins, Homer S., Cumberland 
*Hin, Elsie, Flintstone 
♦Hitchcock, George R. N., Westminster 
Hobbs, Marguerite W., Washington, 

D. C. 
♦Hobbs, Ruth C, Washington, D. C. 
♦Hobbs, Violet E., Washington, D. C. 
Hochbaum, Mary E., Washington, D. C. 



Hodson, Palmer K., Jr., Allison Park, Pa. 
Hoenes, Sophia W., Baltimore 
♦Hoffecker, Frank S., Jr., Sparrows Point 
Hoffmaster, Paul, Myersville 
Hohn, Mary D., Port Deposit 
Holland, Marion L., Easton 
♦Hollins, Stanley M., Baltimore 
♦Holmead, Frances S., Silver Spring 
♦Holmes, Grace B., Takoma Park 
Holmes, Margaret V., College Park 
Holmes, Miriam, College Park 
♦Holt, Nancy B., Wakefield, Va. 
Hooper, Eunice M., Hoopersville 
Hoose, Richard A., Washington, D. C. 
Hopkins, Grace R., Easton 
♦Home, William A., Chevy Chase 
Hosken, Margaret R., Accokeek 
Hosken, Stella L., Frostburg 
Hough, Dorothy G., Washington, D. C. 
♦House, Bolton M., College Park 
House, MUdred L., Flintstone 
House, Theresa R., Collee Park 
Howard, Adrienne R., College Park 
♦Howard, Frank L., Hyattsville 
Howard, Marcus L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Howard, Margaret L., Dayton 
Howard, Willie E., Frederick 
Hubbard, Etta K., Easton 
Hubbard, Olin W., Cordova 
Hubbert, Tilghman S.. Cambridge 

Hudgins, Houlder, Washington, D. C. 
♦Hudson, T. Giles, Alberta, Va. 
♦Hudson, Yola V., Cumberland 

Hueper, Louis R., Berwyn 

Hughes, Robert L., Aberdeen 

Hull, Dorothy D., Frederick 
♦Hull, George R., Frederick 

Hunt, Richard M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Hunt, William H., Baltimore 

Hutcheson, Beulah L., Cumberland 

Hutchinson, James E., Hyattsville 

Hutchinson, M. Carol, Takoma Park 

Hutchison, Frances E., Chevy Chase 

Hutchison, Stella B., Cordova 

Hyatt, Herbert S., Damascus 

Hyde, Jennie M., Barton 

Hynson, B. Thomas, Washington Grove 

Insley, F. Maurille, Cambridge 

Irvine, Elsie V., Chevy Chase 

Itzel, Virginia A., Halethorpe 
♦Ives, Mildred, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Jacobs, Hazel, Gaithersburg 
♦Jacobs, Marion L., Chapel Hill, N. C. 

James, Jennie P., Mt. Rainier 

James, William S., Hancock 

Jeffries, Anna K., Mt. Savage 
♦Jenkins, Stanleigh E., Hyattsville 



^Graduate Students 



363 



Jenkinson, Margaret S.» Washington, 
D. C. 

Jennison, Helen G., Chevy Chase 

Jensen, Lorida J., Washington, D. C. 

Jimmyer, John K., Baltimore 

Johnson, Clara R.. Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Edna E., Brentwood 

Jones, Anna B., Snow Hill 

Jones, Dorothy C, Rockville 

Jones, Joseph F., Baltimore 

Jones, Marguerite E., Owings Mills 
*Jones, Mildred S., Edgewater 
♦Jones, Robert, Frostburg 
♦Jones, Wilbur A., Pittsville 

Jones, William P., Wingate 

Joyce, Agnes C, Frostburg 

Judy, Gladys L., Cumberland 

Kalis, Samuel D., Baltimore 
♦Kalousek, George L., Washington, D. C. 

Keefauver, Helen R., University Park 

Keiser, Grace S., Washington, D. C. 

Keitlen, Philip B., Jersey City, N. J. 

Kelley, Mary M., Wye Mills 
*Kelly, Michael J., Washington, D. C. 

Kemp, Mary, Welcome 

Kerby, Melva I., Washington, D. C. 

Kesler, Katherine E., Silver Spring 
♦Kessler, Herman, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ketchum, Paul F., Washington, D. C. 
♦Kieeny, Reverdy E., Middletown 

Kimmey, Ruth S., East New Market 
♦King. Frances L., Frederick 
♦King, Ruth S., Washington, D. C. 

Kirby, Marion, Takoma Park 
♦Klein, Truman S., Clinton 

Kline, Annabel C, Frederick 

Kline, Gladys M., Smithsburg 
♦Klingsohr. Helen F., College Park 

Kluckhuhn, Frederick H., Laurel 
♦Knox, Clarence M., Finksburg 
♦Knox, Louis P., Jr., Towson 
♦Koerber, Erwin L., Preston 

Kohn, Schuyler G., Baltimore 
♦Kooken, Nellie R., Westernport 

Koontz, Jennie G., Cumberland 
♦Krausse, Harry W., Baltimore 

Kreiter, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 

Krieg, Edward F., Baltimore 
♦Kuhnle, Mary E., Westernport 

Kunes, Geraldine L., Cumberland 

Kunes, Nina E., Cumberland 

Kupka, Anna, Bethesda 

Lam, Gladys I., Cumberland 
♦LaMar, Austin A., Jr., Sandy Spring 
♦Lanahan, Doris, Laurel 
♦Lane, John P., Chevy Chase 
♦Late, Erma B., Washingrton, D. C. 



Leatherman, Margaret N., Myers ville 

Lehr, Emily C, Bethesda 
♦Lehr, H. Franklin, Bethesda 

Leighty, Raymond V., Clarendon, Va. 

Leishear, Virginia E., Washington, D. C. 

Levy, Arthur I., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewald, James H., Laurel 

Lewis, Frank H., Frederick 
♦Liebman, Rebekah, Norfolk, Va. 

Lighter, Edna K., Middletown 

Lightfoot, Georgiana C, Takoma Park 
♦Ligon, Edgar W., Jr., Richmond, Va. 

Ligon, Rosalind, Washington, D. C. 

Lindner, Dorothy E., Washington, D. C. 

Linthicum, Parepa F., Frederick 

Lipin, Edward J., Pasadena 

Liskey, Robert B., Hagerstown 

Litschert, Robert G., Hyattsville 

Little, Lena E., Laurel 
♦Littleford, Robert A., Washington, D. C. 

Litz, Helen E., Washington, D. C. 

Lloyd, Lewis H., Washington, D. C. 

Lodge, Fred R., Washington, D. C. 

Loker, Frank F., Leonardtown 

Long, John J., Cumberland 

Love, Elizabeth T., Lonaconing 

Lovell, John C, New Windsor 

Lovell, Marker J., New Windsor 
♦Lowe, Cletus D., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
♦Lowe, William E., Marion Station 

Lowery, Norma L., Cumberland 

Lubin, Sam, Washington, D. C. 
♦Lucas, Philip E., Cherrydale, Va. 

Ludlow, Francis W., Washington, D. C. 

liUndell, Ernst D., Chevy Chase 

Lutz, Richard L., Riverdale 

Lynch, Elizabeth, Washington, D. C. 

liyons, Margaret M., Cumberland 

Maccubbin, Mary F., Laurel 

Maddox, H. Louise, Hyattsville 
♦Madigan, George F., Washington, D. C. 

Magdeburger, Elviria, Washington, D. C. 

Mahaney, William H., Towson 

Main, Irwin I., Seat Pleasant 

Mandel, Jacob, Jersey City, N. J. 
♦Mandrell, John F., Easton 

Mangum, Mary E., Washington, D, C. 

Mangum, Susie A., Washington, D. C. 

Manley, Mary, Midland 

Mann, Mary E., Sharptown 

Marche, Louise C, Hyattsville 

Marino, Frank T., Washington, D. C. 

Maris, Helen B., Riverdale 

Marshall, Susan E., St. Michaels 

Martin, Alta G., Hagerstown 

Martin, Carrie P., Westminster 

Martin, Clarence W., Baltimore 



♦Graduate Students 



364 



Martin. Grace W., Washington, D. C. 
Marx. Ernest B., Baltimore 
•Massey. John E., Cogersville, Ala. 
Matthews, Abigail G.. La Plata 
Matthews, Elizabeth A.. Stockton 
Matthews, Robert H., Jr., Cambridge 
IVTatthews, William B., Worton 
*Mattingly. Jane G.. Leonardtown 
Mattingly. Joseph A., Leonardtown 
♦Mayer, Lenore A., Frostburg 
Maynard, Stanley A., Baltimore 
McCall, Mildred L.. Washington. D. C. 
♦McCann, Lewis P.. Dayton, Ohio 
McCann, Robert H., Glen Burnie 
♦McCauley, Irma G., Washington, D. C. 
McClenon, Donald, Takoma Park 
McCoy. A. Winifred. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McCurdy, Philip C, Kensington 
McFadden, Burton M.. Hagerstown 
♦McGowan, George E., Baltimore 
Mclntyre. Helen M.. Washington. D. C. 
Mclntyre. Myrtle E., Cumberland 
McKenna. John M., Baltimore 
McLain. Edward J.. Washington, D. C. 
McLaughlin, Thomas O., Woodbridge, 

N. J. 
McMahan, Elizabeth, Cambridge 
McNaughton, Edwina B., Takoma Park 
♦Medlock, Lawrence C, Honea Path, S. C. 
Meese, Louise, Barton 
Meese, Mae, Barton 
Meiring. Mary E., Washington, D. 0. 
♦Meredith, Francis E., East New Market 
Merrick. James B., Crumpton 
Merrill, William E., Pocomoke City 
Meyers, Edith I.. Chevy Chase 
Michaelsen, Elsie E., Washington, D. C. 
♦Middleton, Frederic A., Washington. D. C. 
Millar, Dorothy V., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Gary H., Branchville 
Miller, Ernest Y., Washington, D. C. 
Miller, Jean. Berwyn 
♦Miller, Lula A., Bridgewater, Va. 

Miller, Margaret A.. Washington, D. C. 
♦Miller. Marion E., Easton 

Miller, Philip. Brentwood 

Miller. Rebecca C Berwyn 

Miller, Verna. Lonaconing 

Milliken, Julia W., Silver Spring 

Mills, Christene P., Washington. D. C. 

Mills, Mary L., Washington, D. C. 

Miltner, Margaret E.. Washington, D. C. 

Mitchell, Erma L., Cambridge 
♦Mitchell, Laura N., College Park 

Mitchell. M. Alice. Salisbury 

Mitchell, Opal L., Bel Air 

Mitchell, Virginia V., Mechanicsville 



Mooney, Elizabeth, Kensington 
Moore, Catherine V., Centreville 
Moore, John E., Ellicott City 
Moore, Medora M., East New Market 
♦Morgan, Claudine, Lonaconing 
Morgan, Mary. Frostburg 
Morgan, Virginia, Lonaconing 
Morrison. M. Evelyn, Seat Pleasant 
Morse, Armorel, Forest Hill 
Moser, Marion O., Frederick 
Mudd. H. Virginia, Pomfret 
Muller, Howard C, Baltimore 
Mulligan, Betty, Berwyn 
Mullikin, Alexandria H., Easton 
MuUinix, Margaret, Damascus 
MuUinix, William D.. Damascus 
Murphy, Grace B.. Silver Spring 
♦Murphy, Harry T., Ellicott City 
Murray, Harold F., Washington, D. C 
Muth, Bery W., Washington, D. C. 
Nash, Constance M., Chevy Chase 
♦Nathanson, Albert E.. Washington, D. C. 
Neale. Shirley E.. Washington. D. C. 
Neder, Edith. Mt. Savage 
Nelson, Thorman A., Washington. D. C. 
Nevius. Wilford E., College Park 
♦Newcomer, Joe C. Brunswick 
♦Newman. James P., Blacksburg. Va. 
Newman, Robert A.. Chevy Chase 
♦Nichols. Wilbur C. Hyattsville 
Nicht, Anna M., Frostburg 
Nicht, Theresa B., Frostburg 
Nicol, Mary B., Gaithersburg 
Nolan, Edna P.. Mt. Rainier 
♦Norman, Julia T., Annapolis 
Norris, Joseph V., Baltimore 
Norris, Mary L., Leonardtown 
North. Edna R., Easton 
Nowell, Jessie M„ Washington, D. C. 
Nowell, Margaret L., Shady Side 
♦Nutter, Eva P., Rising Sun 
Nyquist, Hildur V., Princess Anne 
O'Dell, Bernice P., Richwood. W. Va. 
O'Dell, Elizabeth J., Richwood, W. Va. 
Ogle, Emerson, Catons ville 
Oliver, Elmer R„ Washington. D. C. 
Orcutt, Charles B., Washington, D. C. 
Ornett, Pauline H., Easton 
Owens, James L., Federalsburg 
Padgett, E. Anne, Baltimore 
Pailthorp, Robert W.. Takoma Park 
Palmer, Mary E., Palmers 
Panoff, Mortimer, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Pardie. Grace, Washington, D. C. 
Parker, Helen M.. Vale Summit 
Parsons. Charles R.. Washington. D. C. 
Patterson, Norman P., Baltimore 



* Graduate Students 



365 



I 



Peach, Ann W., Mitchellville 

Peck, Alvin, Washington, D. C. 

Perry. A. Gordon, Hyattsville 

Perry, EJvelyn G., Port Deposit 

Perry, Louise H., Washington, D. C. 

Petrides, George A., Washington, D. C. 

Petty, Mary, Washington, D. C. 
♦Philips, Alice P., Takoma Park 

Phillips, Gladys E., Cambridge 
♦Phillips, Watson D., Cambridge 
♦Phipps, William R., Easton 

Picken, Marion, Lonaconing 

Piozet, Nina C, Hyattsville 
♦Poole, Harry R., Williamsport 

Porter, Wade T., Washington, D. C. 

Posey, Margaret A., La Plata 

Powers, Marie W., Catonsville 

Powley, Mary P„ Wingate 

Presley, John T., Lanham 

Pritchett, Hennie G., Bishops Head 

Pruitt, Dorothy M., Berlin 

Pumphrey, Nellie L., Upper Marlboro 

Purnell, Nannie, Ocean City 

Queen, Helen H., Waldorf 

Rafferty, Veronica, Nikep 

Raley, Nellie, Frostburg 

Ramsburg. Helen B., Beltsville 
♦Reahl, Ann E., Baltimore 

Reed, Delia B., Washington, D. C. 

Reeder, Myrtle L., Clements 

Reeves, Eleanor E., Milestown 

Reich, Elinor G. J., La Plata 

Reidy, Kathryn, Chevy Chase 

Reimann, Frances E., Pompton Lakes, 
N. J. 

Reitz, Margaret M., Halethorpe 

Remington, Jesse A., Laurel 

Remsberg. Charles H., Frederick 

Remsen, Peter, Takoma Park 
♦Rhodes, Louis K., Jr., Queenstown 

Rice, Mary A., Germantown 
♦Rice, Russell B., Frostburg 

Richter, Christian F., Jr., Overlea 

Ridder, Garry D., Kitzmiller 
♦Riedel, Erna M., Gambrills 

Ritter, Natalie M., Washington, D. C. 
♦Rives, John J., Washington, D. C. 

Rives, Miriam E., Washington, D. C. 

Robb, John M., Cumberland 

Roberts, Leota H., Cambridge 

Robertson, Elizabeth K., Rockville 

Robertson, James C, Jr., Baltimore 
♦Robertson, Roy L., Elkton 

Robertson, Thomas E., Washington, D. C. 

Robinson, Charles H., Cardiff 

Robinson, Helen C, Bridgeport, W. Va. 

Robinson, Huldah E., Bishop's Head 



Robinson, Sara A., Cambridge 
Roby, Dorothy V., Riverdale 
Roby, Maud F., Riverdale 
Rockwood, Marion, Silver Spring 

♦Roddy, Eleanor J., Frederick 

♦Rolston, Frank, Washington, D. C. 
Ropes, John C, Chevy Chase 
Rosenberg, Albert L., Baltimore 
Rosenberg, Theodore, Manchester, N. H. 
Ross, Alice M., Easton 

♦Roth, Alfred, Annapolis 
Rothschild, Carl, Chefoo, China 
Rowson, Alice L., North East 
Royer, Martha, Cascade 
Roylance, Merriwether L., Branchville 
Rubin, Hilda R.. Baltimore 
Rumsey, Frances E., Kensington 
Ruzicka, Edwin R., Baltimore 
Ryon, Thomas S., Washington, D. C. 
Sacks, Jerome G., Baltimore 
Sadowsky, Ann, North East 

♦Sadowsky, Irving, North East 
Saffell, Ada M., West Friendship 
Sager, Ina M., Mt. Rainier 
St. Leger, Marie, Pompton Lakes, N. J. 
Sallow, William H., Baltimore 

♦Santini, Antoinette, Burtonsville 

♦Sartorius, Ruth W., Pocomoke City 

♦Sasscer, Cora D., Chevy Chase 
Savage, Alfred E., Washington, D. C. 
Savage, Verna B., Deer Park 
Scates, Irene A., Gaithersburg 
Schaeffer, Carol J., Washington, D. C. 
Schaefer, Edna M., Frederick 
Schaffer, George H., Jr., Baltimore 

♦Scheidy, Charlotte T., Silver Spring 
Schlossnagel, Iva D., Accident 
Schneider, Bernard, Bronx, N. Y. 

♦Schollenberger, George S., Laurel, Del. 
Schwab, Alvin R., Washington, D. C. 
Scott, Dorothy V., Berlin 

♦Secrist, Ford I., Easton 
Sensenbaugh, Glenn H., Smithsburg 
Sergent, Edith M., Fairmont, W. Va. 
Sesso, George A., Washington, D. C. 

♦Settle, Elizabeth B., Baltimore 
Settle, L. H., Washington, D. C. 

♦Severance, Katheryne, Gaithersburg 

♦Shaw, Ann B., College Park 
Shaw, Haylett B., Chevy Chase 
Shaw, Roberta F., Stewartstown, Pa. 
Sherwood, Anna E., Beltsville 
Shinn, Virginia S., St. Michaels 
Shires, Dorothy W., Cumberland 

♦Shirk, Harold G., West Lawn, Pa. 

♦Shockey, Virtue M., Smithsburg 
Shreve, Adalyn B., Hyattsville 



Shull, Bertha S., Greensboro 
*Sibley. Martha, Milledgeville, Ga. 
Sieling. Frederick W., Annapolis Junction 
Sikes, Ena^ Washington, D. C. 
Simon, Ruth, Washington, D. C. 
Sims, Olivia K., Washington, D. C. 
Skelley, Mary F., Oldtown 
♦Skinner, Geneva K., Takoma Park 
Sledd, Gladys H., Wake Forest, N. C. 
Sleeman, Mary V., Frostburg 
Sleeman. Ursula C Frostburg 
Sloan, Margaret H., Lonaconing 
Small, Florence F., Hyattsville 
Smith, A. Lida, Claiborne 
Smith, Charles G., Strasburg. Va. 
♦Smith, Ethel L., Washington, D. C. 
♦Smith, Helen I., Takoma Park 
♦Smith, Mary-Esther, Lonaconing 
Smith, Mary E. M., Frederick 
♦Smith, Max A., Clarksville 
Smith, Ruth E., Frederick 
Snead, Maxwell A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Snoddy, Margaret L., Lanham 
Snyder, Ruth I., College Park 
♦SoUers, Henrietta R., Laurel 
Souder, Letty, Gaithersburg 
♦Sowers, Lowell M., Lonaconing 
♦Speicher, Kathryn A., Accident 
Speicher, Nelle I., Laurel 
Speicher, Ruth M., Accident 
Spencer, Ethel D., Easton 
♦Spicknall, Stella P.. Hyattsville 
Springer, Pauline T.. Westernport 
Spruill, William T., Brandywine 
Stabler, Mary C, Washington, D. C. 
Stack, Myrtle, Hurlock 
Staples, Sam J., Lanham 
Stark, El wood V., Aberdeen 
Starr, Peggy E., Hyattsville 
Stearns, Lois E., Mt. Rainier 
Stetson, Margaret B., Washington, D. C. 
Stevens, Grace, Washington, D. C. 
Stiles. Edith L.. Rockville 
*Stimpson, Edwin G., College Park 
Stimson, William H., Chevy Chase 
♦Stinnett, Lucille L., Brentwood 
Stone, John T.. Ferndale 
*Storrs, Dorothy H., Linthicum Heights 
Stotler, Rebecca E., Cumberland 
Strauss, Charles D.. Baltimore 
Streett, J. Hemisler, Bradshaw 
♦Strider. Edith T., Charles Town, W. Va. 
Strobel, Herman R., Baltimore 
Sugrue, Berned A., Chevy Chase 
* Summers, Charles A.. Boonsboro 
Swanson, Margaret E., Washington. D. C. 
Tax, Jerry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



♦Taylor, Alice E., Perryville 
Taylor, Hilda E., Chesapeake City 
Taylor, Myrtle W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Teitelbaum, H. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tepper, Irving S., Baltimore 
♦Graduate Students 
Teter, Naomi R., Cumberland 
♦Teter, Sarah K.. Bridgeport, W. Va. 
Teunis, Audrey S., Upper Marlboro 
♦Thom, Myrtle A., Washington, D. C. 
♦Thomas, Catherine B., Takoma Park 

Thomas, Ramsay B.. Towson 

Thompson, Irving W., Hillsboro, Va. 

Thompson, Raymond K., Riverdale 
♦Todd. Wilton R., Wingate 

Tolker, Ethel B., Silver Spring 

Tompkins, Margaret, Norbeck 

Towers, G. Chester, Preston 

Towner, Ethel L., Washington, D. C. 

Townsend. Lawrence R., Baltimore 

Towson, William O., Baltimore 

Tubbs, Mary C, Salisbury 

Tucker, Lester W., Abingdon 

Tucker, Margaret C, Washington, D. C. 

TuU. Miles T., Marion 

Turner, N.Eva, Malcolm 
♦Usilton, Fred G.. Jr., Chestertown 

Vandervoort, Susan H., Middletown, Pa. 

Vasa, Vladimir, Washington, D. C. 

Vasa-Kiernan, Helen C Washington, 

D. C. 

Venemann, Chester R., Riverdale 
Venemann, Virginia L.. Riverdale 
Vogtman, Harry R., Cumberland 
♦Wade, Margaret E., Port Tobacco 
Wahl, Carleton H.. Silver Spring 
Waite, Merton T., Odenton 
Walker, Grace C, Mitchellville 
Walker Vera H., Ellicott City 
♦Wallace, David H., Barclay 
♦Waltz, George F., Washington, D. C. 

Ward, Frances E.. Brandywine 
♦Warren, John, Snow Hill 
♦Warren, Ryland M.. Washington. D. C. 
♦Warren, Warren, Rising Sun 

Washington, Guy M.. Washington, D. C. 
♦Waskow, Henry B., Baltimore 

Wasserman, Sidney, Baltimore 
♦Watkins, Wilma L., Washington Grove 

Webb, Margaret, Hyattsville 

Wedding, Presley A., Washington, D. C. 

Weidemann, Janet S., Washington, D. C. 

Weinberger, Dorothy S.. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Weld, John R., Sandy Spring 

Wellington, Ruth E., Takoma Park 
♦Weyman, L. Arthur. Washington, D. C. 

Whalin, James T., Hyattsville 



♦Graduate Students 



♦Graduate Students 



367 



366 



Wheatley, Vivian, Rhodesdale 

Wheedleton. Lillie A., Seaford, Del. 

Whitacre, Esther M., Silver Spring 

White, Mary L., Washington, D. C. 

White, William M.. Washington, D. C. 

Whiteford, Charles G., Baltimore 
♦Whiteford. Henry S.. Baltimore 

Whitten, Miriam D., Washington, D. C. 

Wiederlight, Seymour, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
♦Wilkinson, Perry O., Washington, D. C. 

Willett, LeRoy G., Washington, D. C. 

Willey, Edward J., Washington, D. C. 

Williams, Edith M., Washington. D. C. 

Williams, William W., Washington, D. C. 
♦Williams, Zaidee C, Baltimore 

Williamson, George L., Cumberland 

Willis, Pearl N., Hampstead 
♦Wilson, C. Merrick, Poolesville 

Wilson, Iris E., Takoma Park 

Wilson, Josephine. Charlotte Hall 

Wilson, Mary C, Princess Anne 

Wilson, Mary K. S.. Friendship 

Wilson, Meredith R.. White Hall 

Wilson. Ruby E.. Mt. Rainier 

Wimbrow, Ruth N. Hebron 

Winestine. Edith A., Baltimore 
♦Wingate. Phillip J., Baltimore 
♦Winnemore, Augustine E., Washington, 

D. C. 
♦Winstead, Elsie M.. Elm City. N. C. 



Wohlstadter, Leonard, Brooklyn, N. Y, 
♦Wold, Catherine T., Washington, D. C. 
♦Wolfe, Kathleen, Frostburg 
♦Womac, Katye W., Washington, D. C. 

Wood, J. Arthur, Easton 
♦Wood, May L., Boyd 

Woodell, John H., Seaford, Del. 

Woodward, Alberta A., Washington, D. 
♦Wright, Nadia V., Chevy Chase 

Wyvill, Ruth M., Washington, D. C. 

Yarnall, Esther S., Washington. D. C. 
♦Yingling, John E., Ellicott City 

Yohn, Lionel, Westminster 

Yonkers, Bernard O., Emmitsburg 

Yonkers, Saranna W., Elmmitsburg 

Young, Harold K., Detour 

Young, Irene, Silver Spring 

Young, Jerome L., Washington, D. C. 

Zabrek, Herman M., Washington, D. C. 

Zalis, Daniel L., Baltimore 

Zankel, Max D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
♦Zapponi, Paschal P., Wooster, Ohio 

Zebelean, John, Catonsville 

Zeller, Grace A., Rockville 

Ziegler, Electa, Hagerstown 

Zihlman, Frederick A., Silver Spring 
♦Zimmerman, Evelyn, Hopewell, Pa. 

Zimmerman. Mildred F., Baltimore 
♦Zimmermann, Verna M., Baltimore 



'Graduate Students 



368 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
AS OF JUNE 1, 1936 



Resident Collegiate Courses — Academic Year. 

College 
Park 

College of Agriculture ~ 207 

College of Arts and Sciences 894 

School of Dentistry 

College of Education _ _ 312 

College of Engineering 315 

Graduate School 198 

College of Home Economics 140 

School of Law. - 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy -..„ 

Total 2066 

Summer School, 1935 -.. 979 

Extension Courses: 

Industrial Education (Collegiate Credit) 229 

Mining (Sub-Collegiate Credit) 274 

Grand Total - - 3548 

Less Duplications - ~ - 317 

Net Total 3231 



Baltimore 


Total 




207 




894 


325 


325 




312 


•■■••••>• 


315 




198 




140 


258 


258 


422 


422 


125 


125 


291 


291 


1421 


3487 





979 




229 




274 


1421 


4969 




358 



1421 



4611 



Enrollment in Short Courses of from two days to six weeks; Rural 
Women, 736; Boys' and Girls' Club, 324; Volunteer Firemen, 95; Florists, 
S3; Nurserymen, 53; Garden School, 313; Canner's Conference, 45; Winter 
School, 11. 



369 



GENERAL INDEX 



¥ 



Page 

Administration ~ 

board of regents 7 

officers of administration ~ 8 

boards and committees 16 

officers of instruction (College Park) 9 

officers of instruction (Baltimore) -.. 25 

faculty committees (Baltimore) 36 

administrative organization 38 

buildings 39 

libraries 41 

Admission 41 

methods of admission 43 

advanced standing 43 

certificate 43 

entrance 41 

examination, by — - 43 

physical examinations - 46 

transfer — 45 

unclassified students ~ 45 

Agents 2 1 

assistant county 22 

assistant home demonstration 23 

county 21 

county home demonstration _ 22 

local — 23 

Agricultural Education 120, 229 



Agriculture, College of. 

admission 

curricula in 

departments 

farm practice 

fellowships 



„ > 63 

........~. 63 

64 

_.... 63 

64 

64. 154 

requirements for graduation 64 

special students in agriculture 83 

State Board of -. 187 

Agronomy — ^...^... — . . — ... 68, 195 

Alumni 62 

Animal husbandry, 70, 197 

Aquiculture 297 

Arts and Sciences, College of 87 

advanced standing 87 

advisers 91 

degrees 87 

departments 86 

divisions 87 

electives in other colleges and schools 91 

normal load 87 

requirements....87, 91, 92, 94, 95, 106, 107 

student responsibility ~ 89 

Astronomy 199 

Athletics 161 

Bacteriology 70 

Biochemistry, plant ph3^iology 208 

Biophysics 208 

Board of Regents 7 

Botany ^ 71. 204 

Buildings 39 

Business Administration 107, 220 

Calendar >.^ 4 

Certificates, Degrees and 49 



Chemistry 
agricultural 
analytical .... 

curricula 

general 

industrial ... 

organic 

physical 

research 



...96, 209 

96, 218 

96, 210 

96 

97, 209 

. 96. 215 

210 

212 

96 



Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 299 

Chorus _ 284 

Christian Association, the ~ 61 

Civil Engineering 185. 285 

Clubs, miscellaneous 60 



Page 

College of Agriculture 63 

College of Arts and Sciences 87 

College of Education — 112 

College of Engineering 131 

College of Home Economics _ 142 

Committees 16, 36 

Comparative Literature 216 

County agents - 21 

demonstration agents 23 

Course of study, description of — 191 

Dairy husbandry 73, 217 

162 

165 

_. 163 

167 

166 

167 

166 

168 



Dentistry, School of. 
advanced standing. 

building 

deportment 

equipment 

expenses ~ 

promotion 

residence 

Diamondback _ 61 

Divisions, College of Arts and Sciences 87 

lower division — 89 

humanities 9 1 

natural sciences 93 

social sciences 106 

Doi'mitory rules 53 

Drawing 237 

Economics .. 220 

agricultural 192 

Education 112. 223 

history and principles 223 

methods in arts and science subjects 

(high school) _ 226 

agricultural 120, 229 

arts and science 116 

curricula 117 

degrees 113 

departments 112 

home economics 123, 225 

industrial _ 124 

physical „ 128, 161. 232 

teachers* special diploma 113 

Educational psychology 225 

Education, College of — 112 

Electrical Engineering 135, 238 

Employment, student 55 

Engineering _ 131. 235 

civil 135, 235 

drawing 237 

electrical 138, 238 

general subjects 240 

mechanics 240 

mechanical 140, 241 

shop 244 

surveying 244 

admission requirements 131 

bachelor degrees 132 

curricula ., 134 

equipment 132 

library ,. 134 

master of science in 132 

professional degrees in 132 

English Language and Literature. 245 

Entomology 75. 251 

Entrance 41 

Examinations 45 

delinquent students. 49 

Expenses 50. 167. 174, 177, 180, 186 



Extension Service, 
staff 



Experiment Station, Agricultural 

staff 

Faculty 

Farm forestry 189, 254 



86 
20 
84 
18 
9 



GENERAL INDEX 



♦ 



/ 



Page 

Farm management ^ 66, 254 

Farm mechanics 77, 254 

Feed, Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection 

Service 188 

Five Year Combined Arts and Nursing 

Curriculum 105. 182 

Floriculture 79, 263 

Foods and nutrition 259 

Forestry, State Department of Ih9 

course in -^ 254 

Fraternities and Sororities 60 

French ..^ 277 

Genetics ^.-..78. 255, 298 

Geology 255 

Geological Survey 190 

German 280 

Grading system 47 

Graduate School, The lA'O 

admission 145 

council _ 147 

courses 149 

fees 1 54 

fellowships and assistantships 154 

registration 148 

residence requirements 151 

summer graduate work 149 

Greek 235 

Health Service ~- 46 

History 235 

Historical statement 37 

Home Economics 142, 259 

degree 142 

departments 142 

facilities - 142 

general - 143 

curricula _ 142 

Home Economics Education 123, 228 

Honors and awards „ 56, 300 

Horticultural State department 188 

Horticulture 78, 262 

floriculture „ 80, 263 

landscape gardening 81, 264 

olericulture 80, 266 

pomology -. 79. 262 

vegetable crops 263 

Hospital „...41, 175, 176 

Industrial Education 124 

Infirmary rules 46 

Landscape gardening 81, 264 

Latin „ 265 

Law, The School of 171 

advanced standing 173 

admission _ 172 

combined program of study 110, 173 

fees and expenses _ 174 

Libraries 41 

Library Science - 269 

Live Stock Sanitary Service 188 

Mathematics _ 98, 269 

Mechanical Engineering _ 140, 241 

Mechanics _ _ 240 

Medals and prizes _ 56, 312 

Medicine, School of 175 

admission _ 176 

clinical facilities 175 

dispensaries and laboratories 176 

expenses 1 77 

prizes and scholarships „ 176 

Michrochemistry (plant) 208 

Military Science and Tactics 46, 157, 318 

Modern Languages, Courses in 253 

Music : 102, 283 

Musical organizations 284 

Nursing, School of 178 

admission 179 

combined program 105, 180 

degree and diploma 183 



Page 

hours on duty ^ 179 

programs offered - I7g 

Officers, administrative g 

of instruction 9, 25 

Old Line %i 

Olericulture „ 80, 266 

Pathology — ^ — 70, 199 

-... 184 

185 

- — 186 

186 

.. — 184 

59 

284 



Pharmacy, School of. 

admission 

degrees 

expenses 

location 

Phi Kappa Phi. 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 128, 161. 232 

Physical examinations 46 

Physics 100, 286 

Plant pathology 73, 206 

Plant physiology 72, 208 

Political Science -. 289 

Pomology 79, 262 

Poultry husbandry _ 82, 290 

Pre-dental curriculum 104 

Pre-medical curriculum 103 

Princess Anne Academy ^ 39 

Psychology 225, 291 

Public speaking 294 

Publications, student 61 

Refunds 54 

Regimental Organization 318 

Register of students 320 

Registration, date of 4, 5 

penalty for late 42, 52, 167 

Regulations, grades, degrees 47 

degrees and certificates 49 

elimination of delinquent students. 49 

examinations and grades _ 48 

regulation of studies 47 

reports 49 

Religious influences .- _ 61 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps....l57, 318 

Residence and Non-residence 53 

Room reservation 53 

Rural Education 120, 229 

Seed Inspection Service 189 

Societies 59 

honorary fraternities _. 59 

fraternities and sororities 60 

miscellaneous clubs and societies 60 

Sociology 292 

Soils 69, 220 

Solomons Island research 299 

Sororities 60 

Spanish „ 282 

Speech „ 294 

State Board of Agriculture 187 

Statistics, course in 255 

Student 

employment 55 

government 58 

Grange 60 

organization and activities 58 

publications _ 61 

Summer camps 159 

Summer session 156 

credits and certificates 156 

graduate work 149, 156 

terms of admission 156 

Surveying 244 

Terrapin 61 

Textiles and clothing 145, 259 

Uniforms, military 158 

Vegetable crops „ 263 

Weather Service, State 189 

Withdrawals 54 

Zoology 102, 295 



\ 



GENERAL INDEX 



Pa Re 

Farm manaponicnt ttH, 254 

Farm mechanics 77, 254 

Fetd. Fertilizer, and Lime Inspection 

Service 188 

Five Year Combined Arts and Nursinjr 

Curriculum 105, 1S2 

Floriculture 79. 263 

Fcod.x and nutiiti(m 259 

Forestry, Slate Department of 1M> 

courge in 254 

Frattrnities and Sororities HO 

French 277 

Genetics 78, 255. 298 

Geolojry 255 

Geological Survey 100 

German 280 

Grading system 47 

Graduate School, The 147 

admission 1 4.5 

council 147 

courses 140 

fees - 154 

fellowships and assistantships 154 

rej/istration 148 

residence re«iuirements 151 

.--ummer graduate work 149 

Greek 235 

Health Service -.. 46 

History 235 

Historical statement 37 

Home Economics 142, 250 

dejrree 142 

departments 142 

facilities 142 

treneral 143 

curricula 142 

Home Economics Education ...123. 228 

Honors and awards 5G, 300 

Horticultural Stale department 188 

Hort iculture 78, 262 

floriculture 8n, 263 

landscape pardeninjr 81, 264 

olericulture 8n. 266 

p(»molopy 70. 262 

vepfetable crops 263 

Hospital 41, 175, 176 

Industrial Education 124 

Infirmary lules 46 

Landscape pardenlnq: SI, 264 

Latin 265 

Law. The School of 171 

advanced standing 173 

admission 172 

combined pro^iam of study 110, 173 

fees and expenses 174 

Libraries 41 

I^ibrary Science 260 

Live Stock Sanitary Service ISS 

Mathematics _ 08, 260 

Mechanical Engineerinfr I4u. 211 

Mechanics 240 

Medals ard prizes 56, 312 

Medicine, School of 175 

admission 176 

clinical facilities 175 

dispensaries and laODratories 176 

exi>entjes 1 77 

prizes and scholarships 176 

Michrochemistry (plant) 208 

Military Science and Tactics 46, 157. 3 is 

Mo<lern Lanpuajres, Courses in 253 

Music 102, 283 

Musical organizations 284 

Niir'iinfr. School of 178 

admissi<in 170 

ct mbined program 105, ISO 

degree and diploma 183 



expenses ^ ..... . : sq 

hours on duty i7<j 

programs offered I7.s 

Officers, administrative g 

fu' instruction 9. l'5 

Old Line , . {^\ 

Olericulture 8o, 2ti6 

Pathology 70, 1 99 

Pharmacy, School of 1S4 

admission j sj 

degrees \ sg 

expenses i sg 

location 1S4 

Phi Kappa Phi „ 59 

Philo.^ophy „ 2>4 

Physical Education 128, 161, 232 



Physical examinations .. 
Physics 



.100. 



46 

2v*i 



2«6 
208 
2-V9 
2«2 
290 



Plant pathology 73, 

Plant physiology 72, 

Political Science 

Pomology ., .....79, 

Poultry husbandry 82, 

Pre-dental curriculum lo.i 

Pre-medical curriculum I(i3 

Princess Anne Academy 39 

Psychology 225, 201 

Public speaking 204 

Publications, student 61 

Refimds 54 

Regimental Organization 31 S 

Register of students 320 

Registration, date of 4, 5 

penalty for late 42, 52, 167 

Regulations, grades, degrees 47 

degrees and certificates „ 49 

elimination of delintiuent students^ 49 

examinations and grades 4S 

regulation of studies 47 

reports 49 

Religious influences _ 61 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps. ...157, 318 

Residence and Non-residence 53 

Room reservation 53 

Rural Education 120, 229 

Seed Inspection Service ISO 

Societies .59 

honorary fraternities 59 

fraternities and sororities 60 

miscellaneous clubs and societies 6() 

Sociology 292 

Soils 69. 220 

Solomons Island research 2?i9 

Sororities 60 

Spanish 2>2 

Speech 204 

State Board of Agriculture 1*^7 

Statistics, course in 255 

Student 

employment _ 55 

government 5S 

Grange 6t 

organization and activities 5.^ 

publications 61 

Summer camps l.'>9 

Summer session I5''i 

credits and certificates I'x^ 

graduate work 149, 15^; 

terms of admission !'''■> 

S\irveying 244 

Terrapin 61 

Textiles and clothing 145, 25'^' 

Uniforms, military 1 .'s 

Vegetable crops 261^ 

Weather Service, State 18!1 

Withdrawals .' f 

Zoology 102, 2i*''> 



) 



I* 



Any further information desirecll concerning the University 
of Maryland will be furnishfid upon application to 
THE REGISTRAR, College Park, Md. 



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